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Sample records for unique hypusine modification

  1. Protein-protein-interaction Network Organization of the Hypusine Modification System*

    PubMed Central

    Sievert, Henning; Venz, Simone; Platas-Barradas, Oscar; Dhople, Vishnu M.; Schaletzky, Martin; Nagel, Claus-Henning; Braig, Melanie; Preukschas, Michael; Pällmann, Nora; Bokemeyer, Carsten; Brümmendorf, Tim H.; Pörtner, Ralf; Walther, Reinhard; Duncan, Kent E.; Hauber, Joachim; Balabanov, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    Hypusine modification of eukaryotic initiation factor 5A (eIF-5A) represents a unique and highly specific post-translational modification with regulatory functions in cancer, diabetes, and infectious diseases. However, the specific cellular pathways that are influenced by the hypusine modification remain largely unknown. To globally characterize eIF-5A and hypusine-dependent pathways, we used an approach that combines large-scale bioreactor cell culture with tandem affinity purification and mass spectrometry: “bioreactor-TAP-MS/MS.” By applying this approach systematically to all four components of the hypusine modification system (eIF-5A1, eIF-5A2, DHS, and DOHH), we identified 248 interacting proteins as components of the cellular hypusine network, with diverse functions including regulation of translation, mRNA processing, DNA replication, and cell cycle regulation. Network analysis of this data set enabled us to provide a comprehensive overview of the protein-protein interaction landscape of the hypusine modification system. In addition, we validated the interaction of eIF-5A with some of the newly identified associated proteins in more detail. Our analysis has revealed numerous novel interactions, and thus provides a valuable resource for understanding how this crucial homeostatic signaling pathway affects different cellular functions. PMID:22888148

  2. The effect of hypusine modification on the intracellular localization of eIF5A

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung Bum; Park, Jong Hwan; Kaevel, Jorn; Sramkova, Monika; Weigert, Roberto; Park, Myung Hee

    2009-01-01

    Eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5A (eIF5A) is a highly conserved protein essential for eukaryotic cell proliferation and is the only protein containing hypusine, [Nε-(4-amino-2-hydroxybutyl)lysine]. eIF5A is activated by the posttranslational synthesis of hypusine. eIF5A also undergoes an acetylation at specific Lys residue(s). In this study, we have investigated the effect of hypusine modification and acetylation on the subcellular localization of eIF5A. Immunocytochemical analyses showed differences in the distribution of non-hypusinated eIF5A precursor and the hypusine-containing mature eIF5A. While the precursor is found in both cytoplasm and nucleus, the hypusinated eIF5A is primarily localized in cytoplasm. eIF5A mutant proteins, defective in hypusine modification (K50A, K50R) were localized in a similar manner to the eIF5A precursor, whereas hypusine-modified mutant proteins (K47A, K47R, K68A) were localized mainly in the cytoplasm. These findings provide strong evidence that the hypusine modification of eIF5A dictates its localization in the cytoplasmic compartment where it is required for protein synthesis. PMID:19379712

  3. The effect of hypusine modification on the intracellular localization of eIF5A

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Seung Bum; Park, Jong Hwan; Kaevel, Joern; Sramkova, Monika; Weigert, Roberto; Park, Myung Hee

    2009-06-12

    Eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5A (eIF5A) is a highly conserved protein essential for eukaryotic cell proliferation and is the only protein containing hypusine, [N{sup {epsilon}}-(4-amino-2-hydroxybutyl)lysine]. eIF5A is activated by the post-translational synthesis of hypusine. eIF5A also undergoes an acetylation at specific Lys residue(s). In this study, we have investigated the effect of hypusine modification and acetylation on the subcellular localization of eIF5A. Immunocytochemical analyses showed differences in the distribution of non-hypusinated eIF5A precursor and the hypusine-containing mature eIF5A. While the precursor is found in both cytoplasm and nucleus, the hypusinated eIF5A is primarily localized in cytoplasm. eIF5A mutant proteins, defective in hypusine modification (K50A, K50R) were localized in a similar manner to the eIF5A precursor, whereas hypusine-modified mutant proteins (K47A, K47R, K68A) were localized mainly in the cytoplasm. These findings provide strong evidence that the hypusine modification of eIF5A dictates its localization in the cytoplasmic compartment where it is required for protein synthesis.

  4. A novel mouse model for inhibition of DOHH-mediated hypusine modification reveals a crucial function in embryonic development, proliferation and oncogenic transformation

    PubMed Central

    Sievert, Henning; Pällmann, Nora; Miller, Katharine K.; Hermans-Borgmeyer, Irm; Venz, Simone; Sendoel, Ataman; Preukschas, Michael; Schweizer, Michaela; Boettcher, Steffen; Janiesch, P. Christoph; Streichert, Thomas; Walther, Reinhard; Hengartner, Michael O.; Manz, Markus G.; Brümmendorf, Tim H.; Bokemeyer, Carsten; Braig, Melanie; Hauber, Joachim; Duncan, Kent E.; Balabanov, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    The central importance of translational control by post-translational modification has spurred major interest in regulatory pathways that control translation. One such pathway uniquely adds hypusine to eukaryotic initiation factor 5A (eIF5A), and thereby affects protein synthesis and, subsequently, cellular proliferation through an unknown mechanism. Using a novel conditional knockout mouse model and a Caenorhabditis elegans knockout model, we found an evolutionarily conserved role for the DOHH-mediated second step of hypusine synthesis in early embryonic development. At the cellular level, we observed reduced proliferation and induction of senescence in 3T3 Dohh−/− cells as well as reduced capability for malignant transformation. Furthermore, mass spectrometry showed that deletion of DOHH results in an unexpected complete loss of hypusine modification. Our results provide new biological insight into the physiological roles of the second step of the hypusination of eIF5A. Moreover, the conditional mouse model presented here provides a powerful tool for manipulating hypusine modification in a temporal and spatial manner, to analyse both how this unique modification normally functions in vivo as well as how it contributes to different pathological conditions. PMID:24832488

  5. Posttranslational hypusination of the eukaryotic translation initiation factor-5A regulates Fusarium graminearum virulence

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Rocha, Ana Lilia; Woriedh, Mayada; Chemnitz, Jan; Willingmann, Peter; Kröger, Cathrin; Hadeler, Birgit; Hauber, Joachim; Schäfer, Wilhelm

    2016-01-01

    Activation of eukaryotic translation initiation factor eIF5A requires a posttranslational modification, forming the unique amino acid hypusine. This activation is mediated by two enzymes, deoxyhypusine synthase, DHS, and deoxyhypusine hydroxylase, DOHH. The impact of this enzymatic complex on the life cycle of a fungal pathogen is unknown. Plant pathogenic ascomycetes possess a single copy of the eIF5A activated by hypusination. We evaluated the importance of imbalances in eIF5A hypusination in Fusarium graminearum, a devastating fungal pathogen of cereals. Overexpression of DHS leads to increased virulence in wheat, elevated production of the mycotoxin deoxynivalenol, more infection structures, faster wheat tissue invasion in plants and increases vegetatively produced conidia. In contrast, overexpression of DOHH completely prevents infection structure formation, pathogenicity in wheat and maize, leads to overproduction of ROS, reduced DON production and increased sexual reproduction. Simultaneous overexpression of both genes restores wild type-like phenotypes. Analysis of eIF5A posttranslational modification displayed strongly increased hypusinated eIF5A in DOHH overexpression mutant in comparison to wild type, and the DHS overexpression mutants. These are the first results pointing to different functions of differently modified eIF5A. PMID:27098988

  6. Posttranslational hypusination of the eukaryotic translation initiation factor-5A regulates Fusarium graminearum virulence.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Rocha, Ana Lilia; Woriedh, Mayada; Chemnitz, Jan; Willingmann, Peter; Kröger, Cathrin; Hadeler, Birgit; Hauber, Joachim; Schäfer, Wilhelm

    2016-01-01

    Activation of eukaryotic translation initiation factor eIF5A requires a posttranslational modification, forming the unique amino acid hypusine. This activation is mediated by two enzymes, deoxyhypusine synthase, DHS, and deoxyhypusine hydroxylase, DOHH. The impact of this enzymatic complex on the life cycle of a fungal pathogen is unknown. Plant pathogenic ascomycetes possess a single copy of the eIF5A activated by hypusination. We evaluated the importance of imbalances in eIF5A hypusination in Fusarium graminearum, a devastating fungal pathogen of cereals. Overexpression of DHS leads to increased virulence in wheat, elevated production of the mycotoxin deoxynivalenol, more infection structures, faster wheat tissue invasion in plants and increases vegetatively produced conidia. In contrast, overexpression of DOHH completely prevents infection structure formation, pathogenicity in wheat and maize, leads to overproduction of ROS, reduced DON production and increased sexual reproduction. Simultaneous overexpression of both genes restores wild type-like phenotypes. Analysis of eIF5A posttranslational modification displayed strongly increased hypusinated eIF5A in DOHH overexpression mutant in comparison to wild type, and the DHS overexpression mutants. These are the first results pointing to different functions of differently modified eIF5A. PMID:27098988

  7. Structural Analysis and Optimization of Context-Independent Anti-Hypusine Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Qianting; He, Meng; Song, Aimin; Deshayes, Kurt; Dixit, Vishva M; Carter, Paul J

    2016-02-13

    Context-independent anti-hypusine antibodies that bind to the post-translational modification (PTM), hypusine, with minimal dependence on flanking amino acid sequences, were identified. The antibodies bind to both hypusine and deoxyhypusine or selectively to hypusine but not to deoxyhypusine. Phage display was used to further enhance the affinity of the antibodies. Affinity maturation of these anti-hypusine antibodies improved their performance in affinity capture of the only currently known hypusinated protein, eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5A. These anti-hypusine antibodies may have utility in the identification of novel hypusinated proteins. Crystal structures of the corresponding Fab fragments were determined in complex with hypusine- or deoxyhypusine-containing peptides. The hypusine or deoxyhypusine moiety was found to reside in a deep pocket formed between VH and VL domains of the Fab fragments. Interaction between the antibodies and hypusine includes an extensive hydrogen bond network. These are, to our knowledge, the first reported structures of context-independent anti-PTM antibodies in complex with the corresponding PTM. PMID:26778617

  8. Hypusine modification of the ribosome-binding protein eIF5A, a target for new anti-inflammatory drugs: understanding the action of the inhibitor GC7 on a murine macrophage cell line.

    PubMed

    de Almeida, Oedem Paulo; Toledo, Thais Regina; Rossi, Danuza; Rossetto, Daniella de Barros; Watanabe, Tatiana Faria; Galvão, Fábio Carrilho; Medeiros, Alexandra Ivo; Zanelli, Cleslei Fernando; Valentini, Sandro Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation is part of an important mechanism triggered by the innate immune response that rapidly responds to invading microorganisms and tissue injury. One important elicitor of the inflammatory response is the Gram-negative bacteria component lipopolysaccharide (LPS), which induces the activation of innate immune response cells, the release of proinflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin 1 and tumor necrosis factor α(TNF-α), and the cellular generation of nitric oxide (NO) by the inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). Although essential to the immune response, uncontrolled inflammatory responses can lead to pathological conditions, such as sepsis and rheumatoid arthritis. Therefore, identifying cellular targets for new anti-inflammatory treatments is crucial to improving therapeutic control of inflammation-related diseases. More recently, the translation factor eIF5A has been demonstrated to have a proinflammatory role in the release of cytokines and the production of NO. As eIF5A requires and essential and unique modification of a specific residue of lysine, changing it to hypusine, eIF5A is an interesting cellular target for anti-inflammatory treatment. The present study reviews the literature concerning the anti-inflammatory effects of inhibiting eIF5A function. We also present new data showing that the inhibition of eIF5A function by the small molecule GC7 significantly decreases TNF-α release without affecting TNF-α mRNA levels. We discuss the mechanisms by which eIF5A may interfere with TNF-α mRNA translation by binding to and regulating the function of ribosomes during protein synthesis. PMID:23701550

  9. A hypusine-eIF5A-PEAK1 switch regulates the pathogenesis of pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fujimura, Ken; Wright, Tracy; Strnadel, Jan; Kaushal, Sharmeela; Metildi, Cristina; Lowy, Andrew M.; Bouvet, Michael; Kelber, Jonathan A.; Klemke, Richard L.

    2014-01-01

    Deregulation of protein synthesis is a hallmark of cancer cell proliferation, survival, and metastatic progression. eIF5A1, and its highly related isoform eIF5A2, are translation initiation factors that have been implicated in a range of human malignancies, but how they control cancer development and disease progression is still poorly understood. Here, we investigated how eIF5A proteins regulate pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) pathogenesis. eIF5A proteins are the only known proteins regulated by a distinct posttranslational modification termed hypusination, which is catalyzed by two enzymes, deoxyhypusine synthase (DHPS) and deoxyhypusine hydroxylase (DOHH). The highly selective nature of the hypusine modification and its amenability to pharmacological inhibition make eIF5A proteins attractive therapeutic targets. We found that the expression and hypusination of eIF5A proteins are upregulated in human PDAC tissues and in premalignant pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) tissues isolated from Pdx-1-Cre: LSL-KRASG12D mice. Knockdown of eIF5A proteins in PDAC cells inhibited their growth in vitro and orthotopic tumor growth in vivo, whereas amplification of eIF5A proteins increased PDAC cell growth and tumor formation in mice. Small molecule inhibitors of DHPS and DOHH both suppressed eIF5A hypusination, preventing PDAC cell growth. Interestingly, we found that eIF5A proteins regulate PDAC cell growth by modulating the expression of PEAK1, a non-receptor tyrosine kinase essential for PDAC cell growth and therapy resistance. Our findings suggest that eIF5A proteins utilize PEAK1 as a downstream effector to drive PDAC pathogenesis, and that pharmacological inhibition of the eIF5A-hypusine-PEAK1 axis may provide a novel therapeutic strategy to combat this deadly disease. PMID:25261239

  10. The hypusine-containing translation factor eIF5A

    PubMed Central

    Dever, Thomas E.; Gutierrez, Erik; Shin, Byung-Sik

    2014-01-01

    In addition to the small and large ribosomal subunits, aminoacyl-tRNAs, and an mRNA, cellular protein synthesis is dependent on translation factors. The eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5A (eIF5A) and its bacterial ortholog elongation factor P (EF-P) were initially characterized based on their ability to stimulate methionyl-puromycin (Met-Pmn) synthesis, a model assay for protein synthesis; however, the function of these factors in cellular protein synthesis has been difficult to resolve. Interestingly, a conserved lysine residue in eIF5A is post-translationally modified to hypusine and the corresponding lysine residue in EF-P from at least some bacteria is modified by the addition of a βlysine moiety. In this review, we provide a summary of recent data that have identified a novel role for the translation factor eIF5A and its hypusine modification in the elongation phase of protein synthesis and more specifically in stimulating the production of proteins containing runs of consecutive proline residues. PMID:25029904

  11. Unique carbon nanotube architectures via surface modification and capillary effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakrapani, Nirupama

    The extraordinary material properties of carbon nanotubes make them an ideal candidate for a plethora of applications and many fundamental scientific studies. However, precise control over morphology of nanotube-based structures is required before their potential could be realized. A method for surface character alteration and controlled defect induction based on plasma chemistry is presented. This process induces defects in the nanotube structure by way of functionalization and the extent of disorder can be controlled by plasma time and power. This treatment has been characterized by time dependent Raman and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. A better understanding of the changes in the vibrational modes of nanotubes with changes in their structure could be gained from this study. Formation of visually arresting cellular structures from aligned nanotubes by the evaporation of water was discovered. Cellular patterns arise frequently in nature on length scales ranging from microscopic to macroscopic as a result of spatially periodic and random perturbations. However, a film of aligned carbon nanotubes present an unique, yet unstudied system where pattern formation arise from the collapse and reassembly of highly ordered, anisotropic, elastic, nanoscale rods with remarkable properties. The nanoscale dimensions of the nanotube arrays magnify the capillary forces exerted by the evaporating solvent from the interstitial spaces. Shrinkage induced crack formation in the films due to strong capillary forces of evaporating solvent and aided by strong van der Waals interactions between condensed nanotubes, result in the formation of stable cellular patterns and contiguous foams. These foams can be elastically deformed, transferred to other substrates, or floated out to produce free-standing macroscopic fabrics. The length-scale, orientation and shape of cell could be controlled by varying experimental conditions such as the length of nanotubes, rate of evaporation, and array

  12. Development of orthogonally protected hypusine for solid-phase peptide synthesis.

    PubMed

    Song, Aimin; Tom, Jeffrey; Yu, Zhiyong; Pham, Victoria; Tan, Dajin; Zhang, Dengxiong; Fang, Guoyong; Yu, Tao; Deshayes, Kurt

    2015-04-01

    An orthogonally protected hypusine reagent was developed for solid-phase synthesis of hypusinated peptides using the Fmoc/t-Bu protection strategy. The reagent was synthesized in an overall yield of 27% after seven steps from Cbz-Lys-OBzl and (R)-3-hydroxypyrrolidin-2-one. The side-chain protecting groups (Boc and t-Bu) are fully compatible with standard Fmoc chemistry and can be readily removed during the peptide cleavage step. The utility of the reagent was demonstrated by solid-phase synthesis of hypusinated peptides. PMID:25769022

  13. Polyamines and Hypusination Are Required for Ebolavirus Gene Expression and Replication

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, Michelle E.; Filone, Claire Marie; Rozelle, Dan; Mire, Chad E.; Agans, Krystle N.; Hensley, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Ebolavirus (EBOV) is an RNA virus that is known to cause severe hemorrhagic fever in humans and other primates. EBOV successfully enters and replicates in many cell types. This replication is dependent on the virus successfully coopting a number of cellular factors. Many of these factors are currently unidentified but represent potential targets for antiviral therapeutics. Here we show that cellular polyamines are critical for EBOV replication. We found that small-molecule inhibitors of polyamine synthesis block gene expression driven by the viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. Short hairpin RNA (shRNA) knockdown of the polyamine pathway enzyme spermidine synthase also resulted in reduced EBOV replication. These findings led us to further investigate spermidine, a polyamine that is essential for the hypusination of eukaryotic initiation factor 5A (eIF5A). Blocking the hypusination of eIF5A (and thereby inhibiting its function) inhibited both EBOV gene expression and viral replication. The mechanism appears to be due to the importance of hypusinated eIF5A for the accumulation of VP30, an essential component of the viral polymerase. The same reduction in hypusinated eIF5A did not alter the accumulation of other viral polymerase components. This action makes eIF5A function an important gate for proper EBOV polymerase assembly and function through the control of a single virus protein. PMID:27460797

  14. Structure of the exportin Xpo4 in complex with RanGTP and the hypusine-containing translation factor eIF5A.

    PubMed

    Aksu, Metin; Trakhanov, Sergei; Görlich, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    Xpo4 is a bidirectional nuclear transport receptor that mediates nuclear export of eIF5A and Smad3 as well as import of Sox2 and SRY. How Xpo4 recognizes such a variety of cargoes is as yet unknown. Here we present the crystal structure of the RanGTP·Xpo4·eIF5A export complex at 3.2 Å resolution. Xpo4 has a similar structure as CRM1, but the NES-binding site is occluded, and a new interaction site evolved that recognizes both globular domains of eIF5A. eIF5A contains hypusine, a unique amino acid with two positive charges, which is essential for cell viability and eIF5A function in translation. The hypusine docks into a deep, acidic pocket of Xpo4 and is thus a critical element of eIF5A's complex export signature. This further suggests that Xpo4 recognizes other cargoes differently, and illustrates how Xpo4 suppresses - in a chaperone-like manner - undesired interactions of eIF5A inside nuclei. PMID:27306458

  15. Structure of the exportin Xpo4 in complex with RanGTP and the hypusine-containing translation factor eIF5A

    PubMed Central

    Aksu, Metin; Trakhanov, Sergei; Görlich, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    Xpo4 is a bidirectional nuclear transport receptor that mediates nuclear export of eIF5A and Smad3 as well as import of Sox2 and SRY. How Xpo4 recognizes such a variety of cargoes is as yet unknown. Here we present the crystal structure of the RanGTP·Xpo4·eIF5A export complex at 3.2 Å resolution. Xpo4 has a similar structure as CRM1, but the NES-binding site is occluded, and a new interaction site evolved that recognizes both globular domains of eIF5A. eIF5A contains hypusine, a unique amino acid with two positive charges, which is essential for cell viability and eIF5A function in translation. The hypusine docks into a deep, acidic pocket of Xpo4 and is thus a critical element of eIF5A's complex export signature. This further suggests that Xpo4 recognizes other cargoes differently, and illustrates how Xpo4 suppresses – in a chaperone-like manner – undesired interactions of eIF5A inside nuclei. PMID:27306458

  16. Ambient response of a unique performance-based design building with dynamic response modification features

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Celebi, Mehmet; Huang, Moh; Shakal, Antony; Hooper, John; Klemencic, Ron

    2012-01-01

    A 64-story, performance-based design building with reinforced concrete core shear-walls and unique dynamic response modification features (tuned liquid sloshing dampers and buckling-restrained braces) has been instrumented with a monitoring array of 72 channels of accelerometers. Ambient vibration data recorded are analyzed to identify modes and associated frequencies and damping. The low-amplitude dynamic characteristics are considerably different than those computed from design analyses, but serve as a baseline against which to compare with future strong shaking responses. Such studies help to improve our understanding of the effectiveness of the added features to the building and help improve designs in the future.

  17. Isolation of an 18,000-dalton hypusine-containing protein from cultured mouse neuroblastoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Dou, Q.P.; Chen, K.Y.

    1987-05-01

    An 18,000-dalton protein can be metabolically labeled by (TH)putrescine or spermidine in mammalian cells. The labeling is due to a post-translational conversion of a lysine residue to hypusine residue. Previous studies indicated that the labeling is growth-dependent and is greatly diminished in mouse neuroblastoma cells after differentiation. To further study the physiological functions of this protein in the differentiation of mouse neuroblastoma cells, they have developed a simple procedure to purify this protein from cultured NB-15 mouse neuroblastoma cells. The 4-steps procedure included a Cibacron-Blue column, an omega-diaminooctyl-agarose column, a Sephadex G-50 column, and a Mono Q column. The procedure resulted in a 500-fold purification and the preparation appeared to be homogenous as judged by SDS-PAGE. Peptide map analysis using V-8 protease digestion method indicated that the 18,000-dalton hypusine-containing protein from NB-15 cells was identical to eukaryotic initiation factor 4D isolated from rabbit reticulocytes. This purification scheme also enabled them to detect a very faintly labeled protein in NB-15 cells. This weakly labeled protein had an apparent molecular weight of 22,000-dalton and pI of 5.0.

  18. Unique translational modification of an invertebrate neuropeptide: a phosphorylated member of the adipokinetic hormone peptide family

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Separation of an extract of corpora cardiaca from the protea beetle, Trichostetha fascicularis, by single-step RP (reverse-phase)-HPLC and monitoring of tryptophan fluorescence resulted in two distinctive peaks, the material of which mobilized proline and carbohydrates in a bioassay performed using the beetle. Material from one of these peaks was; however, inactive in the classical bioassays of locusts and cockroaches that are used for detecting peptides belonging to the AKH (adipokinetic hormone) family. After enzymatically deblocking the N-terminal pyroglutamic acid (pGlu) residue in the peptide material and sequencing by Edman degradation, a partial sequence was obtained: (pGlu)-Ile-Asn-Met-Thr-Xaa-Gly-Trp. The complete sequence was deduced from ESI-MSn (electrospray ionization multi-stage-MS); position six was identified as a phosphothreonine residue and the C-terminus is amidated. The peptide, code-named Trifa-CC, was chemically synthesized and used in confirmatory experiments to show that the primary structure had been correctly assigned. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a phosphorylated invertebrate neuropeptide. Synthetic Trifa-CC co-elutes with the natural peptide, found in the gland of the protea beetle, after RP-HPLC. Moreover, the natural peptide can be dephosphorylated by alkaline phosphatase and the product of that reaction has the same retention time as a synthetic nonphosphorylated octapeptide which has the same sequence as Trifa-CC. Finally, synthetic Trifa-CC has hypertrehalosaemic and hyperprolinaemic biological activity in the protea beetle, but even high concentrations of synthetic Trifa-CC are inactive in locusts and cockroaches. Hence, the correct peptide structure has been assigned. Trifa-CC of the protea beetle is an unusual member of the AKH family that is unique in its post-translational modification. Since it increases the concentration of carbohydrates and proline in the haemolymph when injected into the protea beetle, and

  19. De novo sequencing of unique sequence tags for discovery of post-translational modifications of proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Yufeng; Tolic, Nikola; Hixson, Kim K.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Smith, Richard D.

    2008-10-15

    De novo sequencing has a promise to discover the protein post-translation modifications; however, such approach is still in their infancy and not widely applied for proteomics practices due to its limited reliability. In this work, we describe a de novo sequencing approach for discovery of protein modifications through identification of the UStags (Anal. Chem. 2008, 80, 1871-1882). The de novo information was obtained from Fourier-transform tandem mass spectrometry for peptides and polypeptides in a yeast lysate, and the de novo sequences obtained were filtered to define a more limited set of UStags. The DNA-predicted database protein sequences were then compared to the UStags, and the differences observed across or in the UStags (i.e., the UStags’ prefix and suffix sequences and the UStags themselves) were used to infer the possible sequence modifications. With this de novo-UStag approach, we uncovered some unexpected variances of yeast protein sequences due to amino acid mutations and/or multiple modifications to the predicted protein sequences. Random matching of the de novo sequences to the predicted sequences were examined with use of two random (false) databases, and ~3% false discovery rates were estimated for the de novo-UStag approach. The factors affecting the reliability (e.g., existence of de novo sequencing noise residues and redundant sequences) and the sensitivity are described. The de novo-UStag complements the UStag method previously reported by enabling discovery of new protein modifications.

  20. De novo sequencing of unique sequence tags for discovery of post-translational modifications of proteins.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yufeng; Tolić, Nikola; Hixson, Kim K; Purvine, Samuel O; Anderson, Gordon A; Smith, Richard D

    2008-10-15

    De novo sequencing is a spectrum analysis approach for mass spectrometry data to discover post-translational modifications in proteins; however, such an approach is still in its infancy and is still not widely applied to proteomic practices due to its limited reliability. In this work, we describe a de novo sequencing approach for the discovery of protein modifications based on identification of the proteome UStags (Shen, Y.; Tolić, N.; Hixson, K. K.; Purvine, S. O.; Pasa-Tolić, L.; Qian, W. J.; Adkins, J. N.; Moore, R. J.; Smith, R. D. Anal. Chem. 2008, 80, 1871-1882). The de novo information was obtained from Fourier-transform tandem mass spectrometry data for peptides and polypeptides from a yeast lysate, and the de novo sequences obtained were selected based on filter levels designed to provide a limited yet high quality subset of UStags. The DNA-predicted database protein sequences were then compared to the UStags, and the differences observed across or in the UStags (i.e., the UStags' prefix and suffix sequences and the UStags themselves) were used to infer possible sequence modifications. With this de novo-UStag approach, we uncovered some unexpected variances within several yeast protein sequences due to amino acid mutations and/or multiple modifications to the predicted protein sequences. To determine false discovery rates, two random (false) databases were independently used for sequence matching, and ~3% false discovery rates were estimated for the de novo-UStag approach. The factors affecting the reliability (e.g., existence of de novo sequencing noise residues and redundant sequences) and the sensitivity of the approach were investigated and described. The combined de novo-UStag approach complements the UStag method previously reported by enabling the discovery of new protein modifications. PMID:18783246

  1. Transcriptomic sequencing reveals a set of unique genes activated by butyrate-induced histone modification

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Butyrate is a nutritional element with strong epigenetic regulatory activity as an inhibitor of histone deacetylases (HDACs). Based on the analysis of differentially expressed genes induced by butyrate in the bovine epithelial cell using deep RNA-sequencing technology (RNA-seq), a set of unique gen...

