Science.gov

Sample records for unpaid family work

  1. Defining Disability for Women and the Problem of Unpaid Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reisine, Susan T.; Fifield, Judith

    1988-01-01

    Discusses political, theoretical, and methodological issues in defining and measuring paid and unpaid work disability. Presents results of study analyzing disability in paid work and unpaid family work among 206 women with rheumatoid arthritis, demonstrating feasibility of measuring disability in family work and showing that women experience…

  2. Unpaid work in health economic evaluations.

    PubMed

    Krol, Marieke; Brouwer, Werner

    2015-11-01

    Given its societal importance, unpaid work should be included in economic evaluations of health care technology aiming to take a societal perspective. However, in practice this does not often appear to be the case. This paper provides an overview of the current place of unpaid work in economic evaluations in theory and in practice. It does so first by summarizing recommendations regarding the inclusion of unpaid labor reported in health economic textbooks and national guidelines for economic evaluations. In total, three prominent health economic text-books were studied and 28 national health economic guidelines. The paper, moreover, provides an overview of the instruments available to measure lost unpaid labor and reports on a review of the place of unpaid labor in applied economic evaluations in the area of rheumatoid arthritis. The review was conducted by examining methodology of evaluations published between 1 March 2008 and 1 March 2013. The results of this study show that little guidance is offered regarding the inclusion of unpaid labor in economic evaluations in textbooks and guidelines. The review identified five productivity costs instruments including questions about unpaid work and 33 economic evaluations of treatments for rheumatoid arthritis of which only one included unpaid work. The results indicate that unpaid work is rarely included in applied economic evaluations of treatments for rheumatoid arthritis, despite this disease expecting to be associated with lost unpaid work. Given the strong effects of certain diseases and treatments on the ability to perform unpaid work, unpaid work currently receives less attention in economic evaluations than it deserves. PMID:26421997

  3. Awarding Educational Credit for Women's Unpaid Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sansregret, Marthe; Ekstrom, Ruth B.

    Women who seek further education and the formal credentials it provides often have acquired valuable knowledge and work experience while performing various unpaid work in their homes and communities. Awarding college credit and recognition for women's nonpaid work is a measure of social justice and equity. The three major ways to evaluate and…

  4. Paid and Unpaid Work. Can Policy Improve Gender Inequalities?

    E-print Network

    Scott, Jacqueline; Dex, Shirley

    2009-01-01

    partner). Table 3.1: Household Work Patterns: Women aged 20–49 in Couples Dual career (both full time) Modifi ed (male full time and female part time) Male bread- winner Female bread- winner No earner Sample size All 1993/94 0.38 0.27 0.21 0... The Netherlands UK US Sweden West Germany Core domestic work Men 29 28 33 56 11 Women 188 177 182 143 238 Other unpaid work Men 84 83 97 117 84 Women 124 111 142 146 132 Paid work Men 325 367 406 379 418 Women 94 178 187 262 168 Total work Men...

  5. The Invisibility of Children's Paid and Unpaid Work: Implications for Ethiopia's National Poverty Reduction Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woldehanna, Tassew; Jones, Nicola; Tefera, Bekele

    2008-01-01

    The complexities of intergenerational and gendered intra-household resource allocations are frequently overlooked in poverty reduction policies. To address this lacuna, this article focuses on links between macro-development policies and children's paid and unpaid work burden in Ethiopia. Using a mixed methods approach, quantitative household…

  6. Shared Work, Valued Care: New Norms for Organizing Market Work and Unpaid Care Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Appelbaum, Eileen; Bailey, Thomas; Berg, Peter; Kalleberg, Arne L.

    Until the 1970s, social norms dictated that women provided care for their families and men were employed for pay. The rapid increase in paid work for women has resulted in an untenable model of work and care in which all employees are assumed to be unencumbered with family responsibilities and women who care for their families are dismissed as…

  7. Psychology Work Experience Placement This is an unpaid work experience opportunity to `shadow' academic and other members

    E-print Network

    Martin, Ralph R.

    Psychology Work Experience Placement (ID:326) Outline This is an unpaid work experience opportunity as an undergraduate student. Further details Learning outcomes: · Psychology is recognised as a Science and awareness is gained of the discipline of Psychology at Higher Education level. · Discover the interesting and exciting

  8. Family and Medical Leave Act As a faculty or staff member employed at Illinois State University, you may take up to twelve (12) weeks of paid/unpaid, job-

    E-print Network

    Branoff, Theodore J.

    Family and Medical Leave Act As a faculty or staff member employed at Illinois State University and medical reasons. Whether the leave is paid or unpaid is dependent on what benefits you have available. You-8311) in order to return to work. MEDICAL LEAVE FACT SHEET Intermittent Leave The "Requirements While

  9. Relatively Different? How Do Gender Differences in Well-Being Depend on Paid and Unpaid Work in Europe?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boye, Katarina

    2009-01-01

    Absolute as well as relative hours of paid and unpaid work may influence well-being. This study investigates whether absolute hours spent on paid work and housework account for the lower well-being among women as compared to men in Europe, and whether the associations between well-being and hours of paid work and housework differ by gender…

  10. Labor Market Work and Home Care's Unpaid Caregivers: A Systematic Review of Labor Force Participation Rates, Predictors of Labor Market Withdrawal, and Hours of Work

    PubMed Central

    Lilly, Meredith B; Laporte, Audrey; Coyte, Peter C

    2007-01-01

    As people continue to age and receive complex health care services at home, concern has arisen about the availability of family caregivers and their ability to combine employment with caregiving. This article evaluates the international research on unpaid caregivers and their labor market choices, highlighting three conclusions: first, caregivers in general are equally as likely to be in the labor force as noncaregivers; second, caregivers are more likely to work fewer hours in the labor market than noncaregivers, particularly if their caring commitments are heavy; and finally, only those heavily involved in caregiving are significantly more likely to withdraw from the labor market than noncaregivers. Policy recommendations are targeting greater access to formal care for “intensive” caregivers and developing workplace policies for employed caregivers. PMID:18070333

  11. The Working Family.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boethius, Monica

    1984-01-01

    The working family is today by far the most common family type in Sweden. However, just over 50 percent of the children of working parents have access to day care. Because Swedish income tax policy is based on the concept that all adults will support themselves and does not take into account the number of persons supported on an income, one parent…

  12. Balancing Family and Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yahnke, Sally; And Others

    The purpose of this monograph is to present a series of activities designed to teach strategies needed for effectively managing the multiple responsibilities of family and work. The guide contains 11 lesson plans dealing with balancing family and work that can be used in any home economics class, from middle school through college. The lesson…

  13. 45 CFR 261.60 - What hours of participation may a State report for a work-eligible individual?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... individual was paid, including paid holidays and sick leave. For participation in unpaid work activities, it... Welfare OFFICE OF FAMILY ASSISTANCE (ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS), ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN AND...

  14. 45 CFR 261.60 - What hours of participation may a State report for a work-eligible individual?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... individual was paid, including paid holidays and sick leave. For participation in unpaid work activities, it... Welfare OFFICE OF FAMILY ASSISTANCE (ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS), ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN AND...

  15. The Enduring Debate over Unpaid Labour.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beneria, Lourdes

    1999-01-01

    Summarizes the theoretical and practical issues related to the under-estimation of women's work in the labor force and national accounting statistics. Responds to the continuing criticism that women's efforts make no useful impact, unpaid work should not be treated the same as paid work, and efforts are misguided. (JOW)

  16. Women and work: a ten year retrospective.

    PubMed

    MacRae, Nancy

    2005-01-01

    A look back, after a decade, at the issues surrounding women and work. Work options, childcare and family concerns, the glass ceiling, sexual harassment, women entrepreneurs, race and poverty, unpaid work, and women with disabilities are discussed. PMID:15920308

  17. Work-family conflicts and work performance.

    PubMed

    Roth, Lawrence; David, Emily M

    2009-08-01

    Prior research indicates that work-family conflict interferes with family far more than it interferes with work. Conservation of resources provides a possible explanation: when shifting resources from family is no longer sufficient to maintain satisfactory work performance, then workers must acquire additional resources or reduce investments in work. One source of such additional resources could be high performance peers in the work group. The performance of workers with resource-rich peers may be less adversely affected by work-family conflict. In this study, 136 employees of a wholesale distribution firm (61% women, 62% minority) working in groups of 7 to 11 in manual labor and low-level administrative jobs rated their own work-to-family conflict. Their supervisors rated workers' performance. Hierarchical regression analysis indicated that work-to-family conflict increasingly adversely affected job performance as work group performance decreased. Hence, work group performance may be an important moderator of the effects of work-family conflict. PMID:19810435

  18. Maine's Families: Poverty Despite Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lazere, Edward B.

    Children are among the poorest of Maine's residents. Nearly 1 in 5 children under the age of 18, 19.3%, lived in families below the federal poverty line in the early 1990s. Most of these poor children lived in working families. The working poor are often missing from policy debates, but their numbers are likely to increase with welfare reform…

  19. Balancing family and work

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2011-08-01

    More than 45% of women scientists at top universities in the United States have indicated that their careers have kept them from having as many children as they want, according to an 8 August study, “Scientists want more children,” which appears in the journal PLoS ONE. The study, by sociologists Elaine Howard Ecklund of Rice University and Anne Lincoln of Southern Methodist University, indicates that 24.5% of male scientists surveyed indicated the same concerns. The study also found that among junior scientists, 29% of women indicated concern that a science career would prevent them from having a family; 7% of men indicated the same concern.

  20. Work, Aging, and Risks to Family Life: The Case of Australia.

    PubMed

    Biggs, Simon; Carr, Ashley; Haapala, Irja

    2015-09-01

    The relationship between work and family is considered with an emphasis on policy solutions. Australian policy is a case example in the context of international trends. A mismatch between policy initiatives and familial and personal priorities constitutes a new social risk associated with demographic and sociocultural development. Contemporary trends, both nationally and internationally, evidence solutions to the “problem of demographic aging” by adopting a form of economic instrumentalism. This restricts legitimate age identities to those associated with work and work-related activity. When applied to family life, such a focus runs the risk of reducing policy interest in intergenerational engagement to unpaid care roles, while personal development and age-related life priorities are ignored. The need for cultural adaptation to population aging is becoming accepted in policy debate and is considered here as an effective response to the personal, social, and economic risks of population aging and associated impacts on family life. PMID:26144871

  1. Changing Work and Work-Family Conflict: Evidence from the Work, Family, and Health Network*

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Erin L.; Moen, Phyllis; Oakes, J. Michael; Fan, Wen; Okechukwu, Cassandra; Davis, Kelly D.; Hammer, Leslie; Kossek, Ellen; King, Rosalind Berkowitz; Hanson, Ginger; Mierzwa, Frank; Casper, Lynne

    2013-01-01

    Schedule control and supervisor support for family and personal life are work resources that may help employees manage the work-family interface. However, existing data and designs have made it difficult to conclusively identify the effects of these work resources. This analysis utilizes a group-randomized trial in which some units in an information technology workplace were randomly assigned to participate in an initiative, called STAR, that targeted work practices, interactions, and expectations by (a) training supervisors on the value of demonstrating support for employees’ personal lives and (b) prompting employees to reconsider when and where they work. We find statistically significant, though modest, improvements in employees’ work-family conflict and family time adequacy and larger changes in schedule control and supervisor support for family and personal life. We find no evidence that this intervention increased work hours or perceived job demands, as might have happened with increased permeability of work across time and space. Subgroup analyses suggest the intervention brings greater benefits to employees more vulnerable to work-family conflict. This study advances our understanding of the impact of social structures on individual lives by investigating deliberate organizational changes and their effects on work resources and the work-family interface with a rigorous design. PMID:25349460

  2. The State of Families, 2: Work and Family.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Family Service America, Milwaukee, WI.

    This report examines trends in the world of work and the economy that affect families. Part 1 presents a futurist's perspective on the changing world of work and how it affects families. Topics include finance capitalism in a global economy, values, work force, compensation and employee benefits, employment and unemployment, government,…

  3. Emerging Factors in Work/Family Interference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mehrotra, Jena; Gebeke, Debra

    In recent years the study of work and family issues has expanded from a focus on men's unemployment, women's employment, and two-career couples to more complex issues of economics, structural and psychological characteristics of work, enactment of multiple roles, the work/family cycle, combined effects of partners' work role characteristics, and…

  4. Caution: Families at Work = Attention: Families au Travail.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Theilheimer, Ish, Ed.; Eisner, Kathy, Ed.

    1996-01-01

    This publication, in English and French, reports on the work-family conflict in Canada, gauges progress over the past decade, and examines how views have changed. The following articles are featured: (1) "Caution: Families at Work" (Ish Theilheimer), an examination of current workplace innovations, viewpoints of employers and employees, and the…

  5. YMCA Work with the Family in Canada.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brundage, Donald Hazen

    This study reviewed the nature and exent of current Canadian Young Men's Christian Association (YMCA) work with families, elicited creative ideas from selected staff personnel and laymen as to future family programs and services, examined current programs against a backdrop of societal change affecting the Canadian family, and drew implications…

  6. Work/Family Conflicts: Policy Implications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Maureen

    In the past 20 years, the percentage of married women in the Canadian labor force has risen dramatically. Despite women's increased participation in the labor force, child care and housework are still largely done by women. While the difficulty of combining work and family responsibilities can result in work/family conflicts, a variety of…

  7. Gender, Work and Family Concentration Concentrations in Sociology

    E-print Network

    Turc, Catalin

    Sociology Gender, Work and Family Concentration Concentrations in Sociology Students majoring. The 4 concentrations are: · Crime, Law and Justice · Health, Medicine and Aging · Gender, Work and Family · Social Inequality Gender, Work and Family Concentration Traditionally, work and family were

  8. The Role of Identity and Work-Family Support in Work-Family Enrichment and Its Work-Related Consequences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wayne, Julie Holliday; Randel, Amy E.; Stevens, Jaclyn

    2006-01-01

    Despite growing research on the positive connections between work and family, antecedents and consequences of work-family enrichment are understudied. Using a sample of employees from a major insurance company, we assessed the relationship of (i) individual (i.e., work and family identities), (ii) family (emotional and instrumental support), and…

  9. Designing Work, Family & Health Organizational Change Initiatives

    PubMed Central

    Hammer, Leslie B.; Kelly, Erin L.; Moen, Phyllis

    2014-01-01

    Executive Summary For decades, leaders and scholars have been advocating change efforts to improve work-life relationships. Yet most initiatives have lacked rigor and not been developed using scientific principles. This has created an evidence gap for employer support of work and personal life as a win–win for productivity and employees’ well-being. This paper examines the approach used by the U.S. Work Family Health Network (WFRN) to develop an innovative workplace intervention to improve employee and family health. The change initiative was designed to reduce organizationally based work-family conflict in two contrasting contexts representative of major segments of today’s U.S. workforce: health care employees and informational technology professionals. The WFRN Intervention (called STAR) had three theoretically based change elements. They were: 1) increase job control over work time and schedule; 2) increase supervisor social support for family and job effectiveness; and 3) improve organizational culture and job design processes to foster results orientation. Seven practical lessons for developing work-life interventions emerged from this groundbreaking endeavor. PMID:24683279

  10. Work-family conflict and job burnout among correctional staff.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Eric G; Hogan, Nancy L

    2010-02-01

    Work-family conflict and job burnout are both issues for 272 correctional staff (response rate of 68%). The two major forms of work-family conflict are work-on-family conflict and family-on-work conflict. Multivariate analysis of survey data from 272 correctional staff at a state prison indicated work-on-family conflict had a significant positive relation with job burnout, while family-on-work conflict did not. PMID:20402422

  11. Considering social work assessment of families

    PubMed Central

    Devine, Lauren

    2015-01-01

    Since the 1990s the way in which social workers respond to referrals of children to Children's Social Care departments has evolved. It has moved through a process that ‘screens families out’ of child protection assessment to a system aiming to ‘screen families in’ where necessary, and now uses a holistic assessment aiming to screen for both risk and need. The assessment framework developed to assess children in need and their families is the modern social work response to all referrals. Little research has been carried out to assess its suitability as a widespread social work response. This article considers the debates that have emerged in relation to its use and concludes that insufficient consideration has been given to evaluating assessment as an appropriate measure of need and risk. Wider provision of non-assessed universal services would reduce the need for assessment. PMID:25866453

  12. The Impact of Emotional Labor on Work-Family Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yanchus, Nancy J.; Eby, Lilian T.; Lance, Charles E.; Drollinger, Sabrina

    2010-01-01

    Theory and research on emotional labor at work is applied to the study of the work-family interface to explore how emotional experiences in both the work and the family domain relate to the experience of work-family conflict and work-family enrichment, and ultimately attitudinal and health outcomes. Emotional intelligence is also examined as a…

  13. Working Fathers: New Strategies for Balancing Work and Family.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, James A.; Pittinsky, Todd L.

    With the steady rise in the number of women joining the workforce, fathers are taking on more responsibility for the nurturing of their children, partly by necessity but often by choice, while still retaining their "breadwinner" pressures. This book is intended to help men reconcile the demands of work and family. It is based on a decade of…

  14. Negative Affectivity, Role Stress, and Work-Family Conflict.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoeva, Albena Z.; Chiu, Randy K.; Greenhaus, Jeffrey H.

    2002-01-01

    Measures of job and family stress and negative affectivity were completed by 148 (of 400) Hong Kong civil service employees. Persons with high negative affectivity experience more work and family stress. Job stress was associated with extensive interference of work with family, and family stress with extensive interference of family with work.…

  15. Teachers' Occupation-Specific Work-Family Conflict

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cinamon, Rachel Gali; Rich, Yisrael; Westman, Mina

    2007-01-01

    To expand work-family conflict (WFC) research to specific occupations, this study investigated how work and family generic and occupation-specific stressors and support variables related to family interfering with work (F [right arrow] W) and work interfering with family (W [right arrow] F) among 230 Israeli high school teachers. Further expanding…

  16. Work-Family Planning Attitudes among Emerging Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Basuil, Dynah A.; Casper, Wendy J.

    2012-01-01

    Using social learning theory as a framework, we explore two sets of antecedents to work and family role planning attitudes among emerging adults: their work-family balance self-efficacy and their perceptions of their parents' work-to-family conflict. A total of 187 college students completed a questionnaire concerning their work-family balance…

  17. Family Care Responsibilities and Employment: Exploring the Impact of Type of Family Care on Work-Family and Family-Work Conflict

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Lisa M.

    2013-01-01

    This study compared work-family and family-work conflict for employed family caregivers with disability-related care responsibilities in contrast to employed family caregivers with typical care responsibilities. Using data from the 2002 National Study of the Changing Workforce, a population-based survey of the U.S. workforce, formal and informal…

  18. Is work–family balance more than conflict and enrichment?

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, Dawn S.; Grzywacz, Joseph G.; Zivnuska, Suzanne

    2009-01-01

    This study deepens our theoretical and practical understanding of work–family balance, defined as the ‘accomplishment of role-related expectations that are negotiated and shared between an individual and his/her role-related partners in the work and family domains’ (Grzywacz & Carlson, 2007: 458). We develop a new measure of work–family balance and establish discriminant validity between it, work–family conflict, and work–family enrichment. Further, we examine the relationship of work–family balance with six key work and family outcomes. Results suggest that balance explains variance beyond that explained by traditional measures of conflict and enrichment for five of six outcomes tested: job satisfaction, organizational commitment, family satisfaction, family performance, and family functioning. We conclude with a discussion of the applications of our work. PMID:20148121

  19. Clarifying Work-Family Intervention Processes: The Roles of Work-Family Conflict and Family-Supportive Supervisor Behaviors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammer, Leslie B.; Kossek, Ellen Ernst; Anger, W. Kent; Bodner, Todd; Zimmerman, Kristi L.

    2011-01-01

    Drawing on a conceptual model integrating research on training, work-family interventions, and social support, we conducted a quasi-experimental field study to assess the impact of a supervisor training and self-monitoring intervention designed to increase supervisors' use of family-supportive supervisor behaviors. Pre- and postintervention…

  20. Family Support & Health Care: Working Together for Healthy Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lalley, Jacqueline, Ed.; Ahsan, Nilofer, Ed.

    1998-01-01

    This report of the Family Resource Coalition of America examines partnerships between family support programs and health care providers, forged to ensure that the comprehensive needs of families are met. The report begins with two articles, "Family Support and the Emerging Health System" and "Social and Economic Issues Affecting Health--A…

  1. Work, Family and Community Support as Predictors of Work-Family Conflict: A Study of Low-Income Workers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griggs, Tracy Lambert; Casper, Wendy J.; Eby, Lillian T.

    2013-01-01

    This study examines relationships between support from work, family and community domains with time- and strain-based work-family conflict in a sample of low-income workers. Results reveal significant within-domain and cross-domain relationships between support from all three life domains with work--family conflict. With respect to family support,…

  2. Role Resources and Work-Family Enrichment: The Role of Work Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siu, Oi-ling; Lu, Jia-fang; Brough, Paula; Lu, Chang-qin; Bakker, Arnold B.; Kalliath, Thomas; O'Driscoll, Michael; Phillips, David R.; Chen, Wei-qing; Lo, Danny; Sit, Cindy; Shi, Kan

    2010-01-01

    This article proposes a theoretical model of work-family enrichment and tests the mediating role of work engagement. The inclusion of work engagement extends prior research on work-family interface, and allows for examination of the effects of role resources (job resources, family support) on work-family enrichment. A two-wave survey was conducted…

  3. Working to End Family Homelessness. Annual Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center on Family Homelessness (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    The National Center on Family Homelessness is determined to end family homelessness. Sheltering families provides a temporary safe haven. Connecting families to permanent housing, essential services, and critical supports can change their lives forever. Through research the Center learns what families need to rebound from the housing, economic,…

  4. Work-Family Balance: Perspectives from Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pillay, Soma; Abhayawansa, Subhash

    2014-01-01

    The article examines different types of work-family pressures amongst people working within the Australian university sector. We were specifically interested in work-family experiences between domestic and migrant Australians. Among the major findings, domestic Australians experience greater levels of work-family imbalance across most of the…

  5. Linking Team Resources to Work-Family Enrichment and Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunter, Emily M.; Perry, Sara Jansen; Carlson, Dawn S.; Smith, Steven A.

    2010-01-01

    Work-family scholars now recognize the potential positive effects of participation in one life domain (i.e., work or family) on performance in other life domains. We examined how employees might benefit from team resources, which are highly relevant to the modern workplace, in both work and nonwork domains via work-family enrichment. Using the…

  6. Generational Differences in Work-Family Conflict and Synergy

    PubMed Central

    Beutell, Nicholas J.

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines differences in work-family conflict and synergy among the four generational groups represented in the contemporary workforce: Generation Y Generation X, Baby Boomers, and Matures using data from the 2008 National Study of the Changing Workforce (n = 3,502). Significant generational differences were found for work-family conflict (work interfering with family and family interfering with work) but not for work-family synergy. Mental health and job pressure were the best predictors of work interfering with family conflict for each generational group. Work-family synergy presented a more complex picture. Work-family conflict and synergy were significantly related to job, marital, and life satisfaction. Implications and directions for future research are discussed. PMID:23783221

  7. "Opportunity" in Paid vs. Unpaid Public Relations Internships: A Semantic Network Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maynard, Michael L.

    1997-01-01

    Compares differences in benefit appeal in letters offering internships written by the business community to an internship director. Finds the promise of "opportunity" and "for credit" appears more often in unpaid internship offers; emphasis was placed on writing skills and work-related tasks in paid internship offers. Reveals the business…

  8. Linking Mechanisms of Work-Family Conflict and Segmentation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michel, Jesse S.; Hargis, Michael B.

    2008-01-01

    Despite the abundance of work and family research, few studies have compared the linking mechanisms specified in theoretical models of work-family conflict and segmentation. Accordingly, the current study provides a greater degree of empirical clarity concerning the interplay of work and family by directly examining the indirect effects of…

  9. Working with families in Tower Hamlets: an evaluation of the Family Welfare Association's Family Support Services.

    PubMed

    Gray, Benjamin

    2002-03-01

    This paper describes an evaluation carried out by South Bank University of the work of the Family Welfare Association's (FWA's) Family Support Services (FSSs) in Tower Hamlets, London. Tower Hamlets is a multi-racial area in east London that, according to the 1991 census, has high levels of poverty, overcrowding and unemployment. Increasing poverty and social exclusion, which further entrench inequalities in health, are reported by sources such as government, health and social services and research as requiring innovative local responses to meet pressing welfare needs. The evaluation reported here examined three projects: Family Support, Building Bridges and Quality Protects - these are referred to collectively as FSSs. The evaluation shows that FSSs are innovative services that demonstrate effective ways of working with vulnerable families affected by experiences of racism, bullying, mental health difficulties, domestic violence or child abuse. In common with other successful initiatives in the UK and abroad, FSSs are aimed to be non-stigmatising, non-intrusive and responsive to the ethnicity, views and specific needs of families. This paper focuses on the participatory work of FSSs with families to illustrate effective methods of quality support, detail outcomes, and draw lessons for policy and practice. PMID:12121270

  10. Measuring the Positive Side of the Work-Family Interface: Development and Validation of a Work-Family Enrichment Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlson, Dawn S.; Kacmar, K. Michele; Wayne, Julie Holliday; Grzywacz, Joseph G.

    2006-01-01

    Based on current conceptualizations of enrichment, or the positive side of the work-family interface, a multi-dimensional measure of work-family enrichment is developed and validated using five samples. The final 18 item measure consists of three dimensions from the work to family direction (development, affect, and capital) and three dimensions…

  11. A Comparative Test of Work-Family Conflict Models and Critical Examination of Work-Family Linkages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michel, Jesse S.; Mitchelson, Jacqueline K.; Kotrba, Lindsey M.; LeBreton, James M.; Baltes, Boris B.

    2009-01-01

    This paper is a comprehensive meta-analysis of over 20 years of work-family conflict research. A series of path analyses were conducted to compare and contrast existing work-family conflict models, as well as a new model we developed which integrates and synthesizes current work-family theory and research. This new model accounted for 40% of the…

  12. Family boundary characteristics, work-family conflict and life satisfaction: A moderated mediation model.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Lin; Fan, Jinyan

    2015-10-01

    Although work-family border and boundary theory suggest individuals' boundary characteristics influence their work-family relationship, it is largely unknown how boundary flexibility and permeability mutually influence work-family conflict and subsequent employee outcomes. Moreover, the existing work-family conflict research has been mainly conducted in the United States and other Western countries. To address these gaps in the work-family literature, the present study examines a moderated mediation model regarding how family boundary characteristics may influence individuals' work-family conflict and life satisfaction with a sample of 278 Chinese full-time employees. Results showed that employees' family flexibility negatively related to their perceived work interference with family (WIF) and family interference with work (FIW), and both these two relationships were augmented by individuals' family permeability. In addition, WIF mediated the relationship between family flexibility and life satisfaction; the indirect effect of family flexibility on life satisfaction via WIF was stronger for individuals with higher family permeability. The theoretical and managerial implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:25331584

  13. Work-Family Conflict and the Perception of Departmental and Institutional Work-Family Policies in Collegiate Athletic Trainers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Godek, Michelle M.

    2012-01-01

    Employees throughout the United States struggle to balance their work and family commitments, in part because the workforce makeup has changed significantly over the last half century. The evolving family structure also has contributed to this struggle. This research seeks to build on previous work-family literature by incorporating the six…

  14. Relations of Work Identity, Family Identity, Situational Demands, and Sex with Employee Work Hours

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenhaus, Jeffrey H.; Peng, Ann C.; Allen, Tammy D.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined relations of multiple indicators of work identity and family identity with the number of weekly hours worked by 193 married business professionals. We found that men generally worked long hours regardless of the situational demands to work long hours and the strength of their work and family identities. Women's work hours, on…

  15. Striking a Balance: Families, Work, and Early Childhood Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callister, Paul; And Others

    This study examines the connections between work, families, and early childhood education, and analyzes international trends and perspectives on parental leave. Chapter 1, "Introduction," shows that the increase in paid work by mothers makes families, work, and education important research and policy issues, and surveys reasons for this increase.…

  16. Family Work and Relationships: Lessons from Families of Men Whose Jobs Require Travel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zvonkovic, Anisa M.; Solomon, Catherine Richards; Humble, Aine M.; Manoogian, Margaret

    2005-01-01

    This study explores how family members experience their lives when family breadwinners must be absent from home because of their jobs. Informed by general systems theory and contextual perspectives, we described wives' family work that supports the breadwinner role and maintains the emotional connections among family members. From our findings…

  17. Work-family balance after childbirth: the association between employer-offered leave characteristics and maternity leave duration.

