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1

Dis-integrated policy: welfare-to-work participants' experiences of integrating paid work and unpaid family work  

Microsoft Academic Search

Using a critical feminist theoretical lens, we followed 17 families for one year – as they attempted to make the transition from welfare to work – eliciting narrative accounts of their day-to-day lives. We used an institutional–ethnographic methodology to analyse the data. Our study shows that the juncture at which unpaid caring work and paid employment meet may be more

Rhonda S. Breitkreuz; Deanna L. Williamson; Kim D. Raine

2010-01-01

2

Gender, Division of Unpaid Family Work and Psychological Distress in Dual-Earner Families  

PubMed Central

Introduction: Epidemiological studies have only recently begun to address the consequences of unpaid family work (ie., housework and child rearing) for mental health. Although research is suggestive of an association between the division of unpaid family work and psychological health, especially for women, additional research is required to clarify the conditions under which such a relationship holds. The purpose of the present study was to examine more nuanced relationships between the division of family work and psychological distress by disaggregating the family work construct according to type (housework/child rearing), control over scheduling, and evaluations of fairness. Methods: Analysis of data obtained from a cross-sectional telephone survey conducted in a Canadian city. Analyses were based on 293 employed parents (182 mothers and 111 fathers), with at least one preschool child, living in dual-earner households. Several multiple linear regression models were estimated with psychological distress as the outcome, adjusting for confounders. Results: For mothers, more perceived time spent in child rearing (particularly primary child care) and high-schedule-control housework tasks (e.g. yard work) relative to one’s partner, were associated with greater distress. For fathers, perceived unfairness in the division of housework and child rearing were associated with greater distress. Conclusion: Although methodological limitations temper firm conclusions, these results suggest that the gendered nature of household work has implications for the psychological well-being of both mothers and fathers of preschool children in dual-earner households. However, more longitudinal research and the development of theoretically-informed measures of family work are needed to advance the field.

Tao, Wenting; Janzen, Bonnie L; Abonyi, Sylvia

2010-01-01

3

Defining Disability for Women and the Problem of Unpaid Work.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses political, theoretical, and methodological issues in defining and measuring paid and unpaid work disability. Presents results of study analyzing disability in paid work and unpaid family work among 206 women with rheumatoid arthritis, demonstrating feasibility of measuring disability in family work and showing that women experience…

Reisine, Susan T.; Fifield, Judith

1988-01-01

4

Defining Disability for Women and the Problem of Unpaid Work.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Discusses political, theoretical, and methodological issues in defining and measuring paid and unpaid work disability. Presents results of study analyzing disability in paid work and unpaid family work among 206 women with rheumatoid arthritis, demonstrating feasibility of measuring disability in family work and showing that women experience…

Reisine, Susan T.; Fifield, Judith

1988-01-01

5

The Influence of Unpaid Work on the Transition out of Full-Time Paid Work  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Purpose: Continued employment after retirement and engagement in unpaid work are both important ways of diminishing the negative economic effects of the retirement of baby boomer cohorts on society. Little research, however, examines the relationship between paid and unpaid work at the transition from full-time work. Using a resource perspective…

Carr, Dawn C.; Kail, Ben Lennox

2013-01-01

6

The Influence of Unpaid Work on the Transition out of Full-Time Paid Work  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: Continued employment after retirement and engagement in unpaid work are both important ways of diminishing the negative economic effects of the retirement of baby boomer cohorts on society. Little research, however, examines the relationship between paid and unpaid work at the transition from full-time work. Using a resource perspective…

Carr, Dawn C.; Kail, Ben Lennox

2013-01-01

7

Unintentional fatal injuries arising from unpaid work at home  

PubMed Central

Objective: Unpaid work in and around the home is a common and potentially high risk activity, yet there is limited information about the circumstances surrounding resulting injuries. This study aimed to describe circumstances surrounding fatal injuries resulting from home duties activities, in order to identify and prioritise areas for prevention. Design and setting: Coroners' reports on all unintentional deaths in Australia from 1989–92 inclusive were inspected to identify deaths of interest. Rates were calculated using population data and incorporating measures of time engaged in particular home duties activities. Results: There were 296 home duties deaths over the four year period. Most (83%) deaths were of males, and males had 10 times the risk of fatal injury compared with females. The most common activities resulting in fatal injuries were home repairs, gardening, and car care. The highest risk activities (deaths per million persons per year per hour of activity) were home repairs (49), car care (20), home improvements (18), and gardening (16). Being hit by inadequately braced vehicles during car maintenance, falls from inadequately braced ladders, contact with fire and flames while cooking, and contact with electricity during maintenance were the most common injury scenarios. Conclusions: Fatal injury of persons engaged in unpaid domestic work activities is a significant cause of death. Use of activity specific denominator data allows appropriate assessment of the degree of risk associated with each activity. The recurrence of similar circumstances surrounding many independent fatal incidents indicates areas where preventative interventions might be usefully targeted.

Driscoll, T; Mitchell, R; Hendrie, A; Healey, S; Mandryk, J; Hull, B

2003-01-01

8

New Home, New Learning: Chinese Immigrants and Unpaid Housework and Care Work  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper examines the learning experience of Chinese immigrants through unpaid housework and care work. Based on the interviews with 8 Chinese immigrants (4 women and 4 men) in the Great Toronto Area, who immigrated to Canada from Mainland China in the previous five years, this paper explores the challenges and difficulties these people encountered in their unpaid labour in

Lichun Liu

9

The Invisibility of Children's Paid and Unpaid Work: Implications for Ethiopia's National Poverty Reduction Policy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The complexities of intergenerational and gendered intra-household resource allocations are frequently overlooked in poverty reduction policies. To address this lacuna, this article focuses on links between macro-development policies and children's paid and unpaid work burden in Ethiopia. Using a mixed methods approach, quantitative household…

Woldehanna, Tassew; Jones, Nicola; Tefera, Bekele

2008-01-01

10

Towards an Equal Division of Paid and Unpaid Work: the Case of the Netherlands  

Microsoft Academic Search

Both the Netherlands and other European countries are involved in the transition from a breadwinner society towards a more individual-oriented society. What is unique in the Dutch case is the strong emphasis on the equal sharing of time, between paid and unpaid work as well as between women and men. Despite the preferences among citizens for a more equal sharing

Janneke Plantenga; Joop Schippers; Jacques Siegers

1999-01-01

11

Caregiving for older Latinos at end of life: perspectives from paid and family (unpaid) caregivers.  

PubMed

This study examined the various settings in which caregiving occurred for terminally ill older Latinos. Qualitative data were collected in Central Florida through in-depth, semi-structured, open-ended interviews. 20 Latinos caring for terminally ill Latinos participated in the study. N = 9 Latino family (unpaid) caregivers provided care in the terminally ill person's home, while N = 4 provided care to a family member in the caregiver's home. N = 4 paid caregivers provided care to terminally ill Latinos who reside in the caregiver's private home and N = 3 in an assisted-living facility. The themes indicate that family (unpaid) caregivers experienced changes in their financial status; they both encountered English language barriers. Geographical distance made caregiving more challenging. Paid caregivers adapted to cultural expectations and their higher income enabled them to hire assistance. PMID:22637704

Carrion, Iraida V; Nedjat-Haiem, Frances R

2012-05-25

12

Midcourse in the United States: Does unpaid community participation replace paid work?  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examines the links between formal community participation (defined as volunteer work for an organization) in the\\u000a United States and psychological well-being, focusing on retirement as a key status transition. It draws on data from 762 American\\u000a retirees and not-yet-retired older workers in the midcourse years (in their 50s, 60s, and early 70s) to examine: (1) whether\\u000a unpaid community

Phyllis Moen; Vivian Fields

2002-01-01

13

Paid work, unpaid work and social support: A study of the health of male and female nurses  

Microsoft Academic Search

Paid work, unpaid work in the home and social support are important elements of the social production of health and illness, though their combined effects on both women and men have only recently become a focus of research. This paper examines their association with the health problems of nurses, presenting data from a survey of a proportional random sample of

Vivienne Walters; Rhonda Lenton; Susan French; John Eyles; Janet Mayr; Bruce Newbold

1996-01-01

14

Labor Market Work and Home Care's Unpaid Caregivers: A Systematic Review of Labor Force Participation Rates, Predictors of Labor Market Withdrawal, and Hours of Work  

PubMed Central

As people continue to age and receive complex health care services at home, concern has arisen about the availability of family caregivers and their ability to combine employment with caregiving. This article evaluates the international research on unpaid caregivers and their labor market choices, highlighting three conclusions: first, caregivers in general are equally as likely to be in the labor force as noncaregivers; second, caregivers are more likely to work fewer hours in the labor market than noncaregivers, particularly if their caring commitments are heavy; and finally, only those heavily involved in caregiving are significantly more likely to withdraw from the labor market than noncaregivers. Policy recommendations are targeting greater access to formal care for “intensive” caregivers and developing workplace policies for employed caregivers.

Lilly, Meredith B; Laporte, Audrey; Coyte, Peter C

2007-01-01

15

Postpartum depressive symptoms and the combined load of paid and unpaid work: a longitudinal analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose  To investigate the effects of total workload and other work-related factors on postpartum depression in the first 6 months\\u000a after childbirth, utilizing a hybrid model of health and workforce participation.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  We utilized data from the Maternal Postpartum Health Study collected in 2001 from a prospective cohort of 817 employed women\\u000a who delivered in three community hospitals in Minnesota. Interviewers collected data

Rada K. DagherPatricia; Patricia M. McGovern; Bryan E. Dowd; Ulf Lundberg

16

Patterns of paid and unpaid work in Western Europe: gender, commodification, preferences and the implications for policy  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article explores how parents in couple families reconcile employment and child-care, and how far the current emphasis of EU-level policy on enhancing the formal provision of child-care fits with patterns and\\/or preferences in Western European member states. We use European Social Survey data from 2004—05 on working patterns and preferences, and on child-care use and preferences regarding the amount

Jane Lewis; Mary Campbell; Carmen Huerta

2008-01-01

17

Why without Pay? The Intrinsic Motivation between Investment and Consumption in Unpaid Labour Supply  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper provides a theoretical model and an empirical investigation on unpaid labour regularly supplied in non profit organisations. The contribution is threefold. First, intrinsic motivation in unpaid labour supply is considered, taking into account simultaneity between investment and consumption motives. Second, we study the impact of family care responsibilities on the determination of unpaid labour supply. Third, the specific

Bruno Bruna; Fiorillo Damiano

2009-01-01

18

A strategy for balancing work and home in Canadian and Belgian families  

Microsoft Academic Search

Rooted in two qualitative research studies of stay-at-home fathers (70 Canadian and 21 Belgian) at the beginning of the twenty-first century, this article explores the innovative ways that families seek to create work family balance in two countries where relevant social policies are still focused on the encouraging of private family-based solutions to balancing paid and unpaid work. At the

Andrea Doucet; Laura Merla

19

How Family, Community, and Work Structured High Blood Pressure AccountsFrom African Americans in Washington State  

Microsoft Academic Search

High blood pressure is one of the most often researched, yet least understood health disparities among African Americans. This descriptive, critical discourse analysis examined how family and community demographics and paid and unpaid work structured participants' accounts of high blood pressure experiences in Washington State. Thirty-seven urban-dwelling African American women (n = 17) and men (n = 20) in Washington

Doris M. Boutain; Clarence Spigner

2008-01-01

20

Women and work: a ten year retrospective.  

PubMed

A look back, after a decade, at the issues surrounding women and work. Work options, childcare and family concerns, the glass ceiling, sexual harassment, women entrepreneurs, race and poverty, unpaid work, and women with disabilities are discussed. PMID:15920308

MacRae, Nancy

2005-01-01

21

Balancing Work & Family.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This curriculum is based on what students need to know, to be able to do, and to be like in order to be competent in the work of the family. Each of the 12 units follows a uniform format that includes the following: perennial problem (one faced over and over by successive generations of families); practical problem (the organizing scheme for how…

Hutchinson Community Junior Coll., KS.

22

Working with Chronically Dysfunctional Families.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper reviews family therapy with chronically dysfunctional families including the development of family therapy and current trends which appear to give little guidance toward working with severely dysfunctional families. A theoretical stance based upon the systems approach to family functioning and pathology is presented which suggests: (1)…

Younger, Robert; And Others

23

Accelerating Adoption of Assistive Technology to Reduce Physical Strain Among Family Caregivers of the Chronically Disabled Elderly Living at Home.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Family caregivers--including relatives, friends, neighbors, and others who provide unpaid support--perform immensely valuable work, helping older adults with chronic disabilities get the help they need at home, rather than entering a facility. Recently, t...

2012-01-01

24

Work-Family Facilitation and Conflict, Working Fathers and Mothers, Work-Family Stressors and Support  

Microsoft Academic Search

Work-family research frequently focuses on the conflict experienced by working mothers. Using data from the National Study of the Changing Workforce (N = 1,314), this study also examined work-family facilitation and working fathers. Ecological systems, family stress, family resilience, and sex role theories were used to organize the data and create hypotheses. Work-to-family facilitation was positively related to job satisfaction

E. Jeffrey Hill

2005-01-01

25

42 CFR 408.110 - Collection of unpaid premiums.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...PROGRAM PREMIUMS FOR SUPPLEMENTARY MEDICAL INSURANCE Collection of Unpaid Premiums; Refund of Excess Premiums After the Death of the Enrollee § 408.110 Collection of unpaid premiums. (a) Basis and scope â(1) Basis. Under...

2012-10-01

26

Work-Family Conflict and Working Conditions in Western Europe  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This article explores the influence of working conditions on work-family conflict (WFC) among married/cohabiting employees across seven European countries. Using data from the European Social Survey, the paper first investigates the role of working conditions relative to household level characteristics in mediating work-family conflict at the…

Gallie, Duncan; Russell, Helen

2009-01-01

27

It Pays to Value Family: Work and Family Tradeoffs Reconsidered  

Microsoft Academic Search

THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN work and family has become a popular research area in the field of management. While there are a range of specific issues under the broad work and family heading, most seem to center on possible conflicts between the two domains—whether the requirements of the workplace have a negative effect on family life and whether the demands of

Peter Cappelli; Jill Constantine; Clint Chadwick

2000-01-01

28

Applying the effort-reward imbalance model to household and family work: a population-based study of German mothers  

PubMed Central

Background This paper reports on results of a newly developed questionnaire for the assessment of effort-reward imbalance (ERI) in unpaid household and family work. Methods: Using a cross-sectional population-based survey of German mothers (n = 3129) the dimensional structure of the theoretical ERI model was validated by means of Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA). Analyses of Variance were computed to examine relationships between ERI and social factors and health outcomes. Results CFA revealed good psychometric properties indicating that the subscale 'effort' is based on one latent factor and the subscale 'reward' is composed of four dimensions: 'intrinsic value of family and household work', 'societal esteem', 'recognition from the partner', and 'affection from the child(ren)'. About 19.3% of mothers perceived lack of reciprocity and 23.8% showed high rates of overcommitment in terms of inability to withdraw from household and family obligations. Socially disadvantaged mothers were at higher risk of ERI, in particular with respect to the perception of low societal esteem. Gender inequality in the division of household and family work and work-family conflict accounted most for ERI in household and family work. Analogous to ERI in paid work we could demonstrate that ERI affects self-rated health, somatic complaints, mental health and, to some extent, hypertension. Conclusions The newly developed questionnaire demonstrates satisfied validity and promising results for extending the ERI model to household and family work.

2012-01-01

29

The Future of Work and Family.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The debate about work-family relationships must focus on the nature of family life, the place of women in the new economy, the needs of children, and the future of an aging population. Because the workplace has limited capacity to meet work-family needs, partnerships with government services are needed. (JOW)|

Edgar, Don

1999-01-01

30

Working with Working Families. ERIC Digest.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This ERIC Digest offers tips for understanding the needs, concerns, and feelings of employed parents, and discusses ways child caregivers can involve working parents in their children's lives while the children are enrolled in child care facilities. Competition with the caregiver, guilt over leaving children in the care of others, and little time…

King, Margaret

31

The State of Families, 2: Work and Family.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This report examines trends in the world of work and the economy that affect families. Part 1 presents a futurist's perspective on the changing world of work and how it affects families. Topics include finance capitalism in a global economy, values, work force, compensation and employee benefits, employment and unemployment, government,…

Family Service America, Milwaukee, WI.

32

The Interface of Work and Family Life  

Microsoft Academic Search

Dramatic changes in the workforce and workplace contribute to the need for a synthesis of knowledge on the interdependence of family life, work, and the vocational development of children, adolescents, and adults. Four prominent themes in the work and family literature are reviewed with the intention of providing guidance for all applied psychologists. These include (a) the meaning of work

Donna E. Palladino Schultheiss

2006-01-01

33

Work and Family Balance: An Economic View  

Microsoft Academic Search

The way in which people balance their work and family responsibilities is becoming increasingly prominent on the policy agenda. This paper uses an economic framework to explore the rationale for government policies to improve work\\/family balance. It finds that strongest economic grounds for government intervention are the effects that maternal work may have on children. The evidence, however, is not

Lindy Fursman; Veronica Jacobsen; Jason Varuhas

2003-01-01

34

Work–Life Imbalance in Call Centres and Software Development  

Microsoft Academic Search

AbstractThe paper evaluates the centrality of work to employees in two growing employment sectors, call-centres and software development. It then examines evidence for extensions of work into household and family life in these two sectors. Extensions are identified as tangible, such as unpaid overtime, or intangible, represented by incursions imported from work, such as exhaustion and stress. The study finds

Jeff Hyman; Chris Baldry; Dora Scholarios; Dirk Bunzel

2003-01-01

35

Working Effectively with Hispanic Immigrant Families.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Newly arrived Hispanic families have needs differing from established families. School staff should recognize that immigrant children may be highly motivated, families may be uncomfortable with English, and parent-school partnerships are unusual in Hispanic cultures. Schools should encourage parents to work with children in their native language,…

Holman, Linda J.

1997-01-01

36

Family WorkWomen's Sense of Fairness  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this article is to use a distributive justice approach to understand women's sense of fairness about family work. Previous research on family work is reviewed and organized around three factors that contribute to sense of fairness: Outcome values, comparison referents, and justifications. Women sense an injustice if they lack some outcome they desire, have a high standard

LINDA THOMPSON

1991-01-01

37

Family matters at work : Depleting and enriching effects of employees' family lives on work outcomes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Juggling work and family life has become a daily topic of conversation. As more women enter the workforce and as men increasingly take on household chores and childcare duties, it has become more likely that employees are combining work and a considerable number of family responsibilities. The impact of working on family life has been widely discussed in the media,

L. L. ten Brummelhuis

2009-01-01

38

Work, family, and gender: elements for a theory of work-family balance.  

PubMed

Over last century, work was not only a means of economic survival, but also a very strong factor of psychological structuring and of organization of personal, family, and everyday life. The new world of work provides new challenges to the balance of work and family life. A questionnaire was administered to a sample of 453 people with the aim of analyzing the relation between variables such as family burdens and domestic responsibilities, and the appraisal of work and family, values involved in work-family balance. The results of this study show that, in the present economic and cultural context, assuming family burdens and domestic responsibilities increases the positive appraisal of work and family, both in men and women. This has theoretical and practical implications concerning the challenge of work-family balance. PMID:19899664

Cantera, Leonor M; Cubells, Ma Eugenia; Martínez, Luz Ma; Blanch, Josep M

2009-11-01

39

27 CFR 46.108 - Interest on unpaid tax.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...false Interest on unpaid tax. 46.108 Section 46...Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT...RELATING TO TOBACCO PRODUCTS AND CIGARETTE PAPERS AND TUBES Rules for Special (Occupational) Tax Payment of Special Tax...

2013-04-01

40

Ideas That Work in ABE Family Literacy.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This guide provides a work-in-progress family literacy curriculum. The materials are intended to be adapted to fit the parents in the specific setting. Each of 14 sections contains a number of activities that support the following ideas: documenting parents as the first teachers of their children using family portfolios; parent support time;…

Northwest Regional Literacy Resource Center, Seattle, WA.

41

A Preventive Law Approach to the Family and Medical Leave Act of 1993.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) of 1993 was passed to promote a healthier balance between work and family responsibilities. It allows covered employers to grant up to 12 weeks of unpaid leave to eligible workers for: (1) the birth, adoption, or foster-care assumption of a child; (2) the "serious health condition" of a spouse, son,…

Miles, Albert S.

42

Protecting the health of employees caring for family members with special health care needs  

Microsoft Academic Search

Over half of American workers are holding a paid job while also providing unpaid assistance and support to a family member. Research shows that family members who provide care to children or adults with special health care needs are themselves at risk of physical and mental health problems. Yet, little research has explored how the work environment mediates the effects

Alison Earle; Jody Heymann

2011-01-01

43

Extended family caring for children orphaned by AIDS: balancing essential work and caregiving in a high HIV prevalence nations.  

PubMed

While over 90 per cent of the 15 million children who have been orphaned by HIV/AIDS are cared for by family members, there is little information about whether adults can meet orphans' essential caregiving needs while working to economically survive. Using a survey we conducted in Botswana of 1033 working adults, we analyse the experience of adults who are caring for orphans. Over one-third of working adults were caring for orphans and many with few financial resources: 82% were living on household incomes below US$10 purchasing power parity adjusted per person per day. Because of their caregiving responsibilities, they were less able to supplement income with overtime, weekend, evening, or night work. At the same time caregiving responsibilities meant orphan caregivers spent fewer hours caring for their own children and other family members. Nearly half of orphan caregivers had difficulties meeting their children's needs, and nearly 75% weren't able to meet with children's teachers. Pay loss at work compounded the problems: One-quarter of orphan caregivers reported having to take unpaid leave to meet sick childcare needs and nearly half reported being absent from work for children's routine health care. This paper makes clear that if families are to provide adequate care for orphans while economically surviving there needs to be increases in social supports and improvements in working conditions. PMID:17453567

Heymann, J; Earle, A; Rajaraman, D; Miller, C; Bogen, K

2007-03-01

44

Work Demands, Work-Family Conflict, and Child Adjustment in African American Families: The Mediating Role of Family Routines  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Using data from a sample of 455 African American children (ages 10 to 12 years) and their parents, this study tests a hypothesized model linking (a) maternal work demands to family routines through work-family conflict and depressive symptoms and (b) maternal work demands to children's externalizing and internalizing problems through family

McLoyd, Vonnie C.; Toyokawa, Teru; Kaplan, Rachel

2008-01-01

45

Integrating Work and Family: Women's Health Outcomes.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|An exploratory study examined the relationship between individual, family, and work variables and working mothers' health. The study also investigated the relationship between health management strategies and health. A cross-sectional survey design was used to gather data from 85 women who were married, employed 20 hours a week or more, and had…

Killien, Marcia

46

Daily consequences of work interference with family and family interference with work  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study proposes that inter-role conflict and its consequences fluctuate on a daily basis, and that both family interference with work and work interference with family should be investigated. The authors propose a model in which the two types of inter-role conflict predict strain (cognitive difficulties, anxiety and depression), which in turn predicts marital behaviour (withdrawal and anger), Specifically, cognitive

Karyl E. Macewen; Julian Barling

1994-01-01

47

Adolescent Work Experiences and Family Formation Behavior  

PubMed Central

A long-standing critique of adolescent employment is that it engenders a precocious maturity of more adult-like roles and behaviors, including school disengagement, substance use, sexual activity, inadequate sleep and exercise, and work-related stress. Though negative effects of high-intensity work on adolescent adjustment have been found, little research has addressed whether such work experiences are associated with precocious family formation behaviors in adolescence, such as sexual intercourse, pregnancy, residential independence, and union formation. Using data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health, we find that teenagers who spend long hours on the job during the school year are more likely to experience these family formation behaviors earlier than youth who work moderately or not at all.

Staff, Jeremy; VanEseltine, Matthew; Woolnough, April; Silver, Eric; Burrington, Lori

2011-01-01

48

Social work training in family practice.  

PubMed

Three undergraduate social-work students were placed in the University Department of Family Medicine for their field practice. This was the first time an element of social work had been introduced in this particular setting. A before and after analysis of opinions from all three parties revealed that the experience was a worthwhile one for all concerned. The services provided by the social workers were wide ranging and perceived to be important by residents and staff. PMID:20468991

Roy, R G; Adams, D W

1973-11-01

49

Social Work Training In Family Practice  

PubMed Central

Three undergraduate social-work students were placed in the University Department of Family Medicine for their field practice. This was the first time an element of social work had been introduced in this particular setting. A before and after analysis of opinions from all three parties revealed that the experience was a worthwhile one for all concerned. The services provided by the social workers were wide ranging and perceived to be important by residents and staff.

Roy, R. G.; Adams, D. W.

1973-01-01

50

Children, Work, and Family: Some Thoughts on \\  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abstract This paper addresses the question of how to study, talk, think, and write about children in studies of work and family in ways that are sensitive to the situations of both children and their parents. We ask, “Is it possible to put children in the center of our research without contributing, even if inadvertently, to the cultural tendency to

Anita Ilta Garey; Terry Arendell

1999-01-01

51

Work Family Relations: Antecedents and Outcomes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This study investigated interrelations between conflict and facilitation in work and family domains, with spousal, managerial, and collegial social support serving as antecedents, and professional vigor and burnout as outcomes. Participants were 322 female, married teachers. Regression analyses revealed complex relations between conflict and…

Cinamon, Rachel Gali; Rich, Yisrael

2010-01-01

52

The magnitude, share and determinants of unpaid care costs for home-based palliative care service provision in Toronto, Canada.  

PubMed

With increasing emphasis on the provision of home-based palliative care in Canada, economic evaluation is warranted, given its tremendous demands on family caregivers. Despite this, very little is known about the economic outcomes associated with home-based unpaid care-giving at the end of life. The aims of this study were to (i) assess the magnitude and share of unpaid care costs in total healthcare costs for home-based palliative care patients, from a societal perspective and (ii) examine the sociodemographic and clinical factors that account for variations in this share. One hundred and sixty-nine caregivers of patients with a malignant neoplasm were interviewed from time of referral to a home-based palliative care programme provided by the Temmy Latner Centre for Palliative Care at Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, Canada, until death. Information regarding palliative care resource utilisation and costs, time devoted to care-giving and sociodemographic and clinical characteristics was collected between July 2005 and September 2007. Over the last 12 months of life, the average monthly cost was $14 924 (2011 CDN$) per patient. Unpaid care-giving costs were the largest component - $11 334, accounting for 77% of total palliative care expenses, followed by public costs ($3211; 21%) and out-of-pocket expenditures ($379; 2%). In all cost categories, monthly costs increased exponentially with proximity to death. Seemingly unrelated regression estimation suggested that the share of unpaid care costs of total costs was driven by patients' and caregivers' sociodemographic characteristics. Results suggest that overwhelming the proportion of palliative care costs is unpaid care-giving. This share of costs requires urgent attention to identify interventions aimed at alleviating the heavy financial burden and to ultimately ensure the viability of home-based palliative care in future. PMID:23758771

Chai, Huamin; Guerriere, Denise N; Zagorski, Brandon; Coyte, Peter C

2013-06-12

53

The Impact of Emotional Labor on Work-Family Outcomes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Theory and research on emotional labor at work is applied to the study of the work-family interface to explore how emotional experiences in both the work and the family domain relate to the experience of work-family conflict and work-family enrichment, and ultimately attitudinal and health outcomes. Emotional intelligence is also examined as a…

Yanchus, Nancy J.; Eby, Lilian T.; Lance, Charles E.; Drollinger, Sabrina

2010-01-01

54

The Impact of Emotional Labor on Work-Family Outcomes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Theory and research on emotional labor at work is applied to the study of the work-family interface to explore how emotional experiences in both the work and the family domain relate to the experience of work-family conflict and work-family enrichment, and ultimately attitudinal and health outcomes. Emotional intelligence is also examined as a…

Yanchus, Nancy J.; Eby, Lilian T.; Lance, Charles E.; Drollinger, Sabrina

2010-01-01

55

Time Use in Rural Home-Working Families.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Examined 15 rural home-working families for allocation of work time. Found families displayed marked variability in work hour and work day patterns, both individual and across group. Both work days and allocated work times were punctuated by interruptions for child care and household chores, resulting in work/family time interaction rather than…

Beach, Betty A.

1987-01-01

56

Community as a Context for the Work-Family Interface  

Microsoft Academic Search

Workplaces, families, and individuals attempt to coordinate work and family opportunities and responsibilities within the context of communities. Workplaces and families are embedded in the communities in which they are located. Work, family, and individual relationships are intertwined with relationships among members of various communities. Communities may both help and hinder the efforts of work organizations, families, and individuals to

Patricia Voydanoff

2004-01-01

57

Psychology at the intersection of work and family: recommendations for employers, working families, and policymakers.  

PubMed

Demographic data show that major changes have been occurring in the everyday lives of families over the last generation, with the majority of mothers of young children in the workforce and an increasing number of men and women assuming caregiving responsibilities for older relatives. Thus, the 2 primary identities of most adults, defined by their multiple family and work roles, need to be coordinated in ways that promote positive family outcomes, returns on investments for employers, and societal values. Despite changes in the workforce, the world of work is still largely organized for a family model that is increasingly rare--one with a stay-at-home caregiver. Recommendations based on psychological and other social science research are offered to align the needs of working families and employers. PMID:16045393

Halpern, Diane F

58

Alzheimer's DiseaseThe Unpaid Burden of Caring  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study presents detailed estimates of the hours and cost of informal care provided to Alzheimer's disease patients in Northern California. Data were collected over 12 months from 93 community-residing patients and their caregivers and from 94 institutionalized patients and their caregivers. Patients residing in the community received an average of 286 hours per month of unpaid care, whereas institutionalized

Wendy Max; Pam Webber; Patrick Fox

1995-01-01

59

Why without pay? Intrinsic motivation in unpaid labour supply  

Microsoft Academic Search

Economic theory explains the supply of volunteering alternatively as an ordinary consumer good or an investment one. This paper provides a simultaneous approach considering both the objectives, by using the psychological distinction between intrinsic and extrinsic motivations, in order to reconcile conflicting results reported in the literature. According to the simultaneity approach, the paper develops a theoretical model of unpaid

Bruna Bruno; Damiano Fiorillo

2011-01-01

60

Work-Family Planning Attitudes among Emerging Adults  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Using social learning theory as a framework, we explore two sets of antecedents to work and family role planning attitudes among emerging adults: their work-family balance self-efficacy and their perceptions of their parents' work-to-family conflict. A total of 187 college students completed a questionnaire concerning their work-family balance…

Basuil, Dynah A.; Casper, Wendy J.

2012-01-01

61

Work-Family Planning Attitudes among Emerging Adults  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Using social learning theory as a framework, we explore two sets of antecedents to work and family role planning attitudes among emerging adults: their work-family balance self-efficacy and their perceptions of their parents' work-to-family conflict. A total of 187 college students completed a questionnaire concerning their work-family balance…

Basuil, Dynah A.; Casper, Wendy J.

