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1

Professionalizing familial care: examining nurses' unpaid family care work.  

PubMed

An emergent grounded theory was used to examine Professionalizing Familial Care, the processes by which registered nurses enact professional care work within the familial care domain. A sample of registered nurses (n = 32) were interviewed by telephone at multiple time points over a 6- to 12-month period. The findings revealed that the professionalization of care work was often reinforced by societal, familial, and self-expectations. Setting Limits and Making Connections were the dialectical overarching processes shaping the professionalizing of care while 6 interdependent substrategies emerged: assessing, advising, advocating, collaborating, coordinating, and consulting. These findings will help inform refinement of policies and practices for nurses who provide care for an older relative. PMID:24786201

St-Amant, Oona; Ward-Griffin, Catherine; Brown, Judith Belle; Martin-Matthews, Anne; Sutherland, Nisha; Keefe, Janice; Kerr, Michael S

2014-01-01

2

Defining Disability for Women and the Problem of Unpaid Work.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses political, theoretical, and methodological issues in defining and measuring paid and unpaid work disability. Presents results of study analyzing disability in paid work and unpaid family work among 206 women with rheumatoid arthritis, demonstrating feasibility of measuring disability in family work and showing that women experience…

Reisine, Susan T.; Fifield, Judith

1988-01-01

3

The Influence of Unpaid Work on the Transition out of Full-Time Paid Work  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: Continued employment after retirement and engagement in unpaid work are both important ways of diminishing the negative economic effects of the retirement of baby boomer cohorts on society. Little research, however, examines the relationship between paid and unpaid work at the transition from full-time work. Using a resource perspective…

Carr, Dawn C.; Kail, Ben Lennox

2013-01-01

4

What Is the Value of Unpaid Work? = Quelle est la valeur du travail non remunere?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This issue of the Canadian journal "Transition" includes a feature story entitled "Unpaid Work--(How) Can You Measure It? Should You Even Try?" which explores issues surrounding unpaid work done in and around the home in Canada, largely by women. It reviews government and independent statistics on the subject, examines the question of including…

Theilheimer, Ish, Ed.

1994-01-01

5

Output-Related Evaluations of Unpaid Household Work: A Challenge for Time Use Studies.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Reviews monetary evaluations of unpaid household work, taking as a starting point the output of household productive activity. Outlines possibilities for further developments and desirable characteristics of such evaluations. (JOW)

Goldschmidt-Clermont, Luisella

1983-01-01

6

Overlooked, overworked: women's unpaid and paid work in the health services' "cost crisis".  

PubMed

Dewaging shifts work from the marketplace to the household. The shift seems a short-term strategy used by capitalists, governmental policy-makers, and managers to reduce the wage bill for service workers in such areas as schooling, retailing, health services, and banking. In health services, the expansion of women's unpaid nursing in the household and a new labor process among paid nursing workers are necessary for new corporate and federal cost-containment strategies. Registered and licensed nurses, nurse's assistants and aides see their jobs eliminated, expanded, or moved from one work site to another. Increased use of outpatient clinics, in-and-out hospital stays of less than one day, and shortened hospital stays mean sick people in their homes, not hospitals. The work of caring for the sick does not disappear, however, though people may go without. Much nursing work is shifted to patients and to their families, and even to friends and neighbors. Within the family, women's unwaged work is central, supporting the new labor process among paid nurses. Wives, mothers, daughters, friends, etc., do the work once done for pay in clinics and hospitals. PMID:3346113

Glazer, N Y

1988-01-01

7

5 CFR 630.403 - Substitution of sick leave for unpaid family and medical leave to care for a covered servicemember.  

...leave for unpaid family and medical leave to care for a covered servicemember. 630.403...leave for unpaid family and medical leave to care for a covered servicemember. The...S.C. 6382(a)(3) for leave to care for a covered servicemember may...

2014-01-01

8

Relatively Different? How Do Gender Differences in Well-Being Depend on Paid and Unpaid Work in Europe?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Absolute as well as relative hours of paid and unpaid work may influence well-being. This study investigates whether absolute hours spent on paid work and housework account for the lower well-being among women as compared to men in Europe, and whether the associations between well-being and hours of paid work and housework differ by gender…

Boye, Katarina

2009-01-01

9

Labor Market Work and Home Care's Unpaid Caregivers: A Systematic Review of Labor Force Participation Rates, Predictors of Labor Market Withdrawal, and Hours of Work  

PubMed Central

As people continue to age and receive complex health care services at home, concern has arisen about the availability of family caregivers and their ability to combine employment with caregiving. This article evaluates the international research on unpaid caregivers and their labor market choices, highlighting three conclusions: first, caregivers in general are equally as likely to be in the labor force as noncaregivers; second, caregivers are more likely to work fewer hours in the labor market than noncaregivers, particularly if their caring commitments are heavy; and finally, only those heavily involved in caregiving are significantly more likely to withdraw from the labor market than noncaregivers. Policy recommendations are targeting greater access to formal care for “intensive” caregivers and developing workplace policies for employed caregivers.

Lilly, Meredith B; Laporte, Audrey; Coyte, Peter C

2007-01-01

10

How Family, Community, and Work Structured High Blood Pressure AccountsFrom African Americans in Washington State  

Microsoft Academic Search

High blood pressure is one of the most often researched, yet least understood health disparities among African Americans. This descriptive, critical discourse analysis examined how family and community demographics and paid and unpaid work structured participants' accounts of high blood pressure experiences in Washington State. Thirty-seven urban-dwelling African American women (n = 17) and men (n = 20) in Washington

Doris M. Boutain; Clarence Spigner

2008-01-01

11

The Academic Effects of After-School Paid and Unpaid Work among 14-Year-Old Students in TIMSS Countries  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

What it means to be a "student" varies within and between countries. Apart from the wide variety of school types and school quality that is experienced by young people, there also is, accompanying increased rates of school participation, a growing population of students who work part-time. The theoretical and actual consequences of student work

Post, David; Pong, Suet-ling

2009-01-01

12

Women and work: a ten year retrospective.  

PubMed

A look back, after a decade, at the issues surrounding women and work. Work options, childcare and family concerns, the glass ceiling, sexual harassment, women entrepreneurs, race and poverty, unpaid work, and women with disabilities are discussed. PMID:15920308

MacRae, Nancy

2005-01-01

13

Work and Family. Special Focus.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This newsletter issue focuses on issues concerning families with both parents employed outside the home and describes several employer programs designed to help employees balance their work and family life. The newsletter includes the following articles: (1) "Work and Family: 1992"; (2) "Levi Strauss and Co.--A Work/Family Program in Action"; (3)…

Goetz, Kathy, Ed.

1992-01-01

14

Work - Family Researchers Electronic Network  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Sponsored by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation and maintained by the Center for Work and Family at Boston College, this site was established to facilitate information dissemination for work-family researchers. The Work-Family Researchers Electronic Network is comprised of four major components: the Work-Family Research Literature Database, the Work-Family Researchers' Discussion Groups, the Work-Family Research Newsletter, and Sloan Grantee Information. The searchable literature database contains over 1,000 bibliographic citations with annotations for selected articles, books, book chapters, reports, and papers in the work-family field. The discussion group section currently provides four fora for exchanging ideas on work and family. The Work-Family Research Newsletter recently posted its first issue online. Information about Sloan grantees and their projects are available in the final section.

15

Work-Family Facilitation and Conflict, Working Fathers and Mothers, Work-Family Stressors and Support  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Work-family research frequently focuses on the conflict experienced by working mothers. Using data from the National Study of the Changing Workforce (N = 1,314), this study also examined work-family facilitation and working fathers. Ecological systems, family stress, family resilience, and sex role theories were used to organize the data and…

Hill, E. Jeffrey

2005-01-01

16

Nebraska's Families: Poverty Despite Work.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The high poverty rate (13.8 percent) among Nebraska's children is cause for concern, since there is strong evidence that poverty can hinder development and adversely affect children's ability to become productive adults. It is commonly assumed that poor children live in families where parents could work but do not. Yet in Nebraska, of poor…

Lazere, Edward B.; Ostrom, Kristin Anderson

17

Balancing Work & Family. A Teaching Guide.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This curriculum guide provides materials for four units: work/family life-style choices, balancing work/family roles, work influences on family life, and family influences on work life. Three teaching methods are used consistently throughout the curriculum: role playing, case studies, and interviews. Each unit is composed of 5 to 10 lessons. There…

Iowa State Univ. of Science and Technology, Ames. Dept. of Family and Consumer Sciences Education.

18

Helping Families Transition from Welfare to Work.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An extension program, Building Nebraska Families, works with Employment First families, Nebraska's welfare reform program, to teach family management and life skills using an individualized, flexible curriculum to help families make successful transitions from welfare to work. Evaluation strategies include an entry/exit behavior checklist and…

Thayer, Carol E.; Fox, Marilyn; Koszewski, Wanda

2002-01-01

19

Work time, work interference with family, and psychological distress  

Microsoft Academic Search

Despite public concern about time pressures experienced by working parents, few scholars have explicitly examined the effects of work time on work-family conflict. The authors developed and tested a model of the predictors of work time and the relationships between time, work interference with family (WIF), and psychological distress. Survey data came from 513 employees in a Fortune 500 company.

Virginia Smith Major; Katherine J. Klein; Mark G. Ehrhart

2002-01-01

20

The Future of Work and Family.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The debate about work-family relationships must focus on the nature of family life, the place of women in the new economy, the needs of children, and the future of an aging population. Because the workplace has limited capacity to meet work-family needs, partnerships with government services are needed. (JOW)

Edgar, Don

1999-01-01

21

"Opportunity" in Paid vs. Unpaid Public Relations Internships: A Semantic Network Analysis.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Compares differences in benefit appeal in letters offering internships written by the business community to an internship director. Finds the promise of "opportunity" and "for credit" appears more often in unpaid internship offers; emphasis was placed on writing skills and work-related tasks in paid internship offers. Reveals the business…

Maynard, Michael L.

1997-01-01

22

Work time, work interference with family, and psychological distress.  

PubMed

Despite public concern about time pressures experienced by working parents, few scholars have explicitly examined the effects of work time on work-family conflict. The authors developed and tested a model of the predictors of work time and the relationships between time, work interference with family (WIF). and psychological distress. Survey data came from 513 employees in a Fortune 500 company. As predicted, several work and family characteristics were significantly related to work time. In addition, work time was significantly, positively related to WIF, which in turn was significantly, negatively related to distress. The results suggest that work time fully or partially mediates the effects of many work and family characteristics on WIF. PMID:12090600

Major, Virginia Smith; Klein, Katherine J; Ehrhart, Mark G

2002-06-01

23

Caution: Families at Work = Attention: Families au Travail.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This publication, in English and French, reports on the work-family conflict in Canada, gauges progress over the past decade, and examines how views have changed. The following articles are featured: (1) "Caution: Families at Work" (Ish Theilheimer), an examination of current workplace innovations, viewpoints of employers and employees, and the…

Theilheimer, Ish, Ed.; Eisner, Kathy, Ed.

1996-01-01

24

Adolescents, Work, and Family: An Intergenerational Developmental Analysis. Understanding Families.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This book contains eight chapters focused on various facets of adolescent work experiences and their effects on the student, the family, and the student's relationship to school, based on research conducted during the Youth Development Study. "Work, Family, and Adolescent Development" (Jeylan T. Mortimer, Michael D. Finch) summarizes earlier…

Mortimer, Jeylan T., Ed.; Finch, Michael D., Ed.

25

[Counseling work with foreign families].  

PubMed

In spite of informations about a rapid change of behavioral patterns, immigrant children, youth and families have problems to keep their identity and being understood in the guest countries. Assistance of any kind and especially counseling in intrapsychic and social conflicts has to follow special topics. There are not only language barriers, the adviser has to take care of the ethnological background and the social-cultural conditions of the home country, he has to know about loyalty mechanisms to the family of origin, to manage closeness and distance in interactional relationship. Often he has also to help children and adult persons to experience self-confidence and self-conciousness in solving psychological problems instead of helplessness and waiting for magic and mystic help. PMID:1584731

Gerhardt, U

1992-03-01

26

Work\\/Family Border Theory: A New Theory of Work\\/Family Balance  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article introduces work\\/family border theory - a new theory about work\\/family balance. According to the theory, people are daily border-crossers between the domains of work and family. The theory addresses how domain integration and segmentation, border creation and management, border-crosser participation, and relationships between border-crossers and others at work and home influence work\\/family balance. Propositions are given to guide

Sue Campbell Clark

2000-01-01

27

Work/Family Conflicts: Policy Implications.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In the past 20 years, the percentage of married women in the Canadian labor force has risen dramatically. Despite women's increased participation in the labor force, child care and housework are still largely done by women. While the difficulty of combining work and family responsibilities can result in work/family conflicts, a variety of…

Baker, Maureen

28

Supervisor referrals to work-family programs.  

PubMed

Supervisors play an important role in determining whether employees use work-family programs. Yet little research has examined the factors that relate to supervisor perceptions of and behaviors surrounding work-family programs. This study builds on past research, the theory of reasoned action, and expectancy theory to explore factors that contribute to supervisors' decisions to refer subordinates to work-family programs. Usable surveys assessing perceptions of work-family programs were completed and returned by 1972 managers in a large government agency. Results revealed that program awareness and instrumentality perceptions both contributed uniquely to predicting the frequency of supervisors' referrals to work-family programs. Supportive attitudes also predicted referrals, but only through their shared relationship with instrumentality perceptions. PMID:15053713

Casper, Wendy J; Fox, Kevin E; Sitzmann, Traci M; Landy, Ann L

2004-04-01

29

Dual Work Families: New Sex Roles.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The ways men and women in dual work families wish to divide or share commitments to work and parenting were studied. Seventy-five dual work couples in which both parents work at least 35 hours a week and were responsible for at least one pre-school child ...

A. Hochschild

1982-01-01

30

Ideas That Work in ABE Family Literacy.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This guide provides a work-in-progress family literacy curriculum. The materials are intended to be adapted to fit the parents in the specific setting. Each of 14 sections contains a number of activities that support the following ideas: documenting parents as the first teachers of their children using family portfolios; parent support time;…

Northwest Regional Literacy Resource Center, Seattle, WA.

31

When Work-Family Benefits Are Not Enough: The Influence of Work-Family Culture on Benefit Utilization, Organizational Attachment, and Work-Family Conflict.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Managers' and professionals' (n=276) perceptions of a supportive work/family culture were related to use of work-family benefits. Employees in organizations with work-family benefits reported greater commitment, less intention to leave, and less work-family conflict. Supportive culture was significantly related to work attitudes. (SK)

Thompson, Cynthia A.; Beauvais, Laura L.; Lyness, Karen S.

1999-01-01

32

Working Fathers: New Strategies for Balancing Work and Family.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

With the steady rise in the number of women joining the workforce, fathers are taking on more responsibility for the nurturing of their children, partly by necessity but often by choice, while still retaining their "breadwinner" pressures. This book is intended to help men reconcile the demands of work and family. It is based on a decade of…

Levine, James A.; Pittinsky, Todd L.

33

Daily consequences of work interference with family and family interference with work  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study proposes that inter-role conflict and its consequences fluctuate on a daily basis, and that both family interference with work and work interference with family should be investigated. The authors propose a model in which the two types of inter-role conflict predict strain (cognitive difficulties, anxiety and depression), which in turn predicts marital behaviour (withdrawal and anger), Specifically, cognitive

Karyl E. Macewen; Julian Barling

1994-01-01

34

Clarifying Relationships among Work and Family Social Support, Stressors, and Work-Family Conflict  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Although work and family social support predict role stressors and work-family conflict, there has been much ambiguity regarding the conceptual relationships among these constructs. Using path analysis on meta-analytically derived validity coefficients (528 effect sizes from 156 samples), we compare three models to address these concerns and…

Michel, Jesse S.; Mitchelson, Jacqueline K.; Pichler, Shaun; Cullen, Kristin L.

2010-01-01

35

Negative Affectivity, Role Stress, and Work-Family Conflict.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Measures of job and family stress and negative affectivity were completed by 148 (of 400) Hong Kong civil service employees. Persons with high negative affectivity experience more work and family stress. Job stress was associated with extensive interference of work with family, and family stress with extensive interference of family with work.…

Stoeva, Albena Z.; Chiu, Randy K.; Greenhaus, Jeffrey H.

2002-01-01

36

Work and Family. Employers' Views. Monograph No. 11.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The increasing number of families in which both partners work has focused attention on the relationship between work and family environments, and the consequences when employers and employees attempt to balance work and family responsibilities. This qualitative study explored whether the connections between family and work life were identified as…

Wolcott, Ilene

37

Work-Family Planning Attitudes among Emerging Adults  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Using social learning theory as a framework, we explore two sets of antecedents to work and family role planning attitudes among emerging adults: their work-family balance self-efficacy and their perceptions of their parents' work-to-family conflict. A total of 187 college students completed a questionnaire concerning their work-family balance…

Basuil, Dynah A.; Casper, Wendy J.

2012-01-01

38

Work-Family Conflict, Children, and Hour Mismatches in Australia  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article helps integrate research on work hours and work-family issues by examining how work-family conflict is related to the desire for more and fewer hours of work. Using the first wave of the Household Income and Labor Dynamics in Australia survey, we find that work-to-family conflict is associated with a desire for fewer hours of work.…

Reynolds, Jeremy; Aletraris, Lydia

2007-01-01

39

46 CFR 545.2 - Interpretation of Shipping Act of 1984-Unpaid ocean freight charges.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Interpretation of Shipping Act of 1984-Unpaid ocean freight charges. 545.2 Section 545...MARITIME COMMISSION REGULATIONS AFFECTING OCEAN SHIPPING IN FOREIGN COMMERCE INTERPRETATIONS...Interpretation of Shipping Act of 1984âUnpaid ocean freight charges. Section...

2013-10-01

40

Clarifying Work-Family Intervention Processes: The Roles of Work-Family Conflict and Family Supportive Supervisor Behaviors  

PubMed Central

Drawing on a conceptual model integrating research on training, work-family interventions, and social support, we conducted a quasi-experimental field study to assess the impact of a supervisory training and self-monitoring intervention designed to increase supervisors' use of family supportive supervisor behaviors. Pre- and post-intervention surveys were completed, nine months apart, by 239 employees at six intervention (N = 117) and six control (N = 122) grocery store sites. Thirty-nine supervisors in the six intervention sites received the training consisting of one hour of self-paced computer-based training, one hour of face-to-face group training, followed by instructions for behavioral self-monitoring (recording the frequency of supportive behaviors) to support on-the-job transfer. Results demonstrated a disordinal interaction for the effect of training and family-to-work conflict on employee job satisfaction, turnover intentions and physical health. In particular, for these outcomes, positive training effects were observed for employees with high family-to-work conflict, while negative training effects were observed for employees with low family-to-work conflict. These moderation effects were mediated by the interactive effect of training and family-to-work conflict on employee perceptions of family-supportive supervisor behaviors. Implications of our findings for future work-family intervention development and evaluation are discussed.

Hammer, Leslie B.; Kossek, Ellen E.; Anger, W. Kent; Bodner, Todd; Zimmerman, Kristi L.

2010-01-01

41

Antecedents and Outcomes of Work–Family Conflict: Testing a Model of the Work–Family Interface  

Microsoft Academic Search

A comprehensive model of the work–family interface was developed and tested. The proposed model extended prior research by explicitly distinguishing between work interfering with family and family interfering with work. This distinction allowed testing of hypotheses concerning the unique antecedents and outcomes of both forms of work–family conflict and a reciprocal relationship between them. The influence of gender, race, and

Michael R. Frone; Marcia Russell; M. Lynne Cooper

1992-01-01

42

Family Care Responsibilities and Employment: Exploring the Impact of Type of Family Care on Work-Family and Family-Work Conflict  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study compared work-family and family-work conflict for employed family caregivers with disability-related care responsibilities in contrast to employed family caregivers with typical care responsibilities. Using data from the 2002 National Study of the Changing Workforce, a population-based survey of the U.S. workforce, formal and informal…

Stewart, Lisa M.

2013-01-01

43

Negative Affectivity, Role Stress, and Work–Family Conflict  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined the mechanisms by which negative affectivity (NA) influences two directions of work–family conflict: work interference with family (W> F conflict) and family interference with work (F> W conflict). We found that NA indirectly affected W> F conflict through its effect on job stress and indirectly affected F> W conflict through its effect on family stress. In addition,

Albena Z. Stoeva; Randy K. Chiu; Jeffrey H. Greenhaus

2002-01-01

44

Working to End Family Homelessness. Annual Report  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The National Center on Family Homelessness is determined to end family homelessness. Sheltering families provides a temporary safe haven. Connecting families to permanent housing, essential services, and critical supports can change their lives forever. Through research the Center learns what families need to rebound from the housing, economic,…

National Center on Family Homelessness (NJ1), 2012

2012-01-01

45

Can natural family planning really work?  

PubMed

The natural family planning project of the Family Life Apostolate (FLA) in the Philippines is aimed specifically at teaching couples about the value of marriage and responsible parenthood rather than at preventing conception. The project receives no outside funding. An evaluation study of the project conducted in 1986 by the Research Institute for Mindanao Culture of Xavier University in Cagayan de Oro City lends support to the claim of success in reaching the project objective. The study sampled 380 married couples of reproductive age (MCRAs) in various camps of Del Monte Philippines and Neighboring villages. All respondents, 95% of whom were Roman Catholics, reported to be using NFP since 1978. 91% of the wives and 93% of the husbands said that NFP had improved their relationship with their spouses. 88% claimed that NFP also had enhanced their appreciation of sex, implying that periodic abstinence did not pose a problem for the respondents. The project also appears to have been effective in reducing the number of accidental pregnancies among the respondents over the 1978-85 period. The study recorded 271 accidental pregnancies out of the total 476 pregnancies during the 8-year period, yet it noted a downward trend in cumulative failure rates over the years. Among the 215 women in the sample who did not get pregnant by accident, 81.8% admitted having practiced withdrawal as a backup measure; 16.5% of the couples had used the condom. The study concludes that NFP can work. The findings suggest that NFP can work only if: the couples, most especially the husbands, are well motivated to limit family size; and the couples are well-informed and knowledgeable about the processes involved in the NFP method. PMID:12342113

Nolasco, A D

1989-01-01

46

Role Resources and Work-Family Enrichment: The Role of Work Engagement  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article proposes a theoretical model of work-family enrichment and tests the mediating role of work engagement. The inclusion of work engagement extends prior research on work-family interface, and allows for examination of the effects of role resources (job resources, family support) on work-family enrichment. A two-wave survey was conducted…

Siu, Oi-ling; Lu, Jia-fang; Brough, Paula; Lu, Chang-qin; Bakker, Arnold B.; Kalliath, Thomas; O'Driscoll, Michael; Phillips, David R.; Chen, Wei-qing; Lo, Danny; Sit, Cindy; Shi, Kan

2010-01-01

47

Family Support & Health Care: Working Together for Healthy Families.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report of the Family Resource Coalition of America examines partnerships between family support programs and health care providers, forged to ensure that the comprehensive needs of families are met. The report begins with two articles, "Family Support and the Emerging Health System" and "Social and Economic Issues Affecting Health--A…

Lalley, Jacqueline, Ed.; Ahsan, Nilofer, Ed.

1998-01-01

48

Work, Family and Community Support as Predictors of Work-Family Conflict: A Study of Low-Income Workers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examines relationships between support from work, family and community domains with time- and strain-based work-family conflict in a sample of low-income workers. Results reveal significant within-domain and cross-domain relationships between support from all three life domains with work--family conflict. With respect to family support,…

Griggs, Tracy Lambert; Casper, Wendy J.; Eby, Lillian T.

2013-01-01

49

Linking Team Resources to Work-Family Enrichment and Satisfaction  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Work-family scholars now recognize the potential positive effects of participation in one life domain (i.e., work or family) on performance in other life domains. We examined how employees might benefit from team resources, which are highly relevant to the modern workplace, in both work and nonwork domains via work-family enrichment. Using the…

Hunter, Emily M.; Perry, Sara Jansen; Carlson, Dawn S.; Smith, Steven A.

2010-01-01

50

The labour market impact of the working families’ tax credit  

Microsoft Academic Search

In October 1999, the working families’ tax credit (WFTC) replaced family credit as the main package of in-work support for families with children. Among a range of stated aims, the WFTC is intended to ‘... improve work incentives, encouraging people without work to move into employment’. In this paper, we consider the impact of WFTC on hours and participation. To

Richard Blundell; Alan Duncan; Julian McCrae; Costas Meghir

2000-01-01

51

Generational Differences in Work-Family Conflict and Synergy  

PubMed Central

This paper examines differences in work-family conflict and synergy among the four generational groups represented in the contemporary workforce: Generation Y Generation X, Baby Boomers, and Matures using data from the 2008 National Study of the Changing Workforce (n = 3,502). Significant generational differences were found for work-family conflict (work interfering with family and family interfering with work) but not for work-family synergy. Mental health and job pressure were the best predictors of work interfering with family conflict for each generational group. Work-family synergy presented a more complex picture. Work-family conflict and synergy were significantly related to job, marital, and life satisfaction. Implications and directions for future research are discussed.

Beutell, Nicholas J.

2013-01-01

52

The Work-Family Dilemma: How HR Managers Can Help.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses three issues faced by human resources managers: (1) the current relationship between work and the family, (2) the business problems created when work and family overlap, and (3) actions that businesses can take to improve the situation. (JOW)

Nollen, Stanley D.

1989-01-01

53

Indirect cost in economic evaluation: the opportunity cost of unpaid inputs.  

PubMed

Unpaid time represents a potentially significant input into the health production function. The paper sets out the basis for valuation of time inputs consistent with the notion of opportunity cost. Such analysis requires consideration of whether time displaced in the production of health involves lost work or lost leisure. Furthermore, because valuation of opportunity cost requires the consistent treatment of costs and benefits, the study also considers the valuation of outputs. The basis for valuing the shadow price of work time is examined by firstly assuming perfect competition. The analysis then considers the presence of monopoly and monopsony in product markets and income and sales taxes. The basis for valuing the shadow price of leisure ("leisure' being all uses of time except paid employment) is restricted to an examination of methods previously used to value unpaid housework. The two methods examined are the replacement cost and the opportunity cost method. As the methods are not equivalent, the circumstances where each is appropriate vary depending on whether the output lost in producing health is replaced. Although not set out as the primary focus of the paper, the issues surrounding the valuation of outputs generated by non-market and quasi-market activity are examined. In particular, where activities such as informal care result in indirect utility to the carers (and patients) themselves, it is likely the full market wage provides a lower bound estimate of the value of marginal benefit. Finally the paper provides a practical approach to examining opportunity cost of unpaid inputs consistent with the concepts set out in preceding sections. PMID:8653189

Posnett, J; Jan, S

1996-01-01

54

The Family Outreach Model: Tools for Engaging and Working with Families in Distress  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this article is to present a family intervention model to family service providers that builds on previous research in areas of social support and family problem solving. The Family Outreach Model provides a set of strategies for engaging and working with families in five phases of family coping at different points in time in the…

Cornille, Thomas A.; Meyer, Andrea S.; Mullis, Ann K.; Mullis, Ronald L.; Boroto, Daniel

2008-01-01

55

The mental health effects of multiple work and family demands  

Microsoft Academic Search

j Abstract Background Individuals who experience work stress or heavy family demands are at elevated risk of poor mental health. Yet, the cumulative effects of multiple work and family demands are not well known, particularly in men. Methods We studied the association between multiple work and family de- mands and sickness absence due to non-psychotic psychiatric disorders in a longitudinal

Maria Melchior; Lisa F. Berkman; Isabelle Niedhammer; Marie Zins; Marcel Goldberg

56

A Chinese Longitudinal Study on Work/Family Enrichment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore reciprocal relationships between work/family resources, work/family enrichment (WFE), and work/family satisfaction in a Chinese society. Design/methodology/approach: A longitudinal design was adopted using a three-wave panel sample. Data were obtained from 310 Taiwanese employees on three occasions,…

Lu, Luo

2011-01-01

57

When Family Considerations Influence Work Decisions: Decision-Making Processes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The work-family literature has provided an abundance of evidence that various family factors are linked to various work decisions, suggesting that the "family-relatedness" of work decisions is a prevalent phenomenon (Greenhaus & Powell, 2012). However, the cognitive processes by which such linkages occur have received little attention. We offer a…

Powell, Gary N.; Greenhaus, Jeffrey H.

2012-01-01

58

Linking Mechanisms of Work-Family Conflict and Segmentation  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Despite the abundance of work and family research, few studies have compared the linking mechanisms specified in theoretical models of work-family conflict and segmentation. Accordingly, the current study provides a greater degree of empirical clarity concerning the interplay of work and family by directly examining the indirect effects of…

Michel, Jesse S.; Hargis, Michael B.

2008-01-01

59

Unsociable Work? Nonstandard Work Schedules, Family Relationships, and Children's Well-Being  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Many children live in families where one or both parents work evenings, nights, or weekends. Do these work schedules affect family relationships or well-being? Using cross-sectional survey data from dual-earner Canadian families (N=4,306) with children aged 2-11 years (N=6,156), we compared families where parents worked standard weekday times with…

Strazdins, Lyndall; Clements, Mark S.; Korda, Rosemary J.; Broom, Dorothy H.; D'Souza, Rennie M.

2006-01-01

60

Work-family balance after childbirth: the association between employer-offered leave characteristics and maternity leave duration.  

PubMed

Early return to work after childbirth has been increasing among working mothers in the US. We assessed the relationship between access to employer-offered maternity leave (EOML) (both paid and unpaid) and uptake and duration of maternity leave following childbirth in a socio-economically diverse sample of full-time working women. We focus on California, a state that has long provided more generous maternity leave benefits than those offered by federal maternity leave policies through the State Disability Insurance program. The sample included 691 mothers who gave birth in Southern California in 2002-2003. Using weighted logistic regression, we examined the EOML-maternity leave duration relationship, controlling for whether the leave was paid, as well as other occupational, personality and health-related covariates. Compared with mothers who were offered more than 12 weeks of maternity leave, mothers with <6 weeks of EOML and those offered 6-12 weeks had five times higher odds of returning to work within 12 weeks; those offered no leave had six times higher odds of an early return. These relationships were similar after controlling for whether the leave was paid and after controlling for other occupational and health characteristics. Access to and duration of employer-offered maternity leave significantly determine timing of return to work following childbirth, potentially affecting work-family balance. Policy makers should recognize the pivotal role of employers in offering job security during and after maternity leave and consider widening the eligibility criteria of the Family and Medical Leave Act. PMID:23504130

Guendelman, Sylvia; Goodman, Julia; Kharrazi, Martin; Lahiff, Maureen

2014-01-01

61

The Moderating Effects of Work-Family Role Combinations and Work-Family Organizational Culture on the Relationship between Family-Friendly Workplace Supports and Job Satisfaction  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study determined whether work-family role combinations (i.e., work and elder care, work and child care, work and elder care and child care) and work-family culture significantly moderate the relationship between availability of workplace supports and job satisfaction. The data were obtained from the Families and Work Institute's 1997 archival…

Sahibzada, Khatera; Hammer, Leslie B.; Neal, Margaret B.; Kuang, Daniel C.

2005-01-01

62

Working with families in Tower Hamlets: an evaluation of the Family Welfare Association's Family Support Services.  

PubMed

This paper describes an evaluation carried out by South Bank University of the work of the Family Welfare Association's (FWA's) Family Support Services (FSSs) in Tower Hamlets, London. Tower Hamlets is a multi-racial area in east London that, according to the 1991 census, has high levels of poverty, overcrowding and unemployment. Increasing poverty and social exclusion, which further entrench inequalities in health, are reported by sources such as government, health and social services and research as requiring innovative local responses to meet pressing welfare needs. The evaluation reported here examined three projects: Family Support, Building Bridges and Quality Protects - these are referred to collectively as FSSs. The evaluation shows that FSSs are innovative services that demonstrate effective ways of working with vulnerable families affected by experiences of racism, bullying, mental health difficulties, domestic violence or child abuse. In common with other successful initiatives in the UK and abroad, FSSs are aimed to be non-stigmatising, non-intrusive and responsive to the ethnicity, views and specific needs of families. This paper focuses on the participatory work of FSSs with families to illustrate effective methods of quality support, detail outcomes, and draw lessons for policy and practice. PMID:12121270

Gray, Benjamin

2002-03-01

63

Helping Families Search for Solutions: Working with Adolescents  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this column, the author focuses on the ways that family counselors can use solution-based therapies (solution-oriented and solution-focused) to work with families with adolescents in individual and/or family therapy. The theoretical foundation for solution-based therapies suggests techniques that help families focus on solutions and not remain…

Paylo, Matthew J.

2005-01-01

64

Work and Family: 1992. Status Report and Outlook.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Many parents are currently struggling to balance job and family responsibilities. Such attempts bring about changes in work and individual attitudes. This report presents the status of work and family in 1992, as well as the nature and direction of workplace changes to accommodate families. The report indicates that large United States companies…

Galinsky, Ellen

65

Father Influences on Employed Mothers' Work-Family Balance  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study employed the ecological systems perspective and gender ideology theory to examine the influence of fathers' paid work-family crossover and family involvement on self-reports of work-family balance by employed mothers with children under the age of 13 (N = 179). Multiple regression analyses revealed that fathers' crossover factors had a…

Fagan, Jay; Press, Julie

2008-01-01

66

Hardships in America: The Real Story of Working Families.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Although U.S. policymakers have adopted the view that work is the solution to poverty, work may not ensure a decent standard of living for many families. This report estimates the number of families who are not making ends meet. It examines the cost of living in various communities in every state and determines "basic family budgets" for six…

Boushey, Heather; Brocht, Chauna; Gundersen, Bethney; Bernstein, Jared

67

Balancing Work and Family: A Literature and Resource Review.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Reviews issues involved in balancing work and family and some of the resources which may be most useful to family practitioners. Includes annotated bibliography of books, reports, newsletters, films, and videos. (ABL)

Hansen, Gary L.

1991-01-01

68

Relations of Work Identity, Family Identity, Situational Demands, and Sex with Employee Work Hours  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined relations of multiple indicators of work identity and family identity with the number of weekly hours worked by 193 married business professionals. We found that men generally worked long hours regardless of the situational demands to work long hours and the strength of their work and family identities. Women's work hours, on…

Greenhaus, Jeffrey H.; Peng, Ann C.; Allen, Tammy D.

2012-01-01

69

Impact of Family Structure on the Structure of Work.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The research supported by this contract investigated the interfaces between dual-earner couples' work and family behaviors by looking simultaneously at intra-spouse relations (same person work and family issues) and cross-spouse issues (his work and her f...

S. Yogev J. Brett

1987-01-01

70

Coworker Informal Work Accommodations to Family: Scale Development and Validation  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Drawing on research regarding the utility of coworker support in mitigating work/family conflict, the authors developed a scale to measure Coworker-enacted Informal Work Accommodations to Family (C-IWAF). C-IWAF differs from coworker support in that it describes actual behaviors coworkers engage in to help one another deal with incompatible work

Mesmer-Magnus, Jessica; Murase, Toshio; DeChurch, Leslie A.; Jimenez, Miliani

2010-01-01

71

Work and Family: Satisfaction, Stress, and Spousal Support.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Married veterinarians were surveyed about work satisfaction, work-related stress, marital-family stress, and spousal support for their career. Female veterinarians reported greater effect of martial/family stress on career and less perceived support than did their male counterparts. Areas of greatest work dissatisfaction for both genders were…

Phillips-Miller, Dianne L.; Campbell, N. Jo; Morrison, Charles R.

