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  1. Emergency Manual, Cornell University Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carey, Margaret; And Others

    The Committee on Safety and Emergencies of Cornell University Libraries compiled this loose-leaf guide to handling emergency situations within the Libraries. The first section lists emergency situations in alphabetical order and provides step-by-step procedures intended to minimize danger to life and property. The remaining sections deal with…

  2. Faculty Productivity in Supervising Doctoral Students' Dissertations at Cornell University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crosta, Peter M.; Packman, Iris G.

    This study used data on all PhDs produced during a 7-year period at Cornell University to investigate whether the degree of inequality in PhD student supervision across faculty members within a broad field of study varied across fields, also noting determinants of differences in PhD student supervision responsibilities across individual faculty…

  3. COBRA accelerator for Sandia ICF diode research at Cornell University

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.L.; Ingwersen, P.; Bennett, L.F.; Boyes, J.D.; Anderson, D.E.; Greenly, J.B.; Sudan, R.N.

    1995-05-01

    The new COBRA accelerator is being built in stages at the Laboratory of Plasma Studies in Cornell University where its applications will include extraction diode and ion beam research in support of the light ion inertial confinement fusion (ICF) program at Sandia National Laboratories. The 4- to 5-MV, 125- to 250-kA accelerator is based on a four-cavity inductive voltage adder (IVA) design. It is a combination of new ferromagnetically-isolated cavities and self magnetically insulated transmission line (MITL) hardware and components from existing Sandia and Cornell facilities: Marx generator capacitors, hardware, and power supply from the DEMON facility; water pulse forming lines (PFL) and gas switch from the Subsystem Test Facility (STF); a HERMES-III intermediate store capacitor (ISC); and a modified ion diode from Cornell`s LION. The present accelerator consists of a single modified cavity similar to those of the Sandia SABRE accelerator and will be used to establish an operating system for the first stage initial lower voltage testing. Four new cavities will be fabricated and delivered in the first half of FY96 to complete the COBRA accelerator. COBRA is unique in the sense that each cavity is driven by a single pulse forming line, and the IVA output polarity may be reversed by rotating the cavities 180{degrees} about their vertical axis. The site preparations, tank construction, and diode design and development are taking place at Cornell with growing enthusiasm as this machine becomes a reality. Preliminary results with the single cavity and short positive inner cylinder MITL configuration will soon be available.

  4. COBRA accelerator for Sandia ICF diode research at Cornell University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, David L.; Ingwersen, Pete; Bennett, Lawrence F.; Boyes, John D.; Anderson, David E.; Greenly, John B.; Sudan, Ravi N.

    The new COBRA accelerator is being built in stages at the Laboratory of Plasma Studies in Cornell University where its applications will include extraction diode and ion beam research in support of the light ion inertial confinement fusion (ICF) program at Sandia National Laboratories. The 4- to 5-MV, 125- to 250-kA accelerator is based on a four-cavity inductive voltage adder (IVA) design. It is a combination of new ferromagnetically-isolated cavities and self magnetically insulated transmission line (MITL) hardware and components from existing Sandia and Cornell facilities: Marx generator capacitors, hardware, and power supply from the DEMON facility; water pulse forming lines (PFL) and gas switch from the Subsystem Test Facility (STF); a HERMES-3 intermediate store capacitor (ISC); and a modified ion diode from Cornell's LION. The present accelerator consists of a single modified cavity similar to those of the Sandia SABRE accelerator and will be used to establish an operating system for the first stage initial lower voltage testing. Four new cavities will be fabricated and delivered in the first half of FY96 to complete the COBRA accelerator. COBRA is unique in the sense that each cavity is driven by a single pulse forming line, and the IVA output polarity may be reversed by rotating the cavities 180(degrees) about their vertical axis. The site preparations, tank construction, and diode design and development are taking place at Cornell with growing enthusiasm as this machine becomes a reality. Preliminary results with the single cavity and short positive inner cylinder MITL configuration will soon be available.

  5. ``Curious About Astronomy?": Cornell University's Ask an Astronomer Website

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carruba, V.; Carter, L. M.; Cuk, M.; Jackson, M. A.; Jordan, C. E.; Krco, M.; Masters, K. L.; Pandian, J. D.; Rothstein, D. M.; Saintonge, A.; Scharringhausen, B. R.; Spekkens, K.; Springob, C. M.; Kornreich, D. A.; Curious Team

    2002-12-01

    ``Curious About Astronomy? Ask an Astronomer" is a website (http://curious.astro.cornell.edu) run by graduate and undergraduate student volunteers at Cornell University. Questions from the general public, submitted either by email or using a convenient web form, are answered by members of the Curious Team, and particularly interesting questions are posted on the website for visitors to browse. We receive and answer a few hundred questions each month from people of diverse backgrounds, including K-12 and post-secondary students and instructors, amateur astronomers, parents, scientists in various fields and others around the world with an interest in astronomy. We have recently upgraded the website, creating 22 different sections about specific topics in astronomy, a searchable index of hundreds of cross-listed questions and a page of suggestions and guidelines for teachers. The Curious Page has already become a source of useful information for the public. Questions and answers about the so-called ``Moon Hoax" and a recent news article about the Sun going supernova have received thousands of hits. By offering individual responses about any aspect of astronomy to anyone who has Internet access and by continually updating our archive of answered questions, we hope to provide a unique, growing astronomy resource for students, educators and the general public---as well as a valuable opportunity for the Curious Team to participate in educational outreach and improve its communication skills in a setting that requires no formal budget or faculty supervision.

  6. Energy-recovery linac project at Cornell University.

    PubMed

    Bilderback, Donald H; Bazarov, I V; Finkelstein, K; Gruner, S M; Padamsee, H S; Sinclair, C K; Shen, Q; Talman, R; Tigner, M; Krafft, G A; Merminga, L

    2003-09-01

    There is considerable interest in using superconducting electron linacs with energy recovery as synchrotron radiation sources. Such energy recovery linacs (ERLs) would open new regimes of X-ray science because they are capable of producing ultra-brilliant X-ray beams [>5 x 10(22) photons s(-1) (0.1% bandwidth)(-1) mm(-2) mrad(-2) at 10 keV], maintaining a very small source size ( approximately 3 micro m r.m.s.) suitable for micro X-ray beams, and making very intense fast ( approximately 100 fs) X-ray pulses. Each of these characteristics would permit the execution of experiments that are not feasible with existing synchrotron sources. Many technical issues must be satisfactorily resolved before the potential of a full-scale ERL can be realised, including the generation of high average current (10 to 100 mA), high-brightness electron beams (0.015 to 0.15 nm rad emittances, respectively); acceleration of these beams to energies of 5-7 GeV without unacceptable emittance degradation; stable and efficient operation of superconducting linear accelerators at very high gradients etc. Cornell University, in collaboration with Jefferson Laboratory, has proposed to resolve these issues by the construction of a 100 MeV, 100 mA prototype ERL. The intention is to then utilize the information that is learned from the prototype to propose the construction of a full-scale ERL light source. PMID:12944617

  7. Slide Library of the History of Art Department, Cornell University: Classification and Retrieval System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nemethy, Judith

    A study was conducted to develop a retrieval system for slides in the History of Art Collection at Cornell University to make it more consistent and easier for patrons from other academic disciplines to use than the system currently in use. To determine whether slide library systems at other institutions could be adapted to the History of Art…

  8. Cornell University's Entrepreneurship Education & Outreach Program: Evaluation and Proposal. A White Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlough, Charles; Streeter, Deborah H.

    In 1997-1999, the Department of Agriculture, Resource, and Managerial Economics of Cornell University's College of Agriculture and Life Sciences conducted an entrepreneurship education and outreach program that was based on the Premier FastTrac Curriculum, which is a model delivery tool for entrepreneurship education. In 1997-1998, the program was…

  9. $35-Million Helps Cornell University Recruit Faculty and Ward off Poachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    June, Audrey Williams

    2008-01-01

    When it comes to building a top-notch faculty, racing to land prominent scholars is only half the battle for colleges. The other half: Fighting off poachers intent on swiping the college's existing talented mid-career professors. At Cornell University, a $35-million gift announced by officials in late September will give the institution an edge in…

  10. Educating the Employee Assistance Professional: Cornell University's Employee Assistance Education and Research Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quick, R. C.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Outlines Cornell University's Employee Assistance Education and Research Program, which uses an academic curriculum and field experience to further develop the Employee Assistance Program (EAP) profession. Addresses the dilemma of personnel executives in ensuring quality in EAP programs and staff. (JOW)

  11. Evaluation of a Computer-Based Cataloging Support System for Use by the Cornell University Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koehler, David W.; Shrut, Barry N.

    Cornell University Libraries maintains one central technical services processing department which processes all material for endowed division libraries. It is divided into four functional departments: acquisitions, serials, cataloging, and catalog maintenance. This report is concerned with the latter two functions. The present manual system of…

  12. Cornell University's Homeless Program: The "Give and Take" Process of Service-Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hales, Ann

    1996-01-01

    Describes a service-learning program at Cornell University's School of Hotel Administration that provides courses and community service activities related to homelessness and hunger. Reviews the program's three components: a course on housing and feeding the homeless, industry linkages, and a research and advocacy center. Presents student…

  13. The Opportunities Map at Cornell University: finding direction in dairy production medicine.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Hilda M; Nydam, Daryl V; Reyher, Kristen; Gilbert, Robert O

    2004-01-01

    Discussion between faculty and interested students revealed the existence of a multitude of opportunities in dairy production medicine at the College of Veterinary Medicine at Cornell University. Many of these were not well known to students, or even to some of the faculty, and the means of accessing specific learning experiences were sometimes obscure. Together, an informal group of faculty, students, and alumni set about cataloging available educational opportunities, resulting in a 31-page publication referred to as the "Opportunities Map." Essentially a student handbook for production medicine students, the Opportunities Map at Cornell helps guide the travel of food animal-interested students through the curriculum without missing the important highlights along the way. The map was originally developed to chronicle the opportunities and resources available to students, but it has also been used to foster face-to-face communications between students and faculty, to welcome incoming students with production animal interests, and to provide a baseline description for further discussion about the curriculum. PMID:15551234

  14. Task Force on the Future of the Cornell University Libraries Card Catalogs. Report #1: Recommendations and Future Agenda, Appendices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jebb, Marcia; And Others

    A task force was set up in September 1975 to develop short and long range planning guidelines for decisions affecting future catalogs at Cornell University Libraries (CUL). This report presents summaries of studies by this group, focusing on developments at the Library of Congress and other research libraries; cost analysis, current status…

  15. High-flux x-ray undulator radiation from proposed B factory storage rings at Cornell University

    SciTech Connect

    Bilderback, D.H.; Batterman, B.W.; Bedzyk, M.J.; Brock, J.; Finkelstein, K.; Headrick, R.; Shen, Q. )

    1992-01-01

    Two intersecting storage rings (8 GeV, 1 A and 3.5 GeV, 2 A) have been proposed to be built at Cornell University to enhance both the production of {ital B} mesons and synchrotron radiation. Exceedingly high x-ray flux from 3-m long undulators will be the new feature of a {ital B} factory for the CHESS laboratory. The flux produced integrated over the central cone of radiation can be as much as an order of magnitude higher than from the third-generation storage rings (now under construction) operating at 0.1 A.

  16. The Bias Response Program at Cornell University: A Metric for Diversity Initiatives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chappell-Williams, Lynette

    2007-01-01

    As universities strive to create an inclusive environment and ensure a fair and pleasant working climate for all individuals, new strategies must be developed for tracking and responding to issues that do not rise to the level of discriminatory action but nonetheless impact the university's commitment to diversity. This article examines Cornell…

  17. Arabidopsis Thaliana and Zea Mays Data from the Plant Proteome Database (PPDB) at Cornell University

    DOE Data Explorer

    The main objective is to provide a centralized, curated, data deposit for predicted and experimentally determined proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana and maize (Zea mays), their annotated functions, as well as their experimental and predicted molecular and biophysical properties. Importantly, information from mass spectrometry-based identifications is available for each identified protein accession; this will allow the database user to determine the significance the experimental identification and also evaluate information of post-translational modification. Multiple search methods are provided so that the user can retrieve information based on gene identification number, functional annotation or various protein properties. Initiated in 2004, PPDB was originally dedicated to plant plastids, but has now expanded to the whole plant proteome. The database includes data generated in Cornell labs, external published data sets, and deposited data from contributors.[Taken from PPDB website at http://ppdb.tc.cornell.edu/introduction.aspx

  18. A Co-Investigator Proposal for the Cornell University CAPER Rocket: Cleft Accelerated Plasma Experiment Rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnoldy, Roger L.

    2001-01-01

    The objectives are: 1) To support the Cornell wave instruments in a study of dayside ion outflow. 2) In conjunction with the U. of Alaska ground optical data, a prime objective was to measure the topside Cusp ion spectra responsible for dayside proton aurora. If such a correlative measurement could be made, then monitoring of this cusp precipitation from the ground could be routinely achieved. The nature of Cusp ions has and will continue to provide information about dayside magnetic reconnection. 3) A third objective was to study the dayside microburst electron precipitation from the BPS/CPS population. The Scifer rocket flight showed a bursty electron population at 1000 km altitude correlated closely with pulsation ground aurora on closed field lines. The frequency of this pulsating aurora is about 1 Hz. Ground pulsation measurements have recorded dayside bursts of Pc1 waves which could very well be the source of the electrons responsible for the pulsating aurora. In support of the Caper flight, UNH provided ground induction antennas to measure the equatorial Pc1 waves that might be dumping trapped electrons from the Central Plasma Sheet population. The Caper flight was launched on the last day of the window and all the Cornell and UNH instrumentation worked perfectly. Unfortunately the rocket trajectory flew very far to the west of the ground site at Longyearbyen missing conjugacy by several hundred kilometers. This meant the intended aurora was not crossed and all the ground experiments were far from being near the foot print of the rocket ruling out correlative science. The "miss" was primarily due to a decision during the countdown by the Andoya Rocket Range to move the azimuth of the rocket to the west to avoid Norwegian fishing boats at the splash point of the first two stages, and to make matters worse, the dispersion of the fourth stage of the rocket added entirely in this direction. Although no publications have resulted from the UNH data up to this

  19. Literacy in Action: A Carbon-Neutral Field Program at Cornell University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, A.; Derry, L.

    2010-12-01

    The Cornell Earth and Environmental Systems (EES) Field Program is a semester-length undergraduate field program located on the island of Hawai`i. The Hawaiian Islands are the world’s most dynamic natural laboratory and the premier location for Earth systems research and education. While there are compelling reasons for students and faculty to travel from the US mainland to Hawai`i, the air and ground travel that comprises the program carries a large carbon footprint. This liability is also an extraordinary educational opportunity. For the past two years EES students have been challenged to make the program carbon-neutral. They are asked to devise a set of criteria for a credible and defensible zero-CO2 footprint and then to put their plan into action. The C-neutral project consists of three elements: (1) quantifying CO2 emissions, (2) reducing emissions wherever possible, and (3) offsetting emissions that cannot be eliminated. In quantifying emissions six areas are identified: air travel, ground travel, domestic electricity, natural gas, food, and waste. Emissions reductions include all of the standard “carpool--turn it down--turn it off “ conservation behaviors, with special emphasis on food and waste; eating local and organic, shopping at re-use centers, and compost and recycling of garbage. Our program facility utilizes solar hot water and is equipped with neither heat nor air conditioning, thus domestic energy use is low. Students tabulate all of our energy use and calculate the resulting CO2 emissions for all program participants for a period of four months. The CO2 offsetting strategy is conducted in collaboration with a native ecosystem restoration project. Students participate in all aspects of forest restoration, including seed collection, germination and outplanting of native plant species and removal of invasive pest species. The initial goal of this locally-supported project was to restore degraded pasture to native forest. The EES students have

  20. The Design and Construction of a Cold Neutron Source for Use in the Cornell University Triga Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Lydia Jane

    A cold neutron source has been designed and constructed for insertion into the 6"-radial beam port of the Cornell University TRIGA reactor for use with a neutron guide tube system. The main differences between this cold source and other existing sources are the use of heat conduction as the method of cooling and the use of mesitylene (1,3,5 -trimethylbenzene; melting point, 228(DEGREES)K; boiling point, 437(DEGREES)K) as the moderating material. This thesis describes the design and construction details of the cold neutron source, discusses its safety aspects, and presents its cryogenic performance curves and also the results of a test of its neutron moderating ability. A closed-cycle helium gas refrigerator, located outside the reactor shielding, cools the 500 cm('3) moderator chamber and its surrounding heat shield by heat conduction through two meters of copper and rod tubing. Moderator temperatures of 23 (+OR-) 3(DEGREES)K have been achieved. Mesitylene, a hydrocarbon, is an effective cold moderator because even at low temperatures the weakly hindered rotational motions of its methyl groups enable the absorption of small amounts of energy ((LESSTHEQ) 0.005 eV) from neutrons. The use of mesitylene simplifies the cold source design because it is a liquid at room temperature and thus, the usual design safeguards required for sources using gaseous moderators are not necessary. Moreover, the flammability of mesitylene is much smaller than that of hydrogen and methane, which are the commonly used cold moderators. A method of transferring and handling the mesitylene, a carcinogen, was devised to ensure minimal contact with this substance. To test the neutron moderating ability of the cold neutron source, an out-of-reactor neutron transmission experiment was performed with the moderator chamber first at room temperature and then at about 23(DEGREES)K. The results indicate that the neutron energy spectrum is strongly shifted to lower energies when the chamber is cold

  1. Skin diseases in the alpaca (Vicugna pacos): a literature review and retrospective analysis of 68 cases (Cornell University 1997-2006).

    PubMed

    Scott, Danny W; Vogel, Jeff W; Fleis, Rebekah I; Miller, William H; Smith, Mary C

    2011-02-01

    This retrospective study describes 68 alpacas with skin diseases investigated from 1997 through 2006 at Cornell University. During this time period, 40 of 715 (5.6%) alpacas presented to the university hospital had dermatological diseases. In addition, skin-biopsy specimens accounted for 86 of 353 (24.4%) of alpaca biopsy specimens submitted to the diagnostic laboratory, and of these 86 specimens, follow-up was available for 28 cases. The following diseases were most common: bacterial infections (22%); neoplasms, cysts and hamartomas (19%); presumed immunological disorders (12%); and ectoparasitisms (10%). Conditions described for the first time included intertrigo, collagen and hair follicle hamartomas, lymphoma, hybrid follicular cysts, melanocytoma, anagen defluxion, telogen defluxion, presumed insect-bite hypersensitivity, ichthyosis, and possible hereditary bilateral aural haematomas and chondritis. The results of the retrospective study are compared and contrasted with the results of a literature review. PMID:20825592

  2. Cornell University Libraries. A Final Report from the Public Services Research Projects. Appropriate Public Services for Agricultural Research Faculty. One of a Series of Self-Studies and Research Projects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olsen, Jan Kennedy; And Others

    This paper reports a self-study undertaken at Cornell University's Albert R. Mann Library to explore appropriate public services for an agricultural research faculty. The study took place over a 22-month period and involved a literature review, development of a questionnaire, administration of the questionnaire, an experimental period of…

  3. The Hospital for Special Surgery affiliates with Cornell University Medical College and New York Hospital, 1951; Philip D. Wilson retires as Surgeon-in-Chief, 1955.

    PubMed

    Levine, David B

    2009-09-01

    When World War II ended in 1945, the Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS), the oldest orthopedic hospital in the country, was entering its eighth decade. Only 5 years previously, its name was changed from the Hospital for the Ruptured and Crippled (R & C). In 1934, Dr. Philip D. Wilson (1886-1969) had been recruited to fill the office of the fifth Surgeon-in-Chief with a key charge to restore the hospital as the leading orthopedic institution in our country, a role it originally held for over half a century since its founding in 1863. Wilson believed that a close affiliation with a university center having a medical school and hospital, while maintaining independence, was vital to achieve this objective. In 1948, negotiations between representatives of the Board of the New York Society for the Relief of the Ruptured and Crippled and representatives of the Society of the New York Hospital and Cornell Medical Center began and a preliminary written agreement was reached in March, the next year. The affiliation called for construction of a new building to house approximately 170 inpatient beds for orthopedics and arthritis. The land on the East River between 70th and 71st Streets, owned by New York Hospital, was to be given, without monetary exchange, to the Hospital for Special Surgery for construction of its new hospital. Finally, on November 1, 1951, a new non-proximate agreement was ratified. On May 25, 1955, after 43 years at 321 East 42nd Street, the Hospital for Special Surgery moved to its new six million dollar building at 535 East 70th Street where it formally became affiliated with New York Hospital-Cornell Medical Center. Two months later, on July 1, 1955, Philip D. Wilson retired as Surgeon-in-Chief to become the Hospital for Special Surgery's new Director of Research and Surgeon-in-Chief Emeritus. PMID:19506964

  4. Cornell University remote sensing program. [New York

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liang, T.; Mcnair, A. J.; Philipson, W. R. (Principal Investigator)

    1978-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Available aerial photographs were used to characterize mosquito breeding sites in Oswego County, New York. Numerous wetlands are contained within this county; this area is the only inland area in North America to have confirmed outbreaks of eastern equine encephalitis. This photocharacterization of primary mosquito breeding sites will be used to develop effective spraying. Large scale color and color infrared aerial photographs were used to assess changes in aquatic vegetation that accompanied phosphorus reduction in an eutrophic lake in New York.

  5. Future-Search Conferences at Cornell University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warzynski, Chester C.

    2004-01-01

    A future-search conference is a participatory planning and decision-making process in which a group of individuals with diverse perspectives come together; engage in a process of data collection, discussion, and learning; and decide on an appropriate course of action. The competencies, skills, and intellectual capital developed as part of this…

  6. Innovative Universities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barsi, Louis M.; Kaebnick, Gweneth W.

    1989-01-01

    The phenomenon of innovation within the university is examined, noting the possibility of innovation as a key to college vitality. A study was conducted using a group of institutions that demonstrated recent innovative spirit. Members of the American Association of State Colleges and Universities (AASCU), each has been recognized in an annual…

  7. University Futures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Recent radical changes to university education in England have been discussed largely in terms of the arrangements for transferring funding from the state to the student as consumer, with little discussion of what universities are for. It is important, while challenging the economic rationale for the new system, to resist talking about higher…

  8. Overseas Universities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Inter-University Council for Higher Education Overseas, London (England).

    The following articles and reports are presented in this publication of "Overseas Universities:""Appropriate Technology and University Education," by John Twidell; "The Training of Engineering Staff for Higher Education Institutions in Developing Countries," by D. W. Daniel, C. A. Leal, J. H. Maynes and T. Wilmore; "A Case Study of an Academic…

  9. University Architecture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Brian

    This book explores how universities relate their built environment to academic discourse, asserting that the character of universities is often a charming dialogue between order and disarray. It contains numerous photographs and building plans for example campuses throughout the world. In part 1, "The Campus," chapters are: (1) "Academic Mission…

  10. Challenged Universities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillis, Malcolm

    1995-01-01

    Pricing and financial aid issues affecting research universities, particularly private universities, are examined, including underpricing of services, decentralization, and diversification of higher education in the United States. The growth of federal regulation is also considered, especially the State Postsecondary Review Entities (SPREs)…

  11. Universal Expansion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McArdle, Heather K.

    1997-01-01

    Describes a week-long activity for general to honors-level students that addresses Hubble's law and the universal expansion theory. Uses a discrepant event-type activity to lead up to the abstract principles of the universal expansion theory. (JRH)

  12. Our Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, Alan

    2001-03-01

    The Universe in which we live is unimaginably vast and ancient, with countless star systems, galaxies, and extraordinary phenomena such as black holes, dark matter, and gamma ray bursts. What phenomena remain mysteries, even to seasoned scientists? Our Universe is a fascinating collection of essays by some of the world's foremost astrophysicists. Some are theorists, some computational modelers, some observers, but all offer their insights into the most cutting-edge, difficult, and curious aspects of astrophysics. Compiled, the essays describe more than the latest techniques and findings. Each of the ten contributors offers a more personal perspective on their work, revealing what motivates them and how their careers and lives have been shaped by their desire to understand our universe. S. Alan Stern is Director of the Department of Space Studies at Southwest Research Institute in Boulder, Colorado. He is a planetary scientist and astrophysicist with both observational and theoretical interests. Stern is an avid pilot and a principal investigator in NASA's planetary research program, and he was selected to be a NASA space shuttle mission specialist finalist. He is the author of more than 100 papers and popular articles. His most recent book is Pluto & Charon (Wiley, 1997). Contributors: Dr. John Huchra, Harvard University Dr. Esther Hu, University of Hawaii, Honolulu Dr. John Mather, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Dr. Nick Gnedin, University of Colorado, Boulder Dr. Doug Richstone, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor Dr. Bohdan Paczynski, Princeton University, NJ Dr. Megan Donahue, Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD Dr. Jerry Ostriker, Princeton University, New Jersey G. Bothun, University of Oregon, Eugene

  13. Universe Awareness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankatsing Nava, Tibisay; Russo, Pedro

    2015-08-01

    Universe Awareness (UNAWE) is an educational programme coordinated by Leiden University that uses the beauty and grandeur of the Universe to encourage young children, particularly those from an underprivileged background, to have an interest in science and technology and foster their sense of global citizenship from the earliest age.UNAWE's twofold vision uses our Universe to inspire and motivate very young children: the excitement of the Universe provides an exciting introduction to science and technology, while the vastness and beauty of the Universe helps broaden the mind and stimulate a sense of global citizenship and tolerance. UNAWE's goals are accomplished through four main activities: the coordination of a global network of more than 1000 astronomers, teachers and educators from more than 60 countries, development of educational resources, teacher training activities and evaluation of educational activities.Between 2011 and 2013, EU-UNAWE, the European branch of UNAWE, was funded by the European Commission to implement a project in 5 EU countries and South Africa. This project has been concluded successfully. Since then, the global project Universe Awareness has continued to grow with an expanding international network, new educational resources and teacher trainings and a planned International Workshop in collaboration with ESA in October 2015, among other activities.

  14. Plasma universe

    SciTech Connect

    Alfven, H.

    1986-09-01

    A model based on the emissions and behavior of the most prevalent material in the universe leads one to view the world as an active and rapidly changing place, and helps one analyze the development of its components.

  15. Universal Truths.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horgan, John

    1990-01-01

    Described is a symposium of Nobel laureates held in the summer of 1990 to discuss cosmology. Different views on the structure and evolution of the universe are presented. Evidence for different theories of cosmology is discussed. (CW)

  16. Einstein's Universe.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlson, Eric; Wald, Robert

    1979-01-01

    Presents a guide to be used by students and teachers in conjunction with a television program about Einstein. Provides general information about special and general relativity, and the universe. Includes questions for discussion after each section and a bibliography. (MA)

  17. Eternal Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wetterich, C.

    2014-08-01

    We discuss cosmological models for an eternal Universe. Physical observables show no singularity from the infinite past to the infinite future. While the Universe is evolving, there is no beginning and no end—the Universe exists forever. The early state of inflation is described in two different, but equivalent pictures. In the freeze frame the Universe emerges from an almost static state with flat geometry. After entropy production it shrinks and "thaws" slowly from a "freeze state" with extremely low temperature. The field transformation to the second "big bang picture" (Einstein frame) is singular. This "field singularity" is responsible for an apparent singularity of the big bang. Furthermore, we argue that past-incomplete geodesics do not necessarily indicate a singularity or beginning of the Universe. Proper time ceases to be a useful concept for physical time if particles become massless. We propose to define physical time by counting the number of zeros of a component of the wave function. This counting is independent of the choice of coordinates and frames, and applies to massive and massless particles alike.

  18. Plasma universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alfven, H.

    1986-01-01

    Traditionally the views on the cosmic environent have been based on observations in the visual octave of the electromagnetic spectrum, during the last half-century supplemented by infrared and radio observations. Space research has opened the full spectrum. Of special importance are the X-ray-gamma-ray regions, in which a number of unexpected phenomena have been discovered. Radiations in these regions are likely to originate mainly from magnetised cosmic plasmas. Such a medium may also emit synchrotron radiation which is observable in the radio region. If a model of the universe is based on the plasma phenomena mentioned it is found that the plasma universe is drastically different from the traditional visual universe. Information about the plasma universe can also be obtained by extrapolation of laboratory experiments and magnetospheric in situ measurements of plasmas. This approach is possible because it is likely that the basic properties of plasmas are the same everywhere. In order to test the usefulness of the plasma universe model it is applied to cosmogony. Such an approach seems to be rather successful. For example, the complicated structure of the Saturnian C ring can be accounted for. It is possible to reconstruct certain phenomena 4 to 5 billions of years ago with an accuracy of better than 1%.

  19. University Citizenship.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kleinsasser, Audrey M.

    2002-01-01

    When called to serve on committees and take on other assignments outside their job descriptions, many educators run in the other direction. How can this work be reframed so educators can play a positive and active role as university citizens? This kind of involvement must be nurtured by all those on campus who play a leadership role. (Author)

  20. Universal Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rydeen, James E.

    1999-01-01

    Examines universal school design that is both user-friendly for all students and compliant with the Americans with Disabilities Act. This approach provides the basic functional design issues for easy traffic control, as well as orientation and classrooms that are adaptable to future curricular changes. Discusses new standards that impact design…

  1. New Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burgett, Bruce

    2011-01-01

    The public-private alliance signals a future in which self-serving agreements could become the coin of the realm. Such a future would be a betrayal of the historical promise of public universities to innovate in ways that expand access to higher education. Given the rise of market-based models in educational policy circles, the threat of the…

  2. University Builders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pearce, Martin

    This publication explores a diverse collection of new university buildings. Ranging from the design of vast new campuses, such as that by Wilford and Stirling at Temasek, Singapore, through to the relatively modest yet strategically important, such as the intervention by Allies and Morrison at Southampton, this book examines the new higher…

  3. Widener University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valesey, Brigitte; Allen, Jo

    2009-01-01

    Founded in 1821, Widener University is a two-state (Pennsylvania and Delaware), four-campus, eight-college private institution serving approximately 6,700 students. Following arrival of the new senior vice president and provost in 2004 and subsequent reorganization of vice presidential responsibilities, Student Affairs is now led by a dean of…

  4. Universities 2035

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thrift, Nigel

    2016-01-01

    This paper examines the future of Western higher education. Situated midway between an analysis and a polemic, it concerns itself with how we might begin to actively design the universities of the future. That will require a productionist account of higher education which is so far sadly lacking. But there are signs that such an account might be…

  5. Expanding Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrödinger, E.

    2011-02-01

    Preface; Part I. The de Sitter Universe: 1. Synthetic construction; 2. The reduced model: geodesics; 3. The elliptic interpretation; 4. The static frame; 5. The determination of parallaxes; 6. The Lemaître-Robertson frame; Part II. The Theory of Geodesics: 7. On null geodesics; i. Determination of the parameter for null lines in special cases; ii. Frequency shift; 8. Free particles and light rays in general expanding spaces, flat or hyperspherical; i. Flat spaces; ii. Spherical spaces; iii. The red shift for spherical spaces; Part III. Waves in General Riemannian Space-Time: 9. The nature of our approximation; 10. The Hamilton-Jacobi theory in a gravitational field; 11. Procuring approximate solutions of the Hamilton-Jacobi equation from wave theory; Part IV. Waves in an Expanding Universe: 12. General considerations; 13. Proper vibrations and wave parcels; Bibliography.

  6. University lobbying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richman, Barbara T.

    In the past year, an increasing number of individual academic institutions have lobbied in Congress for new science facilities funds thus circumventing the traditional peer review process of evaluating the merits of such facilities. As an attempt to stem this rising tide, the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) governing council and the Association of American Universities (AAU) recently and independently issued strong statements condemning lobbying by individual universities and enthusiastically supporting the peer review system.“Informed peer judgments on the scientific merits of specific proposals, in open competition, should be a central element in the awarding of all federal funds for science,” the NAS resolution stated. AAU, meanwhile, implored “scientists, leaders of America's universities, and members of Congress” to “refrain from actions that would make scientific decisions a test of political influence rather than a judgment on the quality of the work to be done.” Roughly 50 research institutions constitute AAU; the two AAU Canadian members did not vote on the consortium's statement.

  7. Collection of University Loans. A New Alternative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seal, John C.

    1975-01-01

    Discusses the deterrent effect large loans may have on a student's choice of college or vocation and presents the Yale Tuition Postponement Plan, the Duke University Tuition Plan, and the Cornell Piolot Tuition Program, and formulates a new approach to tuition postponement. (PG)

  8. Recapturing the Universal in the University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnett, Ronald

    2005-01-01

    The idea of "the university" has stood for universal themes--of knowing, of truthfulness, of learning, of human development, and of critical reason. Through its affirming and sustaining of such themes, the university came itself to stand for universality in at least two senses: the university was neither partial (in its truth criteria) nor local…

  9. Open University

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2011-04-25

    Michel Pentz est née en Afrique du Sud et venu au Cern en 1957 comme physicien et président de l'associaion du personnel. Il est également fondateur du mouvement Antiapartheid de Genève et a participé à la fondation de l'Open University en Grande-Bretagne. Il nous parle des contextes pédagogiques, culturels et nationaux dans lesquels la méthode peut s'appliquer.

  10. Purdue University

    SciTech Connect

    Daly, P.; Grabowski, Z.; Mayer, R.H.

    1995-08-01

    The Purdue University group, including several thesis students, is working on a measurement of high-spin nuclear states at ATLAS. They use in-beam gamma-ray techniques to investigate several aspects of nuclear structure at high spin, testing the validity of shell-model calculations for high-spin-yrast states near Z = 50. The nuclei are produced via deep inelastic reactions, rather than with the more conventional fusion reactions. This technique allows the study of neutron-rich nuclei that cannot be studied by other means. The group is studying proton-rich nuclei with N{approximately}82 using the FMA and an electron spectrometer. Furthermore, D. Nisius is a Ph.D. student, resident at ANL, performing his thesis work under the supervision of R.V.F. Janssens.

  11. Start-Up Costs in American Research Universities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ehrenberg, Ronald G.; Rizzo, Michael J.; Condie, Scott S.

    This report briefly summarizes findings from the 2002 Cornell Higher Education Research Institute survey of start-up costs at the over 220 universities classified as research and doctoral universities by the Carnegie Foundation in 1994. It reports the mean start-up cost packages across institutions for new assistant professors and senior faculty,…

  12. Women at Cornell - The Myth of Equal Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conable, Charlotte Williams

    The history of women at Cornell is presented. First, the origins of coeducation at Cornell are explored. The commitment of the university to women as well as men is analyzed in the context of the social climate of the nineteenth century, particularly in central New York State, as well as the goals of those individuals who established the…

  13. The Value of Wilderness Orientation Programs at Colleges and Universities in the United States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gass, Michael A.

    A 1983 mail survey identified 34 universities and colleges utilizing the wilderness environment as a means to indoctrinate students into a school setting and resulted in: (1) the creation of a networking system of these institutions; (2) the identification of the University of Missouri at Columbia, Cornell University, Towson State University,…

  14. New Feminism on a University Campus: From Job Equality to Female Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tobias, Sheila

    In her speech to the Symposium on Feminism, the author relates the growth and accomplishments of the women's movement at Cornell University. When the author first went to Cornell, not only were no women on tenure in the history, government, economics, English, physics, chemistry and math departments, but pride was taken that there had never been…

  15. University School at the University of Tulsa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hollingsworth, Patricia

    2004-01-01

    This article features the University School at The University of Tulsa, which was established in 1982 as a private, full-school program for gifted students from age 3 through 8th grade. The mission of the University School is to serve as a local and national model of excellence in gifted education. The goal is for students to maximize their…

  16. University Handbook. University of Wisconsin, Whitewater.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisconsin Univ., Whitewater.

    The University of Wisconsin-Whitewater's handbook is divided into major sections dealing with: the university; business services; university services; student matters; curricular matters; and personnel matters. Various topics are covered, including: tuition for senior citizens, medical insurance, risk management, degree requirements, student…

  17. I've Known Rivers: Reflections on Self-Education and the Cornell Experiment, 1966-1970.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McPhail, Irving Pressley

    A graduate of Cornell university's class of 1970 reflects on his experiences as a black undergraduate at Cornell from 1966 to 1970, what affirmative action meant to him and his generation of college students, and the self-education black students experienced at Cornell at that time. William Bowen and Derek Bok recently published "The Shape of the…

  18. Our Roots Feed Our Future: Celebrating the Thirtieth Anniversary of the Cornell Migrant Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY. Cooperative Extension Service.