2012-01-01

62

Teachers' Occupation-Specific Work-Family Conflict  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|To expand work-family conflict (WFC) research to specific occupations, this study investigated how work and family generic and occupation-specific stressors and support variables related to family interfering with work (F [right arrow] W) and work interfering with family (W [right arrow] F) among 230 Israeli high school teachers. Further…

Cinamon, Rachel Gali; Rich, Yisrael; Westman, Mina

2007-01-01

63

Work-Family Conflict, Children, and Hour Mismatches in Australia  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This article helps integrate research on work hours and work-family issues by examining how work-family conflict is related to the desire for more and fewer hours of work. Using the first wave of the Household Income and Labor Dynamics in Australia survey, we find that work-to-family conflict is associated with a desire for fewer hours of work.…

Reynolds, Jeremy; Aletraris, Lydia

2007-01-01

64

Work–Family Conflict, Children, and Hour Mismatches in Australia  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article helps integrate research on work hours and work—family issues by examining how work—family conflict is related to the desire for more and fewer hours of work. Using the first wave of the Household Income and Labor Dynamics in Australia survey, we find that work-to-family conflict is associated with a desire for fewer hours of work. Family-to-work conflict, however,

Jeremy Reynolds; Lydia Aletraris

2007-01-01

65

Clarifying Work-Family Intervention Processes: The Roles of Work-Family Conflict and Family Supportive Supervisor Behaviors  

PubMed Central

Drawing on a conceptual model integrating research on training, work-family interventions, and social support, we conducted a quasi-experimental field study to assess the impact of a supervisory training and self-monitoring intervention designed to increase supervisors' use of family supportive supervisor behaviors. Pre- and post-intervention surveys were completed, nine months apart, by 239 employees at six intervention (N = 117) and six control (N = 122) grocery store sites. Thirty-nine supervisors in the six intervention sites received the training consisting of one hour of self-paced computer-based training, one hour of face-to-face group training, followed by instructions for behavioral self-monitoring (recording the frequency of supportive behaviors) to support on-the-job transfer. Results demonstrated a disordinal interaction for the effect of training and family-to-work conflict on employee job satisfaction, turnover intentions and physical health. In particular, for these outcomes, positive training effects were observed for employees with high family-to-work conflict, while negative training effects were observed for employees with low family-to-work conflict. These moderation effects were mediated by the interactive effect of training and family-to-work conflict on employee perceptions of family-supportive supervisor behaviors. Implications of our findings for future work-family intervention development and evaluation are discussed.

Hammer, Leslie B.; Kossek, Ellen E.; Anger, W. Kent; Bodner, Todd; Zimmerman, Kristi L.

2010-01-01

66

Family Care Responsibilities and Employment: Exploring the Impact of Type of Family Care on Work-Family and Family-Work Conflict  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This study compared work-family and family-work conflict for employed family caregivers with disability-related care responsibilities in contrast to employed family caregivers with typical care responsibilities. Using data from the 2002 National Study of the Changing Workforce, a population-based survey of the U.S. workforce, formal and informal…

Stewart, Lisa M.

2013-01-01

67

Work–Family Spillover and Life Satisfaction Among Professional Psychologists  

Microsoft Academic Search

How do the professional lives of psychologists influence their personal and family lives? Data from 485 psychologists who responded to a survey on professional and family life were analyzed to examine work-to-family spillover, life satisfaction, and family support. Respondents reported a significantly higher incidence of positive spillover, termed family enhancers, than negative spillover, termed family stressors. The low incidence of

Pedja Stevanovic; Patricia A. Rupert

2009-01-01

68

Negative Affectivity, Role Stress, and Work–Family Conflict  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined the mechanisms by which negative affectivity (NA) influences two directions of work–family conflict: work interference with family (W> F conflict) and family interference with work (F> W conflict). We found that NA indirectly affected W> F conflict through its effect on job stress and indirectly affected F> W conflict through its effect on family stress. In addition,

Albena Z. Stoeva; Randy K. Chiu; Jeffrey H. Greenhaus

2002-01-01

69

Single Mothers, Social Capital, and Work--Family Conflict  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The purpose of this article is to examine work-family conflict among low-income, unmarried mothers. Analyzing the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study, a national sample of nonmarital births, I examine how social capital affects work-family conflict and how both social capital and work-family conflict affect employment. Results show that…

Ciabattari, Teresa

2007-01-01

70

Linkages Between the Work-family Interface and Work, Family, and Individual OutcomesAn Integrative Model  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article describes the work-family interface and proposes a conceptual model that links the work-family interface to work, family, and individual outcomes through several mediating mechanisms. First, the work-family interface is related to a cognitive assessment of work-family conflict, role balance, or role enhancement. This relationship may be moderated by social categories and coping resources. The assessment of conflict, balance,

PATRICIA VOYDANOFF

2002-01-01

71

Role Resources and Work-Family Enrichment: The Role of Work Engagement  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This article proposes a theoretical model of work-family enrichment and tests the mediating role of work engagement. The inclusion of work engagement extends prior research on work-family interface, and allows for examination of the effects of role resources (job resources, family support) on work-family enrichment. A two-wave survey was…

Siu, Oi-ling; Lu, Jia-fang; Brough, Paula; Lu, Chang-qin; Bakker, Arnold B.; Kalliath, Thomas; O'Driscoll, Michael; Phillips, David R.; Chen, Wei-qing; Lo, Danny; Sit, Cindy; Shi, Kan

2010-01-01

72

Role Resources and Work-Family Enrichment: The Role of Work Engagement  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article proposes a theoretical model of work-family enrichment and tests the mediating role of work engagement. The inclusion of work engagement extends prior research on work-family interface, and allows for examination of the effects of role resources (job resources, family support) on work-family enrichment. A two-wave survey was conducted…

Siu, Oi-ling; Lu, Jia-fang; Brough, Paula; Lu, Chang-qin; Bakker, Arnold B.; Kalliath, Thomas; O'Driscoll, Michael; Phillips, David R.; Chen, Wei-qing; Lo, Danny; Sit, Cindy; Shi, Kan

2010-01-01

73

Fathers’ Religious and Family Involvement at Home: Work and Family Outcomes  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study investigates the impact of fathers' religious and family involvement on work-family conflict, work- family fit, job satisfaction, and marital satisfaction. The sample consists of employed, married fathers and their spouses from the 2001 Marriott School of Management Alumni Work and Family Survey (n = 210). Fathers' family involvement was related to less work-life conflict, greater work-family fit, and

E. J. Hill; R. O. Whyte; J. I. Jacob; V. L. Blanchard; S. F. Duncan; D. C. Dollahite; L. Wadsworth

2008-01-01

74

Working to End Family Homelessness. Annual Report  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The National Center on Family Homelessness is determined to end family homelessness. Sheltering families provides a temporary safe haven. Connecting families to permanent housing, essential services, and critical supports can change their lives forever. Through research the Center learns what families need to rebound from the housing, economic,…

National Center on Family Homelessness (NJ1), 2012

2012-01-01

75

Work, Family and Community Support as Predictors of Work-Family Conflict: A Study of Low-Income Workers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examines relationships between support from work, family and community domains with time- and strain-based work-family conflict in a sample of low-income workers. Results reveal significant within-domain and cross-domain relationships between support from all three life domains with work--family conflict. With respect to family support,…

Griggs, Tracy Lambert; Casper, Wendy J.; Eby, Lillian T.

2013-01-01

76

Work, Family and Community Support as Predictors of Work-Family Conflict: A Study of Low-Income Workers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This study examines relationships between support from work, family and community domains with time- and strain-based work-family conflict in a sample of low-income workers. Results reveal significant within-domain and cross-domain relationships between support from all three life domains with work--family conflict. With respect to family

Griggs, Tracy Lambert; Casper, Wendy J.; Eby, Lillian T.

2013-01-01

77

Work-family conflict, work- and family-role salience, and women's well-being.  

PubMed

The author considered both the direct effect and the moderator effect of role salience in the stress-strain relationship. In contrast to previous studies that have examined the effects of salience on well-being within specific social roles, the present study focused on the work-family interface. From a sample of 147 employed English women with children, the present results of the regression analyses showed that both effects are possible, depending on the outcome measures used. The author observed a direct effect of role salience in the prediction of job satisfaction; work salience was positively related to job satisfaction, over and above the main-effect terms of work-interfering-with-family (WIF) conflict and family-interfering-with-work (FIW) conflict. In contrast, the author found a moderator effect of role salience and conflict for symptoms of psychological distress. However, contrary to predictions, the author found that work salience exacerbated the negative impact of WIF conflict, rather than FIW conflict, on well-being. The author discussed these results in relation to the literature on work-family conflict, role salience, and the issue of stress-strain specificity. PMID:15279329

Noor, Noraini M

2004-08-01

78

The labour market impact of the working families’ tax credit  

Microsoft Academic Search

In October 1999, the working families’ tax credit (WFTC) replaced family credit as the main package of in-work support for families with children. Among a range of stated aims, the WFTC is intended to ‘... improve work incentives, encouraging people without work to move into employment’. In this paper, we consider the impact of WFTC on hours and participation. To

Richard Blundell; Alan Duncan; Julian McCrae; Costas Meghir

2000-01-01

79

Rational Versus Gender Role Explanations for Work–Family Conflict  

Microsoft Academic Search

Two conflicting frameworks for understanding work–family conflict are proposed. According to the rational view, conflict is related linearly to the total amount of time spent in paid and family work. According to the gender role perspective, gender role expectations mute the relationship between hours expended and perceived work–family conflict, and gender interacts with number of hours worked and work–family conflict.

Barbara A. Gutek; Sabrina Searle; Lilian Klepa

1991-01-01

80

Family Support & Health Care: Working Together for Healthy Families.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report of the Family Resource Coalition of America examines partnerships between family support programs and health care providers, forged to ensure that the comprehensive needs of families are met. The report begins with two articles, "Family Support and the Emerging Health System" and "Social and Economic Issues Affecting Health--A…

Lalley, Jacqueline, Ed.; Ahsan, Nilofer, Ed.

1998-01-01

81

Family Structure, Gender, and the Work–Family Interface: Work-to-Family Conflict Among Single and Partnered Parents  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined whether single parents experience greater reductions in work-to-family conflict from using resources than\\u000a partnered parents do. The question of whether single mothers, single fathers, partnered mothers, or partnered fathers experienced\\u000a differing levels of work-to-family conflict was also addressed. Data were from the 2002 National Study of the Changing Workforce,\\u000a and only those respondents with at least one

Krista Lynn Minnotte

2012-01-01

82

Work-family culture in academia: a gendered view of work-family conflict and coping strategies  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – The paper looks at the tensions and conflict between work and family life that arise from work intensification in higher education, in the particular context of Portuguese academe. Drawing on the concept of work-family culture, the paper aims to discuss its influence on the level of work-family conflict and the effectiveness of work-family policies. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – The study

Gina Gaio Santos; Carlos Cabral-Cardoso

2008-01-01

83

Generational differences in work-family conflict and synergy.  

PubMed

This paper examines differences in work-family conflict and synergy among the four generational groups represented in the contemporary workforce: Generation Y Generation X, Baby Boomers, and Matures using data from the 2008 National Study of the Changing Workforce (n = 3,502). Significant generational differences were found for work-family conflict (work interfering with family and family interfering with work) but not for work-family synergy. Mental health and job pressure were the best predictors of work interfering with family conflict for each generational group. Work-family synergy presented a more complex picture. Work-family conflict and synergy were significantly related to job, marital, and life satisfaction. Implications and directions for future research are discussed. PMID:23783221

Beutell, Nicholas J

2013-06-19

84

The Work-Family Dilemma: How HR Managers Can Help.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses three issues faced by human resources managers: (1) the current relationship between work and the family, (2) the business problems created when work and family overlap, and (3) actions that businesses can take to improve the situation. (JOW)

Nollen, Stanley D.

1989-01-01

85

Anticipated work\\/family conflict and family member views: role in police recruiting  

Microsoft Academic Search

Research on police officer recruiting has not focused on anticipated work\\/family conflict, the amount of conflict an applicant thinks will be in a police job. The influence of anticipated work\\/family conflict on applicant and family member opinions and applicant behavior wasexamined. Also, gender and family role differences were examined. We found congruence in applicant and family member views, and a

Ann Marie Ryan; S. David Kriska; Bradley J. West; Joshua M. Sacco

2001-01-01

86

A Chinese Longitudinal Study on Work/Family Enrichment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore reciprocal relationships between work/family resources, work/family enrichment (WFE), and work/family satisfaction in a Chinese society. Design/methodology/approach: A longitudinal design was adopted using a three-wave panel sample. Data were obtained from 310 Taiwanese employees on three…

Lu, Luo

2011-01-01

87

When Family Considerations Influence Work Decisions: Decision-Making Processes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The work-family literature has provided an abundance of evidence that various family factors are linked to various work decisions, suggesting that the "family-relatedness" of work decisions is a prevalent phenomenon (Greenhaus & Powell, 2012). However, the cognitive processes by which such linkages occur have received little attention. We offer a…

Powell, Gary N.; Greenhaus, Jeffrey H.

2012-01-01

88

Linking Mechanisms of Work-Family Conflict and Segmentation  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Despite the abundance of work and family research, few studies have compared the linking mechanisms specified in theoretical models of work-family conflict and segmentation. Accordingly, the current study provides a greater degree of empirical clarity concerning the interplay of work and family by directly examining the indirect effects of…

Michel, Jesse S.; Hargis, Michael B.

2008-01-01

89

Work-Family Balance After Childbirth: The Association Between Employer-Offered Leave Characteristics and Maternity Leave Duration.  

PubMed

Early return to work after childbirth has been increasing among working mothers in the US. We assessed the relationship between access to employer-offered maternity leave (EOML) (both paid and unpaid) and uptake and duration of maternity leave following childbirth in a socio-economically diverse sample of full-time working women. We focus on California, a state that has long provided more generous maternity leave benefits than those offered by federal maternity leave policies through the State Disability Insurance program. The sample included 691 mothers who gave birth in Southern California in 2002-2003. Using weighted logistic regression, we examined the EOML-maternity leave duration relationship, controlling for whether the leave was paid, as well as other occupational, personality and health-related covariates. Compared with mothers who were offered more than 12 weeks of maternity leave, mothers with <6 weeks of EOML and those offered 6-12 weeks had five times higher odds of returning to work within 12 weeks; those offered no leave had six times higher odds of an early return. These relationships were similar after controlling for whether the leave was paid and after controlling for other occupational and health characteristics. Access to and duration of employer-offered maternity leave significantly determine timing of return to work following childbirth, potentially affecting work-family balance. Policy makers should recognize the pivotal role of employers in offering job security during and after maternity leave and consider widening the eligibility criteria of the Family and Medical Leave Act. PMID:23504130

Guendelman, Sylvia; Goodman, Julia; Kharrazi, Martin; Lahiff, Maureen

2013-03-16

90

Being there for co-workers and family: How balancing work and family roles affects collegiality at work  

Microsoft Academic Search

There is a consensus that employees face increased demands from both the work and the family domains. Family demands have increased due to the more evenly shared family tasks between men and women, whereas employees are expected to invest more in social relations at work since teamwork has become a common work design. This study sought to explain collegiality or

Jarrod M. Haar; Tanja van der Lippe

91

Family Income of Ghent Working-Class Families Ca. 1900  

Microsoft Academic Search

Using an extensive inquiry into the family income of Ghent artisans and cotton, linen, and metal workers around 1900, the research reported in this article examines the level and the composition of family income at different phases of the life-cycle. In the Belgian textile center Ghent, which was characterized by a low male wage level, married women made a substantial

Patricia Van Den Eeckhout

1993-01-01

92

WorkFamily Conflict, Work and Family-Role Salience, and Women's Well-Being  

Microsoft Academic Search

The author considered both the direct effect and the moderator effect of role salience in the stress-strain relationship. In contrast to previous studies that have examined the effects of salience on well-being within specific social roles, the present study focused on the work-family interface. From a sample of 147 employed English women with children, the present results of the regression

Noraini M. Noor

2004-01-01

93

Helping Families Search for Solutions: Working with Adolescents  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|In this column, the author focuses on the ways that family counselors can use solution-based therapies (solution-oriented and solution-focused) to work with families with adolescents in individual and/or family therapy. The theoretical foundation for solution-based therapies suggests techniques that help families focus on solutions and not remain…

Paylo, Matthew J.

2005-01-01

94

Gender Differences in Restricting Work Efforts because of Family Responsibilities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|In egalitarian families, we might expect that men and women similarly prioritize work and family obligations. Yet, prior research examining gender differences in work-family priorities often use measures that imperfectly reflect those priorities. Drawing two samples of full-time married workers from the 1992 National Study of the Changing…

Maume, David J.

2006-01-01

95

Father Influences on Employed Mothers' Work-Family Balance  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study employed the ecological systems perspective and gender ideology theory to examine the influence of fathers' paid work-family crossover and family involvement on self-reports of work-family balance by employed mothers with children under the age of 13 (N = 179). Multiple regression analyses revealed that fathers' crossover factors had a…

Fagan, Jay; Press, Julie

2008-01-01

96

Household Work and Family Life Satisfaction of Blacks.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examined relationship of family life satisfaction to division of household work between men and women among married Black adults. Found women almost twice as likely as men to feel overworked by household work; people who felt overworked had lower levels of family life satisfaction. Found interactions among family life satisfaction, division of…

Broman, Clifford L.

1988-01-01

97

Hardships in America: The Real Story of Working Families.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Although U.S. policymakers have adopted the view that work is the solution to poverty, work may not ensure a decent standard of living for many families. This report estimates the number of families who are not making ends meet. It examines the cost of living in various communities in every state and determines "basic family budgets" for six…

Boushey, Heather; Brocht, Chauna; Gundersen, Bethney; Bernstein, Jared

98

Relations of Work Identity, Family Identity, Situational Demands, and Sex with Employee Work Hours  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined relations of multiple indicators of work identity and family identity with the number of weekly hours worked by 193 married business professionals. We found that men generally worked long hours regardless of the situational demands to work long hours and the strength of their work and family identities. Women's work hours, on…

Greenhaus, Jeffrey H.; Peng, Ann C.; Allen, Tammy D.

2012-01-01

99

Relations of Work Identity, Family Identity, Situational Demands, and Sex with Employee Work Hours  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This study examined relations of multiple indicators of work identity and family identity with the number of weekly hours worked by 193 married business professionals. We found that men generally worked long hours regardless of the situational demands to work long hours and the strength of their work and family identities. Women's work hours, on…

Greenhaus, Jeffrey H.; Peng, Ann C.; Allen, Tammy D.

2012-01-01

100

Tracing a Timeline for Work and Family Research in India  

Microsoft Academic Search

oncern over work-family issues has been an enduring preoccupation of researchers across disciplines for over four decades. Interest in work and family matters has arisen on account of changes in the way in which work has been defined and it has been fuelled by mechanisation and modernisation of production processes, industrialisation and the entry of increas- ing numbers of women

UJVALA RAJADHYAKSHA; SWATI SMITA

101

Impact of Family Structure on the Structure of Work.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The research supported by this contract investigated the interfaces between dual-earner couples' work and family behaviors by looking simultaneously at intra-spouse relations (same person work and family issues) and cross-spouse issues (his work and her f...

S. Yogev J. Brett

1987-01-01

102

FOOD STAMPS FOR WORKING FAMILIES: ISSUES AND OPTIONS  

Microsoft Academic Search

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS The Food Stamps for Working Families: Issues and Options report was written and prepared by Louise Hayes. Assistance and review were provided by Ellen Vollinger and Jim Weill. The Food Research and Action Center gratefully acknowledges the generous support of the following for our work on the Food Stamp Program and working families: Annie E. Casey Foundation General Mills

Louise Hayes

2002-01-01

103

Balancing Work and Family through Flexible Work Options. Monograph. Volume 9, Number 1.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|More than 58 percent of all women working in the U.S. labor force, many of them sole supports of their families, and 67 percent of women with children under age 18 are working. Therefore, more flexible work options are being made to allow a balance of work and family. Increasingly available options include work at home, compressed workweeks,…

Sachs, Sharon

104

Work-family conflict and organizational citizenship behaviors  

Microsoft Academic Search

While recent studies have demonstrated several negative effects of work-family conflict for correctional employees, none have examined the impact of work-family conflict on the organizational citizenship behaviors of correctional personnel. To help fill this gap in the research, this study examined the relationship between four types of work-family conflict and organizational citizenship behaviors for 160 correctional staff of a private

Eric G. Lambert; Thomas Kelley; Nancy L. Hogan

2012-01-01

105

7 CFR 1962.7 - Securing unpaid balances on unsecured loans.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Securing unpaid balances on unsecured loans. 1962.7 Section 1962.7 Agriculture...Liquidation of Chattel Security § 1962.7 Securing unpaid balances on unsecured loans. The County Supervisor will take a...

2013-01-01

106

The voluntary contribution to UK childhood bereavement services: Locating the place and experiences of unpaid staff  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes the unpaid contribution to UK childhood bereavement service provision. Data on staffing was gained through a national postal survey and eight organizational case studies. Compared to volunteers in specialist palliative care and hospice settings, unpaid staff were drawn from a younger age range, were more likely to be in full or part-time employment, and had more personal

Liz Rolls; Sheila A. Payne

2008-01-01

107

19 CFR 24.32 - Claims; unpaid compensation of deceased employees and death benefits.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...unpaid compensation of deceased employees and death benefits. 24.32 Section 24.32...unpaid compensation of deceased employees and death benefits. (a) A claim made by a...an officer or employee at the time of his death shall be executed on standard...

2013-04-01

108

Volunteer/Unpaid Positions and Co-op Student Entrepreneurship in Canada: Program Policies and Placements.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Responses from 141 of 218 cooperative education programs in Canadian universities indicated that only a small number of student placements were in unpaid or entrepreneurial positions; mandatory programs were more likely to allow unpaid and entrepreneurial co-ops; and most programs had policies and controls regarding entrepreneurship. (SK)|

King, Brent; Pearson, Shani; Young, Jeffrey D.

1997-01-01

109

Work-role expectations and work family conflict: gender differences in emotional exhaustion  

Microsoft Academic Search

A model integrating work-role expectations of employees, work-family conflict, family-work conflict, and a component of burnout was proposed and empirically tested on 163 employees, who were also part of dual-earner couples. Gender differences were found in the proposed model. For males, work-family conflict mediated the relationship between work-role expectations and emotional exhaustion. Although the same indirect relationship was found for

Margaret Posig; Jill Kickul

2004-01-01

110

Female Entrepreneurs, Work-Family Conflict, and Venture Performance: New Insights into the Work-Family Interface  

Microsoft Academic Search

Existing theory is extended to predict the effectiveness of strategies for structurally reducing work-family conflict by manipulating roles, given the salience of work and family roles and resources available to the female entrepreneur. A conceptual frame- work based on the constructs of role involvement and role conflict is used to examine whether high-growth female entrepreneurs choose more appropriate strategies for

Lois M. Shelton

2006-01-01

111

Work-Family ConflictA Comparison by Gender, Family Type, and Perceived Control  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objective of this research was to examine the relationships between the dependent variable of work-family conflict (operationalized as overload, work to family interference, family to work interference) and the independent variables of gender, family type, and perceived control. The sample consisted of 1,989 single-parent and dual-income employees with children ages 6 through 12. The findings indicated that individuals with

LINDA DUXBURY; CHRISTOPHER HIGGINS; CATHERINE LEE

1994-01-01

112

Work–Family and Family–Work Conflict: Does Intrinsic–Extrinsic Satisfaction Mediate the Prediction of General Job Satisfaction?  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objective of this study is to analyze the mediating role of intrinsic and extrinsic job satisfaction in the relationship between the 2 dimensions of work–family conflict—family interfering with work (FIW) and work interfering with family (WIF)—and general job satisfaction. Step-by-step hierarchical regression analyses were carried out on a sample of 151 men and women from a Spanish public organization.

Antonia Calvo-Salguero; José-María Salinas Martínez-de-Lecea; Ana-María Carrasco-González

2011-01-01

113

A cross-cultural study of work\\/family demands, work\\/family conflict and wellbeing: the Taiwanese vs British  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – The aim of the research is twofold: to explore relations between work\\/family demands, work-family conflict (WFC), family-work conflict (FWC) and wellbeing outcomes, and to contrast employees from an individualistic (UK) and a collectivistic (Taiwan) society. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – Heterogeneous samples of full-time employees in Taiwan and UK were surveyed using structured questionnaires. Findings – For both the Taiwanese and

Luo Lu; Robin Gilmour; Shu-Fang Kao; Mao-Ting Huang

2006-01-01

114

Work and Family Provisions in Major Collective Bargaining Agreements.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The report contains examples of contract language dealing with work and family provisions such as child care, day care, elder care, maternity leave, parental leave, divorce, flexible work schedules, etc. from 452 collective bargaining agreements covering ...

L. Lunden

1992-01-01

115

Overworked Individuals or Overworked Families? Explaining Trends in Work, Leisure, and Family Time.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Data from the 1970 and 1997 Current Population Survey demonstrate that, more than changes in working hours, the shift from male-breadwinner to dual-earner and single-parent households has increased concern for family-work balance. Research should focus on combined work schedules of family members rather than changes in individual work patterns.…

Jacobs, Jerry A.; Gerson, Kathleen

2001-01-01

116

Differences in wage rates for males and females in the health sector: a consideration of unpaid overtime to decompose the gender wage gap  

PubMed Central

Background In Australia a persistent and sizable gender wage gap exists. In recent years this gap has been steadily widening. The negative impact of gender wage differentials is the disincentive to work more hours. This implies a substantial cost on the Australian health sector. This study aimed to identify the magnitude of gender wage differentials within the health sector. The investigation accounts for unpaid overtime. Given the limited availability of information, little empirical evidence exists that accounts for unpaid overtime. Methods Information was collected from a sample of 10,066 Australian full-time employees within the health sector. Initially, ordinary least-squares regression was used to identify the gender wage gap when unpaid overtime was included and then excluded from the model. The sample was also stratified by gender and then by occupation to allow for comparisons. Later the Blinder–Oaxaca decomposition method was employed to identify and quantify the contribution of individual endowments to wage differentials between males and females. Results The analyses of data revealed a gender wage gap that varied across occupations. The inclusion of unpaid overtime in the analysis led to a slight reduction in the wage differential. The results showed an adjusted wage gap of 16.7%. Conclusions Unpaid overtime made a significant but small contribution to wage differentials. Being female remained the major contributing factor to the wage gap. Given that wage differentials provide a disincentive to work more hours, serious attempts to deal with the skilled labour shortage in the health sector need to address the gender wage gap.

2013-01-01

117

The Moderating Effects of Work-Family Role Combinations and Work-Family Organizational Culture on the Relationship Between Family-Friendly Workplace Supports and Job Satisfaction  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study determined whether work-family role combinations (i.e., work and elder care, work and child care, work and elder care and child care) and work-family culture significantly moderate the relationship between availability of workplace supports and job satisfaction. The data were obtained from the Families and Work Institute’s 1997 archival data set, the National Study of the Changing Workforce (NCSW).

Khatera Sahibzada; Leslie B. Hammer; Margaret B. Neal; Daniel C. Kuang

2005-01-01

118

From "Work-Family" to "Work-Life": Broadening Our Conceptualization and Measurement  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Despite frequent reference to "work-life" issues in the organizational literature, little theoretical or empirical attention has been paid to nonwork areas beyond family. The purpose of the research described here is to move beyond work-family conflict to a broader conceptualization and measurement of work interference with life. A measure of work

Keeney, Jessica; Boyd, Elizabeth M.; Sinha, Ruchi; Westring, Alyssa F.; Ryan, Ann Marie

2013-01-01

119

Work-family culture, work-family interference and well-being at work : Is it possible to distinguish between a positive and a negative process?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to examine whether work-family (WF) interference functions as an explaining mechanism in the link between work-family culture and well-being, hereby distinguishing between a negative and a positive process. The negative, energy depleting process initiates from a hindrance work-family culture and ends up to burnout through the experience of work-family conflict. The positive,

Maria Peeters; Cobi Wattez; Evangelia Demerouti; Wietske de Regt

2009-01-01

120

Employment, flexible working and the family.  

PubMed

This paper assesses some of the implications of one of the major social changes to have taken place in the West during the second half of the twentieth century--that is, the increased employment of women, together with normative changes in gender relations and in women's expectations. These changes have been linked to an increase in individualism, which itself is associated with the transcendence of 'first modernity'. Thus it is suggested that new approaches to social analysis are required (Beck). Here it is argued that, rather than develop completely new approaches in order to grasp the changes that are under way, the 'economic' and the 'social' (that is, employment and the family) should be seen as intertwined, rather than approached as separate phenomena. Past debates in feminism, changes in the family, and flexible employment are critically examined. The growing tensions between employment and family life are discussed. It is argued that these changes are associated with the intensification of capitalist development, rather than reflecting a fundamental transformation of society. Existing approaches to the analysis of social change, including Polanyi's analysis of the development of 'counter-movements' against the 'self-regulating' market, will, therefore, still be relevant to our enquiries. In the concluding section, a programme of research that would examine these changes is outlined. PMID:12556281

Crompton, Rosemary

2002-12-01

121

Faculty Sense of Agency in Decisions about Work and Family  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Over the last decade, many research universities have adopted policies and support mechanisms to help academic parents balance work and family. This study sought to understand what facilitates faculty agency in making decisions about work and family, including parental leave. We conducted 20 interviews with 5 men and 15 women at a research…

O'Meara, KerryAnn; Campbell, Corbin M.

2011-01-01

122

Work and family decision-making framework: A motivational perspective  

Microsoft Academic Search

We introduce motivation theory as a way of understanding the decision-making process in the work and family context. We use core concepts from motivation theory - extrinsic, intrinsic and prosocial motivation - and link them to motivational learning to build our framework. We then propose a framework illustrating motivational factors that influence work-family decision-making and offer propositions focusing on the

Nuria Chinchilla; Maruja Moragas; Sowon Kim

2012-01-01

123

Piecing Together Family Social Work in Mainland China  

Microsoft Academic Search

As rapid economic and sociopolitical development brings about drastic changes in family structure and processes in China, many social concerns arise. Through a review of journal articles published over a period of 28 years (1979–2006) in social work and related disciplines in China, this article presents a glimpse of family social work using the China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) database.

Timothy Sim

2008-01-01

124

Piecing Together Family Social Work in Mainland China  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|As rapid economic and sociopolitical development brings about drastic changes in family structure and processes in China, many social concerns arise. Through a review of journal articles published over a period of 28 years (1979-2006) in social work and related disciplines in China, this article presents a glimpse of family social work using the…

Sim, Timothy

2008-01-01

125

Anticipated Work-Family Conflict: A Construct Investigation  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|To date, little is known about how work-family issues impact the career development process. In the current paper, we explore this issue by investigating a relatively unstudied construct: anticipated work-family conflict. We found that this construct can be represented by the same six-dimensional factor structure used to assess concurrent…

Westring, Alyssa Friede; Ryan, Ann Marie

2011-01-01

126

The Business Case: Managerial Perspectives on Work and the Family  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this chapter, we discuss the different management approaches used by employers for framing, adopting, and managing work and family policies in organizations and by researchers examin- ing work-family issues. The field of management focuses on ensuring that when workers come together in an enterprise, they are organized with the dual goals of achieving effectiveness in accomplishing the organizational mission

Ellen Ernst Kossek; Alyssa Friede

127

On Common Ground: Prominent Women Talk about Work & Family.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This publication presents interviews with 11 prominent women, representing different backgrounds, philosophies, and life experiences, in which they speak about their own experiences with work and family issues. The introduction, "On Common Ground: Prominent Women Talk about Work & Family" (Diana Zuckerman), provides an overview. The 11 interviews…

Zuckerman, Diana, Ed.

128

On Common Ground: Prominent Women Talk about Work & Family.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This publication presents interviews with 11 prominent women, representing different backgrounds, philosophies, and life experiences, in which they speak about their own experiences with work and family issues. The introduction, "On Common Ground: Prominent Women Talk about Work & Family" (Diana Zuckerman), provides an overview. The 11 interviews…

Zuckerman, Diana, Ed.

129

Adolescent Work Experiences and Family Formation Behavior  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|A long-standing critique of adolescent employment is that it engenders a precocious maturity of more adult-like roles and behaviors, including school disengagement, substance use, sexual activity, inadequate sleep and exercise, and work-related stress. Though negative effects of high-intensity work on adolescent adjustment have been found, little…

Staff, Jeremy; VanEseltine, Matthew; Woolnough, April; Silver, Eric; Burrington, Lori

2012-01-01

130

Boom, Bust & Beyond: The State of Working Arkansas. Arkansas Working Families Project.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Using data from several government and private sources and interviews with working families, this report examines the Arkansas economy, how Arkansas working families have fared economically in recent years, and their current challenges. The report offers suggestions about how the state can provide the tools families need to continue to move up…

Huddleston, Richard; Duran, Angela

131

Barriers to Work among Poor Families: Health Limitations, Family Structure, and Lack of Job Opportunities  

Microsoft Academic Search

The fact that poor families work fewer hours than the non-poor families has been a motivation for the U.S. government to establish a work-based welfare system to fight welfare dependency and poverty. Using the Current Population Survey of 2004, this study compared families' annual work hours and the major reasons for working such hours by their income status. The results

Jeounghee Kim

2009-01-01

132

Working parents of children with behavioral problems: a study on the family–work interface  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examines the process by which child behavioral problems are related to parents’ well-being. We developed a family–work spillover model that was tested among 225 working parents. It was hypothesized that family–self conflict (FSC) mediates the relationship between child behavioral problems and parental strain, and that family–work conflict (FWC) mediates the relationship between parental strain and work engagement. Further,

Kimberley Breevaart; Arnold B. Bakker

2011-01-01

133

Career and family: Making it work  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

About 150 people at the 1984 AGU Fall Meeting attended an evening panel session on combining professional and family lives. Panelists were Tanya Atwater (University of California, Santa Barbara), Laurie Brown (University of Massachusetts), Silvia Garzoli (Lamont-Doherty Geological Observatory), and Jimmy Diehl and Suzanne Beske-Diehl (Michigan Technological University). The session was sponsored by the AGU Education and Human Resources Committee. The panelists had been asked to describe their own lives and decisions and to pass on advice or experience that they had gained.

