Sample records for united states geological

  1. United States Geological Survey Geospatial Information Response

    E-print Network

    Torgersen, Christian

    1 United States Geological Survey Geospatial Information Response is comprised of numerous components within the United States Geological Survey (USGS requirements and deactivation process in supporting natural hazards events. 1.2 Scope

  2. United States Geological Survey: Contaminant Biology Program

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This is the homepage of the United States Geological Survey's (USGS) Contaminant Biology Program, whose mission is to investigate the effects and exposure of environmental contaminants (for example, mercury) on the living resources of the United States. The site features links to information on the program's projects, grouped under chemistry and toxicology; contaminated habitats; and monitoring and assessment. There are also links to news items and events, publications, links to biology science centers and cooperative research units, and links to related websites.

  3. Geologic Provinces of the United States

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Mary Leech

    This site provides all information, instructions, downloadable materials, and links to online materials for an exercise developed for use in a Geology of the National Parks course. Using the provided maps, groups of 3 to 6 students are asked to identify between 8 and 12 geologic provinces based on topography, the age of rocks, and the rock types. As a result of this exercise, students will become familiar and comfortable with reading maps and legends, learn basic rock types and how geologic time is divided, define geologic provinces that will form an outline for learning the geology of the U.S., and be able to discuss the maps they create based on what they've learned. This exercise is intended for one of the first class meetings of the quarter or semester and ideally students will approach this exercise without much or any prior knowledge of the geology of the United States.

  4. State Geological Surveys and Related Agencies in the United States

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This web page is part of the California Department of Conservation, Division of Mines and Geology Web site. It provides a list of state geological surveys and related organizations in the United States (and Puerto Rico). For all of these agencies, mail addresses as well as known e-mail and Internet links are provided. Links are also provided to pages on geologic mapping, geologic hazards, earthquake engineering, mineral resources, and technical information and publications.

  5. Generalized Geologic Map of the Conterminous United States

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    USGS

    This site from the USGS features a geologic map of the United States using data prepared for publication in the National Atlas of the United States. There are explanations, documentations, and PDF files presenting the geologic map and a map unit chart, plus archives of ArcInfo files in several formats.

  6. Quantitative bedrock geology of the conterminous United States of America

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bernhard Peucker-Ehrenbrink; Mark W. Miller

    2002-01-01

    We quantitatively analyze the area-age distribution of bedrock based on data from the most recent geologic map of the conterminous United States of America [King and Beikman, 1974a, 1974b], made available in digital form by the United States Geologic Survey. The area-age distribution agrees surprisingly well with older data [Higgs, 1949] but provides much higher temporal resolution. The mean stratigraphic

  7. Environmental aspects of engineering geological mapping in the United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Radbruch-Hall, Dorothy H.

    1979-01-01

    Many engineering geological maps at different scales have been prepared for various engineering and environmental purposes in regions of diverse geological conditions in the United States. They include maps of individual geological hazards and maps showing the effect of land development on the environment. An approach to assessing the environmental impact of land development that is used increasingly in the United States is the study of a single area by scientists from several disciplines, including geology. A study of this type has been made for the National Petroleum Reserve in northern Alaska. In the San Francisco Bay area, a technique has been worked out for evaluating the cost of different types of construction and land development in terms of the cost of a number of kinds of earth science factors. ?? 1979 International Association of Engineering Geology.

  8. Regional geologic framework off northeastern United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schlee, J.; Behrendt, John C.; Grow, J.A.; Robb, James M.; Mattick, R.; Taylor, P.T.; Lawson, B.J.

    1976-01-01

    Six multichannel seismic-reflection profiles taken across the Atlantic continental margin Previous HitoffTop the northeastern United States show an excess of 14 km of presumed Mesozoic and younger sedimentary rocks in the Baltimore Canyon trough and 8 km in the Georges Bank basin. Beneath the continental rise, the sedimentary prism thickness exceeds 7 km south of New Jersey and Maryland, and it is 4.5 km thick south of Georges Bank. Stratigraphically, the continental slope--outer edge of the continental shelf is a transition zone of high-velocity sedimentary rock, probably carbonate, that covers deeply subsided basement. Acoustically, the sedimentary sequence beneath the shelf is divided into three units which are correlated speculatively with the Cenozoic, the Cretaceous, and the Jurassic-Triassic sections. These units thicken offshore, and some have increased seismic velocities farther offshore. The uppermost unit thickens from a fraction of a kilometer to slightly more than a kilometer in a seaward direction, and velocity values range from 1.7 to 2.2 km/sec. The middle unit thickens from a fraction of a kilometer to as much as 5 km (northern Baltimore Canyon trough), and seismic velocity ranges from 2.2 to 5.4 km/sec. The lowest unit thickens to a maximum of 9 km (northern Baltimore Canyon), and velocities span the 3.9 to 5.9-km/sec interval. The spatial separation of magnetic and gravity anomalies on line 2 (New Jersey) suggests that in the Baltimore Canyon region the magnetic-slope anomaly is due to edge effects and that the previously reported free-air and isostatic gravity anomalies over the outer shelf may be due in part to a lateral increase in sediment density (velocity) near the shelf edge. The East Coast magnetic anomaly and the free-air gravity high both coincide over the outer shelf edge on line 1 (Georges Bank) but are offset by 20 km from the ridge on the reflection profile. Because the magnetic-slope-anomaly wavelength is nearly 50 km across, a deep source is likely. In part, the positive free-air gravity anomaly likewise may represent the significant lateral density increase within the sedimentary section to ard the outer edge of the shelf.

  9. United States Geological Survey, Earthquake Hazards Program: Earthquake Research

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This site describes the research activities of the Earthquake Hazards Program (EHP) of the United States Geological Survey (USGS). The activities include: borehole geophysics and rock mechanics, crustal deformation, earthquake information, earthquake geology and paleoseismology, hazards, seismology and earth structure, and strong motion seismology, site response, and ground motion. Other links include: earthquake activity, earthquake facts and education, earthquake products, hazards and preparedness, regional websites, and seismic networks.

  10. United States Geological Survey: Research on Invasive Species

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This is the homepage of the United States Geological Survey's (USGS) Invasive Species Program. Materials include information about the program, news articles, and information on research projects arranged by species, project, or region. There is also contact information for researchers and experts, as well as links to publications, events, and other sites with related information.

  11. United States Geological Survey, Earthquake Hazards Program: Products and Publications

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This portal provides access to products and publications of the United States Geological Survey (USGS) Earthquake Hazards Program (EHP). Links are provided to fact sheets arranged by region in the U.S and by global and national areas. There are also links to general information such as bibliographies and publications on general geology, plate tectonics, and tsunamis. A section on information services includes links to email notification services for earthquakes, moment tensors, and seismicity reports; and RSS feeds on the latest earthquakes. There is also an extensive selection of maps, including earthquake maps, fault and landform maps, and seismic hazard and site response maps. Other materials include multimedia items (CD-ROMs and videos); open-file reports, bulletins, and circulars; and a selection of software for earthquake analysis, mapping, and data distribution. Some items are free; others are available for purchase.

  12. Beowulf Distributed Processing and the United States Geological Survey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Maddox, Brian G.

    2002-01-01

    Introduction In recent years, the United States Geological Survey's (USGS) National Mapping Discipline (NMD) has expanded its scientific and research activities. Work is being conducted in areas such as emergency response research, scientific visualization, urban prediction, and other simulation activities. Custom-produced digital data have become essential for these types of activities. High-resolution, remotely sensed datasets are also seeing increased use. Unfortunately, the NMD is also finding that it lacks the resources required to perform some of these activities. Many of these projects require large amounts of computer processing resources. Complex urban-prediction simulations, for example, involve large amounts of processor-intensive calculations on large amounts of input data. This project was undertaken to learn and understand the concepts of distributed processing. Experience was needed in developing these types of applications. The idea was that this type of technology could significantly aid the needs of the NMD scientific and research programs. Porting a numerically intensive application currently being used by an NMD science program to run in a distributed fashion would demonstrate the usefulness of this technology. There are several benefits that this type of technology can bring to the USGS's research programs. Projects can be performed that were previously impossible due to a lack of computing resources. Other projects can be performed on a larger scale than previously possible. For example, distributed processing can enable urban dynamics research to perform simulations on larger areas without making huge sacrifices in resolution. The processing can also be done in a more reasonable amount of time than with traditional single-threaded methods (a scaled version of Chester County, Pennsylvania, took about fifty days to finish its first calibration phase with a single-threaded program). This paper has several goals regarding distributed processing technology. It will describe the benefits of the technology. Real data about a distributed application will be presented as an example of the benefits that this technology can bring to USGS scientific programs. Finally, some of the issues with distributed processing that relate to USGS work will be discussed.

  13. Estimated Use of Water in the United States in 1975. Geological Survey Circular 765.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, C. Richard; Reeves, E. Bodette

    The United States Geological Survey has compiled data on water use in this country every fifth year since 1950. This document is the most recent of this series and presents data on water withdrawn for use in the United States in 1975. In the introduction, recent and present water use studies are discussed along with a description of the…

  14. The United States Geological Survey in Alaska; accomplishments during 1983

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bartsch-Winkler, S., (Edited By); Reed, K.M.

    1985-01-01

    This circular contains short reports about many of the geologic studies carried out in Alaska by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating agencies during 1983. The topics cover a wide range in scientific and economic interest.

  15. The United States Geological Survey in Alaska; accomplishments during 1984

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bartsch-Winkler, S., (Edited By)

    1985-01-01

    This circular contains short reports about many of the geologic studies carried out in Alaska by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating agencies during 1984. The topics cover a wide range in scientific and economic interest.

  16. The United States Geological Survey in Alaska; accomplishments during 1982

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reed, Katherine M., (Edited By); Bartsch-Winkler, Susan

    1984-01-01

    This circular contains short topical and summary articles about the results of 1982 geologic studies on a wide range of subjects of economic and scientific interest. Included are lists of references cited for each article and a compilation of reports about Alaska written by members of the U.S. Geological Survey and published by the Geological Survey and other organizations.

  17. The Geology of North America Vol. F-2, The Appalachian-OuachitaOrogen in the United States

    E-print Network

    Olsen, Paul E.

    The Geology of North America Vol. F-2, The Appalachian-OuachitaOrogen in the United States., and Viele, G. W., eds., The Appalachian-Oachita Orogen in the United States: Boulder, Colorado, Geological The Geological Society of America, 1989 Chapter 6 Post-Paleozoicactivity Warren Manspeizer Department

  18. Abbreviations used in publications of the United States Geological Survey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey

    1953-01-01

    The use of abbreviations in publications of the Geological Survey is determined by several forces working in different directions. Pulling in the direction of greater condensation and the freer use of abbreviations and symbols is the desire to achieve greater economy in publications. Working in the opposite direction is the desire to have the publications used more conveniently by an increasingly heterogeneous public.

  19. United States Geological Survey (USGS) Natural Hazards Response

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lamb, Rynn; Jones, Brenda K.

    2012-01-01

    The primary goal of U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Natural Hazards Response is to ensure that the disaster response community has access to timely, accurate, and relevant geospatial products, imagery, and services during and after an emergency event. To accomplish this goal, products and services provided by the National Geospatial Program (NGP) and Land Remote Sensing (LRS) Program serve as a geospatial framework for mapping activities of the emergency response community. Post-event imagery and analysis can provide important and timely information about the extent and severity of an event. USGS Natural Hazards Response will also support the coordination of remotely sensed data acquisitions, image distribution, and authoritative geospatial information production as required for use in disaster preparedness, response, and recovery operations.

  20. Relation of geology and hydrogeology in the southeastern United States

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.A. (Geological Survey, Norcross, GA (United States))

    1993-03-01

    Although the geology of the Southeastern US is complex, the principal aquifers in the region can be grouped into four categories. These are: (1) aquifers in consolidated rocks, mostly of Paleozoic age, that are flatlying to intensely folded; (2) crystalline-rock aquifers; (3) aquifers in unconsolidated to semiconsolidated, clastic Coastal Plain sediments; and (4) mostly consolidated carbonate-rock aquifers in the Coastal Plain. Each category is different in porosity type, permeability, and the water-yielding capability of the rocks. Most of the porosity in consolidated Paleozoic rocks of the Appalachian Plateaus and Valley and Ridge areas is secondary and consists of joints, fractures, and bedding planes. Some primary porosity, however, is present in Paleozoic sandstones. Partial dissolution of carbonate rocks, and closely spaced joints and fractures caused by folding or faulting, locally increase permeability. The Paleozoic rocks of Kentucky and Tennessee are typical of this aquifer category, and yield only moderate volumes of water. Crystalline rocks, such as those of the North Carolina Piedmont, have little primary porosity. Fractures are the only effective porosity in these rocks, which yield little water to wells. Classic sediments in the Coastal Plain are characterized by primary porosity. Coarse sands and gravels are the most productive aquifers in these strata. These aquifers yield moderate to large volumes of water, as shown by a regional aquifer that extends from Mississippi to South Carolina. Carbonate rocks in the Florida Coastal Plain have primary and secondary porosity. Partial dissolution of these rocks is the principal type of secondary porosity, but locally, recrystallization and dolomitization are important. The Floridan aquifer system, typical of these carbonate rocks, is extremely porous and permeable, and yield large volumes of water.

  1. Quaternary Geologic Map of the Des Moines 4 Degrees x 6 Degrees Quadrangle, United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hallberg, George R., (compiler); Lineback, Jerry A.; Mickelson, David M.; Knox, James C.; Goebel, Joseph E.; Hobbs, Howard C.; Whitfield, John W.; Ward, Ronald A.; Boellstorff, John D.; Swinehart, James B.; Dreeszen, Vincent H.; edited and integrated by Richmond, Gerald Martin; Fullerton, David S.; Christiansen, Ann Coe

    1994-01-01

    The Quaternary Geologic Map of the Des Moines 4 degree x 6 degree Quadrangle was mapped as part of the Quaternary Geologic Atlas of the United States. The atlas was begun as an effort to depict the areal distribution of surficial geologic deposits and other materials that accumulated or formed during the past 2+ million years, the period that includes all activities of the human species. These materials are at the surface of the earth. They make up the 'ground' on which we walk, the 'dirt' in which we dig foundations, and the 'soil' in which we grow crops. Most of our human activity is related in one way or another to these surface materials that are referred to collectively by many geologists as regolith, the mantle of fragmental and generally unconsolidated material that overlies the bedrock foundation of the continent. The maps were compiled at 1:1,000,000 scale. This map is part of the Quaternary Geologic Atlas of the United States (I-1420). It was first published as a printed edition in 1994. The geologic data have now been captured digitally and are presented here along with images of the printed map sheet and component parts as PDF files.

  2. Quaternary Geologic Map of the Platte River 4 Degrees x 6 Degrees Quadrangle, United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swinehart, James B., (compiler); Dreeszen, Vincent H.; Richmond, Gerald Martin; Tipton, Merlin J.; Bretz, Richard F.; Steece, Fred V.; Hallberg, George R.; Goebel, Joseph E.; edited and integrated by Richmond, Gerald Martin

    1994-01-01

    The Quaternary Geologic Map of the Platte River 4 degree x 6 degree Quadrangle was mapped as part of the Quaternary Geologic Atlas of the United States. The atlas was begun as an effort to depict the areal distribution of surficial geologic deposits and other materials that accumulated or formed during the past 2+ million years, the period that includes all activities of the human species. These materials are at the surface of the earth. They make up the 'ground' on which we walk, the 'dirt' in which we dig foundations, and the 'soil' in which we grow crops. Most of our human activity is related in one way or another to these surface materials that are referred to collectively by many geologists as regolith, the mantle of fragmental and generally unconsolidated material that overlies the bedrock foundation of the continent. The maps were compiled at 1:1,000,000 scale. This map is part of the Quaternary Geologic Atlas of the United States (I-1420). It was first published as a printed edition in 1994. The geologic data have now been captured digitally and are presented here along with images of the printed map sheet and component parts as PDF files.

  3. Quaternary geologic map of the Blue Ridge 4 degrees x 6 degrees quadrangle, United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    State compilations by Howard, Alan D.; Behling, Robert E.; Wheeler, Walter H.; Daniels, Raymond B.; Swadley, W.C.; Richmond, Gerald M.; Goldthwait, Richard P.; Sevon, William D.; Miller, Robert A.; Edited and integrated by Richmond, Gerald M.; Fullerton, David S.; Christiansen, Ann Coe; Digital edition by Bush, Charles A.

    1991-01-01

    This map is part of the Quaternary Geologic Atlas of the United States (I-1420). It was first published as a printed edition in 1986. The geologic data have now been captured digitally and are presented here along with images of the printed map sheet and component parts as PDF files. The Quaternary Geologic Map of the Blue Ridge 4° x 6° Quadrangle was mapped as part of the Quaternary Geologic Atlas of the United States. The atlas was begun as an effort to depict the areal distribution of surficial geologic deposits and other materials that accumulated or formed during the past 2+ million years, the period that includes all activities of the human species. These materials are at the surface of the earth. They make up the "ground" on which we walk, the "dirt" in which we dig foundations, and the "soil" in which we grow crops. Most of our human activity is related in one way or another to these surface materials that are referred to collectively by many geologists as that overlies the bedrock foundation of the continent. The maps were compiled at 1:1,000,000 scale.

  4. Codes for the identification of aquifer names and geologic units in the United States and the Caribbean outlying areas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey

    1988-01-01

    This standard provides codes to be used for the identification of aquifer names and geologic units in the United States, the Caribbean and other outlying areas. Outlying areas include Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, American Samoa, the Midway Islands, Trust Territories of the Pacific Islands, and miscellaneous Pacific Islands. Each code identifies an aquifer or rock-stratigraphic unit and its age designation. The codes provide a standardized base for use by organizations in the storage, retrieval, and exchange of ground-water data; the indexing and inventory of ground-water data and information; the cataloging of ground-water data acquisition activities; and a variety of other applications.

  5. Codes for the identification of aquifer names and geologic units in the United States and the Caribbean outlying areas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey

    1985-01-01

    This standard provides codes to be used for the identification of aquifer names and geologic units in the United States, the Caribbean and other outlying areas. Outlying areas include Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, American Samoa, the Midway Islands, Trust Territories of the Pacific Islands, and miscellaneous Pacific Islands. Each code identifies an aquifer or rock-stratigraphic unit and its age designation. The codes provide a standardized base for use by organizations in the storage, retrieval, and exchange of ground-water data; the indexing and inventory of ground-water data and information; the cataloging of ground-water data acquisition activities; and a variety of other applications.

  6. Quaternary geologic map of the Ottawa 4 degrees x 6 degrees quadrangle, United States and Canada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fullerton, David S.; Gadd, N. R., (compiler); Veillette, J.J.; Wagner, P.W.; Chapman, W.F.

    1993-01-01

    The Quaternary Geologic Map of the Ottawa 4 degree x 6 degree Quadrangle was mapped as part of the Quaternary Geologic Atlas of the United States. The atlas was begun as an effort to depict the areal distribution of surficial geologic deposits and other materials that accumulated or formed during the past 2+ million years, the period that includes all activities of the human species. These materials are at the surface of the earth. They make up the 'ground' on which we walk, the 'dirt' in which we dig foundations, and the 'soil' in which we grow crops. Most of our human activity is related in one way or another to these surface materials that are referred to collectively by many geologists as regolith, the mantle of fragmental and generally unconsolidated material that overlies the bedrock foundation of the continent. The maps were compiled at 1:1,000,000 scale.

  7. Mapping watershed potential to contribute phosphorus from geologic materials to receiving streams, southeastern United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Terziotti, Silvia; Hoos, Anne B.; Harned, Douglas; Garcia, Ana Maria

    2010-01-01

    As part of the southeastern United States SPARROW (SPAtially Referenced Regressions On Watershed attributes) water-quality model implementation, the U.S. Geological Survey created a dataset to characterize the contribution of phosphorus to streams from weathering and erosion of surficial geologic materials. SPARROW provides estimates of total nitrogen and phosphorus loads in surface waters from point and nonpoint sources. The characterization of the contribution of phosphorus from geologic materials is important to help separate the effects of natural or background sources of phosphorus from anthropogenic sources of phosphorus, such as municipal wastewater or agricultural practices. The potential of a watershed to contribute phosphorus from naturally occurring geologic materials to streams was characterized by using geochemical data from bed-sediment samples collected from first-order streams in relatively undisturbed watersheds as part of the multiyear U.S. Geological Survey National Geochemical Survey. The spatial pattern of bed-sediment phosphorus concentration is offered as a tool to represent the best available information at the regional scale. One issue may weaken the use of bed-sediment phosphorus concentration as a surrogate for the potential for geologic materials in the watershed to contribute to instream levels of phosphorus-an unknown part of the variability in bed-sediment phosphorus concentration may be due to the rates of net deposition and processing of phosphorus in the streambed rather than to variability in the potential of the watershed's geologic materials to contribute phosphorus to the stream. Two additional datasets were created to represent the potential of a watershed to contribute phosphorus from geologic materials disturbed by mining activities from active mines and

  8. Quaternary geologic map of the Lookout Mountain 4° x 6° quadrangle, United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    State compilations by Miller, Robert A.; Maher, Stuart W.; Copeland, Charles W., Jr.; Rheams, Katherine F.; Neathery, Thorton L.; Gilliland, William A.; Friddell, Michael S.; Van Nostrand, Arnie K.; Wheeler, Walter H.; Holbrook, Drew F.; Bush, William V.; Edited and integrated by Richmond, Gerald M.; Fullerton, David S.; Digital edition by Bush, Charles A.

    1988-01-01

    This map is part of the Quaternary Geologic Atlas of the United States (I–1420). It was first published as a printed edition in 1988. The geologic data have now been captured digitally and are presented here along with images of the printed map sheet and component parts as PDF files. The Quaternary Geologic Map of the Lookout Mountain 4° x 6° Quadrangle was mapped as part of the Quaternary Geologic Atlas of the United States. The atlas was begun as an effort to depict the areal distribution of surficial geologic deposits and other materials that accumulated or formed during the past 2+ million years, the period that includes all activities of the human species. These materials are at the surface of the Earth. They make up the "ground" on which we walk, the "dirt" in which we dig foundations, and the "soil" in which we grow crops. Most of our human activity is related in one way or another to these surface materials that are referred to collectively by many geologists as regolith, the mantle of fragmental and generally unconsolidated material that overlies the bedrock foundation of the continent. The maps were compiled at 1:1,000,000 scale. In recent years, surficial deposits and materials have become the focus of much interest by scientists, environmentalists, governmental agencies, and the general public. They are the foundations of ecosystems, the materials that support plant growth and animal habitat, and the materials through which travels much of the water required for our agriculture, our industry, and our general well being. They also are materials that easily can become contaminated by pesticides, fertilizers, and toxic wastes. In this context, the value of the surficial geologic map is evident.

  9. Quaternary geologic map of the Mobile 4 degrees x 6 degrees quadrangle, United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    State compilations by Copeland, Charles W., Jr.; Rheams, K.F.; Neathery, T.L.; Gilliland, W.A.; Schmidt, Walter; Clark, W.C., Jr.; Pope, D.E.; edited and integrated by Richmond, Gerald Martin; Fullerton, David S.; Weide, David L.; Digital database by Bush, Charles A.

    1988-01-01

    This map is part of the Quaternary Geologic Atlas of the United States (I-1420). It was first published as a printed edition in 1988. The geologic data have now been captured digitally and are presented here along with images of the printed map sheet and component parts as PDF files. The Quaternary Geologic Map of the Mobile 4 degrees x 6 degrees Quadrangle was mapped as part of the Quaternary Geologic Atlas of the United States. The atlas was begun as an effort to depict the areal distribution of surficial geologic deposits and other materials that accumulated or formed during the past 2+ million years, the period that includes all activities of the human species. These materials are at the surface of the Earth. They make up the ground on which we walk, the dirt in which we dig foundations, and the soil in which we grow crops. Most of our human activity is related in one way or another to these surface materials that are referred to collectively by many geologists as regolith, the mantle of fragmental and generally unconsolidated material that overlies the bedrock foundation of the continent. The maps were compiled at 1:1,000,000 scale. In recent years, surficial deposits and materials have become the focus of much interest by scientists, environmentalists, governmental agencies, and the general public. They are the foundations of ecosystems, the materials that support plant growth and animal habitat, and the materials through which travels much of the water required for our agriculture, our industry, and our general well being. They also are materials that easily can become contaminated by pesticides, fertilizers, and toxic wastes. In this context, the value of the surficial geologic map

  10. About the Geologic Map in the National Atlas of the United States of America

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reed, John C.; Bush, Charles A.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction The geologic map in the National Atlas of the United States of America shows the age, distribution, and general character of the rocks that underlie the Nation, including Alaska, Hawaii, Puerto Rico, and the Virgin Islands (but excluding other small island possessions). (The National Atlas of the United States can be accessed at URL http://nationalatlas.gov/natlas/Natlasstart.asp.) The map depicts the bedrock that lies immediately beneath soils or surficial deposits except where these deposits are so thick and extensive that the type of bedrock beneath them can only be inferred by deep drilling or geophysical methods, or both. Thus, it does not show the extensive glacial deposits of the North Central and Northeastern States, the deep residuum of the Southeastern and South Central States, the relatively thin alluvium along many major rivers and basins, and extensive eolian deposits on the high plains. However, it does show, in a general way, the thick alluvial deposits along the lower Mississippi River and on the Atlantic and Gulf Coastal Plains, and in the deep basins of the western cordillera. The rocks are classified as either sedimentary, volcanic, plutonic, or metamorphic, and their geologic ages are given in terms using a simplified version of the 1999 Geological Society of America geologic time scale. In some places rocks depicted as sedimentary are interlayered with volcanic rocks, including tuff, volcanic breccia, and volcanic flows. Conversely, many of the rocks shown as volcanic include interlayered sedimentary rocks. Plutonic rocks are classified by age and as granitic, intermediate, mafic, or ultramafic, but no similar classification has been attempted for the volcanic rocks in this version of the map. Where sedimentary or volcanic rocks have been metamorphosed but still retain clear evidence of their depositional age and origin, the extent of the metamorphism is shown by a pattern. Where the metamorphism has been so intense that the rocks bear little resemblance to the rocks from which they were derived, they are mapped as gneiss, but the age given is generally the age of the original rocks. The map in the National Atlas is a generalization of a new geologic map of North America that has recently been published by the Geological Society of America. The original compilation was prepared at a scale of 1:2,500,000 for publication at a scale of 1:5,000,000. This generalized version is intended for viewing at scales between about 1:10,000,000 and 1:7,500,000.

  11. Preliminary report on geology along Atlantic Continental Margin of northeastern United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Minard, J.P.; Perry, W.J.; Weed, E.G.A.; Rhodehamel, E.C.; Robbins, E.I.; Mixon, R.B.

    1974-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey is conducting a geologic and geophysical study of the northeastern United States outer continental shelf and the adjacent slope from Georges Bank to Cape Hatteras. The study also includes the adjacent coastal plain because it is a more accessible extension of the shelf. The total study area is about 324,000 sq km, of which the shelf and slope constitute about 181,000 sq km and the coastal plain constitutes 143,000 sq km. The shelf width ranges from about 30 km at Cape Hatteras to about 195 km off Raritan Bay and on Georges Bank. Analyses of bottom samples make it possible to construct a preliminary geologic map of the shelf and slope to a water depth of 2,000 m. The oldest beds cropping out in the submarine canyons and on the slope are of early ate Cretaceous age. Beds of Early Cretaceous and Jurassic age are present in deep wells onshore and probably are present beneath the shelf in the area of this study. Such beds are reported beneath the Scotian shelf on the northeast where they include limestone, salt, and anhydrite. Preliminary conclusions suggest a considerably thicker Mesozoic sedimentary sequence than has been described previously. The region is large; the sedimentary wedge is thick; structures seem favorable; and the hydrocarbon potential may be considerable.

  12. Ground-Water Recharge in the Arid and Semiarid Southwestern United States - Climatic and Geologic Framework

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stonestrom, David A.; Harrill, James R.

    2007-01-01

    Ground-water recharge in the arid and semiarid southwestern United States results from the complex interplay of climate, geology, and vegetation across widely ranging spatial and temporal scales. Present-day recharge tends to be narrowly focused in time and space. Widespread water-table declines accompanied agricultural development during the twentieth century, demonstrating that sustainable ground-water supplies are not guaranteed when part of the extracted resource represents paleorecharge. Climatic controls on ground-water recharge range from seasonal cycles of summer monsoonal and winter frontal storms to multimillennial cycles of glacial and interglacial periods. Precipitation patterns reflect global-scale interactions among the oceans, atmosphere, and continents. Large-scale climatic influences associated with El Ni?o and Pacific Decadal Oscillations strongly but irregularly control weather in the study area, so that year-to-year variations in precipitation and ground-water recharge are large and difficult to predict. Proxy data indicate geologically recent periods of multidecadal droughts unlike any in the modern instrumental record. Anthropogenically induced climate change likely will reduce ground-water recharge through diminished snowpack at higher elevations, and perhaps through increased drought. Future changes in El Ni?o and monsoonal patterns, both crucial to precipitation in the study area, are highly uncertain in current models. Land-use modifications influence ground-water recharge directly through vegetation, irrigation, and impermeable area, and indirectly through climate change. High ranges bounding the study area?the San Bernadino Mountains and Sierra Nevada to the west, and the Wasatch and southern Colorado Rocky Mountains to the east?provide external geologic controls on ground-water recharge. Internal geologic controls stem from tectonic processes that led to numerous, variably connected alluvial-filled basins, exposure of extensive Paleozoic aquifers in mountainous recharge areas, and distinct modes of recharge in the Colorado Plateau and Basin and Range subregions.

  13. An Interactive 3-D Geologic Map for Lake County, Illinois, United States of America

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Andrew J. Stumpf; Donald E. Luman

    2007-01-01

    Please click here to download the map associated with this article.Geological mapping projects undertaken in the Chicago metropolitan areas of northeastern Illinois are providing critical scientific information requested by government officials and public agencies to direct future land use, groundwater extraction, and environmental mitigation. Specifically, in Lake County, the Illinois State Geological Survey is undertaking a program to map glacial

  14. An Evaluation of Selected Extraordinary Floods in the United States Reported by the U.S. Geological Survey and

    E-print Network

    discharge of 580,000 ft3 /s from 402 mi2 in 1935 is a world-record defining flood discharge. #12;AnAn Evaluation of Selected Extraordinary Floods in the United States Reported by the U.S. Geological Survey and Implications for Future Advancement of Flood Science Scientific Investigations Report 2008

  15. Illinois State Geological Survey

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Illinois State Geological Survey (ISGS) homepage provides information on geologic mapping, earthquakes, fossils, groundwater, wetlands, glacial geology, bedrock geology, and Lake Michigan geology. Educational materials include field trip guides, short publications on Illinois geology for students and teachers, online tours, single-page maps, and a geologic column. Other materials include databases and collections of GIS data, well records, drill cores, and mining information; a bibliography of Illinois geology; online maps and data; and information on water and land use, resource development, and geologic hazards.

  16. Geologic occurrences of erionite in the United States: an emerging national public health concern for respiratory disease

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Van Gosen, Bradley S.; Blitz, Thomas A.; Plumlee, Geoffrey S.; Meeker, Gregory P.; Pierson, M. Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Erionite, a mineral series within the zeolite group, is classified as a Group 1 known respiratory carcinogen. This designation resulted from extremely high incidences of mesothelioma discovered in three small villages from the Cappadocia region of Turkey, where the disease was linked to environmental exposures to fibrous forms of erionite. Natural deposits of erionite, including fibrous forms, have been identified in the past in the western United States. Until recently, these occurrences have generally been overlooked as a potential hazard. In the last several years, concerns have emerged regarding the potential for environmental and occupational exposures to erionite in the United States, such as erionite-bearing gravels in western North Dakota mined and used to surface unpaved roads. As a result, there has been much interest in identifying locations and geologic environments across the United States where erionite occurs naturally. A 1996 U.S. Geological Survey report describing erionite occurrences in the United States has been widely cited as a compilation of all US erionite deposits; however, this compilation only focused on one of several geologic environments in which erionite can form. Also, new occurrences of erionite have been identified in recent years. Using a detailed literature survey, this paper updates and expands the erionite occurrences database, provided in a supplemental file (US_erionite.xls). Epidemiology, public health, and natural hazard studies can incorporate this information on known erionite occurrences and their characteristics. By recognizing that only specific geologic settings and formations are hosts to erionite, this knowledge can be used in developing management plans designed to protect the public.

  17. Preliminary integrated geologic map databases for the United States: Digital data for the generalized bedrock geologic map, Yukon Flats region, east-central Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Till, Alison B.; Dumoulin, Julie A.; Phillips, Jeffrey D.; Stanley, Richard G.; Crews, Jessie

    2006-01-01

    The growth in the use of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) has highlighted the need for digital geologic maps that have been attributed with information about age and lithology. Such maps can be conveniently used to generate derivative maps for manifold special purposes such as mineral-resource assessment, metallogenic studies, tectonic studies, and environmental research. This report is part of a series of integrated geologic map databases that cover the entire United States. Three national-scale geologic maps that portray most or all of the United States already exist; for the conterminous U.S., King and Beikman (1974a,b) compiled a map at a scale of 1:2,500,000, Beikman (1980) compiled a map for Alaska at 1:2,500,000 scale, and for the entire U.S., Reed and others (2005a,b) compiled a map at a scale of 1:5,000,000. A digital version of the King and Beikman map was published by Schruben and others (1994). Reed and Bush (2004) produced a digital version of the Reed and others (2005a) map for the conterminous U.S. The present series of maps is intended to provide the next step in increased detail. State geologic maps that range in scale from 1:100,000 to 1:1,000,000 are available for most of the country, and digital versions of these state maps are the basis of this product. The digital geologic maps presented here are in a standardized format as ARC/INFO export files and as ArcView shape files. Data tables that relate the map units to detailed lithologic and age information accompany these GIS files. The map is delivered as a set 1:250,000-scale quadrangle files. To the best of our ability, these quadrangle files are edge-matched with respect to geology. When the maps are merged, the combined attribute tables can be used directly with the merged maps to make derivative maps.

  18. Evaluation of SIR-A space radar for geologic interpretation: United States, Panama, Colombia, and New Guinea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macdonald, H.; Waite, W. P.; Kaupp, V. H.; Bridges, L. C.; Storm, M.

    1983-01-01

    Comparisons between LANDSAT MSS imagery, and aircraft and space radar imagery from different geologic environments in the United States, Panama, Colombia, and New Guinea demonstrate the interdependence of radar system geometry and terrain configuration for optimum retrieval of geologic information. Illustrations suggest that in the case of space radars (SIR-A in particular), the ability to acquire multiple look-angle/look-direction radar images of a given area is more valuable for landform mapping than further improvements in spatial resolution. Radar look-angle is concluded to be one of the most important system parameters of a space radar designed to be used for geologic reconnaissance mapping. The optimum set of system parameters must be determined for imaging different classes of landform features and tailoring the look-angle to local topography.

  19. U.S. Geological Survey probabilistic methodology for oil and gas resource appraisal of the United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crovelli, R.A.

    1984-01-01

    Probabilistic methodology used by the U.S. Geological Survey is described for estimating the quantity of undiscovered recoverable conventional resources of oil and gas in the United States. A judgmental probability distribution of the "quantity of resource" and its properties is determined for a geologic province or basin. From this distribution, point and interval estimates of the quantity of undiscovered resource are obtained. Distributions and their properties are established for each of the following resources: (1) oil and nonassociated gas from estimates of the probability of the resource being present and the conditional probability distribution of the quantity of resource given that the resource is present, (2) associated-dissolved gas from its corresponding oil distribution, (3) total gas, (4) oil and total gas in two or more provinces. Computer graphics routines are illustrated with examples from the U.S. Geological Survey Circular 860. ?? 1984 Plenum Publishing Corporation.

  20. Quaternary geologic map of the Hudson River 4 degree x 6 degree quadrangle, United States and Canada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    State and province compilations by Fullerton, David S.; Sevon, William D.; Muller, Ernest H.; Judson, Sheldon; Black, Robert F.; Wagner, Phillip W.; Hartshorn, Joseph H.; Chapman, William F.; Cowan, William D.; edited and integrated by Fullerton, David S.

    1992-01-01

    The Quaternary Geologic Map of the Hudson River 4? x 6? Quadrangle was mapped as part of the Quaternary Geologic Atlas of the United States. The atlas was begun as an effort to depict the areal distribution of surficial geologic deposits and other materials that accumulated or formed during the past 2+ million years, the period that includes all activities of the human species. These materials are at the surface of the earth. They make up the 'ground' on which we walk, the 'dirt' in which we dig foundations, and the 'soil' in which we grow crops. Most of our human activity is related in one way or another to these surface materials that are referred to collectively by many geologists as regolith, the mantle of fragmental and generally unconsolidated material that overlies the bedrock foundation of the continent. The maps were compiled at 1:1,000,000 scale.