  2. In-house validation study for salmonella unique testing of juice (modification of AOAC official method 2000.07).

    PubMed

    Dailianis, Angela E; Hughes, Denise

    2002-01-01

    Following an industry request, a study was undertaken to validate a minor change to the Unique method for testing fruit juice. Twenty foods were tested in the original precollaborative study for TECRA Unique Salmonella test (2000.07). To validate the modification for juice, both the modified method (42 degrees C module incubation with a 5 h replication step) and the current AOAC Method 2000.07 (37 degrees C incubation with a 4 h replication step) were compared with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's Bacteriological Analytical Manual (BAM; 8th Ed., 1998) reference method, which uses lactose broth as pre-enrichment medium. Twenty uninoculated replicates, 20 replicates with low-level inoculum (target 1-5 cells/25 g), and 20 replicates with high-level inoculum (target 10-50 cells/25 g) were tested for a single batch of fresh orange juice in accordance with AOAC requirements. There was exact agreement between the 2 Unique methods for all samples and exact agreement between the 2 Unique methods and the BAM method for the uninoculated and high-level inoculum samples. For low-level inoculum, 17 samples were confirmed positive with the new Unique method, 17 with AOAC Method 2000.07, and 14 with the BAM method. PMID:12477197

  3. Transcriptomic Sequencing Reveals a Set of Unique Genes Activated by Butyrate-Induced Histone Modification.

    PubMed

    Li, Cong-Jun; Li, Robert W; Baldwin, Ransom L; Blomberg, Le Ann; Wu, Sitao; Li, Weizhong

    2016-01-01

    Butyrate is a nutritional element with strong epigenetic regulatory activity as a histone deacetylase inhibitor. Based on the analysis of differentially expressed genes in the bovine epithelial cells using RNA sequencing technology, a set of unique genes that are activated only after butyrate treatment were revealed. A complementary bioinformatics analysis of the functional category, pathway, and integrated network, using Ingenuity Pathways Analysis, indicated that these genes activated by butyrate treatment are related to major cellular functions, including cell morphological changes, cell cycle arrest, and apoptosis. Our results offered insight into the butyrate-induced transcriptomic changes and will accelerate our discerning of the molecular fundamentals of epigenomic regulation. PMID:26819550

  4. Transcriptomic Sequencing Reveals a Set of Unique Genes Activated by Butyrate-Induced Histone Modification

    PubMed Central

    Li, Cong-Jun; Li, Robert W.; Baldwin, Ransom L.; Blomberg, Le Ann; Wu, Sitao; Li, Weizhong

    2016-01-01

    Butyrate is a nutritional element with strong epigenetic regulatory activity as a histone deacetylase inhibitor. Based on the analysis of differentially expressed genes in the bovine epithelial cells using RNA sequencing technology, a set of unique genes that are activated only after butyrate treatment were revealed. A complementary bioinformatics analysis of the functional category, pathway, and integrated network, using Ingenuity Pathways Analysis, indicated that these genes activated by butyrate treatment are related to major cellular functions, including cell morphological changes, cell cycle arrest, and apoptosis. Our results offered insight into the butyrate-induced transcriptomic changes and will accelerate our discerning of the molecular fundamentals of epigenomic regulation. PMID:26819550

  5. Platinum electrode modification: Unique surface carbonization approach to improve performance and sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hwi Yong; Barber, Cedrick; Minerick, Adrienne R

    2015-08-01

    Many microfluidic devices, also known as lab-on-a-chip devices, employ electrochemical detection methods using microelectrodes. Miniaturizing electrodes inevitably reduces electrode sensitivity and decreases the S/N, which limits applications within microfluidic devices. However, microelectrode surface modification can increase the surface area and sensitivity. In the present work, we report substantial improvement in platinum electrode performance and sensitivity by coating with carbon from red blood cells. The larger goal of this work was to measure DC electrical resistances of red blood cell suspensions in a microchannel for hematocrit determination. It was observed that as current responses of red blood cell suspensions were measured, the platinum electrode performance (reproducibility and S/N) improved with time. The platinum electrode electrocatalytic activity for red blood cell current measurements improved by 140%. Systematic experimentation revealed that red blood cells adsorb and carbonize the platinum electrode surfaces. The electrode surfaces before and after performance improvements were analyzed by field emission scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectrometry, and Raman spectrometry. The formed carbon layers on the electrode surfaces were found to be proteomic and increased surface area with a porous three-dimensional structure, thus improving performance and stabilizing currents. PMID:26032065

  6. A unique nonreducing terminal modification of chondroitin sulfate by N-acetylgalactosamine 4-sulfate 6-o-sulfotransferase.

    PubMed

    Ohtake, Shiori; Kimata, Koji; Habuchi, Osami

    2003-10-01

    N-Acetylgalactosamine 4-sulfate 6-O-sulfotransferase (GalNAc4S-6ST) transfers sulfate from 3'-phosphoadenosine 5'-phosphosulfate (PAPS) to position 6 of N-acetylgalactosamine 4-sulfate (GalNAc(4SO4)). We previously identified human GalNAc4S-6ST cDNA and showed that the recombinant GalNAc4S-6ST could transfer sulfate efficiently to the nonreducing terminal GalNAc(4SO4) residues. We here present evidence that GalNAc4S-6ST should be involved in a unique nonreducing terminal modification of chondroitin sulfate A (CSA). From the nonreducing terminal of CS-A, a GlcA-containing oligosaccharide (Oligo I) that could serve as an acceptor for GalNAc4S-6ST was obtained after chondroitinase ACII digestion. Oligo I was found to be GalNAc(4SO4)-GlcA(2SO4)-GalNAc(6SO4) because GalNAc(4SO4) and deltaHexA(2SO4)-GalNAc(6SO4) were formed after chondroitinase ABC digestion. When Oligo I was used as the acceptor for GalNAc4S-6ST, sulfate was transferred to position 6 of GalNAc(4SO4) located at the nonreducing end of Oligo I. Oligo I was much better acceptor for GalNAc4S-6ST than GalNAc(4SO4)-GlcAGalNAc(6SO4). An oligosaccharide (Oligo II) whose structure is identical to that of the sulfated Oligo I was obtained from CS-A after chondroitinase ACII digestion, indicating that the terminal modification occurs under the physiological conditions. When CS-A was incubated with [35S]PAPS and GalNAc4S-6ST and the 35S-labeled product was digested with chondroitinase ACII, a 35S-labeled trisaccharide (Oligo III) containing [35S]GalNAc(4,6-SO4) residue at the nonreducing end was obtained. Oligo III behaved identically with the sulfated Oligos I and II. These results suggest that GalNAc4S-6ST may be involved in the terminal modification of CS-A, through which a highly sulfated nonreducing terminal sequence is generated. PMID:12874280

  7. Modification of NASA Langley 8 foot high temperature tunnel to provide a unique national research facility for hypersonic air-breathing propulsion systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, H. N.; Wieting, A. R.

    1984-01-01

    A planned modification of the NASA Langley 8-Foot High Temperature Tunnel to make it a unique national research facility for hypersonic air-breathing propulsion systems is described, and some of the ongoing supporting research for that modification is discussed. The modification involves: (1) the addition of an oxygen-enrichment system which will allow the methane-air combustion-heated test stream to simulate air for propulsion testing; and (2) supplemental nozzles to expand the test simulation capability from the current nominal Mach number to 7.0 include Mach numbers 3.0, 4.5, and 5.0. Detailed design of the modifications is currently underway and the modified facility is scheduled to be available for tests of large scale propulsion systems by mid 1988.

  8. Modification of NASA Langley 8 Foot High Temperature Tunnel to provide a unique national research facility for hypersonic air-breathing propulsion systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, H. N.; Wieting, A. R.

    1984-01-01

    A planned modification of the NASA Langley 8-Foot High Temperature Tunnel to make it a unique national research facility for hypersonic air-breathing propulsion systems is described, and some of the ongoing supporting research for that modification is discussed. The modification involves: (1) the addition of an oxygen-enrichment system which will allow the methane-air combustion-heated test stream to simulate air for propulsion testing; and (2) supplemental nozzles to expand the test simulation capability from the current nominal Mach number to 7.0 include Mach numbers 3.0, 4.5, and 5.0. Detailed design of the modifications is currently underway and the modified facility is scheduled to be available for tests of large scale propulsion systems by mid 1988.

  9. Proteome-wide identification of proteins and their modifications with decreased ambiguities and improved false discovery rates using unique sequence tags

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Yufeng; Tolic, Nikola; Hixson, Kim K.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Pasa-Tolic, Liljiana; Qian, Weijun; Adkins, Joshua N.; Moore, Ronald J.; Smith, Richard D.

    2008-03-15

    Identifying proteins correctly and with known levels of confidence remain as significant challenges for proteomics. Random or decoy peptide databases are increasingly being used to estimate the false discovery rate (FDR), e.g., from liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analyses of tryptic digests. We show that this approach can significantly underestimate the FDR, and describe an approach for more confident protein identifications that uses unique partial sequences derived from a combination of database searching and de novo-style data analyses of high precision MS/MS data. Applied to a Saccharomyces cerevisiae tryptic digest, the approach provided 3,132 confident peptide identifications (~5% modified in some fashion), covering 575 proteins with an estimated zero FDR. The conventional approach provided 3,359 peptide identifications and 656 proteins with 0.3% FDR based upon a decoy database analysis. However, the present approach revealed ~5% of the 3,359 identifications to be incorrect, and many more as potentially ambiguous, (e.g., due to not considering certain amino acid substitutions and modifications). In addition, 677 peptides and 39 proteins were identified that had been missed by conventional analysis, including non-tryptic peptides, peptides with various expected/unexpected chemical modifications, known/unknown posttranslational modifications, single nucleotide polymorphisms or gene encoding errors, and multiple modifications of individual peptides.

  10. Insights into the Activity and Substrate Binding of Xylella fastidiosa Polygalacturonase by Modification of a Unique QMK Amino Acid Motif Using Protein Chimeras.

    PubMed

    Warren, Jeremy G; Lincoln, James E; Kirkpatrick, Bruce C

    2015-01-01

    Polygalacturonases (EC 3.2.1.15) catalyze the random hydrolysis of 1, 4-alpha-D-galactosiduronic linkages in pectate and other galacturonans. Xylella fastidiosa possesses a single polygalacturonase gene, pglA (PD1485), and X. fastidiosa mutants deficient in the production of polygalacturonase are non-pathogenic and show a compromised ability to systemically infect grapevines. These results suggested that grapevines expressing sufficient amounts of an inhibitor of X. fastidiosa polygalacturonase might be protected from disease. Previous work in our laboratory and others have tried without success to produce soluble active X. fastidiosa polygalacturonase for use in inhibition assays. In this study, we created two enzymatically active X. fastidiosa / A. vitis polygalacturonase chimeras, AX1A and AX2A to explore the functionality of X. fastidiosa polygalacturonase in vitro. The AX1A chimera was constructed to specifically test if recombinant chimeric protein, produced in Escherichia coli, is soluble and if the X. fastidiosa polygalacturonase catalytic amino acids are able to hydrolyze polygalacturonic acid. The AX2A chimera was constructed to evaluate the ability of a unique QMK motif of X. fastidiosa polygalacturonase, most polygalacturonases have a R(I/L)K motif, to bind to and allow the hydrolysis of polygalacturonic acid. Furthermore, the AX2A chimera was also used to explore what effect modification of the QMK motif of X. fastidiosa polygalacturonase to a conserved RIK motif has on enzymatic activity. These experiments showed that both the AX1A and AX2A polygalacturonase chimeras were soluble and able to hydrolyze the polygalacturonic acid substrate. Additionally, the modification of the QMK motif to the conserved RIK motif eliminated hydrolytic activity, suggesting that the QMK motif is important for the activity of X. fastidiosa polygalacturonase. This result suggests X. fastidiosa polygalacturonase may preferentially hydrolyze a different pectic substrate or

  11. Insights into the Activity and Substrate Binding of Xylella fastidiosa Polygalacturonase by Modification of a Unique QMK Amino Acid Motif Using Protein Chimeras

    PubMed Central

    Warren, Jeremy G.; Lincoln, James E.; Kirkpatrick, Bruce C.

    2015-01-01

    Polygalacturonases (EC 3.2.1.15) catalyze the random hydrolysis of 1, 4-alpha-D-galactosiduronic linkages in pectate and other galacturonans. Xylella fastidiosa possesses a single polygalacturonase gene, pglA (PD1485), and X. fastidiosa mutants deficient in the production of polygalacturonase are non-pathogenic and show a compromised ability to systemically infect grapevines. These results suggested that grapevines expressing sufficient amounts of an inhibitor of X. fastidiosa polygalacturonase might be protected from disease. Previous work in our laboratory and others have tried without success to produce soluble active X. fastidiosa polygalacturonase for use in inhibition assays. In this study, we created two enzymatically active X. fastidiosa / A. vitis polygalacturonase chimeras, AX1A and AX2A to explore the functionality of X. fastidiosa polygalacturonase in vitro. The AX1A chimera was constructed to specifically test if recombinant chimeric protein, produced in Escherichia coli, is soluble and if the X. fastidiosa polygalacturonase catalytic amino acids are able to hydrolyze polygalacturonic acid. The AX2A chimera was constructed to evaluate the ability of a unique QMK motif of X. fastidiosa polygalacturonase, most polygalacturonases have a R(I/L)K motif, to bind to and allow the hydrolysis of polygalacturonic acid. Furthermore, the AX2A chimera was also used to explore what effect modification of the QMK motif of X. fastidiosa polygalacturonase to a conserved RIK motif has on enzymatic activity. These experiments showed that both the AX1A and AX2A polygalacturonase chimeras were soluble and able to hydrolyze the polygalacturonic acid substrate. Additionally, the modification of the QMK motif to the conserved RIK motif eliminated hydrolytic activity, suggesting that the QMK motif is important for the activity of X. fastidiosa polygalacturonase. This result suggests X. fastidiosa polygalacturonase may preferentially hydrolyze a different pectic substrate or

  12. Genetic modification and genetic determinism

    PubMed Central

    Resnik, David B; Vorhaus, Daniel B

    2006-01-01

    In this article we examine four objections to the genetic modification of human beings: the freedom argument, the giftedness argument, the authenticity argument, and the uniqueness argument. We then demonstrate that each of these arguments against genetic modification assumes a strong version of genetic determinism. Since these strong deterministic assumptions are false, the arguments against genetic modification, which assume and depend upon these assumptions, are therefore unsound. Serious discussion of the morality of genetic modification, and the development of sound science policy, should be driven by arguments that address the actual consequences of genetic modification for individuals and society, not by ones propped up by false or misleading biological assumptions. PMID:16800884

  13. Blocking eIF5A Modification in Cervical Cancer Cells Alters the Expression of Cancer-Related Genes and Suppresses Cell Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Mémin, Elisabeth; Hoque, Mainul; Jain, Mohit R.; Heller, Debra S.; Li, Hong; Cracchiolo, Bernadette; Hanauske-Abel, Hartmut M.; Pe’ery, Tsafi; Mathews, Michael B.

    2016-01-01

    Cancer etiology is influenced by alterations in protein synthesis that are not fully understood. In this study, we took a novel approach to investigate the role of the eukaryotic translation initiation factor eIF5A in human cervical cancers, where it is widely overexpressed. eIF5A contains the distinctive amino acid hypusine, which is formed by a posttranslational modification event requiring deoxyhypusine hydroxylase (DOHH), an enzyme that can be inhibited by the drugs ciclopirox and deferiprone. We found that proliferation of cervical cancer cells can be blocked by DOHH inhibition with either of these pharmacologic agents, as well as by RNA interference–mediated silencing of eIF5A, DOHH, or another enzyme in the hypusine pathway. Proteomic and RNA analyses in HeLa cervical cancer cells identified two groups of proteins in addition to eIF5A that were coordinately affected by ciclopirox and deferiprone. Group 1 proteins (Hsp27, NM23, and DJ-1) were downregulated at the translational level, whereas group 2 proteins (TrpRS and PRDX2) were upregulated at the mRNA level. Further investigations confirmed that eIF5A and DOHH are required for Hsp27 expression in cervical cancer cells and for regulation of its key target IκB and hence NF-κB. Our results argue that mature eIF5A controls a translational network of cancer-driving genes, termed the eIF5A regulon, at the levels of mRNA abundance and translation. In coordinating cell proliferation, the eIF5A regulon can be modulated by drugs such as ciclopirox or deferiprone, which might be repositioned to control cancer cell growth. PMID:24220243

  14. Blocking eIF5A modification in cervical cancer cells alters the expression of cancer-related genes and suppresses cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Mémin, Elisabeth; Hoque, Mainul; Jain, Mohit R; Heller, Debra S; Li, Hong; Cracchiolo, Bernadette; Hanauske-Abel, Hartmut M; Pe'ery, Tsafi; Mathews, Michael B

    2014-01-15

    Cancer etiology is influenced by alterations in protein synthesis that are not fully understood. In this study, we took a novel approach to investigate the role of the eukaryotic translation initiation factor eIF5A in human cervical cancers, where it is widely overexpressed. eIF5A contains the distinctive amino acid hypusine, which is formed by a posttranslational modification event requiring deoxyhypusine hydroxylase (DOHH), an enzyme that can be inhibited by the drugs ciclopirox and deferiprone. We found that proliferation of cervical cancer cells can be blocked by DOHH inhibition with either of these pharmacologic agents, as well as by RNA interference-mediated silencing of eIF5A, DOHH, or another enzyme in the hypusine pathway. Proteomic and RNA analyses in HeLa cervical cancer cells identified two groups of proteins in addition to eIF5A that were coordinately affected by ciclopirox and deferiprone. Group 1 proteins (Hsp27, NM23, and DJ-1) were downregulated at the translational level, whereas group 2 proteins (TrpRS and PRDX2) were upregulated at the mRNA level. Further investigations confirmed that eIF5A and DOHH are required for Hsp27 expression in cervical cancer cells and for regulation of its key target IκB and hence NF-κB. Our results argue that mature eIF5A controls a translational network of cancer-driving genes, termed the eIF5A regulon, at the levels of mRNA abundance and translation. In coordinating cell proliferation, the eIF5A regulon can be modulated by drugs such as ciclopirox or deferiprone, which might be repositioned to control cancer cell growth. PMID:24220243

  15. Behavior modification.

    PubMed

    Pelham, W E; Fabiano, G A

    2000-07-01

    Attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a chronic and substantially impairing disorder. This means that treatment must also be chronic and substantial. Behavior Modification, and in many cases, the combination of behavior modification and stimulant medication, is a valid, useful treatment for reducing the pervasive impairment experienced by children with ADHD. Based on the research evidence reviewed, behavior modification should be the first line of treatment for children with ADHD. PMID:10944662

  16. Home Modification

    MedlinePlus

    ... it is important to consider certain safety modifications. Adaptations such as those in the following list can ... The importance of a Consumer Perspective in Home Adaptation of Alzheimer’s Households” (Chapter 6 pp 91-112) ...

  17. Ubiquitin modifications

    PubMed Central

    Swatek, Kirby N; Komander, David

    2016-01-01

    Protein ubiquitination is a dynamic multifaceted post-translational modification involved in nearly all aspects of eukaryotic biology. Once attached to a substrate, the 76-amino acid protein ubiquitin is subjected to further modifications, creating a multitude of distinct signals with distinct cellular outcomes, referred to as the 'ubiquitin code'. Ubiquitin can be ubiquitinated on seven lysine (Lys) residues or on the N-terminus, leading to polyubiquitin chains that can encompass complex topologies. Alternatively or in addition, ubiquitin Lys residues can be modified by ubiquitin-like molecules (such as SUMO or NEDD8). Finally, ubiquitin can also be acetylated on Lys, or phosphorylated on Ser, Thr or Tyr residues, and each modification has the potential to dramatically alter the signaling outcome. While the number of distinctly modified ubiquitin species in cells is mind-boggling, much progress has been made to characterize the roles of distinct ubiquitin modifications, and many enzymes and receptors have been identified that create, recognize or remove these ubiquitin modifications. We here provide an overview of the various ubiquitin modifications present in cells, and highlight recent progress on ubiquitin chain biology. We then discuss the recent findings in the field of ubiquitin acetylation and phosphorylation, with a focus on Ser65-phosphorylation and its role in mitophagy and Parkin activation. PMID:27012465

  18. GR uniqueness and deformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasnov, Kirill

    2015-10-01

    In the metric formulation gravitons are described with the parity symmetric S + 2 ⊗ S - 2 representation of Lorentz group. General Relativity is then the unique theory of interacting gravitons with second order field equations. We show that if a chiral S + 3 ⊗ S - representation is used instead, the uniqueness is lost, and there is an infinite-parametric family of theories of interacting gravitons with second order field equations. We use the language of graviton scattering amplitudes, and show how the uniqueness of GR is avoided using simple dimensional analysis. The resulting distinct from GR gravity theories are all parity asymmetric, but share the GR MHV amplitudes. They have new all same helicity graviton scattering amplitudes at every graviton order. The amplitudes with at least one graviton of opposite helicity continue to be determinable by the BCFW recursion.

  19. Humans and uniqueness.

    PubMed

    Schumpe, Birga Mareen; Erb, Hans-Peter

    2015-01-01

    A defining force in the shaping of human identity is a person's need to feel special and different from others. Psychologists term this motivation Need for Uniqueness (NfU). There are manifold ways to establish feelings of uniqueness, e.g., by showing unusual consumption behaviour or by not conforming to majority views. The NfU can be seen as a stable personality trait, that is, individuals differ in their dispositional need to feel unique. The NfU is also influenced by situational factors and social environments. The cultural context is one important social setting shaping the NfU. This article aims to illuminate the NfU from a social psychological perspective. PMID:25942772

  20. Akhenaten, a unique pharaoh.

    PubMed

    Retief, François Pieter; Cilliers, Louise

    2011-09-01

    Akhenaten was a unique pharaoh in more ways than one. He initiated a major socio-religious revolution that had vast consequences for his country, and possessed a strikingly abnormal physiognomy that was of note in his time and has interested historians up to the present era. In this study, we attempt to identify the developmental disorder responsible for his eunuchoid appearance. PMID:21920162

  1. Unique Access to Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goble, Don

    2009-01-01

    This article describes the many learning opportunities that broadcast technology students at Ladue Horton Watkins High School in St. Louis, Missouri, experience because of their unique access to technology and methods of learning. Through scaffolding, stepladder techniques, and trial by fire, students learn to produce multiple television programs,…

  2. PDV modifications.

    SciTech Connect

    Dolan, Daniel H., III

    2010-09-01

    External modifications can transform a conventional photonic doppler velocimetry (PDV) system to other useful configurations - Non-standard probes and Frequency-conversion measurements. This approach is easier than supporting every conceivable measurement in the core PDV design. Circulator specifications may be important - -30 dB isolation (common) probably not be enough, -50 dB isolation is available, and some bench testing may be needed.

  3. Is Life Unique?

    PubMed Central

    Abel, David L.

    2011-01-01

    Is life physicochemically unique? No. Is life unique? Yes. Life manifests innumerable formalisms that cannot be generated or explained by physicodynamics alone. Life pursues thousands of biofunctional goals, not the least of which is staying alive. Neither physicodynamics, nor evolution, pursue goals. Life is largely directed by linear digital programming and by the Prescriptive Information (PI) instantiated particularly into physicodynamically indeterminate nucleotide sequencing. Epigenomic controls only compound the sophistication of these formalisms. Life employs representationalism through the use of symbol systems. Life manifests autonomy, homeostasis far from equilibrium in the harshest of environments, positive and negative feedback mechanisms, prevention and correction of its own errors, and organization of its components into Sustained Functional Systems (SFS). Chance and necessity—heat agitation and the cause-and-effect determinism of nature’s orderliness—cannot spawn formalisms such as mathematics, language, symbol systems, coding, decoding, logic, organization (not to be confused with mere self-ordering), integration of circuits, computational success, and the pursuit of functionality. All of these characteristics of life are formal, not physical. PMID:25382119

  4. Molecular modeling of the human eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5A (eIF5A) based on spectroscopic and computational analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Costa-Neto, Claudio M. . E-mail: claudio@fmrp.usp.br; Parreiras-e-Silva, Lucas T.; Ruller, Roberto; Oliveira, Eduardo B.; Miranda, Antonio; Oliveira, Laerte; Ward, Richard J.

    2006-09-01

    The eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5A (eIF5A) is a protein ubiquitously present in archaea and eukarya, which undergoes a unique two-step post-translational modification called hypusination. Several studies have shown that hypusination is essential for a variety of functional roles for eIF5A, including cell proliferation and synthesis of proteins involved in cell cycle control. Up to now neither a totally selective inhibitor of hypusination nor an inhibitor capable of directly binding to eIF5A has been reported in the literature. The discovery of such an inhibitor might be achieved by computer-aided drug design based on the 3D structure of the human eIF5A. In this study, we present a molecular model for the human eIF5A protein based on the crystal structure of the eIF5A from Leishmania brasiliensis, and compare the modeled conformation of the loop bearing the hypusination site with circular dichroism data obtained with a synthetic peptide of this loop. Furthermore, analysis of amino acid variability between different human eIF5A isoforms revealed peculiar structural characteristics that are of functional relevance.

  5. Modifications to the translational apparatus which affect the regulation of protein synthesis in sea urchin embryos

    SciTech Connect

    Scalise, F.W.

    1988-01-01

    Protein synthesis can be regulated at a number of cellular levels. I have examined how modifications to specific components of the protein synthetic machinery are involved in regulating the efficiency of initiation of translation during early sea urchin embryogenesis. It is demonstrated that Ca{sup 2+} concentrations exceeding 500 uM cause the inhibition of protein synthesis in cell-free translation lysates prepared from sea urchin embryos. Specific changes in the state of phosphorylation of at least 8 proteins occur during this Ca{sup 2+}-mediated repression of translation. Analysis of these proteins has indicated that, unlike mammalian systems, there is no detectable level of Ca{sup 2+}-dependent phosphorylation of the {alpha}subunit eIF-2. Two of the proteins which do become phosphorylated in response to Ca{sup 2+} are calmodulin and an isoelectric form of sea urchin eIF-4D. In addition, 2 proteins which share similarities with kinases involved in the regulation of protein synthesis in mammalian cells, also become phosphorylated. I have investigated the consequences of changes in eIF-4D during sea urchin embryogenesis because it has been proposed that a polyamine-mediated conversion of lysine to hypusine in this factor may enhance translational activity. It is demonstrated that ({sup 3}H) spermidine-derived radioactivity is incorporated into a number of proteins when sea urchin embryos are labeled in vivo, and that the pattern of individual proteins that become labeled changes over the course of the first 30 hr of development.

  6. Exploring Unique Roles for Psychologists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahmed, Mohiuddin; Boisvert, Charles M.

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents comments on "Psychological Treatments" by D. H. Barlow. Barlow highlighted unique roles that psychologists can play in mental health service delivery by providing psychological treatments--treatments that psychologists would be uniquely qualified to design and deliver. In support of Barlow's position, the authors draw from…

  7. On the Meaning of Uniqueness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shipman, Barbara A.

    2013-01-01

    This article analyzes four questions on the meaning of uniqueness that have contrasting answers in common language versus mathematical language. The investigations stem from a scenario in which students interpreted uniqueness according to a definition from standard English, that is, different from the mathematical meaning, in defining an injective…

  8. Uniqueness of the momentum map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, Chiara; Nest, Ryszard

    2016-08-01

    We give a detailed discussion of existence and uniqueness of the momentum map associated to Poisson Lie actions, which was defined by Lu. We introduce a weaker notion of momentum map, called infinitesimal momentum map, which is defined on one-forms and we analyze its integrability to the Lu's momentum map. Finally, the uniqueness of the Lu's momentum map is studied by describing, explicitly, the tangent space to the space of momentum maps.

  9. Uniqueness of place: uniqueness of models. The FLEX modelling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fenicia, F.; Savenije, H. H. G.; Wrede, S.; Schoups, G.; Pfister, L.

    2009-04-01

    The current practice in hydrological modelling is to make use of model structures that are fixed and a-priori defined. However, for a model to reflect uniqueness of place while maintaining parsimony, it is necessary to be flexible in its architecture. We have developed a new approach for the development and testing of hydrological models, named the FLEX approach. This approach allows the formulation of alternative model structures that vary in configuration and complexity, and uses an objective method for testing and comparing model performance. We have tested this approach on three headwater catchments in Luxembourg with marked differences in hydrological response, where we have generated 15 alternative model structures. Each of the three catchments is best represented by a different model architecture. Our results clearly show that uniqueness of place necessarily leads to uniqueness of models.

  10. The liberal illusion of uniqueness.

    PubMed

    Stern, Chadly; West, Tessa V; Schmitt, Peter G

    2014-01-01

    In two studies, we demonstrated that liberals underestimate their similarity to other liberals (i.e., display truly false uniqueness), whereas moderates and conservatives overestimate their similarity to other moderates and conservatives (i.e., display truly false consensus; Studies 1 and 2). We further demonstrated that a fundamental difference between liberals and conservatives in the motivation to feel unique explains this ideological distinction in the accuracy of estimating similarity (Study 2). Implications of the accuracy of consensus estimates for mobilizing liberal and conservative political movements are discussed. PMID:24247730

  11. COPD: Unique to Older Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... Multiple Health Problems Prevention Join our e-newsletter! Aging & Health A to Z COPD Unique to Older Adults This section provides information ... not a weakness or a normal part of aging. Most people feel better with ... help you can, so that your COPD does not prevent you from living your life ...