    This publication outlines the history of the migrant program at Cornell University (New York) and describes its recent accomplishments and characteristics. The Cornell Migrant Program (CMP) is among the oldest of the land-grant universities' migrant extension efforts and the most comprehensive in approach. The first half of this document presents…

  19. Unionization and Positive Employee Relations: The Cornell Experience--A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Posner, Gary J.

    1981-01-01

    The 1981 unionization of service and maintenance employees at Cornell University marked a growing trend. The university's policy and procedure throughout the process is chronicled and discussed from the perspective of maintaining good personnel relations. (MSE)

  20. Universities as Management Arenas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Donald E.

    1973-01-01

    The process of university leadership is examined in terms of (1) the development of more sophisticated models of the kind of organization a university is, and (2) the development of more precise delineations of the nature of the multiple leadership tasks that must be performed in a university setting. The university is viewed as an "organized…

  1. California State University, Sacramento

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Varlotta, Lori E.

    2009-01-01

    California State University, Sacramento, commonly referred to as "Sacramento State," is a booming metropolitan university located on 300 acres in the state capital of California. The university, the seventh largest in the California State University system, enrolls a multicultural student body of approximately 29,000 students. At Sacramento State,…

  2. Adult Learners in Universities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Janette, Ed.

    1981-01-01

    Theories on adult development and learning and some of the Ontario universities' programs and services for the adult learner are examined, and Athabasca University, Alberta's answer to the British Open University, is described. Peter O'Donnell discusses adult learners' needs and explains how Athabasca University serves this specific type of…

  3. Motivating University Researchers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendriks, Paul; Sousa, Celio

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents an empirical investigation into how universities approach the need and means for motivating university researchers through their management practices. The role of work motivation for this group deserves attention because pressures from outside and within the universities are said to have made university research less of a…

  4. The Global University Press

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dougherty, Peter J.

    2012-01-01

    The modern world's understanding of American university press has long been shaped by university-press books. American university-press books are good international advertisements for the universities whose logos grace their spines. The growth of transnational scholarship and the expansion of digital communications networks are converging in ways…

  5. When Collective Bargaining Fails: The Boston University, Temple University, University of Bridgeport, and Yeshiva University Cases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuechle, David

    This paper highlights some of the similarities and differences in the labor-management experiences of Boston University (Massachusetts), Temple University (Pennsylvania), the University of Bridgeport (Connecticut), and Yeshiva University (New York) to determine which may represent failures and which do not. In comparing the Yeshiva and Boston…

  6. Masks of the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Edward

    2011-11-01

    Preface; Introducing the masks; Part I. Worlds in the Making: 1. The magic Universe; 2. The mythic Universe; 3. The geometric Universe; 4. The medieval Universe; 5. The infinite Universe; 6. The mechanistic Universe; Part II. The Heart Divine: 7. Dance of the atoms and waves; 8. Fabric of space and time; 9. Nearer to the heart's desire; 10. The cosmic tide; 11. Do dreams ever come true?; Part III. The Cloud of Unknowing: 12. The witch universe; 13. The spear of Archytas; 14. All that is made; 15. The cloud of unknowing; 16. Learned ignorance.

  7. Faculty Productivity in Supervising Doctoral Students' Dissertations at Cornell University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crosta, P.M.; Packman, I.G.

    2005-01-01

    Most research on faculty productivity focuses on the research ability of faculty members. This paper provides a new means of looking at faculty productivity by analyzing a second responsibility of faculty members: producing new Ph.D.'s. The authors first utilize a Lorenz curve analysis to establish that graduate student supervision is most equally…

  8. Cornell University remote sensing program. [New York State

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liang, T.; Philipson, W. R. (Principal Investigator); Stanturf, J. A.

    1980-01-01

    High altitude, color infrared aerial photography as well as imagery from Skylab and LANDSAT were used to inventory timber and assess potential sites for industrial development in New York State. The utility of small scale remotely sensed data for monitoring clearcutting in hardwood forests was also investigated. Consultation was provided regarding the Love Canal Landfill as part of environment protection efforts.

  9. Environmental Attitude Survey of University Students 1971 vs. 1981.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, John C., Jr.; Gasteiger, Edgar L.

    An attitudinal survey that contrasted student perceptions on environmental/energy questions during the decade of intense concern for these issues was conducted at Cornell University in 1971 and 1981 (3,414 and 3,867 students were sampled, respectively). The survey was designed to measure changes in attitude toward 35 specific items in five major…

  10. Great Expectations: Distributed Financial Computing at Cornell.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schulden, Louise; Sidle, Clint

    1988-01-01

    The Cornell University Distributed Accounting (CUDA) system is an attempt to provide departments a software tool for better managing their finances, creating microcomputer standards, creating a vehicle for better administrative microcomputer support, and insuring local systems are consistent with central computer systems. (Author/MLW)

  11. University settles discrimination case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gwynne, Peter

    2011-02-01

    A settlement has been reached in a case brought against the University of Kentucky by astrophysicist Martin Gaskell over his claim that the university illegally denied him a staff position on the basis of his evangelical Christian faith.

  12. Metaphor and Universal Language.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blown, Eric; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Attempts to identify elements of universal language and probes the limitations of the communication metaphor. Universal language is discussed in terms of the theory of quantum nonlocality and the implications of this theory for communication with extraterrestrial beings. (PCB)

  13. Towards a Living Universe.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raine, Kathleen

    1981-01-01

    There is a growing realization that the premises of materialism are applicable within certain limits only. The mystical writings of Blake teach that man's body is a mental body, and his universe a mental universe. (JN)

  14. Gambling with the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawking, Stephen

    2002-05-01

    This is an excerpt from Stephen Hawking's book The Universe in a Nutshell. Roger Penrose and Stephen Hawking, Lucasian Professor of Mathematics at the University of Cambridge, were able to show that Einstein's General Theory of Relativity implied that the universe and time itself must have had a beginning in a tremendous explosion. The discovery of the expansion of the universe is one of the great intellectual revolutions of the twentieth century.

  15. Situated University, Situated Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feldman, Ann M.

    2009-01-01

    This article argues that teaching as a situated, civic activity must be a core intellectual activity in the engaged metropolitan university. Situated writing provides the key pedagogy for the Chicago Civic Leadership Certificate Program at the University of Illinois at Chicago, an engaged public research university. The role of writing, or…

  16. British Universities: Visitor's Jurisdiction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khan, Anwar N.

    1993-01-01

    The office and functions of the university visitor in Britain have deep-seated origins in the common law. The visitorial jurisdiction is exclusive in domestic and internal matters. Despite cases brought by disgruntled members of universities, the office of the university visitor was not abolished, and its powers were not eliminated. Analyzes these…

  17. John Carroll University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dean, Kathleen Lis; Rombalski, Patrick; O'Dell, Kyle

    2009-01-01

    John Carroll University (JCU) is a Jesuit Catholic institution located in University Heights, approximately 10 miles east of Cleveland, Ohio. Founded in 1888, the university has a population of 3,400 undergraduates and 800 graduate students. The Division of Student Affairs at JCU comprises 11 units. The mission of the division is the same as that…

  18. Our Listless Universities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bloom, Allan

    1983-01-01

    Students in the best universities do not believe in anything, and those universities are doing nothing about it. The great questions--God, freedom, and immortality--hardly touch the young. The universities have no vision, no view of what a human being must know in order to be considered educated. (MLW)

  19. Program Budgeting: Universities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio Board of Regents, Columbus. Management Improvement Program.

    This manual recognizes there is a wide spectrum of budgeting practices in today's colleges and universities. In particular, universities in Ohio are at different stages in their utilization of program budgeting principles and also have different needs. Thus, this program budgeting manual was written to meet the specific needs of universities in…

  20. The Moral University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berube, Maurice R.; Berube, Clair T.

    2010-01-01

    The Moral University examines the ways that universities act morally toward students, faculty, their communities and the nation. It considers the effectiveness of moral reasoning courses in the curriculum and the growth of leadership courses. The book deals with the myriad ways in which universities act positively toward their communities. It also…

  1. The University Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simplicio, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    In this article the author discusses the role university culture can play on a campus and how it can impact policy and practice. The article explores how a university's history, values, and vision form its culture and how this culture in turn affects its stability and continuity. The article discusses how newcomers within the university are…

  2. Internationalising the University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Suzy

    2008-01-01

    "International" and "internationalisation" are two terms frequently used today in association with the university. In this paper I consider the way in which the notion of internationalisation connects to the contemporary university, which I have termed "Neo-liberal". I begin by outlining the main characteristics of the contemporary university and…

  3. Regulation of University Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindblom-Ylanne, Sari; Nevgi, Anne; Trigwell, Keith

    2011-01-01

    The aims of the present study are twofold: firstly, to explore dimensions in the regulation of teaching in a multidisciplinary sample of university teachers, and secondly, to analyse factors related to the regulation of university teaching. Seventy-three university teachers representing several disciplines participated in the study. These teachers…

  4. Universities That Litigate Patents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rooksby, Jacob H.

    2012-01-01

    American research universities frequently obtain and license patents to their faculty members' inventions. While university licensing is carefully tracked and thoroughly studied, little is known about university decisions to assertively litigate their patents through filing patent infringement lawsuits in federal court. Which universities…

  5. Virtual Universe & Its Interface to Physical Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asija, Pal

    2005-04-01

    This paper postulates a virtual universe and compares and contrasts its properties to that of our known physical universe. A particular attention is paid to the interface between the two and challenges for transition from one to the other. Also discussed is the relationship of the virtual universe to such entities and concepts as dark matter, black holes, time travel, speed of light, mass, gravity just to name just a few. The paper also discusses interface between us physical beings and temporary virtual beings and eventually ultra beings. It also tangentially discusses relationship between body, brain, mind of physical beings with that of virtual and ultra beings. The paper also discusses why virtual beings do not have the same limitations and capabilities as we do. The past, present, elsewhere and potential of physical and virtual universes is compared. Finally possible pathways to discovery of TOE (Theory of Everything) is hypothesized.

  6. Discovering the Expanding Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nussbaumer, Harry; Bieri, Lydia; Sandage, Foreword by Allan

    2009-03-01

    Acknowledgments; Foreword; 1. Introduction; 2. Cosmological concepts at the end of the Middle Ages; 3. Nebulae as a new astronomical phenomenon; 4. On the construction of the Heavens; 5. Island universes turn into astronomical facts: a universe of galaxies; 6. The early cosmology of Einstein and de Sitter; 7. The dynamical universe of Friedmann; 8. Redshifts: how to reconcile Slipher and de Sitter?; 9. Lemaître discovers the expanding universe; 10. Hubble's contribution of 1929; 11. The breakthrough for the expanding universe; 12. Hubble's anger about de Sitter; 13. Robertson and Tolman join the game; 14. The Einstein-de Sitter universe; 15. Are Sun and Earth older than the universe?; 16. In search of alternative tracks; 17. The seed for the Big Bang; 18. Summary and Postscript; Appendix; References; Index.

  7. Universities Scale Like Cities

    PubMed Central

    van Raan, Anthony F. J.

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies of urban scaling show that important socioeconomic city characteristics such as wealth and innovation capacity exhibit a nonlinear, particularly a power law scaling with population size. These nonlinear effects are common to all cities, with similar power law exponents. These findings mean that the larger the city, the more disproportionally they are places of wealth and innovation. Local properties of cities cause a deviation from the expected behavior as predicted by the power law scaling. In this paper we demonstrate that universities show a similar behavior as cities in the distribution of the ‘gross university income’ in terms of total number of citations over ‘size’ in terms of total number of publications. Moreover, the power law exponents for university scaling are comparable to those for urban scaling. We find that deviations from the expected behavior can indeed be explained by specific local properties of universities, particularly the field-specific composition of a university, and its quality in terms of field-normalized citation impact. By studying both the set of the 500 largest universities worldwide and a specific subset of these 500 universities -the top-100 European universities- we are also able to distinguish between properties of universities with as well as without selection of one specific local property, the quality of a university in terms of its average field-normalized citation impact. It also reveals an interesting observation concerning the working of a crucial property in networked systems, preferential attachment. PMID:23544062

  8. Selling University Reform: The University of Melbourne and the Press

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Potts, Anthony

    2012-01-01

    Since the advent of the "Times Higher Education Supplement World University Rankings" and the "Academic Rankings of World Universities" by Shanghai Jiao Tong University, some Australian universities have become especially concerned with being ranked among the 100 leading universities. The University of Melbourne, Australia's second oldest…

  9. On universal knot polynomials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mironov, A.; Mkrtchyan, R.; Morozov, A.

    2016-02-01

    We present a universal knot polynomials for 2- and 3-strand torus knots in adjoint representation, by universalization of appropriate Rosso-Jones formula. According to universality, these polynomials coincide with adjoined colored HOMFLY and Kauffman polynomials at SL and SO/Sp lines on Vogel's plane, respectively and give their exceptional group's counterparts on exceptional line. We demonstrate that [m,n]=[n,m] topological invariance, when applicable, take place on the entire Vogel's plane. We also suggest the universal form of invariant of figure eight knot in adjoint representation, and suggest existence of such universalization for any knot in adjoint and its descendant representations. Properties of universal polynomials and applications of these results are discussed.

  10. The Chinese Television University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCormick, R.

    1980-01-01

    Presents an overview of China's Beijing Broadcasting and Television University: background, establishment, administration and structure, students, courses, teaching package, and course production. (JD)

  11. Typical universal entanglers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Feng; Luo, MingXing; Chen, XiuBo; Yang, YiXian; Wang, XiaoJun

    2014-10-01

    A universal entangler is a very powerful fault-tolerant entangling device for generating quantum entanglements from any joint states. Our paper aims to address the construction of universal entanglers. We prove that universal entanglers may be obtained from random unitary gates according to the Harr measure. The success probability is close to 1 for large system spaces. This result represents the typical density of entanglement subspaces in large state spaces. It also partially solves an open problem of universal bipartite entanglers and is explained by some experiment simulations.

  12. Rice University: College and University Systems Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CAUSE/EFFECT, 1984

    1984-01-01

    Computing began at Rice University with the first computer project on campus about 1958. In 1960 a computer center was formed. Today's Institute for Computer Services and Applications serves Rice administration, departments, faculty, and students by writing systems, maintaining files, entering data, retrieving information, etc. (MLW)

  13. University Funding Changes and University Efficiency.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mace, John

    1993-01-01

    A discussion of the current economics of the United Kingdom's higher education system outlines conceptual models used by economists for evaluating a system's efficiency and applies them to assess the effect of recent funding changes. It is concluded that increased emphasis on research is adversely affecting university teaching quality. (MSE)

  14. Universal Symbols and Cartography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Modley, Rudolf

    The broad use of maps by non-cartographers imposes on the cartographer the burden to make maps not only accurate, but to use symbols which make map-reading easier for the public. The latter requirement implies a need for universal symbols. Although there are no universal symbols today (letters, words, and figures, to a lesser extent, are dependent…

  15. For Free Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ainley, Patrick

    2005-01-01

    This article is a shortened version of an inaugural professorial lecture given at the University of Greenwich on 19 January 2005 as an intervention in the debate at that time within that university and other English further and higher education institutions over the appropriate level of fees to charge in 2006. It anticipates the likely effects…

  16. Faculty Handbook, Stanford University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanford Univ., CA.

    University policies, regulations, and procedures that apply to faculty members directly or indirectly, as well as the university's organization and governance, are described in the 1975 handbook. A brief history of Stanford's academic development and a bibliography to other information sources related to academic affairs are also provided.…

  17. Arizona State University. Exemplars.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wegner, Gregory R.

    This report discusses how the Arizona Board of Regents, which has governing authority over the state's three public universities, dealt with the inability of the universities to respond to new societal needs in a timely manner; a major impediment was felt to be tenure. After a series of meetings of administrators and faculty leaders, the Board…

  18. Marketing University Outreach Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, Ralph S., Jr., Ed.; And Others

    A collection of 12 essays and model program descriptions addresses issues in the marketing of university extension, outreach, and distance education programs. They include: (1) "Marketing and University Outreach: Parallel Processes" (William I. Sauser, Jr. and others); (2) "Segmenting and Targeting the Organizational Market" (Vaughan C. Judd); (3)…

  19. Tutors for a University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Styler, W. E.

    The pamphlet describes the system developed at Hull University for providing tutors for adult education, and analyzes the use of full-time and part-time tutors. These tutors are responsible for teaching courses, generally shorter in duration than a standard academic course, and geared for adults not in school rather than for university students.…

  20. Universal Semantics in Translation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Zhenying

    2009-01-01

    What and how we translate are questions often argued about. No matter what kind of answers one may give, priority in translation should be granted to meaning, especially those meanings that exist in all concerned languages. In this paper the author defines them as universal sememes, and the study of them as universal semantics, of which…

  1. Family Bonding with Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meer, Jonathan; Rosen, Harvey S.

    2010-01-01

    One justification offered for legacy admissions policies at universities is that that they bind entire families to the university. Proponents maintain that these policies have a number of benefits, including increased donations from members of these families. We use a rich set of data from an anonymous selective research institution to investigate…

  2. Talent Management for Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradley, Andrew P.

    2016-01-01

    This paper explores human resource management practices in the university sector with a specific focus on talent pools and talent management more generally. The paper defines talent management in the context of the university sector and then explores its interdependence with organisational strategy, the metrics used to measure academic performance…

  3. UNIVERSAL HIGHER EDUCATION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MCGRATH, EARL J.

    THIS DOCUMENT IS A REPORT ON A GROUP INQUIRY INTO THE SUBSTANCE AND IMPLICATIONS OF UNIVERSAL HIGHER EDUCATION. ELEVEN CHAPTERS ARE PAPERS PRESENTED AT A CONFERENCE HELD UNDER THE AUSPICES OF THE INSTITUTE OF HIGHER EDUCATION, TEACHERS COLLEGE, COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY, IN PUERTO RICO, NOVEMBER 15-21, 1964, FORECASTING THE FORM AND MISSION OF AMERICAN…

  4. Slippery Rock University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnhold, Robert W.

    2008-01-01

    Slippery Rock University (SRU), located in western Pennsylvania, is one of 14 state-owned institutions of higher education in Pennsylvania. The university has a rich tradition of providing professional preparation programs in special education, therapeutic recreation, physical education, and physical therapy for individuals with disabilities.…

  5. Universal Design Problem Solving

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sterling, Mary C.

    2004-01-01

    Universal design is made up of four elements: accessibility, adaptability, aesthetics, and affordability. This article addresses the concept of universal design problem solving through experiential learning for an interior design studio course in postsecondary education. Students' experiences with clients over age 55 promoted an understanding of…

  6. Asian Open Universities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, John

    1983-01-01

    The appearance of open universities in Asia is of interest to Australian educators, particularly since the Asian institutions differ in some respects from the British model which combined open entry to all and extensively employed the electronic media. The Asian Open Universities have provided access to higher education for many. (SSH)

  7. Reeducation at Heidelberg University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giles, Geoffrey J.

    1997-01-01

    Utilizes German archival records to illuminate crucial post-war events at Heidelberg University. The university became the focal point of attempts to define the theoretical and practical meaning of "geistige Umerziehung" (spiritual reeducation). Discusses the conflict between U.S. authorities and such esteemed German scholars as Karl Jaspers and…

  8. The universal propagator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klauder, John R.

    1993-01-01

    For a general Hamiltonian appropriate to a single canonical degree of freedom, a universal propagator with the property that it correctly evolves the coherent-state Hilbert space representatives for an arbitrary fiducial vector is characterized and defined. The universal propagator is explicitly constructed for the harmonic oscillator, with a result that differs from the conventional propagators for this system.

  9. Managing Tomorrow's University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michalak, Craig L., Ed.

    The issues addressed in this conference report concern budgeting, the resourceful manager, extramural funding, employer-employee interaction, management information systems, and management of the university in the future. Contents include: the keynote address by F. E. Balderston; "University Budgeting in an Era of Scarce Resources," by F. M. Bowen…

  10. Understanding University Technology Transfer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association of American Universities, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Federal government agencies provide about $33 billion a year to universities to conduct scientific research. That continuing investment expands human knowledge and helps educate the next generation of science and technology leaders. New discoveries from university research also form the basis for many new products and processes that benefit the…

  11. University, Research, Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laroui, Abdallah

    1991-01-01

    Describes personal experiences with university research and development. Criticizes university research as ineffective and inwardly focused, resulting in a concept of scientific research that negates the notion of economic development. Complains that the focus of study no longer contributes to an increase in consumable wealth. Urges that…

  12. Modelling University Governance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trakman, Leon

    2008-01-01

    Twentieth century governance models used in public universities are subject to increasing doubt across the English-speaking world. Governments question if public universities are being efficiently governed; if their boards of trustees are adequately fulfilling their trust obligations towards multiple stakeholders; and if collegial models of…

  13. [The University in Crisis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abram, Morris B.

    The university reflects the revolution in the world. Large numbers of "find out" students are not goal oriented and are affected by malaise; many approve of the use of violence in certain situations. Part of the revolution must be accepted and part rejected. The university is extremely vulnerable to violence and, unless it is contained, American…

  14. Dynamics of Anisotropic Universes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez, Jérôme

    2006-11-01

    We present a general study of the dynamical properties of Anisotropic Bianchi Universes in the context of Einstein General Relativity. Integrability results using Kovalevskaya exponents are reported and connected to general knowledge about Bianchi dynamics. Finally, dynamics toward singularity in Bianchi type VIII and IX universes are showed to be equivalent in some precise sence.

  15. University Patent Policy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Latker, Norman J.

    The relationship between university research and public need is discussed from both a historical and contemporary perspective. Examples are cited of European experiences in which there has been obvious industrial motivation for research performed by the universities. The author notes that there are no difficulties with the level of government…

  16. The United Nations University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salam, Abdus

    1973-01-01

    Reports the progress already made toward the establishment of a postgraduate international university under United Nations auspices. The resolution adopted by the U.N. General Assembly provides a concise statement of the nature and aims of the United Nations University, which is likely to start operating in 1974. (JR)

  17. Miami University Information Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miami Univ., Oxford, OH.

    The 1975 information manual is designed to provide current data on policies, procedures, services, facilities, organization and governance of Miami University and, through the extensive index, quick access to this information. The manual is complementary to the university catalog and directory. Information relating to students is in the Student…

  18. University-industry interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hastings, Daniel E.

    1990-01-01

    It is posited that university industry interaction is highly desirable from the viewpoint of the long term economic development of the country as well as being desirable for the Space Grant Programs. The present and future possible interactions are reviewed for the three university levels namely, undergraduate, graduate, and faculty research.

  19. The Pennsylvania State University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burlingame, Philip J.; Dowhower, Andrea L.

    2009-01-01

    Founded in 1855 as the Farmer's High School, the Pennsylvania State University (Penn State) began as a small college in Centre County providing agricultural education to young men from regional farm families. Penn State became a land-grant university in 1863 following passage of the Morrill Act. Today, Penn State enrolls more than 83,000 students…

  20. University Freedom in Turkey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dolasir, Semiyha

    2006-01-01

    Freedom means the right of the universities to do their scientific activities and to regulate and do the higher education through their organs. The three feet that make up the university freedom are scientific freedom, administrative freedom and financial freedom. Scientific freedom is realized by the freedom of the faculty and teaching staff and…

  1. The Fully Functioning University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bourner, Tom

    2008-01-01

    This article offers an answer to the question: What goals have persisted across all the stages of the development of the Western university? The main conclusion is that the following three goals have been the common threads: the higher education of students, the advancement of knowledge, and service to those outside the walls of the university.…

  2. New Openings in University-Industry Cooperation: Aalto University as the Forerunner of European University Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markkula, Markku; Lappalainen, Pia

    2009-01-01

    The Innovation University (IU)--to be called the Aalto University after Alvav Aalto, a famous Finnish architect and MIT professor--is a new university which will be created through a merger of three existing universities: the Helsinki University of Technology (TKK), the Helsinki School of Economics (HSE) and the University of Art and Design…

  3. Design and Performance of the Cornell ERL DC Photoemission Gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smolenski, K.; Bazarov, I.; Dunham, B.; Li, H.; Li, Y.; Liu, X.; Ouzounov, D.; Sinclair, C.

    2009-08-01

    Cornell University is planning to build an Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) X-ray facility. For an ERL, it is well known that the x-ray beam brightness for the users is mainly determined by the initial electron beam emittance provided by the injector. To address technical challenges of producing very low emittance beams at high average current as required for an ERL, Cornell University has proposed a prototype injector with 5-15 MeV beam energy, 100 mA maximum average current and 77 pC/bunch. In this article, we describe the design, construction and initial results for a DC photoemission gun now under operation.

  4. The Transient Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shappee, Benjamin John

    When one looks at the night sky, one usually gets the impression of a static and constant universe. Quite apart from appearances, the sky is teeming with violent, variable, and transient events that shape our universe. These capricious objects are not only penetrating probes into physical conditions too extreme for earthbound laboratories, but they are also useful tools to measure the universe. In this dissertation, I investigate the observational and theoretical properties of three classes of transient/variable objects: thermonuclear supernovae, Cepheid variable stars, and active galactic nuclei.

  5. Imagine the Universe. 4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Nicholas

    1999-01-01

    This CD-ROM contains compilations of three NASA Website pages from the Laboratory for High Energy Astrophysics at the Goddard Space Flight Center. The three sites on the CD-ROM are: (1) the Imagine the Universe!, (for ages 14 on up), which is dedicated to discussion of the Universe, what we know, how it is evolving and the kinds of objects and phenomena it contains; (2) StarChild: A learning center for young astronomers, (for ages 4-14), contains information about the Solar System, the Universe and space explorations; and (3) the Astronomy picture of the day, which offers a new astronomical image and caption for each calendar day.

  6. Type II universal spacetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hervik, S.; Málek, T.; Pravda, V.; Pravdová, A.

    2015-12-01

    We study type II universal metrics of the Lorentzian signature. These metrics simultaneously solve vacuum field equations of all theories of gravitation with the Lagrangian being a polynomial curvature invariant constructed from the metric, the Riemann tensor and its covariant derivatives of an arbitrary order. We provide examples of type II universal metrics for all composite number dimensions. On the other hand, we have no examples for prime number dimensions and we prove the non-existence of type II universal spacetimes in five dimensions. We also present type II vacuum solutions of selected classes of gravitational theories, such as Lovelock, quadratic and L({{Riemann}}) gravities.

  7. Profiting from University Research: Tapping into University Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aaron, Elizabeth

    1988-01-01

    Indicates that industry sponsored research in the university environment is increasing. Lists reasons for companies to use university research. Notes 1980 Baigh-Dole Bill which allows the university first rights to technologies they develop. (MVL)

  8. University of Florida Campus, Plaza of the Americas, University of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    University of Florida Campus, Plaza of the Americas, University of Florida Campus Quad Bounded by West University Avenue, US 441/Southwest 13th Street, Stadium Road, and North-South Drive, Gainesville, Alachua County, FL

  9. Universal router concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pesch, W. A.

    1970-01-01

    Portable universal router can cut holes of large diameter and irregular shapes, machine recesses, and drill holes with certain edge-distance limitations. Rectangular and round holes may be cut without a template.

  10. Berkeley College, Yale University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, James S.

    2000-01-01

    Examines the controversial architectural technique of combining contemporary features with traditional designs at Yale University's Berkeley College, and discusses whether there is a place for this type of juxtaposition in architectural design. Photos and diagrams are included. (GR)

  11. California's "Free" Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cudhea, David

    1974-01-01

    Heliotrope, Orpheus, and Communiversity, San Francisco's three free universities, offer curricula with combinations of alchemy, magic, Volkswagen repairs, options in education, dance, conversational Mandarin, basic plumbing, and brain wave experiences. (Author/PG)

  12. The hidden universe

    SciTech Connect

    Disney, M.

    1985-01-01

    Astronomer Disney has followed a somewhat different tack than that of most popular books on cosmology by concentrating on the notion of hidden (as in not directly observable by its own radiation) matter in the universe.

  13. The universal path integral

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloyd, Seth; Dreyer, Olaf

    2016-02-01

    Path integrals calculate probabilities by summing over classical configurations of variables such as fields, assigning each configuration a phase equal to the action of that configuration. This paper defines a universal path integral, which sums over all computable structures. This path integral contains as sub-integrals all possible computable path integrals, including those of field theory, the standard model of elementary particles, discrete models of quantum gravity, string theory, etc. The universal path integral possesses a well-defined measure that guarantees its finiteness. The probabilities for events corresponding to sub-integrals can be calculated using the method of decoherent histories. The universal path integral supports a quantum theory of the universe in which the world that we see around us arises out of the interference between all computable structures.

  14. The Endless Universe

    SciTech Connect

    Steinhardt, Paul

    2003-09-24

    This talk will introduce the Cyclic Model of the Universe, a radical alternative to standard big bang/inflationary cosmology in which space and time exist indefinitely, high energy inflation is avoided, dark energy is given a prominent role, and the universe undergoes periodic epochs of expansion and cooling. The model, which is motivated by recent ideas in superstring theory, seems capable of reproducing all of the successes of the standard picture and leads to distinctive predictions.

  15. Physics of the universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sachs, Mendel

    ch. 1. Physics of the universe. Introduction. Is Newton's theory an explanation of gravity? The expanding universe. The oscillating universe cosmology. The theory of general relativity. The role of space and time. Geometry and matter. Generalization of Einstein's field equations. A unified field theory -- ch. 2. A language of cosmology: the mathematical basis of general relativity. Introduction. Einstein's tensor formulation. The Riemann curvature tensor. The geodesic equation. The vacuum equation. The crucial tests of general relativity. The logic of the spacetime language -- ch. 3. A unified field theory in general relativity: extension from the tensor to the quaternion language. Introduction. Factorization of Einstein's tensor field equations. The Riemann curvature tensor in quaternion form. The quaternion metrical field equations. A symmetric tensor-antisymmetric tensor representation of general relativity - gravity and electromagnetism. The Einstein field equations from the symmetric tensor part. The Maxwell field equations from the antisymmetric tensor part. Conclusions -- ch. 4. An oscillating, spiral universe cosmology. introduction. Dynamics of the expansion and contraction of the universe. Dynamics of the oscillating universe cosmology. Derivation of the Hubble law as an approximation. The spiral structure of the universe. Concluding remarks -- ch. 5. Dark matter. Introduction. The field equations and the ground state solution for the bound particle-antiparticle pair. Olber's paradox -- ch. 6. Concluding remarks. Black holes. Pulsars. On the human race and cosmology -- ch. 7. Philosophical considerations. On truth. Positivism versus realism, subjectivity versus objectivity. On Mach's influence in physics and cosmology. References and notes -- Postscript. Physics in the 21st century. Holism. The universe. The Mach principle and the origin of inertia from general relativity.

  16. The Low Temperature Universe

    SciTech Connect

    Blandford, Roger; Simeon, Paul

    2009-12-16

    We are used to thinking of the universe as a hot place, full of bright stars, quasars, gamma ray bursts, and so on, emanating from a giant explosion - the Big Bang. However, the universe can also be a surprisingly cool place. It is permeated by a background radiation with a temperature close to that of liquid helium. This paper is based on a public lecture aimed at non-specialists.

  17. The Runaway Universe

    SciTech Connect

    Blanford, Roger

    2004-10-26

    The Universe appears to be flat, accelerating and lightweight. In this talk, I will explain what these terms mean, how we developed this view and its implications. I will also discuss the connection between cosmology and particle physics experiments being conducted at accelerators and in underground laboratories. I will conclude with a description of some proposed telescopes that will help us understand much more about the geometry, expansion and contents of our Universe.

  18. University contracts summary book

    SciTech Connect

    1980-08-01

    The principal objectives of the Fossil Energy Program are to seek new ideas, new data, fundamental knowledge that will support the ongoing programs, and new processes to better utilize the nation's fossil energy resources with greater efficiency and environmental acceptability. Toward this end, the Department of Energy supports research projects conducted by universities and colleges to: Ensure a foundation for innovative technology through the use of the capabilities and talents in our academic institutions; provide an effective, two-way channel of communication between the Department of Energy and the academic community; and ensure that trained technical manpower is developed to carry out basic and applied research in support of DOE's mission. Fossil Energy's university activities emphasize the type of research that universities can do best - research to explore the potential of novel process concepts, develop innovative methods and materials for improving existing processes, and obtain fundamental information on the structure of coal and mechanisms of reactions of coal, shale oil, and other fossil energy sources. University programs are managed by different Fossil Energy technical groups; the individual projects are described in greater detail in this book. It is clear that a number of research areas related to the DOE Fossil Energy Program have been appropriate for university involvement, and that, with support from DOE, university scientific and technical expertise can be expected to continue to play a significant role in the advancement of fossil energy technology in the years to come.

  19. The University-Industry Relations of an Entrepreneurial University: The Case of the University of Twente.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schutte, Frits

    1999-01-01

    Describes the development of the University of Twente from a regional teaching university to a national research university, the "entrepreneurial university" of the Netherlands. Focuses on spinoffs from the university, an incubator in a business and science park and the generation of venture capital. Estimates the regional impact of such…

  20. The Universe Revealed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spence, Pam

    1998-10-01

    The Universe is a bewildering place to the uninitiated. The concepts and theories that govern space seem complex and often contradictory. The Universe Revealed provides the keys to unlocking the wonders of the cosmos. Elegantly written and lavishly illustrated, it begins with the Sun and stretches through our solar system into deepest space. Lucid prose, written by many of the people who have shaped our current thinking on space, and spectacular photographs make the physics of the Universe accessible and provide a solid background for understanding the most recent astronomical discoveries. Covering the most intriguing features of the cosmos, the topics discussed range from the Earth and global warming to cosmic collisions and the size of the Universe. Major sections examine the Solar System, stars, galaxies, cosmology, and the observational techniques used by astronomers, both amateur and professional. The Universe Revealed represents the collaboration of internationally renowned experts in astronomy and cosmology, with contributions from authors including David Malin, F. Duccio Macchetto, Iain Nicholson, Neil Bone, Ian Ridpath, Seth Shostak, Mike Lancaster, Steve Miller, Ken Croswell, Geoff McNamara, and Steven Young. This extraordinary blend of astronomy, astrophysics, and cosmology, will appeal to amateur and armchair astronomers alike.

  1. University Reactor Instrumentation Program

    SciTech Connect

    Vernetson, W.G.

    1992-11-01

    Recognizing that the University Reactor Instrumentation Program was developed in response to widespread needs in the academic community for modernization and improvement of research and training reactors at institutions such as the University of Florida, the items proposed to be supported by this grant over its two year period have been selected as those most likely to reduce foreed outages, to meet regulatory concerns that had been expressed in recent years by Nuclear Regulatory Commission inspectors or to correct other facility problems and limitations. Department of Energy Grant Number DE-FG07-90ER129969 was provided to the University of Florida Training Reactor(UFTR) facility through the US Department of Energy's University Reactor Instrumentation Program. The original proposal submitted in February, 1990 requested support for UFTR facility instrumentation and equipment upgrades for seven items in the amount of $107,530 with $13,800 of this amount to be the subject of cost sharing by the University of Florida and $93,730 requested as support from the Department of Energy. A breakdown of the items requested and total cost for the proposed UFTR facility instrumentation and equipment improvements is presented.

  2. University-Community Engagement: Case Study of University Social Responsibility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chile, Love M.; Black, Xavier M.

    2015-01-01

    Corporatisation of universities has drawn parallels between contemporary universities and business corporations, and extended analysis of corporate social responsibility to universities. This article reports on a case study of university-community engagement with schools and school communities through youth engagement programmes to enhance…

  3. The apparent Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binétruy, P.; Helou, A.

    2015-10-01

    We exploit the parallel between dynamical black holes and cosmological spacetimes to describe the evolution of Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker universes from the point of view of an observer in terms of the dynamics of the apparent horizon. Using the Hayward-Kodama formalism of dynamical black holes, we clarify the role of the Clausius relation to derive the Friedmann equations for a Universe, in the spirit of Jacobson’s work on the thermodynamics of spacetime. We also show how dynamics at the horizon naturally leads to the quantum-mechanical process of Hawking radiation. We comment on the connection of this work with recent ideas to consider our observable Universe as a Bose-Einstein condensate and on the corresponding role of vacuum energy.