  1. Geodesy- and geology-based slip-rate models for the Western United States (excluding California) national seismic hazard maps

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Petersen, Mark D.; Zeng, Yuehua; Haller, Kathleen M.; McCaffrey, Robert; Hammond, William C.; Bird, Peter; Moschetti, Morgan; Shen, Zhengkang; Bormann, Jayne; Thatcher, Wayne

    2014-01-01

    The 2014 National Seismic Hazard Maps for the conterminous United States incorporate additional uncertainty in fault slip-rate parameter that controls the earthquake-activity rates than was applied in previous versions of the hazard maps. This additional uncertainty is accounted for by new geodesy- and geology-based slip-rate models for the Western United States. Models that were considered include an updated geologic model based on expert opinion and four combined inversion models informed by both geologic and geodetic input. The two block models considered indicate significantly higher slip rates than the expert opinion and the two fault-based combined inversion models. For the hazard maps, we apply 20 percent weight with equal weighting for the two fault-based models. Off-fault geodetic-based models were not considered in this version of the maps. Resulting changes to the hazard maps are generally less than 0.05 g (acceleration of gravity). Future research will improve the maps and interpret differences between the new models.

  2. Attributes for MRB_E2RF1 Catchments by Major River Basins in the Conterminous United States: Bedrock Geology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wieczorek, Michael E.; LaMotte, Andrew E.

    2010-01-01

    This tabular data set represents the area of bedrock geology types in square meters compiled for every catchment of MRB_E2RF1 catchments for Major River Basins (MRBs, Crawford and others, 2006). The source data set is the "Geology of the Conterminous United States at 1:2,500,000 Scale--A Digital Representation of the 1974 P.B. King and H.M. Beikman Map" (Schuben and others, 1994). The MRB_E2RF1 catchments are based on a modified version of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (USEPA) ERF1_2 and include enhancements to support national and regional-scale surface-water quality modeling (Nolan and others, 2002; Brakebill and others, 2011). Data were compiled for every MRB_E2RF1 catchment for the conterminous United States covering New England and Mid-Atlantic (MRB1), South Atlantic-Gulf and Tennessee (MRB2), the Great Lakes, Ohio, Upper Mississippi, and Souris-Red-Rainy (MRB3), the Missouri (MRB4), the Lower Mississippi, Arkansas-White-Red, and Texas-Gulf (MRB5), the Rio Grande, Colorado, and the Great basin (MRB6), the Pacific Northwest (MRB7) river basins, and California (MRB8).

  3. Wyoming State Geological Survey

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This agency's mission is to study, examine, and seek an understanding of the geology, mineral resources, and physical features of the State; to prepare, publish, and distribute reports and maps of Wyoming's geology, mineral resources, and physical features; and to provide information, advice, and services related to the geology, mineral resources, and physical features of the State. This site contains details and reports about metals in Wyoming, earthquakes and other hazards, coal, industrial minerals, uranium, oil and gas. The field trip section contains details about various areas to visit with students and gives a general geologic description. There is also a searchable bibliography with publications about Wyoming geology. Links are provided for additional resources.

  4. Report upon United States geological surveys west of the one hundredth meridian, Volume VI: Botany

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wheeler, George Montague

    1878-01-01

    Although investigations in Botany, governed in a measure by the sparsely settled condition of the regions visited, are but incidental to the systematic purpose of the Survey, which has for its main object the determination of data necessary for the construction of a detailed topographical map, yet it is believed that the material here presented, as the result of examination, by specialists, of large and complete collections, will have its value as a substantial contribution to the knowledge of the Botany of portions of the United States west of the 1OOth meridian and south of the 40th parallel.

  5. Geology in the 1996 USGS seismic-hazard maps, central and eastern United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wheeler, R.L.; Frankel, A.

    2000-01-01

    The current (1996) national probabilistic seismic-hazard maps utilize information about geologic structure and tectonics of the central and eastern U.S. to compensate for uncertainty that arises from the short seismicity record. Geology was incorporated into the maps mainly as seven source zones that are delineated in three distinct ways. The North American stable continental region is divided into two large zones, the sparsely seismic Precambrian craton and the more active Phanerozoic rim. Five other source zones are much smaller - the Wabash Valley source zone is within the craton, whereas the Reelfoot Rift, eastern Tennessee, Charleston, and Charlevoix source zones are in the Phanerozoic rim of the continent. We document these zones and explain and justify their use. The seven zones provide a foundation from which we suggest a criterion for including more geology in future maps.

  6. UNITED STATES STREAMFLOW DATA FROM US GEOLOGICAL SURVEY STREAM-GAGING STATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) stream-gaging program provides streamflow data for a variety of purposes that range from current needs, such as flood forecasting, to future or long-term needs, such as detection of changes in streamflow due to human activities or global warming....

  7. Geodetic vs. Geologic Measures of Fault Slip Rates in the Northern Walker Lane, Basin and Range Province, Western United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammond, W. C.; Kreemer, C.; Blewitt, G.

    2008-05-01

    Quantifying faults slip rates and styles is an important objective in the study of crustal deformation. Fault slip rates are used to quantify seismic hazard associated with active faults, and are an important input into the U.S.G.S. seismic hazard maps. However, when multiple types of data (e.g. geologic, seismic and geodetic) are used to measure slip rates, results from the different techniques can be corroborative, complementary, or in direct conflict. Geologic methods provide some of the only constraints on slip rates of individual faults over hundreds to tens of thousands of years, time scales that are significant with respect to observed deformation patterns, and likely representative of modern hazard. On the other hand geodetic measurements provide strong constraints on the medium to long spatial wavelength (>50 km) budgets of deformation, and on geographic changes in deformation style, and have the potential to provide geographically complete measurements of surface deformation. However, geodetic measurements can be influenced by earthquake cycle effects, e.g. owing to interseismic fault locking and postseismic relaxation, which limit their ability to resolve individual slip rates, especially in complex systems with many closely spaced faults. The northern Walker Lane (NWL), in the western Basin and Range Province (BRP) of the United States, is an example of a complex system of dextral, normal and sinestral faults that work together to accommodate approximately 10 mm/yr of relative motion between the Sierra Nevada/Great Valley block and the central part of the BRP. To exploit the strengths of each dataset, we have built a detailed model of NWL crustal blocks and are using geodetic and geologic data to resolve patterns of crustal deformation. We use a block modeling technique that incorporates the strengths of both targeted geologic investigations of slip rates on individual faults and longer wavelength constraints offered by GPS geodesy. To constrain these models we use a compilation of GPS data from our own 163-site MAGNET GPS network plus regional continuous GPS sites from the Plate Boundary Observatory and BARGEN networks, and published USGS campaign velocities. For geologic data we have tabulated slip rate estimates into two categories, 1) published studies with quantitative rates valid in the Quaternary, and 2) the USGS Quaternary Fault and Fold Database that is a comprehensive web-available database with many reconnaissance level estimates of fault slip rate. Our modeling helps unravel the slip rate debate by distinguishing between system-wide discrepancies in integrated moment rate across the NWL, and point-wise discrepancies in individual fault slip rates. Our modeling shows that on the systemic level, even a single reliable geologic slip rate can improve the condition of the modeling, and on the individual fault level geodetic constraints can eliminate feasibility of some very high slip rates allowed by the geologic data. We conclude that for the NWL, the rate disagreement is attributable to an incomplete catalog of geologic slip rates and not to systematic underestimation of slip rates in the individual studies.

  8. Attributes for MRB_E2RF1 Catchments by Major River Basins in the Conterminous United States: Surficial Geology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wieczorek, Michael E.; LaMotte, Andrew E.

    2010-01-01

    This tabular data set represents the area of surficial geology types in square meters compiled for every MRB_E2RF1 catchment of selected Major River Basins (MRBs, Crawford and others, 2006). The source data set is the "Digital data set describing surficial geology in the conterminous US" (Clawges and Price, 1999).The MRB_E2RF1 catchments are based on a modified version of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (USEPA) ERF1_2 and include enhancements to support national and regional-scale surface-water quality modeling (Nolan and others, 2002; Brakebill and others, 2008). Data were compiled for every MRB_E2RF1 catchment for the conterminous United States covering New England and Mid-Atlantic (MRB1), South Atlantic-Gulf and Tennessee (MRB2), the Great Lakes, Ohio, Upper Mississippi, and Souris-Red-Rainy (MRB3), the Missouri (MRB4), the Lower Mississippi, Arkansas-White-Red, and Texas-Gulf (MRB5), the Rio Grande, Colorado, and the Great basin (MRB6), the Pacific Northwest (MRB7) river basins, and California (MRB8).

  9. The United States Polar Rock Repository: A geological resource for the Earth science community

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grunow, Annie M.; Elliot, David H.; Codispoti, Julie E.

    2007-01-01

    The United States Polar Rock Repository (USPRR) is a U. S. national facility designed for the permanent curatorial preservation of rock samples, along with associated materials such as field notes, annotated air photos and maps, raw analytic data, paleomagnetic cores, ground rock and mineral residues, thin sections, and microfossil mounts, microslides and residues from Polar areas. This facility was established by the Office of Polar Programs at the U. S. National Science Foundation (NSF) to minimize redundant sample collecting, and also because the extreme cold and hazardous field conditions make fieldwork costly and difficult. The repository provides, along with an on-line database of sample information, an essential resource for proposal preparation, pilot studies and other sample based research that should make fieldwork more efficient and effective. This latter aspect should reduce the environmental impact of conducting research in sensitive Polar Regions. The USPRR also provides samples for educational outreach. Rock samples may be borrowed for research or educational purposes as well as for museum exhibits.

  10. United States Unit

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Mrs. Weaver

    2009-11-09

    Fifth grade social studies. Students are assigned to a specific state in the United states, they are to discover specific details of the state and share with the class. You are forced to move out of your state and must find a new place to live in the United States. You are to research one state and create a power point or brochure to give away to a classmate to help them make their decision on where they want ...

  11. Regional stratigraphy and subsurface geology of Cenozoic deposits, Gulf Coastal Plain, south-central United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hosman, R.L.

    1996-01-01

    The Gulf Coast Regional Aquifer-System Analysis study includes all major Cenozoic aquifer systems in the Gulf Coastal Plain of Alabama, Arkansas, westernmost Florida, Illinois, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, Tennessee, and Texas. Although Cenozoic deposits are not uniformly differentiated, interstate correlations of major Paleocene and Eocene units are generally established, and the altitude of the top and thickness of seven units were mapped. Younger deposits are not as well differentiated; therefore, only three of the younger units were mapped.

  12. The geology of asbestos in the United States and its practical applications

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Van Gosen, B. S.

    2007-01-01

    Recently, naturally occurring asbestos (NOA) has drawn the attention of numerous health and regulatory agencies and citizen groups. NOA can be released airborne by (1) the disturbance of asbestos-bearing bedrocks through human activities or natural weathering, and (2) the mining and milling of some mineral deposits in which asbestos occurs as an accessory mineral(s). Because asbestos forms in specific rock types and geologic conditions, this information can be used to focus on areas with the potential to contain asbestos, rather than devoting effort to areas with minimal NOA potential. All asbestos minerals contain magnesium, silica, and water as essential constituents, and some also contain major iron and/or calcium. Predictably, the geologic environments that host asbestos are enriched in these components. Most asbestos deposits form by metasomatic replacement of magnesium-rich rocks. Asbestos-forming environments typically display shear or evidence for a significant influx of silica-rich hydrothermal fluids. Asbestos-forming processes can be driven by regional metamorphism, contact metamorphism, or magmatic hydrothermal systems. Thus, asbestos deposits of all sizes and styles are typically hosted by magnesium-rich rocks (often also iron-rich) that were altered by a metamorphic or magmatic process. Rock types known to host asbestos include serpentinites, altered ultramafic and some mafic rocks, dolomitic marbles and metamorphosed dolostones, metamorphosed iron formations, and alkalic intrusions and carbonatites. Other rock types appear unlikely to contain asbestos. These geologic insights can be used by the mining industry, regulators, land managers, and others to focus attention on the critical locales most likely to contain asbestos.

  13. OPTIMAL GEOLOGICAL ENVIRONMENTS FOR CARBON DIOXIDE DISPOSAL IN SALINE AQUIFERS IN THE UNITED STATES

    SciTech Connect

    Susan D. Hovorka

    1999-02-01

    Recent research and applications have demonstrated technologically feasible methods, defined costs, and modeled processes needed to sequester carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) in saline-water-bearing formations (aquifers). One of the simplifying assumptions used in previous modeling efforts is the effect of real stratigraphic complexity on transport and trapping in saline aquifers. In this study we have developed and applied criteria for characterizing saline aquifers for very long-term sequestration of CO{sub 2}. The purpose of this pilot study is to demonstrate a methodology for optimizing matches between CO{sub 2} sources and nearby saline formations that can be used for sequestration. This project identified 14 geologic properties used to prospect for optimal locations for CO{sub 2} sequestration in saline-water-bearing formations. For this demonstration, we digitized maps showing properties of saline formations and used analytical tools in a geographic information system (GIS) to extract areas that meet variably specified prototype criteria for CO{sub 2} sequestration sites. Through geologic models, realistic aquifer properties such as discontinuous sand-body geometry are determined and can be used to add realistic hydrologic properties to future simulations. This approach facilitates refining the search for a best-fit saline host formation as our understanding of the most effective ways to implement sequestration proceeds. Formations where there has been significant drilling for oil and gas resources as well as extensive characterization of formations for deep-well injection and waste disposal sites can be described in detail. Information to describe formation properties can be inferred from poorly known saline formations using geologic models in a play approach. Resulting data sets are less detailed than in well-described examples but serve as an effective screening tool to identify prospects for more detailed work.

  14. Geological and production characteristics of strandplain/barrier island reservoirs in the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, E.L.; Fowler, M.; Jackson, S.; Madden, M.P.; Reeves, T.K.; Salamy, S.P.; Young, M.A.

    1994-12-01

    The Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) primary mission in the oil research program is to maximize the economically and environmentally sound recovery of oil from domestic reservoirs and to preserve access to this resource. The Oil Recovery Field Demonstration Program supports DOE`s mission through cost-shared demonstrations of improved Oil Recovery (IOR) processes and reservoir characterization methods. In the past 3 years, the DOE has issued Program Opportunity Notices (PONs) seeking cost-shared proposals for the three highest priority, geologically defined reservoir classes. The classes have been prioritized based on resource size and risk of abandonment. This document defines the geologic, reservoir, and production characteristics of the fourth reservoir class, strandplain/barrier islands. Knowledge of the geological factors and processes that control formation and preservation of reservoir deposits, external and internal reservoir heterogeneities, reservoir characterization methodology, and IOR process application can be used to increase production of the remaining oil-in-place (IOR) in Class 4 reservoirs. Knowledge of heterogeneities that inhibit or block fluid flow is particularly critical. Using the TORIS database of 330 of the largest strandplain/barrier island reservoirs and its predictive and economic models, the recovery potential which could result from future application of IOR technologies to Class 4 reservoirs was estimated to be between 1.0 and 4.3 billion barrels, depending on oil price and the level of technology advancement. The analysis indicated that this potential could be realized through (1) infill drilling alone and in combination with polymer flooding and profile modification, (2) chemical flooding (sufactant), and (3) thermal processes. Most of this future potential is in Texas, Oklahoma, and the Rocky Mountain region. Approximately two-thirds of the potentially recoverable resource is at risk of abandonment by the year 2000.

  15. Geologic factors affecting coal mine roof stability in the eastern United States

    SciTech Connect

    Kane, W.F. (Univ. of the Pacific, Stockton, CA (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering); Milici, R.C. (Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States)); Gathright, T.M. II (Virginia Div. of Mineral Resources, Charlottesville, VA (United States))

    1993-06-01

    Roof falls in underground coal mines are a continuing source of trouble for mine operators. Fatalities and injuries are a prominent concern, but lost time due to cleanup and disruption of mining operations presents an economic problem as well. Many geologic and geomechanical factors contribute to mine roof instability. These may be seen in rock core during exploration, or in the roof as mining progresses. Once these features are recognized, remedial action can then be taken. Geologic parameters attributed to roof falls in underground coal mines include both lithologic and structural discontinuities. The roof may be weakened where different lithologic materials are in contact with one another, such as paleochannels, scours, rider seams, clay veins, or crevasse splay deposits. Fractures, i.e., joints and faults, also contribute to roof falls. The trend, dip angle, and density of fractures, and the presence of slickensides are important in determining roof stability. Stress fields underground, both tectonic and mining-induced, not only can determine whether failure will occur, but also the mode of such failure. Detrimental features of a more localized nature include kettlebottoms, coal balls, and moisture fluctuations. The use of paleoenvironmental studies is important in determining hazardous roof conditions. Particular hazards are more likely to be present in one paleoenvironment than another. When that environment is determined in advance of mining, precautions can be taken during the mine-planning phase.

  16. Divisions of Geologic Time: Major Chronostratigraphic and Geochronologic Units

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This geologic time scale, developed by the United States Geological Survey (USGS) Geologic Names Committee, provides the most up-to-date ages for all the geologic periods and presents recently adopted new names for some of the oldest divisions of geologic time. It is available as a downloadable, printable USGS fact sheet that includes the time-scale graphic, a brief description of the changes, and a discussion of how the time scale's color shemes relate to geologic maps. References and a citation for the publication are provided.

  17. Divisions of Geologic Time - Major Chronostratigraphic and Geochronologic Units

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey Geologic Names Committee

    2007-01-01

    Introduction Effective communication in the geosciences requires consistent uses of stratigraphic nomenclature, especially divisions of geologic time. A geologic time scale is composed of standard stratigraphic divisions based on rock sequences and calibrated in years (Harland and others, 1982). Over the years, the development of new dating methods and refinement of previous ones have stimulated revisions to geologic time scales. Since the mid-1990s, geologists from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), State geological surveys, academia, and other organizations have sought a consistent time scale to be used in communicating ages of geologic units in the United States. Many international debates have occurred over names and boundaries of units, and various time scales have been used by the geoscience community.

  18. Block kinematics of the Pacific–North America plate boundary in the southwestern United States from inversion of GPS, seismological, and geologic data

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert McCaffrey

    2005-01-01

    The active deformation of the southwestern United States (30°–41°N) is represented by a finite number of rotating, elastic-plastic spherical caps. GPS-derived horizontal velocities, geologic fault slip rates, transform fault azimuths, and earthquake-derived fault slip vector azimuths are inverted for block angular velocities, creep on block-bounding faults, permanent strain rates within the blocks, and the rotations of 11 published GPS velocity

  19. Geologic and hydrologic considerations for various concepts of high-level radioactive waste disposal in conterminous United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ekren, E.B.; Dinwiddie, G.A.; Mytton, J.W.; Thordarson, William; Weir, J.E., Jr.; Hinrichs, E.N.; Schroder, L.J.

    1974-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation is to evaluate and identify which geohydrologic environments in conterminous United States are best suited for various concepts or methods of underground disposal of high-level radioactive wastes and to establish geologic and hydrologic criteria that are pertinent to high-level waste disposal. The unproven methods of disposal include (1) a very deep drill hole (30,000-50,000 ft or 9,140-15,240 m), (2) a matrix of (an array of multiple) drill holes (1,000-20,000 ft or 305-6,100 m), (3) a mined chamber (1,000-10,000 ft or 305-3,050 m), (4) a cavity with separate manmade structures (1,000-10,000 ft or 305-3,050 m), and (5) an exploded cavity (2,000-20,000 ft or 610-6,100 m) o The geohydrologic investigation is made on the presumption that the concepts or methods of disposal are technically feasible. Field and laboratory experiments in the future may demonstrate whether or not any of the methods are practical and safe. All the conclusions drawn are tentative pending experimental confirmation. The investigation focuses principally on the geohydrologic possibilities of several methods of disposal in rocks other than salt. Disposal in mined chambers in salt is currently under field investigation, and this disposal method has been intensely investigated and evaluated by various workers under the sponsorship of the Atomic Energy Commission. Of the various geohydrologic factors that must be considered in the selection of optimum waste-disposal sites, the most important is hydrologic isolation to assure that the wastes will be safely contained within a small radius of the emplacement zone. To achieve this degree of hydrologic isolation, the host rock for the wastes must have very low permeability and the site must be virtually free of faults. In addition, the locality should be in (1) an area of low seismic risk where the possibility of large earthquakes rupturing the emplacement zone is very low, (2) where the possibility- of flooding by rise is very low, (3) where a possible return of glacial or pluvial climate will not cause potentially hazardous changes in surface- or ground-water regimens, and (4) where danger of exhumation by erosion is nil. The geographic location for an optimum site is one that is far removed from major drainages, lakes, and oceans, where population density is low, and where the topographic relief is gentle in order to avoid steep surface-water drainage gradients that would allow rapid distribution of contaminants in case of accident. The most suitable medium for the unproven deep drill-hole, matrix-holes, and exploded-cavity methods appears to be crystalline rocks, either intrusive igneous or metamorphic because of their potentially low permeabilities and high mechanical strengths. Salt (either in thick beds or stable domes), tuff, and possibly shale appear to be suitable for mined chambers and cavities with separate manmade structures. Salt appears to be suitable because of its very low permeability, high thermal conductivity, and natural plasticity. Tuff and shale appear suitable because of their very low permeabilities and high ion-exchange capacities. Sedimentary rocks other than shale and volcanic rocks, exclusive of tuff, are considered to be generally unsuitable for waste emplacement because of their potentially high permeabilities. Areas that appear to satisfy most geohydrologic requirements for the deep drill hole and the matrix holes include principally (1) the stable continental interior where the sedimentary cover is thin or absent, (2) the shield area of the North-Central States, and (3) the metamorphic belt of Eastern United States--primarily the Piedmont. These areas are possibly suitable also for the exploded cavity and the mined chamber because the possibility of finding rock with very- permeability at depths from 1,000? feet (305? m) to 20,000 feet (6,100 m) appears to be high. The Basin and Range province of Western United States, particula

  20. Application of geologic map information to water quality issues in the southern part of the Chesapeake Bay watershed, Maryland and Virginia, eastern United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCartan, L.; Peper, J.D.; Bachman, L.J.; Horton, J.W., Jr.

    1999-01-01

    Geologic map units contain much information about the mineralogy, chemistry, and physical attributes of the rocks mapped. This paper presents information from regional-scale geologic maps in Maryland and Virginia, which are in the southern part of the Chesapeake Bay watershed in the eastern United States. The geologic map information is discussed and analyzed in relation to water chemistry data from shallow wells and stream reaches in the area. Two environmental problems in the Chesapeake Bay watershed are used as test examples. The problems, high acidity and high nitrate concentrations in streams and rivers, tend to be mitigated by some rock and sediment types and not by others. Carbonate rocks (limestone, dolomite, and carbonate-cemented rocks) have the greatest capacity to neutralize acidic ground water and surface water in contact with them. Rocks and sediments having high carbon or sulfur contents (such as peat and black shale) potentially contribute the most toward denitrification of ground water and surface water in contact with them. Rocks and sediments that are composed mostly of quartz, feldspar, and light-colored clay (rocks such as granite and sandstone, sediments such as sand and gravel) tend not to alter the chemistry of waters that are in contact with them. The testing of relationships between regionally mapped geologic units and water chemistry is in a preliminary stage, and initial results are encouraging.Geologic map units contain much information about the mineralogy, chemistry, and physical attributes of the rocks mapped. This paper presents information from regional-scale geologic maps in Maryland and Virginia, which are in the southern part of the Chesapeake Bay watershed in the eastern United States. The geologic map information is discussed and analyzed in relation to water chemistry data from shallow wells and stream reaches in the area. Two environmental problems in the Chesapeake Bay watershed are used as test examples. The problems, high acidity and high nitrate concentrations in streams and rivers, tend to be mitigated by some rock and sediment types and not by others. Carbonate rocks (limestone, dolomite, and carbonate-cemented rocks) have the greatest capacity to neutralize acidic ground water and surface water in contact with them. Rocks and sediments having high carbon or sulfur contents (such as peat and black shale) potentially contribute the most toward denitrification of ground water and surface water in contact with them. Rocks and sediments that are composed mostly of quartz, feldspar, and light-colored clay (rocks such as granite and sandstone, sediments such as sand and gravel) tend not to alter the chemistry of waters that are in contact with them. The testing of relationships between regionally mapped geologic units and water chemistry is in a preliminary stage, and initial results are encouraging.

  1. Geographical and geological data from caves and mines infected with white-nose syndrome (WNS) before September 2009 in the eastern United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swezey, Christopher S.; Garrity, Christopher P.

    2011-01-01

    Since 2006, a white fungus named Geomyces destructans has been observed on the muzzles, noses, ears, and (or) wings of bats in the eastern United States, and bat colonies that are infected with this fungus have experienced dramatic incidences of mortality. Although it is not exactly certain how and why these bats are dying, this condition has been named white-nose syndrome (WNS). WNS appears to have spread from an initial infection site at a cave that is connected to a commercial cave in New York, and by the end of August 2009 was identified in at least 74 other sites in the eastern United States. Although detailed geographical and geological data are limited, a review of the available data shows that sites infected with WNS before September 2009 include both natural caves and mines. These infected sites extend from New Hampshire to Virginia, and known site elevations range from 84 to 2693 feet above sea level. In terms of geological setting, the infected sites include sedimentary, metamorphic, and igneous rocks of ages ranging from Precambrian to Jurassic. However, by the end of August 2009, no infected sites had been identified in strata of Mississippian, Cretaceous, or Triassic age. Meteorological data are sparse, but most of the recorded air temperatures in the known WNS-infected caves and mines range from 0 to 13.9 degrees C, and humidity measurements range from 68 to 100 percent. Although it is not certain which environmental parameters are important for WNS, it is hoped that the geographical and geological information presented in this paper will inform and clarify some of the debate about WNS, lead to greater understanding of the environmental parameters associated with WNS, and highlight the paucity of scientific data from caves in the eastern United States.

  2. Geologic assessment of undiscovered oil and gas resources: Oligocene Frio and Anahuac Formations, United States Gulf of Mexico coastal plain and State waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swanson, Sharon M.; Karlsen, Alexander W.; Valentine, Brett J.

    2013-01-01

    The Oligocene Frio and Anahuac Formations were assessed as part of the 2007 U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) assessment of Tertiary strata of the U.S. Gulf of Mexico Basin onshore and State waters. The Frio Formation, which consists of sand-rich fluvio-deltaic systems, has been one of the largest hydrocarbon producers from the Paleogene in the Gulf of Mexico. The Anahuac Formation, an extensive transgressive marine shale overlying the Frio Formation, contains deltaic and slope sandstones in Louisiana and Texas and carbonate rocks in the eastern Gulf of Mexico. In downdip areas of the Frio and Anahuac Formations, traps associated with faulted, rollover anticlines are common. Structural traps commonly occur in combination with stratigraphic traps. Faulted salt domes in the Frio and Anahuac Formations are present in the Houston embayment of Texas and in south Louisiana. In the Frio Formation, stratigraphic traps are found in fluvial, deltaic, barrier-bar, shelf, and strandplain systems. The USGS Tertiary Assessment Team defined a single, Upper Jurassic-Cretaceous-Tertiary Composite Total Petroleum System (TPS) for the Gulf Coast basin, based on previous studies and geochemical analysis of oils in the Gulf Coast basin. The primary source rocks for oil and gas within Cenozoic petroleum systems, including Frio Formation reservoirs, in the northern, onshore Gulf Coastal region consist of coal and shale rich in organic matter within the Wilcox Group (Paleocene–Eocene), with some contributions from the Sparta Sand of the Claiborne Group (Eocene). The Jurassic Smackover Formation and Cretaceous Eagle Ford Formation also may have contributed substantial petroleum to Cenozoic reservoirs. Modeling studies of thermal maturity by the USGS Tertiary Assessment Team indicate that downdip portions of the basal Wilcox Group reached sufficient thermal maturity to generate hydrocarbons by early Eocene; this early maturation is the result of rapid sediment accumulation in the early Tertiary, combined with the reaction kinetic parameters used in the models. A number of studies indicate that the migration of oil and gas in the Cenozoic Gulf of Mexico basin is primarily vertical, occurring along abundant growth faults associated with sediment deposition or along faults associated with salt domes. The USGS Tertiary assessment team developed a geologic model based on recurring regional-scale structural and depositional features in Paleogene strata to define assessment units (AUs). Three general areas, as described in the model, are found in each of the Paleogene stratigraphic intervals assessed: “Stable Shelf,” “Expanded Fault,” and “Slope and Basin Floor” zones. On the basis of this model, three AUs for the Frio Formation were defined: (1) the Frio Stable Shelf Oil and Gas AU, containing reservoirs with a mean depth of about 4,800 feet in normally pressured intervals; (2) the Frio Expanded Fault Zone Oil and Gas AU, containing reservoirs with a mean depth of about 9,000 feet in primarily overpressured intervals; and (3) the Frio Slope and Basin Floor Gas AU, which currently has no production but has potential for deep gas resources (>15,000 feet). AUs also were defined for the Hackberry trend, which consists of a slope facies stratigraphically in the middle part of the Frio Formation, and the Anahuac Formation. The Frio Basin Margin AU, an assessment unit extending to the outcrop of the Frio (or basal Miocene), was not quantitatively assessed because of its low potential for production. Two proprietary, commercially available databases containing field and well production information were used in the assessment. Estimates of undiscovered resources for the five AUs were based on a total of 1,734 reservoirs and 586,500 wells producing from the Frio and Anahuac Formations. Estimated total mean values of technically recoverable, undiscovered resources are 172 million barrels of oil (MMBO), 9.4 trillion cubic feet of natural gas (TCFG), and 542 million barrels of natural gas liquids for all of the Frio and Anahuac AUs. Of the five units asse

  3. Geologic Maps

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Russell Graymer

    This web site provides an introduction to geologic maps. Topics covered include what is a geologic map, unique features of geologic maps, letter symbols, faults, and strike and dip. Users may click to view colored geologic maps, the geologic map of the United States and the geologic relief map of the United States.

  4. Groundwater Atlas of the United States

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The US Geological Survey describes the location, extent, and geologic and hydrologic characteristics of major aquifers in the United States in the Groundwater Atlas of the United States Website. The groundwater resources of the US are broken down into specific regions, which are described in chapters. Some of the chapters are not available online, but the chapters that are available include regional geology and aquifer systems summaries, figures (.eps), and illustrations.

  5. Geologic assessment of undiscovered conventional oil and gas resources--Middle Eocene Claiborne Group, United States part of the Gulf of Mexico Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hackley, Paul C.

    2012-01-01

    The Middle Eocene Claiborne Group was assessed using established U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) assessment methodology for undiscovered conventional hydrocarbon resources as part of the 2007 USGS assessment of Paleogene-Neogene strata of the United States part of the Gulf of Mexico Basin including onshore and State waters. The assessed area is within the Upper Jurassic-Cretaceous-Tertiary Composite total petroleum system, which was defined as part of the assessment. Source rocks for Claiborne oil accumulations are interpreted to be organic-rich downdip shaley facies of the Wilcox Group and the Sparta Sand of the Claiborne Group; gas accumulations may have originated from multiple sources including the Jurassic Smackover and Haynesville Formations and Bossier Shale, the Cretaceous Eagle Ford and Pearsall(?) Formations, and the Paleogene Wilcox Group and Sparta Sand. Hydrocarbon generation in the basin started prior to deposition of Claiborne sediments and is ongoing at present. Emplacement of hydrocarbons into Claiborne reservoirs has occurred primarily via vertical migration along fault systems; long-range lateral migration also may have occurred in some locations. Primary reservoir sands in the Claiborne Group include, from oldest to youngest, the Queen City Sand, Cook Mountain Formation, Sparta Sand, Yegua Formation, and the laterally equivalent Cockfield Formation. Hydrocarbon traps dominantly are rollover anticlines associated with growth faults; salt structures and stratigraphic traps also are important. Sealing lithologies probably are shaley facies within the Claiborne and in the overlying Jackson Group. A geologic model, supported by spatial analysis of petroleum geology data including discovered reservoir depths, thicknesses, temperatures, porosities, permeabilities, and pressures, was used to divide the Claiborne Group into seven assessment units (AU) with distinctive structural and depositional settings. The AUs include (1) Lower Claiborne Stable Shelf Gas and Oil (50470120), (2) Lower Claiborne Expanded Fault Zone Gas (50470121), (3) Lower Claiborne Slope and Basin Floor Gas (50470122), (4) Lower Claiborne Cane River (50470123), (5) Upper Claiborne Stable Shelf Gas and Oil (50470124), (6) Upper Claiborne Expanded Fault Zone Gas (50470125), and (7) Upper Claiborne Slope and Basin Floor Gas (50470126). Total estimated mean undiscovered conventional hydrocarbon resources in the seven assessment units combined are 52 million barrels of oil, 19.145 trillion cubic feet of natural gas, and 1.205 billion barrels of natural gas liquids. A recurring theme that emerged from the evaluation of the seven Claiborne AUs is that the great bulk of undiscovered hydrocarbon resources comprise non-associated gas and condensate contained in deep (mostly >12,000 feet), overpressured, structurally complex outer shelf or slope and basin floor reservoirs. The continuing development of these downdip objectives is expected to be the primary focus of exploration activity for the onshore Middle Eocene Gulf Coast in the coming decades.

  6. USGS National Geologic Map Database: State-wide Geologic Maps

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This search tool provides descriptions and availability information for geologic maps of the 50 States, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico. These geologic maps are published by a variety of organizations, including State geologic agencies, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), universities, and private companies. Title, date, scale, publisher, series (where applicable), and basic ordering information is provided for each map. A place name search and an advanced search using geologic themes, areas, publishers and other criteria allow for more specific queries to the database.

  7. Variable Density Flow Modeling for Simulation Framework for Regional Geologic CO{sub 2} Storage Along Arches Province of Midwestern United States

    SciTech Connect

    Joel Sminchak

    2011-09-30

    The Arches Province in the Midwestern U.S. has been identified as a major area for carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) storage applications because of the intersection of Mt. Simon sandstone reservoir thickness and permeability. To better understand large-scale CO{sub 2} storage infrastructure requirements in the Arches Province, variable density scoping level modeling was completed. Three main tasks were completed for the variable density modeling: Single-phase, variable density groundwater flow modeling; Scoping level multi-phase simulations; and Preliminary basin-scale multi-phase simulations. The variable density modeling task was successful in evaluating appropriate input data for the Arches Province numerical simulations. Data from the geocellular model developed earlier in the project were translated into preliminary numerical models. These models were calibrated to observed conditions in the Mt. Simon, suggesting a suitable geologic depiction of the system. The initial models were used to assess boundary conditions, calibrate to reservoir conditions, examine grid dimensions, evaluate upscaling items, and develop regional storage field scenarios. The task also provided practical information on items related to CO{sub 2} storage applications in the Arches Province such as pressure buildup estimates, well spacing limitations, and injection field arrangements. The Arches Simulation project is a three-year effort and part of the United States Department of Energy (U.S. DOE)/National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) program on innovative and advanced technologies and protocols for monitoring/verification/accounting (MVA), simulation, and risk assessment of CO{sub 2} sequestration in geologic formations. The overall objective of the project is to develop a simulation framework for regional geologic CO{sub 2} storage infrastructure along the Arches Province of the Midwestern U.S.

  8. Exercise 3: Reclassifying the New York State Geologic Map

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Barb Tewksbury

    Barbara and David Tewksbury, Hamilton College Summary Students download and merge the multiple sheets of the New York State Geologic Map together and reclassify units to create an attractive and legible version of ...

  9. Rules for the preparation of manuscript and illustrations designed for publication by the United States Geological Survey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hampson, Thomas

    1888-01-01

    In the annual report of the Director of the U. S. Geological Survey for 1885-'86, pages 40 and 41, you set forth the functions of the chief of the editorial division as follows: "To secure clear and accurate statement in the material sent to press, careful proof-reading, and uniformity in the details of book-making, as well as to assist the Director in exercising a general supervision over the publications of the Survey."

  10. Leveraging Regional Exploration to Develop Geologic Framework for CO2 Storage in Deep Formations in Midwestern United States

    SciTech Connect

    Neeraj Gupta

    2009-09-30

    Obtaining subsurface data for developing a regional framework for geologic storage of CO{sub 2} can require drilling and characterization in a large number of deep wells, especially in areas with limited pre-existing data. One approach for achieving this objective, without the prohibitive costs of drilling costly standalone test wells, is to collaborate with the oil and gas drilling efforts in a piggyback approach that can provide substantial cost savings and help fill data gaps in areas that may not otherwise get characterized. This leveraging with oil/gas drilling also mitigates some of the risk involved in standalone wells. This collaborative approach has been used for characterizing in a number of locations in the midwestern USA between 2005 and 2009 with funding from U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE award: DE-FC26-05NT42434) and in-kind contributions from a number of oil and gas operators. The results are presented in this final technical report. In addition to data collected under current award, selected data from related projects such as the Midwestern Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (MRCSP), the Ohio River Valley CO{sub 2} storage project at and near the Mountaineer Plant, and the drilling of the Ohio Stratigraphic well in Eastern Ohio are discussed and used in the report. Data from this effort are also being incorporated into the MRCSP geologic mapping. The project activities were organized into tracking and evaluation of characterization opportunities; participation in the incremental drilling, basic and advanced logging in selected wells; and data analysis and reporting. Although a large number of opportunities were identified and evaluated, only a small subset was carried into the field stage. Typical selection factors included reaching an acceptable agreement with the operator, drilling and logging risks, and extent of pre-existing data near the candidate wells. The region of study is primarily along the Ohio River Valley corridor in the Appalachian Basin, which underlies large concentrations of CO{sub 2} emission sources. In addition, some wells in the Michigan basin are included. Assessment of the geologic and petrophysical properties of zones of interest has been conducted. Although a large number of formations have been evaluated across the geologic column, the primary focus has been on evaluating the Cambrian sandstones (Mt. Simon, Rose Run, Kerbel) and carbonates layers (Knox Dolomite) as well as on the Silurian-Devonian carbonates (Bass Island, Salina) and sandstones (Clinton, Oriskany, Berea). Factors controlling the development of porosity and permeability, such as the depositional setting have been explored. In northern Michigan the Bass Islands Dolomite appears to have favorable reservoir development. In west central Michigan the St. Peter sandstone exhibits excellent porosity in the Hart and Feuring well and looks promising. In Southeastern Kentucky in the Appalachian Basin, the Batten and Baird well provided valuable data on sequestration potential in organic shales through adsorption. In central and eastern Ohio and western West Virginia, the majority of the wells provided an insight to the complex geologic framework of the relatively little known Precambrian through Silurian potential injection targets. Although valuable data was acquired and a number of critical data gaps were filled through this effort, there are still many challenges ahead and questions that need answered. The lateral extent to which favorable potential injection conditions exist in most reservoirs is still generally uncertain. The prolongation of the characterization of regional geologic framework through partnership would continue to build confidence and greatly benefit the overall CO{sub 2} sequestration effort.

