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Sample records for unique hypusine modification

  1. Protein-protein-interaction Network Organization of the Hypusine Modification System*

    PubMed Central

    Sievert, Henning; Venz, Simone; Platas-Barradas, Oscar; Dhople, Vishnu M.; Schaletzky, Martin; Nagel, Claus-Henning; Braig, Melanie; Preukschas, Michael; Pällmann, Nora; Bokemeyer, Carsten; Brümmendorf, Tim H.; Pörtner, Ralf; Walther, Reinhard; Duncan, Kent E.; Hauber, Joachim; Balabanov, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    Hypusine modification of eukaryotic initiation factor 5A (eIF-5A) represents a unique and highly specific post-translational modification with regulatory functions in cancer, diabetes, and infectious diseases. However, the specific cellular pathways that are influenced by the hypusine modification remain largely unknown. To globally characterize eIF-5A and hypusine-dependent pathways, we used an approach that combines large-scale bioreactor cell culture with tandem affinity purification and mass spectrometry: “bioreactor-TAP-MS/MS.” By applying this approach systematically to all four components of the hypusine modification system (eIF-5A1, eIF-5A2, DHS, and DOHH), we identified 248 interacting proteins as components of the cellular hypusine network, with diverse functions including regulation of translation, mRNA processing, DNA replication, and cell cycle regulation. Network analysis of this data set enabled us to provide a comprehensive overview of the protein-protein interaction landscape of the hypusine modification system. In addition, we validated the interaction of eIF-5A with some of the newly identified associated proteins in more detail. Our analysis has revealed numerous novel interactions, and thus provides a valuable resource for understanding how this crucial homeostatic signaling pathway affects different cellular functions. PMID:22888148

  2. Protein-protein-interaction network organization of the hypusine modification system.

    PubMed

    Sievert, Henning; Venz, Simone; Platas-Barradas, Oscar; Dhople, Vishnu M; Schaletzky, Martin; Nagel, Claus-Henning; Braig, Melanie; Preukschas, Michael; Pällmann, Nora; Bokemeyer, Carsten; Brümmendorf, Tim H; Pörtner, Ralf; Walther, Reinhard; Duncan, Kent E; Hauber, Joachim; Balabanov, Stefan

    2012-11-01

    Hypusine modification of eukaryotic initiation factor 5A (eIF-5A) represents a unique and highly specific post-translational modification with regulatory functions in cancer, diabetes, and infectious diseases. However, the specific cellular pathways that are influenced by the hypusine modification remain largely unknown. To globally characterize eIF-5A and hypusine-dependent pathways, we used an approach that combines large-scale bioreactor cell culture with tandem affinity purification and mass spectrometry: "bioreactor-TAP-MS/MS." By applying this approach systematically to all four components of the hypusine modification system (eIF-5A1, eIF-5A2, DHS, and DOHH), we identified 248 interacting proteins as components of the cellular hypusine network, with diverse functions including regulation of translation, mRNA processing, DNA replication, and cell cycle regulation. Network analysis of this data set enabled us to provide a comprehensive overview of the protein-protein interaction landscape of the hypusine modification system. In addition, we validated the interaction of eIF-5A with some of the newly identified associated proteins in more detail. Our analysis has revealed numerous novel interactions, and thus provides a valuable resource for understanding how this crucial homeostatic signaling pathway affects different cellular functions. PMID:22888148

  3. The effect of hypusine modification on the intracellular localization of eIF5A

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Seung Bum; Park, Jong Hwan; Kaevel, Joern; Sramkova, Monika; Weigert, Roberto; Park, Myung Hee

    2009-06-12

    Eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5A (eIF5A) is a highly conserved protein essential for eukaryotic cell proliferation and is the only protein containing hypusine, [N{sup {epsilon}}-(4-amino-2-hydroxybutyl)lysine]. eIF5A is activated by the post-translational synthesis of hypusine. eIF5A also undergoes an acetylation at specific Lys residue(s). In this study, we have investigated the effect of hypusine modification and acetylation on the subcellular localization of eIF5A. Immunocytochemical analyses showed differences in the distribution of non-hypusinated eIF5A precursor and the hypusine-containing mature eIF5A. While the precursor is found in both cytoplasm and nucleus, the hypusinated eIF5A is primarily localized in cytoplasm. eIF5A mutant proteins, defective in hypusine modification (K50A, K50R) were localized in a similar manner to the eIF5A precursor, whereas hypusine-modified mutant proteins (K47A, K47R, K68A) were localized mainly in the cytoplasm. These findings provide strong evidence that the hypusine modification of eIF5A dictates its localization in the cytoplasmic compartment where it is required for protein synthesis.

  4. A unique modification of the eukaryotic initiation factor 5A shows the presence of the complete hypusine pathway in Leishmania donovani.

    PubMed

    Chawla, Bhavna; Kumar, Ravi Ranjan; Tyagi, Nidhi; Subramanian, Gowri; Srinivasan, N; Park, Myung Hee; Madhubala, Rentala

    2012-01-01

    Deoxyhypusine hydroxylase (DOHH) catalyzes the final step in the post-translational synthesis of an unusual amino acid hypusine (N(€)-(4-amino-2-hydroxybutyl) lysine), which is present on only one cellular protein, eukaryotic initiation factor 5A (eIF5A). We present here the molecular and structural basis of the function of DOHH from the protozoan parasite, Leishmania donovani, which causes visceral leishmaniasis. The L. donovani DOHH gene is 981 bp and encodes a putative polypeptide of 326 amino acids. DOHH is a HEAT-repeat protein with eight tandem repeats of α-helical pairs. Four conserved histidine-glutamate sequences have been identified that may act as metal coordination sites. A ~42 kDa recombinant protein with a His-tag was obtained by heterologous expression of DOHH in Escherichia coli. Purified recombinant DOHH effectively catalyzed the hydroxylation of the intermediate, eIF5A-deoxyhypusine (eIF5A-Dhp), in vitro. L. donovani DOHH (LdDOHH) showed ~40.6% sequence identity with its human homolog. The alignment of L. donovani DOHH with the human homolog shows that there are two significant insertions in the former, corresponding to the alignment positions 159-162 (four amino acid residues) and 174-183 (ten amino acid residues) which are present in the variable loop connecting the N- and C-terminal halves of the protein, the latter being present near the substrate binding site. Deletion of the ten-amino-acid-long insertion decreased LdDOHH activity to 14% of the wild type recombinant LdDOHH. Metal chelators like ciclopirox olamine (CPX) and mimosine significantly inhibited the growth of L. donovani and DOHH activity in vitro. These inhibitors were more effective against the parasite enzyme than the human enzyme. This report, for the first time, confirms the presence of a complete hypusine pathway in a kinetoplastid unlike eubacteria and archaea. The structural differences between the L. donovani DOHH and the human homolog may be exploited for structure based design of selective inhibitors against the parasite. PMID:22438895

  5. A novel mouse model for inhibition of DOHH-mediated hypusine modification reveals a crucial function in embryonic development, proliferation and oncogenic transformation

    PubMed Central

    Sievert, Henning; Pällmann, Nora; Miller, Katharine K.; Hermans-Borgmeyer, Irm; Venz, Simone; Sendoel, Ataman; Preukschas, Michael; Schweizer, Michaela; Boettcher, Steffen; Janiesch, P. Christoph; Streichert, Thomas; Walther, Reinhard; Hengartner, Michael O.; Manz, Markus G.; Brümmendorf, Tim H.; Bokemeyer, Carsten; Braig, Melanie; Hauber, Joachim; Duncan, Kent E.; Balabanov, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    The central importance of translational control by post-translational modification has spurred major interest in regulatory pathways that control translation. One such pathway uniquely adds hypusine to eukaryotic initiation factor 5A (eIF5A), and thereby affects protein synthesis and, subsequently, cellular proliferation through an unknown mechanism. Using a novel conditional knockout mouse model and a Caenorhabditis elegans knockout model, we found an evolutionarily conserved role for the DOHH-mediated second step of hypusine synthesis in early embryonic development. At the cellular level, we observed reduced proliferation and induction of senescence in 3T3 Dohh?/? cells as well as reduced capability for malignant transformation. Furthermore, mass spectrometry showed that deletion of DOHH results in an unexpected complete loss of hypusine modification. Our results provide new biological insight into the physiological roles of the second step of the hypusination of eIF5A. Moreover, the conditional mouse model presented here provides a powerful tool for manipulating hypusine modification in a temporal and spatial manner, to analyse both how this unique modification normally functions in vivo as well as how it contributes to different pathological conditions. PMID:24832488

  6. A novel mouse model for inhibition of DOHH-mediated hypusine modification reveals a crucial function in embryonic development, proliferation and oncogenic transformation.

    PubMed

    Sievert, Henning; Pällmann, Nora; Miller, Katharine K; Hermans-Borgmeyer, Irm; Venz, Simone; Sendoel, Ataman; Preukschas, Michael; Schweizer, Michaela; Boettcher, Steffen; Janiesch, P Christoph; Streichert, Thomas; Walther, Reinhard; Hengartner, Michael O; Manz, Markus G; Brümmendorf, Tim H; Bokemeyer, Carsten; Braig, Melanie; Hauber, Joachim; Duncan, Kent E; Balabanov, Stefan

    2014-08-01

    The central importance of translational control by post-translational modification has spurred major interest in regulatory pathways that control translation. One such pathway uniquely adds hypusine to eukaryotic initiation factor 5A (eIF5A), and thereby affects protein synthesis and, subsequently, cellular proliferation through an unknown mechanism. Using a novel conditional knockout mouse model and a Caenorhabditis elegans knockout model, we found an evolutionarily conserved role for the DOHH-mediated second step of hypusine synthesis in early embryonic development. At the cellular level, we observed reduced proliferation and induction of senescence in 3T3 Dohh-/- cells as well as reduced capability for malignant transformation. Furthermore, mass spectrometry showed that deletion of DOHH results in an unexpected complete loss of hypusine modification. Our results provide new biological insight into the physiological roles of the second step of the hypusination of eIF5A. Moreover, the conditional mouse model presented here provides a powerful tool for manipulating hypusine modification in a temporal and spatial manner, to analyse both how this unique modification normally functions in vivo as well as how it contributes to different pathological conditions. PMID:24832488

  7. Structural Analysis and Optimization of Context-Independent Anti-Hypusine Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Qianting; He, Meng; Song, Aimin; Deshayes, Kurt; Dixit, Vishva M; Carter, Paul J

    2016-02-13

    Context-independent anti-hypusine antibodies that bind to the post-translational modification (PTM), hypusine, with minimal dependence on flanking amino acid sequences, were identified. The antibodies bind to both hypusine and deoxyhypusine or selectively to hypusine but not to deoxyhypusine. Phage display was used to further enhance the affinity of the antibodies. Affinity maturation of these anti-hypusine antibodies improved their performance in affinity capture of the only currently known hypusinated protein, eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5A. These anti-hypusine antibodies may have utility in the identification of novel hypusinated proteins. Crystal structures of the corresponding Fab fragments were determined in complex with hypusine- or deoxyhypusine-containing peptides. The hypusine or deoxyhypusine moiety was found to reside in a deep pocket formed between VH and VL domains of the Fab fragments. Interaction between the antibodies and hypusine includes an extensive hydrogen bond network. These are, to our knowledge, the first reported structures of context-independent anti-PTM antibodies in complex with the corresponding PTM. PMID:26778617

  8. Biochemical quantitation of the eIF5A hypusination in Arabidopsis thaliana uncovers ABA-dependent regulation

    PubMed Central

    Belda-Palazón, Borja; Nohales, María A.; Rambla, José L.; Aceña, José L.; Delgado, Oscar; Fustero, Santos; Martínez, M. Carmen; Granell, Antonio; Carbonell, Juan; Ferrando, Alejandro

    2014-01-01

    The eukaryotic translation elongation factor eIF5A is the only protein known to contain the unusual amino acid hypusine which is essential for its biological activity. This post-translational modification is achieved by the sequential action of the enzymes deoxyhypusine synthase (DHS) and deoxyhypusine hydroxylase (DOHH). The crucial molecular function of eIF5A during translation has been recently elucidated in yeast and it is expected to be fully conserved in every eukaryotic cell, however the functional description of this pathway in plants is still sparse. The genetic approaches with transgenic plants for either eIF5A overexpression or antisense have revealed some activities related to the control of cell death processes but the molecular details remain to be characterized. One important aspect of fully understanding this pathway is the biochemical description of the hypusine modification system. Here we have used recombinant eIF5A proteins either modified by hypusination or non-modified to establish a bi-dimensional electrophoresis (2D-E) profile for the three eIF5A protein isoforms and their hypusinated or unmodified proteoforms present in Arabidopsis thaliana. The combined use of the recombinant 2D-E profile together with 2D-E/western blot analysis from whole plant extracts has provided a quantitative approach to measure the hypusination status of eIF5A. We have used this information to demonstrate that treatment with the hormone abscisic acid produces an alteration of the hypusine modification system in Arabidopsis thaliana. Overall this study presents the first biochemical description of the post-translational modification of eIF5A by hypusination which will be functionally relevant for future studies related to the characterization of this pathway in Arabidopsis thaliana. PMID:24904603

  9. The biosynthesis of hypusine (N epsilon-(4-amino-2-hydroxybutyl)lysine). Alignment of the butylamine segment and source of the secondary amino nitrogen.

    PubMed

    Park, M H; Liberato, D J; Yergey, A L; Folk, J E

    1984-10-10

    The unusual amino acid hypusine is produced in a single protein of mammalian cells by a novel posttranslational event in which a lysine residue is conjugated with the four-carbon moiety from the polyamine spermidine to form an intermediate deoxyhypusine, and in which this intermediate is subsequently hydroxylated. Specifically isotopically labeled precursors of hypusine were used to identify the biosynthetic origin of some of the atoms of hypusine and thus to provide further insight into the mechanism of this in vivo chemical modification reaction. Radiolabel from [1,4-3H] putrescine, [1,8-3H]spermidine, and [5-3H]spermidine entered hypusine during growth of Chinese hamster ovary cells. The occurrence of this label at positions 1 and 4, at position 4, and at position 1, respectively, in the 4-amino-2-hydroxybutyl portion of hypusine revealed an alignment of atoms identical to that in the butylamine segment of spermidine. Growth of cells with [epsilon-15N]lysine as the source of lysine yielded hypusine enriched in 15N, whereas only isotope-free hypusine during growth by [4-15N]spermidine. These was found in cells whose spermidine was replaced during growth by [4-15N]spermidine. These findings are in accordance with a proposal that the first phase of hypusine biosynthesis, the production of intermediate deoxyhypusine, occurs through transfer of the butylamine moiety from spermidine to the epsilon-amino nitrogen of protein-bound lysine. The technique of thermospray high-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry provided positive identification of 15N in hypusine through final separation and on-column direct analysis of this amino acid. Methods of preparation are given for spermidine of high specific radioactivity, labeled specifically at position 5 with 3H, and for spermidine with 15N at the 4-position. PMID:6434537

  10. Characterization of hypusine-containing 21,000-dalton protein in Neurospora crassa

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Yunchung.

    1989-01-01

    The deoxyhypusine/hypusine-containing 21,000-dalton protein was labeled by ({sup 3}H)spermidine both in vitro and in vivo in polyamine depleted Neurospora crassa arg-12 ota aga and aga mutants. The in vitro labeling of the 21,000-dalton protein could be dramatically stimulated by NAD{sup +} and NADP{sup +} but not by FMN or FAD. The in vitro labeled 21,000-dalton protein contained the radioactivity of deoxyhypusine and hypusine with a ratio of 2 to 1. The in vivo labeled protein resulted only in hypusine. Three isoform structures of the in vitro labeled 21,000-dalton protein were found with pl values ranging from 5.2 to 6.5. In contrast, the 21,000-dalton protein metabolically labeled in vivo with ({sup 3}H)ornithine gave only one spot with a pl value of 3.5. The deoxyhypusine-modifying enzyme is heat labile and has a half life of 40 min. The complete inhibition of deoxyhypusine-modifying enzyme by NEM and pCMBS suggests that the sulfhydryl group is required for the activity. The unmodified 21,000-dalton protein is heat stable and has a half life of more than 5 hrs. In order to determine the functional role of hypusine modification of 21,000-dalton protein, a protein synthesizing cell-free system has been established to translate endogenous mRNA to discrete polypeptides ranging up to 200,000-dalton. The inhibitory effect of spermidine on protein synthesis in cell-free system of unmodified 21,000-dalton protein is in contrast to the stimulatory effect on protein synthesis in cell-free system of modified protein, suggesting that unmodified 21,000-dalton protein might be responsible for the inhibitory effect of spermidine on protein synthesis in cell-free system containing unmodified 21,000-dalton protein.

  11. Cryptosporidium parvum has an active hypusine biosynthesis pathway

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Nimisha; Morada, Marie; Tripathi, Pankaj; Gowri, V.S.; Mandal, Swati; Quirch, Alison; Park, Myung Hee; Yarlett, Nigel; Madhubala, Rentala

    2014-01-01

    The protozoan parasite Cryptosporidium parvum causes severe enteric infection and diarrheal disease with substantial morbidity and mortality in untreated AIDS patients and children in developing or resource-limited countries. No fully effective treatment is available. Hypusination of eIF5A is an important post-translational modification essential for cell proliferation. This modification occurs in a two step process catalyzed by deoxyhypusine synthase (DHS) followed by deoxyhypusine hydroxylase. An ORF of 1086 bp was identified in the C. parvum (Cp) genome which encodes for a putative polypeptide of 362 amino acids. The recombinant CpDHS protein was purified to homogeneity and used to probe the enzyme’s mechanism, structure, and inhibition profile in a series of kinetic experiments. Sequence analysis and structural modeling of CpDHS were performed to probe differences with respect to the DHS of other species. Unlike Leishmania, Trypanosomes and Entamoeba, Cryptosporidium contains only a single gene for DHS. Phylogenetic analysis shows that CpDHS is more closely related to apicomplexan DHS than kinetoplastid DHS. Important residues that are essential for the functioning of the enzyme including NAD+ binding residues, spermidine binding residues and the active site lysine are conserved between CpDHS and human DHS. N1-guanyl-1.7-diaminoheptane (GC7), a potent inhibitor of DHS caused an effective inhibition of infection and growth of C. parvum in HCT-8 cells. PMID:24893338

  12. The hypusine-containing translation factor eIF5A

    PubMed Central

    Dever, Thomas E.; Gutierrez, Erik; Shin, Byung-Sik

    2014-01-01

    In addition to the small and large ribosomal subunits, aminoacyl-tRNAs, and an mRNA, cellular protein synthesis is dependent on translation factors. The eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5A (eIF5A) and its bacterial ortholog elongation factor P (EF-P) were initially characterized based on their ability to stimulate methionyl-puromycin (Met-Pmn) synthesis, a model assay for protein synthesis; however, the function of these factors in cellular protein synthesis has been difficult to resolve. Interestingly, a conserved lysine residue in eIF5A is post-translationally modified to hypusine and the corresponding lysine residue in EF-P from at least some bacteria is modified by the addition of a βlysine moiety. In this review, we provide a summary of recent data that have identified a novel role for the translation factor eIF5A and its hypusine modification in the elongation phase of protein synthesis and more specifically in stimulating the production of proteins containing runs of consecutive proline residues. PMID:25029904

  13. A tumour suppressor network relying on the polyamine–hypusine axis

    PubMed Central

    Scuoppo, Claudio; Miething, Cornelius; Lindqvist, Lisa; Reyes, José; Ruse, Cristian; Appelmann, Iris; Yoon, Seungtai; Krasnitz, Alexander; Teruya-Feldstein, Julie; Pappin, Darryl; Pelletier, Jerry; Lowe, Scott W.

    2012-01-01

    Tumour suppressor genes encode a broad class of molecules whose mutational attenuation contributes to malignant progression. In the canonical situation, the tumour suppressor is completely inactivated through a two-hit process involving a point mutation in one allele and chromosomal deletion of the other1. Here, to identify tumour suppressor genes in lymphoma, we screen a short hairpin RNA library targeting genes deleted in human lymphomas. We functionally identify those genes whose suppression promotes tumorigenesis in a mouse lymphoma model. Of the nine tumour suppressors we identified, eight correspond to genes occurring in three physically linked ‘clusters’, suggesting that the common occurrence of large chromosomal deletions in human tumours reflects selective pressure to attenuate multiple genes. Among the new tumour suppressors are adenosylmethionine decarboxylase 1 (AMD1) and eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5A (eIF5A), two genes associated with hypusine, a unique amino acid produced as a product of polyamine metabolism through a highly conserved pathway2. Through a secondary screen surveying the impact of all polyamine enzymes on tumorigenesis, we establish the polyamine–hypusine axis as a new tumour suppressor network regulating apoptosis. Unexpectedly, heterozygous deletions encompassing AMD1 and eIF5A often occur together in human lymphomas and co-suppression of both genes promotes lymphomagenesis in mice. Thus, some tumour suppressor functions can be disabled through a two-step process targeting different genes acting in the same pathway. PMID:22722845

  14. Unique carbon nanotube architectures via surface modification and capillary effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakrapani, Nirupama

    The extraordinary material properties of carbon nanotubes make them an ideal candidate for a plethora of applications and many fundamental scientific studies. However, precise control over morphology of nanotube-based structures is required before their potential could be realized. A method for surface character alteration and controlled defect induction based on plasma chemistry is presented. This process induces defects in the nanotube structure by way of functionalization and the extent of disorder can be controlled by plasma time and power. This treatment has been characterized by time dependent Raman and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. A better understanding of the changes in the vibrational modes of nanotubes with changes in their structure could be gained from this study. Formation of visually arresting cellular structures from aligned nanotubes by the evaporation of water was discovered. Cellular patterns arise frequently in nature on length scales ranging from microscopic to macroscopic as a result of spatially periodic and random perturbations. However, a film of aligned carbon nanotubes present an unique, yet unstudied system where pattern formation arise from the collapse and reassembly of highly ordered, anisotropic, elastic, nanoscale rods with remarkable properties. The nanoscale dimensions of the nanotube arrays magnify the capillary forces exerted by the evaporating solvent from the interstitial spaces. Shrinkage induced crack formation in the films due to strong capillary forces of evaporating solvent and aided by strong van der Waals interactions between condensed nanotubes, result in the formation of stable cellular patterns and contiguous foams. These foams can be elastically deformed, transferred to other substrates, or floated out to produce free-standing macroscopic fabrics. The length-scale, orientation and shape of cell could be controlled by varying experimental conditions such as the length of nanotubes, rate of evaporation, and array dimensions. Pattern formation could also be tailored by prefabricating nanotube arrays by simple lithographic techniques. This study is on the fundamental understanding of capillary effects in dense arrays of ordered nanotubes and the effect of surface modification of nanotubes. This simple self-assembly process is a novel way of creating different macroscopic morphologies and architectures with nanotubes.

  15. The Histone Code of Toxoplasma gondii Comprises Conserved and Unique Posttranslational Modifications

    PubMed Central

    Nardelli, Sheila C.; Che, Fa-Yun; Silmon de Monerri, Natalie C.; Xiao, Hui; Nieves, Edward; Madrid-Aliste, Carlos; Angel, Sergio O.; Sullivan, William J.; Angeletti, Ruth H.; Kim, Kami; Weiss, Louis M.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Epigenetic gene regulation has emerged as a major mechanism for gene regulation in all eukaryotes. Histones are small, basic proteins that constitute the major protein component of chromatin, and posttranslational modifications (PTM) of histones are essential for epigenetic gene regulation. The different combinations of histone PTM form the histone code for an organism, marking functional units of chromatin that recruit macromolecular complexes that govern chromatin structure and regulate gene expression. To characterize the repertoire of Toxoplasma gondii histone PTM, we enriched histones using standard acid extraction protocols and analyzed them with several complementary middle-down and bottom-up proteomic approaches with the high-resolution Orbitrap mass spectrometer using collision-induced dissociation (CID), higher-energy collisional dissociation (HCD), and/or electron transfer dissociation (ETD) fragmentation. We identified 249 peptides with unique combinations of PTM that comprise the T. gondii histone code. T. gondii histones share a high degree of sequence conservation with human histones, and many modifications are conserved between these species. In addition, T. gondii histones have unique modifications not previously identified in other species. Finally, T. gondii histones are modified by succinylation, propionylation, and formylation, recently described histone PTM that have not previously been identified in parasitic protozoa. The characterization of the T. gondii histone code will facilitate in-depth analysis of how epigenetic regulation affects gene expression in pathogenic apicomplexan parasites and identify a new model system for elucidating the biological functions of novel histone PTM. PMID:24327343

  16. Ambient response of a unique performance-based design building with dynamic response modification features

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Celebi, Mehmet; Huang, Moh; Shakal, Antony; Hooper, John; Klemencic, Ron

    2012-01-01

    A 64-story, performance-based design building with reinforced concrete core shear-walls and unique dynamic response modification features (tuned liquid sloshing dampers and buckling-restrained braces) has been instrumented with a monitoring array of 72 channels of accelerometers. Ambient vibration data recorded are analyzed to identify modes and associated frequencies and damping. The low-amplitude dynamic characteristics are considerably different than those computed from design analyses, but serve as a baseline against which to compare with future strong shaking responses. Such studies help to improve our understanding of the effectiveness of the added features to the building and help improve designs in the future.

  17. De novo sequencing of unique sequence tags for discovery of post-translational modifications of proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Yufeng; Tolic, Nikola; Hixson, Kim K.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Smith, Richard D.

    2008-10-15

    De novo sequencing has a promise to discover the protein post-translation modifications; however, such approach is still in their infancy and not widely applied for proteomics practices due to its limited reliability. In this work, we describe a de novo sequencing approach for discovery of protein modifications through identification of the UStags (Anal. Chem. 2008, 80, 1871-1882). The de novo information was obtained from Fourier-transform tandem mass spectrometry for peptides and polypeptides in a yeast lysate, and the de novo sequences obtained were filtered to define a more limited set of UStags. The DNA-predicted database protein sequences were then compared to the UStags, and the differences observed across or in the UStags (i.e., the UStags’ prefix and suffix sequences and the UStags themselves) were used to infer the possible sequence modifications. With this de novo-UStag approach, we uncovered some unexpected variances of yeast protein sequences due to amino acid mutations and/or multiple modifications to the predicted protein sequences. Random matching of the de novo sequences to the predicted sequences were examined with use of two random (false) databases, and ~3% false discovery rates were estimated for the de novo-UStag approach. The factors affecting the reliability (e.g., existence of de novo sequencing noise residues and redundant sequences) and the sensitivity are described. The de novo-UStag complements the UStag method previously reported by enabling discovery of new protein modifications.

  18. Unique Structural Modifications Are Present in the Lipopolysaccharide from Colistin-Resistant Strains of Acinetobacter baumannii

    PubMed Central

    Pelletier, Mark R.; Casella, Leila G.; Jones, Jace W.; Adams, Mark D.; Zurawski, Daniel V.; Hazlett, Karsten R. O.; Doi, Yohei

    2013-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is a nosocomial opportunistic pathogen that can cause severe infections, including hospital-acquired pneumonia, wound infections, and sepsis. Multidrug-resistant (MDR) strains are prevalent, further complicating patient treatment. Due to the increase in MDR strains, the cationic antimicrobial peptide colistin has been used to treat A. baumannii infections. Colistin-resistant strains of A. baumannii with alterations to the lipid A component of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) have been reported; specifically, the lipid A structure was shown to be hepta-acylated with a phosphoethanolamine (pEtN) modification present on one of the terminal phosphate residues. Using a tandem mass spectrometry platform, we provide definitive evidence that the lipid A isolated from colistin-resistant A. baumannii MAC204 LPS contains a novel structure corresponding to a diphosphoryl hepta-acylated lipid A structure with both pEtN and galactosamine (GalN) modifications. To correlate our structural studies with clinically relevant samples, we characterized colistin-susceptible and -resistant isolates obtained from patients. These results demonstrated that the clinical colistin-resistant isolate had the same pEtN and GalN modifications as those seen in the laboratory-adapted A. baumannii strain MAC204. In summary, this work has shown complete structure characterization including the accurate assignment of acylation, phosphorylation, and glycosylation of lipid A from A. baumannii, which are important for resistance to colistin. PMID:23877686

  19. Transcriptomic Sequencing Reveals a Set of Unique Genes Activated by Butyrate-Induced Histone Modification

    PubMed Central

    Li, Cong-Jun; Li, Robert W.; Baldwin, Ransom L.; Blomberg, Le Ann; Wu, Sitao; Li, Weizhong

    2016-01-01

    Butyrate is a nutritional element with strong epigenetic regulatory activity as a histone deacetylase inhibitor. Based on the analysis of differentially expressed genes in the bovine epithelial cells using RNA sequencing technology, a set of unique genes that are activated only after butyrate treatment were revealed. A complementary bioinformatics analysis of the functional category, pathway, and integrated network, using Ingenuity Pathways Analysis, indicated that these genes activated by butyrate treatment are related to major cellular functions, including cell morphological changes, cell cycle arrest, and apoptosis. Our results offered insight into the butyrate-induced transcriptomic changes and will accelerate our discerning of the molecular fundamentals of epigenomic regulation. PMID:26819550

  20. Transcriptomic Sequencing Reveals a Set of Unique Genes Activated by Butyrate-Induced Histone Modification.

    PubMed

    Li, Cong-Jun; Li, Robert W; Baldwin, Ransom L; Blomberg, Le Ann; Wu, Sitao; Li, Weizhong

    2016-01-01

    Butyrate is a nutritional element with strong epigenetic regulatory activity as a histone deacetylase inhibitor. Based on the analysis of differentially expressed genes in the bovine epithelial cells using RNA sequencing technology, a set of unique genes that are activated only after butyrate treatment were revealed. A complementary bioinformatics analysis of the functional category, pathway, and integrated network, using Ingenuity Pathways Analysis, indicated that these genes activated by butyrate treatment are related to major cellular functions, including cell morphological changes, cell cycle arrest, and apoptosis. Our results offered insight into the butyrate-induced transcriptomic changes and will accelerate our discerning of the molecular fundamentals of epigenomic regulation. PMID:26819550

  1. G-rich VEGF aptamer with locked and unlocked nucleic acid modifications exhibits a unique G-quadruplex fold

    PubMed Central

    Marušič, Maja; Veedu, Rakesh N.; Wengel, Jesper; Plavec, Janez

    2013-01-01

    The formation of a single G-quadruplex structure adopted by a promising 25 nt G-rich vascular endothelial growth factor aptamer in a K+ rich environment was facilitated by locked nucleic acid modifications. An unprecedented all parallel-stranded monomeric G-quadruplex with three G-quartet planes exhibits several unique structural features. Five consecutive guanine residues are all involved in G-quartet formation and occupy positions in adjacent DNA strands, which are bridged with a no-residue propeller-type loop. A two-residue D-shaped loop facilitates inclusion of an isolated guanine residue into the vacant spot within the G-quartet. The remaining two G-rich tracts of three residues each adopt parallel orientation and are linked with edgewise and propeller loops. Both 5′ with 3 nt and 3′ with 4 nt overhangs display well-defined conformations, with latter adopting a basket handle topology. Locked residues contribute to thermal stabilization of the adopted structure and formation of structurally pre-organized intermediates that facilitate folding into a single G-quadruplex. Understanding the impact of chemical modifications on folding, thermal stability and structural polymorphism of G-quadruplexes provides means for the improvement of vascular endothelial growth factor aptamers and advances our insights into driving nucleic acid structure by locking or unlocking the conformation of sugar moieties of nucleotides in general. PMID:23935071

  2. Modification of NASA Langley 8 Foot High Temperature Tunnel to provide a unique national research facility for hypersonic air-breathing propulsion systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, H. N.; Wieting, A. R.

    1984-01-01

    A planned modification of the NASA Langley 8-Foot High Temperature Tunnel to make it a unique national research facility for hypersonic air-breathing propulsion systems is described, and some of the ongoing supporting research for that modification is discussed. The modification involves: (1) the addition of an oxygen-enrichment system which will allow the methane-air combustion-heated test stream to simulate air for propulsion testing; and (2) supplemental nozzles to expand the test simulation capability from the current nominal Mach number to 7.0 include Mach numbers 3.0, 4.5, and 5.0. Detailed design of the modifications is currently underway and the modified facility is scheduled to be available for tests of large scale propulsion systems by mid 1988.

  3. Modification of NASA Langley 8 foot high temperature tunnel to provide a unique national research facility for hypersonic air-breathing propulsion systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, H. N.; Wieting, A. R.

    1984-01-01

    A planned modification of the NASA Langley 8-Foot High Temperature Tunnel to make it a unique national research facility for hypersonic air-breathing propulsion systems is described, and some of the ongoing supporting research for that modification is discussed. The modification involves: (1) the addition of an oxygen-enrichment system which will allow the methane-air combustion-heated test stream to simulate air for propulsion testing; and (2) supplemental nozzles to expand the test simulation capability from the current nominal Mach number to 7.0 include Mach numbers 3.0, 4.5, and 5.0. Detailed design of the modifications is currently underway and the modified facility is scheduled to be available for tests of large scale propulsion systems by mid 1988.

  4. Insights into the Activity and Substrate Binding of Xylella fastidiosa Polygalacturonase by Modification of a Unique QMK Amino Acid Motif Using Protein Chimeras.

    PubMed

    Warren, Jeremy G; Lincoln, James E; Kirkpatrick, Bruce C

    2015-01-01

    Polygalacturonases (EC 3.2.1.15) catalyze the random hydrolysis of 1, 4-alpha-D-galactosiduronic linkages in pectate and other galacturonans. Xylella fastidiosa possesses a single polygalacturonase gene, pglA (PD1485), and X. fastidiosa mutants deficient in the production of polygalacturonase are non-pathogenic and show a compromised ability to systemically infect grapevines. These results suggested that grapevines expressing sufficient amounts of an inhibitor of X. fastidiosa polygalacturonase might be protected from disease. Previous work in our laboratory and others have tried without success to produce soluble active X. fastidiosa polygalacturonase for use in inhibition assays. In this study, we created two enzymatically active X. fastidiosa / A. vitis polygalacturonase chimeras, AX1A and AX2A to explore the functionality of X. fastidiosa polygalacturonase in vitro. The AX1A chimera was constructed to specifically test if recombinant chimeric protein, produced in Escherichia coli, is soluble and if the X. fastidiosa polygalacturonase catalytic amino acids are able to hydrolyze polygalacturonic acid. The AX2A chimera was constructed to evaluate the ability of a unique QMK motif of X. fastidiosa polygalacturonase, most polygalacturonases have a R(I/L)K motif, to bind to and allow the hydrolysis of polygalacturonic acid. Furthermore, the AX2A chimera was also used to explore what effect modification of the QMK motif of X. fastidiosa polygalacturonase to a conserved RIK motif has on enzymatic activity. These experiments showed that both the AX1A and AX2A polygalacturonase chimeras were soluble and able to hydrolyze the polygalacturonic acid substrate. Additionally, the modification of the QMK motif to the conserved RIK motif eliminated hydrolytic activity, suggesting that the QMK motif is important for the activity of X. fastidiosa polygalacturonase. This result suggests X. fastidiosa polygalacturonase may preferentially hydrolyze a different pectic substrate or, alternatively, it has a different mechanism of substrate binding than other polygalacturonases characterized to date. PMID:26571265

  5. Insights into the Activity and Substrate Binding of Xylella fastidiosa Polygalacturonase by Modification of a Unique QMK Amino Acid Motif Using Protein Chimeras

    PubMed Central

    Warren, Jeremy G.; Lincoln, James E.; Kirkpatrick, Bruce C.

    2015-01-01

    Polygalacturonases (EC 3.2.1.15) catalyze the random hydrolysis of 1, 4-alpha-D-galactosiduronic linkages in pectate and other galacturonans. Xylella fastidiosa possesses a single polygalacturonase gene, pglA (PD1485), and X. fastidiosa mutants deficient in the production of polygalacturonase are non-pathogenic and show a compromised ability to systemically infect grapevines. These results suggested that grapevines expressing sufficient amounts of an inhibitor of X. fastidiosa polygalacturonase might be protected from disease. Previous work in our laboratory and others have tried without success to produce soluble active X. fastidiosa polygalacturonase for use in inhibition assays. In this study, we created two enzymatically active X. fastidiosa / A. vitis polygalacturonase chimeras, AX1A and AX2A to explore the functionality of X. fastidiosa polygalacturonase in vitro. The AX1A chimera was constructed to specifically test if recombinant chimeric protein, produced in Escherichia coli, is soluble and if the X. fastidiosa polygalacturonase catalytic amino acids are able to hydrolyze polygalacturonic acid. The AX2A chimera was constructed to evaluate the ability of a unique QMK motif of X. fastidiosa polygalacturonase, most polygalacturonases have a R(I/L)K motif, to bind to and allow the hydrolysis of polygalacturonic acid. Furthermore, the AX2A chimera was also used to explore what effect modification of the QMK motif of X. fastidiosa polygalacturonase to a conserved RIK motif has on enzymatic activity. These experiments showed that both the AX1A and AX2A polygalacturonase chimeras were soluble and able to hydrolyze the polygalacturonic acid substrate. Additionally, the modification of the QMK motif to the conserved RIK motif eliminated hydrolytic activity, suggesting that the QMK motif is important for the activity of X. fastidiosa polygalacturonase. This result suggests X. fastidiosa polygalacturonase may preferentially hydrolyze a different pectic substrate or, alternatively, it has a different mechanism of substrate binding than other polygalacturonases characterized to date. PMID:26571265

  6. A rapid and robust assay for the determination of the amino acid hypusine as a possible biomarker for a high-throughput screening of antimalarials and for the diagnosis and therapy of different diseases.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Annette; Khomutov, Alex R; Simonian, Alina; Agostinelli, Enzo

    2012-05-01

    Eukaryotic initiation factor 5A (eIF5A) has recently been identified as a biomarker of prognostic significance and therapeutic potential for the treatment in hepatocellular carcinoma. This prompted us to establish a rapid and robust assay to determine deoxyhypusine and hypusine formed with the purified enzymes deoxyhypusine synthase (DHS) and deoxyhypusine hydroxylase (DOHH) from Plasmodium to develop a rapid screening assay for antimalarial drugs. The peptide hydrolysate obtained from hypusinylated eIF5A was analyzed by ultra performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) with retention times for deoxyhypusine of 7.44 min and for hypusine of 7.30 min, respectively. The limit of detection for both compounds was 0.144 ng/μl. Determination of the specific activity of Plasmodium DOHH resulted in a twofold higher specific activity than its human counterpart. Following the iron-complexing strategy of the ferrous iron which is present in the active site of Plasmodium DOHH, a series of iron chelating compounds was tested. 2,2'-Dipyridyl and mimosine abolished DOHH activity completely while 4-oxo-piperidine-carboxylates i.e. the nitrophenylether JK8-2 and EHW 437, the oxime ether of the piperidine aldehyde, showed no inhibition although they were highly active in in vitro cultures of Plasmodium and in vivo in a rodent mouse model. The method allows a high-throughput screening (HPTS) of antimalarial drugs and the evaluation of eIF5A as a biomarker. PMID:21360085

  7. The Drosophila deoxyhypusine hydroxylase homologue nero and its target eIF5A are required for cell growth and the regulation of autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Prajal H.; Costa-Mattioli, Mauro; Schulze, Karen L.

    2009-01-01

    Hypusination is a unique posttranslational modification by which lysine is transformed into the atypical amino acid hypusine. eIF5A (eukaryotic initiation factor 5A) is the only known protein to contain hypusine. In this study, we describe the identification and characterization of nero, the Drosophila melanogaster deoxyhypusine hydroxylase (DOHH) homologue. nero mutations affect cell and organ size, bromodeoxyuridine incorporation, and autophagy. Knockdown of the hypusination target eIF5A via RNA interference causes phenotypes similar to nero mutations. However, loss of nero appears to cause milder phenotypes than loss of eIF5A. This is partially explained through a potential compensatory mechanism by which nero mutant cells up-regulate eIF5A levels. The failure of eIF5A up-regulation to rescue nero mutant phenotypes suggests that hypusination is required for eIF5A function. Furthermore, expression of enzymatically impaired forms of DOHH fails to rescue nero clones, indicating that hypusination activity is important for nero function. Our data also indicate that nero and eIF5A are required for cell growth and affect autophagy and protein synthesis. PMID:19546244

  8. Genetic modification and genetic determinism.

    PubMed

    Resnik, David B; Vorhaus, Daniel B

    2006-01-01

    In this article we examine four objections to the genetic modification of human beings: the freedom argument, the giftedness argument, the authenticity argument, and the uniqueness argument. We then demonstrate that each of these arguments against genetic modification assumes a strong version of genetic determinism. Since these strong deterministic assumptions are false, the arguments against genetic modification, which assume and depend upon these assumptions, are therefore unsound. Serious discussion of the morality of genetic modification, and the development of sound science policy, should be driven by arguments that address the actual consequences of genetic modification for individuals and society, not by ones propped up by false or misleading biological assumptions. PMID:16800884

  9. Genetic modification and genetic determinism

    PubMed Central

    Resnik, David B; Vorhaus, Daniel B

    2006-01-01

    In this article we examine four objections to the genetic modification of human beings: the freedom argument, the giftedness argument, the authenticity argument, and the uniqueness argument. We then demonstrate that each of these arguments against genetic modification assumes a strong version of genetic determinism. Since these strong deterministic assumptions are false, the arguments against genetic modification, which assume and depend upon these assumptions, are therefore unsound. Serious discussion of the morality of genetic modification, and the development of sound science policy, should be driven by arguments that address the actual consequences of genetic modification for individuals and society, not by ones propped up by false or misleading biological assumptions. PMID:16800884

  10. Blocking eIF5A Modification in Cervical Cancer Cells Alters the Expression of Cancer-Related Genes and Suppresses Cell Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Mémin, Elisabeth; Hoque, Mainul; Jain, Mohit R.; Heller, Debra S.; Li, Hong; Cracchiolo, Bernadette; Hanauske-Abel, Hartmut M.; Pe’ery, Tsafi; Mathews, Michael B.

    2016-01-01

    Cancer etiology is influenced by alterations in protein synthesis that are not fully understood. In this study, we took a novel approach to investigate the role of the eukaryotic translation initiation factor eIF5A in human cervical cancers, where it is widely overexpressed. eIF5A contains the distinctive amino acid hypusine, which is formed by a posttranslational modification event requiring deoxyhypusine hydroxylase (DOHH), an enzyme that can be inhibited by the drugs ciclopirox and deferiprone. We found that proliferation of cervical cancer cells can be blocked by DOHH inhibition with either of these pharmacologic agents, as well as by RNA interference–mediated silencing of eIF5A, DOHH, or another enzyme in the hypusine pathway. Proteomic and RNA analyses in HeLa cervical cancer cells identified two groups of proteins in addition to eIF5A that were coordinately affected by ciclopirox and deferiprone. Group 1 proteins (Hsp27, NM23, and DJ-1) were downregulated at the translational level, whereas group 2 proteins (TrpRS and PRDX2) were upregulated at the mRNA level. Further investigations confirmed that eIF5A and DOHH are required for Hsp27 expression in cervical cancer cells and for regulation of its key target I?B and hence NF-?B. Our results argue that mature eIF5A controls a translational network of cancer-driving genes, termed the eIF5A regulon, at the levels of mRNA abundance and translation. In coordinating cell proliferation, the eIF5A regulon can be modulated by drugs such as ciclopirox or deferiprone, which might be repositioned to control cancer cell growth. PMID:24220243

  11. Post-translational Modification by ?-Lysylation Is Required for Activity of Escherichia coli Elongation Factor P (EF-P)*

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jong-Hwan; Johansson, Hans E.; Aoki, Hiroyuki; Huang, Bill X.; Kim, Hee-Yong; Ganoza, M. Clelia; Park, Myung Hee

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial elongation factor P (EF-P) is the ortholog of archaeal and eukaryotic initiation factor 5A (eIF5A). EF-P shares sequence homology and crystal structure with eIF5A, but unlike eIF5A, EF-P does not undergo hypusine modification. Recently, two bacterial genes, yjeA and yjeK, encoding truncated homologs of class II lysyl-tRNA synthetase and of lysine-2,3-aminomutase, respectively, have been implicated in the modification of EF-P to convert a specific lysine to a hypothetical ?-lysyl-lysine. Here we present biochemical evidence for ?-lysyl-lysine modification in Escherichia coli EF-P and for its role in EF-P activity by characterizing native and recombinant EF-P proteins for their modification status and activity in vitro. Mass spectrometric analyses confirmed the lysyl modification at lysine 34 in native and recombinant EF-P proteins. The ?-lysyl-lysine isopeptide was identified in the exhaustive Pronase digests of native EF-P and recombinant EF-P isolated from E. coli coexpressing EF-P, YjeA, and YjeK but not in the digests of proteins derived from the vectors encoding EF-P alone or EF-P together with YjeA, indicating that both enzymes, YjeA and YjeK, are required for ?-lysylation of EF-P. Endogenous EF-P as well as the recombinant EF-P preparation containing ?-lysyl-EF-P stimulated N-formyl-methionyl-puromycin synthesis ?4-fold over the preparations containing unmodified EF-P and/or ?-lysyl-EF-P. The mutant lacking the modification site lysine (K34A) was inactive. This is the first report of biochemical evidence for the ?-lysylation of EF-P in vivo and the requirement for this modification for the activity of EF-P. PMID:22128152

  12. GR uniqueness and deformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasnov, Kirill

    2015-10-01

    In the metric formulation gravitons are described with the parity symmetric S + 2 ⊗ S - 2 representation of Lorentz group. General Relativity is then the unique theory of interacting gravitons with second order field equations. We show that if a chiral S + 3 ⊗ S - representation is used instead, the uniqueness is lost, and there is an infinite-parametric family of theories of interacting gravitons with second order field equations. We use the language of graviton scattering amplitudes, and show how the uniqueness of GR is avoided using simple dimensional analysis. The resulting distinct from GR gravity theories are all parity asymmetric, but share the GR MHV amplitudes. They have new all same helicity graviton scattering amplitudes at every graviton order. The amplitudes with at least one graviton of opposite helicity continue to be determinable by the BCFW recursion.

  13. Unique Graviton Exchange Signatures at Linear Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Rizzo, Thomas G.

    2002-09-06

    Many types of new physics can lead to contact interaction-like modifications in e{sup +}e{sup -} processes below direct production threshold. We examine the possibility of uniquely identifying the effects of graviton exchange from amongst this large set of models by using the moments of the angular distribution of the final state particles. In the case of e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} f{bar f}(W{sup +}W{sup -}) we demonstrate that this technique allows for the unique identification of the graviton exchange signature at the 5{sigma} level for mass scales as high as 6(2.5){radical}s.

  14. Molecular modeling of the human eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5A (eIF5A) based on spectroscopic and computational analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Costa-Neto, Claudio M. . E-mail: claudio@fmrp.usp.br; Parreiras-e-Silva, Lucas T.; Ruller, Roberto; Oliveira, Eduardo B.; Miranda, Antonio; Oliveira, Laerte; Ward, Richard J.

    2006-09-01

    The eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5A (eIF5A) is a protein ubiquitously present in archaea and eukarya, which undergoes a unique two-step post-translational modification called hypusination. Several studies have shown that hypusination is essential for a variety of functional roles for eIF5A, including cell proliferation and synthesis of proteins involved in cell cycle control. Up to now neither a totally selective inhibitor of hypusination nor an inhibitor capable of directly binding to eIF5A has been reported in the literature. The discovery of such an inhibitor might be achieved by computer-aided drug design based on the 3D structure of the human eIF5A. In this study, we present a molecular model for the human eIF5A protein based on the crystal structure of the eIF5A from Leishmania brasiliensis, and compare the modeled conformation of the loop bearing the hypusination site with circular dichroism data obtained with a synthetic peptide of this loop. Furthermore, analysis of amino acid variability between different human eIF5A isoforms revealed peculiar structural characteristics that are of functional relevance.

  15. Unique Access to Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goble, Don

    2009-01-01

    This article describes the many learning opportunities that broadcast technology students at Ladue Horton Watkins High School in St. Louis, Missouri, experience because of their unique access to technology and methods of learning. Through scaffolding, stepladder techniques, and trial by fire, students learn to produce multiple television programs,…

  16. [Lifestyle modifications].

    PubMed

    Kawano, Yuhei

    2015-11-01

    Lifestyle modifications are important in the prevention and treatment of hypertension. The Japanese Society of Hypertension Guidelines for the Management of Hypertension (JSH2014) recommend salt reduction (< 6 g/day), increased intake of vegetables/fruit and fish (fish oil), reduced intake of cholesterol and saturated fatty acids, weight loss (body mass index < 25kg/m2), exercise (≥ 30 min/day), reduction of alcohol intake (≤ 20-30 mL/day in men, ≤ 10-20 mL/day in women as ethanol), and quitting smoking. These lifestyle modifications are capable of reducing blood pressure and ameliorating other cardiovascular risk factors. However, the reduction in blood pressure is mild to moderate and the adherence to lifestyle modifications has been still suboptimal. PMID:26619658

  17. NASA's unique networking environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Marjory J.

    1988-01-01

    Networking is an infrastructure technology; it is a tool for NASA to support its space and aeronautics missions. Some of NASA's networking problems are shared by the commercial and/or military communities, and can be solved by working with these communities. However, some of NASA's networking problems are unique and will not be addressed by these other communities. Individual characteristics of NASA's space-mission networking enviroment are examined, the combination of all these characteristics that distinguish NASA's networking systems from either commercial or military systems is explained, and some research areas that are important for NASA to pursue are outlined.

  18. Is Life Unique?

    PubMed Central

    Abel, David L.

    2011-01-01

    Is life physicochemically unique? No. Is life unique? Yes. Life manifests innumerable formalisms that cannot be generated or explained by physicodynamics alone. Life pursues thousands of biofunctional goals, not the least of which is staying alive. Neither physicodynamics, nor evolution, pursue goals. Life is largely directed by linear digital programming and by the Prescriptive Information (PI) instantiated particularly into physicodynamically indeterminate nucleotide sequencing. Epigenomic controls only compound the sophistication of these formalisms. Life employs representationalism through the use of symbol systems. Life manifests autonomy, homeostasis far from equilibrium in the harshest of environments, positive and negative feedback mechanisms, prevention and correction of its own errors, and organization of its components into Sustained Functional Systems (SFS). Chance and necessity—heat agitation and the cause-and-effect determinism of nature’s orderliness—cannot spawn formalisms such as mathematics, language, symbol systems, coding, decoding, logic, organization (not to be confused with mere self-ordering), integration of circuits, computational success, and the pursuit of functionality. All of these characteristics of life are formal, not physical. PMID:25382119

  19. Unique Martinique power station

    SciTech Connect

    Chellini, R.

    1995-05-01

    It is quite common that electric power on islands is provided by diesel-driven generators. However, the size of the one presently being installed at the EDF-Pointe des Carrieres power station in Martinique is quite unique. The low-speed, two-stroke New Sulzer Diesel type 12 RTA84C diesel engine, rated 45940 kW at 100 r/min, is among the largest ever built. The advantages of this type of unit at an isolated site are numerous. The plant is simple to operate and does not require highly specialized personnel for routine maintenance. It also offers high efficiency - on the order of 50% without heat recovery - and can burn low-cost heavy fuel.

  20. Modifications to the translational apparatus which affect the regulation of protein synthesis in sea urchin embryos

    SciTech Connect

    Scalise, F.W.

    1988-01-01

    Protein synthesis can be regulated at a number of cellular levels. I have examined how modifications to specific components of the protein synthetic machinery are involved in regulating the efficiency of initiation of translation during early sea urchin embryogenesis. It is demonstrated that Ca{sup 2+} concentrations exceeding 500 uM cause the inhibition of protein synthesis in cell-free translation lysates prepared from sea urchin embryos. Specific changes in the state of phosphorylation of at least 8 proteins occur during this Ca{sup 2+}-mediated repression of translation. Analysis of these proteins has indicated that, unlike mammalian systems, there is no detectable level of Ca{sup 2+}-dependent phosphorylation of the {alpha}subunit eIF-2. Two of the proteins which do become phosphorylated in response to Ca{sup 2+} are calmodulin and an isoelectric form of sea urchin eIF-4D. In addition, 2 proteins which share similarities with kinases involved in the regulation of protein synthesis in mammalian cells, also become phosphorylated. I have investigated the consequences of changes in eIF-4D during sea urchin embryogenesis because it has been proposed that a polyamine-mediated conversion of lysine to hypusine in this factor may enhance translational activity. It is demonstrated that ({sup 3}H) spermidine-derived radioactivity is incorporated into a number of proteins when sea urchin embryos are labeled in vivo, and that the pattern of individual proteins that become labeled changes over the course of the first 30 hr of development.

  1. The Continuing Importance of Uniqueness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coulter, Benjamin B.

    People's conception of uniqueness in policy debate has changed dramatically in the past decade. Concepts like "we control uniqueness" and "direction of uniqueness" have come to dominate disadvantage debates. Unfortunately, policy debate has suffered as an activity as the result of some of these debating practices. In response, debaters and judges…

  2. Uniqueness Theorem for Black Objects

    SciTech Connect

    Rogatko, Marek

    2010-06-23

    We shall review the current status of uniqueness theorem for black objects in higher dimensional spacetime. At the beginning we consider static charged asymptotically flat spacelike hypersurface with compact interior with both degenerate and non-degenerate components of the event horizon in n-dimensional spacetime. We gave some remarks concerning partial results in proving uniqueness of stationary axisymmetric multidimensional solutions and winding numbers which can uniquely characterize the topology and symmetry structure of black objects.

  3. Empirical evidence for unique hues?

    PubMed

    Bosten, J M; Boehm, A E

    2014-04-01

    Red, green, blue, yellow, and white have been distinguished from other hues as unique. We present results from two experiments that undermine existing behavioral evidence to separate the unique hues from other colors. In Experiment 1 we used hue scaling, which has often been used to support the existence of unique hues, but has never been attempted with a set of non-unique primaries. Subjects were assigned to one of two experimental conditions. In the "unique" condition, they rated the proportions of red, yellow, blue, and green that they perceived in each of a series of test stimuli. In the "intermediate" condition, they rated the proportions of teal, purple, orange, and lime. We found, surprisingly, that results from the two conditions were largely equivalent. In Experiment 2, we investigated the effect of instruction on subjects' settings of unique hues. We found that altering the color terms given in the instructions to include intermediate hues led to significant shifts in the hue that subjects identified as unique. The results of both experiments question subjects' abilities to identify certain hues as unique. PMID:24695198

  4. Émission de photons uniques par un atome unique piégé

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darquié, B.; Beugnon, J.; Jones, M. P. A.; Dingjan, J.; Sortais, Y.; Browaeys, A.; Messin, G.; Grangier, P.

    2006-10-01

    En illuminant un atome unique piégé dans une pince optique de taille micrométrique à l'aide d'impulsions lumineuses résonantes d'une durée de 4?ns, nous avons réalisé une source efficace de photons uniques déclenchés, de polarisation bien définie. Nous avons mesuré la fonction d'autocorrélation temporelle en intensité qui met en évidence un dégroupement de photons presque parfait. Une telle source de photons uniques de haut flux possède des applications potentielles pour le traitement de l'information quantique.