Sancetta, Connie

134

Well-balanced families? : A gendered analysis of work-life balance policies and work family practices  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – The paper considers the impact of work-life balance policies on the work and family practices of professional, dual-earner parents with dependent children, by assessing the extent to which “well-balanced families” have been resultantly facilitated. It poses two research questions: the first centres on how far work-life balance policies have better enabled working parents to manage their commitments to

S. B. Burnett; C. J. Gatrell; C. L. Cooper; P. Sparrow

2010-01-01

135

Module 1: Overview of Work-Family Issues in the United States. Work-Family Curriculum Guide  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|There is a long tradition of academic interest in the worlds of work and family. However, there was scant attention paid to the linkages between these two worlds until the mid 1970s. In the United States, the 1977 publication of Kanter's monograph, "Work and family in the United States: A critical review and agenda for research and policy,"…

Kossek, Ellen Ernst; Leana, Carrie; MacDermid, Shelley; Pitt-Catsouphes, Marcie; Raskin, Patricia; Secret, Mary; Sweet, Stephen

2006-01-01

136

How Do People With Different Attachment Styles Balance Work and Family? A Personality Perspective on Work–Family Linkage  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study explored whether different models of work–family relationship were possible for individuals with different attachment styles. A mail survey was conducted using employees (N = 481) at a midwestern university in the United States. Results suggested that (a) individuals with a preoccupied attachment pattern were more likely to experience negative spillover from the family\\/home to the work domain than

H. Canan Sumer; Patrick A. Knight

2001-01-01

137

Satisfaction with work-family balance among German office workers  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – The paper seeks to examine the relationships between various work demands and resources and satisfaction with work-family balance in a sample of German office workers. Work-to-family conflict is expected to mediate several relationships between dependent and independent variables. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – A sample of 716 office workers from two service sector organizations in Germany participated in a comprehensive online

Barbara Beham; Sonja Drobni?

2010-01-01

138

Work and Family Functioning: An Annotated Bibliography Selected from Family Database.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This annotated bibliography lists works published in Australia on issues regarding work obligations and family responsibilities. All works cited are included in Australia's FAMILY database. The following topics are covered: (1) adolescents and attitudes to employment (14 citations); (2) the aged and employment (20 citations); (3) career…

Davis, Mari, Comp.

139

Families at Work: Strengths and Strains. The General Mills American Family Report 1980-81.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Fourth in a series of studies on the American family conducted for General Mills Corporation, this publication provides findings from a survey exploring the relationship between work and the family in contemporary society. Specifically, the survey explores how changes in the work force, especially the increase in numbers of working wives and…

General Mills, Inc., Minneapolis, Minn.

140

Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA)  

MedlinePLUS

... FMLA Wage and Hour Division (WHD) Family and Medical Leave Act Overview The FMLA entitles eligible employees ... unpaid, job-protected leave for specified family and medical reasons with continuation of group health insurance coverage ...

141

Changing University Work, Freedom, Flexibility and Family  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This article investigates what Finnish academics on short fixed-term contracts consider to be the effects of having children on work and careers. The study is framed by the context of the current state of the university sector, its neoliberal and entrepreneurial tendencies and its claims to meritocracy. Informants express relative happiness with…

Nikunen, Minna

2012-01-01

142

Lone mothers, family credit and paid work  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social security payments are typically thought of as being aimed at those who are not in paid work, whether because of age, ill health, caring responsibilities or involuntary unemployment. The great bulk of social security expenditure does go to such groups, and most social security recipients fall outside the paid labour market. But there is a potential role for social

Andrew Dilnot; Alan Duncan

1992-01-01

143

From "Work-Family" to "Work-Life": Broadening Our Conceptualization and Measurement  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Despite frequent reference to "work-life" issues in the organizational literature, little theoretical or empirical attention has been paid to nonwork areas beyond family. The purpose of the research described here is to move beyond work-family conflict to a broader conceptualization and measurement of work interference with life. A measure of…

Keeney, Jessica; Boyd, Elizabeth M.; Sinha, Ruchi; Westring, Alyssa F.; Ryan, Ann Marie

2013-01-01

144

Professional activity. How is family physicians' work time changing?  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE: To examine hours worked professionally, work preferences, and changes in both of these and their correlates. DESIGN: Repeated surveys done in 1993 and 1999. SETTING: Ontario family practices. PARTICIPANTS: Cohort of physicians certified in family medicine between 1989 and 1991 after family medicine residency who were surveyed in 1993 when they resided in Ontario. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Self-reported hours spent weekly on professional activities, desired hours of professional work, and balance between work and other activities. RESULTS: Fifty-three percent (293) of 553 physicians responded to the 1999 survey; 91% had remained family physicians; 85% of these had participated in the 1993 survey. The difference between the hours that family physicians preferred to work professionally and their actual hours of work had increased since 1993. Childless physicians, women physicians with preschool children, and women physicians married to other physicians worked fewer hours professionally than other physicians in 1999. Female physicians and physicians without children worked closer to their preferred hours than other physicians. Reporting a preference to work fewer hours professionally in 1993 was linked with a reduction in professional activities by 1999. CONCLUSION: Greater attention should be paid in physician resource planning to the family life cycle of female physicians. Lifestyle changes could lead to a reduction in professional activity among these physicians.

Woodward, C. A.; Ferrier, B.; Cohen, M.; Brown, J.

2001-01-01

145

WORK?FAMILY CONFLICT AND EMOTIONS: EFFECTS AT WORK AND AT HOME  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study investigated the effect of work-family conflict on the emo- tions of guilt and hostility, and the implications of work-family conflict and these emotions for job satisfaction and marital satisfaction. Using experience-sampling methodology, data were collected from a sample of 75 individuals over a period of 2 weeks (producing 625 data points). Results revealed that within individuals, family-to-work conflict

TIMOTHY A. JUDGE; REMUS ILIES; BRENT A. SCOTT

2006-01-01

146

Searching for a balance: work–family practices, work–team design, and organizational performance  

Microsoft Academic Search

The crucial impact of work–family issues on employee's well-being has been recognized and responded with a variety of research in field of organizational behavior. However, few studies examine the impact of how work–family practices affect productivity at firm-level. Following the research stream of strategic human resource management, we proposed that work–family may form the norm of reciprocity, which is a

Nien-Chi Liu; Chih-Yuan Wang

2011-01-01

147

Emotion work in family caregiving for persons with dementia.  

PubMed

Emotion work enhances emotional well-being and emotional support in relationships between two people. Emotion work is a part of family work but has not been described in the context of caring for a family member with dementia. Content analysis applied to 11 interviews of informal caregivers describing their interactions with a person with dementia resulted in four categories of emotion work: (1) managing feelings, (2) weighing options, (3) being parental, and (4) ensuring emotional well-being. Caregivers performed emotion work to meet the feeling rules of being a good caregiver, but often with emotional dissonance between the caregivers' true feelings. PMID:23301570

Simpson, Cherie; Acton, Gayle

2013-01-01

148

Work–Family Issues of Mothers of Teenage Children  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper addresses the question of how families manage the after-school care of younger (11–14) and older (15–17) teenage children. I examine how mothers of teenage children view their after-school care, and how they coordinate their paid work and their family responsibilities to accommodate the lives of their older children. How families, particularly mothers, manage the after-school care of older

Demie Kurz

2000-01-01

149

Family Transmission of Work Affectivity and Experiences to Children  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Theory and research suggest that children develop orientations toward work appreciably influenced by their family members' own expressed work experiences and emotions. Cross-sectional data from 100 children (53 girls, 47 boys; mean age = 11.1 years) and structural equation modeling were used to assess measures of work affectivity and experiences…

Porfeli, Erik J.; Wang, Chuang; Hartung, Paul J.

2008-01-01

150

Family Transmission of Work Affectivity and Experiences to Children  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Theory and research suggest that children develop orientations toward work appreciably influenced by their family members' own expressed work experiences and emotions. Cross-sectional data from 100 children (53 girls, 47 boys; mean age = 11.1 years) and structural equation modeling were used to assess measures of work affectivity and experiences…

Porfeli, Erik J.; Wang, Chuang; Hartung, Paul J.

2008-01-01

151

Work Values and Job Satisfaction of Family Physicians  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Theory and prior research suggest linkages between work values and job satisfaction. The present study examined such linkages in a group of workers in a professional occupation. Family physicians (134 women, 206 men, 88% Caucasian) responded to context-specific measures of work values and job satisfaction. ANOVA results indicated a work values…

Bouwkamp-Memmer, Jennifer C.; Whiston, Susan C.; Hartung, Paul J.

2013-01-01

152

Family Roles and Work Values: Processes of Selection and Change  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study focuses on whether marriage and parenthood influence work values after taking into account the influence of work values on family formation. In a recent panel of young adults (N=709), stronger extrinsic and weaker intrinsic work values during adolescence predicted marriage and parenthood 9 years out of high school. Controlling these…

Kirkpatrick Johnson, Monica

2005-01-01

153

Work Values and Job Satisfaction of Family Physicians  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Theory and prior research suggest linkages between work values and job satisfaction. The present study examined such linkages in a group of workers in a professional occupation. Family physicians (134 women, 206 men, 88% Caucasian) responded to context-specific measures of work values and job satisfaction. ANOVA results indicated a work values…

Bouwkamp-Memmer, Jennifer C.; Whiston, Susan C.; Hartung, Paul J.

2013-01-01

154

The Job Costs of Family Demands: Gender Differences in Negative Family-to-Work Spillover  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This article uses the 1992 National Study of the Changing Workforce to examine family and workplace factors contributing to gender differences in negative family-to-work spillover. We focus on spillover as manifested when family demands negatively affect job performance. Among married workers, women were twice as likely as men to report that…

Keene, Jennifer Reid; Reynolds, John R.

2005-01-01

155

Gender and the Work-Family Interface: Exploring Differences across the Family Life Course  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This study examines gender differences in the work-family interface across six family life stages using a global sample of IBM employees in 79 countries (N = 41,813). Family life stage was constructed using the age of respondent and age of youngest child. Results revealed that having young children at home was the critical catalyst for gender…

Martinengo, Giuseppe; Jacob, Jenet I.; Hill, E. Jeffrey

2010-01-01

156

Spousal Support and Work--Family Balance in Launching a Family Business  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This study examines whether emotional spousal support contributes to business owners' perceived work-family balance while launching a family business. Hobfoll's Conservation of Resources theory of stress is applied to 109 family business owners and their spouses. Results from structural equation models support several hypotheses. First, reports…

Gudmunson, Clinton G.; Danes, Sharon M.; Werbel, James D.; Loy, Johnben Teik-Cheok

2009-01-01

157

[The family-friendly hospital: (how) does it work?].  

PubMed

The demographic development in Germany is heading towards a significant shortage in specialists within the next 10-15 years with an increased demand for health services at the same time. The three-stage model of family life planning (work, family phase, return) will also be gradually replaced by a model of simultaneous compatibility of family and work. This change in values, although initiated by the parents themselves, may turn out to be a crucial countermeasure in national economy against the demography-related loss of qualified personnel. For these three trends the economic need arises to minimize family-related absence of our well-trained, motivated and reliable doctors from the clinical departments through implementation of family-friendly human resources policies and supporting measures by the employers. In a representative survey 26% of respondents with children had in the past already changed their workplace to ensure a better match of work and family duties. In this regard the compatibility of family and professional responsibilities had a higher impact on the selection of the employer than a high income. Accordingly, a work-life competence oriented business plan will represent the crucial factor within the competition between universities, hospitals and professional disciplines to attract high potential bearers although a sustained change of the traditional hospital culture is mandatory. Anaesthesia-related fields of development regarding family-friendly corporate governance are working hours and organization of work, part-time jobs even for managers and fathers, and staff development. In the hospital daily routine, in particular, creative solutions meeting the local demands are deemed necessary that do not involve the use of high financial resources. Family-friendly personnel policy not only arises from altruistic enthusiasm but also pays off economically. This article discusses the necessity, opportunities and threads of family-oriented hospital management and fields of action for anaesthesia departments. PMID:19484192

Heller, A R; Heller, S C

2009-06-01

158

Resilience across Contexts: Family, Work, Culture, and Community.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Noting that much is known from research and practice regarding what works to promote resilience of children and families in a variety of high-risk life situations, this book considers the impact of culture, economy, employment, poverty, family structure, and social policy on parenting, child development, education, and the life success of youth.…

Taylor, Ronald D., Ed.; Wang, Margaret C., Ed.

159

Simulated Family Therapy Interviews in Clinical Social Work Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article describes a learning method that employed theatre students as family clients in an advanced social work practice course. Students were provided with an opportunity to integrate and apply their learning of theory, clinical skills, and professional conduct in full-length family therapy sessions that occurred in the classroom and were…

Mooradian, John K.

2007-01-01

160

Work and Family Life: Middle School Content Competencies.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document, which lists the middle school content competencies for the Work and Family Studies curriculum within Family and Consumer Sciences in Ohio, is intended to help middle school students develop self-responsibility and competence dealing with the practical problems of early adolescence. (Career awareness and career choice options are…

Ohio State Dept. of Education, Columbus. Div. of Career-Technical and Adult Education.

161

Examining couple agreement about work-family conflict  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – This study aims to explore the nature of couple agreement about work-family conflict, adding to previous research by explicitly testing the extent to which couples agree when rating work interference with family (WIF) and the influence of this agreement on other outcomes. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – In total, 224 dual-earner couples were surveyed to assess their own WIF, as well

Michelle Streich; Wendy J. Casper; Amy Nicole Salvaggio

2008-01-01

162

Work and Family Environments and the Adoption of Computer-Supported Supplemental Work-at-Home  

Microsoft Academic Search

This research compares the work, family, and work–family environments of adopters and nonadopters of computer-supported supplementary work-at-home (e.g., work done at home, after regular office hours, using computer technology). Subjects consisted of 307 men and 147 women. These individuals were married, in managerial or professional positions, used a computer in their job, and had a spouse who had a full-time

Linda Elizabeth Duxbury; Christopher Alan Higgins; D. Roland Thomas

1996-01-01

163

Work, Family and Life-Course Fit: Does Control over Work Time Matter?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This study moves from "work-family" to a multi-dimensional "life-course fit" construct (employees' cognitive assessments of resources, resource deficits, and resource demands), using a combined work-family, demands-control and ecology of the life course framing. It examined (1) impacts of job and home ecological systems on fit dimensions, and (2)…

Moen, Phyllis; Kelly, Erin; Huang, Qinlei

2008-01-01

164

Working Hard, Falling Short: America's Working Families and the Pursuit of Economic Security  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The United States of America is often called the "land of opportunity," a place where hard work and sacrifice lead to economic success. Across generations, countless families have been able to live out that promise. However, more than one out of four American working families now earn wages so low that they have difficulty surviving financially.…

Waldron, Tom; Roberts, Brandon; Reamer, Andrew

2004-01-01

165

Perceived Family Functioning and Family Resources of Hong Kong Families: Implications for Social Work Practice  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This article reports the results of a telephone survey (n = 1,015 respondents) that aims to identify the perceived general family functioning and family resources of Hong Kong Chinese families and their linkage to each other in a rapidly transforming society. The perceived general family functioning of the respondents was average, and the five…

Ma, Joyce L. C.; Wong, Timothy K. Y.; Lau, Luk King; Pun, Shuk Han

2009-01-01

166

Work, family socioeconomic status, and growth among working boys in Jordan  

Microsoft Academic Search

AIMSTo describe the work, family socioeconomic characteristics, and growth of a representative sample of working children in Jordan.METHODSIn a cross sectional survey of growth and health, 135 working children (aged 10–16 years) were studied in the areas of Irbid, Jarash, and North Jordan Valley. The children and their parents were interviewed and data collected on length of working week, income

H Hawamdeh; N Spencer

2001-01-01

167

Changes in the distribution of family hours worked since 1950  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes trends in average weekly hours of market work per person and per family in the United States between 1950 and 2005. We disaggregate married couple households by skill level to determine if there is a pattern in the hours of work by wives and husbands conditional on either husband's wages or on husband's educational attainment. The wage

Ellen R. McGrattan; Richard Rogerson

2007-01-01

168

Work Choices of Mothers in Families with Children with Disabilities.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The choice of women with children to work full time, part time, or not at all was estimated as a function of individual and family characteristics, including the number and ages of children with disabilities. The presence of young children, with or without disabilities, has a significant negative influence on the work choice of both single and…

Porterfield, Shirley L.

2002-01-01

169

Ten adaptive strategies for family and work balance: advice from successful families.  

PubMed

Despite negative media images and social dynamics insensitive to the lives of many dual-career couples, research shows that these families are largely healthy and thriving. In this study, we investigated the adaptive strategies of middle-class, dual-earner couples (N = 47) with children that are successfully managing family and work. Guided by grounded-theory methodology, analysis of interview data revealed that these successful couples structured their lives around 10 major strategies: Valuing family, striving for partnership, deriving meaning from work, maintaining work boundaries, focusing and producing at work, taking pride in dual earning, prioritizing family fun, living simply, making decisions proactively, and valuing time. Each adaptive strategy is defined and illustrated through the participants' own words. Clinical applications for therapists working with dual-earner couples are offered. PMID:11594013

Haddock, S A; Zimmerman, T S; Ziemba, S J; Current, L R

2001-10-01

170

Constructing Work-Life Balance and Fatherhood: Men's Framing of the Meanings of Both Work and Family  

Microsoft Academic Search

We explored 18 fathers' interviews to locate how they constructed work-family balance and their fatherhood roles within their particular life contexts. Using the constant comparative method, we found that these men framed and enlarged work-family balance as both work and life negotiations but elevated family as first by linking family to their meanings of work. To them, fatherhood meant webs

John D. Duckworth; Patrice M. Buzzanell

2009-01-01

171

Firms' contribution to the reconciliation between work and family life  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abstract This paper is a first attempt to provide a comparative view of voluntary family-friendly work arrangements,within firms across the OECD area. It is based on detailed surveys available in Australia, Japan, the United Kingdom and the United States, coupled with restricted, but more comparable,evidence for the European Union. The evidence shows that the extent of family- friendly arrangements,is both

John M. Evans

2000-01-01

172

Psychological distress among employed fathers: associations with family structure, work quality, and the work-family interface.  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to compare levels of psychological distress in employed single fathers relative to partnered fathers and to explore the role of psychosocial job quality, work-family conflict, and work-family facilitation as explanations for differences in distress. The data were collected from a cross-sectional telephone survey conducted in a Canadian city. Participants were 486 employed fathers with children living in the household. In addition to experiencing higher levels of psychological distress than partnered fathers (p = .057), single fathers reported greater work-family conflict, poorer work quality, and lower family-to-work facilitation. Adjusting for the strain-based work-family conflict variables in the regression analysis resulted in the largest reduction to the association between partner status and psychological distress. Future research employing a longitudinal design and subject to lower selection biases is required to tease out the interrelationship between these exposures and to point to the most appropriate policies to support employed single fathers. PMID:22398993

Janzen, Bonnie L; Kelly, Ivan W

2012-03-07

173

Preparing Minority Adolescents to Blend Work and Family Roles: Increasing Work-Family Conflict Management Self Efficacy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Ethnic identity, information about the world of work, and mastery in specific career skills crucially impact the process of career development among minority adolescents. Identity and conflict management skills also affect one of the major stressors experienced by employees today: the work-family conflict. This paper presents a culturally appropriate career intervention program for increasing Israeli Arab adolescents’ self-efficacy to manage

Rachel Gali Cinamon

2006-01-01

174

Changing Workplaces to Reduce Work-Family Conflict: Schedule Control in a White-Collar Organization  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Work-family conflicts are common and consequential for employees, their families, and work organizations. Can workplaces be changed to reduce work-family conflict? Previous research has not been able to assess whether workplace policies or initiatives succeed in reducing work-family conflict or increasing work-family fit. Using longitudinal data…

Kelly, Erin L.; Moen, Phyllis; Tranby, Eric

2011-01-01

175

Changing Workplaces to Reduce Work-Family Conflict: Schedule Control in a White-Collar Organization  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Work-family conflicts are common and consequential for employees, their families, and work organizations. Can workplaces be changed to reduce work-family conflict? Previous research has not been able to assess whether workplace policies or initiatives succeed in reducing work-family conflict or increasing work-family fit. Using longitudinal data…

Kelly, Erin L.; Moen, Phyllis; Tranby, Eric

2011-01-01

176

Parental Work Demands and Parent-Child, Family, and Couple Leisure in Dutch Families: What Gives?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This study uses data on 898 Dutch couples with minor children to examine whether parental work demands are related differently to one-on-one parent-child, family, and couple leisure activities. The authors presume that the impact of working hours and work arrangements is smaller on activities that are prioritized highly and that are easier and…

Roeters, Anne; Treas, Judith K.

2011-01-01

177

Balancing Work and Family. Learning Guide 5. Project Connect. Linking Self-Family-Work.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This learning guide is designed to connect personal, family, and job responsibilities for adults and out-of-school youth in economically depressed areas of the state (including transitional ex-offenders and corrections populations) so that these individuals learn to manage and balance these aspects of their lives in order to prepare for or…

Emily Hall Tremaine Foundation, Inc., Hartford, CT.

178

The George W. Bush Economic Philosophy: How It Might Affect Working Families. Family Review.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Examines impact of presidential candidate George W. Bush's proposed tax cuts on families of various income levels. Discusses how replacing current five-rates with four lower rates would reduce high marginal tax rates for moderate-income working families, focusing on effects of reporting tax breaks in terms of actual dollars rather than…

Lindjord, Denise

2000-01-01

179

The Relationship of Family and Work Roles to Depression: Dual-Working Couples.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|In a study to explore the relationship of family and work roles to depression in dual career couples, 69 couples, in which both spouses worked full-time outside of the home and had at least one child under 18 years of age, completed the self-report Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression Scale (CES-D), and a questionnaire assessing work and…

Kanefield, Linda

180

Adults returning to school: the impact on family and work.  

PubMed

The authors examined the impact of attending a Weekend College (WEC) program on adult students' family, work, and social life. Student participants responded to a 26-item questionnaire and three open-ended questions. Regression analyses of the 566 completed surveys revealed that satisfaction with school and support from family and the work place were predictive of lower levels of stress. Content analyses of responses to open-ended questions showed that expected stress was the result of time constraints but also highlighted the positive aspects of continuing one's education. The study includes suggestions for designing programs to meet the needs of adult students. PMID:15098715

Kirby, Peter G; Biever, Joan L; Martinez, Isaac G; Gómez, John P

2004-01-01

181

When Family-Supportive Supervision Matters: Relations between Multiple Sources of Support and Work-Family Balance  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examines the mechanisms by which family-supportive supervision is related to employee work-family balance. Based on a sample of 170 business professionals, we found that the positive relation between family-supportive supervision and balance was fully mediated by work interference with family (WIF) and partially mediated by family

Greenhaus, Jeffrey H.; Ziegert, Jonathan C.; Allen, Tammy D.

2012-01-01

182

Conflict between Work and Family among New Zealand Teachers with Dependent Children  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Changes in family and employment patterns have lead to an increasing need for families to balance work and family roles. Little research has examined work and family conflict among teachers. In the present study, 69 New Zealand teachers completed a survey examining occupational-related demands, family-related demands, work and family conflict,…

Palmer, Melanie; Rose, Dennis; Sanders, Matthew; Randle, Fiona

2012-01-01

183

Conflict between Work and Family among New Zealand Teachers with Dependent Children  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Changes in family and employment patterns have lead to an increasing need for families to balance work and family roles. Little research has examined work and family conflict among teachers. In the present study, 69 New Zealand teachers completed a survey examining occupational-related demands, family-related demands, work and family conflict, and…

Palmer, Melanie; Rose, Dennis; Sanders, Matthew; Randle, Fiona

2012-01-01

184

77 FR 23238 - Guidelines for Home Energy Professionals: Standard Work Specifications for Single Family Energy...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...for Home Energy Professionals: Standard Work Specifications for Single Family Energy...for Home Energy Professionals: Standard Work Specifications for Single Family Energy...for Home Energy Professionals: Standard Work Specifications for Single Family...

2012-04-18

185

A Longitudinal Investigation of Work-Family Strains and Gains, Work Commitment, and Subsequent Employment Status among Partnered Working Mothers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of the work-family interface on mothers' commitment to work and the implications of that work commitment for subsequent employment. The study included a sample of employed partnered mothers who participated in the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Study of Early Child…

Mulvaney, Matthew K.; McNall, Laurel A.; Morrissey, Rebecca A.

2011-01-01

186

The Internet and academics' workload and work–family balance  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of this article is to analyse whether the Internet and other ICT technologies support a work–family balance amongst academics. The study is based on 20 in-depth interviews with academics in Iceland and analysed according to the Grounded Theory Approach. This study challenges the notion that the Internet, as part of ICT technology, makes it easier to establish a

Thamar M. Heijstra; Gudbjörg Linda Rafnsdottir

2010-01-01

187

The work\\/family challenge: A key career development issue  

Microsoft Academic Search

Never has there been a time in our recent history when the boundaries between work and home life have been so blurred. The U.S. Congress has debated several versions of national childcare and parental leave legislation. Front page stories on the loss of worker productivity due to family concerns adorn the business press. An increasing number of studies indicate that

William M. Kahnweiler; Jennifer B. Kahnweiler

1992-01-01

188

The Internet and Academics' Workload and Work-Family Balance  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The aim of this article is to analyse whether the Internet and other ICT technologies support a work-family balance amongst academics. The study is based on 20 in-depth interviews with academics in Iceland and analysed according to the Grounded Theory Approach. This study challenges the notion that the Internet, as part of ICT technology, makes…

Heijstra, Thamar M.; Rafnsdottir, Gudbjorg Linda

2010-01-01

189

Work\\/Family Benefits: Variables Related to Employees' Fairness Perceptions  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study investigated relations between several individual (parental status and gender) and situational (organization size, task interdependence, and productivity maintenance) variables with perceptions of the fairness of work\\/family benefits. Benefit availability, personal use, and coworker use along with age and race were included as control variables. A total of 283 employees from a variety of organizations participated. Results indicated that

Lauren Parker; Tammy D. Allen

2001-01-01

190

Mexican American Women: Schooling, Work, and Family. ERIC Digest.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This digest examines the interdependence of schooling, work, and family in the lives of Mexican American women. Mexican Americans have lower educational achievement than other Hispanic subgroups and the total U.S. population, although females do somewhat better than males. Hispanic students are overrepresented in classes for special education,…

Ortiz, Flora Ida

191

Head Start: It Works for Indiana Children and Families!  

Microsoft Academic Search

This technical report summarizes new and existing data to address the question, “Does Head Start work for Indiana children, families, and communities?” Data sources consulted in this study include the state Head Start Program Information Report, local Indiana Head Start and Early Head Start Programs, existing national studies of Head Start and Early Head Start, and local and national data

Jennifer Dobbs-Oates; James Elicker; Volker Thomas

2010-01-01

192

Does Work Experience Actually Work?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|As unemployment levels rise, so education and training move into the policy spotlight. For the government, this is a very uncomfortable place to be right now. A number of large companies have withdrawn from the flagship Work Programme--under which jobseekers are invited to take up unpaid work placements of between two and eight weeks--amid…

Field, John

2012-01-01

193

Does Work Experience Actually Work?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

As unemployment levels rise, so education and training move into the policy spotlight. For the government, this is a very uncomfortable place to be right now. A number of large companies have withdrawn from the flagship Work Programme--under which jobseekers are invited to take up unpaid work placements of between two and eight weeks--amid…

Field, John

2012-01-01

194

The Relationship between Core Self-Evaluations and Work and Family Satisfaction: The Mediating Role of Work-Family Conflict and Facilitation  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This study examines the impact of work-family conflict and work-family facilitation on work and family outcomes and explores the influence of core self-evaluations (CSE) among these relationships. CSE is comprised of self-esteem, neuroticism, locus of control, and general self-efficacy. CSE was found to be negatively related to work interfering…

Boyar, Scott L.; Mosley, Donald C., Jr.

2007-01-01

195

Work Interference with Dinnertime as a Mediator and Moderator Between Work Hours and Work and Family Outcomes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Using a sample of U.S. IBM employees who are parents (N = 1,580), the authors evaluated whether work interference with dinnertime mediates and moderates the relationship between work hours and work, personal, and family outcomes. The negative relationships between work hours and success in personal life, relationships with spouse\\/partner and children, and the perception of an emotionally healthy workplace were

Jenet I. Jacob; Sarah Allen; E. Jeffrey Hill; Nicole L. Mead; Maria Ferris

2008-01-01

196

Managing Time in Domestic SpaceHome-Based Contractors and Household Work  

Microsoft Academic Search

Much research shows that paid work performed at home supports a gendered division of household labor, leaving women disproportionately responsible for unpaid domestic work. For contract professionals, however, the flexibility to manage working time outside the constraints of a standard job allows both men and women to meld paid employment with household responsibilities. Interspersing paid and unpaid work, home-based contractors—both

Debra Osnowitz

2005-01-01

197

Working appreciatively to improve services for children and families.  

PubMed

Service improvement approaches are described that specifically focus on appreciating the positive that individuals bring to contexts related to children and family services. This includes application of Solution-Focused approaches, Appreciative Inquiry and other approaches that promote a positive emotional climate and focus on what works. Their conceptual foundations are explored and particularly their value in supporting working well with complex adaptive systems. Specific applications described include leadership and management practice, work in school settings, engaging clinicians in healthcare improvement, establishing clinical networks, work with homeless youth, child protection and approaches to drawing out best practice and community development. The theme that unites is a focus on developing effective relationships at all levels and a pragmatic focus on what works so that we can find opportunities to do more of it. PMID:19759068

Onyett, Steve

2009-10-01

198

WORKPLACE SOCIAL SUPPORT AND WORK-FAMILY CONFLICT: A META-ANALYSIS CLARIFYING THE INFLUENCE OF GENERAL AND WORK-FAMILY-SPECIFIC SUPERVISOR AND ORGANIZATIONAL SUPPORT  

PubMed Central

This article uses meta-analysis to develop a model integrating research on relationships between employee perceptions of general and work–family-specific supervisor and organizational support and work–family conflict. Drawing on 115 samples from 85 studies comprising 72,507 employees, we compared the relative influence of 4 types of workplace social support to work–family conflict: perceived organizational support (POS); supervisor support; perceived organizational work–family support, also known as family-supportive organizational perceptions (FSOP); and supervisor work–family support. Results show work–family-specific constructs of supervisor support and organization support are more strongly related to work–family conflict than general supervisor support and organization support, respectively. We then test a mediation model assessing the effects of all measures at once and show positive perceptions of general and work–family-specific supervisor indirectly relate to work–family conflict via organizational work–family support. These results demonstrate that work–family-specific support plays a central role in individuals’ work–family conflict experiences.

KOSSEK, ELLEN ERNST; PICHLER, SHAUN; BODNER, TODD; HAMMER, LESLIE B.