  11. The preparation of illustrations for reports of the United States Geological survey : with brief descriptions of processes of reproduction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ridgway, John L.

    1920-01-01

    There has been an obvious need in the Geological Survey o£ a paper devoted wholly to illustrations. No complete paper on the character, use, and mode of preparation of illustration has been published by the Survey, though brief suggestions concerning certain features of their use have been printed in connection wit other suggestions pertaining to publications. The present paper includes matter which it is hoped will be of service to authors in their work of making up original drafts of illustrations and to drafsmen who are using these originals in preparing more finished drawing but it is not a technical treatise on drafting.

  12. Satellite Image Atlas of Glaciers of the World: South America: United States Geological Society Professional Paper 1386-I

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The US Geological Survey has recently posted this detailed chapter on South American glaciers as part of the Satellite Image Atlas of Glaciers of the World. Edited by Richard Williams and Jane Ferrigno, this ambitious project incorporates LANDSAT images, aerial photographs, and maps "to produce glacier inventories, define glacier locations, support on-going field studies of glacier dynamics, and monitor the extensive glacier recession that has taken place and is continuing in many parts of South America." Based on an impressive collection of images from the 1970s, this resource provides a permanent historic record of the glacial coverage of the planet. Further, the atlas may be used as a standard for comparison with current and future data. Specific sections of the resource cover the glaciers of Venezuela, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, Bolivia, Chile, and Argentina.

  13. Geology and potential hazards of the continental slope between Lindenkohl and South Toms canyons, offshore Mid-Atlantic United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robb, James M.; Hampson, John C., Jr.; Kirby, John R.; Twichell, David C.

    1981-01-01

    Because sediment instability, or slumping, has been identified as a potential hazard to petroleum development of the east-coast Continental Slope, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Bureau of Land Management, began a detailed study of a segment of the Continental Slope between Lindenkohl and South Toms Canyons off New Jersey. This 40-km x 35-km area was chosen for study because it lies within the area of high interest for petroleum development (Lease sales 49 and 59), and because it includes several wells which provide stratigraphic control. This report discusses the results of geologic mapping, using seismic-reflection data acquired in 1978 and 1979. Some initial results from more recently acquired data are included. The Continental Slope in the study area has a complex surface with ridges, canyons, and valleys. Three slump or slide features were observed in the heads and on the walls of canyons and valleys, and two slides were identified on an intercanyon area. The identified slumps or slides are found in Quaternary sediments and total about 1.3 percent of the Continental Slope area mapped. The slope is generally mantled by less than 2 m of Holocene sediments. Pleistocene sediment (primarily silty clay) is about 450 m thick at the top of the slope and thins to nearly zero or is absent on much of the mid and lower slope, where sediments of Miocene to Eocene age are exposed. Ridges on the midslope (water depths of 800-1,500 m) and parts of the lowr slope (1,500-2,150 m) result primarily from Pleistocene and older deposition. The intervening valleys show evidence of erosion along the deepest parts of their courses. Mid-range sidescan-sonar data show evidence that processes of bottom-current erosion and downcanyon transport of material may be active in the present day. However, major features of the sea floor appear to be unchanged since late-Pleistocene time.

  14. Modelling the impacts of climate policy on the deployment of carbon dioxide capture and geologic storage across electric power regions in the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Wise, Marshall A.; Dooley, James J.; Dahowski, Robert T.; Davidson, Casie L.

    2007-04-02

    This paper summarizes the results of a first-of-its-kind holistic, integrated economic analysis of the potential role of carbon dioxide (CO2) capture and storage (CCS) technologies across the regional segments of the United States of America (USA) electric power sector, over the time frame 2005-2045, in response to two hypothetical emissions control policies analyzed against two potential energy supply futures that include updated and substantially higher projected prices for natural gas. A key feature of this paper’s analysis is an attempt to explicitly model the inherent heterogeneities that exist in both the nation’s current and future electricity generation infrastructure and candidate deep geologic CO2 storage formations. Overall, between 180 and 580 gigawatts (GW) of coal-fired integrated gasification combined cycle with CCS (IGCC+CCS) capacity is built by 2045 in these four scenarios, requiring between 12 and 41gigatons of CO2 (GtCO2) of storage in regional deep geologic reservoirs across the USA. Nearly all of this CO2 is from new IGCC+CCS systems, which start to deploy after 2025. Relatively little IGCC+CCS capacity is built before that time, primarily under unique niche opportunities. For the most part, CO2 emissions prices will likely need to be sustained at well over $10-20/ton CO2 before CCS begins to deploy on a large scale within the electric power sector. Within these broad national trends, a highly nuanced picture of CCS deployment across the USA emerges. Across the four scenarios studied here, some North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions do not employ any CCS while others build more than 100 GW of CCS-enabled generation capacity. One region sees as much as 50% of their geologic CO2 storage reservoirs’ total theoretical capacity consumed by 2045, while the majority of the regions still have more than 90% of their potential storage capacity available to meet storage needs in the second half of the century and beyond.

  15. Water Resources of the United States

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This is the homepage for the Water Resources Division of the United States Geological Survey. It offers links to a variety of issues concerning water resources. The main links include: news, features, water data, publications and products, technical resources, programs, local information, and contacts. Also featured are links to other divisions within the United States Geological Survey, and FirstGov, a clearinghouse for all branches of the federal government.

  16. CVLC: United States Geography

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Cade

    2008-09-04

    What are the major rivers, mountain ranges, and plains of the United States? Follow the directions in each section carefully to fill in and label a blank map of the United States. You will use only one map. Or in other words complete each section on the same map. 1. Mountain Ranges of the United States With ...

  17. United States Nuclear Regulatory

    E-print Network

    United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission United States Department of Energy United States, Energy, in the Code of Federal Regulations may also be purchased from one of these two sources. 1.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Washington, DC 20555-0001 E-mail: DISTRIBUTION@nrc.gov Facsimile: 301

  18. A DIGITAL GEOLOGIC MAP DATABASE FOR THE STATE OF OKLAHOMA

    Microsoft Academic Search

    William D. Heran; Gregory N. Green; Douglas B. Stoeser

    This report consists of a compilation of twelve digital geologic maps provided in ARC\\/INFO interchange (e00) format for the state of Oklahoma. The source maps consisted of nine USGS 1:250,000-scale quadrangle maps and three 1:125,000 scale county maps. This publication presents a digital composite of these data intact and without modification across quadrangle boundaries to resolve geologic unit discontinuities. An

  19. FISHERY STATISTICS UNITED STATES

    E-print Network

    FISHERY STATISTICS OF THE UNITED STATES 1972 STATISTICAL DIGEST NO. 66 Prepared by STATISTICS;ACKNOWLEDGMENTS The data in this edition of "Fishery Statistics of the United States" were collected in co- operation with the various States and tabulated by the staff of the Statistics and Market News Division

  20. Magellan: Preliminary description of Venus surface geologic units

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saunders, R. S.; Arvidson, R.; Head, J. W., III; Schaber, G. G.; Solomon, S. C.; Stofan, E. R.; Basilevsky, Alexander T.; Guest, J. E.; Mcgill, G. E.; Moore, H. J.

    1991-01-01

    Observations from approximately one-half of the Magellan nominal eight-month mission to map Venus are summarized. Preliminary compilation of initial geologic observations of the planet reveals a surface dominated by plains that are characterized by extensive and intensive volcanism and tectonic deformation. Four broad categories of units have been identified: plains units, linear belts, surficial units, and terrain units.

  1. United States Department of

    E-print Network

    Standiford, Richard B.

    (Populus tremuloides) in the Western United States and a New Tool for Surveying Aspen Decline Toni Lyn of the potential effects of climate change on quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides) in the Western United States of the effects of climate on the distribution and growth of quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx

  2. United States of Agriculture

    E-print Network

    Technical Report RMRS-GTR-30WWW October 1999 Ecology and Conservation of Lynx in the United States Leonard F.; Koehler, Gary M.; Krebs, Charles J.; McKelvey, Kevin S.; Squires, John R. Ecology and conservation of lynx regarding the fate of the lynx in the United States. Chapters look at the relationships among lynx, its

  3. United States Department of

    E-print Network

    (Birdsey and Heath 1995) and forest products (Heath and others 1996; Skog and Nicholson 1998), has beenUnited States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Northeastern Research Station Research Paper NE-722 James E. Smith Linda S. Heath A Model of Forest Floor Carbon Mass for United States Forest

  4. Divisions of geologic time-major chronostratigraphic and geochronologic units

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey Geologic Names Committee

    2010-01-01

    Effective communication in the geosciences requires consistent uses of stratigraphic nomenclature, especially divisions of geologic time. A geologic time scale is composed of standard stratigraphic divisions based on rock sequences and is calibrated in years. Over the years, the development of new dating methods and the refinement of previous methods have stimulated revisions to geologic time scales. Advances in stratigraphy and geochronology require that any time scale be periodically updated. Therefore, Divisions of Geologic Time, which shows the major chronostratigraphic (position) and geochronologic (time) units, is intended to be a dynamic resource that will be modified to include accepted changes of unit names and boundary age estimates. This fact sheet is a modification of USGS Fact Sheet 2007-3015 by the U.S. Geological Survey Geologic Names Committee.

  5. An Evaluation of Selected Extraordinary Floods in the United States Reported by the U.S. Geological Survey and Implications for Future Advancement of Flood Science

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Costa, John E.; Jarrett, Robert D.

    2008-01-01

    Thirty flood peak discharges determine the envelope curve of maximum floods documented in the United States by the U.S. Geological Survey. These floods occurred from 1927 to 1978 and are extraordinary not just in their magnitude, but in their hydraulic and geomorphic characteristics. The reliability of the computed discharge of these extraordinary floods was reviewed and evaluated using current (2007) best practices. Of the 30 flood peak discharges investigated, only 7 were measured at daily streamflow-gaging stations that existed when the flood occurred, and 23 were measured at miscellaneous (ungaged) sites. Methods used to measure these 30 extraordinary flood peak discharges consisted of 21 slope-area measurements, 2 direct current-meter measurements, 1 culvert measurement, 1 rating-curve extension, and 1 interpolation and rating-curve extension. The remaining four peak discharges were measured using combinations of culvert, slope-area, flow-over-road, and contracted-opening measurements. The method of peak discharge determination for one flood is unknown. Changes to peak discharge or rating are recommended for 20 of the 30 flood peak discharges that were evaluated. Nine floods retained published peak discharges, but their ratings were downgraded. For two floods, both peak discharge and rating were corrected and revised. Peak discharges for five floods that are subject to significant uncertainty due to complex field and hydraulic conditions, were re-rated as estimates. This study resulted in 5 of the 30 peak discharges having revised values greater than about 10 percent different from the original published values. Peak discharges were smaller for three floods (North Fork Hubbard Creek, Texas; El Rancho Arroyo, New Mexico; South Fork Wailua River, Hawaii), and two peak discharges were revised upward (Lahontan Reservoir tributary, Nevada; Bronco Creek, Arizona). Two peak discharges were indeterminate because they were concluded to have been debris flows with peak discharges that were estimated by an inappropriate method (slope-area) (Big Creek near Waynesville, North Carolina; Day Creek near Etiwanda, California). Original field notes and records could not be found for three of the floods, however, some data (copies of original materials, records of reviews) were available for two of these floods. A rating was assigned to each of seven peak discharges that had no rating. Errors identified in the reviews include misidentified flow processes, incorrect drainage areas for very small basins, incorrect latitude and longitude, improper field methods, arithmetic mistakes in hand calculations, omission of measured high flows when developing rating curves, and typographical errors. Common problems include use of two-section slope-area measurements, poor site selection, uncertainties in Manning's n-values, inadequate review, lost data files, and insufficient and inadequately described high-water marks. These floods also highlight the extreme difficulty in making indirect discharge measurements following extraordinary floods. Significantly, none of the indirect measurements are rated better than fair, which indicates the need to improve methodology to estimate peak discharge. Highly unsteady flow and resulting transient hydraulic phenomena, two-dimensional flow patterns, debris flows at streamflow-gaging stations, and the possibility of disconnected flow surfaces are examples of unresolved problems not well handled by current indirect discharge methodology. On the basis of a comprehensive review of 50,000 annual peak discharges and miscellaneous floods in California, problems with individual flood peak discharges would be expected to require a revision of discharge or rating curves at a rate no greater than about 0.10 percent of all floods. Many extraordinary floods create complex flow patterns and processes that cannot be adequately documented with quasi-steady, uniform one-dimensional analyses. These floods are most accura

  6. Geology, 2000, v. 33, p. 958-959 PrecambrianCambrian transition: Death Valley, United

    E-print Network

    Hagadorn, Whitey

    Geology, 2000, v. 33, p. 958-959 Precambrian­Cambrian transition: Death Valley, United States the Precambrian-Cambrian boundary to the Global Stratotype Section and Point (GSSP) in Newfoundland. Furthermore) two units (~350 m) above what is considered the negative 13 C Precambrian-Cambrian(PC-C) boundary

  7. United States of Agriculture

    E-print Network

    United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Intermountain Research Station General was created by scanning the printed publication. Errors identified by the software have been corrected with the Intermountain Research Station's Enhancing Fish Habitats Research Work Unit in Boise, ID. He received B

  8. United States of Agriculture

    E-print Network

    , Shrubland Biology and Restoration Research Work Unit, Shrub Sciences Laboratory, Intermountain ResearchUnited States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Intermountain Research Station General Technical Report INT-GTR-315 April 1995 Proceedings: Wildland Shrub and Arid Land Restoration Symposium #12

  9. Role of environmental geology in US Department of Energy's advanced research and development programs to promote energy security in the United States

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. E. Brown

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to describe the research programs and program activities of the US Department of Energy (DOE) that most directly relate to topics in the field of environmental geology. In this light, the mission of the DOE and the definition of environmental geology will be discussed. In a broad sense, environmental geology is that branch of

  10. Modeling the impacts of climate policy on the deployment of carbon dioxide capture and geologic storage across electric power regions in the United States

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marshall Wise; James Dooley; Robert Dahowski; Casie Davidson

    2007-01-01

    This paper summarizes the results of a first-of-its-kind holistic, integrated economic analysis of the potential role of carbon dioxide (CO2) capture and storage (CCS) technologies across the regional segments of the United States (U.S.) electric power sector, over the time frame 2005–2045, in response to two hypothetical emissions control policies analyzed against two potential energy supply futures that include updated

  11. Selected data for low-temperature (less than 90{sup 0}C) geothermal systems in the United States: reference data for US Geological Survey Circular 892

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, M.J.; Mariner, R.H.; Brook, C.A.; Sorey, M.L.

    1983-12-15

    Supporting data are presented for the 1982 low-temperature geothermal resource assessment of the United States. Data are presented for 2072 geothermal sites which are representative of 1168 low-temperature geothermal systems identified in 26 States. The low-temperature geothermal systems consist of 978 isolated hydrothermal-convection systems, 148 delineated-area hydrothermal-convection systems, and 42 delineated-area conduction-dominated systems. The basic data and estimates of reservoir conditions are presented for each geothermal system, and energy estimates are given for the accessible resource base, resource, and beneficial heat for each isolated system.

  12. Megayear and Gigayear: Two Units of Geological Time

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kalervo Rankama

    1967-01-01

    FOR measuring geological time and for indicating the age of minerals and rocks before the Quaternary, geologists are at present using two time units, namely, one million years (106 years) and one ``billion'' years (109 years). The abbreviations of these units are indeed variable. A check of a number of recently published books, monographs, and symposium volumes1 produced the following

  13. Prospecting for Gold in the United States

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Harold Kirkemo

    This United States Geological Survey (USGS) publication discusses gold prospecting in the US. The history of prospecting is covered, as well as where in the US gold can still be found and accounts of successful gold mining. Deposits of gold are also explained, including placer deposits and lode gold. Selected references for additional reading are given.

  14. United States National Seismographic Network

    SciTech Connect

    Buland, R. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States)

    1993-09-01

    The concept of a United States National Seismograph Network (USNSN) dates back nearly 30 years. The idea was revived several times over the decades. but never funded. For, example, a national network was proposed and discussed at great length in the so called Bolt Report (U. S. Earthquake Observatories: Recommendations for a New National Network, National Academy Press, Washington, D.C., 1980, 122 pp). From the beginning, a national network was viewed as augmenting and complementing the relatively dense, predominantly short-period vertical coverage of selected areas provided by the Regional Seismograph Networks (RSN`s) with a sparse, well-distributed network of three-component, observatory quality, permanent stations. The opportunity finally to begin developing a national network arose in 1986 with discussions between the US Geological Survey (USGS) and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Under the agreement signed in 1987, the NRC has provided $5 M in new funding for capital equipment (over the period 1987-1992) and the USGS has provided personnel and facilities to develop. deploy, and operate the network. Because the NRC funding was earmarked for the eastern United States, new USNSN station deployments are mostly east of 105{degree}W longitude while the network in the western United States is mostly made up of cooperating stations (stations meeting USNSN design goals, but deployed and operated by other institutions which provide a logical extension to the USNSN).

  15. United States Department of

    E-print Network

    Standiford, Richard B.

    , DC 20090-6090. #12;Federal Recycling Program Printed on Recycled Paper UnitedStates Departmentof://www.psw.fs.fed.us/ General Technical Report PSW-GTR-152 Ecology and Conservation of the Marbled Murrelet Stateofthe Editors. 1995. Ecology and conservation of the Marbled Murrelet. Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-152. Albany, CA

  16. United States Department of

    E-print Network

    Fried, Jeremy S.

    United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Intermountain Research Station General by scanning the printed publication. Errors identified by the software have been corrected; however, some Research Station, Forest Service, U.S. Depart- ment of Agriculture, Ogden, UT, stationed in Moscow, ID

  17. United States Department of

    E-print Network

    Standiford, Richard B.

    United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Pacific Southwest Research Station General Technical Report PSW-GTR-136 Guidelinesfor EvaluatingAir Pollution Impactson Class I Wilderness for evaluating air pollution impacts on class I wilderness areas in California. Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR- 136

  18. United States Department of

    E-print Network

    Standiford, Richard B.

    , and Donald J. Latham, who worked on the lightning-caused fire occurrence index; North Central Forest worked on human-caused fire occurrence index; and the Rocky Mountain Forest and Range Experiment StationUnited States Department of Agriculture The National Fire- Danger Forest Service Pacific Southwest

  19. United States Department of

    E-print Network

    Pederson, Neil

    ; ecology and forest dynamics; natural and artificial regeneration; forest products; wildlife; site United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Southern Research Station e-General Technical Report SRS­101 Proceedings 15th Central Hardwood Forest Conference Knoxville, TN February 27­March

  20. United States Environmental Protection

    E-print Network

    quality in public water systems; remediation of contaminated sites, sediments and ground water; preventionUnited States Environmental Protection Agency Hydrogeologic Framework, Ground-Water Geochemistry/R-02/008 January 2002 Hydrogeologic Framework, Ground-Water Geochemistry, and Assessment of Nitrogen

  1. United States Department of

    E-print Network

    are thought to contribute to carbon sequestration, including current debates on this topic. The science regarding forestry and carbon sequestration is more advanced and less controversial than that for range, land management, carbon sequestration, carbon markets, United States. #12;ii Executive Summary

  2. United States Department of

    E-print Network

    additions to carbon in forests and in forest products. Forest ecosystem carbon yield tables, representing/project leader, USDA Forest Service, Forest Products Laboratory, Madison, Wisconsin. RICHARD A. BIRDSEY (rbirdseyUnited States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Northeastern Research Station General

  3. Regions of the United States

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Ms. Evans

    2011-12-09

    What influences where people live in the United States? Essential Concepts and/or Skills from the IOWA CORE can be found: Link for IOWA CORE What are your guiding questions? Use the following resources to get to know the states in the particular regions of the USA 50 States Practice Regions of the United States Teacherfirst 50 states Map and Facts of the United States United States HIstory Link ...

  4. A multi-modal geological investigation framework for subsurface modeling and kinematic monitoring of a slow-moving landslide complex in Colorado, United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowry, B. W.; Zhou, W.; Smartgeo

    2010-12-01

    The Muddy Creek landslide complex is a large area of active and reactivating landslides that impact the operation of both a state highway and Paonia Reservoir in Gunnison County, Colorado, United States. Historically, the monitoring of this slide has been investigated using disparate techniques leading to protracted analysis and project knowledge attrition. We present an integrated, data-driven investigation framework that supports continued kinematic monitoring, document cataloging, and subsurface modeling of the landslide complex. A geospatial information system (GIS) was integrated with a visual programming based subsurface model to facilitate modular integration of monitoring data with borehole information. Subsurface modeling was organized by material type and activity state based on multiple sources of kinematic measurement. The framework is constructed to modularly integrate remotely sensed imagery and other spatial datasets such as ASTER, InSAR, and LiDAR derived elevation products as more precise datasets become available. The framework allows for terrestrial LiDAR survey error estimation, borehole siting, and placement of wireless sensor (GPS, accelerometers, geophysical ) networks for optimized spatial relevance and utility. Coordinated spatial referencing within the GIS facilitates geotechnical and hydrogeological modeling input generation and common display of modeling outputs. Kinematic data fusion techniques are accomplished with integration of instrumentation, surficial feature tracking, subsurface classification, and 3D interpolation. The framework includes dynamic decision support including landslide dam failure estimates, back-flooding scenario planning that can be accessed by multiple agencies and stakeholders.

  5. Progress report of new state geologic maps for Washington state

    Microsoft Academic Search

    N. Joseph; K. Stoffel; W. Phillips

    1987-01-01

    Geologic maps of Washington were previously published in 1936 and 1961 by predecessors to the Division of Geology and Earth Resources (DGER), Department of Natural Resources. These maps were printed at a scale of 1:500,000 and depicted the entire state on a single map sheet. The new state map will be at a scale of 1:250,000 and will be published

  6. Preliminary catalog of the sedimentary basins of the United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coleman, James L., Jr.; Cahan, Steven M.

    2012-01-01

    One hundred forty-four sedimentary basins (or groups of basins) in the United States (both onshore and offshore) are identified, located, and briefly described as part of a Geographic Information System (GIS) data base in support of the Geologic Carbon Dioxide Sequestration National Assessment Project (Brennan and others, 2010). This catalog of basins is designed to provide a check list and basic geologic framework for compiling more detailed geologic and reservoir engineering data for this project and other future investigations.

  7. Teaching Geology at San Quentin State Prison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Alessio, M. A.; Pehl, J.; Ferrier, K. L.; Pehl, C. W.

    2004-12-01

    The students enrolled in our Geology 215 class are about as on-traditional as it gets. They range in age from about 20 - 50 years old, they are all male, all from under-represented ethnic groups, and they are all serving time in one of the country's most notorious prisons. We teach in a degree-granting community college program inside California's San Quentin State Prison. The program is run entirely by volunteers, and students who participate in educational programs like ours are about 5 times less likely to return to prison than the general inmate population in California. The prison population of California is ethnically diverse, though minorities are present in higher proportion than in the general population. Last semester, our geology class happened to be composed entirely of minorities even though the college program serves the full spectrum of the prison population. While some trends in geoscience education encourage the use of technology in the classroom, security restrictions prevent us from using even some of the simplest visual aids. Faced with these challenges, we have developed an inquiry-based syllabus for an introductory Geology class at the community college level. We find that kinaesthetic learning activities such as urban geologic mapping and acting out plate tectonic motions from ridge to trench (complete with magnetic pole polarity shifts) are not only possible in restricted learning environments, but they promote student learning in unexpected ways.

  8. United States Climate Normals

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Ross, Douglas P.

    2002-01-01

    The National Climate Data Center has recently released weather data from the last thirty years, which is used by forecasters to compare day-to-day normal conditions. The daily and monthly reports are available for download in ASCII or PDF formats and include data on such things as average daily temperatures and precipitation from nearly 8,000 weather stations in the United States, Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, and the U.S. Pacific Islands. Everyone from researchers to those users interested in weather in their hometown will find the information provided valuable.

  9. FISHERY STATISTICS E UNITED STATES

    E-print Network

    SH 11 .A443X FISH FISHERY STATISTICS E UNITED STATES ^ 1951 &ch 3. \\§^ ^/'· m:^ STATISTICAL DIGEST. Farley, Director Statistical Digest 30 FISHERY STATISTICS OF THE UNITED STATES 1951 BY A. W. ANDERSON;Fishery Statistics of the United States and Alaska are compiled and published annually to make available

  10. Geologic Maps

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Geologic Maps are unique in that they show the distribution of geologic features on a landscape through specific symbols and colors. The United States Geological Survey's (USGS) site Geologic Maps provides visitors with a good introduction to these concepts, which include the unique features of a geologic map; the meaning of their lines, colors, and symbols; the location of faults; and more. Anyone working with geologic maps or just interested in learning a little about cartography or geology will find this site easy to explore and full of good information.

  11. 43 CFR 3281.3 - What geologic information may a unit operator use in proposing a unit area?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 false What geologic information may a unit operator use in proposing a unit area? 3281.3 Section 3281.3 Public Lands...MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) GEOTHERMAL RESOURCES UNIT AGREEMENTS Application, Review, and...

  12. 43 CFR 3281.3 - What geologic information may a unit operator use in proposing a unit area?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 false What geologic information may a unit operator use in proposing a unit area? 3281.3 Section 3281.3 Public Lands...MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) GEOTHERMAL RESOURCES UNIT AGREEMENTS Application, Review, and...

  13. 43 CFR 3281.3 - What geologic information may a unit operator use in proposing a unit area?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 false What geologic information may a unit operator use in proposing a unit area? 3281.3 Section 3281.3 Public Lands...MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) GEOTHERMAL RESOURCES UNIT AGREEMENTS Application, Review, and...

  14. 43 CFR 3281.3 - What geologic information may a unit operator use in proposing a unit area?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 false What geologic information may a unit operator use in proposing a unit area? 3281.3 Section 3281.3 Public Lands...MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) GEOTHERMAL RESOURCES UNIT AGREEMENTS Application, Review, and...

  15. National Atlas of the United States

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Developed by the United States Geological Survey and its partners, the National Atlas of the United States is a predominantly digital collection of maps serving to update the 1970 version and providing a reliable summary of national-scale geographic information on the environmental, resource, demographic, economic, social, political, and historical dimensions of American life. The compilation (found under Atlas Maps) includes sections for interactive map browsing, multimedia maps, map layers data, and printed maps. The Interactive Map Browser provides easy-to-use tools to display, manipulate, print, and query National Atlas data using an overlay approach with layers selected from agriculture, biology, boundaries, climate, environment, geology, demography, transportation, water, and general reference categories. The multimedia maps use animation and/or clickable interfaces to explore a number of topics from geologic history to invasive species to vegetation growth. The map layers data warehouse contains a series of authoritative national geospatial and geostatistical datasets for use in Geographical Information Systems (GIS) or computer-aided design systems. Both data types are tied to specific geographic areas and are categorized and indexed using such parameters as county, State, and zip code boundaries or geographic coordinate systems. The printed map section includes reference and thematic maps (for ordering) reprinted from the 1970 version of the Atlas. In addition to the collection, links are provided to federal and business partners, Atlas News with links to relevant federal sites, an Atlas FAQ page, and a feedback page.

  16. United States Environmental Protection

    E-print Network

    Protection Agency (EPA) has promulgated public health and safety standards for radioactive material stored-level radioactive waste (HLW). If approved, the site would be the nation's first geologic repository for disposal of this type of radioactive waste. The potential Yucca Mountain repository is above a large, deep source

  17. Geologic Map of the State of Hawai`i

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sherrod, David R.; Sinton, John M.; Watkins, Sarah E.; Brunt, Kelly M.

    2007-01-01

    About This Map The State's geology is presented on eight full-color map sheets, one for each of the major islands. These map sheets, the illustrative meat of the publication, can be downloaded in pdf format, ready to print. Map scale is 1:100,000 for most of the islands, so that each map is about 27 inches by 36 inches. The Island of Hawai`i, largest of the islands, is depicted at a smaller scale, 1:250,000, so that it, too, can be shown on 36-inch-wide paper. The new publication isn't limited strictly to its map depictions. Twenty years have passed since David Clague and Brent Dalrymple published a comprehensive report that summarized the geology of all the islands, and it has been even longer since the last edition of Gordon Macdonald's book, Islands in the Sea, was revised. Therefore the new statewide geologic map includes an 83-page explanatory pamphlet that revisits many of the concepts that have evolved in our geologic understanding of the eight main islands. The pamphlet includes simplified page-size geologic maps for each island, summaries of all the radiometric ages that have been gathered since about 1960, generalized depictions of geochemical analyses for each volcano's eruptive stages, and discussion of some outstanding topics that remain controversial or deserving of additional research. The pamphlet also contains a complete description of map units, which enumerates the characteristics for each of the state's many stratigraphic formations shown on the map sheets. Since the late 1980s, the audience for geologic maps has grown as desktop computers and map-based software have become increasingly powerful. Those who prefer the convenience and access offered by Geographic Information Systems (GIS) can also feast on this publication. An electronic database, suitable for most GIS software applications, is available for downloading. The GIS database is in an Earth projection widely employed throughout the State of Hawai`i, using the North American datum of 1983 and the Universal Transverse Mercator system projection to zone 4. 'This digital statewide map allows engineers, consultants, and scientists from many different fields to take advantage of the geologic database,' said John Sinton, a geology professor at the University of Hawai`i, whose new mapping of the Wai`anae Range (West O`ahu) appears on the map. Indeed, when a testing version was first made available, most requests came from biologists, archaeologists, and soil scientists interested in applying the map's GIS database to their ongoing investigations. Another area newly depicted on the map, in addition to the Wai`anae Range, is Haleakala volcano, East Maui. So too for the active lava flows of Kilauea volcano, Island of Hawai`i, where the landscape has continued to evolve in the ten years since publication of the Big Island's revised geologic map. For the other islands, much of the map is compiled from mapping published in the 1930-1960s. This reliance stems partly from shortage of funding to undertake entirely new mapping but is warranted by the exemplary mapping of those early experts. The boundaries of all map units are digitized to show correctly on modern topographic maps.

  18. United States West Coast

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    On Thursday (Feb. 14, 2002), the cloud cover that often overshadows the western United States this time of year broke to provide those at the Olympic Games with a beautiful day. The nearly cloud-free day was captured by the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), flying aboard NASAs Terra spacecraft. A thick layer of snow blankets northernmost Nevada, northern Utah, most of Idaho and western Wyoming. The snow surrounds and highlights Utahs Great Salt Lake. Just south of the lake, clouds can be seen hovering over southern Utah. (In general, clouds appear streaky and uneven on a satellite image, and snow cover appears solid with definable borders.) North of the Great Salt Lake, one can clearly discern the light gray Northern Rocky Mountains cutting through Idaho and up into Canada. Moving southwest, the spine-like Sierra Nevada mountains separate the greenery of Southern California from the brown deserts of Arizona and Nevada. Credit: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

  19. Creating the United States

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    As with other countries, the United States is very much a "work in progress". Of course, the nation's founders made a concerted effort to form a republic that would be able to govern effectively across a large geographic region and a plethora of different cultural traditions. This thoughtful and introspective online exhibit from the Library of Congress brings together a set of interactive resources and activities organized around themes that include "Creating the Declaration of Independence" and "Creating the Bill of Rights". Clicking on these themes will bring visitors to a brief narrative essay that sets the tone for the primary and secondary historical documents within each area. Here visitors will find such gems as an early map of the Appalachians, woodcuts of early Presidents, and the musings of Thomas Paine, among many others. Moving on, visitors should not miss the "Interactives" area. Here they can test their mettle by connecting particular phrases and ideas set down in the Declaration of Independence with the key texts that preceded it. And if visitors aren't stumped there (or even if they are), they can try the same tasks with the Constitution and the Bill of Rights. After a visit to this site, some may even find themselves dusting off their old civics textbooks or at least planning a trip to a local government facility for further edification.

  20. A digital geologic map database for the state of Oklahoma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heran, William D.; Green, Gregory N.; Stoeser, Douglas B.

    2003-01-01

    This dataset is a composite of part or all of the 12 1:250,000 scale quadrangles that make up Oklahoma. The result looks like a geologic map of the State of Oklahoma. But it is only an Oklahoma shaped map clipped from the 1:250,000 geologic maps. This is not a new geologic map. No new mapping took place. The geologic information from each quadrangle is available within the composite dataset.

  1. Geology of the Crust and Mantle, Western United States: Geophysical data reveal a thin crust and anomalous upper mantle characteristic of active regions.

    PubMed

    Thompson, G A; Talwani, M

    1964-12-18

    Seismic refraction, gravity, phase velocity, and magnetic data, coupled with the geologic record, are all approximately satisfied by the structure shown in Fig. 9. A 20-kilometer crust under the Coast Ranges and Great Valley thickens to more than 30 kilometers under the Sierra Nevada and parts of the Basin and Range province; this whole area is underlain by an anomalous upper mantle with a velocity and density about 3 percent less than normal. It is not likely that the anomalous mantle extends much deeper than 50 kilometers, and the lower boundary may be gradational. The thicker crust or "root" under the Sierran highland region (Sierra Nevada and western Basin Ranges) is not limited to the Sierra Nevada proper. The root and the voluminous plustonic rocks originated in the Mesozoic era, and they constitute the now consolidated core of the Cordilleran eugeosyncline. But it must not be supposed that the root has persisted unchanged. The great mountain-building uplifts in the Cenozoic era must have been accompanied by large changes in the root and adjacent mantle. A zone of positive gravity and magnetic anomalies extending the length of the Great Valley is associated with mafic rocks of the western Sierra greenstone belt, an element of the Cordilleran eugeosyncline. Belts of maficto-intermediate lavas, accompanied by mafic and ultramafic intrusions, are marked by similar anomalies in other ancient geosynclines. An anomalous upper mantle of plagioclase peridotite, an expanded phase of the normal mantle, could explain about 1 kilometer of the uplift that took place over much of the region in Cenozoic time. To explain all of the Cenozoic uplift in the Sierra Nevada and Basin Ranges by this means would require the hypothesis of a separation of the anomalous mantle into crust and normal mantle fractions, followed by a renewal of the anomalous mantle through the action of regional convection currents or local overturning in the upper mantle. The low-velocity zones for compressional and transverse waves in the upper mantle may be related to this problem. Whatever its origin and composition, an anomalous upper mantle characterizes many regions of present or recent tectonic activity, such as Japan and the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (39). The anomalous mantle of western North America might form a continuous belt to the south, with anomalous mantle beneath the crest of the East Pacific Rise (40). The anomalous upper mantle may thus be an essential part of the heat engine driving the tectonic activity of these regions. The Basin and Range region was broken into blocks and laterally extended during the Cenozoic uplift, so that some blocks lagged behind, or sank. Some of the intricate disruption of the upper crust may be related to shallow Cenozoic volcanism. The relatively large and rigid Sierra Nevada block may have been tilted westward during Basin-Range deformation because of the high density of greenstones on the west side and the lower density of granitic rocks to the east. Man's environment, in the longer view of geologic time, is strongly influenced by mountain-building processes originating in the earth's crust and mantle. In the scale of a few lifetimes, climate, sea level, and the shape of the land are appreciably altered. How this comes about, and whether man can hope to influence the processes, are challenging, unsolved problems. But enough has now been learned about the crust and mantle to suggest precisely what questions must be answered and what critical experiments performed. Note added in proof: Osborne (42) has directed our attention to the possibility that the granitic rocks and also the andesites and dacites were formed by fractional crystallization of basaltic magma under conditions of high oxygen pressure. This possibility in no way conflicts with the geophysical data. In fact, such direct additions to the silicic upper crust from the mantle or lower crust would simplify the perplexing problem of how the crust is replenished in areas of great erosion. PMID:17775979

  2. Geologic and hydraulic characteristics of selected shaly geologic units in Oklahoma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Becker, C.J.; Overton, M.D.; Johnson, K.S.; Luza, K.V.