  5. Uniqueness theorems in bioluminescence tomography.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ge; Li, Yi; Jiang, Ming

    2004-08-01

    Motivated by bioluminescent imaging needs for studies on gene therapy and other applications in the mouse models, a bioluminescence tomography (BLT) system is being developed in the University of Iowa. While the forward imaging model is described by the well-known diffusion equation, the inverse problem is to recover an internal bioluminescent source distribution subject to Cauchy data. Our primary goal in this paper is to establish the solution uniqueness for BLT under practical constraints despite the ill-posedness of the inverse problem in the general case. After a review on the inverse source literature, we demonstrate that in the general case the BLT solution is not unique by constructing the set of all the solutions to this inverse problem. Then, we show the uniqueness of the solution in the case of impulse sources. Finally, we present our main theorem that solid/hollow ball sources can be uniquely determined up to nonradiating sources. For better readability, the exact conditions for and rigorous proofs of the theorems are given in the Appendices. Further research directions are also discussed. PMID:15377096

  6. Uniquely identifying wheat plant structures

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Uniquely naming wheat (Triticum aestivum L. em Thell) plant parts is useful for communicating plant development research and the effects of environmental stresses on normal wheat development. Over the past 30+ years, several naming systems have been proposed for wheat shoot, leaf, spike, spikelet, ...

  7. Milton: A New, Unique Pallasite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, R. H.; Wasson, J. T.; Larson, T.; Sharp, Z. D.

    2003-01-01

    The Milton pallasite was found in Missouri, U.S.A. in October, 2000. It consists of a single stone that originally weighed approximately 2040 g. The chemistry of the olivine and metal phases, plus the oxygen isotope ratios of the olivines, differ significantly from other pallasites, making Milton unique. Unfortunately, the meteorite is heavily fractured and weathered.

  8. UNIQUE MITOCHONDRIAL GENETICS OF CUCUMIS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Cucumis mitochondrial (mt) genome is unique for its enormous size and paternal transmission. Recombination among inverted and direct repeats in the cucumber mt DNA produce paternally transmitted mosaic (MSC) phenotypes with altered mt gene expression. We used MSC to reveal phenotypic variation...

  9. Behavior Modification in Coaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, Annette Rutt; Stillman, Stephen M.

    1979-01-01

    An example of behavior modification used in athletic coaching is presented. The case study involves a member of a women's basketball team and details the use of behavior modification for both weight reduction and skill improvement. (JMF)

  10. Germline Modification and Engineering in Avian Species

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hong Jo; Lee, Hyung Chul; Han, Jae Yong

    2015-01-01

    Production of genome-edited animals using germline-competent cells and genetic modification tools has provided opportunities for investigation of biological mechanisms in various organisms. The recently reported programmed genome editing technology that can induce gene modification at a target locus in an efficient and precise manner facilitates establishment of animal models. In this regard, the demand for genome-edited avian species, which are some of the most suitable model animals due to their unique embryonic development, has also increased. Furthermore, germline chimera production through long-term culture of chicken primordial germ cells (PGCs) has facilitated research on production of genome-edited chickens. Thus, use of avian germline modification is promising for development of novel avian models for research of disease control and various biological mechanisms. Here, we discuss recent progress in genome modification technology in avian species and its applications and future strategies. PMID:26333275

  11. Germline Modification and Engineering in Avian Species.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hong Jo; Lee, Hyung Chul; Han, Jae Yong

    2015-09-01

    Production of genome-edited animals using germline-competent cells and genetic modification tools has provided opportunities for investigation of biological mechanisms in various organisms. The recently reported programmed genome editing technology that can induce gene modification at a target locus in an efficient and precise manner facilitates establishment of animal models. In this regard, the demand for genome-edited avian species, which are some of the most suitable model animals due to their unique embryonic development, has also increased. Furthermore, germline chimera production through long-term culture of chicken primordial germ cells (PGCs) has facilitated research on production of genome-edited chickens. Thus, use of avian germline modification is promising for development of novel avian models for research of disease control and various biological mechanisms. Here, we discuss recent progress in genome modification technology in avian species and its applications and future strategies. PMID:26333275

  12. The bacterial magnetosome: a unique prokaryotic organelle.

    PubMed

    Lower, Brian H; Bazylinski, Dennis A

    2013-01-01

    The bacterial magnetosome is a unique prokaryotic organelle comprising magnetic mineral crystals surrounded by a phospholipid bilayer. These inclusions are biomineralized by the magnetotactic bacteria which are ubiquitous, aquatic, motile microorganisms. Magnetosomes cause cells of magnetotactic bacteria to passively align and swim along the Earth's magnetic field lines, as miniature motile compass needles. These specialized compartments consist of a phospholipid bilayer membrane surrounding magnetic crystals of magnetite (Fe3O4) or greigite (Fe3S4). The morphology of these membrane-bound crystals varies by species with a nominal magnetic domain size between 35 and 120 nm. Almost all magnetotactic bacteria arrange their magnetosomes in a chain within the cell there by maximizing the magnetic dipole moment of the cell. It is presumed that magnetotactic bacteria use magnetotaxis in conjunction with chemotaxis to locate and maintain an optimum position for growth and survival based on chemistry, redox and physiology in aquatic habitats with vertical chemical concentration and redox gradients. The biosynthesis of magnetosomes is a complex process that involves several distinct steps including cytoplasmic membrane modifications, iron uptake and transport, initiation of crystallization, crystal maturation and magnetosome chain formation. While many mechanistic details remain unresolved, magnetotactic bacteria appear to contain the genetic determinants for magnetosome biomineralization within their genomes in clusters of genes that make up what is referred to as the magnetosome gene island in some species. In addition, magnetosomes contain a unique set of proteins, not present in other cellular fractions, which control the biomineralization process. Through the development of genetic systems, proteomic and genomic work, and the use of molecular and biochemical tools, the functions of a number of magnetosome membrane proteins have been demonstrated and the molecular mechanism for the biomineralization of magnetosomes in these organisms is beginning to be revealed. PMID:23615196

  13. Chromatin modifications, epigenetics, and how protozoan parasites regulate their lives

    PubMed Central

    Croken, Matthew M.; Nardelli, Sheila C.; Kim, Kami

    2012-01-01

    Chromatin structure plays a vital role in epigenetic regulation of protozoan parasite gene expression. Epigenetic gene regulation impacts parasite virulence, differentiation and cell cycle control. Recent work in many laboratories has elucidated the functions of histone modifying proteins that regulate parasite gene expression by chemical modification of constituent nucleosomes. A major focus of investigation has been characterizing post-translational modifications (PTM) of histones and identifying the enzymes that are responsible. Despite conserved features and specificity common to all eukaryotes, parasite enzymes involved in chromatin modification have unique functions that regulate unique aspects of parasite biology. PMID:22480826

  14. Mucormycosis in India: unique features.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarti, Arunaloke; Singh, Rachna

    2014-12-01

    Mucormycosis remains a devastating invasive fungal infection, with high mortality rates even after active management. The disease is being reported at an alarming frequency over the past decades from India. Indian mucormycosis has certain unique features. Rhino-orbito-cerebral presentation associated with uncontrolled diabetes is the predominant characteristic. Isolated renal mucormycosis has emerged as a new clinical entity. Apophysomyces elegans and Rhizopus homothallicus are emerging species in this region and uncommon agents such as Mucor irregularis and Thamnostylum lucknowense are also being reported. This review focuses on these distinct features of mucormycosis observed in India. PMID:25187095

  15. Shell develops unique anode system

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, J.

    1983-02-01

    This article reports on how additional cathodic protection requirements on Shell Offshore Inc.'s Cognac platform in the Gulf of Mexico have led to the development of a unique anode carrying member for deepwater anode placement. The need for additional anodes was determined after extensive monitoring indicated a reduction of corrosion protection below 300 ft. at Cognac, especially in the well conductor bays. Each anode carrying member is between 75 to 90 ft. long with a 0.375-in. pipe wall and an OD of 18 in. The member is lowered to a depth of about 90 ft. before a diver is required for hookup.

  16. A unique solar marking construct.

    PubMed

    Sofaer, A; Zinser, V; Sinclair, R M

    1979-10-19

    An assembly of stone slabs on an isolated butte in New Mexico collimates sunlight onto spiral petroglyphs carved on a cliff face. The light illuminates the spirals in a changing pattern throughout the year and marks the solstices and equinoxes with particular images. The assembly can also be used to observe lunar phenomena. It is unique in archeoastronomy in utilizing the changing height of the midday sun throughout the year rather than its rising and setting points. The construct appears to be the result of deliberate work of the Anasazi Indians, the builders of the great pueblos in the area. PMID:17733668

  17. Split liver transplantation: What's unique?

    PubMed

    Dalal, Aparna R

    2015-09-24

    The intraoperative management of split liver transplantation (SLT) has some unique features as compared to routine whole liver transplantations. Only the liver has this special ability to regenerate that confers benefits in survival and quality of life for two instead of one by splitting livers. Primary graft dysfunction may result from small for size syndrome. Graft weight to recipient body weight ratio is significant for both trisegmental and hemiliver grafts. Intraoperative surgical techniques aim to reduce portal hyperperfusion and decrease venous portal pressure. Ischemic preconditioning can be instituted to protect against ischemic reperfusion injury which impacts graft regeneration. Advancement of the technique of SLT is essential as use of split cadaveric grafts expands the donor pool and potentially has an excellent future. PMID:26421261

  18. Uniquely insidious: Yersinia pestis biofilms.

    PubMed

    Darby, Creg

    2008-04-01

    Bubonic plague, one of history's deadliest infections, is transmitted by fleas infected with Yersinia pestis. The bacteria can starve fleas by blocking their digestive tracts, which stimulates the insects to bite repeatedly and thereby infect new hosts. Direct examination of infected fleas, aided by in vitro studies and experiments with the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, have established that Y. pestis forms a biofilm in the insect. The extracellular matrix of the biofilm seems to contain a homopolymer of N-acetyl-d-glucosamine, which is a constituent of many bacterial biofilms. A regulatory mechanism involved in Y. pestis biofilm formation, cyclic-di-GMP signaling, is also widespread in bacteria; yet only Y. pestis forms biofilms in fleas. Here, the historical background of bubonic plague is briefly described and recent studies investigating the mechanisms by which these unique and deadly biofilms are formed are discussed. PMID:18339547

  19. Uniqueness of higher Gaudin Hamiltonians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rybnikov, L. G.

    2008-04-01

    For any semisimple Lie algebra g, the universal enveloping algebra of the infinite-dimensional pro-nilpotent Lie algebra g_:=g?t?[t] contains a large commutative subalgebra A ? U(g_). This subalgebra comes from the center of the universal enveloping of the affine Kac-Moody algebra g^ at the critical level by the AKS-scheme. In this note we show that the corresponding "classical" Poisson-commutative subalgebra gr A ? S(g_) is the Poisson centralizer of its simplest quadratic element, and deduce from this that the "quantum" subalgebra A ? U(g_) is uniquely determined by the classical one. As an application, we show that Feigin-Frenkel-Reshetikhin's and Talalaev-Chervov's constructions of higher Hamiltonians of the Gaudin model give the same family of commuting operators.

  20. The Probabilities of Unique Events

    PubMed Central

    Khemlani, Sangeet S.; Lotstein, Max; Johnson-Laird, Phil

    2012-01-01

    Many theorists argue that the probabilities of unique events, even real possibilities such as President Obama's re-election, are meaningless. As a consequence, psychologists have seldom investigated them. We propose a new theory (implemented in a computer program) in which such estimates depend on an intuitive non-numerical system capable only of simple procedures, and a deliberative system that maps intuitions into numbers. The theory predicts that estimates of the probabilities of conjunctions should often tend to split the difference between the probabilities of the two conjuncts. We report two experiments showing that individuals commit such violations of the probability calculus, and corroborating other predictions of the theory, e.g., individuals err in the same way even when they make non-numerical verbal estimates, such as that an event is highly improbable. PMID:23056224

  1. Permit application modifications

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-01

    This document contains the Permit Application Modifications for the Y-12 Industrial Landfill V site on the Oak Ridge Reservation. These modifications include the assessment of stability of the proposed Landfill V under static and loading conditions. Analyses performed include the general slope stability, veneer stability of the bottom liner and cover system, and a liquefaction potential assessment of the foundation soils.

  2. Modifications of mitosis

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 15, discusses modifications of mitosis, including endoreduplication, polyteny, endomitosis, C-mitosis, restitution, amitosis and multipolar mitoses. Apart from multipolar mitosis, all other mitotic modifications are characterized by an absent or defective spindle, and in most cases these result in the duplication of the chromosome number. 29 refs., 4 figs.

  3. CYP1B1: a unique gene with unique characteristics.

    PubMed

    Faiq, Muneeb A; Dada, Rima; Sharma, Reetika; Saluja, Daman; Dada, Tanuj

    2014-01-01

    CYP1B1, a recently described dioxin inducible oxidoreductase, is a member of the cytochrome P450 superfamily involved in the metabolism of estradiol, retinol, benzo[a]pyrene, tamoxifen, melatonin, sterols etc. It plays important roles in numerous physiological processes and is expressed at mRNA level in many tissues and anatomical compartments. CYP1B1 has been implicated in scores of disorders. Analyses of the recent studies suggest that CYP1B1 can serve as a universal/ideal cancer marker and a candidate gene for predictive diagnosis. There is plethora of literature available about certain aspects of CYP1B1 that have not been interpreted, discussed and philosophized upon. The present analysis examines CYP1B1 as a peculiar gene with certain distinctive characteristics like the uniqueness in its chromosomal location, gene structure and organization, involvement in developmentally important disorders, tissue specific, not only expression, but splicing, potential as a universal cancer marker due to its involvement in key aspects of cellular metabolism, use in diagnosis and predictive diagnosis of various diseases and the importance and function of CYP1B1 mRNA in addition to the regular translation. Also CYP1B1 is very difficult to express in heterologous expression systems, thereby, halting its functional studies. Here we review and analyze these exceptional and startling characteristics of CYP1B1 with inputs from our own experiences in order to get a better insight into its molecular biology in health and disease. This may help to further understand the etiopathomechanistic aspects of CYP1B1 mediated diseases paving way for better research strategies and improved clinical management. PMID:25658124

  4. Textural modification of processing tomatoes.

    PubMed

    Barrett, D M; Garcia, E; Wayne, J E

    1998-04-01

    Knowledge of the textural properties of processing tomatoes is crucial to ensuing product acceptability; measurement, control, and optimization of these properties through judicious selection of varieties and control of unit operations results in products that the consumer prefers. It is important to first define the terms texture, rheology, consistency, and viscosity prior to discussing principles of their measurement. The textural properties of processing tomatoes may be measured using both sensory and objective tests, and the latter may be either destructive or nondestructive in nature. The unique anatomy of tomato fruit (peel, pericarp, columella, and locules) in part dictates the method of texture measurement. Numerous factors, including variety, maturity, genetic modification, cultural particles, and environmental conditions, processing conditions, and calcium addition affect the textural integrity of tomatoes. Textural properties of raw tomatoes and most processed tomato products are reviewed in this article. PMID:9595227

  5. Respiratory infections unique to Asia.

    PubMed

    Tsang, Kenneth W; File, Thomas M

    2008-11-01

    Asia is a highly heterogeneous region with vastly different cultures, social constitutions and populations affected by a wide spectrum of respiratory diseases caused by tropical pathogens. Asian patients with community-acquired pneumonia differ from their Western counterparts in microbiological aetiology, in particular the prominence of Gram-negative organisms, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Burkholderia pseudomallei and Staphylococcus aureus. In addition, the differences in socioeconomic and health-care infrastructures limit the usefulness of Western management guidelines for pneumonia in Asia. The importance of emerging infectious diseases such as severe acute respiratory syndrome and avian influenza infection remain as close concerns for practising respirologists in Asia. Specific infections such as melioidosis, dengue haemorrhagic fever, scrub typhus, leptospirosis, salmonellosis, penicilliosis marneffei, malaria, amoebiasis, paragonimiasis, strongyloidiasis, gnathostomiasis, trinchinellosis, schistosomiasis and echinococcosis occur commonly in Asia and manifest with a prominent respiratory component. Pulmonary eosinophilia, endemic in parts of Asia, could occur with a wide range of tropical infections. Tropical eosinophilia is believed to be a hyper-sensitivity reaction to degenerating microfilariae trapped in the lungs. This article attempts to address the key respiratory issues in these respiratory infections unique to Asia and highlight the important diagnostic and management issues faced by practising respirologists. PMID:18945321

  6. Uniqueness of the equation for quantum state vector collapse.

    PubMed

    Bassi, Angelo; Dürr, Detlef; Hinrichs, Günter

    2013-11-22

    The linearity of quantum mechanics leads, under the assumption that the wave function offers a complete description of reality, to grotesque situations famously known as Schrödinger's cat. Ways out are either adding elements of reality or replacing the linear evolution by a nonlinear one. Models of spontaneous wave function collapses took the latter path. The way such models are constructed leaves the question of whether such models are in some sense unique, i.e., whether the nonlinear equations replacing Schrödinger's equation are uniquely determined as collapse equations. Various people worked on identifying the class of nonlinear modifications of the Schrödinger equation, compatible with general physical requirements. Here we identify the most general class of continuous wave function evolutions under the assumption of no-faster-than-light signaling. PMID:24313467

  7. Enzymatic modification of schizophyllan

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An enzymatic method was developed for the progressive modification of the polysaccharide schizophyllan. Fungal strains Hypocrea nigricans NRRL 62555, Penicillium crustosum NRRL 62558, and Penicillium simplicissimum NRRL 62550 were previously identified as novel sources of ß-endoglucanase with specif...

  8. On the uniqueness of supersymmetric attractors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, Taniya; Tripathy, Prasanta K.

    2015-10-01

    In this paper we discuss the uniqueness of supersymmetric attractors in four-dimensional N = 2 supergravity theories coupled to n vector multiplets. We prove that for a given charge configuration the supersymmetry preserving axion free attractors are unique. We generalise the analysis to axionic attractors and state the conditions for uniqueness explicitly. We consider the example of a two-parameter model and find all solutions to the supersymmetric attractor equations and discuss their uniqueness.

  9. Tyrosine Modifications in Aging

    PubMed Central

    Feeney, Maria B.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Significance: The understanding of physiological and pathological processes involving protein oxidation, particularly under conditions of aging and oxidative stress, can be aided by proteomic identification of proteins that accumulate oxidative post-translational modifications only if these detected modifications are connected to functional consequences. The modification of tyrosine (Tyr) residues can elicit significant changes in protein structure and function, which, in some cases, may contribute to biological aging and age-related pathologies, such as atherosclerosis, neurodegeneration, and cataracts. Recent Advances: Studies characterizing proteins in which Tyr has been modified to 3-nitrotyrosine, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine, 3,3?-dityrosine and other cross-links, or 3-chlorotyrosine are reviewed, with an emphasis on structural and functional consequences. Critical Issues: Distinguishing between inconsequential modifications and functionally significant ones requires careful biochemical and biophysical analysis of target proteins, as well as innovative methods for isolating the effects of the multiple modifications that often occur under oxidizing conditions. Future Directions: The labor-intensive task of isolating and characterizing individual modified proteins must continue, especially given the expanding list of known modifications. Emerging approaches, such as genetic and metabolic incorporation of unnatural amino acids, hold promise for additional focused studies of this kind. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 17, 1571–1579. PMID:22424390

  10. Chemical modification of silicene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Rong; Xu, Ming-Sheng; Pi, Xiao-Dong

    2015-08-01

    Silicene is a two-dimensional (2D) material, which is composed of a single layer of silicon atoms with sp2-sp3 mixed hybridization. The sp2-sp3 mixed hybridization renders silicene excellent reactive ability, facilitating the chemical modification of silicene. It has been demonstrated that chemical modification effectively enables the tuning of the properties of silicene. We now review all kinds of chemical modification methods for silicene, including hydrogenation, halogenation, organic surface modification, oxidation, doping and formation of 2D hybrids. The effects of these chemical modification methods on the geometrical, electronic, optical, and magnetic properties of silicene are discussed. The potential applications of chemically modified silicene in a variety of fields such as electronics, optoelectronics, and magnetoelectronics are introduced. We finally envision future work on the chemical modification of silicene for further advancing the development of silicene. Project supported by the National Basic Program of China (Grant No. 2013CB632101), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61222404 and 61474097), and the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities of China (Grant No. 2014XZZX003-09).

  11. Enzymatic modifications of exopolysaccharides enhance bacterial persistence

    PubMed Central

    Whitfield, Gregory B.; Marmont, Lindsey S.; Howell, P. Lynne

    2015-01-01

    Biofilms are surface-attached communities of bacterial cells embedded in a self-produced matrix that are found ubiquitously in nature. The biofilm matrix is composed of various extracellular polymeric substances, which confer advantages to the encapsulated bacteria by protecting them from eradication. The matrix composition varies between species and is dependent on the environmental niche that the bacteria inhabit. Exopolysaccharides (EPS) play a variety of important roles in biofilm formation in numerous bacterial species. The ability of bacteria to thrive in a broad range of environmental settings is reflected in part by the structural diversity of the EPS produced both within individual bacterial strains as well as by different species. This variability is achieved through polymerization of distinct sugar moieties into homo- or hetero-polymers, as well as post-polymerization modification of the polysaccharide. Specific enzymes that are unique to the production of each polymer can transfer or remove non-carbohydrate moieties, or in other cases, epimerize the sugar units. These modifications alter the physicochemical properties of the polymer, which in turn can affect bacterial pathogenicity, virulence, and environmental adaptability. Herein, we review the diversity of modifications that the EPS alginate, the Pel polysaccharide, Vibrio polysaccharide, cepacian, glycosaminoglycans, and poly-N-acetyl-glucosamine undergo during biosynthesis. These are EPS produced by human pathogenic bacteria for which studies have begun to unravel the effect modifications have on their physicochemical and biological properties. The biological advantages these polymer modifications confer to the bacteria that produce them will be discussed. The expanding list of identified modifications will allow future efforts to focus on linking these modifications to specific biosynthetic genes and biofilm phenotypes. PMID:26029200

  12. Surface modification and characterization Collaborative Research Center at ORNL

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    The Surface Modification and Characterization Collaborative Research Center (SMAC/CRC) is a unique facility for the alteration and characterization of the near-surface properties of materials. The SMAC/CRC facility is equipped with particle accelerators and high-powered lasers which can be used to improve the physical, electrical, and/or chemical properties of solids and to create unique new materials not possible to obtain with conventional ''equilibrium'' processing techniques. Surface modification is achieved using such techniques as ion implantation doping, ion beam mixing, laser mixing, ion deposition, and laser annealing.

  13. Inorganic Surface Modification of Nonwoven Polymeric Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halbur, Jonathan Chandler

    In this study, atomic layer deposition (ALD), a vapor phase inorganic thin film deposition technique, is used to modify the surface of a range of industrially relevant polymers to enhance surface properties or impart additional functionalities. Several unique demonstrations of polymer surface modification are presented including uniform nanomaterial photodeposition to the surface of nonowoven fabrics and the first application of photocatalytic thin film coated nonwovens for advanced filtration of heavy metals from solution. Recent advances in polymer synthesis and processing technologies have resulted in the production of novel polymer systems with unique chemistries and sub-micron scale dimensions. As a result, advanced fiber systems have received much attention for potential use in a wide range of industrially and medically important applications such as advanced and selective filtration, catalysis, flexible electronics, and tissue engineering. However, tailoring the surface properties of the polymer is still needed in order to realize the full range of advanced applications, which can be difficult given the high complexity and non-uniformity of nonwoven polymeric structures. Uniform and controllable inorganic surface modification of nonwovens allows the introduction or modification of many crucial polymer properties with a wide range of application methods.

  14. Unique modification of adenine in genomic DNA of the marine cyanobacterium Trichodesmium sp. strain NIBB 1067.

    PubMed Central

    Zehr, J P; Ohki, K; Fujita, Y; Landry, D

    1991-01-01

    The genomic DNA of the marine nonheterocystous nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium Trichodesmium sp. strain NIBB 1067 was found to be highly resistant to DNA restriction endonucleases. The DNA was digested extensively by the restriction enzyme DpnI, which requires adenine methylation for activity. The DNA composition, determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), was found to be 69% AT. Surprisingly, it was found that a modified adenine which was not methylated at the usual N6 position was present and made up 4.7 mol% of the nucleosides in Trichodesmium DNA (15 mol% of deoxyadenosine). In order for adenine residues to be modified at this many positions, there must be many modifying enzymes or at least one of the modifying enzymes must have a degenerate recognition site. The reason(s) for this extensive methylation has not yet been determined but may have implications for the ecological success of this microorganism in nature. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2 PMID:1657876

  15. Drosophila Follistatin Exhibits Unique Structural Modifications and Interacts with Several TGF-Beta Family Members

    PubMed Central

    Bickel, Daniela; Shah, Ripal; Gesualdi, Scott C.; Haerry, Theodor E.

    2008-01-01

    Follistatin (FS) is one of several secreted proteins that modulate the activity of TGF-β family members during development. The structural and functional analysis of Drosophila Follistatin (dFS) reveals important differences between dFS and its vertebrate orthologues: it is larger, more positively charged, and proteolytically processed. dFS primarily inhibits signaling of Drosophila Activin (dACT) but can also inhibit other ligands like Decapentaplegic (DPP). In contrast, the presence of dFS enhances signaling of the Activin-like protein Dawdle (DAW), indicating that dFS exhibits a dual function in facilitating and inhibiting signaling of TGF-β ligands. In addition, FS proteins may also function in facilitating ligand diffusion. We find that mutants of daw are rescued in significant numbers by expression of vertebrate FS proteins. Since two PiggyBac insertions in dfs are not lethal, it appears that the function of dFS is non-essential or functionally redundant. PMID:18077144

  16. THE MODIFICATION OF STUTTERING.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BRUTTEN, EUGENE J.; SHOEMAKER, DONALD J.

    INTENDED FOR BOTH THE COLLEGE STUDENT AND THE PROFESSIONAL SPEECH PATHOLOGIST, THE BOOK PRESENTS CURRENT LEARNING THEORIES CONCERNING STUTTERING, DATA IMPORTANT TO THE THEORIES, AND A 2-PROCESS THEORY OF LEARNING FOR THEORETICAL INTEGRATION OF THE DATA ON STUTTERING AND FOR THERAPEUTIC MODIFICATION. INFORMATION PRESENTED ABOUT BEHAVIORISTIC…

  17. Toy Modification Note. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vanderheiden, Gregg C.; And Others

    Described are toy modifications which enable handicapped individuals to operate battery-powered toys. A battery interrupter is explained as a device which fits between the batteries in a toy and provides the ability to have a separate on-off switch which can be custom designed to fit a handicapped user's needs. Construction and use of three types…

  18. Posttranslational Protein Modification in Archaea

    PubMed Central

    Eichler, Jerry; Adams, Michael W. W.

    2005-01-01

    One of the first hurdles to be negotiated in the postgenomic era involves the description of the entire protein content of the cell, the proteome. Such efforts are presently complicated by the various posttranslational modifications that proteins can experience, including glycosylation, lipid attachment, phosphorylation, methylation, disulfide bond formation, and proteolytic cleavage. Whereas these and other posttranslational protein modifications have been well characterized in Eucarya and Bacteria, posttranslational modification in Archaea has received far less attention. Although archaeal proteins can undergo posttranslational modifications reminiscent of what their eucaryal and bacterial counterparts experience, examination of archaeal posttranslational modification often reveals aspects not previously observed in the other two domains of life. In some cases, posttranslational modification allows a protein to survive the extreme conditions often encountered by Archaea. The various posttranslational modifications experienced by archaeal proteins, the molecular steps leading to these modifications, and the role played by posttranslational modification in Archaea form the focus of this review. PMID:16148304

  19. Constructing Dense Graphs with Unique Hamiltonian Cycles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, Mark A. M.

    2012-01-01

    It is not difficult to construct dense graphs containing Hamiltonian cycles, but it is difficult to generate dense graphs that are guaranteed to contain a unique Hamiltonian cycle. This article presents an algorithm for generating arbitrarily large simple graphs containing "unique" Hamiltonian cycles. These graphs can be turned into dense graphs…

  20. Teaching and Learning with Individually Unique Exercises

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joerding, Wayne

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the author describes the pedagogical benefits of giving students individually unique homework exercises from an exercise template. Evidence from a test of this approach shows statistically significant improvements in subsequent exam performance by students receiving unique problems compared with students who received traditional…

  1. Constructing Dense Graphs with Unique Hamiltonian Cycles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, Mark A. M.

    2012-01-01

    It is not difficult to construct dense graphs containing Hamiltonian cycles, but it is difficult to generate dense graphs that are guaranteed to contain a unique Hamiltonian cycle. This article presents an algorithm for generating arbitrarily large simple graphs containing "unique" Hamiltonian cycles. These graphs can be turned into dense graphs…

  2. Some Graphs Containing Unique Hamiltonian Cycles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, Mark A. M.

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, two classes of graphs of arbitrary order are described which contain unique Hamiltonian cycles. All the graphs have mean vertex degree greater than one quarter the order of the graph. The Hamiltonian cycles are detailed, their uniqueness proved and simple rules for the construction of the adjacency matrix of the graphs are given.…

  3. Target for diverse chemical modifications.

    PubMed

    Seidler, Norbert W

    2013-01-01

    The chapter begins with an historical perspective of GAPDH isozymes that is juxtaposed to the fact that there is only one somatic functional gene in humans that is virtually identical among the mammalian species. Over the many years of GAPDH research, dozens of labs have reported the existence of multiple forms of GAPDH, which mostly vary as a function of charge with an occasional report of truncated forms. These observations are in part due to GAPDH being a substrate for many enzymatically-controlled post-translational modifications. While target residues have been identified and predictive algorithms have implicated certain residues, this area of research appears to be in its infancy regarding GAPDH. Equally fascinating, the uniquely susceptible nature of GAPDH to non-enzymatic reactions, that typically are associated with cell stress, such as oxidation and nitration, is also discussed. Two metabolic gases, nitric oxide and hydrogen sulfide, which are enzymatically produced, appear to exert their signaling properties through non-enzymatic reaction with GAPDH. Models of cellular decline are also proposed, including the compelling hypothesis that states cell compromise occurs by the physically blocking the function of chaperonins (i.e. dual-ring multiple-subunit molecular chaperones) by the attachment of misfolded GAPDH. PMID:22851450

  4. ASPOD modifications of 1993-1994

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Jennifer J. (Editor); Fogarty, Paul W.; Muller, Matthew; Martucci, Thomas A., III; Williams, Daniel; Rowney, David A.

    1994-01-01

    ASPOD, Autonomous Space Processors for Orbital Debris, provides a unique way of collecting the space debris that has built up over the past 37 years. For the past several years, ASPOD has gone through several different modifications. This year's concentrations were on the solar cutting array, the solar tracker, the earth based main frame/tilt table, the controls for the two robotic arms, and accurate autocad drawings of ASPOD. This final report contains the reports written by the students who worked on the ASPOD project this year.

  5. ASPOD modifications of 1993-1994

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Jennifer J.; Fogarty, Paul W.; Muller, Matthew; Martucci, Thomas A., III; Williams, Daniel; Rowney, David A.

    ASPOD, Autonomous Space Processors for Orbital Debris, provides a unique way of collecting the space debris that has built up over the past 37 years. For the past several years, ASPOD has gone through several different modifications. This year's concentrations were on the solar cutting array, the solar tracker, the earth based main frame/tilt table, the controls for the two robotic arms, and accurate autocad drawings of ASPOD. This final report contains the reports written by the students who worked on the ASPOD project this year.

  6. Generation of unique poliovirus RNA replication organelles.

    PubMed

    Richards, Alexsia L; Soares-Martins, Jamária A P; Riddell, Geoffrey T; Jackson, William T

    2014-01-01

    Poliovirus (PV), a model for interactions of picornaviruses with host cells, replicates its genomic RNA in association with cellular membranes. The origin of PV replication membranes has not been determined. Hypotheses about the origin of replication membranes, based largely on localization of viral proteins, include modification of coat protein complex I (COPI) and/or COPII secretory pathway vesicles and subversion of autophagic membranes. Here, we use an antibody against double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) to identify replication complexes by detection of dsRNA replication intermediates. dsRNA signal is dependent on virus genome replication and colocalizes with the viral integral membrane protein 3A, which is part of the RNA replication complex. We show that early in infection, dsRNA does not colocalize with a marker for autophagic vesicles, making it unlikely that autophagosomes contribute to the generation of PV RNA replication membranes. We also find that dsRNA does not colocalize with a marker of the COPII coat, Sec31, and, in fact, we demonstrate proteasome-dependent loss of full-length Sec31 during PV infection. These data indicate that COPII vesicles are an unlikely source of PV replication membranes. We show that the Golgi resident G-protein Arf1 and its associated guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF), GBF1, transiently colocalize with dsRNA early in infection. In uninfected cells, Arf1 nucleates COPI coat formation, although during infection the COPI coat itself does not colocalize with dsRNA. Phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate, which is associated with enterovirus-induced vesicles, tightly colocalizes with Arf1/GBF1 throughout infection. Our data point to a noncanonical role for some of the COPI-generating machinery in producing unique replication surfaces for PV RNA replication. IMPORTANCE Picornaviruses are a diverse and major cause of human disease, and their genomes replicate in association with intracellular membranes. There are multiple hypotheses to explain the nature and origin of these membranes, and a complete understanding of the host requirements for membrane rearrangement would provide novel drug targets essential for viral genome replication. Here, we study the model picornavirus, poliovirus, and show that some, but not all, components of the cellular machinery required for retrograde traffic from the Golgi apparatus to the endoplasmic reticulum are transiently present at the sites of viral RNA replication. We also show that the full-length Sec31 protein, which has been suggested to be present on PV RNA replication membranes, is lost during infection in a proteasome-dependent manner. This study helps to reconcile multiple hypotheses about the origin of poliovirus replication membranes and points to known host cell protein complexes that would make likely drug targets to inhibit picornavirus infections. PMID:24570367

  7. Response modification in carcinogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Cerutti, P A

    1989-01-01

    A major goal in multistep carcinogenesis research is the integration of recent findings obtained by sophisticated molecular-genetic and cytogenetic analysis of cancer into the more descriptive concepts of experimental pathology. It is proposed that the creation of a promotable cell in carcinogenic initiation requires a response modification to extracellular or intercellular signals. Different types of response modification can be distinguished: changes in the receptors for growth and differentiation factors and their cytoplasmic and nuclear signal transduction pathways; increased resistance of initiated cells to cytotoxic agents; alterations in junctional cell-to-cell communications. The challenge of a response-modified cell to an appropriate promoter results in its selection and clonal expansion, usually to a benign tumor. In addition, for malignancy, chromosomal changes are required that affect cellular functions that can play a role early or late in tumorigenesis. These concepts are illustrated with examples from oncogene research and oxidant promotion. PMID:2667983

  8. In vitro and in vivo modifications of recombinant and human IgG antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hongcheng; Ponniah, Gomathinayagam; Zhang, Hui-Min; Nowak, Christine; Neill, Alyssa; Gonzalez-Lopez, Nidia; Patel, Rekha; Cheng, Guilong; Kita, Adriana Z; Andrien, Bruce

    2014-01-01

    Tremendous knowledge has been gained in the understanding of various modifications of IgG antibodies, driven mainly by the fact that antibodies are one of the most important groups of therapeutic molecules and because of the development of advanced analytical techniques. Recombinant monoclonal antibody (mAb) therapeutics expressed in mammalian cell lines and endogenous IgG molecules secreted by B cells in the human body share some modifications, but each have some unique modifications. Modifications that are common to recombinant mAb and endogenous IgG molecules are considered to pose a lower risk of immunogenicity. On the other hand, modifications that are unique to recombinant mAbs could potentially pose higher risk. The focus of this review is the comparison of frequently observed modifications of recombinant monoclonal antibodies to those of endogenous IgG molecules. PMID:25517300

  9. In vitro and in vivo modifications of recombinant and human IgG antibodies.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongcheng; Ponniah, Gomathinayagam; Zhang, Hui-Min; Nowak, Christine; Neill, Alyssa; Gonzalez-Lopez, Nidia; Patel, Rekha; Cheng, Guilong; Kita, Adriana Z; Andrien, Bruce

    2014-01-01

    Tremendous knowledge has been gained in the understanding of various modifications of IgG antibodies, driven mainly by the fact that antibodies are one of the most important groups of therapeutic molecules and because of the development of advanced analytical techniques. Recombinant monoclonal antibody (mAb) therapeutics expressed in mammalian cell lines and endogenous IgG molecules secreted by B cells in the human body share some modifications, but each have some unique modifications. Modifications that are common to recombinant mAb and endogenous IgG molecules are considered to pose a lower risk of immunogenicity. On the other hand, modifications that are unique to recombinant mAbs could potentially pose higher risk. The focus of this review is the comparison of frequently observed modifications of recombinant monoclonal antibodies to those of endogenous IgG molecules. PMID:25517300

  10. The Uniqueness of -Matrix Graph Invariants

    PubMed Central

    Dehmer, Matthias; Shi, Yongtang

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we examine the uniqueness (discrimination power) of a newly proposed graph invariant based on the matrix defined by Randi? et al. In order to do so, we use exhaustively generated graphs instead of special graph classes such as trees only. Using these graph classes allow us to generalize the findings towards complex networks as they usually do not possess any structural constraints. We obtain that the uniqueness of this newly proposed graph invariant is approximately as low as the uniqueness of the Balaban index on exhaustively generated (general) graphs. PMID:24392099

  11. Unique Ideas in a New Facility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamby, G. W.

    1977-01-01

    Unique features of a new vocational agriculture department facility in Diamond, Missouri, are described, which include an overhead hoist system, arc welders, storage areas, paint room, and greenhouse. (TA)

  12. Unique Biosignatures in Caves of All Lithologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boston, P. J.; Schubert, K. E.; Gomez, E.; Conrad, P. G.

    2015-10-01

    Unique maze-like microbial communities on cave surfaces on all lithologies all over the world are an excellent candidate biosignatures for life detection missions into caves and other extraterrestrial environments.

  13. Heart Failure: Unique to Older Adults

    MedlinePLUS

    ... our e-newsletter! Aging & Health A to Z Heart Failure Unique to Older Adults This section provides ... or maintain quality of life. Urinary Incontinence and Heart Failure If you have heart failure, you may ...

  14. Modularity, comparative cognition and human uniqueness

    PubMed Central

    Shettleworth, Sara J.

    2012-01-01

    Darwin's claim ‘that the difference in mind between man and the higher animals … is certainly one of degree and not of kind’ is at the core of the comparative study of cognition. Recent research provides unprecedented support for Darwin's claim as well as new reasons to question it, stimulating new theories of human cognitive uniqueness. This article compares and evaluates approaches to such theories. Some prominent theories propose sweeping domain-general characterizations of the difference in cognitive capabilities and/or mechanisms between adult humans and other animals. Dual-process theories for some cognitive domains propose that adult human cognition shares simple basic processes with that of other animals while additionally including slower-developing and more explicit uniquely human processes. These theories are consistent with a modular account of cognition and the ‘core knowledge’ account of children's cognitive development. A complementary proposal is that human infants have unique social and/or cognitive adaptations for uniquely human learning. A view of human cognitive architecture as a mosaic of unique and species-general modular and domain-general processes together with a focus on uniquely human developmental mechanisms is consistent with modern evolutionary-developmental biology and suggests new questions for comparative research. PMID:22927578

  15. Modularity, comparative cognition and human uniqueness.

    PubMed

    Shettleworth, Sara J

    2012-10-01

    Darwin's claim 'that the difference in mind between man and the higher animals … is certainly one of degree and not of kind' is at the core of the comparative study of cognition. Recent research provides unprecedented support for Darwin's claim as well as new reasons to question it, stimulating new theories of human cognitive uniqueness. This article compares and evaluates approaches to such theories. Some prominent theories propose sweeping domain-general characterizations of the difference in cognitive capabilities and/or mechanisms between adult humans and other animals. Dual-process theories for some cognitive domains propose that adult human cognition shares simple basic processes with that of other animals while additionally including slower-developing and more explicit uniquely human processes. These theories are consistent with a modular account of cognition and the 'core knowledge' account of children's cognitive development. A complementary proposal is that human infants have unique social and/or cognitive adaptations for uniquely human learning. A view of human cognitive architecture as a mosaic of unique and species-general modular and domain-general processes together with a focus on uniquely human developmental mechanisms is consistent with modern evolutionary-developmental biology and suggests new questions for comparative research. PMID:22927578

  16. Integrated Microfluidics for Protein Modification Discovery.

    PubMed

    Noach-Hirsh, Meirav; Nevenzal, Hadas; Glick, Yair; Chorni, Evelin; Avrahami, Dorit; Barbiro-Michaely, Efrat; Gerber, Doron; Tzur, Amit

    2015-10-01

    Protein post-translational modifications mediate dynamic cellular processes with broad implications in human disease pathogenesis. There is a large demand for high-throughput technologies supporting post-translational modifications research, and both mass spectrometry and protein arrays have been successfully utilized for this purpose. Protein arrays override the major limitation of target protein abundance inherently associated with MS analysis. This technology, however, is typically restricted to pre-purified proteins spotted in a fixed composition on chips with limited life-time and functionality. In addition, the chips are expensive and designed for a single use, making complex experiments cost-prohibitive. Combining microfluidics with in situ protein expression from a cDNA microarray addressed these limitations. Based on this approach, we introduce a modular integrated microfluidic platform for multiple post-translational modifications analysis of freshly synthesized protein arrays (IMPA). The system's potency, specificity and flexibility are demonstrated for tyrosine phosphorylation and ubiquitination in quasicellular environments. Unlimited by design and protein composition, and relying on minute amounts of biological material and cost-effective technology, this unique approach is applicable for a broad range of basic, biomedical and biomarker research. PMID:26276765

  17. Unique Gene-Silencing and Structural Properties of 2;#8242;-Fluoro-Modified siRNAs

    SciTech Connect

    Manoharan, Muthiah; Akinc, Akin; Pandey, Rajendra K.; Qin, June; Hadwiger, Philipp; John, Matthias; Mills, Kathy; Charisse, Klaus; Maier, Martin A.; Nechev, Lubomir; Greene, Emily M.; Pallan, Pradeep S.; Rozners, Eriks; Rajeev, Kallanthottathil G.; Egli, Martin

    2015-10-15

    With little or no negative impact on the activity of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), regardless of the number of modifications or the positions within the strand, the 2'-deoxy-2'-fluoro (2'-F) modification is unique. Furthermore, the 2'-F-modified siRNA (see crystal structure) was thermodynamically more stable and more nuclease-resistant than the parent siRNA, and produced no immunostimulatory response.

  18. The unique biology of lymphatic edema.

    PubMed

    Rockson, Stanley G

    2009-01-01

    Sadly, the subject of lymphatic vascular insufficiency continues to engender relative neglect by health care professionals, which represents a source of frustration and fear among patients. A re-consideration of the unique, complex biology of lymphatic vascular disorders has the capacity both to reinvigorate interest and facilitate the implementation of the correct, existing treatment interventions for individuals affected by these disease states. While most of this complex lymphatic biology remains somewhat elusive, growing insights into the molecular mechanisms of lymphatic development and repair have been instructive. Present and future considerations in lymphedema diagnosis and management must acknowledge the unique tissue biology of this disorder. Many changes are unique to the lymphatic mechanisms of chronic edema. The profound stimulus to collagen deposition in the integument seems to be unique to chronic lymphatic edema, although this biology remains largely unexplicated. Several lines of evidence also suggest that lymphatic function has a unique and important influence upon adipose biology. Molecular investigation of murine models of human acquired lymphedema are beginning to shed light on these processes. Such focused mechanistic, approaches to the study of lymphedema and other lymphatic diseases are vital, as we attempt to expand our insights into the complex biology of lymphedema and its potential responsiveness to pharmacologic control and molecular intervention, prevention, and reversal. PMID:19522679

  19. Structural Modification of Nanocrystalline Ceria using Ion Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yanwen; Edmondson, Philip D; Varga, Tamas; Moll, Sandra; Namavar, Fereydoon; Weber, William J

    2011-01-01

    Exceptional size-dependent electronic-ionic conductivity of nanostructured ceria can significantly alter materials properties in chemical, physical, electronic and optical applications. Using energetic ions, we have demonstrated effective modification of interface volume and grain size in nanocrystalline ceria from a few nm up to ~ 25 nm, which is the critical region for controlling size-dependent material property. The unique self-healing response of radiation damage at grain boundaries is applied to control the grain size at nanoscale as a function of ion dose and irradiation temperature. Structural modification by energetic ions is proposed to achieve disirable electronic-ionic conductivity.

  20. Photons uniques indiscernables à partir d'une boîte quantique unique dans un cristal photonique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurent, S.; Varoutsis, S.; Le Gratiet, L.; Lemaître, A.; Sagnes, I.; Raineri, F.; Levenson, A.; Robert-Philip, I.; Abram, I.

    2006-10-01

    Nous avons développé et caractérisé une source de photons uniques basée sur l'émission spontanée d'une boîte quantique unique insérée dans une cavité à bande interdite photonique bidimensionnelle. Ce système nous a d'abord permis de produire des photons uniques, puis des photons uniques indiscernables avec une indiscernabilité supérieure à 70%. L'observation de l'indiscernabilité des photons, impossible sans un raccourcissement important de la durée de vie, met en évidence un effet Purcell supérieur à 25 dans ce système.

  1. Using Quantum Confinement to Uniquely Identify Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, J.; Bagci, I. E.; Zawawi, M. A. M.; Sexton, J.; Hulbert, N.; Noori, Y. J.; Young, M. P.; Woodhead, C. S.; Missous, M.; Migliorato, M. A.; Roedig, U.; Young, R. J.

    2015-11-01

    Modern technology unintentionally provides resources that enable the trust of everyday interactions to be undermined. Some authentication schemes address this issue using devices that give a unique output in response to a challenge. These signatures are generated by hard-to-predict physical responses derived from structural characteristics, which lend themselves to two different architectures, known as unique objects (UNOs) and physically unclonable functions (PUFs). The classical design of UNOs and PUFs limits their size and, in some cases, their security. Here we show that quantum confinement lends itself to the provision of unique identities at the nanoscale, by using fluctuations in tunnelling measurements through quantum wells in resonant tunnelling diodes (RTDs). This provides an uncomplicated measurement of identity without conventional resource limitations whilst providing robust security. The confined energy levels are highly sensitive to the specific nanostructure within each RTD, resulting in a distinct tunnelling spectrum for every device, as they contain a unique and unpredictable structure that is presently impossible to clone. This new class of authentication device operates with minimal resources in simple electronic structures above room temperature.

  2. Art Libraries: Creating Access to Unique Collections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Falls, Sarah E.

    2009-01-01

    Art libraries face similar issues to other types of libraries during the digital transition but have unique twists driven by the needs of their collections. Art library information seekers may possess a sense of what an art library is: a library, set apart, to support the study of art and art history. For art libraries, it is the collection,…

  3. Is There a Unique Black Personality?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mosby, Doris P.

    This article reviews research from the 1940's, 1950's and 1960's on the effects of discrimination on blacks. Data from these studies indicate that adverse cultural restrictions have fostered a unique and distinctive black personality. Among traits identified are: a negative or inferior self-image, pessimism about the future, attachment to the…

  4. Some Unique Causes of Black Suicide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spaights, Ernest; Simpson, Gloria

    1986-01-01

    Aspects of suicide unique to blacks are: cultural expectations for males, which include repression of feelings and strict obedience to parents and elders; difficulty identifying with their race; gangs and drug abuse; poverty; and racism. These factors can cause depression, a known factor in suicidal behavior. (Author/ABB)

  5. A Unique Approach to Phlebotomy Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brock, Ann; Kelly, Mary Lou

    Unique characteristics of a continuing education course in phlebotomy offered through Tarrant County Junior College in Forth Worth, Texas, are described. The course was created to address the lack of theoretical knowledge in the hospital-trained phlebotomist. The first course was offered in July 1979 on a noncredit basis for 2 nights a week for 4…

  6. A Graduation Stole Uniquely Designed for Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Day, Lawrence H.

    2009-01-01

    In response to student requests, and to help celebrate the graduation of our physics majors, we have designed a graduation stole uniquely befitting physics. The design incorporates the four visible spectral lines of hydrogen--the Balmer series. Since the 2002 debut of the design, all our graduates have proudly worn their physics graduation stoles…

  7. Unique rig fulfills unusual mobility requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-10-01

    This article describes a unique rig designed by SEDCO FOREX operating in the Paris basin of France. Built to drill clusters of wells from a single pad, Rig 47 significantly reduces the time needed to move from well to well on a pad and from location to location.

  8. Unique Discovery Aspects of Utilizing Botanical Sources

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Because of a long tradition of use in humans, botanicals have many unique advantages to offer as sources of natural products with pharmaceutical influence, especially in terms of opportunities for the development of diverse botanical products. This chapter outlines their use in screening programs, ...

  9. (-)-Botryodiplodin, A Unique Ribose Analog Toxin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many toxins owe their mechanisms of action to being structural analogs of essential metabolites, messengers or structural components. Examples range from tubo-curare to penicillin. Ribose plays a unique role in the metabolism of living organisms, whether prokaryotes or eukaryotes. It and its deri...

  10. Using Quantum Confinement to Uniquely Identify Devices.

    PubMed

    Roberts, J; Bagci, I E; Zawawi, M A M; Sexton, J; Hulbert, N; Noori, Y J; Young, M P; Woodhead, C S; Missous, M; Migliorato, M A; Roedig, U; Young, R J

    2015-01-01

    Modern technology unintentionally provides resources that enable the trust of everyday interactions to be undermined. Some authentication schemes address this issue using devices that give a unique output in response to a challenge. These signatures are generated by hard-to-predict physical responses derived from structural characteristics, which lend themselves to two different architectures, known as unique objects (UNOs) and physically unclonable functions (PUFs). The classical design of UNOs and PUFs limits their size and, in some cases, their security. Here we show that quantum confinement lends itself to the provision of unique identities at the nanoscale, by using fluctuations in tunnelling measurements through quantum wells in resonant tunnelling diodes (RTDs). This provides an uncomplicated measurement of identity without conventional resource limitations whilst providing robust security. The confined energy levels are highly sensitive to the specific nanostructure within each RTD, resulting in a distinct tunnelling spectrum for every device, as they contain a unique and unpredictable structure that is presently impossible to clone. This new class of authentication device operates with minimal resources in simple electronic structures above room temperature. PMID:26553435

  11. Art Libraries: Creating Access to Unique Collections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Falls, Sarah E.

    2009-01-01

    Art libraries face similar issues to other types of libraries during the digital transition but have unique twists driven by the needs of their collections. Art library information seekers may possess a sense of what an art library is: a library, set apart, to support the study of art and art history. For art libraries, it is the collection,…

  12. The Uniqueness of Speech among Motor Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kent, Ray

    2004-01-01

    This paper considers evidence that the speech muscles are unique in their genetic, developmental, functional and phenotypical properties. The literature was reviewed using PubMed, ScienceDirect, ComDisDome and other literature-retrieval systems to identify studies reporting on the craniofacial and laryngeal muscles. Particular emphasis was given…

  13. Tulane Student Designs Unique Learning Tool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Modern Schools, 1977

    1977-01-01

    A Louisiana architect has created plans for a unique supplementary learning environment consisting of five circular buildings featuring a planetarium, an indoor display of small animals in their native habitat, an indoor pond, a library, a media center, and an auditorium. (Author/MLF)

  14. Unique Challenges in Teaching Undergraduate Statistics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conners, Frances A.; Mccown, Steven M.; Roskos-Ewoldsen, Beverly

    1998-01-01

    Outlines and discusses four unique and major challenges facing the undergraduate statistics instructor. These are motivating students to study material they think is uninteresting, handling mathematics anxiety, dealing with performance extremes, and making the learning memorable. Offers solutions for each challenge. (MJP)

  15. The Uniqueness of Speech among Motor Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kent, Ray

    2004-01-01

    This paper considers evidence that the speech muscles are unique in their genetic, developmental, functional and phenotypical properties. The literature was reviewed using PubMed, ScienceDirect, ComDisDome and other literature-retrieval systems to identify studies reporting on the craniofacial and laryngeal muscles. Particular emphasis was given…

  16. Author Identification, Idiolect, and Linguistic Uniqueness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coulthard, Malcolm

    2004-01-01

    For forty years linguists have talked about idiolect and the uniqueness of individual utterances. This article explores how far these two concepts can be used to answer certain questions about the authorship of written documents--for instance how similar can two student essays be before one begins to suspect plagiarism? The article examines two…

  17. LCA – Unique and Controversial Case Studies

    EPA Science Inventory

    This session will focus on case studies and applications that have a unique or controversial aspect. Some of the most recent topics that seem to have significant interest include: LCA-based product declarations, LCA-based standards, LCA-based labels, alternative energy, agricul...

  18. Peoria's traffic signal computerization; A unique experience

    SciTech Connect

    McKinley, D.W.; Hudson, J. Jr. )

    1990-02-01

    The City of Peoria, Illinois, recently completed the coordination and computerization of 157 signalized intersections. Two factors made this project unique: the hybrid system that was installed and the creative approach used to determine the type of control hardware required to meet the city's needs, i.e., central and/or distributed computer intelligence. The project is described in this article.

  19. 78 FR 58785 - Unique Device Identification System

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-24

    ...The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is issuing a final rule to establish a system to adequately identify devices through distribution and use. This rule requires the label of medical devices to include a unique device identifier (UDI), except where the rule provides for an exception or alternative placement. The labeler must submit product information concerning devices to FDA's Global......

  20. Using Quantum Confinement to Uniquely Identify Devices

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, J.; Bagci, I. E.; Zawawi, M. A. M.; Sexton, J.; Hulbert, N.; Noori, Y. J.; Young, M. P.; Woodhead, C. S.; Missous, M.; Migliorato, M. A.; Roedig, U.; Young, R. J.

    2015-01-01

    Modern technology unintentionally provides resources that enable the trust of everyday interactions to be undermined. Some authentication schemes address this issue using devices that give a unique output in response to a challenge. These signatures are generated by hard-to-predict physical responses derived from structural characteristics, which lend themselves to two different architectures, known as unique objects (UNOs) and physically unclonable functions (PUFs). The classical design of UNOs and PUFs limits their size and, in some cases, their security. Here we show that quantum confinement lends itself to the provision of unique identities at the nanoscale, by using fluctuations in tunnelling measurements through quantum wells in resonant tunnelling diodes (RTDs). This provides an uncomplicated measurement of identity without conventional resource limitations whilst providing robust security. The confined energy levels are highly sensitive to the specific nanostructure within each RTD, resulting in a distinct tunnelling spectrum for every device, as they contain a unique and unpredictable structure that is presently impossible to clone. This new class of authentication device operates with minimal resources in simple electronic structures above room temperature. PMID:26553435

  1. Regioselective modification of unprotected glycosides.

    PubMed

    Jäger, Manuel; Minnaard, Adriaan J

    2015-12-24

    Selective modification of unprotected carbohydrates is difficult due to the similar reactivity of the hydroxyl groups. In carbohydrate synthesis, therefore, even straightforward transformations often require multiple synthetic steps. The development of selective methods for carbohydrate modification is consequently highly desired. This review describes the methods for the regio- and chemoselective carbohydrate modification, with a focus on novel approaches that mainly apply transition metal catalysis and organocatalysis, and discusses the challenges and opportunities in this field. PMID:26568447

  2. Public perceptions of hurricane modification.

    PubMed

    Klima, Kelly; Bruine de Bruin, Wändi; Morgan, M Granger; Grossmann, Iris

    2012-07-01

    If hurricane modification were to become a feasible strategy for potentially reducing hurricane damages, it would likely generate public discourse about whether to support its implementation. To facilitate an informed and constructive discourse, policymakers need to understand how people perceive hurricane modification. Here, we examine Florida residents' perceptions of hurricane modification techniques that aim to alter path and wind speed. Following the mental models approach, we conducted a survey study about public perceptions of hurricane modification that was guided by formative interviews on the topic. We report a set of four primary findings. First, hurricane modification was perceived as a relatively ineffective strategy for damage reduction, compared to other strategies for damage reduction. Second, hurricane modification was expected to lead to changes in projected hurricane path, but not necessarily to the successful reduction of projected hurricane strength. Third, more anger was evoked when a hurricane was described as having changed from the initially forecasted path or strength after an attempted modification. Fourth, unlike what we expected, participants who more strongly agreed with statements that recognized the uncertainty inherent in forecasts reported more rather than less anger at scientists across hurricane modification scenarios. If the efficacy of intensity-reduction techniques can be increased, people may be willing to support hurricane modification. However, such an effort would need to be combined with open and honest communications to members of the general public. PMID:22050325

  3. Synthetic Proteins and Peptides for the Direct Interrogation of ?-Synuclein Posttranslational Modifications

    PubMed Central

    Pratt, Matthew R.; Abeywardana, Tharindumala; Marotta, Nicholas P.