    PubMed

    Guendelman, Sylvia; Goodman, Julia; Kharrazi, Martin; Lahiff, Maureen

    2014-01-01

    Early return to work after childbirth has been increasing among working mothers in the US. We assessed the relationship between access to employer-offered maternity leave (EOML) (both paid and unpaid) and uptake and duration of maternity leave following childbirth in a socio-economically diverse sample of full-time working women. We focus on California, a state that has long provided more generous maternity leave benefits than those offered by federal maternity leave policies through the State Disability Insurance program. The sample included 691 mothers who gave birth in Southern California in 2002-2003. Using weighted logistic regression, we examined the EOML-maternity leave duration relationship, controlling for whether the leave was paid, as well as other occupational, personality and health-related covariates. Compared with mothers who were offered more than 12 weeks of maternity leave, mothers with <6 weeks of EOML and those offered 6-12 weeks had five times higher odds of returning to work within 12 weeks; those offered no leave had six times higher odds of an early return. These relationships were similar after controlling for whether the leave was paid and after controlling for other occupational and health characteristics. Access to and duration of employer-offered maternity leave significantly determine timing of return to work following childbirth, potentially affecting work-family balance. Policy makers should recognize the pivotal role of employers in offering job security during and after maternity leave and consider widening the eligibility criteria of the Family and Medical Leave Act. PMID:23504130

  18. Understanding Work-Family Spillover in Hotel Managers.

    PubMed

    Lawson, Katie M; Davis, Kelly D; Crouter, Ann C; O'Neill, John W

    2013-06-01

    The present study examined the experience of work-family spillover among 586 hotel managers (HMs) working in 50 full-service hotels throughout the U.S. Work-family spillover occurs when behaviors, moods, stresses, and emotions from work spill over into family. We first investigated which hotel managers were more likely to experience spillover and stressful work conditions based on their life circumstances (gender, parental status, age, decision-making latitude at work). Second, we investigated which work conditions (hours worked per week, organizational time expectations, emotional labor, and permeable boundaries) predicted more work-family spillover. Women, employees without children at home, and younger adults experienced the highest levels of negative work-family spillover. Work conditions, particularly organizational time expectations, put HMs at risk for experiencing more negative and less positive work-family spillover. The results provide evidence that modifying certain work conditions in the hotel industry may be helpful in improving the quality of HMs' jobs and retention. PMID:23888092

  19. Work/Family Balance for Men in Student Affairs 

    E-print Network

    Singh, Shailendra Mohan

    2012-07-16

    /FAMILY BALANCE FOR MEN IN STUDENT AFFAIRS A Dissertation by SHAILENDRA MOHAN SINGH Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY May... 2011 Major Subject: Educational Human Resource Development Work/Family Balance for Men in Student Affairs Copyright 2011 Shailendra Mohan Singh WORK/FAMILY BALANCE FOR MEN IN STUDENT AFFAIRS...

  20. On Common Ground: Prominent Women Talk about Work & Family.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zuckerman, Diana, Ed.

    This publication presents interviews with 11 prominent women, representing different backgrounds, philosophies, and life experiences, in which they speak about their own experiences with work and family issues. The introduction, "On Common Ground: Prominent Women Talk about Work & Family" (Diana Zuckerman), provides an overview. The 11 interviews…

  1. Are Difficulties Balancing Work and Family Associated with Subsequent Fertility?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Siwei; Hynes, Kathryn

    2012-01-01

    Despite considerable interest in the causes and consequences of work-family conflict, and the frequent suggestion in fertility research that difficulty in balancing work and family is one of the factors leading to low fertility rates in several developed countries, little research uses longitudinal data to examine whether women who report…

  2. Faculty Sense of Agency in Decisions about Work and Family

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Meara, KerryAnn; Campbell, Corbin M.

    2011-01-01

    Over the last decade, many research universities have adopted policies and support mechanisms to help academic parents balance work and family. This study sought to understand what facilitates faculty agency in making decisions about work and family, including parental leave. We conducted 20 interviews with 5 men and 15 women at a research…

  3. Advancing Measurement of Work and Family Domain Boundary Characteristics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Russell A.; Barnes-Farrell, Janet L.; Bulger, Carrie A.

    2010-01-01

    Recent research offers promising theoretical frameworks for thinking about the work-family interface in terms of the boundaries individuals develop around work and family. However, measures for important constructs proposed by these theories are needed. Using two independent samples, we report on the refinement of existing "boundary flexibility"…

  4. An examination of the perceived direction of work-family conflict 

    E-print Network

    Huffman, Ann Hergatt

    2005-02-17

    The current trend in the work and family literature is to separate work-family conflict into two distinct dimensions: work interfering with family and family interfering with work. Research suggests that employees who ...

  5. Boom, Bust & Beyond: The State of Working Arkansas. Arkansas Working Families Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huddleston, Richard; Duran, Angela

    Using data from several government and private sources and interviews with working families, this report examines the Arkansas economy, how Arkansas working families have fared economically in recent years, and their current challenges. The report offers suggestions about how the state can provide the tools families need to continue to move up the…

  6. Improving the Health of Working Families: Research Connections Between Work and Health. NPA Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yen, Irene H.; Frank, John W.

    This document contains two papers on connections between work and health and policy options for improving the health of working families. "Foreword" (James A. Auerbach) places the two papers in the context of recent research on the connections between work, family, and health. Chapter 1's overview addresses the changing nature of work, the new…

  7. From "Work-Family" to "Work-Life": Broadening Our Conceptualization and Measurement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keeney, Jessica; Boyd, Elizabeth M.; Sinha, Ruchi; Westring, Alyssa F.; Ryan, Ann Marie

    2013-01-01

    Despite frequent reference to "work-life" issues in the organizational literature, little theoretical or empirical attention has been paid to nonwork areas beyond family. The purpose of the research described here is to move beyond work-family conflict to a broader conceptualization and measurement of work interference with life. A measure of work

  8. Social Support from Work and Family Domains as an Antecedent or Moderator of Work-Family Conflicts?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seiger, Christine P.; Wiese, Bettina S.

    2009-01-01

    On the basis of Conservation of Resources theory, we investigated how social support from supervisor, co-workers, life partner, and family members is associated with work-family conflicts in N=107 working mothers. We used data from a cross-sectional questionnaire and a standardized diary to examine two possible forms of interplay: (a) Social…

  9. Module 1: Overview of Work-Family Issues in the United States. Work-Family Curriculum Guide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kossek, Ellen Ernst; Leana, Carrie; MacDermid, Shelley; Pitt-Catsouphes, Marcie; Raskin, Patricia; Secret, Mary; Sweet, Stephen

    2006-01-01

    There is a long tradition of academic interest in the worlds of work and family. However, there was scant attention paid to the linkages between these two worlds until the mid 1970s. In the United States, the 1977 publication of Kanter's monograph, "Work and family in the United States: A critical review and agenda for research and policy,"…

  10. Adolescent Work Experiences and Family Formation Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Staff, Jeremy; VanEseltine, Matthew; Woolnough, April; Silver, Eric; Burrington, Lori

    2012-01-01

    A long-standing critique of adolescent employment is that it engenders a precocious maturity of more adult-like roles and behaviors, including school disengagement, substance use, sexual activity, inadequate sleep and exercise, and work-related stress. Though negative effects of high-intensity work on adolescent adjustment have been found, little…

  11. Order Amidst Change: Work and Family Trajectories in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Rindfuss, Ronald R.; Choe, Minja Kim; Kabamalan, Maria Midea M.; Tsuya, Noriko O.; Bumpass, Larry L.

    2011-01-01

    Substantial family and work macro-level change has been occurring in Japan. Examples include a decline in the availability of jobs that afford lifetime protection against unemployment, an increase in jobs that do not carry benefits such as a pension, an increase in age at marriage and at first birth, and an increase in marital dissolution. Using life history data from the 2000 National Survey on Family and Economic Conditions, young Japanese appear to have responded to these macro-level changes in a fairly orderly manner. Marriage and childbearing have been postponed, but marriage still precedes childbearing. Education is completed prior to starting work. For men, once work commences they continue working. For women, the classic conflict between work and family roles is evident. For men and women in both the family and work spheres Japanese young adults have more orderly life course trajectories than American young adults. PMID:21547009

  12. Identifying the Family, Job, and Workplace Characteristics of Employees Who Use Work-Family Benefits.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Secret, Mary

    2000-01-01

    Employs a contextual effects perspective to identify family, job, and workplace characteristics associated with the use of work-family benefits of 527 employees in 83 businesses. Determined that particular family problems predict female employee use of paid leave and mental health benefits. Summarizes that workplace size, sector, and culture are…

  13. Spousal Support and Work--Family Balance in Launching a Family Business

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gudmunson, Clinton G.; Danes, Sharon M.; Werbel, James D.; Loy, Johnben Teik-Cheok

    2009-01-01

    This study examines whether emotional spousal support contributes to business owners' perceived work-family balance while launching a family business. Hobfoll's Conservation of Resources theory of stress is applied to 109 family business owners and their spouses. Results from structural equation models support several hypotheses. First, reports of…

  14. The effects of organizational and community embeddedness on work-to-family and family-to-work conflict.

    PubMed

    Ng, Thomas W H; Feldman, Daniel C

    2012-11-01

    The present study offers competing hypotheses regarding the relationships of changes in organizational and community embeddedness with changes in work-to-family and family-to-work conflict. Data were collected from 250 U.S. and 165 Chinese managers and professionals, all of whom were married, at 3 points in time over a 10-month period. Results suggest that increases in perceptions of organizational and community embeddedness are associated with increases in work-to-family conflict and family-to-work conflict over time. Further, we found that these effects were even stronger for employees with highly individualistic values. Thus, although much of the previous research has focused on the positive effects of employee embeddedness for individuals' work lives, the present study provides some evidence of the potentially negative effects of employee embeddedness for individuals' family lives. PMID:22730902

  15. Developing culturally competent marriage and family therapists: guidelines for working with Hispanic families.

    PubMed

    Bean, R A; Perry, B J; Bedell, T M

    2001-01-01

    As the Hispanic population of the United States continues to grow, so will the need for therapists who have been trained to work with Hispanic families. This content analysis of the available treatment literature generated several specific guidelines that can be used in training and evaluating culturally competent therapists. Guidelines included: Use family therapy, act as advocate for the family, assess immigration experience, assess acculturation, respect father, interview family subsystems separately, do not force changes, provide concrete suggestions, and warmly engage the family. Empirical and conceptual support for each guideline is discussed and several conclusions are made regarding culturally competent therapy with Hispanic families. PMID:11215989

  16. Posting Unpaid Internship Opportunities in BU CareerLink Employers should satisfy the criteria for acceptable unpaid internships as established by the United

    E-print Network

    Posting Unpaid Internship Opportunities in BU CareerLink Employers should satisfy the criteria for acceptable unpaid internships as established by the United internships may post these opportunities in BU CareerLink provided the posting clearly

  17. Is Family-to-Work Interference Related to Co-Workers' Work Outcomes?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ten Brummelhuis, Lieke L.; Bakker, Arnold B.; Euwema, Martin C.

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies have convincingly shown that employees' family lives can affect their work outcomes. We investigate whether family-to-work interference (FWI) experienced by the employee also affects the work outcomes of a co-worker. We predict that the employee's FWI has an effect on the co-worker's outcomes through the crossover of positive and…

  18. Changing University Work, Freedom, Flexibility and Family

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nikunen, Minna

    2012-01-01

    This article investigates what Finnish academics on short fixed-term contracts consider to be the effects of having children on work and careers. The study is framed by the context of the current state of the university sector, its neoliberal and entrepreneurial tendencies and its claims to meritocracy. Informants express relative happiness with…

  19. [The family-friendly hospital: (how) does it work?].

    PubMed

    Heller, A R; Heller, S C

    2009-06-01

    The demographic development in Germany is heading towards a significant shortage in specialists within the next 10-15 years with an increased demand for health services at the same time. The three-stage model of family life planning (work, family phase, return) will also be gradually replaced by a model of simultaneous compatibility of family and work. This change in values, although initiated by the parents themselves, may turn out to be a crucial countermeasure in national economy against the demography-related loss of qualified personnel. For these three trends the economic need arises to minimize family-related absence of our well-trained, motivated and reliable doctors from the clinical departments through implementation of family-friendly human resources policies and supporting measures by the employers. In a representative survey 26% of respondents with children had in the past already changed their workplace to ensure a better match of work and family duties. In this regard the compatibility of family and professional responsibilities had a higher impact on the selection of the employer than a high income. Accordingly, a work-life competence oriented business plan will represent the crucial factor within the competition between universities, hospitals and professional disciplines to attract high potential bearers although a sustained change of the traditional hospital culture is mandatory. Anaesthesia-related fields of development regarding family-friendly corporate governance are working hours and organization of work, part-time jobs even for managers and fathers, and staff development. In the hospital daily routine, in particular, creative solutions meeting the local demands are deemed necessary that do not involve the use of high financial resources. Family-friendly personnel policy not only arises from altruistic enthusiasm but also pays off economically. This article discusses the necessity, opportunities and threads of family-oriented hospital management and fields of action for anaesthesia departments. PMID:19484192

  20. Resilience across Contexts: Family, Work, Culture, and Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Ronald D., Ed.; Wang, Margaret C., Ed.

    Noting that much is known from research and practice regarding what works to promote resilience of children and families in a variety of high-risk life situations, this book considers the impact of culture, economy, employment, poverty, family structure, and social policy on parenting, child development, education, and the life success of youth.…

  1. Balancing Work and Family Life. ERIC Digest No. 110.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerka, Sandra

    Career and vocational educators must prepare people with the attitudes and skills needed for successful integration of work and family life. Ideally, life and career planning should be taught as a unit beginning in the middle school. A life/career planning course should incorporate such topics as interdependence of individual, family, and career…

  2. Perceived Family Functioning and Family Resources of Hong Kong Families: Implications for Social Work Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ma, Joyce L. C.; Wong, Timothy K. Y.; Lau, Luk King; Pun, Shuk Han

    2009-01-01

    This article reports the results of a telephone survey (n = 1,015 respondents) that aims to identify the perceived general family functioning and family resources of Hong Kong Chinese families and their linkage to each other in a rapidly transforming society. The perceived general family functioning of the respondents was average, and the five…

  3. Social Work Practice with Native American Families: A Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wintemute, Ginger, Ed.; Messer, Bonnie, Ed.

    A handbook on social work practice with Native American families, developed for use by students in undergraduate social work programs and by social service practitioners who work with Native American people, is divided into four sections. The first section contains four articles, written by Joseph A. Dudley (Methodist minister and Yankton Sioux)…

  4. Family Roles and Work Values: Processes of Selection and Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirkpatrick Johnson, Monica

    2005-01-01

    This study focuses on whether marriage and parenthood influence work values after taking into account the influence of work values on family formation. In a recent panel of young adults (N=709), stronger extrinsic and weaker intrinsic work values during adolescence predicted marriage and parenthood 9 years out of high school. Controlling these…

  5. Family Transmission of Work Affectivity and Experiences to Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porfeli, Erik J.; Wang, Chuang; Hartung, Paul J.

    2008-01-01

    Theory and research suggest that children develop orientations toward work appreciably influenced by their family members' own expressed work experiences and emotions. Cross-sectional data from 100 children (53 girls, 47 boys; mean age = 11.1 years) and structural equation modeling were used to assess measures of work affectivity and experiences…

  6. Work Values and Job Satisfaction of Family Physicians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bouwkamp-Memmer, Jennifer C.; Whiston, Susan C.; Hartung, Paul J.

    2013-01-01

    Theory and prior research suggest linkages between work values and job satisfaction. The present study examined such linkages in a group of workers in a professional occupation. Family physicians (134 women, 206 men, 88% Caucasian) responded to context-specific measures of work values and job satisfaction. ANOVA results indicated a work values…

  7. Reconciliation of Work and Family Life in Hungary 

    E-print Network

    Duman, Anil; Horvath, Anna

    2010-01-01

    The paper analyses the ‘Europeanization’ of policies concerning the reconciliation of work and family life in Hungary between 1998 and 2005. It looks at how politicians – in government or in the opposition – framed European requirements and/or...

  8. Work-Family Conflict, Family-Supportive Supervisor Behaviors (FSSB), and Sleep Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Crain, Tori L.; Hammer, Leslie B.; Bodner, Todd; Kossek, Ellen Ernst; Moen, Phyllis; Lilienthal, Richard; Buxton, Orfeu M.

    2014-01-01

    Although critical to health and well-being, relatively little research has been conducted in the organizational literature on linkages between the work-family interface and sleep. Drawing on Conservation of Resources theory, we use a sample of 623 information technology workers to examine the relationships between work-family conflict, family-supportive supervisor behaviors (FSSB), and sleep quality and quantity. Validated wrist actigraphy methods were used to collect objective sleep quality and quantity data over a one week period of time, and survey methods were used to collect information on self-reported work-family conflict, FSSB, and sleep quality and quantity. Results demonstrated that the combination of predictors (i.e., work-to-family conflict, family-to-work conflict, FSSB) was significantly related to both objective and self-report measures of sleep quantity and quality. Future research should further examine the work-family interface to sleep link and make use of interventions targeting the work-family interface as a means for improving sleep health. PMID:24730425

  9. Work, Family and Life-Course Fit: Does Control over Work Time Matter?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moen, Phyllis; Kelly, Erin; Huang, Qinlei

    2008-01-01

    This study moves from "work-family" to a multi-dimensional "life-course fit" construct (employees' cognitive assessments of resources, resource deficits, and resource demands), using a combined work-family, demands-control and ecology of the life course framing. It examined (1) impacts of job and home ecological systems on fit dimensions, and (2)…

  10. Balancing Work and Family: How Female Superintendents Succeed at Work and Home

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olesniewicz, Julie

    2012-01-01

    Women leaders in education struggle to balance work and family life. Historically, this struggle has stemmed from attempts to manage societal expectations of balancing work and family. In managing these expectations, women leaders face many challenges, which have made it difficult to maintain home responsibilities and deal with increasing demands…

  11. Family medicine residents’ barriers to conducting scholarly work

    PubMed Central

    Bammeke, Femi; Liddy, Clare; Hogel, Matthew; Archibald, Douglas; Chaar, Ziad; MacLaren, Robin

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To identify family medicine residents’ barriers to conducting high-quality research for the mandatory family medicine resident scholarly project, as well as to determine possible strategies to encourage research activity among family medicine residents. Design Descriptive study using an online survey. Setting Department of Family Medicine at the University of Ottawa in Ontario. Participants A total of 54 first- and second-year residents. Main outcome measures Family medicine residents’ involvement in research activities, perceived quality of their mandatory scholarly project, intentions for publication and presentation, and attitudes toward potential barriers to and facilitators of conducting high-quality research. Results Of the 54 residents, 20 (37%) reported that their project was of high quality, 6 (11%) intended to publish their findings, and 2 (4%) intended to present their findings. Respondents indicated that the main barriers to conducting high-quality research were lack of time, interest, and scholarly skills. The proposed solutions to increase participation in scholarly work were to allow full research days to be used in half-day increments and to offer a journal club where residents could learn scholarly activities. Conclusion Family medicine residents found several factors to be considerable barriers to completing the required family medicine resident scholarly project. This indicates that there is a need to change the current approach to developing scholarly skills in family medicine. Greater allotment of and flexibility in protected research time and more sessions focused on developing scholarly skills might facilitate scholarly activity among family medicine residents. PMID:26623463

  12. When Family-Supportive Supervision Matters: Relations between Multiple Sources of Support and Work-Family Balance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenhaus, Jeffrey H.; Ziegert, Jonathan C.; Allen, Tammy D.

    2012-01-01

    This study examines the mechanisms by which family-supportive supervision is related to employee work-family balance. Based on a sample of 170 business professionals, we found that the positive relation between family-supportive supervision and balance was fully mediated by work interference with family (WIF) and partially mediated by family

  13. Youths' Socialization to Work and School within the Family

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Bora; Porfeli, Erik J.

    2015-01-01

    We tested a model of socialization to work in the family context and its implications as a lever for school engagement using a sample of 154 parent-youth dyads living in the United States. A path model was fitted to data. Findings revealed that parents' reported work experiences was aligned to youths' perception of their parents' success in the…

  14. Managing Work and Family: Do Control Strategies Help?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Versey, H. Shellae

    2015-01-01

    How can we effectively manage competing obligations from work and family without becoming overwhelmed? This question inspires the current study by examining control strategies that may facilitate better work-life balance, with a specific focus on the role of lowered aspirations and positive reappraisals, attitudes that underlie adaptive coping…

  15. Beyond Conflict: Functional Facets of the Work-Family Interplay

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiese, Bettina S.; Seiger, Christine P.; Schmid, Christian M.; Freund, Alexandra M.

    2010-01-01

    The present paper deals with three positive facets of the work-family interplay, i.e., transfer of competencies, transfer of positive mood, and cross-domain compensation. The latter refers to the experience that engagement in one domain helps dealing with failures in the other domain. In two correlational studies (N[subscript 1] = 107 working

  16. Facilitating Family Change: A Look at Four Agencies Working Intensively with Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cautley, Patricia W.; Plane, Mary Beth

    This report describes a research project designed to examine the work of four Wisconsin agencies which provide direct services to families with serious problems in parent-child interactions: (1) the Home and Community Treatment group at Mendota Mental Health Institute; (2) Family and Community Services, St. Aemilian Child Care Center, Milwaukee;…

  17. 'It is hard for mums to put themselves first': how mothers diagnosed with breast cancer manage the sociological boundaries between paid work, family and caring for the self.

    PubMed

    Mackenzie, Catherine Ruth

    2014-09-01

    This paper aims to increase understanding of how mothers diagnosed with breast cancer while in the paid workforce experience and manage their multiple demands of taking care of themselves, their children and their paid work. In-depth, semi-structured interviews were conducted with 32 women who were mothers of dependent children and in the paid workforce at the time of their breast cancer diagnosis. The sample includes women living in urban and rural Australia. The study found that after a breast cancer diagnosis, participants tended to prioritise their health and wellbeing over paid work. Yet dominance of gendered identity meant that they tended to place the needs of family, especially children, above their own health and wellbeing. The key factors that influenced mothers' decisions to continue in, return to, or leave paid work after a breast cancer diagnosis included: a change in perspective regarding what was important in their lives; level of support from the workplace and home; the extent to which participating in paid work was a financial necessity; the extent to which their identity was connected to paid work, and; ongoing level of pain or fatigue. The paper concludes that using the sociological concepts of the fateful moment, boundary maintenance and a feminist ethic of care produces a more nuanced understanding of women's participation in paid work after breast cancer than examining paid workforce participation, or unpaid responsibilities and mothering, separately. The nature of the permeability or malleability of boundaries between work, family and taking care of the self affects women's participation in paid work during and/or after breast cancer treatment. Increased boundary permeability or malleability brought about more by cooperation than conflict facilitated positive experiences of re-negotiating boundaries, whereas increased permeability or malleability brought about more by conflict than cooperation created difficulties for women in finding an acceptable balance between their family, paid work and taking care of their own health after breast cancer. PMID:25063965

  18. Changing Workplaces to Reduce Work-Family Conflict: Schedule Control in a White-Collar Organization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Erin L.; Moen, Phyllis; Tranby, Eric

    2011-01-01

    Work-family conflicts are common and consequential for employees, their families, and work organizations. Can workplaces be changed to reduce work-family conflict? Previous research has not been able to assess whether workplace policies or initiatives succeed in reducing work-family conflict or increasing work-family fit. Using longitudinal data…

  19. Parental Work Demands and Parent-Child, Family, and Couple Leisure in Dutch Families: What Gives?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roeters, Anne; Treas, Judith K.

    2011-01-01

    This study uses data on 898 Dutch couples with minor children to examine whether parental work demands are related differently to one-on-one parent-child, family, and couple leisure activities. The authors presume that the impact of working hours and work arrangements is smaller on activities that are prioritized highly and that are easier and…

  20. After the Baby: Work-Family Conflict and Working Mothers' Psychological Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marshall, Nancy L.; Tracy, Allison J.

    2009-01-01

    This study examines work and family characteristics and depressive symptomatology among over 700 working mothers of infants. Working mothers in poorer quality jobs, as well as working mothers who were single or whose infant's health was poorer than that of other infants, reported greater depressive symptomatology. The effect of job quality on…

  1. Conflict between Work and Family among New Zealand Teachers with Dependent Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, Melanie; Rose, Dennis; Sanders, Matthew; Randle, Fiona

    2012-01-01

    Changes in family and employment patterns have lead to an increasing need for families to balance work and family roles. Little research has examined work and family conflict among teachers. In the present study, 69 New Zealand teachers completed a survey examining occupational-related demands, family-related demands, work and family conflict, and…

  2. 77 FR 23238 - Guidelines for Home Energy Professionals: Standard Work Specifications for Single Family Energy...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-18

    ...for Home Energy Professionals: Standard Work Specifications for Single Family Energy...for Home Energy Professionals: Standard Work Specifications for Single Family Energy...for Home Energy Professionals: Standard Work Specifications for Single Family...

  3. 46 CFR 545.2 - Interpretation of Shipping Act of 1984-Unpaid ocean freight charges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...Interpretation of Shipping Act of 1984-Unpaid ocean freight charges. 545.2 Section 545...MARITIME COMMISSION REGULATIONS AFFECTING OCEAN SHIPPING IN FOREIGN COMMERCE INTERPRETATIONS...Interpretation of Shipping Act of 1984—Unpaid ocean freight charges. Section...

  4. 46 CFR 545.2 - Interpretation of Shipping Act of 1984-Unpaid ocean freight charges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...Interpretation of Shipping Act of 1984-Unpaid ocean freight charges. 545.2 Section 545...MARITIME COMMISSION REGULATIONS AFFECTING OCEAN SHIPPING IN FOREIGN COMMERCE INTERPRETATIONS...Interpretation of Shipping Act of 1984—Unpaid ocean freight charges. Section...

  5. 46 CFR 545.2 - Interpretation of Shipping Act of 1984-Unpaid ocean freight charges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...Interpretation of Shipping Act of 1984-Unpaid ocean freight charges. 545.2 Section 545...MARITIME COMMISSION REGULATIONS AFFECTING OCEAN SHIPPING IN FOREIGN COMMERCE INTERPRETATIONS...Interpretation of Shipping Act of 1984—Unpaid ocean freight charges. Section...

  6. 46 CFR 545.2 - Interpretation of Shipping Act of 1984-Unpaid ocean freight charges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...Interpretation of Shipping Act of 1984-Unpaid ocean freight charges. 545.2 Section 545...MARITIME COMMISSION REGULATIONS AFFECTING OCEAN SHIPPING IN FOREIGN COMMERCE INTERPRETATIONS...Interpretation of Shipping Act of 1984—Unpaid ocean freight charges. Section...

  7. 46 CFR 545.2 - Interpretation of Shipping Act of 1984-Unpaid ocean freight charges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...Interpretation of Shipping Act of 1984-Unpaid ocean freight charges. 545.2 Section 545...MARITIME COMMISSION REGULATIONS AFFECTING OCEAN SHIPPING IN FOREIGN COMMERCE INTERPRETATIONS...Interpretation of Shipping Act of 1984—Unpaid ocean freight charges. Section...

  8. Work-family conflict and self-discrepant time allocation at work.

    PubMed

    Dahm, Patricia C; Glomb, Theresa M; Manchester, Colleen Flaherty; Leroy, Sophie

    2015-05-01

    We examine the relationships between work-to-family conflict, time allocation across work activities, and the outcomes of work satisfaction, well-being, and salary in the context of self-regulation and self-discrepancy theories. We posit work-to-family conflict is associated with self-discrepant time allocation such that employees with higher levels of work-to-family conflict are likely to allocate less time than preferred to work activities that require greater self-regulatory resources (e.g., tasks that are complex, or those with longer term goals that delay rewards and closure) and allocate more time than preferred to activities that demand fewer self-regulatory resources or are replenishing (e.g., those that provide closure or are prosocial). We suggest this self-discrepant time allocation (actual vs. preferred time allocation) is one mechanism by which work-to-family conflict leads to negative employee consequences (Allen, Herst, Bruck, & Sutton, 2000; Mesmer-Magnus & Viswesvaran, 2005). Using polynomial regression and response surface methodology, we find that discrepancies between actual and preferred time allocations to work activities negatively relate to work satisfaction, psychological well-being, and physical well-being. Self-discrepant time allocation mediates the relationship between work-to-family conflict and work satisfaction and well-being, while actual time allocation (rather than the discrepancy) mediates the relationship between work-to-family conflict and salary. We find that women are more likely than men to report self-discrepant time allocations as work-to-family conflict increases. PMID:25664468

  9. Module 4: Work-Family Policy in the United States. Work-Family Curriculum Guide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kossek, Ellen Ernst; Leana, Carrie; MacDermid, Shelley; Pitt-Catsouphes, Marcie; Raskin, Patricia; Secret, Mary; Shulkin, Sandee; Sweet, Stephen

    2006-01-01

    Public policy affects the experiences of workers and their families, both directly and indirectly. For example, employment-focused statutes such as the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA), the Employment Retirement and Income Security Act, the Occupational Health and Safety Act, and the Age Discrimination in Employment Act establish frameworks for…

  10. Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... FMLA Wage and Hour Division (WHD) Family and Medical Leave Act Overview The FMLA entitles eligible employees ... unpaid, job-protected leave for specified family and medical reasons with continuation of group health insurance coverage ...