    1997-01-01

    Information was collected on the geologic and hydraulic characteristics of three shale-dominated units in Oklahoma-the Dog Creek Shale and Chickasha Formation in Canadian County, Hennessey Group in Oklahoma County, and the Boggy Formation in Pittsburg County. The purpose of this project was to gain insight into the characteristics controlling fluid flow in shaly units that could be targeted for confinement of hazardous waste in the State and to evaluate methods of measuring hydraulic characteristics of shales. Permeameter results may not indicate in-place small-scale hydraulic characteristics, due to pretest disturbance and deterioration of core samples. The Dog Creek Shale and Chickasha Formation hydraulic conductivities measured by permeameter methods ranged from 2.8 times 10 to the negative 11 to 3.0 times 10 to the negative 7 meter per second in nine samples and specific storage from 3.3 times 10 to the negative 4 to 1.6 times 10 to the negative 3 per meter in four samples. Hennessey Group hydraulic conductivities ranged from 4.0 times 10 to the negative 12 to 4.0 times 10 to the negative 10 meter per second in eight samples. Hydraulic conductivity in the Boggy Formation ranged from 1.7 times 10 to the negative 12 to 1.0 times 10 to the negative 8 meter per second in 17 samples. The hydraulic properties of isolated borehole intervals of average length of 4.5 meters in the Hennessey Group and the Boggy Formation were evaluated by a pressurized slug-test method. Hydraulic conductivities obtained with this method tend to be low because intervals with features that transmitted large volumes of water were not tested. Hennessey Group hydraulic conductivities measured by this method ranged from 3.0 times 10 to the negative 13 to 1.1 times 10 to the negative 9 meter per second; the specific storage values are small and may be unreliable. Boggy Formation hydraulic conductivities ranged from 2.0 times 10 to the negative 13 to 2.7 times 10 to the negative 10 meter per second and specific storage values in these tests also are small and may be unreliable. A substantially higher hydraulic conductivity of 3.0 times 10 to the negative 8 meter per second was measured in one borehole 30 meters deep in the Boggy Formation using an open hole slug-test method.

  3. United States Geological Survey Water Use in the United States

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This site provides access to water use reports for the country and by county and watershed at five year intervals from 1950 to 2000. There is also a region by region comparison and information about how the data was collected.

  4. Notes on the geology and meteorology of sites infected with white-nose syndrome before July 2010 in Southeastern United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swezey, Christopher S.; Garrity, Christopher P.

    2011-01-01

    Since 2006, numerous bat colonies in North America have experienced unusually high incidences of mortality. In these colonies, bats are infected by a white fungus named Geomyces destructans, which has been observed on bat muzzles, noses, ears, and (or) wings. Although it is not exactly certain how and why these bats are dying, this condition has been named white-nose syndrome (WNS). WNS appears to have spread from an initial infection site at a cave in New York, and was first identified south of Pennsylvania during January 2009. By the end of June 2010, 41 infected sites had identified in the states of West Virginia, Maryland, Delaware, Virginia, and Tennessee. Most of these sites are natural caves in limestone of either Cambrian-Ordovician age or Silurian-Devonian age. Published air temperature values in these WNS-infected caves range from -3.3 to 15.6 °C, and humidity measurements range from 68 to 100 %.

  5. UNITED STATES RENAL DATA SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The United States Renal Data System (USRDS) is a national data system that collects, analyzes, and distributes information about end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in the United States. The USRDS is funded directly by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseas...

  6. Some concepts of favorability for world-class-type uranium deposits in the northeastern United States

    SciTech Connect

    Adler, H.H.

    1981-03-01

    An account is given of concepts of favorability of geologic environments in the eastern United States for uranium deposits of several major types existing elsewhere in the world. The purpose is to convey some initial ideas about the interrelationships of the geology of the eastern United States and the geologic settings of certain of these world-class deposits. The study and report include consideration of uranium deposits other than those generally manifesting the geologic, geochemical and genetic characteristics associated with the conventional sandstone-type ores of the western United States.

  7. State geological surveys: Their growing national role in policy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gerhard, L.C.

    2000-01-01

    State geological surveys vary in organizational structure, but are political powers in the field of geology by virtue of their intimate knowledge of and involvement in legislative and political processes. Origins of state geological surveys lie in the recognition of society that settlement and prosperity depended on access to a variety of natural resources, resources that are most familiar to geologists. As the surveys adapt to modern societal pressures, making geology serve the public has become the new mission for many state geological surveys. Geologic mapping was the foundation of most early surveys, and the state surveys have brought mapping back into the public realm to meet today's challenges of growing population density, living environment desires, and resource access.

  8. 31 CFR 596.312 - United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 false United States. 596.312 Section 596...DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY TERRORISM LIST GOVERNMENTS SANCTIONS REGULATIONS...Definitions § 596.312 United States. The term United States means the United...

  9. 31 CFR 595.314 - United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 false United States. 595.314 Section 595...DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY TERRORISM SANCTIONS REGULATIONS General...Definitions § 595.314 United States. The term United States means the United...

  10. 31 CFR 596.312 - United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 false United States. 596.312 Section 596...DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY TERRORISM LIST GOVERNMENTS SANCTIONS REGULATIONS...Definitions § 596.312 United States. The term United States means the United...

  11. 31 CFR 596.312 - United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 false United States. 596.312 Section 596...DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY TERRORISM LIST GOVERNMENTS SANCTIONS REGULATIONS...Definitions § 596.312 United States. The term United States means the United...

  12. 31 CFR 594.313 - United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 false United States. 594.313 Section 594...DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY GLOBAL TERRORISM SANCTIONS REGULATIONS General...Definitions § 594.313 United States. The term United States means the United...

  13. 31 CFR 596.312 - United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 false United States. 596.312 Section 596...DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY TERRORISM LIST GOVERNMENTS SANCTIONS REGULATIONS...Definitions § 596.312 United States. The term United States means the United...

  14. 31 CFR 595.314 - United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 false United States. 595.314 Section 595...DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY TERRORISM SANCTIONS REGULATIONS General...Definitions § 595.314 United States. The term United States means the United...

  15. 31 CFR 595.314 - United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 false United States. 595.314 Section 595...DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY TERRORISM SANCTIONS REGULATIONS General...Definitions § 595.314 United States. The term United States means the United...

  16. 31 CFR 594.313 - United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 false United States. 594.313 Section 594...DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY GLOBAL TERRORISM SANCTIONS REGULATIONS General...Definitions § 594.313 United States. The term United States means the United...

  17. 31 CFR 594.313 - United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 false United States. 594.313 Section 594...DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY GLOBAL TERRORISM SANCTIONS REGULATIONS General...Definitions § 594.313 United States. The term United States means the United...

  18. 31 CFR 595.314 - United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 false United States. 595.314 Section 595...DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY TERRORISM SANCTIONS REGULATIONS General...Definitions § 595.314 United States. The term United States means the United...

  19. A Water Census of the United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey

    2007-01-01

    In 2007, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) developed a science strategy outlining the major natural science issues facing the Nation in the next decade. The science strategy consists of six science directions of critical importance, focusing on areas where natural science can make a substantial contribution to the well-being of the Nation and the world. This fact sheet focuses on the development of a water census of the United States, and how USGS research can strengthen the Nation with information needed to meet the challenges of the 21st century.

  20. Physiographic Maps of the United States

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    These two shaded relief maps of the United States allow students to observe the differences in texture of the various areas, bearing in mind the concept of physiographic province, a region where the topographic features share common characteristics (and similar texture). The first map, in color, clearly shows the provinces, even though they are not named, as differences in texture. The second map is labelled with the names of the physiographic provinces and some geologic features, allowing students to check their observations against the first, unlabelled map.

  1. National Atlas of the United States Maps

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey

    2001-01-01

    The 'National Atlas of the United States of America?', published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in 1970, is out of print, but many of its maps can be purchased separately. Maps that span facing pages in the atlas are printed on one sheet. Maps dated after 1970 and before 1997 are either revisions of original atlas maps or new maps published in the original atlas format. The USGS and its partners in government and industry began work on a new 'National Atlas' in 1997. Though most new atlas products are designed for the World Wide Web, we are continuing our tradition of printing high-quality maps of America. In 1998, the first completely redesigned maps of the 'National Atlas of the United States?' were published.

  2. 7 CFR 1220.615 - State and United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...Referendum Definitions § 1220.615 State and United States. State and United States include the 50 States of the United States of America, the District of Columbia, and the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico....

  3. 7 CFR 1220.615 - State and United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...Referendum Definitions § 1220.615 State and United States. State and United States include the 50 States of the United States of America, the District of Columbia, and the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico....

  4. 7 CFR 1220.615 - State and United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...Referendum Definitions § 1220.615 State and United States. State and United States include the 50 States of the United States of America, the District of Columbia, and the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico....

  5. 7 CFR 1220.615 - State and United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...Referendum Definitions § 1220.615 State and United States. State and United States include the 50 States of the United States of America, the District of Columbia, and the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico....

  6. 7 CFR 1220.615 - State and United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...Referendum Definitions § 1220.615 State and United States. State and United States include the 50 States of the United States of America, the District of Columbia, and the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico....

  7. United States Department of

    E-print Network

    Liebhold, Andrew

    -quarter in total host density. Gypsy moth occupies only 23 percent of its potential range in the Eastern United, and gypsy moth (Mattson 1997), with subsequent secondary adverse effects throughout the invaded ecosystems, and gypsy moth. The three disturbance agents have become established in North America and currently

  8. Jake F. Weltzin United States Geological Survey

    E-print Network

    Kuligowski, Bob

    , Precipitation, Radiation, Humidity, Wind Chemistry CO2, CH4, N2O ozone, aerosols Microclimate Canopy Physiology Storms Windthrows Evaporation Transpiration Snow Melt Infiltration Runoff GPP, Plant & Microbial

  9. 7 CFR 1205.313 - United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...Research and Promotion Order Definitions § 1205.313 United States. United States means the 50 States of the United States of America. [31 FR 16758, Dec. 31, 1966. Redesignated at 56 FR 64472, Dec. 10,...

  10. 7 CFR 1160.104 - United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...in the continental United States and the District of Columbia, except that United States means the 50 states of the United States of America and the District of Columbia under the following provisions: the petition and review under section...

  11. 7 CFR 1205.313 - United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...Research and Promotion Order Definitions § 1205.313 United States. United States means the 50 States of the United States of America. [31 FR 16758, Dec. 31, 1966. Redesignated at 56 FR 64472, Dec. 10,...

  12. 7 CFR 1160.104 - United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...in the continental United States and the District of Columbia, except that United States means the 50 states of the United States of America and the District of Columbia under the following provisions: the petition and review under section...

  13. 7 CFR 1205.313 - United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...Research and Promotion Order Definitions § 1205.313 United States. United States means the 50 States of the United States of America. [31 FR 16758, Dec. 31, 1966. Redesignated at 56 FR 64472, Dec. 10,...

  14. 7 CFR 1205.313 - United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...Research and Promotion Order Definitions § 1205.313 United States. United States means the 50 States of the United States of America. [31 FR 16758, Dec. 31, 1966. Redesignated at 56 FR 64472, Dec. 10,...

  15. 7 CFR 1160.104 - United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...in the continental United States and the District of Columbia, except that United States means the 50 states of the United States of America and the District of Columbia under the following provisions: the petition and review under section...

  16. 7 CFR 1205.313 - United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...Research and Promotion Order Definitions § 1205.313 United States. United States means the 50 States of the United States of America. [31 FR 16758, Dec. 31, 1966. Redesignated at 56 FR 64472, Dec. 10,...

  17. 7 CFR 1160.104 - United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...in the continental United States and the District of Columbia, except that United States means the 50 states of the United States of America and the District of Columbia under the following provisions: the petition and review under section...

  18. 7 CFR 1160.104 - United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...in the continental United States and the District of Columbia, except that United States means the 50 states of the United States of America and the District of Columbia under the following provisions: the petition and review under section...

  19. United States Department of

    E-print Network

    Standiford, Richard B.

    Paper White Pine B ister Rust at Mountain Home Demonstration State Forest: A Case Study of the Epidemic. 1990.White pine blister rust at Mountain Home Demonstration State Forest: a case study of the epidemic not yet stabilized and that the most likely prognosis is a pandemic on white pines in this region within

  20. United States Department of

    E-print Network

    ­ Texas A&M University Bob Lee ­ Bowling Green State University Bruce Lord ­ Penn State University Thomas Thomas Wickham ­ California University of Pennsylvania Greg Wright ­ U.S. Forest Service ­ Green Mountain National Forest Maureen Wakefield ­ SUNY College of Environmental Science & Forestry (conference logistics

  1. Religious Education in United StatesState Schools

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gabriel Moran

    \\u000a Using the experience of the United States and its experiment of banning religion in public schools, this essay explores the\\u000a impact of such separation on interreligious dialogue. The ramifications of such a split are highlighted and critiqued. The\\u000a author proposed that the United States, given its religious diversity and its commitment to schools, should be a leading participant\\u000a in discussion

  2. United States Department of

    E-print Network

    Standiford, Richard B.

    Experiment Station General Technical Report PSW-76 A System of Vegetation Classification Applied to Hawaii earned a bachelor's degree in forest man- agement at Humboldt State College (1969), and a doctorate of Vegetation Classification described in this report developed through the efforts of many persons. We thank

  3. United States Environmental Protection

    E-print Network

    and exercises, EPA's radiological emergency response team helps states and other agencies test their response from exposure--how radiation affects human plans and hone their skills. health. Key risk assessment, biological, radiological, and nuclear terrorism. For terrorist incidents involving radioactive materials

  4. United States Department of

    E-print Network

    Standiford, Richard B.

    of the Pacific Coast." The tree illustrated is within Prairie Creek Redwoods State Park. For more Technical Report PSW-GTR-194 July 2007 Proceedings of the Redwood Region Forest Science Symposium: What Does on this superlative tree, see "A redwood tree whose crown may be the most complex on Earth. SC Sillett, R Van Pelt - L

  5. United States Department of

    E-print Network

    Standiford, Richard B.

    Forest Insect and Disease Service Center, 2606 Old Stage Road, Central Point, OR 97502 (email address involving pesticides. It does not contain recommendations for their use, nor does it imply that the uses discussed here have been registered. All uses of pesticides must be registered by appropriate state

  6. United States Department of

    E-print Network

    Standiford, Richard B.

    's program, San Francisco State University, Recreation, Parks and Tourism, blara@fs.fed.us. Emilyn A in all its programs and activities on the basis of race, color, national origin, age, disability with disabilities who require alternative means for communication of program information (Braille, large print

  7. 31 CFR 800.225 - United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...United States or U.S. means the United States of America, the States of the United States, the District of Columbia, and...entity organized under the laws of the United States of America, one of the States, the District...

  8. 31 CFR 800.225 - United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...United States or U.S. means the United States of America, the States of the United States, the District of Columbia, and...entity organized under the laws of the United States of America, one of the States, the District...

  9. 31 CFR 800.225 - United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...United States or U.S. means the United States of America, the States of the United States, the District of Columbia, and...entity organized under the laws of the United States of America, one of the States, the District...

  10. 31 CFR 800.225 - United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...United States or U.S. means the United States of America, the States of the United States, the District of Columbia, and...entity organized under the laws of the United States of America, one of the States, the District...

  11. 31 CFR 800.225 - United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...United States or U.S. means the United States of America, the States of the United States, the District of Columbia, and...entity organized under the laws of the United States of America, one of the States, the District...

  12. The geology of the basal sandstone-mudstone unit of the Blackhawk Landslide, Lucerne Valley, California 

    E-print Network

    Kuzior, Jerry Linn

    1983-01-01

    THE GEOLOGY OF THE BASAL SANDSTONE-MUDSTONE UNIT OF THE BLACKHAWK LANDSLIDE, LUCERNE VALLEY, CALIFORNIA A Thesis by JERRY LINN KUZIOR Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AAM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1983 Major Subject: Geology THE GEOLOGY OF THE BASAL SANDSTONE-MUDSTONE UNIT OF THE BLACKHANK LANDSLIDE, LUCERNE VALLEY, CALIFORNIA A Thesis by JERRY LINN KUZIOR Approved as to style and content by: Brann Jo...

  13. 7 CFR 1205.23 - United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE COTTON RESEARCH AND PROMOTION Procedures for Conduct of Sign-up Period Definitions § 1205.23 United States. The term United States means the 50 states of the United...

  14. 7 CFR 1205.23 - United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE COTTON RESEARCH AND PROMOTION Procedures for Conduct of Sign-up Period Definitions § 1205.23 United States. The term United States means the 50 states of the United...

  15. 7 CFR 1205.23 - United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE COTTON RESEARCH AND PROMOTION Procedures for Conduct of Sign-up Period Definitions § 1205.23 United States. The term United States means the 50 states of the United...

  16. 7 CFR 1205.23 - United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE COTTON RESEARCH AND PROMOTION Procedures for Conduct of Sign-up Period Definitions § 1205.23 United States. The term United States means the 50 states of the United...

  17. 7 CFR 1205.23 - United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE COTTON RESEARCH AND PROMOTION Procedures for Conduct of Sign-up Period Definitions § 1205.23 United States. The term United States means the 50 states of the United...

  18. Base-Flow Index Grid for the Conterminous United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wolock, David M.

    2003-01-01

    This 1-kilometer raster (grid) dataset for the conterminous United States was created by interpolating base-flow index (BFI) values estimated at U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) streamgages. Base flow is the component of streamflow that can be attributed to ground-water discharge into streams.

  19. HERBICIDE USE ESTIMATES (HERBICIDE1) FOR THE UNITED STATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The US Geological Society (USGS) offers GIS coverage containing estimates of herbicide use for the 20 most-used herbicides in the conterminous United States as reported in Gianessi and Puffer (1991). Herbicide-use estimates in this coverage are reported for each county polygon as...

  20. HERBICIDE USE ESTIMATES FOR UNITED STATES: (HERBICIDE2)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The US Geological Society (USGS) offers GIS coverage containing estimates of herbicide use for the twent-first through the fortieth most-used herbicides in the conterminous United States as reported in Gianessi and Puffer (1991). Herbicide-use estimates in this coverage are repor...

  1. Oil Depletion in the United States and the World

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Seppo A. Korpela

    Oil production peaked in the United States in 1970 and the world peak is imminent. This paper gives the underlying reasons why numerous international petroleum geologists expect global crude oil production to peak soon. First, it reviews how oil has formed and some aspects of petroleum geology. It then moves to the history of U.S. oil production and presents the

  2. River Outflow of the Conterminous United States, 1939-1988

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alexandre K. Guetter; Konstantine P. Georgakakos

    1993-01-01

    A record of 50 years of daily outflows through the boundaries of the continental United States has been assembled based on observations recorded by U.S. Geological Survey streamflow stations. Only stations with continuous records from 1939 through 1988 were included. These stations (197 total) are near the outlets of rivers located at the vicinity of the Canadian, Mexican, Atlantic (including

  3. SHARAD Penetrates Only the Youngest Geological Units on Mars Stillman, D, and R E Grimm

    E-print Network

    Stillman, David E.

    P13B-1276 SHARAD Penetrates Only the Youngest Geological Units on Mars Stillman, D, and R E Grimm caps and in certain ice-rich units. In fact, over the majority of the rocky units of Mars, only surface echoes are detected. Therefore, rocky units are more attenuating than expected. To gain insight

  4. FRONTLINE: United States of Secrets

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2014-05-20

    FRONTLINE doesn't shy away from difficult topics, as demonstrated by "United States of Secrets" a recent documentary on the activities of the National Security Agency (NSA) in the United States. On this site, visitors can view both parts of the documentary, explore interviews with tech industry experts, learn about journalistic guidelines, and also look over a raft of extra features. In The Latest section, visitors can look over meditations that include "How the NSA Can Get Onto Your iPhone" and "Inside the NSA the Day After 9/11." Additionally, visitors can view related programs, such as "Top Secret America" and several others.

  5. 22 CFR 120.13 - United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... DEPARTMENT OF STATE INTERNATIONAL TRAFFIC IN ARMS REGULATIONS PURPOSE AND DEFINITIONS § 120.13 United States. United States, when used in the geographical sense, includes the several states, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico,...

  6. Characterization of Venera 15/16 geologic units from Pioneer Venus reflectivity and roughness data

    SciTech Connect

    Bindschadler, D.L.; Head, J.W.

    1989-01-01

    The characterization of geologic units defined for the Venus surface on the basis of Venera 15/16 image data is presently conducted in light of Pioneer Venus reflectivity and rms slope data. Four geologic-unit groups are distinguished: smooth rocky units, rough ones, rough high-dielectric units, and diffusely-scattering ones. Models have been tested for the surface-property origins of several units, and it is determined that plains and tectonic units may be contrasted in terms not only of surface roughness but of surface-roughening tectonic deformation that appears to dominate the erosional regime of Venus. 41 references.

  7. United States, Capitals and Abbreviations

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Mr. Ribera

    2009-04-22

    Students will use the links below to practice locating, naming, and spelling the 50 U.S.States, Capitals and Abbreviation. Go to these different websites to test your skills and knowledge on states and capitals. Be sure to visit every site. They each have different ways to study. #1 States and Capitals Spelling Practice #2 Practice States and Capitals #3 United States Map Puzzle #4 Where is That?! Practice spelling of state and capital names. #5 State Abbreviations Practice Abbreviations Want to listen to Wakko's America song? Click on the first video below. Wakko s America

  8. 31 CFR 548.310 - United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY BELARUS SANCTIONS REGULATIONS General Definitions § 548.310 United States. The term United States means the United...

  9. 31 CFR 548.310 - United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY BELARUS SANCTIONS REGULATIONS General Definitions § 548.310 United States. The term United States means the United...

  10. 31 CFR 548.310 - United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY BELARUS SANCTIONS REGULATIONS General Definitions § 548.310 United States. The term United States means the United...

  11. 31 CFR 548.310 - United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY BELARUS SANCTIONS REGULATIONS General Definitions § 548.310 United States. The term United States means the United...

  12. 31 CFR 548.310 - United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY BELARUS SANCTIONS REGULATIONS General Definitions § 548.310 United States. The term United States means the United...

  13. 31 CFR 594.313 - United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY GLOBAL TERRORISM SANCTIONS REGULATIONS General Definitions § 594.313 United States. The term United States means the United...

  14. 31 CFR 595.314 - United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY TERRORISM SANCTIONS REGULATIONS General Definitions § 595.314 United States. The term United States means the United...

  15. 31 CFR 594.313 - United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY GLOBAL TERRORISM SANCTIONS REGULATIONS General Definitions § 594.313 United States. The term United States means the United...

  16. 31 CFR 593.311 - United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY FORMER LIBERIAN REGIME OF CHARLES TAYLOR SANCTIONS REGULATIONS General Definitions § 593.311 United States. The term United States means the United...

  17. 31 CFR 593.311 - United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY FORMER LIBERIAN REGIME OF CHARLES TAYLOR SANCTIONS REGULATIONS General Definitions § 593.311 United States. The term United States means the United...

  18. United States IOOS - Program update

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Z. S. Willis

    2008-01-01

    The United States Integrated Ocean Observing System (IOOS) is a user-driven, coordinated network of people, organizations, and technology that generate and disseminate continuous data about our coastal waters, Great Lakes, and oceans. IOOS is intended to be a major shift in approach to ocean observing, drawing together the vast network of disparate, federal and non-federal observing systems to produce a

  19. Accreditation in the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eaton, Judith S.

    2009-01-01

    Accreditation is a process of external quality review created and used by higher education to scrutinize colleges, universities, and programs for quality assurance and quality improvement. Accreditation in the United States is more than a hundred years old, emerging from concerns to protect public health and safety and to serve the public…

  20. United States launch vehicle systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert B. Krause

    1990-01-01

    United States policy for national space launch capability provides for a balanced mix of launches, utilizing the Space Shuttle and Expendable Launch Vehicles (ELVs). The current mixed fleet includes the Space Shuttle and four expendable launch vehicles - Titan, Atlas, Delta, and Scout. New small class launch vehicles, including Pegasus, are in development. In addition, studies are underway to assure

  1. The Changing United States Diet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Page, Louise; Friend, Berta

    1978-01-01

    The nature of the United States diet has changed markedly in this century. We are using more meat, poultry, fish, and dairy products; sugars and other sweeteners; fats and oils; and processed fruits and vegetables. We are using fewer grain products, potatoes, fresh fruits and vegetables, and eggs. (BB)

  2. FISHERY STATISTICS OF THE UNITED STATES

    E-print Network

    Div,, . FISHERY STATISTICS OF THE UNITED STATES 1961 STATISTICAL DIGEST NO. 54 UNITED STATES, Donald L. MeKernan, Director STATISTICAL DIGEST 54 FISHERY STATISTICS OF THE UNITED STATES 1961 BY E. A, Washington, D.C. 20402 - Price $2 (paper cover) #12;Fishery statistics of the United States are compiled

  3. FISHERY STATISTICS OF THE UNITED STATES

    E-print Network

    FISHERY STATISTICS OF THE UNITED STATES 1945 STATISTICAL DIGEST NO, 18 United States Dejtartment. Krug, Secretary FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE Albert M. Day, Director Statistical Digest 18 FISHERY STATISTICS OF THE UNITED STATES 1945 BY A. W. ANDERSON and E. A. POWER UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT PRINTING

  4. UNITED STATES TARIFFS ON SELECTED ITEMS

    E-print Network

    / I UNITED STATES TARIFFS ON SELECTED ITEMS OF COMMERCIAL FISHING GEAR UNITED STATES DEPARTM ENT UNITED STATES TARIFFS ON SELECTED ITEMS OF COMMERCIAL FISHING GEA R By JURA TE E. MICUTA Fishery Leaflet 625 Washington, D.C. February 1969 #12;UNITED STATES TARIFFS ON SELECTED ITEMS OF COMMERCIAL FISHING

  5. From digital mapping to GIS-based 3D visualization of geological maps: example from the Western Alps geological units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balestro, Gianni; Cassulo, Roberto; Festa, Andrea; Fioraso, Gianfranco; Nicolò, Gabriele; Perotti, Luigi

    2015-04-01

    Collection of field geological data and sharing of geological maps are nowadays greatly enhanced by using digital tools and IT (Information Technology) applications. Portable hardware allows accurate GPS localization of data and homogeneous storing of information in field databases, whereas GIS (Geographic Information Systems) applications enable generalization of field data and realization of geological map databases. A further step in the digital processing of geological map information consists of building virtual visualization by means of GIS-based 3D viewers, that allow projection and draping of significant geological features over photo-realistic terrain models. Digital fieldwork activities carried out by the Authors in the Western Alps, together with building of geological map databases and related 3D visualizations, are an example of application of the above described digital technologies. Digital geological mapping was performed by means of a GIS mobile software loaded on a rugged handheld device, and lithological, structural and geomorphological features with their attributes were stored in different layers that form the field database. The latter was then generalized through usual map processing steps such as outcrops interpolation, characterization of geological boundaries and selection of meaningful punctual observations. This map databases was used for building virtual visualizations through a GIS-based 3D-viewer that loaded detailed DTM (resolution of 5 meters) and aerial images. 3D visualizations were focused on projection and draping of significant stratigraphic contacts (e.g. contacts that separate different Quaternary deposits) and tectonic contacts (i.e. exhumation-related contacts that dismembered original ophiolite sequences). In our experience digital geological mapping and related databases ensured homogeneous data storing and effective sharing of information, and allowed subsequent building of 3D GIS-based visualizations. The latters gave realistic and easy-to-read representations of areas of geological interest and are a useful tool to overcome the problems that commonly occur in transferring contents of geological maps to non-expert users (e.g. in the frame of managing and disseminating geoheritage information). Although 3D GIS-based visualizations have not the capabilities of real 3D geological models (i.e. numerical models that actually allow building and checking geometry of geological units), they represent a useful for field geologists that can easily visualize their map representations and related uncertainties.

  6. Geothermal resource assessment of the United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Muffler, L.J.P.; Christiansen, R.L.

    1978-01-01

    Geothermal resource assessment is the broadly based appraisal of the quantities of heat that might be extracted from the earth and used economically at some reasonable future time. In the United States, the Geological Survey is responsible for preparing geothermal assessments based on the best available data and interpretations. Updates are required every few years owing to increasing knowledge, enlarging data base, improving technology, and changing economics. Because geothermal understanding is incomplete and rapidly evolving, the USGS complements its assessments with a broad program of geothermal research that includes (1) study of geothermal processes on crustal and local scales, (2) regional evaluations, (3) intensive study of type systems before and during exploitation (4) improvement of exploration techniques, and (5) investigation of geoenvironmental constraints. ?? 1978 Birkha??user Verlag.

  7. United States National Seismic Hazard Maps

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Many persons are interested in seismic hazard maps, including geologists, everyday citizens, and persons working in the insurance and actuarial fields. This site will be of great interest to all of those persons, as it contains the national seismic hazard maps created by the United States Geological Survey. User can view the latest series of maps via their homepage, and then proceed to look over their on-line web tools that will allow individuals to assess which sources might pose the greatest hazard in a given region of the country. Along the left-hand side of the homepage, visitors will find handy resources that include "Earthquake Hazards 101" and detailed hazard maps of urban areas. Additionally, the site also includes maps which predict the median level of ground shaking from a particular scenario event and a series of maps which forecast the likelihood of an earthquake rupture occurring during an interval of time in the future.

  8. United States National Seismic Hazard Maps

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Many persons are interested in seismic hazard maps, including geologists, everyday citizens, and persons working in the insurance and actuarial fields. This site will be of great interest to all of those persons, as it contains the national seismic hazard maps created by the United States Geological Survey. User can view the latest series of maps via their homepage, and then proceed to look over their on-line web tools that will allow individuals to assess which sources might pose the greatest hazard in a given region of the country. Additionally, the site also includes maps which predict the median level of ground shaking from a particular scenario event and a series of maps which forecast the likelihood of an earthquake rupture occurring during an interval of time in the future.

  9. Trends in Stream Water Quality in the Southeastern United States

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. A. Harned; E. L. Staub; K. L. Peak

    2007-01-01

    As part of the U.S Geological Survey (USGS) National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program water-quality data for 253 streams in 8 states of the Southeastern United States were assessed for trends from 1973-2005. Forty-three USGS sampling sites were examined for trends over multiple periods within 1973-2005 in measures of pH, specific conductance, and dissolved oxygen; and in concentrations of dissolved solids,

  10. Geologic Maps and Mapping

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This portal provides access to resources on geologic mapping, and to sources of geologic maps. There is an introduction to geologic mapping, which summarizes its principles and practices, and a history of United States Geological Survey (USGS) mapping activities from 1879 to the present, as well as links to papers on the values and hazards associated with geologic maps and mapping. Online sources of maps include the USGS Geologic Map Database, other federal map products (FEDMAP), state geological survey products (STATEMAP), and university map products (EDMAP).

  11. Surveillance for Viral Hepatitis - United States, 2012

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Home Page Share Compartir Surveillance for Viral Hepatitis – United States, 2012 Entire report in a printable format [PDF - ... Reported cases of acute hepatitis A, by state ? United States, 2008–2012 Table 2.2 Clinical characteristics of ...

  12. Western United States beyond the Four Corners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The breathtaking beauty of the western United States is apparent in this image from the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer on NASA's Terra spacecraft. Data from 16 different swaths acquired between April 2000 and September 2001by MISR's vertical-viewing (nadir) camera were used to create this cloud-free natural-color image mosaic. The image is draped over a 100-meter (328-foot)shaded relief Digital Terrain Elevation Model from the United States Geological Survey.

    Among the prominent features are the snow-capped Rocky Mountains traversing Montana, Wyoming, Colorado and New Mexico. In the northern portion of the image, the Columbia Plateau stretches across Washington, Oregon and Idaho. Many major rivers originate in this region, including the Missouri to the east of the Continental Divide, the Snake to the west, and the Colorado which wends across Utah and Arizona. The Colorado Plateau and vibrant red-colored rocks of the Painted Desert extend south from Utah into Arizona. In the southwestern portion of the image, California's San Joaquin Valley and the Mojave Desert of California and Nevada give way to the Los Angeles basin and the Pacific Ocean.

    The Terra spacecraft is part of NASA's Earth Science Enterprise, a long-term research and technology program designed to examine Earth's land, oceans, atmosphere, ice and life as a total integrated system.

  13. Phosphate rock resources of the United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cathcart, James Bachelder; Sheldon, Richard Porter; Gulbrandsen, Robert A.

    1984-01-01

    In 1980, the United States produced about 54 million tons of phosphate rock, or about 40 percent of the world's production, of which a substantial amount was exported, both as phosphate rock and as chemical fertilizer. During the last decade, predictions have been made that easily ruinable, low-cost reserves of phosphate rock would be exhausted, and that by the end of this century, instead of being a major exporter of phosphate rock, the United States might become a net importer. Most analysts today, however, think that exports will indeed decline in the next one or two decades, but that resources of phosphate are sufficient to supply domestic needs for a long time into the future. What will happen in the future depends on the actual availability of low-cost phosphate rock reserves in the United States and in the world. A realistic understanding of future phosphate rock reserves is dependent on an accurate assessment, now, of national phosphate rock resources. Many different estimates of resources exist; none of them alike. The detailed analysis of past resource estimates presented in this report indicates that the estimates differ more in what is being estimated than in how much is thought to exist. The phosphate rock resource classification used herein is based on the two fundamental aspects of a mineral resource(l) the degree of certainty of existence and (2) the feasibility of economic recovery. The comparison of past estimates (including all available company data), combined with the writers' personal knowledge, indicates that 17 billion metric tons of identified, recoverable phosphate rock exist in the United States, of which about 7 billion metric tons are thought to be economic or marginally economic. The remaining 10 billion metric tons, mostly in the Northwestern phosphate district of Idaho, are considered to be subeconomic, ruinable when some increase in the price of phosphate occurs. More than 16 billion metric tons probably exist in the southeastern Coastal Plain phosphate province, principally in Florida and North Carolina and offshore in the shallow Atlantic Ocean from North Carolina to southern Florida. This resource is considered to be hypothetical because it is based on geologic inference combined with sparse drilling data. Total resources of phosphate rock in the United States are sufficient to supply domestic demands for the foreseeable future, provided that drilling is done to confirm hypothetical resources and the chemistry of the deposits is determined. Mining and beneficiation techniques will have to be modified or improved, and new techniques will have to be developed so that these deposits can be profitably exploited.

  14. Quaternary Fault and Fold Database of the United States

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This database summarizes geologic, geomorphic, and geographic information for about 2,000 Quaternary faults and folds in the United States. These structures are believed to be sources of magnitude 6 or greater earthquakes during the Quaternary Period (the past 1,600,000 years). Maps of these geologic structures are linked to detailed descriptions, including geologic setting, fault orientation, fault type, sense of movement, slip rate, recurrence (repeat) interval, and the time of the most recent surface-faulting event. The database is searchable by using an interactive map viewer, a state/regional interactive map, or a text-based search. There is also a link to a fact sheet that provides information about the database.

  15. The British Geological Survey's Lexicon of Named Rock Units as Online and Linked Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCormick, T.

    2012-12-01

    The British Geological Survey's Lexicon of Named Rock Units provides freely accessible definitions and supplementary information about geological units of Great Britain, Northern Ireland, and their associated continental shelf. It is an online database that can be searched at www.bgs.ac.uk/Lexicon/. It has existed since 1990 (under different names) but the database and user interface have recently been completely redesigned to improve their semantic capabilities and suitability for describing different styles of geology. The data are also now freely available as linked data from data.bgs.ac.uk/. The Lexicon of Named Rock Units serves two purposes. First, it is a dictionary, defining and constraining the geological units that are referenced in the Survey's data sets, workflows, products and services. These can include printed and digital geological maps at a variety of scales, reports, books and memoirs, and 3- and 4-dimensional geological models. All geological units referenced in any of these must first be present and defined, at least to a basic level of completeness, in the Lexicon database. Only then do they become available for use. The second purpose of the Lexicon is as a repository of knowledge about the geology of the UK and its continental shelf, providing authoritative descriptions written and checked by BGS geoscientists. Geological units are assigned to one of four themes: bedrock, superficial, mass movement and artificial. They are further assigned to one of nine classes: lithostratigraphical, lithodemic intrusive, lithodemic tectono-metamorphic, lithodemic mixed, litho-morpho-genetic, man-made, age-based, composite, and miscellaneous. The combination of theme and class controls the fields that are available to describe each geological unit, so that appropriate fields are offered for each, whether it is a Precambrian tectono-metamorphic complex, a Devonian sandstone formation, or a Devensian river terrace deposit. Information that may be recorded about each unit includes its rank, parentage, previous and alternative names and usage, geochronological age, lithology, environment of deposition / mode of origin, thickness, boundaries, type and reference localities and sections, geographical distribution, associated landforms, and literature references. BGS geoscientists use a web-based 'sandbox' system to write and revise definitions. The Lexicon currently stores information on approximately 13,400 geological units that BGS considers to be 'current', with cross references to some 6,000 other names that are considered to be obsolete or alternative names. The entries span the entire preserved geological history of the UK from Archaean to Recent, onshore and offshore.