    2015-01-01

    ?-Synuclein is the aggregation-prone protein associated with Parkinson’s disease (PD) and related neurodegenerative diseases. Complicating both its biological functions and toxic aggregation are a variety of posttranslational modifications. These modifications have the potential to either positively or negatively affect ?-synuclein aggregation, raising the possibility that the enzymes that add or remove these modifications could be therapeutic targets in PD. Synthetic protein chemistry is uniquely positioned to generate site-specifically and homogeneously modified proteins for biochemical study. Here, we review the application of synthetic peptides and proteins towards understanding the effects of ?-synuclein posttranslational modifications. PMID:26120904

  4. Readout of Epigenetic Modifications

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Dinshaw J.; Wang, Zhanxin

    2015-01-01

    This review focuses on a structure-based analysis of histone posttranslational modification (PTM) readout, where the PTMs serve as docking sites for reader modules as part of larger complexes displaying chromatin modifier and remodeling activities, with the capacity to alter chromatin architecture and templated processes. Individual topics addressed include the diversity of reader-binding pocket architectures and common principles underlying readout of methyl-lysine and methyl-arginine marks, their unmodified counterparts, as well as acetyl-lysine and phosphoserine marks. The review also discusses the impact of multivalent readout of combinations of PTMs localized at specific genomic sites by linked binding modules on processes ranging from gene transcription to repair. Additional topics include cross talk between histone PTMs, histone mimics, epigenetic-based diseases, and drug-based therapeutic intervention. The review ends by highlighting new initiatives and advances, as well as future challenges, toward the promise of enhancing our structural and mechanistic understanding of the readout of histone PTMs at the nucleosomal level. PMID:23642229

  5. User applications unique to mobile satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castiel, David

    1990-01-01

    As AMSC enters the market with its mobile satellite services, it faces a sophisticated user group that has already experimented with a wide range of communications services, including cellular radio and Ku-band satellite messaging. AMSC's challenge is to define applications unique to the capabilities of its dedicated L band satellite and consistent with the provisions outlined in its FCC license. Through a carefully researched approach to its three main markets (aeronautical, land mobile, and maritime) AMSC is discovering a wellspring of interest in corporate and general aviation, trucking companies, pipeline monitoring and control companies, maritime management firms, telecommunications companies, and government agencies. A general overview is provided of AMSC's FCC license and corporate history, and the specific applications unique to each user group is discussed.

  6. Unique device identification system. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2013-09-24

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is issuing a final rule to establish a system to adequately identify devices through distribution and use. This rule requires the label of medical devices to include a unique device identifier (UDI), except where the rule provides for an exception or alternative placement. The labeler must submit product information concerning devices to FDA's Global Unique Device Identification Database (GUDID), unless subject to an exception or alternative. The system established by this rule requires the label and device package of each medical device to include a UDI and requires that each UDI be provided in a plain-text version and in a form that uses automatic identification and data capture (AIDC) technology. The UDI will be required to be directly marked on the device itself if the device is intended to be used more than once and intended to be reprocessed before each use. PMID:24066364

  7. Is mankind unique in the Galaxy?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, A. R.; Bond, A.

    1984-10-01

    There is a relation between questions regarding the uniqueness of mankind in the Galaxy and the 'Fermi Paradox'. It has appeared to Fermi that the eventual controlled command of astronomical quantities of energy, and the ability for mankind to head out into the universe was only a matter of time. On the other hand, he reasoned that a large number of sites for intelligence should have developed in the Galaxy a long time ago. He expected that such civilizations in colonizing the Galaxy would come in contact with the earth, and yet, there is no evidence regarding such contacts. Many aspects of the Fermi Paradox have been debated. The present investigation represents an attempt to further contribute to that debate by exploring some of the arguments prompted by the Paradox. It is concluded that all of the arguments have only one self-consistent resolution. According to this resolution, mankind is unique in the Galaxy.

  8. Surface modification of cellulose nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eyley, Samuel; Thielemans, Wim

    2014-06-01

    Chemical modification of cellulose nanocrystals is an increasingly popular topic in the literature. This review analyses the type of cellulose nanocrystal modification reactions that have been published in the literature thus far and looks at the steps that have been taken towards analysing the products of the nanocrystal modifications. The main categories of reactions carried out on cellulose nanocrystals are oxidations, esterifications, amidations, carbamations and etherifications. More recently nucleophilic substitutions have been used to introduce more complex functionality to cellulose nanocrystals. Multi-step modifications are also considered. This review emphasizes quantification of modification at the nanocrystal surface in terms of degree of substitution and the validity of conclusions drawn from different analysis techniques in this area. The mechanisms of the modification reactions are presented and considered with respect to the effect on the outcome of the reactions. While great strides have been made in the quality of analytical data published in the field of cellulose nanocrystal modification, there is still vast scope for improvement, both in data quality and the quality of analysis of data. Given the difficulty of surface analysis, cross-checking of results from different analysis techniques is fundamental for the development of reliable cellulose nanocrystal modification techniques.

  9. Body Modification and Suicidal Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hicinbothem, Julie; Gonsalves, Sonia; Lester, David

    2006-01-01

    In a large sample of individuals who belong to a website for body modification, having body modifications (e.g., piercings, tattoos, scarification and surgical procedures) was associated with a higher incidence of prior suicidality (i.e., suicidal ideation and attempted suicide). However, controls for self-reported depression weakened the strength…

  10. Assessing non-uniqueness: An algebraic approach

    SciTech Connect

    Vasco, Don W.

    2002-09-16

    Geophysical inverse problems are endowed with a rich mathematical structure. When discretized, most differential and integral equations of interest are algebraic (polynomial) in form. Techniques from algebraic geometry and computational algebra provide a means to address questions of existence and uniqueness for both linear and non-linear inverse problem. In a sense, the methods extend ideas which have proven fruitful in treating linear inverse problems.

  11. The uniqueness of the {theta}+ pentaquark

    SciTech Connect

    Mulders, P.J.; Jimenez Delgado, P.

    2005-05-06

    The existence of the {theta}+ pentaquark requires a peculiar mechanism to explain its stability. Looking at quark clusters, notably diquark and triquark configurations, such a mechanism may be found in the color-magnetic interaction between quarks. It is possible to understand why the {theta}+ is unique. Chiral dynamics, in particular the ease of pion emission, will render other members of the same flavor antidecuplet, such as the {xi} - very unstable.

  12. 77 FR 40735 - Unique Device Identification System

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-10

    ...The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is proposing to establish a unique device identification system to implement the requirement added to the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (FD&C Act) by section 226 of the Food and Drug Administration Amendments Act of 2007 (FDAAA), Section 226 of FDAAA amended the FD&C Act to add new section 519(f), which directs FDA to promulgate regulations......

  13. Metalworking Techniques Unlock a Unique Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2015-01-01

    Approached by West Hartford, Connecticut-based Abbot Ball Company, Glenn Research Center agreed to test an intriguing alloy called Nitinol 60 that had been largely unused for a half century. Using powdered metallurgy, the partners developed a method for manufacturing and working with the material, which Abbott Ball has now commercialized. Nitinol 60 provides a unique combination of qualities that make it an excellent material for ball bearings, among other applications.

  14. Unique nature of hydroplant complicates design

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    This article describes the unique nature of the Niagara Power Project as it affected upgrading of the Robert Moses powerplant and operation of the powerplant and pumped storage facility. To be taken into account are the variable flow of the Niagara River, treaties regarding division of river flow between Canada and USA and maintenance of river flow over the falls, and the level of Lake Erie.

  15. Cochlear Implantation in Unique Pediatric Populations

    PubMed Central

    Hang, Anna X.; Kim, Grace G.; Zdanski, Carlton J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of review Over the last decade, the selection criteria for cochlear implantation have expanded to include children with special auditory, otologic, and medical problems. Included within this expanded group of candidates are those children with auditory neuropathy spectrum disorder, cochleovestibular malformations, cochlear nerve deficiency, associated syndromes, as well as multiple medical and developmental disorders. Definitive indications for cochlear implantation in these unique pediatric populations are in evolution. This review will provide an overview of managing and habilitating hearing loss within these populations with specific focus on cochlear implantation as a treatment option. Recent findings Cochlear implants have been successfully implanted in children within unique populations with variable results. Evaluation for cochlear implant candidacy includes the core components of a full medical, audiologic, and speech and language evaluations. When considering candidacy in these children, additional aspects to consider include disorder specific surgical considerations and child/care-giver counseling regarding reasonable post-implantation outcome expectations. Summary Cochlear implantations are accepted as the standard of care for improving hearing and speech development in children with severe to profound hearing loss. However, children with sensorineural hearing loss who meet established audiologic criteria for cochlear implantation may have unique audiologic, medical, and anatomic characteristics that necessitate special consideration regarding cochlear implantation candidacy and outcome. Individualized pre-operative candidacy and counseling, surgical evaluation, and reasonable post-operative outcome expectations should be taken into account in the management of these children. PMID:23128686

  16. Unique Aspects of Herbal Whole System Research

    PubMed Central

    Zick, Suzanna M.; Schwabl, Herbert; Flower, Andrew; Lac, Dip; Chakraborty, Bibhas; Hirschkorn, Kristine

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Whole systems of healthcare offer unique methodological and theoretical challenges for researchers. Herbalism has its own set of methodological and philosophical research issues, which are beyond those presented for whole system research, in general. Methods An International Society for Complementary Medicine Research (ISCMR) workshop was presented on, “Challenges in Herbal Whole Systems Research”. Starting from a definition of herbalism the most important challenges to herbal whole system research (HWSR) were elicited with inputs from both the workshop presenters and the audience. Results Five major challenges unique to herbal whole systems research were identified: (1) Defining herbalists and herbalism; (2) role of natural products industry in herbal research; (3) designing placebos and delivering active herbal treatments as are given by herbalists; (4) researching the herb as a living entity; and (5) designing trials to investigate and develop multi-component herbal therapies. Conclusions To design studies of herbalism requires unique methods and theoretical frameworks. Solutions to these methodological challenges need to be addressed to conduct research that examines herbal systems of medicine versus conducting trials on individual herbs given out of their original therapeutic context. PMID:19272580

  17. Unique characteristics of informal hospice cancer caregiving

    PubMed Central

    Washington, Karla T.; Pike, Kenneth C.; Demiris, George; Oliver, Debra Parker

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to describe the unique characteristics of informal hospice cancer caregiving. Methods Researchers conducted a secondary analysis of data drawn from a randomized clinical trial of an informal hospice caregiving intervention (N=348). Demographic characteristics and measures of the informal caregiving experience of hospice patients and their informal caregivers were compared based on the patient’s diagnosis using chi-square tests for association of categorical variables and t tests for continuous variables. Results Informal caregivers of cancer patients differed from their non-cancer counterparts in a number of respects including patient age, caregiver age, patient residence, relationship between patient and caregiver, amount and duration of care provided, likelihood to incur out-of-pocket expenses related to patient care, caregiver problem-solving style, and impact on caregiver daily schedule. There were no statistically significant differences between cancer and non-cancer caregivers in terms of gender, race, employment status, anxiety, and quality of life. Conclusions While cancer and non-cancer caregivers are similar in many respects, a number of unique features characterize the informal hospice cancer caregiving experience. Attention to these unique features will allow hospice providers to tailor supportive care interventions to better address cancer caregivers’ needs. PMID:25547480

  18. A Unique Origin for Mojave Crater?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahnle, K.; Colaprete, A.

    2004-12-01

    Williams et al (LPSC 2004; see also Kerr, Science vol. 304, 196 ) recently reported the discovery of a spectacularly eroded, apparently water-carved impact crater on Mars. The ~60 km diameter crater, dubbed "Mojave Crater" for the resemblance of its alluvial fans to alluvial fans seen on Earth, is located on Xanthe Terra, Mars. The crater is rated as late Hesperian or Amazonian, meaning that the impact took place some time in the past 3.5 billion years; there is some evidence that it is not extraordinarily young. Yet the crater seems unique for its size. This crater, and to present knowledge this crater alone, is the obvious source of its own precipitation. Impact by a live, ice-rich comet may provide a unique origin for this unique crater. Impacts by live comets are surprisingly rare in the inner solar system. To make a 60 km crater on Mars requires either a ~6 km diameter nearly isotropic comet (NIC), or an ~10 km diameter Jupiter-family comet (JFC). NICs strike Mars about 3 times in 10 billion if they pass its orbit. The latter happens about 6 times per decade for NICs bigger than 6 km, so that at current rates a NIC makes a 60 km crater on Mars about once every 5 billion years. The typical Mars-crossing JFCs actually hits Mars at a rate of about 8e-11 per comet per year. There are currently 3 known Mars-crossing JFCs that may be big enough to make 60 km craters on Mars (the nearly extinct P/28 Neujmin 1, P/10 Tempel 2, and perhaps P/49 Arend-Rigaux). The rate is about once per 4 billion years. Thus we expect on the order of one 60 km martian impact crater in the past 3.5 Gyr made by a comet. There would be on the order of ten 30 km craters. Preliminary GCM simulations of comet impacts indicate that, while very large impact events generate global climate effects that can lead to precipitation in topographically favored locations anywhere on Mars, on the scale of 60 km craters the impact-generated rainfall becomes localized, such that, to first approximation, a uniquely wet impact might be expected to create uniquely heavy local precipitation on scales comparable to the impact crater.

  19. Autoantibodies to posttranslational modifications in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Burska, Agata N; Hunt, Laura; Boissinot, Marjorie; Strollo, Rocky; Ryan, Brent J; Vital, Ed; Nissim, Ahuva; Winyard, Paul G; Emery, Paul; Ponchel, Frederique

    2014-01-01

    Autoantibodies have been associated with human pathologies for a long time, particularly with autoimmune diseases (AIDs). Rheumatoid factor (RF) is known since the late 1930s to be associated with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The discovery of anticitrullinated protein antibodies in the last century has changed this and other posttranslational modifications (PTM) relevant to RA have since been described. Such PTM introduce neoepitopes in proteins that can generate novel autoantibody specificities. The recent recognition of these novel specificities in RA provides a unique opportunity to understand human B-cell development in vivo. In this paper, we will review the three of the main classes of PTMs already associated with RA: citrullination, carbamylation, and oxidation. With the advancement of research methodologies it should be expected that other autoantibodies against PTM proteins could be discovered in patients with autoimmune diseases. Many of such autoantibodies may provide significant biomarker potential. PMID:24782594

  20. Autoantibodies to Posttranslational Modifications in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Burska, Agata N.; Hunt, Laura; Strollo, Rocky; Ryan, Brent J.; Vital, Ed; Nissim, Ahuva; Winyard, Paul G.; Emery, Paul; Ponchel, Frederique

    2014-01-01

    Autoantibodies have been associated with human pathologies for a long time, particularly with autoimmune diseases (AIDs). Rheumatoid factor (RF) is known since the late 1930s to be associated with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The discovery of anticitrullinated protein antibodies in the last century has changed this and other posttranslational modifications (PTM) relevant to RA have since been described. Such PTM introduce neoepitopes in proteins that can generate novel autoantibody specificities. The recent recognition of these novel specificities in RA provides a unique opportunity to understand human B-cell development in vivo. In this paper, we will review the three of the main classes of PTMs already associated with RA: citrullination, carbamylation, and oxidation. With the advancement of research methodologies it should be expected that other autoantibodies against PTM proteins could be discovered in patients with autoimmune diseases. Many of such autoantibodies may provide significant biomarker potential. PMID:24782594

  1. Materials Modification Under Ion Irradiation: JANNUS Project

    SciTech Connect

    Serruys, Y.; Trocellier, P.; Trouslard, Ph.

    2004-12-01

    JANNUS (Joint Accelerators for Nano-Science and Nuclear Simulation) is a project designed to study the modification of materials using multiple ion beams and in-situ TEM observation. It will be a unique facility in Europe for the study of irradiation effects, the simulation of material damage due to irradiation and in particular of combined effects. The project is also intended to bring together experimental and modelling teams for a mutual fertilisation of their activities. It will also contribute to the teaching of particle-matter interactions and their applications. JANNUS will be composed of three accelerators with a common experimental chamber and of two accelerators coupled to a 200 kV TEM.

  2. Structural Modification of Nanocrystalline Ceria by Ion Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yanwen; Edmondson, Philip D.; Varga, Tamas; Moll, Sandra J.; Namavar, Fereydoon; Lan, Chune; Weber, William J.

    2011-05-25

    Using energetic ions, we have demonstrated effective modification of grain size in nanocrystalline ceria in the critical region for controlling exceptional size-dependent electronicionic conductivity. The grain size increases and follows an exponential law as a function of ion fluence that increases with temperature, while the cubic phase is stable under the irradiation. The unique self-healing response of radiation damage at grain boundaries is utilized to control the grain size at the nanoscale.

  3. Surface modification of bioceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monkawa, Akira

    Hydroxyapatite [Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2, HAp] is a major inorganic component of bone and teeth tissues and has the excellent biocompatibility and high osteoconductivity. The interactions between HAp and protein or cell have been studied. The HAp related bioceramics such as bone substitute, coating substance of metal implants, inorganic-polymer composites, and cell culture. We described two methods; (1) surface modification of HAp using organosilane; (2) fabrication of HAp ultra-thin layer on gold surface for protein adsorption analyzed with QCM-D technique. The interfacial interaction between collagen and HAp in a nano-region was controlled by depositing the organosilane of n-octadecyltrimethoxysilane (ODS: -CH3) or aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTS: -NH2) with a chemical vapor deposition method. The morphologies of collagen adsorbed on the surfaces of HAp and HAp deposited with APTS were similar, however that of the surface with ODS was apparently different, due to the hydrophobic interaction between the organic head group of -CH3 and residual groups of collagen. We present a method for coating gold quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) sensor with ultra-thin layer of hydroxyapatite nanocrystals evenly covering and tightly bound to the surface. The hydroxyapatite sensor operated in liquid with high stability and sensitivity. The in-situ adsorption mechanism and conformational change of fibrinogen on gold, titanium and hydroxyapatite surfaces were investigated by QCM-D technique and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. The study indicates that the hydroxyapatite sensor is applicable for qualitative and conformational analysis of protein adsorption.

  4. Unique biochemical and mineral composition of whale ear bones.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sora L; Thewissen, J G M; Churchill, Morgan M; Suydam, Robert S; Ketten, Darlene R; Clementz, Mark T

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Cetaceans are obligate aquatic mammals derived from terrestrial artiodactyls. The defining characteristic of cetaceans is a thick and dense lip (pachyosteosclerotic involucrum) of an ear bone (the tympanic). This unique feature is absent in modern terrestrial artiodactyls and is suggested to be important in underwater hearing. Here, we investigate the mineralogical and biochemical properties of the involucrum, as these may hold clues to the aquatic adaptations of cetaceans. We compared bioapatites (enamel, dentine, cementum, and skeletal bone) of cetaceans with those of terrestrial artiodactyls and pachyosteosclerotic ribs of manatees (Sirenia). We investigated organic, carbonate, and mineral composition as well as crystal size and crystallinity index. In all studied variables, bioapatites of the cetacean involucrum were intermediate in composition and structure between those of tooth enamel on the one hand and those of dentine, cementum, and skeletal bone on the other. We also studied the amino acid composition of the cetacean involucrum relative to that of other skeletal bone. The central involucrum had low glycine and hydroxyproline concentrations but high concentrations of nonessential amino acids, unlike most bone samples but similar to the tympanic of hippos and the (pachyosteosclerotic) ribs of manatees. These amino acid results are evidence of rapid bone development. We hypothesize that the mineralogical and amino acid composition of cetacean bullae differs from that of other bone because of (1) functional modifications for underwater sound reception and (2) structural adaptations related to rapid ossification. PMID:24940922

  5. A uniquely specialized ear in a very early tetrapod.

    PubMed

    Clack, J A; Ahlberg, P E; Finney, S M; Dominguez Alonso, P; Robinson, J; Ketcham, R A

    2003-09-01

    The Late Devonian genus Ichthyostega was for many decades the earliest known tetrapod, and the sole representative of a transitional form between a fish and a land vertebrate. However, despite being known since 1932 (ref. 1) from a large collection of specimens, its morphology remained enigmatic and not what was expected of a very primitive tetrapod. Its apparent specializations led it to be considered as a "blind offshoot" or "sidebranch" off the tetrapod family tree, and recent cladistic analyses have disagreed about its exact phylogenetic position within the tetrapod stem group. In particular, its braincase and ear region defied interpretation, such that conventional anatomical terms seemed inapplicable. Using new material collected in 1998 (ref. 9), preparation of earlier-collected material, and high-resolution computed tomography scanning, here we identify and interpret these problematic anatomical structures. They can now be seen to form part of a highly specialized ear, probably a hearing device for use in water. This represents a structurally and functionally unique modification of the tetrapod otic region, unlike anything seen in subsequent tetrapod evolution. The presence of deeply grooved gill bars as in its contemporary Acanthostega suggest that Ichthyostega may have been more aquatically adapted than previously believed. PMID:12955140

  6. Unique properties of Drosophila spermatocyte primary cilia

    PubMed Central

    Riparbelli, Maria Giovanna; Cabrera, Oscar A.; Callaini, Giuliano; Megraw, Timothy L.

    2013-01-01

    Summary The primary cilium is an essential organelle required for animal development and adult homeostasis that is found on most animal cells. The primary cilium contains a microtubule-based axoneme cytoskeleton that typically grows from the mother centriole in G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle as a membrane-bound compartment that protrudes from the cell surface. A unique system of bidirectional transport, intraflagellar transport (IFT), maintains the structure and function of cilia. While the axoneme is dynamic, growing and shrinking at its tip, at the same time it is very stable to the effects of microtubule-targeting drugs. The primary cilia found on Drosophila spermatocytes diverge from the general rules of primary cilium biology in several respects. Among these unique attributes, spermatocyte cilia assemble from all four centrioles in an IFT-independent manner in G2 phase, and persist continuously through two cell divisions. Here, we show that Drosophila spermatocyte primary cilia are extremely sensitive to microtubule-targeting drugs, unlike their mammalian counterparts. Spermatocyte cilia and their axonemes fail to assemble or be maintained upon nocodazole treatment, while centriole replication appears unperturbed. On the other hand, paclitaxel (Taxol), a microtubule-stabilizing drug, disrupted transition zone assembly and anchoring to the plasma membrane while causing spermatocyte primary cilia to grow extensively long during the assembly/elongation phase, but did not overtly affect the centrioles. However, once assembled to their mature length, spermatocyte cilia appeared unaffected by Taxol. The effects of these drugs on axoneme dynamics further demonstrate that spermatocyte primary cilia are endowed with unique assembly properties. PMID:24244850

  7. The Parisi Formula has a Unique Minimizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auffinger, Antonio; Chen, Wei-Kuo

    2015-05-01

    In 1979, Parisi (Phys Rev Lett 43:1754-1756, 1979) predicted a variational formula for the thermodynamic limit of the free energy in the Sherrington-Kirkpatrick model, and described the role played by its minimizer. This formula was verified in the seminal work of Talagrand (Ann Math 163(1):221-263, 2006) and later generalized to the mixed p-spin models by Panchenko (Ann Probab 42(3):946-958, 2014). In this paper, we prove that the minimizer in Parisi's formula is unique at any temperature and external field by establishing the strict convexity of the Parisi functional.

  8. Structure of the hypusinylated eukaryotic translation factor eIF-5A bound to the ribosome

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Christian; Becker, Thomas; Heuer, André; Braunger, Katharina; Shanmuganathan, Vivekanandan; Pech, Markus; Berninghausen, Otto; Wilson, Daniel N.; Beckmann, Roland

    2016-01-01

    During protein synthesis, ribosomes become stalled on polyproline-containing sequences, unless they are rescued in archaea and eukaryotes by the initiation factor 5A (a/eIF-5A) and in bacteria by the homologous protein EF-P. While a structure of EF-P bound to the 70S ribosome exists, structural insight into eIF-5A on the 80S ribosome has been lacking. Here we present a cryo-electron microscopy reconstruction of eIF-5A bound to the yeast 80S ribosome at 3.9 Å resolution. The structure reveals that the unique and functionally essential post-translational hypusine modification reaches toward the peptidyltransferase center of the ribosome, where the hypusine moiety contacts A76 of the CCA-end of the P-site tRNA. These findings would support a model whereby eIF-5A stimulates peptide bond formation on polyproline-stalled ribosomes by stabilizing and orienting the CCA-end of the P-tRNA, rather than by directly contributing to the catalysis. PMID:26715760

  9. Structure of the hypusinylated eukaryotic translation factor eIF-5A bound to the ribosome.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Christian; Becker, Thomas; Heuer, André; Braunger, Katharina; Shanmuganathan, Vivekanandan; Pech, Markus; Berninghausen, Otto; Wilson, Daniel N; Beckmann, Roland

    2016-02-29

    During protein synthesis, ribosomes become stalled on polyproline-containing sequences, unless they are rescued in archaea and eukaryotes by the initiation factor 5A (a/eIF-5A) and in bacteria by the homologous protein EF-P. While a structure of EF-P bound to the 70S ribosome exists, structural insight into eIF-5A on the 80S ribosome has been lacking. Here we present a cryo-electron microscopy reconstruction of eIF-5A bound to the yeast 80S ribosome at 3.9 Å resolution. The structure reveals that the unique and functionally essential post-translational hypusine modification reaches toward the peptidyltransferase center of the ribosome, where the hypusine moiety contacts A76 of the CCA-end of the P-site tRNA. These findings would support a model whereby eIF-5A stimulates peptide bond formation on polyproline-stalled ribosomes by stabilizing and orienting the CCA-end of the P-tRNA, rather than by directly contributing to the catalysis. PMID:26715760

  10. Astronomy Outreach for Large and Unique Audiences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubowich, D.; Sparks, R. T.; Pompea, S. M.; Kendall, J. S.; Dugan, C.

    2013-04-01

    In this session, we discuss different approaches to reaching large audiences. In addition to star parties and astronomy events, the audiences for some of the events include music concerts or festivals, sick children and their families, minority communities, American Indian reservations, and tourist sites such as the National Mall. The goal is to bring science directly to the public—to people who attend astronomy events and to people who do not come to star parties, science museums, or science festivals. These programs allow the entire community to participate in astronomy activities to enhance the public appreciation of science. These programs attract large enthusiastic crowds often with young children participating in these family learning experiences. The public will become more informed, educated, and inspired about astronomy and will also be provided with information that will allow them to continue to learn after this outreach activity. Large and unique audiences often have common problems, and their solutions and the lessons learned will be presented. Interaction with the participants in this session will provide important community feedback used to improve astronomy outreach for large and unique audiences. New ways to expand astronomy outreach to new large audiences will be discussed.

  11. Beryllium - A Unique Material in Nuclear Applications

    SciTech Connect

    T., A. Tomberlin

    2004-11-01

    Beryllium, due to its unique combination of structural, chemical, atomic number, and neutron absorption cross section characteristics, has been used successfully as a neutron reflector for three generations of nuclear test reactors at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), the largest test reactor in the world, has utilized five successive beryllium neutron reflectors and is scheduled for continued operation with a sixth beryllium reflector. A high radiation environment in a test reactor produces radiation damage and other changes in beryllium. These changes necessitate safety analysis of the beryllium, methods to predict performance, and appropriate surveillances. Other nuclear applications also utilize beryllium. Beryllium, given its unique atomic, physical, and chemical characteristics, is widely used as a “window” for x-rays and gamma rays. Beryllium, intimately mixed with high-energy alpha radiation emitters has been successfully used to produce neutron sources. This paper addresses operational experience and methodologies associated with the use of beryllium in nuclear test reactors and in “windows” for x-rays and gamma rays. Other nuclear applications utilizing beryllium are also discussed.

  12. Unique features of plant mitochondrial sulfhydryl oxidase.

    PubMed

    Levitan, Alexander; Danon, Avihai; Lisowsky, Thomas

    2004-05-01

    The yeast and human mitochondrial sulfhydryl oxidases of the Erv1/Alr family have been shown to be essential for the biogenesis of mitochondria and the cytosolic iron sulfur cluster assembly. In this study we identified a likely candidate for the first mitochondrial flavin-linked sulfhydryl oxidase of the Erv1-type from a photosynthetic organism. The central core of the plant enzyme (AtErv1) exhibits all of the characteristic features of the Erv1/Alr protein family, including a redox-active YPCXXC motif, noncovalently bound FAD, and sulfhydryl oxidase activity. Transient expression of fusion proteins of AtErv1 and the green fluorescence protein in plant protoplasts showed that the plant enzyme preferentially localizes to the mitochondria. Yet AtErv1 has several unique features, such as the presence of a CXXXXC motif in its carboxyl-terminal domain and the absence of an amino-terminally localized cysteine pair common to yeast and human Erv1/Alr proteins. In addition, the dimerization of AtErv1 is not mediated by its amino terminus but by its unique CXXXXC motif. In vitro assays with purified protein and artificial substrates demonstrate a preference of AtErv1 for dithiols with a defined space between the thiol groups, suggesting a thioredoxin-like substrate. PMID:14996837

  13. What makes Xanthomonas albilineans unique amongst xanthomonads?

    PubMed Central

    Pieretti, Isabelle; Pesic, Alexander; Petras, Daniel; Royer, Monique; Süssmuth, Roderich D.; Cociancich, Stéphane

    2015-01-01

    Xanthomonas albilineans causes leaf scald, a lethal disease of sugarcane. Compared to other species of Xanthomonas, X. albilineans exhibits distinctive pathogenic mechanisms, ecology and taxonomy. Its genome, which has experienced significant erosion, has unique genomic features. It lacks two loci required for pathogenicity in other plant pathogenic species of Xanthomonas: the xanthan gum biosynthesis and the Hrp-T3SS (hypersensitive response and pathogenicity-type three secretion system) gene clusters. Instead, X. albilineans harbors in its genome an SPI-1 (Salmonella pathogenicity island-1) T3SS gene cluster usually found in animal pathogens. X. albilineans produces a potent DNA gyrase inhibitor called albicidin, which blocks chloroplast differentiation, resulting in the characteristic white foliar stripe symptoms. The antibacterial activity of albicidin also confers on X. albilineans a competitive advantage against rival bacteria during sugarcane colonization. Recent chemical studies have uncovered the unique structure of albicidin and allowed us to partially elucidate its fascinating biosynthesis apparatus, which involves an enigmatic hybrid PKS/NRPS (polyketide synthase/non-ribosomal peptide synthetase) machinery. PMID:25964795

  14. Unmanned Aerial Vehicles unique cost estimating requirements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malone, P.; Apgar, H.; Stukes, S.; Sterk, S.

    Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs), also referred to as drones, are aerial platforms that fly without a human pilot onboard. UAVs are controlled autonomously by a computer in the vehicle or under the remote control of a pilot stationed at a fixed ground location. There are a wide variety of drone shapes, sizes, configurations, complexities, and characteristics. Use of these devices by the Department of Defense (DoD), NASA, civil and commercial organizations continues to grow. UAVs are commonly used for intelligence, surveillance, reconnaissance (ISR). They are also use for combat operations, and civil applications, such as firefighting, non-military security work, surveillance of infrastructure (e.g. pipelines, power lines and country borders). UAVs are often preferred for missions that require sustained persistence (over 4 hours in duration), or are “ too dangerous, dull or dirty” for manned aircraft. Moreover, they can offer significant acquisition and operations cost savings over traditional manned aircraft. Because of these unique characteristics and missions, UAV estimates require some unique estimating methods. This paper describes a framework for estimating UAV systems total ownership cost including hardware components, software design, and operations. The challenge of collecting data, testing the sensitivities of cost drivers, and creating cost estimating relationships (CERs) for each key work breakdown structure (WBS) element is discussed. The autonomous operation of UAVs is especially challenging from a software perspective.

  15. Event Segmentation Ability Uniquely Predicts Event Memory

    PubMed Central

    Sargent, Jesse Q.; Zacks, Jeffrey M.; Hambrick, David Z.; Zacks, Rose T.; Kurby, Christopher A.; Bailey, Heather R.; Eisenberg, Michelle L.; Beck, Taylor M.

    2013-01-01

    Memory for everyday events plays a central role in tasks of daily living, autobiographical memory, and planning. Event memory depends in part on segmenting ongoing activity into meaningful units. This study examined the relationship between event segmentation and memory in a lifespan sample to answer the following question: Is the ability to segment activity into meaningful events a unique predictor of subsequent memory, or is the relationship between event perception and memory accounted for by general cognitive abilities? Two hundred and eight adults ranging from 20 to 79 years old segmented movies of everyday events and attempted to remember the events afterwards. They also completed psychometric ability tests and tests measuring script knowledge for everyday events. Event segmentation and script knowledge both explained unique variance in event memory above and beyond the psychometric measures, and did so as strongly in older as in younger adults. These results suggest that event segmentation is a basic cognitive mechanism, important for memory across the lifespan. PMID:23942350

  16. Self-Modification of Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tharp, Roland G.; And Others

    1974-01-01

    Discusses the effectiveness in four case studies of group instruction (pretraining) in the methods and principles of self-modification as an economical and beneficial offering for individuals suffering emotional as well as overt behavioral problems. (Author/PC)

  17. Modifications to Replacement Costs System

    SciTech Connect

    Godec, M.

    1989-05-18

    The purpose of this memorandum is to document the improvements and modifications made to the Replacement Costs of Crude Oil (REPCO) Supply Analysis System. While some of this work was performed under our previous support contract to DOE/ASFE, we are presenting all modifications and improvements are presented here for completeness. The memo primarily documents revisions made to the Lower-48 Onshore Model. Revisions and modifications made to other components and models in the REPCO system which are documented elsewhere are only highlighted in this memo. Generally, the modifications made to the Lower-48 Onshore Model reflect changes that have occurred in domestic drilling, oil field costs, and reserves since 1982, the date of the most recent available data used for the original Replacement Costs report, published in 1985.

  18. Modifications improve waterflood performance model

    SciTech Connect

    El-Banbi, A.H.; Abdel Wally, A.; Abd-el Fattah, K.A.; Sayyouh, M.H.

    1996-01-01

    Modifications to the Craig-Geffen-Morse (CGM) waterflooding model improve reservoir performance predictions and allow for the inclusion of pressure drop variations with time. The modified model was validated against numerical simulation results. The paper describes the CGM model, the hypothetical data set, the simulation technique, comparisons between the CGM model and the simulation, and modifications to the CGM model relating to pressure drop variation and water production.

  19. Electrochemical probing into cytochrome c modification with homocysteine-thiolactone.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jing; Zhu, Wei; Liu, Tao; Yang, Jinghua; Li, Genxi

    2010-05-01

    Homocysteine thiolactone modification is a unique process of posttranslational protein modification as well as a significant clinical indicator of cardiovascular and neurovascular diseases, so we report a new method in this paper to sensitively monitor such a modification using horse heart cytochrome c as a model protein. After the modification has been confirmed by UV-vis spectroscopy and ESI-MS, N-linked cytochrome c is then covalently assembled onto the surface of a gold electrode via the resulted homocysteine thiol group, thus electrochemical techniques, especially differential pulse voltammetry, have been employed and proven to provide an efficient way to probe into the modification of the protein. While the immobilized protein can exhibit well-defined voltammetric response, the signal of the modified cytochrome c is positively correlated to the concentration of homocysteine-thiolactone. The detectable electrochemical signal can be attained with the minimum concentration of 5 x 10(-5) M homocysteine-thiolactone. Furthermore, screening of N-homocysteinylation inhibitors can be also feasible since the electrochemical waves linearly decrease with the concentration of an inhibitor pyridoxal 5-phosphate. The limit of detection for the inhibitors can be about 1 x 10(-5) M. PMID:20213169

  20. The analysis of histone modifications.

    PubMed

    Villar-Garea, Ana; Imhof, Axel

    2006-12-01

    The biological function of many proteins is often regulated through posttranslational modifications (PTMs). Frequently different modifications influence each other and lead to an intricate network of interdependent modification patterns that affect protein-protein interactions, enzymatic activities and sub-cellular localizations. One of the best-studied class of proteins that is affected by PTMs and combinations thereof are the histone molecules. Histones are very abundant, small basic proteins that package DNA in the eukaryotic nucleus to form chromatin. The four core-histones are densely modified within their first 20-40 N-terminal amino acids, which are highly evolutionary conserved despite playing no structural role. The modifications are thought to constitute a histone code that is used by the cell to encrypt various chromatin conformations and gene expression states. The analysis of modified histones can be used as a model to dissect complex modification patterns and to investigate their molecular functions. Here we review techniques that have been used to decipher complex histone modification patterns and discuss the implication of these findings for chromatin structure and function. PMID:17015046

  1. The core and unique proteins of haloarchaea

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Since the first genome of a halophilic archaeon was sequenced in 2000, biologists have been advancing the understanding of genomic characteristics that allow for survival in the harsh natural environments of these organisms. An increase in protein acidity and GC-bias in the genome have been implicated as factors in tolerance to extreme salinity, desiccation, and high solar radiation. However, few previous attempts have been made to identify novel genes that would permit survival in such extreme conditions. Results With the recent release of several new complete haloarchaeal genome sequences, we have conducted a comprehensive comparative genomic analysis focusing on the identification of unique haloarchaeal conserved proteins that likely play key roles in environmental adaptation. Using bioinformatic methods, we have clustered 31,312 predicted proteins from nine haloarchaeal genomes into 4,455 haloarchaeal orthologous groups (HOGs). We assigned likely functions by association with established COG and KOG databases in NCBI. After identifying homologs in four additional haloarchaeal genomes, we determined that there were 784 core haloarchaeal protein clusters (cHOGs), of which 83 clusters were found primarily in haloarchaea. Further analysis found that 55 clusters were truly unique (tucHOGs) to haloarchaea and qualify as signature proteins while 28 were nearly unique (nucHOGs), the vast majority of which were coded for on the haloarchaeal chromosomes. Of the signature proteins, only one example with any predicted function, Ral, involved in desiccation/radiation tolerance in Halobacterium sp. NRC-1, was identified. Among the core clusters, 33% was predicted to function in metabolism, 25% in information transfer and storage, 10% in cell processes and signaling, and 22% belong to poorly characterized or general function groups. Conclusion Our studies have established conserved groups of nearly 800 protein clusters present in all haloarchaea, with a subset of 55 which are predicted to be accessory proteins that may be critical or essential for success in an extreme environment. These studies support core and signature genes and proteins as valuable concepts for understanding phylogenetic and phenotypic characteristics of coherent groups of organisms. PMID:22272718

  2. Data Analysis Strategies for Protein Modification Identification.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Mass spectrometry-based proteomics provides a powerful tool for large-scale analysis of protein modifications. Statistical and computational analysis of mass spectrometry data is a key step in protein modification identification. This chapter presents common and advanced data analysis strategies for modification identification, including variable modification search, unrestrictive approaches for modification discovery, false discovery rate estimation and control methods, and tools for modification site localization. PMID:26519183

  3. Estetrol: a unique steroid in human pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Holinka, Christian F; Diczfalusy, Egon; Coelingh Bennink, Herjan J T

    2008-05-01

    Estetrol (E(4)) is an estrogenic steroid molecule synthesized exclusively by the fetal liver during human pregnancy and reaching the maternal circulation through the placenta. Its function is presently unknown. After its discovery in the mid-1960s, E(4) research revealed rather unique properties of this steroid and spawned a large body of state-of-the art publications. Nevertheless, 20 years later experimental work was virtually abandoned. In recent years based on new data, E(4) has experienced a vita nova, a revival of preclinical and clinical research activities with the goal to elucidate its physiological function and explore its potential for therapeutic use in humans. This review is intended to offer an historical account of the discovery of E(4) and the preclinical studies conducted during the heyday of E(4) research that ended in the mid-1980s. PMID:18462934

  4. Unique Imaging Features of Spinal Neurenteric Cyst

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Hyoung-Seok; Park, Sang-Min; Kim, Gang-Un; Kim, Mi Kyung

    2015-01-01

    A 50-year-old male presented with acutely progressed paraplegia. His magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated two well-demarcated components with opposite signals in one cystic lesion between the T1- and T2-weighted images at the T1 spine level. The patient showed immediately improved neurological symptoms after surgical intervention and the histopathological exam was compatible with a neurenteric cyst. On operation, two different viscous drainages from the cyst were confirmed. A unique similarity of image findings was found from a review of the pertinent literature. The common findings of spinal neurenteric cyst include an isointense or mildly hyperintense signal relative to cerebrospinal fluid for both T1- and T2-weighted images. However, albeit rarer, the signals of some part of the cyst could change into brightly hyperintensity on T1-weighted images and hypointensity on T2-weighted images due to the differing sedimentation of the more viscous contents in the cyst. PMID:26640637

  5. The unique ethics of sports medicine.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Rob

    2004-04-01

    The ethical code by which physicians traditionally conduct themselves is based on the relationship between the physician and the patient: both work toward the goal of improving or maintaining health. Constraints on this relationship may be behaviors of patient choice (tobacco use, excessive alcohol use, sedentary behavior, and so on). The athlete-physician relationship is ethically different. Influences such as the physician's employer, the athlete's desire to play with pain and injury, and the economic consequences of playing or not complicate medical decisions. This perspective suggests something different and even unique about the ethics of the sports medicine practitioner. This article explores the differences fostering the ethical tight ropes that sports physicians walk in their sports medicine practices. PMID:15183565

  6. Unique Imaging Features of Spinal Neurenteric Cyst.

    PubMed

    Jung, Hyoung-Seok; Park, Sang-Min; Kim, Gang-Un; Kim, Mi Kyung; Song, Kwang-Sup

    2015-12-01

    A 50-year-old male presented with acutely progressed paraplegia. His magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated two well-demarcated components with opposite signals in one cystic lesion between the T1- and T2-weighted images at the T1 spine level. The patient showed immediately improved neurological symptoms after surgical intervention and the histopathological exam was compatible with a neurenteric cyst. On operation, two different viscous drainages from the cyst were confirmed. A unique similarity of image findings was found from a review of the pertinent literature. The common findings of spinal neurenteric cyst include an isointense or mildly hyperintense signal relative to cerebrospinal fluid for both T1- and T2-weighted images. However, albeit rarer, the signals of some part of the cyst could change into brightly hyperintensity on T1-weighted images and hypointensity on T2-weighted images due to the differing sedimentation of the more viscous contents in the cyst. PMID:26640637

  7. Unique metabolites protect earthworms against plant polyphenols.

    PubMed

    Liebeke, Manuel; Strittmatter, Nicole; Fearn, Sarah; Morgan, A John; Kille, Peter; Fuchser, Jens; Wallis, David; Palchykov, Vitalii; Robertson, Jeremy; Lahive, Elma; Spurgeon, David J; McPhail, David; Takáts, Zoltán; Bundy, Jacob G

    2015-01-01

    All higher plants produce polyphenols, for defence against above-ground herbivory. These polyphenols also influence the soil micro- and macro-fauna that break down plant leaf litter. Polyphenols therefore indirectly affect the fluxes of soil nutrients and, ultimately, carbon turnover and ecosystem functioning in soils. It is unknown how earthworms, the major component of animal biomass in many soils, cope with high-polyphenol diets. Here, we show that earthworms possess a class of unique surface-active metabolites in their gut, which we term 'drilodefensins'. These compounds counteract the inhibitory effects of polyphenols on earthworm gut enzymes, and high-polyphenol diets increase drilodefensin concentrations in both laboratory and field populations. This shows that drilodefensins protect earthworms from the harmful effects of ingested polyphenols. We have identified the key mechanism for adaptation to a dietary challenge in an animal group that has a major role in organic matter recycling in soils worldwide. PMID:26241769

  8. Unique biology of gliomas: challenges and opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Watkins, Stacey; Sontheimer, Harald

    2013-01-01

    Gliomas are terrifying primary brain tumors for which patient outlook remains bleak. Recent research provides novel insights into the unique biology of gliomas. For example, these tumors exhibit an unexpected pluripotency that enables them to grow their own vasculature. They have an unusual ability to navigate tortuous extracellular pathways as they invade, and they use neurotransmitters to inflict damage and create room for growth. Here, we review studies that illustrate the importance of considering interactions of gliomas with their native brain environment. Such studies suggest that gliomas constitute a neurodegenerative disease caused by the malignant growth of brain support cells. The chosen examples illustrate how targeted research into the biology of gliomas is yielding new and much needed therapeutic approaches to this challenging nervous system disease. PMID:22683220

  9. Britoil's Beatrice gets unique workover rig

    SciTech Connect

    Salter, M.J.; Hogan, K.G.

    1983-11-15

    On the expectation of continuous downhole production problems in its Beatrice field in the UK sector of the North Sea, Britoil selected a unique workover rig, with some drilling capability, for permanent installation on its B platform. Experience on Beatrice A platform provided inputs for the rig's design, which was accomplished by a multidisciplined group of engineers and draftsmen, including an experienced toolpusher. The rig features a kelly racking system, in the absence of space for a rathole, and a spooler unit to handle downhole pump electrical cables, small-bore chemical injection lines, and downhole instrument cables (Fig. 1). The rig is fully instrumented to ensure safe, pollution-free operation. Britoil PLC is the operator of the Beatrice field in Block 11at30 in the Inner Moray Firth off Scotland's East Coast, on behalf of a consortium including Deminex UK Oil and Gas Ltd., Hunt Overseas Oil Inc., Kerr-McGee Oil (UK) Ltd., and Lasmo North Sea Ltd.

  10. Practice effects: a unique cognitive variable.

    PubMed

    Duff, Kevin; Callister, Catherine; Dennett, Kathryn; Tometich, Danielle

    2012-01-01

    Practice effects are improvements in cognitive test performance due to repeated evaluation with the same or similar test materials. Prior studies have reported that these improvements can vary with age, education/intellect, and disease status. However, additional information is needed about variables that influence practice effects. The current study prospectively quantified short-term practice effects in 268 community-dwelling older adults and compared these practice effects to demographic variables, global cognition, premorbid intellect, depression, and individual cognitive domains. Overall, practice effects were not significantly related to most demographic and clinical characteristics or individual cognitive domains, which was contrary to our hypotheses. However, since practice effects appear to be uninfluenced by many variables that typically affect cognitive scores, they may be a unique and valuable tool that could be applied in a number of diverse patient groups. PMID:23020261

  11. Unique metabolites protect earthworms against plant polyphenols

    PubMed Central

    Liebeke, Manuel; Strittmatter, Nicole; Fearn, Sarah; Morgan, A. John; Kille, Peter; Fuchser, Jens; Wallis, David; Palchykov, Vitalii; Robertson, Jeremy; Lahive, Elma; Spurgeon, David J.; McPhail, David; Takáts, Zoltán; Bundy, Jacob G.

    2015-01-01

    All higher plants produce polyphenols, for defence against above-ground herbivory. These polyphenols also influence the soil micro- and macro-fauna that break down plant leaf litter. Polyphenols therefore indirectly affect the fluxes of soil nutrients and, ultimately, carbon turnover and ecosystem functioning in soils. It is unknown how earthworms, the major component of animal biomass in many soils, cope with high-polyphenol diets. Here, we show that earthworms possess a class of unique surface-active metabolites in their gut, which we term ‘drilodefensins'. These compounds counteract the inhibitory effects of polyphenols on earthworm gut enzymes, and high-polyphenol diets increase drilodefensin concentrations in both laboratory and field populations. This shows that drilodefensins protect earthworms from the harmful effects of ingested polyphenols. We have identified the key mechanism for adaptation to a dietary challenge in an animal group that has a major role in organic matter recycling in soils worldwide. PMID:26241769

  12. ARAC: A unique command and control resource

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, M.M.; Baskett, R.L.; Ellis, J.S.

    1996-04-01

    The Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is a centralized federal facility designed to provide real-time, world-wide support to military and civilian command and control centers by predicting the impacts of inadvertent or intentional releases of nuclear, biological, or chemical materials into the atmosphere. ARAC is a complete response system consisting of highly trained and experienced personnel, continually updated computer models, redundant data collection systems, and centralized and remote computer systems. With over 20 years of experience responding to domestic and international incidents, strong linkages with the Department of Defense, and the ability to conduct classified operations, ARAC is a unique command and control resource.

  13. Hausdorff dimension of unique beta expansions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Derong; Li, Wenxia

    2015-01-01

    Given an integer N ? 2 and a real number ? > 1, let ??, N be the set of all x=\\sumi=1^? {d_i}/{?^i} with di ? {0, 1, ···, N - 1} for all i ? 1. The infinite sequence (di) is called a ?-expansion of x. Let U?,N be the set of all x's in ??,N which have unique ?-expansions. We give explicit formula of the Hausdorff dimension of U?,N for ? in any admissible interval [?L, ?U], where ?L is a purely Parry number while ?U is a transcendental number whose quasi-greedy expansion of 1 is related to the classical Thue-Morse sequence. This allows us to calculate the Hausdorff dimension of U?,N for almost every ? > 1. In particular, this improves the main results of Gábor Kallós (1999, 2001). Moreover, we find that the dimension function f(?) = dimHU?,N fluctuates frequently for ? ? (1, N).

  14. A unique element resembling a processed pseudogene.

    PubMed

    Robins, A J; Wang, S W; Smith, T F; Wells, J R

    1986-01-01

    We describe a unique DNA element with structural features of a processed pseudogene but with important differences. It is located within an 8.4-kilobase pair region of chicken DNA containing five histone genes, but it is not related to these genes. The presence of terminal repeats, an open reading frame (and stop codon), polyadenylation/processing signal, and a poly(A) rich region about 20 bases 3' to this, together with a lack of 5' promoter motifs all suggest a processed pseudogene. However, no parent gene can be detected in the genome by Southern blotting experiments and, in addition, codon boundary values and mid-base correlations are not consistent with a protein coding region of a eukaryotic gene. The element was detected in DNA from different chickens and in peafowl, but not in quail, pheasant, or turkey. PMID:3941070

  15. Mushrooms—Biologically Distinct and Nutritionally Unique

    PubMed Central

    Feeney, Mary Jo; Miller, Amy Myrdal; Roupas, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Mushrooms are fungi, biologically distinct from plant- and animal-derived foods (fruits, vegetables, grains, dairy, protein [meat, fish, poultry, legumes, nuts, and seeds]) that comprise the US Department of Agriculture food patterns operationalized by consumer-focused MyPlate messages. Although mushrooms provide nutrients found in these food groups, they also have a unique nutrient profile. Classified into food grouping systems by their use as a vegetable, mushrooms’ increasing use in main entrées in plant-based diets is growing, supporting consumers’ efforts to follow dietary guidance recommendations. Mushrooms’ nutrient and culinary characteristics suggest it may be time to reevaluate food groupings and health benefits in the context of 3 separate food kingdoms: plants/botany, animals/zoology, and fungi/mycology. PMID:25435595

  16. Split liver transplantation: What’s unique?

    PubMed Central

    Dalal, Aparna R

    2015-01-01

    The intraoperative management of split liver transplantation (SLT) has some unique features as compared to routine whole liver transplantations. Only the liver has this special ability to regenerate that confers benefits in survival and quality of life for two instead of one by splitting livers. Primary graft dysfunction may result from small for size syndrome. Graft weight to recipient body weight ratio is significant for both trisegmental and hemiliver grafts. Intraoperative surgical techniques aim to reduce portal hyperperfusion and decrease venous portal pressure. Ischemic preconditioning can be instituted to protect against ischemic reperfusion injury which impacts graft regeneration. Advancement of the technique of SLT is essential as use of split cadaveric grafts expands the donor pool and potentially has an excellent future. PMID:26421261

  17. A unique device for controlled electrospinning.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, S B; Sanders, J E

    2006-07-01

    The purpose of this research was to develop a system for controlled electrospinning of fibro-porous scaffolds for tissue engineering applications and to use this system to assess mesh architecture sensitivity to manufacturing parameters. The intent was to achieve scaffolds with well-controlled fiber diameters and inter-fiber spacing. To accomplish these objectives, a custom, closed-loop controlled, electrospinning system was built. The system was unique in that it had a collection surface that was independent of the electrodes. The system allowed independent manipulation and analysis of a number of manufacturing parameters: distance between the electrodes, distance from the nozzle to the collection surface, applied voltage, temperature of the melt, collection surface dielectric strength, and collection surface area. Morphological analysis of fabricated meshes showed that all test parameters significantly affected fiber diameter and inter-fiber spacing. Further, contrary to what is generally accepted in the electrospinning literature, voltage and temperature (inversely related to viscosity) were not the most significant parameters. Features of the collection surface, including dielectric strength and surface area, were more significant. This dominance is, in part, a reflection of the unique electrospinning system used. The collection surface, which was not connected to either of the electrodes, substantially altered the electric field between the electrodes. Using the developed controlled electrospinning system, thermoplastic polyurethane meshes with fiber diameters ranging from 5 to 18 microm with variability less than 1.8% were made; inter-fiber spacing ranged from 4 to 90 microm with variability less than 20.2%. The system has potential use in biomedical applications where meshes with controlled fiber diameter and inter-fiber spacing are of interest. PMID:16604530

  18. The unique inner landscape of the Anthropocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zalasiewicz, Jan

    2013-04-01

    A characteristic aspect of the Anthropocene is the suite of novel changes made to the surface and subsurface of the Earth by human action, both on land and, increasingly, on and below the sea floor. Geologically, these geomorphological phenomena include features that relate to both lithostratigraphic and biostratigraphic classification, the latter resulting from considering human constructions and modifications as a form of trace fossil system, albeit one that is of unprecedentedly large scale. As regards the potential formalizing of the Anthropocene, one question to be pursued relates to the chronostratigraphic definition of the phenomena involved: that is, given that many of these transformations are diachronous on human timescales, can an Anthropocene Series, with a synchronous time boundary, be characterized and mapped across the Earth's surface? Efforts to answer this question should help in the understanding of the Anthropocene within its geological context, and also in exploring the stratigraphic relation between time and rock generally at very fine stratigraphic timescales. Zalasiewicz, J., Williams M, Fortey, R.A., Smith, A.G., Barry, T.L. Coe, A.L., Bown, P.R., Gale, A., Gibbard, P.L., Gregory, F.J., Hounslow, M.W., Kerr, A.C., Pearson, P., Knox, R., Powell, J., Waters, C., Marshall, J., Oates, M., Rawson, P. & Stone, P. 2011. Stratigraphy of the Anthropocene. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society A369, 1036-1055.

