Sample records for unpaid family work

  1. Gender and Unpaid Work

    Microsoft Academic Search

    BETH ANNE SHELTON

    Gender remains strongly associated with women’s and men’s patterns of unpaid work. The amount of time invested in unpaid work\\u000a as opposed to paid work, the distribution of unpaid work time among specific tasks, and the patterns of care and responsibility\\u000a are all determined to a large degree by one’s gender. Women continue to spend more time than men on

  2. Gender, Division of Unpaid Family Work and Psychological Distress in Dual-Earner Families

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Wenting; Janzen, Bonnie L; Abonyi, Sylvia

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Epidemiological studies have only recently begun to address the consequences of unpaid family work (ie., housework and child rearing) for mental health. Although research is suggestive of an association between the division of unpaid family work and psychological health, especially for women, additional research is required to clarify the conditions under which such a relationship holds. The purpose of the present study was to examine more nuanced relationships between the division of family work and psychological distress by disaggregating the family work construct according to type (housework/child rearing), control over scheduling, and evaluations of fairness. Methods: Analysis of data obtained from a cross-sectional telephone survey conducted in a Canadian city. Analyses were based on 293 employed parents (182 mothers and 111 fathers), with at least one preschool child, living in dual-earner households. Several multiple linear regression models were estimated with psychological distress as the outcome, adjusting for confounders. Results: For mothers, more perceived time spent in child rearing (particularly primary child care) and high-schedule-control housework tasks (e.g. yard work) relative to one’s partner, were associated with greater distress. For fathers, perceived unfairness in the division of housework and child rearing were associated with greater distress. Conclusion: Although methodological limitations temper firm conclusions, these results suggest that the gendered nature of household work has implications for the psychological well-being of both mothers and fathers of preschool children in dual-earner households. However, more longitudinal research and the development of theoretically-informed measures of family work are needed to advance the field. PMID:20802807

  3. Paid Work and Unpaid Work: Diary Information Versus Questionnaire Information

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonke, Jens

    2005-01-01

    Time-use information is preferably obtained from diaries, as this method is considered more reliable than information from questionnaires. Data from the Danish Time Use Survey 2001 thus indicate differences in the level of unpaid work, whereas only minor differences appear for paid work. That is: people reporting many hours of paid work tend to…

  4. Gender Equality in Time: Low-Paid Mothers' Paid and Unpaid Work in the UK

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tracey Warren; Gillian Pascall; Elizabeth Fox

    2010-01-01

    Policies concerning time use are crucial to parents' experiences of paid and unpaid work and the reconciliation of work and family life. In heterosexual-couple households, gender inequalities in the distribution of paid work and care, working hours, and responsibility for children's schedules mean that mothers experience pressure on time and their ability to work, care, and manage households. Via qualitative

  5. The Influence of Unpaid Work on the Transition out of Full-Time Paid Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carr, Dawn C.; Kail, Ben Lennox

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Continued employment after retirement and engagement in unpaid work are both important ways of diminishing the negative economic effects of the retirement of baby boomer cohorts on society. Little research, however, examines the relationship between paid and unpaid work at the transition from full-time work. Using a resource perspective…

  6. Shared Work, Valued Care: New Norms for Organizing Market Work and Unpaid Care Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Appelbaum, Eileen; Bailey, Thomas; Berg, Peter; Kalleberg, Arne L.

    Until the 1970s, social norms dictated that women provided care for their families and men were employed for pay. The rapid increase in paid work for women has resulted in an untenable model of work and care in which all employees are assumed to be unencumbered with family responsibilities and women who care for their families are dismissed as…

  7. Labor Market Work and Home Care's Unpaid Caregivers: A Systematic Review of Labor Force Participation Rates, Predictors of Labor Market Withdrawal, and Hours of Work

    PubMed Central

    Lilly, Meredith B; Laporte, Audrey; Coyte, Peter C

    2007-01-01

    As people continue to age and receive complex health care services at home, concern has arisen about the availability of family caregivers and their ability to combine employment with caregiving. This article evaluates the international research on unpaid caregivers and their labor market choices, highlighting three conclusions: first, caregivers in general are equally as likely to be in the labor force as noncaregivers; second, caregivers are more likely to work fewer hours in the labor market than noncaregivers, particularly if their caring commitments are heavy; and finally, only those heavily involved in caregiving are significantly more likely to withdraw from the labor market than noncaregivers. Policy recommendations are targeting greater access to formal care for “intensive” caregivers and developing workplace policies for employed caregivers. PMID:18070333

  8. Slave Labor on Campus: The Unpaid Postdoc.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broad, William J.

    1982-01-01

    Discusses unpaid postdoctoral researchers, especially those in biology and medicine, addressing reasons why they work without pay, how they receive funding, efforts to help them, their impacts on the field, and personal concerns. (DC)

  9. The Struggle for Life Balance: Work, Family, and Leisure in the Lives of Women Teleworkers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Susan M. Shaw; Jean Andrey; Laura C. Johnson

    2003-01-01

    Contemporary life for many people in North America and elsewhere seems to be characterised by stress, role overload, and a lack of time for leisure. This is particularly true of employed women who are seeking to balance paid and unpaid work, family responsibilities, and leisure in an increasingly hurried society. This study investigated the everyday lives of women teleworkers, in

  10. This document was last updated April 2014 Unpaid Internships

    E-print Network

    Boonstra, Rudy

    This document was last updated April 2014 Unpaid Internships There are many exceptions where an unpaid internship is permitted. When you are applying for an opportunity, you should the organization and internship provide you with valuable work experience? Is the opportunity a good fit for you

  11. Women and work: a ten year retrospective.

    PubMed

    MacRae, Nancy

    2005-01-01

    A look back, after a decade, at the issues surrounding women and work. Work options, childcare and family concerns, the glass ceiling, sexual harassment, women entrepreneurs, race and poverty, unpaid work, and women with disabilities are discussed. PMID:15920308

  12. Social Work Patient & Family Services

    E-print Network

    Goldman, Steven A.

    Social Work and Patient & Family Services 601 Elmwood Avenue RM. 1-1450 P. O. Box 650 Rochester, NY Social Work office lo- cated? The Social Work office is located on the first floor of Strong Memorial Hospital, Rm. 1-1450 How do I get in touch with a social worker? The social work department is open Monday

  13. Work-Family Facilitation and Conflict, Working Fathers and Mothers, Work-Family Stressors and Support

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, E. Jeffrey

    2005-01-01

    Work-family research frequently focuses on the conflict experienced by working mothers. Using data from the National Study of the Changing Workforce (N = 1,314), this study also examined work-family facilitation and working fathers. Ecological systems, family stress, family resilience, and sex role theories were used to organize the data and…

  14. Balancing Work & Family. A Teaching Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iowa State Univ. of Science and Technology, Ames. Dept. of Family and Consumer Sciences Education.

    This curriculum guide provides materials for four units: work/family life-style choices, balancing work/family roles, work influences on family life, and family influences on work life. Three teaching methods are used consistently throughout the curriculum: role playing, case studies, and interviews. Each unit is composed of 5 to 10 lessons. There…

  15. Applying Sens Capabilities Framework to Work Family Balance within a European Context: Theoretical and Empirical Challenges 

    E-print Network

    Hobson, Barbara; Fahlén, Susanne

    2009-01-01

    This state of the art has two specific aims: One is to present the dominant theories and identify weaknesses in theories that have sought to explain the processes surrounding the division of time and paid/unpaid work in ...

  16. Changing Work and Work-Family Conflict: Evidence from the Work, Family, and Health Network*

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Erin L.; Moen, Phyllis; Oakes, J. Michael; Fan, Wen; Okechukwu, Cassandra; Davis, Kelly D.; Hammer, Leslie; Kossek, Ellen; King, Rosalind Berkowitz; Hanson, Ginger; Mierzwa, Frank; Casper, Lynne

    2013-01-01

    Schedule control and supervisor support for family and personal life are work resources that may help employees manage the work-family interface. However, existing data and designs have made it difficult to conclusively identify the effects of these work resources. This analysis utilizes a group-randomized trial in which some units in an information technology workplace were randomly assigned to participate in an initiative, called STAR, that targeted work practices, interactions, and expectations by (a) training supervisors on the value of demonstrating support for employees’ personal lives and (b) prompting employees to reconsider when and where they work. We find statistically significant, though modest, improvements in employees’ work-family conflict and family time adequacy and larger changes in schedule control and supervisor support for family and personal life. We find no evidence that this intervention increased work hours or perceived job demands, as might have happened with increased permeability of work across time and space. Subgroup analyses suggest the intervention brings greater benefits to employees more vulnerable to work-family conflict. This study advances our understanding of the impact of social structures on individual lives by investigating deliberate organizational changes and their effects on work resources and the work-family interface with a rigorous design. PMID:25349460

  17. It Pays to Value Family: Work and Family Tradeoffs Reconsidered

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Peter Cappelli; Jill Constantine; Clint Chadwick

    2000-01-01

    THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN work and family has become a popular research area in the field of management. While there are a range of specific issues under the broad work and family heading, most seem to center on possible conflicts between the two domains—whether the requirements of the workplace have a negative effect on family life and whether the demands of

  18. Applying the effort-reward imbalance model to household and family work: a population-based study of German mothers

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background This paper reports on results of a newly developed questionnaire for the assessment of effort-reward imbalance (ERI) in unpaid household and family work. Methods: Using a cross-sectional population-based survey of German mothers (n = 3129) the dimensional structure of the theoretical ERI model was validated by means of Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA). Analyses of Variance were computed to examine relationships between ERI and social factors and health outcomes. Results CFA revealed good psychometric properties indicating that the subscale 'effort' is based on one latent factor and the subscale 'reward' is composed of four dimensions: 'intrinsic value of family and household work', 'societal esteem', 'recognition from the partner', and 'affection from the child(ren)'. About 19.3% of mothers perceived lack of reciprocity and 23.8% showed high rates of overcommitment in terms of inability to withdraw from household and family obligations. Socially disadvantaged mothers were at higher risk of ERI, in particular with respect to the perception of low societal esteem. Gender inequality in the division of household and family work and work-family conflict accounted most for ERI in household and family work. Analogous to ERI in paid work we could demonstrate that ERI affects self-rated health, somatic complaints, mental health and, to some extent, hypertension. Conclusions The newly developed questionnaire demonstrates satisfied validity and promising results for extending the ERI model to household and family work. PMID:22221851

  19. Work and family: Understanding men's role evaluations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Karen Altergott

    1988-01-01

    Analysis of data provided by a random sample (N=92) of married police officers was used to evaluate the effects of time constraints, job stress, family strengths, family structure, and social networks on men's role evaluations. These men had generally positive evaluations of their income provider, husband, father, and home care roles. Multivariate analysis showed complex relationships between work, family, and

  20. Overcoming Barriers in Working with Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heru, Alison M.; Drury, Laura

    2006-01-01

    Objective: The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education and the Residency Review Committee for psychiatry outline the expected competencies for residents. These competencies include working with families. This article describes barriers that residents face when working with families, and offers ways to overcome these barriers. Method:…

  1. Working with Families: Rethinking Denial.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallagher, Peggy A.; Fialka, Janice; Rhodes, Cheryl; Arceneaux, Cindy

    2002-01-01

    This article argues that if professionals categorize parents as "in denial," unaccepting, or difficult, professionals may lose the chance to understand and learn from the parents. Recommendations are provided for rethinking denial and working with parents, including supporting parents' hopes and dreams for their child, suspending judgment, and…

  2. Work Demands, Work–Family Conflict, and Child Adjustment in African American FamiliesThe Mediating Role of Family Routines

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Vonnie C. McLoyd; Teru Toyokawa; Rachel Kaplan

    2008-01-01

    Using data from a sample of 455 African American children (ages 10 to 12 years) and their parents, this study tests a hypothesized model linking (a) maternal work demands to family routines through work–family conflict and depressive symptoms and (b) maternal work demands to children's externalizing and internalizing problems through family routines. Partial support for our hypotheses was found in

  3. “How Do You Get Two Houses Cleaned?”: Accomplishing Family Caregiving in Commuter Marriages

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Karla Mason Bergen; Erika Kirby; M. Chad McBride

    2007-01-01

    This interpretive study focused on messages reported by commuter wives from social network members concerning unpaid family labor, including domestic work and relational work with spouses and children, and wives' subsequent communication about the accomplishment of such labor within their marriages and families. We conducted a thematic analysis of interview transcripts with commuting wives from five focus groups (n?=?25) and

  4. Work Demands and Work-to-Family and Family-to-Work Conflict: Direct and Indirect Relationships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Voydanoff, Patricia

    2005-01-01

    This article uses a demands-and-resources approach to examine relationships between three types of work demands and work-to-family and family-to-work conflict: time-based demands, strain-based demands, and boundary-spanning demands. The analysis is based on data from 2,155 employed adults living with a family member who were interviewed for the…

  5. When Work–Family Benefits Are Not Enough: The Influence of Work–Family Culture on Benefit Utilization, Organizational Attachment, and Work–Family Conflict

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Cynthia A. Thompson; Laura L. Beauvais; Karen S. Lyness

    1999-01-01

    We developed a measure of work–family culture (i.e., the shared assumptions, beliefs, and values regarding the extent to which an organization supports and values the integration of employees' work and family lives) and examined its relationship to work–family benefit utilization, organizational attachment, and work–family conflict. Using survey data from 276 managers and professionals, we identified three dimensions of work–family culture:

  6. Work, family and life-course fit

    PubMed Central

    Moen, Phyllis; Kelly, Erin; Huang, Qinlei

    2008-01-01

    This study moves from “work-family” to a multi-dimensional “life-course fit” construct (employees’ cognitive assessments of resources, resource deficits, and resource demands), using a combined work-family, demands-control and ecology of the life course framing. It examined (1) impacts of job and home ecological systems on fit dimensions, and (2) whether control over work time predicted and mediated life-course fit outcomes. Using cluster analysis of survey data on a sample of 917 white-collar employees from Best Buy headquarters, we identified four job ecologies (corresponding to the job demands-job control model) and five home ecologies (theorizing an analogous home demands-home control model). Job and home ecologies predicted fit dimensions in an additive, not interactive, fashion. Employees’ work-time control predicted every life-course fit dimension and partially mediated effects of job ecologies, organizational tenure, and job category. PMID:19430546

  7. Work Family Relations: Antecedents and Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cinamon, Rachel Gali; Rich, Yisrael

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated interrelations between conflict and facilitation in work and family domains, with spousal, managerial, and collegial social support serving as antecedents, and professional vigor and burnout as outcomes. Participants were 322 female, married teachers. Regression analyses revealed complex relations between conflict and…

  8. Community as a Context for the Work-Family Interface

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Patricia Voydanoff

    2004-01-01

    Workplaces, families, and individuals attempt to coordinate work and family opportunities and responsibilities within the context of communities. Workplaces and families are embedded in the communities in which they are located. Work, family, and individual relationships are intertwined with relationships among members of various communities. Communities may both help and hinder the efforts of work organizations, families, and individuals to

  9. "Opportunity" in Paid vs. Unpaid Public Relations Internships: A Semantic Network Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maynard, Michael L.

    1997-01-01

    Compares differences in benefit appeal in letters offering internships written by the business community to an internship director. Finds the promise of "opportunity" and "for credit" appears more often in unpaid internship offers; emphasis was placed on writing skills and work-related tasks in paid internship offers. Reveals the business…

  10. Family Care Responsibilities and Employment: Exploring the Impact of Type of Family Care on Work-Family and Family-Work Conflict

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Lisa M.

    2013-01-01

    This study compared work-family and family-work conflict for employed family caregivers with disability-related care responsibilities in contrast to employed family caregivers with typical care responsibilities. Using data from the 2002 National Study of the Changing Workforce, a population-based survey of the U.S. workforce, formal and informal…

  11. Clarifying Work-Family Intervention Processes: The Roles of Work-Family Conflict and Family Supportive Supervisor Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Hammer, Leslie B.; Kossek, Ellen E.; Anger, W. Kent; Bodner, Todd; Zimmerman, Kristi L.

    2010-01-01

    Drawing on a conceptual model integrating research on training, work-family interventions, and social support, we conducted a quasi-experimental field study to assess the impact of a supervisory training and self-monitoring intervention designed to increase supervisors' use of family supportive supervisor behaviors. Pre- and post-intervention surveys were completed, nine months apart, by 239 employees at six intervention (N = 117) and six control (N = 122) grocery store sites. Thirty-nine supervisors in the six intervention sites received the training consisting of one hour of self-paced computer-based training, one hour of face-to-face group training, followed by instructions for behavioral self-monitoring (recording the frequency of supportive behaviors) to support on-the-job transfer. Results demonstrated a disordinal interaction for the effect of training and family-to-work conflict on employee job satisfaction, turnover intentions and physical health. In particular, for these outcomes, positive training effects were observed for employees with high family-to-work conflict, while negative training effects were observed for employees with low family-to-work conflict. These moderation effects were mediated by the interactive effect of training and family-to-work conflict on employee perceptions of family-supportive supervisor behaviors. Implications of our findings for future work-family intervention development and evaluation are discussed. PMID:20853943

  12. Clarifying work-family intervention processes: the roles of work-family conflict and family-supportive supervisor behaviors.

    PubMed

    Hammer, Leslie B; Kossek, Ellen Ernst; Anger, W Kent; Bodner, Todd; Zimmerman, Kristi L

    2011-01-01

    Drawing on a conceptual model integrating research on training, work–family interventions, and social support, we conducted a quasi-experimental field study to assess the impact of a supervisor training and self-monitoring intervention designed to increase supervisors' use of family-supportive supervisor behaviors. Pre- and postintervention surveys were completed, 9 months apart, by 239 employees at 6 intervention (N = 117) and 6 control (N = 122) grocery store sites. Thirty-nine supervisors in the 6 intervention sites received the training consisting of 1 hr of self-paced computer-based training, 1 hr of face-to-face group training, followed by instructions for behavioral self-monitoring (recording the frequency of supportive behaviors) to facilitate on-the-job transfer. Results demonstrated a disordinal interaction for the effect of training and family-to-work conflict on employee job satisfaction, turnover intentions, and physical health. In particular, for these outcomes, positive training effects were observed for employees with high family-to-work conflict, whereas negative training effects were observed for employees with low family-to-work conflict. These moderation effects were mediated by the interactive effect of training and family-to-work conflict on employee perceptions of family-supportive supervisor behaviors. Implications of our findings for future work–family intervention development and evaluation are discussed. PMID:20853943

  13. Across the continuum of satisfaction with work-family balance: Work hours, flexibility-fit, and work-family culture.

    PubMed

    McNamara, Tay K; Pitt-Catsouphes, Marcie; Matz-Costa, Christina; Brown, Melissa; Valcour, Monique

    2013-03-01

    This study investigated the association between hours worked per week and satisfaction with work-family balance, using data from a 2007-2008 survey of employees nested within organizations. We tested hypotheses informed by the resource drain and resources-and-demands perspectives using quantile regression. We found that the negative association between hours worked per week and satisfaction with work-family balance was significantly stronger at the 25th percentile, as compared to at the 75th percentile, of satisfaction with work-family balance. Further, there was some evidence that perceived flexibility-fit (i.e., the fit between worker needs and flexible work options available) and supportive work-family culture attenuated the relationship between hours worked and satisfaction with work-family balance. The results suggest that analyses focusing on the average relationship between long work hours (such as those using ordinary least squares regression) and satisfaction with work-family balance may underestimate the importance of long work hours for workers with lower satisfaction levels. PMID:23347476

  14. Unpaid Child Support: The Abuse of American Values.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kobayashi, Futoshi

    Noting that fewer than half the single mothers in the United States receive complete and regular child support payments, this paper discusses reasons for unpaid child support, examines whether stricter enforcement of child support obligations will help solve the overall problem, and proposes another option for solving the problem of unpaid child…

  15. Work, Family and Community Support as Predictors of Work-Family Conflict: A Study of Low-Income Workers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griggs, Tracy Lambert; Casper, Wendy J.; Eby, Lillian T.

    2013-01-01

    This study examines relationships between support from work, family and community domains with time- and strain-based work-family conflict in a sample of low-income workers. Results reveal significant within-domain and cross-domain relationships between support from all three life domains with work--family conflict. With respect to family support,…

  16. Role Resources and Work-Family Enrichment: The Role of Work Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siu, Oi-ling; Lu, Jia-fang; Brough, Paula; Lu, Chang-qin; Bakker, Arnold B.; Kalliath, Thomas; O'Driscoll, Michael; Phillips, David R.; Chen, Wei-qing; Lo, Danny; Sit, Cindy; Shi, Kan

    2010-01-01

    This article proposes a theoretical model of work-family enrichment and tests the mediating role of work engagement. The inclusion of work engagement extends prior research on work-family interface, and allows for examination of the effects of role resources (job resources, family support) on work-family enrichment. A two-wave survey was conducted…

  17. The labour market impact of the working families’ tax credit

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Richard Blundell; Alan Duncan; Julian McCrae; Costas Meghir

    2000-01-01

    In October 1999, the working families’ tax credit (WFTC) replaced family credit as the main package of in-work support for families with children. Among a range of stated aims, the WFTC is intended to ‘... improve work incentives, encouraging people without work to move into employment’. In this paper, we consider the impact of WFTC on hours and participation. To

  18. Linking Team Resources to Work-Family Enrichment and Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunter, Emily M.; Perry, Sara Jansen; Carlson, Dawn S.; Smith, Steven A.

    2010-01-01

    Work-family scholars now recognize the potential positive effects of participation in one life domain (i.e., work or family) on performance in other life domains. We examined how employees might benefit from team resources, which are highly relevant to the modern workplace, in both work and nonwork domains via work-family enrichment. Using the…

  19. Working to End Family Homelessness. Annual Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center on Family Homelessness (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    The National Center on Family Homelessness is determined to end family homelessness. Sheltering families provides a temporary safe haven. Connecting families to permanent housing, essential services, and critical supports can change their lives forever. Through research the Center learns what families need to rebound from the housing, economic,…

  20. Rational Versus Gender Role Explanations for Work–Family Conflict

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Barbara A. Gutek; Sabrina Searle; Lilian Klepa

    1991-01-01

    Two conflicting frameworks for understanding work–family conflict are proposed. According to the rational view, conflict is related linearly to the total amount of time spent in paid and family work. According to the gender role perspective, gender role expectations mute the relationship between hours expended and perceived work–family conflict, and gender interacts with number of hours worked and work–family conflict.

  1. Generational Differences in Work-Family Conflict and Synergy

    PubMed Central

    Beutell, Nicholas J.

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines differences in work-family conflict and synergy among the four generational groups represented in the contemporary workforce: Generation Y Generation X, Baby Boomers, and Matures using data from the 2008 National Study of the Changing Workforce (n = 3,502). Significant generational differences were found for work-family conflict (work interfering with family and family interfering with work) but not for work-family synergy. Mental health and job pressure were the best predictors of work interfering with family conflict for each generational group. Work-family synergy presented a more complex picture. Work-family conflict and synergy were significantly related to job, marital, and life satisfaction. Implications and directions for future research are discussed. PMID:23783221

  2. The Work-Family Dilemma: How HR Managers Can Help.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nollen, Stanley D.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses three issues faced by human resources managers: (1) the current relationship between work and the family, (2) the business problems created when work and family overlap, and (3) actions that businesses can take to improve the situation. (JOW)

  3. Work/Family Balance for Men in Student Affairs 

    E-print Network

    Singh, Shailendra Mohan

    2012-07-16

    This qualitative study will examine the concept of work/family demand specifically through the lens of male student affairs practitioners. Work family balance has been identified as a critical issue for the field of HRD impacting both individual...

  4. WORK EXPERIENCE REQUIREMENT FOR FAMILY AND CONSUMER SCIENCE EDUCATION

    E-print Network

    de Doncker, Elise

    WORK EXPERIENCE REQUIREMENT FOR FAMILY AND CONSUMER SCIENCE EDUCATION The purpose of the volunteer/work experience requirement is to provide those seeking vocational authorization in family and consumer science education with practical "work experience" in their field. Since family and consumer science education deals

  5. Labor Project for Working Families Cornell ILR Labor Programs

    E-print Network

    Keinan, Alon

    New Approaches to Organizing Women and Young Workers Social Media & Work Family Issues #12;New Approaches to Organizing Women and Young Workers Social Media and Work Family Issues This report RECOMMENDATIONS 2 INTRODUCTION 4 BACKGROUND 5 WOMEN, WORK, AND FAMILY 5 YOUNG WORKERS 6 USE OF SOCIAL MEDIA

  6. Unsociable Work? Nonstandard Work Schedules, Family Relationships, and Children's Well-Being

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strazdins, Lyndall; Clements, Mark S.; Korda, Rosemary J.; Broom, Dorothy H.; D'Souza, Rennie M.

    2006-01-01

    Many children live in families where one or both parents work evenings, nights, or weekends. Do these work schedules affect family relationships or well-being? Using cross-sectional survey data from dual-earner Canadian families (N=4,306) with children aged 2-11 years (N=6,156), we compared families where parents worked standard weekday times with…

  7. Helping Families Search for Solutions: Working with Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paylo, Matthew J.

    2005-01-01

    In this column, the author focuses on the ways that family counselors can use solution-based therapies (solution-oriented and solution-focused) to work with families with adolescents in individual and/or family therapy. The theoretical foundation for solution-based therapies suggests techniques that help families focus on solutions and not remain…

  8. Work and Family Life. Phase 1. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lein, Laura; And Others

    This is the first of a series of working papers and reports on aspects of modern American families. It investigates the issues and problems facing families with preschool children, when both of the parents are employed. The composite portrait of family styles within a sample of 14 young families begins with a project history. The literature is…

  9. 42 CFR 408.110 - Collection of unpaid premiums.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...MEDICARE PROGRAM PREMIUMS FOR SUPPLEMENTARY MEDICAL INSURANCE Collection of Unpaid Premiums...of the following methods: (1) By billing enrollees who pay the premiums directly...from Monthly Benefits); or (3) By billing the estate of a deceased enrollee....

  10. 42 CFR 408.110 - Collection of unpaid premiums.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...MEDICARE PROGRAM PREMIUMS FOR SUPPLEMENTARY MEDICAL INSURANCE Collection of Unpaid Premiums...of the following methods: (1) By billing enrollees who pay the premiums directly...from Monthly Benefits); or (3) By billing the estate of a deceased enrollee....

  11. 42 CFR 408.110 - Collection of unpaid premiums.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...MEDICARE PROGRAM PREMIUMS FOR SUPPLEMENTARY MEDICAL INSURANCE Collection of Unpaid Premiums...of the following methods: (1) By billing enrollees who pay the premiums directly...from Monthly Benefits); or (3) By billing the estate of a deceased enrollee....

  12. 42 CFR 408.110 - Collection of unpaid premiums.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...MEDICARE PROGRAM PREMIUMS FOR SUPPLEMENTARY MEDICAL INSURANCE Collection of Unpaid Premiums...of the following methods: (1) By billing enrollees who pay the premiums directly...from Monthly Benefits); or (3) By billing the estate of a deceased enrollee....

  13. 42 CFR 408.110 - Collection of unpaid premiums.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...MEDICARE PROGRAM PREMIUMS FOR SUPPLEMENTARY MEDICAL INSURANCE Collection of Unpaid Premiums...of the following methods: (1) By billing enrollees who pay the premiums directly...from Monthly Benefits); or (3) By billing the estate of a deceased enrollee....

  14. Preparing Infant-Family Practitioners: A Work in Progress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eggbeer, Linda; Mann, Tammy; Gilkerson, Linda

    2003-01-01

    This article explores what it takes to prepare practitioners to work effectively in the infant-family field and describes efforts to meet training needs. A multifaceted effort to prepare and support practitioners who work with infants, toddlers, and families has been central to the growth of the infant-family field. Part C of IDEA and Early Head…

  15. Hardships in America: The Real Story of Working Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boushey, Heather; Brocht, Chauna; Gundersen, Bethney; Bernstein, Jared

    Although U.S. policymakers have adopted the view that work is the solution to poverty, work may not ensure a decent standard of living for many families. This report estimates the number of families who are not making ends meet. It examines the cost of living in various communities in every state and determines "basic family budgets" for six…

  16. FINDING TIME FOR THE “SECOND SHIFT”:The Impact of Flexible Work Schedules on Women's Double Days

    Microsoft Academic Search

    CAROL S. WHARTON

    1994-01-01

    This article analyzes how women in residential real estate sales interweave their work and family activities. It is presented as a case study of the effects of flexible scheduling on the tasks of managing paid and domestic work. Women are attracted to real estate sales because they perceive that it will enable them to combine their paid and unpaid labor

  17. Role resources and work–family enrichment: The role of work engagement

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Oi-ling Siu; Jia-fang Lu; Paula Brough; Chang-qin Lu; Arnold B. Bakker; Thomas Kalliath; Michael O'Driscoll; David R. Phillips; Wei-qing Chen; Danny Lo; Cindy Sit; Kan Shi

    2010-01-01

    This article proposes a theoretical model of work-family enrichment and tests the mediating role of work engagement. The inclusion of work engagement extends prior research on work-family interface, and allows for examination of the effects of role resources (job resources, family support) on work-family enrichment. A two-wave survey was conducted among a matched sample of 786 employees in China. The

  18. Family boundary characteristics, work-family conflict and life satisfaction: A moderated mediation model.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Lin; Fan, Jinyan

    2014-10-21

    Although work-family border and boundary theory suggest individuals' boundary characteristics influence their work-family relationship, it is largely unknown how boundary flexibility and permeability mutually influence work-family conflict and subsequent employee outcomes. Moreover, the existing work-family conflict research has been mainly conducted in the United States and other Western countries. To address these gaps in the work-family literature, the present study examines a moderated mediation model regarding how family boundary characteristics may influence individuals' work-family conflict and life satisfaction with a sample of 278 Chinese full-time employees. Results showed that employees' family flexibility negatively related to their perceived work interference with family (WIF) and family interference with work (FIW), and both these two relationships were augmented by individuals' family permeability. In addition, WIF mediated the relationship between family flexibility and life satisfaction; the indirect effect of family flexibility on life satisfaction via WIF was stronger for individuals with higher family permeability. The theoretical and managerial implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:25331584

  19. Work-Family Conflict and the Perception of Departmental and Institutional Work-Family Policies in Collegiate Athletic Trainers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Godek, Michelle M.

    2012-01-01

    Employees throughout the United States struggle to balance their work and family commitments, in part because the workforce makeup has changed significantly over the last half century. The evolving family structure also has contributed to this struggle. This research seeks to build on previous work-family literature by incorporating the six…

  20. Working with Families of Learning Disabled Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vigilante, Florence Wexler

    1983-01-01

    Addresses problem areas encountered by families with learning-disabled children: parental self-blame and mourning, family life, the child's biological-psychological-social growth, and the child's achievement of independence. Argues that social workers have skills needed for effective remedial intervention. (RH)

  1. Coworker Informal Work Accommodations to Family: Scale Development and Validation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mesmer-Magnus, Jessica; Murase, Toshio; DeChurch, Leslie A.; Jimenez, Miliani

    2010-01-01

    Drawing on research regarding the utility of coworker support in mitigating work/family conflict, the authors developed a scale to measure Coworker-enacted Informal Work Accommodations to Family (C-IWAF). C-IWAF differs from coworker support in that it describes actual behaviors coworkers engage in to help one another deal with incompatible work

  2. Celebrating 25 Years of Working with Infants, Toddlers, and Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fenichel, Emily, Ed.

    2003-01-01

    "Zero to Three" is a single-focus bulletin of the National Center for Infants, Toddlers, and Families providing insight from multiple disciplines on the development of infants, toddlers, and their families. This issue focuses on the organization's 25 years of working with infants, toddlers, and families. The articles are as follows: (1) "Hope Is a…

  3. A Professional Challenge: Working with Multi-Problem Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carson, Ann Taylor

    The manual for professionals working with multi-problem families was developed by Project IINTACT which provided home-based services to families with young children who were developmentally delayed or at risk of developmental delay. Three groups of high risk families were served: those in which one or more parents is mentally retarded, those…

  4. A cross-cultural study of work\\/family demands, work\\/family conflict and wellbeing: the Taiwanese vs

    Microsoft Academic Search

    British Luo Lu; Robin Gilmour; Shu-Fang Kao

    Purpose - The aim of the research is twofold: to explore relations between work\\/family demands, work-family conflict (WFC), family-work conflict (FWC) and wellbeing outcomes, and to contrast employees from an individualistic (UK) and a collectivistic (Taiwan) society. Design\\/methodology\\/approach - Heterogeneous samples of full-time employees in Taiwan and UK were surveyed using structured questionnaires. Findings - For both the Taiwanese and

  5. Understanding Work-Family Spillover in Hotel Managers

    PubMed Central

    Lawson, Katie M.; Davis, Kelly D.; Crouter, Ann C.; O’Neill, John W.

    2013-01-01

    The present study examined the experience of work-family spillover among 586 hotel managers (HMs) working in 50 full-service hotels throughout the U.S. Work-family spillover occurs when behaviors, moods, stresses, and emotions from work spill over into family. We first investigated which hotel managers were more likely to experience spillover and stressful work conditions based on their life circumstances (gender, parental status, age, decision-making latitude at work). Second, we investigated which work conditions (hours worked per week, organizational time expectations, emotional labor, and permeable boundaries) predicted more work-family spillover. Women, employees without children at home, and younger adults experienced the highest levels of negative work-family spillover. Work conditions, particularly organizational time expectations, put HMs at risk for experiencing more negative and less positive work-family spillover. The results provide evidence that modifying certain work conditions in the hotel industry may be helpful in improving the quality of HMs’ jobs and retention. PMID:23888092

  6. Poverty and Health: Working with Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blackburn, Clare

    This book is concerned with the impact of poverty on health, focusing on families with young children in the United Kingdom. It draws together information from a wide range of disciplines to provide workers in the health and welfare fields with a better understanding of the complex interconnections between living conditions, lifestyles, and health…

  7. SHRM Work & Family Survey Report, 1992.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Society for Human Resource Management, Alexandria, VA.