  4. A Non Singular Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawking, Stephen

    2005-01-01

    The last chapter of my PhD thesis, contained my first singularity theorem. This showed that under certain reasonable conditions, any cosmological solution of the field equations, would have a big bang singularity. At this singularity, classical general relativity would break down, so one could not use it to predict how the universe began. It was therefore necessary to develop a quantum theory of gravity, in order to understand the origin of the universe. In this talk, I explore if the origin of the universe can be semi classical, and non singular. This is possible despite the singularity theorems, because like so many other no go theorems, they have a get out clause. In this case, the get out is the strong energy condition.

  5. Music of the Universe

    SciTech Connect

    2010-01-01

    Scientists are quite familiar with what a supernova looks like — when these stars are destroyed in the most massive explosions in the universe, they leave their mark as one of the brightest objects in space, at least for several weeks. While the supernova can be seen, it cant be heard, as sound waves cannot travel through space. But what if the light waves emitted by the exploding star and other cosmological phenomena could be translated into sound? Thats the idea behind a Rhythms of the Universe, a musical project to sonify the universe by Grateful Dead percussionist and Grammy award-winning artist Mickey Hart that caught the attention of Nobel Prize-winning astrophysicist George Smoot of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Sounds courtesy of Keith Jackson. Images courtesy of NASA

  6. The Classification of Universes

    SciTech Connect

    Bjorken, J.D.

    2004-02-18

    We define a universe as the contents of a spacetime box with comoving walls, large enough to contain measurable phenomena, but not much larger. This allows the construction of a local ensemble of such universes, given modest extrapolations of the observed properties of the cosmos. We then assume that further out similar universes can be constructed, but with different standard model parameters, strongly correlated with the size in a definite way, where by size is meant the Hubble scale at late times. This allows an estimate of the range of sizes supporting life as we know it. The result allows some understanding of the hierarchy problems of particle physics. Other possible implications of the assumptions made will be discussed, including a possible connection between the QCD vacuum structure and cosmological horizon structure. In all cases, our approach is as bottoms-up and as phenomenological as possible, suggesting that theories of the multiverse may eventually lay some claim of being scientific.

  7. The anamorphic universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ijjas, Anna; Steinhardt, Paul J.

    2015-10-01

    We introduce ``anamorphic'' cosmology, an approach for explaining the smoothness and flatness of the universe on large scales and the generation of a nearly scale-invariant spectrum of adiabatic density perturbations. The defining feature is a smoothing phase that acts like a contracting universe based on some Weyl frame-invariant criteria and an expanding universe based on other frame-invariant criteria. An advantage of the contracting aspects is that it is possible to avoid the multiverse and measure problems that arise in inflationary models. Unlike ekpyrotic models, anamorphic models can be constructed using only a single field and can generate a nearly scale-invariant spectrum of tensor perturbations. Anamorphic models also differ from pre-big bang and matter bounce models that do not explain the smoothness. We present some examples of cosmological models that incorporate an anamorphic smoothing phase.

  8. The Biological Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dick, Steven J.

    1999-12-01

    Throughout the twentieth century, from the furor over Percival Lowell's claim of canals on Mars to the sophisticated Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence, otherworldly life has often intrigued and occasionally consumed science and the public. The Biological Universe provides a rich and colorful history of the attempts during the twentieth century to answer questions such as whether "biological law" reigns throughout the universe and whether there are other histories, religions, and philosophies outside those on Earth. Covering a broad range of topics, including the search for life in the solar system, the origins of life, UFOs, and aliens in science fiction, Steven J. Dick shows how the concept of extraterrestrial intelligence is a world view of its own, a "biophysical cosmology" that seeks confirmation no less than physical views of the universe. This book will fascinate astronomers, historians of science, biochemists, and science fiction readers.

  9. Phonology without universal grammar

    PubMed Central

    Archangeli, Diana; Pulleyblank, Douglas

    2015-01-01

    The question of identifying the properties of language that are specific human linguistic abilities, i.e., Universal Grammar, lies at the center of linguistic research. This paper argues for a largely Emergent Grammar in phonology, taking as the starting point that memory, categorization, attention to frequency, and the creation of symbolic systems are all nonlinguistic characteristics of the human mind. The articulation patterns of American English rhotics illustrate categorization and systems; the distribution of vowels in Bantu vowel harmony uses frequencies of particular sequences to argue against Universal Grammar and in favor of Emergent Grammar; prefix allomorphy in Esimbi illustrates the Emergent symbolic system integrating phonological and morphological generalizations. The Esimbi case has been treated as an example of phonological opacity in a Universal Grammar account; the Emergent analysis resolves the pattern without opacity concerns. PMID:26388791

  10. Phonology without universal grammar.

    PubMed

    Archangeli, Diana; Pulleyblank, Douglas

    2015-01-01

    The question of identifying the properties of language that are specific human linguistic abilities, i.e., Universal Grammar, lies at the center of linguistic research. This paper argues for a largely Emergent Grammar in phonology, taking as the starting point that memory, categorization, attention to frequency, and the creation of symbolic systems are all nonlinguistic characteristics of the human mind. The articulation patterns of American English rhotics illustrate categorization and systems; the distribution of vowels in Bantu vowel harmony uses frequencies of particular sequences to argue against Universal Grammar and in favor of Emergent Grammar; prefix allomorphy in Esimbi illustrates the Emergent symbolic system integrating phonological and morphological generalizations. The Esimbi case has been treated as an example of phonological opacity in a Universal Grammar account; the Emergent analysis resolves the pattern without opacity concerns. PMID:26388791

  11. Did the universe recombine?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartlett, James G.; Stebbins, Albert

    1991-01-01

    The Zel'dovich-Sunyaev model-independent arguments for the existence of a neutral hydrogen phase is reviewed in light of new limits on the Compton y parameter from COBE. It is concluded that with baryon densities compatible with standard cosmological nucleosynthesis, the universe could have remained fully ionized throughout its history without producing a detectable spectral distortion. It is argued that it is unlikely that spectral observations of the cosmic microwave background will ever require the universe to have recombined for flat cosmologies.

  12. Understanding the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenstein, George

    2013-04-01

    Part I. Steps to Astronomy: 1. The sky; 2. The origins of astronomy; 3. Gravity and orbits; 4. Light; 5. The astronomers' tools: telescopes and space probes; Part II. The Solar System: 6. Introducing the Solar System; 7. The inner Solar System; 8. The outer Solar System; 9. Smaller bodies in the Solar System; 10. Planets beyond the Solar System; Part III. Stars: 11. Our Sun; 12. A census of stars; 13. The formation of stars and planets; 14. Stellar structure; 15. Stellar evolution and death; Part IV. Galaxies and the Universe: 16. The Milky Way galaxy; 17. Galaxies; 18. Cosmology; 19. Life in the Universe; Index.

  13. Universal cause for celebration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gething, Phillip

    2008-11-01

    The universal law of ageing applies to human beings, animals, plants and inanimate objects. All ages increase by exactly one day per 24 hours, and Hubble's constant gets a tiny bit smaller each day, because it is not really constant at all but varies in time. If we suppose that our universe originated in a Big Bang about 13.7 billion years ago, it too has a birthday each year, but we do not know the actual date. Was it on (say) a wet Wednesday in May or a sunny Saturday in November? It would be nice to know, so that we could have a yearly celebration to mark the event.

  14. Universality in ant behaviour.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Kim; Papavassiliou, Dario; de Figueiredo, Alexandre; Franks, Nigel R; Sendova-Franks, Ana B

    2015-01-01

    Prediction for social systems is a major challenge. Universality at the social level has inspired a unified theory for urban living but individual variation makes predicting relationships within societies difficult. Here, we show that in ant societies individual average speed is higher when event duration is longer. Expressed as a single scaling function, this relationship is universal because for any event duration an ant, on average, moves at the corresponding average speed except for a short acceleration and deceleration at the beginning and end. This establishes cause and effect within a social system and may inform engineering and control of artificial ones. PMID:25411406

  15. The Biological Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dick, Steven J.

    2000-03-01

    Introduction; 1. From the physical world to the biological universe: Democritus to Lowell; 2. Plurality of worlds and the decline of anthropocentrism; 3. The solar system: the limits of observation; 4. Solar systems beyond: the limits of theory; 5. Extraterrestrials in literature and the arts: the role of imagination; 6. The UFO controversy: on perception and deception; 7. The origin and evolution of life in the extraterrestrial context; 8. SETI: the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence; 9. The convergence of disciplines: birth of a new science; 10. The meaning of life; Summary and conclusion: the biological universe and the limits of science.

  16. The Biological Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dick, Steven J.

    1996-09-01

    Introduction; 1. From the physical world to the biological universe: Democritus to Lowell; 2. Plurality of worlds and the decline of anthropocentrism; 3. The solar system: the limits of observation; 4. Solar systems beyond: the limits of theory; 5. Extraterrestrials in literature and the arts: the role of imagination; 6. The UFO controversy: on perception and deception; 7. The origin and evolution of life in the extraterrestrial context; 8. SETI: the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence; 9. The convergence of disciplines: birth of a new science; 10. The meaning of life; Summary and conclusion: the biological universe and the limits of science.

  17. Imaging the early universe

    SciTech Connect

    Krupa, Tyler J.

    2000-07-01

    An international team of cosmologists has released the first detailed images of the universe in its infancy. The images reveal the structure that existed when the universe was a tiny fraction of its current age and 1,000 times smaller and hotter than it is today. Research carried out as part of this project is shedding light on some of cosmology's long-standing mysteries, such as the nature of the matter and energy that dominate intergalactic space and whether space is ''curved'' or ''flat.''(c) 2000 Optical Society of America.

  18. UTM: Universal Transit Modeller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deeg, Hans J.

    2014-12-01

    The Universal Transit Modeller (UTM) is a light-curve simulator for all kinds of transiting or eclipsing configurations between arbitrary numbers of several types of objects, which may be stars, planets, planetary moons, and planetary rings. A separate fitting program, UFIT (Universal Fitter) is part of the UTM distribution and may be used to derive best fits to light-curves for any set of continuously variable parameters. UTM/UFIT is written in IDL code and its source is released in the public domain under the GNU General Public License.

  19. A universal functional object

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, J. P.

    1972-01-01

    A scheme is presented for realizing any function, combinational or sequential, in a single universal function scheme, termed the universal function object UF. This scheme is addressed to the problem of the proliferation of the number of parts (cards, chips) necessary for conventional implementation in an LSI technology of a computer system. The UF implementation will use about ten times more circuits than a conventional implementation regardless of the size of the design. The UF approach also includes general-purpose spares for failing circuits. The procedure could be used both at manufacture to increase yields, as well as to achieve automatic repair.

  20. An Early Cyclic Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duhe, William; Biswas, Tirthibir

    2014-03-01

    We provide a comprehensive numerical study of the Emergent Cyclic Inflation scenario. This is a scenario where instead of traditional monotonic slow roll inflation, the universe expands over numerous short asymmetric cycles due to the production of entropy via interactions among different species. This is one of the very few scenarios of inflation which provides a nonsingular geodesically complete space-time and does not require any ``reheating'' mechanism. A special thanks to Loyola University for an excellent community to help this project grow.

  1. The Expanding Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heacox, William D.

    2015-11-01

    Introducing the Universe; Part I. Conceptual Foundations: 1. Newtonian cosmology; 2. General relativity; 3. Relativistic cosmology; Part II. General Relativity: 4. General covariance; 5. Equivalence principle; 6. Space-time curvature; 7. Einstein field equations of gravitation; Part III. Universal Expansion: 8. Cosmological field equations; 9. Cosmography; 10. Expansion dynamics; Part IV. Expansion Models: 11. Radiation; 12. Matter; 13. Dark energy; 14. Observational constraints; 15. Concordance cosmological model; Part V. Expansion History: 16. Particle era; 17. Plasma era; 18. Galaxy era; 19. Afterword: the new modern cosmology; Part VI: Appendices; Bibliography; Index.

  2. [Traditions of university studies at Kaunas University of Medicine].

    PubMed

    Bruneviciūte, Raimonda; Brazdzionyte, Julija

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this article is to highlight the dimensions of the traditions of the idea of the university that are relevant in our today's world--the autonomy of the university, education of a free and creative personality, and belonging to the unified space of studies--and to review the experience of Kaunas University of Medicine in the development of the traditions of university studies. The research object was university studies, and the methods applied in this research were analysis of literature and analysis of documents. The article consists of the introduction, two parts, and generalization. The first part discusses the autonomy of the university, the importance of liberal studies, and the influence of the European higher education and provides a generalized survey of the historical tradition of university studies in Lithuania. The second part of the article reviews the predominant factors that condition the development of university studies at Kaunas University of Medicine: organization of studies and implementation of liberal studies realized through general university education subjects into the modern content of university studies. The generalization of the results of the performed analysis allows for stating that the contents and the organization of curricula and the ongoing reforms at Kaunas University of Medicine expand the continuity of the traditions of the European university education, highlight the idea of the university, and realize university studies that reflect modern global tendencies. PMID:17090986

  3. Southern Universities: Are They Rising?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitehead, John S.

    1986-01-01

    This essay reviews four recent works on Southern universities: (1) "The University of Georgia: A Bicentennial History" (Dyer, 1985); (2) "A Pictorial History of the University of Georgia" (Boney, 1984); (3) To Foster Knowledge: A History of the University of Tennessee 1794-1970" (Montgomery, et al., 1984); and (4) "Gone with the Ivy: A Biography…

  4. Universals in the World's Musics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Steven; Jordania, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    Many decades of skepticism have prevented the field of musicology from embracing the importance of musical universals. When universals "have" been discussed, it has generally been in the form of meta-critiques about the concept of universals, rather than in positive proposals about actual universals. We present here a typology of four categories…

  5. Universities Venture into Venture Capitalism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Desruisseaux, Paul

    2000-01-01

    Reports that some universities are starting their own venture-capital funds to develop campus companies, or are investing endowment funds with established venture-capital firms inclined to finance potential spinoffs from campus research. Examples cited are from the University of Alabama, Vanderbilt University (Tennessee), University of…

  6. State University System of Florida

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Board of Governors, State University System of Florida, 2012

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents some information about the State University System of Florida. The following are presented in this paper: (1) University Work Plans and Annual Reports; (2) State University System 2009 Annual Report; (3) Quick Facts: Planned New Degree Programs--2010 to 2013; (4) State University System Tuition Differential Summary, FY…

  7. Student Perceptions of University Effectiveness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kleemann, Gary L.; Richardson, Richard C., Jr.

    Student perceptions of the effectiveness of three state universities was studied: Arizona State University, University of Arizona, and Northern Arizona University. An operational definition of effectiveness was proposed based on the literature, and a list of organizational activities was validated by administrators, faculty, community…

  8. Universal Design for Academic Facilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salmen, John P. S.

    2011-01-01

    Universal design (UD) can play a role in many aspects of academic life and is often thought of in the context of learning. However, this chapter focuses on the impact of UD on the design of facilities in a university or campus setting. Universal design has the potential for transforming universities into truly egalitarian institutions that…

  9. Invasion Ecology. Student Edition. Cornell Scientific Inquiry Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krasny, Marianne E.; Trautmann, Nancy; Carlsen, William; Cunningham, Christine

    This book contains the student edition of the Environmental Inquiry curriculum series developed at Cornell University. It is designed to teach learning skills for investigating the behaviors of non-native and native species and demonstrate how to apply scientific knowledge to solve real-life problems. This book focuses on strange intruders…

  10. Decay and Renewal. Student Edition. Cornell Scientific Inquiry Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trautmann, Nancy M.; Krasny, Marianne E.; Carlsen, William S.; Cunningham, Christine M.; Canning, Harry; Carroll, Patricia; Johnson, Mark; Khandar, Alpa; Olynciw, Elaina; Kottler, Bennett; Penningroth, Stephen; Welman, Adam

    This student guide is part of the Environmental Inquiry (EI) curriculum series developed at Cornell University to enable high school students to conduct authentic environmental science research. The goals of EI are for students to: (1) develop research skills; (2) use their newly acquired skills to conduct research projects of their own design,…

  11. Universal Teller Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DuPage Area Vocational Education Authority, Addison, IL.

    This curriculum guide has been designed to provide the teacher with a basis for planning a comprehensive program in the career field of universal teller, and to allow the teacher and learner maximum flexibility. The teaching or instruction, in both educational and financial institutions, can be accomplished through large formal groups, small…

  12. Universal Nonverbal Intelligence Test.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bracken, Bruce A.; McCallum, R. Steve

    This kit presents all components of the Universal Nonverbal Intelligence Test (UNIT), a newly developed instrument designed to measure the general intelligence and cognitive abilities of children and adolescents (ages 5 through 17) who may be disadvantaged by traditional verbal and language-loaded measures such as children with speech, language,…

  13. A Universe of Questions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zeldovich, Yakov

    1992-01-01

    Reprinted from the original Russian manuscript of Yakov Zeldovich, this article chronicles his studies of the universe and his attempts to construct a theory of its evolution. He provides the high school student with compelling cosmological discussions about uniformity, galactic clusters, radiation, evolution, the big bang, and gravitational…

  14. Organizing University Marketing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Thomas E.

    During a period of projected declining enrollments some years ago, colleges and universities began looking to business and industry for models and methods to achieve stability and exhibit accountability. Zero-based budgeting, computerized record keeping, and planned-programmed-budgeting systems found their way to college campuses. A trend to…

  15. PARKING PROGRAMS FOR UNIVERSITIES.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    KINNE, W.S., JR.

    PARKING FACILITIES WERE SURVEYED AT 83 REPRESENTATIVE UNIVERSITIES AND COLLEGES, AND THE METHODS USED IN ADMINISTERING, CONTROLLING AND FINANCING WERE EVALUTED. GENERAL RECOMMENDATIONS WERE MADE CONCERNING (1) THE LOCATION AND DESIGN OF PARKING LOTS AND GARAGES, (2) THE PRACTICE OF CURB PARKING ON CAMPUS, AND (3) THE FINANCING OF PARKING…

  16. Radiation in the universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stuhlinger, Ernst; Truemper, Joachim; Weisskopf, Martin

    1992-01-01

    When Wilhelm Conrad Roentgen discovered radiation one hundred years ago, it seemed that what was discovered was one of the rarest and most volatile members of the family of the basic modules of our natural world. Today cosmologists report that a substantial part of the universe's radiation energy consists of X-rays, which travel through cosmic space with the speed of light.

  17. Colorado State University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKelfresh, David A.; Bender, Kim K.

    2009-01-01

    Colorado State University (CSU) is located in Fort Collins, which is a midsize city of 134,000 situated in Northern Colorado at the western edge of the Great Plains and at the base of the Rocky Mountains. CSU's total enrollment is approximately 25,000 students. The Division of Student Affairs comprises 30 departments organized into programmatic…

  18. University Study in Canada.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association of Universities and Colleges of Canada, Ottawa (Ontario). International Programmes Div.

    These notes for overseas students intending to attend university in Canada contain information on admission requirements and application and registration procedures. A sample budget for a 1967-68 undergraduate as well as a discussion of medical and other insurance are included in the summary of possible financial expenditures. Although there are…

  19. Mapping the Universe.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landy, S. D.

    1999-06-01

    Galaxies congregate into clusters, clusters amass into superclusters and so on - at every observed scale, as astronomers build maps of the sky, they find matter organized into clumps. Yet taken as a whole, the texture of the universe is smooth, in keeping with theory. A new "music of the spheres" may explain how ordered structures emerged from the original smooth chaos.

  20. Mathematics: The Universal Language?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffert, Sharon B.

    2009-01-01

    Mathematics is considered the universal language, but students who speak languages other than English have difficulty doing mathematics in English. For instance, because of a lack of familiarity with the problem's context, many have trouble understanding exactly what operations to perform. In the United States, approximately one in seven students…

  1. A Universal Phylogenetic Tree.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Offner, Susan

    2001-01-01

    Presents a universal phylogenetic tree suitable for use in high school and college-level biology classrooms. Illustrates the antiquity of life and that all life is related, even if it dates back 3.5 billion years. Reflects important evolutionary relationships and provides an exciting way to learn about the history of life. (SAH)

  2. University Libraries in Transition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hyatt, James A.

    1986-01-01

    College and university libraries are experiencing change in the ways they provide services and in their responses to rising costs and reduced financial support. These conditions result from three major phenomena: the information explosion, the technology revolution, and escalating library costs. (MLW)

  3. Should Universities Promote Employability?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCowan, Tristan

    2015-01-01

    Employability is becoming increasingly central to the mission and functioning of universities, spurred on by national and supranational agencies, and the demands of marketisation. This article provides a response to the normative dimensions of the question, progressing through four stages: first, there is a brief consideration of the meaning and…

  4. Langston University. A History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patterson, Zella J. Black; Wert, Lynette L.

    Oklahoma's Langston University, a land-grant college founded under the Morrill Act of 1890, is described. Its founding and growth in the Oklahoma Territory was intertwined with that of black settlers--new arrivals in the territory, some of them former slaves who gathered to establish a farming community and built a higher education institution for…

  5. The Changing University?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schuller, Tom, Ed.

    This collection of papers investigates change and compares university education experiences worldwide, looking at it from the perspective of numbers of students, range of institutions, funding, institutional functions, boundaries, and directions, orientation of students and staff, and institutional change. After an introduction by Tom Schuler,…

  6. Homecoming at Atwater University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marshall, Sarah M.; Van Pelt, Scott; Kingsak, Phoebe; Williams, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Atwater University (AU) administration is struggling with an increased number of student alcohol-related problems. In particular, during the annual homecoming parade, students are extremely intoxicated and belligerent toward alumni. The new dean of students is appalled by the condoned student behavior. He also received two complaint letters from…

  7. Community University Research Agreement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Settee, Priscilla; Thomas-Prokop, Shelley

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes the process of engaging the extended Indigenous community within Saskatoon and the surrounding First Nations communities in what would be a first major research project between Indigenous communities and the University of Saskatchewan. A management committee was established comprised of all the major Saskatoon/Saskatchewan…

  8. Student and University Governance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shoben, Edward Joseph, Jr.

    It is necessary to provide organizational and political bases from which genuine student influence can be exercised if we assume that (1) extensive and meaningful participation by students in university governance is likely to be a permanent feature of academic life; (2) participation legitimately represents serious student concerns and provides a…

  9. A Polarized Universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wanjek, Christopher

    2003-01-01

    The CMB polarization was produced as light scattered off a primordial cloud of protons and electrons nearly 14 billion years ago, about 400,000 years after the Big Bang. This marks the moment of recombination, when the universe finally cooled enough to allow electrons to join protons. The CMB is the light that broke through the fog.

  10. West Texas State University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roach, Ed D.

    1988-01-01

    Threats in the external environment, the arrival of a planning-oriented new president, and new regional reaccreditation criteria prompted West Texas State University to undertake a successful strategic planning venture. Leadership must focus strategic planning in a manner that recognizes the decentralized and collegial elements present in higher…

  11. University of Nevada, Reno

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Library Journal, 2004

    2004-01-01

    A $10 million gift will help the University of Nevada, Reno (UNR), begin construction next year on a new $66 million "Knowledge Center." The donation comes in $5 million gifts from Reno-based International Game Technology (IGT), a slot machine manufacturer, and from former IGT chair Chuck Mathewson and his wife, Ann. UNR's current library was…

  12. Universal voice processor development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The development of a universal voice processor is discussed. The device is based on several circuit configurations using hybrid techniques to satisfy the electrical specifications. The steps taken during the design process are described. Circuit diagrams of the final design are presented. Mathematical models are included to support the theoretical aspects.

  13. NRC Targets University Reactors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marshall, Eliot

    1984-01-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) wants universities to convert to low-grade fuel in their research reactions. Researchers claim the conversion, which will bring U.S. reactors in line with a policy the NRC is trying to impress on foreigners, could be financially and scientifically costly. Impact of the policy is considered. (JN)

  14. Islamist Movement Challenges Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindsey, Ursula

    2013-01-01

    In Tunisian and Egyptian universities, scholars face a growing Islamist resolve to remake their countries on the basis of religious principles. Both Tunisia and Egypt face questions that could affect higher education across the Middle East and North Africa: Can their new Islamist governments spread conservative religious values and also create…

  15. University City Core Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Philadelphia City Planning Commission, PA.

    A redevelopment plan for an urban core area of about 300 acres was warranted by--(1) unsuitable building conditions, (2) undesirable land usage, and (3) faulty traffic circulation. The plan includes expansion of two universities and creation of a regional science center, high school, and medical center. Guidelines for proposed land use and zoning…

  16. Revisiting the University Front

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lock, Grahame; Lorenz, Chris

    2007-01-01

    The article argues that the most important trends in the recent metamorphosis of higher education, especially of university teaching and research, cannot be understood without placing them in the context of general developments in political life. Both processes reveal alarming features and there is a link between them. In recent decades a religion…

  17. The Universe as Calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Wakely, Scott P.

    2006-10-27

    The maturation of very high energy astrophysics has enabled many novel physics applications. Among these is the investigation of extragalactic photon fields, which in some cases encode specific calorimetric information about such things as the formation of large-scale structure and the total high-energy luminosity of the universe. The origins of these backgrounds, and techniques for probing them will be discussed.

  18. Universities under Scrutiny.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, William

    This report is intended to stimulate discussion among and within the 18 countries comprising the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) about recent, current and future changes in the role and functions of their universities. Of particular concern are difficulties associated with preparing, legislating, and implementing…

  19. Universities in Their Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Fred

    2012-01-01

    Universities often seem to be far more concerned about their international connections than their local relationships. The local context seems not to matter much either to their jetsetting vice-chancellors or to their lecturers and researchers under pressure to get papers published in obscure journals. That is how it may seem, but it is not…

  20. Antimatter in the universe

    SciTech Connect

    Dolgov, A. D.

    2011-03-15

    The models leading to a high abundance of antimatter in the universe are discussed. Special attention is payed to the model of antimatter creation in the form of compact stellar-like objects. Such objects can contribute significantly to the cosmological dark matter. Observational signatures of antimatter in the Galaxy are discussed.

  1. Oregon State University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanderson, Rebecca A.; Ketcham, Patricia L.

    2009-01-01

    Oregon State University (OSU) is located in Corvallis, a community of 53,000 people situated in the heart of the Willamette Valley between Portland and Eugene. Approximately 15,700 undergraduate and 3,400 graduate students, including 2,600 U.S. students of color and 950 international students, are currently enrolled at OSU across 11 academic…

  2. Personnel Management. Universities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio Board of Regents, Columbus. Management Improvement Program.

    This manual is one of 10 completed in the Ohio Management Improvement Program (MIP) during the 1971-73 biennium. In this project, Ohio's 34 public universities and colleges, in an effort directed and staffed by the Ohio Board of Regents, have developed manuals of management practices, in this case, concerning personnel management. Emphasis in this…

  3. The University and Freedom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, Benno

    1992-01-01

    The president of Yale University examines the tension between the values of community and harmony and of intellectual freedom on college campuses. He notes incidents at various campuses opposing expressions deemed offensive to some groups. He opposes suppression of unpopular voices (even if seemingly bigoted) and supports freedom of thought and…

  4. Evolution of the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Primack, Joel

    2006-04-01

    Cosmology is in the midst of a scientific revolution that is establishing its lasting foundations. The good agreement between many different sorts of observations and the predictions of the now-standard Lambda Cold Dark Matter (LCDM) theory gives us hope that this is humanity's first picture of the history of the universe as a whole that might actually be true. An unexpected feature of this new picture is that we humans appear to be central or special in many ways -- for example, we are made of the rarest stuff in the universe (stardust); we are intermediate in size between the smallest possible size (the Planck length) and the largest size (the cosmic horizon); and we are living at a pivotal time: the period in the history of the universe when its expansion began to accelerate rather than slow down, and in the middle of the ten-billion-year lifetime of our solar system and of the billion year most habitable period of our planet, and at what must be the end of the exponential growth of human impact on the earth. This talk will review key observations that support modern cosmology, describe some symbolic ways of understanding the modern cosmos, and discuss some possible implications of a cosmic perspective for our 21st century worldview. Based on a new book, The View from the Center of the Universe: Discovering Our Extraordinary Place in the Cosmos, by Joel R. Primack and Nancy Ellen Abrams (Riverhead Books, April 2006).

  5. University Student Online Plagiarism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Yu-mei

    2008-01-01

    This article reports a study investigating university student online plagiarism. The following questions are investigated: (a) What is the incidence of student online plagiarism? (b) What are student perceptions regarding online plagiarism? (c) Are there any differences in terms of student perceptions of online plagiarism and print plagiarism? (d)…

  6. Universality of particle multiplicities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goulianos, K.

    1994-09-01

    We discuss the scaling properties and universality aspects of the rapidity and multiplicity distributions of particles produced in high energy hadronic and e(+)e(-) interactions. This paper is based on material presented in three lectures on pomeron phenomenology, which included a review of traditional soft pomeron physics and selected topics on hard diffraction processes probing the structure function of the pomeron.

  7. Life in the Universe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowman, Paul D., Jr.

    2003-01-01

    The belief that life exists in the universe is an optimism shared by many. With several manned missions expected to be carried out in the future, the possibility of discovering life in outer space will revolutionize the field of astrobiology. In this article, the author presents a summary of recent developments and discoveries made in the search…

  8. Entrepreneurial Planning: Tufts University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunn, John A.

    1990-01-01

    This paper focuses on key strategic decisions taken at Tufts University (Massachusetts) under President Jean Mayer noting the role of formal planning and institutional research. Initiatives in the following areas are described: the School of Veterinary Medicine, nutrition, environmental management, entrepreneurial liberation, fund raising, and a…

  9. The Classification of Universes

    SciTech Connect

    Bjorken, J

    2004-04-09

    We define a universe as the contents of a spacetime box with comoving walls, large enough to contain essentially all phenomena that can be conceivably measured. The initial time is taken as the epoch when the lowest CMB modes undergo horizon crossing, and the final time taken when the wavelengths of CMB photons are comparable with the Hubble scale, i.e. with the nominal size of the universe. This allows the definition of a local ensemble of similarly constructed universes, using only modest extrapolations of the observed behavior of the cosmos. We then assume that further out in spacetime, similar universes can be constructed but containing different standard model parameters. Within this multiverse ensemble, it is assumed that the standard model parameters are strongly correlated with size, i.e. with the value of the inverse Hubble parameter at the final time, in a manner as previously suggested. This allows an estimate of the range of sizes which allow life as we know it, and invites a speculation regarding the most natural distribution of sizes. If small sizes are favored, this in turn allows some understanding of the hierarchy problems of particle physics. Subsequent sections of the paper explore other possible implications. In all cases, the approach is as bottoms up and as phenomenological as possible, and suggests that theories of the multiverse so constructed may in fact lay some claim of being scientific.

  10. Communities in University Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biza, Irene; Jaworski, Barbara; Hemmi, Kirsti

    2014-01-01

    This paper concerns communities of learners and teachers that are formed, develop and interact in university mathematics environments through the theoretical lens of "Communities of Practice." From this perspective, learning is described as a process of participation and reification in a community in which individuals belong and form…

  11. University Reactor Instrumentation Grant

    SciTech Connect

    S. M. Bajorek

    2000-02-01

    A noble gas air monitoring system was purchased through the University Reactor Instrumentation Grant Program. This monitor was installed in the Kansas State TRIGA reactor bay at a location near the top surface of the reactor pool according to recommendation by the supplier. This system is now functional and has been incorporated into the facility license.

  12. Reform in Canadian Universities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Small, J. M.

    1994-01-01

    A survey of 67 Canadian university vice presidents and 66 deans concerning reform in recent years found that the many changes reported were modest and reactive rather than bold and proactive. Most common changes involved strategic planning, retrenchment, curriculum expansion, response to enrollment changes, administrative restructuring, and more…

  13. Teaching Geomorphology at University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sugden, David; Hamilton, Patrick

    1978-01-01

    Geomorphology courses in British universities emphasize the main landform/process systems rather than more abstract concepts. Recommends a more theoretical focus on fundamental geomorphic processes and methodological problems. Available from: Faculty of Modern Studies, Oxford Polytechnic, Headington, Oxford OX3 OBP, England. (Author/AV)

  14. Discovering the Invisible Universe.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedman, Herbert

    1991-01-01

    The discovery of radio waves, infrared, and x-rays and their importance in describing the universe and its origins is discussed. Topics include radio waves from space, the radio pioneers of World War II, radio telescopes, infrared radiation, satellites, space missions, and x-ray telescopes. (KR)

  15. Understanding University Undergraduate Applications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molinero, Cecilio Mar

    1990-01-01

    Much marketing information can be obtained for admissions policy formation and forecasting from existing data sources, including course perceptions, the nature of the competition, and the admissions policies of the competition. The British university application system would benefit by exploiting computer applications of this concept. (MSE)

  16. The University as Microcosm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaldis, Byron

    2009-01-01

    This paper puts forward the model of "microcosm-macrocosm" isomorphism encapsulated in certain philosophical views on the form of university education. The human being as a "microcosm" should reflect internally the external "macrocosm". Higher Education is a socially instituted attempt to guide human beings into forming themselves as microcosms of…

  17. Entropy of the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Humitaka

    2010-06-01

    Charles Darwin's calculation of a life of Earth had ignited Kelvin's insight on a life of Sun, which had eventually inherited to the physical study of stellar structure and energy source. Nuclear energy had secured a longevity of the universe and the goal of the cosmic evolution has been secured by the entropy of black holes.

  18. The Universal Access System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Neil G.

    This final report discusses the outcomes of a project that created a Universal Access System (UAS), a system that gives students with disabilities access to the same computers as their classmates. The project developed a new approach in which the needs of the individual with disabilities are handled separately from the computers and other devices…

  19. The University Needs "You"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webb, Allen

    2009-01-01

    Colleges and universities need English education professors who know what it is to teach five classes a day, accommodate IEPs, and still take on extracurricular activities. They need English education professors who not only present at NCTE Annual Conventions, but who also want to be in schools talking to teachers on a regular basis. They need…

  20. Universal nonlinear entanglement witnesses

    SciTech Connect

    Kotowski, Marcin; Kotowski, Michal

    2010-06-15

    We give a universal recipe for constructing nonlinear entanglement witnesses able to detect nonclassical correlations in arbitrary systems of distinguishable and/or identical particles for an arbitrary number of constituents. The constructed witnesses are expressed in terms of expectation values of observables. As such, they are, at least in principle, measurable in experiments.

  1. Explorers of the Universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alvarez, Marino C.; Busby, Michael R.; Sotoohi, Goli; Rodriguez, William J.; Hennig, Lee Ann; Berenty, Jerry; King, Terry; Grener, Doreen; Kruzan, John

    1998-01-01

    The Explorers of the Universe is a multifaceted scientific/literacy project that involves teachers and their students with problem oriented situations using authentic materials. This paper presents examples of self-directed cases researched by high school students and the met acognitive tools they use in the planning, carrying out, and finalizing their reports.

  2. The Universal Trap.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodman, Paul

    The compulsory system of education is criticized on the grounds that it has become a regimented "universal trap" antithetical to democracy. In contrast to the Jeffersonian concept of education in the service of citizen initiative for the preservation of freedom, current compulsory education is a tool of industrialism and of a rigidly stratified…

  3. Images of the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stott, Carole

    1991-11-01

    Images of the Universe is a special collection of essays written to celebrate astronomy and the inauguration of the British Astronomical Association. Colin Ronan opens the book with a fascinating account of developments over the past hundred years. Next, the solar system is explored by Richard Baum, John Rogers, Richard McKim, and Patrick Moore. Comets and meteors are explained by David Hughes. The stars, birthplace of the elements, are examined by Jacqueline Mitton and John Isles. Paul Murdin gives an account of the brightest supernova to be seen from Earth since 1604. Iain Nicolson explores G2, the single dwarf called the Sun. Heather Couper and Nigel Henbest look at the Milky Way, the hazy band of light that is the edge on view of our galaxy. Malcolm Longair looks beyond our own galaxy into the deep sky. Paul Davies gives an account of the first one second of the existence of our expanding Universe. How did it all happen? Martin Rees, the cosmologist, speculates on the origin of the Universe. The ensuing narrative by many famous astronomers and science writers is written at a general level and will be accessible to anyone with a passing interest in the astronomical wonders of our universe. Carole Stott is the author of The Greenwich Guide to Stargazing (1990), and The Greenwich Guide to Astronomy in Action (1990).