  16. Homogenity of geological units with respect to the radon risk in the Walloon region of Belgium.

    PubMed

    Tondeur, François; Cinelli, Giorgia; Dehandschutter, Boris

    2014-10-01

    In the process of mapping indoor radon risk, an important step is to define geological units well-correlated with indoor radon. The present paper examines this question for the Walloon region of Belgium, using a database of more than 18,000 indoor radon measurements. With a few exceptions like the Carboniferous (to be divided into Tournaisian, Visean and Namurian-Westphalian) and the Tertiary (in which all Series may be treated together), the Series/Epoch stratigraphic level is found to be the most appropriate geological unit to classify the radon risk. A further division according to the geological massif or region is necessary to define units with a reasonable uniformity of the radon risk. In particular, Paleozoic series from Cambrian to Devonian show strong differences between different massifs. Local hot-spots are also observed in the Brabant massif. Finally, 35 geological units are defined according to their radon risk, 6 of which still present a clear weak homogeneity. In the case of 4 of these units (Jurassic, Middle Devonian of Condroz and of Fagne-Famenne, Ordovician of the Stavelot massif) homogeneity is moderate, but the data are strongly inhomogeneous for Visean in Condroz and in the Brabant massif. The 35 geological units are used in an ANOVA analysis, to evaluate the part of indoor radon variability which can be attributed to geology. The result (15.4-17.7%) agrees with the values observed in the UK. PMID:24953229

  17. FISHERY STATIST! OF THE UNITED STATES

    E-print Network

    FISHERY STATIST! OF THE UNITED STATES 1958 i^SL-O/^ ^SSQ STATISTICAL DIGEST NO. 49 UNITKD STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Fish and Wildlife Service; Bureau of Commercial Fisheries #12;#12;UNITED STATES AND SERVICES. Harold E. Crowlher, Chief STATISTICAL DIGEST 49 FISHERY STATISTICS OF THE UNITED STATES 1958 BY E

  18. Drought in Southwestern United States

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    The southwestern United States pined for water in late March and early April 2007. This image is based on data collected by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA's Terra satellite from March 22 through April 6, 2007, and it shows the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index, or NDVI, for the period. In this NDVI color scale, green indicates areas of healthier-than-usual vegetation, and only small patches of green appear in this image, near the California-Nevada border and in Utah. Larger areas of below-normal vegetation are more common, especially throughout California. Pale yellow indicates areas with generally average vegetation. Gray areas appear where no data were available, likely due to persistent clouds or snow cover. According to the April 10, 2007, update from the U.S. Drought Monitor, most of the southwestern United Sates, including Utah, Nevada, California, and Arizona, experienced moderate to extreme drought. The hardest hit areas were southeastern California and southwestern Arizona. Writing for the Drought Monitor, David Miskus of the Joint Agricultural Weather Facility reported that March 2007 had been unusually dry for the southwestern United States. While California's and Utah's reservoir storage was only slightly below normal, reservoir storage was well below normal for New Mexico and Arizona. In early April, an international research team published an online paper in Science noting that droughts could become more common for the southwestern United States and northern Mexico, as these areas were already showing signs of drying. Relying on the same computer models used in the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) report released in early 2007, the researchers who published in Science concluded that global warming could make droughts more common, not just in the American Southwest, but also in semiarid regions of southern Europe, Mediterranean northern Africa, and the Middle East.

  19. Geology

    SciTech Connect

    Reidel, Stephen P.

    2008-01-17

    This chapter summarizes the geology of the single-shell tank (SST) farms in the context of the region’s geologic history. This chapter is based on the information in the geology data package for the SST waste management areas and SST RFI Appendix E, which builds upon previous reports on the tank farm geology and Integrated Disposal Facility geology with information available after those reports were published.

  20. Overview of the potential and identified petroleum source rocks of the Appalachian basin, eastern United States: Chapter G.13 in Coal and petroleum resources in the Appalachian basin: distribution, geologic framework, and geochemical character

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coleman, James L., Jr.; Ryder, Robert T.; Milici, Robert C.; Brown, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    The Appalachian basin is the oldest and longest producing commercially viable petroleum-producing basin in the United States. Source rocks for reservoirs within the basin are located throughout the entire stratigraphic succession and extend geographically over much of the foreland basin and fold-and-thrust belt that make up the Appalachian basin. Major source rock intervals occur in Ordovician, Devonian, and Pennsylvanian strata with minor source rock intervals present in Cambrian, Silurian, and Mississippian strata.

  1. Geologic mapping of the Bauru Group in Sao Paulo state by LANDSAT images. [Brazil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parada, N. D. J. (principal investigator); Godoy, A. M.

    1983-01-01

    The occurrence of the Bauru Group in Sao Paulo State was studied, with emphasis on the western plateau. Regional geological mapping was carried out on a 1:250.000 scale with the help of MSS/LANDSAT images. The visual interpretation of images consisted basically of identifying different spectral characteristics of the geological units using channels 5 and 7. Complementary studies were made for treatment of data with an Interative Image (I-100) analyser in order to facilitate the extraction of information, particularly for areas where visual interpretation proved to be difficult. Regional characteristics provided by MSS/LANDSAT images, coupled with lithostratigraphic studies carried out in the areas of occurrence of Bauru Group sediments, enabled the homogenization of criteria for the subdivision of this group. A spatial distribution of the mapped units was obtained for the entire State of Sao Paulo and results were correlated with proposed stratigraphic divisions.

  2. 7 CFR 65.255 - United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...COUNTRY OF ORIGIN LABELING OF BEEF, PORK, LAMB, CHICKEN, GOAT MEAT, PERISHABLE AGRICULTURAL COMMODITIES, MACADAMIA NUTS, PECANS, PEANUTS, AND GINSENG General Provisions Definitions § 65.255 United States. United States means the 50...

  3. 7 CFR 65.255 - United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...COUNTRY OF ORIGIN LABELING OF BEEF, PORK, LAMB, CHICKEN, GOAT MEAT, PERISHABLE AGRICULTURAL COMMODITIES, MACADAMIA NUTS, PECANS, PEANUTS, AND GINSENG General Provisions Definitions § 65.255 United States. United States means the 50...

  4. 7 CFR 65.255 - United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...COUNTRY OF ORIGIN LABELING OF BEEF, PORK, LAMB, CHICKEN, GOAT MEAT, PERISHABLE AGRICULTURAL COMMODITIES, MACADAMIA NUTS, PECANS, PEANUTS, AND GINSENG General Provisions Definitions § 65.255 United States. United States means the 50...

  5. United States Biosphere Reserves Survey October 2003

    E-print Network

    United States Biosphere Reserves Survey 2003 October 2003 United States Biosphere Reserves Survey U.S. Biosphere Reserves Association U. S. Biosphere Reserves Survey, 2003 CONTENTS ...............................................................................................1 2. Response from biosphere reserves

  6. 31 CFR 592.311 - United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ROUGH DIAMONDS CONTROL REGULATIONS General Definitions § 592.311 United States. The term United States, when used in the...

  7. 31 CFR 592.311 - United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ROUGH DIAMONDS CONTROL REGULATIONS General Definitions § 592.311 United States. The term United States, when used in the...

  8. 31 CFR 592.311 - United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ROUGH DIAMONDS CONTROL REGULATIONS General Definitions § 592.311 United States. The term United States, when used in the...

  9. 31 CFR 598.317 - United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY FOREIGN NARCOTICS KINGPIN SANCTIONS REGULATIONS General Definitions § 598.317 United States. The term United States means...

  10. 31 CFR 536.315 - United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY NARCOTICS TRAFFICKING SANCTIONS REGULATIONS General Definitions § 536.315 United States. The term United States...

  11. 31 CFR 536.315 - United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY NARCOTICS TRAFFICKING SANCTIONS REGULATIONS General Definitions § 536.315 United States. The term United States...

  12. 76 FR 38700 - United States, et al.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-01

    ...DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Antitrust Division United States, et al. v. American Express Company, et al.; Public Comments and Response on Proposed...on the proposed Final Judgment in United States, et al. v. American Express Company, et al.,...

  13. 76 FR 18783 - United States et al.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-05

    ...DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Antitrust Division United States et al. v. Dean Foods Company; Proposed Final Judgment, Stipulation...the Eastern District of Wisconsin in United States of America, et al. v. Dean Foods Company, Civil Action No....

  14. 31 CFR 589.311 - United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY UKRAINE RELATED SANCTIONS REGULATIONS General Definitions § 589.311 United States. The term United States means the...

  15. Health, United States, 2012: Men's Health

    MedlinePLUS

    ... NCHS Home Publications & Information Products Health, United States Health, United States, 2014 Users with Internet Explorer may ... the file to your desktop before opening. Men's Health On this Page Access and utilization of health ...

  16. 31 CFR 562.309 - United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY IRANIAN HUMAN RIGHTS ABUSES SANCTIONS REGULATIONS General Definitions § 562.309 United States. The term United States...

  17. 31 CFR 562.309 - United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY IRANIAN HUMAN RIGHTS ABUSES SANCTIONS REGULATIONS General Definitions § 562.309 United States. The term United States...

  18. 31 CFR 562.309 - United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY IRANIAN HUMAN RIGHTS ABUSES SANCTIONS REGULATIONS General Definitions § 562.309 United States. The term United States...

  19. HIV/AIDS in the United States

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Syndicated Content Podcasts Slide Sets HIV in the United States: At A Glance Language: English Español (Spanish) Format: ... More than 1.2 million people in the United States are living with HIV infection, and almost 1 ...

  20. 31 CFR 592.311 - United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ROUGH DIAMONDS CONTROL REGULATIONS General Definitions § 592.311 United States. The term United States, when used in the...

  1. 31 CFR 592.311 - United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ROUGH DIAMONDS CONTROL REGULATIONS General Definitions § 592.311 United States. The term United States, when used in the...

  2. 31 CFR 562.309 - United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY IRANIAN HUMAN RIGHTS ABUSES SANCTIONS REGULATIONS General Definitions § 562.309 United States. The term United States...

  3. Offshore Aquaculture in the United States

    E-print Network

    Offshore Aquaculture in the United States: Economic Considerations, Implications & Opportunities from: http://aquaculture.noaa.gov This document should be cited as follows: Rubino, Michael (editor). 2008. Offshore Aquaculture in the United States: Economic Considerations, Implications & Opportunities

  4. 7 CFR 1209.21 - State and United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...Columbia, and the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico. (b) United States means collectively the several States of the United States of America, the District of Columbia, and the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico. Mushroom...

  5. 7 CFR 1209.21 - State and United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...Columbia, and the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico. (b) United States means collectively the several States of the United States of America, the District of Columbia, and the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico. Mushroom...

  6. Federation of State Medical Boards of the United States

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Boards Representing the 70 medical boards of the United States and its territories. The Federation of State Medical ... the 70 medical and osteopathic boards of the United States and its territories. Since its founding, the FSMB ...

  7. 7 CFR 1209.21 - State and United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...Columbia, and the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico. (b) United States means collectively the several States of the United States of America, the District of Columbia, and the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico. Mushroom...

  8. 7 CFR 1209.21 - State and United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...Columbia, and the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico. (b) United States means collectively the several States of the United States of America, the District of Columbia, and the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico. Mushroom...

  9. 7 CFR 1209.21 - State and United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...Columbia, and the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico. (b) United States means collectively the several States of the United States of America, the District of Columbia, and the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico. Mushroom...

  10. United States National Waste Terminal Storage argillaceous rock studies

    SciTech Connect

    Brunton, G.D.

    1981-01-01

    The past and present argillaceous rock studies for the US National Waste Terminal Storage Program consist of: (1) evaluation of the geological characteristics of several widespread argillaceous formations in the United States; (2) laboratory studies of the physical and chemical properties of selected argillaceous rock samples; and (3) two full-scale in situ surface heater experiments that simulate the emplacement of heat-generating radioactive waste in argillaceous rock.

  11. A Lithology Based Map Unit Schema For Onegeology Regional Geologic Map Integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moosdorf, N.; Richard, S. M.

    2012-12-01

    A system of lithogenetic categories for a global lithological map (GLiM, http://www.ifbm.zmaw.de/index.php?id=6460&L=3) has been compiled based on analysis of lithology/genesis categories for regional geologic maps for the entire globe. The scheme is presented for discussion and comment. Analysis of units on a variety of regional geologic maps indicates that units are defined based on assemblages of rock types, as well as their genetic type. In this compilation of continental geology, outcropping surface materials are dominantly sediment/sedimentary rock; major subdivisions of the sedimentary category include clastic sediment, carbonate sedimentary rocks, clastic sedimentary rocks, mixed carbonate and clastic sedimentary rock, colluvium and residuum. Significant areas of mixed igneous and metamorphic rock are also present. A system of global categories to characterize the lithology of regional geologic units is important for Earth System models of matter fluxes to soils, ecosystems, rivers and oceans, and for regional analysis of Earth surface processes at global scale. Because different applications of the classification scheme will focus on different lithologic constituents in mixed units, an ontology-type representation of the scheme that assigns properties to the units in an analyzable manner will be pursued. The OneGeology project is promoting deployment of geologic map services at million scale for all nations. Although initial efforts are commonly simple scanned map WMS services, the intention is to move towards data-based map services that categorize map units with standard vocabularies to allow use of a common map legend for better visual integration of the maps (e.g. see OneGeology Europe, http://onegeology-europe.brgm.fr/ geoportal/ viewer.jsp). Current categorization of regional units with a single lithology from the CGI SimpleLithology (http://resource.geosciml.org/201202/ Vocab2012html/ SimpleLithology201012.html) vocabulary poorly captures the lithologic character of such units in a meaningful way. A lithogenetic unit category scheme accessible as a GeoSciML-portrayal-based OGC Styled Layer Description resource is key to enabling OneGeology (http://oneGeology.org) geologic map services to achieve a high degree of visual harmonization.

  12. 7 CFR 1215.20 - United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE POPCORN PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND CONSUMER INFORMATION Popcorn Promotion, Research, and Consumer Information...United States means all of the States. Popcorn...

  13. 7 CFR 1215.20 - United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE POPCORN PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND CONSUMER INFORMATION Popcorn Promotion, Research, and Consumer Information...United States means all of the States. Popcorn...

  14. 7 CFR 1215.20 - United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE POPCORN PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND CONSUMER INFORMATION Popcorn Promotion, Research, and Consumer Information...United States means all of the States. Popcorn...

  15. 7 CFR 1215.20 - United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE POPCORN PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND CONSUMER INFORMATION Popcorn Promotion, Research, and Consumer Information...United States means all of the States. Popcorn...

  16. 7 CFR 1215.20 - United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE POPCORN PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND CONSUMER INFORMATION Popcorn Promotion, Research, and Consumer Information...United States means all of the States. Popcorn...

  17. Municipal Solid Waste in The United States

    E-print Network

    Barlaz, Morton A.

    2011 Facts and Figures Municipal Solid Waste in The United States #12;United States Environmental Protection Agency Office of Solid Waste (5306P) EPA530-R-13-001 May 2013 www.epa.gov #12;MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE IN THE UNITED STATES: 2011 FACTS AND FIGURES Table of Contents Chapter Page MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE

  18. National Surveillance of Asthma: United States,

    E-print Network

    National Surveillance of Asthma: United States, 2001­2010 Series3,Number35November2012 U Moorman JE, Akinbami LJ, Bailey CM, et al. National Surveillance of Asthma: United States, 2001-in-Publication Data National surveillance of asthma: United States, 2001­2010. p. ; cm. -- (Vital and health

  19. FISHERY STATISTICS OF THE UNITED STATES

    E-print Network

    FISHERY STATISTICS OF THE UNITED STATES 1959 ^mmi STATISTICAL DIGEST NO. 51 UNITED STATES DEPARTMl of Commercial Fisheries, Donald L. McKernan, Director jPANlELM COHEN FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE STATISTICAL DIGEST 51 FISHERY STATISTICS OF THE UNITED STATES 1959 BY E. A. POWER PUBLISHED BY BUREAU OF COMMERCIAL

  20. FISHERY STATISTICS OF THE UNITED STATES

    E-print Network

    FISHERY STATISTICS OF THE UNITED STATES 1963 STATISTICAL DIGEST NO. 57 UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT of Commercial Fisheries, Donald L. McKernan, Director STATISTICAL DIGEST 57 FISHERY STATISTICS OF THE UNITEDTernment Printing Office, Washington, D.C., 20402 - Price $2.25 (paper c #12;Fishery statistics of the United States

  1. FISHERY STATISTICS OF THE UNITED STATES

    E-print Network

    FISHERY STATISTICS OF THE UNITED STATES SH 11 A443X FISH 1948 STATISTICAL DIGEST NO. 22 Fish OF THE INTERIOR, Oscar L. Chapman, Secretary FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, Albert M. Day, Director Statistical Digest 22 FISHERY STATISTICS OF THE UNITED STATES 1948 BY A. W. ANDERSON and E. A. POWER UNITED STATES

  2. FISHERY STATISTICS OF THE UNITED STATES

    E-print Network

    FISHERY STATISTICS OF THE UNITED STATES 1944 STATISTICAL DIGEST ISO. 16 Fish and Wildlife Sekvh Albert M. Day, Director Statistical Digest No. 16 FISHERY STATISTICS OF THE UNITED STATES 1944 BY A. W Statistics of the United States and Alaska are coiip i I ed and published annually to make available

  3. FISHERY STATISTICS OF THE UNITED STATES

    E-print Network

    FISHERY STATISTICS OF THE UNITED STATES 1946 STATISTICAL DIGEST NO, 19 Fish and Wildlike Sekvice L. Chapman, Secretary FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE Albert M. Day, Director Statistical Digest 19 FISHERY STATISTICS OF THE UNITED STATES 1946 BY A. W. ANDERSON and E. A. POWER UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT

  4. FISHERY STATISTICS OF THE UNITED STATES

    E-print Network

    FISHERY STATISTICS OF THE UNITED STATES I 1947 cf^^v'^ml STATISTICAL DIGEST NO. 21 Fish Oscar L. Chapman, Secretary FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE Albert M. Day, Director Statistical Digest 21 PI^j^IELW' , COHEN FISHERY STATISTICS OF THE UNITED STATES 1947 BY A. W. ANDERSON and E. A. POWER UNITED STATES

  5. FISHERY STATISTICS F THE UNITED STATES

    E-print Network

    FISHERY STATISTICS »F THE UNITED STATES ^ 1954 ,M^,. 'M' . ' J*"'',-,'i''' ' STATISTICAL DIGEST NO DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR, Fred A. Seaton, Secretary FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE PANIELM. COHEN Statistical Digest 39 FISHERY STATISTICS OF THE UNITED STATES 1954 BY A. W. ANDERSON and E. A. POWER UNITED STATES

  6. FISHERY STATISTICS OF THE UNITED STATES

    E-print Network

    FISHERY STATISTICS OF THE UNITED STATES 1962 STATISTICAL DIGEST NO. 56 UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT Fisheries, Donald L. McKernan, Director STATISTICAL DIGEST 56 FISHERY STATISTICS OF THE UNITED STATES 1962.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C., 20402 - Price $2.25 (paper cover) #12;Fishery statistics

  7. FISHERY STATISTICS OF THE UNITED STATES

    E-print Network

    FISHERY STATISTICS OF THE UNITED STATES I 1952 .^£^ STATISTICAL DIGEST NO. 34 Fish and Wildlife McKay, Secretary FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, John L. Farley, Director -iJ^EUW^ .COHEN Statistical Digest 34 FISHERY STATISTICS OF THE UNITED STATES 1952 BY A. W. ANDERSON and E. A. POWER UNITED STATES

  8. FISHERY STATISTICS OF THE UNITED STATES

    E-print Network

    FISHERY STATISTICS OF THE UNITED STATES 1966 STATISTICAL DIGEST NO. 60 UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR U.S. FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE Bureau of Commercial Fisheries STATISTICAL DIGEST 60 FISHERY STATISTICS OF THE UNITED STATES 1966 BY Charles H. Lyles PUBLISHED BY BUREAU OF COMMERCIAL FISHERIES

  9. Export Controls and United States Space Power

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael J. Noble

    2008-01-01

    This article assesses the impact of export policy on 21st century United States space power. The efficacy of current export controls in preventing the proliferation of space technologies and maintaining United States advantage is evaluated. The study finds that space launch technology has been and remains highly globalized; the United States has lost significant international communications satellite market share, but

  10. United States Pharmacopeia Safety Evaluation of Spirulina

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robin J. Marles; Marilyn L. Barrett; Joanne Barnes; Mary L. Chavez; Paula Gardiner; Richard Ko; Gail B. Mahady; Tieraona Low Dog; Nandakumara D. Sarma; Gabriel I. Giancaspro; Maged Sharaf; James Griffiths

    2011-01-01

    The Dietary Supplements Information Expert Committee (DSI-EC) of the United States Pharmacopeial Convention (USP) reviews the safety of dietary supplements and dietary supplement ingredients for the purpose of determining whether they should be admitted as quality monographs into the United States Pharmacopeia and National Formulary (USP–NF). The United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has enforcement authority to pursue a

  11. THE UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE

    E-print Network

    THE UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE its responsibilities and functions Circular 97 #12;#12;THE UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE its responsibilities and functions U.S. Department of the Interior Fish and Wildlife Service Circular 97 Washington · I960 #12;UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT

  12. Hydrologic Unit Map -- 1978, state of South Dakota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey

    1978-01-01

    This map and accompanying table show Hydrologic Unites that are basically hydrographic in nature. The Cataloging Unites shown supplant the Cataloging Units previously depicted n the 1974 State Hydrologic Unit Map. The boundaries as shown have been adapted from the 1974 State Hydrologic Unit Map, "The Catalog of Information on Water Data" (1972), "Water Resources Regions and Subregions for the National Assessment of Water and Related Land Resources" by the U.S. Water Resources Council (1970), "River Basin of the United States" by the U.S. Soil Conservation Service (1963, 1970), "River Basin Maps Showing Hydrologic Stations" by the Inter-Agency Committee on Water Resources, Subcommittee on Hydrology (1961), and State planning maps. The Political Subdivision has been adopted from "Counties and County Equivalents of the States if the United States" presented in Federal Information Processing Standards Publication 6-2, issued by the National Bureau of Standards (1973) in which each county or county equivalent is identified by a 2-character State code and a 3-character county code. The Regions, Subregions and Accounting Units are aggregates of the Cataloging Unites. The Regions and Sub regions are currently (1978) used by the U.S> Water Resources Council for comprehensive planning, including the National Assessment, and as a standard geographical framework for more detailed water and related land-resources planning. The Accounting Units are those currently (1978) in use by the U.S. Geological Survey for managing the National Water Data Network. This map was revised to include a boundary realinement between Cataloging Units 10140103 and 10160009.

  13. Geologic Setting and Hydrogeologic Units of the Columbia Plateau Regional Aquifer System, Washington, Oregon, and Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kahle, Sue C.; Olsen, Theresa D.; Morgan, David S.

    2009-01-01

    The Columbia Plateau Regional Aquifer System (CPRAS) covers approximately 44,000 square miles of northeastern Oregon, southeastern Washington, and western Idaho. The area supports a $6 billion per year agricultural industry, leading the Nation in production of apples and nine other commodities (State of Washington Office of Financial Management, 2007; U.S. Department of Agriculture, 2007). Groundwater availability in the aquifers of the area is a critical water-resource management issue because the water demand for agriculture, economic development, and ecological needs is high. The primary aquifers of the CPRAS are basalts of the Columbia River Basalt Group (CRBG) and overlying basin-fill sediments. Water-resources issues that have implications for future groundwater availability in the region include (1) widespread water-level declines associated with development of groundwater resources for irrigation and other uses, (2) reduction in base flow to rivers and associated effects on temperature and water quality, and (3) current and anticipated effects of global climate change on recharge, base flow, and ultimately, groundwater availability. As part of a National Groundwater Resources Program, the U.S. Geological Survey began a study of the CPRAS in 2007 with the broad goals of (1) characterizing the hydrologic status of the system, (2) identifying trends in groundwater storage and use, and (3) quantifying groundwater availability. The study approach includes documenting changes in the status of the system, quantifying the hydrologic budget for the system, updating the regional hydrogeologic framework, and developing a groundwater-flow simulation model for the system. The simulation model will be used to evaluate and test the conceptual model of the system and later to evaluate groundwater availability under alternative development and climate scenarios. The objectives of this study were to update the hydrogeologic framework for the CPRAS using the available geologic mapping and well information and to develop a digital, three-dimensional hydrogeologic model that could be used as the basis of a groundwater-flow model. This report describes the principal geologic and hydrogeologic units of the CPRAS and geologic map and well data that were compiled as part of the study. The report also describes simplified regional hydrogeologic sections and unit extent maps that were used to conceptualize the framework prior to development of the digital 3-dimensional framework model.

  14. Coal deposits of the United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    John, Nelson W.

    1987-01-01

    The coal fields of the Unites States can be divided into six major provinces. The Appalachian and Interior Provinces contain dominantly bituminous coal in strata of Pennsylvanian age. The coal seams are relatively thin and are mined both by surface and underground methods. Sulfyur content is low to moderate in the Appalachian Province, generally high in the Interior province. The Gulf Coastal Plain Province, in Texas and neighboring states, contains lignite of Eocene age. The seams are 3-25 ft (0.9-7.5 m) thick and are minded in large open pits. The Northern Great Plains Province has lignite and subbituminous coal of Cretaceous, Paleocene and Eocene age. The coal, largely very low in sulfur, occurs in beds up to 100 ft (30 m) thick and is strip-mined. The Rocky Mountain Province contains a great variety of coal deposits in numerous separate intermontane basins. Most of it is low-sulfur subbituminous to bituminous coal iof Creatceous and early Tertiary age. The seams range from a few feet to over 100 ft (30 m) thick. Strip-mining dominates but underground mines are important in Utah and Colorado. The Pacific Coast Province, which includes Alaska, contains enormous cola resources but has seen little mining. The coal is highly diverse in physical character and geologic setting. ?? 1987.

  15. Probabilistic estimates of maximum acceleration and velocity in rock in the contiguous United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Algermissen, Sylvester Theodore; Perkins, D.M.; Thenhaus, P.C.; Hanson, S.L.; Bender, B.L.

    1982-01-01

    Maximum horizontal accelerations and velocities caused by earthquakes are mapped for exposure times of 10, 50 and 250 years at the 90-percent probability level of nonexceedance for the contiguous United States. In many areas these new maps differ significantly from the 1976 probabilistic acceleration map by Algermlssen and Perkins because of the increase in detail, resulting from greater emphasis on the geologic basis for seismic source zones. This new emphasis is possible because of extensive data recently acquired on Holocene and Quaternary faulting in the western United States and new interpretations of geologic structures controlling the seismicity pattern in the central and eastern United States.

  16. Preliminary site studies for critical facilities using geotechnical units derived from engineering geologic analyses

    E-print Network

    Conover, Dale Everette

    1985-01-01

    of Economic Geology in Austin and other sources of data were utilized. Data was 25 Fart Worth r ~ Dallas El Paso Pecos e ~ Midland Odessa ~ Waco EAST-CENTRAL TEXAS SITE Aust ill ~ Bryan/College Sto I I oh Pl'an'le View Sah Ahtahlo ~ Houston...PRELIMINARY SITE STUDIES FOR CRITICAL FACILITIES USING GEOTECHNICAL UNITS DERIVED FROM ENGINEERING GEOLOG'C ANALYSES A Thesis DALE EVERETTE CONOVER Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AAM University i n partial fulfillment...

  17. Syphilis in the United States.

    PubMed

    Shockman, Solomon; Buescher, Lucinda S; Stone, Stephen P

    2014-01-01

    Syphilis gained notoriety in the 1500s, when it became widespread throughout Europe. While the origins of syphilis are not certain, recent data have shown that it may have originated in the Americas from a close relative that causes Yaws (Treponema pallidum pertenue).(1) For the past 500years, the disease has shown its various faces all over the world. The 19th century saw an entire medical subspecialty-syphilology (sometimes known as syphilography)-devoted to the study of the great disease, then known as "the great imitator." Syphilis has an entire textbook of presentations and can mimic many other infections and immune-mediated processes. At the beginning of the 20th century, the many faces of the disease led to Sir William Osler's well-known aphorism, "The physician who knows syphilis knows medicine."(2) When penicillin was discovered, and used to treat syphilis in 1943, some thought that syphilis would go by the wayside, but syphilis continued what it has been doing for so many years . . . inconspicuously infecting humans. The United States has seen the incidence of syphilis increase numerous times throughout the past 70years. Every decrease in the incidence of syphilis is followed shortly by an increase. A marked shift in the epidemiology occurred from 1990 to 2000. In the 1990s, syphilis primarily occurred in heterosexual minority groups. In the new millennium, a majority of cases of syphilis are now transmitted among men who have sex with men (MSM).(3) This contribution discusses the incidence of syphilis in the United States and the reasons these trends continue. PMID:24559556

  18. Reported historic asbestos prospects and natural asbestos occurrences in the central United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Van Gosen, Bradley S.

    2006-01-01

    This map and its accompanying dataset provide information for 26 natural asbestos occurrences in the Central United States (U.S.), using descriptions found in the geologic literature. Data on location, mineralogy, geology, and relevant literature for each asbestos site are provided. Using the map and digital data in this report, the user can examine the distribution of previously reported asbestos occurrences and their geological characteristics in the Central U.S. This report is part of an ongoing study by the U.S. Geological Survey to identify and map reported natural asbestos occurrences in the U.S., which began with U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report 2005-1189 (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2005/1189/). These reports are intended to provide State and local government agencies and other stakeholders with geologic information on natural occurrences of asbestos in the U.S.

  19. Flooding in the United States Midwest, 2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holmes, Robert R.; Koenig, Todd A.; Karstensen, Krista A.

    2010-01-01

    During 2008, record precipitation amounts, coupled with already saturated soils, resulted in flooding along many rivers in the United States Midwest. Separate flooding events occurred in January, February, March, April, May, June, July, and September of 2008. The June floods were by far the most severe and widespread with substantial (and in places record) flooding and damage occurring in Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, Oklahoma, South Dakota, and Wisconsin. Indiana had the most recurrent flooding during 2008, with peak-of-record streamflows occurring during January, February, March, June, and September. During 2008, peak-of-record streamflows were recorded at more than 147 U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) streamgages. The annual exceedance probability of the peak streamflows at 25 streamgages was less than 0.2 percent and between 0.2 and 1 percent at 68 streamgages. Trends in flood magnitudes were computed for USGS Midwest streamgages that had no regulation. No Midwest-wide systematic trends upward or downward were evident, although clusters of consistent trends (both upward and downward) were detected in parts of the Midwest.

  20. U.S. Geological Survey: Science in Your State

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This portal provides access to a variety of scientific reference materials for the 50 states and some territories in the U.S. For each state, there is a section of real-time data that includes current stream flow conditions, drought and flood watches, ground water data, and current natural hazards information. A facts section provides basic geographic and demographic information such as land area, highest and lowest points, population, capital, and others. There is also a selection of links to maps and tools, and additional information on each state's geology, ecology, natural resources, and natural hazards.

  1. 31 CFR 540.313 - United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY HIGHLY ENRICHED URANIUM (HEU) AGREEMENT ASSETS CONTROL REGULATIONS General Definitions § 540.313 United States. The term United...

  2. Program Accounting in the United States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Costerison, Dennis, Comp.

    This booklet summarizes data on the status of planning, programming, budgeting systems (PPBS) in the United States, based on a survey conducted by the Indiana State Department of Public Instruction in June 1975. Data are presented on a state-by-state basis for 45 states; the states of Hawaii, Iowa, Maryland, Michigan, and Tennessee did not respond…

  3. Radar penetrates only the youngest geological units on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stillman, David E.; Grimm, Robert E.

    2011-03-01

    Signals from the Shallow Radar were intended to penetrate hundreds of meters or more into Mars, but subsurface reflections are abundant only in known or inferred ice-rich units and young (middle to late Amazonian), apparently pristine, volcanic units. As volcanic units age, fewer subsurface reflections are detected. Also, no subsurface reflections are detected from any northern hemisphere units inferred to be altered by water. We suggest that the general lack of subsurface reflections on Mars is not likely an indication that the shallow interior is devoid of structure and stratigraphy but rather an indication that dielectric contrasts cannot be detected due to signal attenuation originating from scattering and/or absorption. We constrained the attenuation rate in regions with no subsurface reflections to 0.065-0.27 dB/m. This corresponds to scattering losses from meter-scale fractures and/or lithologic density variations of 0.27-1.03 g/cm3. Alternatively, our laboratory measurements have shown that three monolayers of adsorbed water on 2.2-14 vol % smectite clays can completely absorb radar energy and would be equivalent to a global water layer just ˜0.2-0.6 m thick. We suggest that the increased attenuation in volcanic units comes from an increase in fracture density. Attenuation in water-altered units may be due to the greater heterogeneity in sedimentary units and/or chemical alteration that has formed high-surface-area smectites capable of holding the necessary amount of adsorbed water. Overall, the lack of widespread, deep subsurface reflections is due to the more Earth-like radar properties of Mars, as compared to the Moon-like properties that were anticipated.

  4. Potato production in the United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Potatoes have been a staple in the American diet for almost 250 years. The United States is the world's fifth biggest producer, behind China, India, the Russian Federation, and the Ukraine. Potatoes in the United States are grown in nearly every state. Idaho produces approximately 1/3 of all potatoe...

  5. FISHERY STATISTICS )F THE UNITED STATES

    E-print Network

    SH 11 .A443X FISH FISHERY STATISTICS )F THE UNITED STATES ^M=^. STATISTICAL DIGEST NO. 36 #12. Farley, Director i]EL M. COHEN Statistical Digest 36 FISHERY STATISTICS OF THE UNITED STATES 1953 BY A. W;Fishery Statistics of the I'nited States and Alaska are compiled and published an- nually to make

  6. The Changing Climate for United States Law

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David M. Driesen

    2007-01-01

    Just a few years ago, the subject of American climate change law would not merit an article like this one, let alone the book that the American Bar Association has recently published on the subject. But the United States has changed, at least somewhat. At the moment, most important United States climate change law consists of state and local law,

  7. United States Early Radio History

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The history of technology, particularly of communicative technologies such as the radio, is often overlooked by scholars. With this in mind, Thomas H. White has developed this fine site containing "articles and extracts about early radio and related technologies, concentrating on the United States in the period from 1897 to 1927." The site itself is divided into four large sections, ordered by chronological period, with the last section containing original pieces by Mr. White, covering such topics as "U.S. Callsign Policies: 1911-2003" and "Washington D.C.: AM Station History, 1920-2003." Each of the topics is essentially a long-form essay, containing numerous hyperlinks to reproductions or transcriptions of original primary documents, including documents relating the efforts to provide entertainment and news over the telephone in the first few decades of the 20th century. Overall, the site is a fascinating place for those persons hoping to learn a bit about the early history and development of the radio and its subsequent effects on related technologies.

  8. 7 CFR 1214.24 - United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CHRISTMAS TREE PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION ORDER Christmas Tree Promotion, Research, and Information Order...possessions of the United States. Christmas Tree Promotion...

  9. 7 CFR 1214.24 - United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CHRISTMAS TREE PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION ORDER Christmas Tree Promotion, Research, and Information Order...possessions of the United States. Christmas Tree Promotion...

  10. 7 CFR 1214.24 - United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CHRISTMAS TREE PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION ORDER Christmas Tree Promotion, Research, and Information Order...possessions of the United States. Christmas Tree Promotion...

  11. The Conterminous United States Mineral Appraisal Program; background information to accompany folio of geologic, geochemical, geophysical, and mineral resources maps of the Tonopah 1 by 2 degree Quadrangle, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    John, David A.; Nash, J.T.; Plouff, Donald; Whitebread, D.H.

    1991-01-01

    The Tonopah 1 ? by 2 ? quadrangle in south-central Nevada was studied by an interdisciplinary research team to appraise its mineral resources. The appraisal is based on geological, geochemical, and geophysical field and laboratory investigations, the results of which are published as a folio of maps, figures, and tables, with accompanying discussions. This circular provides background information on the investigations and integrates the information presented in the folio. The selected bibliography lists references to the geology, geochemistry, geophysics, and mineral deposits of the Tonopah 1 ? by 2 ? quadrangle.

  12. The development and implementation of a sixth grade geology unit through collabrative action research

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Maha Al-Quran; Abu A. Haikal; Abdel M. Razeq; M. Shalabi; N. Fathi; Abu S. Ghoush; T. Majdalawi

    2001-01-01

    In March 2000, a researcher from the Al-Qattan Centre for Research and Educational Development, five pre-service teachers from the UNRWA (United Nations Relief and Works Agency) Educational Science Faculty (ESF), and one in-service teacher collaborated through action research to implement the curriculum inquiry cycle to a sixth grade geology unit for the purpose of improving both the teaching and learning

  13. Mapping the radon potential of the united states: Examples from the Appalachians

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gundersen, L.C.S.; Schumann, R.R.

    1997-01-01

    The geologic radon potential of the United States was recently assessed by the U.S. Geological Survey. Results indicate that approximately 33% of the U.S. population lives within geologic provinces where the average indoor radon levels have the potential to be greater than 4 pCi/L (147 Bq/m3). Rock types most commonly associated with high indoor radon include: 1) Uraniferous metamorphosed sediments, volcanics, and granite intrusives, especially those that are highly deformed or sheared. 2) Glacial deposits derived from uranium-bearing rocks and sediments. 3) Carboniferous, black shales. 4) Soils derived from carbonate rock, especially in karstic terrain. 5) Uraniferous fluvial, deltaic, marine, and lacustrine deposits. Different geologic terrains of the eastern United States illustrate some of the problems inherent in correlating indoor radon with geology. The Central and Southern Appalachian Highlands of the eastern United States have not been glaciated and most soils there are saprolitic, derived directly from the underlying bedrock. Regression analyses of bedrock geologic and radon parameters yield positive correlations (R > 0.5 to 0.9) and indicate that bedrock geology can account for a significant portion of the indoor radon variation. In glaciated areas of the United States such as the northern Appalachian Highlands and Appalachian Plateau, the correlation of bedrock geology to indoor radon is obscured or is positive only in certain cases. In these glaciated areas of the country, it is the type, composition, thickness, and permeability of glacial deposits, rather than the bedrock geology, that controls the radon source.