    In March 1992, a random sample of 5,600 human resource professionals was selected from the membership of the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) and surveyed regarding family issues in the workplace. Respondents were asked to provide information on the size and other characteristics of their organization and workplace practices, and were…

  8. Are Difficulties Balancing Work and Family Associated with Subsequent Fertility?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Siwei; Hynes, Kathryn

    2012-01-01

    Despite considerable interest in the causes and consequences of work-family conflict, and the frequent suggestion in fertility research that difficulty in balancing work and family is one of the factors leading to low fertility rates in several developed countries, little research uses longitudinal data to examine whether women who report…

  9. Anticipated Work-Family Conflict: A Construct Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westring, Alyssa Friede; Ryan, Ann Marie

    2011-01-01

    To date, little is known about how work-family issues impact the career development process. In the current paper, we explore this issue by investigating a relatively unstudied construct: anticipated work-family conflict. We found that this construct can be represented by the same six-dimensional factor structure used to assess concurrent…

  10. Labor Project for Working Families Cornell ILR Labor Programs

    E-print Network

    Keinan, Alon

    New Approaches to Organizing Women and Young Workers Social Media & Work Family Issues #12;New Approaches to Organizing Women and Young Workers Social Media and Work Family Issues This report significant demographic change in the workforce is the presence of young workers. Over 70 percent of those

  11. Work-Based Resources as Moderators of the Relationship Between Work Hours and Satisfaction With Work–Family Balance

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Monique Valcour

    2007-01-01

    This study reports an investigation of the relationships of work hours, job complexity, and control over work time to satisfaction with work–family balance. Based on data from a sample of 570 telephone call center representatives, a moderated hierarchical regression analysis revealed that work hours were negatively related to satisfaction with work–family balance, consistent with the resource drain perspective. Job complexity

  12. Work-based resources as moderators of the relationship between work hours and satisfaction with work-family balance.

    PubMed

    Valcour, Monique

    2007-11-01

    This study reports an investigation of the relationships of work hours, job complexity, and control over work time to satisfaction with work-family balance. Based on data from a sample of 570 telephone call center representatives, a moderated hierarchical regression analysis revealed that work hours were negatively related to satisfaction with work-family balance, consistent with the resource drain perspective. Job complexity and control over work time were positively associated with satisfaction with work-family balance. Control over work time moderated the relationship such that as work hours rose, workers with low control experienced a decline in work-family balance satisfaction, while workers with high control did not. Results encourage greater research attention to work characteristics, such as job complexity and control over work time, and skills that represent resources useful to the successful integration of work and family demands. PMID:18020793

  13. From "Work-Family" to "Work-Life": Broadening Our Conceptualization and Measurement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keeney, Jessica; Boyd, Elizabeth M.; Sinha, Ruchi; Westring, Alyssa F.; Ryan, Ann Marie

    2013-01-01

    Despite frequent reference to "work-life" issues in the organizational literature, little theoretical or empirical attention has been paid to nonwork areas beyond family. The purpose of the research described here is to move beyond work-family conflict to a broader conceptualization and measurement of work interference with life. A measure of work

  14. Improving the Health of Working Families: Research Connections Between Work and Health. NPA Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yen, Irene H.; Frank, John W.

    This document contains two papers on connections between work and health and policy options for improving the health of working families. "Foreword" (James A. Auerbach) places the two papers in the context of recent research on the connections between work, family, and health. Chapter 1's overview addresses the changing nature of work, the new…

  15. Families at Work: Strengths and Strains. The General Mills American Family Report 1980-81.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    General Mills, Inc., Minneapolis, Minn.

    Fourth in a series of studies on the American family conducted for General Mills Corporation, this publication provides findings from a survey exploring the relationship between work and the family in contemporary society. Specifically, the survey explores how changes in the work force, especially the increase in numbers of working wives and…

  16. Social Support from Work and Family Domains as an Antecedent or Moderator of Work-Family Conflicts?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seiger, Christine P.; Wiese, Bettina S.

    2009-01-01

    On the basis of Conservation of Resources theory, we investigated how social support from supervisor, co-workers, life partner, and family members is associated with work-family conflicts in N=107 working mothers. We used data from a cross-sectional questionnaire and a standardized diary to examine two possible forms of interplay: (a) Social…

  17. Divided Allegiance: Men, Work, and Family Life.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berger, Michael; Wright, Larry

    1978-01-01

    The article expresses the philosophy that it is time for clinicians to support male clients in examining roles other than those that are traditionally male. It then goes on to follow the typical work life cycle of men in today's society and to describe alternative work-career patterns, while prescribing a complete societal change. (LPG)

  18. Is Family-to-Work Interference Related to Co-Workers' Work Outcomes?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ten Brummelhuis, Lieke L.; Bakker, Arnold B.; Euwema, Martin C.

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies have convincingly shown that employees' family lives can affect their work outcomes. We investigate whether family-to-work interference (FWI) experienced by the employee also affects the work outcomes of a co-worker. We predict that the employee's FWI has an effect on the co-worker's outcomes through the crossover of positive and…

  19. [The family-friendly hospital: (how) does it work?].

    PubMed

    Heller, A R; Heller, S C

    2009-06-01

    The demographic development in Germany is heading towards a significant shortage in specialists within the next 10-15 years with an increased demand for health services at the same time. The three-stage model of family life planning (work, family phase, return) will also be gradually replaced by a model of simultaneous compatibility of family and work. This change in values, although initiated by the parents themselves, may turn out to be a crucial countermeasure in national economy against the demography-related loss of qualified personnel. For these three trends the economic need arises to minimize family-related absence of our well-trained, motivated and reliable doctors from the clinical departments through implementation of family-friendly human resources policies and supporting measures by the employers. In a representative survey 26% of respondents with children had in the past already changed their workplace to ensure a better match of work and family duties. In this regard the compatibility of family and professional responsibilities had a higher impact on the selection of the employer than a high income. Accordingly, a work-life competence oriented business plan will represent the crucial factor within the competition between universities, hospitals and professional disciplines to attract high potential bearers although a sustained change of the traditional hospital culture is mandatory. Anaesthesia-related fields of development regarding family-friendly corporate governance are working hours and organization of work, part-time jobs even for managers and fathers, and staff development. In the hospital daily routine, in particular, creative solutions meeting the local demands are deemed necessary that do not involve the use of high financial resources. Family-friendly personnel policy not only arises from altruistic enthusiasm but also pays off economically. This article discusses the necessity, opportunities and threads of family-oriented hospital management and fields of action for anaesthesia departments. PMID:19484192

  20. Balancing Work and Family for Faculty: Why It's Important

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curtis, John W.

    2004-01-01

    The success of faculty members in balancing their academic careers with family responsibilities is a matter of more than individual happiness: it is also a matter of addressing structural inequities and attracting the most qualified candidates to the academic profession. To make it possible for faculty members to balance work and family,…

  1. Poverty Among Working Families: Findings From Experimental Poverty Measures

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This report from the US Census Bureau explores poverty among working families. The report uses experimental measures based on recommendations from the National Academy of Sciences Panel of Poverty and Family Assistance, including the following elements: noncash government benefits, job-related expenses, child care costs, social security taxes, and out-of-pocket medical expenses.

  2. A model of work-family dynamics of hotel managers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    John W. O’Neill; Jeanette N. Cleveland; Ann C. Crouter

    2007-01-01

    The tourism industry is well known as one where operating managers have had to make sacrifices in their family and personal lives. This article reviews what is known about the work-family interface in relation to hotel managers in an effort to identify ways to gain a strategic advantage in this competitive sector. By integrating research from several disciplines, this article

  3. Resilience across Contexts: Family, Work, Culture, and Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Ronald D., Ed.; Wang, Margaret C., Ed.

    Noting that much is known from research and practice regarding what works to promote resilience of children and families in a variety of high-risk life situations, this book considers the impact of culture, economy, employment, poverty, family structure, and social policy on parenting, child development, education, and the life success of youth.…

  4. Social Work Practice with Native American Families: A Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wintemute, Ginger, Ed.; Messer, Bonnie, Ed.

    A handbook on social work practice with Native American families, developed for use by students in undergraduate social work programs and by social service practitioners who work with Native American people, is divided into four sections. The first section contains four articles, written by Joseph A. Dudley (Methodist minister and Yankton Sioux)…

  5. Implications of Work and Community Demands and Resources for Work-to-Family Conflict and Facilitation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Patricia Voydanoff

    2004-01-01

    Based on a differential salience approach, this article examines the combined effects of work and community demands and resources on work-to-family conflict and facilitation. The study uses information from 2,507 employed respondents from the 1995 National Survey of Midlife Development in the United States. The findings indicate that work demands are relatively strongly related to work-to-family conflict, whereas work resources

  6. The Relationship between Family and Work: Tensions, Paradigms and Directives. 

    E-print Network

    Knijn, Trudie; Smit, Arnoud

    2009-01-01

    After decades of promoting the reconciliation of work and family life from a gender-equality perspective, to date discourses and related social policy paradigms replace and reframe the once European agenda on gender-equality ...

  7. Reconciliation of Work and Family Life in Hungary 

    E-print Network

    Duman, Anil; Horvath, Anna

    2010-01-01

    The paper analyses the ‘Europeanization’ of policies concerning the reconciliation of work and family life in Hungary between 1998 and 2005. It looks at how politicians – in government or in the opposition – framed European ...

  8. Work-family conflict, family-supportive supervisor behaviors (FSSB), and sleep outcomes.

    PubMed

    Crain, Tori L; Hammer, Leslie B; Bodner, Todd; Kossek, Ellen Ernst; Moen, Phyllis; Lilienthal, Richard; Buxton, Orfeu M

    2014-04-01

    Although critical to health and well-being, relatively little research has been conducted in the organizational literature on linkages between the work-family interface and sleep. Drawing on conservation of resources theory, we use a sample of 623 information technology workers to examine the relationships between work-family conflict, family-supportive supervisor behaviors (FSSB), and sleep quality and quantity. Validated wrist actigraphy methods were used to collect objective sleep quality and quantity data over a 1 week period of time, and survey methods were used to collect information on self-reported work-family conflict, FSSB, and sleep quality and quantity. Results demonstrated that the combination of predictors (i.e., work-to-family conflict, family-to-work conflict, FSSB) was significantly related to both objective and self-report measures of sleep quantity and quality. Future research should further examine the work-family interface to sleep link and make use of interventions targeting the work-family interface as a means for improving sleep health. PMID:24730425

  9. Work-Family Conflict, Family-Supportive Supervisor Behaviors (FSSB), and Sleep Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Crain, Tori L.; Hammer, Leslie B.; Bodner, Todd; Kossek, Ellen Ernst; Moen, Phyllis; Lilienthal, Richard; Buxton, Orfeu M.

    2014-01-01

    Although critical to health and well-being, relatively little research has been conducted in the organizational literature on linkages between the work-family interface and sleep. Drawing on Conservation of Resources theory, we use a sample of 623 information technology workers to examine the relationships between work-family conflict, family-supportive supervisor behaviors (FSSB), and sleep quality and quantity. Validated wrist actigraphy methods were used to collect objective sleep quality and quantity data over a one week period of time, and survey methods were used to collect information on self-reported work-family conflict, FSSB, and sleep quality and quantity. Results demonstrated that the combination of predictors (i.e., work-to-family conflict, family-to-work conflict, FSSB) was significantly related to both objective and self-report measures of sleep quantity and quality. Future research should further examine the work-family interface to sleep link and make use of interventions targeting the work-family interface as a means for improving sleep health. PMID:24730425

  10. 'It is hard for mums to put themselves first': how mothers diagnosed with breast cancer manage the sociological boundaries between paid work, family and caring for the self.

    PubMed

    Mackenzie, Catherine Ruth

    2014-09-01

    This paper aims to increase understanding of how mothers diagnosed with breast cancer while in the paid workforce experience and manage their multiple demands of taking care of themselves, their children and their paid work. In-depth, semi-structured interviews were conducted with 32 women who were mothers of dependent children and in the paid workforce at the time of their breast cancer diagnosis. The sample includes women living in urban and rural Australia. The study found that after a breast cancer diagnosis, participants tended to prioritise their health and wellbeing over paid work. Yet dominance of gendered identity meant that they tended to place the needs of family, especially children, above their own health and wellbeing. The key factors that influenced mothers' decisions to continue in, return to, or leave paid work after a breast cancer diagnosis included: a change in perspective regarding what was important in their lives; level of support from the workplace and home; the extent to which participating in paid work was a financial necessity; the extent to which their identity was connected to paid work, and; ongoing level of pain or fatigue. The paper concludes that using the sociological concepts of the fateful moment, boundary maintenance and a feminist ethic of care produces a more nuanced understanding of women's participation in paid work after breast cancer than examining paid workforce participation, or unpaid responsibilities and mothering, separately. The nature of the permeability or malleability of boundaries between work, family and taking care of the self affects women's participation in paid work during and/or after breast cancer treatment. Increased boundary permeability or malleability brought about more by cooperation than conflict facilitated positive experiences of re-negotiating boundaries, whereas increased permeability or malleability brought about more by conflict than cooperation created difficulties for women in finding an acceptable balance between their family, paid work and taking care of their own health after breast cancer. PMID:25063965

  11. The Effects of Work Demands and Resources on Work-to-family Conflict and Facilitation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Voydanoff, Patricia

    2004-01-01

    This article uses a differential salience-comparable salience approach to examine the effects of work demands and resources on work-to-family conflict and facilitation. The analysis is based on data from 1,938 employed adults living with a family member who were interviewed for the 1997 National Study of the Changing Workforce. The results support…

  12. Who's working at home: The types of families engaged in home-based work

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Barbara R. Rowe; Kathryn Stafford; Alma J. Owen

    1992-01-01

    As increasing numbers of families attempt to balance their need for paid wages with household and child care responsibilities, and corporations struggle with employee flexibility and global competitiveness, there has been a renewed interest in the home as a work place. However, there is little literature on the kinds of families who engage in home-based work, where they live, the

  13. Ten adaptive strategies for family and work balance: advice from successful families.

    PubMed

    Haddock, S A; Zimmerman, T S; Ziemba, S J; Current, L R

    2001-10-01

    Despite negative media images and social dynamics insensitive to the lives of many dual-career couples, research shows that these families are largely healthy and thriving. In this study, we investigated the adaptive strategies of middle-class, dual-earner couples (N = 47) with children that are successfully managing family and work. Guided by grounded-theory methodology, analysis of interview data revealed that these successful couples structured their lives around 10 major strategies: Valuing family, striving for partnership, deriving meaning from work, maintaining work boundaries, focusing and producing at work, taking pride in dual earning, prioritizing family fun, living simply, making decisions proactively, and valuing time. Each adaptive strategy is defined and illustrated through the participants' own words. Clinical applications for therapists working with dual-earner couples are offered. PMID:11594013

  14. Beyond Conflict: Functional Facets of the Work-Family Interplay

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiese, Bettina S.; Seiger, Christine P.; Schmid, Christian M.; Freund, Alexandra M.

    2010-01-01

    The present paper deals with three positive facets of the work-family interplay, i.e., transfer of competencies, transfer of positive mood, and cross-domain compensation. The latter refers to the experience that engagement in one domain helps dealing with failures in the other domain. In two correlational studies (N[subscript 1] = 107 working

  15. Youths' Socialization to Work and School within the Family

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Bora; Porfeli, Erik J.

    2015-01-01

    We tested a model of socialization to work in the family context and its implications as a lever for school engagement using a sample of 154 parent-youth dyads living in the United States. A path model was fitted to data. Findings revealed that parents' reported work experiences was aligned to youths' perception of their parents' success in the…

  16. When Family-Supportive Supervision Matters: Relations between Multiple Sources of Support and Work-Family Balance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenhaus, Jeffrey H.; Ziegert, Jonathan C.; Allen, Tammy D.

    2012-01-01

    This study examines the mechanisms by which family-supportive supervision is related to employee work-family balance. Based on a sample of 170 business professionals, we found that the positive relation between family-supportive supervision and balance was fully mediated by work interference with family (WIF) and partially mediated by family

  17. Women's work and family size in rural Thailand.

    PubMed

    Podhisita, C; Havanon, N; Knodel, J; Sittitrai, W

    1990-06-01

    Surveys of 612 couples in 2 districts of rural Thailand were conducted to analyze the extent to which the birth of each child and the cumulative effect of childbearing interrupts, interferes with, or influences women's economic activity. The districts were in a northern area, Lamphun, where fertility has declined rapidly since the 1960s, and central Suphanburi province where the decline has been slower. Couples were selected for having completed families or 1 or 2 children, or 4 or more surviving children, and were matched for age. Information was obtained by survey questionnaires and by focus groups. Small family couples were somewhat better educated and of higher socioeconomic status, and tended to be farmers, while large family couples were more likely to engage in wage labor. These couples viewed women's labor as an economic necessity, either for survival or to educate and provide for their families. To cope with child care, women resorted to relatives, older children, hired child care, nursery school, primary school, took their children with them to work or modified their work schedule. The double burden of income-earning activity and child care caused considerable strains for working mothers. There was an overwhelming consensus among both groups that childbearing interrupts and that child care interferes with women's work. 95% of the small and 90% of the large families felt that more work could be done if families were kept small. Implications of this study are that government sponsored family planned should continue, and that some type of subsidized day care is needed, including early morning hours when farm women leave for work. PMID:12283484

  18. 7?Getting There from Here: Research on the Effects of Work–Family Initiatives on Work–Family Conflict and Business Outcomes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Erin L. Kelly; Ellen Ernst Kossek; Leslie B. Hammer; Mary Durham; Jeremy Bray; Kelly Chermack; Lauren A. Murphy; Dan Kaskubar

    2008-01-01

    Many employing organizations have adopted work–family policies, programs, and benefits. Yet managers in employing organizations simply do not know what organizational initiatives actually reduce work–family conflict and how these changes are likely to impact employees and the organization. We examine scholarship that addresses two broad questions: first, do work–family initiatives reduce employees’ work–family conflict and\\/or improve work–family enrichment? Second, does

  19. Dual-earner families in Finland: Differences between and within families in relation to work and family experiences

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ulla Kinnunen; Saija Mauno

    2001-01-01

    The aims of the study were to create a typology of dual-earner families, based on mothers' and fathers' reports on vocational education, job involvement, and job exhaustion, and to investigate differences between the groups in family functioning, and work-family interface experiences. The study was carried out by means of questionnaires among 133 dual-earner couples with children under 18 years of

  20. After the Baby: Work-Family Conflict and Working Mothers' Psychological Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marshall, Nancy L.; Tracy, Allison J.

    2009-01-01

    This study examines work and family characteristics and depressive symptomatology among over 700 working mothers of infants. Working mothers in poorer quality jobs, as well as working mothers who were single or whose infant's health was poorer than that of other infants, reported greater depressive symptomatology. The effect of job quality on…

  1. [Family, work, and fertility among migrants from bordering countries].

    PubMed

    Cacopardo, M C; Lopez, E

    1997-04-01

    "A first set of results of a research on households [in Argentina] from migrants from boundary countries is analyzed here. [The] main object is the study of family structure and work among Bolivian, Chilean, Paraguayan and Uruguayan immigrants within each community's own social-cultural frame. The article analyzes information from the 1991 Census, in particular concerning the family structure, job structure of household heads and other household members, and fertility of household heads' wives." (EXCERPT) PMID:12321682

  2. Preparing Minority Adolescents to Blend Work and Family Roles: Increasing Work-Family Conflict Management Self Efficacy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rachel Gali Cinamon

    2006-01-01

    Ethnic identity, information about the world of work, and mastery in specific career skills crucially impact the process of career development among minority adolescents. Identity and conflict management skills also affect one of the major stressors experienced by employees today: the work-family conflict. This paper presents a culturally appropriate career intervention program for increasing Israeli Arab adolescents’ self-efficacy to manage

  3. Organizational Work–Family Resources as Predictors of Job Performance and Attitudes: The Process of Work–Family Conflict and Enrichment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Heather N. Odle-Dusseau; Thomas W. Britt; Tiffany M. Greene-Shortridge

    2012-01-01

    The goal of the current study was to test a model where organizational resources (aimed at managing work and family responsibilities) predict job attitudes and supervisor ratings of performance through the mechanisms of work–family conflict and work–family enrichment. Employees (n = 174) at a large metropolitan hospital were surveyed at two time periods regarding perceptions of family supportive supervisor behaviors

  4. At-Risk Students in Work and Family Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henrico County Public Schools, Glen Allen, VA. Virginia Vocational Curriculum and Resource Center.

    This manual is designed to help work and family studies teachers meet the needs of students who are at risk. It uses a systematic approach to adapting the learning environment that consists of an intervention checklist and intervention strategies. The manual is divided into two general sections: Common Skills Area and Applied Skills Areas. The…

  5. Work-Family Balance and Academic Advancement in Medical Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Geri; Schwartz, Alan; Hart, Katherine M.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: This study examines various options that a faculty member might exercise to achieve work-family balance in academic medicine and their consequences for academic advancement. Method: Three data sets were analyzed: an anonymous web-administered survey of part-time tenure track-eligible University of Illinois College of Medicine (UI-COM)…

  6. [Training Practitioners to Work with Infants, Toddlers and Their Families].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pawl, Jeree, Ed.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    This newsletter theme issue focuses on the training of practitioners to work with infants, toddlers, and their families with emphasis on the activities of the TASK (Training Approaches for Skills and Knowledge) Project of the National Center for Clinical Infant Programs. The TASK project addresses the concerns of four "stakeholder" groups:…

  7. Health Coverage Instability for Mothers in Working Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Steven G.; Eamon, Mary Keegan

    2004-01-01

    Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, the authors examined the health insurance coverage stability of 1,667 women in working families over a three-year period (1995-1997). Findings revealed that coverage instability is common. Nearly one-half of low-income women experienced health coverage instability over the three-year study…

  8. Employee availability for work and family: three Swedish case studies

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ann Bergman; Jean Gardiner

    2007-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this article is to explore the concept of availability, both empirically and theoretically, in the context of three Swedish organisations, and identifies the structural influences on availability patterns for work and family. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – The article is based on quantitative case studies using employer records and an employee questionnaire in three organisations. Multivariate descriptive statistics

  9. The Relationship between Core Self-Evaluations and Work and Family Satisfaction: The Mediating Role of Work-Family Conflict and Facilitation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyar, Scott L.; Mosley, Donald C., Jr.

    2007-01-01

    This study examines the impact of work-family conflict and work-family facilitation on work and family outcomes and explores the influence of core self-evaluations (CSE) among these relationships. CSE is comprised of self-esteem, neuroticism, locus of control, and general self-efficacy. CSE was found to be negatively related to work interfering…

  10. Work and Family Variables, Entrepreneurial Career Success, and Psychological Well-Being.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parasuraman, Saroj; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Responses from 111 entrepreneurs revealed that work characteristics/pressures influence work more than family commitment; parental demands and partner support influence family more than work commitment. Women devote more time to family and men to work. Autonomy enables entrepreneurs to minimize the intrusion of family on work. (SK)

  11. Parental employment and work-family stress: associations with family food environments.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Katherine W; Hearst, Mary O; Escoto, Kamisha; Berge, Jerica M; Neumark-Sztainer, Dianne

    2012-08-01

    Parental employment provides many benefits to children's health. However, an increasing number of studies have observed associations between mothers' full-time employment and less healthful family food environments. Few studies have examined other ways in which parental employment may be associated with the family food environment, including the role of fathers' employment and parents' stress balancing work and home obligations. This study utilized data from Project F-EAT, a population-based study of a socio-demographically diverse sample of 3709 parents of adolescents living in a metropolitan area in the Midwestern United States, to examine cross-sectional associations between mothers' and fathers' employment status and parents' work-life stress with multiple aspects of the family food environment. Among parents participating in Project F-EAT, 64% of fathers and 46% of mothers were full-time employed, while 25% of fathers and 37% of mothers were not employed. Results showed that full-time employed mothers reported fewer family meals, less frequent encouragement of their adolescents' healthful eating, lower fruit and vegetable intake, and less time spent on food preparation, compared to part-time and not-employed mothers, after adjusting for socio-demographics. Full-time employed fathers reported significantly fewer hours of food preparation; no other associations were seen between fathers' employment status and characteristics of the family food environment. In contrast, higher work-life stress among both parents was associated with less healthful family food environment characteristics including less frequent family meals and more frequent sugar-sweetened beverage and fast food consumption by parents. Among dual-parent families, taking into account the employment characteristics of the other parent did not substantially alter the relationships between work-life stress and family food environment characteristics. While parental employment is beneficial for many families, identifying policy and programmatic strategies to reduce parents' work-life stress may have positive implications for the family food environment and for the eating patterns and related health outcomes of children and parents. PMID:22591825

  12. A Longitudinal Investigation of Work-Family Strains and Gains, Work Commitment, and Subsequent Employment Status among Partnered Working Mothers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulvaney, Matthew K.; McNall, Laurel A.; Morrissey, Rebecca A.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of the work-family interface on mothers' commitment to work and the implications of that work commitment for subsequent employment. The study included a sample of employed partnered mothers who participated in the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Study of Early Child…

  13. WORKPLACE SOCIAL SUPPORT AND WORK–FAMILY CONFLICT: A META-ANALYSIS CLARIFYING THE INFLUENCE OF GENERAL AND WORK–FAMILY-SPECIFIC SUPERVISOR AND ORGANIZATIONAL SUPPORT

    PubMed Central

    KOSSEK, ELLEN ERNST; PICHLER, SHAUN; BODNER, TODD; HAMMER, LESLIE B.

    2011-01-01

    This article uses meta-analysis to develop a model integrating research on relationships between employee perceptions of general and work–family-specific supervisor and organizational support and work–family conflict. Drawing on 115 samples from 85 studies comprising 72,507 employees, we compared the relative influence of 4 types of workplace social support to work–family conflict: perceived organizational support (POS); supervisor support; perceived organizational work–family support, also known as family-supportive organizational perceptions (FSOP); and supervisor work–family support. Results show work–family-specific constructs of supervisor support and organization support are more strongly related to work–family conflict than general supervisor support and organization support, respectively. We then test a mediation model assessing the effects of all measures at once and show positive perceptions of general and work–family-specific supervisor indirectly relate to work–family conflict via organizational work–family support. These results demonstrate that work–family-specific support plays a central role in individuals’ work–family conflict experiences. PMID:21691415

  14. Family Policy in Hungary: How to Improve the Reconciliation between Work and Family? OECD Economics Department Working Papers, No. 566

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hemmings, Philip

    2007-01-01

    Hungarian family policy focuses on providing generous options to take time off work to look after children. This system not only contributes to Hungary's low employment rate but encourages long separation from the labour market, has largely failed to significantly influence fertility rates and is relatively expensive to run. This paper looks at…

  15. Work-to-Family Conflict, Positive Spillover, and Boundary Management: A Person-Environment Fit Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Zheng; Powell, Gary N.; Greenhaus, Jeffrey H.

    2009-01-01

    This study adopted a person-environment fit approach to examine whether greater congruence between employees' preferences for segmenting their work domain from their family domain (i.e., keeping work matters at work) and what their employers' work environment allowed would be associated with lower work-to-family conflict and higher work-to-family

  16. Family and Consumer Sciences University Faculty Perceptions of Interdisciplinary Work

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Virginia B. Vincenti

    2005-01-01

    The overall purpose of this article is to describe research focusing on two questions: What is family and consumer sciences (FCS) higher education faculty members’ understanding of interdisciplinary work? What have faculty learned from their interdisciplinary experiences about facilitators and inhibitors? The researcher used Seidman's three-question, in-depth interview protocol with 9 participants in a large, midwestern, land-grant university. Qualitative analysis

  17. What the Person Brings to the Table: Personality, Coping, and Work-Family Conflict

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andreassi, Jeanine K.

    2011-01-01

    Employees (N = 291) of various industries and companies were surveyed to study how individual factors (coping and personality) affect work-family conflict: strain-based work-to-family conflict (S-WFC), time-based work-to-family conflict (T-WFC), strain-based family-to-work conflict (S-FWC), and time-based family-to-work conflict (T-FWC). As…

  18. Let Knowledge Serve the City For-Profit Employers: Guidelines for Unpaid

    E-print Network

    Let Knowledge Serve the City For-Profit Employers: Guidelines for Unpaid Internships While most for-profit companies offer paid internships, there are occasional exceptions. The following guidelines are used by the Portland State University Career Center for determining the appropriateness of unpaid internships with for

  19. 7 CFR Exhibit K to Subpart A of... - Classifications for Multi-Family Residential Rehabilitation Work

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...Classifications for Multi-Family Residential Rehabilitation Work K Exhibit K to Subpart A...Classifications for Multi-Family Residential Rehabilitation Work I. General This exhibit...maintenance and repair work, moderate rehabilitation and substantial...

  20. 7 CFR Exhibit K to Subpart A of... - Classifications for Multi-Family Residential Rehabilitation Work

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...Classifications for Multi-Family Residential Rehabilitation Work K Exhibit K to Subpart A...Classifications for Multi-Family Residential Rehabilitation Work I. General This exhibit...maintenance and repair work, moderate rehabilitation and substantial...

  1. Work and Family Research in the First Decade of the 21st Century

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bianchi, Suzanne M.; Milkie, Melissa A.

    2010-01-01

    Scholarship on work and family topics expanded in scope and coverage during the 2000-2010 decade, spurred by an increased diversity of workplaces and of families, by methodological innovations, and by the growth of communities of scholars focused on the work-family nexus. We discuss these developments as the backdrop for emergent work-family

  2. Differences in wage rates for males and females in the health sector: a consideration of unpaid overtime to decompose the gender wage gap

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In Australia a persistent and sizable gender wage gap exists. In recent years this gap has been steadily widening. The negative impact of gender wage differentials is the disincentive to work more hours. This implies a substantial cost on the Australian health sector. This study aimed to identify the magnitude of gender wage differentials within the health sector. The investigation accounts for unpaid overtime. Given the limited availability of information, little empirical evidence exists that accounts for unpaid overtime. Methods Information was collected from a sample of 10,066 Australian full-time employees within the health sector. Initially, ordinary least-squares regression was used to identify the gender wage gap when unpaid overtime was included and then excluded from the model. The sample was also stratified by gender and then by occupation to allow for comparisons. Later the Blinder–Oaxaca decomposition method was employed to identify and quantify the contribution of individual endowments to wage differentials between males and females. Results The analyses of data revealed a gender wage gap that varied across occupations. The inclusion of unpaid overtime in the analysis led to a slight reduction in the wage differential. The results showed an adjusted wage gap of 16.7%. Conclusions Unpaid overtime made a significant but small contribution to wage differentials. Being female remained the major contributing factor to the wage gap. Given that wage differentials provide a disincentive to work more hours, serious attempts to deal with the skilled labour shortage in the health sector need to address the gender wage gap. PMID:23433245

  3. Honoring Work in Wisconsin: State Policies To Promote Self-Sufficiency for Working Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisconsin Univ., Madison. Center on Wisconsin Strategy.

    Many of Wisconsin's working families face economic distress, living from paycheck to paycheck and being forced to choose between paying their rent or buying food for their children. Parents under stress often cannot support their children with time, energy or resources. In order to affirm the importance of children in the state, and to help build…

  4. Family Mastery Enhances Work Engagement in Chinese Nurses: A Cross-Lagged Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lu, Chang-qin; Siu, Oi-ling; Chen, Wei-qing; Wang, Hai-jiang

    2011-01-01

    Based on Greenhaus and Powell's (2006) theory of work-family enrichment and the job demands-resources (JD-R) model of work engagement (Bakker & Demerouti, 2008), this study focused on the family-to-work enrichment process by investigating the effect of family mastery on work engagement in a Chinese context. A sample of 279 Chinese female nurses…

  5. Changing Workplaces to Reduce Work-Family Conflict: Schedule Control in a White-Collar Organization

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Erin L.; Moen, Phyllis; Tranby, Eric

    2011-01-01

    Work-family conflicts are common and consequential for employees, their families, and work organizations. Can workplaces be changed to reduce work-family conflict? Previous research has not been able to assess whether workplace policies or initiatives succeed in reducing work-family conflict or increasing work-family fit. Using longitudinal data collected from 608 employees of a white-collar organization before and after a workplace initiative was implemented, we investigate whether the initiative affects work-family conflict and fit, whether schedule control mediates these effects, and whether work demands, including long hours, moderate the initiative’s effects on work-family outcomes. Analyses clearly demonstrate that the workplace initiative positively affects the work-family interface, primarily by increasing employees’ schedule control. This study points to the importance of schedule control for our understanding of job quality and for management policies and practices. PMID:21580799

  6. Supervisor Support, Work-Family Conflict, and Satisfaction Outcomes: An Empirical Study in the Hotel Industry

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Osman M. Karatepe; Orhan Uludag

    2008-01-01

    The current study developed and tested a model that investigated the relationship of supervisor support with work-family conflict and family-work conflict and the effects of both directions of conflict with family satisfaction, career satisfaction, and life satisfaction. The model also examined the impact of supervisor support on family and career satisfaction outcomes and the effects of these satisfaction variables on

  7. Personality and Role Variables as Predictors of Three Forms of Work-Family Conflict.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlson, Dawn S.

    1999-01-01

    Time-, strain-, and behavior-based dimensions of work/family conflict were examined for 225 workers. Each dimension had unique dispositional or situational antecedents. Negative affectivity was the strongest predictor of work/family conflict. (SK)

  8. Perceived versus used workplace flexibility in Singapore: predicting work-family fit.

    PubMed

    Jones, Blake L; Scoville, D Phillip; Hill, E Jeffrey; Childs, Geniel; Leishman, Joan M; Nally, Kathryn S

    2008-10-01

    This study examined the relationship of 2 types of workplace flexibility to work-family fit and work, personal, and marriage-family outcomes using data (N = 1,601) representative of employed persons in Singapore. We hypothesized that perceived and used workplace flexibility would be positively related to the study variables. Results derived from structural equation modeling revealed that perceived flexibility predicted work-family fit; however, used flexibility did not. Work-family fit related positively to each work, personal, and marriage-family outcome; however, workplace flexibility only predicted work and personal outcomes. Findings suggest work-family fit may be an important facilitating factor in the interface between work and family life, relating directly to marital satisfaction and satisfaction in other family relationships. Implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:18855513

  9. An Investigation of Role Salience and Linkages to Work-Family Conflict 

    E-print Network

    Greer, Tomika Wilson

    2012-07-16

    This dissertation contains reports of three separate studies in which the connections between work role salience, family role salience, stereotype threat, and work-family conflict were explored. In the first study, findings from a systematic review...