  4. Creating Adaptable Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spanier, Graham B.

    2010-01-01

    Shifting demographics, rising costs of operations, a changing competitive landscape, reductions in state appropriations, pressures for accountability, and a widespread economic decline characterize the environment in which today's colleges and universities operate. This article examines some of the current responses to these challenges and…

  5. Howard University Bookstore

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maxon, Hazel Carter; Negron, Jaime

    1977-01-01

    Two full-time university bookstores, with three satellites helping during rush period, serve the Howard students and faculty. Solutions to problems of space, acquiring used books, and communications with faculty members are discussed, and the successful retailing of black studies books is described. (LBH)

  6. Toward the Multicultural University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowser, Benjamin P., Ed.; And Others

    This book is about the growing need for a more inclusive curriculum and university. The debate about multicultural education is moved from an ideological debate to the realm of the practical in these selections. The first part of the book outlines the demographic and historic realities that make multiculturalism imperative. The second part gives…

  7. Universal Design for Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rose, David

    2001-01-01

    This article presents testimony before the Senate Appropriation Committee on the future of educational technology. Assistive technologies for students with disabilities are explained, and the need for Congress to support continued development of assistive devices, digital curricula, and universal design for learning technologies is stressed. (CR)

  8. University for Masses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharma, Motilal

    Education, a basic need, is the foundation of developing countries such as Bangladesh. Ignorance and illiteracy are obstacles to growth and technological progress. Formal schooling must be supplemented with nonformal education, distance education, and out-of-school education for workers who want to continue their studies. Universities must develop…

  9. University Scientists as Entrepreneurs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richter, Maurice N. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    The formation of business firms by academic scientists is an example of the deteriorating boundary between the academic and business world. The conditions and routes contributing to this phenomenon are explored. This challenge to establish academic and scientific values and norms is resulting in enhanced autonomy for university scientists. (ETS)

  10. The Universe's First Fireworks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Poster VersionFigure 1Figure 2

    This is an image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope of stars and galaxies in the Ursa Major constellation. This infrared image covers a region of space so large that light would take up to 100 million years to travel across it. Figure 1 is the same image after stars, galaxies and other sources were masked out. The remaining background light is from a period of time when the universe was less than one billion years old, and most likely originated from the universe's very first groups of objects -- either huge stars or voracious black holes. Darker shades in the image on the left correspond to dimmer parts of the background glow, while yellow and white show the brightest light.

    Brief History of the Universe In figure 2, the artist's timeline chronicles the history of the universe, from its explosive beginning to its mature, present-day state.

    Our universe began in a tremendous explosion known as the Big Bang about 13.7 billion years ago (left side of strip). Observations by NASA's Cosmic Background Explorer and Wilkinson Anisotropy Microwave Probe revealed microwave light from this very early epoch, about 400,000 years after the Big Bang, providing strong evidence that our universe did blast into existence. Results from the Cosmic Background Explorer were honored with the 2006 Nobel Prize for Physics.

    A period of darkness ensued, until about a few hundred million years later, when the first objects flooded the universe with light. This first light is believed to have been captured in data from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope. The light detected by Spitzer would have originated as visible and ultraviolet light, then stretched, or redshifted, to lower-energy infrared wavelengths during its long voyage to reach us across expanding space. The light detected by the

  11. The Artful Universe Expanded

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrow, John D.

    2005-07-01

    Our love of art, writes John Barrow, is the end product of millions of years of evolution. How we react to a beautiful painting or symphony draws upon instincts laid down long before humans existed. Now, in this enhanced edition of the highly popular The Artful Universe , Barrow further explores the close ties between our aesthetic appreciation and the basic nature of the Universe. Barrow argues that the laws of the Universe have imprinted themselves upon our thoughts and actions in subtle and unexpected ways. Why do we like certain types of art or music? What games and puzzles do we find challenging? Why do so many myths and legends have common elements? In this eclectic and entertaining survey, Barrow answers these questions and more as he explains how the landscape of the Universe has influenced the development of philosophy and mythology, and how millions of years of evolutionary history have fashioned our attraction to certain patterns of sound and color. Barrow casts the story of human creativity and thought in a fascinating light, considering such diverse topics as our instinct for language, the origins and uses of color in nature, why we divide time into intervals as we do, the sources of our appreciation of landscape painting, and whether computer-generated fractal art is really art. Drawing on a wide variety of examples, from the theological questions raised by St. Augustine and C.S. Lewis to the relationship between the pure math of Pythagoras and the music of the Beatles, The Artful Universe Expanded covers new ground and enters a wide-ranging debate about the meaning and significance of the links between art and science.

  12. Universe or Multiverse?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, Bernard

    2009-08-01

    Part I. Overviews: 1. Introduction and overview Bernard Carr; 2. Living in the multiverse Steven Weinberg; 3. Enlightenment, knowledge, ignorance, temptation Frank Wilczek; Part II. Cosmology and Astrophysics: 4. Cosmology and the multiverse Martin J. Rees; 5. The anthropic principle revisited Bernard Carr; 6. Cosmology from the top down Stephen Hawking; 7. The multiverse hierarchy Max Tegmark; 8. The inflationary universe Andrei Linde; 9. A model of anthropic reasoning: the dark to ordinary matter ratio Frank Wilczek; 10. Anthropic predictions: the case of the cosmological constant Alexander Vilenkin; 11. The definition and classification of universes James D. Bjorken; 12. M/string theory and anthropic reasoning Renata Kallosh; 13. The anthropic principle, dark energy and the LHC Savas Dimopoulos and Scott Thomas; Part III. Particle Physics and Quantum Theory: 14. Quarks, electrons and atoms in closely related universes Craig J. Hogan; 15. The fine-tuning problems of particle physics and anthropic mechanisms John F. Donoghue; 16. The anthropic landscape of string theory Leonard Susskind; 17. Cosmology and the many worlds interpretation of quantum mechanics Viatcheslav Mukhanov; 18. Anthropic reasoning and quantum cosmology James B. Hartle; 19. Micro-anthropic principle for quantum theory Brandon Carter; Part IV. More General Philosophical Issues: 20. Scientific alternatives to the anthropic principle Lee Smolin; 21. Making predictions in a multiverse: conundrums, dangers, coincidences Anthony Aguirre; 22. Multiverses: description, uniqueness and testing George Ellis; 23. Predictions and tests of multiverse theories Don N. Page; 24. Observation selection theory and cosmological fine-tuning Nick Bostrom; 25. Are anthropic arguments, involving multiverses and beyond, legitimate? William R. Stoeger; 26. The multiverse hypothesis: a theistic perspective Robin Collins; 27. Living in a simulated universe John D. Barrow; 28. Universes galore: where will it all end? Paul

  13. Cornell U. to Step Up Efforts to Market Its Research; Other Institutions Report Progress on Venture Funds.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuchsberg, Gilbert

    1989-01-01

    While some universities have had success establishing venture funds to market research with commercial potential, Cornell University has formed an alumni panel to evaluate new university technologies for those with promise for new products, spin-off companies, and profits. Members with connections in venture capital will arrange financing and…

  14. The Dark Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livio, Mario

    2010-04-01

    1. A brief history of dark matter Vera Rubin; 2. Microlensing towards the Magellanic Clouds Kailash Sahu; 3. Searching for galactic dark matter Harvey Richer; 4. Hot gas in clusters of galaxies and Omega Megan Donahue; 5. Tracking the Baryon density from the Big Bang to the present Gary Steigman; 6. Modified Newtonian dynamics and its implications Bob Sanders; 7. Cosmological parameters and quintessence from radio galaxies Ruth Daly and Eric Guerra; 8. The mass density of the Universe Neta Bahcall; 9. Growth of structure in the Universe John Peacock; 10. Cosmological implications of the most distant supernova (known) Adam Riess; 11. Dynamical probes of the Halo mass function Chris Kochanek; 12. Detection of gravitational waves from inflation Marc Kamionkowski and Andrew Jaffe; 13. Cosmological constant problems and their solution Alex Vilenkin; 14. Dark Matter and dark energy: a physicist's perspective Michael Dine.

  15. The Dark Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livio, Mario

    2004-02-01

    1. A brief history of dark matter Vera Rubin; 2. Microlensing towards the Magellanic Clouds Kailash Sahu; 3. Searching for galactic dark matter Harvey Richer; 4. Hot gas in clusters of galaxies and Omega Megan Donahue; 5. Tracking the Baryon density from the Big Bang to the present Gary Steigman; 6. Modified Newtonian dynamics and its implications Bob Sanders; 7. Cosmological parameters and quintessence from radio galaxies Ruth Daly and Eric Guerra; 8. The mass density of the Universe Neta Bahcall; 9. Growth of structure in the Universe John Peacock; 10. Cosmological implications of the most distant supernova (known) Adam Riess; 11. Dynamical probes of the Halo mass function Chris Kochanek; 12. Detection of gravitational waves from inflation Marc Kamionkowski and Andrew Jaffe; 13. Cosmological constant problems and their solution Alex Vilenkin; 14. Dark Matter and dark energy: a physicist's perspective Michael Dine.

  16. Universal Test Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laughery, Mike

    A universal test facility (UTF) for Space Station Freedom is developed. In this context, universal means that the experimental rack design must be: automated, highly marketable, and able to perform diverse microgravity experiments according to NASA space station requirements. In order to fulfill these broad objectives, the facility's customers, and their respective requirements, are first defined. From these definitions, specific design goals and the scope of the first phase of this project are determined. An examination is first made into what types of research are most likely to make the UTF marketable. Based on our findings, the experiments for which the UTF would most likely be used included: protein crystal growth, hydroponics food growth, gas combustion, gallium arsenide crystal growth, microorganism development, and cell encapsulation. Therefore, the UTF is designed to fulfill all of the major requirements for the experiments listed above. The versatility of the design is achieved by taking advantage of the many overlapping requirements presented by these experiments.

  17. Universality classes of inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Roest, Diederik

    2014-01-01

    We investigate all single-field, slow-roll inflationary models whose slow-roll parameters scale as 1/N in the limit of a large number of e-folds N. We proof that all such models belong to two universality classes, characterised by a single parameter. One class contains small field models like hilltop inflation, while the other class consists of large field models like chaotic inflation. We give the leading expressions for the spectral index and tensor-to-scalar ratio r, which are universal for each class, plus subleading corrections for a number of models. This predicts r either to be unobservably small, r < 0.01, or close to the present observational limit, r ≈ 0.07.

  18. Universal Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laughery, Mike

    1994-01-01

    A universal test facility (UTF) for Space Station Freedom is developed. In this context, universal means that the experimental rack design must be: automated, highly marketable, and able to perform diverse microgravity experiments according to NASA space station requirements. In order to fulfill these broad objectives, the facility's customers, and their respective requirements, are first defined. From these definitions, specific design goals and the scope of the first phase of this project are determined. An examination is first made into what types of research are most likely to make the UTF marketable. Based on our findings, the experiments for which the UTF would most likely be used included: protein crystal growth, hydroponics food growth, gas combustion, gallium arsenide crystal growth, microorganism development, and cell encapsulation. Therefore, the UTF is designed to fulfill all of the major requirements for the experiments listed above. The versatility of the design is achieved by taking advantage of the many overlapping requirements presented by these experiments.

  19. Life in the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-10-01

    Live Webcast from Europe's Leading Research Organisations Summary Is there life elsewhere in the Universe? Are we alone? These questions have always fascinated humanity and for more than 50 years, physicists, biologists, chemists, cosmologists, astronomers and other scientists have worked tirelessly to answer these fundamental questions. And now this November via webcast, all the world will have the opportunity to see and hear the latest news on extraterrestrial life from the most prestigious research centers and how for the past three months, European students have had the chance to jump into the scientists' shoes and explore these questions for themselves. The event is being sponsored by the European Organisation for Nuclear Research (CERN) , the European Space Agency (ESA) and the European Southern Observatory (ESO) , in cooperation with the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL) and the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) and the European Association for Astronomy Education (EAAE). "Life in the Universe" is being mounted in collaboration with the Research Directorate-General of the European Commission for the European Week of Science and Technology in November 2001 . "Life in the Universe" competitions are already underway in 23 European countries to find the best projects from school students between 14 and 18. Two winning teams from each country will be invited to a final event at CERN in Geneva on 8-11 November 2001 to present their projects and discuss them with a panel of International Experts at a special three-day event. They will also compete for the "Super Prize" - a free visit to ESA's and ESO's research and technology facilities at Kourou and Paranal in South America. Students participating in the programme are encouraged to present their views on extraterrestrial life creatively. The only requirement is that the views be based upon scientific evidence. Many projects are being submitted just now - among them are scientific essays

  20. Kansas State University

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, T.; Carnes, K.; Needham, V.

    1995-08-01

    Argonne has fabricated the niobium resonators and some other linac components required for the superconducting accel/decel linac now in operation at Kansas State University. Several staff members from KSU spent a substantial period of time at ANL during FY 1985 in order to learn the technology, and they return occasionally to assemble and test the resonators. There is a continuing interchange of technical information between ANL and KSU related to linac operations, tuning, and resonator maintenance.

  1. Inflation in the universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, M. S.

    1987-05-01

    The big bang cosmology is a highly successful model, providing a reliable and tested accounting of the Universe from 0.01 sec after the bang until today, some 15 Gyr later. However, very special initial data seem to be required in order to account for the observed smoothness and flatness of our Hubble volume and for the existence of the small primeval density inhomogeneities required for the formation of structure in the Universe. Inflation offers a means of accounting for these special initial data, which is based on physics at sub-planck energy scales (much less than mpl approx. = 10 to the 19th power GeV) and is motivated by contemporary ideas in particle theory. Here the status of the Inflationary Paradigm is reviewed. At present essentially all inflationary models involve a very weakly-coupled (quantified by the presence of a dimensionless parameter of order 10 to the -12 or so) scalar field which is displaced from the minimum of its potential. Regions of the Universe where the scalar field is initially displaced from its minimum undergo inflation as the scalar field relaxes, resulting in a Universe today which resembles ours in regions much larger than our present Hubble volume (approx. = 10 to the 28 cm), may be highly irregular. The most conspicuous blemish on the paradigm is the lack of a compelling particle physics model to implement it. Also reviewed are some other unresolved issues, and the all important confrontation between inflation and observational data is fully discussed. Finally, the possibility that inflation leads to large-scale, primeval magnetic fields of sufficient strength to be of astrophysical interest is covered.

  2. Dark matter universe.

    PubMed

    Bahcall, Neta A

    2015-10-01

    Most of the mass in the universe is in the form of dark matter--a new type of nonbaryonic particle not yet detected in the laboratory or in other detection experiments. The evidence for the existence of dark matter through its gravitational impact is clear in astronomical observations--from the early observations of the large motions of galaxies in clusters and the motions of stars and gas in galaxies, to observations of the large-scale structure in the universe, gravitational lensing, and the cosmic microwave background. The extensive data consistently show the dominance of dark matter and quantify its amount and distribution, assuming general relativity is valid. The data inform us that the dark matter is nonbaryonic, is "cold" (i.e., moves nonrelativistically in the early universe), and interacts only weakly with matter other than by gravity. The current Lambda cold dark matter cosmology--a simple (but strange) flat cold dark matter model dominated by a cosmological constant Lambda, with only six basic parameters (including the density of matter and of baryons, the initial mass fluctuations amplitude and its scale dependence, and the age of the universe and of the first stars)--fits remarkably well all the accumulated data. However, what is the dark matter? This is one of the most fundamental open questions in cosmology and particle physics. Its existence requires an extension of our current understanding of particle physics or otherwise point to a modification of gravity on cosmological scales. The exploration and ultimate detection of dark matter are led by experiments for direct and indirect detection of this yet mysterious particle. PMID:26417091

  3. Inflation in the universe

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, M.S.

    1987-05-01

    The hot big bang cosmology, or the standard cosmology as it is appropriately known, is a highly successful model, providing a reliable and tested accounting of the Universe from 0.01 sec after the bang until today, some 15 Gyr later. However, very special initial data seem to be required in order to account for the observed smoothness and flatness of our Hubble volume and for the existence of the small primeval density inhomogeneities required for the formation of structure in the Universe. Inflation offers a means of accounting for these special initial data, which is based upon physics at sub-planck energy scales (<< m/sub pl/ approx. = 10/sup 19/ GeV) and is motivated by contemporary ideas in particle theory. Here I review the status of the 'Inflationary Paradigm'. At present essentially all inflationary models involve a very weakly-coupled (quantified by the presence of a dimensionless parameter of order 10/sup -12/ or so) scalar field which is displaced from the minimum of its potential. Regions of the Universe where the scalar field is initially displaced from its minimum undergo inflation as the scalar field relaxes, resulting in a Universe today which resembles ours in regions much larger than our present Hubble volume (approx. = 10/sup 28/ cm), but which on very large scales (>> 10/sup 28/ cm) may be highly irregular. The most conspicuous blemish on the paradigm is the lack of a compelling particle physics model to implement it. I also review some other unresolved issues, and discuss in detail the all important confrontation between inflation and observational data. Finally, I discuss the possibility that inflation leads to large-scale, primeval magnetic fields of sufficient strength to be of astrophysical interest. 123 refs., 4 figs.

  4. A Universal Syntax Checker.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leahy, John Francis, III

    A universal syntax checker was constructed to be utilized with a text editor in a time-sharing environment. This syntax checker is a top-down, left-right, slow-back parser that will provide, when supplied the syntax of any language in the Backus-normal form, a syntax check for any string written in a language described. The procedure is capable of…

  5. On separate universes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Liang; Pajer, Enrico; Schmidt, Fabian

    2015-10-01

    The separate universe conjecture states that in General Relativity a density perturbation behaves locally (i.e. on scales much smaller than the wavelength of the mode) as a separate universe with different background density and curvature. We prove this conjecture for a spherical compensated tophat density perturbation of arbitrary amplitude and radius in ΛCDM. We then use Conformal Fermi Coordinates to generalize this result to scalar perturbations of arbitrary configuration and scale in a general cosmology with a mixture of fluids, but to linear order in perturbations. In this case, the separate universe conjecture holds for the isotropic part of the perturbations. The anisotropic part on the other hand is exactly captured by a tidal field in the Newtonian form. We show that the separate universe picture is restricted to scales larger than the sound horizons of all fluid components. We then derive an expression for the locally measured matter bispectrum induced by a long-wavelength mode of arbitrary wavelength, a new result which in standard perturbation theory is equivalent to a relativistic second-order calculation. We show that nonlinear gravitational dynamics does not generate observable contributions that scale like local-type non-Gaussianity flocNL, and hence does not contribute to a scale-dependent galaxy bias Δ b propto k-2 on large scales; rather, the locally measurable long-short mode coupling assumes a form essentially identical to subhorizon perturbation theory results, once the long-mode density perturbation is replaced by the synchronous-comoving gauge density perturbation. Apparent flocNL-type contributions arise through projection effects on photon propagation, which depend on the specific large-scale structure tracer and observable considered, and are in principle distinguishable from the local mode coupling induced by gravity. We conclude that any observation of flocNL beyond these projection effects signals a departure from standard single

  6. Astronomy in Romanian universities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbosu, Mihail

    In this work we present characteristics of the Romanian higher education related to the study of Astronomy. In spite of Romanian economic problems, opportunities for Bachelor's degree, Master's degree (at "Babes-Bolyai" University of Cluj-Napoca) and Ph.D. degree are provided for students enrolled at the faculties of Mathematics or Physics. General regulations, description of courses, research resources and job opportunities are also described and discussed in this paper.

  7. Dark matter universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahcall, Neta A.

    2015-10-01

    Most of the mass in the universe is in the form of dark matter-a new type of nonbaryonic particle not yet detected in the laboratory or in other detection experiments. The evidence for the existence of dark matter through its gravitational impact is clear in astronomical observations-from the early observations of the large motions of galaxies in clusters and the motions of stars and gas in galaxies, to observations of the large-scale structure in the universe, gravitational lensing, and the cosmic microwave background. The extensive data consistently show the dominance of dark matter and quantify its amount and distribution, assuming general relativity is valid. The data inform us that the dark matter is nonbaryonic, is "cold" (i.e., moves nonrelativistically in the early universe), and interacts only weakly with matter other than by gravity. The current Lambda cold dark matter cosmology-a simple (but strange) flat cold dark matter model dominated by a cosmological constant Lambda, with only six basic parameters (including the density of matter and of baryons, the initial mass fluctuations amplitude and its scale dependence, and the age of the universe and of the first stars)-fits remarkably well all the accumulated data. However, what is the dark matter? This is one of the most fundamental open questions in cosmology and particle physics. Its existence requires an extension of our current understanding of particle physics or otherwise point to a modification of gravity on cosmological scales. The exploration and ultimate detection of dark matter are led by experiments for direct and indirect detection of this yet mysterious particle.

  8. Universality of particle multiplicities

    SciTech Connect

    Goulianos, K. |

    1994-09-01

    We discuss the scaling properties and universality aspects of the rapidity and multiplicity distributions of particles produced in high energy hadronic and e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} interactions. This paper is based on material presented in three lectures on pomeron phenomenology, which included a review of traditional soft pomeron physics and selected topics on hard diffraction processes probing the structure function of the pomeron.

  9. Imagine the Universe!

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Welcome to Imagine the Universe! Contained on this CD-ROM you will find three astronomy and space science learning centers, individually captured from the World Wide Web in December of 2000. Each site contains its own learning adventure full of facts, fun, beautiful images, movies, and excitement. (1) Imagine The Universe: this site is dedicated to a discussion about our Universe... what we know about it, how it is evolving, and the kinds of objects and phenomena it contains. Emphasizing the X-ray and gamma-ray parts of the electromagnetic spectrum, it also discusses how scientists know what they know, what mysteries remain, and how the answers to remaining mysteries may one day be found. Lots of movies, quizzes, and a special section for educators. Geared for ages 14 and up. This site can be viewed on-line at http://imagine.gsfc.nasa.gov/. (2) StarChild- a learning center for young astronomers: the 1998 Webby Award Winner for Best Education Website, StarChild is aimed at ages 4-14. It contains easy-to-understand information about our Solar System, the Universe, and space exploration. There are also activities, songs, movies, and puzzles. This site can be viewed on-line at http://starchild.gsfc.nasa.gov/. (3) Astronomy Picture of the Day: APOD offers a new astronomical image and caption each calendar day. We have captured the year 2000 entries of this award-winning site and included them on the disk. The images and information provide a wonderful resource for all ages. This site can be viewed on-line at http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/astropix.html.

  10. Dark matter universe

    PubMed Central

    Bahcall, Neta A.

    2015-01-01

    Most of the mass in the universe is in the form of dark matter—a new type of nonbaryonic particle not yet detected in the laboratory or in other detection experiments. The evidence for the existence of dark matter through its gravitational impact is clear in astronomical observations—from the early observations of the large motions of galaxies in clusters and the motions of stars and gas in galaxies, to observations of the large-scale structure in the universe, gravitational lensing, and the cosmic microwave background. The extensive data consistently show the dominance of dark matter and quantify its amount and distribution, assuming general relativity is valid. The data inform us that the dark matter is nonbaryonic, is “cold” (i.e., moves nonrelativistically in the early universe), and interacts only weakly with matter other than by gravity. The current Lambda cold dark matter cosmology—a simple (but strange) flat cold dark matter model dominated by a cosmological constant Lambda, with only six basic parameters (including the density of matter and of baryons, the initial mass fluctuations amplitude and its scale dependence, and the age of the universe and of the first stars)—fits remarkably well all the accumulated data. However, what is the dark matter? This is one of the most fundamental open questions in cosmology and particle physics. Its existence requires an extension of our current understanding of particle physics or otherwise point to a modification of gravity on cosmological scales. The exploration and ultimate detection of dark matter are led by experiments for direct and indirect detection of this yet mysterious particle. PMID:26417091

  11. Universal Stoppers Are Rupert

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jerrard, Richard P.; Wetzel, John E.

    2008-01-01

    A stopper is called "universal" if it can be used to plug pipes whose cross-sections are a circle, a square, and an isosceles triangle, with the diameter of the circle, the side of the square, and the base and altitude of the triangle all equal. Echoing the well-known result for equal cubes that is attributed to Prince Rupert, we show that it is…

  12. Universality and string theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachlechner, Thomas Christian

    The first run at the Large Hadron Collider has deeply challenged conventional notions of naturalness, and CMB polarization experiments are about to open a new window to early universe cosmology. As a compelling candidate for the ultraviolet completion of the standard model, string theory provides a prime opportunity to study both early universe cosmology and particle physics. However, relating low energy observations to ultraviolet physics requires knowledge of the metastable states of string theory through the study of vacua. While it is difficult to directly obtain infrared data from explicit string theory constructions, string theory imposes constraints on low energy physics. The study of ensembles of low energy theories consistent with ultra-violet constraints provides insight on generic features we might expect to occur in string compactifications. In this thesis we present a statistical treatment of vacuum stability and vacuum properties in the context of random supergravity theories motivated by string theory. Early universe cosmology provides another avenue to high energy physics. From the low energy perspective large field inflation is typically considered highly unnatural: the scale relevant for the diameter of flat regions in moduli space is sub-Planckian in regions of perturbative control. To approach this problem, we consider generic Calabi-Yau compactifications of string theory and find that super-Planckian diameters of axion fundamental domains in fact arise generically. We further demonstrate that such super-Planckian flat regions are plausibly consistent with theWeak Gravity Conjecture.

  13. Averaging the inhomogeneous universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paranjape, Aseem

    2012-03-01

    A basic assumption of modern cosmology is that the universe is homogeneous and isotropic on the largest observable scales. This greatly simplifies Einstein's general relativistic field equations applied at these large scales, and allows a straightforward comparison between theoretical models and observed data. However, Einstein's equations should ideally be imposed at length scales comparable to, say, the solar system, since this is where these equations have been tested. We know that at these scales the universe is highly inhomogeneous. It is therefore essential to perform an explicit averaging of the field equations in order to apply them at large scales. It has long been known that due to the nonlinear nature of Einstein's equations, any explicit averaging scheme will necessarily lead to corrections in the equations applied at large scales. Estimating the magnitude and behavior of these corrections is a challenging task, due to difficulties associated with defining averages in the context of general relativity (GR). It has recently become possible to estimate these effects in a rigorous manner, and we will review some of the averaging schemes that have been proposed in the literature. A tantalizing possibility explored by several authors is that the corrections due to averaging may in fact account for the apparent acceleration of the expansion of the universe. We will explore this idea, reviewing some of the work done in the literature to date. We will argue however, that this rather attractive idea is in fact not viable as a solution of the dark energy problem, when confronted with observational constraints.

  14. The universal ancestor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woese, C.

    1998-01-01

    A genetic annealing model for the universal ancestor of all extant life is presented; the name of the model derives from its resemblance to physical annealing. The scenario pictured starts when "genetic temperatures" were very high, cellular entities (progenotes) were very simple, and information processing systems were inaccurate. Initially, both mutation rate and lateral gene transfer levels were elevated. The latter was pandemic and pervasive to the extent that it, not vertical inheritance, defined the evolutionary dynamic. As increasingly complex and precise biological structures and processes evolved, both the mutation rate and the scope and level of lateral gene transfer, i.e., evolutionary temperature, dropped, and the evolutionary dynamic gradually became that characteristic of modern cells. The various subsystems of the cell "crystallized," i.e., became refractory to lateral gene transfer, at different stages of "cooling," with the translation apparatus probably crystallizing first. Organismal lineages, and so organisms as we know them, did not exist at these early stages. The universal phylogenetic tree, therefore, is not an organismal tree at its base but gradually becomes one as its peripheral branchings emerge. The universal ancestor is not a discrete entity. It is, rather, a diverse community of cells that survives and evolves as a biological unit. This communal ancestor has a physical history but not a genealogical one. Over time, this ancestor refined into a smaller number of increasingly complex cell types with the ancestors of the three primary groupings of organisms arising as a result.

  15. The Flying University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friesen, Catherine

    The Flying University is solo theater performance framed as an academic lecture about Marie Curie and her discovery of radium, delivered to a group of women who have gathered in secret to further their education. As the lecture proceeds, the professor brings in her own research based on a study of Esther Horsch (1905-1991) who lived on a farm in central Illinois. She introduces data from Esther's journals, personal memories, and dreams about Esther's life. The professor's investigation of radium plays at the intersections of magical and mundane, decay and the transformation of life, and the place of ambition in these two women's lives. The intention of this piece is to explore these themes, which are full of mystery, through the traces of the daily lives of Mme. Curie and Esther. Their words and photos are used as roots from which to imagine the things that echo beyond their familiar work; elemental and also fantastically radiant. The Flying University was written and performed by Catherine Friesen April 27-29, 2012 in the Center for Performance Experiment at Hamilton College as part of the University of South Carolina MFA Acting Class of 2013 showcase, Pieces of Eight.

  16. Unfolding our Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolson, Iain

    1999-10-01

    The beauty of the stars, the planets, and other faraway objects of wonder is readily apparent, while the reason for their splendor is not. Now, there exists a source of expert advice that amateur astronomers and interested stargazers can actually understand: Unfolding Our Universe. Popular science writer and award winning author Iain Nicolson opens the world of astronomy to a wide audience. He takes readers into the heart of the Universe, clearly detailing the facts, concepts, methods, and current findings of astronomical science. This unique book strikes a perfect balance between the fundamentals of the subject and cutting-edge research. Step by step, the volume leads to a complete understanding of astronomy. Readers can access the material without referring to any mathematical principles or formulas. The well-designed text allows more ambitious readers to easily delve more deeply into key points and consult basic mathematics found within self-contained boxes. More than 100 full-color photographs beautifully and clearly illustrate all concepts. The wealth of color illustrations and very readable chapters make this book a delight for the casual reader to browse, while the clear and concise explanations will appeal to anyone with an interest in the science of astronomy. Iain Nicolson is the author or co-author of some 17 books, including The Universe (with Patrick Moore) and Heavenly Bodies. In 1995, he received the Eric Zucker Award from the Federation of Astronomical Societies (UK) for his work in popularizing the subject.

  17. [Universal electrogustometer EG-2].

    PubMed

    Wałkanis, Andrzej; Czesak, Michał; Pleskacz, Witold A

    2011-01-01

    Electrogustometry is a method for taste diagnosis and measurement. The EG-2 project is being developed in cooperation between Warsaw University of Technology and Military institute of Medicine in Warsaw. The device is an evolution of the recent universal electrogustometer EG-1 prototype. Due to considerations and experiences acquired during prototype usage, many enhancements have been incorporated into device. The aim was to create an easy-to-use, portable, battery powered device, enabled for fast measurements. Developed electrogustometer is using innovative, low-power microprocessor system, which control whole device. User interface is based on 5.7" graphical LCD (Liquid Crystal Display) and touchscreen. It can be directly operated by finger or with optional stylus. Dedicated GUI (Graphical User Interface) offers simple, predefined measurements and advance settings of signal parameters. It is also possible to store measurements results and patients data in an internal memory. User interface is multilanguage. Signals for patients examinations, supplied with bipolar electrode, are generated by an on-board circuit using DDS (Direct-Digital Synthesis) and DAC (Digital-to-Analog Converter). Electrogustometer is able to generate DC, sinus, triangle or rectangle signals with current amplitude from 0 to 500 pA and frequency form 0 to 500 Hz. Device is designed for manual and automeasurement modes. By using USB (Universal Serial Bus) port it is possible to retrieve data stored in internal memory and charging of built-in Li-lon battery as a source of power. PMID:21735666

  18. The Universal Ancestor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woese, Carl

    1998-06-01

    A genetic annealing model for the universal ancestor of all extant life is presented; the name of the model derives from its resemblance to physical annealing. The scenario pictured starts when ``genetic temperatures'' were very high, cellular entities (progenotes) were very simple, and information processing systems were inaccurate. Initially, both mutation rate and lateral gene transfer levels were elevated. The latter was pandemic and pervasive to the extent that it, not vertical inheritance, defined the evolutionary dynamic. As increasingly complex and precise biological structures and processes evolved, both the mutation rate and the scope and level of lateral gene transfer, i.e., evolutionary temperature, dropped, and the evolutionary dynamic gradually became that characteristic of modern cells. The various subsystems of the cell ``crystallized,'' i.e., became refractory to lateral gene transfer, at different stages of ``cooling,'' with the translation apparatus probably crystallizing first. Organismal lineages, and so organisms as we know them, did not exist at these early stages. The universal phylogenetic tree, therefore, is not an organismal tree at its base but gradually becomes one as its peripheral branchings emerge. The universal ancestor is not a discrete entity. It is, rather, a diverse community of cells that survives and evolves as a biological unit. This communal ancestor has a physical history but not a genealogical one. Over time, this ancestor refined into a smaller number of increasingly complex cell types with the ancestors of the three primary groupings of organisms arising as a result.

  19. Commissioning Cornell OSTs for SRF cavity testing at Jlab

    SciTech Connect

    Eremeev, Grigory

    2011-07-01

    Understanding the current quench limitations in SRF cavities is a topic essential for any SRF accelerator that requires high fields. This understanding crucially depends on correct and precise quench identification. Second sound quench detection in superfluid liquid helium with oscillating superleak transducers is a technique recently applied at Cornell University as a fast and versatile method for quench identification in SRF cavities. Having adopted Cornell design, we report in this contribution on our experience with OST for quench identification in different cavities at JLab.

  20. Cornell U. Pursues a $60-Million Plan To Cool Its Campus with Cayuga's Water.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Basinger, Julianne

    1998-01-01

    Cornell University (New York) plans to use the icy waters of nearby Cayuga Lake to air-condition the campus, but recognizes they can do so only with the community's cooperation. Critics fear the move will change the lake's ecological balance. The university's decision and a subsequent public relations campaign is viewed by some as arrogant. (MSE)

  1. Green University Initiatives in China: A Case of Tsinghua University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhao, Wanxia; Zou, Yonghua

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine green university initiatives in the context of China, using Tsinghua University, which is China's green university pioneer, as a case study. Design/methodology/approach: The research method used for this paper is a case study based on participant observation and document analysis. The approach to…

  2. Who Should Go to University? Justice in University Admissions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kotzee, Ben; Martin, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    Current debates regarding justice in university admissions most often approach the question of access to university from a technical, policy-focussed perspective. Despite the attention that access to university receives in the press and policy literature, ethical discussion tends to focus on technical matters such as who should pay for university…

  3. Research on Universal Combinatorial Coding

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jun; Zhang, Zhuo; Mo, Juan

    2014-01-01

    The conception of universal combinatorial coding is proposed. Relations exist more or less in many coding methods. It means that a kind of universal coding method is objectively existent. It can be a bridge connecting many coding methods. Universal combinatorial coding is lossless and it is based on the combinatorics theory. The combinational and exhaustive property make it closely related with the existing code methods. Universal combinatorial coding does not depend on the probability statistic characteristic of information source, and it has the characteristics across three coding branches. It has analyzed the relationship between the universal combinatorial coding and the variety of coding method and has researched many applications technologies of this coding method. In addition, the efficiency of universal combinatorial coding is analyzed theoretically. The multicharacteristic and multiapplication of universal combinatorial coding are unique in the existing coding methods. Universal combinatorial coding has theoretical research and practical application value. PMID:24772019

  4. Research on universal combinatorial coding.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jun; Zhang, Zhuo; Mo, Juan

    2014-01-01

    The conception of universal combinatorial coding is proposed. Relations exist more or less in many coding methods. It means that a kind of universal coding method is objectively existent. It can be a bridge connecting many coding methods. Universal combinatorial coding is lossless and it is based on the combinatorics theory. The combinational and exhaustive property make it closely related with the existing code methods. Universal combinatorial coding does not depend on the probability statistic characteristic of information source, and it has the characteristics across three coding branches. It has analyzed the relationship between the universal combinatorial coding and the variety of coding method and has researched many applications technologies of this coding method. In addition, the efficiency of universal combinatorial coding is analyzed theoretically. The multicharacteristic and multiapplication of universal combinatorial coding are unique in the existing coding methods. Universal combinatorial coding has theoretical research and practical application value. PMID:24772019

  5. [Patients' University, illness and learning].

