Sample records for unpaid family work

  1. The changing gender distribution of paid and unpaid work in New Zealand

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Paul Callister

    2005-01-01

    This paper explores five main questions regarding the gender distribution of work, primarily in the context of couples with young children. These are: how much total paid and unpaid work is carried out in New Zealand?; how is this work shared between women and men?; how does this compare with other countries?; how might the mix of unpaid and paid

  2. New Home, New Learning: Chinese Immigrants and Unpaid Housework and Care Work

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lichun Liu

    This paper examines the learning experience of Chinese immigrants through unpaid housework and care work. Based on the interviews with 8 Chinese immigrants (4 women and 4 men) in the Great Toronto Area, who immigrated to Canada from Mainland China in the previous five years, this paper explores the challenges and difficulties these people encountered in their unpaid labour in

  3. The Invisibility of Children's Paid and Unpaid Work: Implications for Ethiopia's National Poverty Reduction Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woldehanna, Tassew; Jones, Nicola; Tefera, Bekele

    2008-01-01

    The complexities of intergenerational and gendered intra-household resource allocations are frequently overlooked in poverty reduction policies. To address this lacuna, this article focuses on links between macro-development policies and children's paid and unpaid work burden in Ethiopia. Using a mixed methods approach, quantitative household…

  4. Midcourse in the United States: Does unpaid community participation replace paid work?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Phyllis Moen; Vivian Fields

    2002-01-01

    This study examines the links between formal community participation (defined as volunteer work for an organization) in the\\u000a United States and psychological well-being, focusing on retirement as a key status transition. It draws on data from 762 American\\u000a retirees and not-yet-retired older workers in the midcourse years (in their 50s, 60s, and early 70s) to examine: (1) whether\\u000a unpaid community

  5. Relatively Different? How Do Gender Differences in Well-Being Depend on Paid and Unpaid Work in Europe?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boye, Katarina

    2009-01-01

    Absolute as well as relative hours of paid and unpaid work may influence well-being. This study investigates whether absolute hours spent on paid work and housework account for the lower well-being among women as compared to men in Europe, and whether the associations between well-being and hours of paid work and housework differ by gender…

  6. How does the stork delegate work? Childbearing and the gender division of paid and unpaid labour

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marc Frenette

    2011-01-01

    I estimate the relationship between fertility and the allocation of paid and unpaid labour among couples, accounting for the\\u000a potentially endogenous nature of fertility with two instruments. Additional children lead to a reduction in paid hours and\\u000a to an even larger increase in unpaid hours among mothers. An increase in fertility also leads to a decline in the proportion\\u000a of

  7. Feminist Recenterings of Knowledge: Unpaid Work for Capital--Women's Domesticity Reexamined.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glazer, Nona Y.

    Industrial capitalism has encroached on household production and women's family work. In a series of interviews with women in 1979, the importance of women's activities outside the household, yet within the infrastructures on which they relied for carrying on housework and child care, became evident. The concept of work would be expanded to…

  8. Unpaid Leave Policy 6.45

    E-print Network

    Howat, Ian M.

    this requirement in workers' compensation, short-term disability and long-term disability cases. Medical leave must/01/1973 Edited: 04/15/2014 Faculty and staff may request an unpaid leave for personal, professional or medical unpaid family and medical leave falls under this policy. A leave implies that the same or similar

  9. Balancing Family and Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yahnke, Sally; And Others

    The purpose of this monograph is to present a series of activities designed to teach strategies needed for effectively managing the multiple responsibilities of family and work. The guide contains 11 lesson plans dealing with balancing family and work that can be used in any home economics class, from middle school through college. The lesson…

  10. The Enduring Debate over Unpaid Labour.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beneria, Lourdes

    1999-01-01

    Summarizes the theoretical and practical issues related to the under-estimation of women's work in the labor force and national accounting statistics. Responds to the continuing criticism that women's efforts make no useful impact, unpaid work should not be treated the same as paid work, and efforts are misguided. (JOW)

  11. This document was last updated April 2014 Unpaid Internships

    E-print Network

    Boonstra, Rudy

    This document was last updated April 2014 Unpaid Internships There are many exceptions where an unpaid internship is permitted. When you are applying for an opportunity, you should the organization and internship provide you with valuable work experience? Is the opportunity a good fit for you

  12. Work - Family Researchers Electronic Network

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Sponsored by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation and maintained by the Center for Work and Family at Boston College, this site was established to facilitate information dissemination for work-family researchers. The Work-Family Researchers Electronic Network is comprised of four major components: the Work-Family Research Literature Database, the Work-Family Researchers' Discussion Groups, the Work-Family Research Newsletter, and Sloan Grantee Information. The searchable literature database contains over 1,000 bibliographic citations with annotations for selected articles, books, book chapters, reports, and papers in the work-family field. The discussion group section currently provides four fora for exchanging ideas on work and family. The Work-Family Research Newsletter recently posted its first issue online. Information about Sloan grantees and their projects are available in the final section.

  13. The Academic Effects of After-School Paid and Unpaid Work among 14-Year-Old Students in TIMSS Countries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Post, David; Pong, Suet-ling

    2009-01-01

    What it means to be a "student" varies within and between countries. Apart from the wide variety of school types and school quality that is experienced by young people, there also is, accompanying increased rates of school participation, a growing population of students who work part-time. The theoretical and actual consequences of student work

  14. Maine's Families: Poverty Despite Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lazere, Edward B.

    Children are among the poorest of Maine's residents. Nearly 1 in 5 children under the age of 18, 19.3%, lived in families below the federal poverty line in the early 1990s. Most of these poor children lived in working families. The working poor are often missing from policy debates, but their numbers are likely to increase with welfare reform…

  15. Social Work Patient & Family Services

    E-print Network

    Goldman, Steven A.

    Social Work and Patient & Family Services 601 Elmwood Avenue RM. 1-1450 P. O. Box 650 Rochester, NY Social Work office lo- cated? The Social Work office is located on the first floor of Strong Memorial Hospital, Rm. 1-1450 How do I get in touch with a social worker? The social work department is open Monday

  16. Balancing family and work

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2011-08-01

    More than 45% of women scientists at top universities in the United States have indicated that their careers have kept them from having as many children as they want, according to an 8 August study, “Scientists want more children,” which appears in the journal PLoS ONE. The study, by sociologists Elaine Howard Ecklund of Rice University and Anne Lincoln of Southern Methodist University, indicates that 24.5% of male scientists surveyed indicated the same concerns. The study also found that among junior scientists, 29% of women indicated concern that a science career would prevent them from having a family; 7% of men indicated the same concern.

  17. Work-Family Facilitation and Conflict, Working Fathers and Mothers, Work-Family Stressors and Support

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, E. Jeffrey

    2005-01-01

    Work-family research frequently focuses on the conflict experienced by working mothers. Using data from the National Study of the Changing Workforce (N = 1,314), this study also examined work-family facilitation and working fathers. Ecological systems, family stress, family resilience, and sex role theories were used to organize the data and…

  18. Changing Work and Work-Family Conflict: Evidence from the Work, Family, and Health Network*

    PubMed

    Kelly, Erin L; Moen, Phyllis; Oakes, J Michael; Fan, Wen; Okechukwu, Cassandra; Davis, Kelly D; Hammer, Leslie; Kossek, Ellen; King, Rosalind Berkowitz; Hanson, Ginger; Mierzwa, Frank; Casper, Lynne

    2014-06-01

    Schedule control and supervisor support for family and personal life are work resources that may help employees manage the work-family interface. However, existing data and designs have made it difficult to conclusively identify the effects of these work resources. This analysis utilizes a group-randomized trial in which some units in an information technology workplace were randomly assigned to participate in an initiative, called STAR, that targeted work practices, interactions, and expectations by (a) training supervisors on the value of demonstrating support for employees' personal lives and (b) prompting employees to reconsider when and where they work. We find statistically significant, though modest, improvements in employees' work-family conflict and family time adequacy and larger changes in schedule control and supervisor support for family and personal life. We find no evidence that this intervention increased work hours or perceived job demands, as might have happened with increased permeability of work across time and space. Subgroup analyses suggest the intervention brings greater benefits to employees more vulnerable to work-family conflict. This study advances our understanding of the impact of social structures on individual lives by investigating deliberate organizational changes and their effects on work resources and the work-family interface with a rigorous design. PMID:25349460

  19. Child and Youth Care Family Support Work

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jack Phelan

    2004-01-01

    This article describes the theoretical process and practical skills involved in a child and youth care approach to family work. The behaviors and boundary dynamics for this worker are significantly different than those envisioned in family therapy approaches, including gaining credibility by actually living with difficult youth, trusting families to know what they need, supporting families by doing useful things

  20. Consequences of the Family Work Day.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kingston, Paul William; Nock, Steven L.

    1985-01-01

    Analyzed how dimensions of the family work day are related to the domestic lives of dual-earner couples. Results indicated neither the combined number of hours a couple works nor the amount of time one or both spouses is working is related to the quality of family life, although wives' attitudes and behaviors were more affected. (Author/BL)

  1. Applying the effort-reward imbalance model to household and family work: a population-based study of German mothers

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background This paper reports on results of a newly developed questionnaire for the assessment of effort-reward imbalance (ERI) in unpaid household and family work. Methods: Using a cross-sectional population-based survey of German mothers (n = 3129) the dimensional structure of the theoretical ERI model was validated by means of Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA). Analyses of Variance were computed to examine relationships between ERI and social factors and health outcomes. Results CFA revealed good psychometric properties indicating that the subscale 'effort' is based on one latent factor and the subscale 'reward' is composed of four dimensions: 'intrinsic value of family and household work', 'societal esteem', 'recognition from the partner', and 'affection from the child(ren)'. About 19.3% of mothers perceived lack of reciprocity and 23.8% showed high rates of overcommitment in terms of inability to withdraw from household and family obligations. Socially disadvantaged mothers were at higher risk of ERI, in particular with respect to the perception of low societal esteem. Gender inequality in the division of household and family work and work-family conflict accounted most for ERI in household and family work. Analogous to ERI in paid work we could demonstrate that ERI affects self-rated health, somatic complaints, mental health and, to some extent, hypertension. Conclusions The newly developed questionnaire demonstrates satisfied validity and promising results for extending the ERI model to household and family work. PMID:22221851

  2. Supervisor referrals to work-family programs.

    PubMed

    Casper, Wendy J; Fox, Kevin E; Sitzmann, Traci M; Landy, Ann L

    2004-04-01

    Supervisors play an important role in determining whether employees use work-family programs. Yet little research has examined the factors that relate to supervisor perceptions of and behaviors surrounding work-family programs. This study builds on past research, the theory of reasoned action, and expectancy theory to explore factors that contribute to supervisors' decisions to refer subordinates to work-family programs. Usable surveys assessing perceptions of work-family programs were completed and returned by 1972 managers in a large government agency. Results revealed that program awareness and instrumentality perceptions both contributed uniquely to predicting the frequency of supervisors' referrals to work-family programs. Supportive attitudes also predicted referrals, but only through their shared relationship with instrumentality perceptions. PMID:15053713

  3. [Counseling work with foreign families].

    PubMed

    Gerhardt, U

    1992-03-01

    In spite of informations about a rapid change of behavioral patterns, immigrant children, youth and families have problems to keep their identity and being understood in the guest countries. Assistance of any kind and especially counseling in intrapsychic and social conflicts has to follow special topics. There are not only language barriers, the adviser has to take care of the ethnological background and the social-cultural conditions of the home country, he has to know about loyalty mechanisms to the family of origin, to manage closeness and distance in interactional relationship. Often he has also to help children and adult persons to experience self-confidence and self-conciousness in solving psychological problems instead of helplessness and waiting for magic and mystic help. PMID:1584731

  4. 42 CFR 408.110 - Collection of unpaid premiums.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM PREMIUMS FOR SUPPLEMENTARY MEDICAL...Collection of Unpaid Premiums; Refund of Excess Premiums After the Death of the Enrollee § 408.110 Collection of unpaid...

  5. 42 CFR 408.110 - Collection of unpaid premiums.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM PREMIUMS FOR SUPPLEMENTARY MEDICAL...Collection of Unpaid Premiums; Refund of Excess Premiums After the Death of the Enrollee § 408.110 Collection of unpaid...

  6. Work/Family Linkages over the Life Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Voydanoff, Patricia

    1985-01-01

    Examines how men and women combine and coordinate work and family roles over the life course. Discusses the constraints of work and family roles, work/family role coordination over the life course (sequential work/family role staging and symmetrical work/family role allocation), and policy implications of work/family linkages. (CT)

  7. Working with Families: Rethinking Denial.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallagher, Peggy A.; Fialka, Janice; Rhodes, Cheryl; Arceneaux, Cindy

    2002-01-01

    This article argues that if professionals categorize parents as "in denial," unaccepting, or difficult, professionals may lose the chance to understand and learn from the parents. Recommendations are provided for rethinking denial and working with parents, including supporting parents' hopes and dreams for their child, suspending judgment, and…

  8. Work Demands, Work-Family Conflict, and Child Adjustment in African American Families: The Mediating Role of Family Routines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLoyd, Vonnie C.; Toyokawa, Teru; Kaplan, Rachel

    2008-01-01

    Using data from a sample of 455 African American children (ages 10 to 12 years) and their parents, this study tests a hypothesized model linking (a) maternal work demands to family routines through work-family conflict and depressive symptoms and (b) maternal work demands to children's externalizing and internalizing problems through family

  9. When Work-Family Benefits Are Not Enough: The Influence of Work-Family Culture on Benefit Utilization, Organizational Attachment, and Work-Family Conflict.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Cynthia A.; Beauvais, Laura L.; Lyness, Karen S.

    1999-01-01

    Managers' and professionals' (n=276) perceptions of a supportive work/family culture were related to use of work-family benefits. Employees in organizations with work-family benefits reported greater commitment, less intention to leave, and less work-family conflict. Supportive culture was significantly related to work attitudes. (SK)

  10. The work–family interface in Korea: can family life enrich work life?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Eun-Suk Lee; Jae Yoon Chang; Hyosun Kim

    2011-01-01

    Using data obtained from 363 Korean civil servants, we examine the mechanism of family-to-work enrichment. Although individualistic Western work–family literature predicts that resources from the family role, both instrumental and affective, will improve the work role by mitigating the negative job stress–job satisfaction relationship, data from collectivistic Korean society show an unexpected opposite effect – an accentuating, not a mitigating

  11. Designing Work, Family & Health Organizational Change Initiatives.

    PubMed

    Kossek, Ellen Ernst; Hammer, Leslie B; Kelly, Erin L; Moen, Phyllis

    2014-01-01

    For decades, leaders and scholars have been advocating change efforts to improve work-life relationships. Yet most initiatives have lacked rigor and not been developed using scientific principles. This has created an evidence gap for employer support of work and personal life as a win-win for productivity and employees' well-being. This paper examines the approach used by the U.S. Work Family Health Network (WFRN) to develop an innovative workplace intervention to improve employee and family health. The change initiative was designed to reduce organizationally based work-family conflict in two contrasting contexts representative of major segments of today's U.S. workforce: health care employees and informational technology professionals. The WFRN Intervention (called STAR) had three theoretically based change elements. They were: 1) increase job control over work time and schedule; 2) increase supervisor social support for family and job effectiveness; and 3) improve organizational culture and job design processes to foster results orientation. Seven practical lessons for developing work-life interventions emerged from this groundbreaking endeavor. PMID:24683279

  12. Designing Work, Family & Health Organizational Change Initiatives

    PubMed Central

    Hammer, Leslie B.; Kelly, Erin L.; Moen, Phyllis

    2014-01-01

    Executive Summary For decades, leaders and scholars have been advocating change efforts to improve work-life relationships. Yet most initiatives have lacked rigor and not been developed using scientific principles. This has created an evidence gap for employer support of work and personal life as a win–win for productivity and employees’ well-being. This paper examines the approach used by the U.S. Work Family Health Network (WFRN) to develop an innovative workplace intervention to improve employee and family health. The change initiative was designed to reduce organizationally based work-family conflict in two contrasting contexts representative of major segments of today’s U.S. workforce: health care employees and informational technology professionals. The WFRN Intervention (called STAR) had three theoretically based change elements. They were: 1) increase job control over work time and schedule; 2) increase supervisor social support for family and job effectiveness; and 3) improve organizational culture and job design processes to foster results orientation. Seven practical lessons for developing work-life interventions emerged from this groundbreaking endeavor. PMID:24683279

  13. Clarifying Relationships among Work and Family Social Support, Stressors, and Work-Family Conflict

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michel, Jesse S.; Mitchelson, Jacqueline K.; Pichler, Shaun; Cullen, Kristin L.

    2010-01-01

    Although work and family social support predict role stressors and work-family conflict, there has been much ambiguity regarding the conceptual relationships among these constructs. Using path analysis on meta-analytically derived validity coefficients (528 effect sizes from 156 samples), we compare three models to address these concerns and…

  14. Considering social work assessment of families

    PubMed Central

    Devine, Lauren

    2015-01-01

    Since the 1990s the way in which social workers respond to referrals of children to Children's Social Care departments has evolved. It has moved through a process that ‘screens families out’ of child protection assessment to a system aiming to ‘screen families in’ where necessary, and now uses a holistic assessment aiming to screen for both risk and need. The assessment framework developed to assess children in need and their families is the modern social work response to all referrals. Little research has been carried out to assess its suitability as a widespread social work response. This article considers the debates that have emerged in relation to its use and concludes that insufficient consideration has been given to evaluating assessment as an appropriate measure of need and risk. Wider provision of non-assessed universal services would reduce the need for assessment.

  15. Children's labour in ethnic family businesses: The case of Chinese take?away businesses in Britain

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Miri Song

    1997-01-01

    Reliance upon unpaid and committed family labour is said to make many ethnic businesses competitive. However, most analysts' references to this labour have not taken into account the nature of family members' and, in particular, children's work roles or the ways in which their labour is elicited and maintained. Here, the nature of children's labour participation in ethnic businesses is

  16. 19 CFR 24.32 - Claims; unpaid compensation of deceased employees and death benefits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Claims; unpaid compensation of deceased employees and death benefits. 24.32 Section... Claims; unpaid compensation of deceased employees and death benefits. (a) A claim...spouse for unpaid compensation due an...

  17. Psychology at the intersection of work and family: recommendations for employers, working families, and policymakers.

    PubMed

    Halpern, Diane F

    2005-01-01

    Demographic data show that major changes have been occurring in the everyday lives of families over the last generation, with the majority of mothers of young children in the workforce and an increasing number of men and women assuming caregiving responsibilities for older relatives. Thus, the 2 primary identities of most adults, defined by their multiple family and work roles, need to be coordinated in ways that promote positive family outcomes, returns on investments for employers, and societal values. Despite changes in the workforce, the world of work is still largely organized for a family model that is increasingly rare--one with a stay-at-home caregiver. Recommendations based on psychological and other social science research are offered to align the needs of working families and employers. PMID:16045393

  18. Work-Family Conflict, Children, and Hour Mismatches in Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reynolds, Jeremy; Aletraris, Lydia

    2007-01-01

    This article helps integrate research on work hours and work-family issues by examining how work-family conflict is related to the desire for more and fewer hours of work. Using the first wave of the Household Income and Labor Dynamics in Australia survey, we find that work-to-family conflict is associated with a desire for fewer hours of work.…

  19. Family Care Responsibilities and Employment: Exploring the Impact of Type of Family Care on Work-Family and Family-Work Conflict

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Lisa M.

    2013-01-01

    This study compared work-family and family-work conflict for employed family caregivers with disability-related care responsibilities in contrast to employed family caregivers with typical care responsibilities. Using data from the 2002 National Study of the Changing Workforce, a population-based survey of the U.S. workforce, formal and informal…

  20. Work-family conflict: a study of lesbian mothers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tracy L. Tuten; Rachel A. August

    2006-01-01

    Purpose – Among the most consistent predictors of work-family conflict for working parents are the number of hours worked, job role autonomy, and degree of support managers offer parents. Yet, little is known about the unique work experiences of lesbian women in terms of work-family conflict. This paper seeks to identify correlates of work-family conflict, specifically work interference with family

  1. JOB OPENING POSITION: TV WeatherCenter Intern (unpaid internship)

    E-print Network

    Parker, Matthew D. Brown

    JOB OPENING POSITION: TV WeatherCenter Intern (unpaid internship) JOB NUMBER: 12081 DIVISION/DEPARTMENT: WRAL-TV - Weather DESCRIPTION: THIS IS AN UNPAID INTERNSHIP. Interns in the WRAL HD Weather of North Carolina. The internship will feature hands-on experience in all aspects of television and radio

  2. Clarifying Work-Family Intervention Processes: The Roles of Work-Family Conflict and Family Supportive Supervisor Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Hammer, Leslie B.; Kossek, Ellen E.; Anger, W. Kent; Bodner, Todd; Zimmerman, Kristi L.

    2010-01-01

    Drawing on a conceptual model integrating research on training, work-family interventions, and social support, we conducted a quasi-experimental field study to assess the impact of a supervisory training and self-monitoring intervention designed to increase supervisors' use of family supportive supervisor behaviors. Pre- and post-intervention surveys were completed, nine months apart, by 239 employees at six intervention (N = 117) and six control (N = 122) grocery store sites. Thirty-nine supervisors in the six intervention sites received the training consisting of one hour of self-paced computer-based training, one hour of face-to-face group training, followed by instructions for behavioral self-monitoring (recording the frequency of supportive behaviors) to support on-the-job transfer. Results demonstrated a disordinal interaction for the effect of training and family-to-work conflict on employee job satisfaction, turnover intentions and physical health. In particular, for these outcomes, positive training effects were observed for employees with high family-to-work conflict, while negative training effects were observed for employees with low family-to-work conflict. These moderation effects were mediated by the interactive effect of training and family-to-work conflict on employee perceptions of family-supportive supervisor behaviors. Implications of our findings for future work-family intervention development and evaluation are discussed. PMID:20853943

  3. Single Mothers, Social Capital, and Work--Family Conflict

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ciabattari, Teresa

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to examine work-family conflict among low-income, unmarried mothers. Analyzing the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study, a national sample of nonmarital births, I examine how social capital affects work-family conflict and how both social capital and work-family conflict affect employment. Results show that…

  4. Work-family conflict in East vs Western countries

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Zaiton Hassan; Maureen F. Dollard; Anthony H. Winefield

    2010-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to advance the understanding of both directions of work-family conflict (WFC), work interference with family (WIF) and family interference with work (FIW) in an Eastern culture. Findings are compared with those of 14 other Western studies and the relationships among WIF, FIW and job, family, community and life satisfaction are explored. Design\\/methodology\\/approach

  5. Is work–family balance more than conflict and enrichment?

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, Dawn S.; Grzywacz, Joseph G.; Zivnuska, Suzanne

    2009-01-01

    This study deepens our theoretical and practical understanding of work–family balance, defined as the ‘accomplishment of role-related expectations that are negotiated and shared between an individual and his/her role-related partners in the work and family domains’ (Grzywacz & Carlson, 2007: 458). We develop a new measure of work–family balance and establish discriminant validity between it, work–family conflict, and work–family enrichment. Further, we examine the relationship of work–family balance with six key work and family outcomes. Results suggest that balance explains variance beyond that explained by traditional measures of conflict and enrichment for five of six outcomes tested: job satisfaction, organizational commitment, family satisfaction, family performance, and family functioning. We conclude with a discussion of the applications of our work. PMID:20148121

  6. Role Resources and Work-Family Enrichment: The Role of Work Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siu, Oi-ling; Lu, Jia-fang; Brough, Paula; Lu, Chang-qin; Bakker, Arnold B.; Kalliath, Thomas; O'Driscoll, Michael; Phillips, David R.; Chen, Wei-qing; Lo, Danny; Sit, Cindy; Shi, Kan

    2010-01-01

    This article proposes a theoretical model of work-family enrichment and tests the mediating role of work engagement. The inclusion of work engagement extends prior research on work-family interface, and allows for examination of the effects of role resources (job resources, family support) on work-family enrichment. A two-wave survey was conducted…

  7. Clarifying Work-Family Intervention Processes: The Roles of Work-Family Conflict and Family-Supportive Supervisor Behaviors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammer, Leslie B.; Kossek, Ellen Ernst; Anger, W. Kent; Bodner, Todd; Zimmerman, Kristi L.

    2011-01-01

    Drawing on a conceptual model integrating research on training, work-family interventions, and social support, we conducted a quasi-experimental field study to assess the impact of a supervisor training and self-monitoring intervention designed to increase supervisors' use of family-supportive supervisor behaviors. Pre- and postintervention…

  8. Family Support & Health Care: Working Together for Healthy Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lalley, Jacqueline, Ed.; Ahsan, Nilofer, Ed.

    1998-01-01

    This report of the Family Resource Coalition of America examines partnerships between family support programs and health care providers, forged to ensure that the comprehensive needs of families are met. The report begins with two articles, "Family Support and the Emerging Health System" and "Social and Economic Issues Affecting Health--A…

  9. Working to End Family Homelessness. Annual Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center on Family Homelessness (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    The National Center on Family Homelessness is determined to end family homelessness. Sheltering families provides a temporary safe haven. Connecting families to permanent housing, essential services, and critical supports can change their lives forever. Through research the Center learns what families need to rebound from the housing, economic,…

  10. Linking Team Resources to Work-Family Enrichment and Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunter, Emily M.; Perry, Sara Jansen; Carlson, Dawn S.; Smith, Steven A.

    2010-01-01

    Work-family scholars now recognize the potential positive effects of participation in one life domain (i.e., work or family) on performance in other life domains. We examined how employees might benefit from team resources, which are highly relevant to the modern workplace, in both work and nonwork domains via work-family enrichment. Using the…

  11. Planning Ahead: College Seniors' Concerns about Work-Family Conflict.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnett, Rosalind Chait; Gareis, Karen C.; James, Jacquelyn Boone; Steele, Jennifer

    Recent research suggests that working men experience as much work-family conflict as women do. More men are doing housework and childcare, and feel that family is as important as their work. An attempt was made to determine how college seniors view their potential for managing work-family conflict. College students (N=324) attending a private…

  12. The labour market impact of the working families’ tax credit

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Richard Blundell; Alan Duncan; Julian McCrae; Costas Meghir

    2000-01-01

    In October 1999, the working families’ tax credit (WFTC) replaced family credit as the main package of in-work support for families with children. Among a range of stated aims, the WFTC is intended to ‘... improve work incentives, encouraging people without work to move into employment’. In this paper, we consider the impact of WFTC on hours and participation. To

  13. Work-Family Balance: Perspectives from Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pillay, Soma; Abhayawansa, Subhash

    2014-01-01

    The article examines different types of work-family pressures amongst people working within the Australian university sector. We were specifically interested in work-family experiences between domestic and migrant Australians. Among the major findings, domestic Australians experience greater levels of work-family imbalance across most of the…

  14. Rational Versus Gender Role Explanations for Work–Family Conflict

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Barbara A. Gutek; Sabrina Searle; Lilian Klepa

    1991-01-01

    Two conflicting frameworks for understanding work–family conflict are proposed. According to the rational view, conflict is related linearly to the total amount of time spent in paid and family work. According to the gender role perspective, gender role expectations mute the relationship between hours expended and perceived work–family conflict, and gender interacts with number of hours worked and work–family conflict.

  15. The State of Working Families in Massachusetts

    E-print Network

    Fogg, Neeta

    2004-12-10

    The Massachusetts economy, workforce, and families have all undergone substantial changes over the past two decades. This paper, focusing on the labor market pressures facing families, employers, and ...

  16. The Family Outreach Model: Tools for Engaging and Working with Families in Distress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cornille, Thomas A.; Meyer, Andrea S.; Mullis, Ann K.; Mullis, Ronald L.; Boroto, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to present a family intervention model to family service providers that builds on previous research in areas of social support and family problem solving. The Family Outreach Model provides a set of strategies for engaging and working with families in five phases of family coping at different points in time in the…

  17. Generational Differences in Work-Family Conflict and Synergy

    PubMed Central

    Beutell, Nicholas J.

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines differences in work-family conflict and synergy among the four generational groups represented in the contemporary workforce: Generation Y Generation X, Baby Boomers, and Matures using data from the 2008 National Study of the Changing Workforce (n = 3,502). Significant generational differences were found for work-family conflict (work interfering with family and family interfering with work) but not for work-family synergy. Mental health and job pressure were the best predictors of work interfering with family conflict for each generational group. Work-family synergy presented a more complex picture. Work-family conflict and synergy were significantly related to job, marital, and life satisfaction. Implications and directions for future research are discussed. PMID:23783221

  18. Working with the One-Parent Family in Family Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hajal, Fady; Rosenberg, Elinor B.

    1978-01-01

    This paper describes particular problems that arise in the treatment of one-parent families. These problems are seen as stemming from the experience of disruption in life of the family and resulting special family structure. Techniques of handling the various resistances and issues that surface are presented and discussed. (Author)

  19. Labor Project for Working Families Cornell ILR Labor Programs

    E-print Network

    Keinan, Alon

    New Approaches to Organizing Women and Young Workers Social Media & Work Family Issues #12;New Approaches to Organizing Women and Young Workers Social Media and Work Family Issues This report Yanasak, UFCW #12;Table of Contents EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 1 SOCIAL MEDIA 1 WORK FAMILY ISSUES 2

  20. Unsociable Work? Nonstandard Work Schedules, Family Relationships, and Children's Well-Being

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strazdins, Lyndall; Clements, Mark S.; Korda, Rosemary J.; Broom, Dorothy H.; D'Souza, Rennie M.

    2006-01-01

    Many children live in families where one or both parents work evenings, nights, or weekends. Do these work schedules affect family relationships or well-being? Using cross-sectional survey data from dual-earner Canadian families (N=4,306) with children aged 2-11 years (N=6,156), we compared families where parents worked standard weekday times with…

  1. Measuring the Positive Side of the Work-Family Interface: Development and Validation of a Work-Family Enrichment Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlson, Dawn S.; Kacmar, K. Michele; Wayne, Julie Holliday; Grzywacz, Joseph G.

    2006-01-01

    Based on current conceptualizations of enrichment, or the positive side of the work-family interface, a multi-dimensional measure of work-family enrichment is developed and validated using five samples. The final 18 item measure consists of three dimensions from the work to family direction (development, affect, and capital) and three dimensions…

  2. Posting Unpaid Internship Opportunities in BU CareerLink Employers should satisfy the criteria for acceptable unpaid internships as established by the United

    E-print Network

    of not less than current minimum wage. Employers and organizations seeking to post satisfy the criteria for acceptable unpaid internships as established by the United States Department of Labor (DOL). Employers and organizations offering unpaid

  3. Father Influences on Employed Mothers' Work-Family Balance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fagan, Jay; Press, Julie

    2008-01-01

    This study employed the ecological systems perspective and gender ideology theory to examine the influence of fathers' paid work-family crossover and family involvement on self-reports of work-family balance by employed mothers with children under the age of 13 (N = 179). Multiple regression analyses revealed that fathers' crossover factors had a…

  4. Preparing Infant-Family Practitioners: A Work in Progress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eggbeer, Linda; Mann, Tammy; Gilkerson, Linda

    2003-01-01

    This article explores what it takes to prepare practitioners to work effectively in the infant-family field and describes efforts to meet training needs. A multifaceted effort to prepare and support practitioners who work with infants, toddlers, and families has been central to the growth of the infant-family field. Part C of IDEA and Early Head…

  5. Hardships in America: The Real Story of Working Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boushey, Heather; Brocht, Chauna; Gundersen, Bethney; Bernstein, Jared

    Although U.S. policymakers have adopted the view that work is the solution to poverty, work may not ensure a decent standard of living for many families. This report estimates the number of families who are not making ends meet. It examines the cost of living in various communities in every state and determines "basic family budgets" for six…

  6. Work-Family Conflict and the Perception of Departmental and Institutional Work-Family Policies in Collegiate Athletic Trainers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Godek, Michelle M.

    2012-01-01

    Employees throughout the United States struggle to balance their work and family commitments, in part because the workforce makeup has changed significantly over the last half century. The evolving family structure also has contributed to this struggle. This research seeks to build on previous work-family literature by incorporating the six…

  7. Family boundary characteristics, work-family conflict and life satisfaction: A moderated mediation model.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Lin; Fan, Jinyan

    2014-10-21

    Although work-family border and boundary theory suggest individuals' boundary characteristics influence their work-family relationship, it is largely unknown how boundary flexibility and permeability mutually influence work-family conflict and subsequent employee outcomes. Moreover, the existing work-family conflict research has been mainly conducted in the United States and other Western countries. To address these gaps in the work-family literature, the present study examines a moderated mediation model regarding how family boundary characteristics may influence individuals' work-family conflict and life satisfaction with a sample of 278 Chinese full-time employees. Results showed that employees' family flexibility negatively related to their perceived work interference with family (WIF) and family interference with work (FIW), and both these two relationships were augmented by individuals' family permeability. In addition, WIF mediated the relationship between family flexibility and life satisfaction; the indirect effect of family flexibility on life satisfaction via WIF was stronger for individuals with higher family permeability. The theoretical and managerial implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:25331584

  8. Work and Family: Satisfaction, Stress, and Spousal Support.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips-Miller, Dianne L.; Campbell, N. Jo; Morrison, Charles R.

    2000-01-01

    Married veterinarians were surveyed about work satisfaction, work-related stress, marital-family stress, and spousal support for their career. Female veterinarians reported greater effect of martial/family stress on career and less perceived support than did their male counterparts. Areas of greatest work dissatisfaction for both genders were…

  9. FlextimeA Viable Solution to Work\\/Family Conflict?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    KATHLEEN E. CHRISTENSEN; GRAHAM L. STAINES

    1990-01-01

    Flextime, a work schedule that permits flexible starting and quitting times, has gained wide currency as a partial solution to conflicts between work and family life. This article aims to review the existing research regarding the advantages and disadvantages of flextime to both employers and employees; to evaluate the effects of flextime on resolving work\\/family conflicts; and to establish future

  10. Work-family balance after childbirth: the association between employer-offered leave characteristics and maternity leave duration.

