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1

Household, Paid, and Unpaid Work Time of Farm Women.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examined time allotments to household, paid, and unpaid work for farm, rural nonfarm, and urban women. Findings from 2,100 two-parent, two-child families revealed no significant differences among groups in allocation of time to household work. Of three groups, farm women spent more time in unpaid work, and rural nonfarm women devoted most time to…

Meiners, Jane E.; Olson, Geraldine I.

1987-01-01

2

Responses of French Family and Employment Policy to the Unemployment Crises: Impacts on the Gendering of Paid and Unpaid Work  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article analyses the evolution of family and employment policies in France and evaluates the extent to which they may have ‘stalled’ France's gender revolution. It considers the ‘universal breadwinner’ employment model of women's full-time and continuous participation in the labour market evolving in France in the 1970s and 1980s, due to early state support for childcare, restrictions on part-time

Jan Windebank

2011-01-01

3

The Influence of Unpaid Work on the Transition out of Full-Time Paid Work  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: Continued employment after retirement and engagement in unpaid work are both important ways of diminishing the negative economic effects of the retirement of baby boomer cohorts on society. Little research, however, examines the relationship between paid and unpaid work at the transition from full-time work. Using a resource perspective…

Carr, Dawn C.; Kail, Ben Lennox

2013-01-01

4

The Influence of Unpaid Work on the Transition Out of Full-Time Paid Work  

PubMed Central

Purpose: Continued employment after retirement and engagement in unpaid work are both important ways of diminishing the negative economic effects of the retirement of baby boomer cohorts on society. Little research, however, examines the relationship between paid and unpaid work at the transition from full-time work. Using a resource perspective framework this study examines how engagement in unpaid work prior to and at the transition from full-time work influences whether individuals partially or fully retire. Design and Methods: This study used a sample of 2,236 Americans between the ages 50 and 68, who were interviewed between 1998 and 2008. Logistic regression was used to estimate transitioning into partial retirement (relative to full retirement) after leaving full-time work. Results: We found that the odds of transitioning into part-time work were increased by continuous volunteering (78%) and reduced by starting parental (84%), grandchild (41%), and spousal (90%) caregiving and unaffected by all other patterns of engagement in unpaid work. Implications: Our findings suggest that volunteering is complementary with a transition to part-time work, and starting a new caregiving role at this transitioncreates a barrier to continued employment. In order to provide workers the opportunity to engage in the work force longer at the brink of retirement, it may be necessary to increase the support mechanisms for those who experience new caregiving responsibilities. PMID:22859436

Carr, Dawn C.

2013-01-01

5

Psychology Work Experience Placement This is an unpaid work experience opportunity to `shadow' academic and other members  

E-print Network

Psychology Work Experience Placement (ID:326) Outline This is an unpaid work experience opportunity literature reviews. Participants also attend lectures with undergraduates and experience life as an undergraduate student. Further details Learning outcomes: � Psychology is recognised as a Science and awareness

Harman, Neal.A.

6

Relatively Different? How Do Gender Differences in Well-Being Depend on Paid and Unpaid Work in Europe?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Absolute as well as relative hours of paid and unpaid work may influence well-being. This study investigates whether absolute hours spent on paid work and housework account for the lower well-being among women as compared to men in Europe, and whether the associations between well-being and hours of paid work and housework differ by gender…

Boye, Katarina

2009-01-01

7

Time Use Among new mothers, the Economic Value of Unpaid Care work and gender aspects of superannuation tax concessions  

Microsoft Academic Search

Population aging requires policies addressing ‘population, participation and productivity’. By failing to acknowledge women’s productive work in the unpaid care economy, current retirement income policies may reduce incentives to invest in children, the future labour force, and thereby heighten the economic task of addressing the aging problem. A nationwide time use survey of new mothers conducted during 2005-06 highlights the

Julie Smith

2007-01-01

8

Labor Market Work and Home Care's Unpaid Caregivers: A Systematic Review of Labor Force Participation Rates, Predictors of Labor Market Withdrawal, and Hours of Work  

PubMed Central

As people continue to age and receive complex health care services at home, concern has arisen about the availability of family caregivers and their ability to combine employment with caregiving. This article evaluates the international research on unpaid caregivers and their labor market choices, highlighting three conclusions: first, caregivers in general are equally as likely to be in the labor force as noncaregivers; second, caregivers are more likely to work fewer hours in the labor market than noncaregivers, particularly if their caring commitments are heavy; and finally, only those heavily involved in caregiving are significantly more likely to withdraw from the labor market than noncaregivers. Policy recommendations are targeting greater access to formal care for “intensive” caregivers and developing workplace policies for employed caregivers. PMID:18070333

Lilly, Meredith B; Laporte, Audrey; Coyte, Peter C

2007-01-01

9

Defining the Boundaries between Unpaid Labor and Unpaid Caregiving: Review of the Social and Health Sciences Literature  

Microsoft Academic Search

Informal unpaid caregiving is a critical factor when forming and implementing development policy in and on behalf of developing nations because of how it can affect all aspects of economic and human development for all society, not only women and families. Yet by being treated as an undifferentiated concept from unpaid labor, caregiving remains at the margins in development research

Greta Friedemann-Sánchez; Joan M. Griffin

2011-01-01

10

Page 1 of 2 To allow employees to be away from work upon the death of a family member.  

E-print Network

Page 1 of 2 Purpose To allow employees to be away from work upon the death of a family member. Policy Georgia Southern University allows funeral/bereavement time-off to all employees when a death to five (5) days of paid or unpaid leave in the event of the death of an immediate family member

Hutcheon, James M.

11

Women and work: a ten year retrospective.  

PubMed

A look back, after a decade, at the issues surrounding women and work. Work options, childcare and family concerns, the glass ceiling, sexual harassment, women entrepreneurs, race and poverty, unpaid work, and women with disabilities are discussed. PMID:15920308

MacRae, Nancy

2005-01-01

12

WORK FAMILY LIFE !"#"$%&$'()*!("$+(,-./*$"#(.-/,*$/&!&#&0&-/  

E-print Network

family. This pressure, along with widespread and negative myths and stereotypes about only children, can including Italy, Por- tugal, Spain, South Korea and Japan. They're shrinking in India as well and, of course, China adopted its strict one-child policy in 1979. 5=F%B9%;=B9%=>GG8EBEH%Ewomen

Ginzel, Matthew

13

Balancing family and work  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

More than 45% of women scientists at top universities in the United States have indicated that their careers have kept them from having as many children as they want, according to an 8 August study, “Scientists want more children,” which appears in the journal PLoS ONE. The study, by sociologists Elaine Howard Ecklund of Rice University and Anne Lincoln of Southern Methodist University, indicates that 24.5% of male scientists surveyed indicated the same concerns. The study also found that among junior scientists, 29% of women indicated concern that a science career would prevent them from having a family; 7% of men indicated the same concern.

Showstack, Randy

2011-08-01

14

Social Work Patient & Family Services  

E-print Network

Social Work and Patient & Family Services 601 Elmwood Avenue RM. 1-1450 P. O. Box 650 Rochester, NY Social Work office lo- cated? The Social Work office is located on the first floor of Strong Memorial Hospital, Rm. 1-1450 How do I get in touch with a social worker? The social work department is open Monday

Goldman, Steven A.

15

The Work-Family Role System  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Conceptually analyzes the male work role, the female work role, the female family role, and the male family role as components of the work-family role system. Examines the links among these roles and analyzes sex-segregated labor markets for both paid work and family tasks. (JM)

Pleck, Joseph H.

1977-01-01

16

Work, Welfare, and Family Well-Being.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

As more families move from welfare to work, little is known about the implications of employment for family well-being. This survey and case study examined the effects of employment on the economic, social, and emotional well-being of parents, children, and families. Survey respondents received assistance through Iowa's Family Investment Program…

Sing, Merrile; Hill, Heather; Mendenko, Linda

17

Work-Family Conflict among Female Teachers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Work-family conflict was investigated among 187 Israeli women teachers to better understand relationships between teachers' professional and family lives. The research examined perceived importance of work and family roles and effects of stress and support variables on W->F and F->W conflict. Additionally, effects of teachers' years of experience…

Cinamon, R.G.; Rich, Y.

2005-01-01

18

The State of Families, 2: Work and Family.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report examines trends in the world of work and the economy that affect families. Part 1 presents a futurist's perspective on the changing world of work and how it affects families. Topics include finance capitalism in a global economy, values, work force, compensation and employee benefits, employment and unemployment, government,…

Family Service America, Milwaukee, WI.

19

Work and Family Balance: An Economic View  

Microsoft Academic Search

The way in which people balance their work and family responsibilities is becoming increasingly prominent on the policy agenda. This paper uses an economic framework to explore the rationale for government policies to improve work\\/family balance. It finds that strongest economic grounds for government intervention are the effects that maternal work may have on children. The evidence, however, is not

Lindy Fursman; Veronica Jacobsen; Jason Varuhas

2003-01-01

20

Work and Family Resource Kit.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This kit is designed to help employers understand the range of family needs emerging in the workplace and the numerous options for a company response. An introduction discusses the need for child care services, dependent care problems, and how employers respond and benefit. Sections address the following: selecting the right option in relation to…

Women's Bureau (DOL), Washington, DC.

21

Work and family: Understanding men's role evaluations  

Microsoft Academic Search

Analysis of data provided by a random sample (N=92) of married police officers was used to evaluate the effects of time constraints, job stress, family strengths, family structure, and social networks on men's role evaluations. These men had generally positive evaluations of their income provider, husband, father, and home care roles. Multivariate analysis showed complex relationships between work, family, and

Karen Altergott

1988-01-01

22

Applying the effort-reward imbalance model to household and family work: a population-based study of German mothers  

PubMed Central

Background This paper reports on results of a newly developed questionnaire for the assessment of effort-reward imbalance (ERI) in unpaid household and family work. Methods: Using a cross-sectional population-based survey of German mothers (n = 3129) the dimensional structure of the theoretical ERI model was validated by means of Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA). Analyses of Variance were computed to examine relationships between ERI and social factors and health outcomes. Results CFA revealed good psychometric properties indicating that the subscale 'effort' is based on one latent factor and the subscale 'reward' is composed of four dimensions: 'intrinsic value of family and household work', 'societal esteem', 'recognition from the partner', and 'affection from the child(ren)'. About 19.3% of mothers perceived lack of reciprocity and 23.8% showed high rates of overcommitment in terms of inability to withdraw from household and family obligations. Socially disadvantaged mothers were at higher risk of ERI, in particular with respect to the perception of low societal esteem. Gender inequality in the division of household and family work and work-family conflict accounted most for ERI in household and family work. Analogous to ERI in paid work we could demonstrate that ERI affects self-rated health, somatic complaints, mental health and, to some extent, hypertension. Conclusions The newly developed questionnaire demonstrates satisfied validity and promising results for extending the ERI model to household and family work. PMID:22221851

2012-01-01

23

Administrative Policy: Graduate Assistant Employment July 2009 Paid and Unpaid Leaves of Absence for Graduate Assistants  

E-print Network

-hourly appointment) Up to 10 working days of paid sick leave are provided for occasional or serious illness or injury on an hourly pay appointment Sick leave is unpaid except in the following circumstances: (1) work hours are fixed on a weekly basis, and the sick day falls on the day of the week normally scheduled for work

Thomas, David D.

24

Gender Differences in the Importance of Work and Family Roles: Implications for Work–Family Conflict  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this study we explored between- and within-gender differences in the importance of life roles and their implications for work–family conflict. In earlier research (Cinamon & Rich, 2002) we found 3 profiles of workers who differ in attributions of importance to work and family roles: persons who assigned high importance to both the work role and the family role (“Dual”

Rachel Gali Cinamon; Yisrael Rich

2002-01-01

25

The Role of Identity and Work-Family Support in Work-Family Enrichment and Its Work-Related Consequences  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Despite growing research on the positive connections between work and family, antecedents and consequences of work-family enrichment are understudied. Using a sample of employees from a major insurance company, we assessed the relationship of (i) individual (i.e., work and family identities), (ii) family (emotional and instrumental support), and…

Wayne, Julie Holliday; Randel, Amy E.; Stevens, Jaclyn

2006-01-01

26

Human Service Employees Coping with Job Stress, Family Stress and Work-Family Conflict.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The intersection of work and family life has always been a popular topic of discussion among family theorists. This study examined human service employees in direct service positions coping with work stress, family stress, and work-family conflict. The effects of work stress, family stress and work-family conflict on depression were examined.…

Carbone, Dominic J.

27

Rethinking work and family policy: the making and taking of parental leave in Australia.  

PubMed

Despite the continued increase in female participation rates, Australia remains one of only two developed nations in the world without a paid maternity leave scheme. While research interest and public policy debate about paid maternity leave entitlements continues, little is known about the actual utilization of the 52 weeks unpaid parental leave that is currently available to all employees. Moreover, research and policy debate on the availability and provision of paid paternity leave has only just begun. This paper argues that, given the gendered nature of employee entitlements, it is time to re-evaluate all aspects of parental leave policy in Australia. Using unique data from a national survey of Australian employees, the paper provides a statistical analysis of the use of unpaid parental leave and the availability of paid maternity leave. The paper models the availability of paid maternity leave to Australian employees as a function of demographic and organizational characteristics, including annual income, union status, and establishment size. A parallel analysis of the likelihood that an individual has used the unpaid parental leave provision is also provided. The results show that the existing unpaid parental leave provision is rarely used and that the current availability of paid maternity leave is inequitable. The paper discusses the conceptual and policy implications of these results and concludes that a re-thinking of parental leave policy in Australia is essential if gender inequities at work and in society are to be addressed. PMID:16194818

Baird, M; Litwin, A S

2005-10-01

28

Adolescent Work Experiences and Family Formation Behavior  

PubMed Central

A long-standing critique of adolescent employment is that it engenders a precocious maturity of more adult-like roles and behaviors, including school disengagement, substance use, sexual activity, inadequate sleep and exercise, and work-related stress. Though negative effects of high-intensity work on adolescent adjustment have been found, little research has addressed whether such work experiences are associated with precocious family formation behaviors in adolescence, such as sexual intercourse, pregnancy, residential independence, and union formation. Using data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health, we find that teenagers who spend long hours on the job during the school year are more likely to experience these family formation behaviors earlier than youth who work moderately or not at all. PMID:22736931

Staff, Jeremy; VanEseltine, Matthew; Woolnough, April; Silver, Eric; Burrington, Lori

2011-01-01

29

Working Fathers: New Strategies for Balancing Work and Family.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

With the steady rise in the number of women joining the workforce, fathers are taking on more responsibility for the nurturing of their children, partly by necessity but often by choice, while still retaining their "breadwinner" pressures. This book is intended to help men reconcile the demands of work and family. It is based on a decade of…

Levine, James A.; Pittinsky, Todd L.

30

Child's Play: A Work-Family Issue.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Many parents find that the daily stress of coping with the demanding realities of their work lives leaves them with little personal and family time; playing with their children may therefore fall to the bottom of the "to-do list." One of the tasks of early childhood professionals thus becomes helping parents understand the nature and value of play…

Kuchner, Joan F.

31

BOSTON COLLEGE CENTER FOR WORK & FAMILY  

E-print Network

: · The expanding roles of Millennials · Cautionary notes about the generational prism · Millennials as leaders in the workplace · Tips and best practices for developing Millennials into leadership roles Authored by: Lauren Center for Work & Family Creating Tomorrow's Leaders: the Expanding Roles of Millennials in the Workplace

Huang, Jianyu

32

Work in the Family and Employing Organization.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses and reviews the literature on issues involved in attempts to balance roles in employing organizations and family organizations. The following types of programs are reviewed: (1) maternity and parental leave; (2) child and dependent care; (3) alternative work schedules and workstations; and (4) employee assistance and relocation programs.…

Zedeck, Sheldon; Mosier, Kathleen L.

1990-01-01

33

Barely Getting By: Wisconsin's Working Poor Families.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Noting that 182,000 of Wisconsin's children are living below the poverty line, this report documents factors affecting the working poor of Wisconsin, combining labor market and wage data with profiles of families and their children from communities throughout the state. The report documents the surge in poverty-wage jobs in Wisconsin over the past…

Wisconsin Univ., Madison. Center on Wisconsin Strategy.

34

The Work, Family, and Equity Index  

E-print Network

was created to conduct and support world class research into the impact of social conditions on health selected to provide an evidence-based assessment of policies crucial to the needs of working families and economic systems. These include maternity, paternity and parental leave; infant and toddler care

Volesky, Bohumil

35

The Work-Family Interface: Differentiating Balance and Fit  

Microsoft Academic Search

Work-family fit has recently emerged in work and family literature, comparable to work-family balance in that it represents interactions between work and family and yet distinct because it precedes balance and other outcomes. This study explores the relationship between, predictive factors of, and interactive moderating effects of work-family fit and work-family balance. Data are from a survey of business graduate

Maribeth C. Clarke; Laura C. Koch; E. Jeffrey Hill

2004-01-01

36

JOB OPENING POSITION: TV WeatherCenter Intern (unpaid internship)  

E-print Network

JOB OPENING POSITION: TV WeatherCenter Intern (unpaid internship) JOB NUMBER: 12081 DIVISION/DEPARTMENT: WRAL-TV - Weather DESCRIPTION: THIS IS AN UNPAID INTERNSHIP. Interns in the WRAL HD Weather of North Carolina. The internship will feature hands-on experience in all aspects of television and radio

Parker, Matthew D. Brown

37

Unpaid Child Support: The Abuse of American Values.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Noting that fewer than half the single mothers in the United States receive complete and regular child support payments, this paper discusses reasons for unpaid child support, examines whether stricter enforcement of child support obligations will help solve the overall problem, and proposes another option for solving the problem of unpaid child…

Kobayashi, Futoshi

38

Negative Affectivity, Role Stress, and Work-Family Conflict.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Measures of job and family stress and negative affectivity were completed by 148 (of 400) Hong Kong civil service employees. Persons with high negative affectivity experience more work and family stress. Job stress was associated with extensive interference of work with family, and family stress with extensive interference of family with work.…

Stoeva, Albena Z.; Chiu, Randy K.; Greenhaus, Jeffrey H.

2002-01-01

39

Community as a Context for the Work-Family Interface  

Microsoft Academic Search

Workplaces, families, and individuals attempt to coordinate work and family opportunities and responsibilities within the context of communities. Workplaces and families are embedded in the communities in which they are located. Work, family, and individual relationships are intertwined with relationships among members of various communities. Communities may both help and hinder the efforts of work organizations, families, and individuals to

Patricia Voydanoff

2004-01-01

40

Psychology at the Intersection of Work and Family: Recommendations for Employers, Working Families, and Policymakers  

Microsoft Academic Search

Demographic data show that major changes have been occurring in the everyday lives of families over the last generation, with the majority of mothers of young children in the workforce and an increasing number of men and women assuming caregiving responsibilities for older relatives. Thus, the 2 primary identities of most adults, defined by their multiple family and work roles,

Diane F. Halpern

2005-01-01

41

Work-Family Planning Attitudes among Emerging Adults  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Using social learning theory as a framework, we explore two sets of antecedents to work and family role planning attitudes among emerging adults: their work-family balance self-efficacy and their perceptions of their parents' work-to-family conflict. A total of 187 college students completed a questionnaire concerning their work-family balance…

Basuil, Dynah A.; Casper, Wendy J.

2012-01-01

42

The Invisible CarersFraming Domestic Work(ers) in Gender Equality Policies in Spain  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article explores how paid domestic work is framed in state policies and discourses, drawing upon theoretical discussions on gender, welfare and global care chains. Based on a case study of the political debate on the `reconciliation of personal, family and work life' in Spain, the author argues that dominant policy frames relate gender inequality to women's unpaid domestic work

Elin Peterson

2007-01-01

43

Clarifying Work-Family Intervention Processes: The Roles of Work-Family Conflict and Family Supportive Supervisor Behaviors  

PubMed Central

Drawing on a conceptual model integrating research on training, work-family interventions, and social support, we conducted a quasi-experimental field study to assess the impact of a supervisory training and self-monitoring intervention designed to increase supervisors' use of family supportive supervisor behaviors. Pre- and post-intervention surveys were completed, nine months apart, by 239 employees at six intervention (N = 117) and six control (N = 122) grocery store sites. Thirty-nine supervisors in the six intervention sites received the training consisting of one hour of self-paced computer-based training, one hour of face-to-face group training, followed by instructions for behavioral self-monitoring (recording the frequency of supportive behaviors) to support on-the-job transfer. Results demonstrated a disordinal interaction for the effect of training and family-to-work conflict on employee job satisfaction, turnover intentions and physical health. In particular, for these outcomes, positive training effects were observed for employees with high family-to-work conflict, while negative training effects were observed for employees with low family-to-work conflict. These moderation effects were mediated by the interactive effect of training and family-to-work conflict on employee perceptions of family-supportive supervisor behaviors. Implications of our findings for future work-family intervention development and evaluation are discussed. PMID:20853943

Hammer, Leslie B.; Kossek, Ellen E.; Anger, W. Kent; Bodner, Todd; Zimmerman, Kristi L.

2010-01-01

44

Is work-family balance more than conflict and enrichment?  

PubMed Central

This study deepens our theoretical and practical understanding of work–family balance, defined as the ‘accomplishment of role-related expectations that are negotiated and shared between an individual and his/her role-related partners in the work and family domains’ (Grzywacz & Carlson, 2007: 458). We develop a new measure of work–family balance and establish discriminant validity between it, work–family conflict, and work–family enrichment. Further, we examine the relationship of work–family balance with six key work and family outcomes. Results suggest that balance explains variance beyond that explained by traditional measures of conflict and enrichment for five of six outcomes tested: job satisfaction, organizational commitment, family satisfaction, family performance, and family functioning. We conclude with a discussion of the applications of our work. PMID:20148121

Carlson, Dawn S.; Grzywacz, Joseph G.; Zivnuska, Suzanne

2009-01-01

45

Working to End Family Homelessness. Annual Report  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The National Center on Family Homelessness is determined to end family homelessness. Sheltering families provides a temporary safe haven. Connecting families to permanent housing, essential services, and critical supports can change their lives forever. Through research the Center learns what families need to rebound from the housing, economic,…

National Center on Family Homelessness (NJ1), 2012

2012-01-01

46

The State of Working Families in Massachusetts  

E-print Network

The Massachusetts economy, workforce, and families have all undergone substantial changes over the past two decades. This paper, focusing on the labor market pressures facing families, employers, and ...

Fogg, Neeta

2004-12-10

47

The Timing of Childbirth and Family-to-Work Conflict  

Microsoft Academic Search

A growing pattern, assumed to reflect efforts to balance work and family, is the delaying of childbirth by some working women. This article examines the relationship between the timing of fertility and family-to-work conflict among working women, and the occupational, organizational, and family contexts that influence this relationship. We analyze data from the 2002 wave of the National Study of

Ronald E. Bulanda; Stephen Lippmann

2012-01-01

48

Linking Team Resources to Work-Family Enrichment and Satisfaction  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Work-family scholars now recognize the potential positive effects of participation in one life domain (i.e., work or family) on performance in other life domains. We examined how employees might benefit from team resources, which are highly relevant to the modern workplace, in both work and nonwork domains via work-family enrichment. Using the…

Hunter, Emily M.; Perry, Sara Jansen; Carlson, Dawn S.; Smith, Steven A.

2010-01-01

49

Planning Ahead: College Seniors' Concerns about Work-Family Conflict.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Recent research suggests that working men experience as much work-family conflict as women do. More men are doing housework and childcare, and feel that family is as important as their work. An attempt was made to determine how college seniors view their potential for managing work-family conflict. College students (N=324) attending a private…

Barnett, Rosalind Chait; Gareis, Karen C.; James, Jacquelyn Boone; Steele, Jennifer

50

Work-Family Balance: Perspectives from Higher Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The article examines different types of work-family pressures amongst people working within the Australian university sector. We were specifically interested in work-family experiences between domestic and migrant Australians. Among the major findings, domestic Australians experience greater levels of work-family imbalance across most of the…

Pillay, Soma; Abhayawansa, Subhash

2014-01-01

51

Rational Versus Gender Role Explanations for Work–Family Conflict  

Microsoft Academic Search

Two conflicting frameworks for understanding work–family conflict are proposed. According to the rational view, conflict is related linearly to the total amount of time spent in paid and family work. According to the gender role perspective, gender role expectations mute the relationship between hours expended and perceived work–family conflict, and gender interacts with number of hours worked and work–family conflict.

Barbara A. Gutek; Sabrina Searle; Lilian Klepa

1991-01-01

52

Working with the One-Parent Family in Family Therapy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper describes particular problems that arise in the treatment of one-parent families. These problems are seen as stemming from the experience of disruption in life of the family and resulting special family structure. Techniques of handling the various resistances and issues that surface are presented and discussed. (Author)

Hajal, Fady; Rosenberg, Elinor B.

1978-01-01

53

Generational Differences in Work-Family Conflict and Synergy  

PubMed Central

This paper examines differences in work-family conflict and synergy among the four generational groups represented in the contemporary workforce: Generation Y Generation X, Baby Boomers, and Matures using data from the 2008 National Study of the Changing Workforce (n = 3,502). Significant generational differences were found for work-family conflict (work interfering with family and family interfering with work) but not for work-family synergy. Mental health and job pressure were the best predictors of work interfering with family conflict for each generational group. Work-family synergy presented a more complex picture. Work-family conflict and synergy were significantly related to job, marital, and life satisfaction. Implications and directions for future research are discussed. PMID:23783221

Beutell, Nicholas J.

2013-01-01

54

Main points for 1991 family planning work.  

PubMed

The main points for 1991 Family Planning (FP) Work in China are discussed as follows: 1) strengthen leadership, 2) strengthen grass roots buildup, 3 intensify population plan management and improve the responsibility system, 4) strengthen publicity and promote population and FP education in rural areas, 5) strengthen and establish the legal system for FP management, 6) provide excellent contraceptive and birth control services, 7 perform inservice training conscientiously and technical secondary education earnestly, and 8) coordinate efforts among related departments. Leadership changes involve the 2 top leaders of the Communist Party Committees and governments at each level taking personal responsibility for the implementation of their local population plans and FP work. FP work must have a prominent place on all agendas. The FP service network needs to be accelerated in countries, townships, and villages and grass roots units strengthened in urban areas. Provinces, autonomous regions, and municipalities must work out their local population plans for 1991-95 and 1991-99 according to the national population target. Rational apportionment needs to be considered for prefectures and counties. The emphasis should be on timely and accurate feedback and statistical supervision. The 1990 national population census data should be used to inform everyone about the current population situation. Legal needs entail standardizing documentation and developing local laws and regulations within a comprehensive system. Improvements are needed in such areas as rules and regulations pertaining to the administration of charges for unplanned births, identification of disabled children and approval of the birth quota. Abortion and unplanned births are to be averted through prepregnancy management. The emphasis is on voluntary use of contraception by couples of childbearing age. Inservice training should improve the political, ideological, professional proficiency, and ability to function. Certification will eventually be provided. Provision for FP insurance needs to be encouraged through civil affairs departments, banks, and insurance companies. PMID:12343642

1991-06-01

55

The Impact of Work–Family Conflict on Chinese Employees  

Microsoft Academic Search

In contemporary society, societal changes and technological advances have created a potential interference and conflict between the competing demands of work and family needs for resources. Extensive research in the past few decades on the antecedents and outcomes of work–family conflict has indicated that this kind of conflict will detract from employee's quality of life. Therefore, the identification of work–family

Lai Kuen Law

2011-01-01

56

When Family Considerations Influence Work Decisions: Decision-Making Processes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The work-family literature has provided an abundance of evidence that various family factors are linked to various work decisions, suggesting that the "family-relatedness" of work decisions is a prevalent phenomenon (Greenhaus & Powell, 2012). However, the cognitive processes by which such linkages occur have received little attention. We offer a…

Powell, Gary N.; Greenhaus, Jeffrey H.

2012-01-01

57

Prefamily Counseling: Working with Blended Families  

Microsoft Academic Search

According to the literature, approximately 50% of all Americans have some kind of step-relationship. Living in a blended family has become more commonplace, as have significant issues related to family members' adjustment to and day-to-day maintenance of them. In the majority of instances, blended families enter into life together with little awareness of what to expect, common problems blended families

Jaymes Gonzales

2009-01-01

58

Clarifying Work–Family Intervention Processes: The Roles of Work–Family Conflict and Family-Supportive Supervisor Behaviors  

Microsoft Academic Search

Drawing on a conceptual model integrating research on training, work–family interventions, and social support, we conducted a quasi-experimental field study to assess the impact of a supervisor training and self-monitoring intervention designed to increase supervisors' use of family-supportive supervisor behaviors. Pre- and postintervention surveys were completed, 9 months apart, by 239 employees at 6 intervention (N = 117) and 6

Leslie B. Hammer; Ellen Ernst Kossek; W. Kent Anger; Todd Bodner; Kristi L. Zimmerman

2011-01-01

59

Helping Families Work: A 1995/1996 Factbook.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report illustrates the conditions facing young Ohioans and measures the success of local communities across Ohio in helping families work. Sections of this report are: (1) "Helping Families Work: An Introduction," which discusses how Ohio families are changing, the limits of government, measuring the success of state and local programs that…

Real, Mark; And Others

60

Work and Family: 1992. Status Report and Outlook.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Many parents are currently struggling to balance job and family responsibilities. Such attempts bring about changes in work and individual attitudes. This report presents the status of work and family in 1992, as well as the nature and direction of workplace changes to accommodate families. The report indicates that large United States companies…

Galinsky, Ellen

61

The relationships among part-time work, work-family interference, and well-being.  

PubMed

The authors investigated the effect of part-time work on work-family interference and well-being among 160 part-time and 29 full-time employed mothers (with a partner) working at 2 insurance companies in the Netherlands. The authors controlled for working part time as a strategy for reducing work-family imbalance and found that part-time work was associated with a lower level of work-to-family interference. Also, high levels of work-family interference were associated with diminished well-being. Work-to-family interference played a mediating role in the relationship between part-time work and well-being. Results indicate that part-time jobs can enhance the work-family balance not only for those explicitly choosing part-time employment as a means to reduce work-family imbalance but also for other employees. PMID:15506846

van Rijswijk, Karen; Bekker, Marrie H J; Rutte, Christel G; Croon, Marcel A

2004-10-01

62

Work-Family Conflict and the Perception of Departmental and Institutional Work-Family Policies in Collegiate Athletic Trainers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Employees throughout the United States struggle to balance their work and family commitments, in part because the workforce makeup has changed significantly over the last half century. The evolving family structure also has contributed to this struggle. This research seeks to build on previous work-family literature by incorporating the six…

Godek, Michelle M.

2012-01-01

63

26 CFR 301.6873-1 - Unpaid claims in bankruptcy or receivership proceedings.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-04-01 false Unpaid claims in bankruptcy or receivership proceedings. ...AND ADMINISTRATION Jeopardy, Bankruptcy, and Receiverships Jeopardy § 301.6873-1 Unpaid claims in bankruptcy or receivership...

2010-04-01

64

46 CFR 545.2 - Interpretation of Shipping Act of 1984-Unpaid ocean freight charges.  

...Interpretation of Shipping Act of 1984-Unpaid ocean freight charges. 545.2 Section 545...MARITIME COMMISSION REGULATIONS AFFECTING OCEAN SHIPPING IN FOREIGN COMMERCE INTERPRETATIONS...Interpretation of Shipping Act of 1984—Unpaid ocean freight charges. Section...

2014-10-01

65

Coworker Informal Work Accommodations to Family: Scale Development and Validation  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Drawing on research regarding the utility of coworker support in mitigating work/family conflict, the authors developed a scale to measure Coworker-enacted Informal Work Accommodations to Family (C-IWAF). C-IWAF differs from coworker support in that it describes actual behaviors coworkers engage in to help one another deal with incompatible work

Mesmer-Magnus, Jessica; Murase, Toshio; DeChurch, Leslie A.; Jimenez, Miliani

2010-01-01

66

Tracing a Timeline for Work and Family Research in India  

Microsoft Academic Search

oncern over work-family issues has been an enduring preoccupation of researchers across disciplines for over four decades. Interest in work and family matters has arisen on account of changes in the way in which work has been defined and it has been fuelled by mechanisation and modernisation of production processes, industrialisation and the entry of increas- ing numbers of women

UJVALA RAJADHYAKSHA; SWATI SMITA

67

Work and Family Programs in Texas State Agencies.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A survey of work and family policies in state-supported organizations in Texas was conducted for the Texas Workforce Commission's Work and Family Clearinghouse. Survey questions addressed the prevalence, perceived need, and future direction of dependent care programs and flexible work arrangements (FWA). Key findings in dependent care include: (1)…

Texas Work and Family Clearinghouse, Austin.

68

Work and Family: Satisfaction, Stress, and Spousal Support.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Married veterinarians were surveyed about work satisfaction, work-related stress, marital-family stress, and spousal support for their career. Female veterinarians reported greater effect of martial/family stress on career and less perceived support than did their male counterparts. Areas of greatest work dissatisfaction for both genders were…

Phillips-Miller, Dianne L.; Campbell, N. Jo; Morrison, Charles R.

2000-01-01

69

Striking a Balance: Families, Work, and Early Childhood Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examines the connections between work, families, and early childhood education, and analyzes international trends and perspectives on parental leave. Chapter 1, "Introduction," shows that the increase in paid work by mothers makes families, work, and education important research and policy issues, and surveys reasons for this increase.…

Callister, Paul; And Others

70

Taking stock of work-family initiatives: How announcements of \\  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examines share price reactions to 231 work-family human resource policies adopted by Fortune 500 companies and announced in the Wall Street Journal between 1971 and 1996. Consistent with past research, the results suggest that firm announcements of work-family initiatives positively affected shareholder return. The authors also empirically test three hypotheses concerning how the timing of work-family initiatives influences

Michelle M. Arthur; Alison Cook

2004-01-01

71

Work-family balance after childbirth: the association between employer-offered leave characteristics and maternity leave duration.  

PubMed

Early return to work after childbirth has been increasing among working mothers in the US. We assessed the relationship between access to employer-offered maternity leave (EOML) (both paid and unpaid) and uptake and duration of maternity leave following childbirth in a socio-economically diverse sample of full-time working women. We focus on California, a state that has long provided more generous maternity leave benefits than those offered by federal maternity leave policies through the State Disability Insurance program. The sample included 691 mothers who gave birth in Southern California in 2002-2003. Using weighted logistic regression, we examined the EOML-maternity leave duration relationship, controlling for whether the leave was paid, as well as other occupational, personality and health-related covariates. Compared with mothers who were offered more than 12 weeks of maternity leave, mothers with <6 weeks of EOML and those offered 6-12 weeks had five times higher odds of returning to work within 12 weeks; those offered no leave had six times higher odds of an early return. These relationships were similar after controlling for whether the leave was paid and after controlling for other occupational and health characteristics. Access to and duration of employer-offered maternity leave significantly determine timing of return to work following childbirth, potentially affecting work-family balance. Policy makers should recognize the pivotal role of employers in offering job security during and after maternity leave and consider widening the eligibility criteria of the Family and Medical Leave Act. PMID:23504130

Guendelman, Sylvia; Goodman, Julia; Kharrazi, Martin; Lahiff, Maureen

2014-01-01

72

Work-Family Conflict and the Quality of Family Life: Specifying Linking Mechanisms  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study evaluated a conceptual model that specified relationships between work and family demands, work-family conflict, stress, and the quality offamily life. Usinga sample of 328female and 187 male working parents, path analysis indicated that the intersect of structural and psychological characteristics of work andfamily was related to work-family conflict, influenced stress, and eventually predicted the quality offamily life. Also,

Daniel J. Weigel; Randy R. Weigel; Peggy S. Berger; Alicia S. Cook; Robert DelCampo

1995-01-01

73

Balancing Work and Family through Flexible Work Options. Monograph. Volume 9, Number 1.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

More than 58 percent of all women working in the U.S. labor force, many of them sole supports of their families, and 67 percent of women with children under age 18 are working. Therefore, more flexible work options are being made to allow a balance of work and family. Increasingly available options include work at home, compressed workweeks,…

Sachs, Sharon

74

Magdamayan: drawing the family into community work.  