2011-01-01

199

Parental employment and work-family stress: Associations with family food environments  

PubMed Central

Parental employment provides many benefits to children's health. However, an increasing number of studies have observed associations between mothers' full-time employment and less healthful family food environments. Few studies have examined other ways in which parental employment may be associated with the family food environment, including the role of fathers' employment and parents' stress balancing work and home obligations. This study utilized data from Project F-EAT, a population-based study of a socio-demographically diverse sample of 3709 parents of adolescents living in a metropolitan area in the Midwestern United States, to examine cross-sectional associations between mothers' and fathers' employment status and parents' work-life stress with multiple aspects of the family food environment. Among parents participating in Project F-EAT, 64% of fathers and 46% of mothers were full-time employed, while 25% of fathers and 37% of mothers were not employed. Results showed that full-time employed mothers reported fewer family meals, less frequent encouragement of their adolescents' healthful eating, lower fruit and vegetable intake, and less time spent on food preparation, compared to part-time and not-employed mothers, after adjusting for socio-demographics. Full-time employed fathers reported significantly fewer hours of food preparation; no other associations were seen between fathers' employment status and characteristics of the family food environment. In contrast, higher work-life stress among both parents was associated with less healthful family food environment characteristics including less frequent family meals and more frequent sugar-sweetened beverage and fast food consumption by parents. Among dual-parent families, taking into account the employment characteristics of the other parent did not substantially alter the relationships between work-life stress and family food environment characteristics. While parental employment is beneficial for many families, identifying policy and programmatic strategies to reduce parents' work-life stress may have positive implications for the family food environment and for the eating patterns and related health outcomes of children and parents.

Bauer, Katherine W.; Hearst, Mary O.; Escoto, Kamisha; Berge, Jerica M.; Neumark-Sztainer, Dianne

2013-01-01

200

Cultural Perspective on Work and Family: Dual-Earner Israeli-Jewish and Arab Families at the Transition to Parenthood  

Microsoft Academic Search

Parents' functioning in the work and family roles was examined in traditional and modern societies at the transition to parenthood. Participants were 162 dual-earner Israeli-Jewish and Arab families, who were interviewed and observed in dyadic and triadic interactions. Arab parents reported better adaptation to work following the first childbirth, and the triadic family process in Jewish families was more cohesive.

Ruth Feldman; Shafiq Masalha; Roni Nadam

2001-01-01

201

Reconceptualizing the work-family interface: An ecological perspective on the correlates of positive and negative spillover between work and family  

Microsoft Academic Search

Ecological theory was used to develop a more expanded conceptualization of the work-family interface and to identify significant correlates of multiple dimensions of work-family spillover. Using data from employed adults participating in the National Survey of Midlife Development in the United States (N = 1,986), negative spillover from work to family, positive spillover from work to family, negative spillover from

Joseph G. Grzywacz; Nadine F. Marks

2000-01-01

202

Gender, the family and political thought: Revisiting Marx's work  

Microsoft Academic Search

This dissertation is the first book-length study devoted exclusively to Marx’s unique perspectives on gender and the family. It offers a fresh look at this topic in light of twenty-first century concerns. Although Marx’s writings on gender sometimes exhibit sexism, especially through the naturalization of certain female social functions, much of the time his work transcends these kinds of limitations

Heather Anne Brown

2009-01-01

203

Dual-Earner Families: The Importance of Work Stress and Family Stress for Psychological Well-Being  

Microsoft Academic Search

Scales of work stress and family stress as well as outcome measures of depression and self-esteem were completed by 94 mothers and 48 fathers in dual-earner families. Working mothers and working fathers reported equivalent levels of family stress, work stress, job–family interference, and psychological well-being, although mothers did report a higher level of lack of task sharing. Self-esteem and depression

Neala S. Schwartzberg; Rita Scher Dytell

1996-01-01

204

Work and Family Stress and Well-Being: An Examination of Person-Environment Fit in the Work and Family Domains  

Microsoft Academic Search

Research indicates that work and family are significant sources of stress. However, this research has underemphasized the cognitive appraisal process by which work and family generate stress. This study used person-environment fit theory to examine how the comparison of work and family experiences to the person's values relates to stress and well-being. Using data from 1758 employees, we assessed fit

Jeffrey R. Edwards; Nancy P. Rothbard

1999-01-01

205

Gender-Specific Perceptions of Four Dimensions of the Work/Family Interaction  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The aim of this study was twofold. The first intention was to examine the factorial validity of a work/family interaction in terms of the direction of influence (work-to-family vs. family-to-work) and type of effect (conflict vs. facilitation). Second, gender differences along these four dimensions of work/family interaction were explored. Data…

Innstrand, Siw Tone; Langballe, Ellen Melbye; Falkum, Erik; Espnes, Geir Arild; Aasland, Olaf Gjerlow

2009-01-01

206

Gender-Specific Perceptions of Four Dimensions of the Work/Family Interaction  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The aim of this study was twofold. The first intention was to examine the factorial validity of a work/family interaction in terms of the direction of influence (work-to-family vs. family-to-work) and type of effect (conflict vs. facilitation). Second, gender differences along these four dimensions of work/family interaction were explored. Data…

Innstrand, Siw Tone; Langballe, Ellen Melbye; Falkum, Erik; Espnes, Geir Arild; Aasland, Olaf Gjerlow

2009-01-01

207

Organizational work-family resources as predictors of job performance and attitudes: the process of work-family conflict and enrichment.  

PubMed

The goal of the current study was to test a model where organizational resources (aimed at managing work and family responsibilities) predict job attitudes and supervisor ratings of performance through the mechanisms of work-family conflict and work-family enrichment. Employees (n = 174) at a large metropolitan hospital were surveyed at two time periods regarding perceptions of family supportive supervisor behaviors (FSSB), family supportive organizational perceptions (FSOP), bidirectional work-family conflict, bidirectional work-family enrichment, and job attitudes. Supervisors were also asked to provide performance ratings at Time 2. Results revealed FSSB at Time 1 predicted job satisfaction, organizational commitment and intention to leave, as well as supervisor ratings of performance, at Time 2. In addition, both work-family enrichment and family-work enrichment were found to mediate relationships between FSSB and various organizational outcomes, while work-family conflict was not a significant mediator. Results support further testing of supervisor behaviors specific to family support, as well models that include bidirectional work-family enrichment as the mechanism by which work-family resources predict employee and organizational outcomes. PMID:22149204

Odle-Dusseau, Heather N; Britt, Thomas W; Greene-Shortridge, Tiffany M

2011-12-12

208

Working conditions and Work-Family Conflict in German hospital physicians: psychosocial and organisational predictors and consequences  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Germany currently experiences a situation of major physician attrition. The incompatibility between work and family has been discussed as one of the major reasons for the increasing departure of German physicians for non-clinical occupations or abroad. This study investigates predictors for one particular direction of Work-Family Conflict – namely work interfering with family conflict (WIF) – which are located

Isabelle Fuss; Matthias Nuebling; Hans-Martin Hasselhorn; David Schwappach; Monika A. Rieger

2008-01-01

209

What the Person Brings to the Table: Personality, Coping, and Work-Family Conflict  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Employees (N = 291) of various industries and companies were surveyed to study how individual factors (coping and personality) affect work-family conflict: strain-based work-to-family conflict (S-WFC), time-based work-to-family conflict (T-WFC), strain-based family-to-work conflict (S-FWC), and time-based family-to-work conflict (T-FWC). As…

Andreassi, Jeanine K.

2011-01-01

210

What the Person Brings to the Table: Personality, Coping, and Work-Family Conflict  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Employees (N = 291) of various industries and companies were surveyed to study how individual factors (coping and personality) affect work-family conflict: strain-based work-to-family conflict (S-WFC), time-based work-to-family conflict (T-WFC), strain-based family-to-work conflict (S-FWC), and time-based family-to-work conflict (T-FWC). As…

Andreassi, Jeanine K.

2011-01-01

211

Expanding the psychosocial work environment: workplace norms and work-family conflict as correlates of stress and health.  

PubMed

This study examined the contributions of organizational level norms about work requirements and social relations, and work-family conflict, to job stress and subjective health symptoms, controlling for Karasek's job demand-control-support model of the psychosocial work environment, in a sample of 1,346 employees from 56 firms in the Norwegian food and beverage industry. Hierarchical linear modeling analyses showed that organizational norms governing work performance and social relations, and work-to-family and family-to-work conflict, explained significant amounts of variance for job stress. The cross-level interaction between work performance norms and work-to-family conflict was also significantly related to job stress. Work-to-family conflict was significantly related to health symptoms, but family-to-work conflict and organizational norms were not. PMID:14700459

Hammer, Tove Helland; Saksvik, Per Øystein; Nytrø, Kjell; Torvatn, Hans; Bayazit, Mahmut

2004-01-01

212

Children, families and inter?agency work: experiences of partnership work in primary education settings  

Microsoft Academic Search

Despite UK government initiatives intended to address social exclusion, those with poor access to social and economic resources continue to experience unresponsive services. In these circumstances, small inter?agency projects may offer accessible alternatives. This article explores the implementation of inter?agency work at a local level, focusing on implications for families involved. It draws on a study of a Health Action

Linda Milbourne

2005-01-01

213

Flexible Work Arrangements, Job Satisfaction, and Turnover Intentions: The Mediating Role of Work-to-Family Enrichment  

Microsoft Academic Search

The authors examined the relation between the availability of 2 popular types of flexible work arrangements (i.e., flextime and compressed workweek) and work-to-family enrichment and, in turn, the relation between work-to-family enrichment and (a) job satisfaction and (b) turnover intentions. In a sample of 220 employed working adults, hierarchical regression analyses showed that work-to-family enrichment mediated the relation between flexible

Laurel A. McNall; Aline D. Masuda; Jessica M. Nicklin

2009-01-01

214

Family Social Work Practice: From Therapy to Policy.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses the lack of a comprehensive family policy in the United States and how it affects family therapy and social services. Although ideas about what constitutes a family has changed, what exists of U.S. family policy has not. Argues that family policy and family therapy are becoming mutually exclusive concepts. (JPS)

McNeece, C. Aaron

1995-01-01

215

Job Level, Demands, and Resources as Antecedents of Work-Family Conflict  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Although substantial research has examined the conflict that employees experience between their work and family roles, the literature has not investigated the prevalence and antecedents of work-family conflict for individuals who work at different levels of an organization. This study examines differences in work-family conflict (work

DiRenzo, Marco S.; Greenhaus, Jeffrey H.; Weer, Chisty H.

2011-01-01

216

Job Level, Demands, and Resources as Antecedents of Work-Family Conflict  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Although substantial research has examined the conflict that employees experience between their work and family roles, the literature has not investigated the prevalence and antecedents of work-family conflict for individuals who work at different levels of an organization. This study examines differences in work-family conflict (work interference…

DiRenzo, Marco S.; Greenhaus, Jeffrey H.; Weer, Chisty H.

2011-01-01

217

78 FR 18576 - Guidelines for Home Energy Professionals: Standard Work Specifications for Single Family Energy...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...for Home Energy Professionals: Standard Work Specifications for Single Family Energy...for Home Energy Professionals: Standard Work Specifications for Single Family Energy...This content is a set of recommended work specifications applicable to energy...

2013-03-27

218

77 FR 19008 - Guidelines for Home Energy Professionals: Standard Work Specifications for Single Family Energy...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...for Home Energy Professionals: Standard Work Specifications for Single Family Energy...for Home Energy Professionals: Standard Work Specifications for Single Family Energy Upgrades. This document is a set of work specifications applicable to energy...

2012-03-29

219

Work and Family Research in the First Decade of the 21st Century  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Scholarship on work and family topics expanded in scope and coverage during the 2000-2010 decade, spurred by an increased diversity of workplaces and of families, by methodological innovations, and by the growth of communities of scholars focused on the work-family nexus. We discuss these developments as the backdrop for emergent work-family

Bianchi, Suzanne M.; Milkie, Melissa A.

2010-01-01

220

Work and Family Research in the First Decade of the 21st Century  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Scholarship on work and family topics expanded in scope and coverage during the 2000-2010 decade, spurred by an increased diversity of workplaces and of families, by methodological innovations, and by the growth of communities of scholars focused on the work-family nexus. We discuss these developments as the backdrop for emergent work-family

Bianchi, Suzanne M.; Milkie, Melissa A.

2010-01-01

221

Preliminary Validation of the Work-Family Integration-Blurring Scale  

Microsoft Academic Search

Several studies of telecommuting and working at home have alluded to the blurring line between work and family that can result from such highly integrated work-family arrangements. However, little is known about working parents’ perceptions of the integration and blurring of their work and family roles. In this study, the authors created and validated the Work-Family Integration-Blurring Scale using a

Stephan Desrochers; Jeanne M. Hilton; Laurie Larwood

2005-01-01

222

Integrating a Family-Centered Approach into Social Work Practice with Families of Children and Adolescents with Disabilities  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article identifies a family-centered practice construct for working with children and adolescents with disabilities and their families. The experiences of these families have shifted considerably over the past 30 years. A legislative and historical context provides the basis for an understanding of present policies and practices that influence current approaches to service delivery. Though family-centered practice is emphasized in

Diana Strock-Lynskey; Diane W. Keller

2007-01-01

223

Families and Work. Proceedings Series of the Family Study Center Conference (Stillwater, Oklahoma, March 19-20, 1982). Volume 5.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

These proceedings explore issues pertaining to the combination of work and family roles from the perspectives of the family, business, government, labor, and the non-profit community. The six keynote addresses include an historical overview of families and work followed by unique perspectives representing labor, corporations, government, and the…

Hirschlein, Beulah M., Ed.; Braun, William J., Ed.

224

Social Class and the Experience of Work-Family Conflict during the Transition to Adulthood  

PubMed Central

The challenges of juggling work and family responsibilities are well known, but there has been little attention to the distinctive work and family experiences of young adults. In this chapter, we explore how class affects young adults’ exposure to work-family conflicts and the strategies they use to manage their work and family responsibilities. Using data from a recent cohort of young adults, we find class and gender variations in work and family roles and work-family conflict. Early family formation, coupled with poor working conditions, lead those with lower educational attainments to experience more years of family-to-work interference. In contrast, young adults with more education have more work-to-family interference, and this is especially true for college-educated women.

Ammons, Samantha K.; Kelly, Erin L.

2008-01-01

225

Gender, Time and Inequality: Trends in Women's and Men's Paid Work, Unpaid Work and Free Time  

Microsoft Academic Search

This analysis uses nationally representative time diary data from 1965, 1975 and 1998 to examine trends and gender differences in time use. Women continue to do more household labor than men; however, men have substantially increased time in core household activities such as cooking, cleaning and daily child care. Nonetheless, a 30-minute-per-day free-time gap has emerged. Women and men appear

Liana C. Sayer

2005-01-01

226

Working for Mom and Dad: Are Teens More Likely to Get Injured Working in Family-Owned Businesses?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recent controversy regarding the issue of children working in family-owned businesses has come to the forefront, pitting safety\\u000a and health versus parent’s right to teach their children the family trade. While studies have characterized injury among working\\u000a teens, no studies have assessed work and injury among teens employed in family-owned businesses. This study is the first to\\u000a examine teenagers working

Kristina M. Zierold; Savi Appana; Henry A. Anderson

227

Trait mindfulness and work–family balance among working parents: The mediating effects of vitality and sleep quality  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present study investigates the relationship between trait mindfulness and work–family balance among a sample of working parents. Sleep quality and vitality are tested as mediators of this relationship. Results indicate that those with greater mindfulness report greater work–family balance, better sleep quality, and greater vitality. As expected, the relationship between mindfulness and work–family balance was mediated by sleep quality

Tammy D. Allen; Kaitlin M. Kiburz

228

[Promoting family planning work in Xiaqidu township by establishing a family planning association in each village].  

PubMed

A family planning association was established in each village of Xiaqidu Township in Hunan Province, China in October 1986. The positive functions of each such association were so fully developed that family planning work reached new levels. For example, most villages are no longer experiencing early marriages or unplanned births. Some of the villages have established associations for individual work groups. The traditional method was for both township and village associations to rely upon the positive attitudes of officials to instill into fertile women Party policy, and to arouse their patriotism and initiative. By establishing family planning associations at the village level, however, the people can conduct their own affairs and educate themselves. Emphasis has been placed on attracting into the associations those who are of childbearing age, as well as older villagers of experience. The associations' raison d'etre was to serve the people. They did so through: propaganda (disseminating population theory, birth control and family planning information); helping the people overcome poverty, traditional thinking, and ignorance; assisting women with any problems and anxieties relating to child-bearing; delivering contraceptives to households; and providing the elderly with care and the young with education. PMID:12159303

Li, C

1987-07-01

229

Working for mom and dad: are teens more likely to get injured working in family-owned businesses?  

PubMed

Recent controversy regarding the issue of children working in family-owned businesses has come to the forefront, pitting safety and health versus parent's right to teach their children the family trade. While studies have characterized injury among working teens, no studies have assessed work and injury among teens employed in family-owned businesses. This study is the first to examine teenagers working in family-owned businesses and to compare the experiences of teens working in family-businesses to the experiences of other working teens. A questionnaire was distributed to 8,085 teens in high schools throughout the five public health regions of Wisconsin. A total of 6, 810 teens responded (84%). Overall 2,858 high school teens aged 14-17 reported working (42%); of which 963 (34%) worked in a family-business. Teens working in family-businesses were more likely to report that their injury was severe, affecting their activities for more than three days, compared with other working teens (33% vs. 21%, P = 0.05). The percentage of teens working in family-businesses that reported broken bones or crushed body parts was 17% compared to only 5% of other-working teens. Additionally, teens employed in family-businesses were more likely to file for workers' compensation (28% vs. 12%, P = 0.005). Teens working in family-owned businesses may be at a greater risk for more severe injury based on the jobs and tasks they are doing. Teens working in family-owned businesses were more likely to report engaging in dangerous tasks, including some that are illegal under the Hazardous Occupation Orders. More research is needed to assess the dynamics that exist for teens working in family-owned businesses. PMID:21717209

Zierold, Kristina M; Appana, Savi; Anderson, Henry A

2012-02-01

230

Is There a Downside to Schedule Control for the Work-Family Interface?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Using data from a 2007 U.S. survey of workers, this article examines the implications of schedule control for work-family role blurring and work-family conflict. Four main findings indicate that (a) schedule control is associated with more frequent working at home and work-family multitasking activities; (b) the positive association between…

Schieman, Scott; Young, Marisa

2010-01-01

231

Is There a Downside to Schedule Control for the Work-Family Interface?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Using data from a 2007 U.S. survey of workers, this article examines the implications of schedule control for work-family role blurring and work-family conflict. Four main findings indicate that (a) schedule control is associated with more frequent working at home and work-family multitasking activities; (b) the positive association between…

Schieman, Scott; Young, Marisa

2010-01-01

232

Developing and Testing an Integrative Model of the Work–Family Interface  

Microsoft Academic Search

An integrative model of the work–family interface was developed and tested. This model extends prior work by Frone, Russell, and Cooper (1992a). Although the present model adopts the distinction between work-to-family and family-to-work conflict, several important changes have been incorporated. First, a more explicit attempt is made to model the reciprocal (i.e., feedback) relations between work and family life. Second,

Michael R. Frone; John K. Yardley; Karen S. Markel

1997-01-01

233

45 CFR 261.25 - Do we count Tribal families in calculating the work participation rate?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-10-01 false Do we count Tribal families in calculating the work participation...Relating to Public Welfare OFFICE OF FAMILY ASSISTANCE (ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS), ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN AND FAMILIES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN...

2011-10-01

234

45 CFR 261.25 - Do we count Tribal families in calculating the work participation rate?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-10-01 false Do we count Tribal families in calculating the work participation...261.25 Public Welfare OFFICE OF FAMILY ASSISTANCE (ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS), ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN AND FAMILIES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN...

2012-10-01

235

Working HIV care-givers in Botswana: Spillover effects on work and family well-being  

Microsoft Academic Search

Families provide most of the care to the tens of millions of HIV-infected and -affected in Africa. Little research exists on how care-givers balance the demands of holding a job with providing care for those who have become ill or orphaned by HIV\\/AIDS. Using data from a large survey administered to 1,077 working care-givers in Botswana, we compared the experience

Divya Rajaraman; Alison Earle; S. Jody Heymann

2008-01-01

236

Quality of Work Life as a Mediator Between Emotional Labor and Work Family Interference  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose  We adopted the conservation of resources model (COR, Hobfoll Am Psychol 44:513–524, 1989; Hobfoll in Stress, culture, and community: the psychology and philosophy of stress, Plenum, New York, 1998) to examine the associations among emotional labor, work family interference, and quality of work life.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Design\\/Methodology\\/Approach  Cross-sectional, self-reported data were obtained from 442 Hong Kong Chinese service employees.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Findings  Correlation and hierarchical regression

Francis Yue-Lok Cheung; Catherine So-Kum Tang

2009-01-01

237

Changing Workplaces to Reduce Work-Family Conflict: Schedule Control in a White-Collar Organization  

PubMed Central

Work-family conflicts are common and consequential for employees, their families, and work organizations. Can workplaces be changed to reduce work-family conflict? Previous research has not been able to assess whether workplace policies or initiatives succeed in reducing work-family conflict or increasing work-family fit. Using longitudinal data collected from 608 employees of a white-collar organization before and after a workplace initiative was implemented, we investigate whether the initiative affects work-family conflict and fit, whether schedule control mediates these effects, and whether work demands, including long hours, moderate the initiative’s effects on work-family outcomes. Analyses clearly demonstrate that the workplace initiative positively affects the work-family interface, primarily by increasing employees’ schedule control. This study points to the importance of schedule control for our understanding of job quality and for management policies and practices.

Kelly, Erin L.; Moen, Phyllis; Tranby, Eric

2011-01-01

238

Commentary: what role for the family and Medical Leave Act in long-term care policy?  

PubMed

The Family and Medical Leave Act provides unpaid leave but a key component is its intergenerational structure, permitting employees to take time off from work to care for an infant as well as an ill elderly parent. However, in an effort to provide paid leave, 23 of 28 states dropped the elder care provision in new initiatives introduced between 2000 and 2003. This article argues that in reforming leave policy in the future, the leave should be paid, remain intergenerational, cover more workers, and be adaptable to changing family patterns in an aging society. Also discussed is California's paid leave law, which meets these criteria. PMID:17135096

Wisensale, Steven K

2006-01-01

239

Health and Turnover of Working Mothers after Childbirth via the Work-Family Interface: An Analysis across Time  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This study examined organizational levers that impact work-family experiences, participant health, and subsequent turnover. Using a sample of 179 women returning to full-time work 4 months after childbirth, we examined the associations of 3 job resources (job security, skill discretion, and schedule control) with work-to-family enrichment and the…

Carlson, Dawn S.; Grzywacz, Joseph G.; Ferguson, Merideth; Hunter, Emily M.; Clinch, C. Randall; Arcury, Thomas A.

2011-01-01

240

Health and Turnover of Working Mothers after Childbirth via the Work-Family Interface: An Analysis across Time  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined organizational levers that impact work-family experiences, participant health, and subsequent turnover. Using a sample of 179 women returning to full-time work 4 months after childbirth, we examined the associations of 3 job resources (job security, skill discretion, and schedule control) with work-to-family enrichment and the…

Carlson, Dawn S.; Grzywacz, Joseph G.; Ferguson, Merideth; Hunter, Emily M.; Clinch, C. Randall; Arcury, Thomas A.

2011-01-01

241

Trait Mindfulness and Work-Family Balance among Working Parents: The Mediating Effects of Vitality and Sleep Quality  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The present study investigates the relationship between trait mindfulness and work-family balance among a sample of working parents. Sleep quality and vitality are tested as mediators of this relationship. Results indicate that those with greater mindfulness report greater work-family balance, better sleep quality, and greater vitality. As…

Allen, Tammy D.; Kiburz, Kaitlin M.

2012-01-01

242

Supervisor Support, Work-Family Conflict, and Satisfaction Outcomes: An Empirical Study in the Hotel Industry  

Microsoft Academic Search

The current study developed and tested a model that investigated the relationship of supervisor support with work-family conflict and family-work conflict and the effects of both directions of conflict with family satisfaction, career satisfaction, and life satisfaction. The model also examined the impact of supervisor support on family and career satisfaction outcomes and the effects of these satisfaction variables on

Osman M. Karatepe; Orhan Uludag

2008-01-01

243

MOTHER'S EMPLOYMENT DEMANDS, WORK-FAMILY CONFLICT, AND ADOLESCENT DEVELOPMENT*  

PubMed Central

This study revisited the old research question of whether or not maternal employment would adversely affect children’s development. We reframed the question by asking how a mother’s temporal employment demands might be linked to child development. We used longitudinal data from a sample of 340 white, lower- to middle-class, dual-earner families living in the rural Midwest of the United States. The data were obtained from questionnaires and videotaped observations, and were informed by the mother, the father, the adolescent child, and a trained observer. As predicted, we found a strong relationship between a mother’s temporal employment demands and work-family conflict, which was significantly associated with her emotional distress. A husband’s egalitarian gender ideology was found to reduce the mother’s emotional distress. Maternal distress was then negatively associated with nurturant and involved parenting, which in turn predicted a reduction in the adolescent child’s emotional and behavioral problems over time.

Chee, Kyong Hee; Conger, Rand D.; Elder, Glen H.

2009-01-01

244

The Family Group Conference: Does it work for child protection?  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper summaries the values, goals and philosophy underpinning the care and protection system in New Zealand and in particular emphasises the importance of: participatory practice involving families, whanau and communities; diverting families from more formal processes and keeping them within their families and communities, empowering families and children to take decisions about their own lives, and broadening the safety

Gabrielle Maxwell; Shannon Pakura

245

Positive and Negative Effects of Family Involvement on Work-Related Burnout  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|We aimed to explain the influence of family involvement on feelings of burnout among employees who combine work and family tasks. As proxies for family involvement, we used the family structure (partner, number and age of children) and family tasks (e.g. hours spent on household chores). We compared conflict theory and enrichment theory, and…

ten Brummelhuis, Lieke L.; van der Lippe, Tanja; Kluwer, Esther S.; Flap, Henk

2008-01-01

246

Partnerships at Work: Lessons Learned from Programs and Practices of Families, Professionals and Communities.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Designed to celebrate family/interprofessional collaborative partnerships, this publication describes high-quality examples of how families and professionals at the family, community, state, and national levels have worked together to create programs and practices that are family-friendly and responsive to what families have said they want and…

Bishop, Kathleen Kirk, Ed.; Taylor, Mary Skidmore, Ed.; Arango, Polly, Ed.

247

Partnerships at Work: Lessons Learned from Programs and Practices of Families, Professionals and Communities.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Designed to celebrate family/interprofessional collaborative partnerships, this publication describes high-quality examples of how families and professionals at the family, community, state, and national levels have worked together to create programs and practices that are family-friendly and responsive to what families have said they want and…

Bishop, Kathleen Kirk, Ed.; Taylor, Mary Skidmore, Ed.; Arango, Polly, Ed.

248

A stigma identification framework for family nurses working with parents who are lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgendered and their families.  

PubMed

Parent relationships and family life provide important psychological and health benefits for growing children and adults. Social stigma experienced by parents who are lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgendered, and by their children, creates significant stress on families. Families headed by parents who are sexual orientation or gender identity minorities may require special guidance for navigating an unusually complicated terrain related to parenting and family life. The focus of this article is social stigma, its causes, and health impacts on these families. Approaches that family nurses can take to evaluate stigma when working with this population of families are identified and discussed. This article reviews practice and research literature to examine the impacts of stigma on the social security, lived experience, and health status of these families. The article then applies the Link and Phelan (2001) stigmatization model to work with LGBT parents to help family nurses improve practice effectiveness. PMID:21051755

Weber, Scott

2010-11-01

249

Perceived versus used workplace flexibility in Singapore: predicting work-family fit.  

PubMed

This study examined the relationship of 2 types of workplace flexibility to work-family fit and work, personal, and marriage-family outcomes using data (N = 1,601) representative of employed persons in Singapore. We hypothesized that perceived and used workplace flexibility would be positively related to the study variables. Results derived from structural equation modeling revealed that perceived flexibility predicted work-family fit; however, used flexibility did not. Work-family fit related positively to each work, personal, and marriage-family outcome; however, workplace flexibility only predicted work and personal outcomes. Findings suggest work-family fit may be an important facilitating factor in the interface between work and family life, relating directly to marital satisfaction and satisfaction in other family relationships. Implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:18855513

Jones, Blake L; Scoville, D Phillip; Hill, E Jeffrey; Childs, Geniel; Leishman, Joan M; Nally, Kathryn S

2008-10-01

250

Work-family enrichment as a mediator between organizational interventions for work-life balance and job outcomes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – This paper aims to examine the role of work-family enrichment in the relationships between organizational interventions for work-life balance (job characteristics, work-life benefits and policies, supervisor support and work-family culture) and job outcomes (job satisfaction, affective commitment and organizational citizenship behaviour). It is hypothesized that organizational interventions for work-life balance will be positively related to job outcomes and

Rupashree Baral; Shivganesh Bhargava

2010-01-01

251

Work and Family Commitment and Decision-Making Status Among Emerging Adults  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study was designed to investigate work–family attitudes among emerging adults. Participants were 46 male and 49 female college juniors and seniors. Men and women had similar levels of work and family commitment. For women there was a negative correlation between work and family commitment. Exploratory analyses indicated different relationships between work decision-making status and commitment and family decision-making status

Stacey R. Friedman; Carol S. Weissbrod

2005-01-01

252

Self and Spouse-Reported Work–Family Conflict and Dual-Earners’ Job Satisfaction  

Microsoft Academic Search

We add to the literature on job satisfaction by examining the role played by self-reported and spouse-reported work–family conflict for dual-earner husbands and wives (N = 156 couples, 312 individuals), a contagion model of work and family. Two path models of job satisfaction were tested: a spillover model, including the respondent's work-to-family conflict and family-to-work conflict, and a crossover model, including the

Daphne E. Pedersen; Krista Lynn Minnotte

2012-01-01

253

Work-family culture and job satisfaction: does gender and parenting status alter the relationship?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Previous studies on work-family culture have examined its relationship with different employee outcomes (e.g., work-family conflict, job satisfaction, commitment) but neglected one important question; namely, who are most likely to benefit from a supportive work-family culture in terms of positive employee outcomes? The aim of this study was to shed new light on the work-family culture–job satisfaction linkage by examining

Saija Mauno; Ulla Kinnunen; Taru Feldt

2011-01-01

254

Work-family culture and job satisfaction: does gender and parenting status alter the relationship?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Previous studies on work-family culture have examined its relationship with different employee outcomes (e.g., work-family conflict, job satisfaction, commitment) but neglected one important question; namely, who are most likely to benefit from a supportive work-family culture in terms of positive employee outcomes? The aim of this study was to shed new light on the work-family culture–job satisfaction linkage by examining

Saija Mauno; Ulla Kinnunen; Taru Feldt

2012-01-01

255

Rhythms of Life: Antecedents and Outcomes of Work-Family Balance in Employed Parents  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined antecedents and outcomes of a fourfold taxonomy of work-family balance in terms of the direction of influence (work-family vs. family-work) and type of effect (conflict vs. facilitation). Respondents were full-time employed parents in India. Confirmatory factor analysis results provided evidence for the discriminant validity of M. R. Frone's (2003) fourfold taxonomy of work-family balance. Results of moderated

Samuel Aryee; E. S. Srinivas; Hwee Hoon Tan

2005-01-01

256

Rhythms of Life: Antecedents and Outcomes of Work - Family Balance in Employed Parents  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined antecedents and outcomes of a fourfold taxonomy of work-family balance in terms of the direction of influence (work-family vs. family-work) and type of effect (conflict vs. facilitation). Respondents were full-time employed parents in India. Confirmatory factor analysis results provided evidence for the discriminant validity of M. R. Frone' s (2003) fourfold taxonomy of work-family balance. Results of

S. Aryee; E. S. Srinivas; Hwee Hoon TAN

2010-01-01

257

The Work–Family Interface in the United States and Singapore: Conflict Across Cultures  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article examines the work–family interface in a cross-cultural comparison between two nationally representative samples from the United States (n = 1,860) and Singapore (n = 1,035) with emphasis on work–family conflict. Family-to-work conflict was negatively related to marital satisfaction in both Singapore and the United States, although the effect was stronger in the United States. Similarly, family-to-work conflict was

Adam M. Galovan; Tamara Fackrell; Lydia Buswell; Blake L. Jones; E. Jeffrey Hill; Sarah June Carroll

2010-01-01

258

An assessment of the feasibility of health authorities generating unpaid mass media publicity in the long term  

Microsoft Academic Search

Generating unpaid mass media coverage has been shown to be the most cost-effective method of reducing smoking prevalence. This study looks at the feasibility of generating such unpaid coverage over a prolonged period. Press releases, letters for publication and articles on tobacco-related items Were sent to the local media by an initiative co-ordinated by a health authority cancer-prevention project. Between

Jennifer Mindell

1997-01-01

259

Work-Family Boundary Strategies: Stability and Alignment between Preferred and Enacted Boundaries  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Are individuals bounding work and family the way they would like? Much of the work-family boundary literature focuses on whether employees are segmenting or integrating work with family, but does not explore the boundaries workers would like to have, nor does it examine the fit between desired and enacted boundaries, or assess boundary stability.…

Ammons, Samantha K.