  10. Rhythms of Life: Antecedents and Outcomes of Work-Family Balance in Employed Parents

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Samuel Aryee; E. S. Srinivas; Hwee Hoon Tan

    2005-01-01

    This study examined antecedents and outcomes of a fourfold taxonomy of work-family balance in terms of the direction of influence (work-family vs. family-work) and type of effect (conflict vs. facilitation). Respondents were full-time employed parents in India. Confirmatory factor analysis results provided evidence for the discriminant validity of M. R. Frone's (2003) fourfold taxonomy of work-family balance. Results of moderated

  11. Creating Better Family Child Care Jobs: Model Work Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haack, Peggy

    Based on the premise that good child care jobs are the cornerstone of high-quality services for children and families, this booklet details workplace standards for family child care providers. The booklet is designed to be used for educating family child care providers, evaluating individual family child care programs, setting goals and measuring…

  12. Work-Family Conflict, Resources, and Role Set Density: Assessing Their Effects on Distress among Working Mothers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kulik, Liat; Liberman, Gabriel

    2013-01-01

    We explored the relationships between the experience of work-family conflict and levels of distress in the family and at work among a sample of 227 Israeli working mothers. We also examined how role set density (RSD, the number of roles they perform) and personal and environmental resources are related to the women's experience of distress.…

  13. Health and Turnover of Working Mothers after Childbirth via the Work-Family Interface: An Analysis across Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlson, Dawn S.; Grzywacz, Joseph G.; Ferguson, Merideth; Hunter, Emily M.; Clinch, C. Randall; Arcury, Thomas A.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined organizational levers that impact work-family experiences, participant health, and subsequent turnover. Using a sample of 179 women returning to full-time work 4 months after childbirth, we examined the associations of 3 job resources (job security, skill discretion, and schedule control) with work-to-family enrichment and the…

  14. Working with Military Families Through Deployment and Beyond

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Julie Anne Laser; Paul M. Stephens

    2011-01-01

    Military families experience considerable stress, periods of long separation, and changes to the family system due to family\\u000a members planning to enter a war zone, actively living in a war zone, and reuniting after being in a war zone. Anticipation\\u000a and understanding of the stages of deployment improves family, couple and individual functioning. The issues that the family\\u000a and the

  15. Work-Family Conflict, Perceived Supervisor Support and Organizational Commitment among Brazilian Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casper, Wendy Jean; Harris, Christopher; Taylor-Bianco, Amy; Wayne, Julie Holliday

    2011-01-01

    The current study examines a variety of relationships pertaining to work-family conflict among a sample of Brazilian professionals, in order to shed light on work-family issues in this cultural context. Drawing from the cultural values of Brazil and social identity theory, we examine the relationships of two directions of work-family conflict…

  16. Reducing Work-Family Conflict through Different Sources of Social Support

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Daalen, Geertje; Willemsen, Tineke M.; Sanders, Karin

    2006-01-01

    The present study examines the relationship between four sources of social support (i.e., spouse, relatives and friends, supervisor, and colleagues) and time and strain-based work-to-family and family-to-work conflict among 444 dual-earners. Gender differences with respect to the relationship between social support and work-family conflict were…

  17. Work-Family Boundary Strategies: Stability and Alignment between Preferred and Enacted Boundaries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ammons, Samantha K.

    2013-01-01

    Are individuals bounding work and family the way they would like? Much of the work-family boundary literature focuses on whether employees are segmenting or integrating work with family, but does not explore the boundaries workers would like to have, nor does it examine the fit between desired and enacted boundaries, or assess boundary stability.…

  18. Work and Family Plans among At-Risk Israeli Adolescents: A Mixed-Methods Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cinamon, Rachel Gali; Rich, Yisrael

    2014-01-01

    Quantitative methods were used to investigate attributions of importance to work and family roles and anticipated work--family conflict and facilitation among 353 at-risk Israeli male and female adolescents. Qualitative interviews conducted with 26 of the at-risk youth explored future work and family perceptions. Findings indicated that both sexes…

  19. Anticipated work-family conflict: effects of role salience and self-efficacy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rachel Gali Cinamon

    2010-01-01

    The current study investigated how male and female university students’ self-efficacy and their role salience contributed to the variance in their anticipated work-family conflict (WFC). Participants comprised 387 unmarried students (mean age 24 years). Cluster analysis yielded four profiles of participants who differed in their attributions of importance to work and family roles: work oriented, family oriented, dual oriented, and

  20. Teaching Work and Family to Undergraduate Students: Catalyzing Pedagogical, Curricular, and Programmatic Innovations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweet, Stephen; Mumm, Joshua; Pitt-Catsouphes, Marcie; Casey, Judith

    2008-01-01

    In 2006 and 2007, two workshops on teaching work-family courses were held at the annual meetings of the American Sociological Association. This article examines the current challenges and strategies of teaching work-family, as identified by workshop participants, and the resources that are available through the Sloan Work and Family Research…

  1. Quality of Work Life as a Mediator Between Emotional Labor and Work Family Interference

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Francis Yue-Lok Cheung; Catherine So-Kum Tang

    2009-01-01

    Purpose  We adopted the conservation of resources model (COR, Hobfoll Am Psychol 44:513–524, 1989; Hobfoll in Stress, culture, and community: the psychology and philosophy of stress, Plenum, New York, 1998) to examine the associations among emotional labor, work family interference, and quality of work life.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Design\\/Methodology\\/Approach  Cross-sectional, self-reported data were obtained from 442 Hong Kong Chinese service employees.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Findings  Correlation and hierarchical regression

  2. What makes French employees so happy with their balance between family and work? The impact of firms' family friendly policies

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ariane Pailhé; Anne Solaz

    In France on the whole, people are satisfied with their balance between family and work and women are even a little more satisfied than men. At the same time, French fertility maintains at a relative high level within Europe. One explanation advanced is the family- friendly environment which allows mothers -even with young children- to continue to work without feeling

  3. Thematic content analysis of work-family interactions: Retired cosmonauts’ reflections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Phyllis J.; Asmaro, Deyar; Suedfeld, Peter; Gushin, Vadim

    2012-12-01

    Anecdotal evidence and qualitative research attest to the importance of work-family interactions pre-, during and post-missions. This study uses thematic content analysis to quantify characteristics of work-family interactions and how these changed by stage of cosmonauts' career, identifying the effect of space career variables (e.g., time in space and station) on such interactions during and post-career. Using a thematic scoring scheme developed for this study, we coded work-family interactions identified from interviews with 20 retired male cosmonauts. The majority of work-family interactions were ones in which work overlapped into family life and work hindered or interfered with the family situation. The most common resolution was that family adjusted to work, and the mood or tone about this outcome was almost equally divided among negative, positive and neutral. Changes in work-family interactions and their resolution over the cosmonaut's life showed that the significant interactions were most evident during the cosmonaut career. Although the cosmonaut career has high work demands, it did adjust for family when the need arose. The Russian Space Agency (RKS) eased the impact of the periodic absences, especially through regular communication sessions. Positive work-family interactions, i.e., work or family helping the opposite role, were more likely for those who had been on ISS, not Mir, and for those whose last flight was after 2000. Our data reflect retired cosmonauts' recollections of work-family interactions during their career. Examples of work overlapping into family life and work viewed as interfering with family life were possibly more salient or better remembered than work or family helping the other role.

  4. Does Work Experience Actually Work?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Field, John

    2012-01-01

    As unemployment levels rise, so education and training move into the policy spotlight. For the government, this is a very uncomfortable place to be right now. A number of large companies have withdrawn from the flagship Work Programme--under which jobseekers are invited to take up unpaid work placements of between two and eight weeks--amid…

  5. Work and Family Satisfaction and Conflict: A Meta-Analysis of Cross-Domain Relations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael T. Ford; Beth A. Heinen; Krista L. Langkamer

    2007-01-01

    This meta-analysis is a review of the literature examining the relations among stressors, involvement, and support in the work and family domains, work–family conflict, and satisfaction outside of those domains. Results suggest that a considerable amount of variability in family satisfaction is explained by work domain-specific variables, whereas a considerable amount of variability in job satisfaction is explained by family

  6. Teachers Working with Families: Natural Enemies or Necessary Allies?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cole, Kirsten

    2013-01-01

    The complex and crucial connection between families and schools is embodied in relationship between individual teachers and their students' families. Research findings demonstrate that high levels of family engagement lead to greater success for students. Such findings drive policy mandates that hold individual teachers accountable for…

  7. Working with families in Assertive Community Treatment (ACT): the case manager's perspective.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fang-pei

    2008-10-01

    In response to research findings of insufficient family involvement in mental health services for people with severe mental illness, this grounded theory study examines case managers' interactions with families of clients in Assertive Community Treatment (ACT). Findings suggest that case managers conceptualize families as sources of social connections, rather than sources of care, for clients. This conceptualization is influenced by case managers' goals, which also guide their assessments of families for involvement in treatment in terms of the extent to which families help attain treatment goals. In developing strategies to work with families, case managers engage in ongoing assessments and consider client permission for family involvement in treatment, family availability to clients, and family wishes for involvement in treatment. Three case examples illustrate the relationships among case managers' goals, assessments of families, and selections of work strategies. The potential role of the ACT model in shaping this particular view on families is also discussed. PMID:19123767

  8. Impacts of Children with Troubles on Working Poor Families: Mixed-Method and Experimental Evidence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernheimer, Lucinda P.; Weisner, Thomas S.; Lowe, Edward D.

    2003-01-01

    Research on working poor families participating in an anti-poverty initiative in Milwaukee found 60% of families had at least one child with significant problems (learning, school achievement and/or behavior, retardation, or other disabilities). Comparison with other families with children with troubles found the program families adapted less…

  9. Narrative and Collaborative Practices in Work with Families that Are Homeless

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fraenkel, Peter; Hameline, Thomas; Shannon, Michele

    2009-01-01

    This article reports on the use of narrative therapy ideas and practices in working with families that are homeless in a shelter-based, multiple-family discussion group program called Fresh Start for Families. It begins with a review of the challenges facing homeless families. It then briefly describes the collaborative methods used to develop the…

  10. The Work-Family Support Roles of Child Care Providers across Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bromer, Juliet; Henly, Julia R.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a qualitative investigation of the work-family support roles of a sample of 29 child care providers serving low-income families in the Chicago area (16 family, friend, and neighbor providers (FFN), 7 licensed family child care providers (FCC), and 6 center-based teachers). Providers report offering low-income parents…

  11. Family Relations Resource Guide. A Resource for Teaching the Family Relations Core Course Area of Ohio's Work and Family Life Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kister, Joanna; And Others

    This resource guide provides those teaching the Family Relations course of the Ohio Work and Family Life Program an overview of the course content, teacher background information, learning activities, and assessment ideas. It has one teaching module for each process competency and each content competency in the Family Relations and Process…

  12. The Effects of Home-Based Teleworking on Work-Family Conflict.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madsen, Susan R.

    2003-01-01

    Responses from 98 teleworkers and 123 onsite workers found that teleworkers had lower levels of the dimensions of work-family conflict (WFC): time-, strain-, and behavior-based work interference with family and family interference. Male teleworkers had higher levels of WFC; there were no gender differences for nonteleworkers. WFC was significantly…

  13. Not Babysitting: Work Stress and Well-Being for Family Child Care Providers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerstenblatt, Paula; Faulkner, Monica; Lee, Ahyoung; Doan, Linh Thy; Travis, Dnika

    2014-01-01

    Family child care providers contend with a number of work stressors related to the dual roles of operating a small business and providing child care in their home. Research has documented many sources of work related stress for family child care providers; however, research examining family child care providers' experiences outside of the…

  14. Relationship between Work Interference with Family and Parent-Child Interactive Behavior: Can Guilt Help?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cho, Eunae; Allen, Tammy D.

    2012-01-01

    Despite its theoretical and practical importance, behavioral consequences of work-family conflict that reside in the family domain rarely have been examined. Based on two studies, the current research investigated the relationship of work-interference-with-family (WIF) with parent-child interactive behavior (i.e., educational, recreational, and…

  15. Family Ranching and Farming: A Consensus Management Model to Improve Family Functioning and Decrease Work Stress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zimmerman, Toni Schindler; Fetsch, Robert J.

    1994-01-01

    Notes that internal and external threats could squeeze ranch and farm families out of business. Offers six-step Consensus Management Model that combines strategic planning with psychoeducation/family therapy. Describes pilot test with intergenerational ranch family that indicated improvements in family functioning, including reduced stress and…

  16. Developing and Testing a Theoretical Model Linking Work-Family Conflict to Employee Safety

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jennifer C. Cullen; Leslie B. Hammer

    2007-01-01

    Despite work-family conflict being recognized as a source of stress, no published research to our knowledge has considered how it negatively affects workplace safety. A theoretical model linking strain-based work-family conflict and employee safety was tested with 243 health care workers. Within this model, work-family conflict is conceptualized as a workplace hazard. As expected, strong work performance norms and high

  17. Health and Turnover of Working Mothers After Childbirth Via the Work–Family Interface: An Analysis Across Time

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, Dawn S.; Grzywacz, Joseph G.; Ferguson, Merideth; Hunter, Emily M.; Clinch, C. Randall; Arcury, Thomas A.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined organizational levers that impact work–family experiences, participant health, and subsequent turnover. Using a sample of 179 women returning to full-time work 4 months after childbirth, we examined the associations of 3 job resources (job security, skill discretion, and schedule control) with work-to-family enrichment and the associations of 2 job demands (psychological requirements and nonstandard work schedules) with work-to-family conflict. Further, we considered subsequent impact of work-to-family conflict and enrichment on women’s health (physical and mental health) 8 months after women returned to work and the impact of health on voluntary turnover 12 months after women returned to work. Having a nonstandard work schedule was directly and positively related to conflict, whereas schedule control buffered the effect of psychological requirements on conflict. Skill discretion and job security, both job resources, directly and positively related to enrichment. Work-to-family conflict was negatively related to both physical and mental health, but work-to-family enrichment positively predicted only physical health. Physical health and mental health both negatively influenced turnover. We discuss implications and opportunities for future research. PMID:21604833

  18. Working with Non-Traditional Families: A Director's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eisenbud, Lisa

    2002-01-01

    Highlights issues related to the increase of non- traditional families and challenges child care directors to learn about these families. Guides directors in developing good relationships with parents, children, and their own staff and provides a list of sample questions to get information. Includes a 16-item bibliography for further information.…

  19. Working with Families of Young Children with Special Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McWilliam, R. A., Ed.

    2010-01-01

    This user-friendly book presents research-based best practices for serving families of children with special needs from birth to age 6. Expert contributors demonstrate how early intervention and early childhood special education can effectively address a wide range of family concerns, which in turn optimizes children's development and learning.…

  20. Consumer and Family Perspectives on the Meaning of Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fesko, Sheila; Freedman, Ruth

    1995-01-01

    This qualitative study examined the perspectives of people with significant disabilities (N=23) and their family members about their overall employment experiences, outcomes, and expectations. Four focus groups were convened, two groups of people with significant disabilities and two groups of family members. Disabilities represented included…

  1. Levels of Interventions for MFTs Working with Family Businesses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Distelberg, Brian; Castanos, Carolina

    2012-01-01

    Family businesses (FBs) are a significant population in the world and therefore part of most practicing marriage and family therapists (MFTs) clientele; however, little is mentioned about FBs in the training of MFTs. This article offers some guidance to practicing MFTs who service this population, as well as MFTs who wish to expand their practice…

  2. Working with Families Experiencing Homelessness: Understanding Trauma and Its Impact

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guarino, Kathleen; Bassuk, Ellen

    2010-01-01

    The prevalence of traumatic stress in the lives of families who are homeless is extraordinarily high. Often these families are headed by single mothers who have experienced ongoing trauma in the form of childhood abuse and neglect, domestic violence, and community violence, as well as the trauma associated with poverty and the loss of home,…

  3. Working with Families of Handicapped Infants and Toddlers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trout, Michael; Foley, Gilbert

    1989-01-01

    The family is the handicapped infant or toddler's ecological system, is critical to the child's optimal development, and must be incorporated into early intervention programs. Characteristics of the ecosystem of the family of a handicapped child are discussed, followed by characteristics of ecologically attuned early intervention teams. (JDD)

  4. Family, Religion, and Work among Arab American Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ghazal Read, Jen'nan

    2004-01-01

    Using data from a national survey of 501 Arab American women, this study examines the extent to which family behavior mediates the influence of religion on women's labor force activity. Prior research on families has largely overlooked the role of religion in influencing women's labor force decisions, particularly at different stages of the life…

  5. Shrugging it off: Does psychological detachment from work mediate the relationship between workplace aggression and work-family conflict?

    PubMed

    Demsky, Caitlin A; Ellis, Allison M; Fritz, Charlotte

    2014-04-01

    The current study investigates workplace aggression and psychological detachment from work as possible antecedents of work-family conflict. We draw upon Conservation of Resources theory and the Effort-Recovery Model to argue that employees who fail to psychologically detach from stressful events in the workplace experience a relative lack of resources that is negatively associated with functioning in the nonwork domain. Further, we extend prior research on antecedents of work-family conflict by examining workplace aggression, a prevalent workplace stressor. Utilizing multisource data (i.e., employee, significant other, and coworker reports), our findings indicate that self-reported psychological detachment mediates the relationship between coworker-reported workplace aggression and both self- and significant other-reported work-family conflict. Findings from the current study speak to the value of combining perspectives from research on recovery from work stress and the work-family interface, and point toward implications for research and practice. PMID:24635738

  6. Comparing Families and Staff in Nursing Homes and Assisted Living: Implications for Social Work Practice

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerman, Sheryl; Cohen, Lauren W.; Reed, David; Gwyther, Lisa P.; Washington, Tiffany; Cagle, John C.; Beeber, Anna S.; Sloane, Philip D.

    2013-01-01

    Nursing homes and residential care/assisted living settings provide care to 2.4 million individuals. Few studies compare the experience of and relationships between family and staff in these settings, despite ongoing family involvement and evidence that relationships are problematic. Data from 488 families and 397 staff in 24 settings examined family involvement and family and staff burden, depressive symptoms, and perceptions; and staff absenteeism and turnover. There were few differences across setting types. While conflict rarely occurred, there was room for improvement in family-staff relations; this area, and preparing family for their caregiving roles, are appropriate targets for social work intervention. PMID:23869592

  7. Sensemaking in a High-Risk Lifestyle: The Relationship Between Work and Family for Public Safety Families 

    E-print Network

    Bochantin, Jaime Elizabeth

    2011-10-21

    Past research concerning work and family has largely been from traditional, white-collar settings and has only taken into consideration the perceptions of the employees' experiences with regard to the relationship between ...

  8. No Pain, No Gain? A Resource-Based Model of Work-to-Family Enrichment and Conflict

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Zheng; Powell, Gary N.

    2012-01-01

    Work-family scholars tend to work in two largely disconnected research streams, focusing on either work-family enrichment--the positive side of the work-family interface--or work-family conflict--the negative side of this interface. The purpose of this study is to suggest a reconciliation of the two research streams by proposing and testing a…

  9. The Arts and Family Social Work: A Call for Advancing Practice, Research, and Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazza, Nicholas

    2009-01-01

    This brief report serves as a call for creative and artistic works relative to family social work. Recognizing the "art" of family social work, Mazza's (2003) multidimensional poetry therapy practice model is used as a framework for addressing all arts-based approaches to practice and research.

  10. An examination of the perceived direction of work-family conflict 

    E-print Network

    Huffman, Ann Hergatt

    2005-02-17

    at work are more likely to experience work-to-family conflict, while employees who have a high level of personal demands are more likely to experience family-to-work conflict. Attributing the conflict to the domain with the higher demands oversimplifies a...

  11. Work-Family Relations among Mothers of Children with Learning Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Yagon, Michal; Cinamon, Rachel Gali

    2008-01-01

    The study examined conflict and facilitation in work-family relations among working mothers of children with learning disorders (LD) or with typical development. The study also focused on three maternal personal resources (maternal anxious/avoidant attachment security, affect and sense of coherence) as antecedents of these work-family relations,…

  12. Work-Family Balance and Energy: A Day-Level Study on Recovery Conditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanz-Vergel, Ana Isabel; Demerouti, Evangelia; Moreno-Jimenez, Bernardo; Mayo, Margarita

    2010-01-01

    The present study examines whether daily recovery inhibiting and enhancing conditions predict day-levels of work-family conflict (WFC), work-family facilitation (WFF), exhaustion and vigor. Forty-nine individuals from various professional backgrounds in Spain provided questionnaire and daily survey measures over a period of five working days.…

  13. Beyond Family-Friendly: The Construct and Measurement of Singles-Friendly Work Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casper, Wendy J.; Weltman, David; Kwesiga, Eileen

    2007-01-01

    Although research has examined work-family issues and organizational support for employees' family responsibilities, few studies have explored the work-life issues of single employees without children. The current study examines single employees' perceptions of how their organizations support their work-life balance in comparison to employees with…

  14. Getting There from Here: Research on the Effects of Work–Family Initiatives on Work–Family Conflict and Business Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    KELLY, ERIN L.; KOSSEK, ELLEN ERNST; HAMMER, LESLIE B.; DURHAM, MARY; BRAY, JEREMY; CHERMACK, KELLY; MURPHY, LAUREN A.; KASKUBAR, DAN

    2009-01-01

    Many employing organizations have adopted work–family policies, programs, and benefits. Yet managers in employing organizations simply do not know what organizational initiatives actually reduce work–family conflict and how these changes are likely to impact employees and the organization. We examine scholarship that addresses two broad questions: first, do work–family initiatives reduce employees’ work–family conflict and/or improve work–family enrichment? Second, does reduced work–family conflict improve employees’ work outcomes and, especially, business outcomes at the organizational level? We review over 150 peer-reviewed studies from a number of disciplines in order to summarize this rich literature and identify promising avenues for research and conceptualization. We propose a research agenda based on four primary conclusions: the need for more multi-level research, the necessity of an interdisciplinary approach, the benefits of longitudinal studies that employ quasi-experimental or experimental designs and the challenges of translating research into practice in effective ways. PMID:20589229

  15. Beyond family-friendly: The construct and measurement of singles-friendly work culture

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wendy J. Casper; David Weltman; Eileen Kwesiga

    2007-01-01

    Although research has examined work-family issues and organizational support for employees’ family responsibilities, few studies have explored the work-life issues of single employees without children. The current study examines single employees’ perceptions of how their organizations support their work-life balance in comparison to employees with families. A multi-dimensional scale is developed assessing five dimensions of singles-friendly culture: social inclusion, equal

  16. Work-family policies and the effects of children on women's employment hours and wages

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Joya Misra; Michelle Budig; Irene Boeckmann

    2011-01-01

    Welfare state generosity around work-family policies appears to have somewhat contradictory effects, at least for some measures of gender equality. Work-family policies, in encouraging higher levels of women's labor market participation, may have also contributed to lower wage-levels for women relative to men, for instance. We consider the relationship between particular work-family policies and mothers’ employment outcomes. Analyses use data

  17. Positive and negative work–family interaction and burnout: A longitudinal study of reciprocal relations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Siw Tone Innstrand; Ellen Melbye Langballe; Geir Arild Espnes; Erik Falkum; Olaf Gjerløw Aasland

    2008-01-01

    This study examined the longitudinal relationship between work–family interaction (WFI) in terms of the direction of influence (work-to-family vs. family-to-work) and type of effect (conflict vs. facilitation) and burnout. A sample of 2235 respondents from eight different occupational groups (lawyers, bus drivers, employees within information technology, physicians, teachers, church ministers, employees within advertisement, and nurses) supplied data at two points

  18. Human Resource Practices as Predictors of Work-Family Outcomes and Employee Turnover

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rosemary Batt; P. Monique Valcour

    2001-01-01

    Drawing on a non-random sample of 557 dual- earner white collar employees, this paper explores the relationship between human resource practices and three outcomes of interest to firms and employees: work-family conflict, employees’ control over managing work and family demands, and employees’ turnover intentions. We analyze three types of human resource practices: work-family policies, HR incentives designed to induce attachment

  19. The Impact of Human Resource Policies on EmployeesBalancing Work\\/Family Life

    Microsoft Academic Search

    ELLEN GALINSKY; PETER J. STEIN

    1990-01-01

    Using a number of empirical studies of human resource policies in Fortune 500 companies, this article focuses on (a) the major work\\/family problems faced by employees, (b) how work\\/family programs affect productivity, (c) what trends are emerging among companies, and (d) how a subsample of leading scientific companies and universities are responding to work\\/family issues. The seven major issues employees

  20. A study of work-family conflict, family-work conflict and the contingent effect of self-efficacy of retail salespeople in a transitional economy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Cristian Chelariu; Rodney Stump

    2011-01-01

    Purpose – The present study aims to contribute to the growing cross-national body of literature on work-family conflict (WFC) and family-work conflict (FWC) issues by examining the interrelationship of these constructs with other variables in the context of a transitional economy. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – Data were collected using self-report questionnaires distributed to retail salespeople in Hungary. Hypothesis tests were conducted using

  1. Using Critical Science Questions in Working with a Family

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Frances M.

    2007-01-01

    An example of the use of critical science questions provides insight related to one particular family over a 2 year period. The cultures of providers and recipients are viewed simultaneously to examine the cultural differences.

  2. Thinking big, supporting families and enabling coping: the value of social work in patient and family centered health care.

    PubMed

    Craig, Shelley L; Betancourt, Itanni; Muskat, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Patient and family-centered care has become a focus in health services. Social work has a rich history of providing responsive patient care. This study identified the contribution and value of social work to PFCC from the key stakeholder perspectives of health social workers (n = 65). Utilizing interpretive description, four themes emerged: (1) Thinking big and holistically, (2) Intervening with families, (3) Enabling patient and family coping, and (4) Maximizing hospital and community resources. Barriers included a lack of power, professional isolation and role creep. Implications for research and practice are provided. PMID:25985286

  3. Between Hope and Hard Times: New York's Working Families in Economic Distress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fischer, David J.; Colton, Tara; Kleiman, Neil S.; Schimke, Karen

    2004-01-01

    Today, many jobs that once could support a family barely suffice to keep that family out of poverty. The implied bargain America offers its citizens is supposed to be that anyone who works hard and plays by the rules can support his or her family and move onward and upward. But for millions of New Yorkers, that bargain is out of reach; the uphill…

  4. Linking Work-Family Issues to the Bottom Line. Report Number 962.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedman, Dana E.

    A 1988 symposium on the effect of family problems on the corporate bottom line and a review of more than 80 other studies have confirmed that business investments in programs and policies to resolve family-work conflicts yield returns. Family issues/problems have been documented to affect employee recruitment, productivity, turnover, and…

  5. Cultural Models, Parent Behavior, and Young Child Experience in Working American Families

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jason A. DeCaro; Carol M. Worthman

    2007-01-01

    Objective. We evaluated the resolution of conflicts between cultural models of parenting related to child security and child enrichment in the daily scheduling practices of families with young children, given the competing pressures of work and family. Design. Parents in 35 families provided 7 days of detailed prospective daily schedule data for themselves and their preschool-aged focal child using the

  6. Transferable Skills: One Link between Work and Family.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naimark, Hedwin; Pearce, Susan

    1985-01-01

    The authors explore characteristics of the workplace and the home that make the transfer of skills between them a viable concept, and talk about one of the skills (negotiating) that is beneficial to career as well as to family life. (CT)

  7. Nurturing Careers in Psychology: Combining Work and Family

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halpern, Diane F.

    2008-01-01

    The academic workplace, with its requirements for achieving tenure within the first 6 years of employment, is designed in ways that discriminate against young faculty with family care responsibilities, most notably mothers. Mason and Goulden ("Academe," http://www.aaup.org/publications/Academe/2002/02nd/02ndmas.htm, 2002, "Academe,"…

  8. Latinas without Work: Family, Occupational, and Economic Stress Following Unemployment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Romero, Gloria J.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Examined stressors in family, occupational, and economic domains among 114 Latinas following job loss. Stressors from the occupational stress domain were the greatest source for these women. Women who valued the job they lost and who were older reported the highest level of occupational stress. (Author/BH)

  9. Work Stress in the Family Life of African Americans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broman, Clifford L.

    2001-01-01

    Investigated the link between job-related stressors and family life among African Americans. Data from African Americans who participated in the America's Changing Lives survey indicated that job latitude positively affected marital harmony, and physical demands negatively affected marital harmony. Psychosocial demands, job bother, and chronic…

  10. Developing Cultural Competence in Working with Korean Immigrant Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Irene J.; Kim, Luke I. C.; Kelly, James G.

    2006-01-01

    The authors provide an in-depth examination of the historical background, cultural values, family roles, and community contexts of Korean Americans as an aid to both researchers and clinicians in developing cultural competence with this particular group. First, the concept of cultural competence is defined. A brief history of Korean immigration…

  11. Constructing Family-friendly Work: Three Real Dreams.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Aaron P.; Wilde, Sharon V.

    2000-01-01

    Case studies of three couples who modified their careers to accommodate family life illustrate the barriers and necessary trade-offs as well as significant increases in career and life happiness that can result. Counseling suggestions include revision of the concept of career and assessment of the costs and benefits. (SK)

  12. [Working with Infants, Toddlers, and Families in Rural Areas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fenichel, Emily, Ed.

    1995-01-01

    This newsletter theme issue focuses on providing services to infants with special needs in rural areas. In "Old Threads, New Patterns: Reaching Out to Rural Families," Deborah Harris-Usner discusses bringing infant mental health care and parent-infant psychotherapy to rural New Mexico. In "The People of Kids Place: Creating and Maintaining…

  13. Managing Work and Family: The Decision to Outsource Child Care in Families Engaged in Family-Owned Businesses

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rosemary J. Avery; Deborah C. Haynes; George W. Haynes

    2000-01-01

    This study investigates the decision to outsource child care among families involved in family-owned businesses. A management framework is used to examine the impact of inputs to the decision (i.e., goals and resources) and level of management activity (i.e., planning and implementing) in these families as predictors of the choice to outsource child care. The data are a sub-sample of

  14. A Comprehensive Approach to Refractory Mind-Body Disorders: Working at the Family-Community Interface.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elizur, Joel

    Dysfunctional relations between the family and other social systems usually play a part in maintaining refractory problems and chronic patienthood. Therapeutic interventions need to work at this interface, in order to create a collaborative team that will provide sufficient support to the family at risk. This way of working can be easily applied…

  15. Work-family conflict, and psychological distress in men and women among Canadian police officers.

    PubMed

    Janzen, B L; Muhajarine, Nazeem; Kelly, I W

    2007-04-01

    The present study examined the relations among sex, work-family conflict, and psychological distress in 78 Canadian police officers (50 men and 28 women). The average age of the officers was 36.1 yr. (SD=8.0), and nearly one-third of the respondents had been in policing 16 years or more. Ordinary least-squares regression was conducted to examine the association of Psychological Distress scores, as measured by the K6, with four types of work-family conflict: Time-based Work-to-Family Conflict, Time-based Family-to-Work Conflict, Strain-based Work-to-Family Conflict, and Strain-based Family-to-Work Conflict. Being single and having higher perceived Strain-based Work-to-Family Conflict were associated with greater scores on Psychological Distress. No statistically significant sex differences emerged in the self-reported type or direction of work-family conflict or in the factors associated with Psychological Distress. PMID:17564232

  16. Work and Career Experiences of Men from Families without College Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodside, Marianne; Gibbons, Melinda M.; Davison, John; Hannon, Christine; Sweeney, Jeffrey R.

    2012-01-01

    A dearth of research exists exploring the career and work development of adult men and the influence of family-of-origin on that development. In this qualitative study, the researchers used a phenomenological approach to examine the career and work experiences of men whose parents have no education beyond high school and the influences of family

  17. A Hand Up: How State Earned Income Credits Help Working Families Escape Poverty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hutchinson, Frederick C.; And Others

    This report examines state earned income tax credits (EICs) as a means to assist working poor families to escape poverty. Specifically, the report notes that six states have their own EICs, expressed as a percentage of the federal EIC, with the advantages being that the credit is a reward for work, is a pro-family policy, is efficiently targeted,…

  18. An Exploratory Study into Work/Family Balance within the Australian Higher Education Sector

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pillay, Soma; Kluvers, Ron; Abhayawansa, Subhash; Vranic, Vedran

    2013-01-01

    The higher education landscape is undergoing major transformation, with a significant impact on the work and family practices of academics and professional staff. The purpose of this exploratory study is to examine the extent to which (1) time-related, (2) strain-related and (3) demographical variables impact on the work/family balance of academic…

  19. Informal Caregiving at Working Age: Effects of Job Characteristics and Family Configuration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henz, Ursula

    2006-01-01

    This article addresses the relationship between employment and providing informal care for sick, disabled, or elderly people in Great Britain. Hazard rate models for taking up caring and leaving work when caring are estimated using retrospective family, employment, and caring data from the British Family and Working Lives Survey 1994-1995 for…

  20. Work-Family Climate, Organizational Commitment, and Turnover: Multilevel Contagion Effects of Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Neill, John W.; Harrison, Michelle M.; Cleveland, Jeannette; Almeida, David; Stawski, Robert; Crouter, Anne C.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents empirical research analyzing the relationship between work-family climate (operationalized in terms of three work-family climate sub-scales), organizational leadership (i.e., senior manager) characteristics, organizational commitment and turnover intent among 526 employees from 37 different hotels across the US. Using…

  1. Work-family conflict and career success: the effects of domain-specific determinants

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hassan I. Ballout

    2008-01-01

    Purpose – Despite widespread acknowledgement that work-family conflict and career success are salient issues that impact individual wellbeing and organizational effectiveness, there is little research that studies how the two concepts are related. The purpose of this paper is to develop and present a tentative framework for understanding the relationships among antecedents of interrole conflict between work and family and

  2. Cognitive capacity for processing work-family conflict: an initial examination

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Suzanne C. de Janasz; Scott J. Behson

    2007-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this study is to examine how individuals cognitively process work-family conflict (WFC), specifically whether differences in tolerance for uncertainty and cognitive complexity influence individuals' affective response to WFC. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – Using a sample of 157 employees who completed a survey on work-family issues, the hypotheses were tested using correlation and regression analyses. Findings – The

  3. We've come a long way, maybe: College students' plans for work and family

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Joan Z. Spade; Carole A. Reese

    1991-01-01

    Young men and women today face considerable choices as they plan for family and work. We explore college students' educational preparations, as well as their attitudes, orientations, and expectations for work and family. Although we find some changes toward a more gender-equal society, we also find potential conflicts which these individuals will have to face as they attempt to combine

  4. Influence Strategies Used When Couples Make Work-Family Decisions and Their Importance for Marital Satisfaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zvonkovic, Anisa M.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Investigated how marital partners influenced each other concerning work and family decisions and connected influence strategies to martial satisfaction in 61 married couples who had faced work-family decisions in past 6 months. Found that gender role ideology and indirect influence strategies were related to marital satisfaction. Variables related…

  5. Identification of a Dispositional Tendency to Experience Work-Family Spillover

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cho, Eunae; Tay, Louis; Allen, Tammy D.; Stark, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Are individuals predisposed to experience work-family spillover? Despite theoretical relevance and practical implications related to this issue, research on this topic is scarce. With this in mind, we investigated if there is a dispositional tendency to experience work-family spillover using a nationally representative longitudinal sample. We…

  6. Conflict between Work and Family: An Investigation of Four Policy Measures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruppanner, Leah

    2013-01-01

    Welfare states enact a range of policies aimed at reducing work-family conflict. While welfare state policies have been assessed at the macro-level and work-family conflict at the individual-level, few studies have simultaneously addressed these relationships in a cross-national multi-level model. This study addresses this void by assessing the…

  7. Balancing Work and Family Responsibilities as an Extension 4-H Agent

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhea, Joseph Richard, Jr.