PubMed

Magdamayan is an old word meaning to help one another; it has been chosen as an acronym for a program currently being undertaken by the Family Planning Organization of the Philippines (FPOP) that addresses itself to family life and community development -- a departure from previous FPOP projects. It aims to reach out to rural villages through 44 chapters covering selected communities in the 3 major island groups. Its main objectives are to reach the majority of the eligible population in each village, increasing the awareness, knowledge and understanding of family planning; to enlist 80% of eligible couples; and to maintain a 90% continuation rate. The 1st cycle of the project activities was begun in July 1975, divided into 3 phases spread over 18 months. Phase 1 involved preparations for the project in the villages, including a baseline survey. Phase 2 was the actual program phase, including a mass information drive, contraceptive promotion, identification of target groups, training of motivators, and provision of backup services. Phase 3 involved the phasing out of FPOP staff and turning the project over to community volunteers, and evaluation. Among the activities employed to facilitate integration of family planning into community life were 57 vocational skills training courses, various income generating activities (dances, sporting events, raffles) and community development projects. Preliminary evaluation of the 1st cycle indicates impressive success, but below the 80% acceptance and 90% continuation rates. Community development activities were seen as much enhanced, and basic health services and vocational skills training were successfully introduced. Constraints identified as limiting the success are discussed, and it is concluded that the program's performance this far is good enough to warrant its use as an alternate or model for similar family planning projects. PMID:12261117

Olizon, N C

75

82 Key Statistics on Work and Family Issues. The National Report on Work & Family. Special Report #9.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report was prepared because of the growing national interest in the questions of work and family dynamics. It puts together 82 key statistics on work and family issues in four major areas: child care, parental leave, alternative work schedules, and elder care. In addition, a chapter of miscellaneous statistics covers areas such as the…

Bureau of National Affairs, Inc., Washington, DC.

76

12 CFR 602.15 - Interest on unpaid fees.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...unpaid fees. 602.15 Section 602.15 Banks and Banking FARM CREDIT ADMINISTRATION ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS RELEASING...interest starting on the 31st calendar day following the date we bill you. We will charge you interest at the rate allowed by...

2011-01-01

77

12 CFR 602.15 - Interest on unpaid fees.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...unpaid fees. 602.15 Section 602.15 Banks and Banking FARM CREDIT ADMINISTRATION ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS RELEASING...interest starting on the 31st calendar day following the date we bill you. We will charge you interest at the rate allowed by...

2013-01-01

78

12 CFR 602.15 - Interest on unpaid fees.  

...unpaid fees. 602.15 Section 602.15 Banks and Banking FARM CREDIT ADMINISTRATION ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS RELEASING...interest starting on the 31st calendar day following the date we bill you. We will charge you interest at the rate allowed by...

2014-01-01

79

12 CFR 602.15 - Interest on unpaid fees.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...unpaid fees. 602.15 Section 602.15 Banks and Banking FARM CREDIT ADMINISTRATION ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS RELEASING...interest starting on the 31st calendar day following the date we bill you. We will charge you interest at the rate allowed by...

2012-01-01

80

12 CFR 602.15 - Interest on unpaid fees.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...unpaid fees. 602.15 Section 602.15 Banks and Banking FARM CREDIT ADMINISTRATION ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS RELEASING...interest starting on the 31st calendar day following the date we bill you. We will charge you interest at the rate allowed by...

2010-01-01

81

Family Day Care West: A Working Conference.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An attempt is made to condense data on family day care, i.e., a form of supplemental child care that takes place in the home of a nonrelative. An overview is presented of the kinds of studies that have been done and how they fit into the larger picture of what remains to be done before we can claim to have a body of knowledge to guide us in this…

Pacific Oaks Coll., Pasadena, CA.

82

Understanding Work-Family Spillover in Hotel Managers  

PubMed Central

The present study examined the experience of work-family spillover among 586 hotel managers (HMs) working in 50 full-service hotels throughout the U.S. Work-family spillover occurs when behaviors, moods, stresses, and emotions from work spill over into family. We first investigated which hotel managers were more likely to experience spillover and stressful work conditions based on their life circumstances (gender, parental status, age, decision-making latitude at work). Second, we investigated which work conditions (hours worked per week, organizational time expectations, emotional labor, and permeable boundaries) predicted more work-family spillover. Women, employees without children at home, and younger adults experienced the highest levels of negative work-family spillover. Work conditions, particularly organizational time expectations, put HMs at risk for experiencing more negative and less positive work-family spillover. The results provide evidence that modifying certain work conditions in the hotel industry may be helpful in improving the quality of HMs’ jobs and retention. PMID:23888092

Lawson, Katie M.; Davis, Kelly D.; Crouter, Ann C.; O'Neill, John W.

2013-01-01

83

Piecing Together Family Social Work in Mainland China  

Microsoft Academic Search

As rapid economic and sociopolitical development brings about drastic changes in family structure and processes in China, many social concerns arise. Through a review of journal articles published over a period of 28 years (1979–2006) in social work and related disciplines in China, this article presents a glimpse of family social work using the China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) database.

Timothy Sim

2008-01-01

84

Faculty Sense of Agency in Decisions about Work and Family  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Over the last decade, many research universities have adopted policies and support mechanisms to help academic parents balance work and family. This study sought to understand what facilitates faculty agency in making decisions about work and family, including parental leave. We conducted 20 interviews with 5 men and 15 women at a research…

O'Meara, KerryAnn; Campbell, Corbin M.

2011-01-01

85

Labor Project for Working Families Cornell ILR Labor Programs  

E-print Network

security and privacy for the workers we organize. The use of social media and new technology for organizing New Approaches to Organizing Women and Young Workers Social Media & Work Family Issues #12;New Approaches to Organizing Women and Young Workers Social Media and Work Family Issues This report

Keinan, Alon

86

Developing and Implementing Work-Family Policies for Faculty  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Today, American families juggle many competing priorities: home, work, school, medical care, after-school activities, and other responsibilities required to raise a family and maintain a household. At the same time, more employers are developing policies that acknowledge the need for a healthy balance between work and home. These policies allow…

Sullivan, Beth; Hollenshead, Carol; Smith, Gilia

2004-01-01

87

Adolescent Work Experiences and Family Formation Behavior  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A long-standing critique of adolescent employment is that it engenders a precocious maturity of more adult-like roles and behaviors, including school disengagement, substance use, sexual activity, inadequate sleep and exercise, and work-related stress. Though negative effects of high-intensity work on adolescent adjustment have been found, little…

Staff, Jeremy; VanEseltine, Matthew; Woolnough, April; Silver, Eric; Burrington, Lori

2012-01-01

88

The Family Life-path Theory: a Tool for Nurses Working in Partnership with Families  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this article is to describe the family life-path theory. The theory may offer nurses an alternative model for use in working in partnership with the family of a child with a long-term illness. It is important that nurses have a deep understanding of a family’s everyday life. The better nurses know the family and the context in

Pirkko Jokinen

2004-01-01

89

From "Work-Family" to "Work-Life": Broadening Our Conceptualization and Measurement  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Despite frequent reference to "work-life" issues in the organizational literature, little theoretical or empirical attention has been paid to nonwork areas beyond family. The purpose of the research described here is to move beyond work-family conflict to a broader conceptualization and measurement of work interference with life. A measure of work

Keeney, Jessica; Boyd, Elizabeth M.; Sinha, Ruchi; Westring, Alyssa F.; Ryan, Ann Marie

2013-01-01

90

Improving the Health of Working Families: Research Connections Between Work and Health. NPA Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document contains two papers on connections between work and health and policy options for improving the health of working families. "Foreword" (James A. Auerbach) places the two papers in the context of recent research on the connections between work, family, and health. Chapter 1's overview addresses the changing nature of work, the new…

Yen, Irene H.; Frank, John W.

91

Indirect cost in economic evaluation: the opportunity cost of unpaid inputs.  

PubMed

Unpaid time represents a potentially significant input into the health production function. The paper sets out the basis for valuation of time inputs consistent with the notion of opportunity cost. Such analysis requires consideration of whether time displaced in the production of health involves lost work or lost leisure. Furthermore, because valuation of opportunity cost requires the consistent treatment of costs and benefits, the study also considers the valuation of outputs. The basis for valuing the shadow price of work time is examined by firstly assuming perfect competition. The analysis then considers the presence of monopoly and monopsony in product markets and income and sales taxes. The basis for valuing the shadow price of leisure ("leisure' being all uses of time except paid employment) is restricted to an examination of methods previously used to value unpaid housework. The two methods examined are the replacement cost and the opportunity cost method. As the methods are not equivalent, the circumstances where each is appropriate vary depending on whether the output lost in producing health is replaced. Although not set out as the primary focus of the paper, the issues surrounding the valuation of outputs generated by non-market and quasi-market activity are examined. In particular, where activities such as informal care result in indirect utility to the carers (and patients) themselves, it is likely the full market wage provides a lower bound estimate of the value of marginal benefit. Finally the paper provides a practical approach to examining opportunity cost of unpaid inputs consistent with the concepts set out in preceding sections. PMID:8653189

Posnett, J; Jan, S

1996-01-01

92

Well-balanced families? : A gendered analysis of work-life balance policies and work family practices  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – The paper considers the impact of work-life balance policies on the work and family practices of professional, dual-earner parents with dependent children, by assessing the extent to which “well-balanced families” have been resultantly facilitated. It poses two research questions: the first centres on how far work-life balance policies have better enabled working parents to manage their commitments to

S. B. Burnett; C. J. Gatrell; C. L. Cooper; P. Sparrow

2010-01-01

93

Convergence between Measures of Work-to-Family and Family-to-Work Conflict: A Meta-Analytic Examination  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The overlap between measures of work-to-family (WFC) and family-to-work conflict (FWC) was meta-analytically investigated. Researchers have assumed WFC and FWC to be distinct, however, this assumption requires empirical verification. Across 25 independent samples (total N=9079) the sample size weighted mean observed correlation was .38 and the…

Mesmer-Magnus, Jessica R.; Viswesvaran, Chockalingam

2005-01-01

94

Families at Work: Strengths and Strains. The General Mills American Family Report 1980-81.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Fourth in a series of studies on the American family conducted for General Mills Corporation, this publication provides findings from a survey exploring the relationship between work and the family in contemporary society. Specifically, the survey explores how changes in the work force, especially the increase in numbers of working wives and…

General Mills, Inc., Minneapolis, Minn.

95

Hardships in America: The Real Story of Working Families  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This 115-page report, released by Economic Policy Institute (EPI) at the end of July 2001, "is the most comprehensive study of family hardships ever published." The report examines the plight of the working poor by determining basic family budgets for communities across the nation -- the amount of money a family needs for food, housing, utilities, child care, transportation, and health care -- and comparing these figures to wage statistics. The report concludes that two-and-a-half times more families fall beneath the basic family budget levels for their communities than fall below the federal poverty line.

Bernstein, Jared.; Boushey, Heather, 1970-; Brocht, Chauna.; Gundersen, Bethney.

2001-01-01

96

Gender role attitudes and college students’ work and family expectations  

Microsoft Academic Search

Work and family issues are becoming increasingly important for both women and men. This study examines college students' plans\\u000a and attitudes concerning work and family, gender differences in attitudes and expectations, and the effect of gender role\\u000a attitudes on future expectations. Findings indicate that a majority of men and women expect to marry, have children, and work\\u000a full-time. While men

Gayle Kaufman

2005-01-01

97

Changing University Work, Freedom, Flexibility and Family  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article investigates what Finnish academics on short fixed-term contracts consider to be the effects of having children on work and careers. The study is framed by the context of the current state of the university sector, its neoliberal and entrepreneurial tendencies and its claims to meritocracy. Informants express relative happiness with…

Nikunen, Minna

2012-01-01

98

A short and valid measure of work-family enrichment.  

PubMed

The stream of research concerning work-family enrichment has generated a significant body of research because it plays an important role in occupational health (Masuda, McNall, Allen, & Nicklin, 2012). work-family enrichment has been defined as "the extent to which experiences in one role improve the quality of life in the other role" (Greenhaus & Powell, 2006, p. 73). Within work-family enrichment, there are two directions: work to family and family to work. Carlson, Kacmar, Wayne, and Grzywacz (2006) developed an 18-item scale to measure this construct. Although the scale has been shown to be both reliable and valid, it also requires work-family researchers to include a proportionally large number of items to capture this construct in a study. The goal of the current study was to isolate a subset of the items in this measure that produces results similar to the full version thereby providing a more streamlined scale for researchers. Using a five-sample study that follows the scale reduction procedures offered by Stanton, Sinar, Balzer, and Smith (2002), we provide evidence that scales containing only three items for each direction of enrichment produce results equivalent to the full scale with respect to reliability and discriminant, convergent, and predictive validity. Reducing the original scale by two thirds, without losing explanatory power, allows scholars to measure enrichment in the work and family domains more efficiently, which should help minimize survey time, lower refusal rates, and generate less missing data. PMID:24447219

Kacmar, K Michele; Crawford, Wayne S; Carlson, Dawn S; Ferguson, Merideth; Whitten, Dwayne

2014-01-01

99

Key working for families with young disabled children.  

PubMed

For families with a disabled child, the usual challenges of family life can be further complicated by the need to access a wide range of services provided by a plethora of professionals and agencies. Key working aims to support children and their families in navigating these complexities ensuring easy access to relevant, high quality, and coordinated care. The aim of this paper is to explore the key worker role in relation to "being a key worker" and "having a key worker". The data within this paper draw on a larger evaluation study of the Blackpool Early Support Pilot Programme. The qualitative study used an appreciative and narrative approach and utilised mixed methods (interviews, surveys and a nominal group workshop). Data were collected from 43 participants (parents, key workers, and other stakeholders). All stakeholders who had been involved with the service were invited to participate. In the paper we present and discuss the ways in which key working made a difference to the lives of children and their families. We also consider how key working transformed the perspectives of the key workers creating a deeper and richer understanding of family lives and the ways in which other disciplines and agencies worked. Key working contributed to the shift to a much more family-centred approach, and enhanced communication and information sharing between professionals and agencies improved. This resulted in families feeling more informed. Key workers acted in an entrepreneurial fashion, forging new relationships with families and between families and other stakeholders. Parents of young disabled children and their service providers benefited from key working. Much of the benefit accrued came from strong, relational, and social-professional networking which facilitated the embedding of new ways of working into everyday practice. Using an appreciative inquiry approach provided an effective and relevant way of engaging with parents, professionals, and other stakeholders to explore what was working well with key working within an Early Support Pilot Programme. PMID:21994827

Carter, Bernie; Thomas, Megan

2011-01-01

100

Spousal Support and Work--Family Balance in Launching a Family Business  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examines whether emotional spousal support contributes to business owners' perceived work-family balance while launching a family business. Hobfoll's Conservation of Resources theory of stress is applied to 109 family business owners and their spouses. Results from structural equation models support several hypotheses. First, reports of…

Gudmunson, Clinton G.; Danes, Sharon M.; Werbel, James D.; Loy, Johnben Teik-Cheok

2009-01-01

101

The Job Costs of Family Demands: Gender Differences in Negative Family-to-Work Spillover  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article uses the 1992 National Study of the Changing Workforce to examine family and workplace factors contributing to gender differences in negative family-to-work spillover. We focus on spillover as manifested when family demands negatively affect job performance. Among married workers, women were twice as likely as men to report that…

Keene, Jennifer Reid; Reynolds, John R.

2005-01-01

102

[The family-friendly hospital: (how) does it work?].  

PubMed

The demographic development in Germany is heading towards a significant shortage in specialists within the next 10-15 years with an increased demand for health services at the same time. The three-stage model of family life planning (work, family phase, return) will also be gradually replaced by a model of simultaneous compatibility of family and work. This change in values, although initiated by the parents themselves, may turn out to be a crucial countermeasure in national economy against the demography-related loss of qualified personnel. For these three trends the economic need arises to minimize family-related absence of our well-trained, motivated and reliable doctors from the clinical departments through implementation of family-friendly human resources policies and supporting measures by the employers. In a representative survey 26% of respondents with children had in the past already changed their workplace to ensure a better match of work and family duties. In this regard the compatibility of family and professional responsibilities had a higher impact on the selection of the employer than a high income. Accordingly, a work-life competence oriented business plan will represent the crucial factor within the competition between universities, hospitals and professional disciplines to attract high potential bearers although a sustained change of the traditional hospital culture is mandatory. Anaesthesia-related fields of development regarding family-friendly corporate governance are working hours and organization of work, part-time jobs even for managers and fathers, and staff development. In the hospital daily routine, in particular, creative solutions meeting the local demands are deemed necessary that do not involve the use of high financial resources. Family-friendly personnel policy not only arises from altruistic enthusiasm but also pays off economically. This article discusses the necessity, opportunities and threads of family-oriented hospital management and fields of action for anaesthesia departments. PMID:19484192

Heller, A R; Heller, S C

2009-06-01

103

Part-time work for women: Does it really help balance work and family?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Results of this study suggest that the differential response of women to part-time work as opposed to a career may be a function of motivational and work-context differences between career and non-career women. Part-time work was associated with lower work-to-family interference, better time management ability, and greater life satisfaction for women in both career and earner-type positions. Role overload, family-to-work

Christopher Higgins; Linda Duxbury; Karen Lea Johnson

2000-01-01

104

Practitioners' experiences of working with families with complex needs.  

PubMed

Even though employing a family-sensitive approach has been shown to be beneficial for parents and children, there is sporadic uptake of this approach. This paper focuses on practitioners' perspectives when working with families where a parent, with dependent children, has a mental illness and/or substance abuse disorder. The aim of this research is twofold: (1) identify the issues practitioners face when working with families with complex needs; and (2) present the strategies they find to be effective in addressing family needs. Within the context of an organization that supported a family-sensitive approach, this study reports on 21 semi-structured interviews conducted over 15 months with 10 practitioners, as well as three focus group interviews with the same staff. Employing a qualitative framework, data highlighted the multifaceted nature of family problems, issues working with multiple agencies and problems associated with staff turnover. Successful strategies included working with the family on clearly defined and negotiated goals, focusing on family strengths and employing specific skills such as managing the sometimes competing needs of children and parents. PMID:24645639

Reupert, A; Maybery, D

2014-09-01

105

Family Therapy in Translation - Clinical Work Through an Interpreter  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper will describe how language is used in a systemic, psychotherapeutic context in long- term work with specific objectives when treating non-English speaking families who have suffered physical and mental torture. The systemic family therapy is concerned with the circularity of the therapeutic process which looks at how each member of the team affects and is affected by the

ANNEMARIE FOX

106

Farm Women's Attitudes Toward Change in Work and Family Roles.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A study to assess attitudes of 715 respondents from 2,000 randomly selected farm women toward change in work and family roles found significant differences in women's attitudes according to age, number of children, and religious preference. Generally, attitudes regarding family roles were more conservative than were attitudes regarding career…

Light, Harriett K.; And Others

1983-01-01

107

The family resemblance of technologically mediated work practices  

E-print Network

The family resemblance of technologically mediated work practices Eric Monteiro a , Gasparas (differentiation, assembling and punctuation) through which a family resemblance of ­ similar but not the same), organisational routines (Feldman & Pentland, 2003) or imitation/ isomorphism (Batenburg, Benders, & van der Blonk

Monteiro, Eric

108

Poverty Among Working Families: Findings From Experimental Poverty Measures  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This report from the US Census Bureau explores poverty among working families. The report uses experimental measures based on recommendations from the National Academy of Sciences Panel of Poverty and Family Assistance, including the following elements: noncash government benefits, job-related expenses, child care costs, social security taxes, and out-of-pocket medical expenses.

109

A model of work-family dynamics of hotel managers  

Microsoft Academic Search

The tourism industry is well known as one where operating managers have had to make sacrifices in their family and personal lives. This article reviews what is known about the work-family interface in relation to hotel managers in an effort to identify ways to gain a strategic advantage in this competitive sector. By integrating research from several disciplines, this article

John W. O’Neill; Jeanette N. Cleveland; Ann C. Crouter

2007-01-01

110

Family Roles and Work Values: Processes of Selection and Change  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study focuses on whether marriage and parenthood influence work values after taking into account the influence of work values on family formation. In a recent panel of young adults (N=709), stronger extrinsic and weaker intrinsic work values during adolescence predicted marriage and parenthood 9 years out of high school. Controlling these…

Kirkpatrick Johnson, Monica

2005-01-01

111

Work and Welfare Patterns in Low Income Families.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The study's objective were: (1) to describe the patterns of work and welfare experience in low-income families and to explain their causes, and (2) to apply the findings to the policy problem of deciding which groups of welfare recipients should be required to work and provided with what mix of manpower services. The effectiveness of work

Friedman, Barry L.; Hausman, Leonard J.

112

Family Transmission of Work Affectivity and Experiences to Children  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Theory and research suggest that children develop orientations toward work appreciably influenced by their family members' own expressed work experiences and emotions. Cross-sectional data from 100 children (53 girls, 47 boys; mean age = 11.1 years) and structural equation modeling were used to assess measures of work affectivity and experiences…

Porfeli, Erik J.; Wang, Chuang; Hartung, Paul J.

2008-01-01

113

Examining couple agreement about work-family conflict  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – This study aims to explore the nature of couple agreement about work-family conflict, adding to previous research by explicitly testing the extent to which couples agree when rating work interference with family (WIF) and the influence of this agreement on other outcomes. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – In total, 224 dual-earner couples were surveyed to assess their own WIF, as well

Michelle Streich; Wendy J. Casper; Amy Nicole Salvaggio

2008-01-01

114

Work-family programs: factors affecting employee knowledge and accuracy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – This paper aims to analyze the factors contributing to employee professed knowledge of work-family practices offered by employers and the accuracy of their knowledge. Designed\\/methodology\\/approach – Survey data from four studies (ns=276, 2,877, 2,810, and 310) were used to relate employee demographics to their professed knowledge regarding the availability from their employing organizations of work-family practices. For a

David J. Prottas; Cynthia A. Thompson; Richard E. Kopelman; Eileen W. Jahn

2007-01-01

115

WorkLife Programs -Family Friendly Services Child Care Services Flexible Work Arrangements (FWA)  

E-print Network

WorkLife Programs - Family Friendly Services Child Care Services Flexible Work Arrangements (FWA) · On-campus child care centers · Flex work · Community child care centers · Telecommuting · Camps · Compressed workweek · WorkLife Programs child care website · Job share · WorkLife Programs child care

Fernández-Juricic, Esteban

116

Work-family conflict, family-supportive supervisor behaviors (FSSB), and sleep outcomes.  

PubMed

Although critical to health and well-being, relatively little research has been conducted in the organizational literature on linkages between the work-family interface and sleep. Drawing on conservation of resources theory, we use a sample of 623 information technology workers to examine the relationships between work-family conflict, family-supportive supervisor behaviors (FSSB), and sleep quality and quantity. Validated wrist actigraphy methods were used to collect objective sleep quality and quantity data over a 1 week period of time, and survey methods were used to collect information on self-reported work-family conflict, FSSB, and sleep quality and quantity. Results demonstrated that the combination of predictors (i.e., work-to-family conflict, family-to-work conflict, FSSB) was significantly related to both objective and self-report measures of sleep quantity and quality. Future research should further examine the work-family interface to sleep link and make use of interventions targeting the work-family interface as a means for improving sleep health. PMID:24730425

Crain, Tori L; Hammer, Leslie B; Bodner, Todd; Kossek, Ellen Ernst; Moen, Phyllis; Lilienthal, Richard; Buxton, Orfeu M

2014-04-01

117

Balancing Work and Family: How Female Superintendents Succeed at Work and Home  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Women leaders in education struggle to balance work and family life. Historically, this struggle has stemmed from attempts to manage societal expectations of balancing work and family. In managing these expectations, women leaders face many challenges, which have made it difficult to maintain home responsibilities and deal with increasing demands…

Olesniewicz, Julie

2012-01-01

118

Work, Family and Life-Course Fit: Does Control over Work Time Matter?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study moves from "work-family" to a multi-dimensional "life-course fit" construct (employees' cognitive assessments of resources, resource deficits, and resource demands), using a combined work-family, demands-control and ecology of the life course framing. It examined (1) impacts of job and home ecological systems on fit dimensions, and (2)…

Moen, Phyllis; Kelly, Erin; Huang, Qinlei

2008-01-01

119

Beyond the Superwoman Syndrome: Work Satisfaction and Family Functioning among Working-Class, Mexican American Women.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A survey investigated the interaction of sex role attitudes, division of household and child care responsibilities, role strain, work satisfaction, and family functioning among 87 working-class Mexican American women in dual-earner families with children. Respondents did not subscribe to the "superwoman" myth but, rather, endorsed an expansion of…

Herrera, Ruth S.; DelCampo, Robert L.

1995-01-01

120

'It is hard for mums to put themselves first': how mothers diagnosed with breast cancer manage the sociological boundaries between paid work, family and caring for the self.  

PubMed

This paper aims to increase understanding of how mothers diagnosed with breast cancer while in the paid workforce experience and manage their multiple demands of taking care of themselves, their children and their paid work. In-depth, semi-structured interviews were conducted with 32 women who were mothers of dependent children and in the paid workforce at the time of their breast cancer diagnosis. The sample includes women living in urban and rural Australia. The study found that after a breast cancer diagnosis, participants tended to prioritise their health and wellbeing over paid work. Yet dominance of gendered identity meant that they tended to place the needs of family, especially children, above their own health and wellbeing. The key factors that influenced mothers' decisions to continue in, return to, or leave paid work after a breast cancer diagnosis included: a change in perspective regarding what was important in their lives; level of support from the workplace and home; the extent to which participating in paid work was a financial necessity; the extent to which their identity was connected to paid work, and; ongoing level of pain or fatigue. The paper concludes that using the sociological concepts of the fateful moment, boundary maintenance and a feminist ethic of care produces a more nuanced understanding of women's participation in paid work after breast cancer than examining paid workforce participation, or unpaid responsibilities and mothering, separately. The nature of the permeability or malleability of boundaries between work, family and taking care of the self affects women's participation in paid work during and/or after breast cancer treatment. Increased boundary permeability or malleability brought about more by cooperation than conflict facilitated positive experiences of re-negotiating boundaries, whereas increased permeability or malleability brought about more by conflict than cooperation created difficulties for women in finding an acceptable balance between their family, paid work and taking care of their own health after breast cancer. PMID:25063965

Mackenzie, Catherine Ruth

2014-09-01

121

An examination of the perceived direction of work-family conflict  

E-print Network

??????????????????????????. 40 Exploratory Analysis???????????????? 40 Source of Work-Family Conflict Scale??????.. 40 Hypothesis 1???????????????????. 43 Hypothesis 2???????????????????. 44 Hypothesis 3???????????????????. 54 Hypothesis 4???????????????????. 56...-family conflict????????.???????. 59 10 Interaction between work hours and work salience on family-to-work conflict (Hypothesis 1a) ???..??????.???????. 98 11 Interaction between family hours and work salience on family-to- work conflict (Hypothesis...

Huffman, Ann Hergatt

2005-02-17

122

Telecommuting: The Escher Stairway of Work\\/Family Conflict  

Microsoft Academic Search

This Article was part of a symposium issue on Law, Labor, and Gender. This interdisciplinary project responds to legal scholars in the work\\/family conflict field who advocate telecommuting as a way for women to achieve workplace equality. First, the Article uses sociology research to demonstrate that telecommuting sometimes works to exacerbate gender inequality in the workplace, rather than leveling the

Michelle A. Travis

2002-01-01

123

Restructuring workplace cultures: the ultimate work-family challenge?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Work-life polices and practices have the potential to enhance opportunities for women in the workplace (and opportunities for men to be more involved in family life), but are often undermined by workplace culture. Presents a case study of an organisation which is addressing issues of workplace culture in relation to work-life policies and gender equality. Despite achieving substantial change in

Suzan Lewis

2001-01-01

124

Work & Family: A Changing Dynamic. A BNA Special Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Economic, social, and demographic changes in the last 30 years have resulted in a massive restructuring of the American work force. Consequently, increasing numbers of employees can be expected to experience difficulties balancing family-and-work concerns. There is no consensus in the United States today regarding the responsibility for helping…

Bureau of National Affairs, Inc., Washington, DC.

125

Safeguarding vulnerable families: work with refugees and asylum seekers.  

PubMed

This paper will highlight one of the key findings of a qualitative study based on the analysis of in-depth interviews with 14 health visitors describing their experiences working with refugees and asylum seekers. Despite changes in government legislation to improve children's services in order to prevent harm to children, this recent study demonstrated that health visitors were working with the complexities of needs among refugees and asylum seekers related to safeguarding both children and vulnerable women. The health visitors often worked with families and individuals with no support from other professional services, they worked with failed asylum seekers who were unable to access other forms of support and they worked with women and children who were caught in a cycle of domestic abuse due to their immigration status. They were also working with families who would disappear from the systems in place to safeguard children. PMID:21388040

Burchill, John

2011-02-01

126

Parental Work Demands and Parent-Child, Family, and Couple Leisure in Dutch Families: What Gives?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study uses data on 898 Dutch couples with minor children to examine whether parental work demands are related differently to one-on-one parent-child, family, and couple leisure activities. The authors presume that the impact of working hours and work arrangements is smaller on activities that are prioritized highly and that are easier and…

Roeters, Anne; Treas, Judith K.

2011-01-01

127

Module 4: Work-Family Policy in the United States. Work-Family Curriculum Guide  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Public policy affects the experiences of workers and their families, both directly and indirectly. For example, employment-focused statutes such as the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA), the Employment Retirement and Income Security Act, the Occupational Health and Safety Act, and the Age Discrimination in Employment Act establish frameworks for…

Kossek, Ellen Ernst; Leana, Carrie; MacDermid, Shelley; Pitt-Catsouphes, Marcie; Raskin, Patricia; Secret, Mary; Shulkin, Sandee; Sweet, Stephen

2006-01-01

128

Balancing Work and Family. Learning Guide 5. Project Connect. Linking Self-Family-Work.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This learning guide is designed to connect personal, family, and job responsibilities for adults and out-of-school youth in economically depressed areas of the state (including transitional ex-offenders and corrections populations) so that these individuals learn to manage and balance these aspects of their lives in order to prepare for or…

Emily Hall Tremaine Foundation, Inc., Hartford, CT.

129

7?Getting There from Here: Research on the Effects of Work–Family Initiatives on Work–Family Conflict and Business Outcomes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Many employing organizations have adopted work–family policies, programs, and benefits. Yet managers in employing organizations simply do not know what organizational initiatives actually reduce work–family conflict and how these changes are likely to impact employees and the organization. We examine scholarship that addresses two broad questions: first, do work–family initiatives reduce employees’ work–family conflict and\\/or improve work–family enrichment? Second, does

Erin L. Kelly; Ellen Ernst Kossek; Leslie B. Hammer; Mary Durham; Jeremy Bray; Kelly Chermack; Lauren A. Murphy; Dan Kaskubar

2008-01-01

130

When Family-Supportive Supervision Matters: Relations between Multiple Sources of Support and Work-Family Balance  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examines the mechanisms by which family-supportive supervision is related to employee work-family balance. Based on a sample of 170 business professionals, we found that the positive relation between family-supportive supervision and balance was fully mediated by work interference with family (WIF) and partially mediated by family

Greenhaus, Jeffrey H.; Ziegert, Jonathan C.; Allen, Tammy D.

2012-01-01

131

Traumatic death at work: consequences for surviving families.  

PubMed

Research and policy on occupational health and safety have understandably focused on workers as the direct victims of workplace hazards. However, serious illness, injury, or death at work also has cascading psychological, social, and economic effects on victims' families and close friends. These effects have been neglected by researchers and policymakers. The number of persons immediately affected by workplace death is significant, even in rich countries with relatively low rates of workplace fatality. Every year, more than 5,000 family members and close friends of Australian workers become survivors of traumatic work-related death (TWD). This study investigated the health, social, and financial consequences of TWD on surviving families. In-depth exploratory interviews were conducted with seven family members who had experienced TWD from one to 20 years before the interviews, with an average of three years. All reported serious health, social, and financial consequences, including prolonged grief and unresolved loss, physical health problems, family disruption and behavioral effects on children, immediate financial difficulties, and disturbance of longer-term commitments such as retirement planning. Recommendations for policy development and improved practice are proposed to minimize the trauma and suffering experienced by families, mitigate consequences, and improve outcomes following a TWD. PMID:23367798

Matthews, Lynda R; Bohle, Philip; Quinlan, Michael; Rawlings-Way, Olivia

2012-01-01

132

Health Coverage Instability for Mothers in Working Families  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, the authors examined the health insurance coverage stability of 1,667 women in working families over a three-year period (1995-1997). Findings revealed that coverage instability is common. Nearly one-half of low-income women experienced health coverage instability over the three-year study…

Anderson, Steven G.; Eamon, Mary Keegan

2004-01-01

133

The Internet and Academics' Workload and Work-Family Balance  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The aim of this article is to analyse whether the Internet and other ICT technologies support a work-family balance amongst academics. The study is based on 20 in-depth interviews with academics in Iceland and analysed according to the Grounded Theory Approach. This study challenges the notion that the Internet, as part of ICT technology, makes it…

Heijstra, Thamar M.; Rafnsdottir, Gudbjorg Linda

2010-01-01

134

Gender Equality in Work and FamilyAn Elusive Goal  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article reviews strategies for gender equality that appear in women's and family policy literature, and the evidence for their limited success in U.S. and European public policies and in employment practices, that is, in persisting male and female income differentials, occupational segregation, shortages in child care and child support, and women's disproportionate use of alternate and flexible work schedules

HALCYONE H. BOHEN

1984-01-01

135

Restructuring workplace cultures: the ultimate work-family challenge?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to assess how work-life polices and practices have the potential to enhance opportunities for women in the workplace (and opportunities for men to be more involved in family life), but are often undermined by workplace culture. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – The paper presents a case study of an organisation which is addressing issues of

Suzan Lewis

2010-01-01

136

Best Practices in Working with Linguistically Diverse Families  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Many schools face the challenge of forging partnerships with families from linguistically diverse backgrounds. Effective communication, funds of knowledge, culturally relevant teaching, and extending and accepting assistance are best practices that have been used successfully by school personnel when working with students who are identified as…

Araujo, Blanca E.