2000-01-01

72

Children's and Family Services Working Together  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper is based on keynote addresses by Jane Woodruff, CEO, UnitingCare Burnside to the National Association of Community Based Children's Services, University of Wollongong, April 2004; and to the Mobile Children's Service Association Conference, Dubbo, August 2003. It offers the perspective of one NSW child and family welfare agency on…

Woodruff, Jane; O'Brien, Jon

2005-01-01

73

SHRM Work & Family Survey Report, 1992.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In March 1992, a random sample of 5,600 human resource professionals was selected from the membership of the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) and surveyed regarding family issues in the workplace. Respondents were asked to provide information on the size and other characteristics of their organization and workplace practices, and were…

Society for Human Resource Management, Alexandria, VA.

74

Work and Family Life Must Be Integrated.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Socially responsible business organizations recognize the relationship between the organization, its employees, and their families. A review of the impact of each personnel policy on the personal lives of employees and subsequent adaptation strategies in recruiting methods, promotion, transfer, travel, and scheduling can result in a successful…

Hunsaker, Johanna S.

1983-01-01

75

Family, Work, and Infant Care in Limited Income Latino Migrant Farm-Working and Anglo Non-Migrant Families  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Changes in the policy context of limited income families' lives have created new stresses at the intersection of work and family. This research used detailed interviews with limited income working mothers of infants 4 to 18 months old to learn about their work experiences, individual well-being, and perceptions of their infants' experiences in…

Meece, Darrell; Barratt, Marguerite; Kossek, Ellen

2003-01-01

76

Family-Supportive Work Environments: The Role of Organizational Perceptions  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present study examines global employee perceptions regarding the extent their work organization is family-supportive (FSOP). Data gathered from 522 participants employed in a variety of occupations and organizations indicated that FSOP responses related significantly to the number of family-friendly benefits offered by the organization, benefit usage, and perceived family support from supervisors. FSOP responses also explained a significant amount

Tammy D. Allen

2001-01-01

77

Work–Family and Family–Work Conflict: Does Intrinsic–Extrinsic Satisfaction Mediate the Prediction of General Job Satisfaction?  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objective of this study is to analyze the mediating role of intrinsic and extrinsic job satisfaction in the relationship between the 2 dimensions of work–family conflict—family interfering with work (FIW) and work interfering with family (WIF)—and general job satisfaction. Step-by-step hierarchical regression analyses were carried out on a sample of 151 men and women from a Spanish public organization.

Antonia Calvo-Salguero; José-María Salinas Martínez-de-Lecea; Ana-María Carrasco-González

2011-01-01

78

Social Work Practice with Polygamous Families  

Microsoft Academic Search

Data are based on student files of 25 Bedouin-Arab children born to senior mothers of polygamous families, and interviews with the children's teachers and mothers. Mothers complained of somatic symptoms, economic problems, poor relations with the husband, and competition and jealousy between the co-wives and among the co-wives' children. Children had a variety of behavioural problems, and below average academic

Alean Al-Krenawi; John R. Graham; Salem Al-Krenawi

1997-01-01

79

Family Day Care West: A Working Conference.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An attempt is made to condense data on family day care, i.e., a form of supplemental child care that takes place in the home of a nonrelative. An overview is presented of the kinds of studies that have been done and how they fit into the larger picture of what remains to be done before we can claim to have a body of knowledge to guide us in this…

Pacific Oaks Coll., Pasadena, CA.

80

Understanding Work-Family Spillover in Hotel Managers  

PubMed Central

The present study examined the experience of work-family spillover among 586 hotel managers (HMs) working in 50 full-service hotels throughout the U.S. Work-family spillover occurs when behaviors, moods, stresses, and emotions from work spill over into family. We first investigated which hotel managers were more likely to experience spillover and stressful work conditions based on their life circumstances (gender, parental status, age, decision-making latitude at work). Second, we investigated which work conditions (hours worked per week, organizational time expectations, emotional labor, and permeable boundaries) predicted more work-family spillover. Women, employees without children at home, and younger adults experienced the highest levels of negative work-family spillover. Work conditions, particularly organizational time expectations, put HMs at risk for experiencing more negative and less positive work-family spillover. The results provide evidence that modifying certain work conditions in the hotel industry may be helpful in improving the quality of HMs’ jobs and retention.

Lawson, Katie M.; Davis, Kelly D.; Crouter, Ann C.; O'Neill, John W.

2013-01-01

81

How Husbands and Wives in Dual-Career Families Perceive Their Family and Work Worlds.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Mapped perceptions of men and women in dual-career families (N=127) concerning their attitudes toward their work and family. Results indicate that husbands and wives perceive their family and work worlds in practically the same way, including a psychologically rewarding job dimension, a general effectiveness dimension, and an investment return.…

Sekaran, Uma

1983-01-01

82

Adolescent Work Experiences and Family Formation Behavior  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A long-standing critique of adolescent employment is that it engenders a precocious maturity of more adult-like roles and behaviors, including school disengagement, substance use, sexual activity, inadequate sleep and exercise, and work-related stress. Though negative effects of high-intensity work on adolescent adjustment have been found, little…

Staff, Jeremy; VanEseltine, Matthew; Woolnough, April; Silver, Eric; Burrington, Lori

2012-01-01

83

Firms' Contribution to the Reconciliation between Work and Family Life  

Microsoft Academic Search

One of the most striking, long-term trends in the labour market has been the increase in the proportion of parents at work. This has been reflected in the increase in the proportion of dual-earner couple families and of lone-parent families where the parent is working. A growing proportion of the workforces of firms is thus heavily involved in family life

John M. Evans

2001-01-01

84

Improving the Health of Working Families: Research Connections Between Work and Health. NPA Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document contains two papers on connections between work and health and policy options for improving the health of working families. "Foreword" (James A. Auerbach) places the two papers in the context of recent research on the connections between work, family, and health. Chapter 1's overview addresses the changing nature of work, the new…

Yen, Irene H.; Frank, John W.

85

From "Work-Family" to "Work-Life": Broadening Our Conceptualization and Measurement  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Despite frequent reference to "work-life" issues in the organizational literature, little theoretical or empirical attention has been paid to nonwork areas beyond family. The purpose of the research described here is to move beyond work-family conflict to a broader conceptualization and measurement of work interference with life. A measure of work

Keeney, Jessica; Boyd, Elizabeth M.; Sinha, Ruchi; Westring, Alyssa F.; Ryan, Ann Marie

2013-01-01

86

Differential Models of Social Work Groups with Family Violence  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper examines the research literature on multiple forms of family violence and proposes three social work group models to apply to this widespread phenomenon. The models proposed are group work with wife abusers, groups of reciprocated violent marital dyads and multiple violent family unit groups. The theoretical approach of each model is discussed as well as group composition, goals,

Roxanne Power

1988-01-01

87

Developing and Implementing Work-Family Policies for Faculty  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Today, American families juggle many competing priorities: home, work, school, medical care, after-school activities, and other responsibilities required to raise a family and maintain a household. At the same time, more employers are developing policies that acknowledge the need for a healthy balance between work and home. These policies allow…

Sullivan, Beth; Hollenshead, Carol; Smith, Gilia

2004-01-01

88

Anticipated Work-Family Conflict: A Construct Investigation  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

To date, little is known about how work-family issues impact the career development process. In the current paper, we explore this issue by investigating a relatively unstudied construct: anticipated work-family conflict. We found that this construct can be represented by the same six-dimensional factor structure used to assess concurrent…

Westring, Alyssa Friede; Ryan, Ann Marie

2011-01-01

89

Advancing Measurement of Work and Family Domain Boundary Characteristics  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Recent research offers promising theoretical frameworks for thinking about the work-family interface in terms of the boundaries individuals develop around work and family. However, measures for important constructs proposed by these theories are needed. Using two independent samples, we report on the refinement of existing "boundary flexibility"…

Matthews, Russell A.; Barnes-Farrell, Janet L.; Bulger, Carrie A.

2010-01-01

90

Are Difficulties Balancing Work and Family Associated with Subsequent Fertility?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Despite considerable interest in the causes and consequences of work-family conflict, and the frequent suggestion in fertility research that difficulty in balancing work and family is one of the factors leading to low fertility rates in several developed countries, little research uses longitudinal data to examine whether women who report…

Liu, Siwei; Hynes, Kathryn

2012-01-01

91

On Common Ground: Prominent Women Talk about Work & Family.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This publication presents interviews with 11 prominent women, representing different backgrounds, philosophies, and life experiences, in which they speak about their own experiences with work and family issues. The introduction, "On Common Ground: Prominent Women Talk about Work & Family" (Diana Zuckerman), provides an overview. The 11 interviews…

Zuckerman, Diana, Ed.

92

Boom, Bust & Beyond: The State of Working Arkansas. Arkansas Working Families Project.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Using data from several government and private sources and interviews with working families, this report examines the Arkansas economy, how Arkansas working families have fared economically in recent years, and their current challenges. The report offers suggestions about how the state can provide the tools families need to continue to move up the…

Huddleston, Richard; Duran, Angela

93

Revelation of Private Information about Unpaid Notes in the Trade Credit Bill System in Japan  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article examines a unique Japanese extralegal enforcement system. We discuss how banks in Japan reveal private information about unpaid notes through a joint clearinghouse. We use a 2-period model with asymmetric information between insiders and outside investors, in which banks choose whether or not to reveal information about the unpaid notes of their clients. Banks are constrained in their

Toshihiro Matsumura; Marc Ryser

1995-01-01

94

19 CFR 24.32 - Claims; unpaid compensation of deceased employees and death benefits.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...unpaid compensation of deceased employees and death benefits. 24.32 Section 24.32...unpaid compensation of deceased employees and death benefits. (a) A claim made by a...an officer or employee at the time of his death shall be executed on standard...

2013-04-01

95

Well-balanced families? : A gendered analysis of work-life balance policies and work family practices  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – The paper considers the impact of work-life balance policies on the work and family practices of professional, dual-earner parents with dependent children, by assessing the extent to which “well-balanced families” have been resultantly facilitated. It poses two research questions: the first centres on how far work-life balance policies have better enabled working parents to manage their commitments to

S. B. Burnett; C. J. Gatrell; C. L. Cooper; P. Sparrow

2010-01-01

96

Module 1: Overview of Work-Family Issues in the United States. Work-Family Curriculum Guide  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

There is a long tradition of academic interest in the worlds of work and family. However, there was scant attention paid to the linkages between these two worlds until the mid 1970s. In the United States, the 1977 publication of Kanter's monograph, "Work and family in the United States: A critical review and agenda for research and policy,"…

Kossek, Ellen Ernst; Leana, Carrie; MacDermid, Shelley; Pitt-Catsouphes, Marcie; Raskin, Patricia; Secret, Mary; Sweet, Stephen

2006-01-01

97

Social Support from Work and Family Domains as an Antecedent or Moderator of Work-Family Conflicts?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

On the basis of Conservation of Resources theory, we investigated how social support from supervisor, co-workers, life partner, and family members is associated with work-family conflicts in N=107 working mothers. We used data from a cross-sectional questionnaire and a standardized diary to examine two possible forms of interplay: (a) Social…

Seiger, Christine P.; Wiese, Bettina S.

2009-01-01

98

Order Amidst Change: Work and Family Trajectories in Japan  

PubMed Central

Substantial family and work macro-level change has been occurring in Japan. Examples include a decline in the availability of jobs that afford lifetime protection against unemployment, an increase in jobs that do not carry benefits such as a pension, an increase in age at marriage and at first birth, and an increase in marital dissolution. Using life history data from the 2000 National Survey on Family and Economic Conditions, young Japanese appear to have responded to these macro-level changes in a fairly orderly manner. Marriage and childbearing have been postponed, but marriage still precedes childbearing. Education is completed prior to starting work. For men, once work commences they continue working. For women, the classic conflict between work and family roles is evident. For men and women in both the family and work spheres Japanese young adults have more orderly life course trajectories than American young adults.

Rindfuss, Ronald R.; Choe, Minja Kim; Kabamalan, Maria Midea M.; Tsuya, Noriko O.; Bumpass, Larry L.

2011-01-01

99

Changing University Work, Freedom, Flexibility and Family  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article investigates what Finnish academics on short fixed-term contracts consider to be the effects of having children on work and careers. The study is framed by the context of the current state of the university sector, its neoliberal and entrepreneurial tendencies and its claims to meritocracy. Informants express relative happiness with…

Nikunen, Minna

2012-01-01

100

Changing university work, freedom, flexibility and family  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article investigates what Finnish academics on short fixed-term contracts consider to be the effects of having children on work and careers. The study is framed by the context of the current state of the university sector, its neoliberal and entrepreneurial tendencies and its claims to meritocracy. Informants express relative happiness with what they see as freedom and flexibility in

Minna Nikunen

2011-01-01

101

Hardships in America: The Real Story of Working Families  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This 115-page report, released by Economic Policy Institute (EPI) at the end of July 2001, "is the most comprehensive study of family hardships ever published." The report examines the plight of the working poor by determining basic family budgets for communities across the nation -- the amount of money a family needs for food, housing, utilities, child care, transportation, and health care -- and comparing these figures to wage statistics. The report concludes that two-and-a-half times more families fall beneath the basic family budget levels for their communities than fall below the federal poverty line.

Bernstein, Jared.; Boushey, Heather, 1970-; Brocht, Chauna.; Gundersen, Bethney.

2001-01-01

102

Work and Family Functioning: An Annotated Bibliography Selected from Family Database.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This annotated bibliography lists works published in Australia on issues regarding work obligations and family responsibilities. All works cited are included in Australia's FAMILY database. The following topics are covered: (1) adolescents and attitudes to employment (14 citations); (2) the aged and employment (20 citations); (3) career…

Davis, Mari, Comp.

103

Differences in wage rates for males and females in the health sector: a consideration of unpaid overtime to decompose the gender wage gap  

PubMed Central

Background In Australia a persistent and sizable gender wage gap exists. In recent years this gap has been steadily widening. The negative impact of gender wage differentials is the disincentive to work more hours. This implies a substantial cost on the Australian health sector. This study aimed to identify the magnitude of gender wage differentials within the health sector. The investigation accounts for unpaid overtime. Given the limited availability of information, little empirical evidence exists that accounts for unpaid overtime. Methods Information was collected from a sample of 10,066 Australian full-time employees within the health sector. Initially, ordinary least-squares regression was used to identify the gender wage gap when unpaid overtime was included and then excluded from the model. The sample was also stratified by gender and then by occupation to allow for comparisons. Later the Blinder–Oaxaca decomposition method was employed to identify and quantify the contribution of individual endowments to wage differentials between males and females. Results The analyses of data revealed a gender wage gap that varied across occupations. The inclusion of unpaid overtime in the analysis led to a slight reduction in the wage differential. The results showed an adjusted wage gap of 16.7%. Conclusions Unpaid overtime made a significant but small contribution to wage differentials. Being female remained the major contributing factor to the wage gap. Given that wage differentials provide a disincentive to work more hours, serious attempts to deal with the skilled labour shortage in the health sector need to address the gender wage gap.

2013-01-01

104

A short and valid measure of work-family enrichment.  

PubMed

The stream of research concerning work-family enrichment has generated a significant body of research because it plays an important role in occupational health (Masuda, McNall, Allen, & Nicklin, 2012). work-family enrichment has been defined as "the extent to which experiences in one role improve the quality of life in the other role" (Greenhaus & Powell, 2006, p. 73). Within work-family enrichment, there are two directions: work to family and family to work. Carlson, Kacmar, Wayne, and Grzywacz (2006) developed an 18-item scale to measure this construct. Although the scale has been shown to be both reliable and valid, it also requires work-family researchers to include a proportionally large number of items to capture this construct in a study. The goal of the current study was to isolate a subset of the items in this measure that produces results similar to the full version thereby providing a more streamlined scale for researchers. Using a five-sample study that follows the scale reduction procedures offered by Stanton, Sinar, Balzer, and Smith (2002), we provide evidence that scales containing only three items for each direction of enrichment produce results equivalent to the full scale with respect to reliability and discriminant, convergent, and predictive validity. Reducing the original scale by two thirds, without losing explanatory power, allows scholars to measure enrichment in the work and family domains more efficiently, which should help minimize survey time, lower refusal rates, and generate less missing data. PMID:24447219

Kacmar, K Michele; Crawford, Wayne S; Carlson, Dawn S; Ferguson, Merideth; Whitten, Dwayne

2014-01-01

105

Is Family-to-Work Interference Related to Co-Workers' Work Outcomes?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Previous studies have convincingly shown that employees' family lives can affect their work outcomes. We investigate whether family-to-work interference (FWI) experienced by the employee also affects the work outcomes of a co-worker. We predict that the employee's FWI has an effect on the co-worker's outcomes through the crossover of positive and…

ten Brummelhuis, Lieke L.; Bakker, Arnold B.; Euwema, Martin C.

2010-01-01

106

Work Social Supports, Role Stressors, and Work-Family Conflict: The Moderating Effect of Age  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The current study examined whether important distinctions are masked if participant age is ignored when modeling relationships among constructs associated with the work-family interface. An initial omnibus model of social support, work role stressors, and work-family conflict was tested. Multiple groups analyses were then conducted to investigate…

Matthews, Russell A.; Bulger, Carrie A.; Barnes-Farrell, Janet L.

2010-01-01

107

Work and Family Environments and the Adoption of Computer-Supported Supplemental Work-at-Home.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A survey received responses from 307 men and 147 women in managerial/professional positions. Those who use computers for work at home after office hours had higher task variety, role overload, work-family interference, and stress. However, there were no significant differences in marital and family satisfaction of those who did supplemental work

Duxbury, Linda Elizabeth; And Others

1996-01-01

108

Working During and After Treatment  

MedlinePLUS

... Medical Leave Act (FMLA), a law that allows employees to take reasonable unpaid leave for certain family ... Effects Cancer Facts & Statistics News About Cancer Expert Voices Blog Programs & Services Breast Cancer Support TLC Hair ...

109

The mental health effects of multiple work and family demands  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background  Individuals who experience work stress or heavy family demands are at elevated risk of poor mental health. Yet, the cumulative\\u000a effects of multiple work and family demands are not well known, particularly in men.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  We studied the association between multiple work and family demands and sickness absence due to non-psychotic psychiatric\\u000a disorders in a longitudinal study conducted among members of

Maria Melchior; Lisa F. Berkman; Isabelle Niedhammer; Marie Zins; Marcel Goldberg

2007-01-01

110

Part-time work for women: Does it really help balance work and family?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Results of this study suggest that the differential response of women to part-time work as opposed to a career may be a function of motivational and work-context differences between career and non-career women. Part-time work was associated with lower work-to-family interference, better time management ability, and greater life satisfaction for women in both career and earner-type positions. Role overload, family-to-work

Christopher Higgins; Linda Duxbury; Karen Lea Johnson

2000-01-01

111

Gender and the Work-Family Interface: Exploring Differences across the Family Life Course  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examines gender differences in the work-family interface across six family life stages using a global sample of IBM employees in 79 countries (N = 41,813). Family life stage was constructed using the age of respondent and age of youngest child. Results revealed that having young children at home was the critical catalyst for gender…

Martinengo, Giuseppe; Jacob, Jenet I.; Hill, E. Jeffrey

2010-01-01

112

[The family-friendly hospital: (how) does it work?].  

PubMed

The demographic development in Germany is heading towards a significant shortage in specialists within the next 10-15 years with an increased demand for health services at the same time. The three-stage model of family life planning (work, family phase, return) will also be gradually replaced by a model of simultaneous compatibility of family and work. This change in values, although initiated by the parents themselves, may turn out to be a crucial countermeasure in national economy against the demography-related loss of qualified personnel. For these three trends the economic need arises to minimize family-related absence of our well-trained, motivated and reliable doctors from the clinical departments through implementation of family-friendly human resources policies and supporting measures by the employers. In a representative survey 26% of respondents with children had in the past already changed their workplace to ensure a better match of work and family duties. In this regard the compatibility of family and professional responsibilities had a higher impact on the selection of the employer than a high income. Accordingly, a work-life competence oriented business plan will represent the crucial factor within the competition between universities, hospitals and professional disciplines to attract high potential bearers although a sustained change of the traditional hospital culture is mandatory. Anaesthesia-related fields of development regarding family-friendly corporate governance are working hours and organization of work, part-time jobs even for managers and fathers, and staff development. In the hospital daily routine, in particular, creative solutions meeting the local demands are deemed necessary that do not involve the use of high financial resources. Family-friendly personnel policy not only arises from altruistic enthusiasm but also pays off economically. This article discusses the necessity, opportunities and threads of family-oriented hospital management and fields of action for anaesthesia departments. PMID:19484192

Heller, A R; Heller, S C

2009-06-01

113

The Real-World Problem of Care Coordination: A Longitudinal Qualitative Study with Patients Living with Advanced Progressive Illness and Their Unpaid Caregivers  

PubMed Central

Objectives To develop a model of care coordination for patients living with advanced progressive illness and their unpaid caregivers, and to understand their perspective regarding care coordination. Design A prospective longitudinal, multi-perspective qualitative study involving a case-study approach. Methods Serial in-depth interviews were conducted, transcribed verbatim and then analyzed through open and axial coding in order to construct categories for three cases (sites). This was followed by continued thematic analysis to identify underlying conceptual coherence across all cases in order to produce one coherent care coordination model. Participants Fifty-six purposively sampled patients and 27 case-linked unpaid caregivers. Settings Three cases from contrasting primary, secondary and tertiary settings within Britain. Results Coordination is a deliberate cross-cutting action that involves high-quality, caring and well-informed staff, patients and unpaid caregivers who must work in partnership together across health and social care settings. For coordination to occur, it must be adequately resourced with efficient systems and services that communicate. Patients and unpaid caregivers contribute substantially to the coordination of their care, which is sometimes volunteered at a personal cost to them. Coordination is facilitated through flexible and patient-centered care, characterized by accurate and timely information communicated in a way that considers patients’ and caregivers’ needs, preferences, circumstances and abilities. Conclusions Within the midst of advanced progressive illness, coordination is a shared and complex intervention involving relational, structural and information components. Our study is one of the first to extensively examine patients’ and caregivers’ views about coordination, thus aiding conceptual fidelity. These findings can be used to help avoid oversimplifying a real-world problem, such as care coordination. Avoiding oversimplification can help with the development, evaluation and implementation of real-world coordination interventions for patients and their unpaid caregivers in the future.

Daveson, Barbara A.; Harding, Richard; Shipman, Cathy; Mason, Bruce L.; Epiphaniou, Eleni; Higginson, Irene J.; Ellis-Smith, Clare; Henson, Lesley; Munday, Dan; Nanton, Veronica; Dale, Jeremy R.; Boyd, Kirsty; Worth, Allison; Barclay, Stephen; Donaldson, Anne; Murray, Scott

2014-01-01

114

Balancing Work and Family for Faculty: Why It's Important  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The success of faculty members in balancing their academic careers with family responsibilities is a matter of more than individual happiness: it is also a matter of addressing structural inequities and attracting the most qualified candidates to the academic profession. To make it possible for faculty members to balance work and family,…

Curtis, John W.

2004-01-01

115

Work and Family Life: Middle School Content Competencies.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document, which lists the middle school content competencies for the Work and Family Studies curriculum within Family and Consumer Sciences in Ohio, is intended to help middle school students develop self-responsibility and competence dealing with the practical problems of early adolescence. (Career awareness and career choice options are…

Ohio State Dept. of Education, Columbus. Div. of Career-Technical and Adult Education.

116

Simulated Family Therapy Interviews in Clinical Social Work Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article describes a learning method that employed theatre students as family clients in an advanced social work practice course. Students were provided with an opportunity to integrate and apply their learning of theory, clinical skills, and professional conduct in full-length family therapy sessions that occurred in the classroom and were…

Mooradian, John K.

2007-01-01

117

Poverty Among Working Families: Findings From Experimental Poverty Measures  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This report from the US Census Bureau explores poverty among working families. The report uses experimental measures based on recommendations from the National Academy of Sciences Panel of Poverty and Family Assistance, including the following elements: noncash government benefits, job-related expenses, child care costs, social security taxes, and out-of-pocket medical expenses.

118

Resilience across Contexts: Family, Work, Culture, and Community.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Noting that much is known from research and practice regarding what works to promote resilience of children and families in a variety of high-risk life situations, this book considers the impact of culture, economy, employment, poverty, family structure, and social policy on parenting, child development, education, and the life success of youth.…

Taylor, Ronald D., Ed.; Wang, Margaret C., Ed.

119

Social Work Intervention with White Collared Employees and Their Families  

Microsoft Academic Search

This investigation presents a framework for understanding and also to test the efficacy of Social Work intervention on the well being of the white collared employee (industrial employee) and his\\/her family. A comprehensive and intensive personal- family exploration was done to uncover the relatedness of seemingly disparate areas of the client’s lives. A total of 80 executives (industrial employees) served

Y. S. SiddeGowda

2004-01-01

120

Work and Welfare Patterns in Low Income Families.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The study's objective were: (1) to describe the patterns of work and welfare experience in low-income families and to explain their causes, and (2) to apply the findings to the policy problem of deciding which groups of welfare recipients should be required to work and provided with what mix of manpower services. The effectiveness of work

Friedman, Barry L.; Hausman, Leonard J.

121

Family Roles and Work Values: Processes of Selection and Change  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study focuses on whether marriage and parenthood influence work values after taking into account the influence of work values on family formation. In a recent panel of young adults (N=709), stronger extrinsic and weaker intrinsic work values during adolescence predicted marriage and parenthood 9 years out of high school. Controlling these…

Kirkpatrick Johnson, Monica

2005-01-01

122

Separated by their WorkFamilies with Fathers Living Apart  

Microsoft Academic Search

In studying work and family life as overlapping domains, of interest is the impact of father absence created by work requirements. Commonly, father absence because of marital discord or death has been found to have detrimental effects on the social and cognitive development of children. In contrast, much less is known about the impact of transitory work-related father absence. Yet

Chok C. Hiew

1992-01-01

123

Work, Family and Career Considerations in Understanding Employee Turnover Intentions.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

An overview of the literature on employee turnover is presented. The review discusses, in turn, literatures related to work (organizational, job and task), organizational impact on career, and organizational impact on family, as correlates of turnover. Li...

B. Schneider H. P. Dachler

1978-01-01

124

Anticipated Work-Family Conflict: Effects of Gender, Self-Efficacy, and Family Background  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Anticipated levels of 2 types of work-family conflict (WFC) were studied among 358 students from 2 universities. The study examined the contribution of gender, parental models of child care and housework, and self-efficacy to the variance in anticipated WFC. Findings demonstrated that the bidirectionality of the relations between work and family

Cinamon, Rachel Gali

2006-01-01

125

Work, Family and Life-Course Fit: Does Control over Work Time Matter?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study moves from "work-family" to a multi-dimensional "life-course fit" construct (employees' cognitive assessments of resources, resource deficits, and resource demands), using a combined work-family, demands-control and ecology of the life course framing. It examined (1) impacts of job and home ecological systems on fit dimensions, and (2)…

Moen, Phyllis; Kelly, Erin; Huang, Qinlei

2008-01-01

126

Changes in working time arrangements over time as a consequence of work-family conflict.  

PubMed

Existing longitudinal studies on the relationship between working time arrangements (WTA) and work-family conflict have mainly focused on the normal causal relationship, that is, the impact of WTA on work-family conflict over time. So far, however, the reversed relationship, that is, the effect of work-family conflict on adjustments in WTA over time, has hardly been studied. Because work-family conflict is highly prevalent in the working population, further insight in this reverse relationship is invaluable to gain insight into secondary selection processes. The aim of this study is to investigate whether work-family conflict is prospectively related to adjustments in work schedules, working hours, and overtime work, and to explore sex differences and different time lags in this relation. Data of the prospective Maastricht Cohort Study were used. To study the effect of work-family conflict on a change from shift- to day work over 32 months of follow-up, male three-shift (n = 727), five-shift (n = 932), and irregular-shift (n = 451) workers were selected. To study effects of work-family conflict on reduction of working hours over 12 and 24 months of follow-up, respectively, only day workers (males and females) were selected, capturing 5809 full-time workers (> or =36 h/wk) and 1387 part-time workers (<36 h/wk) at baseline. To examine effects of work-family conflict on refraining from overtime work over 12 months of follow-up, only day workers reporting frequent overtime work at baseline were selected (3145 full-time and 492 part-time workers). Cox regression analyses were performed with adjustments for age, educational level, and presence of a long-term illness. Work-family conflict was associated with a significantly increased risk of changing from shift- to day work over 32 months of follow-up in three-shift workers (relative risk [RR] = 1.77, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.19-2.63) but not in five-shift workers (RR = 1.32, 95% CI 0.78-2.24) and irregular-shift workers (RR = 0.81, 95% CI 0.50-1.31). Within day workers, work-family conflict among full-time workers was associated with a significantly increased risk of reducing working hours during 1 yr of follow-up in women (RR = 2.80, 95% CI 1.42-5.54) but not men (RR = 1.34, 95% CI 0.81-2.22). In part-time workers, work-family conflict was associated with a significantly increased risk of reducing working hours during 1 yr of follow-up both in women (RR = 1.99, 95% CI 1.04-3.82) and men (RR = 4.03, 95% CI 1.28-12.68). Whereas the effects of work-family conflict on a reduction of working hours somewhat decreased among female full-time workers after 2 yr of follow-up (RR = 2.13, 95% CI 1.24-3.66), among male full-time workers the effects increased and reached statistical significance (RR = 1.53, 95% CI 1.05-2.21). Work-family conflict was not significantly associated with refraining from overtime work over 1 yr of follow-up. This study shows that work-family conflict has important consequences in terms of adjustments in work schedules and working hours over time, with considerable sex differences. The study thereby clearly illustrates secondary selection processes both in shift- and day workers, with significant implications for labor force participation, emphasizing the need for prevention of work-family conflict. PMID:20636215

Jansen, Nicole W H; Mohren, Danielle C L; van Amelsvoort, Ludovic G P M; Janssen, Nathalie; Kant, Ijmert

2010-07-01

127

Work-family conflict, family-supportive supervisor behaviors (FSSB), and sleep outcomes.  

PubMed

Although critical to health and well-being, relatively little research has been conducted in the organizational literature on linkages between the work-family interface and sleep. Drawing on conservation of resources theory, we use a sample of 623 information technology workers to examine the relationships between work-family conflict, family-supportive supervisor behaviors (FSSB), and sleep quality and quantity. Validated wrist actigraphy methods were used to collect objective sleep quality and quantity data over a 1 week period of time, and survey methods were used to collect information on self-reported work-family conflict, FSSB, and sleep quality and quantity. Results demonstrated that the combination of predictors (i.e., work-to-family conflict, family-to-work conflict, FSSB) was significantly related to both objective and self-report measures of sleep quantity and quality. Future research should further examine the work-family interface to sleep link and make use of interventions targeting the work-family interface as a means for improving sleep health. PMID:24730425

Crain, Tori L; Hammer, Leslie B; Bodner, Todd; Kossek, Ellen Ernst; Moen, Phyllis; Lilienthal, Richard; Buxton, Orfeu M

2014-04-01

128

Does family planning work in a Chinese way.  

PubMed

China's family planning work should be done with a Chinese appraoch. Consequently, consideration must be given to China's characteristics. China is low in productive forces and underdeveloped in economy and education, but the population is enormous. Thus, the Chinese government confirms family planning as a basic state policy and calls for the control of population growth to around 1.2 billion by 2000. The gross output value of industrial and agricultural production will be quadrupled so as to fit the population growth to the development of the national economy. The population of China has a large base number with a young age structure. At this time, people under the age of 30 account for about 62.7% with more than 20 million people per year reaching marriageable and childbearing age in the coming 10 years or more. The government calls for young people to marry and to have a child later and advocates the practice of 1 child for each couple. By the end of 1983 there were 34.49 million couples of childbearing age with only 1 child each, of whom 24.77 million couples chose voluntarily to have 1 child. The government, while advocating 1 child for each couple, stresses that family planning policies should be fair and resonable, acceptable to the people, and easy for field workers to implement. Since China's rural population makes up a large proportion and the feudal ideas such as preference of sons to daughters, the principle of integrating government's guidance with people's voluntariness has been practiced throughout the family planning work. To achieve the population goal set by the government, a family planning network formed with Chinese characteristics. The practice of family planning has been made a basic state policy and is included in the Constitution and the Marriage Law. The drawing up of the Family Planning Law is now underway. A solid foundation has been laid for family planning work among the masses. China is experienced in giving different guidance to regions with different backgrounds, while implementing the government's family planning policy. It combines the government's guidance with personal voluntariness by letting people choose birth control methods. There exists a complete family planning system in China with a contingent of family planning workers. Family planning and education centers and population information centers at all levels are being set up and perfected to shape a complete set of organizations. The development of scientific research on family planning technology and contraceptives ensures further improvement of family planning work. PMID:12280247

1985-03-01

129

After the Baby: Work-Family Conflict and Working Mothers' Psychological Health  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examines work and family characteristics and depressive symptomatology among over 700 working mothers of infants. Working mothers in poorer quality jobs, as well as working mothers who were single or whose infant's health was poorer than that of other infants, reported greater depressive symptomatology. The effect of job quality on…

Marshall, Nancy L.; Tracy, Allison J.

2009-01-01

130

Putting Math Into Family Life: What's Possible for Working Parents?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A set of parent-child math activities designed to help busy, working parents do math with their children as part of everyday situations such as cleaning up and making dinner included basic steps, variations, and information on working with children were developed for families with elementary grades children aged approximately 5 to 11 and…

Kliman, Marlene; Mokros, Jan; Parkes, Alana

131

Work Choices of Mothers in Families with Children with Disabilities.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The choice of women with children to work full time, part time, or not at all was estimated as a function of individual and family characteristics, including the number and ages of children with disabilities. The presence of young children, with or without disabilities, has a significant negative influence on the work choice of both single and…

Porterfield, Shirley L.

2002-01-01

132

Beyond Conflict: Functional Facets of the Work-Family Interplay  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The present paper deals with three positive facets of the work-family interplay, i.e., transfer of competencies, transfer of positive mood, and cross-domain compensation. The latter refers to the experience that engagement in one domain helps dealing with failures in the other domain. In two correlational studies (N[subscript 1] = 107 working

Wiese, Bettina S.; Seiger, Christine P.; Schmid, Christian M.; Freund, Alexandra M.

2010-01-01

133

Work Pressure, Workplace Social Resources, and Work–Family Conflict: The Tale of Two Sectors  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although research has extensively examined work–family issues in the private sector, little is known about sector-related differences. Here, we used data from the 2002 National Study of the Changing Workforce and multiple-group structural equation modeling to compare the levels and mechanisms through which work pressure and 3 workplace social resources (i.e., work–family culture, supervisor support, and coworker support) are related

Sanda M. Dolcos; Dennis Daley

2009-01-01

134

Module 4: Work-Family Policy in the United States. Work-Family Curriculum Guide  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Public policy affects the experiences of workers and their families, both directly and indirectly. For example, employment-focused statutes such as the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA), the Employment Retirement and Income Security Act, the Occupational Health and Safety Act, and the Age Discrimination in Employment Act establish frameworks for…

Kossek, Ellen Ernst; Leana, Carrie; MacDermid, Shelley; Pitt-Catsouphes, Marcie; Raskin, Patricia; Secret, Mary; Shulkin, Sandee; Sweet, Stephen

2006-01-01

135

Family planning for the home, working wives and mothers.  