  19. Distinctive Core Histone Post-Translational Modification Patterns in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jianhua; Kapoor, Avnish; Zhu, Jian-Kang

    2007-01-01

    Post-translational modifications of histones play crucial roles in the genetic and epigenetic regulation of gene expression from chromatin. Studies in mammals and yeast have found conserved modifications at some residues of histones as well as non-conserved modifications at some other sites. Although plants have been excellent systems to study epigenetic regulation, and histone modifications are known to play critical roles, the histone modification sites and patterns in plants are poorly defined. In the present study we have used mass spectrometry in combination with high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) separation and phospho-peptide enrichment to identify histone modification sites in the reference plant, Arabidopsis thaliana. We found not only modifications at many sites that are conserved in mammalian and yeast cells, but also modifications at many sites that are unique to plants. These unique modifications include H4 K20 acetylation (in contrast to H4 K20 methylation in non-plant systems), H2B K6, K11, K27 and K32 acetylation, S15 phosphorylation and K143 ubiquitination, and H2A K144 acetylation and S129, S141 and S145 phosphorylation, and H2A.X S138 phosphorylation. In addition, we found that lysine 79 of H3 which is highly conserved and modified by methylation and plays important roles in telomeric silencing in non-plant systems, is not modified in Arabidopsis. These results suggest distinctive histone modification patterns in plants and provide an invaluable foundation for future studies on histone modifications in plants. PMID:18030344

  20. Alpbach Summer School - a unique learning experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kern, K.; Aulinas, J.; Clifford, D.; Krejci, D.; Topham, R.

    2011-12-01

    The Alpbach Summer School is a ten-day program that provides a unique opportunity for young european science and engineering students, both undergraduate and graduate, to learn how to approach the entire design process of a space mission. The theme of the 2010 Summer School was "New Space Missions to Understand Climate Change", a current, challenging, very broad and complex topic. The program was established more than 35 years ago and is organised in two interrelated parts: a series of lectures held by renowned experts in the field (in the case of this specific year, climate change and space engineering experts) that provides a technical and scientific background for the workshops that follow, the core of the Summer School. For the workshops the students are split into four international, interdisciplinary teams of about 15 students. In 2010 every team had to complete a number of tasks, four in total: (1) identify climate change research gaps and design a space mission that has not yet been flown or proposed, (2) define the science objectives and requirements of the mission, (3) design a spacecraft that meets the mission requirements, which includes spacecraft design and construction, payload definition, orbit calculations, but also the satellite launch, operation and mission costs and (4) write up a short mission proposal and present the results to an expert review panel. Achieving these tasks in only a few days in a multicultural, interdisciplinary team represents a major challenge for all participants and provides an excellent practical learning experience. Over the course of the program, students do not just learn facts about climate change and space engineering, but scientists also learn from engineers and engineers from scientists. The participants have to deepen their knowledge in an often unfamiliar field, develop organisational and team-work skills and work under pressure. Moreover, teams are supported by team and roving tutors and get the opportunity to meet and learn from international experts. This presentation will provide an overview of the Alpbach Summer School program from a student's perspective. The different stages of this unique and enriching experience will be covered. Special attention will be paid to the workshops, which, as mentioned above, are the core of the Alpbach Summer School. During these intense workshops, participants work towards the proposed goals resulting in the design proposal of a space mission. The Alpbach Summer School is organised by FFG and co-sponsored by ESA, ISSI and the national space authorities of ESA member and cooperating states.

  1. The rural market: a unique communication medium.

    PubMed

    Spain, P

    1992-01-01

    In January 1990, the Health Secretary asked the Technologies for Primary Health Care (PRITECH) project to facilitate access to the many small villages with 500 people in Mexico since PRITECH had assisted the diarrhea disease control program. 1st PRITECH had Ministry of Health staff train trainers which would eventually spread the information to the rural areas. This strategy was effective only for those people who did not live in remote areas. The same reasons for remote people being at high risk of disease also limited this strategy: isolation, lack of education, limited diets, lack of access to services, and limited fluency in Spanish. PRITECH hired a local consulting organization, CICLOPE, to develop a new strategy. CICLOPE limited its activities to the states of Hidalgo and Vera Cruz for 8 months. 1st CICLOPE staff provided proper diarrhea management training including emphasis on oral rehydration therapy (ORT) to rural health auxiliaries. They used a gourd painted to look like an infant with holes and other modifications to depict the workings and results of diarrheal dehydration. The staff then sent the auxiliaries to their own communities to use the gourd dolls to teach mothers about ORT and correct diarrhea management. The staff conducted follow-up activities to monitor the auxiliaries' progress. This training approach allowed the auxiliaries to realize the abilities of the mothers and their active role in learning. The auxiliaries conducted the training at markets where women living in remote areas came weekly. The local radio announced market day events in which the auxiliaries participated and aired dramas about diarrhea management. CICLOPE staff and the auxiliaries sat up a booth at these markets to promote proper diarrhea management. They used a flip chart, comic books, a lottery game, and entertainment to impart education messages. PMID:12285444

  2. Might "Unique" Factors Be "Common"? On the Possibility of Indeterminate Common-Unique Covariances

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grayson, Dave

    2006-01-01

    The present paper shows that the usual factor analytic structured data dispersion matrix lambda psi lambda' + delta can readily arise from a set of scores y = lambda eta + epsilon, shere the "common" (eta) and "unique" (epsilon) factors have nonzero covariance: gamma = Cov epsilon,eta) is not equal to 0. Implications of this finding are discussed…

  3. Unique Ganglioside Recognition Strategies for Clostridial Neurotoxins

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, Marc A.; Fu, Zhuji; Kim, Jung-Ja P.; Baldwin, Michael R.

    2012-03-15

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) and tetanus neurotoxin are the causative agents of the paralytic diseases botulism and tetanus, respectively. The potency of the clostridial neurotoxins (CNTs) relies primarily on their highly specific binding to nerve terminals and cleavage of SNARE proteins. Although individual CNTs utilize distinct proteins for entry, they share common ganglioside co-receptors. Here, we report the crystal structure of the BoNT/F receptor-binding domain in complex with the sugar moiety of ganglioside GD1a. GD1a binds in a shallow groove formed by the conserved peptide motif E ... H ... SXWY ... G, with additional stabilizing interactions provided by two arginine residues. Comparative analysis of BoNT/F with other CNTs revealed several differences in the interactions of each toxin with ganglioside. Notably, exchange of BoNT/F His-1241 with the corresponding lysine residue of BoNT/E resulted in increased affinity for GD1a and conferred the ability to bind ganglioside GM1a. Conversely, BoNT/E was not able to bind GM1a, demonstrating a discrete mechanism of ganglioside recognition. These findings provide a structural basis for ganglioside binding among the CNTs and show that individual toxins utilize unique ganglioside recognition strategies.

  4. Repeated learning makes cultural evolution unique

    PubMed Central

    Strimling, Pontus; Enquist, Magnus; Eriksson, Kimmo

    2009-01-01

    Although genetic information is acquired only once, cultural information can be both abandoned and reacquired during an individual's lifetime. Therefore, cultural evolution will be determined not only by cultural traits' ability to spread but also by how good they are at sticking with an individual; however, the evolutionary consequences of this aspect of culture have not previously been explored. Here we show that repeated learning and multiple characteristics of cultural traits make cultural evolution unique, allowing dynamical phenomena we can recognize as specifically cultural, such as traits that both spread quickly and disappear quickly. Importantly, the analysis of our model also yields a theoretical objection to the popular suggestion that biological and cultural evolution can be understood in similar terms. We find that the possibility to predict long-term cultural evolution by some success index, analogous to biological fitness, depends on whether individuals have few or many opportunities to learn. If learning opportunities are few, we find that the existence of a success index may be logically impossible, rendering notions of “cultural fitness” meaningless. On the other hand, if individuals can learn many times, we find a success index that works, regardless of whether the transmission pattern is vertical, oblique, or horizontal. PMID:19666615

  5. Unique needs of women pharmacy residents.

    PubMed

    Johnson, M W

    1982-12-01

    The needs of women residents in hospital pharmacy programs are discussed with respect to the responsibilities of preceptors to help residents prepare for a successful career. Women were a small minority within the profession of pharmacy until recently. More than half of the current hospital pharmacy residents are women, while over 95% of the preceptors of residency training programs are men. Hospital pharmacy preceptors can help meet the unique needs of women residents, so that women pharmacists can achieve the career successes of which they are capable. Preceptors can help women residents make career decisions and develop career goals and strategies. Preceptors should ensure that women residents develop the broad base of knowledge and skills necessary for advancement. Women residents should be encouraged to get involved in pharmacy organizations, and the importance of networking should be stressed. It is important that women residents develop a business style so that they are perceived as confident and competent. Preceptors must recognize that most women will have conflicts in their roles of career woman, wife, and mother. Preceptors can also help women residents by making managerial changes (e.g., offering part-time positions and flexible scheduling) that will facilitate integration of the professional and personal responsibilities of women. PMID:7180857

  6. Unique features in the ARIES glovebox line

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, H.E.; Brown, W.G.; Flamm, B.; James, C.A.; Laskie, R.; Nelson, T.O.; Wedman, D.E.

    1998-12-31

    A series of unique features have been incorporated into the Advanced Recovery and Integrated Extraction System (ARIES) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, TA-55 Plutonium Facility. The features enhance the material handling in the process of the dismantlement of nuclear weapon primaries in the glovebox line. Incorporated into these features are the various plutonium process module`s different ventilation zone requirements that the material handling systems must meet. These features include a conveyor system that consists of a remotely controlled cart that transverses the length of the conveyor glovebox, can be operated from a remote location and can deliver process components to the entrance of any selected module glovebox. Within the modules there exists linear motion material handling systems with lifting hoist, which are controlled via an Allen Bradley control panel or local control panels. To remove the packaged products from the hot process line, the package is processed through an air lock/electrolytic decontamination process that removes the radioactive contamination from the outside of the package container and allows the package to be removed from the process line.

  7. Arachnoiditis ossificans and syringomyelia: A unique presentation

    PubMed Central

    Opalak, Charles F.; Opalak, Michael E.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Arachnoiditis ossificans (AO) is a rare disorder that was differentiated from leptomeningeal calcification by Kaufman and Dunsmore in 1971. It generally presents with progressive lower extremity myelopathy. Though the underlying etiology has yet to be fully described, it has been associated with various predisposing factors including vascular malformations, previous intradural surgery, myelograms, and adhesive arachnoiditis. Associated conditions include syringomyelia and arachnoid cyst. The preferred diagnostic method is noncontrast computed tomography (CT). Surgical intervention is still controversial and can include decompression and duroplasty or durotomy. Case Description: The authors report the case of a 62-year-old male with a history of paraplegia who presented with a urinary tract infection and dysautonomia. His past surgical history was notable for a C4–C6 anterior fusion and an intrathecal phenol injection for spasticity. A magnetic resonance image (MR) also demonstrated a T6-conus syringx. At surgery, there was significant ossification of the arachnoid/dura, which was removed. After a drain was placed in the syrinx, there was a significant neurologic improvement. Conclusion: This case demonstrates a unique presentation of AO and highlights the need for CT imaging when a noncommunicating syringx is identified. In addition, surgical decompression can achieve good results when AO is associated with concurrent compressive lesions. PMID:26693389

  8. Unique Properties of Reversibly Associating Polymer Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anthamatten, Mitchell

    2008-03-01

    Reversibly associating functional groups offer the polymer physicist with a new tool to develop stimuli-responsive polymers. Our focus has been to attach reversibly associating groups onto rubbery network polymers. Free radical copolymerization was used to synthesize a series of crosslinked poly(n-butylacrylate)s containing quadruple H-bonding ureidopyrimidinone (UPy) side-groups. Resulting elastomeric networks contain both covalent and dynamic non-covalent crosslinks, and this unique architecture is shown to affect viscoelastic behavior and mass-transport properties. Shape-memory effects are studied quantitatively using thermomechanical techniques. Experiments show how reversible interactions, such as hydrogen bonding, are capable of stabilizing mechanically strained states. Unlike conventional shape-memory polymers, these dynamic networks lack a well-defined shape recovery temperature. Instead, their shape recovery rate depends on temperature. To further study the dynamics and temperature dependence of mechanical relaxation, isothermal creep experiments and dynamic mechanical analysis were performed. Creep data, acquired at several different temperatures, are fit to a simple viscoelastic model. Fit viscosities exhibit Arrhenius-like temperature dependence with activation energies of ˜90 kJ/mol, which is in rough agreement with H-bond dissociation barriers. Molecular transport through dynamic networks is studied using gravimetric sorption and dye-diffusion techniques. Diffusion depends on temperature, network architecture, solute size, and the interaction between the solute and the network. Membranes with high temperature-sensitive diffusion properties may be useful in applications such as transdermal drug delivery, microfluidics, or liquid chemical separation processes.

  9. Unique animal prenyltransferase with monoterpene synthase activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilg, Anna B.; Tittiger, Claus; Blomquist, Gary J.

    2009-06-01

    Monoterpenes are structurally diverse natural compounds that play an essential role in the chemical ecology of a wide array of organisms. A key enzyme in monoterpene biosynthesis is geranyl diphosphate synthase (GPPS). GPPS is an isoprenyl diphosphate synthase that catalyzes a single electrophilic condensation reaction between dimethylallyl diphosphate (C5) and isopentenyl diphosphate (C5) to produce geranyl diphosphate (GDP; C10). GDP is the universal precursor to all monoterpenes. Subsequently, monoterpene synthases are responsible for the transformation of GDP to a variety of acyclic, monocyclic, and bicyclic monoterpene products. In pheromone-producing male Ips pini bark beetles (Coleoptera: Scolytidae), the acyclic monoterpene myrcene is required for the production of the major aggregation pheromone component, ipsdienol. Here, we report monoterpene synthase activity associated with GPPS of I. pini. Enzyme assays were performed on recombinant GPPS to determine the presence of monoterpene synthase activity, and the reaction products were analyzed by coupled gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The functionally expressed recombinant enzyme produced both GDP and myrcene, making GPPS of I. pini a bifunctional enzyme. This unique insect isoprenyl diphosphate synthase possesses the functional plasticity that is characteristic of terpene biosynthetic enzymes of plants, contributing toward the current understanding of product specificity of the isoprenoid pathway.

  10. Efficient Nonnegative Tucker Decompositions: Algorithms and Uniqueness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Guoxu; Cichocki, Andrzej; Zhao, Qibin; Xie, Shengli

    2015-12-01

    Nonnegative Tucker decomposition (NTD) is a powerful tool for the extraction of nonnegative parts-based and physically meaningful latent components from high-dimensional tensor data while preserving the natural multilinear structure of data. However, as the data tensor often has multiple modes and is large-scale, existing NTD algorithms suffer from a very high computational complexity in terms of both storage and computation time, which has been one major obstacle for practical applications of NTD. To overcome these disadvantages, we show how low (multilinear) rank approximation (LRA) of tensors is able to significantly simplify the computation of the gradients of the cost function, upon which a family of efficient first-order NTD algorithms are developed. Besides dramatically reducing the storage complexity and running time, the new algorithms are quite flexible and robust to noise because any well-established LRA approaches can be applied. We also show how nonnegativity incorporating sparsity substantially improves the uniqueness property and partially alleviates the curse of dimensionality of the Tucker decompositions. Simulation results on synthetic and real-world data justify the validity and high efficiency of the proposed NTD algorithms.

  11. Biomechanics of the unique pterosaur pteroid.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Colin; Dyke, Gareth J

    2010-04-01

    Pterosaurs, flying reptiles from the Mesozoic, had wing membranes that were supported by their arm bones and a super-elongate fourth finger. Associated with the wing, pterosaurs also possessed a unique wrist bone--the pteroid--that functioned to support the forward part of the membrane in front of the leading edge, the propatagium. Pteroid shape varies across pterosaurs and reconstructions of its orientation vary (projecting anteriorly to the wing leading edge or medially, lying alongside it) and imply differences in the way that pterosaurs controlled their wings. Here we show, using biomechanical analysis and considerations of aerodynamic efficiency of a representative ornithocheirid pterosaur, that an anteriorly orientated pteroid is highly unlikely. Unless these pterosaurs only flew steadily and had very low body masses, their pteroids would have been likely to break if orientated anteriorly; the degree of movement required for a forward orientation would have introduced extreme membrane strains and required impractical tensioning in the propatagium membrane. This result can be generalized for other pterodactyloid pterosaurs because the resultant geometry of an anteriorly orientated pteroid would have reduced the aerodynamic performance of all wings and required the same impractical properties in the propatagium membrane. We demonstrate quantitatively that the more traditional reconstruction of a medially orientated pteroid was much more stable both structurally and aerodynamically, reflecting likely life position. PMID:20007183

  12. Efficient Nonnegative Tucker Decompositions: Algorithms and Uniqueness.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Guoxu; Cichocki, Andrzej; Zhao, Qibin; Xie, Shengli

    2015-12-01

    Nonnegative Tucker decomposition (NTD) is a powerful tool for the extraction of nonnegative parts-based and physically meaningful latent components from high-dimensional tensor data while preserving the natural multilinear structure of data. However, as the data tensor often has multiple modes and is large scale, the existing NTD algorithms suffer from a very high computational complexity in terms of both storage and computation time, which has been one major obstacle for practical applications of NTD. To overcome these disadvantages, we show how low (multilinear) rank approximation (LRA) of tensors is able to significantly simplify the computation of the gradients of the cost function, upon which a family of efficient first-order NTD algorithms are developed. Besides dramatically reducing the storage complexity and running time, the new algorithms are quite flexible and robust to noise, because any well-established LRA approaches can be applied. We also show how nonnegativity incorporating sparsity substantially improves the uniqueness property and partially alleviates the curse of dimensionality of the Tucker decompositions. Simulation results on synthetic and real-world data justify the validity and high efficiency of the proposed NTD algorithms. PMID:26390455

  13. Clinical EPR: unique opportunities and some challenges.

    PubMed

    Swartz, Harold M; Williams, Benjamin B; Zaki, Bassem I; Hartford, Alan C; Jarvis, Lesley A; Chen, Eunice Y; Comi, Richard J; Ernstoff, Marc S; Hou, Huagang; Khan, Nadeem; Swarts, Steven G; Flood, Ann B; Kuppusamy, Periannan

    2014-02-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy has been well established as a viable technique for measurement of free radicals and oxygen in biological systems, from in vitro cellular systems to in vivo small animal models of disease. However, the use of EPR in human subjects in the clinical setting, although attractive for a variety of important applications such as oxygen measurement, is challenged with several factors including the need for instrumentation customized for human subjects, probe, and regulatory constraints. This article describes the rationale and development of the first clinical EPR systems for two important clinical applications, namely, measurement of tissue oxygen (oximetry) and radiation dose (dosimetry) in humans. The clinical spectrometers operate at 1.2 GHz frequency and use surface-loop resonators capable of providing topical measurements up to 1 cm depth in tissues. Tissue pO2 measurements can be carried out noninvasively and repeatedly after placement of an oxygen-sensitive paramagnetic material (currently India ink) at the site of interest. Our EPR dosimetry system is capable of measuring radiation-induced free radicals in the tooth of irradiated human subjects to determine the exposure dose. These developments offer potential opportunities for clinical dosimetry and oximetry, which include guiding therapy for individual patients with tumors or vascular disease by monitoring of tissue oxygenation. Further work is in progress to translate this unique technology to routine clinical practice. PMID:24439333

  14. Lunar granites with unique ternary feldspars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryder, G.; Stoeser, D. B.; Marvin, U. B.; Bower, J. F.

    1975-01-01

    An unusually high concentration of granitic fragments, with textures ranging from holocrystalline to glassy, occurs throughout Boulder 1, a complex breccia of highland rocks from Apollo 17, Station 2. Among the minerals included in the granites are enigmatic K-Ca-rich feldspars that fall in the forbidden region of the ternary diagram. The great variability in chemistry and texture is probably the result of impact degradation and melting of a granitic source-rock. Studies of the breccia matrix suggest that this original granitic source-rock may have contained more pyroxenes and phosphates than most of the present clasts contain. Petrographic observations on Apollo 15 KREEP basalts indicate that granitic liquids may be produced by differentiation without immiscibility, and the association of the granites with KREEP-rich fragments in the boulder suggests that the granites represent a residual liquid from the plutonic fractional crystallization of a KREEP-rich magma. Boulder 1 is unique among Apollo 17 samples in its silica-KREEP-rich composition. We conclude that the boulder represents a source-rock unlike the bedrock of South Massif.

  15. The placenta harbors a unique microbiome.

    PubMed

    Aagaard, Kjersti; Ma, Jun; Antony, Kathleen M; Ganu, Radhika; Petrosino, Joseph; Versalovic, James

    2014-05-21

    Humans and their microbiomes have coevolved as a physiologic community composed of distinct body site niches with metabolic and antigenic diversity. The placental microbiome has not been robustly interrogated, despite recent demonstrations of intracellular bacteria with diverse metabolic and immune regulatory functions. A population-based cohort of placental specimens collected under sterile conditions from 320 subjects with extensive clinical data was established for comparative 16S ribosomal DNA-based and whole-genome shotgun (WGS) metagenomic studies. Identified taxa and their gene carriage patterns were compared to other human body site niches, including the oral, skin, airway (nasal), vaginal, and gut microbiomes from nonpregnant controls. We characterized a unique placental microbiome niche, composed of nonpathogenic commensal microbiota from the Firmicutes, Tenericutes, Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Fusobacteria phyla. In aggregate, the placental microbiome profiles were most akin (Bray-Curtis dissimilarity <0.3) to the human oral microbiome. 16S-based operational taxonomic unit analyses revealed associations of the placental microbiome with a remote history of antenatal infection (permutational multivariate analysis of variance, P = 0.006), such as urinary tract infection in the first trimester, as well as with preterm birth <37 weeks (P = 0.001). PMID:24848255

  16. Playing TETris with DNA modifications

    PubMed Central

    Delatte, Benjamin; Deplus, Rachel; Fuks, François

    2014-01-01

    Methylation of the fifth carbon of cytosine was the first epigenetic modification to be discovered in DNA. Recently, three new DNA modifications have come to light: hydroxymethylcytosine, formylcytosine, and carboxylcytosine, all generated by oxidation of methylcytosine by Ten Eleven Translocation (TET) enzymes. These modifications can initiate full DNA demethylation, but they are also likely to participate, like methylcytosine, in epigenetic signalling per se. A scenario is emerging in which coordinated regulation at multiple levels governs the participation of TETs in a wide range of physiological functions, sometimes via a mechanism unrelated to their enzymatic activity. Although still under construction, a sophisticated picture is rapidly forming where, according to the function to be performed, TETs ensure epigenetic marking to create specific landscapes, and whose improper build-up can lead to diseases such as cancer and neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:24825349

  17. Surface modification for corrosion resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Natesan, K.

    1993-06-01

    The raw gas environments that arise from coal gasification have chemical compositions that are low in pO{sub 2} and moderate-to-high in pS{sub 2}. Metallic materials for service in such an environment undergo predominantly sulfidation attack at temperatures of 400 to 700{degree}C. Modification of alloy compositions in bulk can alter the scaling processes and lead to improvements in corrosion resistance, but the benefits can only be attained at temperatures much higher than the service temperatures of the components. Modification of surfaces of structural components by several of the coating techniques examined in this study showed substantial benefit in corrosion resistance when tested in simulated coal gasification environments. The paper presents several examples of surface modification and their corrosion performance.

  18. Playing TETris with DNA modifications.

    PubMed

    Delatte, Benjamin; Deplus, Rachel; Fuks, François

    2014-06-01

    Methylation of the fifth carbon of cytosine was the first epigenetic modification to be discovered in DNA. Recently, three new DNA modifications have come to light: hydroxymethylcytosine, formylcytosine, and carboxylcytosine, all generated by oxidation of methylcytosine by Ten Eleven Translocation (TET) enzymes. These modifications can initiate full DNA demethylation, but they are also likely to participate, like methylcytosine, in epigenetic signalling per se. A scenario is emerging in which coordinated regulation at multiple levels governs the participation of TETs in a wide range of physiological functions, sometimes via a mechanism unrelated to their enzymatic activity. Although still under construction, a sophisticated picture is rapidly forming where, according to the function to be performed, TETs ensure epigenetic marking to create specific landscapes, and whose improper build-up can lead to diseases such as cancer and neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:24825349

  19. Manufacturer evaluations of endograft modifications.

    PubMed

    Waninger, Matthew S; Whirley, Robert G; Smith, Louis J; Wolf, Ben S

    2013-03-01

    The motivation to modify the design of a vascular device can arise from a number of sources. Clinical experience with the unmodified device could suggest new design modifications to improve device performance or clinical outcomes. Similarly, clinical success with a device often suggests modifications that could broaden the applicability of the device to enable treatment of different or more advanced disease states. As a specific example, both of these scenarios have arisen during the last decade in the evolution of endovascular grafts for the treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysms, with modifications enabling the treatment of patients with shorter infrarenal necks, more angulated anatomy, and smaller access vessels. These modifications have been made by manufacturers and additionally by physicians who create branched and fenestrated devices. The experience to date with the use of fenestrated devices and the development of chimney, snorkel, and periscope techniques suggests that modifications to off-the-shelf devices may provide some clinical benefit. This experience provides additional motivation for manufacturers to develop devices to address the clinical needs not met with their current product lines. For manufacturers, the device development process includes an assessment of the new device design to determine the appropriate evaluation strategy to support the safety and effectiveness of the modified device. This report provides a high-level overview of the process generally followed by device manufacturers to evaluate a proposed device modification before market release, in accordance with local country regulations and recognized international standards such as the International Organization of Standardization (ISO) standards for endovascular grafts (ISO 25539 Part 1). PMID:23446123

  20. Polymer surface modification by plasmas and photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, C.-M.; Ko, T.-M.; Hiraoka, H.

    1996-05-01

    Polymers have been applied successfully in fields such as adhesion, biomaterials, protective coatings, friction and wear, composites, microelectronic devices, and thin-film technology. In general, special surface properties with regard to chemical composition, hydrophilicity, roughness, crystallinity, conductivity, lubricity, and cross-linking density are required for the success of these applications. Polymers very often do not possess the surface properties needed for these applications. However, they have excellent bulk physical and chemical properties, are inexpensive, and are easy to process. For these reasons, surface modification techniques which can transform these inexpensive materials into highly valuable finished products have become an important part of the plastics and many other industries. In recent years, many advances have been made in developing surface treatments to alter the chemical and physical properties of polymer surfaces without affecting bulk properties. Common surface modification techniques include treatments by flame, corona, plasmas, photons, electron beams, ion beams, X-rays, and ?-rays. Plasma treatment is probably the most versatile surface treatment technique. Different types of gases such as argon, oxygen, nitrogen, fluorine, carbon dioxide, and water can produce the unique surface properties required by various applications. For example, oxygen-plasma treatment can increase the surface energy of polymers, whereas fluorine-plasma treatment can decrease the surface energy and improve the chemical inertness. Cross-linking at a polymer surface can be introduced by an inert-gas plasma. Modification by plasma treatment is usually confined to the top several hundred ångströms and does not affect the bulk properties. The main disadvantage of this technique is that it requires a vacuum system, which increases the cost of operation. Thin polymer films with unique chemical and physical properties are produced by plasma polymerization. This technology is still in its infancy, and the plasma chemical process is not fully understood. The films are prepared by vapor phase deposition and can be formed on practically any substrate with good adhesion between the film and the substrate. These films, which are usually highly cross-linked and pinhole-free, have very good barrier properties. Such films find great potential in biomaterial applications and in the microelectronics industry. Very high-power microwave-driven mercury lamps are available, and they are used in UV-hardening of photoresist patterns for image stabilization at high temperatures. Other applications of UV irradiation include surface photo-oxidation, increase of hydrophilicity, and photocuring of paintings. Pulsed UV-lasers are used in surface modification in many areas. Pulsed UV-laser irradiation can produce submicron periodic linear and dot patterns on polymer surfaces without photomask. These interference patterns can be used to increase surface roughness of inert polymers for improved adhesion. These images can also be transferred to silicon surfaces by reactive ion etching. Pulsed laser beams can be applied to inert polymer surfaces for increased hydrophilicity and wettability. Polymer surfaces treated by pulsed UV-laser irradiation can be positively or negatively charged to enhance chemical reactivity and processability. Pulsed UV-laser exposures with high fluence give rise to photoablation with a clean wall profile. There are many other practical applications of laser photoablation, including via-hole fabrication, and diamond-film deposition. The present review discusses all these current applications, especially in the biomedical and microelectronics areas.

  1. Mapping chromatin modifications in nanochannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Shuang Fang; Karpusenko, Alena; Riehn, Robert

    2013-03-01

    DNA and chromatin are elongated to a fixed fraction of their contour length when introduced into quasi-1d nanochannels. Because single molecules are analyzed, their hold great potential for the analysis for the genetic analysis of material from single cells. In this study, we have reconstituted chromatin with histones from a variety of sources, and mapped the modification profile of the chromatin. We monitored methylation and acetylation patterns of the histone tail protein residues using fluorescently labelled antibodies. Using those, we distinguished chromatin reconstituted from chicken erythrocytes, calf thymus, and HeLa cells. We discuss prospects for profiling histone modifications for whole chromosomes from single cells.

  2. Lourdes: A uniquely Catholic approach to medicine

    PubMed Central

    Dichoso, Travis Jon

    2015-01-01

    As an American medical student, I spent the summer break between my first and second year in Lourdes, France, the site where the Immaculate Conception appeared eighteen times to St. Bernadette in 1858 as proclaimed approved by the Catholic Church and whose water is associated with over seven thousand unexplained cures. During this time I volunteered with St. Joseph's Service and Poste Secour, followed several medical teams taking care of large pilgrim groups, and shadowed Dr. Alessandro de Franciscis the president of Le Bureau des Constations Médicales, the office in Lourdes charged with investigating claims of miracles. Through my experiences, I found the mission of medicine in Lourdes to be twofold: to provide the critical care needed to give sick persons the chance to transform their experience of disease through their faith; and secondly, through the efforts of the Medical Bureau, to be an instrument by which we can comprehend the wonders of the work of God. I conclude that this twofold mission should inform the work of every Catholic in health care or research, and Lourdes provides the venue par excellence to cultivate this mission. Lay Summary: Lourdes is a pilgrimage site in southern France that has been associated with medical miracles for the past 150 years. The site is unique in that throughout its history, physicians, of any or no faith, have been invited to participate in the proceedings of the investigations of each claimed cure. The investigations have formalized into a process handled by the Lourdes Medical Bureau and the Lourdes International Medical Association. Travis Dichoso, an American medical student, writes about his experiences as part of this process. PMID:25698838

  3. Evolution of a Unique Systems Engineering Capability

    SciTech Connect

    Robert M. Caliva; James A. Murphy; Kyle B. Oswald

    2011-06-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is a science-based, applied engineering laboratory dedicated to supporting U.S. Department of Energy missions in nuclear and energy research, science, and national security. The INL’s Systems Engineering organization supports all of the various programs under this wide array of missions. As with any multifaceted organization, strategic planning is essential to establishing a consistent culture and a value discipline throughout all levels of the enterprise. While an organization can pursue operational excellence, product leadership or customer intimacy, it is extremely difficult to excel or achieve best-in-class at all three. In fact, trying to do so has resulted in the demise of a number of organizations given the very intricate balancing act that is necessary. The INL’s Systems Engineering Department has chosen to focus on customer intimacy where the customer’s needs are first and foremost and a more total solution is the goal. Frequently a total solution requires the employment of specialized tools to manage system complexity. However, it is only after understanding customer needs that tool selection and use would be pursued. This results in using both commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) tools and, in some cases, requires internal development of specialized tools. This paper describes how a unique systems engineering capability, through the development of customized tools, evolved as a result of this customer-focused culture. It also addresses the need for a common information model or analysis framework and presents an overview of the tools developed to manage and display relationships between entities, support trade studies through the application of utility theory, and facilitate the development of a technology roadmap to manage system risk and uncertainty.

  4. Lourdes: A uniquely Catholic approach to medicine.

    PubMed

    Dichoso, Travis Jon

    2015-02-01

    As an American medical student, I spent the summer break between my first and second year in Lourdes, France, the site where the Immaculate Conception appeared eighteen times to St. Bernadette in 1858 as proclaimed approved by the Catholic Church and whose water is associated with over seven thousand unexplained cures. During this time I volunteered with St. Joseph's Service and Poste Secour, followed several medical teams taking care of large pilgrim groups, and shadowed Dr. Alessandro de Franciscis the president of Le Bureau des Constations Médicales, the office in Lourdes charged with investigating claims of miracles. Through my experiences, I found the mission of medicine in Lourdes to be twofold: to provide the critical care needed to give sick persons the chance to transform their experience of disease through their faith; and secondly, through the efforts of the Medical Bureau, to be an instrument by which we can comprehend the wonders of the work of God. I conclude that this twofold mission should inform the work of every Catholic in health care or research, and Lourdes provides the venue par excellence to cultivate this mission. Lay Summary: Lourdes is a pilgrimage site in southern France that has been associated with medical miracles for the past 150 years. The site is unique in that throughout its history, physicians, of any or no faith, have been invited to participate in the proceedings of the investigations of each claimed cure. The investigations have formalized into a process handled by the Lourdes Medical Bureau and the Lourdes International Medical Association. Travis Dichoso, an American medical student, writes about his experiences as part of this process. PMID:25698838

  5. A unique elastase in human blood platelets.

    PubMed Central

    James, H L; Wachtfogel, Y T; James, P L; Zimmerman, M; Colman, R W; Cohen, A B

    1985-01-01

    Previous investigations suggested that elastolytic activity found in platelets could be due to contamination by neutrophil elastase. In the present study, the lysate of blood platelets free of detectable neutrophils was examined for elastase-like activity using tertiary-butyloxycarbonyl (tBOC)-ala-ala-pro-ala-aminomethyl coumarin (I), tBOC-ala-ala-pro-val-aminomethyl coumarin (II), and succinyl-tri-ala-rho-nitroanilide (SAPNA), and for elastolytic activity using 3H-labeled dog and human lung elastins. The platelet lysate degraded I at a higher rate than II, while the reverse was true of neutrophil elastase. The rate of degradation of I, II, and SAPNA by the lysate increased with reaction time up to 20 min. The rate of I, II, and SAPNA degradation by the lysate was decreased by the presence of 0.5 M NaCl, whereas NaCl greatly potentiated their degradation by neutrophil elastase. Plasma alpha 2-macroglobulin inhibited elastolysis by the platelet lysate, whereas plasma alpha 1-antitrypsin did not. The lysate activity was inhibited by diisopropyl fluorophosphate, phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride, elastatinal, Trasylol, and furoyl-saccharin. The optimum pH for platelet lysate activity was 8.5-9.0, as in other studies using elastin as substrate. The pH 4.5 eluate obtained after incubation of the lysate with dog lung elastin at neutral pH exhibited the same catalytic properties as the activity in the lysate. The different substrate and inhibitor specificities and the failure of IgG specific for neutrophil elastase to remove elastase-like and elastolytic activities from the lysate indicate that a unique elastase occurs in platelets. PMID:2416778

  6. Improvement of stability conditions, accuracy and uniqueness of penalty approach in contact modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bednarek, Tomasz; Kowalczyk, Piotr

    2013-06-01

    The main objective of this paper is to improve stability conditions, uniqueness and convergence of numerical analysis of metal forming processes with contact constraints enforced by the penalty method. A commonly known drawback of this approach is the choice of penalty factor values. When assumed too low, they result in inaccurate fulfillment of the constraints while when assumed too high, they lead to ill-conditioning of the equations system which affects stability and uniqueness of the solution. The proposed modification of the penalty algorithm consists in adaptive estimation of the penalty factor values for the particular system of finite element equations and for the assumed allowed inaccuracy in fulfillment of the contact constraints. The algorithm is tested on realistic examples of sheet metal forming. The finite element code based on flow approach formulation (for rigid-plastic and rigid-viscoplastic material model) has been used.

  7. Exploiting Unique Structural and Functional Properties of Malarial Glycolytic Enzymes for Antimalarial Drug Development

    PubMed Central

    Neyaz, Md. Kausar; Ikramul Hasan, Syed

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic enzymes have been known to carry out a variety of functions besides their normal housekeeping roles known as “moonlighting functions.” These functionalities arise from structural changes induced by posttranslational modifications and/or binding of interacting proteins. Glycolysis is the sole source of energy generation for malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum, hence a potential pathway for therapeutic intervention. Crystal structures of several P. falciparum glycolytic enzymes have been solved, revealing that they exhibit unique structural differences from the respective host enzymes, which could be exploited for their selective targeting. In addition, these enzymes carry out many parasite-specific functions, which could be of potential interest to control parasite development and transmission. This review focuses on the moonlighting functions of P. falciparum glycolytic enzymes and unique structural differences and functional features of the parasite enzymes, which could be exploited for therapeutic and transmission blocking interventions against malaria. PMID:25580350

  8. A modification of Hutchinson's equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolesov, A. Yu.; Mishchenko, E. F.; Rozov, N. Kh.

    2010-12-01

    A new mathematical object is introduced, namely, a scalar nonlinear delay differential-difference equation is considered that is a modification of Hutchinson's equation, which is well known in ecology. The existence and stability of its relaxation self-oscillations are analyzed.

  9. Demonstrating Allotropic Modifications of Sulfur.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarty, Jillian L.; Dragojlovic, Veljko

    2002-01-01

    Shows how a common demonstration that consists of slowly heating sulfur powder in a test tube to illustrate sulfur's allotropic modifications can convince students of conclusions about the moon Io which they often find surprising. Describes the demonstration in full. (Author/MM)

  10. What's Wrong With Behavior Modification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abidin, Richard R., Jr.

    1971-01-01

    This article considers some of the parameters, issues, and problems which must be evaluated before and during the application of behavior modification techniques. Among the topics discussed are: selecting the right teacher, training the teacher, reinforcing the teacher, ineffective, or inappropriate reinforcement, the attitude of the school…

  11. Changing Attitudes Through Behavior Modification.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whipple, W. Scott

    This article describes the philosophy and methods used by the staff at the Granite Alternative School in changing student attitudes through behavior modification. The students involved all have a failure syndrome or low self-image, and are dropouts from traditional high schools. Among the techniques used are: (1) reinforcing good behavior (praise…

  12. Plasma surface modification of polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirotsu, T.

    1980-01-01

    Thin plasma polymerization films are discussed from the viewpoint of simplicity in production stages. The application of selective, absorbent films and films used in selective permeability was tested. The types of surface modification of polymers discussed are: (1) plasma etching, (2) surface coating by plasma polymerized thin films, and (3) plasma activation surface graft polymerization.

  13. Unique Challenges Testing SDRs for Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Sandra; Chelmins, David; Downey, Joseph; Nappier, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the approach used by the Space Communication and Navigation (SCaN) Testbed team to qualify three Software Defined Radios (SDR) for operation in space and the characterization of the platform to enable upgrades on-orbit. The three SDRs represent a significant portion of the new technologies being studied on board the SCAN Testbed, which is operating on an external truss on the International Space Station (ISS). The SCaN Testbed provides experimenters an opportunity to develop and demonstrate experimental waveforms and applications for communication, networking, and navigation concepts and advance the understanding of developing and operating SDRs in space. Qualifying a Software Defined Radio for the space environment requires additional consideration versus a hardware radio. Tests that incorporate characterization of the platform to provide information necessary for future waveforms, which might exercise extended capabilities of the hardware, are needed. The development life cycle for the radio follows the software development life cycle, where changes can be incorporated at various stages of development and test. It also enables flexibility to be added with minor additional effort. Although this provides tremendous advantages, managing the complexity inherent in a software implementation requires a testing beyond the traditional hardware radio test plan. Due to schedule and resource limitations and parallel development activities, the subsystem testing of the SDRs at the vendor sites was primarily limited to typical fixed transceiver type of testing. NASA's Glenn Research Center (GRC) was responsible for the integration and testing of the SDRs into the SCaN Testbed system and conducting the investigation of the SDR to advance the technology to be accepted by missions. This paper will describe the unique tests that were conducted at both the subsystem and system level, including environmental testing, and present results. For example, test waveforms were developed to measure the gain of the transmit system across the tunable frequency band. These were used during thermal vacuum testing to enable characterization of the integrated system in the wide operational temperature range of space. Receive power indicators were used for Electromagnetic Interference tests (EMI) to understand the platform's susceptibility to external interferers independent of the waveform. Additional approaches and lessons learned during the SCaN Testbed subsystem and system level testing will be discussed that may help future SDR integrators.

  14. Unique sextuple system: 65 Ursae Majoris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zasche, P.; Uhlá?, R.; Šlechta, M.; Wolf, M.; Harmanec, P.; Nemravová, J. A.; Kor?áková, D.

    2012-06-01

    Context. The study of stellar multiple systems provides us with important information about the stellar formation processes and can help us to estimate the multiplicity fraction in the Galaxy. 65 UMa belongs to a rather small group of stellar systems of higher multiplicity, whose inner and outer orbits are well-known. This allows us to study the long-term stability and evolution of the orbits in these systems. Aims: We obtained new photometric and spectroscopic data that when combined with interferometric data enables us to analyze the system 65 UMa and determine its basic physical properties. Methods: We perform a combined analysis of the light and radial velocity curves, as well as the period variation by studying the times of the minima and the interferometric orbit. A disentangling technique is used to perform the spectra decomposition. This combined approach allows us to study the long-term period changes in the system for the first time, identifying the period variation due to the motion on the visual orbit, in addition to some short-term modulation. Results: We find that the system contains one more component, hence we tread it as a sextuple hierarchical system. The most inner pair of components consists of an eclipsing binary orbiting around a barycenter on a circular orbit, both components being almost identical of spectral type about A7. This pair orbits on an eccentric orbit around a barycenter, and the third component orbits with a period of about 640 days. This motion is reflected in the period variation in the minima times of the eclipsing pair, as well as in the radial velocities of the primary, secondary, and tertiary components. Moreover, this system orbits around a barycenter with the distant component resolved interferometrically, whose period is of about 118 years. Two more distant components (4'' and 63'') are also probably gravitationally bound to the system. The nodal period of the eclipsing-pair orbit is on the order of only a few centuries, which makes this system even more interesting for a future prospective detection of changing the depths of minima. Conclusions: We identify a unique solution of the system 65 UMa, decomposing the individual components and even shifting the system to higher multiplicity. The study of this kind of multiple can help us to understand the origin of stellar systems. Besides 65 UMa, only another 11 sextuple systems have been studied. Reduced photometric and spectroscopic data, and Tables A.1-A.4 are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/542/A78

  15. Unitary Evolution as a Uniqueness Criterion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortez, J.; Mena Marugán, G. A.; Olmedo, J.; Velhinho, J. M.

    2015-01-01

    It is well known that the process of quantizing field theories is plagued with ambiguities. First, there is ambiguity in the choice of basic variables describing the system. Second, once a choice of field variables has been made, there is ambiguity concerning the selection of a quantum representation of the corresponding canonical commutation relations. The natural strategy to remove these ambiguities is to demand positivity of energy and to invoke symmetries, namely by requiring that classical symmetries become unitarily implemented in the quantum realm. The success of this strategy depends, however, on the existence of a sufficiently large group of symmetries, usually including time-translation invariance. These criteria are therefore generally insufficient in non-stationary situations, as is typical for free fields in curved spacetimes. Recently, the criterion of unitary implementation of the dynamics has been proposed in order to select a unique quantization in the context of manifestly non-stationary systems. Specifically, the unitarity criterion, together with the requirement of invariance under spatial symmetries, has been successfully employed to remove the ambiguities in the quantization of linearly polarized Gowdy models as well as in the quantization of a scalar field with time varying mass, propagating in a static background whose spatial topology is either of a d-sphere (with d = 1, 2, 3) or a three torus. Following Ref. 3, we will see here that the symmetry and unitarity criteria allows for a complete removal of the ambiguities in the quantization of scalar fields propagating in static spacetimes with compact spatial sections, obeying field equations with an explicitly time-dependent mass, of the form ddot φ - Δ φ + s(t)φ = 0 . These results apply in particular to free fields in spacetimes which, like e.g. in the closed FRW models, are conformal to a static spacetime, by means of an exclusively time-dependent conformal factor. In fact, in such cases the free field equation can be mapped to an equation of the above type, via a suitable scaling of the field...

  16. Unique Challenges Testing SDRs for Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chelmins, David; Downey, Joseph A.; Johnson, Sandra K.; Nappier, Jennifer M.

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the approach used by the Space Communication and Navigation (SCaN) Testbed team to qualify three Software Defined Radios (SDR) for operation in space and the characterization of the platform to enable upgrades on-orbit. The three SDRs represent a significant portion of the new technologies being studied on board the SCAN Testbed, which is operating on an external truss on the International Space Station (ISS). The SCaN Testbed provides experimenters an opportunity to develop and demonstrate experimental waveforms and applications for communication, networking, and navigation concepts and advance the understanding of developing and operating SDRs in space. Qualifying a Software Defined Radio for the space environment requires additional consideration versus a hardware radio. Tests that incorporate characterization of the platform to provide information necessary for future waveforms, which might exercise extended capabilities of the hardware, are needed. The development life cycle for the radio follows the software development life cycle, where changes can be incorporated at various stages of development and test. It also enables flexibility to be added with minor additional effort. Although this provides tremendous advantages, managing the complexity inherent in a software implementation requires a testing beyond the traditional hardware radio test plan. Due to schedule and resource limitations and parallel development activities, the subsystem testing of the SDRs at the vendor sites was primarily limited to typical fixed transceiver type of testing. NASA s Glenn Research Center (GRC) was responsible for the integration and testing of the SDRs into the SCaN Testbed system and conducting the investigation of the SDR to advance the technology to be accepted by missions. This paper will describe the unique tests that were conducted at both the subsystem and system level, including environmental testing, and present results. For example, test waveforms were developed to measure the gain of the transmit system across the tunable frequency band. These were used during thermal vacuum testing to enable characterization of the integrated system in the wide operational temperature range of space. Receive power indicators were used for Electromagnetic Interference tests (EMI) to understand the platform s susceptibility to external interferers independent of the waveform. Additional approaches and lessons learned during the SCaN Testbed subsystem and system level testing will be discussed that may help future SDR integrators

  17. Change detection on a hunch: pre-attentive vision allows "sensing" of unique feature changes.

    PubMed

    Ball, Felix; Busch, Niko A

    2015-11-01

    Studies on change detection and change blindness have investigated the nature of visual representations by testing the conditions under which observers are able to detect when an object in a complex scene changes from one moment to the next. Several authors have proposed that change detection can occur without identification of the changing object, but the perceptual processes underlying this phenomenon are currently unknown. We hypothesized that change detection without localization or identification occurs when the change happens outside the focus of attention. Such changes would usually go entirely unnoticed, unless the change brings about a modification of one of the feature maps representing the scene. Thus, the appearance or disappearance of a unique feature might be registered even in the absence of focused attention and without feature binding, allowing for change detection, but not localization or identification. We tested this hypothesis in three experiments, in which changes either involved colors that were already present elsewhere in the display or entirely unique colors. Observers detected whether any change had occurred and then localized or identified the change. Change detection without localization occurred almost exclusively when changes involved a unique color. Moreover, change detection without localization for unique feature changes was independent of the number of objects in the display and independent of change identification. These findings suggest that pre-attentive registration of a change on a feature map can give rise to a conscious experience even when feature binding has failed: that something has changed without knowing what or where. PMID:26353860

  18. 17 CFR 45.5 - Unique swap identifiers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... identifier. (d) Allocations. For swaps involving allocation, unique swap identifiers shall be created and... which primary economic terms data is reported shall create and transmit a unique swap identifier...

  19. Structural modification of nanocrystalline ceria by ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yanwen; Edmondson, Philip D.; Varga, Tamas; Moll, Sandra; Namavar, Fereydoon; Lan, Chune; Weber, William J.

    2011-01-01

    Exceptional size-dependent electronic–ionic conductivity of nanostructured ceria can significantly alter materials properties in chemical, physical, electronic and optical applications. Using energetic ions, we have demonstrated effective modification of interface volume and grain size in nanocrystalline ceria from a few nm up to ~25 nm, which is the critical region for controlling size-dependent material property. The grain size increases and follows an exponential law as a function of ion fluence that increases with temperature, while the cubic phase is stable under the irradiation. The unique self-healing response of radiation damage at grain boundaries is utilized to control the grain size at the nanoscale. Structural modification by energetic ions is proposed to achieve desirable electronic–ionic conductivity.

  20. The Potential and Uniqueness of Virtual Environments for Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Leslie A.

    2008-01-01

    Virtual environments (VEs) are growing in popularity among educators and have unique potential for online learning. This paper describes the unique characteristics of VEs that make them an effective venue for online learning due to increased environmental presence. Unique characteristics of VEs include nature of visual stimuli, control of the…

  1. Unique atom hyper-kagome order in Na4Ir3O8 and in low-symmetry spinel modifications.

    PubMed

    Talanov, V M; Shirokov, V B; Talanov, M V

    2015-05-01

    Group-theoretical and thermodynamic methods of the Landau theory of phase transitions are used to investigate the hyper-kagome atomic order in structures of ordered spinels and a spinel-like Na4Ir3O8 crystal. The formation of an atom hyper-kagome sublattice in Na4Ir3O8 is described theoretically on the basis of the archetype (hypothetical parent structure/phase) concept. The archetype structure of Na4Ir3O8 has a spinel-like structure (space group Fd\\bar 3m) and composition [Na1/2Ir3/2](16d)[Na3/2](16c)O(32e)4. The critical order parameter which induces hypothetical phase transition has been stated. It is shown that the derived structure of Na4Ir3O8 is formed as a result of the displacements of Na, Ir and O atoms, and ordering of Na, Ir and O atoms, ordering dxy, dxz, dyz orbitals as well. Ordering of all atoms takes place according to the type 1:3. Ir and Na atoms form an intriguing atom order: a network of corner-shared Ir triangles called a hyper-kagome lattice. The Ir atoms form nanoclusters which are named decagons. The existence of hyper-kagome lattices in six types of ordered spinel structures is predicted theoretically. The structure mechanisms of the formation of the predicted hyper-kagome atom order in some ordered spinel phases are established. For a number of cases typical diagrams of possible crystal phase states are built in the framework of the Landau theory of phase transitions. Thermodynamical conditions of hyper-kagome order formation are discussed by means of these diagrams. The proposed theory is in accordance with experimental data. PMID:25921499

  2. The Modification of Biocellular Chemical Reactions by Environmental Physicochemicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishido, M.

    Environmental risk factors affect human biological system to different extent from modification of biochemical reaction to cellular catastrophe. There are considerable public concerns about electromagnetic fields and endocrine disruptors. Their risk assessments have not been fully achieved because of their scientific uncertainty: electromagnetic fields just modify the bioreaction in the restricted cells and endocrine disruptors are quite unique in that their expression is dependent on the exposure periods throughout a life. Thus, we here describe their molecular characterization to establish the new risk assessments for environmental physicochemicals.

  3. Plasma technologies application for building materials surface modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volokitin, G. G.; Skripnikova, N. K.; Volokitin, O. G.; Shehovtzov, V. V.; Luchkin, A. G.; Kashapov, N. F.

    2016-01-01

    Low temperature arc plasma was used to process building surface materials, such as silicate brick, sand lime brick, concrete and wood. It was shown that building surface materials modification with low temperature plasma positively affects frost resistance, water permeability and chemical resistance with high adhesion strength. Short time plasma processing is rather economical than traditional processing thermic methods. Plasma processing makes wood surface uniquely waterproof and gives high operational properties, dimensional and geometrical stability. It also increases compression resistance and decreases inner tensions level in material.

  4. Optimization of Process Conditions for Enzymatic Modification of Alternan using Dextranase from Chaetomium erraticum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Alternan is a unique branched glucan with alternating a-(1 ' 6) and a-(1 ' 3) backbone linkages. We previously described the modification of alternan to a reduced molecular weight form using dextranase from Penicillium sp. The solution viscosity properties of this modified alternan resemble those ...

  5. Biological roles of the O-methyl phosphoramidate capsule modification in Campylobacter jejuni

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Campylobacter jejuni is a major cause of bacterial gastroenteritis worldwide, and the capsular polysaccharide (CPS) of this organism is required for persistence and disease. C. jejuni produces over 47 different capsular structures, including a unique O-methyl phosphoramidate (MeOPN) modification pre...