2013-01-01

260

Work-Family Conflict, Perceived Supervisor Support and Organizational Commitment among Brazilian Professionals  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The current study examines a variety of relationships pertaining to work-family conflict among a sample of Brazilian professionals, in order to shed light on work-family issues in this cultural context. Drawing from the cultural values of Brazil and social identity theory, we examine the relationships of two directions of work-family conflict…

Casper, Wendy Jean; Harris, Christopher; Taylor-Bianco, Amy; Wayne, Julie Holliday

2011-01-01

261

Work-Family Conflict, Perceived Supervisor Support and Organizational Commitment among Brazilian Professionals  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The current study examines a variety of relationships pertaining to work-family conflict among a sample of Brazilian professionals, in order to shed light on work-family issues in this cultural context. Drawing from the cultural values of Brazil and social identity theory, we examine the relationships of two directions of work-family conflict…

Casper, Wendy Jean; Harris, Christopher; Taylor-Bianco, Amy; Wayne, Julie Holliday

2011-01-01

262

Examining the Constructs of Work-to-Family Enrichment and Positive Spillover  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This paper reports three studies examining construct validity evidence for two recently developed measures of the positive side of the work-family interface: work-to-family positive spillover (WFPS; Hanson, Hammer, & Colton, 2006) and work-to-family enrichment (WFE; Carlson, Kacmar, Wayne, & Grzywacz, 2006). Using confirmatory factor analysis,…

Masuda, Aline D.; McNall, Laurel A.; Allen, Tammy D.; Nicklin, Jessica M.

2012-01-01

263

Opening Doors: Students' Perspectives on Juggling Work, Family, and College  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

A Manpower Demonstration Research Corporation's report, Opening Doors: Students' Perspectives on Juggling Work, Family, and College sheds light on factors sometimes overlooked by legislators and policymakers as they seek to better the circumstances of America's underclass. Recognizing the critical role of education and vocational training in improving upward mobility, key players effectively fail to appreciate that access to higher education means very little to those already overburdened with substantial work and childcare responsibilities. Focusing exclusively on educational opportunities afforded by large metropolitan community college systems, the study examined an ethnically diverse array of students grouped in three categories: one currently attending a community college, one that had failed to complete a degree or certificate program, and one that had never matriculated in such a program but which hoped to at some point. As readers of the report will discover, the desire to move up the socio-economic ladder through higher education is pronounced across a broad spectrum of America's low-wage population, if only they can find the time, the money, and the broader systemic support necessary to realize such achievements.

Seupersad, Reishma.; Diaz, Melisa.; Wavelet, Melissa.; Gooden, Susan.; Matus-Grossman, Lisa.

2002-01-01

264

Family Leave: It's the Law.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) gives employees the right to take up to 12 weeks of unpaid leave a year for medical or family reasons. Provides key provisions of FMLA as they apply to schools and advises districts to consult school attorneys to help ensure compliance with the act and with the interim regulations issued last summer. (MLF)|

Arnold, Jean B.

1993-01-01

265

Army Family Research Program. Second Annual Work Plan  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Army Family Research Program (AFRP) is a 5-year integrated research program that supports the Chief of Staff of the Army (CSA) White Paper 1983: The Army Family and the Army Family Action Plans (1984-1990) by developing databases, models, program eval...

A. M. Cruze

1990-01-01

266

Thematic content analysis of work-family interactions: Retired cosmonauts’ reflections  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Anecdotal evidence and qualitative research attest to the importance of work-family interactions pre-, during and post-missions. This study uses thematic content analysis to quantify characteristics of work-family interactions and how these changed by stage of cosmonauts’ career, identifying the effect of space career variables (e.g., time in space and station) on such interactions during and post-career. Using a thematic scoring scheme developed for this study, we coded work-family interactions identified from interviews with 20 retired male cosmonauts. The majority of work-family interactions were ones in which work overlapped into family life and work hindered or interfered with the family situation. The most common resolution was that family adjusted to work, and the mood or tone about this outcome was almost equally divided among negative, positive and neutral. Changes in work-family interactions and their resolution over the cosmonaut’s life showed that the significant interactions were most evident during the cosmonaut career. Although the cosmonaut career has high work demands, it did adjust for family when the need arose. The Russian Space Agency (RKS) eased the impact of the periodic absences, especially through regular communication sessions. Positive work-family interactions, i.e., work or family helping the opposite role, were more likely for those who had been on ISS, not Mir, and for those whose last flight was after 2000. Our data reflect retired cosmonauts’ recollections of work-family interactions during their career. Examples of work overlapping into family life and work viewed as interfering with family life were possibly more salient or better remembered than work or family helping the other role.

Johnson, Phyllis J.; Asmaro, Deyar; Suedfeld, Peter; Gushin, Vadim

2012-12-01

267

Immigrant women in Australia: resources, family and work.  

PubMed

Using the 1% public use sample of individual records from the 1981 census and adopting direct standardization for age and sex regression techniques, this paper describes differences among native born Australians and immigrants from English-speaking countries, Northwestern Europe, Eastern Europe, the Mediterranean region and the Third World, in areas of labor participation, unemployment, occupational status, entrepreneurship, and income. While Eastern European women are the most likely to be in the labor force, are the most likely to be unemployed and are the highest paid, Mediterranean women are the least likely to be in the labor force, have fairly low unemployment rates and occupy the lowest status positions and receive the lowest wages. Native born Australians and immigrants from English-speaking and Third World countries and Northwestern Europe are intermediate between these 2 extremes on most dimensions. Some of the differences are not large. In particular, labor force participation only ranges from 49% to 59% and self employment from 9% to 14%. The most apparent differences in work patterns of the various groups of immigrants stem from differences in their own resources and constranits, or from different modes of adaptation to the Australian society, rather than from differential treatment in the labor market. Although family roles affect aspects of work differently, in general, marriage reduces labor force participation by more than 10% among all groups, except for East Europeans and the Mediterraneans, among whom it has no effect. While East European women hold on to their jobs as a potential source of livelihood in the event of divorce which is common among this group, the Mediterraneans view jobs as a means of achieving a measure of economic security. The effect of length of stay in Australia on labor market participation is somewhat larger for women from non-English speaking countries, whose adaptation process includes a slow improvement in language skills. In general, the Australian labor market appears to treat all immigrants equally without regard to their country of origin. PMID:12340229

Evans, M D

1984-01-01

268

Health and turnover of working mothers after childbirth via the work-family interface: an analysis across time.  

PubMed

This study examined organizational levers that impact work-family experiences, participant health, and subsequent turnover. Using a sample of 179 women returning to full-time work 4 months after childbirth, we examined the associations of 3 job resources (job security, skill discretion, and schedule control) with work-to-family enrichment and the associations of 2 job demands (psychological requirements and nonstandard work schedules) with work-to-family conflict. Further, we considered subsequent impact of work-to-family conflict and enrichment on women's health (physical and mental health) 8 months after women returned to work and the impact of health on voluntary turnover 12 months after women returned to work. Having a nonstandard work schedule was directly and positively related to conflict, whereas schedule control buffered the effect of psychological requirements on conflict. Skill discretion and job security, both job resources, directly and positively related to enrichment. Work-to-family conflict was negatively related to both physical and mental health, but work-to-family enrichment positively predicted only physical health. Physical health and mental health both negatively influenced turnover. We discuss implications and opportunities for future research. PMID:21604833

Carlson, Dawn S; Grzywacz, Joseph G; Ferguson, Merideth; Hunter, Emily M; Clinch, C Randall; Arcury, Thomas A

2011-09-01

269

Balancing work and family with telework? Organizational issues and challenges for women and managers  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article presents a research on telework and deals with the following questions: Who are the teleworkers (sex, age, main socio-occupational categories)? What are the impacts of telework on work organization and working conditions, particularly for women, and in terms of work-family balance, since telework is sometimes presented as a solution to problems of reconciling work and family responsibilities? Finally,

Diane-Gabrielle Tremblay

2002-01-01

270

The Work-Family Support Roles of Child Care Providers across Settings  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper presents a qualitative investigation of the work-family support roles of a sample of 29 child care providers serving low-income families in the Chicago area (16 family, friend, and neighbor providers (FFN), 7 licensed family child care providers (FCC), and 6 center-based teachers). Providers report offering low-income parents…

Bromer, Juliet; Henly, Julia R.

2009-01-01

271

Narrative and Collaborative Practices in Work with Families that Are Homeless  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article reports on the use of narrative therapy ideas and practices in working with families that are homeless in a shelter-based, multiple-family discussion group program called Fresh Start for Families. It begins with a review of the challenges facing homeless families. It then briefly describes the collaborative methods used to develop the…

Fraenkel, Peter; Hameline, Thomas; Shannon, Michele

2009-01-01

272

The health effects of work and family role characteristics: Gender and race comparisons  

Microsoft Academic Search

Many studies have documented the benefits of work and family roles for both physical and mental health. A number of these studies have suggested that work and family roles are beneficial to the degree that they entail rewarding relationships and activities. Using data from the National Survey of Families and Households (N = 10633; 17 percent African-American), this paper examines

Beth Rushing; Annette Schwabe

1995-01-01

273

Can We Really Have It All? The Attainment of Work and Family Values  

Microsoft Academic Search

We discuss the role values and value attainment play in the complex and dynamic process of balancing work and family demands. We contend that an individual experiences conflict between work and family demands because of value incongruence between that individual and a pivotal family member (i.e., lack of value similarity) or because of the incongruent values between that individual and

Pamela L. Perrewé; Wayne A. Hochwarter

2001-01-01

274

Family and Work Influences on the Transition to College among Latina Adolescents  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This study investigates the effect of family obligations and part-time work on Latina adolescents' stress and academic achievement during the transition to college. One hundred seventeen Latina college students from immigrant families completed surveys assessing the mother-daughter relationship, family obligations, work-school conflict, school…

Sy, Susan R.

2006-01-01

275

Relationship-Centered Practices in Early Childhood: Working with Families, Infants, and Young Children at Risk  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Strong working relationships with diverse families and children are the foundation of successful early intervention. Discover fresh, practical ways to build these relationships in this essential guidebook, every professional's blueprint for working with children and families within the specific context of their culture, family structure, and risk…

Ensher, Gail L.; Clark, David A.

2011-01-01

276

A Qualitative Examination of the Work-Family Interface: Parents of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Within the work-family literature little is known about the work-family challenges and opportunities faced by families that have one or more children with autism spectrum disorder. However, it has been consistently demonstrated that parents of children with autism spectrum disorder are at a higher risk of experiencing a host of negative outcomes.…

Matthews, Russell A.; Booth, Suzanne M.; Taylor, Claire F.; Martin, Tracy

2011-01-01

277

A qualitative examination of the work–family interface: Parents of children with autism spectrum disorder  

Microsoft Academic Search

Within the work–family literature little is known about the work–family challenges and opportunities faced by families that have one or more children with autism spectrum disorder. However, it has been consistently demonstrated that parents of children with autism spectrum disorder are at a higher risk of experiencing a host of negative outcomes. Using a qualitative design, within grounded theory, the

Russell A. Matthews; Suzanne M. Booth; Claire F. Taylor; Tracy Martin

2011-01-01

278

Men, work and gender  

Microsoft Academic Search

ontemporary analyses of work and unemployment need to place psychological findings in the context of society, culture, and gender in understanding the meanings of paid and unpaid work for men and for women. The Australian Psychological Society discussion paper (in this issue) takes a comprehensive view of the literature and places it in the contemporary Australian social context, but fails

Christina Lee; R. Glynn Owens

2002-01-01

279

Antecedents and Outcomes of Work-Family Conflict Among Employed Women and Men in Finland  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of this study was to examine the prevalence, antecedents, and consequences of work-family conflict among employed women and men in Finland. The data were obtained by questionnaire from a sample of 501 employees working in four organizations. The results showed that work-family conflict was more prevalent than family-work conflict among both sexes, but that there were no gender

Ulla Kinnunen; Saija Mauno

1998-01-01

280

Occupational and Industry Sex Segregation and the Work–Family Interface  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examines how gender interacts with the extent of occupational and industry sex segregation to affect family-to-work\\u000a conflict, work-to-family conflict, coworker support, and supportive work-family culture. Using a theoretical framework that\\u000a highlights the negative ramifications of working in a sex-atypical occupation or industry, we hypothesized that men and women\\u000a would be impacted differently by the percentage of women in

Alison Cook; Krista Lynn Minnotte

2008-01-01

281

Working with Families of Handicapped Infants and Toddlers.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The family is the handicapped infant or toddler's ecological system, is critical to the child's optimal development, and must be incorporated into early intervention programs. Characteristics of the ecosystem of the family of a handicapped child are discussed, followed by characteristics of ecologically attuned early intervention teams. (JDD)

Trout, Michael; Foley, Gilbert

1989-01-01

282

Working with Families of Young Children with Special Needs  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This user-friendly book presents research-based best practices for serving families of children with special needs from birth to age 6. Expert contributors demonstrate how early intervention and early childhood special education can effectively address a wide range of family concerns, which in turn optimizes children's development and learning.…

McWilliam, R. A., Ed.

2010-01-01

283

The integrated approach: important reforms in China's family planning work.  

PubMed

A review of the integrated approach to family planning, which was initiated in 1994 by the Chinese State Family Planning Commission, found that cadres and the people viewed the approach as effective for linking family planning with socioeconomic development. The recent world population conferences offered some enlightened plans of action. The Chinese leadership was made aware of the broader, more comprehensive approach to developing the economy, ending poverty, protecting the environment, promoting family planning, and expanding social development. The integrated program in China is taken by Chinese state authorities to be a follow-up to the UN plan of action. Chinese program effort in integration of family planning with poverty alleviation began during the 1970s and 1980s in some areas, such as Jinzhai County of Anhui Province, Yingshan County of Hubei Province, Wangcang County of Sichuan Province, and Nanzheng County of Shaanxi Province. Other integrated planning did not occur until the 1990s in places such as Jilin, Jiangsu, and Shaanxi provinces. A prominent characteristic of the Chinese integrated approach is the active involvement of governments. The program in Sichuan province illustrates this involvement. Rural households, who practice family planning, are granted by the provincial government help with funding or skills in the proper techniques of production. As income increases, acceptance of family planning is enthusiastic. Integrated programs also improve educational opportunities for women and children in poor areas. In underdeveloped areas, programming aims to quickly increase income and reduce fertility, to promote IEC, and to popularize contraceptive knowledge. More developed areas use quality improvements and "scientific management" as effective program efforts. The integrated approach is designated by different language in each province (New Family Plan, the Three Integrations, or Double Three Golden Bridge Program). The exposure to integrated family planning experiences nationwide occurred during the national family planning conference in Chengdu on October 22-26, 1995. This conference was the first of its kind in China. PMID:12346901

Xiao, Z

1995-12-01

284

Work-family climate, organizational commitment, and turnover: Multilevel contagion effects of leaders ?  

PubMed Central

This paper presents empirical research analyzing the relationship between work–family climate (operationalized in terms of three work–family climate sub-scales), organizational leadership (i.e., senior manager) characteristics, organizational commitment and turnover intent among 526 employees from 37 different hotels across the US. Using multilevel modeling, we found significant associations between work–family climate, and both organizational commitment and turnover intent, both within and between hotels. Findings underscored the importance of managerial support for employee work–family balance, the relevance of senior managers’ own work–family circumstances in relation to employees’ work outcomes, and the existence of possible contagion effects of leaders in relation to work–family climate.

O'Neill, John W.; Harrison, Michelle M.; Cleveland, Jeannette; Almeida, David; Stawski, Robert; Crouter, Anne C.

2009-01-01

285

Antecedents and consequences of work-family conflict: a prospective cohort study.  

PubMed

This study examined both risk factors for the onset of work-family conflict and consequences in terms of need for recovery and prolonged fatigue for men and women separately. Two-year follow-up data from the Maastricht Cohort Study on "Fatigue at Work" (n = 12,095) were used. At baseline, the prevalence of work-family conflict was 10.8% (9.0% in women; 11.1% in men), the cumulative incidence at 1 year follow-up was 5.1%. For men, several work-related demands, shift work, job insecurity, conflicts with coworkers or supervisor, having full responsibility for housekeeping, and having to care for a chronically ill child or other family member at home were risk factors for the onset of work-family conflict, whereas decision latitude and coworker and supervisor social support protected against work-family conflict. In women, physical demands, overtime work, commuting time to work, and having dependent children were risk factors for work-family conflict, whereas domestic help protected against work-family conflict at 1 year follow-up. Work-family conflict was further shown to be a strong risk factor for the onset of elevated need for recovery from work and fatigue. PMID:12769054

Jansen, Nicole W H; Kant, Ijmert; Kristensen, Tage S; Nijhuis, Frans J N

2003-05-01

286

Work–family conflict and crossover in volunteer emergency service workers  

Microsoft Academic Search

A growing literature indicates that organizational and work demands place pressure on the partners and families of volunteer workers as it does on paid workers. This study evaluated a conceptual model integrating work–family conflict and stress crossover theoretical frameworks, to investigate the mechanisms by which emergency service volunteer work, specifically, predicts outcomes for the partners of volunteers. Matched data from

Sean Cowlishaw; Lynette Evans; Jim McLennan

2010-01-01

287

The Relation between Work-Family Balance and Quality of Life.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The relationship between work-family balance and quality of life was assessed for 353 accounting professionals. Those who spent more time on family than work experienced higher quality of life than balanced individuals, who experienced higher quality than those who spent more time on work. Findings were similar for level of involvement balance…

Greenhaus, Jeffrey H.; Collins, Karen M.; Shaw, Jason D.

2003-01-01

288

Self-Reported Work and Family Stress of Female Primary Teachers.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Results of a self-report questionnaire indicated that female primary teachers in Australia report moderate levels of global, work, and family stress. Time and workload pressure was the major work stressor, and responsibility for child rearing the major family stressor. Work stress and home stress both impacted on each other. (EV)

Thomas, Narelle; Clarke, Valerie; Lavery, Judy

2003-01-01

289

It Starts With Access!: A Grounded Theory of Family Members Working to Get Through Critical Illness  

Microsoft Academic Search

The critical illness of an adult constitutes a crisis for the patient’s family. They relinquish primary responsibility for the physical well-being of the patient to health providers, but remain involved, working to get through the situation. What constitutes this “work”? Results of two grounded theory studies revealed that family members were engaged first in the pivotal work of gaining access

Virginia Vandall-Walker; Alexander M. Clark

2011-01-01

290

WOMEN LEADERS IN HIGH-POVERTY COMMUNITY SCHOOLS: WORK-RELATED STRESS AND FAMILY IMPACT  

Microsoft Academic Search

This qualitative study explores the experiences of women administrators in high- poverty community schools, investigating four women's perspectives on work demands and the impact on their families. Their work demands are related to the characteristics of impoverished communities, whereas their work resources are based on intrinsic rewards and social justice. Family demands and resources are related to the developmental stages

Jennifer E. Lawson

2008-01-01

291

Beyond Family-Friendly: The Construct and Measurement of Singles-Friendly Work Culture  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Although research has examined work-family issues and organizational support for employees' family responsibilities, few studies have explored the work-life issues of single employees without children. The current study examines single employees' perceptions of how their organizations support their work-life balance in comparison to employees with…

Casper, Wendy J.; Weltman, David; Kwesiga, Eileen

2007-01-01

292

Beyond Family-Friendly: The Construct and Measurement of Singles-Friendly Work Culture  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Although research has examined work-family issues and organizational support for employees' family responsibilities, few studies have explored the work-life issues of single employees without children. The current study examines single employees' perceptions of how their organizations support their work-life balance in comparison to employees…

Casper, Wendy J.; Weltman, David; Kwesiga, Eileen

2007-01-01

293

Work and Family Issues in the Hospitality Industry: Perspectives of Entrants, Managers, and Spouses  

Microsoft Academic Search

With smaller, more efficient workforces, hotel organizations are competing to retain highly valued managers. Work stress and burnout are often cited as precursors to work and family stress, and together these factors influence employee intentions to leave an organization. However, work and family issues have received little attention in the hospitality and tourism literature. Using focus groups and semistructured interviews

Jeanette N. Cleveland; John W. ONeill; Jodi L. Himelright; Michelle M. Harrison; Ann C. Crouter; Robert Drago

2007-01-01

294

Beyond Work-Family Programs: Confronting and Resolving the Underlying Causes of Work-Personal Life Conflict.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Work-Family Programs (WFPs) are among the most popular and publicized workplace innovations of the 1990s. These programs are intended to alleviate employees' work-personal conflicts by addressing issues such as child care assistance, parental leave, elder care, flexible working arrangements, wellness and fitness, and stress management. The problem…

Kofodimos, Joan R.

295

Family Literacy Funding Reductions and Work-First Welfare Policies: Adaptations and Consequences in Family Literacy Programs  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This article examines the consequences of two concurrent policy changes for family literacy programs in Pennsylvania: (1) the transition from federal (Even Start) to state funding and (2) the elimination of adult education as a work activity for welfare recipients over 22 years of age. Using qualitative data from 10 family literacy programs, the…

Prins, Esther; Gungor, Ramazan

2011-01-01

296

Work-family policies and the effects of children on women's employment hours and wages  

Microsoft Academic Search

Welfare state generosity around work-family policies appears to have somewhat contradictory effects, at least for some measures of gender equality. Work-family policies, in encouraging higher levels of women's labor market participation, may have also contributed to lower wage-levels for women relative to men, for instance. We consider the relationship between particular work-family policies and mothers’ employment outcomes. Analyses use data

Joya Misra; Michelle Budig; Irene Boeckmann

2011-01-01

297

“The Price You Pay”: How Female Professional Chefs Negotiate Work and Family  

Microsoft Academic Search

Work–family conflict can act as an important, and gendered, mechanism underlying women’s under-representation in male-dominated\\u000a occupations. This study uses in-depth interviews to explore the experiences of female professional chefs in order to understand\\u000a how women in a prestigious, yet male-dominated service occupation manage barriers relating to their balance of work and family\\u000a responsibilities. Conflict between work and family responsibilities often

Deborah A. Harris; Patti Giuffre

2010-01-01

298

The Work-Family Interface and Marital Change Across the Transition to Parenthood  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article examines the effects of work-family interference and support on couples experiencing the transition to parenthood. Correlational relationships between measures of work-family interference and support and assessments of marital change (based on measures taken prenatally and at three- and nine-months postpartum) were examined. The findings suggest that husbands and wives experiencing high levels of work-family interference report an increase

JAY BELSKY; MAUREEN PERRY-JENKINS; ANN C. CROUTER

1985-01-01

299

Beyond family-friendly: The construct and measurement of singles-friendly work culture  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although research has examined work-family issues and organizational support for employees’ family responsibilities, few studies have explored the work-life issues of single employees without children. The current study examines single employees’ perceptions of how their organizations support their work-life balance in comparison to employees with families. A multi-dimensional scale is developed assessing five dimensions of singles-friendly culture: social inclusion, equal

Wendy J. Casper; David Weltman; Eileen Kwesiga

2007-01-01

300

The Impact of Human Resource Policies on EmployeesBalancing Work\\/Family Life  

Microsoft Academic Search

Using a number of empirical studies of human resource policies in Fortune 500 companies, this article focuses on (a) the major work\\/family problems faced by employees, (b) how work\\/family programs affect productivity, (c) what trends are emerging among companies, and (d) how a subsample of leading scientific companies and universities are responding to work\\/family issues. The seven major issues employees

ELLEN GALINSKY; PETER J. STEIN

1990-01-01

301

Positive and negative work–family interaction and burnout: A longitudinal study of reciprocal relations  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined the longitudinal relationship between work–family interaction (WFI) in terms of the direction of influence (work-to-family vs. family-to-work) and type of effect (conflict vs. facilitation) and burnout. A sample of 2235 respondents from eight different occupational groups (lawyers, bus drivers, employees within information technology, physicians, teachers, church ministers, employees within advertisement, and nurses) supplied data at two points

Siw Tone Innstrand; Ellen Melbye Langballe; Geir Arild Espnes; Erik Falkum; Olaf Gjerløw Aasland

2008-01-01

302

Job Segregation and Gender Differences in Work-Family Spillover Among White-Collar Workers  

Microsoft Academic Search

We test two propositions in this paper: (1) work-family conflict varies with gender composition and hours on the job; and (2) women will experience more tension between work and family responsibilities than will men. Using a sample of white-collar workers, we measured work-family conflict with a composite scale tapping negative job-to-home spillover. Workgroup composition had no effect on men's reported

David J. Maume; Paula Houston

2001-01-01

303

No Pain, No Gain? A Resource-Based Model of Work-to-Family Enrichment and Conflict  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Work-family scholars tend to work in two largely disconnected research streams, focusing on either work-family enrichment--the positive side of the work-family interface--or work-family conflict--the negative side of this interface. The purpose of this study is to suggest a reconciliation of the two research streams by proposing and testing a…

Chen, Zheng; Powell, Gary N.

2012-01-01

304

No Pain, No Gain? A Resource-Based Model of Work-to-Family Enrichment and Conflict  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Work-family scholars tend to work in two largely disconnected research streams, focusing on either work-family enrichment--the positive side of the work-family interface--or work-family conflict--the negative side of this interface. The purpose of this study is to suggest a reconciliation of the two research streams by proposing and testing a…

Chen, Zheng; Powell, Gary N.

2012-01-01

305

The family and work connect: A case for relationship-focused family life education  

PubMed Central

The article presents the premises for the need to develop a relationship-focused family life education program for young adult employees. The article explores the changing trends in the Indian family unit and their impact on the workforce. The author also presents the findings from interviews with family-intervention experts and their recommendations for the contents of such a program.

Henry, Jane; Parthasarathy, R.

2010-01-01

306

Working with Families Living with Autism: Potential Contributions of Marriage and Family Therapists  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This article introduces marriage and family therapists (MFT) to some of the common issues faced by families that have a child with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). First, autism is defined and common myths surrounding it are discussed. Next, relational challenges are presented that families report experiencing during early childhood through the…

Neely, Jason; Amatea, Ellen S.; Echevarria-Doan, Silvia; Tannen, Tina

2012-01-01

307

Reconciling work and family life : the effect of French family policies  

Microsoft Academic Search

In France, having more than two children has a causal negative impact on mothers' labour supply. The question addressed in this paper is whether some family policies alter this effect. The idea is that by improving the conditions of the conciliation between family life and professional life, family policies could reduce the negative impact of having more than two children

Julie Moschion

2007-01-01

308

Reconciling work and family life : the effect of french family policies  

Microsoft Academic Search

In France, having more than two children has a causal negative impact on mothers' labour supply. The question addressed in this paper is whether some family policies alter this effect. The idea is that by improving the conditions of the conciliation between family life and professional life, family policies could reduce the negative impact of having more than two children

Julie Moschion

2007-01-01

309

Relationships between time management, control, work-family conflict, and strain.  

PubMed

This article incorporates recent research regarding time management into a model of work-family conflict. The authors hypothesized that 3 types of time management behavior would have both direct and indirect (through perceived control of time) relationships, with work interfering with family and family interfering with work. It was also hypothesized that both of these types of work-family conflict would be related to the strain outcomes of job dissatisfaction and health complaints. This model was tested with a sample of 522 workers. In general, the hypothesized relationships were supported. PMID:10100115

Adams, G A; Jex, S M

1999-01-01

310

Innovative Ideas on How Work-Family Research Can Have More Impact  

PubMed Central

The commentaries on our focal article agreed with its main premise that work–family research should follow new strategies to improve its practical impact, and made suggestions clustering into three main themes. The first theme built on our suggestion to improve the research focus, terminology, and framing of work-family research. These essays offered additional ideas such as decoupling work-family from work-life research, and examining contextual factors more deeply. The second theme focused on how to better apply the findings from work family research. These commentaries provided social change approaches for making work-family issues more central to key stakeholders and to organizations. The third theme focused on broadening our scope to the societal level. These editorials advocated tactics supporting the development of basic rights of work–life balance within and across nations.

Kossek, Ellen Ernst; Baltes, Boris B.; Matthews, Russell A.

2011-01-01

311

‘You have to choose your childcare to fit your work’: Childcare decision-making among low-income working families  

Microsoft Academic Search

Regardless of their economic background, most working parents face the task of arranging childcare at some point. The decision-making process they experience is often complex, and this complexity is intensified for particular groups of families with limited financial and social resources. In this paper, we present findings from a three-year qualitative study of the childcare choices of low-income working families,

Heather Sandstrom; Ajay Chaudry

2012-01-01

312

Married Mothers' Work Patterns: The Job-Family Compromise.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Examined the issue of time spent in market work by looking at married mothers' work experience during 1992. Determined that today's married mothers are twice as likely to work full time all year than their predecessors of 20 years ago. (Author)|

Hayghe, Howard V.; Bianchi, Suzanne M.

1994-01-01

313

Developing cultural competence in working with Korean immigrant families  

Microsoft Academic Search

The authors provide an in-depth examination of the historical background, cultural values, family roles, and community contexts of Korean Americans as an aid to both researchers and clinicians in developing cultural competence with this particular group. First, the concept of cultural competence is defined. A brief history of Korean immigration patterns to the United States and demographic information about Korean

Irene J. Kim; Luke I. C. Kim; James G. Kelly

2006-01-01

314

Work Stress in the Family Life of African Americans.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Investigated the link between job-related stressors and family life among African Americans. Data from African Americans who participated in the America's Changing Lives survey indicated that job latitude positively affected marital harmony, and physical demands negatively affected marital harmony. Psychosocial demands, job bother, and chronic…

Broman, Clifford L.

2001-01-01

315

The Family, Flexible Work and Social Cohesion at Risk.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Because of women's increased participation in the labor market, there is an increasing pressure on families. Women are expected to provide stability, focus on child development, and bolster colleagues against unemployment and retraining, whereas society is expected to provide child care facilities and flexible education. (JOW)|

Carnoy, Martin

1999-01-01

316

Working with Black Families Having Mentally Retarded Members.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The paper examines culture as an influential variable in the shaping of the value system within the sturcture of black families specifically those with mentally retarded members. Typical negative views of the black culture included such characteristics as matriarchal, unstable, and pathological. More recent views have focused on strengths,…

Utley, Cheryl A.; Marion, Robert

317

The Role of the Government in Work-Family Conflict  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The foundations of the major federal policies that govern today's workplace were put in place during the 1930s, when most families had a stay-at-home caregiver who could tend to the needs of children, the aged, and the sick. Seven decades later, many of the nation's workplace policies are in need of major updates to reflect the realities of the…

Boushey, Heather

2011-01-01

318

Constructing Family-friendly Work: Three Real Dreams.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Case studies of three couples who modified their careers to accommodate family life illustrate the barriers and necessary trade-offs as well as significant increases in career and life happiness that can result. Counseling suggestions include revision of the concept of career and assessment of the costs and benefits. (SK)|

Jackson, Aaron P.; Wilde, Sharon V.

