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Sample records for universit paul sabatier

  1. Decentralized control of large-scale systems: Fixed modes, sensitivity and parametric robustness. Ph.D. Thesis - Universite Paul Sabatier, 1985

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tarras, A.

    1987-01-01

    The problem of stabilization/pole placement under structural constraints of large scale linear systems is discussed. The existence of a solution to this problem is expressed in terms of fixed modes. The aim is to provide a bibliographic survey of the available results concerning the fixed modes (characterization, elimination, control structure selection to avoid them, control design in their absence) and to present the author's contribution to this problem which can be summarized by the use of the mode sensitivity concept to detect or to avoid them, the use of vibrational control to stabilize them, and the addition of parametric robustness considerations to design an optimal decentralized robust control.

  2. Sabatier Catalyst Poisoning Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nallette, Tim; Perry, Jay; Abney, Morgan; Knox, Jim; Goldblatt, Loel

    2013-01-01

    The Carbon Dioxide Reduction Assembly (CRA) on the International Space Station (ISS) has been operational since 2010. The CRA uses a Sabatier reactor to produce water and methane by reaction of the metabolic CO2 scrubbed from the cabin air and the hydrogen byproduct from the water electrolysis system used for metabolic oxygen generation. Incorporating the CRA into the overall air revitalization system has facilitated life support system loop closure on the ISS reducing resupply logistics and thereby enhancing longer term missions. The CRA utilizes CO2 which has been adsorbed in a 5A molecular sieve within the Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly, CDRA. There is a potential of compounds with molecular dimensions similar to, or less than CO2 to also be adsorbed. In this fashion trace contaminants may be concentrated within the CDRA and subsequently desorbed with the CO2 to the CRA. Currently, there is no provision to remove contaminants prior to entering the Sabatier catalyst bed. The risk associated with this is potential catalyst degradation due to trace organic contaminants in the CRA carbon dioxide feed acting as catalyst poisons. To better understand this risk, United Technologies Aerospace System (UTAS) has teamed with MSFC to investigate the impact of various trace contaminants on the CRA catalyst performance at relative ISS cabin air concentrations and at about 200/400 times of ISS concentrations, representative of the potential concentrating effect of the CDRA molecular sieve. This paper summarizes our initial assessment results.

  3. Sabatier Engineering Development Unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, Jay; Smith, Fred; Murdoch, Karen

    2003-01-01

    To facilitate life support system loop closure on board the International Space Station (ISS), the Node 3 Oxygen Generation System (OGS) rack contains a functional scar to accommodate a carbon dioxide reduction assembly (CRA). As part of the effort to better understand and define the functional scar, significant risk mitigation activities have been performed. To address integration risks, a CRA Engineering Development Unit (EDU) has been developed that is functionally equivalent to a flight CRA and is suitable for integrating with ground based carbon dioxide removal and oxygen generation systems. The CRA EDU has been designed to be functionally equivalent to the Sabatier Reactor Subsystem (SRS) portion of the CRA. The design of the CRA EDU and testing results in a stand alone configuration with simulated OGA and CDRA interfaces are reported. Carbon dioxide flow control is a major area requiring development since the size of the CO2 accumulator may result in periods of CRA starvation. The capability of the CO2 flow control algorithm to effectively manage integrated CRA operations is discussed.

  4. Sabatier Methanation Reactor for Space Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murdoch, Karen; Goldblatt, Loel; Carrasquillo, Robyn; Harris, Danny

    2005-01-01

    The Sabatier Methanation Reactor technology is of vital importance to the success of the human and robotic exploration program. In order to achieve an affordable program, the logistics supply to support the mission must be minimized to the fullest extent possible. One area of potential reduction with high return on investment is the closure of life support loops, particularly oxygen and water. The Sabatier system accomplishes this by utilizing hydrogen and carbon dioxide, waste products from the life support system, to produce water and methane. The recovered water is then recycled back into the life support system to provide oxygen; while the methane can be used for propulsion, or can be broken down further to recover the hydrogen. This technology is applicable not only to transit phases of exploration, but surface habitats as well as in-situ propellant production. The Sabatier Reactor system has been developed for ground based demonstration experiments extensively over the past 30 years. Over the past three years, NASA has funded development of the Sabatier Carbon Dioxide Reduction Assembly (CRA) for use on the ISS. Currently this system is at TRL 5 and it is expected that the system will be flown on the ISS as a flight experiment, The purpose of the flight experiment is to integrate the Sabatier CRA into a synchronized system with the oxygen generation system and the carbon dioxide concentrator. The flight experiment will verify the integration of the different systems working together plus it will verify the capability of the system to operate, and effectively separate its products in a micro-gravity environment. Subsequent to design validation, the flight experiment can remain onboard the ISS providing valuable water to offset logistics re-supply requirements. Some of the challenges facing the development of the Sabatier system include handling vibration induced particulates, microgravity phase separation and containment of hazardous gases. Plans for adequately addressing these issues will be presented. The Sabatier carbon dioxide reduction process will greatly benefit any of the extended duration human exploration missions because of the tremendous savings of consumables realized. Any of these mission scenarios, be they transit or surface based, must consider closing the life support loops in order to make the mission achievable, let alone affordable. Carbon dioxide reduction technology will be necessary for future outpost habitats, and the technology needs to be proven viable in a space application. The Sabatier methanation reaction is also a desirable method for producing propellant from the Mars atmosphere. The common system could be designed to accept carbon dioxide from an indoor air revitalization loop concentrator, or from an outdoor atmosphere compressor. Carbon dioxide reduction validation is but one step in the spiral development of the in-situ propellant production system desired for future planetary exploration.

  5. Modeling and analysis of sabatier CO2 reduction system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeng, F.; Anderson, M.

    To close the air revitalization system (ARS) of the Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) of the International Space Station (ISS), a Sabatier CO2 reduction subsystem (CRS) is being integrated into the ISS ARS. An analytical model was implemented in both stand-alone Fortran and Aspen Custom Modeler and was developed to simulate the performance of Sabatier CO2 reduction subsystem. Analyses of the reaction thermodynamics, reaction equilibrium, and kinetics of the Sabatier reaction were conducted. The reactor was divided into three zones: primary reaction, first cooling and second cooling zones. Reactions, heat and mass transfers in each of the reactor zone were modeled. Impacts of day and night cycles of ISS on the Sabatier CRS will be addressed. Model predictions will be compared with test data. Imp acts of Sabatier CRS parameters on water recovery will be discussed.

  6. Advantages of Sabatier for extended duration manned missions.

    PubMed

    Murdoch, K; Carrasquillo, R; O'Donnell, P; Fort, J

    1998-01-01

    As manned space missions become longer and go farther away (i.e., Mars missions), the cost of resupply missions becomes substantial and even impractical. In order to reduce the logistics penalty for air revitalization in manned spacecraft, breathing oxygen (O2) must be recovered from metabolic carbon dioxide (CO2). The Sabatier CO2 reduction system is a key component of an integrated air revitalization system. The heart of the Sabatier system is the chemical catalyst bed that reacts carbon dioxide with hydrogen to form methane and water. Product water from a Sabatier subsystem would positively affect the current International Space Station (ISS) water balance and Mars missions would also benefit from the use of product methane as a propellant. This article focuses on the potential benefits of using the Sabatier subsystem for ISS and potential Mars mission applications. PMID:11871449

  7. Paul Frampton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Heather A.

    2013-01-01

    I was astonished by an article that appeared on physicsworld.com in November about the physicist Paul Frampton and his imprisonment for attempted cocaine smuggling ("Paul Frampton hit by 56-month drugs sentence", 22 November 2012).

  8. Paul Dirac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pais, Abraham; Jacob, Maurice; Olive, David I.; Atiyah, Michael F.

    2005-09-01

    Preface Peter Goddard; Dirac memorial address Stephen Hawking; 1. Paul Dirac: aspects of his life and work Abraham Pais; 2. Antimatter Maurice Jacob; 3. The monopole David Olive; 4. The Dirac equation and geometry Michael F. Atiyah.

  9. Paul Dirac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pais, Abraham; Jacob, Maurice; Olive, David I.; Atiyah, Michael F.

    1998-02-01

    Preface Peter Goddard; Dirac memorial address Stephen Hawking; 1. Paul Dirac: aspects of his life and work Abraham Pais; 2. Antimatter Maurice Jacob; 3. The monopole David Olive; 4. The Dirac equation and geometry Michael F. Atiyah.

  10. Paul Bert

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colin, J.

    1978-01-01

    This biographical article on Paul Bert highlights his studies on the physiology of respiration and barometric pressure and, in particular his contributions to the understanding of hypoxia, hyperoxia and anesthesia.

  11. Hydrogen Transport to Mars Enables the Sabatier/Electrolysis Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, P. J.; Rapp, D.

    1997-01-01

    The Sabatier/Electrolysis (S/E) process is an attractive approach to in situ propellant production (ISPP), and a breadboard demonstration of this process at Lockheed Martin Astronautics funded by JPL performed very well, with high conversion efficiency, and reliable diurnal operation. There is a net usage of hydrogen in the S/E process, and this has been the principal problem for this approach to ISPP.

  12. Highly Stable and Active Catalyst for Sabatier Reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, Jianli; Brooks, Kriston P.

    2012-01-01

    Highly active Ru/TiO2 catalysts for Sabatier reaction have been developed. The catalysts have shown to be stable under repeated shutting down/startup conditions. When the Ru/TiO2 catalyst is coated on the engineered substrate Fe-CrAlY felt, activity enhancement is more than doubled when compared with an identically prepared engineered catalyst made from commercial Degussa catalyst. Also, bimetallic Ru-Rh/TiO2 catalysts show high activity at high throughput.

  13. Paul Dirac:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Laurie M.

    Paul Dirac was a brilliant and original thinker. He used his physical intuition and his ideal of mathematical beauty to construct bridges between major areas of physics. This article discusses several such important works, including the bridge between quantum mechanics and relativity that led to his prediction of the existence of antimatter.

  14. Paul Erdos

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monroe, Helen; Scott, Paul

    2004-01-01

    This article presents a brief biography of Paul Erdos, who focused on problem-solving, particularly in the areas of number theory, combinatorics and graph theory. During his life he had no property, no family and no fixed address. He buttered his first piece of bread at age 21. He never cooked, nor ever drove a car. Another mathematician, Ron…

  15. [A study of low temperature catalyst for Sabatier reaction].

    PubMed

    Ai, S K; Zhou, D; Sun, J B; Hou, W H; Zhou, K H

    2000-08-01

    Objective. To develop a low temperature catalyst for the Sabatier CO2 reduction of the atmospheric regeneration system and lower the start-up temperature of the Sabatier reaction. Method. A low temperature catalyst was designed from the considerations of the active composition, the choice of the carrier, the production method and condition of the catalyst. Then the performance of the newly developed low temperature catalyst was tested. Result. A new low temperature catalyst for the Sabatier reaction using Ru as the active composition and using r-Al2O3 as the carrier was developed. The start-up temperature was lower than 110 degrees C and the start-up time was 8 min; The conversion efficiency of the lean component (H2 or CO2) was over 95 percent when the temperature of the reactor was from 200 degrees C to 300 degrees C; The reaction product water was nearly colorless, transparent and neutral. Conclusion. The test results showed that the goals of the design are achieved and it is worthwhile to make further studies on the low temperature catalyst. PMID:11892751

  16. Compact and Lightweight Sabatier Reactor for Carbon Dioxide Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Junaedi, Christian; Hawley, Kyle; Walsh, Dennis; Roychoudhury, Subir; Abney, Morgan B.; Perry, Jay L.

    2011-01-01

    The utilization of CO2 to produce life support consumables, such as O2 and H2O, via the Sabatier reaction is an important aspect of NASA s cabin Atmosphere Revitalization System and In-Situ Resource Utilization architectures for both low-earth orbit and long-term manned space missions. In the current International Space Station (ISS) and other low orbit missions, metabolically-generated CO2 is removed from the cabin air and vented into space, resulting in a net loss of O2. This requires a continuous resupply of O2 via water electrolysis, and thus highlights the need for large water storage capacity. For long-duration space missions, the amount of life support consumables is limited and resupply options are practically nonexistent, thus atmosphere resource management and recycle becomes crucial to significantly reduce necessary O2 and H2O storage. Additionally, the potential use of the Martian CO2-rich atmosphere and Lunar regolith to generate life support consumables and propellant fuels is of interest to NASA. Precision Combustion, Inc. (PCI) has developed a compact, lightweight Microlith(Registered TradeMark)-based Sabatier (CO2 methanation) reactor which demonstrates the capability of achieving high CO2 conversion and near 100% CH4 selectivity at space velocities of 30,000-60,000 hr-1. The combination of the Microlith(Registered TradeMark) substrates and durable, novel catalyst coating permitted efficient Sabatier reactor operation that favors high reactant conversion, high selectivity, and long-term durability. This paper presents the reactor development and performance results at various operating conditions. Additionally, results from 100-hr durability tests and mechanical vibration tests are discussed.

  17. A study of Sabatier reactor operation in zero 'G'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forsythe, R. K.; Verostko, C. E.; Cusick, R. J.; Blakely, R. L.

    1984-01-01

    The results of zero-g computer model simulation of the operation of a Sabatier reactor, which relies on the effects of buoyant forces, are presented. The reactor was also operated in an experiment with inlet flow rates of carbon dioxide that correspond to continuous operation of the reactor at three, five, eight, and ten-man loading conditions; the three and five-man conditions are noted to be within the design capabilities of the reactor. The loss of carbon dioxide conversion predicted by the model for zero-g environment is noted to be substantial, ranging from 12 to 18.2 percent for five-man to ten-man loading. The simulated normal-gravity values are within 0.9 percent of the experimental conversions. Finally, the results indicate a much hotter operation of the reactor in zero-g due to the loss of natural convective cooling effect.

  18. Space station prototype Sabatier reactor design verification testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cusick, R. J.

    1974-01-01

    A six-man, flight prototype carbon dioxide reduction subsystem for the SSP ETC/LSS (Space Station Prototype Environmental/Thermal Control and Life Support System) was developed and fabricated for the NASA-Johnson Space Center between February 1971 and October 1973. Component design verification testing was conducted on the Sabatier reactor covering design and off-design conditions as part of this development program. The reactor was designed to convert a minimum of 98 per cent hydrogen to water and methane for both six-man and two-man reactant flow conditions. Important design features of the reactor and test conditions are described. Reactor test results are presented that show design goals were achieved and off-design performance was stable.

  19. A study of the Sabatier-methanation reaction kinetics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verostko, C. E.; Forsythe, R. K.

    1974-01-01

    The kinetics of the Sabatier methanation reaction, the reduction of carbon dioxide with hydrogen to methane and water, was investigated for 58 percent nickel on kieselguhr catalyst and 20 percent ruthenium on alumina catalyst. Differential rate data from an experimental program were correlated with a power function rate equation both for forward and reverse reactions. The kinetic parameters of activation energy, frequency rate constant and reaction order were determined for the rate equation. The values of these parameters were obtained from an Arrhenius plot of the experimental differential rate data. Also the carbon monoxide side reaction effect was measured and included in the correlation of parameters. The reaction was found to fit the rate equation experimentally within the temperature range 421 K, where the reaction effectively begins, the 800 K where the reaction rate drops and departs from the rate equation form.

  20. Development of a preprototype sabatier CO2 reduction subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleiner, G. N.; Birbara, P.

    1980-01-01

    A preoprototype Sabatier CO2 Reduction Subsystem was successfully designed, fabricated and tested. The lightweight, quick starting reactor utilizes a highly active and physically durable methanation catalyst composed of ruthenium on alumina. The use of this improved catalyst permits a single straight through plug flow design with an average lean component H2/CO2 conversion efficiency of over 99% over a range of H2/CO2 molar ratios of 1.8 to 5 while operating with flows equivalent to a crew size of one person steadystate to 3 persons cyclical (equivalent to 5 persons steady state). The reactor requires no heater operation after start-up even during simulated 55 minute lightside/39 minute darkside orbital operation over the above range of molar ratios and crew loadings. The subsystem's operation and performance is controlled by a microprocessor and displayed on a nineteen inch multi-colored cathode ray tube.

  1. Development of an advanced Sabatier CO2 reduction subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleiner, G. N.; Cusick, R. J.

    1981-01-01

    A preprototype Sabatier CO2 reduction subsystem was successfully designed, fabricated and tested. The lightweight, quick starting (less than 5 minutes) reactor utlizes a highly active and physically durable methanation catalyst composed of ruthenium on alumina. The use of this improved catalyst permits a simple, passively controlled reactor design with an average lean component H2/CO2 conversion efficiency of over 99% over a range of H2/CO2 molar ratios of 1.8 to 5 while operating with process flows equivalent to a crew size of up to five persons. The subsystem requires no heater operation after start-up even during simulated 55 minute lightside/39 minute darkside orbital operation.

  2. The Pedagogy of Paul

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Judd, Frank F., Jr.; Hilton, John

    2014-01-01

    In addition to being a remarkable theologian, there can be no doubt that Paul was a skilled teacher. In this article we highlight connections between Paul's pedagogy and educational principles that are currently propounded. Religious educators today can follow Paul's pedagogy as they teach by example, know their audiences, redirect…

  3. Sabatier Carbon Dioxide Reduction Assembly Development for Closed Loop Water Recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Frederick; Perry, Jay; Murdoch, Karen; Goldblatt, Loel

    2004-01-01

    The Sabatier Carbon Dioxide Reduction System (CRA) offers water recovery on a long duration space mission to reduce water resupply. Currently, NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC), NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), Hamilton Sundstrand Space Systems International, Inc. (HSSSI), and Southwest Research Institute (SWRI) are working together to develop a Sabatier CRA for the International Space Station (ISS). This effort is being funded by the Office of Biological and Physical Research (Code U)/Advanced Life Support program which is administered by NASA JSC. The Sabatier CRA is the next step in closing the oxygen life support loop on future space missions. The Sabatier reaction combines the waste carbon dioxide (recovered from crew metabolism) with waste hydrogen (a byproduct of electrolysis to produce oxygen) to produce water and methane (CH4). On ISS, the methane would be vented overboard, however the methane can be utilized for propulsion during a planetary exploration mission. Based on a crew size of 7-equivalent people, the Sabatier CRA can produce as much a 2000 lb/year water. Use of the Sabatier CRA will significantly reduce the amount of water that needs to be resupplied to the ISS on a yearly basis, at a tremendous cost saving to the program. Additionally, by recycling this additional water, the Sabatier CRA enables additional launch capacity for science experiments to be brought up to the ISS. The NASA/Industry team noted above has been working to reduce technical risks associated with the Sabatier CRA system. To date the technical risks have been considerably reduced, bringing the Technology Readiness Level (TRL) from TRL 4 to TRL 5/6. In doing so, the team has developed the system schematic, system models, control scheme, produced engineering development unit (EDU) hardware, performed limited integration testing of the EDU's and verified system modeling through testing. Additionally, the system schematic has been evaluated for failure modes and hazards and had a successful technical review by the NASA Safety Board. The current focus is now related to development of the water/methane phase separator, liquid sensor and CO2 compressor piston seal life. The overall goal of the current effort is to bring the system up to a TRL6 by the end of GFY04. Although the Sabatier CRA is not currently baselined for use on the ISS, its benefits are significant enough such that volume within the Oxygen Generation System rack has been reserved for future installation. The value of the water the CRA recover will allow NASA the additional crew time and payload needed to pursue its mission of scientific research.

  4. [An experimental study of the Sabatier CO2 reduction subsytem for space station].

    PubMed

    Li, J; Ai, S K; Zhou, K H

    1999-04-01

    Objective. To develop and fabricate a prototype Sabatier CO2 reduction subsystem for long duration manned space missions. Method. The rationale, equipment and function of the Sabatier CO2 reduction subsystem were introduced. Groundbased experiments with CO2 flows equivalent to a crewsize of 3 persons were conducted to verify the operation performance of the prototype. Result. The start-up temperature is less than 165 degrees C when the start-up time is 14 min; the lean component H2/CO2 conversion efficiency is over 95 percent when H2/CO2 molar ratios is 1.9-5.0; The water produced is nearly colorless and neutral. Conclusion. The prototype Sabatier CO2 reduction subsystem is simple in operation and the test results showed that design goals were achieved. PMID:12430539

  5. Analyses of the Integration of Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly, Compressor, Accumulator and Sabatier Carbon Dioxide Reduction Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeng, Frank F.; Lafuse, Sharon; Smith, Frederick D.; Lu, Sao-Dung; Knox, James C.; Campbell, Mellssa L.; Scull, Timothy D.; Green Steve

    2010-01-01

    A tool has been developed by the Sabatier Team for analyzing/optimizing CO2 removal assembly, CO2 compressor size, its operation logic, water generation from Sabatier, utilization of CO2 from crew metabolic output, and Hz from oxygen generation assembly. Tests had been conducted using CDRA/Simulation compressor set-up at MSFC in 2003. Analysis of test data has validated CO2 desorption rate profile, CO2 compressor performance, CO2 recovery and CO2 vacuum vent in CDRA desorption. Optimizing the compressor size and compressor operation logic for an integrated closed air revitalization system Is being conducted by the Sabatier Team.

  6. Methanation of carbon dioxide by hydrogen reduction using the Sabatier process in microchannel reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, Kriston P.; Hu, Jianli; Zhu, Huayang; Kee, Robert

    2007-02-01

    This paper describes the development of a microchannel-based Sabatier reactor for applications such as propellant production on Mars or space habitat air revitalization. Microchannel designs offer advantages for a compact reactor with excellent thermal control. This paper discusses the development of a Ru-TiO2 based catalyst using powdered form and its application and testing in a microchannel reactor. The resultant catalyst and microchannel reactor demonstrates good conversion, selectivity, and longevity in a compact device. A chemically reacting flow model is used to assist experimental interpretation and to suggest microchannel design approaches. A kinetic rate expression for the global Sabatier reaction is developed and validated using computational models to interpret packed-bed experiments with catalysts in powder form. The resulting global reaction is then incorporated into a reactive plug-flow model that considers flow within a microchannel reactor.

  7. Paul Adrien Maurice Dirac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kursunoglu, Behram N.; Wigner, Eugene Paul

    1990-04-01

    Portrait R. Feyman; List of contributors; A memorial to P. A. M. Dirac B. N. Kursunoglu; Preface B. N. Kursunoglu and E. P. Wigner; Chronology; Part I. Human Side: 1. Thinking of my darling Paul M. Dirac; 2. Dirac in coral gables S. A. Kursunoglu; 3. Recollections of Paul Dirac at Florida State University J. E. Lannutti; 4. My association with Professor Dirac Harish-Chandra; 5. What Paul Dirac meant in my life N. Kemmer; 6. Dirac's way R. Peierls; 7. An experimenter's view of P. A. M. Dirac A. D. Krisch; 8. Dirac at the University of Miami H. K. Stanford; 9. Remembering Paul Dirac E. P. Wigner; Part II. More Scientific Ideas: 10. Another side to Paul Dirac R. H. Dalitz; 11. Playing with equations, the Dirac way A. Pais; 12. Paul Dirac and Werner Heisenberg - a partnership in science L. M. Brown and H. Rechenberg; 13. Dirac's magnetic monopole and the fine structure constant W. J. Marciano and M. Goldhaber; 14. Magnetic monopoles and the halos of galaxies F. Hoyle; 15. The inadequacies of quantum field theory P. A. M. Dirac; 16. Dirac and the foundation of quantum mechanics P. T. Matthews; Part III. Influenced and Inspired by Association: 17. At the feet of Dirac J. C. Polkinghorne; 18. Reminiscences of Paul Dirac N. Mott; 19. From relativistic quantum theory to the human brain H. J. Lipkin; 20. Dirac in 1962, weak and gravitational radiation interactions J. Weber; 21. Schrödinger's cat W. E. Lamb, Jr.; 22. Dirac and finite field theories A. Salam; 23. Dirac's influence on unified field theory B. N. Kursunoglu; Index.

  8. Increased Oxygen Recovery from Sabatier Systems Using Plasma Pyrolysis Technology and Metal Hydride Separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenwood, Zachary W.; Abney, Morgan B.; Perry, Jay L.; Miller, Lee A.; Dahl, Roger W.; Hadley, Neal M.; Wambolt, Spencer R.; Wheeler, Richard R.

    2015-01-01

    State-of-the-art life support carbon dioxide (CO2) reduction technology is based on the Sabatier reaction where less than 50% of the oxygen required for the crew is recovered from metabolic CO2. The reaction produces water as the primary product and methane as a byproduct. Oxygen recovery is constrained by the limited availability of reactant hydrogen. This is further exacerbated when Sabatier methane (CH4) is vented as a waste product resulting in a continuous loss of reactant hydrogen. Post-processing methane with the Plasma Pyrolysis Assembly (PPA) to recover hydrogen has the potential to dramatically increase oxygen recovery and thus drastically reduce the logistical challenges associated with oxygen resupply. The PPA decomposes methane into predominantly hydrogen and acetylene. Due to the highly unstable nature of acetylene, a separation system is necessary to purify hydrogen before it is recycled back to the Sabatier reactor. Testing and evaluation of a full-scale Third Generation PPA is reported and investigations into metal hydride hydrogen separation technology is discussed.

  9. CO2 Reduction Assembly Prototype Using Microlith-Based Sabatier Reactor for Ground Demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Junaedi, Christian; Hawley, Kyle; Walsh, Dennis; Roychoudhury, Subir; Abney, Morgan B.; Perry, Jay L.

    2014-01-01

    The utilization of CO2 to produce life support consumables, such as O2 and H2O, via the Sabatier reaction is an important aspect of NASA's cabin Atmosphere Revitalization System (ARS) and In-Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) architectures for both low-earth orbit and long-term manned space missions. Carbon dioxide can be reacted with H2, obtained from the electrolysis of water, via Sabatier reaction to produce methane and H2O. Methane can be stored and utilized as propellant while H2O can be either stored or electrolyzed to produce oxygen and regain the hydrogen atoms. Depending on the application, O2 can be used to replenish the atmosphere in human-crewed missions or as an oxidant for robotic and return missions. Precision Combustion, Inc. (PCI), with support from NASA, has previously developed an efficient and compact Sabatier reactor based on its Microlith® catalytic technology and demonstrated the capability to achieve high CO2 conversion and CH4 selectivity (i.e., =90% of the thermodynamic equilibrium values) at high space velocities and low operating temperatures. This was made possible through the use of high-heat-transfer and high-surface-area Microlith catalytic substrates. Using this Sabatier reactor, PCI designed, developed, and demonstrated a stand-alone CO2 Reduction Assembly (CRA) test system for ground demonstration and performance validation. The Sabatier reactor was integrated with the necessary balance-of-plant components and controls system, allowing an automated, single "push-button" start-up and shutdown. Additionally, the versatility of the test system prototype was demonstrated by operating it under H2-rich (H2/CO2 of >4), stoichiometric (ratio of 4), and CO2-rich conditions (ratio of <4) without affecting its performance and meeting the equilibrium-predicted water recovery rates. In this paper, the development of the CRA test system for ground demonstration will be discussed. Additionally, the performance results from testing the system at various operating conditions and the results from durability testing will be presented.

  10. Colloquy to Paul Musset

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2011-04-25

    En honneur de Paul Musset il a été décidé de faire plutôt un colloque scientifique à la place d'une cérémonie. Plusieurs personnes temoignent de leurs estime et amitié pour ce physicien et ses activités

  11. Paul Vallas for Sale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dessoff, Alan

    2012-01-01

    Veteran Superintendent Paul Vallas, who has led turnaround efforts in major urban districts in Chicago, Philadelphia and New Orleans, has started a new venture that he expects will broaden his reach and extend the reform movement. The Vallas Group, headed by Vallas, now interim superintendent of the Bridgeport (Connecticut) Public Schools, is…

  12. Paul Piccone: Outside Academe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacoby, Russell

    2008-01-01

    Today the academic world--open to Jews, women, and other previously excluded groups--has been completely revamped. Or has it? Despite the changes, is it possible the institution still promotes the mediocre and demotes the extraordinary? The life and work of Paul Piccone bear on this question--and others. Piccone, who died of cancer in 2004 at 64,…

  13. Rotating Saddle Paul Trap.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rueckner, Wolfgang; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Describes a demonstration in which a ball is placed in an unstable position on a saddle shape. The ball becomes stable when it is rotated above some threshold angular velocity. The demonstration is a mechanical analog of confining a particle in a "Paul Trap". (DDR)

  14. André Saint-Marc 1944-1988

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reme, H.; Anderson, K. A.

    Andr ?aint-Marc, professor at the Institute of Technology of the Universite Paul Sabatier (IUT), in Toulouse, France, died suddenly and unexpectedly February 17, 1988, a few months before his 44th birthday.Saint-Marc carried out a research career in cosmic rays and space plasma physics beginning in 1969 at the Centre d'Etude Spatiale des Rayonnements (CESR), a laboratory of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) and the Université Paul Sabatier. He was born in Condegaygues, France (Lotet-Garonne). His four university degrees were awarded by the Universite Paul Sabatier. His Thèse de Docteur de Specialité was earned in 1973 for work on propagation of auroral X rays in Earth's atmosphere. The highest degree, the Doctorat d'Etat, came in 1979 for his studies of beam-plasma interactions in the ionosphere.

  15. Integrated Testing of a 4-Bed Molecular Sieve, Air-Cooled Temperature Swing Adsorption Compressor, and Sabatier Engineering Development Unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knox, James C.; Miller, Lee; Campbell, Melissa; Mulloth, Lila; Varghese, Mini

    2006-01-01

    Accumulation and subsequent compression of carbon dioxide that is removed from the space cabin are two important processes involved in a closed-loop air revitalization scheme of the International Space Station (ISS). The 4-Bed Molecular Sieve (4BMS) of ISS currently operates in an open loop mode without a compressor. The Sabatier Engineering Development Unit (EDU) processes waste CO2 to provide water to the crew. This paper reports the integrated 4BMS, air-cooled Temperature Swing Adsorption Compressor (TSAC), and Sabatier EDU testing. The TSAC prototype was developed at NASA Ames Research Center (ARC). The 4BMS was modified to a functionally flight-like condition at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). Testing was conducted at MSFC. The paper provides details of the TSAC operation at various CO2 loadings and corresponding performance of the 4BMS and Sabatier.

  16. In-Situ Propellant Production on Mars: A Sabatier/Electrolysis Demonstration Plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, David L.

    1997-01-01

    An efficient, reliable propellant production plant has been developed for use on Mars. Using a Sabatier reactor in conjunction with a water electrolysis system, a complete demonstration plant has produced methane and liquid oxygen from simulated Martian atmosphere. The production plant has demonstrated high efficiency, extended duration production and autonomous operations. This paper presents the results and conclusions relating to eventual use in a Mars sample return mission. This work was funded by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). The production plant was built and tested at the Propulsion Center of Lockheed Martin at the Denver Colorado facility.

  17. Sir Paul Nurse.

    PubMed

    Birmingham, K

    2001-11-01

    Prizes in science don't come any bigger than the Nobels, and more often than not this award catapults its recipients from the general research milieu into the realms of scientific stardom. In this, its centenary year, the Nobel committee for Physiology or Medicine decided to honor investigators who have identified vital components of the cell cycle. Nature Medicine talked to one of the winners, Sir Paul Nurse. PMID:11689871

  18. The Sabatier Principle Illustrated by Catalytic H[subscript2]O[subscript2] Decomposition on Metal Surfaces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laursen, Anders B.; Man, Isabela Costinela; Trinhammer, Ole L.; Rossmeisl, Jan; Dahl, Soren

    2011-01-01

    Heterogeneous catalysis is important in today's industry. Hence, it is imperative to introduce students to this field and its tools. A new way of introducing one of these tools, the Sabatier principle, via a laboratory exercise is presented. A volcano plot is constructed for the well-known heterogeneous H[subscript2]O[subscript2] catalytic…

  19. The Sabatier Principle Illustrated by Catalytic H[subscript2]O[subscript2] Decomposition on Metal Surfaces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laursen, Anders B.; Man, Isabela Costinela; Trinhammer, Ole L.; Rossmeisl, Jan; Dahl, Soren

    2011-01-01

    Heterogeneous catalysis is important in today's industry. Hence, it is imperative to introduce students to this field and its tools. A new way of introducing one of these tools, the Sabatier principle, via a laboratory exercise is presented. A volcano plot is constructed for the well-known heterogeneous H[subscript2]O[subscript2] catalytic…

  20. Compact, Lightweight Adsorber and Sabatier Reactor for CO2 Capture and Reduction for Consumable and Propellant Production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Junaedi, Christian; Hawley, Kyle; Walsh, Dennis; Roychoudhury, Subir; Busby, Stacy A.; Abney, Morgan B.; Perry, Jay L.; Knox, James C.

    2012-01-01

    The utilization of CO2 to produce (or recycle) life support consumables, such as O2 and H2O, and to generate propellant fuels is an important aspect of NASA's concept for future, long duration planetary exploration. One potential approach is to capture and use CO2 from the Martian atmosphere to generate the consumables and propellant fuels. Precision Combustion, Inc. (PCI), with support from NASA, continues to develop its regenerable adsorber technology for capturing CO2 from gaseous atmospheres (for cabin atmosphere revitalization and in-situ resource utilization applications) and its Sabatier reactor for converting CO2 to methane and water. Both technologies are based on PCI's Microlith(R) substrates and have been demonstrated to reduce size, weight, and power consumption during CO2 capture and methanation process. For adsorber applications, the Microlith substrates offer a unique resistive heating capability that shows potential for short regeneration time and reduced power requirements compared to conventional systems. For the Sabatier applications, the combination of the Microlith substrates and durable catalyst coating permits efficient CO2 methanation that favors high reactant conversion, high selectivity, and durability. Results from performance testing at various operating conditions will be presented. An effort to optimize the Sabatier reactor and to develop a bench-top Sabatier Development Unit (SDU) will be discussed.

  1. In Conversation with Paul Richards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holman, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    Paul Richards is one of those individuals who make a difference and is as far from institutional as one can be. The author met up with him at the Learning Disability Today conference in London to talk more about his work and life. Paul coordinates the service user involvement across Southdown Housing Association, based in Sussex.

  2. Rotary Drum Separator and Pump for the Sabatier Carbon Dioxide Reduction System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holder, Don; Fort, James; Barone, Michael; Murdoch, Karen

    2005-01-01

    A trade study conducted in 2001 selected a rotary disk separator as the best candidate to meet the requirements for an International Space Station (ISS) Carbon Dioxide Reduction Assembly (CRA). The selected technology must provide micro-gravity gasfliquid separation and pump the liquid from 10 psia at the gasfliquid interface to 18 psia at the wastewater bus storage tank. The rotary disk concept, which has pedigree in other systems currently being built for installation on the ISS, failed to achieve the required pumping head within the allotted power. The separator discussed in this paper is a new design that was tested to determine compliance with performance requirements in the CRA. The drum separator and pump @SP) design is similar to the Oxygen Generator Assembly (OGA) Rotary Separator Accumulator (RSA) in that it has a rotating assembly inside a stationary housing driven by a integral internal motor. The innovation of the DSP is the drum shaped rotating assembly that acts as the accumulator and also pumps the liquid at much less power than its predecessors. In the CRA application, the separator will rotate at slow speed while accumulating water. Once full, the separator will increase speed to generate sufficient head to pump the water to the wastewater bus. A proof-of- concept (POC) separator has been designed, fabricated and tested to assess the separation efficiency and pumping head of the design. This proof-of-concept item was flown aboard the KC135 to evaluate the effectiveness of the separator in a microgravity environment. This separator design has exceeded all of the performance requirements. The next step in the separator development is to integrate it into the Sabatier Carbon Dioxide Reduction System. This will be done with the Sabatier Engineering Development Unit at the Johnson Space Center.

  3. Paul Gauguin in Brittany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asmus, John F.

    2009-07-01

    Ever since the dawn of the 20th Century there has been a universal consensus that Alphonse Mucha launched the sensation that became known as Art Nouveau. This event was associated with the appearance of his Gismonda poster promoting the Sarah Bernhardt play of that name in Paris in 1894. At an estate sale in 1954 a small collage bearing a likeness of Mucha's Gismonda was offered. It had been fabricated by gluing slivers cut from sixty postage stamps to a 20cm ceramic tile. Digital computer image enhancement was applied to the collage design, initials on a walking stick from the same estate collection, and the Mucha poster. These geometrical analyses revealed that the collage is more detailed than the Mucha "original". This led to our hypothesis that the famous poster was a hasty photographic plagiarism of the intricate ceramic-tile collage. Image analyses of the initials on the companion walking stick revealed conformity with the famous enigmatic "P GO" monogram of Paul Gauguin. We conclude that Gauguin rather than Mucha created the Gismonda composition. Historical evidence suggests that, while Gauguin was in Brittany recovering from injuries sustained in a fistfight, Annah la Javanese stole his possessions and took them to Paris where her next lover, Mucha, copied the collage and presented it as his original poster design.

  4. Dynamic biogas upgrading based on the Sabatier process: thermodynamic and dynamic process simulation.

    PubMed

    Jürgensen, Lars; Ehimen, Ehiaze Augustine; Born, Jens; Holm-Nielsen, Jens Bo

    2015-02-01

    This study aimed to investigate the feasibility of substitute natural gas (SNG) generation using biogas from anaerobic digestion and hydrogen from renewable energy systems. Using thermodynamic equilibrium analysis, kinetic reactor modeling and transient simulation, an integrated approach for the operation of a biogas-based Sabatier process was put forward, which was then verified using a lab scale heterogenous methanation reactor. The process simulation using a kinetic reactor model demonstrated the feasibility of the production of SNG at gas grid standards using a single reactor setup. The Wobbe index, CO2 content and calorific value were found to be controllable by the H2/CO2 ratio fed the methanation reactor. An optimal H2/CO2 ratio of 3.45-3.7 was seen to result in a product gas with high calorific value and Wobbe index. The dynamic reactor simulation verified that the process start-up was feasible within several minutes to facilitate surplus electricity use from renewable energy systems. PMID:25453430

  5. Sabatier Reactor System Integration with Microwave Plasma Methane Pyrolysis Post-Processor for Closed-Loop Hydrogen Recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abney, Morgan B.; Miller, Lee A.; Williams, Tom

    2010-01-01

    The Carbon Dioxide Reduction Assembly (CRA) designed and developed for the International Space Station (ISS) represents the state-of-the-art in carbon dioxide reduction (CDRe) technology. The CRA produces water and methane by reducing carbon dioxide with hydrogen via the Sabatier reaction. The water is recycled to the Oxygen Generation Assembly (OGA) and the methane is vented overboard resulting in a net loss of hydrogen. The proximity to earth and the relative ease of logistics resupply from earth allow for a semi-closed system on ISS. However, long-term manned space flight beyond low earth orbit (LEO) dictates a more thoroughly closed-loop system involving significantly higher recovery of hydrogen, and subsequent recovery of oxygen, to minimize costs associated with logistics resupply beyond LEO. The open-loop ISS system for CDRe can be made closed-loop for follow-on missions by further processing methane to recover hydrogen. For this purpose, a process technology has been developed that employs a microwave-generated plasma to reduce methane to hydrogen and acetylene resulting in 75% theoretical recovery of hydrogen. In 2009, a 1-man equivalent Plasma Pyrolysis Assembly (PPA) was delivered to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) for technical evaluation. The PPA has been integrated with a Sabatier Development Unit (SDU). The integrated process configuration incorporates a sorbent bed to eliminate residual carbon dioxide and water vapor in the Sabatier methane product stream before it enters the PPA. This paper provides detailed information on the stand-alone and integrated performance of both the PPA and SDU. Additionally, the integrated test stand design and anticipated future work are discussed.

  6. Alice Paul and the ERA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fry, Amelia R.

    1995-01-01

    Describes the work of Alice Paul in her 49-year struggle to pass the Equal Rights Amendment. Discusses the differences between her proposed language for the amendment, drafted in 1922, and what she considered the flawed language of the amendment that passed Congress in 1972. Includes a legislative chronology for the Equal Rights Amendment. (CFR)

  7. "Paul Revere's Ride": Awakening Abolitionists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lepore, Jill

    2011-01-01

    Henry Wadsworth Longfellow used to be both the best-known poet in the English-speaking world and the most beloved, adored by the learned and the lowly alike, read by everyone from Nathaniel Hawthorne and Abraham Lincoln to John Ruskin and Queen Victoria--and, just as avidly, by the queen's servants. "Paul Revere's Ride" is Longfellow's best-known…

  8. In Memoriam: Paul J. Lioy

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure Science has lost one of its founders and intellectual champions. Dr. Paul Lioy unexpectedly passed away on July 8, 2015 at the age of 68 years. The world has been left a far better place thanks to Dr. Lioy’s vision and creativity, enormous scientific contributions,...

  9. In Memoriam: Paul J. Lioy

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure Science has lost one of its founders and intellectual champions. Dr. Paul Lioy unexpectedly passed away on July 8, 2015 at the age of 68 years. The world has been left a far better place thanks to Dr. Lioy’s vision and creativity, enormous scientific contributions,...

  10. [Doctor and patient: Paul Flechsig and Daniel Paul Schreber].

    PubMed

    Steinberg, H; Carius, D

    2004-09-01

    During his three stays in psychiatric institutions between 1884 and 1911, Daniel Paul Schreber was also twice treated in the psychiatric and neurological hospital of Leipzig University headed by Paul Flechsig. In his "Memoirs of a Nervous Patient," Schreber also described the treatment he had received there, which in his perception seemed to be of crucial importance for his later fate. Research on the Schreber case in the last 25 years, based mainly on the interpretation of his own memoirs, supported the view that in fact Flechsig was to blame to a great extent for the outbreak of Schreber's paranoid schizophrenia in February 1894. This paper aims at forwarding exonerating arguments in favor of Flechsig, concluding that what he did did not differ distinctively from the standard tenets of organic psychiatry taught at that time. Of course this does not change the fact that Schreber did not receive the right kind of treatment. However, it puts Flechsig's approach into the right perspective. PMID:15338142

  11. [SS physician Johann Paul Kremer].

    PubMed

    Kucharski, J

    1998-01-01

    SS-Obersturmfuhrer Johann Paul Kremer (professor of anatomy of Munster University) in Auschwitz camp tested upon human bodies result in starvation. He carried out researches concerning liver illness (braune Atrophie). He had been a SS in Auschwitz since 30th August till 18th November 1942. During a process of Auschwitz-Birkenau SS crew he was sentenced to death 22nd December 1947 by National Tribunal in Cracow. Verdict was changed by The President of Polish Republic for life-annuity. Verdict revision in 1960 sentenced him for 10 years of prison. He died in 60's. PMID:11625645

  12. Paul Drude (1863-1906)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, D.

    2006-07-01

    In July 1906 the physics community in Germany was shocked by the sudden death of Paul Drude, one of the key figures of a flourishing field. At the age of almost 43 years he had reached the summit of his career, having just been promoted to Director of the Physics Institute in Berlin and member of the Prussian Academy of Sciences. In the course of his academic research Drude covered the observation of macroscopic phenomena as well as the understanding of microscopic processes; he developed advanced methods to acquire reliable experimental data but also unified mathematical descriptions; he covered thermodynamics and statistical physics as well as optics and transport theory. Being always well grounded in classical physics he was also one of the first modern physicists.

  13. Paul Macklin | Physical Sciences in Oncology

    Cancer.gov

    Paul Macklin is a mathematician at the University of Southern California and a member of the USC PS-OC. He develops mathematical and computer models that simulate cancer in individual patients. He explains how he goes about the process.

  14. Paul G. Silver (1948-2009)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomon, Sean C.

    2009-11-01

    A pioneer in the novel application of seismic observations to infer the flow field of Earth's mantle and the mechanics of fault zones, Paul Gordon Silver tragically was killed on 7 August in an automobile accident that also took the life of his 22-year-old daughter, Celine. Born and raised in Los Angeles, Calif., Paul received all of his degrees from the University of California. Following receipt of a B.A. in psychology from the University of California (UC), Los Angeles (1970), he pursued a career as a musician for several years. Drawn to Earth science, Paul obtained a B.A. in geology from UC Berkeley, in 1976, and he was recruited by Tom Jordan (now at the University of Southern California) to the graduate program of the Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego.

  15. Paul Painlevé and his contribution to science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisov, Alexey V.; Kudryashov, Nikolay A.

    2014-02-01

    The life and career of the great French mathematician and politician Paul Painlevé is described. His contribution to the analytical theory of nonlinear differential equations was significant. The paper outlines the achievements of Paul Painlevé and his students in the investigation of an interesting class of nonlinear second-order equations and new equations defining a completely new class of special functions, now called the Painlevé transcendents. The contribution of Paul Painlevé to the study of algebraic nonintegrability of the N-body problem, his remarkable observations in mechanics, in particular, paradoxes arising in the dynamics of systems with friction, his attempt to create the axiomatics of mechanics and his contribution to gravitation theory are discussed.

  16. Major Additions to the Linus Pauling Canon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davenport, Derek A.

    2002-08-01

    The National Library of Medicine has also just posted a Web site on Linus Pauling in its Profiles of Science series. While by no means as rich as the various Oregon State University sites, it is well worth visiting. There are texts of various speeches (including his Nobel address), many downloadable photographs, correspondence (including a poignant letter to James Watson and Francis Crick concerning their "rival" structures for DNA), and much else besides. There is a certain irony in Linus Pauling being honored by the National Library of Medicine. Ever since his 1949 presidential address to the American Chemical Society, and perhaps earlier, Pauling had been at loggerheads, sometimes acrimoniously so, with the medical establishment. It is easy to imagine him somewhere in the timeless infinitude of the empyrean sporting his characteristic ear-to-ear grin.

  17. 11. Photocopy of photograph (from St. Paul's Church) Photographer unknown ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Photocopy of photograph (from St. Paul's Church) Photographer unknown 1886 'EPISCOPAL CHURCH, CORNER OF 1ST AND J ST. BENICIA' WEST AND SOUTH SIDES - St. Paul's Episcopal Church, 120 East J Street, Benicia, Solano County, CA

  18. 58. Photographic copy of original construction plan (St. Paul Engineer's ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    58. Photographic copy of original construction plan (St. Paul Engineer's Office, Wabasha St. Bridge, Plan of Masonry, February 1899); south abutment - Wabasha Street Bridge, Spanning Mississippi River at Wabasha Street, Saint Paul, Ramsey County, MN

  19. 57. Photographic copy of original construction plan (St. Paul City ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    57. Photographic copy of original construction plan (St. Paul City Engineer's Office, Wabasha St. Bridge, Plan of Masonary, Pier 5, February 1899); fifth pier - Wabasha Street Bridge, Spanning Mississippi River at Wabasha Street, Saint Paul, Ramsey County, MN

  20. Classical Sax: Conversation with Paul Brodie.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Row, David W.

    1984-01-01

    Paul Brodie, the most recorded concert saxophonist in the history of the instrument, talks about a number of topics, including his career, differences among saxophonists, mixing styles of playing, the effectiveness of music schools, and whether it is necessary to understand the structure of the piece being played. (RM)

  1. Hermann Paul and General Linguistic Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koerner, E. F. K.

    2008-01-01

    In most history of linguistics textbooks available until today Hermann Paul and his "Principles of Historical Linguistics," first published in 1880 and still available in reprints of the fifth edition of 1920, if given any attention at all, is cited for a statement he included in the second edition of 1886 in response to a review that had argued…

  2. Paul Zindel: Flirting with the Bizarre.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winarski, Diana L.

    1994-01-01

    Profiles Paul Zindel, the best-selling author of childrens' and adolescents' novels who combines hyperbole and pathos in such works as "The Pigman;""My Darling, My Hamburger;" and "The Pigman and Me." Zindel is also the author of the play "The Effect of Gamma Rays on Man-in-the-Moon Marigolds." (MDM)

  3. Paul Goodman Redux: Education as Apprenticed Anarchism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holowchak, M. Andrew

    2010-01-01

    When talk of philosophy of pedagogy comes up today, it is common to hear the names of Aristotle, Thomas Jefferson, John Dewey, or Paulo Freire, but the name of Paul Goodman, who campaigned vigorously for pedagogical reform much of his life, is seldom mentioned. In spite of neglect of his work, Goodman had much to say on pedagogical practice that…

  4. Profiles in Research: Paul W. Holland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Dan

    2005-01-01

    In this article, the author interviews writer Dr. Paul Holland. After receiving his B.A. in mathematics in 1962, he attended graduate school at Stanford, receiving his Ph.D. in Statistics in 1966. He served as President of the Psychometric Society in 1989; received the E. F. Lindquist Award in 2000 from AERA and ACT; was designated a National…

  5. Line Designs Inspired by Paul Klee

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blanchette, Lisa

    2009-01-01

    In this lesson, students learn about line, shape, color, mixed media and abstraction, while being introduced to Swiss artist, Paul Klee (1879-1940). This lesson works well with a variety of age levels and abilities and could also be used to teach analogous or triad color schemes.

  6. Speaking Personally--With Paul Avon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, D'Arcy

    2012-01-01

    This article presents an interview with Paul Avon, the former executive director of the Canadian Virtual College Consortium. Avon has spent over fifteen years in the distance learning (DL) field managing the production and delivery of online learning at TVOntario, Humber College, the Sri Lankan National Online Distance Education Service, and the…

  7. Profiles in Research: Paul W. Holland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Dan

    2005-01-01

    In this article, the author interviews writer Dr. Paul Holland. After receiving his B.A. in mathematics in 1962, he attended graduate school at Stanford, receiving his Ph.D. in Statistics in 1966. He served as President of the Psychometric Society in 1989; received the E. F. Lindquist Award in 2000 from AERA and ACT; was designated a National…

  8. Paul Dirac:. Building Bridges of the Mind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Laurie M.

    2003-12-01

    Paul Dirac was a brilliant and original thinker. He used his physical intuition and his ideal of mathematical beauty to construct bridges between major areas of physics. This article discusses several such important works, including the bridge between quantum mechanics and relativity that led to his prediction of the existence of antimatter.

  9. Developing Outdoor Leaders: Paul Petzoldt's Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagstaff, Mark; Cashel, Christine

    Paul Petzoldt, an early pioneer in outdoor education, saw the need for trained outdoor leaders. This paper presents material from unpublished papers retrieved after his death that clarify and expand on his philosophy of leadership development. Key ideas such as: judgment, 20-20 vision, and use of wilderness expeditions, are expanded upon and…

  10. John Paul College: The Professional Renewal Journey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mundie, Pauline; Marr, Robert

    2014-01-01

    John Paul College, a K-12 School in Queensland, Australia, recognises the centrality of classroom teachers to the ongoing improvement of student outcomes. The College has implemented a multi-tiered "professional renewal and assessment process." These changes of emphasis are the result of significant research and subsequent/associated…

  11. Speaking Personally--With Paul Avon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, D'Arcy

    2012-01-01

    This article presents an interview with Paul Avon, the former executive director of the Canadian Virtual College Consortium. Avon has spent over fifteen years in the distance learning (DL) field managing the production and delivery of online learning at TVOntario, Humber College, the Sri Lankan National Online Distance Education Service, and the…

  12. Paul W. Clement (1939-2014).

    PubMed

    Prater, Jeffrey S

    2015-12-01

    Paul W. Clement was American psychology's quintessential "Renaissance Man." He was an archetypal scientist-practitioner, ever in the forefront of advancing psychology as a science, as a means of promoting human welfare and as a profession. His pioneering work in creating The Psychological Center at Fuller Seminary's Graduate School of Psychology, a comprehensive community clinic serving people across the life span and addressing the full range of severity in problems of living, was recognized in the American Psychologist as one of the two best examples in the country of how psychological services can be delivered to benefit the public. And his series of seminal papers summarizing client outcomes from nearly 50 years of independent practice sounded the trumpet for psychologists in independent practice to publish studies to help establish practice-based evidence on the effectiveness of psychotherapy. Paul died on March 24, 2014, at the age of 75. To recognize his groundbreaking vision and devotion to mentoring others in the scientist-professional model, the Paul W. Clement, PhD, Scholarship Fund has been established to support a student scholarship at Fuller Seminary's Graduate School of Psychology. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26653319

  13. Obituary: Paul Barr, 1955-2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parmar, Arvind

    2007-12-01

    Paul Barr, an extragalactic astronomer and spacecraft mission planner, died on 19 October 2005 at his home in Noordwijk, the Netherlands, at the age of 50. Although his scientific interests ranged from AGN to X-ray binaries, he will perhaps best be remembered for his mission planning skills on EXOSAT, ISO, and Integral. Many hundreds of observers have benefited from his ability to juggle seemingly impossible observing constraints and arrive at the optimum observing program. A rare talent. Barr was born in Sunderland, England, on 28 July 1995. After attending Saint Aidans Grammar School, where his father was the headmaster, he obtained his Bachelors Degree in astronomy from the University of London (June 1976) before moving to the Mullard Space Science Laboratory. There he obtained his Doctorate in X-ray astronomy in February 1980, using data from the Ariel V and Copernicus satellites. After a Post-Doctoral position at London University, where he did research into ultra-violet emission from AGN and X-ray binaries using IUE, Paul joined ESA in 1983. He worked on a wide range of missions including EXOSAT, ISO, and Integral. These observatories spanned the wavelength range from the Infra-red to the gamma-ray, giving insight into Paul's flexibility and ability to contribute in many areas. On ISO, Paul oversaw the scientific development and use of the very successful observation scheduling system — this topic became his specialty. As ISO operations became routine, he took up the challenge of space-borne gamma-ray astronomy and moved in 1997 to Integral where he worked in the Science Operation Centre (ISOC), at ESTEC in the Netherlands, as senior mission planner. He worked with the gamma-ray imager (IBIS) instrument team to ensure that operations of their instrument were properly supported by ESA and supported preparations of announcements of opportunity. In early 2005 the ISOC moved to Europe's Space Astronomy Centre (ESAC) just outside Madrid, Spain. Paul, however, decided to stay put physically, but move on scientifically, and transferred to the Ulysses mission where he joined the software development team. We miss a uniquely flexible scientist in these days of increasing specialization and a colleague with an infectious enthusiasm for all things to do with Sunderland, especially the football club.

  14. Microfabricated linear Paul-Straubel ion trap

    DOEpatents

    Mangan, Michael A.; Blain, Matthew G.; Tigges, Chris P.; Linker, Kevin L.

    2011-04-19

    An array of microfabricated linear Paul-Straubel ion traps can be used for mass spectrometric applications. Each ion trap comprises two parallel inner RF electrodes and two parallel outer DC control electrodes symmetric about a central trap axis and suspended over an opening in a substrate. Neighboring ion traps in the array can share a common outer DC control electrode. The ions confined transversely by an RF quadrupole electric field potential well on the ion trap axis. The array can trap a wide array of ions.

  15. The posthumous impact of Paul Drude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardona, M.; Marx, W.

    2006-07-01

    In this study the long-term impact of the works of Paul Drude has been analyzed by bibliometric methods. His overall citation impact and rank within the pre-1910 authors in chemistry and physics has been determined. The time-dependent number of mentions of his name, the overall citation impact and the citation numbers of single articles and books have been investigated. The impact time curves of his most frequently cited articles and books are presented and discussed. The scientific contributions of the most influential Drude works for solid state physics are analyzed, in particular their impact on recent research.

  16. 5. Historic American Buildings Survey Paul J. F. Schumacher, Photographer ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Historic American Buildings Survey Paul J. F. Schumacher, Photographer September 1957 FRONT and WEST SIDE ELEVATIONS - Sacred Heart Mission, Interstate 90 & Interchange 39, Cataldo, Shoshone County, ID

  17. Paul A. Witherspoon (1919-2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeze, R. Allan; Javandel, Iraj; Neuman, Shlomo P.

    2012-07-01

    The hydrologic community lost one of its most charismatic leaders with the death of Paul Witherspoon on 10 February 2012, in Berkeley, Calif. He passed away from complications brought on by his long battle with Parkinson's disease. He was 93. Paul was a dynamic and influential research leader in hydrogeology for more than 50 years. Working from his base at the University of California, Berkeley (UC Berkeley), and later from the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), he made significant contributions to the understanding of the flow of fluids in porous media and fractured rock, and he applied his findings to a diverse set of societally important issues, including the development of geothermal energy, use of underground gas storage, and siting and design of nuclear waste disposal facilities. In all these spheres of interest he emphasized the need to marry theoretical studies and field testing. He was especially passionate about the need for large-scale, in situ, underground experiments to guide and corroborate the predictions of theoretically based numerical models.

  18. 78 FR 73857 - Brown, Paul H.; Notice of Filing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-09

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Brown, Paul H.; Notice of Filing Take notice that on November 27, 2013, Paul H. Brown submitted for filing, an application for authority to hold interlocking positions,...

  19. Practitioner Meets Philosopher: Bakhtinian Musings on Learning with Paul

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnsson, Mary Chen

    2013-01-01

    The stars and the planets must have been in alignment when Paul Hager needed a doctoral student to work on his research grant at the same time that I had transitioned from 20 years as business practitioner to become an educator interested in workplace learning. This paper explores the Bakhtinian ways in which I learned about learning with Paul

  20. 56. Photographic copy of original construction plan (St. Paul City ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    56. Photographic copy of original construction plan (St. Paul City Engineer's Office, Wabasha St. Bridge, Plan of Masonary, Piers 4 and 6, February 1899); fourth and sixth piers - Wabasha Street Bridge, Spanning Mississippi River at Wabasha Street, Saint Paul, Ramsey County, MN

  1. Charged nanodiamonds in a Paul trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streed, Erik

    2015-05-01

    Colloidal nanodiamonds were ionized with atmospheric electrospray and loaded into a Paul trap. Fluorescence from atom-like NV0 and NV- colour centres has been observed. The very low intrinsic absorption of bulk diamond is favourable for reducing the heating of cooled, trapped, nanodiamond ions from the surrounding blackbody radiation of the trapping apparatus. The isolated environment of the ion trap is also favourable for in-situ modification of nanodiamond to reduce absorption inducing defects through either physical or chemical processes. The presence or intentional introduction of high luminescence atom-like colour centre defects such as NV or SiV offer the prospect of direct laser cooling in nanodiamonds with low emissivity. Such laser cooled nano-ions are of interest for sympathetically cooling ions of similar charge/mass ratios that lack closed optical transitions, such as large biomolecules. ARC Future Fellow.

  2. Paul Revere Osler: the other child

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Sir William Osler (1849–1919) is among the most honored and esteemed physicians of our time. His life, and that of his wife Grace Revere Osler (1854–1928), has been examined in great detail by historians and biographers and continues to be the subject of intensive scrutiny. Their son “Revere” (Edward Revere Osler) (1895–1917), who died in the Great War, is often mistakenly referred to as their only child. Grace had two previous pregnancies, having given birth to Paul Revere Osler, who lived but a week, early in their marriage in 1893 and to a stillborn infant during her first marriage to Dr. Samuel W. Gross in 1877. Information regarding these two events is often ill defined, cursory, or incorrect. New research provides further knowledge of these events and their impact, giving a fuller understanding and a more lucid historiography of the Oslers. PMID:25552789

  3. STS-111 Crew Interviews: Paul Lockhart, Pilot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-04-01

    STS-111 Pilot Paul Lockhart is seen during this preflight interview, where he gives a quick overview of the mission before answering questions about his inspiration to become an astronaut and his career path. He discusses the following mission goals: the crew transfer activities (the Expedition 5 crew is replacing the Expedition 4 crew on the International Space Station (ISS)), the delivery of the payloads which includes the Mobile Remote Servicer Base System (MBS), and the planned extravehicular activities (EVAs) which include attaching the MBS to the ISS and repairing the station's robot arm. He describes in-flight procedures for launch, reentry and docking with the ISS. He ends with his thoughts on the role of international cooperation in building and maintaining ISS.