  11. The role of the government in work-family conflict.

    PubMed

    Boushey, Heather

    2011-01-01

    The foundations of the major federal policies that govern today's workplace were put in place during the 1930s, when most families had a stay-at-home caregiver who could tend to the needs of children, the aged, and the sick. Seven decades later, many of the nation's workplace policies are in need of major updates to reflect the realities of the modern workforce. American workers, for example, typically have little or no control over their work hours and schedules; few have a right to job-protected access to paid leave to care for a family member. Heather Boushey examines three types of work-family policies that affect work-family conflict and that are in serious need of repair--those that govern hours worked and workplace equity, those that affect the ability of workers to take time off from work because their families need care, and those that govern the outsourcing of family care when necessary. In each case Boushey surveys new programs currently on the policy agenda, assesses their effectiveness, and considers the extent to which they can be used as models for a broader federal program. Boushey looks, for example, at a variety of pilot and experimental programs that have been implemented both by private employers and by federal, state, and local governments to provide workers with flexible working hours. Careful evaluations of these programs show that several can increase scheduling flexibility without adversely affecting employers. Although few Americans have access to paid family and medical leave to attend to family needs, most believe that businesses should be required to provide paid leave to all workers. Boushey notes that several states are moving in that direction. Again, careful evaluations show that these experimental programs are successful for both employers and employees. National programs to address child and elder care do not yet exist. The most comprehensive solution on the horizon is the universal prekindergarten programs offered by a few states, most often free of charge, for children aged three and four. PMID:22013633

  12. Family Interaction under Stress: Emotional Spillover from Work Stress to Family Life for Parents of Kindergartners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schulz, Marc S.

    This study was designed to enhance understanding of individuals' and couples' emotional regulation processes, and the psychological mechanisms that connect work and family spheres for men and women. Forty-three couples and their eldest child participated in this study. On three consecutive days the parents completed several measures of work stress…

  13. Work demands, family demands, and BMI in dual-earners families: A 16-year longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Amit; Chung, Wonjoon

    2015-09-01

    Many scholars assert that work and family demands are negatively related to individuals' long-term physical health, but few studies have explicitly examined this relationship. Among these exceptions, most have employed a cross-sectional design that is limited in its ability to establish causality. We use body mass index (BMI) that generally increases during one's lifetime as an indicator of physical health, and seek to explore the amount of control individuals may have on this seemingly inevitable progression. Drawing on conservation of resources theory, we propose that an increase in demands-both in the work realm (e.g., the number of work hours) and in the family realm (e.g., the number of spouse work hours)-is likely to speed up the increase of BMI. Using a nationally representative sample of 4,264 individuals who were part of a dual-earner family between 1994 and 2010, we find that a within-person increase in weekly work hours, an increase in spouse weekly work hours, and an increase in the number of children are all related to a small within-person increase of the BMI growth trajectory. Within-person increase in work responsibility demands is related to a small within-person decrease in the BMI growth trajectory. We discuss implications of the relationships between work and family demands and long-term physical health. PMID:25602120

  14. More Hard Times for New York's Working Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fischer, David Jason; Colton, Tara; Hilliard, Tom; Schimke, Karen

    2006-01-01

    There is broad consensus about what kind of economy and society New Yorkers would like to see over the decades to come: plentiful and remunerative jobs, reinvigorated communities from New York City to Oswego, and a safety net strong enough to facilitate upward mobility but infused with the values of work and family. Unfortunately, indications are…

  15. [Training Practitioners to Work with Infants, Toddlers and Their Families].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pawl, Jeree, Ed.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    This newsletter theme issue focuses on the training of practitioners to work with infants, toddlers, and their families with emphasis on the activities of the TASK (Training Approaches for Skills and Knowledge) Project of the National Center for Clinical Infant Programs. The TASK project addresses the concerns of four "stakeholder" groups:…

  16. Health Coverage Instability for Mothers in Working Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Steven G.; Eamon, Mary Keegan

    2004-01-01

    Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, the authors examined the health insurance coverage stability of 1,667 women in working families over a three-year period (1995-1997). Findings revealed that coverage instability is common. Nearly one-half of low-income women experienced health coverage instability over the three-year study…

  17. Helping Working Families: The Earned Income Tax Credit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Saul D.; Seidman, Laurence S.

    The impact of the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) on working families was analyzed. The analysis established that the EITC is, on balance, a highly effective program that meets its primary objectives well. The following benefits of the EITC were identified: (1) it reduced the poverty rate in 1999 by an estimated 1.5 percentage points; (2) it is…

  18. The Relationship between Family and Work: Tensions, Paradigms and Directives. 

    E-print Network

    Knijn, Trudie; Smit, Arnoud

    2009-01-01

    After decades of promoting the reconciliation of work and family life from a gender-equality perspective, to date discourses and related social policy paradigms replace and reframe the once European agenda on gender-equality and put the gender issue...

  19. At-Risk Students in Work and Family Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henrico County Public Schools, Glen Allen, VA. Virginia Vocational Curriculum and Resource Center.

    This manual is designed to help work and family studies teachers meet the needs of students who are at risk. It uses a systematic approach to adapting the learning environment that consists of an intervention checklist and intervention strategies. The manual is divided into two general sections: Common Skills Area and Applied Skills Areas. The…

  20. Cultural Differences in Work-Family Interface Values.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engel, John W.

    While there is a growing body of research on middle-class, white American work-family values, sex-role ideals, and attitudes toward women's employment, very little is known about the values and attitudes of other ethnic groups. This study compares the sex-role ideals and attitudes toward women's employment of Chinese, Japanese, and Caucasian…

  1. The Relationship between Core Self-Evaluations and Work and Family Satisfaction: The Mediating Role of Work-Family Conflict and Facilitation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyar, Scott L.; Mosley, Donald C., Jr.

    2007-01-01

    This study examines the impact of work-family conflict and work-family facilitation on work and family outcomes and explores the influence of core self-evaluations (CSE) among these relationships. CSE is comprised of self-esteem, neuroticism, locus of control, and general self-efficacy. CSE was found to be negatively related to work interfering…

  2. Parental employment and work-family stress: Associations with family food environments

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Katherine W.; Hearst, Mary O.; Escoto, Kamisha; Berge, Jerica M.; Neumark-Sztainer, Dianne

    2013-01-01

    Parental employment provides many benefits to children's health. However, an increasing number of studies have observed associations between mothers' full-time employment and less healthful family food environments. Few studies have examined other ways in which parental employment may be associated with the family food environment, including the role of fathers' employment and parents' stress balancing work and home obligations. This study utilized data from Project F-EAT, a population-based study of a socio-demographically diverse sample of 3709 parents of adolescents living in a metropolitan area in the Midwestern United States, to examine cross-sectional associations between mothers' and fathers' employment status and parents' work-life stress with multiple aspects of the family food environment. Among parents participating in Project F-EAT, 64% of fathers and 46% of mothers were full-time employed, while 25% of fathers and 37% of mothers were not employed. Results showed that full-time employed mothers reported fewer family meals, less frequent encouragement of their adolescents' healthful eating, lower fruit and vegetable intake, and less time spent on food preparation, compared to part-time and not-employed mothers, after adjusting for socio-demographics. Full-time employed fathers reported significantly fewer hours of food preparation; no other associations were seen between fathers' employment status and characteristics of the family food environment. In contrast, higher work-life stress among both parents was associated with less healthful family food environment characteristics including less frequent family meals and more frequent sugar-sweetened beverage and fast food consumption by parents. Among dual-parent families, taking into account the employment characteristics of the other parent did not substantially alter the relationships between work-life stress and family food environment characteristics. While parental employment is beneficial for many families, identifying policy and programmatic strategies to reduce parents' work-life stress may have positive implications for the family food environment and for the eating patterns and related health outcomes of children and parents. PMID:22591825

  3. Parental employment and work-family stress: associations with family food environments.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Katherine W; Hearst, Mary O; Escoto, Kamisha; Berge, Jerica M; Neumark-Sztainer, Dianne

    2012-08-01

    Parental employment provides many benefits to children's health. However, an increasing number of studies have observed associations between mothers' full-time employment and less healthful family food environments. Few studies have examined other ways in which parental employment may be associated with the family food environment, including the role of fathers' employment and parents' stress balancing work and home obligations. This study utilized data from Project F-EAT, a population-based study of a socio-demographically diverse sample of 3709 parents of adolescents living in a metropolitan area in the Midwestern United States, to examine cross-sectional associations between mothers' and fathers' employment status and parents' work-life stress with multiple aspects of the family food environment. Among parents participating in Project F-EAT, 64% of fathers and 46% of mothers were full-time employed, while 25% of fathers and 37% of mothers were not employed. Results showed that full-time employed mothers reported fewer family meals, less frequent encouragement of their adolescents' healthful eating, lower fruit and vegetable intake, and less time spent on food preparation, compared to part-time and not-employed mothers, after adjusting for socio-demographics. Full-time employed fathers reported significantly fewer hours of food preparation; no other associations were seen between fathers' employment status and characteristics of the family food environment. In contrast, higher work-life stress among both parents was associated with less healthful family food environment characteristics including less frequent family meals and more frequent sugar-sweetened beverage and fast food consumption by parents. Among dual-parent families, taking into account the employment characteristics of the other parent did not substantially alter the relationships between work-life stress and family food environment characteristics. While parental employment is beneficial for many families, identifying policy and programmatic strategies to reduce parents' work-life stress may have positive implications for the family food environment and for the eating patterns and related health outcomes of children and parents. PMID:22591825

  4. Family Policy in Hungary: How to Improve the Reconciliation between Work and Family? OECD Economics Department Working Papers, No. 566

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hemmings, Philip

    2007-01-01

    Hungarian family policy focuses on providing generous options to take time off work to look after children. This system not only contributes to Hungary's low employment rate but encourages long separation from the labour market, has largely failed to significantly influence fertility rates and is relatively expensive to run. This paper looks at…

  5. WORKPLACE SOCIAL SUPPORT AND WORK–FAMILY CONFLICT: A META-ANALYSIS CLARIFYING THE INFLUENCE OF GENERAL AND WORK–FAMILY-SPECIFIC SUPERVISOR AND ORGANIZATIONAL SUPPORT

    PubMed Central

    KOSSEK, ELLEN ERNST; PICHLER, SHAUN; BODNER, TODD; HAMMER, LESLIE B.

    2011-01-01

    This article uses meta-analysis to develop a model integrating research on relationships between employee perceptions of general and work–family-specific supervisor and organizational support and work–family conflict. Drawing on 115 samples from 85 studies comprising 72,507 employees, we compared the relative influence of 4 types of workplace social support to work–family conflict: perceived organizational support (POS); supervisor support; perceived organizational work–family support, also known as family-supportive organizational perceptions (FSOP); and supervisor work–family support. Results show work–family-specific constructs of supervisor support and organization support are more strongly related to work–family conflict than general supervisor support and organization support, respectively. We then test a mediation model assessing the effects of all measures at once and show positive perceptions of general and work–family-specific supervisor indirectly relate to work–family conflict via organizational work–family support. These results demonstrate that work–family-specific support plays a central role in individuals’ work–family conflict experiences. PMID:21691415

  6. 26 CFR 20.2053-7 - Deduction for unpaid mortgages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 14 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Deduction for unpaid mortgages. 20.2053-7 Section 20.2053-7 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) ESTATE AND GIFT TAXES ESTATE TAX; ESTATES OF DECEDENTS DYING AFTER AUGUST 16, 1954 Taxable Estate §...

  7. 26 CFR 20.2053-7 - Deduction for unpaid mortgages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 14 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Deduction for unpaid mortgages. 20.2053-7 Section 20.2053-7 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) ESTATE AND GIFT TAXES ESTATE TAX; ESTATES OF DECEDENTS DYING AFTER AUGUST 16, 1954 Taxable Estate §...

  8. 26 CFR 20.2053-7 - Deduction for unpaid mortgages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 14 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Deduction for unpaid mortgages. 20.2053-7 Section 20.2053-7 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) ESTATE AND GIFT TAXES ESTATE TAX; ESTATES OF DECEDENTS DYING AFTER AUGUST 16, 1954 Taxable Estate §...

  9. 26 CFR 20.2053-7 - Deduction for unpaid mortgages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 14 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Deduction for unpaid mortgages. 20.2053-7 Section 20.2053-7 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) ESTATE AND GIFT TAXES ESTATE TAX; ESTATES OF DECEDENTS DYING AFTER AUGUST 16, 1954 Taxable Estate §...

  10. 26 CFR 20.2053-7 - Deduction for unpaid mortgages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 14 2014-04-01 2013-04-01 true Deduction for unpaid mortgages. 20.2053-7 Section 20.2053-7 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) ESTATE AND GIFT TAXES ESTATE TAX; ESTATES OF DECEDENTS DYING AFTER AUGUST 16, 1954 Taxable Estate §...

  11. A Longitudinal Investigation of Work-Family Strains and Gains, Work Commitment, and Subsequent Employment Status among Partnered Working Mothers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulvaney, Matthew K.; McNall, Laurel A.; Morrissey, Rebecca A.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of the work-family interface on mothers' commitment to work and the implications of that work commitment for subsequent employment. The study included a sample of employed partnered mothers who participated in the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Study of Early Child…

  12. Work-Life Compendium, 2001: 150 Canadian Statistics on Work, Family & Well-Being.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Karen L.; Lero, Donna S.; Rooney, Jennifer A.

    The issue of integrating work and family responsibilities has been the subject of federal, provincial, and territorial policy planning and several task forces in Canada. This report plus executive summary, designed to inform the dialogue and stimulate continued discussion, brings together a wide variety of work-life facts and figures related to…

  13. Working Poor Families with Children, Summary Report [and] Children in Working Poor Families. Final Report to the Foundation for Child Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wertheimer, Richard F.

    Although it is likely that there will be a substantial number of children who remain poor in spite of considerable work effort by their parents as families leave welfare roles, there has been relatively little research on children in working poor families. The primary purpose of this project is to develop a definition of working poor families and…

  14. Organizational work-family resources as predictors of job performance and attitudes: the process of work-family conflict and enrichment.

    PubMed

    Odle-Dusseau, Heather N; Britt, Thomas W; Greene-Shortridge, Tiffany M

    2012-01-01

    The goal of the current study was to test a model where organizational resources (aimed at managing work and family responsibilities) predict job attitudes and supervisor ratings of performance through the mechanisms of work-family conflict and work-family enrichment. Employees (n = 174) at a large metropolitan hospital were surveyed at two time periods regarding perceptions of family supportive supervisor behaviors (FSSB), family supportive organizational perceptions (FSOP), bidirectional work-family conflict, bidirectional work-family enrichment, and job attitudes. Supervisors were also asked to provide performance ratings at Time 2. Results revealed FSSB at Time 1 predicted job satisfaction, organizational commitment and intention to leave, as well as supervisor ratings of performance, at Time 2. In addition, both work-family enrichment and family-work enrichment were found to mediate relationships between FSSB and various organizational outcomes, while work-family conflict was not a significant mediator. Results support further testing of supervisor behaviors specific to family support, as well models that include bidirectional work-family enrichment as the mechanism by which work-family resources predict employee and organizational outcomes. PMID:22149204

  15. The New Jersey Security and Financial Empowerment Act ("NJ SAFE Act"), P.L. 2013, c.82, provides that certain employees are eligible to receive an unpaid leave of absence, for a period not to exceed 20 days in

    E-print Network

    by both the NJ SAFE Act and the Family Leave Act, N.J.S.A. 34:11B-1 et seq., or the federal Family of no less than one day. The unpaid leave shall run concurrently with any paid vacation leave, personal leave

  16. Social Class and the Experience of Work-Family Conflict during the Transition to Adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Ammons, Samantha K.; Kelly, Erin L.

    2008-01-01

    The challenges of juggling work and family responsibilities are well known, but there has been little attention to the distinctive work and family experiences of young adults. In this chapter, we explore how class affects young adults’ exposure to work-family conflicts and the strategies they use to manage their work and family responsibilities. Using data from a recent cohort of young adults, we find class and gender variations in work and family roles and work-family conflict. Early family formation, coupled with poor working conditions, lead those with lower educational attainments to experience more years of family-to-work interference. In contrast, young adults with more education have more work-to-family interference, and this is especially true for college-educated women. PMID:18330915

  17. School Students' Learning from Their Paid and Unpaid Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Erica; Green, Annette

    A project carried out in New South Wales and South Australia examined ways in which Year 10, 11, and 12 students experience workplaces. A questionnaire administered to students in 13 schools received 1,451 responses. Case studies in five schools included interviews and focus groups with students and teachers. Interviews and focus groups with…

  18. 45 CFR 261.25 - Do we count Tribal families in calculating the work participation rate?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 false Do we count Tribal families in calculating the work participation...Relating to Public Welfare OFFICE OF FAMILY ASSISTANCE (ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS), ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN AND FAMILIES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN...

  19. 45 CFR 261.25 - Do we count Tribal families in calculating the work participation rate?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 false Do we count Tribal families in calculating the work participation...Relating to Public Welfare OFFICE OF FAMILY ASSISTANCE (ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS), ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN AND FAMILIES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN...

  20. Family Mastery Enhances Work Engagement in Chinese Nurses: A Cross-Lagged Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lu, Chang-qin; Siu, Oi-ling; Chen, Wei-qing; Wang, Hai-jiang

    2011-01-01

    Based on Greenhaus and Powell's (2006) theory of work-family enrichment and the job demands-resources (JD-R) model of work engagement (Bakker & Demerouti, 2008), this study focused on the family-to-work enrichment process by investigating the effect of family mastery on work engagement in a Chinese context. A sample of 279 Chinese female nurses…

  1. Is There a Downside to Schedule Control for the Work-Family Interface?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schieman, Scott; Young, Marisa

    2010-01-01

    Using data from a 2007 U.S. survey of workers, this article examines the implications of schedule control for work-family role blurring and work-family conflict. Four main findings indicate that (a) schedule control is associated with more frequent working at home and work-family multitasking activities; (b) the positive association between…

  2. Partnerships at Work: Lessons Learned from Programs and Practices of Families, Professionals and Communities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bishop, Kathleen Kirk, Ed.; Taylor, Mary Skidmore, Ed.; Arango, Polly, Ed.

    Designed to celebrate family/interprofessional collaborative partnerships, this publication describes high-quality examples of how families and professionals at the family, community, state, and national levels have worked together to create programs and practices that are family-friendly and responsive to what families have said they want and…

  3. JOB READINESS TRAINING for Homeless Families: PREPARING FOR WORK TO ACHIEVE HOUSING STABILITY

    E-print Network

    Snider, Barry B.

    1 JOB READINESS TRAINING for Homeless Families: PREPARING FOR WORK TO ACHIEVE HOUSING STABILITY and housing services for homeless families in Massachusetts.i Families in Secure Jobs are homeless and either stable housing for their families. Secure Jobs provides employment services to homeless families in seven

  4. Positive and Negative Effects of Family Involvement on Work-Related Burnout

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ten Brummelhuis, Lieke L.; van der Lippe, Tanja; Kluwer, Esther S.; Flap, Henk

    2008-01-01

    We aimed to explain the influence of family involvement on feelings of burnout among employees who combine work and family tasks. As proxies for family involvement, we used the family structure (partner, number and age of children) and family tasks (e.g. hours spent on household chores). We compared conflict theory and enrichment theory, and…

  5. 101 Key Statistics on Work and Family for the 1990s. The BNA Special Report Series on Work and Family: Special Report No. 21.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of National Affairs, Inc., Washington, DC.

    This special report updates a September, 1988 Bureau of National Affairs (BNA) special report, "82 Key Statistics on Work and Family Issues," by presenting 101 new statistics on work and family concerns. Data concern: (1) child care; (2) parental leave; (3) elder care; (4) flexible work schedules; and (5) miscellaneous issues, such as men and…

  6. Creating Better Family Child Care Jobs: Model Work Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haack, Peggy

    Based on the premise that good child care jobs are the cornerstone of high-quality services for children and families, this booklet details workplace standards for family child care providers. The booklet is designed to be used for educating family child care providers, evaluating individual family child care programs, setting goals and measuring…

  7. Do the benefits of family-to-work transitions come at too great a cost?

    PubMed

    Carlson, Dawn S; Kacmar, K Michele; Zivnuska, Suzanne; Ferguson, Merideth

    2015-04-01

    This research examines the impact of role boundary management on the work-family interface, as well as on organizational (job embeddedness) and family (relationship tension) outcomes. First, we integrate conservation of resources theory with crossover theory, to build a theoretical model of work-family boundary management. Second, we extend prior work by exploring positive and negative paths through which boundary management affects work and family outcomes. Third, we incorporate spouse perceptions to create a dynamic, systems-perspective explanation of the work-family interface. Using a matched sample of 639 job incumbents and their spouses, we found that family-to-work boundary transitions was related to the job incumbents' work-to-family conflict, work-to-family enrichment, and job embeddedness as well as the boundary management strain transmitted to the spouse. We also found that the boundary management strain transmitted to the spouse mediated the relationship between family-to-work boundary transitions and both work-to-family conflict and work-to-family enrichment. Finally, we found significant indirect effects between family-to-work boundary transitions and job embeddedness and relationship tension through both the boundary management strain transmitted to the spouse and the incumbent's work-family conflict, but not through work-family enrichment. Thus, family-to-work boundary transitions offer some benefits to the organization by contributing to job embeddedness, but they also come at a cost in that they are associated with work-family conflict and relationship tension. We discuss the study's implications for theory, research, and practice while suggesting new research directions. PMID:25365628

  8. Work and Family Plans among At-Risk Israeli Adolescents: A Mixed-Methods Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cinamon, Rachel Gali; Rich, Yisrael

    2014-01-01

    Quantitative methods were used to investigate attributions of importance to work and family roles and anticipated work--family conflict and facilitation among 353 at-risk Israeli male and female adolescents. Qualitative interviews conducted with 26 of the at-risk youth explored future work and family perceptions. Findings indicated that both sexes…

  9. The Marital Construction of Gender through Work and Family Decisions: A Qualitative Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zvonkovic, Anisa M.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    In examining factors relating to how married couples make work and family decisions, concluded gender and marriages are constructed and, in turn, reconstructed through the decisions couples make about work and family. Qualitatively analyzed longitudinal data gathered from 61 couples who made a work and family decision. Takes a feminist critical…

  10. Examining the Constructs of Work-to-Family Enrichment and Positive Spillover

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Masuda, Aline D.; McNall, Laurel A.; Allen, Tammy D.; Nicklin, Jessica M.

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports three studies examining construct validity evidence for two recently developed measures of the positive side of the work-family interface: work-to-family positive spillover (WFPS; Hanson, Hammer, & Colton, 2006) and work-to-family enrichment (WFE; Carlson, Kacmar, Wayne, & Grzywacz, 2006). Using confirmatory factor analysis, the…

  11. Work-Family Conflict, Resources, and Role Set Density: Assessing Their Effects on Distress among Working Mothers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kulik, Liat; Liberman, Gabriel

    2013-01-01

    We explored the relationships between the experience of work-family conflict and levels of distress in the family and at work among a sample of 227 Israeli working mothers. We also examined how role set density (RSD, the number of roles they perform) and personal and environmental resources are related to the women's experience of distress.…

  12. Health and Turnover of Working Mothers after Childbirth via the Work-Family Interface: An Analysis across Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlson, Dawn S.; Grzywacz, Joseph G.; Ferguson, Merideth; Hunter, Emily M.; Clinch, C. Randall; Arcury, Thomas A.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined organizational levers that impact work-family experiences, participant health, and subsequent turnover. Using a sample of 179 women returning to full-time work 4 months after childbirth, we examined the associations of 3 job resources (job security, skill discretion, and schedule control) with work-to-family enrichment and the…

  13. Trait Mindfulness and Work-Family Balance among Working Parents: The Mediating Effects of Vitality and Sleep Quality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Tammy D.; Kiburz, Kaitlin M.

    2012-01-01

    The present study investigates the relationship between trait mindfulness and work-family balance among a sample of working parents. Sleep quality and vitality are tested as mediators of this relationship. Results indicate that those with greater mindfulness report greater work-family balance, better sleep quality, and greater vitality. As…

  14. Thematic content analysis of work-family interactions: Retired cosmonauts’ reflections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Phyllis J.; Asmaro, Deyar; Suedfeld, Peter; Gushin, Vadim

    2012-12-01

    Anecdotal evidence and qualitative research attest to the importance of work-family interactions pre-, during and post-missions. This study uses thematic content analysis to quantify characteristics of work-family interactions and how these changed by stage of cosmonauts' career, identifying the effect of space career variables (e.g., time in space and station) on such interactions during and post-career. Using a thematic scoring scheme developed for this study, we coded work-family interactions identified from interviews with 20 retired male cosmonauts. The majority of work-family interactions were ones in which work overlapped into family life and work hindered or interfered with the family situation. The most common resolution was that family adjusted to work, and the mood or tone about this outcome was almost equally divided among negative, positive and neutral. Changes in work-family interactions and their resolution over the cosmonaut's life showed that the significant interactions were most evident during the cosmonaut career. Although the cosmonaut career has high work demands, it did adjust for family when the need arose. The Russian Space Agency (RKS) eased the impact of the periodic absences, especially through regular communication sessions. Positive work-family interactions, i.e., work or family helping the opposite role, were more likely for those who had been on ISS, not Mir, and for those whose last flight was after 2000. Our data reflect retired cosmonauts' recollections of work-family interactions during their career. Examples of work overlapping into family life and work viewed as interfering with family life were possibly more salient or better remembered than work or family helping the other role.

  15. Work-family conflict in context: the impact of structural and perceived neighborhood disadvantage on work-family conflict.

    PubMed

    Young, Marisa

    2015-03-01

    Despite increasing levels of work-family conflict (WFC) among North Americans, few scholars examine the broader contexts in which these conflicts occur. I address this gap by examining how the neighborhood of residence impacts WFC, with a focus on social inequality and disadvantage across neighborhoods. I hypothesize that neighborhood disadvantage may impact WFC directly-by introducing ambient stressors that inhibit individuals from successfully balancing competing domain demands, and indirectly-by undermining the psychological resources that would combat the harmful effects of disadvantaged contexts. Using individual and census-level data from Canada, I consider both objective and subjective measures of neighborhood disadvantage and find that, overall, individuals in more disadvantaged neighborhoods are worse off because these contexts increase WFC, while reducing the psychological resources that would otherwise buffer these deleterious effects. However, some of these associations vary by gender. I discuss the broader implications of these findings for neighborhood effects and WFC research. PMID:25592939

  16. Families of Working Wives Spending More on Services and Nondurables.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, Eva; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Data from the 1984-86 Consumer Expenditure Survey were used to examine effects of a wife's labor force participation on family income and expenditures. Findings indicate that families with employed wives spend significantly more on food away from home, child care, women's apparel, and gasoline than do families in which the wife stays at home. (CH)

  17. Teachers Working with Families: Natural Enemies or Necessary Allies?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cole, Kirsten

    2013-01-01

    The complex and crucial connection between families and schools is embodied in relationship between individual teachers and their students' families. Research findings demonstrate that high levels of family engagement lead to greater success for students. Such findings drive policy mandates that hold individual teachers accountable for…

  18. The Work-Family Support Roles of Child Care Providers across Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bromer, Juliet; Henly, Julia R.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a qualitative investigation of the work-family support roles of a sample of 29 child care providers serving low-income families in the Chicago area (16 family, friend, and neighbor providers (FFN), 7 licensed family child care providers (FCC), and 6 center-based teachers). Providers report offering low-income parents…

  19. 7 CFR 1962.7 - Securing unpaid balances on unsecured loans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Securing unpaid balances on unsecured loans. 1962.7 Section 1962.7 Agriculture...Liquidation of Chattel Security § 1962.7 Securing unpaid balances on unsecured loans. The County Supervisor will take a...

  20. 7 CFR 1962.7 - Securing unpaid balances on unsecured loans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Securing unpaid balances on unsecured loans. 1962.7 Section 1962.7 Agriculture...Liquidation of Chattel Security § 1962.7 Securing unpaid balances on unsecured loans. The County Supervisor will take a...

  1. 7 CFR 1962.7 - Securing unpaid balances on unsecured loans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Securing unpaid balances on unsecured loans. 1962.7 Section 1962.7 Agriculture...Liquidation of Chattel Security § 1962.7 Securing unpaid balances on unsecured loans. The County Supervisor will take a...

  2. 7 CFR 1962.7 - Securing unpaid balances on unsecured loans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Securing unpaid balances on unsecured loans. 1962.7 Section 1962.7 Agriculture...Liquidation of Chattel Security § 1962.7 Securing unpaid balances on unsecured loans. The County Supervisor will take a...

  3. 7 CFR 1962.7 - Securing unpaid balances on unsecured loans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Securing unpaid balances on unsecured loans. 1962.7 Section 1962.7 Agriculture...Liquidation of Chattel Security § 1962.7 Securing unpaid balances on unsecured loans. The County Supervisor will take a...

  4. 7 CFR 1962.7 - Securing unpaid balances on unsecured loans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 14 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Securing unpaid balances on unsecured loans. 1962.7 Section 1962.7 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL HOUSING SERVICE... Security § 1962.7 Securing unpaid balances on unsecured loans. The County Supervisor will take a lien on...