    PubMed

    Guendelman, Sylvia; Goodman, Julia; Kharrazi, Martin; Lahiff, Maureen

    2014-01-01

    Early return to work after childbirth has been increasing among working mothers in the US. We assessed the relationship between access to employer-offered maternity leave (EOML) (both paid and unpaid) and uptake and duration of maternity leave following childbirth in a socio-economically diverse sample of full-time working women. We focus on California, a state that has long provided more generous maternity leave benefits than those offered by federal maternity leave policies through the State Disability Insurance program. The sample included 691 mothers who gave birth in Southern California in 2002-2003. Using weighted logistic regression, we examined the EOML-maternity leave duration relationship, controlling for whether the leave was paid, as well as other occupational, personality and health-related covariates. Compared with mothers who were offered more than 12 weeks of maternity leave, mothers with <6 weeks of EOML and those offered 6-12 weeks had five times higher odds of returning to work within 12 weeks; those offered no leave had six times higher odds of an early return. These relationships were similar after controlling for whether the leave was paid and after controlling for other occupational and health characteristics. Access to and duration of employer-offered maternity leave significantly determine timing of return to work following childbirth, potentially affecting work-family balance. Policy makers should recognize the pivotal role of employers in offering job security during and after maternity leave and consider widening the eligibility criteria of the Family and Medical Leave Act. PMID:23504130

  11. Work-Supportive Family, Family-Supportive Supervision, Use of Organizational Benefits, and Problem-Focused Coping: Implications for Work–Family Conflict and Employee Well-Being

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Laurent M. Lapierre; Tammy D. Allen

    2006-01-01

    Employees (n = 230) from multiple organizations and industries were involved in a study assessing how work–family conflict avoidance methods stemming from the family domain (emotional sustenance and instrumental assistance from the family), the work domain (family-supportive supervision, use of telework and flextime), and the individual (use of problem-focused coping) independently relate to different dimensions of work–family conflict and to

  12. Family Work and Relationships: Lessons from Families of Men Whose Jobs Require Travel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zvonkovic, Anisa M.; Solomon, Catherine Richards; Humble, Aine M.; Manoogian, Margaret

    2005-01-01

    This study explores how family members experience their lives when family breadwinners must be absent from home because of their jobs. Informed by general systems theory and contextual perspectives, we described wives' family work that supports the breadwinner role and maintains the emotional connections among family members. From our findings…

  13. Group Work with Families of Nursing Home Residents

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Carole Cox; Paul H Ephross

    1989-01-01

    Group work with families of nursing home residents can play important functions in assisting families to overcome feelings of guilt and stress that often accompany placement of a relative in a home. The functions of the group are therapeutic in that they permit the families to express and deal with these feelings. The group also involves socialization functions in that

  14. A cross-cultural study of work\\/family demands, work\\/family conflict and wellbeing: the Taiwanese vs British

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Luo Lu; Robin Gilmour; Shu-Fang Kao; Mao-Ting Huang

    2006-01-01

    Purpose – The aim of the research is twofold: to explore relations between work\\/family demands, work-family conflict (WFC), family-work conflict (FWC) and wellbeing outcomes, and to contrast employees from an individualistic (UK) and a collectivistic (Taiwan) society. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – Heterogeneous samples of full-time employees in Taiwan and UK were surveyed using structured questionnaires. Findings – For both the Taiwanese and

  15. A cross-cultural study of work\\/family demands, work\\/family conflict and wellbeing: the Taiwanese vs

    Microsoft Academic Search

    British Luo Lu; Robin Gilmour; Shu-Fang Kao

    Purpose - The aim of the research is twofold: to explore relations between work\\/family demands, work-family conflict (WFC), family-work conflict (FWC) and wellbeing outcomes, and to contrast employees from an individualistic (UK) and a collectivistic (Taiwan) society. Design\\/methodology\\/approach - Heterogeneous samples of full-time employees in Taiwan and UK were surveyed using structured questionnaires. Findings - For both the Taiwanese and

  16. The magnitude, share and determinants of unpaid care costs for home-based palliative care service provision in Toronto, Canada.

    PubMed

    Chai, Huamin; Guerriere, Denise N; Zagorski, Brandon; Coyte, Peter C

    2014-01-01

    With increasing emphasis on the provision of home-based palliative care in Canada, economic evaluation is warranted, given its tremendous demands on family caregivers. Despite this, very little is known about the economic outcomes associated with home-based unpaid care-giving at the end of life. The aims of this study were to (i) assess the magnitude and share of unpaid care costs in total healthcare costs for home-based palliative care patients, from a societal perspective and (ii) examine the sociodemographic and clinical factors that account for variations in this share. One hundred and sixty-nine caregivers of patients with a malignant neoplasm were interviewed from time of referral to a home-based palliative care programme provided by the Temmy Latner Centre for Palliative Care at Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, Canada, until death. Information regarding palliative care resource utilisation and costs, time devoted to care-giving and sociodemographic and clinical characteristics was collected between July 2005 and September 2007. Over the last 12 months of life, the average monthly cost was $14 924 (2011 CDN$) per patient. Unpaid care-giving costs were the largest component - $11 334, accounting for 77% of total palliative care expenses, followed by public costs ($3211; 21%) and out-of-pocket expenditures ($379; 2%). In all cost categories, monthly costs increased exponentially with proximity to death. Seemingly unrelated regression estimation suggested that the share of unpaid care costs of total costs was driven by patients' and caregivers' sociodemographic characteristics. Results suggest that overwhelming the proportion of palliative care costs is unpaid care-giving. This share of costs requires urgent attention to identify interventions aimed at alleviating the heavy financial burden and to ultimately ensure the viability of home-based palliative care in future. PMID:23758771

  17. How Flexitime Eases Work/Family Tensions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ralston, David A.

    1990-01-01

    A little flexibility from an employer can keep an overextended female employee from having to choose between job and family. It allows more women to climb the corporate ladder while helping companies expand their talent pool and meet Equal Employment Opportunity Commission regulations. (Author)

  18. Understanding Work-Family Spillover in Hotel Managers

    PubMed Central

    Lawson, Katie M.; Davis, Kelly D.; Crouter, Ann C.; O’Neill, John W.

    2013-01-01

    The present study examined the experience of work-family spillover among 586 hotel managers (HMs) working in 50 full-service hotels throughout the U.S. Work-family spillover occurs when behaviors, moods, stresses, and emotions from work spill over into family. We first investigated which hotel managers were more likely to experience spillover and stressful work conditions based on their life circumstances (gender, parental status, age, decision-making latitude at work). Second, we investigated which work conditions (hours worked per week, organizational time expectations, emotional labor, and permeable boundaries) predicted more work-family spillover. Women, employees without children at home, and younger adults experienced the highest levels of negative work-family spillover. Work conditions, particularly organizational time expectations, put HMs at risk for experiencing more negative and less positive work-family spillover. The results provide evidence that modifying certain work conditions in the hotel industry may be helpful in improving the quality of HMs’ jobs and retention. PMID:23888092

  19. Understanding Work-Family Spillover in Hotel Managers.

    PubMed

    Lawson, Katie M; Davis, Kelly D; Crouter, Ann C; O'Neill, John W

    2013-06-01

    The present study examined the experience of work-family spillover among 586 hotel managers (HMs) working in 50 full-service hotels throughout the U.S. Work-family spillover occurs when behaviors, moods, stresses, and emotions from work spill over into family. We first investigated which hotel managers were more likely to experience spillover and stressful work conditions based on their life circumstances (gender, parental status, age, decision-making latitude at work). Second, we investigated which work conditions (hours worked per week, organizational time expectations, emotional labor, and permeable boundaries) predicted more work-family spillover. Women, employees without children at home, and younger adults experienced the highest levels of negative work-family spillover. Work conditions, particularly organizational time expectations, put HMs at risk for experiencing more negative and less positive work-family spillover. The results provide evidence that modifying certain work conditions in the hotel industry may be helpful in improving the quality of HMs' jobs and retention. PMID:23888092

  20. 46 CFR 545.2 - Interpretation of Shipping Act of 1984-Unpaid ocean freight charges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...Interpretation of Shipping Act of 1984-Unpaid ocean freight charges. 545.2 Section 545...MARITIME COMMISSION REGULATIONS AFFECTING OCEAN SHIPPING IN FOREIGN COMMERCE INTERPRETATIONS...Interpretation of Shipping Act of 1984—Unpaid ocean freight charges. Section...

  1. 46 CFR 545.2 - Interpretation of Shipping Act of 1984-Unpaid ocean freight charges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...Interpretation of Shipping Act of 1984-Unpaid ocean freight charges. 545.2 Section 545...MARITIME COMMISSION REGULATIONS AFFECTING OCEAN SHIPPING IN FOREIGN COMMERCE INTERPRETATIONS...Interpretation of Shipping Act of 1984—Unpaid ocean freight charges. Section...

  2. 46 CFR 545.2 - Interpretation of Shipping Act of 1984-Unpaid ocean freight charges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...Interpretation of Shipping Act of 1984-Unpaid ocean freight charges. 545.2 Section 545...MARITIME COMMISSION REGULATIONS AFFECTING OCEAN SHIPPING IN FOREIGN COMMERCE INTERPRETATIONS...Interpretation of Shipping Act of 1984—Unpaid ocean freight charges. Section...

  3. 46 CFR 545.2 - Interpretation of Shipping Act of 1984-Unpaid ocean freight charges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...Interpretation of Shipping Act of 1984-Unpaid ocean freight charges. 545.2 Section 545...MARITIME COMMISSION REGULATIONS AFFECTING OCEAN SHIPPING IN FOREIGN COMMERCE INTERPRETATIONS...Interpretation of Shipping Act of 1984—Unpaid ocean freight charges. Section...

  4. 46 CFR 545.2 - Interpretation of Shipping Act of 1984-Unpaid ocean freight charges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...Interpretation of Shipping Act of 1984-Unpaid ocean freight charges. 545.2 Section 545...MARITIME COMMISSION REGULATIONS AFFECTING OCEAN SHIPPING IN FOREIGN COMMERCE INTERPRETATIONS...Interpretation of Shipping Act of 1984—Unpaid ocean freight charges. Section...

  5. Advancing Measurement of Work and Family Domain Boundary Characteristics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Russell A.; Barnes-Farrell, Janet L.; Bulger, Carrie A.

    2010-01-01

    Recent research offers promising theoretical frameworks for thinking about the work-family interface in terms of the boundaries individuals develop around work and family. However, measures for important constructs proposed by these theories are needed. Using two independent samples, we report on the refinement of existing "boundary flexibility"…

  6. Faculty Sense of Agency in Decisions about Work and Family

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Meara, KerryAnn; Campbell, Corbin M.

    2011-01-01

    Over the last decade, many research universities have adopted policies and support mechanisms to help academic parents balance work and family. This study sought to understand what facilitates faculty agency in making decisions about work and family, including parental leave. We conducted 20 interviews with 5 men and 15 women at a research…

  7. Piecing Together Family Social Work in Mainland China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sim, Timothy

    2008-01-01

    As rapid economic and sociopolitical development brings about drastic changes in family structure and processes in China, many social concerns arise. Through a review of journal articles published over a period of 28 years (1979-2006) in social work and related disciplines in China, this article presents a glimpse of family social work using the…

  8. Piecing Together Family Social Work in Mainland China

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Timothy Sim

    2008-01-01

    As rapid economic and sociopolitical development brings about drastic changes in family structure and processes in China, many social concerns arise. Through a review of journal articles published over a period of 28 years (1979–2006) in social work and related disciplines in China, this article presents a glimpse of family social work using the China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) database.

  9. On Common Ground: Prominent Women Talk about Work & Family.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zuckerman, Diana, Ed.

    This publication presents interviews with 11 prominent women, representing different backgrounds, philosophies, and life experiences, in which they speak about their own experiences with work and family issues. The introduction, "On Common Ground: Prominent Women Talk about Work & Family" (Diana Zuckerman), provides an overview. The 11 interviews…

  10. PARENTS' LONG WORK HOURS AND THE IMPACT ON FAMILY LIFE

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lindy Fursman

    2009-01-01

    This article reports on findings from a multi-method study on long working hours and their impact on family life. It draws on data from the New Zealand 2006 Census, a review of the literature, and a small qualitative study involving in-depth interviews with 17 families with dependent children in which at least one partner was working long hours. The study

  11. Labor Project for Working Families Cornell ILR Labor Programs

    E-print Network

    Keinan, Alon

    New Approaches to Organizing Women and Young Workers Social Media & Work Family Issues #12;New Approaches to Organizing Women and Young Workers Social Media and Work Family Issues This report and innovative strategies and tools are being developed by young organizers using new technology and social media

  12. FATHERS, WORK & FAMILY Children thrive when parents are attentive

    E-print Network

    Feigon, Brooke

    changing? How can British work-family policies support children as well as parents and business? (FundedFATHERS, WORK & FAMILY Issues: Children thrive when parents are attentive and emotionally available'. The main questions asked: This Nuffield funded project investigated how low-risk imprisoned fathers

  13. Advancing measurement of work and family domain boundary characteristics

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Russell A. Matthews; Janet L. Barnes-Farrell; Carrie A. Bulger

    2010-01-01

    Recent research offers promising theoretical frameworks for thinking about the work–family interface in terms of the boundaries individuals develop around work and family. However, measures for important constructs proposed by these theories are needed. Using two independent samples, we report on the refinement of existing boundary flexibility measures. Additionally, inter-domain transitions are introduced as a theoretically sound conceptualization of the

  14. Meaning and Structure in the Work and Family Interface

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stefano Ba

    2010-01-01

    This article explores the work and family life of dual-earner parents, how they manage these commitments and how they respond to competing demands on their daily life. The analysis of qualitative data suggests that parents manage the work-family boundaries according to the specific meaning that they attach to these spheres of daily life, but it also points out at employment

  15. Work and Family Conflict: An Often Overlooked Issue in Couple and Family Therapy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Anthony W. Tatman; Alan J. Hovestadt; Paul Yelsma; David L. Fenell; Brian S. Canfield

    2006-01-01

    Despite the systemic interaction, family-based journals, as well as intake and assessment forms most frequently used by couple\\u000a and family therapists (CFTs), have given a limited amount of attention to the issue of work and family conflict. Moreover,\\u000a a review of the literature indicated that many CFTs perceive themselves as inadequately prepared to assist couples and families\\u000a with work and

  16. From "Work-Family" to "Work-Life": Broadening Our Conceptualization and Measurement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keeney, Jessica; Boyd, Elizabeth M.; Sinha, Ruchi; Westring, Alyssa F.; Ryan, Ann Marie

    2013-01-01

    Despite frequent reference to "work-life" issues in the organizational literature, little theoretical or empirical attention has been paid to nonwork areas beyond family. The purpose of the research described here is to move beyond work-family conflict to a broader conceptualization and measurement of work interference with life. A measure of work

  17. Boom, Bust & Beyond: The State of Working Arkansas. Arkansas Working Families Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huddleston, Richard; Duran, Angela

    Using data from several government and private sources and interviews with working families, this report examines the Arkansas economy, how Arkansas working families have fared economically in recent years, and their current challenges. The report offers suggestions about how the state can provide the tools families need to continue to move up the…

  18. Divided Allegiance: Men, Work, and Family Life.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berger, Michael; Wright, Larry

    1978-01-01

    The article expresses the philosophy that it is time for clinicians to support male clients in examining roles other than those that are traditionally male. It then goes on to follow the typical work life cycle of men in today's society and to describe alternative work-career patterns, while prescribing a complete societal change. (LPG)

  19. Adolescent Work Experiences and Family Formation Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Staff, Jeremy; VanEseltine, Matthew; Woolnough, April; Silver, Eric; Burrington, Lori

    2012-01-01

    A long-standing critique of adolescent employment is that it engenders a precocious maturity of more adult-like roles and behaviors, including school disengagement, substance use, sexual activity, inadequate sleep and exercise, and work-related stress. Though negative effects of high-intensity work on adolescent adjustment have been found, little…

  20. Social Support from Work and Family Domains as an Antecedent or Moderator of Work-Family Conflicts?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seiger, Christine P.; Wiese, Bettina S.

    2009-01-01

    On the basis of Conservation of Resources theory, we investigated how social support from supervisor, co-workers, life partner, and family members is associated with work-family conflicts in N=107 working mothers. We used data from a cross-sectional questionnaire and a standardized diary to examine two possible forms of interplay: (a) Social…

  1. Convergence between Measures of Work-to-Family and Family-to-Work Conflict: A Meta-Analytic Examination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mesmer-Magnus, Jessica R.; Viswesvaran, Chockalingam

    2005-01-01

    The overlap between measures of work-to-family (WFC) and family-to-work conflict (FWC) was meta-analytically investigated. Researchers have assumed WFC and FWC to be distinct, however, this assumption requires empirical verification. Across 25 independent samples (total N=9079) the sample size weighted mean observed correlation was .38 and the…

  2. [Decision on improving family planning work, 1992].

    PubMed

    1992-06-10

    This document contains a translation of a Decision on Family Planning (FP) reached by China's Zhejiany province. The Decision calls for party committees and government leaders at all levels to assume responsibility for implementation of the FP program. The Decision also calls for creation of responsibility contracts that will ensure implementation of the FP program through the grassroots level. Additional changes will involve 1) a gradual increase in the investment in FP projects, 2) education and development of FP cadres, and 3) strengthening of interdepartmental coordination. While seeking strengthened propaganda and education, the Decision also calls for progress in advancing prenatal care. PMID:12293808

  3. Hardships in America: The Real Story of Working Families

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Bernstein, Jared.

    2001-01-01

    This 115-page report, released by Economic Policy Institute (EPI) at the end of July 2001, "is the most comprehensive study of family hardships ever published." The report examines the plight of the working poor by determining basic family budgets for communities across the nation -- the amount of money a family needs for food, housing, utilities, child care, transportation, and health care -- and comparing these figures to wage statistics. The report concludes that two-and-a-half times more families fall beneath the basic family budget levels for their communities than fall below the federal poverty line.

  4. The effects of organizational and community embeddedness on work-to-family and family-to-work conflict.

    PubMed

    Ng, Thomas W H; Feldman, Daniel C

    2012-11-01

    The present study offers competing hypotheses regarding the relationships of changes in organizational and community embeddedness with changes in work-to-family and family-to-work conflict. Data were collected from 250 U.S. and 165 Chinese managers and professionals, all of whom were married, at 3 points in time over a 10-month period. Results suggest that increases in perceptions of organizational and community embeddedness are associated with increases in work-to-family conflict and family-to-work conflict over time. Further, we found that these effects were even stronger for employees with highly individualistic values. Thus, although much of the previous research has focused on the positive effects of employee embeddedness for individuals' work lives, the present study provides some evidence of the potentially negative effects of employee embeddedness for individuals' family lives. PMID:22730902

  5. Implications of work and community demands and resources for work-to-family conflict and facilitation.

    PubMed

    Voydanoff, Patricia

    2004-10-01

    Based on a differential salience approach, this article examines the combined effects of work and community demands and resources on work-to-family conflict and facilitation. The study uses information from 2,507 employed respondents from the 1995 National Survey of Midlife Development in the United States. The findings indicate that work demands are relatively strongly related to work-to-family conflict, whereas work resources are relatively more important in relation to work-to-family facilitation. Social incoherence and friend demands are positively related to work-to-family conflict, whereas sense of community and support from friends have positive effects on facilitation. Community resources also show weak amplifying effects on some of the positive relationships between work resources and work-to-family facilitation. The findings provide modest support for the hypotheses. PMID:15506845

  6. Satisfaction with work-family balance among German office workers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Barbara Beham; Sonja Drobni?

    2010-01-01

    Purpose – The paper seeks to examine the relationships between various work demands and resources and satisfaction with work-family balance in a sample of German office workers. Work-to-family conflict is expected to mediate several relationships between dependent and independent variables. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – A sample of 716 office workers from two service sector organizations in Germany participated in a comprehensive online

  7. A short and valid measure of work-family enrichment.

    PubMed

    Kacmar, K Michele; Crawford, Wayne S; Carlson, Dawn S; Ferguson, Merideth; Whitten, Dwayne

    2014-01-01

    The stream of research concerning work-family enrichment has generated a significant body of research because it plays an important role in occupational health (Masuda, McNall, Allen, & Nicklin, 2012). work-family enrichment has been defined as "the extent to which experiences in one role improve the quality of life in the other role" (Greenhaus & Powell, 2006, p. 73). Within work-family enrichment, there are two directions: work to family and family to work. Carlson, Kacmar, Wayne, and Grzywacz (2006) developed an 18-item scale to measure this construct. Although the scale has been shown to be both reliable and valid, it also requires work-family researchers to include a proportionally large number of items to capture this construct in a study. The goal of the current study was to isolate a subset of the items in this measure that produces results similar to the full version thereby providing a more streamlined scale for researchers. Using a five-sample study that follows the scale reduction procedures offered by Stanton, Sinar, Balzer, and Smith (2002), we provide evidence that scales containing only three items for each direction of enrichment produce results equivalent to the full scale with respect to reliability and discriminant, convergent, and predictive validity. Reducing the original scale by two thirds, without losing explanatory power, allows scholars to measure enrichment in the work and family domains more efficiently, which should help minimize survey time, lower refusal rates, and generate less missing data. PMID:24447219

  8. Work-family enrichment, work-family conflict, and marital satisfaction: a dyadic analysis.

    PubMed

    van Steenbergen, Elianne F; Kluwer, Esther S; Karney, Benjamin R

    2014-04-01

    This study was designed to examine whether spouses' work-to-family (WF) enrichment experiences account for their own and their partner's marital satisfaction, beyond the effects of WF conflict. Data were collected from both partners of 215 dual-earner couples with children. As hypothesized, structural equation modeling revealed that WF enrichment experiences accounted for variance in individuals' marital satisfaction, over and above WF conflict. In line with our predictions, this positive link between individuals' WF enrichment and their marital satisfaction was mediated by more positive marital behavior, and more positive perceptions of the partner's behavior. Furthermore, evidence for crossover was found. Husbands who experienced more WF enrichment were found to show more marital positivity (according to their wives), which related to increased marital satisfaction in their wives. No evidence of such a crossover effect from wives to husbands was found. The current findings not only highlight the added value of studying positive spillover and crossover effects of work into the marriage, but also suggest that positive spillover and crossover effects on marital satisfaction might be stronger than negative spillover and crossover are. These results imply that organizational initiatives of increasing job enrichment may make employees' marital life happier and can contribute to a happy, healthy, and high-performing workforce. PMID:24730427

  9. Is Family-to-Work Interference Related to Co-Workers' Work Outcomes?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ten Brummelhuis, Lieke L.; Bakker, Arnold B.; Euwema, Martin C.

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies have convincingly shown that employees' family lives can affect their work outcomes. We investigate whether family-to-work interference (FWI) experienced by the employee also affects the work outcomes of a co-worker. We predict that the employee's FWI has an effect on the co-worker's outcomes through the crossover of positive and…

  10. Changing University Work, Freedom, Flexibility and Family

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nikunen, Minna

    2012-01-01

    This article investigates what Finnish academics on short fixed-term contracts consider to be the effects of having children on work and careers. The study is framed by the context of the current state of the university sector, its neoliberal and entrepreneurial tendencies and its claims to meritocracy. Informants express relative happiness with…

  11. Family response to difficult hospitalizations: the phenomenon of 'working through'.

    PubMed

    Buttery, J; Eades, M; Frisch, S; Giguère, M; Mountjoy, A

    1999-07-01

    This paper describes the process and outcomes of a project to learn about qualitative research methods. A small study of family participation in decision-making was conducted with 7 family members who were interviewed after an inter-unit patient transfer. The data analysis used strategies derived from grounded theory, family life-cycle framework and storytelling. The interviews indicated respondents' concerns about the patient, their efforts to balance their lives during a time of disarray and their sorting through crises in their lives ('working through'). 'Working through' discourse has identifiable features, including: linking the past, present and future; refrains; rhetorical questions; and self-talk. Clinicians should encourage the 'working through' process by family during the hospitalization of a family member. PMID:10624263

  12. [The family-friendly hospital: (how) does it work?].

    PubMed

    Heller, A R; Heller, S C

    2009-06-01

    The demographic development in Germany is heading towards a significant shortage in specialists within the next 10-15 years with an increased demand for health services at the same time. The three-stage model of family life planning (work, family phase, return) will also be gradually replaced by a model of simultaneous compatibility of family and work. This change in values, although initiated by the parents themselves, may turn out to be a crucial countermeasure in national economy against the demography-related loss of qualified personnel. For these three trends the economic need arises to minimize family-related absence of our well-trained, motivated and reliable doctors from the clinical departments through implementation of family-friendly human resources policies and supporting measures by the employers. In a representative survey 26% of respondents with children had in the past already changed their workplace to ensure a better match of work and family duties. In this regard the compatibility of family and professional responsibilities had a higher impact on the selection of the employer than a high income. Accordingly, a work-life competence oriented business plan will represent the crucial factor within the competition between universities, hospitals and professional disciplines to attract high potential bearers although a sustained change of the traditional hospital culture is mandatory. Anaesthesia-related fields of development regarding family-friendly corporate governance are working hours and organization of work, part-time jobs even for managers and fathers, and staff development. In the hospital daily routine, in particular, creative solutions meeting the local demands are deemed necessary that do not involve the use of high financial resources. Family-friendly personnel policy not only arises from altruistic enthusiasm but also pays off economically. This article discusses the necessity, opportunities and threads of family-oriented hospital management and fields of action for anaesthesia departments. PMID:19484192

  13. Resilience across Contexts: Family, Work, Culture, and Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Ronald D., Ed.; Wang, Margaret C., Ed.

    Noting that much is known from research and practice regarding what works to promote resilience of children and families in a variety of high-risk life situations, this book considers the impact of culture, economy, employment, poverty, family structure, and social policy on parenting, child development, education, and the life success of youth.…

  14. Simulated Family Therapy Interviews in Clinical Social Work Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mooradian, John K.

    2007-01-01

    This article describes a learning method that employed theatre students as family clients in an advanced social work practice course. Students were provided with an opportunity to integrate and apply their learning of theory, clinical skills, and professional conduct in full-length family therapy sessions that occurred in the classroom and were…

  15. Family support work at the anna freud centre

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mary Donovan

    1999-01-01

    This paper outlines the context for the emergence and development of a family support service at the Anna Freud Centre. Its main aim is that of helping us think about the therapeutic space to which family support work belongs. Drawing on a range of case material, it describes a flexible and somewhat open-ended model of practice that is emerging in

  16. Poverty Among Working Families: Findings From Experimental Poverty Measures

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This report from the US Census Bureau explores poverty among working families. The report uses experimental measures based on recommendations from the National Academy of Sciences Panel of Poverty and Family Assistance, including the following elements: noncash government benefits, job-related expenses, child care costs, social security taxes, and out-of-pocket medical expenses.

  17. Family Roles and Work Values: Processes of Selection and Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirkpatrick Johnson, Monica

    2005-01-01

    This study focuses on whether marriage and parenthood influence work values after taking into account the influence of work values on family formation. In a recent panel of young adults (N=709), stronger extrinsic and weaker intrinsic work values during adolescence predicted marriage and parenthood 9 years out of high school. Controlling these…

  18. A Comparison of Japanese and American Work and Family Values.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engel, John W.

    In recent years, both American and Japanese people have experienced dramatic changes in the world of work. To compare Japanese and American work ethics and attitudes toward women's employment, Japanese and English versions of the Work/Family Ethic questionnaire were completed by 205 middle-aged Japanese and American adults. An analysis of the…

  19. Flexibility, the Family Ethic, and Rural Home-Based Work

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Christina E. Gringeri

    1995-01-01

    Flexibility is often considered an advantage to workers, especially women. This article shows, however, that, in relation to home-based work by rural women workers, flexibility, when set within the frame work of the family ethic, is often a trade-off for job security, wages, and other benefits. The author suggests that work can become flexible only when tasks are no longer

  20. Work Values and Job Satisfaction of Family Physicians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bouwkamp-Memmer, Jennifer C.; Whiston, Susan C.; Hartung, Paul J.

    2013-01-01

    Theory and prior research suggest linkages between work values and job satisfaction. The present study examined such linkages in a group of workers in a professional occupation. Family physicians (134 women, 206 men, 88% Caucasian) responded to context-specific measures of work values and job satisfaction. ANOVA results indicated a work values…

  1. Family Transmission of Work Affectivity and Experiences to Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porfeli, Erik J.; Wang, Chuang; Hartung, Paul J.

    2008-01-01

    Theory and research suggest that children develop orientations toward work appreciably influenced by their family members' own expressed work experiences and emotions. Cross-sectional data from 100 children (53 girls, 47 boys; mean age = 11.1 years) and structural equation modeling were used to assess measures of work affectivity and experiences…

  2. Group work with families of nursing home residents

    E-print Network

    Duncan, Richard Tillett

    1985-01-01

    GROUP WORK WITH FAMILIES OF NURSING HOME RESIDENTS A Thesis by RICHARD TILLETT DUNCAN Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1985 Major... Subject: Educational Psychology GROUP WORK WITH FAMILIES OF NURSING HOME RESIDENTS A Thesis by RICHARD TILLETT DUNCAN Approved as to style and content by: Michael Duffy (Chairman of Committee) Lannes Hope (Member) ndi Lutes (Member) Michae sh...

  3. Examining couple agreement about work-family conflict

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michelle Streich; Wendy J. Casper; Amy Nicole Salvaggio

    2008-01-01

    Purpose – This study aims to explore the nature of couple agreement about work-family conflict, adding to previous research by explicitly testing the extent to which couples agree when rating work interference with family (WIF) and the influence of this agreement on other outcomes. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – In total, 224 dual-earner couples were surveyed to assess their own WIF, as well

  4. Work-family conflict, family-supportive supervisor behaviors (FSSB), and sleep outcomes.

    PubMed

    Crain, Tori L; Hammer, Leslie B; Bodner, Todd; Kossek, Ellen Ernst; Moen, Phyllis; Lilienthal, Richard; Buxton, Orfeu M

    2014-04-01

    Although critical to health and well-being, relatively little research has been conducted in the organizational literature on linkages between the work-family interface and sleep. Drawing on conservation of resources theory, we use a sample of 623 information technology workers to examine the relationships between work-family conflict, family-supportive supervisor behaviors (FSSB), and sleep quality and quantity. Validated wrist actigraphy methods were used to collect objective sleep quality and quantity data over a 1 week period of time, and survey methods were used to collect information on self-reported work-family conflict, FSSB, and sleep quality and quantity. Results demonstrated that the combination of predictors (i.e., work-to-family conflict, family-to-work conflict, FSSB) was significantly related to both objective and self-report measures of sleep quantity and quality. Future research should further examine the work-family interface to sleep link and make use of interventions targeting the work-family interface as a means for improving sleep health. PMID:24730425

  5. 'It is hard for mums to put themselves first': how mothers diagnosed with breast cancer manage the sociological boundaries between paid work, family and caring for the self.

    PubMed

    Mackenzie, Catherine Ruth

    2014-09-01

    This paper aims to increase understanding of how mothers diagnosed with breast cancer while in the paid workforce experience and manage their multiple demands of taking care of themselves, their children and their paid work. In-depth, semi-structured interviews were conducted with 32 women who were mothers of dependent children and in the paid workforce at the time of their breast cancer diagnosis. The sample includes women living in urban and rural Australia. The study found that after a breast cancer diagnosis, participants tended to prioritise their health and wellbeing over paid work. Yet dominance of gendered identity meant that they tended to place the needs of family, especially children, above their own health and wellbeing. The key factors that influenced mothers' decisions to continue in, return to, or leave paid work after a breast cancer diagnosis included: a change in perspective regarding what was important in their lives; level of support from the workplace and home; the extent to which participating in paid work was a financial necessity; the extent to which their identity was connected to paid work, and; ongoing level of pain or fatigue. The paper concludes that using the sociological concepts of the fateful moment, boundary maintenance and a feminist ethic of care produces a more nuanced understanding of women's participation in paid work after breast cancer than examining paid workforce participation, or unpaid responsibilities and mothering, separately. The nature of the permeability or malleability of boundaries between work, family and taking care of the self affects women's participation in paid work during and/or after breast cancer treatment. Increased boundary permeability or malleability brought about more by cooperation than conflict facilitated positive experiences of re-negotiating boundaries, whereas increased permeability or malleability brought about more by conflict than cooperation created difficulties for women in finding an acceptable balance between their family, paid work and taking care of their own health after breast cancer. PMID:25063965

  6. Working Hard, Falling Short: America's Working Families and the Pursuit of Economic Security

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waldron, Tom; Roberts, Brandon; Reamer, Andrew

    2004-01-01

    The United States of America is often called the "land of opportunity," a place where hard work and sacrifice lead to economic success. Across generations, countless families have been able to live out that promise. However, more than one out of four American working families now earn wages so low that they have difficulty surviving financially.…

  7. Work, Family and Life-Course Fit: Does Control over Work Time Matter?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moen, Phyllis; Kelly, Erin; Huang, Qinlei

    2008-01-01

    This study moves from "work-family" to a multi-dimensional "life-course fit" construct (employees' cognitive assessments of resources, resource deficits, and resource demands), using a combined work-family, demands-control and ecology of the life course framing. It examined (1) impacts of job and home ecological systems on fit dimensions, and (2)…

  8. Balancing Work and Family: How Female Superintendents Succeed at Work and Home

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olesniewicz, Julie

    2012-01-01

    Women leaders in education struggle to balance work and family life. Historically, this struggle has stemmed from attempts to manage societal expectations of balancing work and family. In managing these expectations, women leaders face many challenges, which have made it difficult to maintain home responsibilities and deal with increasing demands…

  9. Who's working at home: The types of families engaged in home-based work

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Barbara R. Rowe; Kathryn Stafford; Alma J. Owen

    1992-01-01

    As increasing numbers of families attempt to balance their need for paid wages with household and child care responsibilities, and corporations struggle with employee flexibility and global competitiveness, there has been a renewed interest in the home as a work place. However, there is little literature on the kinds of families who engage in home-based work, where they live, the

  10. An empirical study of the selected consequences of frontline employees’ work–family conflict and family–work conflict

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Osman M. Karatepe; Lulu Baddar

    2006-01-01

    This study developed and tested a research model that examined the effects of work–family conflict (W–FCON) and family–work conflict (F–WCON) on a number of selected consequences using data collected from frontline employees in international five-star chain hotels in Jordan. The results demonstrated that W–FCON exerted a significant positive influence on job stress (JSTRESS), while F–WCON did not. Contrary to the

  11. Balancing Work and Family: Professional Development Needs of Extension Faculty

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Steven G. Jacob; William R. Summerhill; Larry R. Arrington

    This study was designed to identify workplace and individual factors that cause stress in the lives of Extension professionals and to determine baseline needs assessment data for professional development in the area of balancing work and family. A census-survey questionnaire (74 percent response rate) was utilized to explore balancing work and personal life issues among the population of University of

  12. Beyond Conflict: Functional Facets of the Work-Family Interplay

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiese, Bettina S.; Seiger, Christine P.; Schmid, Christian M.; Freund, Alexandra M.

    2010-01-01

    The present paper deals with three positive facets of the work-family interplay, i.e., transfer of competencies, transfer of positive mood, and cross-domain compensation. The latter refers to the experience that engagement in one domain helps dealing with failures in the other domain. In two correlational studies (N[subscript 1] = 107 working

  13. After the Baby: Work-Family Conflict and Working Mothers' Psychological Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marshall, Nancy L.; Tracy, Allison J.