    2009-01-01

    A career with Extension can be very rewarding, but also very demanding, as employees have to balance job stress and time demands with family goals and demands. The very nature of Extension work brings some tension between the job and family, and employees need to be equipped to make decisions about personal and work time. If the Extension System…

  8. The Work-Family Interface as a Mediator between Job Demands and Employee Behaviour.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Jade S; Heneghan, Camille J; Bailey, Sarah F; Barber, Larissa K

    2014-06-11

    In this investigation, we draw from the job demands-resource model and conservation of resources theory to examine the relationship between job demands, the work-family interface and worker behaviours. Data collected from an online survey of workers revealed that hindrance demands indirectly increase interpersonal and organizational deviance through work interference with family and family interference with work. Challenge demands indirectly predict interpersonal and organizational deviance through work interference with family. Finally, hindrance demands indirectly decreased individual-directed organizational citizenship behaviours through work-to-family enrichment. Taken together, these results stress the relevance of job demand management and resource drain/acquisition to counterproductive and extra-role behaviours. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:24917073

  9. Factors associated with work-family conflict stress among African American women.

    PubMed

    Cole, Portia L; Secret, Mary C

    2012-01-01

    Job demands and workplace culture variables associated with work-family conflict stress, in addition to workplace racial bias, were examined for a national sample of 607 African American women in 16 Fortune 1000 companies. Similar to other studies, women in this sample who had dependents were younger, had supervisory responsibilities, and experienced a less positive workplace culture, and those in professional job positions with high job demand were most likely to experience work-family stress. Married women who experienced a more subtle form of workplace racial bias reported more work-family conflict stress. Implications for social work policy, practice, and research are considered. PMID:22657146

  10. Working conditions and Work-Family Conflict in German hospital physicians: psychosocial and organisational predictors and consequences

    PubMed Central

    Fuß, Isabelle; Nübling, Matthias; Hasselhorn, Hans-Martin; Schwappach, David; Rieger, Monika A

    2008-01-01

    Background Germany currently experiences a situation of major physician attrition. The incompatibility between work and family has been discussed as one of the major reasons for the increasing departure of German physicians for non-clinical occupations or abroad. This study investigates predictors for one particular direction of Work-Family Conflict – namely work interfering with family conflict (WIF) – which are located within the psychosocial work environment or work organisation of hospital physicians. Furthermore, effects of WIF on the individual physicians' physical and mental health were examined. Analyses were performed with an emphasis on gender differences. Comparisons with the general German population were made. Methods Data were collected by questionnaires as part of a study on Psychosocial work hazards and strains of German hospital physicians during April–July 2005. Two hundred and ninety-six hospital physicians (response rate 38.9%) participated in the survey. The Copenhagen Psychosocial Questionnaire (COPSOQ), work interfering with family conflict scale (WIF), and hospital-specific single items on work organisation were used to assess WIF, its predictors, and consequences. Results German hospital physicians reported elevated levels of WIF (mean = 74) compared to the general German population (mean = 45, p < .01). No significant gender difference was found. Predictors for the WIF were lower age, high quantitative demands at work, elevated number of days at work despite own illness, and consequences of short-notice changes in the duty roster. Good sense of community at work was a protective factor. Compared to the general German population, we observed a significant higher level of quantitative work demands among hospital physicians (mean = 73 vs. mean = 57, p < .01). High values of WIF were significantly correlated to higher rates of personal burnout, behavioural and cognitive stress symptoms, and the intention to leave the job. In contrast, low levels of WIF predicted higher job satisfaction, better self-judged general health status, better work ability, and higher satisfaction with life in general. Compared to the German general population, physicians showed significantly higher levels of individual stress and quality of life as well as lower levels for well-being. This has to be judged as an alerting finding regarding the state of physicians' health. Conclusion In our study, work interfering with family conflict (WIF) as part of Work-Family Conflict (WFC) was highly prevalent among German hospital physicians. Factors of work organisation as well as factors of interpersonal relations at work were identified as significant predictors for WIF. Some of these predictors are accessible to alteration by improving work organisation in hospitals. PMID:18840296

  11. Work–family interface from a life and career stage perspective: The role of demands and resources

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Evangelia Demerouti; Maria C. W. Peeters; Beatrice I. J. M. van der Heijden

    2012-01-01

    Work–family conflict and enrichment are experiences that occur daily and have substantial consequences for employees, their families, and the organizations that employ them. The aim of the current review is to make a link between life and career stage, work and family conditions, and the work–family interface. The basic proposition is that life stages partly determine career development, and consequently

  12. Flexible and Family-Friendly Working Arrangements in UK-Based SMEs: Business Cases

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Shirley Dex; Fiona Scheibl

    2001-01-01

    Interest in researching flexible working arrangements has been growing as such practices have been heralded as the way to reconcile or balance the increased pressures of work and family life. Relatively little attention has been paid to the experiences of flexible working arrangements in small and medium sized enterprises. We report the findings of empirical work on ten small and

  13. Work-family conflict and burnout among Chinese female nurses: the mediating effect of psychological capital

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Burnout among nurses not only threatens their own health, but also that of their patients. Exploring risk factors of nurse’ burnout is important to improve nurses’ health and to increase the quality of health care services. This study aims to explore the relationship between work-family conflict and burnout among Chinese female nurses and the mediating role of psychological capital in this relationship. Methods This cross-sectional study was performed during the period of September and October 2010. A questionnaire that consisted of the Maslach Burnout Inventory-General Survey (MBI-GS), the work-family conflict scale and the psychological capital questionnaire (PCQ-24) scale, as well as demographic and working factors, was distributed to nurses in Liaoning province, China. A total of 1,332 individuals (effective response rate: 78.35%) became our subjects. Hierarchical linear regression analyses were performed to explore the mediating role of psychological capital. Results Both work interfering family conflict and family interfering work conflict were positively related with emotional exhaustion and cynicism. However, work interfering family conflict was positively related with professional efficacy whereas family interfering work conflict was negatively related with it. Psychological capital partially mediated the relationship of work interfering family conflict with emotional exhaustion and cynicism; and partially mediated the relationship of family interfering work conflict with emotional exhaustion, cynicism and professional efficacy. Conclusion Work-family conflict had effects on burnout and psychological capital was a mediator in this relationship among Chinese nurses. Psychological capital was a positive resource for fighting against nurses’ burnout. PMID:23107113

  14. An exploration of the adaptive strategies of working families in the Australian construction industry

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Helen Lingard; Valerie Francis

    2008-01-01

    Purpose – This paper seeks to identify the adaptive strategies of couples in which at least one spouse\\/partner is employed in a professional role in the Australian construction industry. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – Most studies of work-family balance identify the determinants and outcomes of work-family conflict for individual employees. However, there is a growing recognition that analyses or work hours and coping

  15. Antecedents and Outcomes of Work-Family Conflict: Toward a Motivational Model

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. Senecal; Robert J. Vallerand; F. Guay

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to propose and test a model of work-family conflict based on Self-Determination Theory and the Hierarchical Model of Intrinsic and Extrinsic Motivation. The model posits that positive interpersonal factors both at work (i.e., one's employer) and at home (e.g., one's spouse) influence work and family motivation. Moreover, the model proposes that low levels

  16. [The National Conference of Propaganda Work on Family Planning held Beijing].

    PubMed

    Ma, B

    1983-01-29

    The National Conference on Propaganda Work in Family Planning, held in Beijing from November 1-6, 1982, was sponsored by the the Propaganda Department of the Chinese Communist Party Central Committee and the National Family Planning Committee. Among the 136 participants were representatives from various provincial, city, and autonomous region propaganda and family planning units, the General Political Department of the People's Liberation Army, general trade unions, All China Women's Federation, Communist Youth League, and propaganda reporters. The purpose of the conference was to discuss how to organize family planning propaganda in meeting China's goal of limiting the population to 1,200,000,000 by 2000, and how to arrange a Family Planning Propaganda Month for early 1983. The Chairman of the National Family Planning Committee made 3 points: family planning is a basic national policy, greater propaganda efforts must be made towards peasant family planning, and everyone must work hard to create a new situation in family planning work. The Vice Minister of the Propaganda Department remarked that family planning propaganda was foremost among the 12 national propaganda topics; these sentiments were supported totally by the representatives of the women and youth groups. The Vice Chairman of the Advisory Committee of the Central Committee said that family planning work was longterm, and that its success lay in the countryside. Finally, the Vice Chairman of the National Family Planning Committee encouraged all delegates to take the spirit of the conference back to their home. During the conference delegates also met to discuss important points in planning the Family Planning Propaganda Month. PMID:12312938

  17. Family Problems on the Job: Responding to the Needs of Employees with Family Responsibilities. Some Discussion Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vanier Inst. of the Family, Ottawa (Ontario).

    Recent statistics on the Canadian family suggest that, for many families, family life is now characterized by exhaustion, deprivation, older members, and the provision of support services by agencies rather than by unpaid women. Stress, in particular, is an effect of heavy burdens and a cause of new ones. But families cannot be adequately…

  18. Expanding the Psychosocial Work Environment: Workplace Norms and Work-Family Conflict as Correlates of Stress and Health

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tove Helland Hammer; Per Øystein Saksvik; Kjell Nytrø; Hans Torvatn; Mahmut Bayazit

    2004-01-01

    This study examined the contributions of organizational level norms about work requirements and social relations, and work-family conflict, to job stress and subjective health symptoms, controlling for Karasek's job demand-control-support model of the psychosocial work environment, in a sample of 1,346 employees from 56 firms in the Norwegian food and beverage industry. Hierarchical linear modeling analyses showed that organizational norms

  19. Knowledge Work, Working Time, and Use of Time among Finnish Dual-Earner Families: Does Knowledge Work Require the Marginalization of Private Life?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Natti, Jouko; Anttila, Timo; Tammelin, Mia

    2012-01-01

    The industrial working-time regime is dissolving--not dramatically, but rather as a trend. A new trend is that those in dynamic sectors and in a good labor market position work long hours: Demanding knowledge work appears to require the marginalization of private life. This study investigates the family situation of knowledge workers, the…

  20. Association between work-family conflict and musculoskeletal pain among hospital patient care workers

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seung-Sup; Okechukwu, Cassandra; Buxton, Orfeu M.; Dennerlein, Jack T.; Boden, Leslie I.; Hashimoto, Dean M.; Sorensen, Glorian

    2014-01-01

    Background A growing body of evidence suggests that work-family conflict is an important risk factor for workers' health and well-being. The goal of this study is to examine association between work-family conflict and musculoskeletal pain among hospital patient care workers. Methods We analyzed a cross-sectional survey of 1119 hospital patient care workers in 105 units in two urban, academic hospitals. Work-family conflict was measured by 5-item Work-Family Conflict Scale questionnaire. Multilevel logistic regression was applied to examine associations between work-family conflict and self-reported musculoskeletal pain in the past 3 months, adjusting for confounders including work-related psychosocial factors and physical work factors. Results In fully adjusted models, high work-family conflict was strongly associated with neck or shoulder pain (OR: 2.34, 95% CI: 1.64 - 3.34), arm pain (OR: 2.79, 95% CI: 1.64 - 4.75), lower extremity pain (OR: 2.20, 95% CI: 1.54- 3.15) and any musculoskeletal pain (OR: 2.45, 95% CI: 1.56 - 3.85), and a number of body areas in pain (OR: 2.47, 95% CI: 1.82 - 3.36) in the past 3 months. The association with low back pain was attenuated and became non-significant after adjusting for confounders. Conclusions Given the consistent associations between work-family conflict and self-reported musculoskeletal pains, the results suggest that work-family conflict could be an important domain for health promotion and workplace policy development among hospital patient care workers. PMID:23019044

  1. Effects of Marital Status and Shift Work on Family Function among Registered Nurses

    PubMed Central

    TAI, Shu-Yu; LIN, Pei-Chen; CHEN, Yao-Mei; HUNG, Hsin-Chia; PAN, Chih-Hong; PAN, Shung-Mei; LEE, Chung-Yin; HUANG, Chia-Tsuan; WU, Ming-Tsang

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to assess the interactive effect of marital status and shift work on family function. A population-based sample of 1,438 nurses between the ages of 20–45?yr was recruited from Taiwan during the period from July 2005 to April 2006 using a mailed questionnaire. The self-administered questionnaire contained information about demographic data, work status, shift work schedule, and the Family APGAR (Adaptation, Partnership, Growth, Affection, and Resolve) Scale, to evaluate family function. Compared to day shift nurses, non-night and rotation shift nurses had 1.53- and 1.38-fold (95% CI=1.09–2.14 and 1.01–1.88) risk to have poor family function after adjusting for other covariates. Married nurses, by contrast, had a 0.44-fold (95% CI=0.29–0.66) risk to have poor family function compared to single nurses. In addition, married nurses who worked non-night or rotation shifts had a significantly higher percent of poor family function than those married nurses working day shifts; however, similar results were not replicated in single nurses. We concluded that shift work and marital status could influence family function. PMID:24909112

  2. Women in orthodontics and work-family balance: challenges and strategies.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Sarah; Major, Paul W; Flores-Mir, Carlos; Amin, Maryam; Keenan, Louanne

    2012-01-01

    The number of women entering the orthodontic profession over the past few decades has increased dramatically. A review of the literature revealed the lack of research on achieving a work-family balance among female dentists and dental specialists. Work-family balance has been researched more extensively in the field of medicine; however, despite some critical differences, parallels between these 2 professions exist. This study identified issues that Canadian female orthodontists face and strategies they use to achieve a work-family balance. A phenomenological qualitative study was used to analyze the results of semi-structured telephone interviews of a purposive sample of 13 Canadian female orthodontists. The results strongly support the role-conflict theory about the competing pressures of maternal and professional roles. Female orthodontists described their challenges and strategies to minimize role conflict in their attempt to achieve a work-family balance. The women defined balance as having success and satisfaction in both their family life and professional life. They identified specific challenges of achieving a work-family balance that are unique to orthodontic practice and strategies for adapting to their maternal and professional roles. Achieving a work-family balance is of paramount importance to female orthodontists, and the results of this study may be applied to other specialties in dentistry. PMID:22770247

  3. Family-supportive organization perceptions, multiple dimensions of work–family conflict, and employee satisfaction: A test of model across five samples

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Laurent M. Lapierre; Paul E. Spector; Tammy D. Allen; Steven Poelmans; Cary L. Cooper; Michael P. O’Driscoll; Juan I. Sanchez; Paula Brough; Ulla Kinnunen

    2008-01-01

    Using samples of managers drawn from five Western countries, we tested a theoretical model linking employees’ perceptions of their work environment’s family-supportiveness to six different dimensions of work–family conflict (WFC), and to their job satisfaction, family satisfaction, and life satisfaction. Our results are consistent with a causal process whereby employees working in an environment viewed as more family-supportive experience lower

  4. Balancing Work and Family: A Panel Analysis of the Impact of Part-Time Work on the Experience of Time Pressure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laurijssen, Ilse; Glorieux, Ignace

    2013-01-01

    In this article we consider the consequences of work-family reconciliation, in terms of the extent to which the adjustment of the labour market career to family demands (by women) contributes to a better work-life balance. Using the Flemish SONAR-data, we analyse how changes in work and family conditions between the age of 26 and 29 are related to…

  5. Work-Family Conflict, Part I: Antecedents of Work-Family Conflict in National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I-A Certified Athletic Trainers

    PubMed Central

    Mazerolle, Stephanie M; Bruening, Jennifer E; Casa, Douglas J

    2008-01-01

    Context: Work-family conflict (WFC) involves discord that arises when the demands of work interfere with the demands of family or home life. Long work hours, minimal control over work schedules, and time spent away from home are antecedents to WFC. To date, few authors have examined work-family conflict within the athletic training profession. Objective: To investigate the occurrence of WFC in certified athletic trainers (ATs) and to identify roots and factors leading to quality-of-life issues for ATs working in the National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I-A setting. Design: Survey questionnaire and follow-up, in-depth, in-person interviews. Setting: Division I-A universities sponsoring football. Patients or Other Participants: A total of 587 ATs (324 men, 263 women) responded to the questionnaire. Twelve ATs (6 men, 6 women) participated in the qualitative portion: 2 head ATs, 4 assistant ATs, 4 graduate assistant ATs, and 2 AT program directors. Data Collection and Analysis: Multiple regression analysis was performed to determine whether workload and travel predicted levels of WFC. Analyses of variance were calculated to investigate differences among the factors of sex, marital status, and family status. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and then analyzed using computer software as well as member checks and peer debriefing. The triangulation of the data collection and multiple sources of qualitative analysis were utilized to limit potential researcher prejudices. Results: Regression analyses revealed that long work hours and travel directly contributed to WFC. In addition to long hours and travel, inflexible work schedules and staffing patterns were discussed by the interview participants as antecedents to WFC. Regardless of sex (P ?=? .142), marital status (P ?=? .687), family status (P ?=? .055), or age of children (P ?=? .633), WFC affected Division I-A ATs. Conclusions: No matter their marital or family status, ATs employed at the Division I-A level experienced difficulties balancing their work and home lives. Sources of conflict primarily stemmed from the consuming nature of the profession, travel, inflexible work schedules, and lack of full-time staff members. PMID:18833313

  6. Consequences of Boundary-Spanning Demands and Resources for Work-to-Family Conflict and Perceived Stress

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Patricia Voydanoff

    2005-01-01

    Using work-family border theory, this article examines relationships between boundary-spanning demands and resources and work-to-family conflict and perceived stress. The analysis uses data from 2,109 respondents from the 2002 National Study of the Changing Workforce. The demands that were positively related to work-to-family conflict and perceived stress were commuting time, bringing work home, job contacts at home, and work-family multitasking.

  7. Families That Work: Policies for Reconciling Parenthood and Employment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gornick, Janet C.; Meyers, Marcia K.

    2003-01-01

    Parents around the world grapple with the common challenge of balancing work and child care. Despite common problems, the industrialized nations have developed dramatically different social and labor market policies--policies that vary widely in the level of support they provide for parents and the extent to which they encourage an equal division…

  8. Women, Men, Work, and Family: An Expansionist Theory

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rosalind Chait Barnett; Janet Shibley Hyde

    2001-01-01

    The lives of women and men, the relationships that they establish, and their work have changed dramatically in the past 50 years, but the dominant theories driving research in these areas have not. In this article, the authors argue that the facts underlying the assumptions of the classical theories of gender and multiple roles have changed so radically as to

  9. Distance Education in Social Work: An Evaluation of an Undergraduate Course on Family Violence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walsh, Christine Ann; Baynton, Myra

    2012-01-01

    Social work is a discipline that emphasizes personal contact and has traditionally been taught face-to-face. This paper examines whether online learning is appropriate for educating social workers about family violence. It describes a newly-developed online course in family violence and evaluates its effectiveness. Two surveys of the class and an…

  10. Occupational stress, social and family difficulties and job contentment of working women: Bangladesh perspective

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rubab Abdullah; Sabnam Jahan; Sampa Saha

    It was a practice that women would principally do the household tasks, bringing up families and men would work to impart financial supports to the families. But in course of time due to declining population, education, economic welfare and women liberation movement, that convention has changed gradually. Women now seek out careers for livelihood and earning money as well as

  11. The Application of Family Systems Theory to Geriatric Hospital Social Work

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Donna Margles

    1995-01-01

    Integrating and applying Family Systems Theory principles into the assessment and treatment process of families of hospitalized high risk elderly is an area that has received little attention in health care literature. The multigenerational approach is a model that can be used as a clinical framework for guiding the social workers in developing intervention strategies when working with hospitalized high

  12. WORKING PAPER N 2012 32 Education, Life Expectancy and Family Bargaining: The Ben-

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    WORKING PAPER N° 2012 ­ 32 Education, Life Expectancy and Family Bargaining: The Ben- Porath Effect Revisited Laura Leker Grégory Ponthière JEL Codes: D13, J10, O41 Keywords: Education ; Life Expectancy, Life Expectancy and Family Bargaining: The Ben-Porath E¤ect Revisited Laura Lekery Gregory Ponthierez

  13. The Impact of Public Housing Policy on Family Social Work Theory and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarty, Dawn

    2008-01-01

    Social workers are the professionals most engaged with families living in low-income and subsidized housing and most familiar with the problems associated with inadequate housing. Yet the discussion of public housing policy has been left largely to economists and housing activists and the clear implications for family social work practice have not…

  14. Multicultural Considerations: Working with Families of Developmentally Disabled and High Risk Children. The Hispanic Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Rocio DeMateo

    The paper first points out how important it is for professionals who work with families and infants with developmental problems to be aware of ethnic and cultural differences, and then goes on to discuss some values typically held by Hispanic Americans. Professionals should understand the family's immigration history and status in order to know…

  15. The Use of Non-Verbal and Body Movement Techniques in Working with Families with Infants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, James M.

    1979-01-01

    Presents an experiential-educational approach to families with infants integrating dance and movement therapy with family therapy theories and techniques. Nonverbal techniques are the only possible methods of working directly with infants present with their parents in these workshops. The focus is on negotiations and exchanges of feelings in…

  16. Observations of a Working Class Family: Implications for Self-Regulated Learning Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vassallo, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Guardians have been implicated in the development of children's academic self-regulation. In this case study, which involved naturalistic observations and interviews, the everyday practices of a working class family were considered in the context of self-regulated learning development. The family's practices, beliefs, dispositions and home…

  17. Marriage and Family Therapists Working with Couples Who Have Children with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramisch, Julie

    2012-01-01

    Current research about families and couples who have children with autism is discussed using the Double ABCX model as a guide. A case study is presented along with recommendations for therapists who work with couples who have children with autism. Marriage and family therapists are encouraged to use the Double ABCX model as both an assessment tool…

  18. The State of Working Arkansas: How Families are Faring in the Booming Economy. A Special Report from the Arkansas Working Families Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huddleston, Rich; Duran, Angela

    Using a wide array of government data, this report examines the impact of the 1990s economy and other developments on the living standards of Arkansas's working families and their children. Information is provided on: (1) unemployment rates by geographic region, educational level, and race; (2) employment and average weekly earnings by industry…

  19. Considering the role of personality in the work–family experience: Relationships of the big five to work–family conflict and facilitation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Julie Holliday Wayne; Nicholas Musisca; William Fleeson

    2004-01-01

    Using a national, random sample (N=2130), we investigated the relationship between each of the Big Five personality traits and conflict and facilitation between work and family roles. Extraversion was related to greater facilitation between roles but was not related to conflict, whereas neuroticism was related to greater conflict but only weakly related to facilitation. Conscientiousness was related to less conflict,

  20. Rosabeth Moss Kanter Keynotes Boston College Center for Work & Family 20th Anniversary Celebration

    E-print Network

    Huang, Jianyu

    Rosabeth Moss Kanter Keynotes Boston College Center for Work & Family. Governor Timothy Murray attended the Gala at the Boston College Club on behalf and esteemed Harvard Business School Professor Rosabeth Moss Kanter provided her insights

  1. Work-family boundary strategies: Stability and alignment between preferred and enacted boundaries

    PubMed Central

    Ammons, Samantha K.

    2015-01-01

    Are individuals bounding work and family the way they would like? Much of the work-family boundary literature focuses on whether employees are segmenting or integrating work with family, but does not explore the boundaries workers would like to have, nor does it examine the fit between desired and enacted boundaries, or assess boundary stability. In this study, 23 respondents employed at a large Fortune 500 company were interviewed about their work-family boundaries before and after their teams underwent a cultural change initiative that sought to loosen workplace norms and allow employees more autonomy to decide when and where they performed their job tasks. Four distinct boundary strategies emerged from the data, with men and parents of young children having better alignment between preferred and enacted boundaries than women and those without these caregiving duties. Implications for boundary theory and research are discussed. PMID:25620801

  2. Working Families Tax Relief Act of 2004 (released in AEO2005)

    EIA Publications

    2005-01-01

    The Working Families Tax Relief Act of 2004 was signed into law on October 13, 2004. Primarily, the Act reduces taxes for individuals and businesses. At least two provisions relate to energy: Depletion of marginal properties and qualified vehicles.

  3. Family-Supportive Organization Perceptions, Multiple Dimensions of Work-Family Conflict, and Employee Satisfaction: A Test of Model across Five Samples

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lapierre, Laurent M.; Spector, Paul E.; Allen, Tammy D.; Poelmans, Steven; Cooper, Cary L.; O'Driscoll, Michael P.; Sanchez, Juan I.; Brough, Paula; Kinnunen, Ulla

    2008-01-01

    Using samples of managers drawn from five Western countries, we tested a theoretical model linking employees' perceptions of their work environment's family-supportiveness to six different dimensions of work-family conflict (WFC), and to their job satisfaction, family satisfaction, and life satisfaction. Our results are consistent with a causal…

  4. How Job Demands Affect Partners' Experience of Exhaustion: Integrating Work–Family Conflict and Crossover Theory

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Arnold B. Bakker; Evangelia Demerouti; Maureen F. Dollard

    2008-01-01

    This study among 168 couples of dual-earner parents uses insights from previous work–family conflict and crossover research to propose an integrative model delineating how job demands experienced by men and women carry over to the home domain. The authors hypothesized that for both men and women, job demands foster their own work–family conflict (WFC), which in turn contributes to their

  5. Work-Family Balance as a Potential Strategic Advantage: a Hotel General Manager Perspective

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Qu Xiao; John W. ONeill

    2010-01-01

    This qualitative study is an exploratory attempt to investigate hotel general managers’ (GMs) perceived work—family balance\\/interface issues from a strategic perspective. Based on 49 in-person, in-depth, in-office, interviews with full-service hotel GMs, the authors identify current strategic issue perceptions (SIPs) of hotel GMs and explore potential relationships between these SIPs and work—family issues in the hotel industry. Findings suggest that

  6. Is Work-Family Policy Use Related to the Gendered Division of Housework?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sarah Beth Estes; Mary C. Noonan; David J. Maume

    2007-01-01

    Researchers have proposed that work-family policy use may either reinforce or challenge the existing gendered division of\\u000a labor within couples, but results from prior studies have been inconclusive. Using data from a regional survey of work and\\u000a family life, we extend this research by focusing on how housework is divided within couples and by differentiating between\\u000a traditionally female- and male-

  7. The Exchange Relationship between Work-Family Enrichment and Affective Commitment: the Moderating Role of Gender.

    PubMed

    Marques, António Manuel; Chambel, Maria José; Pinto, Inês

    2015-01-01

    Workers' perception that their job experience enriches their family life has been considered a mechanism that explains their positive attitudes toward the organization where they work. However, because women and men live their work and family differently, gender may condition this relationship between the work-family enrichment and workers' attitudes. With a sample of 1885 workers from one Portuguese bank, with 802 women, the current study investigated the relationship between work-family enrichment and organizational affective commitment as well as the role of sex as a moderator of this relationship. The hypotheses were tested by using regression analysis. The results indicated that the perception held by workers that their work enriches their family is positively correlated with their affective commitment toward the organization. Furthermore, the data revealed that this relationship is stronger for women than for men. Study results have implications for management, particularly for human resource management, enhancing their knowledge about the relationship of work-family enrichment and workers' affective commitment toward organization. PMID:26037591

  8. The relationship of social support to the work-family balance and work outcomes of midlife women

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wendy C. Marcinkus; Karen S. Whelan-Berry; Judith R. Gordon

    2007-01-01

    Purpose – This paper seeks to examine the relationship of a network of social support for midlife women with their attitudes toward work-family balance and work outcomes, including job satisfaction, organisational commitment, and career accomplishment. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – A total of 1,089 women between the ages of 35 and 50 across three organizations were surveyed and then 72 of them interviewed.

  9. Working with Adolescents: A Guide for Practitioners. Social Work Practice with Children and Families Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laser, Julie Anne; Nicotera, Nicole

    2010-01-01

    This state-of-the-art practitioner resource and course text provides a comprehensive view of adolescent development and spells out effective ways to help teens who are having difficulties. The book illuminates protective and risk factors in the many contexts of adolescents' lives, from individual attributes to family, school, neighborhood, and…

  10. Balancing work and family: effect of employment characteristics on breastfeeding.

    PubMed

    Ogbuanu, Chinelo; Glover, Saundra; Probst, Janice; Hussey, James; Liu, Jihong

    2011-08-01

    This article describes an investigation of the effect of postpartum employment and occupational type on breastfeeding initiation and duration. Data were from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study-Birth Cohort. Postpartum employment status was classified as full-time, part-time, and not employed. Among postpartum workers, occupational type was classified as management, professional, service, sales, administrative, and "other." In adjusted analysis, professional women had a 20% greater likelihood of initiating breastfeeding than administrative workers (risk ratio [RR] 1.20; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.06-1.30). Full-time workers had a 10% lower likelihood of initiating breastfeeding than those not employed (RR 0.90; 95% CI, 0.82-0.97). Among breastfeeding initiators, full-time workers had a 19% lower likelihood of any breastfeeding beyond 6 months than those not employed (RR 0.81; 95% CI, 0.65-0.99). To improve breastfeeding initiation and duration in the United States, part-time options may be an effective solution for working mothers. PMID:21393503

  11. Work-family interface from a life and career stage perspective: the role of demands and resources.

    PubMed

    Demerouti, Evangelia; Peeters, Maria C W; van der Heijden, Beatrice I J M

    2012-01-01

    Work-family conflict and enrichment are experiences that occur daily and have substantial consequences for employees, their families, and the organizations that employ them. The aim of the current review is to make a link between life and career stage, work and family conditions, and the work-family interface. The basic proposition is that life stages partly determine career development, and consequently the specific working conditions (job demands and job resources) and family conditions (family demands and family resources) that individuals are exposed to. As a result, the specific demands and resources in the work and family domains determine to what extent individuals experience that work and family are conflicting or enriching life domains. In this review we suggest that individuals in early adulthood will experience high inter-role conflict and low facilitation due to high demands and low resources in both life domains, while individuals in late adulthood will experience the opposite pattern; that is, low conflict and high facilitation due to low demands and high resources in both domains. Individuals in middle adulthood will experience high work-family conflict but also high family-work facilitation due to the presence of high job demands and resources in both life domains. Integrating life and career stage perspectives and the experience of work-family interface is of notable practical utility because it provides a mechanism to make more informed decisions about the relative need for and corresponding benefits of work-family programs. PMID:22793870

  12. Embeddedness and well-being in the United States and Singapore: the mediating effects of work-to-family and family-to-work conflict.

    PubMed

    Ng, Thomas W H; Feldman, Daniel C

    2014-07-01

    Guided by conservation of resources theory, we propose that both organizational and community embeddedness are associated with increased work-to-family conflict (WFC) and family to-work conflict (FWC), which in turn are associated with strain-related outcomes. Because stress can have both short-term and long-term consequences, we examined negative mood as an immediate reaction to stress and chronic insomnia as a longer-term reaction to stress. We examined these relationships in 2-career couples in both the United States (n = 416) and Singapore (n = 400). Results provided full support for the mediating effects of WFC and FWC in the U.S. sample, with only limited support for those mediating effects in the Singaporean sample. In addition, we found that the effects of community embeddedness on FWC were significantly stronger in the U.S. sample than in the Singaporean sample. PMID:24885684

  13. Nonstandard Work Schedules, Perceived Family Well-Being, and Daily Stressors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Kelly D.; Goodman, W. Benjamin; Pirretti, Amy E.; Almeida, David M.

    2008-01-01

    Data from two studies assessed the effects of nonstandard work schedules on perceived family well-being and daily stressors. Study 1, using a sample of employed, married adults aged 25-74 (n = 1,166) from the National Survey of Midlife in the United States, showed that night work was associated with perceptions of greater marital instability,…

  14. Child protection workers' experiences of working with high-conflict separating families

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael Saini; Tara Black; Kristen Lwin; Alena Marshall; Barbara Fallon; Deborah Goodman

    2012-01-01

    Ongoing acrimonious conflict between separating parents can challenge child protection workers charged with the responsibility of investigating repeated allegations, especially when parents vigorously deflect blame to the other parent. There remains little evidence, however to guide practice when working with high-conflict families. The aim of this grounded theory approach was to explore child protection workers' perspectives of working with high-conflict

  15. School Social Work and Early Childhood Student's Attitudes toward Gay and Lesbian Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Averett, Paige E.; Hegde, Archana

    2012-01-01

    The present study assessed the attitudes of school professionals in training at an American university toward homosexuality and their comfort, action-related disposition, and preparation to work with gay and lesbian (GL) families and their children. Fifty-nine students specializing in birth through kindergarten education and school social work

  16. Work in the Family and in the Labor Market: A Cross-National, Reciprocal Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalleberg, Arne L.; Rosenfeld, Rachel A.