  4. Influence of Oxygenated Compounds on Reaction Products in a Microwave Plasma Methane Pyrolysis Assembly for Post-Processing of Sabatier Methane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mansell, J. Matthew; Abney, Morgan B.

    2012-01-01

    The state-of-the-art Carbon Dioxide Reduction Assembly (CRA) was delivered to the International Space Station (ISS) in April 2010. The system is designed to accept carbon dioxide from the Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly and hydrogen from the Oxygen Generation Assembly. The two gases are reacted in the CRA in a Sabatier reactor to produce water and methane. Venting of methane results in an oxygen resupply requirement of about 378 lbs per crew member per year. If the oxygen is supplied as water, the total weight for resupply is about 476 lb per crew member per year. For long-term missions beyond low Earth orbit, during which resupply capabilities will be further limited, recovery of hydrogen from methane is highly desirable. For this purpose, NASA is pursuing development of a Plasma Pyrolysis Assembly (PPA) capable of recovering hydrogen from methane. Under certain conditions, water vapor and carbon dioxide (nominally intended to be separated from the CRA outlet stream) may be present in the PPA feed stream. Thus, testing was conducted in 2010 to determine the effect of these oxygenated compounds on PPA performance, particularly the effect of inlet carbon dioxide and water variations on the PPA product stream. This paper discusses the test set-up, analysis, and results of this testing.

  5. Influence of Oxygenated Compounds on Reaction Products in a Microwave Plasma Methane Pyrolysis Assembly for Post-Processing of Sabatier Methane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mansell, J. Matthew; Abney, Morgan B.; Miller, Lee A.

    2011-01-01

    The state-of-the-art Carbon Dioxide Reduction Assembly (CRA) was delivered to the International Space Station (ISS) in April 2010. The system is designed to accept carbon dioxide from the Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly and hydrogen from the Oxygen Generation Assembly. The two gases are reacted in the CRA in a Sabatier reactor to produce water and methane. Venting of methane results in an oxygen resupply requirement of about 378 lbs per crew member per year. If the oxygen is supplied as water, the total weight for resupply is about 476 lb per crew member per year. For long-term missions beyond low Earth orbit, during which resupply capabilities will be further limited, recovery of hydrogen from methane is highly desirable. For this purpose, NASA is pursuing development of a Plasma Pyrolysis Assembly (PPA) capable of recovering hydrogen from methane. Under certain conditions, water vapor and carbon dioxide (nominally intended to be separated from the CRA outlet stream) may be present in the PPA feed stream. Thus, testing was conducted in 2010 to determine the effect of these "oxygenated" compounds on PPA performance, particularly the effect of inlet carbon dioxide and water variations on the PPA product stream. This paper discusses the test set-up, analysis, and results of this testing

  6. The 'scientific artworks' of Doctor Paul Richer.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Gómez, Natasha

    2013-06-01

    This article examines the little-known sculptures of pathology created by Doctor Paul Richer (1849-1933) in the 1890s for the so-called Musée Charcot at the Hôpital de la Salpêtrière in Paris. Under the direction of Doctor Jean-Martin Charcot (1825-1893), one of the founders of modern neurology, Richer was the head of the hospital's museum of pathological anatomy, as well as the Salpêtrière's resident artist. His 'series of figural representations of the principal types of nervous pathology' included busts of patients suffering from labio-glosso-laryngeal paralysis and myopathy, as well as sculptures depicting patients with Parkinson's disease and juvenile hypothyroidism. These patient portraits were seen as objective, while also paradoxically providing an alternative to mechanical media, such as the photograph and the cast, by permitting the doctor's intervention in not only controlling and animating the sitter, but also emphasising the patient's symptoms. This was a new kind of medical specimen: the 'scientific artwork', as they were called by a contemporary. This phrase, far from being an oxymoron, indicates the purposive collapse of the objective ('scientific') and subjective ('artistic') binary in Richer's sculptures of pathology. Through a detailed examination of three of Richer's works, this article problematises the categories traditionally used to describe, analyse and understand medical imagery and complicates our understanding of the relationship between science and art at the end of the nineteenth century. PMID:23596317

  7. Paul Sollier, Pierre Janet, and their vicinity.

    PubMed

    Walusinski, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    Paul Sollier (1861-1933) and Pierre Janet (1859-1947) shared the same fate: achieving fame during their lives, then slipping into obscurity. However, their work is highly relevant for describing and explaining hysteria in the tradition of Jean-Martin Charcot (1825-1893). Both men had their teacher's clinical perspicacity, which enabled them to accumulate detailed clinical and psychological descriptions. These were published in books that achieved success in their day. From his descriptions, Sollier deduced a pathophysiology of hysteria in which a psychic inhibition led to a functional deficit in sensory-motor areas. This is partially confirmed by current functional brain imaging techniques. As for Janet, he developed concepts which are still valid today, involving personality dissociation, what he referred to as 'fixed ideas', and the subconscious. Sollier and Janet both saw hysteria as a response to the trigger of an emotional shock, specific to certain personalities. While the fundamental work by Joseph Babinski (1857-1932) on hysterical paralysis did much to enrich neurological semiology, Sollier contributed a novel description of the pathophysiology of hysteria, and Janet elucidated its psychopathological mechanisms. PMID:25273495

  8. Paul Sollier: the first clinical neuropsychologist.

    PubMed

    Bogousslavsky, Julien; Walusinski, Olivier

    2011-01-01

    Paul Sollier (1861-1933) is perhaps the most unjustly forgotten follower of Jean-Martin Charcot. He studied with Désiré Bourneville, Charcot's second interne, and was considered by Léon Daudet as the cleverest collaborator of Charcot, along with Joseph Babinski. Charcot assigned him the task of summarizing the theories on memory, which led to two major books, in 1892 and 1900, that anticipated several contemporary concepts by several decades. In 1905-1906, the novelist Marcel Proust spent 6 weeks with Sollier in his sanatorium at Boulogne-Billancourt, and it is now obvious that several of Proust's ideas on involuntary memories which appear inside In Search of Lost Time (published 8 years later) had been inspired by Sollier's theories on the 'surge of reminiscences'. Sollier also designed the framework which led to the intellectual quotient (IQ) and made interesting studies on hysteria and behavioral issues in neurological diseases, activities that may make him the first modern clinical neuro psychologist. Sollier was also the first to correlate clinical findings with neurophysiological concepts, which makes him a precursor of our current approach to neurology and psychiatry. PMID:20938150

  9. Paul Ehrenfest and the dilemmas of modernity.

    PubMed

    van Lunteren, Frans H; Hollestelle, Marijn J

    2013-09-01

    This essay considers the highly ambivalent attitude of the Austrian-Dutch physicist Paul Ehrenfest toward contemporary developments in both science and society. On the one hand, he was in the vanguard of the quantum and relativity revolutions, supported industrialization and economic planning based on mathematical models, and, in general, cherished technocratic ideals. The essay highlights several influences that shaped his attitude in these respects, from his ties with the Philips Physics Laboratory and his sojourns in the United States to the utopian visions of H. G. Wells. On the other hand, he was extremely worried about the harmful consequences of contemporary changes in science and society, such as specialization, the growing pace of city life, and the increasing dependence on modern technologies, be they material or mathematical. In this regard, he agreed with cultural critics such as Max Nordau, Henri Bergson, Ostwald Spengler, and Ludwig Klages. Rather than attempting to solve this paradox, the essay suggests that this kind of ambiguity characterized a great deal of innovative science in the period. PMID:24341262

  10. 44. Photograph of original sketch by Paul Cloyd, Historical Architect, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    44. Photograph of original sketch by Paul Cloyd, Historical Architect, Denver Service Center, National Park Service, Denver, Colorado, dated March 1985. EVOLUTION OF GRAND CANYON WATER RECLAMATION PLANT AS IT STANDS TODAY. - Water Reclamation Plant, Grand Canyon, Coconino County, AZ

  11. GOES-14 Sees Hurricane Paul and Rafael - Duration: 34 seconds.

    NASA Video Gallery

    An animation of satellite observations from Oct. 13-16, 2012, shows Hurricane Paul affecting Baja California, Mexico, and Hurricane Rafael moving toward Bermuda. This visualization was created by t...

  12. How Energy Efficiency is Adding Jobs in St. Paul, Minnesota

    ScienceCinema

    Hannigan, Jim; Coleman, Chris; Oliver, LeAnn; Jambois, Louis

    2013-05-29

    Saint Paul, Minnesota is using an energy efficiency grant to provide commercial retrofits that will allow a local produce distribution company to dramatically reduce its energy costs and add dozens of new workers.

  13. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey, Paul L. and Sally L. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey, Paul L. and Sally L. Gordon, Photographers May 30, 1967, WEST (FRONT) ELEVATION. - First Universalist Church, South Clinton Avenue & Court Street, Rochester, Monroe County, NY

  14. 3. Historic American Buildings Survey, Paul L. and Sally L. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Historic American Buildings Survey, Paul L. and Sally L. Gordon, Photographers May 30, 1967, EAST (REAR) ELEVATION. - First Universalist Church, South Clinton Avenue & Court Street, Rochester, Monroe County, NY

  15. 4. Historic American Buildings Survey, Paul L. and Sally L. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Historic American Buildings Survey, Paul L. and Sally L. Gordon, Photographers May 30, 1967, DETAIL OF WEST ELEVATION. - First Universalist Church, South Clinton Avenue & Court Street, Rochester, Monroe County, NY

  16. 2. Historic American Buildings Survey, Paul L. and Sally L. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Historic American Buildings Survey, Paul L. and Sally L. Gordon, Photographers May 30, 1967, NORTH (SIDE) ELEVATION FROM NORTHEAST. - First Universalist Church, South Clinton Avenue & Court Street, Rochester, Monroe County, NY

  17. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey, Paul L. and Sally L. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey, Paul L. and Sally L. Gordon, Photographers October 15, 1966, VIEW OF SOUTH AND WEST ELEVATION. - Lindley M. Moore House, 22 Lake View Park, Rochester, Monroe County, NY

  18. 4. Historic American Buildings Survey, Paul L. and Sally L. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Historic American Buildings Survey, Paul L. and Sally L. Gordon, Photographers October 15, 1966, DETAIL OF DOOR, SOUTHWEST PARLOR, FIRST FLOOR. - Lindley M. Moore House, 22 Lake View Park, Rochester, Monroe County, NY

  19. 7. Historic American Buildings Survey, Paul L. and Sally L. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Historic American Buildings Survey, Paul L. and Sally L. Gordon, Photographers October 23, 1966, FIRST FLOOR, HALL AND STAIRS INSIDE NORTH ENTRANCE. - First Universalist Church, South Clinton Avenue & Court Street, Rochester, Monroe County, NY

  20. 5. Historic American Buildings Survey, Paul L. and Sally L. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Historic American Buildings Survey, Paul L. and Sally L. Gordon, Photographers November 25, 1966, EAST SIDE OF CARRIAGE HOUSE. - George Thompson House, 546 East Avenue, Rochester, Monroe County, NY

  1. 6. Historic American Buildings Survey, Paul L. and Sally L. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Historic American Buildings Survey, Paul L. and Sally L. Gordon, Photographers October 23, 1966, FIRST FLOOR, AUDITORIUM TOWARD WEST. - First Universalist Church, South Clinton Avenue & Court Street, Rochester, Monroe County, NY

  2. 5. Historic American Buildings Survey, Paul L. and Sally L. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Historic American Buildings Survey, Paul L. and Sally L. Gordon, Photographers October 23, 1966, FIRST FLOOR, VIEW OF AUDITORIUM TOWARD ORGAN. - First Universalist Church, South Clinton Avenue & Court Street, Rochester, Monroe County, NY

  3. 27. Photocopy of August 25, 1921 photograph by Paul A. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    27. Photocopy of August 25, 1921 photograph by Paul A. Kohl. Glass Negative Box IX, Tower Grove, Missouri Botanical Garden. ITALIAN GARDEN BY JOHN NOYES, LOOKING WEST - Missouri Botanical Garden, 2345 Tower Grove Avenue, Saint Louis, Independent City, MO

  4. 28. Photocopy of August 25, 1921 photograph by Paul A, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    28. Photocopy of August 25, 1921 photograph by Paul A, Kohl. Glass Negative Box IX, Tower Grove, Missouri Botanical Garden. ITALIAN GARDEN AND FLORAL DISPLAY HOUSE, LOOKING NORTH - Missouri Botanical Garden, 2345 Tower Grove Avenue, Saint Louis, Independent City, MO

  5. A Wealth of Scholarship: The J. Paul Getty Library.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malkoff-Smith, Susan

    1983-01-01

    Discusses the establishment of the library of the J. Paul Getty Center for the History of Art and the Humanities, noting the architectural design of the Getty Museum, the Getty Trust, library automation, and collection development. (EJS)

  6. How Energy Efficiency is Adding Jobs in St. Paul, Minnesota

    SciTech Connect

    Hannigan, Jim; Coleman, Chris; Oliver, LeAnn; Jambois, Louis

    2011-01-01

    Saint Paul, Minnesota is using an energy efficiency grant to provide commercial retrofits that will allow a local produce distribution company to dramatically reduce its energy costs and add dozens of new workers.

  7. 11. Photocopy of 1906 photograph. Glass negative in Paul A. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Photocopy of 1906 photograph. Glass negative in Paul A. Kohl's office, Missouri Botanical Garden. CLOSE VIEW OF LINNAEUS BUST - Missouri Botanical Garden, Linnaean House, 2345 Tower Grove Avenue, Saint Louis, Independent City, MO

  8. 13. Photocopy of 1906 photograph. Glass negative in Paul A. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. Photocopy of 1906 photograph. Glass negative in Paul A. Kohl's office, Missouri Botanical Garden. BUST OF THOMAS NUTTALL AT SOUTH ENTRANCE - Missouri Botanical Garden, Linnaean House, 2345 Tower Grove Avenue, Saint Louis, Independent City, MO

  9. 12. Photocopy of 1906 photograph. Glass negative in Paul A. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. Photocopy of 1906 photograph. Glass negative in Paul A. Kohl's office, Missouri Botanical Garden. BUST OF ASA GRAY AT SOUTH ENTRANCE - Missouri Botanical Garden, Linnaean House, 2345 Tower Grove Avenue, Saint Louis, Independent City, MO

  10. COMMENCEMENT BAY - ST. PAUL WATERWAY SITE 1995 MONITORING DATA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The data set contains data for sediment chemistry, benthic infauna, and epibenthic infauna from environmental sampling in Commencement Bay - St. Paul Waterway, a National Priority List (NPL) Superfund site in Washington State. Both surface and subsurface sediments were collected...

  11. Re-Os systematics of St. Paul's Rocks, equatorial Atlantic.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blusztajn, J.; Hart, S. R.

    2006-12-01

    St. Paul's Rocks, small islets in the middle of the equatorial Atlantic (0°56'N, 29°22'W) just north of the St. Paul's Fracture zone, represent oceanic peridotites that are unique compared to abyssal peridotites. The main difference is the occurrence of modally metasomatized peridotites containing hornblende and pargasite. These mantle peridotites from St. Paul's Rocks show large Os isotopic heterogeneity, with present day 187Os/188Os ratios ranging from 0.1179 to 0.1273. In contrast, two hornblendite samples have very radiogenic Os isotopic compositions of 0.221 and 0.284. The Os concentrations vary from 0.003 ppb (hornblendite) to 5.8 ppb (spinel peridotite). Pargasite peridotites contain on average about 1.6 ppb Os. Even modally metasomatized samples with hornblende and pargasite have subchondritic Os isotopic ratios, indicating that enrichment processes did not disturb the Os isotopic system. The only indication of pervasive enrichment is a very high Re content in two of the amphibole peridotites (0.7 and 2.2 ppb). The unradiogenic Os isotopic ratios in the peridotites record ancient melting events with model ages of about 1.5 Ga. Three alkali basalts dredged on the flank of St. Paul's Rocks (1966 Atlantis II-20 cruise) have relatively high Os contents (62 to 167 ppt) and are quite radiogenic, with 187Os/188Os ranging from 0.167 to 0.239. Data from this study indicates that mixing of the different lithologies observed on St. Paul's Rocks cannot produce 187Os/188Os as high as that observed in the dredged basalts. On the other hand, the similar 187Os/188Os in the hornblendites and alkali basalts show that interaction between basalts and mantle peridotites took place. The very low Os isotopic ratios in St. Paul's Rocks, in conjunction with other Os studies from the equatorial Atlantic, indicate dispersed heterogeneities of old subcontinental lithospheric material in the oceanic mantle.

  12. Obituary: Damon Paul Simonelli, 1959-2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buratti, Bonnie Jean; Veverka, Joseph

    2005-12-01

    Damon Paul Simonelli died unexpectedly on 1 December 2004 after he collapsed of heart failure at his home near Pasadena, California. Damon led pioneering studies in the scientific exploration of the satellites of the Solar System with spacecraft. He was a longtime member of the AAS's Division for Planetary Sciences community. Only two weeks before his death he attended the 2004 DPS meeting in Louisville where he presented a paper on the surface roughness of Phoebe based on Cassini observations. Damon was born in the Bronx, New York, on 15 August 1959. His father, Aldo Simonelli (d. 1990), was a clarinetist for the New York City Opera Company, and his mother, Alice Kennard Simonelli, was a secretary. His parents met while they were both students at the Julliard School. Family history has it that Damon's mother was an opera student, but she ruined her voice after singing when she had the flu. By junior high school, Damon had become a master at convincing his mother to wake him up at 3 AM to watch televised moonwalks, and to allow the entire family to view Star Trek episodes at the dinner table. Damon graduated from the Bronx High School of Science in 1976, with a composition on the New York State Regents exam that mentioned the significance of bicentennial toilet bowl lids. In addition to placing great emphasis on humor, the Simonelli family valued education. Damon's younger sister Danelle graduated from Vassar College and has served many years as a U. S. Park Ranger at Liberty Island. Damon graduated with a BA summa cum laude in physics from Cornell in 1980, where he had begun working with Carl Sagan. Damon had painstakingly gone through all the Viking images to look for any possibility of sentient life on Mars (he didn't find any). Perhaps the arrival of data from the first great explorers of the outer Solar System - Voyagers 1 and 2 - convinced Damon to continue at Cornell with Joe Veverka. While at Cornell, Damon began his pioneering work on the use of quantitative radiative transfer models to understand the physical character of planetary surfaces. He also became interested in post-eclipse brightening on the Galilean satellite Io, a phenomenon that was purported to be due to the condensation of the satellite's tenuous atmosphere during an eclipse by Jupiter. He carefully and skeptically studied this phenomenon, as well as the related problem of night time atmospheric condensation. His thesis was on the microphysical nature and thermal properties of Io's surface. He graduated with a PhD in Astronomy and Space Sciences from Cornell in 1987. Damon took on a new scientific challenge when he accepted a National Research Council Fellowship at NASA Ames Research Center with Jim Pollack. He worked with Pollack, Ray Reynolds, and Chris McKay on the interior structure of the Pluto/Charon system, and the carbon budget in the outer Solar System. Using new data on the density of Pluto derived from mutual events, Damon led a team that maintained the rockier composition of Pluto implied it formed in a CO-rich outer solar nebula rather than in a circumplanetary nebula. A paper by Simonelli and Reynolds suggested the possibility that Pluto was dense because it had lost its volatiles during an impact event that formed Charon, a suggestion that was later validated by Robin Canup's work. At the time of his death, Damon was a collaborator on the New Horizons Mission to Pluto, due to be launched in early 2006. Damon returned to Cornell in 1991 to embark on a third scientific career. With Veverka, Peter Thomas, and Paul Helfenstein, he led a team to study the nature of the small, formerly uninteresting bodies of the Solar System, including the inner satellites of Jupiter that were imaged by the Galileo camera. He applied Thomas's "spud" shape model and Helfenstein's Hapke model to derive the shapes, roughness, albedo, and surface texture of a wide range of small bodies, including Io, Phobos, Phoebe, the asteroids Gaspra and Ida, and Europa. Damon also became an expert at planning spacecraft observations and command sequences for Galileo. He was recognized for these efforts with a NASA Superior Performance Award. Damon became known as a patient mentor to undergraduate students, many of whom are coauthors on his papers. In 2002, Damon left his home turf of Cornell to accept a Senior National Research Council Fellowship at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory with Bonnie J. Buratti. Damon quickly became a key member of the Small Bodies Group at JPL, assuming responsibility for planning the Visual Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) Cassini observations of Titan. Although Damon had spent many Friday nights as a Cornell undergraduate conducting open nights at the Campus observatory, his first professional astronomical observing experience was at JPL. Damon's style in science was always the egoless pursuit of truth. Generous in showing data to competitors, he never took shortcuts when it came to matters of scientific integrity. This good man did not have a single enemy among his colleagues. Damon was an avid cyclist, amateur actor, and hockey player, continuing his participation in a team even after his move from the great white north to sunny southern California. He had an encyclopedic knowledge of sports, movies, TV, and science fiction, and he owned a world class collection of Star Trek and other science fiction memorabilia, most of which has been distributed to his friends. His science fiction book collection is now part of the Palomar Observatory Library in the Monastery, and his Star Trek collection will be on view at the Altadena Public Library later in 2006. Although Damon's contributions to science were substantial, and his personal attributes of honesty, selflessness, humor, and intelligence deeply affected his wide circle of friends, his early death left unwritten chapters in both his professional and personal life. The deluge of Cassini data he had intended to work on had just begun to come in, and he will not see the New Horizons launch and encounter. He was devoted to his parents and sister and to the families of his close friends. The Community's tribute to Damon's life will be to continue his work and to keep his spirit of scientific honesty alive. His unique and dry wit and keen scientific insights will be missed. Damon's survivors include his mother Alice and sister Danelle.

  13. Sir Paul McCartney Wake-up Song and Greeting - Duration: 105 seconds.

    NASA Video Gallery

    Paul McCartney and Beatles favorite "Good Day Sunshine" greet the Atlantis crew of Chris Ferguson, Doug Hurley, Sandy Magnus and Rex Walheim first thing on Flight Day 8. Sir Paul and the Beatles’...

  14. Detail view of the Alice Paul Bedroom door lock and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail view of the Alice Paul Bedroom door lock and escutcheon, and dead bolt lock above, looking from the east at the inside of the (closed) door, with scale - Sewall-Belmont House, 144 Constitution Avenue, Northeast, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  15. Close view of the Alice Paul Bedroom door, looking from ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Close view of the Alice Paul Bedroom door, looking from the east at the dead bolt lock and escutcheon on the inside of the (closed) door, with scale - Sewall-Belmont House, 144 Constitution Avenue, Northeast, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  16. Justice John Paul Stevens and the Erotic Boomerang.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lieberman, Marc

    Justice John Paul Stevens of the United States Supreme Court has ruled on obscenity cases in seven instances since his appointment. His rulings reveal that he regards obscenity as a nuisance rather than as a danger threatening to undermine the nation's morality, that he supports a nationwide standard to adjudicate obscenity cases, and that he…

  17. Consequences That Cannot Be Avoided: A Response to Paul Newton

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Randy Elliot

    2012-01-01

    This article presents the author's response to Paul E. Newton's paper titled "Clarifying the Consensus Definition of Validity" ("Measurement: Interdisciplinary Research and Perspectives," 2012). Newton's paper offers an interesting and constructive discussion about how people think about validity. In this reaction, the author comments on some of…

  18. 2000 Newbery Medal Winner: A Conversation with Christopher Paul Curtis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Nancy J.; Giorgis, Cyndi

    2001-01-01

    Presents an interview with 2000 Newbery Medal winner Christopher Paul Curtis. Reveals the author's journey as a reader and a writer, offers glimpses into the humor and upbeat attitude of Bud (the main character in Curtis' s award-winning book "Bud, Not Buddy"), and gives a peek into what readers can expect next from this award-winning author. (SR)

  19. One More Legacy of Paul F. Brandwein: Creating Scientists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fort, Deborah C.

    2011-01-01

    This paper studies the influence of Paul F. Brandwein, author, scientist, teacher and mentor, publisher, humanist, and environmentalist, on gifted youngsters who later became scientists, based primarily on information gathered from surveys completed by 25 of his students and one colleague. It also traces his profound interactions with science…

  20. Rewards versus Learning: A Response to Paul Chance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kohn, Alfie

    1993-01-01

    Responding to Paul Chance's November 1992 "Kappan" article on motivational value of rewards, this article argues that manipulating student behavior with either punishments or rewards is unnecessary and counterproductive. Extrinsic rewards can never buy more than short-term compliance because they are inherently controlling and ineffective and make…

  1. The Initial Shock: A Conversation with Paul Fussell.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hackney, Sheldon

    1996-01-01

    Presents an interview with Paul Fussell, author of "The Great War and Modern Memory." Fussell speaks about the destruction of that war and his own experiences as a combat officer in World War II. He also addresses his original field of study, 18th century literature, and some of the changes wrought by the 20th century. (MJP)

  2. SEDIMENT DATA - ST. PAUL WATERWAY - TACOMA, WA - 1996 MONITORING DATA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Benthic Infauna Monitoring Data Files are Excel-format spreadsheet files which contain data presented in the St. Paul Waterway Area Remedial Action and Habitat Restoration Project, 1996 Monitoring Report. The files can be viewed directly or readily downlo aded and read into most ...

  3. Improving Success in Developmental Mathematics: An Interview with Paul Nolting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boylan, Hunter R.

    2011-01-01

    This article presents an interview with Dr. Paul Nolting, a national expert in assessing individual math learning problems, developing effective student learning strategies, and assessing institutional variables that affect math success. Since his dissertation in 1986 on improving math success with study skills Dr. Nolting has consulted with over…

  4. Consequences That Cannot Be Avoided: A Response to Paul Newton

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Randy Elliot

    2012-01-01

    This article presents the author's response to Paul E. Newton's paper titled "Clarifying the Consensus Definition of Validity" ("Measurement: Interdisciplinary Research and Perspectives," 2012). Newton's paper offers an interesting and constructive discussion about how people think about validity. In this reaction, the author comments on some of…

  5. Connect the Book. The Midnight Ride of Paul Revere

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brodie, Carolyn S.

    2005-01-01

    The famous poem "The Midnight Ride of Paul Revere" by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (originally included in "Tales of a Wayside Inn" as "The Landlord's Tale") has been illustrated by a number of children's book artists over the years. One particular version of note was graved and painted by Christopher Bing and published by Handprint Books in 2001.…

  6. Looking east at canal and R. Paul Smith Power Station. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Looking east at canal and R. Paul Smith Power Station. The dark trestle at right center carried the spur track to coal unloading facilities located in the space now occupied by the coal pile. - Potomac Edison Company, Chesapeake & Ohio Canal Bridge, Spanning C & O Canal South of U.S. 11, Williamsport, Washington County, MD

  7. Paul Winter, Sun Singer...He Talks about Outdoor Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Breslav, Marc

    1984-01-01

    Interviews Paul Winter, well-known musical emissary for the Earth and its wildlife among the environmental community. Incorporating voices of wolves, whales, and other creatures as accompanists to an uncategorizable blend of symphonic, jazz, African and Latin musical traditions, Winter's sound involves listeners in a guided experience of…

  8. SPEAKING, WRITING, AND LISTENING IN THE ST. PAUL ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    AMBROSE, HELEN; AND OTHERS

    DESIGNED AS A RESOURCE FOR ELEMENTARY SCHOOL TEACHERS TO USE IN HELPING CHILDREN THINK CLEARLY AND COMMUNICATE EFFECTIVELY, THE ST. PAUL CURRICULUM GUIDE IS DIVIDED INTO THREE SECTIONS--SPEAKING, LISTENING, AND WRITING. AN OVERVIEW OF EACH SECTION DESCRIBES CURRENT THINKING IN THE FIELD AND GENERAL SKILLS WHICH NEED TO BE ACQUIRED BY STUDENTS.…

  9. Paul Pinsky, PhD | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Dr. Paul Pinsky is acting chief of the Early Detection Research Branch. He has a background in statistics, epidemiology and mathematical modeling. He has worked extensively with data from the Branch's two large screening trials, the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian (PLCO) Cancer Screening Trial and the National Lung Screening Trial (NLST). |

  10. Paul Pinsky, PhD | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Dr. Paul Pinsky is acting chief of the Early Detection Research Branch. He has a background in statistics, epidemiology and mathematical modeling. He has worked extensively with data from the Branch's two large screening trials, the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian (PLCO) Cancer Screening Trial and the National Lung Screening Trial (NLST). |

  11. One More Legacy of Paul F. Brandwein: Creating Scientists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fort, Deborah C.

    2011-01-01

    This paper studies the influence of Paul F. Brandwein, author, scientist, teacher and mentor, publisher, humanist, and environmentalist, on gifted youngsters who later became scientists, based primarily on information gathered from surveys completed by 25 of his students and one colleague. It also traces his profound interactions with science…

  12. Justice John Paul Stevens and the Erotic Boomerang.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lieberman, Marc

    Justice John Paul Stevens of the United States Supreme Court has ruled on obscenity cases in seven instances since his appointment. His rulings reveal that he regards obscenity as a nuisance rather than as a danger threatening to undermine the nation's morality, that he supports a nationwide standard to adjudicate obscenity cases, and that he…

  13. SEAFOOD PROCESSING PERMITTING, ALASKA - ST. PAUL ISLAND - CHART #16382

    EPA Science Inventory

    St. Paul Island was digitized from NOAA Marine Chart #16382. Map details include ledge nesting seabirds, rookeries, haul out grounds, water depth and land. This map was created for the Water Permits division to establish new permit sites. Visual illustration shows how future site...

  14. SEAFOOD PROCESSING PERMITTING, ALASKA - KODIAK & ST, PAUL HARBORS - CHART #16595

    EPA Science Inventory

    Kodiak & St, Paul Harbors was digitized from NOAA Marine Chart #16595. Map details include water depth and land. This map was created for EPA Region 10 Water Division to evaluate NPDES permit sites and environmental quality. Visual illustration facilitates the evaluation of the e...

  15. Production of Arq+ ions with a tandem linear Paul trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higaki, H.; Nagayasu, K.; Iwai, T.; Ito, K.; Okamoto, H.

    2015-06-01

    A tandem linear Paul trap was used to create highly charged Argon ions by electron impact ionizations. By improving the operation scheme, the production of Ar4+ ions was confirmed. Possible improvements for the future experiments with laser cooled Ca+ ions are suggested.

  16. "Between the Heavens and the Earth": Narrating the Execution of Moses Paul

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salyer, Matt

    2012-01-01

    The 1772 execution of the Mohegan sailor Moses Paul served as the occasion for Samson Occom's popular "Sermon," reprinted in numerous editions. Recent work by Ava Chamberlain seeks to recover Paul's version of events from contemporary court records. This article argues that Paul's "firsthand" account of the case and autobiographical narrative…

  17. 78 FR 76143 - Proposed CERCLA Settlement Relating to the Paul's Tank Cleaning Service Superfund Site...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-16

    ... AGENCY Proposed CERCLA Settlement Relating to the Paul's Tank Cleaning Service Superfund Site, Burlington... incurred at or in connection Paul's Tank Cleaning Service Superfund Site (``Site''), located in Burlington... should reference the Paul's Tank Cleaning Service Superfund Site, located in Burlington County,...

  18. "Between the Heavens and the Earth": Narrating the Execution of Moses Paul

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salyer, Matt

    2012-01-01

    The 1772 execution of the Mohegan sailor Moses Paul served as the occasion for Samson Occom's popular "Sermon," reprinted in numerous editions. Recent work by Ava Chamberlain seeks to recover Paul's version of events from contemporary court records. This article argues that Paul's "firsthand" account of the case and autobiographical narrative…

  19. Paul trapping of charged particles in aqueous solution

    SciTech Connect

    Guan, Weihau; Reed, Mark A; Joseph, Sony nmn; Park, Jae Hyun nmn; Krstic, Predrag

    2011-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate the feasibility of an aqueous Paul trap using a proof-of-principle planar device. Radio frequency voltages are used to generate an alternating focusing/defocusing potential well in two orthogonal directions. Individual charged particles are dynamically confined into nanometer scale in space. Compared with conventional Paul traps working in frictionless vacuum, the aqueous environment associated with damping forces and thermally induced fluctuations (Brownian noise) exerts a fundamental influence on the underlying physics. We investigate the impact of these two effects on the confining dynamics, with the aim to reduce the rms value of the positional fluctuations. We find that the rms fluctuations can be modulated by adjusting the voltages and frequencies. This technique provides an alternative for the localization and control of charged particles in an aqueous environment.

  20. Saint Paul Energy Park: the potential for district heating

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, C.; Kron, R.; Davis, H.

    1980-03-01

    The results of ANL's study of the energy and economic aspects of using district heating in the St. Paul Energy Park are summarized. The Energy Park is a 6 million ft/sup 2/ residential, commercial office, and light industrial complex to be built in the midway area of St. Paul, Minnesota. Space heating and cooling design loads for the park were calculated assuming that the ASHRAE's 90-75 energy-conserving construction standards would be used in constructing the park's buildings. Based in part on this assumption, ANL estimated the costs and energy use characteristics of six possible energy system options for supplying Energy Park's space heating, space cooling, and domestic hot water heating needs. The results indicate that in today's economy, a central heating and cooling plant with natural gas boilers and electrically driven centrifugal chillers with thermal storage has good potential for energy and economic savings and clearly merits further consideration.

  1. Dipole Excitation With A Paul Ion Trap Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacAskill, J. A.; Madzunkov, S. M.; Chutjian, A.

    2011-06-01

    Preliminary results are presented for the use of an auxiliary radiofrequency (rf) excitation voltage in combination with a high purity, high voltage rf generator to perform dipole excitation within a high precision Paul ion trap. These results show the effects of the excitation frequency over a continuous frequency range on the resultant mass spectra from the Paul trap with particular emphasis on ion ejection times, ion signal intensity, and peak shapes. Ion ejection times are found to decrease continuously with variations in dipole frequency about several resonant values and show remarkable symmetries. Signal intensities vary in a complex fashion with numerous resonant features and are driven to zero at specific frequency values. Observed intensity variations depict dipole excitations that target ions of all masses as well as individual masses. Substantial increases in mass resolution are obtained with resolving powers for nitrogen increasing from 114 to 325.

  2. Paul trapping of charged particles in aqueous solution

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Weihua; Joseph, Sony; Park, Jae Hyun; Krsti?, Predrag S.; Reed, Mark A.

    2011-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate the feasibility of an aqueous Paul trap using a proof-of-principle planar device. Radio frequency voltages are used to generate an alternating focusing/defocusing potential well in two orthogonal directions. Individual charged particles are dynamically confined into nanometer scale in space. Compared with conventional Paul traps working in frictionless vacuum, the aqueous environment associated with damping forces and thermally induced fluctuations (Brownian noise) exerts a fundamental influence on the underlying physics. We investigate the impact of these two effects on the confining dynamics, with the aim to reduce the rms value of the positional fluctuations. We find that the rms fluctuations can be modulated by adjusting the voltages and frequencies. This technique provides an alternative for the localization and control of charged particles in an aqueous environment. PMID:21606331

  3. Physics of Dielectrophoretic Trap by Analogy with Electrophoretic Paul Trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jae Hyun

    2013-11-01

    Dielectrophoresis (DEP) is defined as the motion of suspended particles in solvent resulting from polarization forces induced by an inhomogeneous electric field. DEP has been utilized for various biological applications such as trapping, sorting, separation of cells, viruses, nanoparticles, etc. The analysis of DEP trap has been so far based on the period-averaged pondermotive forces only while the dynamic features of DEP trapping have not been attracted. However, the recent study about aqueous electrophoretic Paul trap showed that a close relation between particle properties and their random motions, which cannot be understood via pondermotive effects. Similar to this, the present study reveals a detailed understanding of dynamic responses of DEP trap and their relation to various system parameters. The analogy with electrophoretic Paul trap is emphasized. This research was supported by Basic Science Research Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) funded by the Ministry of Education, Science and Technology (2012R1A1A1042920).

  4. Astronaut Charles Conrad trims hair of Astronaut Paul Weitz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Astronaut Charles Conrad Jr., Skylab 2 commander, trims the hair of Astronaut Paul J. Weitz, Skylab 2 pilot, during the 28-day Skylab 2 mission in Earth orbit. They are in the crew quarters wardroom of the Orbital Workshop of the Skylab 1 and 2 space station. Weitz is holding a vacuum hose in his right hand. This picture was taken by Scientist-Astronaut Joseph P. Kerwin, Skylab 2 science pilot.

  5. Astronaut Paul Weitz gets physical examination from Astronaut Joseph Kerwin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Astronaut Paul J. Weitz, Skylab 2 pilot, gets a physical examination by a fellow crewman during the 28-day Skylab 2 mission. Scientist-Astronaut Joseph P. Kerwin, Skylab 2 science pilot and a doctor of medicine, uses a stethoscope to check the Weitz's heartbeat. They are in the Orbital Workshop crew quarters of the Skylab 1 and 2 space station in Earth orbit. This photograph was taken by Charles Conrad Jr., Skylab 2 commander.

  6. Cold highly charged ions in a cryogenic Paul trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Versolato, O. O.; Schwarz, M.; Windberger, A.; Ullrich, J.; Schmidt, P. O.; Drewsen, M.; Crespo López-Urrutia, J. R.

    2013-03-01

    Narrow optical transitions in highly charged ions (HCIs) are of particular interest for metrology and fundamental physics, exploiting the high sensitivity of HCIs to new physics. The highest sensitivity for a changing fine structure constant ever predicted for a stable atomic system is found in Ir17 + . However, laser spectroscopy of HCIs is hindered by the large (˜ 106 K) temperatures at which they are produced and trapped. An unprecedented improvement in such laser spectroscopy can be obtained when HCIs are cooled down to the mK range in a linear Paul trap. We have developed a cryogenic linear Paul trap in which HCIs will be sympathetically cooled by 9Be + ions. Optimized optical access for laser light is provided while maintaining excellent UHV conditions. The Paul trap will be connected to an electron beam ion trap (EBIT) which is able to produce a wide range of HCIs. This EBIT will also provide the first experimental input needed for the determination of the transition energies in Ir17 + , enabling further laser-spectroscopic investigations of this promising HCI.

  7. Overview of Outreach Activities of the Planetary Sciences and Remote Sensing Group at Freie Universität Berlin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musiol, S.; Balthasar, H.; Dumke, A.; Gross, C.; Michael, G.; Neu, D.; Platz, T.; Rosenberg, H.; Schreiner, B.; Walter, S. H. G.; van Gasselt, S.

    2014-04-01

    Planetary Sciences teach us how special our homeplanet is in the solar system. Incorporating a broad variety of natural science topics they count to the most fundamental branches of scientific research with a strong interdisciplinary character. However, since planetary sciences are not a school subject, children as well as adults are often lacking an overall awareness and understanding of that field. The mission of planetary education has to be fulfilled by research institutions. With several platforms and activities our group is engaged to address this topic. The Planetary Sciences and Remote Sensing Group at Freie Universität Berlin (FUB) is involved in space missions such as Mars Express with the High Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC), Cassini to Saturn, and Dawn to the asteroids Vesta and Ceres. Moreover, we participate in developing a planetary X-ray fluorescence spectrometer. Information of our planetary research activities can be found on our institutes website [1]. Our outreach activities include press releases, an image download hub, permanent and special exhibition support, 3D-HD-animation production, science fairs, workshops, hands-on courses, public talks at observatories and schools, as well as media appearances in radio, press and TV.

  8. In Memoriam: Paul M. Kintner Jr. (1946-2010)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farley, Donald T.

    2011-03-01

    Paul M. Kintner Jr., who died on 16 November 2010 of pancreatic cancer, was a pioneer in studies of Earth's space environment and of space weather. His discoveries about plasma waves, wave-particle interactions, nonlinear structures, irregularities, and radio wave propagation in random media revealed how heavy ions are injected into the magnetosphere and characterized the sometimes catastrophic effects of scintillations produced in the ionosphere on satellite navigation systems (e.g., the Global Positioning System (GPS)). Paul, a professor of electrical and computer engineering at Cornell University, pioneered the use of multiple-sensor electric field and plasma wave measurements on sounding rockets and satellites and used these sensors (together the multiple sensors are sometimes called a plasma wave interferometer) to characterize plasma waves by their wavelengths and wave vectors and to identify new solitary structures in space plasmas and describe their speed, shape, and size. This interferometer was particularly useful in investigating transverse ion acceleration in the polar ionosphere. In a decisive sounding rocket experiment, Sounding of the Cleft Ion Fountain Energization Region (SCIFER), in 1995 at 1400 kilometers over Svalbard, Norway, Paul showed that the principal source of this acceleration (the source of mass in the magnetosphere) is short-wavelength broadband waves whose frequencies are determined primarily by Doppler broadening. He is also credited with discovering lower hybrid solitary structures and describing them as rotating modes in magnetic field-aligned density cavities that produce transverse ion acceleration. He extended the approach to higher frequencies and was the first to measure the speed and shape of electron solitary holes (Bernstein-Greene-Kruskal (BGK) modes).

  9. Paul-trap resonance in He+ He collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busch, M.; Drozdowski, R.; Ludwig, Th; von Oppen, G.

    2003-12-01

    Single-electron excitation in He+-He collisions is investigated in the 30-50 keV range, where the excitation cross-sections have resonance-like maxima. By measuring anticrossing spectra, we show that the 1{\\mathrm {s}}5\\ell levels of He I with \\ell \\ge 2 are populated effectively and coherently in this energy range. The superposition states of the excited electron resulting from the collision process are identified as the parabolic Stark states with the largest electric dipole moments. The results are explained with the Paul-trap model and saddle dynamics.

  10. Paul Drude's Prediction of Nonreciprocal Mutual Inductance for Tesla Transformers

    PubMed Central

    McGuyer, Bart

    2014-01-01

    Inductors, transmission lines, and Tesla transformers have been modeled with lumped-element equivalent circuits for over a century. In a well-known paper from 1904, Paul Drude predicts that the mutual inductance for an unloaded Tesla transformer should be nonreciprocal. This historical curiosity is mostly forgotten today, perhaps because it appears incorrect. However, Drude's prediction is shown to be correct for the conditions treated, demonstrating the importance of constraints in deriving equivalent circuits for distributed systems. The predicted nonreciprocity is not fundamental, but instead is an artifact of the misrepresentation of energy by an equivalent circuit. The application to modern equivalent circuits is discussed. PMID:25542040

  11. Paul Drude's prediction of nonreciprocal mutual inductance for Tesla transformers.

    PubMed

    McGuyer, Bart

    2014-01-01

    Inductors, transmission lines, and Tesla transformers have been modeled with lumped-element equivalent circuits for over a century. In a well-known paper from 1904, Paul Drude predicts that the mutual inductance for an unloaded Tesla transformer should be nonreciprocal. This historical curiosity is mostly forgotten today, perhaps because it appears incorrect. However, Drude's prediction is shown to be correct for the conditions treated, demonstrating the importance of constraints in deriving equivalent circuits for distributed systems. The predicted nonreciprocity is not fundamental, but instead is an artifact of the misrepresentation of energy by an equivalent circuit. The application to modern equivalent circuits is discussed. PMID:25542040

  12. Carbon Cycle 2.0: Paul Alivisatos: Introduction

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Alivisatos

    2010-02-09

    Berkeley Lab Director Paul Alivisatos speaks at the Carbon Cycle 2.0 kick-off symposium Feb. 1, 2010. Humanity emits more carbon into the atmosphere than natural processes are able to remove - an imbalance with negative consequences.Carbon Cycle 2.0 is a Berkeley Lab initiative to provide the science needed to restore this balance by integrating the Labs diverse research activities and delivering creative solutions toward a carbon-neutral energy future. http://carboncycle2.lbl.gov/

  13. Paul A.M. Dirac's The Principles of Quantum Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Laurie M.

    2006-12-01

    Paul A.M. Dirac’s book, The Principles of Quantum Mechanics, summarized the foundations of a new science, much of which was his own creation. It expressed the spirit of the new quantum mechanics, creating a descriptive language that we still use. I discuss the successive editions of Dirac’s book and their critical reception, noting changes, especially in the formulation of the general theory and in its treatment of relativistic quantum theory and quantum electrodynamics. In the case of the later editions, I discuss Dirac’s negative attitude toward renormalized quantum electrodynamics.

  14. Carbon Cycle 2.0: Paul Alivisatos: Introduction

    ScienceCinema

    Paul Alivisatos

    2010-09-01

    Berkeley Lab Director Paul Alivisatos speaks at the Carbon Cycle 2.0 kick-off symposium Feb. 1, 2010. Humanity emits more carbon into the atmosphere than natural processes are able to remove - an imbalance with negative consequences.Carbon Cycle 2.0 is a Berkeley Lab initiative to provide the science needed to restore this balance by integrating the Labs diverse research activities and delivering creative solutions toward a carbon-neutral energy future. http://carboncycle2.lbl.gov/

  15. 76 FR 73666 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Paul H. Karshner Memorial Museum, Puyallup, WA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-29

    .... Karshner Memorial Museum at the address below by December 29, 2011. ADDRESSES: Brian Fox, Director of... Fox, Director of Instructional Leadership, Paul H. Karshner Memorial Museum, Puyallup, WA,...

  16. A Long DNA Segment in a Linear Nanoscale Paul Trap

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph, Sony nmn; Guan, Weihau; Reed, Mark A; Krstic, Predrag S

    2009-01-01

    We study the dynamics of a linearly distributed line charge such as single stranded DNA (ssDNA) in a nanoscale, linear 2D Paul trap in vacuum. Using molecular dynamics simulations we show that a line charge can be trapped effectively in the trap for a well defined range of stability parameters. We investigated (i) a flexible bonded string of charged beads and (ii) a ssDNA polymer of variable length, for various trap parameters. A line charge undergoes oscillations or rotations as it moves, depending on its initial angle, the position of the center of mass and the velocity. The stability region for a strongly bonded line of charged beads is similar to that of a single ion with the same charge to mass ratio. Single stranded DNA as long as 40 nm does not fold or curl in the Paul trap, but could undergo rotations about the center of mass. However, we show that a stretching field in the axial direction can effectively prevent the rotations and increase the confinement stability.

  17. Paul W. Kruse (1927-2012), In Memoriam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reine, Marion B.; Norton, Paul R.; Stelzer, Ernie L.

    2013-06-01

    During his distinguished 37-year career as a research physicist at the Honeywell Research Center in Minneapolis, Minnesota, Dr. Paul W. Kruse (1927-2012) played leadership roles in two disruptive infrared detector technologies, the narrow-gap semiconductor alloy HgCdTe and the silicon CMOS-based microbolometer array, both of which revolutionized the worldwide infrared detector industry. He served on numerous government advisory boards and panels, including the Army Scientific Advisory Panel and the Army Science Board, for which he received the Outstanding Civilian Service Medal. After retiring for Honeywell in 1993, he remained active in the infrared detector field in several roles: as a successful small-business entrepreneur, as an author of two books, and as a SPIE lecturer. His books, papers and lectures have educated new generations of workers in the infrared detector industry. His career, a model for industrial research physicists, has had major and permanent impacts on the worldwide infrared detector industry. This paper is a summary of the career of Paul W. Kruse, as well as a tribute to that career and its lasting legacy.

  18. 77 FR 45965 - Determination of Attainment for the Paul Spur/Douglas PM10

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-02

    .... See 77 FR 31268; (May 25, 2012). \\1\\ The Paul Spur/Douglas NA covers approximately 220 square miles... FR 31269-31271. In conjunction with and based on our proposed determination that the Paul Spur.../Douglas NA, please see 77 FR 31271-31273. Lastly, we noted that suspension of the State's SIP...

  19. 77 FR 41168 - Marine Mammals; Subsistence Taking of Northern Fur Seals; St. Paul Island

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-12

    ... Northern Fur Seals; St. Paul Island AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and...) petitioned NMFS to revise regulations governing the subsistence taking of northern fur seals on St. Paul..., Alaska to: Take male young of the year (less than 1 year old) fur seals; take a total of up to 3,000...

  20. Paul Voosen Receives 2013 David Perlman Award for Excellence in Science Journalism—News: Citation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaneski, Cyril T.

    2014-01-01

    It's my pleasure to nominate Paul Voosen, the former science reporter for Greenwire, for the David Perlman award. Last November, as Superstorm Sandy pounded the East Coast of the United States, Paul found himself stranded for several days in Miami, mourning a recently deceased family member.

  1. Privilege: The Making of an Adolescent Elite at St. Paul's School. Princeton Studies in Cultural Sociology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khan, Shamus Rahman

    2012-01-01

    As one of the most prestigious high schools in the nation, St. Paul's School in Concord, New Hampshire, has long been the exclusive domain of America's wealthiest sons. But times have changed. Today, a new elite of boys and girls is being molded at St. Paul's, one that reflects the hope of openness but also the persistence of inequality. In…

  2. Richard Paul's Strong Sense Critical Thinking and Procedural Knowing: A Comparison.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thayer-Bacon, Barbara

    The levels of critical thinking proposed by R. Paul are described and his theory is compared with that of the procedural knowing approach of M. F. Belenky, B. M. Clinchy, N. R. Goldberger, and J. M. Tarule (1986). The distinction between strong sense and weak sense critical thinking is unique to Paul and central to his theory. Critical thinking in…

  3. Friends of the National Library of Medicine - Letter from Friends of the NLM Chairman Paul G. Rogers

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Letter from Friends of the NLM Chairman Paul G. Rogers Past Issues / Winter 2008 Table of Contents ... for your interest in NIH MedlinePlus . Sincerely, Paul G. Rogers, Chairman Friends of the National Library of ...

  4. Baring the soul: Paul Bindrim, Abraham Maslow and 'nude psychotherapy'.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, Ian

    2007-01-01

    Nude psychotherapy is one of the most flamboyant therapeutic techniques ever developed in American psychology. Largely forgotten today, the therapy was an academic and popular sensation upon its introduction in 1967. Developed by psychologist Paul Bindrim, the therapy promised to guide clients to their authentic selves through the systematic removal of clothing. This paper explores the intellectual, cultural and ethical context of nude therapy and its significance as a form of unchurched spirituality. Although nude therapy has an indisputable tabloid character, it is also rooted in a long-standing academic search for authenticity and ultimate meaning through science. Bindrim's career demonstrates the historically long-standing interweaving of spirituality and science within American psychology while simultaneously highlighting the field's extraordinary capacity for adaptive reinvention. PMID:17912714

  5. Cryogenic linear Paul trap for cold highly charged ion experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, M.; Versolato, O. O.; Windberger, A.; Brunner, F. R.; Ballance, T.; Eberle, S. N.; Ullrich, J.; Schmidt, P. O.; Hansen, A. K.; Gingell, A. D.; Drewsen, M.; López-Urrutia, J. R. Crespo

    2012-08-01

    Storage and cooling of highly charged ions require ultra-high vacuum levels obtainable by means of cryogenic methods. We have developed a linear Paul trap operating at 4 K capable of very long ion storage times of about 30 h. A conservative upper bound of the H2 partial pressure of about 10-15 mbar (at 4 K) is obtained from this. External ion injection is possible and optimized optical access for lasers is provided, while exposure to black body radiation is minimized. First results of its operation with atomic and molecular ions are presented. An all-solid state laser system at 313 nm has been set up to provide cold Be+ ions for sympathetic cooling of highly charged ions.

  6. Minimization of ion micromotion in a Paul trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berkeland, D. J.; Miller, J. D.; Bergquist, J. C.; Itano, W. M.; Wineland, D. J.

    1998-05-01

    Micromotion of ions in Paul traps has several adverse effects, including alterations of atomic transition line shapes, significant second-order Doppler shifts in high-accuracy studies, and limited confinement time in the absence of cooling. The ac electric field that causes the micromotion may also induce significant Stark shifts in atomic transitions. We describe three methods of detecting micromotion. The first relies on the change of the average ion position as the trap potentials are changed. The second monitors the amplitude of the sidebands of a narrow atomic transition, caused by the first-order Doppler shift due to the micromotion. The last technique detects the Doppler shift induced modulation of the fluorescence rate of a broad atomic transition. We discuss the detection sensitivity of each method to Doppler and Stark shifts, and show experimental results using the last technique.

  7. [Paul Diepgen as a senior within his field after 1945].

    PubMed

    Kümmel, Werner Friedrich

    2014-01-01

    Paul Diepgen (1878-1966), professor emeritus in Berlin in 1945, remained a leading figure within the field of German medical historians from 1947 onwards in his capacity as "guest professor" in Mainz. The present article focuses on two areas in which Diepgen was particularly active within his academic field as documented in his extensive correspondence: firstly the resumption of contacts with émigrés and other foreign colleagues which was hampered by Diepgen's ambivalent relationship to the National Socialist regime and secondly the establishment of the history of medicine as a full academic discipline. Up until 1961, he continued to nominate his pupils who had been politically "incriminated" during the Nazi period for academic positions, but simultaneously encouraged younger colleagues and campaigned for the establishment of a comprehensive academic degree course in the history of medicine. An examination of the confrontation between Diepgen and Werner Leibbrand additionally reveals Diepgen's not always uncontroversial concept of the history of medicine. PMID:25980305

  8. Beauty in physics: the legacy of Paul Dirac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCubbin, Norman

    2004-04-01

    In 2002 physicists around the world celebrated the centenary of the birth of Paul Dirac, OM, FRS, Nobel Laureate, who was one of the greatest physicists of the 20th century. He made towering contributions to the formulation of quantum mechanics and he was one of the principal creators of quantum field theory. In 1928 he combined relativity and quantum mechanics in the Dirac equation, which provides a natural description for the spin of the electron and which led to the prediction, by Dirac himself, of the existence of anti-matter. In this article I try to explain, in the simplest terms, these major contributions to physics and to give some flavour of the man himself.

  9. Trapping Laser Ablated Ca+ Ions in Linear Paul Trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, Yoshinori; Matsuoka, Leo; Osaki, Hiroyuki; Fukushima, Yu; Hasegawa, Shuichi

    2006-09-01

    We have investigated the efficiency of ion trapping in a linear Paul trap. First, we measured the dependence of trapping efficiency on dc and rf voltages using a channel electron multiplier for the direct detection of the electric current of the trapped ions. The most efficient dc and rf voltages were 5.0 and 175 V, respectively. Second, we calculated the trapping efficiency using a simulation code and compared it with the experimental results. We determined that the efficiency of ion trapping decreased monotonically with increasing dc voltage and had an optimum rf voltage. From the numerical calculation, the dependences of trapping efficiency on dc and rf voltages and the initial kinetic energy of ions was derived and the optimum dc and rf voltages and the initial kinetic energy of ions were found to be 0, 210 V, and 1 eV, respectively.

  10. Paul Gauguin and the origin of Art Noveau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asmus, John F.

    1997-10-01

    Since the turn of the century there has been widespread acknowledgement that Alphonse Mucha inspired the birth of the Art Nouveau movement when he created the 'Gismonda' poster advertising the opening of the Sarah Bernhardt play of that name in Paris in 1894. At an estate sale in 1954 a small collage bearing a likeness of the Mucha 'Gismonda' was offered. It was composed of fragments of sixty postage stamps glued to a small ceramic tile. Digital computer image processing has been applied to the collage design, scratches on the handle of a walking stick in the same collection, and the Mucha poster. From comparative analyses of the enhanced 'Gismonda' images it is revealed that the little collage is considerably more detailed and compete than the Mucha 'original'. Thus, it is concluded that the poster is a hasty photographic plagiarism of the intricate collage. Further image processing of the scratches on the handle of the walking stick and the collage reveal them to conform to the famous and enigmatic 'P GO' monogram signature of the artist Paul Gauguin. Thus, it follows that the original design was created by Gauguin rather than by Mucha. It may be that while Gauguin was in Brittany recovering from injuries sustained in a brawl his former lover, Annah la Javanese, pilfered his belongings and took them with her to Paris and her next lover, photographer-designer, Alphonse Mucha, who copied the collage and offered it as the Gismonda Poster.

  11. One More Legacy of Paul F. Brandwein: Creating Scientists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fort, Deborah C.

    2011-06-01

    This paper studies the influence of Paul F. Brandwein, author, scientist, teacher and mentor, publisher, humanist, and environmentalist, on gifted youngsters who later became scientists, based primarily on information gathered from surveys completed by 25 of his students and one colleague. It also traces his profound interactions with science educators. It illuminates the theories of Brandwein and his protégés and colleagues about the interaction of environment, schooling, and education and Brandwein's belief in having students do original research (that is, research whose results are unknown) on their way to discovering their future scientific paths. It tests Brandwein's 1955 hypothesis on the characteristics typical of the young who eventually become scientists, namely: Three factors are considered as being significant in the development of future scientists: a Genetic Factor with a primary base in heredity (general intelligence, numerical ability, and verbal ability); a Predisposing Factor, with a primary base in functions which are psychological in nature; an Activating Factor, with a primary base in the opportunities offered in school and in the special skills of the teacher. High intelligence alone does not make a youngster a scientist (p xix).

  12. STS-102 Astronaut Paul Richards Participates in Space Walk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Astronaut Paul W. Richards, STS-102 mission specialist, works in the cargo bay of the Space Shuttle Discovery during the second of two scheduled space walks. Richards, along with astronaut Andy Thomas, spent 6.5 hours outside the International Space Station (ISS), continuing work to outfit the station and prepare for delivery of its robotic arm. STS-102 delivered the first Multipurpose Logistics Modules (MPLM) named Leonardo, which was filled with equipment and supplies to outfit the U.S. Destiny Laboratory Module. The Leonardo MPLM is the first of three such pressurized modules that will serve as the ISS' moving vans, carrying laboratory racks filled with equipment, experiments, and supplies to and from the Station aboard the Space Shuttle. The cylindrical module is approximately 21-feet long and 15- feet in diameter, weighing almost 4.5 tons. It can carry up to 10 tons of cargo in 16 standard Space Station equipment racks. Of the 16 racks the module can carry, 5 can be furnished with power, data, and fluid to support refrigerators or freezers. In order to function as an attached station module as well as a cargo transport, the logistics module also includes components that provide life support, fire detection and suppression, electrical distribution, and computer functions. NASA's 103rd overall mission and the 8th Space Station Assembly Flight, STS-102 mission also served as a crew rotation flight. It delivered the Expedition Two crew to the Station and returned the Expedition One crew back to Earth.