  5. 7 CFR 1962.7 - Securing unpaid balances on unsecured loans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 14 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Securing unpaid balances on unsecured loans. 1962.7 Section 1962.7 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL HOUSING SERVICE... Security § 1962.7 Securing unpaid balances on unsecured loans. The County Supervisor will take a lien on...

  6. 7 CFR 1962.7 - Securing unpaid balances on unsecured loans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 14 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Securing unpaid balances on unsecured loans. 1962.7 Section 1962.7 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL HOUSING SERVICE... Security § 1962.7 Securing unpaid balances on unsecured loans. The County Supervisor will take a lien on...

  7. 7 CFR 1962.7 - Securing unpaid balances on unsecured loans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 14 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Securing unpaid balances on unsecured loans. 1962.7 Section 1962.7 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL HOUSING SERVICE... Security § 1962.7 Securing unpaid balances on unsecured loans. The County Supervisor will take a lien on...

  8. 7 CFR 1962.7 - Securing unpaid balances on unsecured loans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 14 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Securing unpaid balances on unsecured loans. 1962.7 Section 1962.7 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL HOUSING SERVICE... Security § 1962.7 Securing unpaid balances on unsecured loans. The County Supervisor will take a lien on...

  9. 46 CFR 545.2 - Interpretation of Shipping Act of 1984-Unpaid ocean freight charges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 9 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Interpretation of Shipping Act of 1984-Unpaid ocean freight charges. 545.2 Section 545.2 Shipping FEDERAL MARITIME COMMISSION REGULATIONS AFFECTING OCEAN... Act of 1984—Unpaid ocean freight charges. Section 10(a)(1) of the Shipping Act of 1984 (46...

  10. 46 CFR 545.2 - Interpretation of Shipping Act of 1984-Unpaid ocean freight charges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 9 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Interpretation of Shipping Act of 1984-Unpaid ocean freight charges. 545.2 Section 545.2 Shipping FEDERAL MARITIME COMMISSION REGULATIONS AFFECTING OCEAN... Act of 1984—Unpaid ocean freight charges. Section 10(a)(1) of the Shipping Act of 1984 (46...

  11. 46 CFR 545.2 - Interpretation of Shipping Act of 1984-Unpaid ocean freight charges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Interpretation of Shipping Act of 1984-Unpaid ocean freight charges. 545.2 Section 545.2 Shipping FEDERAL MARITIME COMMISSION REGULATIONS AFFECTING OCEAN... Act of 1984—Unpaid ocean freight charges. Section 10(a)(1) of the Shipping Act of 1984 (46...

  12. 46 CFR 545.2 - Interpretation of Shipping Act of 1984-Unpaid ocean freight charges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 9 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Interpretation of Shipping Act of 1984-Unpaid ocean freight charges. 545.2 Section 545.2 Shipping FEDERAL MARITIME COMMISSION REGULATIONS AFFECTING OCEAN... Act of 1984—Unpaid ocean freight charges. Section 10(a)(1) of the Shipping Act of 1984 (46...

  13. 46 CFR 545.2 - Interpretation of Shipping Act of 1984-Unpaid ocean freight charges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 9 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Interpretation of Shipping Act of 1984-Unpaid ocean freight charges. 545.2 Section 545.2 Shipping FEDERAL MARITIME COMMISSION REGULATIONS AFFECTING OCEAN... Act of 1984—Unpaid ocean freight charges. Section 10(a)(1) of the Shipping Act of 1984 (46...

  14. Relationship-Centered Practices in Early Childhood: Working with Families, Infants, and Young Children at Risk

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ensher, Gail L.; Clark, David A.

    2011-01-01

    Strong working relationships with diverse families and children are the foundation of successful early intervention. Discover fresh, practical ways to build these relationships in this essential guidebook, every professional's blueprint for working with children and families within the specific context of their culture, family structure, and risk…

  15. Special Issue: Gender and Contextual Perspectives on Work and Family Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zvonkovic, Anisa M.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Includes "Introduction" (Zvonkovic); "Work-Family Conflict and the Quality of Family Life" (Weigel et al.); "Generational Differences in the Meaning of Retirement from Farming" (Marotz-Baden et al.); "Economic Resources, Influence and Stress among Married Couples" (Greaves et al.); "Needs and Priorities in Balancing Paid and Family Work" (Nichols…

  16. Not Babysitting: Work Stress and Well-Being for Family Child Care Providers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerstenblatt, Paula; Faulkner, Monica; Lee, Ahyoung; Doan, Linh Thy; Travis, Dnika

    2014-01-01

    Family child care providers contend with a number of work stressors related to the dual roles of operating a small business and providing child care in their home. Research has documented many sources of work related stress for family child care providers; however, research examining family child care providers' experiences outside of the…

  17. A Qualitative Examination of the Work-Family Interface: Parents of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Russell A.; Booth, Suzanne M.; Taylor, Claire F.; Martin, Tracy

    2011-01-01

    Within the work-family literature little is known about the work-family challenges and opportunities faced by families that have one or more children with autism spectrum disorder. However, it has been consistently demonstrated that parents of children with autism spectrum disorder are at a higher risk of experiencing a host of negative outcomes.…

  18. Balancing Early Childhood Education and Work. Consultations with Key Groups about Striking a Balance: Families, Work, and Early Childhood Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Podmore, Valerie N.; Sawicka, Theresa

    This report documents some of the findings from a consultative interview process which marked the final stage of a New Zealand research program on families, work, and education. The consultations followed from, and were based in part on, the report "Striking a Balance: Families, Work, and Early Childhood Education." The focus of this short,…

  19. Coping with work-family conflict: A leader-member exchange perspective.

    PubMed

    Major, Debra A; Morganson, Valerie J

    2011-01-01

    Leader-member exchange (LMX) theory is applied as a framework for understanding coping with work-family conflict. The effectiveness of four work-family coping strategies (i.e., preventive and episodic forms of both problem-focused and emotion-focused coping) is considered with emphasis on how the LMX relationship contributes to each form of coping with work interference with family. The LMX-based model of work-family coping accounts for the development of family-friendly work roles, use of organizational family-friendly policies, and the negotiation of flextime and flexplace accommodations. Constraints on the relationship between LMX and work-family coping associated with supervisor authority and resources and aspects of the organizational context are also discussed. Research and applied implications of the model are offered. PMID:21280949

  20. Health and Turnover of Working Mothers After Childbirth Via the Work–Family Interface: An Analysis Across Time

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, Dawn S.; Grzywacz, Joseph G.; Ferguson, Merideth; Hunter, Emily M.; Clinch, C. Randall; Arcury, Thomas A.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined organizational levers that impact work–family experiences, participant health, and subsequent turnover. Using a sample of 179 women returning to full-time work 4 months after childbirth, we examined the associations of 3 job resources (job security, skill discretion, and schedule control) with work-to-family enrichment and the associations of 2 job demands (psychological requirements and nonstandard work schedules) with work-to-family conflict. Further, we considered subsequent impact of work-to-family conflict and enrichment on women’s health (physical and mental health) 8 months after women returned to work and the impact of health on voluntary turnover 12 months after women returned to work. Having a nonstandard work schedule was directly and positively related to conflict, whereas schedule control buffered the effect of psychological requirements on conflict. Skill discretion and job security, both job resources, directly and positively related to enrichment. Work-to-family conflict was negatively related to both physical and mental health, but work-to-family enrichment positively predicted only physical health. Physical health and mental health both negatively influenced turnover. We discuss implications and opportunities for future research. PMID:21604833

  1. 7 CFR Exhibit K to Subpart A of... - Classifications for Multi-Family Residential Rehabilitation Work

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...Multi-Family Residential Rehabilitation Work I. General This exhibit...considers maintenance and repair work, moderate rehabilitation...applicant shall have a structural analysis of the existing building made...Definitions Maintenance and Repair—Work involved in the...

  2. Working with Families of Young Children with Special Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McWilliam, R. A., Ed.

    2010-01-01

    This user-friendly book presents research-based best practices for serving families of children with special needs from birth to age 6. Expert contributors demonstrate how early intervention and early childhood special education can effectively address a wide range of family concerns, which in turn optimizes children's development and learning.…

  3. Working with Families Experiencing Homelessness: Understanding Trauma and Its Impact

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guarino, Kathleen; Bassuk, Ellen

    2010-01-01

    The prevalence of traumatic stress in the lives of families who are homeless is extraordinarily high. Often these families are headed by single mothers who have experienced ongoing trauma in the form of childhood abuse and neglect, domestic violence, and community violence, as well as the trauma associated with poverty and the loss of home,…

  4. Levels of Interventions for MFTs Working with Family Businesses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Distelberg, Brian; Castanos, Carolina

    2012-01-01

    Family businesses (FBs) are a significant population in the world and therefore part of most practicing marriage and family therapists (MFTs) clientele; however, little is mentioned about FBs in the training of MFTs. This article offers some guidance to practicing MFTs who service this population, as well as MFTs who wish to expand their practice…

  5. Does Work Experience Actually Work?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Field, John

    2012-01-01

    As unemployment levels rise, so education and training move into the policy spotlight. For the government, this is a very uncomfortable place to be right now. A number of large companies have withdrawn from the flagship Work Programme--under which jobseekers are invited to take up unpaid work placements of between two and eight weeks--amid…

  6. Sensemaking in a High-Risk Lifestyle: The Relationship Between Work and Family for Public Safety Families 

    E-print Network

    Bochantin, Jaime Elizabeth

    2011-10-21

    Past research concerning work and family has largely been from traditional, white-collar settings and has only taken into consideration the perceptions of the employees' experiences with regard to the relationship between ...

  7. Shrugging it off: Does psychological detachment from work mediate the relationship between workplace aggression and work-family conflict?

    PubMed

    Demsky, Caitlin A; Ellis, Allison M; Fritz, Charlotte

    2014-04-01

    The current study investigates workplace aggression and psychological detachment from work as possible antecedents of work-family conflict. We draw upon Conservation of Resources theory and the Effort-Recovery Model to argue that employees who fail to psychologically detach from stressful events in the workplace experience a relative lack of resources that is negatively associated with functioning in the nonwork domain. Further, we extend prior research on antecedents of work-family conflict by examining workplace aggression, a prevalent workplace stressor. Utilizing multisource data (i.e., employee, significant other, and coworker reports), our findings indicate that self-reported psychological detachment mediates the relationship between coworker-reported workplace aggression and both self- and significant other-reported work-family conflict. Findings from the current study speak to the value of combining perspectives from research on recovery from work stress and the work-family interface, and point toward implications for research and practice. PMID:24635738

  8. Working with Families Living with Autism: Potential Contributions of Marriage and Family Therapists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neely, Jason; Amatea, Ellen S.; Echevarria-Doan, Silvia; Tannen, Tina

    2012-01-01

    This article introduces marriage and family therapists (MFT) to some of the common issues faced by families that have a child with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). First, autism is defined and common myths surrounding it are discussed. Next, relational challenges are presented that families report experiencing during early childhood through the…

  9. No Pain, No Gain? A Resource-Based Model of Work-to-Family Enrichment and Conflict

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Zheng; Powell, Gary N.

    2012-01-01

    Work-family scholars tend to work in two largely disconnected research streams, focusing on either work-family enrichment--the positive side of the work-family interface--or work-family conflict--the negative side of this interface. The purpose of this study is to suggest a reconciliation of the two research streams by proposing and testing a…

  10. Getting There from Here: Research on the Effects of Work–Family Initiatives on Work–Family Conflict and Business Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    KELLY, ERIN L.; KOSSEK, ELLEN ERNST; HAMMER, LESLIE B.; DURHAM, MARY; BRAY, JEREMY; CHERMACK, KELLY; MURPHY, LAUREN A.; KASKUBAR, DAN

    2009-01-01

    Many employing organizations have adopted work–family policies, programs, and benefits. Yet managers in employing organizations simply do not know what organizational initiatives actually reduce work–family conflict and how these changes are likely to impact employees and the organization. We examine scholarship that addresses two broad questions: first, do work–family initiatives reduce employees’ work–family conflict and/or improve work–family enrichment? Second, does reduced work–family conflict improve employees’ work outcomes and, especially, business outcomes at the organizational level? We review over 150 peer-reviewed studies from a number of disciplines in order to summarize this rich literature and identify promising avenues for research and conceptualization. We propose a research agenda based on four primary conclusions: the need for more multi-level research, the necessity of an interdisciplinary approach, the benefits of longitudinal studies that employ quasi-experimental or experimental designs and the challenges of translating research into practice in effective ways. PMID:20589229

  11. Child Care, Family, and Work Issues: Current Statistics and Their Implications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Equity Issues, 1997

    1997-01-01

    This issue contains three fact sheets covering the impact of child care on work, the impact of family on work, and the impact of work on family. They are meant to be given to community and business leaders, employers, school board members, legislators, local community agency staff, and other individuals who desire a productive workforce. Each of…

  12. 78 FR 16278 - Notice of Submission of Proposed Information Collection to OMB Family Report, Moving-To-Work...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-14

    ...Submission of Proposed Information Collection to OMB Family Report, Moving-To-Work Family Report AGENCY: Office of the Chief Information...assisted housing programs. Form HUD-50058 MTW Family Reports solicit demographic, family...

  13. Thinking big, supporting families and enabling coping: the value of social work in patient and family centered health care.

    PubMed

    Craig, Shelley L; Betancourt, Itanni; Muskat, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Patient and family-centered care has become a focus in health services. Social work has a rich history of providing responsive patient care. This study identified the contribution and value of social work to PFCC from the key stakeholder perspectives of health social workers (n = 65). Utilizing interpretive description, four themes emerged: (1) Thinking big and holistically, (2) Intervening with families, (3) Enabling patient and family coping, and (4) Maximizing hospital and community resources. Barriers included a lack of power, professional isolation and role creep. Implications for research and practice are provided. PMID:25985286

  14. Professional Skills, Concerns, and Perceived Importance of Work with Families in Early Intervention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, Donald B., Jr.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    This study of 142 early interventionists examined self-competence in working with families, value placed on family roles, and concern about family-centered practices, and explored their relationship with experience, discipline, and job category. Nurses and social workers scored higher than educators and other health care professionals in several…

  15. Building Meaningful Relationships with Families: The Essence of Our Work with Young Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elliott, Dana

    2006-01-01

    The focus of college early childhood programs is on working with children and learning about child development. Unfortunately, they all ignore families. While there is an occasional nod toward family dynamics, very little time in both theory and practice is devoted to learning the techniques of developing relationships with families and…

  16. Between Hope and Hard Times: New York's Working Families in Economic Distress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fischer, David J.; Colton, Tara; Kleiman, Neil S.; Schimke, Karen

    2004-01-01

    Today, many jobs that once could support a family barely suffice to keep that family out of poverty. The implied bargain America offers its citizens is supposed to be that anyone who works hard and plays by the rules can support his or her family and move onward and upward. But for millions of New Yorkers, that bargain is out of reach; the uphill…

  17. Strategies and Practices for Working with Immigrant Families in Early Education Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vesely, Colleen K.; Ginsberg, Mark R.

    2011-01-01

    This study explores how early childhood education programs engage immigrant families in their children's learning, how programs learn about these families and incorporate their cultures into the classrooms, and what programs are doing in terms of their staff's professional development related to working with immigrant children and families. The…

  18. Commentary: what role for the family and Medical Leave Act in long-term care policy?

    PubMed

    Wisensale, Steven K

    2006-01-01

    The Family and Medical Leave Act provides unpaid leave but a key component is its intergenerational structure, permitting employees to take time off from work to care for an infant as well as an ill elderly parent. However, in an effort to provide paid leave, 23 of 28 states dropped the elder care provision in new initiatives introduced between 2000 and 2003. This article argues that in reforming leave policy in the future, the leave should be paid, remain intergenerational, cover more workers, and be adaptable to changing family patterns in an aging society. Also discussed is California's paid leave law, which meets these criteria. PMID:17135096

  19. Validation Study of the Malay Version of the Work-Family Conflict Questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    SANAZ, Aazami; SYAQIRAH, Akmal; KHADIJAH, Shamsuddin

    2014-01-01

    Background: Work-family conflict has received increasing attention in recent decades in the area of workplace stressors, which can affect employees’ health. However, the dimensionality of the work–family conflict construct among the Malay-speaking population has not been clarified. In order to do so, it is crucial to use an instrument that is appropriate and valid for the Malay-speaking population. As such, the goal of this study was to validate and test the dimensionality of the Malay version of the Work-Family Conflict Questionnaire. Methods: The present study conducted exploratory factor analysis, confirmatory factor analysis, discriminant validity, convergent validity, and internal consistency, using Cronbach’s alpha, of the work–family conflict construct among 332 working women in Malaysia. Results: The results supported the existence of four dimensions in the Work-Family Conflict Questionnaire that distinguish between time based and strain-based work-family conflict and family-work conflict. The discriminant validity, convergent validity, and internal consistency of this construct are adequately supported. Conclusion: The findings of this study supported the existence of discriminant and convergent validity, as well as adequate reliability, for the construct. Thus, the Work–Family Conflict Questionnaire is a valid and reliable instrument among Malay-speaking working women. PMID:24639612

  20. Work-family conflict and enrichment from the perspective of psychosocial resources: comparing Finnish healthcare workers by working schedules.

    PubMed

    Mauno, Saija; Ruokolainen, Mervi; Kinnunen, Ulla

    2015-05-01

    We examined work-family conflict (WFC) and work-family enrichment (WFE) by comparing Finnish nurses, working dayshifts (non-shiftworkers, n = 874) and non-dayshifts. The non-dayshift employees worked either two different dayshifts (2-shiftworkers, n = 490) or three different shifts including nightshifts (3-shiftworkers, n = 270). Specifically, we investigated whether different resources, i.e. job control, managers' work-family support, co-workers' work-family support, control at home, personal coping strategies, and schedule satisfaction, predicted differently WFC and WFE in these three groups. Results showed that lower managers' work-family support predicted higher WFC only among 3-shiftworkers, whereas lower co-workers' support associated with increased WFC only in non-shiftworkers. In addition, shiftworkers reported higher WFC than non-shiftworkers. However, the level of WFE did not vary by schedule types. Moreover, the predictors of WFE varied only very little across schedule types. Shiftwork organizations should pay more attention to family-friendly management in order to reduce WFC among shiftworkers. PMID:25683534

  1. Training Family Therapists to Work with Children and Families: A Modified Delphi Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sori, Catherine Ford; Sprenkle, Douglas H.

    2004-01-01

    This study examined child inclusion issues and training marriage and family therapists (MFTs) to treat children. This modified Delphi study utilized a panel of experts, and gathered data through questionnaires and qualitative interviews. Panelists believe children should participate in family therapy sessions for both child and adult problems,…

  2. Developing Cultural Competence in Working with Korean Immigrant Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Irene J.; Kim, Luke I. C.; Kelly, James G.

    2006-01-01

    The authors provide an in-depth examination of the historical background, cultural values, family roles, and community contexts of Korean Americans as an aid to both researchers and clinicians in developing cultural competence with this particular group. First, the concept of cultural competence is defined. A brief history of Korean immigration…

  3. [Working with Infants, Toddlers, and Families in Rural Areas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fenichel, Emily, Ed.

    1995-01-01

    This newsletter theme issue focuses on providing services to infants with special needs in rural areas. In "Old Threads, New Patterns: Reaching Out to Rural Families," Deborah Harris-Usner discusses bringing infant mental health care and parent-infant psychotherapy to rural New Mexico. In "The People of Kids Place: Creating and Maintaining…

  4. The Role of the Government in Work-Family Conflict

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boushey, Heather

    2011-01-01

    The foundations of the major federal policies that govern today's workplace were put in place during the 1930s, when most families had a stay-at-home caregiver who could tend to the needs of children, the aged, and the sick. Seven decades later, many of the nation's workplace policies are in need of major updates to reflect the realities of the…

  5. Nurturing Careers in Psychology: Combining Work and Family

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halpern, Diane F.

    2008-01-01

    The academic workplace, with its requirements for achieving tenure within the first 6 years of employment, is designed in ways that discriminate against young faculty with family care responsibilities, most notably mothers. Mason and Goulden ("Academe," http://www.aaup.org/publications/Academe/2002/02nd/02ndmas.htm, 2002, "Academe,"…

  6. Trilingual Families in Mainly Monolingual Societies: Working towards a Typology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braun, Andreas; Cline, Tony

    2010-01-01

    Trilingualism has often been studied within the framework established for bilingualism. Although there is overlap, the dynamics around trilingualism pose greater variations than is the case with bilingualism. The aim of this study is to analyse the language practices of different groups of trilingual families. Particular attention is paid to the…

  7. Opportunities for School Psychologists Working with Children of Military Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherman, Michelle D.; Glenn, Marshall Andrew

    2011-01-01

    Today's military families are a diverse, resilient group of brave Americans, and the country owes them a tremendous debt of gratitude. To date, over 2 million service members have been deployed in support of the Global War on Terrorism, many for multiple tours. For the first time in the country's history, there are more military dependents…

  8. Family Dynamics of the Stay-at-Home Father and Working Mother Relationship.

    PubMed

    Rushing, Cassie; Powell, Lisa

    2015-09-01

    A phenomenological qualitative study was utilized to explore family dynamics in stay-at-home father and working mother households. A total of 20 working mothers were asked to describe family interactions and daily routines with regard to their stay-at-home father and working mother dynamic. All participants were married, heterosexual women with biological children ages 1 to 4 and who worked outside the home and the father stayed home as primary caretaker and did not contribute financially. The study indicated that the family dynamic of a working mother and stay-at-home father provided a positive parent-child relationship, enhanced parenting cohesion, and enhanced quality time. PMID:25204589

  9. A Cross-Cultural Test of the Work-Family Interface in 48 Countries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jeffrey Hill, E.; Yang, Chongming; Hawkins, Alan J.; Ferris, Maria

    2004-01-01

    This study tests a cross-cultural model of the work-family interface. Using multigroup structural equation modeling with IBM survey responses from 48 countries (N= 25,380), results show that the same work-family interface model that fits the data globally also fits the data in a four-group model composed of culturally related groups of countries,…

  10. Social Class, Families and the Politics of Educational Advantage: The Work of Dennis Marsden

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ball, Stephen J.

    2011-01-01

    This article presents a review of Dennis Marsden's work. Looking at his oeuvre overall it is the family and intimate social relations and social class that are at the centre of his interests and analytical focus. Part of the power and effectiveness of his work was an ability to see families and their everyday lives in relation to social policy and…

  11. A Two-Study Examination of Work-Family Conflict, Production Deviance and Gender

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferguson, Merideth; Carlson, Dawn; Hunter, Emily M.; Whitten, Dwayne

    2012-01-01

    Building on the spillover and crossover literatures of work-family conflict and the theoretical framework of Conservation of Resources Theory (Hobfoll, 1989) we examine the effects of conflict on production deviance. Using a two-study constructive replication and extension design, we examine how partner work-to-family conflict contributes to job…

  12. Traditional and Nontraditional Gender Roles and Work-Family Interface for Men and Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perrone, Kristin M.; Wright, Stephen L.; Jackson, Z. Vance

    2009-01-01

    In this article, we examine traditional and nontraditional gender roles and work-family interface for men and women. Recent empirical literature is reviewed and implications for career counselors are discussed. We discuss changing gender roles in career, marriage, and parenting and provide strategies for helping clients to cope with work-family

  13. Work-Family Climate, Organizational Commitment, and Turnover: Multilevel Contagion Effects of Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Neill, John W.; Harrison, Michelle M.; Cleveland, Jeannette; Almeida, David; Stawski, Robert; Crouter, Anne C.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents empirical research analyzing the relationship between work-family climate (operationalized in terms of three work-family climate sub-scales), organizational leadership (i.e., senior manager) characteristics, organizational commitment and turnover intent among 526 employees from 37 different hotels across the US. Using…

  14. Work-Related Learning Guide for Family Literacy and Adult Education Organizations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jobs for the Future, Boston, MA.

    This guide assists family literacy and adult education organizations considering ways in which work and learning can be integrated in their educational programs. Part I addresses influences motivating the family literacy and adult education fields to incorporate work-related learning into their efforts. Part II provides a framework for designing…

  15. An Exploratory Study into Work/Family Balance within the Australian Higher Education Sector

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pillay, Soma; Kluvers, Ron; Abhayawansa, Subhash; Vranic, Vedran

    2013-01-01

    The higher education landscape is undergoing major transformation, with a significant impact on the work and family practices of academics and professional staff. The purpose of this exploratory study is to examine the extent to which (1) time-related, (2) strain-related and (3) demographical variables impact on the work/family balance of academic…

  16. Influence Strategies Used When Couples Make Work-Family Decisions and Their Importance for Marital Satisfaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zvonkovic, Anisa M.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Investigated how marital partners influenced each other concerning work and family decisions and connected influence strategies to martial satisfaction in 61 married couples who had faced work-family decisions in past 6 months. Found that gender role ideology and indirect influence strategies were related to marital satisfaction. Variables related…

  17. Challenges, Not Barriers: The Work and Family Issues of Women Superintendents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reecks-Rodgers, Debra Ann

    2013-01-01

    Prior studies have indicated that qualified female administrators have not applied for superintendency positions because of possible work/family conflicts, but little research has been done on the work/family issues encountered by women in the superintendency or on the strategies they use to resolve these issues. In response, this study is an…

  18. Conflict between Work and Family: An Investigation of Four Policy Measures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruppanner, Leah

    2013-01-01

    Welfare states enact a range of policies aimed at reducing work-family conflict. While welfare state policies have been assessed at the macro-level and work-family conflict at the individual-level, few studies have simultaneously addressed these relationships in a cross-national multi-level model. This study addresses this void by assessing the…

  19. Identification of a Dispositional Tendency to Experience Work-Family Spillover

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cho, Eunae; Tay, Louis; Allen, Tammy D.; Stark, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Are individuals predisposed to experience work-family spillover? Despite theoretical relevance and practical implications related to this issue, research on this topic is scarce. With this in mind, we investigated if there is a dispositional tendency to experience work-family spillover using a nationally representative longitudinal sample. We…

  20. 76 FR 65545 - Notice of Revision of Standard Form 1152: Unpaid Compensation of Deceased Civilian Employee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-21

    ...to receive any unpaid compensation due and payable after the employee's death. The form relates solely to money due as defined...which may become payable under the Retirement or Group Life Insurance Acts applicable to the deceased...

  1. How Work–Family Research Can Finally Have an Impact in Organizations

    PubMed Central

    Kossek, Ellen Ernst; Baltes, Boris B.; Matthews, Russell A.

    2011-01-01

    Although work–family research has mushroomed over the past several decades, an implementation gap persists in putting work–family research into practice. Because of this, work–family researchers have not made a significant impact in improving the lives of employees relative to the amount of research that has been conducted. The goal of this article is to clarify areas where implementation gaps between work–family research and practice are prevalent, discuss the importance of reducing these gaps, and make the case that both better and different research should be conducted. We recommend several alternative but complementary actions for the work–family researcher: (a) work with organizations to study their policy and practice implementation efforts, (b) focus on the impact of rapid technological advances that are blurring work–family boundaries, (c) conduct research to empower the individual to self-manage the work–family interface, and (d) engage in advocacy and collaborative policy research to change institutional contexts and break down silos. Increased partnerships between industrial–organizational (I–O) psychology practitioners and researchers from many industries and disciplines could break down silos that we see as limiting development of the field. PMID:22247737

  2. Thirty-Five Years of Studying Work and Family

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brett, Jeanne M.

    2011-01-01

    The author and Karen Gyllstrom began working on the study that resulted in the highly cited article entitled, "Working Men and Women: Inter-and Intra-role Conflict" (Herman & Gyllstrom, "Psychology of Women Quarterly" 1977) probably more for personal than professional reasons. The study was based on Gyllstrom's master's thesis. The focus of…

  3. Work-Family Conflict: An Exploration of the Differential Effects of a Dependent Childs Age on Working Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darcy, Colette; McCarthy, Alma

    2007-01-01

    Purpose--The purpose of this article is to explore the impact of life cycle stage, specifically parenting stage, on work-family conflict among working parents to determine whether discernible differences are evident among those individuals at the early stage of their parenting cycle compared with those with older children.…

  4. [The National Conference of Propaganda Work on Family Planning held Beijing].