    2009-01-01

    This study examines work and family characteristics and depressive symptomatology among over 700 working mothers of infants. Working mothers in poorer quality jobs, as well as working mothers who were single or whose infant's health was poorer than that of other infants, reported greater depressive symptomatology. The effect of job quality on…

  14. WorkLife Programs -Family Friendly Services Child Care Services Flexible Work Arrangements (FWA)

    E-print Network

    Fernández-Juricic, Esteban

    offerings for caregivers · Substance abuse assessments · Annual Family Caregiver Fair · Emergency · Purdue Working Parents Club · WorkLife Programs offerings on financial topics · WorkLife Programs offerings on parent/child topics · Resources on campus · WorkLife Programs Employee Assistance

  15. Toward a Conceptualization of Perceived Work-Family Fit and Balance: A Demands and Resources Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Voydanoff, Patricia

    2005-01-01

    Using person-environment fit theory, this article formulates a conceptual model that links work, family, and boundary-spanning demands and resources to work and family role performance and quality. Linking mechanisms include 2 dimensions of perceived work-family fit (work demands--family resources fit and family demands--work resources fit) and a…

  16. 7?Getting There from Here: Research on the Effects of Work–Family Initiatives on Work–Family Conflict and Business Outcomes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Erin L. Kelly; Ellen Ernst Kossek; Leslie B. Hammer; Mary Durham; Jeremy Bray; Kelly Chermack; Lauren A. Murphy; Dan Kaskubar

    2008-01-01

    Many employing organizations have adopted work–family policies, programs, and benefits. Yet managers in employing organizations simply do not know what organizational initiatives actually reduce work–family conflict and how these changes are likely to impact employees and the organization. We examine scholarship that addresses two broad questions: first, do work–family initiatives reduce employees’ work–family conflict and\\/or improve work–family enrichment? Second, does

  17. Interaction of Work and Family Stress on Fathers in Single and Dual-Earner Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dytell, Rita Scher; Schwartzberg, Neala S.

    While the effects of maternal employment on women have been highlighted in the literature, less attention has been given to the effects of maternal employment on men. This study examined the interaction of work sources and family sources of stress on the psychological health of men in single- and dual-earner families. Questionnaires on background…

  18. School Students' Learning from Their Paid and Unpaid Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Erica; Green, Annette

    A project carried out in New South Wales and South Australia examined ways in which Year 10, 11, and 12 students experience workplaces. A questionnaire administered to students in 13 schools received 1,451 responses. Case studies in five schools included interviews and focus groups with students and teachers. Interviews and focus groups with…

  19. Conflict between Work and Family among New Zealand Teachers with Dependent Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, Melanie; Rose, Dennis; Sanders, Matthew; Randle, Fiona

    2012-01-01

    Changes in family and employment patterns have lead to an increasing need for families to balance work and family roles. Little research has examined work and family conflict among teachers. In the present study, 69 New Zealand teachers completed a survey examining occupational-related demands, family-related demands, work and family conflict, and…

  20. Psychology at the Intersection of Work and Family: Recommendations for Employers, Working Families, and Policymakers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halpern, Diane F.

    2005-01-01

    Demographic data show that major changes have been occurring in the everyday lives of families over the last generation, with the majority of mothers of young children in the workforce and an increasing number of men and women assuming caregiving responsibilities for older relatives. Thus, the 2 primary identities of most adults, defined by their…

  1. Balancing Work and Family. Learning Guide 5. Project Connect. Linking Self-Family-Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emily Hall Tremaine Foundation, Inc., Hartford, CT.

    This learning guide is designed to connect personal, family, and job responsibilities for adults and out-of-school youth in economically depressed areas of the state (including transitional ex-offenders and corrections populations) so that these individuals learn to manage and balance these aspects of their lives in order to prepare for or…

  2. Traumatic death at work: consequences for surviving families.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Lynda R; Bohle, Philip; Quinlan, Michael; Rawlings-Way, Olivia

    2012-01-01

    Research and policy on occupational health and safety have understandably focused on workers as the direct victims of workplace hazards. However, serious illness, injury, or death at work also has cascading psychological, social, and economic effects on victims' families and close friends. These effects have been neglected by researchers and policymakers. The number of persons immediately affected by workplace death is significant, even in rich countries with relatively low rates of workplace fatality. Every year, more than 5,000 family members and close friends of Australian workers become survivors of traumatic work-related death (TWD). This study investigated the health, social, and financial consequences of TWD on surviving families. In-depth exploratory interviews were conducted with seven family members who had experienced TWD from one to 20 years before the interviews, with an average of three years. All reported serious health, social, and financial consequences, including prolonged grief and unresolved loss, physical health problems, family disruption and behavioral effects on children, immediate financial difficulties, and disturbance of longer-term commitments such as retirement planning. Recommendations for policy development and improved practice are proposed to minimize the trauma and suffering experienced by families, mitigate consequences, and improve outcomes following a TWD. PMID:23367798

  3. The role of the government in work-family conflict.

    PubMed

    Boushey, Heather

    2011-01-01

    The foundations of the major federal policies that govern today's workplace were put in place during the 1930s, when most families had a stay-at-home caregiver who could tend to the needs of children, the aged, and the sick. Seven decades later, many of the nation's workplace policies are in need of major updates to reflect the realities of the modern workforce. American workers, for example, typically have little or no control over their work hours and schedules; few have a right to job-protected access to paid leave to care for a family member. Heather Boushey examines three types of work-family policies that affect work-family conflict and that are in serious need of repair--those that govern hours worked and workplace equity, those that affect the ability of workers to take time off from work because their families need care, and those that govern the outsourcing of family care when necessary. In each case Boushey surveys new programs currently on the policy agenda, assesses their effectiveness, and considers the extent to which they can be used as models for a broader federal program. Boushey looks, for example, at a variety of pilot and experimental programs that have been implemented both by private employers and by federal, state, and local governments to provide workers with flexible working hours. Careful evaluations of these programs show that several can increase scheduling flexibility without adversely affecting employers. Although few Americans have access to paid family and medical leave to attend to family needs, most believe that businesses should be required to provide paid leave to all workers. Boushey notes that several states are moving in that direction. Again, careful evaluations show that these experimental programs are successful for both employers and employees. National programs to address child and elder care do not yet exist. The most comprehensive solution on the horizon is the universal prekindergarten programs offered by a few states, most often free of charge, for children aged three and four. PMID:22013633

  4. More Hard Times for New York's Working Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fischer, David Jason; Colton, Tara; Hilliard, Tom; Schimke, Karen

    2006-01-01

    There is broad consensus about what kind of economy and society New Yorkers would like to see over the decades to come: plentiful and remunerative jobs, reinvigorated communities from New York City to Oswego, and a safety net strong enough to facilitate upward mobility but infused with the values of work and family. Unfortunately, indications are…

  5. Collaboration: Working Together To Support Families. Program Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Padak, Nancy; Sapin, Connie

    This paper discusses collaboration as a process that can be used to support adult learners and families. The article distinguishes between collaboration, coordination, and cooperation; suggests ways to find collaborators; lists factors that promote or hinder collaboration; and provides guidelines for working with collaborators. A section on how to…

  6. Work-Family Conflict, Gender, and Parenthood, 1977-1997

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winslow, Sarah

    2005-01-01

    Although many observers assume that balancing the often-competing demands of work and family has become increasingly difficult in recent decades, little research has explicitly examined this proposition. This study examines this question by drawing on data from the 1977 Quality of Employment Survey and the 1997 National Study of the Changing…

  7. Health Coverage Instability for Mothers in Working Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Steven G.; Eamon, Mary Keegan

    2004-01-01

    Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, the authors examined the health insurance coverage stability of 1,667 women in working families over a three-year period (1995-1997). Findings revealed that coverage instability is common. Nearly one-half of low-income women experienced health coverage instability over the three-year study…

  8. Effective Management of Multiple Roles: Family and Work. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Couch, Anna Sue; And Others

    A model program was developed for helping parents, students, teachers, and businesspersons deal effectively with the interrelatedness of work and family responsibilities. Various research procedures, including focus group discussions and mail and telephone surveys administered to adolescent students' parents, and businesspersons in the Lubbock and…

  9. Daily Management of Work and Family Goals in Employed Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoppmann, Christiane A.; Klumb, Petra L.

    2012-01-01

    This study uses one-week time-sampling information from 104 employed parents with pre-school children to examine the association between daily workloads, control strategies, and goal progress. In addition, it examines relationships between work- and family-goal progress and important stress indices such as positive/negative affect and cortisol…

  10. Retail managers: stress and the work-family relationship

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Adelina Broadbridge

    1999-01-01

    Causes and effects of occupational stress have received research attention for several decades although increasing focus has been paid to it during the 1990s as organisations and individual workers attempt to adapt to accelerating rates of change. Previous research has proposed three hypotheses to explain the work-family relationship: spillover, compensation and independence. Drawing on qualitative research with retail managers from

  11. Reducing Teachers' Work-Family Conflict: From Theory to Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cinamon, Rachel Gali; Rich, Yisrael

    2005-01-01

    Work-family conflict is a vocational psychology variable whose antecedents and outcomes have been extensively investigated. In contrast, less effort has been invested in creating practical programs to prevent and reduce it. This article provides the rationale and describes the framework for a comprehensive organizational program designed to ease…

  12. The Internet and Academics' Workload and Work-Family Balance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heijstra, Thamar M.; Rafnsdottir, Gudbjorg Linda

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this article is to analyse whether the Internet and other ICT technologies support a work-family balance amongst academics. The study is based on 20 in-depth interviews with academics in Iceland and analysed according to the Grounded Theory Approach. This study challenges the notion that the Internet, as part of ICT technology, makes it…

  13. Opening Doors: Students' Perspectives on Juggling Work, Family, and College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matus-Grossman, Lisa; Gooden, Susan

    Information gathered in focus groups of current, former, and potential students at six community colleges was used to explore institutional and personal access and retention issues faced by students seeking a workable balance of their college, work, and family responsibilities. The six community colleges were as follows: Cabrillo College (Aptos,…

  14. The Relationship between Core Self-Evaluations and Work and Family Satisfaction: The Mediating Role of Work-Family Conflict and Facilitation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyar, Scott L.; Mosley, Donald C., Jr.

    2007-01-01

    This study examines the impact of work-family conflict and work-family facilitation on work and family outcomes and explores the influence of core self-evaluations (CSE) among these relationships. CSE is comprised of self-esteem, neuroticism, locus of control, and general self-efficacy. CSE was found to be negatively related to work interfering…

  15. The Family. Preserving America's Future. A Report to the President from the White House Working Group on the Family.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Domestic Policy Council, Washington, DC.

    The White House Working Group on the Family was mandated to study how government at all levels could be made supportive of American families (i.e., how a pro-family policy could be implemented). This report on the status of family life in the United States opens with guidelines by which to judge public policy and its effects on the family. The…

  16. WORKPLACE SOCIAL SUPPORT AND WORK–FAMILY CONFLICT: A META-ANALYSIS CLARIFYING THE INFLUENCE OF GENERAL AND WORK–FAMILY-SPECIFIC SUPERVISOR AND ORGANIZATIONAL SUPPORT

    PubMed Central

    KOSSEK, ELLEN ERNST; PICHLER, SHAUN; BODNER, TODD; HAMMER, LESLIE B.

    2011-01-01

    This article uses meta-analysis to develop a model integrating research on relationships between employee perceptions of general and work–family-specific supervisor and organizational support and work–family conflict. Drawing on 115 samples from 85 studies comprising 72,507 employees, we compared the relative influence of 4 types of workplace social support to work–family conflict: perceived organizational support (POS); supervisor support; perceived organizational work–family support, also known as family-supportive organizational perceptions (FSOP); and supervisor work–family support. Results show work–family-specific constructs of supervisor support and organization support are more strongly related to work–family conflict than general supervisor support and organization support, respectively. We then test a mediation model assessing the effects of all measures at once and show positive perceptions of general and work–family-specific supervisor indirectly relate to work–family conflict via organizational work–family support. These results demonstrate that work–family-specific support plays a central role in individuals’ work–family conflict experiences. PMID:21691415

  17. The effect of positive and negative work-family interaction on exhaustion : Does work social support make a difference?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Osman M. Karatepe

    2010-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to develop and test a conceptual model, which investigates the effects of work-family conflict, family-work conflict, work-family facilitation, and family-work facilitation simultaneously on exhaustion. This study also aims to examine work social support as a moderator in the relationship between two directions of conflict and facilitation and exhaustion. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – Data for

  18. Work and family life: parental work schedules and child academic achievement

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chrissy D. Vincent; Barbara L. Neis

    2011-01-01

    This review essay deals with interconnectivity between work life and family life. Specifically, it explores the relationship between parental work schedules and child academic achievement. Existing research focused on that relationship has been somewhat narrow in scope and has largely ignored the issue of underlying mechanisms. This review essay seeks to address those shortcomings by introducing a conceptual framework that

  19. Longitudinal Associations between Maternal Work Stress, Negative Work-Family Spillover, and Depressive Symptoms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodman, W. Benjamin; Crouter, Ann C.

    2009-01-01

    The current study examined associations over an 18-month period between maternal work stressors, negative work-family spillover, and depressive symptoms in a sample of 414 employed mothers with young children living in six predominantly nonmetropolitan counties in the Eastern United States. Results from a one-group mediation model showed that a…

  20. Work-Life Compendium, 2001: 150 Canadian Statistics on Work, Family & Well-Being.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Karen L.; Lero, Donna S.; Rooney, Jennifer A.

    The issue of integrating work and family responsibilities has been the subject of federal, provincial, and territorial policy planning and several task forces in Canada. This report plus executive summary, designed to inform the dialogue and stimulate continued discussion, brings together a wide variety of work-life facts and figures related to…

  1. Work and Family: Flexible Working Arrangements = Le Travail et la Famille: Conditions de Travail Flexibles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ontario Women's Directorate, Toronto.

    Working in partnership with the Ontario Women's Directorate, Camco Inc. has taken a planned approach in determining appropriate workplace initiatives to help its employees address the issue of balancing paid work and family responsibilities. Camco surveyed employees to identify their needs and determine what kinds of programs would best respond to…

  2. When Work Just Isn't Enough: Measuring Hardships Faced by Families after Moving from Welfare to Work. Briefing Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boushey, Heather; Gundersen, Bethney

    This paper examined the extent to which families faced hardships in moving from welfare to work, highlighting: families who received Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC) during the last month of the Survey of Income and Program Participation or the National Survey of American Families; families who received other public assistance in the…

  3. Working Poor Families with Children, Summary Report [and] Children in Working Poor Families. Final Report to the Foundation for Child Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wertheimer, Richard F.

    Although it is likely that there will be a substantial number of children who remain poor in spite of considerable work effort by their parents as families leave welfare roles, there has been relatively little research on children in working poor families. The primary purpose of this project is to develop a definition of working poor families and…

  4. Strategies for Promoting a Work-Family Agenda. Report Number 973.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedman, Dana E.; Johnson, Arlene A.

    This document, which is intended to help individual managers and task forces committed to development of a work-family agenda, is based on recommendations of the Work and Family Research Council, which is composed of 35 advocates of work-family policies within U.S. firms. Basic strategies for promoting (marketing) work-family programs within…

  5. Leadership Style of School Head-Teachers and Their Colleague's Work-Family Conflict

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tatlah, Ijaz Ahmed; Quraishi, Uzma

    2010-01-01

    This paper aims to investigate the relationship of people-oriented and task-oriented leadership styles with the work-family and family-work conflicts and the intensity of mutual relationship between work-family and family-work conflicts. Data for the research were collected through a survey of public sector elementary and secondary school teachers…

  6. Gender-Specific Perceptions of Four Dimensions of the Work/Family Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Innstrand, Siw Tone; Langballe, Ellen Melbye; Falkum, Erik; Espnes, Geir Arild; Aasland, Olaf Gjerlow

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was twofold. The first intention was to examine the factorial validity of a work/family interaction in terms of the direction of influence (work-to-family vs. family-to-work) and type of effect (conflict vs. facilitation). Second, gender differences along these four dimensions of work/family interaction were explored. Data…

  7. Relationships of work–family conflict with business and marriage outcomes in Taiwanese copreneurial women

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Melien Wu; Chen-Chieh Chang; Wen-Long Zhuang

    2010-01-01

    This study used bidirectional interrole conflict measures to examine the permeability of work and family domains, and to further investigate the relationships of work–family conflict with business and marriage outcomes in copreneurial women. Analytical results from 202 Taiwanese copreneurial women were summarized as follows: (1) family boundaries were more permeable than work domains; (2) work–family conflict is negatively related to

  8. Working in partnership with vulnerable families: the experience of child and family health practitioners.

    PubMed

    Rossiter, Chris; Fowler, Cathrine; Hopwood, Nick; Lee, Alison; Dunston, Roger

    2011-01-01

    Family circumstances in infancy are persistent and powerful determinants of children's physical and mental health, influencing inequalities that trace from childhood through to adulthood. While the social factors that perpetuate patterns of inequality are more complex than can be addressed through single interventions, child and family health (CFH) services represent crucial sites where trajectories of inequality can be disrupted. In particular, approaches that foster opportunities for practitioner-parent engagement that challenge traditional hierarchical health care practice, such as the Family Partnership Model (FPM), are recommended as ways of addressing disadvantage. Little is known about how practitioners implement models of working in partnership with families and, consequently, there is a gap in understanding how best to develop and sustain these new CFH practices. This paper reports a research project that investigated the experiences of 25 health professionals working within a FPM framework with vulnerable families. Through discussion of four key themes - redefining expertise, changing practices, establishing new relationships with parents and the complexities of partnership practice - the paper offers first-hand accounts of reframing practices that recognise the needs, skills and expertise of parents and thus contribute to empowerment of families. PMID:22112707

  9. Work-to-Family Conflict, Positive Spillover, and Boundary Management: A Person-Environment Fit Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Zheng; Powell, Gary N.; Greenhaus, Jeffrey H.

    2009-01-01

    This study adopted a person-environment fit approach to examine whether greater congruence between employees' preferences for segmenting their work domain from their family domain (i.e., keeping work matters at work) and what their employers' work environment allowed would be associated with lower work-to-family conflict and higher work-to-family

  10. Differences in wage rates for males and females in the health sector: a consideration of unpaid overtime to decompose the gender wage gap

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In Australia a persistent and sizable gender wage gap exists. In recent years this gap has been steadily widening. The negative impact of gender wage differentials is the disincentive to work more hours. This implies a substantial cost on the Australian health sector. This study aimed to identify the magnitude of gender wage differentials within the health sector. The investigation accounts for unpaid overtime. Given the limited availability of information, little empirical evidence exists that accounts for unpaid overtime. Methods Information was collected from a sample of 10,066 Australian full-time employees within the health sector. Initially, ordinary least-squares regression was used to identify the gender wage gap when unpaid overtime was included and then excluded from the model. The sample was also stratified by gender and then by occupation to allow for comparisons. Later the Blinder–Oaxaca decomposition method was employed to identify and quantify the contribution of individual endowments to wage differentials between males and females. Results The analyses of data revealed a gender wage gap that varied across occupations. The inclusion of unpaid overtime in the analysis led to a slight reduction in the wage differential. The results showed an adjusted wage gap of 16.7%. Conclusions Unpaid overtime made a significant but small contribution to wage differentials. Being female remained the major contributing factor to the wage gap. Given that wage differentials provide a disincentive to work more hours, serious attempts to deal with the skilled labour shortage in the health sector need to address the gender wage gap. PMID:23433245

  11. Ten Adaptive Strategies for Family and Work Balance: Advice from Successful Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haddock, Shelley A.; Zimmerman, Toni Schindler; Ziemba, Scott J.; Current, Lisa R.

    2001-01-01

    Investigated adaptive strategies of middle class, dual earner couples (N=47) with children that are successfully managing family and work. Guided by grounded-theory methodology, analysis of interview data revealed these successful couples structured their lives around 10 major strategies. Each strategy is defined and illustrated through the…

  12. Working conditions and Work-Family Conflict in German hospital physicians: psychosocial and organisational predictors and consequences

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Isabelle Fuss; Matthias Nuebling; Hans-Martin Hasselhorn; David Schwappach; Monika A. Rieger

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Germany currently experiences a situation of major physician attrition. The incompatibility between work and family has been discussed as one of the major reasons for the increasing departure of German physicians for non-clinical occupations or abroad. This study investigates predictors for one particular direction of Work-Family Conflict – namely work interfering with family conflict (WIF) – which are located

  13. Preliminary Validation of the Work-Family Integration-Blurring Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Desrochers, Stephan; Hilton, Jeanne M.; Larwood, Laurie

    2005-01-01

    Several studies of telecommuting and working at home have alluded to the blurring line between work and family that can result from such highly integrated work-family arrangements. However, little is known about working parents' perceptions of the integration and blurring of their work and family roles. In this study, the authors created and…

  14. Job Level, Demands, and Resources as Antecedents of Work-Family Conflict

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiRenzo, Marco S.; Greenhaus, Jeffrey H.; Weer, Chisty H.

    2011-01-01

    Although substantial research has examined the conflict that employees experience between their work and family roles, the literature has not investigated the prevalence and antecedents of work-family conflict for individuals who work at different levels of an organization. This study examines differences in work-family conflict (work interference…

  15. The Real-World Problem of Care Coordination: A Longitudinal Qualitative Study with Patients Living with Advanced Progressive Illness and Their Unpaid Caregivers

    PubMed Central

    Daveson, Barbara A.; Harding, Richard; Shipman, Cathy; Mason, Bruce L.; Epiphaniou, Eleni; Higginson, Irene J.; Ellis-Smith, Clare; Henson, Lesley; Munday, Dan; Nanton, Veronica; Dale, Jeremy R.; Boyd, Kirsty; Worth, Allison; Barclay, Stephen; Donaldson, Anne; Murray, Scott

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To develop a model of care coordination for patients living with advanced progressive illness and their unpaid caregivers, and to understand their perspective regarding care coordination. Design A prospective longitudinal, multi-perspective qualitative study involving a case-study approach. Methods Serial in-depth interviews were conducted, transcribed verbatim and then analyzed through open and axial coding in order to construct categories for three cases (sites). This was followed by continued thematic analysis to identify underlying conceptual coherence across all cases in order to produce one coherent care coordination model. Participants Fifty-six purposively sampled patients and 27 case-linked unpaid caregivers. Settings Three cases from contrasting primary, secondary and tertiary settings within Britain. Results Coordination is a deliberate cross-cutting action that involves high-quality, caring and well-informed staff, patients and unpaid caregivers who must work in partnership together across health and social care settings. For coordination to occur, it must be adequately resourced with efficient systems and services that communicate. Patients and unpaid caregivers contribute substantially to the coordination of their care, which is sometimes volunteered at a personal cost to them. Coordination is facilitated through flexible and patient-centered care, characterized by accurate and timely information communicated in a way that considers patients’ and caregivers’ needs, preferences, circumstances and abilities. Conclusions Within the midst of advanced progressive illness, coordination is a shared and complex intervention involving relational, structural and information components. Our study is one of the first to extensively examine patients’ and caregivers’ views about coordination, thus aiding conceptual fidelity. These findings can be used to help avoid oversimplifying a real-world problem, such as care coordination. Avoiding oversimplification can help with the development, evaluation and implementation of real-world coordination interventions for patients and their unpaid caregivers in the future. PMID:24788451

  16. An examination of the perceived direction of work-family conflict

    E-print Network

    Huffman, Ann Hergatt

    2005-02-17

    ??????????????. 15 Social Support???????????????? 17 Supervisor Support?????...?????? 18 Family Support?????????????. 19 Gender Roles????????????????. 20 Societal Roles???????????????? 24 Work-Family Interface Summary???????????. 25 Measuring...???????????????... 30 Role Salience????????????????. 30 vi Page Social Support???????????????? 31 Gender Roles????????????????. 32 Social Norm Responses???????????? 33 Work-Family Conflict????????????.. 33 Source of Work-Family Conflict...

  17. Work and Family Research in the First Decade of the 21st Century

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bianchi, Suzanne M.; Milkie, Melissa A.

    2010-01-01

    Scholarship on work and family topics expanded in scope and coverage during the 2000-2010 decade, spurred by an increased diversity of workplaces and of families, by methodological innovations, and by the growth of communities of scholars focused on the work-family nexus. We discuss these developments as the backdrop for emergent work-family

  18. Family Social Work Practice: From Therapy to Policy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNeece, C. Aaron

    1995-01-01

    Discusses the lack of a comprehensive family policy in the United States and how it affects family therapy and social services. Although ideas about what constitutes a family has changed, what exists of U.S. family policy has not. Argues that family policy and family therapy are becoming mutually exclusive concepts. (JPS)

  19. Preliminary Validation of the Work-Family Integration-Blurring Scale

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stephan Desrochers; Jeanne M. Hilton; Laurie Larwood

    2005-01-01

    Several studies of telecommuting and working at home have alluded to the blurring line between work and family that can result from such highly integrated work-family arrangements. However, little is known about working parents’ perceptions of the integration and blurring of their work and family roles. In this study, the authors created and validated the Work-Family Integration-Blurring Scale using a

  20. On the integration of fighting poverty with family planning work.

    PubMed

    Zhou, H

    1991-10-01

    New approaches to family planning (FP) are being applied in poor areas of China. Poverty programs are being integrated into FP programs. The current situation reveals that 679 poor counties were helped to increase per capita income. Between 1986 and 1988, per capita income of farmers rose from 245 yuan to 331.1 yuan, or a 14.2% increase. Between 1985-88, the population earning 200 yuan dropped from 64.54 million to 22.565 million, or from 39.5% to 9.9% of the total population. The reason given for poverty is unchecked population growth. Poverty is concentrated in 8 provinces and autonomous regions. This population also has a total fertility rate for married women of childbearing age of 3.0 compared with 2.47 nationally. 7 out of the 8 provinces are known to be ethnic border provinces that are economically and educationally backward. The approach to fighting poverty is to develop production with assistance from the state and society. Difficulties involve a high dependency ratio and the lower accumulation of family wealth. In 32 counties in Sichuan, survey results reveal 15.4% fewer working age persons in poor families, and the dependency ratio in poor families an average of 34.2 higher. A successful integrated program occurred in the mountainous areas of Jinzhai County of Anhui Province. Population had soared from 320,000 in the 1950s to 546,000 in 1978. Children/family varied from 3-5 to 9-10. A policy to require approval of a 2nd birth only after income reaches 300 yuan was implemented. For those practicing FP, economic development is provided. Between 1979-89, the birth rate of Jinzhai County dropped from 17.69/1000 to 12.67/1000, and the natural increase from 11.45/1000 to 7.1/1000. Quality of life had improved such that by 1989 90.1% of poor families had enough food and clothing. The net per capita income was 301 yuan in 1989. The ways in which FP and fighting poverty can be integrated are fourfold. 1) It must be part of the overall strategy of socioeconomic development, with FP in the target management of responsibility system and contract responsibility system. 2) Consistency is required between programs. Family income should be a requirement for additional children and economic support provided for those responding. 3) Measures to prevent additional unplanned births must be provided. 4) Good coordination of departments requires FP officials in poverty programs and vice versa. PMID:12285199

  1. Work, gender, and stress in family cancer caregiving

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Joseph E. Gaugler; William C. Given; Jeanette Linder; Ritesh Kataria; Galina Tucker; William F. Regine

    2008-01-01

    Goals of work  The objective of this study was to examine whether employment status and gender was associated with family cancer caregivers’\\u000a reports of stress and well-being.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Materials and methods  Using a correlational, cross-sectional survey design, this study included 183 primary caregivers (i.e., those individuals\\u000a who provided the most help to persons with cancer). Caregivers were recruited in a radiation oncology cancer

  2. [Promoting family planning work in Xiaqidu township by establishing a family planning association in each village].

    PubMed

    Li, C

    1987-07-01

    A family planning association was established in each village of Xiaqidu Township in Hunan Province, China in October 1986. The positive functions of each such association were so fully developed that family planning work reached new levels. For example, most villages are no longer experiencing early marriages or unplanned births. Some of the villages have established associations for individual work groups. The traditional method was for both township and village associations to rely upon the positive attitudes of officials to instill into fertile women Party policy, and to arouse their patriotism and initiative. By establishing family planning associations at the village level, however, the people can conduct their own affairs and educate themselves. Emphasis has been placed on attracting into the associations those who are of childbearing age, as well as older villagers of experience. The associations' raison d'etre was to serve the people. They did so through: propaganda (disseminating population theory, birth control and family planning information); helping the people overcome poverty, traditional thinking, and ignorance; assisting women with any problems and anxieties relating to child-bearing; delivering contraceptives to households; and providing the elderly with care and the young with education. PMID:12159303

  3. Cultural perspective on work and family: dual-earner Israeli-Jewish and Arab families at the transition to parenthood.

    PubMed

    Feldman, R; Masalha, S; Nadam, R

    2001-09-01

    Parents' functioning in the work and family roles was examined in traditional and modern societies at the transition to parenthood. Participants were 162 dual-earner Israeli-Jewish and Arab families, who were interviewed and observed in dyadic and triadic interactions. Arab parents reported better adaptation to work following the first childbirth, and the triadic family process in Jewish families was more cohesive. Child care arrangements, part-time employment, easier infant temperament, and lower separation anxiety predicted maternal readaptation to work. Traditional sex-role attitudes, career centrality, full-time employment, and marital satisfaction predicted fathers' work adaptation. Parents' family focus, marital satisfaction, and responsive parenting correlated with a cohesive triadic process. Discussion considered the impact of nuclear- and extended-family living arrangements on the emerging work and family roles in young couples. PMID:11584798

  4. 45 CFR 261.25 - Do we count Tribal families in calculating the work participation rate?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 false Do we count Tribal families in calculating the work participation...Relating to Public Welfare OFFICE OF FAMILY ASSISTANCE (ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS), ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN AND FAMILIES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN...

  5. 45 CFR 261.25 - Do we count Tribal families in calculating the work participation rate?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 true Do we count Tribal families in calculating the work participation...Relating to Public Welfare OFFICE OF FAMILY ASSISTANCE (ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS), ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN AND FAMILIES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN...

  6. 45 CFR 261.25 - Do we count Tribal families in calculating the work participation rate?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 true Do we count Tribal families in calculating the work participation...Relating to Public Welfare OFFICE OF FAMILY ASSISTANCE (ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS), ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN AND FAMILIES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN...

  7. 45 CFR 261.25 - Do we count Tribal families in calculating the work participation rate?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 false Do we count Tribal families in calculating the work participation...Relating to Public Welfare OFFICE OF FAMILY ASSISTANCE (ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS), ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN AND FAMILIES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN...

  8. 45 CFR 261.25 - Do we count Tribal families in calculating the work participation rate?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 false Do we count Tribal families in calculating the work participation...Relating to Public Welfare OFFICE OF FAMILY ASSISTANCE (ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS), ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN AND FAMILIES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN...

  9. Is There a Downside to Schedule Control for the Work-Family Interface?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schieman, Scott; Young, Marisa

    2010-01-01

    Using data from a 2007 U.S. survey of workers, this article examines the implications of schedule control for work-family role blurring and work-family conflict. Four main findings indicate that (a) schedule control is associated with more frequent working at home and work-family multitasking activities; (b) the positive association between…

  10. Women, Work, and Family: Bernard's Perspective on the Past, Present, and Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Voydanoff, Patricia

    1988-01-01

    Reviews Jessie Bernard's writings on women, work, and family. Explores the dilemmas of caring, the feminization of work, work and family roles over the life course, and the two worlds of women and men. Suggests implications for future research on women's work and family roles. (BH)

  11. Changing Workplaces to Reduce Work-Family Conflict: Schedule Control in a White-Collar Organization

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Erin L.; Moen, Phyllis; Tranby, Eric

    2011-01-01

    Work-family conflicts are common and consequential for employees, their families, and work organizations. Can workplaces be changed to reduce work-family conflict? Previous research has not been able to assess whether workplace policies or initiatives succeed in reducing work-family conflict or increasing work-family fit. Using longitudinal data collected from 608 employees of a white-collar organization before and after a workplace initiative was implemented, we investigate whether the initiative affects work-family conflict and fit, whether schedule control mediates these effects, and whether work demands, including long hours, moderate the initiative’s effects on work-family outcomes. Analyses clearly demonstrate that the workplace initiative positively affects the work-family interface, primarily by increasing employees’ schedule control. This study points to the importance of schedule control for our understanding of job quality and for management policies and practices. PMID:21580799

  12. Partnerships at Work: Lessons Learned from Programs and Practices of Families, Professionals and Communities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bishop, Kathleen Kirk, Ed.; Taylor, Mary Skidmore, Ed.; Arango, Polly, Ed.

    Designed to celebrate family/interprofessional collaborative partnerships, this publication describes high-quality examples of how families and professionals at the family, community, state, and national levels have worked together to create programs and practices that are family-friendly and responsive to what families have said they want and…

  13. The place of family therapy in the Australian undergraduate social work curricula: Literature and research findings

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Andrew Wood

    1997-01-01

    Given the renewed interest in the family as a unit of attention and intervention in social work, as evidenced by the family preservation movement and recent family oriented child protection legislation adopted in a number of Australian states, this paper argues that it is important and timely to examine the place of family theory and family therapy in the undergraduate

  14. Work Roles, Management and Perceived Well-being for Married Women within Family Businesses

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yoon G. Lee; Sharon M. Danes; Mack C. Shelley

    2006-01-01

    The study uses the National Family Business Survey and is grounded in the systemic Sustainable Family Business Model. It investigated the relationship between management activity of married women within family businesses and perceived well-being controlling for work roles, family context, personal and financial resources. Statistical analyses indicated that successfully achieving the most important family goal was positively related to management

  15. Positive and Negative Effects of Family Involvement on Work-Related Burnout

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ten Brummelhuis, Lieke L.; van der Lippe, Tanja; Kluwer, Esther S.; Flap, Henk

    2008-01-01

    We aimed to explain the influence of family involvement on feelings of burnout among employees who combine work and family tasks. As proxies for family involvement, we used the family structure (partner, number and age of children) and family tasks (e.g. hours spent on household chores). We compared conflict theory and enrichment theory, and…

  16. Supervisor Support, Work-Family Conflict, and Satisfaction Outcomes: An Empirical Study in the Hotel Industry

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Osman M. Karatepe; Orhan Uludag

    2008-01-01

    The current study developed and tested a model that investigated the relationship of supervisor support with work-family conflict and family-work conflict and the effects of both directions of conflict with family satisfaction, career satisfaction, and life satisfaction. The model also examined the impact of supervisor support on family and career satisfaction outcomes and the effects of these satisfaction variables on

  17. An Examination of the Selected Antecedents and Outcomes of Work-Family Conflict and Family-Work Conflict in Frontline Service Jobs

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Osman M. Karatepe; Hasan Kilic; Bengi Isiksel

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop and test a model that investigates the selected antecedents and consequences of work-family conflict and family-work conflict in frontline service jobs. Data were obtained from a sample of full-time frontline employees in Northern Cyprus hotels as its setting. The results of the path analysis showed that negative affectivity (NA) amplified employees' work-family

  18. Does Work Experience Actually Work?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Field, John

    2012-01-01

    As unemployment levels rise, so education and training move into the policy spotlight. For the government, this is a very uncomfortable place to be right now. A number of large companies have withdrawn from the flagship Work Programme--under which jobseekers are invited to take up unpaid work placements of between two and eight weeks--amid…

  19. Do Work Demands and Resources Predict Work-to-Family Conflict and Facilitation? A Study of Iranian Male Employees

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Leila Karimi; Aboulghasem Nouri

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the effects of some work demands-resources on two dimensions of work-to-family interface among Iranian\\u000a employees. The results of canonical correlation and multiple-regression showed that among work resources (i.e., social support\\u000a and autonomy), social support was associated negatively with work-to-family conflict and autonomy was associated positively\\u000a with work-to-family facilitation. Also, among work demands (i.e., job demands and working

  20. [Decision on family planning work of 7 March 1990].