  12. Uniquely identifying wheat plant structures

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Uniquely naming wheat (Triticum aestivum L. em Thell) plant parts is useful for communicating plant development research and the effects of environmental stresses on normal wheat development. Over the past 30+ years, several naming systems have been proposed for wheat shoot, leaf, spike, spikelet, ...

  13. Identity Foreclosure: A Unique Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petitpas, Al

    1978-01-01

    Foreclosure occurs when individuals prematurely make a firm commitment to an occupation or an ideology. If the pressure of having an occupational identity can be eased, then it may be possible to establish an environment in which foreclosed students could move toward the consolidation of their unique identities. (Author)

  14. Germline Modification and Engineering in Avian Species.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hong Jo; Lee, Hyung Chul; Han, Jae Yong

    2015-09-01

    Production of genome-edited animals using germline-competent cells and genetic modification tools has provided opportunities for investigation of biological mechanisms in various organisms. The recently reported programmed genome editing technology that can induce gene modification at a target locus in an efficient and precise manner facilitates establishment of animal models. In this regard, the demand for genome-edited avian species, which are some of the most suitable model animals due to their unique embryonic development, has also increased. Furthermore, germline chimera production through long-term culture of chicken primordial germ cells (PGCs) has facilitated research on production of genome-edited chickens. Thus, use of avian germline modification is promising for development of novel avian models for research of disease control and various biological mechanisms. Here, we discuss recent progress in genome modification technology in avian species and its applications and future strategies. PMID:26333275

  15. Germline Modification and Engineering in Avian Species

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hong Jo; Lee, Hyung Chul; Han, Jae Yong

    2015-01-01

    Production of genome-edited animals using germline-competent cells and genetic modification tools has provided opportunities for investigation of biological mechanisms in various organisms. The recently reported programmed genome editing technology that can induce gene modification at a target locus in an efficient and precise manner facilitates establishment of animal models. In this regard, the demand for genome-edited avian species, which are some of the most suitable model animals due to their unique embryonic development, has also increased. Furthermore, germline chimera production through long-term culture of chicken primordial germ cells (PGCs) has facilitated research on production of genome-edited chickens. Thus, use of avian germline modification is promising for development of novel avian models for research of disease control and various biological mechanisms. Here, we discuss recent progress in genome modification technology in avian species and its applications and future strategies. PMID:26333275

  16. Deoxyhypusine Modification of Eukaryotic Translation Initiation Factor 5A (eIF5A) Is Essential for Trypanosoma brucei Growth and for Expression of Polyprolyl-containing Proteins*

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Suong; Leija, Chrisopher; Kinch, Lisa; Regmi, Sandesh; Li, Qiong; Grishin, Nick V.; Phillips, Margaret A.

    2015-01-01

    The eukaryotic protozoan parasite Trypanosoma brucei is the causative agent of human African trypanosomiasis. Polyamine biosynthesis is essential in T. brucei, and the polyamine spermidine is required for synthesis of a novel cofactor called trypanothione and for deoxyhypusine modification of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5A (eIF5A). eIF5A promotes translation of proteins containing polyprolyl tracts in mammals and yeast. To evaluate the function of eIF5A in T. brucei, we used RNA interference (RNAi) to knock down eIF5A levels and found that it is essential for T. brucei growth. The RNAi-induced growth defect was complemented by expression of wild-type human eIF5A but not by a Lys-50 mutant that blocks modification by deoxyhypusine. Bioinformatics analysis showed that 15% of the T. brucei proteome contains 3 or more consecutive prolines and that actin-related proteins and cysteine proteases were highly enriched in the group. Steady-state protein levels of representative proteins containing 9 consecutive prolines that are involved in actin assembly (formin and CAP/Srv2p) were significantly reduced by knockdown of eIF5A. Several T. brucei polyprolyl proteins are involved in flagellar assembly. Knockdown of TbeIF5A led to abnormal cell morphologies and detached flagella, suggesting that eIF5A is important for translation of proteins needed for these processes. Potential specialized functions for eIF5A in T. brucei in translation of variable surface glycoproteins were also uncovered. Inhibitors of deoxyhypusination would be expected to cause a pleomorphic effect on multiple cell processes, suggesting that deoxyhypusine/hypusine biosynthesis could be a promising drug target in not just T. brucei but in other eukaryotic pathogens. PMID:26082486

  17. Unique MSV for every job

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-06-01

    Consafe is now using a computer-aided design and drafting system adapting its multipurpose support vessels (MSVS) to specific user requirements. The vessels are based on the concept of standard container modules adapted into living quarters, workshops, service units, offices with each application for a specific project demanding a unique mix. There is also the need for constant refurbishment program as service conditions take their toll on the modules. The computer-aided design system is described.

  18. The bacterial magnetosome: a unique prokaryotic organelle.

    PubMed

    Lower, Brian H; Bazylinski, Dennis A

    2013-01-01

    The bacterial magnetosome is a unique prokaryotic organelle comprising magnetic mineral crystals surrounded by a phospholipid bilayer. These inclusions are biomineralized by the magnetotactic bacteria which are ubiquitous, aquatic, motile microorganisms. Magnetosomes cause cells of magnetotactic bacteria to passively align and swim along the Earth's magnetic field lines, as miniature motile compass needles. These specialized compartments consist of a phospholipid bilayer membrane surrounding magnetic crystals of magnetite (Fe3O4) or greigite (Fe3S4). The morphology of these membrane-bound crystals varies by species with a nominal magnetic domain size between 35 and 120 nm. Almost all magnetotactic bacteria arrange their magnetosomes in a chain within the cell there by maximizing the magnetic dipole moment of the cell. It is presumed that magnetotactic bacteria use magnetotaxis in conjunction with chemotaxis to locate and maintain an optimum position for growth and survival based on chemistry, redox and physiology in aquatic habitats with vertical chemical concentration and redox gradients. The biosynthesis of magnetosomes is a complex process that involves several distinct steps including cytoplasmic membrane modifications, iron uptake and transport, initiation of crystallization, crystal maturation and magnetosome chain formation. While many mechanistic details remain unresolved, magnetotactic bacteria appear to contain the genetic determinants for magnetosome biomineralization within their genomes in clusters of genes that make up what is referred to as the magnetosome gene island in some species. In addition, magnetosomes contain a unique set of proteins, not present in other cellular fractions, which control the biomineralization process. Through the development of genetic systems, proteomic and genomic work, and the use of molecular and biochemical tools, the functions of a number of magnetosome membrane proteins have been demonstrated and the molecular

  19. The ethics of molecular memory modification.

    PubMed

    Hui, Katrina; Fisher, Carl E

    2015-07-01

    Novel molecular interventions have recently shown the potential to erase, enhance and alter specific long-term memories. Unique features of this form of memory modification call for a close examination of its possible applications. While there have been discussions of the ethics of memory modification in the literature, molecular memory modification (MMM) can provide special insights. Previously raised ethical concerns regarding memory enhancement, such as safety issues, the 'duty to remember', selfhood and personal identity, require re-evaluation in light of MMM. As a technology that exploits the brain's updating processes, MMM helps correct the common misconception that memory is a static entity by demonstrating how memory is plastic and subject to revision even in the absence of external manipulation. Furthermore, while putatively safer than other speculative technologies because of its high specificity, MMM raises notable safety issues, including potential insidious effects on the agent's emotions and personal identity. Nonetheless, MMM possesses characteristics of a more permissible form of modification, not only because it is theoretically safer, but because its unique mechanism of action requires a heightened level of cooperation from the agent. Discussions of memory modification must consider the specific mechanisms of action, which can alter the weight and relevance of various ethical concerns. MMM also highlights the need for conceptual accuracy regarding the term 'enhancement'; this umbrella term will have to be differentiated as new technologies are applied to a widening array of purposes. PMID:25552663

  20. The probabilities of unique events.

    PubMed

    Khemlani, Sangeet S; Lotstein, Max; Johnson-Laird, Phil

    2012-01-01

    Many theorists argue that the probabilities of unique events, even real possibilities such as President Obama's re-election, are meaningless. As a consequence, psychologists have seldom investigated them. We propose a new theory (implemented in a computer program) in which such estimates depend on an intuitive non-numerical system capable only of simple procedures, and a deliberative system that maps intuitions into numbers. The theory predicts that estimates of the probabilities of conjunctions should often tend to split the difference between the probabilities of the two conjuncts. We report two experiments showing that individuals commit such violations of the probability calculus, and corroborating other predictions of the theory, e.g., individuals err in the same way even when they make non-numerical verbal estimates, such as that an event is highly improbable. PMID:23056224

  1. The Probabilities of Unique Events

    PubMed Central

    Khemlani, Sangeet S.; Lotstein, Max; Johnson-Laird, Phil

    2012-01-01

    Many theorists argue that the probabilities of unique events, even real possibilities such as President Obama's re-election, are meaningless. As a consequence, psychologists have seldom investigated them. We propose a new theory (implemented in a computer program) in which such estimates depend on an intuitive non-numerical system capable only of simple procedures, and a deliberative system that maps intuitions into numbers. The theory predicts that estimates of the probabilities of conjunctions should often tend to split the difference between the probabilities of the two conjuncts. We report two experiments showing that individuals commit such violations of the probability calculus, and corroborating other predictions of the theory, e.g., individuals err in the same way even when they make non-numerical verbal estimates, such as that an event is highly improbable. PMID:23056224

  2. Permit application modifications

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-01

    This document contains the Permit Application Modifications for the Y-12 Industrial Landfill V site on the Oak Ridge Reservation. These modifications include the assessment of stability of the proposed Landfill V under static and loading conditions. Analyses performed include the general slope stability, veneer stability of the bottom liner and cover system, and a liquefaction potential assessment of the foundation soils.

  3. Environmental Modification: A Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grinnell, Richard M., Jr.; Kyte, Nancy S.

    1975-01-01

    This study shows that environmental modification is a surprisingly intricate technique. This may account for its relatively low use and also for its more frequent use by MSW than non-MSW caseworkers. The findings indicate the need for further research on environmental modification. (Author)

  4. Lifestyle modifications for GDM.

    PubMed

    Dhingra, Atul; Ahuja, Kamlesh

    2016-09-01

    Prevalence of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is increasing worldwide more so in Southeast Asian countries like India and Pakistan. 1 GDM is associated with various adverse foetal and maternal effects. The management of GDM aims at reducing blood glucose to reduce maternal and foetal morbidity and mortality. Various studies have shown that lifestyle modifications are an important tool for reducing blood glucose levels in patients with GDM. Lifestyle modifications consist of dietary modifications and daily physical activity. Dietary modifications aim to achieve glycaemic control by providing adequate calories to the mother and foetus. Exercise is an obvious adjunct to dietary modifications for management of GDM. Therefore the purpose of this review is to summarize the benefits of lifestyle interventions in patients with GDM. PMID:27582149

  5. Some Uniqueness Results for PARAFAC2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ten Berge, Jos M. F.; Kiers, Henk A. L.

    1996-01-01

    Some uniqueness properties are presented for the PARAFAC2 model for covariance matrices, focusing on uniqueness in the rank two case of PARAFAC2. PARAFAC2 is shown to be usually unique with four matrices, but not unique with three unless a certain additional assumption is introduced. (SLD)

  6. CYP1B1: a unique gene with unique characteristics.

    PubMed

    Faiq, Muneeb A; Dada, Rima; Sharma, Reetika; Saluja, Daman; Dada, Tanuj

    2014-01-01

    CYP1B1, a recently described dioxin inducible oxidoreductase, is a member of the cytochrome P450 superfamily involved in the metabolism of estradiol, retinol, benzo[a]pyrene, tamoxifen, melatonin, sterols etc. It plays important roles in numerous physiological processes and is expressed at mRNA level in many tissues and anatomical compartments. CYP1B1 has been implicated in scores of disorders. Analyses of the recent studies suggest that CYP1B1 can serve as a universal/ideal cancer marker and a candidate gene for predictive diagnosis. There is plethora of literature available about certain aspects of CYP1B1 that have not been interpreted, discussed and philosophized upon. The present analysis examines CYP1B1 as a peculiar gene with certain distinctive characteristics like the uniqueness in its chromosomal location, gene structure and organization, involvement in developmentally important disorders, tissue specific, not only expression, but splicing, potential as a universal cancer marker due to its involvement in key aspects of cellular metabolism, use in diagnosis and predictive diagnosis of various diseases and the importance and function of CYP1B1 mRNA in addition to the regular translation. Also CYP1B1 is very difficult to express in heterologous expression systems, thereby, halting its functional studies. Here we review and analyze these exceptional and startling characteristics of CYP1B1 with inputs from our own experiences in order to get a better insight into its molecular biology in health and disease. This may help to further understand the etiopathomechanistic aspects of CYP1B1 mediated diseases paving way for better research strategies and improved clinical management. PMID:25658124

  7. Respiratory infections unique to Asia.

    PubMed

    Tsang, Kenneth W; File, Thomas M

    2008-11-01

    Asia is a highly heterogeneous region with vastly different cultures, social constitutions and populations affected by a wide spectrum of respiratory diseases caused by tropical pathogens. Asian patients with community-acquired pneumonia differ from their Western counterparts in microbiological aetiology, in particular the prominence of Gram-negative organisms, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Burkholderia pseudomallei and Staphylococcus aureus. In addition, the differences in socioeconomic and health-care infrastructures limit the usefulness of Western management guidelines for pneumonia in Asia. The importance of emerging infectious diseases such as severe acute respiratory syndrome and avian influenza infection remain as close concerns for practising respirologists in Asia. Specific infections such as melioidosis, dengue haemorrhagic fever, scrub typhus, leptospirosis, salmonellosis, penicilliosis marneffei, malaria, amoebiasis, paragonimiasis, strongyloidiasis, gnathostomiasis, trinchinellosis, schistosomiasis and echinococcosis occur commonly in Asia and manifest with a prominent respiratory component. Pulmonary eosinophilia, endemic in parts of Asia, could occur with a wide range of tropical infections. Tropical eosinophilia is believed to be a hyper-sensitivity reaction to degenerating microfilariae trapped in the lungs. This article attempts to address the key respiratory issues in these respiratory infections unique to Asia and highlight the important diagnostic and management issues faced by practising respirologists. PMID:18945321

  8. Enzymatic modification of schizophyllan

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An enzymatic method was developed for the progressive modification of the polysaccharide schizophyllan. Fungal strains Hypocrea nigricans NRRL 62555, Penicillium crustosum NRRL 62558, and Penicillium simplicissimum NRRL 62550 were previously identified as novel sources of ß-endoglucanase with specif...

  9. Study Faults Behavior Modification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science News, 1977

    1977-01-01

    Reports on the analysis of 27 behavior modification programs for delinquents. Findings reveal that a low percentage of the programs have followup mechanisms and that the behavior which is modified is often not that which caused the problem. (CP)

  10. Modified Behavior Modification.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vockell, Edward

    1982-01-01

    Argues that major behavior modification techniques can be easily and usefully integrated into a classroom management strategy. Focuses on the need for teachers to consider the internal perceptions of students when employing the techniques. (FL)

  11. Histone Modifications and Cancer.

    PubMed

    Audia, James E; Campbell, Robert M

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARYHistone posttranslational modifications represent a versatile set of epigenetic marks involved not only in dynamic cellular processes, such as transcription and DNA repair, but also in the stable maintenance of repressive chromatin. In this article, we review many of the key and newly identified histone modifications known to be deregulated in cancer and how this impacts function. The latter part of the article addresses the challenges and current status of the epigenetic drug development process as it applies to cancer therapeutics. PMID:27037415

  12. Human Rights and Behavior Modification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roos, Philip

    1974-01-01

    Criticisms of behavior modification, which charge that it violates ethical and legal principles, are discussed and reasons are presented to explain behavior modification's susceptibility to attack. (GW)

  13. Enzymatic modifications of exopolysaccharides enhance bacterial persistence

    PubMed Central

    Whitfield, Gregory B.; Marmont, Lindsey S.; Howell, P. Lynne

    2015-01-01

    Biofilms are surface-attached communities of bacterial cells embedded in a self-produced matrix that are found ubiquitously in nature. The biofilm matrix is composed of various extracellular polymeric substances, which confer advantages to the encapsulated bacteria by protecting them from eradication. The matrix composition varies between species and is dependent on the environmental niche that the bacteria inhabit. Exopolysaccharides (EPS) play a variety of important roles in biofilm formation in numerous bacterial species. The ability of bacteria to thrive in a broad range of environmental settings is reflected in part by the structural diversity of the EPS produced both within individual bacterial strains as well as by different species. This variability is achieved through polymerization of distinct sugar moieties into homo- or hetero-polymers, as well as post-polymerization modification of the polysaccharide. Specific enzymes that are unique to the production of each polymer can transfer or remove non-carbohydrate moieties, or in other cases, epimerize the sugar units. These modifications alter the physicochemical properties of the polymer, which in turn can affect bacterial pathogenicity, virulence, and environmental adaptability. Herein, we review the diversity of modifications that the EPS alginate, the Pel polysaccharide, Vibrio polysaccharide, cepacian, glycosaminoglycans, and poly-N-acetyl-glucosamine undergo during biosynthesis. These are EPS produced by human pathogenic bacteria for which studies have begun to unravel the effect modifications have on their physicochemical and biological properties. The biological advantages these polymer modifications confer to the bacteria that produce them will be discussed. The expanding list of identified modifications will allow future efforts to focus on linking these modifications to specific biosynthetic genes and biofilm phenotypes. PMID:26029200

  14. Modifications of gravity.

    PubMed

    Skordis, Constantinos

    2011-12-28

    General relativity (GR) is a phenomenologically successful theory that rests on firm foundations, but has not been tested on cosmological scales. The deep mystery of dark energy (and possibly even the requirement of cold dark matter (CDM)) has increased the need for testing modifications to GR, as the inference of such otherwise undetected fluids depends crucially on the theory of gravity. Here, I discuss a general scheme for constructing consistent and covariant modifications to the Einstein equations. This framework is such that there is a clear connection between the modification and the underlying field content that produces it. I argue that this is mandatory for distinguishing modifications of gravity from conventional fluids. I give a non-trivial example, a simple metric-based modification of the fluctuation equations for which the background is exact ΛCDM, but differs from it in the perturbations. I show how this can be generalized and solved in terms of two arbitrary functions. Finally, I discuss future prospects and directions of research. PMID:22084286

  15. Readers of PCNA modifications.

    PubMed

    Ulrich, Helle D; Takahashi, Tomio

    2013-08-01

    The eukaryotic sliding clamp, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), acts as a central coordinator of DNA transactions by providing a multivalent interaction surface for factors involved in DNA replication, repair, chromatin dynamics and cell cycle regulation. Posttranslational modifications (PTMs), such as mono- and polyubiquitylation, sumoylation, phosphorylation and acetylation, further expand the repertoire of PCNA's binding partners. These modifications affect PCNA's activity in the bypass of lesions during DNA replication, the regulation of alternative damage processing pathways such as homologous recombination and DNA interstrand cross-link repair, or impact on the stability of PCNA itself. In this review, we summarise our current knowledge about how the PTMs are "read" by downstream effector proteins that mediate the appropriate action. Given the variety of interaction partners responding to PCNA's modified forms, the ensemble of PCNA modifications serves as an instructive model for the study of biological signalling through PTMs in general. PMID:23580141

  16. Inorganic Surface Modification of Nonwoven Polymeric Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halbur, Jonathan Chandler

    In this study, atomic layer deposition (ALD), a vapor phase inorganic thin film deposition technique, is used to modify the surface of a range of industrially relevant polymers to enhance surface properties or impart additional functionalities. Several unique demonstrations of polymer surface modification are presented including uniform nanomaterial photodeposition to the surface of nonowoven fabrics and the first application of photocatalytic thin film coated nonwovens for advanced filtration of heavy metals from solution. Recent advances in polymer synthesis and processing technologies have resulted in the production of novel polymer systems with unique chemistries and sub-micron scale dimensions. As a result, advanced fiber systems have received much attention for potential use in a wide range of industrially and medically important applications such as advanced and selective filtration, catalysis, flexible electronics, and tissue engineering. However, tailoring the surface properties of the polymer is still needed in order to realize the full range of advanced applications, which can be difficult given the high complexity and non-uniformity of nonwoven polymeric structures. Uniform and controllable inorganic surface modification of nonwovens allows the introduction or modification of many crucial polymer properties with a wide range of application methods.

  17. Utilization of waste tires employing novel surface-modification technology

    SciTech Connect

    Bauman, B.D. )

    1989-01-01

    Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. is developing unique technology for the recycle of scrap tires. The approach involves surface-modification of ground tire rubber particles to facilitate their incorporation into novel composites. This form of recycling represents the highest value-added and greatest energy conservation potential of all tire recycle technologies. Furthermore, it is environmentally innocuous. Research and development of this unique technology is partially funded through a cost-shared contract with the US Department of Energy. 4 figs.

  18. Unique modification of adenine in genomic DNA of the marine cyanobacterium Trichodesmium sp. strain NIBB 1067.

    PubMed Central

    Zehr, J P; Ohki, K; Fujita, Y; Landry, D

    1991-01-01

    The genomic DNA of the marine nonheterocystous nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium Trichodesmium sp. strain NIBB 1067 was found to be highly resistant to DNA restriction endonucleases. The DNA was digested extensively by the restriction enzyme DpnI, which requires adenine methylation for activity. The DNA composition, determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), was found to be 69% AT. Surprisingly, it was found that a modified adenine which was not methylated at the usual N6 position was present and made up 4.7 mol% of the nucleosides in Trichodesmium DNA (15 mol% of deoxyadenosine). In order for adenine residues to be modified at this many positions, there must be many modifying enzymes or at least one of the modifying enzymes must have a degenerate recognition site. The reason(s) for this extensive methylation has not yet been determined but may have implications for the ecological success of this microorganism in nature. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2 PMID:1657876

  19. Surface modification of silica nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranjan, Rajesh

    Surface modification of nanosized silica particles by polymer grafting is gaining attention. This can be attributed to the fact that it provides a unique opportunity to engineer the interfacial properties of these modified particles; at the same time the mechanical and thermal properties of the polymers can be improved. Controlled free radical polymerization is a versatile technique which affords control over molecular weight, molecular weight distribution, architecture and functionalities of the resulting polymer. Three commonly used controlled free radical polymerizations include nitroxide-mediated polymerization (NMP), atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) and reversible addition fragmentation transfer (RAFT) polymerization. ATRP and RAFT polymerization were explored in order to modify the silica surface with well-defined polymer brushes. A novel click-functionalized RAFT chain transfer agent (RAFT CTA) was synthesized which opened up the possibility of using RAFT polymerization and click chemistry together in surface modification. Using this RAFT CTA, the surface of silica nanoparticles was modified with polystyrene and polyacrylamide brushes via the "grafting to" approach. Both tethered polystyrene and polyacrylamide chains were found in the brush regime. The combination of ATRP and click chemistry was also explored for surface modification. A combination of RAFT polymerization and click chemistry was also studied to modify the surface via the "grafting from" approach. Our strategy included the (1) "grafting from" approach for brush formation (2) facile click reaction to immobilize the RAFT agent (3) synthesis of R-supported chain transfer agent and (4) use of the more active trithiocarbonate RAFT agent. Grafting density obtained by this method was significantly higher than reported values in the literature. Polystyrene (PS) grafted silica nanoparticles were also prepared by a tandem process that simultaneously employs reversible addition fragmentation

  20. Personalizing Behavior Modification.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Debra G.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Process reinforcement is proposed as a reinforcement method that is more comfortable, personal, comprehensive, and interactive than traditional behavior modification. Process reinforcement strengthens desired behaviors by engaging learners in a one-on-one examination of how they achieved correct responses and by practicing comfortable eye contact…

  1. Behavior Modification with Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Daniel G.

    1972-01-01

    The author urges wider use of positive reinforcement theories in helping emotionally disturbed and mentally handicapped children. Underlining the influence of environment on behavior, he also notes that behavior modification programs utilize fewer trained personnel more effectively and, like Tennessee's Re-Education Treatment, allow for therapy in…

  2. Instructional Improvement: Behavior Modification.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haring, Norris G.; Hayden, Alice H.

    Sixteen papers are provided. B. F. Skinner discusses the arrangement of contingencies for learning: Lloyd Homme describes behavioral engineering; and Frank Hewett considers behavior modification in special education. Also treated are experimental education by Norris Haring, program evaluation by Arthur Lumsdaine, and administration of special…

  3. Defining Behavior Modification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christoplos, Florence; Valletutti, Peter

    1969-01-01

    Discusses the proposition that: "The educational problem involved in behavior modification, in the evaluationand measurement of learning, is the integration and coordination of three types of information affecting the achievement of specific behavioral goals: (1) information about the child, (2) information about the task, and (3) information…

  4. Toy Modification Note. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vanderheiden, Gregg C.; And Others

    Described are toy modifications which enable handicapped individuals to operate battery-powered toys. A battery interrupter is explained as a device which fits between the batteries in a toy and provides the ability to have a separate on-off switch which can be custom designed to fit a handicapped user's needs. Construction and use of three types…

  5. Behavior Modification: Education's Watergate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carrison, Muriel Paskin

    Several of the theoretical and experimental assumptions relating to behavior modification are examined and criticized: (1) the human mind can only be understood by observing and measuring the functional behavior it causes, (2) performance can be equated with learning, (3) reward systems and token economies improve intrinsic learning, and (4) all…

  6. ASPOD modifications of 1993-1994

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Jennifer J. (Editor); Fogarty, Paul W.; Muller, Matthew; Martucci, Thomas A., III; Williams, Daniel; Rowney, David A.

    1994-01-01

    ASPOD, Autonomous Space Processors for Orbital Debris, provides a unique way of collecting the space debris that has built up over the past 37 years. For the past several years, ASPOD has gone through several different modifications. This year's concentrations were on the solar cutting array, the solar tracker, the earth based main frame/tilt table, the controls for the two robotic arms, and accurate autocad drawings of ASPOD. This final report contains the reports written by the students who worked on the ASPOD project this year.

  7. Teaching and Learning with Individually Unique Exercises

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joerding, Wayne

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the author describes the pedagogical benefits of giving students individually unique homework exercises from an exercise template. Evidence from a test of this approach shows statistically significant improvements in subsequent exam performance by students receiving unique problems compared with students who received traditional…

  8. Constructing Dense Graphs with Unique Hamiltonian Cycles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, Mark A. M.

    2012-01-01

    It is not difficult to construct dense graphs containing Hamiltonian cycles, but it is difficult to generate dense graphs that are guaranteed to contain a unique Hamiltonian cycle. This article presents an algorithm for generating arbitrarily large simple graphs containing "unique" Hamiltonian cycles. These graphs can be turned into dense graphs…

  9. Pectin modifications: a review.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jun; Liu, Wei; Liu, Cheng-Mei; Li, Ti; Liang, Rui-Hong; Luo, Shun-Jing

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, the interest in studying modification of pectin has increased. A number of hydroxyl and carboxyl groups distributed along the backbone as well as a certain amount of neutral sugars presented as side chains make pectin capable of preparing a broad spectrum of derivatives. By forming pectin derivatives, their properties may be modified and some other new functional properties may be created. This article attempts to review the information about various methods used for pectin modification, including substitution (alkylation, amidation, quaternization, thiolation, sulfation, oxidation, etc.), chain elongation (cross-linking and grafting) and depolymerization (chemical, physical, and enzymatic degradation). Characteristics and applications of some pectin derivatives are also presented. In addition, the safety and regulatory status of pectin and its derivatives were reviewed. PMID:24798790

  10. PES fabric plasma modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vatuňa, T.; Špatenka, P.; Píchal, J.; Koller, J.; Aubrecht, L.; Wiener, J.

    2004-03-01

    Polyester ranks the upper position in the world fiber production — nearly 54% of the total production of synthetic fibers. Troubles connected with minimizing of the textile hydrophobicity are usually being solved by the textile fibers’ surface chemical modification, but from ecological point of view modification of fabric with low temperature plasma is superior to classical chemical wet processes. Application of various plasmas for PES treatment has been already described. To compare the effectiveness of different plasma sources we performed a series of experiment both in RF and MW plasmas. For working gas nitrogen, oxygen and their mixtures were employed. Internal plasma control was provided by measurement of optical emission spectra. The hydrophilicity degree was determined by the drop test. Paper discusses optimal conditions of the PES fabric plasma treatment.