  13. Paul de Kruif's Microbe Hunters and an outraged Ronald Ross.

    PubMed

    Chernin, E

    1988-01-01

    Paul de Kruif's book, Microbe Hunters, published in New York in 1926, was a romanticized medical "history," written in a breathless style, that describes the lives and works of a dozen famous figures, ranging from Leeuwenhoek to Sir Ronald Ross. Ross, who received the Nobel Prize in 1902 for his discovery that certain mosquitoes transmit malaria, resented de Kruif's personal remarks and his version of the malaria story, especially concerning the disputes with Italian workers over priorities. In a little-known polemic "review" of Microbe Hunters, Ross castigated de Kruif for statements he considered libelous. While Ross could not sue for libel across the Atlantic, his threatened action for libel forced the publisher of the British edition of Microbe Hunters to delete the chapter about Ross and one about David Bruce, Ross's countryman. de Kruif's book, a best-seller in its day and influential among the young for a generation, now seems gauche and anachronistic. While Ross seems to have been justified in some of his complaints about Microbe Hunters, the bitter tone of his reactions all but confirms de Kruif's opinion of him. Ross died in 1932 with a permanent niche in medical history; de Kruif died in 1971 and is little remembered except, perhaps, for Microbe Hunters. PMID:3293166

  14. A Cryogenic Linear Paul Trap for Quantum Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hess, Paul; Kaplan, Harvey; Lee, Aaron; Neyenhuis, Brain; Parsagian, Lexi; Richerme, Phil; Smith, Jake; Monroe, Christopher

    2015-05-01

    Ions confined in radio frequency Paul traps are a useful tool for quantum simulation of long-range spin-spin interaction models. As the system size increases, classical simulations cannot fully compute the properties of the exponentially growing Hilbert space, necessitating quantum simulation for accurate predictions. Current experiments are limited to less than 20 qubits due to the fragile nature of linear ion chains. Even at UHV pressures, collisions with background gas particles are sufficient to melt the ion crystal and frequent enough to disrupt the accumulation of statistics. We present progress towards the construction of a cryogenic ion trap apparatus, designed to cryopump background gas within the 4 K chamber. The resulting reduction in pressure will allow robust trapping of up to 100 ions in a single chain. Cooling is provided by a closed cycle cryostat with a gas mediated thermal linkage which mechanically decouples the ion trap from the vibrating cold head. A spherical octagon surrounding the ion trap allows optical access for global and individual addressing beams and high numerical aperture fluorescence collection. This work is supported by the ARO Atomic Physics Program, the AFOSR MURI on Quantum Measurement and Verification, and the NSF Physics Frontier Center at JQI.

  15. Experimental realization of fast ion separation in segmented Paul traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruster, T.; Warschburger, C.; Kaufmann, H.; Schmiegelow, C. T.; Walther, A.; Hettrich, M.; Pfister, A.; Kaushal, V.; Schmidt-Kaler, F.; Poschinger, U. G.

    2014-09-01

    We experimentally demonstrate fast separation of a two-ion crystal in a microstructured segmented Paul trap. By the use of spectroscopic calibration routines for the electrostatic trap potentials, we achieve the required precise control of the ion trajectories near the critical point, where the harmonic confinement by the external potential vanishes. The separation procedure can be controlled by three parameters: a static potential tilt, a voltage offset at the critical point, and the total duration of the process. We show how to optimize the control parameters by measurements of ion distances, trap frequencies, and the final motional excitation. We extend the standard measurement technique for motional excitation to allow for discriminating thermal and oscillatory states, and to cover a dynamic range covering more than 4 orders of magnitude in energy. It is shown that for fast separation times, oscillatory motion is excited, while a predominantly thermal state is obtained for long times. At a separation duration of 80?s, a minimum mean excitation of n¯=4.16(0.16) vibrational quanta per ion is achieved, which is consistent with the adiabatic limit given by our particular trap. The presented technique does not rely on specific trap geometry parameters and can therefore be adopted for different segmented traps.

  16. The Pauling 3-Electron Bond: A Recommendation for the Use of the Linnett Structure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harcourt, Richard D.

    1985-01-01

    Recommends the Linnett structure IV (as in VIII for molecular oxygen) for future use when a valence-bond structure for a Pauling 3-electron bond is required. Examples are provided to illustrate why this recommendation is made. (JN)

  17. Paul Bikle's Record Altitude Sailplane Flight - Duration: 2 minutes, 8 seconds.

    NASA Video Gallery

    On a cold and windy February afternoon 50 years ago, the late Paul Bikle, then director of NASA's Flight Research Center, soared into the stratosphere with one goal in mind - a world altitude recor...

  18. Scientific Advances from Paul Silver's Inspirational Leadership of the EarthScope Plate Boundary Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, M. M.; Calais, E.; Jackson, M. E.; Owen, S. E.; Segall, P.

    2009-12-01

    While major scientific endeavors and advances rely on the work and dedication of many, they are often made possible thanks to the passion and clear vision articulated by one or two leading scientists. Paul Silver was that leading visionary for EarthScope’s Plate Boundary Observatory. Paul Silver understood early on that the synergy of seismic and geodetic observations contained fundamental information on the coupled lithosphere-mantle system, the key to cracking the dynamics that underlies plate tectonics and continental deformation. This became a central theme of the Earthscope initiative, and Paul, a seismologist by training, became a tireless advocate for geodesy at all stages of the project - and for instrumentation over the broadest possible temporal bandwidth, from GPS geodesy to strainmeters. The presentation, given on behalf of UNAVCO and the UNAVCO community, will review and honor Paul's contributions to UNAVCO and the Plate Boundary Observatory science.

  19. Effective forces and pseudopotential wells and barriers in the linear Paul trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapitsky, D. S.

    2015-11-01

    The paper presents the numerical studies of effective forces acting on a charged microparticle inside the linear Paul trap in gas media. The locations of the microparticle trapping as the dependence on microparticle and trap parameters have been studied.

  20. Sun-Earth Day WEBCAST - NASA TV; Host Paul Mortfield, Astronomer Stanford Solar Center and visiting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Sun-Earth Day WEBCAST - NASA TV; Host Paul Mortfield, Astronomer Stanford Solar Center and visiting students from San Francisco Bay Area Schools Documentation Technology Branch Video communications van (code-JIT)

  1. Pauling bond strength, bond length and electron density distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbs, Gerald V.; Ross, Nancy L.; Cox, David F.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Iversen, Bo B.; Spackman, M. A.

    2014-01-18

    A power law regression equation, = 1.46(<ρ(rc)>/r)-0.19, connecting the average experimental bond lengths, , with the average accumulation of the electron density at the bond critical point, <ρ(rc)>, between bonded metal M and oxygen atoms, determined at ambient conditions for oxide crystals, where r is the row number of the M atom, is similar to the regression equation R(M-O) = 1.39(ρ(rc)/r)-0.21 determined for three perovskite crystals for pressures as high as 80 GPa. The two equations are also comparable with those, = 1.43(/r)-0.21, determined for a large number of oxide crystals at ambient conditions and = 1.39(/r)-0.22, determined for geometry optimized hydroxyacid molecules, that connect the bond lengths to the average Pauling electrostatic bond strength, , for the M-O bonded interactions. On the basis of the correspondence between the two sets of equations connecting ρ(rc) and the Pauling bond strength s with bond length, it appears that Pauling’s simple definition of bond strength closely mimics the accumulation of the electron density between bonded pairs of atoms. The similarity of the expressions for the crystals and molecules is compelling evidence that the M-O bonded interactions for the crystals and molecules 2 containing the same bonded interactions are comparable. Similar expressions, connecting bond lengths and bond strength, have also been found to hold for fluoride, nitride and sulfide molecules and crystals. The Brown-Shannon bond valence, σ, power law expression σ = [R1/(R(M-O)]N that has found wide use in crystal chemistry, is shown to be connected to a more universal expression determined for oxides and the perovskites, <ρ(rc)> = r[(1.41)/]4.76, demonstrating that the bond valence for a bonded interaction is likewise closely connected to the accumulation of the electron density between the bonded atoms. Unlike the Brown-Shannon expression, it is universal in that it holds for the M-O bonded interactions for a relatively wide range of M atoms of the periodic table. The power law equation determined for the oxide crystals at ambient conditions is similar to the power law expression <ρ(rc)> = r[1.46/]5.26 determined for the perovskites at pressures as high as 80 GPa, indicating that the intrinsic connection between R(M-O) and ρ(rc) that holds at ambient conditions also holds, to a first approximation, at high pressures.

  2. [Paul-Louis Simond and the Marchoux mission in Brazil].

    PubMed

    Tran, D; Chastel, C; Cenac, A

    1999-12-01

    In 1900 the role of a particular mosquito called Stegomyia fasciata in the transmission of yellow fever was proved by a board of American medical officers. This discovery was the beginning of several scientific missions in South America, mostly in Brazil. As yellow fever was increasing in its West African colonies, the French government decided to send a scientific mission to Rio de Janeiro, to find new ways of prevention against the disease. Under the authority of the Institut Pasteur, Paul-Louis Simond, who had just discovered the role of the flea in the transmission of plague, was designated to carry through this mission together with Emile Marchoux and Alexandre Salimbeni, eminent Pasteurians like him. From November 1901 to May 1905, the three men studied the epidemiological and clinical aspects of the disease in Rio. They worked on the intermediate host's entomology, the Stegomyia female mosquito, improving the knowledge of yellow fever and its means of transmission. They also realized experiments on 25 healthy volunteers, submitting them to the bite of infected mosquitoes. They were among the first to proceed to yellow féver vaccinations by means of virulent serum heated to 55 degrees C or filtered. Their work led to the establishment of new sanitary rules to prevent the spread of the disease. This contributed to the success of the "yellow fever campaign" initiated by Oswaldo Cruz in the town of Rio. One of the most original contribution of their studies was to show that the yellow fever agent (which was still unknown) could be transmitted from an infected female Stegomyia to its eggs and larvaes. After this mission, the French authorities were able to fight yellow fever efficiently in their African colonies as well as in the West Indies and French Guyana. PMID:11000945

  3. A conversation with Paul Greengard. Interview by Eric J Nestler.

    PubMed

    Greengard, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Paul Greengard was born in New York City in 1925. After completing high school, he served three years in the US Navy during World War II and then completed his bachelor's degree at Hamilton College where he majored in physics and mathematics. He obtained a PhD in biophysics from Johns Hopkins University in 1953 and pursued postdoctoral training with Wilhelm Feldberg at the National Institute for Medical Research in England. After eight years as head of biochemistry at Geigy, and sabbaticals at Albert Einstein College of Medicine and Vanderbilt University, he joined the Yale University faculty as a full professor of pharmacology in 1968. While he was at Yale, Greengard's laboratory performed groundbreaking research, which demonstrated a role for cyclic nucleotides, protein kinases and protein phosphatases, and their protein substrates in the regulation of synaptic transmission. In 1983, Greengard moved to The Rockefeller University, where he has since served as the Vincent Astor Professor and Head of the Laboratory of Molecular and Cellular Neuroscience. Greengard's paradigm-shifting research has continued at Rockefeller and has informed our understanding and possible treatment of a host of brain disorders, including schizophrenia, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and depression. He is the author of more than 950 research articles and reviews. Greengard has received numerous awards and honors, including the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 2000, the Metropolitan Life Foundation Award for Medical Research, The National Academy of Sciences Award in Neuroscience, the Ralph W. Gerard Prize in Neuroscience for the Society for Neuroscience, and the Karolinska Institutet's Bicentennial Gold Medal. He is a member of the US National Academy of Sciences and the Institute of Medicine of the National Academies. The following interview was conducted on May 29, 2012. PMID:23294305

  4. Fremde und Exil: Paul Zech in Argentinien und Henry Kreisel in Kanada (Foreignness and Exile: Paul Zech in Argentina and Henry Kreisel in Canada).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Leeden, Katrin

    1996-01-01

    For teachers of German as a foreign language it's especially important to provide a new point of access to one's own world through the "view from the outside" and simultaneously to understand the foreign (learner) culture. Analysis of different life paths of Paul Zech (1881-1946) in Argentina and Henry Kreisel (1922-1991) in Canada makes this…

  5. Paul Ehrenfest, Niels Bohr, and Albert Einstein: Colleagues and Friends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, Martin J.

    2010-09-01

    In May 1918 Paul Ehrenfest received a monograph from Niels Bohr in which Bohr had used Ehrenfest's adiabatic principle as an essential assumption for understanding atomic structure. Ehrenfest responded by inviting Bohr, whom he had never met, to give a talk at a meeting in Leiden in late April 1919, which Bohr accepted; he lived with Ehrenfest, his mathematician wife Tatyana, and their young family for two weeks. Albert Einstein was unable to attend this meeting, but in October 1919 he visited his old friend Ehrenfest and his family in Leiden, where Ehrenfest told him how much he had enjoyed and profited from Bohr's visit. Einstein first met Bohr when Bohr gave a lecture in Berlin at the end of April 1920, and the two immediately proclaimed unbounded admiration for each other as physicists and as human beings. Ehrenfest hoped that he and they would meet at the Third Solvay Conference in Brussels in early April 1921, but his hope was unfulfilled. Einstein, the only physicist from Germany who was invited to it in this bitter postwar atmosphere, decided instead to accompany Chaim Weizmann on a trip to the United States to help raise money for the new Hebrew University in Jerusalem. Bohr became so overworked with the planning and construction of his new Institute for Theoretical Physics in Copenhagen that he could only draft the first part of his Solvay report and ask Ehrenfest to present it, which Ehrenfest agreed to do following the presentation of his own report. After recovering his strength, Bohr invited Ehrenfest to give a lecture in Copenhagen that fall, and Ehrenfest, battling his deep-seated self-doubts, spent three weeks in Copenhagen in December 1921 accompanied by his daughter Tanya and her future husband, the two Ehrenfests staying with the Bohrs in their apartment in Bohr's new Institute for Theoretical Physics. Immediately after leaving Copenhagen, Ehrenfest wrote to Einstein, telling him once again that Bohr was a prodigious physicist, and again expressing the hope that he soon would see both of them in Leiden.

  6. Amsterdam-St. Paul Hotspot: Composition, Motion and History

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janin, Myriam; Hemond, Christophe; Maia, Marcia; Guillou, Herve; Nonnotte, Philippe; Ponzevera, Emmanuel

    2010-05-01

    The Amsterdam-St Paul (ASP) plateau results of the excess of melting induced by the interaction between the ASP hotspot and the South-East Indian Ridge. The ASP plume was originally located beneath the Australian Plate and its interaction with the SEIR began about 10 Ma ago. This location provides an unique opportunity to study the hotspot prior to its interaction with the SEIR and its chemical and physical evolution. An exhaustive study of the hotspot characteristics prior to its interaction lead to know its geochemical compositions. The geochemistry of its interaction with the SEIR (i. e. ASP plateau) provides indirect information on the regional Indian Ocean upper mantle. ASP plume has a moderately enriched composition with resulting seamount melts having 2.5 < (La/Sm)C1norm < 2.8. In addition isotope ratios are not as extreme as estimated in previous works [Doucet et al. 2004; Nicolaysen et al., 2007] with 86Sr/87Sr ? 0.7040, 143Nd/144Nd ? 0.5128, 206Pb/204Pb ? 19.0 and 208Pb/204Pb ? 39.2. The ASP plateau isotopic composition reveals that the Indian Ocean upper mantle is extremely heterogeneous. It was proposed that the ridge segments across the plateau have interacted 40 My ago with Kerguelen plume [Frey et al. 2000]. We therefore assume that some plume material has been left behind in the Indian Ocean upper mantle during the movement of the Australian plate above it. Consequently, the upper mantle in the area might be a good example of 'marble cake' [Allegre&Turcotte, 1986]. When the SEIR approaches the ASP hotspot, plume derived material mixes with the surrounded mantle leading to the complexity seen in ASP plateau materials. K-Ar datings reveal that the absolute motion of the Australian plate calculated with respect to the fixity of ASP plume is of about 77 km/My. With a spreading rate of about 6-7 cm/yr the accretion at the SEIR axis cannot account for this velocity. In consequence, an absolute motion of the ASP plume of about 10-20km/My, comparable to that of Hawaii [Tarduno et al. 2003], could account for this discrepancy. References: Allegre & Turcotte. (1986). Nature 323, 123-127. Doucet, S., et al. (2004). Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 208, 179-195. Frey, F.A., et al. 2000). Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 176, 73-89. Nicolaysen, K. P., et al. (2007). Geochem. Geophys. Geosyst., 8, Q09007. Tarduno, J. A., et al., (2003). Science 301, 1064-1069.

  7. The first 'molecular disease': a story of Linus Pauling, the intellectual patron.

    PubMed

    Gormley, Melinda

    2007-06-01

    In November 1949, chemist Linus Pauling and three colleagues published an article on sickle-cell anemia, a study that opened up new and exciting possibilities for research into such 'molecular diseases'. Even before this celebrated publication appeared in Science, Pauling foresaw its potential benefits and announced it as a medical breakthrough: '... our structural chemistry and understanding of molecules is getting to the point where it should be of assistance in converting medicine into a real science' [Guiles, R. (1949) Discovery of blood disease called key to cancer research. The Detroit Times 13 Sep 1949, Newspaper Clippings 1949n.18, Pauling Papers.]. Their discovery--that this debilitating disorder was caused by an abnormal form of hemoglobin--was borne out of a rich mix of expertise, from Pauling's remarkable intuition to the careful experimental chemistry of his student Harvey A. Itano. It also relied upon technological innovation: a custom-made electrophoresis machine housed at the California Institute of Technology was the perfect tool to reveal fundamental chemical differences between normal and abnormal forms of hemoglobin. Not only did this work establish a new way of looking at inherited diseases, it also stimulated the mass production of the electrophoresis machine as an essential investigative and diagnostic tool. A close inspection of this case study illustrates just how Pauling ran his laboratory and helps to explain how one man could achieve so much over his lifetime. PMID:17602747

  8. Brotherly Advice: Letters from Hugo to Paul Ehrenfest in his Final Years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halpern, Paul

    2006-03-01

    At the start of the 1930s, theoretician Paul Ehrenfest spent much of his time traveling through America and Europe while engaged in a steady stream of lectures. This traveling phase coincided with a frantic and intense period of negative self-examination, financial difficulty, and various other personal concerns that would ultimately lead to his 1933 suicide. Throughout these final years, he kept up a steady correspondence with his brother Hugo, a physician based in Saint Louis. Ten years older than Paul, Hugo freely doled out frank psychological advice about subjects ranging from the proper treatment of children to the dangers of self-pity. Through a look at some of the letters exchanged between the two brothers, this talk will examine the role Hugo played during the dark final years of Paul Ehrenfest's life.

  9. Energy-level structure of ion cloud and crystal in a linear Paul trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Wei; Wu, Wei; Zhou, Yan-Li; Ou, Bao-Quan; Chen, Ping-Xing

    2014-08-01

    Ion cloud and crystal are recognized as two distinct states in ion traps, but there is no theory that can describe the energy-level structures of these two states from the perspective of quantum theory. In this paper, we construct a model describing ions in a linear Paul trap to investigate the energy-level structure with the linear response function, which is often used in the field of condensed matter to compute the energy-level of electrons or plasmas. We support a method to calculate the energy-level of both the crystal and cloudy states of trapped ions in a linear Paul trap. Furthermore, we present the energy-level diagram of two trapped ions and give a quantum interpretation for the fluorescence hysteresis loops that were observed in our laboratory. This is a fundamental theory that will help us to understand the crystallization and cooling processes of ions in a linear Paul trap.

  10. Nyblade Receives 2012 Paul G. Silver Award for Outstanding Scientific Service: Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyblade, Andrew

    2013-10-01

    I would like to thank Peter Shearer for his citation and the Seismology, Geodesy, and Tectonophysics sections for this honor. Paul Silver was a friend and mentor, and so receiving this award is especially meaningful. I first met Paul in 1993 when I was a postdoc writing a National Science Foundation proposal to deploy a seismic network in Tanzania and recall his strong encouragement to not cut back on the size of the project in spite of the cost. The project, which was funded, helped pave the way for the development of AfricaArray more than a decade later, illustrating Paul's far-reaching influence on the community through his support of junior scientists.

  11. [The vitalism of Paul-Joseph Barthez (1734-1806)].

    PubMed

    Han, Hee Jin

    2010-06-30

    In The Logic of Life (1970), Francois Jacob (1920- ), Nobel Prize laureate in Physiology or Medicine (1965), proclaimed the end of vitalism based on the concept of life. More than two decades before this capital sentence condemning vitalism was pronounced, Georges Canguilhem (1904-1995), a French philosopher of medicine, already acknowledged that eighteenth-century vitalism was scientifically retrograde and politically reactionary or counter-revolutionary insofar as it was rooted in the animism of Georg Ernst Stahl (1660-1734). The negative preconception of the term 'vitalism' came to be established as an orthodox view, since Claude Bernard (1813-1878) unfairly criticized contemporary vitalism in order to propagate his idea of experimental medicine. An eminent evolutionary biologist like Ernst Mayr (1904-2005) still defended similar views in This is Biology (1997), arguing that if vitalists were decisive and convincing in their rejection of the Cartesian model (negative heuristics), however they were equally indecisive and unconvincing in their own explanatory endeavors (positive heuristics). Historically speaking, vitalists came to the forefront for their outstanding criticism of Cartesian mechanism and physicochemical reductionism, while their innovative concepts and theories were underestimated and received much less attention. Is it true that vitalism was merely a pseudo-science, representing a kind of romanticism or mysticism in biomedical science? Did vitalists lack any positive heuristics in their biomedical research? Above all, what was actually the so.called 'vitalism'? This paper aims to reveal the positive heuristics of vitalism defined by Paul.Joseph Barthez (1734-1806) who was the founder of the vitalist school of Montpellier. To this end, his work and idea are introduced with regard to the vying doctrines in physiology and medicine. At the moment when he taught at the medical school of Montpellier, his colleagues advocated the mechanism of Rene Descartes (1596-1650), the iatromechanism of Herman Boerhaave (1668-1738), the iatrochemistry of Jan Baptist van Helmont (1579-1644), the animism of Stahl, and the organicism of Theophile de Bordeu (1722-1776). On the contrary, Barthez devoted himself to synthesize diverse doctrines and his vitalism consequently illustrated an eclectic character. Always taking a skeptical standpoint regarding the capacity of biomedical science, he defined his famous concept of 'vital principle (principe vital)' as the 'x (unknown variable)' of physiology. He argued that the hypothetical concept of vital principle referred to the 'experimental cause (cause experimentale)' verifiable by positive science. Thus, the vital principle was not presupposed as an a priori regulative principle. It was an a posteriori heuristic principle resulting from several experiments. The 'positivist hypothetism' of Barthez demonstrates not only pragmatism but also positivism in his scientific terminology. Furthermore, Barthez established a guideline for clinical practice according to his own methodological principles. It can be characterized as a 'humanist pragmatism' for the reason that all sort of treatments were permitted as far as they were beneficial to the patient. Theoretical incoherence or incommensurability among different treatments did not matter to Barthez. His practical strategy for clinical medicine consisted of three principles: namely, the natural, analytic, and empirical method. This formulation is indebted to the 'analytic method (methode analytique)' of the French empiricist philosopher Etienne Bonnot de Condillac (1714-1780). In conclusion, the eighteenth.century French vitalism conceived by Barthez pursued pragmatism in general, positivism in methodology, and humanism in clinics. PMID:20671403

  12. Miniature Paul—Straubel ion trap with well-defined deep potential well

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Nan; Dehmelt, Hans; Nagourney, Warren

    1989-01-01

    In some recently proposed experiments using ion traps, a Paul trap of conventional size and design is insufficient. We have constructed a miniature Paul—Straubel trap. It has a small elliptic ring (?0.2 mm) and three pairs of planar electrodes (?2 cm part) arranged so that they form a cube. The two conventional end-cap electrodes are replaced by the six planar electrodes. The ring is heatable to a high temperature for improving the uniformity of the dc potential on the ring surface. With this trap, we hope to do such fundamental studies as the true zero-point confinement of a single ion. Images PMID:16594055

  13. Nyblade Receives 2012 Paul G. Silver Award for Outstanding Scientific Service: Citation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shearer, Peter M.

    2013-10-01

    Andrew Nyblade is the first recipient of AGU's new Paul G. Silver Award for Outstanding Scientific Service. This award is given jointly by the Seismology, Geodesy, and Tectonophysics sections to a section member who has made outstanding contributions to these fields through mentoring of junior colleagues, leadership of community research initiatives, or other forms of unselfish collaboration in research. The award was named for the late Paul Silver as a tribute to the excellence and generosity of his scientific service and the importance of his research on mantle anisotropy, continental evolution, subduction zone dynamics, and earthquake source processes.

  14. 77 FR 42672 - Radio Broadcasting Services; Alberton, MT; Crystal Falls, MI; Saint Paul, AR; and Waitsburg, WA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-20

    ... allotted in MM Docket No. 97-34. See Saint Paul, Arkansas, 62 FR 65765, published December 16, 1997... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 73 Radio Broadcasting Services; Alberton, MT; Crystal Falls, MI; Saint Paul, AR;...

  15. Paul Abraham: A Forgotten Scholar of the Prussian Academy of Sciences and Humanities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thiel, Jens

    2004-01-01

    Paul Abraham, one of the Berlin Academy's most experienced researchers, was deported to Auschwitz in 1943. The fate of this Jewish scholar reveals much about the inner life of the Academy, and its treatment of Jewish staff, during the World War II. This paper describes his life, against a backdrop of war, revolution, and dictatorship, and in the…

  16. Astronaut Paul Weitz prepares to use bicycle ergometer in Skylab trainer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Astronaut Paul J. Weitz, pilot for the first manned Skylab mission, prepares to check out the bicycle ergometer in the work and experiments area of the crew quarters of the Skylab Orbital Workshop (OWS) trainer during Skylab training at the Johnson Space Center. Scientist-Astronaut Joseph P. Kerwin, science pilot of the mission, is in the background.

  17. At Paul Quinn, Students Till the Soil to Cultivate a Better College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelderman, Eric

    2012-01-01

    In autumn, most colleges' football fields are covered with a thick carpet of grass or artificial turf and are adorned with yard lines. But the football field at Paul Quinn College was carved up by plowing and planting. This past fall, portions of the college's gridiron were covered with sweet potatoes, watermelons, peppers, rosemary, and sugar…

  18. On Yesterday: Paul Levinson, President and Founder of Connected Education, Inc.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    TECHNOS, 1999

    1999-01-01

    This interview with author Paul Levinson applies Marshall McLuhans' ideas regarding media to today's society, the Internet and the Web, and their effects on human communication and education. Highlights include societal change; teachers as gatekeepers; accreditation of online college courses; the global village; and control of technology. (LRW)

  19. Phonology and Reading: A Response to Wang, Trezek, Luckner, and Paul

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Thomas E.; Clark, M. Diane; del Giudice, Alex; Koo, Daniel; Lieberman, Amy; Mayberry, Rachel; Millerd, Paul

    2009-01-01

    Four critical responses to an article, "The Role of Phonology and Phonologically Related Skills in Reading Instruction for Students Who Are Deaf or Hard of Hearing" (Wang, Trezek, Luckner, & Paul, 2008), are presented. Issue is taken with the conclusions of the article by Wang and colleagues regarding the "necessary" condition of phonological…

  20. Marco Paul's Travels on the Erie Canal: An Educational Voyage. Learning Page Lesson Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williammee, Janet; King, Rhonda

    In Jacob Abbott's book, "Marco Paul's Travels on the Erie Canal," Marco's cousin Forester explains to Marco that there are two modes of acquiring knowledge--through books and through observation. Students obtain more complete and meaningful understanding of a topic when provided with experiences that use both primary and secondary sources. This…

  1. Video Q&A: Patients leading the direction of clinical research - an interview with Paul Wicks

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In this video Q&A, we talk to Paul Wicks about the emergence of participant-led research, and discuss how this field may be expected to develop in the near future, particularly with regard to personalized medicine. PMID:25192467

  2. A Bridge Too Far? Comparative Reflections on St. Paul and Confucius

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayhoe, Ruth

    2012-01-01

    This paper is a personal reflection on a lifetime experience of bridging the values and ideas of two distinctive faith traditions: the Christian and the Confucian. The author has chosen to focus on the lives and beliefs of two great teachers: St. Paul in Europe of the first century CE and Confucius in China of the 5th century BCE First the context…

  3. Paul Broca and French Brains: Portraits from the Life of an Eminent Neuroscientist

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaPointe, Leonard L.

    2014-01-01

    Pierre Paul Broca is one of the most legendary neuroscientists of the last few centuries. His name graces a region of the brain, and his work is richly associated with human communication and its disorders. This article traces the contributions of this man and the historical context of his remarkable discoveries. After approval to visit and access…

  4. Paul F-Brandwein Lecture 2006: Conservation Education for the 21st Century and beyond

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roth, Charles E.

    2008-01-01

    This paper explores Paul Brandwein's contribution to the concept of conservation education in America. It examines the evolution of the concept to today's environmental education. It then identifies some of the weaknesses of current environmental education and presents ideas on how to move past them to a point where conservation education is…

  5. A Short Biography of Paul A. M. Dirac and Historical Development of Dirac Delta Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Debnath, Lokenath

    2013-01-01

    This paper deals with a short biography of Paul Dirac, his first celebrated work on quantum mechanics, his first formal systematic use of the Dirac delta function and his famous work on quantum electrodynamics and quantum statistics. Included are his first discovery of the Dirac relativistic wave equation, existence of positron and the intrinsic…

  6. A School-Based Enterprise: The Saint Pauls, North Carolina Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paquin, Thomas F.

    1991-01-01

    The superintendent of Saint Pauls Schools describes how educators, community leaders, businesspersons, and high school students worked together to develop the Way Off Broadway Deli, a successful school-based enterprise providing experiential education in entrepreneurship and small business management, as well as student employment and local…

  7. E. Paul Torrance: His Life, Accomplishments, and Legacy. Research Monograph Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hebert, Thomas P.; Cramond, Bonnie; Neumeister, Kristie L. Speirs; Millar, Garnet; Silvian, Alice F.

    This monograph is designed to be a tribute to E. Paul Torrance, a renowned creativity researcher, university teacher, and mentor. It is presented in three sections, the first of which is a discussion of Torrance's life. It reviews his childhood in rural Georgia, his academic accomplishments, the emergence of his interest in creativity and the…

  8. 75 FR 34097 - Expansion of Foreign-Trade Zone 119; Minneapolis-St. Paul Area

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-16

    .../21/09); Whereas, notice inviting public comment was given in the Federal Register (74 FR 26652, 6/3... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Foreign-Trade Zones Board Expansion of Foreign-Trade Zone 119; Minneapolis-St. Paul Area Pursuant to...

  9. Cost Study of the Saint Paul Early Childhood Scholarship Program. Technical Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Heather L.; Karoly, Lynn A.

    2011-01-01

    In 2008, the Minnesota Early Learning Foundation created the Saint Paul Early Childhood Scholarship Program, a pilot program to provide families with scholarships to cover the cost of high-quality early childhood education (ECE) programs. Although there is a large body of research about the benefits of preschool specifically and early learning…

  10. Astronaut Paul Weitz lies in lower body negative pressure device in trainer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Astronaut Paul J. Weitz, pilot of the first manned Skylab mission, lies in the lower body negative pressure device during Skylab training at JSC. Operating the controls in the background is scientist-astronaut Joseph P. Kerwin, science pilot of the mission. They are in the work and experiments area of the crew quarters of the Skylab Orbital Workshop (OWS) trainer at JSC.

  11. A Short Biography of Paul A. M. Dirac and Historical Development of Dirac Delta Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Debnath, Lokenath

    2013-01-01

    This paper deals with a short biography of Paul Dirac, his first celebrated work on quantum mechanics, his first formal systematic use of the Dirac delta function and his famous work on quantum electrodynamics and quantum statistics. Included are his first discovery of the Dirac relativistic wave equation, existence of positron and the intrinsic…

  12. Design and construction of a linear Paul trap for the study of crystalline beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kjærgaard, Niels; Mølhave, Kristian; Drewsen, Michael

    2005-03-01

    We comment on the paper "Design and fabrication of a linear Paul trap for the study space-charge-dominated beams" by Takai et al. (Nucl. Instr. and Meth. 532 (2004) 508) and describe a preceding experimental setup which shows many similarities.

  13. Systems Performance Analyses of Alaska Wind-Diesel Projects; St. Paul, Alaska (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Baring-Gould, I.

    2009-04-01

    This fact sheet summarizes a systems performance analysis of the wind-diesel project in St. Paul, Alaska. Data provided for this project include load data, average wind turbine output, average diesel plant output, dump (controlling) load, average net capacity factor, average net wind penetration, estimated fuel savings, and wind system availability.

  14. Micro-particle charge determination using a linear Paul trap with the end electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapitsky, D. S.

    2016-01-01

    A method for measuring the charge-to-mass ratio of micron-sized particles, using an electrodynamic linear Paul trap supplemented with the end electrode, is presented. Measurements were performed for the particle charge acquired by passing through a corona discharge.

  15. Remote sensing and crop models: The work of Paul Doraiswamy from 1995-2010

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ability to scale upward based on ground data has been a long standing principle of Dr. Paul Doraiswamy. While it is important to have ground data, it is equally important to be able to extend that data across a large landscape. The three primary methods of extending ground data are to use s...

  16. Elsie Shawe, Music Supervisor in St. Paul, Minnesota (1898-1933)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howe, Sondra Wieland

    2004-01-01

    Elsie Shawe (1866-1962), supervisor of music in St. Paul, Minnesota, for thirty-five years, is an example of a music supervisor in the United States who was active in the formative years of the Music Supervisors National Conference (MSNC). Although she is cited only briefly in national accounts, there is a substantial amount of material on her…

  17. The Birth of TCJ: Father's Curiosity Launched Paul Boyer on His Journey into Indian Country

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hernandez, Juan Avila

    2009-01-01

    From its inception in 1988, the "Tribal College Journal" (TCJ) has been a family affair. Paul Boyer, the buoyant founder of the TCJ who published, produced, and edited the magazine until 1995, says the magazine sprouted not from an idealistic plan but from a combination of his own youthful enthusiasm; the support and guidance of his late father,…

  18. Spatial fluorescence distribution and laser cooling of Ca+ in a Paul trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gudjons, T.; Arbes, F.; Benzing, M.; Kurth, F.; Werth, G.

    1995-01-01

    Experiments on Ca+ ions, confined in a Paul trap, deal with the spatial distribution of the fluorescence intensity, from which information on the velocity distribution of an ion cloud can be derived. We obtained laser cooling of a large (about 104) ion cloud. For a few or single trapped ions crystallization, "dark resonances" and quantum jumps have been observed.

  19. Payload specialists Marc Garneau and Paul Scully-Power in SMS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Payload specialists Marc Garneau and Paul Scully-Power are strapped into their seats in the Shuttle Mission Simulator in the mockup and integration laboratory by backup Payload specialist Dr. Robert Thirsk. The two 41-G payload specialists are strapped in with chairs in the launch position.

  20. A Philosophy of Man and Woman: Paul Goodman's Theory of Human Nature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Nadine Shanler

    Paul Goodman's criticisms of and proposals for institutions, including educational institutions, have as their foundation 1) a set of leading principles derived from experience and centered in a transactional view of experiences and 2) a concept of "self" which constitutes a theory of human nature. Human nature is viewed as process: tendencies or…

  1. A Contemporary View of Paul Klee as an Artist-Teacher.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malcolm, Dorothea C.

    The thesis explores the development of Paul Klee, a German artist, in terms of his educational and artistic philosophies. The research was limited to his teaching years at the Bauhaus and the Dusseldorf Academy, 1921 through 1933. Klee's own writings served as primary sources, and other sources included his son, a close friend, and Bauhaus…

  2. Paul Ricoeur, Memory, and the Historical Gaze: Implications for Education Histories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colby, Sherri Rae

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the author shares the potential applications of Paul Ricoeur's philosophies of history, memory, and narrative to the interpretation of educational histories, and those histories' life spans: moving cyclically from early conception, to evidentiary construction, to published dissemination; and ultimately to death or immortality. Her…

  3. Paul Ricoeur, Memory, and the Historical Gaze: Implications for Education Histories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colby, Sherri Rae

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the author shares the potential applications of Paul Ricoeur's philosophies of history, memory, and narrative to the interpretation of educational histories, and those histories' life spans: moving cyclically from early conception, to evidentiary construction, to published dissemination; and ultimately to death or immortality. Her…

  4. At Paul Quinn, Students Till the Soil to Cultivate a Better College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelderman, Eric

    2012-01-01

    In autumn, most colleges' football fields are covered with a thick carpet of grass or artificial turf and are adorned with yard lines. But the football field at Paul Quinn College was carved up by plowing and planting. This past fall, portions of the college's gridiron were covered with sweet potatoes, watermelons, peppers, rosemary, and sugar…

  5. USDA-ARS Plant Science Research Unit, St. Paul Alfalfa/Forage Research Program

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Plant Science Research Unit (PSRU) located at the University of Minnesota in St. Paul receives approximately $1.5 million to fund the research of six scientists who direct their research efforts toward developing new uses and improved traits for alfalfa. Our overarching goal is to develop alfalf...

  6. The Rhetoric of Opposing Constructions of Reality: Gay Rights in St. Paul.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmerton, Patricia R.

    Fantasy Theme Analysis was used to examine the rhetorical clash of incongruent world views during the 1978 controversy over a gay rights ordinance in St. Paul, Minnesota. Fantasy Theme Analysis considers the individual and collective dramatizations of a group's goals, scope, and activities--the group's conceptualized reality, or fantasy theme--in…

  7. 76 FR 44359 - Paul Weir Battershell, N.P.; Suspension Of Registration

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-25

    ... Wonderyears, Inc., 74 FR 457, 458 (2009)). See also id. at 45. The ALJ then discussed those facts she deemed... issuance of a final order by the Agency. Paul Volkman, 73 FR 30630, 30641 (2008). Accordingly, I find that... the DI went back to Healthy Habits and met with Respondent, his then attorney, and Dr. Lundahl. GX...

  8. Multiple Achievement Goals and Multiple Pathways for Learning: The Agenda and Impact of Paul R. Pintrich

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harackiewicz, Judith M.; Linnenbrink, Elizabeth A.

    2005-01-01

    This article considers the profound impact that Paul R. Pintrich had on the field of achievement motivation, specifically achievement goal theory. The article highlights Pintrich's groundbreaking research and theorizing, beginning with his early work integrating research on motivation and cognition and ending with his development of a multiple…

  9. Paul Broca and French Brains: Portraits from the Life of an Eminent Neuroscientist

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaPointe, Leonard L.

    2014-01-01

    Pierre Paul Broca is one of the most legendary neuroscientists of the last few centuries. His name graces a region of the brain, and his work is richly associated with human communication and its disorders. This article traces the contributions of this man and the historical context of his remarkable discoveries. After approval to visit and access…

  10. Socrates, Augustine, and Paul Gauguin on the Reciprocity between Speech and Silence in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caranfa, Angelo

    2013-01-01

    While most educational practices today place an excessive amount of attention on discourse, this article attaches great importance to the reciprocity between speech and silence by drawing from the writings of Plato's Socrates, Augustine, and Paul Gauguin for whom this reciprocity is of the essence in learning. These three figures teach that…

  11. The neutron Electric Dipole Moment experiment at the Paul Scherrer Institute

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hélaine, V.

    2014-06-01

    The neutron Electric Dipole Moment (nEDM) is a probe for physics beyond the Standard Model. A report on the nEDM measurement performed at the Paul Scherrer Institute (Switzerland) is given. A neutron spin analyzer designed to simultaneously detect both neutron spin states is presented.

  12. Time to Dream: "Reflections on Paul Diederich and the Progressive American High School"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Connor, John S.; Lessing, Avi D.

    2015-01-01

    In this essay, John S. O'Connor and Avi D. Lessing discuss the increasingly reductive and routinized nature of contemporary schools and the costs such an approach holds for students and teachers alike. The current approach is especially troublesome in light of the rich history of progressive voices, such as Paul Diederich, who have cautioned…

  13. On the integrability of the two-ion Paul trap in the pseudo potential approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blümel, R.

    1993-03-01

    The two-ion Paul trap is integrable in the pseudo potential approximation for trap asymmetry parameters ? = {1}/{2}and ? = 2 . Integrability at ? = {1}/{2} (proved by explicitly stating the corresponding analytical integral of the motion) is not consistent with recently published results [G. Baumann, Phys. Lett. A 162 (1992) 464].

  14. Paul F-Brandwein Lecture 2006: Conservation Education for the 21st Century and beyond

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roth, Charles E.

    2008-01-01

    This paper explores Paul Brandwein's contribution to the concept of conservation education in America. It examines the evolution of the concept to today's environmental education. It then identifies some of the weaknesses of current environmental education and presents ideas on how to move past them to a point where conservation education is…

  15. Invisible Walls: A Study of Racial Division and the Challenge of Building Bridges of Understanding in the St. Paul, MN Area Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    People for the American Way, Washington, DC.

    This is a report of a 6-month study of race relations in three public schools in the Saint Paul (Minnesota) metropolitan area. The study is intended to be the first phase of an attempt to improve intergroup relations and the social climate in Saint Paul, Roseville, and South St. Paul schools. Based on 154 interviews, 10 focus groups, and a written…

  16. A comparison of the Monospot with the Paul-Bunnell test in infectious mononucleosis and other diseases.

    PubMed

    Seitanidis, B

    1969-05-01

    The Monospot is a spot test designed for the diagnosis of infectious mononucleosis and its efficacy has been compared with that of the standard Paul-Bunnell test. Three out of 210 (1.4%) sera from normal persons and persons suffering from diseases other than infectious mononucleosis gave ;false' positive results when compared with the Paul-Bunnell test. Using 38 sera from patients with strong clinical and haematological evidence of infectious mononucleosis no false negative results were found with the Monospot test. The sera of 37 patients gave positive results with the Paul-Bunnell test: the one negative result was positive using serum taken a few days later. PMID:5814737

  17. The Paul wavelet algorithm: an alternative approach to calculate the refractive index dispersion of a dielectric film from transmittance spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Co?kun, Emre; Özder, Serhat; Tiryaki, Erhan

    2013-11-01

    A new application of the Paul wavelet algorithm was presented to determine the refractive index dispersion of a dielectric film from transmittance spectrum in the visible and near infrared region. The developed algorithm was tested by simulated data and experimentally applied to a sample of mica. The obtained refractive index dispersion determined by the Paul wavelet algorithm was compared with the refractive index values determined by the envelope and fringe counting methods, and also with the established result. It was shown that the degree of the Paul wavelet has a major effect on the outcome of a refractive index determination. The noise immunity of the presented method was shown by the simulation study.

  18. Paul-Mohr-Coulomb failure surface of rock in the brittle regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makhnenko, Roman Y.; Harvieux, Justice; Labuz, Joseph F.

    2015-09-01

    The Paul-Mohr-Coulomb failure criterion includes the intermediate principal stress ?II and friction angles at the limiting stress states of ?II = ?III and ?II = ?I, where ?I and ?III are major and minor principal stresses. Conventional triaxial compression (?II = ?III), extension (?II = ?I), and plane strain (?I ? ?II ? ?III) experiments were performed on dry rock. The failure data were plotted in principal stress space, and material parameters were determined in the context of two internal friction angles and the theoretical uniform triaxial (all-around equal) tensile strength. Assuming isotropy, the triaxial compression and extension results were used to construct a six-sided pyramidal failure surface, and the extension friction angle was larger than the compression friction angle, a sufficient but not necessary condition of the intermediate stress effect. To capture the behavior of the rock in multiaxial loading, the Paul-Mohr-Coulomb criterion was extended to form a 12-sided pyramid with best fit planes.

  19. Dipole Field Effects on Ion Ejections from a Paul Ion Trap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacAskill, J. A.; Chutjian, A.

    2011-01-01

    Attempts at improving the quality of mass spectra obtained from a Paul trap mass spectrometer prompted an investigation of the effects of additional fields to supplement the primary rf quadrupole trapping field. Reported here are the results of the first in a series of tests that focuses on the application of a single dipole field to augment the trapping and subsequent ejections of ions stored within a Paul trap. Measurements are presented for a fixed quadrupole frequency with varying dipole frequencies. The presence of the dipole field during the quadrupole trapping phase causes ion ejections of single m/z species at discrete dipole frequencies. During the mass analysis phase, the varying dipole frequency produces a complex set of resonant structures that impact ejection time (mass range), as well as mass spectral peak intensity and width

  20. Twin Trap or Hyphenation of a 3D Paul- and a Cassinian Ion Trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köster, Claus

    2015-03-01

    A new, generalized form of electrostatic, harmonic ion trap mass analyzer, referred to as a Cassinian trap, was introduced in 2009. The present work couples a second order Cassinian trap with a 3D Paul trap in an effort to produce an instrument having the advantages of both (i.e., MSn and high mass resolution and accuracy). The present study demonstrates the trapping of ions in the 3D Paul trap and their subsequent transfer to the Cassinian trap. The simultaneous transfer of ions over a broad (factor of 13) mass range is shown. Once in the Cassinian trap, ions can be mass analyzed by Fourier transform means, producing resolving powers as high as 53,000 for the fundamental FID and 140,000 for the third harmonic in 1 s.

  1. Experimental study on dipole motion of an ion plasma confined in a linear Paul trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, K.; Okano, T.; Moriya, K.; Fukushima, K.; Higaki, H.; Okamoto, H.

    2015-06-01

    The compact non-neutral plasma trap systems named "S-POD" have been developed at Hiroshima University as an experimental simulator of beam dynamics. S-POD is based either on a linear Paul trap or on a Penning trap and can approximately reproduce the collective motion of a relativistic charged-particle beam observed in the center-of-mass frame. We here employ the Paul trap system to investigate the behavior of an ion plasma near a dipole resonance. A simple method is proposed to calibrate the data of secular frequency measurements by using the dipole instability condition. We also show that the transverse density profile of an ion plasma in the trap can be estimated from the time evolution of ion losses caused by the resonance.

  2. Analytical mean-field scaling theory of radio-frequency heating in a Paul trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nam, Y. S.; Jones, E. B.; Blümel, R.

    2014-07-01

    While the microscopic origins of radio-frequency (rf) heating of simultaneously stored, charged particles in a Paul trap are not yet understood in detail, a universal heating curve [J. D. Tarnas, Y. S. Nam, and R. Blümel, Phys. Rev. A 88, 041401 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevA.88.041401] was recently discovered that collapses scaled rf heating data onto a single universal curve. Based on a simple analytical mean-field theory, we derive an analytical expression for the universal heating curve, which is in excellent agreement with numerical data. We find that for spherical clouds the universal curve depends only on a single scaling parameter, ? =[q(N-1)]2/3/T, where N is the number of trapped particles, q is the Paul-trap control parameter, and T is the temperature.

  3. Measurement of isotope ratio of Ca{sup +} ions in a linear Paul Trap

    SciTech Connect

    Hashimoto, Y.; Minamino, K.; Nagamoto, D.; Hasegawa, S.

    2009-03-17

    Measurement of isotope ratios of Calcium is very useful in many fields. So we demonstrated the measurement of isotope ratios of {sup 40}Ca{sup +}(abundance 96.4%) to {sup 44}Ca{sup +}(2.09%) ions in a linear Paul trap with several laser lights tuning to the isotope shifts. And we found that the experimental parameters had large influences on the measurement of the isotope ratios.

  4. 77 FR 31268 - Determination of Attainment for the Paul Spur/Douglas PM10

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-25

    ... published on August 8, 1991, (56 FR 37654). As a former ``group I'' area, the Paul Spur/Douglas NA\\2\\ was..., appendix A. See 40 CFR 58.14 (2006) and 58.20 (2007)\\4\\; 71 FR 61236, 61242; (October 17, 2006). All valid....'' See 57 FR 13564; (April 16, 1992), and Seitz memorandum, pages 5-6. Both sections 172(c)(1) and...

  5. An infrared astronomer's early vision of airborne astronomy: Paul Merrill 1920

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osterbrock, Donald E.

    1995-01-01

    The first published paper by a professional, research astronomer which discussed airborne astronomy from airplanes was by Paul W. Merrill. In it he proposed some of the types of observations which might be made, looking up at astronomical objects in the sky. This paper describes Merrill's paper, his education, training and subsequent career, and a few other aspects of the early history of airborne astronomy.

  6. Concordia U. Saint Paul Will Slash Tuition by One-Third

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Supiano, Beckie

    2012-01-01

    Concordia University Saint Paul will reduce the sticker price of its tuition and fees by $10,000, or about 33 percent, for the 2013-2014 academic year. Tuition and fees for all new and returning students in the traditional undergraduate program will drop to $19,700 next year from $29,700 this year, while the price of room and board will not…

  7. Concordia U. Saint Paul Will Slash Tuition by One-Third

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Supiano, Beckie

    2012-01-01

    Concordia University Saint Paul will reduce the sticker price of its tuition and fees by $10,000, or about 33 percent, for the 2013-2014 academic year. Tuition and fees for all new and returning students in the traditional undergraduate program will drop to $19,700 next year from $29,700 this year, while the price of room and board will not…

  8. Apollo 11 Astronauts Receive a Papal Audience by Pope Paul VI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    The Apollo 11 astronauts, Neil A. Armstrong, Edwin E. Aldrin, Jr., Michael Collins, and their wives receive a papal audience by Pope Paul VI in the Papal Library, St. Peters Cathedral at the Vatican. The GIANTSTEP-APOLLO 11 Presidential Goodwill Tour emphasized the willingness of the United States to share its space knowledge, and carried the Apollo 11 astronauts and their wives to 24 countries and 27 cities in 45 days.

  9. ISS Update: Final Week for Long Time Flight Director Paul Dye â?? 01.11.13 - Duration: 12 minutes.

    NASA Video Gallery

    Public Affairs Officer Dan Huot sits down with Flight Director Paul Dye in the Station Flight Control Room. In his final week as a flight director, Dye discusses his experiences from the beginning ...

  10. The effects of barometric pressure according to Paul Bert: the question today.

    PubMed

    Dejours, P; Dejours, S

    1992-10-01

    The scientific activity of Paul Bert was very diverse, but his main achievements concern the effects of barometric pressure upon life. The fundamental physiological effect of decreasing barometric pressure is due to the concomitant fall of the O2 partial pressure. The effects of lowering or raising the barometric pressure can be countered by increasing or decreasing the O2 fraction in the air. Extreme hyperoxia modifies cellular metabolism of all living beings: this is O2 poisoning, the Paul Bert effect. Rapid decompressions from several atmospheres, or even from sea level to high altitude, can entail the formation of bubbles of N2 dissolved under the high pressure in the tissues and blood. Decompression accidents may be prevented by decompressing slowly. Immediate recompression is the only way to overcome decompression accidents, as the N2 is forced back into solution. These main discoveries were not universally accepted before about 1915. However, since Paul Bert's time, some additional effects of changes of the barometric pressure, for example related to the variation of gas diffusivity and density, have been pointed out. It is also clear that some factors other than low barometric pressure, for instance radiation, temperature, humidity etc. may play important roles in the mechanism of mountain sickness. However, it remains that the main factor is hypoxia, since oxygen inhalation or recompression lead to a quick recovery. PMID:1483742

  11. Surface-electrode Paul trap with optimized near-field microwave control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carsjens, M.; Kohnen, M.; Dubielzig, T.; Ospelkaus, C.

    2014-01-01

    We describe the design of a microfabricated Paul trap with integrated microwave conductors for quantum simulation and entangling logic gates. We focus on an approach where near-field amplitude gradients of microwave fields from conductors in the trap structure induce the required spin-motional couplings. This necessitates a strong amplitude gradient of the microwave near-field at the position of the ions, while the field itself needs to be suppressed as much as possible. We introduce a single meander-like microwave conductor structure which provides the desired field configuration. We optimize its parameters through full-wave microwave numerical simulations of the near-fields. The microwave conductor is integrated with additional dc and rf electrodes to form the actual Paul trap. We discuss the influence of the additional electrodes on the field configuration. To be able to fine-tune the overlap of the Paul trap rf null with the microwave field minimum, our trap design allows relative tuning of trap rf electrode amplitudes. Our optimized geometry could achieve a ratio of sideband-to-carrier excitations comparable to experiments with focused laser beams.

  12. College and University Speech Codes in the Aftermath of R.A.V v. City of St. Paul.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fraleigh, Douglas

    In the case of RAV v. City of St. Paul, a teenager was charged with violating the city's Bias-Motivated Crime Ordinance after being accused of burning a cross inside the fenced yard of a black family. In a 9-0 decision, the Supreme Court struck down the St. Paul ordinance, a decision which raised a question as to whether many college and…

  13. As it is in heaven? John Paul II listened to God and misunderstood the message.

    PubMed

    1993-10-27

    This articles focuses on John Paul II's 1993 Veritatis Splendor, an 1798 page encyclical letter to the Church's bishops on the crisis in the Catholic Church of family limitation and the implications for the laity and society. The communication states that a flexible interpretation of theology must be abandoned. Paul VI's 19963 Humanae Vitae is reportedly affirmed. John XXIII's spiritualism and concern with conscience is ignored. This encyclical is identified as not spoken "ex cathedra" or from the throne, which would have made the pronouncement true, unarguable forever, and subject to excommunication for those disobeying. Pope John Paul II is said to be preparing another encyclical on life issues and sexuality. Reference is made in this encyclical to devices that are acceptable to use to gauge a safe period for copulation without impregnation. The devices include the rectal thermometer and the calculator for determining the infertile days in the natural cycle. Veritatis Splendor's position on fertility is viewed as an issue of loyalty to the Church and not as an honest evaluation of the moral implications of artificial birth control. This encyclical comes closer to "ex cathedra" than the Humanae Vitae, which banned the birth control pill, IUD, spermicides, hormonal implants, vasectomies, and tubal ligation. Liberal Catholic theologians are reported to have interpreted Paul VI's statement that "God illuminates from within the hearts of the faithful and invites their assent," as a validation of dissent. Pope John Paul II closes the door to dissent in this proclamation. The Church also closes the door to free will for people to decide for themselves. The Jesuits, with different notions of divine will, are described as potentially concluding that the denial of free will and individual reason for the sake of Papal supremacy must be the work of the devil himself. For good Catholics this encyclical is interpreted as potentially forcing even stronger opposition to the Vatican's teachings and continued adherence to the dictates of their own conscience. A God who gave men and women the power of his reason would not allow the Pope, however infallible, to take this away. Among nonreligious thinkers the Catholic posture is viewed as very wrong on birth control. Divisions within the Church are expected to increase. PMID:12345270

  14. Paul's gospel and the rhetoric of apostolic rejection: A study of Galatians 1:15--17, 1 Corinthians 15:8, F. C. Baur, and the origins of Paul's Gentile mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Matthew Wesley

    This dissertation proposes a new understanding of Paul's Gentile mission and its relationship to his so-called "conversion." This dissertation examines the origins of Paul's mission to the Gentiles, and locates it in his claims to have been personally commissioned to undertake such a mission by Jesus. Specifically, I argue that it is the rejection of Paul's claim to be an apostle, a claim founded upon his "conversion" experience, that precipitates his mission to the Gentiles. In arguing this view, I draw upon Ferdinand Christian Baur's nineteenth century theories concerning both the unreliability of Acts as a historical source, and his proposal of a clear division between Paul and the other apostles. In establishing the methodological and theoretical framework of the dissertation, I discuss the "New Perspective on Paul" that has dominated New Testament scholarship over the past thirty years. My study is also informed methodologically by the growing interest in rhetorical criticism among biblical scholars, although the emphasis of this dissertation bears more of a resemblance to the approach of the New Rhetoric than the categories of classical, Greco-Roman rhetoric. The textual component of this work falls into two stages. The first contains a full examination of Paul's "conversion passages" in Galatians 1:15--17 and 1 Corinthians 15:8, attempting to situate these seemingly unusual self-descriptions in their cultural contexts. The second involves an examination of F. C. Baur's presentation of Paul, and the reception of Baur's views among biblical scholars throughout the years following his scholarly activity. This dissertation makes two claims, each of which can stand on its own as an important contribution to scholarship. My first claim is that components of Baur's work support my proposal concerning Paul's Gentile mission and his experience of apostolic rejection, and that this proposal has much to commend it as an explanation of a perennial scholarly puzzle. My second claim is methodological, as I demonstrate that scholarly writings about Paul and his modern interpreters are themselves exercises in argumentation, and thus are not to be accepted uncritically, or without close attention to the rhetorical practices they utilize.

  15. Insights into the crystal chemistry of Earth materials rendered by electron density distributions: Pauling's rules revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbs, Gerald V.; Ross, Nancy L.; Cox, David F.; Rosso, Kevin M.

    2014-05-20

    Pauling's first two rules are examined in terms of the accumulation of the electron density between bonded pairs of atoms for a relatively large number of oxide and silicate crystals and siloxane molecules. The distribution of the electron density shows that the radius of the oxygen atom is not fixed, but that it actually decreases systematically from ~1.40 Å to ~ 0.65 Å as the polarizing power and the electronegativity of the bonded metal atoms increase and the distribution of the O atom is progressively polarized and contracted along the bond vectors by the impact of the bonded interactions. The contractions result in an aspherical oxygen atom that displays as many different bonded “radii” as it has bonded interactions. The bonded radii for the metal atoms match the Shannon and Prewitt ionic radii for the more electropositive atoms like potassium and sodium, but they are systematically larger for the more electronegative atoms like aluminum, silicon and phosphorous. Pauling's first rule is based on the assumption that the radius of the oxide anion is fixed and that the radii of the cations are such that radius sum of the spherical oxide anion and a cation necessarily equals the separation between the cation-anion bonded pair with the coordination number of the cation being determined by the ratio of the radii of the cation and anion. In the case of the bonded radii, the sum of the bonded radii for the metal atoms and the oxide anion necessarily equals the bond lengths by virtue of the way that the bonded radii were determined in the partitioning of the electron density along the bond path into metal and O atom parts. But, the radius ratio for the O and M atoms is an unsatisfactory rule for determining the coordination number of the metal atom inasmuch as a bonded O atom is not, in general, spherical, and its size varies substantially along its bonded directions. But by counting the number of bond paths that radiate from a bonded atom, the coordination number of the atom is determined uniquely independent of the asphericity and sizes of the atom. A power law connection established between the bond lengths and bond strengths for crystals and molecules is mirrored by a comparable power law connection between bond length and the accumulation of the electron density between bonded pairs of atoms, a connection that is consistent with Pauling's electroneutrality postulate that the charges of the atoms in an oxide are negligibly small. The connection indicates that a one-to-one correspondence exists between the accumulation between a pair of bonded atoms and the Pauling bond strength for M-O bonded interaction for all atoms of the periodic table. The connection provides a common basis for understanding the success of the manifold applications that have been made with the bond valence theory model together with the modeling of crystal structures, chemical zoning, leaching and cation transport in batteries and the like. We believe that the wide spread applications of the model in mineralogy and material science owes much of its success to the direct connection between bond strength and the quantum mechanical observable, the electron density distribution. Comparable power law expressions established for the bonded interactions for both crystals and molecules support Pauling's assertion that his second rule has significance for molecules as well as for crystals. A simple expression is found that provides a one to one connection between the accumulation of the electron density between bonded M and O atoms and the Pauling bond strength for all M atoms of the periodic table with ~ 95 % of the variation of the bond strength being explained in terms of a linear dependence on the accumulated electron density. Compelling evidence is presented that supports the argument that the Si-O bonded interactions for tiny siloxane molecules and silicate crystals are chemically equivalent.