    PubMed

    Ma, B

    1983-01-29

    The National Conference on Propaganda Work in Family Planning, held in Beijing from November 1-6, 1982, was sponsored by the the Propaganda Department of the Chinese Communist Party Central Committee and the National Family Planning Committee. Among the 136 participants were representatives from various provincial, city, and autonomous region propaganda and family planning units, the General Political Department of the People's Liberation Army, general trade unions, All China Women's Federation, Communist Youth League, and propaganda reporters. The purpose of the conference was to discuss how to organize family planning propaganda in meeting China's goal of limiting the population to 1,200,000,000 by 2000, and how to arrange a Family Planning Propaganda Month for early 1983. The Chairman of the National Family Planning Committee made 3 points: family planning is a basic national policy, greater propaganda efforts must be made towards peasant family planning, and everyone must work hard to create a new situation in family planning work. The Vice Minister of the Propaganda Department remarked that family planning propaganda was foremost among the 12 national propaganda topics; these sentiments were supported totally by the representatives of the women and youth groups. The Vice Chairman of the Advisory Committee of the Central Committee said that family planning work was longterm, and that its success lay in the countryside. Finally, the Vice Chairman of the National Family Planning Committee encouraged all delegates to take the spirit of the conference back to their home. During the conference delegates also met to discuss important points in planning the Family Planning Propaganda Month. PMID:12312938

  5. Predictors of Family Strength: The Integrated Spiritual-Religious/Resilient Perspective for Understanding the Healthy/Strong Family

    PubMed Central

    Ghaffari, Majid; Fatehizade, Maryam; Ahmadi, Ahmad; Ghasemi, Vahid; Baghban, Iran

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The present study aimed to investigate the effects of spiritual well-being and family protective factors on the family strength in a propositional structural model. Methods: The research population consisted of all the married people of the Isfahan, Iran, in 2012 with preschool-aged children and in the first decade of marriage with at least eight grades of educational level. Three hundred and ninety five voluntary and unpaid participants were selected randomly through multi-stage sampling from seven regions of the city. The instruments used were the Spiritual Well-being Scale, Inventory of Family Protective Factors, and Family Strength Scale. Descriptive statistics and a structural equation modeling analytic approach were used. Results: The analytic model predicted 82% of the variance of the family strength. The total effect of the spiritual well-being on the family strength was higher compared to the family protective factors. Furthermore, spiritual well-being predicted 43% of the distribution of the family protective factors and had indirect effect on the family strength through the family protective factors (p < 0.001). Conclusions: The results of this study confirmed the interrelationships among spiritual well-being and family protective factors, and their simultaneous effects on family strength. Family counselors may employ an integrated spiritual-religious/resilient perspective to inform their strength-based work with individuals and their families. Declaration of interest: None. PMID:24644511

  6. Managing Work and Family. Nonstandard Work Arrangements among Managers and Professionals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spalter-Roth, Roberta M.; Kalleberg, Arne L.; Rasell, Edith; Cassirer, Naomi; Reskin, Barbara F.; Hudson, Ken; Webster, David; Appelbaum, Eileen; Dooley, Betty L.

    With more mothers in the work force and greater stresses created by competing demands of work and home, nonstandard work arrangements (NSWAs), which include temporary help agency work, on-call work, day labor, contract work, independent contracting, self-employment, and part-time work, have been suggested as a remedy for this conflict. For the…

  7. Black Family Basic Facts Handbook: A Resource for YMCAs Planning to Work with Black Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibbs, Elsie, Ed.

    This handbook is a resource tool designed to assist Young Men's Christian Association (YMCA) staff and lay leaders of local communities in planning and developing programs for their constituents. Materials included consist of excerpted information from various sources. An attempt has been made to present a total family concept that provides a…

  8. Early Childhood Care, Work, and Family in Japan: Trends in a Society of Smaller Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newport, Sally F.

    2001-01-01

    Examined opinions of diverse parents, teachers, and academics regarding Japanese society, its infant/toddler care system, labor force, and family. Found evidence of a difficult transition in the culture of child rearing, including increased caregiver responsibility for child rearing and increased anxiety about parenting among young mothers.…

  9. 45 CFR 286.95 - What, if any, are the special rules concerning counting work for two-parent families?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...concerning counting work for two-parent families? 286.95 Section 286.95 Public...Relating to Public Welfare OFFICE OF FAMILY ASSISTANCE (ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS), ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN AND FAMILIES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN...

  10. 45 CFR 286.95 - What, if any, are the special rules concerning counting work for two-parent families?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...concerning counting work for two-parent families? 286.95 Section 286.95 Public...Relating to Public Welfare OFFICE OF FAMILY ASSISTANCE (ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS), ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN AND FAMILIES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN...

  11. Association between work-family conflict and musculoskeletal pain among hospital patient care workers

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seung-Sup; Okechukwu, Cassandra; Buxton, Orfeu M.; Dennerlein, Jack T.; Boden, Leslie I.; Hashimoto, Dean M.; Sorensen, Glorian

    2014-01-01

    Background A growing body of evidence suggests that work-family conflict is an important risk factor for workers' health and well-being. The goal of this study is to examine association between work-family conflict and musculoskeletal pain among hospital patient care workers. Methods We analyzed a cross-sectional survey of 1119 hospital patient care workers in 105 units in two urban, academic hospitals. Work-family conflict was measured by 5-item Work-Family Conflict Scale questionnaire. Multilevel logistic regression was applied to examine associations between work-family conflict and self-reported musculoskeletal pain in the past 3 months, adjusting for confounders including work-related psychosocial factors and physical work factors. Results In fully adjusted models, high work-family conflict was strongly associated with neck or shoulder pain (OR: 2.34, 95% CI: 1.64 - 3.34), arm pain (OR: 2.79, 95% CI: 1.64 - 4.75), lower extremity pain (OR: 2.20, 95% CI: 1.54- 3.15) and any musculoskeletal pain (OR: 2.45, 95% CI: 1.56 - 3.85), and a number of body areas in pain (OR: 2.47, 95% CI: 1.82 - 3.36) in the past 3 months. The association with low back pain was attenuated and became non-significant after adjusting for confounders. Conclusions Given the consistent associations between work-family conflict and self-reported musculoskeletal pains, the results suggest that work-family conflict could be an important domain for health promotion and workplace policy development among hospital patient care workers. PMID:23019044

  12. Knowledge Work, Working Time, and Use of Time among Finnish Dual-Earner Families: Does Knowledge Work Require the Marginalization of Private Life?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Natti, Jouko; Anttila, Timo; Tammelin, Mia

    2012-01-01

    The industrial working-time regime is dissolving--not dramatically, but rather as a trend. A new trend is that those in dynamic sectors and in a good labor market position work long hours: Demanding knowledge work appears to require the marginalization of private life. This study investigates the family situation of knowledge workers, the…

  13. Families That Work: Policies for Reconciling Parenthood and Employment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gornick, Janet C.; Meyers, Marcia K.

    2003-01-01

    Parents around the world grapple with the common challenge of balancing work and child care. Despite common problems, the industrialized nations have developed dramatically different social and labor market policies--policies that vary widely in the level of support they provide for parents and the extent to which they encourage an equal division…

  14. "Good Work Awards:" Effects on Children's Families. Technical Report #12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chun, Sherlyn; Mays, Violet

    This brief report describes parental reaction to a reinforcement strategy used with children in the Kamehameha Early Education Program (KEEP). Staff members report that "Good Work Awards" (GWAs) are viewed favorably by mothers of students. GWAs are dittoed notes sent home with children when they have met a minimum criterion for daily classroom…

  15. Serving Vulnerable Families: The Important Work of Head Start Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vinci, Yasmina

    2012-01-01

    The Obama Administration's most recent regulation on designation renewal of Early/Head Start grantees opens opportunities for early childhood programs in some communities to compete with existing grantees for the federal funding. Understanding some of the behind-the-scenes work that goes into Head Start may be helpful to centers deciding whether…

  16. Animal Behavior: The Family that Works Together Stays Together

    E-print Network

    Ryan, Michael J.

    care in frogs is more likely to evolve when tadpoles are reared under environmentally harsh conditions in frogs when tadpoles are raised under environmentally harsh conditions, with biparental care occurring. Biparental care facilitates both social monogamy and genetic monogamy; frogs that work together to raise

  17. Balancing Work and Family: A Panel Analysis of the Impact of Part-Time Work on the Experience of Time Pressure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laurijssen, Ilse; Glorieux, Ignace

    2013-01-01

    In this article we consider the consequences of work-family reconciliation, in terms of the extent to which the adjustment of the labour market career to family demands (by women) contributes to a better work-life balance. Using the Flemish SONAR-data, we analyse how changes in work and family conditions between the age of 26 and 29 are related to…

  18. Ethnic Variations in the Connection between Work-Induced Family Separation and Turnover Intent

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Behnke, Andrew O.; MacDermid, Shelley M.; Anderson, James C.; Weiss, Howard M.

    2010-01-01

    Using conservation of resources theory, this study examines the role of resources in the relationship between work-induced family separation and workers' intentions to leave their employment and how these relationships vary across ethnic groups. Analyses of a large representative sample of military members reveal that family separation is…

  19. Observations of a Working Class Family: Implications for Self-Regulated Learning Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vassallo, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Guardians have been implicated in the development of children's academic self-regulation. In this case study, which involved naturalistic observations and interviews, the everyday practices of a working class family were considered in the context of self-regulated learning development. The family's practices, beliefs, dispositions and home…

  20. Rewarding the Work of Individuals: A Counterintuitive Approach to Reducing Poverty and Strengthening Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berlin, Gordon L.

    2007-01-01

    Gordon Berlin discusses the nation's long struggle to reduce poverty in families with children, and proposes a counterintuitive solution--rewarding the work of individuals. He notes that policymakers' difficulty in reducing family poverty since 1973 is attributable to two intertwined problems--falling wages among low-skilled workers and the…

  1. Cultural and Ethnic Awareness Manual for Professionals Working with Mexican-American Migrant Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montoya, Jose R.

    Intended as a tool for personnel in the helping professions who work with Chicano migrant families and have little or nor prior knowledge of their culture or history, the manual presents a historical and cultural perspective of the Mexican American migrant families. The six units cover Mexican American history, cultural awareness, Mexican American…

  2. The Family as a Site for Gendered Ethnic Identity Work among Asian Indian Immigrants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mehrotra, Meeta; Calasanti, Toni M.

    2010-01-01

    Research on immigrants often points to the family as a source of support and a location for oppression. Using in-depth interviews with 38 first-generation immigrant Indians, this study adds to this literature by exploring families as sites of identity work where first-generation immigrants manage their gendered ethnic identities. Relocation into a…

  3. The Impact of Public Housing Policy on Family Social Work Theory and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarty, Dawn

    2008-01-01

    Social workers are the professionals most engaged with families living in low-income and subsidized housing and most familiar with the problems associated with inadequate housing. Yet the discussion of public housing policy has been left largely to economists and housing activists and the clear implications for family social work practice have not…

  4. Marriage and Family Therapists Working with Couples Who Have Children with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramisch, Julie

    2012-01-01

    Current research about families and couples who have children with autism is discussed using the Double ABCX model as a guide. A case study is presented along with recommendations for therapists who work with couples who have children with autism. Marriage and family therapists are encouraged to use the Double ABCX model as both an assessment tool…

  5. Poverty Trends for Families Headed by Working Single Mothers, 1993-1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, Kathryn H.; Dupree, Allen

    This analysis examines poverty in families headed by working single mothers, addressing whether and to what degree their economic situations have improved. It investigates the effect of the 1996 Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act, which moved single mothers from welfare to work. Poverty data from the annual Census…

  6. Work Valence as a Predictor of Academic Achievement in the Family Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porfeli, Erik; Ferrari, Lea; Nota, Laura

    2013-01-01

    This study asserts a theoretical model of academic and work socialization within the family setting. The presumed associations between parents' work valences, children's work valences and valence perceptions, and children's academic interest and achievement are tested. The results suggest that children's perceptions of parents…

  7. Family Interference with Work and Workplace Cognitive Failure: The Mitigating Role of Recovery Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lapierre, Laurent M.; Hammer, Leslie B.; Truxillo, Donald M.; Murphy, Lauren A.

    2012-01-01

    The first goal of this study was to test whether family interference with work (FIW) is positively related to increased workplace cognitive failure (WCF), which is defined as errors made at work that indicate lapses in memory (e.g., failing to recall work procedures), attention (e.g., not fully listening to instruction), and motor function (e.g.,…

  8. Key worker housing : a demographic analysis of working families in eastern Massachusetts

    E-print Network

    Wagner, Margaret Fitzgerald

    2005-01-01

    As housing costs have soared nationwide, many policy makers have grown increasingly aware of working families' housing needs. Currently, having a full-time job does not guarantee decent and affordable housing. Many housing ...

  9. Family-Supportive Organization Perceptions, Multiple Dimensions of Work-Family Conflict, and Employee Satisfaction: A Test of Model across Five Samples

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lapierre, Laurent M.; Spector, Paul E.; Allen, Tammy D.; Poelmans, Steven; Cooper, Cary L.; O'Driscoll, Michael P.; Sanchez, Juan I.; Brough, Paula; Kinnunen, Ulla

    2008-01-01

    Using samples of managers drawn from five Western countries, we tested a theoretical model linking employees' perceptions of their work environment's family-supportiveness to six different dimensions of work-family conflict (WFC), and to their job satisfaction, family satisfaction, and life satisfaction. Our results are consistent with a causal…

  10. FAMILY-RELATED LEAVE POLICIES

    E-print Network

    Gasch, Audrey P.

    2 Sick Leave 2 Vacation 2 Examples 2 Unpaid Leave After Birth or Adoption 3 Benefits During://www.ohr.wisc.edu/polproced/fambroch.pdf #12;Table of Contents Introduction 1 Caring for Ill Family Members 2 Paid leave for Birth or Adoption Birth or Adoption 4 Managing Parental Leave in an Instructional Environment 4 Responsibilities

  11. Spending Time: The Impact of Hours Worked on Work-Family Conflict

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adkins, Cheryl L.; Premeaux, Sonya F.

    2012-01-01

    Scholars have long assumed that as workers spend more time at work fewer hours are available for their non-work lives leading to negative effects in both domains, and most studies examining the impact of work hours on work and life domains have supported this viewpoint. However, the majority of these studies have used one-dimensional measures of…

  12. Working with Adolescents: A Guide for Practitioners. Social Work Practice with Children and Families Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laser, Julie Anne; Nicotera, Nicole

    2010-01-01

    This state-of-the-art practitioner resource and course text provides a comprehensive view of adolescent development and spells out effective ways to help teens who are having difficulties. The book illuminates protective and risk factors in the many contexts of adolescents' lives, from individual attributes to family, school, neighborhood, and…

  13. Work and family conflict in academic science: patterns and predictors among women and men in research universities.

    PubMed

    Fox, Mary Frank; Fonseca, Carolyn; Bao, Jinghui

    2011-10-01

    This article addresses work-family conflict as reported among women and men academic scientists in data systematically collected across fields of study in nine US research universities. Arguing that academic science is a particularly revealing case for studying work-family conflict, the article addresses: (1) the bi-directional conflict of work with family, and family with work, reported among the scientists; (2) the ways that higher, compared with lower, conflict, is predicted by key features of family, academic rank, and departments/institutions; and (3) patterns and predictors of work-family conflict that vary, as well as converge, by gender. Results point to notable differences, and commonalties, by gender, in factors affecting interference in both directions of work-family conflict reported by scientists. These findings have implications for understandings of how marriage and children, senior compared with junior academic rank, and departmental climates shape work-family conflict among women and men in US academic science. PMID:22164721

  14. Work-family conflict and well-being in university employees.

    PubMed

    Winefield, Helen R; Boyd, Carolyn; Winefield, Anthony H

    2014-01-01

    This is one of the first reported studies to have reviewed the role of work-family conflict in university employees, both academic and nonacademic. The goal of this research was to examine the role of work-family conflict as a mediator of relationships between features of the work environment and worker well-being and organizational outcomes. A sample of 3,326 Australian university workers responded to an online survey. Work-family conflict added substantially to the explained variance in physical symptoms and psychological strain after taking account of job demands and control, and to a lesser extent to the variance in job performance. However, it had no extra impact on organizational commitment, which was most strongly predicted by job autonomy. Despite differing in workloads and work-family conflict, academic ("faculty") and nonacademic staff demonstrated similar predictors of worker and organizational outcomes. Results suggest two pathways through which management policies may be effective in improving worker well-being and productivity: improving job autonomy has mainly direct effects, while reducing job demands is mediated by consequent reductions in work-family conflict. PMID:25175890

  15. Embeddedness and well-being in the United States and Singapore: the mediating effects of work-to-family and family-to-work conflict.

    PubMed

    Ng, Thomas W H; Feldman, Daniel C

    2014-07-01

    Guided by conservation of resources theory, we propose that both organizational and community embeddedness are associated with increased work-to-family conflict (WFC) and family to-work conflict (FWC), which in turn are associated with strain-related outcomes. Because stress can have both short-term and long-term consequences, we examined negative mood as an immediate reaction to stress and chronic insomnia as a longer-term reaction to stress. We examined these relationships in 2-career couples in both the United States (n = 416) and Singapore (n = 400). Results provided full support for the mediating effects of WFC and FWC in the U.S. sample, with only limited support for those mediating effects in the Singaporean sample. In addition, we found that the effects of community embeddedness on FWC were significantly stronger in the U.S. sample than in the Singaporean sample. PMID:24885684

  16. John `Buster' Beier Memorial Excellence Fund Spring 2015/Summer 2015 Application for Travel, Research, Unpaid Coop or Internship Funding

    E-print Network

    Virginia Tech

    other sources. ESSAY ­UNPAID COOP OR INTERNSHIP *Can be applied to Spring 2015 or Summer 2015 PleaseJohn `Buster' Beier Memorial Excellence Fund Spring 2015/Summer 2015 Application for Travel, Research, Unpaid Coop or Internship Funding Background and Use of Gift: In memory and in honor

  17. Las obreras: Chicana Politics of Work and Family. Aztlan Anthology Series, Volume 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruiz, Vicki L., Ed.

    In this anthology, Chicana voices of the past and present illuminate the experiences of Mexican American women as they strive to integrate wage work, family life, and community engagement. Sections cover confrontations with the state through community action, court litigation, and union organizing; negotiating work, marriage, and children; stories…

  18. Working with Teams and Organizations to Help Them Involve Family Members

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orford, Jim; Templeton, Lorna; Copello, Alex; Velleman, Richard; Ibanga, Akanidomo

    2010-01-01

    In this article we describe our work in trying to influence whole service teams to move their practice towards greater involvement of affected family members. Work with five teams is described. The process varied but in all cases it included recruitment of the team, training, continued support and evaluation of results. Use of a standard…

  19. School Social Work and Early Childhood Student's Attitudes toward Gay and Lesbian Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Averett, Paige E.; Hegde, Archana

    2012-01-01

    The present study assessed the attitudes of school professionals in training at an American university toward homosexuality and their comfort, action-related disposition, and preparation to work with gay and lesbian (GL) families and their children. Fifty-nine students specializing in birth through kindergarten education and school social work

  20. Work, Family, and Community: Summary Proceedings of an Ad Hoc Committee.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayes, Cheryl D., Ed.

    These proceedings contain summaries of five working group discussions and a discussion of suggestions for future research from an ad hoc meeting on Work, Family, and Community (Fedruary 21-22, 1980) in Washington, D.C. The meeting had these objectives: (1) to identify salient policy and research issues associated with changing patterns of labor…

  1. Family Sub-System and Sex Roles in the Work Situation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michel, Andree

    The family is only one sub-system in the total society. It is closely related to other sub-systems at work in the whole society: the educational system, the market economy, the state apparatus, the cultural system, which works through the media and the school. The data given in this paper indicate that it will be very difficult to change the…

  2. Nonstandard Work Schedules, Perceived Family Well-Being, and Daily Stressors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Kelly D.; Goodman, W. Benjamin; Pirretti, Amy E.; Almeida, David M.

    2008-01-01

    Data from two studies assessed the effects of nonstandard work schedules on perceived family well-being and daily stressors. Study 1, using a sample of employed, married adults aged 25-74 (n = 1,166) from the National Survey of Midlife in the United States, showed that night work was associated with perceptions of greater marital instability,…

  3. LMX, Breach Perceptions, Work-Family Conflict, and Well-Being: A Mediational Model.

    PubMed

    Hill, Rachel T; Morganson, Valerie J; Matthews, Russell A; Atkinson, Theresa P

    2016-01-01

    Despite research advances, work-family scholars still lack an understanding of how leadership constructs relate to an employee's ability to effectively manage the work-family interface. In addition, there remains a need to examine the process through which leadership and work-family conflict influence well-being outcomes. Using a sample of 312 workers, a mediated process model grounded in social exchange theory is tested wherein the authors seek to explain how leaders shape employee perceptions, which, in turn, impact organizational fulfillment of expectations (i.e., psychological contract breach), work-family conflict, and well-being. A fully latent structural equation model was used to test study hypotheses, all of which were supported. Building on existing theory, findings suggest that the supervisor plays a critical role as a frontline representative for the organization and that work-family conflict is reduced and well-being enhanced through a process of social exchange between the supervisor and worker. PMID:25802949

  4. 20 CFR 234.34 - When an entitled relative of the employee dies before receiving payment of a due but unpaid annuity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... dies before receiving payment of a due but unpaid annuity. 234.34 Section 234.34 Employees' Benefits... Unpaid at Death § 234.34 When an entitled relative of the employee dies before receiving payment of a due... relationship to the employee, dies before negotiating the check in payment of the unpaid annuities, the...

  5. The cosmos of the Paris apartment: working-class family life in the nineteenth century.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Eliza

    2011-01-01

    Drawing on Bachelard's notion of “cosmicity” this article investigates the living conditions of Parisian working-class families in the second half of the nineteenth century. Nineteenth-century social critics claimed that the lack of privacy in urban apartments made decent family life impossible. However, evidence from judicial dossiers concerning attentat à la pudeur (intimate assault against children) illuminates the lived experience of children and their families in Paris apartments. Rather than a sharp divide between public and private, children experienced their apartment homes as the core of a social and spatial world under the surveillance of parents, neighbors, and other children. PMID:21158198

  6. Work-family conflicts and subsequent sleep medication among women and men: a longitudinal registry linkage study.

    PubMed

    Lallukka, T; Arber, S; Laaksonen, M; Lahelma, E; Partonen, T; Rahkonen, O

    2013-02-01

    Work and family are two key domains of life among working populations. Conflicts between paid work and family life can be detrimental to sleep and other health-related outcomes. This study examined longitudinally the influence of work-family conflicts on subsequent sleep medication. Questionnaire data were derived from the Helsinki Health Study mail surveys in 2001-2002 (2929 women, 793 men) of employees aged 40-60 years. Data concerning sleep medication were derived from the Finnish Social Insurance Institution's registers covering all prescribed medication from 1995 to 2007. Four items measured whether job responsibilities interfered with family life (work to family conflicts), and four items measured whether family responsibilities interfered with work (family to work conflicts). Cox proportional hazard models were fitted, adjusting for age, sleep medication five years before baseline, as well as various family- and work-related covariates. During a five-year follow-up, 17% of women and 10% of men had at least one purchase of prescribed sleep medication. Among women, family to work conflicts were associated with sleep medication over the following 5 years after adjustment for age and prior medication. The association remained largely unaffected after adjusting for family-related and work-related covariates. Work to family conflicts were also associated with subsequent sleep medication after adjustment for age and prior medication. The association attenuated after adjustment for work-related factors. No associations could be confirmed among men. Thus reasons for men's sleep medication likely emerge outside their work and family lives. Concerning individual items, strain-based ones showed stronger associations with sleep medication than more concrete time-based items. In conclusion, in particular family to work conflicts, but also work to family conflicts, are clear determinants of women's sleep medication. PMID:22721964

  7. Group Work with Adolescents: Principles and Practice. Second Edition. Social Work Practice with Children and Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malekoff, Andrew

    2006-01-01

    This popular text provides essential knowledge and skills for conducting creative, strengths-based group work with adolescents. A rich introduction to the field, enlivened by numerous illustrations from actual sessions, the book provides principles and guidelines for practice in a wide range of settings. The book covers all phases of group work,…

  8. Work and Family in the United States: A Policy Initiative. A Report of the Family Policy Panel of the Economic Policy Council of UNA-USA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Association of the United States of America, New York, NY.

    As part of its world employment project, the Economic Policy Council of the United Nations Association of the United States formed the family policy panel to further examine the extent of ongoing changes affecting the family, the workplace, and the economy. In its work, the family policy panel concentrated on five issues considered central to the…

  9. Work-family conflict, emotional exhaustion, and displaced aggression toward others: the moderating roles of workplace interpersonal conflict and perceived managerial family support.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yihao; Wang, Mo; Chang, Chu-Hsiang; Shi, Junqi; Zhou, Le; Shao, Ruodan

    2015-05-01

    Taking a resource-based self-regulation perspective, this study examined afternoon emotional exhaustion as a mediator linking the within-person relations between morning work-family conflict and later employee displaced aggression in the work and family domains. In addition, it examined resource-related contextual factors as moderators of these relations. The theoretical model was tested using daily diary data from 125 employees. Data were collected at 4 time points during each workday for 3 consecutive weeks. Multilevel modeling analysis showed that morning family-to-work conflict was positively related to afternoon emotional exhaustion, which in turn predicted displaced aggression toward supervisors and coworkers in the afternoon and displaced aggression toward family members in the evening. In addition, morning workplace interpersonal conflict exacerbated the impact of morning work-to-family conflict on afternoon emotional exhaustion, whereas perceived managerial family support alleviated the impact of morning family-to-work conflict on afternoon emotional exhaustion. These findings indicate the importance of adopting a self-regulation perspective to understand work-family conflict at work and its consequences (i.e., displaced aggression) in both work and family domains. PMID:25528246

  10. Family Planning for Low-Income African American Families: Contributions of Social Work Pioneer Ophelia Settle Egypt.

    PubMed

    Wells-Wilbon, Rhonda

    2015-10-01

    Historically, African Americans made huge contributions to the field of social welfare and the social work profession, yet little has been written about them in the professional literature. This article explores the contributions of pioneering social worker Ophelia Settle Egypt. A thorough assessment of her pioneering role would reveal her unique work as an educator, researcher, and grassroots social worker, but the focus here is on her innovative commitment to the Planned Parenthood movement. Egypt's work around population control in her Southeast Washington, DC, neighborhood with low-income African American families in the early 1950s became a labor of love in her community that can help inform current practice approaches in urban environments with African American populations. PMID:26489354

  11. The Relationship of Self-Esteem, Maternal Employment, and Work-Family Plans to Sex Role Orientations of Late Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keith, Pat M.

    1988-01-01

    Examined self-esteem, maternal employment, and work-family plans in relation to sex role orientations of 387 male and female late adolescents. Found future work-family plans closely tied to sex role orientations for both genders. Sons, but not daughters, of women in high-status occupations were reluctant to become involved in two-career family

  12. Family Home Childcare Providers: A Comparison of Subsidized and Non-Subsidized Working Environments and Employee Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shriner, Michael; Schlee, Bethanne M.; Mullis, Ronald L.; Cornille, Thomas A.; Mullis, Ann K.

    2008-01-01

    Federal and State Governments provide childcare subsidies for low-income working families. This study compares the encountered issues and working environments of family home providers of subsidized and non-subsidized childcare. Questionnaires were distributed throughout a southeastern state in the United States to 548 family home childcare…

  13. Faculty Work-Family Issues: Finding the Balance at a Liberal Arts College

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amador Kane, Suzanne

    2008-03-01

    The demands and expectations on science faculty at liberal arts colleges are in many ways distinct from those at research universities. While these differences can work in favor of easing work-family conflicts, there are also unique problems that faculty can confront in a setting of smaller departments and undergraduate-only institutions. I will discuss how these issues play out for junior and senior faculty, with an emphasis on how concrete policy changes can make the workplace a more family-friendly and supportive environment for all faculty, as well as making liberal arts colleges more attractive options for those seeking physics faculty jobs.

  14. The psychological well-being of disability caregivers: examining the roles of family strain, family-to-work conflict, and perceived supervisor support.

    PubMed

    Li, Andrew; Shaffer, Jonathan; Bagger, Jessica

    2015-01-01

    We draw on the cross-domain model of work-family conflict and conservation of resources theory to examine the relationship between disability caregiving demands and the psychological well-being of employed caregivers. Using a sample of employed disability caregivers from a national survey, we found that the relationship between caregiving demands and family-to-work conflict was stronger when employees experienced high levels of strain from family. Additionally, we found high levels of family to-work conflict were subsequently associated with decreases in life satisfaction and increases in depression, but only when perceived supervisor support was low. Overall, our findings suggest an indirect relationship between caregiving demands and psychological well-being that is mediated by family-to-work conflict and is conditional on family strain and perceived supervisor support. The theoretical and practical implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:25181282

  15. Managing work–family conflict in the medical profession: working conditions and individual resources as related factors

    PubMed Central

    Mache, Stefanie; Bernburg, Monika; Vitzthum, Karin; Groneberg, David A; Klapp, Burghard F; Danzer, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This study developed and tested a research model that examined the effects of working conditions and individual resources on work–family conflict (WFC) using data collected from physicians working at German clinics. Material and methods This is a cross-sectional study of 727 physicians working in German hospitals. The work environment, WFC and individual resources were measured by the Copenhagen Psychosocial Questionnaire, the WFC Scale, the Brief Resilient Coping Scale and the Questionnaire for Self-efficacy, Optimism and Pessimism. Descriptive, correlation and linear regression analyses were applied. Results Clinical doctors working in German hospitals perceived high levels of WFC (mean=76). Sociodemographic differences were found for age, marital status and presence of children with regard to WFC. No significant gender differences were found. WFCs were positively related to high workloads and quantitative job demands. Job resources (eg, influence at work, social support) and personal resources (eg, resilient coping behaviour and self-efficacy) were negatively associated with physicians’ WFCs. Interaction terms suggest that job and personal resources buffer the effects of job demands on WFC. Conclusions In this study, WFC was prevalent among German clinicians. Factors of work organisation as well as factors of interpersonal relations at work were identified as significant predictors for WFC. Our results give a strong indication that both individual and organisational factors are related to WFC. Results may play an important role in optimising clinical care. Practical implications for physicians’ career planning and recommendations for future research are discussed. PMID:25941177

  16. 29 CFR 1400.735-12 - Outside employment, business activities, or interests (paid or unpaid).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Outside employment, business activities, or interests (paid... and Other Conduct and Responsibilities § 1400.735-12 Outside employment, business activities, or interests (paid or unpaid). (a) Outside employment. (1) An employee shall not engage in outside...