  14. Annual report to the Pecos River Commission on investigations being made in New Mexico and Texas by the United States Geological Survey in cooperation with the Pecos River Commission: calendar year 1976

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey

    1976-01-01

    This report describes investigations in New Mexico and Texas made by the Water Resources Division of the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Pecos River Commission during the 1976 calendar year and provides a summary of costs for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1976.

  15. United States Space Explorations 1958

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1962-01-01

    United States Space Explorations 1958. The film describes preparation and launch of five satellites and two space probes during 1958. On January 31, a Jupiter vehicle launched Explorer I into space. Data from this satellite was used to identify the van Allen radiation belts. On March 17, a Vanguard I rocket launched an Earth satellite with solar batteries. Data from the mission was used to determine that the Earth is slightly pear-shaped. On March 26, Explorer III was launched to further study the van Allen belts, micrometeoroid impacts, and internal and external temperatures. Explorer IV, launched on July 26, was intended to study radiation and temperature data. A lunar probe, ABLE I, was intended to measure radiation, magnetic fields of Earth and the Moon, density of micrometeoric matter, and internal temperatures. A four-stage rocket was used in the launch. However, a turbo-pump failed and the liquid oxygen pump stopped, resulting in a failed mission. On October 10, Pioneer I was launched by an ABLE vehicle. First and second stage velocity was less than desired and the probe did not leave Earth orbit. Attempts to attain escape velocity were unsuccessful. On December, a Jupiter boost vehicle was used to launch Juno II, with Pioneer III as the payload. Escape velocity was reached and Pioneer III left Earth's atmosphere. Failed launches, such as those of Vanguard boost vehicles and several Explorer satellites, also added to scientific knowledge. [Entire movie available on DVD from CASI as Doc ID 20070030963. Contact help@sti.nasa.gov

  16. Geology of Kentucky

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This website contains geologic maps of Kentucky, with a discussion of geologic time in regards to the rocks, minerals, fossils, and economic deposits found there. There are also sections that describe strata and geologic structures beneath the surface (faults, basins, and arches), the structural processes (folding and faulting) that create stratigraphic units, the geomorphology of the state, geologic information by county, a general description of geologic time, fossil, rocks, and minerals of Kentucky, and a virtual field trip through Natural Bridges State Park. Links are provided for further information.

  17. UNITED STATES CODE TITLE 15 CHAPTER 82 -

    E-print Network

    . The national interest of the United States lies in maintaining international leadership in satellite land's Landsat system established the United States as the world leader in land remote sensing technology. 3 and nondiscriminatory access. 11. Technological advances aimed at reducing the size and weight of satellite systems hold

  18. Major land uses in the United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marschner, Francis J.; Anderson, James R.

    1967-01-01

    This is a polygon coverage of major land uses in the United States. The source of the coverage is the map of major land uses in the National Atlas, pages 158-159, which was adapted from U.S. Department of Agriculture, "Major Land Uses in the United States," by Francis J. Marschner, revised by James R. Anderson, 1967.

  19. Climate Change Impacts in the United States

    E-print Network

    Debinski, Diane M.

    Climate Change Impacts in the United States U.S. National Climate Assessment U.S. Global Change Research Program #12;i CLIMATE CHANGE IMPACTS IN THE UNITED STATES Members of the National Guard lay climate change. Climate change is contributing to an increase in wildfires across the U.S. West. Solar

  20. FISHERY STATISTICS OF THE UNITED STATES

    E-print Network

    SH 11 A443X FISH FISHERY STATISTICS OF THE UNITED STATES 1943 STATISTICAL DIGEST NO. 14 Sll \\M AND WILDLIFE SERVICE Albert M. Day, Director CAMEL M. COHEN Statistical Digest No. 14 FISHERY STATISTICS. - Price 75 cents #12;Fishery Statistics of the United States and Alaska are compiled and published

  1. FISHERY STATISTICS OF THE UNITED STATES

    E-print Network

    FISHERY STATISTICS OF THE UNITED STATES 1950 STATISTICAL DIGEST NO. 27 Fish and Wildlife ServiceKay, Secretary FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, John L. Farley, Director Statistical Digest 27 FISHERY STATISTICS 25, DC. - - Price $2.00 (paper) #12;Fishery Statistics of the United States and A] aska are corapi

  2. FISHERY STATISTICS OF THE UNITED STATES

    E-print Network

    FISHERY STATISTICS OF THE UNITED STATES 1964 STATISTICAL DIGEST NO. 58 UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT Bureau of Commercial Fisheries, Donald L. McKernan, Director STATISTICAL DIGEST 58 FISHERY STATISTICS.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C., 20402 - Price S2.50 (paper cover) #12;Fishery statistics

  3. FISHERY STATISTICS OF THE UNITED STATES

    E-print Network

    pa%Mv--. FISHERY STATISTICS OF THE UNITED STATES 1965 STATISTICAL DIGEST NO. 59 UNITED STATES, Commissioner Bureau of Commercial Fisheries, H. E. Crowther, Director STATISTICAL DIGEST 59 FISHERY STATISTICS.S. Government Printing Office Washington, D.C. 20402 - Price $4 (Paper Cover) #12;Fishery statistics

  4. FISHERY STATISTICS QF THE UNITED STATES

    E-print Network

    I FISHERY STATISTICS QF THE UNITED STATES 1942 By A. W, ANDERSON and E. A. POWER STATISTICAL DIGEST Statistical Digest No. 11 FISHERY STATISTICS OF THE UNITED STATES 1942 BY A. W. ANDERSON and E. A. POWER. S. Government Printing Offic Washington 25, D. C. - Price 60 cents #12;Fishery Statistics

  5. United States Department of Agriculture Resource Bulletin

    E-print Network

    . These estimates are typically the first data source sought by parties interested in developing new forest products in the United States. Information provided by the U.S. Forest Service related to the forest and timber resourcesUnited States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Resource Bulletin NRS-87 Northern Research

  6. Criminal Procedure - Parretti v. United States

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nedia L. DeSouza

    2010-01-01

    In Parretti v. United States, the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit, sitting en banc, addressed two constitutional claims: (1) whether Giancarlo Parretti's arrest pursuant to an Extradition Treaty with France violated the Fourth Amendment; and (2) whether his detention without bail prior to the French government's request for his extradition violated the Due Process Clause of

  7. Health care technology in the United States

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sean R. Tunis; Hellen Gelband

    1994-01-01

    The United States has the largest economy in the world, driven by a free enterprise system concentrated in manufacturing and service; agriculture, mining, fishing, and tourism also make sub- stantial contributions. The per-capita gross domestic product (GDP) in the United States is second highest among Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) countries (after Switzerland); at $21,399 in 19911 (84),

  8. Congressional RecordU United States

    E-print Network

    Lotko, William

    Congressional RecordU NUM E PLURIBU S United States of America PROCEEDINGS AND DEBATES OF THE 105th the bill for the second time. The assistant legislative clerk read as follows: A bill (S. 1065) to amend the conditions for the United States becoming a signatory to any international agreement on green- house gas

  9. Pharmacy student training in United States hospices

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Christopher M. Herndon; David S. Fike; Allan C. Anderson; Ernest J. Dole

    2001-01-01

    Hospice is a quickly growing field in health care in the United States. As the pharmacist’s role in providing patient care to persons at the end of life increases, considerations should be given for training pharmacy students in this area. The objectives of this study were to examine the frequency of pharmacy student education and training among United States hospice

  10. Analysis of United States' Utility Conservation Programs

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Franz Wirl; Wolfgang Orasch

    1998-01-01

    This paper reviews the United States' experience with utility sponsored energy conservation programs. Such programs are central to the recent discussions about electric utility regulation in the United States and elsewhere. First it is shown that these programs are exposed to three problems on the consumers' side – rebound, adverse selection and moral hazard – which lower the effectiveness of

  11. Municipal Solid Waste in The United States

    E-print Network

    Laughlin, Robert B.

    2007 Facts and Figures Municipal Solid Waste in The United States #12;United States Environmental Protection Agency Office of Solid Waste (5306P) EPA530-R-08-010 November 2008 www.epa.gov #12;MUNICIPAL SOLID ............................................................................................................................... 1 WHAT IS INCLUDED IN MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE

  12. Update: Fusarium Keratitis - United States, 2005 - 2006

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This report describes the results of a Fusarium keratitis outbreak investigation being conducted by the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The epidemiological data indicate that the 2005-2006 outbreaks of corneal infections within the United States are linked to the use of on...

  13. Western United States and Southwestern Canada

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    This natural-color image from the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) captures the beauty of the western United States and Canada. Data from 45 swaths from MISR's vertical-viewing (nadir) camera were combined to create this cloud-free mosaic. The image extends from 48o N 128o W in the northwest, to 32oN, 104o W in the southeast, and has been draped over a shaded relief Digital Terrain Elevation Model from the United States Geological Survey.

    The image area includes much of British Columbia, Alberta and Saskatchewan in the north, and extends southward to California, Arizona and New Mexico. The snow-capped Rocky Mountains are a prominent feature extending through British Columbia, Montana, Wyoming, Colorado and New Mexico. Many major rivers originate in the Columbia Plateau region of Washington, Oregon and Idaho. The Colorado Plateau region is characterized by the vibrant red-colored rocks of the Painted Desert in Utah and Arizona, and in New Mexico, White Sands National Park is the large white feature in the Southeast corner of the image with the Malpais lava flow just to its North. The southwest is dominated by the Mojave Desert of California and Nevada, California's San Joaquin Valley, the Los Angeles basin and the Pacific Ocean.

    The Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer observes the daylit Earth continuously from pole to pole, and every 9 days views the entire globe between 82 degrees north and 82 degrees south latitude. This data product was generated from a portion of the imagery acquired during 2000-2002. The panels utilize data from blocks 45 to 65 within World Reference System-2 paths 31 to 53.

    MISR was built and is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Office of Earth Science, Washington, DC. The Terra satellite is managed by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology.

  14. The structural geology of boulby (potash) mine, Cleveland, United Kingdom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talbot, C. J.; Tully, C. P.; Woods, P. J. E.

    1982-05-01

    This is the first description of the structural geology of the Upper Permian potash and salt of the third Zechstein Cycle exposed in Boulby Mine. The near seam lithologies are described briefly and the associated veins, vein networks, shear zones and slides are introduced. It is argued that the Boulby Potash migrated from lower levels to those at which it is now found to fill fractures which developed in a grey anhydrite shale produced by the reduction and wetting of the lower parts of the Carnallitic (Rotten) Marl. Continued introduction of chlorides of Na and K into vein networks dispersed the shale as clasts of ever decreasing size in a sub-horizontal zone of gneissose sylvinite which, when it reached a significant thickness, began to flow in an extraordinary manner. Hundreds of asymmetric sub-horizontal lobes of gneissose sylvinite root to and repeat the first formed layer in structures which developed to various degrees in different parts of the mine. These are shown to represent small-scale movement cells (e.g. 15 × 30 to 100m in axial section) in which the movements integrate within a pattern of larger-scale movement cells ( 15 × 200 to 400 m). Where the sylvinite was thickest these movement cells progressed to a stage which involved the complete circulation of a compound layer of sylvinite and grey shale. Continued circulation almost homogenised this compound layer to sylvinite in which the grey shale has been disrupted and dispersed to small aggregates and individual clay particles included within the chloride grains. The circulation cells in the sylvinite are rectilinear rolls close to where thin but extensive sub-horizontal lobes of Boulby Halite moved through and over them late in the structural history. Away from such salt lobes, the small-scale circulation cells are concentric within the boundaries of larger cells which have polygonal planforms. After rejecting explanations invoking near surface slumping for the small-scale circulation cells it is argued that they developed near their maximum depth of burial in late Jurassic or Cretaceous times. The multiwavelength circulation pattern in the Boulby Potash is interpreted as due to thermal convection influenced by primary gravitational instabilities on a larger scale. The sub-horizontal lobes of Boulby Halite are assigned to a final Laramide transcurrent reactivation of faults inherited from the basement during earlier phases of movement.

  15. The Conterminous United States Mineral Assessment Program; background information to accompany folio of geologic, geochemical, geophysical, and mineral resource maps of the Ajo and Lukeville 1 degree x 2 degrees quadrangles, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gray, Floyd; Tosdal, R.M.; Peterson, J.A.; Cox, D.P.; Miller, R.J.; Klein, D.P.; Theobald, P.K.; Haxel, G.B.; Grubensky, M.J.; Raines, G.L.; Barton, H.N.; Singer, D.A.; Eppinger, R.G.

    1992-01-01

    Encompassing about 21,000 km 2 in southwestern Arizona, the Ajo and Lukeville 1 ? by 2 ? quadrangles have been the subject of mineral resource investigations utilizing field and laboratory studies in the disciplines of geology, geochemistry, geophysics, and Landsat imagery. The results of these studies are published as a folio of maps, figures, and tables, with accompanying discussions. Past mineral production has been limited to copper from the Ajo Mining District. In addition to copper, the quadrangles contain potentially significant resources of gold and silver; a few other commodities, including molybdenum and evaporites, may also exist in the area as appreciable resources. This circular provides background information on the mineral deposits and on the investigations and integrates the information presented in the folio. The bibliography cites references to the geology, geochemistry, geophysics, and mineral deposits of the two quadrangles.

  16. LA-10634-MS Los AISMOS National Laboratory is operated by the University of California for the United States Department of Energy under contract W-7405 -ENG-36,

    E-print Network

    ctrica)/United States of America (Los Alamos National Laboratory and U.S. Geological Survey) assessment for the United States Department of Energy under contract W-7405 -ENG-36, / G r-#P {" Central American Energy States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any

  17. New York State Geological Survey crystalline rock project. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-03-01

    Presented is a preliminary geologic map of the West-Central Adirondack Region, based on mapping by members of the New York State Geological Survey and participants from several universities during the 1984 field season. The area mapped comprises portions of the West Canada Lakes, Old Forge, McKeever, Number Four, Big Moose and Raquette Lake 15 minute quadrangles. The geology of the area is dominated by two major groups of hornblende-granulite facies rocks: (a) a supracrustal sequence locally showing internal stratigraphy, including quartzofeldspathic leucogneiss, kinzigite, marble, calcsilicate granulite and amphibolite, and (b) granitic and charnockitic gneisses of both plutonic and supracrustal origin, which are widespread and often occur as elliptical domes and lenses, as well as being interstratified with the metasedimentary sequence. Clear intrusive relationships are few. In addition to these rocks, minor intrusions of meta-anorthosite and metagabbro are locally present. At least three phases of folding are present. The first is expressed by regional foliation development. The second generation is tight to isoclinal and overturned with axial trends ranging from east to northeast. The third generation is open folds with north to northwest axial trends. Good correlation exists between photogeology, aeromagnetics, and field observations.

  18. STATE SOIL GEOGRAPHIC (STATSGO) DATA BASE FOR THECOTERNIMOUS UNITED STATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    USSOILS is an Arc 7.0 coverage containing hydrology-relevant information for 10,498 map units covering the entire conterminous United States. The coverage was compiled from individual State coverages contained in the October 1994 State Soil Geographic (STATSGO) Data Base produce...

  19. Tritium rainout over the United States in 1962 and 1963

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stewart, G.L.; Hoffman, C.M.

    1966-01-01

    The magnitude and frequency of floods are defined regionally for small streams (drainage This report describes the tritium sampling network established by the U.S. Geological Survey. Tritium rainout data are included for 1962 and 1963 precipitation collected at 15 stations in the United States and Puerto Rico. These data are presented graphically to show seasonal variations and geographic distribution patterns for 1963 tritium rainout. Total tritium rainout during 1963 was considerably higher than it was in previous years. Peak tritium concentrations in late spring or early summer of 1963 were higher by a factor of three or more over concentrations measured in 1962.

  20. Basement domain map of the conterminous United States and Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lund, Karen; Box, Stephen E.; Holm-Denoma, Christopher S.; San Juan, Carma A.; Blakely, Richard J.; Saltus, Richard W.; Anderson, Eric D.; DeWitt, Ed H.

    2015-01-01

    The tectonic settings for crustal types represented in the basement domains are subdivided into constituent geologic environments and the types of primary metals endowments and deposits in them are documented. The compositions, architecture, and original metals endowments are potentially important to assessments of primary mineral deposits and to the residence and recycling of metals in the crust of the United States portion of the North American continent. The databases can be configured to demonstrate the construction of the United States through time, to identify specific types of crust, or to identify domains potentially containing metal endowments of specific genetic types or endowed with specific metals. The databases can also be configured to illustrate other purposes chosen by users.

  1. Late Paleozoic extension in the Great Basin, western United States

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, E.L.; Smith, D.L. (Stanford Univ., CA (USA))

    1990-08-01

    Geologic mapping in the Toiyabe Range in central Nevada has revealed the existence of normal faults of probable mid-Mississippian to Early Permian age that strike roughly east-west and dip northward. Additional evidence of uplift and erosion followed by mafic volcanism and subsidence suggests that much of the central and southern Toiyabe Range was affected by late Paleozoic extension. Similar patterns of late Paleozoic uplift and subsidence, together with local basaltic volcanism, are widespread in the western United States, suggesting that the continental margin was dominated by extension or transtension in Mississippian to Permian time. This extension was coeval with convergence between North America and South America across the Ouachita and Marathon belts, and the dynamic interaction of these two margins may, by analogy with the Cenozoic tectonics of Asia, has given rise to complex late Paleozoic deformation in the Ancestral Rocky Mountains and adjacent areas of the interior western United States.

  2. Temporal variability in the hydrologic regimes of the United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hubbard, E.F.; Landwehr, J.M.; Barker, A.R.

    1997-01-01

    Discharge records where flows have not been subject to overt anthropogenic controls have been identified for over 1500 streamflow gauging stations throughout the United States in the US Geological Survey Hydro-Climatic Data Network. These stations fall within all 21 water resources regions of the United States. Analysis of runoff in 20 regions, where long-term daily records are available, shows an increasing trend in 16 regions. Further analysis using a stratified subset of 65 sites shows an increase in baseflow at approximately 90% of the sites during the past 50 years, regardless of the size of the drainage area. Because anthropogenic alterations of watershed characteristics cannot explain these hydrologic changes, then meteorological or climatic forces are implicated.

  3. Guidelines for ground motion definition for the eastern United States

    SciTech Connect

    Gwaltney, R.C.; Aramayo, G.A.; Williams, R.T.

    1985-06-01

    Guidelines for the determination of earthquake ground motion definition for the eastern United States are established here. Both far-field and near-field guidelines are given. The guidelines were based on an extensive review of the current procedures for specifying ground motion in the United States. Both empirical and theoretical procedures were used in establishing the guidelines because of the low seismicity in the eastern United States. Only a few large- to great-sized earthquakes (M/sub s/ > 7.5) have occurred in this region, no evidence of tectonic surface ruptures related to historic or Holocene earthquakes has been found, and no currently active plate boundaries of any kind are known in this region. Very little instrumented data have been gathered in the East. Theoretical procedures are proposed so that in regions of almost no data, a reasonable level of seismic ground motion activity can be assumed. The guidelines are to be used to develop the safe shutdown earthquake (SSE). A new procedure for establishing the operating basis earthquake (OBE) is proposed, in particular for the eastern United States. The OBE would be developed using a probabilistic assessment of the geological conditions and the recurrence of seismic events at a site. These guidelines should be useful in development of seismic design requirements for future reactors. 17 refs., figs., tabs.

  4. UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE

    E-print Network

    PMEL-139 DEVELOPMENT OF THE FORECAST PROPAGATION DATABASE FOR NOAA's SHORT-TERM INUNDATION FORECAST Sensitivity to Earthquake Source Parameters . . . . 6 3.2.1 Sensitivity to epicenter and rake angles . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 4 The Forecast Propagation Database 9 4.1 Defining Unit Sources

  5. United States Vital Records Information

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Amateur genealogists beginning their searches through the vital records at the state or county level will find useful resources on this web site. Organized by state and then by county, these pages present instructions on how to make inquiries concerning vital records. In addition to general guidelines on what data to include in a request for birth, marital, and death records, each state's page has addresses for both state and county records offices and information about fees. All fifty states and several US possessions are included. There are also links to other local and national genealogy resources, as well as state and local historical societies, which can often be a good source for genealogical information.

  6. SAN DIEGO STATE UNIVERSITY GEOL 200 Geologic Inquiry and Problem Solving

    E-print Network

    Kimbrough, David L.

    : Professor David L. Kimbrough email: dkimbrough@geology.sdsu.edu, Phone: 594-1385 Class time T 930-1110 ThSAN DIEGO STATE UNIVERSITY GEOL 200 Geologic Inquiry and Problem Solving Course Syllabus Instructor. Darling Corporation. "Rite in the Rain" all-weather Geological Field Book No., 540F J.L. Recommeneded

  7. National Geothermal Data System: State Geological Survey Contributions to Date

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patten, K.; Allison, M. L.; Richard, S. M.; Clark, R.; Love, D.; Coleman, C.; Caudill, C.; Matti, J.; Musil, L.; Day, J.; Chen, G.

    2012-12-01

    In collaboration with the Association of American State Geologists the Arizona Geological Survey is leading the effort to bring legacy geothermal data to the U.S. Department of Energy's National Geothermal Data System (NGDS). NGDS is a national, sustainable, distributed, interoperable network of data and service (application) providers entering its final stages of development. Once completed the geothermal industry, the public, and policy makers will have access to consistent and reliable data, which in turn, reduces the amount of staff time devoted to finding, retrieving, integrating, and verifying information. With easier access to information, the high cost and risk of geothermal power projects (especially exploration drilling) is reduced. This presentation focuses on the scientific and data integration methodology as well as State Geological Survey contributions to date. The NGDS is built using the U.S. Geoscience Information Network (USGIN) data integration framework to promote interoperability across the Earth sciences community and with other emerging data integration and networking efforts. Core to the USGIN concept is that of data provenance; by allowing data providers to maintain and house their data. After concluding the second year of the project, we have nearly 800 datasets representing over 2 million data points from the state geological surveys. A new AASG specific search catalog based on popular internet search formats enables end users to more easily find and identify geothermal resources in a specific region. Sixteen states, including a consortium of Great Basin states, have initiated new field data collection for submission to the NGDS. The new field data includes data from at least 21 newly drilled thermal gradient holes in previously unexplored areas. Most of the datasets provided to the NGDS are being portrayed as Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) Web Map Services (WMS) and Web Feature Services (WFS), meaning that the data is compatible with a variety of visualization software. Web services are ideal for the NGDS data for a number of reasons including that they preserve data ownership in that they are read only and new services can be deployed to meet new requirements without modifying existing applications.

  8. Snow in Southwest United States

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    In late December, the Southwest was blanketed with snow, and this scence was captured by MODIS on December 27, 2001. The white drape contrasts sharply with the red rock of the Colorado Plateau, a geologic region made up of a succession of plateaus and mesas composed mostly of sedimentary rock, whose reddish hues indicate the presence of oxidized iron. The Plateau covers the Four Corners area of the Southwest, including (clockwise from upper left) southern Utah, Colorado, New Mexico, and Arizona. The region gets its name from the Colorado River, seen most prominently as a dark ribbon running southwest through southern Utah. At the upper left of the image, a bank of low clouds partially obscures Utah's Great Salt Lake, but its faint outline is still visible. To the east and southeast of the lake, some high peaks of the Wasatch Mountain range break free of the clouds. The Park City area, one of the 2002 Winter Olympic venues, can be seen poking through the cloud deck about 75km southeast of the lake. Farther east, the dark Uinta Mountains follow the border between Colorado and Wyoming. The Uinta are one of the rare east-west running ranges of the Rocky Mountains.

  9. Telenursing in the United States

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Janet L. Grady

    \\u000a Ask an average citizen what nurses do and where and how they do it. Shaped by the popular media, the answer is likely to describe\\u000a nurses dressed in white uniforms scurrying around a central station in a hospital unit or emergency department, performing\\u000a treatments or administering medications to their patients lying in bed in the surrounding rooms. While this scenario

  10. Assemblages of geologic/morphologic units in the northern hemisphere of Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Head, James W.

    1990-01-01

    Several basic assemblages of geologic/morphologic units are defined, and their characteristics, spatial distribution, and correlation with topography and other surface properties are documented. The relationships of these assemblages are analyzed, and their possible origins discussed. It is concluded that the geologic/morphologic map units derived from Venera 15/16 data at the northern mid-to-high latitudes do not occur randomly and can be grouped into several basic assemblages. The distribution and characteristics of assemblages demonstrate that vertical and horizontal tectonic forces are operating on the crust and lithosphere of Venus in different ways in specific localized areas. Alternative models are outlined for the origin of each assemblage and the relationship between assemblages, and important unresolved questions are identified.

  11. Special Education Programs Within the United States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Morris Val, Ed.

    Twenty-two special education programs in the United States are described. Diagnostic centers and special schools discussed are the Institute for Childhood Aphasia, California programs for orthopedically handicapped children, the experimental education unit of the University of Washington Mental Retardation and Child Development Center, the Phoebe…

  12. FRAGMENTATION OF CONTINENTAL UNITES STATES FORESTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    We report a multiple-scale analysis of forest fragmentation based on 30-m land-cover maps for the conterminous United States. Each 0.09-ha unit of forest was classified according to fragmentation indices measured within the surrounding landscape, for five landscape sizes from 2....

  13. Bibliographic Databases Outside of the United States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGinn, Thomas P.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Eight articles describe the development, content, and structure of databases outside of the United States. Features discussed include library involvement, authority control, shared cataloging services, union catalogs, thesauri, abstracts, and distribution methods. Countries and areas represented are Latin America, Australia, the United Kingdom,…

  14. Methamphetamine Trends in the United States

    MedlinePLUS

    ... 2009, based on data from 2005, estimated the economic cost to society of methamphetamine use at between $ ... NSS), EPIC, extracted 4/21/2010. 4 The Economic cost of Methamphetamine Use in the United States, ...

  15. 75 FR 25925 - United States Mint

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-10

    ...Washington, DC 20220. Subject: Review and discuss obverse and reverse candidate designs for the 2011 United States Army Commemorative Coin Program and the obverse and reverse candidate designs for the 2011 Medal of Honor Commemorative...

  16. Industrial motor repair in the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Schueler, V.; Leistner, P.; Douglass, J.

    1994-09-01

    This report characterizes the motor repair industry in the United States; summarizes current motor repair and testing practice; and identifies barriers to energy motor repair practice and recommends strategies for overcoming those barriers.

  17. Facilities in the United States: Synchrotron Radiation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowe, Ednor M.

    1981-01-01

    Summarizes information on the properties of synchrotron radiation and describes laboratories in the United States specializing in this science, including facilities at the National Bureau of Standards, University of Wisconsin, Stanford, and Brookhaven. (CS)

  18. PUBLIC FISH CULTURE UNITED STATES,

    E-print Network

    and rearing stations U2 111 #12;Steve Cocke Hatchery, Dawson, Georgia- -a Georgia State Game and Fish. But as advances are made, there are opened before us new vistas to be explored: new problems arise and old

  19. Investigation of background radiation levels and geologic unit profiles in Durango, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Triplett, G.H. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)); Foutz, W.L.; Lesperance, L.R. (Oak Ridge Associated Universities, Inc., TN (USA))

    1989-11-01

    As part of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has performed radiological surveys on 435 vicinity properties (VPs) in the Durango area. This study was undertaken to establish the background radiation levels and geologic unit profiles in the Durango VP area. During the months of May through June, 1986, extensive radiometric measurements and surface soil samples were collected in the Durango VP area by personnel from ORNL's Grand Junction Office. A majority of the Durango VP surveys were conducted at sites underlain by Quaternary alluvium, older Quaternary gravels, and Cretaceous Lewis and Mancos shales. These four geologic units were selected to be evaluated. The data indicated no formation anomalies and established regional background radiation levels. Durango background radionuclide concentrations in surface soil were determined to be 20.3 {plus minus} 3.4 pCi/g for {sup 40}K, 1.6 {plus minus} 0.5 pCi/g for {sup 226}Ra, and 1.2 {plus minus} 0.3 pCi/g for {sup 232}Th. The Durango background gamma exposure rate was found to be 16.5 {plus minus} 1.3 {mu}R/h. Average gamma spectral count rate measurements for {sup 40}K, {sup 226}Ra and {sup 232}Th were determined to be 553, 150, and 98 counts per minute (cpm), respectively. Geologic unit profiles and Durango background radiation measurements are presented and compared with other areas. 19 refs., 15 figs., 5 tabs.

  20. Summary of Notifiable Diseases - United States, 2011.

    PubMed

    Adams, Deborah A; Gallagher, Kathleen M; Jajosky, Ruth Ann; Kriseman, Jeffrey; Sharp, Pearl; Anderson, Willie J; Aranas, Aaron E; Mayes, Michelle; Wodajo, Michael S; Onweh, Diana H; Abellera, John P

    2013-07-01

    The Summary of Notifiable Diseases - United States, 2011 contains the official statistics, in tabular and graphic form, for the reported occurrence of nationally notifiable infectious diseases in the United States for 2011. Unless otherwise noted, the data are final totals for 2011 reported as of June 30, 2012. These statistics are collected and compiled from reports sent by state health departments and territories to the National Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System (NNDSS), which is operated by CDC in collaboration with the Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists (CSTE). PMID:23820934

  1. Patrick G. R. Jodice U.S. Geological Survey South Carolina Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit

    E-print Network

    Jodice, Patrick

    Patrick G. R. Jodice U.S. Geological Survey South Carolina Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Clemson, South Carolina, 29634, USA Tel.: (Office) +1 864.656.6190, (Home) +1 864.653.3872 Email: pjodice-June 2004), U.S. Geological Survey, South Carolina Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit, Clemson

  2. Geology of Caves

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This webpage of the United States Geological Survey (USGS) and National Park Service (NPS) describes the geology and features of caves. It discusses cave formation, features, minerals found in caves, uses of caves, and various investigations of caves. There is an educational activity on karst topography formation, and links for additional information.

  3. Strong Motion Recording in the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archuleta, R. J.; Fletcher, J. B.; Shakal, A. F.

    2014-12-01

    The United States strong motion program began in 1932 when the Coast and Geodetic Survey (C&GS) installed eight strong motion accelerographs in California. During the March 1933 Long Beach earthquake, three of these produced the first strong motion records. With this success the C&GS expanded the number of accelerographs to 71 by 1964. With development of less expensive, mass-produced accelerographs the number of strong motion accelerographs expanded to ~575 by 1972. Responsibilities for operating the network and disseminating data were transferred to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration in 1970 and then to the U.S. Geological Survey in 1973. In 1972 the California Legislature established the California Strong Motion Instrumentation Program (CSMIP). CSMIP operates accelerographs at 812 ground stations, with multi-channel accelerographs in 228 buildings, 125 lifelines and 37 geotechnical arrays, in California. The USGS and the ANSS effort operate accelerographs at 1584 ground stations, 96 buildings, 14 bridges, 70 dams, and 15 multi-channel geotechnical arrays. The USC Los Angeles array has 78 ground stations; UCSB operates 5 geotechnical arrays; other government and private institutions also operate accelerographs. Almost all accelerographs are now digital with a sampling rate of 200 Hz. Most of the strong motion data can be downloaded from the Center for Engineering Strong Motion Data (http://strongmotioncenter.org). As accelerographs have become more sophisticated, the concept of what constitutes strong motion has blurred because small earthquakes (M ~3) are well recorded on accelerometers as well as seismometers. However, when accelerations are over ~10%g and velocities over ~1 cm/s, the accelerometers remain on scale, providing the unclipped data necessary to analyze the ground motion and its consequences. Strong motion data are essential to the development of ground motion prediction equations, understanding structural response, performance based engineering, soil response, and inversions for earthquake rupture parameters. While an important number of stations have been installed, many areas of the US are significantly deficient, e.g., recordings were obtained from only 2 stations within 60 km of the Mineral earthquake that damaged the nation's capital and other areas.

  4. Geologic Time: Online Edition

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    1997-10-09

    Offered by the United States Geological Survey (USGS) as a general interest publication, this site is an online edition of a text by the same name, offering a concise overview of the concepts associated with the age of the Earth. The online edition was revised in October of 1997 to reflect current thinking on this topic. Section headers are Geologic Time, Relative Time Scale, Major Divisions of Geologic Time, Index Fossils, Radiometric Time Scale, and Age of the Earth.

  5. 31 CFR 596.313 - United States person.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 false United States person. 596.313 Section...DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY TERRORISM LIST GOVERNMENTS SANCTIONS...Definitions § 596.313 United States person. The term United States person means any...

  6. 31 CFR 596.313 - United States person.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 false United States person. 596.313 Section...DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY TERRORISM LIST GOVERNMENTS SANCTIONS...Definitions § 596.313 United States person. The term United States person means any...

  7. 31 CFR 596.313 - United States person.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 false United States person. 596.313 Section...DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY TERRORISM LIST GOVERNMENTS SANCTIONS...Definitions § 596.313 United States person. The term United States person means any...

  8. 31 CFR 596.313 - United States person.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 false United States person. 596.313 Section...DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY TERRORISM LIST GOVERNMENTS SANCTIONS...Definitions § 596.313 United States person. The term United States person means any...

  9. 37 CFR 1.412 - The United States Receiving Office.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...United States Receiving Office. (a) The United States Patent and Trademark Office is a Receiving Office only for applicants who are residents or nationals of the United States of America. (b) The Patent and Trademark Office,...

  10. 37 CFR 1.412 - The United States Receiving Office.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...United States Receiving Office. (a) The United States Patent and Trademark Office is a Receiving Office only for applicants who are residents or nationals of the United States of America. (b) The Patent and Trademark Office,...

  11. 37 CFR 1.412 - The United States Receiving Office.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...United States Receiving Office. (a) The United States Patent and Trademark Office is a Receiving Office only for applicants who are residents or nationals of the United States of America. (b) The Patent and Trademark Office,...

  12. 37 CFR 1.412 - The United States Receiving Office.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...United States Receiving Office. (a) The United States Patent and Trademark Office is a Receiving Office only for applicants who are residents or nationals of the United States of America. (b) The Patent and Trademark Office,...

  13. 37 CFR 1.412 - The United States Receiving Office.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...United States Receiving Office. (a) The United States Patent and Trademark Office is a Receiving Office only for applicants who are residents or nationals of the United States of America. (b) The Patent and Trademark Office,...

  14. 78 FR 77103 - United States Travel and Tourism Advisory Board

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-20

    ...Administration United States Travel and Tourism Advisory Board AGENCY: International...membership on the United States Travel and Tourism Advisory Board...membership on the United States Travel and Tourism Advisory Board (Board). The...

  15. 78 FR 70275 - United States Travel and Tourism Advisory Board

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-25

    ...Administration United States Travel and Tourism Advisory Board AGENCY: International...membership on the United States Travel and Tourism Advisory Board...membership on the United States Travel and Tourism Advisory Board (Board). The...

  16. Intervention and United States Foreign Policy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boulding, Kenneth E.

    1988-01-01

    Identifies threat, economic, and integrative powers as components of national power, and examines the use of such powers by the United States and other nations. States that threat power is costly, while crippling those who use it. Advises nations to concentrate on economic and integrative powers, avoiding intervention and related actions. (GEA)

  17. Investigation of Inhalation Anthrax Case, United States

    PubMed Central

    Blaney, David; Shadomy, Sean; Lehman, Mark; Pesik, Nicki; Tostenson, Samantha; Delaney, Lisa; Tiller, Rebekah; DeVries, Aaron; Gomez, Thomas; Sullivan, Maureen; Blackmore, Carina; Stanek, Danielle; Lynfield, Ruth

    2014-01-01

    Inhalation anthrax occurred in a man who vacationed in 4 US states where anthrax is enzootic. Despite an extensive multi-agency investigation, the specific source was not detected, and no additional related human or animal cases were found. Although rare, inhalation anthrax can occur naturally in the United States. PMID:24447835

  18. Tornado climatology of the contiguous United States

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsdell, J.V.; Andrews, G.L.

    1986-05-01

    The characteristics of tornadoes that were reported in the contiguous United States for the period from January 1, 1954, through December 31, 1983, have been computed from data in the National Severe Storms Forecast Center tornado data base. The characteristics summarized in this report include frequency and locations of tornadoes, and their lengths, widths, and areas. Tornado strike and intensity probabilities have been estimated on a regional basis, and these estimates have been used to compute wind speeds with 10/sup -5/, 10/sup -6/, and 10/sup -7/ yr/sup -1/ probabilities of occurrence. The 10/sup -7/ yr/sup -1/ wind speeds range from below 200 mph in the western United States to about 330 mph in the vicinity of Kansas and Nebraska. The appendices contain extensive tabulations of tornado statistics. Variations of the characteristics within the contiguous United States are presented in the summaries. Separate tabulations are provided for the contiguous United States, for each state, for each 5/sup 0/ and 1/sup 0/ latitude and longitude box, and for the eastern and western United States.

  19. ASSESSMENT OF NUTRIENTS AND SELECTED ORGANIC CONTAMINANTS IN SMALL STREAMS IN THE MIDWESTERN UNITED STATES, 2004

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U. S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA), collected water samples from 120 small streams (watersheds less than 200 square kilometers) across the Midwestern United States during the summer and fall of 2004. This stu...