    PubMed

    1990-05-11

    The full decision in 7 parts of the Fujian Provincial CPC Committee and Government on Family Planning (FP) Work on March 7, 1990 is reported. A general statement about population growth in Fujian urges a stop to unplanned births, early marriages, and early childbearing. Section 1 pertains to cooperative leadership at all levels of party committees and governments in strengthening FP. The call is for integration of FP with economic development in accordance with the law, available cultivated land/capita, and population growth. Leadership in FP must come from the highest levels and be integrated into normal routines with provision for manpower, material, and financial resources. Local party committees and government must supervise FP work in units at all levels according the Central Committee and State Council's directives. Members of the Communist Youth League need to be actively involved. Section 2 pertains to establishing a responsibility system at various levels in order to meet targets, particularly in the next 3 years. Average annual rate of natural population growth should not exceed 13% and should be maintained at 11.33% for 1990. Couples must stay with 1 child/family and reduce unplanned births. Evaluation of work is dependent on fulfilling FP responsibilities for leaders at all levels. Rewards and punishments are to be established. Review of FP occurs annually for individuals and units, and a progress report sent to the People's Congress at the appropriate level of the Standing Committee. Accurate statistics need to be compiled. Section 3 stipulates that FP work is be carried out within the confines of provincial law. Strict enforcement of regulations is necessary. Approval is necessary for a 2nd child, and this regulation needs to be closely monitored. The position recommended is marrying and childbearing late and having only 1 child. Prevention is the key. Rewards and punishments pertain to government or party members. Social welfare benefits for those abiding by the regulations should be expanded. In section 4, emphasis is placed on rural areas lagging behind. Section 5 calls for old age homes and insurance for the aged, which could be funded from the unplanned birth funds, and a fund for women workers' childbearing and social security system. Section 7 promotes education about population, living conditions, and the legal system and propaganda on population and FP at all ages. Population theory and adolescence science need to be incorporated into the curriculum. Section 7 is concerned with increasing the collaboration between FP associations and party and government workers, both past and present. In section 8, the means of strengthening FP work is detailed. PMID:12285788

  1. Rhythms of Life: Antecedents and Outcomes of Work-Family Balance in Employed Parents

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Samuel Aryee; E. S. Srinivas; Hwee Hoon Tan

    2005-01-01

    This study examined antecedents and outcomes of a fourfold taxonomy of work-family balance in terms of the direction of influence (work-family vs. family-work) and type of effect (conflict vs. facilitation). Respondents were full-time employed parents in India. Confirmatory factor analysis results provided evidence for the discriminant validity of M. R. Frone's (2003) fourfold taxonomy of work-family balance. Results of moderated

  2. Work-family culture and job satisfaction: does gender and parenting status alter the relationship?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Saija Mauno; Ulla Kinnunen; Taru Feldt

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies on work-family culture have examined its relationship with different employee outcomes (e.g., work-family conflict, job satisfaction, commitment) but neglected one important question; namely, who are most likely to benefit from a supportive work-family culture in terms of positive employee outcomes? The aim of this study was to shed new light on the work-family culture–job satisfaction linkage by examining

  3. Work-family culture and job satisfaction: does gender and parenting status alter the relationship?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Saija Mauno; Ulla Kinnunen; Taru Feldt

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies on work-family culture have examined its relationship with different employee outcomes (e.g., work-family conflict, job satisfaction, commitment) but neglected one important question; namely, who are most likely to benefit from a supportive work-family culture in terms of positive employee outcomes? The aim of this study was to shed new light on the work-family culture–job satisfaction linkage by examining

  4. Do the benefits of family-to-work transitions come at too great a cost?

    PubMed

    Carlson, Dawn S; Kacmar, K Michele; Zivnuska, Suzanne; Ferguson, Merideth

    2015-04-01

    This research examines the impact of role boundary management on the work-family interface, as well as on organizational (job embeddedness) and family (relationship tension) outcomes. First, we integrate conservation of resources theory with crossover theory, to build a theoretical model of work-family boundary management. Second, we extend prior work by exploring positive and negative paths through which boundary management affects work and family outcomes. Third, we incorporate spouse perceptions to create a dynamic, systems-perspective explanation of the work-family interface. Using a matched sample of 639 job incumbents and their spouses, we found that family-to-work boundary transitions was related to the job incumbents' work-to-family conflict, work-to-family enrichment, and job embeddedness as well as the boundary management strain transmitted to the spouse. We also found that the boundary management strain transmitted to the spouse mediated the relationship between family-to-work boundary transitions and both work-to-family conflict and work-to-family enrichment. Finally, we found significant indirect effects between family-to-work boundary transitions and job embeddedness and relationship tension through both the boundary management strain transmitted to the spouse and the incumbent's work-family conflict, but not through work-family enrichment. Thus, family-to-work boundary transitions offer some benefits to the organization by contributing to job embeddedness, but they also come at a cost in that they are associated with work-family conflict and relationship tension. We discuss the study's implications for theory, research, and practice while suggesting new research directions. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:25365628

  5. Health and Turnover of Working Mothers after Childbirth via the Work-Family Interface: An Analysis across Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlson, Dawn S.; Grzywacz, Joseph G.; Ferguson, Merideth; Hunter, Emily M.; Clinch, C. Randall; Arcury, Thomas A.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined organizational levers that impact work-family experiences, participant health, and subsequent turnover. Using a sample of 179 women returning to full-time work 4 months after childbirth, we examined the associations of 3 job resources (job security, skill discretion, and schedule control) with work-to-family enrichment and the…

  6. Quality of Work Life as a Mediator Between Emotional Labor and Work Family Interference

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Francis Yue-Lok Cheung; Catherine So-Kum Tang

    2009-01-01

    Purpose  We adopted the conservation of resources model (COR, Hobfoll Am Psychol 44:513–524, 1989; Hobfoll in Stress, culture, and community: the psychology and philosophy of stress, Plenum, New York, 1998) to examine the associations among emotional labor, work family interference, and quality of work life.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Design\\/Methodology\\/Approach  Cross-sectional, self-reported data were obtained from 442 Hong Kong Chinese service employees.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Findings  Correlation and hierarchical regression

  7. Working with Military Families Through Deployment and Beyond

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Julie Anne Laser; Paul M. Stephens

    2011-01-01

    Military families experience considerable stress, periods of long separation, and changes to the family system due to family\\u000a members planning to enter a war zone, actively living in a war zone, and reuniting after being in a war zone. Anticipation\\u000a and understanding of the stages of deployment improves family, couple and individual functioning. The issues that the family\\u000a and the

  8. "Flexible Work Arrangements: Managing the Work-Family Boundary" by B. Gottlieb, E. K. Kelloway, and E. Barham. Book Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daly, Kerry

    1999-01-01

    Finds that Gottlieb et al.'s work provides an excellent overview of flexible work arrangements in a variety of work organizations for managers, human-resources professionals, and employees. Considers the work an excellent primer presenting useful information about alternative work arrangements, factors involved in work/family clashes,…

  9. Interrole Conflicts and the Permeability of Work and Family Domains: Are There Gender Differences?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bruce W. Eagle; Edward W. Miles; Marjorie L. Icenogle

    1997-01-01

    Multiple measures of bidirectional interrole conflict were used to determine whether work and family domains were asymmetrically permeable. Family boundaries were more permeable than work boundaries in that demands of the work role were permitted to intrude more so in one's family role than vice versa. No gender differences were found in the pattern of asymmetry. Theoretical implications are discussed.

  10. Work-Family Boundary Strategies: Stability and Alignment between Preferred and Enacted Boundaries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ammons, Samantha K.

    2013-01-01

    Are individuals bounding work and family the way they would like? Much of the work-family boundary literature focuses on whether employees are segmenting or integrating work with family, but does not explore the boundaries workers would like to have, nor does it examine the fit between desired and enacted boundaries, or assess boundary stability.…

  11. Work-Family Conflict, Perceived Supervisor Support and Organizational Commitment among Brazilian Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casper, Wendy Jean; Harris, Christopher; Taylor-Bianco, Amy; Wayne, Julie Holliday

    2011-01-01

    The current study examines a variety of relationships pertaining to work-family conflict among a sample of Brazilian professionals, in order to shed light on work-family issues in this cultural context. Drawing from the cultural values of Brazil and social identity theory, we examine the relationships of two directions of work-family conflict…

  12. Examining the Constructs of Work-to-Family Enrichment and Positive Spillover

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Masuda, Aline D.; McNall, Laurel A.; Allen, Tammy D.; Nicklin, Jessica M.

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports three studies examining construct validity evidence for two recently developed measures of the positive side of the work-family interface: work-to-family positive spillover (WFPS; Hanson, Hammer, & Colton, 2006) and work-to-family enrichment (WFE; Carlson, Kacmar, Wayne, & Grzywacz, 2006). Using confirmatory factor analysis, the…

  13. Understanding the roles of subjective and objective aspects of time in the work-family interface

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alicia G. Dugan; Russell A. Matthews; Janet L. Barnes-Farrell

    2012-01-01

    The experience of time has been posited as an important predictor of work-family conflict; however, few studies have considered subjective and objective aspects of time conjointly. This study examined the reported number of hours dedicated to work and family as indices of objective aspects of time, and perceived time pressure (in the work and family domains respectively) as an important

  14. Work-family boundary management strategies: examining outcomes, and the role of fit

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Madhura Chakrabarti

    2011-01-01

    As more and more people attempt to effectively manage the simultaneous demands of work and family, researchers are now trying to investigate the various ways by which people choose to do so. The present study investigated the concept of boundary management strategies that describes the work-family interface in terms of cognitive, physical, and behavioral boundaries between work and family domains

  15. Work-family boundary management strategies: Examining outcomes, and the role of fit

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Madhura Chakrabarti

    2011-01-01

    As more and more people attempt to effectively manage the simultaneous demands of work and family, researchers are now trying to investigate the various ways by which people choose to do so. The present study investigated the concept of boundary management strategies that describes the work-family interface in terms of cognitive, physical, and behavioral boundaries between work and family domains

  16. Understanding the roles of subjective and objective aspects of time in the work-family interface

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alicia G. Dugan; Russell A. Matthews; Janet L. Barnes-Farrell

    2011-01-01

    The experience of time has been posited as an important predictor of work-family conflict; however, few studies have considered subjective and objective aspects of time conjointly. This study examined the reported number of hours dedicated to work and family as indices of objective aspects of time, and perceived time pressure (in the work and family domains respectively) as an important

  17. Conflict, facilitation, and individual coping styles across the work and family domains

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Denise M. Rotondo; Joel F. Kincaid

    2008-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to explore the relationships between four general coping styles, work and family conflict, and work and family facilitation in a simultaneous equations framework Design\\/methodology\\/approach – Data from the MIDUS study were analyzed using two-staged least squares regression to incorporate the reciprocity between the work and family domains into the model. Hypotheses about

  18. Work-family enrichment as a mediator between organizational interventions for work-life balance and job outcomes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rupashree Baral; Shivganesh Bhargava

    2010-01-01

    Purpose – This paper aims to examine the role of work-family enrichment in the relationships between organizational interventions for work-life balance (job characteristics, work-life benefits and policies, supervisor support and work-family culture) and job outcomes (job satisfaction, affective commitment and organizational citizenship behaviour). It is hypothesized that organizational interventions for work-life balance will be positively related to job outcomes and

  19. Opening Doors: Students' Perspectives on Juggling Work, Family, and College

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Diaz, Melisa.

    2002-01-01

    A Manpower Demonstration Research Corporation's report, Opening Doors: Students' Perspectives on Juggling Work, Family, and College sheds light on factors sometimes overlooked by legislators and policymakers as they seek to better the circumstances of America's underclass. Recognizing the critical role of education and vocational training in improving upward mobility, key players effectively fail to appreciate that access to higher education means very little to those already overburdened with substantial work and childcare responsibilities. Focusing exclusively on educational opportunities afforded by large metropolitan community college systems, the study examined an ethnically diverse array of students grouped in three categories: one currently attending a community college, one that had failed to complete a degree or certificate program, and one that had never matriculated in such a program but which hoped to at some point. As readers of the report will discover, the desire to move up the socio-economic ladder through higher education is pronounced across a broad spectrum of America's low-wage population, if only they can find the time, the money, and the broader systemic support necessary to realize such achievements.

  20. WORK EXPERIENCE REQUIREMENT FOR FAMILY AND CONSUMER SCIENCE EDUCATION

    E-print Network

    de Doncker, Elise

    Hospitals Nursing Homes Extended Care Facilities Domestic Shelters Parent Education Programs Catholic Family of university-level courses EXCLUSIVE of the student teaching experience. CATEGORIES AREA 1: FAMILY Substitute Teaching in Family and Consumer Sciences courses Community education programs in Life Skills

  1. Play Therapy: A Paradigm for Work with Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keith, David V.; Whitaker, Carl A.

    1981-01-01

    Provides a partial list of similarities between play therapy and family therapy and reviews methods for using play with families. Considers the question of indications and contraindications for play therapy with families. Clinical examples are utilized to illustrate throughout the paper. (Author)

  2. Identity work: young disabled people, family and sport

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hayley Fitzgerald; David Kirk

    2009-01-01

    It has long been recognised that family is an important arena in which sporting tastes and interests are nurtured. Indeed, for many young people the family introduces them to and then provides ongoing support for engaging in sport. Research has also indicated that the family has a significant position in the lives of young disabled people. In this paper we

  3. Families of Working Wives Spending More on Services and Nondurables.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, Eva; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Data from the 1984-86 Consumer Expenditure Survey were used to examine effects of a wife's labor force participation on family income and expenditures. Findings indicate that families with employed wives spend significantly more on food away from home, child care, women's apparel, and gasoline than do families in which the wife stays at home. (CH)

  4. The Work-Family Support Roles of Child Care Providers across Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bromer, Juliet; Henly, Julia R.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a qualitative investigation of the work-family support roles of a sample of 29 child care providers serving low-income families in the Chicago area (16 family, friend, and neighbor providers (FFN), 7 licensed family child care providers (FCC), and 6 center-based teachers). Providers report offering low-income parents…

  5. The Well-Being of Children in Working Poor Families: Report of a Meeting. Working Paper Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Sheila, Ed.

    The number of children in working poor families is expected to increase as a result of welfare reform. This report summarizes the discussion of scholars, policy experts, and leaders of the Foundation for Child Development regarding research and policy on children in families headed by adults working in low-wage jobs. Key findings regarding…

  6. Not Babysitting: Work Stress and Well-Being for Family Child Care Providers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerstenblatt, Paula; Faulkner, Monica; Lee, Ahyoung; Doan, Linh Thy; Travis, Dnika

    2014-01-01

    Family child care providers contend with a number of work stressors related to the dual roles of operating a small business and providing child care in their home. Research has documented many sources of work related stress for family child care providers; however, research examining family child care providers' experiences outside of the…

  7. Employment Capital: How Work Builds and Protects Family Wealth and Security

    E-print Network

    Fraden, Seth

    Employment Capital: How Work Builds and Protects Family Wealth and Security Hannah Thomas, Janet income and expenditures, household wealth and debt, their work history, family financial and non and Wealth Interviewing young families in the late 1990s, when the economy was growing and prosperous

  8. Family Ranching and Farming: A Consensus Management Model to Improve Family Functioning and Decrease Work Stress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zimmerman, Toni Schindler; Fetsch, Robert J.

    1994-01-01

    Notes that internal and external threats could squeeze ranch and farm families out of business. Offers six-step Consensus Management Model that combines strategic planning with psychoeducation/family therapy. Describes pilot test with intergenerational ranch family that indicated improvements in family functioning, including reduced stress and…

  9. Health and Turnover of Working Mothers After Childbirth Via the Work–Family Interface: An Analysis Across Time

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, Dawn S.; Grzywacz, Joseph G.; Ferguson, Merideth; Hunter, Emily M.; Clinch, C. Randall; Arcury, Thomas A.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined organizational levers that impact work–family experiences, participant health, and subsequent turnover. Using a sample of 179 women returning to full-time work 4 months after childbirth, we examined the associations of 3 job resources (job security, skill discretion, and schedule control) with work-to-family enrichment and the associations of 2 job demands (psychological requirements and nonstandard work schedules) with work-to-family conflict. Further, we considered subsequent impact of work-to-family conflict and enrichment on women’s health (physical and mental health) 8 months after women returned to work and the impact of health on voluntary turnover 12 months after women returned to work. Having a nonstandard work schedule was directly and positively related to conflict, whereas schedule control buffered the effect of psychological requirements on conflict. Skill discretion and job security, both job resources, directly and positively related to enrichment. Work-to-family conflict was negatively related to both physical and mental health, but work-to-family enrichment positively predicted only physical health. Physical health and mental health both negatively influenced turnover. We discuss implications and opportunities for future research. PMID:21604833

  10. On the socioeconomic benefits of family planning work.

    PubMed

    Yang, D

    1991-01-01

    The focus of this article is on 1) the intended socioeconomic benefit of Chinese family planning (FP) versus the benefit of the maternal production sector, 2) the estimated costs of FP work, 3) and the principal ways to lower FP costs. Marxian population theory, which is ascribed to in socialist China, states that population and socioeconomic development are interconnected and must adapt to each other and that an excessively large or small population will upset the balance and retard development. Malthusians believe that large populations reduce income, and Adam Smith believed that more people meant a larger market and more income. It is believed that FP will bring socioeconomic benefits to China. The socioeconomic benefit of material production is the linkage between labor consumption and the amount of labor usage with the fruits and benefits of labor. FP invests in human, material, and financial resources to reduce the birth rate and the absolute number of births. The investment is recouped in population. The increased national income generated from a small outlay to produce an ideal population would be used to improve material and cultural lives. FP brings economic benefits and accelerates social development (ecological balances women's emancipation and improvement in the physical and mental health of women and children, improvement in cultural learning and employment, cultivation of socialist morality and new practices, and stability). In computing FP cost, consideration is given to total cost and unit cost. Cost is dependent on the state budget allocation, which was 445.76 million yuan in 1982 and was doubled by 1989. World Bank figures for 1984 affixed the FP budget in China at 979.6 million US dollars, of which 80% was provided by China. Per person, this means 21 cents for central, provincial, prefecture, and country spending, 34 cents for rural collective set-ups, 25 cents for child awards, and various subsidies, 15 cents for sterilization, and 5 cents for rural medical services, or 1 US dollar/person. Unit costs are the costs to reduce the population of one and include direct and indirect costs. The unit cost between 1970-82 was 35.5 yuan, but if outlays for families and industrial units are included, the cost was 70-100 yuan. Population growth, however, must be balanced so that aging does not cancel out the benefits from FP gains. Lower costs can be achieved by better FP administration. PMID:12343682

  11. Work–family climate, organizational commitment, and turnover: Multilevel contagion effects of leaders ?

    PubMed Central

    O’Neill, John W.; Harrison, Michelle M.; Cleveland, Jeannette; Almeida, David; Stawski, Robert; Crouter, Anne C.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents empirical research analyzing the relationship between work–family climate (operationalized in terms of three work–family climate sub-scales), organizational leadership (i.e., senior manager) characteristics, organizational commitment and turnover intent among 526 employees from 37 different hotels across the US. Using multilevel modeling, we found significant associations between work–family climate, and both organizational commitment and turnover intent, both within and between hotels. Findings underscored the importance of managerial support for employee work–family balance, the relevance of senior managers’ own work–family circumstances in relation to employees’ work outcomes, and the existence of possible contagion effects of leaders in relation to work–family climate. PMID:19412351

  12. Working with Families of Young Children with Special Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McWilliam, R. A., Ed.

    2010-01-01

    This user-friendly book presents research-based best practices for serving families of children with special needs from birth to age 6. Expert contributors demonstrate how early intervention and early childhood special education can effectively address a wide range of family concerns, which in turn optimizes children's development and learning.…

  13. Working with Different Cultural Patterns & Beliefs: Teachers & Families Learning Together

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Purcell-Gates, Victoria; Lenters, Kimberly; McTavish, Marianne; Anderson, Jim

    2014-01-01

    Rogoff (2003) argues that "Human development is a cultural process….People develop as participants in cultural communities" (p. 3). Children develop within families, and different cultures reflect differences in how they structure activity for this development. For example, middle class North American families generally would not permit…

  14. Family Bonding with Universities. NBER Working Paper No. 15493

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meer, Jonathan; Rosen, Harvey S.

    2009-01-01

    One justification offered for legacy admissions policies at universities is that they bind entire families to the university. Proponents maintain that these policies have a number of benefits, including increased donations from members of these families. We use a rich set of data from an anonymous selective research institution to investigate…

  15. Work, Health, and Family at Older Ages in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Raymo, James M.; Liang, Jersey; Kobayashi, Erika; Sugihara, Yoko; Fukaya, Taro

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate ways in which the relationship between health and labor force exit at older ages is moderated by family characteristics. Using two waves of data from a national sample of older Japanese men collected 1999 and 2002, we estimate logistic regression models for labor force exit beyond age 63 as a function of health change, family characteristics, and their interactions. We confirm that poor health is strongly associated with labor force exit and find evidence that moderating influences of family context depend upon the level of health. However, results are only partially consistent with hypotheses that the relationship between health and the likelihood of labor force exit should be stronger for (a) those with good health and family incentives to exit the labor force and (b) those with poor health and family incentives to remain in the labor force. PMID:23082037

  16. Examining Behavioural Coping Strategies as Mediators between Work-Family Conflict and Psychological Distress

    PubMed Central

    Shamsuddin, Khadijah

    2015-01-01

    We examined the mediating role of behavioral coping strategies in the association between work-family conflict and psychological distress. In particular, we examined the two directions of work-family conflict, namely, work interference into family and family interference into work. Furthermore, two coping styles in this study were adaptive and maladaptive coping strategies. This cross-sectional study was conducted among 429 Malaysian working women using self-reported data. The results of mediational analysis in the present study showed that adaptive coping strategy does not significantly mediate the effect of work-family conflict on psychological distress. However, maladaptive coping strategies significantly mediate the effect of work-family conflict on psychological distress. These results show that adaptive coping strategies, which aimed to improve the stressful situation, are not effective in managing stressor such as work-family conflict. We found that experiencing interrole conflict steers employees toward frequent use of maladaptive coping strategies which in turn lead to psychological distress. Interventions targeted at improvement of coping skills which are according to individual's needs and expectation may help working women to balance work and family demands. The important issue is to keep in mind that effective coping strategies are to control the situations not to eliminate work-family conflict. PMID:25695097

  17. Work-Family Conflict and Psychosocial Work Environment Stressors as Predictors of Job Stress in a Cross-Cultural Study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Suchitra Pal; Per Øystein Saksvik

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this cross-cultural study was to investigate the relationship between work-family conflict (WFC), family-work conflict (FWC), job demands, job control, social support, flexibility in working hours, and job stress. The sample consisted of 27 doctors and 328 nurses from Norway, as well as 111 doctors and 136 nurses from India. The results indicate that predictors of job stress

  18. Coping with work-family conflict: The reciprocal and additive contributions of personal coping and organizational family-friendly support

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Anit Somech; Anat Drach-Zahavy

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to test three alternative models – additive, interactive, and reciprocal – of the relationship between personal coping strategies and formal organizational family-friendly supports in mitigating work-family conflict (WFC). Altogether 474 employees in Israel having a partner and children and representing diverse professions and organizations were surveyed. The additive model, that is, personal coping and

  19. [The work profile of family caregivers of persons affected by HIV/AIDS].

    PubMed

    Bischofberger, Iren; Spirig, Rebecca

    2004-06-01

    In Switzerland, HIV incidence has increased considerably during the past two years. This fact has raised concern both in the media and in the health care system. However family caregivers have not been considered in these debates, although their figures are increasing as well. In Switzerland, a few research studies were conducted focussing on the situation of family caregivers affected by HIV/AIDS. This particular qualitative research project focuses on the questions as to what kind of work these family caregivers are doing, under which conditions they are working, and which consequences arise from their work. Data were collected by conducting eleven semi-structured interviews, and data analysis was done through a content analysis. Results show that family caregivers provide a wide range and a large amount of family work. Not only are family caregivers working for the HIV-positive persons, but also for the benefit of other family members and friends as well as for themselves. Family caregivers achieve mainly stable life situations for their HIV-positive family member. The discussion focuses on the dynamics of family work which requires constant adaptations in daily life. In addition, ordinary family work needs to be noticed and appreciated in symbolic, social, and financial terms. Finally, implications for nursing practice are considered. PMID:15281357

  20. The family empowerment program: an interdisciplinary approach to working with multi-stressed urban families.

    PubMed

    Cleek, Elizabeth N; Wofsy, Matt; Boyd-Franklin, Nancy; Mundy, Brian; Howell Lcsw, Tamika J

    2012-06-01

    The family empowerment program (FEP) is a multi-systemic family therapy program that partners multi-stressed families with an interdisciplinary resource team while remaining attached to a "traditional" mental health clinic. The rationale for this model is that far too often, families presenting at community mental health centers struggle with multiple psychosocial forces, for example problems with housing, domestic violence, child care, entitlements, racism, substance abuse, and foster care, as well as chronic medical and psychiatric illnesses, that exacerbate symptoms and impact traditional service delivery and access to effective treatment. Thus, families often experience fragmented care and are involved with multiple systems with contradictory and competing agendas. As a result, services frequently fail to harness the family's inherent strengths. The FEP partners the family with a unified team that includes representatives from Entitlements Services, Family Support and Parent Advocacy, and Clinical Staff from the agency's Outpatient Mental Health Clinic practicing from a strength-based family therapy perspective. The goal of the FEP is to support the family in achieving their goals. This is accomplished through co-construction of a service plan that addresses the family's needs in an efficient and coherent manner-emphasizing family strengths and competencies and supporting family self-sufficiency. PMID:22690861

  1. [To raise the family planning work to a new level--a comprehensive introduction to the National Family Planning Working Conference].

    PubMed

    Peng, Z L

    1982-11-29

    The National Family Planning Working Conference convened on August 10-16, 1982 in Beijing, China. Among the 250 conferees were family planning representatives from various provinces, cities, autonomous regions, the People's Liberation Armt, representatives of partial progressive areas, counties, communes, the Central Committee, State Council, All China Women's Federation, All China Federation of Trade Unions, journalists and population theorists. Topics of discussion included the current situation of family planning work, how to implement the Central Committee's directive on improving family planning work, and the relationship between population law and population development by the year 2000. On August 18 Premier Zhao Ziyang told various representatives at a meeting that population control was a longterm national policy and emphasized its importance in long-range economic and social planning. The Vice-premier of the Chinese People's Political Consultative Conference, Wang Shoudao, implored the representatives to understand the directive's contents and said family planning would serve later generations. The Chairman of the National Family Planning Commission, Quian Xinzhong, reviewed the current population situation, noting the encouraging fact that the birth rate for the first 6 months of 1982 was higher than the first 6 months in 1981 by only 1/1000. In order to raise birth control work to a new level, he suggested the following steps: strengthen family planning propaganda; strenuously follow the policy of 1 child per family; obtain permission to have a 2nd child; oppose unplanned births; establish various birth control responsibility systems; and improve contraceptive research and techniques. PMID:12159365

  2. Getting There from Here: Research on the Effects of Work–Family Initiatives on Work–Family Conflict and Business Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    KELLY, ERIN L.; KOSSEK, ELLEN ERNST; HAMMER, LESLIE B.; DURHAM, MARY; BRAY, JEREMY; CHERMACK, KELLY; MURPHY, LAUREN A.; KASKUBAR, DAN

    2009-01-01

    Many employing organizations have adopted work–family policies, programs, and benefits. Yet managers in employing organizations simply do not know what organizational initiatives actually reduce work–family conflict and how these changes are likely to impact employees and the organization. We examine scholarship that addresses two broad questions: first, do work–family initiatives reduce employees’ work–family conflict and/or improve work–family enrichment? Second, does reduced work–family conflict improve employees’ work outcomes and, especially, business outcomes at the organizational level? We review over 150 peer-reviewed studies from a number of disciplines in order to summarize this rich literature and identify promising avenues for research and conceptualization. We propose a research agenda based on four primary conclusions: the need for more multi-level research, the necessity of an interdisciplinary approach, the benefits of longitudinal studies that employ quasi-experimental or experimental designs and the challenges of translating research into practice in effective ways. PMID:20589229

  3. The Arts and Family Social Work: A Call for Advancing Practice, Research, and Education

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nicholas Mazza

    2009-01-01

    This brief report serves as a call for creative and artistic works relative to family social work. Recognizing the “art” of family social work, Mazza's (2003) multidimensional poetry therapy practice model is used as a framework for addressing all arts-based approaches to practice and research.

  4. Work-Family Relations among Mothers of Children with Learning Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Yagon, Michal; Cinamon, Rachel Gali

    2008-01-01

    The study examined conflict and facilitation in work-family relations among working mothers of children with learning disorders (LD) or with typical development. The study also focused on three maternal personal resources (maternal anxious/avoidant attachment security, affect and sense of coherence) as antecedents of these work-family relations,…

  5. Beyond Family-Friendly: The Construct and Measurement of Singles-Friendly Work Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casper, Wendy J.; Weltman, David; Kwesiga, Eileen

    2007-01-01

    Although research has examined work-family issues and organizational support for employees' family responsibilities, few studies have explored the work-life issues of single employees without children. The current study examines single employees' perceptions of how their organizations support their work-life balance in comparison to employees with…

  6. Work-Family Balance and Energy: A Day-Level Study on Recovery Conditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanz-Vergel, Ana Isabel; Demerouti, Evangelia; Moreno-Jimenez, Bernardo; Mayo, Margarita

    2010-01-01

    The present study examines whether daily recovery inhibiting and enhancing conditions predict day-levels of work-family conflict (WFC), work-family facilitation (WFF), exhaustion and vigor. Forty-nine individuals from various professional backgrounds in Spain provided questionnaire and daily survey measures over a period of five working days.…

  7. The Relation between Work-Family Balance and Quality of Life.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenhaus, Jeffrey H.; Collins, Karen M.; Shaw, Jason D.

    2003-01-01

    The relationship between work-family balance and quality of life was assessed for 353 accounting professionals. Those who spent more time on family than work experienced higher quality of life than balanced individuals, who experienced higher quality than those who spent more time on work. Findings were similar for level of involvement balance and…

  8. The Arts and Family Social Work: A Call for Advancing Practice, Research, and Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazza, Nicholas

    2009-01-01

    This brief report serves as a call for creative and artistic works relative to family social work. Recognizing the "art" of family social work, Mazza's (2003) multidimensional poetry therapy practice model is used as a framework for addressing all arts-based approaches to practice and research.

  9. Long work hours and the wellbeing of fathers and their families

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Matthew Gray; Lixia Qu; David Stanton

    2004-01-01

    The average hours worked by full-time employees in Australia have increased since the late 1970s. This, combined with increases in female labour force participation, has led to concerns about the impact of long work hours on family life. This paper explores the relationship between fathers' work hours, their own wellbeing and that of their families using data from the HILDA

  10. Questions and Answers about AFTERSCHOOL CARE: A Sloan Work and Family Research Network Fact Sheet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sloan Work and Family Research Network, 2008

    2008-01-01

    The Sloan Work and Family Research Network has prepared Fact Sheets that provide statistical answers to some important questions about work-family and work-life issues. This Fact Sheet includes statistics about Afterschool Care, and answers the following questions about afterschool programs: (1) How does afterschool care help children?; (2) How…

  11. 3 CFR - White House Task Force on Middle-Class Working Families

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...White House Task Force on Middle-Class Working Families Presidential Documents Other...White House Task Force on Middle-Class Working Families Memorandum for the Heads of...years, middle-class Americans have been working harder, yet not enjoying...

  12. The Work-Family Conflict Scale (WAFCS): Development and Initial Validation of a Self-report Measure of Work-Family Conflict for Use with Parents.

    PubMed

    Haslam, Divna; Filus, Ania; Morawska, Alina; Sanders, Matthew R; Fletcher, Renee

    2014-06-12

    This paper outlines the development and validation of the Work-Family Conflict Scale (WAFCS) designed to measure work-to-family conflict (WFC) and family-to-work conflict (FWC) for use with parents of young children. An expert informant and consumer feedback approach was utilised to develop and refine 20 items, which were subjected to a rigorous validation process using two separate samples of parents of 2-12 year old children (n = 305 and n = 264). As a result of statistical analyses several items were dropped resulting in a brief 10-item scale comprising two subscales assessing theoretically distinct but related constructs: FWC (five items) and WFC (five items). Analyses revealed both subscales have good internal consistency, construct validity as well as concurrent and predictive validity. The results indicate the WAFCS is a promising brief measure for the assessment of work-family conflict in parents. Benefits of the measure as well as potential uses are discussed. PMID:24919779

  13. Impact of flexible scheduling on employee performance regarding stress and work-family conflict

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Raja Abdul Ghafoor Khan; Furqan Ahmad Khan; Muhammad Aslam Khan; Mohsin Shakeel

    2011-01-01

    Stress, work-family conflicts and flexible scheduling are three of the most important elements in organizational studies. The focus of current study is to understand the effect of Stress,work family conflicts and flexible scheduling on employee’s performance and also to understand whether flexible scheduling helps in reducing stress and work-family conflicts or not. The back bone of this study is the

  14. Work-family policies and the effects of children on women's employment hours and wages

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Joya Misra; Michelle Budig; Irene Boeckmann

    2011-01-01

    Welfare state generosity around work-family policies appears to have somewhat contradictory effects, at least for some measures of gender equality. Work-family policies, in encouraging higher levels of women's labor market participation, may have also contributed to lower wage-levels for women relative to men, for instance. We consider the relationship between particular work-family policies and mothers’ employment outcomes. Analyses use data

  15. Using Critical Science Questions in Working with a Family

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Frances M.