  6. Dramatic colour changes in a bird of paradise caused by uniquely structured breast feather barbules

    PubMed Central

    Stavenga, Doekele G.; Leertouwer, Hein L.; Marshall, N. Justin; Osorio, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    The breast-plate plumage of male Lawes' parotia (Parotia lawesii) produces dramatic colour changes when this bird of paradise displays on its forest-floor lek. We show that this effect is achieved not solely by the iridescence—that is an angular-dependent spectral shift of the reflected light—which is inherent in structural coloration, but is based on a unique anatomical modification of the breast-feather barbule. The barbules have a segmental structure, and in common with many other iridescent feathers, they contain stacked melanin rodlets surrounded by a keratin film. The unique property of the parotia barbules is their boomerang-like cross section. This allows each barbule to work as three coloured mirrors: a yellow-orange reflector in the plane of the feather, and two symmetrically positioned bluish reflectors at respective angles of about 30°. Movement during the parotia's courtship displays thereby achieves much larger and more abrupt colour changes than is possible with ordinary iridescent plumage. To our knowledge, this is the first example of multiple thin film or multi-layer reflectors incorporated in a single structure (engineered or biological). It nicely illustrates how subtle modification of the basic feather structure can achieve novel visual effects. The fact that the parotia's breast feathers seem to be specifically adapted to give much stronger colour changes than normal structural coloration implies that colour change is important in their courtship display. PMID:21159676

  7. Dramatic colour changes in a bird of paradise caused by uniquely structured breast feather barbules.

    PubMed

    Stavenga, Doekele G; Leertouwer, Hein L; Marshall, N Justin; Osorio, Daniel

    2011-07-22

    The breast-plate plumage of male Lawes' parotia (Parotia lawesii) produces dramatic colour changes when this bird of paradise displays on its forest-floor lek. We show that this effect is achieved not solely by the iridescence--that is an angular-dependent spectral shift of the reflected light--which is inherent in structural coloration, but is based on a unique anatomical modification of the breast-feather barbule. The barbules have a segmental structure, and in common with many other iridescent feathers, they contain stacked melanin rodlets surrounded by a keratin film. The unique property of the parotia barbules is their boomerang-like cross section. This allows each barbule to work as three coloured mirrors: a yellow-orange reflector in the plane of the feather, and two symmetrically positioned bluish reflectors at respective angles of about 30°. Movement during the parotia's courtship displays thereby achieves much larger and more abrupt colour changes than is possible with ordinary iridescent plumage. To our knowledge, this is the first example of multiple thin film or multi-layer reflectors incorporated in a single structure (engineered or biological). It nicely illustrates how subtle modification of the basic feather structure can achieve novel visual effects. The fact that the parotia's breast feathers seem to be specifically adapted to give much stronger colour changes than normal structural coloration implies that colour change is important in their courtship display. PMID:21159676

  8. ROSAT Discovers Unique, Distant Cluster of Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1995-06-01

    Brightest X-ray Cluster Acts as Strong Gravitational Lens Based on exciting new data obtained with the ROSAT X-ray satellite and a ground-based telescope at the ESO La Silla Observatory, a team of European astronomers [2] has just discovered a very distant cluster of galaxies with unique properties. It emits the strongest X-ray emission of any cluster ever observed by ROSAT and is accompanied by two extraordinarily luminous arcs that represent the gravitationally deflected images of even more distant objects. The combination of these unusual characteristics makes this cluster, now known as RXJ1347.5-1145, a most interesting object for further cosmological studies. DISCOVERY AND FOLLOW-UP OBSERVATIONS This strange cluster of galaxies was discovered during the All Sky Survey with the ROSAT X-ray satellite as a moderately intense X-ray source in the constellation of Virgo. It could not be identified with any already known object and additional ground-based observations were therefore soon after performed with the Max-Planck-Society/ESO 2.2-metre telescope at the La Silla observatory in Chile. These observations took place within a large--scale redshift survey of X-ray clusters of galaxies detected by the ROSAT All Sky Survey, a so-called ``ESO Key Programme'' led by astronomers from the Max-Planck-Institut fur Extraterrestrische Physik and the Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera. The main aim of this programme is to identify cluster X-ray sources, to determine the distance to the X-ray emitting clusters and to investigate their overall properties. These observations permitted to measure the redshift of the RXJ1347.5-1145 cluster as z = 0.45, i.e. it moves away from us with a velocity (about 106,000 km/sec) equal to about one-third of the velocity of light. This is an effect of the general expansion of the universe and it allows to determine the distance as about 5,000 million light-years (assuming a Hubble constant of 75 km/sec/Mpc). In other words, we see these galaxies as they were 5,000 million years ago. Knowing the intensity of the X-ray emission as measured by ROSAT and also the distance, the astronomers were then able to estimate the total X-ray energy emitted by this cluster. It was found to be extremely high [3], in fact higher than that of any other cluster ever observed by ROSAT. It amounts to no less than 1.5 million million times the total energy emitted by the Sun. It is believed that this strong X-ray emission originates in a hot gas located between the galaxies in the cluster. The high temperature indicates that the components of the gas move very rapidly; this is related to the strong gravitational field within the cluster. THE GRAVITATIONAL ARCS To their great surprise and delight, the astronomers also discovered two bright arcs, 5 - 6 arcseconds long and symmetrically placed about 35 arcseconds to the North-East and South-West of the brightest galaxies in the cluster (see the photo). They were detected on exposures of only 3 minutes duration with the 2.2-metre telescope and are among the brightest such arcs ever found. At the indicated distance, the arcs are situated at a projected distance of about 500,000 light-years from the centre of the cluster. It is an interesting possibility that the two arcs may in fact be two images of the same, very distant galaxy, that is situated far beyond RXJ1347.5-1145 and whose light has been bent and split by this cluster's strong gravitational field. This strange phenomenon was first discovered in the late 1970's and is referred to as gravitational lensing. Quite a few examples are now known, in most cases in the form of double or multiple images of quasars. About three dozen cases involve well visible galaxy clusters and elongated arcs, but few, if any, of these arcs are as bright as those seen in the present cluster. This particular arc configuration enables a very accurate determination of the total mass of the cluster, once the distance of the background galaxy has been measured (by obtaining spectra of the arcs and measuring their redshift). The masses of galaxy clus

  9. Medium Modification of Vector Mesons

    SciTech Connect

    Chaden Djalali, Michael Paolone, Dennis Weygand, Michael H. Wood, Rakhsha Nasseripour

    2011-03-01

    The theory of the strong interaction, Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD), has been remarkably successful in describing high-energy and short-distance-scale experiments involving quarks and gluons. However, applying QCD to low energy and large-distance scale experiments has been a major challenge. Various QCD-inspired models predict a partial restoration of chiral symmetry in nuclear matter with modifications of the properties of hadrons from their free-space values. Measurable changes such as a shift in mass and/or a change of width are predicted at normal nuclear density. Photoproduction of vector mesons off nuclei have been performed at different laboratories. The properties of the ρ, ω and φ mesons are investigated either directly by measuring their mass spectra or indirectly through transparency ratios. The latest results regarding medium modifications of the vector mesons in the nuclear medium will be discussed.

  10. Modification of chemotherapy by nitroimidazoles

    SciTech Connect

    Siemann, D.W.

    1984-09-01

    The potentiation of chemotherapeutic agents by radiation sensitizers has been extensively studied for several years. There is little doubt that the effectiveness of certain anti-cancer drugs, primarily alkylating agents, can readily be enhanced both in vitro and in vivo through the addition of a sensitizer. While enhanced effects have been observed in certain critical normal tissues, in general most animal model studies have demonstrated a therapeutic gain at large sensitizer doses. This approach to combination therapies therefore appears promising. Yet many questions concerning the interaction between chemotherapeutic agents and radiosensitizers, particularly in the aspects of modification of chemotherapy by nitroimidazoles are reviewed and discussed. These address the importance in chemopotentiation of (i) hypoxia, (ii) alterations in DNA damage and/or repair, (iii) depletion of intracellular sulfhydryls and (iv) modification of drug pharmacokinetics.

  11. HHMD: the human histone modification database

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yan; Lv, Jie; Liu, Hongbo; Zhu, Jiang; Su, Jianzhong; Wu, Qiong; Qi, Yunfeng; Wang, Fang; Li, Xia

    2010-01-01

    Histone modifications play important roles in chromatin remodeling, gene transcriptional regulation, stem cell maintenance and differentiation. Alterations in histone modifications may be linked to human diseases especially cancer. Histone modifications including methylation, acetylation and ubiquitylation probed by ChIP-seq, ChIP-chip and qChIP have become widely available. Mining and integration of histone modification data can be beneficial to novel biological discoveries. There has been no comprehensive data repository that is exclusive for human histone modifications. Therefore, we developed a relatively comprehensive database for human histone modifications. Human Histone Modification Database (HHMD, http://bioinfo.hrbmu.edu.cn/hhmd) focuses on the storage and integration of histone modification datasets that were obtained from laboratory experiments. The latest release of HHMD incorporates 43 location-specific histone modifications in human. To facilitate data extraction, flexible search options are built in HHMD. It can be searched by histone modification, gene ID, functional categories, chromosome location and cancer name. HHMD also includes a user-friendly visualization tool named HisModView, by which genome-wide histone modification map can be shown. HisModView facilitates the acquisition and visualization of histone modifications. The database also has manually curated information of histone modification dysregulation in nine human cancers. PMID:19892823

  12. Cradle modification for hydraulic ram

    SciTech Connect

    Koons, B.M.

    1995-03-02

    The analysis of the cradle hydraulic system considers stress, weld strength, and hydraulic forces required to lift and support the cradle/pump assembly. The stress and weld strength of the cradle modifications is evaluated to ensure that they meet the requirements of the American Institute for Steel Construction (AISC 1989). The hydraulic forces are evaluated to ensure that the hydraulic system is capable of rotating the cradle and pump assembly to the vertical position (between 70{degrees} and 90{degrees}).

  13. Polyaniline nanofibers: a unique polymer nanostructure for versatile applications.

    PubMed

    Li, Dan; Huang, Jiaxing; Kaner, Richard B

    2009-01-20

    Known for more than 150 years, polyaniline is the oldest and potentially one of the most useful conducting polymers because of its facile synthesis, environmental stability, and simple acid/base doping/dedoping chemistry. Because a nanoform of this polymer could offer new properties or enhanced performance, nanostructured polyaniline has attracted a great deal of interest during the past few years. This Account summarizes our recent research on the syntheses, processing, properties, and applications of polyaniline nanofibers. By monitoring the nucleation behavior of polyaniline, we demonstrate that high-quality nanofibers can be readily produced in bulk quantity using the conventional chemical oxidative polymerization of aniline. The polyaniline nanostructures formed using this simple method have led to a number of exciting discoveries. For example, we can readily prepare aqueous polyaniline colloids by purifying polyaniline nanofibers and controlling the pH. The colloids formed are self-stabilized via electrostatic repulsions without the need for any chemical modification or steric stabilizer, thus providing a simple and environmentally friendly way to process this polymer. An unusual nanoscale photothermal effect called "flash welding", which we discovered with polyaniline nanofibers, has led to the development of new techniques for making asymmetric polymer membranes and patterned nanofiber films and creating polymer-based nanocomposites. We also demonstrate the use of flash-welded polyaniline films for monolithic actuators. Taking advantage of the unique reduction/oxidation chemistry of polyaniline, we can decorate polyaniline nanofibers with metal nanoparticles through in situ reduction of selected metal salts. The resulting polyaniline/metal nanoparticle composites show promise for use in ultrafast nonvolatile memory devices and for chemical catalysis. In addition, the use of polyaniline nanofibers or their composites can significantly enhance the sensitivity, selectivity, and response time of polyaniline-based chemical sensors. By combining straightforward synthesis and composite formation with exceptional solution processability, we have developed a range of new useful functionalities. Further research on nanostructured conjugated polymers holds promise for even more exciting discoveries and intriguing applications. PMID:18986177

  14. Protein Modification by Adenine Propenal

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Base propenals are products of the reaction of DNA with oxidants such as peroxynitrite and bleomycin. The most reactive base propenal, adenine propenal, is mutagenic in Escherichia coli and reacts with DNA to form covalent adducts; however, the reaction of adenine propenal with protein has not yet been investigated. A survey of the reaction of adenine propenal with amino acids revealed that lysine and cysteine form adducts, whereas histidine and arginine do not. Nε-Oxopropenyllysine, a lysine–lysine cross-link, and S-oxopropenyl cysteine are the major products. Comprehensive profiling of the reaction of adenine propenal with human serum albumin and the DNA repair protein, XPA, revealed that the only stable adduct is Nε-oxopropenyllysine. The most reactive sites for modification in human albumin are K190 and K351. Three sites of modification of XPA are in the DNA-binding domain, and two sites are subject to regulatory acetylation. Modification by adenine propenal dramatically reduces XPA’s ability to bind to a DNA substrate. PMID:25211669

  15. Epigenetic modifications and diabetic nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Marpadga A.; Park, Jung Tak; Natarajan, Rama

    2012-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is a major complication associated with both type 1 and type 2 diabetes, and a leading cause of end-stage renal disease. Conventional therapeutic strategies are not fully efficacious in the treatment of DN, suggesting an incomplete understanding of the gene regulation mechanisms involved in its pathogenesis. Furthermore, evidence from clinical trials has demonstrated a “metabolic memory” of prior exposure to hyperglycemia that continues to persist despite subsequent glycemic control. This remains a major challenge in the treatment of DN and other vascular complications. Epigenetic mechanisms such as DNA methylation, nucleosomal histone modifications, and noncoding RNAs control gene expression through regulation of chromatin structure and function and post-transcriptional mechanisms without altering the underlying DNA sequence. Emerging evidence indicates that multiple factors involved in the etiology of diabetes can alter epigenetic mechanisms and regulate the susceptibility to diabetes complications. Recent studies have demonstrated the involvement of histone lysine methylation in the regulation of key fibrotic and inflammatory genes related to diabetes complications including DN. Interestingly, histone lysine methylation persisted in vascular cells even after withdrawal from the diabetic milieu, demonstrating a potential role of epigenetic modifications in metabolic memory. Rapid advances in high-throughput technologies in the fields of genomics and epigenomics can lead to the identification of genome-wide alterations in key epigenetic modifications in vascular and renal cells in diabetes. Altogether, these findings can lead to the identification of potential predictive biomarkers and development of novel epigenetic therapies for diabetes and its associated complications.

  16. [Advances in genetic modification technologies].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Baixue; Sun, Qixin; Li, Haifeng

    2015-08-01

    Genetic modification technology is a new molecular tool for targeted genome modification. It includes zinc finger nucleases (ZFN) technology, transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALEN) technology and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)-associated (Cas) (CRISPR-Cas) nucleases technology. All of these nucleases create DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) at chromosomal targeted sites and induce cell endogenous mechanisms that are primarily repaired by the non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) or homologous recombination (HR) pathway, resulting in targeted endogenous gene knock-out or exogenous gene insertion. In recent years, genetic modification technologies have been successfully applied to bacteria, yeast, human cells, fruit fly, zebra fish, mouse, rat, livestock, cynomolgus monkey, Arabidopsis, rice, tobacco, maize, sorghum, wheat, barley and other organisms, showing its enormous advantage in gene editing field. Especially, the newly developed CRISPR-Cas9 system arose more attention because of its low cost, high effectiveness, simplicity and easiness. We reviewed the principles and the latest research progress of these three technologies, as well as prospect of future research and applications. PMID:26762038

  17. Protein modification by adenine propenal.

    PubMed

    Shuck, Sarah C; Wauchope, Orrette R; Rose, Kristie L; Kingsley, Philip J; Rouzer, Carol A; Shell, Steven M; Sugitani, Norie; Chazin, Walter J; Zagol-Ikapitte, Irene; Boutaud, Olivier; Oates, John A; Galligan, James J; Beavers, William N; Marnett, Lawrence J

    2014-10-20

    Base propenals are products of the reaction of DNA with oxidants such as peroxynitrite and bleomycin. The most reactive base propenal, adenine propenal, is mutagenic in Escherichia coli and reacts with DNA to form covalent adducts; however, the reaction of adenine propenal with protein has not yet been investigated. A survey of the reaction of adenine propenal with amino acids revealed that lysine and cysteine form adducts, whereas histidine and arginine do not. N(?)-Oxopropenyllysine, a lysine-lysine cross-link, and S-oxopropenyl cysteine are the major products. Comprehensive profiling of the reaction of adenine propenal with human serum albumin and the DNA repair protein, XPA, revealed that the only stable adduct is N(?)-oxopropenyllysine. The most reactive sites for modification in human albumin are K190 and K351. Three sites of modification of XPA are in the DNA-binding domain, and two sites are subject to regulatory acetylation. Modification by adenine propenal dramatically reduces XPA's ability to bind to a DNA substrate. PMID:25211669

  18. DNA modifications: Another stable base in DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brazauskas, Pijus; Kriaucionis, Skirmantas

    2014-12-01

    Oxidation of 5-methylcytosine has been proposed to mediate active and passive DNA demethylation. Tracking the history of DNA modifications has now provided the first solid evidence that 5-hydroxymethylcytosine is a stable epigenetic modification.

  19. Classroom Modification for Mainstreamed Hyperactive Adolescent Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shuck, Annette; And Others

    1987-01-01

    A review of the literature on classroom communication, structure, noise minimization, behavior modification, and cognitive behavior modification indicates that such techniques can help reduce non-attending, non-work-oriented behaviors of mainstreamed hyperactive adolescents. (Author/CB)

  20. Implementing a QA program for plant modifications

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, D.R.

    1985-11-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the implementation of the quality assurance (QA) program within the modification process at Niagara Mohawk Power Corporation. The modification process includes design, procurement, installation, transition to operations, and closeout. Niagara Mohawk Power Corporation operates one nuclear power plant, a 610-MW General Electric (GE) boiling water reactor, and has another under construction, a 1080-MW GE reactor planned for commercial operation in October 1986. Niagara Mohawk has achieved a marked improvement in the implementation of its nuclear modifications. Modifications are now generally completed within budget and either on schedule or ahead of schedule. An example (the recirculation pipe replacement modification) is discussed and illustrates the increased QA attention to major modifications. This modification was a success from both Niagara Mohawk's point of view and also from our contractor's point of view. The implementation of the quality plan was a positive factor in the success of this modification.

  1. Modification of Alternan by Dextranase

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Alternan is a unique glucan with a backbone structure of alternating alpha-(1=-6) and alpha-(1=-3) linkages. Previously, we isolated strains of Penicillium sp. that modify native, high molecular weight alternan in a novel bioconversion process to a lower molecular weight form with solution viscosit...

  2. Energy conservation potential of surface modification technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Le, H.K.; Horne, D.M.; Silberglitt, R.S.

    1985-09-01

    This report assesses the energy conservation impact of surface modification technologies on the metalworking industries. The energy conservation impact of surface modification technologies on the metalworking industries is assessed by estimating their friction and wear tribological sinks and the subsequent reduction in these sinks when surface modified tools are used. Ion implantation, coatings, and laser and electron beam surface modifications are considered.

  3. 49 CFR 22.59 - Loan modifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Loan modifications. 22.59 Section 22.59 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation SHORT-TERM LENDING PROGRAM (STLP) Loan Administration § 22.59 Loan modifications. Any modification to the terms of the DOT OSDBU guarantee agreement...

  4. 49 CFR 22.59 - Loan modifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Loan modifications. 22.59 Section 22.59 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation SHORT-TERM LENDING PROGRAM (STLP) Loan Administration § 22.59 Loan modifications. Any modification to the terms of the DOT OSDBU guarantee agreement...

  5. 49 CFR 22.59 - Loan modifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Loan modifications. 22.59 Section 22.59 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation SHORT-TERM LENDING PROGRAM (STLP) Loan Administration § 22.59 Loan modifications. Any modification to the terms of the DOT OSDBU guarantee agreement...

  6. Modification of Nanostructures via Laser Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franzel, Louis Avery

    Modification of nanostructures via laser processing is of great interest for a wide range of applications such as aerospace and the storage of nuclear waste. The primary goal of this dissertation is to improve the understanding of nanostructures through two primary routes: the modification of aerogels and pulsed laser ablation in ethanol. A new class of materials, patterned aerogels, was fabricated by photopolymerizing selected regions of homogeneous aerogel monoliths using visible light. The characterization and fabrication of functionally graded, cellular and compositionally anisotropic aerogels and ceramics is discussed. Visible light was utilized due to it's minimal absorption and scattering by organic molecules and oxide nanoparticles within wet gels. This allowed for the fabrication of deeply penetrating, well resolved patterns. Similarly, nanoporous monoliths with a typical aerogel core and a mechanically robust exterior ceramic layer were synthesized from silica aerogels cross-linked with polyacrylonitrile. Simple variations of the exposure geometry allowed fabrication of a wide variety of anisotropic materials without requiring layering or bonding. Nanoparticle solutions were prepared by laser ablation of metal foils (Fe and Mo) in ethanol. Ablation of Fe generated Fe3O4 and Fe3C nanoparticles which were superparamagnetic with a saturation magnetization Ms = 124 emu/g. Zero field cooled (ZFC) measurements collected at an applied field of 50 Oe displayed a maximum magnetic susceptibility at 120 K with a broad distribution. Field cooled (FC) measurements showed a thermal hysteresis indicative of temperature dependent magnetic viscosity. Pulsed laser ablation of a Mo foil in ethanol generated inhomogeneous nanoparticles where Mo and MoC coexisted within the same aggregate. Formation of these unique nanoparticles is likely due to phase separation that occurs when a high temperature carbide phase cools after the laser pulse terminates. Similarly, magnetic nanoparticle suspensions were generated by pulsed laser ablation of Fe and Mo in ethanol. The formation of several carbide phases with no discernable alloy formation was seen. A decrease in magnetization with a decrease in Fe concentration was seen which was reconciled with the decreased Fe content in the system. However, at Fe concentrations below ˜ 40%, an increase in Ms and Hc was observed which was reconciled with the disappearance of the epsilon--Fe 3C. TEM analysis showed the formation of core-shell nanoparticles and Energy Filtered TEM showed the distribution of Fe-based nanoparticles in the suspensions.

  7. Modification of Nanostructures via Laser Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franzel, Louis Avery

    Modification of nanostructures via laser processing is of great interest for a wide range of applications such as aerospace and the storage of nuclear waste. The primary goal of this dissertation is to improve the understanding of nanostructures through two primary routes: the modification of aerogels and pulsed laser ablation in ethanol. A new class of materials, patterned aerogels, was fabricated by photopolymerizing selected regions of homogeneous aerogel monoliths using visible light. The characterization and fabrication of functionally graded, cellular and compositionally anisotropic aerogels and ceramics is discussed. Visible light was utilized due to it's minimal absorption and scattering by organic molecules and oxide nanoparticles within wet gels. This allowed for the fabrication of deeply penetrating, well resolved patterns. Similarly, nanoporous monoliths with a typical aerogel core and a mechanically robust exterior ceramic layer were synthesized from silica aerogels cross-linked with polyacrylonitrile. Simple variations of the exposure geometry allowed fabrication of a wide variety of anisotropic materials without requiring layering or bonding. Nanoparticle solutions were prepared by laser ablation of metal foils (Fe and Mo) in ethanol. Ablation of Fe generated Fe3O4 and Fe3C nanoparticles which were superparamagnetic with a saturation magnetization Ms = 124 emu/g. Zero field cooled (ZFC) measurements collected at an applied field of 50 Oe displayed a maximum magnetic susceptibility at 120 K with a broad distribution. Field cooled (FC) measurements showed a thermal hysteresis indicative of temperature dependent magnetic viscosity. Pulsed laser ablation of a Mo foil in ethanol generated inhomogeneous nanoparticles where Mo and MoC coexisted within the same aggregate. Formation of these unique nanoparticles is likely due to phase separation that occurs when a high temperature carbide phase cools after the laser pulse terminates. Similarly, magnetic nanoparticle suspensions were generated by pulsed laser ablation of Fe and Mo in ethanol. The formation of several carbide phases with no discernable alloy formation was seen. A decrease in magnetization with a decrease in Fe concentration was seen which was reconciled with the decreased Fe content in the system. However, at Fe concentrations below ˜ 40%, an increase in Ms and Hc was observed which was reconciled with the disappearance of the epsilon--Fe3C. TEM analysis showed the formation of core-shell nanoparticles and Energy Filtered TEM showed the distribution of Fe-based nanoparticles in the suspensions.

  8. 30 CFR 18.81 - Field modification of approved (permissible) equipment; application for approval of modification...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Field modification of approved (permissible) equipment; application for approval of modification; approval of plans for modification before modification. 18.81 Section 18.81 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TESTING, EVALUATION, AND APPROVAL OF...

  9. Mesoatrial shunt: a prosthesis modification.

    PubMed

    Cameron, J L; Kadir, S; Pierce, W S

    1984-07-01

    The mesoatrial shunt is the indicated treatment in the Budd-Chiari syndrome when the inferior vena cava is occluded and not usable for the standard portasystemic shunts. As the mesoatrial shunt courses from the abdomen into the right side of the chest, it passes posterior to the xiphoid and sternum and frequently is compressed at this point. A prosthesis modification is reported whereby an exterior silicone rubber cuff is bonded to the Dacron or Gortex graft at the point at which it passes posterior to the sternum. This obviates the possibility of graft compression and should increase long-term patency. PMID:6234672

  10. Piperine: bioactivities and structural modifications.

    PubMed

    Qu, Huan; Lv, Min; Xu, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Piperine is a simple alkaloid isolated from the seeds of Piper nigrum. Piperine and its derivatives exhibited a wide range of biological properties such as antitumor activity, antioxidant activity, antiinflammatory activity, antimycobacterial activity, insecticidal activity, etc. Although five excellent reviews have recently been described by Srinivasan in 2007, Mao in 2011, Butt in 2013, and Meghwal in 2013, respectively, their topics were mainly focused on the biological effects. Therefore, in the present review, the progress in the structural modifications on the aliphatic chain and the amide moiety of piperine was reported. Meanwhile, the biological activities and structure-activity relationship of piperine and its derivatives were also described. PMID:25553428

  11. Protein prenylation: unique fats make their mark on biology.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mei; Casey, Patrick J

    2016-02-01

    The modification of eukaryotic proteins by isoprenoid lipids, which is known as prenylation, controls the localization and activity of a range of proteins that have crucial functions in biological regulation. The roles of prenylated proteins in cells are well conserved across species, underscoring the biological and evolutionary importance of this lipid modification pathway. Genetic suppression and pharmacological inhibition of the protein prenylation machinery have provided insights into several cellular processes and into the aetiology of diseases in which prenylation is involved. The functional dependence of prenylation substrates, such as RAS proteins, on this modification and the therapeutic potential of targeting the prenylation process in pathological conditions accentuate the need to fully understand this form of post-translational modification. PMID:26790532

  12. The MmeI family: type II restriction–modification enzymes that employ single-strand modification for host protection

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Richard D.; Dwinell, Elizabeth A.; Bhatia, Tanya K.; Lang, Elizabeth M.; Luyten, Yvette A.

    2009-01-01

    The type II restriction endonucleases form one of the largest families of biochemically-characterized proteins. These endonucleases typically share little sequence similarity, except among isoschizomers that recognize the same sequence. MmeI is an unusual type II restriction endonuclease that combines endonuclease and methyltransferase activities in a single polypeptide. MmeI cuts DNA 20 bases from its recognition sequence and modifies just one DNA strand for host protection. Using MmeI as query we have identified numerous putative genes highly similar to MmeI in database sequences. We have cloned and characterized 20 of these MmeI homologs. Each cuts DNA at the same distance as MmeI and each modifies a conserved adenine on only one DNA strand for host protection. However each enzyme recognizes a unique DNA sequence, suggesting these enzymes are undergoing rapid evolution of DNA specificity. The MmeI family thus provides a rich source of novel endonucleases while affording an opportunity to observe the evolution of DNA specificity. Because the MmeI family enzymes employ modification of only one DNA strand for host protection, unlike previously described type II systems, we propose that such single-strand modification systems be classified as a new subgroup, the type IIL enzymes, for Lone strand DNA modification. PMID:19578066

  13. Bilingual Effects Are Not Unique, Only More Salient

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paradis, Michel

    2008-01-01

    I am in full agreement with Aneta Pavlenko's analysis of the data and her line of reasoning about emotion words and emotion concepts, but not with her claim that the findings are unique to the study of bilingualism, and that differential language emotionality is uniquely visible in bi- and multilingual speakers. I will argue that (i) emotion words…

  14. 13 CFR 120.344 - Unique requirements of the EWCP.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Unique requirements of the EWCP. 120.344 Section 120.344 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION BUSINESS LOANS Special Purpose Loans Export Working Capital Program (ewcp) § 120.344 Unique requirements of the EWCP....

  15. 45 CFR 162.506 - Standard unique health plan identifier.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Standard unique health plan identifier. 162.506 Section 162.506 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES ADMINISTRATIVE DATA STANDARDS AND RELATED REQUIREMENTS ADMINISTRATIVE REQUIREMENTS Standard Unique Health Identifier for Health Plans §...

  16. 13 CFR 120.344 - Unique requirements of the EWCP.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Unique requirements of the EWCP. 120.344 Section 120.344 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION BUSINESS LOANS Special Purpose Loans Export Working Capital Program (ewcp) § 120.344 Unique requirements of the EWCP....

  17. 13 CFR 120.344 - Unique requirements of the EWCP.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Unique requirements of the EWCP. 120.344 Section 120.344 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION BUSINESS LOANS Special Purpose Loans Export Working Capital Program (ewcp) § 120.344 Unique requirements of the EWCP....

  18. 13 CFR 120.344 - Unique requirements of the EWCP.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Unique requirements of the EWCP. 120.344 Section 120.344 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION BUSINESS LOANS Special Purpose Loans Export Working Capital Program (ewcp) § 120.344 Unique requirements of the EWCP....

  19. 13 CFR 120.344 - Unique requirements of the EWCP.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Unique requirements of the EWCP. 120.344 Section 120.344 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION BUSINESS LOANS Special Purpose Loans Export Working Capital Program (ewcp) § 120.344 Unique requirements of the EWCP....

  20. 15 CFR 748.8 - Unique application and submission requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Unique application and submission... APPLICATIONS (CLASSIFICATION, ADVISORY, AND LICENSE) AND DOCUMENTATION § 748.8 Unique application and... in this section are addressed in your license application. See Supplement No. 2 to this part 748...

  1. Salience of unique hues and implications for color theory

    PubMed Central

    Wool, Lauren E.; Komban, Stanley J.; Kremkow, Jens; Jansen, Michael; Li, Xiaobing; Alonso, Jose-Manuel; Zaidi, Qasim

    2015-01-01

    The unique hues—blue, green, yellow, red—form the fundamental dimensions of opponent-color theories, are considered universal across languages, and provide useful mental representations for structuring color percepts. However, there is no neural evidence for them from neurophysiology or low-level psychophysics. Tapping a higher prelinguistic perceptual level, we tested whether unique hues are particularly salient in search tasks. We found no advantage for unique hues over their nonunique complementary colors. However, yellowish targets were detected faster, more accurately, and with fewer saccades than their complementary bluish targets (including unique blue), while reddish-greenish pairs were not significantly different in salience. Similarly, local field potentials in primate V1 exhibited larger amplitudes and shorter latencies for yellowish versus bluish stimuli, whereas this effect was weaker for reddish versus greenish stimuli. Consequently, color salience is affected more by early neural response asymmetries than by any possible mental or neural representation of unique hues. PMID:25761328

  2. Salience of unique hues and implications for color theory.

    PubMed

    Wool, Lauren E; Komban, Stanley J; Kremkow, Jens; Jansen, Michael; Li, Xiaobing; Alonso, Jose-Manuel; Zaidi, Qasim

    2015-01-01

    The unique hues--blue, green, yellow, red--form the fundamental dimensions of opponent-color theories, are considered universal across languages, and provide useful mental representations for structuring color percepts. However, there is no neural evidence for them from neurophysiology or low-level psychophysics. Tapping a higher prelinguistic perceptual level, we tested whether unique hues are particularly salient in search tasks. We found no advantage for unique hues over their nonunique complementary colors. However, yellowish targets were detected faster, more accurately, and with fewer saccades than their complementary bluish targets (including unique blue), while reddish-greenish pairs were not significantly different in salience. Similarly, local field potentials in primate V1 exhibited larger amplitudes and shorter latencies for yellowish versus bluish stimuli, whereas this effect was weaker for reddish versus greenish stimuli. Consequently, color salience is affected more by early neural response asymmetries than by any possible mental or neural representation of unique hues. PMID:25761328

  3. Black-hole uniqueness theorems in Euclidean quantum gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Lapedes, A.S.

    1980-10-15

    The Euclidean section of the classical Lorentzian black-hole solutions has been used in approximating the functional integral in the Euclidean path-integral approach to quantum gravity. In this paper the claim that classical black-hole uniqueness theorems apply to the Euclidean section is disproved. In particular, it is shown that although a Euclidean version of Israel's theorem does provide a type of uniqueness theorem for the Euclidean Schwarzschild solution, a Euclidean version of Robinson's theorem does not allow one to form conclusions about the uniqueness of the Euclidean Kerr solution. Despite the failure of uniqueness theorems, ''no-hair'' theorems are shown to exist. Implications are discussed. A precise mathematical statement of the Euclidean black-hole uniqueness conjecture is made and the proof, left as an unsolved problem in Riemannian geometry.

  4. Review of Rule Modification in Sport

    PubMed Central

    Arias, Jose L.; Argudo, Francisco M.; Alonso, Jose I.

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this qualitative review was to analyze the state of the bibliography about rule modification in sport. In the literature reviewed, there are few studies of rule modification and related aspects. Most studies omit mentioning the purpose of the modifications, but they do refer to the goals of their analysis (improving players' performance, attracting spectators and athletes, attending to commercial pressure, adapting the sport to children’s needs and interests, preventing injuries). Eighty percent of the studies did not report the outcome of the previous modifications they analyzed. More than half of the studies (60%) achieved the proposed goals. Nearly two-thirds (63.83%) analyzed the effect of rule modification on game actions occurring during the game or through a test. Most of the studies (91.5%) did not consult the participants. Three-fourths of the studies (74.46%) examined the effect of rule modification without any knowledge of a previous analysis or without any previous analysis, and 74.47% studied rule modification related to internal logic. Modifications to be introduced in a sport should be analyzed through a reflective process before their final introduction. The following points should be considered: establishing goals, respecting the basic rules without modifying them, becoming familiar with players’ and coaches’ opinions, determining the effect of the modification on a wide spectrum of variables, elaborating useful proposals for the organizations that are responsible for competitions, using more than one type of data, modifying the internal logic and, preferably, the functional rules, and following some basic stages to consolidate rule modification. Key points Rule modification involves processes that seek change in the game conditions with a certain goal in mind. The rules related to internal logic model the game actions that are characteristic of a sport. Functional rules facilitate achieving the goals. There are few valid research studies on which to base the modifications. Modifications in a sport should be validated after a reflective process before they are introduced. PMID:24149289

  5. The partial retro-inverso modification: a road traveled together.

    PubMed

    Chorev, Michael

    2005-01-01

    In the mid-1970s, Dr. Murray Goodman was interested in a reversed peptide bond as a surrogate to understand the functional role of the amide bond in aspartame, a dipeptide sweetener. Very soon, realizing the breath and potential of this modification, Murray expanded this activity into a full program and I was fortunate to be part of it. Together we formulated new concepts such as the partially modified retro-inverso and end-group modified retro-inverso transformations, tested hypotheses, generated novel nomenclature, developed synthetic routes, characterized the preferred conformations of the unique building blocks employed in this modification, the gem-diaminoalkyl and the C2-substituted malonyl residues, and studied the biological activity of retro-inverso isomers of bioactive peptides. In the early 1980s several laboratories initiated extensive research targeted at the retro-inverso modification. The revival of this field led to new applications, new methods of synthesis, and new insights on the conformational and topological properties of the retro-inverso modification. Among the fields that embraced the retro-inverso concept were immunology as pertains to subjects such as synthetic vaccines, immunomodulators, and diagnostic tools, and drug delivery field as pertains to targeted and nontargeted cell permeation vectors loaded with bioactive cargo. Doctor Murray Goodman's sudden death leaves behind not only family, friends, and colleagues, but also an impressive record of scientific achievements among which is the revival of the modern era of the retro-inverso transformation. Murray's numerous contributions, excellent leadership, enthusiastic promotion, and outstanding teachings in this field will carry and illuminate his memory far into the future. PMID:15729688

  6. Antigenic protein modifications in Ehrlichia

    PubMed Central

    THOMAS, S; THIRUMALAPURA, N; CROSSLEY, E C; ISMAIL, N; WALKER, D H

    2009-01-01

    To develop effective vaccination strategies againstEhrlichia, we have previously reported developing an animal model of cross-protection in which C57BL/6 mice primed withE. muris were resistant to lethal infection withIxodes ovatus ehrlichia (IOE). Polyclonal antibody produced in mice after priming withE. muris and later injected with IOE-detected antigenic proteins inE. muris and IOE cell lysates. Cross-reaction of antigenic proteins was observed when we probed both theE. muris and IOE cell lysates with IOE andE. muris-specific polyclonal antibody. Analysis of the total proteins ofE. muris and IOE by two dimensional electrophoresis showed that bothE. muris and IOE have the same antigenic proteins. Finally, studies on post-translational protein modifications using a novel technique, Eastern blotting, showed thatE. muris proteins are more lipoylated and glycosylated than those of IOE. PMID:19493209

  7. Paper surface modification by lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zekou, E.; Kotsifaki, D. G.; Serafetinides, A. A.

    2010-10-01

    Lasers can provide a precious tool to conservation process due to their accuracy and the controlled energy they deliver, especially to fragile organic material such as paper. The current study concerns laser modification such as paper cleaning, initially of test papers artificially soiled and then of an original book of the early 20th Century. The test objects were A4 copier paper, newspaper, and paper Whatman No.1056. During the experiments, ink of a pen, pencil and ink from a stamp was mechanically employed on each paper surface. Laser cleaning was applied using a Q-switched Nd:YAG operating at 532 nm and CO2 laser at 10.6 μm for various fluences. The experimental results were presented by using optical microscopy. Eventually, laser cleaning of ink was performed to a book of 1934, by choosing the best conditions and parameters from cleaning the test samples, like Nd:YAG laser operating at 532 nm.

  8. Global Identification of Protein Post-translational Modifications in a Single-Pass Database Search

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Bottom-up proteomics database search algorithms used for peptide identification cannot comprehensively identify post-translational modifications (PTMs) in a single-pass because of high false discovery rates (FDRs). A new approach to database searching enables global PTM (G-PTM) identification by exclusively looking for curated PTMs, thereby avoiding the FDR penalty experienced during conventional variable modification searches. We identified over 2200 unique, high-confidence modified peptides comprising 26 different PTM types in a single-pass database search. PMID:26418581

  9. Changes in unique hues induced by chromatic surrounds.

    PubMed

    Klauke, Susanne; Wachtler, Thomas

    2016-03-01

    A chromatic surround can have a strong influence on the perceived hue of a stimulus. We investigated whether chromatic induction has similar effects on the perception of colors that appear pure and unmixed (unique red, green, blue, and yellow) as on other colors. Subjects performed unique hue settings of stimuli in isoluminant surrounds of different chromaticities. Compared with the settings in a neutral gray surround, unique hue settings altered systematically with chromatic surrounds. The amount of induced hue shift depended on the difference between stimulus and surround hues, and was similar for unique hue settings as for settings of nonunique hues. Intraindividual variability in unique hue settings was roughly twice as high as for settings obtained in asymmetric matching experiments, which may reflect the presence of a reference stimulus in the matching task. Variabilities were also larger with chromatic surrounds than with neutral gray surrounds, for both unique hue settings and matching of nonunique hues. The results suggest that the neural representations underlying unique hue percepts are influenced by the same neural processing mechanisms as the percepts of other colors. PMID:26974931

  10. Childhood remembered: Reports of both unique and repeated events.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Carole; Baker-Ward, Lynne; Grovenstein, Tiffany N

    2016-02-01

    To explore the significance of repeated memories for individuals' personal histories, we compared the characteristics of young adults' unique and repeated memories of childhood experiences. Memory type (unique vs. repeated) was a within-participant variable. In Experiment 1, college-age participants generated as many early memories as possible in 4 minutes; in Experiment 2, another sample provided complete reports of five early memories in each condition. In both experiments, participants rated the vividness, biographical importance and personal meaning of each memory and labelled the accompanying emotion. Unique memories were more vivid than repeated memories as well as more likely to include negative emotion, regardless of the method of reporting. Most importantly, college students rated their memories for unique and repeated events as equivalently infused with personal meaning. Analysis of the content of the memories reported in Experiment 2 established that unique and repeated memories did not differ in word count or percentages of perceptual terms or words indicating positive affect, although unique memories contained a greater percentage of negative affect. Additional analyses of content provided evidence for differences in the functions served by unique and repeated memories. The results have implications for the study of autobiographical memory and for identifying over-general memories. PMID:25647252

  11. On the Development of a Unique Arc Jet Test Apparatus for Control Surface Seal Evaluations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finkbeiner, Joshua R.; Dunlap, Patrick H., Jr.; Steinetz, Bruce M.; Robbie, Malcolm; Baker, Gus; Erker, Arthur

    2004-01-01

    NASA Glenn has developed a unique test apparatus capable of evaluating control surface seal and flap designs under simulated reentry heating conditions in NASA Johnson's arc jet test facility. The test apparatus is capable of testing a variety of seal designs with a variety of control surface materials and designs using modular components. The flap angle can be varied during testing, allowing modification of the seal environment while testing is in progress. The flap angle is varied using an innovative transmission system which limits heat transfer from the hot flap structure to the motor, all while keeping the components properly aligned regardless of thermal expansion. A combination of active and passive cooling is employed to prevent thermal damage to the test fixture while still obtaining the target seal temperature.

  12. Characterization of the binding interactions between a unique class of modified purines and the natural nucleobases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LaPointe, Shenna M.; Wetmore, Stacey D.

    2005-06-01

    Density-functional theory was used to study the hydrogen-bonding properties of a series of modified purines that contain unusual glycosylation positions. These unique molecules have been previously studied experimentally for their ability to behave as universal nucleobases, which must bind with an equal affinity to all natural DNA bases. The thermodynamics and kinetics for rotation about the glycosidic bond are considered since two hydrogen-bonding faces must be readily available for these molecules to bind with all natural nucleobases. The binding energies between modified and natural bases are also calculated. The present study provides support for the universal properties of some modified nucleobases and offers potential explanations for why other modifications do not bind indiscriminately.

  13. 75 FR 41530 - Petitions for Modification; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-16

    ...The Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) published a document in the Federal Register of June 17, 2010, concerning petitions for modification of existing safety standards. The document contains an under II. Petitions for Modification, Modification Request, paragraph 2. Docket Numbers: M-2010-024-C, M-2010-025-C, M-2010-026-C, M-2010- 027-C, and M-2010-028-C. Petitioners:......

  14. (Non)Uniqueness of critical points in variational data assimilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Graham

    2015-04-01

    In this paper we apply the 4D-Var data assimilation scheme to the initialization problem for a family of quasilinear evolution equations. The resulting variational problem is non-convex, so it need not have a unique minimizer. We comment on the implications of non-uniqueness for numerical applications, then prove uniqueness results in the following situations: (1) the observational times are sufficiently small; (2) the prior covariance is sufficiently small. We also give an example of a data set where the cost functional has a critical point of arbitrarily large Morse index, thus demonstrating that the geometry can be highly nonconvex even for a relatively mild nonlinearity.

  15. On the unique reconstruction of induced spherical magnetizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerhards, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Recovering spherical magnetizations m from magnetic field data in the exterior is a highly non-unique problem. A spherical Hardy–Hodge decomposition supplies information on what contributions of the magnetization m are recoverable but it does not supply geophysically suitable constraints on m that would guarantee uniqueness for the entire magnetization. In this paper, we focus on the case of induced spherical magnetizations and show that uniqueness is guaranteed if one assumes that the magnetization is compactly supported on the sphere. The results are based on ideas presented in (Baratchart et al 2013 Inverse Problems 29 015004) for the planar setting.

  16. Epigenetic Modifications and Plant Hormone Action.

    PubMed

    Yamamuro, Chizuko; Zhu, Jian-Kang; Yang, Zhenbiao

    2016-01-01

    The action of phytohormones in plants requires the spatiotemporal regulation of their accumulation and responses at various levels. Recent studies reveal an emerging relationship between the function of phytohormones and epigenetic modifications. In particular, evidence suggests that auxin biosynthesis, transport, and signal transduction is modulated by microRNAs and epigenetic factors such as histone modification, chromatin remodeling, and DNA methylation. Furthermore, some phytohormones have been shown to affect epigenetic modifications. These findings are shedding light on the mode of action of phytohormones and are opening up a new avenue of research on phytohormones as well as on the mechanisms regulating epigenetic modifications. PMID:26520015

  17. Lantibiotics: biosynthesis and biological activities of uniquely modified peptides from gram-positive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Sahl, H G; Bierbaum, G

    1998-01-01

    A plethora of novel gene-encoded antimicrobial peptides from animals, plants and bacteria has been described during the last decade. Many of the bacterial peptides possess modified building blocks such as thioethers and thiazoles or unsaturated and stereoinverted amino acids, which are unique among ribosomally made peptides. Genetic and biochemical studies of many of these peptides, mostly the so-called lantibiotics, have revealed the degree to which cells are capable of transforming peptides by posttranslational modification. The biosynthesis follows a general scheme: Precursor peptides are first modified and then proteolytically activated; the latter may occur prior to, concomitantly with or after export from the cell. The genes for the biosynthetic machinery are organized in clusters and include information for the antibiotic prepeptide, the modification enzymes and accessory functions such as dedicated proteases and ABC transporters as well as immunity factors and regulatory proteins. These fundamental aspects are discussed along with the biotechnological potential of the peptides and of the biosynthesis enzymes, which could be used for construction of novel, peptide-based biomedical effector molecules. PMID:9891793

  18. Medium-range restriction maps of five chromosomes of Leishmania infantum and localization of size-variable regions

    SciTech Connect

    Ravel, C.; Wincker, P.; Blaineau, C.

    1996-08-01

    This report describes the localization of the gene coding for human deoxyhypusine synthase (DHPS) to human chromosome 19p13.11-p13.12 using fluorescence in situ hybridization and somatic cell hybridization analysis. DHPS plays a vital role in the modification of hypusine. 10 refs., 1 fig.

  19. Uniqueness in inverse boundary value problems for fractional diffusion equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhiyuan; Imanuvilov, Oleg Yu; Yamamoto, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    We consider an inverse boundary value problem for diffusion equations with multiple fractional time derivatives. We prove the uniqueness in determining the number of fractional time-derivative terms, the orders of the derivatives and spatially varying coefficients.

  20. 221. View entering smart view. Note the unique snake rail ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    221. View entering smart view. Note the unique snake rail fence. The pond was a manipulated landscape element. - Blue Ridge Parkway, Between Shenandoah National Park & Great Smoky Mountains, Asheville, Buncombe County, NC

  1. Abdominal cocoon: a unique presentation in an immunodeficient infant.

    PubMed

    Browne, Lorna P; Patel, Jigar; Guillerman, R Paul; Hanson, Imelda C; Cass, Darrell L

    2012-02-01

    Abdominal cocoon is a rare disorder that may pose a diagnostic conundrum in patients presenting with intermittent symptoms of small bowel obstruction. We describe the imaging findings of a unique case of abdominal cocoon that presented in infancy. PMID:21713442

  2. Comparison of Bacillus monooxygenase genes for unique fatty acid production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper reviews Bacillus genes encoding monooxygenase enzymes producing unique fatty acid metabolites. Specifically, it examines standard monooxygenase electron transfer schemes and related domain structures of these fused domain enzymes on route to understanding the observed oxygenase activiti...

  3. Unique in the Crowd: The privacy bounds of human mobility

    PubMed Central

    de Montjoye, Yves-Alexandre; Hidalgo, César A.; Verleysen, Michel; Blondel, Vincent D.

    2013-01-01

    We study fifteen months of human mobility data for one and a half million individuals and find that human mobility traces are highly unique. In fact, in a dataset where the location of an individual is specified hourly, and with a spatial resolution equal to that given by the carrier's antennas, four spatio-temporal points are enough to uniquely identify 95% of the individuals. We coarsen the data spatially and temporally to find a formula for the uniqueness of human mobility traces given their resolution and the available outside information. This formula shows that the uniqueness of mobility traces decays approximately as the 1/10 power of their resolution. Hence, even coarse datasets provide little anonymity. These findings represent fundamental constraints to an individual's privacy and have important implications for the design of frameworks and institutions dedicated to protect the privacy of individuals. PMID:23524645

  4. Unique-sample selection via near-infrared spectral subtraction

    SciTech Connect

    Honigs, D.E.; Hieftje, G.M.; Mark, H.L.; Hirschfeld, T.B.

    1985-10-01

    A method is described and tested for improving the training sample set in near-infrared diffuse-reflectance analysis (NIRA). Utilizing linear algebra techniques similar to spectral subtraction, this method selects the most spectrally unique samples from those in a larger pool. Upon being analyzed, these spectrally unique samples are found to have a significantly larger variation in their chemical compositions than the pool of samples from which they were selected. When the spectrally unique samples are incorporated into a NIRA training set, the resulting calibration is improved in two ways: first, the larger variations in sample composition help to make a NIRA calibration more robust and less subject to unexpected variations in the sample matrix; second, use of the spectrally unique samples reduces the time and effort involved in developing a NIRA method of analysis. 13 references, 2 figures, 7 tables.

  5. New Guidelines for Reducing Stroke Risks Unique to Women

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Social Media Hub On Heart.org Learn More New guidelines for reducing stroke risks unique to women ... Bushnell, M.D., M.H.S., author of the new scientific statement published in the American Heart Association ...

  6. Denture identification using unique identification authority of India barcode

    PubMed Central

    Mahoorkar, Sudhindra; Jain, Anoop

    2013-01-01

    Over the years, various denture marking systems have been reported in the literature for personal identification. They have been broadly divided into surface marking and inclusion methods. In this technique, patient's unique identification number and barcode printed in the patient's Aadhaar card issued by Unique Identification Authority of India (UIDAI) are used as denture markers. This article describes a simple, quick, and economical method for identification of individual. PMID:23960418

  7. Uniqueness regime for Markov dynamics on quantum lattice spin systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crawford, N.; De Roeck, W.; Schütz, M.

    2015-10-01

    We consider a lattice of weakly interacting quantum Markov processes. Without interaction, the dynamics at each site is relaxing exponentially to a unique stationary state. With interaction, we show that there remains a unique stationary state in the thermodynamic limit, i.e. absence of phase coexistence, and the relaxation towards it is exponentially fast for local observables. We do not assume that the quantum Markov process is reversible (detailed balance) w.r.t. a local Hamiltonian.

  8. Uniqueness in the forensic identification sciences--fact or fiction?

    PubMed

    Page, Mark; Taylor, Jane; Blenkin, Matt

    2011-03-20

    Fingerprint analysts, firearms and toolmark examiners, and forensic odontologists often rely on the uniqueness proposition in order to support their theory of identification. However, much of the literature claiming to have proven uniqueness in the forensic identification sciences is methodologically weak, and suffers flaws that negate any such conclusion being drawn. The finding of uniqueness in any study appears to be an overstatement of the significance of its results, and in several instances, this claim is made despite contrary data being presented. The mathematical and philosophical viewpoint regarding this topic is that obtaining definitive proof of uniqueness is considered impossible by modern scientific methods. More importantly, there appears to be no logical reason to pursue such research, as commentators have established that uniqueness is not the essential requirement for forming forensic conclusions. The courts have also accepted this in several recent cases in the United States, and have dismissed the concept of uniqueness as irrelevant to the more fundamental question of the reliability of the forensic analysis. PMID:20832209

  9. Epigenetic Modifications during Angiosperm Gametogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Migicovsky, Zoë; Kovalchuk, Igor

    2012-01-01

    Angiosperms do not contain a distinct germline, but rather develop gametes from gametophyte initials that undergo cell division. These gametes contain cells that give rise to an endosperm and the embryo. DNA methylation is decreased in the vegetative nucleus (VN) and central cell nuclei (CCN) resulting in expression of transposable elements (TEs). It is thought that the siRNAs produced in response to TE expression are able to travel to the sperm cells and egg cells (EC) from VN and CCN, respectively, in order to enforce silencing there. Demethylation during gametogenesis helps ensure that even newly integrated TEs are expressed and therefore silenced by the resulting siRNA production. A final form of epigenetic control is modification of histones, which includes accumulation of the H3 variant HTR10 in mature sperm that is then completely replaced following fertilization. In females, the histone isoforms present in the EC and CCN differ, potentially helping to differentiate the two components during gametogenesis. PMID:22645573

  10. Bioactive Surface Modification of Hydroxyapatite

    PubMed Central

    Okazaki, Yohei; Hiasa, Kyou; Yasuda, Keisuke; Nogami, Keisuke; Mizumachi, Wataru; Hirata, Isao

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to establish an acid-etching procedure for altering the Ca/P ratio of the nanostructured surface of hydroxyapatite (HAP) by using surface chemical and morphological analyses (XPS, XRD, SEM, surface roughness, and wettability) and to evaluate the in vitro response of osteoblast-like cells (MC3T3-E1 cells) to the modified surfaces. This study utilized HAP and HAP treated with 10%, 20%, 30%, 40%, 50%, or 60% phosphoric acid solution for 10 minutes at 25°C, followed by rinsing 3 times with ultrapure water. The 30% phosphoric acid etching process that provided a Ca/P ratio of 1.50, without destruction of the grain boundary of HAP, was selected as a surface-modification procedure. Additionally, HAP treated by the 30% phosphoric acid etching process was stored under dry conditions at 25°C for 12 hours, and the Ca/P ratio approximated to 1.00 accidentally. The initial adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation (alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and relative mRNA level for ALP) of MC3T3-E1 cells on the modified surfaces were significantly promoted (P < 0.05 and 0.01). These findings show that the 30% phosphoric acid etching process for the nanostructured HAP surface can alter the Ca/P ratio effectively and may accelerate the initial adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation of MC3T3-E1 cells. PMID:23862150

  11. Characterization of Surface Modification of Polyethersulfone Membrane

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Surface modification of polyethersulfone (PES) membrane surface using UV/ozone-treated grafting and interfacial polymerization on membrane surface was investigated in order to improve the resistance of membrane surface to protein adsorption. These methods of surface modification were compared in te...

  12. UAE Teachers' Awareness & Perceptions of Testing Modifications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elhoweris, Hala; Alsheikh, Negmeldin

    2010-01-01

    The objectives of this study were threefold: (a) to determine whether the United Arab Emirates (UAE) general and special education teachers were making any specific testing modifications for students with disabilities; (b) to survey UAE general and special education teachers' perceptions of testing modifications in terms of their usefulness,…

  13. 40 CFR 60.304 - Modifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Modifications. 60.304 Section 60.304 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STANDARDS OF PERFORMANCE FOR NEW STATIONARY SOURCES Standards of Performance for Grain Elevators § 60.304 Modifications. (a) The factor 6.5 shall be used...

  14. 7 CFR 636.10 - Modifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Modifications. 636.10 Section 636.10 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATURAL RESOURCES CONSERVATION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LONG TERM CONTRACTING WILDLIFE HABITAT INCENTIVE PROGRAM § 636.10 Modifications. (a)...

  15. 7 CFR 636.10 - Modifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Modifications. 636.10 Section 636.10 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATURAL RESOURCES CONSERVATION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LONG TERM CONTRACTING WILDLIFE HABITAT INCENTIVES PROGRAM § 636.10 Modifications. (a)...

  16. 7 CFR 636.10 - Modifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Modifications. 636.10 Section 636.10 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATURAL RESOURCES CONSERVATION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LONG TERM CONTRACTING WILDLIFE HABITAT INCENTIVE PROGRAM § 636.10 Modifications. (a)...

  17. 7 CFR 636.10 - Modifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Modifications. 636.10 Section 636.10 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATURAL RESOURCES CONSERVATION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LONG TERM CONTRACTING WILDLIFE HABITAT INCENTIVE PROGRAM § 636.10 Modifications. (a)...

  18. 7 CFR 636.10 - Modifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Modifications. 636.10 Section 636.10 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATURAL RESOURCES CONSERVATION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LONG TERM CONTRACTING WILDLIFE HABITAT INCENTIVE PROGRAM § 636.10 Modifications. (a)...

  19. 30 CFR 44.53 - Amended modification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Amended modification. 44.53 Section 44.53 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR FILING AND OTHER ADMINISTRATIVE REQUIREMENTS RULES OF PRACTICE FOR PETITIONS FOR MODIFICATION OF MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS Effect of Initial Decision § 44.53...

  20. 30 CFR 44.53 - Amended modification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Amended modification. 44.53 Section 44.53 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR FILING AND OTHER ADMINISTRATIVE REQUIREMENTS RULES OF PRACTICE FOR PETITIONS FOR MODIFICATION OF MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS Effect of Initial Decision § 44.53...

  1. 30 CFR 44.53 - Amended modification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Amended modification. 44.53 Section 44.53 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR FILING AND OTHER ADMINISTRATIVE REQUIREMENTS RULES OF PRACTICE FOR PETITIONS FOR MODIFICATION OF MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS Effect of Initial Decision § 44.53...

  2. 30 CFR 44.53 - Amended modification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Amended modification. 44.53 Section 44.53 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR FILING AND OTHER ADMINISTRATIVE REQUIREMENTS RULES OF PRACTICE FOR PETITIONS FOR MODIFICATION OF MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS Effect of Initial Decision § 44.53...

  3. 30 CFR 44.53 - Amended modification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Amended modification. 44.53 Section 44.53 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR FILING AND OTHER ADMINISTRATIVE REQUIREMENTS RULES OF PRACTICE FOR PETITIONS FOR MODIFICATION OF MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS Effect of Initial Decision § 44.53...

  4. The Behavior Modification Audio-Visual Directory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilds, Thomas, Comp.

    Described in the directory are approximately 125 audiovisual aids that pertain to the area of behavior modification with handicapped children. It is explained that the audiovisuals were selected for their relevance to behavior modification steps such as keeping appropriate records and scheduling reinforcements. Entries are alphabetical within the…

  5. Behavior Modification: A Practical Guide for Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poteet, James A.

    This teachers guide in behavior modification is divided into five chapters. Chapter one, "Describing Behavior," presents methods for specifying behaviors in precise wording, labeling behavior, and deciding on the target behavior (behavior designated for modification). Chapter two, "Measuring Behavior," describes and illustrates by means of graphs…

  6. Behavior Modification in Secondary Schools: Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenson, William R.

    1978-01-01

    Reviews the use of behavior modification to control behavior problems in secondary schools. The literature reviewed demonstrates the effectiveness of behavior modification with both average and very difficult students. Describes behavioral techniques, such as group contingencies, home-based reinforcement systems, and contingency contracting, as…

  7. 30 CFR 282.25 - Plan modification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Plan modification. 282.25 Section 282.25... § 282.25 Plan modification. Approved Delineation, Testing, and Mining Plans may be modified upon the... to modify an approved plan to adjust to changed conditions. If the lessee requests the change,...