    PubMed

    Tourette-Turgis, Catherine

    2015-10-01

    The Patients' University, a pilot project at the Université Pierre et Marie Curie, in Paris, enables patients-experts to follow a degree program in patient therapeutic education (University Diploma and Master). Recently, graduate patients and patients directly concerned proposed to co-create a new university certificate for treatment pathway coordinators for breast cancer, rounding out the 120-hour university certificate program on healthcare democracy and meeting the recommendations of the new cancer plan. PMID:26455618

  6. Ontario Universities - 1998: Resource Document.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council of Ontario Universities, Toronto.

    This report on the financial status of Ontario (Canada) universities notes that Ontario's universities continue to receive less than universities in any other Canadian province in per capita funding and have had the largest two-year decline in public funding of any jurisdiction in Canada or the United States. It notes that although total operating…

  7. How to Run a University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, G. R.

    2006-01-01

    The Lambert Review of Business-University Collaboration proposed a business model for universities in 2003. Pressure to change university governance to make it match the business model remains strong, and it is being most actively applied to Oxford and Cambridge. The Oxford and Cambridge governance debates (which began in the 1990s) open up the…

  8. Symbiosis: University/School Partnerships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skeele, Rosemary W.; Daly, James K.

    1999-01-01

    Describes technology integration at Seton Hall. Discusses new teaching roles and methods; technology and popular culture; technological equity; and school and university needs. Focuses on several technology-based partnerships between the university and schools, including summer programs; technology training; connecting university faculty and…

  9. Reflections on Commercializing University Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hum, Derek

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the extent of commercialization of research in Canadian universities, explains why copyright enforcement is difficult, and discusses the benefits and disadvantages of licensing an innovation versus creating a spinoff company to exploit university discoveries. Explores issues related to sharing benefits of university discoveries. (SLD)

  10. University Relations: The HP Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, W. C.

    2003-01-01

    Hewlett-Packard benefited from one of the earliest examples of knowledge transfer in a strategic relationship, with the investment by Stanford University professor Frederick Terman in the work of former students Dave Packard and Bill Hewlett. Today, HP University Relations (UR) works with university partners to create similar valuable synergy. UR…

  11. Education in a Research University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arrow, Kenneth J. Ed.; And Others

    This collection of 30 essays on the character, administration, and management of research universities research university emphasizes the perspective of statistics and operations research: The essays are: "A Robust Faculty Planning Model" (Frederick Biedenweg); "Looking Back at Computer Models Employed in the Stanford University Administration"…

  12. A Look at the Universe.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nature Scope, 1986

    1986-01-01

    Provides: (1) background information on what makes up the universe, ways astronomers study the universe, and theories about how the universe began; (2) six activities; and (3) four read-to-duplicate pages. Activities include objective(s), recommended age level(s), subject area(s), list of materials needed, and procedures. (JN)

  13. Do Universities Have "Successful" Brands?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapleo, Chris

    2005-01-01

    Branding in universities is a topical issue, but arguably few UK universities have fully developed "successful" brands in the manner of commercial organizations. This qualitative paper explores the opinions of 40 opinion formers on which UK universities have successful brands and the associations these brands have. Current literature on what…

  14. Widening Participation in University Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rissman, Barbara; Carrington, Suzanne; Bland, Derek

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports how one Australian university and the Queensland Department of Education and Training (DET) are working together to increase the number of school students from low socio-economic backgrounds enrolling in undergraduate university degrees. This innovative program involves university lecturers and school teachers working together…

  15. Quality Assurance for University Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Roger, Ed.

    This book, written from a British perspective, presents 17 papers on quality assurance in teaching at the university level. The first eight papers address issues of assuring quality and include: (1) "Quality Assurance for University Teaching; Issues and Approaches" (Roger Ellis); (2) "A British Standard for University Teaching?" (Roger Ellis); (3)…

  16. A University of the Air

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanistreet, Paul

    2009-01-01

    The term "open university" was coined by that visionary "seedsman" of reformist ideas Michael Young in an article for a 1962 number of "Where?" magazine. He proposed an "open university" to prepare people for external degrees at London University, with three key functions: (1) to organise new and better correspondence courses for the degree; (2)…

  17. The RAE and University Efficiency.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mace, John

    2000-01-01

    Evaluates effects of the new British funding formula for universities, based on the research assessment exercise (RAE). Compares effects of the RAE on two contrasting universities and finds the RAE has dramatically affected university organization, teaching, and research. RAE may have increased efficiency in teaching and research but encourages…

  18. Remembering the University of Utah.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haglund, Elizabeth, Ed.

    Nineteen essays comprise this personal and historical look at the University of Utah and the relationship between the university, its people, and the community. Essays include: "One Cannot Live Long Enough to Outgrow a University" (Ramona Wilcox Cannon); "Ever in the Freshness of Its Youth" (G. Homer Durham); "The Final Payoff" (David W. Evans);…

  19. Texas A&M University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osters, Sandi

    2009-01-01

    Texas A&M University is a research extensive institution located in College Station. More than 45,000 students attend the university (about 20% are graduate or professional students). Academically, the university is known for its engineering, business, and agricultural and veterinary medicine programs, although there are more than 150 programs of…

  20. Downsizing the University: Bonne Chance!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Appelbaum, Steven H.; Patton, Eric

    2002-01-01

    Begins with a general discussion of downsizing and its outcomes, then offers an analysis of downsizing in higher education with an emphasis on three points: the factors causing universities to consider downsizing, the special nature of universities that makes downsizing particularly difficult, and the downsizing methods used by universities. (EV)

  1. The University and Social Transformation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Godon, Rafal

    2004-01-01

    The article focuses on the problem of a crisis in contemporary European universities. The key question is whether the crisis in university education is a calamity or a challenge in these times of social transformation. Adapting a metaphor of health to the university education in the contexts of "politics", "knowledge" and "self-understanding", the…

  2. Physics in our Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conn Henry, Richard

    2016-06-01

    The recent detection of gravitational waves from the merger of two massive black holes means that we must now take Newton's approach to the Universe even more seriously than we have taken it since Principia: General Relativity has now been tested, as never before, and GR has passed with flying colors! In my poster I try to summarize all of fundamental physics taken together --- gravitation, dark energy, and particles. But the whole job is not yet done: mass + energy remains as a final frontier. It may be that the topology of 4-space is the answer: how I wish I were a mathematical topologist of great ability!

  3. Drexel University Temperature Sensors

    SciTech Connect

    K. L. Davis; D. L. Knudson; J. L. Rempe; B. M. Chase

    2014-09-01

    This document summarizes background information and presents results related to temperature measurements in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) Drexel University Project 31091 irradiation. The objective of this test was to assess the radiation performance of new ceramic materials for advanced reactor applications. Accordingly, irradiations of transition metal carbides and nitrides were performed using the Hydraulic Shuttle Irradiation System (HSIS) in the B-7 position and in static capsules inserted into the A-3 and East Flux Trap Position 5 locations of the ATR.

  4. Alone in the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Howard

    Recent measurements of over 1056 confirmed exoplanets reveal details about their masses, compositions, orbital parameters, possible evolutionary histories, and even their atmospheres. These results, though marking just the beginnings of a dramatic new period of exoplanet discovery, suggest that for all practical purposes we are alone in the universe, at least in the sense implied by SETI: extraterrestrial intelligence. This talk will summarize the evidence to date, offer conclusions about the critical importance of increased exoplanet research, and emphasize the need for a renewed appreciation of the rare value of the Earth, its fragile environment, and its inhabitants.

  5. Flordia State University

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, J.; Frawley, A.; Myers, E.

    1995-08-01

    Argonne fabricated the niobium resonators and some auxiliary devices for the superconducting-linac energy booster built at Florida State University. Personnel from FSU came to ANL to assemble and test the resonators. The main resonator fabrication work for FSU was completed during 1986, but we continue to interact with personnel concerning ongoing refinements in the technology. Topics in which we were most recently involved are (1) a change in the method of cooling the FSU resonators and (2) the transfer of information about fast tuner upgrades. During the past year there was very little interaction.

  6. Scaling the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frankel, Norman E.

    2014-04-01

    A model is presented for the origin of the large scale structure of the universe and their Mass-Radius scaling law. The physics is conventional, orthodox, but it is used to fashion a highly unorthodox model of the origin of the galaxies, their groups, clusters, super-clusters, and great walls. The scaling law fits the observational results and the model offers new suggestions and predictions. These include a largest, a supreme, cosmic structure, and possible implications for the recently observed pressing cosmological anomalies.

  7. Mapping the Baby Universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wanjek, Christopher

    2003-01-01

    In June, NASA plans to launch the Microwave Anisotropy Probe (MAP) to survey the ancient radiation in unprecedented detail. MAP will map slight temperature fluctuations within the microwave background that vary by only 0.00001 C across a chilly radiation that now averages 2.73 C above absolute zero. The temperature differences today point back to density differences in the fiery baby universe, in which there was a little more matter here and a little less matter there. Areas of slightly enhanced density had stronger gravity than low-density areas. The high-density areas pulled back on the background radiation, making it appear slightly cooler in those directions.

  8. VLSI Universal Noiseless Coder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, Robert F.; Lee, Jun-Ji; Fang, Wai-Chi

    1989-01-01

    Proposed universal noiseless coder (UNC) compresses stream of data signals for efficient transmission in channel of limited bandwidth. Noiseless in sense original data completely recoverable from output code. System built as very-large-scale integrated (VLSI) circuit, compressing data in real time at input rates as high as 24 Mb/s, and possibly faster, depending on specific design. Approach yields small, lightweight system operating reliably and consuming little power. Constructed as single, compact, low-power VLSI circuit chip. Design of VLSI circuit chip made specific to code algorithms. Entire UNC fabricated in single chip, worst-case power dissipation less than 1 W.

  9. Journey Through the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, J.

    2005-12-01

    Journey through the Universe held its first Journey Week January 21-28, 2005 in Hilo, Hawaii. This ambitious program uses the fi elds of space, earth science and exploration to engage communities with long-term connections to science, mathematics and technology. All content is aligned to state and national education standards. Last year, the Hawaii-based program trained 135 teachers, visited more than 120 classrooms, talked to more than 5,000 students and hosted three family science events for more than 2,500 people. In 2006 the program seeks to reach an additional 8,000 students in public, private and charter schools in North Hawaii.

  10. Universal signal conditioning amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, William E.; Hallberg, Carl; Medelius, Pedro J.

    1994-01-01

    Engineers at NASA's Kennedy Space Center have designed a signal conditioning amplifier which automatically matches itself to almost any kind of transducer. The product, called Universal Signal Conditioning Amplifier (USCA), uses state-of-the-art technologies to deliver high accuracy measurements. USCA's features which can be either programmable or automated include: voltage, current, or pulsed excitation, unlimited resolution gain, digital filtering and both analog and digital output. USCA will be used at Kennedy Space Center's launch pads for environmental measurements such as vibrations, strains, temperatures and overpressures. USCA is presently being commercialized through a co-funded agreement between NASA, the State of Florida, and Loral Test and Information Systems, Inc.

  11. Hydrogen Research at Florida Universities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Block, David L.; T-Raissi, Ali

    2009-01-01

    This final report describes the R&D activities and projects conducted for NASA under the 6-year NASA Hydrogen Research at Florida Universities grant program. Contained within this report are summaries of the overall activities, one-page description of all the reports funded under this program and all of the individual reports from each of the 29 projects supported by the effort. The R&D activities cover hydrogen technologies related to production, cryogenics, sensors, storage, separation processes, fuel cells, resource assessments and education. In the span of 6 years, the NASA Hydrogen Research at Florida Universities program funded a total of 44 individual university projects, and employed more than 100 faculty and over 100 graduate research students in the six participating universities. Researchers involved in this program have filed more than 20 patents in all hydrogen technology areas and put out over 220 technical publications in the last 2 years alone. This 6 year hydrogen research program was conducted by a consortium of six Florida universities: Florida International University (FIU) in Miami, Florida State University (FSU) and Florida A&M University (FAMU) in Tallahassee, University of Central Florida (UCF) in Orlando, University of South Florida (USF) in Tampa, and University of Florida (UF) in Gainesville. The Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC) of the University of Central Florida managed the research activities of all consortium member universities except those at the University of Florida. This report does not include any of the programs or activities conducted at the University of Florida, but can be found in NASA/CR-2008-215440-PART 1-3.

  12. Universal Memcomputing Machines.

    PubMed

    Traversa, Fabio Lorenzo; Di Ventra, Massimiliano

    2015-11-01

    We introduce the notion of universal memcomputing machines (UMMs): a class of brain-inspired general-purpose computing machines based on systems with memory, whereby processing and storing of information occur on the same physical location. We analytically prove that the memory properties of UMMs endow them with universal computing power (they are Turing-complete), intrinsic parallelism, functional polymorphism, and information overhead, namely, their collective states can support exponential data compression directly in memory. We also demonstrate that a UMM has the same computational power as a nondeterministic Turing machine, namely, it can solve nondeterministic polynomial (NP)-complete problems in polynomial time. However, by virtue of its information overhead, a UMM needs only an amount of memory cells (memprocessors) that grows polynomially with the problem size. As an example, we provide the polynomial-time solution of the subset-sum problem and a simple hardware implementation of the same. Even though these results do not prove the statement NP = P within the Turing paradigm, the practical realization of these UMMs would represent a paradigm shift from the present von Neumann architectures, bringing us closer to brain-like neural computation. PMID:25667360

  13. Carbon in the Universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allamandola, Louis J.

    2013-01-01

    Over the past few decades, NASA missions have revealed that we live in a Universe that is not a hydrogen-dominated, physicist's paradise, but in a molecular Universe with complex molecules directly interwoven into its fabric. These missions have shown that molecules are an abundant and important component of astronomical objects at all stages of their evolution and that they play a key role in many processes that dominate the structure and evolution of galaxies. Closer to home in our galaxy, the Milky Way, they have revealed a unique and complex organic inventory of regions of star and planet formation that may well represent some of the prebiotic roots to life. Astrobiology emerges from the great interest in understanding astrochemical evolution from simple to complex molecules, especially those with biogenic potential and the roles they may play as primordial seeds in the origin of life on habitable worlds. The first part of this talk will highlight how infrared spectroscopic studies of interstellar space, combined with dedicated laboratory simulations, have revealed the widespread presence of complex organics across deep space. The remainder of the presentation will focus on the evolution of these materials and astrobiology.

  14. Universality of fragment shapes.

    PubMed

    Domokos, Gábor; Kun, Ferenc; Sipos, András Árpád; Szabó, Tímea

    2015-01-01

    The shape of fragments generated by the breakup of solids is central to a wide variety of problems ranging from the geomorphic evolution of boulders to the accumulation of space debris orbiting Earth. Although the statistics of the mass of fragments has been found to show a universal scaling behavior, the comprehensive characterization of fragment shapes still remained a fundamental challenge. We performed a thorough experimental study of the problem fragmenting various types of materials by slowly proceeding weathering and by rapid breakup due to explosion and hammering. We demonstrate that the shape of fragments obeys an astonishing universality having the same generic evolution with the fragment size irrespective of materials details and loading conditions. There exists a cutoff size below which fragments have an isotropic shape, however, as the size increases an exponential convergence is obtained to a unique elongated form. We show that a discrete stochastic model of fragmentation reproduces both the size and shape of fragments tuning only a single parameter which strengthens the general validity of the scaling laws. The dependence of the probability of the crack plan orientation on the linear extension of fragments proved to be essential for the shape selection mechanism. PMID:25772300

  15. Universities and nursing education.

    PubMed

    Hayward, J

    1982-07-01

    Trends reflected by Department of Health and Social Security statistics on the nursing workforce are examined and the ratios between grades discussed. Recruitment into nursing degree courses in the UK is considered in relation to overall recruitment into nursing. The somewhat ambiguous position of nursing degree courses in the UK leads into consideration of policy statements by the universities and the nursing profession. The importance of such policies is emphasized in the current financial climate, as are the potential contributions of university departments to professional debate, for example standards of care. Comparisons are drawn between the goals of courses involving full-time studentships as opposed to part-time apprenticeships and the present boundaries between these noted, especially in relation to the expanding roles of courses. On-going research into the preparation of nurse-tutors in the UK is mentioned, together with a preliminary analysis of the academic basis in the biological sciences possessed by learners and tutors. Out of this is derived a suggestion that the present-day shortage of nurse teachers could be helped by varying the existing patterns of recruitment, especially involving subject specialists in the biological, behavioural and social sciences. PMID:6922880

  16. [The geriatric university clinic].

    PubMed

    Stähelin, H B

    1995-01-01

    The very old are the fastest growing population group. Medical progress allows more autonomy and better quality of life for the elderly. Traditional medical concepts are, however, only partly suited for dealing with age-associated problems. Medical education responds to these new requirements in a limited way. Interdisciplinary teamwork is a prerequisite in treating the multimorbid, acutely ill elderly patient. The task of the university is not only the development and implementation of high-tech medicine, but first of all a comprehensive training in medicine, including geriatrics. The Geriatric University Clinic therefore offers pre- and postgraduate training in geriatrics, but also in related disciplines by promoting teaching and research. In order to attain these goals, the geriatric acute ward was created for acutely ill, very old, multimorbid, frail elderly patients. A geriatric ward for rehabilitation complements this ward. A consultation service offers geriatric know-how to all other services. A special task is the early diagnosis and treatment of dementia in an outpatient service. The aim is to prevent chronification by early intervention and to reestablish satisfactory function and autonomy. PMID:7780809

  17. Universal Payload Information Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elmore, Ralph B.

    2003-01-01

    As the overall manager and integrator of International Space Station (ISS) science payloads, the Payload Operations Integration Center (POIC) at Marshall Space Flight Center has a critical need to provide an information management system for exchange and control of ISS payload files as well as to coordinate ISS payload related operational changes. The POIC's information management system has a fundamental requirement to provide secure operational access not only to users physically located at the POIC, but also to remote experimenters and International Partners physically located in different parts of the world. The Payload Information Management System (PIMS) is a ground-based electronic document configuration management and collaborative workflow system that was built to service the POIC's information management needs. This paper discusses the application components that comprise the PIMS system, the challenges that influenced its design and architecture, and the selected technologies it employs. This paper will also touch on the advantages of the architecture, details of the user interface, and lessons learned along the way to a successful deployment. With PIMS, a sophisticated software solution has been built that is not only universally accessible for POIC customer s information management needs, but also universally adaptable in implementation and application as a generalized information management system.

  18. The Mechanical Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olenick, Richard P.; Apostol, Tom M.; Goodstein, David L.

    2008-06-01

    Preface; 1. Introduction to the mechanical universe; 2. The law of falling bodies; 3. Derivatives; 4. Inertia; 5. Vectors; 6. Newton's law; 7. Integration; 8. The apple and the moon; 9. Moving in circles; 10. Forces; 11. Gravity, electricity, and magnetism; 12. The Milliken oil-drop experiment; 13. The law of conservation of energy; 14. Energy and stability; 15. Temperature and the gas laws; 16. The engine of nature; 17. Entropy; 18. The quest for low temperatures; 19. The conservation of momentum; 20. Harmonic motion; 21. Resonance; 22. Coupled oscillators and waves; 23. Angular momentum; 24. Gyroscopes; 25. Kepler's laws and the conic sections; 26. Solving the Kepler problem; 27. Energy and eccentricity; 28. Navigating in space; 29. Loose ends and black holes; 30. The harmony of the spheres: an overview of the mechanical universe; Appendix A. The international system of units; Appendix B. Conversion factors; Appendix C. Formulas from algebra, geometry, and trigonometry; Appendix D. Astronomical data; Appendix E. Physical constants; Selected bibliography; Index.

  19. Universality of fragment shapes

    PubMed Central

    Domokos, Gábor; Kun, Ferenc; Sipos, András Árpád; Szabó, Tímea

    2015-01-01

    The shape of fragments generated by the breakup of solids is central to a wide variety of problems ranging from the geomorphic evolution of boulders to the accumulation of space debris orbiting Earth. Although the statistics of the mass of fragments has been found to show a universal scaling behavior, the comprehensive characterization of fragment shapes still remained a fundamental challenge. We performed a thorough experimental study of the problem fragmenting various types of materials by slowly proceeding weathering and by rapid breakup due to explosion and hammering. We demonstrate that the shape of fragments obeys an astonishing universality having the same generic evolution with the fragment size irrespective of materials details and loading conditions. There exists a cutoff size below which fragments have an isotropic shape, however, as the size increases an exponential convergence is obtained to a unique elongated form. We show that a discrete stochastic model of fragmentation reproduces both the size and shape of fragments tuning only a single parameter which strengthens the general validity of the scaling laws. The dependence of the probability of the crack plan orientation on the linear extension of fragments proved to be essential for the shape selection mechanism. PMID:25772300

  20. Universality of fragment shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domokos, Gábor; Kun, Ferenc; Sipos, András Árpád; Szabó, Tímea

    2015-03-01

    The shape of fragments generated by the breakup of solids is central to a wide variety of problems ranging from the geomorphic evolution of boulders to the accumulation of space debris orbiting Earth. Although the statistics of the mass of fragments has been found to show a universal scaling behavior, the comprehensive characterization of fragment shapes still remained a fundamental challenge. We performed a thorough experimental study of the problem fragmenting various types of materials by slowly proceeding weathering and by rapid breakup due to explosion and hammering. We demonstrate that the shape of fragments obeys an astonishing universality having the same generic evolution with the fragment size irrespective of materials details and loading conditions. There exists a cutoff size below which fragments have an isotropic shape, however, as the size increases an exponential convergence is obtained to a unique elongated form. We show that a discrete stochastic model of fragmentation reproduces both the size and shape of fragments tuning only a single parameter which strengthens the general validity of the scaling laws. The dependence of the probability of the crack plan orientation on the linear extension of fragments proved to be essential for the shape selection mechanism.

  1. Open Universities in India 2000: Brief Information.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhushan, Bharat, Comp.; Lele, Nalini A., Comp.; Rausaria, R. R., Comp.

    This report contains information on the following open universities in India: (1) Indira Gandhi National Open University; (2) Dr. B.R. Ambedkar Open University; (3) Kota Open University; (4) Nalanda Open University; (5) Yashwantrao Chavan Maharashtra Open University; (6) Madhya Pradesh Bhoj (Open) University; (7) Dr. Babasaheb Ambedkar Open…

  2. Wikipedia ranking of world universities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lages, José; Patt, Antoine; Shepelyansky, Dima L.

    2016-03-01

    We use the directed networks between articles of 24 Wikipedia language editions for producing the wikipedia ranking of world Universities (WRWU) using PageRank, 2DRank and CheiRank algorithms. This approach allows to incorporate various cultural views on world universities using the mathematical statistical analysis independent of cultural preferences. The Wikipedia ranking of top 100 universities provides about 60% overlap with the Shanghai university ranking demonstrating the reliable features of this approach. At the same time WRWU incorporates all knowledge accumulated at 24 Wikipedia editions giving stronger highlights for historically important universities leading to a different estimation of efficiency of world countries in university education. The historical development of university ranking is analyzed during ten centuries of their history.

  3. Imagine the Universe!

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, N.

    2003-01-01

    Welcome to the 2004 edition of the education CD from the Laboratory for High Energy Astrophysics at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. We hope that you will find it to be an exciting and fun learning experience. We have tried very hard to make this CD as user-friendly as possible and along the way we have discovered some things that every user may need to know. Please read the README file found on the CD if you have any questions or problems using the disk. Then, after that, if you still have problems, email us at itu@athena.gsfc.nasa.gov. We will be happy to help you 'get going'! Below are links to all of the sites included on the CD. You will also find the addresses for the on-line version of each of these sites. If you have a good Internet connection available, we recommend that you view the sites on-line. There you will find the latest updated information, interactive activities, and active links to other sites. Included on the disk are: Imagine The Universe! This site is dedicated to a discussion about our Universe... what we know about it, how it is evolving, and the kinds of objects and phenomena it contains. Emphasizing the X-ray and gamma-ray parts of the electromagnetic spectrum, it also discusses how scientists know what they know, what mysteries remain, and how the answers to remaining mysteries may one day be found. Lots of movies, quizzes, and a special section for educators. Geared for ages 14 and up. This site can be viewed on-line at http://imagine.gsfc.nasa.gov/. StarChild: A learning center for young astronomers The 1998 Webby Award Winner for Best Education Website, StarChild is aimed at ages 4-14. It contains easy-to-understand information about our Solar System, the Universe, and space exploration. There are also activities, songs, movies, and puzzles! This site can be viewed on-line at http://starchild.gsfc.nasa.gov/. Astronomy Picture of the Day APOD offers a new astronomical image and caption each calendar day. We have captured the year 2003

  4. Inflating an inhomogeneous universe

    SciTech Connect

    Easther, Richard; Price, Layne C.; Rasero, Javier E-mail: lpri691@aucklanduni.ac.nz

    2014-08-01

    While cosmological inflation can erase primordial inhomogeneities, it is possible that inflation may not begin in a significantly inhomogeneous universe. This issue is particularly pressing in multifield scenarios, where even the homogeneous dynamics may depend sensitively on the initial configuration. This paper presents an initial survey of the onset of inflation in multifield models, via qualitative lattice-based simulations that do not include local gravitational backreaction. Using hybrid inflation as a test model, our results suggest that small subhorizon inhomogeneities do play a key role in determining whether inflation begins in multifield scenarios. Interestingly, some configurations which do not inflate in the homogeneous limit ''succeed'' after inhomogeneity is included, while other initial configurations which inflate in the homogeneous limit ''fail'' when inhomogeneity is added.

  5. University Engagement at INL

    SciTech Connect

    Morrell, Sean Robert; Rynes, Amanda Renee

    2014-07-01

    There are currently over 900 facilities in over 170 countries which fall under International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) safeguards. As additional nations look to purse civilian nuclear programs or to expand infrastructure already in place, the number of reactors and accompanying facilities as well as the quantity of material has greatly increased. Due to the breadth of the threat and the burden placed on the IAEA as nuclear applications expand, it has become increasingly important that safeguards professionals have a strong understanding of both the technical and political aspects of nonproliferation starting early in their career. To begin overcoming this challenge, Idaho National Laboratory, has partnered with local universities to deliver a graduate level nuclear engineering course that covers both aspects of the field with a focus on safeguards applications. To date over 60 students across multiple disciplines have participated in this course with many deciding to transition into a nonproliferation area of focus in both their academic and professional careers.

  6. Stable magnetic universes revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahamtan, T.; Halilsoy, M.

    2013-01-01

    Recent discovery of magnetars ( B˜1015 G) motivates us to consider magnetic universes in general relativity a new. A regular class of static, cylindrically symmetric pure magnetic field metrics is rederived in a different metric ansatz in all dimensions. Radial, time dependent perturbations show that for dimensions d>3 such spacetimes are stable at both near r≈0 and large radius r→∞. For d=3, however, simultaneous stability requirement at both, near and far radial distances can not be reconciled for time-dependent perturbations. We argue that this distinct property may be the cause for the absence of pure magnetic black holes in d=3. Restricted, numerical geodesics for neutral particles reveal a gravitational confinement around the center in the polar plane. Charged, time-like geodesics for d=4 are shown numerically to remain confined as well.

  7. Universal Steering Criteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Huangjun; Hayashi, Masahito; Chen, Lin

    2016-02-01

    We propose a general framework for constructing universal steering criteria that are applicable to arbitrary bipartite states and measurement settings of the steering party. The same framework is also useful for studying the joint measurement problem. Based on the data-processing inequality for an extended Rényi relative entropy, we then introduce a family of steering inequalities, which detect steering much more efficiently than those inequalities known before. As illustrations, we show unbounded violation of a steering inequality for assemblages constructed from mutually unbiased bases and establish an interesting connection between maximally steerable assemblages and complete sets of mutually unbiased bases. We also provide a single steering inequality that can detect all bipartite pure states of full Schmidt rank. In the course of study, we generalize a number of results intimately connected to data-processing inequalities, which are of independent interest.

  8. Zöllner's Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kragh, Helge

    2012-12-01

    The idea that space is not Euclidean by necessity, and that there are other kinds of "curved" spaces, diffused slowly to the physical and astronomical sciences. Until Einstein's general theory of relativity, only a handful of astronomers contemplated a connection between non-Euclidean geometry and real space. One of them, the German astrophysicist Johann Carl Friedrich Zöllner (1834-1882), suggested in 1872 a remarkable cosmological model describing a finite universe in closed space. I examine Zöllner's little-known contribution to cosmology and also his even more unorthodox speculations of a four-dimensional space including both physical and spiritual phenomena. I provide an overview of Zöllner's scientific work, of his status in the German scientific community, and of the controversies caused by his polemical style of science. Zöllner's cosmology was effectively forgotten, but there is no reason why it should remain an unwritten chapter in the history of science.

  9. The International Space University

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidian, Kenneth J.

    1990-01-01

    The International Space University (ISU) was founded on the premise that any major space program in the future would require international cooperation as a necessary first step toward its successful completion. ISU is devoted to being a leading center for educating future authorities in the world space industry. ISU's background, goals, current form, and future plans are described. The results and benefits of the type of education and experience gained from ISU include technical reports describing the design projects undertaken by the students, an exposure to the many different disciplines which are a part of a large space project, an awareness of the existing activities from around the world in the space community, and an international professional network which spans all aspects of space activities and covers the globe.

  10. Universe exploration vision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Handley, D.; Swan, P.; Sadeh, W.

    1992-01-01

    U.S. space policy is discussed in terms of present and planned activities in the solar system and beyond to develop a concept for expanding space travel. The history of space exploration is briefly reviewed with references to the Mariner II, Apollo, and Discoverer programs. Attention is given to the issues related to return trips to the moon, sprint vs repetitive missions to Mars, and the implications of propulsion needs. The concept of terraforming other bodies within the solar system so that they can support human activity is identified as the next major phase of exploration. The following phase is considered to be the use of robotic or manned missions that extend beyond the solar system. Reference is given to a proposed Thousand Astronomical Units mission as a precursor to exploratory expansion into the universe, and current robotic mission activities are mentioned.

  11. Universal visualization platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gee, Alexander G.; Li, Hongli; Yu, Min; Smrtic, Mary Beth; Cvek, Urska; Goodell, Howie; Gupta, Vivek; Lawrence, Christine; Zhou, Jainping; Chiang, Chih-Hung; Grinstein, Georges G.

    2005-03-01

    Although there are a number of visualization systems to choose from when analyzing data, only a few of these allow for the integration of other visualization and analysis techniques. There are even fewer visualization toolkits and frameworks from which one can develop ones own visualization applications. Even within the research community, scientists either use what they can from the available tools or start from scratch to define a program in which they are able to develop new or modified visualization techniques and analysis algorithms. Presented here is a new general-purpose platform for constructing numerous visualization and analysis applications. The focus of this system is the design and experimentation of new techniques, and where the sharing of and integration with other tools becomes second nature. Moreover, this platform supports multiple large data sets, and the recording and visualizing of user sessions. Here we introduce the Universal Visualization Platform (UVP) as a modern data visualization and analysis system.

  12. Universal Steering Criteria.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Huangjun; Hayashi, Masahito; Chen, Lin

    2016-02-19

    We propose a general framework for constructing universal steering criteria that are applicable to arbitrary bipartite states and measurement settings of the steering party. The same framework is also useful for studying the joint measurement problem. Based on the data-processing inequality for an extended Rényi relative entropy, we then introduce a family of steering inequalities, which detect steering much more efficiently than those inequalities known before. As illustrations, we show unbounded violation of a steering inequality for assemblages constructed from mutually unbiased bases and establish an interesting connection between maximally steerable assemblages and complete sets of mutually unbiased bases. We also provide a single steering inequality that can detect all bipartite pure states of full Schmidt rank. In the course of study, we generalize a number of results intimately connected to data-processing inequalities, which are of independent interest. PMID:26943513

  13. Universal Landau pole.

    PubMed

    Andrianov, A A; Espriu, D; Kurkov, M A; Lizzi, F

    2013-07-01

    Our understanding of quantum gravity suggests that at the Planck scale the usual geometry loses its meaning. If so, the quest for grand unification in a large non-Abelian group naturally endowed with the property of asymptotic freedom may also lose its motivation. Instead, we propose a unification of all fundamental interactions at the Planck scale in the form of a universal Landau pole, at which all gauge couplings diverge. The Higgs quartic coupling also diverges while the Yukawa couplings vanish. The unification is achieved with the addition of fermions with vector gauge couplings coming in multiplets and with hypercharges identical to those of the standard model. The presence of these particles also prevents the Higgs quartic coupling from becoming negative, thus avoiding the instability (or metastability) of the standard model vacuum. PMID:23862991

  14. Some toy sheet universes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamerský, Jaroslav; Langer, Jiří

    2012-07-01

    Our model is based on the model studied by Langer [1] and in more detail by Langer and Žofka [2]. In these papers we studied a toy closed universe which is flat except of a thin spherical shell. The model was constructed in the framework of the Israel formalism [3]. In this approach the history of a thin shell of matter is described by the time-like hypersurface Σ which divides the spacetime into two parts V- and V+. The hypersuface Σ is a common boundary of V- and V+ consequently its intrinsic metric induced by the geometries in both regions must be the same. However, the extrinsic curvatures of Σ in V- and V+ are in general different. The jump in projections of the extrinsic curvature tensors on Σ determines the surface energy-momentum tensor of matter on Σ.

  15. European Universe Awareness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russo, P.; Miley, G.; Westra van Holthe, F.; Schrier, W.; Reed, S.

    2011-10-01

    The European Universe Awareness (EU-UNAWE) programme uses the beauty and grandeur of the cosmos to encourage young children, particularly those from underprivileged backgrounds, to develop an interest in science and technology and to foster a sense of global citizenship. EU-UNAWE is already active in 40 countries and comprises a global network of almost 500 astronomers, teachers and other educators. The programme was recently awarded a grant of 1.9 million euros by the European Union so that it can be further developed in five European countries and South Africa. The grant will be used to organise teacher training workshops and to develop educational materials, such as an astronomy news service for children and games. During this presentation we will outline some of the biggest achievements of EU-UNAWE to date and discuss future plans for the programme.

  16. Universal thermoelectric unit

    SciTech Connect

    Fedorov, M.I.; Engalychev, A.E.; Zaitsev, V.K.; Kaliazin, A.E.; Solomkin, F.Y.

    1994-08-10

    The problems of energy supply of low power electric devices very often can be solved with thermoelectric generator even with low coefficient of performance, when other electric energy sources are not convenient. The problems of thermoelectric and construction choice for such generators are discussed in the paper. A series of domestic thermoelectric generators was designed by the authors. The work is based on designing an universal thermoelectric unit---a battery which consist of ten thermoelements. The coefficient of performance of the unit is about 4%. Any thermoelectric generator can be made as a combination of these units. Principal opportunity of production such thermoelectric generators on industrial scale was proved. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  17. Rocket University at KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, Steven J.

    2014-01-01

    "Rocket University" is an exciting new initiative at Kennedy Space Center led by NASA's Engineering and Technology Directorate. This hands-on experience has been established to develop, refine & maintain targeted flight engineering skills to enable the Agency and KSC strategic goals. Through "RocketU", KSC is developing a nimble, rapid flight engineering life cycle systems knowledge base. Ongoing activities in RocketU develop and test new technologies and potential customer systems through small scale vehicles, build and maintain flight experience through balloon and small-scale rocket missions, and enable a revolving fresh perspective of engineers with hands on expertise back into the large scale NASA programs, providing a more experienced multi-disciplined set of systems engineers. This overview will define the Program, highlight aspects of the training curriculum, and identify recent accomplishments and activities.

  18. Revealing the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornell, James; Lightman, Alan

    1983-05-01

    Contributors include Owen Gingerich, Kenneth Bracher, Robert F. C. Vessot, Fred L. Whipple, Fred Franklin, Robert W. Noyes, Robert Rosner, Harvey Tananbaum, Alan P. Lightman, Walter H. G. Lewin, William H. Press, John Huchra, and George B. Field. Alan Lightman, a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts & Sciences since 1996, is adjunct professor of humanities at MIT. He is the author of several books on science, including "Ancient Light: Our Changing View of the Universe" (1991) and "Origins: The Lives and Worlds of Modern Cosmologists" (with R. Brawer, 1990). His works of fiction include "Einstein's Dreams" (1993), "The Diagnosis" (2000), which was a finalist for the National Book Award, and, most recently, "Reunion" (2003).