    2007-01-01

    An example of the use of critical science questions provides insight related to one particular family over a 2 year period. The cultures of providers and recipients are viewed simultaneously to examine the cultural differences.

  16. Family and Medical Leave Revised 06/06

    E-print Network

    Kasman, Alex

    Policy Family and Medical Leave Revised 06/06 THE LANGUAGE USED IN THIS DOCUMENT DOES NOT CREATE/University of Charleston has established the Family and Medical Leave Policy and Procedures. The Family and Medical Leave to "eligible" employees for certain family and medical reasons. While family medical leave is defined as unpaid

  17. 78 FR 16278 - Notice of Submission of Proposed Information Collection to OMB Family Report, Moving-To-Work...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-14

    ...Submission of Proposed Information Collection to OMB Family Report, Moving-To-Work Family Report AGENCY: Office of the Chief Information...assisted housing programs. Form HUD-50058 MTW Family Reports solicit demographic, family...

  18. Beyond Work-Family Programs: Confronting and Resolving the Underlying Causes of Work-Personal Life Conflict.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kofodimos, Joan R.

    Work-Family Programs (WFPs) are among the most popular and publicized workplace innovations of the 1990s. These programs are intended to alleviate employees' work-personal conflicts by addressing issues such as child care assistance, parental leave, elder care, flexible working arrangements, wellness and fitness, and stress management. The problem…

  19. Work-family conflict and enrichment from the perspective of psychosocial resources: Comparing Finnish healthcare workers by working schedules.

    PubMed

    Mauno, Saija; Ruokolainen, Mervi; Kinnunen, Ulla

    2015-05-01

    We examined work-family conflict (WFC) and work-family enrichment (WFE) by comparing Finnish nurses, working dayshifts (non-shiftworkers, n = 874) and non-dayshifts. The non-dayshift employees worked either two different dayshifts (2-shiftworkers, n = 490) or three different shifts including nightshifts (3-shiftworkers, n = 270). Specifically, we investigated whether different resources, i.e. job control, managers' work-family support, co-workers' work-family support, control at home, personal coping strategies, and schedule satisfaction, predicted differently WFC and WFE in these three groups. Results showed that lower managers' work-family support predicted higher WFC only among 3-shiftworkers, whereas lower co-workers' support associated with increased WFC only in non-shiftworkers. In addition, shiftworkers reported higher WFC than non-shiftworkers. However, the level of WFE did not vary by schedule types. Moreover, the predictors of WFE varied only very little across schedule types. Shiftwork organizations should pay more attention to family-friendly management in order to reduce WFC among shiftworkers. PMID:25683534

  20. Validation Study of the Malay Version of the Work-Family Conflict Questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    SANAZ, Aazami; SYAQIRAH, Akmal; KHADIJAH, Shamsuddin

    2014-01-01

    Background: Work-family conflict has received increasing attention in recent decades in the area of workplace stressors, which can affect employees’ health. However, the dimensionality of the work–family conflict construct among the Malay-speaking population has not been clarified. In order to do so, it is crucial to use an instrument that is appropriate and valid for the Malay-speaking population. As such, the goal of this study was to validate and test the dimensionality of the Malay version of the Work-Family Conflict Questionnaire. Methods: The present study conducted exploratory factor analysis, confirmatory factor analysis, discriminant validity, convergent validity, and internal consistency, using Cronbach’s alpha, of the work–family conflict construct among 332 working women in Malaysia. Results: The results supported the existence of four dimensions in the Work-Family Conflict Questionnaire that distinguish between time based and strain-based work-family conflict and family-work conflict. The discriminant validity, convergent validity, and internal consistency of this construct are adequately supported. Conclusion: The findings of this study supported the existence of discriminant and convergent validity, as well as adequate reliability, for the construct. Thus, the Work–Family Conflict Questionnaire is a valid and reliable instrument among Malay-speaking working women. PMID:24639612

  1. Developing cultural competence for social work with families living in poverty

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gordon Jack; Owen Gill

    2012-01-01

    Social workers need to have a good understanding of the cultural contexts within which the families they are working with are living. Whilst each context will be unique in many respects, the majority of families involved with social workers will share the experience of living in impoverished circumstances. At a time when levels of family poverty are rising rapidly in

  2. Between Hope and Hard Times: New York's Working Families in Economic Distress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fischer, David J.; Colton, Tara; Kleiman, Neil S.; Schimke, Karen

    2004-01-01

    Today, many jobs that once could support a family barely suffice to keep that family out of poverty. The implied bargain America offers its citizens is supposed to be that anyone who works hard and plays by the rules can support his or her family and move onward and upward. But for millions of New Yorkers, that bargain is out of reach; the uphill…

  3. ‘You have to choose your childcare to fit your work’: Childcare decision-making among low-income working families

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Heather Sandstrom; Ajay Chaudry

    2012-01-01

    Regardless of their economic background, most working parents face the task of arranging childcare at some point. The decision-making process they experience is often complex, and this complexity is intensified for particular groups of families with limited financial and social resources. In this paper, we present findings from a three-year qualitative study of the childcare choices of low-income working families,

  4. 77 FR 23238 - Guidelines for Home Energy Professionals: Standard Work Specifications for Single Family Energy...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-18

    ...OF ENERGY Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Guidelines...Energy Professionals: Standard Work Specifications for Single Family...Upgrades AGENCY: Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, U...Energy Professionals: Standard Work Specifications for Single...

  5. Work-Family Conflict and Well-Being in Northern Europe

    E-print Network

    Scott, Jacqueline; Plagnol, Anke C.

    2012-01-01

    Looking at 7 North European countries, we use the European Social Survey to investigate men and women's work-family conflict and wellbeing. We find that men's wellbeing is increased if the divide of domestic work is less traditional...

  6. Workforce Issues in the Greater Boston Health Care Industry: Implications for Work and Family

    E-print Network

    Harrington, Mona

    2004-12-10

    This working paper synthesizes critical problems identified by interviews with more than 40 leaders in the Boston area health care industry and places them in the context of work and family issues. At ...

  7. Family Dynamics of the Stay-at-Home Father and Working Mother Relationship.

    PubMed

    Rushing, Cassie; Powell, Lisa

    2014-09-01

    A phenomenological qualitative study was utilized to explore family dynamics in stay-at-home father and working mother households. A total of 20 working mothers were asked to describe family interactions and daily routines with regard to their stay-at-home father and working mother dynamic. All participants were married, heterosexual women with biological children ages 1 to 4 and who worked outside the home and the father stayed home as primary caretaker and did not contribute financially. The study indicated that the family dynamic of a working mother and stay-at-home father provided a positive parent-child relationship, enhanced parenting cohesion, and enhanced quality time. PMID:25204589

  8. Gendered Work. Sexuality, Family and the Labour Market.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adkins, Lisa

    A study examined the interrelationships between sexuality, family, and the labor market in Great Britain. First, a range of analyses of women's role in the labor market, including analyses from feminist and sociological perspectives, were reviewed to determine how sexual as opposed to gender relations operate in the labor market. Next, the role of…

  9. Secret Wounds: Working with Child Observers of Family Violence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banerjee Associates, Skillman, NJ.

    Noting that children who witness family violence, but are not direct victims of the violence, are frequently forgotten, this 33-minute video and complementary written materials provide a highly flexible program designed to address the multiple needs of these children with diverse backgrounds and a wide range of experiences. The first part of the…

  10. Designing Computerized Decision Support That Works for Clinicians and Families

    PubMed Central

    Fiks, Alexander G.

    2011-01-01

    Evidence-based decision-making is central to the practice of pediatrics. Clinical trials and other biomedical research provide a foundation for this process, and practice guidelines, drawing from their results, inform the optimal management of an increasing number of childhood health problems. However, many clinicians fail to adhere to guidelines. Clinical decision support delivered using health information technology, often in the form of electronic health records, provides a tool to deliver evidence-based information to the point of care and has the potential to overcome barriers to evidence-based practice. An increasing literature now informs how these systems should be designed and implemented to most effectively improve outcomes in pediatrics. Through the examples of computerized physician order entry, as well as the impact of alerts at the point of care on immunization rates, the delivery of evidence-based asthma care, and the follow-up of children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, the following review addresses strategies for success in using these tools. The following review argues that, as decision support evolves, the clinician should no longer be the sole target of information and alerts. Through the Internet and other technologies, families are increasingly seeking health information and gathering input to guide health decisions. By enlisting clinical decision support systems to deliver evidence-based information to both clinicians and families, help families express their preferences and goals, and connect families to the medical home, clinical decision support may ultimately be most effective in improving outcomes. PMID:21315295

  11. Nurturing Careers in Psychology: Combining Work and Family

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halpern, Diane F.

    2008-01-01

    The academic workplace, with its requirements for achieving tenure within the first 6 years of employment, is designed in ways that discriminate against young faculty with family care responsibilities, most notably mothers. Mason and Goulden ("Academe," http://www.aaup.org/publications/Academe/2002/02nd/02ndmas.htm, 2002, "Academe,"…

  12. Opportunities for School Psychologists Working with Children of Military Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherman, Michelle D.; Glenn, Marshall Andrew

    2011-01-01

    Today's military families are a diverse, resilient group of brave Americans, and the country owes them a tremendous debt of gratitude. To date, over 2 million service members have been deployed in support of the Global War on Terrorism, many for multiple tours. For the first time in the country's history, there are more military dependents…

  13. [Working with Infants, Toddlers, and Families in Rural Areas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fenichel, Emily, Ed.

    1995-01-01

    This newsletter theme issue focuses on providing services to infants with special needs in rural areas. In "Old Threads, New Patterns: Reaching Out to Rural Families," Deborah Harris-Usner discusses bringing infant mental health care and parent-infant psychotherapy to rural New Mexico. In "The People of Kids Place: Creating and Maintaining…

  14. Work-Related Learning Guide for Family Literacy and Adult Education Organizations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jobs for the Future, Boston, MA.

    This guide assists family literacy and adult education organizations considering ways in which work and learning can be integrated in their educational programs. Part I addresses influences motivating the family literacy and adult education fields to incorporate work-related learning into their efforts. Part II provides a framework for designing…

  15. Traditional and Nontraditional Gender Roles and Work-Family Interface for Men and Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perrone, Kristin M.; Wright, Stephen L.; Jackson, Z. Vance

    2009-01-01

    In this article, we examine traditional and nontraditional gender roles and work-family interface for men and women. Recent empirical literature is reviewed and implications for career counselors are discussed. We discuss changing gender roles in career, marriage, and parenting and provide strategies for helping clients to cope with work-family

  16. Work-family conflict and career success: the effects of domain-specific determinants

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hassan I. Ballout

    2008-01-01

    Purpose – Despite widespread acknowledgement that work-family conflict and career success are salient issues that impact individual wellbeing and organizational effectiveness, there is little research that studies how the two concepts are related. The purpose of this paper is to develop and present a tentative framework for understanding the relationships among antecedents of interrole conflict between work and family and

  17. Cognitive capacity for processing work-family conflict: an initial examination

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Suzanne C. de Janasz; Scott J. Behson

    2007-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this study is to examine how individuals cognitively process work-family conflict (WFC), specifically whether differences in tolerance for uncertainty and cognitive complexity influence individuals' affective response to WFC. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – Using a sample of 157 employees who completed a survey on work-family issues, the hypotheses were tested using correlation and regression analyses. Findings – The

  18. Work-family conflict, and psychological distress in men and women among Canadian police officers.

    PubMed

    Janzen, B L; Muhajarine, Nazeem; Kelly, I W

    2007-04-01

    The present study examined the relations among sex, work-family conflict, and psychological distress in 78 Canadian police officers (50 men and 28 women). The average age of the officers was 36.1 yr. (SD=8.0), and nearly one-third of the respondents had been in policing 16 years or more. Ordinary least-squares regression was conducted to examine the association of Psychological Distress scores, as measured by the K6, with four types of work-family conflict: Time-based Work-to-Family Conflict, Time-based Family-to-Work Conflict, Strain-based Work-to-Family Conflict, and Strain-based Family-to-Work Conflict. Being single and having higher perceived Strain-based Work-to-Family Conflict were associated with greater scores on Psychological Distress. No statistically significant sex differences emerged in the self-reported type or direction of work-family conflict or in the factors associated with Psychological Distress. PMID:17564232

  19. A Comprehensive Approach to Refractory Mind-Body Disorders: Working at the Family-Community Interface.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elizur, Joel

    Dysfunctional relations between the family and other social systems usually play a part in maintaining refractory problems and chronic patienthood. Therapeutic interventions need to work at this interface, in order to create a collaborative team that will provide sufficient support to the family at risk. This way of working can be easily applied…

  20. Conflict between Work and Family: An Investigation of Four Policy Measures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruppanner, Leah

    2013-01-01

    Welfare states enact a range of policies aimed at reducing work-family conflict. While welfare state policies have been assessed at the macro-level and work-family conflict at the individual-level, few studies have simultaneously addressed these relationships in a cross-national multi-level model. This study addresses this void by assessing the…

  1. An Exploratory Study into Work/Family Balance within the Australian Higher Education Sector

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pillay, Soma; Kluvers, Ron; Abhayawansa, Subhash; Vranic, Vedran

    2013-01-01

    The higher education landscape is undergoing major transformation, with a significant impact on the work and family practices of academics and professional staff. The purpose of this exploratory study is to examine the extent to which (1) time-related, (2) strain-related and (3) demographical variables impact on the work/family balance of academic…

  2. Work-Family Climate, Organizational Commitment, and Turnover: Multilevel Contagion Effects of Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Neill, John W.; Harrison, Michelle M.; Cleveland, Jeannette; Almeida, David; Stawski, Robert; Crouter, Anne C.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents empirical research analyzing the relationship between work-family climate (operationalized in terms of three work-family climate sub-scales), organizational leadership (i.e., senior manager) characteristics, organizational commitment and turnover intent among 526 employees from 37 different hotels across the US. Using…

  3. A Cross-Cultural Test of the Work-Family Interface in 48 Countries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jeffrey Hill, E.; Yang, Chongming; Hawkins, Alan J.; Ferris, Maria

    2004-01-01

    This study tests a cross-cultural model of the work-family interface. Using multigroup structural equation modeling with IBM survey responses from 48 countries (N= 25,380), results show that the same work-family interface model that fits the data globally also fits the data in a four-group model composed of culturally related groups of countries,…

  4. A comparative study of Work and Family Conflict in Norwegian and Indian Hospitals

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Suchitra Pal; Per Øystein Saksvik

    2006-01-01

    This study investigated the gender and cultural differences experienced in the work-family conflict (WFC) by Norwegian and Indian doctors and nurses. Do Norwegian and Indian doctors and nurses experience a similar or different type of work-family conflict for their respective gender? Our sample consisted of 27 doctors and 328 nurses from Norway, as well as 111 doctors and 136 nurses

  5. Interrole Conflicts and the Permeability of Work and Family Domains: Are There Gender Differences?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eagle, Bruce W.; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Usable responses from 393 of 1,100 university employees yielded multiple measures of bidirectional role conflict. Family boundaries were more permeable than work boundaries: demands of work were allowed to intrude more on family roles than vice versa. No gender differences were found. (SK)

  6. Informal Caregiving at Working Age: Effects of Job Characteristics and Family Configuration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henz, Ursula

    2006-01-01

    This article addresses the relationship between employment and providing informal care for sick, disabled, or elderly people in Great Britain. Hazard rate models for taking up caring and leaving work when caring are estimated using retrospective family, employment, and caring data from the British Family and Working Lives Survey 1994-1995 for…

  7. Identification of a Dispositional Tendency to Experience Work-Family Spillover

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cho, Eunae; Tay, Louis; Allen, Tammy D.; Stark, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Are individuals predisposed to experience work-family spillover? Despite theoretical relevance and practical implications related to this issue, research on this topic is scarce. With this in mind, we investigated if there is a dispositional tendency to experience work-family spillover using a nationally representative longitudinal sample. We…

  8. Work Family liFe Balancing joB and personal responsiBilities

    E-print Network

    Ginzel, Matthew

    Work Family liFe Balancing joB and personal responsiBilities continued on page 2... Work & Family Life is distributed by companies and other organizations to their employees and clients. To see used to play the piano or chess but you stopped years ago, those circuits can be revived. making

  9. A Two-Study Examination of Work-Family Conflict, Production Deviance and Gender

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferguson, Merideth; Carlson, Dawn; Hunter, Emily M.; Whitten, Dwayne

    2012-01-01

    Building on the spillover and crossover literatures of work-family conflict and the theoretical framework of Conservation of Resources Theory (Hobfoll, 1989) we examine the effects of conflict on production deviance. Using a two-study constructive replication and extension design, we examine how partner work-to-family conflict contributes to job…

  10. The Value and Commitment to Work and Family Roles: Influence of Gender and Family Background.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Gregory E.

    Expectations of young adults concerning their future participation in four adult life roles (occupation, parenthood, marriage, homecare) were examined by comparing the responses of 301 male and 354 female college students from intact families, single-parent families, and stepfamilies on the Life Roles Salience Scales (LRSS). The results indicated…

  11. The work-family interface in the United States and Singapore: conflict across cultures.

    PubMed

    Galovan, Adam M; Fackrell, Tamara; Buswell, Lydia; Jones, Blake L; Hill, E Jeffrey; Carroll, Sarah June

    2010-10-01

    This article examines the work-family interface in a cross-cultural comparison between two nationally representative samples from the United States (n = 1,860) and Singapore (n = 1,035) with emphasis on work-family conflict. Family-to-work conflict was negatively related to marital satisfaction in both Singapore and the United States, although the effect was stronger in the United States. Similarly, family-to-work conflict was positively related to job satisfaction in the United States but was negatively related in Singapore. As expected, schedule flexibility was negatively related to depression in the United States, but in Singapore the relationship was positive. These findings suggest that theoretical relationships in the work-family interface developed in the more culturally individualistic West may need to be adapted when studying populations in the more collectivist East. PMID:20954775

  12. Working conditions and Work-Family Conflict in German hospital physicians: psychosocial and organisational predictors and consequences

    PubMed Central

    Fuß, Isabelle; Nübling, Matthias; Hasselhorn, Hans-Martin; Schwappach, David; Rieger, Monika A

    2008-01-01

    Background Germany currently experiences a situation of major physician attrition. The incompatibility between work and family has been discussed as one of the major reasons for the increasing departure of German physicians for non-clinical occupations or abroad. This study investigates predictors for one particular direction of Work-Family Conflict – namely work interfering with family conflict (WIF) – which are located within the psychosocial work environment or work organisation of hospital physicians. Furthermore, effects of WIF on the individual physicians' physical and mental health were examined. Analyses were performed with an emphasis on gender differences. Comparisons with the general German population were made. Methods Data were collected by questionnaires as part of a study on Psychosocial work hazards and strains of German hospital physicians during April–July 2005. Two hundred and ninety-six hospital physicians (response rate 38.9%) participated in the survey. The Copenhagen Psychosocial Questionnaire (COPSOQ), work interfering with family conflict scale (WIF), and hospital-specific single items on work organisation were used to assess WIF, its predictors, and consequences. Results German hospital physicians reported elevated levels of WIF (mean = 74) compared to the general German population (mean = 45, p < .01). No significant gender difference was found. Predictors for the WIF were lower age, high quantitative demands at work, elevated number of days at work despite own illness, and consequences of short-notice changes in the duty roster. Good sense of community at work was a protective factor. Compared to the general German population, we observed a significant higher level of quantitative work demands among hospital physicians (mean = 73 vs. mean = 57, p < .01). High values of WIF were significantly correlated to higher rates of personal burnout, behavioural and cognitive stress symptoms, and the intention to leave the job. In contrast, low levels of WIF predicted higher job satisfaction, better self-judged general health status, better work ability, and higher satisfaction with life in general. Compared to the German general population, physicians showed significantly higher levels of individual stress and quality of life as well as lower levels for well-being. This has to be judged as an alerting finding regarding the state of physicians' health. Conclusion In our study, work interfering with family conflict (WIF) as part of Work-Family Conflict (WFC) was highly prevalent among German hospital physicians. Factors of work organisation as well as factors of interpersonal relations at work were identified as significant predictors for WIF. Some of these predictors are accessible to alteration by improving work organisation in hospitals. PMID:18840296

  13. The interactive effects of proactive personality and work-family interference on well-being.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Christopher J L; De La Rosa, Gabriel M

    2008-07-01

    Proactive personality was expected to moderate the relationship between controllable work and nonwork stressors (e.g., time-based work-family interference) and job/life satisfaction. Moderated multiple regression analyses of survey data from a sample of professionals (N=133) revealed a significant interaction between time-based family interfering-with work and proactive personality predicting life satisfaction and several main effects offering partial support for the hypothesized relationships (alpha<.05). No other interactions between proactive personality and other forms of work-family interference were observed. The benefits of proactive personality may only emerge when personal control over occupational stressors can be exercised. PMID:18572997

  14. Work-Family Conflict: An Exploration of the Differential Effects of a Dependent Childs Age on Working Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darcy, Colette; McCarthy, Alma

    2007-01-01

    Purpose--The purpose of this article is to explore the impact of life cycle stage, specifically parenting stage, on work-family conflict among working parents to determine whether discernible differences are evident among those individuals at the early stage of their parenting cycle compared with those with older children.…

  15. Introducing Work-Family Scholarship to Social Work Students: The Development and Assessment of an Online Reading Seminar

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Secret, Mary; Pitt-Catsouphes, Marcie

    2008-01-01

    This three-part article first presents an overview of a Web-based reading-intensive course that introduces work-family scholarship to social work students so that they can integrate the historical, theoretical, and empirical perspectives of this rich body of knowledge into their practice. Second, the authors explore the compatibility of…

  16. Family Policy, Women's Access to Paid Work and Decommodification

    E-print Network

    Janus, Alexander Lincoln

    2012-01-01

    Results Women’s and Men’s Work Orientations Before I discusswomen’s high levels of labor force involvement before childbirth, the average workwomen with high levels of labor force engagement before childbirth continue on a path of full-time work (“

  17. Thirty-Five Years of Studying Work and Family

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brett, Jeanne M.

    2011-01-01

    The author and Karen Gyllstrom began working on the study that resulted in the highly cited article entitled, "Working Men and Women: Inter-and Intra-role Conflict" (Herman & Gyllstrom, "Psychology of Women Quarterly" 1977) probably more for personal than professional reasons. The study was based on Gyllstrom's master's thesis. The focus of…

  18. How Work–Family Research Can Finally Have an Impact in Organizations

    PubMed Central

    Kossek, Ellen Ernst; Baltes, Boris B.; Matthews, Russell A.

    2011-01-01

    Although work–family research has mushroomed over the past several decades, an implementation gap persists in putting work–family research into practice. Because of this, work–family researchers have not made a significant impact in improving the lives of employees relative to the amount of research that has been conducted. The goal of this article is to clarify areas where implementation gaps between work–family research and practice are prevalent, discuss the importance of reducing these gaps, and make the case that both better and different research should be conducted. We recommend several alternative but complementary actions for the work–family researcher: (a) work with organizations to study their policy and practice implementation efforts, (b) focus on the impact of rapid technological advances that are blurring work–family boundaries, (c) conduct research to empower the individual to self-manage the work–family interface, and (d) engage in advocacy and collaborative policy research to change institutional contexts and break down silos. Increased partnerships between industrial–organizational (I–O) psychology practitioners and researchers from many industries and disciplines could break down silos that we see as limiting development of the field. PMID:22247737

  19. Work–family interface from a life and career stage perspective: The role of demands and resources

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Evangelia Demerouti; Maria C. W. Peeters; Beatrice I. J. M. van der Heijden

    2012-01-01

    Work–family conflict and enrichment are experiences that occur daily and have substantial consequences for employees, their families, and the organizations that employ them. The aim of the current review is to make a link between life and career stage, work and family conditions, and the work–family interface. The basic proposition is that life stages partly determine career development, and consequently

  20. Work-Family Supportiveness Organizational Perceptions: Important for the Well-Being of Male Blue-Collar Hourly Workers?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grandey, Alicia A.; Cordeiro, Bryanne L.; Michael, Judd H.

    2007-01-01

    The current study questions whether organizational perceptions of family supportiveness predict work-family conflict (WFC) and job satisfaction for an atypical sample of male hourly workers in a manufacturing organization, and whether those relationships depend on work (number of work hours) and family (number of family roles) demands. A…

  1. WORKING PAPER N 2010 -40 Working in family firms: less paid but more secure?

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    heterogeneity. Moreover, it is relatively homogeneous across workers with different gender, educational pay on average lower wages to their workers. This family/non-family wage gap is robust to controlling either by a compensating wage differential story or by a model in which workers sort in different firms

  2. Antecedents and Outcomes of Work-Family Conflict: Toward a Motivational Model

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. Senecal; Robert J. Vallerand; F. Guay

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to propose and test a model of work-family conflict based on Self-Determination Theory and the Hierarchical Model of Intrinsic and Extrinsic Motivation. The model posits that positive interpersonal factors both at work (i.e., one's employer) and at home (e.g., one's spouse) influence work and family motivation. Moreover, the model proposes that low levels

  3. Hidden Child Labor: Determinants of Housework and Family Business Work of Children in 16 Developing Countries

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ellen Webbink; Jeroen Smits; Eelke de Jong

    2012-01-01

    Two forms of “hidden†child labor – housework and family business work – are studied for 178,000 children in 16 African and Asian countries. About 30% of African children and 11% of Asian children work over 15h a week in hidden child labor. Girls are more involved in housework and boys more in family business work, but this division is

  4. Work–family relations among mothers of children with learning disorders

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rachel Gali Cinamon

    2008-01-01

    The study examined conflict and facilitation in work–family relations among working mothers of children with learning disorders (LD) or with typical development. The study also focused on three maternal personal resources (maternal anxious\\/avoidant attachment security, affect and sense of coherence) as antecedents of these work–family relations, and examined outcomes of such conflict and facilitation between the two life domains, as

  5. [The National Conference of Propaganda Work on Family Planning held Beijing].

    PubMed

    Ma, B

    1983-01-29

    The National Conference on Propaganda Work in Family Planning, held in Beijing from November 1-6, 1982, was sponsored by the the Propaganda Department of the Chinese Communist Party Central Committee and the National Family Planning Committee. Among the 136 participants were representatives from various provincial, city, and autonomous region propaganda and family planning units, the General Political Department of the People's Liberation Army, general trade unions, All China Women's Federation, Communist Youth League, and propaganda reporters. The purpose of the conference was to discuss how to organize family planning propaganda in meeting China's goal of limiting the population to 1,200,000,000 by 2000, and how to arrange a Family Planning Propaganda Month for early 1983. The Chairman of the National Family Planning Committee made 3 points: family planning is a basic national policy, greater propaganda efforts must be made towards peasant family planning, and everyone must work hard to create a new situation in family planning work. The Vice Minister of the Propaganda Department remarked that family planning propaganda was foremost among the 12 national propaganda topics; these sentiments were supported totally by the representatives of the women and youth groups. The Vice Chairman of the Advisory Committee of the Central Committee said that family planning work was longterm, and that its success lay in the countryside. Finally, the Vice Chairman of the National Family Planning Committee encouraged all delegates to take the spirit of the conference back to their home. During the conference delegates also met to discuss important points in planning the Family Planning Propaganda Month. PMID:12312938

  6. The Efficacy of Symbolic Work-Family Integration for Married Professionals who Share Paid Work - A Descriptive Study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michelle Y. Janning

    This study investigates whether spouses sharing paid work (in terms of workplace, occupation, or both) affects the amount and direction of work-family integration in terms of use of time, space, artifacts, activities, and associates (Nippert-Eng 1996). Results from interviews of each member of twenty-six professional couples reveal that spousal shared paid work arrangements influenced the likelihood of about half of

  7. Knowledge Work, Working Time, and Use of Time among Finnish Dual-Earner Families: Does Knowledge Work Require the Marginalization of Private Life?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Natti, Jouko; Anttila, Timo; Tammelin, Mia

    2012-01-01

    The industrial working-time regime is dissolving--not dramatically, but rather as a trend. A new trend is that those in dynamic sectors and in a good labor market position work long hours: Demanding knowledge work appears to require the marginalization of private life. This study investigates the family situation of knowledge workers, the…

  8. Development and initial validation of a measure of work, family, and school conflict.

    PubMed

    Olson, Kristine J

    2014-01-01

    This study reports the development and initial validation of a theoretically based measure of conflict between work, family, and college student roles. The measure was developed through the assessment of construct definitions and an assessment of measurement items by subject matter experts. Then, the measurement items were assessed with data from 500 college students who were engaged in work and family responsibilities. The results indicate that conflict between work, family, and school are effectively measured by 12 factors assessing the direction of conflict (e.g., work-to-school conflict, and school-to-work conflict) as well as the form of conflict (i.e., time, strain, and behavior based conflict). Sets of exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses demonstrated that the 12 factors of the new measure are distinct from the 6 factors of the Carlson, Kacmar, and Williams (2000) work-family conflict measure. Criterion validity of the measure was established through a series of regression analyses testing hypothesized relationships between antecedent and outcome variables with role conflict. Results indicate that role demand was a robust predictor of role conflict. To extend the literature, core self-evaluations and emotional stability were established as predictors of role conflict. Further, work, family, and school role satisfaction were significantly impacted with the presence of role conflict between work, family, and school. PMID:24447220

  9. Semiotic Processes in Women's Coordination of Work and Family.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crawford, Valerie M.

    This study examined how women who work in the professions and who have been mothers for 1 to 4 years construct and coordinate their roles as professionals and as mothers, in terms of both the symbolic meanings of these roles and the practical organization of their daily activity related to these roles. Fifteen women participated in extensive…

  10. Families That Work: Policies for Reconciling Parenthood and Employment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gornick, Janet C.; Meyers, Marcia K.

    2003-01-01

    Parents around the world grapple with the common challenge of balancing work and child care. Despite common problems, the industrialized nations have developed dramatically different social and labor market policies--policies that vary widely in the level of support they provide for parents and the extent to which they encourage an equal division…

  11. Coping with work and family: How do dual-earners interact?

    PubMed

    Matias, Marisa; Fontaine, Anne Marie

    2015-04-01

    Juggling the demands of both work and family has become increasingly difficult, especially for dual-earner households; nevertheless, families have developed strategies to deal with work-family challenges. This paper uses couple level analyses (APIM models) with 100 dual-earner couples to provide insight about partners' mutual influence on the use of work-family coping strategies. The results show that women's use of coping strategies is more associated with work-family conflict and work-family enrichment than men's coping. In addition, using partner coping, having a positive attitude towards multiple roles, using planning and management skills and avoiding having to cut back on professional responsibilities is associated with better outcomes (more enrichment and less conflict). Surprisingly, the use of childcare facilities is associated with women's conflict and partner effects were only found concerning the use of management and planning skills. These skills, however, have distinct effects for men and women's outcomes: their use by men reduces their own conflict but increases their wives', while their use by women decreases their own conflict and increases their own and their partner's enrichment. These results point to the fact that gender roles continue to be a hallmark of work-family issues. Our design and results point out the need for new interventions that take couple interdependences into account. PMID:25600426

  12. Women in orthodontics and work-family balance: challenges and strategies.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Sarah; Major, Paul W; Flores-Mir, Carlos; Amin, Maryam; Keenan, Louanne

    2012-01-01

    The number of women entering the orthodontic profession over the past few decades has increased dramatically. A review of the literature revealed the lack of research on achieving a work-family balance among female dentists and dental specialists. Work-family balance has been researched more extensively in the field of medicine; however, despite some critical differences, parallels between these 2 professions exist. This study identified issues that Canadian female orthodontists face and strategies they use to achieve a work-family balance. A phenomenological qualitative study was used to analyze the results of semi-structured telephone interviews of a purposive sample of 13 Canadian female orthodontists. The results strongly support the role-conflict theory about the competing pressures of maternal and professional roles. Female orthodontists described their challenges and strategies to minimize role conflict in their attempt to achieve a work-family balance. The women defined balance as having success and satisfaction in both their family life and professional life. They identified specific challenges of achieving a work-family balance that are unique to orthodontic practice and strategies for adapting to their maternal and professional roles. Achieving a work-family balance is of paramount importance to female orthodontists, and the results of this study may be applied to other specialties in dentistry. PMID:22770247

  13. Working-class fathers and childcare: the economic and family contexts of fathering in the UK

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Annette Braun; Carol Vincent; Stephen J. Ball

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports on a UK-based study that explored the ways in which working-class families living in the inner city negotiate and resolve childcare and domestic responsibilities between mothers and fathers and how men balance employment and family demands. Drawing on interviews with 70 families with pre-school children, including interviews with 16 men, we explore how the respondents practice fathering

  14. Understanding resilience in same-sex parented families: the work, love, play study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jennifer J Power; Amaryll Perlesz; Margot J Schofield; Marian K Pitts; Rhonda Brown; Ruth McNair; Anna Barrett; Andrew Bickerdike

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: While families headed by same-sex couples have achieved greater public visibility in recent years, there are still many challenges for these families in dealing with legal and community contexts that are not supportive of same-sex relationships. The Work, Love, Play study is a large longitudinal study of same-sex parents. It aims to investigate many facets of family life among

  15. Balancing Work and Family: A Panel Analysis of the Impact of Part-Time Work on the Experience of Time Pressure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laurijssen, Ilse; Glorieux, Ignace

    2013-01-01

    In this article we consider the consequences of work-family reconciliation, in terms of the extent to which the adjustment of the labour market career to family demands (by women) contributes to a better work-life balance. Using the Flemish SONAR-data, we analyse how changes in work and family conditions between the age of 26 and 29 are related to…

  16. Work-family conflict as a mediator of the work stress - mental health relationship

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Steven Poelmans

    2001-01-01

    The relationship between work stressors and mental health outcomes has been demonstrated in a whole range of work stress models and studies. But less has been written about factors outside the work setting that might predict or moderate the relationship between work stressors and strain. In this exploratory study, we suggest a model linking work stressors and \\

  17. Nine Black Families: A Study of Household Management and Childrearing in Black Families with Working Mothers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peters, Marie F.

    This dissertation is a descriptive study of nine intact black American families. The research focuses on the employed black wife/mother. Based on the cross-cultural approach of the Whiting model for psycho-cultural research which emphasizes the relationship between patterns of childrearing and later personality and postulates that environmental…

  18. Managing Individual and Family Resources. Learning Guide 7. Project Connect. Linking Self-Family-Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emily Hall Tremaine Foundation, Inc., Hartford, CT.