  17. What Contributes to the (Im)Balanced Division of Family Work Between the Sexes?

    PubMed Central

    Lothaller, Harald; Mikula, Gerold; Schoebi, Dominik

    2011-01-01

    This study examines a comprehensive set of variables that have been proposed as explaining the imbalance of the division of family work between the sexes. The analyses use survey data of 735 dual-earner couples from Austria, the Netherlands, and Portugal. The results support theoretical explanations referring to time availability, gender ideology, relative resources, and the importance of characteristics of the family system. No support was obtained for the doing-gender perspective. Additional findings suggest that increased consideration of psychological concepts adds to the understanding of why women do more family work than men. The analyses revealed similarities, but also differences between the factors that contribute to the division of household labor and childcare. PMID:22318972

  18. Work Experience Guidance for Managers

    E-print Network

    Work Experience Guidance for Managers When approached with a request for work experience, managers any work, paid or unpaid: Before 7am or after 7pm For more than two hours on a school day or Sunday, they must have a two week break from any work during the school holiday For those aged between 16 and 17

  19. Can naloxone prescription and overdose training for opioid users work in family practice?

    PubMed Central

    Leece, Pamela; Orkin, Aaron; Shahin, Rita; Steele, Leah S.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To explore family physicians’ attitudes toward prescribing naloxone to at-risk opioid users, as well as to determine the opportunities and challenges for expanding naloxone access to patients in family practice settings. Design One-hour focus group session and SWOT (strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats) analysis. Setting Workshop held at the 2012 Family Medicine Forum in Toronto, Ont. Participants Seventeen conference attendees from 3 Canadian cities who practised in various family practice settings and who agreed to participate in the workshop. Methods The workshop included an overview of information about naloxone distribution and overdose education programs, followed by group discussion in smaller focus groups. Participants were instructed to focus their discussion on the question, “Could this [overdose education and naloxone prescription] work in your practice?” and to record notes using a standardized discussion guide based on a SWOT analysis. Two investigators reviewed the forms, extracting themes using an open coding process. Main findings Some participants believed that naloxone could be used safely among family practice patients, that the intervention fit well with their clinical practice settings, and that its use in family practice could enhance engagement with at-risk individuals and create an opportunity to educate patients, providers, and the public about overdose. Participants also indicated that the current guidelines and support systems for prescribing or administering naloxone were inadequate, that medicolegal uncertainties existed for those who prescribed or administered naloxone, and that high-quality evidence about the intervention’s effectiveness in family practice was lacking. Conclusion Family physicians believe that overdose education and naloxone prescription might provide patients at risk of opioid overdose in their practices with broad access to a potentially lifesaving intervention. However, they explain that there are key barriers currently limiting widespread implementation of naloxone use in family practice settings.

  20. Standard Work Specifications for Single-Family Home Energy Upgrades Summary (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2012-11-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and numerous industry stakeholders developed the Standard Work Specifications for Single-Family Home Energy Upgrades to define the minimum requirements for high-quality residential energy upgrades. Today, the Standard Work Specifications provide a unique source for defining high-quality home energy upgrades, establishing clear expectations for homeowners, contractors, trainers, workers, program administrators, and organizations that provide financing for energy upgrades.

  1. Indigenous Women College Students' Perspectives on College, Work, and Family

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bingham, Jennie L.; Adolpho, Quintina Bearchief; Jackson, Aaron P.; Alexitch, Louise R.

    2014-01-01

    Native American and First Nations (herein collectively referred to as Indigenous) women college students are faced with the challenge of balancing their cultural imperatives and the demands of the dominant Western culture in family, school, and work/employment roles. In order to explore these women's experiences and perspectives, this study…

  2. 7 CFR Exhibit K to Subpart A of... - Classifications for Multi-Family Residential Rehabilitation Work

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 12 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Classifications for Multi-Family Residential Rehabilitation Work K Exhibit K to Subpart A of Part 1924 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of... Planning and Performing Construction and Other Development Pt. 1924, Subpt. A, Exh. K Exhibit K to...

  3. 7 CFR Exhibit K to Subpart A of... - Classifications for Multi-Family Residential Rehabilitation Work

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 12 2014-01-01 2013-01-01 true Classifications for Multi-Family Residential Rehabilitation Work K Exhibit K to Subpart A of Part 1924 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of... Planning and Performing Construction and Other Development Pt. 1924, Subpt. A, Exh. K Exhibit K to...

  4. When Work Enriches Family-Life: The Mediational Role of Professional Development Opportunities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molino, Monica; Ghislieri, Chiara; Cortese, Claudio G.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Several studies have pointed out the importance of work-family enrichment (WFE) for individuals' well-being and organizations and for this reason, it seems important to understand how organizations may promote it. This study attempts to understand the role of organizational resources and, particularly, of opportunities for professional…

  5. [The suffering of professionals working at home with families with multiple problems].

    PubMed

    Lamour, Martine; Barraco-De Pinto, Marthe

    2015-01-01

    The management of families with multiple problems often adversely affects the many people involved in their case. This suffering at work affects particularly professionals carrying out home visits. Acknowledging this suffering, enabling these professionals to express and give meaning to their feelings is essential in order to enable them to draw on their skills and creativity. PMID:26145299

  6. Group Supervision: Supporting Practitioners in Their Work with Children and Families in Children's Centres

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soni, Anita

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses how group supervision can be used to support the Continuing Professional Development (CPD) of those working with children and families in early years provision in England. It is based on research conducted in 2008 with a cluster of four Children's Centres in the West Midlands in England, UK. The research evaluated group…

  7. Resilience across Contexts: Family, Work, Culture, and Community. Recommendations from a National Invitational Conference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, Sue, Ed.; Sullivan, Robert, Ed.

    1998-01-01

    In this issue of the "CEIC Review," commissioned papers for a national invitational conference on student resilience developed across contexts of family, work, culture, and community are summarized. The concept of resilience-promoting interventions has emerged from research and indicates that some children survive adversity without lasting damage.…

  8. Work-Family Enrichment and Conflict: Additive Effects, Buffering, or Balance?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gareis, Karen C.; Barnett, Rosalind Chait; Ertel, Karen A.; Berkman, Lisa F.

    2009-01-01

    We used data from the Midlife Development in the United States (MIDUS I) (N = 2,031) to compare three models of how work-family conflict and enrichment might operate to predict well-being (mental health, life satisfaction, affect balance, partner relationship quality). We found no support for a relative-difference model in which the…

  9. AdvoCasey: Documenting Programs That Work for Kids and Families, 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Douglas W.; Rust, Bill; Hinds, Michael DeCourcy

    2000-01-01

    This publication includes five articles on health care and health promotion within impoverished communities. "The Health of Families and Communities" (Douglas W. Nelson) introduces the issue, discussing the work of the Annie E. Casey Foundation in communities. "Inconspicuous Consumption: Treating Latent TB Infection in Seattle" (Bill Rust) reports…

  10. The Impact of Role Modeling on Proteges' Personal Learning and Work-to-Family Enrichment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kwan, Ho Kwong; Mao, Yina; Zhang, Haina

    2010-01-01

    The present study investigates the impact of role modeling as perceived by proteges on their personal learning (i.e., relational job learning and personal skill development) and work-to-family enrichment (WFE). Results from a two-wave field survey of 173 proteges in the People's Republic of China indicate that role modeling positively affects…

  11. 7 CFR Exhibit K to Subpart A of... - Classifications for Multi-Family Residential Rehabilitation Work

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 12 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Classifications for Multi-Family Residential Rehabilitation Work K Exhibit K to Subpart A of Part 1924 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of... Planning and Performing Construction and Other Development Pt. 1924, Subpt. A, Exh. K Exhibit K to...

  12. 7 CFR Exhibit K to Subpart A of... - Classifications for Multi-Family Residential Rehabilitation Work

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 12 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Classifications for Multi-Family Residential Rehabilitation Work K Exhibit K to Subpart A of Part 1924 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of... Planning and Performing Construction and Other Development Pt. 1924, Subpt. A, Exh. K Exhibit K to...

  13. Education and Work-Family Conflict: Explanations, Contingencies and Mental Health Consequences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schieman, Scott; Glavin, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Using data from a representative sample of American workers, we examine the association between education and work-to-family conflict--a form of inter-role conflict in which role pressures from each domain are incompatible in some way. The well-educated tend to occupy professional jobs with more income and pressures, and experience more…

  14. Participants' Experiences in Hellinger's Family Constellation Work: A Grounded Theory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgiadou, Sofia

    2012-01-01

    As a recently introduced to the U.S. model of intergenerational systemic therapy from Germany, Bert Hellinger's Family Constellation Work (FCW) has very limited research support. Hellinger himself has authored a number of publications referencing hundreds of cases, where he implemented his method to approach a broad array of physical,…

  15. Job Adequacy and Work-Family Balance: Looking at Jobs as a Whole

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bass, Brenda L.; Grzywacz, Joseph G.

    2011-01-01

    Using an ecological person-process-context model and recent conceptualization of the "employment continuum," this study examines differences in components of work-family balance among individuals in diverse types of jobs ranging from "inadequate" to "optimal." Cross-sectional data from the 1997 National Study of the Changing Workforce (n = 2,877)…

  16. Work-Family Conflict, Job Satisfaction and Labour Turnover Intentions among State University Lecturers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oredein, Afolakemi Olasumbo; Alao, Foluso Toyin

    2010-01-01

    Examining the extent at which work-family conflict and job satisfaction could predict the labour turnover intentions among lecturers, Olabisi Onabanjo University, Nigeria, as a case study, is the purpose of this study. 229 (95%) respondents out of 240 returned their copies of the questionnaire for data analysis. The results reveal that there was a…

  17. Time with Children, Children's Well-Being, and Work-Family Balance among Employed Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milkie, Melissa A.; Kendig, Sarah M.; Nomaguchi, Kei M.; Denny, Kathleen E.

    2010-01-01

    Cultural imperatives for "good" parenting include spending time with children and ensuring that they do well in life. Knowledge of how these factors influence employed parents' work-family balance is limited. Analyses using time diary and survey data from the 2000 National Survey of Parents (N = 933) indicate that how time with children relates to…

  18. Child Care Assistance: Helping Families Work. Annual Report, 2001-2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greater Minneapolis Day Care Association, MN.

    This annual report of the Greater Minneapolis Day Care Association (GMDCA) details the accomplishments of the organization for 2001-2002. The report begins with a letter from the executive director focusing on need to continue funding for the Basic Sliding Fee Child-Care Assistance program to help low- and moderate-income working families. The…

  19. Learning from Sure Start: Working with Young Children and Their Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinberger, Jo, Ed.; Pickstone, Caroline, Ed.; Hannon, Peter, Ed.

    2005-01-01

    The book comes out of a University research project that has worked closely with one local programme over five years from its beginning. Sure Start is a national government initiative that targets families with children aged up to the age of four in areas of social and economic disadvantage, to promote development so children are ready to thrive…

  20. The Willingness-to-Pay for Work/Family Policies: A Study of Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drago, Robert; Costanza, David; Caplan, Robert; Brubaker, Tanya; Cloud, Darnell; Harris, Naomi; Kashian, Russell; Riggs, T. Lynn

    2001-01-01

    A contingent valuation study of 343 elementary teachers identified circumstances in which they would be willing to provide, through payroll deductions, certain work-family policies/programs. Even those with little or no likelihood of using the programs exhibited willingness to pay for some of them. (SK)

  1. Whose Time Is It? The Effect of Employment and Work/Family Stress on Children's Housework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gager, Constance T.; Sanchez, Laura A.; Demaris, Alfred

    2009-01-01

    Children's time use--and specifically the time they spend on household chores--is an important arena for understanding social change. However, few studies accurately depict the multiple factors influencing children's household labor, including parent's and children's available time and parent's levels of work/family stress. We address these gaps…

  2. 77 FR 19008 - Guidelines for Home Energy Professionals: Standard Work Specifications for Single Family Energy...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-29

    ... of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Guidelines for Home Energy Professionals: Standard Work Specifications for Single Family Energy Upgrades AGENCY: Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, U.S.... Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) requests comments on......

  3. 77 FR 23238 - Guidelines for Home Energy Professionals: Standard Work Specifications for Single Family Energy...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-18

    ... of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Guidelines for Home Energy Professionals: Standard Work Specifications for Single Family Energy Upgrades AGENCY: Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, U.S... March 29, 2012. 77 FR 19008. A number of commenters indicated that because of the extent of changes...

  4. Examining Work and Family Conflict among Female Bankers in Accra Metropolis, Ghana

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kissi-Abrokwah, Bernard; Andoh-Robertson, Theophilus; Tutu-Danquah, Cecilia; Agbesi, Catherine Selorm

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the effects and solutions of work and family conflict among female bankers in Accra Metropolis. Using triangulatory mixed method design, a structured questionnaire was randomly administered to 300 female bankers and 15 female Bankers who were interviewed were also sampled by using convenient sampling technique. The…

  5. Focus Groups with Working Parents of School-Aged Children: What's Needed to Improve Family Meals?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fulkerson, Jayne A.; Kubik, Martha Y.; Rydell, Sarah; Boutelle, Kerri N.; Garwick, Ann; Story, Mary; Neumark-Sztainer, Dianne; Dudovitz, Bonnie

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To conduct focus groups to identify parents' perceptions of barriers to family meals and elucidate ideas to guide the development of interventions to overcome barriers. Methods: Focus groups were conducted with a convenience sample of 27 working parents in urban community settings. Results: Parents reported enjoying the sharing/bonding…

  6. Women Administrators Negotiate Work-Family Conflicts in Changing Times: An Intergenerational Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loder, Tondra L.

    2005-01-01

    Background: Concerns about work-family conflicts are becoming an increasing problem for women administrators. Yet these concerns have been overshadowed in the educational leadership scholarship, which has focused on barriers related to discrimination in hiring and promotion and lack of sponsoring and mentoring. Purpose: To illuminate differences…

  7. Emerging Adults in Sweden: Identity Formation in the Light of Love, Work, and Family

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frisen, Ann; Wangqvist, Maria

    2011-01-01

    In this study, the identity formation of emerging adults in Sweden was investigated in order to discover how identity issues concerning love, work and family are handled. The study group comprised 136 24- to 26-year-olds. The results revealed differences between men and women with regard to their position in the identity formation process. While…

  8. Change in Work-Family Conflict among Employed Parents between 1977 and 1997

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nomaguchi, Kei M.

    2009-01-01

    Using data from two national surveys (N = 2,050), this paper examines what accounts for the increase in the sense of work-family conflict among employed parents between 1977 and 1997. Decomposition analysis indicates that the increases in women's labor force participation, college education, time pressure in completing one's job, and the decline…

  9. Work and Family Roles of Women in Ho Chi Minh City

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phuong, Tran Phi

    2007-01-01

    This study aims to point out the differences between the North and the South of Vietnam, more particularly, Saigon and Hanoi, in terms of family and work roles of women. It helps to explain the ways women in Ho Chi Minh City reconstruct their reproduction role, the attitudes of Southern husbands towards household tasks and the husband-wife…

  10. Nonstandard Schedules and Young Children's Behavioral Outcomes among Working Low-Income Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joshi, Pamela; Bogen, Karen

    2007-01-01

    This article focuses on how maternal employment in nonstandard schedules at night, on the weekends, or that rotate on a weekly basis influence preschoolers' behavioral outcomes. Examining low-income working mothers and their children aged 2-4 years from the Welfare, Children, and Families: A Three-City Study (N = 206), we find that maternal…

  11. Developing Cross-Cultural Competence: A Guide for Working with Children and Their Families. Fourth Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, Eleanor W., Ed.; Hanson, Marci J., Ed.

    2011-01-01

    As the U.S. population grows more and more diverse, how can professionals who work with young children and families deliver the best services while honoring different customs, beliefs, and values? The answers are in the fourth edition of this bestselling textbook, fully revised to reflect nearly a decade of population changes and best practices in…

  12. Do positive affectivity and boundary preferences matter for work-family enrichment? A study of human service workers.

    PubMed

    McNall, Laurel A; Scott, Lindsay D; Nicklin, Jessica M

    2015-01-01

    More individuals than ever are managing work and family roles, but relatively little research has been done exploring whether boundary preferences help individuals benefit from multiple role memberships. Drawing on Greenhaus and Powell's (2006) work-family enrichment theory, along with Boundary Theory (Ashforth, Kreiner, & Fugate, 2000) and Conservation of Resources Theory (Hobfoll, 2002), we explore the impact of personal characteristics as enablers of work-family enrichment, and in turn, work outcomes relevant to human service workers: turnover intentions and emotional exhaustion. In a 2-wave study of 161 human service employees, we found that individuals high in positive affectivity were more likely to experience both work-to-family and family to-work enrichment, whereas those with preferences toward integration were more likely to experience work-to-family enrichment (but not family to-work enrichment). In turn, work-to-family enrichment (but not family to-work enrichment) was related to lower turnover intentions and emotional exhaustion. Enrichment served as a mediating mechanism for only some of the hypothesized relationships. Implications for theory and practice are discussed. PMID:25347683

  13. The Impact of Fathers' Work and Family Conflicts on Children's Self-Esteem: The Hong Kong Case

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lau, Yuk King

    2010-01-01

    Work and family conflicts are always viewed as issues of human resource management or occupational health. Insufficient attention has been focused on the impact on child development and quality of parenting, especially regarding the impact of a father's work. To examine the impact of work and family conflicts on the quality of father-child…

  14. "They Talked as Industriously as They Worked": Reforming the Family and its Labor in Louisa May Alcott's Work: A Story of Experience

    E-print Network

    Isaac, Jessica A.

    2009-04-27

    As my title suggests, this project examines Alcott's vision of the family in Work (1873). Her characters do indeed "talk as industriously as they work" as a means of creating the circumstances necessary for the achievement ...

  15. What matters for working fathers? Job characteristics, work-family conflict and enrichment, and fathers' postpartum mental health in an Australian cohort.

    PubMed

    Cooklin, Amanda R; Giallo, Rebecca; Strazdins, Lyndall; Martin, Angela; Leach, Liana S; Nicholson, Jan M

    2015-12-01

    One in ten fathers experience mental health difficulties in the first year postpartum. Unsupportive job conditions that exacerbate work-family conflict are a potential risk to fathers' mental health given that most new fathers (95%) combine parenting with paid work. However, few studies have examined work-family conflict and mental health for postpartum fathers specifically. The aim of the present study was to identify the particular work characteristics (e.g., work hours per week, job quality) associated with work-family conflict and enrichment, and fathers' mental health in the postpartum period. Survey data from 3243 fathers of infants (aged 6-12 months) participating in the Longitudinal Study of Australian Children were analysed via path analysis, considering key confounders (age, education, income, maternal employment, maternal mental health and relationship quality). Long and inflexible work hours, night shift, job insecurity, a lack of autonomy and more children in the household were associated with increased work-family conflict, and this was in turn associated with increased distress. Job security, autonomy, and being in a more prestigious occupation were positively associated with work-family enrichment and better mental health. These findings from a nationally representative sample of Australian fathers contribute novel evidence that employment characteristics, via work-family conflict and work-family enrichment, are key determinants of fathers' postnatal mental health, independent from established risk factors. Findings will inform the provision of specific 'family-friendly' conditions protective for fathers during this critical stage in the family life-cycle, with implications for their wellbeing and that of their families. PMID:26520473

  16. Conflict between work and family roles and satisfaction among nurses in different shift systems in Croatia: a questionnaire survey.

    PubMed

    Simuni?, Ana; Gregov, Ljiljana

    2012-06-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the perception of conflict between work and family roles and job, family, and life satisfaction among nurses in Croatia. One hundred and twenty-nine nurses (married mothers) working in hospitals in Zadar, Šibenik, and Split were divided in four groups according to their worktime schedule. The participants completed a survey, which included a set of sociodemographic-type questions, questions about the level and allocation of family responsibilities between spouses, and scales measuring the perceived negative effects of worktime, psychological demands of the work, work-family conflict, and semantic differential scales for measuring the affective and cognitive-evaluative component of job, family, and life satisfaction. This was the first study in Croatia to deal with work-family conflict among nurses or workers with different shift systems.The results of this study indicate that nurses working morning shifts only experienced less conflict between work and family than other groups of nurses, who worked the morning, afternoon, and the night shift. The cognitive-evaluative component of job satisfaction was the highest among morning shift nurses and the lowest in nurses who worked 12-hour shifts, while the affective component of life satisfaction was the lowest in nurses working irregular and backward rotated shifts. These results confirm that shiftwork makes the work-family role conflict even worse. They also support the view that the type of shift rotation matters. PMID:22728801

  17. Male Scientists’ Competing Devotions to Work and Family: Changing Norms in a Male-Dominated Profession

    PubMed Central

    Damaske, Sarah; Ecklund, Elaine Howard; Lincoln, Anne E.; White, Virginia Johnston

    2014-01-01

    Using in-depth interviews with 74 men across different ranks in biology and physics at prestigious US universities, we ask to what extent changing norms of fatherhood and a flexible workplace affect men working in a highly male-dominated profession and what variation exists in family forms. We conceptualize four typologies of men: those forgoing children, egalitarian partners, neo-traditional dual-earners, and traditional breadwinners. Findings suggest male scientists hold strong work devotions yet a growing number seek egalitarian relationships, which they frame as reducing their devotion to work. The majority of men find the all-consuming nature of academic science conflicts with changing fatherhood norms. PMID:25419040

  18. "The Changers and the Changed": Preparing Early Childhood Teachers to Work with Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kintner-Duffy, Victoria L.; Vardell, Rosemarie; Lower, Joanna K.; Cassidy, Deborah J.

    2012-01-01

    The Census Bureau estimates that up to 14 million children under the age of 18 are being raised by lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender (LGBT) families. Just as heterosexual families require child care to enable work and want high-quality early childhood education to enhance their children's development, LGBT families experience the same needs…

  19. An Investigation into the Inter-relationship among Work, Family and Part-time Education in Hong Kong.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hung, Humphry; Mondejar, Reuben

    2001-01-01

    A study of 459 part-time graduate and undergraduate students with full-time jobs in Hong Kong found that support of employers and families had a significant relationship with perceived job performance and satisfaction with family and work life. Academic performance was not significantly correlated with perceived employer and family support.…

  20. Work or family or both? Value trajectories and their prediction over ten years.

    PubMed

    Tschopp, Cécile; Keller, Anita C; Stalder, Barbara E

    2015-07-01

    Previous studies have shown that values are developed during young adulthood. This study investigated whether and when developmental trajectories of values depend on gender, language region, cognitive competence, expected education duration, and ambition. Longitudinal data of 2620 adolescents in Switzerland were collected at eight waves of measurement over 10 years. Latent growth model analysis revealed that work values mainly increase between ages 16 and 20, whereas family values primarily increase after age 20. This pattern fits the major life and career roles sequence: Becoming established in one's career comes first, and focusing on family building follows later. The initial levels and development of values were essentially affected by gender, but other individual factors such as cognitive competence, expected education duration, and ambition also showed some effect, particularly on family values. These new insights into the development of values improve the understanding of the career decisions and career behavior of adolescents. PMID:25899131

  1. Rewarding the work of individuals: a counterintuitive approach to reducing poverty and strengthening families.

    PubMed

    Berlin, Gordon L

    2007-01-01

    Gordon Berlin discusses the nation's long struggle to reduce poverty in families with children, and proposes a counterintuitive solution--rewarding the work of individuals.He notes that policymakers' difficulty in reducing family poverty since 1973 is attributable to two intertwined problems--falling wages among low-skilled workers and the striking increase in children living with a lone parent, usually the mother. As the wages of men with a high school education or less began to decline, their employment rates did likewise. The share of men who could support a family above the poverty line thus began to decline--and with it the willingness of low-income women to marry the fathers of their children. Because the U.S. social welfare system is built around the needs of poor families with children--and largely excludes single adults who are poor (and disproportionately male)--it creates disincentives to work and marry for some families, aggravating these larger trends. Berlin proposes a new policy that would partially overcome the low wages and income of poorly educated males and second earners in two-parent households by using the earned income tax credit (EITC) to supplement the earnings of all low-wage workers aged twenty-one to fifty-four who work full time--regardless of whether they have children or whether they are married. By conditioning the benefit on full-time work and by retaining the existing family-based EITC program while treating EITC payments as individual income rather than as joint income for income tax purposes, the policy would restore equity to the American social compact without distorting incentives to work, marry, and bear children. The largest benefits by far would accrue to two-parent households in which both adults can work full time. Because the policy would carry a large price tag--nearly $30 billion a year when fully implemented--Berlin says that a prudent next step would be to test this strategy rigorously in several states over several years, preferably using a random assignment design. PMID:17902259

  2. Module 2: Surveying the "Best of the Best"--A Seminar Based on Research Articles Nominated for the Rosabeth Moss Kanter Award for Work-Family Research. Work-Family Curriculum Guide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kossek, Ellen Ernst; Leana, Carrie; MacDermid, Shelley; Pitt-Catsouphes, Marcie; Raskin, Patricia; Secret, Mary; Sweet, Stephen

    2006-01-01

    This module offers students opportunities to examine the theories and research associated with a range of different disciplines that focus on relationships between family life and work life. The module is organized around articles that have been nominated for the Rosabeth Moss Kanter Award for Work-Family Research. This award process identifies…

  3. Women at the top: powerful leaders define success as work + family in a culture of gender.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Fanny M; Halpern, Diane F

    2010-04-01

    How do women rise to the top of their professions when they also have significant family care responsibilities? This critical question has not been addressed by existing models of leadership. In a review of recent research, we explore an alternative model to the usual notion of a Western male as the prototypical leader. The model includes (a) relationship-oriented leadership traits, (b) the importance of teamwork and consensus building, and (c) an effective work-family interface that women with family care responsibilities create and use to break through the glass ceiling. We adopted a cross-cultural perspective to highlight the importance of relational orientation and work-family integration in collectivistic cultures, which supplements models of leadership based on Western men. Our expanded model of leadership operates in the context of a "culture of gender" that defines expectations for women and men as leaders. This complex model includes women in diverse global contexts and enriches our understanding of the interplay among personal attributes, processes, and environments in leadership. PMID:20350017

  4. An Integrative, Multilevel, and Transdisciplinary Research Approach to Challenges of Work, Family, and Health

    PubMed Central

    Bray, Jeremy W.; Kelly, Erin L.; Hammer, Leslie B.; Almeida, David M.; Dearing, James W.; King, Rosalind B.; Buxton, Orfeu M.

    2013-01-01

    Recognizing a need for rigorous, experimental research to support the efforts of workplaces and policymakers in improving the health and wellbeing of employees and their families, the National Institutes of Health and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention formed the Work, Family & Health Network (WFHN). The WFHN is implementing an innovative multisite study with a rigorous experimental design (adaptive randomization, control groups), comprehensive multilevel measures, a novel and theoretically based intervention targeting the psychosocial work environment, and translational activities. This paper describes challenges and benefits of designing a multilevel and transdisciplinary research network that includes an effectiveness study to assess intervention effects on employees, families, and managers; a daily diary study to examine effects on family functioning and daily stress; a process study to understand intervention implementation; and translational research to understand and inform diffusion of innovation. Challenges were both conceptual and logistical, spanning all aspects of study design and implementation. In dealing with these challenges, however, the WFHN developed innovative, transdisciplinary, multi-method approaches to conducting workplace research that will benefit both the research and business communities. PMID:24618878

  5. An Integrative, Multilevel, and Transdisciplinary Research Approach to Challenges of Work, Family, and Health.

    PubMed

    Bray, Jeremy W; Kelly, Erin L; Hammer, Leslie B; Almeida, David M; Dearing, James W; King, Rosalind B; Buxton, Orfeu M

    2013-03-01

    Recognizing a need for rigorous, experimental research to support the efforts of workplaces and policymakers in improving the health and wellbeing of employees and their families, the National Institutes of Health and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention formed the Work, Family & Health Network (WFHN). The WFHN is implementing an innovative multisite study with a rigorous experimental design (adaptive randomization, control groups), comprehensive multilevel measures, a novel and theoretically based intervention targeting the psychosocial work environment, and translational activities. This paper describes challenges and benefits of designing a multilevel and transdisciplinary research network that includes an effectiveness study to assess intervention effects on employees, families, and managers; a daily diary study to examine effects on family functioning and daily stress; a process study to understand intervention implementation; and translational research to understand and inform diffusion of innovation. Challenges were both conceptual and logistical, spanning all aspects of study design and implementation. In dealing with these challenges, however, the WFHN developed innovative, transdisciplinary, multi-method approaches to conducting workplace research that will benefit both the research and business communities. PMID:24618878

  6. Opening doors: factors influencing the establishment of a working relationship between paraprofessional home visitors and at-risk families.