  16. [Personalization concepts of medical ethics in the teachings of John Paul II].

    PubMed

    Guba?a, W

    1998-01-01

    According to John Paul's teaching, the medicine cannot be purely technological, but needs to have some human character. The medicine doctors should consider patients as a whole, not only their problems bound with the treating them as patients, and to cure them from their illnesses, but together considering their feelings, and their intellectual and spiritual life. John Paul's teaching in relation to "the personalizing of medicine" means such a consideration of the human being that is leading to the respect about the body, spirit and their culture. Therefore the knowledge about the biological properties of human life, should be accompanied together with the look onto their dignity. Nobody could be a doctor who cures only one organ of the human's body, but must see the whole human person together with the relations to other persons connected with that patient, because they have very often much of influence on to the health of a patient. That "personalizing of the medicine" should be done on such a way, when it is seen the total ill person. The doctor should be having friendly and even heartily personal relationship to the patient, which should lead to a dialog between them, full of respect and confidence. Nobody is allowed to consider an ill person as a clinical case, but should see a person who is expecting not only professional, competent medical attention, but also the understanding of the patient's spirit, which is being bound with that illness. In this way, John Paul II is telling us, that the health service should not be based entirely on the professional knowledge and skill. The doctor should see in the ill person his own dearest brother or sister, whom we are to love very much, and should be taking part in the illnesses of them. PMID:10816965

  17. Generalized Slater--Pauling curve and the role of metalloids in Fe-based amorphous alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Sostarich, M. )

    1990-05-01

    A modification of the generalized Slater--Pauling curve so as to consider the concentration dependence of the number of majority-spin {ital sp} electrons per average atom is proposed for amorphous iron-metalloid alloys. In this way an improved matching of the measured magnetic moment dependence on composition is achieved for Fe alloys with B and/or P as metalloids. Comparison of theory with experiment shows that amorphous Fe-P alloys tend to be magnetically rather strong, whereas their Fe-B counterparts are weak itinerant ferromagnets in almost the entire range of compositions.

  18. Phonology and reading: a response to Wang, Trezek, Luckner, and Paul.

    PubMed

    Allen, Thomas E; Clark, M Diane; del Giudice, Alex; Koo, Daniel; Lieberman, Amy; Mayberry, Rachel; Miller, Paul

    2009-01-01

    Four critical responses to an article, "The Role of Phonology and Phonologically Related Skills in Reading Instruction for Students Who Are Deaf or Hard of Hearing" (Wang, Trezek, Luckner, & Paul, 2008), are presented. Issue is taken with the conclusions of the article by Wang and colleagues regarding the "necessary" condition of phonological awareness for the development of reading skills among deaf readers. Research findings (not cited by Wang and colleagues) are pointed out that reveal weak correlations between phonemic awareness and reading comprehension, and stronger correlations between other variables such as overall language skill and early exposure to a visual language. PMID:20066916

  19. A history of gravity: An introduction to the epistemology of Paul Feyerabend

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, Danilo Miranda

    2015-08-01

    The goal of this work is to show an historical introduction to epistemology of Paul Feyerabend and the importance of his concept of epistemological anarchism for education.Feyerabend defended that different and even contradictory theories must be used in education, this multiplicity of possible explanations for natural phenomena is important to express the real development of science.There are many different explanations for the fall of bodies, since the "natural places" in Aristotle until the Newtonian Gravitation or the General Relativity. The contact with many different explanations has as important contribution for the learning of Astronomy.

  20. Integration of Rooftop Photovoltaic Systems in St. Paul Ford Site's Redevelopment Plans

    SciTech Connect

    Olis, D.; Mosey, G.

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this analysis is to estimate how much electricity the redeveloped Ford Motor Company assembly plant site in St. Paul, Minnesota, might consume under different development scenarios and how much rooftop photovoltaic (PV) generation might be possible at the site. Because the current development scenarios are high-level, preliminary sketches that describe mixes of residential, retail, commercial, and industrial spaces, electricity consumption and available rooftop area for PV under each scenario can only be grossly estimated. These results are only indicative and should be used for estimating purposes only and to help inform development goals and requirements moving forward.

  1. Vegetation and Mammuthus primigenius extinction history on St Paul Island, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Newsom, L.; Belmecheri, S.; Culleton, B.; Williams, J. W.

    2014-12-01

    St. Paul Island, AK, part of the Pribilofs, is an island remnant of the Bering Land Bridge, a possible coastal Picea refugium at the last glacial maximum, and a Holocene refugium for Mammuthus primigenius. A prior pollen record from Lake Hill indicates that St. Paul was predominantly herb tundra during the last glacial maximum followed by a shrub tundra in the early Holocene (Colinvaux, 1980). Subsequently, three radiocarbon dates on bones from Qagnax Cave indicate a last appearance of Mammuthus primigenius of 6.5 ka on St. Paul (Veltre et al. 2008). In March 2013, our team retrieved a 13.5 m composite core from Lake Hill to refine the extinction timing chronology, assess environmental change during the extinction interval, and test hypotheses about vegetation-megafauna feedback. This paper reports the results from modern botanical survey and analyses of fossil pollen, Sporormiella and other coprophilous spores, anchored by a new radiocarbon chronology consisting of seven AMS dates. Presently, bryophytes, Equisetum, Poaceae, Juncaceae, Salix and Viola commonly occur at the lake margin, accompanied increasingly by sedge meadow taxa with greater distance from the water's edge, especially Cyperaceae, Asteraceae, Apiaceae, Lupinus, Rubus and Valeriana. Sporormiella is consistently present in low abundances (2%, ~700 grains/cm3) in the late glacial and early Holocene until a drop to zero at 6,050 yr BP, remaining absent during the middle and late Holocene when it reappears at 1904 AD. The timing of Sporormiella decline and reappearance match well to the youngest mammoth bone date and the historic reintroduction of reindeer (1911 AD) on St. Paul Island. After 11 ka, major pollen types include Apiaceae, Poaceae, Cyperaceae, Artemisia and Salix, with lower abundances of Betula, Alnus and Ericaceae, consistent with herb tundra with some shrubs. Degraded Picea pollen grains are found at 12,240 yr BP in very low concentrations (223 grains/cm3), indicating long-distance deposition from a distal source with no local refugium. Declines in Apiaceae and Poaceae, and increases in Artemisia and Salix between 8014 and 7605 yr BP suggest a gradual increase prevalence of shrub tundra. The establishment of shrub tundra precedes the Sporormiella decline, suggesting this vegetation change was not caused by the megafaunal extinction.

  2. Addendum to "Quantum theory of the stability region of an ion in a Paul trap"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Leilei; Feng, Mang; Wang, Kelin

    2014-03-01

    The authors call attention to a previous work [Kelin Wang, Mang Feng, and Juhao Wu, Phys. Rev. A 52, 1419 (1995), 10.1103/PhysRevA.52.1419] for quantum-mechanically studying the stability region of the Paul trap, where the calculation does not work for the case of zero dc voltage. But the ions can be confined experimentally at zero dc voltage which is understandable via the Mathieu equation. We present a quantum-mechanical study for such a case as a supplement.

  3. Two-Ion System in Paul Trap as Element of Quantum Logic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakovlev, V. P.; Pal'chikov, V. G.; Troyan, V. I.; Borisyuk, P. V.; Krasavin, A. V.

    The results are presented and the future prospects for research are discussed on the practical implementation of the simplest quantum register consisting of two ions trapped and cooled in a linear Paul trap. Physical mechanisms allowing manipulation of systems with high-Q transitions that can be used as new generation optical frequency standards are discussed. Mechanism of a sympathetic cooling for such systems and spectroscopy of highly forbidden "clock" transitions based on quantum logics are presented. Some prospects for the development of a nuclear frequency standard based on optical transition in thorium nucleus allowing increasing frequency uncertainty up to 10-20 ÷ 10-22 are also discussed.

  4. Description of ion motion in a Paul trap immersed in a cold atomic gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krych, Micha?; Idziaszek, Zbigniew

    2015-02-01

    We investigate the problem of a single ion in a radio-frequency trap immersed in an ultracold Bose gas in either a condensed or a noncondensed phase. We develop a master-equation formalism describing the sympathetic cooling, and we determine the cooling rates of ions. We show that the cold atomic reservoir modifies the stability diagram of the ion in the Paul trap, creating regions where the ion is either cooled or heated due to the energy quanta exchanged with the time-dependent potential.

  5. Ultracold Neutron Production at the Second Spallation Target of the Paul Scherrer Institute

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauss, Bernhard

    The ultracold neutron (UCN) source at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), Switzerland has started full beam operation in mid 2011. Since then, continuous improvements have led to an UCN intensity increase by about a factor of 80 in comparison to first beam on target. UCN delivery to two beam ports is now operating on a regular basis, with e.g. about 17 million UCN delivered to one experiment over the first 200 s with every 4 s long beam pulse operated in a 480 s interval.

  6. [Jean-Louis-Paul Denucé (1824-1889): A forgotten pioneer of plastic surgery].

    PubMed

    Marck, K W; Martin, D

    2016-02-01

    The authors propose to define as main characterization of plastic reconstructive surgery the conceptual thinking that leads to a rational choice of an operative treatment. Conceptual thinking in plastic surgery started halfway the nineteenth century with the first schematic representations of the operative procedures available at that time, in which Von Ammon and Baumgarten, Szymanowski and Denucé played a prominent role. These four authors and their works are presented with special attention for the less known of them, Jean-Paul Denucé, surgeon in Bordeaux. PMID:26612441

  7. Startup of the high-intensity ultracold neutron source at the Paul Scherrer Institute

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauss, Bernhard

    2012-05-01

    Ultracold neutrons (UCN) can be stored in suitable bottles and observed for several hundreds of seconds. Therefore UCN can be used to study in detail the fundamental properties of the neutron. A new user facility providing ultracold neutrons for fundamental physics research has been constructed at the Paul Scherrer Institute, the PSI UCN source. Assembly of the facility finished in December 2010 with the first production of ultracold neutrons. Operation approval was received in June 2011. We give an overview of the source and the status at startup.

  8. Startup of the high-intensity ultracold neutron source at the Paul Scherrer Institute

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauss, Bernhard

    Ultracold neutrons (UCN) can be stored in suitable bottles and observed for several hundreds of seconds. Therefore UCN can be used to study in detail the fundamental properties of the neutron. A new user facility providing ultracold neutrons for fundamental physics research has been constructed at the Paul Scherrer Institute, the PSI UCN source. Assembly of the facility finished in December 2010 with the first production of ultracold neutrons. Operation approval was received in June 2011. We give an overview of the source and the status at startup.

  9. Sea level at Saint Paul Island, southern Indian Ocean, from 1874 to the present

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Testut, L.; Miguez, B. Martin; WöPpelmann, G.; Tiphaneau, P.; Pouvreau, N.; Karpytchev, M.

    2010-12-01

    A data archeology exercise was carried out on sea level observations recorded during the transit of Venus across the Sun observed in 1874 from Saint Paul Island (38°41'S, 77°31 E) in the southern Indian Ocean. Historical (1874) and recent (1994-2009) sea level observations were assembled into a consistent time series. A thorough check of the data and its precise geodetic connection to the same datum was only possible thanks to the recent installation of new technologies (GPS buoy and radar water level sensor) and leveling campaigns. The estimated rate of relative sea level change, spanning the last 135 years at Saint Paul Island, was not significantly different from zero (-0.1 ± 0.3 mm yr-1), a value which could be reconciled with estimates of global average sea level rise for the 20th century assuming the DORIS vertical velocity estimate at Amsterdam Island (100 km distant) could be applied to correct for the land motion at the tide gauge. Considering the scarcity of long-term sea level data in the Southern Hemisphere, the exercise provides an invaluable additional observational constraint for further investigations of the spatial variability of sea level change, once vertical land rates can be determined.

  10. Water-resources reconnaissance of the southeastern part of St Paul Island, Pribilof Islands, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Feulner, Alvin John

    1980-01-01

    A hydrologic reconnaissance of the southeastern part of St. Paul Island, Pribilof Islands, Alaska, was made in August 1979 to determine if sufficient freshwater is available for a proposed harbor and fish-processing facility. Only three wells were being used in 1979, two by the community of St. Paul and one by the Coast Guard Loran facility. All wells are in the southeastern part of the island. The island has no established surface drainage, and no springs were found on the eastern part of the island during the survey. Drainage of ground-water from the island is assumed to be by seepage through the sandy deposits along the east coast and possibly by undersea discharge elsewhere on the island. On the basis of present well yields, amount of freshwater inferred to be present below the water table, and potential recharge from precipitation, it is concluded that it should be possible to design a well field in the southeastern part of the island that could yield more than a million gallons per day without danger of inducing saline water into the well field. The water is of good chemical quality. (USGS)

  11. Long-term drifts of stray electric fields in a Paul trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Härter, A.; Krükow, A.; Brunner, A.; Hecker Denschlag, J.

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the evolution of quasi-static stray electric fields in a linear Paul trap over a period of several months. Depending on how these electric fields are initially induced, we observe very different timescales for the field drifts. Photo-induced electric fields decay on timescales of days. We interpret this as photo-electrically generated charges on insulating materials which decay via discharge currents. In contrast, stray fields due to the exposure of the ion trap to a beam of Ba atoms mainly exhibit slow dynamics on the order of months. We explain this observation as a consequence of a coating of the trap electrodes by the atomic beam. This may lead to contact potentials which can slowly drift over time due to atomic diffusion and chemical processes on the surface. In order not to perturb the field evolutions, we suppress the generation of additional charges and atomic coatings in the Paul trap during the measurements. For this, we shield the ion trap from ambient light and only allow the use of near-infrared lasers. Furthermore, we minimize the flux of atoms into the ion trap chamber. Long-term operation of our shielded trap led us to a regime of very low residual electric field drifts of less than 0.03 V/m per day.

  12. High Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC) on Mars Express - a decade of PR/EO activities at Freie Universität Berlin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balthasar, Heike; Dumke, Alexander; van Gasselt, Stephan; Gross, Christoph; Michael, Gregory; Musiol, Stefanie; Neu, Dominik; Platz, Thomas; Rosenberg, Heike; Schreiner, Björn; Walter, Sebastian

    2014-05-01

    Since 2003 the High Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC) experiment on the Mars Express mission is in orbit around Mars. First images were sent to Earth on January 14th, 2004. The goal-oriented HRSC data dissemination and the transparent representation of the associated work and results are the main aspects that contributed to the success in the public perception of the experiment. The Planetary Sciences and Remote Sensing Group at Freie Universität Berlin (FUB) offers both, an interactive web based data access, and browse/download options for HRSC press products [www.fu-berlin.de/planets]. Close collaborations with exhibitors as well as print and digital media representatives allows for regular and directed dissemination of, e.g., conventional imagery, orbital/synthetic surface epipolar images, video footage, and high-resolution displays. On a monthly basis we prepare press releases in close collaboration with the European Space Agency (ESA) and the German Aerospace Center (DLR) [http://www.geo.fu-berlin.de/en/geol/fachrichtungen/planet/press/index.html]. A release comprises panchromatic, colour, anaglyph, and perspective views of a scene taken from an HRSC image of the Martian surface. In addition, a context map and descriptive texts in English and German are provided. More sophisticated press releases include elaborate animations and simulated flights over the Martian surface, perspective views of stereo data combined with colour and high resolution, mosaics, and perspective views of data mosaics. Altogether 970 high quality PR products and 15 movies were created at FUB during the last decade and published via FUB/DLR/ESA platforms. We support educational outreach events, as well as permanent and special exhibitions. Examples for that are the yearly "Science Fair", where special programs for kids are offered, and the exhibition "Mars Mission and Vision" which is on tour until 2015 through 20 German towns, showing 3-D movies, surface models, and images of the HRSC camera experiment. Press and media appearances of group members, and talks to school classes and interested communities also contribute to the public outreach. For HRSC data dissemination we use digital platforms. Since 2007 HRSC image data can be viewed and accessed via the online interface HRSCview [http://hrscview.fu-berlin.de] which was built in cooperation with the DLR Institute for Planetary Research. Additionally HRSC ortho images (level 4) are presented in a modern MapServer setup in GIS-read format since 2013 [http://www.geo.fu-berlin.de/en/geol/fachrichtungen/planet/projects/marsexpress/level4downloads/index.html]. All of these offers ensured the accessibility of HRSC data and products to the science community as well as to the general public for the last ten years and will do so also in the future, taking advantage of modern and user-optimized applications and networks.

  13. Moral Perception and Judgment and a Truly Radical Change of Social Practices: A Reply to Paul Standish's "Registers of the Religious"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smeyers, Paul

    2012-01-01

    This article presents the author's response to Paul Standish's "Registers of the Religious". Addressing what he calls the "global", Paul Standish starts from MacIntyre's observation that people live in a world characterized by a vocabulary of value whose purchase on life is no longer authentically experienced: "MacIntyre's diagnosis of the…

  14. "Toward a Strategic Use of Resources in Saint Paul Public Schools": A Review of the SPPS FY2006 Spending Strategy with Recommendations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frank, Stephen; Munkwitz, Keri

    2007-01-01

    In the Fall of 2006, Education Resource Strategies (ERS), a nation-wide leader in helping school systems make the most of their resources, was invited by Saint Paul Public Schools (SPPS) to study the use of resources in the district and create priority recommendations to inform the district's strategic plan. Saint Paul is in a situation where…

  15. Rotational dynamics of a diatomic molecular ion in a Paul trap.

    PubMed

    Hashemloo, A; Dion, C M

    2015-11-28

    We present models for a heteronuclear diatomic molecular ion in a linear Paul trap in a rigid-rotor approximation, one purely classical and the other where the center-of-mass motion is treated classically, while rotational motion is quantized. We study the rotational dynamics and their influence on the motion of the center-of-mass, in the presence of the coupling between the permanent dipole moment of the ion and the trapping electric field. We show that the presence of the permanent dipole moment affects the trajectory of the ion and that it departs from the Mathieu equation solution found for atomic ions. For the case of quantum rotations, we also evidence the effect of the above-mentioned coupling on the rotational states of the ion. PMID:26627960

  16. [Ilya Ilich Metchnikov and Paul Ehrlich: 1908 Nobel Prize winners for their research on immunity].

    PubMed

    Lokaj, J; John, C

    2008-11-01

    The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1908 was awarded to Ilya I. Mechnikov and Paul Ehrlich for recognition of their work on immunity. Mechnikov have discovered phagocytes and phagocytosis as the basis of natural cellular immunity. His ,,phagocytic theory" is the principle of immunological concept "self and not self" as the prerequisition of physiological inflammation, and selfmaintaining of organism. Ehrlich developed the methods for standardization of antibody activity in immune sera, described neutralizing and complement-depending effect of antibodies and enunciated the ,"ide-chain" theory of the formation of antibodies. Their concept of the key-stone of immunity was different, but they expressed the basic paradigma of immunology: immunity imply the protection of identity and guarantee the integrity of organism. Both are the founders of immunology as the scientific discipline. Discoveries and conceptions of I. Mechnikov and P. Ehrlich exceedingly influenced development of immunology and are also applicable, instructive and suggestive in contemporary immunology and microbiology. PMID:19069024

  17. Louis Paul Cailletet: The liquefaction of oxygen and the emergence of low-temperature research

    PubMed Central

    Papanelopoulou, Faidra

    2013-01-01

    In 1877 Louis Paul Cailletet in France and Raoul Pictet in Switzerland liquefied oxygen in the form of a mist. The liquefaction of the first of the so-called permanent gases heralded the birth of low-temperature research and is often described in the literature as having started a ‘race’ for attaining progressively lower temperatures. In fact, between 1877 and 1908, when helium, the last of the permanent gases, was liquefied, there were many priority disputes—something quite characteristic of the emergence of a new research field. This paper examines Cailletet's path to the liquefaction of oxygen, as well as a debate between him and the Polish physicist Zygmunt Wróblewski over the latter's contribution to the liquefaction of gases.

  18. Improving the Spatial Resolution of Neutron Imaging at Paul Scherrer Institut - The Neutron Microscope Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trtik, Pavel; Hovind, Jan; Grünzweig, Christian; Bollhalder, Alex; Thominet, Vincent; David, Christian; Kaestner, Anders; Lehmann, Eberhard H.

    Here we present results stemming from the first prototype of the Neutron Microscope instrument at Paul ScherrerInstitut (PSI). The instrument is based on a very thin gadolinium oxysulfide (Gd2O2S:Tb+) scintillator screen and a magnifying optics. The Neutron Microscope prototype has been tested at the ICON and the BOA beamlines at PSI and sub-10 μm features can be clearly resolved on a focussed ion beam (FIB) enhance test object - a gadolinium-based Siemens star. The spatial resolution of the images of the gadolinium-based Siemensstar assessed by Fourier ring correlation was about 7.6 μm. The outlook for future improvement of the Neutron Microscope system is presented.

  19. Stretched and overwound DNA forms a Pauling-like structure with exposed bases

    PubMed Central

    Allemand, J. F.; Bensimon, D.; Lavery, R.; Croquette, V.

    1998-01-01

    We investigate structural transitions within a single stretched and supercoiled DNA molecule. With negative supercoiling, for a stretching force >0.3 pN, we observe the coexistence of B-DNA and denatured DNA from σ ≈ −0.015 down to σ = −1. Surprisingly, for positively supercoiled DNA (σ > +0.037) stretched by 3 pN, we observe a similar coexistence of B-DNA and a new, highly twisted structure. Experimental data and molecular modeling suggest that this structure has ≈2.62 bases per turn and an extension 75% larger than B-DNA. This structure has tightly interwound phosphate backbones and exposed bases in common with Pauling’s early DNA structure [Pauling, L. & Corey, R. B. (1953), Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 39, 84–97] and an unusual structure proposed for the Pf1 bacteriophage [Liu, D. J. & Day, L. A. (1994) Science 265, 671–674]. PMID:9826669

  20. Rotational dynamics of a diatomic molecular ion in a Paul trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashemloo, A.; Dion, C. M.

    2015-11-01

    We present models for a heteronuclear diatomic molecular ion in a linear Paul trap in a rigid-rotor approximation, one purely classical and the other where the center-of-mass motion is treated classically, while rotational motion is quantized. We study the rotational dynamics and their influence on the motion of the center-of-mass, in the presence of the coupling between the permanent dipole moment of the ion and the trapping electric field. We show that the presence of the permanent dipole moment affects the trajectory of the ion and that it departs from the Mathieu equation solution found for atomic ions. For the case of quantum rotations, we also evidence the effect of the above-mentioned coupling on the rotational states of the ion.

  1. Critical thinking in clinical nurse education: application of Paul's model of critical thinking.

    PubMed

    Andrea Sullivan, E

    2012-11-01

    Nurse educators recognize that many nursing students have difficulty in making decisions in clinical practice. The ability to make effective, informed decisions in clinical practice requires that nursing students know and apply the processes of critical thinking. Critical thinking is a skill that develops over time and requires the conscious application of this process. There are a number of models in the nursing literature to assist students in the critical thinking process; however, these models tend to focus solely on decision making in hospital settings and are often complex to actualize. In this paper, Paul's Model of Critical Thinking is examined for its application to nursing education. I will demonstrate how the model can be used by clinical nurse educators to assist students to develop critical thinking skills in all health care settings in a way that makes critical thinking skills accessible to students. PMID:22525831

  2. Impact assessment report: R. Paul Smith Steam Electric Station aquatic monitoring program. Volume I. Text

    SciTech Connect

    Janicki, A.J.; Johnson, G.F.; Summers, J.K.; Smith, R.P.; Ross, R.N.

    1981-06-01

    This document is a summary and interpretation of findings from aquatic monitoring studies that have been conducted since 1976 at the site of the R. Paul Smith Steam Electric Station on the upper Potomac River. The report gives an overview of all the studies, summarizes major findings, and presents conclusions about the impact of plant operations on the lotic ecosystem. More detailed descriptions of individual studies (e.g., methods, analyses, results) are presented in Appendices A through D (Volume II), wherein studies are grouped by similar topics: A -- physical and chemical variables, B -- periphyton, C -- benthic macroinvertebrates, and D -- finfish. These appendices include all study findings deemed relevant to the assessment of plant impact.

  3. The Galileo Affair from John Milton to John Paul II: Problems and Prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finocchiaro, Maurice A.

    In an attempt to lay the groundwork for systematically studying the controversy generated by Galileo's trial in 1633, I begin by distinguishing the original 20-year episode from the subsequent 350-year controversy, and the historical aftermath of the original episode from the reflective commentary about it. The historical aftermath is sketched by a periodization into five phases, and the reflective commentary by defining and illustrating several historiographical types: surface-structural, deep-structural, evaluatively overcharged, pro- and anti-clerical, pro- and anti-Galilean, circumstantial, principled, one-dimensional, and multi-dimensional. Finally, I examine in somewhat greater detail Milton's comment in the Areopagitica (1644) and Pope John Paul II's alleged rehabilitation of Galileo (1979-1992).

  4. Objective measures of laryngeal imaging: what have we learned since Dr. Paul Moore.

    PubMed

    Woo, Peak

    2014-01-01

    Dr. Paul Moore pioneered the use of high-speed cinematography for observation of normal and abnormal vocal fold vibrations during phonation. His analysis of the glottal area waveform, opening and closing speed index, and open quotient from the high-speed films were labor intensive but relevant today. With advances in digital image capture and automated image extraction techniques, stroboscopy and high-speed images of vocal fold vibration may be analyzed with objective measures. Digital high-speed image capture in color is now clinically practical at high resolution. Digital kymography now allows analysis of the vibratory waveform from each vocal fold. Serial capture and comparison can document changes in vibratory function with treatment. Quantification of vocal fold vibration using such techniques is now practical. This is a review of vocal fold vibration capture and analysis techniques since Dr. Moore. PMID:24094798

  5. Richard Arwed Pfeifer - a pioneer of 'medical pedagogy' and an opponent of Paul Schroder.

    PubMed

    Steinberg, Holger; Carius, Dirk; Himmerich, Hubertus

    2013-12-01

    Richard Arwed Pfeifer (1877-1957) was one of the initiators and foster fathers of the renowned child-psychiatric and special needs education workgroup at Leipzig University under Paul Schröder (1873-1941) in the 1920s and 1930s. This paper is an account of their dispute concerning the interrelations between child and adolescent psychiatry and special needs education, as well as their disagreement about whether adolescent psychopaths should be admitted to specialized child psychiatric wards or elsewhere. Moreover, Pfeifer questioned the practical relevance of the separation of constitutional and environmentally-based psychopathy and fought eugenic research, which he found incompatible with the ethics of his profession as a remedial teacher and child psychiatrist. PMID:24573755

  6. [Legal regulation of the personnel issues of military medicine during the reign of Paul I].

    PubMed

    Iskhakov, E R

    2015-08-01

    The article describes laws and regulations concerning the Russian army and navy, and accordingly its medical services accepted during the reign of Paul I. During this period different decrees aimed to improve medical personnel training in order to admit students to medical and surgical schools, reorganization of educational medical institutions, improving of professional skills of medical workers. Other decrees, aimed to improvement of recruitment of medical personnel of troops: the best students of had to be sent to troops instead physician assistant, medical staff increase and additional funding, countering the reduce of physicians' social welfare due to the inhumane attitude of the authorities, to regulate of the military medical service rotation order as well as assessment of their professional, moral, and psychological qualities. PMID:26829875

  7. Persistence rates and detection probabilities of oiled king eider carcasses on St Paul Island, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fowler, A.C.; Flint, P.L.

    1997-01-01

    Following an oil spill off St Paul Island, Alaska in February 1996, persistence rates and detection probabilities of oiled king eider (Somateria spectabilis) carcasses were estimated using the Cormack-Jolly-Seber model. Carcass persistence rates varied by day, beach type and sex, while detection probabilities varied by day and beach type. Scavenging, wave action and weather influenced carcass persistence. The patterns of persistence differed on rock and sand beaches and female carcasses had a different persistence function than males. Weather, primarily snow storms, and degree of carcass scavenging, diminished carcass detectability. Detection probabilities on rock beaches were lower and more variable than on sand beaches. The combination of persistence rates and detection probabilities can be used to improve techniques of estimating total mortality.

  8. Off-resonance energy absorption in a linear Paul trap due to mass selective resonant quenching

    SciTech Connect

    Sivarajah, I.; Goodman, D. S.; Wells, J. E.; Smith, W. W.; Narducci, F. A.

    2013-11-15

    Linear Paul traps (LPT) are used in many experimental studies such as mass spectrometry, atom-ion collisions, and ion-molecule reactions. Mass selective resonant quenching (MSRQ) is implemented in LPT either to identify a charged particle's mass or to remove unwanted ions from a controlled experimental environment. In the latter case, MSRQ can introduce undesired heating to co-trapped ions of different mass, whose secular motion is off resonance with the quenching ac field, which we call off-resonance energy absorption (OREA). We present simulations and experimental evidence that show that the OREA increases exponentially with the number of ions loaded into the trap and with the amplitude of the off-resonance external ac field.

  9. Neutron imaging options at the BOA beamline at Paul Scherrer Institut

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgano, M.; Peetermans, S.; Lehmann, E. H.; Panzner, T.; Filges, U.

    2014-08-01

    The BOA beamline at the Swiss spallation neutron source SINQ at Paul Scherrer Institut is a flexible instrument used mainly for testing novel techniques and devices for neutron scattering and optics, but, due to the large and relatively homogeneous field of view, it can be successfully used for experiments in the field of neutron imaging. The beamline allows also for the exploitation of advanced imaging concepts such as polarized neutron imaging and diffractive neutron imaging. In this paper we present the characterization of the BOA beamline in the light of its neutron imaging capabilities. We show also the different techniques that can be employed there as user-friendly plugins for non-standard neutron imaging experiments.

  10. Universal heating curve of damped Coulomb plasmas in a Paul trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarnas, J. D.; Nam, Y. S.; Blümel, R.

    2013-10-01

    A charged-particle cloud in a Paul trap is a nonlinear system that exhibits deterministic heating, i.e., conversion of energy provided by the radio-frequency (rf) drive of the trap into the disordered, gaslike motions of the trapped particles. In the presence of weak damping clouds reach an equilibrium state in which heating and cooling balance. For large damping, a cloud may collapse into a crystal. While the rf heating power of a given cloud depends sensitively on its particle number, its equilibrium size, the damping, and the control parameters of the trap, we find that scaling the heating power of the cloud with respect to its associated Coulomb-decoupled, non-interacting-gas state, and its equilibrium size with respect to its crystal size, results in a single, universal heating curve, independent of particle number and trap control parameters.

  11. A Novel Approach to ?-delayed Neutron Spectroscopy Using the Beta-decay Paul Trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scielzo, N. D.; Yee, R. M.; Bertone, P. F.; Buchinger, F.; Caldwell, S. A.; Clark, J. A.; Czeszumska, A.; Deibel, C. M.; Greene, J. P.; Gulick, S.; Lascar, D.; Levand, A. F.; Li, G.; Norman, E. B.; Padgett, S.; Pedretti, M.; Perez Galvan, A.; Savard, G.; Segel, R. E.; Sharma, K. S.; Sternberg, M. G.; Van Schelt, J.; Zabransky, B. J.

    2014-06-01

    A new approach to ?-delayed neutron spectroscopy has been demonstrated that circumvents the many limitations associated with neutron detection by instead inferring the decay branching ratios and energy spectra of the emitted neutrons by studying the nuclear recoil. Using the Beta-decay Paul Trap, fission-product ions were trapped and confined to within a 1-mm3 volume under vacuum using only electric fields. Results from recent measurements of 137I+ and plans for development of a dedicated ion trap for future experiments using the intense fission fragment beams from the Californium Rare Isotope Breeder Upgrade (CARIBU) facility at Argonne National Laboratory are summarized. The improved nuclear data that can be collected is needed in many fields of basic and applied science such as nuclear energy, nuclear astrophysics, and stockpile stewardship.

  12. Fast transport of mixed-species ion chains within a Paul trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmero, M.; Bowler, R.; Gaebler, J. P.; Leibfried, D.; Muga, J. G.

    2014-11-01

    We investigate the dynamics of mixed-species ion crystals during transport between spatially distinct locations in a linear Paul trap in the diabatic regime. In a general mixed-species crystal, all degrees of freedom along the direction of transport are excited by an accelerating well, so unlike the case of same-species ions, where only the center-of-mass mode is excited, several degrees of freedom have to be simultaneously controlled by the transport protocol. We design protocols that lead to low final excitations in the diabatic regime using invariant-based inverse engineering for two different-species ions and also show how to extend this approach to longer mixed-species ion strings. Fast transport of mixed-species ion strings can significantly reduce the operation time in certain architectures for scalable quantum-information processing with trapped ions.

  13. Off-resonance energy absorption in a linear Paul trap due to mass selective resonant quenching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivarajah, I.; Goodman, D. S.; Wells, J. E.; Narducci, F. A.; Smith, W. W.

    2013-11-01

    Linear Paul traps (LPT) are used in many experimental studies such as mass spectrometry, atom-ion collisions, and ion-molecule reactions. Mass selective resonant quenching (MSRQ) is implemented in LPT either to identify a charged particle's mass or to remove unwanted ions from a controlled experimental environment. In the latter case, MSRQ can introduce undesired heating to co-trapped ions of different mass, whose secular motion is off resonance with the quenching ac field, which we call off-resonance energy absorption (OREA). We present simulations and experimental evidence that show that the OREA increases exponentially with the number of ions loaded into the trap and with the amplitude of the off-resonance external ac field.

  14. Aharonov-Bohm effect in the tunnelling of a quantum rotor in a linear Paul trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noguchi, Atsushi; Shikano, Yutaka; Toyoda, Kenji; Urabe, Shinji

    2014-05-01

    Quantum tunnelling is a common fundamental quantum mechanical phenomenon that originates from the wave-like characteristics of quantum particles. Although the quantum tunnelling effect was first observed 85 years ago, some questions regarding the dynamics of quantum tunnelling remain unresolved. Here we realize a quantum tunnelling system using two-dimensional ionic structures in a linear Paul trap. We demonstrate that the charged particles in this quantum tunnelling system are coupled to the vector potential of a magnetic field throughout the entire process, even during quantum tunnelling, as indicated by the manifestation of the Aharonov-Bohm effect in this system. The tunnelling rate of the structures periodically depends on the strength of the magnetic field, whose period is the same as the magnetic flux quantum ?0 through the rotor [(0.99±0.07) × ?0].

  15. 78 FR 31985 - Atomic Safety and Licensing Board Panel; Before the Licensing Board: G. Paul Bollwerk, III...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-28

    ...-1534, License Amendment to Construct and Operate , 77 FR 71,454 (Nov. 30, 2012), petitioner Oglala... Board, 78 FR 9945 (Feb. 12, 2013). Thereafter, in a May 10, 2013 issuance, while concluding that none of... COMMISSION Atomic Safety and Licensing Board Panel; Before the Licensing Board: G. Paul Bollwerk,...

  16. 78 FR 46938 - St. Paul Park Refining Co. LLC v. Enbridge Pipelines (North Dakota) LLC; Notice of Complaint

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-02

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission St. Paul Park Refining Co. LLC v. Enbridge Pipelines (North Dakota) LLC... a formal complaint against Enbridge Pipelines (North Dakota) LLC (Respondent) pursuant to sections 1... Project of Enbridge Pipelines (North Dakota) LLC is no longer fair and reasonable and that the...

  17. I Hear America Humming and It Is out of Tune: Review of Paul G. Woodford's "Democracy and Music Education"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peters, Michael A.

    2008-01-01

    This article presents the author's critique on Paul G. Woodford's positions with regard to music education and the notion of liberal democracy. The author seeks to broaden the contextual/historical scholarship around John Dewey and makes it clear that liberalism is a contested concept, as is democracy. He calls for contemporary responses to…

  18. The Many Faces of Paul Robeson. The Constitution Community: Postwar United States (1945 to Early 1970s).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Kerry C.

    Paul Robeson was an athlete-scholar-concert artist-actor who was also an activist for civil and human rights. The son of a former slave, he was born and raised during segregation, lynching, and open racism. Robeson was one of the top performers of his time, earning more money than many white entertainers. His travels overseas opened his awareness…

  19. 33 CFR 207.320 - Mississippi River, Twin City Locks and Dam, St. Paul and Minneapolis, Minn.; pool level.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Mississippi River, Twin City Locks and Dam, St. Paul and Minneapolis, Minn.; pool level. 207.320 Section 207.320 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE NAVIGATION REGULATIONS § 207.320 Mississippi River, Twin City Locks...

  20. 33 CFR 207.320 - Mississippi River, Twin City Locks and Dam, St. Paul and Minneapolis, Minn.; pool level.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Mississippi River, Twin City Locks and Dam, St. Paul and Minneapolis, Minn.; pool level. 207.320 Section 207.320 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE NAVIGATION REGULATIONS § 207.320 Mississippi River, Twin City Locks...

  1. Bitz, Ginoux, Jacobson, Nizkorodov, and Yang Receive 2013 Atmospheric Sciences Ascent Awards: Citation for Paul A. Ginoux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, Peter J.

    2014-07-01

    The Atmospheric Sciences section of AGU awards one of the five Ascent Awards to Dr. Paul A. Ginoux of the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL) at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration for outstanding world-leading research on dust aerosols using observations and models that has contributed to a comprehensive scientific understanding of atmospheric aerosols."

  2. The Economic Impact of Ten Cultural Institutions on the Economy of the Minneapolis-St. Paul SMSA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cwi, David

    The impact on the economy of 10 cultural institutions in the Minneapolis-St. Paul area was determined by measuring their 1978 direct and indirect fianancial effects. The institutions are the Children's Theatre Company, Chimera Theatre, Cricket Theatre, Guthrie Theatre, Minneapolis Institute of Arts, Minnesota Dance Theatre, Minnesota Orchestra,…

  3. Human Rights--A Priority for Peace. Celebration of Pope Paul VI's 9th Annual Period of Peace.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jennings, James R., Ed.; Rengel, Patricia L., Ed.

    The 1976 World Day of Peace booklet focuses on the arms race, as contrary to peace and human rights, as a positive weapon for peace. The booklet includes a five-week study outline and resources. Pope Paul VI selected "The Real Weapons of Peace" as the theme for the 1976 World Day of Peace. His emphasis on "real" weapons suggests that there exist…

  4. 33 CFR 207.320 - Mississippi River, Twin City Locks and Dam, St. Paul and Minneapolis, Minn.; pool level.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Mississippi River, Twin City... § 207.320 Mississippi River, Twin City Locks and Dam, St. Paul and Minneapolis, Minn.; pool level. In... the Twin City Locks and Dam, Minneapolis, in the interest of navigation, and supersedes rules...

  5. 33 CFR 207.320 - Mississippi River, Twin City Locks and Dam, St. Paul and Minneapolis, Minn.; pool level.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Mississippi River, Twin City... § 207.320 Mississippi River, Twin City Locks and Dam, St. Paul and Minneapolis, Minn.; pool level. In... the Twin City Locks and Dam, Minneapolis, in the interest of navigation, and supersedes rules...

  6. 33 CFR 207.320 - Mississippi River, Twin City Locks and Dam, St. Paul and Minneapolis, Minn.; pool level.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Mississippi River, Twin City... § 207.320 Mississippi River, Twin City Locks and Dam, St. Paul and Minneapolis, Minn.; pool level. In... the Twin City Locks and Dam, Minneapolis, in the interest of navigation, and supersedes rules...

  7. Music for Citizenship: A Commentary on Paul Woodford's "Democracy and Music Education--Liberalism, Ethics, and the Politics of Practice"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elliott, David J.

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the author engages in a lively interactive discussion with Paul Woodford's text, "Democracy and Music Education." He questions Woodford's criticism of Praxial Music Education (PME)--particularly his dismissal of PME as a "performance alone" notion. PME, this author asserts, is fundamentally multidimensional, contextually reflexive…

  8. Harlem Connections: Teaching Walter Dean Myers'"Scorpions" with Paul Laurence Dunbar's "The Sport of the Gods."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    West, Mark I.

    1999-01-01

    Describes how the author, in a course titled "Literature for Adolescents" paired Walter Dean Myers' 1988 young adult novel, "Scorpions," with Paul Laurence Dunbar's 1902 novel for adults, "The Sport of the Gods." Describes student readers' responses to the pair of books, which focus on the difficulties of growing up in Harlem. (SR)

  9. Music for Citizenship: A Commentary on Paul Woodford's "Democracy and Music Education--Liberalism, Ethics, and the Politics of Practice"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elliott, David J.

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the author engages in a lively interactive discussion with Paul Woodford's text, "Democracy and Music Education." He questions Woodford's criticism of Praxial Music Education (PME)--particularly his dismissal of PME as a "performance alone" notion. PME, this author asserts, is fundamentally multidimensional, contextually reflexive…

  10. Review Symposium; Dancing on the Ceiling: A Study of Women Managers in Education, by Valerie Hall. London: Paul Chapman, 1996.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Valerie; Gronn, Peter; Jenkin, Mazda; Power, Sally; Reynolds, Cecilia

    1999-01-01

    Hall and four colleagues review "Dancing on the Ceiling: A Study of Women Managers in Education" (Paul Chapman, 1996). Reviewers agree that Hall's profiles of six British elementary and secondary women headteachers should improve readers' understanding of female managers' development and their preference for "soft," collaborative leadership…

  11. Release from "Grimm" Captivity: Paul O. Zelinsky Talks about the Making of "Rapunzel," the 1998 Caldecott Medal Winner.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peck, Jackie; Hendershot, Judy

    1999-01-01

    Relates a conversation with Paul O. Zelinsky, winner of the 1998 Caldecott Medal for his elegant Italianate "Rapunzel" in Renaissance style. Describes the challenges and pleasure of using a historical setting to tell a good story and delight the viewers' eyes. (SR)

  12. The Obliteration of Truth by Management: Badiou, St. Paul and the Question of Economic Managerialism in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strhan, Anna

    2010-01-01

    This paper considers the questions that Badiou's theory poses to the culture of economic managerialism within education. His argument that radical change is possible, for people and the situations they inhabit, provides a stark challenge to the stifling nature of much current educational debate. In "Saint Paul: The Foundation of Universalism",…

  13. Ion-neutral-atom sympathetic cooling in a hybrid linear rf Paul and magneto-optical trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodman, D. S.; Sivarajah, I.; Wells, J. E.; Narducci, F. A.; Smith, W. W.

    2012-09-01

    Long-range polarization forces between ions and neutral atoms result in large elastic scattering cross sections (e.g., ˜106a.u. for Na-Na+ or Na-Ca+ at cold and ultracold temperatures). This suggests that a hybrid ion-neutral trap should offer a general means for significant sympathetic cooling of atomic or molecular ions. We present simion 7.0 simulation results concerning the advantages and limitations of sympathetic cooling within a hybrid trap apparatus consisting of a linear rf Paul trap concentric with a Na magneto-optical trap (MOT). This paper explores the impact of various heating mechanisms on the hybrid system and how parameters related to the MOT, Paul trap, number of ions, and ion species affect the efficiency of the sympathetic cooling.

  14. Examination of the vocal fold activity using ultra high speed filming: archival recordings by Paul Moore and Hans von Leden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izdebski, Krzysztof; Vaughan, Laura

    2012-02-01

    We present excerpts from three archival ultra high-speed films on the function of the human larynx by Paul Moore, Ph. D. and Hans von Leden, M.D. The films received two awards for best scientific cinematography from two different international film festivals in Italy in 1957. These films present ultra high-speed cinematographic accounts on the workings of the human vocal folds during various phonatory and ventilatory activities. These films were captured at speeds of 2000 to 5000 frames-per-second via an ingeniously arranged laryngeal mirror viewing device. Such speeds were revolutionary six decades ago. Technology currently allows us to film laryngeal behavior at speeds of up to 16,000 frames-per-second using digital recordings. However, the ultra high-speed films by Paul and Hans remain a beacon for anyone sincerely interested in how the smallest instrument of sound production works, and how it is subjected to failure by intrinsic or extrinsic factors.

  15. Suppression of Pauling's residual entropy in the dilute spin ice (Dy1-xYx) 2Ti2O7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scharffe, S.; Breunig, O.; Cho, V.; Laschitzky, P.; Valldor, M.; Welter, J. F.; Lorenz, T.

    2015-11-01

    Around 0.5 K, the entropy of the spin ice Dy2Ti2O7 has a plateau like feature close to Pauling's residual entropy derived originally for water ice, but an unambiguous quantification towards lower temperature is prevented by ultraslow thermal equilibration. Based on the specific-heat data of (Dy1-xYx)2Ti2O7 we analyze the influence of nonmagnetic dilution on the low-temperature entropy. With increasing x , the ultraslow thermal equilibration rapidly vanishes, the low-temperature entropy systematically decreases, and its temperature dependence strongly increases. These data suggest that a nondegenerate ground state is realized in (Dy1-xYx)2Ti2O7 for intermediate dilution. This contradicts the expected zero-temperature residual entropy obtained from a generalization of Pauling's theory for dilute spin ice, but is supported by Monte Carlo simulations.

  16. Keeping the fire burning: Georges Gilles de la Tourette, Paul Richer, Charles Féré and Alfred Binet.

    PubMed

    Walusinski, Olivier

    2011-01-01

    Jean-Martin Charcot (1825-1893) was the one of the world's leading physicians during the final third of the 19th century. Rewarded in 1882 with the creation of the first chair in the diseases of the nervous system, he was extremely successful at recruiting loyal and talented students. Charcot himself never produced a general treatise on hysteria, but instead encouraged his pupils to write their own books. Here, we describe how the work on hysteria of Georges Gilles de la Tourette, Paul Richer, Charles Féré and Alfred Binet was closely associated with Charcot, and how they remained faithful to their mentor. We will highlight the unusual personality of G. Gilles de la Tourette and the tragic end to his life, the exceptional artistic talent of P. Richer (writer and painter of his magnificently illustrated thesis), the prolific writing capacity of C. Féré (bearing witness to his broad fields of interest) and A. Binet (blessed with an extraordinary capacity for work, and author of The Psychology of Reasoning, before presenting his metric scale of intelligence). PMID:20938148

  17. Proton Irradiation Facility and space radiation monitoring at the Paul Scherrer Institute.

    PubMed

    Hajdas, W; Zehnder, A; Adams, L; Buehler, P; Harboe-Sorensen, R; Daum, M; Nickson, R; Daly, E; Nieminen, P

    2001-01-01

    The Proton Irradiation Facility (PIF) has been designed and constructed, in cooperation between Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) and European Space Agency (ESA), for terrestrial proton testing of components and materials for spacecraft. Emphasis has been given to generating realistic proton spectra encountered by space-flights at any potential orbit. The facility, designed in a user-friendly manner, can be readily adapted to the individual requirements of experimenters. It is available for general use serving also in testing of radiation monitors and for proton experiments in different scientific disciplines. The Radiation Environment Monitor REM has been developed for measurements of the spacecraft radiation conditions. Two instruments were launched into space, one into a Geo-stationary Transfer Orbit on board of the STRV-1b satellite and one into a Low Earth Orbit on the Russian MIR station. The next generation of monitors (SREMs--Standard REMs) is currently under development in partnership of ESA, PSI and Contraves-Space. They will operate both as minimum intrusive monitors, which provide radiation housekeeping data and alert the spacecraft when the radiation level crosses allowed limits and as small scientific devices measuring particle spectra and fluxes. Future missions as e.g. INTEGRAL, STRV-1c and PROBA will be equipped with new SREMs. PMID:11770526

  18. Miniaturized system of a gas chromatograph coupled with a Paul ion trap mass spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shortt, B. J.; Darrach, M. R.; Holland, Paul M.; Chutjian, A.

    2005-01-01

    Miniature gas chromatography (GC) and miniature mass spectrometry (MS) instrumentation has been developed to identify and quantify the chemical compounds present in complex mixtures of gases. The design approach utilizes micro-GC components coupled with a Paul quadrupole ion trap (QIT) mass spectrometer. Inherent to the system are high sensitivity, good dynamic range, good QIT resolution, low GC flow-rates to minimize vacuum requirements and the need for consumables; and the use of a modular approach to adapt to volatile organic compounds dissolved in water or present in sediment. Measurements are reported on system response to gaseous species at concentrations varying over four orders of magnitude. The ability of the system to deal with complicated mixtures is demonstrated, and future improvements are discussed. The GC/QIT system described herein has a mass, volume and power that are, conservatively, one-twentieth of those of commercial off-the-shelf systems. Potential applications are to spacecraft cabin-air monitoring, robotic planetary exploration and trace-species detection for residual gas analysis and environmental monitoring.

  19. Models for biological research: the theory and practice of Paul Ehrlich.

    PubMed

    Travis, Anthony S

    2008-01-01

    In the late-nineteenth and early-twentieth centuries, the study of the living world placed considerable reliance on applied chemistry and chemical concepts. Paul Ehrlich, the subject of this paper, adopted from the mid-1870s principles of organic chemistry to devise procedures for use in histology, to suggest features of cellular structure, and to draw up cartoons that explained the nature of immunity. From a distinctly molecular basis, he devised meaningful experimental strategies and was inspired to develop speculative but effective theoretical models along the same lines that chemists had used to resolve problems of molecular structure and behavior. Thus, Ehrlich suggested that combining power and toxicity were independent properties of the antigen toxin. He succeeded to classify synthetic dyestuffs as stains, to use them for investigating molecular combustion, to adapt theories of dyeing to develop models for both combustion and immunity, and to exploit the properties of dyes in the development of chemotherapy. Ehrlich not only speculated on the behavior of synthetic chemicals toward his model of the protoplasm but also invoked biological specificity, a concept that would have a tremendous impact on immunology, drug development, and molecular biology. PMID:19203012

  20. Diabetic foot--what can we learn from leprosy? Legacy of Dr Paul W. Brand.

    PubMed

    Boulton, Andrew J M

    2012-02-01

    Leprosy and diabetes, though two very different conditions, may both result in severe loss of sensation in the feet, which are then a great risk of painless injury and ulceration. Seminal observations made by the late Dr Paul W. Brand, a surgeon working with leprosy patients in South India in the mid-20th century, resulted in the subsequent development of treatments to manage insensitive foot ulcers that are today entirely applicable to patients with diabetes. As a consequence of his research, the recognition of the relationship between insensitivity, repetitive pressures and skin breakdown has helped our understanding of the aetiopathogenesis of neuropathic foot lesions in diabetes: the development of the total contact cast and other casting devices to treat such lesions forms the basis of management of diabetic foot lesions with off-loading devices that are widely used in the 21st century in diabetic foot clinics around the world. Moreover, observations by Brand that the foot 'heats up before it breaks down' resulted in more recent research showing that self-skin temperature monitoring might help reduce the incidence of recurrent neuropathic foot ulcers in diabetes. In summary, Brand's understanding of 'the gift of pain' that, when lost, results in the late complications of diabetic neuropathy has guided the prevention, diagnosis and management of diabetic foot problems in the 21st century. PMID:22271715

  1. Molecular dynamics simulation study on trapping ions in a nanoscale Paul trap

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xiongce; Krstic, Predrag S.

    2012-01-01

    We found by molecular dynamics simulations that a low energy ion can be trapped effectively in a nanoscale Paul trap in both vacuum and aqueous environment when appropriate AC/DC electric fields are applied to the system. Using the negatively charged chlorine ion as an example, we show that the trapped ion oscillates around the center of the nanotrap with the amplitude dependent on the parameters of the system and applied voltages. Successful trapping of the ion within nanoseconds requires electric bias of GHz frequency, in the range of hundreds of mV. The oscillations are damped in the aqueous environment, but polarization of water molecules requires application of higher voltage biases to reach improved stability of the trapping. Application of a supplemental DC driving field along the trap axis can effectively drive the ion off the trap center and out of the trap, opening a possibility of studying DNA and other charged molecules using embedded probes while achieving a full control of their translocation and localization in the trap. PMID:21825720

  2. Conspiracies of immanence: Paul Tillich, Pierre Teilhard de Chardin and C.G. Jung.

    PubMed

    Dourley, John

    2015-02-01

    Jung's psychology proffers a sustained reflection on the traditional religious question of the relation of divine transcendence to immanence. On this issue his psychology affirms a position of radical immanence in its contention that the experience of divinity is initially wholly from within. Though this position remains on the periphery of religious and theological orthodoxy Jung is not alone in holding it among moderns. Paul Tillich adopts a similar stance with his controlling symbols of the divine as 'Ground of Being' and 'Depth of Reason'. Pierre Teilhard de Chardin understands divinity as the experiential energy of evolution itself working within nature and humanity toward greater configurations of universal communion as the basis of community. All of Jung's master symbols of individuation assume such an understanding of immanence uniting individual and totality. His psychology strongly suggests and contributes to the current emergence of a new religious sensitivity based on the awareness of the intra-psychic origin of all religions. In his later writings he held out such a position as a significant alternative to genocide. PMID:25610962

  3. Hot spot activity and tectonic settings near Amsterdam-St. Paul plateau (Indian Ocean)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janin, M.; HéMond, C.; Guillou, H.; Maia, M.; Johnson, K. T. M.; Bollinger, C.; Liorzou, C.; Mudholkar, A.

    2011-05-01

    The Amsterdam-St. Paul (ASP) plateau is located in the central part of the Indian Ocean and results from the interaction between the ASP hot spot and the Southeast Indian Ridge (SEIR). It is located near the diffuse boundary between the Capricorn and Australian plates. The seamount chain of the Dead Poets (CDP) is northeast of the ASP plateau and may represent older volcanism related to the ASP hot spot; this chain consists of two groups of seamounts: (1) large flat-topped seamounts formed 8-10 Ma and (2) smaller conical seamounts formed during the last 2 Myr. The ASP hot spot has produced two pulses of magmatism that have been ponded under the ASP plateau and erupted along the divergent boundary between the Capricorn and Australian plates. The N65° orientation of the CDP as well as the seamount's elongated shapes support an opening motion between the Capricorn and Australian plates along a suture oriented in the N155° direction. This motion compared to the Antarctic plate amounts to an apparent velocity of 7.7 cm/yr northeastward for the Capricorn-Australian block. This motion does not fit with a fixed plume model. We suggest, therefore, that the ASP plume experienced a motion of about 1-2 cm/yr to the SW, which is opposite to the asthenospheric flow in this region and suggests a deep-seated plume.

  4. Objectivity, abstraction, and the individual: the influence of Søren Kierkegaard on Paul Feyerabend.

    PubMed

    Kidd, Ian James

    2011-03-01

    This paper explores the influence of Søren Kierkegaard upon Paul Feyerabend by examining their common criticisms of totalising accounts of human nature. Both complained that philosophical and scientific theories of human nature which were methodologically committed to objectivity and abstraction failed to capture the richness of human experience. Kierkegaard and Feyerabend argued that philosophy and the science were threatening to become obstacles to human development by imposing abstract theories of human nature and reality which denied the complexities of both. In both cases, this took the form of asserting an 'existential' criterion for the assessment of philosophical and scientific theories. Kierkegaard also made remarks upon the inappropriateness of applying natural scientific methods to human beings which Feyerabend later expanded and developed in his criticisms of the inability of the 'scientific world-view' to accommodate the values necessary to a flourishing human life. I conclude by noting some differences between Kierkegaard and Feyerabend's positions and by affirming the value of existential criticisms of scientific knowledge. PMID:21657128

  5. The cestode community in northern fur seals (Callorhinus ursinus) on St. Paul Island, Alaska.

    PubMed

    Kuzmina, Tetiana A; Hernández-Orts, Jesús S; Lyons, Eugene T; Spraker, Terry R; Kornyushyn, Vadym V; Kuchta, Roman

    2015-08-01

    The diversity and ecology of cestodes from the northern fur seals, Callorhinus ursinus (NFS), were examined using newly collected material from 756 humanely harvested subadult males between 2011 and 2014. NFSs were collected from five different haul-outs on St. Paul Island, Alaska. A total of 14,660 tapeworms were collected with a prevalence of 98.5% and intensity up to 107 cestodes per host (mean intensity 19.7?±?16.5 SD). Three species of tapeworms were found: Adenocephalus pacificus (Diphyllobothriidea) was the most prevalent (prevalence 97.4%), followed by Diplogonoporus tetrapterus (49.7%), and 5 immature specimens of Anophryocephalus cf. ochotensis (Tetrabothriidea) (0.5%). Most of the cestodes found in the NFS were immature (69.7%). However, only 0.9% of cestodes were in larval (plerocercoid) stages. The species composition, prevalence and intensity of cestodes from these NFSs were not statistically different between the five separate haul-outs. Significant increases in the intensity of NFS infections were observed during the study period. PMID:26101743

  6. The cestode community in northern fur seals (Callorhinus ursinus) on St. Paul Island, Alaska

    PubMed Central

    Kuzmina, Tetiana A.; Hernández-Orts, Jesús S.; Lyons, Eugene T.; Spraker, Terry R.; Kornyushyn, Vadym V.; Kuchta, Roman

    2015-01-01

    The diversity and ecology of cestodes from the northern fur seals, Callorhinus ursinus (NFS), were examined using newly collected material from 756 humanely harvested subadult males between 2011 and 2014. NFSs were collected from five different haul-outs on St. Paul Island, Alaska. A total of 14,660 tapeworms were collected with a prevalence of 98.5% and intensity up to 107 cestodes per host (mean intensity 19.7?±?16.5 SD). Three species of tapeworms were found: Adenocephalus pacificus (Diphyllobothriidea) was the most prevalent (prevalence 97.4%), followed by Diplogonoporus tetrapterus (49.7%), and 5 immature specimens of Anophryocephalus cf. ochotensis (Tetrabothriidea) (0.5%). Most of the cestodes found in the NFS were immature (69.7%). However, only 0.9% of cestodes were in larval (plerocercoid) stages. The species composition, prevalence and intensity of cestodes from these NFSs were not statistically different between the five separate haul-outs. Significant increases in the intensity of NFS infections were observed during the study period. PMID:26101743

  7. Miniaturized system of a gas chromatograph coupled with a Paul ion trap mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Shortt, B J; Darrach, M R; Holland, Paul M; Chutjian, A

    2005-01-01

    Miniature gas chromatography (GC) and miniature mass spectrometry (MS) instrumentation has been developed to identify and quantify the chemical compounds present in complex mixtures of gases. The design approach utilizes micro-GC components coupled with a Paul quadrupole ion trap (QIT) mass spectrometer. Inherent to the system are high sensitivity, good dynamic range, good QIT resolution, low GC flow-rates to minimize vacuum requirements and the need for consumables; and the use of a modular approach to adapt to volatile organic compounds dissolved in water or present in sediment. Measurements are reported on system response to gaseous species at concentrations varying over four orders of magnitude. The ability of the system to deal with complicated mixtures is demonstrated, and future improvements are discussed. The GC/QIT system described herein has a mass, volume and power that are, conservatively, one-twentieth of those of commercial off-the-shelf systems. Potential applications are to spacecraft cabin-air monitoring, robotic planetary exploration and trace-species detection for residual gas analysis and environmental monitoring. PMID:15619267

  8. High resolution neutron imaging capabilities at BOA beamline at Paul Scherrer Institut

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tremsin, A. S.; Morgano, M.; Panzner, T.; Lehmann, E.; Filgers, U.; Vallerga, J. V.; McPhate, J. B.; Siegmund, O. H. W.; Feller, W. B.