PubMed

The Indian family planning program is discussed in relation to the home, working wives, and mothers. The major objectives of the program are to learn the reasons for the rapid growth of population, to discover suitable contraceptive techniques, advise, and reduce the birthrate to a level consonant with India's economic well being. Efforts to reach the home are made more difficult by geographic remoteness of some regions, sociological barriers, and the experience of infant mortality. Emphasis must be put on the fact that the fewer the children, the more hopeful the outlook for health and economic security. The trend today is for the middle classes to have fewer children than members of the lower classes. This situation should be reversed if India is to prosper. The hazzards to health of repeated childbirth are especially great to the working wife. Every large-scale industry should begin family planning clinics. By limiting family size, working wives can increase productivity and raise healthier and happier children; middle class wives will be able to respond to their desire to serve their country. Attitudes of working wives toward family planning is increasingly favorable. The most common deterrent to family planning use is fear of losing their children through death. Members of some communities also feel the need to increase the population of their community. PMID:12306150

Gupta, P S

1972-10-01

136

Parental Work Demands and Parent-Child, Family, and Couple Leisure in Dutch Families: What Gives?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study uses data on 898 Dutch couples with minor children to examine whether parental work demands are related differently to one-on-one parent-child, family, and couple leisure activities. The authors presume that the impact of working hours and work arrangements is smaller on activities that are prioritized highly and that are easier and…

Roeters, Anne; Treas, Judith K.

2011-01-01

137

7?Getting There from Here: Research on the Effects of Work–Family Initiatives on Work–Family Conflict and Business Outcomes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Many employing organizations have adopted work–family policies, programs, and benefits. Yet managers in employing organizations simply do not know what organizational initiatives actually reduce work–family conflict and how these changes are likely to impact employees and the organization. We examine scholarship that addresses two broad questions: first, do work–family initiatives reduce employees’ work–family conflict and\\/or improve work–family enrichment? Second, does

Erin L. Kelly; Ellen Ernst Kossek; Leslie B. Hammer; Mary Durham; Jeremy Bray; Kelly Chermack; Lauren A. Murphy; Dan Kaskubar

2008-01-01

138

Conflict between Work and Family among New Zealand Teachers with Dependent Children  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Changes in family and employment patterns have lead to an increasing need for families to balance work and family roles. Little research has examined work and family conflict among teachers. In the present study, 69 New Zealand teachers completed a survey examining occupational-related demands, family-related demands, work and family conflict, and…

Palmer, Melanie; Rose, Dennis; Sanders, Matthew; Randle, Fiona

2012-01-01

139

The burden of health care costs for working families.  

PubMed

Health care spending represents a growing share of our national income, and based on current projections, will increase from 16% of the gross domestic product today to 20% by 2018. What does this mean for typical working families with private health insurance, who shoulder the financial burden of maintaining the current system? In this Issue Brief, Polsky and Grande construct a typical health care budget for working families of various income levels, calculate the percentage of total compensation devoted to health care over time, and project how rising health care costs will affect standards of living in the future. Their findings remind us that what works today also has to work tomorrow. Sustainability depends critically on successful cost containment. PMID:19795545

Polsky, Daniel; Grande, David

2009-07-01

140

The role of the government in work-family conflict.  

PubMed

The foundations of the major federal policies that govern today's workplace were put in place during the 1930s, when most families had a stay-at-home caregiver who could tend to the needs of children, the aged, and the sick. Seven decades later, many of the nation's workplace policies are in need of major updates to reflect the realities of the modern workforce. American workers, for example, typically have little or no control over their work hours and schedules; few have a right to job-protected access to paid leave to care for a family member. Heather Boushey examines three types of work-family policies that affect work-family conflict and that are in serious need of repair--those that govern hours worked and workplace equity, those that affect the ability of workers to take time off from work because their families need care, and those that govern the outsourcing of family care when necessary. In each case Boushey surveys new programs currently on the policy agenda, assesses their effectiveness, and considers the extent to which they can be used as models for a broader federal program. Boushey looks, for example, at a variety of pilot and experimental programs that have been implemented both by private employers and by federal, state, and local governments to provide workers with flexible working hours. Careful evaluations of these programs show that several can increase scheduling flexibility without adversely affecting employers. Although few Americans have access to paid family and medical leave to attend to family needs, most believe that businesses should be required to provide paid leave to all workers. Boushey notes that several states are moving in that direction. Again, careful evaluations show that these experimental programs are successful for both employers and employees. National programs to address child and elder care do not yet exist. The most comprehensive solution on the horizon is the universal prekindergarten programs offered by a few states, most often free of charge, for children aged three and four. PMID:22013633

Boushey, Heather

2011-01-01

141

Supervisor relationships and perceptions of work—family conflict  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social capital theory (SCT) is used as a lens for operationalising the impact of one type of workplace relationship — the supervisor—subordinate relationship (measured using leader—member exchange (LMX)) — upon employees’ perceptions of work—family conflict (WFC) and in turn, job satisfaction. The analysis distinguishes between different types of employees (professional and non-professional) within different work contexts (public and private sector).

Yvonne Brunetto; Rod Farr-Wharton; Sheryl Ramsay; Kate Shacklock

2010-01-01

142

Family life under pressure? Parents' paid work and the quantity and quality of parent-child and family time  

Microsoft Academic Search

Even though family life and paid work are often considered as difficult to reconcile, prior research found that family time is relatively unaffected by the demands paid work imposes upon employed parents. This dissertation investigates this puzzling finding by exploring how parents protect family life from work encroachments. We study the protection of family life by looking in more detail

A. Roeters

2010-01-01

143

Work and Family Balance: How Community College Faculty Cope  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Although work-family balance policies are slowly becoming the norm at four-year institutions, they are not equally common at community colleges. In part, this discrepancy is due to the cost of providing assistance to faculty. Unlike community colleges, research institutions tend to have sufficient resources to offer accommodations for faculty,…

Sallee, Margaret W.

2008-01-01

144

Helping Working Families: The Earned Income Tax Credit.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The impact of the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) on working families was analyzed. The analysis established that the EITC is, on balance, a highly effective program that meets its primary objectives well. The following benefits of the EITC were identified: (1) it reduced the poverty rate in 1999 by an estimated 1.5 percentage points; (2) it is…

Hoffman, Saul D.; Seidman, Laurence S.

145

The Partnership for Working Families: Best Practices in Cities.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report describes 39 successful initiatives that illustrate what 27 cities have been able to accomplish for working families across four goal areas: improving job access and quality employment for residents of underemployed neighborhoods (e.g., connecting quality labor-seeking employers in metropolitan markets with placement and training…

City Policy Associates, Washinton, DC.

146

Work-Family Balance and Academic Advancement in Medical Schools  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: This study examines various options that a faculty member might exercise to achieve work-family balance in academic medicine and their consequences for academic advancement. Method: Three data sets were analyzed: an anonymous web-administered survey of part-time tenure track-eligible University of Illinois College of Medicine (UI-COM)…

Fox, Geri; Schwartz, Alan; Hart, Katherine M.

2006-01-01

147

Reducing Teachers' Work-Family Conflict: From Theory to Practice  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Work-family conflict is a vocational psychology variable whose antecedents and outcomes have been extensively investigated. In contrast, less effort has been invested in creating practical programs to prevent and reduce it. This article provides the rationale and describes the framework for a comprehensive organizational program designed to ease…

Cinamon, Rachel Gali; Rich, Yisrael

2005-01-01

148

A Longitudinal Investigation of Work-Family Strains and Gains, Work Commitment, and Subsequent Employment Status among Partnered Working Mothers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of the work-family interface on mothers' commitment to work and the implications of that work commitment for subsequent employment. The study included a sample of employed partnered mothers who participated in the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Study of Early Child…

Mulvaney, Matthew K.; McNall, Laurel A.; Morrissey, Rebecca A.

2011-01-01

149

Family Policy in Hungary: How to Improve the Reconciliation between Work and Family? OECD Economics Department Working Papers, No. 566  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Hungarian family policy focuses on providing generous options to take time off work to look after children. This system not only contributes to Hungary's low employment rate but encourages long separation from the labour market, has largely failed to significantly influence fertility rates and is relatively expensive to run. This paper looks at…

Hemmings, Philip

2007-01-01

150

Longitudinal Associations between Maternal Work Stress, Negative Work-Family Spillover, and Depressive Symptoms  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The current study examined associations over an 18-month period between maternal work stressors, negative work-family spillover, and depressive symptoms in a sample of 414 employed mothers with young children living in six predominantly nonmetropolitan counties in the Eastern United States. Results from a one-group mediation model showed that a…

Goodman, W. Benjamin; Crouter, Ann C.

2009-01-01

151

Parental employment and work-family stress: Associations with family food environments  

PubMed Central

Parental employment provides many benefits to children's health. However, an increasing number of studies have observed associations between mothers' full-time employment and less healthful family food environments. Few studies have examined other ways in which parental employment may be associated with the family food environment, including the role of fathers' employment and parents' stress balancing work and home obligations. This study utilized data from Project F-EAT, a population-based study of a socio-demographically diverse sample of 3709 parents of adolescents living in a metropolitan area in the Midwestern United States, to examine cross-sectional associations between mothers' and fathers' employment status and parents' work-life stress with multiple aspects of the family food environment. Among parents participating in Project F-EAT, 64% of fathers and 46% of mothers were full-time employed, while 25% of fathers and 37% of mothers were not employed. Results showed that full-time employed mothers reported fewer family meals, less frequent encouragement of their adolescents' healthful eating, lower fruit and vegetable intake, and less time spent on food preparation, compared to part-time and not-employed mothers, after adjusting for socio-demographics. Full-time employed fathers reported significantly fewer hours of food preparation; no other associations were seen between fathers' employment status and characteristics of the family food environment. In contrast, higher work-life stress among both parents was associated with less healthful family food environment characteristics including less frequent family meals and more frequent sugar-sweetened beverage and fast food consumption by parents. Among dual-parent families, taking into account the employment characteristics of the other parent did not substantially alter the relationships between work-life stress and family food environment characteristics. While parental employment is beneficial for many families, identifying policy and programmatic strategies to reduce parents' work-life stress may have positive implications for the family food environment and for the eating patterns and related health outcomes of children and parents.

Bauer, Katherine W.; Hearst, Mary O.; Escoto, Kamisha; Berge, Jerica M.; Neumark-Sztainer, Dianne

2013-01-01

152

Work–family interpersonal capitalization: Sharing positive work events at home  

Microsoft Academic Search

In a 3-week experience-sampling study of 52 full-time employees, the authors investigated the within-individual relationships among positive work events, affective states, and job satisfaction. They also examined the influence of work–family interpersonal capitalization (sharing work events with one’s spouse or partner at home) on employees’ job and relationship satisfaction. Results revealed that positive events influenced job satisfaction through positive affect,

Remus Ilies; Jessica Keeney; Brent A. Scott

2011-01-01

153

WORKPLACE SOCIAL SUPPORT AND WORK-FAMILY CONFLICT: A META-ANALYSIS CLARIFYING THE INFLUENCE OF GENERAL AND WORK-FAMILY-SPECIFIC SUPERVISOR AND ORGANIZATIONAL SUPPORT  

PubMed Central

This article uses meta-analysis to develop a model integrating research on relationships between employee perceptions of general and work–family-specific supervisor and organizational support and work–family conflict. Drawing on 115 samples from 85 studies comprising 72,507 employees, we compared the relative influence of 4 types of workplace social support to work–family conflict: perceived organizational support (POS); supervisor support; perceived organizational work–family support, also known as family-supportive organizational perceptions (FSOP); and supervisor work–family support. Results show work–family-specific constructs of supervisor support and organization support are more strongly related to work–family conflict than general supervisor support and organization support, respectively. We then test a mediation model assessing the effects of all measures at once and show positive perceptions of general and work–family-specific supervisor indirectly relate to work–family conflict via organizational work–family support. These results demonstrate that work–family-specific support plays a central role in individuals’ work–family conflict experiences.

KOSSEK, ELLEN ERNST; PICHLER, SHAUN; BODNER, TODD; HAMMER, LESLIE B.

2011-01-01

154

When Work Just Isn't Enough: Measuring Hardships Faced by Families after Moving from Welfare to Work. Briefing Paper.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper examined the extent to which families faced hardships in moving from welfare to work, highlighting: families who received Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC) during the last month of the Survey of Income and Program Participation or the National Survey of American Families; families who received other public assistance in the…

Boushey, Heather; Gundersen, Bethney

155

Reconceptualizing the work-family interface: An ecological perspective on the correlates of positive and negative spillover between work and family  

Microsoft Academic Search

Ecological theory was used to develop a more expanded conceptualization of the work-family interface and to identify significant correlates of multiple dimensions of work-family spillover. Using data from employed adults participating in the National Survey of Midlife Development in the United States (N = 1,986), negative spillover from work to family, positive spillover from work to family, negative spillover from

Joseph G. Grzywacz; Nadine F. Marks

2000-01-01

156

Tough Choices: Making It Work When Work Doesn't Pay: Narratives from Texas Working Families  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Tough Choices begins not with a hypothesis, but rather a question. Statistically, the Center for Public Policy Priorities knows that low-income Texas families are engaged in a juggling act--struggling to survive on limited income. If the center could ask even a few of them how they manage, what would they tell them? What does it mean to earn too…

Finet, Dayna

2005-01-01

157

Work and Family Stress and Well-Being: An Examination of Person-Environment Fit in the Work and Family Domains  

Microsoft Academic Search

Research indicates that work and family are significant sources of stress. However, this research has underemphasized the cognitive appraisal process by which work and family generate stress. This study used person-environment fit theory to examine how the comparison of work and family experiences to the person's values relates to stress and well-being. Using data from 1758 employees, we assessed fit

Jeffrey R. Edwards; Nancy P. Rothbard

1999-01-01

158

Leadership Style of School Head-Teachers and Their Colleague's Work-Family Conflict  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper aims to investigate the relationship of people-oriented and task-oriented leadership styles with the work-family and family-work conflicts and the intensity of mutual relationship between work-family and family-work conflicts. Data for the research were collected through a survey of public sector elementary and secondary school teachers…

Tatlah, Ijaz Ahmed; Quraishi, Uzma

2010-01-01

159

Conflict or Support: Work and Family in Middle and Old Age.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes several career and family issues that may arise for adults and suggests possible counseling interventions. Several assumptions are made about the work/family connection: renegotiation of work/family balance continues throughout work life; a variety of demographic variables affect work/family roles; and some issues relate more to roles…

Goodman, Jane; Waters, Elinor B.

1985-01-01

160

Social Class and the Experience of Work-Family Conflict during the Transition to Adulthood  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The challenges of juggling work and family responsibilities are well known, but there has been little attention to the distinctive work and family experiences of young adults. This chapter explores how class affects young adults' exposure to work-family conflicts and the strategies they use to manage their work and family responsibilities. Using…

Ammons, Samantha K.; Kelly, Erin L.

2008-01-01

161

Working conditions and Work-Family Conflict in German hospital physicians: psychosocial and organisational predictors and consequences  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Germany currently experiences a situation of major physician attrition. The incompatibility between work and family has been discussed as one of the major reasons for the increasing departure of German physicians for non-clinical occupations or abroad. This study investigates predictors for one particular direction of Work-Family Conflict – namely work interfering with family conflict (WIF) – which are located

Isabelle Fuss; Matthias Nuebling; Hans-Martin Hasselhorn; David Schwappach; Monika A. Rieger

2008-01-01

162

Ten Adaptive Strategies for Family and Work Balance: Advice from Successful Families.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Investigated adaptive strategies of middle class, dual earner couples (N=47) with children that are successfully managing family and work. Guided by grounded-theory methodology, analysis of interview data revealed these successful couples structured their lives around 10 major strategies. Each strategy is defined and illustrated through the…

Haddock, Shelley A.; Zimmerman, Toni Schindler; Ziemba, Scott J.; Current, Lisa R.

2001-01-01

163

What the Person Brings to the Table: Personality, Coping, and Work-Family Conflict  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Employees (N = 291) of various industries and companies were surveyed to study how individual factors (coping and personality) affect work-family conflict: strain-based work-to-family conflict (S-WFC), time-based work-to-family conflict (T-WFC), strain-based family-to-work conflict (S-FWC), and time-based family-to-work conflict (T-FWC). As…

Andreassi, Jeanine K.

2011-01-01

164

Construction and Initial Validation of a Multidimensional Measure of Work–Family Conflict  

Microsoft Academic Search

This manuscript reports on three studies that utilized five different samples (N = 1211) to construct and validate a multidimensional measure of work–family conflict. The six dimensions of conflict measured include the combination of three forms of work–family conflict (time, strain, and behavior) and two directions of work–family conflict (work interference with family and family interference with work). The three

Dawn S. Carlson; K. Michele Kacmar; Larry J. Williams

2000-01-01

165

On the integration of fighting poverty with family planning work.  

PubMed

New approaches to family planning (FP) are being applied in poor areas of China. Poverty programs are being integrated into FP programs. The current situation reveals that 679 poor counties were helped to increase per capita income. Between 1986 and 1988, per capita income of farmers rose from 245 yuan to 331.1 yuan, or a 14.2% increase. Between 1985-88, the population earning 200 yuan dropped from 64.54 million to 22.565 million, or from 39.5% to 9.9% of the total population. The reason given for poverty is unchecked population growth. Poverty is concentrated in 8 provinces and autonomous regions. This population also has a total fertility rate for married women of childbearing age of 3.0 compared with 2.47 nationally. 7 out of the 8 provinces are known to be ethnic border provinces that are economically and educationally backward. The approach to fighting poverty is to develop production with assistance from the state and society. Difficulties involve a high dependency ratio and the lower accumulation of family wealth. In 32 counties in Sichuan, survey results reveal 15.4% fewer working age persons in poor families, and the dependency ratio in poor families an average of 34.2 higher. A successful integrated program occurred in the mountainous areas of Jinzhai County of Anhui Province. Population had soared from 320,000 in the 1950s to 546,000 in 1978. Children/family varied from 3-5 to 9-10. A policy to require approval of a 2nd birth only after income reaches 300 yuan was implemented. For those practicing FP, economic development is provided. Between 1979-89, the birth rate of Jinzhai County dropped from 17.69/1000 to 12.67/1000, and the natural increase from 11.45/1000 to 7.1/1000. Quality of life had improved such that by 1989 90.1% of poor families had enough food and clothing. The net per capita income was 301 yuan in 1989. The ways in which FP and fighting poverty can be integrated are fourfold. 1) It must be part of the overall strategy of socioeconomic development, with FP in the target management of responsibility system and contract responsibility system. 2) Consistency is required between programs. Family income should be a requirement for additional children and economic support provided for those responding. 3) Measures to prevent additional unplanned births must be provided. 4) Good coordination of departments requires FP officials in poverty programs and vice versa. PMID:12285199

Zhou, H

1991-10-01

166

Job Level, Demands, and Resources as Antecedents of Work-Family Conflict  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Although substantial research has examined the conflict that employees experience between their work and family roles, the literature has not investigated the prevalence and antecedents of work-family conflict for individuals who work at different levels of an organization. This study examines differences in work-family conflict (work interference…

DiRenzo, Marco S.; Greenhaus, Jeffrey H.; Weer, Chisty H.

2011-01-01

167

Work and Family Research in the First Decade of the 21st Century  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Scholarship on work and family topics expanded in scope and coverage during the 2000-2010 decade, spurred by an increased diversity of workplaces and of families, by methodological innovations, and by the growth of communities of scholars focused on the work-family nexus. We discuss these developments as the backdrop for emergent work-family

Bianchi, Suzanne M.; Milkie, Melissa A.

2010-01-01

168

Families and Work. Proceedings Series of the Family Study Center Conference (Stillwater, Oklahoma, March 19-20, 1982). Volume 5.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

These proceedings explore issues pertaining to the combination of work and family roles from the perspectives of the family, business, government, labor, and the non-profit community. The six keynote addresses include an historical overview of families and work followed by unique perspectives representing labor, corporations, government, and the…

Hirschlein, Beulah M., Ed.; Braun, William J., Ed.

169

Predictors of work\\/family interference and leisure-time physical activity among teachers: The role of passion towards work  

Microsoft Academic Search

People highly involved in their work are likely to experience negative repercussions on other life domains such as family and leisure activities. The purpose of the present study was to identify the potential contribution of passion towards work on work\\/family interference (WFI) and leisure-time physical activity (LTPA). It was hypothesized that obsessive passion towards work would be positively related to

Johan Caudroit; Julie Boiché; Yannick Stephan; Christine Le Scanff; David Trouilloud

2011-01-01

170

45 CFR 261.25 - Do we count Tribal families in calculating the work participation rate?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2012-10-01 true Do we count Tribal families in calculating the work participation...261.25 Public Welfare OFFICE OF FAMILY ASSISTANCE (ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS), ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN AND FAMILIES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN...

2013-10-01

171

Working for mom and dad: are teens more likely to get injured working in family-owned businesses?  

PubMed

Recent controversy regarding the issue of children working in family-owned businesses has come to the forefront, pitting safety and health versus parent's right to teach their children the family trade. While studies have characterized injury among working teens, no studies have assessed work and injury among teens employed in family-owned businesses. This study is the first to examine teenagers working in family-owned businesses and to compare the experiences of teens working in family-businesses to the experiences of other working teens. A questionnaire was distributed to 8,085 teens in high schools throughout the five public health regions of Wisconsin. A total of 6, 810 teens responded (84%). Overall 2,858 high school teens aged 14-17 reported working (42%); of which 963 (34%) worked in a family-business. Teens working in family-businesses were more likely to report that their injury was severe, affecting their activities for more than three days, compared with other working teens (33% vs. 21%, P = 0.05). The percentage of teens working in family-businesses that reported broken bones or crushed body parts was 17% compared to only 5% of other-working teens. Additionally, teens employed in family-businesses were more likely to file for workers' compensation (28% vs. 12%, P = 0.005). Teens working in family-owned businesses may be at a greater risk for more severe injury based on the jobs and tasks they are doing. Teens working in family-owned businesses were more likely to report engaging in dangerous tasks, including some that are illegal under the Hazardous Occupation Orders. More research is needed to assess the dynamics that exist for teens working in family-owned businesses. PMID:21717209

Zierold, Kristina M; Appana, Savi; Anderson, Henry A

2012-02-01

172

Is There a Downside to Schedule Control for the Work-Family Interface?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Using data from a 2007 U.S. survey of workers, this article examines the implications of schedule control for work-family role blurring and work-family conflict. Four main findings indicate that (a) schedule control is associated with more frequent working at home and work-family multitasking activities; (b) the positive association between…

Schieman, Scott; Young, Marisa

2010-01-01

173

Family Mastery Enhances Work Engagement in Chinese Nurses: A Cross-Lagged Analysis  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Based on Greenhaus and Powell's (2006) theory of work-family enrichment and the job demands-resources (JD-R) model of work engagement (Bakker & Demerouti, 2008), this study focused on the family-to-work enrichment process by investigating the effect of family mastery on work engagement in a Chinese context. A sample of 279 Chinese female nurses…

Lu, Chang-qin; Siu, Oi-ling; Chen, Wei-qing; Wang, Hai-jiang

2011-01-01

174

Quality of Work Life as a Mediator Between Emotional Labor and Work Family Interference  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose  We adopted the conservation of resources model (COR, Hobfoll Am Psychol 44:513–524, 1989; Hobfoll in Stress, culture, and community: the psychology and philosophy of stress, Plenum, New York, 1998) to examine the associations among emotional labor, work family interference, and quality of work life.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Design\\/Methodology\\/Approach  Cross-sectional, self-reported data were obtained from 442 Hong Kong Chinese service employees.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Findings  Correlation and hierarchical regression

Francis Yue-Lok Cheung; Catherine So-Kum Tang

2009-01-01

175

Changing Workplaces to Reduce Work-Family Conflict: Schedule Control in a White-Collar Organization  

PubMed Central

Work-family conflicts are common and consequential for employees, their families, and work organizations. Can workplaces be changed to reduce work-family conflict? Previous research has not been able to assess whether workplace policies or initiatives succeed in reducing work-family conflict or increasing work-family fit. Using longitudinal data collected from 608 employees of a white-collar organization before and after a workplace initiative was implemented, we investigate whether the initiative affects work-family conflict and fit, whether schedule control mediates these effects, and whether work demands, including long hours, moderate the initiative’s effects on work-family outcomes. Analyses clearly demonstrate that the workplace initiative positively affects the work-family interface, primarily by increasing employees’ schedule control. This study points to the importance of schedule control for our understanding of job quality and for management policies and practices.

Kelly, Erin L.; Moen, Phyllis; Tranby, Eric

2011-01-01

176

Workaholism and work–family spillover in a cross-occupational sample  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined the relationship between three components of workaholism (work involvement, drive, enjoyment of work) and work–family spillover. A cross-occupational sample consisting of 661 Norwegian employees from six different organizations responded to a Web-based questionnaire measuring workaholism and work–family spillover. A short and revised version of the WorkBAT showed that work involvement was positively related to both positive family-to-work

Cecilie Schou Andreassen; Jørn Hetland; Ståle Pallesen

2011-01-01

177

An Examination of the Selected Antecedents and Outcomes of Work-Family Conflict and Family-Work Conflict in Frontline Service Jobs  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study is to develop and test a model that investigates the selected antecedents and consequences of work-family conflict and family-work conflict in frontline service jobs. Data were obtained from a sample of full-time frontline employees in Northern Cyprus hotels as its setting. The results of the path analysis showed that negative affectivity (NA) amplified employees' work-family

Osman M. Karatepe; Hasan Kilic; Bengi Isiksel

2008-01-01

178

Working with Military Families Through Deployment and Beyond  

Microsoft Academic Search

Military families experience considerable stress, periods of long separation, and changes to the family system due to family\\u000a members planning to enter a war zone, actively living in a war zone, and reuniting after being in a war zone. Anticipation\\u000a and understanding of the stages of deployment improves family, couple and individual functioning. The issues that the family\\u000a and the

Julie Anne Laser; Paul M. Stephens

2011-01-01

179

Trait Mindfulness and Work-Family Balance among Working Parents: The Mediating Effects of Vitality and Sleep Quality  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The present study investigates the relationship between trait mindfulness and work-family balance among a sample of working parents. Sleep quality and vitality are tested as mediators of this relationship. Results indicate that those with greater mindfulness report greater work-family balance, better sleep quality, and greater vitality. As…

Allen, Tammy D.; Kiburz, Kaitlin M.

2012-01-01

180

Health and Turnover of Working Mothers after Childbirth via the Work-Family Interface: An Analysis across Time  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined organizational levers that impact work-family experiences, participant health, and subsequent turnover. Using a sample of 179 women returning to full-time work 4 months after childbirth, we examined the associations of 3 job resources (job security, skill discretion, and schedule control) with work-to-family enrichment and the…

Carlson, Dawn S.; Grzywacz, Joseph G.; Ferguson, Merideth; Hunter, Emily M.; Clinch, C. Randall; Arcury, Thomas A.

2011-01-01

181

Work-Family Conflict, Resources, and Role Set Density: Assessing Their Effects on Distress among Working Mothers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We explored the relationships between the experience of work-family conflict and levels of distress in the family and at work among a sample of 227 Israeli working mothers. We also examined how role set density (RSD, the number of roles they perform) and personal and environmental resources are related to the women's experience of distress.…

Kulik, Liat; Liberman, Gabriel

2013-01-01

182

"Flexible Work Arrangements: Managing the Work-Family Boundary" by B. Gottlieb, E. K. Kelloway, and E. Barham. Book Review.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Finds that Gottlieb et al.'s work provides an excellent overview of flexible work arrangements in a variety of work organizations for managers, human-resources professionals, and employees. Considers the work an excellent primer presenting useful information about alternative work arrangements, factors involved in work/family clashes,…

Daly, Kerry

1999-01-01

183

Work-Family Attitudes and Beliefs: Implications for Future Air Force Officers.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Our surroundings are rich with environmental and associated paradigm shifts that influence work and family. There are many potential consequences of these shifts. These changes impact the very nucleus of work and family, and often result in conflict with ...

S. K. Johnson

2001-01-01

184

Patterns of Work and Family Involvement Among Single and Dual Earner Couples: Two Competing Analytical Approaches.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This study analyzes the intersection of work and family at the individual level (i.e. segmented, compensatory, and spillover models) and at the couple level (i.e. independent, all roles symmetric, all roles asymmetric, symmetric family - asymmetric work, ...

S. Yogev J. Brett

1983-01-01

185

Work-family enrichment as a mediator between organizational interventions for work-life balance and job outcomes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – This paper aims to examine the role of work-family enrichment in the relationships between organizational interventions for work-life balance (job characteristics, work-life benefits and policies, supervisor support and work-family culture) and job outcomes (job satisfaction, affective commitment and organizational citizenship behaviour). It is hypothesized that organizational interventions for work-life balance will be positively related to job outcomes and

Rupashree Baral; Shivganesh Bhargava

2010-01-01

186

Work and Family Variables, Entrepreneurial Career Success, and Psychological Well-Being  

Microsoft Academic Search

The study examines the influence of work and family variables on the career success and psychological well-being of 111 men and women entrepreneurs. The results show that work-domain variables account for significant variation in time commitment to work, whereas family-domain variables explain substantial variation in time commitment to family. Time commitment to work and time commitment to family play an

Saroj Parasuraman; Yasmin S. Purohit; Veronica M. Godshalk; Nicholas J. Beutell

1996-01-01

187

Work-Family Balance and Job Satisfaction: The Impact of Family-Friendly Policies on Attitudes of Federal Government Employees.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Analysis of 1991 survey data on federal employees indicates that a variety of presumably family-friendly policies were used to varying degrees. Use of policies and employee perceptions of organizational understanding of family demands had very difference effects on work-family balance and job satisfaction. (Contains 57 references.) (SK)

Saltzstein, Alan L.; Ting, Yuan; Saltzstein, Grace Hall

2001-01-01

188

Gender, Time and Inequality: Trends in Women's and Men's Paid Work, Unpaid Work and Free Time  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This analysis uses nationally representative time diary data from 1965, 1975 and 1998 to examine trends and gender differences in time use. Women continue to do more household labor than men; however, men have substantially increased time in core household activities such as cooking, cleaning and daily child care. Nonetheless, a 30-minute-per-day…

Sayer, Liana C.

2005-01-01

189

Patterns of Work and Family Involvement among Single and Dual Earner Couples: Two Competing Analytical Approaches.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper offers a conceptual framework for the intersection of work and family roles based on the constructs of work involvement and family involvement. The theoretical and empirical literature on the intersection of work and family roles is reviewed from two analytical approaches. From the individual level of analysis, the literature reviewed…

Yogev, Sara; Brett, Jeanne

190

Effects of work-family human resource practices: a longitudinal perspective  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the face of demographic developments and changes in employees' priorities, work-family issues have become increasingly important for organizations. It has been suggested that organizations benefit from human resource practices that are designed to help employees balance the demands of both work and family. However, research investigating the purported positive effects of these work-family practices is still scarce and inconclusive.

Angelo Giardini; Rüdiger Kabst

2008-01-01

191

Work-Family Boundary Strategies: Stability and Alignment between Preferred and Enacted Boundaries  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Are individuals bounding work and family the way they would like? Much of the work-family boundary literature focuses on whether employees are segmenting or integrating work with family, but does not explore the boundaries workers would like to have, nor does it examine the fit between desired and enacted boundaries, or assess boundary stability.…

Ammons, Samantha K.

2013-01-01

192

Work-Family Conflict, Perceived Supervisor Support and Organizational Commitment among Brazilian Professionals  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The current study examines a variety of relationships pertaining to work-family conflict among a sample of Brazilian professionals, in order to shed light on work-family issues in this cultural context. Drawing from the cultural values of Brazil and social identity theory, we examine the relationships of two directions of work-family conflict…

Casper, Wendy Jean; Harris, Christopher; Taylor-Bianco, Amy; Wayne, Julie Holliday

2011-01-01

193

Examining the Constructs of Work-to-Family Enrichment and Positive Spillover  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper reports three studies examining construct validity evidence for two recently developed measures of the positive side of the work-family interface: work-to-family positive spillover (WFPS; Hanson, Hammer, & Colton, 2006) and work-to-family enrichment (WFE; Carlson, Kacmar, Wayne, & Grzywacz, 2006). Using confirmatory factor analysis, the…

Masuda, Aline D.; McNall, Laurel A.; Allen, Tammy D.; Nicklin, Jessica M.

2012-01-01

194

Conflict, facilitation, and individual coping styles across the work and family domains  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to explore the relationships between four general coping styles, work and family conflict, and work and family facilitation in a simultaneous equations framework Design\\/methodology\\/approach – Data from the MIDUS study were analyzed using two-staged least squares regression to incorporate the reciprocity between the work and family domains into the model. Hypotheses about

Denise M. Rotondo; Joel F. Kincaid

2008-01-01

195

Work and Family Plans among At-Risk Israeli Adolescents: A Mixed-Methods Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Quantitative methods were used to investigate attributions of importance to work and family roles and anticipated work--family conflict and facilitation among 353 at-risk Israeli male and female adolescents. Qualitative interviews conducted with 26 of the at-risk youth explored future work and family perceptions. Findings indicated that both sexes…

Cinamon, Rachel Gali; Rich, Yisrael

2014-01-01

196

Families of Working Wives Spending More on Services and Nondurables.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Data from the 1984-86 Consumer Expenditure Survey were used to examine effects of a wife's labor force participation on family income and expenditures. Findings indicate that families with employed wives spend significantly more on food away from home, child care, women's apparel, and gasoline than do families in which the wife stays at home. (CH)

Jacobs, Eva; And Others

1989-01-01

197

Thematic content analysis of work-family interactions: Retired cosmonauts’ reflections  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Anecdotal evidence and qualitative research attest to the importance of work-family interactions pre-, during and post-missions. This study uses thematic content analysis to quantify characteristics of work-family interactions and how these changed by stage of cosmonauts' career, identifying the effect of space career variables (e.g., time in space and station) on such interactions during and post-career. Using a thematic scoring scheme developed for this study, we coded work-family interactions identified from interviews with 20 retired male cosmonauts. The majority of work-family interactions were ones in which work overlapped into family life and work hindered or interfered with the family situation. The most common resolution was that family adjusted to work, and the mood or tone about this outcome was almost equally divided among negative, positive and neutral. Changes in work-family interactions and their resolution over the cosmonaut's life showed that the significant interactions were most evident during the cosmonaut career. Although the cosmonaut career has high work demands, it did adjust for family when the need arose. The Russian Space Agency (RKS) eased the impact of the periodic absences, especially through regular communication sessions. Positive work-family interactions, i.e., work or family helping the opposite role, were more likely for those who had been on ISS, not Mir, and for those whose last flight was after 2000. Our data reflect retired cosmonauts' recollections of work-family interactions during their career. Examples of work overlapping into family life and work viewed as interfering with family life were possibly more salient or better remembered than work or family helping the other role.

Johnson, Phyllis J.; Asmaro, Deyar; Suedfeld, Peter; Gushin, Vadim

2012-12-01

198

Immigrant women in Australia: resources, family and work.  

PubMed

Using the 1% public use sample of individual records from the 1981 census and adopting direct standardization for age and sex regression techniques, this paper describes differences among native born Australians and immigrants from English-speaking countries, Northwestern Europe, Eastern Europe, the Mediterranean region and the Third World, in areas of labor participation, unemployment, occupational status, entrepreneurship, and income. While Eastern European women are the most likely to be in the labor force, are the most likely to be unemployed and are the highest paid, Mediterranean women are the least likely to be in the labor force, have fairly low unemployment rates and occupy the lowest status positions and receive the lowest wages. Native born Australians and immigrants from English-speaking and Third World countries and Northwestern Europe are intermediate between these 2 extremes on most dimensions. Some of the differences are not large. In particular, labor force participation only ranges from 49% to 59% and self employment from 9% to 14%. The most apparent differences in work patterns of the various groups of immigrants stem from differences in their own resources and constranits, or from different modes of adaptation to the Australian society, rather than from differential treatment in the labor market. Although family roles affect aspects of work differently, in general, marriage reduces labor force participation by more than 10% among all groups, except for East Europeans and the Mediterraneans, among whom it has no effect. While East European women hold on to their jobs as a potential source of livelihood in the event of divorce which is common among this group, the Mediterraneans view jobs as a means of achieving a measure of economic security. The effect of length of stay in Australia on labor market participation is somewhat larger for women from non-English speaking countries, whose adaptation process includes a slow improvement in language skills. In general, the Australian labor market appears to treat all immigrants equally without regard to their country of origin. PMID:12340229

Evans, M D

1984-01-01

199

The Work-Family Support Roles of Child Care Providers across Settings  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper presents a qualitative investigation of the work-family support roles of a sample of 29 child care providers serving low-income families in the Chicago area (16 family, friend, and neighbor providers (FFN), 7 licensed family child care providers (FCC), and 6 center-based teachers). Providers report offering low-income parents…

Bromer, Juliet; Henly, Julia R.