    PubMed

    Jack, Susan; DiCenso, Alba; Lohfeld, Lynne

    2002-12-01

    The purpose of this phenomenological study was to identify and describe factors that influence the establishment of a working relationship between paraprofessionals and at-risk families. In-depth, semi-structured interviews were conducted with a purposive sample of 6 family visitors and 6 public health nurses hired to visit at-risk families in their homes. Analysis revealed that nurses have an important role to play in marketing home visiting programs and facilitating family visitor access to the home. Factors related to the family visitor, the client, and the client's household influenced relationship development. Family visitor-client engagement occurred through "finding common ground" and "building trust." Increased understanding of these factors will help both nurses and family visitors to access those families who are hard to reach and resist support and the provision of services. The findings have implications for nurses who are responsible for hiring, training, and supervising family visitors. PMID:12619478

  7. Work in America: Implications for Families. Hearing before the Select Committee on Children, Youth, and Families. House of Representatives, Ninety-Ninth Congress, Second Session.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Select Committee on Children, Youth, and Families.

    This hearing explored the value of work, and how changes in the economy and the composition of the work force have affected families. Witnesses (1) reported data on such topics as the kinds of jobs currently available, women's participation in the work force, unemployment, and labor force growth over the next decade; (2) argued that the economy is…

  8. [Interprofessional collaboration in the Family Health Strategy: implications for the provision of care and work management].

    PubMed

    Matuda, Caroline Guinoza; Pinto, Nicanor Rodrigues da Silva; Martins, Cleide Lavieri; Frazão, Paulo

    2015-08-01

    Interprofessional collaboration is seen as a resource for tackling model of care and workforce problems. The scope of this study was to understand the perception about the shared work and interprofessional collaboration of professionals who work in primary health care. A qualitative study was conducted in São Paulo city. In-depth interviews were performed with professionals from distinct categories who worked in the Family Health Strategy and Support Center for Family Health. The results highlighted the empirical 'professional interaction' and 'production goals' categories. The forms of interaction, the role of specialized matrix support and the perspective in which production goals are perceived by the professionals pointed to tensions between traditional professional logic and collaboration logic. It also revealed the tensions between a model based on specialized procedures and a more collaborative model centered on health needs of families and of the community. The sharing of responsibilities and practices, changes in the logic of patient referral to specialized services and inadequate organizational arrangements remain major challenges to the integration of interprofessional collaboration for the development of new care practices. PMID:26221816

  9. Factor Structure and Psychometric Properties of the Work-Family Balance Scale in an Urban Chinese Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Huiping; Yip, Paul S. F.; Chi, Peilian; Chan, Kinsun; Cheung, Yee Tak; Zhang, Xiulan

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the factor structure of the Work-Family Balance Scale (WFBS) and examine its reliability and validity in use in the urban Chinese population. The scale was validated using a sample of 605 urban Chinese residents from 7 cities. Exploratory factor analysis identified two factors: work-family conflict and…

  10. Construct Validation of the Translated Version of the Work-Family Conflict Scale for Use in Korea

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lim, Doo Hun; Morris, Michael Lane; McMillan, Heather S.

    2011-01-01

    Recently, the stress of work-family conflict has been a critical workplace issue for Asian countries, especially within those cultures experiencing rapid economic development. Our research purpose is to translate and establish construct validity of a Korean-language version of the Multi-Dimensional Work-Family Conflict (WFC) scale used in the U.S.…

  11. Module 3: Workplace Policy, Practice and Culture--Employer and Employee Perspectives. Work-Family Curriculum Guide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kossek, Ellen Ernst; Leana, Carrie; MacDermid, Shelley; Pitt-Catsouphes, Marcie; Raskin, Patricia; Secret, Mary; Sweet, Stephen

    2006-01-01

    The contents of this module have been prepared to address some of challenges associated with teaching about work-family issues from a human resource management and employment perspective. The goals of this module are: (1) To develop an understanding that work-family policies are part of a human resource management system and the employment…

  12. Work Characteristics and Fathers’ Vocabulary to Infants in African American Families

    PubMed Central

    Pancsofar, Nadya; Vernon-Feagans, Lynne; Odom, Erika C.

    2012-01-01

    Fathers’ vocabulary to infants has been linked in the literature to early child language development, however, little is known about the variability in fathers’ language behavior. This study considered associations between fathers’ work characteristics and fathers’ vocabulary among a sample of employed African American fathers of 6-month old infants who were living in low-income rural communities. After controlling for family and individual factors, we found that fathers who worked nonstandard shifts and reported more job flexibility used more diverse vocabulary with their infants. PMID:23483822

  13. The unpaid donation of blood and altruism: a comment on Keown.

    PubMed Central

    McLachlan, H V

    1998-01-01

    In line with article 3.4 of EC directive 89/381, Keown has presented an ethical case in support of the policy of voluntary, unpaid donation of blood. Although no doubt is cast on the desirability of the policy, that part of Keown's argument which pertains to the suggested laudability of altruism and of its encouragment by social policy is examined and shown to be dubious. PMID:9752628

  14. Going Back Part-time: Family Leave Legislation and Women’s Return to Work

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Using a multinomial logit model with data from the Survey of Income and Program Participation, this paper tests whether the implementation of the Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) is associated with an increase in return to work at part-time status among first-time mothers working full-time during their pregnancy. I find a statistically significant trend of increasingly higher odds of returning to work at part-time status relative to return at full-time status, beginning in 1993 (the year in which the FMLA is implemented). Furthermore, an additional week of either state or federal leave is significantly associated with a higher odds of return at part-time status. This article provides evidence that job protection and leave legislation may help facilitate higher levels of labor force participation among women with small children, through more flexible work arrangements. PMID:22685365

  15. The Growing Costs and Burden of Family Caregiving of Older Adults: A Review of Paid Sick Leave and Family Leave Policies.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mei-Lan

    2014-10-21

    Many family caregivers of older adults suffer from a high burden of care and struggle with the balance of jobs and caregiving tasks. However, the United States is the only developed country without paid sick leave policies for all workers and their families. The purpose of this article is to review the federal Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) and empirical studies about paid sick policy, propose policy recommendations, and provide a starting point for future research. The result has shown that the FMLA only applies to certain employees and the provided leave is unpaid under the act. Working women, Latinos, low-wage workers, and less-educated employees are less likely to access paid sick leave and family leave. Obviously, social injustice exists in the FMLA and paid sick leave policies. This article proposes that the Family and Medical Leave Act coverage should be expanded to protect all workers, especially for primary family caregivers of older adults, regardless of family relationships. Also, paid sick and family leave laws should be passed, and requirements to contribute to a family-friendly workplace added to relieve the growing burden of family caregiving of older adults. Policy recommendations including the exemplar of the San Francisco Paid Sick Leave Ordinance, and suggestions for more comprehensive policies are proposed for federal, state, or/and city legislation. PMID:25335873

  16. Understanding resilience in same-sex parented families: the work, love, play study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background While families headed by same-sex couples have achieved greater public visibility in recent years, there are still many challenges for these families in dealing with legal and community contexts that are not supportive of same-sex relationships. The Work, Love, Play study is a large longitudinal study of same-sex parents. It aims to investigate many facets of family life among this sample and examine how they change over time. The study focuses specifically on two key areas missing from the current literature: factors supporting resilience in same-sex parented families; and health and wellbeing outcomes for same-sex couples who undergo separation, including the negotiation of shared parenting arrangements post-separation. The current paper aims to provide a comprehensive overview of the design and methods of this longitudinal study and discuss its significance. Methods/Design The Work, Love, Play study is a mixed design, three wave, longitudinal cohort study of same-sex attracted parents. The sample includes lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender parents in Australia and New Zealand (including single parents within these categories) caring for any children under the age of 18 years. The study will be conducted over six years from 2008 to 2014. Quantitative data are to be collected via three on-line surveys in 2008, 2010 and 2012 from the cohort of parents recruited in Wave1. Qualitative data will be collected via interviews with purposively selected subsamples in 2012 and 2013. Data collection began in 2008 and 355 respondents to Wave One of the study have agreed to participate in future surveys. Work is currently underway to increase this sample size. The methods and survey instruments are described. Discussion This study will make an important contribution to the existing research on same-sex parented families. Strengths of the study design include the longitudinal method, which will allow understanding of changes over time within internal family relationships and social supports. Further, the mixed method design enables triangulation of qualitative and quantitative data. A broad recruitment strategy has already enabled a large sample size with the inclusion of both gay men and lesbians. PMID:20211027

  17. Protecting the health of employees caring for family members with special health care needs.

    PubMed

    Earle, Alison; Heymann, Jody

    2011-07-01

    Over half of American workers are holding a paid job while also providing unpaid assistance and support to a family member. Research shows that family members who provide care to children or adults with special health care needs are themselves at risk of physical and mental health problems. Yet, little research has explored how the work environment mediates the effects of caregiving on caregivers' mental and physical health. With a sample of 2455 currently employed U.S. adults from the Work, Family, Community Nexus (WFCN) survey, a random-digit dial, nationally representative survey of Americans aged 18-69, we examine whether paid leave and flexibility policies mediate the relationship between caregiving and health. In Ordinary Least Squares regression models, we find that paid leave to address family members' health was associated with better mental health status as measured by the 5-item Mental Health Inventory and paid sick leave with better physical health status as measured by self-rated overall health status. A supportive supervisor was also associated with improvements in mental and physical health. For both men and women, paid leave and a supervisor's support offset some or all of the negative effects of caregiving, but for women, the buffering effects of working conditions are slightly larger. Enhancing the unpaid leave guaranteed in the U.S. Family and Medical Leave Act so that it is paid and passing national paid sick days legislation will help ensure that employed caregivers can retain their jobs, receive needed income, and meet their own mental and physical health needs. PMID:21669484

  18. A Three-wave Study of Antecedents of Work-Family Enrichment: The Roles of Social Resources and Affect.

    PubMed

    Siu, Oi Ling; Bakker, Arnold B; Brough, Paula; Lu, Chang-Qin; Wang, Haijiang; Kalliath, Thomas; O'Driscoll, Michael; Lu, Jiafang; Timms, Carolyn

    2015-10-01

    On the basis of conservation of resources theory (Hobfoll, ) and the resource-gain-development perspective (Wayne, Grzywacz, Carlson, & Kacmar, ), this paper examines the differential impact of specific social resources (supervisory support and family support) on specific types of affect (job satisfaction and family satisfaction, respectively), which, in turn, influence work-to-family enrichment and family-to-work enrichment, respectively. A sample of 276 Chinese workers completed questionnaires in a three-wave survey. The model was tested with structural equation modelling. Job satisfaction at time 2 partially mediated the relationship between time 1 supervisory support and time 3 work-to-family enrichment (capital), and the effect of supervisory support on work-to-family enrichment (affect) was fully mediated by job satisfaction. Family satisfaction at time 2 fully mediated the relationship between time 1 family support and time 3 family-to-work enrichment (affect, efficiency). Implications for theory, practice and future research are discussed. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26468889

  19. Family Kinship Patterns and Female Sex Work in the Informal Urban Settlement of Kibera, Nairobi, Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Ngugi, Elizabeth N.; Benoit, Cecilia; Hallgrimsdottir, Helga; Jansson, Mikael

    2015-01-01

    A basic ecological and epidemiological question is why some women enter into commercial sex work while other women in the same socio-economic environment never do. To address this question respondent driven sampling principles were adopted to recruit and collect data for 161 female sex workers and 159 same aged women who never engaged in commercial sex in Kibera, a large informal settlement in Nairobi, Kenya. Univariate analysis indicated that basic kinship measures, including number of family members seen during adolescence and at present, not having a male guardian while growing up, and earlier times of ending relationships with both male and female guardians were associated with commercial sex work in Kibera. Multivariate analysis via logistic regression modeling showed that not having a male guardian during childhood, low education attainment and a small number of family members seen at adolescence were all significant predictors of entering sex work. By far the most important predictor of entering sex work was not having any male guardian, e.g., father, uncle, older brother, etc. during childhood. Results are interpreted in light of the historic pattern of sub-Saharan African child fostering and their relevance for young women in Kibera today. PMID:26523084

  20. Managers’ Practices Related to Work–Family Balance Predict Employee Cardiovascular Risk and Sleep Duration in Extended Care Settings

    PubMed Central

    Berkman, Lisa F.; Buxton, Orfeu; Ertel, Karen; Okechukwu, Cassandra

    2012-01-01

    An increasing proportion of U.S. workers have family caregiving responsibilities. The purpose of this study was to determine whether employees in extended care settings whose managers are supportive, open, and creative about work–family needs, such as flexibility with work schedules, have lower cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk and longer sleep than their less supported counterparts. From semistructured interviews with managers, we constructed a work–family balance score of manager openness and creativity in dealing with employee work–family needs. Trained interviewers collected survey and physiologic outcome data from 393 employees whose managers had a work–family score. Employee outcomes are sleep duration (actigraphy) and CVD risk assessed by blood cholesterol, high glycosylated hemoglobin/diabetes, blood pressure/hypertension, body-mass index, and tobacco consumption. Employees whose managers were less supportive slept less (29 min/day) and were over twice as likely to have 2 or more CVD risk factors (ORs = 2.1 and 2.03 for low and middle manager work–family scores, respectively) than employees whose managers were most open and creative. Employees who provide direct patient care exhibited particularly elevated CVD risk associated with low manager work–family score. Managers’ attitudes and practices may affect employee health, including sleep duration and CVD risk. PMID:20604637

  1. Family and Consumer Sciences Education. Focusing on Families, Work, and Their Interrelationships. Alabama Course of Study. Bulletin 1996, No. 17.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alabama State Dept. of Education, Montgomery.

    This guide, which is intended for classroom teachers, supervisors, and administrators throughout Alabama, contains the minimum required content (core program) for public school instruction in family and consumer sciences education in grades 7-12. Presented first are the following: introduction examining the objectives/delivery of family and…

  2. Marriage and Family Therapists Working with Family Violence: Strained Bedfellows or Compatible Partners?: A Commentary on Avis, Kaufman, and Bograd.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meth, Richard L.

    1992-01-01

    Responds to previous articles by Avis, Kaufman, and Bograd on role of marital and family therapists in dealing with family violence among clients. Comments on presentation style of earlier articles and then discusses points of agreement and disagreement with each of the three authors. Concludes by urging therapists to learn more so they can…

  3. "Doing the Job as a Parent": Parenting Alone, Work, and Family Policy in Ireland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Millar, Michelle; Coen, Liam; Bradley, Ciara; Rau, Henrike

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies of family life in Ireland have focused on changes in "traditional" family structures, including the increase in one-parent families. This article illustrates the impact dominant conceptions in Irish society that privilege the family based on marriage have on one-parent family policy. The authors focus on two key areas of social…

  4. Linkages between Negative Work-to-Family Spillover and Mothers' and Fathers' Knowledge of Their Young Adolescents Daily Lives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bumpus, Matthew F.; Crouter, Ann C.; McHale, Susan M.

    2006-01-01

    This study examines the relationships between mothers' and fathers' perceptions of negative work-to-family spillover and their knowledge of their preadolescent children's (mean age = 11.8 years) daily lives in a sample of dual-earner families. Three constructs are tested as potential mediators of the association between spillover and parental…

  5. 78 FR 16278 - Notice of Submission of Proposed Information Collection to OMB Family Report, Moving-To-Work...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-14

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT Notice of Submission of Proposed Information Collection to OMB Family Report, Moving-To-Work Family Report AGENCY: Office of the Chief Information Officer, HUD. ACTION: Notice....

  6. For graduate students in MFT, Social Work, Child & Family Studies, Women's & Gender Studies, Counseling and related programs

    E-print Network

    McConnell, Terry

    the relationship between gender transition and life satisfaction, family relationships, social support, and mental relationships and other social systems. The self-of-therapist will be examined in relation to sexual and genderFor graduate students in MFT, Social Work, Child & Family Studies, Women's & Gender Studies

  7. Job insecurity and work-family conflict in teachers in Sweden: Examining their relations with longitudinal cross-lagged modeling.

    PubMed

    Richter, Anne; Näswall, Katharina; Lindfors, Petra; Sverke, Magnus

    2015-06-01

    Job insecurity and work-family conflict are increasingly prevalent in contemporary working life and numerous studies have documented their antecedents and negative consequences. The present study used longitudinal questionnaire data collected among teachers in Sweden to test the direction of the relation between job insecurity and work-family conflict using cross-lagged modeling. Multiple-group comparisons were conducted to account for the skewed gender composition in the teachers' group. After controlling for baseline levels of job insecurity, work-family conflict, and four potential confounders (age, children under 12 living at home, university education, and relationship status), we found that the reciprocal relationship between job insecurity and work-family conflict over a 1-year time period fitted the data best for the men. For women, however, only the auto regression coefficients were significant. The results provide some empirical support for gender differences in the relation between job insecurity and work-family conflict. Moreover, this study partially supports theoretical assumptions suggesting that job insecurity and work-family conflict influence each other. PMID:26261909

  8. In the Best Interests of the Child: Social Work in the Family Court.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindner, Charles

    This manual was designed to familiarize social workers with the dramatically restructured family court practices in order to prepare them for a family court appearance. Chapter I presents a brief history of the family court and describes such aspects of the family court as confidentiality of proceedings, impact of a court record on the individual,…

  9. Afterschool Programs Help Working Families. Afterschool Alert. Issue Brief No. 16

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Afterschool Alliance, 2003

    2003-01-01

    Changing family structures place extra burdens on children, parents and employers. The image of 21st century families is vastly different from that of previous centuries, or even the family image of 50 years ago. While women are still the primary caregivers, either as single mothers or part of a two-parent family, they are entering the workforce…

  10. Encouraging Strong Family Relationships. State Policies That Work. Brief Number 6

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for the Study of Social Policy, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The relational well-being of families is an important factor affecting a family's economic success, physical and mental heath, the readiness and success of children in school, and the engagement of youth in positive and productive roles. In short, the strength of family bonds is crucial to a family's capacity to provide, nurture, and care for its…

  11. Hidden Knowing of Working-Class Transnational Mexican Families in Schools: Bridge-Building, Nepantlera Knowers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kasun, G. Sue

    2014-01-01

    Reframing immigrant families as transnationals, this article highlights transnational families' ways of knowing. This study is based on a three-year, multi-sited critical ethnographic set of case studies of four families in the USA and Mexico. Transnational families in this study demonstrated Nepantlera knowing, or liminal, bridge-building…

  12. MOTHER’S EMPLOYMENT DEMANDS, WORK-FAMILY CONFLICT, AND ADOLESCENT DEVELOPMENT*

    PubMed Central

    Chee, Kyong Hee; Conger, Rand D.; Elder, Glen H.

    2009-01-01

    This study revisited the old research question of whether or not maternal employment would adversely affect children’s development. We reframed the question by asking how a mother’s temporal employment demands might be linked to child development. We used longitudinal data from a sample of 340 white, lower- to middle-class, dual-earner families living in the rural Midwest of the United States. The data were obtained from questionnaires and videotaped observations, and were informed by the mother, the father, the adolescent child, and a trained observer. As predicted, we found a strong relationship between a mother’s temporal employment demands and work-family conflict, which was significantly associated with her emotional distress. A husband’s egalitarian gender ideology was found to reduce the mother’s emotional distress. Maternal distress was then negatively associated with nurturant and involved parenting, which in turn predicted a reduction in the adolescent child’s emotional and behavioral problems over time. PMID:20927198

  13. Balancing Work and Family All of us must allocate 24 hours a day to the activities of life. How well we balance responsibilities with

    E-print Network

    Leistikow, Bruce N.

    Balancing Work and Family All of us must allocate 24 hours a day to the activities of life. How. It also helps manage stress. Are you satisfied with your balance of time between work and family? If you answered "no," you are not alone. Achieving balance with work and family is an ongoing process of juggling

  14. Improving Individual, Child, and Family Nutrition, Health and Wellness. Learning Guide 8. Project Connect. Linking Self-Family-Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emily Hall Tremaine Foundation, Inc., Hartford, CT.

    This learning guide is designed to connect personal, family, and job responsibilities for adults and out-of-school youth in economically depressed areas of the state (including transitional ex-offenders and corrections populations) so that these individuals learn to manage and balance these aspects of their lives in order to prepare for or…

  15. Improving Individual, Child, and Family Nutrition, Health and Wellness. Secondary Learning Guide 8. Project Connect. Linking Self-Family-Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emily Hall Tremaine Foundation, Inc., Hartford, CT.

    This competency-based secondary learning guide on improving individual, child, and family nutrition is part of a series that are adaptations of guides developed for adult consumer and homemaking education programs. The guides provide students with experiences that help them learn to do the following: make decisions; use creative approaches to…

  16. Liminal Cultural Work in Family Childcare: Latino Immigrant Family Childcare Providers and Bicultural Childrearing in the United States, 2002-2004

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uttal, Lynet

    2010-01-01

    Immigrants find themselves in a liminal state of limbo between two societies. In this zone, competing cultural ideas coexist. This essay examines how Latino immigrant family childcare providers in the United States questioned US norms of childrearing and how they engaged in liminal cultural work to produce a bicultural childrearing. They are…

  17. 5 CFR 734.307 - Campaigning for a spouse or family member.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...307 Campaigning for a spouse or family member. An employee covered under this subpart who is the spouse or family member of either a candidate for partisan...the paid or unpaid services of a business or corporation, or sell or...

  18. How important are work-family support policies? A meta-analytic investigation of their effects on employee outcomes.

    PubMed

    Butts, Marcus M; Casper, Wendy J; Yang, Tae Seok

    2013-01-01

    This meta-analysis examines relationships between work-family support policies, which are policies that provide support for dependent care responsibilities, and employee outcomes by developing a conceptual model detailing the psychological mechanisms through which policy availability and use relate to work attitudes. Bivariate results indicated that availability and use of work-family support policies had modest positive relationships with job satisfaction, affective commitment, and intentions to stay. Further, tests of differences in effect sizes showed that policy availability was more strongly related to job satisfaction, affective commitment, and intentions to stay than was policy use. Subsequent meta-analytic structural equation modeling results indicated that policy availability and use had modest effects on work attitudes, which were partially mediated by family-supportive organization perceptions and work-to-family conflict, respectively. Additionally, number of policies and sample characteristics (percent women, percent married-cohabiting, percent with dependents) moderated the effects of policy availability and use on outcomes. Implications of these findings and directions for future research on work-family support policies are discussed. PMID:23106685

  19. Strategies for managing work/life interaction among women and men with variable and unpredictable work hours in retail sales in Québec, Canada.

    PubMed

    Messing, Karen; Tissot, France; Couture, Vanessa; Bernstein, Stephanie

    2014-01-01

    Increasingly, work schedules in retail sales are generated by software that takes into account variations in predicted sales. The resulting variable and unpredictable schedules require employees to be available, unpaid, over extended periods. At the request of a union, we studied schedule preferences in a retail chain in Québec using observations, interviews, and questionnaires. Shift start times had varied on average by four hours over the previous week; 83 percent had worked at least one day the previous weekend. Difficulties with work/life balance were associated with schedules and, among women, with family responsibilities. Most workers wanted: more advance notice; early shifts; regular schedules; two days off in sequence; and weekends off. Choices varied, so software could be adapted to take preferences into account. Also, employers could give better advance notice and establish systems for shift exchanges. Governments could limit store hours and schedule variability while prolonging the minimum sequential duration of leave per week. PMID:25085829

  20. Facing the Future: Barriers and Resources in Work and Family Plans of At-Risk Israeli Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cinamon, Rachel Gali; Hason, Iris

    2009-01-01

    This study examines 15 at-risk Israeli youngsters' work and family plans and the perceived barriers and resources influencing the realization of those plans. In-depth interviews analyzed by Consensual Qualitative Research (CQR) demonstrate the complexity of the future awaiting these youths. Participants perceive work mainly as a means of obtaining…

  1. Explaining the Links between Workload, Distress, and Work-Family Conflict among School Employees: Physical, Cognitive, and Emotional Fatigue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ilies, Remus; Huth, Megan; Ryan, Ann Marie; Dimotakis, Nikolaos

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the intraindividual relationships among workload and affective distress; cognitive, physical, and emotional fatigue; and work-family conflict among school employees. Using a repeated-measure, within-person research design, the authors found that work demands and affective distress, as well as cognitive, emotional, and physical…

  2. Do Workers Who Experience Conflict between the Work and Family Domains Hit a "Glass Ceiling?": A Meta-Analytic Examination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoobler, Jenny M.; Hu, Jia; Wilson, Morgan

    2010-01-01

    Based in Conservation of Resources (COR; Hobfoll, 1989) and self-verification (Swann, 1987) theories, we argue that when workers experience conflict between the work and family domains, this should have implications for evaluations of their work performance and ultimately affect more "objective" career outcomes such as salary and hierarchical…

  3. Tribes of Louis : families, communities and secret societies in the works of Robert Louis Stevenson 

    E-print Network

    Ames, Sarah

    2013-07-04

    If the Victorians privileged the idea of ‘the family’ and the domestic configuration, what, then, was the position of unrelated groups, quasi-families and outsiders? While mid-Victorian literature widely praised or ...

  4. Working nonstandard schedules and variable shifts in low-income families: associations with parental psychological well-being, family functioning, and child well-being.

    PubMed

    Hsueh, JoAnn; Yoshikawa, Hirokazu

    2007-05-01

    Longitudinal data from the New Hope Project--an experimental evaluation of a work-based antipoverty program in Milwaukee, Wisconsin--was used to explore concurrent and lagged associations of nonstandard schedules and variable shifts with parental psychological well-being, regularity of family mealtimes, and child well-being among low-income families. Working a combination of variable shifts and nonstandard hours was associated concurrently with lower teacher-reported school performance and engagement and higher levels of externalizing behavior problems. Fixed nonstandard schedules were associated with lagged decreases in parent-reported school performance, whereas working variable shifts was associated with lagged increases in parent-reported school performance. PMID:17484575

  5. The partnership model: working with individuals, families, and communities toward a new vision of health.

    PubMed

    Courtney, R; Ballard, E; Fauver, S; Gariota, M; Holland, L

    1996-06-01

    Increasingly, health professionals must learn to work in new partnership relationships with clients and community to promote health effectively. A partnership requires a transformation of the professional role from chief actor to partner, and the client role from passive recipient to partner. A partnership approach has particular merit in a reformed health care system that increasingly emphasizes active involvement and self-care actions of individuals and families to maintain health and prevent disease. A partnership approach is also important to professionals working with underserved, vulnerable, and/or minority populations. For too long professionals and policymakers have relegated these groups to passive roles in health decision making and action. This article will provide a description of the partnership process as it has been developed and implemented by nurse practitioners in an urban Hispanic community with emphasis on a community partnership. A partnership model is described and compared to the more traditional professional model. A definition and essential criteria for partnership are presented. Finally, a specific example of how the partnership process was implemented at the community level is discussed. PMID:8677233

  6. Does Family Structure Affect Children's Educational Outcomes? NBER Working Paper Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pollak, Robert A.; Ginther, Donna K.

    This paper examines correlations between children's educational outcomes and family structure. Although popular discussions focus on distinctions between two-parent and single-parent families, earlier research shows that outcomes for stepchildren are similar to outcomes for children in single-parent families, and earlier researchers suggested that…

  7. Working with Parents to Promote Children's Literacy: A Family Literacy Project in Uganda

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parry, Kate; Kirabo, Elizabeth; Nakyato, Gorreth

    2014-01-01

    This article discusses the importance of family practices to children's acquisition of literacy and describes attempts to influence such practices through the institution of family literacy programmes. One of these is the Family Literacy Project in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa, which both served as a model and provided material for a similar…

  8. Service Family Support -- A Small-Scale Project of Educational Psychologists Working with Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hogg, Jane; Hart, Anne; Collins, Zoe V.