    This learning guide is designed to connect personal, family, and job responsibilities for adults and out-of-school youth in economically depressed areas of the state (including transitional ex-offenders and corrections populations) so that these individuals learn to manage and balance these aspects of their lives in order to prepare for or…

  19. Family-supportive organization perceptions, multiple dimensions of work–family conflict, and employee satisfaction: A test of model across five samples

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Laurent M. Lapierre; Paul E. Spector; Tammy D. Allen; Steven Poelmans; Cary L. Cooper; Michael P. O’Driscoll; Juan I. Sanchez; Paula Brough; Ulla Kinnunen

    2008-01-01

    Using samples of managers drawn from five Western countries, we tested a theoretical model linking employees’ perceptions of their work environment’s family-supportiveness to six different dimensions of work–family conflict (WFC), and to their job satisfaction, family satisfaction, and life satisfaction. Our results are consistent with a causal process whereby employees working in an environment viewed as more family-supportive experience lower

  20. Considering the role of personality in the work–family experience: Relationships of the big five to work–family conflict and facilitation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Julie Holliday Wayne; Nicholas Musisca; William Fleeson

    2004-01-01

    Using a national, random sample (N=2130), we investigated the relationship between each of the Big Five personality traits and conflict and facilitation between work and family roles. Extraversion was related to greater facilitation between roles but was not related to conflict, whereas neuroticism was related to greater conflict but only weakly related to facilitation. Conscientiousness was related to less conflict,

  1. The State of Working Arkansas: How Families are Faring in the Booming Economy. A Special Report from the Arkansas Working Families Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huddleston, Rich; Duran, Angela

    Using a wide array of government data, this report examines the impact of the 1990s economy and other developments on the living standards of Arkansas's working families and their children. Information is provided on: (1) unemployment rates by geographic region, educational level, and race; (2) employment and average weekly earnings by industry…

  2. Multicultural Considerations: Working with Families of Developmentally Disabled and High Risk Children. The Hispanic Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Rocio DeMateo

    The paper first points out how important it is for professionals who work with families and infants with developmental problems to be aware of ethnic and cultural differences, and then goes on to discuss some values typically held by Hispanic Americans. Professionals should understand the family's immigration history and status in order to know…

  3. Balancing Work and Family: A Citizens' Agenda for the '90s.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roosevelt Center for American Policy Studies, Washington, DC.

    The 813 participants in the Roosevelt Center's May, 1989, regional citizen assemblies discussed trends affecting workers, employers, and families and laid the groundwork for a recommended national work and family policy. Part 1 of this report analyzes the results of a series of introductory exercises in which citizens were asked to register their…

  4. The Family as a Site for Gendered Ethnic Identity Work among Asian Indian Immigrants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mehrotra, Meeta; Calasanti, Toni M.

    2010-01-01

    Research on immigrants often points to the family as a source of support and a location for oppression. Using in-depth interviews with 38 first-generation immigrant Indians, this study adds to this literature by exploring families as sites of identity work where first-generation immigrants manage their gendered ethnic identities. Relocation into a…

  5. Using Social Marketing to Understand the Family Dinner with Working Mothers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mary P. Martinasek; Rita D. DeBate; Ashley G. Walvoord; Stephanie T. Melton; David Himmelgreen; Tammy D. Allen; Robert J. McDermott

    2010-01-01

    The family dinner is a valued tradition that affords opportunities for social interaction and attachment, as well as sharing events of the day, role modeling, connectedness, and problem solving. Guided by the social-marketing framework, this study explored factors associated with the frequency of the family dinner among working mothers with children ages 8–11 years. A qualitative design was used, employing

  6. The Impact of Public Housing Policy on Family Social Work Theory and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarty, Dawn

    2008-01-01

    Social workers are the professionals most engaged with families living in low-income and subsidized housing and most familiar with the problems associated with inadequate housing. Yet the discussion of public housing policy has been left largely to economists and housing activists and the clear implications for family social work practice have not…

  7. Ethnic Variations in the Connection Between Work-Induced Family Separation and Turnover Intent

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Andrew O. Behnke; Shelley M. MacDermid; James C. Anderson; Howard M. Weiss

    2010-01-01

    Using conservation of resources theory, this study examines the role of resources in the relationship between work-induced family separation and workers’ intentions to leave their employment and how these relationships vary across ethnic groups. Analyses of a large representative sample of military members reveal that family separation is significantly related to intent to leave the military and that this relationship

  8. The Family-Relatedness of Work Decisions: A Framework and Agenda for Theory and Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenhaus, Jeffrey H.; Powell, Gary N.

    2012-01-01

    Due to global trends such as the increased labor force participation of women, the growing presence of dual-earner couples and single parents in the labor force, and changing values regarding the importance of life balance, individuals' work decisions are being increasingly influenced by family considerations. However, the "family-relatedness" of…

  9. Work and Family: The Crucial Balance = Travail et la Famille: Un Equilibre Delicat.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ontario Ministry of Community and Social Services, Toronto.

    The dynamics of the Canadian workforce have changed. Demographic, social and employment trends, coupled with the changing face of the Canadian family, will increasingly challenge business and industry in the '90s. This practical resource guide for employers explores the changing relationship between family and paid work, and how that new…

  10. Work–Family Imagery and Gender Stereotypes: Television and the Reproduction of Difference

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Scott Coltrane; Michele Adams

    1997-01-01

    This article explores how popular cultural imagery reflects and reproduces work–family segregation and gender inequality. Social constructionist research on television, advertising, and gender is reviewed, and theories explaining gender inequality in the workplace and the home are summarized. Results of a study of 1699 television commercials from the 1990s are presented, and hypotheses about the relationships among gender, family relationship,

  11. Common Themes and Treatment Approaches in Working with Families of Runaway Youths

    Microsoft Academic Search

    DEBBIE B. RILEY; GEOFFREY L. GREIF; DEBRA L. CAPLAN; HEATHER K. MACAULAY

    2004-01-01

    Running away behavior in youth has long been recognized as a significant social problem affecting not only the youth themselves but their families, schools, the local community, and law enforcement efforts. We describe common themes these youth and their families present when they enter treatment in a program that works in conjunction with local law enforcement. These themes include problematic

  12. Working with Families of At-Risk and Special Needs Students: A Systems Change Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lambie, Rosemary

    2000-01-01

    This article provides some basic foundation of family systems concepts for school professionals who work with students with disabilities. It addresses communication skills and psychological issues that can result in barriers to implementation of family systems concepts and describes a five-step process leading to conflict resolution. (Contains…

  13. Work-Family Interface for Same-Sex, Dual-Earner Couples: Implications for Counselors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perrone, Kristin M.

    2005-01-01

    The author highlights information for career counselors to consider when addressing work-family interface with individuals who are members of same-sex, dual-earner couples or families. D. E. Super's (1990) life-span, life-space theory is the framework used to organize the literature review and discussion of current trends. Issues related to the…

  14. Family Interference with Work and Workplace Cognitive Failure: The Mitigating Role of Recovery Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lapierre, Laurent M.; Hammer, Leslie B.; Truxillo, Donald M.; Murphy, Lauren A.

    2012-01-01

    The first goal of this study was to test whether family interference with work (FIW) is positively related to increased workplace cognitive failure (WCF), which is defined as errors made at work that indicate lapses in memory (e.g., failing to recall work procedures), attention (e.g., not fully listening to instruction), and motor function (e.g.,…

  15. [To develop the family planning work deeply through following the working method of "taking three as the keys"].

    PubMed

    1982-11-29

    In recent years family planning work in China's Rongcheng County has been accomplished through "sudden attacks" on the problem, and although these concentrated work efforts have been successful, nevertheless there have been deleterious effects, e.g., a drain on the leadership such that work is affected, overburdened hospital workloads that lead to surgical mistakes, and pressure on the people's spirits. In order to ameliorate the situation, longterm planning was proposed in 1981 "to take three as the keys," i.e., to take propaganda education as the key in its relationship to economic measures, to take birth control as the key in its relationship to abortion, and to take longterm work as the key in its relationship to shortterm work. In 1981 Roncheng County increased its propaganda education efforts by making family planning the subject of numerous meetings, radio broadcasts, recordings, posters, and drama. It also emphasized positive education (i.e., teaching the good qualities of life conduct) and commended good people and good deeds. Family planning work also strengthened political education, making people aware of the policy of 1 child per family. Due to a sudden rise in unplanned 2nd pregnancies in Roncheng County, the number of abortions was high, so scientific knowledge of contraceptive use was widely disseminated to all fertile women. In order to make family planning function on a continous basis, one must grasp surely and carefully the primary work of organizations at all levels and be systematic in follow-ups. The results of "taking three as the keys" include: for the first 6 months of 1982 the single child rate was 95.63%; contraceptive use was more effective, causing the abortion rate to drop 10.3% from a comparable period in 1981; and 99.52% of 1-child-couples applied for Single Child Certificates. PMID:12159366

  16. Men, work and gender

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Christina Lee; R. Glynn Owens

    2002-01-01

    ontemporary analyses of work and unemployment need to place psychological findings in the context of society, culture, and gender in understanding the meanings of paid and unpaid work for men and for women. The Australian Psychological Society discussion paper (in this issue) takes a comprehensive view of the literature and places it in the contemporary Australian social context, but fails

  17. Novel treatments for familial hypercholesterolemia: pharmacogenetics at work.

    PubMed

    Marbach, Jeffrey A; McKeon, Jessica L; Ross, Joyce L; Duffy, Danielle

    2014-09-01

    The familial hypercholesterolemias (FHs) are inherited disorders of lipoprotein metabolism that are among the most prevalent genetically inherited disorders. Various genetic mutations ultimately lead to greatly increased low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C) levels over a lifetime. Consequently, patients with FH develop coronary artery disease at significantly earlier ages and at a greater frequency than the general population. Current therapies revolve around aggressive lifestyle modifications, cholesterol-lowering medications, and in some cases LDL apheresis. Despite maximal medical therapy, LDL-C is not sufficiently reduced in some patients, and they remain at a substantially increased risk of coronary heart disease. Recent advances in genetic-based pharmacology have enabled the development of three novel classes of medications for FH. Two of those compounds, mipomersen and lomitapide, result in decreased LDL-C production and were approved by the Food and Drug Administration in the past 18 months for treatment of homozygous FH. Mipomersen is an antisense oligonucleotide that inhibits the translation of apolipoprotein B-100, and lomitapide is an inhibitor of the microsomal triglyceride transfer protein, which prevents the incorporation of triglycerides into lipoproteins. A third class of drugs, the proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 inhibitors, is still in development, although studies in patients with heterozygous or receptor-defective homozygous FH have demonstrated substantial reductions in LDL-C by decreasing the degradation of LDL receptors. Development of these novel treatments for hypercholesterolemia resulted from the application of known genetic mutations and is the focus of this review. PMID:24899514

  18. Working Families Tax Relief Act of 2004 (released in AEO2005)

    EIA Publications

    2005-01-01

    The Working Families Tax Relief Act of 2004 was signed into law on October 13, 2004. Primarily, the Act reduces taxes for individuals and businesses. At least two provisions relate to energy: Depletion of marginal properties and qualified vehicles.

  19. Rosabeth Moss Kanter Keynotes Boston College Center for Work & Family 20th Anniversary Celebration

    E-print Network

    Huang, Jianyu

    Rosabeth Moss Kanter Keynotes Boston College Center for Work & Family. Governor Timothy Murray attended the Gala at the Boston College Club on behalf and esteemed Harvard Business School Professor Rosabeth Moss Kanter provided her insights

  20. Work-family Conflict and Alcohol Use: Examination of a Moderated Mediation Model

    PubMed Central

    Wolff, Jennifer M.; Rospenda, Kathleen M.; Richman, Judith A.; Liu, Li; Milner, Lauren A.

    2013-01-01

    Research consistently documents the negative effects of work-family conflict; however, little focuses on alcohol use. This study embraces a tension-reduction theory of drinking, wherein alcohol use is thought to reduce the negative effects of stress. The purpose of the present study was to test a moderated mediation model of the relationship between work-family conflict and alcohol use in a Chicagoland community sample of 998 caregivers. Structural equation models showed that distress mediated the relationship between work-family conflict and alcohol use. Furthermore, tension reduction expectancies of alcohol exacerbated the relationship between distress and alcohol use. The results advance the study of work-family conflict and alcohol use, helping explain this complicated relationship using sophisticated statistical techniques. Implications for theory and practice are discussed. PMID:23480251

  1. Mothers' work–family conflict and enrichment: associations with parenting quality and couple relationship

    PubMed Central

    Cooklin, A R; Westrupp, E; Strazdins, L; Giallo, R; Martin, A; Nicholson, J M

    2015-01-01

    Background Employment participation of mothers of young children has steadily increased in developed nations. Combining work and family roles can create conflicts with family life, but can also bring enrichment. Work–family conflict and enrichment experienced by mothers may also impact children's home environments via parenting behaviour and the couple relationship, particularly in the early years of parenting when the care demands for young children is high. Methods In order to examine these associations, while adjusting for a wide range of known covariates of parenting and relationship quality, regression models using survey data from 2151 working mothers of 4- to 5-year-old children are reported. Results/Conclusion Results provided partial support for the predicted independent relationships between work–family conflict, enrichment and indicators of the quality of parenting and the couple relationship. PMID:24673505

  2. Key worker housing : a demographic analysis of working families in eastern Massachusetts

    E-print Network

    Wagner, Margaret Fitzgerald

    2005-01-01

    As housing costs have soared nationwide, many policy makers have grown increasingly aware of working families' housing needs. Currently, having a full-time job does not guarantee decent and affordable housing. Many housing ...

  3. Working with Veterans, Active Duty Military, and Military Families A Collection of Career Transition Resources

    E-print Network

    Vertes, Akos

    Working with Veterans, Active Duty Military, and Military Families A Collection of Career Association Military Interest page: After the Army - http disorder (PTSD). American Corporate Partners - http://www.acp-usa.org/ Networking, mentoring

  4. Work-family boundary strategies: Stability and alignment between preferred and enacted boundaries

    PubMed Central

    Ammons, Samantha K.

    2015-01-01

    Are individuals bounding work and family the way they would like? Much of the work-family boundary literature focuses on whether employees are segmenting or integrating work with family, but does not explore the boundaries workers would like to have, nor does it examine the fit between desired and enacted boundaries, or assess boundary stability. In this study, 23 respondents employed at a large Fortune 500 company were interviewed about their work-family boundaries before and after their teams underwent a cultural change initiative that sought to loosen workplace norms and allow employees more autonomy to decide when and where they performed their job tasks. Four distinct boundary strategies emerged from the data, with men and parents of young children having better alignment between preferred and enacted boundaries than women and those without these caregiving duties. Implications for boundary theory and research are discussed. PMID:25620801

  5. Work and Stress in the Home: How Do You Help in the Family?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawhon, Tommie M.

    1984-01-01

    The instrument described in this article, "How Do You Help in the Family?," provides a way to recognize the number of tasks performed in home management and a method for expressing feelings about the stress associated with household work. (SK)

  6. Experiences of family therapists working with families in a transitional homeless community.

    PubMed

    Harris-McKoy, DeAnna E; Woods, Sarah B; Brantley, Cicely W; Farineau, Heather M

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the experiences and observations of marriage and family therapists (MFTs) conducting an empirically supported parenting program at a transitional homeless community. A diary method was used in recording five MFTs' observations and reactions to implementing the psychoeducational groups. Fifty-one recordings were collected from three different parenting groups over the course of 20 weeks. Constant comparative method was used to identify themes related to MFTs' experiences of conducting the parenting program. These themes included the needs of at-risk families, confidentiality, and role ambivalence and boundary ambiguity. We provide recommendations for best practices and an example of therapists' decision-making process using Kitchener's (1984) model. PMID:24372187

  7. How Job Demands Affect Partners' Experience of Exhaustion: Integrating Work–Family Conflict and Crossover Theory

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Arnold B. Bakker; Evangelia Demerouti; Maureen F. Dollard

    2008-01-01

    This study among 168 couples of dual-earner parents uses insights from previous work–family conflict and crossover research to propose an integrative model delineating how job demands experienced by men and women carry over to the home domain. The authors hypothesized that for both men and women, job demands foster their own work–family conflict (WFC), which in turn contributes to their

  8. [Family grasping establishment of service net, making family planning work become a regular practice and a system].

    PubMed

    1987-07-01

    In accordance with Central Committee Document no. 7 which calls for family planning work reform, China's Yuncheng Prefecture established changes in its family planning System. Yuncheng Prefecture contains 13 counties, 211 townships, 3292 administrative villages, and a population of 3,850,000. Propaganda technique leadership stations were implemented in 70% of the prefectures and counties, propaganda technique service stations in 90% of the townships, 1829 service rooms and 475 services in the villages. The Central Committee has frequently stated that controlling population growth entails strategic responsibility; the establishment of service nets is the primary step for fulfilling that responsibility. Methods in its establishment include: 1) Comprehensive planning: determining which districts have leadership and are receptive; 2) Proper selection of enthusiastic and educated personnel; 3) Adequate equipment at service sites; 4) Coordination of service net efforts with public health departments; 5) Accomplishing the following 5 services through administrative and professional management: propaganda, technology, policy, eugenics, and social welfare. The social advantage of the service nets is the creation in 2 years of a specialized group form the agrarian community who will become a systematic force which will guarantee continuous family planning work. As a consequence of the establishment service nets, more couples now desire only 1 child; unplanned 2nd births in 1984 decreased 12% from 1983. The multiple child rate fell 4.83% for those years. Family planning work has become more economical and efficient. PMID:12159297

  9. Family-Supportive Organization Perceptions, Multiple Dimensions of Work-Family Conflict, and Employee Satisfaction: A Test of Model across Five Samples

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lapierre, Laurent M.; Spector, Paul E.; Allen, Tammy D.; Poelmans, Steven; Cooper, Cary L.; O'Driscoll, Michael P.; Sanchez, Juan I.; Brough, Paula; Kinnunen, Ulla

    2008-01-01

    Using samples of managers drawn from five Western countries, we tested a theoretical model linking employees' perceptions of their work environment's family-supportiveness to six different dimensions of work-family conflict (WFC), and to their job satisfaction, family satisfaction, and life satisfaction. Our results are consistent with a causal…

  10. The relationship of social support to the work-family balance and work outcomes of midlife women

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wendy C. Marcinkus; Karen S. Whelan-Berry; Judith R. Gordon

    2007-01-01

    Purpose – This paper seeks to examine the relationship of a network of social support for midlife women with their attitudes toward work-family balance and work outcomes, including job satisfaction, organisational commitment, and career accomplishment. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – A total of 1,089 women between the ages of 35 and 50 across three organizations were surveyed and then 72 of them interviewed.

  11. Gender difference in work-family conflict among Japanese information technology engineers with preschool children.

    PubMed

    Watai, Izumi; Nishikido, Noriko; Murashima, Sachiyo

    2008-01-01

    Since the Family Policy Act, which requires companies to develop action plans to support their employees who have children in an attempt to reverse the declining birthrate in Japan, was enacted in 2003, many Japanese organizations and occupational health staff have become interested in work-family conflict (WFC), especially WFC in employees with young children. A cross-sectional survey of regularly employed information technology (IT) engineers with preschool children in Japan was conducted to examine the gender difference in WFC, relationship of WFC with outcomes, and predictors of WFC by gender. Data from 78 male and 102 female respondents were analyzed. There was no significant gender difference in total level of WFC. However, the level of work interference with family (WIF) was significantly higher in males than in females and the level of family interference with work (FIW) was significantly higher in females. Regarding outcomes, WIF was significantly related to depression and fatigue in both genders. Moreover, different predictors were related to WIF and FIW by gender. A family-friendly culture in the company was related to WIF only in males. To prevent depression and cumulative fatigue in employees with young children, occupational practitioners have to pay attention to not only employees' work stress but also their family stress or amount of family role in both genders. PMID:18493112

  12. Working with Adolescents: A Guide for Practitioners. Social Work Practice with Children and Families Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laser, Julie Anne; Nicotera, Nicole

    2010-01-01

    This state-of-the-art practitioner resource and course text provides a comprehensive view of adolescent development and spells out effective ways to help teens who are having difficulties. The book illuminates protective and risk factors in the many contexts of adolescents' lives, from individual attributes to family, school, neighborhood, and…

  13. Fathers' and Mothers' Work and Family Issues as Related to Internalizing and Externalizing Behavior of Children Attending Day Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hart, Margaret S.; Kelley, Michelle L.

    2006-01-01

    Relationships between work and family variables and children's internalizing and externalizing behavior are examined in 132 dual-earner couples of preschool-age children. Mothers' and fathers' parenting stress and mothers' work-family conflict predict children's internalizing behavior; mothers' work-family conflict, mothers' and fathers' parenting…

  14. Crossover of distress due to work and family demands in dual-earner couples: A dyadic analysis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lieke L. ten Brummelhuis; Jarrod M. Haar; Tanja van der Lippe

    2010-01-01

    Distress resulting from work and family overload is likely to be interdependent between partners, as both men and women increasingly participate in work and family tasks. We attempted to explain distress of both partners by looking at their work and family demands and the resulting time and energy deficits experienced by each partner. Furthermore, we investigated how time deficit, energy

  15. The unpaid donation of blood and altruism: a comment on Keown.

    PubMed Central

    McLachlan, H V

    1998-01-01

    In line with article 3.4 of EC directive 89/381, Keown has presented an ethical case in support of the policy of voluntary, unpaid donation of blood. Although no doubt is cast on the desirability of the policy, that part of Keown's argument which pertains to the suggested laudability of altruism and of its encouragment by social policy is examined and shown to be dubious. PMID:9752628

  16. Work-family conflict and well-being in university employees.

    PubMed

    Winefield, Helen R; Boyd, Carolyn; Winefield, Anthony H

    2014-01-01

    This is one of the first reported studies to have reviewed the role of work-family conflict in university employees, both academic and nonacademic. The goal of this research was to examine the role of work-family conflict as a mediator of relationships between features of the work environment and worker well-being and organizational outcomes. A sample of 3,326 Australian university workers responded to an online survey. Work-family conflict added substantially to the explained variance in physical symptoms and psychological strain after taking account of job demands and control, and to a lesser extent to the variance in job performance. However, it had no extra impact on organizational commitment, which was most strongly predicted by job autonomy. Despite differing in workloads and work-family conflict, academic ("faculty") and nonacademic staff demonstrated similar predictors of worker and organizational outcomes. Results suggest two pathways through which management policies may be effective in improving worker well-being and productivity: improving job autonomy has mainly direct effects, while reducing job demands is mediated by consequent reductions in work-family conflict. PMID:25175890

  17. Work–family reconciliation policies without equal opportunities? The case of Austria

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Manfred Auer; Heike Welte

    2009-01-01

    This paper explores the main public work–family policies in Austria (parental leave in connection with the Childcare Benefit, parents’ entitlement to part-time work, the extension of the childcare infrastructure) from the perspective of social justice using the normative concepts of gender equality, recognition, and choice. The main results show that for the most part, these policies offer affirmative recognition of

  18. Holding the child in mind: Work with parents and families in a consultation service

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Judith Edwards; Jane Maltby

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes work done in the voluntary sector under the auspices of the Catholic Children's Society (Westminster). Based on the Tavistock's Under-5s model, whole families are offered a series of up to five meetings to explore their difficulties. This application of psychoanalytic concepts to brief work is described technically and organizationally, and is seen as an alternative choice for

  19. Shift Work, Parenting Behaviors, and Children's Socioemotional Well-Being: A Within-Family Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnett, Rosalind Chait; Gareis, Karen C.

    2007-01-01

    Many U.S. employees with children work nonstandard hours, yet we know little about the linkages among maternal shift schedules, mothers' and fathers' parenting behaviors, and children's socioemotional outcomes. In a sample of 55 dual-earner families with children age 8 to 14 years and mothers working day versus evening shifts, the authors found…

  20. Las obreras: Chicana Politics of Work and Family. Aztlan Anthology Series, Volume 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruiz, Vicki L., Ed.

    In this anthology, Chicana voices of the past and present illuminate the experiences of Mexican American women as they strive to integrate wage work, family life, and community engagement. Sections cover confrontations with the state through community action, court litigation, and union organizing; negotiating work, marriage, and children; stories…

  1. Cross-Border Family Therapy: An Innovative Approach to Working with Latina Refugee Women in Therapy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mirna E. Carranza

    2012-01-01

    In the era of transnationalism, family therapists working with immigrant women are provided with the space to be innovative in their search for alternatives to Eurocentric approaches. Doing so can help therapists to best serve working-class immigrants and refugees who arrive in North America to escape violence and poverty. The case presented in this article highlights the cross-border interconnectedness between

  2. Working with Practitioners' Perspectives: Supporting Father Involvement in Family Services in England

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chawla-Duggan, Rita

    2011-01-01

    The paper draws on a study aiming to work with practitioners' perspectives to support involvement through family services. Data were collected from a cluster sample of practitioners conducting father groups in south-west England. The paper focuses upon working with their perspectives. Two issues in their perspectives were associated with…

  3. School Social Work and Early Childhood Student's Attitudes toward Gay and Lesbian Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Averett, Paige E.; Hegde, Archana

    2012-01-01

    The present study assessed the attitudes of school professionals in training at an American university toward homosexuality and their comfort, action-related disposition, and preparation to work with gay and lesbian (GL) families and their children. Fifty-nine students specializing in birth through kindergarten education and school social work

  4. The Changing Workforce. Comparison of Federal and Nonfederal Work/Family Programs and Approaches.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    General Accounting Office, Washington, DC. General Government Div.

    The tremendous growth in the number of women in the labor force has dramatically changed the world of work. Traditional human resources policies were not designed for this new workforce. Federal regulations prohibit federal workers from using any of their sick leave to care for a child or a parent. To learn about nonfederal work/family efforts,…

  5. Working Poor Families with Children: A Statistical Portrait. Child Trends Research Brief.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Child Trends, Inc., Washington, DC.

    Although having one or more working parents reduces the likelihood that children will live in poverty, it does not provide a guarantee of escaping poverty. This report summarizes results of a project to develop a definition of working poor families and to provide a baseline of descriptive information about them. The primary data sources for the…

  6. Work Socialization and Adolescents' Work-Related Values in Single-Mother African American Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toyokawa, Teru; McLoyd, Vonnie C.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined African American mothers' work socialization messages in relation to adolescents' work-related values. Moderation effects of mother-adolescent relation quality on the linkage between maternal socialization messages and adolescents' outcomes were also examined. Participants were 245 single African American mothers and their…

  7. Group Work with Adolescents: Principles and Practice. Second Edition. Social Work Practice with Children and Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malekoff, Andrew

    2006-01-01

    This popular text provides essential knowledge and skills for conducting creative, strengths-based group work with adolescents. A rich introduction to the field, enlivened by numerous illustrations from actual sessions, the book provides principles and guidelines for practice in a wide range of settings. The book covers all phases of group work,…

  8. Work-family conflict and job satisfaction: emotional intelligence as a moderator.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yongdong; Shi, Junqi; Niu, Qikun; Wang, Lei

    2013-08-01

    The negative impact of work-family conflict (WFC) on employees' well-being and job-related outcomes has attracted much research attention recently. A major gap in the literature is which factors could potentially buffer its negative effect on employees. The present study examined the moderating effect of emotional intelligence on the relationship between WFC and job satisfaction in a sample of 212 Chinese high school teachers. On the basis of conservation of resource theory, we hypothesized that emotional intelligence would weaken the negative effect of family-to-work and work-to-family interference on job satisfaction. Results suggested that WFC (work-to-family interference and family-to-work interference) was negatively related to job satisfaction and that emotional intelligence weakened the effect of WFC on job satisfaction. These findings provide implications for theories on WFC and emotional intelligence, such as conservation of resource theory. The current study also provides a test of these theories in Chinese culture to support the generalizability of theories developed in previous research. Practical implications for reducing the negative influence of WFC on employees' job satisfaction are also provided, such as the potential value of emotional intelligence for the training and development of employees in teaching professions. PMID:23015466

  9. When Work and Family are in Conflict: Impact on Psychological Strain Experienced by Social Workers in Australia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Parveen Kalliath; Mark Hughes; Peter Newcombe

    2012-01-01

    The impact of workplace stress and the need for work-life balance are increasingly recognised within social work. Recent theorising on work–family interface suggests that work-related stress cannot be contained within the workplace without it impacting on other life domains such as the family. Similarly, it is claimed that family-related issues also affect what happens at work. The present study examined

  10. When Work and Family are in Conflict: Impact on Psychological Strain Experienced by Social Workers in Australia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Parveen Kalliath; Mark Hughes; Peter Newcombe

    2011-01-01

    The impact of workplace stress and the need for work-life balance are increasingly recognised within social work. Recent theorising on work–family interface suggests that work-related stress cannot be contained within the workplace without it impacting on other life domains such as the family. Similarly, it is claimed that family-related issues also affect what happens at work. The present study examined

  11. 45 CFR 286.95 - What, if any, are the special rules concerning counting work for two-parent families?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...the special rules concerning counting work for two-parent families? 286.95 Section 286.95 Public...the special rules concerning counting work for two-parent families? Parents in a two-parent family may share the number of...

  12. 45 CFR 286.95 - What, if any, are the special rules concerning counting work for two-parent families?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...the special rules concerning counting work for two-parent families? 286.95 Section 286.95 Public...the special rules concerning counting work for two-parent families? Parents in a two-parent family may share the number of...

  13. 45 CFR 286.95 - What, if any, are the special rules concerning counting work for two-parent families?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...the special rules concerning counting work for two-parent families? 286.95 Section 286.95 Public...the special rules concerning counting work for two-parent families? Parents in a two-parent family may share the number of...

  14. 45 CFR 286.95 - What, if any, are the special rules concerning counting work for two-parent families?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...the special rules concerning counting work for two-parent families? 286.95 Section 286.95 Public...the special rules concerning counting work for two-parent families? Parents in a two-parent family may share the number of...

  15. 45 CFR 286.95 - What, if any, are the special rules concerning counting work for two-parent families?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...the special rules concerning counting work for two-parent families? 286.95 Section 286.95 Public...the special rules concerning counting work for two-parent families? Parents in a two-parent family may share the number of...

  16. The Widening Gap: Why America's Working Families Are in Jeopardy and What Can Be Done about It.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heymann, Jody

    This book examines the lives of America's working families from all social classes and ethnic groups and the familial obligations they must deal with, arguing that there is a widening gap between the demands of the workplace and the well-being of America's families. Chapter one provides an overview of the problems of longer work days, outdated…

  17. Family Home Childcare Providers: A Comparison of Subsidized and Non-Subsidized Working Environments and Employee Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shriner, Michael; Schlee, Bethanne M.; Mullis, Ronald L.; Cornille, Thomas A.; Mullis, Ann K.

    2008-01-01

    Federal and State Governments provide childcare subsidies for low-income working families. This study compares the encountered issues and working environments of family home providers of subsidized and non-subsidized childcare. Questionnaires were distributed throughout a southeastern state in the United States to 548 family home childcare…

  18. Transitions on the Margins of Work and Family Life for Low-Income African-American Fathers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kevin M. Roy

    2005-01-01

    Few studies explore linked transitions in work and family life for low-income African-American men. I examine patterns of work engagement among three cohorts of fathers and explore how they shape transitions in family residence and dynamics of family life. Establishment of a household was considered a shared project with partners and extended kin networks. Findings indicated that most fathers nested

  19. How to Fund an Unpaid CCE-administered programs

    E-print Network

    Hone, James

    of Financial Aid & Educational Financing · Student perspectives on CCE programs · Funding advice ­ Fellowships. · ALEXANDER HARSTRICK, CC 2012 Columbia University Medical Center Liver Transplant Center, New York City Parliament, Belgium Internship Description: Worked with the Industry, Research and Energy Committee

  20. Fit inside the work-family black box: An ecology of the life course, cycles of control reframing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Phyllis Moen; Erin Kelly; Reiping Huang

    2008-01-01

    Scholars have not fully theorized the multifaceted, interdependent dimensions within the work-family 'black box'. Taking an ecology of the life course approach, we theorize common work-family and adequacy constructs as capturing different components of employees' cognitive appraisals of fit between their demands and resources at the interface between home and work. Employees' appraisals of their work-family linkages and of their

  1. The psychological well-being of disability caregivers: examining the roles of family strain, family-to-work conflict, and perceived supervisor support.

    PubMed

    Li, Andrew; Shaffer, Jonathan; Bagger, Jessica

    2015-01-01

    We draw on the cross-domain model of work-family conflict and conservation of resources theory to examine the relationship between disability caregiving demands and the psychological well-being of employed caregivers. Using a sample of employed disability caregivers from a national survey, we found that the relationship between caregiving demands and family-to-work conflict was stronger when employees experienced high levels of strain from family. Additionally, we found high levels of family to-work conflict were subsequently associated with decreases in life satisfaction and increases in depression, but only when perceived supervisor support was low. Overall, our findings suggest an indirect relationship between caregiving demands and psychological well-being that is mediated by family-to-work conflict and is conditional on family strain and perceived supervisor support. The theoretical and practical implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:25181282

  2. Sensemaking in a High-Risk Lifestyle: The Relationship Between Work and Family for Public Safety Families

    E-print Network

    Bochantin, Jaime Elizabeth

    2011-10-21

    for letting me ?pick your brain? over many cups of coffee and tea (and the occasional adult beverage) as we debated gender, critical theory and the philosophical underpinnings of qualitative and quantitative research. Thank you for indulging my, as you put...; Williams, 2000). If both parents work full time, families face the acute stress of "two adults and three jobs" as children spend less time with one or both parents (Williams, 2000). This ?ideal worker? norm, then, creates a double- edged sword for both...

  3. [How to carry out work on family planning after adopting production responsibility systems in rural areas].