2009-01-01

200

Health and Turnover of Working Mothers After Childbirth Via the Work-Family Interface: An Analysis Across Time  

PubMed Central

This study examined organizational levers that impact work–family experiences, participant health, and subsequent turnover. Using a sample of 179 women returning to full-time work 4 months after childbirth, we examined the associations of 3 job resources (job security, skill discretion, and schedule control) with work-to-family enrichment and the associations of 2 job demands (psychological requirements and nonstandard work schedules) with work-to-family conflict. Further, we considered subsequent impact of work-to-family conflict and enrichment on women’s health (physical and mental health) 8 months after women returned to work and the impact of health on voluntary turnover 12 months after women returned to work. Having a nonstandard work schedule was directly and positively related to conflict, whereas schedule control buffered the effect of psychological requirements on conflict. Skill discretion and job security, both job resources, directly and positively related to enrichment. Work-to-family conflict was negatively related to both physical and mental health, but work-to-family enrichment positively predicted only physical health. Physical health and mental health both negatively influenced turnover. We discuss implications and opportunities for future research.

Carlson, Dawn S.; Grzywacz, Joseph G.; Ferguson, Merideth; Hunter, Emily M.; Clinch, C. Randall; Arcury, Thomas A.

2013-01-01

201

Health and turnover of working mothers after childbirth via the work-family interface: an analysis across time.  

PubMed

This study examined organizational levers that impact work-family experiences, participant health, and subsequent turnover. Using a sample of 179 women returning to full-time work 4 months after childbirth, we examined the associations of 3 job resources (job security, skill discretion, and schedule control) with work-to-family enrichment and the associations of 2 job demands (psychological requirements and nonstandard work schedules) with work-to-family conflict. Further, we considered subsequent impact of work-to-family conflict and enrichment on women's health (physical and mental health) 8 months after women returned to work and the impact of health on voluntary turnover 12 months after women returned to work. Having a nonstandard work schedule was directly and positively related to conflict, whereas schedule control buffered the effect of psychological requirements on conflict. Skill discretion and job security, both job resources, directly and positively related to enrichment. Work-to-family conflict was negatively related to both physical and mental health, but work-to-family enrichment positively predicted only physical health. Physical health and mental health both negatively influenced turnover. We discuss implications and opportunities for future research. PMID:21604833

Carlson, Dawn S; Grzywacz, Joseph G; Ferguson, Merideth; Hunter, Emily M; Clinch, C Randall; Arcury, Thomas A

2011-09-01

202

A Meta-Analytic Review of Work-Family Conflict and Its Antecedents  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This meta-analytic review combines the results of more than 60 studies to help determine the relative effects of work, nonwork, and demographic and individual factors on work interference with family (WIF) and family interference with work (FIW). As expected, work factors related more strongly to WIF, and some nonwork factors were more strongly…

Byron, Kristin

2005-01-01

203

Consumer and Family Perspectives on the Meaning of Work.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This qualitative study examined the perspectives of people with significant disabilities (N=23) and their family members about their overall employment experiences, outcomes, and expectations. Four focus groups were convened, two groups of people with significant disabilities and two groups of family members. Disabilities represented included…

Fesko, Sheila; Freedman, Ruth

1995-01-01

204

Working with Families of Young Children with Special Needs  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This user-friendly book presents research-based best practices for serving families of children with special needs from birth to age 6. Expert contributors demonstrate how early intervention and early childhood special education can effectively address a wide range of family concerns, which in turn optimizes children's development and learning.…

McWilliam, R. A., Ed.

2010-01-01

205

Levels of Interventions for MFTs Working with Family Businesses  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Family businesses (FBs) are a significant population in the world and therefore part of most practicing marriage and family therapists (MFTs) clientele; however, little is mentioned about FBs in the training of MFTs. This article offers some guidance to practicing MFTs who service this population, as well as MFTs who wish to expand their practice…

Distelberg, Brian; Castanos, Carolina

2012-01-01

206

Working with Families Experiencing Homelessness: Understanding Trauma and Its Impact  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The prevalence of traumatic stress in the lives of families who are homeless is extraordinarily high. Often these families are headed by single mothers who have experienced ongoing trauma in the form of childhood abuse and neglect, domestic violence, and community violence, as well as the trauma associated with poverty and the loss of home,…

Guarino, Kathleen; Bassuk, Ellen

2010-01-01

207

Family Ranching and Farming: A Consensus Management Model to Improve Family Functioning and Decrease Work Stress.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Notes that internal and external threats could squeeze ranch and farm families out of business. Offers six-step Consensus Management Model that combines strategic planning with psychoeducation/family therapy. Describes pilot test with intergenerational ranch family that indicated improvements in family functioning, including reduced stress and…

Zimmerman, Toni Schindler; Fetsch, Robert J.

1994-01-01

208

Incorporating Family Work into Individual Counseling: Establishing a Relationship with Families. ERIC Digest.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This digest provides an overview of basic family counseling concepts for counselors whose specialty is in an area other than marriage and family counseling. The author notes that there are two pivotal areas the counselor and client must address upon deciding to involve a family in the client's counseling sessions: how to get the family to come…

Kaplan, David M.; Cole, Melody J.

209

Relationship between Work Interference with Family and Parent-Child Interactive Behavior: Can Guilt Help?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Despite its theoretical and practical importance, behavioral consequences of work-family conflict that reside in the family domain rarely have been examined. Based on two studies, the current research investigated the relationship of work-interference-with-family (WIF) with parent-child interactive behavior (i.e., educational, recreational, and…

Cho, Eunae; Allen, Tammy D.

2012-01-01

210

Beating Time/Making Time: The Impact of Work Scheduling on Men's Family Roles.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Case studies examine men's family situations. Attempts to beat time by working from noon to midnight result in unintended negative consequences for one family. For another, creation of a split-shift family when a wife returns to work brings a father closer to his children and wife. (Author)

Hood, Jane; Golden, Susan

1979-01-01

211

Family and Work Influences on the Transition to College among Latina Adolescents  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigates the effect of family obligations and part-time work on Latina adolescents' stress and academic achievement during the transition to college. One hundred seventeen Latina college students from immigrant families completed surveys assessing the mother-daughter relationship, family obligations, work-school conflict, school and…

Sy, Susan R.

2006-01-01

212

Coping with work-family conflict: A leader-member exchange perspective.  

PubMed

Leader-member exchange (LMX) theory is applied as a framework for understanding coping with work-family conflict. The effectiveness of four work-family coping strategies (i.e., preventive and episodic forms of both problem-focused and emotion-focused coping) is considered with emphasis on how the LMX relationship contributes to each form of coping with work interference with family. The LMX-based model of work-family coping accounts for the development of family-friendly work roles, use of organizational family-friendly policies, and the negotiation of flextime and flexplace accommodations. Constraints on the relationship between LMX and work-family coping associated with supervisor authority and resources and aspects of the organizational context are also discussed. Research and applied implications of the model are offered. PMID:21280949

Major, Debra A; Morganson, Valerie J

2011-01-01

213

Work—Family Conflict, Self-Efficacy, Job Satisfaction, and Gender: Evidences From Asia  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article examines the relationships between two types of work—family conflict (work interfering with family [WIF] and family interfering with work [FIW]), job-related self-efficacy, work satisfaction, and supervisor satisfaction in China and India. Central to the analysis is a comparison of the authors’ model between men and women, where important differences were projected to exist. Results showed that FIW was

Peng Wang; John J. Lawler; Kan Shi

2010-01-01

214

Antecedents and Outcomes of Work-Family Conflict Among Married Professional Women: Evidence from Singapore  

Microsoft Academic Search

The study reported here examined the impact ol fivc antecedent sets of work and family domain variables on three types of work-lamily conflict (job-spouse, job-parent, and job-homemakcr) and the impact of these types of work-family conflict on well-being and work outcome measures. Data were obtained from 354 married professional women from duil-career families in Singapore. Results indicate that married professional

Samuel Aryee

1992-01-01

215

Poverty Among Working Families: Findings from Experimental Poverty Measures, 1998. Special Studies. Current Population Reports.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report examines poverty among working families with children using experimental measures of poverty that are based on recommendations by the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) Panel on Poverty and Family Assistance. These experimental poverty measure...

J. Iceland

2000-01-01

216

Work-family climate, organizational commitment, and turnover: Multilevel contagion effects of leaders.  

PubMed

This paper presents empirical research analyzing the relationship between work-family climate (operationalized in terms of three work-family climate sub-scales), organizational leadership (i.e., senior manager) characteristics, organizational commitment and turnover intent among 526 employees from 37 different hotels across the US. Using multilevel modeling, we found significant associations between work-family climate, and both organizational commitment and turnover intent, both within and between hotels. Findings underscored the importance of managerial support for employee work-family balance, the relevance of senior managers' own work-family circumstances in relation to employees' work outcomes, and the existence of possible contagion effects of leaders in relation to work-family climate. PMID:19412351

O'Neill, John W; Harrison, Michelle M; Cleveland, Jeannette; Almeida, David; Stawski, Robert; Crouter, Anne C

2009-01-01

217

Comparing Families and Staff in Nursing Homes and Assisted Living: Implications for Social Work Practice  

PubMed Central

Nursing homes and residential care/assisted living settings provide care to 2.4 million individuals. Few studies compare the experience of and relationships between family and staff in these settings, despite ongoing family involvement and evidence that relationships are problematic. Data from 488 families and 397 staff in 24 settings examined family involvement and family and staff burden, depressive symptoms, and perceptions; and staff absenteeism and turnover. There were few differences across setting types. While conflict rarely occurred, there was room for improvement in family-staff relations; this area, and preparing family for their caregiving roles, are appropriate targets for social work intervention.

Zimmerman, Sheryl; Cohen, Lauren W.; Reed, David; Gwyther, Lisa P.; Washington, Tiffany; Cagle, John C.; Beeber, Anna S.; Sloane, Philip D.

2013-01-01

218

Social Class, Work, and the Family: Some Implications of the Father's Occupation for Familial Relationships and Sons' Career Decisions.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The effects of both vertical and nonvertical dimensions of fathers' work on family relations and vocational socialization are explored through a multivariate analysis of data collected from several hundred male student participants enrolled in a Michigan College from 1962-1967. Social class and occupationally-related differences in family

Mortimer, Jeylan T.

219

Understanding Family Roles and Ethics in Working with First-Generation College Students and Their Families  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article examines the family roles and ethics of first-generation college students and their families through discussion of a case vignette. London's family roles applied to first-generation college students are discussed. Narrative therapy practices and an ethical model that examines the value process of counselors are explored as possible…

Hartig, Nadine; Steigerwald, Fran

2007-01-01

220

The family and work connect: A case for relationship-focused family life education  

PubMed Central

The article presents the premises for the need to develop a relationship-focused family life education program for young adult employees. The article explores the changing trends in the Indian family unit and their impact on the workforce. The author also presents the findings from interviews with family-intervention experts and their recommendations for the contents of such a program.

Henry, Jane; Parthasarathy, R.

2010-01-01

221

Work, family, support, and depression: Employed mothers in Israel, Korea, and the United States.  

PubMed

Our research revealed differences in work-family constructs for employed mothers in 3 countries, Israel (N = 105), Korea (N = 298), and the United States (N = 305). Although levels of work-family conflict were comparable, the Korean women had the lowest levels of work-family enrichment compared with the Israeli and American mothers. Moreover, Korean women reported the most depression and the least support from both spouses and employers. Spousal support mediated the relationship between work-family conflict and depression for employed mothers in Israel, Korea, and the United States. As hypothesized by conservation of resources theory (Hobfoll, 1989, 1998, 2001), threat of resource loss (operationalized as work-family conflict) was related to depression more strongly than was resource gain (i.e., work-family enrichment). (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved). PMID:25019548

O'Brien, Karen M; Ganginis Del Pino, Heather V; Yoo, Sung-Kyung; Cinamon, Rachel Gali; Han, Young-Joo

2014-07-01

222

The Relation between Work-Family Balance and Quality of Life.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The relationship between work-family balance and quality of life was assessed for 353 accounting professionals. Those who spent more time on family than work experienced higher quality of life than balanced individuals, who experienced higher quality than those who spent more time on work. Findings were similar for level of involvement balance and…

Greenhaus, Jeffrey H.; Collins, Karen M.; Shaw, Jason D.

2003-01-01

223

WOMEN LEADERS IN HIGH-POVERTY COMMUNITY SCHOOLS: WORK-RELATED STRESS AND FAMILY IMPACT  

Microsoft Academic Search

This qualitative study explores the experiences of women administrators in high- poverty community schools, investigating four women's perspectives on work demands and the impact on their families. Their work demands are related to the characteristics of impoverished communities, whereas their work resources are based on intrinsic rewards and social justice. Family demands and resources are related to the developmental stages

Jennifer E. Lawson

2008-01-01

224

Successful Family Reunification: The Contribution of Social Work Theory in the Provision of Services and Decisionmaking  

Microsoft Academic Search

Masters'-level social work practitioners in child welfare practice discussed their work with successfully reunified families. The majority used theory and found it helpful in conducting ongoing casework and making decisions in the complex area of family reunification. Social work theory, specifically the Life Model and the Problem- Solving Model, provided language to describe and document change and the conditions under

Elizabeth Peffer Talbot

225

Work-Family Balance and Energy: A Day-Level Study on Recovery Conditions  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The present study examines whether daily recovery inhibiting and enhancing conditions predict day-levels of work-family conflict (WFC), work-family facilitation (WFF), exhaustion and vigor. Forty-nine individuals from various professional backgrounds in Spain provided questionnaire and daily survey measures over a period of five working days.…

Sanz-Vergel, Ana Isabel; Demerouti, Evangelia; Moreno-Jimenez, Bernardo; Mayo, Margarita

2010-01-01

226

Beyond Family-Friendly: The Construct and Measurement of Singles-Friendly Work Culture  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Although research has examined work-family issues and organizational support for employees' family responsibilities, few studies have explored the work-life issues of single employees without children. The current study examines single employees' perceptions of how their organizations support their work-life balance in comparison to employees with…

Casper, Wendy J.; Weltman, David; Kwesiga, Eileen

2007-01-01

227

Work-Family Relations among Mothers of Children with Learning Disorders  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The study examined conflict and facilitation in work-family relations among working mothers of children with learning disorders (LD) or with typical development. The study also focused on three maternal personal resources (maternal anxious/avoidant attachment security, affect and sense of coherence) as antecedents of these work-family relations,…

Al-Yagon, Michal; Cinamon, Rachel Gali

2008-01-01

228

Self-Reported Work and Family Stress of Female Primary Teachers.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Results of a self-report questionnaire indicated that female primary teachers in Australia report moderate levels of global, work, and family stress. Time and workload pressure was the major work stressor, and responsibility for child rearing the major family stressor. Work stress and home stress both impacted on each other. (EV)

Thomas, Narelle; Clarke, Valerie; Lavery, Judy

2003-01-01

229

The Arts and Family Social Work: A Call for Advancing Practice, Research, and Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This brief report serves as a call for creative and artistic works relative to family social work. Recognizing the "art" of family social work, Mazza's (2003) multidimensional poetry therapy practice model is used as a framework for addressing all arts-based approaches to practice and research.

Mazza, Nicholas

2009-01-01

230

The Influence of Work-Family Conflict and Supervisor Support on Job Satisfaction  

Microsoft Academic Search

Work-family conflict (WFC) is a bi-directional construct consisting of work interfering with family (WIF) and family interfering with work (FIW). This study examined the direct effects of WIF, FIW and supervisor support on job satisfaction, and the moderating effect of supervisor support on the relationship between WFC and job satisfaction as well. Data gather from 166 frontline blue-collar employees from

Lin Qiu

2010-01-01

231

[Drawings and art work in systemic family therapy].  

PubMed

As in most other forms of psychotherapy, creative media are an essential ingredient of systemic therapy with children, adolescents and their families. Therapists cannot rely solely on verbal interventions but rather have to utilize the natural tendency of children to express themselves through drawings and art. The therapeutic functions of creative expression in systemic therapy are being discussed. An overview of a variety of techniques with case examples is given that illustrates the many forms and uses of creative techniques in systemic family therapy. PMID:15730149

Retzlaff, Rüdiger

2005-01-01

232

No Pain, No Gain? A Resource-Based Model of Work-to-Family Enrichment and Conflict  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Work-family scholars tend to work in two largely disconnected research streams, focusing on either work-family enrichment--the positive side of the work-family interface--or work-family conflict--the negative side of this interface. The purpose of this study is to suggest a reconciliation of the two research streams by proposing and testing a…

Chen, Zheng; Powell, Gary N.

2012-01-01

233

‘You have to choose your childcare to fit your work’: Childcare decision-making among low-income working families  

Microsoft Academic Search

Regardless of their economic background, most working parents face the task of arranging childcare at some point. The decision-making process they experience is often complex, and this complexity is intensified for particular groups of families with limited financial and social resources. In this paper, we present findings from a three-year qualitative study of the childcare choices of low-income working families,

Heather Sandstrom; Ajay Chaudry

2012-01-01

234

The Role of the Government in Work-Family Conflict  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The foundations of the major federal policies that govern today's workplace were put in place during the 1930s, when most families had a stay-at-home caregiver who could tend to the needs of children, the aged, and the sick. Seven decades later, many of the nation's workplace policies are in need of major updates to reflect the realities of the…

Boushey, Heather

2011-01-01

235

New Beginnings: Preparing Future Teachers to Work with Diverse Families  

Microsoft Academic Search

Professional literature increasingly documents the importance of school and family connections for increasing student success in school. The need to involve parents in the education of their children is so compelling that it has become a national goal. Collaboration with parents to support students' learning is included as one of the competencies in new standards for beginning teachers. Universities can

Linda T. Jones; Jack Blendinger

1994-01-01

236

[Working with Infants, Toddlers, and Families in Rural Areas.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This newsletter theme issue focuses on providing services to infants with special needs in rural areas. In "Old Threads, New Patterns: Reaching Out to Rural Families," Deborah Harris-Usner discusses bringing infant mental health care and parent-infant psychotherapy to rural New Mexico. In "The People of Kids Place: Creating and Maintaining…

Fenichel, Emily, Ed.

1995-01-01

237

Constructing Family-friendly Work: Three Real Dreams.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Case studies of three couples who modified their careers to accommodate family life illustrate the barriers and necessary trade-offs as well as significant increases in career and life happiness that can result. Counseling suggestions include revision of the concept of career and assessment of the costs and benefits. (SK)

Jackson, Aaron P.; Wilde, Sharon V.

2000-01-01

238

Designing Computerized Decision Support That Works for Clinicians and Families  

PubMed Central

Evidence-based decision-making is central to the practice of pediatrics. Clinical trials and other biomedical research provide a foundation for this process, and practice guidelines, drawing from their results, inform the optimal management of an increasing number of childhood health problems. However, many clinicians fail to adhere to guidelines. Clinical decision support delivered using health information technology, often in the form of electronic health records, provides a tool to deliver evidence-based information to the point of care and has the potential to overcome barriers to evidence-based practice. An increasing literature now informs how these systems should be designed and implemented to most effectively improve outcomes in pediatrics. Through the examples of computerized physician order entry, as well as the impact of alerts at the point of care on immunization rates, the delivery of evidence-based asthma care, and the follow-up of children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, the following review addresses strategies for success in using these tools. The following review argues that, as decision support evolves, the clinician should no longer be the sole target of information and alerts. Through the Internet and other technologies, families are increasingly seeking health information and gathering input to guide health decisions. By enlisting clinical decision support systems to deliver evidence-based information to both clinicians and families, help families express their preferences and goals, and connect families to the medical home, clinical decision support may ultimately be most effective in improving outcomes.

Fiks, Alexander G.

2011-01-01

239

Designing computerized decision support that works for clinicians and families.  

PubMed

Evidence-based decision-making is central to the practice of pediatrics. Clinical trials and other biomedical research provide a foundation for this process, and practice guidelines, drawing from their results, inform the optimal management of an increasing number of childhood health problems. However, many clinicians fail to adhere to guidelines. Clinical decision support delivered using health information technology, often in the form of electronic health records, provides a tool to deliver evidence-based information to the point of care and has the potential to overcome barriers to evidence-based practice. An increasing literature now informs how these systems should be designed and implemented to most effectively improve outcomes in pediatrics. Through the examples of computerized physician order entry, as well as the impact of alerts at the point of care on immunization rates, the delivery of evidence-based asthma care, and the follow-up of children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, the following review addresses strategies for success in using these tools. The following review argues that, as decision support evolves, the clinician should no longer be the sole target of information and alerts. Through the Internet and other technologies, families are increasingly seeking health information and gathering input to guide health decisions. By enlisting clinical decision support systems to deliver evidence-based information to both clinicians and families, help families express their preferences and goals, and connect families to the medical home, clinical decision support may ultimately be most effective in improving outcomes. PMID:21315295

Fiks, Alexander G

2011-03-01

240

Developing Cultural Competence in Working with Korean Immigrant Families  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The authors provide an in-depth examination of the historical background, cultural values, family roles, and community contexts of Korean Americans as an aid to both researchers and clinicians in developing cultural competence with this particular group. First, the concept of cultural competence is defined. A brief history of Korean immigration…

Kim, Irene J.; Kim, Luke I. C.; Kelly, James G.

2006-01-01

241

Fragile Families and Welfare Reform: An Introduction. JCPR Working Paper.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper summarizes a collection of papers in a special issue that examines what resources and capabilities parents likely to be affected by Temporary Assistance for Needy Families have; whether these parents are likely to be good parents; the nature of parents' relationships and whether they will be able to cooperate in raising their children;…

Garfinkel, Irwin; McLanahan, Sara S.; Tienda, Marta; Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne

242

Trilingual Families in Mainly Monolingual Societies: Working towards a Typology  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Trilingualism has often been studied within the framework established for bilingualism. Although there is overlap, the dynamics around trilingualism pose greater variations than is the case with bilingualism. The aim of this study is to analyse the language practices of different groups of trilingual families. Particular attention is paid to the…

Braun, Andreas; Cline, Tony

2010-01-01

243

Innovative Ideas on How Work-Family Research Can Have More Impact.  

PubMed

The commentaries on our focal article agreed with its main premise that work-family research should follow new strategies to improve its practical impact, and made suggestions clustering into three main themes. The first theme built on our suggestion to improve the research focus, terminology, and framing of work-family research. These essays offered additional ideas such as decoupling work-family from work-life research, and examining contextual factors more deeply. The second theme focused on how to better apply the findings from work family research. These commentaries provided social change approaches for making work-family issues more central to key stakeholders and to organizations. The third theme focused on broadening our scope to the societal level. These editorials advocated tactics supporting the development of basic rights of work-life balance within and across nations. PMID:22247738

Kossek, Ellen Ernst; Baltes, Boris B; Matthews, Russell A

2011-09-01

244

Episodic work-family conflict, cardiovascular indicators, and social support: an experience sampling approach.  

PubMed

Work-family conflict, a prevalent stressor in today's workforce, has been linked to several detrimental consequences for the individual, including physical health. The present study extends this area of research by examining episodic work-family conflict in relation to objectively measured cardiovascular health indicators (systolic and diastolic blood pressure and heart rate) using an experience sampling methodology. The results suggested that the occurrence of an episode of work interference with family conflict is linked to a subsequent increase in heart rate but not blood pressure; however, the relationship between episodes of family interference with work conflict and both systolic and diastolic blood pressure is moderated by perceptions of family-supportive supervision. No evidence was found for the moderating role of work-supportive family. Further theoretical and practical implications are discussed. PMID:23834444

Shockley, Kristen M; Allen, Tammy D

2013-07-01

245

Validation Study of the Malay Version of the Work-Family Conflict Questionnaire  

PubMed Central

Background: Work-family conflict has received increasing attention in recent decades in the area of workplace stressors, which can affect employees’ health. However, the dimensionality of the work–family conflict construct among the Malay-speaking population has not been clarified. In order to do so, it is crucial to use an instrument that is appropriate and valid for the Malay-speaking population. As such, the goal of this study was to validate and test the dimensionality of the Malay version of the Work-Family Conflict Questionnaire. Methods: The present study conducted exploratory factor analysis, confirmatory factor analysis, discriminant validity, convergent validity, and internal consistency, using Cronbach’s alpha, of the work–family conflict construct among 332 working women in Malaysia. Results: The results supported the existence of four dimensions in the Work-Family Conflict Questionnaire that distinguish between time based and strain-based work-family conflict and family-work conflict. The discriminant validity, convergent validity, and internal consistency of this construct are adequately supported. Conclusion: The findings of this study supported the existence of discriminant and convergent validity, as well as adequate reliability, for the construct. Thus, the Work–Family Conflict Questionnaire is a valid and reliable instrument among Malay-speaking working women.

SANAZ, Aazami; SYAQIRAH, Akmal; KHADIJAH, Shamsuddin

2014-01-01

246

Strategies and Practices for Working with Immigrant Families in Early Education Programs  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study explores how early childhood education programs engage immigrant families in their children's learning, how programs learn about these families and incorporate their cultures into the classrooms, and what programs are doing in terms of their staff's professional development related to working with immigrant children and families. The…

Vesely, Colleen K.; Ginsberg, Mark R.

2011-01-01

247

Social Work With Affluent and Low-income Families: Attribution Theory  

Microsoft Academic Search

A study to assess attribution theory and the work done by social workers with wealthy and poor families was performed using two vignettes identical in information suggesting abuse, with one described as a wealthy family and the other a family living in poverty. Attribution theory suggests that humans label and assume certain traits to be true of different persons based

Katharine Terbush

2008-01-01

248

We Are Not Babysitters: Family Child Care Providers Redefine Work and Care.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Drawing on in-depth interviews with 20 family child care providers of diverse race, ethnicity, immigrant status, and social class, this book explores the social, political, and economic forces and processes that draw women into the work of family child care. The articles dispel not only myths about why women choose to be family child care…

Tuominen, Mary C.

249

Psychosocial Stressors of Families Affected by HIV\\/AIDS: Implications for Social Work Practice  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study identified the psychosocial stressors of low-income families who were affected by HIV\\/AIDS in Alabama. Methods consisted of personal interviews with 12 social workers at public agencies and a review of social work charts for 80 clients at an HIV clinic for mothers and children. The combined results indicated that families were likely to experience housing instability, family breakdown,

Bronwen Lichtenstein; Marsha S. Sturdevant; Anil A. Mujumdar

2010-01-01

250

Shiftwork, work-family conflict among Italian nurses, and prevention efficacy.  

PubMed

Shiftwork may be a demanding situation because it raises problems for reconciling work and nonwork activities; as such, this conflict may be mitigated by designing and implementing effective preventative actions at the workplace. There is a paucity of research directly examining the impact of work schedules and preventative measures at work on work-family conflict. Hence, the authors posed the following questions in their study: What is the impact of different work schedules on work-family conflict? Is a preventative culture associated with less work-family conflict? Is work-family conflict associated with specific health and well-being indicators and if so, how does work-family conflict affect well-being as compared with other potential determinants? A subset of 750 nurses ( approximately 10% of total workforce) were randomly selected from a larger sample. Nurses completed the Italian version of the NEXT questionnaire plus newly developed items to create an index on occupational safety and health prevention at work. Data were explored using two data mining techniques, Random Forests and Bayesian Networks, and modeled using hierarchical linear regression models. In all, 664 (88.5% of sample) nurses answered the questionnaire. The authors found that different work schedules had a differential impact on work-family conflict. In addition, effective risk communication between workers and people in charge of safety and health, and participation in preventative activities, quantitative workload, performing tasks not belonging to the nursing profession, and the number of weekends/month spent at work were all strongly associated with work-family conflict. The variable "time schedules" also acted as an effect modifier in the relationship between effective communication and participation in preventative activities and work-family conflict. In addition, quantitative demands played a role as a mediator (30% of total effect) in the relationship between effective communication and participation in preventative activities and work-family conflict. Work-family conflict was significantly associated with burnout, sleep, and presenteeism; its association with burnout was higher than other precursors. Shift schedules that involved night work implied different workload demands, less effective communication, and participation in preventative activities than the other work schedules considered. The presence of a preventative culture directly reduced work-family conflict and indirectly via reduction of work demands. The authors conclude that the development of a preventative culture among irregular and night shiftworkers can be effective in reducing work-family conflict, while positively increasing well-being and job performance. PMID:20636219

Camerino, Donatella; Sandri, Marco; Sartori, Samantha; Conway, Paul Maurice; Campanini, Paolo; Costa, Giovanni

2010-07-01

251

Age Differences in the Longitudinal Relationship between Work-Family Conflict and Alcohol Use  

PubMed Central

Research on the relationship between work-family conflict and alcohol use has generally shown small effects possibly due to failure to include important individual differences relevant to the experience of work-family conflict and alcohol use, notably age. This study examined whether the relationships between aspects of work-family conflict and alcohol use variables differed by age. Participants were 543 individuals (51.2% women) from a community sample of working adults in the greater Chicagoland area who responded to a mail survey at three time points. Results showed important differences between age groups in several predictors of alcohol use. Strain versus time-based conflict had different effects on drinking, and strain-based forms of work-family conflict were related to increased problematic alcohol use depending on age. This study indicates that individual differences, particularly age, should be systematically accounted for when studying the relationship between work-family conflict and alcohol use.

Wolff, Jennifer M.; Rospenda, Kathleen M.; Richman, Judith A.

2014-01-01

252

Predictors of family strength: the integrated spiritual-religious/resilient perspective for understanding the healthy/strong family.  

PubMed

Objective: The present study aimed to investigate the effects of spiritual well-being and family protective factors on the family strength in a propositional structural model. Methods: The research population consisted of all the married people of the Isfahan, Iran, in 2012 with preschool-aged children and in the first decade of marriage with at least eight grades of educational level. Three hundred and ninety five voluntary and unpaid participants were selected randomly through multi-stage sampling from seven regions of the city. The instruments used were the Spiritual Well-being Scale, Inventory of Family Protective Factors, and Family Strength Scale. Descriptive statistics and a structural equation modeling analytic approach were used. Results: The analytic model predicted 82% of the variance of the family strength. The total effect of the spiritual well-being on the family strength was higher compared to the family protective factors. Furthermore, spiritual well-being predicted 43% of the distribution of the family protective factors and had indirect effect on the family strength through the family protective factors (p < 0.001). Conclusions: The results of this study confirmed the interrelationships among spiritual well-being and family protective factors, and their simultaneous effects on family strength. Family counselors may employ an integrated spiritual-religious/resilient perspective to inform their strength-based work with individuals and their families. Declaration of interest: None. PMID:24644511

Ghaffari, Majid; Fatehizade, Maryam; Ahmadi, Ahmad; Ghasemi, Vahid; Baghban, Iran

2013-01-01

253

NIOSH Conference Grant: 5th International Congress on Women, Work, and Health, Mexico, October 2008.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Researchers and women's health advocates over the years have highlighted the importance of the relationship between work and women's health. This complex area of investigation includes the impact of women's work in the unpaid private and paid public spher...

C. Becerril L. Delp

2010-01-01

254

Managing Work and Family. Nonstandard Work Arrangements among Managers and Professionals.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

With more mothers in the work force and greater stresses created by competing demands of work and home, nonstandard work arrangements (NSWAs), which include temporary help agency work, on-call work, day labor, contract work, independent contracting, self-employment, and part-time work, have been suggested as a remedy for this conflict. For the…

Spalter-Roth, Roberta M.; Kalleberg, Arne L.; Rasell, Edith; Cassirer, Naomi; Reskin, Barbara F.; Hudson, Ken; Webster, David; Appelbaum, Eileen; Dooley, Betty L.

255

Relationship between Women's Work and Family Roles and Subjective Well-Being and Psychological Distress.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The relationship between the experience of women in their work and family roles and their mental health was examined. Specifically, the aspects of women's work which were related to the levels of psychological distress and subjective well being were ident...

R. C. Barnett N. L. Marshall

1989-01-01

256

Training Family Therapists to Work with Children and Families: A Modified Delphi Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined child inclusion issues and training marriage and family therapists (MFTs) to treat children. This modified Delphi study utilized a panel of experts, and gathered data through questionnaires and qualitative interviews. Panelists believe children should participate in family therapy sessions for both child and adult problems,…

Sori, Catherine Ford; Sprenkle, Douglas H.

2004-01-01

257

Working for families with dysfunctional children: An approach and structure for the first family therapy interview  

Microsoft Academic Search

A preplanned and structured format for conducting the first family treatment interview is presented in which the assessment task is seen as an opportunity to help a family succeed in constructively, coherently, and logically looking at itself, the “problem” child, and the problems with which it is attempting to deal. Strategies of modelling openness and competence are suggested. Building on

Carl Bryant

1984-01-01

258

Work and Welfare Patterns in Low Income Families.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Using data from the New Jersey Graduated Work Incentive Experiment and from the University of Michigan Panel Study on Income Dynamics, this study investigates the work and welfare patterns of low income persons. Types of patterns are identified and an att...

B. L. Friedman L. J. Hausman

1975-01-01

259

Thirty-Five Years of Studying Work and Family  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The author and Karen Gyllstrom began working on the study that resulted in the highly cited article entitled, "Working Men and Women: Inter-and Intra-role Conflict" (Herman & Gyllstrom, "Psychology of Women Quarterly" 1977) probably more for personal than professional reasons. The study was based on Gyllstrom's master's thesis. The focus of…

Brett, Jeanne M.

2011-01-01

260

Adolescent Work and Alcohol Use Revisited: Variations by Family Structure  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Previous research finds adolescent work hours to be associated with increased alcohol use. Most studies, however, fail to account for possible selection effects that lead youth to both work and substance use. Using data from the first two waves of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (N = 12,620), a fixed effects regression method…

Rocheleau, Gregory C.; Swisher, Raymond R.

2012-01-01

261

Working conditions and Work-Family Conflict in German hospital physicians: psychosocial and organisational predictors and consequences  

PubMed Central

Background Germany currently experiences a situation of major physician attrition. The incompatibility between work and family has been discussed as one of the major reasons for the increasing departure of German physicians for non-clinical occupations or abroad. This study investigates predictors for one particular direction of Work-Family Conflict – namely work interfering with family conflict (WIF) – which are located within the psychosocial work environment or work organisation of hospital physicians. Furthermore, effects of WIF on the individual physicians' physical and mental health were examined. Analyses were performed with an emphasis on gender differences. Comparisons with the general German population were made. Methods Data were collected by questionnaires as part of a study on Psychosocial work hazards and strains of German hospital physicians during April–July 2005. Two hundred and ninety-six hospital physicians (response rate 38.9%) participated in the survey. The Copenhagen Psychosocial Questionnaire (COPSOQ), work interfering with family conflict scale (WIF), and hospital-specific single items on work organisation were used to assess WIF, its predictors, and consequences. Results German hospital physicians reported elevated levels of WIF (mean = 74) compared to the general German population (mean = 45, p < .01). No significant gender difference was found. Predictors for the WIF were lower age, high quantitative demands at work, elevated number of days at work despite own illness, and consequences of short-notice changes in the duty roster. Good sense of community at work was a protective factor. Compared to the general German population, we observed a significant higher level of quantitative work demands among hospital physicians (mean = 73 vs. mean = 57, p < .01). High values of WIF were significantly correlated to higher rates of personal burnout, behavioural and cognitive stress symptoms, and the intention to leave the job. In contrast, low levels of WIF predicted higher job satisfaction, better self-judged general health status, better work ability, and higher satisfaction with life in general. Compared to the German general population, physicians showed significantly higher levels of individual stress and quality of life as well as lower levels for well-being. This has to be judged as an alerting finding regarding the state of physicians' health. Conclusion In our study, work interfering with family conflict (WIF) as part of Work-Family Conflict (WFC) was highly prevalent among German hospital physicians. Factors of work organisation as well as factors of interpersonal relations at work were identified as significant predictors for WIF. Some of these predictors are accessible to alteration by improving work organisation in hospitals.