    1990-01-01

    Examined interrelationships by sex between domestic work and labor market work in the United States, Canada, Norway, and Sweden. Findings suggested that Scandinavian women used their greater opportunities for part-time employment to reconcile family and labor market responsibilities. No significant effects were observed for men in any of the…

  17. A Meta-Analytic Review of the Consequences Associated with Work–Family Enrichment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Laurel A. McNallJessica; Jessica M. Nicklin; Aline D. Masuda

    2010-01-01

    Purpose  This study investigated the relationship between work-to-family enrichment (WFE) and family-to-work enrichment (FWE) with\\u000a work-related, non work-related, and health-related consequences using meta-analysis.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Design\\/methodology\\/approach  We conducted a meta-analytic review of 21 studies (54 correlations) for WFE and 25 studies (57 correlations) for FWE.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Findings  We found that both WFE and FWE were positively related to job satisfaction, affective commitment, and family satisfaction\\u000a but

  18. Do women's provider-role attitudes moderate the links between work and family?

    PubMed

    Helms-Erikson, H; Tanner, J L; Crouter, A C; McHale, S M

    2000-12-01

    The authors examined the links between mothers' work qualities and their individual well-being and marital quality, as well as adolescent daughters' and sons' gender-role attitudes, as a function of mothers' provider-role attitudes, in 134 dual-earner families. In home interviews, mothers described their work, provider-role attitudes, family relationships, and mental health; their offspring reported gender-role attitudes. Women's attitudes about breadwinning were coded into main-secondary, coprovider, and ambivalent coprovider groups. Mothers' provider-role attitudes moderated the links between status indicators and mothers' depression, marital conflict, and daughters' gender-role attitudes. For example, depression and marital conflict were negatively related to coprovider mothers' earnings and occupational prestige. The same was not true for main-secondary and ambivalent coprovider mothers. These findings underscore the importance of considering employed women's interpretation of their work roles when exploring work-family links. PMID:11132487

  19. Influences of Work-Family Conflict on Job Satisfaction, Life Satisfaction and Quitting Intentions Among Business Owners: The Case of Family-Operated Businesses

    Microsoft Academic Search

    James S. Boles

    1996-01-01

    This study examines the effect of inter-role conflict between the family and business domains among operators of small businesses and family-owned businesses. Findings indicate that work-family conflict can significantly affect both job and life satisfaction of owners as well as their propensity to seek a new line of work. Results vary among owners depending on whether or not they work

  20. The unpaid donation of blood and altruism: a comment on Keown.

    PubMed Central

    McLachlan, H V

    1998-01-01

    In line with article 3.4 of EC directive 89/381, Keown has presented an ethical case in support of the policy of voluntary, unpaid donation of blood. Although no doubt is cast on the desirability of the policy, that part of Keown's argument which pertains to the suggested laudability of altruism and of its encouragment by social policy is examined and shown to be dubious. PMID:9752628

  1. Work Socialization and Adolescents' Work-Related Values in Single-Mother African American Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toyokawa, Teru; McLoyd, Vonnie C.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined African American mothers' work socialization messages in relation to adolescents' work-related values. Moderation effects of mother-adolescent relation quality on the linkage between maternal socialization messages and adolescents' outcomes were also examined. Participants were 245 single African American mothers and their…

  2. Impacts of Children With Troubles on Working Poor Families: Mixed-Method and Experimental Evidence

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lucinda P. Bernheimer; Thomas S. Weisner; Edward D. Lowe

    2003-01-01

    Mixed-method and experimental data on working poor families and children with troubles partic- ipating in the New Hope anti-poverty experimental initiative in Milwaukee are described. Sixty percent of these families had at least one child who had significant problems (learning, school achievement and\\/or behavior, home behavior, retardation, other disabilities). Control group fam- ilies with children who had troubles had more

  3. Recovery at home and performance at work: A diary study on self–family facilitation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Felieke E. Volman; Arnold B. Bakker; Despoina Xanthopoulou

    2012-01-01

    This 5-day diary study among 65 Dutch employees focuses on the interplay between time on and off the job. We examined how daily off-job (work-related, physical, household) activities, in combination with the degree to which people want to engage in these activities relate to self–family facilitation (i.e., the positive influence of the fulfilment of one's own interests on one's family

  4. Working with Family Members to Engage Treatment-Refusing Drinkers: The CRAFT Program

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jane Ellen Smith; Robert J. Meyers; Julia L. Austin

    2008-01-01

    Community Reinforcement and Family Training (CRAFT) is an empirically-supported program based on behavioral reinforcement that engages treatment-refusing alcohol-other drug abusers into treatment by working with their concerned family members. These concerned significant others (CSOs) are taught how to rearrange contingencies in the drinker's environment such that sober behavior is supported and drinking behavior is discouraged. CSOs receive behavioral skills training

  5. Work and Family in the United States: A Policy Initiative. A Report of the Family Policy Panel of the Economic Policy Council of UNA-USA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Association of the United States of America, New York, NY.

    As part of its world employment project, the Economic Policy Council of the United Nations Association of the United States formed the family policy panel to further examine the extent of ongoing changes affecting the family, the workplace, and the economy. In its work, the family policy panel concentrated on five issues considered central to the…

  6. Perceptions of Injustice in Family Work: The Role of Psychological Distress

    PubMed Central

    Grote, Nancy K.; Clark, Margaret S.; Moore, Alicia

    2011-01-01

    During the transition to parenthood, perceived imbalances in family work typically increase. Little is known, however, about which individuals are especially prone to perceive unfairness in the division of family work during this time. Using data from a longitudinal study of married couples expecting their first child and controlling for marital distress and other relevant variables, we observed that when husbands were psychologically distressed, both they and their wives were subsequently more likely to perceive unfairness to wives in the division of family work. No analogous significant and prospective effects of wives' levels of distress on their own or their husbands' perceptions of unfairness were found. We also found that once wives perceived the amount of child care they did as unfair, both they and their husbands were later more likely to experience psychological distress, controlling for marital distress and other relevant variables. PMID:15382973

  7. Political ideology and labor arbitrators' decision making in work-family conflict cases.

    PubMed

    Biernat, Monica; Malin, Martin H

    2008-07-01

    Labor arbitrators were asked to render decisions about grievances brought by employees who had been fired because of problems created by work conflicts with family responsibilities. The study examined the effects of experimentally manipulated grievant attributes (gender, type of work-family conflict) as well as arbitrator attributes (gender, political ideology) on decision making. When employees were depicted as having had child care problems, liberal arbitrators tended to favor female over male grievants, and political conservatism predicted more favorable judgments rendered toward male grievants. Overall, the data suggest that child care responsibilities cue different patterns of gender bias among liberal and conservative decision makers. PMID:18463394

  8. The psychological well-being of disability caregivers: examining the roles of family strain, family-to-work conflict, and perceived supervisor support.

    PubMed

    Li, Andrew; Shaffer, Jonathan; Bagger, Jessica

    2015-01-01

    We draw on the cross-domain model of work-family conflict and conservation of resources theory to examine the relationship between disability caregiving demands and the psychological well-being of employed caregivers. Using a sample of employed disability caregivers from a national survey, we found that the relationship between caregiving demands and family-to-work conflict was stronger when employees experienced high levels of strain from family. Additionally, we found high levels of family to-work conflict were subsequently associated with decreases in life satisfaction and increases in depression, but only when perceived supervisor support was low. Overall, our findings suggest an indirect relationship between caregiving demands and psychological well-being that is mediated by family-to-work conflict and is conditional on family strain and perceived supervisor support. The theoretical and practical implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:25181282

  9. Marital and Family Satisfaction as a Function of Work-Family Demands and Community Resources: Individual- and Couple-Level Analyses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hostetler, Andrew J.; Desrochers, Stephan; Kopko, Kimberly; Moen, Phyllis

    2012-01-01

    This study uses individual- and couple-level analyses to examine the influence of work-family demands and community resources on marital and family satisfaction within a sample of dual-earner parents with dependent children (N = 260 couples, 520 individuals). Total couple work hours were strongly negatively associated with marital satisfaction for…

  10. “Preventing the Pain” When Working with Family and Sexual Violence in Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    Dartnall, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Primary care professionals (PCPs) are increasingly being expected to identify and respond to family and sexual violence as the chronic nature and severity of the long-term health impacts are increasingly recognized. This discussion paper reports the authors' expert opinion from their experiences running international workshops to prevent trauma among those who work and research sexual violence. It describes the burnout and secondary traumatic stress literature which provides the evidence supporting their work. Implications for practicing basic training in response to trauma and ongoing education are a key area for responding to family violence and preventing professional stress. A professional culture that supports and values caring well for those who have experienced family violence as well as “caring for the carer” is needed. Working in teams and having more support systems in place are likely to protect PCPs from secondary traumatic stress and burnout. Undergraduate and postgraduate training of PCPs to develop trauma knowledge and the skills to ask about and respond to family violence safely are essential. In addition, the healthcare system, workplace, and the individual practitioner support structures need to be in place to enable PCPs to provide safe and effective long-term care and access to other appropriate services for those who have experienced family violence. PMID:23533754

  11. What Contributes to the (Im)Balanced Division of Family Work Between the Sexes?

    PubMed Central

    Lothaller, Harald; Mikula, Gerold; Schoebi, Dominik

    2011-01-01

    This study examines a comprehensive set of variables that have been proposed as explaining the imbalance of the division of family work between the sexes. The analyses use survey data of 735 dual-earner couples from Austria, the Netherlands, and Portugal. The results support theoretical explanations referring to time availability, gender ideology, relative resources, and the importance of characteristics of the family system. No support was obtained for the doing-gender perspective. Additional findings suggest that increased consideration of psychological concepts adds to the understanding of why women do more family work than men. The analyses revealed similarities, but also differences between the factors that contribute to the division of household labor and childcare. PMID:22318972

  12. Can naloxone prescription and overdose training for opioid users work in family practice?

    PubMed Central

    Leece, Pamela; Orkin, Aaron; Shahin, Rita; Steele, Leah S.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To explore family physicians’ attitudes toward prescribing naloxone to at-risk opioid users, as well as to determine the opportunities and challenges for expanding naloxone access to patients in family practice settings. Design One-hour focus group session and SWOT (strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats) analysis. Setting Workshop held at the 2012 Family Medicine Forum in Toronto, Ont. Participants Seventeen conference attendees from 3 Canadian cities who practised in various family practice settings and who agreed to participate in the workshop. Methods The workshop included an overview of information about naloxone distribution and overdose education programs, followed by group discussion in smaller focus groups. Participants were instructed to focus their discussion on the question, “Could this [overdose education and naloxone prescription] work in your practice?” and to record notes using a standardized discussion guide based on a SWOT analysis. Two investigators reviewed the forms, extracting themes using an open coding process. Main findings Some participants believed that naloxone could be used safely among family practice patients, that the intervention fit well with their clinical practice settings, and that its use in family practice could enhance engagement with at-risk individuals and create an opportunity to educate patients, providers, and the public about overdose. Participants also indicated that the current guidelines and support systems for prescribing or administering naloxone were inadequate, that medicolegal uncertainties existed for those who prescribed or administered naloxone, and that high-quality evidence about the intervention’s effectiveness in family practice was lacking. Conclusion Family physicians believe that overdose education and naloxone prescription might provide patients at risk of opioid overdose in their practices with broad access to a potentially lifesaving intervention. However, they explain that there are key barriers currently limiting widespread implementation of naloxone use in family practice settings.

  13. Standard Work Specifications for Single-Family Home Energy Upgrades Summary (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2012-11-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and numerous industry stakeholders developed the Standard Work Specifications for Single-Family Home Energy Upgrades to define the minimum requirements for high-quality residential energy upgrades. Today, the Standard Work Specifications provide a unique source for defining high-quality home energy upgrades, establishing clear expectations for homeowners, contractors, trainers, workers, program administrators, and organizations that provide financing for energy upgrades.

  14. Analysis of organizational commitment and work–family conflict in view of doctors and nurses

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Serap Benligiray; Harun Sönmez

    2012-01-01

    The present study investigates the relationship between organizational commitment and work–family conflict for medical doctors and nurses. Using canonical analysis on questionnaire, this relation has been tested distinctively through three sub-dimensions of organizational commitment listed: affective commitment, continuance commitment and normative commitment. Data collected from 766 (411 doctors and 355 nurses) individuals employed at seven state hospitals and three medical

  15. Work and Family Roles of Women in Ho Chi Minh City

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phuong, Tran Phi

    2007-01-01

    This study aims to point out the differences between the North and the South of Vietnam, more particularly, Saigon and Hanoi, in terms of family and work roles of women. It helps to explain the ways women in Ho Chi Minh City reconstruct their reproduction role, the attitudes of Southern husbands towards household tasks and the husband-wife…

  16. Emerging Adults in Sweden: Identity Formation in the Light of Love, Work, and Family

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frisen, Ann; Wangqvist, Maria

    2011-01-01

    In this study, the identity formation of emerging adults in Sweden was investigated in order to discover how identity issues concerning love, work and family are handled. The study group comprised 136 24- to 26-year-olds. The results revealed differences between men and women with regard to their position in the identity formation process. While…

  17. Time with Children, Children's Well-Being, and Work-Family Balance among Employed Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milkie, Melissa A.; Kendig, Sarah M.; Nomaguchi, Kei M.; Denny, Kathleen E.

    2010-01-01

    Cultural imperatives for "good" parenting include spending time with children and ensuring that they do well in life. Knowledge of how these factors influence employed parents' work-family balance is limited. Analyses using time diary and survey data from the 2000 National Survey of Parents (N = 933) indicate that how time with children relates to…

  18. "I Am-We Are": Personal and Social Pathways to Further Study, Work and Family Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bornholt, L. J.; Maras, P. M.; Robinson, R. A.

    2009-01-01

    This project explores the apparent layers in motivation for young people's plans in order to extend Pathways Theory. We bring together personal, relational and group motivation to explain the planned pathways to study, work and family life. Location was an Australian town, close to the national socio-economic average, to control broad social…

  19. Does Fertility Respond to Work and Family-life Reconciliation Policies in France?

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    231 Does Fertility Respond to Work and Family-life Reconciliation Policies in France? Olivier Thévenon In Noriyuki Takayama and Martin Werding (eds., 2009), Fertility and Public Policy: How To Reverse For the past two years, France has enjoyed fertility rates approaching replacement level, with a total

  20. Transitioning between Work and Family Roles as a Function of Boundary Flexibility and Role Salience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winkel, Doan E.; Clayton, Russell W.

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates the manner in which people separate their work and family roles and how they manage the boundaries of these two important roles. Specifically, we focus on how role flexibility and salience influence transitions between roles. Results indicate that the ability and willingness to flex a role boundary and role salience are…

  1. Change in Work-Family Conflict among Employed Parents between 1977 and 1997

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nomaguchi, Kei M.

    2009-01-01

    Using data from two national surveys (N = 2,050), this paper examines what accounts for the increase in the sense of work-family conflict among employed parents between 1977 and 1997. Decomposition analysis indicates that the increases in women's labor force participation, college education, time pressure in completing one's job, and the decline…

  2. When Work Enriches Family-Life: The Mediational Role of Professional Development Opportunities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molino, Monica; Ghislieri, Chiara; Cortese, Claudio G.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Several studies have pointed out the importance of work-family enrichment (WFE) for individuals' well-being and organizations and for this reason, it seems important to understand how organizations may promote it. This study attempts to understand the role of organizational resources and, particularly, of opportunities for professional…

  3. Gender, Work-Family Linkages, and Economic Success among Small Business Owners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loscocco, Karyn A.; Leicht, Kevin T.

    1993-01-01

    Investigated work-family connections and economic success among women and men small business owners. Analyses of data from 3-year panel survey of 99 women and 312 men showed considerable gender similarity in processes through which business and individual characteristics affect personal earnings, although women were disadvantaged in some…

  4. Sex Role Attitudes among High School Seniors: Views about Work and Family Roles. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herzog, A. Regula; Bachman, Jerald G.

    Although sex roles seem to be undergoing substantial changes in today's society, the work and family roles of women remain quite different from those of men. Data from the Monitoring the Future project, a 2-year project focusing on high school seniors' sex role attitudes and the relationship of those attitudes to various plans for adult roles,…

  5. Indigenous Women College Students' Perspectives on College, Work, and Family

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bingham, Jennie L.; Adolpho, Quintina Bearchief; Jackson, Aaron P.; Alexitch, Louise R.

    2014-01-01

    Native American and First Nations (herein collectively referred to as Indigenous) women college students are faced with the challenge of balancing their cultural imperatives and the demands of the dominant Western culture in family, school, and work/employment roles. In order to explore these women's experiences and perspectives, this study…

  6. Dispositional Variables and Work-Family Conflict: A Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Tammy D.; Johnson, Ryan C.; Saboe, Kristin N.; Cho, Eunae; Dumani, Soner; Evans, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    Meta-analysis was used to comprehensively summarize the relationship between dispositional variables and both directions of work-family conflict. The largest effects detected were those associated with negative affect, neuroticism, and self-efficacy; all were in expected directions. In general, negative trait-based variables (e.g., negative affect…

  7. Stress Reduction for Family Caregivers in Chronic Mental Illness: Implications of a Work Stress Management Perspective

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Helen R. Winefield

    2000-01-01

    In several studies involving a total of 291 family caregivers for schizophrenia sufferers, the stressors that arise from caregiving were identified. Also identified were the outcomes for caregivers, which often include psychological distress. Caregivers develop various stress-reduction techniques, but this article explores the utility of applying the principles of work stress management to caregiver well-being. An organizational psychology perspective suggests

  8. Resilience across Contexts: Family, Work, Culture, and Community. Recommendations from a National Invitational Conference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, Sue, Ed.; Sullivan, Robert, Ed.

    1998-01-01

    In this issue of the "CEIC Review," commissioned papers for a national invitational conference on student resilience developed across contexts of family, work, culture, and community are summarized. The concept of resilience-promoting interventions has emerged from research and indicates that some children survive adversity without lasting damage.…

  9. Struggling for balance amid turbulence on international assignments: work–family conflict, support and commitment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Margaret A. Shaffer; David A. Harrison; K. Matthew Gilley; Dora M. Luka

    2001-01-01

    Using human capital theory, we develop hypotheses about the impact of perceived organizational support and two forms of work–family conflict on the psychological withdrawal of expatriates. We also consider the exacerbating effects of commitment to either domain. To test these hypotheses, we collected multisource data from 324 expatriates in 46 countries. Results indicate that perceived organizational support and the interplay

  10. Becoming Stronger at Broken Places: A Model for Group Work with Young Adult from Divorced Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hage, Sally M.; Nosanow, Mia

    2000-01-01

    Describes a model for group work with young adults from divorced families using an 8-session psychoeducational group intervention. Goals include reducing isolation, establishing connectedness, and building a stronger sense of identify. By educating young adults on topics such as assertiveness, communication skills, and self-esteem, it will give…

  11. Participants' Experiences in Hellinger's Family Constellation Work: A Grounded Theory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgiadou, Sofia

    2012-01-01

    As a recently introduced to the U.S. model of intergenerational systemic therapy from Germany, Bert Hellinger's Family Constellation Work (FCW) has very limited research support. Hellinger himself has authored a number of publications referencing hundreds of cases, where he implemented his method to approach a broad array of physical,…

  12. Child & Family Social Work, (2007) 12 (2). pp. 143-151. ISSN 1356-7500 Multi-agency working: Implications for an

    E-print Network

    Sheldon, Nathan D.

    2007-01-01

    1 Child & Family Social Work, (2007) 12 (2). pp. 143-151. ISSN 1356-7500 Multi-agency working: Implications for an early intervention social work team Patricia Moran, Catherine Jacobs, Amanda Bunn: patriciamoran@aol.com #12;2 Multi-agency working: Implications for an early intervention social work team

  13. Self-Efficacy for Managing Work-Family Conflict: Validating the English Language Version of a Hebrew Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hennessy, Kelly D.; Lent, Robert W.

    2008-01-01

    The Self-Efficacy for Work-Family Conflict Management Scale (SE-WFC), developed in Israel, was designed to assess beliefs regarding one's ability to manage conflict between work and family roles. This study examined the factor structure, reliability, and validity of an English language version of the SE-WFC in a sample of 159 working mothers in…

  14. When Can Employees Have a Family Life? The Effects of Daily Workload and Affect on Work-Family Conflict and Social Behaviors at Home

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Remus Ilies; Kelly M. Schwind; David Turley WAGNER; Michael D. Johnson; D. Scott DeRue; Daniel R. Ilgen

    2007-01-01

    This article presents a longitudinal examination of antecedents and outcomes of work-to-family conflict. A total of 106 employees participating in an experience-sampling study were asked to respond to daily surveys both at work and at home, and their spouses were interviewed daily via telephone for a period of 2 weeks. Intraindividual analyses revealed that employees' perceptions of workload predicted work-to-family

  15. Does It Matter Where You Work? A Comparison of How Three Work Venues (Traditional Office, Virtual Office, and Home Office) Influence Aspects of Work and Personal/Family Life.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, E. Jeffrey; Ferris, Maria; Martinson, Vjollca

    2003-01-01

    A comparison was made of IBM employees in traditional offices (n=4,316), virtual offices (n=767), and home offices (n=441). Home office teleworking helped balance work and family and enhanced business performance with cost savings. Virtual office teleworking was associated with less work-family balance and less successful personal/family life.…

  16. Working with Families: Messages for Policy and Practice from an Evaluation of a School-Based Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Featherstone, Brid; Manby, Martin

    2006-01-01

    In 2002 the authors evaluated a family support project known as Working with Families managed by the Children's Society and located in a primary school on a large, mainly white council estate in Rochdale. Our reflections on some of the issues which emerged in relation to basing family support services in a school setting seem timely in the light…

  17. Work or family or both? Value trajectories and their prediction over ten years.

    PubMed

    Tschopp, Cécile; Keller, Anita C; Stalder, Barbara E

    2015-07-01

    Previous studies have shown that values are developed during young adulthood. This study investigated whether and when developmental trajectories of values depend on gender, language region, cognitive competence, expected education duration, and ambition. Longitudinal data of 2620 adolescents in Switzerland were collected at eight waves of measurement over 10 years. Latent growth model analysis revealed that work values mainly increase between ages 16 and 20, whereas family values primarily increase after age 20. This pattern fits the major life and career roles sequence: Becoming established in one's career comes first, and focusing on family building follows later. The initial levels and development of values were essentially affected by gender, but other individual factors such as cognitive competence, expected education duration, and ambition also showed some effect, particularly on family values. These new insights into the development of values improve the understanding of the career decisions and career behavior of adolescents. PMID:25899131

  18. Working Poor Families in the Chicago Metropolitan Area. Statistical Profile and Proceedings of the Working Poor Policy Forum (Chicago, Illinois, December 8, 1993).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Latino Inst., Chicago, IL.

    A statistical profile of the working poor in Chicago (Illinois) and the proceedings of the Working Poor Policy Forum held to discuss the findings of the profile are presented. In America it is supposed to be impossible to work and remain chronically poor, but in fact this is not the case. There are many ways to define the income working families

  19. An Integrative, Multilevel, and Transdisciplinary Research Approach to Challenges of Work, Family, and Health

    PubMed Central

    Bray, Jeremy W.; Kelly, Erin L.; Hammer, Leslie B.; Almeida, David M.; Dearing, James W.; King, Rosalind B.; Buxton, Orfeu M.

    2013-01-01

    Recognizing a need for rigorous, experimental research to support the efforts of workplaces and policymakers in improving the health and wellbeing of employees and their families, the National Institutes of Health and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention formed the Work, Family & Health Network (WFHN). The WFHN is implementing an innovative multisite study with a rigorous experimental design (adaptive randomization, control groups), comprehensive multilevel measures, a novel and theoretically based intervention targeting the psychosocial work environment, and translational activities. This paper describes challenges and benefits of designing a multilevel and transdisciplinary research network that includes an effectiveness study to assess intervention effects on employees, families, and managers; a daily diary study to examine effects on family functioning and daily stress; a process study to understand intervention implementation; and translational research to understand and inform diffusion of innovation. Challenges were both conceptual and logistical, spanning all aspects of study design and implementation. In dealing with these challenges, however, the WFHN developed innovative, transdisciplinary, multi-method approaches to conducting workplace research that will benefit both the research and business communities. PMID:24618878

  20. Supervisor Appraisal as the Link Between Family–Work Balance and Contextual Performance

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dawn S. Carlson; L. A. Witt; Suzanne Zivnuska; K. Michele Kacmar; Joseph G. Grzywacz

    2008-01-01

    We examined the relationship between subordinates’ family to work balance (conflict and enrichment) and two dimensions of\\u000a contextual performance (interpersonal facilitation and job dedication) reported by supervisors. Beyond the direct effects,\\u000a we hypothesized that supervisor’s appraisals of employee conflict and enrichment would influence the supervisor’s contextual\\u000a performance ratings. Data collected from a matched sample of 156 private sector employees and

  1. Maternal Working Conditions and Child Well-Being in Welfare-Leaving Families

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rachel Dunifon; Ariel Kalil; Ashish Bajracharya

    2005-01-01

    In the wake of welfare reform, thousands of low-income single mothers have transitioned into the labor market. In this article, the authors examine how the work conditions of mothers leaving welfare for employment are associated with the emotional well-being of 372 children ages 5 to 15 years. The authors examine the cumulative incidence, over a 5-year period, of maternal non-family-friendly

  2. The Growing Costs and Burden of Family Caregiving of Older Adults: A Review of Paid Sick Leave and Family Leave Policies.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mei-Lan

    2014-10-21

    Many family caregivers of older adults suffer from a high burden of care and struggle with the balance of jobs and caregiving tasks. However, the United States is the only developed country without paid sick leave policies for all workers and their families. The purpose of this article is to review the federal Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) and empirical studies about paid sick policy, propose policy recommendations, and provide a starting point for future research. The result has shown that the FMLA only applies to certain employees and the provided leave is unpaid under the act. Working women, Latinos, low-wage workers, and less-educated employees are less likely to access paid sick leave and family leave. Obviously, social injustice exists in the FMLA and paid sick leave policies. This article proposes that the Family and Medical Leave Act coverage should be expanded to protect all workers, especially for primary family caregivers of older adults, regardless of family relationships. Also, paid sick and family leave laws should be passed, and requirements to contribute to a family-friendly workplace added to relieve the growing burden of family caregiving of older adults. Policy recommendations including the exemplar of the San Francisco Paid Sick Leave Ordinance, and suggestions for more comprehensive policies are proposed for federal, state, or/and city legislation. PMID:25335873

  3. 38 CFR 3.1000 - Entitlement under 38 U.S.C. 5121 to benefits due and unpaid upon death of a beneficiary.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...C. 5121 to benefits due and unpaid upon death of a beneficiary. 3.1000 Section...C. 5121 to benefits due and unpaid upon death of a beneficiary. (a) Basic entitlement...provided in §§ 3.1001 and 3.1008, where death occurred on or after December 1,...

  4. 38 CFR 3.1000 - Entitlement under 38 U.S.C. 5121 to benefits due and unpaid upon death of a beneficiary.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...C. 5121 to benefits due and unpaid upon death of a beneficiary. 3.1000 Section...C. 5121 to benefits due and unpaid upon death of a beneficiary. (a) Basic entitlement...provided in §§ 3.1001 and 3.1008, where death occurred on or after December 1,...

  5. 38 CFR 3.1000 - Entitlement under 38 U.S.C. 5121 to benefits due and unpaid upon death of a beneficiary.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...C. 5121 to benefits due and unpaid upon death of a beneficiary. 3.1000 Section...C. 5121 to benefits due and unpaid upon death of a beneficiary. (a) Basic entitlement...provided in §§ 3.1001 and 3.1008, where death occurred on or after December 1,...

  6. 38 CFR 3.1000 - Entitlement under 38 U.S.C. 5121 to benefits due and unpaid upon death of a beneficiary.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...C. 5121 to benefits due and unpaid upon death of a beneficiary. 3.1000 Section...C. 5121 to benefits due and unpaid upon death of a beneficiary. (a) Basic entitlement...provided in §§ 3.1001 and 3.1008, where death occurred on or after December 1,...

  7. 38 CFR 3.1000 - Entitlement under 38 U.S.C. 5121 to benefits due and unpaid upon death of a beneficiary.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...C. 5121 to benefits due and unpaid upon death of a beneficiary. 3.1000 Section...C. 5121 to benefits due and unpaid upon death of a beneficiary. (a) Basic entitlement...provided in §§ 3.1001 and 3.1008, where death occurred on or after December 1,...

  8. Family-supportive work environments and psychological strain: a longitudinal test of two theories.

    PubMed

    Odle-Dusseau, Heather N; Herleman, Hailey A; Britt, Thomas W; Moore, Dewayne D; Castro, Carl A; McGurk, Dennis

    2013-01-01

    Based on the Job Demands-Resources (JDR) model (E. Demerouti, A. B. Bakker, F. Nachreiner, & W. B. Schaufeli, 2001, The job demands-resources model of burnout. Journal of Applied Psychology, 86, 499-512) and Conservation of Resources (COR) theory (S. E. Hobfoll, 2002, Social and psychological resources and adaptation. Review of General Psychology, 6, 307-324), we tested three competing models that predict different directions of causation for relationships over time between family-supportive work environments (FSWE) and psychological strain, with two waves of data from a military sample. Results revealed support for both the JDR and COR theories, first in the static model where FSWE at Time 1 predicted psychological strain at Time 2 and when testing the opposite direction, where psychological strain at Time 1 predicted FSWE at Time 2. For change models, FSWE predicted changes in psychological strain across time, although the reverse causation model was not supported (psychological strain at Time 1 did not predict changes in FSWE). Also, changes in FSWE across time predicted psychological strain at Time 2, whereas changes in psychological strain did not predict FSWE at Time 2. Theoretically, these results are important for the work-family interface in that they demonstrate the application of a systems approach to studying work and family interactions, as support was obtained for both the JDR model with perceptions of FSWE predicting psychological strain (in both the static and change models), and for COR theory where psychological strain predicts FSWE across time. PMID:23276196

  9. The Factor Structure of the Work-Family Conflict Multidimensional Scale: Exploring the Expectations of College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaffey, Abigail R.; Rottinghaus, Patrick J.

    2009-01-01

    Work-family conflict (WFC) has been examined from a unidimensional approach, yet recent research has revealed three types (i.e., time, strain, and behavior) and two directions of work-family conflict. Previous researchers suggested that college students are unable to discern between the multiple-facets of WFC, thus measured anticipated WFC…

  10. Module 3: Workplace Policy, Practice and Culture--Employer and Employee Perspectives. Work-Family Curriculum Guide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kossek, Ellen Ernst; Leana, Carrie; MacDermid, Shelley; Pitt-Catsouphes, Marcie; Raskin, Patricia; Secret, Mary; Sweet, Stephen

    2006-01-01

    The contents of this module have been prepared to address some of challenges associated with teaching about work-family issues from a human resource management and employment perspective. The goals of this module are: (1) To develop an understanding that work-family policies are part of a human resource management system and the employment…

  11. Managers' Practices Related to Work–Family Balance Predict Employee Cardiovascular Risk and Sleep Duration in Extended Care Settings

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lisa F. Berkman; Orfeu Buxton; Karen Ertel; Cassandra Okechukwu

    2010-01-01

    An increasing proportion of U.S. workers have family caregiving responsibilities. The purpose of this study was to determine whether employees in extended care settings whose managers are supportive, open, and creative about work–family needs, such as flexibility with work schedules, have lower cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk and longer sleep than their less supported counterparts. From semistructured interviews with managers, we

  12. Work–Family Conflict Among Athletic Trainers in the Secondary School Setting

    PubMed Central

    Pitney, William A.; Mazerolle, Stephanie M.; Pagnotta, Kelly D.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Context: Work–family conflict (WFC) negatively affects a professional's ability to function at work or home. Objective: To examine perceptions of and contributing factors to WFC among secondary school athletic trainers. Design: Sequential explanatory mixed-methods study. Setting: Secondary school. Patients or Other Participants: From a random sample of 1325 individuals selected from the National Athletic Trainers' Association Member Services database, 415 individuals (203 women, 212 men; age = 36.8 ± 9.3 years) provided usable online survey data. Fourteen individuals participated in follow-up interviews. Intervention(s): Online WFC questionnaire followed by in-depth phone interviews. Main Outcome Measure(s): Descriptive statistics were obtained to examine perceived WFC. Pearson product moment correlations were calculated to examine the relationship between work hours, total athletic training staff, and number of children and WFC score. We performed analysis of variance to examine differences between the independent variables of sex and control over work schedule and the dependent variable of WFC score. The a priori ? was set at P ? .05. Qualitative data were analyzed using inductive content analysis. Multiple-analyst triangulation and member checks established trustworthiness of the qualitative data. Results: Mean WFC scores were 23.97 ± 7.78 for scale 1 (family defined as having a partner or spouse with or without children) and 23.17 ± 7.69 for scale 2 (family defined as individuals, including parents, siblings, grandparents, and any other close relatives, involved in one's life), indicating moderate perceived WFC. A significant relationship was found between the average hours of work per week and WFC scores: those with less scheduling control experienced more WFC. Two dimensions emerged from the qualitative methods that relate to how WFC is mitigated in the secondary school environment: (1) organizational—having colleagues and administration that understood the role demands and allowed for modifications in schedule and personal time and (2) personal—taking time for oneself and having a family that understands the work demands of an athletic trainer resulted in reduced perceived WFC. Conclusions: A large number of work hours per week and lack of control over work schedules affected the perceived level of WFC. PMID:21391804

  13. Working Nonstandard Schedules and Variable Shifts in Low-Income Families: Associations With Parental Psychological Well-Being, Family Functioning, and Child Well-Being

    Microsoft Academic Search

    JoAnn Hsueh; Hirokazu Yoshikawa

    2007-01-01

    Longitudinal data from the New Hope Project—an experimental evaluation of a work-based antipoverty program in Milwaukee, Wisconsin—was used to explore concurrent and lagged associations of nonstandard schedules and variable shifts with parental psychological well-being, regularity of family mealtimes, and child well-being among low-income families. Working a combination of variable shifts and nonstandard hours was associated concurrently with lower teacher-reported school

  14. Making families: organizational boundary work in US egg and sperm donation.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Katherine M

    2013-12-01

    Egg and sperm donation can create distinct issues for designating family boundaries. These issues come to the forefront as relations between donors, recipients, and donor-conceived children have been shifting from anonymous to more open arrangements in the US and other western countries. In this study, I address US organizational practices and family boundary construction. Fertility clinics, egg donation agencies, and sperm banks are central providers of US gamete donation services. Given the disruptive potential of gamete donation, how do they manage relationships between parties? Through a content analysis of materials from twenty fertility clinics, twenty egg donation agencies, and thirty-one sperm banks, I address three major strategies of organizational boundary work: 1) creating identity categories, 2) managing information, and 3) managing interaction. I ultimately argue that even as many organizations offer opportunities for connections between parties, they exercise social control over donation arrangements through bounded relationships. PMID:24355472

  15. The Impact of Fathers’ Work and Family Conflicts on Children’s Self-Esteem: The Hong Kong Case

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yuk King Lau

    2010-01-01

    Work and family conflicts are always viewed as issues of human resource management or occupational health. Insufficient attention\\u000a has been focused on the impact on child development and quality of parenting, especially regarding the impact of a father’s\\u000a work. To examine the impact of work and family conflicts on the quality of father–child interactions in Hong Kong, a cross-sectional\\u000a survey

  16. Florida Atlantic University School of Social Work

    E-print Network

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    Florida Atlantic University School of Social Work 1 Rev. 10-20-09 Own Agency Placement (OAP) - Policy Overview: Traditionally, Social Work field placements are educationally focused, unpaid training experiences in social work settings which are selected on the basis of the student's level and

  17. Comparison of burnout pattern between hospital physicians and family physicians working in Suez Canal University Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Kotb, Amany Ali; Mohamed, Khalid Abd-Elmoez; Kamel, Mohammed Hbany; Ismail, Mosleh Abdul Rahman; Abdulmajeed, Abdulmajeed Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The burnout syndrome is characterized by emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and low personal accomplishment. It is associated with impaired job performance. Methods This descriptive study examined 171 physicians for the presence of burnout and its related risk factors. The evaluation of burnout was through Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI). The participant was considered to meet the study criteria for burnout if he or she got a “high“ score on at least 2 of the three dimensions of MBI. Results In the current study, the prevalence of burnout in hospital physicians (53.9%) was significantly higher than family physicians (41.94%) with (p=0.001). Participants who work in the internal medicine department scored the highest prevalence (69.64%) followed by Surgeons (56.50%) and Emergency doctors (39.39%). On the other hand, Pediatricians got the lowest prevalence (18.75%). Working in the teaching hospital and being married are strong predictors for occurrence of burnout. Conclusion There is a significant difference of burnout between hospital physicians and family physicians among the study subjects. Working in the teaching hospital and being married are strong predictors for occurrence of burnout. PMID:25422682

  18. Work-family conflicts and self-rated health among middle-aged municipal employees in finland

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Torsten Winter; Eva Roos; Ossi Rahkonen; Pekka Martikainen; Eero Lahelma

    2006-01-01

    Work-family conflicts are common, but their effects on health are not well known. The aim of this study was to examine the\\u000a associations between work-family conflicts and self-rated health among middle-aged municipal employees. In addition, the effect\\u000a of social background factors on the association between work-family conflicts and self-rated health were examined. The data\\u000a were based on cross-sectional postal surveys,

  19. Family and Consumer Sciences Education. Focusing on Families, Work, and Their Interrelationships. Alabama Course of Study. Bulletin 1996, No. 17.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alabama State Dept. of Education, Montgomery.