  11. In vitro and in vivo modifications of recombinant and human IgG antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hongcheng; Ponniah, Gomathinayagam; Zhang, Hui-Min; Nowak, Christine; Neill, Alyssa; Gonzalez-Lopez, Nidia; Patel, Rekha; Cheng, Guilong; Kita, Adriana Z; Andrien, Bruce

    2014-01-01

    Tremendous knowledge has been gained in the understanding of various modifications of IgG antibodies, driven mainly by the fact that antibodies are one of the most important groups of therapeutic molecules and because of the development of advanced analytical techniques. Recombinant monoclonal antibody (mAb) therapeutics expressed in mammalian cell lines and endogenous IgG molecules secreted by B cells in the human body share some modifications, but each have some unique modifications. Modifications that are common to recombinant mAb and endogenous IgG molecules are considered to pose a lower risk of immunogenicity. On the other hand, modifications that are unique to recombinant mAbs could potentially pose higher risk. The focus of this review is the comparison of frequently observed modifications of recombinant monoclonal antibodies to those of endogenous IgG molecules. PMID:25517300

  12. Latent Variable Models of Need for Uniqueness.

    PubMed

    Tepper, K; Hoyle, R H

    1996-10-01

    The theory of uniqueness has been invoked to explain attitudinal and behavioral nonconformity with respect to peer-group, social-cultural, and statistical norms, as well as the development of a distinctive view of self via seeking novelty goods, adopting new products, acquiring scarce commodities, and amassing material possessions. Present research endeavors in psychology and consumer behavior are inhibited by uncertainty regarding the psychometric properties of the Need for Uniqueness Scale, the primary instrument for measuring individual differences in uniqueness motivation. In an important step toward facilitating research on uniqueness motivation, we used confirmatory factor analysis to evaluate three a priori latent variable models of responses to the Need for Uniqueness Scale. Among the a priori models, an oblique three-factor model best accounted for commonality among items. Exploratory factor analysis followed by estimation of unrestricted three- and four-factor models revealed that a model with a complex pattern of loadings on four modestly correlated factors may best explain the latent structure of the Need for Uniqueness Scale. Additional analyses evaluated the associations among the three a priori factors and an array of individual differences. Results of those analyses indicated the need to distinguish among facets of the uniqueness motive in behavioral research. PMID:26788594

  13. Modification of surfaces and surface layers by non equilibrium processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beamson, G.; Brennan, W. J.; Clark, D. T.; Howard, J.

    1988-01-01

    Methods for using plasma in the synthesis and modification of materials in ways impossible by conventional routes are introduced. The equipment used in these methods is described. The chemical analysis of polymer surfaces undergoing modification by inert gas, hydrogen or oxygen plasmas is shown to give physical information regarding the relative roles of diffusion of active species and direct and radiative energy transfer from the plasma. Surface modification by plasma depositing a new material onto an existing substrate is discussed with particular reference to the deposition of amorphous carbon films. Applications of the unique properties of these films are outlined together with current understanding of these properties based on chemical and physical methods of analysis of both the films and the plasmas producing them. Finally, surface modification by ion beams is briefly illustrated using examples from the electronics and metals industries.

  14. Falls Prevention: Unique to Older Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... Prevention Sleep Problems Stroke Join our e-newsletter! Aging & Health A to Z Falls Prevention Unique to ... difficulties. Optimizing Management of Congestive Heart Failure and COPD Congestive Heart Failure (CHF) Many older people develop ...

  15. Unique Ideas in a New Facility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamby, G. W.

    1977-01-01

    Unique features of a new vocational agriculture department facility in Diamond, Missouri, are described, which include an overhead hoist system, arc welders, storage areas, paint room, and greenhouse. (TA)

  16. Unique Biosignatures in Caves of All Lithologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boston, P. J.; Schubert, K. E.; Gomez, E.; Conrad, P. G.

    2015-10-01

    Unique maze-like microbial communities on cave surfaces on all lithologies all over the world are an excellent candidate biosignatures for life detection missions into caves and other extraterrestrial environments.

  17. Dual modification of biomolecules.

    PubMed

    Maruani, Antoine; Richards, Daniel A; Chudasama, Vijay

    2016-07-14

    With the advent of novel bioorthogonal reactions and "click" chemistry, an increasing number of strategies for the single labelling of proteins and oligonucleotides have emerged. Whilst several methods exist for the site-selective introduction of a single chemical moiety, site-selective and bioorthogonal dual modification of biomolecules remains a challenge. The introduction of multiple modules enables a plethora of permutations and combinations and can generate a variety of bioconjuguates with many potential applications. From de novo approaches on oligomers to the post-translational functionalisation of proteins, this review will highlight the main strategies to dually modify biomolecules. PMID:27278999

  18. Solitons and ionospheric modification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheerin, J. P.; Nicholson, D. R.; Payne, G. L.; Hansen, P. J.; Weatherall, J. C.; Goldman, M. V.

    1982-01-01

    The possibility of Langmuir soliton formation and collapse during ionospheric modification is investigated. Parameters characterizing former facilities, existing facilities, and planned facilities are considered, using a combination of analytical and numerical techniques. At a spatial location corresponding to the exact classical reflection point of the modifier wave, the Langmuir wave evolution is found to be dominated by modulational instability followed by soliton formation and three-dimensional collapse. The earth's magnetic field is found to affect the shape of the collapsing soliton. These results provide an alternative explanation for some recent observations.

  19. Modularity, comparative cognition and human uniqueness

    PubMed Central

    Shettleworth, Sara J.

    2012-01-01

    Darwin's claim ‘that the difference in mind between man and the higher animals … is certainly one of degree and not of kind’ is at the core of the comparative study of cognition. Recent research provides unprecedented support for Darwin's claim as well as new reasons to question it, stimulating new theories of human cognitive uniqueness. This article compares and evaluates approaches to such theories. Some prominent theories propose sweeping domain-general characterizations of the difference in cognitive capabilities and/or mechanisms between adult humans and other animals. Dual-process theories for some cognitive domains propose that adult human cognition shares simple basic processes with that of other animals while additionally including slower-developing and more explicit uniquely human processes. These theories are consistent with a modular account of cognition and the ‘core knowledge’ account of children's cognitive development. A complementary proposal is that human infants have unique social and/or cognitive adaptations for uniquely human learning. A view of human cognitive architecture as a mosaic of unique and species-general modular and domain-general processes together with a focus on uniquely human developmental mechanisms is consistent with modern evolutionary-developmental biology and suggests new questions for comparative research. PMID:22927578

  20. Modularity, comparative cognition and human uniqueness.

    PubMed

    Shettleworth, Sara J

    2012-10-01

    Darwin's claim 'that the difference in mind between man and the higher animals … is certainly one of degree and not of kind' is at the core of the comparative study of cognition. Recent research provides unprecedented support for Darwin's claim as well as new reasons to question it, stimulating new theories of human cognitive uniqueness. This article compares and evaluates approaches to such theories. Some prominent theories propose sweeping domain-general characterizations of the difference in cognitive capabilities and/or mechanisms between adult humans and other animals. Dual-process theories for some cognitive domains propose that adult human cognition shares simple basic processes with that of other animals while additionally including slower-developing and more explicit uniquely human processes. These theories are consistent with a modular account of cognition and the 'core knowledge' account of children's cognitive development. A complementary proposal is that human infants have unique social and/or cognitive adaptations for uniquely human learning. A view of human cognitive architecture as a mosaic of unique and species-general modular and domain-general processes together with a focus on uniquely human developmental mechanisms is consistent with modern evolutionary-developmental biology and suggests new questions for comparative research. PMID:22927578

  1. Unique Gene-Silencing and Structural Properties of 2;#8242;-Fluoro-Modified siRNAs

    SciTech Connect

    Manoharan, Muthiah; Akinc, Akin; Pandey, Rajendra K.; Qin, June; Hadwiger, Philipp; John, Matthias; Mills, Kathy; Charisse, Klaus; Maier, Martin A.; Nechev, Lubomir; Greene, Emily M.; Pallan, Pradeep S.; Rozners, Eriks; Rajeev, Kallanthottathil G.; Egli, Martin

    2015-10-15

    With little or no negative impact on the activity of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), regardless of the number of modifications or the positions within the strand, the 2'-deoxy-2'-fluoro (2'-F) modification is unique. Furthermore, the 2'-F-modified siRNA (see crystal structure) was thermodynamically more stable and more nuclease-resistant than the parent siRNA, and produced no immunostimulatory response.

  2. Chromaticity of unique white in object mode.

    PubMed

    Kevin, A G Smet; Geert, Deconinck; Peter, Hanselaer

    2014-10-20

    The chromaticity of unique white viewed in object mode and under dark adapted conditions was investigated for 3 luminance levels (200, 1000 and 2000 cd/m(2)) using two experimental methods: unique white setting and rating. The results of the two methods were found to agree well. Both showed quite large observer variation and an apparent shift of the average unique white (across observers) towards colder correlated color temperatures as the stimulus luminance was dropped from 2000 cd/m(2) to 200 cd/m(2), although no such trend was observable at the individual observer level. Unique white was shown to encompass a region in color space, mostly located below the blackbody locus at around 6000 K. The low and high color temperature ends of the CIE class A and B white regions tend to respectively over- and slightly underestimate the size of the chromaticity area perceived as white by the dark adapted average observer. However, the agreement along a direction approximately perpendicular to the blackbody locus was quite good. Finally, the unique white ratings were modeled by a bivariate Gaussian function, resulting in a simple empirical metric to predict the degree of neutrality of any object stimulus viewed under dark adapted conditions. PMID:25401616

  3. Enzymatic modification of schizophyllan.

    PubMed

    Leathers, Timothy D; Sutivisedsak, Nongnuch; Nunnally, Melinda S; Price, Neil P J; Stanley, April M

    2015-03-01

    An enzymatic method was developed for the progressive modification of the polysaccharide schizophyllan. Fungal strains Hypocrea nigricans NRRL 62555, Penicillium crustosum NRRL 62558, and Penicillium simplicissimum NRRL 62550 were previously identified as novel sources of β-endoglucanase with specificity towards schizophyllan. Concentrated enzyme preparations from these strains showed specific activities of 1.7-4.3 U β-glucanase/mg protein. Using dilutions of these enzymes in time course digestions, schizophyllan was progressively modified to reduced molecular weight species. Glucose and oligosaccharides were found only in the more complete digestions, and thus modified schizophyllan can be produced quantitatively, without loss, to small molecules. Permethylation analysis confirmed that modified schizophyllan retains the fundamental linkage structure of native schizophyllan. Modified schizophyllan species showed progressively reduced viscosity profiles, and all exhibited pseudoplasticity in response to shear thinning. PMID:25335747

  4. Perioperative period: immunological modifications.

    PubMed

    Cardinale, F; Chinellato, I; Caimmi, S; Peroni, D G; Franceschini, F; Miraglia Del Giudice, M; Bernardini, R

    2011-01-01

    Surgical stress induces complex modifications in the hemodynamic, metabolic, neuro-hormonal and immune response of the individual. The magnitude of these alterations depends on preoperative events leading to surgery, the severity of surgical trauma, and also on post-operative/post-traumatic complications (multiple hit hypothesis). As in other conditions of tissue damage, surgery trauma is followed by an immune-inflammatory response, initiated at the site of injury by the innate immune system, followed by a compensatory anti-inflammatory (or immunosuppressive) response (CARS), involving mainly cells of the adaptive immune system, which predispose the host to septic complications. The up-regulated inflammatory response, together with a profound impairment of macrophage and cell-mediated immunity, appear to be the cause for patients' increased susceptibility in developing subsequent sepsis after major surgery. PMID:22014920

  5. Structural Modification of Nanocrystalline Ceria using Ion Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yanwen; Edmondson, Philip D; Varga, Tamas; Moll, Sandra; Namavar, Fereydoon; Weber, William J

    2011-01-01

    Exceptional size-dependent electronic-ionic conductivity of nanostructured ceria can significantly alter materials properties in chemical, physical, electronic and optical applications. Using energetic ions, we have demonstrated effective modification of interface volume and grain size in nanocrystalline ceria from a few nm up to ~ 25 nm, which is the critical region for controlling size-dependent material property. The unique self-healing response of radiation damage at grain boundaries is applied to control the grain size at nanoscale as a function of ion dose and irradiation temperature. Structural modification by energetic ions is proposed to achieve disirable electronic-ionic conductivity.

  6. Uniquely designed nuclear structures of lower eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Iwamoto, Masaaki; Hiraoka, Yasushi; Haraguchi, Tokuko

    2016-06-01

    The nuclear structures of lower eukaryotes, specifically protists, often vary from those of yeasts and metazoans. Several studies have demonstrated the unique and fascinating features of these nuclear structures, such as a histone-independent condensed chromatin in dinoflagellates and two structurally distinct nuclear pore complexes in ciliates. Despite their unique molecular/structural features, functions required for formation of their cognate molecules/structures are highly conserved. This provides important information about the structure-function relationship of the nuclear structures. In this review, we highlight characteristic nuclear structures found in lower eukaryotes, and discuss their attractiveness as potential biological systems for studying nuclear structures. PMID:26963276

  7. Uniqueness of conserved currents in quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holland, P.

    2003-10-01

    It is proved by a functional method that the conventional expression for the Dirac current is the only conserved 4-vector implied by the Dirac equation that is a function of just the quantum state. The demonstration is extended to derive the unique conserved currents implied by the coupled Maxwell-Dirac equations and the Klein-Gordon equation. The uniqueness of the usual Pauli and Schrödinger currents follows by regarding these as the non-relativistic limits of the Dirac and Klein-Gordon currents, respectively. The existence and properties of further conserved vectors that are not functions of just the state is examined.

  8. Unique forbidden beta decays and neutrino mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dvornický, Rastislav; Šimkovic, Fedor

    2015-10-01

    The measurement of the electron energy spectrum in single β decays close to the endpoint provides a direct determination of the neutrino masses. The most sensitive experiments use β decays with low Q value, e.g. KATRIN (tritium) and MARE (rhenium). We present the theoretical spectral shape of electrons emitted in the first, second, and fourth unique forbidden β decays. Our findings show that the Kurie functions for these unique forbidden β transitions are linear in the limit of massless neutrinos like the Kurie function of the allowed β decay of tritium.

  9. Unique forbidden beta decays and neutrino mass

    SciTech Connect

    Dvornický, Rastislav; Šimkovic, Fedor

    2015-10-28

    The measurement of the electron energy spectrum in single β decays close to the endpoint provides a direct determination of the neutrino masses. The most sensitive experiments use β decays with low Q value, e.g. KATRIN (tritium) and MARE (rhenium). We present the theoretical spectral shape of electrons emitted in the first, second, and fourth unique forbidden β decays. Our findings show that the Kurie functions for these unique forbidden β transitions are linear in the limit of massless neutrinos like the Kurie function of the allowed β decay of tritium.

  10. Synthetic Proteins and Peptides for the Direct Interrogation of α-Synuclein Posttranslational Modifications

    PubMed Central

    Pratt, Matthew R.; Abeywardana, Tharindumala; Marotta, Nicholas P.

    2015-01-01

    α-Synuclein is the aggregation-prone protein associated with Parkinson’s disease (PD) and related neurodegenerative diseases. Complicating both its biological functions and toxic aggregation are a variety of posttranslational modifications. These modifications have the potential to either positively or negatively affect α-synuclein aggregation, raising the possibility that the enzymes that add or remove these modifications could be therapeutic targets in PD. Synthetic protein chemistry is uniquely positioned to generate site-specifically and homogeneously modified proteins for biochemical study. Here, we review the application of synthetic peptides and proteins towards understanding the effects of α-synuclein posttranslational modifications. PMID:26120904

  11. Using Quantum Confinement to Uniquely Identify Devices

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, J.; Bagci, I. E.; Zawawi, M. A. M.; Sexton, J.; Hulbert, N.; Noori, Y. J.; Young, M. P.; Woodhead, C. S.; Missous, M.; Migliorato, M. A.; Roedig, U.; Young, R. J.

    2015-01-01

    Modern technology unintentionally provides resources that enable the trust of everyday interactions to be undermined. Some authentication schemes address this issue using devices that give a unique output in response to a challenge. These signatures are generated by hard-to-predict physical responses derived from structural characteristics, which lend themselves to two different architectures, known as unique objects (UNOs) and physically unclonable functions (PUFs). The classical design of UNOs and PUFs limits their size and, in some cases, their security. Here we show that quantum confinement lends itself to the provision of unique identities at the nanoscale, by using fluctuations in tunnelling measurements through quantum wells in resonant tunnelling diodes (RTDs). This provides an uncomplicated measurement of identity without conventional resource limitations whilst providing robust security. The confined energy levels are highly sensitive to the specific nanostructure within each RTD, resulting in a distinct tunnelling spectrum for every device, as they contain a unique and unpredictable structure that is presently impossible to clone. This new class of authentication device operates with minimal resources in simple electronic structures above room temperature. PMID:26553435

  12. Unraveling the evolution of uniquely human cognition.

    PubMed

    MacLean, Evan L

    2016-06-01

    A satisfactory account of human cognitive evolution will explain not only the psychological mechanisms that make our species unique, but also how, when, and why these traits evolved. To date, researchers have made substantial progress toward defining uniquely human aspects of cognition, but considerably less effort has been devoted to questions about the evolutionary processes through which these traits have arisen. In this article, I aim to link these complementary aims by synthesizing recent advances in our understanding of what makes human cognition unique, with theory and data regarding the processes of cognitive evolution. I review evidence that uniquely human cognition depends on synergism between both representational and motivational factors and is unlikely to be accounted for by changes to any singular cognitive system. I argue that, whereas no nonhuman animal possesses the full constellation of traits that define the human mind, homologies and analogies of critical aspects of human psychology can be found in diverse nonhuman taxa. I suggest that phylogenetic approaches to the study of animal cognition-which can address questions about the selective pressures and proximate mechanisms driving cognitive change-have the potential to yield important insights regarding the processes through which the human cognitive phenotype evolved. PMID:27274041

  13. Unique characteristics of Geneva apple rootstocks

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Geneva® apple rootstock breeding program has been operating since the early 1970’s. It is a unique program in that it had access to important germplasm resources that later became the USDA ARS apple collection in Geneva, NY. This genetic diversity allowed for the achievement of one of the proj...

  14. LCA – Unique and Controversial Case Studies

    EPA Science Inventory

    This session will focus on case studies and applications that have a unique or controversial aspect. Some of the most recent topics that seem to have significant interest include: LCA-based product declarations, LCA-based standards, LCA-based labels, alternative energy, agricul...

  15. Helping Homeless People: Unique Challenges and Solutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solomon, Clemmie, Ed.; Jackson-Jobe, Peggy, Ed.

    This publication is designed to provide a practical guide for gaining a detailed awareness and understanding of homelessness. After a foreword by Jesse Jackson, these chapters are included: (1) Introduction: Assessing the Unique Needs of Homeless People (Clemmie Solomon), which discusses the need for helping professionals to commit to addressing…

  16. Marketing the Uniqueness of Small Towns. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunn, Douglas; Hogg, David H.

    The key to marketing a town is determining and promoting the town's "differential advantage" or uniqueness that would make people want to visit or live there. Exercises to help communities gain important insights into the town's competitive edge include a brainstorming session with knowledgeable community members, a visitor questionnaire, a…

  17. Some Unique Causes of Black Suicide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spaights, Ernest; Simpson, Gloria

    1986-01-01

    Aspects of suicide unique to blacks are: cultural expectations for males, which include repression of feelings and strict obedience to parents and elders; difficulty identifying with their race; gangs and drug abuse; poverty; and racism. These factors can cause depression, a known factor in suicidal behavior. (Author/ABB)

  18. Using Quantum Confinement to Uniquely Identify Devices.

    PubMed

    Roberts, J; Bagci, I E; Zawawi, M A M; Sexton, J; Hulbert, N; Noori, Y J; Young, M P; Woodhead, C S; Missous, M; Migliorato, M A; Roedig, U; Young, R J

    2015-01-01

    Modern technology unintentionally provides resources that enable the trust of everyday interactions to be undermined. Some authentication schemes address this issue using devices that give a unique output in response to a challenge. These signatures are generated by hard-to-predict physical responses derived from structural characteristics, which lend themselves to two different architectures, known as unique objects (UNOs) and physically unclonable functions (PUFs). The classical design of UNOs and PUFs limits their size and, in some cases, their security. Here we show that quantum confinement lends itself to the provision of unique identities at the nanoscale, by using fluctuations in tunnelling measurements through quantum wells in resonant tunnelling diodes (RTDs). This provides an uncomplicated measurement of identity without conventional resource limitations whilst providing robust security. The confined energy levels are highly sensitive to the specific nanostructure within each RTD, resulting in a distinct tunnelling spectrum for every device, as they contain a unique and unpredictable structure that is presently impossible to clone. This new class of authentication device operates with minimal resources in simple electronic structures above room temperature. PMID:26553435

  19. The Unique American Vision of Childhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ozturk, Mehmet Ali; Debelak, Charles

    2008-01-01

    The present article scrutinizes "the unique American vision of childhood" (UAVC) as a phenomenon undermining high academic expectations and good work ethics, and in turn, contributing to the generally low academic achievement of U.S. students compared to their counterparts in other advanced countries. It starts with a definition of UAVC, followed…

  20. (-)-Botryodiplodin, A Unique Ribose Analog Toxin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many toxins owe their mechanisms of action to being structural analogs of essential metabolites, messengers or structural components. Examples range from tubo-curare to penicillin. Ribose plays a unique role in the metabolism of living organisms, whether prokaryotes or eukaryotes. It and its deri...

  1. Art Libraries: Creating Access to Unique Collections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Falls, Sarah E.

    2009-01-01

    Art libraries face similar issues to other types of libraries during the digital transition but have unique twists driven by the needs of their collections. Art library information seekers may possess a sense of what an art library is: a library, set apart, to support the study of art and art history. For art libraries, it is the collection,…

  2. Unraveling the evolution of uniquely human cognition

    PubMed Central

    MacLean, Evan L.

    2016-01-01

    A satisfactory account of human cognitive evolution will explain not only the psychological mechanisms that make our species unique, but also how, when, and why these traits evolved. To date, researchers have made substantial progress toward defining uniquely human aspects of cognition, but considerably less effort has been devoted to questions about the evolutionary processes through which these traits have arisen. In this article, I aim to link these complementary aims by synthesizing recent advances in our understanding of what makes human cognition unique, with theory and data regarding the processes of cognitive evolution. I review evidence that uniquely human cognition depends on synergism between both representational and motivational factors and is unlikely to be accounted for by changes to any singular cognitive system. I argue that, whereas no nonhuman animal possesses the full constellation of traits that define the human mind, homologies and analogies of critical aspects of human psychology can be found in diverse nonhuman taxa. I suggest that phylogenetic approaches to the study of animal cognition—which can address questions about the selective pressures and proximate mechanisms driving cognitive change—have the potential to yield important insights regarding the processes through which the human cognitive phenotype evolved. PMID:27274041

  3. The Uniqueness of Speech among Motor Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kent, Ray

    2004-01-01

    This paper considers evidence that the speech muscles are unique in their genetic, developmental, functional and phenotypical properties. The literature was reviewed using PubMed, ScienceDirect, ComDisDome and other literature-retrieval systems to identify studies reporting on the craniofacial and laryngeal muscles. Particular emphasis was given…

  4. Unique Discovery Aspects of Utilizing Botanical Sources

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Because of a long tradition of use in humans, botanicals have many unique advantages to offer as sources of natural products with pharmaceutical influence, especially in terms of opportunities for the development of diverse botanical products. This chapter outlines their use in screening programs, ...

  5. Using Quantum Confinement to Uniquely Identify Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, J.; Bagci, I. E.; Zawawi, M. A. M.; Sexton, J.; Hulbert, N.; Noori, Y. J.; Young, M. P.; Woodhead, C. S.; Missous, M.; Migliorato, M. A.; Roedig, U.; Young, R. J.

    2015-11-01

    Modern technology unintentionally provides resources that enable the trust of everyday interactions to be undermined. Some authentication schemes address this issue using devices that give a unique output in response to a challenge. These signatures are generated by hard-to-predict physical responses derived from structural characteristics, which lend themselves to two different architectures, known as unique objects (UNOs) and physically unclonable functions (PUFs). The classical design of UNOs and PUFs limits their size and, in some cases, their security. Here we show that quantum confinement lends itself to the provision of unique identities at the nanoscale, by using fluctuations in tunnelling measurements through quantum wells in resonant tunnelling diodes (RTDs). This provides an uncomplicated measurement of identity without conventional resource limitations whilst providing robust security. The confined energy levels are highly sensitive to the specific nanostructure within each RTD, resulting in a distinct tunnelling spectrum for every device, as they contain a unique and unpredictable structure that is presently impossible to clone. This new class of authentication device operates with minimal resources in simple electronic structures above room temperature.

  6. Static black hole uniqueness and Penrose inequality

    SciTech Connect

    Mizuno, Ryosuke; Shiromizu, Tetsuya; Ohashi, Seiju

    2010-02-15

    Under certain conditions, we offer a new way to prove the uniqueness of the static black hole in higher dimensional asymptotically flat spacetimes. In the proof, the Penrose inequality plays a key role in higher dimensions as well as four dimensions.

  7. A Graduation Stole Uniquely Designed for Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Day, Lawrence H.

    2009-01-01

    In response to student requests, and to help celebrate the graduation of our physics majors, we have designed a graduation stole uniquely befitting physics. The design incorporates the four visible spectral lines of hydrogen--the Balmer series. Since the 2002 debut of the design, all our graduates have proudly worn their physics graduation stoles…

  8. Unique rig fulfills unusual mobility requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-10-01

    This article describes a unique rig designed by SEDCO FOREX operating in the Paris basin of France. Built to drill clusters of wells from a single pad, Rig 47 significantly reduces the time needed to move from well to well on a pad and from location to location.

  9. Readout of Epigenetic Modifications

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Dinshaw J.; Wang, Zhanxin

    2015-01-01

    This review focuses on a structure-based analysis of histone posttranslational modification (PTM) readout, where the PTMs serve as docking sites for reader modules as part of larger complexes displaying chromatin modifier and remodeling activities, with the capacity to alter chromatin architecture and templated processes. Individual topics addressed include the diversity of reader-binding pocket architectures and common principles underlying readout of methyl-lysine and methyl-arginine marks, their unmodified counterparts, as well as acetyl-lysine and phosphoserine marks. The review also discusses the impact of multivalent readout of combinations of PTMs localized at specific genomic sites by linked binding modules on processes ranging from gene transcription to repair. Additional topics include cross talk between histone PTMs, histone mimics, epigenetic-based diseases, and drug-based therapeutic intervention. The review ends by highlighting new initiatives and advances, as well as future challenges, toward the promise of enhancing our structural and mechanistic understanding of the readout of histone PTMs at the nucleosomal level. PMID:23642229

  10. Surface Modification of Intraocular Lenses

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Qi; Cheng, George Pak-Man; Chiu, Kin; Wang, Gui-Qin

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This paper aimed to review the current literature on the surface modification of intraocular lenses (IOLs). Data Sources: All articles about surface modification of IOLs published up to 2015 were identified through a literature search on both PubMed and ScienceDirect. Study Selection: The articles on the surface modification of IOLs were included, but those on design modification and surface coating were excluded. Results: Technology of surface modification included plasma, ion beam, layer-by-layer self-assembly, ultraviolet radiation, and ozone. The main molecules introduced into IOLs surface were poly (ethylene glycol), polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane, 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine, TiO2, heparin, F-heparin, titanium, titanium nitride, vinyl pyrrolidone, and inhibitors of cytokines. The surface modification either resulted in a more hydrophobic lens, a more hydrophilic lens, or a lens with a hydrophilic anterior and hydrophobic posterior surface. Advances in research regarding surface modification of IOLs had led to a better biocompatibility in both in vitro and animal experiments. Conclusion: The surface modification is an efficient, convenient, economic and promising method to improve the biocompatibility of IOLs. PMID:26830993

  11. Body Modification and Suicidal Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hicinbothem, Julie; Gonsalves, Sonia; Lester, David

    2006-01-01

    In a large sample of individuals who belong to a website for body modification, having body modifications (e.g., piercings, tattoos, scarification and surgical procedures) was associated with a higher incidence of prior suicidality (i.e., suicidal ideation and attempted suicide). However, controls for self-reported depression weakened the strength…

  12. Uniqueness of Nash equilibrium in vaccination games.

    PubMed

    Bai, Fan

    2016-12-01

    One crucial condition for the uniqueness of Nash equilibrium set in vaccination games is that the attack ratio monotonically decreases as the vaccine coverage level increasing. We consider several deterministic vaccination models in homogeneous mixing population and in heterogeneous mixing population. Based on the final size relations obtained from the deterministic epidemic models, we prove that the attack ratios can be expressed in terms of the vaccine coverage levels, and also prove that the attack ratios are decreasing functions of vaccine coverage levels. Some thresholds are presented, which depend on the vaccine efficacy. It is proved that for vaccination games in homogeneous mixing population, there is a unique Nash equilibrium for each game. PMID:27465224

  13. User applications unique to mobile satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castiel, David

    As AMSC enters the market with its mobile satellite services, it faces a sophisticated user group that has already experimented with a wide range of communications services, including cellular radio and Ku-band satellite messaging. AMSC's challenge is to define applications unique to the capabilities of its dedicated L band satellite and consistent with the provisions outlined in its FCC license. Through a carefully researched approach to its three main markets (aeronautical, land mobile, and maritime) AMSC is discovering a wellspring of interest in corporate and general aviation, trucking companies, pipeline monitoring and control companies, maritime management firms, telecommunications companies, and government agencies. A general overview is provided of AMSC's FCC license and corporate history, and the specific applications unique to each user group is discussed.