Fuss, Isabelle; Nubling, Matthias; Hasselhorn, Hans-Martin; Schwappach, David; Rieger, Monika A

2008-01-01

262

The Development and Validation of Scores on Perceived Work and Family Demand Scales  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Two scales, Perceived Work Demand (PWD) and Perceived Family Demand (PFD), are developed and their scores validated using three diverse samples. The scales are of particular interest in the work-family conflict (WFC) area and provide needed clarification in predicting WFC. Scale development procedures were followed, and dimensionality, internal…

Boyar, Scott L.; Carr, Jon C.; Mosley, Donald C., Jr.; Carson, Charles M.

2007-01-01

263

Work-Family Climate, Organizational Commitment, and Turnover: Multilevel Contagion Effects of Leaders  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper presents empirical research analyzing the relationship between work-family climate (operationalized in terms of three work-family climate sub-scales), organizational leadership (i.e., senior manager) characteristics, organizational commitment and turnover intent among 526 employees from 37 different hotels across the US. Using…

O'Neill, John W.; Harrison, Michelle M.; Cleveland, Jeannette; Almeida, David; Stawski, Robert; Crouter, Anne C.

2009-01-01

264

Adaptive Strategies, Gender Ideology, and Work-Family Balance among Dutch Dual Earners  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Using questionnaire data on 149 Dutch dual-earner couples with young children participating in the European Famwork study, we examine how adaptive strategies and gender ideology relate to parents' perceived success in balancing work and family. Path analysis indicates that some adaptive strategies may harm individuals' work-family balance,…

Wierda-Boer, Hilde H.; Gerris, Jan R. M.; Vermulst, Ad A.

2008-01-01

265

Work-Related Learning Guide for Family Literacy and Adult Education Organizations.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This guide assists family literacy and adult education organizations considering ways in which work and learning can be integrated in their educational programs. Part I addresses influences motivating the family literacy and adult education fields to incorporate work-related learning into their efforts. Part II provides a framework for designing…

Jobs for the Future, Boston, MA.

266

Traditional and Nontraditional Gender Roles and Work-Family Interface for Men and Women  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this article, we examine traditional and nontraditional gender roles and work-family interface for men and women. Recent empirical literature is reviewed and implications for career counselors are discussed. We discuss changing gender roles in career, marriage, and parenting and provide strategies for helping clients to cope with work-family

Perrone, Kristin M.; Wright, Stephen L.; Jackson, Z. Vance

2009-01-01

267

Work and Career Experiences of Men from Families without College Experience  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A dearth of research exists exploring the career and work development of adult men and the influence of family-of-origin on that development. In this qualitative study, the researchers used a phenomenological approach to examine the career and work experiences of men whose parents have no education beyond high school and the influences of family

Woodside, Marianne; Gibbons, Melinda M.; Davison, John; Hannon, Christine; Sweeney, Jeffrey R.

2012-01-01

268

Intimate Partnership: Foundation to the Successful Balance of Family and Work.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examines data from interviews with 47 middle-class, dual-earner couples with children, who perceive themselves as successful in balancing family and work. Details how these couples practiced marital partnership in ways that supported effective work-family balance. Data indicates that these successful couples equally share housework and emotion…

Zimmerman, Toni Schindler; Haddock, Shelley A.; Current, Lisa R.; Ziemba, Scott

2003-01-01

269

A Hand Up: How State Earned Income Credits Help Working Families Escape Poverty.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report examines state earned income tax credits (EICs) as a means to assist working poor families to escape poverty. Specifically, the report notes that six states have their own EICs, expressed as a percentage of the federal EIC, with the advantages being that the credit is a reward for work, is a pro-family policy, is efficiently targeted,…

Hutchinson, Frederick C.; And Others

270

A Hand Up: How State Earned Income Tax Credits Help Working Families Escape Poverty. 2000 Edition.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) is a tax reduction and a wage supplement for low- and moderate-income working families. The federal government, and some states, administer an EITC through the income tax. States that enact EITCs can reduce child poverty, support welfare-to-work efforts, and cut taxes for families struggling to make ends meet.…

Johnson, Nicholas

271

A Hand Up: How State Earned Income Tax Credits Help Working Families Escape Poverty. 1999 Edition.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) is a tax reduction and a wage supplement for low- and moderate-income working families. The federal government administers an EITC through the income tax, as do some states. States that enact EITCs can reduce child poverty, support welfare-to-work efforts, and cut taxes for families struggling to make ends meet.…

Johnson, Nicholas

272

Work--family conflict, perceived organizational support, and organizational commitment among employed mothers  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study investigated the impact of work interfering with family (WIF) and family interfering with work (FIW) on women's organizational commitment and examined both the direct and moderating effects of their perceived organizational support. Participants were 143 professional employed mothers with at least 1 preschool-age child. The study found that WIF was positively related to continuance organizational commitment but unrelated

Wendy J. Casper; Jennifer A. Martin; Louis C. Buffardi; Carol J. Erdwins

2002-01-01

273

Work and Family Policies: The New Strategic Plan. Research Report Number 949.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

These 38 presentations are the highlights of the Conference Board's Work and Family Conference. An "Introduction" (Dana Friedman) is followed by "The Future Is Not What It Was, and Why Companies Care" (William Lee, Reuben Mark), which consists of introductory remarks and responses to an interview. "The Diversity of Work-Family Issues" (David…

Peters, James L., Ed.; And Others

274

Conflict between Work and Family: An Investigation of Four Policy Measures  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Welfare states enact a range of policies aimed at reducing work-family conflict. While welfare state policies have been assessed at the macro-level and work-family conflict at the individual-level, few studies have simultaneously addressed these relationships in a cross-national multi-level model. This study addresses this void by assessing the…

Ruppanner, Leah

2013-01-01

275

Social Class, Families and the Politics of Educational Advantage: The Work of Dennis Marsden  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article presents a review of Dennis Marsden's work. Looking at his oeuvre overall it is the family and intimate social relations and social class that are at the centre of his interests and analytical focus. Part of the power and effectiveness of his work was an ability to see families and their everyday lives in relation to social policy and…

Ball, Stephen J.

2011-01-01

276

Do procedural skills workshops during family practice residency work?  

PubMed Central

ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To determine if participation in a procedural skills workshop during family practice residency affects future use of these skills in postgraduate clinical practice. DESIGN Survey involving self-assessment of procedural skills experience and competence. SETTING British Columbia. PARTICIPANTS Former University of British Columbia family practice residents who trained in Vancouver, BC, including residents who participated in a procedural skills workshop in 2001 or 2003 and residents graduating in 2000 and 2002 who did not participate in the procedural skills workshop. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Self-assessed experience and competence in the 6 office-based procedural skills that were taught during the procedural skills workshops in 2001 and 2003. RESULTS Participation in a procedural skills workshop had no positive effect on future use of these skills in clinical practice. Participation in the workshop was associated with less reported experience (P = .091) in injection of lateral epicondylitis. As with previous Canadian studies, more women than men reported experience and competence in gynecologic procedures. More women than men reported experience (P = .001) and competence (P = .004) in intrauterine device insertion and experience (P = .091) in endometrial aspiration biopsy. More men than women reported competence (P = .052) in injection of trochanteric bursae. A third year of emergency training was correlated with an increase in reported experience (P = .021) in shoulder injection. CONCLUSION Participation in a procedural skills workshop during family practice residency did not produce a significant increase in the performance of these skills on the part of participants once they were in clinical practice. The benefit of a skills workshop might be lost when there is no opportunity to practise and perfect these skills. Sex bias in the case of some procedures might represent a needs-based acquisition of skills on the part of practising physicians. Short procedural skills workshops might be better suited to graduated physicians with more clinical experience.

MacKenzie, Mark S.; Berkowitz, Jonathan

2010-01-01

277

Work-Family Conflict: An Exploration of the Differential Effects of a Dependent Childs Age on Working Parents  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose--The purpose of this article is to explore the impact of life cycle stage, specifically parenting stage, on work-family conflict among working parents to determine whether discernible differences are evident among those individuals at the early stage of their parenting cycle compared with those with older children.…

Darcy, Colette; McCarthy, Alma

2007-01-01

278

The work-family interface in the United States and Singapore: conflict across cultures.  

PubMed

This article examines the work-family interface in a cross-cultural comparison between two nationally representative samples from the United States (n = 1,860) and Singapore (n = 1,035) with emphasis on work-family conflict. Family-to-work conflict was negatively related to marital satisfaction in both Singapore and the United States, although the effect was stronger in the United States. Similarly, family-to-work conflict was positively related to job satisfaction in the United States but was negatively related in Singapore. As expected, schedule flexibility was negatively related to depression in the United States, but in Singapore the relationship was positive. These findings suggest that theoretical relationships in the work-family interface developed in the more culturally individualistic West may need to be adapted when studying populations in the more collectivist East. PMID:20954775

Galovan, Adam M; Fackrell, Tamara; Buswell, Lydia; Jones, Blake L; Hill, E Jeffrey; Carroll, Sarah June

2010-10-01

279

Employed Parents of Children With Mental Health Disorders: Achieving Work-Family Fit, Flexibility, and Role Quality  

Microsoft Academic Search

Extensive interviews with 60 employed parents of school-age children treated for mental health problems explored work-family fit, flexibility, family support, and work-life strategies in relation to role quality. Role quality was measured as employment and parenting rewards and concerns. Work-family fit was positively related to family flexibility but not work flexibility. Higher flexi­ bility in work and family predicted lower

Eileen M. Brennan; Julie M. Rosenzweig; A. Myrth Ogilvie; Leslie Wuest; Ann A. Shindo

280

Knowledge Work, Working Time, and Use of Time among Finnish Dual-Earner Families: Does Knowledge Work Require the Marginalization of Private Life?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The industrial working-time regime is dissolving--not dramatically, but rather as a trend. A new trend is that those in dynamic sectors and in a good labor market position work long hours: Demanding knowledge work appears to require the marginalization of private life. This study investigates the family situation of knowledge workers, the…

Natti, Jouko; Anttila, Timo; Tammelin, Mia

2012-01-01

281

Strengths and secondary trauma in family violence work.  

PubMed

The strengths perspective has been a unique contribution by the field of social work to the understanding of the helper-client relationship. This article explores the utility of the strengths perspective as a conceptual framework for research in a qualitative study of secondary trauma with counselors of battered women. An emphasis on strengths allowed the researcher to identify strategies and resources that prevented symptoms of secondary trauma in the majority of counselors. These strengths include a sense of competence about their coping, maintaining an objective motivation for their work, resolving their own personal traumas, drawing on early positive role models of coping, and having buffering personal beliefs. Implications for social work practice, education, and research are discussed. PMID:14620108

Bell, Holly

2003-10-01

282

Leaving family for work: ambivalence and mental health among Mexican migrant farmworker men.  

PubMed

Men migrating to the United States from Mexico and Central America confront opposing family norms. They need to leave their families to gain family economic security; yet, leaving renders their families vulnerable. We examined the mental health implications of the opposing family norms inherent in migration using an ambivalence framework. We interviewed 60 Latino migrant farmworkers working in North Carolina. Most were from Mexico; each had left a wife and children in his country of origin. Analysis indicated that family ambivalence was common. Ambivalence was associated with anxiety symptoms (but not depression or alcohol dependence), especially among men who were unable to contact their families regularly. Results show the usefulness of the ambivalence framework, and suggest that the origins of poor migrant mental health may reside in circumstances preceding migration. Study recommendations include facilitating family contact by expanding access to telephones among migrant workers. PMID:19835002

Grzywacz, Joseph G; Quandt, Sara A; Early, Julie; Tapia, Janeth; Graham, Christopher N; Arcury, Thomas A

2006-01-01

283

How Work-Family Research Can Finally Have an Impact in Organizations  

PubMed Central

Although work–family research has mushroomed over the past several decades, an implementation gap persists in putting work–family research into practice. Because of this, work–family researchers have not made a significant impact in improving the lives of employees relative to the amount of research that has been conducted. The goal of this article is to clarify areas where implementation gaps between work–family research and practice are prevalent, discuss the importance of reducing these gaps, and make the case that both better and different research should be conducted. We recommend several alternative but complementary actions for the work–family researcher: (a) work with organizations to study their policy and practice implementation efforts, (b) focus on the impact of rapid technological advances that are blurring work–family boundaries, (c) conduct research to empower the individual to self-manage the work–family interface, and (d) engage in advocacy and collaborative policy research to change institutional contexts and break down silos. Increased partnerships between industrial–organizational (I–O) psychology practitioners and researchers from many industries and disciplines could break down silos that we see as limiting development of the field.

Kossek, Ellen Ernst; Baltes, Boris B.; Matthews, Russell A.

2011-01-01

284

Women, Men, Work, and Family: An Expansionist Theory  

Microsoft Academic Search

The lives of women and men, the relationships that they establish, and their work have changed dramatically in the past 50 years, but the dominant theories driving research in these areas have not. In this article, the authors argue that the facts underlying the assumptions of the classical theories of gender and multiple roles have changed so radically as to

Rosalind Chait Barnett; Janet Shibley Hyde

2001-01-01

285

Serving Vulnerable Families: The Important Work of Head Start Programs  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Obama Administration's most recent regulation on designation renewal of Early/Head Start grantees opens opportunities for early childhood programs in some communities to compete with existing grantees for the federal funding. Understanding some of the behind-the-scenes work that goes into Head Start may be helpful to centers deciding whether…

Vinci, Yasmina

2012-01-01

286

New Parents at Work: Jobs, Families, and the Psychological Contract.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examines the impact of policies, practices, and attitudes of employers toward new parents by interviews with seven women and six men who had recently returned to work after becoming first-time parents. Findings pointed to considerable differences in the attitudes of employers to the men and women. Discusses implications for organizational careers…

Borrill, Carol; Kidd, Jennifer M.

1994-01-01

287

Employers and Child Care: Benefiting Work and Family.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The publication is designed for employers and employees concerned with developing programs and policies to assist in quality and cost efficient child care programs while parents are at work. It was created to help in a vast array of situations. It provide...

1989-01-01

288

Women, Work, and Family: Dimensions of Change in American Society.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The research presented in this volume considers a number of factors associated with women's participation in the labor market. These include the educational and training experiences of women now reaching adulthood, the rationales associated with work attachment during the early years of marriage, and the implications of marital breakdown and of…

Mott, Frank L.; And Others

289

Predictors of Negative Spillover from Family to Work  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Prior research has inconsistently documented the gendered nature of negative spillover between the domains of home and work. Little is known about predictors of negative spillover for employed mothers and fathers. Using the 1997 wave of the National Study of the Changing Workforce, this study's purpose was twofold: to determine if a difference…

Dilworth, Jennie E. Long

2004-01-01

290

Families That Work: Policies for Reconciling Parenthood and Employment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Parents around the world grapple with the common challenge of balancing work and child care. Despite common problems, the industrialized nations have developed dramatically different social and labor market policies--policies that vary widely in the level of support they provide for parents and the extent to which they encourage an equal division…

Gornick, Janet C.; Meyers, Marcia K.

2003-01-01

291

38 CFR 3.1000 - Entitlement under 38 U.S.C. 5121 to benefits due and unpaid upon death of a beneficiary.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...C. 5121 to benefits due and unpaid upon death of a beneficiary. 3.1000 Section...C. 5121 to benefits due and unpaid upon death of a beneficiary. (a) Basic entitlement...provided in §§ 3.1001 and 3.1008, where death occurred on or after December 1,...

2013-07-01

292

Nonstandard Work Schedules, Perceived Family Well-Being, and Daily Stressors  

PubMed Central

Data from two studies assessed the effects of nonstandard work schedules on perceived family well-being and daily stressors. Study 1, using a sample of employed, married adults aged 25 – 74 (n = 1,166) from the National Survey of Midlife in the United States, showed that night work was associated with perceptions of greater marital instability, negative family-work, and work-family spillover than weekend or daytime work. In Study 2, with a subsample of adults (n = 458) who participated in the National Study of Daily Experiences, weekend workers reported more daily work stressors than weekday workers. Several sociodemographic variables were tested as moderators. Both studies demonstrated that nonstandard work schedules place a strain on working, married adults at the global and daily level.

Davis, Kelly D.; Goodman, W. Benjamin; Pirretti, Amy E.; Almeida, David M.

2009-01-01

293

Spending Time: The Impact of Hours Worked on Work-Family Conflict  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Scholars have long assumed that as workers spend more time at work fewer hours are available for their non-work lives leading to negative effects in both domains, and most studies examining the impact of work hours on work and life domains have supported this viewpoint. However, the majority of these studies have used one-dimensional measures of…

Adkins, Cheryl L.; Premeaux, Sonya F.

2012-01-01

294

Work–family interface from a life and career stage perspective: The role of demands and resources  

Microsoft Academic Search

Work–family conflict and enrichment are experiences that occur daily and have substantial consequences for employees, their families, and the organizations that employ them. The aim of the current review is to make a link between life and career stage, work and family conditions, and the work–family interface. The basic proposition is that life stages partly determine career development, and consequently

Evangelia Demerouti; Maria C. W. Peeters; Beatrice I. J. M. van der Heijden

2012-01-01

295

Work-Family Supportiveness Organizational Perceptions: Important for the Well-Being of Male Blue-Collar Hourly Workers?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The current study questions whether organizational perceptions of family supportiveness predict work-family conflict (WFC) and job satisfaction for an atypical sample of male hourly workers in a manufacturing organization, and whether those relationships depend on work (number of work hours) and family (number of family roles) demands. A…

Grandey, Alicia A.; Cordeiro, Bryanne L.; Michael, Judd H.

2007-01-01

296

Family therapy treatment: Working with obese children and their families with small steps and realistic goals  

Microsoft Academic Search

Childhood obesity treatment can be discussed from several points of view, and there are many forms of treatment. Solution- focused brief therapy (SFBT) and systemic family therapy can be useful in a wide range of contexts and settings such as social care, education and healthcare. They can also be used wherever practitioners sometimes feel that they have very little impact

Ywonne Peterson

2005-01-01

297

Association between work-family conflict and musculoskeletal pain among hospital patient care workers  

PubMed Central

Background A growing body of evidence suggests that work-family conflict is an important risk factor for workers' health and well-being. The goal of this study is to examine association between work-family conflict and musculoskeletal pain among hospital patient care workers. Methods We analyzed a cross-sectional survey of 1119 hospital patient care workers in 105 units in two urban, academic hospitals. Work-family conflict was measured by 5-item Work-Family Conflict Scale questionnaire. Multilevel logistic regression was applied to examine associations between work-family conflict and self-reported musculoskeletal pain in the past 3 months, adjusting for confounders including work-related psychosocial factors and physical work factors. Results In fully adjusted models, high work-family conflict was strongly associated with neck or shoulder pain (OR: 2.34, 95% CI: 1.64 - 3.34), arm pain (OR: 2.79, 95% CI: 1.64 - 4.75), lower extremity pain (OR: 2.20, 95% CI: 1.54- 3.15) and any musculoskeletal pain (OR: 2.45, 95% CI: 1.56 - 3.85), and a number of body areas in pain (OR: 2.47, 95% CI: 1.82 - 3.36) in the past 3 months. The association with low back pain was attenuated and became non-significant after adjusting for confounders. Conclusions Given the consistent associations between work-family conflict and self-reported musculoskeletal pains, the results suggest that work-family conflict could be an important domain for health promotion and workplace policy development among hospital patient care workers.

Kim, Seung-Sup; Okechukwu, Cassandra; Buxton, Orfeu M.; Dennerlein, Jack T.; Boden, Leslie I.; Hashimoto, Dean M.; Sorensen, Glorian

2014-01-01

298

Understanding resilience in same-sex parented families: the work, love, play study  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: While families headed by same-sex couples have achieved greater public visibility in recent years, there are still many challenges for these families in dealing with legal and community contexts that are not supportive of same-sex relationships. The Work, Love, Play study is a large longitudinal study of same-sex parents. It aims to investigate many facets of family life among

Jennifer J Power; Amaryll Perlesz; Margot J Schofield; Marian K Pitts; Rhonda Brown; Ruth McNair; Anna Barrett; Andrew Bickerdike

2010-01-01

299

An exploration of the dynamics of the overlapping worlds of work and family.  

PubMed

The relationship between the working lives and family lives of people in our society is a concern to both families and corporations. This article describes a research project that yielded theoretical statements about the interactions between organization life and family life for members of large corporations; grounded theory methodology and a systems theory approach were used. Data were obtained in a large multinational corporation from managers and their families who were undergoing three different kinds of organizational stress: international transfer, extensive travel, and job change to facilitator of personal and organizational change. The findings give reason for viewing organization and family as interacting systems and for considering the uniqueness of each individual's response to stressful events. They also indicate that an individual's feeling of influence over stressful events at the organization-family boundaries are significant for both organizational and family effectiveness. PMID:1026434

Renshaw, J R

1976-03-01

300

The State of Working Arkansas: How Families are Faring in the Booming Economy. A Special Report from the Arkansas Working Families Project.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Using a wide array of government data, this report examines the impact of the 1990s economy and other developments on the living standards of Arkansas's working families and their children. Information is provided on: (1) unemployment rates by geographic region, educational level, and race; (2) employment and average weekly earnings by industry…

Huddleston, Rich; Duran, Angela

301

Employers' Roundtable on Work and Family Issues: A Directory of Metro-Denver Employers' Involvement in Work and Family Programs and Policies.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In 1989, a group of employer representatives in the Denver metropolitan area formed an employers' roundtable to address work and family issues. A survey developed by the roundtable was sent to employers in the Denver area in 1992. This directory compiles the results of the survey. Section 1 of the directory summarizes employers' efforts to provide…

Colorado Office of the Governor, Denver.

302

Balancing Work and Family: A Panel Analysis of the Impact of Part-Time Work on the Experience of Time Pressure  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this article we consider the consequences of work-family reconciliation, in terms of the extent to which the adjustment of the labour market career to family demands (by women) contributes to a better work-life balance. Using the Flemish SONAR-data, we analyse how changes in work and family conditions between the age of 26 and 29 are related to…

Laurijssen, Ilse; Glorieux, Ignace

2013-01-01

303

Managing Home and Work Responsibilities. Learning Guide 9. Project Connect. Linking Self-Family-Work.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This learning guide is designed to connect personal, family, and job responsibilities for adults and out-of-school youth in economically depressed areas of the state (including transitional ex-offenders and corrections populations) so that these individuals learn to manage and balance these aspects of their lives in order to prepare for or…

Emily Hall Tremaine Foundation, Inc., Hartford, CT.

304

Social Class, Work and the Family: Some Implications of the Father's Occupation for Familial Relationships and Sons' Career Decisions  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The effects of both vertical and nonvertical dimensions of fathers' work on family relations and vocational socialization are explored through a multivariate analysis of data from several hundred male participants in the 1962-1967 Michigan Student Study. Closeness to father emerged as an important, structurally-related intervening variable.…

Mortimer, Jeylan T.

1976-01-01

305

The Impact of Public Housing Policy on Family Social Work Theory and Practice  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social workers are the professionals most engaged with families living in low-income and subsidized housing and most familiar with the problems associated with inadequate housing. Yet the discussion of public housing policy has been left largely to economists and housing activists and the clear implications for family social work practice have not been made clear. To connect these critical policy

Dawn McCarty

2008-01-01

306

Work-Family Commitment and Attitudes toward Feminism in Medical Students.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examines work-family commitment and attitudes toward feminism in a medical student sample. Results indicated no significant gender differences in commitment levels. Third-year students reported more family commitment than did students in lower years. Women reported more positive attitudes towards feminism than did men. (Author/JDM)

Hartung, Paul J.; Rogers, James R.

2000-01-01

307

The Family-Relatedness of Work Decisions: A Framework and Agenda for Theory and Research  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Due to global trends such as the increased labor force participation of women, the growing presence of dual-earner couples and single parents in the labor force, and changing values regarding the importance of life balance, individuals' work decisions are being increasingly influenced by family considerations. However, the "family-relatedness" of…

Greenhaus, Jeffrey H.; Powell, Gary N.

2012-01-01

308

The new generation of family physicians - career motivation, life goals and work-life balance  

Microsoft Academic Search

Questions under study: The present study aimed to investigate the differences between fu- ture family physicians, and physicians aspiring to other medical specialities, in terms of sociodemo- graphic factors and variables concerning person- ality factors, career motivation, career success, importance of life goals and work-life balance; further, the stability in career choice of family physicians from medical school through to

Barbara Buddeberg-Fischer; Martina Stamm; Claus Buddeberg; Richard Klaghofer

2008-01-01

309

Families Affected by Substance Abuse: Implications for Generalist Social Work Practice  

Microsoft Academic Search

A generalist approach to practice with families affected by parental addiction is presented. Using a model program for working with parents and children who have been affected by substance abuse, the article illustrates the application of the problem-solving process to effect change at multiple levels, including individual, family, community, organizational, and policy-making levels. The authors describe assessment and intervention strategies

Annmarie Mumm; Lenore J. Olsen; Darlene Allen

1998-01-01

310

Marriage and Family Therapists Working with Couples Who Have Children with Autism  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Current research about families and couples who have children with autism is discussed using the Double ABCX model as a guide. A case study is presented along with recommendations for therapists who work with couples who have children with autism. Marriage and family therapists are encouraged to use the Double ABCX model as both an assessment tool…

Ramisch, Julie

2012-01-01

311

Ethnic Variations in the Connection Between Work-Induced Family Separation and Turnover Intent  

Microsoft Academic Search

Using conservation of resources theory, this study examines the role of resources in the relationship between work-induced family separation and workers’ intentions to leave their employment and how these relationships vary across ethnic groups. Analyses of a large representative sample of military members reveal that family separation is significantly related to intent to leave the military and that this relationship

Andrew O. Behnke; Shelley M. MacDermid; James C. Anderson; Howard M. Weiss

2010-01-01

312

Work and Family: The Crucial Balance = Travail et la Famille: Un Equilibre Delicat.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The dynamics of the Canadian workforce have changed. Demographic, social and employment trends, coupled with the changing face of the Canadian family, will increasingly challenge business and industry in the '90s. This practical resource guide for employers explores the changing relationship between family and paid work, and how that new…

Ontario Ministry of Community and Social Services, Toronto.

313

Beyond Specialization: Social Work Education and Practice for Health Care and Family Life.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

There is a role for social workers in all settings to play in providing assistance related to the health care needs of individuals and families. Schools of social work should prepare all students to understand and deal with the effects of evolving health policies and practices on family life. (Author/MH)

Olson, Miriam Meltzer

1986-01-01

314

The Family as a Site for Gendered Ethnic Identity Work among Asian Indian Immigrants  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Research on immigrants often points to the family as a source of support and a location for oppression. Using in-depth interviews with 38 first-generation immigrant Indians, this study adds to this literature by exploring families as sites of identity work where first-generation immigrants manage their gendered ethnic identities. Relocation into a…

Mehrotra, Meeta; Calasanti, Toni M.

2010-01-01

315

Using Social Marketing to Understand the Family Dinner with Working Mothers  

Microsoft Academic Search

The family dinner is a valued tradition that affords opportunities for social interaction and attachment, as well as sharing events of the day, role modeling, connectedness, and problem solving. Guided by the social-marketing framework, this study explored factors associated with the frequency of the family dinner among working mothers with children ages 8–11 years. A qualitative design was used, employing

Mary P. Martinasek; Rita D. DeBate; Ashley G. Walvoord; Stephanie T. Melton; David Himmelgreen; Tammy D. Allen; Robert J. McDermott

2010-01-01

316

Clinical social work and the family court: A new role in child sexual abuse cases  

Microsoft Academic Search

Clinical social workers encounter difficult treatment issues when working with children where there is a suspicion of child sexual abuse, or where there has been an indicated child protective services case but no family court action. This article outlines a new role for the clinical social worker to play in relationship to the family court system. The author argues that

Virginia C. Strand

1994-01-01

317

Working with Families in Urban Teacher Education: A Critical Need for All Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The positive impact of family-school relationships is well documented in the literature, as is the need for teacher education to prepare teachers to work positively with diverse families. This article reports the experiences and perspectives of candidates in an elementary urban teacher preparation program in the United States as they engaged in…

Waddell, Jennifer H.

2013-01-01

318

The Impact of Public Housing Policy on Family Social Work Theory and Practice  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Social workers are the professionals most engaged with families living in low-income and subsidized housing and most familiar with the problems associated with inadequate housing. Yet the discussion of public housing policy has been left largely to economists and housing activists and the clear implications for family social work practice have not…

McCarty, Dawn

2008-01-01

319

Observations of a Working Class Family: Implications for Self-Regulated Learning Development  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Guardians have been implicated in the development of children's academic self-regulation. In this case study, which involved naturalistic observations and interviews, the everyday practices of a working class family were considered in the context of self-regulated learning development. The family's practices, beliefs, dispositions and home…

Vassallo, Stephen

2012-01-01

320

Balancing Work and Family: A Citizens' Agenda for the '90s.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The 813 participants in the Roosevelt Center's May, 1989, regional citizen assemblies discussed trends affecting workers, employers, and families and laid the groundwork for a recommended national work and family policy. Part 1 of this report analyzes the results of a series of introductory exercises in which citizens were asked to register their…

Roosevelt Center for American Policy Studies, Washington, DC.

321

Multicultural Considerations: Working with Families of Developmentally Disabled and High Risk Children. The Hispanic Perspective.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The paper first points out how important it is for professionals who work with families and infants with developmental problems to be aware of ethnic and cultural differences, and then goes on to discuss some values typically held by Hispanic Americans. Professionals should understand the family's immigration history and status in order to know…

Smith, Rocio DeMateo

322

Work Valence as a Predictor of Academic Achievement in the Family Context  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study asserts a theoretical model of academic and work socialization within the family setting. The presumed associations between parents' work valences, children's work valences and valence perceptions, and children's academic interest and achievement are tested. The results suggest that children's perceptions of parents…

Porfeli, Erik; Ferrari, Lea; Nota, Laura

2013-01-01

323

Poverty Trends for Families Headed by Working Single Mothers, 1993-1999.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This analysis examines poverty in families headed by working single mothers, addressing whether and to what degree their economic situations have improved. It investigates the effect of the 1996 Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act, which moved single mothers from welfare to work. Poverty data from the annual Census…

Porter, Kathryn H.; Dupree, Allen

324

Nonstandard Work Schedules, Perceived Family Well-Being, and Daily Stressors  

Microsoft Academic Search

Data from two studies assessed the effects of nonstandard work schedules on perceived fam- ily well-being and daily stressors. Study 1, using a sample of employed, married adults aged 25 - 74 (n ¼ 1,166) from the National Survey of Midlife in the United States, showed that night work was associated with perceptions of greater marital instability, negative family- work,

DAVID M. ALMEIDA

325

Balancing work and family: effect of employment characteristics on breastfeeding.  

PubMed

This article describes an investigation of the effect of postpartum employment and occupational type on breastfeeding initiation and duration. Data were from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study-Birth Cohort. Postpartum employment status was classified as full-time, part-time, and not employed. Among postpartum workers, occupational type was classified as management, professional, service, sales, administrative, and "other." In adjusted analysis, professional women had a 20% greater likelihood of initiating breastfeeding than administrative workers (risk ratio [RR] 1.20; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.06-1.30). Full-time workers had a 10% lower likelihood of initiating breastfeeding than those not employed (RR 0.90; 95% CI, 0.82-0.97). Among breastfeeding initiators, full-time workers had a 19% lower likelihood of any breastfeeding beyond 6 months than those not employed (RR 0.81; 95% CI, 0.65-0.99). To improve breastfeeding initiation and duration in the United States, part-time options may be an effective solution for working mothers. PMID:21393503

Ogbuanu, Chinelo; Glover, Saundra; Probst, Janice; Hussey, James; Liu, Jihong

2011-08-01

326

45 CFR 286.95 - What, if any, are the special rules concerning counting work for two-parent families?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...rules concerning counting work for two-parent families? 286.95 Section 286.95 Public Welfare OFFICE OF FAMILY ASSISTANCE (ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS), ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN AND FAMILIES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES...

2013-10-01

327

Working Families Tax Relief Act of 2004 (released in AEO2005)  

EIA Publications

The Working Families Tax Relief Act of 2004 was signed into law on October 13, 2004. Primarily, the Act reduces taxes for individuals and businesses. At least two provisions relate to energy: Depletion of marginal properties and qualified vehicles.

Information Center

2005-02-01

328

Work-family Conflict and Alcohol Use: Examination of a Moderated Mediation Model  

PubMed Central

Research consistently documents the negative effects of work-family conflict; however, little focuses on alcohol use. This study embraces a tension-reduction theory of drinking, wherein alcohol use is thought to reduce the negative effects of stress. The purpose of the present study was to test a moderated mediation model of the relationship between work-family conflict and alcohol use in a Chicagoland community sample of 998 caregivers. Structural equation models showed that distress mediated the relationship between work-family conflict and alcohol use. Furthermore, tension reduction expectancies of alcohol exacerbated the relationship between distress and alcohol use. The results advance the study of work-family conflict and alcohol use, helping explain this complicated relationship using sophisticated statistical techniques. Implications for theory and practice are discussed.

Wolff, Jennifer M.; Rospenda, Kathleen M.; Richman, Judith A.; Liu, Li; Milner, Lauren A.

2013-01-01

329

Small Family, Smart Family? Family Size and the IQ Scores of Young Men. NBER Working Paper No. 13336  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

How do families influence the ability of children? Cognitive skills have been shown to be a strong predictor of educational attainment and future labor market success; as a result, understanding the determinants of cognitive skills can lead to a better understanding of children's long run outcomes. This paper uses a large dataset on the male…

Black, Sandra E.; Devereux, Paul J.; Salvanes, Kjell G.

2007-01-01

330

Women Administrators Negotiate Work-Family Conflicts in Changing Times: An Intergenerational Perspective  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background:Concerns about work-family conflicts are becoming an increasing problem for women administrators. Yet these concerns have been overshadowed in the educational leadership scholarship, which has focused on barriers related to discrimination in hiring and promotion and lack of sponsoring and mentoring.Purpose:To illuminate differences and commonalities in how women administrators from different generations and racial\\/ethnic identities negotiate work-family conflicts.Research Methodology:A qualitative

Tondra L. Loder

2005-01-01

331

Linking work–family conflict to job attitudes: the mediating role of social exchange relationships  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study uses social exchange theory to develop a model of the processes linking work–family conflict to job attitudes. This model was tested on a sample of 236 employees in Taiwan's high-technology industry. The regression results revealed that perceived organizational support and leader–member exchange fully mediated the influence of work–family conflict on intentions to quit and affective organizational commitment, and

Pen-Yuan Liao

2011-01-01

332

Work family balance, stress, and salivary cortisol in men and women academic physicians  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: The stress of medical practice has been recurrently studied, but work- and family-related determinants of health\\u000a by gender remain under researched. Purpose: To test the hypothesis that cortisol excretion would be affected by the perceived\\u000a severity of total workload imbalance. Method: By hierarchical regression analysis, the associations between work-family balance\\u000a and diurnal salivary cortisol levels by sex in academic

B. Bergman; F. Ahmad; D. E. Stewart

2008-01-01

333

Results of Viral Marker Screening of Unpaid Blood Donations and Probability of Window Period Donations in 1997  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background and Objectives: To monitor the safety of the blood supply and evaluate the potential benefits of additional measures, the likelihood of virus transmission must be assessed. The European Plasma Fractionation Association and its member organisations have therefore developed a surveillance system to monitor infection markers among unpaid blood and plasma donors. We report and analyse the results of this

2000-01-01

334

[Mental health and solidary economy: the family in the inclusion through work].  