    2015-06-01

    The cold neutron spectrum of the Beamline for neutron Optics and other Applications (BOA) at Paul Scherrer Institut enables high contrast neutron imaging because neutron cross sections for many materials increase with neutron wavelength. However, for many neutron imaging applications, spatial resolution can be as important as contrast. In this paper the neutron transmission imaging capabilities of an MCP/Timepix detector installed at the BOA beamline are presented, demonstrating the possibilities for studying sub-20 μm features in various samples. In addition to conventional neutron radiography and microtomography, the high degree of neutron polarization at the BOA beamline can be very attractive for imaging of magnetic fields, as demonstrated by our measurements. We also show that a collimated cold neutron beamline combined with a high resolution detector can produce image artifacts, (e.g. edge enhancements) due to neutron refraction and scattering. The results of our experiments indicate that the BOA beamline is a valuable addition to neutron imaging facilities, providing improved and sometimes unique capabilities for non-destructive studies with cold neutrons.

  9. Hospitals and Health Maintenance Organizations: An Analysis of the Minneapolis-St. Paul Experience

    PubMed Central

    Morrisey, Michael A.; Gibson, Geoffrey; Ashby, Cynthia S.

    1983-01-01

    Minneapolis-St. Paul is recognized as a prime example of health care competition. Policymakers and others have been asked to look to the Twin Cities as a model upon which to base new competitive initiatives in the health care sector. Yet little is known about the impact of Health Maintenance Organizations (HMOs) on other health care providers. This study examines the effects of the area's seven health maintenance organizations on the local hospital community. Three questions are addressed. First, is the situation in the Twin Cities unique? A comparison of case study findings and the available literature together with hospital data from similarly HMO-penetrated markets suggests that the Twin Cities' hospital market is indeed different. Second, what is the nature of hospital-HMO interaction? The flexibility of contracting apparently allows hospitals to affiliate successfully with an HMO under a variety of service and reimbursement agreements. Third, what effect has HMO activity had on community-wide utilization? While HMO enrollees clearly use fewer hospital days and the trend in the community is toward fewer days, attributing the change to HMOs is difficult. A large portion of the differences between HMO and community-wide utilization levels is attributable to differences in population. PMID:10309856

  10. Test-Retest Reliability of the DePaul Symptom Questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Jason, Leonard A.; So, Suzanna; Brown, Abigail A.; Sunnquist, Madison; Evans, Meredyth

    2015-01-01

    Background The DePaul Symptom Questionnaire (DSQ) was developed to provide a structured approach for collecting standardized symptomatology and health history information to allow researchers and clinicians to determine whether a patient meets the diagnostic criteria for myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS), myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME), and/or chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS). Purpose The purpose of this study was to examine the test-retest reliability of the DSQ. Methods Test-retest reliability of the measure was examined with a sample of 26 adults self-identifying as having either ME/CFS, ME and/or CFS and 25 adults who did not self-identify as having these illnesses and were otherwise healthy controls. Results Overall, the majority of items on the DSQ exhibited good to excellent test-retest reliability, with Pearson’s or kappa correlation coefficients that were 0.70 or higher. Conclusions Thus, the present study suggests that the DSQ is a reliable diagnostic measure that can provide a standardized way of examining illness constructs and symptomatology among patients who identify as having ME/CFS, ME and/or CFS. PMID:26973799

  11. The lasting legacy of Paul Randall Harrington to pediatric spine surgery: historical vignette.

    PubMed

    Desai, Sohum K; Brayton, Alison; Chua, Valerie B; Luerssen, Thomas G; Jea, Andrew

    2013-02-01

    Spinal arthrodesis was the first successful treatment for scoliosis, performed by Dr. Russell A. Hibbs in 1911 and later by Dr. Fred H. Albee for tuberculosis. In 1914, Dr. H.P.H. Galloway and Dr. Hibbs began using the method to treat neuromuscular scoliosis in patients with poliomyelitis. However, this treatment approach was plagued by loss of deformity correction over time and high pseudarthrosis rates. The turning point in the operative management of spinal deformities began in 1947 with Dr. Paul Randall Harrington when he started a decade-long process to revolutionize surgical treatment of spinal deformities culminating in the advent of the Harrington Rod, the first successful implantable spinal instrumentation system. During the epoch that he was in practice, Dr. Harrington's achievement influenced the technology and art of spine surgery for his contemporaries and the coming generations of spine surgeons. The purpose of this article is to review the life of Dr. Harrington, and how he has arguably come to be known as "Father of the Modern Treatment of Scoliosis." PMID:23216320

  12. Simulations of Parametric Transitions to Chaos for Two Ions in a Paul Trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackie, M. A.; Smith, W. W.; Jensen, R. V.

    1996-05-01

    We examine order-chaos transitions for the classical motion of two ions in a Paul-type radiofrequency trap that are induced by adiabatic or non-adiabatic variations in the value of the damping constant. With sufficient damping a two-ion Wigner or Coulomb crystal can be formed such that the ions vibrate with small amplitude about equilibrium positions. By considering various fixed values of the trap parameters (a,q) and the damping constant, we find three different types of ordered attractors: on-axis, titled and ion exchange. The exchange attractors that involve close ion-ion collisions are found to exhibit long-lived chaotic transients. When the damping constant is reduced from a high to a low value adiabatically in time, we find an order-chaos transition if the change moves the ion motion onto a close-collision exchange attractor and when the final minimum value of the damping constant is insufficient to damp out the resulting chaotic transients. Our results will be discussed in the context of earlier work by Bluemel et al. [Phys. Rev. A 40, 808 (1989); Phys. Rev. 48, R1757 (1993)] and by Brewer et al. [PRL 61, 255 (1988)].

  13. Trapping of relatively short-lived radioactive {}^{146}Eu in a Paul trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, M. K.; Sikdar, A. K.; Rao, Pushpa M.; Bhattacharjee, T.; Das, S. K.; Das, P.

    2014-08-01

    A new technique has been developed wherein one of the relatively short lived isotopes of europium ({}^{146}Eu, Half life =\\;4.61 days) has been generated by decay of parent {}^{146}Gd atoms and the ions are confined in a Paul trap for spectroscopic studies. Studies of the mass dependent ion oscillation frequencies show that the ions trapped have a mass number 146 amu and this was confirmed by similar measurements carried out on trapped barium and potassium ions. From calculations of thermal ionization probabilities based on the Langmuir-Saha equation and the number of trapped ions estimated from ion response signal, the approximate number of the different isobars (of mass number 146) trapped, has been evaluated. We also present simulations of the evolution of laser-induced fluorescence photons of the trapped {}^{146}Eu ions, wherein a pulsed laser is used to excite the resonance {}^{9}S_{4} - {}^{9}P_{5} transition, which rapidly decays to the metastable {}^{9}D_{4-6} states emitting fluorescence photons.

  14. Dynamics and control of fast ion crystal splitting in segmented Paul traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufmann, H.; Ruster, T.; Schmiegelow, C. T.; Schmidt-Kaler, F.; Poschinger, U. G.

    2014-07-01

    We theoretically investigate the process of splitting two-ion crystals in segmented Paul traps, i.e. the structural transition from two ions confined in a common well to ions confined in separate wells. The precise control of this process by application of suitable voltage ramps to the trap segments is non-trivial, as the harmonic confinement transiently vanishes during the process. This makes the ions strongly susceptible to background electric field noise, and to static offset fields in the direction of the trap axis. We analyze the reasons why large energy transfers can occur, which are impulsive acceleration, the presence of residual background fields and enhanced anomalous heating. For the impulsive acceleration, we identify the diabatic and adiabatic regimes, which are characterized by different scaling behavior of the energy transfer with respect to time. We propose a suitable control scheme based on experimentally accessible parameters. Simulations are used to verify both the high sensitivity of the splitting result and the performance of our control scheme. Finally, we analyze the impact of trap geometry parameters on the crystal splitting process.

  15. Remote sensing applications to hydrology in Minnesota. [Rice Creek watershed and St. Paul-Minneapolis metropolitan area

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, D.; Skaggs, R.

    1975-01-01

    Development of low lying southeastern shore of Pike Lake is described as part of the Rice Creek watershed study. Several small wetlands in Arden Hills, Minnesota were incorporated into the drainage plans as pollutant and nutrient sinks rather than being infilled. Lake water quality in the St. Paul-Minneapolis metropolitan area was analyzed using Landsat images. In the same urban area, the inventory and seasonal change of the open water were also studied.

  16. Two concurrent enteric disease outbreaks among men who have sex with men, minneapolis-st paul area.

    PubMed

    Danila, Richard N; Eikmeier, Dana L; Robinson, Trisha J; La Pointe, Allison; DeVries, Aaron S

    2014-10-01

    Between 1 November 2013 and 31 March 2014, concurrent shigellosis and cryptosporidiosis outbreaks occurred among men who have sex with men in the Minneapolis-St. Paul area, 75% of whom were HIV-infected. Current HIV/AIDS strategy emphasizing treatment as prevention may effectively decrease HIV transmission, but raises concerns about other diseases if safer sex messages are de-emphasized. PMID:24944234

  17. First Results from the 0.7-meter Alumni Telescope at the Hawley Observatory of St. Paul's School

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, Ian M.; Cohen, B. J.; Pacelli, R. R., Jr.

    2010-05-01

    The 0.7-meter Alumni Telescope of the Lenore and Walter Hawley Observatory at St. Paul's School is operational. This optical telescope is located on campus in Concord, New Hampshire as part of a larger facility. We present the results of the initial commissioning exercises including photometry and polarimetry. The equipment and site are described. We envision developing the Alumni Telescope as a user facility with science observations beginning in the near future.

  18. Buffer-gas-cooled ion clouds in a classical Paul trap: superimposed stability diagrams and trapping capacity investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leuthner, H.; Werth, G.

    2014-01-01

    Ion clouds of different species and variable size are stored in a 3D Paul trap and detected after extraction from the trap. We report on measurements of the superimposed stability regions of four simultaneously stored ion species. We determine the operating conditions for trapping capacity under variation of buffer gas pressure and observe space charge shifts for a specific ion in the presence of other elements.

  19. A new facility for fundamental particle physics: The high-intensity ultracold neutron source at the Paul Scherrer Institute

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauss, Bernhard; UCN Project Team

    2012-09-01

    The fundamental properties of the neutron can be studied in detail using ultracold neutrons (UCN) which can be stored and observed for hundreds of seconds. A new user facility providing ultracold neutrons for fundamental physics research has been constructed at the Paul Scherrer Institute, the PSI UCN source. Assembly of the facility finished in December 2010 with the first production of ultracold neutrons. The layout of the source and its operation are briefly discussed.

  20. Basic science and clinical trials: interview with William Paul, director of the Office of AIDS Research. Interview by John S James.

    PubMed

    Paul, W

    1995-02-17

    William E. Paul, Director of the Office of AIDS Research (OAR) at the U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH), responded to questions addressing public concern that his proposal for more basic AIDS research will reduce clinical trial research intended to find treatments. Dr. Paul clarified the role of small, rapid, data-intensive, exploratory human trials. He stressed the need for a balanced approach to studying HIV to better understand the mechanisms of this disease without abandoning therapeutic research. He believes that smaller, laboratory-intensive, pathogenesis trials should be part of the overall effort and that conventional grant support should fund data-intensive trials. Dr. Paul also advocates clinical investigation on humans, due to the lack of animal models, using known parameters to see how the immune system responds. As a result of limited funding, Dr. Paul believes that research usefulness should be a criteria for funding. The suggestion that management consultants be brought in to assess the effectiveness of the system used in conducting the research is questioned. Dr. Paul states that while systems management professionals are good at the development end, they are not experienced at grappling with problems in discovery. Finally, Dr. Paul indicates that OAR's role is recognizing where the opportunities lie and finding ways of putting the resources there. PMID:11362304

  1. Influence of water on the mineralogy and microstructure of mylonites from St. Paul's Rocks, Equatorial Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deems, N. J.; Warren, J. M.

    2012-12-01

    St. Paul's Rocks (SPR) are a unique set of islets in the Equatorial Atlantic, which represent the only subaerial exposure of an active transform fault along the global ridge system. The islets cap a submarine massif that extends to ~3km below sea level. The massif itself lies within the larger St. Paul's Transform Fault, which is approximately 540km long and composed of four transform fault segments separated by three intra-transform spreading ridges. The SPR islets are also unique as they are almost entirely composed of peridotite mylonites with unusual microstructures and mineralogy. Early studies of SPR noted the presence of minerals uncommon in ultramafic rocks, including scapolite and hydrous minerals such as amphibole (Melson et al., 1967; Roden et al., 1984). Our observations also indicate the presence of a strong lattice preferred orientation (LPO) among both olivine and amphibole. To better understand the microstructural and mineralogical evolution of the SPR peridotite mylonites, we carried out combined EBSD-EDS analysis. Results show a pronounced olivine LPO that corresponds to predominant slip in the [010] direction on both the (100) and (001) planes. This indicates deformation by dislocation creep, whereas olivine flow laws - at least for dry rheology - predict a transition to diffusion creep among the 1-10 micron grain size population of the sample. In addition, our results show the amphibole phase is Ti-rich pargasite, which is unexpectedly ubiquitous, including in a sample previously assumed to contain only olivine. Phlogopite, scapolite and plagioclase were also found to be present. Pargasite and scapolite are high (~750° C) temperature phases that require the presence of water, chlorine, and plagioclase to form. In order to explain the unique mineralogy and microstructures found in SPR mylonites, we propose a two-stage model for their evolution. In the first stage, trapped melt leads to the formation of gabbro veins and plagioclase crystallization, which may have coincided with initial strain localization. In the second stage, seawater infiltrated into the brittle-ductile transition zone (BDTZ), due to episodic propagation of fractures below the zone of brittle faulting. This results in the reaction of seawater with pyroxene, forsterite and plagioclase to form pargasite and scapolite. The second stage was coincident with strain localization and mylonitization, as indicated by olivine recrystallization and the presence of olivine and pargasite LPOs. Deep circulation of seawater is consistent with numerical models of oceanic transform faults proposed by Roland et al., (2010), which show that hydrothermal alteration can extend into the upper mantle. In addition, McGuire et al. (2012) recorded foreshocks beneath the Gofar transform fault at depth corresponding to the mantle BDTZ. Our petrographic and microstructural observations demonstrate that seawater can penetrate the upper mantle beneath oceanic transform faults to greater depths than previously thought. This results in high temperature alteration of mantle peridotites in the BDTZ, followed by ductile deformation that gives rise to the strong LPOs observed in forsterite and pargasite.

  2. Experimental simulations of beam propagation over large distances in a compact linear Paul trapa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilson, Erik P.; Chung, Moses; Davidson, Ronald C.; Dorf, Mikhail; Efthimion, Philip C.; Majeski, Richard

    2006-05-01

    The Paul Trap Simulator Experiment (PTSX) is a compact laboratory experiment that places the physicist in the frame of reference of a long, charged-particle bunch coasting through a kilometers-long magnetic alternating-gradient (AG) transport system. The transverse dynamics of particles in both systems are described by similar equations, including nonlinear space-charge effects. The time-dependent voltages applied to the PTSX quadrupole electrodes are equivalent to the axially oscillating magnetic fields applied in the AG system. Experiments concerning the quiescent propagation of intense beams over large distances can then be performed in a compact and flexible facility. An understanding and characterization of the conditions required for quiescent beam transport, minimum halo particle generation, and precise beam compression and manipulation techniques, are essential, as accelerators and transport systems demand that ever-increasing amounts of space charge be transported. Application areas include ion-beam-driven high energy density physics, high energy and nuclear physics accelerator systems, etc. One-component cesium plasmas have been trapped in PTSX that correspond to normalized beam intensities, ?=?p2(0)/2?q2, up to 80% of the space-charge limit where self-electric forces balance the applied focusing force. Here, ?p(0)=[nb(0)eb2/mb?0]1/2 is the on-axis plasma frequency, and ?q is the smooth-focusing frequency associated with the applied focusing field. Plasmas in PTSX with values of ? that are 20% of the limit have been trapped for times corresponding to equivalent beam propagation over 10km. Results are presented for experiments in which the amplitude of the quadrupole focusing lattice is modified as a function of time. It is found that instantaneous changes in lattice amplitude can be detrimental to transverse confinement of the charge bunch.

  3. Endothelial Function in the Time of the Giants: Paul M. Vanhoutte Lecture

    PubMed Central

    Heistad, Donald D.

    2010-01-01

    Paul Vanhoutte is one of the fathers of vascular biology. Among his great contributions, he demonstrated that endothelium modulates vasomotor response to vasoactive products (including serotonin) that are released when platelets aggregate in an artery. He found in arteries ex vivo that when endothelium is dysfunctional, in atherosclerosis or hypertension, normal relaxation to aggregation of platelets is impaired, and vessels may contract. He proposed that this mechanism may predispose to vasospasm. Our experiments in vivo indicated that atherosclerosis greatly potentiates vasoconstrictor responses to serotonin in the limb, brain, and eye of monkeys. We proposed that transient ischemic attacks may be mediated by platelet-induced vasospasm. We observed endothelial dysfunction in atherosclerotic monkeys, with improvement of endothelial function when hypercholesterolemia was corrected. Recently, we have studied the aortic valve (which has unique endothelium) in hypercholesterolemic mice, to examine the pathophysiology of aortic valvular stenosis. Oxidative stress is increased in stenotic valves, and severe aortic stenosis develops in about one-third of old, hypercholesterolemic mice. In stenotic aortic valves from humans, there is increased oxidative stress near calcified regions of the valves. Oxidative stress may trigger expression of pro-calcific genes in the aortic valve. Finally, we have used gene transfer of extracellular superoxide dismutase (ecSOD) to study endothelial effects of oxidative stress. Gene transfer of normal ecSOD improves endothelial dysfunction in several disease states, but gene transfer of ecSODR213G, a gene variant of ecSOD that is common in humans, fails to improve endothelial function. Gene transfer approaches may be useful to study mechanisms by which gene variants predispose to endothelial dysfunction and vascular disease. PMID:19033817

  4. A Theoretical Method for Characterizing Nonlinear Effects in Paul Traps with Added Octopole Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Caiqiao; Zhou, Xiaoyu; Zhang, Ning; Zhan, Lingpeng; Chen, Yongtai; Chen, Suming; Nie, Zongxiu

    2015-08-01

    In comparison with numerical methods, theoretical characterizations of ion motion in the nonlinear Paul traps always suffer from low accuracy and little applicability. To overcome the difficulties, the theoretical harmonic balance (HB) method was developed, and was validated by the numerical fourth-order Runge-Kutta (4th RK) method. Using the HB method, analytical ion trajectory and ion motion frequency in the superimposed octopole field, ?, were obtained by solving the nonlinear Mathieu equation (NME). The obtained accuracy of the HB method was comparable with that of the 4th RK method at the Mathieu parameter, q = 0.6, and the applicable q values could be extended to the entire first stability region with satisfactory accuracy. Two sorts of nonlinear effects of ion motion were studied, including ion frequency shift, ? ?, and ion amplitude variation, ?( C 2 n / C 0) ( n ? 0). New phenomena regarding ? ? were observed, although extensive studies have been performed based on the pseudo-potential well (PW) model. For instance, the |? ?| at ? = 0.1 and ? = -0.1 were found to be different, but they were the same in the PW model. This is the first time the nonlinear effects regarding ?( C 2 n / C 0) ( n ? 0) are studied, and the associated study has been a challenge for both theoretical and numerical methods. The nonlinear effects of ?( C 2 n / C 0) ( n ? 0) and ? ? were found to share some similarities at q < 0.6: both of them were proportional to ?, and the square of the initial ion displacement, z(0)2.

  5. The CEO as organizational architect: an interview with Xerox's Paul Allaire. Interview by Robert Howard.

    PubMed

    Allaire, P

    1992-01-01

    As chairman and CEO of the Xerox Corporation, Paul Allaire leads a company that is a microcosm of the changes transforming American business. With the introduction of the first plain-paper copier in 1959, Xerox invented a new industry and launched itself on a decade of spectacular growth. But easy growth led Xerox to neglect the fundamentals of its core business, leaving the company vulnerable to low-cost Japanese competition. Starting in the mid-1980s, Xerox embarked on a long-term effort to regain its dominant position in world copier markets and to create a new platform for future growth. Thanks to the company's Leadership through Quality program, Xerox became the first major U.S. company to win back market share from the Japanese. Allaire describes his efforts to take Xerox's corporate transformation to a new level. Since becoming CEO in 1990, he has repositioned Xerox as "the document company" at the intersection of the worlds of paper-based and electronic information. And he has guided the company through a fundamental redesign of what he calls the "organizational architecture" of Xerox's document processing business. Few CEOs have approached the process of organizational redesign as systematically and methodically as Allaire has. He has created a new corporate structure that balances independent business divisions with integrated R&D and customer operations organizations. He has redefined managerial roles and responsibilities, changed the way managers are selected and compensated, and renewed the company's senior management ranks. And he has articulated the new values and behaviors Xerox managers will need to thrive in a more competitive and fast-changing business environment. PMID:10121313

  6. Multiple scales analysis of early and delayed boundary ejection in Paul traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajanbabu, N.; Marathe, Amol; Chatterjee, Anindya; Menon, A. G.

    2007-03-01

    We use the method of multiple scales to elucidate dynamics associated with early and delayed ejection of ions in mass selective ejection experiments in Paul traps. We develop a slow flow equation to approximate the solution of a weakly nonlinear Mathieu equation to describe ion dynamics in the neighborhood of the stability boundary of ideal traps (where the Mathieu parameter ). The method of multiple scales enables us to incorporate higher order multipoles, extend computations to higher orders, and generate phase portraits through which we view early and delayed ejection. Our use of the method of multiple scales is atypical in two ways. First, because we look at boundary ejection, the solution to the unperturbed equation involves linearly growing terms, requiring some care in identification and elimination of secular terms. Second, due to analytical difficulties, we make additional harmonic balance approximations within the formal implementation of the method. For positive even multipoles in the ion trapping field, in the stable region of trap operation, the phase portrait obtained from the slow flow consists of three fixed points, two of which are saddles and the third is a center. As the qz value of an ion approaches , the saddles approach each other, and a point is reached where all nonzero solutions are unbounded, leading to an observation of early ejection. The phase portraits for negative even multipoles and odd multipoles of either sign are qualitatively similar to each other and display bounded solutions even for , resulting in the observation of delayed ejection associated with a more gentle increase in ion motion amplitudes, a mechanism different from the case of the positive even multipoles.

  7. The DORIS Data Center at the CDDIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noll, Carey E.; Dube, Maurice

    2000-01-01

    The DORIS system (Doppler Orbitography and Radio positioning Integrated by Satellite) was designed and developed by CNES, the National Geographic Institute, IGN (Institut G6ographique National), and the Space Geodesy Research Group, GRGS (Groupe de Recherches de Geodesie Spatiale - CNES/CNRS/Universite Paul Sabatier) to meet new needs for the precise determination of satellite positions on their orbits and for precise positioning of terrestrial beacons. This system has been carried since 1990 on the French SPOT 2 satellite, since 1992 on the French/American satellite TOPEX/POSEIDON, and since 1998 on the French SPOT 4 satellite. It will be part of the JASON (CNES/NASA) and ENVISAT (ESA) altimetric missions and also the SPOT follow-on Earth observation missions. DORIS is a radio-electrical system which takes Doppler measurements between a satellite in low orbit and a permanent global network for the purpose, on the one hand, of determining the satellite's position in orbit, and on the other hand, of locating ground beacons with a high degree of precision.

  8. Paul Tsongas and the battles over energy and the environment, 1974--1980

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Netherton, Dane Morris

    This dissertation examines the political career of Paul Tsongas of Lowell, Massachusetts, from 1974 to 1980, with particular attention to his efforts to reconcile regional, environmental, and economic interests during his two terms in the U.S. House of Representatives and his first two years in the U.S. Senate. The national debates over energy policy during the late 1970s present an essential context for understanding Tsongas's lasting place in American political history. The energy crisis created a divisive legislative battleground during the late 1970s, forming the backdrop of Tsongas's first congressional election in 1974 and his two terms as U.S. Representative. Tsongas played an active part in congressional consideration of energy issues through his seat in the House Committee on Interior and Insular Affairs, his participation in the Ad Hoc Committee (created to shepherd President Jimmy Carter's National Energy Plan through the House of Representatives), and his efforts to locate a Solar Energy Research Center in Massachusetts. Energy issues also formed a backdrop to Tsongas's other accomplishments as a Representative: his key role in the creation of the Lowell National Historical Park, the economic revitalization of Greater Lowell, and the first congressional hearings to examine the contribution of carbon dioxide to global warming. Throughout his career, he worked to promote a rational and responsible regional energy policy for Massachusetts and New England. In his first two years in the Senate, energy issues were intimately connected to Tsongas's role in the Chrysler Bailout bill, the Solar Energy and Energy Conservation Bank Act of 1980, and the Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act. Notably, he also worked hard to push President Carter towards a renewed effort to deal with energy problems. This dissertation draws upon the extensive primary sources available in the Tsongas Collections at The University of Massachusetts Lowell's Center for Lowell History as well as interviews with Tsongas's aides. It also makes use of newspaper accounts, the Congressional Record, Tsongas's published works, and a variety of secondary sources.

  9. Experimental simulations of beam propagation over large distances in a compact linear Paul trap

    SciTech Connect

    Gilson, Erik P.; Chung, Moses; Davidson, Ronald C.; Dorf, Mikhail; Efthimion, Philip C.; Majeski, Richard

    2006-05-15

    The Paul Trap Simulator Experiment (PTSX) is a compact laboratory experiment that places the physicist in the frame of reference of a long, charged-particle bunch coasting through a kilometers-long magnetic alternating-gradient (AG) transport system. The transverse dynamics of particles in both systems are described by similar equations, including nonlinear space-charge effects. The time-dependent voltages applied to the PTSX quadrupole electrodes are equivalent to the axially oscillating magnetic fields applied in the AG system. Experiments concerning the quiescent propagation of intense beams over large distances can then be performed in a compact and flexible facility. An understanding and characterization of the conditions required for quiescent beam transport, minimum halo particle generation, and precise beam compression and manipulation techniques, are essential, as accelerators and transport systems demand that ever-increasing amounts of space charge be transported. Application areas include ion-beam-driven high energy density physics, high energy and nuclear physics accelerator systems, etc. One-component cesium plasmas have been trapped in PTSX that correspond to normalized beam intensities, s={omega}{sub p}{sup 2}(0)/2{omega}{sub q}{sup 2}, up to 80% of the space-charge limit where self-electric forces balance the applied focusing force. Here, {omega}{sub p}(0)=[n{sub b}(0)e{sub b}{sup 2}/m{sub b}{epsilon}{sub 0}]{sup 1/2} is the on-axis plasma frequency, and {omega}{sub q} is the smooth-focusing frequency associated with the applied focusing field. Plasmas in PTSX with values of s that are 20% of the limit have been trapped for times corresponding to equivalent beam propagation over 10 km. Results are presented for experiments in which the amplitude of the quadrupole focusing lattice is modified as a function of time. It is found that instantaneous changes in lattice amplitude can be detrimental to transverse confinement of the charge bunch.

  10. Evolution of the Saint Paul Amsterdam Plateau in the Last 10 m.y.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maia, M.; Courreges, E.; Pessanha, I.; Hemond, C.; Janin, M.; Bassoullet, C.; Brachet, C.; Chavrit, D.; Gente, P.; Humler, E.; Johnson, K.; Loubrieu, B.; Martin, C.; Mudholkar, A.; Oldra, J.; Patriat, M.; Raquin, A.; Richard, M.; Royer, J.; Vatteville, J.

    2008-12-01

    The PLURIEL cruise aimed to study the evolution of the interaction between the St Paul-Amsterdam hotspot (SPA) and the Southeast Indian Ridge (SEIR) over the last 10 m.y. The SPA-SEIR system appears to be an ideal target to study the initial phases of the building of an oceanic plateau. The interpretatio of the geophysical data acquired during the cruise reveals that the time evolution of the ridge-hotspot interaction and the building of the plateau are complex. The volcanic chain, extending north-east of the SEIR and thought to represent the past trace of the hotspot, disappears at about 450 km northeast of the ridge axis, where a volcanic plateau begins. The plateau was built in different steps, with two periods of increased magmatic activity, shown by areas of shallow and smooth seafloor morphology and negative Bouguer anomalies, separated by an area of rough morphology and positive Bouguer. As suggested by the Bouguer pattern, the crustal thickness varied with time as a function of the evolution of ridge-hotspot distance but also probably due to temporal variations in the plume flux. The beginning of the first phase happens at about 8.5 Ma, when the hotspot is thought to be still positioned off-axis. During this phase, the crustal volume produced at the ridge axis gradually increased. Between 6.8 Ma and 5.7 Ma, the ridge jumped to the south-west, possibly due to an adjustment in the relative motion between Antarctica and Australia, which served as a trigger. This jump is very likely linked to a decrease in the plume flux. A phase with low magmatic budget begins. During this period, the gradual nearing between ridge and hotspot placed the ridge above the hotspot. However, the volume of crust produced at the ridge remained relatively low. Around 3 Ma, the axis jumped southwestwards, towards the hotspot, and a new phase of increased crustal production begun. At 1.5 Ma the ridge was located above the hotspot. Changes in the spreading geometry such as ridge jumps may interfere with the ridge-hotspot connection and partly explain the beginning of the phase of low magmatic budget. However, the permanence of this low budget during periods where the hotspot was located beneath the ridge axis suggests that during this period, the plume flux was relatively low. Increase in the plume flux may explain the second ridge jump and the second phase of high crustal production and, for the SPA hotspot, this period appears to last roughly 3 m.y.

  11. Precision spectroscopy with a single 40Ca+ ion in a Paul trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Hua; Huang, Yao; Liu, Pei-Liang; Bian, Wu; Shao, Hu; Gao, Ke-Lin

    2015-05-01

    Precision measurement of the 4s2S1/2–3d2D5/2 clock transition based on 40Ca+ ion at 729 nm is reported. A single 40Ca+ ion is trapped and laser-cooled in a ring Paul trap, and the storage time for the ion is more than one month. The linewidth of a 729 nm laser is reduced to about 1 Hz by locking to a super cavity for longer than one month uninterruptedly. The overall systematic uncertainty of the clock transition is evaluated to be better than 6.5×10?16. The absolute frequency of the clock transition is measured at the 10?15 level by using an optical frequency comb referenced to a hydrogen maser which is calibrated to the SI second through the global positioning system (GPS). The frequency value is 411 042 129 776 393.0(1.6) Hz with the correction of the systematic shifts. In order to carry out the comparison of two 40Ca+ optical frequency standards, another similar 40Ca+ optical frequency standard is constructed. Two optical frequency standards exhibit stabilities of 1×10?14??1/2 with 3 days of averaging. Moreover, two additional precision measurements based on the single trapped 40Ca+ ion are carried out. One is the 3d2D5/2 state lifetime measurement, and our result of 1174(10) ms agrees well with the results reported in [Phys. Rev. A 62 032503 (2000)] and [Phys. Rev. A 71 032504 (2005)]. The other one is magic wavelengths for the 4s2S1/2–3d2D5/2 clock transition; ?|mj|=1/2= 395.7992(7) nm and ?|mj|=3/2 = 395.7990(7) nm are reported, and it is the first time that two magic wavelengths for the 40Ca+ clock-transition have been reported. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant Nos. 2012CB821301 and 2005CB724502), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11474318, 91336211, and 11034009), and Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  12. Simulation of ion behavior in an open three-dimensional Paul trap using a power series method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herbane, Mustapha Said; Berriche, Hamid; Abd El-hady, Alaa; Al Shahrani, Ghadah; Ban, Gilles; Fléchard, Xavier; Liénard, Etienne

    2014-07-01

    Simulations of the dynamics of ions trapped in a Paul trap with terms in the potential up to the order 10 have been carried out. The power series method is used to solve numerically the equations of motion of the ions. The stability diagram has been studied and the buffer gas cooling has been implemented by a Monte Carlo method. The dipole excitation was also included. The method has been applied to an existing trap and it has shown good agreement with the experimental results and previous simulations using other methods.

  13. Electrochemical Hydrogen Evolution: Sabatier's Principle and the Volcano Plot

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laursen, Anders B.; Varela, Ana Sofia; Dionigi, Fabio; Fanchiu, Hank; Miller, Chandler; Trinhammer, Ole L.; Rossmeisl, Jan; Dahl, Soren

    2012-01-01

    The electrochemical hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) is growing in significance as society begins to rely more on renewable energy sources such as wind and solar power. Thus, research on designing new, inexpensive, and abundant HER catalysts is important. Here, we describe how a simple experiment combined with results from density functional…

  14. Electrochemical Hydrogen Evolution: Sabatier's Principle and the Volcano Plot

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laursen, Anders B.; Varela, Ana Sofia; Dionigi, Fabio; Fanchiu, Hank; Miller, Chandler; Trinhammer, Ole L.; Rossmeisl, Jan; Dahl, Soren

    2012-01-01

    The electrochemical hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) is growing in significance as society begins to rely more on renewable energy sources such as wind and solar power. Thus, research on designing new, inexpensive, and abundant HER catalysts is important. Here, we describe how a simple experiment combined with results from density functional…

  15. Development of a preprototype Sabatier CO2 reduction subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleiner, G. N.; Birbara, P.

    1981-01-01

    A lightweight, quick starting reactor utilizes a highly active and physically durable methanation catalyst composed of ruthenium on alumina. The use of this improved catalyst permits a single straight through plug flow design with an average lean component H2/CO2 conversion efficiency of over 99% over a range of H2/CO2 molar ratios of 1.8 to 5 while operating with flows equivalent to a crew size of one person steadystate to 3 persons cyclical. The reactor requires no heater operation after start-up even during simulated 55 minute lightside/39 minute darkside orbital operation over the above range of molar ratios and crew loadings. Subsystem performance was proven by parametric testing and endurance testing over a wide range of crew sizes and metabolic loadings. The subsystem's operation and performance is controlled by a microprocessor and displayed on a nineteen inch multi-colored cathode ray tube.

  16. Detection of linkage to affective disorders in the catalogued Amish pedigrees: A reply to Pauls et al.

    SciTech Connect

    Gershon, E.S.; Goldin, L.R.; Badner, J.A.; Berrettini, W.H.

    1996-06-01

    We have reported evidence for linkage of a region of chromosome 18 markers to affective illness in 22 bipolar (BP) pedigrees. The pedigree series included 21 US pedigrees collected by us and part of Amish pedigree 884 referred to as panel 3 in the catalog and also known as {open_quotes}the right extension.{close_quotes} The rest of 884 was never genotyped by us, because it did not fit the criteria for inclusion, as described elsewhere. Pauls et al. have recently studied whether this linkage can be detected in the entire catalogued Amish pedigrees (884 and 1075) in four of the marker loci reported. The authors conclude that the Amish data contain no significant susceptibility locus for BP illness in this region of chromosome 18. We find that the data published by Pauls et al. are not conclusive with regard to the presence or absence of any susceptibility locus under the nonparametric analyses presented, and, although the sample size is extremely small, it could also be interpreted as consistent with our findings. 17 refs., 1 tab.

  17. Emergence and devopment of the Pauls Stradiņs Museum of the History of Medicine in Rīga.

    PubMed

    Salaks, Juris

    2009-01-01

    This paper reviews the establishment, development and present day of the Pauls Stradins Museum of the History of Medicine in RÄ«ga, Latvia. The museum initially represented the hopes of one very excited enthusiast, and what was decisive was that he was able to fill the vacuum of knowledge and information, expand on it, and legalise it as an institution protected by the state. No less important, however, has been the approach taken by government structures and the public at large in support of Pauls Stradins' hopes. This comparatively liberal approach toward what could be seen as a private museum can be attributed to the fact that health care had been declared a priority in the Soviet Union at that time, and in ideological terms, the history of medicine was a fairly neutral issue. The museum celebrated its 50th anniversary in 2007. This paper reviews the basic functions and structures of the museum, as well as the changes which have occurred in the complex era of the 20th century. Some areas of activity are reviewed in greater detail, and there are statistics to offer a look at the museum today. PMID:20481367

  18. Les luxations bilatérales antérieures pures des épaules à mécanisme particulier: à propos de deux cas

    PubMed Central

    Koufagued, Kaldadak; Chafry, Bouchaib; Bouabid, Salim; Chagar, Belkacem

    2015-01-01

    Les luxations bilatérales antérieures pures des épaules sont des entités cliniques rares. Une trentaine de cas sont décrits dans la littérature. Le mécanisme varie d'un cas à l'autre, les épaules en abduction et en rétro-pulsion, coudes en extention et en supination a été décrite une seule fois dans la littérature. A ce propos, les auteurs rapportent ce même mécanisme particulier de luxation antérieure bilatérale pure des épaules chez deux jeunes patients, et discutent des circonstances, mécanisme de survenue, du traitement et du pronostique. PMID:26918074

  19. Tuberculose de l’épaule masquée par une infection concomitante à enterobacter cloacae: à propos d'un cas

    PubMed Central

    Gbané-Koné, Mariam; Koné, Samba; Ouali, Boubacar; Djaha, Kouassi Jean-Mermoz; Diomandé, Mohamed; Eti, Edmond; Touré, Stanislas André; Kouakou, N'zué Marcel

    2015-01-01

    La tuberculose de l’épaule est une localisation rare de même que l'arthrite septique à Enterobacter cloacae, les auteurs rapportent un cas d'ostéoarthrite de l’épaule à Bacille de Koch et à E. Cloacae chez une patiente de 36 ans avec un terrain particulier (drépanocytose SC et infection à VIH). Le diagnostic a été possible grâce aux prélèvements chirurgicaux effectués lors de l'arthrotomie PMID:26401203

  20. Biology of Grapsus grapsus (L innaeus, 1758) (Brachyura, Grapsidae) in the Saint Peter and Saint Paul Archipelago, Equatorial Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freire, A. S.; Pinheiro, M. A. A.; Karam-Silva, H.; Teschima, M. M.

    2011-09-01

    Eleven expeditions were undertaken to the Saint Peter and Saint Paul Archipelago to study the reproductive biology of Grapsus grapsus, providing additional information on limb mutilation and carapace colour. MATURE software was used to estimate morphological maturity, while gonadal analyses were conducted to estimate physiological maturity. The puberty moult took place at larger size in males (51.4 mm of carapace length) than in females (33.8 mm), while physiological maturity occurred at a similar size in males (38.4 mm) and in females (33.4 mm). Above 50 mm, the proportion of red males increased in the population, indicating that functional maturity is also related to colour pattern. Small habitat and high local population density contributed to the high rate of cannibalism. The low diversity of food items, absence of predators of large crabs and high geographic isolation are the determinants of unique behavioural and biological characteristics observed in the G. grapsus population.

  1. Potential metabolic strategies of widely distributed holobionts in the oceanic archipelago of St Peter and St Paul (Brazil).

    PubMed

    Rua, Cintia P J; Gregoracci, Gustavo B; Santos, Eidy O; Soares, Ana Carolina; Francini-Filho, Ronaldo B; Thompson, Fabiano

    2015-06-01

    Sponges are one of the most complex symbiotic communities and while the taxonomic composition of associated microbes has been determined, the biggest challenge now is to uncover their functional role in symbiosis. We investigated the microbiota of two widely distributed sponge species, regarding both their taxonomic composition and their functional roles. Samples of Didiscus oxeata and Scopalina ruetzleri were collected in the oceanic archipelago of St Peter and St Paul and analysed through metagenomics. Sequences generated by 454 pyrosequencing and Ion Torrent were taxonomically and functionally annotated on the MG-RAST server using the GenBank and SEED databases, respectively. Both communities exhibit equivalence in core functions, interestingly played by the most abundant taxa in each community. Conversely, the microbial communities differ in composition, taxonomic diversity and potential metabolic strategies. Functional annotation indirectly suggests differences in preferential pathways of carbon, nitrogen and sulphur metabolisms, which may indicate different metabolic strategies. PMID:25873456

  2. ON THE MAKING OF A SYSTEM THEORY OF LIFE: PAUL A WEISS AND LUDWIG VON BERTALANFFY’S CONCEPTUAL CONNECTION

    PubMed Central

    Drack, Manfred; Apfalter, Wilfried; Pouvreau, David

    2010-01-01

    In this article, we review how two eminent Viennese system thinkers, Paul A Weiss and Ludwig von Bertalanffy, began to develop their own perspectives toward a system theory of life in the 1920s. Their work is especially rooted in experimental biology as performed at the Biologische Versuchsanstalt, as well as in philosophy, and they converge in basic concepts. We underline the conceptual connections of their thinking, among them the organism as an organized system, hierarchical organization, and primary activity. With their system thinking, both biologists shared a strong desire to overcome what they viewed as a “mechanistic” approach in biology. Their interpretations are relevant to the renaissance of system thinking in biology—“systems biology.” Unless otherwise noted, all translations are our own. PMID:18217527

  3. Occurrences of whale shark (Rhincodon typus Smith, 1828) in the Saint Peter and Saint Paul archipelago, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Hazin, F H V; Vaske Júnior, T; Oliveira, P G; Macena, B C L; Carvalho, F

    2008-05-01

    The Saint Peter and Saint Paul Archipelago in the central tropical Atlantic, is an important ground of whale sharks that are commonly sighted throughout the year close to the fishing boats in the adjacencies of the islands. In sightings reported between February 2000 and November 2005, the lengths of the individuals ranged between 1.8 to 14.0 m. The causes of these concentrations in the archipelago are still unclear, once there are no upwellings and plankton concentrations for feeding, and no reproductive activities were reported. Nevertheless, they could be associated to the spawning period of the abundant flying fishes, mainly in the first semester, when sightings were more frequent. PMID:18660968

  4. A Plea for the traditional family: Situating marriage within John Paul II's realist, or personalist, perspective of human freedom1

    PubMed Central

    Schumacher, Michele M.

    2014-01-01

    This article is an attempt to defend the rights of the traditional family: not simply against the redefinition of marriage, but more fundamentally against a re-conceptualization of human freedom and human rights. To this end, it contrasts what Saint John Paul II calls an individualistic understanding of freedom and a personalistic notion of the same in order to argue that human freedom is called by the Creator to be in service of, and not in opposition to, the good of the human family. From this perspective—that of the social doctrine of the Catholic Church—it argues for the harmony between natural marriage and the respect of fundamental human rights, and it presents the social dimension of marriage as fundamental with respect to the legal and social protection of the family. PMID:25473131

  5. An Automatic Unpacking Method for Computer Virus Effective in the Virus Filter Based on Paul Graham's Bayesian Theorem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Dengfeng; Nakaya, Naoshi; Koui, Yuuji; Yoshida, Hitoaki

    Recently, the appearance frequency of computer virus variants has increased. Updates to virus information using the normal pattern matching method are increasingly unable to keep up with the speed at which viruses occur, since it takes time to extract the characteristic patterns for each virus. Therefore, a rapid, automatic virus detection algorithm using static code analysis is necessary. However, recent computer viruses are almost always compressed and obfuscated. It is difficult to determine the characteristics of the binary code from the obfuscated computer viruses. Therefore, this paper proposes a method that unpacks compressed computer viruses automatically independent of the compression format. The proposed method unpacks the common compression formats accurately 80% of the time, while unknown compression formats can also be unpacked. The proposed method is effective against unknown viruses by combining it with the existing known virus detection system like Paul Graham's Bayesian Virus Filter etc.

  6. Dynamics enhanced by HCl doping triggers full Pauling entropy release at the ice XII-XIV transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köster, K. W.; Fuentes-Landete, V.; Raidt, A.; Seidl, M.; Gainaru, C.; Loerting, T.; Böhmer, R.

    2015-06-01

    The pressure-temperature phase diagram of ice displays a perplexing variety of structurally distinct phases. In the century-long history of scientific research on ice, the proton-ordered ice phases numbered XIII through XV were discovered only recently. Despite considerable effort, none of the transitions leading from the low-temperature ordered ices VIII, IX, XI, XIII, XIV and XV to their high-temperature disordered counterparts were experimentally found to display the full Pauling entropy. Here we report calorimetric measurements on suitably high-pressure-treated, hydrogen chloride-doped ice XIV that demonstrate just this at the transition to ice XII. Dielectric spectroscopy on undoped and on variously doped ice XII crystals reveals that addition of hydrogen chloride, the agent triggering complete proton order in ice XIV, enhances the precursor dynamics strongest. These discoveries provide new insights into the puzzling observation that different dopants trigger the formation of different proton-ordered ice phases.

  7. Benign familial hypermobility syndrome and Trendelenburg sign in a painting "The Three Graces" by Peter Paul Rubens (1577-1640)

    PubMed Central

    DEQUEKER, J

    2001-01-01

    Clinical features suggestive of hypermobility syndrome and a positive Trendelenburg sign are described in a painting "The Three Graces" (1638-1640) by Peter Paul Rubens, Prado, Madrid. The most obvious findings are scoliosis, positive Trendelenburg sign, and hyperextension of the metacarpal joints, hyperlordosis, and flat feet. The sitters, presumably Hélène Fourment (second wife of Rubens) and her sisters, support the hereditary familial aspect of hypermobility. Manifest hypermobility of the hand has also been found in two other ancient paintings: "Saint Cyriaque" in the Heller Retable by Mathias Grünewald (1450-1528), Frankfurt, and "The wounded man" by Gaspare Traversi, Venice (1732-1769). The finding of signs of hypermobility in ancient paintings shows that artists who are keen observers of nature could describe, or at least record, this condition long before doctors did. The art of the past can be a useful tool in the field of paleopathology.?? PMID:11502619

  8. Voids-driven breakdown of the local-symmetry and Slater-Pauling rule in half-metallic Heusler compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galanakis, I.; ?a??o?lu, E.; Blügel, S.; Özdo?an, K.

    2014-08-01

    Slater-Pauling (SP) rules connect the magnetic and electronic properties of the half-metallic (HM) Heusler compounds. Employing first-principles electronic structure calculations we explore the validity of the SP rules in the case of transition from HM semi-Heusler compounds to various cases of HM full-Heusler compounds. We show that the coherent-potential approximation yields half-metallicity and thus a generalized version of the SP rules can be derived. On the contrary, supercell calculations, which are expected to describe the experimental situation more accurately, show that the energy gap considerably shrinks for the intermediate compounds and in several cases the half-metallicity is completely destroyed. The origin of this behavior is attributed to the voids, which influence the symmetry of the lattice.

  9. Dynamics enhanced by HCl doping triggers full Pauling entropy release at the ice XII–XIV transition

    PubMed Central

    Köster, K. W.; Fuentes-Landete, V.; Raidt, A.; Seidl, M.; Gainaru, C.; Loerting, T.; Böhmer, R.

    2015-01-01

    The pressure–temperature phase diagram of ice displays a perplexing variety of structurally distinct phases. In the century-long history of scientific research on ice, the proton-ordered ice phases numbered XIII through XV were discovered only recently. Despite considerable effort, none of the transitions leading from the low-temperature ordered ices VIII, IX, XI, XIII, XIV and XV to their high-temperature disordered counterparts were experimentally found to display the full Pauling entropy. Here we report calorimetric measurements on suitably high-pressure-treated, hydrogen chloride-doped ice XIV that demonstrate just this at the transition to ice XII. Dielectric spectroscopy on undoped and on variously doped ice XII crystals reveals that addition of hydrogen chloride, the agent triggering complete proton order in ice XIV, enhances the precursor dynamics strongest. These discoveries provide new insights into the puzzling observation that different dopants trigger the formation of different proton-ordered ice phases. PMID:26076946

  10. A Plea for the traditional family: Situating marriage within John Paul II's realist, or personalist, perspective of human freedom.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, Michele M

    2014-11-01

    This article is an attempt to defend the rights of the traditional family: not simply against the redefinition of marriage, but more fundamentally against a re-conceptualization of human freedom and human rights. To this end, it contrasts what Saint John Paul II calls an individualistic understanding of freedom and a personalistic notion of the same in order to argue that human freedom is called by the Creator to be in service of, and not in opposition to, the good of the human family. From this perspective-that of the social doctrine of the Catholic Church-it argues for the harmony between natural marriage and the respect of fundamental human rights, and it presents the social dimension of marriage as fundamental with respect to the legal and social protection of the family. PMID:25473131

  11. A drift experiment to assess the influence of wind on recovery of oiled seabirds on St Paul Island, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Flint, P.L.; Fowler, A.C.

    1998-01-01

    We used wooden blocks to estimate the proportion of oiled seabird carcasses that were likely to be recovered on beaches of St Paul Island, Alaska following a near-shore oil spill. We released a total of 302 blocks 6 km north of the island in 1997 at the site of a 17 II 1996 oil spill. We used a paired design and released half the blocks when the winds were onshore and released the second half when the winds were offshore. We systematically searched beaches after the second release to recover blocks. We recovered 93 of 152 (61%) blocks released when winds were onshore but only 1 of 150 (0.7%) blocks released when winds were offshore. Given that winds following the 1996 spill were offshore, we conclude that most birds killed at sea following the 1996 spill were likely not recovered on beaches.

  12. Dynamics enhanced by HCl doping triggers full Pauling entropy release at the ice XII-XIV transition.

    PubMed

    Köster, K W; Fuentes-Landete, V; Raidt, A; Seidl, M; Gainaru, C; Loerting, T; Böhmer, R

    2015-01-01

    The pressure-temperature phase diagram of ice displays a perplexing variety of structurally distinct phases. In the century-long history of scientific research on ice, the proton-ordered ice phases numbered XIII through XV were discovered only recently. Despite considerable effort, none of the transitions leading from the low-temperature ordered ices VIII, IX, XI, XIII, XIV and XV to their high-temperature disordered counterparts were experimentally found to display the full Pauling entropy. Here we report calorimetric measurements on suitably high-pressure-treated, hydrogen chloride-doped ice XIV that demonstrate just this at the transition to ice XII. Dielectric spectroscopy on undoped and on variously doped ice XII crystals reveals that addition of hydrogen chloride, the agent triggering complete proton order in ice XIV, enhances the precursor dynamics strongest. These discoveries provide new insights into the puzzling observation that different dopants trigger the formation of different proton-ordered ice phases. PMID:26076946

  13. Paul E. Meehl's influence on experimental psychopathology: fruits of the nexus of schizotypy and schizophrenia, neurology, and methodology.

    PubMed

    Lenzenweger, Mark F; Maher, Brendan A; Manschreck, Theo C

    2005-10-01

    Paul E. Meehl made numerous contributions to clinical science and a hallmark of many of these contributions was their integrative nature. Meehl's positions on complex topics, especially one such as schizophrenia, were reflective of input from a variety of disciplines and levels of analysis. In this essay the authors focus on Meehl's uniquely rich contribution to our understanding of schizophrenia through his theoretical model of schizotypy, his abiding interest in exploring neurologically based indicators of schizophrenia liability and encouragement to others to pursue such indicators, and his passion for rigorous research methodology. Meehl's contributions in each of these areas continue to influence the direction and research strategies used in experimental psychopathology to illuminate the fundamental nature of schizophrenia. These contributions have also shaped inquiry into many other psychopathological entities. PMID:16041784

  14. Experimental study of integer resonance crossing in a nonscaling fixed field alternating gradient accelerator with a Paul ion trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moriya, K.; Fukushima, K.; Ito, K.; Okano, T.; Okamoto, H.; Sheehy, S. L.; Kelliher, D. J.; Machida, S.; Prior, C. R.

    2015-03-01

    We present an experimental study aimed at exploring integer resonance crossing with a focus on nonscaling fixed field alternating gradient accelerators. The method uses the Simulator of Particle Orbit Dynamics system at Hiroshima University based on a compact ion trap known as a Paul trap. In a setup that mimics the Electron Model for Many Applications nonscaling fixed field alternating gradient accelerator, we have verified the theoretical prediction of the coherent excitation of dipole motion over a wide range of errors and crossing speeds. In addition, the cancellation of amplitude growth dependent on the relative betatron oscillation phase between two consecutive resonances is observed and studied. We also explore nonlinear effects and, in particular, the effects of amplitude-dependent tune shifts and find that these nonlinear effects are a key factor in understanding our experimental results.

  15. Decay Rate Measurement of the First Vibrationally Excited State of MgH+ in a Cryogenic Paul Trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Versolato, O. O.; Schwarz, M.; Hansen, A. K.; Gingell, A. D.; Windberger, A.; K?osowski, ?.; Ullrich, J.; Jensen, F.; Crespo López-Urrutia, J. R.; Drewsen, M.

    2013-08-01

    We present a method to measure the decay rate of the first excited vibrational state of polar molecular ions that are part of a Coulomb crystal in a cryogenic linear Paul trap. Specifically, we have monitored the decay of the |?=1,J=1?X towards the |?=0,J=0?X level in MgH+ by saturated laser excitation of the |?=0,J=2?X-|?=1,J=1?X transition followed by state selective resonance enhanced two-photon dissociation out of the |?=0,J=2?X level. The experimentally observed rate of 6.32(0.69)s-1 is in excellent agreement with the theory value of 6.13(0.03)s-1 (this Letter). The technique enables the determination of decay rates, and thus absorption strengths, with an accuracy at the few percent level.

  16. There's Madness in Your Method: A Philosophical Exploration into the Thought of Paul Feyerabend and Its Implications for Music Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Louth, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Drawing on the work of the philosopher of science Paul Feyerabend, this paper argues that the popular yet mistaken notion of scientific method has had a deleterious effect on music education by discouraging us from embracing conflict or pursuing counterinductive ways of thinking about music. Feyerabend argues that knowledge advances not according…

  17. Responding to the Ideals of Lassallian Education in the 21st Century: A Case Study of St. Paul's Secondary School in Marsabit, Kenya

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marius, Boya Francois; Teklemariam, Amanuel Abraha; Akala, Winston Jumba

    2011-01-01

    De La Salle Brothers are Christian educators operating in more than 80 countries, including Kenya. The purpose of this study was to find if the ideals of Lasallian education are being realized in the 21st century in Kenya and to establish whether the findings concur with the Lasallian philosophy of education. The study was conducted at St. Paul's…

  18. There's Madness in Your Method: A Philosophical Exploration into the Thought of Paul Feyerabend and Its Implications for Music Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Louth, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Drawing on the work of the philosopher of science Paul Feyerabend, this paper argues that the popular yet mistaken notion of scientific method has had a deleterious effect on music education by discouraging us from embracing conflict or pursuing counterinductive ways of thinking about music. Feyerabend argues that knowledge advances not according…

  19. Paul Goodman, 30 Years Later: "Growing Up Absurd"; "Compulsory Mis-Education, and The Community of Scholars"; and "The New Reformation"--A Retrospective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaminsky, James S.

    2006-01-01

    This article is a retrospective account of the legacy of Paul Goodman's major educational works: "Growing Up Absurd"; "Compulsory Mis-education, and The Community of Scholars"; and "The New Reformation." It is argued here that what remains of interest in Goodman's work is to be found in the tropes and the anarchic Zeitgeist of his work. The legacy…

  20. Economic Impact of Arts and Cultural Institutions. Case Studies in Columbus, Minneapolis/St. Paul, St. Louis, Salt Lake City, San Antonio, Springfield. Report #15.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Endowment for the Arts, Washington, DC. Research Div.

    This report examines the economic impact of cultural institutions on their communities in Columbus (Ohio), Minneapolis/ St. Paul (Minnesota), St. Louis (Missouri), Salt Lake City (Utah), San Antonio (Texas), and Springfield (Illinois). For each city, tables are included which list data in the following categories: (1) audience per capita spending;…

  1. Measuring Students' Perceptions of Institutional Identity: Validating the DePaul Mission and Values Inventory at a Franciscan University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matteo, Elizabeth K.; Bottom, Todd L.; Ferrari, Joseph R.

    2013-01-01

    The "DePaul Mission and Values Inventory" ("DMV") was validated based on the mission, identity, and values of a large, urban, Catholic, Vincentian institution. We examined the suitability of the "DMV" at a small, suburban, Catholic, Franciscan university. A sample of 275 undergraduates (218 women, 57 men:…

  2. An Overview of the Project on the Imaging and Full-Text Retrieval of the Ava Helen and Linus Pauling Papers at the Oregon State University Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krishnamurthy, Ramesh S.; Mead, Clifford S.

    1995-01-01

    Presents plan of Oregon State University Libraries to convert all paper documents from the Ava Helen and Linus Pauling archives to digital format. The scope, goals, tasks and objectives set by the project coordinators are outlined, and issues such as protection of equipment, access, copyright and management are discussed. (JKP)

  3. The Economic Impact of Ten Cultural Institutions on the Economy of the Minneapolis-St. Paul SMSA. Technical Supplement. Volume I [and] Volume II--Appendices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cwi, David; Smith, D. Alden

    The research methods, procedures, and data for determining the impact of 10 fine arts institutions on the Minneapolis-St. Paul economy (1978) are outlined. A 30-equation model was used to identify a variety of effects on local businesses, government, and individuals. Researchers examined internal records of the 10 institutions as well as local,…

  4. Paul Bunyan Takes A Wife--Developing Language, Reading, and Thinking Abilities through Creative Arts: An Alternative to Performance Centered Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward, Pat; And Others

    This guide, designed for the elementary level, contains written and oral language activities involving the five senses which are intended to help teachers develop enthusiastic readers. The guide's five sections are as follows: (1) My Very Own Paul Bunyan Songbook; (2) A Logger's Log; (3) Teacher's Instructions for the Magic Wall and Parachute…

  5. Measuring Students' Perceptions of Institutional Identity: Validating the DePaul Mission and Values Inventory at a Franciscan University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matteo, Elizabeth K.; Bottom, Todd L.; Ferrari, Joseph R.

    2013-01-01

    The "DePaul Mission and Values Inventory" ("DMV") was validated based on the mission, identity, and values of a large, urban, Catholic, Vincentian institution. We examined the suitability of the "DMV" at a small, suburban, Catholic, Franciscan university. A sample of 275 undergraduates (218 women, 57 men:…

  6. A Continuation of Paul Grobstein's Theory of Science as Story Telling and Story Revising: A Discussion of Its Relevance to History

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weller, Toni

    2006-01-01

    This paper applies Paul Grobstein's theory of science as story telling and story revising to history. The purpose of drawing such links is to show that in our current age when disciplinary borders are becoming increasingly blurred, what may be effective research practice for one discipline, may have some useful insights for another. It argues that…

  7. A Review of Class-Based Theories of Student Resistance in Education: Mapping the Origins and Influence of "Learning to Labor" by Paul Willis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGrew, Ken

    2011-01-01

    This article examines the origins, influence, and contemporary understandings of class-based theories of student resistance in education, contributing to or emerging from "Learning to Labor" by Paul Willis. It reports the results of a review of the literature that discusses class-based student resistance and cites the seminal book. More than 500…

  8. Responding to the Ideals of Lassallian Education in the 21st Century: A Case Study of St. Paul's Secondary School in Marsabit, Kenya

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marius, Boya Francois; Teklemariam, Amanuel Abraha; Akala, Winston Jumba

    2011-01-01

    De La Salle Brothers are Christian educators operating in more than 80 countries, including Kenya. The purpose of this study was to find if the ideals of Lasallian education are being realized in the 21st century in Kenya and to establish whether the findings concur with the Lasallian philosophy of education. The study was conducted at St. Paul's…

  9. Two Traditions in the Social Studies Curriculum for the Elementary Grades: The Textbooks of Paul R. Hanna and Harold O. Rugg

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bisland, Beverly Milner

    2009-01-01

    In the 1920s and 1930s, Paul R. Hanna and Harold O. Rugg developed new textbooks that integrated social studies curriculum in the elementary grades for the first time. Each author's curriculum; Hanna's expanding environments framework and Rugg's recurring concepts with a focus on contemporary issues has significantly impacted today's elementary…

  10. Anisakids (Nematoda: Anisakidae) from stomachs of northern fur seals (Callorhinus ursinus) on St. Paul Island, Alaska: parasitological and pathological analysis.