  14. User applications unique to mobile satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castiel, David

    1990-01-01

    As AMSC enters the market with its mobile satellite services, it faces a sophisticated user group that has already experimented with a wide range of communications services, including cellular radio and Ku-band satellite messaging. AMSC's challenge is to define applications unique to the capabilities of its dedicated L band satellite and consistent with the provisions outlined in its FCC license. Through a carefully researched approach to its three main markets (aeronautical, land mobile, and maritime) AMSC is discovering a wellspring of interest in corporate and general aviation, trucking companies, pipeline monitoring and control companies, maritime management firms, telecommunications companies, and government agencies. A general overview is provided of AMSC's FCC license and corporate history, and the specific applications unique to each user group is discussed.

  15. Metalworking Techniques Unlock a Unique Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2015-01-01

    Approached by West Hartford, Connecticut-based Abbot Ball Company, Glenn Research Center agreed to test an intriguing alloy called Nitinol 60 that had been largely unused for a half century. Using powdered metallurgy, the partners developed a method for manufacturing and working with the material, which Abbott Ball has now commercialized. Nitinol 60 provides a unique combination of qualities that make it an excellent material for ball bearings, among other applications.

  16. 77 FR 40735 - Unique Device Identification System

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-10

    ...The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is proposing to establish a unique device identification system to implement the requirement added to the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (FD&C Act) by section 226 of the Food and Drug Administration Amendments Act of 2007 (FDAAA), Section 226 of FDAAA amended the FD&C Act to add new section 519(f), which directs FDA to promulgate regulations......

  17. Carbon nanotube modification of microbial fuel cell electrodes.

    PubMed

    Yazdi, Alireza Ahmadian; D'Angelo, Lorenzo; Omer, Nada; Windiasti, Gracia; Lu, Xiaonan; Xu, Jie

    2016-11-15

    The use of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) for energy harvesting devices is preferable due to their unique mechanical, thermal, and electrical properties. On the other hand, microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are promising devices to recover carbon-neutral energy from the organic matters, and have been hindered with major setbacks towards commercialization. Nanoengineered CNT-based materials show remarkable electrochemical properties, and therefore have provided routes towards highly effective modification of MFC compartments to ultimately reach the theoretical limits of biomass energy recovery, low-cost power production, and thus the commercialization of MFCs. Moreover, these CNT-based composites offer significant flexibility in the design of MFCs that enable their use for a broad spectrum of applications ranging from scaled-up power generation to medically related devices. This article reviews the recent advances in the modification of MFCs using CNTs and CNT-based composites, and the extent to which each modification route impacts MFC power and current generation. PMID:27213269

  18. Unique Aspects of Herbal Whole System Research

    PubMed Central

    Zick, Suzanna M.; Schwabl, Herbert; Flower, Andrew; Lac, Dip; Chakraborty, Bibhas; Hirschkorn, Kristine

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Whole systems of healthcare offer unique methodological and theoretical challenges for researchers. Herbalism has its own set of methodological and philosophical research issues, which are beyond those presented for whole system research, in general. Methods An International Society for Complementary Medicine Research (ISCMR) workshop was presented on, “Challenges in Herbal Whole Systems Research”. Starting from a definition of herbalism the most important challenges to herbal whole system research (HWSR) were elicited with inputs from both the workshop presenters and the audience. Results Five major challenges unique to herbal whole systems research were identified: (1) Defining herbalists and herbalism; (2) role of natural products industry in herbal research; (3) designing placebos and delivering active herbal treatments as are given by herbalists; (4) researching the herb as a living entity; and (5) designing trials to investigate and develop multi-component herbal therapies. Conclusions To design studies of herbalism requires unique methods and theoretical frameworks. Solutions to these methodological challenges need to be addressed to conduct research that examines herbal systems of medicine versus conducting trials on individual herbs given out of their original therapeutic context. PMID:19272580

  19. Existence, uniqueness and stability of positive periodic solution for a nonlinear prey-competition model with delays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Fengde; Xie, Xiangdong; Shi, Jinlin

    2006-10-01

    A nonlinear periodic predator-prey model with m-preys and (n-m)-predators and delays is proposed in this paper, which can be seen as the modification of the traditional Lotka-Volterra prey-competition model. Sufficient conditions which guarantee the existence of a unique globally attractive positive periodic solution of the system are obtained.

  20. Structural modifications of nucleosides in ionic liquids

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Vineet; Parmar, Virinder S.; Malhotra, Sanjay V.

    2011-01-01

    Nucleoside chemistry represents an important research area for drug discovery, as many nucleoside analogs are prominent drugs and have been widely applied for cancer and viral chemotherapy. However, the synthesis of modified nucleosides presents a major challenge, which is further aggravated by poor solubility of these compounds in common organic solvents. Most of the currently available methods for nucleoside modification employ toxic high boiling solvents; require long reaction time and tedious workup methods. As such, there is constant effort to develop process chemistry in alternative medium to limit the use of organic solvents that are hazardous to the environment and can be deleterious to human health. One such approach is to use ionic liquids, which are ‘designer materials’ with unique and tunable physico-chemical properties. Studies have shown that methodologies using ionic liquids are highly efficient and convenient for the synthesis of nucleoside analogs, as demonstrated by the preparation of pharmaceutically important anti-viral drugs. This article summarizes recent efforts on nucleoside modification using ionic liquids. PMID:20178825

  1. Unique biochemical and mineral composition of whale ear bones.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sora L; Thewissen, J G M; Churchill, Morgan M; Suydam, Robert S; Ketten, Darlene R; Clementz, Mark T

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Cetaceans are obligate aquatic mammals derived from terrestrial artiodactyls. The defining characteristic of cetaceans is a thick and dense lip (pachyosteosclerotic involucrum) of an ear bone (the tympanic). This unique feature is absent in modern terrestrial artiodactyls and is suggested to be important in underwater hearing. Here, we investigate the mineralogical and biochemical properties of the involucrum, as these may hold clues to the aquatic adaptations of cetaceans. We compared bioapatites (enamel, dentine, cementum, and skeletal bone) of cetaceans with those of terrestrial artiodactyls and pachyosteosclerotic ribs of manatees (Sirenia). We investigated organic, carbonate, and mineral composition as well as crystal size and crystallinity index. In all studied variables, bioapatites of the cetacean involucrum were intermediate in composition and structure between those of tooth enamel on the one hand and those of dentine, cementum, and skeletal bone on the other. We also studied the amino acid composition of the cetacean involucrum relative to that of other skeletal bone. The central involucrum had low glycine and hydroxyproline concentrations but high concentrations of nonessential amino acids, unlike most bone samples but similar to the tympanic of hippos and the (pachyosteosclerotic) ribs of manatees. These amino acid results are evidence of rapid bone development. We hypothesize that the mineralogical and amino acid composition of cetacean bullae differs from that of other bone because of (1) functional modifications for underwater sound reception and (2) structural adaptations related to rapid ossification. PMID:24940922

  2. A neuronal morphologic type unique to humans and great apes

    PubMed Central

    Nimchinsky, Esther A.; Gilissen, Emmanuel; Allman, John M.; Perl, Daniel P.; Erwin, Joseph M.; Hof, Patrick R.

    1999-01-01

    We report the existence and distribution of an unusual type of projection neuron, a large, spindle-shaped cell, in layer Vb of the anterior cingulate cortex of pongids and hominids. These spindle cells were not observed in any other primate species or any other mammalian taxa, and their volume was correlated with brain volume residuals, a measure of encephalization in higher primates. These observations are of particular interest when considering primate neocortical evolution, as they reveal possible adaptive changes and functional modifications over the last 15–20 million years in the anterior cingulate cortex, a region that plays a major role in the regulation of many aspects of autonomic function and of certain cognitive processes. That in humans these unique neurons have been shown previously to be severely affected in the degenerative process of Alzheimer’s disease suggests that some of the differential neuronal susceptibility that occurs in the human brain in the course of age-related dementing illnesses may have appeared only recently during primate evolution. PMID:10220455

  3. The Parisi Formula has a Unique Minimizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auffinger, Antonio; Chen, Wei-Kuo

    2015-05-01

    In 1979, Parisi (Phys Rev Lett 43:1754-1756, 1979) predicted a variational formula for the thermodynamic limit of the free energy in the Sherrington-Kirkpatrick model, and described the role played by its minimizer. This formula was verified in the seminal work of Talagrand (Ann Math 163(1):221-263, 2006) and later generalized to the mixed p-spin models by Panchenko (Ann Probab 42(3):946-958, 2014). In this paper, we prove that the minimizer in Parisi's formula is unique at any temperature and external field by establishing the strict convexity of the Parisi functional.

  4. Event Segmentation Ability Uniquely Predicts Event Memory

    PubMed Central

    Sargent, Jesse Q.; Zacks, Jeffrey M.; Hambrick, David Z.; Zacks, Rose T.; Kurby, Christopher A.; Bailey, Heather R.; Eisenberg, Michelle L.; Beck, Taylor M.

    2013-01-01

    Memory for everyday events plays a central role in tasks of daily living, autobiographical memory, and planning. Event memory depends in part on segmenting ongoing activity into meaningful units. This study examined the relationship between event segmentation and memory in a lifespan sample to answer the following question: Is the ability to segment activity into meaningful events a unique predictor of subsequent memory, or is the relationship between event perception and memory accounted for by general cognitive abilities? Two hundred and eight adults ranging from 20 to 79 years old segmented movies of everyday events and attempted to remember the events afterwards. They also completed psychometric ability tests and tests measuring script knowledge for everyday events. Event segmentation and script knowledge both explained unique variance in event memory above and beyond the psychometric measures, and did so as strongly in older as in younger adults. These results suggest that event segmentation is a basic cognitive mechanism, important for memory across the lifespan. PMID:23942350

  5. Young children's preference for unique owned objects.

    PubMed

    Gelman, Susan A; Davidson, Natalie S

    2016-10-01

    An important aspect of human thought is the value we place on unique individuals. Adults place higher value on authentic works of art than exact replicas, and young children at times value their original possessions over exact duplicates. What is the scope of this preference in early childhood, and when do children understand its subjective nature? On a series of trials, we asked three-year-olds (N=36) to choose between two toys for either themselves or the researcher: an old (visibly used) toy vs. a new (more attractive) toy matched in type and appearance (e.g., old vs. brand-new blanket). Focal pairs contrasted the child's own toy with a matched new object; Control pairs contrasted toys the child had never seen before. Children preferred the old toys for Focal pairs only, and treated their own preferences as not shared by the researcher. By 3years of age, young children place special value on unique individuals, and understand the subjective nature of that value. PMID:27395441

  6. What makes Xanthomonas albilineans unique amongst xanthomonads?

    PubMed

    Pieretti, Isabelle; Pesic, Alexander; Petras, Daniel; Royer, Monique; Süssmuth, Roderich D; Cociancich, Stéphane

    2015-01-01

    Xanthomonas albilineans causes leaf scald, a lethal disease of sugarcane. Compared to other species of Xanthomonas, X. albilineans exhibits distinctive pathogenic mechanisms, ecology and taxonomy. Its genome, which has experienced significant erosion, has unique genomic features. It lacks two loci required for pathogenicity in other plant pathogenic species of Xanthomonas: the xanthan gum biosynthesis and the Hrp-T3SS (hypersensitive response and pathogenicity-type three secretion system) gene clusters. Instead, X. albilineans harbors in its genome an SPI-1 (Salmonella pathogenicity island-1) T3SS gene cluster usually found in animal pathogens. X. albilineans produces a potent DNA gyrase inhibitor called albicidin, which blocks chloroplast differentiation, resulting in the characteristic white foliar stripe symptoms. The antibacterial activity of albicidin also confers on X. albilineans a competitive advantage against rival bacteria during sugarcane colonization. Recent chemical studies have uncovered the unique structure of albicidin and allowed us to partially elucidate its fascinating biosynthesis apparatus, which involves an enigmatic hybrid PKS/NRPS (polyketide synthase/non-ribosomal peptide synthetase) machinery. PMID:25964795

  7. Unmanned Aerial Vehicles unique cost estimating requirements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malone, P.; Apgar, H.; Stukes, S.; Sterk, S.

    Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs), also referred to as drones, are aerial platforms that fly without a human pilot onboard. UAVs are controlled autonomously by a computer in the vehicle or under the remote control of a pilot stationed at a fixed ground location. There are a wide variety of drone shapes, sizes, configurations, complexities, and characteristics. Use of these devices by the Department of Defense (DoD), NASA, civil and commercial organizations continues to grow. UAVs are commonly used for intelligence, surveillance, reconnaissance (ISR). They are also use for combat operations, and civil applications, such as firefighting, non-military security work, surveillance of infrastructure (e.g. pipelines, power lines and country borders). UAVs are often preferred for missions that require sustained persistence (over 4 hours in duration), or are “ too dangerous, dull or dirty” for manned aircraft. Moreover, they can offer significant acquisition and operations cost savings over traditional manned aircraft. Because of these unique characteristics and missions, UAV estimates require some unique estimating methods. This paper describes a framework for estimating UAV systems total ownership cost including hardware components, software design, and operations. The challenge of collecting data, testing the sensitivities of cost drivers, and creating cost estimating relationships (CERs) for each key work breakdown structure (WBS) element is discussed. The autonomous operation of UAVs is especially challenging from a software perspective.

  8. Astronomy Outreach for Large and Unique Audiences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubowich, D.; Sparks, R. T.; Pompea, S. M.; Kendall, J. S.; Dugan, C.

    2013-04-01

    In this session, we discuss different approaches to reaching large audiences. In addition to star parties and astronomy events, the audiences for some of the events include music concerts or festivals, sick children and their families, minority communities, American Indian reservations, and tourist sites such as the National Mall. The goal is to bring science directly to the public—to people who attend astronomy events and to people who do not come to star parties, science museums, or science festivals. These programs allow the entire community to participate in astronomy activities to enhance the public appreciation of science. These programs attract large enthusiastic crowds often with young children participating in these family learning experiences. The public will become more informed, educated, and inspired about astronomy and will also be provided with information that will allow them to continue to learn after this outreach activity. Large and unique audiences often have common problems, and their solutions and the lessons learned will be presented. Interaction with the participants in this session will provide important community feedback used to improve astronomy outreach for large and unique audiences. New ways to expand astronomy outreach to new large audiences will be discussed.

  9. Unique topographic distribution of greyhound nonsuppurative meningoencephalitis.

    PubMed

    Terzo, Eloisa; McConnell, J Fraser; Shiel, Robert E; McAllister, Hester; Behr, Sebastien; Priestnall, Simon L; Smith, Ken C; Nolan, Catherine M; Callanan, John J

    2012-01-01

    Greyhound nonsuppurative meningoencephalitis is an idiopathic breed-associated fatal meningoencephalitis with lesions usually occurring within the rostral cerebrum. This disorder can only be confirmed by postmortem examination, with a diagnosis based upon the unique topography of inflammatory lesions. Our purpose was to describe the magnetic resonance (MR) imaging features of this disease. Four Greyhounds with confirmed Greyhound nonsuppurative meningoencephalitis were evaluated by MR imaging. Lesions predominantly affected the olfactory lobes and bulbs, frontal, and frontotemporal cortical gray matter, and caudate nuclei bilaterally. Fluid attenuation inversion recovery (FLAIR) and T2 weighted spin-echo (T2W) sequences were most useful to assess the nature, severity, extension, and topographic pattern of lesions. Lesions were predominantly T2-hyperintense and T1-isointense with minimal or absent contrast enhancement. PMID:22742427

  10. Split liver transplantation: What’s unique?

    PubMed Central

    Dalal, Aparna R

    2015-01-01

    The intraoperative management of split liver transplantation (SLT) has some unique features as compared to routine whole liver transplantations. Only the liver has this special ability to regenerate that confers benefits in survival and quality of life for two instead of one by splitting livers. Primary graft dysfunction may result from small for size syndrome. Graft weight to recipient body weight ratio is significant for both trisegmental and hemiliver grafts. Intraoperative surgical techniques aim to reduce portal hyperperfusion and decrease venous portal pressure. Ischemic preconditioning can be instituted to protect against ischemic reperfusion injury which impacts graft regeneration. Advancement of the technique of SLT is essential as use of split cadaveric grafts expands the donor pool and potentially has an excellent future. PMID:26421261

  11. Imaging concerns unique to twin pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Mahalingam, Sowmya; Dighe, Manjiri

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of multiple gestations is increasing with rising maternal age and the utilization of artificial reproductive techniques. Twinning confers an increased risk to the pregnancy, with higher incidence of structural anomalies, preterm delivery, and perinatal morbidity and mortality. Certain conditions are unique to twin pregnancy, such as the twin-to-twin transfusion syndrome and the acardiac twin, secondary to vascular sharing between both the fetuses. Conjoined twinning is a phenomenon occurring because of late splitting of the zygote. Advances in imaging have increased our ability to manage multiple pregnancies with accurate prenatal diagnosis, better antenatal surveillance, and novel image-guided procedures. The purpose of this article is to provide an overview of the twinning process, including the pathophysiology, diagnostic pearls, and dilemmas and to briefly outline the outcomes and available treatment options to assist the radiologist in better management of multiple gestations. PMID:25239076

  12. Organizing the spatially and temporally unique hydrosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berghuijs, Wouter

    2016-04-01

    Growing anthropogenic activity is quickly changing the hydrosphere. Panta Rhei calls for improved understanding of changing hydrosphere dynamics in their connection with human systems. I argue that progress within the Panta Rhei initiative is strongly limited by the absence of hydrological principles that help to organise our spatially and temporally unique hydrosphere; without guiding principles (e.g. classification systems) hydrology will continue to be a case study dominated science that will have a hard time to efficiently improve understanding, estimation and prediction of human affected systems. Exposing such organising principles should not be considered as a step backwards into the recent PUB decade. Instead, it should be regarded as an exciting scientific challenge that is becoming increasingly relevant now the hydrosphere is quickly changing.

  13. The unique ethics of sports medicine.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Rob

    2004-04-01

    The ethical code by which physicians traditionally conduct themselves is based on the relationship between the physician and the patient: both work toward the goal of improving or maintaining health. Constraints on this relationship may be behaviors of patient choice (tobacco use, excessive alcohol use, sedentary behavior, and so on). The athlete-physician relationship is ethically different. Influences such as the physician's employer, the athlete's desire to play with pain and injury, and the economic consequences of playing or not complicate medical decisions. This perspective suggests something different and even unique about the ethics of the sports medicine practitioner. This article explores the differences fostering the ethical tight ropes that sports physicians walk in their sports medicine practices. PMID:15183565

  14. Unique Crystallization of Fullerenes: Fullerene Flowers

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jungah; Park, Chibeom; Song, Intek; Lee, Minkyung; Kim, Hyungki; Choi, Hee Cheul

    2016-01-01

    Solution-phase crystallization of fullerene molecules strongly depends on the types of solvent and their ratios because solvent molecules are easily included in the crystal lattice and distort its structure. The C70 (solute)–mesitylene (solvent) system yields crystals with various morphologies and structures, such as cubes, tubes, and imperfect rods. Herein, using C60 and C70 dissolved in mesitylene, we present a novel way to grow unique flower-shaped crystals with six symmetric petals. The different solubility of C60 and C70 in mesitylene promotes nucleation of C70 with sixfold symmetry in the early stage, which is followed by co-crystallization of both C60 and C70 molecules, leading to lateral petal growth. Based on the growth mechanism, we obtained more complex fullerene crystals, such as multi-deck flowers and tube-flower complexes, by changing the sequence and parameters of crystallization. PMID:27561446

  15. Unique metabolites protect earthworms against plant polyphenols

    PubMed Central

    Liebeke, Manuel; Strittmatter, Nicole; Fearn, Sarah; Morgan, A. John; Kille, Peter; Fuchser, Jens; Wallis, David; Palchykov, Vitalii; Robertson, Jeremy; Lahive, Elma; Spurgeon, David J.; McPhail, David; Takáts, Zoltán; Bundy, Jacob G.

    2015-01-01

    All higher plants produce polyphenols, for defence against above-ground herbivory. These polyphenols also influence the soil micro- and macro-fauna that break down plant leaf litter. Polyphenols therefore indirectly affect the fluxes of soil nutrients and, ultimately, carbon turnover and ecosystem functioning in soils. It is unknown how earthworms, the major component of animal biomass in many soils, cope with high-polyphenol diets. Here, we show that earthworms possess a class of unique surface-active metabolites in their gut, which we term ‘drilodefensins'. These compounds counteract the inhibitory effects of polyphenols on earthworm gut enzymes, and high-polyphenol diets increase drilodefensin concentrations in both laboratory and field populations. This shows that drilodefensins protect earthworms from the harmful effects of ingested polyphenols. We have identified the key mechanism for adaptation to a dietary challenge in an animal group that has a major role in organic matter recycling in soils worldwide. PMID:26241769

  16. The Unique American Vision of Childhood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozturk, Mehmet Ali; Debelak, Charles

    2008-01-01

    The present article scrutinizes "the unique American vision of childhood" (UAVC) as a phenomenon undermining high academic expectations and good work ethics, and in turn, contributing to the generally low academic achievement of U.S. students compared to their counterparts in other advanced countries. It starts with a definition of UAVC, followed by a discussion of how influential it has been. The article goes on to state three reasons why UAVC is troublesome and misleading, especially in an era of global competition. Excuses devised by the proponents for UAVC's adverse effects are also revealed. The article ends with recommendations for future research and a conclusion elaborating on the consequences of UAVC and the likelihood that other countries might adopt a similar mentality.

  17. Unique metabolites protect earthworms against plant polyphenols.

    PubMed

    Liebeke, Manuel; Strittmatter, Nicole; Fearn, Sarah; Morgan, A John; Kille, Peter; Fuchser, Jens; Wallis, David; Palchykov, Vitalii; Robertson, Jeremy; Lahive, Elma; Spurgeon, David J; McPhail, David; Takáts, Zoltán; Bundy, Jacob G

    2015-01-01

    All higher plants produce polyphenols, for defence against above-ground herbivory. These polyphenols also influence the soil micro- and macro-fauna that break down plant leaf litter. Polyphenols therefore indirectly affect the fluxes of soil nutrients and, ultimately, carbon turnover and ecosystem functioning in soils. It is unknown how earthworms, the major component of animal biomass in many soils, cope with high-polyphenol diets. Here, we show that earthworms possess a class of unique surface-active metabolites in their gut, which we term 'drilodefensins'. These compounds counteract the inhibitory effects of polyphenols on earthworm gut enzymes, and high-polyphenol diets increase drilodefensin concentrations in both laboratory and field populations. This shows that drilodefensins protect earthworms from the harmful effects of ingested polyphenols. We have identified the key mechanism for adaptation to a dietary challenge in an animal group that has a major role in organic matter recycling in soils worldwide. PMID:26241769

  18. Unique Crystallization of Fullerenes: Fullerene Flowers.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jungah; Park, Chibeom; Song, Intek; Lee, Minkyung; Kim, Hyungki; Choi, Hee Cheul

    2016-01-01

    Solution-phase crystallization of fullerene molecules strongly depends on the types of solvent and their ratios because solvent molecules are easily included in the crystal lattice and distort its structure. The C70 (solute)-mesitylene (solvent) system yields crystals with various morphologies and structures, such as cubes, tubes, and imperfect rods. Herein, using C60 and C70 dissolved in mesitylene, we present a novel way to grow unique flower-shaped crystals with six symmetric petals. The different solubility of C60 and C70 in mesitylene promotes nucleation of C70 with sixfold symmetry in the early stage, which is followed by co-crystallization of both C60 and C70 molecules, leading to lateral petal growth. Based on the growth mechanism, we obtained more complex fullerene crystals, such as multi-deck flowers and tube-flower complexes, by changing the sequence and parameters of crystallization. PMID:27561446

  19. A unique element resembling a processed pseudogene.

    PubMed

    Robins, A J; Wang, S W; Smith, T F; Wells, J R

    1986-01-01

    We describe a unique DNA element with structural features of a processed pseudogene but with important differences. It is located within an 8.4-kilobase pair region of chicken DNA containing five histone genes, but it is not related to these genes. The presence of terminal repeats, an open reading frame (and stop codon), polyadenylation/processing signal, and a poly(A) rich region about 20 bases 3' to this, together with a lack of 5' promoter motifs all suggest a processed pseudogene. However, no parent gene can be detected in the genome by Southern blotting experiments and, in addition, codon boundary values and mid-base correlations are not consistent with a protein coding region of a eukaryotic gene. The element was detected in DNA from different chickens and in peafowl, but not in quail, pheasant, or turkey. PMID:3941070

  20. ARAC: A unique command and control resource

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, M.M.; Baskett, R.L.; Ellis, J.S.

    1996-04-01

    The Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is a centralized federal facility designed to provide real-time, world-wide support to military and civilian command and control centers by predicting the impacts of inadvertent or intentional releases of nuclear, biological, or chemical materials into the atmosphere. ARAC is a complete response system consisting of highly trained and experienced personnel, continually updated computer models, redundant data collection systems, and centralized and remote computer systems. With over 20 years of experience responding to domestic and international incidents, strong linkages with the Department of Defense, and the ability to conduct classified operations, ARAC is a unique command and control resource.

  1. Mushrooms—Biologically Distinct and Nutritionally Unique

    PubMed Central

    Feeney, Mary Jo; Miller, Amy Myrdal; Roupas, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Mushrooms are fungi, biologically distinct from plant- and animal-derived foods (fruits, vegetables, grains, dairy, protein [meat, fish, poultry, legumes, nuts, and seeds]) that comprise the US Department of Agriculture food patterns operationalized by consumer-focused MyPlate messages. Although mushrooms provide nutrients found in these food groups, they also have a unique nutrient profile. Classified into food grouping systems by their use as a vegetable, mushrooms’ increasing use in main entrées in plant-based diets is growing, supporting consumers’ efforts to follow dietary guidance recommendations. Mushrooms’ nutrient and culinary characteristics suggest it may be time to reevaluate food groupings and health benefits in the context of 3 separate food kingdoms: plants/botany, animals/zoology, and fungi/mycology. PMID:25435595

  2. Wafer dicing utilizing unique beam shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lizotte, Todd; Ohar, Orest

    2007-09-01

    Laser dicing of wafers is of keen interest to the semiconductor and LED industry. Devices such as ASICs, Ultra-thin Wafer Scale Packages and LEDS are unique in that they typically are formed from various materials in a multilayered structure. Many of these layers include active device materials, passivation coatings, conductors and dielectric films all deposited on top of a bulk wafer substrate and all potentially having differing ablation thresholds. These composite multi-layered structures require high finesse laser processes to ensure yields, cut quality and low process cost. Such processes have become very complex over the years as new devices have become miniaturized, requiring smaller kerf sizes. Of critical concern is the need to minimize substrate micro-cracking or lift off of upper layers along the dicing streets which directly corresponds to bulk device strength and device operational integrity over its projected lifetime. Laser processes involving the sequential use of single or multiple diode pumped solid state (DPSS) lasers, such as UV DPSS (355nn, 266nm, 532 nm), VIS DPSS (~532 nm) and IR DPSS (1064nm, 1070nm) as well as (UV, VIS, NIR, FIR and Eye Safe Wavelengths) DPFL (Diode Pumped Fiber Lasers) lasers to penetrate various and differing material layers and substrates including Silicon Carbide (SiC), Silicon, GaAs and Sapphire. Development of beam shaping optics with the purpose of permitting two or more differing energy densities within a single focused or imaged beam spot would provide opportunities for pre-processing or pre-scribing of thinner cover layers, while following through with a higher energy density segment to cut through the bulk base substrates. This paper will describe the development of beam shaping optical elements with unique beam shapes that could benefit dicing and patterning of delicate thin film coatings. Various designs will be described, with processing examples using LED wafer materials.