PubMed

The Psychiatric Reform raises the issue of social inclusion through work from the perspective of Solidary Economy and family involvement. In city in the interior of São Paulo, a solidary enterprise of users of the Psychosocial Care Center was created. This qualitative study was performed with the following objective: to identify the composition and relationships of the families of members of the referred enterprise; to know the perception of the family members about inclusion of the users through work and the possibility of the family taking on a major role in this process. Interviews were performed using the genogram and ecomap of the Calgary Family Assessment Model as well as open questions about the families' perceptions, based on content analysis. Result show that most families are nuclear, headed by women. AMost users do not have and family conflicts and those who do refer having conflict with their parents. They recognize the importance of work as a space for creating meanings and new relationships and point at several forms for co-involvement to take place. PMID:21655793

Filizola, Carmen Lúcia Alves; Teixeira, Iraí Maria de Campos; Milioni, Débora Brechesi; Pavarini, Sofia Cristina Iost

2011-04-01

335

Work Socialization and Adolescents' Work-Related Values in Single-Mother African American Families  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined African American mothers' work socialization messages in relation to adolescents' work-related values. Moderation effects of mother-adolescent relation quality on the linkage between maternal socialization messages and adolescents' outcomes were also examined. Participants were 245 single African American mothers and their…

Toyokawa, Teru; McLoyd, Vonnie C.

2013-01-01

336

Work-family conflict among members of full-time dual-earner couples: An examination of family life stage, gender, and age.  

PubMed

Based on cross-sectional data from the 2008 National Study of the Changing Workforce, this study investigates relationships between gender, age, and work-family conflict across 6 family life stages. Participants were 690 married/partnered employees who worked 35 or more hours a week. Results indicated a small but negative relationship between age and work-family conflict. Work-family conflict was also associated with family stage, with the least amount of conflict occurring during the empty nest stage and the most occurring when the youngest child in the home was 5 years of age or younger. Gender differences were also observed. Specifically, men reported more work interference with family than did women when the youngest child in the home was a teen. Women overall reported more family interference with work than did men. Results concerning age and gender revealed a different pattern demonstrating that family stage is not simply a proxy for age. Age had a main effect on work-to-family conflict that was monotonic in nature and on family to-work conflict that was linear in nature. In conclusion, the results indicate gender, age, and family stage each uniquely relate to work-family conflict. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved). PMID:24885688

Allen, Tammy D; Finkelstein, Lisa M

2014-07-01

337

Women and work.  

PubMed

An understanding of what work means to women is provided with an overview of history; a review of unpaid work, including child care, parental care, and volunteerism; and the current status of women and work. Women's leadership style emphasizing team building, empowerment, and a consensus model is described. The need for validation of the multiple roles women play in society and for espousing balance in their lives is encouraged. Finally, strategies for eliminating bias are offered. PMID:24440880

Macrae, N

1994-01-01

338

Work-Family Conflict within the Family: Crossover Effects, Perceived Parent-Child Interaction Quality, Parental Self-Efficacy, and Life Role Attributions  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

To better understand the work-family interface within the family domain, this study investigated crossover effects of two types of work-family conflict among 120 participants (60 married couples), these conflicts' relations with parental self-efficacy and perceived quality of parent-child interaction, and the contribution of attributions of…

Cinamon, Rachel Gali; Weisel, Amatzia; Tzuk, Kineret

2007-01-01

339

Embeddedness and well-being in the United States and Singapore: The mediating effects of work-to-family and family-to-work conflict.  

PubMed

Guided by conservation of resources theory, we propose that both organizational and community embeddedness are associated with increased work-to-family conflict (WFC) and family to-work conflict (FWC), which in turn are associated with strain-related outcomes. Because stress can have both short-term and long-term consequences, we examined negative mood as an immediate reaction to stress and chronic insomnia as a longer-term reaction to stress. We examined these relationships in 2-career couples in both the United States (n = 416) and Singapore (n = 400). Results provided full support for the mediating effects of WFC and FWC in the U.S. sample, with only limited support for those mediating effects in the Singaporean sample. In addition, we found that the effects of community embeddedness on FWC were significantly stronger in the U.S. sample than in the Singaporean sample. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved). PMID:24885684

Ng, Thomas W H; Feldman, Daniel C

2014-07-01

340

Adolescent Future Expectations of Work, Education, Family, and Community: Development of a New Measure  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The development and validation of a measure of adolescent future expectations associated with work, education, family, health, and church/community participation is presented. The 25-item measure was administered to a sample of 389 7th- to 12th-grade urban poor and working-class Chilean students. Results of an exploratory principal axis factor…

McWhirter, Ellen Hawley; McWhirter, Benedict T.

2008-01-01

341

School Social Work and Early Childhood Student's Attitudes toward Gay and Lesbian Families  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The present study assessed the attitudes of school professionals in training at an American university toward homosexuality and their comfort, action-related disposition, and preparation to work with gay and lesbian (GL) families and their children. Fifty-nine students specializing in birth through kindergarten education and school social work

Averett, Paige E.; Hegde, Archana

2012-01-01

342

Working with Teams and Organizations to Help Them Involve Family Members  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this article we describe our work in trying to influence whole service teams to move their practice towards greater involvement of affected family members. Work with five teams is described. The process varied but in all cases it included recruitment of the team, training, continued support and evaluation of results. Use of a standard…

Orford, Jim; Templeton, Lorna; Copello, Alex; Velleman, Richard; Ibanga, Akanidomo

2010-01-01

343

Social Work Clinical Practice in Family Medicine Centers: The Need for a Practice Model  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper reports the findings of a recently conducted study of the clinical practice of social work in family medicine residency training centers in eight southeastern states. Findings indicate that the practice of social work is firmly entrenched and expanding in this primary health care setting. Analysis of the clinical practice of these workers shows that workers tend to select

Howard Hess

1985-01-01

344

Implications of Shift Work for Parent-Adolescent Relationships in Dual-Earner Families  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This investigation examined the implications of shift work for parent-adolescent relationship quality--intimacy, conflict, parental knowledge, and involvement--in a sample of 376 dual-earner families. The findings suggested that mothers' relationships with their adolescents were not negatively impacted by their working nonstandard schedules but…

Davis, Kelly D.; Crouter, Ann C.; McHale, Susan M.

2006-01-01

345

Shift Work, Parenting Behaviors, and Children's Socioemotional Well-Being: A Within-Family Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Many U.S. employees with children work nonstandard hours, yet we know little about the linkages among maternal shift schedules, mothers' and fathers' parenting behaviors, and children's socioemotional outcomes. In a sample of 55 dual-earner families with children age 8 to 14 years and mothers working day versus evening shifts, the authors found…

Barnett, Rosalind Chait; Gareis, Karen C.

2007-01-01

346

Working with Practitioners' Perspectives: Supporting Father Involvement in Family Services in England  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The paper draws on a study aiming to work with practitioners' perspectives to support involvement through family services. Data were collected from a cluster sample of practitioners conducting father groups in south-west England. The paper focuses upon working with their perspectives. Two issues in their perspectives were associated with…

Chawla-Duggan, Rita

2011-01-01

347

A Hand Up: How State Earned Income Tax Credits Help Working Families Escape Poverty in 2001.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The federal government administers an Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC), as do many states. States that enact EITCs can reduce child poverty, support welfare-to-work, and cut taxes for working poor families. The popularity of state EITCs results from continued child poverty, welfare reform, and tax changes. Research confirms the effectiveness of…

Johnson, Nicholas

348

Relationships between Parental Attachment, Work and Family Roles, and Life Satisfaction  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between parental attachment and satisfaction with work and family roles, as well as the relationship of these variables to life satisfaction. Results from a multiple regression analysis indicated that satisfaction with work and marriage, but not parenting satisfaction or parental…

Perrone, Kristin M.; Webb, L. Kay; Jackson, Z. Vance

2007-01-01

349

Nonstandard Work Schedules, Perceived Family Well-Being, and Daily Stressors  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Data from two studies assessed the effects of nonstandard work schedules on perceived family well-being and daily stressors. Study 1, using a sample of employed, married adults aged 25-74 (n = 1,166) from the National Survey of Midlife in the United States, showed that night work was associated with perceptions of greater marital instability,…

Davis, Kelly D.; Goodman, W. Benjamin; Pirretti, Amy E.; Almeida, David M.

2008-01-01

350

Working at the Weekend: Fathers' Time with Family in the United Kingdom  

PubMed Central

Whereas most resident fathers are able to spend more time with their children on weekends than on weekdays, many fathers work on the weekends spending less time with their children on these days. There are conflicting findings about whether fathers are able to make up for lost weekend time on weekdays. Using unique features of the United Kingdom’s National Survey of Time Use 2000 (UKTUS) I examine the impact of fathers’ weekend work on the time fathers spend with their children, family, and partners (N = 595 fathers). I find that weekend work is common among fathers and is associated with less time with children, families, and partners. Fathers do not recover lost time with children on weekdays, largely because weekend work is a symptom of overwork. Findings also reveal that even if fathers had compensatory time, they are unlikely to recover lost time spent as a family or couple.

Hook, Jennifer L.

2012-01-01

351

Work-family conflict and job satisfaction: emotional intelligence as a moderator.  

PubMed

The negative impact of work-family conflict (WFC) on employees' well-being and job-related outcomes has attracted much research attention recently. A major gap in the literature is which factors could potentially buffer its negative effect on employees. The present study examined the moderating effect of emotional intelligence on the relationship between WFC and job satisfaction in a sample of 212 Chinese high school teachers. On the basis of conservation of resource theory, we hypothesized that emotional intelligence would weaken the negative effect of family-to-work and work-to-family interference on job satisfaction. Results suggested that WFC (work-to-family interference and family-to-work interference) was negatively related to job satisfaction and that emotional intelligence weakened the effect of WFC on job satisfaction. These findings provide implications for theories on WFC and emotional intelligence, such as conservation of resource theory. The current study also provides a test of these theories in Chinese culture to support the generalizability of theories developed in previous research. Practical implications for reducing the negative influence of WFC on employees' job satisfaction are also provided, such as the potential value of emotional intelligence for the training and development of employees in teaching professions. PMID:23015466

Gao, Yongdong; Shi, Junqi; Niu, Qikun; Wang, Lei

2013-08-01

352

Work-family conflict, health services and medication use among dual-income couples in Europe.  

PubMed

Combination pressure or work-life imbalance is linked to adverse health. However, it remains unclear how work-family conflict is related to healthcare utilisation. Does work-family conflict function as a barrier or as a facilitator in relation to the use of health services and prescription medication? Lack of time may prevent people from visiting a doctor when they feel unwell. However, combination pressure can also be expected to intensify the use of health services, as the need for a quick fix is prioritised. Further, do women and men differ in their susceptibility to medicalisation and time pressure resulting from work-life imbalance? This article investigates the use of health services and prescription medication of dual-income couples with children, based on data from 23 countries in the European Social Survey round 2 (N(women) = 3755; N(men) = 3142). It was found that medical services and prescription medications are used more frequently in dual-income couples experiencing work-to-family spillover, but for women only this is irrespective of their self-reported health. Family-to-work spillover does not result in increased health service or medication use for either men or women. While women opt for a medical response to work-life imbalance, men's reluctance to seek formal health support is confirmed. PMID:24111523

Christiaens, Wendy; Bracke, Piet

2014-03-01

353

Managing work, family, and school roles: disengagement strategies can help and hinder.  

PubMed

The extent to which individuals manage multiple role domains has yet to be fully understood. We advance past research by examining the effect of interrole conflict among three very common and critically important life roles-work, family, and school-on three corresponding types of satisfaction. Further, we examine individual-based techniques that can empower people to manage multiple roles. In doing so, we integrate the disengagement strategies from the work recovery and coping literatures. These strategies focus on taking your mind off the problems at hand and include cognitive disengagement (psychological detachment, cognitive avoidance coping), as well as cognitive distortion (escape avoidance coping). We examine these strategies in a two-wave study of 178 individuals faced with the challenge of managing work, family, and school responsibilities. Findings demonstrated a joint offsetting effect of psychological detachment and cognitive avoidance coping on the relationship between work conflict and work satisfaction. Findings also indicated an exacerbating effect of escape avoidance coping on the relationship between work conflict and work satisfaction, school conflict and school satisfaction, and between family conflict and family satisfaction. Implications for theory and practice are discussed. PMID:23688249

Cheng, Bonnie Hayden; McCarthy, Julie M

2013-07-01

354

Recovery at home and performance at work: A diary study on self–family facilitation  

Microsoft Academic Search

This 5-day diary study among 65 Dutch employees focuses on the interplay between time on and off the job. We examined how daily off-job (work-related, physical, household) activities, in combination with the degree to which people want to engage in these activities relate to self–family facilitation (i.e., the positive influence of the fulfilment of one's own interests on one's family

Felieke E. Volman; Arnold B. Bakker; Despoina Xanthopoulou

2012-01-01

355

Social work with vulnerable families and children in 11 Russian regions  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose. The purpose of the study was to describe and analyse how key actors in the social sector in Russian regions identify problems, objectives and social work achievements in connection with vulnerable families and children.Methods. University personnel conducted 209 interviews using semi-structured questionnaires.Results. Family problems were reported to be related to poverty, parents’ alcohol abuse, the child's behaviour, the child's

Sven Trygged

2009-01-01

356

Evidence-based social work practice with children and families: a cross national perspective  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper summarizes, from a cross-national perspective, some commonly used models of evidence-based practice and relates them to social work practice with children and families. We first identify concepts and dimensions central to an analysis of the outcomes of social work practice. We then present and discuss key components of social work practice that any evidence-based model must take into

A. Zeira; C. Canali; T. Vecchiato; U. Jergeby; J. Thoburn; E. Neve

2008-01-01

357

Marriage and family therapists working with couples who have children with autism.  

PubMed

Current research about families and couples who have children with autism is discussed using the Double ABCX model as a guide. A case study is presented along with recommendations for therapists who work with couples who have children with autism. Marriage and family therapists are encouraged to use the Double ABCX model as both an assessment tool as well as for intervention. More research and effective therapists in this area are needed in order to keep up with the rising rates of families that include children diagnosed with autism. PMID:22512293

Ramisch, Julie

2012-04-01

358

Faculty Work-Family Issues: Finding the Balance at a Liberal Arts College  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The demands and expectations on science faculty at liberal arts colleges are in many ways distinct from those at research universities. While these differences can work in favor of easing work-family conflicts, there are also unique problems that faculty can confront in a setting of smaller departments and undergraduate-only institutions. I will discuss how these issues play out for junior and senior faculty, with an emphasis on how concrete policy changes can make the workplace a more family-friendly and supportive environment for all faculty, as well as making liberal arts colleges more attractive options for those seeking physics faculty jobs.

Amador Kane, Suzanne

2008-03-01

359

Family Home Childcare Providers: A Comparison of Subsidized and Non-Subsidized Working Environments and Employee Issues  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Federal and State Governments provide childcare subsidies for low-income working families. This study compares the encountered issues and working environments of family home providers of subsidized and non-subsidized childcare. Questionnaires were distributed throughout a southeastern state in the United States to 548 family home childcare…

Shriner, Michael; Schlee, Bethanne M.; Mullis, Ronald L.; Cornille, Thomas A.; Mullis, Ann K.

2008-01-01

360

Work and Family in the United States: A Policy Initiative. A Report of the Family Policy Panel of the Economic Policy Council of UNA-USA.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

As part of its world employment project, the Economic Policy Council of the United Nations Association of the United States formed the family policy panel to further examine the extent of ongoing changes affecting the family, the workplace, and the economy. In its work, the family policy panel concentrated on five issues considered central to the…

United Nations Association of the United States of America, New York, NY.

361

Mapping social capital: a critical contextual approach for working with low-status families.  

PubMed

Promoting justice in therapeutic work with families demands an analysis of contextual factors such as race, ethnicity, gender, and social class in relationship to societal systems of power, privilege, and oppression. A broad understanding of these dynamics, however, is inadequate to inform our work with families whose social capital severely limits available life choices, social influence, and material resources. In this article, we describe working from a critical contextual perspective to consider how families gain and/or lose social capital through participation in multiple contexts. We introduce a technique for mapping social capitol within and across multiple systems as well as suggestions for interventions aimed at increasing the social well-being of low-status families. These include considering the dynamics of boundary crossing, recognizing and optimizing resistance to oppressive dynamics, finding ways to limit constraints and optimize opportunities, and developing webs of allies to support family functioning and access to resources. We offer the example of 13-year-old Pepe as a case in point. PMID:20074127

Garcia, Marisol; McDowell, Teresa

2010-01-01

362

"Preventing the Pain" When Working with Family and Sexual Violence in Primary Care  

PubMed Central

Primary care professionals (PCPs) are increasingly being expected to identify and respond to family and sexual violence as the chronic nature and severity of the long-term health impacts are increasingly recognized. This discussion paper reports the authors' expert opinion from their experiences running international workshops to prevent trauma among those who work and research sexual violence. It describes the burnout and secondary traumatic stress literature which provides the evidence supporting their work. Implications for practicing basic training in response to trauma and ongoing education are a key area for responding to family violence and preventing professional stress. A professional culture that supports and values caring well for those who have experienced family violence as well as “caring for the carer” is needed. Working in teams and having more support systems in place are likely to protect PCPs from secondary traumatic stress and burnout. Undergraduate and postgraduate training of PCPs to develop trauma knowledge and the skills to ask about and respond to family violence safely are essential. In addition, the healthcare system, workplace, and the individual practitioner support structures need to be in place to enable PCPs to provide safe and effective long-term care and access to other appropriate services for those who have experienced family violence.

Dartnall, Elizabeth

2013-01-01

363

Snoezelen: children with intellectual disability and working with the whole family.  

PubMed

Snoezelen, or controlled multisensory stimulation, was first introduced in Israel in 1993. This paper presents a new concept of working with the whole family in the Snoezelen room with the participation of a social worker. The purpose was to facilitate family encounters with the child, to enable parents and siblings to become better acquainted with the resident through his/her strengths and special abilities, to encourage parental involvement in the care, to encourage increased visits, to improve quality of life (QOL) for the resident, and to reinforce a better relationship between resident, family, and home. Sessions were divided into two major parts. The first segment (duration 20-40 min) was free activity and the second was more structured (duration 15-30 min). Case stories are presented to illustrate the positive effects of this approach. Snoezelen can be used with the entire family with the participation of a social worker and can add new dimensions to communication. PMID:15258676

Nasser, Karim; Cahana, Carmit; Kandel, Isack; Kessel, Shlomo; Merrick, Joav

2004-07-01

364

Mexican American 7(th) Graders' Future Work and Family Plans: Associations with Cultural Experiences and Adjustment.  

PubMed

We describe Mexican American 7(th) graders' expectations for future work and family roles and investigate links between patterns of future expectations and adolescents' cultural experiences and adjustment. Adolescents participated in home interviews and a series of seven nightly phone calls. Five unique patterns of adolescents' future expectations were identified (N = 246): Career Oriented, Independent, Family Oriented, Early, and Inconsistent. Career Oriented adolescents had the highest socioeconomic status and contact with the U.S. (e.g., generation status) whereas Family Oriented adolescents had the lowest. Cultural orientations, values, and involvement also varied across groups. For example, Career Oriented adolescents reported significantly higher familism values compared to Inconsistent adolescents. Clusters also differed on adjustment: Career Oriented and Family Oriented adolescents reported higher parental warmth and less risky behavior compared to Independent and Inconsistent adolescents. Findings underscore the multi-faceted nature of adolescents' future expectations and the diversity in cultural experiences among Mexican origin youth. PMID:23338812

Cansler, Emily; Updegraff, Kimberly A; Simpkins, Sandra D

2012-06-01

365

Experiences of Marriage and Family Therapists Working with Intimate Partner Violence  

PubMed Central

The purpose of our study was to explore the experiences of marriage and family therapists in working with violent couples. In particular, we focused on therapists’ questions and feelings of competency pertaining to violence assessment and treatment, the difficulties they face during their practices, and the factors that affect their practice. Data for this study was collected via a focus group that lasted approximately an hour. The participants included five marriage and family therapists. A set of questions were used to explore experiences of therapists who were working with clients who are experiencing domestic violence. The research team recorded the answers to these questions as well as associated discussion. A grounded theory approach was used to analyze the data. Six themes were derived from the coded data: acknowledgment and reliance on systemic foundations, therapist factors, assessment, treatment considerations, sex of batterers, and training in Marriage and Family Therapy programs.

Karakurt, Gunnur; Dial, Shannonn; Korkow, Hannah; Mansfield, Ty; Banford, Alyssa

2014-01-01

366

Family history, near work, outdoor activity, and myopia in Singapore Chinese preschool children  

Microsoft Academic Search

AimsTo investigate the risk factors for myopia, including near work and outdoor activity, in Singapore Chinese preschool children.MethodsA cross-sectional study, with disproportionate random sampling by 6-month age groups, of 3009 Singapore Chinese children aged 6–72 months was performed. Information on family history, near work and outdoor activity was obtained. Spherical equivalent refraction (SER) was assessed.ResultsChildren with two myopic parents were

Wilson Low; Mohamed Dirani; Gus Gazzard; Yiong-Huak Chan; Hui-Jun Zhou; Prabakaran Selvaraj; Kah-Guan Au Eong; Terri L Young; Paul Mitchell; Tien-Yin Wong; Seang-Mei Saw

2010-01-01

367

Women’s Changing Work Roles: Impact on Health, Family, and Public Policy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Women’s work roles have changed enormously. This article describes the long-term and short-term changes in women’s paid employment. It also introduces a set of Public Forum articles that discuss the consequences of these changes for women’s health and for their families and delineate the government’s responses to women’s changing work roles. The impetus for this Public Forum section came from

Karen A. Matthews; Judith Rodin

1989-01-01

368

Standard Work Specifications for Single-Family Home Energy Upgrades Summary (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and numerous industry stakeholders developed the Standard Work Specifications for Single-Family Home Energy Upgrades to define the minimum requirements for high-quality residential energy upgrades. Today, the Standard Work Specifications provide a unique source for defining high-quality home energy upgrades, establishing clear expectations for homeowners, contractors, trainers, workers, program administrators, and organizations that provide financing for energy upgrades.

Not Available

2012-11-01

369

Group Supervision: Supporting Practitioners in Their Work with Children and Families in Children's Centres  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article discusses how group supervision can be used to support the Continuing Professional Development (CPD) of those working with children and families in early years provision in England. It is based on research conducted in 2008 with a cluster of four Children's Centres in the West Midlands in England, UK. The research evaluated group…

Soni, Anita

2013-01-01

370

Work-Family Enrichment and Conflict: Additive Effects, Buffering, or Balance?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We used data from the Midlife Development in the United States (MIDUS I) (N = 2,031) to compare three models of how work-family conflict and enrichment might operate to predict well-being (mental health, life satisfaction, affect balance, partner relationship quality). We found no support for a relative-difference model in which the…

Gareis, Karen C.; Barnett, Rosalind Chait; Ertel, Karen A.; Berkman, Lisa F.

2009-01-01

371

Beyond the Fear Factor: Work/Family Policies in Academia--Resources or Rewards?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Several decades ago, as the composition of the workforce changed and married women increased their labor-force participation rates, federal policies were designed to help employees balance work and family responsibilities. And as the gender composition of faculty in colleges and universities increasingly changed as well, a broad-based movement…

Spalter-Roth, Roberta; Erskine, William

2005-01-01

372

Transitions in Mid-life: Women's Work and Family Roles in the 1970s.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examined work and family ties over 10-year period (1970-79) for women aged 35 to 59 using life-course perspective and data from Panel Study of Income Dynamics. Marital status (and marital transitions) and presence of children were related to labor force patterns over 10-year period, but with different effects for women aged 35-44 than for those…

Moen, Phyllis

1991-01-01

373

Restructuring Work for Family: How Dual-Earner Couples with Children Manage.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This study developed and tested a model of the conditions under which dual earner, professional couples with children living at home restructure work in order to accommodate family needs. 87 such couples where at least one spouse was a professional in adv...

S. Yogev J. M. Brett

1987-01-01

374

AdvoCasey: Documenting Programs That Work for Kids and Families, 2000.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This publication includes five articles on health care and health promotion within impoverished communities. "The Health of Families and Communities" (Douglas W. Nelson) introduces the issue, discussing the work of the Annie E. Casey Foundation in communities. "Inconspicuous Consumption: Treating Latent TB Infection in Seattle" (Bill Rust) reports…

Nelson, Douglas W.; Rust, Bill; Hinds, Michael DeCourcy

2000-01-01

375

Change in Work-Family Conflict among Employed Parents between 1977 and 1997  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Using data from two national surveys (N = 2,050), this paper examines what accounts for the increase in the sense of work-family conflict among employed parents between 1977 and 1997. Decomposition analysis indicates that the increases in women's labor force participation, college education, time pressure in completing one's job, and the decline…

Nomaguchi, Kei M.

2009-01-01

376

Work and Family Roles of Women in Ho Chi Minh City  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study aims to point out the differences between the North and the South of Vietnam, more particularly, Saigon and Hanoi, in terms of family and work roles of women. It helps to explain the ways women in Ho Chi Minh City reconstruct their reproduction role, the attitudes of Southern husbands towards household tasks and the husband-wife…

Phuong, Tran Phi

2007-01-01

377

Employee Health and Well-Being: The Role of Flexibility and Work–Family Balance  

Microsoft Academic Search

There is substantial interest in the potential health effects of workplace flexibility; however, the literature linking flexibility to health is limited. The purpose of this study was to enhance understanding of the potential benefits of flexibility for employee health and well-being. Additionally, this study determines if this association is mediated by work–family balance. Results from longitudinal data obtained from a

Patrick R. Casey; Joseph G. Grzywacz

2008-01-01

378

Stress Reduction for Family Caregivers in Chronic Mental Illness: Implications of a Work Stress Management Perspective  

Microsoft Academic Search

In several studies involving a total of 291 family caregivers for schizophrenia sufferers, the stressors that arise from caregiving were identified. Also identified were the outcomes for caregivers, which often include psychological distress. Caregivers develop various stress-reduction techniques, but this article explores the utility of applying the principles of work stress management to caregiver well-being. An organizational psychology perspective suggests

Helen R. Winefield

2000-01-01

379

State Budget Cuts Create a Growing Child Care Crisis for Low-Income Working Families.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

As one of a series of reports concerning state policies and practices in child care and early education, this report identifies reductions in state investments in child care, early education, and school-age care and argues that such reductions will result in many low-income working families losing the assistance they need to stay employed. The…

Ewen, Danielle; Hart, Katherine

380

Role Salience and Anticipated Work-Family Relations among Young Adults with and without Hearing Loss  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined the effect of hearing status on role salience and anticipated work-family relations among 101 unmarried young adults aged 20-33 years: 35 with hearing loss (19 hard of hearing and 16 deaf) and 66 hearing. Participants completed the Life Role Salience scale, anticipated conflictual relations scale, anticipated facilitory…

Cinamon, Rachel Gali; Most, Tova; Michael, Rinat

2008-01-01

381

Transitioning between Work and Family Roles as a Function of Boundary Flexibility and Role Salience  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigates the manner in which people separate their work and family roles and how they manage the boundaries of these two important roles. Specifically, we focus on how role flexibility and salience influence transitions between roles. Results indicate that the ability and willingness to flex a role boundary and role salience are…

Winkel, Doan E.; Clayton, Russell W.

2010-01-01

382

Anticipated Work-Family Conflict: Effects of Role Salience and Self-Efficacy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The current study investigated how male and female university students' self-efficacy and their role salience contributed to the variance in their anticipated work-family conflict (WFC). Participants comprised 387 unmarried students (mean age 24 years). Cluster analysis yielded four profiles of participants who differed in their attributions of…

Cinamon, Rachel Gali

2010-01-01

383

Working with American Indian Students and Families: Disabilities, Issues, and Interventions  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Although most American Indian students are educated in the public school system, there is limited literature regarding (a) how general and special educators can effectively meet the unique educational needs of these students or (b) what strategies educators can use while working with their families. Additionally, there are limited resources…

Pewewardy, Cornel; Fitzpatrick, Michael

2009-01-01

384

Struggling for balance amid turbulence on international assignments: work–family conflict, support and commitment  

Microsoft Academic Search

Using human capital theory, we develop hypotheses about the impact of perceived organizational support and two forms of work–family conflict on the psychological withdrawal of expatriates. We also consider the exacerbating effects of commitment to either domain. To test these hypotheses, we collected multisource data from 324 expatriates in 46 countries. Results indicate that perceived organizational support and the interplay

Margaret A. Shaffer; David A. Harrison; K. Matthew Gilley; Dora M. Luka

2001-01-01

385

Attachment between working mothers and their infants: the influence of family processes.  

PubMed

The literature on maternal employment and attachment is reviewed, with emphasis on the system of care the infant experiences within the context of the family. Maternal characteristics, paternal involvement in child rearing, and the nature of the marital relationship are identified as contributing to qualitative differences in the attachment relationship between working mothers and their infants. PMID:2407128

Schachere, K

1990-01-01

386

Resilience across Contexts: Family, Work, Culture, and Community. Recommendations from a National Invitational Conference.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this issue of the "CEIC Review," commissioned papers for a national invitational conference on student resilience developed across contexts of family, work, culture, and community are summarized. The concept of resilience-promoting interventions has emerged from research and indicates that some children survive adversity without lasting damage.…

Russell, Sue, Ed.; Sullivan, Robert, Ed.

1998-01-01

387

Career Paths of Women Administrators: The Intersection of Work and Family.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A review of the literature on work and family as it pertains to administrative careers of women in higher education was conducted. The review revealed a continuing increase since 1900 in the number and proportion of women faculty. However, women are not moving up in the academic ranks and therefore are not likely to be considered for…

Sederberg, Nancy; Mueller, Cindy

388

Nonstandard Schedules and Young Children's Behavioral Outcomes among Working Low-Income Families  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article focuses on how maternal employment in nonstandard schedules at night, on the weekends, or that rotate on a weekly basis influence preschoolers' behavioral outcomes. Examining low-income working mothers and their children aged 2-4 years from the Welfare, Children, and Families: A Three-City Study (N = 206), we find that maternal…

Joshi, Pamela; Bogen, Karen

2007-01-01

389

Balancing Work and Family in Cooperative Extension: History, Effective Programs, and Future Directions.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Research on stress, burnout, and family-work balance among extension agents in several states identified factors influencing stress. Effective stress management techniques were derived from successful extension workshops. Also needed are systemic changes in policies and in practices that contribute to high stress. (SK)

Fetsch, Robert J.; Kennington, Mary S.

1997-01-01

390

Whose Time Is It? The Effect of Employment and Work/Family Stress on Children's Housework  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Children's time use--and specifically the time they spend on household chores--is an important arena for understanding social change. However, few studies accurately depict the multiple factors influencing children's household labor, including parent's and children's available time and parent's levels of work/family stress. We address these gaps…

Gager, Constance T.; Sanchez, Laura A.; Demaris, Alfred

2009-01-01

391

Factors Associated with Work–Family Conflict Stress among African American Women  

Microsoft Academic Search

Job demands and workplace culture variables associated with work–family conflict stress, in addition to workplace racial bias, were examined for a national sample of 607 African American women in 16 Fortune 1000 companies. Similar to other studies, women in this sample who had dependents were younger, had supervisory responsibilities, and experienced a less positive workplace culture, and those in professional

Portia L. Cole; Mary C. Secret

2012-01-01

392

Emerging Adults in Sweden: Identity Formation in the Light of Love, Work, and Family  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this study, the identity formation of emerging adults in Sweden was investigated in order to discover how identity issues concerning love, work and family are handled. The study group comprised 136 24- to 26-year-olds. The results revealed differences between men and women with regard to their position in the identity formation process. While…

Frisen, Ann; Wangqvist, Maria

2011-01-01

393

The Impact of Work on Family Functioning: A Review of the Literature. Occasional Paper Number 3.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this paper is to examine the connection between work and family functioning in Australia by critically reviewing relevant literature, especially literature concerning empirical research. Special attention is given to Australian literature and data. However, where local material is lacking, information from overseas (frequently…

Brewer, Graeme

394

Marital and Family Satisfaction as a Function of Work-Family Demands and Community Resources: Individual- and Couple-Level Analyses  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study uses individual- and couple-level analyses to examine the influence of work-family demands and community resources on marital and family satisfaction within a sample of dual-earner parents with dependent children (N = 260 couples, 520 individuals). Total couple work hours were strongly negatively associated with marital satisfaction for…

Hostetler, Andrew J.; Desrochers, Stephan; Kopko, Kimberly; Moen, Phyllis

2012-01-01

395

Marriage and family therapy faculty members' balance of work and personal life.  

PubMed

A sense of imbalance is common among both professors and therapists, though few studies have been published examining the work and personal life balance of those who work in both professions simultaneously. Using in-depth telephone interviews, this study examined the work and personal life balance of 16 marriage and family therapy (MFT) faculty members. Results showed that six were satisfied with their balance, six were dissatisfied, and four were "middle of the road." Men, older participants, and those who were in their career longer were more likely to report feeling satisfied with their balance. Internal indicators of their balance included family and workplace messages, health indicators, feelings of contentment, and congruence with personal values. Child and relationship status, tenure status, and gender issues also impacted their sense of balance. Specific balance enhancers and reducers were highlighted, and participants discussed coping strategies and recommendations for other MFT faculty members. Clinical, training, and career implications are discussed. PMID:22512300

Matheson, Jennifer L; Rosen, Karen H

2012-04-01

396

Using social marketing to understand the family dinner with working mothers.  

PubMed

The family dinner is a valued tradition that affords opportunities for social interaction and attachment, as well as sharing events of the day, role modeling, connectedness, and problem solving. Guided by the social-marketing framework, this study explored factors associated with the frequency of the family dinner among working mothers with children ages 8-11 years. A qualitative design was used, employing focus groups and Atlas-ti software for thematic analysis. Lack of time, cost, and exhaustion/lack of energy emerged as barriers. Working mothers indicated that a youth-based organization operating as a community partner could increase the frequency of the family dinner by helping with homework completion during after-school care, thereby providing mothers with the time necessary to prepare dinner. This research identified both community partners and working mothers as valued resources for prevention strategies. Interventions developed to increase family dinner frequency should emphasize the perceived value while decreasing the costs/barriers. PMID:21888572

Martinasek, Mary P; DeBate, Rita D; Walvoord, Ashley G; Melton, Stephanie T; Himmelgreen, David; Allen, Tammy D; McDermott, Robert J

2010-01-01

397

Teaching the behavioral science component in a family practice residency: social work role.  

PubMed

The article describes a social work-oriented behavioral science component within a family practice residency training program. The identified goal of teaching the behavioral science component is the development of skills in the area of interpersonal (physician-patient) relationships. To this end, a lecture series, self-awareness growth groups, and counseling experiences by residents are used. Whereas a number of disciplines deal with human interaction and behavior and are included under the "behavioral science" rubric, the paper shows the particular effectiveness of a social worker's direction in meeting the behavioral science training needs of family practice residents. PMID:7292244

Wolkenstein, A S; Laufenburg, H F

1981-01-01

398

The Impact of Fathers' Work and Family Conflicts on Children's Self-Esteem: The Hong Kong Case  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Work and family conflicts are always viewed as issues of human resource management or occupational health. Insufficient attention has been focused on the impact on child development and quality of parenting, especially regarding the impact of a father's work. To examine the impact of work and family conflicts on the quality of father-child…

Lau, Yuk King

2010-01-01

399

Self-Efficacy for Managing Work-Family Conflict: Validating the English Language Version of a Hebrew Scale  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Self-Efficacy for Work-Family Conflict Management Scale (SE-WFC), developed in Israel, was designed to assess beliefs regarding one's ability to manage conflict between work and family roles. This study examined the factor structure, reliability, and validity of an English language version of the SE-WFC in a sample of 159 working mothers in…

Hennessy, Kelly D.; Lent, Robert W.