2000-01-01

319

Opportunities for School Psychologists Working with Children of Military Families  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Today's military families are a diverse, resilient group of brave Americans, and the country owes them a tremendous debt of gratitude. To date, over 2 million service members have been deployed in support of the Global War on Terrorism, many for multiple tours. For the first time in the country's history, there are more military dependents…

Sherman, Michelle D.; Glenn, Marshall Andrew

2011-01-01

320

Developing Cultural Competence in Working with Korean Immigrant Families  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The authors provide an in-depth examination of the historical background, cultural values, family roles, and community contexts of Korean Americans as an aid to both researchers and clinicians in developing cultural competence with this particular group. First, the concept of cultural competence is defined. A brief history of Korean immigration…

Kim, Irene J.; Kim, Luke I. C.; Kelly, James G.

2006-01-01

321

Developing Cultural Competence in Working with Korean Immigrant Families  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The authors provide an in-depth examination of the historical background, cultural values, family roles, and community contexts of Korean Americans as an aid to both researchers and clinicians in developing cultural competence with this particular group. First, the concept of cultural competence is defined. A brief history of Korean immigration…

Kim, Irene J.; Kim, Luke I. C.; Kelly, James G.

2006-01-01

322

[Working with Infants, Toddlers, and Families in Rural Areas.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This newsletter theme issue focuses on providing services to infants with special needs in rural areas. In "Old Threads, New Patterns: Reaching Out to Rural Families," Deborah Harris-Usner discusses bringing infant mental health care and parent-infant psychotherapy to rural New Mexico. In "The People of Kids Place: Creating and Maintaining…

Fenichel, Emily, Ed.

1995-01-01

323

Hispanic Women in the United States: Family and Work Relations.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Reviews research and data on the factors influencing the lives of Hispanic women in the United States. Considers differences between Mexican American, Puerto Rican, and Cuban American women and differences between Anglo and Hispanic family norms. Also discusses labor force participation. (KH)|

Alcalay, Rina

1984-01-01

324

Designing Computerized Decision Support That Works for Clinicians and Families  

PubMed Central

Evidence-based decision-making is central to the practice of pediatrics. Clinical trials and other biomedical research provide a foundation for this process, and practice guidelines, drawing from their results, inform the optimal management of an increasing number of childhood health problems. However, many clinicians fail to adhere to guidelines. Clinical decision support delivered using health information technology, often in the form of electronic health records, provides a tool to deliver evidence-based information to the point of care and has the potential to overcome barriers to evidence-based practice. An increasing literature now informs how these systems should be designed and implemented to most effectively improve outcomes in pediatrics. Through the examples of computerized physician order entry, as well as the impact of alerts at the point of care on immunization rates, the delivery of evidence-based asthma care, and the follow-up of children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, the following review addresses strategies for success in using these tools. The following review argues that, as decision support evolves, the clinician should no longer be the sole target of information and alerts. Through the Internet and other technologies, families are increasingly seeking health information and gathering input to guide health decisions. By enlisting clinical decision support systems to deliver evidence-based information to both clinicians and families, help families express their preferences and goals, and connect families to the medical home, clinical decision support may ultimately be most effective in improving outcomes.

Fiks, Alexander G.

2011-01-01

325

Reflection and Emotional Containment: Therapeutic Work in Family Centres.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Considers the need for developing a theoretical framework for therapy in family centers. Examines the contribution of concepts of "emotional containment" and "holding" from parent-infant relationship theories to management and therapy. Explores how workers' anxieties can be managed so reflective practice and therapeutic relationships are…

McMahon, Linnet; Dacre, Viv; Vale, Janet

1997-01-01

326

78 FR 16278 - Notice of Submission of Proposed Information Collection to OMB Family Report, Moving-To-Work...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Submission of Proposed Information Collection to OMB Family Report, Moving-To-Work Family Report AGENCY: Office of the Chief Information...assisted housing programs. Form HUD-50058 MTW Family Reports solicit demographic, family...

2013-03-14

327

Strategies and Practices for Working with Immigrant Families in Early Education Programs  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This study explores how early childhood education programs engage immigrant families in their children's learning, how programs learn about these families and incorporate their cultures into the classrooms, and what programs are doing in terms of their staff's professional development related to working with immigrant children and families. The…

Vesely, Colleen K.; Ginsberg, Mark R.

2011-01-01

328

Psychosocial Stressors of Families Affected by HIV\\/AIDS: Implications for Social Work Practice  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study identified the psychosocial stressors of low-income families who were affected by HIV\\/AIDS in Alabama. Methods consisted of personal interviews with 12 social workers at public agencies and a review of social work charts for 80 clients at an HIV clinic for mothers and children. The combined results indicated that families were likely to experience housing instability, family breakdown,

Bronwen Lichtenstein; Marsha S. Sturdevant; Anil A. Mujumdar

2010-01-01

329

Cultural Models, Parent Behavior, and Young Child Experience in Working American Families  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective. We evaluated the resolution of conflicts between cultural models of parenting related to child security and child enrichment in the daily scheduling practices of families with young children, given the competing pressures of work and family. Design. Parents in 35 families provided 7 days of detailed prospective daily schedule data for themselves and their preschool-aged focal child using the

Jason A. DeCaro; Carol M. Worthman

2007-01-01

330

Developing cultural competence for social work with families living in poverty  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social workers need to have a good understanding of the cultural contexts within which the families they are working with are living. Whilst each context will be unique in many respects, the majority of families involved with social workers will share the experience of living in impoverished circumstances. At a time when levels of family poverty are rising rapidly in

Gordon Jack; Owen Gill

2012-01-01

331

NIOSH Conference Grant: 5th International Congress on Women, Work, and Health, Mexico, October 2008.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Researchers and women's health advocates over the years have highlighted the importance of the relationship between work and women's health. This complex area of investigation includes the impact of women's work in the unpaid private and paid public spher...

C. Becerril L. Delp

2010-01-01

332

38 CFR 3.1000 - Entitlement under 38 U.S.C. 5121 to benefits due and unpaid upon death of a beneficiary.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...C. 5121 to benefits due and unpaid upon death of a beneficiary. 3.1000 Section...C. 5121 to benefits due and unpaid upon death of a beneficiary. (a) Basic entitlement...provided in §§ 3.1001 and 3.1008, where death occurred on or after December 1,...

2013-07-01

333

Temporal Rhythms in Family Life: Seasonal Variation in the Relation Between Parental Work and Family Processes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Families with school-age children were interviewed 3 times, at 6-month intervals (winter-summer-winter), to test whether summer brings discontinuity in family processes. Longitudinal patterns of parent–child involvement, parental monitoring, and children's involvement in activities were examined for 125 families in 3 groups: DDD (consistently dual-earner), SSS (consistently single-earner), and DSD (dual-earner at Times 1 and 3, single-earner over the summer). In

Ann C. Crouter; Susan M. McHale

1993-01-01

334

Are organizations shooting themselves in the foot? : Workplace contributors to family-to-work conflict  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – To examine the direct effects of work domain variables on family-to-work conflict (FWC), beyond their indirect effects via the mediating variable of work-to-family conflict (WFC), and sex differences in the effects of work role expectations and supervisor support on FWC. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – A survey was conducted among 208 UK public sector employees. Hierarchical multiple regression analysis tested main

T. Alexandra Beauregard

2006-01-01

335

Opportunity for Interaction? A Naturalistic Observation Study of Dual-Earner Families After Work and School  

Microsoft Academic Search

Everyday patterns of interaction can strengthen or undermine bonds between family members. This naturalistic observation study focused on an understudied facet of family life: opportunities for interaction among dual-earner family members after work and family members’ responses to these opportunities. Thirty dual-earner couples and their children were observed and video-recorded in their homes throughout two weekday afternoons and evenings. Two

Belinda Campos; Anthony P. Graesch; Rena Repetti; Thomas Bradbury; Elinor Ochs

2009-01-01

336

Working with Immigrant Children of “Undocumented” and “Mixed” Families  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Immigrant children constitute a large and growing segment of preK-5 children in the United States. An increasing number of\\u000a young children are also living with undocumented parents or in families of mixed status, i.e., one or both parents, as well\\u000a as one or more siblings, are undocumented. Despite this population growth, researchers and educational practitioners know\\u000a little about these children

Xue Lan Rong; Liv Thorstensson Dávila; Jeremy Hilburn

337

Work and family practices in Japanese firms: their scope, nature and impact on employee turnover  

Microsoft Academic Search

Using firm-level data from Japan, this study examines the effects of four commonly used work and family practices on employee turnover: flextime, maternity leave, child care leave, and nursing care leave. Overall, we find statistically significant associations between work and family practices and female employee turnover in Japan. In stark contrast, we do not find such a statistically significant linkage

Yoshio Yanadori; Takao Kato

2009-01-01

338

Conflict between Work and Family: An Investigation of Four Policy Measures  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Welfare states enact a range of policies aimed at reducing work-family conflict. While welfare state policies have been assessed at the macro-level and work-family conflict at the individual-level, few studies have simultaneously addressed these relationships in a cross-national multi-level model. This study addresses this void by assessing the…

Ruppanner, Leah

2013-01-01

339

British South Asian women managers and professionals: experiences of work and family  

Microsoft Academic Search

Even though an increasing number of British South Asian women have moved into paid employment over the years as a reflection of social and cultural mobility and change, their work-family experiences are not widely reported. This paper examines the experiences of British South Asian full-time managerial or professional women combining work and family life. A qualitative study based in the

Baljit Kaur Rana; Carolyn Kagan; Suzan Lewis; Usha Rout

1998-01-01

340

Cognitive capacity for processing work-family conflict: an initial examination  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – The purpose of this study is to examine how individuals cognitively process work-family conflict (WFC), specifically whether differences in tolerance for uncertainty and cognitive complexity influence individuals' affective response to WFC. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – Using a sample of 157 employees who completed a survey on work-family issues, the hypotheses were tested using correlation and regression analyses. Findings – The

Suzanne C. de Janasz; Scott J. Behson

2007-01-01

341

Youth from Low-Income Working Families. Vulnerable Youth and the Transition to Adulthood  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Approximately 6 in 10 low-income families have at least one adult who works full time throughout the year. This fact sheet uses data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 to describe the adolescent risk behaviors and the transition to adulthood for low-income youth from "high-work" families compared to low-income youth from…

McDaniel, Marla; Kuehn, Daniel

2009-01-01

342

Work–Family Conflict: Experiences and Health Implications Among Immigrant Latinos  

Microsoft Academic Search

Work–family conflict research has focused almost exclusively on professional, White adults. The goal of this article was to expand the understanding of culture and industry in shaping experiences and consequences of work–family conflict. Using in-depth interview data (n = 26) and structured survey data (n = 200) from immigrant Latinos employed in the poultry processing industry, the authors evaluated predictions

Joseph G. Grzywacz; Thomas A. Arcury; Antonio Marín; Lourdes Carrillo; Bless Burke; Michael L. Coates; Sara A. Quandt

2007-01-01

343

Identification of a Dispositional Tendency to Experience Work-Family Spillover  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Are individuals predisposed to experience work-family spillover? Despite theoretical relevance and practical implications related to this issue, research on this topic is scarce. With this in mind, we investigated if there is a dispositional tendency to experience work-family spillover using a nationally representative longitudinal sample. We…

Cho, Eunae; Tay, Louis; Allen, Tammy D.; Stark, Stephen

2013-01-01

344

Balancing Work and Family Responsibilities as an Extension 4-H Agent  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|A career with Extension can be very rewarding, but also very demanding, as employees have to balance job stress and time demands with family goals and demands. The very nature of Extension work brings some tension between the job and family, and employees need to be equipped to make decisions about personal and work time. If the Extension System…

Rhea, Joseph Richard, Jr.

2009-01-01

345

Work and Family Policies: The New Strategic Plan. Research Report Number 949.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

These 38 presentations are the highlights of the Conference Board's Work and Family Conference. An "Introduction" (Dana Friedman) is followed by "The Future Is Not What It Was, and Why Companies Care" (William Lee, Reuben Mark), which consists of introductory remarks and responses to an interview. "The Diversity of Work-Family Issues" (David…

Peters, James L., Ed.; And Others

346

Training volunteers and professionals to work with grieving children and their families  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article presents five foundational principles important for the training of professionals and volunteers who work with grieving children and their families. The principles discussed are: first, that expressing feelings is part of the healing process and requires safety and trust; second, that grieving is a process unique to each person; third, that working with grieving children and their families

Helene McGlauflin

1996-01-01

347

The take-up of means-tested benefits by working families with children  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this paper is to analyse the take-up of the two major means-tested benefits that are available for working families with children in the UK: family income supplement (FIS) and housing benefit (HB). As eligibility for FIS depended on at least one member of the household working 30 hours per week (24 hours for single parents), we are

Richard Dorsett; Christopher Heady

1991-01-01

348

Traditional and Nontraditional Gender Roles and Work-Family Interface for Men and Women  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|In this article, we examine traditional and nontraditional gender roles and work-family interface for men and women. Recent empirical literature is reviewed and implications for career counselors are discussed. We discuss changing gender roles in career, marriage, and parenting and provide strategies for helping clients to cope with work-family

Perrone, Kristin M.; Wright, Stephen L.; Jackson, Z. Vance

2009-01-01

349

Work--family conflict, perceived organizational support, and organizational commitment among employed mothers  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study investigated the impact of work interfering with family (WIF) and family interfering with work (FIW) on women's organizational commitment and examined both the direct and moderating effects of their perceived organizational support. Participants were 143 professional employed mothers with at least 1 preschool-age child. The study found that WIF was positively related to continuance organizational commitment but unrelated

Wendy J. Casper; Jennifer A. Martin; Louis C. Buffardi; Carol J. Erdwins

2002-01-01

350

Work-Family Climate, Organizational Commitment, and Turnover: Multilevel Contagion Effects of Leaders  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This paper presents empirical research analyzing the relationship between work-family climate (operationalized in terms of three work-family climate sub-scales), organizational leadership (i.e., senior manager) characteristics, organizational commitment and turnover intent among 526 employees from 37 different hotels across the US. Using…

O'Neill, John W.; Harrison, Michelle M.; Cleveland, Jeannette; Almeida, David; Stawski, Robert; Crouter, Anne C.

2009-01-01

351

A Two-Study Examination of Work-Family Conflict, Production Deviance and Gender  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Building on the spillover and crossover literatures of work-family conflict and the theoretical framework of Conservation of Resources Theory (Hobfoll, 1989) we examine the effects of conflict on production deviance. Using a two-study constructive replication and extension design, we examine how partner work-to-family conflict contributes to job…

Ferguson, Merideth; Carlson, Dawn; Hunter, Emily M.; Whitten, Dwayne

2012-01-01

352

Informal Caregiving at Working Age: Effects of Job Characteristics and Family Configuration  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This article addresses the relationship between employment and providing informal care for sick, disabled, or elderly people in Great Britain. Hazard rate models for taking up caring and leaving work when caring are estimated using retrospective family, employment, and caring data from the British Family and Working Lives Survey 1994-1995 for…

Henz, Ursula

2006-01-01

353

Do Working Wives Increase Family Income Inequality? Discussion Paper No. 518-78.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The distribution of family incomes is now slightly more equal than the distribution of husbands' earnings. Movements toward equal opportunity for women are likely to have only a small effect on family income inequality. In a world with no differences by sex in work behavior, we could expect that the work experience of women and men and the…

Danziger, Sheldon

354

We've come a long way, maybe: College students' plans for work and family  

Microsoft Academic Search

Young men and women today face considerable choices as they plan for family and work. We explore college students' educational preparations, as well as their attitudes, orientations, and expectations for work and family. Although we find some changes toward a more gender-equal society, we also find potential conflicts which these individuals will have to face as they attempt to combine

Joan Z. Spade; Carole A. Reese

1991-01-01

355

Social Class, Families and the Politics of Educational Advantage: The Work of Dennis Marsden  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This article presents a review of Dennis Marsden's work. Looking at his oeuvre overall it is the family and intimate social relations and social class that are at the centre of his interests and analytical focus. Part of the power and effectiveness of his work was an ability to see families and their everyday lives in relation to social policy…

Ball, Stephen J.

2011-01-01

356

Work-family conflict and career success: the effects of domain-specific determinants  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – Despite widespread acknowledgement that work-family conflict and career success are salient issues that impact individual wellbeing and organizational effectiveness, there is little research that studies how the two concepts are related. The purpose of this paper is to develop and present a tentative framework for understanding the relationships among antecedents of interrole conflict between work and family and

Hassan I. Ballout

2008-01-01

357

Work and family conflict: Understanding the role of race, gender, racial discrimination, and sexual discrimination  

Microsoft Academic Search

The pervasive nature and confluence of organizational and personal challenges should serve as motivation for theorists and researchers alike to investigate how work and family interact and impact all social groups in our society. This need is further compounded by the fact that in the last three decades there have been extreme changes in the face of work and family

Katrina Wade-Golden

2006-01-01

358

Work–home conflict and facilitation across four different family structures in Norway  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study was to examine how work–home conflict and facilitation vary among people living in different family structures in Norway, here conceptualized as: two-parent families; single parents; childless couples; and singles. The study used data from a Norwegian study on occupational health (N=2414). We hypothesized that respondents living in two-parent families experience more work–home conflict and facilitation

Siw Tone Innstrand; Ellen Melbye Langballe; Geir Arild Espnes; Olaf Gjerløw Aasland; Erik Falkum

2010-01-01

359

Supervisor and Subordinate Work-Family Values: Does Similarity Make a Difference?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Supervisor-subordinate similarity affects a number of workplace outcomes, but the effect of similarity in work-family values is not well understood. Our sample consisted of 209 participants (121 female and 88 male) from a range of occupations. A structural model was tested in which subordinate perceptions of supervisor work-family value similarity predicted increased supervisor support and reduced family conflict, with an

Briony M. Thompson; Paula A. Brough; Helen Schmidt

2006-01-01

360

The role of citizenship behavior in personal learning and work-family enrichment  

Microsoft Academic Search

Extending the research on work-family interface in the Chinese context, the present study examines how organizational citizenship\\u000a behavior (OCB) may enrich the quality of OCB performers’ family life through personal learning. Results from a sample of 385\\u000a supervisor-subordinate dyads in China show that OCB is positively associated with work-to-family enrichment. This association\\u000a is fully mediated by one type of personal

Ho-Kwong Kwan; Yina Mao

2011-01-01

361

Thirty-Five Years of Studying Work and Family  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The author and Karen Gyllstrom began working on the study that resulted in the highly cited article entitled, "Working Men and Women: Inter-and Intra-role Conflict" (Herman & Gyllstrom, "Psychology of Women Quarterly" 1977) probably more for personal than professional reasons. The study was based on Gyllstrom's master's thesis. The focus of…

Brett, Jeanne M.

2011-01-01

362

Adolescent Work and Alcohol Use Revisited: Variations by Family Structure  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Previous research finds adolescent work hours to be associated with increased alcohol use. Most studies, however, fail to account for possible selection effects that lead youth to both work and substance use. Using data from the first two waves of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (N = 12,620), a fixed effects regression method…

Rocheleau, Gregory C.; Swisher, Raymond R.

2012-01-01

363

Work-Family Conflict: An Exploration of the Differential Effects of a Dependent Childs Age on Working Parents  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Purpose--The purpose of this article is to explore the impact of life cycle stage, specifically parenting stage, on work-family conflict among working parents to determine whether discernible differences are evident among those individuals at the early stage of their parenting cycle compared with those with older children.…

Darcy, Colette; McCarthy, Alma

2007-01-01

364

Work-family conflict : An exploration of the differential effects of a dependent child's age on working parents  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – The purpose of this article is to explore the impact of life cycle stage, specifically parenting stage, on work-family conflict among working parents to determine whether discernible differences are evident among those individuals at the early stage of their parenting cycle compared with those with older children. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – An explorative study was undertaken among parents employed within

Colette Darcy; Alma McCarthy

2007-01-01

365

Introducing Work-Family Scholarship to Social Work Students: The Development and Assessment of an Online Reading Seminar  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This three-part article first presents an overview of a Web-based reading-intensive course that introduces work-family scholarship to social work students so that they can integrate the historical, theoretical, and empirical perspectives of this rich body of knowledge into their practice. Second, the authors explore the compatibility of…

Secret, Mary; Pitt-Catsouphes, Marcie

2008-01-01

366

Perceptions of work-family balance: how effective are family-friendly policies?  

Microsoft Academic Search

The increase in the proportion of mothers with young children returning to paid employment has generated considerable interest in how women juggle the demands of the workplace with the demands of family. Making workplaces more family-friendly has potential benefits for both employees and employers, but research findings are mixed about the take-up rate of such benefits and the outcomes for

Janeen Baxter

2011-01-01

367

Training Family Therapists to Work with Children and Families: A Modified Delphi Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined child inclusion issues and training marriage and family therapists (MFTs) to treat children. This modified Delphi study utilized a panel of experts, and gathered data through questionnaires and qualitative interviews. Panelists believe children should participate in family therapy sessions for both child and adult problems,…

Sori, Catherine Ford; Sprenkle, Douglas H.

2004-01-01

368

Work and Family Characteristics as Predictors of Early Retirement in Married Men and Women  

PubMed Central

This study presents an integrative model of early retirement using data from the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study. The model extends prior work by incorporating work-family conflict to capture the interaction between the work and family domains and by assuming proximal and distal predictors of early retirement. More precisely, the model suggests that family and job demands and resources predict family-to-work and work-to-family conflict, respectively. All of these factors are presumed to have only indirect effects on retirement timing via the intervening effect of quality of life measures, that is, marital satisfaction, job satisfaction and health. The authors assume that these three factors constitute predictors of early retirement in addition to socioeconomic status and the availability of a pension plan and health insurance. The model was tested with structural equation modeling techniques, and the results were supportive. Therefore, the proposed model offers a general framework for the integration of previous research findings.

Kubicek, Bettina; Korunka, Christian; Hoonakker, Peter; Raymo, James M.

2010-01-01

369

Gender Roles and the Division of Unpaid Work in Spanish Households  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper examines the role of the doing-gender hypothesis versus traditional models of the household in explaining how the woman's share of home labor varies with relative earnings. The findings, using the 2002–3 Spanish Time Use Survey (STUS; Spanish Statistical Office 2003), support the doing-gender hypothesis in the case of housework: a woman's relative share of housework fails to decrease

Almudena Sevilla-Sanz; Jose Ignacio Gimenez-Nadal; Cristina Fernández

2010-01-01

370

Employed Parents of Children With Mental Health Disorders: Achieving Work-Family Fit, Flexibility, and Role Quality  

Microsoft Academic Search

Extensive interviews with 60 employed parents of school-age children treated for mental health problems explored work-family fit, flexibility, family support, and work-life strategies in relation to role quality. Role quality was measured as employment and parenting rewards and concerns. Work-family fit was positively related to family flexibility but not work flexibility. Higher flexi­ bility in work and family predicted lower

Eileen M. Brennan; Julie M. Rosenzweig; A. Myrth Ogilvie; Leslie Wuest; Ann A. Shindo

371

Knowledge Work, Working Time, and Use of Time among Finnish Dual-Earner Families: Does Knowledge Work Require the Marginalization of Private Life?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The industrial working-time regime is dissolving--not dramatically, but rather as a trend. A new trend is that those in dynamic sectors and in a good labor market position work long hours: Demanding knowledge work appears to require the marginalization of private life. This study investigates the family situation of knowledge workers, the…

Natti, Jouko; Anttila, Timo; Tammelin, Mia

2012-01-01

372

Needs and Priorities in Balancing Paid and Family Work: A Gender and Social Class Analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of gender and social class on perceptions of work-family needs and priorities. The target population was allfull-time, on-campus employees (faculty and staff) of the University of Idaho. Medical information and supportive work environment surfaced as the most pressing work\\/family needs for all employees. Gender and social class were significant influences

Laurie Stenberg Nichols; Nancy Wanamaker; Nancy Deringer

1995-01-01

373

Antecedents and Outcomes of Work-Family Conflict: Toward a Motivational Model  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of the present study was to propose and test a model of work-family conflict based on Self-Determination Theory and the Hierarchical Model of Intrinsic and Extrinsic Motivation. The model posits that positive interpersonal factors both at work (i.e., one's employer) and at home (e.g., one's spouse) influence work and family motivation. Moreover, the model proposes that low levels

C. Senecal; Robert J. Vallerand; F. Guay

2001-01-01

374

Work-family conflict and burnout among Chinese female nurses: the mediating effect of psychological capital  

PubMed Central

Background Burnout among nurses not only threatens their own health, but also that of their patients. Exploring risk factors of nurse’ burnout is important to improve nurses’ health and to increase the quality of health care services. This study aims to explore the relationship between work-family conflict and burnout among Chinese female nurses and the mediating role of psychological capital in this relationship. Methods This cross-sectional study was performed during the period of September and October 2010. A questionnaire that consisted of the Maslach Burnout Inventory-General Survey (MBI-GS), the work-family conflict scale and the psychological capital questionnaire (PCQ-24) scale, as well as demographic and working factors, was distributed to nurses in Liaoning province, China. A total of 1,332 individuals (effective response rate: 78.35%) became our subjects. Hierarchical linear regression analyses were performed to explore the mediating role of psychological capital. Results Both work interfering family conflict and family interfering work conflict were positively related with emotional exhaustion and cynicism. However, work interfering family conflict was positively related with professional efficacy whereas family interfering work conflict was negatively related with it. Psychological capital partially mediated the relationship of work interfering family conflict with emotional exhaustion and cynicism; and partially mediated the relationship of family interfering work conflict with emotional exhaustion, cynicism and professional efficacy. Conclusion Work-family conflict had effects on burnout and psychological capital was a mediator in this relationship among Chinese nurses. Psychological capital was a positive resource for fighting against nurses’ burnout.

2012-01-01

375

Policy Alternatives for Solving Work-Family Conflict  

Microsoft Academic Search

The failure of highly educated women to stay in the labor market represents a wasted societal investment. Despite publicity suggesting that educated mothers are increasingly staying home, the long-term trend is toward greater work effort by all mothers, especially highly educated ones. Policy measures can address the reasons some women do drop out by making it more possible for professionals,

Heidi Hartmann

2004-01-01

376

Serving Vulnerable Families: The Important Work of Head Start Programs  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The Obama Administration's most recent regulation on designation renewal of Early/Head Start grantees opens opportunities for early childhood programs in some communities to compete with existing grantees for the federal funding. Understanding some of the behind-the-scenes work that goes into Head Start may be helpful to centers deciding whether…

Vinci, Yasmina

2012-01-01

377

Children and Families' Involvement in Social Work Decision Making  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This review summarises the research literature on children's and parents' involvement in social work decision making, which is regarded, in policy terms, as increasingly important. In practice, however, it tends to be messy, difficult and compromised. Different individuals or groups may have different understandings of participation and related…

Gallagher, Michael; Smith, Mark; Hardy, Mark; Wilkinson, Heather

2012-01-01

378

"Good Work Awards:" Effects on Children's Families. Technical Report #12.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This brief report describes parental reaction to a reinforcement strategy used with children in the Kamehameha Early Education Program (KEEP). Staff members report that "Good Work Awards" (GWAs) are viewed favorably by mothers of students. GWAs are dittoed notes sent home with children when they have met a minimum criterion for daily classroom…

Chun, Sherlyn; Mays, Violet

379

Women, Work, and Family: Dimensions of Change in American Society.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The research presented in this volume considers a number of factors associated with women's participation in the labor market. These include the educational and training experiences of women now reaching adulthood, the rationales associated with work attachment during the early years of marriage, and the implications of marital breakdown and of…

Mott, Frank L.; And Others

380

Families That Work: Policies for Reconciling Parenthood and Employment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Parents around the world grapple with the common challenge of balancing work and child care. Despite common problems, the industrialized nations have developed dramatically different social and labor market policies--policies that vary widely in the level of support they provide for parents and the extent to which they encourage an equal division…

Gornick, Janet C.; Meyers, Marcia K.

2003-01-01

381

Women, Men, Work, and Family: An Expansionist Theory  

Microsoft Academic Search

The lives of women and men, the relationships that they establish, and their work have changed dramatically in the past 50 years, but the dominant theories driving research in these areas have not. In this article, the authors argue that the facts underlying the assumptions of the classical theories of gender and multiple roles have changed so radically as to

Rosalind Chait Barnett; Janet Shibley Hyde

2001-01-01

382

Spending Time: The Impact of Hours Worked on Work-Family Conflict  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Scholars have long assumed that as workers spend more time at work fewer hours are available for their non-work lives leading to negative effects in both domains, and most studies examining the impact of work hours on work and life domains have supported this viewpoint. However, the majority of these studies have used one-dimensional measures of…

Adkins, Cheryl L.; Premeaux, Sonya F.

2012-01-01

383

Spending Time: The Impact of Hours Worked on Work-Family Conflict  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Scholars have long assumed that as workers spend more time at work fewer hours are available for their non-work lives leading to negative effects in both domains, and most studies examining the impact of work hours on work and life domains have supported this viewpoint. However, the majority of these studies have used one-dimensional measures of…

Adkins, Cheryl L.; Premeaux, Sonya F.

2012-01-01

384

Combining work and family: rewards or risks for children's mental health?  

PubMed

Prevailing child psychopathology paradigms focus on caregiving in isolation from market work. Yet most children's caregivers - mothers and fathers - are also employed. Although policy and academic debate has voiced concerns that employment could hamper mothers' capacity to care, less emphasis is given to the benefits generated by mothers' jobs. By contrast, theories of child mental health often view fathers' employment as beneficial, indeed necessary, for children's wellbeing, and few problematise fathers' capacity to combine work and care. This paper aims to integrate these seemingly contradictory concerns. We consider whether mothers' and fathers' rewards from combining employment with childcare may be protective for children's mental health, and whether their conflicts and dilemmas generate risks. Analyses use cross-sectional data from a representative survey of families with 4-5 year old children (Growing Up in Australia Study). We restricted our sample to employed parents (N = 2809 mothers; 3982 fathers), using data gathered in 2004. While a majority of parents reported benefits and rewards from working (work-family facilitation), more than one third also reported difficulties and conflicts (work-family conflict). When mothers or fathers experienced conflict we found elevations in young children's emotional and behavioural symptoms, with the risks compounding if both parents experienced conflict between work and family. Associations persisted after adjusting for family socioeconomic circumstances and composition, and they were not offset by work-family facilitation. We did not find evidence for heightened vulnerability to work-family conflict in families with few socioeconomic resources. However, among these disadvantaged families we observed stronger protective associations with children's mental health when parents had rewarding and supportive jobs. Our study extends current paradigms of child mental health by considering the interplay between care environments and market work. Jobs which help mothers and fathers to combine employment with caregiving could yield health benefits across generations. PMID:23631784

Strazdins, Lyndall; Obrien, Léan V; Lucas, Nina; Rodgers, Bryan

2013-04-03

385

Work dynamics in family care of hemophilic children  

Microsoft Academic Search

School-aged boys with hemophilia, their parents, and siblings were interviewed and observed over a 5-year period, the field work taking place in their homes, schools, and during hospitalization, clinic visits, and summer camp periods. Sequential, open-ended interviews, and participant-observation techniques enabled the inquiry to study the process of the children's development as a major factor in changes that occured in

Evelyn K. Oremland

1988-01-01

386

His and Her Perspectives: Gender Ideology, Work-to-Family Conflict, and Marital Satisfaction  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examines the relationships between gender ideology, work-to-family conflict, and marital satisfaction. We hypothesize\\u000a that gender ideology will moderate relationships between both the respondent’s work-to-family conflict and their spouse’s\\u000a work-to-family conflict in predicting marital satisfaction, and that spouses’ gender ideologies will interact in predicting\\u000a marital satisfaction. The hypotheses are addressed using data from a random sample of U.S. dual-earner

Krista Lynn Minnotte; Michael C. Minnotte; Daphne E. Pedersen; Susan E. Mannon; Gary Kiger

2010-01-01

387

Job-Related Emotional Labor and Its Relationship to Work-Family Conflict and Facilitation  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article used a differential salience demands-resources model to explore how self-focused (i.e., surface and deep acting)\\u000a and other-focused (i.e., emotional enhancement and relationship management) job-related emotional labor are associated with\\u000a bidirectional measures of work-family conflict and facilitation. Results indicated that surface acting was related positively\\u000a with time-, strain-, and behavior-based work-family conflict and was associated negatively with work-to-family facilitation.