  19. Fred Hoyle's Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregory, Jane

    2005-08-01

    Fred Hoyle was a Yorkshire truant who became the voice of British astronomy. For fifty years, he spoke out for astronomy in the newspapers, on government committees, at scientific meetings, in popular books and on the radio. He devised a never-ending history of the universe, and worked out how the elements were made. He founded a prestigious institute for theoretical astronomy and built a giant telescope, and if it rained on his summer holiday, he sat in his caravan and wrote science fiction novels for his legions of fans around the world. Fred Hoyle also claimed that diseases fall from the sky, that the big bang never happened, and that the Astronomer Royal should be abolished. When the outspoken Fred Hoyle spoke out for astronomy, some astronomers really wished he had kept his mouth shut. This book tells the behind-the-scenes story of Hoyle's widely acclaimed and deeply controversial role in the ideas, organization and public face of astronomy in post-war Britain. It chronicles the triumphs, acrimony, jealousies, rewards and bitter feuds of a field in turmoil, and meets the astronomers, contemplating cosmic questions, keeping secrets, losing their tempers, winkling information out of distant stars and, over tea on the lawn, discussing the finer points of libel law. Fred Hoyle's Universe draws on previously confidential government documents, recently released personal correspondence and interviews with Hoyle's friends, colleagues and critics, as well as with Hoyle himself, to bring you the man, the science, and the scandal behind the genial and genteel facade of the most exciting period in the history of astronomy.

  20. Acceleration of Black Hole Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tianxi

    2012-05-01

    An alternative cosmological model called black hole universe has been recently proposed by the author. According to this model, the universe originated from a hot star-like black hole, and gradually grew up through a supermassive black hole to the present state by accreting ambient materials and merging with other black holes. The entire space is structured with an infinite number of layers hierarchically. The innermost three layers are the universe that we live, the outside space called mother universe, and the inside star-like and supermassive black holes called child universes. The outermost layer has an infinite radius and limits to zero for both the mass density and absolute temperature. All layers or universes are governed by the same physics, the Einstein general theory of relativity with the Robertson-Walker metric of space-time, and tend to expand outward physically. The evolution of the space structure is iterative. When one universe expands out, a new similar universe grows up from its inside. In this study. we will analyze the acceleration of black hole universe that accretes its ambient matter in an increasing rate. We will also compare the result obtained from the black hole universe model with the measurement of type Ia supernova and the result from the big bang cosmology.

  1. Austin Peay State University: College and University Computing Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CAUSE/EFFECT, 1987

    1987-01-01

    Planning for information technology, computer services, computer hardware, administrative computing, academic computing, and office automation/networking at Austin Peay State University are described. (MLW)

  2. Is the Universe logotropic?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chavanis, Pierre-Henri

    2015-07-01

    We consider the possibility that the universe is made of a single dark fluid described by a logotropic equation of state P = A ln( ρ/ρ*, where ρ is the rest-mass density, ρ * is a reference density, and A is the logotropic temperature. The energy density ɛ is the sum of two terms: a rest-mass energy term ρ c 2 that mimics dark matter and an internal energy term u( ρ) = - P( ρ) - A that mimics dark energy. This decomposition leads to a natural, and physical, unification of dark matter and dark energy, and elucidates their mysterious nature. In the early universe, the rest-mass energy dominates and the dark fluid behaves as pressureless dark matter ( P ≃ 0, ɛ ∝ a -3. In the late universe, the internal energy dominates and the dark fluid behaves as dark energy ( P ˜ - ɛ, ɛ ∝ ln a. The logotropic model depends on a single parameter B = A / ρ Λ c 2 (dimensionless logotropic temperature), where ρ Λ = 6.72 × 10-24 g m-3 is the cosmological density. For B = 0, we recover the ΛCDM model with a different justification. For B > 0, we can describe deviations from the ΛCDM model. Using cosmological constraints, we find that 0 ≤ B ≤ 0.09425. We consider the possibility that dark matter halos are described by the same logotropic equation of state. When B > 0, pressure gradients prevent gravitational collapse and provide halo density cores instead of cuspy density profiles, in agreement with the observations. The universal rotation curve of logotropic dark matter halos is consistent with the observational Burkert profile (Burkert, Astrophys. J. 447, L25 (1995)) up to the halo radius. It decreases as r -1 at large distances, similarly to the profile of dark matter halos close to the core radius (Burkert, arXiv:1501.06604). Interestingly, if we assume that all the dark matter halos have the same logotropic temperature B, we find that their surface density Σ 0 = ρ0 r h is constant. This result is in agreement with the observations (Donato et al., Mon

  3. Our Astounding Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Monika

    2016-04-01

    The philosophy of my life is to keep encouraging children to think beyond they could achieve easily. I understand children are adaptive to change and take things with an open mind. They are ready to experiment with new things and dare to dream big. I am fortunate to being a teacher by profession and thus I always attempt experimenting, observing, and participating with other children and adults. Children learn through play. From birth, children are active participants in building their own understanding. Teachers prepare the environment to help each child build on what they already know. It is such a great pleasure to observe every young kid that becomes excited and curious to know when we show them the Universe pictures and tell them about the strange objects in our Universe. So my aim is to keep them ignited by doing different activities throughout the year related to Space. I am always a firm believer of: Creativity is the key to success in the future, and primary education is where teachers can bring creativity in children at that level. One of my main ways of teaching is to conduct various presentations on The Solar System and beyond and debates on Space explorations. A Planet making project is one of the all-time favorite project for my students where they dare to dream to fly in the universe, and with their imagination, kids make different celestial objects and present them. To inculcate scientific attitude I arrange film screening, simulation exercises and quizzes on various topics of astronomy. Every year we celebrate World Space Week 4th to 10th of Oct. The motivation among all came through different hands-on activities like-painting, slogan competition, topics related to space, poetry and essay writing on various topics related to astronomy, assembly presentations in school. I am indeed overwhelmed when I started the very special Space and Astronomy club where young toddlers are involved in different activities like a star gazing program, conducting

  4. Inter-Universal Quantum Entanglement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robles-Pérez, S. J.; González-Díaz, P. F.

    2015-01-01

    The boundary conditions to be imposed on the quantum state of the whole multiverse could be such that the universes would be created in entangled pairs. Then, interuniversal entanglement would provide us with a vacuum energy for each single universe that might be fitted with observational data, making testable not only the multiverse proposal but also the boundary conditions of the multiverse. Furthermore, the second law of the entanglement thermodynamics would enhance the expansion of the single universes.

  5. Entrepreneurial science and the university.

    PubMed

    Bean, L R

    1982-10-01

    The relationship between universities and the free enterprise system has become increasingly controversial as researchers and universities reap profits from scientific investigations. A review is given of developments in this relationship and issues which have been raised at symposia of university leaders and researchers, and by individual professors and students. These issues include conflict of interest, secrecy, patent ownership, research priorities, the role of graduate students, public confidence, and the traditional norms of scientific research. It is concluded that future university deliberations about these concerns should represent a broad range of disciplines and viewpoints, and be open to students, the public, and the press. PMID:7174298

  6. 13 Universities on NCAA Probation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chronicle of Higher Education, 1984

    1984-01-01

    The 13 universities currently on National Collegiate Athletics Association probation, their probation expiration dates, sports affected, sanctions, and grounds for probationary action are listed. (MSE)

  7. Chemistry Inreach: University Employees' Children Experiencing University Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Amanda J.; Harrison, Timothy G.; Shallcross, Dudley E.; Medley, Marcus I.

    2009-01-01

    Many university departments provide public engagement activities, often referred to as "outreach" to school students, their teachers and other members of the public. It is less common for University Departments to run activities for their employees let alone the children of these employees. This paper looks at the value put on an…

  8. University Intercommunication. The Nine Universities Research Project. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Brian, Ed.

    Many universities have already begun to explore the use of closed-circuit television (CCTV) for internal purposes. Provided that the equipment installed is of adequate quality and technically compatible with that of other universities, CCTV, supplemented by arrangements for recording on magnetic tape or on film, can provide a basis for…

  9. Building Effective Community-University Partnerships: Are Universities Truly Ready?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curwood, Susan Eckerle; Munger, Felix; Mitchell, Terry; Mackeigan, Mary; Farrar, Ashley

    2011-01-01

    Community service learning and community-based research necessitate the development of strong community-university partnerships. In this paper, students, faculty, and a community partner critically reflect upon the process of establishing a long-term community-university partnership through the integration of a community service learning component…

  10. International University Ranking Systems and the Idea of University Excellence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Paul; Braddock, Richard

    2007-01-01

    We look at some of the theoretical and methodological issues underlying international university ranking systems and, in particular, their conceptual connection with the idea of excellence. We then turn to a critical examination of the two best-known international university ranking systems--the "Times Higher Education Supplement (THES)" World…

  11. Western Governors University: Creating the First Virtual University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Katrina A.

    2009-01-01

    Distance education in its many forms had been around for decades, but the Western Governors University (WGU) was arguably the first "virtual university" (VU) in the United States, or at least the first VU that gained widespread attention from the press and public. After the governors in the Western Governors Association announced they would create…

  12. The European System for Electing University Presidents and University Governance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ma, Huaide

    2014-01-01

    The system of electing university presidents in Spain, Switzerland, Italy, and the United Kingdom has distinctive characteristics. Almost all university presidents are elected by teachers and students, either directly or indirectly through elections with government approval of the appointment a mere formality. Principles of these elections include…

  13. Assessing Civic Engagement at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pike, Gary R.; Bringle, Robert G.; Hatcher, Julie A.

    2014-01-01

    Faculty and staff at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis (IUPUI) have developed several tools to assess campus civic engagement initiatives. This chapter describes the IUPUI Faculty Survey and the Civic-Minded Graduate Scale, and reports on findings from campus-based assessment and research.

  14. University of Missouri: College and University Systems Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CAUSE/EFFECT, 1983

    1983-01-01

    The computing and information systems at the University of Missouri are described. All computing activity was centralized beginning in 1973 with the formation of the university computer network. Administrative data processing, financial systems, student systems, and office automation are discussed. (MLW)

  15. McMaster University`s artificial computing system

    SciTech Connect

    Dawes, A.; Bentley, M.

    1996-12-31

    This will be McMaster University`s first entry into the AAAI Mobile Robotics competition. As such, this year will serve as a testing ground for future developments. It is the goal of the designers to experiment with new techniques and approaches based on their engineering background.

  16. Viscous dark fluid universe

    SciTech Connect

    Hipolito-Ricaldi, W. S.; Velten, H. E. S.; Zimdahl, W.

    2010-09-15

    We investigate the cosmological perturbation dynamics for a universe consisting of pressureless baryonic matter and a viscous fluid, the latter representing a unified model of the dark sector. In the homogeneous and isotropic background the total energy density of this mixture behaves as a generalized Chaplygin gas. The perturbations of this energy density are intrinsically nonadiabatic and source relative entropy perturbations. The resulting baryonic matter power spectrum is shown to be compatible with the 2dFGRS and SDSS (DR7) data. A joint statistical analysis, using also Hubble-function and supernovae Ia data, shows that, different from other studies, there exists a maximum in the probability distribution for a negative present value q{sub 0{approx_equal}}-0.53 of the deceleration parameter. Moreover, while previous descriptions on the basis of generalized Chaplygin-gas models were incompatible with the matter power-spectrum data since they required a much too large amount of pressureless matter, the unified model presented here favors a matter content that is of the order of the baryonic matter abundance suggested by big-bang nucleosynthesis.

  17. Local Universe Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carignan, Claude

    2015-08-01

    One of the outstanding problems in cosmology is addressing the "small-scale crisis" and understanding structure formation at the smallest scales. Standard Lambda Cold Dark Matter cosmological simulations of Milky Way-size DM halos predict many more DM sub-halos than the number of dwarf galaxies observed. This is the so-called Missing Satellites Problem. The most popular interpretation of the Missing Satellites Problem is that the smallest dark matter halos in the universe are extremely inefficient at forming stars. The virialized extent of the Milky Way's halo should contain ~500 satellites, while only ˜100 satellites and dwarfs are observed in the whole Local Group. Despite the large amount of theoretical work and new optical observations, the discrepancy, even if reduced, still persists between observations and hierarchical models, regardless of the model parameters. It may be possible to find those isolated ultra-faint missing dwarf galaxies via their neutral gas component, which is one of the goals we are pursuing with the SKA precursor KAT-7 in South Africa, and soon with the SKA pathfinder MeerKAT.

  18. University of Sao Paulo

    SciTech Connect

    Acquadro, J.C.; Added, N.; Ferraretto, M.

    1995-08-01

    Argonne has agreed to assist the University of Sao Paulo (USP) in the construction of a small superconducting heavy-ion linac to serve as an energy booster for projectiles from their 8-MV tandem. This booster will be similar in many respects to the ANL booster linac built in the late 1970s. The ANL contribution to this project will be (1) to build (at USP expense) 14 split-ring niobium resonators and some of the associated rf electronics, (2) to provide technical information, and (3) to train USP staff members in several phases of superconducting-linac technology. Two Brazilian engineers worked at Argonne for one year, gaining experience in cryogenics and in superconducting-resonator technology. Another engineer worked on the new control system at ATLAS for two years, the first year supported by Sao Paulo and the second with direct ANL support. Sao Paulo personnel returned to ANL in 1993 for assembly and testing of the first batch of completed resonators. The fabrication of the resonators will be completed by early 1995 when the Sao Paulo personnel will come back for final assembly and testing. Fabrication of electronics modules at ANL is still in progress.

  19. Universal ripper miner

    DOEpatents

    Morrell, Roger J.; Larson, David A.

    1991-01-01

    A universal ripper miner used to cut, collect and transfer material from an underground mine working face includes a cutter head that is vertically movable in an arcuate cutting cycle by means of drive members, such as hydraulically actuated pistons. The cutter head may support a circular cutter bit having a circular cutting edge that may be indexed to incrementally expose a fresh cutting edge. An automatic indexing system is disclosed wherein indexing occurs by means of a worm gear and indexing lever mechanism. The invention also contemplates a bi-directional bit holder enabling cutting to occur in both the upstroke and the downstroke cutting cycle. Another feature of the invention discloses multiple bits arranged in an in-line, radially staggered pattern, or a side-by-side pattern to increase the mining capacity in each cutting cycle. An on-board resharpening system is also disclosed for resharpening the cutting edge at the end of cutting stroke position. The aforementioned improvement features may be used either singly, or in any proposed combination with each other.

  20. Is the Universe homogeneous?

    PubMed

    Maartens, Roy

    2011-12-28

    The standard model of cosmology is based on the existence of homogeneous surfaces as the background arena for structure formation. Homogeneity underpins both general relativistic and modified gravity models and is central to the way in which we interpret observations of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) and the galaxy distribution. However, homogeneity cannot be directly observed in the galaxy distribution or CMB, even with perfect observations, since we observe on the past light cone and not on spatial surfaces. We can directly observe and test for isotropy, but to link this to homogeneity we need to assume the Copernican principle (CP). First, we discuss the link between isotropic observations on the past light cone and isotropic space-time geometry: what observations do we need to be isotropic in order to deduce space-time isotropy? Second, we discuss what we can say with the Copernican assumption. The most powerful result is based on the CMB: the vanishing of the dipole, quadrupole and octupole of the CMB is sufficient to impose homogeneity. Real observations lead to near-isotropy on large scales--does this lead to near-homogeneity? There are important partial results, and we discuss why this remains a difficult open question. Thus, we are currently unable to prove homogeneity of the Universe on large scales, even with the CP. However, we can use observations of the cosmic microwave background, galaxies and clusters to test homogeneity itself. PMID:22084298

  1. Universal mechatronics coordinator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muir, Patrick F.

    1999-11-01

    Mechatronic systems incorporate multiple actuators and sensor which must be properly coordinated to achieve the desired system functionality. Many mechatronic systems are designed as one-of-a-kind custom projects without consideration for facilitating future system or alterations and extensions to the current syste. Thus, subsequent changes to the system are slow, different, and costly. It has become apparent that manufacturing processes, and thus the mechatronics which embody them, need to be agile in order to more quickly and easily respond to changing customer demands or market pressures. To achieve agility, both the hardware and software of the system need to be designed such that the creation of new system and the alteration and extension of current system is fast and easy. This paper describes the design of a Universal Mechatronics Coordinator (UMC) which facilitates agile setup and changeover of coordination software for mechatronic systems. The UMC is capable of sequencing continuous and discrete actions that are programmed as stimulus-response pairs, as state machines, or a combination of the two. It facilitates the modular, reusable programing of continuous actions such as servo control algorithms, data collection code, and safety checking routines; and discrete actions such as reporting achieved states, and turning on/off binary devices. The UMC has been applied to the control of a z- theta assembly robot for the Minifactory project and is applicable to a spectrum of widely differing mechatronic systems.

  2. Universal Signal Conditioning Amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinney, Frank

    1997-01-01

    The Technological Research and Development Authority (TRDA) and NASA-KSC entered into a cooperative agreement in March of 1994 to achieve the utilization and commercialization of a technology development for benefiting both the Space Program and U.S. industry on a "dual-use basis". The technology involved in this transfer is a new, unique Universal Conditioning Amplifier (USCA) used in connection with various types of transducers. The project was initiated in partnership with I-Net Corporation, Lockheed Martin Telemetry & Instrumentation (formerly Loral Test and Information Systems) and Brevard Community College. The project consists of designing, miniaturizing, manufacturing, and testing an existing prototype of USCA that was developed for NASA-KSC by the I-Net Corporation. The USCA is a rugged and field-installable self (or remotely)- programmable amplifier that works in combination with a tag random access memory (RAM) attached to various types of transducers. This summary report comprises performance evaluations, TRDA partnership tasks, a project summary, project milestones and results.

  3. Universal signal conditioning amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Medelius, Pedro J.; Hallberg, Carl; Cecil, Jim

    1994-01-01

    A state-of-the-art instrumentation amplifier capable of being used with most types of transducers has been developed at the Kennedy Space Center. This Universal Signal Conditioning Amplifier (USCA) can eliminate costly measurement setup item and troubleshooting, improve system reliability and provide more accurate data than conventional amplifiers. The USCA can configure itself for maximum resolution and accuracy based on information read from a RAM chip attached to each transducer. Excitation voltages or current are also automatically configured. The amplifier uses both analog and digital state-of-the-art technology with analog-to-digital conversion performed in the early stages in order to minimize errors introduced by offset and gain drifts in the analog components. A dynamic temperature compensation scheme has been designed to achieve and maintain 12-bit accuracy of the amplifier from 0 to 70 C. The digital signal processing section allows the implementation of digital filters up to 511th order. The amplifier can also perform real-time linearizations up to fourth order while processing data at a rate of 23.438 kS/s. Both digital and analog outputs are available from the amplifier.

  4. Hydrogen fuel - Universal energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prince, A. G.; Burg, J. A.

    The technology for the production, storage, transmission, and consumption of hydrogen as a fuel is surveyed, with the physical and chemical properties of hydrogen examined as they affect its use as a fuel. Sources of hydrogen production are described including synthesis from coal or natural gas, biomass conversion, thermochemical decomposition of water, and electrolysis of water, of these only electrolysis is considered economicially and technologically feasible in the near future. Methods of production of the large quantities of electricity required for the electrolysis of sea water are explored: fossil fuels, hydroelectric plants, nuclear fission, solar energy, wind power, geothermal energy, tidal power, wave motion, electrochemical concentration cells, and finally ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC). The wind power and OTEC are considered in detail as the most feasible approaches. Techniques for transmission (by railcar or pipeline), storage (as liquid in underwater or underground tanks, as granular metal hydride, or as cryogenic liquid), and consumption (in fuel cells in conventional power plants, for home usage, for industrial furnaces, and for cars and aircraft) are analyzed. The safety problems of hydrogen as a universal fuel are discussed, noting that they are no greater than those for conventional fuels.

  5. Universal Uncertainty Relations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gour, Gilad

    2014-03-01

    Uncertainty relations are a distinctive characteristic of quantum theory that imposes intrinsic limitations on the precision with which physical properties can be simultaneously determined. The modern work on uncertainty relations employs entropic measures to quantify the lack of knowledge associated with measuring non-commuting observables. However, I will show here that there is no fundamental reason for using entropies as quantifiers; in fact, any functional relation that characterizes the uncertainty of the measurement outcomes can be used to define an uncertainty relation. Starting from a simple assumption that any measure of uncertainty is non-decreasing under mere relabeling of the measurement outcomes, I will show that Schur-concave functions are the most general uncertainty quantifiers. I will then introduce a novel fine-grained uncertainty relation written in terms of a majorization relation, which generates an infinite family of distinct scalar uncertainty relations via the application of arbitrary measures of uncertainty. This infinite family of uncertainty relations includes all the known entropic uncertainty relations, but is not limited to them. In this sense, the relation is universally valid and captures the essence of the uncertainty principle in quantum theory. This talk is based on a joint work with Shmuel Friedland and Vlad Gheorghiu. This research is supported by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council (NSERC) of Canada and by the Pacific Institute for Mathematical Sciences (PIMS).

  6. HACCing the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pope, Adrian

    2014-03-01

    Simulations of large-scale structure formation that can simultaneously encompass a representative volume of the universe and resolve the dark matter halos that host galaxies are required for both planning and analyzing current and future astronomical surveys of galaxies across the sky. In order to harness the power of modern supercomputing systems for running such simulations we have developed the Hardware/Hybrid Cosmology Code (HACC) to address the issues of massive concurrency and heterogeneity. HACC uses n-body methods and splits the calculation of the gravitational force into a long-range component that is highly portable and a short-range component that is tuned to specific compute node architectures. We have developed and used variants of HACC for x86, IBM Cell (LANL/Roadrunner), IBM Blue Gene (ANL/Mira), and GPGPU (ORNL/Titan) systems. This talk will focus on how our experiences with various memory hierarchies and potential performance bottlenecks has influenced our iterations of code design in order to achieve better load-balancing and higher performance.

  7. The Universe of Fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidharth, B. G.

    We discuss the recent model of a Quantum Mechanical Black Hole (QMBH) which describes the most fundamental known particles, the leptons and approximately the quarks in terms of the Kerr-Newman Black Hole with a naked singularity shielded by Zitterbewegung effects. This goes beyond the Zitterbewegung and self interaction models of Barut and Bracken, Hestenes, Chacko and others and provides a unified picture which amongst other things gives a rationale for and an insight into: (1) The apparently inexplicable reason why complex space-time transformations lead to the Kerr-Newman metric in General Relativity. (2) The value of the fine structure constant. (3) The ratio between electromagnetic and gravitational interaction strengths. (4) The anomalous gyromagnetic ratio for the electron. (5) Why the neutrino is left-handed. (6) Why the charge is discrete. In the spirit of Effective Field Theories, this model provides an alternative formalism for Quantum Theory and also for its combination with General Relativity. Finally a mechanism for the formation of these QMBH or particles is explored within the framework of Stochastic Electrodynamics, QED and Quantum Statistical Mechanics. The cosmological implications are then examined. It turns out that a surprisingly large number of facts, including some which were hitherto inexplicable. follow as a consequence of the model. These include a theoretical deduction of the Mass, Radius and Age of the Universe, also the values of Hubble's constant and the Cosmological constant.

  8. Universal Cluster Deposition System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiang, You; Sun, Zhiguang; Sellmyer, David J.

    2001-03-01

    We have developed a universal cluster deposition system (UCDS), which combines a new kind of sputtering-gas-aggregation (SGA) cluster beam source with two atom beams from magnetron sputtering. A highly intense, very stable beam of nanoclusters (like Co, Fe, Ni, Si, CoSm or CoPt) are produced. A quadrupole and/or a new high transmission infinite range mass selector have been designed for the cluster beam. The size distribution (Δd/d) is between 0.05+/-0.10, measured in situ by TOF. A range of mean cluster size is 2 to 10 nm. Usually the deposition rate is about 5 deg/s. The cluster concentration in the film is adjusted through the ratio of cluster and atomic beam deposition rates, as measured in situ with a rotatable quartz microbalance. The UCDS can be used to prepare coated clusters. After exiting from the cluster source, the clusters can be coated first with an atomic or molecular species in an evaporation chamber, and deposited alone or co-deposited with another material. This system is used to deposit simultaneously or alternately mesoscopic thin films or multilayers, and offers the possibility to control independently the incident cluster size and concentration, and thereby the interaction between clusters and cluster-matrix material which is of interest for fundamental research and industry applications. Magnetic properties of Co cluster-assembled materials will be discussed. * Research supported by NSF, DARPA through ARO, and CMRA

  9. The Medieval German University: Transformation and Innovation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwinges, Rainer Christoph

    1998-01-01

    Discusses the development of the university system within the Holy Roman Empire, especially in Germany, explaining that the University of Prague in 1348 was the Empire's first university. Reports that after the University of Prague, the new university type, or the "German type," developed by combining types of universities in Bologna and Paris.…

  10. The Dynamics of University Protest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Light, Donald, Jr.; Spiegel, John P.

    Eleven years after the end of the height of protest on college and university campuses, it is important to try to understand what the student protest movement was all about, how it came to be, how and why it ended, and what will happen next. Through intimate case studies of takeovers at various universities, the dynamics of that era are examined.…

  11. The Overseas University Leadership Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yu, Haibo

    2014-01-01

    This article analyzes the content and format of the Overseas University Leadership Program organized by the National Academy of Education Administration in Beijing, China. Universities provide the country with scientific and technological expertise, pave the path to individual advancement, and are major economic engines. China's new mission…

  12. Positioning the Undervalued Metropolitan University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Herbert E.

    1993-01-01

    It is noted that "undervalued metropolitan universities," which generally have open enrollment, low tuition, and a large proportion of nontraditional students, often also have a diffuse and unclear public image. A model positioning concept for these institutions, used by Wright State University (Ohio) is proposed and described. (MSE)

  13. The Impact of Universities' ERPs?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jefferson, Anne L.

    Early retirement plans (ERPs) have recently been considered and implemented at a number of universities as a means to address their need to contain costs while simultaneously generating new ideas and energy within the institution through the revitalization of faculty ranks. This endorsement of ERPs by university administrators, however, is…

  14. Growing an Emerging Research University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birx, Donald L.; Anderson-Fletcher, Elizabeth; Whitney, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    The emerging research college or university is one of the most formidable resources a region has to reinvent and grow its economy. This paper is the first of two that outlines a process of building research universities that enhance regional technology development and facilitate flexible networks of collaboration and resource sharing. Although the…

  15. The Philosophy of University Housing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallace, James A.

    2012-01-01

    This article examines a stated philosophy of university housing and the philosophy's effect on the facilitation of the personal and intellectual growth of students residing in the residence halls and the development of a sense of community. This particular philosophy governs the housing operations at Southern Illinois University at Carbondale.…

  16. The Future of the Universe.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Page, Don N.; McKee, M. Randall

    1983-01-01

    The future of the universe is discussed in terms of several models. These include the closed, open, and critical models of the universe. Black holes and speculation on what may happen to life in the cosmological models are also discussed. (JN)

  17. Water Recycling in Schools & Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meeten, Nick

    2013-01-01

    Consider the waste streams generated in schools and universities. So what is in the typical used water generated in schools and universities? It is typically about 99 percent water, with the remaining 1 percent mainly made up of organic compounds. Used water contains nutrients such as nitrogen and phosphorous. When one judges it on its quality, it…

  18. Sign Program for a University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Architectural and Engineering News, 1968

    1968-01-01

    A co-ordinated sign program for a multi-campus university not only helps students and visitors find their way around, but is a design element that adds identification and unity. Graphic designer, Paul Arthur, has designed a modular sign system for the University of Tennessee with all elements having standard color, lettering, size and materials.…

  19. Learning Productivity at Research Universities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuh, George D.; Hu, Shouping

    2001-01-01

    Compared levels of engagement in learning activities and gains of students at research universities (RUs) and other types of colleges in the 1980s and 1990s. Though students at other universities generally outperformed RU students, the gap closed somewhat between the mid-80s and mid-90s due in part to declines in many learning productivity…

  20. Infra-red soft universality

    SciTech Connect

    Jack, I.

    1997-06-15

    In a special class of supersymmetric grand unified theories, the commonly assumed universal form of the soft supersymmetry-breaking terms is approached in the infra-red limit. The resulting universal scalar mass and trilinear coupling are predicted in terms of the gaugino mass.

  1. Student Leadership at the University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hilliard, Ann T.

    2010-01-01

    The focus of this article is about the utilization of student leadership at the University. Based on research, student leadership opportunities at the university have been frequently at a low percentage (Zimmerman, Burkhart, 2002). The researcher identifies practical ways to involve students in various leadership activities. Emphases are placed on…

  2. A University for the People

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webb, Sue

    2010-01-01

    Over the past year lifelong learning in universities has come under the spotlight of politicians, educationalists, journalists and adult learners. For some, the concern has been about countering the fall-out from changes in public funding and challenging the reduction in provision--and even closure--of university departments. A number of…

  3. Outdoor Recreation at Brock University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Breunig, Mary; O'Connell, Tim; Hutson, Garrett

    2007-01-01

    Brock University offers both undergraduate and graduate programs and is host to approximately 17,000 students. It is the only Canadian university located in a World Biosphere Reserve--the Niagara Escarpment. The Bruce Trail passes through campus, and offers ample opportunities for hiking, mountain biking, nature interpretation and outdoor…

  4. University Research: Understanding Its Role

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association of American Universities, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Since World War II, the federal government has maintained a partnership with the nation's research universities, based on the bipartisan consensus that (1) the nation needs to invest its resources in curiosity-driven, competitively awarded basic research, and (2) basic research is best conducted at the nation's universities. As a result of that…

  5. Cable Television and the University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyman, Richard

    Universities contain powerful blocs of resistance to new educational technology, perhaps especially to television. University attitudes and structures as well as faculty ignorance, apathy, and resistance affect the development of cable television. No one seems to speak with great confidence and precision about the educational potential of cable.…

  6. Sustainability in Brazilian Federal Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palma, Lisiane Celia; de Oliveira, Lessandra M.; Viacava, Keitiline R.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to identify the number of courses related to sustainability offered in bachelor degree programs of business administration in Brazilian federal universities. Design/methodology/approach: An exploratory research was carried out based on a descriptive scope. The process of mapping federal universities in Brazil…

  7. Quantum entanglement of baby universes

    SciTech Connect

    Essman, Eric P.; Aganagic, Mina; Okuda, Takuya; Ooguri, Hirosi

    2006-12-07

    We study quantum entanglements of baby universes which appear in non-perturbative corrections to the OSV formula for the entropy of extremal black holes in type IIA string theory compactified on the local Calabi-Yau manifold defined as a rank 2 vector bundle over an arbitrary genus G Riemann surface. This generalizes the result for G=1 in hep-th/0504221. Non-perturbative terms can be organized into a sum over contributions from baby universes, and the total wave-function is their coherent superposition in the third quantized Hilbert space. We find that half of the universes preserve one set of supercharges while the other half preserve a different set, making the total universe stable but non-BPS. The parent universe generates baby universes by brane/anti-brane pair creation, and baby universes are correlated by conservation of non-normalizable D-brane charges under the process. There are no other source of entanglement of baby universes, and all possible states are superposed with the equal weight.

  8. Internationalization and the Cosmopolitical University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Britez, Rodrigo; Peters, Michael A.

    2010-01-01

    This article discusses some of the issues that surround the internationalization of higher education as a way to open discussion about the construction of an alternative cosmopolitical vision of the university, necessary if the university is to fulfill any historic tasks concerning the creation of globally aware citizens. The authors indicate that…

  9. University Rankings and Social Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marginson, Simon

    2014-01-01

    University rankings widely affect the behaviours of prospective students and their families, university executive leaders, academic faculty, governments and investors in higher education. Yet the social science foundations of global rankings receive little scrutiny. Rankings that simply recycle reputation without any necessary connection to real…

  10. On evolution of the universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slavnov, D. A.

    2016-01-01

    We consider the model of evolution of the Universe where the Big Bang is regarded as an explosion of a photon superstar. The inflationary epoch is not necessary in the model. The model describes the fundamental phenomena observed: the Universe is expanding at an increasing rate, it is homogeneous and isotropic and contains no antimatter, and its metrics is almost flat.

  11. University Satellite Campus Management Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fraser, Doug; Stott, Ken

    2015-01-01

    Among the 60 or so university satellite campuses in Australia are many that are probably failing to meet the high expectations of their universities and the communities they were designed to serve. While in some cases this may be due to the demand driven system, it may also be attributable in part to the ways in which they are managed. The…

  12. The Marine Corps University Library.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramkey, Carol E.

    2001-01-01

    Describes the Marine Corps University (Virginia) Library's collections and reserves. States that the library's resources focus on military doctrine, history, arts, and sciences, and that they include Web- and CD-ROM-based specialized military databases. Describes the library's mission to serve the university community and Marine Corps patrons…

  13. Jaspers' Concept of the University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burch, Robert

    1976-01-01

    The general character of Jaspers' idea of the university is outlined, and some basic objections to that view are examined. Throughout the paper an attempt is made to establish the relevance of Jaspers' work to current university problems. (Author/LBH)

  14. Universities: Engaging with Local Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Universities UK, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This leaflet illustrates the many ways in which universities impact on the local area. Universities are a major contributor to the economy in their own right, both as employers and purchasers of goods. Their social and cultural influence is also felt through their provision of: (1) art galleries, museums and exhibitions; (2) cinemas and theatres;…

  15. Integrating Environmental Sustainability into Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ralph, Meredith; Stubbs, Wendy

    2014-01-01

    Universities play a fundamental role in addressing global environmental challenges as their education, research and community involvement can produce long-lasting environmental effects and societal change. By demonstrating best practice in their operations, research and teaching, universities have both multiple and multiplier effects on society.…

  16. The University as an Organization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perkins, James A., Ed.

    This collection of studies by men and women who understand universities and have the experience and ability to view them in perspectives of history and international experience demonstrates that universities constitute a genus of institution that is unique in its totality and comparable to other organizations only in certain of its…

  17. Technical Pitfalls in University Rankings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bougnol, Marie-Laure; Dulá, Jose H.

    2015-01-01

    Academicians, experts, and other stakeholders have contributed extensively to the literature on university rankings also known as "league tables". Often the tone is critical usually focused on the subjective aspects of the process; e.g., the list of the universities' attributes used in the rankings, their respective weights, and the size…

  18. University Students: Attainment and Sport

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendry, L. B.; Douglass, L.

    1975-01-01

    The extent to which 230 university students following a one-year psychology course were 'active' (i.e., competitively or recreationally involved) in sport or 'non-participant' was compared with their scores on measures of personality, attitude, social class, sex, previous school involvement in sport, and attainment in university course work.…

  19. Managing University Research Microdata Collections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woolfrey, Lynn; Fry, Jane

    2015-01-01

    This article examines the management of microdata collections in a university context. It is a cross-country analysis: Collection management at data services in Canada and South Africa are considered. The case studies are of two university sub-contexts: One collection is located in a library; the other at a Faculty-based Data Service. Stages in…

  20. University--Science Fair Partnership.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tallman, Erika; Taylor, Karen

    1997-01-01

    Describes a partnership between a fifth-grade teacher and a university methods professor that involved developing an elementary science fair project mentored by university students. Provides opportunities for elementary students to conduct scientific investigations to learn about science, and opportunities for education majors to have firsthand…

  1. Universities in Transition in Asia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gungwu, Wang

    1992-01-01

    Discusses the history of Asian universities, their position today, and what the transitions represent for the future. Describes the major debate in the past as concerning the preservation of traditional cultural values while becoming modern institutions. Argues that Asian universities need to recognize the great relevance of traditions to social…

  2. Islamic Universities Spread through Africa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindow, Megan

    2007-01-01

    This article reports on new universities for Muslims, many supported by groups in the Middle East, which are spreading through the sub-Saharan region. The Islamic University in Uganda is a prime example of a new kind of institution that has slowly been spreading its way across the continent. Embracing both conservative Muslim values and modern…

  3. Are Universities Becoming More Unequal?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yan, Lau; Rosen, Harvey S.