  20. Stratigraphy and structure of coalbed methane reservoirs in the United States: An overview

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jack C Pashin

    1998-01-01

    Stratigraphy and geologic structure determine the shape, continuity and permeability of coal and are therefore critical considerations for designing exploration and production strategies for coalbed methane. Coal in the United States is dominantly of Pennsylvanian, Cretaceous and Tertiary age, and to date, more than 90% of the coalbed methane produced is from Pennsylvanian and Cretaceous strata of the Black Warrior

  1. MAJOR LAND USES IN THE UNITED STATES, FROM THE NATIONAL ATLAS PLATE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Geological Survey offers geographical information system (GIS) polygon coverage of major land uses in the United States at a scale of 1:7,500,000. The scale of the data limits its use to broad overviews of land use. The source of the coverage is the map of major land u...

  2. Shear-wave splitting beneath western United States in relation to plate tectonics

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Serdar Özalaybey; Martha K. Savage

    1995-01-01

    We have examined shear wave splitting in teleseismic shear waves from 26 broadband stations in the western United States. Fast polarization directions (varphi) and delay times (deltat) show spatial variations that are coherent within geologic provinces. Stations located near the San Andreas fault show clear evidence for fault-parallel anisotropy in the crust and upper mantle (115-125 km thickness). This can

  3. The Southern Sierra Nevada Drip and the Mantle Wind Direction Beneath the Southwestern United States

    Microsoft Academic Search

    George Zandt

    2003-01-01

    The Miocene-Pliocene convective removal of the southern Sierra Nevada batholithic root and its sinking through the upper mantle provides a natural experiment to estimate the direction and velocity of mantle flow beneath the southwestern United States. Xenolith data, volcanism patterns, and geologic evidence are used to constrain the location and timing of the initial detachment. Seismic tomography images of the

  4. Earth Science Research in DUSEL; a Deep Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory in the United States

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. Fairhurst; T. C. Onstott; J. M. Tiedje; B. McPherson; S. M. Pfiffner; J. S. Wang

    2004-01-01

    A summary of efforts to create one or more Deep Underground Science and Engineering Laboratories (DUSEL) in the United States is presented. A workshop in Berkeley, August 11-14, 2004, explored the technical requirements of DUSEL for research in basic and applied geological and microbiological sciences, together with elementary particle physics and integrated education and public outreach. The workshop was organized

  5. Building a "geologic Library" of the Major Lithologic Units in the EL Paso Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieto, J.; Sanderson, E.; Cancellare, J.; Caskey, D. J.

    2013-12-01

    Mineralogy and Introduction to Petrology, a sophomore level course, is being offered at El Paso Community College for the first time in the spring semester, 2014. To prepare for this, several geology major students have been establishing a "Geologic Library" to include a comprehensive accumulation of material covering the major lithologic units in the El Paso area. Students associated with the Mineralogy SOLARIS project, funded by the National Science Foundation, began this summer by collecting, cutting, slabbing, and polishing rock samples, doing geochemical analyses of all samples using the microprobe, and making petrographic thin sections of each unit collected. In addition, other SOLARIS students have been taking Giga-pan photos of the outcrops where the samples were collected, and Giga-pan photos of the polished slabs. The goal of this "Geologic Library" is to put all of this information on a website, allowing students to observe each outcrop from the Giga-pans, scroll to a close-up of the polished section, link to the geochemical analysis, and then link to photomicrographs of the thin sections.

  6. 78 FR 70274 - United States Travel and Tourism Advisory Board: Meeting of the United States Travel and Tourism...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-25

    ...Administration United States Travel and Tourism Advisory Board: Meeting of the United States Travel and Tourism Advisory Board AGENCY: International...meeting of the United States Travel and Tourism Advisory Board (Board). This will...

  7. 78 FR 3398 - United States Travel and Tourism Advisory Board: Meeting of the United States Travel and Tourism...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-16

    ...Administration United States Travel and Tourism Advisory Board: Meeting of the United States Travel and Tourism Advisory Board AGENCY: International...meeting of the United States Travel and Tourism Advisory Board (Board). The Board...

  8. Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology (NBMG) is a research unit of the Mackay School of Mines at the University of Nevada, Reno and is the state geological survey. Scientists at NBMG conduct research and publish reports on mineral resources and various aspects of general, environmental, and engineering geology for the state of Nevada. There are on-line publications available to download, geologic maps, K-12 educational resources for teaching about Nevada geology, and a photo and image archive of the state. Links are provided for further information about the state and general geology resources.

  9. Business and politics in the United States and United Kingdom

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael Useem

    1983-01-01

    Conclusion  A central objective of the business mobilization of the late 1970s and early 1980s in both the United States and Great Britain\\u000a was to restore company profits to levels of an earlier decade. In the name of “reindustrialization” and “recapitalizing capitalism,”\\u000a government spending was targeted as the chief impediment to such prosperity.64 In the American case, government restraint on business

  10. Statistical assessment of Persistent Scatterers location in different landslide prone geological units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nico, G.; Oliveira, S.; Catalão, J.; Zêzere, J. L.

    2009-04-01

    In the last decade Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry (InSAR) has been applied to measure with an accuracy of a fraction of a centimetre terrain deformations induced by different geological phenomena. In particular, approaches have been developed, within the framework of InSAR techniques, to detect pixels characterized by a stable interferometric phase where it is possible to get very accurate estimation of deformation. These pixels correspond to terrain patches (Persistent Scatterers) with well behaved scattering properties in the microwave domain. The occurrence of Persistent Scatterers (PS) is related to the vegetation coverage, the presence of man-made structures, as well as to the lithological and geological properties of the observed area. Generally, a high number of PS are found in urban areas whereas vegetation causes temporal de-correlation which destroys interferometric phase stability. An interesting research issue is to study how the probability to find a PS are related to the lithology/geology and slope angle. Knowing more about those issues could be of major importance when trying to apply InSAR as a support for landslide inventory at a regional scale. For this study two regions at north of Lisbon, Portugal (Arruda dos Vinhos and Fanhões-Trancão/Lousa) were chosen as test sites due to the presence of a high number of landslides previously identified and mapped at the scale 1:2000 through detailed field geomorphological mapping. Moreover, the landslide inventorying for the two regions allows the recognition of more than 500 slope movements (deep and shallow) of rotational and translational types. However, due to the dimension (in some cases, less than 50 m2) of the smaller landslides, essentially shallow translational, only a part of the landslide data base was used to compare with the correlation between PS and lithological units and slope angle. The geomorphological settings of the test sites are in the essential controlled by an alternation of rocks with different resistance to erosion, permeability and plasticity and by a geological structure favourable to slope instability. Furthermore, those test sites presents only sparsely vegetated areas over which the current space-borne interferometric SAR missions have limitations due to temporal de-correlation. A dataset of 58 ERS-1/2 SAR images was processed. They were acquired along both from 1992 to 1997 and from 1998 to 2002. The map with the location of Persistent Scatterers was overlaid to the lithological/geological and to the slope map, slopes maps and the frequency distribution of PS per squared kilometres in the different lithological/geological units and slope angle classes were obtained. This distribution can be used too as a means to characterize the capability of a given lithological/geological unit or a particular slope value to generate PS when not covered by huge vegetation. Furthermore, PS where terrain displacements were detected were selected and the corresponding frequency distribution of PS per square kilometres in the different lithological/geological units and by slope angle values were obtained. This distribution was compared to that of landslides mapped to statistically assess the map of landslides detected by SAR inteferometry. This research is part of the Project Maprisk (PTDC/GEO/68227/2006) supported by the Portuguese Foundation for Science and Technology.

  11. Database for Assessment Unit-Scale Analogs (Exclusive of the United States)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Charpentier, Ronald R.; Klett, T.R.; Attanasi, Emil D.

    2008-01-01

    This publication presents a database of geologic analogs useful for the assessment of undiscovered oil and gas resources. Particularly in frontier areas, where few oil and gas fields have been discovered, assessment methods such as discovery process models may not be usable. In such cases, comparison of the assessment area to geologically similar but more maturely explored areas may be more appropriate. This analog database consists of 246 assessment units, based on the U.S. Geological Survey 2000 World Petroleum Assessment. Besides geologic data to facilitate comparisons, the database includes data pertaining to numbers and sizes of oil and gas fields and the properties of their produced fluids.

  12. Understanding human trafficking in the United States.

    PubMed

    Logan, T K; Walker, Robert; Hunt, Gretchen

    2009-01-01

    The topic of modern-day slavery or human trafficking has received increased media and national attention. However, to date there has been limited research on the nature and scope of human trafficking in the United States. This article describes and synthesizes nine reports that assess the U.S. service organizations' legal representative knowledge of, and experience with, human trafficking cases, as well as information from actual cases and media reports. This article has five main goals: (a) to define what human trafficking is, and is not; (b) to describe factors identified as contributing to vulnerability to being trafficked and keeping a person entrapped in the situation; (c) to examine how the crime of human trafficking differs from other kinds of crimes in the United States; (d) to explore how human trafficking victims are identified; and, (e) to provide recommendations to better address human trafficking in the United States. PMID:19056686

  13. Landslide overview map of the conterminous United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Radbruch-Hall, Dorothy H.; Colton, Roger B.; Davies, William E.; Lucchitta, Ivo; Skipp, Betty A.; Varnes, David J.

    1982-01-01

    The accompanying landslide overview map of the conterminous United States is one of a series of National Environmental Overview Maps that summarize geologic, hydrogeologic, and topographic data essential to the assessment of national environmental problems. The map delineates areas where large numbers of landslides exist and areas which are susceptible to landsliding. It was prepared by evaluating the geologic map of the United States and classifying the geologic units according to high, medium, or low landslide incidence (number) and high, medium, or low susceptibility to landsliding. Rock types, structures, topography, precipitation, landslide type, and landslide incidence are mentioned for each physical subdivision of the United States. The differences in slope stability between the Colorado Plateau, the Appalachian Highlands, the Coast Ranges of California, and the Southern Rocky Mountains are compared in detail, to illustrate the influence of various natural factors on the types of landsliding that occur in regions having different physical conditions. These four mountainous regions are among the most landslide-prone areas in the United States. The Colorado Plateau is a deformed platform where interbedded sedimentary rocks of varied lithologic properties have been gently warped and deeply eroded. The rocks are extensively fractured. Regional fracture systems, joints associated with individual geologic structures, and joints parallel to topographic surfaces, such as cliff faces, greatly influence slope stability. Detached blocks at the edges of mesas, as well as columns, arched recesses, and many natural arches on the Colorado Plateau, were formed wholly or in part by mass movement. In the Appalachian Highlands, earth flows, debris flows, and debris avalanches predominate in weathered bedrock and colluvium. Damaging debris avalanches result when persistent steady rainfall is followed by a sudden heavy downpour. Landsliding in unweathered bedrock is controlled locally by joint systems similar to those on the Colorado Plateau. In some places, outward gravitational movement of valley walls due to stress release has formed anticlines and caused thrusting in the center of valleys. In the Coast Ranges of California, slopes are steep, and rocks are varied and extensively deformed. One of the most slide-prone terrains of the Coast Ranges is the tectonic melange of the Franciscan assemblage, on which huge masses of debris are moving slowly downslope. In southern California, debris flows generated by soil slips are particularly damaging. Similar flows are common in poorly consolidated Tertiary rocks of the central part of the State. Like the debris avalanches of the Appalachian Highlands, the flows form during intense rainfall after previous steady rain. The Southern Rocky Mountains are complex in rock type and climate, so that the landslides there are also complex. Slides range from rock-falls at one extreme to slumps and debris flows at the other. They include ?sackungen,? which are distinguished by ridgetop grabens associated with uphill-facing scarps on ridge sides, both features of gravitational origin. Extensive regional joint patterns have not been recognized, and shallow soil slips are only a minor hazard.

  14. Hydrogeologic factors that influence ground water movement in the desert southwest United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chuang, Frank C.; McKee, Edwin H.; Howard, Keith A.

    2003-01-01

    A project to study ground-water and surface-water interactions in the desert southwestern United States was initiated in 2001 by the Tucson, Arizona office of the Water Resources Division, U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). One of the goals of the Southwest Ground-water Resources Project was to develop a regional synthesis that includes the use of available digital geologic data, which is growing rapidly due to the increasing use of Geographic Information Systems (GIS). Included in this report are the digital maps and databases of geologic information that should have a direct impact on the studies of ground-water flow and surface-water interaction. Ground-water flow is governed by many geologic factors or elements including rock and soil permeability, stratigraphy and structural features. These elements directly influence ground-water flow, which is key to understanding the possible inter-connectivity of aquifer systems in desert basins of the southwestern United States. We derive these elements from the evaluation of regional geology and localized studies of hydrogeologic basins. These elements can then be applied to other unstudied areas throughout the desert southwest. This report presents a regional perspective of the geologic elements controlling ground-water systems in the desert southwest that may eventually lead to greater focus on smaller sub-regions and ultimately, to individual ground-water basins.

  15. New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services: State Geologic Publications

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This site provides a bibliography of the published reports of the New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services, including: 15-Minute Quadrangle Reports (designed for the nonprofessional with simple text and few scientific names), bulletins (designed to appeal to professional and amateur geologists seeking further information about the geology of the region), geologic maps, mineral resources, Geology of New Hampshire series, mineral and water resource studies, and open-file reports released by the U.S. Geological Survey. Links to web-based free Fact Sheets, Pamphlets and Booklets on subjects of general interest to the public are provided.

  16. The United States Government Manual -- 2001/ 2002

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2001-01-01

    The National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) released the latest edition of the United States Government Manual on the US Government Printing Office Website September 5 (last year's edition is discussed in the September 15, 2000 Scout Report). The 693-page manual covers agencies in all three branches of the government as well as "quasi-official agencies; international organizations in which the United States participates; and boards, commissions, and committees." Agency descriptions include main officials, the agency's purpose and history, its activities, and a section entitled "Sources of Interest," which gives information such as employment, publications, and other

  17. Acid rain reduced in eastern United States

    SciTech Connect

    Bowersox, V.C. [Illinois State Water Survey, Champaign, IL (United States); Lynch, J.A.; Grimm, J.W. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    1997-12-31

    Sulfate and free hydrogen ion concentrations in precipitation decreased 10 to 25 percent over large areas of the eastern United States in 1995. The largest decreases in both ions occurred in and downwind of the Ohio River Valley, the same area where Phase I of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments set limitations, effective January 1, 1995, on sulfur dioxide emissions from affected coal-fired sources. Based on our analysis of precipitation chemistry and emissions data, we conclude that substantial declines in acid rain occurred in the eastern United States in 1995 because of large reductions in sulfur dioxide emissions in the same region.

  18. Freezing precipitation in the Southeastern United States 

    E-print Network

    Young, William Robert

    1978-01-01

    FREEZING PRECIPITATION IN THE SOUTHEASTERN UNITED STATES A Thesis NILLIAN ROBERT YOUNG Sxhmitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASN University in partial fulfillsent o( the requirement for the decree of RASTER OF SCIENCE NaY 19'7B rV, 'or... Suoject: Net *oroloRY FREE 1NG PRE fPITATION IN THE SOUTHEASTERN UNITED STATES A Thesis 'NXLDIAN ROBERT YOUNG Approved as to style and coni ent hy: Chairman of Committe "Leaser (Head of Departne. "i Niay 19y8 443?10 Freesing Precipitation...

  19. Wetland classification in the United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cowardin, L.M.

    1978-01-01

    Wetland is part of a continuum of land types between deep water and dryland. Only one wetland classification was available for the United States prior to preparation of the new system described here, but numerous regional and special-purpose classifications are in use. The new classification is hierarchical, progressing from five systems (marine, estuarine, lacustrine, riverine, and palustrine) at the most general level to dominance types based on plant or animal communities at the most specific level . The system is currently in use for prototype maps of wetlands of the United States. It is hoped that it may be incorporated into a classification of all land.

  20. The MEMIN Research Unit: New results from impact cratering experiments into geological materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poelchau, M. H.; Deutsch, A.; Thoma, K.; Kenkmann, T.

    2013-09-01

    The MEMIN research unit (Multidisciplinary Experimental and Modeling Impact research Network) is focused on performing hypervelocity impact experiments, analyzing experimental impact craters and modeling cratering rocesses in geological materials. The main goal of the MEMIN project is to comprehensively quantify impact processes by conducting stringently controlled experimental impact cratering campaigns on the mesoscale with a multidisciplinary analytical approach. As a unique feature we use two-stage light gas guns capable of producing impact craters in thedecimeter size-range in solid rocks that, in turn, allow detailed spatial analysis of petrophysical, structural, and geochemical changes in target rocks and ejecta.

  1. Estimated Water Flows in 2005: United States

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, C A; Belles, R D; Simon, A J

    2011-03-16

    Flow charts depicting water use in the United States have been constructed from publicly available data and estimates of water use patterns. Approximately 410,500 million gallons per day of water are managed throughout the United States for use in farming, power production, residential, commercial, and industrial applications. Water is obtained from four major resource classes: fresh surface-water, saline (ocean) surface-water, fresh groundwater and saline (brackish) groundwater. Water that is not consumed or evaporated during its use is returned to surface bodies of water. The flow patterns are represented in a compact 'visual atlas' of 52 state-level (all 50 states in addition to Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands) and one national water flow chart representing a comprehensive systems view of national water resources, use, and disposition.

  2. THE SHRIMP AND THE SHRIMP INDUSTRY OF THE SOUTHERN UNIT,ED STATES

    E-print Network

    THE SHRIMP AND THE SHRIMP INDUSTRY OF THE SOUTHERN UNIT,ED STATES FISHERY LEAFLET No. 472 UNITED, D. C. #12;THE SHRIMP AND THE SHRIMP INDUSTRY OF THE SOUTHERN UNITED STATES by William W. Anderson Fishery Research Biologist The shrimp fishery of the United States is centered primarily in the eight

  3. China's international trade and air pollution in the United States

    E-print Network

    2014-01-01

    trade and air pollution in the United States Jintai Linair pollution due to Chinese export of goods to the United Statesair pollution to daily mean surface air pollutant concentrations over the United States

  4. Mirex in milk from Southeastern United States

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Joseph C. Hawthorne; Joseph H. Ford; C. D. Loftis; G. P. Markin

    1974-01-01

    Throughout the Southeastern United States the imported fire ant(Sq!enopsi s invicta Buren) is a major pest on ranches and dairy farms. Large mounds built by this ant interfere with haying and pasture maintenance, and the ants occasionally attack the cattle themselves. During the time this paper was written, the most effective and recommended means of controlling this pest is a

  5. SLOW SAND FILTRATION IN THE UNITED STATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Interest in slow sand filtration has increased dramatically in the United States in the past ten years. esearch conducted to evaluate removal of Giardia cysts and bacteria, showed that slow sand filtration is very effective in removal of these contaminants. low sand filters are m...

  6. Cohousing Association of the United States

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This web site lists cohousing communities in the United States and abroad with links to their web sites. It also lists products, such as books and videos; services, including professional consulting; and other resources for those interested in developing a cohousing community or learning more about them.

  7. United States Department of Education Update

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linton, John

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the author provides updates on the various programs of the United States Department of Education. Among others, the Office of Correctional Education is sponsoring training sessions dealing with the utilization of post release outcome data to evaluate institutionally based educational services. Also, a few weeks after the upcoming…

  8. 2011 floods of the central United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey

    2013-01-01

    * Do floods contribute to the transport and fate of contaminants that affect human and ecosystem health? In an effort to help address these and other questions, USGS Professional Paper 1798 consists of independent but complementary chapters dealing with various scientific aspects of the 2011 floods in the Central United States.

  9. (12) United States Patent Grier et al.

    E-print Network

    Grier, David

    (12) United States Patent Grier et al. US008502132B2 US 8,502,132 B2 Aug. 6, 2013 (10) Patent N0.: (45) Date of Patent: (54) (75) (73) (*) (21) (22) (65) (62) (60) (51) (52) MANIPULATION OF OBJECTS) Assignee: New York University, NeW York, NY (Us) Notice: Subject to any disclaimer, the term ofthis patent

  10. (12) United States Patent Grier et al.

    E-print Network

    Grier, David

    (12) United States Patent Grier et al. US008791985B2 US 8,791,985 B2 Jul. 29, 2014 (10) Patent N0.: (45) Date of Patent: (54) (75) (73) (21) (22) (86) (87) (65) (60) (51) (52) TRACKING to any disclaimer, the term ofthis patent is extended or adjusted under 35 U.S.C. 154(b) by 744 days. 12

  11. Legislating Biofuels in the United States

    E-print Network

    Legislating Biofuels in the United States Wendy Clark National Renewable Energy Laboratory Golden, Colorado, USA 2008 SAE Biofuels Specifications and Performance Symposium July 7-9, 2008, Paris NREL PR-540 Legislate Biofuels? · Plentiful U.S. biomass resources: energy crops, agricultural and forestry residues

  12. MICHELLE J. HOWARD United States Navy

    E-print Network

    Barrash, Warren

    MICHELLE J. HOWARD Admiral, United States Navy FREIDA MOCK Academy Award Winning Film Producer Court Justice #12;#12;WOMEN AND LEADERSHIP 2014 | 1 It is with great pleasure and honor that we convene this gathering of some of the nation's most accomplished women. Once again, we celebrate women who have reached

  13. Preparing Geography Teachers in the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bednarz, Sarah Witham; Stoltman, Joseph P.; Lee, Jongwon

    2004-01-01

    Teacher preparation has been called the "bete noire" of geography education in the United States (Boehm et al., 1994). Despite progress in other areas of geography, teacher education remains a significant issue affecting the quality of geography instruction nationwide. It is a multifaceted, multidimensional problem tied inextricably to national…

  14. United States of &yicu~ture

    E-print Network

    Fried, Jeremy S.

    United States De artment of &yicu~ture Forest Service Intermountain Research Station Research Paper-Dumroese Prescribed Fire Machinery This file was created by scanning the printed publication. Errors identified is a Research Foresterwith the lntermountain Station's Forestry Sciences Laboratory in Moscow, ID. He receiveda

  15. United States Jurisdiction Over Extraterritorial Crime

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Christopher L. Blakesley

    1982-01-01

    The term jurisdiction may be defined as the authority to affect legal interests -- to prescribe rules of law (legislative jurisdiction), to adjudicate legal questions (judicial jurisdiction) and to enforce judgments the judiciary made (enforcement jurisdiction). The definition, nature and scope of jurisdiction vary depending on the context in which it is to be applied. United States domestic law, for

  16. Bullying in Europe and the United States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoover, John H.; Juul, Kristen

    1993-01-01

    Examines nature and scope of group violence among children in schools on both sides of Atlantic Ocean. Reviews studies of student attitudes about victimization and offers suggestions for prevention and treatment of bullying. Focus is on studies on bullying undertaken in Europe, mostly Scandinavia, and in United States (Author/NB)

  17. Community Colleges in the United States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lundberg, Richard, Ed.

    2002-01-01

    This issue discusses the importance of the community college to higher education in the United States. Contained are six articles: (1) "America's Community Colleges: On the Ascent," by Arthur M. Cohen, which places the strengths and challenges of the American community college within a historical context; (2) "Lamps Beside the Golden Door," by…

  18. Early Marriage in the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uecker, Jeremy E.; Stokes, Charles E.

    2008-01-01

    Despite drastic changes in the American family, a significant minority of Americans marry early. Using data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (N = 14,165), this study evaluates the prevalence and antecedents of early marriage in the United States. The results indicate 25% of women and 16% of men marry before age 23, and…

  19. Haitian Students in the United States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Savain, Roger E.

    1998-01-01

    Discusses issues faced by Haitian students in the United States, examining Haiti's two distinct societies and describing the effect of Haitian culture on students of Haitian descent in U.S. public schools. Explains how children of Haitian descent must cope with U.S. education and discusses the bilingual challenge for such students. (SM)

  20. Orienteering: Growth Patterns in the United States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jeffery, Charles F.

    The history of orienteering in the United States includes both military and civilian interest, with the period of greatest growth between 1970 and 1980. To investigate growth patterns in orienteering, questionnaires were mailed to 42 civilian orienteering clubs and 286 universities supporting senior Reserve Office Training Corps (ROTC)…

  1. Renewable Energy in United States Foreign Policy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Daniel Karnrnen

    2010-01-01

    This article examines the root-causes of the United States' oil-induced myopia, and highlights the synergies that could exist between a low-carbon and a high-security national energy policy and how such synergies might reshape foreign policy dynamics and options.

  2. AIR QUALITY OVER THE EASTERN UNITED STATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Atmospheric concentrations of ozone and fine particulate matter continue to exceed their standards in many parts of the eastern United States. However, the peak concentration levels and number of ozone exceedances have decreased substantially in recent years due, in part, to the...

  3. United States Patent [19] Church et al.

    E-print Network

    Church, George M.

    United States Patent [19] Church et al. [54] CHARACTERIZATION OF INDIVIDUAL POLYMER MOLECULES BASED of Search ............................ 435/6. 4. 5; 43612. 436/151 [56] References Cited PUBUCATIONS Auld et of the Volt- age-Dependent Sodium Channel". 1990, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA, 87:323-27. Bensirnon. A.. et al

  4. (12) United States Patent Vertes et al.

    E-print Network

    Vertes, Akos

    (12) United States Patent Vertes et al. (54) LASER DESORPTION IONIZATION AND PEPTIDE SEQUENCING Suizdak et al. 6,589,485 B2 7/2003 Koster 6,794,196 B2 912004 Fonash et al. 6,846,681 B2 112005 Buriak et al. 6,881,950 B2 4/2005 Schlaf et aI. 111111

  5. UNITED STATES NUCLEAR WASTE TECHNICAL REVIEW BOARD

    E-print Network

    of Representatives Washington, D.C. 20515-6501 The Honorable Strom Thurmond President Pro Tempore United States Review Board (the Board) herewith submits this second report of 1997 as required by the Nuclear Waste and recommendations in biannual reports to Congress and the Secretary of Energy. This short letter report includes

  6. UNITED STATES NUCLEAR WASTE TECHNICAL REVIEW BOARD

    E-print Network

    of Representatives Washington, DC 20515 The Honorable Robert C. Byrd President Pro Tempore United States Senate Policy Amendments Act of 1987, Public Law 100-203, which direct the Board to report to Congress Mountain in Nevada. During that time, the Board has reported on the technical validity of DOE's efforts

  7. UNITED STATES NUCLEAR WASTE TECHNICAL REVIEW BOARD

    E-print Network

    of Representatives Washington, DC 20515 The Honorable Strom Thurmond President Pro Tempore United States Senate Board (Board) submits this Letter Report to The U.S. Congress and The Secretary of Energy in accordance to report to Congress and the Secretary of Energy no fewer than two times each year. Congress created

  8. UNITED STATES NUCLEAR WASTE TECHNICAL REVIEW BOARD

    E-print Network

    of Representatives Washington, DC 20515 The Honorable Robert C. Byrd President Pro Tempore United States Senate, and transporting high-level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel. The Board is required to report its findings this letter report to Congress and the Secretary. The report, which is the Board's second report of 2006

  9. Health, United States, 1981. [Sixth Annual Report].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Health Services Research (DHHS/PHS), Hyattsville, MD.

    This document provides the sixth annual report on the health status of the citizens of the United States. Submitted by the Secretary of Health and Human Services to the President and Congress in compliance with Section 308 of the Public Health Services Act, the report presents statistics concerning recent trends in the health care sector along…

  10. AIDS Pandemic in the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erickson, Amy H.; Melendez, Barbra S.; Ball, Daniel L.; Morse, Steven T.; Phillips, Geoffrey P.

    2010-01-01

    This project is one of four that were issued to first semester sophomore undergraduates at the United States Military Academy as part of an integrated learning experience at the end of their Calculus II course work. This project was used during a short, seven lesson block of instruction that was intended to capitalize on their recent academic…

  11. Contemporary African Immigrants to The United States

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Joseph Takougang

    The severe economic difficulties, increased poverty and the political instability that have plagued many African countries in the last two decades have resulted in the large scale migration of Africans Europe and the United States. Unlike their counterparts in the 1960s and 70s who were anxious to return home after acquiring an American education in order to contribute in the

  12. Unauthorized Aliens in the United States

    Microsoft Academic Search

    2010-01-01

    [Excerpt] The unauthorized alien (illegal alien) population in the United States is a key and controversial immigration issue. In recent years, competing views on how to address this population have proved to be a major obstacle to enacting comprehensive immigration reform legislation. The unauthorized alien issue is likely to be a key challenge if, as the Senate Majority Leader and

  13. Bumble bees of the western United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bumble bees (genus Bombus) are critical pollinators of flowering plants. Thirty species of bumble bees are native to the western United States and this publication is a guide to the natural history and identification of these species. We present phenology graphs, host-plant associations, detailed ...

  14. Storage Reservoir Behavior in the United States

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Richard M. Vogel; Ranjith S. Ravindiran; Paul Kirshen

    1999-01-01

    Numerous experiments are performed that characterize the behavior of individual storage reser- voirs across the United States. Storage-yield curves based on annual and monthly flow records are compared to show that the standardized net inflow and the coefficient of variation of net inflow Cv completely characterize the refill properties of storage reservoirs. For example, these experiments indicate that for any

  15. AED in the United States of America

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Academy for Educational Development, 2007

    2007-01-01

    The Academy for Educational Development's (AED's) work in the United States includes programs with many of the nation's major foundations on issues of education reform, parental involvement in the schools, youth development and bridging the distance between school, work, and successful university education. The projects described here cover a wide…

  16. CLIMATE CHANGE IMPACTS ON THE UNITED STATES

    E-print Network

    McCarl, Bruce A.

    CLIMATE CHANGE IMPACTS ON THE UNITED STATES The Potential Consequences of Climate Variability and Change Foundation Humanity's influence on the global climate will grow in the 21st century. Increasingly, there will be significant climate-related changes that will affect each one of us. We must begin now to consider our

  17. Internationalizing Teacher Education in the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaklee, Beverly D., Ed.; Baily, Supriya, Ed.

    2012-01-01

    As countries become increasingly interdependent, student populations in the United States are becoming more culturally diverse. These students' transnational perspectives present significant challenges to teachers, but a disconnect exists between the skills teachers need and those provided to them by colleges of education. As teacher preparation…

  18. Upper Mantle Structure of Midwestern United States

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Donald Helmberger; Ralph A. Wiggins

    1971-01-01

    Body-wave observations from nuclear events at the Nevada Test Site and several earthquakes near the western edge of the United States have been used to construct a model of the upper mantle along profiles extending toward the Great Lakes. The Cagniard-de Hoop technique for computing synthetic seismograms for laterally homogeneous earth models was used to fit both the amplitudes and

  19. Conservation of Lynx in the United States

    E-print Network

    455 Chapter 17 Conservation of Lynx in the United States: A Systematic Approach to Closing Critical. To avoid haphazard research and to maximize the benefits to lynx conservation with limited research funds, a carefully coordinated approach to lynx research is needed. The purpose of this chapter is to provide

  20. Characterizing Hospice Services in the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Maureen A.; Seplaki, Christopher; Biagtan, Mark; DuPreez, Amanda; Cleary, James

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Although caregivers desire specific information about hospice programs, there is little descriptive information available. We characterized agencies that provide formal or informal hospice care in the United States according to four types of services considered important by caregivers: medications and treatments; rehabilitative care;…

  1. ECOREGIONS OF THE CONTERMINOUS UNITED STATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A map of ecoregions of the conterminous United States has been compiled to assist managers of aquatic and terrestrial resources in understanding the regional patterns of the realistically attainable quality of these resources. The ecoregions are based on perceived patterns of a c...

  2. Direct Broadcasting Satellite in the United States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Haeryon

    The introduction of Direct Broadcasting Satellites (DBS) in the United States sparked both government's regulatory development of domestic DBS services and the communication industry's efforts to implement a commercial DBS system. J. D. Slack's symptomatic causality and technological assessment models help to explain how these practices were…

  3. Educational Attainment in the United States: 2007

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crissey, Sarah R.

    2009-01-01

    This report provides a portrait of educational attainment in the United States based on data collected in the 2007 American Community Survey (ACS) and data collected in 2008 and earlier in the Annual Social and Economic Supplement (ASEC) to the Current Population Survey (CPS). Previous U.S. Census Bureau reports on this topic were based on…

  4. Wood energy in the United States

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. E. Hewett; C. J. High; N. Marshall; R. Wildermuth

    1981-01-01

    Studies in the United States have concluded that wood could supply ten quadrillion Btu (quads) of energy per year by the year 2000 if appropriate policies were implemented. As a result, imported oil consumption would be reduced and additional income would accrue to the national economy thus improving the energy-related balance of trade deficit. However, potential losses in the production

  5. Higher Education in the United States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doucette, Donald S.

    Issues concerning higher education in the United States are considered, with attention to historical developments; functions and objectives; types of institutions and degrees; internal and external organization; finance; admissions, access, and financial assistance; student and faculty characteristics; distance and recurrent education;…

  6. Child Care in the United States Today

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sandra L. Hofferth

    1996-01-01

    This article describes the consumers and providers of child care in the United States. It uses data from nationally representative surveys and research studies conducted from the late 1960s through 1995 to examine the child care arrangements parents select for their young children, comparing today's arrangements with those made by parents decades ago. It then discusses the availability of child

  7. The technological dilemma of the United States

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. H. Hollomon; A. E. Harger

    1971-01-01

    The rapid growth of federally supported research and development during and following World War II, and particularly between 1950 and 1960, appears to have had several major effects on the technological activity of the United States and its industry. However, the most important effect of this growth was the rise in the cost of research and development, including the cost

  8. Atherosclerotic renovascular disease in the United States

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Philip A Kalra; Haifeng Guo; David T Gilbertson; Jiannong Liu; Shu-Cheng Chen; Areef Ishani; Allan J Collins; Robert N Foley

    2010-01-01

    Atherosclerotic renovascular disease (ARVD) is an increasingly recognized clinical condition that is diagnosed predominantly in older patients. Here we used annual United States Medicare 5% Denominator Files and studied 16,036,904 patients, 66 years of age and older, to quantify trends in diagnostic rates, associations, treatment, and outcomes of ARVD over a 13-year period. Overall, there was an ARVD rate of

  9. Ground Water Contamination in the United States

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Veronica I. Pye; Ruth Patrick

    1983-01-01

    Ground water contamination is of increasing concern in the United States because about 50 percent of our drinking water comes from well water. The causes of contamination stem from both point sources and nonpoint sources. Since ground water moves slowly, the contaminant may affect only a small portion of an aquifer for a considerable period of time. Deleterious effects on

  10. ALTERNATIVE SEWERS IN THE UNITED STATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The history of development of alternative sewers in the United States is discussed along with their basic design features and extent of their use at the present time. Guidance is provided in the form of field experience and rational projections for engineers to estimate the capit...

  11. Color Vision Deficiencies in Children. United States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Health Statistics (DHEW/PHS), Hyattsville, MD.

    Presented are prevalence data on color vision deficiencies (color blindness) in noninstitutionalized children, aged 6-11, in the United States, as estimated from the Health Examination Survey findings on a representative sample of over 7,400 children. Described are the two color vision tests used in the survey, the Ishihara Test for Color…

  12. The United States Uranium Industry, 1993

    Microsoft Academic Search

    1993-01-01

    Low prices and foreign competition continue to plague the United States uranium industry. For eight years (1984-1991) the Secretary of Energy has declared the industry to be nonviable. A similar declaration is expected late in 1993 for 1992. Surface drilling for uranium in 1993 is expected to be about 1 million ft., because deposits are developed prior to mining. Drilling

  13. CTS United States experiments. A progress report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robbins, W. H.; Donoughe, P. L.

    1976-01-01

    The results are presented of the United States experiments activity to date. Wide segments of the population are involved in the Experiments Program including the scientific community, other government agencies, industry, and the education and health entities. The experiments are associated with both technological objectives and the demonstration of new community and social services via satellite.

  14. United States: Exploring the Marriage Debate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Julie H.

    2004-01-01

    As citizens of the United States respond to legislative and judicial actions that have challenged the prohibition against same-sex couples receiving marriage licenses, schools have a timely opportunity to engage students on this most important debate. Educators can help their students understand the full significance of this issue by encouraging…

  15. Classical Linguistics in the United States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poultney, James W.

    1988-01-01

    Reviews the history of classical linguistic studies in the United States. Cites many of the important American classicists from the nineteenth century to the present. Also gives the history of some scholarly organizations, including the Linguistic Society of America and the American Philological Association. (LMO)

  16. United States Council on Geotechnical Engineering Research

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The United States Council on Geotechnical Engineering Research provides this website to "provide advocacy for the continued development and expansion of high quality geotechnical engineering research and education by US academic institutions." The site features many different items, these include things such as, images, animations and interactive resources.

  17. Climate Change Indicators for the United States

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA?s publishes the Climate Change Indicators for the United States report to communicate information about the science and impacts of climate change, track trends in environmental quality, and inform de¬cision-making. This report presents a set of key indicators to help readers ...

  18. The United States Territory of Hawaii

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Stanley Gardiner

    1913-01-01

    THE first article in the ``Fauna Hawaiiensis'' is entitled ``Introduction, being a Review of the Land-Fauna of Hawaiia.'' Dr. Brigham's quarrel is hence with the writer of that article, and with the editor of the fauna, not with me. I should have expected ``Hawaiia'' to meet with his approval as against the rather cumbrous title, ``United States Territory of Hawaii,''

  19. 78 FR 60191 - United States-Colombia Trade Promotion Agreement

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-01

    ...13-16] RIN 1515-AD88 United States-Colombia Trade Promotion Agreement AGENCY: U...customs-related provisions of the United States- Colombia Trade Promotion Agreement. DATES: Effective...November 22, 2006, the United States and Colombia signed the United States-Colombia...