Brenda L. Seery; Elizabeth A. Corrigall; Tammy Harpel

2008-01-01

388

Work-Family Conflict, Part I: Antecedents of Work-Family Conflict in National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I-A Certified Athletic Trainers  

PubMed Central

Context: Work-family conflict (WFC) involves discord that arises when the demands of work interfere with the demands of family or home life. Long work hours, minimal control over work schedules, and time spent away from home are antecedents to WFC. To date, few authors have examined work-family conflict within the athletic training profession. Objective: To investigate the occurrence of WFC in certified athletic trainers (ATs) and to identify roots and factors leading to quality-of-life issues for ATs working in the National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I-A setting. Design: Survey questionnaire and follow-up, in-depth, in-person interviews. Setting: Division I-A universities sponsoring football. Patients or Other Participants: A total of 587 ATs (324 men, 263 women) responded to the questionnaire. Twelve ATs (6 men, 6 women) participated in the qualitative portion: 2 head ATs, 4 assistant ATs, 4 graduate assistant ATs, and 2 AT program directors. Data Collection and Analysis: Multiple regression analysis was performed to determine whether workload and travel predicted levels of WFC. Analyses of variance were calculated to investigate differences among the factors of sex, marital status, and family status. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and then analyzed using computer software as well as member checks and peer debriefing. The triangulation of the data collection and multiple sources of qualitative analysis were utilized to limit potential researcher prejudices. Results: Regression analyses revealed that long work hours and travel directly contributed to WFC. In addition to long hours and travel, inflexible work schedules and staffing patterns were discussed by the interview participants as antecedents to WFC. Regardless of sex (P ?=? .142), marital status (P ?=? .687), family status (P ?=? .055), or age of children (P ?=? .633), WFC affected Division I-A ATs. Conclusions: No matter their marital or family status, ATs employed at the Division I-A level experienced difficulties balancing their work and home lives. Sources of conflict primarily stemmed from the consuming nature of the profession, travel, inflexible work schedules, and lack of full-time staff members.

Mazerolle, Stephanie M; Bruening, Jennifer E; Casa, Douglas J

2008-01-01

389

Balancing Work and Family: A Panel Analysis of the Impact of Part-Time Work on the Experience of Time Pressure  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this article we consider the consequences of work-family reconciliation, in terms of the extent to which the adjustment of the labour market career to family demands (by women) contributes to a better work-life balance. Using the Flemish SONAR-data, we analyse how changes in work and family conditions between the age of 26 and 29 are related to…

Laurijssen, Ilse; Glorieux, Ignace

2013-01-01

390

Balancing Work and Family: A Panel Analysis of the Impact of Part-Time Work on the Experience of Time Pressure  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|In this article we consider the consequences of work-family reconciliation, in terms of the extent to which the adjustment of the labour market career to family demands (by women) contributes to a better work-life balance. Using the Flemish SONAR-data, we analyse how changes in work and family conditions between the age of 26 and 29 are related…

Laurijssen, Ilse; Glorieux, Ignace

2013-01-01

391

Women in orthodontics and work-family balance: challenges and strategies.  

PubMed

The number of women entering the orthodontic profession over the past few decades has increased dramatically. A review of the literature revealed the lack of research on achieving a work-family balance among female dentists and dental specialists. Work-family balance has been researched more extensively in the field of medicine; however, despite some critical differences, parallels between these 2 professions exist. This study identified issues that Canadian female orthodontists face and strategies they use to achieve a work-family balance. A phenomenological qualitative study was used to analyze the results of semi-structured telephone interviews of a purposive sample of 13 Canadian female orthodontists. The results strongly support the role-conflict theory about the competing pressures of maternal and professional roles. Female orthodontists described their challenges and strategies to minimize role conflict in their attempt to achieve a work-family balance. The women defined balance as having success and satisfaction in both their family life and professional life. They identified specific challenges of achieving a work-family balance that are unique to orthodontic practice and strategies for adapting to their maternal and professional roles. Achieving a work-family balance is of paramount importance to female orthodontists, and the results of this study may be applied to other specialties in dentistry. PMID:22770247

Davidson, Sarah; Major, Paul W; Flores-Mir, Carlos; Amin, Maryam; Keenan, Louanne

2012-01-01

392

Work-family conflict as a risk factor for sickness absence  

PubMed Central

Objectives (1) To study both cross?sectional and prospective relationships between work–family conflict and sickness absence from work; (2) to explore the direction of the relationships between the different types of conflict (work–home interference and home–work interference) and sickness absence; and (3) to explore gender differences in the above relationships. Methods Data from the Maastricht Cohort Study were used with six months of follow up (5072 men and 1015 women at T6). Work–family conflict was measured with the Survey Work–Home Interference Nijmegen (SWING). Sickness absence was assessed objectively through individual record linkage with the company registers on sickness absence. Results In the cross?sectional analyses, high levels of work–family conflict, work–home interference, and home–work interference were all associated with a higher odds of being absent at the time of completing the questionnaire, after controlling for age and long term disease. Differences in average number of absent days between cases and non?cases of work–home interference were significant for men and most pronounced in women, where the average number of absent days over six months follow up was almost four days higher in women with high versus low–medium work–home interference. Conclusions A clear relation between work–family conflict and sickness absence was shown. Additionally, the direction of work–family conflict was associated with a different sickness absence pattern. Sickness absence should be added to the list of adverse outcomes for employees struggling to combine their work and family life.

Jansen, N W H; Kant, IJ; van Amelsvoort, L G P M; Kristensen, T S; Swaen, G M H; Nijhuis, F J N

2006-01-01

393

Employers' Roundtable on Work and Family Issues: A Directory of Metro-Denver Employers' Involvement in Work and Family Programs and Policies.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In 1989, a group of employer representatives in the Denver metropolitan area formed an employers' roundtable to address work and family issues. A survey developed by the roundtable was sent to employers in the Denver area in 1992. This directory compiles the results of the survey. Section 1 of the directory summarizes employers' efforts to provide…

Colorado Office of the Governor, Denver.

394

Considering the role of personality in the work–family experience: Relationships of the big five to work–family conflict and facilitation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Using a national, random sample (N=2130), we investigated the relationship between each of the Big Five personality traits and conflict and facilitation between work and family roles. Extraversion was related to greater facilitation between roles but was not related to conflict, whereas neuroticism was related to greater conflict but only weakly related to facilitation. Conscientiousness was related to less conflict,

Julie Holliday Wayne; Nicholas Musisca; William Fleeson

2004-01-01

395

Working-class fathers and childcare: the economic and family contexts of fathering in the UK  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper reports on a UK-based study that explored the ways in which working-class families living in the inner city negotiate and resolve childcare and domestic responsibilities between mothers and fathers and how men balance employment and family demands. Drawing on interviews with 70 families with pre-school children, including interviews with 16 men, we explore how the respondents practice fathering

Annette Braun; Carol Vincent; Stephen J. Ball

2011-01-01

396

Early Childhood Care, Work, and Family in Japan: Trends in a Society of Smaller Families.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examined opinions of diverse parents, teachers, and academics regarding Japanese society, its infant/toddler care system, labor force, and family. Found evidence of a difficult transition in the culture of child rearing, including increased caregiver responsibility for child rearing and increased anxiety about parenting among young mothers.…

Newport, Sally F.

2001-01-01

397

Maternal EmploymentRelations With Young Adults' Work and Family Expectations and Self-Efficacy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Relations between maternal employment and young adults' work and family expectations, and self-efficacy were examined with 721 college students (mean age = 21 years). Young men expected more work hours per day and older retirement age, whereas women expected full-time work at a younger age and more time with spouse and children each week. Individuals with employed mothers reported less

Heidi R. Riggio; Stephan J. Desrochers

2006-01-01

398

Women Leaders in High-Poverty Community Schools: Work-Related Stress and Family Impact  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This qualitative study explores the experiences of women administrators in high-poverty community schools, investigating four women's perspectives on work demands and the impact on their families. Their work demands are related to the characteristics of impoverished communities, whereas their work resources are based on intrinsic rewards and…

Lawson, Jennifer E.

2008-01-01

399

Family Interference with Work and Workplace Cognitive Failure: The Mitigating Role of Recovery Experiences  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The first goal of this study was to test whether family interference with work (FIW) is positively related to increased workplace cognitive failure (WCF), which is defined as errors made at work that indicate lapses in memory (e.g., failing to recall work procedures), attention (e.g., not fully listening to instruction), and motor function (e.g.,…

Lapierre, Laurent M.; Hammer, Leslie B.; Truxillo, Donald M.; Murphy, Lauren A.

2012-01-01

400

The Relationship of Work Orientation to Family Situational and Other Variables.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|A study was conducted to determine the relationship of work orientation, as measured by a 45-statement instrument, to family background and socioeconomic condition, work history of the student, and participation in school-supervised work experience. The study used data collected as part of a longitudinal study of 1,063 high school students in…

McMillion, Martin B.; And Others

401

The Relationship of Work Orientation to Family Situational and Other Variables.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A study was conducted to determine the relationship of work orientation, as measured by a 45-statement instrument, to family background and socioeconomic condition, work history of the student, and participation in school-supervised work experience. The study used data collected as part of a longitudinal study of 1,063 high school students in 1989…

McMillion, Martin B.; And Others

402

Socialization to Work in Late Adolescence: The Role of Television and Family  

Microsoft Academic Search

This survey of college freshmen examines the role of television and family in anticipatory socialization to work. Findings indicate that both sources play a role in the development of work-related values and aspirations, but contribute in different ways. Wishful identification was higher for characters perceived to have higher paying jobs and stronger extrinsic (but not intrinsic) work values. Although causal

Cynthia A. Hoffner; Kenneth J. Levine; Raiza A. Toohey

2008-01-01

403

The Good Working Mother: Managerial Women’s Sensemaking and Feelings About Work–Family Issues  

Microsoft Academic Search

We use a sensemaking lens to explore how women managers experience and articulate work–life concerns upon their return to paid work following maternity leaves. We focus on 11 women who held different types of managerial positions, including vice presidents, circulation managers, and human resources experts. We found that our participants re?framed the good mother image into a good working mother

Patrice M. Buzzanell; Rebecca Meisenbach; Robyn Remke; Meina Liu; Venessa Bowers; Cindy Conn

2005-01-01

404

The relationship of social support to the work-family balance and work outcomes of midlife women  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – This paper seeks to examine the relationship of a network of social support for midlife women with their attitudes toward work-family balance and work outcomes, including job satisfaction, organisational commitment, and career accomplishment. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – A total of 1,089 women between the ages of 35 and 50 across three organizations were surveyed and then 72 of them interviewed.

Wendy C. Marcinkus; Karen S. Whelan-Berry; Judith R. Gordon

2007-01-01

405

Working with Adolescents: A Guide for Practitioners. Social Work Practice with Children and Families Series  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This state-of-the-art practitioner resource and course text provides a comprehensive view of adolescent development and spells out effective ways to help teens who are having difficulties. The book illuminates protective and risk factors in the many contexts of adolescents' lives, from individual attributes to family, school, neighborhood, and…

Laser, Julie Anne; Nicotera, Nicole

2010-01-01

406

Working with Adolescents: A Guide for Practitioners. Social Work Practice with Children and Families Series  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This state-of-the-art practitioner resource and course text provides a comprehensive view of adolescent development and spells out effective ways to help teens who are having difficulties. The book illuminates protective and risk factors in the many contexts of adolescents' lives, from individual attributes to family, school, neighborhood, and…

Laser, Julie Anne; Nicotera, Nicole

2010-01-01

407

Gambling and debt: the hidden impacts on family and work life  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper discusses the key findings from the first qualitative study focused on understanding the impacts of gambling-related debt on the family and work life of problem gamblers. The paper illustrates how current research priorities marginalise the social impacts of gambling on families and communities and suggests ways in which researchers and practitioners can address the issues and impacts of

Carolyn Downs; Ryan Woolrych

2010-01-01

408

Marriage and Family Therapists Working with Couples Who Have Children with Autism  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Current research about families and couples who have children with autism is discussed using the Double ABCX model as a guide. A case study is presented along with recommendations for therapists who work with couples who have children with autism. Marriage and family therapists are encouraged to use the Double ABCX model as both an assessment…

Ramisch, Julie

2012-01-01

409

The new generation of family physicians - career motivation, life goals and work-life balance  

Microsoft Academic Search

Questions under study: The present study aimed to investigate the differences between fu- ture family physicians, and physicians aspiring to other medical specialities, in terms of sociodemo- graphic factors and variables concerning person- ality factors, career motivation, career success, importance of life goals and work-life balance; further, the stability in career choice of family physicians from medical school through to

Barbara Buddeberg-Fischer; Martina Stamm; Claus Buddeberg; Richard Klaghofer

2008-01-01

410

The Family-Relatedness of Work Decisions: A Framework and Agenda for Theory and Research  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Due to global trends such as the increased labor force participation of women, the growing presence of dual-earner couples and single parents in the labor force, and changing values regarding the importance of life balance, individuals' work decisions are being increasingly influenced by family considerations. However, the "family-relatedness" of…

Greenhaus, Jeffrey H.; Powell, Gary N.

2012-01-01

411

THE DUAL-WORKER FAMILY: COMBINING WORKING LIFE WITH SOCIAL LIFE  

Microsoft Academic Search

The lifestyle of the dual-worker family is a complex system of work, family and personal roles. The cultural ambivalences bred by the traditional stereotype of masculinity and femininity add to this complexity. Unravelling part of this complexity was the aim of a survey consisting of a questionnaire distributed to a quota sample of spouses living in a two-earner household. The

Saviour Rizzo

2009-01-01

412

The Impact of Public Housing Policy on Family Social Work Theory and Practice  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Social workers are the professionals most engaged with families living in low-income and subsidized housing and most familiar with the problems associated with inadequate housing. Yet the discussion of public housing policy has been left largely to economists and housing activists and the clear implications for family social work practice have…

McCarty, Dawn

2008-01-01

413

On the Bottom Rung: A Profile of Americans in Low Income Working Families  

Microsoft Academic Search

g ofthe economic ladder is a family in whichthe adults work outside the home on asubstantial and regular basis, but whoseincome is so low that it is difficult for themto sustain what Americans generally considera minimally adequate standard of living.How can this essentially qualitativedescription be defined precisely enough tocapture the number of persons in lowincomeworking families, their characteristics,and the types

Gregory Acs; Katherin Ross Phillips; Daniel McKenzie

2000-01-01

414

Childhood family relationships, marital and work conflict, and mental health distress in Mexican immigrants  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present study examined the associations among childhood family relationships, adult conflict in marriage and work relationships, and mental health distress in Mexican immigrants. The sample consisted of 135 married Mexican immigrants recruited from an ESL program in Southern California. Structural equation modeling was used to test theoretical hypotheses. The model revealed that dysfunctional childhood family relationships predicted dissatisfaction and

Silvia J. Santos; Lisa M. Bohon

1998-01-01

415

Observations of a Working Class Family: Implications for Self-Regulated Learning Development  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Guardians have been implicated in the development of children's academic self-regulation. In this case study, which involved naturalistic observations and interviews, the everyday practices of a working class family were considered in the context of self-regulated learning development. The family's practices, beliefs, dispositions and home…

Vassallo, Stephen

2012-01-01

416

Balancing Work and Family: A Citizens' Agenda for the '90s.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The 813 participants in the Roosevelt Center's May, 1989, regional citizen assemblies discussed trends affecting workers, employers, and families and laid the groundwork for a recommended national work and family policy. Part 1 of this report analyzes the results of a series of introductory exercises in which citizens were asked to register their…

Roosevelt Center for American Policy Studies, Washington, DC.

417

Dynamics and Dilemmas in Working with Families in Inpatient CAMH Services  

Microsoft Academic Search

Working with the families of children and adolescents who are being treated in an Inpatient Child and Adolescent Mental Health facility can be both a vital part of the composite treatment package, and also a potential locus of tension, ambivalence and family—team rivalries. This article looks in detail at how collaborative principles put into practice in Inpatient CAMHS settings can

Vivienne Gross; Jon Goldin

2008-01-01

418

College and University Reference Guide to Work-Family Programs. Report on a Collaborative Study.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report summarizes findings of a study that assessed current levels of support for family friendly programs at colleges and universities in the United States. Analysis of the survey data text and tables is presented in four sections that define purpose and methodology, historical context, provide profiles of various work-family initiatives,…

Friedman, Dana E.; And Others

419

Using Social Marketing to Understand the Family Dinner with Working Mothers  

Microsoft Academic Search

The family dinner is a valued tradition that affords opportunities for social interaction and attachment, as well as sharing events of the day, role modeling, connectedness, and problem solving. Guided by the social-marketing framework, this study explored factors associated with the frequency of the family dinner among working mothers with children ages 8–11 years. A qualitative design was used, employing

Mary P. Martinasek; Rita D. DeBate; Ashley G. Walvoord; Stephanie T. Melton; David Himmelgreen; Tammy D. Allen; Robert J. McDermott

2010-01-01

420

Ethnic Variations in the Connection between Work-Induced Family Separation and Turnover Intent  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Using conservation of resources theory, this study examines the role of resources in the relationship between work-induced family separation and workers' intentions to leave their employment and how these relationships vary across ethnic groups. Analyses of a large representative sample of military members reveal that family separation is…

Behnke, Andrew O.; MacDermid, Shelley M.; Anderson, James C.; Weiss, Howard M.

2010-01-01

421

The Family as a Site for Gendered Ethnic Identity Work among Asian Indian Immigrants  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Research on immigrants often points to the family as a source of support and a location for oppression. Using in-depth interviews with 38 first-generation immigrant Indians, this study adds to this literature by exploring families as sites of identity work where first-generation immigrants manage their gendered ethnic identities. Relocation into…

Mehrotra, Meeta; Calasanti, Toni M.

2010-01-01

422

African American Therapists Working with African American Families: An Exploration of the Strengths Perspective in Treatment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|With the exception of Hill's (1971, 1999) work, historically much of the literature on African American families has focused more on pathology than strengths. This study used interviews with 30 African American psychotherapists, self-identified as employing a strengths perspective with African American families, to investigate which strengths…

Bell-Tolliver, Laverne; Burgess, Ruby; Brock, Linda J.

2009-01-01

423

Work–Family Imagery and Gender Stereotypes: Television and the Reproduction of Difference  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article explores how popular cultural imagery reflects and reproduces work–family segregation and gender inequality. Social constructionist research on television, advertising, and gender is reviewed, and theories explaining gender inequality in the workplace and the home are summarized. Results of a study of 1699 television commercials from the 1990s are presented, and hypotheses about the relationships among gender, family relationship,

Scott Coltrane; Michele Adams

1997-01-01

424

Work and Family: Marriage, Children, Child Gender and the Work Hours and Earnings of West German Men  

Microsoft Academic Search

We find a strong association between family status and labor market outcomes for recent cohorts of West German men in the German Socio-Economic Panel. Living with a partner and living with a child both have substantial positive effects on earnings and work hours. These effects persist in fixed effects models that control for correlation in time-invariant unobservables that affect both

Hyung-Jai Choi; Jutta M. Joesch; Shelly Lundberg

2005-01-01

425

Working Families Tax Relief Act of 2004 (released in AEO2005)  

EIA Publications

The Working Families Tax Relief Act of 2004 was signed into law on October 13, 2004. Primarily, the Act reduces taxes for individuals and businesses. At least two provisions relate to energy: Depletion of marginal properties and qualified vehicles.

Information Center

2005-02-01

426

Work-family conflict and alcohol use: examination of a moderated mediation model.  

PubMed

Research consistently documents the negative effects of work-family conflict; however, little research focuses on alcohol use. This study embraces a tension reduction theory of drinking, wherein alcohol use is thought to reduce the negative effects of stress. The purpose of the study was to test a moderated mediation model of the relationship between work-family conflict and alcohol use in a Chicagoland community sample of 998 caregivers. Structural equation models showed that distress mediated the relationship between work-family conflict and alcohol use. Furthermore, tension reduction expectancies of alcohol exacerbated the relationship between distress and alcohol use. The results advance the study of work-family conflict and alcohol use, helping explain this complicated relationship using sophisticated statistical techniques. Implications for theory and practice are discussed. PMID:23480251

Wolff, Jennifer M; Rospenda, Kathleen M; Richman, Judith A; Liu, Li; Milner, Lauren A

2013-01-01

427

Predictability, Work-Family Conflict, and Intent to Stay: An Air Force Case Study.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A survey was completed by 362 active duty Air Force members in December 2000 regarding their perceptions of schedule predictability, work- family conflict, job satisfaction, organizational commitment, and intent to stay with the Air Force. Theory suggests...

P. J. Obruba J. Captain

2001-01-01

428

Health consequences of work in childhood in opinions of respondents from agricultural families.  

PubMed

Introduction: The engagement of children in work on a family farm is a common phenomenon in many countries worldwide. An excessive loading of children with work creates many risks for their health or even life. Studies concerning the effect of work on health concern mainly the negative consequences for the health of working children. Objective: The objective of the study was the recognition of opinions of adults from agricultural families concerning the effect of work in childhood on their state of health. Materials and method: The study was conducted by the method of a diagnostic survey using a questionnaire technique, and covered a group of 482 adults from agricultural families. The selection of the study group was targeted according to the following criteria: 1) agricultural family origin, 2) respondents' age 20 - 65, 3) completed education. Results: The majority of respondents expressed the opinion that work in childhood had no impact on their health. At the same time, 2/5 of respondents considered that work on their parents' farm exerted an effect on their health in childhood (current effects), whereas nearly 1/3 admitted that an engagement in work in childhood also affected their present state of health as adults (distant effects). Respondents who experienced the impact of work on health perceived both positive and negative consequences of performing agricultural work activities in their childhood. Opinions concerning the effect of work on health depended on loading with agricultural work in childhood. The higher the level of loading with work activities, the more frequently the respondents perceived the impact of work on their health. Conclusion: The engagement of children in agricultural work in a small amount of working time, and adjustment of the endowed jobs to their capabilities brings about many benefits for health with low health risk. In turn, the engagement of children in work from their youngest years and overloading them with work exerts a negative effect on health, especially in later life. PMID:24069875

Lachowski, Stanis?aw

2013-09-20

429

Work-to-family enrichment and voice behavior in China: The role of modernity  

Microsoft Academic Search

There is a lack of knowledge in the literature regarding the effects of the work-family interface on employees’ behaviors\\u000a while taking into consideration of cultural values in developing countries. This study investigates the impact of work-to-family\\u000a enrichment on employees’ voice behavior by focusing on the moderating role of modernity in a Chinese setting. Results from\\u000a a survey of 230 Chinese

Haina Zhang; Xia Zhou; Ying Wang; Malcolm H. Cone

2011-01-01

430

Explaining supervisory support to work-family conflict : The perspectives of guanxi, LMX, and emotional intelligence  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – Previous studies of manufacturing management have ignored a critical theme: the relationship between supervisory support and work-family conflict. This paper aims to explore the link between interpersonal relationships, guanxi, leader-member exchange (LMX) theory, emotional intelligence (EI), supervisory support, and work-family conflict. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – The unit of analysis of this research is the dyad; the paper gathered 244 valid

Bi-Fen Hsu; Wan-Yu Chen; Mei-Ling Wang; Yen-Yu Lin

2010-01-01

431

Responses to Gender Inequality in the Division of Family Work: The Status Quo Effect  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study addresses responses to gender inequality in the division of family work as well as the outcomes of those responses. Ninety-eight husbands and 95 wives responded to stimulus information manipulated by means of scenarios. Participants reported more wife-demand\\/husband-withdraw interaction than husband-demand\\/wife-withdraw interaction when the wife was discontent with her spouse's contribution to family work, but the demand\\/withdraw interaction patterns

Esther S. Kluwer

1998-01-01

432

Working class families in an era of uncertainty: Perceptions of the achievability of the American Dream  

Microsoft Academic Search

As the relatively high-paying, traditionally unionized blue-collar jobs are being de-industrialized out of existence; more working class people are finding themselves in the service sector whose policies often make it extremely difficult for them to find the time and resources to care for their families. The goal of this study was to better understand how working families are adjusting to

Michelle M Proctor

2005-01-01

433

Caring for Dying Children and Their Families: MFTs Working at the Gates of the Elysian Fields  

Microsoft Academic Search

The constant comparison method was used to analyze seven in-depth interviews with Marriage and Family Therapists and some\\u000a of their colleagues working with dying children and their families. The findings of the study revealed that working in these\\u000a settings can encourage shifts in priorities, relationships, and beliefs about life and death, and can elicit professional\\u000a growth. Also, it can carry

Ileana Ungureanu; Jonathan G. Sandberg

2008-01-01

434

Work Place Flexibility: Implications for Developmental Opportunities and Work-Family Conflicts  

Microsoft Academic Search

Contemporary HR practices in the business organizations today have moot concerns towards managing workplace in such a way\\u000a that it is desirable for both employees and employers. This study proposes to assess the consequences of workplace arrangement\\u000a promoting the individualization of employment conditions, i.e. flexible working hours- part time work and telecommuting. The\\u000a implications of flexible working hours on the

Manjari Srivastava

435

Work Socialization and Adolescents' Work-Related Values in Single-Mother African American Families  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This study examined African American mothers' work socialization messages in relation to adolescents' work-related values. Moderation effects of mother-adolescent relation quality on the linkage between maternal socialization messages and adolescents' outcomes were also examined. Participants were 245 single African American mothers and their…

Toyokawa, Teru; McLoyd, Vonnie C.

2013-01-01

436

Work Socialization and Adolescents' Work-Related Values in Single-Mother African American Families  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined African American mothers' work socialization messages in relation to adolescents' work-related values. Moderation effects of mother-adolescent relation quality on the linkage between maternal socialization messages and adolescents' outcomes were also examined. Participants were 245 single African American mothers and their…

Toyokawa, Teru; McLoyd, Vonnie C.

2013-01-01

437

Work and nonwork outcomes of workplace incivility: Does family support help?  

PubMed

This study extended incivility research beyond the confines of the workplace by exploring the relationships between incivility, work-to-family conflict and family support. Data collected from 180 employees from various organizations in Singapore showed that incivility is not a rare phenomenon in Asian cultures. Employees experienced more incivility from superiors than coworkers or subordinates, and these experiences were related to different outcomes. Coworker-initiated incivility was associated with decreased coworker satisfaction, increased perceptions of unfair treatment, and increased depression. On the other hand, superior-initiated incivility was associated with decreased supervisor satisfaction and increased work-to-family conflict. Results also revealed that employees with high family support showed stronger relationships between workplace incivility and negative outcomes, compared with employees with low family support. PMID:21280947

Lim, Sandy; Lee, Alexia

2011-01-01

438

Developmental trajectories of work-family conflict for Finnish workers in midlife.  

PubMed

This study investigated the developmental trajectories of work-family conflict among the same participants (n = 277; 48% female) at ages 36, 42, and 50. Across this 14-year time span, with respect to the sample as a whole, there was no significant change in the mean levels of work-to-family conflict (WFC) or family to-work conflict (FWC). However, latent profile analyses revealed four latent trajectories within the sample, showing both mean-level stability and change in WFC and FWC: (1) "WFC decreasing" (n = 151); (2) "WFC and FWC stable low" (n = 105); (3) "WFC and FWC increasing" (n = 14); and (4) "FWC decreasing" (n = 7). Of these trajectories the strongest contrast existed between the WFC and FWC stable low and the WFC and FWC increasing trajectories: the former had the lowest and the latter the highest number of weekly working hours at ages 36, 42, and 50, and in the former but not in the latter the number of children living at home significantly decreased from age 36 to 50. Also, at ages 42 and 50 the WFC and FWC increasing trajectory showed higher job exhaustion and depressive symptoms than the WFC and FWC stable low trajectory. Altogether these findings suggest that work-family conflict is not limited to the early part of employees' working career and that developmental trajectories of work-family conflict exhibit a substantial amount of heterogeneity. PMID:22642408

Rantanen, Johanna; Kinnunen, Ulla; Pulkkinen, Lea; Kokko, Katja

2012-05-28

439

The role of individual differences in particular autonomy-connectedness in women's and men's work-family balance.  

PubMed

Individual differences are increasingly considered important in the relationship between work-family balance and health. The present study examined the role of autonomy-connectedness in positive and negative work-family interaction and family-work interaction. We also investigated the relationship of work-family interaction and family-work interaction with positive and negative affect, coping patterns, and demographic characteristics. All variables under study were measured with questionnaires in a Dutch sample of 205 respondents. As expected, the individual difference factors were substantially associated with work-family interaction and family-work interaction; together they accounted for 10 to 39% of their variance. In particular, negative affect and the autonomy-connectedness components Sensitivity to others and Capacity for managing new situations appeared to be strongly related to work-family interactions. Health implications of the findings are discussed and recommendations for further research are presented. PMID:20512744

Bekker, Marrie H J; Willemse, Jolanda J P; De Goeij, Jacqueline W J M

2010-05-01

440

Reducing work\\/home conflicts in employed couples: A proposed program to balance job and family demands  

Microsoft Academic Search

Work\\/home conflict is a dominant stress for workers in industrialized countries, particularly in dual-employment families. Interindividual (husband\\/wife) and interrole (work\\/home) conflicts in such families are a unique source of stress and adversely affect family and marital relationships as well as performance at work. Neither family therapy nor the stress literature have reported any interventions directed specifically at reducing work\\/home conflicts

Talma Kushnir; Ruth Malkinson; Riva Kasan

1996-01-01

441

34 CFR Appendix E to Part 674 - Examples for Computing Maximum Penalty Charges (6 Months Unpaid Overdue Payments) on Direct Loans...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

Examples for Computing Maximum Penalty Charges (6 Months Unpaid Overdue Payments) on Direct Loans Made for Periods of Enrollment Before January 1, 1986 E Appendix E to Part 674 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education...

2009-07-01

442

State Maternity/Family Leave Law.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Congress has newly enacted the Family and Medical Leave Act of 1993. The Federal law requires employers with 50 or more employees to provide workers with up to 12 weeks of unpaid leave a year for the birth or adoption of a child, or for the foster care of...

1993-01-01

443

First Time Parents’ Paid Work Patterns in Amsterdam: Father’s Part-Time Work, Family’s Immigrant Background and Mother’s Work for Pay When the Infant Is Very Young  

Microsoft Academic Search

We analyze first time parents’ work patterns. Little empirical work exists on the influence of the partner’s (change of) employment status. There is no study known to us that investigates the effects of the family’s immigrant background. This study explores both issues in addition to the effects of human capital, the mother’s partner not sharing the household, the women’s breastfeeding

Cécile Wetzels

2007-01-01

444

Fathers' and Mothers' Work and Family Issues as Related to Internalizing and Externalizing Behavior of Children Attending Day Care  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Relationships between work and family variables and children's internalizing and externalizing behavior are examined in 132 dual-earner couples of preschool-age children. Mothers' and fathers' parenting stress and mothers' work-family conflict predict children's internalizing behavior; mothers' work-family conflict, mothers' and fathers' parenting…

Hart, Margaret S.; Kelley, Michelle L.

2006-01-01

445

Fathers' and Mothers' Work and Family Issues as Related to Internalizing and Externalizing Behavior of Children Attending Day Care  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Relationships between work and family variables and children's internalizing and externalizing behavior are examined in 132 dual-earner couples of preschool-age children. Mothers' and fathers' parenting stress and mothers' work-family conflict predict children's internalizing behavior; mothers' work-family conflict, mothers' and fathers'…

Hart, Margaret S.; Kelley, Michelle L.