    PubMed

    Kuzmina, T A; Lyons, E T; Spraker, T R

    2014-12-01

    Anisakid nematodes parasitize the alimentary tracts of aquatic vertebrates, including northern fur seals (Callorhinus ursinus) (NFS). The main purpose of this study was to estimate the prevalence, intensity, and species composition of anisakids in NFSs on St. Paul Island, Alaska, and to analyze changes in NFS infection with these nematodes during the last decades. The study was carried out on St. Paul Island, Alaska, in July-August 2011-2013. Stomachs of 443 humanely harvested NFS males were collected from five separate haul-out areas. A total of 4,460 anisakid specimens were collected and identified by morphological criteria. Gross and histological examinations of stomachs were also performed. The overall prevalence of NFS infection was 91.2%; overall mean intensity 10.9, and overall median intensity 6. Five species, Anisakis simplex s. l., Contracaecum osculatum s. l., Pseudoterranova decipiens s. l., P. azarazi and Phocascaris cystophorae, were found. The prevalence of Anisakis was 46.5%, its intensity 7.5. The prevalence and intensity of Contracaecum, Pseudoterranova, and Phocascaris were 33.6% and 3.5, 81.9% and 6.5, and 5.2% and 1.7, respectively. Significant differences in the prevalence of NFS infection were observed between separate haul-outs. Comparison of the present data with the results of studies performed in the North Pacific in the 1960s, showed a significant decrease in the intensity of NFS infection with anisakids during the last decades. The prevalence of mucosal lesions in NFS stomachs caused by anisakids also decreased from 92 to 20.9%. Possible reasons for the changes in NFS infection with anisakids are discussed. PMID:25216781

  11. De astronomicis instrumentis in Universitate monspeliensi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reboul, H.

    2013-11-01

    Montpellier hosted one of the first French observatories, and has therefore a long and rich tradition in the development of astronomy as a research topic or as a teaching subject since the 17(th) th century. This is the reason why such a large collection of astronomical instruments could be gathered and preserved. Recently, the Science university of Montpellier has worked towards the inclusion of this collection on the French National Heritage List (at least for 56 items out of the 240 listed in the inventory), and some of them have been repaired. You will find below the history of this collection which can be accessed online.

  12. Evolution of the Phreatomagmatic Cova de Paul Eruption, Santo Antao, Cape Verde Islands: Links Between Eruption Development and Crater Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarff, R.; Day, S. J.; Downes, H.; Seghedi, I.

    2013-12-01

    Episodes of phreatomagmatic explosive activity that excavate large deep craters occur at high-elevation vents on many oceanic island volcanoes. The water driving these explosions is sourced from freshwater aquifers within the volcanic edifices, whose location and other characteristics will influence crater growth and final geometry. Here we describe phreatomagmatic deposits from the single eruption that formed the large Cova de Paul crater on the island of Santo Antao, Cape Verde Islands. These deposits, emplaced after an initial Strombolian phase of activity, record wide fluctuations in the intensity of phreatomagmatic explosivity. The largest explosions produced low-temperature, indurated lithic-rich phreatomagmatic ignimbrites and surge deposits; these occur as isolated and often erosive-based units in more distal areas but are interbedded in proximal outcrops with airfall to mixed fall and flow breccia and ash beds containing varying proportions of lithic and juvenile clasts, pointing to a series of climactic explosions within an extended period of milder phreatomagmatic explosive activity. We find that whereas the lithic clasts in the mixed units can be matched with the varied rock units in the exposed crater walls, the ignimbrite and surge units also contain hydrothermally altered clasts that appear to have originated from deeper in the volcanic edifice. They imply that during the climactic explosions the crater was excavated to several hundred meters depth below the surface. The phreatomagmatic explosive phase of the CDPC eruption was initiated by shattering of the chilled margins of the eruptive conduit, which had formed during the early Strombolian activity. The remains of these chilled margins form a distinctive bed of large flow-banded angular sub-glassy juvenile clasts that separates the Strombolian deposits from the later phreatomagmatic deposits. At this point water inflow from pressurized aquifers into the conduit attained a critical coolant input ratio prompting the onset of the phreatomagmatic explosions (Tarff and Day 2013). Only rare small angular sub-glassy clasts are present in the rest of the eruptive sequence, suggesting that the chilled margins never re-established. Instead, we propose that subsequent variations in the intensity of phreatomagmatic activity were controlled by fluctuations in water flow to the conduit as the crater was excavated to deeper levels and different aquifers were tapped and depleted. The CDPC deposits can be compared with older phreatomagmatic ignimbrites in other ocean islands, where the source vents have been eroded. Tarff, R. W. and Day, S. J. (2013). "Chilled margin fragmentation as a trigger for transition from Strombolian to phreatomagmatic explosive activity at Cova de Paul Crater, Santo Antao, Cape Verde Islands." Bulletin of Volcanology 75(7): 1-14.

  13. Morphological and karyotypic differentiation in Caranx lugubris (Perciformes: Carangidae) in the St. Peter and St. Paul Archipelago, mid-Atlantic Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobina, Uedson Pereira; Martinez, Pablo Ariel; Cioffi, Marcelo de Bello; Garcia, José; Bertollo, Luiz Antonio Carlos; Molina, Wagner Franco

    2014-03-01

    Isolated oceanic islands constitute interesting model systems for the study of colonization processes, as several climatic and oceanographic phenomena have played an important role in the history of the marine ichthyofauna. The present study describes the presence of two morphotypes of Caranx lugubris, in the St. Peter and St. Paul Archipelago located in the mid-Atlantic. Morphotypes were compared in regard to their morphological and cytogenetic patterns, using C-banding, Ag-NORs, staining with CMA3/DAPI fluorochromes and chromosome mapping by dual-color FISH analysis with 5S rDNA and 18S rDNA probes. We found differences in chromosome patterns and marked divergence in body patterns which suggest that different populations of the Atlantic or other provinces can be found in the Archipelago of St. Peter and St. Paul.

  14. Mesophotic reef fish assemblages of the remote St. Peter and St. Paul's Archipelago, Mid-Atlantic Ridge, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosa, Marcos Rogerio; Alves, Aline Cristina; Medeiros, Diego Valverde; Coni, Ericka Oliveira Cavalcanti; Ferreira, Camilo Moitinho; Ferreira, Beatrice Padovani; de Souza Rosa, Ricardo; Amado-Filho, Gilberto Menezes; Pereira-Filho, Guilherme Henrique; de Moura, Rodrigo Leão; Thompson, Fabiano Lopes; Sumida, Paulo Yukio Gomes; Francini-Filho, Ronaldo Bastos

    2016-03-01

    Mesophotic reef fish assemblages (30-90 m depth) of the small and remote St. Peter and St. Paul's Archipelago (SPSPA), Mid-Atlantic Ridge, Brazil, were characterized using remotely operated vehicles. Ordination analyses identified distinct fish assemblages in the upper (30-50 m) and lower (50-90 m) mesophotic zones, the former characterized by high abundances of species that are also abundant at euphotic reefs ( Caranx lugubris, Melichthys niger, Stegastes sanctipauli and Chromis multilineata) and the latter dominated by two mesophotic specialists ( Prognathodes obliquus and Chromis enchrysura). Planktivores dominated fish assemblages, particularly in the upper mesophotic zone, possibly due to a greater availability of zooplankton coming from the colder Equatorial Undercurrent in mesophotic depths of the SPSPA. Turf algae, fleshy macroalgae and scleractinian corals dominated benthic assemblages between 30 and 40 m depth, while bryozoans, black corals and sponges dominated between 40 and 90 m depth. Canonical correspondence analysis explained 74 % of the relationship between environmental characteristics (depth, benthic cover and complexity) and structure of fish assemblages, with depth as the most important independent variable. Juveniles of Bodianus insularis and adults of P. obliquus and C. enchrysura were clearly associated with branching black corals ( Tanacetipathes spp.), suggesting that black corals play key ecological roles in lower mesophotic reefs of the SPSPA. Results from this study add to the global database about mesophotic reef ecosystems (MREs) and provide a baseline for future evaluations of possible anthropogenic and natural disturbances on MREs of the SPSPA.

  15. Dynamic stabilization of the magnetic field surrounding the neutron electric dipole moment spectrometer at the Paul Scherrer Institute

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afach, S.; Bison, G.; Bodek, K.; Burri, F.; Chowdhuri, Z.; Daum, M.; Fertl, M.; Franke, B.; Grujic, Z.; Hélaine, V.; Henneck, R.; Kasprzak, M.; Kirch, K.; Koch, H.-C.; Kozela, A.; Krempel, J.; Lauss, B.; Lefort, T.; Lemière, Y.; Meier, M.; Naviliat-Cuncic, O.; Piegsa, F. M.; Pignol, G.; Plonka-Spehr, C.; Prashanth, P. N.; Quéméner, G.; Rebreyend, D.; Roccia, S.; Schmidt-Wellenburg, P.; Schnabel, A.; Severijns, N.; Voigt, J.; Weis, A.; Wyszynski, G.; Zejma, J.; Zenner, J.; Zsigmond, G.

    2014-08-01

    The Surrounding Field Compensation (SFC) system described in this work is installed around the four-layer Mu-metal magnetic shield of the neutron electric dipole moment spectrometer located at the Paul Scherrer Institute. The SFC system reduces the DC component of the external magnetic field by a factor of about 20. Within a control volume of approximately 2.5 m × 2.5 m × 3 m, disturbances of the magnetic field are attenuated by factors of 5-50 at a bandwidth from 10 - 3 Hz up to 0.5 Hz, which corresponds to integration times longer than several hundreds of seconds and represent the important timescale for the neutron electric dipole moment measurement. These shielding factors apply to random environmental noise from arbitrary sources. This is achieved via a proportional-integral feedback stabilization system that includes a regularized pseudoinverse matrix of proportionality factors which correlates magnetic field changes at all sensor positions to current changes in the SFC coils.

  16. Seasonality in deep-sea food webs—A tribute to the early works of Paul Tyler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowe, Gilbert T.

    2013-08-01

    A numerical simulation has been constructed that illustrates the vertical biological pathways of carbon fluxes from the surface down through the entire water column to the Sigsbee Abyssal Plain at a depth of 3.7 km in the central Gulf of Mexico (GoM). Seasonal production of particulate organic carbon (POC) in a six month long pulse is delivered with lag times that reflect sinking rates of the POC and time-dependent incorporation of the POC into biomass by the pelagic and the benthic biota. The model illustrates that the seasonal variations in carbon and energy are transmitted down the water column and, in the model, are reflected in subdued but distinct variations in pelagic and benthic respiration and biomass; the amount reaching the bottom is adequate to support the variable growth patterns of numerous shell-bearing invertebrates on the deep-sea floor described by Paul Tyler and John Gage. A notable realization is the profound lack of information on the biomass and bioenergetics of the deep abyssopelagic biota in the GoM.

  17. Lock and Dam Number 1 hydropower study, Mississippi River at Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minnesota. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-10-01

    This report determines the feasibility of adding hydropower generation to Lock and Dam Number 1, located on the Mississippi River in St. Paul, Minnesota. The existing project consists of a concrete Ambursen-type spillway section, two navigation locks on the right side of the river and an existing 14.4-mw hydro plant on the left side. The Corps owns and operates the dam and locks, while the Ford Motor Company owns and operates the hydro plant. This study shows that an additional powerplant can be built at the project that will more fully utilize the existing river flows. Four alternative powerplant locations were investigated. The selected powerplant will be 7.2-mw, single tubular unit, constructed at the spillway located near the existing powerplant. The new powerplant will produce 21.5 million kWh of annual generation. The total investment cost will be 11.5 million dollars. The project is economically feasibile with a benefit cost ratio of 1.12. The annual production cost will be 48 mills per kWh.

  18. Paul Wittgenstein's right arm and his phantom: the saga of a famous concert pianist and his amputation.

    PubMed

    Boller, François; Bogousslavsky, Julien

    2015-01-01

    Reports of postamputation pain and problems linked to phantom limbs have increased in recent years, particularly in relation to war-related amputations. These problems are still poorly understood and are considered rather mysterious, and they are difficult to treat. In addition, they may shed light on brain physiology and neuropsychology. Functional neuroimaging techniques now enable us to better understand their pathophysiology and to consider new rehabilitation techniques. Several artists have suffered from postamputation complications and this has influenced not only their personal life but also their artistic work. Paul Wittgenstein (1887-1961), a pianist whose right arm was amputated during the First World War, became a famous left-handed concert performer. His case provides insight into Post-World War I musical and political history. More specifically, the impact on the artistic life of this pianist illustrates various postamputation complications, such as phantom limb, stump pain, and especially moving phantom. The phantom movements of his right hand helped him develop the dexterity of his left hand. Wittgenstein played piano works that were written especially for him (the most famous being Ravel's Concerto for the Left Hand) and composed some of his own. Additionally, several famous composers had previously written for the left hand. PMID:25684295

  19. Interview with Paul W. Kruse on the Early History of HgCdTe, Conducted on October 22, 1980

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reine, Marion B.

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents an interview with Dr Paul W. Kruse (1927-2012) on the early history of the semiconductor alloy mercury cadmium telluride (HgCdTe or Hg1- x Cd x Te) at the Honeywell Corporate Research Center near Minneapolis, Minnesota. Conducted on October 22, 1980, the interview covers two main areas. One area is the story of how the HgCdTe research effort came about at the Honeywell Research Center in the early 1960s, what technical choices were made and when, and what technical challenges were overcome and how. The other area is the organization, culture, environment and personnel at the Honeywell Research Center that made the early HgCdTe research programs so successful. HgCdTe has emerged as the highest-performance, most widely applicable infrared detector material. HgCdTe continues to satisfy a broad variety of advanced military and space applications. It is illustrative to look back on the early history of this remarkable semiconductor alloy to help to understand why its technological development as an infrared detector has been so successful.

  20. Sports medicine across Missouri: interviews with Dr. Paul Meyer and Dr. Stanley London. Interview by Thomas D. Eppright, Shane Bradley, Maureen Alwood.

    PubMed

    Meyer, P; London, S

    1998-12-01

    Paul Meyer and Stanley London are two Missourians who have led the way for many in the field of Sports Medicine. The careers of many professional athletes have been extended due to the clinical expertise of these exemplary physicians who both began their medical careers in the 1940s. Through this interview, they offer a historical perspective of Sports Medicine and baseball. They also share their life experiences, as well as their formulas for successful careers and long-lasting marriages. PMID:9863341

  1. North-south compression, active uplift, and abyssal mantle exhumation of the Saint Peter and Saint Paul Rock, Equatorial Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motoki, A.; Sichel, S. E.; Campos, T. F.; Motoki, K. F.; Szatmari, P.; Poseidon-Colmeia

    2013-05-01

    This article presents near N-S compression, active uplift tectonism, and the consequent abyssal mantle exhumation of the Saint Peter and Saint Paul Rock, Equatorial Atlantic Ocean. The mantle peridotite ridge is about 80 km long, 25 km wide, 3800 m high, and of near E-W direction. The ridge flanks are extremely steep with sub-vertical scarps of about 2000 m of relative height. The Flandrian wave-cut and the 14C datings for the carbonaceous algae of the Saint Peter and Saint Paul Rock indicate active uplift of 1.5 mm/year. The tectonic factures shows conjugated system of N-S compression tending slightly to NW-ES. Close to the peridotite ridge, the earthquakes with near N-S compression focal mechanism take place. The southern half of the peridotite ridge is constituted by undeformed peridotite. The existence of corrugation morphology indicates that the mantle rocks are originated from old megamullion. On the other hand, the northern half is composed of strongly deformed mylonitic peridotite suggesting that the ultramafic rocks are possibly originated from sub-crustal abyssal mantle of old transform fault. The mylonite structure is intensely perturbed indicating the tectonic events which disturbed the original parallel structure. The Saint Paul transform fault zone is characterized by E-W trend right lateral movement and the near N-S compression is unlikely. Therefore, an unusual local geotectonic process is expected. This tectonism was originated from the plate boundary jump at about 8 Ma, caused by the emergence of a new ridge segment, and the new transform fault is oblique to the relative plate movement. This angular discrepancy causes the compression perpendicular to the oblique transform fault, of near N-S direction, which squeeze out the sub-crustal abyssal mantle up to sea level. Therefore, the peridotite Ridge is considered to be a pressure ridge of the strike-slip movement of the Saint Paul transform fault.

  2. Field observations, preliminary model analysis, and aquifer thermal efficiency: Cyclic injection, storage, and withdrawal of heated water in a sandstone aquifer at St. Paul, Minnesota. Professional paper

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.T.; Delin, G.N.

    1993-12-31

    The report describes the (1) analysis of field observations for aquifer characterization and observation network design, (2) preliminary model analysis to determine model sensitivity to hydraulic and thermal characteristics and to facilitate final model design, and (3) aquifer thermal efficiency. The report is the first of three reports that describes the potential for thermal-energy storage within the Franconia-Ironton-Galesville aquifer located beneath the St. Paul campus of the University of Minnesota.

  3. Luxation postérieure de l’épaule chez un sujet sportif traitée par transfert pédiculé du sub-scapulaire

    PubMed Central

    El Alaoui, Adil; Rabhi, Ilyas; Bah, Aliou; Sbiyaa, Mouhcine; Mezzani, Amine; Alami, Badr; Marzouki, Amine; Boutayeb, Fawzi

    2015-01-01

    La luxation postérieure de l’épaule constitue une lésion rare et un piège diagnostique et mettant en jeu le pronostic fonctionnel de l'articulation de l’épaule. Les signes cliniques et radiologiques des luxations postérieures de l’épaule ont été bien définis dans la littérature par Bernageau et Patte, mais elles passent le plus souvent inaperçues. Nous rapportons un cas de luxation postérieure de l’épaule chez un sujet sportif de 22 ans pratiquant le Hand-Ball, traité par la technique de transfert pédiculé du sub-scapulaire. PMID:26985271

  4. pAUL: A Gateway-Based Vector System for Adaptive Expression and Flexible Tagging of Proteins in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Lyska, Dagmar; Engelmann, Kerstin; Meierhoff, Karin; Westhoff, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Determination of protein function requires tools that allow its detection and/or purification. As generation of specific antibodies often is laborious and insufficient, protein tagging using epitopes that are recognized by commercially available antibodies and matrices appears more promising. Also, proper spatial and temporal expression of tagged proteins is required to prevent falsification of results. We developed a new series of binary Gateway cloning vectors named pAUL1-20 for C- and N-terminal in-frame fusion of proteins to four different tags: a single (i) HA epitope and (ii) Strep-tagIII, (iii) both epitopes combined to a double tag, and (iv) a triple tag consisting of the double tag extended by a Protein A tag possessing a 3C protease cleavage site. Expression can be driven by either the 35 S CaMV promoter or, for C-terminal fusions, promoters from genes encoding the chloroplast biogenesis factors HCF107, HCF136, or HCF173. Fusions of the four promoters to the GUS gene showed that endogenous promoter sequences are functional and drive expression more moderately and consistently throughout different transgenic lines when compared to the 35 S CaMV promoter. By testing complementation of mutations affected in chloroplast biogenesis factors HCF107 and HCF208, we found that the effect of different promoters and tags on protein function strongly depends on the protein itself. Single-step and tandem affinity purification of HCF208 via different tags confirmed the integrity of the cloned tags. PMID:23326506

  5. Paul B. Beeson career development awards in aging research and U.S. medical schools aging and geriatric medicine programs.

    PubMed

    Bragg, Elizabeth J; Warshaw, Gregg A; van der Willik, Odette; Meganathan, Karthikeyan; Weber, Debra; Cornwall, Danielle; Leonard, Anthony C

    2011-09-01

    Established in 1995, the Paul B. Beeson Career Development program provides faculty development awards to outstanding junior and midcareer faculty committed to academic careers in aging-related research, training, and practice. This study evaluated the effect of 134 Beeson Scholars on their medical schools' aging and geriatric medicine programs and on the field of aging research from 1995 to 2007. Quantitative and qualitative survey data from multiple sources, including the American Geriatrics Society/Association of Directors of Geriatric Academic Programs' Geriatrics Workforce Policy Studies Center, National Institutes of Health (NIH) rankings of research funding, and other governmental databases were used to compare 36 medical schools with Beeson Scholars with 34 similar medical schools without Beeson scholars and to examine the influence of Beeson Scholars on the field of geriatrics and aging. Most Beeson Scholars remained at the institution where they trained during their Beeson award, and 89% are still practicing or conducting research in the field of geriatrics and aging. Twenty-six (19.4%) of the scholars have led institutional research mentoring awards, 51 (39%) report leadership roles in institutional program project grants, and 13 (10%) report leadership roles in the Clinical and Translational Science Award programs at their institutions. Beeson Scholars are more likely than a matched sample of non-Beeson NIH K awardees to study important geriatric syndromes such as falls, cognitive impairment, adverse drug events, osteoporosis, and functional recovery from illness. Total Beeson Impact Years (the total number of years all Beeson Scholars have worked at each school) is positively correlated with more geriatrics research faculty, after controlling for NIH funding rank (P=.02). Beeson Scholars have made positive contributions to the development of academic geriatrics research programs at U.S. medical schools. PMID:21806567

  6. Studies of emittance growth and halo particle production in intense charged particle beams using the Paul Trap Simulator Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Gilson, Erik P.; Davidson, Ronald C.; Dorf, Mikhail; Efthimion, Philip C.; Majeski, Richard; Chung, Moses; Gutierrez, Michael S.; Kabcenell, Aaron N.

    2010-05-15

    The Paul Trap Simulator Experiment (PTSX) is a compact laboratory experiment that places the physicist in the frame-of-reference of a long, charged-particle bunch coasting through a kilometers-long magnetic alternating-gradient (AG) transport system. The transverse dynamics of particles in both systems are described by the same set of equations, including nonlinear space-charge effects. The time-dependent voltages applied to the PTSX quadrupole electrodes in the laboratory frame are equivalent to the spatially periodic magnetic fields applied in the AG system. The transverse emittance of the charge bunch, which is a measure of the area in the transverse phase space that the beam distribution occupies, is an important metric of beam quality. Maintaining low emittance is an important goal when defining AG system tolerances and when designing AG systems to perform beam manipulations such as transverse beam compression. Results are reviewed from experiments in which white noise and colored noise of various amplitudes and durations have been applied to the PTSX electrodes. This noise is observed to drive continuous emittance growth and increase in root-mean-square beam radius over hundreds of lattice periods. Additional results are reviewed from experiments that determine the conditions necessary to adiabatically reduce the charge bunch's transverse size and simultaneously maintain high beam quality. During adiabatic transitions, there is no change in the transverse emittance. The transverse compression can be achieved either by a gradual change in the PTSX voltage waveform amplitude or frequency. Results are presented from experiments in which low emittance is achieved by using focusing-off-defocusing-off waveforms.

  7. Spot-scanning proton therapy for malignant soft tissue tumors in childhood: First experiences at the Paul Scherrer Institute

    SciTech Connect

    Timmermann, Beate . E-mail: beate.timmermann@psi.ch; Schuck, Andreas; Niggli, Felix; Weiss, Markus; Lomax, Antony Jonathan; Pedroni, Eros; Coray, Adolf; Jermann, Martin; Rutz, Hans Peter; Goitein, Gudrun

    2007-02-01

    Purpose: Radiotherapy plays a major role in the treatment strategy of childhood sarcomas. Consequences of treatment are likely to affect the survivor's quality of life significantly. We investigated the feasibility of spot-scanning proton therapy (PT) for soft tissue tumors in childhood. Methods and Materials: Sixteen children with soft tissue sarcomas were included. Median age at PT was 3.3 years. In 10 children the tumor histology was embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma. All tumors were located in the head or neck, parameningeal, or paraspinal, or pelvic region. In the majority of children, the tumor was initially unresectable (Intergroup Rhabdomyosarcoma Study [IRS] Group III in 75%). In 50% of children the tumors exceeded 5 cm. Fourteen children had chemotherapy before and during PT. Median total dose of radiotherapy was 50 cobalt Gray equivalent (CGE). All 16 children were treated with spot-scanning proton therapy at the Paul Scherrer Institute, and in 3 children the PT was intensity-modulated (IMPT). Results: After median follow-up of 1.5 years, local control was achieved in 12 children. Four children failed locally, 1 at the border of the radiation field and 3 within the field. All 4 children died of tumor recurrence. All 4 showed unfavorable characteristic either of site or histopathology of the tumor. Acute toxicity was low, with Grade 3 or 4 side effects according to Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (RTOG/EORTC) criteria occurring in the bone marrow only. Conclusions: Proton therapy was feasible and well tolerated. Early local control rates are comparable to those being achieved after conventional radiotherapy. For investigations on late effect, longer follow-up is needed.

  8. Carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus fluxes in household ecosystems in the Minneapolis-Saint Paul, Minnesota, urban region.

    PubMed

    Fissore, C; Baker, L A; Hobbie, S E; King, J Y; McFadden, J P; Nelson, K C; Jakobsdottir, I

    2011-04-01

    Rapid worldwide urbanization calls for a better understanding of the biogeochemical cycling of those macroelements that have large environmental impacts in cities. This study, part of the Twin Cities Household Ecosystem Project, quantified fluxes of carbon (C), nitrogen (N), and phosphorus (P) at the scale of individual households in the Minneapolis-Saint Paul metropolitan area in Minnesota, USA. We estimated input and output fluxes associated with several components of household activities including air and motor vehicle travel, food consumption, home energy use, landscape, pets, and paper and plastic use for 360 owner-occupied, stand-alone households. A few component fluxes dominated total input fluxes of elements. For instance, air and motor vehicle transportation, together with home energy use, accounted for 85% of total C consumption and emissions. All total and component fluxes were skewed to varying degrees, suggesting that policies targeting disproportionately high fluxes could be an effective and efficient way to reduce pollution. For example, 20% of households contributed 75% of air travel emissions and 40% of motor vehicle emissions. Home energy use was more nearly normally distributed. Nitrogen fluxes were dominated by human diet and lawn fertilizer applications, which together accounted for 65% of total household N inputs. The majority of P inputs were associated with human diet, use of detergents, and pet food. A large portion of the variation among household fluxes of C, N, and P was related to a few biophysical variables. A better understanding of the biophysical, demographic, and behavioral drivers of household activities that contribute to C, N, and P fluxes is pivotal for developing accurate urban biogeochemical models and for informing policies aimed at reducing sources of pollution in urban ecosystems. PMID:21639033

  9. Availability, brands, labelling and Salmonella contamination of raw pet food in the Minneapolis/St. Paul area.

    PubMed

    Mehlenbacher, S; Churchill, J; Olsen, K E; Bender, J B

    2012-11-01

    The purpose of the study was to characterize the commercially available raw meat pet food diets in the Minneapolis/St. Paul area by (i) determining the number and types of available diets; (ii) assessing pet food stores and brand labels for the provision of precautionary statements regarding the risk of foodborne illness from raw meat; (ii) assessing the labels for Food and Drug Administration (FDA)/American Association of Feed Control Officials (AAFCO) required content and nutrient-related information; and (iv) culturing purchased diets for the presence of Salmonella. Sixty raw meat diets were purchased, representing 11 different brands from eight different stores. Diets were readily available in the form of raw-frozen, dehydrated or freeze-dried varieties from different protein sources, such as lamb, beef, chicken or duck. All stores promoted raw meat diets; however, none provided foodborne illness warnings. Brands varied greatly in their precautionary statements; none of the diets underwent feeding trials; and nutritional adequacy substantiation was through formulation only. The first five ingredients tended to consist of meat, organ meat (by-products), vegetables, grains and ground bones. Currently, it is required that pet foods have an AAFCO nutritional adequacy statement and provide a guaranteed analysis table. Three brands did not meet these FDA requirements. Thirty-one (51.7%) of the 60 raw meat diets underwent some degree of processing including dehydration, freeze-drying or high-pressure pasteurization. Four of the 60 raw diets (7%) tested positive for Salmonella. Analysis of raw meat pet food labels indicated a lack of foodborne illness warnings. Based on these findings, we recommend that warning statements similar to those required by the United States Department of Agriculture and placed on labels of raw meat intended for human consumption be provided on the labels of raw meat pet food diets. PMID:22551080

  10. Continuity and change in subsistence harvests in five Bering Sea communities: Akutan, Emmonak, Savoonga, St. Paul, and Togiak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fall, James A.; Braem, Nicole S.; Brown, Caroline L.; Hutchinson-Scarbrough, Lisa B.; Koster, David S.; Krieg, Theodore M.

    2013-10-01

    To document and quantify subsistence harvests of fish and wildlife resources, and provide topics for subsequent key respondent interviews to collect local and traditional knowledge (LTK) about the Bering Sea ecosystem, comprehensive household harvest surveys were conducted in four Bering Sea Alaska Native communities: Akutan, Emmonak, Savoonga, and Togiak. In a fifth community, St. Paul, annual programs to document two key subsistence resources, fur seals and sea lions, continued. Surveys documented relatively high and diverse subsistence harvests, consistent with earlier research that demonstrated the continuing economic, social, and cultural importance of subsistence uses of wild resources. The research also found differences in subsistence use patterns compared to previous years' studies, such as harvest levels, harvest composition, and diversity of resources used, although differences between study years were not uniform across communities. Survey respondents, as well as key respondents in subsequent interviews, identified a complex range of personal, economic, and environmental factors when comparing subsistence uses in the study year with other years, such as increasing costs of fuel and purchased food, commercial fisheries harvests and bycatch, more persistent storms and less predictable winds, and reduced sea ice. Such conditions affect resource abundance and locations as well as access to fish and wildlife populations, and may shape long-term trends. So far, as in the past, families and communities have adapted to changing economic, social, and environmental conditions, but the future is less clear if such changes intensify or accelerate. Local community residents should be essential partners in future efforts to understand these complex processes that affect the natural resources of the Bering Sea.

  11. The GSO Data Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paletou, F.; Glorian, J.-M.; Génot, V.; Rouillard, A.; Petit, P.; Palacios, A.; Caux, E.; Wakelam, V.

    2015-12-01

    Hereafter we describe the activities of the Grand Sud-Ouest Data Centre operated for INSU (CNRS) by the OMP--IRAP and the Université Paul Sabatier in Toulouse, in a collaboration with the OASU--LAB in Bordeaux and OREME--LUPM in Montpellier.

  12. Complex ridge-transform evolution and mantle exhumation at the St. Paul fracture zone system, Equatorial Alantic. Preliminary results from the COLMEIA cruise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maia, M.; Sichel, S. E.; Santos, R.; Birot, D.; Brachet, C.; Brehme, I.; Briais, A.; Brunelli, D.; Campos, T.; Colosio, A.; de Moraes, E.; Donval, J.; Fontes, F.; Gaspar, F.; Guyader, V.; Hemond, C.; Konn, C.; Marcondes, M.; Motoki, A.; berengere, M.; Moura, D.; Pessanha, I.; Scalabrin, C.; Vale, E.

    2013-12-01

    The COLMEIA cruise, held in the Equatorial Atlantic, in the area of the St. Paul transform system, is part of a joint effort between France and Brazil for the study of the Mid-Atlantic ridge near the St. Peter & St. Paul's Rocks. The scientific objective of the cruise was to study in detail the temporal evolution of the complex transform plate boundary, and the origin of the St. Peter-St. Paul mylonitic massif. This area of the Mid-Atlantic ridge was considered to be a mantle 'cold spot', thus a magma-starved region with large occurrences of mantle-derived units outcropping at the seafloor. During the cruise we acquired multibeam echosounder bathymetry, backscattering, water column acoustic data, gravity, magnetics and seismics. 31 dredges successfully returned a wide variety of rocks, including basalts, gabbros and peridotites. The 15 CTD stations with nephelometric profiles casted in the transform region returned a single hydrothermal plume signal, probably sourced in the MAR segment south of the St. Paul system, while no hydrothermal activity was directly detected inside the transform system. 5 autonomous hydrophones were moored in the SOFAR channel around the study area in order to monitor the seismic activity and whale presence; they will be recovered mid-2014. Both bathymetry data and recovered rocks show that the image of a regional amagmatic MAR cannot be applied to the whole of the St. Paul system. The ridge segments are short and narrow, with deep axial valleys. Axial depths are below 4000 m on average, and reach 5400 m in some nodal basins. There is no evidence for a clearly defined neo-volcanic ridge on the axial valley floors, but a few volcanoes were observed in the axial valley of the central segment. The pattern of off-axis abyssal hills is highly variable from one segment to another. The northern segment displays a long sequence of magmatic abyssal hills. The central segment shows both hummocky ridges probably of magmatic origin, alternated to peridotitic ridges as attested by sampling. The southern segment shows few short, symmetric ridges made of peridotite and gabbros. Both the central and the southern segments display asymmetric core complexes nucleating at segments ends. This variety of off-axis morphologies suggest that accretionary processes along the intra-transform segments are unstable and highly variable in space and time. Thus, significant variations in the spreading style were recognized, with a more magmatic northern segment and comparatively less magmatic central and southern segments. However, the existence of long-lived, gabbro cored, core complexes at the western flanks of these later segments suggests that lacking of magma extrusion and presence of mantle-derived rocks at ridge axis, is possibly generated by a reduced efficiency of melt extraction, instead of a reduced magma primary production. We postulate this regime to be controlled by a cold, thick lithosphere where magma is preferentially retained in the crust to create large gabbro bodies. Another striking result is the evidence for compressive stresses across the area, which can be linked to the uplift of the Saint Paul massif. An intense tectonic deformation is attested by the large presence of ultramafic and mafic-derived mylonites associated to km-large shear and thrust zones.

  13. Working with Paul

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, June

    2006-01-01

    The author is a learning support teacher and works with children at Key Stage 3 (KS3) who are struggling to keep up with their peers in most areas of the curriculum. Many of them have specific learning difficulties such as dyslexia and dyspraxia and problems may emerge in reading, spelling, writing, mathematics, speaking or listening.…

  14. St. Paul's Pig Pack.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Penny Folley

    1982-01-01

    Describes a guinea pig (cavy) breeding and management program developed as part of an elementary school science curriculum. Includes comments on show competitions (sponsored by the American Rabbit Breeders Association) to measure the success of the breeding program and to enable children to experience the business world. (Author/JN)

  15. Inter-rater reliability of data elements from a prototype of the Paul Coverdell National Acute Stroke Registry

    PubMed Central

    Reeves, Mathew J; Mullard, Andrew J; Wehner, Susan

    2008-01-01

    Background The Paul Coverdell National Acute Stroke Registry (PCNASR) is a U.S. based national registry designed to monitor and improve the quality of acute stroke care delivered by hospitals. The registry monitors care through specific performance measures, the accuracy of which depends in part on the reliability of the individual data elements used to construct them. This study describes the inter-rater reliability of data elements collected in Michigan's state-based prototype of the PCNASR. Methods Over a 6-month period, 15 hospitals participating in the Michigan PCNASR prototype submitted data on 2566 acute stroke admissions. Trained hospital staff prospectively identified acute stroke admissions, abstracted chart information, and submitted data to the registry. At each hospital 8 randomly selected cases were re-abstracted by an experienced research nurse. Inter-rater reliability was estimated by the kappa statistic for nominal variables, and intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) for ordinal and continuous variables. Factors that can negatively impact the kappa statistic (i.e., trait prevalence and rater bias) were also evaluated. Results A total of 104 charts were available for re-abstraction. Excellent reliability (kappa or ICC > 0.75) was observed for many registry variables including age, gender, black race, hemorrhagic stroke, discharge medications, and modified Rankin Score. Agreement was at least moderate (i.e., 0.75 > kappa ?; 0.40) for ischemic stroke, TIA, white race, non-ambulance arrival, hospital transfer and direct admit. However, several variables had poor reliability (kappa < 0.40) including stroke onset time, stroke team consultation, time of initial brain imaging, and discharge destination. There were marked systematic differences between hospital abstractors and the audit abstractor (i.e., rater bias) for many of the data elements recorded in the emergency department. Conclusion The excellent reliability of many of the data elements supports the use of the PCNASR to monitor and improve care. However, the poor reliability for several variables, particularly time-related events in the emergency department, indicates the need for concerted efforts to improve the quality of data collection. Specific recommendations include improvements to data definitions, abstractor training, and the development of ED-based real-time data collection systems. PMID:18547421

  16. Reproduction of Blackfin tuna Thunnus atlanticus (Perciformes: Scombridae) in Saint Peter and Saint Paul Archipelago, Equatorial Atlantic, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Bezerra, Natalia P A; Fernandes, Cezar A F; Albuquerque, Fernanda V; Pedrosa, Vanessa; Hazin, Fábio; Travassos, Paulo

    2013-09-01

    The reproduction of Blackfin tuna Thunnus atlanticus has been described for coastal regions, and for a long time, this species was considered to be a strictly continental spawner. Recently, this species was observed around a seamount habitat 500 nautical miles Northeast of Brazil, located between South America and Africa. In this study we describe the reproductive biology of Blackfin tuna at Saint Peter and Saint Paul Archipelago (SPSPA). Male and female gonads were sampled from December 2008 to July 2010, and analyzed macro and microscopically. A total of 361 fish were sampled (247 males and 114 females). Males were more common than females, with a sex ratio of 2.2 male:1 female. The fork length (FL) of all sampled specimens ranged from 38 to 98cm, and larger length classes were more frequent in males. It was possible to distinguish six maturity phases for females: immature, developing, spawning capable, actively spawning, regressing and recovering. Five phases were identified for males: immature, developing, spawning capable, actively spawning and recovering. The gonad index (GI) mean monthly values ranged from 6.6 (SD = 4.1) to 58.4 (SD = 34.7) for females, and from 2.6 (SD = 1.3) to 66.2 (SD = 30.4) for males. For both sexes, the largest GI values were observed at the beginning of the first semester of the year. Size at first maturity was estimated at 48cm FL and 55cm FL for females and males respectively. Approximately 80% of the specimens were adults and considered to be in reproductive conditions. Histological analysis of the ovaries and testes showed that most of the specimens were sexually mature and were reproductively active during all months of the year. However, females with mature ovaries, with large amounts of hydrated oocytes and post-ovulatory follicles, were mainly found from December to March, thus these months may constitute the main spawning season in SPSPA. Batch fecundity varied between 272025 and 1,140584 oocytes for 56 and 68 cm FL females respectively. Oocyte development and spawning patterns suggest a multiple spawning behavior. The results revealed that Blackfin tuna is using the SPSPA as a spawning ground, similar to other species commonly observed in the same area during the same reproductive season. PMID:24027926

  17. The Ninetyeast Ridge and its Relation to the Kerguelen, Amsterdam and St. Paul Mantle Plumes in the Indian Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nobre Silva, I. G.; Weis, D.; Scoates, J. S.

    2011-12-01

    The Ninetyeast Ridge, a 5000 km long north-south oriented submarine volcanic ridge in the eastern Indian Ocean, has been interpreted to have formed from magmatism associated with the deep-seated Kerguelen mantle plume as the Indian plate drifted rapidly northward during the Late Cretaceous. Samples recovered along the ridge have the characteristic Dupal geochemical signatures of Indian Ocean basalts, but debate concerning the nature and number of components in the mantle source contributing to the formation of these basalts persists. New MC-ICP-MS (Pb, Hf) and TIMS (Sr, Nd) isotopic analyses were determined for tholeiites representative of the ~180 m of basaltic basement recovered from three drill sites (758: 82 Ma; 757: 58 Ma, 756: 43 Ma) along the Ninetyeast Ridge during ODP Leg 121. These analyses provide substantially greater precision compared to earlier studies (ppm vs. % range) after removal of the effects of post-magmatic alteration by thorough acid leaching [1]. No systematic temporal or spatial isotopic variations are observed along the ridge, which is inconsistent with the hypothesis of an aging mantle plume origin for the ridge [2]. The Pb-Hf-Sr-Nd isotopic compositions of the Ninetyeast Ridge basalts are generally intermediate between those of the volcanic products of the Kerguelen and Amsterdam-St. Paul mantle plumes and define mixing trends between components with relatively enriched and depleted signatures. At least three, possibly four, source components are required to explain the observed isotopic variability along the Ninetyeast Ridge. The less radiogenic isotopic signatures of some Ninetyeast Ridge basalts (87Sr/86Sr = 0.70381-0.70438) are not consistent with mixing with shallow level Indian MORB and are instead consistent with the presence of a relatively depleted component in a deep mantle source. A similar source component is also identified in other Indian ocean island basalts (e.g., Crozet, Réunion [3, 4]) with typical EM-1-like compositions. The Pb-Hf-Sr-Nd isotopic compositions of the Ninetyeast Ridge basalts are consistent with provenance from a deep mantle source that has incorporated a mixture of recycled sediments and lower continental crust together with altered oceanic crust. This supports a deep origin for the EM-1-like Dupal signatures encountered in ocean island basalts. [1] Nobre Silva et al. (2009), G-cubed, 10, Q08012, doi:10.1029/2009GC002537. [2] Class et al. (1993), Nature, 362, 715-721. [3] Mahoney et al. (1996), Geology, 24, 7, 615-618. [4] Bosch et al. (2008), EPSL, 265, 748-768.

  18. Relative biologic effectiveness determination in mouse intestine for scanning proton beam at Paul Scherrer Institute, Switzerland. Influence of motion

    SciTech Connect

    Gueulette, John . E-mail: gueulette@rbnt.ucl.ac.be; Blattmann, Hans; Pedroni, Eros; Coray, A.; Coster, Blanche de; Mahy, Pierre; Wambersie, Andre; Goitein, Gudrun

    2005-07-01

    Purpose To determine the relative biologic effectiveness (RBE) of the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) scanning proton beam in reference conditions and to evaluate the influence of intestine motion on the proton dose homogeneity. Methods and Materials: First, RBE was determined for crypt regeneration in mice after irradiation in a single fraction. Irradiation was performed at the middle of a 7-cm spread out Bragg peak (SOBP; reference position), as well as in the proximal part of the plateau and at the distal end of the SOBP. Control {gamma}-irradiation was randomized with proton irradiation and performed simultaneously. Second, motion of mouse intestine was determined by radiographs after copper wire markers had been placed on the jejunum and intestinal wall. Results: Proton RBE (reference {sup 60}Co {gamma}) was equal to 1.16 for irradiation at the middle of the SOBP and to 1.11 and 1.21 for irradiation in the initial plateau and end of the SOBP, respectively. The confidence intervals for these RBE values were much larger than those obtained in the other proton beams we have tested so far. They exceeded {+-}0.20 (compared with the usual value of {+-}0.07), which resulted from the unusually large dispersion of the individual proton data. The instantaneous positions of the mice intestines varied by {+-}2 mm in the course of irradiation. Conclusion: The results of this study have shown that the RBE of the PSI proton beam is in total accordance with the RBE obtained at the other centers. This experiment has corroborated that proton RBE at the middle of the SOBP is slightly larger than the generic value of 1.10 and that there is a slight tendency for the RBE to increase close to the end of the SOBP. Also, excessive dispersion of individual proton data may be considered to result from intestine motion, taking into account that irradiation at the PSI is delivered dynamically by scanning the target volume with a pencil proton beam ('spot scanning'). Because 2-mm movements resulted in significant variations in local dose depositions, this should be considered for moving targets. Strategies to reduce this effect for the spot scanning technique have been developed at the PSI for radiotherapy of humans.

  19. Miniaturized GC/MS instrumentation for in situ measurements: micro gas chromatography coupled with miniature quadrupole array and paul ion trap mass spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holland, P.; Chutjian, A.; Darrach, M.; Orient, O.

    2002-01-01

    Miniaturized chemical instrumentation is needed for in situ measurements in planetary exploration and other spaceflight applications where factors such as reduction in payload requirements and enhanced robustness are important. In response to this need, we are 'continuing to develop miniaturized GC/MS instrumentation which combines chemical separations by gas chromatography (GC) with mass spectrometry (MS) to provide positive identification of chemical compounds in complex mixtures of gases, such as those found in the International Space Station's cabin atmosphere. Our design approach utilizes micro gas chromatography components coupled with either a miniature quadrupole mass spectrometer array (QMSA) or compact, high-resolution Paul ion trap.

  20. Human radiation studies: Remembering the early years: Oral history of medical physicist Katherine L. Lathrop and physician Paul V. Harper, conducted January 26, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    This report provides a transcript of an interview with Ms. Katherine L. Lathrop and Dr. Paul V. Hopper by representatives of the DOE Office of Human Radiation Research. Ms. Lathrop and Dr. Hopper were chosen for this interview because of their long-standing interest and research experience in the development of nuclear medicine. After brief biographical sketches the researchers provide a broad and interesting description of their roles in the initial uses of many radiopharmaceuticals, their experiences in human experimentation, and interactions with many other pioneers in nuclear medicine.

  1. Weak magnetic field, solid-envelope rotation, and wave-induced N-enrichment in the SPB star ζ Cassiopeiae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briquet, M.; Neiner, C.; Petit, P.; Leroy, B.; de Batz, B.

    2016-03-01

    Aims: The main-sequence B-type star ζ Cassiopeiae is known as a N-rich star with a magnetic field discovered with the Musicos spectropolarimeter. We model the magnetic field of the star by means of 82 new spectropolarimetric observations of higher precision to investigate the field strength, topology, and effect. Methods: We gathered data with the Narval spectropolarimeter installed at Télescope Bernard Lyot (TBL; Pic du Midi, France) and applied the least-squares deconvolution technique to measure the circular polarisation of the light emitted from ζ Cas. We used a dipole oblique rotator model to determine the field configuration by fitting the longitudinal field measurements and by synthesizing the measured Stokes V profiles. We also made use of the Zeeman-Doppler imaging technique to map the stellar surface and to deduce the difference in rotation rate between the pole and equator. Results: ζ Cas exhibits a polar field strength Bpol of 100-150 G, which is the weakest polar field observed so far in a massive main-sequence star. Surface differential rotation is ruled out by our observations and the field of ζ Cas is strong enough to enforce rigid internal rotation in the radiative zone according to theory. Thus, the star rotates as a solid body in the envelope. Conclusions: We therefore exclude rotationally induced mixing as the cause of the surface N-enrichment. We discuss that the transport of chemicals from the core to the surface by internal gravity waves is the most plausible explanation for the nitrogen overabundance at the surface of ζ Cas. Based on observations obtained at the Télescope Bernard Lyot (USR5026) operated by the Observatoire Midi-Pyrénées, Université de Toulouse (Paul Sabatier), Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) of France.

  2. The magnetic field of ζ Orionis A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blazère, A.; Neiner, C.; Tkachenko, A.; Bouret, J.-C.; Rivinius, Th.

    2015-10-01

    Context. ζ Ori A is a hot star claimed to host a weak magnetic field, but no clear magnetic detection was obtained so far. In addition, it was recently shown to be a binary system composed of a O9.5I supergiant and a B1IV star. Aims: We aim at verifying the presence of a magnetic field in ζ Ori A, identifying to which of the two binary components it belongs (or whether both stars are magnetic), and characterizing the field. Methods: Very high signal-to-noise spectropolarimetric data were obtained with Narval at the Bernard Lyot Telescope (TBL) in France. Archival HEROS, FEROS and UVES spectroscopic data were also used. The data were first disentangled to separate the two components. We then analyzed them with the least-squares deconvolution technique to extract the magnetic information. Results: We confirm that ζ Ori A is magnetic. We find that the supergiant component ζ Ori Aa is the magnetic component: Zeeman signatures are observed and rotational modulation of the longitudinal magnetic field is clearly detected with a period of 6.829 d. This is the only magnetic O supergiant known as of today. With an oblique dipole field model of the Stokes V profiles, we show that the polar field strength is ~140 G. Because the magnetic field is weak and the stellar wind is strong, ζ Ori Aa does not host a centrifugally supported magnetosphere. It may host a dynamical magnetosphere. Its companion ζ Ori Ab does not show any magnetic signature, with an upper limit on the undetected field of ~300 G. Based on observations obtained at the Télescope Bernard Lyot (USR5026) operated by the Observatoire Midi-Pyrénées, Université de Toulouse (Paul Sabatier), Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique of France.Appendix A is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  3. Prothèse totale inversée bilatéral de l’épaule: à propos de deux

    PubMed Central

    Boussakri, Hassan; Alassaf, Ihab; Hammoudi, Samir; Elidrissi, Mohammed; Shimi, Mohammed; Elibrahimi, Abdelhalim; Elmrini, Abdelmajid; Dumez, Jean François

    2015-01-01

    Omarthrose bilatérale de l’épaule sur ostéonécrose est une pathologie rarement traitée dans la littérature. La présence de cette pathologie chez deux sœurs gémellaires n'est jamais décrite. Sa prise en charge chirurgicale représente un défi et nécessite un chirurgien orthopédique expérimenté en chirurgie du membre supérieur. Nous présentent deux sœurs gémellaires qui avaient une omarthrose bilatérale de l’épaule sur ostéonécrose, qui ont été traités dans notre département par prothèse inversée. La planification préopératoire a été réalisée par une équipe de chirurgiennes entrainées. Globalement nos résultats (cliniques et radiologiques) immédiats, moyen terme et au dernier recul étaient satisfaisants. Le but de notre travail est d'attirer l'attention sur cette association rare et de discuter sa prise en charge thérapeutique. PMID:26161195

  4. Recent Results on the Study of Machine Imperfection Effects and the Development of a Laser-Induced-Fluorescence Diagnostic on the Paul Trap Simulator Experiment (PTSX)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hua; Gilson, Erik; Davidson, Ronald; Efthimion, Philip; Majeski, Richard

    2013-10-01

    The Paul Trap Simulator Experiment (PTSX) is a cylindrical Paul Trap that simulates the nonlinear transverse dynamics of intense charged particle beams propagating through a magnetic alternating-gradient (AG) focusing system. Machine imperfections cause the degradation of the charged particle beam's quality when the external perturbation is resonant with the collective modes of the charged particle beam. Rearranging the external perturbation can mitigate the machine imperfection effects by eliminating the frequency components at the collective mode frequencies. A laser-induced-fluorescence (LIF) diagnostic will allow us to measure the 4D, time dependent, transverse phase space profiles of the charge bunch and better understand critical issues including emittance growth, and halo particle formation. A stable and high-number-density barium ion source has been developed. A detailed analysis of the LIF signal-to-noise ratio has been conducted and the computed ratio is favorable. The measurements of the radial density profiles of the barium ion source using the LIF diagnostic are calibrated and compared to measurements using a charge collector. The LIF diagnostic system includes an excimer laser, a dye laser, and a CCD camera system. Recent results on the machine imperfection effects will be presented. The LIF diagnostic system and the initial results of the radial density profiles measured by the LIF diagnostic will be presented. This research is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy.

  5. Recent Results on the Study of Transverse Beam Dynamics Using the Laser-Induced-Fluorescence Diagnostic on the Paul Trap Simulator Experiment (PTSX)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hua; Gilson, Erik; Davidson, Ronald; Efthimion, Philip; Majeski, Richard

    2014-10-01

    The Paul Trap Simulator Experiment (PTSX) is a compact Paul trap that simulates the nonlinear transverse dynamics of an intense charged particle beam propagating through an equivalent kilometers-long magnetic alternating-gradient (AG) focusing system. The recently developed laser- induced-fluorescence (LIF) diagnostic allowed us to measure the time dependent, transverse phase space profiles of the charge bunch and better understand critical issues in charged particle beam dynamics including emittance growth, and halo particle formation. The LIF diagnostic system includes an excimer laser, a dye laser, a CCD camera system and a stable high-density barium ion source. The measurements of the radial density profiles of the barium ion source using the LIF diagnostic are calibrated and compared to measurements using a charge collector. The design of the new barium ion source and the LIF diagnostic system will be discussed. The initial results of the radial density profiles measured by the LIF diagnostic will be presented. This research is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy.

  6. Lower jaw reconstruction and dental rehabilitation after war injuries: The experience of Paul Tessier in Iran in the late 1980s.

    PubMed

    Simon, François; Ketoff, Serge; Guichard, Benjamin; Wolfe, S Anthony; Tulasne, Jean-François; Bertolus, Chloé; Khonsari, Roman Hossein

    2015-06-01

    Iraq-Iran war resulted in more than 400,000 people requiring prolonged medical care in Iran. An international team of prominent reconstructive surgeons led by Paul Tessier, the founder of craniofacial surgery, was invited to Iran during the war by official organizations entitled to support war victims. This team provided up-to-date oral and maxillofacial rehabilitation to patients with severe trauma defects in the lower third of the face. We collected the medical notes of 43 patients operated on by the Tessier team in Iran in the 1980s (files property of AFCF). The parameters we collected were: age of the patient, nature of the trauma (when available), previous procedures, number of implants placed (mandibular and maxillary), associated procedures (bone grafts, soft-tissue procedures, orthognathic surgery). A protocol based on soft-tissue rehabilitation using local flaps, parietal or iliac bone grafts and implant placement 6 months later was used in all patients. Paul Tessier's approach emphasizes the importance of keeping high standards of care in difficult situations and maintaining standard protocols. PMID:25887424

  7. Handling Radioactive Waste from the Proton Accelerator Facility at the Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI) - Always Surprising? - 13320

    SciTech Connect

    Mueth, Joachim

    2013-07-01

    The Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI) is the largest national research centre in Switzerland. Its multidisciplinary research is dedicated to a wide field in natural science and technology as well as particle physics. In this context, PSI is operating, amongst others, a large proton accelerator facility since more than 30 years. In two cyclotrons, protons are accelerated to high speeds and then guided along roughly 100 m of beam line to three different target stations to produce secondary particles like mesons and neutrons for experiments and a separately beam line for UCN. The protons induce spallation processes in the target materials, and also at other beam loss points along the way, with emission of protons, neutrons, hydrogen, tritium, helium, heavier fragments and fission processes. In particular the produced neutrons, due to their large penetration depth, will then interact also with the surrounding materials. These interactions of radiation with matter lead to activation and partly to contamination of machine components and the surrounding infrastructures. Maintenance, operation and decommissioning of installations generate inevitably substantial amounts of radioactive operational and dismantling waste like targets, magnets, collimators, shielding (concrete, steel) and of course secondary waste. To achieve an optimal waste management strategy for interim storage or final disposal, radioactive waste has to be characterized, sorted and treated. This strategy is based on radiation protection demands, raw waste properties (size, material, etc.), and requirements to reduce the volume of waste, mainly for legal and economical reasons. In addition, the radiological limitations for transportation of the waste packages to a future disposal site have to be taken into account, as well as special regulatory demands. The characterization is a task of the waste producer. The conditioning processes and quality checks for radioactive waste packages are part of an accredited waste management process of PSI, especially of the Section Dismantling and Waste Management. Strictly proven and accepted methods needed to be developed and enhanced for safe treatment, transport, conditioning and storage. But in the field of waste from research activities, individual and new solutions have to be found in an increasingly growing administrative environment. Furthermore, a wide variety of components, with a really large inventory of radioactive nuclides, has to be handled. And there are always surprising challenges concerning the unusual materials or the nuclide inventory. In case of the operational and dismantling radioactive accelerator waste, the existing conditioning methods are in the process of a continuous enhancement - technically and administratively. The existing authorized specifications of conditioning processes have to be extended to optimize and fully describe the treatment of the inevitably occurring radioactive waste from the accelerator facility. Additional challenges are the changes with time concerning the legal and regulatory requirements - or do we have to consider it as business as usual? This paper gives an overview of the current practices in radioactive waste management and decommissioning of the existing operational accelerator waste. (authors)

  8. [Paul Dorveau (July 21, 1851 - January 7 1938), a librarian of the Ecole supérieure de pharmacie de Paris and cofounder of the Société d'histoire de la pharmacie].

    PubMed

    Viel, Claude; Warolin, Christian

    2003-01-01

    Paul Dorveaux was appointed librarian of the Ecole supérieure de pharmacie de Paris in 1884. He was associated to the foundation of the Société d' histoire de la pharmacie in 1913 because of his numerous national and international relations. This physician scholar devoted his life to the study of the medical and pharmaceutical history. Born in Lorraine he published studies on Metz pharmacy history. We owe him publications on the statutes of apothecary communities, pharmacy shops and libraries inventories, apothecaries biographies, new editions of ancient pharmacy books and a host of medical sciences studies. Paul Dorveauz published about 300 books and articles. PMID:15095734

  9. The novel Arrowsmith, Paul de Kruif (1890-1971) and Jacques Loeb (1859-1924): a literary portrait of "medical science".

    PubMed

    Fangerau, H M

    2006-12-01

    Shortly after bacteriologist Paul de Kruif had been dismissed from a research position at the Rockefeller Institute for Medical Research, he started contributing to a novel in collaboration with the future Nobel laureate Sinclair Lewis. The novel, Arrowsmith, would become one of the most famous satires on medicine and science. Using de Kruif's correspondence with his idol Jacques Loeb, this paper describes the many ways in which medical science is depicted in Arrowsmith. This article compares the novel with de Kruif's and Loeb's biographies, and (1) focuses on the struggles of the main character, Martin Arrowsmith, as an allegory of the institutionalisation of medical research in the US, (2) shows that (influenced by de Kruif) Sinclair's purpose is to caricaturise scientific work in modern medical research institutions anywhere and (3) shows that the novel depicts a reductionist philosophy of research that seems to contradict the "messiness" of medical practice. PMID:23673799

  10. Hydrology of lakes in the Minneapolis-Saint Paul Metropolitan Area : a summary of available data stored - using a data-base management system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McBride, Mark S.

    1976-01-01

    Data were collected and summarized on the hydrology and hydrogeology of 949 lakes, 10 acres or larger, in the Minneapolis-St. Paul metropolitan area, Minnesota. Eight tables totaling over 100 pages present data on location, depth, area, lake level, ecological and game-management classification, inflowing and outflowing streams, soils, bedrock type, water added to or taken from lake, and reported lake-related problems. SYSTEM 2000, a generalized computer data-base management system, was used to organize the data and prepare the tables. SYSTEM 2000 provides powerful capabilities for future retrieval and analysis of the data. The data base is available to potential users so that questions not implicitly anticipated in the preparation of the published tables can be answered readily, and the user can retrieve data in tabular or other forms to meet his particular needs. (Woodard-USGS)

  11. Ilya Ilich Metchnikoff (1845-1915) and Paul Ehrlich (1854-1915): the centennial of the 1908 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine.