    This guide, which is intended for classroom teachers, supervisors, and administrators throughout Alabama, contains the minimum required content (core program) for public school instruction in family and consumer sciences education in grades 7-12. Presented first are the following: introduction examining the objectives/delivery of family and…

  20. Family-supportive organization perceptions and organizational commitment: the mediating role of work-family conflict and enrichment and partner attitudes.

    PubMed

    Wayne, Julie Holliday; Casper, Wendy J; Matthews, Russell A; Allen, Tammy D

    2013-07-01

    The present study aims to explain the processes through which family-supportive organizational perceptions (FSOP) relate to employee affective commitment. We suggest multiple mechanisms through which this relationship transpires-(a) the focal employee's experience of work-to-family conflict and enrichment and (b) the attitudes of the employee's spouse/partner. Hypotheses are tested with data from 408 couples. Results suggest that employee FSOP is positively associated with employee commitment through both employee work-to-family experiences and partner attitudes. FSOP was positively related to employee work-to-family enrichment, which was positively associated with employee affective commitment. FSOP was negatively associated with employee work-to-family conflict, which related to a partner's more positive attitude toward the employee's work schedule and higher commitment to the employee's firm. Partner commitment was positively and reciprocally related to employee affective commitment. These relationships partially mediated the FSOP-employee affective commitment relationship and varied as a function of parental status and single- versus dual-earner couple status but not as a function of employee gender. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed. PMID:23565896

  1. "Doing the Job as a Parent": Parenting Alone, Work, and Family Policy in Ireland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Millar, Michelle; Coen, Liam; Bradley, Ciara; Rau, Henrike

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies of family life in Ireland have focused on changes in "traditional" family structures, including the increase in one-parent families. This article illustrates the impact dominant conceptions in Irish society that privilege the family based on marriage have on one-parent family policy. The authors focus on two key areas of social…

  2. MAKING DO: How Working Families in Seven U.S. Metropolitan Areas Trade Off Housing Costs and Commuting Times

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert Cervero; Karen Chapple; John Landis; Martin Wachs; Michael Duncan; Patricia Lynn Scholl; Evelyn Blumenberg

    2006-01-01

    This report explores how working families in seven major metropolitan regions (Atlanta, Chicago, Dallas–Ft. Worth, Los Angeles, New York City, the San Francisco Bay Area, and Baltimore–Washington) tradeoff housing and commuting costs, and how their tradeoffs differ from those of wealthier families. It is organized into five sections. Beyond this brief introduction, the report consists of five parts. Section 2

  3. Combining work and family in the Netherlands: blessing or burden for one's mental health?

    PubMed

    Oomens, Shirley; Geurts, Sabine; Scheepers, Peer

    2007-01-01

    In this article we study which characteristics of combining work and family put people at risk for mental illness. Two alternative perspectives on the impact of multiple social roles on mental health are tested: the role accumulation perspective and the role strain perspective. Both perspectives are studied with data from a cross-sectional national survey held among a large, representative sample of Dutch people (N=1008). Multivariate analyses provided support for both perspectives. Having more social roles was related to better mental health. We also found a positive mental health effect of having a full-time job in combination with having children. However, having a partner who contributes less to household duties or having a job with low decision latitude or lower skill discretion was related to mental illness. So, certain aspects of social roles may also threaten people's mental health. Overall, our findings do not support the idea that combining work and family is necessarily a burden and harmful for people's mental health. Whether multiple social roles are a blessing or burden for people's mental health seems to depend on the characteristics of the social roles. PMID:17673292

  4. Strategies for managing work/life interaction among women and men with variable and unpredictable work hours in retail sales in Québec, Canada.

    PubMed

    Messing, Karen; Tissot, France; Couture, Vanessa; Bernstein, Stephanie

    2014-01-01

    Increasingly, work schedules in retail sales are generated by software that takes into account variations in predicted sales. The resulting variable and unpredictable schedules require employees to be available, unpaid, over extended periods. At the request of a union, we studied schedule preferences in a retail chain in Québec using observations, interviews, and questionnaires. Shift start times had varied on average by four hours over the previous week; 83 percent had worked at least one day the previous weekend. Difficulties with work/life balance were associated with schedules and, among women, with family responsibilities. Most workers wanted: more advance notice; early shifts; regular schedules; two days off in sequence; and weekends off. Choices varied, so software could be adapted to take preferences into account. Also, employers could give better advance notice and establish systems for shift exchanges. Governments could limit store hours and schedule variability while prolonging the minimum sequential duration of leave per week. PMID:25085829

  5. Equipping Managers to Assist Employees in Addressing Work-Family Conflict: Applying the Research Literature toward Innovative Practice

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Debra A. Major; Heather M. Lauzun

    2010-01-01

    Although there is a great deal of research documenting that work-family conflict is a problem, the literature offers much less in the way of practical managerial guidance. Equipped with the well-documented premise that support from the immediate supervisor or manager is associated with diminished work-family conflict, the authors aimed to bridge the science–practice gap by articulating (a) the effective ways

  6. “Fit” inside the Work-Family Black Box: An Ecology of the Life Course, Cycles of Control Reframing1

    PubMed Central

    Moen, Phyllis; Kelly, Erin; Huang, Reiping

    2009-01-01

    Scholars have not fully theorized the multifaceted, interdependent dimensions within the work-family “black box.” Taking an ecology of the life course approach, we theorize common work-family and adequacy constructs as capturing different components of employees' cognitive appraisals of fit between their demands and resources at the interface between home and work. Employees' appraisals of their work-family linkages and of their relative resource adequacy are not made independently but, rather, co-occur as identifiable constellations of fit. The life course approach hypothesizes that shifts in objective demands/ resources at work and at home over the life course result in employees experiencing cycles of control, that is, corresponding shifts in their cognitive assessments of fit. We further theorize patterned appraisals of fit are key mediators between objective work-family conditions and employees' health, well-being and strategic adaptations. As a case example, we examine whether employees' assessments on ten dimensions cluster together as patterned fit constellations, using data from a middle-class sample of 753 employees working at Best Buy's corporate headquarters. We find no single linear construct of fit that captures the complexity within the work-family black box. Instead, respondents experience six distinctive constellations of fit: one optimal, two poor, and three moderate fit constellations. PMID:19809532

  7. MOTHER’S EMPLOYMENT DEMANDS, WORK-FAMILY CONFLICT, AND ADOLESCENT DEVELOPMENT*

    PubMed Central

    Chee, Kyong Hee; Conger, Rand D.; Elder, Glen H.

    2009-01-01

    This study revisited the old research question of whether or not maternal employment would adversely affect children’s development. We reframed the question by asking how a mother’s temporal employment demands might be linked to child development. We used longitudinal data from a sample of 340 white, lower- to middle-class, dual-earner families living in the rural Midwest of the United States. The data were obtained from questionnaires and videotaped observations, and were informed by the mother, the father, the adolescent child, and a trained observer. As predicted, we found a strong relationship between a mother’s temporal employment demands and work-family conflict, which was significantly associated with her emotional distress. A husband’s egalitarian gender ideology was found to reduce the mother’s emotional distress. Maternal distress was then negatively associated with nurturant and involved parenting, which in turn predicted a reduction in the adolescent child’s emotional and behavioral problems over time. PMID:20927198

  8. Liminal Cultural Work in Family Childcare: Latino Immigrant Family Childcare Providers and Bicultural Childrearing in the United States, 2002-2004

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uttal, Lynet

    2010-01-01

    Immigrants find themselves in a liminal state of limbo between two societies. In this zone, competing cultural ideas coexist. This essay examines how Latino immigrant family childcare providers in the United States questioned US norms of childrearing and how they engaged in liminal cultural work to produce a bicultural childrearing. They are…

  9. Where have they gone? – A discussion on the balancing act of female doctors between work and family

    PubMed Central

    Jerg-Bretzke, Lucia; Limbrecht, Kerstin

    2012-01-01

    Goals: The increasing number of vacant positions for doctors increasingly puts the issue of reconciling work and family into the spotlight in companies, hospitals and universities, as increased expectations of a better work-life balance are seen as one of the reasons for these vacancies. Highly qualified professionals are trained, but not available to the labour market. The aim is to summarise what difficulties doctors who want to have a family and their potential employers must face. Methods: The following articles show the current state of research and potential starting points for an optimisation of the medical profession from a family-friendly perspective and intend to stimulate debate. Results: Some basic steps towards better work-life balance have already been taken, such as the provision of childcare places and the increasing availability of more flexible working patterns. But it seems that these measures, since they have been implemented neither sufficiently nor universally, do not suffice to secure the next generation of staff. Especially women in leadership positions are still rare to find. Conclusions: Both male and female doctors want better quality of life by achieving a better work-life balance. The expansion of family-friendly services is seen as a necessary step to allow female doctors to successfully combine work and family. PMID:22558025

  10. Do Workers Who Experience Conflict between the Work and Family Domains Hit a "Glass Ceiling?": A Meta-Analytic Examination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoobler, Jenny M.; Hu, Jia; Wilson, Morgan

    2010-01-01

    Based in Conservation of Resources (COR; Hobfoll, 1989) and self-verification (Swann, 1987) theories, we argue that when workers experience conflict between the work and family domains, this should have implications for evaluations of their work performance and ultimately affect more "objective" career outcomes such as salary and hierarchical…

  11. New-Concept Part-Time Employment as a Work-Family Adaptive Strategy for Women Professionals with Small Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, E. Jeffrey; Martinson, Vjollca; Ferris, Maria

    2004-01-01

    This study investigates how the option for new-concept part-time (NPT) employment influences the ability of mothers of preschool children working in professional occupations to successfully integrate work and family responsibilities. Female NPT professionals (n=279) and female full-time (FT) professionals (n=250) were compared. The NPT group…

  12. Facing the Future: Barriers and Resources in Work and Family Plans of At-Risk Israeli Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cinamon, Rachel Gali; Hason, Iris

    2009-01-01

    This study examines 15 at-risk Israeli youngsters' work and family plans and the perceived barriers and resources influencing the realization of those plans. In-depth interviews analyzed by Consensual Qualitative Research (CQR) demonstrate the complexity of the future awaiting these youths. Participants perceive work mainly as a means of obtaining…

  13. Working nonstandard schedules and variable shifts in low-income families: associations with parental psychological well-being, family functioning, and child well-being.

    PubMed

    Hsueh, JoAnn; Yoshikawa, Hirokazu

    2007-05-01

    Longitudinal data from the New Hope Project--an experimental evaluation of a work-based antipoverty program in Milwaukee, Wisconsin--was used to explore concurrent and lagged associations of nonstandard schedules and variable shifts with parental psychological well-being, regularity of family mealtimes, and child well-being among low-income families. Working a combination of variable shifts and nonstandard hours was associated concurrently with lower teacher-reported school performance and engagement and higher levels of externalizing behavior problems. Fixed nonstandard schedules were associated with lagged decreases in parent-reported school performance, whereas working variable shifts was associated with lagged increases in parent-reported school performance. PMID:17484575

  14. Women Who Maintain Families. Facts on Working Women No. 93-3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Women's Bureau (DOL), Washington, DC.

    In 1992, 12 million families were maintained by women in the United States--a figure that more than doubled since 1970 when there were only 5.6 million such families. They accounted for 14.8 percent of all families in 1980 and 17.6 percent in 1992. Women maintained 3.5 million Black families in 1992; this represented nearly half of all Black…

  15. Working with Parents to Promote Children's Literacy: A Family Literacy Project in Uganda

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parry, Kate; Kirabo, Elizabeth; Nakyato, Gorreth

    2014-01-01

    This article discusses the importance of family practices to children's acquisition of literacy and describes attempts to influence such practices through the institution of family literacy programmes. One of these is the Family Literacy Project in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa, which both served as a model and provided material for a similar…

  16. Women's Work, Education, and Family Welfare in Peru. World Bank Discussion Papers 116.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herz, Barbara K., Ed.; Khandker, Shahidur R., Ed.

    This report examines ways of improving women's productivity and education and the consequences for development in Peru. The research finds that women account for about 39 percent of family income in Peru. They carry the main responsibility for child care and heavily influence family decisions on children's education and family size. Improving…

  17. Manager support for work/family issues and its impact on employee-reported pain in the extended care setting

    PubMed Central

    O’Donnell, Emily M.; Berkman, Lisa F.; Subramanian, Sv

    2012-01-01

    Objective Supervisor-level policies and the presence of a manager engaged in an employee’s need to achieve work/family balance, or “supervisory support,” may benefit employee health, including self-reported pain. Methods We conducted a census of employees at four selected extended-care facilities in the Boston metropolitan region (n= 368). Supervisory support was assessed through interviews with managers and pain was employee-reported. Results Our multilevel logistic models indicate that employees with managers who report the lowest levels of support for work/family balance experience twice as much overall pain as employees with managers who report high levels of support. Conclusions Low supervisory support for work/family balance is associated with an increased prevalence of employee-reported pain in extended-care facilities. We recommend that manager-level policies and practices receive additional attention as a potential risk factor for poor health in this setting. PMID:22892547

  18. Socioeconomic and gender inequalities in job dissatisfaction among Japanese civil servants: the roles of work, family and personality characteristics.

    PubMed

    Sekine, Michikazu; Tatsuse, Takashi; Cable, Noriko; Chandola, Tarani; Marmot, Michael

    2014-01-01

    This study examines (1) whether there are employment grade and gender differences in job dissatisfaction and (2) whether work, family, and personality characteristics explain grade and gender differences in job dissatisfaction. The participants were 3,812 civil servants, aged 20-65, working at a local government in Japan. In both males and females, low control, low social support, work-to-family conflict, type A behaviour pattern and negative affectivity were significantly associated with job dissatisfaction. In females, high demands, long work hours and being unmarried were also associated with job dissatisfaction. Among males, in comparison with the highest grade employees, the age-adjusted odds ratio (OR) for job dissatisfaction in the lowest grade employees was 1.90 (95% CI: 1.40-2.59). The grade differences reduced to 1.08 (0.76-1.54) after adjustment for work, family and personality characteristics. Among females, similar grade differences were observed, although the differences were not statistically significant. In comparison with males, the age-adjusted OR in females for job dissatisfaction was 1.32 (1.14-1.52). This gender difference was reduced to 0.95 (0.79-1.14) following adjustment for the other factors. The majority of employees belong to low to middle grades, and female employees have increased. Reducing grade and gender differences in work and family characteristics is needed. PMID:25055848

  19. You Can't Always Get What You Want: Incongruence between Sex-Role Attitudes and Family Work Roles and Its Implications for Marriage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McHale, Susan M.; Crouter, Ann C.

    1992-01-01

    Examined incongruencies between spouses' sex-role attitudes and division of family work and links with marital evaluations and family characteristics. Findings from 153 couples revealed that wives with nontraditional sex-role attitudes but traditional family work roles and husbands with traditional attitudes but egalitarian roles evaluated…

  20. How to add more "Family" to the Work-Life-Balance? – Family Friendliness in Medical Under- and Postgraduate Studies and the Workplace

    PubMed Central

    De Ridder, Daniela

    2012-01-01

    Today universities have to compete for the best brains more than ever before. The issues of reconciliation of work/study and family and the work-life balance have become increasingly important recently in higher education policy development as higher education institutions in the competition for the best minds are already forced to tackle these issues, some of which are still novel to them, as they are faced with demographic change. High dropout rates among students with children, increasing shortages of physicians and high sector emigration and high levels of childlessness among graduates serve as indicators for urgent action towards more family-oriented university and faculty strategies. But how can medical schools, hospitals and (teaching) hospitals achieve a family-oriented profile? Which key players, which areas of higher education management are relevant to management and decision-making structures? What exemplary measures for designing family-friendly medical studies and work places offer success? The underrepresentation of women in the next generation of scientists also poses an additional challenge to the development of an innovative higher education policy if it is to be sustainable. Thus strategies promoting the next generation and family orientation are key factors for a future-oriented higher education policy. These factors should therefore be seen as leadership strategies which will introduce measures that will make (re)design the university’s profile. To this end, a holistic approach which will lead to fundamental reforms of higher education structures which are outlined below and illustrated with examples are a prerequisite for successful implementation. PMID:22558028

  1. [The young resident between work and family. Status quo and approaches to a solution in orthopedics and traumatology].

    PubMed

    Depeweg, D; Achatz, G; Liebig, K; Lorenz, O

    2013-01-01

    The compatibility between the family and the medical profession requires a new challenge of leadership in hospitals, politics and medical societies. The generation change in the medical profession needs the implementation of modern framework conditions in the departments of orthopedics and traumatology. Topics such as work organisation, family support and programs to assist the return to work need to be discussed and should be used as a competitive advantage. Employees of generation y need a gender-independent role model in the field of modern management methods in employee leadership. PMID:23325155

  2. Work-family conflict and job burnout among correctional staff: a comment on Lambert and Hogan (2010)1.

    PubMed

    Smith, Kenneth J

    2011-02-01

    Lambert and Hogan (2010) examined the relations between work-family conflict, role stress, and other noted predictors, on reported emotional exhaustion among a sample of 272 correctional staff at a maximum security prison. Using an ordinary least squares (OLS) regression model, the authors found work-on-family conflict, perceived dangerousness of the job, and role strain to have positive relations with emotional exhaustion. However, contrary to expectation they found that custody officers reported lower exhaustion than did their noncustody staff counterparts. Suggestions are provided for follow-up efforts designed to extend this line of research and correct methodological issues. PMID:21526587

  3. Creating a TeleLearning Community for Training Social Work Practitioners Working with Troubled Youth and Their Families

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Philip M. Ouellette; Scott Sells

    2001-01-01

    With the advent of several new communication technologies and the improvement of Web-based instructional software, combining several technology-supported teaching media may be a viable added dimension to consider when teaching advanced social work practice courses. What follows is a description of how faculty from two separate universities collaborated to create a dynamic telelearning community to train social work practitioners working

  4. [The working process in the Family Health Strategy and its repercussions on the health-disease process].

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Helena Eri; de Carvalho Junior, Daniel Alvão

    2012-09-01

    This study analyzes the perceptions that health workers engaged in the Family Heath Strategy (FHS) of the Federal District (FD) have of their own work process and its repercussions on the health-illness process. It is a cross-sectional descriptive survey carried out with a sample of 243 FHS/FD workers: 139 community health agents, 47 nursing assistants, 41 nurses, and 11 doctors. Four previously validated scales were used (Evaluation of Work Context, Human Cost at Work, Pain and Pleasure, Work Inventory and Risk of illness). The results revealed a highly Taylorised type of work process management typified by a sharp work distinction between formulators and performers, highly repetitive work tasks, performance supervision and very weak formal communication between the various hierarchical levels. These factors have seriously impaired the re-regulation of the work process by confronting current objective and subjective realities with pre-existing norms. In conclusion, the Taylorised work processes, the precarious working conditions and the specific difficulties associated with providing care to families and communities in their own territories are highly stressful and debilitating and underscore the need for improved management of the respective work processes. PMID:22996891

  5. Revisiting the social construction of family in the context of work

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. Alexandra Beauregard; Mustafa Ozbilgin; Myrtle P. Bell

    2009-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate how traditional definitions of family, in the context of employment, have not kept pace with actual family formation in the USA and much of the rest of the world, and how this disadvantages individuals from atypical (i.e. non-nuclear), but increasingly common, families. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – A wide range of literature from

  6. Families as Decision-Makers: When Researchers and Advocates Work Together

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fields-Smith, Cheryl; Neuharth-Pritchett, Stacey

    2009-01-01

    Families across the United States must routinely make difficult choices about child care arrangements because of the need to resume a job, continue an education or training program, or care for other family members. Leaving children in the care of others for the first time can be difficult (Sayer, Bianchi, & Robinson, 2004; Van Horn, Ramey,…

  7. Cooperative Working towards Family-Centred Health Education in Acute Care: Improvement in Client Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bastani, Farideh; Golaghaie, Farzaneh; Farahani, Mansoureh A.; Rafeie, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To establish family-centred health education for patients in a neurosurgery unit and to evaluate its impact on patients' and families' satisfaction. Design: Cooperative participatory research through which a group of clinical nurses and an academic researcher engaged in cycles of action and reflection. Setting: The study was…

  8. The nexus between family and work roles of academic women in Israel: Reality and representation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nina Toren

    1991-01-01

    This study examines the relationships between family responsibilities and scientific and scholarly productivity of women in academia. It is commonly believed that faculty women are less productive than their male colleagues because of childbearing and other domestic duties. Though this assumption seems logical, it is not supported by evidence from a growing number of studies including the present. The family-career

  9. Family Engagement in Rural Schools. R[superscript 2]Ed Working Papers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Witte, Amanda L.; Sheridan, Susan M.

    2011-01-01

    The importance of family-school partnerships for student success is unequivocal. Given the limited resources evident in many rural communities, family-school partnerships can be especially beneficial for students in rural schools. Decades of research has documented the positive effects of parent participation in children's academic endeavors for…

  10. Exploring theatre of the oppressed in family therapy clinical work and supervision

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kerry Proctor; Amaryll Perlesz; Banu Moloney; Fiona McIlwaine; Imogen ONeill

    2008-01-01

    Augusto Boal's theatre of the oppressed (TOTO) techniques have been used in education, health, welfare, and prison systems world-wide. However, the link between family therapy clinical supervision and training and TOTO has not been explored, either in Australia or overseas. This innovative action research project explores the ways family therapists and supervisors apply these theatre techniques in their everyday practice.

  11. Working with Arab American Families: Culturally Competent Practice for School Psychologists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haboush, Karen L.

    2007-01-01

    Individuals of Arab descent residing within the United States currently number between 1.2 million and 3.9 million. These families are characterized by considerable diversity depending upon their nationality, religion, and extent of acculturation to both Western and Arab cultures. More recently, Arab families have immigrated to the United States…

  12. Is Mom Still Doing It All?: Reexamining Depictions of Family Work in Popular Advertising

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Bryan K.; Hunter, Erica

    2008-01-01

    This study examines a sample of 299 advertisements from 4 of the top 10 circulated magazines of 2005 to see how contemporary advertising depicts household labor. Modeling after previous studies that examined the depiction of gender in family advertising, this study seeks to determine whether advertising reflects the changes in families that have…

  13. Welfare, Work and Raising Children: Conversations with Twenty-One Maine Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hastedt, Christine B.; Smith, Rebekah J.

    Five years after the massive overhaul of the nation's welfare system, 21 Maine families receiving public assistance spoke about their lives during welfare reform. The following were among the key themes that emerged throughout the conversations: (1) those leaving Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) often remain poor or very nearly poor;…

  14. Conceptualising Social Change: Family, Work and the Changing Pattern of Social Reproduction

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sarah Irwin

    Developments in respect of gender and life course related claims and obligations and patterns of interdependence and mutuality provide another theme for the paper. These impact on changes in the configuration of employment and familial \\/ household relations. These issues are dominant themes within a wide literature on change in family life and patterns of employment at the turn of

  15. The Role of Personal Resources in Work-Family Conflict: Implications for Young Mothers' Well-Being

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braunstein-Bercovitz, Hedva; Frish-Burstein, Smadar; Benjamin, Benny A.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to examine the role that personal resources (person-environment [PE] congruence and personality types associated with resilience) and work-family conflict (WFC) play in the sense of well-being (as reflected by burnout and life-satisfaction) of mothers of young children. A sample of 146 mothers holding demanding…

  16. "I Teach Him Everything He Learns in School": The Acquisition of Literacy for Learning in Working Class Families. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Varenne, Herve; And Others

    Presenting an indepth examination of 12 working class families to determine what they did that either helped or hindered children in making the transition from basic literacy (the ability to decode written symbols) to advanced literacy (the ability to use writing for the acquisition of knowledge), this report focuses on 12 children, 1 from each…

  17. In search of the 'problem family': public health and social work in England and Wales 1940-70.

    PubMed

    Welshman, J

    1996-12-01

    Recent attempts to explain the decline of public health in England and Wales after 1948 have suggested that services had developed steadily but haphazardly in the interwar period, and that the lack of an underlying philosophy left Medical Officers of Health and their empires vulnerable to a range of forces that included the decline of infectious disease, the rise of hospital medicine, the growth of general practice, and the increasing professionalism of social work. Yet the argument that public health practitioners lagged behind contemporary thinking on social work in the 1950s deserves closer examination, and this article uses the rise and decline of the concept of the 'problem family' to examine the changing relationship between the two professional groups. It traces the emergence of the concept of the 'social problem group' in the 1930s, and considers why and how Medical Officers of Health and the Eugenics Society took up the idea of the 'problem family' after the Second world War. It charts how the Ministry of Health encouraged local authorities to use home helps and health visitors to tackle the 'problem family', and contrasts this medical approach with the casework methods developed by voluntary organizations and subsequently adopted by the social work profession. The article concludes that in revealing how Medical Officers of Health were out of touch with contemporary research and practice in social work, the issue of the 'problem family' helps to explain the decline of public health under the early National Health Service. PMID:11618731

  18. Role Salience, Social Support, and Work-Family Conflict among Jewish and Arab Female Teachers in Israel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cinamon, Rachel Gali

    2009-01-01

    Conceptualizing career development in a cultural and contextual framework, this study examined within-gender differences in role salience and work-family conflict (WFC) among 101 Jewish and 99 Arab female teachers (aged 23-64 years) from central Israel. The contribution of social support to women's conflict was also examined. Results highlighted…

  19. Balancing Healthy Meals and Busy Lives: Associations between Work, School, and Family Responsibilities and Perceived Time Constraints among Young Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pelletier, Jennifer E.; Laska, Melissa N.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To characterize associations between perceived time constraints for healthy eating and work, school, and family responsibilities among young adults. Design: Cross-sectional survey. Setting: A large, Midwestern metropolitan region. Participants: A diverse sample of community college (n = 598) and public university (n = 603) students.…

  20. Confidentiality Statement In this nursery we work very closely with families and outside agencies and there is a possibility

    E-print Network

    Anderson, Jim

    Confidentiality Statement In this nursery we work very closely with families and outside agencies and there is a possibility that we will come into contact with confidential information. Confidential information to enhance the welfare of their child. Respecting confidentiality The nursery will respect confidentiality

  1. Support for Families: Working with Parents and Caregivers to Support Children from Birth to Three Years of Age.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanssen, Elizabeth, Ed.; Zimanyi, Louise, Ed.

    2000-01-01

    This theme issue of Coordinators' Notebook focuses on how early childhood care and development (ECCD) programs world-wide can work with parents and caregivers to support children from birth to 3 years of age. Section 1 of the journal describes the needs of parents and families and the development of parent programs around the world. Section 2…

  2. A Comparative Analysis of Training and Development and Work-Family Education Systems in a Large Corporate Organization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibson, Sharon K.

    2005-01-01

    This paper reviews the findings of a comparative analysis of two education systems in one corporate organization: training and development and work-family. Key learning features across these systems were analyzed to determine similarities and differences and to identify common concerns. The findings indicated that, although this organization…

  3. College Women in the 21st Century: A Closer Look at Academic, Family and Work Demands on Levels of Burnout

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valoy, Glenny A.

    2012-01-01

    This study explored the contributions of background characteristics, family, academic, and work demands on levels of burnout among undergraduate females in an urban college setting and to what extent informal/formal support is related to levels of burnout. Data were obtained through the use of self-administered questionnaires, which were…

  4. Entangled strands: A process perspective on the evolution of careers in the context of personal, family, work, and community life

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mary Dean Lee; Ellen Ernst Kossek; Douglas T Hall; Jean-Baptiste Litrico

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this study is to develop a theoretical framework to illuminate the process of careers unfolding over time in an overall life context. We draw on data from a qualitative field study of the career paths of 81 professionals who pursued working on a reduced-load basis as a strategy for sustaining commitment to both their careers and family

  5. Unemployment and well-being in Europe. The effect of country unemployment rate, work ethics and family ties

    Microsoft Academic Search

    MIKUCKA Malgorzata

    2011-01-01

    Subjective well-being literature shows that higher unemployment rate corresponds to lower psychological cost of own unemployment. The goal of the paper is to deepen the understanding of this regularity by investigating the role played by the work ethics and the strength of family ties. I analyze the European Values Study data (2008) for 36 countries using multilevel regression methodology. First,

  6. WORKING WITH LOW-INCOME FAMILIES, PROCEEDINGS OF THE AHEA WORKSHOP (UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO, MARCH 15-19, 1965).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Home Economics Association, Washington, DC.

    WORK WITH LOW INCOME FAMILIES HAS BEEN PART OF THE BASIC PHILOSOPHY OF THE AMERICAN HOME ECONOMICS ASSOCIATION (AHEA) SINCE ITS INCEPTION. A NATIONAL WORKSHOP WAS ATTENDED BY STATE DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION AND U.S. OFFICE OF EDUCATION PERSONNEL, TEACHER-EDUCATORS, EXTENSION WORKERS, SOCIAL WORKERS, AND PERSONS WITH RELATED INTERESTS. TEXTS OF THE…

  7. Poor Families in 2001: Parents Working Less and Children Continue To Lag Behind. Child Trends Research Brief.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wertheimer, Richard

    With increasing unemployment in the United States, the nation has seen a drop in the percentage of children in poverty with one or more parents in the workforce, a reverse of trends evident in the late 1990s. This research brief presents a statistical snapshot of working poor families with children in 2001. Analyses revealed that in 2001 children…

  8. Linden Services for Children--Extern: A Holisitic Approach in Working with Young People with Challenging Behaviours and Their Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devlin, Angela

    2006-01-01

    Linden Services for Children is part of Extern, which is a charity within the voluntary sector. The organisation's mission is to promote social inclusion and help reduce the incidence of offending behaviour. Extern operates in both the North and South of Ireland and works with children, families, adults and communities. It aims, through assessment…

  9. Making Ends Meet: Six Programs That Help Working Families and Employers. A Guide for Business Leaders and Policymakers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patel, Nisha; Greenberg, Mark; Savner, Steve; Turetsky, Vicki

    This document is intended to provide business leaders, policymakers, and others with information about the operation and value of six work support programs designed to help low-income parents obtain the assistance needed to enter a job, retain employment, and better provide for their families' needs. The six programs profiled are as follows: the…

  10. Implementing family involvement in the treatment of patients with psychosis: a systematic review of facilitating and hindering factors

    PubMed Central

    Eassom, Erica; Giacco, Domenico; Dirik, Aysegul; Priebe, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Objective To synthesise the evidence on implementing family involvement in the treatment of patients with psychosis with a focus on barriers, problems and facilitating factors. Design Systematic review of studies evaluating the involvement of families in tripartite communication between health professionals, ‘families’ (or other unpaid carers) and adult patients, in a single-family context. A theoretical thematic analysis approach and thematic synthesis were used. Data sources A systematic electronic search was carried out in seven databases, using database-specific search strategies and controlled vocabulary. A secondary manual search of grey literature was performed as well as using forwards and backwards snowballing techniques. Results A total of 43 studies were included. The majority featured qualitative data (n=42), focused solely on staff perspectives (n=32) and were carried out in the UK (n=23). Facilitating the training and ongoing supervision needs of staff are necessary but not sufficient conditions for a consistent involvement of families. Organisational cultures and paradigms can work to limit family involvement, and effective implementation appears to operate via a whole team coordinated effort at every level of the organisation, supported by strong leadership. Reservations about family involvement regarding power relations, fear of negative outcomes and the need for an exclusive patient–professional relationship may be explored and addressed through mutually trusting relationships. Conclusions Implementing family involvement carries additional challenges beyond those generally associated with translating research to practice. Implementation may require a cultural and organisational shift towards working with families. Family work can only be implemented if this is considered a shared goal of all members of a clinical team and/or mental health service, including the leaders of the organisation. This may imply a change in the ethos and practices of clinical teams, as well as the establishment of working routines that facilitate family involvement approaches. PMID:25280809

  11. Birth-to-Work: A Systems Framework for Individual, Family, and Community Development

    E-print Network

    and rebuildingg · Economic and entrepreneurial development · Education and technology · Family development over personality disorder ­ Children of parents with clinical depression ­ Children of parents in conflict ­ Child ­ Negative emotionality, depression ­ Attention problems, ADHD ­ Shyness, social withdrawal, social phobias

  12. CARNEGIE MELLON UNIVERSITY APPLICATION FOR FAMILY AND MEDICAL LEAVE OF ABSENCE

    E-print Network

    McGaughey, Alan

    parent Care for a new child: Birth Adoption Foster care of a child Expected Date of birth, adoption or entrusted with foster care Call to Duty Leave: Eligible employees may take up to 12 weeks of unpaid leave, for Short-term Disability benefits? yes no Care of a seriously ill family member (select one) child spouse

  13. Work and family: associations with long-term sick-listing in Swedish women – a case-control study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hélène Sandmark

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The number of Swedish women who are long-term sick-listed is high, and twice as high as for men. Also the periods of sickness absence have on average been longer for women than for men. The objective of this study was to investigate the associations between factors in work- and family life and long-term sick-listing in Swedish women. METHODS: This

  14. Strengthening Parenting Skills: School Age. Learning Guide 2. Project Connect. Linking Self-Family-Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emily Hall Tremaine Foundation, Inc., Hartford, CT.