  3. The unique inner landscape of the Anthropocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zalasiewicz, Jan

    2013-04-01

    A characteristic aspect of the Anthropocene is the suite of novel changes made to the surface and subsurface of the Earth by human action, both on land and, increasingly, on and below the sea floor. Geologically, these geomorphological phenomena include features that relate to both lithostratigraphic and biostratigraphic classification, the latter resulting from considering human constructions and modifications as a form of trace fossil system, albeit one that is of unprecedentedly large scale. As regards the potential formalizing of the Anthropocene, one question to be pursued relates to the chronostratigraphic definition of the phenomena involved: that is, given that many of these transformations are diachronous on human timescales, can an Anthropocene Series, with a synchronous time boundary, be characterized and mapped across the Earth's surface? Efforts to answer this question should help in the understanding of the Anthropocene within its geological context, and also in exploring the stratigraphic relation between time and rock generally at very fine stratigraphic timescales. Zalasiewicz, J., Williams M, Fortey, R.A., Smith, A.G., Barry, T.L. Coe, A.L., Bown, P.R., Gale, A., Gibbard, P.L., Gregory, F.J., Hounslow, M.W., Kerr, A.C., Pearson, P., Knox, R., Powell, J., Waters, C., Marshall, J., Oates, M., Rawson, P. & Stone, P. 2011. Stratigraphy of the Anthropocene. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society A369, 1036-1055.

  4. Émission de photons uniques par un atome unique piégé

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darquié, B.; Beugnon, J.; Jones, M. P. A.; Dingjan, J.; Sortais, Y.; Browaeys, A.; Messin, G.; Grangier, P.

    2006-10-01

    En illuminant un atome unique piégé dans une pince optique de taille micrométrique à l'aide d'impulsions lumineuses résonantes d'une durée de 4 ns, nous avons réalisé une source efficace de photons uniques déclenchés, de polarisation bien définie. Nous avons mesuré la fonction d'autocorrélation temporelle en intensité qui met en évidence un dégroupement de photons presque parfait. Une telle source de photons uniques de haut flux possède des applications potentielles pour le traitement de l'information quantique.

  5. Epigenetic modifications and diabetic retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Kowluru, Renu A; Santos, Julia M; Mishra, Manish

    2013-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy remains one of the most debilitating chronic complications, but despite extensive research in the field, the exact mechanism(s) responsible for how retina is damaged in diabetes remains ambiguous. Many metabolic pathways have been implicated in its development, and genes associated with these pathways are altered. Diabetic environment also facilitates epigenetics modifications, which can alter the gene expression without permanent changes in DNA sequence. The role of epigenetics in diabetic retinopathy is now an emerging area, and recent work has shown that genes encoding mitochondrial superoxide dismutase (Sod2) and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) are epigenetically modified, activates of epigenetic modification enzymes, histone lysine demethylase 1 (LSD1), and DNA methyltransferase are increased, and the micro RNAs responsible for regulating nuclear transcriptional factor and VEGF are upregulated. With the growing evidence of epigenetic modifications in diabetic retinopathy, better understanding of these modifications has potential to identify novel targets to inhibit this devastating disease. Fortunately, the inhibitors and mimics targeted towards histone modification, DNA methylation, and miRNAs are now being tried for cancer and other chronic diseases, and better understanding of the role of epigenetics in diabetic retinopathy will open the door for their possible use in combating this blinding disease. PMID:24286082

  6. 48 CFR 552.211-93 - Unique Item Identification (UID).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Unique Item Identification....211-93 Unique Item Identification (UID). As prescribed in 511.204(b)(12), insert the following clause: Unique Item Identification (UID) (JAN 2010) Unique Item Identification shall be required on...

  7. 48 CFR 552.211-93 - Unique Item Identification (UID).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Unique Item Identification....211-93 Unique Item Identification (UID). As prescribed in 511.204(b)(12), insert the following clause: Unique Item Identification (UID) (JAN 2010) Unique Item Identification shall be required on...

  8. 48 CFR 552.211-93 - Unique Item Identification (UID).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Unique Item Identification....211-93 Unique Item Identification (UID). As prescribed in 511.204(b)(12), insert the following clause: Unique Item Identification (UID) (JAN 2010) Unique Item Identification shall be required on...

  9. 48 CFR 552.211-93 - Unique Item Identification (UID).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Unique Item Identification....211-93 Unique Item Identification (UID). As prescribed in 511.204(b)(12), insert the following clause: Unique Item Identification (UID) (JAN 2010) Unique Item Identification shall be required on...

  10. 14 CFR 221.203 - Unique rule numbers required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Unique rule numbers required. 221.203... PROCEEDINGS) ECONOMIC REGULATIONS TARIFFS Electronically Filed Tariffs § 221.203 Unique rule numbers required... bear a unique rule number. (b) The unique rule numbers for the fares specified in this section shall...

  11. What motivates nonconformity? Uniqueness seeking blocks majority influence.

    PubMed

    Imhoff, Roland; Erb, Hans-Peter

    2009-03-01

    A high need for uniqueness undermines majority influence. Need for uniqueness (a) is a psychological state in which individuals feel indistinguishable from others and (b) motivates compensatory acts to reestablish a sense of uniqueness. Three studies demonstrate that a strive for uniqueness motivates individuals to resist majority influence. In Study 1, the need for uniqueness was measured, and it was found that individuals high in need for uniqueness yielded less to majority influence than those low in need for uniqueness. In Study 2, participants who received personality feedback undermining their feeling of uniqueness agreed less with a majority (vs. minority) position. Study 3 replicated this effect and additionally demonstrated the motivational nature of the assumed mechanism: An alternative means that allowed participants to regain a feeling of uniqueness canceled out the effect of high need for uniqueness on majority influence. PMID:19098256

  12. Laser modification of polyamide fabrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahtiyari, M. İ.

    2011-02-01

    A new method for the modification of the properties of polyamide fabric, based on exposure to the output from a CO 2 laser, has been investigated. It was found that, after laser modification of polyamide fabric, the dyeability of fabric was increased significantly, while the bursting strength was decreased. The reasons for this drastic increase in dyeability of polyamide fabrics have been analyzed with the help of FTIR and iodine sorption methods, revealing a relationship with a decrease in the crystallinity of the polyamide. It was observed that, as the laser modification of the fabric was carried out with low intensity, the concentration of free amino groups, which are necessary during dyeing with acid and reactive dyes, increased.

  13. The rural market: a unique communication medium.

    PubMed

    Spain, P

    1992-01-01

    In January 1990, the Health Secretary asked the Technologies for Primary Health Care (PRITECH) project to facilitate access to the many small villages with 500 people in Mexico since PRITECH had assisted the diarrhea disease control program. 1st PRITECH had Ministry of Health staff train trainers which would eventually spread the information to the rural areas. This strategy was effective only for those people who did not live in remote areas. The same reasons for remote people being at high risk of disease also limited this strategy: isolation, lack of education, limited diets, lack of access to services, and limited fluency in Spanish. PRITECH hired a local consulting organization, CICLOPE, to develop a new strategy. CICLOPE limited its activities to the states of Hidalgo and Vera Cruz for 8 months. 1st CICLOPE staff provided proper diarrhea management training including emphasis on oral rehydration therapy (ORT) to rural health auxiliaries. They used a gourd painted to look like an infant with holes and other modifications to depict the workings and results of diarrheal dehydration. The staff then sent the auxiliaries to their own communities to use the gourd dolls to teach mothers about ORT and correct diarrhea management. The staff conducted follow-up activities to monitor the auxiliaries' progress. This training approach allowed the auxiliaries to realize the abilities of the mothers and their active role in learning. The auxiliaries conducted the training at markets where women living in remote areas came weekly. The local radio announced market day events in which the auxiliaries participated and aired dramas about diarrhea management. CICLOPE staff and the auxiliaries sat up a booth at these markets to promote proper diarrhea management. They used a flip chart, comic books, a lottery game, and entertainment to impart education messages. PMID:12285444

  14. Manufacturer evaluations of endograft modifications.

    PubMed

    Waninger, Matthew S; Whirley, Robert G; Smith, Louis J; Wolf, Ben S

    2013-03-01

    The motivation to modify the design of a vascular device can arise from a number of sources. Clinical experience with the unmodified device could suggest new design modifications to improve device performance or clinical outcomes. Similarly, clinical success with a device often suggests modifications that could broaden the applicability of the device to enable treatment of different or more advanced disease states. As a specific example, both of these scenarios have arisen during the last decade in the evolution of endovascular grafts for the treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysms, with modifications enabling the treatment of patients with shorter infrarenal necks, more angulated anatomy, and smaller access vessels. These modifications have been made by manufacturers and additionally by physicians who create branched and fenestrated devices. The experience to date with the use of fenestrated devices and the development of chimney, snorkel, and periscope techniques suggests that modifications to off-the-shelf devices may provide some clinical benefit. This experience provides additional motivation for manufacturers to develop devices to address the clinical needs not met with their current product lines. For manufacturers, the device development process includes an assessment of the new device design to determine the appropriate evaluation strategy to support the safety and effectiveness of the modified device. This report provides a high-level overview of the process generally followed by device manufacturers to evaluate a proposed device modification before market release, in accordance with local country regulations and recognized international standards such as the International Organization of Standardization (ISO) standards for endovascular grafts (ISO 25539 Part 1). PMID:23446123

  15. Polymer surface modification by plasmas and photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, C.-M.; Ko, T.-M.; Hiraoka, H.

    1996-05-01

    Polymers have been applied successfully in fields such as adhesion, biomaterials, protective coatings, friction and wear, composites, microelectronic devices, and thin-film technology. In general, special surface properties with regard to chemical composition, hydrophilicity, roughness, crystallinity, conductivity, lubricity, and cross-linking density are required for the success of these applications. Polymers very often do not possess the surface properties needed for these applications. However, they have excellent bulk physical and chemical properties, are inexpensive, and are easy to process. For these reasons, surface modification techniques which can transform these inexpensive materials into highly valuable finished products have become an important part of the plastics and many other industries. In recent years, many advances have been made in developing surface treatments to alter the chemical and physical properties of polymer surfaces without affecting bulk properties. Common surface modification techniques include treatments by flame, corona, plasmas, photons, electron beams, ion beams, X-rays, and γ-rays. Plasma treatment is probably the most versatile surface treatment technique. Different types of gases such as argon, oxygen, nitrogen, fluorine, carbon dioxide, and water can produce the unique surface properties required by various applications. For example, oxygen-plasma treatment can increase the surface energy of polymers, whereas fluorine-plasma treatment can decrease the surface energy and improve the chemical inertness. Cross-linking at a polymer surface can be introduced by an inert-gas plasma. Modification by plasma treatment is usually confined to the top several hundred ångströms and does not affect the bulk properties. The main disadvantage of this technique is that it requires a vacuum system, which increases the cost of operation. Thin polymer films with unique chemical and physical properties are produced by plasma polymerization

  16. Might "Unique" Factors Be "Common"? On the Possibility of Indeterminate Common-Unique Covariances

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grayson, Dave

    2006-01-01

    The present paper shows that the usual factor analytic structured data dispersion matrix lambda psi lambda' + delta can readily arise from a set of scores y = lambda eta + epsilon, shere the "common" (eta) and "unique" (epsilon) factors have nonzero covariance: gamma = Cov epsilon,eta) is not equal to 0. Implications of this finding are discussed…

  17. Mapping chromatin modifications in nanochannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Shuang Fang; Karpusenko, Alena; Riehn, Robert

    2013-03-01

    DNA and chromatin are elongated to a fixed fraction of their contour length when introduced into quasi-1d nanochannels. Because single molecules are analyzed, their hold great potential for the analysis for the genetic analysis of material from single cells. In this study, we have reconstituted chromatin with histones from a variety of sources, and mapped the modification profile of the chromatin. We monitored methylation and acetylation patterns of the histone tail protein residues using fluorescently labelled antibodies. Using those, we distinguished chromatin reconstituted from chicken erythrocytes, calf thymus, and HeLa cells. We discuss prospects for profiling histone modifications for whole chromosomes from single cells.

  18. Microbial profile modification with spores

    SciTech Connect

    Bae, J.H.; Chambers, K.T.; Lee, H.O.

    1996-08-01

    To overcome the shortcomings of conventional, near-wellbore profile modification methods, a microbial profile modification (MPM) method with spores was investigated. A halotolerant, spore-forming mesophile was isolated and characterized. These biopolymer-producing spores propagate easily in Berea cores with permeabilities more than about 500 md. With a specifically formulated nutrient package, they are readily germinated and produce biofilm, which reduces the permeability of the rock. The depth of penetration and the degree of permeability reduction can be controlled by varying injection schemes.

  19. [A unique psychopharmacologic profile of adrafinil in mice].

    PubMed

    Rambert, F A; Pessonnier, J; de Sereville, J E; Pointeau, A M; Duteil, J

    1986-01-01

    The following psychopharmacological effects of adrafinil have been observed in mice: increase in locomotor activity (64-256 mg.kg-1), antagonism (16-128 mg.kg-1) of the hypnotic effects of barbitone but not of pentobarbitone, reduction of immobility duration in the forced swimming test (16-256 mg.kg-1); slight antagonism (256 mg.kg-1) of electroshock-induced convulsions; no modification of rectal temperature; no stereotyped or climbing behaviour; no increase in lethality in aggregated mice (LD50 isolated = 1022 mg.kg-1, LD50 aggregated = 859 mg.kg-1); lack of effects on the provisional tests for antidepressants: no interaction with reserpine-, oxotremorine-, or apomorphine-induced hypothermia but potentiation of yohimbine-induced toxicity; lack of peripheral sympathetic effects (no mydriasis, no salivation, no contraction of the pilomotor muscles, no antagonism of reserpine-induced ptosis); lack of peripheral anticholinergic effects (no mydriasis, no antagonism of oxotremorine-induced salivation or lacrimation). As compared to no analeptic, anticholinergic or antidepressant drugs, adrafinil shows a unique behavioural profile in mice defined on the one hand by a specific stimulant activity associated with antidepressant-like effects that do no seem related to a beta-adrenergic mechanism and on the other hand by a lack of dopaminergic effects. Most adrafinil-induced effects (increase in locomotor activity, reduction of immobility duration in the forced swimming test) may correspond to a central alpha 1-adrenergic stimulation, but the unexpected lack of peripheral sympathetic effects remains unexplained. PMID:3713198

  20. The unique mitochondrial form and function of Antarctic channichthyid icefishes.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Kristin M; Mueller, Irina A

    2010-12-01

    Antarctic icefishes of the family Channichthyidae are the only vertebrate animals that as adults do not express the circulating oxygen-binding protein hemoglobin (Hb). Six of the 16 family members also lack the intracellular oxygen-binding protein myoglobin (Mb) in the ventricle of their hearts and all lack Mb in oxidative skeletal muscle. The loss of Hb has led to substantial remodeling in the cardiovascular system of icefishes to facilitate adequate oxygenation of tissues. One of the more curious adaptations to the loss of Hb and Mb is an increase in mitochondrial density in cardiac myocytes and oxidative skeletal muscle fibers. The proliferation of mitochondria in the aerobic musculature of icefishes does not arise through a canonical pathway of mitochondrial biogenesis. Rather, the biosynthesis of mitochondrial phospholipids is up-regulated independently of the synthesis of proteins and mitochondrial DNA, and newly-synthesized phospholipids are targeted primarily to the outer-mitochondrial membrane. Consequently, icefish mitochondria have a higher lipid-to-protein ratio compared to those from red-blooded species. Elevated levels of nitric oxide in the blood plasma of icefishes, compared to red-blooded notothenioids, may mediate alterations in mitochondrial density and architecture. Modifications in mitochondrial structure minimally impact state III respiration rates but may significantly enhance intracellular diffusion of oxygen. The rate of oxygen diffusion is greater within the hydrocarbon core of membrane lipids compared to the aqueous cytosol and impeded only by proteins within the lipid bilayer. Thus, the proliferation of icefish's mitochondrial membranes provides an optimal conduit for the intracellular diffusion of oxygen and compensates for the loss of Hb and Mb. Currently little is known about how mitochondrial phospholipid synthesis is regulated and integrated into mitochondrial biogenesis. The unique architecture of the oxidative muscle cells of

  1. Biomechanics of the unique pterosaur pteroid.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Colin; Dyke, Gareth J

    2010-04-01

    Pterosaurs, flying reptiles from the Mesozoic, had wing membranes that were supported by their arm bones and a super-elongate fourth finger. Associated with the wing, pterosaurs also possessed a unique wrist bone--the pteroid--that functioned to support the forward part of the membrane in front of the leading edge, the propatagium. Pteroid shape varies across pterosaurs and reconstructions of its orientation vary (projecting anteriorly to the wing leading edge or medially, lying alongside it) and imply differences in the way that pterosaurs controlled their wings. Here we show, using biomechanical analysis and considerations of aerodynamic efficiency of a representative ornithocheirid pterosaur, that an anteriorly orientated pteroid is highly unlikely. Unless these pterosaurs only flew steadily and had very low body masses, their pteroids would have been likely to break if orientated anteriorly; the degree of movement required for a forward orientation would have introduced extreme membrane strains and required impractical tensioning in the propatagium membrane. This result can be generalized for other pterodactyloid pterosaurs because the resultant geometry of an anteriorly orientated pteroid would have reduced the aerodynamic performance of all wings and required the same impractical properties in the propatagium membrane. We demonstrate quantitatively that the more traditional reconstruction of a medially orientated pteroid was much more stable both structurally and aerodynamically, reflecting likely life position. PMID:20007183

  2. Biomechanics of the unique pterosaur pteroid

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Colin; Dyke, Gareth J.

    2010-01-01

    Pterosaurs, flying reptiles from the Mesozoic, had wing membranes that were supported by their arm bones and a super-elongate fourth finger. Associated with the wing, pterosaurs also possessed a unique wrist bone—the pteroid—that functioned to support the forward part of the membrane in front of the leading edge, the propatagium. Pteroid shape varies across pterosaurs and reconstructions of its orientation vary (projecting anteriorly to the wing leading edge or medially, lying alongside it) and imply differences in the way that pterosaurs controlled their wings. Here we show, using biomechanical analysis and considerations of aerodynamic efficiency of a representative ornithocheirid pterosaur, that an anteriorly orientated pteroid is highly unlikely. Unless these pterosaurs only flew steadily and had very low body masses, their pteroids would have been likely to break if orientated anteriorly; the degree of movement required for a forward orientation would have introduced extreme membrane strains and required impractical tensioning in the propatagium membrane. This result can be generalized for other pterodactyloid pterosaurs because the resultant geometry of an anteriorly orientated pteroid would have reduced the aerodynamic performance of all wings and required the same impractical properties in the propatagium membrane. We demonstrate quantitatively that the more traditional reconstruction of a medially orientated pteroid was much more stable both structurally and aerodynamically, reflecting likely life position. PMID:20007183

  3. Unique features of trabectedin mechanism of action.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Annette K; Galmarini, Carlos M; D'Incalci, Maurizio

    2016-04-01

    Trabectedin (Yondelis(®), ET-743) is a marine-derived natural product that was initially isolated from the marine ascidian Ecteinascidia turbinata and is currently prepared synthetically. Trabectedin is used as a single agent for the treatment of patients with soft tissue sarcoma after failure of doxorubicin or ifosfamide or who are unsuited to receive these agents, and in patients with relapsed, platinum-sensitive ovarian cancer in combination with pegylated liposomal doxorubicin. Trabectedin presents a complex mechanism of action affecting key cell biology processes in tumor cells as well as in the tumor microenvironment. The inhibition of trans-activated transcription and the interaction with DNA repair proteins appear as a hallmark of the antiproliferative activity of trabectedin. Inhibition of active transcription is achieved by an initial direct mechanism that involves interaction with RNA polymerase II, thereby inducing its ubiquitination and degradation by the proteasome. This subsequently modulates the production of cytokines and chemokines by tumor and tumor-associated macrophages. Another interesting effect on activated transcription is mediated by the displacement of oncogenic transcription factors from their target promoters, thereby affecting oncogenic signaling addiction. In addition, it is well established that DNA repair systems including transcription-coupled nucleotide excision repair and homologous recombination play a role in the antitumor activity of trabectedin. Ongoing studies are currently addressing how to exploit these unique mechanistic features of trabectedin to combine this agent either with immunological or microenvironmental modulators or with classical chemotherapeutic agents in a more rational manner. PMID:26666647

  4. Unique Ganglioside Recognition Strategies for Clostridial Neurotoxins

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, Marc A.; Fu, Zhuji; Kim, Jung-Ja P.; Baldwin, Michael R.

    2012-03-15

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) and tetanus neurotoxin are the causative agents of the paralytic diseases botulism and tetanus, respectively. The potency of the clostridial neurotoxins (CNTs) relies primarily on their highly specific binding to nerve terminals and cleavage of SNARE proteins. Although individual CNTs utilize distinct proteins for entry, they share common ganglioside co-receptors. Here, we report the crystal structure of the BoNT/F receptor-binding domain in complex with the sugar moiety of ganglioside GD1a. GD1a binds in a shallow groove formed by the conserved peptide motif E ... H ... SXWY ... G, with additional stabilizing interactions provided by two arginine residues. Comparative analysis of BoNT/F with other CNTs revealed several differences in the interactions of each toxin with ganglioside. Notably, exchange of BoNT/F His-1241 with the corresponding lysine residue of BoNT/E resulted in increased affinity for GD1a and conferred the ability to bind ganglioside GM1a. Conversely, BoNT/E was not able to bind GM1a, demonstrating a discrete mechanism of ganglioside recognition. These findings provide a structural basis for ganglioside binding among the CNTs and show that individual toxins utilize unique ganglioside recognition strategies.

  5. The Placenta Harbors a Unique Microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Aagaard, Kjersti; Ma, Jun; Antony, Kathleen M.; Ganu, Radhika; Petrosino, Joseph; Versalovic, James

    2016-01-01

    Humans and their microbiomes have coevolved as a physiologic community composed of distinct body site niches with metabolic and antigenic diversity. The placental microbiome has not been robustly interrogated, despite recent demonstrations of intracellular bacteria with diverse metabolic and immune regulatory functions. A population-based cohort of placental specimens collected under sterile conditions from 320 subjects with extensive clinical data was established for comparative 16S ribosomal DNA–based and whole-genome shotgun (WGS) metagenomic studies. Identified taxa and their gene carriage patterns were compared to other human body site niches, including the oral, skin, airway (nasal), vaginal, and gut microbiomes from nonpregnant controls. We characterized a unique placental microbiome niche, composed of nonpathogenic commensal microbiota from the Firmicutes, Tenericutes, Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Fusobacteria phyla. In aggregate, the placental microbiome profiles were most akin (Bray-Curtis dissimilarity <0.3) to the human oral microbiome. 16S-based operational taxonomic unit analyses revealed associations of the placental microbiome with a remote history of antenatal infection (permutational multivariate analysis of variance, P = 0.006), such as urinary tract infection in the first trimester, as well as with preterm birth <37 weeks (P = 0.001). PMID:24848255

  6. Clinical EPR: Unique Opportunities and Some Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Swartz, Harold M.; Williams, Benjamin B.; Zaki, Bassem I.; Hartford, Alan C.; Jarvis, Lesley A.; Chen, Eunice; Comi, Richard J.; Ernstoff, Marc S.; Hou, Huagang; Khan, Nadeem; Swarts, Steven G.; Flood, Ann B.; Kuppusamy, Periannan

    2014-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy has been well established as a viable technique for measurement of free radicals and oxygen in biological systems, from in vitro cellular systems to in vivo small animal models of disease. However, the use of EPR in human subjects in the clinical setting, although attractive for a variety of important applications such as oxygen measurement, is challenged with several factors including the need for instrumentation customized for human subjects, probe and regulatory constraints. This paper describes the rationale and development of the first clinical EPR systems for two important clinical applications, namely, measurement of tissue oxygen (oximetry), and radiation dose (dosimetry) in humans. The clinical spectrometers operate at 1.2 GHz frequency and use surface loop resonators capable of providing topical measurements up to 1 cm depth in tissues. Tissue pO2 measurements can be carried out noninvasively and repeatedly after placement of an oxygen-sensitive paramagnetic material (currently India ink) at the site of interest. Our EPR dosimetry system is capable of measuring radiation-induced free radicals in the tooth of irradiated human subjects to determine the exposure dose. These developments offer potential opportunities for clinical dosimetry and oximetry, which include guiding therapy for individual patients with tumors or vascular disease, by monitoring of tissue oxygenation. Further work is in progress to translate this unique technology to routine clinical practice. PMID:24439333

  7. Unique animal prenyltransferase with monoterpene synthase activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilg, Anna B.; Tittiger, Claus; Blomquist, Gary J.

    2009-06-01

    Monoterpenes are structurally diverse natural compounds that play an essential role in the chemical ecology of a wide array of organisms. A key enzyme in monoterpene biosynthesis is geranyl diphosphate synthase (GPPS). GPPS is an isoprenyl diphosphate synthase that catalyzes a single electrophilic condensation reaction between dimethylallyl diphosphate (C5) and isopentenyl diphosphate (C5) to produce geranyl diphosphate (GDP; C10). GDP is the universal precursor to all monoterpenes. Subsequently, monoterpene synthases are responsible for the transformation of GDP to a variety of acyclic, monocyclic, and bicyclic monoterpene products. In pheromone-producing male Ips pini bark beetles (Coleoptera: Scolytidae), the acyclic monoterpene myrcene is required for the production of the major aggregation pheromone component, ipsdienol. Here, we report monoterpene synthase activity associated with GPPS of I. pini. Enzyme assays were performed on recombinant GPPS to determine the presence of monoterpene synthase activity, and the reaction products were analyzed by coupled gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The functionally expressed recombinant enzyme produced both GDP and myrcene, making GPPS of I. pini a bifunctional enzyme. This unique insect isoprenyl diphosphate synthase possesses the functional plasticity that is characteristic of terpene biosynthetic enzymes of plants, contributing toward the current understanding of product specificity of the isoprenoid pathway.

  8. Unique features in the ARIES glovebox line

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, H.E.; Brown, W.G.; Flamm, B.; James, C.A.; Laskie, R.; Nelson, T.O.; Wedman, D.E.

    1998-12-31

    A series of unique features have been incorporated into the Advanced Recovery and Integrated Extraction System (ARIES) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, TA-55 Plutonium Facility. The features enhance the material handling in the process of the dismantlement of nuclear weapon primaries in the glovebox line. Incorporated into these features are the various plutonium process module`s different ventilation zone requirements that the material handling systems must meet. These features include a conveyor system that consists of a remotely controlled cart that transverses the length of the conveyor glovebox, can be operated from a remote location and can deliver process components to the entrance of any selected module glovebox. Within the modules there exists linear motion material handling systems with lifting hoist, which are controlled via an Allen Bradley control panel or local control panels. To remove the packaged products from the hot process line, the package is processed through an air lock/electrolytic decontamination process that removes the radioactive contamination from the outside of the package container and allows the package to be removed from the process line.

  9. Lunar granites with unique ternary feldspars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryder, G.; Stoeser, D. B.; Marvin, U. B.; Bower, J. F.

    1975-01-01

    An unusually high concentration of granitic fragments, with textures ranging from holocrystalline to glassy, occurs throughout Boulder 1, a complex breccia of highland rocks from Apollo 17, Station 2. Among the minerals included in the granites are enigmatic K-Ca-rich feldspars that fall in the forbidden region of the ternary diagram. The great variability in chemistry and texture is probably the result of impact degradation and melting of a granitic source-rock. Studies of the breccia matrix suggest that this original granitic source-rock may have contained more pyroxenes and phosphates than most of the present clasts contain. Petrographic observations on Apollo 15 KREEP basalts indicate that granitic liquids may be produced by differentiation without immiscibility, and the association of the granites with KREEP-rich fragments in the boulder suggests that the granites represent a residual liquid from the plutonic fractional crystallization of a KREEP-rich magma. Boulder 1 is unique among Apollo 17 samples in its silica-KREEP-rich composition. We conclude that the boulder represents a source-rock unlike the bedrock of South Massif.