  8. 48 CFR 204.7106 - Contract modifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Contract modifications... SYSTEM, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE GENERAL ADMINISTRATIVE MATTERS Uniform Contract Line Item Numbering System 204.7106 Contract modifications. (a) If new items are added, assign new contract line or subline...

  9. 7 CFR 763.19 - Contract modification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Contract modification. 763.19 Section 763.19... AGRICULTURE SPECIAL PROGRAMS LAND CONTRACT GUARANTEE PROGRAM § 763.19 Contract modification. (a) The seller and buyer may modify the land contract to lower the interest rate and corresponding amortized...

  10. 36 CFR 251.61 - Modifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Modifications. 251.61 Section 251.61 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LAND USES Special Uses § 251.61 Modifications. (a) A holder shall file a new or amended application for a special...

  11. Modification of integrated partial payload lifting assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groah, Melodie; Haddock, Michael; Woodworth, Warren

    1986-01-01

    The Integrated Partial Payload Lifting Assembly (IPPLA) is currently used to transport and load experimental payloads into the cargo bay of the Space Shuttle. It is unable to carry the astronaut/passenger tunnel without a structural modification. The purpose of this design is to create a removalbe modification that will allow the IPPLA to lift and carry the passenger tunnel. Modifications evaluated were full-length insert beams which would extend through the existing strongback arms. These beam proposals were eliminated because of high cost and weight. Other proposals evaluated were attachments of cantilever beams to the existing strongback areas. The cantilever proposals reduced cost and weight compared to the full-length modifications. A third method evaluated was to simply make modifications to one side of the IPPLA therefore reducing the materials of the cantilever proposals by 40 percent. The design of the modification selected was completed with two channel beams jointly welded to a centered steel plate. The extension arm modification is inserted into the existing strongback channel beams and bolted into place. Two extension arms are added to one side of the IPPLA to provide the extra length needed to accommodate the passenger tunnel. The center counterbalance will then be offset about 20 inches to center gravity and therefore maintain horizontal status. The extension arm modification was selected because of minimum cost, low weight, and minimal installation time.

  12. The Modification of Compounds by Attributive Adjectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berg, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines the modification of nominal compounds by attributive adjectives in English. It draws on a distinction between compound-external (i.e. syntactic) and compound-internal (i.e. morphological) modification. An analysis is presented of more than 1000 pertinent cases, which are roughly equally divided into two-, three- and four-noun…

  13. 7 CFR 1467.13 - Modifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... AGRICULTURE LOANS, PURCHASES, AND OTHER OPERATIONS WETLANDS RESERVE PROGRAM § 1467.13 Modifications. (a... the program so long as the modification will not adversely affect the wetland functions and values for... of other lands that provide greater wetland functions and values at no additional cost to...

  14. 76 FR 1063 - Modifications of Debt Instruments

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-07

    ... FR 31736) that proposed amendments to Sec. 1.1001-3 to clarify the circumstances in which the credit... Internal Revenue Service 26 CFR Part 1 RIN 1545-BJ30 Modifications of Debt Instruments AGENCY: Internal... regulations relating to the modification of debt instruments. The regulations clarify the extent to which...

  15. Essential service water and charging system modifications

    SciTech Connect

    Brems, R.R.; Nemcic, K.S.

    1996-08-01

    Slovenia`s Krsko nuclear power plant (632 MWe Westinghouse, 2 loop PWR), which went into commercial operation in 1982, has recently completed two modifications that have solved some longstanding plant operational problems. The first modification was the installation, in June, 1994, of three self-cleaning strainers in the safety related essential service water system. The second modification was the replacement, in May, 1995, of the charging flow control valve. Because the valve had been improperly sized in the initial design, loss of automatic flow control had been a recurring plant problem, and the plug and trim had been replaced four times. This paper describes the problems leading to the decisions to make the modifications, and the design, installation, and testing that was done to perform and prove the modifications.

  16. Absolute quantitation of protein posttranslational modification isoform.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhu; Li, Ning

    2015-01-01

    Mass spectrometry has been widely applied in characterization and quantification of proteins from complex biological samples. Because the numbers of absolute amounts of proteins are needed in construction of mathematical models for molecular systems of various biological phenotypes and phenomena, a number of quantitative proteomic methods have been adopted to measure absolute quantities of proteins using mass spectrometry. The liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) coupled with internal peptide standards, i.e., the stable isotope-coded peptide dilution series, which was originated from the field of analytical chemistry, becomes a widely applied method in absolute quantitative proteomics research. This approach provides more and more absolute protein quantitation results of high confidence. As quantitative study of posttranslational modification (PTM) that modulates the biological activity of proteins is crucial for biological science and each isoform may contribute a unique biological function, degradation, and/or subcellular location, the absolute quantitation of protein PTM isoforms has become more relevant to its biological significance. In order to obtain the absolute cellular amount of a PTM isoform of a protein accurately, impacts of protein fractionation, protein enrichment, and proteolytic digestion yield should be taken into consideration and those effects before differentially stable isotope-coded PTM peptide standards are spiked into sample peptides have to be corrected. Assisted with stable isotope-labeled peptide standards, the absolute quantitation of isoforms of posttranslationally modified protein (AQUIP) method takes all these factors into account and determines the absolute amount of a protein PTM isoform from the absolute amount of the protein of interest and the PTM occupancy at the site of the protein. The absolute amount of the protein of interest is inferred by quantifying both the absolute amounts of a few PTM-site-independent peptides in the total cellular protein and their peptide yields. The PTM occupancy determination is achieved by measuring the absolute amounts of both PTM and non-PTM peptides from the highly purified protein sample expressed in transgenic organisms or directly isolated from an organism using affinity purification. The absolute amount of each PTM isoform in the total cellular protein extract is finally calculated from these two variables. Following this approach, the ion intensities given by mass spectrometers are used to calculated the peptide amounts, from which the amounts of protein isoforms are then deduced. In this chapter, we describe the principles underlying the experimental design and procedures used in AQUIP method. This quantitation method basically employs stable isotope-labeled peptide standards and affinity purification from a tagged recombinant protein of interest. Other quantitation strategies and purification techniques related to this method are also discussed. PMID:25930697

  17. Upconversion Nanoparticles: Synthesis, Surface Modification, and Biological Applications

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Meng; Abbineni, Gopal; Clevenger, April; Mao, Chuanbin; Xu, Shukun

    2011-01-01

    New generation fluorophores, also termed upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs), have the ability to convert near infrared radiations with lower energy into visible radiations with higher energy via a non-linear optical process. Recently, these UCNPs have evolved as alternative fluorescent labels to traditional fluorophores, showing great potential for imaging and biodetection assays in both in vitro and in vivo applications. UCNPs exhibit unique luminescent properties, including high penetration depth into tissues, low background signals, large Stokes shifts, sharp emission bands, and high resistance to photo-bleaching, making UCNPs an attractive alternative source for overcoming current limitations in traditional fluorescent probes. In this review, we discuss the recent progress in the synthesis and surface modification of rare earth doped UCNPs with a specific focus on their biological applications. PMID:21419877

  18. Modification of Doublet III to a large Dee facility

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, L.G.; Rawls, J.M.

    1981-10-01

    The Doublet III facility represents a unique opportunity to convert an existing device to a powerful test bed for FED design and operation issues. Such a conversion is made possible by virtue of the demountability of the devices toroidal field coils. Doublet III can be partially disassembled then reassembled with a large dee-shaped vacuum vessel and associated poloidal coils and structure. Doublet III presently possesses or is acquiring adequate auxiliary heating (14 MW of neutral beams and 2 MW of ECH), stored energy (3 GJ), and power conversion equipment (some added field shaping power equipment is required) to support large dee, reactor-level, plasma experiments. The only modifications required of the device are those directly caused by installing a larger vessel - the vessel itself (and its internal protection system); poloidal field coils that interfere with the larger vessel; and a support system for the new vessel and coils.

  19. Dynamics of Femtosecond Laser Modification Inside Fused Silica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witcher, Jonathan Jetty

    Femtosecond (fs) laser modification of transparent media provides great potential for the creation of a wide variety of novel optical devices. Progress in the creation of many devices has been limited by a lack of understanding of the mechanism behind the fs-laser modification process. To better understand the nature and behavior of fs-laser modification inside a transparent medium both the short and long time-scale dynamics of the modification process in fused silica were investigated in this thesis research. To measure short time-scale dynamics of the fs-laser generated plasma inside fused silica a novel, broadband fs pump-probe experiment was built with the broadband probe ranging from 500--1100 nm. In this setup a strongly focused, 800 nm, fs pump pulse is used to create a plasma, which is subsequently interrogated by the weak broadband probe. The time delay between pump and probe can be varied over a 1 ns range with a time resolution of 440 fs. Probe transmission measurements show that, as the energy of the modifying fs-laser pulse increases, the electron density remains capped at 4.0x10 21 cm-3, which is roughly the critical density associated with the pump wavelength of 800 nm, while the plasma size increases. The spectral shape of the probe transmission suggests that the plasmas generated in the experiments are "collisionless" with electron collision times > 500 fs. The experimental plasmas persist for longer than ˜1 ns after absorption of the fs-laser pulse. Plasma structure and emission characteristics depend on the pulse energy of the modifying fs-laser. At high pulse energies the structure within the plasma exhibits poor stability with very inhomogeneous emission characteristics. At lower pulse energies the fs-laser generated plasmas exhibit a stable "head and tail" structure with two distinct regions of emission: an intense, broad emission centered at 540 nm ("head" region) and a weaker, narrower emission centered at 475 nm ("tail" region). Long time-scale dynamics were studied by observing changes to fs-laser modified structures under various thermal annealing conditions. Using confocal fluorescence and Raman microscopy, changes in fs-laser induced non-bridging oxygen hole center (NBOHC) defects were monitored through their fluorescence at 650 nm, while changes in the glass network, specifically the concentration of 3-membered Si-O rings, were measured by the relative intensity of the 605 cm-1 Raman peak. NBOHC defects and the Si-O ring distributions of fs-laser modified structures return to levels of unmodified fused silica through thermal annealing. In both cases the required annealing temperatures are far below the glass transition temperature: 300 °C for NBOHCs and 900 °C for 3-membered Si-O rings. The disappearance of these defect and glass network changes is not always accompanied by the removal of the visible modification created by the fs-laser absorption. Under fs-laser conditions that produce "smooth" refractive index changes, suitable for optical waveguide writing, the visible structures return to that of the bulk glass. Under fs-laser conditions that result in visibly "rough" modification that includes cracks and exhibits strong scattering, the visible structure remains constant for annealing temperatures up to 900 °C even when the NBOHC and Si-O ring concentrations return to unmodified values. The design of the unique broadband pump-probe experiment allows for new, robust measurements of short time-scale plasma dynamics. Such short time-scale dynamics along with measurements of long time-scale dynamics and stability of the fs-laser induced modification improve the understanding of the fs-laser modification process.

  20. Conformation Effects of Base Modification on the Anticodon Stem-loop of Bacillus subtilis tRNATyr

    PubMed Central

    Denmon, Andria P.; Wang, Jiachen; Nikonowicz, Edward P.

    2011-01-01

    tRNA molecules contain 93 chemically unique nucleotide base modifications that expand the chemical and biophysical diversity of RNA and contribute to the overall fitness of the cell. Nucleotide modifications of tRNA confer fidelity and efficiency to translation and are important in tRNA-dependent RNA-mediated regulatory processes. The three-dimensional structure of the anticodon is crucial to tRNA-mRNA specificity and the diverse modifications of nucleotide bases in the anticodon region modulate this specificity. We have determined the solution structures and thermodynamic properties of B. subtilis tRNATyr anticodon arms containing the natural base modifications N6-dimethylallyl adenine (i6A37) and pseudouridine (ψ39). UV melting and differential scanning calorimetry indicate the modifications stabilize the stem and may enhance base stacking in the loop. The i6A37 modification disrupts the hydrogen bond network of the unmodified anticodon loop including a C32-A38+ base pair and an A37-U33 base-base interaction. Although the i6A37 modification increases the dynamic nature of the loop nucleotides, metal ion coordination re-establishes conformational homogeneity. Interestingly, the i6A37 modification and Mg2+ are sufficient to promote the U-turn fold of the anticodon loop of E. coli tRNAPhe, but these elements do not result in this signature feature of the anticodon loop in tRNATyr. PMID:21782828

  1. Novel modification of voice prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Al Kadah, Basel; Papaspyrou, George; Schneider, Mathias; Schick, Bernhard

    2016-03-01

    The undesired dilatation of the tracheooesophageal shunt after surgical implantation of voice prosthesis is a typical complication of this procedure. Temporary removal of the prosthesis and reinsertion after a short period of time is a first-line therapeutical option aiming shrinkage of the shunt. Failure of this measure generally is an indication of revision surgery. We present first experiences treating leakage problems with novel modified voice prosthesis without surgical intervention in specified cases. 11 patients (1 female, 10 male) aging between 51 and 71 years were presented with shunt leakage between 11/2008 and 11/2012 in the ENT-Department of the University Hospital of Homburg/Saar after a custom built voice prosthesis had been used initially successfully. A "Provox 2"(®) voice prosthesis was modified with two discs made of silicone each on the tracheal and oesophageal side and additionally reinforcing the diameter of the prosthesis by a silicone tube. The modified prosthesis was inserted in a retrograde way under general anesthesia, analogical to the approach used with the "Provox 1"(®)-prosthesis. The period of observation ranged between 12 and 48 months. As a measure of control swallowing of methylene blue was used. In all cases leakage suspended. Durability of the modified prosthesis ranged between 2 and 6 months. Neither the patients' complained about, nor did the physicians notice subjectively an impairment of the voice quality. Modifications of "Provox 2"(®)-prosthesis should be regarded in individual cases and constitute a reasonable alternative to revision surgery. A surgical approach is more intricate and costly, more taxing for the patient and susceptible to failure. We regard the necessity of general anesthesia for the insertion of the modified prosthesis as a disadvantage. PMID:26463715

  2. Surface modifications of dental implants.

    PubMed

    Stanford, C M

    2008-06-01

    Dental implant surface technologies have been evolving rapidly to enhance a more rapid bone formation on their surface and hold a potential to increase the predictability of expedited implant therapy. While implant outcomes have become highly predictable, there are sites and conditions that result in elevated implant loss. This paper reviews the impact of macro-retentive features which includes approaches to surface oxide modification, thread design, press-fit and sintered-bead technologies to increase predictability of outcomes. Implant designs that lead to controlled lateral compression of the bone can improve primary stability as long as the stress does not exceed the localized yield strength of the cortical bone. Some implant designs have reduced crestal bone loss by use of multiple cutting threads that are closely spaced, smoothed on the tip but designed to create a hoop-stress stability of the implant as it is completely seated in the osteotomy. Following the placement of the implant, there is a predictable sequence of bone turnover and replacement at the interface that allows the newly formed bone to adapt to microscopic roughness on the implant surface, and on some surfaces, a nanotopography (<10(-9) m scale) that has been shown to preferably influence the formation of bone. Newly emerging studies show that bone cells are exquisitely sensitive to these topographical features and will upregulate the expression of bone related genes for new bone formation when grown on these surfaces. We live in an exciting time of rapid changes in the modalities we can offer patients for tooth replacement therapy. Given this, it is our responsibility to be critical when claims are made, incorporate into our practice what is proven and worthwhile, and to continue to support and provide the best patient care possible. PMID:18498581

  3. Surface modification of semiconductor photoelectrodes.

    PubMed

    Guijarro, Néstor; Prévot, Mathieu S; Sivula, Kevin

    2015-06-28

    Photoelectrochemical (PEC) cells have emerged as promising devices that afford the direct conversion of solar energy into electric power and/or chemical fuels. Apart from the obvious importance of the bulk properties of semiconductor materials employed as photoelectrodes, the semiconductor-liquid interface has proven to strongly govern surface-related processes, i.e. the stability, charge separation/recombination and catalytic activity. Because of this, numerous surface treatments have been reported in an effort to tailor the physicochemical properties of the semiconductor-liquid interface, and in turn, the overall PEC response. In this Perspective article we provide a brief conceptual overview of these surface engineering treatments, connecting the particular effects on the interfacial energetics with the respective consequences on the performance. The beneficial effects that arise from surface treatment are categorized as (i) the protection of the surface against photocorrosion, (ii) the passivation of deleterious surface states, (iii) the modification of the band edge positions or band bending, and (iv) the selective extraction of carriers and improved catalytic activity. State-of-the-art surface treatments such as the adsorption of organic molecules or ions, the deposition of semiconductor overlayers and metal nanoparticles or etching procedures are exemplified and described with respect to the observed beneficial effects. A common emerging theme from recent work is that one single surface treatment can lead to multiple distinct effects. Overall, we suggest that surface engineering holds the key for effectively managing the intrinsic common defects of native semiconductor photoelectrodes regardless of their nature, leading to improved light harvesting efficiency. PMID:26030025

  4. Review of rule modification in sport.

    PubMed

    Arias, Jose L; Argudo, Francisco M; Alonso, Jose I

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this qualitative review was to analyze the state of the bibliography about rule modification in sport. In the literature reviewed, there are few studies of rule modification and related aspects. Most studies omit mentioning the purpose of the modifications, but they do refer to the goals of their analysis (improving players' performance, attracting spectators and athletes, attending to commercial pressure, adapting the sport to children's needs and interests, preventing injuries). Eighty percent of the studies did not report the outcome of the previous modifications they analyzed. More than half of the studies (60%) achieved the proposed goals. Nearly two-thirds (63.83%) analyzed the effect of rule modification on game actions occurring during the game or through a test. Most of the studies (91.5%) did not consult the participants. Three-fourths of the studies (74.46%) examined the effect of rule modification without any knowledge of a previous analysis or without any previous analysis, and 74.47% studied rule modification related to internal logic. Modifications to be introduced in a sport should be analyzed through a reflective process before their final introduction. The following points should be considered: establishing goals, respecting the basic rules without modifying them, becoming familiar with players' and coaches' opinions, determining the effect of the modification on a wide spectrum of variables, elaborating useful proposals for the organizations that are responsible for competitions, using more than one type of data, modifying the internal logic and, preferably, the functional rules, and following some basic stages to consolidate rule modification. Key pointsRule modification involves processes that seek change in the game conditions with a certain goal in mind.The rules related to internal logic model the game actions that are characteristic of a sport.Functional rules facilitate achieving the goals.There are few valid research studies on which to base the modifications.Modifications in a sport should be validated after a reflective process before they are introduced. PMID:24149289

  5. Silent Encoding of Chemical Post-Translational Modifications in Phage-Displayed Libraries.

    PubMed

    Tjhung, Katrina F; Kitov, Pavel I; Ng, Simon; Kitova, Elena N; Deng, Lu; Klassen, John S; Derda, Ratmir

    2016-01-13

    In vitro selection of chemically modified peptide libraries presented on phage, while a powerful technology, is limited to one chemical post-translational modification (cPTM) per library. We use unique combinations of redundant codons to encode cPTMs with "silent barcodes" to trace multiple modifications within a mixed modified library. As a proof of concept, we produced phage-displayed peptide libraries Ser-[X]4-Gly-Gly-Gly, with Gly and Ser encoded using unique combinations of codons (TCA-[X]4-GGAGGAGGA, AGT-[X]4-GGTGGTGGT, etc., where [X]4 denotes a random NNK library). After separate chemical modification and pooling, mixed-modified libraries can be panned and deep-sequenced to identify the enriched peptide sequence and the accompanying cPTM simultaneously. We panned libraries bearing combinations of modifications (sulfonamide, biotin, mannose) against matched targets (carbonic anhydrase, streptavidin, concanavalin A) to identify desired ligands. Synthesis and validation of sequences identified by deep sequencing revealed that specific cPTMs are significantly enriched in panning against the specific targets. Panning on carbonic anhydrase yielded a potent ligand, sulfonamide-WIVP, with Kd = 6.7 ± 2.1 nM, a 20-fold improvement compared with the control ligand sulfonamide-GGGG. Silent encoding of multiple cPTMs can be readily incorporated into other in vitro display technologies such as bacteriophage T7 or mRNA display. PMID:26683999

  6. Rapid End-Group Modification of Polysaccharides for Biomaterial Applications in Regenerative Medicine.

    PubMed

    Bondalapati, Somasekhar; Ruvinov, Emil; Kryukov, Olga; Cohen, Smadar; Brik, Ashraf

    2014-09-15

    Polysaccharides have emerged as important functional materials because of their unique properties such as biocompatibility, biodegradability, and availability of reactive sites for chemical modifications to optimize their properties. The overwhelming majority of the methods to modify polysaccharides employ random chemical modifications, which often improve certain properties while compromising others. On the other hand, the employed methods for selective modifications often require excess of coupling partners, long reaction times and are limited in their scope and wide applicability. To circumvent these drawbacks, aniline-catalyzed oxime formation is developed for selective modification of a variety of polysaccharides through their reducing end. Notably, it is found that for efficient oxime formation, different conditions are required depending on the composition of the specific polysaccharide. It is also shown how our strategy can be applied to improve the physical and functional properties of alginate hydrogels, which are widely used in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications. While the randomly and selectively modified alginate exhibits similar viscoelastic properties, the latter forms significantly more stable hydrogel and superior cell adhesive and functional properties. Our results show that the developed conjugation reaction is robust and should open new opportunities for preparing polysaccharide-based functional materials with unique properties. PMID:25220432

  7. Magnetic perturbations as a viable tool for edge turbulence modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vianello, N.; Rea, C.; Agostini, M.; Cavazzana, R.; Ciaccio, G.; De Masi, G.; Martines, E.; Mazzi, A.; Momo, B.; Spizzo, G.; Scarin, P.; Spolaore, M.; Zanca, P.; Zuin, M.; Carraro, L.; Innocente, P.; Marrelli, L.; Puiatti, M. E.; Terranova, D.

    2015-01-01

    A complete description of the effects of magnetic perturbation on the edge region of RFX-mod is here reported. The flexibility of the RFX-mod device [1] allows for the operation of the machine both as a reversed field pinch (RFP, with maximum current 2 MA) and as a low-current, circular ohmic tokamak (Ip,max = 0.15 MA). The present paper summarizes the most recent results obtained in both configurations with either spontaneous or induced edge radial magnetic perturbation. Emphasis will be devoted to the experimental characterization of the edge flow, focusing on the phase relation between flow and perturbed magnetic field. These informations are provided for natural and stimulated helical discharges in RFPs, and for tokamak safely operated, thanks to the unique RFX-mod MHD control system, in a wide range of edge safety factor 1.9 ? q(a) ? 3.4 with externally imposed helical boundary. For the first time a detailed comparison between this phenomenology in tokamaks and RFPs will be presented, providing experimental measurement of the streamline of E × B flow around the magnetic perturbation and of the density modulation which exhibits the same periodicity of the perturbation. Strong new indication of the modification of the small scale turbulence in presence of magnetic perturbation is reported: this modification is deeply connected to the variation of turbulence induced particle transport.

  8. Harnessing Redox Cross-Reactivity To Profile Distinct Cysteine Modifications.

    PubMed

    Majmudar, Jaimeen D; Konopko, Aaron M; Labby, Kristin J; Tom, Christopher T M B; Crellin, John E; Prakash, Ashesh; Martin, Brent R

    2016-02-17

    Cysteine S-nitrosation and S-sulfination are naturally occurring post-translational modifications (PTMs) on proteins induced by physiological signals and redox stress. Here we demonstrate that sulfinic acids and nitrosothiols react to form a stable thiosulfonate bond, and leverage this reactivity using sulfinate-linked probes to enrich and annotate hundreds of endogenous S-nitrosated proteins. In physiological buffers, sulfinic acids do not react with iodoacetamide or disulfides, enabling selective alkylation of free thiols and site-specific analysis of S-nitrosation. In parallel, S-nitrosothiol-linked probes enable enrichment and detection of endogenous S-sulfinated proteins, confirming that a single sulfinic acid can react with a nitrosothiol to form a thiosulfonate linkage. Using this approach, we find that hydrogen peroxide addition increases S-sulfination of human DJ-1 (PARK7) at Cys106, whereas Cys46 and Cys53 are fully oxidized to sulfonic acids. Comparative gel-based analysis of different mouse tissues reveals distinct profiles for both S-nitrosation and S-sulfination. Quantitative proteomic analysis demonstrates that both S-nitrosation and S-sulfination are widespread, yet exhibit enhanced occupancy on select proteins, including thioredoxin, peroxiredoxins, and other validated redox active proteins. Overall, we present a direct, bidirectional method to profile select redox cysteine modifications based on the unique nucleophilicity of sulfinic acids. PMID:26780921

  9. Modification Progress of the S-IC Test Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was originally designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage. Modifications to the S-IC Test Stand began in 1975 to accommodate space shuttle external tank testing. This photo depicts the continuation of the modification process as of July 14, 1975. The flame deflector originally used to provide water to the 5 F-1 engines of the S-IC stage during testing has been removed.

  10. Discovery of cell-type specific regulatory elements in the human genome using differential chromatin modification analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chen; Zhang, Shihua; Zhang, Xiang-Sun

    2013-01-01

    Chromatin modifications have been comprehensively illustrated to play important roles in gene regulation and cell diversity in recent years. Given the rapid accumulation of genome-wide chromatin modification maps across multiple cell types, there is an urgent need for computational methods to analyze multiple maps to reveal combinatorial modification patterns and define functional DNA elements, especially those are specific to cell types or tissues. In this current study, we developed a computational method using differential chromatin modification analysis (dCMA) to identify cell-type-specific genomic regions with distinctive chromatin modifications. We then apply this method to a public data set with modification profiles of nine marks for nine cell types to evaluate its effectiveness. We found cell-type-specific elements unique to each cell type investigated. These unique features show significant cell-type-specific biological relevance and tend to be located within functional regulatory elements. These results demonstrate the power of a differential comparative epigenomic strategy in deciphering the human genome and characterizing cell specificity. PMID:23945931

  11. Surface modification of a microcellular porous solid: carbon foam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhopadhyay, S. M.; Pulikollu, R. V.; Roy, A. K.

    2004-03-01

    Microcellular solids such as carbon foams offer unique advantages over traditional solids in many applications. However, since these structures are 80-90% porous, they have a high interface/volume ratio, and surface driven properties such as atmospheric tolerance and bond formation with the matrix material are crucial for applicability. This calls for controlled surface modification techniques that can tailor surface-related properties without compromising the desirable bulk properties of the material (graphite in this case). Several types of modification, using liquid-phase and plasma-phase treatments, have been investigated by this group. One of the goals is to improve composite formation. If a composite is to be made with the foam, it needs to be infiltrated with a matrix phase (e.g. epoxy for structural composite or metal for thermal composite). Enhanced infiltration of the matrix material and optimum bond-strength is achieved by surface treatments that increase chemical affinity between the two phases. Hydrophilic coatings that increase oxygen-functional groups on the surface are seen to be very effective. The second modification goal is to enhance the foam's durability as a stand-alone solid (such as in a lightweight sandwich structure or thermal dissipation foam). Coatings that incorporate moisture-repellent and chemically inert groups (such as fluorocarbons) achieve this. The following aspects of these coatings have been discussed: (a) chemistry of specific surface functional groups, (b) contact angle changes with water, and (c) infiltration of water (which is a predictor of infiltration of other polar compounds). The significance of these results to our understanding of composite interfaces and future fabrication issues has been discussed.

  12. Uniqueness of photon spheres in electro-vacuum spacetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cederbaum, Carla; Galloway, Gregory J.

    2016-04-01

    In a recent paper (Cederbaum C and Galloway G J 2015 Commun. Analysis Geom. at press), the authors established the uniqueness of photon spheres in static vacuum asymptotically flat spacetimes by adapting Bunting and Masood-ul-Alam’s proof of static vacuum black hole uniqueness. Here, we establish uniqueness of suitably defined sub-extremal photon spheres in static electro-vacuum asymptotically flat spacetimes by adapting the argument of Masood-ul-Alam (1992 Class. Quantum Grav. 9 L53-5). As a consequence of our result, we can rule out the existence of electrostatic configurations involving multiple ‘very compact’ electrically charged bodies and sub-extremal black holes.

  13. Flexible and efficient genome tiling design with penalized uniqueness score

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background As a powerful tool in whole genome analysis, tiling array has been widely used in the answering of many genomic questions. Now it could also serve as a capture device for the library preparation in the popular high throughput sequencing experiments. Thus, a flexible and efficient tiling array design approach is still needed and could assist in various types and scales of transcriptomic experiment. Results In this paper, we address issues and challenges in designing probes suitable for tiling array applications and targeted sequencing. In particular, we define the penalized uniqueness score, which serves as a controlling criterion to eliminate potential cross-hybridization, and a flexible tiling array design pipeline. Unlike BLAST or simple suffix array based methods, computing and using our uniqueness measurement can be more efficient for large scale design and require less memory. The parameters provided could assist in various types of genomic tiling task. In addition, using both commercial array data and experiment data we show, unlike previously claimed, that palindromic sequence exhibiting relatively lower uniqueness. Conclusions Our proposed penalized uniqueness score could serve as a better indicator for cross hybridization with higher sensitivity and specificity, giving more control of expected array quality. The flexible tiling design algorithm incorporating the penalized uniqueness score was shown to give higher coverage and resolution. The package to calculate the penalized uniqueness score and the described probe selection algorithm are implemented as a Perl program, which is freely available at http://www1.fbn-dummerstorf.de/en/forschung/fbs/fb3/paper/2012-yang-1/OTAD.v1.1.tar.gz. PMID:23216884

  14. Fetal alcohol syndrome and secondary schizophrenia: a unique neuropathologic study.

    PubMed

    Stoos, Catherine; Nelsen, Laura; Schissler, Kathryn A; Elliott, Amy J; Kinney, Hannah C

    2015-04-01

    We report the unique neuropathologic study of an adult brain of a patient with fetal alcohol syndrome who developed the well-recognized complication of schizophrenia in adolescence. The major finding was asymmetric formation of the lateral temporal lobes, with marked enlargement of the right superior temporal gyrus, suggesting that alcohol is preferentially toxic to temporal lobe patterning during gestation. Critical maturational changes unique to adolescence can unmask psychotic symptomatology mediated by temporal lobe pathology that has been clinically dormant since birth. Elucidating the neuropathologic basis of the secondary psychiatric disorders in fetal alcohol syndrome can help provide insight into their putative developmental origins. PMID:24563476

  15. DNA modifications in the mammalian brain

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Jaehoon; Ming, Guo-li; Song, Hongjun

    2014-01-01

    DNA methylation is a crucial epigenetic mark in mammalian development, genomic imprinting, X-inactivation, chromosomal stability and suppressing parasitic DNA elements. DNA methylation in neurons has also been suggested to play important roles for mammalian neuronal functions, and learning and memory. In this review, we first summarize recent discoveries and fundamental principles of DNA modifications in the general epigenetics field. We then describe the profiles of different DNA modifications in the mammalian brain genome. Finally, we discuss roles of DNA modifications in mammalian brain development and function. PMID:25135973

  16. Physical modification of polyetheretherketone for orthopedic implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Ya-Wei; Zhang, Li-Nan; Hou, Zeng-Tao; Ye, Xin; Gu, Hong-Sheng; Yan, Guo-Ping; Shang, Peng

    2014-12-01

    Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) is regarded as one of the most potential candidates for replacing current implant applications. To obtain good bone-implant interfaces, many modification methods have been developed to enable PEEK and PEEK-based composites from bio-inert to bioactive. Among them, physical methods have aroused significant attention and been widely used to modify PEEK for orthopedic implants. This review summarizes current physical modification techniques of PEEK for orthopedic applications, which include composite strategies, surface coating methods and irradiation treatments. The positive consequences of those modification methods will encourage continuing investigations and stimulate the wide range of applications of PEEK-based implants in orthopedics.

  17. Wing modification for increased spin resistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stough, H. P.; Dicarlo, D. J.; Stewart, E. C.

    1983-01-01

    A simple wing leading-edge modification has been developed that delays outer wing panel stall, thus maintaining roll damping to higher angles of attack and delaying the onset of autorotation. The stall angle of attack of the outer wing panel has been shown to be a function of the spanwise length of the leading-edge modification. The margin of spin resistance provided by the modification is being explored through flight tests. Preliminary results have been used to evaluate spin resistance in terms of the difference in angle of attack between outer wing panel stall and the maximum attainable angle of attack.

  18. Is Self-Assessment in Religious Education Unique?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks, Val; Fancourt, Nigel

    2012-01-01

    This paper addresses the question: is self-assessment in religious education unique? It first presents an overview of some challenges for assessment from subject differences, and then reviews the generic literature on self-assessment. It builds on earlier empirical research on self-assessment in religious education, carried out in an English state…

  19. Across the Nation: Unique Delivery and Inventive Approaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fick, Jill; McKeown, Patricia; Whiteside, Ann B.; Paneitz, Becky; Flemming, Sondra; Wolf, Toni; West-Sands, Leslie; Gray, Patricia M.; Orre, Deborah J.; Adams, Ann-Marie

    2004-01-01

    In this article, American Association of Community Colleges member institutions provide information on the collaborative efforts in allied health programs between their colleges and the communities they serve. These are but a fraction of the inventive and unique programs community colleges across the U.S. offer to support the health and wellness…

  20. [Child health nurse in prison, a unique experience].

    PubMed

    Girou, Sylvie

    2015-01-01

    A child health nurse from the mother and infant welfare protection service describes her work in prisons, with women prisoners and their children. A unique experience in which professionalism and emotion go hand in hand. Indeed, while prison is a place of detention, it can also be a place of care and support. PMID:26573402

  1. Uniqueness in the problem of an obstacle in oblique waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, Nikolay

    2003-03-01

    A solution to the linearized water-wave problem involving a pair of surface-piercing cylinders in oblique waves and infinite water depth is proved to be unique for certain geometric arrangements and frequencies in some interval above the cut-off frequency. To cite this article: N. Kuznetsov, C. R. Mecanique 331 (2003).

  2. PROBES, A SEARCH FOR UNIQUENESS OF THE COMMUNITY COLLEGE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    HUGHES, JAMES M.; AND OTHERS

    A COLLECTION OF STATEMENTS CONCERNING FUNDAMENTAL FUNCTIONS WHICH DISTINGUISH THE COMMUNITY COLLEGE FROM THE HIGH SCHOOL OR THE UNIVERSITY IS PRESENTED. THE UNIQUE NATURE OF THE COMMUNITY COLLEGE, ITS EDUCATIONAL ROLE, AND THE COLLEGE TO COMMUNITY RELATIONSHIPS ARE DISCUSSED AND ARCHITECTURAL IMPLICATIONS SUGGESTED. SUCH AREAS AS THE COMMUNITY…

  3. a Uniqueness Theorem for Second Order Elliptic Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meshkov, V. Z.

    1987-02-01

    A uniqueness theorem for the solutions of second order elliptic equations is proved on the basis of a Carleman-type inequality. The author's theorem covers earlier results in this direction obtained by Cordes, Aronszajn, and Hörmander, and is definitive in a certain sense.Bibliography: 11 titles.

  4. Meeting Each Student's Unique Potential: One Approach to Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gauld, Joseph W.

    1996-01-01

    By championing extrinsic motivation, the achievement-reward system short-circuits individuals' innate inner power. Achievement-oriented adults rely on their knowledge, skills, and abilities, not their deeper potential. Hyde School, in Bath, Maine, solves this problem by committing the entire school community to development of unique potential via…

  5. Is unique scaling of aquifer macrodispersivity supported by field data?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zech, A.; Attinger, S.; Cvetkovic, V.; Dagan, G.; Dietrich, P.; Fiori, A.; Rubin, Y.; Teutsch, G.

    2015-09-01

    Spreading of conservative solutes in groundwater due to aquifer heterogeneity is quantified by the macrodispersivity, which was found to be scale dependent. It increases with travel distance, stabilizing eventually at a constant value. However, the question of its asymptotic behavior at very large scale is still a matter of debate. It was surmised in the literature that macrodispersivity scales up following a unique scaling law. Attempts to define such a law were made by fitting a regression line in the log-log representation of an ensemble of macrodispersivities from multiple experiments. The functional relationships differ among the authors, based on the choice of data. Our study revisits the data basis, used for inferring unique scaling, through a detailed analysis of literature marcodispersivities. In addition, values were collected from the most recent tracer tests reported in the literature. We specified a system of criteria for reliability and reevaluated the reliability of the reported values. The final collection of reliable estimates of macrodispersivity does not support a unique scaling law relationship. On the contrary, our results indicate, that the field data can be explained as a collection of macrodispersivities of aquifers with varying degree of heterogeneity where each exhibits its own constant asymptotic value. Our investigation concludes that transport, and particularly the macrodispersivity, is formation-specific, and that modeling of transport cannot be relegated to a unique scaling law. Instead, transport requires characterization of aquifer properties, e.g., spatial distribution of hydraulic conductivity, and the use of adequate models.

  6. Quality improvement in EMS: a unique and challenging necessity.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Devin; Choi, Bryan; Sullivan, Francis; Williams, Kenneth A

    2014-08-01

    Quality Improvement (QI) is required in all aspects of the healthcare field. Emergency Medical Services (EMS) poses unique QI challenges. This article explores some of these challenges and provides some points to consider when performing QI in EMS services. PMID:25083952

  7. SAFETY TESTING OF 2-ALKYLCYCLOBYTANONES- UNIQUE RADIOLYTIC PRODUCTS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Treatment of foods containing fatty acids, including meat and poultry, with ionizing radiation can lead to the formation of a class of chemicals called 2-alkylcyclobutanones (2-ACBs) that are unique to irradiated foods. The major 2-ACB formed in irradiated meat is 2 dodecylcyclobutanone (2-DCB), wh...

  8. Differentiating Performance Approach Goals and Their Unique Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Ordene V.

    2014-01-01

    The study differentiates between two types of performance approach goals (competence demonstration performance approach goal and normative performance approach goal) by examining their unique effects on self-efficacy, interest, and fear of failure. Seventy-nine students completed questionnaires that measure performance approach goals,…

  9. What Is Valuable and Unique about the Educational Psychologist?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashton, Rebecca; Roberts, Elizabeth

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes a small-scale piece of research identifying which aspects of the EP role are considered valuable by SENCos and by EPs themselves. In addition, both groups were asked to identify whether they felt these aspects were uniquely offered by EPs or whether other professionals offered similar or identical services. The differences…

  10. 76 FR 39234 - Federal Acquisition Regulation; Unique Procurement Instrument Identifier

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-05

    .... Background DoD, GSA, and NASA published a proposed rule in the Federal Register at 75 FR 50731 on August 17... Federal Acquisition Regulation; Unique Procurement Instrument Identifier AGENCIES: Department of Defense...). ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: DoD, GSA, and NASA are issuing a final rule amending the Federal...

  11. Unique Sensor Plane Maps Invisible Toxins for First Responders

    SciTech Connect

    2008-04-30

    A unique airborne emergency response tool, ASPECT is a Los Alamos/U.S. Environmental Protection Agency project that can put chemical and radiological mapping tools in the air over an accident scene. The name ASPECT is an acronym for Airborne Spectral Photometric Environmental Collection Technology.

  12. The Uniqueness of EFL Teachers: Perceptions of Japanese Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Joseph J.

    2010-01-01

    Building on the work of Borg (2006), this article reports on a study of Japanese English as a foreign language (EFL) learners' perceptions of some of the unique characteristics of EFL teachers that distinguish them from teachers of other subjects. The data were collected by means of a questionnaire to which 163 college-level EFL students in Japan…

  13. Females with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders: Unique Considerations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Darcy; And Others

    This paper offers profiles of females with behavioral/emotional disorders and suggests that these young women have unique needs. The paper discusses selected characteristics and assessment considerations and offers recommendations that will facilitate more responsive social, correctional, and educational programming. Characteristics of these young…

  14. Debating Historical Propositions: Toward a Unique Genre of NEDA Debate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, David K.

    The best way to develop a unique identity for the National Education Debate Association (NEDA) is to debate propositions distinct from National Debate Tournament (NDT) and the Cross Examination Debate Association (CEDA). A neglected area of debate includes propositions temporally framed in the past. Yet, the present propositional categories of…

  15. The unique kidney of the spider monkey (Ateles geoffroyi).

    PubMed

    Goodman, J R; Wolf, R H; Roberts, J A

    1977-01-01

    Among nonhuman primates, the renal anatomy of the spider monkey (Ateles geoffroyi) is unique, as it is multipyramidal and multipapillary. Renal function parameters (glomerular filtration rate, renal plasma flow, and concentrating ability) are compared to man and other primates. The kidneys of the spider monkey are similar both anatomically and functionally to man. PMID:412972

  16. Unique Factorization in Cyclotomic Integers of Degree Seven

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duckworth, W. Ethan

    2008-01-01

    This article provides a survey of some basic results in algebraic number theory and applies this material to prove that the cyclotomic integers generated by a seventh root of unity are a unique factorization domain. Part of the proof uses the computer algebra system Maple to find and verify factorizations. The proofs use a combination of historic…

  17. Anisotropic uniqueness classes for a degenerate parabolic equation

    SciTech Connect

    Vil'danova, V F; Mukminov, F Kh

    2013-11-30

    Anisotropic uniqueness classes of Tacklind type are identified for a degenerate linear parabolic equation of the second order in an unbounded domain. The Cauchy problem and mixed problems with boundary conditions of the first and third type are considered. Bibliography: 18 titles.

  18. 48 CFR 552.211-93 - Unique Item Identification (UID).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Unique Item Identification (UID). 552.211-93 Section 552.211-93 Federal Acquisition Regulations System GENERAL SERVICES... personal property in accordance with DFARS 211.274-4 as requested by the Defense Logistics Agency (DLA)...

  19. Unique Sensor Plane Maps Invisible Toxins for First Responders

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2010-01-08

    A unique airborne emergency response tool, ASPECT is a Los Alamos/U.S. Environmental Protection Agency project that can put chemical and radiological mapping tools in the air over an accident scene. The name ASPECT is an acronym for Airborne Spectral Photometric Environmental Collection Technology.

  20. Unique Invulnerability: A Classroom Demonstration in Estimating Personal Morality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snyder, C. R.

    1997-01-01

    Describes a class experiment illustrating students' illusions about their own mortality (often referred to as "unique invulnerability"). The students received information, culled from actuarial tables, concerning age and mortality rates. The students consistently overestimated their own age of death even when told they would do so. (MJP)

  1. 40 CFR 72.81 - Permit modifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... compliance deadline extension; and (5) Changes in a thermal energy plan that result in any addition or... replacement of thermal energy. (c)(1) Permit modifications shall follow the permit issuance requirements...

  2. Post-Translational Modifications of TRP Channels

    PubMed Central

    Voolstra, Olaf; Huber, Armin

    2014-01-01

    Transient receptor potential (TRP) channels constitute an ancient family of cation channels that have been found in many eukaryotic organisms from yeast to human. TRP channels exert a multitude of physiological functions ranging from Ca2+ homeostasis in the kidney to pain reception and vision. These channels are activated by a wide range of stimuli and undergo covalent post-translational modifications that affect and modulate their subcellular targeting, their biophysical properties, or channel gating. These modifications include N-linked glycosylation, protein phosphorylation, and covalent attachment of chemicals that reversibly bind to specific cysteine residues. The latter modification represents an unusual activation mechanism of ligand-gated ion channels that is in contrast to the lock-and-key paradigm of receptor activation by its agonists. In this review, we summarize the post-translational modifications identified on TRP channels and, when available, explain their physiological role. PMID:24717323

  3. 40 CFR 72.81 - Permit modifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... compliance deadline extension; and (5) Changes in a thermal energy plan that result in any addition or... replacement of thermal energy. (c)(1) Permit modifications shall follow the permit issuance requirements...

  4. 25 CFR 134.7 - Modifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... INDIAN IRRIGATION PROJECTS § 134.7 Modifications. The act of July 1, 1932 (47 Stat. 564; 25 U.S.C. 386a), cancelled all irrigation assessments for construction costs against lands in Indian ownership which...

  5. 25 CFR 134.7 - Modifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... INDIAN IRRIGATION PROJECTS § 134.7 Modifications. The act of July 1, 1932 (47 Stat. 564; 25 U.S.C. 386a), cancelled all irrigation assessments for construction costs against lands in Indian ownership which...

  6. 40 CFR 58.14 - System modification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) AMBIENT AIR QUALITY SURVEILLANCE Monitoring Network § 58.14 System modification. (a) The State, or where appropriate local, agency shall develop and implement a plan and schedule to modify the ambient air...

  7. 40 CFR 58.14 - System modification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) AMBIENT AIR QUALITY SURVEILLANCE Monitoring Network § 58.14 System modification. (a) The State, or where appropriate local, agency shall develop and implement a plan and schedule to modify the ambient air...

  8. 40 CFR 58.14 - System modification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) AMBIENT AIR QUALITY SURVEILLANCE Monitoring Network § 58.14 System modification. (a) The State, or where appropriate local, agency shall develop and implement a plan and schedule to modify the ambient air...

  9. 40 CFR 58.14 - System modification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) AMBIENT AIR QUALITY SURVEILLANCE Monitoring Network § 58.14 System modification. (a) The State, or where appropriate local, agency shall develop and implement a plan and schedule to modify the ambient air...

  10. A-1 modification work under way

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Phil Schemanski of Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne removes equipment inside the thrust drum on the A-1 Test Stand as part of a comprehensive modification project to prepare for testing the new J-2X engine.

  11. 30 CFR 582.25 - Plan modification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... change, the lessee shall submit a detailed, written statement of the proposed modifications, potential impacts, and the justification for the proposed changes. Revision of an approved plan whether initiated...

  12. 30 CFR 582.25 - Plan modification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... change, the lessee shall submit a detailed, written statement of the proposed modifications, potential impacts, and the justification for the proposed changes. Revision of an approved plan whether initiated...

  13. 30 CFR 582.25 - Plan modification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... change, the lessee shall submit a detailed, written statement of the proposed modifications, potential impacts, and the justification for the proposed changes. Revision of an approved plan whether initiated...

  14. 7 CFR 987.35 - Modifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... RIVERSIDE COUNTY, CALIFORNIA Order Regulating Handling Marketing Policy § 987.35 Modifications. In the event the Committee subsequently determines that the marketing policy should be modified due to changing... Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing...

  15. Histone modifications in DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Cao, Lin-Lin; Shen, Changchun; Zhu, Wei-Guo

    2016-03-01

    DNA damage is a relatively common event in eukaryotic cell and may lead to genetic mutation and even cancer. DNA damage induces cellular responses that enable the cell either to repair the damaged DNA or cope with the damage in an appropriate way. Histone proteins are also the fundamental building blocks of eukaryotic chromatin besides DNA, and many types of post-translational modifications often occur on tails of histones. Although the function of these modifications has remained elusive, there is ever-growing studies suggest that histone modifications play vital roles in several chromatin-based processes, such as DNA damage response. In this review, we will discuss the main histone modifications, and their functions in DNA damage response. PMID:26825946

  16. Sustainable environmental nanotechnology using nanoparticle surface modification.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Reactive nanomaterials used for environmental remediation require surface modification to make them mobile in the subsurface. Nanomaterials released into the environment inadvertently without an engineered surface coating will acquire one (e.g. adsorption of natural organic matt...

  17. 47 CFR 25.118 - Modifications not requiring prior authorization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ....118 Modifications not requiring prior authorization. (a) Earth station license modifications, notification required. Authorized earth station operators may make the following modifications to their... of part 1, subpart Y of this chapter: (1) Licensees may make changes to their authorized...

  18. 47 CFR 25.118 - Modifications not requiring prior authorization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ....118 Modifications not requiring prior authorization. (a) Earth station license modifications, notification required. Authorized earth station operators may make the following modifications to their... of part 1, subpart Y of this chapter: (1) Licensees may make changes to their authorized...

  19. 47 CFR 25.118 - Modifications not requiring prior authorization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ....118 Modifications not requiring prior authorization. (a) Earth station license modifications, notification required. Authorized earth station operators may make the following modifications to their... of part 1, subpart Y of this chapter: (1) Licensees may make changes to their authorized...

  20. 47 CFR 25.118 - Modifications not requiring prior authorization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ....118 Modifications not requiring prior authorization. (a) Earth station license modifications, notification required. Authorized earth station operators may make the following modifications to their... of part 1, subpart Y of this chapter: (1) Licensees may make changes to their authorized...

  1. 47 CFR 25.118 - Modifications not requiring prior authorization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ....118 Modifications not requiring prior authorization. (a) Earth station license modifications, notification required. Authorized earth station operators may make the following modifications to their... of part 1, subpart Y of this chapter: (1) Licensees may make changes to their authorized...

  2. Targeted genome modification via triple helix formation.

    PubMed

    Ricciardi, Adele S; McNeer, Nicole A; Anandalingam, Kavitha K; Saltzman, W Mark; Glazer, Peter M

    2014-01-01

    Triplex-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) are capable of coordinating genome modification in a targeted, site-specific manner, causing mutagenesis or even coordinating homologous recombination events. Here, we describe the use of TFOs such as peptide nucleic acids for targeted genome modification. We discuss this method and its applications and describe protocols for TFO design, delivery, and evaluation of activity in vitro and in vivo. PMID:25030921

  3. Distribution of histone H4 modifications as revealed by a panel of specific monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Hayashi-Takanaka, Yoko; Maehara, Kazumitsu; Harada, Akihito; Umehara, Takashi; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Obuse, Chikashi; Ohkawa, Yasuyuki; Nozaki, Naohito; Kimura, Hiroshi

    2015-12-01

    Post-translational histone modifications play a critical role in genome functions such as epigenetic gene regulation and genome maintenance. The tail of the histone H4 N-terminus contains several amino acids that can be acetylated and methylated. Some of these modifications are known to undergo drastic changes during the cell cycle. In this study, we generated a panel of mouse monoclonal antibodies against histone H4 modifications, including acetylation at K5, K8, K12, and K16, and different levels of methylation at K20. Their specificity was evaluated by ELISA and immunoblotting using synthetic peptide and recombinant proteins that harbor specific modifications or amino acid substitutions. Immunofluorescence confirmed the characteristic distributions of target modifications. An H4K5 acetylation (H4K5ac)-specific antibody CMA405 reacted with K5ac only when the neighboring K8 was unacetylated. This unique feature allowed us to detect newly assembled H4, which is diacetylated at K5 and K12, and distinguish it from hyperacetylated H4, where K5 and K8 are both acetylated. Chromatin immunoprecipiation combined with deep sequencing (ChIP-seq) revealed that acetylation of both H4K8 and H4K16 were enriched around transcription start sites. These extensively characterized and highly specific antibodies will be useful for future epigenetics and epigenome studies. PMID:26343042

  4. Epigenetic Modifications of Histones in Periodontal Disease.

    PubMed

    Martins, M D; Jiao, Y; Larsson, L; Almeida, L O; Garaicoa-Pazmino, C; Le, J M; Squarize, C H; Inohara, N; Giannobile, W V; Castilho, R M

    2016-02-01

    Periodontitis is a chronic infectious disease driven by dysbiosis, an imbalance between commensal bacteria and the host organism. Periodontitis is a leading cause of tooth loss in adults and occurs in about 50% of the US population. In addition to the clinical challenges associated with treating periodontitis, the progression and chronic nature of this disease seriously affect human health. Emerging evidence suggests that periodontitis is associated with mechanisms beyond bacteria-induced protein and tissue degradation. Here, we hypothesize that bacteria are able to induce epigenetic modifications in oral epithelial cells mediated by histone modifications. In this study, we found that dysbiosis in vivo led to epigenetic modifications, including acetylation of histones and downregulation of DNA methyltransferase 1. In addition, in vitro exposure of oral epithelial cells to lipopolysaccharides resulted in histone modifications, activation of transcriptional coactivators, such as p300/CBP, and accumulation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB). Given that oral epithelial cells are the first line of defense for the periodontium against bacteria, we also evaluated whether activation of pathogen recognition receptors induced histone modifications. We found that activation of the Toll-like receptors 1, 2, and 4 and the nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain protein 1 induced histone acetylation in oral epithelial cells. Our findings corroborate the emerging concept that epigenetic modifications play a role in the development of periodontitis. PMID:26496800

  5. LincRNAs and base modifications of p53 induced by arsenic methylation in workers.

    PubMed

    Wen, Weihua; Lu, Lin; He, Yuefeng; Cheng, Huirong; He, Fang; Cao, Shuqiao; Li, Liang; Xiong, Li; Wu, Tangchun

    2016-02-25

    Arsenic (As) metabolites could induce methylation changes of DNA and base modifications of p53, which play role in the toxicity of As. LincRNAs should play a key regulatory role in the p53 transcriptional response. There were 43 workers producing As trioxide, 36 workers who stopped exposure to As trioxide about 85 days ago, and 24 individuals as control group. Three As species in urine were measured, and primary and secondary methylation indexes, iAs%, MMA% and DMA% were calculated. RT-PCR was performed to detect the expression of 7 LincRNAs and the base modifications of exon 5, 6, 7, and 8 of p53. The concentrations of urinary As were high in workers. Compared to control group, significant changes for 5 LincRNAs in workers producing As trioxide were found (P < 0.05), and there were significant base modifications of p53 in workers came from the two plants (P < 0.05). There exist various correlations between different exon base modifications of p53 and expressions of LincRNAs (P < 0.05). The closely positive correlations between MMA/DMA and MEG3/TUG1/HOTAIR/MALAT1 were found, but negative correlation between DMA/MALAT1 and the base modifications of exon 7 and 8 of p53 were found also (P < 0.05). LincRNAs and base modifications of p53 could be induced by As, MALAT1 and the base modifications of exon 7 and 8 of p53 could play unique roles in epigenic changes. These findings suggest potentially widespread roles of p53 and relative RNAs in arsenic workers, which may be caused by As metabolism. PMID:26772154

  6. Unique amino acids cluster for switching from the dehydrogenase to oxidase form of xanthine oxidoreductase.

    PubMed

    Kuwabara, Yoshimitsu; Nishino, Tomoko; Okamoto, Ken; Matsumura, Tomohiro; Eger, Bryan T; Pai, Emil F; Nishino, Takeshi

    2003-07-01

    In mammals, xanthine oxidoreductase is synthesized as a dehydrogenase (XDH) but can be readily converted to its oxidase form (XO) either by proteolysis or modification of cysteine residues. The crystal structures of bovine milk XDH and XO demonstrated that atoms in the highly charged active-site loop (Gln-423-Lys-433) around the FAD cofactor underwent large dislocations during the conversion, blocking the approach of the NAD+ substrate to FAD in the XO form as well as changing the electrostatic environment around FAD. Here we identify a unique cluster of amino acids that plays a dual role by forming the core of a relay system for the XDH/XO transition and by gating a solvent channel leading toward the FAD ring. A more detailed structural comparison and site-directed mutagenesis analysis experiments showed that Phe-549, Arg-335, Trp-336, and Arg-427 sit at the center of a relay system that transmits modifications of the linker peptide by cysteine oxidation or proteolytic cleavage to the active-site loop (Gln-423-Lys-433). The tight interactions of these residues are crucial in the stabilization of the XDH conformation and for keeping the solvent channel closed. Both oxidative and proteolytic generation of XO effectively leads to the removal of Phe-549 from the cluster causing a reorientation of the bulky side chain of Trp-336, which then in turn forces a dislocation of Arg-427, an amino acid located in the active-site loop. The conformational change also opens the gate for the solvent channel, making it easier for oxygen to reach the reduced FAD in XO. PMID:12817083

  7. The unique properties of polyurethane foam for small engine filters

    SciTech Connect

    Pizzirusso, J.F.