2009-01-01

137

Mexican American Women: Schooling, Work, and Family. ERIC Digest.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This digest examines the interdependence of schooling, work, and family in the lives of Mexican American women. Mexican Americans have lower educational achievement than other Hispanic subgroups and the total U.S. population, although females do somewhat better than males. Hispanic students are overrepresented in classes for special education,…

Ortiz, Flora Ida

138

19 CFR 24.32 - Claims; unpaid compensation of deceased employees and death benefits.  

...unpaid compensation of deceased employees and death benefits. 24.32 Section 24.32...unpaid compensation of deceased employees and death benefits. (a) A claim made by a...an officer or employee at the time of his death shall be executed on standard...

2014-04-01

139

7 CFR 1962.7 - Securing unpaid balances on unsecured loans.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Securing unpaid balances on unsecured loans. 1962.7 Section 1962.7 Agriculture...Liquidation of Chattel Security § 1962.7 Securing unpaid balances on unsecured loans. The County Supervisor will take a...

2010-01-01

140

The Relationship between Core Self-Evaluations and Work and Family Satisfaction: The Mediating Role of Work-Family Conflict and Facilitation  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examines the impact of work-family conflict and work-family facilitation on work and family outcomes and explores the influence of core self-evaluations (CSE) among these relationships. CSE is comprised of self-esteem, neuroticism, locus of control, and general self-efficacy. CSE was found to be negatively related to work interfering…

Boyar, Scott L.; Mosley, Donald C., Jr.

2007-01-01

141

Work and Family: New Partnerships. Work and Family Conference Proceedings (Toronto, Ontario, Canada, November 30-December 2, 1988).  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This conference involving business, labor, policymakers and dependent care service providers covered issues related to the conflict between family and work responsibilities. The conference addressed the conflict's scope, substance, and major issues. Also covered are: information-gathering efforts which concerned institutions' national and…

Chant, Deborah, Ed.

142

Work and Family Variables, Entrepreneurial Career Success, and Psychological Well-Being.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Responses from 111 entrepreneurs revealed that work characteristics/pressures influence work more than family commitment; parental demands and partner support influence family more than work commitment. Women devote more time to family and men to work. Autonomy enables entrepreneurs to minimize the intrusion of family on work. (SK)

Parasuraman, Saroj; And Others

1996-01-01

143

Parental employment and work-family stress: Associations with family food environments  

PubMed Central

Parental employment provides many benefits to children's health. However, an increasing number of studies have observed associations between mothers' full-time employment and less healthful family food environments. Few studies have examined other ways in which parental employment may be associated with the family food environment, including the role of fathers' employment and parents' stress balancing work and home obligations. This study utilized data from Project F-EAT, a population-based study of a socio-demographically diverse sample of 3709 parents of adolescents living in a metropolitan area in the Midwestern United States, to examine cross-sectional associations between mothers' and fathers' employment status and parents' work-life stress with multiple aspects of the family food environment. Among parents participating in Project F-EAT, 64% of fathers and 46% of mothers were full-time employed, while 25% of fathers and 37% of mothers were not employed. Results showed that full-time employed mothers reported fewer family meals, less frequent encouragement of their adolescents' healthful eating, lower fruit and vegetable intake, and less time spent on food preparation, compared to part-time and not-employed mothers, after adjusting for socio-demographics. Full-time employed fathers reported significantly fewer hours of food preparation; no other associations were seen between fathers' employment status and characteristics of the family food environment. In contrast, higher work-life stress among both parents was associated with less healthful family food environment characteristics including less frequent family meals and more frequent sugar-sweetened beverage and fast food consumption by parents. Among dual-parent families, taking into account the employment characteristics of the other parent did not substantially alter the relationships between work-life stress and family food environment characteristics. While parental employment is beneficial for many families, identifying policy and programmatic strategies to reduce parents' work-life stress may have positive implications for the family food environment and for the eating patterns and related health outcomes of children and parents. PMID:22591825

Bauer, Katherine W.; Hearst, Mary O.; Escoto, Kamisha; Berge, Jerica M.; Neumark-Sztainer, Dianne

2013-01-01

144

Differences in wage rates for males and females in the health sector: a consideration of unpaid overtime to decompose the gender wage gap  

PubMed Central

Background In Australia a persistent and sizable gender wage gap exists. In recent years this gap has been steadily widening. The negative impact of gender wage differentials is the disincentive to work more hours. This implies a substantial cost on the Australian health sector. This study aimed to identify the magnitude of gender wage differentials within the health sector. The investigation accounts for unpaid overtime. Given the limited availability of information, little empirical evidence exists that accounts for unpaid overtime. Methods Information was collected from a sample of 10,066 Australian full-time employees within the health sector. Initially, ordinary least-squares regression was used to identify the gender wage gap when unpaid overtime was included and then excluded from the model. The sample was also stratified by gender and then by occupation to allow for comparisons. Later the Blinder–Oaxaca decomposition method was employed to identify and quantify the contribution of individual endowments to wage differentials between males and females. Results The analyses of data revealed a gender wage gap that varied across occupations. The inclusion of unpaid overtime in the analysis led to a slight reduction in the wage differential. The results showed an adjusted wage gap of 16.7%. Conclusions Unpaid overtime made a significant but small contribution to wage differentials. Being female remained the major contributing factor to the wage gap. Given that wage differentials provide a disincentive to work more hours, serious attempts to deal with the skilled labour shortage in the health sector need to address the gender wage gap. PMID:23433245

2013-01-01

145

Longitudinal Associations between Maternal Work Stress, Negative Work-Family Spillover, and Depressive Symptoms  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The current study examined associations over an 18-month period between maternal work stressors, negative work-family spillover, and depressive symptoms in a sample of 414 employed mothers with young children living in six predominantly nonmetropolitan counties in the Eastern United States. Results from a one-group mediation model showed that a…

Goodman, W. Benjamin; Crouter, Ann C.

2009-01-01

146

Work and family life: parental work schedules and child academic achievement  

Microsoft Academic Search

This review essay deals with interconnectivity between work life and family life. Specifically, it explores the relationship between parental work schedules and child academic achievement. Existing research focused on that relationship has been somewhat narrow in scope and has largely ignored the issue of underlying mechanisms. This review essay seeks to address those shortcomings by introducing a conceptual framework that

Chrissy D. Vincent; Barbara L. Neis

2011-01-01

147

Cultural Perspective on Work and Family: Dual-Earner Israeli-Jewish and Arab Families at the Transition to Parenthood  

Microsoft Academic Search

Parents' functioning in the work and family roles was examined in traditional and modern societies at the transition to parenthood. Participants were 162 dual-earner Israeli-Jewish and Arab families, who were interviewed and observed in dyadic and triadic interactions. Arab parents reported better adaptation to work following the first childbirth, and the triadic family process in Jewish families was more cohesive.

Ruth Feldman; Shafiq Masalha; Roni Nadam

2001-01-01

148

An Investigation of Role Salience and Linkages to Work-Family Conflict  

E-print Network

interference with family (? = -0.049; p ? 0.05). Family role salience appeared to support healthy involvement in both the work and family roles while work family salience appeared to deplete the necessary resources to balance work and family roles...

Greer, Tomika Wilson

2012-07-16

149

The Real-World Problem of Care Coordination: A Longitudinal Qualitative Study with Patients Living with Advanced Progressive Illness and Their Unpaid Caregivers  

PubMed Central

Objectives To develop a model of care coordination for patients living with advanced progressive illness and their unpaid caregivers, and to understand their perspective regarding care coordination. Design A prospective longitudinal, multi-perspective qualitative study involving a case-study approach. Methods Serial in-depth interviews were conducted, transcribed verbatim and then analyzed through open and axial coding in order to construct categories for three cases (sites). This was followed by continued thematic analysis to identify underlying conceptual coherence across all cases in order to produce one coherent care coordination model. Participants Fifty-six purposively sampled patients and 27 case-linked unpaid caregivers. Settings Three cases from contrasting primary, secondary and tertiary settings within Britain. Results Coordination is a deliberate cross-cutting action that involves high-quality, caring and well-informed staff, patients and unpaid caregivers who must work in partnership together across health and social care settings. For coordination to occur, it must be adequately resourced with efficient systems and services that communicate. Patients and unpaid caregivers contribute substantially to the coordination of their care, which is sometimes volunteered at a personal cost to them. Coordination is facilitated through flexible and patient-centered care, characterized by accurate and timely information communicated in a way that considers patients’ and caregivers’ needs, preferences, circumstances and abilities. Conclusions Within the midst of advanced progressive illness, coordination is a shared and complex intervention involving relational, structural and information components. Our study is one of the first to extensively examine patients’ and caregivers’ views about coordination, thus aiding conceptual fidelity. These findings can be used to help avoid oversimplifying a real-world problem, such as care coordination. Avoiding oversimplification can help with the development, evaluation and implementation of real-world coordination interventions for patients and their unpaid caregivers in the future. PMID:24788451

Daveson, Barbara A.; Harding, Richard; Shipman, Cathy; Mason, Bruce L.; Epiphaniou, Eleni; Higginson, Irene J.; Ellis-Smith, Clare; Henson, Lesley; Munday, Dan; Nanton, Veronica; Dale, Jeremy R.; Boyd, Kirsty; Worth, Allison; Barclay, Stephen; Donaldson, Anne; Murray, Scott

2014-01-01

150

Leadership Style of School Head-Teachers and Their Colleague's Work-Family Conflict  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper aims to investigate the relationship of people-oriented and task-oriented leadership styles with the work-family and family-work conflicts and the intensity of mutual relationship between work-family and family-work conflicts. Data for the research were collected through a survey of public sector elementary and secondary school teachers…

Tatlah, Ijaz Ahmed; Quraishi, Uzma

2010-01-01

151

Conflict or Support: Work and Family in Middle and Old Age.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes several career and family issues that may arise for adults and suggests possible counseling interventions. Several assumptions are made about the work/family connection: renegotiation of work/family balance continues throughout work life; a variety of demographic variables affect work/family roles; and some issues relate more to roles…

Goodman, Jane; Waters, Elinor B.

1985-01-01

152

FMLA: Family & Medical FLA: Family Leave Act  

E-print Network

Leave FCAL: Family Care Act Leave Parental Leave & Leave Without Salary Who is · Faculty (9 month" in order to be eligible for up to 15 days of unpaid leave per deployment) · Women who take leave due FCAL: Family Care Act Leave Parental Leave & Leave Without Salary Leave Restrictions · Runs

Borenstein, Elhanan

153

Preliminary Validation of the Work-Family Integration-Blurring Scale  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Several studies of telecommuting and working at home have alluded to the blurring line between work and family that can result from such highly integrated work-family arrangements. However, little is known about working parents' perceptions of the integration and blurring of their work and family roles. In this study, the authors created and…

Desrochers, Stephan; Hilton, Jeanne M.; Larwood, Laurie

2005-01-01

154

The Effects of Work Stressors, Perceived Organizational Support, and Gender on Work-Family Conflict in Hong Kong  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined the direct and moderating effects of perceived organizational support (POS) and gender on the relationship between work stressors and work-family conflict for a sample of Hong Kong Chinese employees. As predicted, we found that POS is negatively related to both FWC (family-to-work conflict) and WFC (work-to-family conflict), and that work stressors (including role ambiguity, role conflict, and

Sharon Foley; Ngo Hang-yue; Steven Lui

2005-01-01

155

Work and Family Research in the First Decade of the 21st Century  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Scholarship on work and family topics expanded in scope and coverage during the 2000-2010 decade, spurred by an increased diversity of workplaces and of families, by methodological innovations, and by the growth of communities of scholars focused on the work-family nexus. We discuss these developments as the backdrop for emergent work-family

Bianchi, Suzanne M.; Milkie, Melissa A.

2010-01-01

156

[Promoting family planning work in Xiaqidu township by establishing a family planning association in each village].  

PubMed

A family planning association was established in each village of Xiaqidu Township in Hunan Province, China in October 1986. The positive functions of each such association were so fully developed that family planning work reached new levels. For example, most villages are no longer experiencing early marriages or unplanned births. Some of the villages have established associations for individual work groups. The traditional method was for both township and village associations to rely upon the positive attitudes of officials to instill into fertile women Party policy, and to arouse their patriotism and initiative. By establishing family planning associations at the village level, however, the people can conduct their own affairs and educate themselves. Emphasis has been placed on attracting into the associations those who are of childbearing age, as well as older villagers of experience. The associations' raison d'etre was to serve the people. They did so through: propaganda (disseminating population theory, birth control and family planning information); helping the people overcome poverty, traditional thinking, and ignorance; assisting women with any problems and anxieties relating to child-bearing; delivering contraceptives to households; and providing the elderly with care and the young with education. PMID:12159303

Li, C

1987-07-01

157

Social Class and the Experience of Work-Family Conflict during the Transition to Adulthood  

PubMed Central

The challenges of juggling work and family responsibilities are well known, but there has been little attention to the distinctive work and family experiences of young adults. In this chapter, we explore how class affects young adults’ exposure to work-family conflicts and the strategies they use to manage their work and family responsibilities. Using data from a recent cohort of young adults, we find class and gender variations in work and family roles and work-family conflict. Early family formation, coupled with poor working conditions, lead those with lower educational attainments to experience more years of family-to-work interference. In contrast, young adults with more education have more work-to-family interference, and this is especially true for college-educated women. PMID:18330915

Ammons, Samantha K.; Kelly, Erin L.

2008-01-01

158

Family Mastery Enhances Work Engagement in Chinese Nurses: A Cross-Lagged Analysis  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Based on Greenhaus and Powell's (2006) theory of work-family enrichment and the job demands-resources (JD-R) model of work engagement (Bakker & Demerouti, 2008), this study focused on the family-to-work enrichment process by investigating the effect of family mastery on work engagement in a Chinese context. A sample of 279 Chinese female nurses…

Lu, Chang-qin; Siu, Oi-ling; Chen, Wei-qing; Wang, Hai-jiang

2011-01-01

159

Family\\/Work-Life Balance: How Much Does the Spouse Matter?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Balancing between family- and work life is difficult for many individuals. Existing analyses especially study the impact of individual work-related factors for the balance. However, dual-earner families must balance one family life and two working lives and, therefore, the work- conditions of the spouse is likely to have an effect on the family\\/work-life balance of the individual. In this paper,

Mette Deding; Mette Lausten

160

Does Work Experience Actually Work?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

As unemployment levels rise, so education and training move into the policy spotlight. For the government, this is a very uncomfortable place to be right now. A number of large companies have withdrawn from the flagship Work Programme--under which jobseekers are invited to take up unpaid work placements of between two and eight weeks--amid…

Field, John

2012-01-01

161

Working HIV care-givers in Botswana: Spillover effects on work and family well-being  

Microsoft Academic Search

Families provide most of the care to the tens of millions of HIV-infected and -affected in Africa. Little research exists on how care-givers balance the demands of holding a job with providing care for those who have become ill or orphaned by HIV\\/AIDS. Using data from a large survey administered to 1,077 working care-givers in Botswana, we compared the experience

Divya Rajaraman; Alison Earle; S. Jody Heymann

2008-01-01

162

101 Key Statistics on Work and Family for the 1990s. The BNA Special Report Series on Work and Family: Special Report No. 21.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This special report updates a September, 1988 Bureau of National Affairs (BNA) special report, "82 Key Statistics on Work and Family Issues," by presenting 101 new statistics on work and family concerns. Data concern: (1) child care; (2) parental leave; (3) elder care; (4) flexible work schedules; and (5) miscellaneous issues, such as men and…

Bureau of National Affairs, Inc., Washington, DC.

163

Changing Workplaces to Reduce Work-Family Conflict: Schedule Control in a White-Collar Organization  

PubMed Central

Work-family conflicts are common and consequential for employees, their families, and work organizations. Can workplaces be changed to reduce work-family conflict? Previous research has not been able to assess whether workplace policies or initiatives succeed in reducing work-family conflict or increasing work-family fit. Using longitudinal data collected from 608 employees of a white-collar organization before and after a workplace initiative was implemented, we investigate whether the initiative affects work-family conflict and fit, whether schedule control mediates these effects, and whether work demands, including long hours, moderate the initiative’s effects on work-family outcomes. Analyses clearly demonstrate that the workplace initiative positively affects the work-family interface, primarily by increasing employees’ schedule control. This study points to the importance of schedule control for our understanding of job quality and for management policies and practices. PMID:21580799

Kelly, Erin L.; Moen, Phyllis; Tranby, Eric

2011-01-01

164

Positive and Negative Effects of Family Involvement on Work-Related Burnout  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We aimed to explain the influence of family involvement on feelings of burnout among employees who combine work and family tasks. As proxies for family involvement, we used the family structure (partner, number and age of children) and family tasks (e.g. hours spent on household chores). We compared conflict theory and enrichment theory, and…

ten Brummelhuis, Lieke L.; van der Lippe, Tanja; Kluwer, Esther S.; Flap, Henk

2008-01-01

165

[Decision on family planning work of 7 March 1990].  

PubMed

The full decision in 7 parts of the Fujian Provincial CPC Committee and Government on Family Planning (FP) Work on March 7, 1990 is reported. A general statement about population growth in Fujian urges a stop to unplanned births, early marriages, and early childbearing. Section 1 pertains to cooperative leadership at all levels of party committees and governments in strengthening FP. The call is for integration of FP with economic development in accordance with the law, available cultivated land/capita, and population growth. Leadership in FP must come from the highest levels and be integrated into normal routines with provision for manpower, material, and financial resources. Local party committees and government must supervise FP work in units at all levels according the Central Committee and State Council's directives. Members of the Communist Youth League need to be actively involved. Section 2 pertains to establishing a responsibility system at various levels in order to meet targets, particularly in the next 3 years. Average annual rate of natural population growth should not exceed 13% and should be maintained at 11.33% for 1990. Couples must stay with 1 child/family and reduce unplanned births. Evaluation of work is dependent on fulfilling FP responsibilities for leaders at all levels. Rewards and punishments are to be established. Review of FP occurs annually for individuals and units, and a progress report sent to the People's Congress at the appropriate level of the Standing Committee. Accurate statistics need to be compiled. Section 3 stipulates that FP work is be carried out within the confines of provincial law. Strict enforcement of regulations is necessary. Approval is necessary for a 2nd child, and this regulation needs to be closely monitored. The position recommended is marrying and childbearing late and having only 1 child. Prevention is the key. Rewards and punishments pertain to government or party members. Social welfare benefits for those abiding by the regulations should be expanded. In section 4, emphasis is placed on rural areas lagging behind. Section 5 calls for old age homes and insurance for the aged, which could be funded from the unplanned birth funds, and a fund for women workers' childbearing and social security system. Section 7 promotes education about population, living conditions, and the legal system and propaganda on population and FP at all ages. Population theory and adolescence science need to be incorporated into the curriculum. Section 7 is concerned with increasing the collaboration between FP associations and party and government workers, both past and present. In section 8, the means of strengthening FP work is detailed. PMID:12285788

1990-05-11

166

Employment Capital: How Work Builds and Protects Family Wealth and Security  

E-print Network

interview sample saw their incomes and educations rise in relation to those of white families and yet the sample was white families and half was African-American families and included an equal split of working income and expenditures, household wealth and debt, their work history, family financial and non

Fraden, Seth

167

Supervisor Support, Work-Family Conflict, and Satisfaction Outcomes: An Empirical Study in the Hotel Industry  

Microsoft Academic Search

The current study developed and tested a model that investigated the relationship of supervisor support with work-family conflict and family-work conflict and the effects of both directions of conflict with family satisfaction, career satisfaction, and life satisfaction. The model also examined the impact of supervisor support on family and career satisfaction outcomes and the effects of these satisfaction variables on

Osman M. Karatepe; Orhan Uludag

2008-01-01

168

Working with Military Families Through Deployment and Beyond  

Microsoft Academic Search

Military families experience considerable stress, periods of long separation, and changes to the family system due to family\\u000a members planning to enter a war zone, actively living in a war zone, and reuniting after being in a war zone. Anticipation\\u000a and understanding of the stages of deployment improves family, couple and individual functioning. The issues that the family\\u000a and the

Julie Anne Laser; Paul M. Stephens

2011-01-01

169

Work-Family Conflict, Resources, and Role Set Density: Assessing Their Effects on Distress among Working Mothers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We explored the relationships between the experience of work-family conflict and levels of distress in the family and at work among a sample of 227 Israeli working mothers. We also examined how role set density (RSD, the number of roles they perform) and personal and environmental resources are related to the women's experience of distress.…

Kulik, Liat; Liberman, Gabriel

2013-01-01

170

Health and Turnover of Working Mothers after Childbirth via the Work-Family Interface: An Analysis across Time  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined organizational levers that impact work-family experiences, participant health, and subsequent turnover. Using a sample of 179 women returning to full-time work 4 months after childbirth, we examined the associations of 3 job resources (job security, skill discretion, and schedule control) with work-to-family enrichment and the…

Carlson, Dawn S.; Grzywacz, Joseph G.; Ferguson, Merideth; Hunter, Emily M.; Clinch, C. Randall; Arcury, Thomas A.

2011-01-01

171

Trait Mindfulness and Work-Family Balance among Working Parents: The Mediating Effects of Vitality and Sleep Quality  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The present study investigates the relationship between trait mindfulness and work-family balance among a sample of working parents. Sleep quality and vitality are tested as mediators of this relationship. Results indicate that those with greater mindfulness report greater work-family balance, better sleep quality, and greater vitality. As…

Allen, Tammy D.; Kiburz, Kaitlin M.

2012-01-01

172

Rhythms of Life: Antecedents and Outcomes of Work-Family Balance in Employed Parents  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined antecedents and outcomes of a fourfold taxonomy of work-family balance in terms of the direction of influence (work-family vs. family-work) and type of effect (conflict vs. facilitation). Respondents were full-time employed parents in India. Confirmatory factor analysis results provided evidence for the discriminant validity of M. R. Frone's (2003) fourfold taxonomy of work-family balance. Results of moderated

Samuel Aryee; E. S. Srinivas; Hwee Hoon Tan

2005-01-01

173

Work-Family Concerns of Norwegian Police Officers: Antecedents and Consequences  

Microsoft Academic Search

This research examined (a) potential predictors of work–family conflict and marital partner concerns and (b) consequences of these 2 work–family measures on indicators of psychological and physical well-being. Data were collected, using self-report questionnaires, from 766 male and female police officers in Norway. Job demands and burnout components (exhaustion, cynicism) emerged as strong predictors of the 2 work–family measures. Work–family

Aslaug Mikkelsen; Ronald J. Burke

2004-01-01

174

Work-Family Boundary Strategies: Stability and Alignment between Preferred and Enacted Boundaries  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Are individuals bounding work and family the way they would like? Much of the work-family boundary literature focuses on whether employees are segmenting or integrating work with family, but does not explore the boundaries workers would like to have, nor does it examine the fit between desired and enacted boundaries, or assess boundary stability.…

Ammons, Samantha K.

2013-01-01

175

Budgeting for Work-Life Balance: The Ideology and Politics of Work and Family Policy in Australia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Since its election in 1996 the Howard Government has invested billions of dollars in Australian families with children. Much of this money has been delivered through policies the Government claims will 'support families in the choices they wish to make' about how they combine paid work and family life (Howard 2005). This paper evaluates three areas of Commonwealth budget expenditure

E. Hill

2007-01-01

176

Thematic content analysis of work-family interactions: Retired cosmonauts’ reflections  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Anecdotal evidence and qualitative research attest to the importance of work-family interactions pre-, during and post-missions. This study uses thematic content analysis to quantify characteristics of work-family interactions and how these changed by stage of cosmonauts' career, identifying the effect of space career variables (e.g., time in space and station) on such interactions during and post-career. Using a thematic scoring scheme developed for this study, we coded work-family interactions identified from interviews with 20 retired male cosmonauts. The majority of work-family interactions were ones in which work overlapped into family life and work hindered or interfered with the family situation. The most common resolution was that family adjusted to work, and the mood or tone about this outcome was almost equally divided among negative, positive and neutral. Changes in work-family interactions and their resolution over the cosmonaut's life showed that the significant interactions were most evident during the cosmonaut career. Although the cosmonaut career has high work demands, it did adjust for family when the need arose. The Russian Space Agency (RKS) eased the impact of the periodic absences, especially through regular communication sessions. Positive work-family interactions, i.e., work or family helping the opposite role, were more likely for those who had been on ISS, not Mir, and for those whose last flight was after 2000. Our data reflect retired cosmonauts' recollections of work-family interactions during their career. Examples of work overlapping into family life and work viewed as interfering with family life were possibly more salient or better remembered than work or family helping the other role.

Johnson, Phyllis J.; Asmaro, Deyar; Suedfeld, Peter; Gushin, Vadim

2012-12-01

177

The Association Between Work-Family Conflict and Job Burnout Among Correctional Staff: A Preliminary Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Working in corrections can be a demanding career in which work-family conflict and job burnout are possible. This study examined\\u000a the relationship of the different forms of work-family conflict (time-based conflict, strain-based conflict, behavior-based\\u000a conflict, and family on work conflict) with job burnout. Multivariate analysis of survey results from 160 staff who worked\\u000a at a private Midwestern correctional facility for

Eric Lambert; Nancy L. Hogan; Irshad Altheimer

2010-01-01

178

Immigrant women in Australia: resources, family and work.  

PubMed

Using the 1% public use sample of individual records from the 1981 census and adopting direct standardization for age and sex regression techniques, this paper describes differences among native born Australians and immigrants from English-speaking countries, Northwestern Europe, Eastern Europe, the Mediterranean region and the Third World, in areas of labor participation, unemployment, occupational status, entrepreneurship, and income. While Eastern European women are the most likely to be in the labor force, are the most likely to be unemployed and are the highest paid, Mediterranean women are the least likely to be in the labor force, have fairly low unemployment rates and occupy the lowest status positions and receive the lowest wages. Native born Australians and immigrants from English-speaking and Third World countries and Northwestern Europe are intermediate between these 2 extremes on most dimensions. Some of the differences are not large. In particular, labor force participation only ranges from 49% to 59% and self employment from 9% to 14%. The most apparent differences in work patterns of the various groups of immigrants stem from differences in their own resources and constranits, or from different modes of adaptation to the Australian society, rather than from differential treatment in the labor market. Although family roles affect aspects of work differently, in general, marriage reduces labor force participation by more than 10% among all groups, except for East Europeans and the Mediterraneans, among whom it has no effect. While East European women hold on to their jobs as a potential source of livelihood in the event of divorce which is common among this group, the Mediterraneans view jobs as a means of achieving a measure of economic security. The effect of length of stay in Australia on labor market participation is somewhat larger for women from non-English speaking countries, whose adaptation process includes a slow improvement in language skills. In general, the Australian labor market appears to treat all immigrants equally without regard to their country of origin. PMID:12340229

Evans, M D

1984-01-01

179

Impacts of Children with Troubles on Working Poor Families: Mixed-Method and Experimental Evidence.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Research on working poor families participating in an anti-poverty initiative in Milwaukee found 60% of families had at least one child with significant problems (learning, school achievement and/or behavior, retardation, or other disabilities). Comparison with other families with children with troubles found the program families adapted less…

Bernheimer, Lucinda P.; Weisner, Thomas S.; Lowe, Edward D.

2003-01-01

180

The Work-Family Support Roles of Child Care Providers across Settings  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper presents a qualitative investigation of the work-family support roles of a sample of 29 child care providers serving low-income families in the Chicago area (16 family, friend, and neighbor providers (FFN), 7 licensed family child care providers (FCC), and 6 center-based teachers). Providers report offering low-income parents…

Bromer, Juliet; Henly, Julia R.

2009-01-01

181

Family and Work Predictors of Parenting Role Stress among Two-Earner Families of Children with Disabilities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Family resources (i.e. household income and spouse support), parenting challenges (i.e. number of children, difficulty finding reliable child care, and child characteristics), work rewards (i.e. work interest) and work demands (i.e. hours and work overload) were tested as predictors of parenting role stress among mothers and fathers in two-earner…

Warfield, Marji Erickson

2005-01-01

182

On the socioeconomic benefits of family planning work.  

PubMed

The focus of this article is on 1) the intended socioeconomic benefit of Chinese family planning (FP) versus the benefit of the maternal production sector, 2) the estimated costs of FP work, 3) and the principal ways to lower FP costs. Marxian population theory, which is ascribed to in socialist China, states that population and socioeconomic development are interconnected and must adapt to each other and that an excessively large or small population will upset the balance and retard development. Malthusians believe that large populations reduce income, and Adam Smith believed that more people meant a larger market and more income. It is believed that FP will bring socioeconomic benefits to China. The socioeconomic benefit of material production is the linkage between labor consumption and the amount of labor usage with the fruits and benefits of labor. FP invests in human, material, and financial resources to reduce the birth rate and the absolute number of births. The investment is recouped in population. The increased national income generated from a small outlay to produce an ideal population would be used to improve material and cultural lives. FP brings economic benefits and accelerates social development (ecological balances women's emancipation and improvement in the physical and mental health of women and children, improvement in cultural learning and employment, cultivation of socialist morality and new practices, and stability). In computing FP cost, consideration is given to total cost and unit cost. Cost is dependent on the state budget allocation, which was 445.76 million yuan in 1982 and was doubled by 1989. World Bank figures for 1984 affixed the FP budget in China at 979.6 million US dollars, of which 80% was provided by China. Per person, this means 21 cents for central, provincial, prefecture, and country spending, 34 cents for rural collective set-ups, 25 cents for child awards, and various subsidies, 15 cents for sterilization, and 5 cents for rural medical services, or 1 US dollar/person. Unit costs are the costs to reduce the population of one and include direct and indirect costs. The unit cost between 1970-82 was 35.5 yuan, but if outlays for families and industrial units are included, the cost was 70-100 yuan. Population growth, however, must be balanced so that aging does not cancel out the benefits from FP gains. Lower costs can be achieved by better FP administration. PMID:12343682

Yang, D

1991-01-01

183

Relationship-Centered Practices in Early Childhood: Working with Families, Infants, and Young Children at Risk  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Strong working relationships with diverse families and children are the foundation of successful early intervention. Discover fresh, practical ways to build these relationships in this essential guidebook, every professional's blueprint for working with children and families within the specific context of their culture, family structure, and risk…

Ensher, Gail L.; Clark, David A.

2011-01-01

184

The health effects of work and family role characteristics: Gender and race comparisons  

Microsoft Academic Search

Many studies have documented the benefits of work and family roles for both physical and mental health. A number of these studies have suggested that work and family roles are beneficial to the degree that they entail rewarding relationships and activities. Using data from the National Survey of Families and Households (N = 10633; 17 percent African-American), this paper examines

Beth Rushing; Annette Schwabe

1995-01-01

185

Not Babysitting: Work Stress and Well-Being for Family Child Care Providers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Family child care providers contend with a number of work stressors related to the dual roles of operating a small business and providing child care in their home. Research has documented many sources of work related stress for family child care providers; however, research examining family child care providers' experiences outside of the…

Gerstenblatt, Paula; Faulkner, Monica; Lee, Ahyoung; Doan, Linh Thy; Travis, Dnika

2014-01-01

186

Family and Work Influences on the Transition to College among Latina Adolescents  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigates the effect of family obligations and part-time work on Latina adolescents' stress and academic achievement during the transition to college. One hundred seventeen Latina college students from immigrant families completed surveys assessing the mother-daughter relationship, family obligations, work-school conflict, school and…

Sy, Susan R.

2006-01-01

187

Beating Time/Making Time: The Impact of Work Scheduling on Men's Family Roles.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Case studies examine men's family situations. Attempts to beat time by working from noon to midnight result in unintended negative consequences for one family. For another, creation of a split-shift family when a wife returns to work brings a father closer to his children and wife. (Author)

Hood, Jane; Golden, Susan

1979-01-01

188

Health and Turnover of Working Mothers After Childbirth Via the Work-Family Interface: An Analysis Across Time  

PubMed Central

This study examined organizational levers that impact work–family experiences, participant health, and subsequent turnover. Using a sample of 179 women returning to full-time work 4 months after childbirth, we examined the associations of 3 job resources (job security, skill discretion, and schedule control) with work-to-family enrichment and the associations of 2 job demands (psychological requirements and nonstandard work schedules) with work-to-family conflict. Further, we considered subsequent impact of work-to-family conflict and enrichment on women’s health (physical and mental health) 8 months after women returned to work and the impact of health on voluntary turnover 12 months after women returned to work. Having a nonstandard work schedule was directly and positively related to conflict, whereas schedule control buffered the effect of psychological requirements on conflict. Skill discretion and job security, both job resources, directly and positively related to enrichment. Work-to-family conflict was negatively related to both physical and mental health, but work-to-family enrichment positively predicted only physical health. Physical health and mental health both negatively influenced turnover. We discuss implications and opportunities for future research. PMID:21604833

Carlson, Dawn S.; Grzywacz, Joseph G.; Ferguson, Merideth; Hunter, Emily M.; Clinch, C. Randall; Arcury, Thomas A.

2013-01-01

189

Family Bonding with Universities. NBER Working Paper No. 15493  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

One justification offered for legacy admissions policies at universities is that they bind entire families to the university. Proponents maintain that these policies have a number of benefits, including increased donations from members of these families. We use a rich set of data from an anonymous selective research institution to investigate…

Meer, Jonathan; Rosen, Harvey S.

2009-01-01

190

Working with Families of Young Children with Special Needs  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This user-friendly book presents research-based best practices for serving families of children with special needs from birth to age 6. Expert contributors demonstrate how early intervention and early childhood special education can effectively address a wide range of family concerns, which in turn optimizes children's development and learning.…

McWilliam, R. A., Ed.

2010-01-01

191

Levels of Interventions for MFTs Working with Family Businesses  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Family businesses (FBs) are a significant population in the world and therefore part of most practicing marriage and family therapists (MFTs) clientele; however, little is mentioned about FBs in the training of MFTs. This article offers some guidance to practicing MFTs who service this population, as well as MFTs who wish to expand their practice…

Distelberg, Brian; Castanos, Carolina

2012-01-01

192

Working with Families Experiencing Homelessness: Understanding Trauma and Its Impact  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The prevalence of traumatic stress in the lives of families who are homeless is extraordinarily high. Often these families are headed by single mothers who have experienced ongoing trauma in the form of childhood abuse and neglect, domestic violence, and community violence, as well as the trauma associated with poverty and the loss of home,…

Guarino, Kathleen; Bassuk, Ellen

2010-01-01

193

Work dynamics in family care of hemophilic children.  