    PubMed

    Xiao, S H

    1982-05-29

    After the Third Meeting of the Eleventh People's Congress, the entire responsibility for agricultural production was transferred to a lower level. Peasants in various areas have adopted the so called production responsibility system, and the phenomenon of an increased population rate has also appeared in some areas. In this article, the author discusses how to solve these problems created by the new situation. The 1st step is try to control population growth through socialist propaganda education, administrative measures, economic incentives and punishments, and family planning work. The 2nd step is to popularize the practice of having only 1 child per household in the rural areas. The 2nd and 3rd child in each family should be controlled and prohibited. This policy formulated by the Central Government should be carried out thoroughly. Families which follow the policy and have only 1 child should be encouraged with economic rewards, and those families which have 2 or more children should be punished economically. The 3rd step is to establish a national work team to be in charge of family planning and birth control. There should be an ideological unity among the nation's leadership. Party members and cadres should establish themselves as good examples for the people so that the population control work may become successful. PMID:12266135

  4. “Preventing the Pain” When Working with Family and Sexual Violence in Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    Dartnall, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Primary care professionals (PCPs) are increasingly being expected to identify and respond to family and sexual violence as the chronic nature and severity of the long-term health impacts are increasingly recognized. This discussion paper reports the authors' expert opinion from their experiences running international workshops to prevent trauma among those who work and research sexual violence. It describes the burnout and secondary traumatic stress literature which provides the evidence supporting their work. Implications for practicing basic training in response to trauma and ongoing education are a key area for responding to family violence and preventing professional stress. A professional culture that supports and values caring well for those who have experienced family violence as well as “caring for the carer” is needed. Working in teams and having more support systems in place are likely to protect PCPs from secondary traumatic stress and burnout. Undergraduate and postgraduate training of PCPs to develop trauma knowledge and the skills to ask about and respond to family violence safely are essential. In addition, the healthcare system, workplace, and the individual practitioner support structures need to be in place to enable PCPs to provide safe and effective long-term care and access to other appropriate services for those who have experienced family violence. PMID:23533754

  5. Marital and Family Satisfaction as a Function of Work-Family Demands and Community Resources: Individual- and Couple-Level Analyses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hostetler, Andrew J.; Desrochers, Stephan; Kopko, Kimberly; Moen, Phyllis

    2012-01-01

    This study uses individual- and couple-level analyses to examine the influence of work-family demands and community resources on marital and family satisfaction within a sample of dual-earner parents with dependent children (N = 260 couples, 520 individuals). Total couple work hours were strongly negatively associated with marital satisfaction for…

  6. What Contributes to the (Im)Balanced Division of Family Work Between the Sexes?

    PubMed Central

    Lothaller, Harald; Mikula, Gerold; Schoebi, Dominik

    2011-01-01

    This study examines a comprehensive set of variables that have been proposed as explaining the imbalance of the division of family work between the sexes. The analyses use survey data of 735 dual-earner couples from Austria, the Netherlands, and Portugal. The results support theoretical explanations referring to time availability, gender ideology, relative resources, and the importance of characteristics of the family system. No support was obtained for the doing-gender perspective. Additional findings suggest that increased consideration of psychological concepts adds to the understanding of why women do more family work than men. The analyses revealed similarities, but also differences between the factors that contribute to the division of household labor and childcare. PMID:22318972

  7. Experiences of Marriage and Family Therapists Working with Intimate Partner Violence

    PubMed Central

    Karakurt, Gunnur; Dial, Shannonn; Korkow, Hannah; Mansfield, Ty; Banford, Alyssa

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to explore the experiences of marriage and family therapists in working with violent couples. In particular, we focused on therapists’ questions and feelings of competency pertaining to violence assessment and treatment, the difficulties they face during their practices, and the factors that affect their practice. Data for this study was collected via a focus group that lasted approximately an hour. The participants included five marriage and family therapists. A set of questions were used to explore experiences of therapists who were working with clients who are experiencing domestic violence. The research team recorded the answers to these questions as well as associated discussion. A grounded theory approach was used to analyze the data. Six themes were derived from the coded data: acknowledgment and reliance on systemic foundations, therapist factors, assessment, treatment considerations, sex of batterers, and training in Marriage and Family Therapy programs. PMID:24817787

  8. A case study of team work and performance-linked payment of family physicians in Portugal.

    PubMed

    Conceição, Claudia; Van Lerberghe, Wim; Ramos, Vitor; Hipólito, Fátima; Ferrinho, Paulo

    2007-01-01

    In Portugal, the design and the implementation of models of primary care teams has a history of 30 years. The evolution observed is from individual medical work, in Health Centres, supported on an ad hoc basis by other health professionals, to health centres integrating a diversity of formal working groups, including primary care/family health teams called "Family Health Units" (FHU). This evolution included the creation and gradual affirmation of the speciality of family medicine and the experimentation with different models of primary health care provision: voluntary primary care health teams without financial incentives (Alfa project), voluntary primary care health teams with a performance-related-remuneration system and the current phase of scaling up FHU. The process described here illustrates how a group of physicians has established a non-formal strategy of reform throughout 30 years. This strategy involves mobilization policies and the development of field experiences by individual leaders, groups and organizations. PMID:17665838

  9. Standard Work Specifications for Single-Family Home Energy Upgrades Summary (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2012-11-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and numerous industry stakeholders developed the Standard Work Specifications for Single-Family Home Energy Upgrades to define the minimum requirements for high-quality residential energy upgrades. Today, the Standard Work Specifications provide a unique source for defining high-quality home energy upgrades, establishing clear expectations for homeowners, contractors, trainers, workers, program administrators, and organizations that provide financing for energy upgrades.

  10. Labor force participation and family formation: A study of working mothers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. Theodore Groat; Randy L. Workman; Arthur G. Neal

    1976-01-01

    Drawing upon a sample of 638 mothers aged 18 to 40, with at least some marital work experience, significant associations were\\u000a found between the extent, kind, and timing of employment and a series of family formation variables. Generally lower fertility,\\u000a longer first birth intervals, and earlier use of birth control were associated with the longest work durations, the highest\\u000a status

  11. Learning from Sure Start: Working with Young Children and Their Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinberger, Jo, Ed.; Pickstone, Caroline, Ed.; Hannon, Peter, Ed.

    2005-01-01

    The book comes out of a University research project that has worked closely with one local programme over five years from its beginning. Sure Start is a national government initiative that targets families with children aged up to the age of four in areas of social and economic disadvantage, to promote development so children are ready to thrive…

  12. Focus Groups with Working Parents of School-Aged Children: What's Needed to Improve Family Meals?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fulkerson, Jayne A.; Kubik, Martha Y.; Rydell, Sarah; Boutelle, Kerri N.; Garwick, Ann; Story, Mary; Neumark-Sztainer, Dianne; Dudovitz, Bonnie

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To conduct focus groups to identify parents' perceptions of barriers to family meals and elucidate ideas to guide the development of interventions to overcome barriers. Methods: Focus groups were conducted with a convenience sample of 27 working parents in urban community settings. Results: Parents reported enjoying the sharing/bonding…

  13. WORKING PAPER N 2011 28 Childbearing Age, Family Allowances and Social Security

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    WORKING PAPER N° 2011 ­ 28 Childbearing Age, Family Allowances and Social Security Pierre Pestieau benefits PARIS-JOURDAN SCIENCES ECONOMIQUES 48, BD JOURDAN ­ E.N.S. ­ 75014 PARIS T�L. : 33(0) 1 43 13 63 Allowances and Social Security Pierre Pestieau and Gregory Ponthierey July 19, 2011 Abstract Although

  14. Developing Cross-Cultural Competence: A Guide for Working with Children and Their Families. Fourth Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, Eleanor W., Ed.; Hanson, Marci J., Ed.

    2011-01-01

    As the U.S. population grows more and more diverse, how can professionals who work with young children and families deliver the best services while honoring different customs, beliefs, and values? The answers are in the fourth edition of this bestselling textbook, fully revised to reflect nearly a decade of population changes and best practices in…

  15. When Work Enriches Family-Life: The Mediational Role of Professional Development Opportunities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molino, Monica; Ghislieri, Chiara; Cortese, Claudio G.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Several studies have pointed out the importance of work-family enrichment (WFE) for individuals' well-being and organizations and for this reason, it seems important to understand how organizations may promote it. This study attempts to understand the role of organizational resources and, particularly, of opportunities for professional…

  16. Group Supervision: Supporting Practitioners in Their Work with Children and Families in Children's Centres

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soni, Anita

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses how group supervision can be used to support the Continuing Professional Development (CPD) of those working with children and families in early years provision in England. It is based on research conducted in 2008 with a cluster of four Children's Centres in the West Midlands in England, UK. The research evaluated group…

  17. Dispositional Variables and Work-Family Conflict: A Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Tammy D.; Johnson, Ryan C.; Saboe, Kristin N.; Cho, Eunae; Dumani, Soner; Evans, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    Meta-analysis was used to comprehensively summarize the relationship between dispositional variables and both directions of work-family conflict. The largest effects detected were those associated with negative affect, neuroticism, and self-efficacy; all were in expected directions. In general, negative trait-based variables (e.g., negative affect…

  18. Job Adequacy and Work-Family Balance: Looking at Jobs as a Whole

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bass, Brenda L.; Grzywacz, Joseph G.

    2011-01-01

    Using an ecological person-process-context model and recent conceptualization of the "employment continuum," this study examines differences in components of work-family balance among individuals in diverse types of jobs ranging from "inadequate" to "optimal." Cross-sectional data from the 1997 National Study of the Changing Workforce (n = 2,877)…

  19. Professional work and the timing of family formation among young lawyers in US and German cities

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gabriele Plickert; John Hagan

    2011-01-01

    There is little cross-national empirical research on which to develop our understanding of the relationship between family formation among lawyers and the organization of work in the legal profession. This study compares young German lawyers practicing in Frankfurt and Berlin with young US lawyers practicing in New York and Washington, DC at similar career stages when they are most likely

  20. Conditional Welfare: A Family Social Work Perspective on Mandatory Drug Testing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael S. Spencer; Jordana R. Muroff; Jorge Delva

    2000-01-01

    Drug testing of welfare applicants as a requirement for benefits, its pros and cons, and its implications for family social work practice are discussed in this paper. While proponents of drug testing argue that drug use and welfare dependency are correlated, opponents suggest that mandatory drug testing is costly, infringes upon individuals' civil rights, and unfairly assumes welfare applicants are

  1. Family-friendly and career-flexibility policies to achieve work-life balance

    E-print Network

    Leistikow, Bruce N.

    Family-friendly and career-flexibility policies to achieve work-life balance RESOURCES an extended period of time off as an assistant professor just before my promotion, I was fortunate that UC Chair in Women's Cardiovascular Medicine Director of the Women's Cardiovascular Medicine Program

  2. Resilience across Contexts: Family, Work, Culture, and Community. Recommendations from a National Invitational Conference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, Sue, Ed.; Sullivan, Robert, Ed.

    1998-01-01

    In this issue of the "CEIC Review," commissioned papers for a national invitational conference on student resilience developed across contexts of family, work, culture, and community are summarized. The concept of resilience-promoting interventions has emerged from research and indicates that some children survive adversity without lasting damage.…

  3. Employee Health and Well-Being: The Role of Flexibility and Work–Family Balance

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Patrick R. Casey; Joseph G. Grzywacz

    2008-01-01

    There is substantial interest in the potential health effects of workplace flexibility; however, the literature linking flexibility to health is limited. The purpose of this study was to enhance understanding of the potential benefits of flexibility for employee health and well-being. Additionally, this study determines if this association is mediated by work–family balance. Results from longitudinal data obtained from a

  4. A family of new working materials for solid sorption air conditioning systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yu. I Aristov; G Restuccia; G Cacciola; V. N Parmon

    2002-01-01

    In this communication a family of new working materials, so called selective water sorbents, is presented for sorption air conditioning. These materials are composites “hygroscopic salt inside porous matrix with open pores” and possess intermediate behaviour between solid adsorbents, salt hydrates and liquid absorbents, so that their water sorption properties can be controllably modified by varying (a) porous structure of

  5. Working with American Indian Students and Families: Disabilities, Issues, and Interventions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pewewardy, Cornel; Fitzpatrick, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Although most American Indian students are educated in the public school system, there is limited literature regarding (a) how general and special educators can effectively meet the unique educational needs of these students or (b) what strategies educators can use while working with their families. Additionally, there are limited resources…

  6. Emerging Adults in Sweden: Identity Formation in the Light of Love, Work, and Family

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frisen, Ann; Wangqvist, Maria

    2011-01-01

    In this study, the identity formation of emerging adults in Sweden was investigated in order to discover how identity issues concerning love, work and family are handled. The study group comprised 136 24- to 26-year-olds. The results revealed differences between men and women with regard to their position in the identity formation process. While…

  7. AdvoCasey: Documenting Programs That Work for Kids and Families, 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Douglas W.; Rust, Bill; Hinds, Michael DeCourcy

    2000-01-01

    This publication includes five articles on health care and health promotion within impoverished communities. "The Health of Families and Communities" (Douglas W. Nelson) introduces the issue, discussing the work of the Annie E. Casey Foundation in communities. "Inconspicuous Consumption: Treating Latent TB Infection in Seattle" (Bill Rust) reports…

  8. Analysis of organizational commitment and work–family conflict in view of doctors and nurses

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Serap Benligiray; Harun Sönmez

    2012-01-01

    The present study investigates the relationship between organizational commitment and work–family conflict for medical doctors and nurses. Using canonical analysis on questionnaire, this relation has been tested distinctively through three sub-dimensions of organizational commitment listed: affective commitment, continuance commitment and normative commitment. Data collected from 766 (411 doctors and 355 nurses) individuals employed at seven state hospitals and three medical

  9. Time with Children, Children's Well-Being, and Work-Family Balance among Employed Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milkie, Melissa A.; Kendig, Sarah M.; Nomaguchi, Kei M.; Denny, Kathleen E.

    2010-01-01

    Cultural imperatives for "good" parenting include spending time with children and ensuring that they do well in life. Knowledge of how these factors influence employed parents' work-family balance is limited. Analyses using time diary and survey data from the 2000 National Survey of Parents (N = 933) indicate that how time with children relates to…

  10. Gender, Work, and Family in Cuba: The Challenges of the Special Period

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Maura I. Toro-Morn; Anne R. Roschelle; Elisa Facio

    2002-01-01

    It is within the context of the Special Period, the economic crisis that began in the early 1990s after the collapse of the Soviet Union and the tightening of the economic blockade by the United States, that we analyze work and family relations in Cuba. Although women made significant gains in the labor market after the Revolution, the Special Period

  11. Participants' Experiences in Hellinger's Family Constellation Work: A Grounded Theory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgiadou, Sofia

    2012-01-01

    As a recently introduced to the U.S. model of intergenerational systemic therapy from Germany, Bert Hellinger's Family Constellation Work (FCW) has very limited research support. Hellinger himself has authored a number of publications referencing hundreds of cases, where he implemented his method to approach a broad array of physical,…

  12. Factors Associated with Work–Family Conflict Stress among African American Women

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Portia L. Cole; Mary C. Secret

    2012-01-01

    Job demands and workplace culture variables associated with work–family conflict stress, in addition to workplace racial bias, were examined for a national sample of 607 African American women in 16 Fortune 1000 companies. Similar to other studies, women in this sample who had dependents were younger, had supervisory responsibilities, and experienced a less positive workplace culture, and those in professional

  13. A HIGHER MINIMUM WAGE WOULD BENEFIT WORKING WOMEN, THEIR FAMILIES AND ALL NEW JERSEYANS

    E-print Network

    Garfunkel, Eric

    300,000 women, increasing the minimum wage would help close the wage gap. In 2010, New Jersey women wage would help close this 21-cent gap. New Jersey's wage standards are lower than in other statesJUNE 2012 A HIGHER MINIMUM WAGE WOULD BENEFIT WORKING WOMEN, THEIR FAMILIES AND ALL NEW JERSEYANS

  14. Most family physicians work routinely with nurse practitioners, physician assistants, or certified nurse midwives.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Lars E; Phillips, Robert L; Puffer, James C; Bazemore, Andrew; Petterson, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    The U.S. physician workforce is struggling to keep pace with the demand for health care services, a situation that may worsen without efforts to enhance team-based care. More than half of family physicians work with nurse practitioners, physician assistants, or certified nurse midwives, and doing so helps ensure access to health care services, particularly in rural areas. PMID:23657691

  15. Indigenous Women College Students' Perspectives on College, Work, and Family

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bingham, Jennie L.; Adolpho, Quintina Bearchief; Jackson, Aaron P.; Alexitch, Louise R.

    2014-01-01

    Native American and First Nations (herein collectively referred to as Indigenous) women college students are faced with the challenge of balancing their cultural imperatives and the demands of the dominant Western culture in family, school, and work/employment roles. In order to explore these women's experiences and perspectives, this study…

  16. Does Fertility Respond to Work and Family-life Reconciliation Policies in France?

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    231 Does Fertility Respond to Work and Family-life Reconciliation Policies in France? Olivier For the past two years, France has enjoyed fertility rates approaching replacement level, with a total has thus reached its highest level in about thirty years (Prioux, 2007), placing France in top

  17. Becoming Stronger at Broken Places: A Model for Group Work with Young Adult from Divorced Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hage, Sally M.; Nosanow, Mia

    2000-01-01

    Describes a model for group work with young adults from divorced families using an 8-session psychoeducational group intervention. Goals include reducing isolation, establishing connectedness, and building a stronger sense of identify. By educating young adults on topics such as assertiveness, communication skills, and self-esteem, it will give…

  18. A STORY TO TELL: USE OF STORY AND DRAMA IN WORK WITH SUBSTITUTE FAMILIES

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Joan Moore

    2010-01-01

    This paper discusses the use of a dramatic narrative approach with adoptive and foster families, involving the parents in enactment of their child's life history for the purpose of changing unhelpful patterns in working towards enhanced mutuality. Research on outcomes finds adoption to be mainly successful, however the likelihood of disruption increases with age from approx 20% at age 7

  19. Transitioning between Work and Family Roles as a Function of Boundary Flexibility and Role Salience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winkel, Doan E.; Clayton, Russell W.

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates the manner in which people separate their work and family roles and how they manage the boundaries of these two important roles. Specifically, we focus on how role flexibility and salience influence transitions between roles. Results indicate that the ability and willingness to flex a role boundary and role salience are…

  20. Gender and Attitudes to Work and Family Roles: The Views of Young People at the Millennium

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tinklin, Teresa; Croxford, Linda; Ducklin, Alan; Frame, Barbara

    2005-01-01

    The last century, in particular the latter half, saw radical shifts in the roles and expectations of women in society. This article investigates the views of 14- to 16-year-olds in the year 2000 on work and family roles, exploring both their general views on gender roles and their own personal aspirations for the future. In general the young…

  1. School of Health Sciences As a midwife you will be working with families and parents at

    E-print Network

    Weyde, Tillman

    School of Health Sciences As a midwife you will be working with families and parents at one Sciences Fundamental Aspects of Care Professional Midwifery Knowledge Psychosocial Sciences and Public Health. Students will be able to combine theoretical study and develop clinical skills within our

  2. Relationships between pay satisfaction, work-family conflict, and coaching turnover intentions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Timothy David Ryan; Michael Sagas

    2009-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this study is to examine within college coaches the effects of pay satisfaction and work-family conflict (WFC) on occupational turnover intentions. Specifically, it predicts that WFC would mediate the relationship between satisfaction with pay to occupational turnover intentions. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – Data were collected through a mailed questionnaire of college coaches. Regression analysis was used to

  3. [A gold key to initiate a new situation in family planning work].

    PubMed

    Du, S; Yuan, Z; Fang, X

    1983-05-29

    Because of the popularization of a responsible agricultural production system, the livilihood of peasants has been improving greatly, while the demands and needs of the general public are also increasing at the same time. Still under the influence of the traditional belief of carrying on one's family line and emphasis on having male children, married people prefer to have more childre, and the birth rate is now rising again. In order to solve this new problem, we need to teach the peasants national policies on population, land utilization, and food supply. In order to initiate a new situation in family planning work, we need to control this "gold key" of ideological education and propaganda. The emphasis should be placed on ideological education for cadres at all levels as well as the general public in order that they may understand the Party's strategy. Education on the national strategy should be combined with material interests of the peasants, and reward and punishment in production should also be linked up with that of family planning. Social measures are needed to reduce economic burdens of the peasants, offer better treatment for single-child households, and provide adequate care for old and retired people. Family planning projects should be consolidated and improved. Scientific management, facilities and techniques for birth control, compensation for working personnel in family planning, and other practical problems deserve immediate attention and solution. PMID:12159355

  4. Marriage and family therapy faculty members' balance of work and personal life.

    PubMed

    Matheson, Jennifer L; Rosen, Karen H

    2012-04-01

    A sense of imbalance is common among both professors and therapists, though few studies have been published examining the work and personal life balance of those who work in both professions simultaneously. Using in-depth telephone interviews, this study examined the work and personal life balance of 16 marriage and family therapy (MFT) faculty members. Results showed that six were satisfied with their balance, six were dissatisfied, and four were "middle of the road." Men, older participants, and those who were in their career longer were more likely to report feeling satisfied with their balance. Internal indicators of their balance included family and workplace messages, health indicators, feelings of contentment, and congruence with personal values. Child and relationship status, tenure status, and gender issues also impacted their sense of balance. Specific balance enhancers and reducers were highlighted, and participants discussed coping strategies and recommendations for other MFT faculty members. Clinical, training, and career implications are discussed. PMID:22512300

  5. Conflict between work and family roles and satisfaction among nurses in different shift systems in Croatia: a questionnaire survey.

    PubMed

    Simuni?, Ana; Gregov, Ljiljana

    2012-06-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the perception of conflict between work and family roles and job, family, and life satisfaction among nurses in Croatia. One hundred and twenty-nine nurses (married mothers) working in hospitals in Zadar, Šibenik, and Split were divided in four groups according to their worktime schedule. The participants completed a survey, which included a set of sociodemographic-type questions, questions about the level and allocation of family responsibilities between spouses, and scales measuring the perceived negative effects of worktime, psychological demands of the work, work-family conflict, and semantic differential scales for measuring the affective and cognitive-evaluative component of job, family, and life satisfaction. This was the first study in Croatia to deal with work-family conflict among nurses or workers with different shift systems.The results of this study indicate that nurses working morning shifts only experienced less conflict between work and family than other groups of nurses, who worked the morning, afternoon, and the night shift. The cognitive-evaluative component of job satisfaction was the highest among morning shift nurses and the lowest in nurses who worked 12-hour shifts, while the affective component of life satisfaction was the lowest in nurses working irregular and backward rotated shifts. These results confirm that shiftwork makes the work-family role conflict even worse. They also support the view that the type of shift rotation matters. PMID:22728801

  6. Male Scientists’ Competing Devotions to Work and Family: Changing Norms in a Male-Dominated Profession

    PubMed Central

    Damaske, Sarah; Ecklund, Elaine Howard; Lincoln, Anne E.; White, Virginia Johnston

    2014-01-01

    Using in-depth interviews with 74 men across different ranks in biology and physics at prestigious US universities, we ask to what extent changing norms of fatherhood and a flexible workplace affect men working in a highly male-dominated profession and what variation exists in family forms. We conceptualize four typologies of men: those forgoing children, egalitarian partners, neo-traditional dual-earners, and traditional breadwinners. Findings suggest male scientists hold strong work devotions yet a growing number seek egalitarian relationships, which they frame as reducing their devotion to work. The majority of men find the all-consuming nature of academic science conflicts with changing fatherhood norms. PMID:25419040

  7. When Can Employees Have a Family Life? The Effects of Daily Workload and Affect on Work-Family Conflict and Social Behaviors at Home

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Remus Ilies; Kelly M. Schwind; David Turley WAGNER; Michael D. Johnson; D. Scott DeRue; Daniel R. Ilgen

    2007-01-01

    This article presents a longitudinal examination of antecedents and outcomes of work-to-family conflict. A total of 106 employees participating in an experience-sampling study were asked to respond to daily surveys both at work and at home, and their spouses were interviewed daily via telephone for a period of 2 weeks. Intraindividual analyses revealed that employees' perceptions of workload predicted work-to-family

  8. Does It Matter Where You Work? A Comparison of How Three Work Venues (Traditional Office, Virtual Office, and Home Office) Influence Aspects of Work and Personal/Family Life.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, E. Jeffrey; Ferris, Maria; Martinson, Vjollca

    2003-01-01

    A comparison was made of IBM employees in traditional offices (n=4,316), virtual offices (n=767), and home offices (n=441). Home office teleworking helped balance work and family and enhanced business performance with cost savings. Virtual office teleworking was associated with less work-family balance and less successful personal/family life.…

  9. Alberta family physicians’ willingness to work during an influenza pandemic: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Objective Effective pandemic responses rely on frontline healthcare workers continuing to work despite increased risk to themselves. Our objective was to investigate Alberta family physicians willingness to work during an influenza pandemic. Design: Cross-sectional survey. Setting: Alberta prior to the fall wave of the H1N1 epidemic. Participants: 192 participants from a random sample of 1000 Alberta family physicians stratified by region. Main Outcome Measures: Willingness to work through difficult scenarios created by an influenza epidemic. Results The corrected response rate was 22%. The most physicians who responded were willing to continue working through some scenarios caused by a pandemic, but in other circumstances less than 50% would continue. Men were more willing to continue working than women. In some situations South African and British trained physicians were more willing to continue working than other groups. Conclusions Although many physicians intend to maintain their practices in the event of a pandemic, in some circumstances fewer are willing to work. Pandemic preparation requires ensuring a workforce is available. Healthcare systems must provide frontline healthcare workers with the support and resources they need to enable them to continue providing care. PMID:23800113

  10. Family Structure and Attitudes Toward the Family for Negroes and Whites From Lower-Class and Working-Class Backgrounds.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nosow, Sigmund

    This study is concerned with attitudes of family members, and whether such attitudes indeed vary with different family structures. The increasing sociological and psychiatric evidence seems to support the existence of family strengths in families which have been defined as unstable because of structural attributes. Given the historical character…

  11. Designation of Beneficiary for Unpaid Compensation Upon the death of a University of Memphis employee who was in active pay status at the time of death, the

    E-print Network

    Dasgupta, Dipankar

    Designation of Beneficiary for Unpaid Compensation Upon the death of a University of Memphis employee who was in active pay status at the time of death, the University of Memphis will pay unpaid compensation, which may include annual leave, sick leave, and/or earnings, due at the time of death

  12. 38 CFR 3.1000 - Entitlement under 38 U.S.C. 5121 to benefits due and unpaid upon death of a beneficiary.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...C. 5121 to benefits due and unpaid upon death of a beneficiary. 3.1000 Section...C. 5121 to benefits due and unpaid upon death of a beneficiary. (a) Basic entitlement...provided in §§ 3.1001 and 3.1008, where death occurred on or after December 1,...

  13. 38 CFR 3.1000 - Entitlement under 38 U.S.C. 5121 to benefits due and unpaid upon death of a beneficiary.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...C. 5121 to benefits due and unpaid upon death of a beneficiary. 3.1000 Section...C. 5121 to benefits due and unpaid upon death of a beneficiary. (a) Basic entitlement...provided in §§ 3.1001 and 3.1008, where death occurred on or after December 1,...

  14. 38 CFR 3.1000 - Entitlement under 38 U.S.C. 5121 to benefits due and unpaid upon death of a beneficiary.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...C. 5121 to benefits due and unpaid upon death of a beneficiary. 3.1000 Section...C. 5121 to benefits due and unpaid upon death of a beneficiary. (a) Basic entitlement...provided in §§ 3.1001 and 3.1008, where death occurred on or after December 1,...

  15. 38 CFR 3.1000 - Entitlement under 38 U.S.C. 5121 to benefits due and unpaid upon death of a beneficiary.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...C. 5121 to benefits due and unpaid upon death of a beneficiary. 3.1000 Section...C. 5121 to benefits due and unpaid upon death of a beneficiary. (a) Basic entitlement...provided in §§ 3.1001 and 3.1008, where death occurred on or after December 1,...

  16. 34 CFR Appendix E to Part 674 - Examples for Computing Maximum Penalty Charges (6 Months Unpaid Overdue Payments) on Direct Loans...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Examples for Computing Maximum Penalty Charges (6 Months Unpaid Overdue Payments...Pt. 674, App. E Appendix E to Part 674—Examples for Computing Maximum Penalty Charges (6 Months Unpaid Overdue...

  17. 34 CFR Appendix E to Part 674 - Examples for Computing Maximum Penalty Charges (6 Months Unpaid Overdue Payments) on Direct Loans...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Examples for Computing Maximum Penalty Charges (6 Months Unpaid Overdue Payments...Pt. 674, App. E Appendix E to Part 674—Examples for Computing Maximum Penalty Charges (6 Months Unpaid Overdue...

  18. Working with Families: Messages for Policy and Practice from an Evaluation of a School-Based Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Featherstone, Brid; Manby, Martin

    2006-01-01

    In 2002 the authors evaluated a family support project known as Working with Families managed by the Children's Society and located in a primary school on a large, mainly white council estate in Rochdale. Our reflections on some of the issues which emerged in relation to basing family support services in a school setting seem timely in the light…

  19. "The Changers and the Changed": Preparing Early Childhood Teachers to Work with Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kintner-Duffy, Victoria L.; Vardell, Rosemarie; Lower, Joanna K.; Cassidy, Deborah J.

    2012-01-01

    The Census Bureau estimates that up to 14 million children under the age of 18 are being raised by lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender (LGBT) families. Just as heterosexual families require child care to enable work and want high-quality early childhood education to enhance their children's development, LGBT families experience the same needs…

  20. “The Changers and the Changed”: Preparing Early Childhood Teachers to Work With Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Families

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Victoria L. Kintner-Duffy; Rosemarie Vardell; Joanna K. Lower; Deborah J. Cassidy

    2012-01-01

    The Census Bureau estimates that up to 14 million children under the age of 18 are being raised by lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender (LGBT) families. Just as heterosexual families require child care to enable work and want high-quality early childhood education to enhance their children's development, LGBT families experience the same needs and desires for their children. However, similar

  1. Expertise in research-informed clinical decision making: Working effectively with families of children with little or no functional speech

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gillian King; Beata Batorowicz; Tracy A. Shepherd

    2008-01-01

    In this article, we consider what is known about how to work effectively with families of children with disabilities, including those with little or no functional speech. Existing evidence about what families want from services is considered, along with information about how expert therapists practice. Our review indicates the importance of understanding family needs, preferences, and priorities, and of being

  2. Protecting the health of employees caring for family members with special health care needs.

    PubMed

    Earle, Alison; Heymann, Jody

    2011-07-01

    Over half of American workers are holding a paid job while also providing unpaid assistance and support to a family member. Research shows that family members who provide care to children or adults with special health care needs are themselves at risk of physical and mental health problems. Yet, little research has explored how the work environment mediates the effects of caregiving on caregivers' mental and physical health. With a sample of 2455 currently employed U.S. adults from the Work, Family, Community Nexus (WFCN) survey, a random-digit dial, nationally representative survey of Americans aged 18-69, we examine whether paid leave and flexibility policies mediate the relationship between caregiving and health. In Ordinary Least Squares regression models, we find that paid leave to address family members' health was associated with better mental health status as measured by the 5-item Mental Health Inventory and paid sick leave with better physical health status as measured by self-rated overall health status. A supportive supervisor was also associated with improvements in mental and physical health. For both men and women, paid leave and a supervisor's support offset some or all of the negative effects of caregiving, but for women, the buffering effects of working conditions are slightly larger. Enhancing the unpaid leave guaranteed in the U.S. Family and Medical Leave Act so that it is paid and passing national paid sick days legislation will help ensure that employed caregivers can retain their jobs, receive needed income, and meet their own mental and physical health needs. PMID:21669484

  3. 48 CFR 52.222-4 - Contract Work Hours and Safety Standards-Overtime Compensation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...employing laborers or mechanics (see Federal Acquisition...unpaid wages; liquidated damages. The responsible...wages and liquidated damages. The Contracting...wages and liquidated damages. If amounts withheld...for all laborers and mechanics working on...

  4. 48 CFR 52.222-4 - Contract Work Hours and Safety Standards Act-Overtime Compensation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...employing laborers or mechanics (see Federal Acquisition...unpaid wages; liquidated damages. The responsible...wages and liquidated damages. The Contracting...wages and liquidated damages. If amounts withheld...for all laborers and mechanics working on...

  5. 48 CFR 52.222-4 - Contract Work Hours and Safety Standards Act-Overtime Compensation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...employing laborers or mechanics (see Federal Acquisition...unpaid wages; liquidated damages. The responsible...wages and liquidated damages. The Contracting...wages and liquidated damages. If amounts withheld...for all laborers and mechanics working on...

  6. 48 CFR 52.222-4 - Contract Work Hours and Safety Standards Act-Overtime Compensation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...employing laborers or mechanics (see Federal Acquisition...unpaid wages; liquidated damages. The responsible...wages and liquidated damages. The Contracting...wages and liquidated damages. If amounts withheld...for all laborers and mechanics working on...

  7. 48 CFR 52.222-4 - Contract Work Hours and Safety Standards Act-Overtime Compensation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...employing laborers or mechanics (see Federal Acquisition...unpaid wages; liquidated damages. The responsible...wages and liquidated damages. The Contracting...wages and liquidated damages. If amounts withheld...for all laborers and mechanics working on...

  8. Module 2: Surveying the "Best of the Best"--A Seminar Based on Research Articles Nominated for the Rosabeth Moss Kanter Award for Work-Family Research. Work-Family Curriculum Guide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kossek, Ellen Ernst; Leana, Carrie; MacDermid, Shelley; Pitt-Catsouphes, Marcie; Raskin, Patricia; Secret, Mary; Sweet, Stephen

    2006-01-01

    This module offers students opportunities to examine the theories and research associated with a range of different disciplines that focus on relationships between family life and work life. The module is organized around articles that have been nominated for the Rosabeth Moss Kanter Award for Work-Family Research. This award process identifies…

  9. An Integrative, Multilevel, and Transdisciplinary Research Approach to Challenges of Work, Family, and Health

    PubMed Central

    Bray, Jeremy W.; Kelly, Erin L.; Hammer, Leslie B.; Almeida, David M.; Dearing, James W.; King, Rosalind B.; Buxton, Orfeu M.