2006-01-01

446

FAMILY FRIEND OR FOE? Working Time, Flexibility, and the Fair Labor Standards Act  

Microsoft Academic Search

Employers and workers both desire flexibility in working time. Businesses want flexibility to change the number of workers and their hours on short notice and in response to market demand and competition. At the same time, workers and their families want flexibility in allocating their work time—daily, weekly, and over their lifetimes—to balance competing demands on their time. For almost

Lonnie Golden

447

The Organization of Work, Schooling and Family Life in Philadelphia, 1838-1920.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Thirteen papers which analyze the relations of work, schooling and family life in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, from 1838 to 1920, are provided in this report. The papers (and their authors) are the following: (1) "The Transition to Adulthood Among White Philadelphians, 1850-1880" (Michael B. Katz and John Modell); (2) "Work, Household, and the…

Katz, Michael B.; And Others

448

The Impact of Workaholism on Work-Family Conflict, Job Satisfaction, and Perception of Leisure Activities  

Microsoft Academic Search

Data were collected from university employees (N?=?129) and Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) members (N?=?103) to assess the impact of workaholism on work-family conflict, job satisfaction, and perceptions of leisure time. The results, using two different measures of workaholism (Workaholism Battery, Work Addiction Risk Test), indicated that greater scores on the Workaholic Risk Test were significantly related to greater

Becca R. Brady; Stephen J. Vodanovich; Robert Rotunda

2008-01-01

449

School Social Work and Early Childhood Student's Attitudes toward Gay and Lesbian Families  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The present study assessed the attitudes of school professionals in training at an American university toward homosexuality and their comfort, action-related disposition, and preparation to work with gay and lesbian (GL) families and their children. Fifty-nine students specializing in birth through kindergarten education and school social work

Averett, Paige E.; Hegde, Archana

2012-01-01

450

School Social Work and Early Childhood Student's Attitudes toward Gay and Lesbian Families  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The present study assessed the attitudes of school professionals in training at an American university toward homosexuality and their comfort, action-related disposition, and preparation to work with gay and lesbian (GL) families and their children. Fifty-nine students specializing in birth through kindergarten education and school social work

Averett, Paige E.; Hegde, Archana

2012-01-01

451

School social work and early childhood student's attitudes toward gay and lesbian families  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present study assessed the attitudes of school professionals in training at an American university toward homosexuality and their comfort, action-related disposition, and preparation to work with gay and lesbian (GL) families and their children. Fifty-nine students specializing in birth through kindergarten education and school social work participated in the study. Overall, participants held positive attitudes toward homosexuality, felt prepared

Paige E. Averett; Archana Hegde

2012-01-01

452

Las obreras: Chicana Politics of Work and Family. Aztlan Anthology Series, Volume 1.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|In this anthology, Chicana voices of the past and present illuminate the experiences of Mexican American women as they strive to integrate wage work, family life, and community engagement. Sections cover confrontations with the state through community action, court litigation, and union organizing; negotiating work, marriage, and children;…

Ruiz, Vicki L., Ed.

453

Implications of Shift Work for Parent-Adolescent Relationships in Dual-Earner Families  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This investigation examined the implications of shift work for parent-adolescent relationship quality--intimacy, conflict, parental knowledge, and involvement--in a sample of 376 dual-earner families. The findings suggested that mothers' relationships with their adolescents were not negatively impacted by their working nonstandard schedules but…

Davis, Kelly D.; Crouter, Ann C.; McHale, Susan M.

2006-01-01

454

Work, Family, and Community: Summary Proceedings of an Ad Hoc Committee.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|These proceedings contain summaries of five working group discussions and a discussion of suggestions for future research from an ad hoc meeting on Work, Family, and Community (Fedruary 21-22, 1980) in Washington, D.C. The meeting had these objectives: (1) to identify salient policy and research issues associated with changing patterns of labor…

Hayes, Cheryl D., Ed.

455

Understanding the 'Mommy Tracks': A Framework for Analyzing Work-Family Issues in the IT Workforce  

Microsoft Academic Search

Despite the recent growth in the number of women in the U.S. labor force, women are still underrepresented in IT work. This paper presents a framework for analyzing work-family conflicts as a way of better understanding the contribution of this factor to the underrepresentation of women in IT. Data from a field study of women employed in the American IT

Jeria L. Quesenberry; Allison J. Morgan; Eileen M. Trauth

456

Work in the Family and in the Labor Market: A Cross-National, Reciprocal Analysis.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examined interrelationships by sex between domestic work and labor market work in the United States, Canada, Norway, and Sweden. Findings suggested that Scandinavian women used their greater opportunities for part-time employment to reconcile family and labor market responsibilities. No significant effects were observed for men in any of the…

Kalleberg, Arne L.; Rosenfeld, Rachel A.

1990-01-01

457

Work-family conflict in Japan: how job and home demands affect psychological distress.  

PubMed

The aim of the present study was to examine how job and home demands are related to psychological distress in a sample of Japanese working parents with preschool children (n=196). We expected that job and home demands are partially related to psychological distress through work-to-family conflict (WFC) and family-to-work conflict (FWC), respectively. Structural equation modeling showed that, as expected, home demands were partially related to psychological distress, both directly and indirectly through FWC. In contrast, job demands were only directly related to psychological distress. The differences between the roles of FWC and WFC are discussed using identity theory. PMID:20616471

Shimazu, Akihito; Bakker, Arnold B; Demerouti, Evangelia; Peeters, Maria C W

2010-07-01

458

Work-to-family Conflict and Family-to-Work Conflict among Japanese Dual-earner Couples with Preschool Children: A Spillover-crossover Perspective.  

PubMed

Objectives: This study among Japanese dual-earner couples examined the independent and combined associations of work-to-family conflict (WFC) and family-to-work conflict (FWC) with psychological health of employees and their partners and the relationship quality between partners. Methods: The matched responses of 895 couples were analyzed with logistic regression analysis to examine whether there were differences among the four work-family conflict groups (i.e., no conflict, WFC, FWC and both conflicts groups) in terms of own psychological distress, social undermining (i.e., negative behaviors directed toward the target person) reported by partners and partner's psychological distress. The no conflicts group was used as the reference group. Results: The both conflicts group had the highest odds ratios for own psychological distress and social undermining towards the partner for both genders. In addition, for husbands, the both conflicts group had the highest odds ratio for partner's psychological distress, whereas for wives, it did not. Conclusions: Dual experiences of WFC and FWC have adverse associations with psychological health of employees and relationship quality between partners of both genders. In addition, dual experiences in husbands have an adverse association with psychological health of their partners (i.e., wives), whereas this is not the case for wives. PMID:23748206

Shimazu, Akito; Kubota, Kazumi; Bakker, Arnold; Demerouti, Eva; Shimada, Kyoko; Kawakami, Norito

2013-06-07

459

Working at the Weekend: Fathers' Time with Family in the United Kingdom.  

PubMed

Whereas most resident fathers are able to spend more time with their children on weekends than on weekdays, many fathers work on the weekends spending less time with their children on these days. There are conflicting findings about whether fathers are able to make up for lost weekend time on weekdays. Using unique features of the United Kingdom's National Survey of Time Use 2000 (UKTUS) I examine the impact of fathers' weekend work on the time fathers spend with their children, family, and partners (N = 595 fathers). I find that weekend work is common among fathers and is associated with less time with children, families, and partners. Fathers do not recover lost time with children on weekdays, largely because weekend work is a symptom of overwork. Findings also reveal that even if fathers had compensatory time, they are unlikely to recover lost time spent as a family or couple. PMID:22844157

Hook, Jennifer L

2012-07-13

460

Working at the Weekend: Fathers' Time with Family in the United Kingdom  

PubMed Central

Whereas most resident fathers are able to spend more time with their children on weekends than on weekdays, many fathers work on the weekends spending less time with their children on these days. There are conflicting findings about whether fathers are able to make up for lost weekend time on weekdays. Using unique features of the United Kingdom’s National Survey of Time Use 2000 (UKTUS) I examine the impact of fathers’ weekend work on the time fathers spend with their children, family, and partners (N = 595 fathers). I find that weekend work is common among fathers and is associated with less time with children, families, and partners. Fathers do not recover lost time with children on weekdays, largely because weekend work is a symptom of overwork. Findings also reveal that even if fathers had compensatory time, they are unlikely to recover lost time spent as a family or couple.

Hook, Jennifer L.

2012-01-01

461

OVERWORKED FAMILIES? CHANGES IN THE PAID WORKING HOURS OF FAMILIES WITH YOUNG CHILDREN, 1986 TO 2001  

Microsoft Academic Search

Internationally, there is much research interest in the potential challenges associated with overwork within households, particularly for parents raising children. New Zealand census data show that, when individuals are considered, average hours of paid work for employed women and men changed very little between 1986 and 2001. Yet, in this time period, there were significant changes in both employment rates

Paul Callister

2005-01-01

462

Work-family conflict and job satisfaction: emotional intelligence as a moderator.  

PubMed

The negative impact of work-family conflict (WFC) on employees' well-being and job-related outcomes has attracted much research attention recently. A major gap in the literature is which factors could potentially buffer its negative effect on employees. The present study examined the moderating effect of emotional intelligence on the relationship between WFC and job satisfaction in a sample of 212 Chinese high school teachers. On the basis of conservation of resource theory, we hypothesized that emotional intelligence would weaken the negative effect of family-to-work and work-to-family interference on job satisfaction. Results suggested that WFC (work-to-family interference and family-to-work interference) was negatively related to job satisfaction and that emotional intelligence weakened the effect of WFC on job satisfaction. These findings provide implications for theories on WFC and emotional intelligence, such as conservation of resource theory. The current study also provides a test of these theories in Chinese culture to support the generalizability of theories developed in previous research. Practical implications for reducing the negative influence of WFC on employees' job satisfaction are also provided, such as the potential value of emotional intelligence for the training and development of employees in teaching professions. PMID:23015466

Gao, Yongdong; Shi, Junqi; Niu, Qikun; Wang, Lei

2012-09-27

463

[TFR is incapable of reflecting the situation of family planning work at a basic level].  

PubMed

Total fertility rate (TFR) does not reflect the quality of family planning work. Records support this opinion, showing that the TFR has fluctuated from year to year since 1979, but the percentage of families with 1 child is steadily increasing. Also, when the 11 regions of Lu county, China, are compared, it is found that there is no absolute and direct relationship between the TFR and the number of families with 1 child. The TFR is influenced by 2 factors: 1) The number of births (a larger number means a higher rate), and 2) the concentration of women of childbearing age (the greater the concentration, the higher the rate). Thus, the TFR is not a good indicator of success in family planning work. PMID:12159341

1984-07-29

464

Social work’s ‘electronic turn’: notes on the deployment of information and communication technologies in social work with children and families  

Microsoft Academic Search

Information and communication technologies (ICTs) are becoming central to the remaking of social work with children and families in England and Wales. Factors helping to steer this development include ‘joined up thinking’, the ‘e-government agenda’, and marketization. Examples of ‘e-practice’ discussed include: the envisaged databases for children, featured in the Children Act 2004; the utilization by local authorities of the

Paul Michael Garrett

2005-01-01

465

When Work and Family are in Conflict: Impact on Psychological Strain Experienced by Social Workers in Australia  

Microsoft Academic Search

The impact of workplace stress and the need for work-life balance are increasingly recognised within social work. Recent theorising on work–family interface suggests that work-related stress cannot be contained within the workplace without it impacting on other life domains such as the family. Similarly, it is claimed that family-related issues also affect what happens at work. The present study examined

Parveen Kalliath; Mark Hughes; Peter Newcombe

2012-01-01

466

Marriage and family therapists working with couples who have children with autism.  

PubMed

Current research about families and couples who have children with autism is discussed using the Double ABCX model as a guide. A case study is presented along with recommendations for therapists who work with couples who have children with autism. Marriage and family therapists are encouraged to use the Double ABCX model as both an assessment tool as well as for intervention. More research and effective therapists in this area are needed in order to keep up with the rising rates of families that include children diagnosed with autism. PMID:22512293

Ramisch, Julie

2010-05-06

467

The cosmos of the Paris apartment: working-class family life in the nineteenth century.  

PubMed

Drawing on Bachelard's notion of “cosmicity” this article investigates the living conditions of Parisian working-class families in the second half of the nineteenth century. Nineteenth-century social critics claimed that the lack of privacy in urban apartments made decent family life impossible. However, evidence from judicial dossiers concerning attentat à la pudeur (intimate assault against children) illuminates the lived experience of children and their families in Paris apartments. Rather than a sharp divide between public and private, children experienced their apartment homes as the core of a social and spatial world under the surveillance of parents, neighbors, and other children. PMID:21158198

Ferguson, Eliza

2011-01-01

468

Effect of a brief emergency medicine education course on emergency department work intensity of family physicians.  

PubMed

ABSTRACTBackground:Recently, many Canadian emergency departments (EDs) have struggled with physician staffing shortages. In 2006, the Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care funded a brief "emergency medicine primer" (EMP) course for family physicians to upgrade or refresh skills, with the goal of increasing their ED work intensity. We sought to determine the effect of the EMP on the ED work intensity of family physicians.Methods:A retrospective longitudinal study was conducted of the ED work of 239 family physicians in the 2 years before and after a minimum of 6 months and up to 2 years from completing an EMP course in 2006 to 2008 compared to non-EMP physicians. ED work intensity was defined as the number of ED shifts per month and the number of ED patients seen per month. We conducted two analyses: a before and after comparison of all EMP physicians and a matched cohort analysis matching each EMP physician to four non-EMP physicians on sex, year of medical school graduation, rurality, and pre-EMP ED work intensity.Results:Postcourse, EMP physicians worked 0.5 more ED shifts per month (13% increase, p ?=? 0.027). Compared to their matched controls, EMP physicians worked 0.7 more shifts per month (13% increase, p ?=? 0.0032) and saw 15 more patients per month (17% increase, p ?=? 0.0008) compared to matched non-EMP physicians. The greatest increases were among EMP physicians who were younger, were urban, had previous ED experience, or worked in a high-volume ED. The effect of the EMP course was negligible for physicians with no previous ED experience or working in rural areas.Conclusion:The EMP course is associated with modest increases in ED work intensity among some family physicians, in particular younger physicians in urban areas. No increase was seen among physicians without previous ED experience or working in rural areas. PMID:23283121

Vaillancourt, Samuel; Schultz, Susan E; Leaver, Chad; Stukel, Thérèse A; Schull, Michael J

2013-01-01

469

Work–Family Conflicts and Health Behaviors Among British, Finnish, and Japanese Employees  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background  Work–family conflicts are associated with poor health. However, work–family conflicts and health behaviors have been little\\u000a studied.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Purpose  This study examined the associations of conflicts between paid work and family life with unhealthy behaviors among British,\\u000a Finnish, and Japanese employees.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Method  Data were derived from postal questionnaire surveys among 40 to 60 years old employees from three cohorts, the British Whitehall\\u000a II Study

T. Lallukka; T. Chandola; E. Roos; N. Cable; M. Sekine; S. Kagamimori; T. Tatsuse; M. Marmot; E. Lahelma

2010-01-01

470

Giuseppe and Aloysius Frari's Works on Rabies and History of Frari Medical Family of ?ibenik, Dalmatia  

PubMed Central

This article is an attempt to reconstruct the family history of the Fraris, the famous Šibenik medical family. Three generations of physicians from the Frari family played an important role not only at medical and social scene of Šibenik in the 18th and 19th century, but also in Croatian and Italian medical history. I will try to provide important details on the lives, medical and social work, and publications of 5 members of the family, Giuseppe (Josip), Angelo Antonio (An?eo Antun), Sebastiano (Sebastijan), Michele Carlo (Mihovil), and Aloysius (Luigi) Frari. I would also like to pay a special attention to the works on rabies, written by Giuseppe and Luigi Frari, which are among the earliest and most accurate Croatian works on the subject. To reconstruct the history of the family, I studied the relevant editions about the medical and social history of Šibenik, Dalmatia, Venice, and Croatia, together with the Fraris’ publications and reflections. This was the first time Italian and Latin language works by Giuseppe and Luigi Frari on rabies were analyzed. The story on Fraris also documents that medical publishing was a common practice in Dalmatia in the 18th and the 19th century.

Krnic, Anton

2007-01-01

471

Faculty Work-Family Issues: Finding the Balance at a Liberal Arts College  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The demands and expectations on science faculty at liberal arts colleges are in many ways distinct from those at research universities. While these differences can work in favor of easing work-family conflicts, there are also unique problems that faculty can confront in a setting of smaller departments and undergraduate-only institutions. I will discuss how these issues play out for junior and senior faculty, with an emphasis on how concrete policy changes can make the workplace a more family-friendly and supportive environment for all faculty, as well as making liberal arts colleges more attractive options for those seeking physics faculty jobs.

Amador Kane, Suzanne

2008-03-01

472

Protecting the health of employees caring for family members with special health care needs.  

PubMed

Over half of American workers are holding a paid job while also providing unpaid assistance and support to a family member. Research shows that family members who provide care to children or adults with special health care needs are themselves at risk of physical and mental health problems. Yet, little research has explored how the work environment mediates the effects of caregiving on caregivers' mental and physical health. With a sample of 2455 currently employed U.S. adults from the Work, Family, Community Nexus (WFCN) survey, a random-digit dial, nationally representative survey of Americans aged 18-69, we examine whether paid leave and flexibility policies mediate the relationship between caregiving and health. In Ordinary Least Squares regression models, we find that paid leave to address family members' health was associated with better mental health status as measured by the 5-item Mental Health Inventory and paid sick leave with better physical health status as measured by self-rated overall health status. A supportive supervisor was also associated with improvements in mental and physical health. For both men and women, paid leave and a supervisor's support offset some or all of the negative effects of caregiving, but for women, the buffering effects of working conditions are slightly larger. Enhancing the unpaid leave guaranteed in the U.S. Family and Medical Leave Act so that it is paid and passing national paid sick days legislation will help ensure that employed caregivers can retain their jobs, receive needed income, and meet their own mental and physical health needs. PMID:21669484

Earle, Alison; Heymann, Jody

2011-05-27

473

Family Home Childcare Providers: A Comparison of Subsidized and Non-Subsidized Working Environments and Employee Issues  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Federal and State Governments provide childcare subsidies for low-income working families. This study compares the encountered issues and working environments of family home providers of subsidized and non-subsidized childcare. Questionnaires were distributed throughout a southeastern state in the United States to 548 family home childcare…

Shriner, Michael; Schlee, Bethanne M.; Mullis, Ronald L.; Cornille, Thomas A.; Mullis, Ann K.

2008-01-01

474

Work and Family in the United States: A Policy Initiative. A Report of the Family Policy Panel of the Economic Policy Council of UNA-USA.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

As part of its world employment project, the Economic Policy Council of the United Nations Association of the United States formed the family policy panel to further examine the extent of ongoing changes affecting the family, the workplace, and the economy. In its work, the family policy panel concentrated on five issues considered central to the…

United Nations Association of the United States of America, New York, NY.

475

Fathers’ and Mothers’ Work and Family Issues as Related to Internalizing and Externalizing Behavior of Children Attending Day Care  

Microsoft Academic Search

Relationships between work and family variables and children’s internalizing and externalizing behavior are examined in 132 dual-earner couples of preschool-age children. Mothers’ and fathers’ parenting stress and mothers’ work-family conflict predict children’s internalizing behavior; mothers’ work-family conflict, mothers’ and fathers’ parenting stress, the number of hours fathers’ worked, and mothers’ beliefs about father involvement predict externalizing symptoms in children. Results

Margaret S. Hart; Michelle L. Kelley

2006-01-01

476

"Preventing the pain" when working with family and sexual violence in primary care.  

PubMed

Primary care professionals (PCPs) are increasingly being expected to identify and respond to family and sexual violence as the chronic nature and severity of the long-term health impacts are increasingly recognized. This discussion paper reports the authors' expert opinion from their experiences running international workshops to prevent trauma among those who work and research sexual violence. It describes the burnout and secondary traumatic stress literature which provides the evidence supporting their work. Implications for practicing basic training in response to trauma and ongoing education are a key area for responding to family violence and preventing professional stress. A professional culture that supports and values caring well for those who have experienced family violence as well as "caring for the carer" is needed. Working in teams and having more support systems in place are likely to protect PCPs from secondary traumatic stress and burnout. Undergraduate and postgraduate training of PCPs to develop trauma knowledge and the skills to ask about and respond to family violence safely are essential. In addition, the healthcare system, workplace, and the individual practitioner support structures need to be in place to enable PCPs to provide safe and effective long-term care and access to other appropriate services for those who have experienced family violence. PMID:23533754

Coles, Jan; Dartnall, Elizabeth; Astbury, Jill

2013-02-26

477

"Preventing the Pain" When Working with Family and Sexual Violence in Primary Care  

PubMed Central

Primary care professionals (PCPs) are increasingly being expected to identify and respond to family and sexual violence as the chronic nature and severity of the long-term health impacts are increasingly recognized. This discussion paper reports the authors' expert opinion from their experiences running international workshops to prevent trauma among those who work and research sexual violence. It describes the burnout and secondary traumatic stress literature which provides the evidence supporting their work. Implications for practicing basic training in response to trauma and ongoing education are a key area for responding to family violence and preventing professional stress. A professional culture that supports and values caring well for those who have experienced family violence as well as “caring for the carer” is needed. Working in teams and having more support systems in place are likely to protect PCPs from secondary traumatic stress and burnout. Undergraduate and postgraduate training of PCPs to develop trauma knowledge and the skills to ask about and respond to family violence safely are essential. In addition, the healthcare system, workplace, and the individual practitioner support structures need to be in place to enable PCPs to provide safe and effective long-term care and access to other appropriate services for those who have experienced family violence.

Dartnall, Elizabeth

2013-01-01

478

Mexican American 7(th) Graders' Future Work and Family Plans: Associations with Cultural Experiences and Adjustment.  

PubMed

We describe Mexican American 7(th) graders' expectations for future work and family roles and investigate links between patterns of future expectations and adolescents' cultural experiences and adjustment. Adolescents participated in home interviews and a series of seven nightly phone calls. Five unique patterns of adolescents' future expectations were identified (N = 246): Career Oriented, Independent, Family Oriented, Early, and Inconsistent. Career Oriented adolescents had the highest socioeconomic status and contact with the U.S. (e.g., generation status) whereas Family Oriented adolescents had the lowest. Cultural orientations, values, and involvement also varied across groups. For example, Career Oriented adolescents reported significantly higher familism values compared to Inconsistent adolescents. Clusters also differed on adjustment: Career Oriented and Family Oriented adolescents reported higher parental warmth and less risky behavior compared to Independent and Inconsistent adolescents. Findings underscore the multi-faceted nature of adolescents' future expectations and the diversity in cultural experiences among Mexican origin youth. PMID:23338812

Cansler, Emily; Updegraff, Kimberly A; Simpkins, Sandra D

2011-03-23

479

Working with transnational immigrants: expanding meanings of family, community, and culture.  

PubMed

An increasing number of recent immigrants maintain intense connections with their countries and extended families. The complexity of relationships that arise from transnational connections calls into question dominant discourses about family bonds and requires that we adopt new theory and treatment considerations. The relational stresses and the almost untenable choices that economic immigrants face take the form of separations and reunions of parents and children, and difficult gender or generation transformations that need to be considered against this new transnational backdrop. This article proposes a model that encompasses foundational approaches with new approaches in family therapy by focusing on three crucial contexts for work with immigrants: the relational, the community, and the cultural-sociopolitical. Family therapists are also encouraged to create collaborative links with migration studies, a growing interdisciplinary field. PMID:17593882

Falicov, Celia J

2007-06-01

480

Standard Work Specifications for Single-Family Home Energy Upgrades Summary (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and numerous industry stakeholders developed the Standard Work Specifications for Single-Family Home Energy Upgrades to define the minimum requirements for high-quality residential energy upgrades. Today, the Standard Work Specifications provide a unique source for defining high-quality home energy upgrades, establishing clear expectations for homeowners, contractors, trainers, workers, program administrators, and organizations that provide financing for energy upgrades.

Not Available

2012-11-01

481

Factors associated with work, social life and family life disability in bipolar disorder patients  

Microsoft Academic Search

We analyzed the presence of work, social life and family life disability in 108 outpatients with a Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders IV (DSM-IV) diagnosis of bipolar disorder and their association with previous course-of-illness variables and current psychopathology. Work disability was pragmatically defined as being on a disability pension or in the process of obtaining it; social life

Luis Gutiérrez-Rojas; Dolores Jurado; Manuel Gurpegui

2011-01-01

482

Long Work Hours and Family LifeA Cross-National Study of Employees' Concerns  

Microsoft Academic Search

Work-family conflict is a pressing research and policy issue. The authors extend previous scholarship on this issue by studying elite employees’worries about the effects of longwork hours on those in their personal life. This issue is researched cross-nationally in a sample of managers and professionals based in the United States, London, and Hong Kong, all of whom work for one

Amy S. Wharton; Mary Blair-Loy

2006-01-01

483

[Action in mental health to families in different contexts of work: integrative review].  

PubMed

This is an integrative review aimed to identify and analyze studies in nursing journals that focus on mental health actions directed to families in different work contexts. To collect data, we used the descriptors mental health, family and nursing in the databases of the Latin American and Caribbean in Health Sciences (LILACS) and Scientific Electronic Library Online (SciELO). Inclusion criteria were: original articles published in Portuguese, Spanish and English in journals in the field of nursing between the years 2003 to 2008. This work showed a predominance of studies focusing on issues of health staff and/or professional, indicating a need to produce research for users and families. It is believed that these findings may be of great value to the teams in the scenarios of psychosocial care and point the way toward further research. PMID:21574345

Aires, Marinês; Roos, Cristine Moraes; Gonçalves, Ana Valéria Furquim; Schneider, Jacó Fernando; Olschowsky, Agnes

2010-09-01

484

The impact of individual and organizational characteristics on work-family conflict and career outcomes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – This paper aims to examine the dynamics of individual and organizational characteristics in work-family conflict (WFC) and career outcomes. It aims to consider the role of self-esteem, career management and multiple life role commitment, and, as individual characteristics, on WFC and career outcomes; it also seeks to consider the role of career encouragement and organizational culture, as organizational

Irene Nikandrou; Leda Panayotopoulou; Eleni Apospori

2008-01-01

485

Job Adequacy and Work-Family Balance: Looking at Jobs as a Whole  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Using an ecological person-process-context model and recent conceptualization of the "employment continuum," this study examines differences in components of work-family balance among individuals in diverse types of jobs ranging from "inadequate" to "optimal." Cross-sectional data from the 1997 National Study of the Changing Workforce (n = 2,877)…

Bass, Brenda L.; Grzywacz, Joseph G.

2011-01-01

486

Working with Families: Promising Programs to Help Parents Support Young Children's Learning. Summary of Findings.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The impetus for the study was the U.S. Department of Education's interest in improving the school achievement of disadvantaged children. The report presents the results from an in-depth study of promising family education programs that are working with lo...

B. D. Goodson J. P. Swartz M. A. Millsap S. C. Spielman M. Moss

1991-01-01

487

The Impact of Work on Family Functioning: A Review of the Literature. Occasional Paper Number 3.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The purpose of this paper is to examine the connection between work and family functioning in Australia by critically reviewing relevant literature, especially literature concerning empirical research. Special attention is given to Australian literature and data. However, where local material is lacking, information from overseas (frequently…

Brewer, Graeme

488

Nonstandard Schedules and Young Children's Behavioral Outcomes among Working Low-Income Families  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article focuses on how maternal employment in nonstandard schedules at night, on the weekends, or that rotate on a weekly basis influence preschoolers' behavioral outcomes. Examining low-income working mothers and their children aged 2-4 years from the Welfare, Children, and Families: A Three-City Study (N = 206), we find that maternal…

Joshi, Pamela; Bogen, Karen

2007-01-01

489

The Relation between Work-Family Conflict and Job Satisfaction: A Finer-Grained Analysis.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A study of 160 hospital employees with partners and/or children showed that work-family conflict was significantly related to global and composite job satisfaction. Behavior-based conflict was significantly related to job satisfaction; strain-based and time-based conflicts were not. (Contains 30 references.) (SK)

Bruck, Carly S.; Allen, Tammy D.; Spector, Paul E.

2002-01-01

490

Coping Profiles Associated With Psychiatric, Physical Health, Work, and Family Problems  

Microsoft Academic Search

Compares the coping profiles of 11 samples (total N = 1,298) of individuals experiencing psychiatric, physical health, work, or family problems. Comparisons are made in individuals with and without anxiety and depression to control for the effects of distress. Coping was similar for samples in similar problem categories but different for samples in different categories. Psychiatric patients made more use

Peter P. Vitaliano; Roland D. Maiuro; Joan Russo; Wayne Katon; Deborah DeWolfe; Gordon Hall

1990-01-01

491

When Work Enriches Family-Life: The Mediational Role of Professional Development Opportunities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Purpose: Several studies have pointed out the importance of work-family enrichment (WFE) for individuals' well-being and organizations and for this reason, it seems important to understand how organizations may promote it. This study attempts to understand the role of organizational resources and, particularly, of opportunities for professional…

Molino, Monica; Ghislieri, Chiara; Cortese, Claudio G.

2013-01-01

492

Time with Children, Children's Well-Being, and Work-Family Balance among Employed Parents  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Cultural imperatives for "good" parenting include spending time with children and ensuring that they do well in life. Knowledge of how these factors influence employed parents' work-family balance is limited. Analyses using time diary and survey data from the 2000 National Survey of Parents (N = 933) indicate that how time with children relates…

Milkie, Melissa A.; Kendig, Sarah M.; Nomaguchi, Kei M.; Denny, Kathleen E.

2010-01-01

493

Gender, Work, and Family in Cuba: The Challenges of the Special Period  

Microsoft Academic Search

It is within the context of the Special Period, the economic crisis that began in the early 1990s after the collapse of the Soviet Union and the tightening of the economic blockade by the United States, that we analyze work and family relations in Cuba. Although women made significant gains in the labor market after the Revolution, the Special Period

Maura I. Toro-Morn; Anne R. Roschelle; Elisa Facio

2002-01-01

494

Conditional Welfare: A Family Social Work Perspective on Mandatory Drug Testing  

Microsoft Academic Search

Drug testing of welfare applicants as a requirement for benefits, its pros and cons, and its implications for family social work practice are discussed in this paper. While proponents of drug testing argue that drug use and welfare dependency are correlated, opponents suggest that mandatory drug testing is costly, infringes upon individuals' civil rights, and unfairly assumes welfare applicants are

Michael S. Spencer; Jordana R. Muroff; Jorge Delva

2000-01-01

495

Working with American Indian Students and Families: Disabilities, Issues, and Interventions  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Although most American Indian students are educated in the public school system, there is limited literature regarding (a) how general and special educators can effectively meet the unique educational needs of these students or (b) what strategies educators can use while working with their families. Additionally, there are limited resources…

Pewewardy, Cornel; Fitzpatrick, Michael

2009-01-01

496

Where Does Australia Fit in Internationally with Work and Family Issues?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examines the status of work and family initiatives in Australia in terms of legal responses to global trends, the adoption of workplace policies and programs, and innovative organizational responses. States that these issues need to be approached from a strategic business perspective and that globalization of organizations needs to be taken into…

Russell, Graeme; Bourke, Juliet

1999-01-01

497

Change in Work-Family Conflict among Employed Parents between 1977 and 1997  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Using data from two national surveys (N = 2,050), this paper examines what accounts for the increase in the sense of work-family conflict among employed parents between 1977 and 1997. Decomposition analysis indicates that the increases in women's labor force participation, college education, time pressure in completing one's job, and the decline…

Nomaguchi, Kei M.

2009-01-01

498

Work and Family Roles of Women in Ho Chi Minh City  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This study aims to point out the differences between the North and the South of Vietnam, more particularly, Saigon and Hanoi, in terms of family and work roles of women. It helps to explain the ways women in Ho Chi Minh City reconstruct their reproduction role, the attitudes of Southern husbands towards household tasks and the husband-wife…

Phuong, Tran Phi

2007-01-01

499

Gender and Attitudes to Work and Family Roles: The Views of Young People at the Millennium  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The last century, in particular the latter half, saw radical shifts in the roles and expectations of women in society. This article investigates the views of 14- to 16-year-olds in the year 2000 on work and family roles, exploring both their general views on gender roles and their own personal aspirations for the future. In general the young…

Tinklin, Teresa; Croxford, Linda; Ducklin, Alan; Frame, Barbara

2005-01-01

500

Work–family policies, participation, and practices: fathers and childcare in Europe  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper asks about social policies for fathers’ participation in childcare in Europe, and fathers’ work–family reconciliation practices and ideals, with special reference to the UK. In some European countries, especially Sweden, reform has given fathers non-transferable rights to parental leave. Might such innovations enhance UK men's contribution to childcare? In the UK, gender inequalities in policy are stark: parental

Elizabeth Fox; Gillian Pascall; Tracey Warren

2009-01-01