PubMed

School-aged boys with hemophilia, their parents, and siblings were interviewed and observed over a 5-year period, the field work taking place in their homes, schools, and during hospitalization, clinic visits, and summer camp periods. Sequential, open-ended interviews, and participant-observation techniques enabled the inquiry to study the process of the children's development as a major factor in changes that occurred in the management of their illness over time. Qualitative issues identified for study focused on the divisions of labor inherent in family interactions concerning the care of their hemophiliac children. The locus of control relative to particular technical medical interventions shifted from the medical center to a parent, eventually to each boy, with his associated development. Shifts were not entirely unidirectional, particular conditions influencing the tasks which transfer, the pace of changes and the resulting consequences. Categories of tasks are examined, with specific focus being the learning-teaching processes, the related awareness contexts, and the temporal dimensions involved. Concurrent with the hemophiliac boys' learning to infuse themselves with their particular missing clotting factor, a speaking up for themselves in interaction with peers and nonparent adults, relative to defining or treating the hemophilia, did not shift away from their parents. The boys' nonassumption of this aspect of their interactions is associated with a developing self-consciousness about their 'differences', which indicated a greater willingness to take physical risk (nonattention to the hemophilia requirements) than the social risk of emphasizing difference from peers. Adult intermediating, especially in the larger school contexts, thus remained primarily the parents' task in order to support the children's integration into the organizations.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3363397

Oremland, E K

1988-01-01

194

Telecommuting's differential impact on work-family conflict: is there no place like home?  

PubMed

The literature on the impact of telecommuting on work-family conflict has been equivocal, asserting that telecommuting enhances work-life balance and reduces conflict, or countering that it increases conflict as more time and emotional energy are allocated to family. Surveying 454 professional-level employees who split their work time between an office and home, the authors examined how extensively working in this mode impacts work-to-family conflict and family-to-work conflict, as well as the contextual impact of job autonomy, scheduling flexibility, and household size. As hypothesized, the findings suggest that telecommuting has a differential impact on work-family conflict, such that the more extensively individuals work in this mode, the lower their work-to-family conflict, but the higher their family-to-work conflict. Additionally, job autonomy and scheduling flexibility were found to positively moderate telecommuting's impact on work-to-family conflict, but household size was found to negatively moderate telecommuting's impact on family-to-work conflict, suggesting that contextual factors may be domain specific. PMID:17100488

Golden, Timothy D; Veiga, John F; Simsek, Zeki

2006-11-01

195

Work-family climate, organizational commitment, and turnover: Multilevel contagion effects of leaders ?  

PubMed Central

This paper presents empirical research analyzing the relationship between work–family climate (operationalized in terms of three work–family climate sub-scales), organizational leadership (i.e., senior manager) characteristics, organizational commitment and turnover intent among 526 employees from 37 different hotels across the US. Using multilevel modeling, we found significant associations between work–family climate, and both organizational commitment and turnover intent, both within and between hotels. Findings underscored the importance of managerial support for employee work–family balance, the relevance of senior managers’ own work–family circumstances in relation to employees’ work outcomes, and the existence of possible contagion effects of leaders in relation to work–family climate. PMID:19412351

O'Neill, John W.; Harrison, Michelle M.; Cleveland, Jeannette; Almeida, David; Stawski, Robert; Crouter, Anne C.

2009-01-01

196

Leaving Family for Work: Ambivalence and Mental Health Among Mexican Migrant Farmworker Men  

Microsoft Academic Search

Men migrating to the United States from Mexico and Central America confront opposing family norms. They need to leave their\\u000a families to gain family economic security; yet, leaving renders their families vulnerable. We examined the mental health implications\\u000a of the opposing family norms inherent in migration using an ambivalence framework. We interviewed 60 Latino migrant farmworkers\\u000a working in North Carolina.

Joseph G. Grzywacz; Sara A. Quandt; Julie Early; Janeth Tapia; Christopher N. Graham; Thomas A. Arcury

2006-01-01

197

The Impact of Stroke on Unpaid Caregivers: Results from the Auckland Regional Community Stroke Study, 2002–2003  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Few studies have assessed the longitudinal impact of providing unpaid care for stroke survivors. We aimed to describe the positive and negative impact of providing unpaid care and to identify independent predictors of poor carer outcome. Methods: The Auckland Regional Community Stroke study was a prospective population-based stroke incidence study conducted in Auckland, New Zealand, over a 12-month period

Varsha Parag; Maree L. Hackett; Chaturangi M. Yapa; Ngaire Kerse; Harry McNaughton; Valery L. Feigin; Craig S. Anderson

2008-01-01

198

Family functioning of child-rearing Japanese families on family-accompanied work assignments in Hong Kong.  

PubMed

Although the number of employees on overseas assignments accompanied by their families has increased steadily, little is known about the effects of this experience on family functioning. Japanese families on family-accompanied assignments living in Hong Kong were compared with families living in Japan (consisting of 135 and 248 paired partners, respectively). Applying an ecological framework, family functioning was examined using the Feetham Family Functioning Survey-Japanese (FFFS-J). Japanese wives living in Hong Kong rated family functioning lower, particularly in the area of "relationship between family and family members." Between paired marital partners living in Hong Kong, the level of satisfaction in the area of "relationship between family and society" was significantly lower for wives than for husbands. This study provides application of the family ecological framework in families in a multicultural environment and identifies potential areas for family assessment and intervention that may of interest to health care professionals who care for families living away from their home countries. PMID:22084484

Hohashi, Naohiro; Honda, Junko

2011-11-01

199

The family empowerment program: an interdisciplinary approach to working with multi-stressed urban families.  

PubMed

The family empowerment program (FEP) is a multi-systemic family therapy program that partners multi-stressed families with an interdisciplinary resource team while remaining attached to a "traditional" mental health clinic. The rationale for this model is that far too often, families presenting at community mental health centers struggle with multiple psychosocial forces, for example problems with housing, domestic violence, child care, entitlements, racism, substance abuse, and foster care, as well as chronic medical and psychiatric illnesses, that exacerbate symptoms and impact traditional service delivery and access to effective treatment. Thus, families often experience fragmented care and are involved with multiple systems with contradictory and competing agendas. As a result, services frequently fail to harness the family's inherent strengths. The FEP partners the family with a unified team that includes representatives from Entitlements Services, Family Support and Parent Advocacy, and Clinical Staff from the agency's Outpatient Mental Health Clinic practicing from a strength-based family therapy perspective. The goal of the FEP is to support the family in achieving their goals. This is accomplished through co-construction of a service plan that addresses the family's needs in an efficient and coherent manner-emphasizing family strengths and competencies and supporting family self-sufficiency. PMID:22690861

Cleek, Elizabeth N; Wofsy, Matt; Boyd-Franklin, Nancy; Mundy, Brian; Howell Lcsw, Tamika J

2012-06-01

200

Working with Families Affected by HIV/AIDS.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article introduces the reader to several of the major issues in treatment and prevention of HIV/AIDS, as well as clinical and ethical considerations facing marriage and family therapists today. (Contains 20 references.) (GCP)

Yarhouse, Mark A.

2003-01-01

201

Social Class, Work, and the Family: Some Implications of the Father's Occupation for Familial Relationships and Sons' Career Decisions.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The effects of both vertical and nonvertical dimensions of fathers' work on family relations and vocational socialization are explored through a multivariate analysis of data collected from several hundred male student participants enrolled in a Michigan College from 1962-1967. Social class and occupationally-related differences in family

Mortimer, Jeylan T.

202

Comparing Families and Staff in Nursing Homes and Assisted Living: Implications for Social Work Practice  

PubMed Central

Nursing homes and residential care/assisted living settings provide care to 2.4 million individuals. Few studies compare the experience of and relationships between family and staff in these settings, despite ongoing family involvement and evidence that relationships are problematic. Data from 488 families and 397 staff in 24 settings examined family involvement and family and staff burden, depressive symptoms, and perceptions; and staff absenteeism and turnover. There were few differences across setting types. While conflict rarely occurred, there was room for improvement in family-staff relations; this area, and preparing family for their caregiving roles, are appropriate targets for social work intervention. PMID:23869592

Zimmerman, Sheryl; Cohen, Lauren W.; Reed, David; Gwyther, Lisa P.; Washington, Tiffany; Cagle, John C.; Beeber, Anna S.; Sloane, Philip D.

2013-01-01

203

Reconciling work and family life : the effect of French family policies  

Microsoft Academic Search

In France, having more than two children has a causal negative impact on mothers' labour supply. The question addressed in this paper is whether some family policies alter this effect. The idea is that by improving the conditions of the conciliation between family life and professional life, family policies could reduce the negative impact of having more than two children

Julie Moschion

2007-01-01

204

Reconciling work and family life : the effect of french family policies  

Microsoft Academic Search

In France, having more than two children has a causal negative impact on mothers' labour supply. The question addressed in this paper is whether some family policies alter this effect. The idea is that by improving the conditions of the conciliation between family life and professional life, family policies could reduce the negative impact of having more than two children

Julie Moschion

2007-01-01

205

Working with Families Living with Autism: Potential Contributions of Marriage and Family Therapists  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article introduces marriage and family therapists (MFT) to some of the common issues faced by families that have a child with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). First, autism is defined and common myths surrounding it are discussed. Next, relational challenges are presented that families report experiencing during early childhood through the…

Neely, Jason; Amatea, Ellen S.; Echevarria-Doan, Silvia; Tannen, Tina

2012-01-01

206

Work-family conflict, psychological distress, and sleep deficiency among patient care workers.  

PubMed

This study examined whether work-family conflict was associated with sleep deficiencies, both cross-sectionally and longitudinally. In this two-phase study, a workplace health survey was completed by a cohort of patient care workers (n = 1,572). Additional data were collected 2 years later from a subsample of the original respondents (n = 102). Self-reported measures included work-family conflict, workplace factors, and sleep outcomes. The participants were 90% women, with a mean age of 41 ± 11.7 years. At baseline, after adjusting for covariates, higher levels of work-family conflict were significantly associated with sleep deficiency. Higher levels of work-family conflict also predicted sleep insufficiency nearly 2 years later. The first study to determine the predictive association between work-family conflict and sleep deficiency suggests that future sleep interventions should include a specific focus on work-family conflict. PMID:25000547

Jacobsen, Henrik B; Reme, Silje Endresen; Sembajwe, Grace; Hopcia, Karen; Stoddard, Anne M; Kenwood, Christopher; Stiles, Tore C; Sorensen, Glorian; Buxton, Orfeu M

2014-07-01

207

Self-Reported Work and Family Stress of Female Primary Teachers.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Results of a self-report questionnaire indicated that female primary teachers in Australia report moderate levels of global, work, and family stress. Time and workload pressure was the major work stressor, and responsibility for child rearing the major family stressor. Work stress and home stress both impacted on each other. (EV)

Thomas, Narelle; Clarke, Valerie; Lavery, Judy

2003-01-01

208

Work–family conflict and crossover in volunteer emergency service workers  

Microsoft Academic Search

A growing literature indicates that organizational and work demands place pressure on the partners and families of volunteer workers as it does on paid workers. This study evaluated a conceptual model integrating work–family conflict and stress crossover theoretical frameworks, to investigate the mechanisms by which emergency service volunteer work, specifically, predicts outcomes for the partners of volunteers. Matched data from

Sean Cowlishaw; Lynette Evans; Jim McLennan

2010-01-01

209

Work-Family Relations among Mothers of Children with Learning Disorders  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The study examined conflict and facilitation in work-family relations among working mothers of children with learning disorders (LD) or with typical development. The study also focused on three maternal personal resources (maternal anxious/avoidant attachment security, affect and sense of coherence) as antecedents of these work-family relations,…

Al-Yagon, Michal; Cinamon, Rachel Gali

2008-01-01

210

Questions and Answers about Child Care: A Sloan Work and Family Research Network Fact Sheet  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Sloan Work and Family Research Network has prepared Fact Sheets that provide statistical answers to some important questions about work-family and work-life issues. This Fact Sheet includes statistics about Child Care, and answers the following questions about child care: (1) How many children are in child care?; (2) How many hours per week do…

Sloan Work and Family Research Network, 2008

2008-01-01

211

Sensemaking in a High-Risk Lifestyle: The Relationship Between Work and Family for Public Safety Families  

E-print Network

at Home 146 Superhero vs. Empathic Rhetoric: Male and Female Communication About Work and Family 147 Superhero Rhetoric 148 Empathic Rhetoric 149 RQ4: Similarities and Differences Between Police Officers and Fire Fighters... at Home 146 Superhero vs. Empathic Rhetoric: Male and Female Communication About Work and Family 147 Superhero Rhetoric 148 Empathic Rhetoric 149 RQ4: Similarities and Differences Between Police Officers and Fire Fighters...

Bochantin, Jaime Elizabeth

2011-10-21

212

Work-family policies and the effects of children on women's employment hours and wages  

Microsoft Academic Search

Welfare state generosity around work-family policies appears to have somewhat contradictory effects, at least for some measures of gender equality. Work-family policies, in encouraging higher levels of women's labor market participation, may have also contributed to lower wage-levels for women relative to men, for instance. We consider the relationship between particular work-family policies and mothers’ employment outcomes. Analyses use data

Joya Misra; Michelle Budig; Irene Boeckmann

2011-01-01

213

Positive and negative work–family interaction and burnout: A longitudinal study of reciprocal relations  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined the longitudinal relationship between work–family interaction (WFI) in terms of the direction of influence (work-to-family vs. family-to-work) and type of effect (conflict vs. facilitation) and burnout. A sample of 2235 respondents from eight different occupational groups (lawyers, bus drivers, employees within information technology, physicians, teachers, church ministers, employees within advertisement, and nurses) supplied data at two points

Siw Tone Innstrand; Ellen Melbye Langballe; Geir Arild Espnes; Erik Falkum; Olaf Gjerløw Aasland

2008-01-01

214

WORK-FAMILY INTEGRATION IN THE UK - A REVIEW  

Microsoft Academic Search

There has been increasing concern among employers, workers and trade unions about the pres- sures placed on workers by the mismatch between work requirements and domestic roles in the UK (Walsh 2005). The issues of overwork, lengthening working time and work-life balance have risen to the top of the Government's political agenda and the Employment Act 2002 has given working

Celia Stanworth; Niels-Erik Wergin; Geoff White

2007-01-01

215

Do Economic Stresses Influence Child Work Hours on Family Farms?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Economic stresses are a frequently cited reason for children doing farm work.Objective: To explore the relationship between economic indicators and child agricultural work hours between 2001 and October 2003.Methods: This ecologic study design compares trends in aggregate child work hours with national and regional economic indicators. Child work hours were obtained from quarterly surveillance data from a randomized field

Anne Gadomski; Rachel de Long; Patrick Burdick; Paul Jenkins

2005-01-01

216

Beyond Work-Family Programs: Confronting and Resolving the Underlying Causes of Work-Personal Life Conflict.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Work-Family Programs (WFPs) are among the most popular and publicized workplace innovations of the 1990s. These programs are intended to alleviate employees' work-personal conflicts by addressing issues such as child care assistance, parental leave, elder care, flexible working arrangements, wellness and fitness, and stress management. The problem…

Kofodimos, Joan R.

217

Innovative Ideas on How Work-Family Research Can Have More Impact  

PubMed Central

The commentaries on our focal article agreed with its main premise that work–family research should follow new strategies to improve its practical impact, and made suggestions clustering into three main themes. The first theme built on our suggestion to improve the research focus, terminology, and framing of work-family research. These essays offered additional ideas such as decoupling work-family from work-life research, and examining contextual factors more deeply. The second theme focused on how to better apply the findings from work family research. These commentaries provided social change approaches for making work-family issues more central to key stakeholders and to organizations. The third theme focused on broadening our scope to the societal level. These editorials advocated tactics supporting the development of basic rights of work–life balance within and across nations. PMID:22247738

Kossek, Ellen Ernst; Baltes, Boris B.; Matthews, Russell A.

2011-01-01

218

Designing Computerized Decision Support That Works for Clinicians and Families  

PubMed Central

Evidence-based decision-making is central to the practice of pediatrics. Clinical trials and other biomedical research provide a foundation for this process, and practice guidelines, drawing from their results, inform the optimal management of an increasing number of childhood health problems. However, many clinicians fail to adhere to guidelines. Clinical decision support delivered using health information technology, often in the form of electronic health records, provides a tool to deliver evidence-based information to the point of care and has the potential to overcome barriers to evidence-based practice. An increasing literature now informs how these systems should be designed and implemented to most effectively improve outcomes in pediatrics. Through the examples of computerized physician order entry, as well as the impact of alerts at the point of care on immunization rates, the delivery of evidence-based asthma care, and the follow-up of children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, the following review addresses strategies for success in using these tools. The following review argues that, as decision support evolves, the clinician should no longer be the sole target of information and alerts. Through the Internet and other technologies, families are increasingly seeking health information and gathering input to guide health decisions. By enlisting clinical decision support systems to deliver evidence-based information to both clinicians and families, help families express their preferences and goals, and connect families to the medical home, clinical decision support may ultimately be most effective in improving outcomes. PMID:21315295

Fiks, Alexander G.

2011-01-01

219

Nurturing Careers in Psychology: Combining Work and Family  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The academic workplace, with its requirements for achieving tenure within the first 6 years of employment, is designed in ways that discriminate against young faculty with family care responsibilities, most notably mothers. Mason and Goulden ("Academe," http://www.aaup.org/publications/Academe/2002/02nd/02ndmas.htm, 2002, "Academe,"…

Halpern, Diane F.

2008-01-01

220

Librarians and Working Families: Bridging the Information Divide.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Considers the impact of services public libraries provide to union members, particularly access to computers, based on experiences with the SEIU (Service Employees International Union). Topics include training; resources for families; education; and Locals Online, a program that provides training and Web content to SEIU local unions. (LRW)

Williams, Gaye

2002-01-01

221

Opportunities for School Psychologists Working with Children of Military Families  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Today's military families are a diverse, resilient group of brave Americans, and the country owes them a tremendous debt of gratitude. To date, over 2 million service members have been deployed in support of the Global War on Terrorism, many for multiple tours. For the first time in the country's history, there are more military dependents…

Sherman, Michelle D.; Glenn, Marshall Andrew

2011-01-01

222

Work Stress in the Family Life of African Americans.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Investigated the link between job-related stressors and family life among African Americans. Data from African Americans who participated in the America's Changing Lives survey indicated that job latitude positively affected marital harmony, and physical demands negatively affected marital harmony. Psychosocial demands, job bother, and chronic…

Broman, Clifford L.

2001-01-01

223

Linking Work-Family Issues to the Bottom Line. Report Number 962.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A 1988 symposium on the effect of family problems on the corporate bottom line and a review of more than 80 other studies have confirmed that business investments in programs and policies to resolve family-work conflicts yield returns. Family issues/problems have been documented to affect employee recruitment, productivity, turnover, and…

Friedman, Dana E.

224

Social Work With Affluent and Low-income Families: Attribution Theory  

Microsoft Academic Search

A study to assess attribution theory and the work done by social workers with wealthy and poor families was performed using two vignettes identical in information suggesting abuse, with one described as a wealthy family and the other a family living in poverty. Attribution theory suggests that humans label and assume certain traits to be true of different persons based

Katharine Terbush

2008-01-01

225

Age Differences in the Longitudinal Relationship between Work-Family Conflict and Alcohol Use  

PubMed Central

Research on the relationship between work-family conflict and alcohol use has generally shown small effects possibly due to failure to include important individual differences relevant to the experience of work-family conflict and alcohol use, notably age. This study examined whether the relationships between aspects of work-family conflict and alcohol use variables differed by age. Participants were 543 individuals (51.2% women) from a community sample of working adults in the greater Chicagoland area who responded to a mail survey at three time points. Results showed important differences between age groups in several predictors of alcohol use. Strain versus time-based conflict had different effects on drinking, and strain-based forms of work-family conflict were related to increased problematic alcohol use depending on age. This study indicates that individual differences, particularly age, should be systematically accounted for when studying the relationship between work-family conflict and alcohol use. PMID:24949213

Wolff, Jennifer M.; Rospenda, Kathleen M.; Richman, Judith A.

2014-01-01

226

Training Family Therapists to Work with Children and Families: A Modified Delphi Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined child inclusion issues and training marriage and family therapists (MFTs) to treat children. This modified Delphi study utilized a panel of experts, and gathered data through questionnaires and qualitative interviews. Panelists believe children should participate in family therapy sessions for both child and adult problems,…

Sori, Catherine Ford; Sprenkle, Douglas H.

2004-01-01

227

Workforce Issues in the Greater Boston Health Care Industry: Implications for Work and Family  

E-print Network

This working paper synthesizes critical problems identified by interviews with more than 40 leaders in the Boston area health care industry and places them in the context of work and family issues. At ...

Harrington, Mona

2004-12-10

228

Work and Family and Unions: Labor's Agenda for the 1990s. The BNA Special Report Series on Work and Family: Special Report No. 20.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This special report examines the labor movement's growing interest in benefits that help two-income families and single parents. The report also: (1) examines benefits that unions have won for their members and employers' reactions to labor's increasing advocacy on behalf of working parents; (2) profiles the results of union activism for work and…

Bureau of National Affairs, Inc., Washington, DC.

229

The role of citizenship behavior in personal learning and work-family enrichment  

Microsoft Academic Search

Extending the research on work-family interface in the Chinese context, the present study examines how organizational citizenship\\u000a behavior (OCB) may enrich the quality of OCB performers’ family life through personal learning. Results from a sample of 385\\u000a supervisor-subordinate dyads in China show that OCB is positively associated with work-to-family enrichment. This association\\u000a is fully mediated by one type of personal

Ho-Kwong Kwan; Yina Mao

2011-01-01

230

Youth from Low-Income Working Families. Vulnerable Youth and the Transition to Adulthood  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Approximately 6 in 10 low-income families have at least one adult who works full time throughout the year. This fact sheet uses data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 to describe the adolescent risk behaviors and the transition to adulthood for low-income youth from "high-work" families compared to low-income youth from…

McDaniel, Marla; Kuehn, Daniel

2009-01-01

231

We've come a long way, maybe: College students' plans for work and family  

Microsoft Academic Search

Young men and women today face considerable choices as they plan for family and work. We explore college students' educational preparations, as well as their attitudes, orientations, and expectations for work and family. Although we find some changes toward a more gender-equal society, we also find potential conflicts which these individuals will have to face as they attempt to combine

Joan Z. Spade; Carole A. Reese

1991-01-01

232

Work and family conflict: Understanding the role of race, gender, racial discrimination, and sexual discrimination  

Microsoft Academic Search

The pervasive nature and confluence of organizational and personal challenges should serve as motivation for theorists and researchers alike to investigate how work and family interact and impact all social groups in our society. This need is further compounded by the fact that in the last three decades there have been extreme changes in the face of work and family

Katrina Wade-Golden

2006-01-01

233

A Comprehensive Approach to Refractory Mind-Body Disorders: Working at the Family-Community Interface.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Dysfunctional relations between the family and other social systems usually play a part in maintaining refractory problems and chronic patienthood. Therapeutic interventions need to work at this interface, in order to create a collaborative team that will provide sufficient support to the family at risk. This way of working can be easily applied…

Elizur, Joel

234

12 to 1 Income Inequality among Working Families in Milwaukee County: Workforce Challenges for 2014  

E-print Network

: 12 to 1 Income Inequality among Working Families in Milwaukee County: Workforce Challenges-elderly married and single state tax filers with dependents) #12;2 12 to 1 Income Inequality among Working" in Milwaukee County is worsening rather than improving. 12 to 1 income inequality among families with children

Saldin, Dilano

235

Developing and Implementing Work and Family Policies: The Implications for Human Resource Policies  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper examines the processes involved in the development and implementation of work and family policies in five organizations. It identifies the types of work and family policies and describes the formal and informal processes involved in the development and implementation of some of the major initiatives. The critical steps associated with these processes and the critical factors, such as

Robin Kramar

1998-01-01

236

An Exploratory Study into Work/Family Balance within the Australian Higher Education Sector  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The higher education landscape is undergoing major transformation, with a significant impact on the work and family practices of academics and professional staff. The purpose of this exploratory study is to examine the extent to which (1) time-related, (2) strain-related and (3) demographical variables impact on the work/family balance of academic…

Pillay, Soma; Kluvers, Ron; Abhayawansa, Subhash; Vranic, Vedran

2013-01-01

237

Adaptive Strategies, Gender Ideology, and Work-Family Balance Among Dutch Dual Earners  

Microsoft Academic Search

Using questionnaire data on 149 Dutch dual-earner couples with young children participating in the European Famwork study, we examine how adaptive strategies and gender ideology relate to parents' perceived success in balancing work and family. Path analysis indicates that some adaptive strategies may harm individuals' work-family balance, particularly when they are made in the domain where the time budget is

H. H. Wierda-Boer; J. R. M. Gerris; A. A. Vermulst

2008-01-01

238

Traditional and Nontraditional Gender Roles and Work-Family Interface for Men and Women  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this article, we examine traditional and nontraditional gender roles and work-family interface for men and women. Recent empirical literature is reviewed and implications for career counselors are discussed. We discuss changing gender roles in career, marriage, and parenting and provide strategies for helping clients to cope with work-family

Perrone, Kristin M.; Wright, Stephen L.; Jackson, Z. Vance

2009-01-01

239

The Development and Validation of Scores on Perceived Work and Family Demand Scales  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Two scales, Perceived Work Demand (PWD) and Perceived Family Demand (PFD), are developed and their scores validated using three diverse samples. The scales are of particular interest in the work-family conflict (WFC) area and provide needed clarification in predicting WFC. Scale development procedures were followed, and dimensionality, internal…

Boyar, Scott L.; Carr, Jon C.; Mosley, Donald C., Jr.; Carson, Charles M.

2007-01-01

240

Cognitive capacity for processing work-family conflict: an initial examination  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – The purpose of this study is to examine how individuals cognitively process work-family conflict (WFC), specifically whether differences in tolerance for uncertainty and cognitive complexity influence individuals' affective response to WFC. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – Using a sample of 157 employees who completed a survey on work-family issues, the hypotheses were tested using correlation and regression analyses. Findings – The

Suzanne C. de Janasz; Scott J. Behson

2007-01-01

241

Work-family conflict and career success: the effects of domain-specific determinants  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – Despite widespread acknowledgement that work-family conflict and career success are salient issues that impact individual wellbeing and organizational effectiveness, there is little research that studies how the two concepts are related. The purpose of this paper is to develop and present a tentative framework for understanding the relationships among antecedents of interrole conflict between work and family and

Hassan I. Ballout

2008-01-01

242

Informal Caregiving at Working Age: Effects of Job Characteristics and Family Configuration  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article addresses the relationship between employment and providing informal care for sick, disabled, or elderly people in Great Britain. Hazard rate models for taking up caring and leaving work when caring are estimated using retrospective family, employment, and caring data from the British Family and Working Lives Survey 1994-1995 for…

Henz, Ursula

2006-01-01

243

Instability in Child Care: Ethnographic Evidence from Working Poor Families in the New Hope Intervention  

Microsoft Academic Search

Unstable child care arrangements can lead to negative consequences both for parents' employment and for children's well-being, particularly among families already struggling with low incomes and variable work schedules. This paper draws upon longitudinal ethnographic information from a sample of 44 working poor families who participated in the New Hope Demonstration, an experimental intervention in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, that provided a

Edward D. Lowe; Thomas S. Weisner; Sonya Geis

244

Head Start: Helping Families Move from Welfare to Work.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report describes some of the ways in which Head Start agencies are helping to set parents on the path to self-sufficiency. The report is intended to illustrate the variety of initiatives that are underway and to highlight the important work all Head Start agencies are doing to support parents as they move from welfare to work. The…

Finlay, Belva; Blank, Helen; Poersch, Nicole Oxendine

245

Work and Family Characteristics as Predictors of Early Retirement in Married Men and Women  

PubMed Central

This study presents an integrative model of early retirement using data from the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study. The model extends prior work by incorporating work-family conflict to capture the interaction between the work and family domains and by assuming proximal and distal predictors of early retirement. More precisely, the model suggests that family and job demands and resources predict family-to-work and work-to-family conflict, respectively. All of these factors are presumed to have only indirect effects on retirement timing via the intervening effect of quality of life measures, that is, marital satisfaction, job satisfaction and health. The authors assume that these three factors constitute predictors of early retirement in addition to socioeconomic status and the availability of a pension plan and health insurance. The model was tested with structural equation modeling techniques, and the results were supportive. Therefore, the proposed model offers a general framework for the integration of previous research findings. PMID:21430790

Kubicek, Bettina; Korunka, Christian; Hoonakker, Peter; Raymo, James M.

2010-01-01

246

Working conditions and Work-Family Conflict in German hospital physicians: psychosocial and organisational predictors and consequences  

PubMed Central

Background Germany currently experiences a situation of major physician attrition. The incompatibility between work and family has been discussed as one of the major reasons for the increasing departure of German physicians for non-clinical occupations or abroad. This study investigates predictors for one particular direction of Work-Family Conflict – namely work interfering with family conflict (WIF) – which are located within the psychosocial work environment or work organisation of hospital physicians. Furthermore, effects of WIF on the individual physicians' physical and mental health were examined. Analyses were performed with an emphasis on gender differences. Comparisons with the general German population were made. Methods Data were collected by questionnaires as part of a study on Psychosocial work hazards and strains of German hospital physicians during April–July 2005. Two hundred and ninety-six hospital physicians (response rate 38.9%) participated in the survey. The Copenhagen Psychosocial Questionnaire (COPSOQ), work interfering with family conflict scale (WIF), and hospital-specific single items on work organisation were used to assess WIF, its predictors, and consequences. Results German hospital physicians reported elevated levels of WIF (mean = 74) compared to the general German population (mean = 45, p < .01). No significant gender difference was found. Predictors for the WIF were lower age, high quantitative demands at work, elevated number of days at work despite own illness, and consequences of short-notice changes in the duty roster. Good sense of community at work was a protective factor. Compared to the general German population, we observed a significant higher level of quantitative work demands among hospital physicians (mean = 73 vs. mean = 57, p < .01). High values of WIF were significantly correlated to higher rates of personal burnout, behavioural and cognitive stress symptoms, and the intention to leave the job. In contrast, low levels of WIF predicted higher job satisfaction, better self-judged general health status, better work ability, and higher satisfaction with life in general. Compared to the German general population, physicians showed significantly higher levels of individual stress and quality of life as well as lower levels for well-being. This has to be judged as an alerting finding regarding the state of physicians' health. Conclusion In our study, work interfering with family conflict (WIF) as part of Work-Family Conflict (WFC) was highly prevalent among German hospital physicians. Factors of work organisation as well as factors of interpersonal relations at work were identified as significant predictors for WIF. Some of these predictors are accessible to alteration by improving work organisation in hospitals. PMID:18840296

Fuss, Isabelle; Nubling, Matthias; Hasselhorn, Hans-Martin; Schwappach, David; Rieger, Monika A

2008-01-01

247

The influence of shift work on emotional exhaustion in firefighters : The role of work-family conflict and social support  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – With the demand for continuous services increasing, organizations have relied more upon shift work to adapt to the needs of consumers. However, relatively little research has adequately explored the effects of different types of shifts on emotional exhaustion, particularly as they relate to work-family conflict and social support. In this paper based on the conservation of resources (COR)

Jonathon R. B. Halbesleben

2009-01-01

248

Social rights and employment rights related to family care: family care regimes in Europe.  

PubMed

In early welfare states, social rights predominantly derived from formal employment relations. Within the past two decades, however, some European countries have opened these social institutions to care work also. Cash-for-care and social entitlements for periods of at-home family caregiving have changed the characteristics of informal care work that family members traditionally provide to older relatives. Formerly based on unpaid kinship relations, it has changed towards new paid and more formalized forms of care work by family members. But it can be assumed that long-term care work by family members is constructed differently across welfare states. The paper is guided by the following research question: How do welfare-state policies differ in the degree to which their policies towards family care for senior citizens create social risks for the caring family members? We use the conceptual framework of "family care regimes" as our analytical framework for the comparative research. To do this, we compare care policies towards older care-needy people in the welfare states of the Netherlands, Germany and Denmark. The findings show that a common feature in all three countries is that the situation of family carers is to some degree being formalized: in all three countries a frail senior citizen can chose a family member as the care provider, and the welfare states support the family care providers. Still, the legal situation as well as the quality and level of social rights for family caregivers differ considerably among the three countries. It is shown that the institutional framework for senior care by family members in Germany and the Netherlands represents a family care regime that supports semi-formal family care, and that in Denmark it can be classified as a family care regime that supports formal family care. We show that these different types of family care regimes differ considerably in the social risks they pose to family carers. PMID:24655674

Frericks, Patricia; Jensen, Per H; Pfau-Effinger, Birgit

2014-04-01

249

Desempenho em consciência fonológica, memória operacional, leitura e escrita na dislexia familial****** Phonological awareness, working memory, reading and writing performances in familial dyslexia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: familial dyslexia. Aim: to characterize and compare the phonological awareness, working memory, reading and writing abilities of individuals whose family members are also affected. Method: in this study 10 familial nuclei of natural family relationship of individuals with dyslexia were analyzed. Families of natural individuals living in the west region of the state of São Paulo were selected. Inclusion

Simone Aparecida Capellini

250

Work/Family Balance for Men in Student Affairs  

E-print Network

. Snowball, or network sampling (Merriam, 1998) was to recruit a wide variety of participants. Seven cases were selected for this study. Participants were interviewed either via phone or in person (dependent on location), with 5 interviews lasting... number of years, due to expectations for increased productivity and work hours (Polach, 2003). Schor (1992) asserts that much of this increased demand for additional work hours is driven by increased debt and consumerism, and therefore, may not improve...

Singh, Shailendra Mohan

2012-07-16

251

Creating flexible work arrangements through idiosyncratic deals.  

PubMed

A survey of 887 employees in a German government agency assessed the antecedents and consequences of idiosyncratic arrangements individual workers negotiated with their supervisors. Work arrangements promoting the individualization of employment conditions, such as part-time work and telecommuting, were positively related to the negotiation of idiosyncratic deals ("i-deals"). Worker personal initiative also had a positive effect on i-deal negotiation. Two types of i-deals were studied: flexibility in hours of work and developmental opportunities. Flexibility i-deals were negatively related and developmental i-deals positively related to work-family conflict and working unpaid overtime. Developmental i-deals were also positively related to increased performance expectations and affective organizational commitment, while flexibility i-deals were unrelated to either. PMID:18457493

Hornung, Severin; Rousseau, Denise M; Glaser, Jürgen

2008-05-01

252

Expanding the Psychosocial Work Environment: Workplace Norms and Work-Family Conflict as Correlates of Stress and Health  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined the contributions of organizational level norms about work requirements and social relations, and work-family conflict, to job stress and subjective health symptoms, controlling for Karasek's job demand-control-support model of the psychosocial work environment, in a sample of 1,346 employees from 56 firms in the Norwegian food and beverage industry. Hierarchical linear modeling analyses showed that organizational norms

Tove Helland Hammer; Per Øystein Saksvik; Kjell Nytrø; Hans Torvatn; Mahmut Bayazit

2004-01-01

253

Antecedents and Outcomes of Work-Family Conflict: Toward a Motivational Model  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of the present study was to propose and test a model of work-family conflict based on Self-Determination Theory and the Hierarchical Model of Intrinsic and Extrinsic Motivation. The model posits that positive interpersonal factors both at work (i.e., one's employer) and at home (e.g., one's spouse) influence work and family motivation. Moreover, the model proposes that low levels

C. Senecal; Robert J. Vallerand; F. Guay

2001-01-01

254

Family-to-work Spillover Stress: Coping Communicatively in the Workplace  

Microsoft Academic Search

One career path that sheds light on the relationship between work and family for women is that of care-giving professionals. Because of the stressful nature of their socialized roles as caregivers at work and at home, these women constitute a unique population. This interpretive study investigated female care-giving professionals' family-to-work spillover stress and revealed eight communication strategies the women used

S. S. Krouse; T. D. Afifi

2007-01-01

255

A resilience perspective on family adjustment to cross?border work arrangements of Hong Kong residents  

Microsoft Academic Search

With the close economic relationship between Hong Kong and the Mainland, cross?border commutes for work have become an increasingly common work?family arrangement for Hong Kong residents. Due to the special social context of Mainland China, the impact of the cross?border work arrangement is mostly understood in terms of the cost or its negative impact on the families involved. However, this

Yuk King Lau; Joyce Lai Chong Ma; Ying Keung Chan; Liping He

2008-01-01

256

Work–family conflicts and job attitudes of single women: a developing country perspective  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study addresses work–family conflicts and job attitudes of white-collar single women and the ensuing work-related attitudes in a developing country context. After an overview of gender roles in Arab society, several hypotheses were advanced and tested. Although married females reported higher family–work conflicts than single females, the latter group faced a host of strains, which are presented and analyzed.