    2016-01-01

    Observers have expressed concern about growing inequality in resources across universities. But are universities really becoming more unequal? We argue that the typical approach of examining endowment growth alone is not sensible. In line with the literature on household inequality, we focus instead on a comprehensive income measure. We find that…

  4. CARES: Mentoring through University Outreach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergerson, Amy Aldous; Petersen, Kari K.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined whether a university outreach program featuring peer mentoring and offering a social support network can impact college-going aspirations. Study participants were middle school students of color and low SES students and their university student mentors. Purposeful selection was used to identify six mentors and six proteges and…

  5. University Macro Analytic Simulation Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baron, Robert; Gulko, Warren

    The University Macro Analytic Simulation System (UMASS) has been designed as a forecasting tool to help university administrators budgeting decisions. Alternative budgeting strategies can be tested on a computer model and then an operational alternative can be selected on the basis of the most desirable projected outcome. UMASS uses readily…

  6. Research and the Universities' Image

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santiago, Rui; Carvalho, Teresa; Relva, Rosario

    2008-01-01

    Traditionally, and from a Humboltian perspective, research was conceived as an important part of the tripartite mission of universities, with teaching and services to the community being the other two. The traditional idea of universities as cultural and social institutions is increasingly being replaced by another: the entrepreneurial, capitalist…

  7. Millersville University Secondary Education PDS

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marcum-Dietrich, Nanette I.; Mahoney, Tim

    2015-01-01

    Millersville University of Pennsylvania (MU) has over 150 years of proud heritage in the preparation of teachers. This article describes how the Secondary Education Professional Development School (PDS) Program model has transformed Millersville University's secondary teacher education from a traditional teacher preparation program into a dynamic…

  8. Future University-Industry Relations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sorrows, Howard E.

    1983-01-01

    University and industry relations in the United States, it is suggested, must promote competitive U.S. industries. The prime motive for increasing university-industrial relations is competitive commercial products and services. Other countries' success results from national technology ventures based on superior marketing and marshalling of…

  9. URBAN INSTITUTIONS AS UNIVERSITY CLIENTS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    KRAVITZ, SANFORD L.

    THE AUTHOR DISCUSSES THE WAYS IN WHICH THE UNIVERSITY CAN AND MUST HELP THE CITY SOLVE ITS PROBLEMS. HE SEES THE TWO MAJOR NEEDS OF URBAN INSTITUTIONS AS A MANPOWER SHORTAGE AND A KNOWLEDGE PROBLEM. THE UNIVERSITY MUST MOBILIZE ITS RESOURCES RAPIDLY AND RESPONSIBLY NOT ONLY TO INCREASE THE NUMBER OF WORKERS AVAILABLE BUT TO IMPROVE THE QUALITY AND…

  10. University Autonomy: The Ethiopian Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gebru, Demewoz Admasu

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses and analyzes the state of university autonomy in Ethiopia at a time when the country has embarked on massive expansion of the sector, and universities are established out of urban centers based on regional equity. Legislative provisions and case study reports were reviewed, and lived experiences documented with emphasis on…

  11. Employability and Finnish University Graduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Puhakka, Antero; Rautopuro, Juhani; Tuominen, Visa

    2010-01-01

    In this article the authors concentrate on the change in the concept of employability during the Bologna process. They show that employability has gradually moved from a peripheral to a core presence in the most recent Bologna process documents. Using a Finnish university merger (University of Eastern Finland) as an example, the authors…

  12. The Architect as University President

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barker, James F.

    2008-01-01

    Architecture blends the arts and sciences in a vigorous way--one well suited to a university presidency. In this article, the author shares how his architectural education and background prepared and helped him for his responsibility as president of Clemson University. A big part of his responsibility is to help plan, financially support, build,…

  13. Reformation Comes to the University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaffer, Susan M.

    1992-01-01

    The lessons from the corporate experience of the 1980s, carefully applied, can strengthen the university in support of its mission. Those experiences, sifted and shaped for higher education, can help with the difficult tasks of downsizing, rightsizing, restructuring, streamlining, and decentralizing that confront the university in the 1990s. (MSE)

  14. Gifted Students' Transition to University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mendaglio, Sal

    2013-01-01

    The transition from school to university presents novel demands for all students. Although this educational milestone has been addressed by scholars, particularly those interested in the study of higher education, there is a dearth of literature regarding gifted students' experience of their handling demands of first-year university. In the…

  15. Visualising the "Internationalisation" of Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elkin, Graham; Devjee, Faiyaz; Farnsworth, John

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: There are few means of measuring whether universities have effective international programmes or policies in response to increasing globalisation. The purpose of this paper is to report on the development and testing of a model for measuring the internationalisation of universities and to assist with the strategic planning of…

  16. What Is the University Today?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heaney, Conor

    2015-01-01

    What is the University today? In this paper, a Foucault and Deleuzo-Guattarian inspired approach is taken. I argue that the University is, today, a site of "neoliberal governmentality," which governs students and academics as sites of human capital. That is, students and academics are governed to self-govern themselves as sites of human…

  17. Environmental Management at Swedish Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arvidsson, Karin

    2004-01-01

    Since 1996, all Swedish public authorities, which includes most universities, have been made responsible for contributing to the sustainable development of the society. Swedish universities are thus required to submit annual environmental reports about their policies, structures and actions. This study provides a review of the activities that…

  18. University Ranking as Social Exclusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amsler, Sarah S.; Bolsmann, Chris

    2012-01-01

    In this article we explore the dual role of global university rankings in the creation of a new, knowledge-identified, transnational capitalist class and in facilitating new forms of social exclusion. We examine how and why the practice of ranking universities has become widely defined by national and international organisations as an important…

  19. The age of universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Zeeshan

    The presence of short-lived isotope Curium-247 in the early Solar System complicates the job of dating the earliest events in the solar nebula. Primitive components in meteorites contain a detailed record of the conditions and processes in the solarnebula, the cloud of dust and gas surrounding the infant Sun. Determining accurately when the first materialsformed re-quires the lead-lead (Pb-Pb) dating method, a method based on the decay of uranium (U) isotopes toPb isotopes. The initial ratio of U-238 to U-235 is critical to determining theages correctly, and many studies have concluded that the ratio is constant for any given age. How-ever, my colleagues at Arizona State University(Frankfurt, Germany), and the Senckenberg Forschungsinstitut und Naturmuseum (also in Frankfurt) and I have found that some calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions (CAIs) in chondritic meteorites deviate from the conventional value for the U-238/U-235 ratio. This could lead to inaccuracies of up to 5 million years in the age of these objects, if no correction is made.Variations in the concentrations of thorium and neodymium with the U-238/U-235 ratio suggest that the ratio may have been lowered by the decay of curium-247, which decays to U-235 with a half-life of 15.6 million years. Curium-247 is created in certain types of energetic supernovae, so its presence suggests that a supernova added material to the pre-solar interstellar cloud between 110 and 140 million years before theSolar System began to form.

  20. Kennedy at Rice University

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1962-01-01

    President Kennedy speaks before a crowd of 35,000 people at Rice University in the football field. The following are excerpts from his speech. ' ...We set sail on his new sea because there is a new knowledge to be gained, and new rights to be won, and they must be won and used for the progress of all people. ...Whether it will become a force for good or ill depends on man, and only if the United States occupies a position of pre-eminence can we help decide whether this new ocean will be a sea of peace or a new terrifying theater of war. But I do say space can be explored and mastered without feeding the fires of war, without repeating the mistakes that man has made with extending his writ around this globe of ours. ...There is no strife, no prejudice, no national conflict in outer space as yet. Its conquest deserves the best of all mankind, and its opportunity for peaceful cooperation may never come again. But why, some say the Moon? Why choose this as our goal? And they may well ask, why climb the highest mountian? Why - 35 years ago - why fly the Atlantic? Why does Rice play Texas? We choose to go to the Moon, we choose to go to the Moon in this decade and do the other things, not because they are easy, but because they are hard, because that goal will serve to organize and measure the best of our energies and skills, because that challenge is one that we are willing to accept, one we are unwilling to postpone, and one in which we intend to win, and the others too.'

  1. Kennedy at Rice University

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1962-01-01

    President Kennedy speaks before a crowd of 35,000 people at Rice University in the football field. The following are excerpts from his speech. ' ...We set sail on his new sea because there is a new knowledge to begained, and new rights to be won, and they must be won and used for the progress of all people. Whether it will become a force for good or ill depends on man, and only if the United States occupies a position of pre-eminence can we help decide whether this new ocean will be a sea of peace or a new terrifying theater of war. But I do say space can be explored and mastered without feeding the fires of war, without repeating the mistakes that man has made with extending his wirt around this globe of ours. There is no strife, no prejudice, no national conflict in outer space as yet. Its conquest deserves the best of all mankind, and its opportunity for peaceful cooperation may never come again. But why, some say the Moon? Why choose this as our goal? And they may well ask, why climb the highest mountain? Why 35 years ago why fly the Atlantic? Why does Rice play Texas? We choose to go to the Moon, we choose to go to the moon in this decade and do the other things, not because they are easy, but because they are hard, because that goal will serve to organize and measure the best of our energies and skills, because that challenge is one that we are willing to accept, one we are unwilling to postpone, and one in which we attend to win, and the others , too.'

  2. TIGER: the universal biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofstadler, Steven A.; Sampath, Rangarajan; Blyn, Lawrence B.; Eshoo, Mark W.; Hall, Thomas A.; Jiang, Yun; Drader, Jared J.; Hannis, James C.; Sannes-Lowery, Kristin A.; Cummins, Lendell L.; Libby, Brian; Walcott, Demetrius J.; Schink, Amy; Massire, Christian; Ranken, Raymond; Gutierrez, Jose; Manalili, Sheri; Ivy, Cristina; Melton, Rachael; Levene, Harold; Barrett-Wilt, Greg; Li, Feng; Zapp, Vanessa; White, Neill; Samant, Vivek; McNeil, John A.; Knize, Duane; Robbins, David; Rudnick, Karl; Desai, Anjali; Moradi, Emily; Ecker, David J.

    2005-03-01

    In this work, we describe a strategy for the detection and characterization of microorganisms associated with a potential biological warfare attack or a natural outbreak of an emerging infectious disease. This approach, termed TIGER (Triangulation Identification for the Genetic Evaluation of Risks), relies on mass spectrometry-derived base composition signatures obtained from PCR amplification of broadly conserved regions of the microbial genome(s) in a sample. The sample can be derived from air filtration devices, clinical samples, or other sources. Core to this approach are "intelligent PCR primers" that target broadly conserved regions of microbial genomes that flank variable regions. This approach requires that high-performance mass measurements be made on PCR products in the 80-140 bp size range in a high-throughput, robust modality. As will be demonstrated, the concept is equally applicable to bacteria and viruses and could be further applied to fungi and protozoa. In addition to describing the fundamental strategy of this approach, several specific examples of TIGER are presented that illustrate the impact this approach could have on the way biological weapons attacks are detected and the way that the etiologies of infectious diseases are determined. The first example illustrates how any bacterial species might be identified, using Bacillus anthracis as the test agent. The second example demonstrates how DNA-genome viruses are identified using five members of Poxviridae family, whose members includes Variola virus, the agent responsible for smallpox. The third example demonstrates how RNA-genome viruses are identified using the Alphaviruses (VEE, WEE, and EEE) as representative examples. These examples illustrate how the TIGER technology can be applied to create a universal identification strategy for all pathogens, including those that infect humans, livestock, and plants.

  3. The INTEGRAL Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoenfelder, V.; Lichti, G.; Winkler, C.

    2004-10-01

    The 5th INTEGRAL workshop "The INTEGRAL Universe" was held at the premises of the Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften in Munich, Germany, from February 16 - 20, 2004. The workshop was attended by over 230 scientists from all over the world. The aim of the workshop was twofold: to bring the scientists together who are using data from the INTEGRAL mission and to present first results which were obtained by the four INTEGRAL instruments during the first 18 months of operation. It was for the first time after launch that INTEGRAL results were presented and discussed in a broader scientific context and compared with results obtained with other instruments at different wavelengths (especially in the optical, infrared and radio). Naturally the results concentrated mainly on the hard X-ray regime since photons are plentiful and the sensitivity of the INTEGRAL instruments is best there. But also very interesting early results at low-energy gamma-rays, especially on gamma-ray lines, were presented. Because of INTEGRAL?s ability to measure and localize gamma-ray bursts quickly, this topic also drew a lot of attention and stimulating results were presented. The following list emphasizes the scientific importance of the topics which were covered by 6 invited, 1 special and 64 contributed talks as well as about 180 posters: + Nucleosynthesis and gamma-ray line spectroscopy + Pulsars + X-ray binaries (with neutron stars and black holes) + Interstellar continuum emission + AGN (Seyferts and Blazars) + Clusters of galaxies + Cosmic background radiation + Gamma-ray bursts + Unidentified gamma-ray sources + Solar flare gamma-rays + Data analysis (posters only) * Future instruments and missions (posters only)

  4. University cardiology clinic.

    PubMed

    Borozanov, V

    2013-01-01

    In distant 1972, within framework of the Internal Clinic, a cardiologic department was organized which was soon, on 29.XII.1974, transformed into the Cardiology Clinic, later the Institute for Heart Diseases, and in 2008 was renamed the University Cardiology Clinic. The greater part of its foundation was possible owing to Prof. Dimitar Arsov and Prof. Radovan Percinkovski, who was the clinic's first director in the period from 1974 to 1984. In 1985, the Clinic moved into its own new building, and in that way was physically detached from the Internal Clinics. Until its move to the new building, the Clinic functioned in the Internal Clinics building, organized as an outpatient polyclinic and inpatient infirmary department with clinical beds, a coronary intensive care unit and a haemodynamics laboratory equipped with the most modern equipment of that time. Today the Clinic functions through two integral divisions: an inpatient infirmary department which comprises an intensive coronary care unit and fourteen wards which altogether have 139 clinical beds, and the diagnostic centre which comprises an emergency clinic and day hospital, a communal and consultative outpatients' clinic functioning on a daily basis, through which some 300-350 patients pass every day, and diagnostic laboratories with a capacity of nearly 100 non-invasive and 20-30 invasive diagnostic procedures daily. The Clinic is a teaching base, and its doctors are educators of students at the Medical, Dental and Pharmacy Faculties, and also of students at the High School for Nurses and X-ray technicians, but also for those in Internal Medicine and especially Cardiology. The Clinic is also a base for scientific Masters' and post-doctoral studies, and such higher degrees are achieved not only by doctors who work here, but also by doctors from Medical Centres both in the country and abroad. Doctors working in this institution publish widely, not only a great number of books and monographs, but also original

  5. PREFACE: The Quantum Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adler, Stephen L.; Bassi, Angelo; Dowker, Fay; Dürr, Detlef

    2007-03-01

    This special issue of Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical entitled 'The Quantum Universe' is dedicated to Professor Giancarlo Ghirardi on the occasion of his 70th birthday. Giancarlo Ghirardi has made many important contributions to the foundations of quantum mechanics including the celebrated Ghirardi Rimini Weber (GRW) model of spontaneous wavefunction collapse. However, although Professor Ghirardi's birthday is the inspiration for this issue, it has a much broader scope than the area traditionally known as Foundations of Quantum Mechanics. All invited authors are experts in areas of physics in which quantum theory is fundamental: non relativistic quantum mechanics, quantum computation and information, quantum field theory, quantum gravity, quantum cosmology and philosophy of science. The issue was conceived as an opportunity for workers in these diverse areas to share with the widest possible readership their views on quantum theory. Authors were encouraged to give their personal assessment of the role of quantum theory in their work particularly as it pertains to a vision of the global aims of their research. The articles are accessible to any physicist with a solid knowledge of quantum mechanics, and many contain an emphasis on conceptual developments, both those achieved and those hoped for. One theme that runs throughout Giancarlo Ghirardi's contributions to science is the unity of physics: the development of the GRW model itself was motivated by the conviction that the same physics should govern microscopic and macroscopic systems. However, readers of this special issue will clearly see that there is no unity as yet in the views of workers on fundamental quantum theories. Indeed the diversity of the articles, ranging from technical developments in well defined approaches, to new proposals for interpretations of quantum mechanics, indicates the state of fundamental physics: healthily active and yet lacking the consensus we seek in science

  6. Soldier universal robot controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyams, Jeffrey; Batavia, Parag; Liao, Elizabeth; Somerville, Andrew

    2008-04-01

    The Soldier Universal Robot Controller (SURC) is a modular OCU designed for simultaneous control of heterogeneous unmanned vehicles. It has a well defined, published API., defined using XML schemas, that allows other potential users of the system to develop their own modules for rapid integration with SURC. The SURC architecture is broken down into three layers: User Interface, Core Functions, and Transport. The User Interface layer is the front end module which provides the human computer interface for user control of robots. The Core layer is further divided into the following modules: Capabilities, Tactical, Mobility, and World Model. The Capabilities module keeps track of the known robots and provides a list of specifications and services. The Mobility module provides path planning via D*, while the Tactical module provides higher level mission planning (multi-agent/multi-mission) capabilities for collaborative operations. The World Model module is a relational database which stores world model objects. Finally, a Transport module provides translation from the SURC architecture to the robot specific messaging protocols (such as JAUS). This allows fast integration of new robot protocols into an existing SURC implementation to enable a new system to rapidly leverage existing SURC capabilities. The communication between different modules within the SURC architecture is done via XML. This gives developers and users the flexibility to extend existing messages without breaking backwards compatibility. The modularity of SURC offers users and developers alike the capability to create custom modules and plug them into place, as long as they follow the pre defined messaging API for that module.

  7. The Black Hole Universe Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tianxi

    2014-06-01

    The black hole universe model is a multiverse model of cosmology recently developed by the speaker. According to this new model, our universe is a fully grown extremely supermassive black hole, which originated from a hot star-like black hole with several solar masses, and gradually grew up from a supermassive black hole with million to billion solar masses to the present state with trillion-trillion solar masses by accreting ambient matter or merging with other black holes. The entire space is structured with infinite layers or universes hierarchically. The innermost three layers include the universe that we live, the inside star-like and supermassive black holes called child universes, and the outside space called mother universe. The outermost layer is infinite in mass, radius, and entropy without an edge and limits to zero for both the matter density and absolute temperature. All layers are governed by the same physics and tend to expand physically in one direction (outward or the direction of increasing entropy). The expansion of a black hole universe decreases its density and temperature but does not alter the laws of physics. The black hole universe evolves iteratively and endlessly without a beginning. When one universe expands out, a new similar one is formed from inside star-like and supermassive black holes. In each of iterations, elements are resynthesized, matter is reconfigurated, and the universe is renewed rather than a simple repeat. The black hole universe is consistent with the Mach principle, observations, and Einsteinian general relativity. It has only one postulate but is able to explain all phenomena occurred in the universe with well-developed physics. The black hole universe does not need dark energy for acceleration and an inflation epoch for flatness, and thus has a devastating impact on the big bang model. In this talk, I will present how this new cosmological model explains the various aspects of the universe, including the origin

  8. Acceleration of black hole universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, T. X.; Frederick, C.

    2014-01-01

    Recently, Zhang slightly modified the standard big bang theory and developed a new cosmological model called black hole universe, which is consistent with Mach's principle, governed by Einstein's general theory of relativity, and able to explain all observations of the universe. Previous studies accounted for the origin, structure, evolution, expansion, and cosmic microwave background radiation of the black hole universe, which grew from a star-like black hole with several solar masses through a supermassive black hole with billions of solar masses to the present state with hundred billion-trillions of solar masses by accreting ambient matter and merging with other black holes. This paper investigates acceleration of the black hole universe and provides an alternative explanation for the redshift and luminosity distance measurements of type Ia supernovae. The results indicate that the black hole universe accelerates its expansion when it accretes the ambient matter in an increasing rate. In other words, i.e., when the second-order derivative of the mass of the black hole universe with respect to the time is positive . For a constant deceleration parameter , we can perfectly explain the type Ia supernova measurements with the reduced chi-square to be very close to unity, χ red˜1.0012. The expansion and acceleration of black hole universe are driven by external energy.

  9. Astrobiology and the Biological Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dick, S. J.

    2002-12-01

    Four hundred years ago two astronomical world views hung in the balance: the geocentric and the heliocentric. Today astronomy faces a similar choice between two grand world views: a purely physical universe, in which cosmic evolution commonly ends in planets, stars and galaxies, and a biological universe, in which cosmic evolution routinely results in life, mind and intelligence. Astrobiology is the science providing the data to make this critical choice. This 20th century overview shows how we have arrived at the view that cosmic evolution may have resulted in life and intelligence in the universe. It examines how our astronomical world view has changed over the last century, recalls the opinions of astronomical pioneers like Russell, Shapley, and Struve on life in the universe, and shows how planetary science, planetary systems science, origins of life studies and SETI have combined to form a new discipline. Astrobiology now commands \\$50 million in direct funding from NASA, funds 15 Astrobiology Institute members around the country and four affiliates around the world, and seeks to answer one of astronomy's oldest questions. Whether we live in a mostly physical universe, as exemplified in Isaac Asimov's Foundation series, or in a biological universe, as portrayed in Arthur C. Clarke's works, this reality will have profound consequences, no less than the Copernican theory. Astrobiology also looks to the future of life; taking a long-term ``Stapledonian" view, it is possible we may live in a postbiological universe.

  10. Female physicists in Ugandan universities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'ujanga, Florence M.; Ssentongo, Grace Spencer; Ayugi, Gertrude; Akoba, Rashida; Saphina, Biira

    2015-12-01

    For a long time, only one public university in Uganda had a department of physics. Several women graduated from this department, but not many showed much interest in pursuing higher degrees in physics. Currently, there are five public universities in Uganda with departments of physics, and there has been an increase in the number of female graduates in physics. At the same time, the number of women pursuing higher degrees in physics has increased, and the universities have registered an increase in female physics lecturers.

  11. The role of the university.

    PubMed Central

    Starck, P L

    1987-01-01

    The role of the university, and particularly the health sciences university, in promoting positive health for women is twofold. First, the dissemination of existing knowledge raises awareness of special health needs and identifies gaps in the present research and literature base. Second, universities must project future needs of women in a rapidly changing society where such things as space travel may become commonplace. Reduction of the risk of debilitating disease and promotion of positive attitudes will enhance the quality of life for women. A logotherapeutic approach to choosing one's own attitudes toward life's challenges promotes successful coping in a dynamic society. PMID:3120225

  12. Universal planetary tectonics (supertectonics)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochemasov, G. G.

    2009-04-01

    Universal planetary tectonics (supertectonics) G. Kochemasov IGEM of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow, Russia, kochem.36@mail.ru The wave planetology [1-3 & others] proceeds from the following: "planetary structures are made by orbits and rotations". A uniform reason makes uniform structures. Inertia-gravity waves arising in planetary bodies due to their movements in Keplerian elliptical orbits with periodically changing accelerations warp these bodies in such way that they acquire polyhedron shapes (after interference of standing waves of four directions). Strong Newtonian gravity makes bodies larger than ~400 to 500 km in diameter globular and polyhedra are rarely seen. Only geomorphologic, geologic and geophysical mapping can develop these hidden structures. But small bodies, normally less than ~ 300 to 400 km in diameter, often show parts of the polyhedra, rarely fully developed forms (the asteroid Steins and satellite Amalthea present rather perfect forms of "diamond"). Depending on warping wavelengths (they make harmonics) various Plato's figures superimposed on each other can be distinguished. The fundamental wave 1 produces a tetrahedron, intrinsically dichotomic figure in which a vertex (contraction) always is opposed to a face (expansion). From the recent examples the best is the saturnian northern hexagon (a face) opposed to the southern hurricane (a vertex). The first overtone wave 2 is responsible for creation of structural octahedra. Whole ‘diamonds" and their parts are known [4, 5]. Other overtones produce less developed (because of smaller wave amplitudes) planetary shapes complicating main forms. Thus, the first common structural peculiarity of planetary bodies is their polyhedron nature. Not less important is the second common structural peculiarity. As all globular or smaller more or less isometric bodies rotate, they have an angular momentum. It is inevitably different in tropic and extra-tropic belts having uneven radii or distances to

  13. Twenty Practices of an Entrepreneurial University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gjerding, Allan N.; Wilderom, Celeste P. M.; Cameron, Shona P. B.; Taylor, Aadam; Scheunert, Klaus-Joachim

    2006-01-01

    The idea of an entrepreneurial university caught on fast after the American sociologist Burton R. Clark published his books on entrepreneurship in universities ("Creating Entrepreneurial Universities," 1998; "Sustaining Changes in Universities," 2004). Inspired by the alluring of the notion of an entrepreneurial university, and by decreasing…

  14. The Pragmatic University: A Feasible Utopia?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Badley, Graham

    2016-01-01

    "Imaginings" of the modern university include such ideas as "the ecological university" and "the pragmatic university". In his attempt to separate utopian from dystopian visions of the university, Ronald Barnett concentrates on an analysis of the ecological university and ignores, for example, the case of the…

  15. An International Student's Guide to Mexican Universities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adelman, Alan, Ed.; Salazar, Sylvia Ortega, Ed.

    This guide for students interested in studying at Mexican universities covers 50 universities including all state universities, the National University of Mexico, as well as a representative selection of the leading private universities. Introductory material provides a brief history of Mexico, a discussion of differences from and similarities to…

  16. Astronomy in the Digital Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haisch, Bernard M.; Lindblom, J.; Terzian, Y.

    2006-12-01

    The Digital Universe is an Internet project whose mission is to provide free, accurate, unbiased information covering all aspects of human knowledge, and to inspire humans to learn, make use of, and expand this knowledge. It is planned to be a decades long effort, inspired by the Encyclopedia Galactica concept popularized by Carl Sagan, and is being developed by the non-profit Digital Universe Foundation. A worldwide network of experts is responsible for selecting content featured within the Digital Universe. The first publicly available content is the Encyclopedia of Earth, a Boston University project headed by Prof. Cutler Cleveland, which will be part of the Earth Portal. The second major content area will be an analogous Encyclopedia of the Cosmos to be part of the Cosmos Portal. It is anticipated that this will evolve into a major resource for astronomy education. Authors and topic editors are now being recruited for the Encyclopedia of the Cosmos.

  17. Beyond Divestment: The Moral University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pifer, Alan

    1986-01-01

    Issues in university divestment of stock in American corporations doing business in South Africa, in protest of apartheid, are discussed in light of the American experience with discrimination. Divestment options are examined. (MSE)

  18. Vontz Center, University of Cincinnati.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephens, Suzanne

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the innovative and whimsical use of brick and glass architectural design at the University of Cincinnati's Vontz Center for Molecular Studies. The architectural development process is described. Building diagrams and photos are included. (GR)

  19. Office Automation Boosts University's Productivity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Business Affairs, 1986

    1986-01-01

    The University of Pittsburgh has a 2-year agreement designating the Xerox Corporation as the primary supplier of word processing and related office automation equipment in order to increase productivity and more efficient use of campus resources. (MLF)

  20. Third Quantization and Quantum Universes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sang Pyo

    2014-01-01

    We study the third quantization of the Friedmann-Robertson-Walker cosmology with N-minimal massless fields. The third quantized Hamiltonian for the Wheeler-DeWitt equation in the minisuperspace consists of infinite number of intrinsic time-dependent, decoupled oscillators. The Hamiltonian has a pair of invariant operators for each universe with conserved momenta of the fields that play a role of the annihilation and the creation operators and that construct various quantum states for the universe. The closed universe exhibits an interesting feature of transitions from stable states to tachyonic states depending on the conserved momenta of the fields. In the classical forbidden unstable regime, the quantum states have googolplex growing position and conjugate momentum dispersions, which defy any measurements of the position of the universe.

  1. Flinders University Electric Vehicle Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atkinson, D. A.

    1973-01-01

    Outlines the specifications and principles involved in the operation of an electric car developed by the Institute of Solar and Electochemical Energy Conversion at Flinders University in South Australia. (JR)

  2. The TR University Research Scorecard.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zacks, Rebecca

    2000-01-01

    Presents a ranking of the top United States universities in their quest for intellectual property, commercial partners, and profits. Bases rankings on a consideration of patent numbers, patent quality, and licensing revenues. (WRM)

  3. Emergent Universe with Particle Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gangopadhyay, Sunandan; Saha, Anirban; Mukherjee, S.

    2016-06-01

    The possibility of an emergent universe solution to Einstein's field equations allowing for an irreversible creation of matter at the expense of the gravitational field is shown. With the universe being chosen as spatially flat FRW spacetime together with equation of state proposed in Mukherjee et al. (Class. Quant. Grav. 23, 6927, 2006), the solution exists when the ratio of the phenomenological matter creation rate to the number density times the Hubble parameter is a number β of the order of unity and independent of time. The thermodynamic behaviour is also determined for this solution. Interestingly, we also find that an emergent universe scenario is present with usual equation of state in cosmology when the matter creation rate is chosen to be a constant. More general class of emergent universe solutions are also discussed.

  4. Case for an open universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canuto, V.; Hsieh, S.-H.

    1980-01-01

    The determination of the geometrical structure of the universe through the magnitude-vs-redshift relation in standard cosmology has not been very successful, mainly because of the intrinsic insensitivity of the m-vs-z relation to a deceleration parameter, which determines the spatial curvature and therefore the geometry. By relaxing the assumption usually made, i.e., the identity of gravitational and atomic clocks, sufficient sensitivity is achieved. Existing observational evidence then leads one to conclude that the universe is open.

  5. A Universe without Weak Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Harnik, Roni; Kribs, Graham D.; Perez, Gilad

    2006-04-07

    A universe without weak interactions is constructed that undergoes big-bang nucleosynthesis, matter domination, structure formation, and star formation. The stars in this universe are able to burn for billions of years, synthesize elements up to iron, and undergo supernova explosions, dispersing heavy elements into the interstellar medium. These definitive claims are supported by a detailed analysis where this hypothetical ''Weakless Universe'' is matched to our Universe by simultaneously adjusting Standard Model and cosmological parameters. For instance, chemistry and nuclear physics are essentially unchanged. The apparent habitability of the Weakless Universe suggests that the anthropic principle does not determine the scale of electroweak breaking, or even require that it be smaller than the Planck scale, so long as technically natural parameters may be suitably adjusted. Whether the multi-parameter adjustment is realized or probable is dependent on the ultraviolet completion, such as the string landscape. Considering a similar analysis for the cosmological constant, however, we argue that no adjustments of other parameters are able to allow the cosmological constant to raise up even remotely close to the Planck scale while obtaining macroscopic structure. The fine-tuning problems associated with the electroweak breaking scale and the cosmological constant therefore appear to be qualitatively different from the perspective of obtaining a habitable universe.

  6. National University Consortium on Microwave Research (NUCOMR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barker, Robert J.; Agee, Forrest J.

    1995-09-01

    This paper introduces a new cooperative research program of national scale that is focused on crucial research issues in the development of high energy microwave sources. These have many applications in the DOD and industry. The Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR), in coopertaion with the Phillips Laboratory, the Naval Research Laboratory, and the Army Research Laboratory, has established a tri-service research consortium to investigate novel high energy microwave sources. The program is part of the DODs 'Multidisciplinary University Research Initiative' and will be funded at a rate of $DLR3.0M per year for up to five years. All research performed under this program will be unclassified. Under its auspices, HPM scientists at nine US universities will be attacking twenty-two separate research projects under the leadership of Neville Luhmann at UC-Davis, Victor Granatstein at Maryland, Magne Kristiansen at Texas Tech, Edl Schamiloglu at New Mexico, John Nation at Cornell, Ned Birdsall at UC-Berkeley, George Caryotakis at Standord, Ronald Gilgenbach at Michigan, and Anthony Lin at UCLA. To facilitate the rapid transition of research results into the industrial community, formal collaborative subcontracts are already in place with James Benford at Physics International, Carter Armstrong at Northrop, and Glen Huffman at Varian Associates. Although this new program officially only came into existence in mid-March of this year, it builds on over a decade of microwave research efforts funded by the plasma physics office at AFOSR. It also is synergistic with the ongoing Tri-Service Vacuum Electronics Initiative led by Robert Parker of NRL as well as with the AFOSR's and Rome Laboratory's long standing Advanced Thermionic Research Initiative. An overview will be given of the broad spectrum of research objectives encompassed by NUCOMR. Areas of collaboration and technology transfer will be highlighted. The areas in which the three university consortia will conduct

  7. The Civic Mission of Australian Universities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Lawrence; Muirhead, Bruce

    2003-01-01

    Discusses the origins and meaning of civic responsibility in the Australian model of the university, beginning with medieval European universities and progressing through Australian reforms of the 20th century. Warns against the university without a civic mission. (SLD)

  8. Science Parks: Strategic Options for Universities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnstad, Tom

    1987-01-01

    A discussion of the emergence of science parks as an option for university-industry cooperation focuses on the university's role and the need for careful planning of the university's involvement. (Author/MSE)

  9. University Management of Weapons Labs? No.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Archer, Dane

    1986-01-01

    Offers reasons why universities should not manage weapons laboratories, such as the Los Alamos and Livermore national laboratories, operated by the University of California. (A viewpoint favoring such university management is presented in SE 538 518.) (JN)

  10. University Program Management Information System: NASA's University Program Active Projects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gans, Gary (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    As basic policy, NASA believes that colleges and universities should be encouraged to participate in the nation's space and aeronautics program to the maximum extent practicable. Indeed, universities are considered as partners with government and industry in the nation's aerospace program. NASA's objective is to have them bring their scientific, engineering, and social research competence to bear on aerospace problems and on the broader social, economic, and international implications of NASA's technical and scientific programs. It is expected that, in so doing, universities will strengthen both their research and their educational capabilities to contribute more effectively to the national well being. This annual report is one means of documenting the NASA-university relationship, frequently denoted, collectively, as NASA's University Program. This report is consistent with agency accounting records, as the data is obtained from NASA's Financial and Contractual Status (FACS) System, operated by the Financial Management Division and the Procurement Office. However, in accordance with interagency agreements, the orientation differs from that required for financial or procurement purposes. Any apparent discrepancies between this report and other NASA procurement or financial reports stem from the selection criteria for the data. This report was prepared by the Office of Education/N.

  11. Invasion Ecology. Teacher's Guide [and Student Edition]. Cornell Scientific Inquiry Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krasny, Marianne E.; Trautmann, Nancy; Carlsen, William; Cunningham, Christine

    This book contains the teacher's guide of the Environmental Inquiry curriculum series developed at Cornell University. It is designed to teach learning skills for investigating the behaviors of non-native and native species and demonstrate how to apply scientific knowledge to solve real-life problems. This book focuses on strange intruders…

  12. University Reactor Conversion Lessons Learned Workshop for Purdue University Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Eric C. Woolstenhulme; Dana M. Hewit

    2008-09-01

    The Department of Energy’s Idaho National Laboratory, under its programmatic responsibility for managing the University Research Reactor Conversions, has completed the conversion of the reactor at Purdue University Reactor. With this work completed and in anticipation of other impending conversion projects, the INL convened and engaged the project participants in a structured discussion to capture the lessons learned. The lessons learned process has allowed us to capture gaps, opportunities, and good practices, drawing from the project team’s experiences. These lessons will be used to raise the standard of excellence, effectiveness, and efficiency in all future conversion projects.

  13. Effective theories of universal theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, James D.; Zhang, Zhengkang

    2016-01-01

    It is well-known but sometimes overlooked that constraints on the oblique parameters (most notably S and T parameters) are generally speaking only applicable to a special class of new physics scenarios known as universal theories. In the effective field theory (EFT) framework, the oblique parameters should not be associated with Wilson coefficients in a particular operator basis, unless restrictions have been imposed on the EFT so that it describes universal theories. We work out these restrictions, and present a detailed EFT analysis of universal theories. We find that at the dimension-6 level, universal theories are completely characterized by 16 parameters. They are conveniently chosen to be: 5 oblique parameters that agree with the commonly-adopted ones, 4 anomalous triple-gauge couplings, 3 rescaling factors for the h 3, hf f , hV V vertices, 3 parameters for hV V vertices absent in the Standard Model, and 1 four-fermion coupling of order y f 2 . All these parameters are defined in an unambiguous and basis-independent way, allowing for consistent constraints on the universal theories parameter space from precision electroweak and Higgs data.