  20. The magnetic charts of the United States for Epoch 1975

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fabiano, Eugene B.; Jones, W.J.; Peddie, Norman W.

    1979-01-01

    Approximately 24,000 measurements taken from 1900 to 1974 were analyzed by least-squares methods to produce a series of five magnetic charts of the United States for 1975. A feature of the analysis, differing from techniques used for previous editions of the national chart, is that analytic models define the regional magnetic field and are used to contour the magnetic charts. An overall rms (root mean square) fit of less than 235 nT was obtained for the horizontal and vertical intensities; for the chart of magnetic declination, the rms deviation was on the order of 0.5 degrees. The models of annual change, derived from data at repeat stations and observatories operated by the U.S. Geological Survey, yielded an rms deviation of approximately 6 nT/yr in the force components and 0.7 min/yr in magnetic declination.

  1. Color Landform Atlas of the United States

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Sterner, Ray.

    For those with an interest in historical US maps, this site will be of value. Ray Sterner of the Johns Hopkins University has relaunched his Color Landform Atlas of the United States (discussed in the January 17, 1997 issue of the Scout Report). The highlight of this relaunch is the availability of 1895 Rand McNally state maps (for twenty-nine states at present). These maps are very large (usually over one megabyte) and detailed; counties are color-coded and railroad lines rather than roads are shown.

  2. ShakeAlert: an earthquake early warning system for the United States West Coast

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burkett, Erin R.; Given, Douglas D.; Jones, Lucile M.

    2014-01-01

    Earthquake early warning systems use earthquake science and the technology of monitoring systems to alert devices and people when shaking waves generated by an earthquake are expected to arrive at their location. The seconds to minutes of advance warning can allow people and systems to take actions to protect life and property from destructive shaking. The United States Geological Survey (USGS) in collaboration with several partners has been working to develop an early warning system for the United States. ShakeAlert, a demonstration system currently under development, is designed to cover the West Coast States of California, Oregon, and Washington.

  3. Adoption of intensive care unit telemedicine in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Kahn, Jeremy M.; Cicero, Brandon D.; Wallace, David J.; Iwashyna, Theodore J.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Intensive care unit (ICU) telemedicine is a novel approach for providing critical care services from a distance. We sought to study the extent of use and patterns of adoption of this technology in United States ICUs. Design Retrospective study combining a systematic listing of ICU telemedicine installations with hospital characteristic data from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. We examined adoption over time and compared hospital characteristics between facilities that have adopted ICU telemedicine and those that have not. Setting United States hospitals from 2003 to 2010. Measurements and main results The number of hospitals using ICU telemedicine increased from 16 (0.4% of total) to 213 (4.6% of total) between 2003 and 2010. The number of ICU beds covered by telemedicine increased from 598 (0.9% of total) to 5,799 (7.9% of total). The average annual rate of ICU bed coverage growth was 101% per year in the first four study years but slowed to 8.1% per year over the last four study years (p<0.001 for difference in linear trend). Compared to non-adopting hospitals, hospitals adopting ICU telemedicine were more likely to be large (percentage with >400 beds: 11.1% vs. 3.7%, p<0.001), teaching (percentage with resident coverage: 31.4% vs. 21.9%, p=0.003) and urban (percentage located in metropolitan statistical areas with over one million residents: 45.3% vs. 30.1%, p<0.001). Conclusions ICU telemedicine adoption was initially rapid but recently slowed. Efforts are needed to uncover the barriers to future growth, particularly regarding the optimal strategy for using this technology most effectively and efficiently. PMID:24145839

  4. Uranium- and thorium-bearing pegmatites of the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, J.W.; Arengi, J.T.; Parrish, I.S.

    1980-04-01

    This report is part of the National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) Program designed to identify criteria favorable for the occurrence of the world's significant uranium deposits. This project deals specifically with uranium- and thorium-bearing pegmatites in the United States and, in particular, their distribution and origin. From an extensive literature survey and field examination of 44 pegmatite localities in the United States and Canada, the authors have compiled an index to about 300 uranium- and thorium-bearing pegmatites in the United States, maps giving location of these deposits, and an annotated bibliography to some of the most pertinent literature on the geology of pegmatites. Pegmatites form from late-state magma differentiates rich in volatile constituents with an attendant aqueous vapor phase. It is the presence of an aqueous phase which results in the development of the variable grain size which characterizes pegmatites. All pegmatites occur in areas of tectonic mobility involving crustal material usually along plate margins. Those pegmatites containing radioactive mineral species show, essentially, a similar distribution to those without radioactive minerals. Criteria such as tectonic setting, magma composition, host rock, and elemental indicators among others, all serve to help delineate areas more favorable for uranium- and thorium-bearing pegmatites. The most useful guide remains the radioactivity exhibited by uranium- and thorium-bearing pegmatites. Although pegmatites are frequently noted as favorable hosts for radioactive minerals, the general paucity and sporadic distribution of these minerals and inherent mining and milling difficulties negate the resource potential of pegmatites for uranium and thorium.

  5. Aufeis accumulations in stream bottoms in arctic and subarctic environments as a possible indicator of geologic structure: Chapter F in Recent U.S. Geological Survey studies in the Tintina Gold Province, Alaska, United States, and Yukon, Canada--results of a 5-year project

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wanty, Richard B.; Wang, Bronwen; Vohden, Jim; Day, Warren C.; Gough, Larry P.

    2007-01-01

    The thickest (>3 meters) and most extensive aufeis (100’s of meters to kilometers along valleys) coincided with locations of laterally extensive (>5 kilometers) mapped high-angle brittle fault zones, suggesting that the fault zones are hydraulically conductive. Additional evidence of water flow is provided by observed changes in stream-water chemistry in reaches in which aufeis forms, despite a lack of surface tributaries. Minor or no aufeis was observed in many other drainage valleys where no laterally extensive structures have been mapped, implying that aufeis formation results from more than a topographic effect or discharge from bank storage. Thus, the presence of thick, laterally extensive aufeis in highgradient streams may be a useful aid to geologic structural mapping in arctic and subarctic climates.

  6. Search for an Emergency Contraception Provider in the United States

    MedlinePLUS

    ... an Emergency Contraception (Plan B) Provider in the United States Looking for Emergency Contraception NOW? In the U.S., ... pharmacists in some states) near you in the United States who will write prescriptions for emergency contraception or ...

  7. Mapping Curie temperature depth in the western United States with a fractal model for crustal magnetization

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bouligand, C.; Glen, J.M.G.; Blakely, R.J.

    2009-01-01

    We have revisited the problem of mapping depth to the Curie temperature isotherm from magnetic anomalies in an attempt to provide a measure of crustal temperatures in the western United States. Such methods are based on the estimation of the depth to the bottom of magnetic sources, which is assumed to correspond to the temperature at which rocks lose their spontaneous magnetization. In this study, we test and apply a method based on the spectral analysis of magnetic anomalies. Early spectral analysis methods assumed that crustal magnetization is a completely uncorrelated function of position. Our method incorporates a more realistic representation where magnetization has a fractal distribution defined by three independent parameters: the depths to the top and bottom of magnetic sources and a fractal parameter related to the geology. The predictions of this model are compatible with radial power spectra obtained from aeromagnetic data in the western United States. Model parameters are mapped by estimating their value within a sliding window swept over the study area. The method works well on synthetic data sets when one of the three parameters is specified in advance. The application of this method to western United States magnetic compilations, assuming a constant fractal parameter, allowed us to detect robust long-wavelength variations in the depth to the bottom of magnetic sources. Depending on the geologic and geophysical context, these features may result from variations in depth to the Curie temperature isotherm, depth to the mantle, depth to the base of volcanic rocks, or geologic settings that affect the value of the fractal parameter. Depth to the bottom of magnetic sources shows several features correlated with prominent heat flow anomalies. It also shows some features absent in the map of heat flow. Independent geophysical and geologic data sets are examined to determine their origin, thereby providing new insights on the thermal and geologic crustal structure of the western United States.

  8. Tuberculosis trends--United States, 2014.

    PubMed

    Scott, Colleen; Kirking, Hannah L; Jeffries, Carla; Price, Sandy F; Pratt, Robert

    2015-03-20

    In 2014, a total of 9,412 new tuberculosis (TB) cases were reported in the United States, with an incidence rate of 3.0* cases per 100,000 persons, a decrease of 2.2% from 2013. Although overall numbers of TB cases and rates continue to decline, the percentage decrease in rate is the smallest decrease in over a decade (1). This report summarizes provisional TB surveillance data reported to CDC's National Tuberculosis Surveillance System for 2014. TB cases and rates decreased among U.S.-born persons, and although the case rate also decreased among foreign-born persons, there was an increase in total number of cases among foreign-born persons. The rate among foreign-born persons in the United States in 2014 was 13.4 times higher than among U.S.-born persons. Racial/ethnic minorities continue to be disproportionately affected by TB within the United States. Asians continue to be the racial/ethnic group with the largest number of TB cases. Compared with non-Hispanic whites, the TB rate among Asians was 28.5 times higher, whereas rates among non-Hispanic blacks and Hispanics were each eight times higher. Four states (California, Texas, New York, and Florida), representing approximately one third of the U.S. population, accounted for half of all TB cases reported in 2014. Continued progress toward TB elimination in the United States will require focused TB control efforts among populations and in geographic areas with disproportionate burdens of TB. PMID:25789741

  9. Dissolved Solids in Streams of the Conterminous United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anning, D. W.; Flynn, M.

    2014-12-01

    Studies have shown that excessive dissolved-solids concentrations in water can have adverse effects on the environment and on agricultural, municipal, and industrial water users. Such effects motivated the U.S. Geological Survey's National Water-Quality Assessment Program to develop a SPAtially-Referenced Regression on Watershed Attributes (SPARROW) model to improve the understanding of dissolved solids in streams of the United States. Using the SPARROW model, annual dissolved-solids loads from 2,560 water-quality monitoring stations were statistically related to several spatial datasets serving as surrogates for dissolved-solids sources and transport processes. Sources investigated in the model included geologic materials, road de-icers, urban lands, cultivated lands, and pasture lands. Factors affecting transport from these sources to streams in the model included climate, soil, vegetation, terrain, population, irrigation, and artificial-drainage characteristics. The SPARROW model was used to predict long-term mean annual conditions for dissolved-solids sources, loads, yields, and concentrations in about 66,000 stream reaches and corresponding incremental catchments nationwide. The estimated total amount of dissolved solids delivered to the Nation's streams is 272 million metric tons (Mt) annually, of which 194 million Mt (71%) are from geologic sources, 38 million Mt (14%) are from road de-icers, 18 million Mt (7%) are from pasture lands, 14 million Mt (5 %) are from urban lands, and 8 million Mt (3%) are from cultivated lands. The median incremental-catchment yield delivered to local streams is 26 metric tons per year per square kilometer [(Mt/yr)/km2]. Ten percent of the incremental catchments yield less than 4 (Mt/yr)/km2, and 10 percent yield more than 90 (Mt/yr)/km2. In 13% of the reaches, predicted flow-weighted concentrations exceed 500 mg/L—the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency secondary non-enforceable drinking-water standard.

  10. Evidence for an additional uppermost geological unit in the Medusae Fossae Formation, Equatorial Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Samantha; Balme, Matt; Hagermann, Axel

    2013-04-01

    The Medusae Fossae Formation (MFF) is a geological formation comprising three geological units (members) spread across five principal outcrops. The MFF dominates roughly a quarter of the longitudinal extent of the equatorial region of Mars, extending east-west across a distance of ~ 5,500 km between the southern Elysium Planitia and the Tharsis region. The nature of these materials is often referred to as enigmatic, as their exact origin remains unknown. Harrison et al. (Icarus, 2010) presented new observations of outlying occurrences of MFF materials on the southern highlands, atop the dichotomy boundary. They presented two hypotheses to explain these observation: 1) the MFF had a much larger pre-erosional extent than previously thought or 2) these materials had initially been eroded from the main outcrops of the formation, then transported southward by wind and subsequently reworked. A subsequent extension of this work provided evidence for an even larger extent of outlying MFF materials, particularly around and south of the easternmost portions of the MFF. Here we present these new outlier data, together with new textural classification and facies mapping of this region of the MFF. These data show that MFF outlier textures, whilst external to the main MFF outcrops in many places, are also found superposing large areas of the "main" MFF formations. These data support the first of the two working hypotheses presented, but also suggest that these so-called outlying materials represent a previously unmapped, stratigraphically uppermost unit of the Medusae Fossae Formation. We also suggest that, based upon our own morphometric study of yardangs across members and analogue studies by de Silva et al. (Icarus, 2010), these represent a less indurated material than other units of the formation. In the overall context of the origins of the MFF, we find that our data are consistent with the Medusae Fossae materials being a large-scale ignimbrite complex, perhaps with multiple sources, including the Tharsis volcanic province.

  11. Renewable Electricity Futures for the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Mai, Trieu; Hand, Maureen; Baldwin, Sam F.; Wiser , Ryan; Brinkman, G.; Denholm, Paul; Arent, Doug; Porro, Gian; Sandor, Debra; Hostick, Donna J.; Milligan, Michael; DeMeo, Ed; Bazilian, Morgan

    2014-04-14

    This paper highlights the key results from the Renewable Electricity (RE) Futures Study. It is a detailed consideration of renewable electricity in the United States. The paper focuses on technical issues related to the operability of the U. S. electricity grid and provides initial answers to important questions about the integration of high penetrations of renewable electricity technologies from a national perspective. The results indicate that the future U. S. electricity system that is largely powered by renewable sources is possible and the further work is warranted to investigate this clean generation pathway. The central conclusion of the analysis is that renewable electricity generation from technologies that are commercially available today, in combination with a more flexible electric system, is more than adequate to supply 80% of the total U. S. electricity generation in 2050 while meeting electricity demand on an hourly basis in every region of the United States.

  12. Crime in the United States, 2000

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2001-01-01

    The FBI this week released their annual report on United States' crime levels (the 1998 report is discussed in the November 5, 1999 Scout Report). Data in the report are compiled from approximately 17,000 law enforcement agencies as part of the FBI's Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR) Program. According to this year's report, the Crime Index total, which indicates serious crime volume, decreased 0.2 percent from 1999. Among other findings, Crime in the United States reports that robbery, aggravated assault, and murder all decreased from 1999 to 2000, but forcible rape increased .9 percent. The report, which contains detailed tables and charts throughout, is available in seven sections in .pdf format only. Sections include a summary, crime index offenses reported and cleared, persons arrested, an analysis of motor vehicle theft, and a section on law enforcement personnel.

  13. Climate Change Impacts on the United States

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Sponsored by the US Global Change Research Project, this site contains the much-publicized draft report of the Climate Change Impacts on the United States National Assessment Project. This landmark project investigates the impacts of global climate change at a regional scale. The report includes an overview from the fourteen-member National Assessment Synthesis Team and the full text of the draft report containing information about the effects of climate change on specific regions of the United States and the future of the country's ecosystems. The text is in .pdf format and is accompanied by color figures and tables. The report has been put online for public review and a comments page with instructions for submitting responses via email is included.

  14. Onychomycosis treatment in the United States.

    PubMed

    Taheri, Arash; Davis, Scott A; Huang, Karen E; Feldman, Steven R

    2015-05-01

    Onychomycosis is a common progressive infection of the nails that may result in remarkable morbidity. Although there are a variety of treatments available for fungal nail infections with different efficacy and safety profiles, there are limited reports on the ways in which physicians use these treatments or the frequency with which they prescribe them. In this retrospective study, major trends in the prescription and use of antifungal agents for treatment of onychomycosis in the United States were evaluated using data from the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey. Results showed that current treatment and trends in use of drugs for onychomycosis in the United States are in accordance with recommendations in current guidelines. PMID:26057514

  15. Francisella tularensis in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Farlow, Jason; Wagner, David M.; Dukerich, Meghan; Stanley, Miles; Chu, May; Kubota, Kristy; Petersen, Jeannine

    2005-01-01

    The causative agent of tularemia, Francisella tularensis, is a formidable biologic agent that occurs naturally throughout North America. We examined genetic and spatial diversity patterns among 161 US F. tularensis isolates by using a 24-marker multiple-locus variable-number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA) system. MLVA identified 126 unique genotypes. Phylogenetic analyses showed patterns similar to recently reported global-scale analyses. We observed clustering by subspecies, low genetic diversity within F. tularensis subsp. holarctica, and division of F. tularensis subsp. tularensis into 2 distinct subpopulations: A.I. and A.II. The 2 F. tularensis subsp. tularensis subpopulations also represent geographically distinct groups; A.I. occurs primarily in the central United States, and A.II. occurs primarily in the western United States. These spatial distributions are correlated with geographic ranges of particular vectors, hosts of tularemia, and abiotic factors. These correlates provide testable hypotheses regarding ecologic factors associated with maintaining tularemia foci. PMID:16485467

  16. Indian Entrepreneurial Success in the United States, Canada and the United Kingdom

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert W. Fairlie; Harry Krashinsky; Julie Zissimopoulos; Krishna B. Kumar

    2009-01-01

    Indian immigrants in the United States and other wealthy countries are successful in entrepreneurship. Using census data from the three largest developed countries in the world receiving Indian immigrants-the United States, United Kingdom and Canada-the authors examine the performance of Indian entrepreneurs and the causes of their success. In the United States, Indian entrepreneurs have average business income that is

  17. The Geologic Story of the Ocoee River

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The United States Geological Survey (USGS) highlights the geology of the Ocoee River, in the scenic Cherokee National Forest of southeastern Tennessee. This report covers the geologic history of the area, from 750 million years ago (Precambrian) to the present. Uses of the river, from dams to mining, are also discussed.

  18. Physician Assistant Education in the United States

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. Eugene Jones

    2007-01-01

    As physician assistant (PA) programs developed in the 1960s, curriculum models emerged around the central themes of physician-dependent practice and competency-based education. By 2007, there were 136 accredited programs in the United States, with 108 (79%) offering a master-degree curriculum. PA program preclinical and clinical curricula are typically evenly divided in length, and the typical U.S. PA program has a

  19. United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO)

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) provides a Web page covering "Basic Facts About Registering A Trademark." Topics include establishing trademark rights, applications, who may apply, searching for conflicting marks, and use of the "TM," "SM" and "circled R" symbols. The information presented here has been quoted on the 'Net often recently with respect to the relationship (or lack thereof) between domain names and trademarks.

  20. United States IOOS - A national look

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Z. S. Willis

    2008-01-01

    The United States Integrated Ocean Observing System(IOOS) is a user-driven, coordinated network of people, organizations, and technology that generate and disseminate continuous data about our coastal waters, great lakes, and oceans. IOOS is intended to be a major shift in approach to ocean observing, drawing together the vast network of disparate, federal and non-federal observing systems to produce a cohesive

  1. Climate Change Indicators in the United States

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Advanced Technology Environmental and Energy Center (ATEEC) hosts this 2010 report from the Environmental Protection Agency on climate change indicators in the United States. The 76 page report is available for download in PDF file format and includes coverage of greenhouse gases, weather and climate, the oceans, snow and ice and society and ecosystems.Users must download this resource for viewing, which requires a free log-in. There is no cost to download the item.

  2. National Atlas of the United States

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Those interested in aerial photographs, satellite images, or maps as ways to conceptualize the world, will find this site interesting, entertaining, and educational. The US Dept. of Interior offers a National Atlas of the United States, an interactive resource that allows users to view part or all of the US and overlay layers of information including natural features, political boundaries, federal lands, roads, cities, or airports. These layers can be downloaded as compressed .tar.gz files.

  3. Poverty in the United States: 2011

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Thomas Gabe

    2012-01-01

    [Excerpt] In 2011, 46.2 million people were counted as poor in the United States, the same number as in 2010 and the largest number of persons counted as poor in the measure’s 53-year recorded history. The poverty rate, or percent of the population considered poor under the official definition, was reported at 15.0% in 2011, statistically unchanged from 2010. The

  4. "Warming hole" in the midwestern United States

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Pan et al.

    A regional climate model was used to estimate current and future climate scenarios to examine the effect of low-level circulation patterns in the midwestern United States on that part of the country's resistance to warming seen over the rest of North America at that time. A "warming hole" was found in the central U.S. during June-September that is not reflected in previously examined global climate models.

  5. Wood fuel resources in the United States

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hornick

    1982-01-01

    Fuelwood is now a major forest product in the United States. Currently 2 to 2.5% of the U.S. energy consumption is met with wood. There is an adequate supply of unused wood annually to meet 10-15% of energy needs. Because of Btu content, moisture, and lack of uniformity in shape and sizes, wood as a source of energy presents some

  6. High School Dropouts in the United States

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Russell W. Rumberger

    \\u000a One of the major educational challenges in virtually all industrialised nations is raising the education level of the workforce.\\u000a This includes getting more students to complete upper secondary school or what is referred to as ‘high school’ in the United\\u000a States. Completing high school is increasingly viewed as a minimal requirement for entry into the labour market and for further,

  7. Environmental health collaboration: United States and Russia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. H. Rubin; R. L. Jones; B. Revich; S. L. Avaliani; E. Gurvich

    2003-01-01

    Developed nations share similar challenges to human health from commercial and agricultural chemicals that are released into the environment. Although Russia and the United States are historically distinct and unique, both countries are geographically large and economically dependent on emission-producing surface transportation. This paper describes U.S.-Russian collaborative activities that grew from a 1995 conference in Moscow that brought together environmental

  8. Increasing IQ in the United States

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. Grant Steen

    \\u000a Americans tend to feel smug about the health benefits of living in a developed nation, yet a great many people in the United\\u000a States are too poor to benefit from the advances in medical care that tend to grab the headlines. If tens of millions of people\\u000a lack medical insurance, then tens of millions will be denied necessary medical treatment.

  9. 3 Branches of the United States Government

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    avery

    2012-04-04

    Look through these sites and answer , in detail, What are the many duties and functions of the Judicial, Executive, and Legislative Branches of the United States Government? There are many different duties and functions of the three branches of government. As you browse through these websites, record your findings in this chart Venn Diagram Follow the links below to assist you in gathering all the information about the three branches of government. These videos will help you with an overview of ...

  10. River Outflow of the Conterminous United States, 1939-1988.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guetter, Alexandre K.; Georgakakos, Konstantine P.

    1993-10-01

    A record of 50 years of daily outflows through the boundaries of the continental United States has been assembled based on observations recorded by U.S. Geological Survey streamflow stations. Only stations with continuous records from 1939 through 1988 were included. These stations (197 total) are near the outlets of rivers located at the vicinity of the Canadian, Mexican, Atlantic (including the Gulf of Mexico), and Pacific borders of the continental United States. The drainage area of the selected stations covers 77% of the conterminous United States, whereas the existing network of gauging stations covers 83% of the conterminous U.S. area. Station daily data were aggregated over the entire boundary of the United States and were integrated in monthly and annual totals. The 50-year average annual streamflow divergence normalized by the aggregated drainage area is 210.2 mm yr1, reaching a peak in April with 27.3 mm month1 and a minimum in September with 8.7 mm month1. The Mississippi-Missouri Basin comprises 50% of the gauged area and dominates the absolute value of the outflow discharge. Spectral analysis of the monthly outflow anomalies shows an 11-year dominant cycle. The 1939-1988 period contains four notable droughts. Two droughts are partially registered in the limits of the records characterized by the negative anomalies extending from 1939 to 1941 and by the 1987-1988 anomalies for the late 1980s drought. The middle 1950s and early 1960s droughts are fully included in the dataset. Periods of high outflows were registered in the middle 1940s, early 1970s, and early 1980s. Analysis of the spatial coherence of the annual anomalies shows large-scale features, whereas analysis of the monthly anomalies yields the frequency and persistence patterns of floods and droughts. An estimate of the climatological land-surface water budget for the continental United States was done based on recorded precipitation, panevaporation, and outflow. Eigenvector analysis of the monthly outflow residuals per 3° range has been performed to identify the major modes of the spatial correlation structure. The first eight modes explain 66% of the variance of the system and identify the following regions: Atlantic seaboard, Mississippi-Missouri and Ohio River basins, Northeast, Pacific Northwest, Pacific seaboard, Texas Gulf region, North-central, and the Colorado River and Great Basin. Annual and monthly specific outflow aggregates were used to describe the temporal characteristics of the coherent regions. Both time-domain and spectral analyses of the regional outflow anomalies identify the dominant modes of temporal variability.

  11. Uranium ore rolls in the United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harshman, E.N.

    1970-01-01

    About 40% of the uranium ore reserves in the United States, minable at $8 per pound of contained U3O8, are in roll-type deposits in the State of Wyoming. The host rocks are arkosic sandstones, deposited in intermontane basins under fluvial conditions, and derived from the granitic cores of mountain ranges that flank the basins. The host rocks are Eocene and possibly Paleocene in age and are, or were, overlain by a sequence of continental tuffaceous siltstones, sandstones and conglomerates 400 - 700 m thick.

  12. Arboviral disease--United States, 1994.

    PubMed

    1995-09-01

    Arboviruses are mosquitoborne and tickborne agents that persist in nature in complex cycles involving birds and mammals, including humans. Characteristics of arboviral infection include fever, headache, encephalitis, and sometimes death. In 1994, health departments in 20 states reported 100 presumptive or confirmed human cases of arboviral disease to CDC. Of these, 76 were California (CAL) serogroup encephalitis; 20, St. Louis encephalitis (SLE); two, western equine encephalomyelitis (WEE); one, eastern equine encephalomyelitis (EEE); and one, Powassan encephalitis (POW). This report summarizes information about arboviral disease in the United States during 1994. PMID:7643850

  13. Civil Commitment in the United States

    PubMed Central

    West, Sara G.

    2010-01-01

    This article reviews the academic literature on the psychiatric practice of civil commitment. It provides an overview of the history of involuntary psychiatric hospitalization in the United States—from the creation of the first asylum and the era of institutionalization to the movement of deinstitutionalization. The ethical conflict that the practice of involuntary hospitalization presents for providers, namely the conflict between the ethical duties of beneficence and respect for patient autonomy, is presented. The evolution of the United States commitment standards, from being based on a right to treatment for patients with mental illness to being based on dangerousness, as well as the implications that the changes in commitment criteria has had on patients and society, are discussed. Involuntary hospitalization of patient populations that present unique challenges for psychiatry (e.g., not guilty by reason of insanity acquittees, sex offenders, and individuals with eating disorders, substance use disorders, and personality disorders) is discussed. Finally, an overview of outpatient commitment is provided. By reading this article, one will learn the history of involuntary psychiatric hospitalization in the United States and gain an understanding of the ethical issues that make civil commitment one of the most controversial practices in modern psychiatry. PMID:22778709

  14. The United States Uranium Industry, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Chenoweth, W.L.

    1993-08-01

    Low prices and foreign competition continue to plague the United States uranium industry. For eight years (1984-1991) the Secretary of Energy has declared the industry to be nonviable. A similar declaration is expected late in 1993 for 1992. Surface drilling for uranium in 1993 is expected to be about 1 million ft., because deposits are developed prior to mining. Drilling for claim assessment purposes has ceased due to changes in the mining law. All conventional mining and milling in the United States ceased in early 1992 when the last open-pit mine closed. Underground mining ceased in late 1990. Current uranium production is from solution mining (in-situ leaching) in Wyoming, Texas, and Nebraska. Uranium is recovered from Florida phosphate rock processed in Louisiana and from mine water in New Mexico. Uranium concentrate production in 1993 is expected to be about 5 million lbs U[sub 3]O[sub 8]. The United States has large reserves of uranium, but a significant price increase is needed for the industry to rebound.

  15. National Geologic Map Database

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    1997-01-01

    The National Geologic Map Database (NGMDB) is an Internet-based system for query and retrieval of earth-science map information, created as a collaborative effort between the USGS and the Association of American State Geologists. Its functions include providing a catalog of available map information; a data repository; and a source for general information on the nature and intended uses of the various types of earth-science information. The map catalog is a comprehensive, searchable catalog of all geoscience maps of the United States, in paper or digital format. It includes maps published in geological survey formal series and open-file series, maps in books, theses and dissertations, maps published by park associations, scientific societies, and other agencies, as well as publications that do not contain a map but instead provide a geological description of an area (for example, a state park). The geologic-names lexicon (GEOLEX) is a search tool for lithologic and geochronologic unit names. It now contains roughly 90% of the geologic names found in the most recent listing of USGS-approved geologic names. Current mapping activities at 1:24,000- and 1:100,000-scale are listed in the Geologic Mapping in Progress Database. Information on how to find topographic maps and list of geology-related links is also available.

  16. County-level estimates of nitrogen and phosphorus from animal manure for the conterminous United States, 2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mueller, David K.; Gronberg, Jo Ann M.

    2013-01-01

    County-level nitrogen and phosphorus inputs from animal manure for the conterminous United States for 2002 were estimated from animal populations from the 2002 Census of Agriculture by using methods described in U.S. Geological Survey Scientific Investigations Report 2006–5012. These estimates of nitrogen and phosphorus from animal manure were compiled in support of the U.S. Geological Survey’s National Water-Quality Assessment Program.

  17. The State of Homeless Children in the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kabler, Brenda; Weinstein, Elana

    2009-01-01

    Across America, the numbers of homeless children and families are growing as a result of many factors including the recent economic crisis, home foreclosures, and natural disasters. Because of an increase in the number of homeless children throughout the United States, this population has unmet needs that can be targeted in school settings under…

  18. Geology of Mojave National Preserve

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This website of the United States Geological Survey (USGS) and the National Park Service (NPS) highlights the geology of the Mojave National Preserve in California. It includes a field trip describing areas of interest at the preserve, as well as a geologic time scale describing the history and development of this area. Processes that shaped this region include volcanism, tectonics, faulting, erosion, deposition, spreading, intrusions, and glaciation. There is a geologic map of the area with units and a legend, and links to maps and technical papers.

  19. Characterization of Floods in the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saharia, M.; Kirstetter, P. E.; Gourley, J. J.; Hong, Y.; Vergara, H. J.

    2014-12-01

    Floods, especially flash floods, have attracted significant attention in the recent past, due to their devastating nature and potential for causing significant economic damage and loss of life. In the United States, flood characterization studies have only been done on a case study basis. The lack of a comprehensive database matching flood characteristics such as peak discharges and flood duration with geospatial and geomorphologic information hampered systematic exploration. This study examines flooding characteristics across the continental United States in order to identify how space and time scales of floods vary with climatic regimes and geomorphology. Benefiting from the availability of a representative and long archive of flood events, this work results in a spatially and temporally comprehensive flood characterization over the US. We characterized flooding events by linking flood response variables such as unit peak discharge and flooding rise time with morphologic parameters such as basin area, relief ratio and elongation ratio. This study also establishes new regression equations taking advantage of the long historical record of floods in US at our disposal per the publicly available flooding database.

  20. Prominent emerging diseases within the United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cipriano, R.C.; Bowser, A.; Dove, A.; Goodwin, A.; Puzach, C.

    2011-01-01

    This manuscript reviews disease syndromes that have become significant aquatic animal health issues within the United States since 2003. The emergence of Viral Hemorrhagic Septicemia (VHS) disease among wild fish in the Great Lakes is probably the most problematic and political issue. The emergence of this pathogen resulted in the issuance of a 2006 VHSV Federal order that placed restrictions on the movement of certain species of fish in the eight states that border the Great Lakes (New York, Pennsylvania, Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Michigan, and Wisconsin and Minnesota) as well as the movement of live fish into the United States from the Ontario and Quebec Provinces, Canada. Spring Viremia of Carp (SVC) was identified for the first times in the United States during 2002. It was diagnosed as the source of mortality among koi at a private facility in North Carolina as well as from feral carp in Cedar Lake (WI). In 2004, Koi Herpesvirus (KHV) killed 8,000 adult common carp (Cyprinus carpio) in the Chadakoin River (NY); it reoccurred the next year within Chautauqua Lake (NY), killing an estimated 25,000 carp (20–30 lbs. apiece). During the summers of 2007 and 2008, KHV epizootics also occurred among carp in Ontario (Canada). Finally, outbreaks of epizootic shell disease in American lobster (Homarus americanus) have generated concern along the southern New England coast and eastern Long Island Sound. The prevalence and severity of shell disease have increased within inshore areas of southern New England and resulted in significant decreases in lobster catches and marketability.

  1. Water Use in the United States

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The USGS National Water-Use Information Program is a cooperative program with State and local governments designed to collect, store, analyze, and disseminate water-use information, both nationally and locally, to a wide variety of government agencies and private organizations. Two reports detail the estimated water use in the United States in 1990 and 1995. The corresponding data for counties and watersheds is available in tab-delimited files for 1985, 1990 and 1995. A handbook for collecting water-use data provides standards and guidance in measuring, estimating, collecting, compiling, and analyzing water-use data. A series of color maps of water-use by State for 1990 illustrates water use for a variety of purposes. There is a link to Water Science for Schools, which offers information for students ages 9-90. A fact sheet includes water-use information for planners, managers, policy makers, educators, and the general public.

  2. Geologic History of Western US

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Ronald Blakey

    This web-site is a presentation showing graphically the Proterozoic and Phanerozoic geologic history of the Southwestern United States. There is a text file providing a brief narrative of the geologic history, which links to map graphics for each period. The graphics contain a scale and have labeled features to better understand what is happening as time progresses.

  3. 7 CFR 28.482 - United States Cotton Futures Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...2011-01-01 false United States Cotton Futures Act. 28.482 Section 28...STANDARDS AND STANDARD CONTAINER REGULATIONS COTTON CLASSING, TESTING, AND STANDARDS Standards... General § 28.482 United States Cotton Futures Act. The cotton...

  4. 7 CFR 28.482 - United States Cotton Futures Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...2010-01-01 false United States Cotton Futures Act. 28.482 Section 28...STANDARDS AND STANDARD CONTAINER REGULATIONS COTTON CLASSING, TESTING, AND STANDARDS Standards... General § 28.482 United States Cotton Futures Act. The cotton...

  5. 7 CFR 28.482 - United States Cotton Futures Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...2014-01-01 false United States Cotton Futures Act. 28.482 Section 28...STANDARDS AND STANDARD CONTAINER REGULATIONS COTTON CLASSING, TESTING, AND STANDARDS Standards... General § 28.482 United States Cotton Futures Act. The cotton...

  6. 7 CFR 28.482 - United States Cotton Futures Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...2013-01-01 false United States Cotton Futures Act. 28.482 Section 28...STANDARDS AND STANDARD CONTAINER REGULATIONS COTTON CLASSING, TESTING, AND STANDARDS Standards... General § 28.482 United States Cotton Futures Act. The cotton...

  7. 7 CFR 28.482 - United States Cotton Futures Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...2012-01-01 false United States Cotton Futures Act. 28.482 Section 28...STANDARDS AND STANDARD CONTAINER REGULATIONS COTTON CLASSING, TESTING, AND STANDARDS Standards... General § 28.482 United States Cotton Futures Act. The cotton...

  8. Religiosity and United States Suicide Rates, 1972-1978.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, William T.

    1984-01-01

    Related annual variations in United States suicide rates between 1972 and 1978 to annual variations in church attendance of representative subpopulations of the United States (N=1,500). Results supported the general hypothesis that religiosity deters suicide. (LLL)

  9. 27 CFR 41.140 - Taxpayment in the United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...TOBACCO PRODUCTS, CIGARETTE PAPERS AND TUBES, AND PROCESSED TOBACCO Puerto Rican Tobacco Products and Cigarette Papers and Tubes, Brought Into the United States Deferred...tobacco products or cigarette papers or tubes in the United States who receives...

  10. 27 CFR 41.140 - Taxpayment in the United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...TOBACCO PRODUCTS, CIGARETTE PAPERS AND TUBES, AND PROCESSED TOBACCO Puerto Rican Tobacco Products and Cigarette Papers and Tubes, Brought Into the United States Deferred...tobacco products or cigarette papers or tubes in the United States who receives,...

  11. 27 CFR 41.140 - Taxpayment in the United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...TOBACCO PRODUCTS, CIGARETTE PAPERS AND TUBES, AND PROCESSED TOBACCO Puerto Rican Tobacco Products and Cigarette Papers and Tubes, Brought Into the United States Deferred...tobacco products or cigarette papers or tubes in the United States who receives...

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    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...TOBACCO PRODUCTS, CIGARETTE PAPERS AND TUBES, AND PROCESSED TOBACCO Puerto Rican Tobacco Products and Cigarette Papers and Tubes, Brought Into the United States Deferred...tobacco products or cigarette papers or tubes in the United States who receives...

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    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 2012-04-01 false Samples for the United States. 24... Authorities § 24.37 Samples for the United States. ...officers are authorized to take samples of wine, spirits, volatile...analysis, testing, etc., free of tax to determine...

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    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 2013-04-01 false Samples for the United States. 24... Authorities § 24.37 Samples for the United States. ...officers are authorized to take samples of wine, spirits, volatile...analysis, testing, etc., free of tax to determine...

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    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 2014-04-01 false Samples for the United States. 24... Authorities § 24.37 Samples for the United States. ...officers are authorized to take samples of wine, spirits, volatile...analysis, testing, etc., free of tax to determine...

  16. 27 CFR 24.37 - Samples for the United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 2011-04-01 false Samples for the United States. 24... Authorities § 24.37 Samples for the United States. ...officers are authorized to take samples of wine, spirits, volatile...analysis, testing, etc., free of tax to determine...

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