Yusuf M. Sidani; Zeina T. Al Hakim

2012-01-01

257

Work–family conflicts and job attitudes of single women: a developing country perspective  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study addresses work–family conflicts and job attitudes of white-collar single women and the ensuing work-related attitudes in a developing country context. After an overview of gender roles in Arab society, several hypotheses were advanced and tested. Although married females reported higher family–work conflicts than single females, the latter group faced a host of strains, which are presented and analyzed.

Yusuf M. Sidani; Zeina T. Al Hakim

2011-01-01

258

New Parents at Work: Jobs, Families, and the Psychological Contract.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examines the impact of policies, practices, and attitudes of employers toward new parents by interviews with seven women and six men who had recently returned to work after becoming first-time parents. Findings pointed to considerable differences in the attitudes of employers to the men and women. Discusses implications for organizational careers…

Borrill, Carol; Kidd, Jennifer M.

1994-01-01

259

Predictors of Negative Spillover from Family to Work  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Prior research has inconsistently documented the gendered nature of negative spillover between the domains of home and work. Little is known about predictors of negative spillover for employed mothers and fathers. Using the 1997 wave of the National Study of the Changing Workforce, this study's purpose was twofold: to determine if a difference…

Dilworth, Jennie E. Long

2004-01-01

260

Families That Work: Policies for Reconciling Parenthood and Employment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Parents around the world grapple with the common challenge of balancing work and child care. Despite common problems, the industrialized nations have developed dramatically different social and labor market policies--policies that vary widely in the level of support they provide for parents and the extent to which they encourage an equal division…

Gornick, Janet C.; Meyers, Marcia K.

2003-01-01

261

"Good Work Awards:" Effects on Children's Families. Technical Report #12.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This brief report describes parental reaction to a reinforcement strategy used with children in the Kamehameha Early Education Program (KEEP). Staff members report that "Good Work Awards" (GWAs) are viewed favorably by mothers of students. GWAs are dittoed notes sent home with children when they have met a minimum criterion for daily classroom…

Chun, Sherlyn; Mays, Violet

262

[The National Conference of Propaganda Work on Family Planning held Beijing].  

PubMed

The National Conference on Propaganda Work in Family Planning, held in Beijing from November 1-6, 1982, was sponsored by the the Propaganda Department of the Chinese Communist Party Central Committee and the National Family Planning Committee. Among the 136 participants were representatives from various provincial, city, and autonomous region propaganda and family planning units, the General Political Department of the People's Liberation Army, general trade unions, All China Women's Federation, Communist Youth League, and propaganda reporters. The purpose of the conference was to discuss how to organize family planning propaganda in meeting China's goal of limiting the population to 1,200,000,000 by 2000, and how to arrange a Family Planning Propaganda Month for early 1983. The Chairman of the National Family Planning Committee made 3 points: family planning is a basic national policy, greater propaganda efforts must be made towards peasant family planning, and everyone must work hard to create a new situation in family planning work. The Vice Minister of the Propaganda Department remarked that family planning propaganda was foremost among the 12 national propaganda topics; these sentiments were supported totally by the representatives of the women and youth groups. The Vice Chairman of the Advisory Committee of the Central Committee said that family planning work was longterm, and that its success lay in the countryside. Finally, the Vice Chairman of the National Family Planning Committee encouraged all delegates to take the spirit of the conference back to their home. During the conference delegates also met to discuss important points in planning the Family Planning Propaganda Month. PMID:12312938

Ma, B

1983-01-29

263

Work-family conflict as a mediator of the work stress - mental health relationship  

Microsoft Academic Search

The relationship between work stressors and mental health outcomes has been demonstrated in a whole range of work stress models and studies. But less has been written about factors outside the work setting that might predict or moderate the relationship between work stressors and strain. In this exploratory study, we suggest a model linking work stressors and \\

Steven Poelmans

2001-01-01

264

Work-Family Supportiveness Organizational Perceptions: Important for the Well-Being of Male Blue-Collar Hourly Workers?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The current study questions whether organizational perceptions of family supportiveness predict work-family conflict (WFC) and job satisfaction for an atypical sample of male hourly workers in a manufacturing organization, and whether those relationships depend on work (number of work hours) and family (number of family roles) demands. A…

Grandey, Alicia A.; Cordeiro, Bryanne L.; Michael, Judd H.

2007-01-01

265

Work–family interface from a life and career stage perspective: The role of demands and resources  

Microsoft Academic Search

Work–family conflict and enrichment are experiences that occur daily and have substantial consequences for employees, their families, and the organizations that employ them. The aim of the current review is to make a link between life and career stage, work and family conditions, and the work–family interface. The basic proposition is that life stages partly determine career development, and consequently

Evangelia Demerouti; Maria C. W. Peeters; Beatrice I. J. M. van der Heijden

2012-01-01

266

His and Her Perspectives: Gender Ideology, Work-to-Family Conflict, and Marital Satisfaction  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examines the relationships between gender ideology, work-to-family conflict, and marital satisfaction. We hypothesize\\u000a that gender ideology will moderate relationships between both the respondent’s work-to-family conflict and their spouse’s\\u000a work-to-family conflict in predicting marital satisfaction, and that spouses’ gender ideologies will interact in predicting\\u000a marital satisfaction. The hypotheses are addressed using data from a random sample of U.S. dual-earner

Krista Lynn Minnotte; Michael C. Minnotte; Daphne E. Pedersen; Susan E. Mannon; Gary Kiger

2010-01-01

267

Job-Related Emotional Labor and Its Relationship to Work-Family Conflict and Facilitation  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article used a differential salience demands-resources model to explore how self-focused (i.e., surface and deep acting)\\u000a and other-focused (i.e., emotional enhancement and relationship management) job-related emotional labor are associated with\\u000a bidirectional measures of work-family conflict and facilitation. Results indicated that surface acting was related positively\\u000a with time-, strain-, and behavior-based work-family conflict and was associated negatively with work-to-family facilitation.

Brenda L. Seery; Elizabeth A. Corrigall; Tammy Harpel

2008-01-01

268

Development and initial validation of a measure of work, family, and school conflict.  

PubMed

This study reports the development and initial validation of a theoretically based measure of conflict between work, family, and college student roles. The measure was developed through the assessment of construct definitions and an assessment of measurement items by subject matter experts. Then, the measurement items were assessed with data from 500 college students who were engaged in work and family responsibilities. The results indicate that conflict between work, family, and school are effectively measured by 12 factors assessing the direction of conflict (e.g., work-to-school conflict, and school-to-work conflict) as well as the form of conflict (i.e., time, strain, and behavior based conflict). Sets of exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses demonstrated that the 12 factors of the new measure are distinct from the 6 factors of the Carlson, Kacmar, and Williams (2000) work-family conflict measure. Criterion validity of the measure was established through a series of regression analyses testing hypothesized relationships between antecedent and outcome variables with role conflict. Results indicate that role demand was a robust predictor of role conflict. To extend the literature, core self-evaluations and emotional stability were established as predictors of role conflict. Further, work, family, and school role satisfaction were significantly impacted with the presence of role conflict between work, family, and school. PMID:24447220

Olson, Kristine J

2014-01-01

269

Association between work-family conflict and musculoskeletal pain among hospital patient care workers  

PubMed Central

Background A growing body of evidence suggests that work-family conflict is an important risk factor for workers' health and well-being. The goal of this study is to examine association between work-family conflict and musculoskeletal pain among hospital patient care workers. Methods We analyzed a cross-sectional survey of 1119 hospital patient care workers in 105 units in two urban, academic hospitals. Work-family conflict was measured by 5-item Work-Family Conflict Scale questionnaire. Multilevel logistic regression was applied to examine associations between work-family conflict and self-reported musculoskeletal pain in the past 3 months, adjusting for confounders including work-related psychosocial factors and physical work factors. Results In fully adjusted models, high work-family conflict was strongly associated with neck or shoulder pain (OR: 2.34, 95% CI: 1.64 - 3.34), arm pain (OR: 2.79, 95% CI: 1.64 - 4.75), lower extremity pain (OR: 2.20, 95% CI: 1.54- 3.15) and any musculoskeletal pain (OR: 2.45, 95% CI: 1.56 - 3.85), and a number of body areas in pain (OR: 2.47, 95% CI: 1.82 - 3.36) in the past 3 months. The association with low back pain was attenuated and became non-significant after adjusting for confounders. Conclusions Given the consistent associations between work-family conflict and self-reported musculoskeletal pains, the results suggest that work-family conflict could be an important domain for health promotion and workplace policy development among hospital patient care workers. PMID:23019044

Kim, Seung-Sup; Okechukwu, Cassandra; Buxton, Orfeu M.; Dennerlein, Jack T.; Boden, Leslie I.; Hashimoto, Dean M.; Sorensen, Glorian

2014-01-01

270

Balancing Work and Family:The Role of Employer-Supported Child Care Benefits  

Microsoft Academic Search

The stress of balancing work and family demands has increased as more wives and mothers have entered the workforce. One way to alleviate that stress is through employer-supported, family-related benefits and policies. The purpose of this research is to determine what family-oriented benefits and policy options are being offered by businesses in one state, as well as the circumstances or

DIAN L. SEYLER; PAMELA A. MONROE; JAMES C. GARAND

1995-01-01

271

Understanding resilience in same-sex parented families: the work, love, play study  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: While families headed by same-sex couples have achieved greater public visibility in recent years, there are still many challenges for these families in dealing with legal and community contexts that are not supportive of same-sex relationships. The Work, Love, Play study is a large longitudinal study of same-sex parents. It aims to investigate many facets of family life among

Jennifer J Power; Amaryll Perlesz; Margot J Schofield; Marian K Pitts; Rhonda Brown; Ruth McNair; Anna Barrett; Andrew Bickerdike

2010-01-01

272

Effects of Marital Status and Shift Work on Family Function among Registered Nurses  

PubMed Central

This study aims to assess the interactive effect of marital status and shift work on family function. A population-based sample of 1,438 nurses between the ages of 20–45?yr was recruited from Taiwan during the period from July 2005 to April 2006 using a mailed questionnaire. The self-administered questionnaire contained information about demographic data, work status, shift work schedule, and the Family APGAR (Adaptation, Partnership, Growth, Affection, and Resolve) Scale, to evaluate family function. Compared to day shift nurses, non-night and rotation shift nurses had 1.53- and 1.38-fold (95% CI=1.09–2.14 and 1.01–1.88) risk to have poor family function after adjusting for other covariates. Married nurses, by contrast, had a 0.44-fold (95% CI=0.29–0.66) risk to have poor family function compared to single nurses. In addition, married nurses who worked non-night or rotation shifts had a significantly higher percent of poor family function than those married nurses working day shifts; however, similar results were not replicated in single nurses. We concluded that shift work and marital status could influence family function. PMID:24909112

TAI, Shu-Yu; LIN, Pei-Chen; CHEN, Yao-Mei; HUNG, Hsin-Chia; PAN, Chih-Hong; PAN, Shung-Mei; LEE, Chung-Yin; HUANG, Chia-Tsuan; WU, Ming-Tsang

2014-01-01

273

Spending Time: The Impact of Hours Worked on Work-Family Conflict  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Scholars have long assumed that as workers spend more time at work fewer hours are available for their non-work lives leading to negative effects in both domains, and most studies examining the impact of work hours on work and life domains have supported this viewpoint. However, the majority of these studies have used one-dimensional measures of…

Adkins, Cheryl L.; Premeaux, Sonya F.

2012-01-01

274

Family Problems on the Job: Responding to the Needs of Employees with Family Responsibilities. Some Discussion Notes.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Recent statistics on the Canadian family suggest that, for many families, family life is now characterized by exhaustion, deprivation, older members, and the provision of support services by agencies rather than by unpaid women. Stress, in particular, is an effect of heavy burdens and a cause of new ones. But families cannot be adequately…

Vanier Inst. of the Family, Ottawa (Ontario).

275

Social Class, Work and the Family: Some Implications of the Father's Occupation for Familial Relationships and Sons' Career Decisions  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The effects of both vertical and nonvertical dimensions of fathers' work on family relations and vocational socialization are explored through a multivariate analysis of data from several hundred male participants in the 1962-1967 Michigan Student Study. Closeness to father emerged as an important, structurally-related intervening variable.…

Mortimer, Jeylan T.

1976-01-01

276

Considering the role of personality in the work–family experience: Relationships of the big five to work–family conflict and facilitation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Using a national, random sample (N=2130), we investigated the relationship between each of the Big Five personality traits and conflict and facilitation between work and family roles. Extraversion was related to greater facilitation between roles but was not related to conflict, whereas neuroticism was related to greater conflict but only weakly related to facilitation. Conscientiousness was related to less conflict,

Julie Holliday Wayne; Nicholas Musisca; William Fleeson

2004-01-01

277

Employers' Roundtable on Work and Family Issues: A Directory of Metro-Denver Employers' Involvement in Work and Family Programs and Policies.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In 1989, a group of employer representatives in the Denver metropolitan area formed an employers' roundtable to address work and family issues. A survey developed by the roundtable was sent to employers in the Denver area in 1992. This directory compiles the results of the survey. Section 1 of the directory summarizes employers' efforts to provide…

Colorado Office of the Governor, Denver.

278

The State of Working Arkansas: How Families are Faring in the Booming Economy. A Special Report from the Arkansas Working Families Project.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Using a wide array of government data, this report examines the impact of the 1990s economy and other developments on the living standards of Arkansas's working families and their children. Information is provided on: (1) unemployment rates by geographic region, educational level, and race; (2) employment and average weekly earnings by industry…

Huddleston, Rich; Duran, Angela

279

Balancing Work and Family: A Panel Analysis of the Impact of Part-Time Work on the Experience of Time Pressure  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this article we consider the consequences of work-family reconciliation, in terms of the extent to which the adjustment of the labour market career to family demands (by women) contributes to a better work-life balance. Using the Flemish SONAR-data, we analyse how changes in work and family conditions between the age of 26 and 29 are related to…

Laurijssen, Ilse; Glorieux, Ignace

2013-01-01

280

The 1990s Father: Balancing Work & Family Concerns. BNA Special Report Series on Work & Family. Special Report #18.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report examines the issues surrounding working fathers and the changing expectations of fatherhood that are creating the necessity for changes in the workplace. Issues examined include the following: (1) fathers are torn between employers expecting super employees and mothers expecting super fathers; (2) a few companies are taking note of the…

Bureau of National Affairs, Inc., Washington, DC.

281

The Impact of Public Housing Policy on Family Social Work Theory and Practice  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Social workers are the professionals most engaged with families living in low-income and subsidized housing and most familiar with the problems associated with inadequate housing. Yet the discussion of public housing policy has been left largely to economists and housing activists and the clear implications for family social work practice have not…

McCarty, Dawn

2008-01-01

282

Work–Family Imagery and Gender Stereotypes: Television and the Reproduction of Difference  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article explores how popular cultural imagery reflects and reproduces work–family segregation and gender inequality. Social constructionist research on television, advertising, and gender is reviewed, and theories explaining gender inequality in the workplace and the home are summarized. Results of a study of 1699 television commercials from the 1990s are presented, and hypotheses about the relationships among gender, family relationship,

Scott Coltrane; Michele Adams

1997-01-01

283

The Family-Relatedness of Work Decisions: A Framework and Agenda for Theory and Research  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Due to global trends such as the increased labor force participation of women, the growing presence of dual-earner couples and single parents in the labor force, and changing values regarding the importance of life balance, individuals' work decisions are being increasingly influenced by family considerations. However, the "family-relatedness" of…

Greenhaus, Jeffrey H.; Powell, Gary N.

2012-01-01

284

Beyond Specialization: Social Work Education and Practice for Health Care and Family Life.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

There is a role for social workers in all settings to play in providing assistance related to the health care needs of individuals and families. Schools of social work should prepare all students to understand and deal with the effects of evolving health policies and practices on family life. (Author/MH)

Olson, Miriam Meltzer

1986-01-01

285

Balancing Work and Family: A Citizens' Agenda for the '90s.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The 813 participants in the Roosevelt Center's May, 1989, regional citizen assemblies discussed trends affecting workers, employers, and families and laid the groundwork for a recommended national work and family policy. Part 1 of this report analyzes the results of a series of introductory exercises in which citizens were asked to register their…

Roosevelt Center for American Policy Studies, Washington, DC.

286

Occupational stress, social and family difficulties and job contentment of working women: Bangladesh perspective  

Microsoft Academic Search

It was a practice that women would principally do the household tasks, bringing up families and men would work to impart financial supports to the families. But in course of time due to declining population, education, economic welfare and women liberation movement, that convention has changed gradually. Women now seek out careers for livelihood and earning money as well as

Rubab Abdullah; Sabnam Jahan; Sampa Saha

287

Marriage and Family Therapists Working with Couples Who Have Children with Autism  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Current research about families and couples who have children with autism is discussed using the Double ABCX model as a guide. A case study is presented along with recommendations for therapists who work with couples who have children with autism. Marriage and family therapists are encouraged to use the Double ABCX model as both an assessment tool…

Ramisch, Julie

2012-01-01

288

Childhood family relationships, marital and work conflict, and mental health distress in Mexican immigrants  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present study examined the associations among childhood family relationships, adult conflict in marriage and work relationships, and mental health distress in Mexican immigrants. The sample consisted of 135 married Mexican immigrants recruited from an ESL program in Southern California. Structural equation modeling was used to test theoretical hypotheses. The model revealed that dysfunctional childhood family relationships predicted dissatisfaction and

Silvia J. Santos; Lisa M. Bohon

1998-01-01

289

The Use of Non-Verbal and Body Movement Techniques in Working with Families with Infants.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents an experiential-educational approach to families with infants integrating dance and movement therapy with family therapy theories and techniques. Nonverbal techniques are the only possible methods of working directly with infants present with their parents in these workshops. The focus is on negotiations and exchanges of feelings in…

Murphy, James M.

1979-01-01

290

Small Family, Smart Family? Family Size and the IQ Scores of Young Men. NBER Working Paper No. 13336  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

How do families influence the ability of children? Cognitive skills have been shown to be a strong predictor of educational attainment and future labor market success; as a result, understanding the determinants of cognitive skills can lead to a better understanding of children's long run outcomes. This paper uses a large dataset on the male…

Black, Sandra E.; Devereux, Paul J.; Salvanes, Kjell G.

2007-01-01

291

Family-friendly and career-flexibility policies to achieve work-life balance  

E-print Network

Family-friendly and career-flexibility policies to achieve work-life balance RESOURCES TO ACHIEVE WORK-LIFE BALANCE Hiring, retaining and promoting a first-rate team of innovative, dedicated is committed to helping its faculty achieve optimum work-life balance and career satisfaction. This brochure

Leistikow, Bruce N.

292

Shortages in Professions Working with Young Children with Disabilities and Their Families.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper synthesizes information about shortages among the professions working with young children with disabilities, birth through age 5, and their families. The paper begins with a look at national data on personnel working in early intervention and preschool special education. Distinctions between the work force in early intervention (Part H…

Hebbeler, Kathleen

293

Income Changes during the Recession for "Working Poor" Single Parent Families in Central City Milwaukee  

E-print Network

Income Changes during the Recession for "Working Poor" Single Parent Families in Central City of working age single tax filers (with dependents) in 9 Milwaukee central city zipcodes #12;2 Income Changes Institute, 2012) Summary One of the most critical labor force problems facing Milwaukee's "working poor

Saldin, Dilano

294

Organizational justice and stress: the mediating role of work-family conflict.  

PubMed

This study examined the relationship between organizational justice and stress and whether work-family conflict was a mediator of the relationship. Distributive, procedural, interpersonal, and informational injustice were cast as stressors to explore their relationships with the stress levels of 174 faculty members employed at 23 U.S. universities. The results revealed that procedural and interpersonal justice had the strongest relationships with stress, and that these effects were mediated by work-family conflict. The presence of justice seemed to allow participants to better manage the interface of their work and family lives, which was associated with lower stress levels. These results were observed even when controlling for job satisfaction and the presence of organizational work-family policies. PMID:15161400

Judge, Timothy A; Colquitt, Jason A

2004-06-01

295

Work-family Conflict and Alcohol Use: Examination of a Moderated Mediation Model  

PubMed Central

Research consistently documents the negative effects of work-family conflict; however, little focuses on alcohol use. This study embraces a tension-reduction theory of drinking, wherein alcohol use is thought to reduce the negative effects of stress. The purpose of the present study was to test a moderated mediation model of the relationship between work-family conflict and alcohol use in a Chicagoland community sample of 998 caregivers. Structural equation models showed that distress mediated the relationship between work-family conflict and alcohol use. Furthermore, tension reduction expectancies of alcohol exacerbated the relationship between distress and alcohol use. The results advance the study of work-family conflict and alcohol use, helping explain this complicated relationship using sophisticated statistical techniques. Implications for theory and practice are discussed. PMID:23480251

Wolff, Jennifer M.; Rospenda, Kathleen M.; Richman, Judith A.; Liu, Li; Milner, Lauren A.

2013-01-01

296

Working Families Tax Relief Act of 2004 (released in AEO2005)  

EIA Publications

The Working Families Tax Relief Act of 2004 was signed into law on October 13, 2004. Primarily, the Act reduces taxes for individuals and businesses. At least two provisions relate to energy: Depletion of marginal properties and qualified vehicles.

2005-01-01

297

Key worker housing : a demographic analysis of working families in eastern Massachusetts  

E-print Network

As housing costs have soared nationwide, many policy makers have grown increasingly aware of working families' housing needs. Currently, having a full-time job does not guarantee decent and affordable housing. Many housing ...

Wagner, Margaret Fitzgerald

2005-01-01

298

The relationship of social support to the work-family balance and work outcomes of midlife women  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – This paper seeks to examine the relationship of a network of social support for midlife women with their attitudes toward work-family balance and work outcomes, including job satisfaction, organisational commitment, and career accomplishment. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – A total of 1,089 women between the ages of 35 and 50 across three organizations were surveyed and then 72 of them interviewed.

Wendy C. Marcinkus; Karen S. Whelan-Berry; Judith R. Gordon

2007-01-01

299

Caring for Dying Children and Their Families: MFTs Working at the Gates of the Elysian Fields  

Microsoft Academic Search

The constant comparison method was used to analyze seven in-depth interviews with Marriage and Family Therapists and some\\u000a of their colleagues working with dying children and their families. The findings of the study revealed that working in these\\u000a settings can encourage shifts in priorities, relationships, and beliefs about life and death, and can elicit professional\\u000a growth. Also, it can carry

Ileana Ungureanu; Jonathan G. Sandberg

2008-01-01

300

Work-to-family enrichment and voice behavior in China: The role of modernity  

Microsoft Academic Search

There is a lack of knowledge in the literature regarding the effects of the work-family interface on employees’ behaviors\\u000a while taking into consideration of cultural values in developing countries. This study investigates the impact of work-to-family\\u000a enrichment on employees’ voice behavior by focusing on the moderating role of modernity in a Chinese setting. Results from\\u000a a survey of 230 Chinese

Haina Zhang; Xia Zhou; Ying Wang; Malcolm H. Cone

2011-01-01

301

The Interface of Work to Family Conflict and Racioethnic Identification: An Analysis of Hispanic Business Professionals  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article examines work to family conflict for Hispanic Business Professionals with varied levels of Hispanic identity.\\u000a Based on this study of 971 Hispanics from across the United States, results show that level of Hispanic identity moderates\\u000a the relationship between work to family conflict and job satisfaction. The authors posit that identification with a culture\\u000a of collectivism may attenuate the

Robert Gregory DelCampo; Kristie M. Rogers; Andrew T. Hinrichs

2011-01-01

302

Schools, Families, and Social and Emotional Learning: Ideas and Tools for Working with Parents and Families  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Parents and schools working together to build students' social, emotional, and academic skills can accomplish far more than either group working alone. Both schools and parents can contribute in unique ways to make the partnership fruitful. Handouts included with this packet offer small things that all parents can consider doing. When done on a…

Fredericks, Linda; Weissberg, Roger; Resnik, Hank; Patrikakou, Eva; O'Brien, Mary Utne

2005-01-01

303

Group Work with Adolescents: Principles and Practice. Second Edition. Social Work Practice with Children and Families  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This popular text provides essential knowledge and skills for conducting creative, strengths-based group work with adolescents. A rich introduction to the field, enlivened by numerous illustrations from actual sessions, the book provides principles and guidelines for practice in a wide range of settings. The book covers all phases of group work,…

Malekoff, Andrew

2006-01-01

304

Work Socialization and Adolescents' Work-Related Values in Single-Mother African American Families  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined African American mothers' work socialization messages in relation to adolescents' work-related values. Moderation effects of mother-adolescent relation quality on the linkage between maternal socialization messages and adolescents' outcomes were also examined. Participants were 245 single African American mothers and their…

Toyokawa, Teru; McLoyd, Vonnie C.

2013-01-01

305

Embeddedness and well-being in the United States and Singapore: the mediating effects of work-to-family and family-to-work conflict.  

PubMed

Guided by conservation of resources theory, we propose that both organizational and community embeddedness are associated with increased work-to-family conflict (WFC) and family to-work conflict (FWC), which in turn are associated with strain-related outcomes. Because stress can have both short-term and long-term consequences, we examined negative mood as an immediate reaction to stress and chronic insomnia as a longer-term reaction to stress. We examined these relationships in 2-career couples in both the United States (n = 416) and Singapore (n = 400). Results provided full support for the mediating effects of WFC and FWC in the U.S. sample, with only limited support for those mediating effects in the Singaporean sample. In addition, we found that the effects of community embeddedness on FWC were significantly stronger in the U.S. sample than in the Singaporean sample. PMID:24885684

Ng, Thomas W H; Feldman, Daniel C

2014-07-01

306

Work-family conflict and well-being in university employees.  

PubMed

This is one of the first reported studies to have reviewed the role of work-family conflict in university employees, both academic and nonacademic. The goal of this research was to examine the role of work-family conflict as a mediator of relationships between features of the work environment and worker well-being and organizational outcomes. A sample of 3,326 Australian university workers responded to an online survey. Work-family conflict added substantially to the explained variance in physical symptoms and psychological strain after taking account of job demands and control, and to a lesser extent to the variance in job performance. However, it had no extra impact on organizational commitment, which was most strongly predicted by job autonomy. Despite differing in workloads and work-family conflict, academic ("faculty") and nonacademic staff demonstrated similar predictors of worker and organizational outcomes. Results suggest two pathways through which management policies may be effective in improving worker well-being and productivity: improving job autonomy has mainly direct effects, while reducing job demands is mediated by consequent reductions in work-family conflict. PMID:25175890

Winefield, Helen R; Boyd, Carolyn; Winefield, Anthony H

2014-01-01

307

Assessing mothers' and fathers' violence toward children as a function of their involuntary participation in family work  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examines the association between parents' violence toward children and their involuntary participation in family work. Involuntary participation in family work is conceptualized as a form of role strain measured by the disparity between the amount of responsibility husbands and wives would prefer to assume in the home and the amount of family work they actually perform. The prediction

Leslie Margolin; Oscar W. Larson

1988-01-01

308

Work and family conflict in academic science: patterns and predictors among women and men in research universities.  

PubMed

This article addresses work-family conflict as reported among women and men academic scientists in data systematically collected across fields of study in nine US research universities. Arguing that academic science is a particularly revealing case for studying work-family conflict, the article addresses: (1) the bi-directional conflict of work with family, and family with work, reported among the scientists; (2) the ways that higher, compared with lower, conflict, is predicted by key features of family, academic rank, and departments/institutions; and (3) patterns and predictors of work-family conflict that vary, as well as converge, by gender. Results point to notable differences, and commonalties, by gender, in factors affecting interference in both directions of work-family conflict reported by scientists. These findings have implications for understandings of how marriage and children, senior compared with junior academic rank, and departmental climates shape work-family conflict among women and men in US academic science. PMID:22164721

Fox, Mary Frank; Fonseca, Carolyn; Bao, Jinghui

2011-10-01

309

School Social Work and Early Childhood Student's Attitudes toward Gay and Lesbian Families  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The present study assessed the attitudes of school professionals in training at an American university toward homosexuality and their comfort, action-related disposition, and preparation to work with gay and lesbian (GL) families and their children. Fifty-nine students specializing in birth through kindergarten education and school social work

Averett, Paige E.; Hegde, Archana

2012-01-01

310

Work in the Family and in the Labor Market: A Cross-National, Reciprocal Analysis.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examined interrelationships by sex between domestic work and labor market work in the United States, Canada, Norway, and Sweden. Findings suggested that Scandinavian women used their greater opportunities for part-time employment to reconcile family and labor market responsibilities. No significant effects were observed for men in any of the…

Kalleberg, Arne L.; Rosenfeld, Rachel A.

1990-01-01

311

UK Work\\/Family Balance Policies and Gender Equality, 1997–2005  

Microsoft Academic Search

AbstractSince 1997, the UK has developed policies to address the issue of work\\/family balance in the form of childcare services, leaves for childcare, and the right to request flexible working patterns. We examine the policy aims and nature of these different approaches and assess how far they promote gender equality, which we define in terms of the possibility of making

Jane Lewis; Mary Campbell

2007-01-01

312

Relationships between Parental Attachment, Work and Family Roles, and Life Satisfaction  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between parental attachment and satisfaction with work and family roles, as well as the relationship of these variables to life satisfaction. Results from a multiple regression analysis indicated that satisfaction with work and marriage, but not parenting satisfaction or parental…

Perrone, Kristin M.; Webb, L. Kay; Jackson, Z. Vance

2007-01-01

313

Implications of Shift Work for Parent-Adolescent Relationships in Dual-Earner Families  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This investigation examined the implications of shift work for parent-adolescent relationship quality--intimacy, conflict, parental knowledge, and involvement--in a sample of 376 dual-earner families. The findings suggested that mothers' relationships with their adolescents were not negatively impacted by their working nonstandard schedules but…

Davis, Kelly D.; Crouter, Ann C.; McHale, Susan M.

2006-01-01

314

The Impact of Workaholism on Work-Family Conflict, Job Satisfaction, and Perception of Leisure Activities  

Microsoft Academic Search

Data were collected from university employees (N?=?129) and Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) members (N?=?103) to assess the impact of workaholism on work-family conflict, job satisfaction, and perceptions of leisure time. The results, using two different measures of workaholism (Workaholism Battery, Work Addiction Risk Test), indicated that greater scores on the Workaholic Risk Test were significantly related to greater

Becca R. Brady; Stephen J. Vodanovich; Robert Rotunda

2008-01-01

315

Working with Practitioners' Perspectives: Supporting Father Involvement in Family Services in England  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The paper draws on a study aiming to work with practitioners' perspectives to support involvement through family services. Data were collected from a cluster sample of practitioners conducting father groups in south-west England. The paper focuses upon working with their perspectives. Two issues in their perspectives were associated with…

Chawla-Duggan, Rita

2011-01-01

316

Working with Teams and Organizations to Help Them Involve Family Members  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this article we describe our work in trying to influence whole service teams to move their practice towards greater involvement of affected family members. Work with five teams is described. The process varied but in all cases it included recruitment of the team, training, continued support and evaluation of results. Use of a standard…

Orford, Jim; Templeton, Lorna; Copello, Alex; Velleman, Richard; Ibanga, Akanidomo

2010-01-01

317

Shift Work, Parenting Behaviors, and Children's Socioemotional Well-Being: A Within-Family Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Many U.S. employees with children work nonstandard hours, yet we know little about the linkages among maternal shift schedules, mothers' and fathers' parenting behaviors, and children's socioemotional outcomes. In a sample of 55 dual-earner families with children age 8 to 14 years and mothers working day versus evening shifts, the authors found…

Barnett, Rosalind Chait; Gareis, Karen C.

2007-01-01

318

Understanding the 'Mommy Tracks': A Framework for Analyzing Work-Family Issues in the IT Workforce  

Microsoft Academic Search

Despite the recent growth in the number of women in the U.S. labor force, women are still underrepresented in IT work. This paper presents a framework for analyzing work-family conflicts as a way of better understanding the contribution of this factor to the underrepresentation of women in IT. Data from a field study of women employed in the American IT

Jeria L. Quesenberry; Allison J. Morgan; Eileen M. Trauth

319

Work–family reconciliation policies without equal opportunities? The case of Austria  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper explores the main public work–family policies in Austria (parental leave in connection with the Childcare Benefit, parents’ entitlement to part-time work, the extension of the childcare infrastructure) from the perspective of social justice using the normative concepts of gender equality, recognition, and choice. The main results show that for the most part, these policies offer affirmative recognition of

Manfred Auer; Heike Welte

2009-01-01

320

Las obreras: Chicana Politics of Work and Family. Aztlan Anthology Series, Volume 1.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this anthology, Chicana voices of the past and present illuminate the experiences of Mexican American women as they strive to integrate wage work, family life, and community engagement. Sections cover confrontations with the state through community action, court litigation, and union organizing; negotiating work, marriage, and children; stories…

Ruiz, Vicki L., Ed.

321

Work-family conflict and job satisfaction: emotional intelligence as a moderator.  

PubMed

The negative impact of work-family conflict (WFC) on employees' well-being and job-related outcomes has attracted much research attention recently. A major gap in the literature is which factors could potentially buffer its negative effect on employees. The present study examined the moderating effect of emotional intelligence on the relationship between WFC and job satisfaction in a sample of 212 Chinese high school teachers. On the basis of conservation of resource theory, we hypothesized that emotional intelligence would weaken the negative effect of family-to-work and work-to-family interference on job satisfaction. Results suggested that WFC (work-to-family interference and family-to-work interference) was negatively related to job satisfaction and that emotional intelligence weakened the effect of WFC on job satisfaction. These findings provide implications for theories on WFC and emotional intelligence, such as conservation of resource theory. The current study also provides a test of these theories in Chinese culture to support the generalizability of theories developed in previous research. Practical implications for reducing the negative influence of WFC on employees' job satisfaction are also provided, such as the potential value of emotional intelligence for the training and development of employees in teaching professions. PMID:23015466

Gao, Yongdong; Shi, Junqi; Niu, Qikun; Wang, Lei

2013-08-01

322

Managing work, family, and school roles: disengagement strategies can help and hinder.  