    1995-12-31

    The properties of reticulated polyurethane foam have been investigated to determine its suitability as a small engine filter system. Polyurethane foam is useful in small engine filter systems due to the ease of manufacturing, freedom in geometric design, variable physical properties, and ease of property modification and filter enhancement through the use of composite materials and coatings. The results of this study will give direction to the filtration designer to optimize the selection of the proper polyurethane foam or foam combinations along with the geometric configuration to obtain a suitable design.

  8. Uniqueness of black holes with bubbles in minimal supergravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armas, Jay

    2015-02-01

    We generalize uniqueness theorems for non-extremal black holes with three mutually independent Killing vector fields in five-dimensional minimal supergravity in order to account for the existence of non-trivial two-cycles in the domain of outer communication. The black hole space-times we consider may contain multiple disconnected horizons and be asymptotically flat or asymptotically Kaluza-Klein. We show that in order to uniquely specify the black hole space-time, besides providing its domain structure and a set of asymptotic and local charges, it is necessary to measure the magnetic fluxes that support the two-cycles as well as fluxes in the two semi-infinite rotation planes of the domain diagram.

  9. Resistive Network Optimal Power Flow: Uniqueness and Algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, CW; Cai, DWH; Lou, X

    2015-01-01

    The optimal power flow (OPF) problem minimizes the power loss in an electrical network by optimizing the voltage and power delivered at the network buses, and is a nonconvex problem that is generally hard to solve. By leveraging a recent development on the zero duality gap of OPF, we propose a second-order cone programming convex relaxation of the resistive network OPF, and study the uniqueness of the optimal solution using differential topology, especially the Poincare-Hopf Index Theorem. We characterize the global uniqueness for different network topologies, e.g., line, radial, and mesh networks. This serves as a starting point to design distributed local algorithms with global behaviors that have low complexity, are computationally fast, and can run under synchronous and asynchronous settings in practical power grids.

  10. Discovery and characterization of a unique mycobacterial heme acquisition system

    PubMed Central

    Harmston, Christine A.; Owens, Cedric P.; Chim, Nicholas; Morse, Robert P.; McMath, Lisa M.; Iniguez, Angelina; Kimmey, Jacqueline M.; Sawaya, Michael R.; Whitelegge, Julian P.; Horwitz, Marcus A.; Goulding, Celia W.

    2011-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis must import iron from its host for survival, and its siderophore-dependent iron acquisition pathways are well established. Here we demonstrate a newly characterized pathway, whereby M. tuberculosis can use free heme and heme from hemoglobin as an iron source. Significantly, we identified the genomic region, Rv0202c–Rv0207c, responsible for the passage of heme iron across the mycobacterial membrane. Key players of this heme uptake system were characterized including a secreted protein and two transmembrane proteins, all three specific to mycobacteria. Furthermore, the crystal structure of the key heme carrier protein Rv0203 was found to have a unique fold. The discovery of a unique mycobacterial heme acquisition pathway opens new avenues of exploration into mycobacterial therapeutics. PMID:21383189

  11. The unique enzymatic and mechanistic properties of plant myosins.

    PubMed

    Henn, Arnon; Sadot, Einat

    2014-12-01

    Myosins are molecular motors that move along actin-filament tracks. Plants express two main classes of myosins, myosin VIII and myosin XI. Along with their relatively conserved sequence and functions, plant myosins have acquired some unique features. Myosin VIII has the enzymatic characteristics of a tension sensor and/or a tension generator, similar to functions found in other eukaryotes. Interestingly, class XI plant myosins have gained a novel function that consists of propelling the exceptionally rapid cytoplasmic streaming. This specific class includes the fastest known translocating molecular motors, which can reach an extremely high velocity of about 60?ms(-1). However, the enzymatic properties and mechanistic basis for these remarkable manifestations are not yet fully understood. Here we review recent progress in understanding the uniqueness of plant myosins, while emphasizing the unanswered questions. PMID:25435181

  12. Unique research challenges for high-speed civil transports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Charlie M., Jr.; Morris, E. K., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Market growth and technological advances are expected to lead to a generation of long-range transports that cruise at supersonic or even hypersonic speeds. Current NASA/industry studies will define the market windows in terms of time frame, Mach number, and technology requirements for these aircraft. Initial results indicate that, for the years 2000 to 2020, economically attractive vehicles could have a cruise speed up to Mach 6. The resulting research challenges are unique. They must be met with technologies that will produce commercially successful and environmentally compatible vehicles where none have existed. Several important areas of research were identified for the high-speed civil transports. Among these are sonic boom, takeoff noise, thermal management, lightweight structures with long life, unique propulsion concepts, unconventional fuels, and supersonic laminar flow.

  13. Unique research challenges for high-speed civil transports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Charlie M., Jr.; Morris, Charles E. K., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    Market growth and technological advances are expected to lead to a generation of long-range transports that cruise at supersonic or even hypersonic speeds. Current NASA/industry studies will define the market windows in terms of time frame, Mach number, and technology requirements for these aircraft. Initial results indicate that, for the years 2000 to 2020, economically attractive vehicles could have a cruise speed up to Mach 6. The resulting research challenges are unique. They must be met with technologies that will produce commercially successful and environmentally compatible vehicles where none have existed. Several important areas of research were identified for the high-speed civil transports. Among these are sonic boom, takeoff noise, thermal management, lightweight structures with long life, unique propulsion concepts, unconventional fuels, and supersonic laminar flow.

  14. Chemical characterization of a unique chondrite - Allan Hills 85085

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gosselin, David C.; Laul, J. C.

    1990-01-01

    Allan Hills 85085 is a new and very important addition to the growing list of unique carbonaceous chondrites because of its unique chemical and mineralogical properties. This chemical study provides more precise data on the major, minor, and trace element characteristics of ALH85085. ALH85085 has compositional, petrological, and isotopic affinities to AL Rais and Renazzo, and to Bencubbin-Weatherford. The similarities to Al Rais and Renazzo suggest similar formation locations and thermal processing, possibly in the vicinity of CI chondrites. Petrologic, compositional and isotopic studies indicate that the components that control the abundance of the various refractory and volatile elements were not allowed to equilibrate with the nebula as conditions changed, explaining the inconsistencies in the classification of these meteorites using known taxonomic parameters.

  15. [I, Robot: artificial intelligence, uniqueness and self-consciousness].

    PubMed

    Agrest, Martín

    2008-01-01

    The cinematographic version of the science fiction classical book by Isaac Asimov (I, Robot) is used as a starting point, from the Artificial Intelligence perspective, in order to analyze what it is to have a self. Uniqueness or the exchange impossibility and the continuity of being one self are put forward to understand the movie's characters as well as the possibilities of feeling self conscious. PMID:18592055

  16. The Mysteries of Diamonds: Bizarre History, Amazing Properties, Unique Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Kagan, Harris

    2008-06-24

    Diamonds have been a prized material throughout history. They are scarce and beautiful, wars have been fought over them, and they remain today a symbol of wealth and power. Diamonds also have exceptional physical properties which can lead to unique applications in science. There are now techniques to artificially synthesize diamonds of extraordinarily high quality. In this talk, Professor Kagan will discuss the history of diamonds, their bizarre properties, and their manufacture and use for 21st century science.

  17. Uniqueness of Kerr space-time near null infinity

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Xiaoning; Bai Shan

    2008-12-15

    We reexpress the Kerr metric in standard Bondi-Sachs coordinates near null infinity I{sup +}. Using the uniqueness result of the characteristic initial value problem, we prove the Kerr metric is the only asymptotically flat, stationary, axially symmetric, type-D solution of the vacuum Einstein equation. The Taylor series of Kerr space-time is expressed in terms of Bondi-Sachs coordinates, and the Newman-Penrose constants have been calculated.

  18. On the Non-Uniqueness of Sediment Yield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J.; Ivanov, V. Y.; Fatichi, S.

    2014-12-01

    There has been ample experimental evidence that soil erosion does not necessarily occur at the same rate, given the same amount of rainfall or runoff. Such a non-unique phenomenon has been often referred to in literature as due to 'natural variability'. Our recent study hypothesized that uncertainties in the distribution and properties of a sediment layer can be a potential clue to one of the reasons of the non-unique sediment yield. Specifically, numerical experimentation with a sophisticated two-dimensional model showed that a deposited layer plays two conflicting roles: it can both increase and decrease soil erosion, given the same magnitude of runoff. The difference in erodibilities of the "original, intact soil layer" and the "deposited, loose soil layer" and the composition of soil particles in the underlying layers give rise to the non-uniqueness of the amount of eroded materials. In continuing efforts, we attempt to investigate this phenomenon using a comprehensive the Universal Soil Loss Erosion (USLE) database, that contains data on paired hillslopes that show a high degree of non-uniqueness in the response, even though the hillslopes exhibit the same topography, soil type, rainfall and meteorological forcings, and landuse. An underlying hypothesis of this study is that uncertainties in the distribution of soil substrate prior to a rainfall event lead to low predictability skill, i.e., a stochastically-varying outcome. A large number of simulation cases demonstrating the proposed hypothesis are conducted using a coupled numerical model, tRIBS-VEGGIE-FEaST (Triangulated irregular network - based Real time Integrated Basin Simulator- VEGetation Generator for Interactive Evolution -Flow Erosion and Sediment Transport).

  19. Unique mitochondrial DNA in highly inbred feral cattle

    PubMed Central

    Hudson, Gavin; Wilson, Ian; Payne, Brendan I.A.; Elson, Joanna; Samuels, David C.; Santibanez-Korev, Mauro; Hall, Stephen J.G.; Chinnery, Patrick F.

    2012-01-01

    The Chillingham herd of wild Northumbrian cattle remains viable despite over 300 years of in-breeding and a near-homozygous nuclear genome. Here we report the complete mitochondrial DNA sequence using ultra-deep next generation sequencing. Random population sampling of ~ 10% of the extant herd identified a single mtDNA haplotype harbouring a unique bovine variant present in all other higher mammals (m.11789C/Y421H) which may contribute to their survival. PMID:22609322

  20. The unique signal concept for detonation safety in nuclear weapons

    SciTech Connect

    Spray, S.D.; Cooper, J.A.

    1993-06-01

    The purpose of a unique signal (UQS) in a nuclear weapon system is to provide an unambiguous communication of intent to detonate from the UQS information input source device to a stronglink safety device in the weapon in a manner that is highly unlikely to be duplicated or simulated in normal environments and in a broad range of ill-defined abnormal environments. This report presents safety considerations for the design and implementation of UQSs in the context of the overall safety system.

  1. A unique transformation from ordinary differential equations to reaction networks.

    PubMed

    Soliman, Sylvain; Heiner, Monika

    2010-01-01

    Many models in Systems Biology are described as a system of Ordinary Differential Equations, which allows for transient, steady-state or bifurcation analysis when kinetic information is available. Complementary structure-related qualitative analysis techniques have become increasingly popular in recent years, like qualitative model checking or pathway analysis (elementary modes, invariants, flux balance analysis, graph-based analyses, chemical organization theory, etc.). They do not rely on kinetic information but require a well-defined structure as stochastic analysis techniques equally do. In this article, we look into the structure inference problem for a model described by a system of Ordinary Differential Equations and provide conditions for the uniqueness of its solution. We describe a method to extract a structured reaction network model, represented as a bipartite multigraph, for example, a continuous Petri net (CPN), from a system of Ordinary Differential Equations (ODEs). A CPN uniquely defines an ODE, and each ODE can be transformed into a CPN. However, it is not obvious under which conditions the transformation of an ODE into a CPN is unique, that is, when a given ODE defines exactly one CPN. We provide biochemically relevant sufficient conditions under which the derived structure is unique and counterexamples showing the necessity of each condition. Our method is implemented and available; we illustrate it on some signal transduction models from the BioModels database. A prototype implementation of the method is made available to modellers at http://contraintes.inria.fr/~soliman/ode2pn.html, and the data mentioned in the "Results" section at http://contraintes.inria.fr/~soliman/ode2pn_data/. Our results yield a new recommendation for the import/export feature of tools supporting the SBML exchange format. PMID:21203560

  2. A unique multipurpose damping circuit for shunt capacitor bank switching

    SciTech Connect

    Sabot, A.; Morin, C.; Guillaume, C.; Pons, A. . Les Renardieres Lab.); Taisne, J.P. . Transmission Division); Pizzo, G.L.; Morf, H.U. )

    1993-07-01

    Considerations on disturbances related to Shunt Capacitor Bank (SCB) switching are summarized and a unique damping circuit able to cope with all of them is proposed. This damping circuit consists of a reactor in parallel with a resistor which is in series with a Metal Oxide Varistor (MOV), the latter being used to switch on the resistor only during transients. The design parameter of this damping circuit are described and the main tests performed are presented.

  3. HowTo - Easy use of global unique identifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czerniak, A.; Fleischer, D.; Schirnick, C.

    2013-12-01

    The GEOMAR sample- and core repository covers several thousands of samples and cores and was collected over the last decades. In the actual project, we bring this collection up to the new generation and tag every sample and core with a unique identifier, in our case the International Geo Sample Number (ISGN). This work is done with our digital Ink and hand writing recognition implementation. The Smart Pen technology was save time and resources to record the information on every sample or core. In the procedure of recording, there are several steps systematical are done: 1. Getting all information about the core or sample, such as cruise number, responsible person and so on. 2. Tag with unique identifiers, in our case a QR-Code. 3. Wrote down the location of sample or core. After transmitting the information from Smart Pen, actually via USB but wireless is a choice too, into our server infrastructure the link to other information began. As it linked in our Virtual Research Environment (VRE) with the unique identifier (ISGN) sample or core can be located and the QR-Code was simply linked back from core or sample to ISGN with additional scientific information. On the QR-Code all important information are on it and it was simple to produce thousand of it.

  4. Uniqueness of the gauge invariant action for cosmological perturbations

    SciTech Connect

    Prokopec, Tomislav; Weenink, Jan E-mail: j.g.weenink@uu.nl

    2012-12-01

    In second order perturbation theory different definitions are known of gauge invariant perturbations in single field inflationary models. Consequently the corresponding gauge invariant cubic actions do not have the same form. Here we show that the cubic action for one choice of gauge invariant variables is unique in the following sense: the action for any other, non-linearly related variable can be brought to the same bulk action, plus additional boundary terms. These boundary terms correspond to the choice of hypersurface and generate extra, disconnected contributions to the bispectrum. We also discuss uniqueness of the action with respect to conformal frames. When expressed in terms of the gauge invariant curvature perturbation on uniform field hypersurfaces the action for cosmological perturbations has a unique form, independent of the original Einstein or Jordan frame. Crucial is that the gauge invariant comoving curvature perturbation is frame independent, which makes it extremely helpful in showing the quantum equivalence of the two frames, and therefore in calculating quantum effects in nonminimally coupled theories such as Higgs inflation.

  5. Potential unique causes of burnout for chiropractic professionals

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Shawn

    2011-01-01

    Objective The objective of this narrative review is to discuss the potential for burnout in chiropractic practitioners. This discussion is grounded in the job demands-resource model, the conservation of resources model, the unique profession-specific stressors experienced by chiropractors, and information from similar health care professions. Methods A search using both the indexed (PubMed and PsychLit) and nonindexed psychosocial literature was used. Other resources included the Cochrane Library, articles from governing bodies of the chiropractic profession, trade magazines, and research conferences and symposium proceedings. Articles were analyzed following the grounded theory principles: open coding and memos for conceptual labeling, axial coding and memos for category building, and selective coding for model building. Results Potential stressors unique to doctors of chiropractic include factors associated with physical workload, role stress, and mental and emotional demands. Conclusions There are unique chiropractic-specific occupational characteristics that possibly contribute to burnout in the chiropractic professionals. These findings emphasize the need for assessing and measuring burnout and attrition within the chiropractic profession. PMID:22693483

  6. Plastic-casting intrinsic-surface unique identifier (tag)

    SciTech Connect

    Palm, R.G.; De Volpi, A.

    1995-04-01

    This report describes the development of an authenticated intrinsic-surf ace tagging method for unique- identification of controlled items. Although developed for control of items limited by an arms control treaty, this method has other potential applications to keep track of critical or high-value items. Each tag (unique-identifier) consists of the intrinsic, microscopic surface topography of a small designated area on a controlled item. It is implemented by making a baseline plastic casting of the designated tag area and usually placing a cover (for example, a bar-code label) over this area to protect the surface from environmental alteration. The plastic casting is returned to a laboratory and prepared for high-resolution scanning electron microscope imaging. Several images are digitized and stored for use as a standard for authentication of castings taken during future inspections. Authentication is determined by numerically comparing digital images. Commercially available hardware and software are used for this tag. Tag parameters are optimized, so unique casting images are obtained from original surfaces, and images obtained from attempted duplicate surfaces are detected. This optimization uses the modulation transfer function, a first principle of image analysis, to determine the parameters. Surface duplication experiments confirmed the optimization.

  7. Unique marine derived cyanobacterial biosynthetic genes for chemical diversity.

    PubMed

    Kleigrewe, Karin; Gerwick, Lena; Sherman, David H; Gerwick, William H

    2016-02-01

    Covering: 2010 to July 2015. Previous review: Nat. Prod. Rep., 2010, 27, 1048-1065Cyanobacteria are a prolific source of structurally unique and biologically active natural products that derive from intriguing biochemical pathways. Advancements in genome sequencing have accelerated the identification of unique modular biosynthetic gene clusters in cyanobacteria and reveal a wealth of unusual enzymatic reactions involved in their construction. This article examines several interesting mechanistic transformations involved in cyanobacterial secondary metabolite biosynthesis with a particular focus on marine derived modular polyketide synthases (PKS), nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPS) and combinations thereof to form hybrid natural products. Further, we focus on the cyanobacterial genus Moorea and the co-evolution of its enzyme cassettes that create metabolic diversity. Progress in the development of heterologous expression systems for cyanobacterial gene clusters along with chemoenzymatic synthesis makes it possible to create new analogs. Additionally, phylum-wide genome sequencing projects have enhanced the discovery rate of new natural products and their distinctive enzymatic reactions. Summarizing, cyanobacterial biosynthetic gene clusters encode for a large toolbox of novel enzymes that catalyze unique chemical reactions, some of which may be useful in synthetic biology. PMID:26758451

  8. Biosynthetic Potential of Phylogenetically Unique Endophytic Actinomycetes from Tropical Plants? †

    PubMed Central

    Janso, Jeffrey E.; Carter, Guy T.

    2010-01-01

    The culturable diversity of endophytic actinomycetes associated with tropical, native plants is essentially unexplored. In this study, 123 endophytic actinomycetes were isolated from tropical plants collected from several locations in Papua New Guinea and Mborokua Island, Solomon Islands. Isolates were found to be prevalent in roots but uncommon in leaves. Initially, isolates were dereplicated to the strain level by ribotyping. Subsequent characterization of 105 unique strains by 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis revealed that 17 different genera were represented, and rare genera, such as Sphaerisporangium and Planotetraspora, which have never been previously reported to be endophytic, were quite prevalent. Phylogenetic analyses grouped many of the strains into clades distinct from known genera within Thermomonosporaceae and Micromonosporaceae, indicating that they may be unique genera. Bioactivity testing and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) profiling of crude fermentation extracts were performed on 91 strains. About 60% of the extracts exhibited bioactivity or displayed LC-MS profiles with spectra indicative of secondary metabolites. The biosynthetic potential of 29 nonproductive strains was further investigated by the detection of putative polyketide synthase (PKS) and nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) genes. Despite their lack of detectable secondary metabolite production in fermentation, most were positive for type I (66%) and type II (79%) PKS genes, and all were positive for NRPS genes. These results suggest that tropical plants from New Guinea and the adjacent archipelago are hosts to unique endophytic actinomycetes that possess significant biosynthetic potential. PMID:20472734

  9. Pannexin1 Channel Proteins in the Zebrafish Retina Have Shared and Unique Properties

    PubMed Central

    Kurtenbach, Sarah; Prochnow, Nora; Kurtenbach, Stefan; Klooster, Jan; Zoidl, Christiane; Dermietzel, Rolf; Kamermans, Maarten; Zoidl, Georg

    2013-01-01

    In mammals, a single pannexin1 gene (Panx1) is widely expressed in the CNS including the inner and outer retinae, forming large-pore voltage-gated membrane channels, which are involved in calcium and ATP signaling. Previously, we discovered that zebrafish lack Panx1 expression in the inner retina, with drPanx1a exclusively expressed in horizontal cells of the outer retina. Here, we characterize a second drPanx1 protein, drPanx1b, generated by whole-genome duplications during teleost evolution. Homology searches strongly support the presence of pannexin sequences in cartilaginous fish and provide evidence that pannexins evolved when urochordata and chordata evolution split. Further, we confirm Panx1 ohnologs being solely present in teleosts. A hallmark of differential expression of drPanx1a and drPanx1b in various zebrafish brain areas is the non-overlapping protein localization of drPanx1a in the outer and drPanx1b in the inner fish retina. A functional comparison of the evolutionary distant fish and mouse Panx1s revealed both, preserved and unique properties. Preserved functions are the capability to form channels opening at resting potential, which are sensitive to known gap junction and hemichannel blockers, intracellular calcium, extracellular ATP and pH changes. However, drPanx1b is unique due to its highly complex glycosylation pattern and distinct electrophysiological gating kinetics. The existence of two Panx1 proteins in zebrafish displaying distinct tissue distribution, protein modification and electrophysiological properties, suggests that both proteins fulfill different functions in vivo. PMID:24194896

  10. Pannexin1 channel proteins in the zebrafish retina have shared and unique properties.

    PubMed

    Kurtenbach, Sarah; Prochnow, Nora; Kurtenbach, Stefan; Klooster, Jan; Zoidl, Christiane; Dermietzel, Rolf; Kamermans, Maarten; Zoidl, Georg

    2013-01-01

    In mammals, a single pannexin1 gene (Panx1) is widely expressed in the CNS including the inner and outer retinae, forming large-pore voltage-gated membrane channels, which are involved in calcium and ATP signaling. Previously, we discovered that zebrafish lack Panx1 expression in the inner retina, with drPanx1a exclusively expressed in horizontal cells of the outer retina. Here, we characterize a second drPanx1 protein, drPanx1b, generated by whole-genome duplications during teleost evolution. Homology searches strongly support the presence of pannexin sequences in cartilaginous fish and provide evidence that pannexins evolved when urochordata and chordata evolution split. Further, we confirm Panx1 ohnologs being solely present in teleosts. A hallmark of differential expression of drPanx1a and drPanx1b in various zebrafish brain areas is the non-overlapping protein localization of drPanx1a in the outer and drPanx1b in the inner fish retina. A functional comparison of the evolutionary distant fish and mouse Panx1s revealed both, preserved and unique properties. Preserved functions are the capability to form channels opening at resting potential, which are sensitive to known gap junction and hemichannel blockers, intracellular calcium, extracellular ATP and pH changes. However, drPanx1b is unique due to its highly complex glycosylation pattern and distinct electrophysiological gating kinetics. The existence of two Panx1 proteins in zebrafish displaying distinct tissue distribution, protein modification and electrophysiological properties, suggests that both proteins fulfill different functions in vivo. PMID:24194896

  11. Interpreting thelanguage of histone and DNA modifications

    PubMed Central

    Rothbart, Scott B.; Strahl, Brian D.

    2014-01-01

    A major mechanism regulating the accessibility and function of eukaryotic genomes are the covalent modifications to DNA and histone proteins that dependably package our genetic information inside the nucleus of every cell. Formally postulated over a decade ago, it is becoming increasingly clear that post-translational modifications (PTMs) on histones act singly and in combination to form a language or ‘code’ that is read by specialized proteins to facilitate downstream functions in chromatin. Underappreciated at the time was the level of complexity harbored both within histone PTMs and their combinations, as well as within the proteins that read and interpret the language. In addition to histone PTMs, newly-identified DNA modifications that can recruit specific effector proteins has raised further awareness that histone PTMs operate within a broader language of epigenetic modifications to orchestrate the dynamic functions associated with chromatin. Here, we highlight key recent advances in our understanding of the epigenetic language encompassing histone and DNA modifications and foreshadow challenges that lie ahead as we continue our quest to decipher the fundamental mechanisms of chromatin regulation. PMID:24631868

  12. Chromatin Modifications Associated With Diabetes and Obesity.

    PubMed

    Schones, Dustin E; Leung, Amy; Natarajan, Rama

    2015-07-01

    The incidence of obesity across the globe has doubled over the past several decades, leading to escalating rates of diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease, and other complications. Given this dramatic rise in disease incidence, understanding the cause of these diseases is therefore of paramount importance. Metabolic diseases, such as obesity and diabetes mellitus, result from a multitude of genetic and environmental factors. Although the genetic basis of these diseases has been extensively studied, the molecular pathways whereby environmental factors influence disease progression are only beginning to be understood. One manner by which environmental factors can contribute to disease progression is through modifications to chromatin. The highly structured packaging of the genome into the nucleus through chromatin has been shown to be fundamental to tissue-specific gene regulation. Modifications to chromatin can regulate gene expression and are involved in a myriad of biological functions, and hence, disruption of these modifications is central to many human diseases. These modifications can furthermore be epigenetic in nature, thereby contributing to prolonged disease risk. Recent work has demonstrated that modifications to chromatin are associated with the progression of both diabetes mellitus and obesity, which is the subject of this review. PMID:26044585

  13. Consistent cosmological modifications to the Einstein equations

    SciTech Connect

    Skordis, Constantinos

    2009-06-15

    General relativity is a phenomenologically successful theory that rests on firm foundations, but has not been tested on cosmological scales. The deep mystery of dark energy (and possibly even the requirement of cold dark matter), has increased the need for testing modifications to general relativity, as the inference of such otherwise undetected fluids, depends crucially on the theory of gravity. In this work I outline a general scheme for constructing consistent and covariant modifications to the Einstein equations. This framework is such that there is a clear connection between the modification and the underlying field content that produces it. I argue that this is mandatory for distinguishing modifications of gravity from conventional fluids. I give two nontrivial examples, the first of which is a simple metric-based modification of the fluctuation equations for which the background is exact {lambda}CDM and the second has a Dvali-Gabadadze-Porrati background but differs from it in the perturbations. I present their impact on observations of the cosmic microwave background radiation.

  14. Process modification and emergency department radiology service.

    PubMed

    DeFlorio, Robert; Coughlin, Bret; Coughlin, Ryan; Li, Haiping; Santoro, John; Akey, Bridget; Favreau, Michael

    2008-11-01

    Our purpose was to demonstrate the impact of changes in technology, staffing, and departmental processes on service levels in emergency department (ED) radiology. We also attempted to determine if report turnaround time affects ED patient throughput. Radiology performance was evaluated before and after the modifications of processes integral to the interpretation of ED imaging. Picture archiving and communication system, voice recognition (VR), staffing, physical site, work flow, and administrative modifications were undertaken over approximately 2 years. The average time interval from the exam completion to report signature was 5,184 min (standard deviation (SD) of 1,858 min before the implementation of VR and other modifications of ED radiology processes). In post initial modifications, it was 150 min (SD, 169 min) and 157 min (SD, 215 min) in post additional modifications. The percentage of the signed written reports available in less than or equal to 60 min was 0%, 27%, and 40%, respectively. Ongoing improvements are needed to increase the service levels for ED radiology. Further improvement will require collaboration and adjustment with the ongoing assessment of metrics. PMID:18665405

  15. Applications for unique identifiers in the geological sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klump, J.; Lehnert, K. A.

    2012-12-01

    Even though geology has always been a generalist discipline in many parts, approaches towards questions about Earth's past have become increasingly interdisciplinary. At the same time, a wealth of samples has been collected, the resulting data have been stored in in disciplinary databases, the interpretations published in scientific literature. In the past these resources have existed alongside each other, semantically linked only by the knowledge of the researcher and his peers. One of the main drivers towards the inception of the world wide web was the ability to link scientific sources over the internet. The Uniform Resource Locator (URL) used to locate resources on the web soon turned out to be ephemeral in nature. A more reliable way of addressing objects was needed, a way of persistent identification to make digital objects, or digital representations of objects, part of the record of science. With their high degree of centralisation the scientific publishing houses were quick to implement and adopt a system for unique and persistent identification, the Digital Object Identifier (DOI) ®. At the same time other identifier systems exist alongside DOI, e.g. URN, ARK, handle ®, and others. There many uses for persistent identification in science, other than the identification of journal articles. DOI are already used for the identification of data, thus making data citable. There are several initiatives to assign identifiers to authors and institutions to allow unique identification. A recent development is the application of persistent identifiers for geological samples. As most data in the geosciences are derived from samples, it is crucial to be able to uniquely identify the samples from which a set of data were derived. Incomplete documentation of samples in publications, use of ambiguous sample names are major obstacles for synthesis studies and re-use of data. Access to samples for re-analysis and re-appraisal is limited due to the lack of a central catalogue that allows finding a sample's archiving location. The International Geo Sample Number (IGSN) provides solutions to the questions of unique sample identification and discovery. Use of the IGSN in digital data systems allows building linkages between the digital representation of samples in sample registries, e.g. SESAR, and their related data in the literature and in web accessible digital data repositories. Persistent identifiers are now available for literature, data, samples, and authors. More applications, e.g. identification of methods or instruments, will follow. In conjunction with semantic web technology the application of unique and persistent identifiers in the geosciences will aid discovery both through systematic data mining, exploratory data analysis, and serendipity effects. This talk will discuss existing and emerging applications for persistent identifiers in the geological sciences.

  16. 30 CFR 18.81 - Field modification of approved (permissible) equipment; application for approval of modification...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Field modification of approved (permissible... TESTING, EVALUATION, AND APPROVAL OF MINING PRODUCTS ELECTRIC MOTOR-DRIVEN MINE EQUIPMENT AND ACCESSORIES Machines Assembled With Certified or Explosion-Proof Components, Field Modifications of Approved...

  17. 30 CFR 18.81 - Field modification of approved (permissible) equipment; application for approval of modification...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Field modification of approved (permissible... TESTING, EVALUATION, AND APPROVAL OF MINING PRODUCTS ELECTRIC MOTOR-DRIVEN MINE EQUIPMENT AND ACCESSORIES Machines Assembled With Certified or Explosion-Proof Components, Field Modifications of Approved...

  18. 30 CFR 18.81 - Field modification of approved (permissible) equipment; application for approval of modification...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Field modification of approved (permissible... TESTING, EVALUATION, AND APPROVAL OF MINING PRODUCTS ELECTRIC MOTOR-DRIVEN MINE EQUIPMENT AND ACCESSORIES Machines Assembled With Certified or Explosion-Proof Components, Field Modifications of Approved...

  19. 30 CFR 18.81 - Field modification of approved (permissible) equipment; application for approval of modification...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Field modification of approved (permissible... TESTING, EVALUATION, AND APPROVAL OF MINING PRODUCTS ELECTRIC MOTOR-DRIVEN MINE EQUIPMENT AND ACCESSORIES Machines Assembled With Certified or Explosion-Proof Components, Field Modifications of Approved...

  20. Uniqueness and Non-uniqueness of Limit Cycles for Piecewise Linear Differential Systems with Three Zones and No Symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llibre, Jaume; Ponce, Enrique; Valls, Clàudia

    2015-08-01

    Some techniques for proving the existence and uniqueness of limit cycles for smooth differential systems are extended to continuous piecewise linear differential systems with two and three zones and no symmetry. For planar systems with three linearity zones, the existence of two limit cycles surrounding the only equilibrium point at the origin is rigorously shown for the first time. The usefulness of the achieved analytical results is illustrated by considering non-symmetric memristor-based electronic oscillators.

  1. On Time Delay Margin Estimation for Adaptive Control and Optimal Control Modification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Nhan T.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents methods for estimating time delay margin for adaptive control of input delay systems with almost linear structured uncertainty. The bounded linear stability analysis method seeks to represent an adaptive law by a locally bounded linear approximation within a small time window. The time delay margin of this input delay system represents a local stability measure and is computed analytically by three methods: Pade approximation, Lyapunov-Krasovskii method, and the matrix measure method. These methods are applied to the standard model-reference adaptive control, s-modification adaptive law, and optimal control modification adaptive law. The windowing analysis results in non-unique estimates of the time delay margin since it is dependent on the length of a time window and parameters which vary from one time window to the next. The optimal control modification adaptive law overcomes this limitation in that, as the adaptive gain tends to infinity and if the matched uncertainty is linear, then the closed-loop input delay system tends to a LTI system. A lower bound of the time delay margin of this system can then be estimated uniquely without the need for the windowing analysis. Simulation results demonstrates the feasibility of the bounded linear stability method for time delay margin estimation.

  2. A Multi-Application Smart Card System with Authentic Post-Issuance Program Modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uddin, Mohammad Mesbah; Nohara, Yasunobu; Ikeda, Daisuke; Yasuura, Hiroto

    A multi-application smart card system consists of an issuer, service vendors and cardholders, where cardholders are recipients of smart cards (from the issuer) to be used in connection with applications offered by service vendors. Authentic post-issuance program modification is necessary for a multi-application smart card system because applications in the system are realized after the issuance of a smart card. In this paper, we propose a system where only authentic modification is possible. In the proposed system, the smart card issuer stores a unique long bitstring called PID in a smart card. The smart card is then given to the cardholder. A unique substring of the PID (subPID) is shared between the cardholder and a corresponding service vendor. Another subPID is shared between the issuer and the cardholder. During program modification, a protocol using the subPlDs, a one-way hash function and a pseudorandom number generator function verifies the identity of the parties and the authenticity of the program.

  3. Development and application of FI catalysts for olefin polymerization: unique catalysis and distinctive polymer formation.

    PubMed

    Makio, Haruyuki; Fujita, Terunori

    2009-10-20

    Catalysts contribute to the efficient production of chemicals and materials in almost all processes in the chemical industry. The polyolefin industry is one prominent example of the importance of catalysts. The discovery of Ziegler-Natta catalysts in the 1950s resulted in the production of high-density polyethylenes (PEs) and isotactic polypropylenes (iPPs). Since then, further catalyst development has led to the production of a new series of polyolefins, including linear low-density PEs, amorphous ethylene/1-butene copolymers, ethylene/propylene/diene elastomers, and syndiotactic PPs (sPPs). Polyolefins are now the most important and the most produced synthetic polymers. This Account describes a family of next-generation olefin polymerization catalysts (FI catalysts) that are currently being used in the commercial production of value-added olefin-based materials. An FI catalyst is a heteroatom-coordinated early transition metal complex that combines a pair of nonsymmetric phenoxy-imine [O(-), N] chelating ligands with a group 4 transition metal. The catalytically active species derived from FI catalysts is highly electrophilic and can assume up to five isomeric structures based on the coordination of the phenoxy-imine ligand. In addition, the accessibility of the ligands of the FI catalysts and their amenability to modification offers an opportunity for the design of diverse catalytic structures. FI catalysts exhibit many unique chemical characteristics: precise control over chain transfers (including highly controlled living ethylene and propylene polymerizations), extremely high selectivity for ethylene, high functional group tolerance, MAO- and borate-free polymerization catalysis, significant morphology polymer formation, controlled multimodal behavior, high incorporation ability for higher alpha-olefins and norbornene, and highly syndiospecific and isospecific polymerizations of both propylene and styrene. These reactions also occur with very high catalyst efficiency. The reaction products include a wide variety of unique olefin-based materials, many of which were previously unavailable via other means of polymerization. We have produced selective vinyl- and Al-terminated PEs, ultrahigh molecular weight linear PEs, regio- and stereoirregular high molecular weight poly(higher alpha-olefin)s, ethylene- and propylene-based telechelic polymers, a wide array of polyolefinic block copolymers from ethylene, propylene, and higher alpha-olefins, and ultrafine noncoherent PE particles. FI catalysts are important from the organometallic, catalytic, and polymer science points of view, and the chemical industry is now using them for the production of value-added olefin-based materials. We anticipate that future research on FI catalysts will produce additional olefin-based materials with unique architectures and material properties and will offer scientists the chance to further study olefin polymerization catalysis and related reaction mechanisms. PMID:19588950

  4. Linkage via K27 Bestows Ubiquitin Chains with Unique Properties among Polyubiquitins.

    PubMed

    Castañeda, Carlos A; Dixon, Emma K; Walker, Olivier; Chaturvedi, Apurva; Nakasone, Mark A; Curtis, Joseph E; Reed, Megan R; Krueger, Susan; Cropp, T Ashton; Fushman, David

    2016-03-01

    Polyubiquitination, a critical protein post-translational modification, signals for a diverse set of cellular events via the different isopeptide linkages formed between the C terminus of one ubiquitin (Ub) and the ɛ-amine of K6, K11, K27, K29, K33, K48, or K63 of a second Ub. We assembled di-ubiquitins (Ub2) comprising every lysine linkage and examined them biochemically and structurally. Of these, K27-Ub2 is unique as it is not cleaved by most deubiquitinases. As this remains the only structurally uncharacterized lysine linkage, we comprehensively examined the structures and dynamics of K27-Ub2 using nuclear magnetic resonance, small-angle neutron scattering, and in silico ensemble modeling. Our structural data provide insights into the functional properties of K27-Ub2, in particular that K27-Ub2 may be specifically recognized by K48-selective receptor UBA2 domain from proteasomal shuttle protein hHR23a. Binding studies and mutagenesis confirmed this prediction, further highlighting structural/recognition versatility of polyubiquitins and the potential power of determining function from elucidation of conformational ensembles. PMID:26876099

  5. Beagle 2 and NASA's Mars 2003 Orbiter: A Unique Exobiology Opportunity with an Orbiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, Everett K., Jr.; Pillinger, Colin T.; Thatcher, John; Westall, Frances

    2000-01-01

    With the exploration strategy for Mars undergoing reexamination, the opportunity exists for the incorporation of the 60 kg Beagle 2 lander, developed in the United Kingdom for inclusion on ESA's 2003 Mars Express mission, with NASA's Mars 2003 orbiter derived from the Mars Global Orbiter. The combination of Beagle 2 with a Mars orbiter would result in a unique mission which could obtain information on Mars' life, climate and resources both from orbit as well as on the surface of the planet. Beagle 2 has been developed in the LJK for ESA as a low-cost opportunity to study the exobiology of Mars and the spacecraft is in its final stages of manufacture. Only limited modifications to the Beagle 2 package would be required for inclusion on NASA's Mars 2003 orbiter. With the ESA Mars Express mission launch in 2003 and a potential NASA Mars orbiter in 2003, both Beagle 2 landers on Mars would offer a low-cost, decreased risk and increased science return opportunity for the exploration of Mars at two distinct geologically interesting sites.

  6. Unique roles of acidic amino acids in phase transformation of calcium phosphates.

    PubMed

    Chu, Xiaobin; Jiang, Wenge; Zhang, Zhisen; Yan, Yang; Pan, Haihua; Xu, Xurong; Tang, Ruikang

    2011-02-10

    Although phase transformation is suggested as a key step in biomineralization, the chemical scenario about how organic molecules mediate inorganic phase transformations is still unclear. The inhibitory effect of amino acids on hydroxyapatite (HAP, the main inorganic component of biological hard tissues such as bone and enamel) formation was concluded by the previous biomimetic modeling based upon direct solution crystallization. Here we demonstrate that acidic amino acids, Asp and Glu, could promote HAP crystallization from its precursor crystal, brushite (DCPD). However, such a promotion effect could not be observed when the nonacidic amino acids were applied in the transformation-based HAP formation. We found that the specific modification of acidic amino acid on crystal-solution interfaces played a key role in the phase transition. The distinct properties between DCPD and HAP in the solution resulted in an interfacial energy barrier to suppress the spontaneous formation of HAP phase on DCPD phase. Different from the other amino acids, the carboxylate-rich amino acids, Asp and Glu, could modify the interfacial characteristics of these two calcium phosphate crystals to make them similar to each other. The experiments confirmed that the involvement of Asp or Glu reduced the interfacial energy barrier between DCPD and HAP, leading to a trigger effect on the phase transformation. An in-depth understanding about the unique roles of acidic amino acids may contribute to understanding phase transformation controls druing biomineralization. PMID:21190387

  7. Mimivirus giant particles incorporate a large fraction of anonymous and unique gene products.

    PubMed

    Renesto, Patricia; Abergel, Chantal; Decloquement, Philippe; Moinier, Danielle; Azza, Saïd; Ogata, Hiroyuki; Fourquet, Patrick; Gorvel, Jean-Pierre; Claverie, Jean-Michel

    2006-12-01

    Acanthamoeba polyphaga mimivirus is the largest known virus in both particle size and genome complexity. Its 1.2-Mb genome encodes 911 proteins, among which only 298 have predicted functions. The composition of purified isolated virions was analyzed by using a combined electrophoresis/mass spectrometry approach allowing the identification of 114 proteins. Besides the expected major structural components, the viral particle packages 12 proteins unambiguously associated with transcriptional machinery, 3 proteins associated with DNA repair, and 2 topoisomerases. Other main functional categories represented in the virion include oxidative pathways and protein modification. More than half of the identified virion-associated proteins correspond to anonymous genes of unknown function, including 45 "ORFans." As demonstrated by both Western blotting and immunogold staining, some of these "ORFans," which lack any convincing similarity in the sequence databases, are endowed with antigenic properties. Thus, anonymous and unique genes constituting the majority of the mimivirus gene complement encode bona fide proteins that are likely to participate in well-integrated processes. PMID:16971431

  8. Mimivirus Giant Particles Incorporate a Large Fraction of Anonymous and Unique Gene Products? †

    PubMed Central

    Renesto, Patricia; Abergel, Chantal; Decloquement, Philippe; Moinier, Danielle; Azza, Saïd; Ogata, Hiroyuki; Fourquet, Patrick; Gorvel, Jean-Pierre; Claverie, Jean-Michel

    2006-01-01

    Acanthamoeba polyphaga mimivirus is the largest known virus in both particle size and genome complexity. Its 1.2-Mb genome encodes 911 proteins, among which only 298 have predicted functions. The composition of purified isolated virions was analyzed by using a combined electrophoresis/mass spectrometry approach allowing the identification of 114 proteins. Besides the expected major structural components, the viral particle packages 12 proteins unambiguously associated with transcriptional machinery, 3 proteins associated with DNA repair, and 2 topoisomerases. Other main functional categories represented in the virion include oxidative pathways and protein modification. More than half of the identified virion-associated proteins correspond to anonymous genes of unknown function, including 45 “ORFans.” As demonstrated by both Western blotting and immunogold staining, some of these “ORFans,” which lack any convincing similarity in the sequence databases, are endowed with antigenic properties. Thus, anonymous and unique genes constituting the majority of the mimivirus gene complement encode bona fide proteins that are likely to participate in well-integrated processes. PMID:16971431

  9. Unique motifs and hydrophobic interactions shape the binding of modified DNA ligands to protein targets.

    PubMed

    Davies, Douglas R; Gelinas, Amy D; Zhang, Chi; Rohloff, John C; Carter, Jeffrey D; O'Connell, Daniel; Waugh, Sheela M; Wolk, Steven K; Mayfield, Wesley S; Burgin, Alex B; Edwards, Thomas E; Stewart, Lance J; Gold, Larry; Janjic, Nebojsa; Jarvis, Thale C

    2012-12-01

    Selection of aptamers from nucleic acid libraries by in vitro evolution represents a powerful method of identifying high-affinity ligands for a broad range of molecular targets. Nevertheless, a sizeable fraction of proteins remain difficult targets due to inherently limited chemical diversity of nucleic acids. We have exploited synthetic nucleotide modifications that confer protein-like diversity on a nucleic acid scaffold, resulting in a new generation of binding reagents called SOMAmers (Slow Off-rate Modified Aptamers). Here we report a unique crystal structure of a SOMAmer bound to its target, platelet-derived growth factor B (PDGF-BB). The SOMAmer folds into a compact structure and exhibits a hydrophobic binding surface that mimics the interface between PDGF-BB and its receptor, contrasting sharply with mainly polar interactions seen in traditional protein-binding aptamers. The modified nucleotides circumvent the intrinsic diversity constraints of natural nucleic acids, thereby greatly expanding the structural vocabulary of nucleic acid ligands and considerably broadening the range of accessible protein targets. PMID:23139410

  10. Preliminary evaluation of a unique freezing technology for bovine spermatozoa cryopreservation.

    PubMed

    Cotter, P Z; Goolsby, H A; Prien, S D

    2005-04-01

    Artificial insemination (AI) and semen cryopreservation has significantly improved the breeding potential of male animals. However, current freezing techniques commonly result in reduced semen quality. Ten years ago, a unique freezing technology (UFT) was developed for the freezing of foodstuffs and other materials. Previous work from this laboratory has demonstrated the UFT to be a superior method of freezing for a number of cell types. In a preliminary study, the UFT was compared with the conventional freezing methodology of bovine semen. Semen samples were collected from an angus (Bull A) and a gelbivich bull (Bull B), prepared using a conventional bovine cryoprotectant, and frozen in the UFT or in liquid nitrogen (LN) mist. The samples were stored in LN before being thawed and assessed for the semen parameters of motility and forward progression. Preliminary results suggest the UFT is equivalent to current techniques in the cryopreservation and recovery of bovine semen, and with modification, possibly a superior technique for semen freezing. Further studies using larger sample populations, and using a CASA system to evaluate motility, forward progression and linearity are merited. PMID:15819955

  11. Ionospheric modification experiments in northern Scandinavia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stubbe, P.; Kopka, H.; Lauche, H.; Rietveld, M. T.; Brekke, A.; Holt, O.; Jones, T. B.; Robinson, T.; Hedberg, A.; Thide, B.

    1982-12-01

    The heating facility at Ramfjordmoen near Tromso, Norway, is briefly described, and a survey is given of the experiments performed with this facility until now. These experiments comprise D-region modification, polar electrojet modulation at VLF, ELF and ULF, HF absorption and backscatter due to short-scale field-aligned irregularities, stimulated radio wave emission of the modified ionospheric plasma, short-time scale HF absorption due to the parametric decay instability, airglow modification, excitation of large-scale irregularities, and F-region cross modulation.

  12. Beam Distribution Modification by Alfven Modes

    SciTech Connect

    White, R. B.; Gorelenkov, N.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Van Zeeland, M. A.

    2010-04-03

    Modification of a deuterium beam distribution in the presence of low amplitude Toroidal Alfven (TAE) eigenmodes and Reversed Shear Alfven (RSAE) eigenmodes in a toroidal magnetic confinement device is examined. Comparison with experimental data shows that multiple low amplitude modes can account for significant modification of high energy beam particle distributions. It is found that there is a stochastic threshold for beam transport, and that the experimental amplitudes are only slightly above this threshold. The modes produce a substantial central flattening of the beam distribution.

  13. Beam Distribution Modification By Alfven Modes

    SciTech Connect

    White, R. B.; Gorelenkov, N.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Van Zeeland, M. A.

    2010-01-25

    Modification of a deuterium beam distribution in the presence of low amplitude Toroidal Alfven (TAE) eigenmodes and Reversed Shear Alfven (RSAE) eigenmodes in a toroidal magnetic confinement device is examined. Comparison with experimental data shows that multiple low amplitude modes can account for significant modification of high energy beam particle distributions. It is found that there is a stochastic threshold for beam transport, and that the experimental amplitudes are only slightly above this threshold. The modes produce a substantial central flattening of the beam distribution.

  14. A amphoteric copolymer profile modification agent

    SciTech Connect

    Wang HongGuan; Yu LianCheng; Tian HongKun

    1995-11-01

    This report provides a new gel profile modification agent prepared by an amphoteric copolymer (FT-213) and a novel crosslinking agent (BY), and introduces the preparations of the amphoteric polymer, the crosslinking agent and the profile modification agent, the action mechanism, the test conditions and the evaluations of the performance of the agent. The 45 well treatments in oilfields demonstrate that the agent can be prepared conveniently, the agent has better compatibility and application performances, and the treatment life is longer with the use of the agent. 80,000 tons incremental oil and 60,000 m{sup 3} decreasing water production have been achieved.

  15. Modification of gravity due to torsion

    SciTech Connect

    Nair, V. P.; Nikiforova, V.; Randjbar-Daemi, S.; Rubakov, V.

    2010-01-01

    Modifications of general relativity have been considered as one of the possible ways of addressing some of the outstanding problems related to the large scale gravitational physics. In this contribution we review some of the recent results which are due to the inclusion of dynamical torsion. More specifically we shall discuss the propagation of massive spin-2 particles in flat and curved space times. We shall show that, contrary to what is generally believed, spinning matter is not the sole source of torsion field. A symmetric energy momentum tensor can also couple to torsion degrees of freedom. The massive and massless spin-2 particles mix giving rise to an infrared modification of gravity.

  16. Development of an Improved Permeability Modification Simulator

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, H.W.; Elphnick, J.

    1999-03-09

    This report describes the development of an improved permeability modification simulator performed jointly by BDM Petroleum Technologies and Schlumberger Dowell under a cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA) with the US Department of Energy. The improved simulator was developed by modifying NIPER's PC-GEL permeability modification simulator to include a radial model, a thermal energy equation, a wellbore simulator, and a fully implicit time-stepping option. The temperature-dependent gelation kinetics of a delayed gel system (DGS) is also included in the simulator.

  17. Meteorological satellites in support of weather modification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, D. W.; Vonder Haar, T. H.; Grant, L. O.

    1978-01-01

    During the past several years, many weather modification programs have been incorporating meteorological satellite data into both the operations and the analysis phase of these projects. This has occurred because of the advancement of the satellite as a mesoscale measurement platform, both temporally and spatially, and as the availability of high quality data has increased. This paper surveys the applications of meteorological satellite data to both summer and winter weather modification programs. A description of the types of observations needed by the programs is given, and an assessment of how accurately satellites can determine these necessary parameters is made.

  18. Surface modification to prevent oxide scale spallation

    DOEpatents

    Stephens, Elizabeth V; Sun, Xin; Liu, Wenning; Stevenson, Jeffry W; Surdoval, Wayne; Khaleel, Mohammad A

    2013-07-16

    A surface modification to prevent oxide scale spallation is disclosed. The surface modification includes a ferritic stainless steel substrate having a modified surface. A cross-section of the modified surface exhibits a periodic morphology. The periodic morphology does not exceed a critical buckling length, which is equivalent to the length of a wave attribute observed in the cross section periodic morphology. The modified surface can be created using at least one of the following processes: shot peening, surface blasting and surface grinding. A coating can be applied to the modified surface.

  19. Oxygen from Hydrogen Peroxide: An Experimental Modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burness, James H.

    1996-09-01

    A common experiment, performed at the high school and college levels, is the generation of a gas to explore molar mass and molar volume relationships. In one version of this experiment, hydrogen peroxide is decomposed by yeast to generate oxygen gas. This paper describes a simple modification to this experiment which eliminates the need for a pencil coated with petroleum jelly and dry yeast. This elimination not only prevents falling pieces of yeast from prematurely starting the reaction, but at the same time makes the reaction faster and simplifies cleanup. The modification also reduces the likelihood of cuts from broken tubing.