    PubMed

    Schmalstieg, Frank C; Goldman, Armond S

    2008-05-01

    Ilya Metchnikoff and Paul Ehrlich shared the 1908 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine - Metchnikoff for discovering the major types and functions of phagocytes and Ehrlich for discovering the types of blood leukocytes, helping to uncover how to generate and use antibodies to protect against bacterial toxins, and formulating the receptor concept of antibodies binding to antigens. In 1908 phagocytic and humoral defences were thought to be unrelated but it was realized much later that they influence one other. Thus, it is fitting that the 1908 Nobel Laureates in Physiology or Medicine remain closely connected in the minds of modern immunologists. Metchnikoff and Ehrlich shared qualities of natural curiosity and tenacity coupled with remarkable inductive-mechanistic thinking and a zest for experimentation. However, their approaches to and methods of research were decidedly different - Metchnikoff's by evolutionary biology and an approach to experimentation via microscopy and Ehrlich's by an imaginative side-chain theory and organic chemistry. PMID:18463079

  12. Excitation of transverse dipole and quadrupole modes in a pure ion plasma in a linear Paul trap to study collective processes in intense beams

    SciTech Connect

    Gilson, Erik P.; Davidson, Ronald C.; Efthimion, Philip C.; Majeski, Richard; Startsev, Edward A.; Wang, Hua; Koppell, Stewart; Talley, Matthew

    2013-05-15

    Transverse dipole and quadrupole modes have been excited in a one-component cesium ion plasma trapped in the Paul Trap Simulator Experiment (PTSX) in order to characterize their properties and understand the effect of their excitation on equivalent long-distance beam propagation. The PTSX device is a compact laboratory Paul trap that simulates the transverse dynamics of a long, intense charge bunch propagating through an alternating-gradient transport system by putting the physicist in the beam's frame of reference. A pair of arbitrary function generators was used to apply trapping voltage waveform perturbations with a range of frequencies and, by changing which electrodes were driven with the perturbation, with either a dipole or quadrupole spatial structure. The results presented in this paper explore the dependence of the perturbation voltage's effect on the perturbation duration and amplitude. Perturbations were also applied that simulate the effect of random lattice errors that exist in an accelerator with quadrupole magnets that are misaligned or have variance in their field strength. The experimental results quantify the growth in the equivalent transverse beam emittance that occurs due to the applied noise and demonstrate that the random lattice errors interact with the trapped plasma through the plasma's internal collective modes. Coherent periodic perturbations were applied to simulate the effects of magnet errors in circular machines such as storage rings. The trapped one component plasma is strongly affected when the perturbation frequency is commensurate with a plasma mode frequency. The experimental results, which help to understand the physics of quiescent intense beam propagation over large distances, are compared with analytic models.

  13. Excitation of transverse dipole and quadrupole modes in a pure ion plasma in a linear Paul trap to study collective processes in intense beamsa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilson, Erik P.; Davidson, Ronald C.; Efthimion, Philip C.; Majeski, Richard; Startsev, Edward A.; Wang, Hua; Koppell, Stewart; Talley, Matthew

    2013-05-01

    Transverse dipole and quadrupole modes have been excited in a one-component cesium ion plasma trapped in the Paul Trap Simulator Experiment (PTSX) in order to characterize their properties and understand the effect of their excitation on equivalent long-distance beam propagation. The PTSX device is a compact laboratory Paul trap that simulates the transverse dynamics of a long, intense charge bunch propagating through an alternating-gradient transport system by putting the physicist in the beam's frame of reference. A pair of arbitrary function generators was used to apply trapping voltage waveform perturbations with a range of frequencies and, by changing which electrodes were driven with the perturbation, with either a dipole or quadrupole spatial structure. The results presented in this paper explore the dependence of the perturbation voltage's effect on the perturbation duration and amplitude. Perturbations were also applied that simulate the effect of random lattice errors that exist in an accelerator with quadrupole magnets that are misaligned or have variance in their field strength. The experimental results quantify the growth in the equivalent transverse beam emittance that occurs due to the applied noise and demonstrate that the random lattice errors interact with the trapped plasma through the plasma's internal collective modes. Coherent periodic perturbations were applied to simulate the effects of magnet errors in circular machines such as storage rings. The trapped one component plasma is strongly affected when the perturbation frequency is commensurate with a plasma mode frequency. The experimental results, which help to understand the physics of quiescent intense beam propagation over large distances, are compared with analytic models.

  14. Excitation of Transverse Dipole and Quadrupole Modes in a Pure Ion Plasma in a Linear Paul Trap to Study Collective Processes in Intense Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilson, Erik

    2012-10-01

    Transverse dipole and quadrupole modes have been excited in a one-component cesium ion plasma trapped in the Paul Trap Simulator Experiment (PTSX) in order to characterize their properties, and understand the effect of their excitation on equivalent long-distance beam propagation. The PTSX device is a compact laboratory Paul trap that simulates the transverse dynamics of a long, intense charge bunch propagating through an alternating-gradient transport system by putting the physicist in the beam's frame of reference. A pair of arbitrary function generators was used to apply trapping voltage waveform perturbations with a range of frequencies and, by changing which electrodes were driven with the perturbation, with either a dipole or quadrupole spatial structure. The results presented in this paper explore the dependence of the perturbation voltage's effect on the amount of trapped charge, the perturbation duration and amplitude. Perturbations were also applied that simulate the effect of random lattice errors that exist in an accelerator with quadrupole magnets that are misaligned or have variance in their field strength. The experimental results quantify the growth in the equivalent transverse beam emittance that occurs due to the applied noise and demonstrate that the random lattice errors interact with the trapped plasma through the plasma's internal collective modes. Coherent periodic perturbations were applied to simulate the effects of magnet errors in circular machines such as storage rings. The trapped one component plasma is strongly affected when the perturbation frequency is commensurate with a plasma mode frequency. The experimental results, which help to understand the physics of quiescent intense beam propagation over large distances, are compared with analytic models and particle-in-cell simulations.

  15. Evaluation of baseline ground-water conditions in the Mosteiros, Ribeira Paul, and Ribeira Faja Basins, Republic of Cape Verde, West Africa, 2005-06

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heilweil, Victor M.; Earle, John D.; Cederberg, Jay R.; Messer, Mickey M.; Jorgensen, Brent E.; Verstraeten, Ingrid M.; Moura, Miguel A.; Querido, Arrigo; Spencer; Osorio, Tatiana

    2006-01-01

    This report documents current (2005-06) baseline ground-water conditions in three basins within the West African Republic of Cape Verde (Mosteiros on Fogo, Ribeira Paul on Santo Ant?o, and Ribeira Faj? on S?o Nicolau) based on existing data and additional data collected during this study. Ground-water conditions (indicators) include ground-water levels, ground-water recharge altitude, ground-water discharge amounts, ground-water age (residence time), and ground-water quality. These indicators are needed to evaluate (1) long-term changes in ground-water resources or water quality caused by planned ground-water development associated with agricultural projects in these basins, and (2) the feasibility of artificial recharge as a mitigation strategy to offset the potentially declining water levels associated with increased ground-water development. Ground-water levels in all three basins vary from less than a few meters to more than 170 meters below land surface. Continuous recorder and electric tape measurements at three monitoring wells (one per basin) showed variations between August 2005 and June 2006 of as much as 1.8 meters. Few historical water-level data were available for the Mosteiros or Ribeira Paul Basins. Historical records from Ribeira Faj? indicate very large ground-water declines during the 1980s and early 1990s, associated with dewatering of the Galleria Faj? tunnel. More-recent data indicate that ground-water levels in Ribeira Faj? have reached a new equilibrium, remaining fairly constant since the late 1990s. Because of the scarcity of observation wells within each basin, water-level data were combined with other techniques to evaluate ground-water conditions. These techniques include the quantification of ground-water discharge (well withdrawals, spring discharge, seepage to springs, and gallery drainage), field water-quality measurements, and the use of environmental tracers to evaluate sources of aquifer recharge, flow paths, and ground-water residence times. In the Mosteiros Basin, measured well and spring discharge is about 220,000 cubic meters per year. For the Ribeira Paul Basin, measured well discharge, spring discharge, and ground-water seepage to springs is about 1,600,000 cubic meters per year. Ribeira Faj? Basin is the driest of the three basins with a precipitation rate of about half that of the other two basins. The only measurable ground-water discharge from this basin is from Galleria Faj?, estimated to be about 150,000 cubic meters per year. Measured discharge for all three basins does not include submarine outflow or agricultural/phreatophyte consumptive use (Paul Basin, only) and is assumed to be less than total ground-water discharge. Ground-water ages indicate that recharge to wells and springs occurred from more than 50 years ago at some locations to within the past decade at other sites. Ground water in Paul is younger than that in the other two basins, indicating that recharge generally occurred within the past 50 years. Ground water at all the dateable sites using tritium/helium in both the Mosteiros and Ribeira Faj? Basins show that recharge occurred more than 50 years before the sampling dates. Ground-water tritium/helium age dating was not possible at some sites in Mosteiros and Ribeira Faj? Basins because of the presence of helium in the aquifer derived from the mantle or aquifer matrix. However, this helium was useful for accurate age dating of the unaffected ground-water sites. Dissolved gases indicate that most ground-water recharge occurs at mid and high altitudes within all three basins; calculated recharge altitudes ranged from 700 to more than 2,000 meters. In the Mosteiros and Ribeira Faj? Basins, recharge altitudes are much higher than the wells and springs. This suggests that it may take many years for artificial recharge to result in a beneficial impact on the aquifer in areas where the agricultural projects are implemented. Recharge altitudes in Paul Basin

  16. Ridge Jumps, Segments Evolution and Accretion Rate Variations on the St-Paul & Amsterdam Plateau in a Context (as a Result?) of Ridge-Hotspot Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courrèges, E.; Pessanha, I.; Maia, M. A.; Patriat, M.; Roest, W. R.; Brandon, V.; Royer, J.

    2009-12-01

    Structures of oceanic plateaus are complex, but record many aspects of ridge-hotspot interaction. To address this question, the young (still active) Saint-Paul and Amsterdam Plateau, in the southern Indian Ocean, is of particular interest because of its small size (800 km long, and 150 km wide) allowing an almost complete data coverage and because of its young age (10 Ma) facilitating the reconstruction of the relative motions between the ridge (SEIR) and the hot spot (Saint Paul and Amsterdam hot spot). Two geophysical surveys, Boomerang in 1996 (Johnson et al., 1996; Scheirer et al., 2000; Conder et al., 2000) and Pluriel in 2006 (Maia et al., 2008), provided geophysical data and rocks samples throughout most of the Plateau. In this presentation, we focus on geophysical data, mostly bathymetry, gravity and magnetics, to describe in details the complex geometry of the plateau. Its formation and evolution through time will be discussed and we will examine the evolution of the ridge axis (morphology, spreading rates, segmentation) and its interaction with the hot spot. The shallowest part of the plateau is centered on the active spreading axis. The plateau progressively deepens northeastward to become a discontinuous chain of volcanoes that morphologically links the plateau with the 90°E Ridge. To the NW and SE, the plateau is bounded by two fracture zones, that each offset the ridge axis by more than 100 km. Second order segmentation, between these two fracture zones, evolved during the construction of the plateau. Two main secondary segments are recognized that evolved in very different ways. Along the northern segment (I1), topography is very chaotic with abyssal hills showing variable directions and amplitudes, while the southern segment (I2) is more regular with textural directions consistent with the spreading direction. While on segment I1, spreading rates look highly variable, segment I2 exhibits two clear ridge jumps of 70 and 40 km. One of them unambiguously moves the ridge axis away from the hot spot, contrary to what is commonly observed in other ridge-hotspot contexts. We examine other changes (such as variations in crustal thickness, length of spreading segments, orientation of abyssal hills …) coincident with the ridge jumps in order to understand what, aside from interactions with the hotspot, could have triggered these ridge jumps.

  17. Slater-Pauling behavior within quaternary intermetallic borides of the Ti{sub 3}Co{sub 5}B{sub 2} structure-type

    SciTech Connect

    Burghaus, Jens; Dronskowski, Richard; Miller, Gordon J.

    2009-10-15

    First-principles, density-functional studies of several intermetallic borides of the general type M{sub 2}M'Ru{sub 5-n}Rh{sub n}B{sub 2} (n=0-5; M=Sc, Ti, Nb; M'=Fe, Co) show that the variation in saturation magnetic moment with valence-electron count follows a Slater-Pauling curve, with a maximum moment occurring typically at 66 valence electrons. The magnetic moments in these compounds occur primarily from the 3d electrons of the magnetically active M' sites, with some contribution from the Ru/Rh sites via magnetic polarization. Electronic DOS curves reveal that a rigid-band approach is a reasonable approximation for the estimation of saturation moments and the analysis of orbital interactions in this family of complex borides. COHP analyses of the M'-M' orbital interactions indicate optimized interactions in the minority spin states for Co-containing phases, but strong bonding interactions remaining in Fe-containing phases. - Graphical abstract: Theoretically determined (spin-polarized LMTO-GGA) local magnetic moments as a function of the chemical valence Z for various intermetallic borides.

  18. Geophysical evidence for the intersection of the St Paul, Cape Palmas and Grand Cess fracture zones with the continental margin of Liberia, West Africa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Behrendt, John C.; Schlee, J.; Robb, James M.

    1974-01-01

    PUBLISHED reconstructions of Gondwana continent1 (Fig. la) show a gap in fit near the junction of the Americas and Africa. To study this critical area, the Unitedgeo I made geophysical measurements and collected rock samples across the continental margin of Liberia (USGS-IDOE cruise leg 5) in November 1971. Figure Ib indicates the location of the 5,400 km of ship track on a generalised bathymetric map2. We shall discuss the data in detail elsewhere. Here we present the evidence for the existence of three fracture zones, two of which have not been reported previously, intersecting the continental margin at the north end of the South Atlantic, which remained closed probably until Cretaceous time. We suggest that Precambrian structures on the African continent controlled the location of these fracture zones. Figure Ic compares gravity and magnetic profiles and interpretations of the seismic profiles for three selected lines (27, 30 and 34) crossing the Grand Cess, Cape Palmas and St Paul fracture zones, respectively. ?? 1974 Nature Publishing Group.

  19. [Narratives in the study of mental health care practices: contributions of the perspectives of Paul Ricoeur, Walter Benjamin and of medical anthropology].

    PubMed

    Onocko-Campos, Rosana Teresa; Palombini, Analice de Lima; Leal, Erotildes; de Serpa, Octavio Domont; Baccari, Ivana Oliveira Preto; Ferrer, Ana Luiza; Diaz, Alberto Giovanello; Xavier, Maria Angélica Zamora

    2013-10-01

    Narratives are ever more frequent in qualitative studies seeking to interpret experiences and the different viewpoints of individuals in a given context. Starting from this concept, the tradition that addresses narrative is reexamined, including the philosophy of Paul Ricoeur, the historical perspective of Walter Benjamin and the field of medical anthropology grounded in phenomenology. In Ricoeur, with hermeneutics as a variation derived from phenomenology, narrative is linked to temporality. In Benjamin, narrative comprised of bits and pieces, always inconclusive, emerges in spite of the official stories. If Ricoeur retrieves tradition from Gadamer as a fundamental component for the construction of the world of a text that makes imitation of life possible, Benjamin, faced with the collapse of tradition, suggests the invention of narrative forms outside the traditional canons, making it possible to hark to the past in order to change the present. Assumptions of medical anthropology are also presented, as they consider narrative a dimension of life and not its abstraction, namely an embodied and situated narrative. Lastly, three distinct research projects in mental health that use narrative linked to the theoretical concepts cited with their differences and similarities are presented. PMID:24061011

  20. Trends in Fatty Acid Intake of Adults in the Minneapolis‐St Paul, MN Metropolitan Area, 1980–1982 Through 2007–2009

    PubMed Central

    Honors, Mary Ann; Harnack, Lisa J.; Zhou, Xia; Steffen, Lyn M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Intake of dietary fatty acids has been linked to cardiovascular disease risk. However, data available to evaluate trends in fatty acid intake in the US population are limited, particularly with regard to trans fatty acids, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA). Methods and Results The present analysis examined trends in fatty acid intake from 1980–1982 through 2007–2009 and compared levels of intake to those recommended in the 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans and by the American Heart Association. Twenty‐four‐hour dietary recalls were collected from 12 526 participants enrolled in the Minnesota Heart Survey, a series of 6 independent cross‐sectional surveys designed to monitor cardiovascular risk factors in noninstitutionalized adults residing in the Minneapolis‐St Paul, MN metropolitan area. Mean intake estimates were generated for each survey, and a generalized linear mixed model was used to test the null hypothesis of no difference in the age‐adjusted, sex‐specific means across survey years. Downward trends were observed for total, saturated, and trans fat as a percent of total energy in both men and women. However, mean intakes were still above recommended levels for both trans and saturated fatty acids. Mean intakes of DHA and EPA were also below recommended levels. Conclusions Despite promising trends, mean intakes of trans and saturated fatty acids do not meet current recommendations. Additional public health strategies are needed to promote recommended intakes of dietary fats. PMID:25339343

  1. Culturable heterotrophic bacteria associated with healthy and bleached scleractinian Madracis decactis and the fireworm Hermodice carunculata from the remote St. Peter and St. Paul Archipelago, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Ana Paula B; Tonon, Luciane A Chimetto; Pereira, Cecilia do Valle P; Alves, Nelson; Amado-Filho, Gilberto M; Francini-Filho, Ronaldo Bastos; Paranhos, Rodolfo; Thompson, Fabiano L

    2014-01-01

    We report on the first characterization of the culturable heterotrophic bacteria of the scleractinian Madracis decactis. In addition, we characterized the culturable bacteria associated with the fireworm Hermodice carunculata, observed predating partially bleached coral colonies. Our study was carried out in the remote St. Peter and St. Paul Archipelago (SPSPA), Mid-Atlantic Ridge, Brazil. We constituted a 403 isolates collection and subsequently characterized it by means of pyrH and 16S rRNA partial sequences. We identified Photobacterium, Bacillus, and Vibrio species as members of the culturable microbiota of healthy M. decactis. V. campbellii, V. harveyi, V. communis, and V. maritimus were the most commonly found Vibrio species in healthy corals, representing more than 60 % of all vibrio isolates. Most of the vibrios isolated from the fireworm's tissues (n = 143; >90 %) were identified as V. shiloi. However, we did not recover V. shiloi from bleached M. decactis. Instead, we isolated V. communis, a novel Photobacterium species, Bacillus, Kocuria, and Pseudovibrio, suggesting a possible role of other facultative anaerobic bacteria and/or environmental features (such as water quality) in the onset of bleaching in SPSPA's M. decactis. PMID:23979060

  2. Chilled margin fragmentation as a trigger for transition from Strombolian to phreatomagmatic explosive activity at Cova de Paul Crater, Santo Antao, Cape Verde Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarff, R. W.; Day, S. J.

    2013-07-01

    Sudden transitions from effusive or mildly explosive eruptions to violent phreatomagmatic explosive activity can occur at high-elevation vents on oceanic island volcanoes. Here, we describe near-vent deposits around the large Cova de Paul crater on Santo Antao, Cape Verde Islands, which provide insights into the transition from Strombolian magmatic to violently explosive phreatomagmatic activity during one such eruption. The Strombolian deposits change from welded spatter to bedded clinkery scoria to angular blocky scoria, and contain a distinct population of strongly banded, low-vesicularity angular sub-glassy clasts with strongly prolate vesicles. These sub-glassy clasts also form a discrete layer of larger blocks at the transition to the overlying phreatomagmatic deposits. They are compositionally identical to the Strombolian scoria and are interpreted to be fragments of flow-banded chilled margins from the walls of the eruptive conduit. The layer of large sub-glassy blocks records disintegration and expulsion of the chilled margins at the transition to phreatomagmatic activity. We interpret the sequence from spatter through clinkery scoria to blocky scoria as recording an increase in groundwater inflow into the conduit from pressurised aquifers, but at coolant input ratios below those required for explosions. The shattering of the chilled margins to produce the bed of large sub-glassy blocks appears to have allowed a much greater water flow into the conduit, leading to the phreatomagmatic explosive phase of the eruption.

  3. Non-destructive Investigation of "The Violinist" a Lead Sculpture by Pablo Gargallo, Using the Neutron Imaging Facility NEUTRA in the Paul Scherrer Institute

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masalles, Alex; Lehmann, Eberhard; Mannes, David

    The Violinist (1920), the only sculpture made by Gargallo using lead sheet and wood, is being corroded by carbonation, most probably due to the organic vapours released by the wood inside, a material not chemically compatible with lead. Hydrogen plasma has been tested and proved to be an effective treatment meaning that the sculpture has to be dismantled in order to give the plasma gas access to the lead carbonate crusts on the inner surface of the lead sheet. Prior to dismantling, a complete exploration and diagnosis of this lead sculpture has been carried out through neutron imaging at the Paul Scherrer Institute. This non-destructive technique has produced different sets of images including radiography, tomography and 3D reconstruction. Despite the presence of a core made of an organic material such as wood, the digital processing of the images and their in depth visual analysis have yielded new three-dimensional information of inaccessible details of the sculpture, allowing us to assess its present state of conservation and the manufacturing technique and materials used by the artist. The results presented in this article highlight how information from neutron imaging can be of great value when it comes to set the strategies for future conservation treatment

  4. Intrinsic anharmonic effects on the phonon frequencies and effective spin-spin interactions in a quantum simulator made from trapped ions in a linear Paul trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAneny, M.; Freericks, J. K.

    2014-11-01

    The Coulomb repulsion between ions in a linear Paul trap gives rise to anharmonic terms in the potential energy when expanded about the equilibrium positions. We examine the effect of these anharmonic terms on the accuracy of a quantum simulator made from trapped ions. To be concrete, we consider a linear chain of Yb171+ ions stabilized close to the zigzag transition. We find that for typical experimental temperatures, frequencies change by no more than a factor of 0.01 % due to the anharmonic couplings. Furthermore, shifts in the effective spin-spin interactions (driven by a spin-dependent optical dipole force) are also, in general, less than 0.01 % for detunings to the blue of the transverse center-of-mass frequency. However, detuning the spin interactions near other frequencies can lead to non-negligible anharmonic contributions to the effective spin-spin interactions. We also examine an odd behavior exhibited by the harmonic spin-spin interactions for a range of intermediate detunings, where nearest-neighbor spins with a larger spatial separation on the ion chain interact more strongly than nearest neighbors with a smaller spatial separation.

  5. Spot-Scanning Proton Radiation Therapy for Pediatric Chordoma and Chondrosarcoma: Clinical Outcome of 26 Patients Treated at Paul Scherrer Institute

    SciTech Connect

    Rombi, Barbara; ATreP , Trento ; Ares, Carmen; Hug, Eugen B.; ProCure Proton Therapy Center, Somerset, New Jersey ; Schneider, Ralf; Goitein, Gudrun; Staab, Adrian; Albertini, Francesca; Bolsi, Alessandra; Lomax, Antony J.; Timmermann, Beate; WestGerman Proton Therapy Center Essen

    2013-07-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical results of fractionated spot-scanning proton radiation therapy (PT) in 26 pediatric patients treated at Paul Scherrer Institute for chordoma (CH) or chondrosarcoma (CS) of the skull base or axial skeleton. Methods and Materials: Between June 2000 and June 2010, 19 CH and 7 CS patients with tumors originating from the skull base (17) and the axial skeleton (9) were treated with PT. Mean age at the time of PT was 13.2 years. The mean prescribed dose was 74 Gy (relative biological effectiveness [RBE]) for CH and 66 Gy (RBE) for CS, at a dose of 1.8-2.0 Gy (RBE) per fraction. Results: Mean follow-up was 46 months. Actuarial 5-year local control (LC) rates were 81% for CH and 80% for CS. Actuarial 5-year overall survival (OS) was 89% for CH and 75% for CS. Two CH patients had local failures: one is alive with evidence of disease, while the other patient succumbed to local recurrence in the surgical pathway. One CS patient died of local progression of the disease. No high-grade late toxicities were observed. Conclusions: Spot-scanning PT for pediatric CH and CS patients resulted in excellent clinical outcomes with acceptable rates of late toxicity. Longer follow-up time and larger cohort are needed to fully assess tumor control and late effects of treatment.

  6. Prévalence et caractéristiques de l'automédication chez les étudiants de 18 à 35 ans résidant au Campus de la Kasapa de l'Université de Lubumbashi

    PubMed Central

    Chiribagula, Valentin Bashige; Mboni, Henry Manya; Amuri, Salvius Bakari; kamulete, Grégoire Sangwa; Byanga, Joh Kahumba; Duez, Pierre; Simbi, Jean Baptiste Lumbu

    2015-01-01

    Introduction L'automédication est devenue un phénomène émergeant et menaçant de plus en plus la santé publique. La présente étude objective de déterminer la prévalence et les caractéristiques dans le campus Universitaire Kasapa de l'Université de Lubumbashi. Méthodes L'interview indirecte a servi à la collecte des données qui ont été traitées par le logiciel Graphpad version 5. Résultats De 515 étudiants consultés, l'automédication présente une prévalence de 99%, une partie des sujets l'ayant débutée à l'adolescence (35%). Des répondants, 78,8% reconnaissent que l'automédication peut conduire à un échec thérapeutique et que des erreurs de dose, un traitement inadapté, des effets secondaires et des erreurs diagnostiques sont plausibles. Cette pratique est acceptée pour autant qu'elle permette de prendre en charge des maladies ou symptômes présumés bénins et connus avec pour avantages, discrétion et économie de temps et d'argent. La malaria (82,4%), la fièvre (65,5%), les maux de tête (65,5%) en constituent les trois premières causes. L'amoxicilline (98,2%), le paracétamol (97,5%), l'acide ascorbique (91,6%) et la quinine (79,4%) sont les quatre premiers médicaments les plus consommés. L'association la plus utilisée est paracétamol’ vitamine(s) (88,8%) et la plus aberrante amoxycilline -Erytromycine (25,5%). Le comprimé (37%) constitue la forme la plus utilisée. La plupart des sujets (84,9%), recourent aux plantes médicinales. Conclusion Dans ce milieu, il existe une forte prévalence de l'automédication largement dans un but antipalustre avec quelques abus. PMID:26327945

  7. Operation and maintenance manual for a preprototype Sabatier carbon dioxide reduction subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleiner, G. N.

    1981-01-01

    The manual delineates the procedures, precautions and necessary sequences of steps required to prepare the package for test, provide troubleshooting information and perform required maintenance by the operating crew. The manual is divided into five sections: Installation, Checkout, Operation, Failure Detection/Isolation and Maintenance.

  8. Lack of Healthy Food in Small-Size to Mid-Size Retailers Participating in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, Minneapolis–St. Paul, Minnesota, 2014

    PubMed Central

    Caspi, Caitlin E.; Pelletier, Jennifer E.; Friebur, Robin; Harnack, Lisa J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The US Department of Agriculture has stocking criteria for healthy foods among Supplemental Nutrition Assistant Program (SNAP)-authorized retailers. Increased access to healthy food could improve diet quality among SNAP participants, which has implications for chronic disease prevention. The objective of this study was to quantify healthy foods stocked in small-size to mid-size retailers who are authorized under SNAP but not under the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC). Methods We used formative, cross-sectional data from a large policy evaluation to conduct secondary analyses. Store audits were conducted in 2014 in 91 randomly selected, licensed food stores in Minneapolis and St. Paul, Minnesota. Supermarkets and retailers participating in WIC, which are required to stock healthy foods, were excluded as were other stores not reasonably expected to stock staple foods, such as specialty stores or produce stands. Availability of milk, fruits, vegetables, and whole-grain–rich foods was assessed. Results The 91 stores studied were corner stores, food–gas marts, dollar stores, and pharmacies. More than half carried 1 or more varieties of fat-free or low-fat milk, fresh or canned fruit, and whole-grain–rich cereal. However, only one-third stocked 1 or more varieties of fresh vegetables and only one-quarter stocked whole-grain–rich products, such as whole-grain-rich bread (26%) or tortillas (21%) or brown rice (25%). Few stores stocked at least 2 varieties of each product. Conclusions Many stores did not stock a variety of healthy foods. The US Department of Agriculture should change policies to improve minimum stocking requirements for SNAP-authorized retailers. PMID:26312380

  9. Characterization of ground-water discharge from bedrock aquifers to the Mississippi and Minnesota Rivers at three areas, Minneapolis-St. Paul area, Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schoenberg, M.E.

    1994-01-01

    The hydrogeology at three areas along the Mississippi and Minnesota Rivers in the Minneapolis-St. Paul area were studied to characterize ground-water discharge from bedrock aquifers to the two rivers. Along the Mississippi River between Fridley and Brooklyn Center, a buried valley underlying the Mississippi River cuts through the overlying terrace deposits and glacial-drift deposits into two underlying bedrock hydro- geologic units: the St Peter aquifer, and a rubble zone between the St. Peter and Prairie du Chien-Jordan aquifers. Shallow ground-water flow in the near-surface gray and upper red tills and sand and gravel outwash aquifer discharges to springs along the edge of the river. Ground water flowing through the rubble zone and upper part of the Prairie du Chien-Jordan aquifer probably discharges through alluvial deposits to the river. In study area 2, along the Minnesota River between Eagan and Bloomington, almost 200 feet of post-glacial alluvium, glaciofluvial sand and gravel, Pleistocene lake deposits, and peat fill a bedrock valley under the present-day Minnesota River. As much as 40 feet of post-glacial peat, silty clay, clay, and muck lie near the river-valley walls. Confining units beneath the river channel impede the discharge of ground water from the underlying Prairie du Chien-Jordan aquifer to the river. Ground water discharges to wetlands, lakes, and springs along both the north and south side of the river. Along the Mississippi River at Minneapolis about 5 miles upstream of the confluence of the Minnesota and Mississippi Rivers, the Mississippi River lies in a post-glacial valley cut through thin glacial drift into the St. Peter aquifer. Beneath the river, ground water flows from the St. Peter aquifer through the overlying post-glacial ailuvium to the Mississippi River. No confining unit separates the St. Peter aquifer and the river.

  10. Extraintestinal Pathogenic and Antimicrobial-Resistant Escherichia coli Contamination of 56 Public Restrooms in the Greater Minneapolis-St. Paul Metropolitan Area

    PubMed Central

    Owens, Kris; Gajewski, Abby; Clabots, Connie; Johnston, Brian; Thuras, Paul; Kuskowski, Michael A.; Johnson, James R.

    2015-01-01

    How extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC) and antimicrobial-resistant E. coli disseminate through the population is undefined. We studied public restrooms for contamination with E. coli and ExPEC in relation to source and extensively characterized the E. coli isolates. For this, we cultured 1,120 environmental samples from 56 public restrooms in 33 establishments (obtained from 10 cities in the greater Minneapolis-St. Paul, MN, metropolitan area in 2003) for E. coli and compared ecological data with culture results. Isolates underwent virulence genotyping, phylotyping, clonal typing, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), and disk diffusion antimicrobial susceptibility testing. Overall, 168 samples (15% from 89% of restrooms) fluoresced, indicating presumptive E. coli: 25 samples (2.2% from 32% of restrooms) yielded E. coli isolates, and 10 samples (0.9% from 16% of restrooms) contained ExPEC. Restroom category and cleanliness level significantly predicted only fluorescence, gender predicted fluorescence and E. coli, and feces-like material and toilet-associated sites predicted all three endpoints. Of the 25 E. coli isolates, 7 (28%) were from phylogenetic group B2(virulence-associated), and 8 (32%) were ExPEC. ExPEC isolates more commonly represented group B2 (50% versus 18%) and had significantly higher virulence gene scores than non-ExPEC isolates. Six isolates (24%) exhibited ≥3-class antibiotic resistance, 10 (40%) represented classic human-associated sequence types, and one closely resembled reference human clinical isolates by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Thus, E. coli, ExPEC, and antimicrobial-resistant E. coli sporadically contaminate public restrooms, in ways corresponding with restroom characteristics and within-restroom sites. Such restroom-source E. coli strains likely reflect human fecal contamination, may pose a health threat, and may contribute to population-wide dissemination of such strains. PMID:25911488

  11. Change in survival from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest and its effect on coronary heart disease mortality, Minneapolis-St. Paul. The Minnesota Heart Survey.

    PubMed

    Tillinghast, S J; Doliszny, K M; Kottke, T E; Gomez-Marin, O; Lilja, G P; Campion, B C

    1991-10-15

    Emergency medical services with advanced life support systems were implemented in the Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minnesota, area in the mid-1970s. To assess the impact of emergency medical services on coronary heart disease mortality, the authors reviewed ambulance records and hospital emergency room logs for possible out-of-hospital cardiac arrest cases in the period 1972-1982. Potential cases, and their survival to discharge, were validated by hospital record review and were checked against Minnesota death certificates for the year of cardiac arrest and the year following cardiac arrest. Age-adjusted rates of survival to 1 year after cardiac arrest (per 100,000 population) for survivors of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest aged 30-74 years increased significantly from 1972 to 1982 for men (1.8 vs. 11.7; p less than 0.00001) and for women (0.5 vs. 3.5; p less than 0.01). Coronary heart disease mortality rates declined in that period by 34.9% for men (from 527.5 per 100,000 to 343.3 per 100,000) and by 41.7% for women (from 168.6 per 100,000 to 98.3 per 100,000). The authors estimate that improved survival from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest contributed 5.4% (9.9 of 184.2) of the mortality decline for men and 4.3% (3.0 of 70.3) of the decline for women. This was a significant contribution to the decline in coronary heart disease mortality, but it explains only a small part of it. PMID:1951280

  12. Turbulence-driven shifts in holobionts and planktonic microbial assemblages in St. Peter and St. Paul Archipelago, Mid-Atlantic Ridge, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Moreira, Ana Paula B.; Meirelles, Pedro M.; Santos, Eidy de O.; Amado-Filho, Gilberto M.; Francini-Filho, Ronaldo B.; Thompson, Cristiane C.; Thompson, Fabiano L.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the planktonic and the holobiont Madracis decactis (Scleractinia) microbial diversity along a turbulence-driven upwelling event, in the world's most isolated tropical island, St Peter and St Paul Archipelago (SPSPA, Brazil). Twenty one metagenomes were obtained for seawater (N = 12), healthy and bleached holobionts (N = 9) before, during and after the episode of high seawater turbulence and upwelling. Microbial assemblages differed between low turbulence-low nutrient (LLR) and high-turbulence-high nutrient (HHR) regimes in seawater. During LLR there was a balance between autotrophy and heterotrophy in the bacterioplankton and the ratio cyanobacteria:heterotrophs ~1 (C:H). Prochlorales, unclassified Alphaproteobacteria and Euryarchaeota were the dominant bacteria and archaea, respectively. Basic metabolisms and cyanobacterial phages characterized the LLR. During HHR C:H < < 0.05 and Gammaproteobacteria approximated 50% of the most abundant organisms in seawater. Alteromonadales, Oceanospirillales, and Thaumarchaeota were the dominant bacteria and archaea. Prevailing metabolisms were related to membrane transport, virulence, disease, and defense. Phages targeting heterotrophs and virulence factor genes characterized HHR. Shifts were also observed in coral microbiomes, according to both annotation–indepent and -dependent methods. HHR bleached corals metagenomes were the most dissimilar and could be distinguished by their di- and tetranucleotides frequencies, Iron Acquision metabolism and virulence genes, such as V. cholerae-related virulence factors. The healthy coral holobiont was shown to be less sensitive to transient seawater-related perturbations than the diseased animals. A conceptual model for the turbulence-induced shifts is put forward. PMID:26483769

  13. Effects of rain gardens on the quality of water in the Minneapolis-St. Paul metropolitan area of Minnesota, 2002-04

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tornes, Lan H.

    2005-01-01

    Rain gardens are a popular method of managing runoff while attempting to provide aesthetic and environmental benefits. Five rain-garden sites in the Minneapolis - Saint Paul metropolitan area of Minnesota were instrumented to evaluate the effects of this water-management system on surface and subsurface water quality. Most of these sites were in suburban locations and frequently in newer developments. Because of this they were affected by changing hydrology during the course of this study. Less-than-normal precipitation during much of the study may have resulted in samples that may not be representative of normal conditions. However, the resulting data indicate that properly designed rain gardens enhance infiltration and can reduce concentrations of dissolved ions relative to background conditions. The runoff events in one rain garden and several runoff events in the other rain gardens produced no sampled overflow during this study because the gardens captured all of the inflow, which subsequently infiltrated beneath the land surface, evaporated, or transpired through garden vegetation. Where measured, overflow had reduced concentrations of suspended solids and most nutrient species associated with particulate material, as compared to inflow. Many of these materials settle to the bottom of the rain garden, and some nutrients may be assimilated by the plant community. Site design, including capacity relative to drainage area and soil permeability, is an important consideration in the efficiency of rain-garden operation. Vegetation type likely affects the infiltration capacity, nutrient uptake, and evapotranspiration of a rain garden and probably the resulting water quality. The long-term efficiency of rain gardens is difficult to determine from the results of this study because most are still evolving and maturing in relation to their hydrologic, biologic, and chemical setting. Many resource managers have questioned what long-term maintenance will be needed to keep rain gardens operating effectively. Additional or continued studies could address many of these concerns.

  14. Turbulence-driven shifts in holobionts and planktonic microbial assemblages in St. Peter and St. Paul Archipelago, Mid-Atlantic Ridge, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Ana Paula B; Meirelles, Pedro M; Santos, Eidy de O; Amado-Filho, Gilberto M; Francini-Filho, Ronaldo B; Thompson, Cristiane C; Thompson, Fabiano L

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the planktonic and the holobiont Madracis decactis (Scleractinia) microbial diversity along a turbulence-driven upwelling event, in the world's most isolated tropical island, St Peter and St Paul Archipelago (SPSPA, Brazil). Twenty one metagenomes were obtained for seawater (N = 12), healthy and bleached holobionts (N = 9) before, during and after the episode of high seawater turbulence and upwelling. Microbial assemblages differed between low turbulence-low nutrient (LLR) and high-turbulence-high nutrient (HHR) regimes in seawater. During LLR there was a balance between autotrophy and heterotrophy in the bacterioplankton and the ratio cyanobacteria:heterotrophs ~1 (C:H). Prochlorales, unclassified Alphaproteobacteria and Euryarchaeota were the dominant bacteria and archaea, respectively. Basic metabolisms and cyanobacterial phages characterized the LLR. During HHR C:H < < 0.05 and Gammaproteobacteria approximated 50% of the most abundant organisms in seawater. Alteromonadales, Oceanospirillales, and Thaumarchaeota were the dominant bacteria and archaea. Prevailing metabolisms were related to membrane transport, virulence, disease, and defense. Phages targeting heterotrophs and virulence factor genes characterized HHR. Shifts were also observed in coral microbiomes, according to both annotation-indepent and -dependent methods. HHR bleached corals metagenomes were the most dissimilar and could be distinguished by their di- and tetranucleotides frequencies, Iron Acquision metabolism and virulence genes, such as V. cholerae-related virulence factors. The healthy coral holobiont was shown to be less sensitive to transient seawater-related perturbations than the diseased animals. A conceptual model for the turbulence-induced shifts is put forward. PMID:26483769

  15. Similarities and differences of recent hybrid pixel detectors for X-ray and high energy physics developed at the Paul Scherrer Institut

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinti, G.; Bergamaschi, A.; Cartier, S.; Dinapoli, R.; Greiffenberg, D.; Horisberger, R.; Johnson, I.; Jungmann-Smith, J. H.; Mezza, D.; Mozzanica, A.; Schmitt, B.; Shi, X.

    2015-04-01

    Hybrid pixel detectors are being developed for both photon science and high energy physics. The article will cover similarities and differences in pixel detectors for both applications using two of the pixel detectors developed at the Paul Scherrer Institute (Switzerland) as examples: the EIGER photon counting detector and the psi46dig chip, which has been developed for the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) tracking pixel detector upgrade. EIGER is a single photon counting hybrid pixel detector for applications at synchrotron light sources in the energy range from a few to 25 keV. It is characterized by a small pixel size (75 × 75 μm2), high count rate capability (106 counts/pixel/s) and very high data rate, which reaches 6 Gb/s for a 256 × 256 pixel chip. The CMS pixel detector is designed to provide charge information from the pixels in the harsh radiation environment at the Large Hadron Collider. The short time between bunches of 25 ns and the high event rate at luminosity up to 2 × 1034cm-2s-1 require a detector with high hit efficiency, with good timing resolution and the ability to retain timestamp information for the hits. The readout architecture is based on the transfer of hits from the pixels to the periphery, where the trigger validation is performed before data transfer. The data rates of the digitized output reach 160 Mb/s for a 52×80 pixel chip.The specific timing and rate requirements for the detectors, the analog performances (minimum threshold and noise), the power consumption and the radiation hardness will be compared. An overview on future developments based on mutual learning and common solutions will be discussed.

  16. Cancer, viruses, and mass migration: Paul Berg's venture into eukaryotic biology and the advent of recombinant DNA research and technology, 1967-1980.

    PubMed

    Yi, Doogab

    2008-01-01

    The existing literature on the development of recombinant DNA technology and genetic engineering tends to focus on Stanley Cohen and Herbert Boyer's recombinant DNA cloning technology and its commercialization starting in the mid-1970s. Historians of science, however, have pointedly noted that experimental procedures for making recombinant DNA molecules were initially developed by Stanford biochemist Paul Berg and his colleagues, Peter Lobban and A. Dale Kaiser in the early 1970s. This paper, recognizing the uneasy disjuncture between scientific authorship and legal invention in the history of recombinant DNA technology, investigates the development of recombinant DNA technology in its full scientific context. I do so by focusing on Stanford biochemist Berg's research on the genetic regulation of higher organisms. As I hope to demonstrate, Berg's new venture reflected a mass migration of biomedical researchers as they shifted from studying prokaryotic organisms like bacteria to studying eukaryotic organisms like mammalian and human cells. It was out of this boundary crossing from prokaryotic to eukaryotic systems through virus model systems that recombinant DNA technology and other significant new research techniques and agendas emerged. Indeed, in their attempt to reconstitute 'life' as a research technology, Stanford biochemists' recombinant DNA research recast genes as a sequence that could be rewritten thorough biochemical operations. The last part of this paper shifts focus from recombinant DNA technology's academic origins to its transformation into a genetic engineering technology by examining the wide range of experimental hybridizations which occurred as techniques and knowledge circulated between Stanford biochemists and the Bay Area's experimentalists. Situating their interchange in a dense research network based at Stanford's biochemistry department, this paper helps to revise the canonized history of genetic engineering's origins that emerged during the patenting of Cohen-Boyer's recombinant DNA cloning procedures. PMID:19244843

  17. Configuration of water table and distribution of downward leakage to the Prairie du Chien-Jordan Aquifer in the Minneapolis-Saint Paul metropolitan area, Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Larson-Higdem, Dana C.; Larson, S.P.; Norvitch, Ralph F.

    1975-01-01

    The configuration of the water table as plotted at a contour interval of 20 feet (6 metres) on quadrangle maps (scale 1:2,500) of the Minneapolis-Saint Paul metropolitan area. Control points used for mapping were water levels in wells, lakes and sloughs, and places where topographic contours cross perennial streams. A computer program, using a variation of Darcy's law, was developed to determine distribution of 1) downward leakage to the Prairie du Chien-Jordan aquifer under steady-state conditions, using estimated vertical-hydraulic conductivity values for overlying materials; 2) calculated vertical hydraulic conductivity values, assuming uniform leakage to the aquifer; and 3) additional leakage to the aquifer resulting from increased pumpage during the summer. For data determination and data input to the computer program, the area was gridded into units of 1-minute longitude by 1-minute latitude, about 600 acres (243 hectares) per unit. Previous work estimated the increased summer pumpage (1971) of ground water to be 127 million gallons (481x106 litres) per day. Calculations, made Within the limits of governing assumptions, indicate that 10 to 20 percent of increased summer pumpage is derived from increased leakage. Most of the remainder is probably from captured natural discharge and induced recharge from major streams within the influence of summer cones of depression. Based on available data and estimates of vertical hydraulic conductivity for geologic units, major leakage to the Prairie du Chien-Jordan aquifer is indicated to occur in formation subcrop areas, especially where these areas are. overlain by the most permeable glacial drift.

  18. Interview with Paul O. Zelinsky.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marantz, Sylvia; Marantz, Kenneth

    1986-01-01

    Zelinsky relates thoughts on his career beginnings, motivation, and illustrations. Discusses the illustrations in such books as "How I Hunted the Little Fellows,""The Maid and the Mouse and the Odd Shaped House," and "Emily Upham's Revenge." (EL)

  19. Helmut Paul, a happy physicist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inokuti, Mitio

    Each time I meet Helmut (I address him in an American way, perhaps awfully improperly in Austria), I get a strong impression of a happy man. Why is it so? Well gifted as a physicist and also as a manager, he has had a well-deserved eminently successful career, which warrants his happiness. However, not every physicist of a comparable stature appears to be as happy as Helmut. As a tribute on the occasion of his retirement, I offer in what follows an analysis of his life, accomplishments, and happiness. The present article is also a dedication to him as the chairman of the 16th International Conference on Atomic Collisions in Solids, which was highly successful, as seen in the Proceedings appearing in the following papes.

  20. The Case of Paul Framson.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berman, Alan L., Ed.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Presents case of man who died suddenly on morning of his fifty-sixth birthday and whose death was ruled to be from natural causes. Describes wife's handling of situation, victim's past medical history, and allegations and facts concerning his business and financial affairs. Comments are included from Timothy Michaels, MD, and Robert Litman, MD.…

  1. Characterization of microbial populations across geochemical and lithological boundaries in urban lake sediments under environmental change in Minneapolis-St. Paul

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbertson, M.; Harrison, B. K.; Flood, B. E.; Myrbo, A.; Bailey, J. V.

    2013-12-01

    The characterization of microbial communities within urban lake sediments may offer a promising method to observe changes in lake geochemistry due to human impact. By mapping the abundances and diversity of microorganisms through the uppermost meter of sediment in three distinctive Minneapolis-St. Paul lakes (Brownie Lake and Twin Lake, both meromictic, and oligomictic Lake McCarrons) using 16S rRNA characterization, our aim was to observe changes in microbial populations across steep geochemical and lithological gradients. Lake McCarrons underwent a process of eutrophication and a shift to bottom water anoxia beginning around 1910 due mostly to agricultural run-off. This shift greatly increased the preservation potential of seasonal sedimentation and finely laminated varve accumulation. The onset of meromixis in Brownie Lake in ~1915 is abrupt and has been attributed to a sudden drop in water level. Twin Lake is perennially meromictic due to the topography of the watershed. The three lakes were sampled by collecting freeze cores in July, 2012 (McCarrons, Brownie) and February, 2013 (Twin) at the deepest locations beneath anoxic to hypoxic bottom waters. The cores were then subsampled with high resolution techniques at places of interest: within individual lamina, across mass flow deposits, and near the onset of laminae preservation (beginning of oxygen-depleted bottom waters). Terminal Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (T-RFLP) allows for comparison of the microbial assemblages throughout the sediment columns of each lake and from lake to lake, with a focus on the horizons mentioned previously. The microbial assemblages present in specific horizons are often introduced via sedimentation and are partially derived from community composition at the time of sedimentation. T-RFLP analyses are complemented by mineralogical and lithological descriptions. The lakes have each been subject to their own set of variables and inputs. Brownie Lake contains high levels of Fe and Mn (measured up to 78 and 6 mg/l in bottom waters, respectively, US EPA STORET). The ecology of McCarrons has been greatly disturbed most recently when the lake was targeted by a 2004 aluminum sulfate treatment to counteract high phosphorous levels. Twin Lake has mass flow deposits nearly 5 cm thick, similar to turbidites, likely caused by increased sedimentation from large housing developments on the lake shores. The microbial community in each of the lakes is impacted by these distinct parameters. This study examines variability in microbial community assemblages through time and space within these lake sediments. Changes seen in the ecology of the communities are related to changes in chemical and physical parameters, namely, shifts in lithology and sediment accumulation via the onset of meromixis. Freeze coring exceptionally allows super-high resolution subsampling techniques to identify differences across geochemical gradients and between individual seasonal laminae within each lake and from lake to lake.

  2. Magnetic field structure in single late-type giants: the effectively single giant V390 Aurigae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konstantinova-Antova, R.; Aurière, M.; Petit, P.; Charbonnel, C.; Tsvetkova, S.; Lèbre, A.; Bogdanovski, R.

    2012-05-01

    Aims: We have studied the active giant V390 Aur using spectropolarimetry to obtain direct and simultaneous measurements of the magnetic field and the activity indicators to obtain a precise insight of its activity. Methods: We used the spectropolarimeter NARVAL at the Bernard Lyot Telescope (Observatoire du Pic du Midi, France) to obtain a series of Stokes I and Stokes V profiles. Using the least-squares deconvolution (LSD) technique we were able to detect the Zeeman signature of the magnetic field in each of our 13 observations and to measure its longitudinal component. Using the wide wavelength range of the spectra we were able to monitor the CaII K&H and IR triplet, as well as the Hα lines, which are activity indicators. To reconstruct the magnetic field geometry of V390 Aur on the basis of modelling the Stokes V profiles, we applied the Zeeman Doppler imaging (ZDI) inversion method and present a map for the magnetic field. Based on the obtained spectra, we also refined the fundamental parameters of the star and the Li abundance using MARCS model atmospheres. Results: The ZDI revealed a structure in the radial magnetic field consisting of a polar magnetic spot of positive polarity and several negative spots at lower latitude. A high latitude belt is present on the azimuthal field map, indicative of a toroidal field close to the surface. Similar features are observed in some RS CVn and FK Com -type stars. It was found that the photometric period cannot fit the behaviour of the activity indicators formed in the chromosphere. Their behaviour suggests slower rotation compared to the photosphere, but our dataset is too short for us to be able to estimate their exact periods. All these results can be explained in terms of an α - ω dynamo operation, taking into account the stellar structure and rotation properties of V390 Aur that we studied with up-to-date stellar models computed at solar metallicity with the code STAREVOL. The calculated Rossby number also points to a very efficient dynamo. Based on data obtained using the Bernard Lyot Telescope at Observatoire du Pic du Midi, CNRS and Université Paul Sabatier, France.

  3. Search for surface magnetic fields in Mira stars. First detection in χ Cygni

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lèbre, A.; Aurière, M.; Fabas, N.; Gillet, D.; Herpin, F.; Konstantinova-Antova, R.; Petit, P.

    2014-01-01

    Context. So far, surface magnetic fields have never been detected on Mira stars. Only recently have the spectropolarimetric capabilities of measuring it via the Zeeman effect become available to us. Then, to complete the knowledge of the magnetic field and of its influence during the transition from asymptotic giant branch to planetary nebulae stages, we have undertaken a search for magnetic fields on the surface of Mira stars. Aims: Our main goal is to constrain - at this stage of stellar evolution - the surface magnetic field (presence and strength) and to define the magnetic field strength dependence along the radial distance to the star, above the photosphere and across the circumstellar envelope of cool and evolved stars. Methods: We used spectropolarimetric observations (Stokes V spectra probing circular polarization), collected with the Narval instrument at TBL, in order to detect - with the least squares deconvolution (LSD) method - a Zeeman signature in the visible part of the spectrum. Results: We present the first spectropolarimetric observations of the S-type Mira star χ Cyg, performed around its maximum light. We detected a polarimetric signal in the Stokes V spectra and established its Zeeman origin. We claim that it is likely to be related to a weak magnetic field present at the photospheric level and in the lower part of the stellar atmosphere. We estimated the strength of its longitudinal component to about 2-3 gauss. This result favors a 1/r law for the variation in the magnetic field strength across the circumstellar envelope of χ Cyg. This is the first detection of a weak magnetic field on the stellar surface of a Mira star, and we discuss its origin in the framework of shock waves periodically propagating throughout the atmosphere of these radially pulsating stars. Conclusions: At the date of our observations of χ Cyg, the shock wave reaches its maximum intensity, and it is likely that the shock amplifies a weak stellar magnetic field during its passage through the atmosphere. Without such an amplification by the shock, the magnetic field strength would have been too low to be detected. For the first time, we also report strong Stokes Q and U signatures (linear polarization) centered on the zero velocity (i.e., on the shock front position). They seem to indicate that the radial direction would be favored by the shock during its propagation throughout the atmosphere. Based on observations obtained at the Télescope Bernard Lyot (TBL, USR5026) at the Observatoire du Pic du Midi, operated by the Observatoire Midi-Pyrénées, Université de Toulouse (Paul Sabatier), Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique of France.

  4. Magnetic field topology of the unique chemically peculiar star CU Virginis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochukhov, O.; Lüftinger, T.; Neiner, C.; Alecian, E.; MiMeS Collaboration

    2014-05-01

    Context. The late-B, magnetic, chemically peculiar star CU Vir is one of the fastest rotators among the intermediate-mass stars with strong fossil magnetic fields. It shows a prominent rotational modulation of the spectral energy distribution and absorption line profiles due to chemical spots and exhibits a unique, strongly beamed variable radio emission. Aims: Little is known about the magnetic field topology of CU Vir. In this study, we aim to derive detailed maps of the magnetic field distribution over the surface of this star for the first time. Methods: We use high-resolution spectropolarimetric observations covering the entire rotational period. These data are interpreted using a multi-line technique of least-squares deconvolution (LSD) and a new Zeeman Doppler imaging code, which is based on detailed polarised radiative transfer modelling of the Stokes I and V LSD profiles. This new magnetic inversion approach relies on the spectrum synthesis calculations over the full wavelength range that is covered by observations and does not assume that the LSD profiles behave as a single spectral line with mean parameters. Results: We present magnetic and chemical abundance maps derived from the Si and Fe lines. Mean polarisation profiles of both elements reveal a significant departure of CU Vir's magnetic field topology from the commonly assumed axisymmetric dipolar configuration. The field of CU Vir is dipolar-like but clearly non-axisymmetric, showing a large difference in the field strength between the regions of opposite polarity. The main relative abundance depletion features in both Si and Fe maps coincide with the weak-field region in the magnetic map. Conclusions: The detailed information on the distorted dipolar magnetic field topology of CU Vir provided by our study is essential for understanding chemical spot formation, radio emission, and rotational period variation of this star. Based on observations obtained at the Bernard Lyot Telescope (USR5026) operated by the Observatoire Midi-Pyrénées, Université de Toulouse (Paul Sabatier), Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique of France.

  5. γ Pegasi: testing Vega-like magnetic fields in B stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neiner, C.; Monin, D.; Leroy, B.; Mathis, S.; Bohlender, D.

    2014-02-01

    Context. The bright B pulsator γ Peg shows both p and g modes of β Cep and SPB types. It has also been claimed that it is a magnetic star, while others do not detect any magnetic field. Aims: We check for the presence of a magnetic field, with the aim to characterise it if it exists, or else provide a firm upper limit of its strength if it is not detected. If γ Peg is magnetic as claimed, it would make an ideal asteroseismic target for testing various theoretical scenarios. If it is very weakly magnetic, it would be the first observation of an extension of Vega-like fields to early B stars. Finally, if it is not magnetic and we can provide a very low upper limit on its non-detected field, it would make an important result for stellar evolution models. Methods: We acquired high resolution, high signal-to-noise spectropolarimetric Narval data at Telescope Bernard Lyot (TBL). We also gathered existing dimaPol spectropolarimetric data from the Dominion Astrophysical Observatory (DAO) and Musicos spectropolarimetric data from TBL. We analysed the Narval and Musicos observations using the least-squares deconvolution (LSD) technique to derive the longitudinal magnetic field and Zeeman signatures in lines. The longitudinal field strength was also extracted from the Hβ line observed with the DAO. With a Monte Carlo simulation we derived the maximum strength of the field possibly hosted by γ Peg. Results: We find that no magnetic signatures are visible in the very high quality spectropolarimetric data. The average longitudinal field measured in the Narval data is Bl = -0.1 ± 0.4 G. We derive a very strict upper limit of the dipolar field strength of Bpol ~ 40 G. Conclusions: We conclude that γ Peg is not magnetic: it hosts neither a strong stable fossil field as observed in a fraction of massive stars nor a very weak Vega-like field. There is therefore no evidence that Vega-like fields exist in B stars, contrary to the predictions by fossil field dichotomy scenarios. These scenarios should thus be revised. Our results also provide strong constraints for stellar evolution models. Based on observations obtained at the Telescope Bernard Lyot (USR5026) operated by the Observatoire Midi-Pyrénées, Université de Toulouse (Paul Sabatier), Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique of France, and at the Dominion Astrophysical Observatory.Tables 1-3 are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  6. The MiMeS survey of magnetism in massive stars: CNO surface abundances of Galactic O stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, F.; Hervé, A.; Bouret, J.-C.; Marcolino, W.; Wade, G. A.; Neiner, C.; Alecian, E.; Grunhut, J.; Petit, V.

    2015-03-01

    Context. The evolution of massive stars is still partly unconstrained. Mass, metallicity, mass loss, and rotation are the main drivers of stellar evolution. Binarity and the magnetic field may also significantly affect the fate of massive stars. Aims: Our goal is to investigate the evolution of single O stars in the Galaxy. Methods: For that, we used a sample of 74 objects comprising all luminosity classes and spectral types from O4 to O9.7. We relied on optical spectroscopy obtained in the context of the MiMeS survey of massive stars. We performed spectral modelling with the code CMFGEN. We determined the surface properties of the sample stars, with special emphasis on abundances of carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen. Results: Most of our sample stars have initial masses in the range of 20 to 50 M⊙. We show that nitrogen is more enriched and carbon and oxygen are more depleted in supergiants than in dwarfs, with giants showing intermediate degrees of mixing. CNO abundances are observed in the range of values predicted by nucleosynthesis through the CNO cycle. More massive stars, within a given luminosity class, appear to be more chemically enriched than lower mass stars. We compare our results with predictions of three types of evolutionary models and show that for two sets of models, 80% of our sample can be explained by stellar evolution including rotation. The effect of magnetism on surface abundances is unconstrained. Conclusions: Our study indicates that in the 20-50 M⊙ mass range, the surface chemical abundances of most single O stars in the Galaxy are fairly well accounted for by stellar evolution of rotating stars. Based on observations obtained at 1) the Telescope Bernard Lyot (USR5026) operated by the Observatoire Midi-Pyrénées, Université de Toulouse (Paul Sabatier), Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique of France; 2) at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) which is operated by the National Research Council (NRC) of Canada, the Institut National des Science de l'Univers of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) of France, and the University of Hawaii; 3) at the ESO/La Silla Observatory under program ID 187.D-0917.

  7. Notes from the Field: Outbreaks of Shigella sonnei Infection with Decreased Susceptibility to Azithromycin Among Men Who Have Sex with Men - Chicago and Metropolitan Minneapolis-St. Paul, 2014.