PubMed

The extent to which individuals manage multiple role domains has yet to be fully understood. We advance past research by examining the effect of interrole conflict among three very common and critically important life roles-work, family, and school-on three corresponding types of satisfaction. Further, we examine individual-based techniques that can empower people to manage multiple roles. In doing so, we integrate the disengagement strategies from the work recovery and coping literatures. These strategies focus on taking your mind off the problems at hand and include cognitive disengagement (psychological detachment, cognitive avoidance coping), as well as cognitive distortion (escape avoidance coping). We examine these strategies in a two-wave study of 178 individuals faced with the challenge of managing work, family, and school responsibilities. Findings demonstrated a joint offsetting effect of psychological detachment and cognitive avoidance coping on the relationship between work conflict and work satisfaction. Findings also indicated an exacerbating effect of escape avoidance coping on the relationship between work conflict and work satisfaction, school conflict and school satisfaction, and between family conflict and family satisfaction. Implications for theory and practice are discussed. PMID:23688249

Cheng, Bonnie Hayden; McCarthy, Julie M

2013-07-01

323

Work Choices: Increasing Productivity, Job Creation and Work-Family Balance? Not Likely  

Microsoft Academic Search

The introduction of the Workplace Relations (Work Choices) Amendment Act 2005 (Cth) has resulted in one of the most contentious changes to federal labour law in Australia's history. There is considerable debate as to whether it has fulfilled the government's expectations of giving 'flexibility' and 'choice' to both employees and employers or if there has been an overall deterioration in

Kerrie Saville; Bruce Hearn-Mackinnon; Leanne Morris; Dianne Waddell

324

Children, Families and Interagency Work: Experiences of Partnership Work in Primary Education Settings  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Despite UK government initiatives intended to address social exclusion, those with poor access to social and economic resources continue to experience unresponsive services. In these circumstances, small inter-agency projects may offer accessible alternatives. This article explores the implementation of inter-agency work at a local level, focusing…

Milbourne, Linda

2005-01-01

325

Women, work, and family in the Czech Republic—and comparisons with the West  

Microsoft Academic Search

What are the work-family experiences of Czech women, and to what extent are there similarities and differences with women in the West? Drawing on a cross-national survey and other findings, this paper points out that unlike the extensive part-time employment of many Western European women, most Czech women in the post-Communist era have continued to combine full-time employment with family

Phyllis H. Raabe

1998-01-01

326

The cosmos of the Paris apartment: working-class family life in the nineteenth century.  

PubMed

Drawing on Bachelard's notion of “cosmicity” this article investigates the living conditions of Parisian working-class families in the second half of the nineteenth century. Nineteenth-century social critics claimed that the lack of privacy in urban apartments made decent family life impossible. However, evidence from judicial dossiers concerning attentat à la pudeur (intimate assault against children) illuminates the lived experience of children and their families in Paris apartments. Rather than a sharp divide between public and private, children experienced their apartment homes as the core of a social and spatial world under the surveillance of parents, neighbors, and other children. PMID:21158198

Ferguson, Eliza

2011-01-01

327

The influence of workplace injuries on work-family conflict: job and financial insecurity as mechanisms.  

PubMed

Research examining the outcomes of workplace injuries has focused on high costs to the organization. In this study, we utilize conservation of resources theory to develop and test a model that explains how and under what circumstances workplace injuries impact employees' perceptions of how their work interferes with their family. Results from 194 registered nurses (along with 85 of their spouses), using path analytic tests of moderated mediation, provide support for the prediction that the mediated effect of workplace injury severity on work-family conflict (through job and financial insecurity) is weaker when employees perceive high levels of supervisor support. We discuss the implications of these findings for the study of job and financial insecurity and work-family conflict. Limitations of this study and directions for future research are also presented. PMID:24099157

Lawrence, Ericka R; Halbesleben, Jonathon R B; Paustian-Underdahl, Samantha C

2013-10-01

328

Giuseppe and Aloysius Frari's works on rabies and history of Frari medical family of Sibenik, Dalmatia.  

PubMed

This article is an attempt to reconstruct the family history of the Fraris, the famous Sibenik medical family. Three generations of physicians from the Frari family played an important role not only at medical and social scene of Sibenik in the 18th and 19th century, but also in Croatian and Italian medical history. I will try to provide important details on the lives, medical and social work, and publications of 5 members of the family, Giuseppe (Josip), Angelo Antonio (Andeo Antun), Sebastiano (Sebastijan), Michele Carlo (Mihovil), and Aloysius (Luigi) Frari. I would also like to pay a special attention to the works on rabies, written by Giuseppe and Luigi Frari, which are among the earliest and most accurate Croatian works on the subject. To reconstruct the history of the family, I studied the relevant editions about the medical and social history of Sibenik, Dalmatia, Venice, and Croatia, together with the Fraris' publications and reflections. This was the first time Italian and Latin language works by Giuseppe and Luigi Frari on rabies were analyzed. The story on Fraris also documents that medical publishing was a common practice in Dalmatia in the 18th and the 19th century. PMID:17589982

Krni?, Anton

2007-06-01

329

Gender and police stress : The convergent and divergent impact of work environment, work-family conflict, and stress coping mechanisms of female and male police officers  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study explores the impact of work environment, work-family conflict, and coping mechanisms on physical and psychological stresses of police officers. Using survey data from a large police department located in the New England area, we pay specific attention to analyzing similar and dissimilar results while comparing across gender groups. Our research indicates that for both gender groups, work-family conflict

Ni He; Jihong Zhao; Carol A. Archbold

2002-01-01

330

Work and Family in the United States: A Policy Initiative. A Report of the Family Policy Panel of the Economic Policy Council of UNA-USA.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

As part of its world employment project, the Economic Policy Council of the United Nations Association of the United States formed the family policy panel to further examine the extent of ongoing changes affecting the family, the workplace, and the economy. In its work, the family policy panel concentrated on five issues considered central to the…

United Nations Association of the United States of America, New York, NY.

331

Experiences of Marriage and Family Therapists Working with Intimate Partner Violence  

PubMed Central

The purpose of our study was to explore the experiences of marriage and family therapists in working with violent couples. In particular, we focused on therapists’ questions and feelings of competency pertaining to violence assessment and treatment, the difficulties they face during their practices, and the factors that affect their practice. Data for this study was collected via a focus group that lasted approximately an hour. The participants included five marriage and family therapists. A set of questions were used to explore experiences of therapists who were working with clients who are experiencing domestic violence. The research team recorded the answers to these questions as well as associated discussion. A grounded theory approach was used to analyze the data. Six themes were derived from the coded data: acknowledgment and reliance on systemic foundations, therapist factors, assessment, treatment considerations, sex of batterers, and training in Marriage and Family Therapy programs. PMID:24817787

Karakurt, Gunnur; Dial, Shannonn; Korkow, Hannah; Mansfield, Ty; Banford, Alyssa

2014-01-01

332

What Contributes to the (Im)Balanced Division of Family Work Between the Sexes?  

PubMed Central

This study examines a comprehensive set of variables that have been proposed as explaining the imbalance of the division of family work between the sexes. The analyses use survey data of 735 dual-earner couples from Austria, the Netherlands, and Portugal. The results support theoretical explanations referring to time availability, gender ideology, relative resources, and the importance of characteristics of the family system. No support was obtained for the doing-gender perspective. Additional findings suggest that increased consideration of psychological concepts adds to the understanding of why women do more family work than men. The analyses revealed similarities, but also differences between the factors that contribute to the division of household labor and childcare. PMID:22318972

Lothaller, Harald; Mikula, Gerold; Schoebi, Dominik

2011-01-01

333

38 CFR 3.1000 - Entitlement under 38 U.S.C. 5121 to benefits due and unpaid upon death of a beneficiary.  

...C. 5121 to benefits due and unpaid upon death of a beneficiary. 3.1000 Section...C. 5121 to benefits due and unpaid upon death of a beneficiary. (a) Basic entitlement...provided in §§ 3.1001 and 3.1008, where death occurred on or after December 1,...

2014-07-01

334

Does Family-Centered Out-of-Home Care Work? Comparison of a Family-Centered Approach and Traditional Care  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This research assessed the effectiveness of a family-centered approach to out-of-home care in reunifying children with their families by comparing differential exit rates of children whose families received family-centered services with children whose families received routine child welfare services. The sample included 472 children who were in…

Lewandowski, Cathleen A.; Pierce, Lois

2004-01-01

335

Work-Related Disability, Veteran Status, and Poverty: Implications for Family Well-Being  

Microsoft Academic Search

The authors examine the interrelationships between work-related disability, veteran, and poverty statuses using data from the 1992–2004 panels of the Survey of Income and Program Participation. They find that households with nondisabled veterans present have a lower likelihood of poverty, but that advantage is severely eroded when the veteran or another family member has a work-limiting disability. Nevertheless, all veteran

Andrew S. London; Colleen M. Heflin; Janet M. Wilmoth

2011-01-01

336

Social Work Treatment with Children, Adolescents, and Families Exposed to Religious and Satanic Cults  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article presents a brief description of cults; their impact upon children, adolescents and families; indications of how social work treatment can be helpful to this population; results of a research study that addressed these issues; suggestions for teaching curriculum; and conclusions of the research study.

Marvin W. Clifford

1995-01-01

337

Developing Cross-Cultural Competence: A Guide for Working with Children and Their Families. Fourth Edition  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

As the U.S. population grows more and more diverse, how can professionals who work with young children and families deliver the best services while honoring different customs, beliefs, and values? The answers are in the fourth edition of this bestselling textbook, fully revised to reflect nearly a decade of population changes and best practices in…

Lynch, Eleanor W., Ed.; Hanson, Marci J., Ed.

2011-01-01

338

Indigenous Women College Students' Perspectives on College, Work, and Family  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Native American and First Nations (herein collectively referred to as Indigenous) women college students are faced with the challenge of balancing their cultural imperatives and the demands of the dominant Western culture in family, school, and work/employment roles. In order to explore these women's experiences and perspectives, this study…

Bingham, Jennie L.; Adolpho, Quintina Bearchief; Jackson, Aaron P.; Alexitch, Louise R.

2014-01-01

339

AdvoCasey: Documenting Programs That Work for Kids and Families, 2000.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This publication includes five articles on health care and health promotion within impoverished communities. "The Health of Families and Communities" (Douglas W. Nelson) introduces the issue, discussing the work of the Annie E. Casey Foundation in communities. "Inconspicuous Consumption: Treating Latent TB Infection in Seattle" (Bill Rust) reports…

Nelson, Douglas W.; Rust, Bill; Hinds, Michael DeCourcy

2000-01-01

340

Gender and attitudes to work and family roles: the views of young people at the millennium  

Microsoft Academic Search

The last century, in particular the latter half, saw radical shifts in the roles and expectations of women in society. This article investigates the views of 14? to 16?year?olds in the year 2000 on work and family roles, exploring both their general views on gender roles and their own personal aspirations for the future. In general the young people believed

Teresa Tinklin; Linda Croxford; Alan Ducklin; Barbara Frame

2005-01-01

341

Emerging Adults in Sweden: Identity Formation in the Light of Love, Work, and Family  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this study, the identity formation of emerging adults in Sweden was investigated in order to discover how identity issues concerning love, work and family are handled. The study group comprised 136 24- to 26-year-olds. The results revealed differences between men and women with regard to their position in the identity formation process. While…

Frisen, Ann; Wangqvist, Maria

2011-01-01

342

Time for College: When You Work, Have a Family, and Want More from Life.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Designed for adults entering college after having been out of school for some time, this book provides information about succeeding in school while meeting family and work obligations. Chapter 1 offers words of encouragement; chapter 2 offers advice on confronting and eliminating many fears and concerns reported by older than average students.…

Siebert, Al; Gilpin, Bernadine

343

School-to-Work Career Portfolios. Instructional Guide. Family & Consumer Science.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

With this instructional guide, teachers of eighth-grade family and consumer sciences courses can help their students create a school-to-work career portfolio and accomplish the following behavioral objectives during the process: demonstrate skills/attitudes essential for job interviews; describe the importance of academic and occupational skills…

Duffy, Linda

344

Education and Work-Family Conflict: Explanations, Contingencies and Mental Health Consequences  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Using data from a representative sample of American workers, we examine the association between education and work-to-family conflict--a form of inter-role conflict in which role pressures from each domain are incompatible in some way. The well-educated tend to occupy professional jobs with more income and pressures, and experience more…

Schieman, Scott; Glavin, Paul

2011-01-01

345

Whose Time Is It? The Effect of Employment and Work/Family Stress on Children's Housework  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Children's time use--and specifically the time they spend on household chores--is an important arena for understanding social change. However, few studies accurately depict the multiple factors influencing children's household labor, including parent's and children's available time and parent's levels of work/family stress. We address these gaps…

Gager, Constance T.; Sanchez, Laura A.; Demaris, Alfred

2009-01-01

346

Time with Children, Children's Well-Being, and Work-Family Balance among Employed Parents  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Cultural imperatives for "good" parenting include spending time with children and ensuring that they do well in life. Knowledge of how these factors influence employed parents' work-family balance is limited. Analyses using time diary and survey data from the 2000 National Survey of Parents (N = 933) indicate that how time with children relates to…

Milkie, Melissa A.; Kendig, Sarah M.; Nomaguchi, Kei M.; Denny, Kathleen E.

2010-01-01

347

Home Economists Working with Low-Income Families and Implications for College Food and Nutrition Curriculum.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

To identify implications for college food and nutrition curriculum, multiple-choice questionnaires were developed to provide general characteristics of home economists and the concerns they had in their work with low-income families. Job concerns were ranked and analyzed according to the degree of concern expressed by the 129 respondents (70.8…

Kopel, Bernice Helene

348

Gender and Attitudes to Work and Family Roles: The Views of Young People at the Millennium  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The last century, in particular the latter half, saw radical shifts in the roles and expectations of women in society. This article investigates the views of 14- to 16-year-olds in the year 2000 on work and family roles, exploring both their general views on gender roles and their own personal aspirations for the future. In general the young…

Tinklin, Teresa; Croxford, Linda; Ducklin, Alan; Frame, Barbara

2005-01-01

349

Gender Differences in Perceived Work Demands, Family Demands, and Life Stress among Married Chinese Employees  

Microsoft Academic Search

abstract? Although gender-based division of labour and the identity theory of stress suggest that the relationship between work and family demands and life stress may vary as a function of gender, it is largely unknown whether these arguments are also valid in China. To address this gap in the existing literature, the current study investigates the gender differences in perceived

Jaepil Choi; Chao C. Chen

2006-01-01

350

Gender, Care Work, and the Complexity of Family Membership in Japan  

Microsoft Academic Search

This research investigates sociological ambivalence in negotiating care work in Japanese families. Women and their aging parents experience ambivalence based on conflicting norms of filial obligation, gender ideology, and cultural beliefs about the parent—child bond. Analysis of in-depth interview data showed ambivalence was based on (1) conflict between norms and cultural beliefs and (2) intergenerational differences in norms of caregiving.

Kristen Schultz Lee

2010-01-01

351

Transitioning between Work and Family Roles as a Function of Boundary Flexibility and Role Salience  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigates the manner in which people separate their work and family roles and how they manage the boundaries of these two important roles. Specifically, we focus on how role flexibility and salience influence transitions between roles. Results indicate that the ability and willingness to flex a role boundary and role salience are…

Winkel, Doan E.; Clayton, Russell W.

2010-01-01

352

Nonstandard Schedules and Young Children's Behavioral Outcomes among Working Low-Income Families  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article focuses on how maternal employment in nonstandard schedules at night, on the weekends, or that rotate on a weekly basis influence preschoolers' behavioral outcomes. Examining low-income working mothers and their children aged 2-4 years from the Welfare, Children, and Families: A Three-City Study (N = 206), we find that maternal…

Joshi, Pamela; Bogen, Karen

2007-01-01

353

Group Supervision: Supporting Practitioners in Their Work with Children and Families in Children's Centres  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article discusses how group supervision can be used to support the Continuing Professional Development (CPD) of those working with children and families in early years provision in England. It is based on research conducted in 2008 with a cluster of four Children's Centres in the West Midlands in England, UK. The research evaluated group…

Soni, Anita

2013-01-01

354

Does Fertility Respond to Work and Family-life Reconciliation Policies in France?  

E-print Network

231 Does Fertility Respond to Work and Family-life Reconciliation Policies in France? Olivier Thévenon In Noriyuki Takayama and Martin Werding (eds., 2009), Fertility and Public Policy: How To Reverse For the past two years, France has enjoyed fertility rates approaching replacement level, with a total

Boyer, Edmond

355

Work and Family Roles of Women in Ho Chi Minh City  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study aims to point out the differences between the North and the South of Vietnam, more particularly, Saigon and Hanoi, in terms of family and work roles of women. It helps to explain the ways women in Ho Chi Minh City reconstruct their reproduction role, the attitudes of Southern husbands towards household tasks and the husband-wife…

Phuong, Tran Phi

2007-01-01

356

Family Contributions to Adolescent Readiness for School-to-Work Transition.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Data from 1,266 high school seniors show how success in school-to-work transition is influenced by the family. Proactive functioning style (well organized, open communication, positive conflict management, democratic decision making) was most helpful, inactive style least helpful, and dominating style had limited effects. (SK)

Way, Wendy L.; Rossman, Marilyn Martin

1996-01-01

357

The Impact of Role Modeling on Proteges' Personal Learning and Work-to-Family Enrichment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The present study investigates the impact of role modeling as perceived by proteges on their personal learning (i.e., relational job learning and personal skill development) and work-to-family enrichment (WFE). Results from a two-wave field survey of 173 proteges in the People's Republic of China indicate that role modeling positively affects…

Kwan, Ho Kwong; Mao, Yina; Zhang, Haina

2010-01-01

358

Established or excluded? A longitudinal study of criminality, work and family formation  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this article we explore the longer-term implications of criminality. We look at different groups in a birth cohort defined on the basis of their level of involvement in crime. To what extent is juvenile and adult crime related to social exclusion in mid-life? We study differences in outcomes related to work and family, and whether these differences tend to

Anders Nilsson; Felipe Estrada

2011-01-01

359

Work—Family Conflict Within the FamilyCrossover Effects, Perceived Parent— Child Interaction Quality, Parental Self-Efficacy, and Life Role Attributions  

Microsoft Academic Search

To better understand the work—family interface within the family domain, this study investigated crossover effects of two types of work—family conflict among 120 participants (60 married couples), these conflicts' relations with parental self-efficacy and perceived quality of parent—child interaction, and the contribution of attributions of importance to life roles on variance in these two parental outcomes. Results indicated complementary correlations

Rachel Gali Cinamon; Amatzia Weisel; Kineret Tzuk

2007-01-01

360

Marital and Family Satisfaction as a Function of Work-Family Demands and Community Resources: Individual- and Couple-Level Analyses  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study uses individual- and couple-level analyses to examine the influence of work-family demands and community resources on marital and family satisfaction within a sample of dual-earner parents with dependent children (N = 260 couples, 520 individuals). Total couple work hours were strongly negatively associated with marital satisfaction for…

Hostetler, Andrew J.; Desrochers, Stephan; Kopko, Kimberly; Moen, Phyllis

2012-01-01

361

Impact of value congruence on work-family conflicts: the mediating role of work-related support.  

PubMed

Based on past research regarding the relationship between person-environment fit and work-family conflict (WFC), we examined the mediating effects of perceived organization/supervisor support on the relationship between person-organization/supervisor value congruence and WFC. A structural equation model was used to test three hypotheses using data collected from 637 workers in Taiwan. Person-organization value congruence regarding role boundaries was found to be positively correlated with employee perception of organizational support, resulting in reduced WFC. Person-supervisor value congruence regarding role boundaries also increased employee perception of organizational support, mediated by perceived supervisor support. Research and managerial implications are discussed. PMID:22558824

Pan, Su-Ying; Yeh, Ying-Jung Yvonne

2012-01-01

362

Child & Family Social Work, (2007) 12 (2). pp. 143-151. ISSN 1356-7500 Multi-agency working: Implications for an  

E-print Network

1 Child & Family Social Work, (2007) 12 (2). pp. 143-151. ISSN 1356-7500 Multi-agency working: Implications for an early intervention social work team Patricia Moran, Catherine Jacobs, Amanda Bunn: patriciamoran@aol.com #12;2 Multi-agency working: Implications for an early intervention social work team

Sheldon, Nathan D.

363

"They Talked as Industriously as They Worked": Reforming the Family and its Labor in Louisa May Alcott's Work: A Story of Experience  

E-print Network

As my title suggests, this project examines Alcott's vision of the family in Work (1873). Her characters do indeed "talk as industriously as they work" as a means of creating the circumstances necessary for the achievement of sentimental ideals...

Isaac, Jessica A.

2009-04-27

364

Male Scientists’ Competing Devotions to Work and Family: Changing Norms in a Male-Dominated Profession  

PubMed Central

Using in-depth interviews with 74 men across different ranks in biology and physics at prestigious US universities, we ask to what extent changing norms of fatherhood and a flexible workplace affect men working in a highly male-dominated profession and what variation exists in family forms. We conceptualize four typologies of men: those forgoing children, egalitarian partners, neo-traditional dual-earners, and traditional breadwinners. Findings suggest male scientists hold strong work devotions yet a growing number seek egalitarian relationships, which they frame as reducing their devotion to work. The majority of men find the all-consuming nature of academic science conflicts with changing fatherhood norms.

Damaske, Sarah; Ecklund, Elaine Howard; Lincoln, Anne E.; White, Virginia Johnston

2014-01-01

365

The role of social support in the stressor-strain relationship: an examination of work-family conflict  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examines the role of social support in work-family conflict. Although previous research has examined social support as a promising coping mechanism, questions as to how social support affects work-family conflict remain unanswered. Social support is examined as an antecedent, an intervening, a moderating, and an independent variable in the stressors to work-family conflict relationship. Results suggest that social

Dawn S Carlson; Pamela L Perrewé

1999-01-01

366

The Role of Social Support in the Stressor-Strain Relationship: An Examination of Work-Family Conflict  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examines the role of social support in work-family conflict. Although previous research has examined social support as a promising coping mechanism, questions as to how social support affects work-family conflict remain unanswered. Social support is examined as an antecedent, an intervening, a moderating, and an independent variable in the stressors to work-family conflict relationship. Results suggest that social

Dawn S. Carlson; Pamela L. Perrewé

1999-01-01

367

Alberta family physicians' willingness to work during an influenza pandemic: a cross-sectional study  

PubMed Central

Objective Effective pandemic responses rely on frontline healthcare workers continuing to work despite increased risk to themselves. Our objective was to investigate Alberta family physicians willingness to work during an influenza pandemic. Design: Cross-sectional survey. Setting: Alberta prior to the fall wave of the H1N1 epidemic. Participants: 192 participants from a random sample of 1000 Alberta family physicians stratified by region. Main Outcome Measures: Willingness to work through difficult scenarios created by an influenza epidemic. Results The corrected response rate was 22%. The most physicians who responded were willing to continue working through some scenarios caused by a pandemic, but in other circumstances less than 50% would continue. Men were more willing to continue working than women. In some situations South African and British trained physicians were more willing to continue working than other groups. Conclusions Although many physicians intend to maintain their practices in the event of a pandemic, in some circumstances fewer are willing to work. Pandemic preparation requires ensuring a workforce is available. Healthcare systems must provide frontline healthcare workers with the support and resources they need to enable them to continue providing care. PMID:23800113

2013-01-01

368

Conflict between work and family roles and satisfaction among nurses in different shift systems in Croatia: a questionnaire survey.  

PubMed

The objective of this study was to examine the perception of conflict between work and family roles and job, family, and life satisfaction among nurses in Croatia. One hundred and twenty-nine nurses (married mothers) working in hospitals in Zadar, Šibenik, and Split were divided in four groups according to their worktime schedule. The participants completed a survey, which included a set of sociodemographic-type questions, questions about the level and allocation of family responsibilities between spouses, and scales measuring the perceived negative effects of worktime, psychological demands of the work, work-family conflict, and semantic differential scales for measuring the affective and cognitive-evaluative component of job, family, and life satisfaction. This was the first study in Croatia to deal with work-family conflict among nurses or workers with different shift systems.The results of this study indicate that nurses working morning shifts only experienced less conflict between work and family than other groups of nurses, who worked the morning, afternoon, and the night shift. The cognitive-evaluative component of job satisfaction was the highest among morning shift nurses and the lowest in nurses who worked 12-hour shifts, while the affective component of life satisfaction was the lowest in nurses working irregular and backward rotated shifts. These results confirm that shiftwork makes the work-family role conflict even worse. They also support the view that the type of shift rotation matters. PMID:22728801

Simuni?, Ana; Gregov, Ljiljana

2012-06-01

369

When Can Employees Have a Family Life? The Effects of Daily Workload and Affect on Work-Family Conflict and Social Behaviors at Home  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article presents a longitudinal examination of antecedents and outcomes of work-to-family conflict. A total of 106 employees participating in an experience-sampling study were asked to respond to daily surveys both at work and at home, and their spouses were interviewed daily via telephone for a period of 2 weeks. Intraindividual analyses revealed that employees' perceptions of workload predicted work-to-family

Remus Ilies; Kelly M. Schwind; David Turley WAGNER; Michael D. Johnson; D. Scott DeRue; Daniel R. Ilgen

2007-01-01

370

Infant sleep, parental sleep and parenting stress in families of mothers on maternity leave and in families of working mothers.  

PubMed

The purpose of the present study was to investigate the links between infants' sleep and their parents' sleep and to assess the links between infant/parent sleep and parenting stress. Furthermore, we explored whether the links between sleep and parenting stress are moderated by maternal leave status. Participants were 50 families with an infant between the ages of 4-5 months. Half of the mothers were on maternity leave while the others returned to work. Parents completed daily sleep logs about infants' and their own sleep for 4 consecutive nights. Each parent also completed the Parenting Stress Index. Infant sleep was associated with sleep of both mothers and fathers, but the correlations with maternal sleep were stronger. Parental perceptions of their infant's sleep as problematic were associated with higher parenting stress. Poorer infant and maternal sleep patterns were associated with parenting stress only in families with mothers on maternity leave, probably because these mothers need to provide intensive caregiving "around the clock" without sufficient opportunities to rest. PMID:22306183

Sinai, Dana; Tikotzky, Liat

2012-04-01

371

Effects of Family History of Alcohol Use Disorders on Spatial Working Memory BOLD Response in Adolescents  

PubMed Central

Background A positive family history (FH) of alcohol use disorders (AUD) has been linked to increased risk for the development of AUD, and neurocognitive factors have been postulated as important underlying mechanisms of familial alcoholism transmission. Methods We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) during a spatial working memory (SWM) and vigilance paradigm to investigate potential neurodevelopmental differences linked to familial density of AUD in 72 adolescents aged 12 to 14 years. Results Youth with denser family histories of AUD showed less activation during a simple vigilance condition relative to SWM in cingulate and medial frontal gyri (? = 0.28, p = 0.03), and a trend for more relative activity during rest (? = ?0.25, p = 0.07) in this cluster. Conclusions Youth with greater familial densities of AUD may be less successful at modulating activity of the default network, potentially indicating a greater propensity for task-independent thought or reduced inhibition of task-irrelevant processing. Failure to moderate activation of the default network may have implications for cognitive efficiency and goal directed behavior in youth with dense FH. Further, aberrant activation in cingulate regions may be linked to genetic variation in GABA receptor units, suggesting a useful endophenotype for risk associated with alcohol dependence. PMID:18540914

Spadoni, Andrea D.; Norman, Andria L.; Schweinsburg, Alecia D.; Tapert, Susan F.

2008-01-01

372

An Integrative, Multilevel, and Transdisciplinary Research Approach to Challenges of Work, Family, and Health  

PubMed Central

Recognizing a need for rigorous, experimental research to support the efforts of workplaces and policymakers in improving the health and wellbeing of employees and their families, the National Institutes of Health and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention formed the Work, Family & Health Network (WFHN). The WFHN is implementing an innovative multisite study with a rigorous experimental design (adaptive randomization, control groups), comprehensive multilevel measures, a novel and theoretically based intervention targeting the psychosocial work environment, and translational activities. This paper describes challenges and benefits of designing a multilevel and transdisciplinary research network that includes an effectiveness study to assess intervention effects on employees, families, and managers; a daily diary study to examine effects on family functioning and daily stress; a process study to understand intervention implementation; and translational research to understand and inform diffusion of innovation. Challenges were both conceptual and logistical, spanning all aspects of study design and implementation. In dealing with these challenges, however, the WFHN developed innovative, transdisciplinary, multi-method approaches to conducting workplace research that will benefit both the research and business communities. PMID:24618878

Bray, Jeremy W.; Kelly, Erin L.; Hammer, Leslie B.; Almeida, David M.; Dearing, James W.; King, Rosalind B.; Buxton, Orfeu M.

2013-01-01

373

Women at the top: powerful leaders define success as work + family in a culture of gender.  

PubMed

How do women rise to the top of their professions when they also have significant family care responsibilities? This critical question has not been addressed by existing models of leadership. In a review of recent research, we explore an alternative model to the usual notion of a Western male as the prototypical leader. The model includes (a) relationship-oriented leadership traits, (b) the importance of teamwork and consensus building, and (c) an effective work-family interface that women with family care responsibilities create and use to break through the glass ceiling. We adopted a cross-cultural perspective to highlight the importance of relational orientation and work-family integration in collectivistic cultures, which supplements models of leadership based on Western men. Our expanded model of leadership operates in the context of a "culture of gender" that defines expectations for women and men as leaders. This complex model includes women in diverse global contexts and enriches our understanding of the interplay among personal attributes, processes, and environments in leadership. PMID:20350017

Cheung, Fanny M; Halpern, Diane F

2010-04-01

374

An Investigation into the Inter-relationship among Work, Family and Part-time Education in Hong Kong.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A study of 459 part-time graduate and undergraduate students with full-time jobs in Hong Kong found that support of employers and families had a significant relationship with perceived job performance and satisfaction with family and work life. Academic performance was not significantly correlated with perceived employer and family support.…

Hung, Humphry; Mondejar, Reuben

2001-01-01

375

Working with Families: Messages for Policy and Practice from an Evaluation of a School-Based Project  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In 2002 the authors evaluated a family support project known as Working with Families managed by the Children's Society and located in a primary school on a large, mainly white council estate in Rochdale. Our reflections on some of the issues which emerged in relation to basing family support services in a school setting seem timely in the light…

Featherstone, Brid; Manby, Martin

2006-01-01

376

"The Changers and the Changed": Preparing Early Childhood Teachers to Work with Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Families  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Census Bureau estimates that up to 14 million children under the age of 18 are being raised by lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender (LGBT) families. Just as heterosexual families require child care to enable work and want high-quality early childhood education to enhance their children's development, LGBT families experience the same needs…

Kintner-Duffy, Victoria L.; Vardell, Rosemarie; Lower, Joanna K.; Cassidy, Deborah J.

2012-01-01

377

20 CFR 664.460 - What are work experiences for youth?  

...Work experiences are planned, structured learning experiences that take place in a workplace...SCANS); (2) Exposure to various aspects of an industry; (3) Progressively...Entrepreneurship; (8) Service learning; (9) Paid and unpaid community...

2014-04-01

378

20 CFR 664.460 - What are work experiences for youth?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Work experiences are planned, structured learning experiences that take place in a workplace...SCANS); (2) Exposure to various aspects of an industry; (3) Progressively...Entrepreneurship; (8) Service learning; (9) Paid and unpaid community...

2012-04-01

379

20 CFR 664.460 - What are work experiences for youth?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Work experiences are planned, structured learning experiences that take place in a workplace...SCANS); (2) Exposure to various aspects of an industry; (3) Progressively...Entrepreneurship; (8) Service learning; (9) Paid and unpaid community...

2011-04-01

380

20 CFR 664.460 - What are work experiences for youth?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Work experiences are planned, structured learning experiences that take place in a workplace...SCANS); (2) Exposure to various aspects of an industry; (3) Progressively...Entrepreneurship; (8) Service learning; (9) Paid and unpaid community...

2013-04-01

381

20 CFR 664.460 - What are work experiences for youth?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Work experiences are planned, structured learning experiences that take place in a workplace...SCANS); (2) Exposure to various aspects of an industry; (3) Progressively...Entrepreneurship; (8) Service learning; (9) Paid and unpaid community...

2010-04-01

382

Work Family liFe Balancing joB and personal responsiBilities  

E-print Network

into old family roles: you don't have to be the "fixer-upper" or the "kid sister" if you don't want to be activities, especially if you have shared the same rituals for years. u don't Send mixed meSSageS. If youEs Finding a support group that works for you 4 parEntIng What to do about kids' unrealistic wish lists 5

Ginzel, Matthew

383

Communicating Personal Goals: Consequences for Person Perception in the Work and Family Domains  

Microsoft Academic Search

Based on a set of three experimental studies (total N = 608), we examined how people appraise another person’s well-being and motivation in the work and family domains on the basis of knowledge of this other person’s goal system. Participants were introduced to the life situation of either a woman or a man belonging to a successful dual-career couple. This

Katariina Salmela-Aro; Bettina S. Wiese

2006-01-01

384

Family Life and Work Experience before 1918: An oral history research project  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site from Qualidata, the ESRC Qualitative Data Archival Resource Centre of University of Essex in the United Kingdom, provides the methodology used, as well as samples of the work, from Family Life and Work Experience before 1918, the first national oral history study in Britain which was performed from 1970 to 1973. The site for the project includes samples of the occupation and geographical classifications used in the study, the original interview schedule, and the transcripts, summary sheet, and index card for a sample interview with "Emmie Durham." The site is accompanied by an extensive bibliography on oral history methodology.