    2013-01-01

    Recognizing a need for rigorous, experimental research to support the efforts of workplaces and policymakers in improving the health and wellbeing of employees and their families, the National Institutes of Health and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention formed the Work, Family & Health Network (WFHN). The WFHN is implementing an innovative multisite study with a rigorous experimental design (adaptive randomization, control groups), comprehensive multilevel measures, a novel and theoretically based intervention targeting the psychosocial work environment, and translational activities. This paper describes challenges and benefits of designing a multilevel and transdisciplinary research network that includes an effectiveness study to assess intervention effects on employees, families, and managers; a daily diary study to examine effects on family functioning and daily stress; a process study to understand intervention implementation; and translational research to understand and inform diffusion of innovation. Challenges were both conceptual and logistical, spanning all aspects of study design and implementation. In dealing with these challenges, however, the WFHN developed innovative, transdisciplinary, multi-method approaches to conducting workplace research that will benefit both the research and business communities. PMID:24618878

  10. Return to work after occupational injury. Family physicians' perspectives on soft-tissue injuries.

    PubMed Central

    Guzman, Jaime; Yassi, Annalee; Cooper, Juliette E.; Khokhar, Jawad

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To document physicians' views about facilitating factors for and barriers to their helping workers recover after occupational soft-tissue injuries and to ascertain physicians' knowledge and attitudinal barriers to their involvement in return to work. DESIGN: Faxed survey. SETTING: Manitoba family practices and emergency departments. PARTICIPANTS: General practitioners, family physicians, and emergency physicians regularly caring for injured workers. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Physicians' ranking of facilitating factors and barriers, changes to help their involvement in return to work, and their attitudes and knowledge about return to work. RESULTS: Respondents and nonrespondents were demographically similar, 232 physicians (51.3%) responded. Respondents believed the main facilitating factors were physicians' ability to explain the nature and prognosis of injuries to workers (69%) and the willingness of workplaces to accommodate injured workers (26%). The main barriers were workers' misunderstandings and fears about their injuries (70.7%) and non-supportive supervisors and co-workers (20.8%). The most frequently requested change was better workplace job accommodation (48%). Most physicians agreed they had a role in planning return to work and were aware of the effect of job satisfaction, psychosocial elements, and work-related factors. Despite supporting evidence, only one third of physicians stated they would say "try to continue usual activities" to patients with occupational low back pain. CONCLUSION: Most physicians seemed aware of their role in return to work and the effect of occupational factors, but their advice on activity after injury differed from that in practice guidelines. PMID:12520791

  11. Does trait affectivity predict work-to-family conflict and enrichment beyond job characteristics?

    PubMed

    Tement, Sara; Korunka, Christian

    2013-01-01

    The present study examines whether negative and positive affectivity (NA and PA, respectively) predict different forms of work-to-family conflict (WFC-time, WFC-strain, WFC-behavior) and enrichment (WFE-development, WFE-affect, WFE-capital) beyond job characteristics (workload, autonomy, variety, workplace support). Furthermore, interactions between job characteristics and trait affectivity while predicting WFC and WFE were examined. Using a large sample of Slovenian employees (N = 738), NA and PA were found to explain variance in WFC as well as in WFE above and beyond job characteristics. More precisely, NA significantly predicted WFC, whereas PA significantly predicted WFE. In addition, several interactive effects were found to predict forms of WFC and WFE. These results highlight the importance of trait affectivity in work-family research. They provide further support for the crucial impact of job characteristics as well. PMID:23469478

  12. Family\\/work roles' relation to perceived stress: Do gender and ethnicity matter?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Peggy S. Berger; Alicia Skinner Cook; Robert L. DelCampo; Ruth S. Herrera; Randy R. Weigel

    1994-01-01

    This exploratory research examines whether gender and ethnic differences exist in family- and work-related variables that\\u000a best predict perceived stress. The Anglo male (N=115) and female (N=199) and Mexican-American male (N=35) and female (N=85)\\u000a respondents each had the roles of employee, spouse, and parent. Data were collected by mail questionnaire from state-classified\\u000a employees at the three land-grant universities in Colorado,

  13. Consequences of work-family conflict on employee well-being over time

    Microsoft Academic Search

    STEWART I. DONALDSON

    2001-01-01

    The eVects of work-family conict on the well-being of a diverse sample of 342 non-professional employees from the greater Los Angeles area were examined. Data were collected at two points in time, and a rigorous research design was employed. The eVects of self-report bias were considered by controlling for social desirability bias, and by collecting two sources of data (i.e.

  14. An Investigation of Role Salience and Linkages to Work-Family Conflict

    E-print Network

    Greer, Tomika Wilson

    2012-07-16

    that influences work-family conflict. Role Salience. Role salience has been used as ?the inclusive term for the attitudinal, cognitive, and behavioral aspects of the relative prominence or importance of any [life] role? (Super, 1982, p. 96). Consistent... structure of salience. Role salience has been used as ?the inclusive term for the attitudinal, cognitive, and behavioral aspects of the relative prominence or importance of any [life] role? (Super, 1982, p. 96). Role salience should be of particular...

  15. The Growing Costs and Burden of Family Caregiving of Older Adults: A Review of Paid Sick Leave and Family Leave Policies.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mei-Lan

    2014-10-21

    Many family caregivers of older adults suffer from a high burden of care and struggle with the balance of jobs and caregiving tasks. However, the United States is the only developed country without paid sick leave policies for all workers and their families. The purpose of this article is to review the federal Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) and empirical studies about paid sick policy, propose policy recommendations, and provide a starting point for future research. The result has shown that the FMLA only applies to certain employees and the provided leave is unpaid under the act. Working women, Latinos, low-wage workers, and less-educated employees are less likely to access paid sick leave and family leave. Obviously, social injustice exists in the FMLA and paid sick leave policies. This article proposes that the Family and Medical Leave Act coverage should be expanded to protect all workers, especially for primary family caregivers of older adults, regardless of family relationships. Also, paid sick and family leave laws should be passed, and requirements to contribute to a family-friendly workplace added to relieve the growing burden of family caregiving of older adults. Policy recommendations including the exemplar of the San Francisco Paid Sick Leave Ordinance, and suggestions for more comprehensive policies are proposed for federal, state, or/and city legislation. PMID:25335873

  16. Family-supportive work environments and psychological strain: a longitudinal test of two theories.

    PubMed

    Odle-Dusseau, Heather N; Herleman, Hailey A; Britt, Thomas W; Moore, Dewayne D; Castro, Carl A; McGurk, Dennis

    2013-01-01

    Based on the Job Demands-Resources (JDR) model (E. Demerouti, A. B. Bakker, F. Nachreiner, & W. B. Schaufeli, 2001, The job demands-resources model of burnout. Journal of Applied Psychology, 86, 499-512) and Conservation of Resources (COR) theory (S. E. Hobfoll, 2002, Social and psychological resources and adaptation. Review of General Psychology, 6, 307-324), we tested three competing models that predict different directions of causation for relationships over time between family-supportive work environments (FSWE) and psychological strain, with two waves of data from a military sample. Results revealed support for both the JDR and COR theories, first in the static model where FSWE at Time 1 predicted psychological strain at Time 2 and when testing the opposite direction, where psychological strain at Time 1 predicted FSWE at Time 2. For change models, FSWE predicted changes in psychological strain across time, although the reverse causation model was not supported (psychological strain at Time 1 did not predict changes in FSWE). Also, changes in FSWE across time predicted psychological strain at Time 2, whereas changes in psychological strain did not predict FSWE at Time 2. Theoretically, these results are important for the work-family interface in that they demonstrate the application of a systems approach to studying work and family interactions, as support was obtained for both the JDR model with perceptions of FSWE predicting psychological strain (in both the static and change models), and for COR theory where psychological strain predicts FSWE across time. PMID:23276196

  17. Work Characteristics and Fathers’ Vocabulary to Infants in African American Families

    PubMed Central

    Pancsofar, Nadya; Vernon-Feagans, Lynne; Odom, Erika C.

    2012-01-01

    Fathers’ vocabulary to infants has been linked in the literature to early child language development, however, little is known about the variability in fathers’ language behavior. This study considered associations between fathers’ work characteristics and fathers’ vocabulary among a sample of employed African American fathers of 6-month old infants who were living in low-income rural communities. After controlling for family and individual factors, we found that fathers who worked nonstandard shifts and reported more job flexibility used more diverse vocabulary with their infants. PMID:23483822

  18. Family Life and Work Experience before 1918: An oral history research project

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This site from Qualidata, the ESRC Qualitative Data Archival Resource Centre of University of Essex in the United Kingdom, provides the methodology used, as well as samples of the work, from Family Life and Work Experience before 1918, the first national oral history study in Britain which was performed from 1970 to 1973. The site for the project includes samples of the occupation and geographical classifications used in the study, the original interview schedule, and the transcripts, summary sheet, and index card for a sample interview with "Emmie Durham." The site is accompanied by an extensive bibliography on oral history methodology.

  19. Working Parents Project (WPP), Division of Family, School and Community Studies (DFSCS) Annual Report and Executive Summary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Espinoza, Renato; And Others

    The basic goal of the Working Parents Project (WPP) has been to contribute to the understanding of issues arising from the relationship between work and family life. The WPP perspective pays particular attention to the ways workplace culture affects the ability of family members to participate in their children's education at home and in school.…

  20. The relationship between work-family conflict and the level of self-efficacy in female nurses in Alzahra Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Baghban, Iran; Malekiha, Marziyeh; Fatehizadeh, Maryam

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Work-family conflict has many negative outcomes for organization and career and family life of each person. The aim of present study was to determine the relationship between work-family conflict and the level of self-efficacy in female nurses. METHODS: In this cross-sectional descriptive research, the relationship between work-family conflict and the level of self-efficacy in female nurses of Alzahra Hospital was assessed. Questionnaire, demographic data form, work-family conflict scale and self-efficacy scale were the data collection tools. Content analysis and Cronbach’s alpha were used for evaluating the validity and reliability of questionnaire. The study sample included 160 nurses (80 permanent nurses and 80 contract-based nurses) selected through simple random sampling from nurses working in different wards of Alzahra Hospital. Data analysis was done using SPSS software. RESULTS: There was significant difference in work-family conflict between the two groups of permanent and contract-based nurses (p = 0.02). Also, a significant difference in the level of self-efficacy was observed between the two groups of nurses (p = 0.03). CONCLUSIONS: The level of self-efficacy and work-family conflict in contract-based nurses was not acceptable. Therefore, it is suggested to arrange courses to train effective skills in the field of management of work-family conflicts in order to increase the level of self-efficacy for contract-based nurses. PMID:21589794

  1. Module 3: Workplace Policy, Practice and Culture--Employer and Employee Perspectives. Work-Family Curriculum Guide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kossek, Ellen Ernst; Leana, Carrie; MacDermid, Shelley; Pitt-Catsouphes, Marcie; Raskin, Patricia; Secret, Mary; Sweet, Stephen

    2006-01-01

    The contents of this module have been prepared to address some of challenges associated with teaching about work-family issues from a human resource management and employment perspective. The goals of this module are: (1) To develop an understanding that work-family policies are part of a human resource management system and the employment…

  2. Construct Validation of the Translated Version of the Work-Family Conflict Scale for Use in Korea

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lim, Doo Hun; Morris, Michael Lane; McMillan, Heather S.

    2011-01-01

    Recently, the stress of work-family conflict has been a critical workplace issue for Asian countries, especially within those cultures experiencing rapid economic development. Our research purpose is to translate and establish construct validity of a Korean-language version of the Multi-Dimensional Work-Family Conflict (WFC) scale used in the U.S.…

  3. Florida Atlantic University School of Social Work

    E-print Network

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    Florida Atlantic University School of Social Work 1 Rev. 10-20-09 Own Agency Placement (OAP) - Policy Overview: Traditionally, Social Work field placements are educationally focused, unpaid training experiences in social work settings which are selected on the basis of the student's level and

  4. Understanding resilience in same-sex parented families: the work, love, play study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background While families headed by same-sex couples have achieved greater public visibility in recent years, there are still many challenges for these families in dealing with legal and community contexts that are not supportive of same-sex relationships. The Work, Love, Play study is a large longitudinal study of same-sex parents. It aims to investigate many facets of family life among this sample and examine how they change over time. The study focuses specifically on two key areas missing from the current literature: factors supporting resilience in same-sex parented families; and health and wellbeing outcomes for same-sex couples who undergo separation, including the negotiation of shared parenting arrangements post-separation. The current paper aims to provide a comprehensive overview of the design and methods of this longitudinal study and discuss its significance. Methods/Design The Work, Love, Play study is a mixed design, three wave, longitudinal cohort study of same-sex attracted parents. The sample includes lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender parents in Australia and New Zealand (including single parents within these categories) caring for any children under the age of 18 years. The study will be conducted over six years from 2008 to 2014. Quantitative data are to be collected via three on-line surveys in 2008, 2010 and 2012 from the cohort of parents recruited in Wave1. Qualitative data will be collected via interviews with purposively selected subsamples in 2012 and 2013. Data collection began in 2008 and 355 respondents to Wave One of the study have agreed to participate in future surveys. Work is currently underway to increase this sample size. The methods and survey instruments are described. Discussion This study will make an important contribution to the existing research on same-sex parented families. Strengths of the study design include the longitudinal method, which will allow understanding of changes over time within internal family relationships and social supports. Further, the mixed method design enables triangulation of qualitative and quantitative data. A broad recruitment strategy has already enabled a large sample size with the inclusion of both gay men and lesbians. PMID:20211027

  5. Work Family liFeBalancing joB and personal responsiBilities continued on page 2...

    E-print Network

    Ginzel, Matthew

    Work Family liFeBalancing joB and personal responsiBilities continued on page 2... Work & Family on thE job Keeping in touch when you travel for work 6 a hEalthy you Tips for eating healthier in restaurants for others. Adapted from The Blessing of a Skinned Knee by Wendy Mogel, Ph.D. H ere's a simple formula

  6. Effects of work–family culture on employee well-being: Exploring moderator effects in a longitudinal sample

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Saija Mauno

    2010-01-01

    This present panel study had three aims: (1) to shed new light on the work–family culture (WFC)–well-being (work–family conflict, work engagement, job exhaustion) linkage by investigating lagged associations between the phenomena; (2) to consider the multidimensional nature of WFC by specifying whether its lagged effects on well-being would vary by its dimensions; and (3) to explore whether the positive aspects

  7. The impact of work-family policies on women's employment: a review of research from OECD countries

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ariane Hegewisch; Janet C. Gornick

    2011-01-01

    All industrialized countries, as well as many developing and transition countries, have policies in place to support work-family reconciliation such as care-related leaves, policies that increase the quality or availability of flexible and alternative work arrangements, and childcare supports. While work-family policies share common elements across borders, the extent and nature of supports vary widely across countries. This cross-national diversity

  8. Managers’ Practices Related to Work–Family Balance Predict Employee Cardiovascular Risk and Sleep Duration in Extended Care Settings

    PubMed Central

    Berkman, Lisa F.; Buxton, Orfeu; Ertel, Karen; Okechukwu, Cassandra

    2012-01-01

    An increasing proportion of U.S. workers have family caregiving responsibilities. The purpose of this study was to determine whether employees in extended care settings whose managers are supportive, open, and creative about work–family needs, such as flexibility with work schedules, have lower cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk and longer sleep than their less supported counterparts. From semistructured interviews with managers, we constructed a work–family balance score of manager openness and creativity in dealing with employee work–family needs. Trained interviewers collected survey and physiologic outcome data from 393 employees whose managers had a work–family score. Employee outcomes are sleep duration (actigraphy) and CVD risk assessed by blood cholesterol, high glycosylated hemoglobin/diabetes, blood pressure/hypertension, body-mass index, and tobacco consumption. Employees whose managers were less supportive slept less (29 min/day) and were over twice as likely to have 2 or more CVD risk factors (ORs = 2.1 and 2.03 for low and middle manager work–family scores, respectively) than employees whose managers were most open and creative. Employees who provide direct patient care exhibited particularly elevated CVD risk associated with low manager work–family score. Managers’ attitudes and practices may affect employee health, including sleep duration and CVD risk. PMID:20604637

  9. Comparison of burnout pattern between hospital physicians and family physicians working in Suez Canal University Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Kotb, Amany Ali; Mohamed, Khalid Abd-Elmoez; Kamel, Mohammed Hbany; Ismail, Mosleh Abdul Rahman; Abdulmajeed, Abdulmajeed Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The burnout syndrome is characterized by emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and low personal accomplishment. It is associated with impaired job performance. Methods This descriptive study examined 171 physicians for the presence of burnout and its related risk factors. The evaluation of burnout was through Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI). The participant was considered to meet the study criteria for burnout if he or she got a “high“ score on at least 2 of the three dimensions of MBI. Results In the current study, the prevalence of burnout in hospital physicians (53.9%) was significantly higher than family physicians (41.94%) with (p=0.001). Participants who work in the internal medicine department scored the highest prevalence (69.64%) followed by Surgeons (56.50%) and Emergency doctors (39.39%). On the other hand, Pediatricians got the lowest prevalence (18.75%). Working in the teaching hospital and being married are strong predictors for occurrence of burnout. Conclusion There is a significant difference of burnout between hospital physicians and family physicians among the study subjects. Working in the teaching hospital and being married are strong predictors for occurrence of burnout. PMID:25422682

  10. Gender differences in insomnia and the role of paid work and family responsibilities

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Eiji Yoshioka; Yasuaki Saijo; Toshiko Kita; Hiroki Satoh; Mariko Kawaharada; Tomonori Fukui; Reiko Kishi

    Purpose  A higher prevalence of insomnia in females has been consistently demonstrated across countries and cultures. The aim of this\\u000a study was to clarify whether gender differences in insomnia could be explained by gender differences in paid work and family\\u000a responsibilities.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  Participants were employees at two local governments in Hokkaido, Japan, who underwent annual health checkups from April 2003\\u000a to March

  11. Training issues for supervisors of marriage and family therapists working with persons living with HIV.

    PubMed

    Serovich, J M; Mosack, K E

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to address the special issues and considerations Martial and Family Therapy (MFT) supervisors might face with the increasing HIV/AIDS epidemic. Three primary issues will be addressed in this article. First, the importance of educating therapists regarding various aspects of the disease process and its transmission will be discussed, followed by educational strategies programs might adopt. Second, we will discuss the ethical and legal considerations that may need monitoring by supervisors and trainees. Third, special therapeutic considerations will be provided to supervisors of therapists working with stigmatized populations. PMID:10685356

  12. Young Australian Women’s Aspirations for Work and Family: Individual and Sociocultural Differences

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Melissa Johnstone; Christina Lee

    2009-01-01

    The arguments underlying Hakim’s Lifestyle Preference Theory have initiated debate over the importance of individual preferences,\\u000a versus social and structural constraints, in women’s work and family patterns. This paper investigates the role of sociocultural\\u000a factors in lifestyle preferences. A total of 6,929 Australian women, aged 25–30 years, from the Australian Longitudinal Study\\u000a on Women’s Health (ALSWH), were categorised into Hakim’s Lifestyle

  13. Marriage and Family Therapists Working with Family Violence: Strained Bedfellows or Compatible Partners?: A Commentary on Avis, Kaufman, and Bograd.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meth, Richard L.

    1992-01-01

    Responds to previous articles by Avis, Kaufman, and Bograd on role of marital and family therapists in dealing with family violence among clients. Comments on presentation style of earlier articles and then discusses points of agreement and disagreement with each of the three authors. Concludes by urging therapists to learn more so they can…

  14. Family and Consumer Sciences Education. Focusing on Families, Work, and Their Interrelationships. Alabama Course of Study. Bulletin 1996, No. 17.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alabama State Dept. of Education, Montgomery.

    This guide, which is intended for classroom teachers, supervisors, and administrators throughout Alabama, contains the minimum required content (core program) for public school instruction in family and consumer sciences education in grades 7-12. Presented first are the following: introduction examining the objectives/delivery of family and…

  15. Family-supportive organization perceptions and organizational commitment: the mediating role of work-family conflict and enrichment and partner attitudes.

    PubMed

    Wayne, Julie Holliday; Casper, Wendy J; Matthews, Russell A; Allen, Tammy D

    2013-07-01

    The present study aims to explain the processes through which family-supportive organizational perceptions (FSOP) relate to employee affective commitment. We suggest multiple mechanisms through which this relationship transpires-(a) the focal employee's experience of work-to-family conflict and enrichment and (b) the attitudes of the employee's spouse/partner. Hypotheses are tested with data from 408 couples. Results suggest that employee FSOP is positively associated with employee commitment through both employee work-to-family experiences and partner attitudes. FSOP was positively related to employee work-to-family enrichment, which was positively associated with employee affective commitment. FSOP was negatively associated with employee work-to-family conflict, which related to a partner's more positive attitude toward the employee's work schedule and higher commitment to the employee's firm. Partner commitment was positively and reciprocally related to employee affective commitment. These relationships partially mediated the FSOP-employee affective commitment relationship and varied as a function of parental status and single- versus dual-earner couple status but not as a function of employee gender. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed. PMID:23565896

  16. The Relationship between Organizational Support, Work-Family Conflict, and the Job-Life Satisfaction of University Coaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dixon, Marlene A.; Sagas, Michael

    2007-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between organizational support, work-family conflict, and job and life satisfaction among coaches. Data from collegiate head coaches with families (N = 253) were gathered through a mailed questionnaire. Results from a series of covariance structure models indicated that a partially mediated model was the best…

  17. Linkages between Negative Work-to-Family Spillover and Mothers' and Fathers' Knowledge of Their Young Adolescents Daily Lives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bumpus, Matthew F.; Crouter, Ann C.; McHale, Susan M.

    2006-01-01

    This study examines the relationships between mothers' and fathers' perceptions of negative work-to-family spillover and their knowledge of their preadolescent children's (mean age = 11.8 years) daily lives in a sample of dual-earner families. Three constructs are tested as potential mediators of the association between spillover and parental…

  18. Relationship between work-family conflict and quality of life : An investigation into the role of social support

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Murali Sambasivan; Izhairi Ismail

    2010-01-01

    Purpose – The main purpose of this study is to link work-family conflict, quality of work and non-work lives, quality of life and social support (supervisor and spouse supports). Specifically, it seeks to address three different roles of social support that have theoretical and empirical support and the mediating roles of quality of work life and quality of non-work life.

  19. Work-family conflict and job satisfaction in stressful working environments : The moderating roles of perceived supervisor support and internal locus of control

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yu Ru Hsu

    2011-01-01

    Purpose – This study aims to examine the moderating effects of perceived supervisor support (work environment variable) and internal locus of control (personality variable) on the relationship of work-family conflict with job satisfaction. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – Questionnaire surveys were administered. Data were collected from correctional officers in Taiwan. Hierarchical regression analysis was used to test the hypotheses. Findings – Results show

  20. Work, Family, and the Faculty Career. New Pathways: Faculty Career and Employment for the 21st Century Working Paper Series, Inquiry #8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gappa, Judith M.; MacDermid, Shelley M.

    This paper, one in a series about the priorities of the professoriate, examines work-family issues as they affect faculty recruitment, retention, and productivity. Following a brief discussion of changing work-force demographics, the first part of the paper examines the structure of an academic career, focusing particularly on junior faculty and…

  1. Family Caregivers of Elderly Patients With Cancer: Understanding and Minimizing the Burden of Care

    Microsoft Academic Search

    William E. Haley

    2003-01-01

    Family caregivers play an essential role, usually unpaid, in car- ing for patients with cancer. Most older patients with cancer are cared for by a family member, who may not be prepared for the challenges. The needs of older patients are diverse and may include assistance with medication, transportation for treatment, activities of daily living, and emotional support. The activities

  2. Equipping Managers to Assist Employees in Addressing Work-Family Conflict: Applying the Research Literature toward Innovative Practice

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Debra A. Major; Heather M. Lauzun

    2010-01-01

    Although there is a great deal of research documenting that work-family conflict is a problem, the literature offers much less in the way of practical managerial guidance. Equipped with the well-documented premise that support from the immediate supervisor or manager is associated with diminished work-family conflict, the authors aimed to bridge the science–practice gap by articulating (a) the effective ways

  3. Publicly funded and family-friend care in the case of long-term illness: the role of the spouse.

    PubMed

    Hayward, Lynda; Davies, Sharon; Robb, Roberta; Denton, Margaret; Auton, Greg

    2004-01-01

    In recent years, considerable attention has been devoted to the value of unpaid work in the economy. One very important aspect of unpaid work is caregiving for chronically ill or disabled people and the question of whether or not family-and-friend caregiving eases the burden on the publicly funded system. Using data from the 1996 General Social Survey, this paper investigates the extent to which the presence of a spouse of a senior aged 55 and over with a long-term illness reduces the amount of publicly funded care received. The findings from the multivariate Tobit analysis show that the presence of the spouse does significantly reduce the amount of publicly funded care used. This result is not gender-specific. The total hours of caregiving by the spouse are valued, as well as the savings generated for the publicly funded system, and the policy issue of tax relief for spouses who are engaged in long-term caregiving is explored. PMID:15660302

  4. The Occupational Safety of Health Professionals Working at Community and Family Health Centers

    PubMed Central

    Ozturk, Havva; Babacan, Elif

    2014-01-01

    Background: Healthcare professionals encounter many medical risks while providing healthcare services to individuals and the community. Thus, occupational safety studies are very important in health care organizations. They involve studies performed to establish legal, technical, and medical measures that must be taken to prevent employees from sustaining physical or mental damage because of work hazards. Objectives: This study was conducted to determine if the occupational safety of health personnel at community and family health centers (CHC and FHC) has been achieved. Martials and Methods: The population of this cross-sectional study comprised 507 nurses, 199 physicians, and 237 other medical personnel working at a total of 18 family health centers (FHC) and community health centers (CHC) in Trabzon, Turkey. The sample consisted of a total of 418 nurses, 156 physicians, and 123 other medical personnel. Sampling method was not used, and the researchers tried to reach the whole population. Data were gathered with the Occupational Safety Scale (OSS) and a questionnaire regarding demographic characteristics and occupational safety. Results: According to the evaluations of all the medical personnel, the mean ± SD of total score of the OSS was 3.57 ± 0.98; of the OSS’s subscales, the mean ± SD of the health screening and registry systems was 2.76 ± 1.44, of occupational diseases and problems was 3.04 ± 1.3 and critical fields control was 3.12 ± 1.62. In addition, occupational safety was found more insufficient by nurses (F = 14.18; P < 0.001). Conclusions: All healthcare personnel, particularly nurses working in CHCs and FHCs found occupational safety to be insufficient as related to protective and supportive activities. PMID:25558383

  5. Working memory span capacity improved by a D2 but not D1 receptor family agonist

    PubMed Central

    Tarantino, Isadore S; Sharp, Richard F; Geyer, Mark A; Meves, Jessica M; Young, Jared W

    2011-01-01

    Patients with schizophrenia exhibit poor working memory (WM). Although several subcomponents of WM can be measured, evidence suggests the primary subcomponent affected in schizophrenia is span capacity (WMC). Indeed, the NIMH-funded MATRICS initiative recommended assaying the WMC when assessing the efficacy of a putative therapeutic for FDA approval. Although dopamine D1 receptor agonists improve delay-dependent memory in animals, evidence for improvements in WMC due to dopamine D1 receptor activation is limited. In contrast, the dopamine D2-family agonist bromocriptine improves WMC in humans. The radial arm maze (RAM) can be used to assess WMC, although complications due to ceiling effects or strategy confounds have limited its use. We describe a 12-arm RAM protocol designed to assess whether the dopamine D1-family agonist SKF 38393 (0, 1, 3, and 10 mg/kg) or bromocriptine (0, 1, 3, and 10 mg/kg) could improve WMC in C57BL/6N mice (n=12) in cross-over designs. WMC increased and strategy usage decreased with training. The dopamine D1 agonist SKF 38393 had no effect on WMC or long-term memory. Bromocriptine decreased WMC errors, without affecting long-term memory, consistent with human studies. These data confirm that WMC can be measured in mice and reveal drug effects that are consistent with reported effects in humans. Future research is warranted to identify the subtype of the D2-family of receptors responsible for the observed improvement in WMC. Finally, this RAM procedure may prove useful in developing animal models of deficient WMC to further assess putative treatments for the cognitive deficits in schizophrenia. PMID:21232557

  6. Hidden Knowing of Working-Class Transnational Mexican Families in Schools: Bridge-Building, Nepantlera Knowers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kasun, G. Sue

    2014-01-01

    Reframing immigrant families as transnationals, this article highlights transnational families' ways of knowing. This study is based on a three-year, multi-sited critical ethnographic set of case studies of four families in the USA and Mexico. Transnational families in this study demonstrated Nepantlera knowing, or liminal, bridge-building…

  7. Encouraging Strong Family Relationships. State Policies That Work. Brief Number 6

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for the Study of Social Policy, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The relational well-being of families is an important factor affecting a family's economic success, physical and mental heath, the readiness and success of children in school, and the engagement of youth in positive and productive roles. In short, the strength of family bonds is crucial to a family's capacity to provide, nurture, and care for its…

  8. Work and Family Life among Anglo, Black and Mexican American Single-Parent Families. Executive Summary of the 1983 Annual Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Espinoza, Renato; And Others

    The focus of the Working Parents Project (WPP) has been on how families adapt and function in relation to workplace policies, with particular attention given to the participation of parents in contexts of child care and socialization, including education-related activities. This report builds on previous data from the WPP by expanding the sample…

  9. Liminal Cultural Work in Family Childcare: Latino Immigrant Family Childcare Providers and Bicultural Childrearing in the United States, 2002-2004

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uttal, Lynet

    2010-01-01

    Immigrants find themselves in a liminal state of limbo between two societies. In this zone, competing cultural ideas coexist. This essay examines how Latino immigrant family childcare providers in the United States questioned US norms of childrearing and how they engaged in liminal cultural work to produce a bicultural childrearing. They are…

  10. Education, Training and Resources for Family Workers in Western Canada: A Follow-up Study of the 1977 Banff Conference on "Clinical Approaches to Work with Families."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baskett, H. K.

    After a 1977 Banff Conference on "Clinical Approaches to Work with Families" in June, 1977, approximately one-third of the 134 participants were surveyed or interviewed to determine their evaluation of the conference and their perceptions of future education, training, and resource needs findings were made: (1) the 1977 Banff Conference would…

  11. How important are work-family support policies? A meta-analytic investigation of their effects on employee outcomes.

    PubMed

    Butts, Marcus M; Casper, Wendy J; Yang, Tae Seok

    2013-01-01

    This meta-analysis examines relationships between work-family support policies, which are policies that provide support for dependent care responsibilities, and employee outcomes by developing a conceptual model detailing the psychological mechanisms through which policy availability and use relate to work attitudes. Bivariate results indicated that availability and use of work-family support policies had modest positive relationships with job satisfaction, affective commitment, and intentions to stay. Further, tests of differences in effect sizes showed that policy availability was more strongly related to job satisfaction, affective commitment, and intentions to stay than was policy use. Subsequent meta-analytic structural equation modeling results indicated that policy availability and use had modest effects on work attitudes, which were partially mediated by family-supportive organization perceptions and work-to-family conflict, respectively. Additionally, number of policies and sample characteristics (percent women, percent married-cohabiting, percent with dependents) moderated the effects of policy availability and use on outcomes. Implications of these findings and directions for future research on work-family support policies are discussed. PMID:23106685

  12. Facing the Future: Barriers and Resources in Work and Family Plans of At-Risk Israeli Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cinamon, Rachel Gali; Hason, Iris

    2009-01-01

    This study examines 15 at-risk Israeli youngsters' work and family plans and the perceived barriers and resources influencing the realization of those plans. In-depth interviews analyzed by Consensual Qualitative Research (CQR) demonstrate the complexity of the future awaiting these youths. Participants perceive work mainly as a means of obtaining…

  13. Extended family caring for children orphaned by AIDS: balancing essential work and caregiving in a high HIV prevalence nations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Heymann; A. Earle; D. Rajaraman; C. Miller; K. Bogen

    2007-01-01

    While over 90 per cent of the 15 million children who have been orphaned by HIV\\/AIDS are cared for by family members, there is little information about whether adults can meet orphans’ essential caregiving needs while working to economically survive. Using a survey we conducted in Botswana of 1033 working adults, we analyse the experience of adults who are caring

  14. Family-centered care: a resource for social work in end-of-life and palliative care.

    PubMed

    Kovacs, Pamela J; Bellin, Melissa Hayden; Fauri, David P

    2006-01-01

    Recent trends in medicine reflect an attempt to be more patient-centered and while this is progress from the disease- or provider- focused model familiar in healthcare, the experiences and contributions of family as caregivers continue to be overlooked in some settings. The family-centered care model, developed most notably in pediatrics, but emerging in HIV, cancer, and aging, is presented as a resource to increase family involvement at the end of life. In this paper, family-centered care is defined, caregiving trends including support needs of formal and informal caregivers are discussed, and barriers to family-centered services are identified. Reintroducing family into the focus of care at the end of life is the primary goal of this paper. The family- centered model of care offers an appropriate framework for understanding the value of family in end-of-life care and fits well with social work perspectives that understand individuals in the context of their family system and greater environment. PMID:17387080

  15. Exploring core competencies for mental health and addictions work within a Family Health Team setting.

    PubMed

    Rush, Brian; McPherson-Doe, Catherine; Behrooz, Reneé C; Cudmore, Alan

    2013-06-01

    Approximately 200 Family Health Teams (FHTs) have been implemented in Ontario to improve access to primary healthcare, including mental health and addiction. The objectives of this project were to examine, through a focus group and qualitative methodology with three FHTs, the profile of patients' mental health and addiction-related needs and to identify the implications for the development of core competencies in these innovative organisations. A spectrum of needs and service trajectories was identified, as well as the importance of a wide range of clinical skills and knowledge. The results indicate that 'core' competencies for mental health work in the context of an FHT go well beyond those required for an embedded mental health 'programme' or specialised mental health counsellors, but rather they relate to the core and discipline-specific competencies of members of the entire team. In addition to specific knowledge and skills, competencies include common attitudes and values relating to teamwork, good communication and collaboration. Challenges were noted with regard to working with some community service providers, especially addiction services. Implications for core competencies at the individual and organisational level were identified. PMID:24427175

  16. Tribes of Louis : families, communities and secret societies in the works of Robert Louis Stevenson 

    E-print Network

    Ames, Sarah

    2013-07-04

    If the Victorians privileged the idea of ‘the family’ and the domestic configuration, what, then, was the position of unrelated groups, quasi-families and outsiders? While mid-Victorian literature widely praised or ...

  17. 7 CFR Exhibit K to Subpart A of... - Classifications for Multi-Family Residential Rehabilitation Work

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...partitions and columns; the replacement...conversion of existing multi-family residential...recreation areas, water and waste disposal...Components of Multi-Family Building...components: Beams Chimneys and vents o Columns and post o...

  18. Applications of collaborative helping maps: supporting professional development, supervision and work teams in family-centered practice.

    PubMed

    Madsen, William C

    2014-03-01

    Collaborative, family-centered practice has become an influential approach in helping efforts across a broad spectrum of human services. This article draws from previous work that presented a principle-based, practice framework of Collaborative Helping and highlighted the use of Collaborative Helping maps as a tool both to help workers think their way through complex situations and to provide a guideline for constructive conversations between families and helpers about challenging issues. It builds on that work to examine ways to utilize Collaborative Helping maps at worker, supervisory, and organizational levels to enhance and sustain collaborative, family-centered practice and weave its core values and principles into the everyday fabric of organizational cultures in human service agencies and government agencies that serve poor and marginalized families and communities. PMID:24215323

  19. Working with Parents to Promote Children's Literacy: A Family Literacy Project in Uganda

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parry, Kate; Kirabo, Elizabeth; Nakyato, Gorreth

    2014-01-01

    This article discusses the importance of family practices to children's acquisition of literacy and describes attempts to influence such practices through the institution of family literacy programmes. One of these is the Family Literacy Project in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa, which both served as a model and provided material for a similar…

  20. Women's Work, Education, and Family Welfare in Peru. World Bank Discussion Papers 116.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herz, Barbara K., Ed.; Khandker, Shahidur R., Ed.

    This report examines ways of improving women's productivity and education and the consequences for development in Peru. The research finds that women account for about 39 percent of family income in Peru. They carry the main responsibility for child care and heavily influence family decisions on children's education and family size. Improving…