  10. Cathepsin K: a unique collagenolytic cysteine peptidase.

    PubMed

    Novinec, Marko; Lenarčič, Brigita

    2013-09-01

    Cathepsin K has emerged as a promising target for the treatment of osteoporosis in recent years. Initially identified as a papain-like cysteine peptidase expressed in high levels in osteoclasts, the important role of this enzyme in bone metabolism was highlighted by the finding that mutations in the CTSK gene cause the rare recessive disorder pycnodysostosis, which is characterized by severe bone anomalies. At the molecular level, the physiological role of cathepsin K is reflected by its unique cleavage pattern of type I collagen molecules, which is fundamentally different from that of other endogenous collagenases. Several cathepsin K inhibitors have been developed to reduce the excessive bone matrix degradation associated with osteoporosis, with the frontrunner odanacatib about to successfully conclude Phase 3 clinical trials. Apart from osteoclasts, cathepsin K is expressed in different cell types throughout the body and is involved in processes of adipogenesis, thyroxine liberation and peptide hormone regulation. Elevated activity of cathepsin K has been associated with arthritis, atherosclerosis, obesity, schizophrenia, and tumor metastasis. Accordingly, its activity is tightly regulated via multiple mechanisms, including competitive inhibition by endogenous macromolecular inhibitors and allosteric regulation by glycosaminoglycans. This review provides a state-of-the-art description of the activity of cathepsin K at the molecular level, its biological functions and the mechanisms involved in its regulation. PMID:23629523

  11. Structure of the hypusinylated eukaryotic translation factor eIF-5A bound to the ribosome

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Christian; Becker, Thomas; Heuer, André; Braunger, Katharina; Shanmuganathan, Vivekanandan; Pech, Markus; Berninghausen, Otto; Wilson, Daniel N.; Beckmann, Roland

    2016-01-01

    During protein synthesis, ribosomes become stalled on polyproline-containing sequences, unless they are rescued in archaea and eukaryotes by the initiation factor 5A (a/eIF-5A) and in bacteria by the homologous protein EF-P. While a structure of EF-P bound to the 70S ribosome exists, structural insight into eIF-5A on the 80S ribosome has been lacking. Here we present a cryo-electron microscopy reconstruction of eIF-5A bound to the yeast 80S ribosome at 3.9 Å resolution. The structure reveals that the unique and functionally essential post-translational hypusine modification reaches toward the peptidyltransferase center of the ribosome, where the hypusine moiety contacts A76 of the CCA-end of the P-site tRNA. These findings would support a model whereby eIF-5A stimulates peptide bond formation on polyproline-stalled ribosomes by stabilizing and orienting the CCA-end of the P-tRNA, rather than by directly contributing to the catalysis. PMID:26715760

  12. Structure of the hypusinylated eukaryotic translation factor eIF-5A bound to the ribosome.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Christian; Becker, Thomas; Heuer, André; Braunger, Katharina; Shanmuganathan, Vivekanandan; Pech, Markus; Berninghausen, Otto; Wilson, Daniel N; Beckmann, Roland

    2016-02-29

    During protein synthesis, ribosomes become stalled on polyproline-containing sequences, unless they are rescued in archaea and eukaryotes by the initiation factor 5A (a/eIF-5A) and in bacteria by the homologous protein EF-P. While a structure of EF-P bound to the 70S ribosome exists, structural insight into eIF-5A on the 80S ribosome has been lacking. Here we present a cryo-electron microscopy reconstruction of eIF-5A bound to the yeast 80S ribosome at 3.9 Å resolution. The structure reveals that the unique and functionally essential post-translational hypusine modification reaches toward the peptidyltransferase center of the ribosome, where the hypusine moiety contacts A76 of the CCA-end of the P-site tRNA. These findings would support a model whereby eIF-5A stimulates peptide bond formation on polyproline-stalled ribosomes by stabilizing and orienting the CCA-end of the P-tRNA, rather than by directly contributing to the catalysis. PMID:26715760

  13. Evolution of a Unique Systems Engineering Capability

    SciTech Connect

    Robert M. Caliva; James A. Murphy; Kyle B. Oswald

    2011-06-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is a science-based, applied engineering laboratory dedicated to supporting U.S. Department of Energy missions in nuclear and energy research, science, and national security. The INL’s Systems Engineering organization supports all of the various programs under this wide array of missions. As with any multifaceted organization, strategic planning is essential to establishing a consistent culture and a value discipline throughout all levels of the enterprise. While an organization can pursue operational excellence, product leadership or customer intimacy, it is extremely difficult to excel or achieve best-in-class at all three. In fact, trying to do so has resulted in the demise of a number of organizations given the very intricate balancing act that is necessary. The INL’s Systems Engineering Department has chosen to focus on customer intimacy where the customer’s needs are first and foremost and a more total solution is the goal. Frequently a total solution requires the employment of specialized tools to manage system complexity. However, it is only after understanding customer needs that tool selection and use would be pursued. This results in using both commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) tools and, in some cases, requires internal development of specialized tools. This paper describes how a unique systems engineering capability, through the development of customized tools, evolved as a result of this customer-focused culture. It also addresses the need for a common information model or analysis framework and presents an overview of the tools developed to manage and display relationships between entities, support trade studies through the application of utility theory, and facilitate the development of a technology roadmap to manage system risk and uncertainty.

  14. Lourdes: A uniquely Catholic approach to medicine.

    PubMed

    Dichoso, Travis Jon

    2015-02-01

    As an American medical student, I spent the summer break between my first and second year in Lourdes, France, the site where the Immaculate Conception appeared eighteen times to St. Bernadette in 1858 as proclaimed approved by the Catholic Church and whose water is associated with over seven thousand unexplained cures. During this time I volunteered with St. Joseph's Service and Poste Secour, followed several medical teams taking care of large pilgrim groups, and shadowed Dr. Alessandro de Franciscis the president of Le Bureau des Constations Médicales, the office in Lourdes charged with investigating claims of miracles. Through my experiences, I found the mission of medicine in Lourdes to be twofold: to provide the critical care needed to give sick persons the chance to transform their experience of disease through their faith; and secondly, through the efforts of the Medical Bureau, to be an instrument by which we can comprehend the wonders of the work of God. I conclude that this twofold mission should inform the work of every Catholic in health care or research, and Lourdes provides the venue par excellence to cultivate this mission. Lay Summary: Lourdes is a pilgrimage site in southern France that has been associated with medical miracles for the past 150 years. The site is unique in that throughout its history, physicians, of any or no faith, have been invited to participate in the proceedings of the investigations of each claimed cure. The investigations have formalized into a process handled by the Lourdes Medical Bureau and the Lourdes International Medical Association. Travis Dichoso, an American medical student, writes about his experiences as part of this process. PMID:25698838

  15. MODIFICATION OF CC WHITEFLY TRAPS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Modifications of CC whitefly traps are in progress to improve their potential for adult whitefly control in greenhouses. Adult catches in the modified CC traps have been increased by 50% by coating trap tops with Tanglefoot and removing the deflector plates. In laboratory studies, installation of ...

  16. Black Psychologists Discuss Behavior Modification.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bardo, Harold R.; And Others

    The primary purpose of this paper is to discuss reasons why blacks should be concerned and actively involved with practices in behavior modification. The concern is that as these techniques are refined it becomes more important to be sure blacks should be involved at all levels of the application of these procedures when other blacks are subjects…

  17. Plasma surface modification of polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirotsu, T.

    1980-01-01

    Thin plasma polymerization films are discussed from the viewpoint of simplicity in production stages. The application of selective, absorbent films and films used in selective permeability was tested. The types of surface modification of polymers discussed are: (1) plasma etching, (2) surface coating by plasma polymerized thin films, and (3) plasma activation surface graft polymerization.

  18. Changing Attitudes Through Behavior Modification.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whipple, W. Scott

    This article describes the philosophy and methods used by the staff at the Granite Alternative School in changing student attitudes through behavior modification. The students involved all have a failure syndrome or low self-image, and are dropouts from traditional high schools. Among the techniques used are: (1) reinforcing good behavior (praise…

  19. Demonstrating Allotropic Modifications of Sulfur.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarty, Jillian L.; Dragojlovic, Veljko

    2002-01-01

    Shows how a common demonstration that consists of slowly heating sulfur powder in a test tube to illustrate sulfur's allotropic modifications can convince students of conclusions about the moon Io which they often find surprising. Describes the demonstration in full. (Author/MM)

  20. Behaviour modification in hyperactive children.

    PubMed

    Weeks, A; Laver-Bradbury, C

    Behaviour problems in pre-school children can be significantly improved by professionals experienced in child behaviour modification techniques. Reported disobedience, temper tantrums and poor concentration in hyperactive children aged three to three-and-a-half years improved significantly in a treatment group, following eight home visits by research health visitors working in a child and family guidance service. PMID:9418516

  1. Carbohydrate post-glycosylational modifications

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hai; Chen, Xi

    2008-01-01

    Carbohydrate modification is a common phenomenon in nature. Many carbohydrate modifications such as some epimerization, O-acetylation, O-sulfation, O-methylation, N-deacetylation, and N-sulfation, take place after the formation of oligosaccharide or polysaccharide backbones. These modifications can be categorized as carbohydrate post-glycosylational modifications (PGMs). Carbohydrate PGMs further extend the complexity of the structures and the synthesis of carbohydrates and glycoconjugates. They also increase the capacity of the biological information that can be controlled by finely tuning the structures of carbohydrates. Developing efficient methods to obtain structurally defined naturally occurring oligosaccharides, polysaccharides, and glycoconjugates with carbohydrate PGMs is essential for understanding the biological significance of carbohydrate PGMs. Combine with high-throughput screening methods, synthetic carbohydrates with PGMs are invaluable probes in structure-activity relationship studies. We illustrate here several classes of carbohydrates with PGMs and their applications. Recent progress in chemical, enzymatic, and chemoenzymatic syntheses of these carbohydrates and their derivatives are also presented. PMID:17340000

  2. Exploiting Unique Structural and Functional Properties of Malarial Glycolytic Enzymes for Antimalarial Drug Development

    PubMed Central

    Neyaz, Md. Kausar; Ikramul Hasan, Syed

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic enzymes have been known to carry out a variety of functions besides their normal housekeeping roles known as “moonlighting functions.” These functionalities arise from structural changes induced by posttranslational modifications and/or binding of interacting proteins. Glycolysis is the sole source of energy generation for malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum, hence a potential pathway for therapeutic intervention. Crystal structures of several P. falciparum glycolytic enzymes have been solved, revealing that they exhibit unique structural differences from the respective host enzymes, which could be exploited for their selective targeting. In addition, these enzymes carry out many parasite-specific functions, which could be of potential interest to control parasite development and transmission. This review focuses on the moonlighting functions of P. falciparum glycolytic enzymes and unique structural differences and functional features of the parasite enzymes, which could be exploited for therapeutic and transmission blocking interventions against malaria. PMID:25580350

  3. HIPK2 modification code for cell death and survival

    PubMed Central

    Wook Choi, Dong; Yong Choi, Cheol

    2014-01-01

    Homeodomain-interacting protein kinase 2 (HIPK2) is a serine/threonine protein kinase that participates in the regulation of diverse cellular activities as a transcriptional cofactor and signal transducer. HIPK2 senses various signaling cues that in turn phosphorylate downstream substrates to coordinate developmental processes, cell cycle regulation, cell proliferation, differentiation, and the DNA damage response. HIPK2 functions are affected by its catalytic activity, stability, and subcellular localization, which in turn are dynamically regulated by diverse post-translational modifications such as polyubiquitination, SUMOylation, phosphorylation, and acetylation. HIPK2 is not modified with small molecules and/or peptides individually or independently, but in a combinatorial manner that is referred to as the “HIPK2 modification code.” HIPK2 integrates various signaling cues and senses different doses of DNA damage and ROS stimuli, which are reflected by unique patterns of HIPK2 modification. Hence, the HIPK2 modification code differentially contributes to cellular homeostasis and determination of cell fate depending on cellular context. PMID:27308327

  4. Polydopamine-Assisted Surface Modification for Bone Biosubstitutes.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shishu; Liang, Nuanyi; Hu, Yang; Zhou, Xin; Abidi, Noureddine

    2016-01-01

    Polydopamine (PDA) prepared in the form of a layer of polymerized dopamine (DA) in a weak alkaline solution has been used as a versatile biomimetic surface modifier as well as a broadly used immobilizing macromolecule. This review mainly discusses the progress of biomaterial surface modification inspired by the participation of PDA in bone tissue engineering. A comparison between PDA-assisted coating techniques and traditional surface modification applied to bone tissue engineering is first presented. Secondly, the chemical composition and the underlying formation mechanism of PDA coating layer as a unique surface modifier are interpreted and discussed. Furthermore, several typical examples are provided to evidence the importance of PDA-assisted coating techniques in the construction of bone biosubstitutes and the improvement of material biocompatibility. Nowadays, the application of PDA as a superior surface modifier in multifunctional biomaterials is drawing tremendous interests in bone tissue scaffolds to promote the osteointegration for bone regeneration. PMID:27595097

  5. Structural modification of nanocrystalline ceria by ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yanwen; Edmondson, Philip D.; Varga, Tamas; Moll, Sandra; Namavar, Fereydoon; Lan, Chune; Weber, William J.

    2011-01-01

    Exceptional size-dependent electronic–ionic conductivity of nanostructured ceria can significantly alter materials properties in chemical, physical, electronic and optical applications. Using energetic ions, we have demonstrated effective modification of interface volume and grain size in nanocrystalline ceria from a few nm up to ~25 nm, which is the critical region for controlling size-dependent material property. The grain size increases and follows an exponential law as a function of ion fluence that increases with temperature, while the cubic phase is stable under the irradiation. The unique self-healing response of radiation damage at grain boundaries is utilized to control the grain size at the nanoscale. Structural modification by energetic ions is proposed to achieve desirable electronic–ionic conductivity.

  6. Polydopamine-Assisted Surface Modification for Bone Biosubstitutes

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Polydopamine (PDA) prepared in the form of a layer of polymerized dopamine (DA) in a weak alkaline solution has been used as a versatile biomimetic surface modifier as well as a broadly used immobilizing macromolecule. This review mainly discusses the progress of biomaterial surface modification inspired by the participation of PDA in bone tissue engineering. A comparison between PDA-assisted coating techniques and traditional surface modification applied to bone tissue engineering is first presented. Secondly, the chemical composition and the underlying formation mechanism of PDA coating layer as a unique surface modifier are interpreted and discussed. Furthermore, several typical examples are provided to evidence the importance of PDA-assisted coating techniques in the construction of bone biosubstitutes and the improvement of material biocompatibility. Nowadays, the application of PDA as a superior surface modifier in multifunctional biomaterials is drawing tremendous interests in bone tissue scaffolds to promote the osteointegration for bone regeneration. PMID:27595097

  7. Structural characteristics, dispersion, and modification of fibrous brucite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Xi; Chuan, Xiu-yun

    2014-01-01

    Fibrous brucite has very unique structure and physical properties. Brucite fibers were exfoliated into single nanofibers by using dioctyl sodium sulfosuccinate (AOT) as a dispersant through mechanical agitation and ultrasonic dispersion; and then, the nanofibers were modified by stearic acid and (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane (γ-APS) compound modification agent. The nanofibers were characterized by using X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and thermal gravimetric analysis. It is found that AOT has good effect on the dispersion. The single fiber has a consistent morphology, and fibrous brucite is dispersed and modified without destroying the crystal structure. Infrared and thermal analysis shows that the surface modification of fibrous brucite is achieved by forming chemical bonds between the coupling agent and magnesium hydroxide.

  8. Laser surface and subsurface modification of sapphire using femtosecond pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eberle, G.; Schmidt, M.; Pude, F.; Wegener, K.

    2016-08-01

    Two methods to process sapphire using femtosecond laser pulses are demonstrated, namely ablation (surface), and in-volume laser modification followed by wet etching (subsurface). Firstly, the single and multipulse ablation threshold is determined and compared with previous literature results. A unique application of ablation is demonstrated by modifying the entrance aperture of water jet orifices. Laser ablation exhibits advantages in terms of geometric flexibility and resolution, however, defects in the form of edge outbreaks and poor surface quality are evident. Secondly, the role of material transformation, polarisation state and formation of multi-focus structures after in-volume laser modification is investigated in order to explain their influence during the wet etching process. Laser scanning and electron microscopy as well as electron backscatter diffraction measurements supported by ion beam polishing are used to better understand quality and laser-material interactions of the two demonstrated methods of processing.

  9. Chemoenzymatic Methods for Site-Specific Protein Modification

    PubMed Central

    Rabuka, David

    2010-01-01

    In the past decade, numerous chemical technologies have been developed to allow the site-specific post-translational modification of proteins. Traditionally covalent chemical protein modification has been accomplished by the attachment of synthetic groups to nucleophilic amino acids on protein surfaces. These chemistries, however, are rarely sufficiently selective to distinguish one residue within a literal sea of chemical functionality. One solution to this problem is to introduce a unique chemical handle into the target protein that is orthogonal to the remainder of the proteome. In practice, this handle can be a novel peptide sequence, which forms a “tag” that is selectively and irreversibly modified by enzymes. Furthermore, if the enzymes can tolerate substrate analogs, it becomes possible to engineer chemically modified proteins in a site-specific fashion. This review details the significant progress in creating techniques for the chemoenzymatic generation of protein-small molecule constructs and provides examples of novel applications of these methodologies. PMID:21030291

  10. Thiol Dioxygenases: Unique Families of Cupin Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Simmons, C. R.; Karplus, P. A.; Dominy, J. E.

    2011-01-01

    fingerprint motif for ADOs, or DUF1637 family members, is proposed. In ADOs, the conserved glutamate residue in cupin motif 1 is replaced by either glycine or valine. Both ADOs and CDOs appear to represent unique clades within the cupin superfamily. PMID:20195658

  11. Unique Challenges Testing SDRs for Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Sandra; Chelmins, David; Downey, Joseph; Nappier, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the approach used by the Space Communication and Navigation (SCaN) Testbed team to qualify three Software Defined Radios (SDR) for operation in space and the characterization of the platform to enable upgrades on-orbit. The three SDRs represent a significant portion of the new technologies being studied on board the SCAN Testbed, which is operating on an external truss on the International Space Station (ISS). The SCaN Testbed provides experimenters an opportunity to develop and demonstrate experimental waveforms and applications for communication, networking, and navigation concepts and advance the understanding of developing and operating SDRs in space. Qualifying a Software Defined Radio for the space environment requires additional consideration versus a hardware radio. Tests that incorporate characterization of the platform to provide information necessary for future waveforms, which might exercise extended capabilities of the hardware, are needed. The development life cycle for the radio follows the software development life cycle, where changes can be incorporated at various stages of development and test. It also enables flexibility to be added with minor additional effort. Although this provides tremendous advantages, managing the complexity inherent in a software implementation requires a testing beyond the traditional hardware radio test plan. Due to schedule and resource limitations and parallel development activities, the subsystem testing of the SDRs at the vendor sites was primarily limited to typical fixed transceiver type of testing. NASA's Glenn Research Center (GRC) was responsible for the integration and testing of the SDRs into the SCaN Testbed system and conducting the investigation of the SDR to advance the technology to be accepted by missions. This paper will describe the unique tests that were conducted at both the subsystem and system level, including environmental testing, and present results. For example, test

  12. Kerala: a unique model of development.

    PubMed

    Kannan, K P; Thankappan, K R; Ramankutty, V; Aravindan, K P

    1991-12-01

    This article capsules health in terms of morbidity, mortality, and maternal and child health; sex ratios, and population density in Kerala state in India from a more expanded report. Kerala state is known for its highly literate and female literate, and poor income population, but its well advanced state of demographic transition. There is a declining population growth rate, a high average marriage age, a low fertility rate, and a high degree of population mobility. One of the unique features of Kerala is the high female literacy, and the favorable position of women in decision making and a matrilineal inheritance mode. The rights of the poor and underprivileged have been upheld. The largest part of government revenue is spent on education followed by health. Traditional healing systems such the ayurveda are strong in Kerala, and Christian missionaries have contributed to a caring tradition. Morbidity is high and mortality is low because medical interventions have affected morality only. The reduction of poverty and environmentally related diseases has not been accomplished inspite of land reform, mass schooling, and general egalitarian policies. Mortality declines and a decline in birth rates have lead to a more adult and aged population, which increases the prevalence of chronic degenerative diseases. Historically, the death rate in Kerala was always lower (25/1000 in 1930 and 6.4 in 1986). The gains in mortality were made in reducing infant mortality (27/1000), which is 4 times less than India as a whole and comparable to Korea, Panama, Yugoslavia, Sri Lanka, and Colombia. Lower female mortality occurs in the 0-4 years. Life expectancy which was the same as India's in 1930 is currently 12 years higher than India's. Females have a higher expectation of life. The sex ratio in 1981 was 1032 compared to India's of 935. Kerala had almost replacement level in 1985. The crude birth rate is 21 versus 32 for India. In addition to the decline in death rates of those 5

  13. Unique Challenges Testing SDRs for Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chelmins, David; Downey, Joseph A.; Johnson, Sandra K.; Nappier, Jennifer M.

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the approach used by the Space Communication and Navigation (SCaN) Testbed team to qualify three Software Defined Radios (SDR) for operation in space and the characterization of the platform to enable upgrades on-orbit. The three SDRs represent a significant portion of the new technologies being studied on board the SCAN Testbed, which is operating on an external truss on the International Space Station (ISS). The SCaN Testbed provides experimenters an opportunity to develop and demonstrate experimental waveforms and applications for communication, networking, and navigation concepts and advance the understanding of developing and operating SDRs in space. Qualifying a Software Defined Radio for the space environment requires additional consideration versus a hardware radio. Tests that incorporate characterization of the platform to provide information necessary for future waveforms, which might exercise extended capabilities of the hardware, are needed. The development life cycle for the radio follows the software development life cycle, where changes can be incorporated at various stages of development and test. It also enables flexibility to be added with minor additional effort. Although this provides tremendous advantages, managing the complexity inherent in a software implementation requires a testing beyond the traditional hardware radio test plan. Due to schedule and resource limitations and parallel development activities, the subsystem testing of the SDRs at the vendor sites was primarily limited to typical fixed transceiver type of testing. NASA s Glenn Research Center (GRC) was responsible for the integration and testing of the SDRs into the SCaN Testbed system and conducting the investigation of the SDR to advance the technology to be accepted by missions. This paper will describe the unique tests that were conducted at both the subsystem and system level, including environmental testing, and present results. For example, test

  14. Change detection on a hunch: pre-attentive vision allows "sensing" of unique feature changes.

    PubMed

    Ball, Felix; Busch, Niko A

    2015-11-01

    Studies on change detection and change blindness have investigated the nature of visual representations by testing the conditions under which observers are able to detect when an object in a complex scene changes from one moment to the next. Several authors have proposed that change detection can occur without identification of the changing object, but the perceptual processes underlying this phenomenon are currently unknown. We hypothesized that change detection without localization or identification occurs when the change happens outside the focus of attention. Such changes would usually go entirely unnoticed, unless the change brings about a modification of one of the feature maps representing the scene. Thus, the appearance or disappearance of a unique feature might be registered even in the absence of focused attention and without feature binding, allowing for change detection, but not localization or identification. We tested this hypothesis in three experiments, in which changes either involved colors that were already present elsewhere in the display or entirely unique colors. Observers detected whether any change had occurred and then localized or identified the change. Change detection without localization occurred almost exclusively when changes involved a unique color. Moreover, change detection without localization for unique feature changes was independent of the number of objects in the display and independent of change identification. These findings suggest that pre-attentive registration of a change on a feature map can give rise to a conscious experience even when feature binding has failed: that something has changed without knowing what or where. PMID:26353860

  15. ALKBHs-facilitated RNA modifications and de-modifications.

    PubMed

    A Alemu, Endalkachew; He, Chuan; Klungland, Arne

    2016-08-01

    The AlkB gene that protects E.coli against methylation damage to DNA was identified more than 3 decades ago. 20 years later, the AlkB protein was shown to catalyze repair of methylated DNA base lesions by oxidative demethylation. Two human AlkB homologs were characterized with similar DNA repair activities and seven additional human AlkB homologs were identified based on sequence homology. All these dioxygenases, ALKBH1-8 and FTO, contain a conserved α-ketoglutarate/iron-dependent domain for methyl modifications and de-modifications. Well-designed research over the last 10 years has identified unforeseen substrate heterogeneity for the AlkB homologs, including novel reversible methyl modifications in RNA. The discoveries of RNA demethylation catalyzed by AlkB family enzymes initiated a new realm of gene expression regulation, although the understanding of precise endogenous activities and roles of these RNA demethylases are still undeveloped. It is worth mentioning that the AlkB mechanism and use of α-ketoglutarate have also emerged to be essential for many enzymes in epigenetic reprogramming that modify and de-modify methylated bases in DNA and methylated amino acids in histones. PMID:27237585

  16. Unique Surface Modification of Silica Nanoparticles with Polyethylenimine (PEI) for siRNA Delivery Using Cerium Cation Coordination Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Kapilov-Buchman, Yekaterina; Lellouche, Emmanuel; Michaeli, Shulamit; Lellouche, Jean-Paul

    2015-05-20

    The discovery of RNA interference (RNAi) as a naturally occurring mechanism for gene knockdown has attracted considerable attention toward the use of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) for therapeutic purposes. The main obstacles of harnessing siRNAs as drugs are their inefficient delivery to cells and off-target effect making clinical applications very challenging. The positively charged, branched 25 kDa polyethylenimine (b-PEI) polymer is widely regarded as one of the most efficient nonviral commercially available transfection agents. However, it has also been shown that 25 kDa b-PEI is highly cytotoxic and can readily lead to cell death. In this specific context, this study presents the preparation and characterization of innovative 25 kDa b-PEI-decorated polycationic silica nanoparticles (SiO2 NPs) for cellular siRNA delivery and subsequent gene silencing. A new method of b-PEI attachment onto the SiO2 NP surface has been developed that makes use of cerium(III) cations (Ce(3+)), a lanthanide group element, as an effective noncovalent inorganic linker between both polyNH2-SiO2 nanoparticle (SPA NPs) surface and polycationic 25 kDa b-PEI polymer. Two resulting novel SPA-Ce-PEI NPs consist of similar amounts of b-PEI, while possessing different amounts of Ce(3+). Various analytical techniques (TEM, DLS, ζ potential, ICP-AES, and TGA) have been used to deeply characterize NPs physicochemical qualities. The observed results of Ce(3+)-dependent gene silencing and cytotoxic activities led us to conclusions about the role of Ce(3+)-N bonding during the chemical attachment of the 25 kDa b-PEI shell onto the NP surface. PMID:25830668

  17. Unique atom hyper-kagome order in Na4Ir3O8 and in low-symmetry spinel modifications.

    PubMed

    Talanov, V M; Shirokov, V B; Talanov, M V

    2015-05-01

    Group-theoretical and thermodynamic methods of the Landau theory of phase transitions are used to investigate the hyper-kagome atomic order in structures of ordered spinels and a spinel-like Na4Ir3O8 crystal. The formation of an atom hyper-kagome sublattice in Na4Ir3O8 is described theoretically on the basis of the archetype (hypothetical parent structure/phase) concept. The archetype structure of Na4Ir3O8 has a spinel-like structure (space group Fd\\bar 3m) and composition [Na1/2Ir3/2](16d)[Na3/2](16c)O(32e)4. The critical order parameter which induces hypothetical phase transition has been stated. It is shown that the derived structure of Na4Ir3O8 is formed as a result of the displacements of Na, Ir and O atoms, and ordering of Na, Ir and O atoms, ordering dxy, dxz, dyz orbitals as well. Ordering of all atoms takes place according to the type 1:3. Ir and Na atoms form an intriguing atom order: a network of corner-shared Ir triangles called a hyper-kagome lattice. The Ir atoms form nanoclusters which are named decagons. The existence of hyper-kagome lattices in six types of ordered spinel structures is predicted theoretically. The structure mechanisms of the formation of the predicted hyper-kagome atom order in some ordered spinel phases are established. For a number of cases typical diagrams of possible crystal phase states are built in the framework of the Landau theory of phase transitions. Thermodynamical conditions of hyper-kagome order formation are discussed by means of these diagrams. The proposed theory is in accordance with experimental data. PMID:25921499

  18. Plasma technologies application for building materials surface modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volokitin, G. G.; Skripnikova, N. K.; Volokitin, O. G.; Shehovtzov, V. V.; Luchkin, A. G.; Kashapov, N. F.