    This learning guide is designed to connect personal, family, and job responsibilities for adults and out-of-school youth in economically depressed areas of the state (including transitional ex-offenders and corrections populations) so that these individuals learn to manage and balance these aspects of their lives in order to prepare for or…

  15. Love and work: feminism, family and ideas of equality and citizenship, Britain 1900-39. 

    E-print Network

    Innes, Susan K

    1998-01-01

    The thesis is a political history and a history of ideas. It is an account of social feminism in the early twentieth century as it sought to extend the ideal of equality to the family and social citizenshp to women in ...

  16. Working with Latino Families: Challenges Faced by Educators and Civic Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lieshoff, Sylvia Cobos

    2007-01-01

    This article analyzes a subset of data gathered during a survey of 155 school systems and communities across the nation. The data were obtained from a capability survey as part of the application for a Toyota Family Literacy Program (TFLP) grant. Educators and civic leaders in 38 states responded to questions about their five greatest challenges…

  17. Family Networks and School Enrolment: Evidence from a Randomized Social Experiment. NBER Working Paper No. 14949

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Angelucci, Manuela; DeGiorgi, Giacomo; Rangel, Marcos A.; Rasul, Imran

    2009-01-01

    We present evidence on whether and how a household's behavior is influenced by the presence and characteristics of its extended family. Using household panel data from the Progresa program in rural Mexico, we exploit information on the paternal and maternal surnames of heads and spouses in conjunction with the Spanish naming convention to identify…

  18. What works in family planning interventions: A systematic review of the evidence

    PubMed Central

    Mwaikambo, Lisa; Speizer, Ilene S.; Schurmann, Anna; Morgan, Gwen; Fikree, Fariyal

    2013-01-01

    This study presents findings from a systematic review of evaluations of family planning interventions published between 1995 and 2008. Studies that used an experimental or quasi-experimental design or had another way to attribute program exposure to observed changes in fertility or family planning outcomes at the individual or population levels were included and ranked by strength of evidence. A total of 63 studies were found that met the inclusion criteria. The findings from this review are summarized in tabular format by the type of intervention (classified as supply-side or demand-side). About two-thirds of the studies found were on demand generation type-programs. Findings from all programs revealed significant improvements in knowledge, attitudes, discussion, and intentions. Program impacts on contraceptive use and use of family planning services were less consistently found and less than half of the studies that measured fertility or pregnancy-related outcomes found an impact. Based on the review findings, we identify promising programmatic approaches and propose directions for future evaluation research of family planning interventions. PMID:21834409

  19. School Personnel's Perceptions of Effective Programs for Working with Mobile Students and Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Teresa A.; Matthews, Linda; Stafford, Mary E.; Nakagawa, Kathryn; Durante, Katie

    2002-01-01

    Examined elementary school interventions perceived to address the challenges related to high student mobility. Found that schools experiencing high mobility had a diverse network of programs that provided curricular and extracurricular services including academic and family support; school personnel believed these interventions addressed either…

  20. The effect of family member migration on education and work among nonmigrant youth in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Halpern-Manners, Andrew

    2011-02-01

    While academic and policy circles have given much attention to the assimilatory experiences of Mexican immigrants in the United States, less is known about those who stay behind-an especially unfortunate oversight given the increasing number of Mexican youth with migrant family members. Of the studies on this topic, most have sought to identify the effect that migration has on youths' migratory and educational aspirations, often using qualitative methods in individual sending communities. The present article supplements this research in two ways: (1) in addition to assessing educational outcomes, the scope of the analysis is expanded to include nonmigrant' interaction with another homeland institution of upward mobility: the labor market; and (2) using a large demographic data set, statistical techniques are employed to adjust for unobserved selectivity into the migrant family-member population, thus accounting for a potentially serious source of bias. The results suggest that youth in migrant-sending families are less likely to complete the educational transitions leading up to postsecondary school and have a lower probability of participating in the local economy. The results also indicate that unobserved factors play a "nonignorable" role in sorting youth into migrant and nonmigrant families. PMID:21347807

  1. Influencing Preservice Teachers' Attitudes about Working with Low-Income and/or Ethnic Minority Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amatea, Ellen S.; Cholewa, Blaire; Mixon, Kacy A.

    2012-01-01

    There is a growing literature revealing the complexity of family-school relationships and the significant power imbalances and mismatches between the role expectations of caregivers and teachers who differ by class and race. This study investigates a course at a large research university in the Southeastern United States designed to influence the…

  2. The Effect of Family Member Migration on Education and Work among Nonmigrant Youth in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Halpern-Manners, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    While academic and policy circles have given much attention to the assimilatory experiences of Mexican immigrants in the United States, less is known about those who stay behind—an especially unfortunate oversight given the increasing number of Mexican youth with migrant family members. Of the studies that do exist, most have sought to identify the effect migration has on youths’ migratory and educational aspirations, often using qualitative methods in single sending communities. The present article supplements this research in two ways: (1) in addition to assessing educational outcomes, the scope of the analysis is expanded to include nonmigrants’ interaction with another homeland institution of upward mobility—the labor market; and (2) using a large demographic data set, statistical techniques are employed to adjust for unobserved selectivity into the migrant family-member population, thus accounting for a potentially serious source of bias. The results suggest that youth in migrant-sending families are less likely to complete the educational transitions leading up to post-secondary school, and have a lower probability of participating in the local economy. The results also indicate that unobserved factors play a “nonignorable” role in sorting youth into migrant and nonmigrant families. PMID:21347807

  3. Role of Early Family Configuration and Hours Worked on Student Success in Two-Year Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boswell, Robert A.; Passmore, David L.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine factors that influence student success in two-year colleges, community colleges, or junior colleges. In determining the purpose of the study, a research framework is established to review the relationships between student success and biological children, marriage/co-habitation, early family configuration,…

  4. Preventing Teen Pregnancy. Learning Guide 4. Project Connect. Linking Self-Family-Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emily Hall Tremaine Foundation, Inc., Hartford, CT.

    This learning guide is designed to connect personal, family, and job responsibilities for adults and out-of-school youth in economically depressed areas of the state (including transitional ex-offenders and corrections populations) so that these individuals learn to manage and balance these aspects of their lives in order to prepare for or…

  5. Caring for Children with Special Needs. BNA Special Report Series on Work & Family. Special Report #43.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ott-Worrow, Karen; Baldassano, Victoria A.

    This report examines day care needs and services for families with handicapped children. A section providing background information identifies barriers to finding day care for these children and discusses the relevance of federal legislation, especially the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990. The next section presents information on standards…

  6. International Perspectives on Work-Family Policies: Lessons from the World's Most Competitive Economies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Earle, Alison; Mokomane, Zitha; Heymann, Jody

    2011-01-01

    The United States does not guarantee families a wide range of supportive workplace policies such as paid maternity and paternity leave or paid leave to care for sick children. Proposals to provide such benefits are invariably met with the complaint that the costs would reduce employment and undermine the international competitiveness of American…

  7. REACH Detroit is a community research partnership that works with African American and Latino families, health care providers and community organiza-

    E-print Network

    Awtar, Shorya

    ). Latino and African American Family Health Advocates (FHA), Community Facilitators and Community HealthREACH Detroit is a community research partnership that works with African American and Latino to Health El Camino a la Salud The purpose of the REACH Detroit Family Intervention is to work with African

  8. Reported Levels of Time-Based and Strain-Based Conflict between Work and Family Roles in Europe: A Multilevel Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steiber, Nadia

    2009-01-01

    What are the determinants of the "subjective experience" of conflict between work and family roles among dual-earner couples in Europe? Taking a demands-and-resources approach, this study investigates the individual and macro-level factors that generate perceptions of negative spill-over from work to family. Comparative survey data for 23…

  9. Family and Medical Leave (FMLA) Request Form 1) Complete first page of form and sign on page two

    E-print Network

    He, Chuan

    Family and Medical Leave (FMLA) Request Form 1) Complete first page of form and sign on page two 2: _____________ I HEREBY REQUEST THE FOLLOWING BENEFITS BE CONTINUED DURING AN UNPAID FMLA LEAVE: ______ Medical processing of my request. I am not required to provide details about my medical condition to my supervisor

  10. The chicken or the egg? A meta-analysis of panel studies of the relationship between work-family conflict and strain.

    PubMed

    Nohe, Christoph; Meier, Laurenz L; Sonntag, Karlheinz; Michel, Alexandra

    2015-03-01

    Does work-family conflict predict strain, does strain predict work-family conflict, or are they reciprocally related? To answer these questions, we used meta-analytic path analyses on 33 studies that had repeatedly measured work interference with family (WIF) or family interference with work (FIW) and strain. Additionally, this study sheds light on whether relationships between WIF/FIW and work-specific strain support the popular cross-domain perspective or the less popular matching perspective. Results showed reciprocal effects; that is, that WIF predicted strain (? = .08) and strain predicted WIF (? = .08). Similarly, FIW and strain were reciprocally related, such that FIW predicted strain (? = .03) and strain predicted FIW (? = .05). These findings held for both men and women and for different time lags between the 2 measurement waves. WIF had a stronger effect on work-specific strain than did FIW, supporting the matching hypothesis rather than the cross-domain perspective. PMID:25285385

  11. Learning by Experience, Work and Productivity: Theory and Empirical Evidence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pankhurst, K. V.

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines the nature and significance of learning by experience during work, both paid and unpaid. Data about the relationship between costs, especially labour costs, and output have come to be interpreted as evidence of learning by experience, but these grouped data are unable to explain the nature and process of individual experience…

  12. Responding to Children's Everyday Transgressions in Chinese Working-Class Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Xiao-lei; Bernas, Ronan; Eberhard, Philippe

    2008-01-01

    This study examines how working-class mothers in the People's Republic of China respond to their young children's transgressions in everyday contexts. Twenty 4-year-old children and their mothers in a working-class neighbourhood were observed in their daily routines at home. When addressing children's transgressions and socialising desirable…

  13. Compassion fatigue and burnout in nurses who work with children with chronic conditions and their families

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jennifer C. Maytum; Mary Bielski Heiman; Ann W. Garwick

    2004-01-01

    IntroductionWith the current and ever-growing shortage of nurses in the United States, it is imperative that nurses find ways to prevent burnout and effectively manage compassion fatigue that can result from working with traumatized populations. The aim of this study is to identify the triggers and coping strategies that nurses who work with children with chronic conditions use to manage

  14. Introductory Text: Education for Social Work Practice with American Indian Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Eddie F., Ed.; Shaughnessy, Timothy F., Ed.

    Prepared for social work students and social service providers, this text is designed to help non-Indians expand their understanding of Indian customs, cultures, and life styles with the purpose of achieving greater transcultural appreciation and, consequently, more effective social work practices appropriate to Indian communities. Information is…

  15. Using Interactive Family Science Shows to Improve Public Knowledge on Antibiotic Resistance: Does It Work?

    PubMed Central

    Lecky, Donna M.; Hawking, Meredith K. D.; Verlander, Neville Q.; McNulty, Cliodna A. M.

    2014-01-01

    The public plays an important role in controlling the emergence and spread of antibiotic resistance. A large British survey showed that there is still public misunderstanding about microbes and antibiotics. e-Bug, a European DG Sanco sponsored project, aims to disseminate a school antibiotic and hygiene educational pack and website across Europe. Interactive science shows based on the e-Bug educational packs were developed to take the key health and hygiene messages from the e-Bug school resources to families. The science show was evaluated to assess public knowledge and understanding of antibiotics and antibiotic resistance pre and post intervention. An interactive stall comprised of a 3×2 m backing stand with background information, an interactive activity and discussions with a trained demonstrator was on display at a family holiday resort. Pre-piloted knowledge questionnaires were completed by parents and children pre and post intervention. Adult (?19 years) baseline knowledge regarding antibiotics and antibiotic resistance was high although significant knowledge improvement was observed where baseline knowledge was low. Children's (5–11 years) knowledge around antibiotics and antibiotic resistance was significantly improved for all questions. The science show can be viewed as a success in improving parents' and children's knowledge of antibiotic use thereby highlighting the importance of educating the public through interaction. PMID:25162505

  16. Using interactive family science shows to improve public knowledge on antibiotic resistance: does it work?

    PubMed

    Lecky, Donna M; Hawking, Meredith K D; Verlander, Neville Q; McNulty, Cliodna A M

    2014-01-01

    The public plays an important role in controlling the emergence and spread of antibiotic resistance. A large British survey showed that there is still public misunderstanding about microbes and antibiotics. e-Bug, a European DG Sanco sponsored project, aims to disseminate a school antibiotic and hygiene educational pack and website across Europe. Interactive science shows based on the e-Bug educational packs were developed to take the key health and hygiene messages from the e-Bug school resources to families. The science show was evaluated to assess public knowledge and understanding of antibiotics and antibiotic resistance pre and post intervention. An interactive stall comprised of a 3×2 m backing stand with background information, an interactive activity and discussions with a trained demonstrator was on display at a family holiday resort. Pre-piloted knowledge questionnaires were completed by parents and children pre and post intervention. Adult (?19 years) baseline knowledge regarding antibiotics and antibiotic resistance was high although significant knowledge improvement was observed where baseline knowledge was low. Children's (5-11 years) knowledge around antibiotics and antibiotic resistance was significantly improved for all questions. The science show can be viewed as a success in improving parents' and children's knowledge of antibiotic use thereby highlighting the importance of educating the public through interaction. PMID:25162505

  17. Part-time work and job sharing in health care: is the NHS a family-friendly employer?

    PubMed

    Branine, Mohamed

    2003-01-01

    This paper examines the nature and level of flexible employment in the National Health Service (NHS) by investigating the extent to which part-time work and job sharing arrangements are used in the provision and delivery of health care. It attempts to analyse the reasons for an increasing number of part-timers and a very limited number of job sharers in the NHS and to explain the advantages and disadvantages of each pattern of employment. Data collected through the use of questionnaires and interviews from 55 NHS trusts reveal that the use of part-time work is a tradition that seems to fit well with the cost-saving measures imposed on the management of the service but at the same time it has led to increasing employee dissatisfaction, and that job sharing arrangements are suitable for many NHS employees since the majority of them are women with a desire to combine family commitments with career prospects but a very limited number of employees have had the opportunity to job share. Therefore it is concluded that to attract and retain the quality of staff needed to ensure high performance standards in the provision and delivery of health care the NHS should accept the diversity that exists within its workforce and take a more proactive approach to promoting a variety of flexible working practices and family-friendly policies. PMID:12800280

  18. Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haines, Annette M.

    2003-01-01

    Draws upon Maria Montessori's writings to examine work as a universal human tendency throughout life. Discusses the work of adaptation of the infant, work of "psycho-muscular organism" for the preschooler, work of the imagination for the elementary child, community work of the adolescent, and work of the adult. Asserts that Montessorians' role is…

  19. Working on the Weekend: Fathers' Time with Family in the United Kingdom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hook, Jennifer L.

    2012-01-01

    Whereas most resident fathers are able to spend more time with their children on weekends than on weekdays, many fathers work on the weekends, spending less time with their children on these days. There are conflicting findings about whether fathers are able to make up for lost weekend time on weekdays. Using unique features of the United…

  20. Juggling the Balls--Study, Work, Family and Play: Student Perspectives on Flexible and Blended Heutagogy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashton, Jean; Elliott, Roslyn

    2007-01-01

    This article draws on research with the student cohort in one of the early childhood teacher education programmes at the University of Western Sydney, Australia. It explores students' perceptions of a flexible and blended pedagogy, or "heutagogy" which combines online work with face-to-face lectures and tutorials. Research into teaching and…

  1. Sexual Behavior, Sexual Knowledge, and Sexual Attitudes of Emerging Adult Women: Implications for Working with Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byno, Lucy H.; Mullis, Ronald L.; Mullis, Ann K.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was twofold: first, to examine the sexual behavior of emerging adult women in relation to their sexual knowledge, sexual attitudes, and perceptions of their parents' sexual attitudes; and second, to discuss the implications of this research in working with young adult women. Three hundred and sixty-four college-age women…

  2. Contemporary Work and Family Issues Affecting Marriage and Cohabitation among Low-Income Single Mothers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joshi, Pamela; Quane, James M.; Cherlin, Andrew J.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we advance and test an integrative model of the effects of employment status, nonstandard work schedules, male employment, and women's perceptions of economic instability on union formation among low-income single mothers. On the basis of the longitudinal data from 1,299 low-income mothers from the Three-City Welfare Study, results…

  3. Social Work and the Right of Psychiatric Patients to Refuse Medication: A Family Advocate's Response.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenson, Marilyn K.

    1993-01-01

    Notes that overriding a mentally ill person's refusal to take medications may pose a dilemma around the issue of patients' rights, despite opinion of many authorities that refusal is often illness related. Presents information to help promote understanding of reasons why those who work with mentally ill people should be ready to override their…

  4. Temporary Assistance for Needy Families: Implications of Recent Legislative and Economic Changes for State Programs and Work Participation Rates. Report to Congressional Requesters. GAO-10-525

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Kay E.

    2010-01-01

    The Deficit Reduction Act of 2005 (DRA) reauthorized the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) block grant and made modifications expected to strengthen work requirements for families receiving cash assistance through state TANF programs. Both the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and states were required to take steps to…

  5. 45 CFR 286.150 - Can a family, with a child under age 6, be penalized because a parent refuses to work because (s...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 true Can a family, with a child under age 6, be penalized because a...refuses to work because (s)he cannot find child care? 286.150 Section 286.150...ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS), ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN AND FAMILIES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH...

  6. 45 CFR 286.150 - Can a family, with a child under age 6, be penalized because a parent refuses to work because (s...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 false Can a family, with a child under age 6, be penalized because a...refuses to work because (s)he cannot find child care? 286.150 Section 286.150...ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS), ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN AND FAMILIES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH...

  7. 45 CFR 286.150 - Can a family, with a child under age 6, be penalized because a parent refuses to work because (s...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 false Can a family, with a child under age 6, be penalized because a...refuses to work because (s)he cannot find child care? 286.150 Section 286.150...ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS), ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN AND FAMILIES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH...

  8. 45 CFR 286.150 - Can a family, with a child under age 6, be penalized because a parent refuses to work because (s...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 false Can a family, with a child under age 6, be penalized because a...refuses to work because (s)he cannot find child care? 286.150 Section 286.150...ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS), ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN AND FAMILIES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH...

  9. 45 CFR 286.150 - Can a family, with a child under age 6, be penalized because a parent refuses to work because (s...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 true Can a family, with a child under age 6, be penalized because a...refuses to work because (s)he cannot find child care? 286.150 Section 286.150...ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS), ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN AND FAMILIES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH...

  10. Goal conflict and facilitation as predictors of work–family satisfaction and engagement

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bettina S. Wiese; Katariina Salmela-Aro

    2008-01-01

    In a study of working adults (N=131; Mean age=43.52yrs; 62 males) in Germany and Finland, the mean level of goal facilitation was found to be significantly higher than that of goal interference. Hence, many individuals seem to be rather successful in constructing a personal goal system that is functional in terms of supportive links. As hypothesized, goal conflict and facilitation

  11. The trip to bountiful: a study in family pathology in the work of horton foote.

    PubMed

    Morris, Muriel Gold

    2015-04-01

    This paper focusing on a major dramatic work by Horton Foote represents a compilation of many tragic themes he repeated over a lifetime of playwriting. The author pinpoints the psychological limitations of the characters and the problematic plot lines as they relate to Horton Foote in his own life experience. Psychoanalytic developmental theory is used to enlighten the reader with a powerful account of the playwright's struggle to fulfill his talent as well as to inform the public of the cultural problems underlying the life of the people and events of the time. PMID:25871694

  12. Strengthening Working Families Act of 2001. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Social Security and Family Policy of the Committee on Finance. United States Senate, One Hundred Seventh Congress, First Session on S. 685 (October 11, 2001).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Committee on Finance.

    This Congressional report contains the testimony and documents presented for the record of a hearing to gather input regarding the Strengthening Working Families Act of 2001, which was drafted to provide the assistance needed by former welfare recipients and other poor working parents to remain employed and advance in the labor market. The…

  13. Who's got the balance? A study of satisfaction with the work–family balance among part-time service sector employees in five western European countries

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Barbara Beham; Patrick Präg; Sonja Drobni?

    2012-01-01

    Working part-time is frequently considered a viable strategy for employees to better combine work and non-work responsibilities. The present study examines differences in satisfaction with work-family balance (SWFB) among professional and non-professional part-time service sector employees in five western European countries. Part-time employees were found to be more SWFB than full-time employees even after taking varying demands and resources into

  14. NET-Works: Linking families, communities and primary care to prevent obesity in preschool-age children?,??

    PubMed Central

    Sherwood, Nancy E.; French, Simone A.; Veblen-Mortenson, Sara; Crain, A. Lauren; Berge, Jerica; Kunin-Batson, Alicia; Mitchell, Nathan; Senso, Meghan

    2014-01-01

    Obesity prevention in children offers a unique window of opportunity to establish healthful eating and physical activity behaviors to maintain a healthful body weight and avoid the adverse proximal and distal long-term health consequences of obesity. Given that obesity is the result of a complex interaction between biological, behavioral, family-based, and community environmental factors, intervention at multiple levels and across multiple settings is critical for both short- and long-term effectiveness. The Minnesota NET-Works (Now Everybody Together for Amazing and Healthful Kids) study is one of four obesity prevention and/or treatment trials that are part of the Childhood Obesity Prevention and Treatment (COPTR) Consortium. The goal of the NET-Works study is to evaluate an intervention that integrates home, community, primary care and neighborhood strategies to promote healthful eating, activity patterns, and body weight among low income, racially/ethnically diverse preschool-age children. Critical to the success of this intervention is the creation of linkages among the settings to support parents in making home environment and parenting behavior changes to foster healthful child growth. Five hundred racially/ethnically diverse, two–four year old children and their parent or primary caregiver will be randomized to the multi-component intervention or to a usual care comparison group for a three-year period. This paper describes the study design, measurement and intervention protocols, and statistical analysis plan for the NET-Works trial. PMID:24120933

  15. Family Policies and Academic Achievement by Young Children in Single-Parent Families: An International Comparison. Population Research Institute Working Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pong, Suet-ling; Dronkers, Jaap; Hampden-Thompson, Gillian

    This study investigates the differences in the degree of low academic achievement of third and fourth graders living with single-parent families from 11 industrialized countries. The United States ranks first among the countries compared in terms of the achievement gap for children in single- and two-parent families. After controlling for…

  16. Auditory working memory impairments in individuals at familial high risk for schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Seidman, Larry J.; Meyer, Eric C.; Giuliano, Anthony J.; Breiter, Hans C.; Goldstein, Jill M.; Kremen, William S.; Thermenos, Heidi W.; Toomey, Rosemary; Stone, William S.; Tsuang, Ming T.; Faraone, Stephen V.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The search for predictors of schizophrenia has accelerated with a growing focus on early intervention and prevention of psychotic illness. Studying nonpsychotic relatives of individuals with schizophrenia enables identification of markers of vulnerability for the illness independent of confounds associated with psychosis. The goal of these studies was to develop new auditory continuous performance tests (ACPTs) and evaluate their effects in individuals with schizophrenia and their relatives. Methods We carried out two studies of auditory vigilance with tasks involving working memory (WM) and interference control with increasing levels of cognitive load to discern the information processing vulnerabilities in a sample of schizophrenia patients, and two samples of nonpsychotic relatives of individuals with schizophrenia and controls. Study 1 assessed adults (mean age = 41), and Study 2 assessed teenagers and young adults age 13-25 (mean =19). Results Patients with schizophrenia were impaired on all five versions of the ACPTs, while relatives were impaired only on WM tasks, particularly the two interference tasks that maximize cognitive load. Across all groups, the interference tasks were more difficult to perform than the other tasks. Schizophrenia patients performed worse than relatives who performed worse than controls. For patients, the effect sizes were large (Cohen’s d =1.5), whereas for relatives, they were moderate (d = ~0.40-0.50). There was no age by group interaction in the relatives –control comparison except for participants <31 years of age. Conclusions Novel WM tasks that manipulate cognitive load and interference control index an important component of the vulnerability to schizophrenia. PMID:22563872

  17. The Relationships Between Lost Work Time and Duration of Absence Spells: Proposal for a Payroll Driven Measure of Absenteeism

    PubMed Central

    Hill, James J.; Slade, Martin D.; Cantley, Linda; Vegso, Sally; Fiellin, Martha; Cullen, Mark R.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To propose a standard measure of absenteeism (the work lost rate [WLR]) be included in future research to facilitate understanding and allow for translation of findings between scientific disciplines. Methods Hourly payroll data derived from “punch clock” reports was used to compare various measures of absenteeism used in the literature and the application of the proposed metric (N = 4000 workers). Results Unpaid hours and full absent days were highly correlated with the WLR (r = 0.896 to 0.898). The highest percentage of unpaid hours (lost work time) is captured by absence spells of 1 and 2 days duration. Conclusion The proposed WLR metric captures: 1) The range and distribution of the individual WLRs, 2) the percentage of subjects with no unpaid hours, and 3) the population WLR and should be included whenever payroll data is used to measure absenteeism. PMID:18617841

  18. Work and Family: Sharing the Balance: The Union Gas Experience = Travail et la Famille: Un Equilibre a Partager: L'experience de Union Gas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ontario Women's Directorate, Toronto.

    Canadian business is changing. Competition is stiffer, markets are shifting. The workforce is also changing. Flexibility in when, where, and how work gets done is key to attracting the employees organizations need to gain a competitive edge. Many companies, organizations, and unions are recognizing the interdependence of work life and family life.…

  19. Family Therapy into the 21st Century: Can we Work our Way out of the Epistemological Maze?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David Mellor; Shane Storer; Lucy Firth

    Family therapy is a generic term used to describe a paradigm within the helping professions that encompasses a range of competing approaches which share a common view about the importance of family to maladaptive behaviours and dis- orders. The various family therapies have evolved rapidly over the last three decades, at a time when society has been attuned to innovation,

  20. An Analysis of Bronfenbrenner's Bio-Ecological Perspective for Early Childhood Educators: Implications for Working with Families Experiencing Stress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swick, Kevin James; Williams, Reginald D.

    2006-01-01

    Today's families face many stressors during the early childhood years. Particular stressors like homelessness, violence, and chemical dependence, play havoc with the family system. Urie Bronfenbrenner's bio-ecological perspective offers an insightful lens for understanding and supporting families under stress. This article presents the key…

  1. Working with families of hospitalized older adults with dementia: caregivers are useful resources and should be part of the care team.

    PubMed

    Bradway, Christine; Hirschman, Karen B

    2008-10-01

    Families provide a considerable amount of informal care and support for older adults living with dementia. And when an older adult with dementia is hospitalized, family caregivers should be seen as important sources of information and included as valuable members of the health care team. This article describes a best-practice approach to working with families and includes recommendations for using the Information for the Hospital Team About a Patient with Memory Problems form. For a free online video demonstrating the use of this form, go to http://links.lww.com/A301. PMID:18827544

  2. Work

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Stern, David P. (David Peter), 1931-

    Authored and curated by David P. Stern, these web pages introduce the concept of work and its relation to energy. An example of electric work and energy using the example of a Van de Graaff Generator. These pages are part of "From Stargazers to Starships", an extensive web site that introduces topics in physics and astronomy using space exploration and space science. Translations are available in French and Spanish.

  3. Work Time and Learning Activities of the Continuously Employed: A Longitudinal Analysis, 1998-2004

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Livingstone, David; Stowe, Susan

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine the paid and unpaid work time and learning activities of a small longitudinal sample (n=286) of continuously employed Canadians over the 1998-2004 period. Design/methodology/approach: A sub-sample of those who responded to two national surveys carried out in 1998 and 2004 and who were continuously…

  4. Women swell ranks of working poor.

    PubMed

    1996-01-01

    Despite expanded global female employment (45% of women aged 15-64 years are economically active), women still comprise 70% of the world's 1 billion people living in poverty. Moreover, women's economic activities remain largely confined to low-wage, low-productivity forms of employment. A report by the International Labor Organization (ILO), prepared as a follow-up to the Fourth World Conference on Women and the World Summit for Social Development, identified discrimination in education as a central cause of female poverty and underemployment. Each additional year of schooling is estimated to increase a woman's earnings by 15%, compared to 11% for a man. At the workplace, women face inequalities in terms of hiring and promotion standards, access to training and retraining, access to credit, equal pay for equal work, and participation in economic decision making. In addition, even women in higher-level jobs in developing countries spend 31-42 hours per week in unpaid domestic activities. The ILO has concluded that increasing employment opportunities for women is not a sufficient goal. Required are actions to improve the terms and conditions of such employment, including equal pay for work of equal value, improved occupational safety and health, enhanced security in informal or atypical forms of work, guarantees of freedom of association and the right to organize and bargain collectively, and appropriate maternity protection and child care provisions. Finally, taxation and social welfare policies must be rewritten to accommodate the reality that women are no longer the dependent or secondary earner in families. PMID:12320523

  5. Associations between work family conflict, emotional exhaustion, musculoskeletal pain, and gastrointestinal problems in a sample of business travelers.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Maria Therese; Rundmo, Torbjørn

    2015-02-01

    The aim of the study was to examine the associations among work-family conflict (WFC), emotional exhaustion, musculoskeletal (MS) pain, and gastrointestinal problems on a sample of business travelers (n = 2,093). An additional aim was to examine differences in the mentioned relationships among three traveler groups: commuters, national travelers, and international travelers. The study was conducted in a large Norwegian oil and gas company, and the company's business travel database was utilized to examine business travel. Structural equation modeling (SEM) revealed significant relations between WFC and emotional exhaustion and between emotional exhaustion and health problems. Contrary to the expectations, no direct association was found between WFC and health problems. However, we found that emotional exhaustion mediated the relation between WFC and health outcomes. The results from multi-group analysis revealed that associations among WFC, emotional exhaustion, and health-outcomes showed a similar pattern for commuters, national travelers, and international travelers. However, the association between emotional exhaustion and MS pain proved to be significantly stronger for the commuter group compared to the national and international travel groups. Practical implications and the consequences of these findings for future research are discussed. PMID:25363417

  6. Work and Family Patterns of American Women. The Family Life Cycle: 1985; [and] Maternity Leave Arrangements: 1961-85. Current Population Reports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Current Population Reports, 1990

    1990-01-01

    The two papers in this report focus on some of the social, demographic, and economic consequences of the increasing entry of women into the workforce. Arthur Norton and Louisa Miller in "The Family Life Cycle: 1985" show trends in the frequency and timing of marriage, divorce, remarriage, and fertility across several generations of women. Martin…

  7. Working

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    A new special section in the New York Times, Working, features articles on the American worker. For example, the current issue contains stories on the contrast between the recent trend in layoffs and employers's complaints that they are unable to fill job openings; what is "retaining and motivating...the American worker"; and the shortage of qualified legal talent. The site also offers a great deal of career and job advice such as an article on non-traditional jobs, job forecasts, and office design. Interviews include an audio piece with Robert B. Reich, the former US Secretary of Labor. And of course, what would a newspaper section on work be without a link to the Dilbert comic strip?

  8. Family Planning Programs: The Clients' Perspective. World Bank Staff Working Papers No. 676 and Population and Development Series No. 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ainsworth, Martha

    Lowering fertility will require both a reduction in desired family size and provision of family planning services that respond to clients' needs. The World Fertility Survey and the Contraceptive Prevalence Survey found sizable groups of women with an "unmet need" for contraception. Investigators have also found evidence of unanswered need among…

  9. Changes in the Formation and Structure of Black Families: The Impact on Black Women. Working Paper No. 182.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAdoo, Harriette Pipes

    This paper attempts to dispel stereotypes about black family structures through an examination of the impact of demographic trends on black women. Topics covered include the following: (1) the structure of black families from the arrival of black slaves in North America through the 1950's; (2) the impact that the historical structure and…

  10. Race, Class, and Schooling: Multicultural Families Doing the Hard Work of Home Literacy in America's Inner City

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Guofang

    2010-01-01

    Drawing on a larger ethnographic study, this article documents (a) how and for what purposes literacy is used in 3 culturally diverse families of low socioeconomic status and (b) what various cultural, socioeconomic, and environmental factors shape the families' literacy practices in their home milieus in an urban context. Data analysis revealed…

  11. European journal of social work. . Author manuscript Caretakers of children with HIV in extended and foster families: The French

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ; extended families ; care ; foster families BACKGROUNDS The issue of the future of children, infected or not of them suffer from disruption in caregiving. In the USA, foster care by adults other than the biological), the situation of children living with relatives or in foster care was analysed. Following a brief review of the

  12. This course examines Canadian child welfare systems, policies and programs and teaches skills for working with children, families and substitute caregivers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gary Dumbrill

    Attention is paid to the knowledge, approaches and social work skills that address the personal troubles children and families face and also the social issues that cause or compound these troubles. This perspective emerges from the school mission statement: As social workers, we operate in a society characterized by power imbalances that affect us all. These power imbalances are based

  13. Nutrition and Wellness Resource Guide. A Resource for Teaching the Nutrition and Wellness Core Course Area of Ohio's Work and Family Life Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kister, Joanna; And Others

    This guide is designed to assist vocational home economics teachers in implementing the nutrition and wellness course that is one of the six core course areas of Ohio's Work and Family Life program. Included in the guide are an introduction providing an overview of the practical problems proposed in the nutrition and wellness core course area,…

  14. Social Factors in the Health of Families: A Public Health Social Work Responsibility. Proceedings of a Conference (Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, March 23-26, 1986).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    St. Denis, Gerald C., Ed.

    This document contains a list of planning committee members, institute participants, an introduction by Gerald C. St. Denis a program agenda, and institute presentations from this conference. The following presentations are included: (1) "Social Factors in the Health of Families: A Public Health Social Work Responsibility" (Stanley F. Battle); (2)…

  15. North Carolina's Homeless Families: Issues for the 90's. Papers from an Invitational Working Conference (Raleigh, North Carolina, January 24, 1991).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Relos, Ruth, Ed.