385

Examining the Relationships Between Personality, Coping Strategies, and Work–Family Conflict  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose  The purpose of this study was to examine the processes through which personality characteristics may influence work–family\\u000a conflict (WFC). Specifically, the mediating effects of selection, optimization, and compensation (SOC) behavioral stress-coping\\u000a strategies on the relationship between personality characteristics and WFC were tested.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Design\\/Methodology\\/Approach  A snowball sampling technique was used to recruit 289 working adults, who completed online questionnaires. The proposed model

Boris B. BaltesLudmila; Ludmila S. Zhdanova; Malissa A. Clark

386

A Longitudinal Study of the Effects of Dual-Earner Couples' Utilization of Family-Friendly Workplace Supports on Work and Family Outcomes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Little research exists on the effects of the utilization of workplace supports on work–family conflict and job satisfaction. With family systems theory as a framework, 2 waves of national survey data were collected from 234 couples (N = 468) caring for children and for aging parents. Data were analyzed with structural equation modeling techniques. Longitudinal results indicate that individuals' use

Leslie B. Hammer; Margaret B. Neal; Jason T. Newsom; Krista J. Brockwood; Cari L. Colton

2005-01-01

387

Going Back Part-time: Family Leave Legislation and Women's Return to Work  

PubMed Central

Using a multinomial logit model with data from the Survey of Income and Program Participation, this paper tests whether the implementation of the Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) is associated with an increase in return to work at part-time status among first-time mothers working full-time during their pregnancy. I find a statistically significant trend of increasingly higher odds of returning to work at part-time status relative to return at full-time status, beginning in 1993 (the year in which the FMLA is implemented). Furthermore, an additional week of either state or federal leave is significantly associated with a higher odds of return at part-time status. This article provides evidence that job protection and leave legislation may help facilitate higher levels of labor force participation among women with small children, through more flexible work arrangements. PMID:22685365

2012-01-01

388

Factor Structure and Psychometric Properties of the Work-Family Balance Scale in an Urban Chinese Sample  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to explore the factor structure of the Work-Family Balance Scale (WFBS) and examine its reliability and validity in use in the urban Chinese population. The scale was validated using a sample of 605 urban Chinese residents from 7 cities. Exploratory factor analysis identified two factors: work-family conflict and…

Zhang, Huiping; Yip, Paul S. F.; Chi, Peilian; Chan, Kinsun; Cheung, Yee Tak; Zhang, Xiulan

2012-01-01

389

Construct Validation of the Translated Version of the Work-Family Conflict Scale for Use in Korea  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Recently, the stress of work-family conflict has been a critical workplace issue for Asian countries, especially within those cultures experiencing rapid economic development. Our research purpose is to translate and establish construct validity of a Korean-language version of the Multi-Dimensional Work-Family Conflict (WFC) scale used in the U.S.…

Lim, Doo Hun; Morris, Michael Lane; McMillan, Heather S.

2011-01-01

390

Florida Atlantic University School of Social Work  

E-print Network

Florida Atlantic University School of Social Work 1 Rev. 10-20-09 Own Agency Placement (OAP) - Policy Overview: Traditionally, Social Work field placements are educationally focused, unpaid training experiences in social work settings which are selected on the basis of the student's level and

Fernandez, Eduardo

391

Understanding resilience in same-sex parented families: the work, love, play study  

PubMed Central

Background While families headed by same-sex couples have achieved greater public visibility in recent years, there are still many challenges for these families in dealing with legal and community contexts that are not supportive of same-sex relationships. The Work, Love, Play study is a large longitudinal study of same-sex parents. It aims to investigate many facets of family life among this sample and examine how they change over time. The study focuses specifically on two key areas missing from the current literature: factors supporting resilience in same-sex parented families; and health and wellbeing outcomes for same-sex couples who undergo separation, including the negotiation of shared parenting arrangements post-separation. The current paper aims to provide a comprehensive overview of the design and methods of this longitudinal study and discuss its significance. Methods/Design The Work, Love, Play study is a mixed design, three wave, longitudinal cohort study of same-sex attracted parents. The sample includes lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender parents in Australia and New Zealand (including single parents within these categories) caring for any children under the age of 18 years. The study will be conducted over six years from 2008 to 2014. Quantitative data are to be collected via three on-line surveys in 2008, 2010 and 2012 from the cohort of parents recruited in Wave1. Qualitative data will be collected via interviews with purposively selected subsamples in 2012 and 2013. Data collection began in 2008 and 355 respondents to Wave One of the study have agreed to participate in future surveys. Work is currently underway to increase this sample size. The methods and survey instruments are described. Discussion This study will make an important contribution to the existing research on same-sex parented families. Strengths of the study design include the longitudinal method, which will allow understanding of changes over time within internal family relationships and social supports. Further, the mixed method design enables triangulation of qualitative and quantitative data. A broad recruitment strategy has already enabled a large sample size with the inclusion of both gay men and lesbians. PMID:20211027

2010-01-01

392

Family history, near work, outdoor activity, and myopia in Singapore Chinese preschool children  

PubMed Central

Aims To investigate the risk factors for myopia, including near work and outdoor activity, in Singapore Chinese preschool children. Methods A cross-sectional study, with disproportionate random sampling by 6-month age groups, of 3009 Singapore Chinese children aged 6–72 months was performed. Information on family history, near work and outdoor activity was obtained. Spherical equivalent refraction (SEA) was assessed. Results Children with two myopic parents were more likely to be myopic (adjusted OR=1.91; 95% CI 1.38 to 2.63) and to have a more myopic SER (regression coefficient=?0.35; 95% CI ?0.47 to ?0.22) than children without myopic parents. For each 1 cm taller height, the SER was more myopic by 0.01 dioptres. Neither near work nor outdoor activity was associated with preschool myopia. Conclusions A family history of myopia was the strongest factor associated with preschool myopia. In contrast, neither near work nor outdoor activity was found to be associated with early myopia. These data suggest that genetic factors may play a more substantial role in the development of early-onset myopia than key environmental factors. PMID:20472747

Low, Wilson; Dirani, Mohamed; Gazzard, Gus; Chan, Yiong-Huak; Zhou, Hui-Jun; Selvaraj, Prabakaran; Au Eong, Kah-Guan; Young, Terri L; Mitchell, Paul; Wong, Tien-Yin; Saw, Seang-Mei

2014-01-01

393

Formative versus reflective measurement: an illustration using work-family balance.  

PubMed

The aim of this article is to propose the formative measurement approach that can be used in various constructs of applied psychology. To illustrate this approach, the authors will (a) discuss the distinction between commonly used principal-factor (reflective) measures in comparison to the composite (formative) latent variable model, which is often applied in other disciplines such as marketing or engineering, and (b) point out the advantages and limitations of formative specifications using the example of the work-family balance (WFB) construct. Data collected from 2 large cross-sectional field studies confirm the reliability and validity of formative WFB measures as well as its predictive value regarding criteria of WFB (i.e., job satisfaction, family satisfaction, and life satisfaction). Last, the specific informational value of each formative indicator will be demonstrated and discussed in terms of practical implications for the assessment in different psychological fields. PMID:21902009

Ellwart, Thomas; Konradt, Udo

2011-01-01

394

Comparison of burnout pattern between hospital physicians and family physicians working in Suez Canal University Hospitals  

PubMed Central

Introduction The burnout syndrome is characterized by emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and low personal accomplishment. It is associated with impaired job performance. Methods This descriptive study examined 171 physicians for the presence of burnout and its related risk factors. The evaluation of burnout was through Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI). The participant was considered to meet the study criteria for burnout if he or she got a “high“ score on at least 2 of the three dimensions of MBI. Results In the current study, the prevalence of burnout in hospital physicians (53.9%) was significantly higher than family physicians (41.94%) with (p=0.001). Participants who work in the internal medicine department scored the highest prevalence (69.64%) followed by Surgeons (56.50%) and Emergency doctors (39.39%). On the other hand, Pediatricians got the lowest prevalence (18.75%). Working in the teaching hospital and being married are strong predictors for occurrence of burnout. Conclusion There is a significant difference of burnout between hospital physicians and family physicians among the study subjects. Working in the teaching hospital and being married are strong predictors for occurrence of burnout.

Kotb, Amany Ali; Mohamed, Khalid Abd-Elmoez; Kamel, Mohammed Hbany; Ismail, Mosleh Abdul Rahman; Abdulmajeed, Abdulmajeed Ahmed

2014-01-01

395

A major challenge. Entrepreneurship characterizes the work of the Soviet Family Health Association.  

PubMed

The work of the Soviet Family Health Association (SFHA) is described. Created in January, 1989, the organization boasts 25 state-paid workers, and as of June 1991, membership of 15,000 corporate and individual members. Individual annual membership fee is 5 rubles, and entitles members to counseling and family planning (FP) services. The SFHA works in cooperation with the Commission on Family Planning Problems of the USSR's Academy of Sciences, and has been a member of the International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF) since 1990. Association activities include lectures for students, newly-weds, adolescents, and working women on modern contraceptive methods; research on attitude regarding sex, sex behaviors, and the perceived need for effective contraception; clinical trials of contraceptive suitability for women; and the training of doctors in FP and contraceptives. Problems central to the SFHA's operations include insufficient service and examination equipment, a shortage of hard currency, and the small number of FP specialists in the country. Solutions to these obstacles are sought through collaboration with the government, non-governmental organizations in the Soviet Union, and international groups. The SFHA has a series of activities planned for 1991 designed to foster wider acceptance of FP. Increased FP services at industrial enterprises, establishing more FP centers throughout the Soviet Union, and studying FP programs in other countries are among Association targets for the year. Research on and promotion of contraceptives has been virtually stagnant since abortion was declared illegal in 1936. Catching up on these lost decades and remaining self-reliant are challenges to the SPHA. PMID:12284294

Manuilova, I A

1991-09-01

396

The impact of work-family policies on women's employment: a review of research from OECD countries  

Microsoft Academic Search

All industrialized countries, as well as many developing and transition countries, have policies in place to support work-family reconciliation such as care-related leaves, policies that increase the quality or availability of flexible and alternative work arrangements, and childcare supports. While work-family policies share common elements across borders, the extent and nature of supports vary widely across countries. This cross-national diversity

Ariane Hegewisch; Janet C. Gornick

2011-01-01

397

Comparing intra-familial and extra-familial child sexual abusers with professionals who have sexually abused children with whom they work.  

PubMed

The aim of this study is to establish whether professionals who have sexually molested children with whom they work present as a homogeneous group identifiable by their personal histories, offending patterns, and profiles as distinct from other child molesters (intra-familial and extra-familial offenders). Participants were matched on age and IQ. It was found that child molesters who were professionals (similar to extra-familial offenders generally) were likely to have sexually abused male, or both male and female, children and had abused more than 20 child victims. Professionals were also significantly more likely to have offended against post-pubescent children than were extra-familial or intra-familial offenders. In terms of psychological profiles, professionals, like extra-familial offenders, were found to have a significantly higher level of reported sexual pre-occupation and emotional over-identification with children compared with intra-familial offenders and a significantly lower level of distorted sexual attitudes about their victims compared with extra-familial offenders. These results are discussed in the context of assessment that might be used to assess risk in those working with children in a professional capacity. PMID:20150651

Sullivan, Joe; Beech, Anthony R; Craig, Leam A; Gannon, Theresa A

2011-02-01

398

Managers' Practices Related to Work-Family Balance Predict Employee Cardiovascular Risk and Sleep Duration in Extended Care Settings  

PubMed Central

An increasing proportion of U.S. workers have family caregiving responsibilities. The purpose of this study was to determine whether employees in extended care settings whose managers are supportive, open, and creative about work–family needs, such as flexibility with work schedules, have lower cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk and longer sleep than their less supported counterparts. From semistructured interviews with managers, we constructed a work–family balance score of manager openness and creativity in dealing with employee work–family needs. Trained interviewers collected survey and physiologic outcome data from 393 employees whose managers had a work–family score. Employee outcomes are sleep duration (actigraphy) and CVD risk assessed by blood cholesterol, high glycosylated hemoglobin/diabetes, blood pressure/hypertension, body-mass index, and tobacco consumption. Employees whose managers were less supportive slept less (29 min/day) and were over twice as likely to have 2 or more CVD risk factors (ORs = 2.1 and 2.03 for low and middle manager work–family scores, respectively) than employees whose managers were most open and creative. Employees who provide direct patient care exhibited particularly elevated CVD risk associated with low manager work–family score. Managers’ attitudes and practices may affect employee health, including sleep duration and CVD risk. PMID:20604637

Berkman, Lisa F.; Buxton, Orfeu; Ertel, Karen; Okechukwu, Cassandra

2012-01-01

399

Marriage and Family Therapists Working with Family Violence: Strained Bedfellows or Compatible Partners?: A Commentary on Avis, Kaufman, and Bograd.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Responds to previous articles by Avis, Kaufman, and Bograd on role of marital and family therapists in dealing with family violence among clients. Comments on presentation style of earlier articles and then discusses points of agreement and disagreement with each of the three authors. Concludes by urging therapists to learn more so they can…

Meth, Richard L.

1992-01-01

400

"Doing the Job as a Parent": Parenting Alone, Work, and Family Policy in Ireland  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Recent studies of family life in Ireland have focused on changes in "traditional" family structures, including the increase in one-parent families. This article illustrates the impact dominant conceptions in Irish society that privilege the family based on marriage have on one-parent family policy. The authors focus on two key areas of social…

Millar, Michelle; Coen, Liam; Bradley, Ciara; Rau, Henrike

2012-01-01

401

The influence of family-work role experience and mastery on psychological health of Chinese employed mothers.  

PubMed

Four-hundred-and-thirty-five Chinese married nurses with children were surveyed on their family-work role experience, sense of mastery, and psychological distress. Hierarchical regression analyses showed spillover effects of role experience on psychological health as well as asymmetrical permeability of family and work boundaries. The hypothesis that mastery acted as a moderator between role experience and psychological health was supported. In general, a higher level of mastery augmented positive but mitigated negative influence of role experience on psychological functioning. Findings provide useful information to practitioners and policy makers on issues related to family-work stress and women's health in contemporary Chinese society. PMID:19858340

Tang, Catherine So-Kum

2009-11-01

402

Strategies for managing work/life interaction among women and men with variable and unpredictable work hours in retail sales in Québec, Canada.  

PubMed

Increasingly, work schedules in retail sales are generated by software that takes into account variations in predicted sales. The resulting variable and unpredictable schedules require employees to be available, unpaid, over extended periods. At the request of a union, we studied schedule preferences in a retail chain in Québec using observations, interviews, and questionnaires. Shift start times had varied on average by four hours over the previous week; 83 percent had worked at least one day the previous weekend. Difficulties with work/life balance were associated with schedules and, among women, with family responsibilities. Most workers wanted: more advance notice; early shifts; regular schedules; two days off in sequence; and weekends off. Choices varied, so software could be adapted to take preferences into account. Also, employers could give better advance notice and establish systems for shift exchanges. Governments could limit store hours and schedule variability while prolonging the minimum sequential duration of leave per week. PMID:25085829

Messing, Karen; Tissot, France; Couture, Vanessa; Bernstein, Stephanie

2014-01-01

403

Family-supportive organization perceptions and organizational commitment: the mediating role of work-family conflict and enrichment and partner attitudes.  

PubMed

The present study aims to explain the processes through which family-supportive organizational perceptions (FSOP) relate to employee affective commitment. We suggest multiple mechanisms through which this relationship transpires-(a) the focal employee's experience of work-to-family conflict and enrichment and (b) the attitudes of the employee's spouse/partner. Hypotheses are tested with data from 408 couples. Results suggest that employee FSOP is positively associated with employee commitment through both employee work-to-family experiences and partner attitudes. FSOP was positively related to employee work-to-family enrichment, which was positively associated with employee affective commitment. FSOP was negatively associated with employee work-to-family conflict, which related to a partner's more positive attitude toward the employee's work schedule and higher commitment to the employee's firm. Partner commitment was positively and reciprocally related to employee affective commitment. These relationships partially mediated the FSOP-employee affective commitment relationship and varied as a function of parental status and single- versus dual-earner couple status but not as a function of employee gender. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed. PMID:23565896

Wayne, Julie Holliday; Casper, Wendy J; Matthews, Russell A; Allen, Tammy D

2013-07-01

404

Work, Family, and the Faculty Career. New Pathways: Faculty Career and Employment for the 21st Century Working Paper Series, Inquiry #8.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper, one in a series about the priorities of the professoriate, examines work-family issues as they affect faculty recruitment, retention, and productivity. Following a brief discussion of changing work-force demographics, the first part of the paper examines the structure of an academic career, focusing particularly on junior faculty and…

Gappa, Judith M.; MacDermid, Shelley M.

405

Linkages between Negative Work-to-Family Spillover and Mothers' and Fathers' Knowledge of Their Young Adolescents Daily Lives  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examines the relationships between mothers' and fathers' perceptions of negative work-to-family spillover and their knowledge of their preadolescent children's (mean age = 11.8 years) daily lives in a sample of dual-earner families. Three constructs are tested as potential mediators of the association between spillover and parental…

Bumpus, Matthew F.; Crouter, Ann C.; McHale, Susan M.

2006-01-01

406

FACILITATING FERTILITY AND PAID WORK: CONTEMPORARY FAMILY-FRIENDLY POLICY INITIATIVES AND THEIR SOCIAL IMPACTS IN AUSTRALASIA  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper focuses on contemporary public perceptions of the challenges of combining paid work and raising a family, set against the backdrop of concerns about low fertility, structural population ageing and the composition of the future labour force. Australasian policy makers have responded to these issues with various initiatives aimed at assisting people who are raising families and engaging in

Joanne James

2009-01-01

407

Will Family Health History Tools Work for Complex Families? Scenario-Based Testing of a Web-Based Consumer Application  

PubMed Central

Objective: Identify challenges that people from complex families may encounter when using traditional consumer family health history (FHH) applications and examine assumptions on which the applications are based. Method: Scenario-based testing was employed in which three evaluators used a consumer FHH application guided by four scenarios, recording the challenges they encountered and time required. Challenges identified were analyzed through qualitative content analysis of field notes. Results: Several types of FHH information deemed important in the scenarios could not be entered into the traditional FHH. Evaluators reported frustration at being unable to enter some information and perceived the resulting FHH as less accurate than it could be. These observations challenge certain implicit assumptions about families and consumers on which FHH applications are based. Conclusion: Current consumer FHH applications mirror clinical FHH tools, which may not be the most appropriate approach for consumers, especially for people from complex and diverse families. PMID:23304344

Peace, Jane; Bisanar, William; Licht, Nathan

2012-01-01

408

A work-family conflict/subjective well-being process model: A test of competing theories of longitudinal effects.  

PubMed

In the present study, we examine competing predictions of stress reaction models and adaptation theories regarding the longitudinal relationship between work-family conflict and subjective well-being. Based on data from 432 participants over 3 time points with 2 lags of varying lengths (i.e., 1 month, 6 months), our findings suggest that in the short term, consistent with prior theory and research, work-family conflict is associated with poorer subjective well-being. Counter to traditional work-family predictions but consistent with adaptation theories, after accounting for concurrent levels of work-family conflict as well as past levels of subjective well-being, past exposure to work-family conflict was associated with higher levels of subjective well-being over time. Moreover, evidence was found for reverse causation in that greater subjective well-being at 1 point in time was associated with reduced work-family conflict at a subsequent point in time. Finally, the pattern of results did not vary as a function of using different temporal lags. We discuss the theoretical, research, and practical implications of our findings. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved). PMID:24773400

Matthews, Russell A; Wayne, Julie Holliday; Ford, Michael T

2014-11-01

409

Afterschool Programs Help Working Families. Afterschool Alert. Issue Brief No. 16  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Changing family structures place extra burdens on children, parents and employers. The image of 21st century families is vastly different from that of previous centuries, or even the family image of 50 years ago. While women are still the primary caregivers, either as single mothers or part of a two-parent family, they are entering the workforce…

Afterschool Alliance, 2003

2003-01-01

410

Hidden Knowing of Working-Class Transnational Mexican Families in Schools: Bridge-Building, Nepantlera Knowers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Reframing immigrant families as transnationals, this article highlights transnational families' ways of knowing. This study is based on a three-year, multi-sited critical ethnographic set of case studies of four families in the USA and Mexico. Transnational families in this study demonstrated Nepantlera knowing, or liminal, bridge-building…

Kasun, G. Sue

2014-01-01

411

Working memory span capacity improved by a D2 but not D1 receptor family agonist  

PubMed Central

Patients with schizophrenia exhibit poor working memory (WM). Although several subcomponents of WM can be measured, evidence suggests the primary subcomponent affected in schizophrenia is span capacity (WMC). Indeed, the NIMH-funded MATRICS initiative recommended assaying the WMC when assessing the efficacy of a putative therapeutic for FDA approval. Although dopamine D1 receptor agonists improve delay-dependent memory in animals, evidence for improvements in WMC due to dopamine D1 receptor activation is limited. In contrast, the dopamine D2-family agonist bromocriptine improves WMC in humans. The radial arm maze (RAM) can be used to assess WMC, although complications due to ceiling effects or strategy confounds have limited its use. We describe a 12-arm RAM protocol designed to assess whether the dopamine D1-family agonist SKF 38393 (0, 1, 3, and 10 mg/kg) or bromocriptine (0, 1, 3, and 10 mg/kg) could improve WMC in C57BL/6N mice (n=12) in cross-over designs. WMC increased and strategy usage decreased with training. The dopamine D1 agonist SKF 38393 had no effect on WMC or long-term memory. Bromocriptine decreased WMC errors, without affecting long-term memory, consistent with human studies. These data confirm that WMC can be measured in mice and reveal drug effects that are consistent with reported effects in humans. Future research is warranted to identify the subtype of the D2-family of receptors responsible for the observed improvement in WMC. Finally, this RAM procedure may prove useful in developing animal models of deficient WMC to further assess putative treatments for the cognitive deficits in schizophrenia. PMID:21232557

Tarantino, Isadore S; Sharp, Richard F; Geyer, Mark A; Meves, Jessica M; Young, Jared W

2011-01-01

412

"Fit" inside the Work-Family Black Box: An Ecology of the Life Course, Cycles of Control Reframing1  

PubMed Central

Scholars have not fully theorized the multifaceted, interdependent dimensions within the work-family “black box.” Taking an ecology of the life course approach, we theorize common work-family and adequacy constructs as capturing different components of employees' cognitive appraisals of fit between their demands and resources at the interface between home and work. Employees' appraisals of their work-family linkages and of their relative resource adequacy are not made independently but, rather, co-occur as identifiable constellations of fit. The life course approach hypothesizes that shifts in objective demands/ resources at work and at home over the life course result in employees experiencing cycles of control, that is, corresponding shifts in their cognitive assessments of fit. We further theorize patterned appraisals of fit are key mediators between objective work-family conditions and employees' health, well-being and strategic adaptations. As a case example, we examine whether employees' assessments on ten dimensions cluster together as patterned fit constellations, using data from a middle-class sample of 753 employees working at Best Buy's corporate headquarters. We find no single linear construct of fit that captures the complexity within the work-family black box. Instead, respondents experience six distinctive constellations of fit: one optimal, two poor, and three moderate fit constellations. PMID:19809532

Moen, Phyllis; Kelly, Erin; Huang, Reiping

2009-01-01

413

MOTHER’S EMPLOYMENT DEMANDS, WORK-FAMILY CONFLICT, AND ADOLESCENT DEVELOPMENT*  

PubMed Central

This study revisited the old research question of whether or not maternal employment would adversely affect children’s development. We reframed the question by asking how a mother’s temporal employment demands might be linked to child development. We used longitudinal data from a sample of 340 white, lower- to middle-class, dual-earner families living in the rural Midwest of the United States. The data were obtained from questionnaires and videotaped observations, and were informed by the mother, the father, the adolescent child, and a trained observer. As predicted, we found a strong relationship between a mother’s temporal employment demands and work-family conflict, which was significantly associated with her emotional distress. A husband’s egalitarian gender ideology was found to reduce the mother’s emotional distress. Maternal distress was then negatively associated with nurturant and involved parenting, which in turn predicted a reduction in the adolescent child’s emotional and behavioral problems over time. PMID:20927198

Chee, Kyong Hee; Conger, Rand D.; Elder, Glen H.

2009-01-01

414

"A lot of sacrifices:" Work-family spillover and the food choice coping strategies of low wage employed parents  

PubMed Central

Integrating their work and family lives is an everyday challenge for employed parents. Competing demands for parents’ time and energy may contribute to fewer meals prepared or eaten at home and poorer nutritional quality of meals. Thus, work-family spillover (feelings, attitudes, and behaviors carried over from one role to another) is a phenomenon with implications for nutrition and health. The aim of this theory-guided constructivist research was to understand how low-wage employed parents’ experiences of work-family spillover affected their food choice coping strategies. Participants were 69 black, white and Latino mothers and fathers in a Northeastern U.S. city. We explored participants’ understandings of family and work roles, spillover, and food choice strategies using open-ended qualitative interviews. Data analysis was based on the constant comparative method. These parents described affective, evaluative, and behavioral instances of work-family spillover and role overload as normative parts of everyday life and dominant influences on their food choices. They used food choice coping strategies to: 1) manage feelings of stress and fatigue, 2) reduce the time and effort for meals, 3) redefine meanings and reduce expectations for food and eating, and 4) set priorities and trade off food and eating against other family needs. Only a few parents used adaptive strategies that changed work or family conditions to reduce the experience of conflict. Most coping strategies were aimed at managing feelings and redefining meanings, and were inadequate for reducing the everyday hardships from spillover and role overload. Some coping strategies exacerbated feelings of stress. These findings have implications for family nutrition, food expenditures, nutritional self-efficacy, social connections, food assistance policy, and work place strategies. PMID:16889881

Devine, Carol M.; Jastran, Margaret; Jabs, Jennifer A; Wethington, Elaine; Farrell, Tracy J; Bisogni, Carole A

2006-01-01

415

Work Conditions, Mastery and Psychological Distress: Are Housework and Paid Work Contexts Conceptually Similar?  

Microsoft Academic Search

This research examined how the conditions of paid work and unpaid housework were related to women's sense of mastery, depressed mood and anxiety. The data for these analyses were taken from the American Changing Lives (ACL) survey (House, 1986). This research draws from a subsample of 992 black and non-Hispanic white women aged 24 to 59. The conditions of work

Emilio L. Lombardi; Patricia M. Ulbrich

1998-01-01

416

Improving Individual, Child, and Family Nutrition, Health and Wellness. Secondary Learning Guide 8. Project Connect. Linking Self-Family-Work.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This competency-based secondary learning guide on improving individual, child, and family nutrition is part of a series that are adaptations of guides developed for adult consumer and homemaking education programs. The guides provide students with experiences that help them learn to do the following: make decisions; use creative approaches to…

Emily Hall Tremaine Foundation, Inc., Hartford, CT.

417

Improving Individual, Child, and Family Nutrition, Health and Wellness. Learning Guide 8. Project Connect. Linking Self-Family-Work.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This learning guide is designed to connect personal, family, and job responsibilities for adults and out-of-school youth in economically depressed areas of the state (including transitional ex-offenders and corrections populations) so that these individuals learn to manage and balance these aspects of their lives in order to prepare for or…

Emily Hall Tremaine Foundation, Inc., Hartford, CT.

418

Emotional exhaustion and mental health problems among employees doing “people work”: the impact of job demands, job resources and family-to-work conflict  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective  This study investigates the relationship between four job characteristics and family-to-work conflict on emotional exhaustion\\u000a and mental health problems.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  Multiple regression analyses were performed using data from 1,008 mental health care employees. Separate regression analyses\\u000a were computed for high and low patient interaction jobs.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Results  Different job characteristics as well as family-to-work conflict were associated with emotional exhaustion and mental health

Geertje van Daalen; Tineke M. Willemsen; Karin Sanders

2009-01-01

419

An Examination of Work to Family Spillover, Family Meal Rituals, and Parenting Styles on Children's Outcome of Obesity  

E-print Network

full model. Only a mothers' work strain was associated with increased odds of having overweight children in the 9-11 age group. Although the relationship between mothers? work strain and mothers' controlling parenting style and obesity-related variables...

Roberson, Samuel

2012-07-16

420

Liminal Cultural Work in Family Childcare: Latino Immigrant Family Childcare Providers and Bicultural Childrearing in the United States, 2002-2004  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Immigrants find themselves in a liminal state of limbo between two societies. In this zone, competing cultural ideas coexist. This essay examines how Latino immigrant family childcare providers in the United States questioned US norms of childrearing and how they engaged in liminal cultural work to produce a bicultural childrearing. They are…

Uttal, Lynet

2010-01-01

421

Work and Family Life among Anglo, Black and Mexican American Single-Parent Families. Executive Summary of the 1983 Annual Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The focus of the Working Parents Project (WPP) has been on how families adapt and function in relation to workplace policies, with particular attention given to the participation of parents in contexts of child care and socialization, including education-related activities. This report builds on previous data from the WPP by expanding the sample…

Espinoza, Renato; And Others

422

Work placements in the creative industries  

E-print Network

, and employers cannot discriminate against you on the grounds of age, disability, gender, pregnancy or maternity to access placements. The majority of placements are unpaid or low-paid. This can discriminate against workforce. Nearly 12% of creative workers have a work-limiting disability= and/or are disabled as compared

423

Why do Women feel the way they do about market work: the role of familial, social and economic factors  

Microsoft Academic Search

Various empirical studies find evidence of that women tend to underestimate the probability that they will work in the market in the future. This can lead to initial under-investment in market human capital and resulting earnings penalties later in life. However, virtually no study investigates the familial, social and economic factors that cause women to plan\\/expect not to work. Thus

Bisakha Sen

2003-01-01

424

Do Workers Who Experience Conflict between the Work and Family Domains Hit a "Glass Ceiling?": A Meta-Analytic Examination  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Based in Conservation of Resources (COR; Hobfoll, 1989) and self-verification (Swann, 1987) theories, we argue that when workers experience conflict between the work and family domains, this should have implications for evaluations of their work performance and ultimately affect more "objective" career outcomes such as salary and hierarchical…

Hoobler, Jenny M.; Hu, Jia; Wilson, Morgan

2010-01-01

425

Extended family caring for children orphaned by AIDS: balancing essential work and caregiving in a high HIV prevalence nations  

Microsoft Academic Search

While over 90 per cent of the 15 million children who have been orphaned by HIV\\/AIDS are cared for by family members, there is little information about whether adults can meet orphans’ essential caregiving needs while working to economically survive. Using a survey we conducted in Botswana of 1033 working adults, we analyse the experience of adults who are caring

J. Heymann; A. Earle; D. Rajaraman; C. Miller; K. Bogen

2007-01-01

426

International perspectives on work-family policies: lessons from the world's most competitive economies.  

PubMed

The United States does not guarantee families a wide range of supportive workplace policies such as paid maternity and paternity leave or paid leave to care for sick children. Proposals to provide such benefits are invariably met with the complaint that the costs would reduce employment and undermine the international competitiveness of American businesses. In this article, Alison Earle, Zitha Mokomane, and Jody Heymann explore whether paid leave and other work-family policies that support children's development exist in countries that are economically competitive and have low unemployment rates. Their data show that the answer is yes. Using indicators of competitiveness gathered by the World Economic Forum, the authors identify fifteen countries, including the United States, that have been among the top twenty countries in competitiveness rankings for at least eight of ten years. To this group they add China and India, both rising competitors in the global economy. They find that every one of these countries, except the United States, guarantees some form of paid leave for new mothers as well as annual leave. And all but Switzerland and the United States guarantee paid leave for new fathers. The authors perform a similar exercise to identify thirteen advanced countries with consistently low unemployment rates, again including the United States. The majority of these countries provide paid leave for new mothers, paid leave for new fathers, paid leave to care for children's health care needs, breast-feeding breaks, paid vacation leave, and a weekly day of rest. Of these, the United States guarantees only breast-feeding breaks (part of the recently passed health care legislation). The authors' global examination of the most competitive economies as well as the economies with low unemployment rates makes clear that ensuring that all parents are available to care for their children's healthy development does not preclude a country from being highly competitive economically. PMID:22013634

Earle, Alison; Mokomane, Zitha; Heymann, Jody

2011-01-01

427

The regulation of working time as work-family reconciliation policy: Comparing Europe, Japan, and the United States  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article compares working time policies in eight European countries, Japan, and the US, specifically policies that embody three goals: (1) reducing the full-time working week to less than the traditional standard of 40 hours; (2) guaranteeing workers an adequate number of paid days, annually, away from the workplace; and (3) raising the quality and availability of voluntary part-time work.

Janet C. Gornick; Alexandra Heron

2006-01-01

428

Changing the Way We Work  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A 21-hour working week is a long way from today's standard of 40 hours or more, but not so far-fetched when people consider the infinitely varied ways in which they actually spend their time. On average, people of working age spend 19.6 hours a week in paid employment and 20.4 hours in unpaid housework and childcare. These averages mask huge…

Coote, Anna

2010-01-01

429

Manager support for work/family issues and its impact on employee-reported pain in the extended care setting  

PubMed Central

Objective Supervisor-level policies and the presence of a manager engaged in an employee’s need to achieve work/family balance, or “supervisory support,” may benefit employee health, including self-reported pain. Methods We conducted a census of employees at four selected extended-care facilities in the Boston metropolitan region (n= 368). Supervisory support was assessed through interviews with managers and pain was employee-reported. Results Our multilevel logistic models indicate that employees with managers who report the lowest levels of support for work/family balance experience twice as much overall pain as employees with managers who report high levels of support. Conclusions Low supervisory support for work/family balance is associated with an increased prevalence of employee-reported pain in extended-care facilities. We recommend that manager-level policies and practices receive additional attention as a potential risk factor for poor health in this setting. PMID:22892547

O'Donnell, Emily M.; Berkman, Lisa F.; Subramanian, Sv

2012-01-01

430

Why Warner-Lieberman Failed and How to Get America’s Working Families behind  

E-print Network

Among partisans of greenhouse gas emissions regulation, the Senate’s failure to pass the Warner-Lieberman cap-and-trade bill is often attributed to rampant denial, fueled by diehard political conservatism, energy-company propaganda, and government suppression of evidence on global warming. If so, the solution to the problem is electoral change, exposure of the propaganda, and public education. However, public concern is already so widespread that even leaders of the Southern Baptist Convention have acknowledged the need for action. In this paper, I consider two additional forces that have stymied carbon emissions regulation in developing countries. The first is the perception that costly carbon regulation promoted by the rich will inflict an unjust burden on the poor. The second is hostility to taxation of critical fossil-fuel resources that were developed long before climate risk was identified. My econometric analysis suggests that these same forces have significantly affected senators ’ votes on Warner-Lieberman. By implication, Congress is not likely to approve cap-and-trade legislation unless Americans with below-median incomes are compensated for expected losses. My analysis supports recent proposals for direct distribution of emissions permit auction revenues to American families on an equal per-capita basis. The Center for Global Development is an independent, nonprofit policy research organization that is dedicated to reducing global poverty and inequality and to making globalization work for the poor Use and dissemination of this Working Paper is encouraged; however, reproduced copies may not be used for commercial purposes. Further usage is permitted under the terms of the Creative Commons License. The views expressed in this paper are those of the author and should not be attributed to the board of

The Next Cap; Trade Bill; David Wheeler; David Wheeler

2008-01-01

431

Attitudes Toward Gender, Work, and Family among Female and Male Scientists in Germany and the United States  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This research used a comparative approach and an elite framework to look at attitudes toward gender, work, and family among male and female scientists. The data came from the 1994 International Social Survey Program module measuring family and changing gender roles in (the former) East Germany, West Germany, and the United States. Research questions focused on the variation between the three samples in male scientists' attitudes regarding gender, work, and family; women's representation in science occupations; and the relation between the two. Another major concern was the extent to which female scientists express attitudes regarding gender, work, and family that resemble those of male scientists and the implications of these processes for increasing women's access to science. As predicted, male scientists in East Germany tended to have the most progressive attitudes (especially those regarding gender and work), East German women had the greatest access to science occupations, and there were virtually no sex differences in attitudes of East German scientists. West German male scientists were the most traditional on attitudes regarding gender and work, and U. S. male scientists tended to be the most traditional on attitudes regarding family. The attitudes of female scientists in West Germany and the United States reflected this larger trend, but there were sex differences within countries, with female scientists being more progressive than male scientists. Thus, the findings suggest that women s representation in science is related to the attitudes of male scientists regarding gender, work, and family. And although female scientists often hold quite similar attitudes as male scientists, there is considerable cross-country variation in how progressive the attitudes are and how similar men's and women's attitudes are. Implications for women's access to elite science occupations are discussed.