    2016-01-01

    Low temperature arc plasma was used to process building surface materials, such as silicate brick, sand lime brick, concrete and wood. It was shown that building surface materials modification with low temperature plasma positively affects frost resistance, water permeability and chemical resistance with high adhesion strength. Short time plasma processing is rather economical than traditional processing thermic methods. Plasma processing makes wood surface uniquely waterproof and gives high operational properties, dimensional and geometrical stability. It also increases compression resistance and decreases inner tensions level in material.

  19. The Modification of Biocellular Chemical Reactions by Environmental Physicochemicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishido, M.

    Environmental risk factors affect human biological system to different extent from modification of biochemical reaction to cellular catastrophe. There are considerable public concerns about electromagnetic fields and endocrine disruptors. Their risk assessments have not been fully achieved because of their scientific uncertainty: electromagnetic fields just modify the bioreaction in the restricted cells and endocrine disruptors are quite unique in that their expression is dependent on the exposure periods throughout a life. Thus, we here describe their molecular characterization to establish the new risk assessments for environmental physicochemicals.

  20. Optimization of Process Conditions for Enzymatic Modification of Alternan using Dextranase from Chaetomium erraticum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Alternan is a unique branched glucan with alternating a-(1 ' 6) and a-(1 ' 3) backbone linkages. We previously described the modification of alternan to a reduced molecular weight form using dextranase from Penicillium sp. The solution viscosity properties of this modified alternan resemble those ...

  1. Biological roles of the O-methyl phosphoramidate capsule modification in Campylobacter jejuni

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Campylobacter jejuni is a major cause of bacterial gastroenteritis worldwide, and the capsular polysaccharide (CPS) of this organism is required for persistence and disease. C. jejuni produces over 47 different capsular structures, including a unique O-methyl phosphoramidate (MeOPN) modification pre...

  2. Two Galaxies for a Unique Event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-04-01

    To celebrate the 100 Hours of Astronomy, ESO is sharing two stunning images of unusual galaxies, both belonging to the Sculptor group of galaxies. The images, obtained at two of ESO's observatories at La Silla and Paranal in Chile, illustrate the beauty of astronomy. ESO PR Photo 14a/09 Irregular Galaxy NGC 55 ESO PR Photo 14b/09 Spiral Galaxy NGC 7793 As part of the International Year of Astronomy 2009 Cornerstone project, 100 Hours of Astronomy, the ambitious "Around the World in 80 Telescopes" event is a unique live webcast over 24 hours, following night and day around the globe to some of the most advanced observatories on and off the planet. To provide a long-lasting memory of this amazing world tour, observatories worldwide are revealing wonderful, and previously unseen, astronomical images. For its part, ESO is releasing outstanding pictures of two galaxies, observed with telescopes at the La Silla and Paranal observatories. The first of these depicts the irregular galaxy NGC 55, a member of the prominent Sculptor group of galaxies in the southern constellation of Sculptor. The galaxy is about 70 000 light-years across, that is, a little bit smaller than our own Milky Way. NGC 55 actually resembles more our galactic neighbour, the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), although the LMC is seen face-on, whilst NGC 55 is edge-on. By studying about 20 planetary nebulae in this image, a team of astronomers found that NGC 55 is located about 7.5 million light-years away. They also found that the galaxy might be forming a bound pair with the gorgeous spiral galaxy NGC 300 . Planetary nebulae are the final blooming of Sun-like stars before their retirement as white dwarfs. This striking image of NGC 55, obtained with the Wide Field Imager on the 2.2-metre MPG/ESO telescope at La Silla, is dusted with a flurry of reddish nebulae, created by young, hot massive stars. Some of the more extended ones are not unlike those seen in the LMC, such as the Tarantula Nebula. The quality

  3. ROSAT Discovers Unique, Distant Cluster of Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1995-06-01

    Brightest X-ray Cluster Acts as Strong Gravitational Lens Based on exciting new data obtained with the ROSAT X-ray satellite and a ground-based telescope at the ESO La Silla Observatory, a team of European astronomers [2] has just discovered a very distant cluster of galaxies with unique properties. It emits the strongest X-ray emission of any cluster ever observed by ROSAT and is accompanied by two extraordinarily luminous arcs that represent the gravitationally deflected images of even more distant objects. The combination of these unusual characteristics makes this cluster, now known as RXJ1347.5-1145, a most interesting object for further cosmological studies. DISCOVERY AND FOLLOW-UP OBSERVATIONS This strange cluster of galaxies was discovered during the All Sky Survey with the ROSAT X-ray satellite as a moderately intense X-ray source in the constellation of Virgo. It could not be identified with any already known object and additional ground-based observations were therefore soon after performed with the Max-Planck-Society/ESO 2.2-metre telescope at the La Silla observatory in Chile. These observations took place within a large--scale redshift survey of X-ray clusters of galaxies detected by the ROSAT All Sky Survey, a so-called ``ESO Key Programme'' led by astronomers from the Max-Planck-Institut fur Extraterrestrische Physik and the Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera. The main aim of this programme is to identify cluster X-ray sources, to determine the distance to the X-ray emitting clusters and to investigate their overall properties. These observations permitted to measure the redshift of the RXJ1347.5-1145 cluster as z = 0.45, i.e. it moves away from us with a velocity (about 106,000 km/sec) equal to about one-third of the velocity of light. This is an effect of the general expansion of the universe and it allows to determine the distance as about 5,000 million light-years (assuming a Hubble constant of 75 km/sec/Mpc). In other words, we see these

  4. The Potential and Uniqueness of Virtual Environments for Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Leslie A.

    2008-01-01

    Virtual environments (VEs) are growing in popularity among educators and have unique potential for online learning. This paper describes the unique characteristics of VEs that make them an effective venue for online learning due to increased environmental presence. Unique characteristics of VEs include nature of visual stimuli, control of the…

  5. Dynamic RNA modifications in disease.

    PubMed

    Klungland, Arne; Dahl, John Arne

    2014-06-01

    While the presence of 6-methyladenosine (m6A) modifications in mRNA was noted several decades ago, the first enzyme reversing this modification was identified very recently. Today we know of two methyltransferases introducing m6A in mRNA--METTL3 and METTL14--and two demethylases that remove it have been identified-FTO (ALKBH9) and ALKBH5. The conserved role of m6A seems to relate to meiosis, and mice lacking ALKBH5 are infertile. While loss-of-function mutation in FTO causes a recessive lethal syndrome, sequence variants in introns of the FTO gene are associated with obesity and type 2 diabetes. PMID:25005745

  6. Modification of chemotherapy by nitroimidazoles

    SciTech Connect

    Siemann, D.W.

    1984-09-01

    The potentiation of chemotherapeutic agents by radiation sensitizers has been extensively studied for several years. There is little doubt that the effectiveness of certain anti-cancer drugs, primarily alkylating agents, can readily be enhanced both in vitro and in vivo through the addition of a sensitizer. While enhanced effects have been observed in certain critical normal tissues, in general most animal model studies have demonstrated a therapeutic gain at large sensitizer doses. This approach to combination therapies therefore appears promising. Yet many questions concerning the interaction between chemotherapeutic agents and radiosensitizers, particularly in the aspects of modification of chemotherapy by nitroimidazoles are reviewed and discussed. These address the importance in chemopotentiation of (i) hypoxia, (ii) alterations in DNA damage and/or repair, (iii) depletion of intracellular sulfhydryls and (iv) modification of drug pharmacokinetics.

  7. Medium Modification of Vector Mesons

    SciTech Connect

    Chaden Djalali, Michael Paolone, Dennis Weygand, Michael H. Wood, Rakhsha Nasseripour

    2011-03-01

    The theory of the strong interaction, Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD), has been remarkably successful in describing high-energy and short-distance-scale experiments involving quarks and gluons. However, applying QCD to low energy and large-distance scale experiments has been a major challenge. Various QCD-inspired models predict a partial restoration of chiral symmetry in nuclear matter with modifications of the properties of hadrons from their free-space values. Measurable changes such as a shift in mass and/or a change of width are predicted at normal nuclear density. Photoproduction of vector mesons off nuclei have been performed at different laboratories. The properties of the ρ, ω and φ mesons are investigated either directly by measuring their mass spectra or indirectly through transparency ratios. The latest results regarding medium modifications of the vector mesons in the nuclear medium will be discussed.

  8. Dramatic colour changes in a bird of paradise caused by uniquely structured breast feather barbules.

    PubMed

    Stavenga, Doekele G; Leertouwer, Hein L; Marshall, N Justin; Osorio, Daniel

    2011-07-22

    The breast-plate plumage of male Lawes' parotia (Parotia lawesii) produces dramatic colour changes when this bird of paradise displays on its forest-floor lek. We show that this effect is achieved not solely by the iridescence--that is an angular-dependent spectral shift of the reflected light--which is inherent in structural coloration, but is based on a unique anatomical modification of the breast-feather barbule. The barbules have a segmental structure, and in common with many other iridescent feathers, they contain stacked melanin rodlets surrounded by a keratin film. The unique property of the parotia barbules is their boomerang-like cross section. This allows each barbule to work as three coloured mirrors: a yellow-orange reflector in the plane of the feather, and two symmetrically positioned bluish reflectors at respective angles of about 30°. Movement during the parotia's courtship displays thereby achieves much larger and more abrupt colour changes than is possible with ordinary iridescent plumage. To our knowledge, this is the first example of multiple thin film or multi-layer reflectors incorporated in a single structure (engineered or biological). It nicely illustrates how subtle modification of the basic feather structure can achieve novel visual effects. The fact that the parotia's breast feathers seem to be specifically adapted to give much stronger colour changes than normal structural coloration implies that colour change is important in their courtship display. PMID:21159676

  9. Epigenetic Modifications in Essential Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Wise, Ingrid A.; Charchar, Fadi J.

    2016-01-01

    Essential hypertension (EH) is a complex, polygenic condition with no single causative agent. Despite advances in our understanding of the pathophysiology of EH, hypertension remains one of the world’s leading public health problems. Furthermore, there is increasing evidence that epigenetic modifications are as important as genetic predisposition in the development of EH. Indeed, a complex and interactive genetic and environmental system exists to determine an individual’s risk of EH. Epigenetics refers to all heritable changes to the regulation of gene expression as well as chromatin remodelling, without involvement of nucleotide sequence changes. Epigenetic modification is recognized as an essential process in biology, but is now being investigated for its role in the development of specific pathologic conditions, including EH. Epigenetic research will provide insights into the pathogenesis of blood pressure regulation that cannot be explained by classic Mendelian inheritance. This review concentrates on epigenetic modifications to DNA structure, including the influence of non-coding RNAs on hypertension development. PMID:27023534

  10. [Advances in genetic modification technologies].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Baixue; Sun, Qixin; Li, Haifeng

    2015-08-01

    Genetic modification technology is a new molecular tool for targeted genome modification. It includes zinc finger nucleases (ZFN) technology, transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALEN) technology and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)-associated (Cas) (CRISPR-Cas) nucleases technology. All of these nucleases create DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) at chromosomal targeted sites and induce cell endogenous mechanisms that are primarily repaired by the non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) or homologous recombination (HR) pathway, resulting in targeted endogenous gene knock-out or exogenous gene insertion. In recent years, genetic modification technologies have been successfully applied to bacteria, yeast, human cells, fruit fly, zebra fish, mouse, rat, livestock, cynomolgus monkey, Arabidopsis, rice, tobacco, maize, sorghum, wheat, barley and other organisms, showing its enormous advantage in gene editing field. Especially, the newly developed CRISPR-Cas9 system arose more attention because of its low cost, high effectiveness, simplicity and easiness. We reviewed the principles and the latest research progress of these three technologies, as well as prospect of future research and applications. PMID:26762038

  11. 77 FR 73054 - Petition for Modification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-07

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Mine Safety and Health Administration Petition for Modification AGENCY: Mine Safety and Health Administration, Labor. ACTION: Notice; correction. SUMMARY: This notice amends a petition for modification published...

  12. DNA modifications: Another stable base in DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brazauskas, Pijus; Kriaucionis, Skirmantas

    2014-12-01

    Oxidation of 5-methylcytosine has been proposed to mediate active and passive DNA demethylation. Tracking the history of DNA modifications has now provided the first solid evidence that 5-hydroxymethylcytosine is a stable epigenetic modification.

  13. Implementing a QA program for plant modifications

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, D.R.

    1985-11-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the implementation of the quality assurance (QA) program within the modification process at Niagara Mohawk Power Corporation. The modification process includes design, procurement, installation, transition to operations, and closeout. Niagara Mohawk Power Corporation operates one nuclear power plant, a 610-MW General Electric (GE) boiling water reactor, and has another under construction, a 1080-MW GE reactor planned for commercial operation in October 1986. Niagara Mohawk has achieved a marked improvement in the implementation of its nuclear modifications. Modifications are now generally completed within budget and either on schedule or ahead of schedule. An example (the recirculation pipe replacement modification) is discussed and illustrates the increased QA attention to major modifications. This modification was a success from both Niagara Mohawk's point of view and also from our contractor's point of view. The implementation of the quality plan was a positive factor in the success of this modification.

  14. 40 CFR 60.397 - Modifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Coating Operations § 60.397 Modifications. The following physical or operational changes are not, by themselves, considered modifications of existing facilities: (a) Changes as a result of model...

  15. The Effects of Need for Uniqueness and Uniqueness Relevant Feedback on Mood, Recall, and Perceptions of Peers and the Self.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Case, Thomas L.; Rosen, Signey

    According to the Uniqueness theory, individuals characteristically desire to perceive themselves as moderately different from others. The effects of need for uniqueness and uniqueness relevant feedback on mood, recall, and perceptions of peers and the self were examined in 60 college students who participated in a two-part study. In part one of…

  16. Modification of Alternan by Dextranase

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Alternan is a unique glucan with a backbone structure of alternating alpha-(1=-6) and alpha-(1=-3) linkages. Previously, we isolated strains of Penicillium sp. that modify native, high molecular weight alternan in a novel bioconversion process to a lower molecular weight form with solution viscosit...

  17. Energy conservation potential of surface modification technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Le, H.K.; Horne, D.M.; Silberglitt, R.S.

    1985-09-01

    This report assesses the energy conservation impact of surface modification technologies on the metalworking industries. The energy conservation impact of surface modification technologies on the metalworking industries is assessed by estimating their friction and wear tribological sinks and the subsequent reduction in these sinks when surface modified tools are used. Ion implantation, coatings, and laser and electron beam surface modifications are considered.

  18. Modification Of Gear Teeth To Reduce Vibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, Dennis P.; Oswald, Fred B.; Lin, Hsiang Hsi

    1990-01-01

    Computer simulations yield data useful in designing for low noise. Effects of modifications in shape of gear teeth upon static transmission error and dynamic loading of gears now analyzed systematically. Design curves generated by conducting numerical simulations of dynamic effects at successive incremental modifications of gear systems operated at various applied loads. Modifications that result in minimum dynamic effect determined from design curves.

  19. All about that fat: Lipid modification of proteins in Cryptococcus neoformans

    PubMed Central

    Santiago-Tirado, Felipe H.; Doering, Tamara L.

    2016-01-01

    Lipid modification of proteins is a widespread, essential process whereby fatty acids, cholesterol, isoprenoids, phospholipids, or glycosylphospholipids are attached to polypeptides. These hydrophobic groups may affect protein structure, function, localization, and/or stability; as a consequence such modifications play critical regulatory roles in cellular systems. Recent advances in chemical biology and proteomics have allowed the profiling of modified proteins, enabling dissection of the functional consequences of lipid addition. The enzymes that mediate lipid modification are specific for both the lipid and protein substrates, and are conserved from fungi to humans. In this article we review these enzymes, their substrates, and the processes involved in eukaryotic lipid modification of proteins. We further focus on its occurrence in the fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans, highlighting unique features that are both relevant for the biology of the organism and potentially important in the search for new therapies. PMID:26920881

  20. Modification of Nanostructures via Laser Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franzel, Louis Avery

    Modification of nanostructures via laser processing is of great interest for a wide range of applications such as aerospace and the storage of nuclear waste. The primary goal of this dissertation is to improve the understanding of nanostructures through two primary routes: the modification of aerogels and pulsed laser ablation in ethanol. A new class of materials, patterned aerogels, was fabricated by photopolymerizing selected regions of homogeneous aerogel monoliths using visible light. The characterization and fabrication of functionally graded, cellular and compositionally anisotropic aerogels and ceramics is discussed. Visible light was utilized due to it's minimal absorption and scattering by organic molecules and oxide nanoparticles within wet gels. This allowed for the fabrication of deeply penetrating, well resolved patterns. Similarly, nanoporous monoliths with a typical aerogel core and a mechanically robust exterior ceramic layer were synthesized from silica aerogels cross-linked with polyacrylonitrile. Simple variations of the exposure geometry allowed fabrication of a wide variety of anisotropic materials without requiring layering or bonding. Nanoparticle solutions were prepared by laser ablation of metal foils (Fe and Mo) in ethanol. Ablation of Fe generated Fe3O4 and Fe3C nanoparticles which were superparamagnetic with a saturation magnetization Ms = 124 emu/g. Zero field cooled (ZFC) measurements collected at an applied field of 50 Oe displayed a maximum magnetic susceptibility at 120 K with a broad distribution. Field cooled (FC) measurements showed a thermal hysteresis indicative of temperature dependent magnetic viscosity. Pulsed laser ablation of a Mo foil in ethanol generated inhomogeneous nanoparticles where Mo and MoC coexisted within the same aggregate. Formation of these unique nanoparticles is likely due to phase separation that occurs when a high temperature carbide phase cools after the laser pulse terminates. Similarly, magnetic

  1. Modification of Nanostructures via Laser Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franzel, Louis Avery

    Modification of nanostructures via laser processing is of great interest for a wide range of applications such as aerospace and the storage of nuclear waste. The primary goal of this dissertation is to improve the understanding of nanostructures through two primary routes: the modification of aerogels and pulsed laser ablation in ethanol. A new class of materials, patterned aerogels, was fabricated by photopolymerizing selected regions of homogeneous aerogel monoliths using visible light. The characterization and fabrication of functionally graded, cellular and compositionally anisotropic aerogels and ceramics is discussed. Visible light was utilized due to it's minimal absorption and scattering by organic molecules and oxide nanoparticles within wet gels. This allowed for the fabrication of deeply penetrating, well resolved patterns. Similarly, nanoporous monoliths with a typical aerogel core and a mechanically robust exterior ceramic layer were synthesized from silica aerogels cross-linked with polyacrylonitrile. Simple variations of the exposure geometry allowed fabrication of a wide variety of anisotropic materials without requiring layering or bonding. Nanoparticle solutions were prepared by laser ablation of metal foils (Fe and Mo) in ethanol. Ablation of Fe generated Fe3O4 and Fe3C nanoparticles which were superparamagnetic with a saturation magnetization Ms = 124 emu/g. Zero field cooled (ZFC) measurements collected at an applied field of 50 Oe displayed a maximum magnetic susceptibility at 120 K with a broad distribution. Field cooled (FC) measurements showed a thermal hysteresis indicative of temperature dependent magnetic viscosity. Pulsed laser ablation of a Mo foil in ethanol generated inhomogeneous nanoparticles where Mo and MoC coexisted within the same aggregate. Formation of these unique nanoparticles is likely due to phase separation that occurs when a high temperature carbide phase cools after the laser pulse terminates. Similarly, magnetic

  2. Piperine: bioactivities and structural modifications.

    PubMed

    Qu, Huan; Lv, Min; Xu, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Piperine is a simple alkaloid isolated from the seeds of Piper nigrum. Piperine and its derivatives exhibited a wide range of biological properties such as antitumor activity, antioxidant activity, antiinflammatory activity, antimycobacterial activity, insecticidal activity, etc. Although five excellent reviews have recently been described by Srinivasan in 2007, Mao in 2011, Butt in 2013, and Meghwal in 2013, respectively, their topics were mainly focused on the biological effects. Therefore, in the present review, the progress in the structural modifications on the aliphatic chain and the amide moiety of piperine was reported. Meanwhile, the biological activities and structure-activity relationship of piperine and its derivatives were also described. PMID:25553428

  3. Chromatin Proteomics Reveals Variable Histone Modifications during the Life Cycle of Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    de Jesus, Teresa Cristina Leandro; Nunes, Vinícius Santana; Lopes, Mariana de Camargo; Martil, Daiana Evelin; Iwai, Leo Kei; Moretti, Nilmar Silvio; Machado, Fabrício Castro; de Lima-Stein, Mariana L; Thiemann, Otavio Henrique; Elias, Maria Carolina; Janzen, Christian; Schenkman, Sergio; da Cunha, Julia Pinheiro Chagas

    2016-06-01

    Histones are well-conserved proteins that form the basic structure of chromatin in eukaryotes and undergo several post-translational modifications, which are important for the control of transcription, replication, DNA damage repair, and chromosome condensation. In early branched organisms, histones are less conserved and appear to contain alternative sites for modifications, which could reveal evolutionary unique functions of histone modifications in gene expression and other chromatin-based processes. Here, by using high-resolution mass spectrometry, we identified and quantified histone post-translational modifications in two life cycle stages of Trypanosoma cruzi, the protozoan parasite that causes Chagas disease. We detected 44 new modifications, namely: 18 acetylations, seven monomethylations, seven dimethylations, seven trimethylations, and four phosphorylations. We found that replicative (epimastigote stage) contains more histone modifications than nonreplicative and infective parasites (trypomastigote stage). Acetylations of lysines at the C-terminus of histone H2A and methylations of lysine 23 of histone H3 were found to be enriched in trypomastigotes. In contrast, phosphorylation in serine 23 of H2B and methylations of lysine 76 of histone H3 predominates in proliferative states. The presence of one or two methylations in the lysine 76 was found in cells undergoing mitosis and cytokinesis, typical of proliferating parasites. Our findings provide new insights into the role of histone modifications related to the control of gene expression and cell-cycle regulation in an early divergent organism. PMID:27108550

  4. Ion Beam Modification of Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Averback, B; de la Rubia, T D; Felter, T E; Hamza, A V; Rehn, L E

    2005-10-10

    This volume contains the proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Ion Beam Modification of Materials, IBMM 2004, and is published by Elsevier-Science Publishers as a special issue of Nuclear Instruments and Methods B. The conference series is the major international forum to present and discuss recent research results and future directions in the field of ion beam modification, synthesis and characterization of materials. The first conference in the series was held in Budapest, Hungary, 1978, and subsequent conferences were held every two years at locations around the Globe, most recently in Japan, Brazil, and the Netherlands. The series brings together physicists, materials scientists, and ion beam specialists from all over the world. The official conference language is English. IBMM 2004 was held on September 5-10, 2004. The focus was on materials science involving both basic ion-solid interaction processes and property changes occurring either during or subsequent to ion bombardment and ion beam processing in relation to materials and device applications. Areas of research included Nanostructures, Multiscale Modeling, Patterning of Surfaces, Focused Ion Beams, Defects in Semiconductors, Insulators and Metals, Cluster Beams, Radiation Effects in Materials, Photonic Devices, Ion Implantation, Ion Beams in Biology and Medicine including New Materials, Imaging, and Treatment.

  5. Theorems on Positive Data: On the Uniqueness of NMF

    PubMed Central

    Laurberg, Hans; Christensen, Mads Græsbøll; Plumbley, Mark D.; Hansen, Lars Kai; Jensen, Søren Holdt

    2008-01-01

    We investigate the conditions for which nonnegative matrix factorization (NMF) is unique and introduce several theorems which can determine whether the decomposition is in fact unique or not. The theorems are illustrated by several examples showing the use of the theorems and their limitations. We have shown that corruption of a unique NMF matrix by additive noise leads to a noisy estimation of the noise-free unique solution. Finally, we use a stochastic view of NMF to analyze which characterization of the underlying model will result in an NMF with small estimation errors. PMID:18497868

  6. Germline modification of domestic animals

    PubMed Central

    Tang, L.; González, R.; Dobrinski, I.

    2016-01-01

    Genetically-modified domestic animal models are of increasing significance in biomedical research and agriculture. As authentic ES cells derived from domestic animals are not yet available, the prevailing approaches for engineering genetic modifications in those animals are pronuclear microinjection and somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT, also known as cloning). Both pronuclear microinjection and SCNT are inefficient, costly, and time-consuming. In animals produced by pronuclear microinjection, the exogenous transgene is usually inserted randomly into the genome, which results in highly variable expression patterns and levels in different founders. Therefore, significant efforts are required to generate and screen multiple founders to obtain animals with optimal transgene expression. For SCNT, specific genetic modifications (both gain-of-function and loss-of-function) can be engineered and carefully selected in the somatic cell nucleus before nuclear transfer. SCNT has been used to generate a variety of genetically modified animals such as goats, pigs, sheep and cattle; however, animals resulting from SCNT frequently suffer from developmental abnormalities associated with incomplete nuclear reprogramming. Other strategies to generate genetically-modified animals rely on the use of the spermatozoon as a natural vector to introduce genetic material into the female gamete. This sperm mediated DNA transfer (SMGT) combined with intracytoplasmatic sperm injection (ICSI) has relatively high efficiency and allows the insertion of large DNA fragments, which, in turn, enhance proper gene expression. An approach currently being developed to complement SCNT for producing genetically modified animals is germ cell transplantation using genetically modified male germline stem cells (GSCs). This approach relies on the ability of GSCs that are genetically modified in vitro to colonize the recipient testis and produce donor derived sperm upon transplantation. As the genetic change

  7. Review of Rule Modification in Sport

    PubMed Central

    Arias, Jose L.; Argudo, Francisco M.; Alonso, Jose I.

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this qualitative review was to analyze the state of the bibliography about rule modification in sport. In the literature reviewed, there are few studies of rule modification and related aspects. Most studies omit mentioning the purpose of the modifications, but they do refer to the goals of their analysis (improving players' performance, attracting spectators and athletes, attending to commercial pressure, adapting the sport to children’s needs and interests, preventing injuries). Eighty percent of the studies did not report the outcome of the previous modifications they analyzed. More than half of the studies (60%) achieved the proposed goals. Nearly two-thirds (63.83%) analyzed the effect of rule modification on game actions occurring during the game or through a test. Most of the studies (91.5%) did not consult the participants. Three-fourths of the studies (74.46%) examined the effect of rule modification without any knowledge of a previous analysis or without any previous analysis, and 74.47% studied rule modification related to internal logic. Modifications to be introduced in a sport should be analyzed through a reflective process before their final introduction. The following points should be considered: establishing goals, respecting the basic rules without modifying them, becoming familiar with players’ and coaches’ opinions, determining the effect of the modification on a wide spectrum of variables, elaborating useful proposals for the organizations that are responsible for competitions, using more than one type of data, modifying the internal logic and, preferably, the functional rules, and following some basic stages to consolidate rule modification. Key points Rule modification involves processes that seek change in the game conditions with a certain goal in mind. The rules related to internal logic model the game actions that are characteristic of a sport. Functional rules facilitate achieving the goals. There are few valid research

  8. Uniqueness of extremal Kerr and Kerr-Newman black holes

    SciTech Connect

    Amsel, Aaron J.; Horowitz, Gary T.; Marolf, Donald; Roberts, Matthew M.

    2010-01-15

    We prove that the only four-dimensional, stationary, rotating, asymptotically flat (analytic) vacuum black hole with a single degenerate horizon is given by the extremal Kerr solution. We also prove a similar uniqueness theorem for the extremal Kerr-Newman solution. This closes a long-standing gap in the black hole uniqueness theorems.

  9. 45 CFR 162.506 - Standard unique health plan identifier.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Standard unique health plan identifier. 162.506 Section 162.506 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES ADMINISTRATIVE DATA STANDARDS AND RELATED REQUIREMENTS ADMINISTRATIVE REQUIREMENTS Standard Unique Health Identifier for Health Plans §...

  10. 48 CFR 552.211-93 - Unique Item Identification (UID).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Unique Item Identification (UID). 552.211-93 Section 552.211-93 Federal Acquisition Regulations System GENERAL SERVICES ADMINISTRATION CLAUSES AND FORMS SOLICITATION PROVISIONS AND CONTRACT CLAUSES Text of Provisions and Clauses 552.211-93 Unique Item Identification (UID)....