    The North Carolina Conference for Social Services invited North Carolina policymakers and service providers to participate in a working conference in January 1991. The conference addressed issues relating to homeless families in North Carolina. Goals of the conference were to: (1) increase the potential for collaboration on behalf of homeless…

  16. Interrelationships between Work Life and Family Life. Proceedings, Silver Jubilee Conference, Illinois Teacher of Home Economics (Urbana, Illinois, April l8-2l, 1982).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spitze, Hazel Taylor, Ed.

    These conference proceedings examine the interrelationships between work life and family life and explore ways in which home economics education can contribute to the solution of attendant problems. The opening session includes a welcome and an introduction to the topic. Other papers address (1) the evolution of the role of women; (2) inflation…

  17. Transforming Training. Families Matter.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Gwen

    The Families Matter series of papers from the Harvard Family Research Project advances the concept of family-centered child care, advocating an approach to early childhood education that addresses the development of the child and family together. Grounded in family support principles, which build on family strengths and work from a community's…

  18. Reaching out or missing out: approaches to outreach with family carers in social care organisations

    PubMed Central

    Moriarty, Jo; Manthorpe, Jill; Cornes, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    Outreach is advocated as a way of improving the uptake of services among underserved populations and of filling the gaps between mainstream services and the populations they are intended to support. Despite the policy emphasis on providing better help for family carers, research consistently shows that many of those providing unpaid care to a family member or friend report difficulties in finding out about the assistance to which they are entitled. This article presents results from a concurrent mixed-methods study, which aimed to describe different ways of working with family carers in adult social care departments and to collect the views of a range of stakeholders about the advantages and disadvantages of the approaches that were identified. A total of 86 semi-structured face-to-face interviews were undertaken with a purposive sample of funders, carers' workers, representatives of voluntary organisations and family carers based in four contrasting localities. An email survey was sent to all local councils in England with social care responsibilities and resulted in a 53% response rate. Data collection took place in 2012, with a small number of interviews being completed in 2011. Our approach to data analysis combined methodological, data and theoretical triangulation. The findings presented here mainly draw on the interview data to highlight the different models of outreach that we identified. The article highlights important differences between outreach and the provision of information. It concludes that organisations providing support for carers need to consider the advantages and disadvantages of different models of outreach as they develop carers' support and the extent to which different models might be more effective than others in reaching particular types of carer. PMID:25331912

  19. Association between Work-Family Conflict and Depressive Symptoms among Chinese Female Nurses: The Mediating and Moderating Role of Psychological Capital

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Junhui; Wu, Di; Liu, Li; Li, Xirui; Wu, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Depressive symptoms have been in the limelight for many kinds of people, but few studies have explored positive resources for combating depressive symptoms among Chinese nurses. The purpose of this study is to explore the association between work-family conflict (WFC) and depressive symptoms among Chinese female nurses, along with the mediating and moderating role of psychological capital (PsyCap) in this relationship. This cross-sectional study was completed during the period of September and October 2013. A questionnaire that consisted of the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale, the Work-Family Conflict scale and the Psychological Capital Questionnair scale was distributed to nurses in Shenyang, China. A total of 824 individuals (effective response rate: 74.9%) participated. Asymptotic and resampling strategies explored the mediating role of PsyCap in the relationship between WFC and depressive symptoms. Hierarchical linear regression analyses were performed to explore the moderating role of PsyCap. Both WFC and family-work conflict (FWC) were positively related with depressive symptoms. PsyCap positively moderated the relationship of WFC with depressive symptoms. Self-efficacy and hope positively moderated the relationship of WFC with depressive symptoms. PsyCap partially mediated the relationship of FWC with depressive symptoms. Hope and optimism partially mediated the relationship of FWC with depressive symptoms. Work-family conflict, as the risk factor of depressive symptoms, can increase nurses’ depressive symptoms, and PsyCap is a positive resource to combat nurses’ depressive symptoms. PsyCap can aggravate the effects of WFC on depressive symptoms and FWC can impact PsyCap to increase nurses’ depressive symptoms. PMID:26075725

  20. Quality_Family Deployment: A New Perspective in Determining Priority Importance for Improving Work Performance in Organization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fatimah, P. L. Rika; Jemain, A. A.; Ibrahim, K.; Nasir, S. Mohammad; Anuar, M. A. Khairul

    2009-01-01

    Determining priority importance is a matter of concerns among the organization to improve their performance. One of the important aspects that should be considered by the organization is management of human resources, comprising of members who have their own family life. In this paper, we deliver a new perspective for organization to provide…

  1. Men Who Are Abusive to Their Female Intimate Partners: Incorporating Family of Origin Work into Group Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Musick-Neily, Erin Francess; McBride, Dawn Lorraine

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines and provides a rationale for incorporating past victimization into group treatment for men who have been abusive to their female intimate partners. It begins with providing a general overview of the issue of family violence in Canada and in the U.S including statistics and an overview of group treatment effectiveness overall.…

  2. Examining the Impact of Workplace Supports: Work-Family Fit and Satisfaction in the U.S. Military

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McFadyen, Jennifer M.; Kerpelman, Jennifer L.; Adler-Baeder, Francesca

    2005-01-01

    The current study sought to discover whether workplace support provided by Army Family Team Building (AFTB) of the Department of the Army was associated with changes in individual knowledge of basic Army lifestyle information, and whether such changes influenced a sense of fit and satisfaction with the Army. Data were collected from 69 Army wives.…

  3. The Role of the Farm Family in Integrated Rural Development: The Decision Making Matrix Approach. Working Paper No. 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Obura, Willis Bill

    Rural Africa includes some 80% of the African population; its people are poverty stricken, illiterate, ill-sheltered, and ill-nourished. These circumstances make rural development absolutely vital. However, past rural development policies have failed to take into consideration the structure and division of labor in the farm family, the traditional…

  4. Family Incomes in the 1980s: New Pressure on Wives, Husbands, and Young Adults. Working Paper No. 103.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rose, Stephen; Fasenfest, David

    This study examined family income developments between 1979 (the last business cycle peak) and 1986 (the latest year for which comprehensive data were available). The analyses were based on the 1980 and 1987 Current Population Survey March Supplement Data collected by and made available through the Bureau of the Census (and therefore dealing with…

  5. Work Family liFeBalancing joB and personal responsiBilities continued on page 2...

    E-print Network

    Ginzel, Matthew

    Es "You always were Mom's favorite" 4 parEntIng Bullying...when and how to step in 5 on thE job Yes by a variety of factors, including inborn temperament, ed- ucational experiences, family style and values Goldstein, Ph.D. W hat do most parents want for their children? High on the list are happiness, success

  6. The Boat People and Achievement in America. A Study of Family Life, Hard Work, and Cultural Values.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caplan, Nathan; And Others

    A longitudinal study of the economic self-sufficiency and academic achievement of Indochinese refugees, commonly known as "Boat People," concludes that cultural background and family influence play key roles in achievement in American society. Statistical data were drawn from two surveys of 6,775 individuals in 1,384 Chinese, Laotian, and…

  7. The Timmons Savings Plan: A Working Document on a Plan to Encourage Families to Save for College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tierney, Michael L.

    The Timmons Savings Plan, which encourages families to save toward college costs, is analyzed. This plan allows for periodic (non-tax deductible) contributions to an account administered by the U.S. Department of the Treasury. The amount deposited would be matched by the federal government in exchange for the government's earning the interest on…

  8. Low-Skill Workers' Access to Quality Green Jobs. Perspectives on Low-Income Working Families. Brief 13

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinson, Karin; Stanczyk, Alexandra; Eyster; Lauren

    2010-01-01

    This brief discusses strategies for improving access to green jobs among those with low skill levels, particularly jobs that can help improve workers' economic standing and better support their families. In order to understand where green jobs for low-skill individuals can be found, the first section provides an overview of green industries and…

  9. Assisting the Elderly and Individuals with Disabilities. Learning Guide 15. Project Connect. Linking Self-Family-Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emily Hall Tremaine Foundation, Inc., Hartford, CT.

    This learning guide on assisting the elderly and individuals with disabilities is part of a series of learning guides developed for competency-based adult consumer and homemaking education programs in community colleges, adult education centers, community centers, and the workplace. Focus is on the connections among personal, family, and job…

  10. Families & Friendships

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Traumatic Brain Injury Life Stress Health & Wellness Anger Stigma Suicide Prevention Families with Kids Alcohol and Drugs ... Resilience Satisfaction with Life Sexual Truama Sleep Spirituality Stigma Stress Work Adjustment Worry Videos Post-Traumatic Stress ...

  11. Lagged effects of family-supportive organization perceptions and supervision in relation to generalized work-related resources.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Russell A; Toumbeva, Tatiana H

    2015-07-01

    In the present study, grounded in organizational support and social exchange theory, the dynamic lagged interplay between family supportive supervision (FSS), family supportive organization perceptions (FSOP), perceived organizational support (POS), and leader-member exchange (LMX) was examined. Data were collected from 435 respondents over 3 time points with 6-week lags between assessments. Consistent with theory, FSS had a significant lagged effect on FSOP, whereas the reverse relationship was not supported. Interestingly, contrary to conservation of resources theory, we did not find significant lagged effects between POS and FSOP. Results further indicated that LMX and FSS were reciprocally related over time, suggesting the potential for a dynamic, mutually beneficial exchange relationship between subordinates and supervisors. Theoretical implications and considerations for research and practice are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:25402223

  12. Family Issues for the Nineties.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mirabelli, Alan

    This presentation reviews the characteristics of the Canadian family at present. Discussion focuses on divorce, family structure, reproductive technology, fertility, family size, family mobility, family support, government role, women's participation in the labor force, daily family routines, television viewing, work and the family, the need for…

  13. AN FMRI STUDY OF SPATIAL WORKING MEMORY IN CHILDREN WITH PRENATAL ALCOHOL EXPOSURE: CONTRIBUTION OF FAMILIAL HISTORY OF ALCOHOL USE DISORDERS

    PubMed Central

    Norman, Andria L.; O’Brien, Jessica W.; Spadoni, Andrea D.; Tapert, Susan F.; Jones, Kenneth Lyons; Riley, Edward P.; Mattson, Sarah N.

    2013-01-01

    Background Heavy prenatal alcohol exposure leads to widespread cognitive deficits, including problems with spatial working memory (SWM). Neuroimaging studies report structural and functional abnormalities in FASD, but interpretations may be complicated by the co-occurrence of a family history of alcoholism. Since, this history is also linked to cognitive deficits and brain abnormalities, it is difficult to determine the extent to which deficits are unique to prenatal alcohol exposure. Methods Age-matched subjects selected from two neuroimaging studies, underwent functional imaging while engaging in a task assessing memory for spatial locations relative to a vigilance condition assessing attention. Pairwise comparisons were made for the following three groups: children with histories of heavy prenatal alcohol exposure (ALC, n=18); those with no prenatal alcohol exposure, but a confirmed family history of alcoholism (FHP, n=18); and non-exposed, family history negative controls (CON, n=17). Results Relative to CON and FHP, the ALC group showed increased BOLD response in the left middle and superior frontal gyri for the spatial working memory condition relative to the vigilance condition (SWM contrast). Additionally, the ALC group showed unique BOLD response increases in the left lingual gyrus and right middle frontal gyrus relative to CON, and left cuneus and precuneus relative to FHP. Both ALC and FHP showed greater activation compared to CON in the lentiform nucleus and insular region. Conclusions These results confirm previous studies suggesting SWM deficits in FASD. Differences between the ALC group and the CON and FHP groups suggest the left middle and superior frontal region may be specifically affected in alcohol-exposed children. Conversely, differences from the CON group in the lentiform nucleus and insular region for the ALC and FHP groups may indicate this region is associated with family history of alcoholism rather than specifically with prenatal alcohol exposure. PMID:23072431

  14. Family Literacy Schools, teachers and

    E-print Network

    Ellis, Randy

    1 Family Literacy Schools, teachers and family literacy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 A snapshot of National Family Literacy . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 A representative community organization . . . 7 Supporting regional cooperation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Family Literacy: Programming that Works

  15. The Effect of Work\\/Family Conflict on Intention to Quit: The Mediating Roles of Job and Life Satisfaction

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Joseph C. Rode; Michael T. Rehg; John R. Underhill

    2007-01-01

    Research has shown consistently that job satisfaction predicts turnover, but much less attention has been given to the how\\u000a relationships between work and nonwork or how overall subjective evaluations of life (i.e., life satisfaction) affects turnover.\\u000a We tested a model that included job satisfaction, life satisfaction, and conflict between work and nonwork domains of life\\u000a as predictors of intent to

  16. Associations between strain in domestic work and self-rated health: A study of employed women in Sweden

    Microsoft Academic Search

    CARIN STALAND-NYMAN; KRISTINA ALEXANDERSON; GUNNEL HENSING

    Aim: The aim of this study was to analyse the association between strain in domestic work and self-rated health among employed women in Sweden, using two different methods of measuring strain in domestic work. Methods: Questionnaire data were collected on health and living conditions in paid and unpaid work for employed women (n51,417), aged 17-64 years. ''Domestic job strain'' was

  17. Does Context Matter? How the Family, Peer, School, and Neighborhood Contexts Relate to Adolescents' Civic Engagement. CIRCLE Working Paper #64

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkenfeld, Britt

    2009-01-01

    This working paper is a summary of the author's dissertation, submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for her doctoral degree under the supervision of Dr. Judith Torney-Purta (successfully defended February 4, 2009). In her study she explored potential explanations for disparities in adolescent civic engagement through a comprehensive…

  18. PROVIDING OUTREACH TO FAMILIES OF YOUTH WITH DISABILITIES FROM CULTURALLY AND LINGUISTICALLY DIVERSE BACKGROUNDS BY WORKING WITH CULTURAL GROUPS AND COMMUNITY ORGANIZATIONS

    E-print Network

    Williams, Tracey Rachelle

    2010-08-10

    , parents set rules for their children, thus, creating boundaries in their relationship. Boundaries that families set in the environment may include those relationships with a non-family member such as a teacher, therapist, pastor or family friend...

  19. An Analytical Comparison of the Opinions of Physicians Working in Emergency and Trauma Surgery Departments at Tabriz and Vienna Medical Universities Regarding Family Presence during Resuscitation

    PubMed Central

    Soleimanpour, Hassan; Behringer, Wilhelm; Tabrizi, Jafar Sadegh; Sarahrudi, Kambiz; Golzari, Samad E J; Hajdu, Stefan; Rasouli, Maryam; Nikakhtar, Mehdi; Mehdizadeh Esfanjani, Robab

    2015-01-01

    The present study evaluated the opinions of physicians working in the emergency and trauma surgery departments of Vienna Medical University, in Austria, and Tabriz Medical University, in Iran, regarding the presence of patients’ relatives during resuscitation. In a descriptive-analytical study, the data obtained from questionnaires that had been distributed randomly to 40 specialists and residents at each of the participating universities were analyzed. The questionnaire consisted of two sections aimed at capturing the participants’ demographic data, the participants’ opinions regarding their support for the family’s presence during resuscitation, and the multiple potential factors affecting the participants’ attitudes, including health beliefs, triggers that could facilitate the procedure, self-efficacy, intellectual norms, and perceived behavioral control. The questionnaire also included a direct question (Question 16) on whether the participants approved of family presence. Each question could be answered using a Likert-type scale. The results showed that the mean scores for Question 16 were 4.31 ± 0.64 and 3.57 ± 1.31 for participants at Vienna and Tabriz universities, respectively. Moreover, physicians at Vienna University disapproved of the presence of patients’ families during resuscitation to a higher extent than did those at Tabriz University (P = 0.018). Of the studied prognostic factors affecting the perspectives of Vienna Medical University’s physicians, health beliefs (P = 0.000; B = 1.146), triggers (P = 0.000; B = 1.050), and norms (P = 0.000; B = 0.714) were found to be significant. Moreover, of the studied prognostic factors affecting the perspectives of Tabriz Medical University’s physicians, health beliefs (P = 0.000; B = 0.875), triggers (P = 0.000; B = 1.11), self-efficacy (P = 0.001; B = 0.5), and perceived behavioral control (P = 0.03; B = 0.713) were significant. Most physicians at Vienna and Tabriz Medical universities were not open towards family members’ presence during resuscitation. PMID:25905799

  20. Work time and learning activities of the continuously employed : A longitudinal analysis, 1998-2004

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David Livingstone; Susan Stowe

    2007-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to examine the paid and unpaid work time and learning activities of a small longitudinal sample (n=286) of continuously employed Canadians over the 1998-2004 period. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – A sub-sample of those who responded to two national surveys carried out in 1998 and 2004 and who were continuously employed throughout this period was

  1. Working Women Working Together

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Working Women Working Together, a site created by the American Federation of Labor-Congress of Industrial Organizations (AFL-CIO), focuses on the wag gap. On average, American working women make $0.74 for every dollar earned by men, meaning that working women make an average of $148 dollars a week less than men. Working Women Working Together contains several fact sheets and data tables which compare salaries between men and women, as well as project the impact that equal pay would have on American families. The site also contains annotated links, several email distribution lists, and fact sheets on related topics including the world wage gap, retirement, and flexible work schedules.

  2. When Citizens Become Consumer-Producers: Immaterial Labour and the Unpaid Work of Patrons in the Library as Place and Virtual Space

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Siobhan Stevenson

    This paper situates the public library's adoption of Web 2.0 technologies within the wider context of the historic transformation of the public library user\\/patron into an information consumer\\/producer. Analyzing fifty years of Ontario library policies, the question of who benefits from the immaterial and free labour of these customers is revealed. Résumé : Cette communication situe l'adoption par les bibliothèques

  3. Welfare Policies and Black Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trader, Harriet Peat

    1979-01-01

    The family is an important resource for minority persons, and many minority families depend on public welfare for their survival. This article offers a compact analysis of how welfare policies often work to the disadvantage of poor Black families. (Author)

  4. Work Adjustment

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Traumatic Brain Injury Life Stress Health & Wellness Anger Stigma Suicide Prevention Families with Kids Alcohol and Drugs ... Resilience Satisfaction with Life Sexual Truama Sleep Spirituality Stigma Stress Work Adjustment Worry Videos Post-Traumatic Stress ...

  5. Risky Situations: Vulnerable Children. Working with Families Who Have Children, Ages Birth to 5, Who Are at Risk of Maltreatment with a Focus on Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Deb; And Others

    Information on the prevention of child maltreatment is provided, as well as methods and programs to respond to the maltreatment of children with disabilities, ages birth to 5 years. Challenges to providing effective service delivery are addressed, along with the family perspective and total family needs. Risk factors that affect family functioning…

  6. Work-Family Conflict, Part II: Job and Life Satisfaction in National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I-A Certified Athletic Trainers

    PubMed Central

    Mazerolle, Stephanie M; Bruening, Jennifer E; Casa, Douglas J; Burton, Laura J

    2008-01-01

    Context: Previous researchers have shown that work-family conflict (WFC) affects the level of a person's job satisfaction, life satisfaction, and job burnout and intentions to leave the profession. However, WFC and its consequences have not yet been fully investigated among certified athletic trainers. Objective: To investigate the relationship between WFC and various outcome variables among certified athletic trainers working in National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I-A settings. Design: A mixed-methods design using a 53-item survey questionnaire and follow-up in-depth interviews was used to examine the prevalence of WFC. Setting: Division I-A universities sponsoring football. Patients or Other Participants: A total of 587 athletic trainers (324 men, 263 women) responded to the questionnaire, and 12 (6 men, 6 women) participated in the qualitative portion of the mixed-methods study. Data Collection and Analysis: We calculated Pearson correlations to determine the relationship between WFC and job satisfaction, life satisfaction, and job burnout. Regression analyses were run to determine whether WFC was a predictor of job satisfaction, job burnout, or intention to leave the profession. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and then analyzed using the computer program N6 as well as member checks and peer debriefing. Results: Negative relationships were found between WFC and job satisfaction (r ?=? ?.52, P < .001). Positive were noted between WFC and job burnout (r ?=? .63, P < .001) and intention to leave the profession (r ?=? .46, P < .001). Regression analyses revealed that WFC directly contributed to job satisfaction (P < .001), job burnout (P < .001), and intention to leave the profession (P < .001). Conclusions: Overall, our findings concur with those of previous researchers on WFC and its negative relationships to job satisfaction and life satisfaction and positive relationship to job burnout and intention to leave an organization. Sources of WFC, such as time, inflexible work schedules, and inadequate staffing, were also related to job burnout and job dissatisfaction in this population. PMID:18833314

  7. The effects of two different incentives on recruitment rates of families into a prevention program.

    PubMed

    Heinrichs, Nina

    2006-07-01

    This study experimentally manipulated two incentives for participation (monetary: paid participation for sessions and setting: group vs. individual) in a child behavior problem prevention program to analyze their effects on recruitment and retention of families. A population of 690 eligible families from 15 preschools located in socially disadvantaged neighborhoods was invited to participate in a parent training (PT) program. The study recruited parents by using advertisements that had information describing only the indicated condition (i.e., PT in group-unpaid, or PT individual-unpaid, or PT in group-paid, or PT individual-paid). Results demonstrate significant impact of payment on recruitment and initial attendance. Training setting alone (individual or group) did not significantly influence these rates. Editors' Strategic Implications: A compelling case is made for the utility of monetary incentives to increase proportions of low-income families in prevention research and programs. Evaluators and program designers should note the impressive use of the experimental design and hierarchical linear modeling to test the effects on recruitment. PMID:16802074

  8. Food Security and Hunger in Poor, Mother-Headed Families in Four U.S. Cities. The Project on Devolution and Urban Change Working Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polit, Denise F.; London, Andrew S.; Martinez, John M.

    Drawing on 1998-99 survey and ethnographic data from research on the implementation and effects of welfare reform in four large cities, this paper describes the food security of mother-headed families in highly disadvantaged urban neighborhoods who had received or currently receive cash welfare benefits. The families of four groups of women were…

  9. Behind Family Lines : Family members? adaptations to military-induced separations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Manon Daniëlle Andres

    2010-01-01

    The interrelation between work and family life has long been recognized and in many of today?s Western societies, both men and women face the challenges of combining work and family demands. Above and beyond the widespread prevalence of work affecting family, work is especially likely to bear upon family life in the course of job-induced separations. In such instances, work

  10. 45 CFR 261.15 - Can a family be penalized if a parent refuses to work because he or she cannot find child care?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...because he or she cannot find child care? 261.15 Section...PROGRAMS), ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN AND FAMILIES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES ENSURING...because he or she cannot find child care? (a) No, the...

  11. The Parent Services Project. Families Matter.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Lisa; Seiderman, Ethel

    The Families Matter series of papers from the Harvard Family Research Project advances the concept of family-centered child care, advocating an approach to early childhood education that addresses the development of the child and family together. Grounded in family support principles, which build on family strengths and work from a community's…

  12. Social Work 0 -1 Social Work Today

    E-print Network

    Jones, Graeme A.

    School of Social Work #12;Contents 0 - 1 Social Work Today 2 - 3 The World of Social Work 4 - 11 standards that govern their social work practice. Typical service users include: G Children and families people with health and social care needs. Social work is difficult and challenging: it demands maturity

  13. Family and Child Sciences This sheet has sample occupations, work settings, employers, and career development activities associated with this major. Some of these

    E-print Network

    Ronquist, Fredrik

    development activities associated with this major. Some of these options may require additional training Occupations 4-H Specialist Activities Director Alcohol Treatment Counselor Business, Family, and Consumer.........................................IIA CF-G6 Careers for Kids at Heart & Others Who Adore Children

  14. Child Care Indicators, 1998. Part I: Preliminary Figures [and] Part II: County Aggregates, Working Poor Families, Child Care Workforce. Research Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuller, Bruce; Kipnis, Fran; Siegel, Patricia

    Rising maternal employment, welfare reform, and increased preschool enrollment contribute to accelerating family demand for child care in California, and federal and state governments have responded by doubling support for child care and preschool programs between 1996 and 1999. However, there is little information available on how child care…

  15. The Well-Being of Children in Working Poor and Other Families: 1997 and 2004. Child Trends Research Brief. Publication #2008-33

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wertheimer, Richard; Moore, Kristin Anderson; Burkhauser, Mary

    2008-01-01

    When Congress reformed the welfare system in 1996, major goals of the legislation were to increase employment and income of needy families and to decrease child poverty. Another major goal was to improve child outcomes through increased parental employment and earnings along with other provisions of welfare reform. However, there was also concern…

  16. Providers and Families: Do They Have the Same Views of Early Childhood Programmes? Some Questions Raised by Working on Early Childhood Education in the Lao People's Democratic Republic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emblen, Valerie

    1998-01-01

    Examines what providers of early childhood programs and children's families want from the program, comparing responses from Laos and England. Considers decision-making roles and the need for early childhood education to provide a foundation for the child's future. Suggests that different theories and practices deserve respect and should be…

  17. Family-School Connections in Rural Educational Settings: A Systematic Review of the Empirical Literature. R[superscript 2]Ed Working Papers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Semke, Carrie A.; Sheridan, Susan M.

    2011-01-01

    Parental participation and cooperation in children's educational experiences is positively related to important student outcomes. It is becoming increasingly evident that context is a significant factor in understanding academic achievement, and the setting in which a child, family, and school is situated is among the salient contexts…

  18. Afterschool Programs: Making a Difference in America's Communities by Improving Academic Achievement, Keeping Kids Safe and Helping Working Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Afterschool Alliance, 2008

    2008-01-01

    This 2-page resource describes the benefits of afterschool programs for children, youth, and families, including evidence of improved school attendance and engagement learning, improved test scores and grades, and students at greatest risk showing the greatest gains. Additional benefits of afterschool programs include keeping kids safe, healthy,…

  19. Parental Job Loss and Children's Educational Attainment in Black and White Middle-Class Families. National Poverty Center Working Paper Series #10-06

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalil, Ariel; Wightman, Patrick

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: We aim to understand why blacks are significantly less likely than whites to perpetuate their middle class status across generations. To do so, we focus on the potentially different associations between parental job loss and youth's educational attainment in black and white middle class families. Methods: We use data from the Panel…

  20. Family Systems Consultation: Opportunities for Teaching in Family Medicine

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Susan H. McDaniel; Thomas Campbell; Lyman C. Wynne; Timothy Weber

    1988-01-01

    Family-systems consultation offers opportunities to teach residents basic concepts and relevant skills for working with families in family medicine. The application of systems theory to the consultation process helps clarify the role of the consultant-teacher in relation to the patient or family and the consultee-practitioner. Residents are able to gain experience interviewing and assessing families from their own practices with

  1. Globalization of the economy and women's work in a sustainable society.

    PubMed

    Mies, M

    1998-01-01

    This article critiques theories of development and growth models, which are not compatible with conservation of resources, women's empowerment, and a sustainable society. Affluent societies are using up most of the world's resources in unsustainable ways. Industrial giants have co-opted the term "sustainability." This gender discussion addresses the issue of patriarchal and capitalist systems and presents a new theoretical framework. The author disagrees with the global division of labor, where women are manipulated as producer-housewives and consumer-housewives, and with the global level of violence against women, in general. Gender equality is not viable in the present patriarchal order. In all economic theories, women's work is a free resource and invisible as unpaid housework and nurturing work. The globalization of the economy leads to greater capital and power concentration in the hands of a few. Women are ill served by structural adjustment policies. New global restructuring has improved the welfare of Third World elites. Globalization of capital and new technology makes ethics obsolete. A new economic model must be based on the preservation of life at the center, with livelihood based on wage labor and unpaid work, control of communal assets, and solidarity of communities. Unpaid necessary social labor must be shared by men and women equally. The checklist for change includes, for example, that money would be a means of circulation, not of accumulation. Nature would be reintegrated into economics. There must be new meanings for work, productive labor, economics, the good life, satisfaction of needs, and political structures. PMID:12179928

  2. "Only Connect"--A Sexually Abused Girl's Rediscovery of Memory and Meaning as She Works towards the Transition from a Therapeutic Community to a Foster-Family

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cant, Diana

    2005-01-01

    This paper looks at the role of individual psychotherapy with a severely sexually abused girl in a therapeutic community, and the place of this work as she makes the transition into foster-care. It emphasizes the importance, not only of the individual work, but also of the drawing together of the work around the child, particularly at such a…

  3. Family Folklore

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kotkin, Amy J.; Baker, Holly C.

    1977-01-01

    Discusses the Family Folklore Program of the Smithsonian Institution's annual Festival of American Folklife, in which the whole family can be involved in tracing family history through story telling, photographs, etc. (MS)

  4. Family History Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bookmark, 1991

    1991-01-01

    The 12 articles in this issue focus on the theme of family history resources: (1) "Introduction: Family History Resources" (Joseph F. Shubert); (2) "Work, Credentials, and Expectations of a Professional Genealogist" (Coreen P. Hallenbeck and Lewis W. Hallenbeck); (3) "Computers and Genealogy" (Theresa C. Strasser); (4) "Finding Historical Records…

  5. Black Families. Interdisciplinary Perspectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheatham, Harold E., Ed.; Stewart, James B., Ed.

    Since the early 1960s, the black family has been characterized as pathological. This six-part collection of 18 research studies presents alternative approaches to understanding the special characteristics of black families. Part I, "Theoretical and Methodological Perspectives," comprises a comparison of the pioneering work of W. E. B. Du Bois and…

  6. Adlerian Family Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dinkmeyer, Don; Dinkmeyer, Don, Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Discusses the competencies basic to Adlerian therapy--including influencing psychological movement, working with the family communication system, focusing on the real issue, aligning goals and dealing with resistance, stimulating social interest, encouragement, and tentative hypotheses, and antisuggestion. A specific process for helping the family

  7. Child Care Resource and Referral Agencies: Training Child Care Providers To Support Families. Families Matter.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kreider, Holly M.; Hurd, Tracey L.

    The Families Matter series of papers from the Harvard Family Research Project advances the concept of family-centered child care, advocating an approach to early childhood education that addresses the development of the child and family together. Grounded in family support principles, which build on family strengths and work from a community's…

  8. Social Work Social work engages with individuals,

    E-print Network

    Social Work Social work engages with individuals, families, communities and societies to improve and professional development. www.uwindsor.ca/socialwork A Bachelor of Social Work degree can lead to careers and advocacy associations. A Rigorous, Enriching Program The mission of the School of Social Work is to promote

  9. Helping Friends and Family

    MedlinePLUS

    ... counselor specializing in treating families dealing with a chronic illness. Notify school social workers and teachers about your ... professional who has experience working with people facing chronic disease can help one or both of you deal ...

  10. Families with Kids

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Traumatic Brain Injury Life Stress Health & Wellness Anger Stigma Suicide Prevention Families with Kids Alcohol and Drugs ... Resilience Satisfaction with Life Sexual Truama Sleep Spirituality Stigma Stress Work Adjustment Worry Videos Post-Traumatic Stress ...

  11. Family Privilege

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seita, John R.

    2014-01-01

    Family privilege is defined as "strengths and supports gained through primary caring relationships." A generation ago, the typical family included two parents and a bevy of kids living under one roof. Now, every variation of blended caregiving qualifies as family. But over the long arc of human history, a real family was a…

  12. Family Adventure Questionnaire: Results and Discussion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillis, H. L.; And Others

    This article presents the results of a survey conducted with 44 adventure programs working with families. Results of the survey show that the majority of families served by family adventure programs are step families. The source of the programs' primary referrals were mental health or medical staff. Programs reported that they worked almost…

  13. Limited Engagements? Women’s and Men’s Work/Volunteer Time in the Encore Life Course Stage

    PubMed Central

    Moen, Phyllis; Flood, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    Americans are living healthier and longer lives, but the shifting age distribution is straining existing and projected social welfare protections for older adults (e.g., Social Security, Medicare). One solution is to delay retirement. Another is an alternative to “total leisure” retirement -- an “encore” stage of paid or unpaid engagement coming after career jobs but before infirmities associated with old age. We draw on gendered life-course themes together with data from the American Time Use Survey (2003–2009) to examine the real time American men and women ages 50–75 apportion to paid work and unpaid volunteer work on an average day, as well as factors predicting their time allocations. We find that while full-time employment declines after the 50s, many Americans allot time to more limited engagements – working part time, being self-employed, volunteering, helping out – through and even beyond their 60s. Caring for a child or infirm adult reduces the odds of paid work but not volunteering. While time working for pay declines with age (though more slowly for men than women), time volunteering does not. Older men and women in poor health, without a college degree, with a disability or SSI income are the least likely to be publicly engaged. This social patterning illustrates that while the ideal of an encore of paid or unpaid voluntary, flexible, and meaningful engagement is an emerging reality for some, it appears less attainable for others. This suggests the importance of organizational and public policy innovations offering all Americans a range of encore opportunities. PMID:24273348

  14. 45 CFR 261.31 - How many hours must a work-eligible individual participate for the family to count in the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...subsidized private-sector employment; subsidized public-sector employment; work experience; on-the-job training; job search and job readiness assistance; community service programs; vocational educational training; and providing...

  15. 45 CFR 261.31 - How many hours must a work-eligible individual participate for the family to count in the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...subsidized private-sector employment; subsidized public-sector employment; work experience; on-the-job training; job search and job readiness assistance; community service programs; vocational educational training; and providing...

  16. 45 CFR 261.31 - How many hours must a work-eligible individual participate for the family to count in the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...subsidized private-sector employment; subsidized public-sector employment; work experience; on-the-job training; job search and job readiness assistance; community service programs; vocational educational training; and providing...

  17. 45 CFR 261.31 - How many hours must a work-eligible individual participate for the family to count in the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...subsidized private-sector employment; subsidized public-sector employment; work experience; on-the-job training; job search and job readiness assistance; community service programs; vocational educational training; and providing...

  18. Job Families Booklet Human Resources

    E-print Network

    Doran, Simon J.

    Job Families Booklet Human Resources University of Surrey #12;Job Families summarise the main features of roles which are similar in character and engaged in broadly similar work. There are four Job Families, which will cover the vast majority of jobs within the University. They are: · Operational

  19. Teaching Family Reunification: A Sourcebook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warsh, Robin; And Others

    Each year, many of the children in family foster care, group homes, or residential treatment centers are reunited with their families. This sourcebook is intended to aid the development of well-trained service providers who work with family reunification. The information here, presented in four parts, can be used for agency staff development…

  20. Family Textbooks Twelve Years Later

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glenn, Norval D.

    2009-01-01

    In 1996 the author conducted an intensive study of twenty current family textbooks published in the United States, the results of which appeared in an academic journal article and a nonacademic report in 1997. The study included practical "functionalist" marriage and family textbooks and more academic sociology of the family books; these works