Hanson, Sandra L.; Fuchs, Stefan; Aisenbrey, Silke; Kravets, Natalyia

432

Revisiting the social construction of family in the context of work  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate how traditional definitions of family, in the context of employment, have not kept pace with actual family formation in the USA and much of the rest of the world, and how this disadvantages individuals from atypical (i.e. non-nuclear), but increasingly common, families. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – A wide range of literature from

T. Alexandra Beauregard; Mustafa Ozbilgin; Myrtle P. Bell

2009-01-01

433

Reducing Psychosocial Distress in Family Caregivers  

Microsoft Academic Search

Families remain the most common source of assistance for older adults with physical and\\/or cognitive limitations (National\\u000a Alliance for Caregiving and the American Association of Retired Persons, 1997; Schulz & Martire, 2004). A national phone survey\\u000a found that nearly one in four US households included at least one self-identified caregiver who gave unpaid assistance to\\u000a an impaired or physically frail

Ann M. Steffen; Judith R. Gant; Dolores Gallagher-Thompson

434

Cooperative Working towards Family-Centred Health Education in Acute Care: Improvement in Client Satisfaction  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: To establish family-centred health education for patients in a neurosurgery unit and to evaluate its impact on patients' and families' satisfaction. Design: Cooperative participatory research through which a group of clinical nurses and an academic researcher engaged in cycles of action and reflection. Setting: The study was…

Bastani, Farideh; Golaghaie, Farzaneh; Farahani, Mansoureh A.; Rafeie, Mohammad

2014-01-01

435

A Typology of Work-Family Arrangements among Dual-Earner Couples in Norway  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A symmetrical family model of two workers or caregivers is a political goal in many western European countries. We explore how common this family type is in Norway, a country with high gender-equality ambitions, by using a multinomial latent class model to develop a typology of dual-earner couples with children based on the partners' allocations…

Kitterod, Ragni Hege; Lappegard, Trude

2012-01-01

436

Exploring theatre of the oppressed in family therapy clinical work and supervision  

Microsoft Academic Search

Augusto Boal's theatre of the oppressed (TOTO) techniques have been used in education, health, welfare, and prison systems world-wide. However, the link between family therapy clinical supervision and training and TOTO has not been explored, either in Australia or overseas. This innovative action research project explores the ways family therapists and supervisors apply these theatre techniques in their everyday practice.

Kerry Proctor; Amaryll Perlesz; Banu Moloney; Fiona McIlwaine; Imogen ONeill

2008-01-01

437

Working with Families to Prevent Obesity: A Community-Campus Partnership  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

University faculty and community agencies collaborated to design and implement Healthy Weigh/El camino saludable, a family-focused obesity prevention and intervention program in a low-income, urban community at high risk for obesity and related chronic disease. Hispanic and African American families participated in 12 weekly sessions. Offered in…

Dart, Lyn; Frable, Pamela Jean; Bradley, Patricia J.; Bae, Sejong; Singh, Karan

2005-01-01

438

Working with Arab American Families: Culturally Competent Practice for School Psychologists  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Individuals of Arab descent residing within the United States currently number between 1.2 million and 3.9 million. These families are characterized by considerable diversity depending upon their nationality, religion, and extent of acculturation to both Western and Arab cultures. More recently, Arab families have immigrated to the United States…

Haboush, Karen L.

2007-01-01

439

Family caregiving: who provides the care, and at what cost?  

PubMed

Today, there are an estimated 1.6 million people over 65 years of age who require assistance with two or more daily activities. This number is projected to rise to 2.1 million by 2001, with fewer family caregivers expected to be available to provide this informal care. Seventy-two percent of unpaid family caregivers are women, the majority of whom are mid-life daughters or daughters in law. Uncompensated care to the frail elderly requires an average of 28 to 39.9 hours per week of custodial care. The financial impact on informal caregivers includes: 9% of family caregivers who leave the labor force to provide care, 29.4% who adjust their work schedules, and 18.1% who take time off without pay. The estimated annual value of uncompensated kin care in 1990 was $18 billion. Thirty-two percent of all family caregivers are categorized as poor or near-poor at incomes that are less than 125% of the federal poverty level. PMID:9362866

Robinson, K M

1997-01-01

440

Effects of extended work shifts on employee fatigue, health, satisfaction, work/family balance, and patient safety.  

PubMed

12-hour shifts are quickly spreading in Europe. From our multivariate analysis concerning 25,924 European nurses, including twenty explanatory variables simultaneously, we found that work schedule itself is not a major determinant factor. Nurses aim to choose or accept night shifts or 12-hour shift in order to reduce their work/home conflicts, however, at the expense of the patient's safety, as well as their own health and safety. Therefore, it is important to develop measures, such as extended child care, association of nurses to the elaboration of their rota, 9- or 10-hour shifts in the afternoon, allowing naps during night shifts, and reduction of changing shifts with short notice. Work schedules must be organized in order to allow time for shift handover, social support and team building. PMID:22317378

Estryn-Béhar, Madeleine; Van der Heijden, Beatrice I J M

2012-01-01

441

Linking Parents' Work Pressure and Adolescents' Well-Being: Insights Into Dynamics in Dual-Earner Families  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study focused on the connections between mothers' and fathers' work pressure and the psychological adjustment of their older (M = 15 years) and younger (M = 12.5 years) adolescent offspring in a sample of 190 dual-earner families. Structural equation models revealed that the effects of work pressure on adolescent well-being were mediated by parental role overload and parent–adolescent conflict.

Ann C. Crouter; Matthew F. Bumpus; Mary C. Maguire; Susan M. McHale

1999-01-01

442

The Response of Schools of Social Work to the Return of Uniformed Service Members and Their Families  

Microsoft Academic Search

The following article is designed to provide an historical overview of the role that the Smith College School for Social Work has played in serving U.S. service members and their families throughout the past 91 years. Particular attention is paid to the building momentum of interest and activity at the School since 2005.

Carolyn Jacobs

2009-01-01

443

Attachment and Parenting: The Mediating Role of Work-Family Balance in Portuguese Parents of Preschool Children  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Given the increasingly challenging task of balancing multiple adult life roles in contemporary society, this study examined the influences of both conflicting and (positively) synergistic work and family roles in mediating associations between the quality of adult attachment and both parental satisfaction and parenting stress. Participants were…

Vieira, Joana Marina; AVila, Marisa; Matos, Paula Mena

2012-01-01

444

Hierarchies of Risk: The Longitudinal Dynamics of Family, Work, Welfare, and Health Insurance in Low-Income Women's Lives  

E-print Network

from 1,662 low-income women I conduct a series of logistic regression analyses to assess the role of individual-level welfare, work, and family changes in predicting women's access to insurance and changes in poverty status over time. The results...

Legerski, Elizabeth Miklya

2010-06-09

445

"I Teach Him Everything He Learns in School": The Acquisition of Literacy for Learning in Working Class Families. Final Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presenting an indepth examination of 12 working class families to determine what they did that either helped or hindered children in making the transition from basic literacy (the ability to decode written symbols) to advanced literacy (the ability to use writing for the acquisition of knowledge), this report focuses on 12 children, 1 from each…

Varenne, Herve; And Others

446

Linking Social Environments with the Well-Being of Adolescents in Dual-Earner and Single Working Parent Families  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This investigation examined the relationships between middle school-aged children's perceptions of their social environments (home, school, neighborhood, and parental work) with self-reports of well-being. In the present study, well-being was defined by measures of physical health and psychological happiness. Data from the Nurturing Families Study…

Tisdale, Sandee; Pitt-Catsuphes, Marcie

2012-01-01

447

The Rhetoric of Choice and 21st-Century Feminism: Online Conversations About Work, Family, and Sarah Palin  

Microsoft Academic Search

Critical exploration of online discourse concerning Sarah Palin's vice presidential candidacy and role as mother reveals the rhetoric of choice is predominant when it comes to how women approach and understand work and family as well as interact with feminism. With strong roots in cultural narratives, the rhetoric of choice draws upon an understanding of individual rights and responsibility and

Virginia McCarver

2011-01-01

448

The Role of Personal Resources in Work-Family Conflict: Implications for Young Mothers' Well-Being  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of the current study was to examine the role that personal resources (person-environment [PE] congruence and personality types associated with resilience) and work-family conflict (WFC) play in the sense of well-being (as reflected by burnout and life-satisfaction) of mothers of young children. A sample of 146 mothers holding demanding…

Braunstein-Bercovitz, Hedva; Frish-Burstein, Smadar; Benjamin, Benny A.

2012-01-01

449

The Role of Ethnic Culture in Work-Family Balance among Armenian Women in Leadership Positions in Higher Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In contemporary society women leaders in education have struggled to balance work and family. While some women have succeeded in finding that balance, many others are still struggling. The purpose of this qualitative study was to examine the experiences of three Armenian women in senior-level leadership positions in higher education in the United…

Baran, Hasmig

2012-01-01

450

College Women in the 21st Century: A Closer Look at Academic, Family and Work Demands on Levels of Burnout  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study explored the contributions of background characteristics, family, academic, and work demands on levels of burnout among undergraduate females in an urban college setting and to what extent informal/formal support is related to levels of burnout. Data were obtained through the use of self-administered questionnaires, which were…

Valoy, Glenny A.

2012-01-01

451

Telecommuting, Control, and Boundary Management: Correlates of Policy Use and Practice, Job Control, and Work-Family Effectiveness  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We examine professionals' use of telecommuting, perceptions of psychological job control, and boundary management strategies. We contend that work-family research should distinguish between descriptions of flexibility use (formal telecommuting policy user, amount of telecommuting practiced) and how the individual psychologically experiences…

Kossek, Ellen Ernst; Lautsch, Brenda A.; Eaton, Susan C.

2006-01-01

452

Making Ends Meet: Six Programs That Help Working Families and Employers. A Guide for Business Leaders and Policymakers.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document is intended to provide business leaders, policymakers, and others with information about the operation and value of six work support programs designed to help low-income parents obtain the assistance needed to enter a job, retain employment, and better provide for their families' needs. The six programs profiled are as follows: the…

Patel, Nisha; Greenberg, Mark; Savner, Steve; Turetsky, Vicki

453

The Hours of Work and Family Income Response to Negative Income Tax Plans. The Impact on the Working Poor.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The negative income tax has been proposed as an effective means to combat poverty in the United States. This study, which is inferential in nature and a complement to ongoing field experimentation, is concerned with such questions as: (1) How will a negative income tax affect the working poor, (2) Will a negative income tax encourage some people…

Tella, Alfred; And Others

454

Bringing Work Home: Take-Home Pesticide Exposure Among Farm Families  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this thesis take-home pesticide exposure among farm families, with an emphasis on herbicides, was investigated. Take-home exposure occurs when a worker unwittingly brings home a substance on his or her clothing or shoes, thereby potentially exposing his or her family. The pesticides investigated were atrazine, metolachlor, acetochlor, alachlor, 2,4-D, glyphosate, and chlorpyrifos; all were applied to either corn or

B. D. Curwin

2006-01-01

455

Quality of life and competitive work among adults with severe mental illness: moderating effects of family contact.  

PubMed

OBJECTIVE Competitive employment may improve life quality for adults with severe mental illness, but it is not known for whom or under what circumstances. On the basis of previous research demonstrating benefits of family contact for African-American adults with severe mental illness, it was hypothesized that frequent family contact would moderate (enhance) a positive association between competitive employment and global quality of life for a rural sample of predominantly African-American adults. METHODS In a secondary analysis of data collected from a randomized trial of supported employment, a series of nested random regression analyses was conducted to test the hypothesized moderating effect of face-to-face family contact on the association between competitive employment and global quality of life, controlling for severity of psychiatric symptoms and satisfaction with family relations. RESULTS Most of the 143 study participants spent time with a family member at least once a month (80%)-and most at least weekly (60%). Participants who held a competitive job and had face-to-face contact with family members at least weekly reported higher global quality of life than all other study participants. CONCLUSIONS In this rural sample of African-American adults with severe mental illness, competitive work was associated with higher global quality of life only for those who frequently spent time with family members. Research is needed to test the generalizability of this finding to other geographic settings and cultures, as well as the feasibility and effectiveness of formal inclusion of family members in psychosocial rehabilitation interventions. PMID:23999865

Gold, Paul B

2013-12-01

456

Perceptions of work and family assistance and the prevalence of lower back problems in a South African manganese factory.  

PubMed

An analytical cross-sectional epidemiological study was carried out among 109 manganese plant workers to examine the prevalence and association between lower back problems (LBP) and family and workplace related psychosocial risk factors. Outcome (LBP) was defined using a guided questionnaire and a functional rating index. Exposure to family and workplace related psychosocial risk was determined using the Occupational Risk Factor (ORFQ) and APGAR questionnaires for work and family support. Using inclusive and stringent definitions for perceived LBP, point prevalence was 37.6% and 29.4%, respectively. Only 8 cases of LBP were, however recorded officially over a 7-yr period (1996-2003). Multivariate analyses indicated a high, but non-significant odds ratio (OR) for negative perceptions of workplace support OR 3.29 (CI 0.95-11.30). A positive, non-significant, association for negative perceptions of family support (2.56; CI 0.69-9.52) and a protective, but non-significant, association for control over the order and pace of working tasks (OR 0.40; CI 0.12-1.35) was found. These findings together with the under-reporting, leads one to conclude that work hardening and a cultural ethos of non-complaining among manual labourers, moderates the association between LBP and the aetiological factors studied. PMID:17085927

van Vuuren, Bernard; van Heerden, Hendrik Johannes; Zinzen, Evert; Becker, Piet; Meeusen, Romain

2006-10-01

457

45 CFR 261.15 - Can a family be penalized if a parent refuses to work because he or she cannot find child care?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... Can a family be penalized if a parent refuses to work because he or... Can a family be penalized if a parent refuses to work because he or she...required work if the individual is a single custodial parent caring for a child under age...

2011-10-01

458

45 CFR 261.15 - Can a family be penalized if a parent refuses to work because he or she cannot find child care?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... Can a family be penalized if a parent refuses to work because he or... Can a family be penalized if a parent refuses to work because he or she...required work if the individual is a single custodial parent caring for a child under age...

2010-10-01

459

45 CFR 261.15 - Can a family be penalized if a parent refuses to work because he or she cannot find child care?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... Can a family be penalized if a parent refuses to work because he or... Can a family be penalized if a parent refuses to work because he or she...required work if the individual is a single custodial parent caring for a child under age...

2013-10-01

460

45 CFR 261.15 - Can a family be penalized if a parent refuses to work because he or she cannot find child care?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

... Can a family be penalized if a parent refuses to work because he or... Can a family be penalized if a parent refuses to work because he or she...required work if the individual is a single custodial parent caring for a child under age...

2012-10-01

461

Reconsidering the Division of Household Labor: Incorporating Volunteer Work and Informal Support  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The gendered division of household labor is more multifaceted than the allocation of paid work and domestic work. People also engage in volunteer work and informal support. I investigate the applicability of household labor allocation theories - specifically the time constraints, economic, and doing gender perspectives - to all unpaid work. I…

L. Hook, Jennifer

2004-01-01

462

Summer Internship for J.D. Credit Students may receive academic credit for unpaid summer internships for which credit is a  

E-print Network

Summer Internship for J.D. Credit Overview Students may receive academic credit for unpaid summer internships for which credit is a condition of employment. To receive credit, students must propose and get an HLS faculty member's approval of a one-credit paper prior to accepting the internship. The paper

Wolfe, Patrick J.

463

Implementing family involvement in the treatment of patients with psychosis: a systematic review of facilitating and hindering factors  

PubMed Central

Objective To synthesise the evidence on implementing family involvement in the treatment of patients with psychosis with a focus on barriers, problems and facilitating factors. Design Systematic review of studies evaluating the involvement of families in tripartite communication between health professionals, ‘families’ (or other unpaid carers) and adult patients, in a single-family context. A theoretical thematic analysis approach and thematic synthesis were used. Data sources A systematic electronic search was carried out in seven databases, using database-specific search strategies and controlled vocabulary. A secondary manual search of grey literature was performed as well as using forwards and backwards snowballing techniques. Results A total of 43 studies were included. The majority featured qualitative data (n=42), focused solely on staff perspectives (n=32) and were carried out in the UK (n=23). Facilitating the training and ongoing supervision needs of staff are necessary but not sufficient conditions for a consistent involvement of families. Organisational cultures and paradigms can work to limit family involvement, and effective implementation appears to operate via a whole team coordinated effort at every level of the organisation, supported by strong leadership. Reservations about family involvement regarding power relations, fear of negative outcomes and the need for an exclusive patient–professional relationship may be explored and addressed through mutually trusting relationships. Conclusions Implementing family involvement carries additional challenges beyond those generally associated with translating research to practice. Implementation may require a cultural and organisational shift towards working with families. Family work can only be implemented if this is considered a shared goal of all members of a clinical team and/or mental health service, including the leaders of the organisation. This may imply a change in the ethos and practices of clinical teams, as well as the establishment of working routines that facilitate family involvement approaches. PMID:25280809

Eassom, Erica; Giacco, Domenico; Dirik, Aysegul; Priebe, Stefan

2014-01-01

464

Prenatal Diagnosis: Current Procedures and Implications for Early Interventionists Working with Families.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article provides an overview of procedures commonly used in prenatal screening and diagnosis including ultrasound, amniocentesis, chorionic villus biopsy, maternal serum alpha-fetoprotein, and deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) analysis. Emphasis is on the role of the early interventionist in supporting families during prenatal diagnosis. (Author/DB)

Blasco, Patricia M.; And Others

1994-01-01

465

Birth-to-Work: A Systems Framework for Individual, Family, and Community Development  

E-print Network

and rebuildingg · Economic and entrepreneurial development · Education and technology · Family development over Characteristics ­ Children of alcoholics and other drug-using parents ­ Children of parents with antisocial personality disorder ­ Children of parents with clinical depression ­ Children of parents in conflict ­ Child

466

Widowed Families with Children: Personal Need and Societal Response. Working Paper No. 7.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The death of a parent can cause economic and emotional stress for the surviving family members. As part of a larger survey of widowed men and women, living in Melbourne, Australia, data on needs of children who had experienced a parent's death were collected from 126 widowed parents with at least one child under the age of 18. Parents reported…

Rosenman, Linda; And Others

467

The Effect of Family Member Migration on Education and Work among Nonmigrant Youth in Mexico  

PubMed Central

While academic and policy circles have given much attention to the assimilatory experiences of Mexican immigrants in the United States, less is known about those who stay behind—an especially unfortunate oversight given the increasing number of Mexican youth with migrant family members. Of the studies that do exist, most have sought to identify the effect migration has on youths’ migratory and educational aspirations, often using qualitative methods in single sending communities. The present article supplements this research in two ways: (1) in addition to assessing educational outcomes, the scope of the analysis is expanded to include nonmigrants’ interaction with another homeland institution of upward mobility—the labor market; and (2) using a large demographic data set, statistical techniques are employed to adjust for unobserved selectivity into the migrant family-member population, thus accounting for a potentially serious source of bias. The results suggest that youth in migrant-sending families are less likely to complete the educational transitions leading up to post-secondary school, and have a lower probability of participating in the local economy. The results also indicate that unobserved factors play a “nonignorable” role in sorting youth into migrant and nonmigrant families. PMID:21347807

Halpern-Manners, Andrew

2013-01-01

468

Illusions of Prosperity: America's Working Families in an Age of Economic Insecurity.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This book examines the political and economic consequences of the United States' growing reliance on the market and the effects that this growing reliance is having on U.S. workers and their families. The following are among the topics discussed in the book's 10 chapters: (1) consequences of the turn to the market (disinvestment, imbalance between…

Blau, Joel

469

Preferences for Job Attributes Associated with Work and Family: A Longitudinal Study of Career Outcomes  

Microsoft Academic Search

We examined the relationship between family responsibilities, job attribute preferences, and career-related outcomes (salary, management level, job satisfaction) in a longitudinal study of 171 women and men students in the same MBA program. Findings indicated that preferences for high salary and good advancement opportunities assessed when students entered the MBA program predicted satisfaction with their salary and advancement outcomes 3

Alison M. Konrad; Yang Yang; Caren Goldberg; Sherry E. Sullivan

2005-01-01

470

Conserving Limited Resources. Learning Guide 14. Project Connect. Linking Self-Family-Work.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This learning guide on conserving limited resources is part of a series of learning guides developed for competency-based adult consumer and homemaking education programs in community colleges, adult education centers, community centers, and the workplace. Focus is on the connections among personal, family, and job responsibilities so that these…

Emily Hall Tremaine Foundation, Inc., Hartford, CT.

471

Cost of Children in Australia. Institute of Family Studies Working Paper No. 8.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report estimates costs of feeding and clothing Australian children at a basic survival level. Detailed information is provided on the types of costs incurred by families at different income levels and with children of different ages. After a brief introduction characterizing the study and summarizing findings, discussion focuses on the…

Lovering, Kerry

472

Work-Family Imagery and Gender Stereotypes: Television and the Reproduction of Difference.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Analysis of cultural imagery in 1,699 television commercials from 1992-94 showed that women were less prevalent, more likely to be shown in families, less likely to hold jobs or be in professional occupations, less likely to exercise authority, and more likely to be depicted as sex objects. Results suggest that sex stereotypes in media imagery…

Coltrane, Scott; Adams, Michele

1997-01-01

473

Women at the Top: Powerful Leaders Define Success as Work + Family in a Culture of Gender  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

How do women rise to the top of their professions when they also have significant family care responsibilities? This critical question has not been addressed by existing models of leadership. In a review of recent research, we explore an alternative model to the usual notion of a Western male as the prototypical leader. The model includes (a)…

Cheung, Fanny M.; Halpern, Diane F.

2010-01-01

474

Baggage vs. Ballast: Work and Family on the Tenure Track Published in  

E-print Network

other things to devote your life to, like your small children, or your aging parents. Life is very not actually be single). For family faculty on the tenure track, it's easy to look at their single colleagues, or pick up kids at day care, or go to kindergarten back-to-school night. They can be so productive. How

Robins, Gabriel

475

Strengthening Parenting Skills: Teenagers. Learning Guide 3. Project Connect. Linking Self-Family-Work.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This learning guide is designed to connect personal, family, and job responsibilities for adults and out-of-school youth in economically depressed areas of the state (including transitional ex-offenders and corrections populations) so that these individuals learn to manage and balance these aspects of their lives in order to prepare for or…

Emily Hall Tremaine Foundation, Inc., Hartford, CT.

476

Working with Latino Families: Challenges Faced by Educators and Civic Leaders  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article analyzes a subset of data gathered during a survey of 155 school systems and communities across the nation. The data were obtained from a capability survey as part of the application for a Toyota Family Literacy Program (TFLP) grant. Educators and civic leaders in 38 states responded to questions about their five greatest challenges…

Lieshoff, Sylvia Cobos

2007-01-01

477

Work Family liFe Balancing joB and personal responsiBilities  

E-print Network

VOl. 24, NO. 11 Practical solutions for family, workplace and health issues what's insidE EldEr Issu, Ed.D. A growing body of research on how the mind ages is encouraging. It challenges the conventional names, page 6.) use mental images. It can help your "prospective memory"--the ability to remember to do

Ginzel, Matthew

478

Educating and Supporting the Infant/Family Work Force: Models, Methods and Materials.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This special newsletter issue was based on a July 1994 forum for educators and trainers of infant/family practitioners. Papers in the first section present emerging conceptual frameworks and the process of helping trainees to use these frameworks. Included are the following papers: "Head Start: The Emotional Foundations of School Readiness as…

Eggbeer, Linda, Ed.; Fenichel, Emily, Ed.

1995-01-01

479

Work Family liFe Balancing joB and personal responsiBilities  

E-print Network

Vol. 25, No. 2 Practical solutions for family, workplace and health issues what's insidE EldEr Issu and skills are likely to grow. Likewise, a girl's ease with reading and language may begin with an early on tests of reading and writing. Boys are much more likely than girls to drop out of high school

Ginzel, Matthew

480

Cultural and Ethical Issues in Working with Culturally Diverse Patients and Their Families  

Microsoft Academic Search

In all aspects of health and mental health care-the emergency room, the outpatient clinic, inpatient facilities, rehab centers, nursing homes, and hospicessocial workers interact with patients from many different cultures. This paper will introduce an assessment tool for health care professionals to advance understanding of culturally diverse patients and their families.

Elaine P. Congress

2005-01-01

481

Working Together with Children and Families: Case Studies in Early Intervention.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This book presents 21 case studies of young children with disabilities in a variety of family situations and settings, for early interventionists to study in planning and applying recommended practices. Section I, "Defining and Delivering Quality Services in Early Intervention," provides two introductory chapters: "The Search for Quality…

McWilliam, P. J., Ed.; Bailey, Donald B., Jr., Ed.

482

International Perspectives on Work-Family Policies: Lessons from the World's Most Competitive Economies  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The United States does not guarantee families a wide range of supportive workplace policies such as paid maternity and paternity leave or paid leave to care for sick children. Proposals to provide such benefits are invariably met with the complaint that the costs would reduce employment and undermine the international competitiveness of American…

Earle, Alison; Mokomane, Zitha; Heymann, Jody

2011-01-01

483

AdvoCasey: Documenting Programs That Work for Kids and Families, 1999-2000.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This periodical provides accessible, in-depth profiles of programs and policies that have made measurable differences in the lives of children and families. A particular focus is on initiatives that have helped reform child-serving institutions and systems and that have strengthened the physical infrastructure, economic vitality, and social fabric…

AdvoCasey, 2000

2000-01-01

484

Role of Early Family Configuration and Hours Worked on Student Success in Two-Year Colleges  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to examine factors that influence student success in two-year colleges, community colleges, or junior colleges. In determining the purpose of the study, a research framework is established to review the relationships between student success and biological children, marriage/co-habitation, early family configuration,…

Boswell, Robert A.; Passmore, David L.

2013-01-01

485

Resources for Early Childhood Professionals Working with Families and Very Young Children.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This collection of resources was compiled by the Birth to Kindergarten students of Lenoir-Rhyne College (North Carolina) to provide the early childhood professional--whether a child care center director, early interventionist, teacher, family resource counselor, or program consultant--with ready, easy to use information to share with parents.…

Summer, Gail L., Ed.

486

Mentorship quality and protégés' work-to-family positive spillover, career satisfaction and voice behavior in China  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mentoring has long captured the attention of scholars due to its effects on personal lives and career and organizational success. This study investigates the impact of mentorship quality, as perceived by protégés, while lending consideration to the moderating role of interpersonal citizenship behavior (ICB). Results from a two-wave survey of 173 Chinese protégés indicate that mentorship quality positively influences work-to-family

Jun Liu; Ho Kwong Kwan; Yina Mao

2012-01-01

487

Minister Peng stresses the necessity for improving the working style in family planning implementation.  

PubMed

China's State Counselor and Minister of the State Family Planning (FP) Commission is reported to have made suggestions on improving FP effectiveness to officials in Qianshan and Jinzhai counties of Anhui Province, in Hongya and Mingshan counties of Sichuan Province, and in Dezhau Prefecture and Tai'an City of Shandong Province. In Anhui Province, Minister Peng Peiyun emphasized the importance of FP at the grassroots level and the responsibility of providing education, publicity, and contraceptive services to each couple of childbearing age. Publicity is needed to popularize the advantages and necessity of deferred marriage, deferred childbearing, fewer and healthier births, and gender equality. In Sichuan, Minister Peng state that FP is important for economic development. Other benefits are an improved standard of living, an improvement in women's social status, the formation of healthier and happier families, and improvement in the quality of human resources. Minister Peng stressed that social reform could change existing habits and customs. Publicity should be specific to conditions in each province and include information on how to increase family income, scientific production skills, and good child-rearing practices. Contraceptive services should be available in every village, and quality must be improved. This means wider contraceptive choices, more concern for the day-to-day problems of families with one daughter, and improved training of FP technicians to increase safety and reliability. In Shandong Province, Minister Peng urged that quotas be retained, but the pressure should be reduced on subordinating departments. Targets for FP implementation can be attained when major departments cooperate with those on grass roots level. Requirements must be practical. All couples should be permitted to bear a second child after a birth interval of several years. Program quality can be improved by upgrading worker's skills and building a large group of qualified FP workers. PMID:12318429

1993-06-01

488

Work Family liFe Balancing joB and personal responsiBilities  

E-print Network

a "second family," exerting even more influence on teenagers than their parents. tune in on the "secondEs Should my older relative stop driving? 4 parEntIng Helping kids cope with divorce 5 on thE job `Great 1971 7 IntErchangE Is my child ready for sleep-away camp? 3 rEsEarch rEvIEw Moms feeling guilty when

Ginzel, Matthew

489

The Effect of Family Member Migration on Education and Work Among Nonmigrant Youth in Mexico  

Microsoft Academic Search

While academic and policy circles have given much attention to the assimilatory experiences of Mexican immigrants in the United\\u000a States, less is known about those who stay behind—an especially unfortunate oversight given the increasing number of Mexican\\u000a youth with migrant family members. Of the studies on this topic, most have sought to identify the effect that migration has\\u000a on youths’

Andrew Halpern-Manners

2011-01-01

490

A survey of work done by the China family planning association.  

PubMed

The China Family Planning Association was set up in May 1980 as a nongovernmental organization under the leadership of the Communist Party of China. Funds come from the government, international organizations, and individual or community donations. 13 branches have been established so far. The Association has contributed to publicity, education, and research: members have given lectures on family planning, genetics, and population theory, and have helped develop contraceptives. The lectures on population problems have been published. In addition, the Association's periodical "Ren Sheng" is published bimonthly, and has a circulation of 125,000. Meeting have been convened for the exchange of information and experience among family planning workers. The Association organized tripartite seminars with IPPF and JOICFP in June and October, 1983. Under the auspices of the Association, 8 trainees have been sent to the David Owen Center in the United Kingdom for a Year's study, and 1 trainee was sent to the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. The Association was accepted as a full member of the IPPF at the conference held in Nairobi, Kenya, in November, 1983. PMID:12313408

Guo, W

1983-01-01

491

Social and Civic Values of Young Italians and the Educational Role of the Family, the School, Local Bodies, Associations, and the Working World.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper briefly outlines Italian pedagogical research on youth since World War II and presents the sociological interaction of youth to family, friends, work, and current issues. A 1987 survey is reviewed with youth responses given in percentages and ranked according to the importance of family, work, friends, leisure activities, studies and…

Corradini, Luciano

492

Work-Family Conflict and Psychological Well-Being: Stability and Cross-Lagged Relations within One- and Six-Year Follow-Ups  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The rank-order stability and cross-lagged relations between work-to-family conflict (WFC), family-to-work conflict (FWC), and psychological well-being were examined in two longitudinal studies with full two-wave panel designs. In Study 1 (n = 365), the time lag was one year, and in Study 2 (n = 153), six years. The Structural Equation Modeling…

Rantanen, Johanna; Kinnunen, Ulla; Feldt, Taru; Pulkkinen, Lea

2008-01-01

493

Taking Pressure off Families: Child-Care Subsidies Lessen Mothers' Work-Hour Problems  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We use the Philadelphia Survey of Child Care and Work to model the effect of child-care subsidies and other ecological demands and resources on the work hour, shift, and overtime problems of 191 low-income urban mothers. Comparing subsidy applicants who do and do not receive cash payments for child care, we find that mothers who receive subsidies…

Press, Julie E.; Fagan, Jay; Laughlin, Lynda

2006-01-01

494

Making Ends Meet: Insufficiency and Work-Family Coordination in the New Economy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The "New Economy" features 24/7 employment, varied work schedules, job insecurity, and lower benefits and wages, which lead to disparities in experiences of security and sufficiency. This study investigates sufficiency concerns in the New Economy; who is having trouble making ends meet? Sufficiency concerns are subjective perceptions that work is…

Edgell, Penny; Ammons, Samantha K.; Dahlin, Eric C.

2012-01-01

495

Responding to Children's Everyday Transgressions in Chinese Working-Class Families  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examines how working-class mothers in the People's Republic of China respond to their young children's transgressions in everyday contexts. Twenty 4-year-old children and their mothers in a working-class neighbourhood were observed in their daily routines at home. When addressing children's transgressions and socialising desirable…

Wang, Xiao-lei; Bernas, Ronan; Eberhard, Philippe

2008-01-01

496

Using Interactive Family Science Shows to Improve Public Knowledge on Antibiotic Resistance: Does It Work?  

PubMed Central

The public plays an important role in controlling the emergence and spread of antibiotic resistance. A large British survey showed that there is still public misunderstanding about microbes and antibiotics. e-Bug, a European DG Sanco sponsored project, aims to disseminate a school antibiotic and hygiene educational pack and website across Europe. Interactive science shows based on the e-Bug educational packs were developed to take the key health and hygiene messages from the e-Bug school resources to families. The science show was evaluated to assess public knowledge and understanding of antibiotics and antibiotic resistance pre and post intervention. An interactive stall comprised of a 3×2 m backing stand with background information, an interactive activity and discussions with a trained demonstrator was on display at a family holiday resort. Pre-piloted knowledge questionnaires were completed by parents and children pre and post intervention. Adult (?19 years) baseline knowledge regarding antibiotics and antibiotic resistance was high although significant knowledge improvement was observed where baseline knowledge was low. Children's (5–11 years) knowledge around antibiotics and antibiotic resistance was significantly improved for all questions. The science show can be viewed as a success in improving parents' and children's knowledge of antibiotic use thereby highlighting the importance of educating the public through interaction. PMID:25162505

Lecky, Donna M.; Hawking, Meredith K. D.; Verlander, Neville Q.; McNulty, Cliodna A. M.

2014-01-01

497

7 CFR Exhibit K to Subpart A of... - Classifications for Multi-Family Residential Rehabilitation Work  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...the agreed upon approaches, treatments and techniques resulting from...work o Wallpapering o Window shades and curtains o Door...or relocation o Storm windows and weatherstripping o ...exterior and interior o Window replacement o New or...

2013-01-01

498

7 CFR Exhibit K to Subpart A of... - Classifications for Multi-Family Residential Rehabilitation Work  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...the agreed upon approaches, treatments and techniques resulting from...work o Wallpapering o Window shades and curtains o Door...or relocation o Storm windows and weatherstripping o ...exterior and interior o Window replacement o New or...

2012-01-01

499

Workforce Issues in the Greater Boston Health Care Industry: Implications for Work and Family  

E-print Network

Interviews with more than 40 leaders in the Boston area health care industry have identified a range of broadly-felt critical problems. This document synthesizes these problems and places them in the context of work and ...

Harrington, Mona

500

Quality of Family and Work Roles and Its Relationship with Health Indicators in Men and Women  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of the present study was to evaluate whether the perceived qualities of work-related, marital, and parenting roles\\u000a differentially predict distress symptoms, cardiovascular risk, anxiety, depression, and self-esteem. Also, I sought to evaluate\\u000a whether there are interactions among the quality of different roles (work, marital, and parenting) and whether there are differences\\u000a between men and women. Participants were 340

Viviola Gómez

2006-01-01