2008-01-01

400

Examining leadership and its influence on work-family interferences among health care professionals: Multiple mechanisms at play?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Leadership scholars note that the relationship of employees with their supervisor is crucial for the work-family balance these employees experience. A good relationship with your supervisor can seriously improve your work-family balance. This is especially crucial is a healthcare setting, which is often characterized by long work days and night shifts. However, it seems unclear precisely how leadership influences various

L. G. Tummers; B. A. C. Bronkhorst

2012-01-01

401

The Impact of Job Characteristics on Work-to-Family Facilitation: Testing a Theory and Distinguishing a Construct  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study used objective measures of job characteristics appended to the National Survey of Midlife Development in the United States (MIDUS), self-reported job characteristics, and an individual resource characteristic (orientation toward personal growth) to test a theory of work-family facilitation. Results indicated that resource-rich jobs enable work-to-family facilitation. A higher level of work-to-family facilitation was reported by individuals in jobs

Joseph G. Grzywacz; Adam B. Butler

2005-01-01

402

Relationships of supervisor support and conflicts in the work–family interface with the selected job outcomes of frontline employees  

Microsoft Academic Search

A research model investigating the relationship of supervisor support and work–family conflict with the selected job outcomes was developed and tested using a sample of frontline employees in Northern Cyprus hotels. The results of the path analysis suggest that supervisor support alleviates frontline employees’ conflicts in the work–family interface and increases their job satisfaction. Results demonstrate that family–work conflict influences

Osman M. Karatepe; Hasan Kilic

2007-01-01

403

Alberta family physicians' willingness to work during an influenza pandemic: a cross-sectional study  

PubMed Central

Objective Effective pandemic responses rely on frontline healthcare workers continuing to work despite increased risk to themselves. Our objective was to investigate Alberta family physicians willingness to work during an influenza pandemic. Design: Cross-sectional survey. Setting: Alberta prior to the fall wave of the H1N1 epidemic. Participants: 192 participants from a random sample of 1000 Alberta family physicians stratified by region. Main Outcome Measures: Willingness to work through difficult scenarios created by an influenza epidemic. Results The corrected response rate was 22%. The most physicians who responded were willing to continue working through some scenarios caused by a pandemic, but in other circumstances less than 50% would continue. Men were more willing to continue working than women. In some situations South African and British trained physicians were more willing to continue working than other groups. Conclusions Although many physicians intend to maintain their practices in the event of a pandemic, in some circumstances fewer are willing to work. Pandemic preparation requires ensuring a workforce is available. Healthcare systems must provide frontline healthcare workers with the support and resources they need to enable them to continue providing care.

2013-01-01

404

Does It Matter Where You Work? A Comparison of How Three Work Venues (Traditional Office, Virtual Office, and Home Office) Influence Aspects of Work and Personal/Family Life.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A comparison was made of IBM employees in traditional offices (n=4,316), virtual offices (n=767), and home offices (n=441). Home office teleworking helped balance work and family and enhanced business performance with cost savings. Virtual office teleworking was associated with less work-family balance and less successful personal/family life.…

Hill, E. Jeffrey; Ferris, Maria; Martinson, Vjollca

2003-01-01

405

Rewarding the work of individuals: a counterintuitive approach to reducing poverty and strengthening families.  

PubMed

Gordon Berlin discusses the nation's long struggle to reduce poverty in families with children, and proposes a counterintuitive solution--rewarding the work of individuals.He notes that policymakers' difficulty in reducing family poverty since 1973 is attributable to two intertwined problems--falling wages among low-skilled workers and the striking increase in children living with a lone parent, usually the mother. As the wages of men with a high school education or less began to decline, their employment rates did likewise. The share of men who could support a family above the poverty line thus began to decline--and with it the willingness of low-income women to marry the fathers of their children. Because the U.S. social welfare system is built around the needs of poor families with children--and largely excludes single adults who are poor (and disproportionately male)--it creates disincentives to work and marry for some families, aggravating these larger trends. Berlin proposes a new policy that would partially overcome the low wages and income of poorly educated males and second earners in two-parent households by using the earned income tax credit (EITC) to supplement the earnings of all low-wage workers aged twenty-one to fifty-four who work full time--regardless of whether they have children or whether they are married. By conditioning the benefit on full-time work and by retaining the existing family-based EITC program while treating EITC payments as individual income rather than as joint income for income tax purposes, the policy would restore equity to the American social compact without distorting incentives to work, marry, and bear children. The largest benefits by far would accrue to two-parent households in which both adults can work full time. Because the policy would carry a large price tag--nearly $30 billion a year when fully implemented--Berlin says that a prudent next step would be to test this strategy rigorously in several states over several years, preferably using a random assignment design. PMID:17902259

Berlin, Gordon L

2007-01-01

406

Conflict between work and family roles and satisfaction among nurses in different shift systems in Croatia: a questionnaire survey.  

PubMed

The objective of this study was to examine the perception of conflict between work and family roles and job, family, and life satisfaction among nurses in Croatia. One hundred and twenty-nine nurses (married mothers) working in hospitals in Zadar, Šibenik, and Split were divided in four groups according to their worktime schedule. The participants completed a survey, which included a set of sociodemographic-type questions, questions about the level and allocation of family responsibilities between spouses, and scales measuring the perceived negative effects of worktime, psychological demands of the work, work-family conflict, and semantic differential scales for measuring the affective and cognitive-evaluative component of job, family, and life satisfaction. This was the first study in Croatia to deal with work-family conflict among nurses or workers with different shift systems.The results of this study indicate that nurses working morning shifts only experienced less conflict between work and family than other groups of nurses, who worked the morning, afternoon, and the night shift. The cognitive-evaluative component of job satisfaction was the highest among morning shift nurses and the lowest in nurses who worked 12-hour shifts, while the affective component of life satisfaction was the lowest in nurses working irregular and backward rotated shifts. These results confirm that shiftwork makes the work-family role conflict even worse. They also support the view that the type of shift rotation matters. PMID:22728801

Simuni?, Ana; Gregov, Ljiljana

2012-06-01

407

[Working with families in the early stages of psychosis: a structured intervention for caregivers].  

PubMed

In the field of early psychosis psychoeducation is considered fundamental to increase coping skills with diseases and to improve the quality of life of patients and their families. The more recent and updated guidelines on schizophrenia underline the extreme importance of the families involvement in treatment of young people in the initial phases of illness. "Families are the main support for many young patients. They could be the primary carers but they have also to face individual and social consequences following the onset course. Where feasible, family members must be involved in the treatment". This work describes the components of the work with families carried on by the Centre for the early detection of psychoses and high-risk situations--Programma 2000 ("Niguarda Ca' Granda" Hospital-Milan) and is mostly focused on psychoeducation and on Expressed Emotions aspects. Even the advances suggested by the international literature drove Programma 2000 to define both the steps of caregivers assessment and intervention. During the last ten years, Programma 2000 has followed 191 caregivers. Aims of this work is to verifier the outcome of the "pilot project", started in 2007, projected specifically to increase the normally used strategies to improve the caregivers adherence and involvement in the therapeutic process. The individualized multi-componential intervention has been structured in 8 session over one years. Outcome measures used in this article are the scores of the Camberwell Family Interview and from the Psychosis Knowledge Assessement Semistructured Interview (VCP). The subjects enrolled in the structured pilot project were 25 family caregiver to young (18-30 yrs old) patients. Results shows change in the Expressed Emotion level: 13% of families moved from High Expressed Emotion to Low Expressed Emotion. Furthermore data on the knowledge of illness knowledge level illustrate a reduction in the percentage, from 47% to 18%, of carers who have just a very vague knowledge of illness, and an increase from 16% to 27% of carers who obtain a good level of specific knowledge. In conclusion we can sustain mental health expert with aim to treatment project programme individualized and multi-componential tailored for young's caregiver at the onset phase of psychosis. PMID:19288779

Alpi, A; Cocchi, A; Meneghelli, A; Pafumi, N; Patelli, G

2008-01-01

408

Infant sleep, parental sleep and parenting stress in families of mothers on maternity leave and in families of working mothers.  

PubMed

The purpose of the present study was to investigate the links between infants' sleep and their parents' sleep and to assess the links between infant/parent sleep and parenting stress. Furthermore, we explored whether the links between sleep and parenting stress are moderated by maternal leave status. Participants were 50 families with an infant between the ages of 4-5 months. Half of the mothers were on maternity leave while the others returned to work. Parents completed daily sleep logs about infants' and their own sleep for 4 consecutive nights. Each parent also completed the Parenting Stress Index. Infant sleep was associated with sleep of both mothers and fathers, but the correlations with maternal sleep were stronger. Parental perceptions of their infant's sleep as problematic were associated with higher parenting stress. Poorer infant and maternal sleep patterns were associated with parenting stress only in families with mothers on maternity leave, probably because these mothers need to provide intensive caregiving "around the clock" without sufficient opportunities to rest. PMID:22306183

Sinai, Dana; Tikotzky, Liat

2012-04-01

409

An Integrative, Multilevel, and Transdisciplinary Research Approach to Challenges of Work, Family, and Health  

PubMed Central

Recognizing a need for rigorous, experimental research to support the efforts of workplaces and policymakers in improving the health and wellbeing of employees and their families, the National Institutes of Health and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention formed the Work, Family & Health Network (WFHN). The WFHN is implementing an innovative multisite study with a rigorous experimental design (adaptive randomization, control groups), comprehensive multilevel measures, a novel and theoretically based intervention targeting the psychosocial work environment, and translational activities. This paper describes challenges and benefits of designing a multilevel and transdisciplinary research network that includes an effectiveness study to assess intervention effects on employees, families, and managers; a daily diary study to examine effects on family functioning and daily stress; a process study to understand intervention implementation; and translational research to understand and inform diffusion of innovation. Challenges were both conceptual and logistical, spanning all aspects of study design and implementation. In dealing with these challenges, however, the WFHN developed innovative, transdisciplinary, multi-method approaches to conducting workplace research that will benefit both the research and business communities.

Bray, Jeremy W.; Kelly, Erin L.; Hammer, Leslie B.; Almeida, David M.; Dearing, James W.; King, Rosalind B.; Buxton, Orfeu M.

2013-01-01

410

Women at the top: powerful leaders define success as work + family in a culture of gender.  

PubMed

How do women rise to the top of their professions when they also have significant family care responsibilities? This critical question has not been addressed by existing models of leadership. In a review of recent research, we explore an alternative model to the usual notion of a Western male as the prototypical leader. The model includes (a) relationship-oriented leadership traits, (b) the importance of teamwork and consensus building, and (c) an effective work-family interface that women with family care responsibilities create and use to break through the glass ceiling. We adopted a cross-cultural perspective to highlight the importance of relational orientation and work-family integration in collectivistic cultures, which supplements models of leadership based on Western men. Our expanded model of leadership operates in the context of a "culture of gender" that defines expectations for women and men as leaders. This complex model includes women in diverse global contexts and enriches our understanding of the interplay among personal attributes, processes, and environments in leadership. PMID:20350017

Cheung, Fanny M; Halpern, Diane F

2010-04-01

411

An Investigation into the Inter-relationship among Work, Family and Part-time Education in Hong Kong.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A study of 459 part-time graduate and undergraduate students with full-time jobs in Hong Kong found that support of employers and families had a significant relationship with perceived job performance and satisfaction with family and work life. Academic performance was not significantly correlated with perceived employer and family support.…

Hung, Humphry; Mondejar, Reuben

2001-01-01

412

"The Changers and the Changed": Preparing Early Childhood Teachers to Work with Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Families  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Census Bureau estimates that up to 14 million children under the age of 18 are being raised by lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender (LGBT) families. Just as heterosexual families require child care to enable work and want high-quality early childhood education to enhance their children's development, LGBT families experience the same needs…

Kintner-Duffy, Victoria L.; Vardell, Rosemarie; Lower, Joanna K.; Cassidy, Deborah J.

2012-01-01

413

Integrating social work into palliative care for lung cancer patients and families: a multidimensional approach.  

PubMed

Lung cancer patients and their family caregivers face a wide range of potentially distressing symptoms across the four domains of quality of life. A multidimensional approach to addressing these complex concerns with early integration of palliative care has proven beneficial. This article highlights opportunities to integrate social work using a comprehensive quality of life model and a composite patient scenario from a large lung cancer educational intervention National Cancer Institute-funded program project grant. PMID:24797998

Otis-Green, Shirley; Sidhu, Rupinder K; Del Ferraro, Catherine; Ferrell, Betty

2014-01-01

414

Work-Family Conflict and Job Satisfaction: A Study Based on Multidimensional Measures  

Microsoft Academic Search

The relation between work-family conflict (WFC) and job satisfaction was examined using a six-dimensional measure of WFC and a nine-facets measure of job satisfaction. Data were collected from 166 frontline employees in a manufacturing company in China. The results supported the negative correlation between WFC and job satisfaction. And the relation between WFC dimensions and facets of job satisfaction provided

Lin Qiu; Biaobin Yan

2010-01-01

415

Current family planning work viewed from results of the National Fertility Sample Survey.  

PubMed

According to data from a 1982 State Family Planning Commission fertility sample survey, the total fertility rate (TFR) of Chinese women was 5.87 in the 1950s and 5.68 in the 1960s. The fertility rate of women in this period was the highest in Chinese history. The consequences of this rapid population growth in the 1950s and 1960s will continue to affect population reproduction for a long period. The average number of young couples getting married between 1983 and 1987 will be 10 million per year, and 12 million per year between 1988 and 1992. Even if women's fertility is kept at 2 births each, the annual births will be 20 million. If family planning policies are lax or not effective, the fertility rate is likely to increase on a large scale. The TFR must drop from 2.63 in 1981 to 1.7 in 1985 and further down to 1.5 in 1990 and remain at that level at all times to achieve the control target of 1.2 billion. There is a great discrepancy in family planning work between urban and rural areas; the 1981 birth rate in urban areas was 14.5/1000, and in rural areas it was 22.43/1000. There is also a great imbalance in family planning work between the Hans and the minorities; the 1981 TFR was 2.53 among the Hans and 4.55 among the minorities. To ensure the realization of the population control target set for the end of this century, it is necessary to attain new levels and be more scientific in publicity, education, and technical measures for family planning. Considering the health of women and reliability of birth control, it is desirable for couples under age 40 who have 2 children to have ligation surgery. Survey data show that great achievements in family planning have been made in the 10 year period, but continued intensive development of family planning work is still necessary. PMID:12314260

Xiao, Z; Chen, S

1985-07-01

416

Family-supportive work environments and psychological strain: a longitudinal test of two theories.  

PubMed

Based on the Job Demands-Resources (JDR) model (E. Demerouti, A. B. Bakker, F. Nachreiner, & W. B. Schaufeli, 2001, The job demands-resources model of burnout. Journal of Applied Psychology, 86, 499-512) and Conservation of Resources (COR) theory (S. E. Hobfoll, 2002, Social and psychological resources and adaptation. Review of General Psychology, 6, 307-324), we tested three competing models that predict different directions of causation for relationships over time between family-supportive work environments (FSWE) and psychological strain, with two waves of data from a military sample. Results revealed support for both the JDR and COR theories, first in the static model where FSWE at Time 1 predicted psychological strain at Time 2 and when testing the opposite direction, where psychological strain at Time 1 predicted FSWE at Time 2. For change models, FSWE predicted changes in psychological strain across time, although the reverse causation model was not supported (psychological strain at Time 1 did not predict changes in FSWE). Also, changes in FSWE across time predicted psychological strain at Time 2, whereas changes in psychological strain did not predict FSWE at Time 2. Theoretically, these results are important for the work-family interface in that they demonstrate the application of a systems approach to studying work and family interactions, as support was obtained for both the JDR model with perceptions of FSWE predicting psychological strain (in both the static and change models), and for COR theory where psychological strain predicts FSWE across time. PMID:23276196

Odle-Dusseau, Heather N; Herleman, Hailey A; Britt, Thomas W; Moore, Dewayne D; Castro, Carl A; McGurk, Dennis

2013-01-01

417

Work-Family Conflict Among Athletic Trainers in the Secondary School Setting  

PubMed Central

Abstract Context: Work–family conflict (WFC) negatively affects a professional's ability to function at work or home. Objective: To examine perceptions of and contributing factors to WFC among secondary school athletic trainers. Design: Sequential explanatory mixed-methods study. Setting: Secondary school. Patients or Other Participants: From a random sample of 1325 individuals selected from the National Athletic Trainers' Association Member Services database, 415 individuals (203 women, 212 men; age = 36.8 ± 9.3 years) provided usable online survey data. Fourteen individuals participated in follow-up interviews. Intervention(s): Online WFC questionnaire followed by in-depth phone interviews. Main Outcome Measure(s): Descriptive statistics were obtained to examine perceived WFC. Pearson product moment correlations were calculated to examine the relationship between work hours, total athletic training staff, and number of children and WFC score. We performed analysis of variance to examine differences between the independent variables of sex and control over work schedule and the dependent variable of WFC score. The a priori ? was set at P ? .05. Qualitative data were analyzed using inductive content analysis. Multiple-analyst triangulation and member checks established trustworthiness of the qualitative data. Results: Mean WFC scores were 23.97 ± 7.78 for scale 1 (family defined as having a partner or spouse with or without children) and 23.17 ± 7.69 for scale 2 (family defined as individuals, including parents, siblings, grandparents, and any other close relatives, involved in one's life), indicating moderate perceived WFC. A significant relationship was found between the average hours of work per week and WFC scores: those with less scheduling control experienced more WFC. Two dimensions emerged from the qualitative methods that relate to how WFC is mitigated in the secondary school environment: (1) organizational—having colleagues and administration that understood the role demands and allowed for modifications in schedule and personal time and (2) personal—taking time for oneself and having a family that understands the work demands of an athletic trainer resulted in reduced perceived WFC. Conclusions: A large number of work hours per week and lack of control over work schedules affected the perceived level of WFC.

Pitney, William A.; Mazerolle, Stephanie M.; Pagnotta, Kelly D.

2011-01-01

418

Work Characteristics and Fathers' Vocabulary to Infants in African American Families  

PubMed Central

Fathers’ vocabulary to infants has been linked in the literature to early child language development, however, little is known about the variability in fathers’ language behavior. This study considered associations between fathers’ work characteristics and fathers’ vocabulary among a sample of employed African American fathers of 6-month old infants who were living in low-income rural communities. After controlling for family and individual factors, we found that fathers who worked nonstandard shifts and reported more job flexibility used more diverse vocabulary with their infants.

Pancsofar, Nadya; Vernon-Feagans, Lynne; Odom, Erika C.

2012-01-01

419

Analyzing development of working models for disrupted attachments: the case of hidden family violence.  

PubMed

This article offers a developmental model of attachment theory rooted in dynamic skill theory. Dynamic skill theory is based on the assumption that people do not have integrated, fundamentally logical minds, but instead develop along naturally fractionated strands of a web. Contrary to traditional interpretations of attachment theory, dynamic skill theory proposes that individuals continue to modify their working models of attachments throughout the lifespan. In particular, working models of close relationships develop systematically through a series of skill levels such that the skills vary across strands in the web and will not automatically form a unified whole. The continual modification of working models is particularly pertinent for the consequences of hidden family violence for individuals' development. Dynamic skill theory shows how trauma can produce not developmental delay or fixation, as has been proposed previously, but instead the construction of advanced, complex working models. PMID:12791562

Ayoub, Catherine C; Fischer, Kurt W; O'Connor, Erin E

2003-06-01

420

Module 3: Workplace Policy, Practice and Culture--Employer and Employee Perspectives. Work-Family Curriculum Guide  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The contents of this module have been prepared to address some of challenges associated with teaching about work-family issues from a human resource management and employment perspective. The goals of this module are: (1) To develop an understanding that work-family policies are part of a human resource management system and the employment…

Kossek, Ellen Ernst; Leana, Carrie; MacDermid, Shelley; Pitt-Catsouphes, Marcie; Raskin, Patricia; Secret, Mary; Sweet, Stephen

2006-01-01

421

Impact of Life-Cycle Stage and Gender on the Ability to Balance Work and Family Responsibilities.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examined impact of gender and life-cycle stage on three components of work-family conflict using sample of 3,616 respondents. For men, levels of work-family conflict were moderately lower in each successive life-cycle stage. For women, levels were similar in two early life-cycle stages but were significantly lower in later life-cycle stage.…

Higgins, Christopher; And Others

1994-01-01

422

Linking Work-Family Conflict to Career Commitment: The Moderating Effects of Gender and Mentoring among Nigerian Civil Servants  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Little research attention has been given to the linkage between work-family conflict and career commitment. Likewise, although, theoretical arguments about the moderator effects of mentoring on the relationship between work-family conflict and career attitudes have been made in the literature, no research has investigated this assumption. This…

Okurame, David E.

2012-01-01

423

Understanding resilience in same-sex parented families: the work, love, play study  

PubMed Central

Background While families headed by same-sex couples have achieved greater public visibility in recent years, there are still many challenges for these families in dealing with legal and community contexts that are not supportive of same-sex relationships. The Work, Love, Play study is a large longitudinal study of same-sex parents. It aims to investigate many facets of family life among this sample and examine how they change over time. The study focuses specifically on two key areas missing from the current literature: factors supporting resilience in same-sex parented families; and health and wellbeing outcomes for same-sex couples who undergo separation, including the negotiation of shared parenting arrangements post-separation. The current paper aims to provide a comprehensive overview of the design and methods of this longitudinal study and discuss its significance. Methods/Design The Work, Love, Play study is a mixed design, three wave, longitudinal cohort study of same-sex attracted parents. The sample includes lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender parents in Australia and New Zealand (including single parents within these categories) caring for any children under the age of 18 years. The study will be conducted over six years from 2008 to 2014. Quantitative data are to be collected via three on-line surveys in 2008, 2010 and 2012 from the cohort of parents recruited in Wave1. Qualitative data will be collected via interviews with purposively selected subsamples in 2012 and 2013. Data collection began in 2008 and 355 respondents to Wave One of the study have agreed to participate in future surveys. Work is currently underway to increase this sample size. The methods and survey instruments are described. Discussion This study will make an important contribution to the existing research on same-sex parented families. Strengths of the study design include the longitudinal method, which will allow understanding of changes over time within internal family relationships and social supports. Further, the mixed method design enables triangulation of qualitative and quantitative data. A broad recruitment strategy has already enabled a large sample size with the inclusion of both gay men and lesbians.

2010-01-01

424

Changing the Way We Work  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A 21-hour working week is a long way from today's standard of 40 hours or more, but not so far-fetched when people consider the infinitely varied ways in which they actually spend their time. On average, people of working age spend 19.6 hours a week in paid employment and 20.4 hours in unpaid housework and childcare. These averages mask huge…

Coote, Anna

2010-01-01

425

Family history, near work, outdoor activity, and myopia in Singapore Chinese preschool children  

PubMed Central

Aims To investigate the risk factors for myopia, including near work and outdoor activity, in Singapore Chinese preschool children. Methods A cross-sectional study, with disproportionate random sampling by 6-month age groups, of 3009 Singapore Chinese children aged 6–72 months was performed. Information on family history, near work and outdoor activity was obtained. Spherical equivalent refraction (SEA) was assessed. Results Children with two myopic parents were more likely to be myopic (adjusted OR=1.91; 95% CI 1.38 to 2.63) and to have a more myopic SER (regression coefficient=?0.35; 95% CI ?0.47 to ?0.22) than children without myopic parents. For each 1 cm taller height, the SER was more myopic by 0.01 dioptres. Neither near work nor outdoor activity was associated with preschool myopia. Conclusions A family history of myopia was the strongest factor associated with preschool myopia. In contrast, neither near work nor outdoor activity was found to be associated with early myopia. These data suggest that genetic factors may play a more substantial role in the development of early-onset myopia than key environmental factors.

Low, Wilson; Dirani, Mohamed; Gazzard, Gus; Chan, Yiong-Huak; Zhou, Hui-Jun; Selvaraj, Prabakaran; Au Eong, Kah-Guan; Young, Terri L; Mitchell, Paul; Wong, Tien-Yin; Saw, Seang-Mei

2014-01-01

426

76 FR 66860 - Single Family Housing Guaranteed Loan Program  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...outstanding principal balance of the loan for the life of the loan...during regular work hours at...outstanding principal balance of the loan for the life of the loan...and intends to work closely with...unpaid principal balance for the life of the...

2011-10-28

427

A major challenge. Entrepreneurship characterizes the work of the Soviet Family Health Association.  

PubMed

The work of the Soviet Family Health Association (SFHA) is described. Created in January, 1989, the organization boasts 25 state-paid workers, and as of June 1991, membership of 15,000 corporate and individual members. Individual annual membership fee is 5 rubles, and entitles members to counseling and family planning (FP) services. The SFHA works in cooperation with the Commission on Family Planning Problems of the USSR's Academy of Sciences, and has been a member of the International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF) since 1990. Association activities include lectures for students, newly-weds, adolescents, and working women on modern contraceptive methods; research on attitude regarding sex, sex behaviors, and the perceived need for effective contraception; clinical trials of contraceptive suitability for women; and the training of doctors in FP and contraceptives. Problems central to the SFHA's operations include insufficient service and examination equipment, a shortage of hard currency, and the small number of FP specialists in the country. Solutions to these obstacles are sought through collaboration with the government, non-governmental organizations in the Soviet Union, and international groups. The SFHA has a series of activities planned for 1991 designed to foster wider acceptance of FP. Increased FP services at industrial enterprises, establishing more FP centers throughout the Soviet Union, and studying FP programs in other countries are among Association targets for the year. Research on and promotion of contraceptives has been virtually stagnant since abortion was declared illegal in 1936. Catching up on these lost decades and remaining self-reliant are challenges to the SPHA. PMID:12284294

Manuilova, I A

1991-09-01

428

Gender differences in insomnia and the role of paid work and family responsibilities  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose  A higher prevalence of insomnia in females has been consistently demonstrated across countries and cultures. The aim of this\\u000a study was to clarify whether gender differences in insomnia could be explained by gender differences in paid work and family\\u000a responsibilities.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  Participants were employees at two local governments in Hokkaido, Japan, who underwent annual health checkups from April 2003\\u000a to March

Eiji Yoshioka; Yasuaki Saijo; Toshiko Kita; Hiroki Satoh; Mariko Kawaharada; Tomonori Fukui; Reiko Kishi

429

Paths to Participatory Autonomy: The Meanings of Work for Children in Germany  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article examines the experiences of working children aged between 9 and 14 years in a German city, and the meanings the children ascribe to their work. This qualitative study is based upon a broad concept of work, which includes both unpaid and paid work. As far as work is concerned, the most important thing for children is being able to act…

Hungerland, Beatrice; Liebel, Manfred; Liesecke, Anja; Wihstutz, Anne

2007-01-01

430

Managers' Practices Related to Work-Family Balance Predict Employee Cardiovascular Risk and Sleep Duration in Extended Care Settings  

PubMed Central

An increasing proportion of U.S. workers have family caregiving responsibilities. The purpose of this study was to determine whether employees in extended care settings whose managers are supportive, open, and creative about work–family needs, such as flexibility with work schedules, have lower cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk and longer sleep than their less supported counterparts. From semistructured interviews with managers, we constructed a work–family balance score of manager openness and creativity in dealing with employee work–family needs. Trained interviewers collected survey and physiologic outcome data from 393 employees whose managers had a work–family score. Employee outcomes are sleep duration (actigraphy) and CVD risk assessed by blood cholesterol, high glycosylated hemoglobin/diabetes, blood pressure/hypertension, body-mass index, and tobacco consumption. Employees whose managers were less supportive slept less (29 min/day) and were over twice as likely to have 2 or more CVD risk factors (ORs = 2.1 and 2.03 for low and middle manager work–family scores, respectively) than employees whose managers were most open and creative. Employees who provide direct patient care exhibited particularly elevated CVD risk associated with low manager work–family score. Managers’ attitudes and practices may affect employee health, including sleep duration and CVD risk.

Berkman, Lisa F.; Buxton, Orfeu; Ertel, Karen; Okechukwu, Cassandra

2012-01-01

431

What works for therapists conducting family meetings: treatment integrity in family-focused grief therapy during palliative care and bereavement.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the treatment integrity of Family-Focused Grief Therapy (FFGT), a preventive intervention designed for families at high risk of poor functioning during palliative care and bereavement. From the 81 families participating in a randomized controlled trial (53 assigned to therapy), 28 were randomly selected for this study of treatment fidelity using the FFGT integrity measure. A total of 109 family sessions were appraised. This represented a review of 62% of treated families, 38% of total therapy sessions, and 87% of the 15 participating therapists. Weighted mean percentage occurrences of therapist behaviors permitted trends in therapy application to be observed. Inter-rater reliability using the FFGT integrity measure was satisfactory, with 88% overall agreement. Eighty-six percent of therapists adhered faithfully to core elements of the model. Therapist competence was evidenced by a strong therapeutic alliance (94%), affirmation of family strengths in over 90%, and focus on agreed themes in 76% of sessions. Therapists averaged 10 grief-related questions per session, 7 on communication-related issues during assessment, 7 on conflict late in therapy, and 4 on cohesiveness across the course of therapy. Consistent application of FFGT, with attention to its four key themes of family communication, cohesiveness, conflict resolution, and shared grief has been demonstrated. The model is generalizable when applied by family therapists. PMID:15165648

Chan, Eunice K H; O'Neill, Imogen; McKenzie, Maria; Love, Anthony; Kissane, David W

2004-06-01

432

Marriage and Family Therapists Working with Family Violence: Strained Bedfellows or Compatible Partners?: A Commentary on Avis, Kaufman, and Bograd.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Responds to previous articles by Avis, Kaufman, and Bograd on role of marital and family therapists in dealing with family violence among clients. Comments on presentation style of earlier articles and then discusses points of agreement and disagreement with each of the three authors. Concludes by urging therapists to learn more so they can…

Meth, Richard L.

1992-01-01

433

"Doing the Job as a Parent": Parenting Alone, Work, and Family Policy in Ireland  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Recent studies of family life in Ireland have focused on changes in "traditional" family structures, including the increase in one-parent families. This article illustrates the impact dominant conceptions in Irish society that privilege the family based on marriage have on one-parent family policy. The authors focus on two key areas of social…

Millar, Michelle; Coen, Liam; Bradley, Ciara; Rau, Henrike

2012-01-01

434

Work-family conflict and job satisfaction in stressful working environments : The moderating roles of perceived supervisor support and internal locus of control  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – This study aims to examine the moderating effects of perceived supervisor support (work environment variable) and internal locus of control (personality variable) on the relationship of work-family conflict with job satisfaction. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – Questionnaire surveys were administered. Data were collected from correctional officers in Taiwan. Hierarchical regression analysis was used to test the hypotheses. Findings – Results show

Yu Ru Hsu

2011-01-01

435

Family-supportive organization perceptions and organizational commitment: the mediating role of work-family conflict and enrichment and partner attitudes.  

PubMed

The present study aims to explain the processes through which family-supportive organizational perceptions (FSOP) relate to employee affective commitment. We suggest multiple mechanisms through which this relationship transpires-(a) the focal employee's experience of work-to-family conflict and enrichment and (b) the attitudes of the employee's spouse/partner. Hypotheses are tested with data from 408 couples. Results suggest that employee FSOP is positively associated with employee commitment through both employee work-to-family experiences and partner attitudes. FSOP was positively related to employee work-to-family enrichment, which was positively associated with employee affective commitment. FSOP was negatively associated with employee work-to-family conflict, which related to a partner's more positive attitude toward the employee's work schedule and higher commitment to the employee's firm. Partner commitment was positively and reciprocally related to employee affective commitment. These relationships partially mediated the FSOP-employee affective commitment relationship and varied as a function of parental status and single- versus dual-earner couple status but not as a function of employee gender. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed. PMID:23565896

Wayne, Julie Holliday; Casper, Wendy J; Matthews, Russell A; Allen, Tammy D

2013-07-01

436

Beyond Main Effects Models of Adolescent Work Intensity, Family Closeness, and School Disengagement: Mediational and Conditional Hypotheses.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Interviewed adolescents in grades 9 through 12 to examine family closeness as either mediator or moderator of relationships between intense work and academic engagement. Found that for boys, the family closeness mediational model provided best fit for data; for girls, the moderator model fit best. Found girls were especially vulnerable to negative…

Roisman, Glenn I.

2002-01-01

437

Preparing Practitioners To Work with Infants, Toddlers and Their Families: Issues and Recommendations for Educators and Trainers.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Written for faculty members, administrators, and trainers in a variety of educational settings, this publication discusses issues and offers recommendations on the preparation of professionals working with infants, toddlers, and their families. Section I identifies four key elements in the training of infant/family practitioners and describes…

Fenichel, Emily Schrag; Eggbeer, Linda

438

Will Family Health History Tools Work for Complex Families? Scenario-Based Testing of a Web-Based Consumer Application  

PubMed Central

Objective: Identify challenges that people from complex families may encounter when using traditional consumer family health history (FHH) applications and examine assumptions on which the applications are based. Method: Scenario-based testing was employed in which three evaluators used a consumer FHH application guided by four scenarios, recording the challenges they encountered and time required. Challenges identified were analyzed through qualitative content analysis of field notes. Results: Several types of FHH information deemed important in the scenarios could not be entered into the traditional FHH. Evaluators reported frustration at being unable to enter some information and perceived the resulting FHH as less accurate than it could be. These observations challenge certain implicit assumptions about families and consumers on which FHH applications are based. Conclusion: Current consumer FHH applications mirror clinical FHH tools, which may not be the most appropriate approach for consumers, especially for people from complex and diverse families.

Peace, Jane; Bisanar, William; Licht, Nathan

2012-01-01

439

The Relationships among Mother’s Resilience, Family Health Work, and Mother’s Health-Promoting Lifestyle Practices in Families with Preschool Children  

Microsoft Academic Search

Hypotheses derived from the Developmental Model of Health and Nursing were tested by examining relationships among mothers’ resilience (health potential), family health-promoting activity (health work), and mothers’ health-promoting lifestyle practices (competence in health behavior) in 67 families with preschool children. Mothers completed a mailed survey containing self-report measures of the study variables and a demographic form. As hypothesized, both mother’s

Bonnie Monteith; Marilyn Ford-Gilboe

2002-01-01

440

Reconsidering the Division of Household Labor: Incorporating Volunteer Work and Informal Support  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The gendered division of household labor is more multifaceted than the allocation of paid work and domestic work. People also engage in volunteer work and informal support. I investigate the applicability of household labor allocation theories - specifically the time constraints, economic, and doing gender perspectives - to all unpaid work. I…

L. Hook, Jennifer

2004-01-01

441

The Longitudinal Effects of Work-Family Conflict and Positive Spillover on Depressive Symptoms Among Dual-Earner Couples  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study assessed longitudinal and cross-sectional relationships between work-family conflict, positive spillover, and depression in a national sample of 234 dual-earner couples. The authors also assessed crossover effects (i.e., the transmission of emotions, affect, or stress from 1 member of a dyad to another) of work-family conflict and positive spillover on spouses' depression. Two general findings of the study were

Leslie B. Hammer; Jennifer C. Cullen; Margaret B. Neal; Robert R. Sinclair; Margarita V. Shafiro

2005-01-01

442

Working memory span capacity improved by a D2 but not D1 receptor family agonist  

PubMed Central

Patients with schizophrenia exhibit poor working memory (WM). Although several subcomponents of WM can be measured, evidence suggests the primary subcomponent affected in schizophrenia is span capacity (WMC). Indeed, the NIMH-funded MATRICS initiative recommended assaying the WMC when assessing the efficacy of a putative therapeutic for FDA approval. Although dopamine D1 receptor agonists improve delay-dependent memory in animals, evidence for improvements in WMC due to dopamine D1 receptor activation is limited. In contrast, the dopamine D2-family agonist bromocriptine improves WMC in humans. The radial arm maze (RAM) can be used to assess WMC, although complications due to ceiling effects or strategy confounds have limited its use. We describe a 12-arm RAM protocol designed to assess whether the dopamine D1-family agonist SKF 38393 (0, 1, 3, and 10 mg/kg) or bromocriptine (0, 1, 3, and 10 mg/kg) could improve WMC in C57BL/6N mice (n=12) in cross-over designs. WMC increased and strategy usage decreased with training. The dopamine D1 agonist SKF 38393 had no effect on WMC or long-term memory. Bromocriptine decreased WMC errors, without affecting long-term memory, consistent with human studies. These data confirm that WMC can be measured in mice and reveal drug effects that are consistent with reported effects in humans. Future research is warranted to identify the subtype of the D2-family of receptors responsible for the observed improvement in WMC. Finally, this RAM procedure may prove useful in developing animal models of deficient WMC to further assess putative treatments for the cognitive deficits in schizophrenia.