  14. University Program Management Information System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gans, Gary (Technical Monitor)

    2004-01-01

    As basic policy, NASA believes that colleges and universities should be encouraged to participate in the nation's space and aeronautics program to the maximum extent practicable. Indeed, universities are considered as partners with government and industry in the nation's aerospace program. NASA's objective is to have them bring their scientific, engineering, and social research competence to bear on aerospace problems and on the broader social, economic, and international implications of NASA's technical and scientific programs. It is expected that, in so doing, universities will strengthen both their research and their educational capabilities to contribute more effectively to the national well being. This annual report is one means of documenting the NASA-university relationship, frequently denoted, collectively, as NASA's University Program. This report is consistent with agency accounting records, as the data is obtained from NASA's Financial and Contractual Status (FACS) System, operated by the Financial Management Division and the Procurement Office. However, in accordance with interagency agreements, the orientation differs from that required for financial or procurement purposes. Any apparent discrepancies between this report and other NASA procurement or financial reports stem from the selection criteria for the data.

  15. University Program Management Information System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gans, Gary (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    As basic policy, NASA believes that colleges and universities should be encouraged to participate in the nation's space and aeronautics program to the maximum extent practicable. Indeed, universities are considered as partners with government and industry in the nation's aerospace program. NASA's objective is to have them bring their scientific, engineering, and social research competence to bear on aerospace problems and on the broader social, economic, and international implications of NASA's technical and scientific programs. It is expected that, in so doing, universities will strengthen both their research and their educational capabilities to contribute more effectively to the national well-being. This annual report is one means of documenting the NASA-university relationship, frequently denoted, collectively, as NASA's University Program. This report is consistent with agency accounting records, as the data is obtained from NASA's Financial and Contractual Status (FACS) System, operated by the Financial Management Division and the Procurement Office. However, in accordance with interagency agreements, the orientation differs from that required for financial or procurement purposes. Any apparent discrepancies between this report and other NASA procurement or financial reports stem from the selection criteria for the data. This report was prepared by the Education Division/FE, Office of Human Resources and Education.

  16. University Program Management Information System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    As basic policy, NASA believes that colleges and universities should be encouraged to participate in the nation's space and aeronautics program to the maximum extent practicable. Indeed, universities are considered as partners with government and industry in the nation's aerospace program. NASA' objective is to have them bring their scientific, engineering, and social research competence to bear on aerospace problems and on the broader social, economic, and international implications of NASA's technical and scientific programs. It is expected that, in so doing, universities will strengthen both their research and their educational capabilities to contribute more effectively to the national well being. This annual report is one means of documenting the NASA-university relationship, frequently denoted, collectively, as NASA's University Program. This report is consistent with agency accounting records, as the data is obtained from NASA's Financial and Contractual Status (FACS) System, operated by the Financial Management Division and the Procurement Office. However, in accordance with interagency agreements, the orientation differs from that required for financial or procurement purposes. Any apparent discrepancies between this report and other NASA procurement or financial reports stem from the selection criteria for the data.

  17. Euclid and the Dark Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mellier, Yannick

    2016-07-01

    The ESA Euclid mission aims to understand why the expansion of the Universe is accelerating and pin down the source responsible for the acceleration. It will uncover the very nature of dark energy and gravitation by measuring with exquisite accuracy the expansion rate of the Universe and the growth rate of structure formation in the Universe. To achieve its objectives Euclid will observe the distribution of dark matter in the Universe by measuring shapes of weakly distorted distant galaxies lensed by foreground cosmic structures with the VIS imaging instrument. In parallel, Euclid will analyse the clustering of galaxies and the distribution of clusters of galaxies by using spectroscopy and measuring redshifts of galaxies with the NISP photometer and spectrometer instrument. The Euclid mission will observe one third of the sky (15,000 deg2) to collect data on several billion galaxies spread over the last ten billion years. In this presentation I will report on the considerable technical and scientific progresses made since COSPAR 2014, on behalf of the Euclid Collaboration. The recent mission PDR that has been passed successfully shows that Euclid should meet its requirements and achieve its primary scientific objectives to map the dark universe. The most recent forecasts and constraints on dark energy, gravity, dark matter and inflation will be presented.

  18. 1988-91 Agreement between Oakland University and the Oakland University Chapter, American Association of University Professors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association of Univ. Professors, Washington, DC.

    This document presents the 1988-91 agreement between Oakland University (Michigan) and the Oakland University Chapter of the American Association of University Professors. The following 32 articles are detailed: definitions; recognition; work of the bargaining unit; academic titles; association rights; University management; faculty employment,…

  19. Agreement between Oakland University and the Oakland University Chapter, American Association of University Professors, 1985-88.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association of Univ. Professors, Washington, DC.

    The collective bargaining agreement between Oakland University and the University's chapter (370 members) of the American Association of University Professors (AAUP) covering the period 1985-1988 is presented. Items covered in the agreement include: definitions and recognition of AAUP, academic titles, AAUP rights, university management,…

  20. Factors Negatively Affecting University Adjustment from the Views of First-Year University Students: The Case of Mersin University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sevinç, Seda; Gizir, Cem Ali

    2014-01-01

    This qualitative case study aims to investigate the most common factors that negatively affect adjustment to university and coping strategies used by first-year university students in the adaptation process from the viewpoint of first-year university students. The participants were 25 first-year university students from various faculties at Mersin…

  1. Tuning universality far from equilibrium

    PubMed Central

    Karl, Markus; Nowak, Boris; Gasenzer, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Possible universal dynamics of a many-body system far from thermal equilibrium are explored. A focus is set on meta-stable non-thermal states exhibiting critical properties such as self-similarity and independence of the details of how the respective state has been reached. It is proposed that universal dynamics far from equilibrium can be tuned to exhibit a dynamical transition where these critical properties change qualitatively. This is demonstrated for the case of a superfluid two-component Bose gas exhibiting different types of long-lived but non-thermal critical order. Scaling exponents controlled by the ratio of experimentally tuneable coupling parameters offer themselves as natural smoking guns. The results shed light on the wealth of universal phenomena expected to exist in the far-from-equilibrium realm. PMID:23928853

  2. Big questions about the universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stavinschi, Magda

    2011-06-01

    Astronomy is not only a branch of science but also an important part of the culture and civilisations of peoples. Starting with archeoastronomy to the present day, it has always contributed to a better understanding of life, of humanity. After 400 years of modern astronomy, it still addresses major problems such as: Why there is something rather than nothing? Why is nature comprehensible to humans? How is cosmos related to humanity? Do multiverses exist? Is there life on other planets? Are we alone in the universe? Does the universe have a beginning? If so, what does it mean? How did the universe originate? All these questions are a challenge for interdisciplinary and transdisciplinary investigations, for philosophers, physicists, cosmologists, mathematicians, theologians. The new insights gained by pursuing in depth these common investigations will shape the society we live in and have important consequences on the future we are creating.

  3. The topology of fractal universes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, A. J. S.

    1988-01-01

    It is shown how the genus per unit volume of isodensity surfaces in general nonlinear universes is related to the entire hierarchy of correlation functions. The general relation between the correlation function, the probability distribution of densities at several points, and the probability distributions of density and its derivatives at a point are given. Formulas for the area and genus per unit volume of isodensity surfaces are presented. As an application, after first reviewing the case of Gaussian fields, analytic results are reported for one particular example of a thoroughly nonlinear universe, Mandelbrot's Rayleigh-Levy random-walk fractal. While this fractal bears little resemblance to the real universe of galaxies, it possesses the singular and theoretically interesting property that in it cluster-cluster correlations are identically equal to galaxy-galaxy correlations to all orders.

  4. Universal mortality law and immortality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azbel', Mark Ya.

    2004-10-01

    Well-protected human and laboratory animal populations with abundant resources are evolutionarily unprecedented. Physical approach, which takes advantage of their extensively quantified mortality, establishes that its dominant fraction yields the exact law, which is universal for all animals from yeast to humans. Singularities of the law demonstrate new kinds of stepwise adaptation. The law proves that universal mortality is an evolutionary by-product, which at any given age is reversible, independent of previous life history, and disposable. Life expectancy may be extended, arguably to immortality, by minor biological amendments in the animals. Indeed, in nematodes with a small number of perturbed genes and tissues it increased 6-fold (to 430 years in human terms), with no apparent loss in health and vitality. The law relates universal mortality to specific processes in cells and their genetic regulation.

  5. Pauli mechanism for universal expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayes, Robert

    2016-03-01

    By assuming the cosmological principle includes the Pauli exclusion principle (PEP) and that existence occurred post big bang within Planck time and length scales, a model for universal expansion can be argued. All Fermionic matter is forced by the PEP to make a quantum transition to minimally orthogonal states scaling with that predicted for a neutron star (NS). This predicts the minimum inflation time scale to be on the order of 1e-44 s. A coupling of primordial low mass neutrinos to have wavelengths comparable to or greater than the Hubble length is also postulated as a contributor to universal expansion. The model provides a mechanistic explanation for universal expansion using only physics from the standard model. This work supported in part under federal Grant NRC-HQ-84-14-G-0059.

  6. A Journey through the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morison, Ian

    2014-09-01

    1. Watchers of the skies; 2. Our Sun; 3. Aspects of our Solar System; 4. The rocky planets; 5. The hunt for Planet X; 6. Voyages to the outer planets; 7. Harbingers of doom; 8. Impact!; 9. 400 years of the telescope; 10. The family of stars; 11. Aging stars; 12. The search for other worlds; 13. Are we alone? The search for life beyond the Earth; 14. Our island Universe; 15. Wonders of the southern sky; 16: Proving Einstein right; 17. Black holes - no need to be afraid; 18. It's about time; 19. Hubble's heritage - the astronomer and the telescope that honours his name; 20. The violent Universe; 21. The invisible Universe: dark matter and dark energy; 22. The afterglow of creation; 23. To infinity and beyond; Index.

  7. Early Universe with CMB polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souradeep, Tarun

    2011-12-01

    The Universe is the grandest conceivable scale on which the human mind can strive to understand nature. The amazing aspect of cosmology, the branch of science that attempts to understand the origin and evolution of the Universe, is that it is largely comprehensible by applying the same basic laws of physics that we use for other branches of physics. The observed cosmic microwave background (CMB) is understood by applying the basic laws of radiative processes and transfer, masterfully covered in the classic text by S. Chandrasekhar, in the cosmological context. In addition to the now widely acclaimed temperature anisotropy, there is also linear polarization information imprinted on the observed Cosmic Microwave background. CMB polarization already has addressed, and promises to do a lot more to unravel the deepest fundamental queries about physics operating close to the origin of the Universe.

  8. Taking the Measure of the Universe: Cosmology from the WMAP Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinshaw, Gary F.

    2006-01-01

    The data from the first three years of operation of the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) satellite provide detailed full-sky maps of the cosmic microwave background temperature anisotropy and new full-sky maps of the polarization. Together, the data provide a wealth of cosmological information, including the age of the universe, the epoch when the first stars formed, and the overall composition of baryonic matter, dark matter, and dark energy. The results also provide constraints on the period of inflationary expansion in the very first moments of time. These and other aspects of the mission will be discussed. WMAP, part of NASA's Explorers program, was launched on June 30,2001. The WMAP satellite was produced in a partnership between the Goddard Space Flight Center and Princeton University. The WMAP team also includes researchers at the Johns Hopkins University; the Canadian Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics; University of Texas; Cornel1 University; University of Chicago; Brown University; University of British Columbia; University of Pennsylvania; and University of California, Los Angeles

  9. Dark matter in the universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Michael S.

    1991-01-01

    What is the quantity and composition of material in the Universe? This is one of the most fundamental questions we can ask about the Universe, and its answer bears on a number of important issues including the formation of structure in the Universe, and the ultimate fate and the earliest history of the Universe. Moreover, answering this question could lead to the discovery of new particles, as well as shedding light on the nature of the fundamental interactions. At present, only a partial answer is at hand. Most of the radiation in the Universe does not give off detectable radiation; it is dark. The dark matter associated with bright galaxies contributes somewhere between 10 and 30 percent of the critical density; baryonic matter contributes between 1.1 and 12 percent of the critical. The case for the spatially flat, Einstein-de Sitter model is supported by three compelling theoretical arguments - structure formation, the temporal Copernican principle, and inflation - and by some observational data. If Omega is indeed unity, or even just significantly greater than 0.1, then there is a strong case for a Universe comprised of nonbaryonic matter. There are three well motivated particle dark matter candidates: an axion of mass 10 (exp -6) eV to 10 (exp -4) eV; a neutrino of mass 10 GeV to about 3 TeV; or a neutrino of mass 20 eV to 90 eV. All three possibilities can be tested by experiments that are either planned or are underway.

  10. Dark matter in the Universe

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, M.S. Chicago Univ., IL . Enrico Fermi Inst.)

    1991-03-01

    What is the quantity and composition of material in the universe This is one of the most fundamental questions we can ask about the universe, and its answer bears on a number of important issues including the formation of structure in the universe, and the ultimate fate and the earliest history of the universe. Moreover, answering this question could lead to the discovery of new particles, as well as shedding light on the nature of the fundamental interactions. At present, only a partial answer is at hand: most of the material in the universe does not give off detectable radiation, i.e., is dark;'' the dark matter associated with bright galaxies contributes somewhere between 10% and 30% of the critical density (by comparison luminous matter contributes less than 1%); baryonic matter contributes between 1.1% and 12% of critical. The case for the spatially-flat, Einstein-de Sitter model is supported by three compelling theoretical arguments -- structure formation, the temporal Copernican principle, and inflation -- and by some observational data. If {Omega} is indeed unity--or even just significantly greater than 0.1--then there is a strong case for a universe comprised of nonbaryonic matter. There are three well motivated particle dark-matter candidates: an axion of mass 10{sup {minus}6} eV to 10{sup {minus}4} eV; a neutralino of mass 10 GeV to about 3 TeV; or a neutrino of mass 20 eV to 90 eV. All three possibilities can be tested by experiments that are either being planned or are underway. 71 refs., 6 figs.

  11. Universe Awareness For Young Children

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scorza, C.; Miley, G.; Ödman, C.; Madsen, C.

    2006-08-01

    Universe Awareness (UNAWE) is an international programme that will expose economically disadvantaged young children aged between 4 and 10 years to the inspirational aspects of modern astronomy. The programme is motivated by the premise that access to simple knowledge about the Universe is a basic birth right of everybody. These formative ages are crucial in the development of a human value system. This is also the age range in which children can learn to develop a 'feeling' for the vastness of the Universe. Exposing young children to such material is likely to broaden their minds and stimulate their world-view. The goals of Universe Awareness are in accordance with two of the United Nations Millennium goals, endorsed by all 191 UN member states, namely (i) the achievement of universal primary education and (ii) the promotion of gender equality in schools. We propose to commence Universe Awareness with a pilot project that will target disadvantaged regions in about 4 European countries (possibly Spain, France, Germany and The Netherlands) and several non-EU countries (possibly Chile, Colombia, India, Tunisia, South Africa and Venezuela). There will be two distinct elements in the development of the UNAWE program: (i) Creation and production of suitable UNAWE material and delivery techniques, (ii) Training of educators who will coordinate UNAWE in each of the target countries. In addition to the programme, an international network of astronomy outreach will be organised. We present the first results of a pilot project developed in Venezuela, where 670 children from different social environments, their teachers and members of an indigenous tribe called Ye´kuana from the Amazon region took part in a wonderful astronomical and cultural exchange that is now being promoted by the Venezuelan ministry of Education at the national level.

  12. Dark matter in the universe

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, M.S. Chicago Univ., IL . Enrico Fermi Inst.)

    1990-11-01

    What is the quantity and composition of material in the Universe This is one of the most fundamental questions we can ask about the Universe, and its answer bears on a number of important issues including the formation of structure in the Universe, and the ultimate fate and the earliest history of the Universe. Moreover, answering this question could lead to the discovery of new particles, as well as shedding light on the nature of the fundamental interactions. At present, only a partial answer is at hand: Most of the material in the Universe does not give off detectable radiation, i.e., is dark;'' the dark matter associated with bright galaxies contributes somewhere between 10% and 30% of the critical density (by comparison luminous matter contributes less than 1%); baryonic matter contributes between 1.1% and 12% of critical. The case for the spatially-flat, Einstein-de Sitter model is supported by three compelling theoretical arguments--structure formation, the temporal Copernican principle, and inflation--and by some observational data. If {Omega} is indeed unity--or even just significantly greater than 0.1--then there is a strong case for a Universe comprised of nonbaryonic matter. There are three well motivated particle dark-matter candidates: an axion of mass 10{sup {minus}6} eV to 10{sup {minus}4} eV; a neutralino of mass 10 GeV to about 3 TeV; or a neutrino of mass 20 eV to 90 eV. All three possibilities can be tested by experiments that are either being planned or are underway. 63 refs.

  13. College and University Systems Environment: University of Hawaii.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CAUSE/EFFECT, 1983

    1983-01-01

    The management systems office at the University of Hawaii assists in the development and operation of an effective management information systems service. A shared computer system approach was developed to provide service in the areas of office automation and data processing. (MLW)

  14. The University Lost: The Meaning of the University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McFarlane, Donovan A.

    2014-01-01

    This essay examines the current state of the University in terms of lost meaning and value, especially from the perspective of scholarship. The author specifically points to three works of literature and writers on the subject, and how these works have significantly contributed to our understanding of what is taking place within the modern…

  15. El Espanol como Idioma Universal (Spanish as a Universal Language)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mijares, Jose

    1977-01-01

    A proposal to transform Spanish into a universal language because it possesses the prerequisites: it is a living language, spoken in several countries; it is a natural language; and it uses the ordinary alphabet. Details on simplification and standardization are given. (Text is in Spanish.) (AMH)

  16. The Integrative University: Why University Management Is Different

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Temple, Paul

    2008-01-01

    Managing universities "is" different from managing in most other sorts of organisation. In this article, the author shows why this claim is more than just special pleading, and how it relates to the particular form of the organisation. Appreciating their integrative aspects helps people to understand some of the difficulties that they regularly…

  17. Understanding Catholic Universities' Organizational Identity: Perspectives from University Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hickey, Suzanne M.

    2012-01-01

    Since the 1960s, American Catholic social institutions have struggled with issues related to their organizational and religious identities (Dosen, 2009; Gallin, 2000; Weakland, 1994). For Catholic colleges and universities, these issues are evidenced by the difficulty some institutions have with being readily able to recognize their distinctive…

  18. Behavioral medicine in Teikyo University and Toho University.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Takeaki; Hashizume, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    Behavioral medicine has increased in importance to become a promising field in medical education. The Teikyo University Graduate School of Public Health and Toho University School of Medicine were evaluated in terms of their educational emphasis on behavioral medicine. The Teikyo University Graduate School of Public Health has the following five core requirements, as in the global standards: behavioral medicine, biostatistics, epidemiology, occupational health, and health policy management. Behavioral medicine mainly encompasses psychology in normal populations, working as a gateway to the medical world among non-medical professionals who are interested in medicine. The Toho University School of Medicine aims to produce "good clinicians" who have a thorough knowledge, a deep sense of professional ethics, and a profound humanity to contribute to human welfare through medicine. In behavioral medicine here, systematic knowledge based on human behavior in medicine is taught from the first to sixth year. Psychosomatic physicians could be among the most optimal professionals for behavioral medicine because of the similarities between psychosomatic medicine and behavioral medicine. The establishment of a Center of Behavioral Medicine is a potential solution to tackle forthcoming medical problems, such as increasing medical costs and an aging society. We must focus on the importance of behavior change as a way for preventive medicine to connect hospitals and communities in Japan. PMID:26913061

  19. Transfer Guides: University at Albany, State University of New York.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foti, Patrick A.

    The State University of New York (SUNY) at Albany has worked with the state's community colleges to develop guides for community college students to identify programs and patterns of study which maximize the transfer of credit from the community college courses toward specific SUNY academic programs. This collection of 11 documents provides the…

  20. University Autonomy in a Third-Generation University in Nigeria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arikewuyo, M. Olalekan; Ilusanya, Gboyega

    2010-01-01

    The study examined the level of autonomy in one of Nigeria's third-generation universities. Findings indicated that generally government intervention was rated as not unreasonable. Specifically, the study discovered that government never exerts any influence on the appointment, discipline, tenure and dismissal of staff; entry standards and pass…

  1. Universal map for cellular automata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Morales, V.

    2012-08-01

    A universal map is derived for all deterministic 1D cellular automata (CAs) containing no freely adjustable parameters and valid for any alphabet size and any neighborhood range (including non-symmetrical neighborhoods). The map can be extended to an arbitrary number of dimensions and topologies and to arbitrary order in time. Specific CA maps for the famous Conway's Game of Life and Wolfram's 256 elementary CAs are given. An induction method for CAs, based in the universal map, allows mathematical expressions for the orbits of a wide variety of elementary CAs to be systematically derived.

  2. Interpreting the universal phylogenetic tree

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woese, C. R.

    2000-01-01

    The universal phylogenetic tree not only spans all extant life, but its root and earliest branchings represent stages in the evolutionary process before modern cell types had come into being. The evolution of the cell is an interplay between vertically derived and horizontally acquired variation. Primitive cellular entities were necessarily simpler and more modular in design than are modern cells. Consequently, horizontal gene transfer early on was pervasive, dominating the evolutionary dynamic. The root of the universal phylogenetic tree represents the first stage in cellular evolution when the evolving cell became sufficiently integrated and stable to the erosive effects of horizontal gene transfer that true organismal lineages could exist.

  3. Sustainable Chemistry at Sungkyunkwan University.

    PubMed

    Park, Nam-Gyu

    2015-07-20

    Special Issue: Sustainable Chemistry at Sungkyunkwan University. Sustainable chemistry is key to the development of efficient renewable energies, which will become more and more important in order to combat global warming. In this Editorial, guest editor Prof. Nam-Gyu Park describes the context of this Special Issue on top-quality research towards sustainability performed at Sungkyunkwan University (SKKU) in Korea. Scientists at SKKU work on, for example, photovoltaic solar cells to generate low-cost electricity, lithium batteries and capacitors to store electricity, piezoelectric nanogenerators, thermoelectric devices, hydrogen generation, and fuel cells. PMID:26183687

  4. The Creation of the Universe

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2011-10-06

    Gravity and quantum theory cause the Universe to be spontaneously created out of nothing. Most of these universes are quite unlike our own but we select out a subset that are compatible with what we observe. Please note that Professor Hawking's talk will be broadcasted in the following rooms : TH auditorium (4-3-006) TE auditorium (30-7-018) 40-S2-A01 40-S2-C01 BE Meyrin (6-2-024) BE Prévessin (864-1-D02)

  5. Universality of sequential quantum measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinosaari, Teiko; Miyadera, Takayuki

    2015-02-01

    We show that any jointly measurable pair of quantum observables can be obtained in a sequential measurement scheme, even if the second observable will be decided after the first measurement. This means that it is possible to perform a measurement of any quantum observable in a way that does not disturb the subsequent measurements more than is dictated by joint measurability. Only measurements with a specific structure have this universality feature. As a supplementing result, we provide a characterization of all possible joint measurements obtained from a sequential measurement lacking universality.

  6. Interpreting the universal phylogenetic tree

    PubMed Central

    Woese, Carl R.

    2000-01-01

    The universal phylogenetic tree not only spans all extant life, but its root and earliest branchings represent stages in the evolutionary process before modern cell types had come into being. The evolution of the cell is an interplay between vertically derived and horizontally acquired variation. Primitive cellular entities were necessarily simpler and more modular in design than are modern cells. Consequently, horizontal gene transfer early on was pervasive, dominating the evolutionary dynamic. The root of the universal phylogenetic tree represents the first stage in cellular evolution when the evolving cell became sufficiently integrated and stable to the erosive effects of horizontal gene transfer that true organismal lineages could exist. PMID:10900003

  7. The Creation of the Universe

    SciTech Connect

    2009-09-09

    Gravity and quantum theory cause the Universe to be spontaneously created out of nothing. Most of these universes are quite unlike our own but we select out a subset that are compatible with what we observe. Please note that Professor Hawking's talk will be broadcasted in the following rooms : TH auditorium (4-3-006) TE auditorium (30-7-018) 40-S2-A01 40-S2-C01 BE Meyrin (6-2-024) BE Prévessin (864-1-D02)

  8. Public Services in Research Libraries. Preliminary Reports from the Public Services Research Projects: University of Arizona, Cornell University, University of Illinois, Michigan State University, New York University, Pennsylvania State University, and Texas A & M University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association of Research Libraries, Washington, DC. Office of Management Studies.

    Preliminary reports from seven Association of Research Library (ARL) members conducting research on current public services concerns describe progress to date and initial findings. Research grants of up to $4,000 were provided for the projects, which were selected in part because of their potential usefulness to academic and research libraries.…

  9. Joint Big Decision Committees and University Governance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yamada, Myrtle M.

    1991-01-01

    Four case studies concerning joint faculty-administration committees established to make major decisions (Princeton University, New Jersey; Northwestern University, Illinois; Teacher's College Columbia University, New York; Ohio University) suggest that, although the committees have potential to improve campus management, they are neither as…

  10. Governing Public Universities in Arab Countries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ElObeidy, Ahmed A.

    2014-01-01

    Traditionally in Arab public universities, presidents are appointed by government authorities. Recently, in uprising Arab countries universities' presidents have been elected by universities' faculty members. Neither traditional nor self-governance pattern succeeded to modernise Arab universities. Reforming patterns of governance is…

  11. Illinois State University Handbook, 1974-1975.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois State Univ., Normal.

    The 1974-1975 edition of this handbook is intended to provide the students and employees of the university with a broad insight into the university and its operations. The handbook's four chapters deal with university organization and governance, general university information, student life, and faculty life. Specific consideration is given to:…

  12. The Managerialist University: An Economic Interpretation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aspromourgos, Tony

    2012-01-01

    The rise of the managerialist university, in terms of a shift towards supposed corporate forms of governance in universities, associated also with greater competition between universities, has been the subject of considerable controversy. Dissent with respect to these developments has commonly appealed to the notion of the university as a special…

  13. Summer Session Organizational Models at Canadian Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kops, Bill

    2010-01-01

    The issue of summer session organizational models continues to be of interest to summer session deans/directors and university administrators. The University of Victoria surveyed Canadian universities on this issue in 1994. Based on a similar survey done in 2009, this paper updates the status of Canadian university summer session organizational…

  14. Campus Capitalists: Universities as Development Entrepreneurs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, Douglas

    1983-01-01

    The trend for universities to use their excess land for profitable real estate ventures in conjunction with private developers and builders is considered. One of the first institutions to embark on development was the University of Washington, Seattle, and one of the best known examples of university-sponsored development is Stanford University,…

  15. Particularizing Universal Education in Postcolonial Sierra Leone

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pai, Grace

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a vertical case study of the history of universalizing education in postcolonial Sierra Leone from the early 1950s to 1990 to highlight how there has never been a universal conception of universal education. In order to unite a nation behind a universal ideal of schooling, education needed to be adapted to different…

  16. Approaches of Improving University Assets Management Efficiency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Jingliang

    2015-01-01

    University assets management, as an important content of modern university management, is generally confronted with the issue of low efficiency. Currently, to address the problems exposed in university assets management and take appropriate modification measures is an urgent issue in front of Chinese university assets management sectors. In this…

  17. The American University: Problems, Prospects, and Trends.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blits, Jan H., Ed.

    Issues and trends relating to science and technology, liberal education and the aims of the university, and academic governance in U.S. universities are considered in 10 essays. Questions are raised concerning: whether universities should be linked to industrial research projects, how America's universities should respond to the wave of computer…

  18. Senate Code. 1969. The University of Kansas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kansas Univ., Lawrence.

    This senate code of the University of Kansas is divided into 14 articles: 1) "University Senate: Structure and Functions;" 2) "Faculty Senate: Structure and Functions;" 3) "Student Senate: Structure and Functions;" 4) "University Council: Structure and Functions;" 5) "Faculty Council: Structure and Functions;" 6) "University Committees and…

  19. Kentucky College and University Enrollments. Fall 1977.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kentucky Center for Education Statistics, Frankfort.

    Fall 1977 enrollment data from the Kentucky state-supported and independent colleges and universities, seminaries, proprietary business colleges and Eagle University are presented. Total enrollment in the state and independent colleges and universities was 126,162. Of this total, 108,546 students were enrolled in the state universities and…

  20. The Idea of a Catholic University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Brien, George Dennis

    This book considers the Catholic university in relation to religious truth and academic freedom. The book offers a practical consideration of how the ideal Catholic university might be expressed. The chapters are: (1) "Biblical Foundations of the Modern University"; (2) "Science: The Truth of Universities"; (3) "Art: Signatured Truth"; (4)…

  1. Entrepreneurialism at the University of Novi Sad

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stankovic, Fuada

    2006-01-01

    What does being an entrepreneurial university mean? The University of Novi Sad in Serbia is taken as an example of how one University in a transition country, which was lacking tradition in entrepreneurial practices, is striving to become an entrepreneurial university. Examples of new practices are also described such as the establishment of a…

  2. Yale University Press: Disseminating "Lux et Veritas"?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parrott, John B.

    2010-01-01

    America's university presses are situated within a network of over one hundred universities, learned societies, and scholarly associations. According to a pamphlet put out by the American Association of University Presses, these presses "make available to the broader public the full range and value of research generated by university faculty."…

  3. The Emergent African University: An Interpretation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Kiewiet, C. W.

    The present document presents an account of the development of higher education in Africa up to 1970. It considers the idea of the university in Africa; the metropolitan form of the university with emphasis on the economic aspects, the growth and influence on urban life, and the politics of university formation; the university in its traditional…

  4. A Christian Critique of the University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malik, Charles Habib

    Views on the place and power of the university, the church's role in the university, and the sciences and humanities are presented. The secularization of western universities raises fundamental criticisms from the Christian point of view that the university atmosphere is not congenial to Christian spiritual values, and that higher education…

  5. The Globalization of College and University Rankings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Altbach, Philip G.

    2012-01-01

    In the era of globalization, accountability, and benchmarking, university rankings have achieved a kind of iconic status. The major ones--the Academic Ranking of World Universities (ARWU, or the "Shanghai rankings"), the QS (Quacquarelli Symonds Limited) World University Rankings, and the "Times Higher Education" World University Rankings…

  6. Adjusting to University: The Hong Kong Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yau, Hon Keung; Sun, Hongyi; Cheng, Alison Lai Fong

    2012-01-01

    Students' adjustment to the university environment is an important factor in predicting university outcomes and is crucial to their future achievements. University support to students' transition to university life can be divided into three dimensions: academic adjustment, social adjustment and psychological adjustment. However, these…

  7. Measuring the topology of the universe

    PubMed Central

    Cornish, Neil J.; Spergel, David N.; Starkman, Glenn D.

    1998-01-01

    Observations of microwave background fluctuations can yield information not only about the geometry of the universe but potentially about the topology of the universe. If the universe is negatively curved, then the characteristic scale for the topology of the universe is the curvature radius. Thus, if we are seeing the effects of the geometry of the universe, we can hope to soon see signatures of the topology of the universe. The cleanest signature of the topology of the universe is written on the microwave sky: There should be thousands of pairs of matched circles. These circles can be used to determine the precise topology and volume of the universe. Because we see hundreds of slices through the fundamental domain of the universe, we can use the microwave observations to reconstruct the initial conditions of the entire universe on the scale of a few megaparsecs. PMID:9419329

  8. Hawthorne Academy: The University Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frazee, Bruce M.; Frazee, Felicia F.

    2005-01-01

    This article revisits the Trinity University and Hawthorne School partnership since the first case study written 10 years ago. This new perspective analyzes the teacher education program-particularly beliefs and attitudes about it and changes made to the program-with an eye to two primary themes: preparing future teachers and Hawthorne's Core…

  9. Disciplines, Skills and the University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muller, Johan; Young, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Several authors have suggested that the contract between the university and society formulated in the nineteenth century is breaking down, and a new relation between knowledge and society is being installed. This paper investigates what is at stake in this shift by re-visiting the roots of disciplinary knowledge, examining Durkheim's social…

  10. University of California, Santa Cruz.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McHenry, Dean E.

    1993-01-01

    An overview of the evolution of the innovative University of California, Santa Cruz, looks at its origins, campus organization, curriculum and instructional philosophy, campus design, leadership and faculty, student population, campus life, and curriculum design. Strategies for and obstacles to effective change are highlighted. (MSE)

  11. Research at Small Canadian Universities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owen, Michael

    1992-01-01

    There are many excellent scientists in the natural and human sciences in Canada's small universities. If the institutions implement internal procedures to encourage and foster a research climate and if research councils consider alternative strategies for research funding, research productivity could expand greatly in quality and scope. (MSE)

  12. Universal Child Immunization by 1990.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mandl, P. E., Ed.

    1985-01-01

    The present volume endeavors to highlight the deeper significance and broader implications for development theory, policy and practice of the realization of the movement toward universal child immunization by 1990 (UCI-1990). Simultaneously, the volume collects and analyzes the most significant findings and experiences of the movement since 1984.…

  13. The Future of the Universe.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pasachoff, Jay M.

    1979-01-01

    Discusses some of the basic theories in cosmology, such as Hubble's laws and the big-bang theories, and looks at some of the ideas of astronomers and scientists with respect to their evaluation of the future of the universe. (GA)

  14. Third Generation Nigerian University Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agboola, A. T.

    1993-01-01

    Examines the development of Nigerian University libraries and the political factors that created them and continue to effect their development, with a focus on those established between 1980 and 1984. Users, governance, finance, buildings, staffing, collection development, services, cataloging and classification, and automation are described.…

  15. Brazil's best university seeks fame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maddox, John

    1994-10-01

    The University of São Paulo believes it should be making a more prominent mark on the world outside Brazil, but the difficulties of doing so from within a still-developing country are greater and less tangible than may be thought.

  16. Verbal Interaction in University Tutorials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baumgart, Neil

    1976-01-01

    An attempt was made to describe the verbal interaction of 29 university tutorial groups. Tutor roles were identified (reflexive judge, data input, stage setter, elaborator, probe, and cognitive engineer) and examined in relationship to student ratings of the sessions and use by students of different cognitive levels. Applications of the research…

  17. Geographical Knowledge of University Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Robert W.; And Others

    In order to obtain information on the status of geographical knowledge possessed by University of South Dakota (Vermillion) students, a geography survey designed to determine specific knowledge about the locations of bodies of water, countries, and cities was conducted. One map was used for identifying cities, while the second was used for…

  18. NASA/University Technology Cooperation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    NASA is extensively engaged in cooperative technology development efforts with the nation's research universities. An example of NASA/university cooperation is the work of the Space Technology Center at the University of Kansas (KU) and the KU Center for Research, Inc. (CRINC). Directed by Professor Bill G. Barr, the Space Technology Center is one of 27 interdisciplinary centers established as part of a NASA plan to set up a network of advanced facilities across the nation. Since 1981 CRINC has been involved in a technology transfer program supported by the NASA Technology Utilization Division and by industry. The objective of the technology transfer program is to encourage industrial innovation through utilization of NASA technology through improved industry/university cooperation. At KU, research is conducted by the Industrial Innovation Laboratory and the Computer Integrated Manufacturing Laboratory which utilize graduate students in engineering and computer science as research assistants. A new project of the Space Technology Center is one designed to advance NASA objectives in "augmented telerobotics." A telerobot is programmed to respond to commands from a human operator, or to mimic the movements of its human operator. The project is being conducted under the guidance of Langley Research Center.

  19. Catholic Universities and Juridic Persons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheridan, Sean

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author maintains that a Catholic university does not need to be established as a separate juridic person to be subject to rights and obligations in canon law. The Church's law allows a group or persons or things to join together as a juridic person to be recognized by the Church to have rights and obligations in the Church.…

  20. Inflation in the early universe.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmeli, M.

    1998-04-01

    In this talk it will be assumed that gravitation is negligible. Under this assumption, the receding velocities of galaxies and the distances between them in the Hubble expansion are united into a four-dimensional pseudo-Euclidean manifold, similarly to space and time in ordinary special relativity. The Hubble law is assumed and is written in an invariant way that enables one to derive a four-dimensional transformation which is similar to the Lorentz transformation. The parameter in the new transformation is the ratio between the cosmic time to the Hubble time. Accordingly, the new transformation relates physical quantities at different cosmic times in the limit of weak or negligible gravitation. The transformation is then applied to the problem of the expansion of the Universe at the very early stage when gravity was negligible and thus the transformation is applicable. The author calculates the ratio of the volumes of the Universe at two different times T1 and T2 after the big bang. The result conforms with the standard inflationary universe theory, but now it is obtained without assuming that the Universe is propelled by antigravity.