  20. ROSICS: CHEMISTRY AND PROTEOMICS OF CYSTEINE MODIFICATIONS IN REDOX BIOLOGY

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hee-Jung; Ha, Sura; Lee, Hee Yoon; Lee, Kong-Joo

    2015-01-01

    Post-translational modifications (PTMs) occurring in proteins determine their functions and regulations. Proteomic tools are available to identify PTMs and have proved invaluable to expanding the inventory of these tools of nature that hold the keys to biological processes. Cysteine (Cys), the least abundant (1–2%) of amino acid residues, are unique in that they play key roles in maintaining stability of protein structure, participating in active sites of enzymes, regulating protein function and binding to metals, among others. Cys residues are major targets of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which are important mediators and modulators of various biological processes. It is therefore necessary to identify the Cys-containing ROS target proteins, as well as the sites and species of their PTMs. Cutting edge proteomic tools which have helped identify the PTMs at reactive Cys residues, have also revealed that Cys residues are modified in numerous ways. These modifications include formation of disulfide, thiosulfinate and thiosulfonate, oxidation to sulfenic, sulfinic, sulfonic acids and thiosulfonic acid, transformation to dehydroalanine (DHA) and serine, palmitoylation and farnesylation, formation of chemical adducts with glutathione, 4-hydroxynonenal and 15-deoxy PGJ2, and various other chemicals. We present here, a review of relevant ROS biology, possible chemical reactions of Cys residues and details of the proteomic strategies employed for rapid, efficient and sensitive identification of diverse and novel PTMs involving reactive Cys residues of redox-sensitive proteins. We propose a new name, “ROSics,” for the science which describes the principles of mode of action of ROS at molecular levels. © 2014 The Authors. Mass Spectrometry Reviews Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Rapid Commun. Mass Spec Rev 34:184–208, 2015. PMID:24916017

  1. Post-Translational Modifications of Histones in Human Sperm.

    PubMed

    Krejčí, Jana; Stixová, Lenka; Pagáčová, Eva; Legartová, Soňa; Kozubek, Stanislav; Lochmanová, Gabriela; Zdráhal, Zbyněk; Sehnalová, Petra; Dabravolski, Siarhei; Hejátko, Jan; Bártová, Eva

    2015-10-01

    We examined the levels and distribution of post-translationally modified histones and protamines in human sperm. Using western blot immunoassay, immunofluorescence, mass spectrometry (MS), and FLIM-FRET approaches, we analyzed the status of histone modifications and the protamine P2. Among individual samples, we observed variability in the levels of H3K9me1, H3K9me2, H3K27me3, H3K36me3, and H3K79me1, but the level of acetylated (ac) histones H4 was relatively stable in the sperm head fractions, as demonstrated by western blot analysis. Sperm heads with lower levels of P2 exhibited lower levels of H3K9ac, H3K9me1, H3K27me3, H3K36me3, and H3K79me1. A very strong correlation was observed between the levels of P2 and H3K9me2. FLIM-FRET analysis additionally revealed that acetylated histones H4 are not only parts of sperm chromatin but also appear in a non-integrated form. Intriguingly, H4ac and H3K27me3 were detected in sperm tail fractions via western blot analysis. An appearance of specific histone H3 and H4 acetylation and H3 methylation in sperm tail fractions was also confirmed by both LC-MS/MS and MALDI-TOF MS analysis. Taken together, these data indicate that particular post-translational modifications of histones are uniquely distributed in human sperm, and this distribution varies among individuals and among the sperm of a single individual. PMID:25808548

  2. Unique expression of cytoskeletal proteins in human soft palate muscles.

    PubMed

    Shah, Farhan; Berggren, Diana; Holmlund, Thorbjörn; Levring Jäghagen, Eva; Stål, Per

    2016-03-01

    The human oropharyngeal muscles have a unique anatomy with diverse and intricate functions. To investigate if this specialization is also reflected in the cytoarchitecture of muscle fibers, intermediate filament proteins and the dystrophin-associated protein complex have been analyzed in two human palate muscles, musculus uvula (UV) and musculus palatopharyngeus (PP), with immunohistochenmical and morphological techniques. Human limb muscles were used as reference. The findings show that the soft palate muscle fibers have a cytoskeletal architecture that differs from the limb muscles. While all limb muscles showed immunoreaction for a panel of antibodies directed against different domains of cytoskeletal proteins desmin and dystrophin, a subpopulation of palate muscle fibers lacked or had a faint immunoreaction for desmin (UV 11.7% and PP 9.8%) and the C-terminal of the dystrophin molecule (UV 4.2% and PP 6.4%). The vast majority of these fibers expressed slow contractile protein myosin heavy chain I. Furthermore, an unusual staining pattern was also observed in these fibers for ?-dystroglycan, caveolin-3 and neuronal nitric oxide synthase nNOS, which are all membrane-linking proteins associated with the dystrophin C-terminus. While the immunoreaction for nNOS was generally weak or absent, ?-dystroglycan and caveolin-3 showed a stronger immunostaining. The absence or a low expression of cytoskeletal proteins otherwise considered ubiquitous and important for integration and contraction of muscle cells indicate a unique cytoarchitecture designed to meet the intricate demands of the upper airway muscles. It can be concluded that a subgroup of muscle fibers in the human soft palate appears to have special biomechanical properties, and their unique cytoarchitecture must be taken into account while assessing function and pathology in oropharyngeal muscles. PMID:26597319

  3. Bound nucleons have unique masses that govern elemental properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pamfiloff, Eugene

    2005-07-01

    It is known that measured binding energies associated with elements require equivalent energy to break the nuclear bond of a nucleus. Based upon the proposals contained in recent published works [1] [2] and with support from experimental high-energy data, it can be shown that a portion of listed binding energies are attributable to bound nucleons having a unique mass for every element. The figures show, relative to the hydrogen proton, that of the: a) 1.112 MeV binding energy per nucleon for 2H, 44% or 0.486 MeV represents a change in mass (?m) for the proton or neutron; b) of 5.629 MeV binding energy per nucleon for 7Li, 87% or 4.890 MeV represents a change of mass for each nucleon; c) likewise, 56Fe has 8.811 MeV binding energy per nucleon and of this 92% or 8.119 MeV represents a change in mass for each nucleon, and 232Th has 7.639 MeV binding energy per nucleon and of this, 90% or 6.848 MeV represents a change in mass for each nucleon. This demonstrates that the nucleons of each element have unique masses. It has been shown that if three protons are removed from 82Pb the result is not 79Au; therefore, we conclude and predict that in addition to the Z number, elemental properties are determined by the unique proton and neutron masses for each element. mailto:megforce@physast.uga.edumegforce@physast.uga.edu [1] ``The Order of the Forces'', [2] ``The Geatron Nuclear Model''

  4. Bound nucleons have unique masses that govern elemental properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pamfiloff, Eugene

    2005-04-01

    It is know that measured binding energies associated with elements require equivalent energy to break the nuclear bond of a nucleus. Based upon the proposals contained in a recent published work [1] and with support from experimental high-energy data, it can be shown that a portion of listed binding energies are attributed to bound nucleons having a unique mass for every element. The figures show, relative to the hydrogen proton, that of the: a) 1.112 MeV binding energy per nucleon for ^2H, 44% or 0.486 MeV represents a change in mass for the proton and neutron; b) of 5.629 MeV binding energy per nucleon for ^7Li, 87% or 4.890 MeV represents a change of mass for each nucleon; c) likewise, ^56Fe has 8.811 MeV binding energy per nucleon and of this 92% or 8.119 MeV represents a change in mass for each nucleon; and ^232Th has 7.639 MeV binding energy per nucleon and of this, 90% or 6.848 MeV represents a change in mass for each nucleon. This demonstrates that the nucleons of each element have unique masses. It can be shown that if three protons are removed from 82Pb the result is not 79Au. We conclude and predict that in addition to the Z number, elemental properties are determined by the unique proton and neutron masses for each element. [1] mailto:megforce@physast.uga.edumegforce@physast.uga.edu ``The Order of the Forces''

  5. Bound nucleons have unique masses that govern elemental properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pamfiloff, Eugene

    2005-03-01

    It is known that measured binding energies associated with elements require equivalent energy to break the nuclear bond of a nucleus. Based upon the proposals contained in recent published works [1] [2] and with support from experimental high-energy data, it can be shown that a portion of listed binding energies are attributable to bound nucleons having a unique mass for every element. The figures show, relative to the hydrogen proton, that of the: a) 1.112 MeV binding energy per nucleon for 2H, 44% or 0.486 MeV represents a change in mass (?m) for the proton or neutron; b) of 5.629 MeV binding energy per nucleon for 7Li, 87% or 4.890 MeV represents a change of mass for each nucleon; c) likewise, 56Fe has 8.811 MeV binding energy per nucleon and of this 92% or 8.119 MeV represents a change in mass for each nucleon, and 232Th has 7.639 MeV binding energy per nucleon and of this, 90% or 6.848 MeV represents a change in mass for each nucleon. This demonstrates that the nucleons of each element have unique masses. It has been shown that if three protons are removed from 82Pb the result is not 79Au; therefore, we conclude and predict that in addition to the Z number, elemental properties are determined by the unique proton and neutron masses for each element. mailto:megforce@physast.uga.edumegforce@physast.uga.edu [1] ``The Order of the Forces'', [2] ``The Geatron Nuclear Model''

  6. Pichinde virus L and S RNAs contain unique sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Leung, W C; Ramsingh, A; Dimock, K; Rawls, W E; Petrovich, J; Leung, M

    1981-01-01

    Using oligodeoxyribonucleotides produced by limited DNase I digestion of calf thymus DNA as a primer, we synthesized complementary DNA (cDNA) from the L and the S RNAs of Pichinde virus. The reaction conditions for in vitro cDNA synthesis were optimized to allow transcription of about 90% of either L or S RNA. No significant hybridization was observed when the L cDNA was hybridized to the S RNA, or when the S cDNA was hybridized to the L RNA. The results indicate that the L and S RNAs of Pichinde virus contain unique nucleotide sequences. Images PMID:7218428

  7. Alzheimer's disease: Unique markers for diagnosis & new treatment modalities

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Neelum T.; Shah, Raj C.; Bennett, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive and irreversible neurodegenerative disease. In humans, AD becomes symptomatic only after brain changes occur over years or decades. Three contiguous phases of AD have been proposed: (i) the AD pathophysiologic process, (ii) mild cognitive impairment due to AD, and (iii) AD dementia. Intensive research continues around the world on unique diagnostic markers and interventions associated with each phase of AD. In this review, we summarize the available evidence and new therapeutic approaches that target both amyloid and tau pathology in AD and discuss the biomarkers and pharmaceutical interventions available and in development for each AD phase. PMID:26609028

  8. Cryogenic wind tunnels: Unique capabilities for the aerodynamicist

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, R. M.

    1976-01-01

    The cryogenic wind-tunnel concept as a practical means for improving ground simulation of transonic flight conditions. The Langley 1/3-meter transonic cryogenic tunnel is operational, and the design of a cryogenic National Transonic Facility is undertaken. A review of some of the unique capabilities of cryogenic wind tunnels is presented. In particular, the advantages of having independent control of tunnel Mach number, total pressure, and total temperature are highlighted. This separate control over the three tunnel parameters will open new frontiers in Mach number, Reynolds number, aeroelastic, and model-tunnel interaction studies.

  9. Space Station Freedom: a unique laboratory for gravitational biology research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, R. W.; Cowing, K. L.

    1993-01-01

    The advent of Space Station Freedom (SSF) will provide a permanent laboratory in space with unparalleled opportunities to perform biological research. As with any spacecraft there will also be limitations. It is our intent to describe this space laboratory and present a picture of how scientists will conduct research in this unique environment we call space. SSF is an international venture which will continue to serve as a model for other peaceful international efforts. It is hoped that as the human race moves out from this planet back to the moon and then on to Mars that SSF can serve as a successful example of how things can and should be done.

  10. Explaining human uniqueness: genome interactions with environment, behaviour and culture

    PubMed Central

    Varki, Ajit; Geschwind, Daniel H.; Eichler, Evan E.

    2009-01-01

    What makes us human? Specialists in each discipline respond through the lens of their own expertise. In fact, ‘anthropogeny’ (explaining the origin of humans) requires a transdisciplinary approach that eschews such barriers. Here we take a genomic and genetic perspective towards molecular variation, explore systems analysis of gene expression and discuss an organ-systems approach. Rejecting any ‘genes versus environment’ dichotomy, we then consider genome interactions with environment, behaviour and culture, finally speculating that aspects of human uniqueness arose because of a primate evolutionary trend towards increasing and irreversible dependence on learned behaviours and culture — perhaps relaxing allowable thresholds for large-scale genomic diversity. PMID:18802414

  11. Eubacterial rhodopsins - unique photosensors and diverse ion pumps.

    PubMed

    Brown, Leonid S

    2014-05-01

    Since the discovery of proteorhodopsins, the ubiquitous marine light-driven proton pumps of eubacteria, a large number of other eubacterial rhodopsins with diverse structures and functions have been characterized. Here, we review the body of knowledge accumulated on the four major groups of eubacterial rhodopsins, with the focus on their biophysical characterization. We discuss advances and controversies on the unique eubacterial sensory rhodopsins (as represented by Anabaena sensory rhodopsin), proton-pumping proteorhodopsins and xanthorhodopsins, as well as novel non-proton ion pumps. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Retinal Proteins - You can teach an old dog new tricks. PMID:23748216

  12. Apparatus for controlling system state based on unique identifiers

    DOEpatents

    Drotning, William D.

    2002-01-01

    An apparatus allows workers to assert and release control over the energization of a system. The apparatus does not require the workers to carry any additional paraphernalia, and is not be easily defeated by other workers. Users asserting and releasing control present tokens uniquely identifying each user to a reader, and the apparatus prevents transition of the system to an undesired state until an appropriate number of users are currently asserting control. For example, a dangerous manufacturing robot can be prevented from energizing until all the users that have asserted control when entering the robot's controlled space have subsequently released control when leaving the robot's controlled space.

  13. Copernicus crater central peak - Lunar mountain of unique composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pieters, C. M.

    1982-01-01

    Olivine is identified as the major mafic mineral in a central peak of Copernicus crater. Information on the mineral assemblages of such unsampled lunar surface material is provided by near infrared reflectance spectra (0.7 to 2.5 micrometers) obtained with earth-based telescopes. The composition of the deep-seated material comprising the Copernicus central peak is unique among measured areas. Other lunar terra areas and the wall of Copernicus exhibit spectral characteristics of mineral assemblages comparable to the feldspathic breccias returned by the Apollo missions, with low-calcium orthopyroxene being the major mafic mineral.

  14. The unique sound of the Uni-Vibe pedal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahlweg, Cornelius; Rothe, Hendrik

    2012-10-01

    A short paper covering optics and music: the Uni-Vibe, which is responsible for the unique sound of Hendrix' Woodstock performance, is one of many phasing devices based on photo conductive cells used as variable resistors. However, its sound is well distinguishable from other phasers. In the paper we shall discuss the basic properties and try to qualify and quantify the effect on the spectra of certain chords. The present paper is a side effect of the musical interests of the authors and is triggered by the announcement of the Novel Systems Session including the topics 'Optics and Music' and Historical Devices.

  15. Rediscovering area CA2: unique properties and functions.

    PubMed

    Dudek, Serena M; Alexander, Georgia M; Farris, Shannon

    2016-01-25

    Hippocampal area CA2 has several features that distinguish it from CA1 and CA3, including a unique gene expression profile, failure to display long-term potentiation and relative resistance to cell death. A recent increase in interest in the CA2 region, combined with the development of new methods to define and manipulate its neurons, has led to some exciting new discoveries on the properties of CA2 neurons and their role in behaviour. Here, we review these findings and call attention to the idea that the definition of area CA2 ought to be revised in light of gene expression data. PMID:26806628

  16. Left over bowels: an unique complication in a surviving twin.

    PubMed

    George, A T; Varkey, S; Kalam, A; Surendran, N

    2004-12-01

    Conjoint twins have always been a surgical challenge. The authors report an unusual finding in a surviving epigastric heteropagus twin. A 17 year old boy who underwent laparotomy for acute intestinal obstruction revealed a blind ending but complete duplication of the large bowel and an accessory liver in the falciform ligament, along with a separate gall bladder but with fused bile ducts. The findings suggest that the duplicated bowel loop and the accessory liver were remnants of the incomplete parasite twin, assimilated into the body of the autosite, which remained asymptomatic for 17 years. This case is being reported because of the uniqueness of the finding. PMID:15579618

  17. Biological activities of unique isoflavones prepared from Apios americana Medik.

    PubMed

    Kaneta, Haruna; Koda, Mina; Saito, Shun; Imoto, Masaya; Kawada, Manabu; Yamazaki, Yoko; Momose, Isao; Shindo, Kazuoshi

    2016-04-01

    Four unique isoflavone aglycones (barpisoflavone A (1), 2'-hydroxygenistein (2), 5-methylgenistein (3), and gerontoisoflavone A (4)) whose structures were related to genistein were prepared from the tuber of Apios americana Medik. We examined the estrogen receptor and androgen receptor binding activities, estrogen agonistic activities, antioxidant activities, and α-glucosidase inhibitory activities of 1-4. The results obtained showed that 2 possessed potent and 1, 3, and 4 possessed moderate estrogen partial agonistic activities, 1 and 2 possessed moderate antioxidant activities, and 2 and 3 possessed moderate α-glucosidase inhibitory activities. PMID:26806328

  18. Space - A unique environment for process modeling R&D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Overfelt, Tony

    1991-01-01

    Process modeling, the application of advanced computational techniques to simulate real processes as they occur in regular use, e.g., welding, casting and semiconductor crystal growth, is discussed. Using the low-gravity environment of space will accelerate the technical validation of the procedures and enable extremely accurate determinations of the many necessary thermophysical properties. Attention is given to NASA's centers for the commercial development of space; joint ventures of universities, industries, and goverment agencies to study the unique attributes of space that offer potential for applied R&D and eventual commercial exploitation.

  19. Cascade de photons dans les boîtes quantiques uniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robert, I.; Moreau, E.; Gérard, J. M.; Abram, I.

    2002-06-01

    Nous présentons l'observation expérimentale de l'émission squentielle de photons par une boîte quantique unique sous pompage optique continu ou pulsé. Cette cascade radiative produit des paires de photons corrélés qui sont émis suivant un ordre bien défini. En effet, la fonction de corrélation croisée entre les deux photons formant la paire présente une allure asymétrique, de type groupement ou dégroupement de photons, suivant l'ordre temporel de détection des deux photons. Prédit théoriquement en physique atomique, ce comportement asymétrique de la fonction de corrélation de second ordre est la signature de l'émission successive de photons.

  20. Boîtes quantiques II-VI comme sources de photons uniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couteau, C.; Moehl, S.; Tinjod, F.; Suffczynski, J.; Romestain, R.; Vial, J.-C.; Gérard, J.-M.; Kheng, K.; Poizat, J.-P.

    2004-11-01

    Dans le cadre de l'information et de la communication quantique, la nécessité d'avoir des photons uniques monomodes et à la demande se révèle cruciale. De récents travaux théoriques ont montré la possibilité de réaliser des portes logiques quantiques n'utilisant que de l'optique linéaire. C'est dans ce contexte que s'insère notre travail sur l'élaboration et l'utilisation de boîtes quantiques semi-conductrices II-VI comme “pistolet” à photons. Des expériences de dégroupement et d'interférences à 2 photons sont les premiers pas nécessaires pour caractériser notre source.

  1. A unique data acquisition system for electrical resistance tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Daily, W.; Ramirez, A.; Zonge, K.

    1996-01-04

    Unique capabilities are needed in instrumentation used for acquiring data to do electrical resistance tomography (ERT). A data acquisition system is described which has a good combination of the required capabilities and yet is field rugged and user friendly. The system is a multichannel detector for high data rates, can operate over a wide range of load conditions, will measure both in phase and quadrature resistance at frequencies between 0.0007 Hz and 8 kHz. The system has been used in both the field and laboratory to collect data with a typical accuracy between 1 and 10%.

  2. High Altitude Ice Fields: A Search for Unique Radar Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haldemann, A. F. C.; Muhleman, D. O.

    1996-09-01

    An enormous, publicly accessible data set was compiled by the two Shuttle Imaging Radar (SIR-C) missions. Just as features with unique radar polarization signatures have been observed on Venus' highlands (Haldemann et al. 1995), and Mars' polar regions (Muhleman et al. 1991), we expect that unique sites exist on Earth. Indeed, unique polarization properties of ice have been observed over Greenland (Rignot et al. 1993) that mimic the radar properties of Mars' residual south polar cap, and the ice of the Galilean satellites (Ostro et al. 1992). We hypothesize that cold ice at high elevations on Earth may also display similar enhancements of the radar echo in the same sense of circular polarization. We are surveying the SIR-C data set for full polarization images of high altitude ice fields. We are concentrating on locations with significant or full sun-shadowing, and plan to compare radar properties of the ices with different insolation patterns. This investigation is complicated by the nature of the terrain in which we seek our targets: mountainous terrain typically produces foldover or radar-shadowing which we hope to avoid through judicious target site selection, and the use of digitally mapped topography where possible. We will us the full set of Stokes parameters obtained by SIR-C on many of its tracks to reconstruct circular polarization properties of the ices for comparison to planetary studies. We hope to correlate some of our measured values with known models for mountain ice field properties, and perhaps locate and elucidate unique locales. Haldemann, A. F. C., D. O. Muhleman, B. J. Butler, and M. A. Slade, The Western Hemisphere of Venus: 3.5 cm Dual Circular Polarization Radar Images, submitted to \\it Icarus, 1995. Muhleman, D. O., B. J. Butler, A. W. Grossman, and M. A. Slade, Radar Images of Mars, \\it Science, 253, 1508--1513, 1991. Ostro \\it et al., Europa, Ganymede, and Callisto: New Radar Results from Arecibo and Goldstone, \\it J. Geophys. Res., 97, 18227--18244, 1992. Rignot, E. J., S. J. Ostro, J. J. van Zyl, and K. C. Jezek, Unusual Radar Echoes from the Greenland Ice Sheet, \\it Science, 261, 1710--1713, 1993.

  3. Unique Perspectives on a Transforming Energy Economy: 2014 Annual Report (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Gossett, S.

    2014-03-01

    What makes JISEA unique? Unique perspectives. This brochure highlights the unique perspectives provided by the Joint Institute for Strategic Energy Analysis through JISEA's recent accomplishments and the people behind them.

  4. Unique material requirements in the Space Shuttle Main Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fulton, D. L.; Shoemaker, M. C.; Bashir, S.

    1983-01-01

    Components operating in staged-combustion cycle liquid fuel rocket engines such as the Space Shuttle Main Engines (SSMEs) are subjected to severe temperature changes during start/stop transients, together with extremely high pressures, corrosive gases, high fluid velocities, demanding weight-control criteria, etc. Attention is given to the selection and application of metallic and nonmetallic materials for high temperature resistance, cryogenic properties, and hydrogen and oxygen compatibility. The materials in question include polyimides, Kel-F, Armalon, and Teflon among plastics, and gold and copper platings, weld-overlays and heat treatment modifications among metals and metallic processing techniques. The polymeric materials are oxygen-resistant, and the metallic ones hydrogen-resistant.

  5. Tracking epigenetic histone modifications in single cells using Fab-based live endogenous modification labeling

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi-Takanaka, Yoko; Yamagata, Kazuo; Wakayama, Teruhiko; Stasevich, Timothy J.; Kainuma, Takashi; Tsurimoto, Toshiki; Tachibana, Makoto; Shinkai, Yoichi; Kurumizaka, Hitoshi; Nozaki, Naohito; Kimura, Hiroshi

    2011-01-01

    Histone modifications play an important role in epigenetic gene regulation and genome integrity. It remains largely unknown, however, how these modifications dynamically change in individual cells. By using fluorescently labeled specific antigen binding fragments (Fabs), we have developed a general method to monitor the distribution and global level of endogenous histone H3 lysine modifications in living cells without disturbing cell growth and embryo development. Fabs produce distinct nuclear patterns that are characteristic of their target modifications. H3K27 trimethylation-specific Fabs, for example, are concentrated on inactive X chromosomes. As Fabs bind their targets transiently, the ratio of bound and free molecules depends on the target concentration, allowing us to measure changes in global modification levels. High-affinity Fabs are suitable for mouse embryo imaging, so we have used them to monitor H3K9 and H3K27 acetylation levels in mouse preimplantation embryos produced by in vitro fertilization and somatic cell nuclear transfer. The data suggest that a high level of H3K27 acetylation is important for normal embryo development. As Fab-based live endogenous modification labeling (FabLEM) is broadly useful for visualizing any modification, it should be a powerful tool for studying cell signaling and diagnosis in the future. PMID:21576221

  6. Unique human orbital morphology compared with that of apes

    PubMed Central

    Denion, Eric; Hitier, Martin; Guyader, Vincent; Dugué, Audrey-Emmanuelle; Mouriaux, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    Humans’ and apes’ convergent (front-facing) orbits allow a large overlap of monocular visual fields but are considered to limit the lateral visual field extent. However, humans can greatly expand their lateral visual fields using eye motion. This study aimed to assess whether the human orbital morphology was unique compared with that of apes in avoiding lateral visual field obstruction. The orbits of 100 human skulls and 120 ape skulls (30 gibbons; 30 orangutans; 30 gorillas; 30 chimpanzees and bonobos) were analyzed. The orbital width/height ratio was calculated. Two orbital angles representing orbital convergence and rearward position of the orbital margin respectively were recorded using a protractor and laser levels. Humans have the largest orbital width/height ratio (1.19; p < 0.001). Humans and gibbons have orbits which are significantly less convergent than those of chimpanzees / bonobos, gorillas and orangutans (p < 0.001). These elements suggest a morphology favoring lateral vision in humans. More specifically, the human orbit has a uniquely rearward temporal orbital margin (107.1°; p < 0.001), suitable for avoiding visual obstruction and promoting lateral visual field expansion through eye motion. Such an orbital morphology may have evolved mainly as an adaptation to open-country habitat and bipedal locomotion. PMID:26111067

  7. Rationality, irrationality and escalating behavior in lowest unique bid auctions.

    PubMed

    Radicchi, Filippo; Baronchelli, Andrea; Amaral, Luís A N

    2012-01-01

    Information technology has revolutionized the traditional structure of markets. The removal of geographical and time constraints has fostered the growth of online auction markets, which now include millions of economic agents worldwide and annual transaction volumes in the billions of dollars. Here, we analyze bid histories of a little studied type of online auctions--lowest unique bid auctions. Similarly to what has been reported for foraging animals searching for scarce food, we find that agents adopt Lévy flight search strategies in their exploration of "bid space". The Lévy regime, which is characterized by a power-law decaying probability distribution of step lengths, holds over nearly three orders of magnitude. We develop a quantitative model for lowest unique bid online auctions that reveals that agents use nearly optimal bidding strategies. However, agents participating in these auctions do not optimize their financial gain. Indeed, as long as there are many auction participants, a rational profit optimizing agent would choose not to participate in these auction markets. PMID:22279553

  8. Design, characterization and control of the Unique Mobility Corporation robot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Velasco, Virgilio B., Jr.; Newman, Wyatt S.; Steinetz, Bruce; Kopf, Carlo; Malik, John

    1994-01-01

    Space and mass are at a premium on any space mission, and thus any machinery designed for space use should be lightweight and compact, without sacrificing strength. It is for this reason that NASA/LeRC contracted Unique Mobility Corporation to exploit their novel actuator designs to build a robot that would advance the present state of technology with respect to these requirements. Custom-designed motors are the key feature of this robot. They are compact, high-performance dc brushless servo motors with a high pole count and low inductance, thus permitting high torque generation and rapid phase commutation. Using a custom-designed digital signal processor-based controller board, the pulse width modulation power amplifiers regulate the fast dynamics of the motor currents. In addition, the programmable digital signal processor (DSP) controller permits implementation of nonlinear compensation algorithms to account for motoring vs. regeneration, torque ripple, and back-EMF. As a result, the motors produce a high torque relative to their size and weight, and can do so with good torque regulation and acceptably high velocity saturation limits. This paper presents the Unique Mobility Corporation robot prototype: its actuators, its kinematic design, its control system, and its experimental characterization. Performance results, including saturation torques, saturation velocities and tracking accuracy tests are included.

  9. Unique Features and Spacecraft Applications of Dynamic Isotope Power Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Raab, B.

    1982-01-01

    The dynamic isotope power system represents the most recent attempt to develop a heat-engine generator for space electric power. A major objective in this most recent effort was to increase the power and to reduce the cost of nuclear space power systems to the point where the unique features of this power source could be brought to bear for Earth-orbit missions which could benefit therefrom. This objective was largely achieved; both weight and cost of the dynamic isotope systems are comparable to solar power systems. The dynamic isotope power system, designed for spacecraft requiring prime power in the 500-2000 W range, has been successfully built and ground tested. A number of studies, summarized herein, have demonstrated the advantages of using such a power system instead of the conventional solar system for a variety of Earth-orbit missions. These advantages stem from the unique nature of the dynamic isotope system, different in kind from solar power systems. As a result, in many cases, the spacecraft design can be significantly simplified and more closely harmonized with mission requirements. This overall advantage can be crucial in missions which have stringent pointing, stability, viewing, and/or positioning requirements.

  10. Hierarchical graphene nanoribbon assemblies feature unique electronic and mechanical properties.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhiping; Buehler, Markus J

    2009-09-16

    Graphene nanoribbons present intriguing electronic properties due to their characteristic size and edge shape, and have been suggested for a wide range of applications from electronics to electromechanical systems. To bridge the scales from their nanostructural geometry--the key for their unique properties--to the requirements critical for large-scale electronics and device applications, here we propose a de novo hierarchical material assembled from functionalized graphene nanoribbons stabilized through hydrogen bonds, mimicking the structure of beta-sheet proteins. By investigating their mechanical and electronic properties through first principles calculations, we demonstrate that hierarchical graphene nanoribbons not only preserve the unique electronic properties of individual graphene nanoribbons in the bulk, but are also energetically and mechanically stable. Specifically, we find that the energy gap of the bulk material shrinks as the width of the constituting graphene nanoribbons increases. The tuning of bulk material properties through controlling the nanostructure enables the synthesis of a broader class of biomimetic multifunctional mechanomutable and electromutable nanomaterials for electromechanical applications. PMID:19706941

  11. Historical contingency and the purported uniqueness of evolutionary innovations

    PubMed Central

    Vermeij, Geerat J.

    2006-01-01

    Many events in the history of life are thought to be singular, that is, without parallels, analogs, or homologs in time and space. These claims imply that history is profoundly contingent in that independent origins of life in the universe will spawn radically different histories. If, however, most innovations arose more than once on Earth, histories would be predictable and replicable at the scale of functional roles and directions of adaptive change. Times of origin of 23 purportedly unique evolutionary innovations are significantly more ancient than the times of first instantiation of 55 innovations that evolved more than once, implying that the early phases of life’s history were less replicable than later phases or that the appearance of singularity results from information loss through time. Indirect support for information loss comes from the distribution of sizes of clades in which the same minor, geologically recent innovation has arisen multiple times. For three repeated molluscan innovations, 28–71% of instantiations are represented by clades of five or fewer species. Such small clades would be undetectable in the early history of life. Purportedly unique innovations either arose from the union and integration of previously independent components or belong to classes of functionally similar innovations. Claims of singularity are therefore not well supported by the available evidence. Details of initial conditions, evolutionary pathways, phenotypes, and timing are contingent, but important ecological, functional, and directional aspects of the history of life are replicable and predictable. PMID:16443685

  12. Common processes at unique volcanoes - a volcanological conundrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cashman, Katharine; Biggs, Juliet

    2014-11-01

    An emerging challenge in modern volcanology is the apparent contradiction between the perception that every volcano is unique, and classification systems based on commonalities among volcano morphology and eruptive style. On the one hand, detailed studies of individual volcanoes show that a single volcano often exhibits similar patterns of behaviour over multiple eruptive episodes; this observation has led to the idea that each volcano has its own distinctive pattern of behaviour (or “personality”). In contrast, volcano classification schemes define eruption “styles” referenced to “type” volcanoes (e.g. Plinian, Strombolian, Vulcanian); this approach implicitly assumes that common processes underpin volcanic activity and can be used to predict the nature, extent and ensuing hazards of individual volcanoes. Actual volcanic eruptions, however, often include multiple styles, and type volcanoes may experience atypical eruptions (e.g., violent explosive eruptions of Kilauea, Hawaii1). The volcanological community is thus left with a fundamental conundrum that pits the uniqueness of individual volcanic systems against generalization of common processes. Addressing this challenge represents a major challenge to volcano research.

  13. Covalent Adaptable Networks (CANs): A Unique Paradigm in Crosslinked Polymers

    PubMed Central

    Kloxin, Christopher J.; Scott, Timothy F.; Adzima, Brian J.; Bowman, Christopher N.

    2010-01-01

    Polymer networks possessing reversible covalent crosslinks constitute a novel material class with the capacity for adapting to an externally applied stimulus. These covalent adaptable networks (CANs) represent a trend in polymer network fabrication towards the rational design of structural materials possessing dynamic characteristics for specialty applications. Herein, we discuss the unique attributes of CANs that must be considered when designing, fabricating, and characterizing these smart materials that respond to either thermal or photochemical stimuli. While there are many reversible reactions which to consider as possible crosslink candidates in CANs, there are very few that are readily and repeatedly reversible. Furthermore, characterization of the mechanical properties of CANs requires special consideration owing to their unique attributes. Ultimately, these attributes are what lead to the advantageous properties displayed by CANs, such as recyclability, healability, tunability, shape changes, and low polymerization stress. Throughout this perspective, we identify several trends and future directions in the emerging field of CANs that demonstrate the progress to date as well as the essential elements that are needed for further advancement. PMID:20305795

  14. Unique life sciences research facilities at NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulenburg, G. M.; Vasques, M.; Caldwell, W. F.; Tucker, J.

    1994-01-01

    The Life Science Division at NASA's Ames Research Center has a suite of specialized facilities that enable scientists to study the effects of gravity on living systems. This paper describes some of these facilities and their use in research. Seven centrifuges, each with its own unique abilities, allow testing of a variety of parameters on test subjects ranging from single cells through hardware to humans. The Vestibular Research Facility allows the study of both centrifugation and linear acceleration on animals and humans. The Biocomputation Center uses computers for 3D reconstruction of physiological systems, and interactive research tools for virtual reality modeling. Psycophysiological, cardiovascular, exercise physiology, and biomechanical studies are conducted in the 12 bed Human Research Facility and samples are analyzed in the certified Central Clinical Laboratory and other laboratories at Ames. Human bedrest, water immersion and lower body negative pressure equipment are also available to study physiological changes associated with weightlessness. These and other weightlessness models are used in specialized laboratories for the study of basic physiological mechanisms, metabolism and cell biology. Visual-motor performance, perception, and adaptation are studied using ground-based models as well as short term weightlessness experiments (parabolic flights). The unique combination of Life Science research facilities, laboratories, and equipment at Ames Research Center are described in detail in relation to their research contributions.

  15. Unique Genotypic Differences Discovered among Indigenous Bangladeshi Rice Landraces

    PubMed Central

    Elias, Sabrina M.; Haque, Taslima; Mahbub Hasan, A. K. M.; Seraj, Zeba I.

    2014-01-01

    Bangladesh is a reservoir of diverse rice germplasm and is home to many landraces with unique, important traits. Molecular characterization of these landraces is of value for their identification, preservation, and potential use in breeding programs. Thirty-eight rice landraces from different regions of Bangladesh including some high yielding BRRI varieties were analyzed by 34 polymorphic microsatellite markers yielding a total of 258 reproducible alleles. The analysis could locate 34 unique identifiers for 21 genotypes, making the latter potentially amenable to identity verification. An identity map for these genotypes was constructed with all the 12 chromosomes of the rice genome. Polymorphism information content (PIC) scores of the 34 SSR markers were 0.098 to 0.89 where on average 7.5 alleles were observed. A dendogram constructed using UPGMA clustered the varieties into two major groups and five subgroups. In some cases, the clustering matched with properties like aromaticity, stickiness, salt tolerance, and photoperiod insensitivity. The results will help breeders to work towards the proper utilization of these landraces for parental selection and linkage map construction for discovery of useful alleles. PMID:25301195

  16. Historical contingency and the purported uniqueness of evolutionary innovations.

    PubMed

    Vermeij, Geerat J

    2006-02-01

    Many events in the history of life are thought to be singular, that is, without parallels, analogs, or homologs in time and space. These claims imply that history is profoundly contingent in that independent origins of life in the universe will spawn radically different histories. If, however, most innovations arose more than once on Earth, histories would be predictable and replicable at the scale of functional roles and directions of adaptive change. Times of origin of 23 purportedly unique evolutionary innovations are significantly more ancient than the times of first instantiation of 55 innovations that evolved more than once, implying that the early phases of life's history were less replicable than later phases or that the appearance of singularity results from information loss through time. Indirect support for information loss comes from the distribution of sizes of clades in which the same minor, geologically recent innovation has arisen multiple times. For three repeated molluscan innovations, 28-71% of instantiations are represented by clades of five or fewer species. Such small clades would be undetectable in the early history of life. Purportedly unique innovations either arose from the union and integration of previously independent components or belong to classes of functionally similar innovations. Claims of singularity are therefore not well supported by the available evidence. Details of initial conditions, evolutionary pathways, phenotypes, and timing are contingent, but important ecological, functional, and directional aspects of the history of life are replicable and predictable. PMID:16443685

  17. The unique role of occupational therapy in industry.

    PubMed

    Ellexson, M T

    1985-01-01

    Experienced occupational therapists have five particular characteristics gained from their education and clinical experience which make them uniquely suited for a major role in rehabilitation of persons with industrial injuries. These are: (1) knowledge of injury and illness, (2) understanding of psych-social aspects of disability, (3) knowledge of the rehabilitation system, (4) ability to analyze tasks and (5) ability to creatively adapt the physical environment. Skills in administration, teaching and the ability to deal with a variety of people from different backgrounds: educational, socio-economic and work ethic are also vitally important for effective functioning in and with industry. For the aspirant, the beginning steps are to become familiar with the tasks workers perform, to self management personnel on a rehabilitation philosophy by showing them how return on investment can be realized, and to inform supervisors, union officials and employees of the goals of such ideas and how they will work in their company. This paper will describe how one occupational therapist has developed a program and functioned successfully in and with the railroad industry. Analysis of statistics and a case study will show cost savings and return on energy and on initial investment. The historical link between occupational therapy and industry gives credence to the unique contribution of occupational therapy and establishes the need for more occupational therapists in industry. PMID:23952309

  18. Hospice palliative care volunteers: a Unique Care Link.

    PubMed

    Weeks, Lori E; Macquarrie, Colleen; Bryanton, Olive

    2008-01-01

    In this research, we endeavoured to gain a clearer understanding of what impact hospice palliative care (HPC) volunteers have on family caregivers and the underlying factors that contribute to this. We conducted ten face-to-face interviews with bereaved women who had previously provided care for their spouses and who used HPC volunteers. We checked our interpretation through a feedback focus group. Using a methodological hermeneutic approach, we came to understand the unique position HPC volunteers occupy within the formal health care system. Our constitutive organizing theme was manifest throughout the women's stories in seven thematic areas that explicate the dimensions of the overarching theme: the Unique Care Link. We identified seven themes that exemplify specific ways in which HPC volunteers have a positive impact on the lives of spousal caregivers. This knowledge can be incorporated into the further development of training and support programs for HPC volunteers, and to increase the quality of volunteer HPC services provided to family members. PMID:18681244

  19. On characterizing adaptive events unique to modern humans.

    PubMed

    Crisci, Jessica L; Wong, Alex; Good, Jeffrey M; Jensen, Jeffrey D

    2011-01-01

    Ever since the first draft of the human genome was completed in 2001, there has been increased interest in identifying genetic changes that are uniquely human, which could account for our distinct morphological and cognitive capabilities with respect to other apes. Recently, draft sequences of two extinct hominin genomes, a Neanderthal and Denisovan, have been released. These two genomes provide a much greater resolution to identify human-specific genetic differences than the chimpanzee, our closest extant relative. The Neanderthal genome paper presented a list of regions putatively targeted by positive selection around the time of the human-Neanderthal split. We here seek to characterize the evolutionary history of these candidate regions-examining evidence for selective sweeps in modern human populations as well as for accelerated adaptive evolution across apes. Results indicate that 3 of the top 20 candidate regions show evidence of selection in at least one modern human population (P < 5 × 10(5)). Additionally, four genes within the top 20 regions show accelerated amino acid substitutions across multiple apes (P < 0.01), suggesting importance across deeper evolutionary time. These results highlight the importance of evaluating evolutionary processes across both recent and ancient evolutionary timescales and intriguingly suggest a list of candidate genes that may have been uniquely important around the time of the human-Neanderthal split. PMID:21803765

  20. Adrenal Steroids Uniquely Influence Sexual Motivation Behavior in Male Rats

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, George T.; Dearborn, Joshua T.; Maloney, Susan E.

    2012-01-01

    The androgenic adrenal steroids dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and 4?-androstenedione (4-A) have significant biological activity, but it is unclear if the behavioral effects are unique or only reflections of the effects of testosterone (TS). Gonadally intact male Long-Evans rats were assigned to groups to receive supplements of DHEA, 4-A, TS, corticosteroid (CORT), all at 400 µg steroid/kg of body weight, or vehicle only for 5 weeks. All males were tested in a paradigm for sexual motivation that measures time and urinary marks near an inaccessible receptive female. It was found that DHEA and 4-A supplements failed to influence time near the estrous female in the same way TS supplements did, and, indeed, 5 weeks of 4-A administration reduced the time similar to the suppressive effects of CORT after 3 weeks. Further, animals treated with DHEA or 4-A left fewer urinary marks near an estrous female than TS and control groups. These results suggest that DHEA and 4-A are not merely precursors of sex hormones, and provide support for these steroids influencing the brain and behavior in a unique fashion that is dissimilar from the effects of TS on male sexual behavior. PMID:25379221

  1. Unique design of Doublet and Big Dee vacuum vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.E.

    1982-04-01

    The Doublet III tokamak now in its fourth year of operation at General Atomic Company, has its plasma contained in a kidney-shaped toroidal vacuum vessel, a configuration that presented unique design challenges. Most tokamak vacuum vessels are constructed of solid walled sections separated by either thin walled bellows (to increase the toroidal resistance) or by poloidal insulation breaks. Such control of the toroidal resistance is crucial in minimizing magnetic error fields in the plasma region caused by currents induced in the vessel by the changing fields. The Doublet III vessel is unique in its all-welded construction consisting of thin skins over a corrugated center. Such a construction results in a low cross sectional area of material to increase the toroidal resistance, while maintaining adequate strength. The design process for such a vessel is reviewed with a description of its design. In order to more closely address the design issues of next generation devices, plans are being formulated to modify Doublet III to a large Dee-shaped plasma facility. This would be accomplished by disassembling the device and replacing the Doublet vessel with a large Dee vessel. The design approach for the new vessel will be similar to that of the present vessel, but because of different operating requirements and experience gained in the operation of Doublet III and other large tokamaks, the specific design criteria are different. These differences and their implications are reviewed.

  2. A unique lineage gives rise to the meibomian gland

    PubMed Central

    Fischesser, Katy; Lunn, Matthew O.; Kao, Winston W-Y.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To identify the lineage that contributes to the morphogenesis of the meibomian gland. Methods To examine which cell lineage gives rise to the meibomian gland, the expression of Pax6 as well as that of various cytokeratin markers, including keratin 14 (Krt14), Krt15, Krt4, and Krt10, was examined with immunofluorescent staining of C57BL/6J mouse eyelids from P2 to P11 pups and adult mice. Results Pax6 was localized to the cytoplasm within the acinar region of the meibomian glands during morphogenesis but was absent in the fully developed gland. Keratin 14 was expressed throughout the gland at all stages whereas keratin 15 was absent at all stages. Keratin 4, a marker of mucosal lineage, was present throughout the gland and was colocalized with keratin 10 (epidermal lineage marker) in the developing duct at P4. This colocalization region decreased as the gland developed becoming restricted to the central duct near the opening to the acini in the fully developed gland. Conclusions We identified a unique cell lineage that expresses markers characteristic of mucosal and epidermal epithelia during meibomian gland morphogenesis. This unique group of cells was located in the central duct with a concentration near the ductule orifice. The expression of these cells reduced during meibomian gland morphogenesis and may play a role in the development and homeostasis of the gland. PMID:26957900

  3. DRUMS: a human disease related unique gene mutation search engine.

    PubMed

    Li, Zuofeng; Liu, Xingnan; Wen, Jingran; Xu, Ye; Zhao, Xin; Li, Xuan; Liu, Lei; Zhang, Xiaoyan

    2011-10-01

    With the completion of the human genome project and the development of new methods for gene variant detection, the integration of mutation data and its phenotypic consequences has become more important than ever. Among all available resources, locus-specific databases (LSDBs) curate one or more specific genes' mutation data along with high-quality phenotypes. Although some genotype-phenotype data from LSDB have been integrated into central databases little effort has been made to integrate all these data by a search engine approach. In this work, we have developed disease related unique gene mutation search engine (DRUMS), a search engine for human disease related unique gene mutation as a convenient tool for biologists or physicians to retrieve gene variant and related phenotype information. Gene variant and phenotype information were stored in a gene-centred relational database. Moreover, the relationships between mutations and diseases were indexed by the uniform resource identifier from LSDB, or another central database. By querying DRUMS, users can access the most popular mutation databases under one interface. DRUMS could be treated as a domain specific search engine. By using web crawling, indexing, and searching technologies, it provides a competitively efficient interface for searching and retrieving mutation data and their relationships to diseases. The present system is freely accessible at http://www.scbit.org/glif/new/drums/index.html. PMID:21913285

  4. Unique Construction and Social Experiences in Residential Remediation Sites - 13423

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, Paul; Scarborough, Rebecca

    2013-07-01

    Sevenson Environmental Services, Inc., (Sevenson) has performed several radiological remediation projects located in residential urban areas. Over the course of these projects, there has been a wide variety of experiences encountered from construction related issues to unique social situations. Some of the construction related issues included the remediation of interior basements where contaminated material was located under the footers of the structure or was used in the mortar between cinder block or field stone foundations. Other issues included site security, maintaining furnaces or other utilities, underpinning, backfilling and restoration. In addition to the radiological hazards associated with this work there were occupational safety and industrial hygiene issues that had to be addressed to ensure the safety and health of neighboring properties and residents. The unique social situations at these job sites have included arson, theft/stolen property, assault/battery, prostitution, execution of arrest warrants for residents, discovery of drugs and paraphernalia, blood borne pathogens, and unexploded ordnance. Some of these situations have become a sort of comical urban legend throughout the organization. One situation had historical significance, involving the demolition of a house to save a tree older than the Declaration of Independence. All of these projects typically involve the excavation of early 20. century items such as advertisement signs, various old bottles (milk, Listerine, perfume, whisky) and other miscellaneous common trash items. (authors)

  5. Core and Shell Song Systems Unique to the Parrot Brain

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Mukta; Walløe, Solveig; Nedergaard, Signe; Fridel, Emma E.; Dabelsteen, Torben; Pakkenberg, Bente; Bertelsen, Mads F.; Dorrestein, Gerry M.; Brauth, Steven E.; Durand, Sarah E.; Jarvis, Erich D.

    2015-01-01

    The ability to imitate complex sounds is rare, and among birds has been found only in parrots, songbirds, and hummingbirds. Parrots exhibit the most advanced vocal mimicry among non-human animals. A few studies have noted differences in connectivity, brain position and shape in the vocal learning systems of parrots relative to songbirds and hummingbirds. However, only one parrot species, the budgerigar, has been examined and no differences in the presence of song system structures were found with other avian vocal learners. Motivated by questions of whether there are important differences in the vocal systems of parrots relative to other vocal learners, we used specialized constitutive gene expression, singing-driven gene expression, and neural connectivity tracing experiments to further characterize the song system of budgerigars and/or other parrots. We found that the parrot brain uniquely contains a song system within a song system. The parrot “core” song system is similar to the song systems of songbirds and hummingbirds, whereas the “shell” song system is unique to parrots. The core with only rudimentary shell regions were found in the New Zealand kea, representing one of the only living species at a basal divergence with all other parrots, implying that parrots evolved vocal learning systems at least 29 million years ago. Relative size differences in the core and shell regions occur among species, which we suggest could be related to species differences in vocal and cognitive abilities. PMID:26107173

  6. Plants and the Solar System Organized by Unique Longitudinal Waves.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Orvin E.

    2001-03-01

    From my experimental work and measurements, covering more than 20 years, I hypothesize that the larger systems of our universe like stars and galaxies emit unique long wavelength waves which drive other oscillating systems. Operating frequencies depend on the dimensions of the oscillator so long wavelength waves convert to short wavelengths of the order of the dimensions of the driven system. For example, the sun emits large amplitude wavelengths of the order of dimensions of the sun. The waves automatically become standing waves in a receiving system because of the reaction of the vacuum. These waves tend to organize the system that contains them. For example plants, which seem to be organized by these waves, operate with more than 100 different wavelengths having to do with a plants interaction with gravity, macroscopic and microscopic plant growth, and most other features of plant growth and development. The waves discussed here appear to penetrate everything but still can be reflected and guided. Plants appear to be unique wave guides for these waves. See the Wagner web site.

  7. New IUE Observations of Unique Asteroids & Asteroid Surface Calibration Targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, S. Alan

    We propose that IUE expand the first-order reconnaissance of non-icy planetary surface properties in the mid-ultraviolet by obtaining the UV spectra of (i) a set of asteroids visited by spacecraft, (ii) well characterized lunar surfaces, and (iii) a pair of objects making unique apparitions in 1993-1994. None of the proposed targets (including the lunar terrains, as we describe below) have been studied by IUE or HST. The proposed IUE observations are designed to provide both an important framework to "calibrate" the UV taxonomy of non-icy solar system surfaces, and useful observations to complement spacecraft flybys of asteroids, and new insights into unique objects. In the process of obtaining this dataset, we will achieve the first spectra Near Earth Asteroids (NEA) below 2500 A, obtain the first spectrum of an NEA comet nucleus candidate, and expand our database of rotationally resolved spectra from 2 objects to 5 by including the first C- and M-types, and an S-type 3x brighter than 4179 Toutatis (a target in Episode 15). We will analyze the proposed spectra to expand the database of UV-characterized asteroids, to place new constraints on the composition and reflectance of these bodies, and to make comparisons of their UV spectral properties to other planetary satellites and asteroids previously studied by IUE. Several of the observations we are proposing are time critical because particular observation geometries argue they be performed in the 1993-1994 window.

  8. Translational invariance, the Post constraint and uniqueness in macroscopic electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Lange, O. L.; Raab, R. E.; Welter, A.

    2012-07-01

    We consider semi-classical multipole theory for non-magnetic molecules interacting with harmonic plane electromagnetic waves, to electric octopole-magnetic quadrupole order and relative to an arbitrary set of molecular coordinate origins {On}. Spatial averaging of expectation values of induced molecular multipole moments produces a macroscopic theory for linear, homogeneous, anisotropic media that has three shortcomings: it is only partially invariant with respect to {On}, it is ambivalent on the Post constraint (equality of the traces of the magnetoelectric tensors), and it yields non-unique dynamic response fields D and H. To remedy these, we present a fully invariant theory that is consistent (affirmative) on the Post constraint, and is based on five time-even, invariant molecular polarizability tensors (one each of electric dipole and electric quadrupole-magnetic dipole order, and three of electric octopole-magnetic quadrupole order). As in previous work on linear phenomena, translational invariance is achieved through the Van Vleck-Buckingham condition. Uniqueness of the invariant response fields is demonstrated, based on linear independence of molecular polarizability tensors at each multipole order above electric dipole. Our results are compared with previously published expressions for two invariant polarizabilities.

  9. Unique human orbital morphology compared with that of apes.

    PubMed

    Denion, Eric; Hitier, Martin; Guyader, Vincent; Dugué, Audrey-Emmanuelle; Mouriaux, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    Humans' and apes' convergent (front-facing) orbits allow a large overlap of monocular visual fields but are considered to limit the lateral visual field extent. However, humans can greatly expand their lateral visual fields using eye motion. This study aimed to assess whether the human orbital morphology was unique compared with that of apes in avoiding lateral visual field obstruction. The orbits of 100 human skulls and 120 ape skulls (30 gibbons; 30 orangutans; 30 gorillas; 30 chimpanzees and bonobos) were analyzed. The orbital width/height ratio was calculated. Two orbital angles representing orbital convergence and rearward position of the orbital margin respectively were recorded using a protractor and laser levels. Humans have the largest orbital width/height ratio (1.19; p?uniquely rearward temporal orbital margin (107.1°; p?

  10. Arm coordination in octopus crawling involves unique motor control strategies.

    PubMed

    Levy, Guy; Flash, Tamar; Hochner, Binyamin

    2015-05-01

    To cope with the exceptional computational complexity that is involved in the control of its hyper-redundant arms [1], the octopus has adopted unique motor control strategies in which the central brain activates rather autonomous motor programs in the elaborated peripheral nervous system of the arms [2, 3]. How octopuses coordinate their eight long and flexible arms in locomotion is still unknown. Here, we present the first detailed kinematic analysis of octopus arm coordination in crawling. The results are surprising in several respects: (1) despite its bilaterally symmetrical body, the octopus can crawl in any direction relative to its body orientation; (2) body and crawling orientation are monotonically and independently controlled; and (3) contrasting known animal locomotion, octopus crawling lacks any apparent rhythmical patterns in limb coordination, suggesting a unique non-rhythmical output of the octopus central controller. We show that this uncommon maneuverability is derived from the radial symmetry of the arms around the body and the simple pushing-by-elongation mechanism by which the arms create the crawling thrust. These two together enable a mechanism whereby the central controller chooses in a moment-to-moment fashion which arms to recruit for pushing the body in an instantaneous direction. Our findings suggest that the soft molluscan body has affected in an embodied way [4, 5] the emergence of the adaptive motor behavior of the octopus. PMID:25891406

  11. Dissociative absorption: An empirically unique, clinically relevant, dissociative factor.

    PubMed

    Soffer-Dudek, Nirit; Lassri, Dana; Soffer-Dudek, Nir; Shahar, Golan

    2015-11-01

    Research of dissociative absorption has raised two questions: (a) Is absorption a unique dissociative factor within a three-factor structure, or a part of one general dissociative factor? Even when three factors are found, the specificity of the absorption factor is questionable. (b) Is absorption implicated in psychopathology? Although commonly viewed as "non-clinical" dissociation, absorption was recently hypothesized to be specifically associated with obsessive-compulsive symptoms. To address these questions, we conducted exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses on 679 undergraduates. Analyses supported the three-factor model, and a "purified" absorption scale was extracted from the original inclusive absorption factor. The purified scale predicted several psychopathology scales. As hypothesized, absorption was a stronger predictor of obsessive-compulsive symptoms than of general psychopathology. In addition, absorption was the only dissociative scale that longitudinally predicted obsessive-compulsive symptoms. We conclude that absorption is a unique and clinically relevant dissociative tendency that is particularly meaningful to obsessive-compulsive symptoms. PMID:26241024

  12. Unique High-Resolution Stratospheric Observations of Polar Mesospheric Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, A.; Araujo, D.; Chapman, D.; Didier, J.; Fritts, D. C.; Jones, G.; Kjellstrand, B.; Limon, M.; Lizancos, A.; Luu, T. V.; Macioce, T.; Tucker, G.; Vinokurov, J.

    2014-12-01

    We present a unique data set consisting of high-resolution optical images of Polar Mesospheric Clouds (PMCs), observed serendipitously from a stratospheric balloon platform in January of 2013. Complex morphological structures in the PMC brightness distribution provide observable consequences of the deposition of energy and momentum by atmospheric gravity waves in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere. This data set represents the highest resolution set of optical images of this phenomenon to date, and therefore provides a unique window into the poorly understood instability and turbulent dynamics on the smallest scales (between roughly a meter and a few km). Through this analysis, morphological features identified in individual images will be compared with those predicted in numerical models in order to identify key dynamical features present in the data on these small scales. Multiple spatially-overlapping sequential images will be analyzed together in order to extract cloud velocities and to measure timescales for feature permanence. These image compilations will also be used to place the observed small-scale features in a broader context by using multiple images to re-construct larger features, as well as to compare to features simultaneously observed on much larger scales by the CIPS instrument flying on the AIM satellite.

  13. The Mossy Fiber Bouton: the “Common” or the “Unique” Synapse?

    PubMed Central

    Rollenhagen, Astrid; Lübke, Joachim H. R.

    2010-01-01

    Synapses are the key elements for signal processing and plasticity in the brain. They are composed of nearly the same structural subelements, an apposition zone including a pre- and postsynaptic density, a cleft and a pool of vesicles. It is, however, their actual composition that determines their different behavior in synaptic transmission and plasticity. Here, we describe and discuss the structural factors underlying the unique functional properties of the hippocampal mossy fiber (MF) synapse. Two membrane specializations, active zones (AZs; transmitter release sites), and puncta adherentia (PA), putative adhesion complexes were found. On average, individual boutons had ?20 AZs with a mean surface area of 0.1??m2 and a short distance of 0.45??m between individual AZs. Mossy fiber boutons (MFBs) and their target structures were isolated from each other by astrocytes, but fine glial processes never reached the AZs. Therefore, two structural factors are likely to promote synaptic cross-talk: the short distance and the absence of fine glial processes between individual AZs. Thus, synaptic crosstalk may contribute to the high efficacy of hippocampal MF synapses. On average, an adult bouton contained ?16,000 synaptic vesicles; ?600 vesicles were located within 60?nm from the AZ, ?4000 between 60?nm and 200?nm, and the remaining beyond 200?nm, suggesting large readily releasable, recycling, and reserve pools. Thus, the size of the three pools together with the number and distribution of AZs underlie the unique extent of synaptic efficacy and plasticity of the hippocampal MF synapse. PMID:21423488

  14. 40 CFR 60.14 - Modification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... PERFORMANCE FOR NEW STATIONARY SOURCES General Provisions § 60.14 Modification. (a) Except as provided under... representative performance of the facility. At least three valid test runs must be conducted before and at least...) Maintenance, repair, and replacement which the Administrator determines to be routine for a source...

  15. 14 CFR 420.47 - License modification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false License modification. 420.47 Section 420.47 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING LICENSE TO OPERATE A LAUNCH SITE License Terms and Conditions § 420.47...

  16. 14 CFR 420.47 - License modification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false License modification. 420.47 Section 420.47 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING LICENSE TO OPERATE A LAUNCH SITE License Terms and Conditions § 420.47...

  17. 14 CFR 420.47 - License modification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false License modification. 420.47 Section 420.47 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING LICENSE TO OPERATE A LAUNCH SITE License Terms and Conditions § 420.47...

  18. 40 CFR 60.397 - Modifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Modifications. 60.397 Section 60.397 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STANDARDS OF PERFORMANCE FOR NEW STATIONARY SOURCES Standards of Performance for Automobile and Light Duty Truck...

  19. APPLICATION OF COMBUSTION MODIFICATIONS OF INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a field test program to evaluate the effect of minor combustion modifications on pollutant emissions from a variety of industrial combustion equipment types. Tested were 22 units, including refinery process heaters; clay and cement kilns; steel and alu...

  20. 75 FR 16186 - Petitions for Modification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-31

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Mine Safety and Health Administration Petitions for Modification AGENCY: Mine Safety and Health Administration.... SUMMARY: Section 101(c) of the Federal Mine Safety and Health Act of 1977 and 30 CFR Part 44 govern...