Tarantino, Isadore S; Sharp, Richard F; Geyer, Mark A; Meves, Jessica M; Young, Jared W

2011-01-01

443

Encouraging Strong Family Relationships. State Policies That Work. Brief Number 6  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The relational well-being of families is an important factor affecting a family's economic success, physical and mental heath, the readiness and success of children in school, and the engagement of youth in positive and productive roles. In short, the strength of family bonds is crucial to a family's capacity to provide, nurture, and care for its…

Center for the Study of Social Policy, 2012

2012-01-01

444

Afterschool Programs Help Working Families. Afterschool Alert. Issue Brief No. 16  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Changing family structures place extra burdens on children, parents and employers. The image of 21st century families is vastly different from that of previous centuries, or even the family image of 50 years ago. While women are still the primary caregivers, either as single mothers or part of a two-parent family, they are entering the workforce…

Afterschool Alliance, 2003

2003-01-01

445

"Fit" inside the Work-Family Black Box: An Ecology of the Life Course, Cycles of Control Reframing1  

PubMed Central

Scholars have not fully theorized the multifaceted, interdependent dimensions within the work-family “black box.” Taking an ecology of the life course approach, we theorize common work-family and adequacy constructs as capturing different components of employees' cognitive appraisals of fit between their demands and resources at the interface between home and work. Employees' appraisals of their work-family linkages and of their relative resource adequacy are not made independently but, rather, co-occur as identifiable constellations of fit. The life course approach hypothesizes that shifts in objective demands/ resources at work and at home over the life course result in employees experiencing cycles of control, that is, corresponding shifts in their cognitive assessments of fit. We further theorize patterned appraisals of fit are key mediators between objective work-family conditions and employees' health, well-being and strategic adaptations. As a case example, we examine whether employees' assessments on ten dimensions cluster together as patterned fit constellations, using data from a middle-class sample of 753 employees working at Best Buy's corporate headquarters. We find no single linear construct of fit that captures the complexity within the work-family black box. Instead, respondents experience six distinctive constellations of fit: one optimal, two poor, and three moderate fit constellations.

Moen, Phyllis; Kelly, Erin; Huang, Reiping

2009-01-01

446

[Social determinants of health: community features and nurse work in family health care].  

PubMed

The purpose of this study is to identify the Social Determinants of Health Care which emerge in nurses' statements as they characterize the community, analyzing its relation to the work carried out by them. It is an exploratory and descriptive study containing a qualitative analysis in the theoretical categories of the determinants. We used a semi-structured interview, recorded with the permission of the 65 nurses of the Family Health Care, members of the 3rd Regional Health Care Coordination of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. It has been shown the inter- and intra-relation in the health determinant factors, obtaining 104 citations for the anatomo-physiological features of the corresponding individuals/community to the proximal correspondents and in association, mainly, to the work carried out by the nurses. For intermediate determinants there were 27 citations and, for distals, 166, with predominant reference to the territorial localization of communities in rural areas and peripheries. The nurses have stated a narrow relation between the proximal features and the work carried out by them, as well as the connection with other determinants in the relation with the process of getting sick. PMID:20839542

Sant'Anna, Cynthia Fontella; Cezar-Vaz, Marta Regina; Cardoso, Leticia Silveira; Erdmann, Alacoque Lorenzini; Soares, Jorgana Fernanda de Souza

2010-03-01

447

"A lot of sacrifices:" Work-family spillover and the food choice coping strategies of low wage employed parents  

PubMed Central

Integrating their work and family lives is an everyday challenge for employed parents. Competing demands for parents’ time and energy may contribute to fewer meals prepared or eaten at home and poorer nutritional quality of meals. Thus, work-family spillover (feelings, attitudes, and behaviors carried over from one role to another) is a phenomenon with implications for nutrition and health. The aim of this theory-guided constructivist research was to understand how low-wage employed parents’ experiences of work-family spillover affected their food choice coping strategies. Participants were 69 black, white and Latino mothers and fathers in a Northeastern U.S. city. We explored participants’ understandings of family and work roles, spillover, and food choice strategies using open-ended qualitative interviews. Data analysis was based on the constant comparative method. These parents described affective, evaluative, and behavioral instances of work-family spillover and role overload as normative parts of everyday life and dominant influences on their food choices. They used food choice coping strategies to: 1) manage feelings of stress and fatigue, 2) reduce the time and effort for meals, 3) redefine meanings and reduce expectations for food and eating, and 4) set priorities and trade off food and eating against other family needs. Only a few parents used adaptive strategies that changed work or family conditions to reduce the experience of conflict. Most coping strategies were aimed at managing feelings and redefining meanings, and were inadequate for reducing the everyday hardships from spillover and role overload. Some coping strategies exacerbated feelings of stress. These findings have implications for family nutrition, food expenditures, nutritional self-efficacy, social connections, food assistance policy, and work place strategies.

Devine, Carol M.; Jastran, Margaret; Jabs, Jennifer A; Wethington, Elaine; Farrell, Tracy J; Bisogni, Carole A

2006-01-01

448

Emotional exhaustion and mental health problems among employees doing “people work”: the impact of job demands, job resources and family-to-work conflict  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective  This study investigates the relationship between four job characteristics and family-to-work conflict on emotional exhaustion\\u000a and mental health problems.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  Multiple regression analyses were performed using data from 1,008 mental health care employees. Separate regression analyses\\u000a were computed for high and low patient interaction jobs.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Results  Different job characteristics as well as family-to-work conflict were associated with emotional exhaustion and mental health

Geertje van Daalen; Tineke M. Willemsen; Karin Sanders

2009-01-01

449

Improving Individual, Child, and Family Nutrition, Health and Wellness. Secondary Learning Guide 8. Project Connect. Linking Self-Family-Work.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This competency-based secondary learning guide on improving individual, child, and family nutrition is part of a series that are adaptations of guides developed for adult consumer and homemaking education programs. The guides provide students with experiences that help them learn to do the following: make decisions; use creative approaches to…

Emily Hall Tremaine Foundation, Inc., Hartford, CT.

450

Learning by experience, work and productivity: theory and empirical evidence  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper examines the nature and significance of learning by experience during work, both paid and unpaid. Data about the relationship between costs, especially labour costs, and output have come to be interpreted as evidence of learning by experience, but these grouped data are unable to explain the nature and process of individual experience or learning. Direct and detailed evidence

K. V. Pankhurst

2010-01-01

451

Exploring core competencies for mental health and addictions work within a Family Health Team setting  

PubMed Central

Approximately 200 Family Health Teams (FHTs) have been implemented in Ontario to improve access to primary healthcare, including mental health and addiction. The objectives of this project were to examine, through a focus group and qualitative methodology with three FHTs, the profile of patients' mental health and addiction-related needs and to identify the implications for the development of core competencies in these innovative organisations. A spectrum of needs and service trajectories was identified, as well as the importance of a wide range of clinical skills and knowledge. The results indicate that ‘core’ competencies for mental health work in the context of an FHT go well beyond those required for an embedded mental health ‘programme’ or specialised mental health counsellors, but rather they relate to the core and discipline-specific competencies of members of the entire team. In addition to specific knowledge and skills, competencies include common attitudes and values relating to teamwork, good communication and collaboration. Challenges were noted with regard to working with some community service providers, especially addiction services. Implications for core competencies at the individual and organisational level were identified.

2013-01-01

452

How important are work-family support policies? A meta-analytic investigation of their effects on employee outcomes.  

PubMed

This meta-analysis examines relationships between work-family support policies, which are policies that provide support for dependent care responsibilities, and employee outcomes by developing a conceptual model detailing the psychological mechanisms through which policy availability and use relate to work attitudes. Bivariate results indicated that availability and use of work-family support policies had modest positive relationships with job satisfaction, affective commitment, and intentions to stay. Further, tests of differences in effect sizes showed that policy availability was more strongly related to job satisfaction, affective commitment, and intentions to stay than was policy use. Subsequent meta-analytic structural equation modeling results indicated that policy availability and use had modest effects on work attitudes, which were partially mediated by family-supportive organization perceptions and work-to-family conflict, respectively. Additionally, number of policies and sample characteristics (percent women, percent married-cohabiting, percent with dependents) moderated the effects of policy availability and use on outcomes. Implications of these findings and directions for future research on work-family support policies are discussed. PMID:23106685

Butts, Marcus M; Casper, Wendy J; Yang, Tae Seok

2013-01-01

453

New-Concept Part-Time Employment as a Work-Family Adaptive Strategy for Women Professionals with Small Children  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigates how the option for new-concept part-time (NPT) employment influences the ability of mothers of preschool children working in professional occupations to successfully integrate work and family responsibilities. Female NPT professionals (n=279) and female full-time (FT) professionals (n=250) were compared. The NPT group…

Hill, E. Jeffrey; Martinson, Vjollca; Ferris, Maria

2004-01-01

454

The influence of work-family conflict trajectories on self-rated health trajectories in Switzerland: A life course approach.  

PubMed

Self-rated health (SRH) trajectories tend to decline over a lifetime. Moreover, the Cumulative Advantage and Disadvantage (CAD) model indicates that SRH trajectories are known to consistently diverge along socioeconomic positions (SEP) over the life course. However, studies of working adults to consider the influence of work and family conflict (WFC) on SRH trajectories are scarce. We test the CAD model and hypothesise that SRH trajectories diverge over time according to socioeconomic positions and WFC trajectories accentuate this divergence. Using longitudinal data from the Swiss Household Panel (N = 2327 working respondents surveyed from 2004 to 2010), we first examine trajectories of SRH and potential divergence over time across age, gender, SEP and family status using latent growth curve analysis. Second, we assess changes in SRH trajectories in relation to changes in WFC trajectories and divergence in SRH trajectories according to gender, SEP and family status using parallel latent growth curve analysis. Three measures of WFC are used: exhaustion after work, difficulty disconnecting from work, and work interference in private family obligations. The results show that SRH trajectories slowly decline over time and that the rate of change is not influenced by age, gender or SEP, a result which does not support the CAD model. SRH trajectories are significantly correlated with exhaustion after work trajectories but not the other two WFC measures. When exhaustion after work trajectories are taken into account, SRH trajectories of higher educated people decline slower compared to less educated people, supporting the CAD hypothesis. PMID:24833250

Cullati, Stéphane

2014-07-01

455

Do Workers Who Experience Conflict between the Work and Family Domains Hit a "Glass Ceiling?": A Meta-Analytic Examination  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Based in Conservation of Resources (COR; Hobfoll, 1989) and self-verification (Swann, 1987) theories, we argue that when workers experience conflict between the work and family domains, this should have implications for evaluations of their work performance and ultimately affect more "objective" career outcomes such as salary and hierarchical…

Hoobler, Jenny M.; Hu, Jia; Wilson, Morgan

2010-01-01

456

Liminal Cultural Work in Family Childcare: Latino Immigrant Family Childcare Providers and Bicultural Childrearing in the United States, 2002-2004  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Immigrants find themselves in a liminal state of limbo between two societies. In this zone, competing cultural ideas coexist. This essay examines how Latino immigrant family childcare providers in the United States questioned US norms of childrearing and how they engaged in liminal cultural work to produce a bicultural childrearing. They are…

Uttal, Lynet

2010-01-01

457

Women Who Maintain Families. Facts on Working Women No. 93-3.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In 1992, 12 million families were maintained by women in the United States--a figure that more than doubled since 1970 when there were only 5.6 million such families. They accounted for 14.8 percent of all families in 1980 and 17.6 percent in 1992. Women maintained 3.5 million Black families in 1992; this represented nearly half of all Black…

Women's Bureau (DOL), Washington, DC.

458

Social Work in the Emergency Department—Implementation of a Domestic and Family Violence Screening Program  

Microsoft Academic Search

Women who have experienced domestic and family violence use health services more frequently than women who have not. Early identification and intervention by the health system may reduce health problems associated with domestic and family violence and lead to savings for the health sector. This study aimed to evaluate the impact of a new domestic and family violence screening program,

Charmaine Power; Laura Bahnisch; Debbie McCarthy

2011-01-01

459

Alcohol and Other Drug Abuse among Social Work Colleagues and Their Families: Impact on Practice.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Surveyed 198 social workers to determine prevalence of alcohol and other drug problems among colleagues, family members, and friends. Forty-three percent of respondents reported knowing at least one social worker who had alcohol or drug problem; 60% had close friends or family with problems; 39% had nuclear family member with problem; and 11% were…

Fewell, Christine Huff; And Others

1993-01-01

460

A Short Course in Sensitivity Training: Working with Hispanic Families of Children with Disabilities.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Gives recommendations for providing culturally sensitive service coordination for Hispanic families, including become part of the family, be flexible, accept different views of time and punctuality, be accessible, speak the language, be aware of views of authority, and understand why families may not follow up on recommendations. (CR)

Alvarez, Lourdes I. Gonzalez

1998-01-01

461

Does Family Structure Affect Children's Educational Outcomes? NBER Working Paper Series.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper examines correlations between children's educational outcomes and family structure. Although popular discussions focus on distinctions between two-parent and single-parent families, earlier research shows that outcomes for stepchildren are similar to outcomes for children in single-parent families, and earlier researchers suggested that…

Pollak, Robert A.; Ginther, Donna K.

462

Working with Interpreters To Plan Early Childhood Services with Limited-English-Proficient Families. Technical Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this report is to review the existing literature on the use of interpreters, and to make recommendations that will promote effective communication among family members, professionals, and untrained interpreters during IEP/IFSP meetings and family conferences. Effective communication between professionals and families is crucial in…

Ohtake, Yoshi; Fowler, Susan A.; Santos, Rosa M.

463

International perspectives on work-family policies: lessons from the world's most competitive economies.  

PubMed

The United States does not guarantee families a wide range of supportive workplace policies such as paid maternity and paternity leave or paid leave to care for sick children. Proposals to provide such benefits are invariably met with the complaint that the costs would reduce employment and undermine the international competitiveness of American businesses. In this article, Alison Earle, Zitha Mokomane, and Jody Heymann explore whether paid leave and other work-family policies that support children's development exist in countries that are economically competitive and have low unemployment rates. Their data show that the answer is yes. Using indicators of competitiveness gathered by the World Economic Forum, the authors identify fifteen countries, including the United States, that have been among the top twenty countries in competitiveness rankings for at least eight of ten years. To this group they add China and India, both rising competitors in the global economy. They find that every one of these countries, except the United States, guarantees some form of paid leave for new mothers as well as annual leave. And all but Switzerland and the United States guarantee paid leave for new fathers. The authors perform a similar exercise to identify thirteen advanced countries with consistently low unemployment rates, again including the United States. The majority of these countries provide paid leave for new mothers, paid leave for new fathers, paid leave to care for children's health care needs, breast-feeding breaks, paid vacation leave, and a weekly day of rest. Of these, the United States guarantees only breast-feeding breaks (part of the recently passed health care legislation). The authors' global examination of the most competitive economies as well as the economies with low unemployment rates makes clear that ensuring that all parents are available to care for their children's healthy development does not preclude a country from being highly competitive economically. PMID:22013634

Earle, Alison; Mokomane, Zitha; Heymann, Jody

2011-01-01

464

Dad Was a Terrible Hard Worker: The Influence of Family and School on Dublin's Men's Working Lives--Preliminary Findings. CLMS Working Paper.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The influences that home, family, and education have on Irish men's experiences of working life are explored based on interviews and questionnaire research carried out in North Dublin during 1997 and 1998. A two-stage research design was adopted. The first stage involved a short attitudinal-type questionnaire given to men at a sporting club. The…

Goodwin, John

465

Applications of collaborative helping maps: supporting professional development, supervision and work teams in family-centered practice.  

PubMed

Collaborative, family-centered practice has become an influential approach in helping efforts across a broad spectrum of human services. This article draws from previous work that presented a principle-based, practice framework of Collaborative Helping and highlighted the use of Collaborative Helping maps as a tool both to help workers think their way through complex situations and to provide a guideline for constructive conversations between families and helpers about challenging issues. It builds on that work to examine ways to utilize Collaborative Helping maps at worker, supervisory, and organizational levels to enhance and sustain collaborative, family-centered practice and weave its core values and principles into the everyday fabric of organizational cultures in human service agencies and government agencies that serve poor and marginalized families and communities. PMID:24215323

Madsen, William C

2014-03-01

466

Liminal cultural work in family childcare: Latino immigrant family childcare providers and bicultural childrearing in the United States, 2002-2004.  

PubMed

Immigrants find themselves in a liminal state of limbo between two societies. In this zone, competing cultural ideas coexist. This essay examines how Latino immigrant family childcare providers in the United States questioned US norms of childrearing and how they engaged in liminal cultural work to produce a bicultural childrearing. They are exposed to US norms through family childcare certification programmes that they were legally required to participate in, in order to receive the accreditation required to care for young children in their homes. They were simultaneously critical and embracing of US mainstream ideas of childrearing. Two contested areas for them are the emphasis on individual child development and the levelling of authority relations between adults and children. Their traditional values are absent from the training programmes, yet they develop a process of selective adaptation which both maintains and discards traditional ideas of childrearing and integrates them with some of the new ideas they learn in the US. The liminal cultural work that immigrant family childcare workers do is both for themselves and for the children and the families for whom they provide care. The providers experience a process of ongoing liminal cultural work. PMID:21280397

Uttal, Lynet

2010-01-01

467

Manager support for work/family issues and its impact on employee-reported pain in the extended care setting  

PubMed Central

Objective Supervisor-level policies and the presence of a manager engaged in an employee’s need to achieve work/family balance, or “supervisory support,” may benefit employee health, including self-reported pain. Methods We conducted a census of employees at four selected extended-care facilities in the Boston metropolitan region (n= 368). Supervisory support was assessed through interviews with managers and pain was employee-reported. Results Our multilevel logistic models indicate that employees with managers who report the lowest levels of support for work/family balance experience twice as much overall pain as employees with managers who report high levels of support. Conclusions Low supervisory support for work/family balance is associated with an increased prevalence of employee-reported pain in extended-care facilities. We recommend that manager-level policies and practices receive additional attention as a potential risk factor for poor health in this setting.

O'Donnell, Emily M.; Berkman, Lisa F.; Subramanian, Sv

2012-01-01

468

Attitudes Toward Gender, Work, and Family among Female and Male Scientists in Germany and the United States  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This research used a comparative approach and an elite framework to look at attitudes toward gender, work, and family among male and female scientists. The data came from the 1994 International Social Survey Program module measuring family and changing gender roles in (the former) East Germany, West Germany, and the United States. Research questions focused on the variation between the three samples in male scientists' attitudes regarding gender, work, and family; women's representation in science occupations; and the relation between the two. Another major concern was the extent to which female scientists express attitudes regarding gender, work, and family that resemble those of male scientists and the implications of these processes for increasing women's access to science. As predicted, male scientists in East Germany tended to have the most progressive attitudes (especially those regarding gender and work), East German women had the greatest access to science occupations, and there were virtually no sex differences in attitudes of East German scientists. West German male scientists were the most traditional on attitudes regarding gender and work, and U. S. male scientists tended to be the most traditional on attitudes regarding family. The attitudes of female scientists in West Germany and the United States reflected this larger trend, but there were sex differences within countries, with female scientists being more progressive than male scientists. Thus, the findings suggest that women s representation in science is related to the attitudes of male scientists regarding gender, work, and family. And although female scientists often hold quite similar attitudes as male scientists, there is considerable cross-country variation in how progressive the attitudes are and how similar men's and women's attitudes are. Implications for women's access to elite science occupations are discussed.

Hanson, Sandra L.; Fuchs, Stefan; Aisenbrey, Silke; Kravets, Natalyia

469

Revisiting the social construction of family in the context of work  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate how traditional definitions of family, in the context of employment, have not kept pace with actual family formation in the USA and much of the rest of the world, and how this disadvantages individuals from atypical (i.e. non-nuclear), but increasingly common, families. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – A wide range of literature from

T. Alexandra Beauregard; Mustafa Ozbilgin; Myrtle P. Bell

2009-01-01

470

Attachment in the Family Context: Insights from Development and Clinical Work  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a The formation of stable relational bonds that function to provide security and ­support developmental growth is described\\u000a as a primary task of family development across cultures (Ainsworth, Blehar, Waters, & Wall, 1978; Bowlby, 1969\\/1982; Posada\\u000a et al., 2002; Rothbaum, Rosen, Ujiie, & Uchida, 2002). Secure attachment bonds acquired within the family system confer developmental\\u000a advantages on family members by providing

Janet Shapiro

471

Working with families in which a parent has depression: A resilience perspective  

PubMed Central

The association between parental depression and child maladjustment is well documented in the literature. Less is known about the strengths and potential protective mechanisms that help promote resilience for this population. This literature review on resilience in these families was conducted to help inform policy and practice for these families. Five protective factors (goodness of fit, self-esteem and self-efficacy, social support, family functioning, and opportunities for change) and four practice principles (discovery of resources and abilities, explanation of risk and protective factors, development of both collaborative family relationships, and social support) emerged from this review. Implications for policy and practice in light of these principles are provided.

Chen, Hsing-Jung; Kovacs, Pamela J.

2014-01-01

472

How to add more "family" to the work-life-balance? - family friendliness in medical under- and postgraduate studies and the workplace.  

PubMed

Today universities have to compete for the best brains more than ever before. The issues of reconciliation of work/study and family and the work-life balance have become increasingly important recently in higher education policy development as higher education institutions in the competition for the best minds are already forced to tackle these issues, some of which are still novel to them, as they are faced with demographic change. High dropout rates among students with children, increasing shortages of physicians and high sector emigration and high levels of childlessness among graduates serve as indicators for urgent action towards more family-oriented university and faculty strategies. But how can medical schools, hospitals and (teaching) hospitals achieve a family-oriented profile? Which key players, which areas of higher education management are relevant to management and decision-making structures? What exemplary measures for designing family-friendly medical studies and work places offer success? The underrepresentation of women in the next generation of scientists also poses an additional challenge to the development of an innovative higher education policy if it is to be sustainable. Thus strategies promoting the next generation and family orientation are key factors for a future-oriented higher education policy. These factors should therefore be seen as leadership strategies which will introduce measures that will make (re)design the university's profile. To this end, a holistic approach which will lead to fundamental reforms of higher education structures which are outlined below and illustrated with examples are a prerequisite for successful implementation. PMID:22558028

De Ridder, Daniela

2012-01-01

473

Social Work Practice in a Rural Health Care Setting: Farm Families.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Literature review addresses the status of farm families; farm stresses and their effects; dysfunctional family relationships; and the unique attitudes, behaviors, and perceptions of rural culture toward social service intervention. By implementing coordinated service programs and initiating new legislation that addresses rural health care issues,…

Durham, Judith A.; Miah, M. Mizanur Rahman

1993-01-01

474

The Difference a Course Can Make: Preservice Teachers' Perceptions of Efficacy in Working with Families  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The primary purpose of this study was to examine the extent to which preservice teachers participating in a 16-week course in family and community relations would evidence a change in perception of the importance, feasibility, and level of preparation regarding family involvement strategies. A sample of 132 undergraduate preservice teachers was…

Zygmunt-Fillwalk, Eva M.

2006-01-01

475

Families as Decision-Makers: When Researchers and Advocates Work Together  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Families across the United States must routinely make difficult choices about child care arrangements because of the need to resume a job, continue an education or training program, or care for other family members. Leaving children in the care of others for the first time can be difficult (Sayer, Bianchi, & Robinson, 2004; Van Horn, Ramey,…

Fields-Smith, Cheryl; Neuharth-Pritchett, Stacey

2009-01-01

476

Working with Families to Prevent Obesity: A Community-Campus Partnership  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

University faculty and community agencies collaborated to design and implement Healthy Weigh/El camino saludable, a family-focused obesity prevention and intervention program in a low-income, urban community at high risk for obesity and related chronic disease. Hispanic and African American families participated in 12 weekly sessions. Offered in…

Dart, Lyn; Frable, Pamela Jean; Bradley, Patricia J.; Bae, Sejong; Singh, Karan

2005-01-01

477

Cooperative Working towards Family-Centred Health Education in Acute Care: Improvement in Client Satisfaction  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: To establish family-centred health education for patients in a neurosurgery unit and to evaluate its impact on patients' and families' satisfaction. Design: Cooperative participatory research through which a group of clinical nurses and an academic researcher engaged in cycles of action and reflection. Setting: The study was…

Bastani, Farideh; Golaghaie, Farzaneh; Farahani, Mansoureh A.; Rafeie, Mohammad

2014-01-01

478

Work Experiences and Family Functioning among Employed Fathers with Children of School Age.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Investigated how 657 fathers' job satisfaction and job stress were related to four domains: individual, parent-child, marital, and child. Results showed that the job affected all four domains. Job stress and job satisfaction were directly related to family functioning. Discusses implications for families with school-age children. (RJM)

Kinnunen, Ulla; And Others

1996-01-01

479

Exploring theatre of the oppressed in family therapy clinical work and supervision  

Microsoft Academic Search

Augusto Boal's theatre of the oppressed (TOTO) techniques have been used in education, health, welfare, and prison systems world-wide. However, the link between family therapy clinical supervision and training and TOTO has not been explored, either in Australia or overseas. This innovative action research project explores the ways family therapists and supervisors apply these theatre techniques in their everyday practice.

Kerry Proctor; Amaryll Perlesz; Banu Moloney; Fiona McIlwaine; Imogen ONeill

2008-01-01

480

A Typology of Work-Family Arrangements among Dual-Earner Couples in Norway  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A symmetrical family model of two workers or caregivers is a political goal in many western European countries. We explore how common this family type is in Norway, a country with high gender-equality ambitions, by using a multinomial latent class model to develop a typology of dual-earner couples with children based on the partners' allocations…

Kitterod, Ragni Hege; Lappegard, Trude

2012-01-01

481

How Block Grants Can Make--or Break--Supports for Families: A Working Paper.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper represents a pooling of diverse perspectives and experiences of four organizations concerned that the current block grant structure of funding for social and family support services will not adequately improve the social services system or the lives of children and families. Focusing on ways in which the current re-examination of…

Center for the Study of Social Policy, Washington, DC.

482

Working with Arab American Families: Culturally Competent Practice for School Psychologists  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Individuals of Arab descent residing within the United States currently number between 1.2 million and 3.9 million. These families are characterized by considerable diversity depending upon their nationality, religion, and extent of acculturation to both Western and Arab cultures. More recently, Arab families have immigrated to the United States…

Haboush, Karen L.

2007-01-01

483

Working with Family, Friend, and Neighbor Caregivers: Lessons from Four Diverse Communities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article is excerpted from "Who's Watching the Babies? Improving the Quality of Family, Friend, and Neighbor Care" by Douglas R. Powell ("ZERO TO THREE," 2008). The article explores questions about program development and implementation strategies for supporting Family, Friend, and Neighbor (FFN) caregivers: How do programs and their host…

Powell, Douglas R.

2011-01-01

484

45 CFR 261.32 - How many hours must work-eligible individuals participate for the family to count in the...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...1) We will deem a family with two work-eligible...activity. (2) This policy is limited to States...this section, if the family receives federally funded...1) We will deem a family with two work-eligible...activity. (2) This policy is limited to...

2010-10-01

485

SEAFARERS' WIVES AND INTERMITTENT HUSBANDS- SOCIAL AND PSYCHOLOGICAL IMPACT OF A SUBGROUP OF NORWEGIAN SEAFARERS' WORK SCHEDULE ON THEIR FAMILIES  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective - To examine the psycho-social impact of work schedules (absence from home) on the families of a subgroup of Norwegian seafarers as reported by their wives (sea wives). Their husbands worked 4-6 weeks on and 4-6 weeks off Norwegian- registered multipurpose vessels (MPV) supporting the off-shore oil industry. Methods - Questionnaires addressing demographic characteristics, marital satisfaction, social support, subjective

ARNE JOHAN ULVEN; KNUT ARVE OMDAL; HENRIK HERLØV-NIELSEN; ÅGOT IRGENS; EILIF DAHL

2007-01-01

486

The Contribution of Work and Family Roles to Mental Health: An Evaluation of Additive and Interactive Models.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Rather than ask whether multiple roles, such as employee, wife, and mother, have a protective or harmful effect on women's psychological well being, this study examined the combination of stressors and supports associated with work and family roles. Female clerical workers (N=44) who were married and/or had a child living at home completed…

Repetti, Rena L.

487

Work and family research in IO\\/OB: Content analysis and review of the literature (1980–2002)  

Microsoft Academic Search

This monograph reviews 190 work–family studies published in IO\\/OB journals from 1980 to 2002. The results of a content analysis are presented which catalog these articles with respect to the study focus, nature and direction of the proposed effects, and predictor, criterion, and mediator variables examined. Then a narrative review of the articles is presented, organized in terms of the

Lillian T. Eby; Wendy J. Casper; Angie Lockwood; Chris Bordeaux; Andi Brinleya

2005-01-01

488

The Impact of Work and Family Roles on Associate and Baccalaureate Degree Completion among Students in Early Adulthood.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined the impact of work and family roles on the probability of students in early adulthood completing the associate or baccalaureate degree. It also looked at the effect of gender on degree completion and differences between adult associate and baccalaureate degree seekers. The study used data from the National Longitudinal Study of…

Hanniford, Barbara E.; Sagaria, Mary Ann D.

489

Work and Family Research in IO/OB: Content Analysis and Review of the Literature (1980-2002)  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This monograph reviews 190 work-family studies published in IO/OB journals from 1980 to 2002. The results of a content analysis are presented which catalog these articles with respect to the study focus, nature and direction of the proposed effects, and predictor, criterion, and mediator variables examined. Then a narrative review of the articles…

Eby, Lillian T.; Casper, Wendy J.; Lockwood, Angie; Bordeaux, Chris; Brinley, Andi

2005-01-01

490

Telecommuting, Control, and Boundary Management: Correlates of Policy Use and Practice, Job Control, and Work-Family Effectiveness  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We examine professionals' use of telecommuting, perceptions of psychological job control, and boundary management strategies. We contend that work-family research should distinguish between descriptions of flexibility use (formal telecommuting policy user, amount of telecommuting practiced) and how the individual psychologically experiences…

Kossek, Ellen Ernst; Lautsch, Brenda A.; Eaton, Susan C.

2006-01-01

491

What do we need to know to work effectively with young children and families? Towards a core curriculum  

Microsoft Academic Search

This presentation reports on the key findings of a national survey of the knowledge base and training needs of those working with young children and their families. A review of the literature review was conducted to identify what the core curriculum should comprise - this includes knowledge of the key principles of child development and the factors that effect the

Tim Moore

492

Making Ends Meet: Six Programs That Help Working Families and Employers. A Guide for Business Leaders and Policymakers.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document is intended to provide business leaders, policymakers, and others with information about the operation and value of six work support programs designed to help low-income parents obtain the assistance needed to enter a job, retain employment, and better provide for their families' needs. The six programs profiled are as follows: the…

Patel, Nisha; Greenberg, Mark; Savner, Steve; Turetsky, Vicki

493

Poor Families in 2001: Parents Working Less and Children Continue To Lag Behind. Child Trends Research Brief.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

With increasing unemployment in the United States, the nation has seen a drop in the percentage of children in poverty with one or more parents in the workforce, a reverse of trends evident in the late 1990s. This research brief presents a statistical snapshot of working poor families with children in 2001. Analyses revealed that in 2001 children…

Wertheimer, Richard

494

Possible Futures for Social Work with Children and Families in Australia, the United Kingdom and the United States  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

There has been considerable interest in recent years in comparing the operation of social work services for children and families internationally, particularly between Australia, the United Kingdom and the United States. Reviewing the respective policy environments and drawing on recent research experience in these three nations, the author…

Spratt, Trevor

2008-01-01

495

Role Salience, Social Support, and Work-Family Conflict among Jewish and Arab Female Teachers in Israel  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Conceptualizing career development in a cultural and contextual framework, this study examined within-gender differences in role salience and work-family conflict (WFC) among 101 Jewish and 99 Arab female teachers (aged 23-64 years) from central Israel. The contribution of social support to women's conflict was also examined. Results highlighted…

Cinamon, Rachel Gali

2009-01-01

496

Unemployment and well-being in Europe. The effect of country unemployment rate, work ethics and family ties  

Microsoft Academic Search

Subjective well-being literature shows that higher unemployment rate corresponds to lower psychological cost of own unemployment. The goal of the paper is to deepen the understanding of this regularity by investigating the role played by the work ethics and the strength of family ties. I analyze the European Values Study data (2008) for 36 countries using multilevel regression methodology. First,

MIKUCKA Malgorzata

2011-01-01

497

Support for Families: Working with Parents and Caregivers to Support Children from Birth to Three Years of Age.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This theme issue of Coordinators' Notebook focuses on how early childhood care and development (ECCD) programs world-wide can work with parents and caregivers to support children from birth to 3 years of age. Section 1 of the journal describes the needs of parents and families and the development of parent programs around the world. Section 2…

Hanssen, Elizabeth, Ed.; Zimanyi, Louise, Ed.

2000-01-01

498

Quality of Work Life of Independent vs Employed Family Physicians in Wisconsin: A WReN Study  

PubMed Central

PURPOSE Family physicians in Wisconsin who are mainly employed by large health care organizations have voiced concerns regarding the quality of their work lives. We explored the quality of work life and its relationship to employment by health care organizations. METHODS We conducted a cross-sectional survey of the 1,482 active members of the Wisconsin Academy of Family Physicians in 2000. RESULTS A 47% overall response rate was obtained, and 584 respondents could be identified as independent or employed by a health care organization. There were no differences in age or sex between the 2 groups. The independent physicians worked longer hours, were in smaller work groups, and had been in practice longer and in their current practice longer than the employed physicians. Independent physicians reported better working relationships, more satisfaction with family time, more influence over management decisions, better satisfaction with being a physician, better perceived quality of the care they provided, greater ability to achieve professional goals, and lesser intention to leave the practice. CONCLUSIONS Independent physicians have significantly more positive ratings of several aspects of the quality of their work life compared with physicians employed by health care organizations. Health care organizations need to address these issues if they are to have a satisfied and stable workforce.

Beasley, John W.; Karsh, Ben-Tzion; Hagenauer, Mary Ellen; Marchand, Lucille; Sainfort, Francois

2005-01-01

499

Development of a Behavioral Measure of Supervisor Support for Work and Family.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The project addressed three major gaps in the Occupational Safety and Health research. First, this was an intervention study that developed, implemented, and evaluated a workplace behavioral intervention and its effects on worker, family, and organization...

E. E. Kossek K. Anger L. B. Hammer R. Olson

2009-01-01