    PubMed

    Bowen, Anna; Eikmeier, Dana; Talley, Pamela; Siston, Alicia; Smith, Shamika; Hurd, Jacqueline; Smith, Kirk; Leano, Fe; Bicknese, Amelia; Norton, J Corbin; Campbell, Davina

    2015-06-01

    Increasing rates of shigellosis among adult males, particularly men who have sex with men (MSM), have been documented in the United States, Canada, and Europe, and MSM appear to be at greater risk for infection with shigellae that are not susceptible to ciprofloxacin or azithromycin. Azithromycin is the first-line empiric antimicrobial treatment for shigellosis among children and is a second-line treatment among adults. Isolates collected in 2014 in two U.S. cities from outbreaks of shigellosis displayed highly similar pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) patterns and decreased susceptibility to azithromycin (DSA). This report summarizes and compares the findings from investigations of the two outbreaks, which occurred among MSM in metropolitan Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minnesota, and Chicago, Illinois. PMID:26042652

  8. Preface: Materiaux 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheikhrouhou, Abdelwaheb

    2012-02-01

    The national conference 'MATERIAUX 2010', which took place in Mahdia (Tunisia), from 4-7 November 2010 was organized by The 'Tunisian Materials Research Society: Tu-MRS' in collaboration with the Materials Physics Laboratory of Sfax 'LPM', Faculty of Sciences, Sfax University and the Research Unit ' Physique, Informatique et Mathématiques ', Faculty of Sciences, Gafsa University The First National Conference on Materials 'MATERIAUX 2006' was organized in Douz (Tunisia) in December 2006. This was followed by 'MATERIAUX 2007' held in Hammamet (Tunisia) in April 2007 and the National Conference 'MATERIAUX 2009' organized jointly with the Second 'Journées Internationales de la Physique des Matériaux et Applications: JIPMA 2009' in Gafsa (Tunisia) from 20-24 December 2009. 'MATERIAUX 2010' is intended to provide an excellent opportunity for National, Maghreb and International researchers to make their own work on materials known to a wider audience and to have discussions with other participants. This conference will also be an opportunity to exchange experiences, create and consolidate cooperation between different research structures in the Maghreb countries and also the countries around the Mediterranean. This conference will equally promote research development, contribution to collaboration between universities and the socio-economical milieu. More than 300 senior researchers, Professors, PhD and Masters students attended this conference from Tunisia, Algeria, Morocco, France, Spain and Canada. Several researchers, engineers and managers from industrial firms also attended. The conference consisted of plenary talks (8), oral contributions (40) and poster presentations (250). The topics of the Conference were: Nano-materials, nano-systems, thin films, surfaces and interfaces, applications Multifunctionnal materials, magnetic materials, dielectric materials, superconducting materials, applications,... Materials for electronics, informatics and communication Ceramics, glasses, polymers Natural materials (phosphates, clay,...) Metallic materials, alloys, metallurgy,... Others (materials and environment, materials and energy, biomaterials,...) I want to thank the scientific committee, the organizing committee, the local committee and everyone who contributed to the organization of this meeting for their invaluable efforts in order to guarantee the complete success of this conference. Abdelwaheb Cheikhrouhou President of 'Tu-MRS' Chairman of the Conference 'MATERIAUX 2010' Conference photograph Committies Organizing Committee Chairman CHEIKHROUHOU Abdelwaheb (Faculté des Sciences de Sfax) Members ALAYA Sahbi (Faculté des Sciences de Gabès) BENNACEUR Raouf (Faculté des Sciences de Tunis) BEN SALEM Mohamed (Faculté des Sciences de Bizerte) CHEIKHROUHOU-KOUBAA Wissem (Faculté des Sciences de Sfax) EL JANI Belgacem (Faculté des Sciences de Monastir) EZZAOUIA Hatem (Centre de Recherches et de Technologies de l'Energie, Technopole de Borj Cédria) LAMLOUMI Jilani (Ecole Supérieure des Sciences et Techniques de Tunis) REZIG Bahri (Ecole Nationale d'Ingénieurs de Tunis) Local Committee Chairman CHEIKHROUHOU Abdelwaheb (Faculté des Sciences de Sfax) Members CHEIKHROUHOU-KOUBAA Wissem (Faculté des Sciences de Sfax) KOUBAA Mohamed (Institut Supérieur de Biotechnologie de Sfax) NJEH Anwar (Institut Préparatoire aux Etudes d'Ingénieurs de Sfax) BEN SALAH Issam (Faculté des Sciences de Sfax) TAKKALI Férid (Faculté des Sciences de Sfax) REGAIEG Yassin (Faculté des Sciences de Sfax) OTHMANI Safa (Faculté des Sciences de Sfax) MNASSRI Rafik (Faculté des Sciences de Sfax) Secretariat BEN GHOZLEN Afifa (Faculté des Sciences de Sfax) BOUGHARIOU Sana (Faculté des Sciences de Sfax) Scientific Committee M. ADDOU, Faculté des Sciences de Kénitra (Morocco) N. AMDOUNI, Faculté des Sciences de Tunis (Tunisia) M. BACCOUCHE, Faculté des Sciences d'Annaba (Algeria) H. BATIS, Faculté des Sciences de Tunis (Tunisia) A. BELAFHAL, Faculté des Sciences d'El Jadida (Morocco) M.H. BEN GHOZLEN, Faculté des Sciences de Sfax (Tunisia) R. BENNACEUR, Faculté des Sciences de Tunis (Tunisia) B. BENYOUCEF, Université Abou Bakr Belkaid, Tlemcen (Algeria) M. BEN SALEM, Faculté des Sciences de Bizerte (Tunisia) B. BESSAIES, Centre de Recherches et Technologies de l'Energie (Tunisia) H. BOUCHRIHA, Faculté des Sciences de Tunis (Tunisia) W. BOUJELBEN, Faculté des Sciences de Sfax (Tunisia) A. CHEIKHROUHOU, Faculté des Sciences de Sfax (Tunisia) W. CHEIKHROUHOU-KOUBAA, Faculté des Sciences de Sfax (Tunisia) R. CHTOUROU, Centre de Recherches et Technologies de l'Energie (Tunisia) M. DEBBABI, Ecole Nationale d'Ingénieurs de Monastir (Tunisia) A. DAKHLAOUI, Faculté des Sciences de Bizerte (Tunisia) A. DINIA, Université de Strasbourg (France) B. ELJANI, Faculté des Sciences de Monastir (Tunisia) A. ELJAZOULI, Faculté des Sciences Ben Msik, Casablanca (Morocco) Z. FAKHFAKH, Faculté des Sciences de Sfax (Tunisia) A. GASMI, Faculté des Sciences d'Annaba (Algeria) A. GHARBI, Faculté des Sciences de Tunis (Tunisia) R. GHARBI, Faculté des Sciences de Sfax (Tunisia) K. GUIDARA, Faculté des Sciences de Sfax (Tunisia) H. GUERMAZI, Institut Préparatoire aux Etudes d'Ingénieurs de Sfax (Tunisia) S. GUERMAZI, Faculté des Sciences de Sfax (Tunisia) M. HADDAD, Faculté des Sciences de Meknès (Morocco) A. HAJ AMARA, Faculté des Sciences de Bizerte (Tunisia) D. HAMANA, Faculté des Sciences de Constantine (Algeria) N. KAMOUN, Faculté des Sciences de Tunis (Tunisia) S. KADDOUR-CHARFI, Faculté des Sciences de Tunis (Tunisia) M. KADDOUR, Faculté des Sciences de Sfax (Tunisia) M. KHITOUNI, Faculté des Sciences de Sfax (Tunisia) T. MHIRI, Faculté des Sciences de Sfax (Tunisia) Y. MLIK, Institut Préparatoire aux Etudes Scientifiques et Techniques (Tunisia) N. MLIKI, Faculté des Sciences de Tunis (Tunisia) A. NJAH, Faculté des Sciences de Gafsa (Tunisia) M. OUESLATI, Faculté des Sciences de Tunis (Tunisia) K. ZELLAMA, Faculté des Sciences d'Amiens (France) Invited Speakers AMMAR-MERIAH Souad, ITODYS, Université Paris Diderot (France) BEN SALEM Mohamed, Faculté des Sciences de Bizerte, Université du 7 Novembre á Carthage (Tunisia) CHEIKHROUHOU Abdelwaheb, Faculté des Sciences de Sfax, Université de Sfax (Tunisia) DAKHLAOUI Amel, Faculté des Sciences de Bizerte, Université du 7 Novembre á Carthage (Tunisia) DJABBAR Ahmed, Université des Sciences et des Technologies de Lille (France) DURASTANTI Félix, Centre d'Etudes et Recherche en Thermique, Environnement et Systèmes (C.E.R.T.E.S.), Université Paris Est- Créteil (France) FERY-FORGUES Suzanne, Université Paul Sabatier, Toulouse (France) GIRAUD Romain, Laboratoire de Photonique et de Nanostructures, CNRS/LPN, Marcoussis (France)

  9. Public Forum Before the Committee on Urban Indians in L.A., Calif. (Dec. 16-17, 1968); Dallas, Tex. (Feb. 13-14, 1969); Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minn. (Mar. 18-19, 1969); San Francisco, Calif. (Apr. 11-12, 1968); Phoenix, Ariz. (Apr. 17-18, 1969).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Council on Indian Opportunity, Washington, DC.

    The proceedings of public forums of the National Council of Indian Opportunity are recorded in these 5 documents. These forums were designed to gain information on the condition of urban American Indians living in Los Angeles, Minneapolis-St. Paul, San Francisco, Dallas, and Phoenix. Included in each of the documents are discussions on such…

  10. Building of the Amsterdam-Saint Paul plateau: A 10 Myr history of a ridge-hot spot interaction and variations in the strength of the hot spot source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maia, Marcia; Pessanha, Ivo; CourrèGes, Esther; Patriat, Martin; Gente, Pascal; HéMond, Christophe; Janin, Myriam; Johnson, Kevin; Roest, Walter; Royer, Jean-Yves; Vatteville, Judith

    2011-09-01

    The Amsterdam-Saint Paul plateau results from a 10 Myr interaction between the South East Indian Ridge and the Amsterdam-Saint Paul hot spot. During this period of time, the structure of the plateau changed as a consequence of changes in both the ridge-hot spot relative distance and in the strength of the hot spot source. The joint analysis of gravity-derived crust thickness and bathymetry reveals that the plateau started to form at ˜10 Ma by an increase of the crustal production at the ridge axis, due to the nearby hot spot. This phase, which lasted 3-4 Myr, corresponds to a period of a strong hot spot source, maybe due to a high temperature or material flux, and decreasing ridge-hot spot distance. A second phase, between ˜6 and ˜3 Ma, corresponds to a decrease in the ridge crustal production. During this period, the hot spot center was close to the ridge axis and this reduced magmatic activity suggests a weak hot spot source. At ˜3 Ma, the ridge was located approximately above the hot spot center. An increase in the hot spot source strength then resulted in the building of the shallower part of the plateau. The variations of the melt production at the ridge axis through time resulted in variations in crustal thickness but also in changes in the ridge morphology. The two periods of increased melt production correspond to smooth ridge morphology, characterized by axial highs, while the intermediate period corresponds to a rougher, rift-valley morphology. These variations reveal changes in axial thermal structure due to higher melting production rates and temperatures.

  11. Stanley Cavell in Conversation with Paul Standish

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Philosophy of Education, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Having acknowledged the recurrent theme of education in Stanley Cavell's work, the discussion addresses the topic of scepticism, especially as this emerges in the interpretation of Wittgenstein. Questions concerning rule-following, language and society are then turned towards political philosophy, specifically with regard to John Rawls. The…

  12. [Paul-Louis Simond and coccidia].

    PubMed

    Brey, P T

    1999-12-01

    In 1880, during a sojourn at Constantine, Alphonse Laveran discovered the etiological agent of human malaria. During his microscopic observations of the parasite in freshly collected blood, Laveran's attention was attracted to the movement of flagellar bodies in the preparations. For Laveran these flagellar bodies corresponded to living organisms, in fact he considered them the most characteristic stage of the parasite; perhaps the sexual form of the parasite. In 1884, back in Paris at the military hospital Val de Grâce, A. Laveran showed these flagellated bodies to Pasteur, Roux and Chamberland who all thought that is was impossible not to recognize a living body in this mass of protoplasm displacing the surrounding red blood cells with its protruding flagella. As early as 1890, Elie Metchnikoff established a link between the flagellar bodies of Laveran and the stealthy stage of parasitic Coccidia infecting the intestinal epithelium of salamanders. It was the Pasteuriens and a few others scientists like Danilewski and Pfeiffer who firmly believed that the flagellar forms were indeed a normal stage during the hematozoan life cycle. On the contrary, Grassi and the Italian school, as well as the French protozoologist Labbé were convinced that the flagellar bodies corresponded to a degenerative form of the parasite provoked by the exposure of the parasites to air during slide preparation. In early 1896, P-L Simond joined Metchnikoff's laboratory and was assigned to study salamander coccidia in order to clarify the nature of the flagellar bodies. In a very short period of time, Simond clearly demonstrated that the coccidia had two types of life cycles; one of which resulted in the formation of flagellar bodies. Simond called the flagellar bodies "chromatozoites" due to the important quantities of chromatin twisted around the flagellum. From these observations and the sperm-like movement of the chromatozoites, Simond put forth the hypothesis that the chromatozoites were the male sexual forms of the parasite. He noted that they were found in all species of coccidia, as well as in the different species of malaria causing hematozoans of man and birds. Simond went even further in his interpretation to suggest that malaria parasites undergo sexual reproduction. This was indeed true, but Simond thought erroneously that sexual reproduction in hematozoans would result in the formation of resistant spores like in the Coccidia. The sexual reproduction hypothesis of malaria parasites was also formulated independently a year later by W. G. MacCallum (1898) working in the United States on Halteridium, a hematozoan infecting crows. Initially MacCallum was not aware of Simond's work, but later gave Simond full credit for his work on Coccidia. Furthermore, MacCallum observed for the first time the chromatozoite (microgamete) enter a female element (macrogamete) to form a mobile worm-like stage of the parasite know today as the ookinete. In his writings Simond is very modest, giving most of the credit to his mentors Metchnikoff and Laveran, but Laveran in an article which appeared in 1899 recognizes P.-L. Simond as the first person having put forth the hypothesis that the flagellar bodies of hematozoans causing human and bird malaria were the male forms of the parasite destined to fertilize the female elements. PMID:11000943

  13. [Paul-Louis Simond and yellow fever].

    PubMed

    Löwy, I; Rodhain, F

    1999-12-01

    P.L. Simond participated in the Pasteur Institute mission sent to Rio de Janeiro from 1901 to 1905 to investigate yellow fever and was to make an important contribution to the knowledge of the disease. At that time, the aetiologic agent of yellow fever was still unknown, and its transmission by mosquitoes was controversial. Several authors had observed apparent differences in the susceptibility to the illness between African and European populations. Otherwise, the soundness of epidemic control measures then being administered was often called into question. As such, many points needed to be definitely clarified. During the four years they spent in Brazil, the Pasteur Institute scientists--and particularly Simond--achieved important results. They confirmed the viral aetiology of yellow fever, were able to define several pathological aspects of the disease and conduct various serotherapeutic tests. The role of Aedes aegypti (known at the time as Stegomyia fasciata) was also confirmed and the bionomics of the mosquito began to be studied. This research laid the ground for classical measures of controlling the vector and preventing outbreaks of the disease. Furthermore, Marchoux and Simond observed the vertical transmission of yellow fever virus in Ae. aegypti; this phenomenon of major epidemiological importance remained controversial until it was confirmed in the field as recently as 1997. The French scientists were also able to specify many aspects of the epidemiology of yellow fever, particularly its apparent low pathogenicity in young children--a possible explanation for the fact that local residents of endemic zones often had a certain level of immunity as a result of benign infection contracted in childhood. P.L. Simond later spent several months in Martinique where he set up a successful yellow fever vector control programme. Clearly Simond, who had already acquired much expertise in the epidemiology of vector-borne diseases, played a key role in the success of the mission sent by Institute Pasteur to Brazil, and, more generally, in the scientific advances of yellow fever prevention. PMID:11000946

  14. Paul Petzoldt's Perspective: The Final 20 Years.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagstaff, Mark; Cashel, Christine

    2001-01-01

    Petzoldt's "grasshopper" method of teaching was a systematic adaptation of opportunity teaching or using the teachable moment. An excellent example of effective experiential education, it presented small, manageable bites of information which were immediately relevant. His emphasis on the importance of judgment and decision making and the first 24…

  15. Paul Monroe and Education of Modern China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhou, Hongyu; Chen, Jingrong

    2007-01-01

    Monroe was a well-known American world-wide educator in the first half of the 20th century. He came to China more than ten times to investigate Chinese education, deliver academic lectures, and conduct cultural exchanges from the 1920s to the 1940s. He made a great contribution to Sino-American cultural and educational exchanges in Modern China.…

  16. Precursors and fluid flows in the case of the 1996, ML = 5.2 Saint-Paul-de-Fenouillet earthquake (Pyrenees, France): A complete pre-, co- and post-seismic scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rigo, Alexis

    2010-01-01

    Earthquake precursors are now regularly described but often detected only after a major or moderate seismic event. Presence and influence of fluids in the seismogenic processes are often observed at the time of earthquake studies. Even today, the understanding of the physical processes involved in the source region is a real challenge for seismic hazard assessment. Here, the aftershock sequence of the ML = 5.2, 1996 Saint-Paul-de-Fenouillet (Eastern Pyrenees, France) earthquake is first re-examined with P-wave cross-correlations, resulting in extracting three multiplets and in determining new locations. Multiplets and spatio-temporal distribution analysis of the aftershocks allow for quantifying the hydraulic diffusivity D at a maximum value of 5 m 2/s and the permeability K at 10 - 15 m 2 in the upper Pyrenean crust. Second, a model is established in order to explain the hydrogeochemical transient anomalies, which occurred during the 15 day-period preceding the 1996 earthquake. These anomalies consist on a temporal and spatial sequence of gas emissions in the epicentral area and on chloride and lead concentration variations in a bottled mineral water 25 km north to the main shock epicenter. The proposed model processed in a standard elastic half-space, consists of creep on a low-angle crustal normal-fault, generating volumetric strain field changes over a distance of 25 km from the epicentral area. This model is able to constrain not only the mechanisms and the locations of the geochemical anomalies, but also their timing and probable casual links to the triggering of the impending major event. Also, the active extension proposed here is compatible with seismological observations in the Pyrenees. Thus, the possibility of such creep, which can be considered as a slow-slip event, is discussed in the Pyrenean tectonic and geological context. The model is discussed and compared to previous proposed models on precursor processes of earthquakes, especially concerning the preparation zone concept. Finally, a complete seismic scenario over the period beginning 15 days before the quake and ending 5 days after is proposed and discussed.

  17. Feasibility Study of Economics and Performance of Solar Photovoltaics at the Former Chicago, Milwaukee, and St. Paul Rail Yard Company Site in Perry, Iowa. A Study Prepared in Partnership with the Environmental Protection Agency for the RE-Powering America's Land Initiative: Siting Renewable Energy on Potentially Contaminated Land and Mine Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Salasovich, J.; Geiger, J.; Healey, V.; Mosey, G.

    2013-03-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in accordance with the RE-Powering America's Land initiative, selected the Former Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Rail Yard Company site in Perry, Iowa, for a feasibility study of renewable energy production. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) provided technical assistance for this project. The purpose of this report is to assess the site for a photovoltaic (PV) system installation and estimate the cost, performance, and site impacts of different PV options. In addition, the report recommends financing options that could assist in the implementation of a PV system at the site. This study did not assess environmental conditions at the site.

  18. The Fourier transform spectrometer of the Universite? Pierre et Marie Curie QualAir platform.

    PubMed

    Té, Y; Jeseck, P; Payan, S; Pépin, I; Camy-Peyret, C

    2010-10-01

    A Bruker Optics IFS 125HR Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) and the Laboratoire de Physique Mole?culaire pour l'Atmosphe?re et l'Astrophysique retrieval algorithm were adapted for ground based atmospheric measurements. As one of the major instruments of the experimental research platform QualAir, this FTS is dedicated to study the urban air composition of large megacity such as Paris. The precise concentration measurements of the most important atmospheric pollutants are a key to improve the understanding and modeling of urban air pollution processes. Located in the center of Paris, this remote sensing spectrometer enables to monitor many pollutants. Examples for NO(2) and CO are demonstrating the performances of this new experimental setup. PMID:21034070

  19. An Apprenticeship in Resistance May '68 and the Power of Vincennes (Universite de Paris VIII)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dolphijn, Rick

    2007-01-01

    Background: The riots in Paris '68 marked among others, the creation of a "Centre universitaire experimental" in Vincennes of which especially the philosophy faculty became the testing laboratory for educational reform. There, scholars like Michel Foucault, Gilles Deleuze, Alain Badiou and Jean-Francois Lyotard developed new ideas on education…

  20. Participation of Women in the Web Development in the Universitities: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thevar, Suriya Mayandi; Schinzel, Britta; Ben, Esther Ruiz

    This study evaluates the extent to which the escalation of the labor demand, the transformation of work culture, and the diversification of the professional characteristics of the World Wide Web profession have attracted women to enter in to this new branch of information technology (IT) occupations. The study focuses on Web designers at the…

  1. BOOK REVIEW: Die Universitäts-Sternwarte München im Wandel ihrer Geschichte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duerbeck, H. W.; Haefner, R.

    2003-01-01

    This concise history of Munich Observatory, written by a staff member, is actually the second, enlarged and updated edition of a brochure that was based on a pair of articles in the now defunct journal Die Sterne (Vol. 68, 263 and 340, 1992). First attempts to establish an observatory in Munich date back to 1759, when the Bavarian Academy of Sciences was founded and a topographic survey was begun; but these private attempts did not lead to a permanent installation. A more official interest arose when a topographic bureau was opened under French direction in 1801, and when the prince-elect Max IV Joseph planned a new land tax which required precise mapping. The collapse of the French rule also meant a collapse of the plans for the new observatory. In 1816, however, things began to develop with an unprecedented speed. The astronomer and surveyor Johann Georg von Soldner was appointed to become observatory director, and king Max I Joseph gave the order to erect the new observatory, which was completed near the end of 1817. The location was chosen near the the village of Bogenhausen (now a suburb of Munich). It took a little longer to install the instrumentation; first observations started in early 1819. Soldner's circle of friends comprised local instrument makers, including Fraunhofer and Reichenbach. With the former, he completed a new apparatus for experiments on the nature of the light of the fixed stars, a refractor of 10 cm aperture equipped with an objective prism. The study of sunlight, began by Fraunhofer, was now extended to the light of planets and fixed stars. Soldner also started a continuous meteorological record. But his name will always be remembered in the annals of science because of a short note, published in 1801 when he was still a student of Bode in Berlin, his On the deviation of a light ray from its rectilinear motion by the attraction of a celestial body which it passes at short distance. Soldner's last years were darkened by illness and enmities. Unfortunately the book does not tell anything about the notorious lunar observer Franz von Paula Gruithuisen, who was appointed professor of astronomy at Munich University in 1826. Soldner died in 1833, and his position was taken by Johann von Lamont, who did pioneering astrometric measurements of Halley's comet, took up again Fraunhofer's and Soldners studies of stellar spectra, but then felt that he should concentrate on only a few studies (stellar positions, magnetic and meteorological measurements). In addition he installed a mechanical workshop in the observatory, where many of the instruments were built, and which exists till the present day. After his death, a three-year vacancy of the director's chair was filled by the mathematician Ludwig Seidel. This was followed by the long reign of Hugo von Seeliger, beginning in 1882 and only ending in 1924. He is most famous for his studies in stellar statistics and other theoretical fields, but he was also active in observational work, including the timeservice. The following 25 years saw two less known directors, Alexander Wilkens and Wilhelm Rabe. After the latter's dismissal, Erich Schoenberg, a theoretician from Breslau, took over in 1949. Numerous changes had happened since Seeliger's time: the integration of a private solar observatory in Herrsching in 1932, which was dissolved in 1946, the transformation into a ``University Observatory'' in 1937/8, major damages through air raids in 1944, and finally, in 1949, the integration of the Wendelstein Solar Observatory, founded by the Deutsche Versuchsanstalt für Luftfahrt in 1941, as one of a series of stations to monitor solar activity. Schoenberg's retirement in 1955 was followed by an interim time of six years. In the following 21 years, Peter Wellmann re-shaped the observatory by building a research group on stellar atmospheres, one of the fields in which the observatory still excels. In the era of Rolf Kudritzki (1982 - 1998), these studies were further pursued and extended. An overview of the Observatory's actual research fields, research installations, its development of modern instrumentation, as well as its activities in public outreach (dating back to TV programmes by R. Kühn in the 1950s which the reviewer still vividly recalls) conclude this historic overview. The appendix lists the Observatory's publication series, statistics of recent publications and their impact, as well as post statistics of the institute - the booklet may also have been written to serve as a lobbying tool for governmental and private sponsorship. Häfner has succeeded in writing a concise sketch of the history of a an important German astronomical institution. It contains a lot of citations from original sources, printed in italics (without indicating their exact locations - this is understandable since Häfner did not want to write an ``academic'' article full of references and footnotes), as well as a useful bibliography.

  2. New determination of abundances and stellar parameters for a set of weak G-band stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palacios, A.; Jasniewicz, G.; Masseron, T.; Thévenin, F.; Itam-Pasquet, J.; Parthasarathy, M.

    2016-03-01

    Context. Weak G-band (wGb) stars are a very peculiar class of red giants; they are almost devoided of carbon and often present mild lithium enrichment. Despite their very puzzling abundance patterns, very few detailed spectroscopic studies existed up to a few years ago, which prevented any clear understanding of the wGb phenomenon. We recently proposed the first consistent analysis of published data for a sample of 28 wGb stars and were able to identify them as descendants of early A-type to late B-type stars, although we were not able to conclude on their evolutionary status or the origin of their peculiar abundance pattern. Aims: Using new high-resolution spectra, we present the study of a new sample of wGb stars with the aim of homogeneously deriving their fundamental parameters and surface abundances for a selected set of chemical species that we use to improve our insight on this peculiar class of objects. Methods: We obtained high-resolution and high signal-to-noise spectra for 19 wGb stars in the southern and northern hemisphere that we used to perform consistent spectral synthesis to derive their fundamental parameters and metallicities, as well as the spectroscopic abundances for Li, C, 12C/13C, N, O, Na, Sr, and Ba. We also computed dedicated stellar evolution models that we used to determine the masses and to investigate the evolutionary status and chemical history of the stars in our sample. Results: We confirm that the wGb stars are stars with initial masses in the range 3.2 to 4.2 M⊙. We suggest that a large fraction could be mildly evolved stars on the subgiant branch currently undergoing the first dredge-up, while a smaller number of stars are more probably in the core He burning phase at the clump. After analysing their abundance pattern, we confirm their strong nitrogen enrichment anti-correlated with large carbon depletion, characteristic of material fully processed through the CNO cycle to an extent not known in evolved intermediate-mass stars in the field and in open clusters. However, we demonstrate here that such a pattern is very unlikely owing to self-enrichment. Conclusions: In the light of the current observational constraints, no solid self-consistent pollution scenario can be presented either, leaving the wGb puzzle largely unsolved. Based on data collected at La Silla Observatory (ESO, Chile), program identifier ID 089.D-0189(A), and at the Telescope Bernard Lyot (USR5026) operated by the Observatoire Midi-Pyrénées, Université de Toulouse (Paul Sabatier), Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique of France.

  3. List of Participants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-11-01

    Mohab Abou ZeidInstitut des Hautes Études Scientifiques, Bures-sur-Yvette Ido AdamMax-Planck-Institut für Gravitationsphysik (AEI), Potsdam Henrik AdorfLeibniz Universität Hannover Mohammad Ali-AkbariIPM, Tehran Antonio Amariti Università di Milano-Bicocca Nicola Ambrosetti Université de Neuchâtel Martin Ammon Max-Planck-Institut für Physik, München Christopher AndreyÉcole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL) Laura AndrianopoliPolitecnico di Torino David AndriotLPTHE, Université UPMC Paris VI Carlo Angelantonj Università di Torino Pantelis ApostolopoulosUniversitat de les Illes Balears, Palma Gleb ArutyunovInstitute for Theoretical Physics, Utrecht University Davide AstolfiUniversità di Perugia Spyros AvramisUniversité de Neuchâtel Mirela BabalicChalmers University, Göteborg Foday BahDigicom Ioannis Bakas University of Patras Igor BandosUniversidad de Valencia Jose L F BarbonIFTE UAM/CSIC Madrid Till BargheerMax-Planck-Institut für Gravitationsphysik (AEI), Potsdam Marco Baumgartl Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule (ETH), Zürich James BedfordImperial College London Raphael BenichouLaboratoire de Physique Théorique, École Normale Supérieure, Paris Francesco Benini SISSA, Trieste Eric Bergshoeff Centre for Theoretical Physics, University of Groningen Alice BernamontiVrije Universiteit, Brussel Julia BernardLaboratoire de Physique Théorique, École Normale Supérieure, Paris Adel Bilal Laboratoire de Physique Théorique, École Normale Supérieure, Paris Marco Billo' Università di Torino Matthias Blau Université de Neuchâtel Guillaume BossardAlbert-Einstein-Institut, Golm Leonardo BriziÉcole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL) Johannes BroedelLeibniz Universität Hannover (AEI) Tom BrownQueen Mary, University of London Ilka BrunnerEidgenössische Technische Hochschule (ETH), Zürich Erling BrynjolfssonUniversity of Iceland Dmitri BykovSteklov Institute, Moscow and Trinity College, Dublin Joan CampsUniversitat de Barcelona Davide CassaniLaboratoire de Physique Théorique, École Normale Supérieure, Paris Alejandra CastroUniversity of Michigan Claudio Caviezel Max-Planck-Institut für Physik, München Alessio Celi Universitat de Barcelona Anna Ceresole Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Università di Torino Athanasios ChatzistavrakidisNational Technical University of Athens Wissam ChemissanyCentre for Theoretical Physics, University of Groningen Eugen-Mihaita CioroianuUniversity of Craiova Andres CollinucciTechnische Universität Wien Paul CookUniversità di Roma, Tor Vergata Lorenzo CornalbaUniversità di Milano-Bicocca Aldo CotroneKatholieke Universiteit Leuven Ben Craps Vrije Universiteit, Brussel Stefano Cremonesi SISSA, Trieste Riccardo D'AuriaPolitecnico di Torino Gianguido Dall'AgataUniversity of Padova Jose A de AzcarragaUniversidad de Valencia Jan de BoerInstituut voor Theoretische Fysica, Universiteit van Amsterdam Sophie de BuylInstitut des Hautes Études Scientifiques, Bures-sur-Yvette Marius de LeeuwUtrecht University Frederik De RooVrije Universiteit, Brussel Jan De Rydt Katholieke Universiteit Leuven and CERN, Geneva Bernard de WitInstitute for Theoretical Physics, Utrecht University Stephane DetournayIstituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Milano Paolo Di Vecchia Niels Bohr Institute, København Eugen DiaconuUniversity of Craiova Vladimir Dobrev Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia Nick DoreyUniversity of Cambridge Hajar Ebrahim NajafabadiIPM, Tehran Federico Elmetti Università di Milano Oleg Evnin Vrije Universiteit, Brussel Francesco Fiamberti Università di Milano Davide Forcella SISSA, Trieste and CERN, Geneva Valentina Forini Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin Angelos Fotopoulos Università di Torino Denis Frank Université de Neuchâtel Marialuisa Frau Università di Torino Matthias Gaberdiel Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule (ETH), Zürich Diego Gallego SISSA/ISAS, Trieste Maria Pilar Garcia del MoralIstituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Università di Torino Valentina Giangreco Marotta PulettiUppsala University Valeria L GiliQueen Mary, University of London Luciano GirardelloUniversità di Milano-Bicocca Gian GiudiceCERN, Geneva Kevin Goldstein Institute for Theoretical Physics, Utrecht University Joaquim Gomis Universitat de Barcelona Pietro Antonio GrassiUniversità del Piemonte Orientale, Alessandria Viviane GraßLudwig-Maximilians-Universität, München Gianluca Grignani Università di Perugia Luca Griguolo Università di Parma Johannes GrosseJagiellonian University, Krakow Umut Gursoy École Polytechnique, Palaiseau Norberto Gutierrez RodriguezUniversity of Oviedo Babak HaghighatPhysikalisches Institut, Universität Bonn Troels Harmark Niels Bohr Institute, København Robert HaslhoferEidgenössische Technische Hochschule (ETH), Zürich Tae-Won HaPhysikalisches Institut, Universität Bonn Alexander HauptImperial College London and Max-Planck-Institut für Gravitationsphysik (AEI), Potsdam Marc HenneauxUniversité Libre de Bruxelles Johannes HennLAPTH, Annecy-le-Vieux Shinji HiranoNiels Bohr Institute, København Stefan HoheneggerEidgenössische Technische Hochschule (ETH), Zürich Jan HomannLudwig-Maximilians-Universität, München Gabriele Honecker CERN, Geneva Joost HoogeveenInstituut voor Theoretische Fysica, Universiteit van Amsterdam Mechthild HuebscherUniversidad Autónoma de Madrid Chris HullImperial College London Carmen-Liliana IonescuUniversity of Craiova Ella JasminUniversité Libre de Bruxelles Konstantin KanishchevInstitute of Theoretical Physics, University of Warsaw Stefanos Katmadas Utrecht University Alexandros KehagiasNational Technical University of Athens Christoph Keller Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule (ETH), Zürich Patrick Kerner Max-Planck-Institut für Physik, München Rebiai KhaledLaboratoire de Physique Mathématique et Physique Subatomique, Université Mentouri, Constantine Elias Kiritsis Centre de Physique Théorique, École Polytechnique, Palaiseau and University of Crete Denis KleversPhysikalisches Institut, Universität Bonn Paul Koerber Max-Planck-Institut für Physik, München Simon Koers Max-Planck-Institut für Physik, München Karl KollerLudwig-Maximilians-Universität, München Peter Koroteev Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics (ITEP), Moscow and Max-Planck-Institut für Gravitationsphysik (AEI), Potsdam Alexey KoshelevVrije Universiteit, Brussel Costas KounnasÉcole Normale Supérieure, Paris Daniel KreflCERN, Geneva Charlotte KristjansenNiels Bohr Institute, København Finn LarsenCERN, Geneva and University of Michigan Arnaud Le DiffonÉcole Normale Supérieure, Lyon Michael LennekCentre de Physique Théorique, École Polytechnique, Palaiseau Alberto Lerda Università del Piemonte Orientale, Alessandria Andreas LiberisUniversity of Patras Maria A Lledo Universidad de Valencia Oscar Loaiza-Brito CINVESTAV, Mexico Florian Loebbert Max-Planck-Institut für Gravitationsphysik (AEI), Potsdam Yolanda Lozano University of Oviedo Dieter Luest Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, München Tomasz Łukowski Jagiellonian University, Krakow Diego Mansi University of Crete Alberto Mariotti Università di Milano-Bicocca Raffaele Marotta Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Napoli Alessio Marrani Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare and LNF, Firenze Andrea Mauri University of Crete Liuba Mazzanti École Polytechnique, Palaiseau Sean McReynoldsUniversità di Milano-Bicocca AKM Moinul Haque Meaze Chittagong University Patrick Meessen Instituto de Física Teórica, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid Carlo MeneghelliUniversità di Parma and Albert-Einstein-Institut, Golm Lotta Mether University of Helsinki and CERN, Geneva René Meyer Max-Planck-Institut für Physik, München Georgios MichalogiorgakisCenter de Physique Théorique, École Polytechnique, Palaiseau Giuseppe Milanesi Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule (ETH), Zürich Samuel Monnier Université de Genève Wolfgang MueckUniversità di Napoli Federico II Elena Méndez Escobar University of Edinburgh Iulian Negru University of Craiova Emil NissimovInstitute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, Sofia Teake NutmaCentre for Theoretical Physics, University of Groningen Niels Obers Niels Bohr Institute, København Olof Ohlsson SaxUppsala University Rodrigo OleaIstituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Milano Domenico OrlandoUniversité de Neuchâtel Marta Orselli Niels Bohr Institute, København Tomas OrtinInstituto de Física Teórica, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid Yaron OzTel Aviv University Enrico PajerLudwig-Maximilians-Universität, München Angel Paredes GalanUtrecht University Sara PasquettiUniversité de Neuchâtel Silvia PenatiUniversità di Milano-Bicocca Jan PerzKatholieke Universiteit Leuven Igor PesandoUniversità di Torino Tassos PetkouUniversity of Crete Marios PetropoulosCenter de Physique Théorique, École Polytechnique, Palaiseau Franco PezzellaIstituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Napoli Moises Picon PonceUniversity of Padova Marco PirroneUniversità di Milano-Bicocca Andrea PrinslooUniversity of Cape Town Joris RaeymaekersKatholieke Universiteit Leuven Alfonso RamalloUniversidade de Santiago de Compostela Carlo Alberto RattiUniversità di Milano-Bicocca Marco RauchPhysikalisches Institut, Universität Bonn Ronald Reid-EdwardsUniversity of Hamburg Patricia RitterUniversity of Edinburgh Peter RoenneDESY, Hamburg Jan RosseelUniversità di Torino Clement RuefService de Physique Théorique, CEA Saclay Felix RustMax-Planck-Institut für Physik, München Thomas RyttovNiels Bohr Institute, København and CERN, Geneva Agustin Sabio VeraCERN, Geneva Christian SaemannTrinity College, Dublin Houman Safaai SISSA, Trieste Henning SamtlebenÉcole Normale Supérieure, Lyon Alberto SantambrogioIstituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Milano Silviu Constantin SararuUniversity of Craiova Ricardo SchiappaCERN, Geneva Ionut Romeo SchiopuChalmers University, Göteborg Cornelius Schmidt-ColinetEidgenössische Technische Hochschule (ETH), Zürich Johannes SchmudeSwansea University Waldemar SchulginLaboratoire de Physique Théorique, École Normale Supérieure, Paris Domenico SeminaraUniversità di Firenze Alexander SevrinVrije Universiteit, Brussel Konstadinos SfetsosUniversity of Patras Igor ShenderovichSt Petersburg State University Jonathan ShockUniversidade de Santiago de Compostela Massimo SianiUniversità di Milano-Bicocca Christoph SiegUniversità Degli Studi di Milano Joan SimonUniversity of Edinburgh Paul SmythUniversity of Hamburg Luca SommovigoUniversidad de Valencia Dmitri Sorokin Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Padova Christos SourdisUniversity of Patras Wieland StaessensVrije Universiteit, Brussel Ivan StefanovUniversity of Patras Sigurdur StefanssonUniversity of Iceland Kellogg Stelle Imperial College London Giovanni Tagliabue Università di Milano Laura Tamassia Katholieke Universiteit Leuven Javier TarrioUniversidade de Santiago de Compostela Dimitri TerrynVrije Universiteit, Brussel Larus Thorlacius University of Iceland Mario ToninDipartimento Di Fisica, Sezione Di Padova Mario Trigiante Politecnico di Torino Efstratios TsatisUniversity of Patras Arkady TseytlinImperial College London Pantelis TziveloglouCornell University, New York and CERN, Geneva Angel Uranga CERN, Geneva Dieter Van den Bleeken Katholieke Universiteit Leuven Ernst van Eijk Università di Napoli Federico II Antoine Van Proeyen Katholieke Universiteit Leuven Maaike van ZalkUtrecht University Pierre Vanhove Service de Physique Théorique, CEA Saclay Silvia Vaula Instituto de Física Teórica, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid Cristian Vergu Service de Physique Théorique, CEA Saclay Alessandro VichiÉcole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL) Marlene WeissCERN, Geneva and Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule (ETH), Zürich Sebastian Weiss Université de Neuchâtel Alexander WijnsUniversity of Iceland Linus WulffUniversity of Padova Thomas WyderKatholieke Universiteit Leuven Ahmed YoussefAstroParticule et Cosmologie (APC), Université Paris Diderot Daniela ZanonUniversità Degli Studi di Milano Andrea ZanziPhysikalisches Institut, Universität Bonn Andrey ZayakinInstitute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics (ITEP), Moscow Tobias ZinggUniversity of Iceland Dimitrios ZoakosUniversidade de Santiago de Compostela Emanuele ZorzanUniversità di Milano Konstantinos ZoubosNiels Bohr Institute, København

  4. (Gas discharges and applications)

    SciTech Connect

    Sauers, I.

    1988-10-04

    The traveler attended the Ninth International Conference on Gas Discharges and Their Applications, which was held in Venice, Italy, on September 19--23, 1988; presented two papers, (1) Ion Chemistry in SF{sub 6} Corona'' and (2) Production of S{sub 2}F{sub 10} by SF{sub 6} Spark Discharge''; and participated in numerous discussions with conference participants on gas discharges related to his work on SF{sub 6}. The traveler visited the Centre de Physique Atomique at the University Paul Sabatier in Toulouse, France, to discuss with Dr. J. Casanovas his work on SF{sub 6} decomposition. Following that visit, the traveler visited the Laboratoire de Photoelectricite at the University of Dijon to discuss with Dr. J.-P. Goudonnet his work on surface studies and on the use of tunneling electron spectroscopy for the chemical analysis of surfaces.

  5. List of Participants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-11-01

    Mohab Abou ZeidVrije Universiteit, Brussel Joke AdamKatholieke Universiteit Leuven Nikolas AkerblomMax-Planck-Institut für Physik, München Luis Fernando Alday Utrecht University Stelios Alexandris University of Patras Antonio Amariti Università di Milano-Bicocca Nicola Ambrosetti Université de Neuchâtel Pascal Anastasopoulos Università di Roma Tor Vergata Laura Andrianopoli Enrico Fermi Center Carlo Angelantonj Università di Torino Lilia Anguelova Queen Mary, University of London Daniel AreanUniversidade de Santiago de Compostela Gleb ArutyunovUtrecht University Spyros Avramis NTU Athens—University of Patras Ioannis Bakas University of Patras Subrata Bal Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies Igor Bandos Valencia University Jessica Barrett University of Iceland Marco Baumgartl Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule, Zürich Jacopo Bechi Università di Firenze James Bedford Queen Mary, University of London Jorge Bellorin Universidad Autonoma de Madrid Francesco Benini SISSA, Trieste Eric Bergshoeff Centre for Theoretical Physics, University of Groningen Gaetano BertoldiUniversity of Wales, Swansea Adel Bilal Laboratoire de Physique Théorique, École Normale Superieure, Paris Matthias Blau Université de Neuchâtel Johannes BroedelUniversität Hannover Felix Brümmer Universität Heidelberg Julio Cesar Bueno de Andrade São Paulo State University—UNESP Cliff Burgess McMaster University Agostino Butti Laboratoire de Physique Théorique, École Normale Superieure, Paris Marco Caldarelli Universitat de Barcelona Pablo G Camara Centre de Physique Théorique, École Polytechnique, Palaiseau Joan Camps Universitat de Barcelona Felipe Canoura FernandezUniversidade de Santiago de Compostela Luigi Cappiello Università di Napoli Federico II Luca Carlevaro École Polytechnique, Palaiseau Roberto Casero Centre de Physique Théorique, École Polytechnique, Palaiseau Claudio Caviezel Max-Planck-Institut für Physik, München Alessio Celi Universitat de Barcelona Anna Ceresole Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare and Università di Torino Kang Sin Choi University of Bonn Michele Cirafici University of Patras Andres Collinucci Katholieke Universiteit Leuven Aldo Cotrone Universitat de Barcelona Ben Craps Vrije Universiteit, Brussel Stefano Cremonesi SISSA, Trieste Gianguido Dall'Agata Padova University Sanjit Das Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur Forcella Davide SISSA, Trieste Jose A de Azcarraga Valencia University and Instituto de Fìsica Corpuscular (CSIC-UVEG), Valencia Sophie de BuylInstitut des Hautes Études Scientifiques, Bures-sur-Yvette Jean-Pierre Derendinger Université de Neuchâtel Stephane Detournay Università Degli Studi di Milano Paolo Di Vecchia NORDITA, København Oscar Dias Universitat de Barcelona Vladimir Dobrev Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia Joel Ekstrand Department of Theoretical Physics, Uppsala University Federico Elmetti Università di Milano I Diaconu Eugen University of Craiova Oleg Evnin Vrije Universiteit, Brussel Bo Feng Imperial College, London Livia Ferro Università di Torino Pau Figueras Universitat de Barcelona Raphael Flauger University of Texas at Austin Valentina Forini Università di Perugia Angelos Fotopoulos Università di Torino Denis Frank Université de Neuchâtel Lisa Freyhult Albert-Einstein-Institut, Golm Carlos Fuertes Instituto de Física Teórica, Madrid Matthias Gaberdiel Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule, Zürich Maria Pilar Garcia del Moral Università di Torino Daniel Gerber Instituto de Física Teórica, Madrid Valentina Giangreco Marotta Puletti Uppsala University Joaquim Gomis Universitat de Barcelona Gianluca Grignani Università di Perugia Luca Griguolo Università di Parma Umut Gursoy École Polytechnique, Palaiseau and École Normale Supérieure, Paris Michael Haack Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, München Troels Harmark Niels Bohr Institute, København Alexander Haupt Imperial College, London Michal Heller Jagiellonian University, Krakow Samuli Hemming University of Iceland Yasuaki Hikida DESY, Hamburg Christian Hillmann Max-Planck-Institut für Gravitationsphysik, Potsdam Stephan Hoehne Max-Planck-Institut für Physik, München Gabriele Honecker CERN, Geneva Carlos Hoyos University of Wales, Swansea Mechthild Huebscher Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Madrid Matthias Ihl University of Texas at Austin Emiliano Imeroni University of Wales, Swansea Nikos Irges University of Crete Negru Iulian University of Craiova Matthias Kaminski Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, München Stefanos Katmadas Universiteit Utrecht Shoichi Kawamoto Oxford University Christoph Keller Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule, Zürich Arjan Keurentjes Vrije Universiteit, Brussel Sadi Khodaee Institute for Advanced Studies in Basic Sciences (IASBS), Zanjan, Iran Michael Kiermaier Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA Elias Kiritsis Centre de Physique Théorique, École Polytechnique, Palaiseau and University of Crete Ingo KirschEidgenössische Technische Hochschule, Zürich Johanna Knapp CERN, Geneva Paul Koerber Max-Planck-Institut für Physik, München Simon Koers Max-Planck-Institut für Physik, München Anatoly Konechny Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh Peter Koroteev Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics (ITEP), Moscow Daniel KreflLudwig-Maximilians-Universität and Max-Planck-Institut für Physik, München Chethan KrishnanUniversité Libre de Bruxelles Stanislav Kuperstein Université Libre de Bruxelles Alberto Lerda Università del Piemonte Orientale, Alessandria Roman Linares Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, Iztapalapa, México Maria A Lledo Universidad de Valencia Dieter Luest Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität and Max-Planck-Institut für Physik, München Joseph Lykken Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab), Batavia, IL Carlo Maccaferri Vrije Universiteit, Brussel Oscar Macia Universidad de Valencia Tristan Maillard Centre de Physique Théorique, École Polytechnique, Palaiseau Diego Mansi Università Degli Studi di Milano Matteo Marescotti Università del Piemonte Orientale, Alessandria Alberto Mariotti Università di Milano-Bicocca Raffaele Marotta Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Napoli Alessio Marrani Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare and LNF, Firenze Luca Martucci Instituto de Física Teórica, Madrid and Katholieke Universiteit Leuven David Mateos University of California, Santa Barbara Andrea Mauri Università di Milano Liuba Mazzanti Università di Milano-Bicocca Patrick Meessen Instituto de Física Teórica, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid Lotta Mether Helsinki Institute of Physics Rene Meyer Max-Planck-Institut für Physik, München Giuseppe Milanesi SISSA, Trieste Cesar Miquel-Espanya Universitat de Valencia and Instituto de Física Corpuscular, Valencia Alexander Monin Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics (ITEP), Moscow and Moscow State University (MSU) Samuel Monnier Université de Genève Sergio Montero Instituto de Física Teórica, Madrid Nicola Mori Università di Firenze Alexander Marcel Morisse University of California, Santa Cruz Sebastian Moster Max-Planck-Institut für Physik, München Adele Nasti Queen Mary, University of London Vasilis Niarchos École Polytechnique, Palaiseau Emil Nissimov Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, Sofia Francesco Nitti École Polytechnique, Palaiseau Eoin O'Colgain Imperial College, London Niels Obers Niels Bohr Institute, København Rodrigo Olea Università Degli Studi di Milano Marta Orselli Niels Bohr Institute, København Enrico PajerLudwig-Maximilians-Universität, München Eran PaltiOxford University Georgios PapathanasiouBrown University, Providence, RI Angel ParedesCentre de Physique Théorique, École Polytechnique, Palaiseau Jeong-Hyuck ParkMax-Planck-Institut für Physik, München Sara PasquettiUniversità di Parma Silvia PenatiUniversità di Milano-Bicocca Igor PesandoUniversità di Torino Marios PetropoulosÉcole Polytechnique, Palaiseau Roberto PettorinoUniversità di Napoli Federico II Franco PezzellaIstituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Napoli Moises Picon PonceIstituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Padova Marco PirroneUniversità di Milano-Bicocca Erik PlauschinnMax-Planck-Institut für Physik, München Andre PloeghCentre for Theoretical Physics, University of Groningen Giuseppe PolicastroLaboratoire de Physique Théorique, École Normale Superieure, Paris Josep PonsUniversitat de Barcelona S Prem KumarUniversity of Wales, Swansea Nikolaos PrezasCERN, Geneva Carlo Alberto RattiUniversità di Milano-Bicocca Riccardo RicciImperial College, London Alejandro RiveroEscuela Universitaria Politécnica de Teruel, Universidad de Zaragoza Irene RodriguezInstituto de Física Teórica, Madrid Maria Jose RodriguezUniversitat de Barcelona Diederik RoestUniversitat de Barcelona Alberto RomagnoniLaboratoire de Physique Théorique d'Orsay, Paris Christian RomelsbergerDublin Institute for Advanced Studies Jan RosseelKatholieke Universiteit Leuven Sebastiano RossiEidgenössische Technische Hochschule, Zürich Felix RustMax-Planck-Institut für Physik, München Cheol RyouPohang University of Science and Technology (POSTECH) Christian SaemannDublin Institute for Advanced Studies Houman Safaai SISSA, Trieste Alberto SantambrogioIstituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Milano Frank SaueressigUniversiteit Utrecht Ricardo SchiappaCERN, Geneva Cornelius Schmidt-ColinetEidgenössische Technische Hochschule, Zürich Maximilian Schmidt-SommerfeldMax-Planck-Institut für Physik, München Waldemar SchulginMax-Planck-Institut für Physik, München Claudio ScruccaUniversité de Neuchâtel Nathan SeibergInstitute of Advanced Studies, Princeton, NJ Domenico SeminaraUniversità di Firenze Alexander SevrinVrije Universiteit, Brussel Konstadinos SfetsosUniversity of Patras Kostas SiamposUniversity of Patras Christoph SiegUniversità Degli Studi di Milano Vaula Silvia Instituto de Física Teórica, Madrid Aaron Sim Imperial College, London Woojoo Sim Pohang University of Science and Technology (POSTECH) Sergey Slizovskiy Department of Theoretical Physics, Uppsala University Paul Smyth Katholieke Universiteit Leuven Corneliu Sochichiu Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati Dmitri Sorokin Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Padova Kellogg Stelle Imperial College, London Piotr Surowka Jagiellonian University, Krakow Yasutoshi Takayama Niels Bohr Institute, København Laura Tamassia Katholieke Universiteit Leuven Radu Tatar University of Liverpool Larus Thorlacius University of Iceland Paavo Tiitola Helsinki Institute of Physics Diego Trancanelli Stony Brook University, NY Michele TraplettiInstitut für Theoretische Physik, Universität Heidelberg Mario Trigiante Politecnico di Torino Angel Uranga CERN, Geneva and Instituto de Física Teórica, Madrid Roberto Valandro SISSA, Trieste Dieter Van den Bleeken Katholieke Universiteit Leuven Antoine Van Proeyen Katholieke Universiteit Leuven Thomas Van Riet Centre for Theoretical Physics, University of Groningen Pierre Vanhove Service de Physique Théorique, Saclay Oscar Varela Universidad de Valencia Alessandro Vichi Scuola Normale Superiore di Pisa Massimiliano VinconQueen Mary, University of London John Ward Queen Mary, University of London and CERN, Geneva Brian Wecht Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA Marlene Weiss Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule, Zürich and CERN, Geneva Sebastian Weiss Université de Neuchâtel Alexander Wijns Vrije Universiteit, Brussel Przemek Witaszczyk Jagiellonian University, Krakow Timm Wrase University of Texas at Austin Jun-Bao Wu SISSA, Trieste Amos Yarom Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, München Marco Zagermann Max-Planck-Institut für Physik, München Daniela Zanon Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Milano Andrea Zanzi University of Bonn Andrey Zayakin Moscow State University (MSU) and Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics (ITEP), Moscow Konstantinos Zoubos Queen Mary, University of London

  6. Robbing Peter to Pay Paul: The Case Against "Comparability"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walsh, Kate

    2007-01-01

    Two proposals in the bill currently circulating to reauthorize No Child Left Behind seem to be shoe-ins for making their way into federal law. The impetus behind both proposals is to help poor kids by making sure that districts spend as much money on them as gets spent on rich kids. Going against the grain, the National Council on Teacher Quality…

  7. MERIT Award Recipient: Paul A. Wender, Ph.D.

    Cancer.gov

    Our research program involves studies in chemistry, biology, and medicine. We place special emphasis on both the design of novel therapeutic drug candidates, and the development of new strategies for the efficient synthesis and evaluation of these molecules. The research supported by this grant is focused on molecules that are selected because of their unique biological activities and consequently their potential to lead to new therapeutics for treating cancer and other diseases.

  8. Landscape by Moonlight: Peter Paul Rubens and Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendillo, M.

    2016-01-01

    In the last years of his life, Rubens (1577–1640) lived happily with his wife and children on his Het Steen estate. During this period he worked and reworked a painting that had special meaning to him—Landscape by Moonlight (1635–40), now at the Courtauld Gallery in London. After a highly successful career painting religious and secular portraits, allegories, and occasional landscapes, Rubens put an extraordinary amount of effort into this final landscape. He was well known as a person who would commit to memory ideas and themes that he would use in future works. This paper reviews Rubens' attention to the visualization of nature, his personal connections to Elsheimer, Galileo, and Peiresc, and explores his possible depiction of constellations recalled from memory and placed within the cloudy skies in his Landscape by Moonlight.

  9. Deconstructing, Reconstructing, Preserving Paul E. Meehl's Legacy of Construct Validity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maher, Brendan A.; Gottesman, Irving I.

    2005-01-01

    The question of the status of cause-and-effect explanations of human behavior that posit physically existing causative factors and those that, on the other hand, posit hypothetical entities in the form of "useful fictions" has a long history. The influence of the works of Jeremy Bentham and Hans Vaihinger, as well as the later influence of Francis…

  10. Paul Pinsky, PhD | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  11. Paul Weiss and the genesis of canonical quantization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rickles, Dean; Blum, Alexander

    2015-10-01

    This paper describes the life and work of a figure who, we argue, was of primary importance during the early years of field quantisation and (albeit more indirectly) quantum gravity. A student of Dirac and Born, he was interned in Canada during the second world war as an enemy alien and after his release never seemed to regain a good foothold in physics, identifying thereafter as a mathematician. He developed a general method of quantizing (linear and non-linear) field theories based on the parameters labelling an arbitrary hypersurface. This method (the `parameter formalism' often attributed to Dirac), though later discarded, was employed (and viewed at the time as an extremely important tool) by the leading figures associated with canonical quantum gravity: Dirac, Pirani and Schild, Bergmann, DeWitt, and others. We argue that he deserves wider recognition for this and other innovations.

  12. E. Paul Torrance: His Life, Accomplishments, and Legacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hebert, Thomas P.; Cramond, Bonnie; Spiers Neumeister,Kristie L.; Millar, Garnet; Silvian, Alice F.

    2002-01-01

    E. P. Torrance: His Life, Accomplishments, and Legacy is a tribute to the renowned creativity researcher, university teacher, and mentor to numerous individuals throughout the world. This monograph is presented in three sections which include a discussion of Torrance's life, followed by an overview of his accomplishments, including his creativity…

  13. Hilary Putnam Interviewed by Naoko Saito and Paul Standish

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Philosophy of Education, 2014

    2014-01-01

    The interview, which took place on the eve of the 2012 American presidential election, coincides with the publication of three major works by or about Hilary Putnam. It begins and ends with the topic of science, drawing attention to science's profound importance but also to its contemporary forms of distortion. It explores Putnam's…

  14. Minneapolis and Saint Paul, Minnesota: Solar in Action (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-10-01

    This brochure provides an overview of the challenges and successes of Minneapolis, MN, a 2008 Solar America City awardee, on the path toward becoming a solar-powered community. Accomplishments, case studies, key lessons learned, and local resource information are given.

  15. Hilary Putnam Interviewed by Naoko Saito and Paul Standish

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Philosophy of Education, 2014

    2014-01-01

    The interview, which took place on the eve of the 2012 American presidential election, coincides with the publication of three major works by or about Hilary Putnam. It begins and ends with the topic of science, drawing attention to science's profound importance but also to its contemporary forms of distortion. It explores Putnam's…

  16. Agency in Paul and Implications for Adolescent Girls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peck-McClain, Emily A.

    2015-01-01

    Agency is a particular concern for ministry with adolescent girls because they rarely see themselves as subjects of their own lives. Human agency is often emphasized in churches as a way to explain human sinful action. As a population treated as objects by society, it is important for young women to embrace and exercise their agency in order to be…

  17. Reading Paul in the Light of Differing Frameworks of Thinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ehrensperger, Kathy

    2005-01-01

    In a not very distant past one method of interpretation has dominated New Testament (NT) studies almost totally. The historical-critical method and its application in so-called appropriate exegesis has often uncritically been perceived as the means via which "the original and thus right" understanding of a text could be found. More recently this…

  18. A New Digital Literacy: A Conversation with Paul Gilster.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pool, Carolyn R.

    1997-01-01

    Digital literacy, the ability to understand, evaluate, and integrate information in multiple, computer-delivered formats, is a critical skill. A multimedia computer with an Internet connection allows people to construct information from around the world. Virtual instruction is best used to supplement, not replace classroom teachers. Educators…

  19. Paul Weiss and the genesis of canonical quantization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rickles, Dean; Blum, Alexander

    2015-12-01

    This paper describes the life and work of a figure who, we argue, was of primary importance during the early years of field quantisation and (albeit more indirectly) quantum gravity. A student of Dirac and Born, he was interned in Canada during the second world war as an enemy alien and after his release never seemed to regain a good foothold in physics, identifying thereafter as a mathematician. He developed a general method of quantizing (linear and non-linear) field theories based on the parameters labelling an arbitrary hypersurface. This method (the `parameter formalism' often attributed to Dirac), though later discarded, was employed (and viewed at the time as an extremely important tool) by the leading figures associated with canonical quantum gravity: Dirac, Pirani and Schild, Bergmann, DeWitt, and others. We argue that he deserves wider recognition for this and other innovations.

  20. Agency in Paul and Implications for Adolescent Girls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peck-McClain, Emily A.

    2015-01-01

    Agency is a particular concern for ministry with adolescent girls because they rarely see themselves as subjects of their own lives. Human agency is often emphasized in churches as a way to explain human sinful action. As a population treated as objects by society, it is important for young women to embrace and exercise their agency in order to be…