    2014-01-01

    Being in a Service family can be a difficult position for children and parents alike due to high levels of mobility, parental separation, and the remaining parent's stress and emotional well-being. A Service family is defined as a family with one or both parents employed by the Ministry of Defence (MOD). The current project looked at the…

  9. Family and Work Influences on Stress, Anxiety and Depression Among Bisexual Latino Men in the New York City Metropolitan Area.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Laboy, Miguel; Ripkin, Alexandra; Garcia, Jonathan; Severson, Nicolette

    2015-12-01

    The empirical exploration of mental health problems among bisexual Latino men is scarce. Bisexual men experience stress because of their non-conforming sexuality from multiple-sources. In this study we focus on the family and work environments. We conducted a mixed-methods study to examine the impacts of these social environments among behavioral bisexual Latino men in New York City (N = 142). Using the Brief Symptom Inventory we measured stress, depression, and anxiety, and used specific scales to measure familial and work social environmental stress factors. We also measured four cultural factors to assess their potential influence on our hypothesized stressors. To test our hypothesis we used linear regression with stress, depression and anxiety as the primary outcome variables. Our results indicated that bisexual Latino men experienced negative mental health outcomes due to pressures in their familial and work environments. Stress was the strongest predictor of anxiety and depression among the men in the study. After taking stress into account, familial factors were stronger predictors of negative mental health outcomes than work factors. Cultural factors such as acculturation and length of living in the United States were not associated with negative mental health outcomes in our sample. Our findings suggest the importance of addressing stress, anxiety and depression among behaviorally bisexual men, and suggest that addressing family-based stressors is critical for this population. This research should inform future studies addressing this underserved population and provide mental health providers with a foundation for working with bisexual Latino men. PMID:25957046

  10. International perspectives on work-family policies: lessons from the world's most competitive economies.

    PubMed

    Earle, Alison; Mokomane, Zitha; Heymann, Jody

    2011-01-01

    The United States does not guarantee families a wide range of supportive workplace policies such as paid maternity and paternity leave or paid leave to care for sick children. Proposals to provide such benefits are invariably met with the complaint that the costs would reduce employment and undermine the international competitiveness of American businesses. In this article, Alison Earle, Zitha Mokomane, and Jody Heymann explore whether paid leave and other work-family policies that support children's development exist in countries that are economically competitive and have low unemployment rates. Their data show that the answer is yes. Using indicators of competitiveness gathered by the World Economic Forum, the authors identify fifteen countries, including the United States, that have been among the top twenty countries in competitiveness rankings for at least eight of ten years. To this group they add China and India, both rising competitors in the global economy. They find that every one of these countries, except the United States, guarantees some form of paid leave for new mothers as well as annual leave. And all but Switzerland and the United States guarantee paid leave for new fathers. The authors perform a similar exercise to identify thirteen advanced countries with consistently low unemployment rates, again including the United States. The majority of these countries provide paid leave for new mothers, paid leave for new fathers, paid leave to care for children's health care needs, breast-feeding breaks, paid vacation leave, and a weekly day of rest. Of these, the United States guarantees only breast-feeding breaks (part of the recently passed health care legislation). The authors' global examination of the most competitive economies as well as the economies with low unemployment rates makes clear that ensuring that all parents are available to care for their children's healthy development does not preclude a country from being highly competitive economically. PMID:22013634

  11. 76 FR 9702 - Shortpaid and Unpaid Information-Based Indicia (IBI) Postage and Shortpaid Express Mail Postage...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-22

    ... Service published a proposed rule in the Federal Register on November 18, 2009 (74 FR 59494-59496... procedures the Postal Service will use to identify and verify shortpaid and unpaid IBI postage payment and... information on the automated procedures that the Postal Service will implement to identify and...

  12. 76 FR 39299 - Shortpaid and Unpaid Information-Based Indicia (IBI) Postage and Shortpaid Express Mail Postage

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-06

    ... Express Mail Postage, Revised Proposal (76 FR 9702-9705). The Postal Service received four comments and...-electronic processes'' that will be used to identify shortpaid and unpaid postage. In the event that the new... existing processes to identify or recover postage deficiencies. For items with shortpaid IBI postage...

  13. Dad Was a Terrible Hard Worker: The Influence of Family and School on Dublin's Men's Working Lives--Preliminary Findings. CLMS Working Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodwin, John

    The influences that home, family, and education have on Irish men's experiences of working life are explored based on interviews and questionnaire research carried out in North Dublin during 1997 and 1998. A two-stage research design was adopted. The first stage involved a short attitudinal-type questionnaire given to men at a sporting club. The…

  14. How to add more "Family" to the Work-Life-Balance? – Family Friendliness in Medical Under- and Postgraduate Studies and the Workplace

    PubMed Central

    De Ridder, Daniela

    2012-01-01

    Today universities have to compete for the best brains more than ever before. The issues of reconciliation of work/study and family and the work-life balance have become increasingly important recently in higher education policy development as higher education institutions in the competition for the best minds are already forced to tackle these issues, some of which are still novel to them, as they are faced with demographic change. High dropout rates among students with children, increasing shortages of physicians and high sector emigration and high levels of childlessness among graduates serve as indicators for urgent action towards more family-oriented university and faculty strategies. But how can medical schools, hospitals and (teaching) hospitals achieve a family-oriented profile? Which key players, which areas of higher education management are relevant to management and decision-making structures? What exemplary measures for designing family-friendly medical studies and work places offer success? The underrepresentation of women in the next generation of scientists also poses an additional challenge to the development of an innovative higher education policy if it is to be sustainable. Thus strategies promoting the next generation and family orientation are key factors for a future-oriented higher education policy. These factors should therefore be seen as leadership strategies which will introduce measures that will make (re)design the university’s profile. To this end, a holistic approach which will lead to fundamental reforms of higher education structures which are outlined below and illustrated with examples are a prerequisite for successful implementation. PMID:22558028

  15. How to add more "family" to the work-life-balance? - family friendliness in medical under- and postgraduate studies and the workplace.

    PubMed

    De Ridder, Daniela

    2012-01-01

    Today universities have to compete for the best brains more than ever before. The issues of reconciliation of work/study and family and the work-life balance have become increasingly important recently in higher education policy development as higher education institutions in the competition for the best minds are already forced to tackle these issues, some of which are still novel to them, as they are faced with demographic change. High dropout rates among students with children, increasing shortages of physicians and high sector emigration and high levels of childlessness among graduates serve as indicators for urgent action towards more family-oriented university and faculty strategies. But how can medical schools, hospitals and (teaching) hospitals achieve a family-oriented profile? Which key players, which areas of higher education management are relevant to management and decision-making structures? What exemplary measures for designing family-friendly medical studies and work places offer success? The underrepresentation of women in the next generation of scientists also poses an additional challenge to the development of an innovative higher education policy if it is to be sustainable. Thus strategies promoting the next generation and family orientation are key factors for a future-oriented higher education policy. These factors should therefore be seen as leadership strategies which will introduce measures that will make (re)design the university's profile. To this end, a holistic approach which will lead to fundamental reforms of higher education structures which are outlined below and illustrated with examples are a prerequisite for successful implementation. PMID:22558028

  16. Socioeconomic and gender inequalities in job dissatisfaction among Japanese civil servants: the roles of work, family and personality characteristics.

    PubMed

    Sekine, Michikazu; Tatsuse, Takashi; Cable, Noriko; Chandola, Tarani; Marmot, Michael

    2014-01-01

    This study examines (1) whether there are employment grade and gender differences in job dissatisfaction and (2) whether work, family, and personality characteristics explain grade and gender differences in job dissatisfaction. The participants were 3,812 civil servants, aged 20-65, working at a local government in Japan. In both males and females, low control, low social support, work-to-family conflict, type A behaviour pattern and negative affectivity were significantly associated with job dissatisfaction. In females, high demands, long work hours and being unmarried were also associated with job dissatisfaction. Among males, in comparison with the highest grade employees, the age-adjusted odds ratio (OR) for job dissatisfaction in the lowest grade employees was 1.90 (95% CI: 1.40-2.59). The grade differences reduced to 1.08 (0.76-1.54) after adjustment for work, family and personality characteristics. Among females, similar grade differences were observed, although the differences were not statistically significant. In comparison with males, the age-adjusted OR in females for job dissatisfaction was 1.32 (1.14-1.52). This gender difference was reduced to 0.95 (0.79-1.14) following adjustment for the other factors. The majority of employees belong to low to middle grades, and female employees have increased. Reducing grade and gender differences in work and family characteristics is needed. PMID:25055848

  17. Giuseppe and Aloysius Frari’s Works on Rabies and History of Frari Medical Family of Šibenik, Dalmatia

    PubMed Central

    Krni?, Anton

    2007-01-01

    This article is an attempt to reconstruct the family history of the Fraris, the famous Šibenik medical family. Three generations of physicians from the Frari family played an important role not only at medical and social scene of Šibenik in the 18th and 19th century, but also in Croatian and Italian medical history. I will try to provide important details on the lives, medical and social work, and publications of 5 members of the family, Giuseppe (Josip), Angelo Antonio (An?eo Antun), Sebastiano (Sebastijan), Michele Carlo (Mihovil), and Aloysius (Luigi) Frari. I would also like to pay a special attention to the works on rabies, written by Giuseppe and Luigi Frari, which are among the earliest and most accurate Croatian works on the subject. To reconstruct the history of the family, I studied the relevant editions about the medical and social history of Šibenik, Dalmatia, Venice, and Croatia, together with the Fraris’ publications and reflections. This was the first time Italian and Latin language works by Giuseppe and Luigi Frari on rabies were analyzed. The story on Fraris also documents that medical publishing was a common practice in Dalmatia in the 18th and the 19th century. PMID:17589982

  18. Working Memory and Decision-Making Biases in Young Adults With a Family History of Alcoholism: Studies from the Oklahoma Family Health Patterns Project

    PubMed Central

    Lovallo, William R.; Yechiam, Eldad; Sorocco, Kristen H.; Vincent, Andrea S.; Collins, Frank L.

    2008-01-01

    Background Alcohol misuse is more common in persons with a family history of alcoholism (FH+) than in those with no such history (FH?). Among FH+, behavioral disinhibition and male sex seem to signal the presence of an increased risk. Methods This study examined cognitive and behavioral characteristics of 175 nonabusing 18- to 30-year-olds, 87 FH+ and 88 FH?, who were further characterized by their degree of behavioral disinhibition using the Sociability scale of the California Personality Inventory. Working memory and decision making were tested using the Stroop Color-Word Test and the Iowa Gambling Task, a simulated card game. Results Persons with a family history of alcoholism who were behaviorally disinhibited displayed significantly greater interference on the Stroop task than the other subgroups. On the Iowa Gambling Task, FH+ males, but not the females, were significantly more attentive to financial gains than other subgroups, and they had greater consistency in their choice behaviors. Conclusions Persons with a family history of alcoholism, in combination with behavioral disinhibition, appears to signal working memory deficits and in combination with male sex indicates an attraction to the rewarding aspects of a risk-taking challenge. These findings are not secondary to heavy exposure to alcohol or other drugs, but instead reflect intrinsic risk-related familial and personal characteristics of the subjects. PMID:16634844

  19. Attitudes Toward Gender, Work, and Family among Female and Male Scientists in Germany and the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, Sandra L.; Fuchs, Stefan; Aisenbrey, Silke; Kravets, Natalyia

    This research used a comparative approach and an elite framework to look at attitudes toward gender, work, and family among male and female scientists. The data came from the 1994 International Social Survey Program module measuring family and changing gender roles in (the former) East Germany, West Germany, and the United States. Research questions focused on the variation between the three samples in male scientists' attitudes regarding gender, work, and family; women's representation in science occupations; and the relation between the two. Another major concern was the extent to which female scientists express attitudes regarding gender, work, and family that resemble those of male scientists and the implications of these processes for increasing women's access to science. As predicted, male scientists in East Germany tended to have the most progressive attitudes (especially those regarding gender and work), East German women had the greatest access to science occupations, and there were virtually no sex differences in attitudes of East German scientists. West German male scientists were the most traditional on attitudes regarding gender and work, and U. S. male scientists tended to be the most traditional on attitudes regarding family. The attitudes of female scientists in West Germany and the United States reflected this larger trend, but there were sex differences within countries, with female scientists being more progressive than male scientists. Thus, the findings suggest that women s representation in science is related to the attitudes of male scientists regarding gender, work, and family. And although female scientists often hold quite similar attitudes as male scientists, there is considerable cross-country variation in how progressive the attitudes are and how similar men's and women's attitudes are. Implications for women's access to elite science occupations are discussed.

  20. Family 

    E-print Network

    Unknown

    2011-09-05

    (ADJFAT) and actual(ACTFAT)), intramuscular fat (MARB), and Warner-Bratzler shear force tenderness (WBSF). Family types with a greater proportion of Bos indicus in the sire in relation to the amount in the dam (F1 x A and B x F1) averaged longer GL... between males and females. Further examination within each sex showed a difference between male reciprocals that was two times that of females. iv Calves with a higher percentage of Bos indicus in the sire compared to the proportion in the dam showed...

  1. Work Based Learning Policy Definition, focus and scope

    E-print Network

    Aickelin, Uwe

    Work Based Learning Policy Definition, focus and scope Learning through working means learning that normally has been achieved by learners in and through paid or unpaid work, which can be assessed as being institutions of higher education but may also be gained outside them through experiential learning within work

  2. Family caregiving: who provides the care, and at what cost?

    PubMed

    Robinson, K M

    1997-01-01

    Today, there are an estimated 1.6 million people over 65 years of age who require assistance with two or more daily activities. This number is projected to rise to 2.1 million by 2001, with fewer family caregivers expected to be available to provide this informal care. Seventy-two percent of unpaid family caregivers are women, the majority of whom are mid-life daughters or daughters in law. Uncompensated care to the frail elderly requires an average of 28 to 39.9 hours per week of custodial care. The financial impact on informal caregivers includes: 9% of family caregivers who leave the labor force to provide care, 29.4% who adjust their work schedules, and 18.1% who take time off without pay. The estimated annual value of uncompensated kin care in 1990 was $18 billion. Thirty-two percent of all family caregivers are categorized as poor or near-poor at incomes that are less than 125% of the federal poverty level. PMID:9362866

  3. Work and family roles of Soviet women: historical trends and cross-section analysis.

    PubMed

    Ofer, G; Vinokur, A

    1985-01-01

    Changes in the way of life of USSR women over the last 2 generations are very similar to those experienced by women in most industrialized and industializing societies. The rate of participation of women in the labor force increased substantially, and this movement was accompanied by a marked rise in the level of women's general and professional education. As a result, women occupy more white collar positions than they did in older generations, but these developments have created a double burden for most women who complain that increased resonsibilities outside the home have not been synchronized with an adequate increase in men's sharing household responsibilities. Historical explanations for changes in women's role particularly emphasize the nature of relationships between participation, wages, incomes, fertility, education and labor market conditions. The long term changes of these major variables, since the 1920s, along with an investigation based on an income survey of 1000 immigrant families, are studied in this paper. Cross sectional analysis examines a longer life cycle, participation decisions, and relates them to decisions on fertility and education. Fertility rates among the Jewish immigrants are much higher and labor participation rates of women much lower than for the rest of the population. Some of the main features of the long trends since 1926 are: 1) of the overall measures of participation of women, only those in the 15-54 and 20-54 age ranges show some increase over the 1926-1980 period, 2) sharp rises in specific participation rates for 25-44 and 45-54 age groups since 1950, and for urban women overall, 3) only a small fraction of the total increase in participation can be attributed to the increase in the proportion of single women, and 4) by 1980 the overall female participation figure rose to 80%--and 88% for the 20-54 age group--the difference reflecting the sharp decline in 15-19 age group participation. While the short run decision about participation is heavily determined by the expected wage, other family income, and the presence of small children, longer term decisions about participation are influenced by the level of education and by fertility--decisions normally made early in life. Although women's schooling is rapidly catching up with men's, their relative wages have hardly increased because the extra pressure of home and work responsibilities results in high divorce rates, lower fertility, and lower investment in human capital and effort on the job. PMID:12267651

  4. Max's Family Experience: Web-Resources for Working with Special Education Students and Their Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Theoharis, Raschelle; Fitzpatrick, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Today's principals are required to put in longer hours, lead larger schools, and supervise more faculty and staff members. Additionally they need to create a positive learning environment for students, a productive work environment for their employees, and contend with a variety of student behaviors at the building level. Aside from the…

  5. Family Engagement in Rural Schools. R[superscript 2]Ed Working Papers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Witte, Amanda L.; Sheridan, Susan M.

    2011-01-01

    The importance of family-school partnerships for student success is unequivocal. Given the limited resources evident in many rural communities, family-school partnerships can be especially beneficial for students in rural schools. Decades of research has documented the positive effects of parent participation in children's academic endeavors for…

  6. Reading Their Worlds: Working with Diverse Families to Enhance Children's Early Literacy Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ordonez-Jasis, Rosario; Ortiz, Robert W.

    2006-01-01

    Successful, Culturally Enriched, and Linguistically Sensitive family literacy programs incorporate families' life experiences, ways of knowing, educational needs and resources, and goals. Alma Flor Ada (2003) reminds us that "students live in two worlds: home and school. If these two worlds do not recognize, understand, and respect each other,…

  7. Citizenship, Beneficence, and Informed Consent: The Ethics of Working in Mixed-Status Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mangual Figueroa, Ariana

    2016-01-01

    This article draws from a 23-month ethnographic study conducted in mixed-status Mexican homes to detail the particular methodological concerns that arise when conducting research within these legally complex and vulnerable families. Specifically, the analysis illustrates when and why undocumented parents in one focal family asked the ethnographer…

  8. Is Mom Still Doing It All?: Reexamining Depictions of Family Work in Popular Advertising

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Bryan K.; Hunter, Erica

    2008-01-01

    This study examines a sample of 299 advertisements from 4 of the top 10 circulated magazines of 2005 to see how contemporary advertising depicts household labor. Modeling after previous studies that examined the depiction of gender in family advertising, this study seeks to determine whether advertising reflects the changes in families that have…

  9. Transnational Migratory Labor and Filipino Fathers: How Families Are Affected When Men Work Abroad

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harper, Scott E.; Martin, Alan M.

    2013-01-01

    Transnational migratory labor remains a primary method many Filipinos use in an effort to gain financial security for their families. Based on data collected from an urban Southern Visayan province during the summer of 2007, this study examined a sample of 116 OFW (Overseas Filipino Workers) families and a sample of 99 traditional two-parent…

  10. Cooperative Working towards Family-Centred Health Education in Acute Care: Improvement in Client Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bastani, Farideh; Golaghaie, Farzaneh; Farahani, Mansoureh A.; Rafeie, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To establish family-centred health education for patients in a neurosurgery unit and to evaluate its impact on patients' and families' satisfaction. Design: Cooperative participatory research through which a group of clinical nurses and an academic researcher engaged in cycles of action and reflection. Setting: The study was…

  11. A Typology of Work-Family Arrangements among Dual-Earner Couples in Norway

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kitterod, Ragni Hege; Lappegard, Trude

    2012-01-01

    A symmetrical family model of two workers or caregivers is a political goal in many western European countries. We explore how common this family type is in Norway, a country with high gender-equality ambitions, by using a multinomial latent class model to develop a typology of dual-earner couples with children based on the partners' allocations…

  12. The Afro-American Work/Family Nexus: An Exploratory Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Patricia Hill

    1986-01-01

    Sketches out a framework linking black labor market trends in the post World War II era to actual and potential changes in black family patterns. Summarizes selected scholarship and then provides a gender-specific analysis of the changing employment status of black Americans. Urgres that links be made between black family life and the political…

  13. Work and Family Research in IO/OB: Content Analysis and Review of the Literature (1980-2002)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eby, Lillian T.; Casper, Wendy J.; Lockwood, Angie; Bordeaux, Chris; Brinley, Andi

    2005-01-01

    This monograph reviews 190 work-family studies published in IO/OB journals from 1980 to 2002. The results of a content analysis are presented which catalog these articles with respect to the study focus, nature and direction of the proposed effects, and predictor, criterion, and mediator variables examined. Then a narrative review of the articles…

  14. Support for Families: Working with Parents and Caregivers to Support Children from Birth to Three Years of Age.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanssen, Elizabeth, Ed.; Zimanyi, Louise, Ed.

    2000-01-01

    This theme issue of Coordinators' Notebook focuses on how early childhood care and development (ECCD) programs world-wide can work with parents and caregivers to support children from birth to 3 years of age. Section 1 of the journal describes the needs of parents and families and the development of parent programs around the world. Section 2…

  15. A Comparative Analysis of Training and Development and Work-Family Education Systems in a Large Corporate Organization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibson, Sharon K.

    2005-01-01

    This paper reviews the findings of a comparative analysis of two education systems in one corporate organization: training and development and work-family. Key learning features across these systems were analyzed to determine similarities and differences and to identify common concerns. The findings indicated that, although this organization…

  16. Linden Services for Children--Extern: A Holisitic Approach in Working with Young People with Challenging Behaviours and Their Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devlin, Angela

    2006-01-01

    Linden Services for Children is part of Extern, which is a charity within the voluntary sector. The organisation's mission is to promote social inclusion and help reduce the incidence of offending behaviour. Extern operates in both the North and South of Ireland and works with children, families, adults and communities. It aims, through assessment…

  17. WORKING WITH LOW-INCOME FAMILIES, PROCEEDINGS OF THE AHEA WORKSHOP (UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO, MARCH 15-19, 1965).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Home Economics Association, Washington, DC.

    WORK WITH LOW INCOME FAMILIES HAS BEEN PART OF THE BASIC PHILOSOPHY OF THE AMERICAN HOME ECONOMICS ASSOCIATION (AHEA) SINCE ITS INCEPTION. A NATIONAL WORKSHOP WAS ATTENDED BY STATE DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION AND U.S. OFFICE OF EDUCATION PERSONNEL, TEACHER-EDUCATORS, EXTENSION WORKERS, SOCIAL WORKERS, AND PERSONS WITH RELATED INTERESTS. TEXTS OF THE…

  18. Policies for Families: Work, Poverty and Resources. Proceedings of Seminars Held in London (October 27 and 31, 1994).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bayley, Rosalind, Ed.; Condy, Ann, Ed.; Roberts, Ceridwen, Ed.

    Concerned with the need to assess strategies for dealing with poverty and work concerns and to base British public policy on an appreciation of how different types of families are differentially affected by a changed labor market and an unchanged benefit system, this report compiles proceedings of seminars held in 1994 on the relationship between…

  19. The Role of Ethnic Culture in Work-Family Balance among Armenian Women in Leadership Positions in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baran, Hasmig

    2012-01-01

    In contemporary society women leaders in education have struggled to balance work and family. While some women have succeeded in finding that balance, many others are still struggling. The purpose of this qualitative study was to examine the experiences of three Armenian women in senior-level leadership positions in higher education in the United…

  20. Balancing Healthy Meals and Busy Lives: Associations between Work, School, and Family Responsibilities and Perceived Time Constraints among Young Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pelletier, Jennifer E.; Laska, Melissa N.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To characterize associations between perceived time constraints for healthy eating and work, school, and family responsibilities among young adults. Design: Cross-sectional survey. Setting: A large, Midwestern metropolitan region. Participants: A diverse sample of community college (n = 598) and public university (n = 603) students.…

  1. Family and Coordination Issues in the Preparation of Service Providers Working with Children with Hearing Impairment: The Case of Cyprus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kassini, Irene

    2005-01-01

    This paper explores the pre- and in-service preparation of service providers on family and inter-professional coordination issues. It particularly looks at the service providers affiliated with seven occupation groups and who work with 48 children with hearing impairment in a specific geographical region of Cyprus. The research study from which…

  2. Linking Social Environments with the Well-Being of Adolescents in Dual-Earner and Single Working Parent Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tisdale, Sandee; Pitt-Catsuphes, Marcie

    2012-01-01

    This investigation examined the relationships between middle school-aged children's perceptions of their social environments (home, school, neighborhood, and parental work) with self-reports of well-being. In the present study, well-being was defined by measures of physical health and psychological happiness. Data from the Nurturing Families Study…

  3. Do Female and Male Employees in Iran Experience Similar Work-Family Interference, Job, and Life Satisfaction?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karimi, Leila

    2009-01-01

    This study aims at examining gender differences in the experience of work-family interference and perceived job-life satisfaction in a group of Iranian employees. The participants in the study consist of 387 Iranian male and female employees from a variety of organizations. The results of t tests and multiple regression analysis using EQS 6.1…

  4. Attachment and Parenting: The Mediating Role of Work-Family Balance in Portuguese Parents of Preschool Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vieira, Joana Marina; AVila, Marisa; Matos, Paula Mena

    2012-01-01

    Given the increasingly challenging task of balancing multiple adult life roles in contemporary society, this study examined the influences of both conflicting and (positively) synergistic work and family roles in mediating associations between the quality of adult attachment and both parental satisfaction and parenting stress. Participants were…

  5. The Role of Personal Resources in Work-Family Conflict: Implications for Young Mothers' Well-Being

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braunstein-Bercovitz, Hedva; Frish-Burstein, Smadar; Benjamin, Benny A.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to examine the role that personal resources (person-environment [PE] congruence and personality types associated with resilience) and work-family conflict (WFC) play in the sense of well-being (as reflected by burnout and life-satisfaction) of mothers of young children. A sample of 146 mothers holding demanding…

  6. Liminality in Ontario’s long-term care facilities: Private companions’ care work in the space ‘betwixt and between’

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, Pat; Lowndes, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    Nursing, personal care, food and cleaning are publicly funded in Ontario’s long-term care facilities, but under-staffing usually renders all but the most basic of personal preferences superfluous. This individualization of responsibility for more personalized care has resulted in more families providing more care and opting to hire private, private companion care. With direct payment of companions becoming a growing but largely invisible facet of care, exploring companion’s roles is important. Using a six site rapid ethnographic study in long-term care facilities (i.e. observations, documents and key informant interviews (n?=?167)), this paper argues that private companions occupy a liminal space between policy, family and market, and their role within institutions and in private homes may be the missing link in the care work chain in the sense that it can at once be classified as formal and informal and draws on their own and others paid and unpaid labour. PMID:26229416

  7. Investigation of mindfulness, psychological inflexibility and valued living as potential moderators of the relationships between burden, distress and well-being in unpaid carers. 

    E-print Network

    Slowey, Lindsey

    2014-11-28

    Unpaid carers are known to be at heightened risk of poor outcomes (e.g. financially, physically and emotionally). Conversely it is known that carers can have positive experiences through their caring role and continue ...

  8. Implementing family involvement in the treatment of patients with psychosis: a systematic review of facilitating and hindering factors

    PubMed Central

    Eassom, Erica; Giacco, Domenico; Dirik, Aysegul; Priebe, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Objective To synthesise the evidence on implementing family involvement in the treatment of patients with psychosis with a focus on barriers, problems and facilitating factors. Design Systematic review of studies evaluating the involvement of families in tripartite communication between health professionals, ‘families’ (or other unpaid carers) and adult patients, in a single-family context. A theoretical thematic analysis approach and thematic synthesis were used. Data sources A systematic electronic search was carried out in seven databases, using database-specific search strategies and controlled vocabulary. A secondary manual search of grey literature was performed as well as using forwards and backwards snowballing techniques. Results A total of 43 studies were included. The majority featured qualitative data (n=42), focused solely on staff perspectives (n=32) and were carried out in the UK (n=23). Facilitating the training and ongoing supervision needs of staff are necessary but not sufficient conditions for a consistent involvement of families. Organisational cultures and paradigms can work to limit family involvement, and effective implementation appears to operate via a whole team coordinated effort at every level of the organisation, supported by strong leadership. Reservations about family involvement regarding power relations, fear of negative outcomes and the need for an exclusive patient–professional relationship may be explored and addressed through mutually trusting relationships. Conclusions Implementing family involvement carries additional challenges beyond those generally associated with translating research to practice. Implementation may require a cultural and organisational shift towards working with families. Family work can only be implemented if this is considered a shared goal of all members of a clinical team and/or mental health service, including the leaders of the organisation. This may imply a change in the ethos and practices of clinical teams, as well as the establishment of working routines that facilitate family involvement approaches. PMID:25280809

  9. Stimulated Recall Methodology for Assessing Work System Barriers and Facilitators in Family-Centered Rounds in a Pediatric Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Carayon, Pascale; Li, Yaqiong; Kelly, Michelle M.; DuBenske, Lori L.; Xie, Anping; McCabe, Brenna; Orne, Jason; Cox, Elizabeth D.

    2014-01-01

    Human factors and ergonomics methods are needed to redesign healthcare processes and support patient-centered care, in particular for vulnerable patients such as hospitalized children. We implemented and evaluated a stimulated recall methodology for collective confrontation in the context of family-centered rounds. Five parents and five healthcare team members reviewed video records of their bedside rounds, and were then interviewed using the stimulated recall methodology to identify work system barriers and facilitators in family-centered rounds. The evaluation of the methodology was based on a survey of the participants, and a qualitative analysis of interview data in light of the work system model of Smith and Carayon (1989; 2000). Positive survey feedback from the participants was received. The stimulated recall methodology identified barriers and facilitators in all work system elements. Participatory ergonomics methods such as the stimulated recall methodology allow a range of participants, including parents and children, to participate in healthcare process improvement. PMID:24894378

  10. Family-supportive supervisor behaviors, work engagement, and subjective well-being: a contextually dependent mediated process.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Russell A; Mills, Maura J; Trout, Rachel C; English, Lucy

    2014-04-01

    Grounded in a multistudy framework, we examined the relationship between family-supportive supervisor behaviors, work engagement, and subjective well-being as a contextually dependent mediated process. In Study 1 (N = 310), based on broaden-and-build and conservation of resources theories, we tested the proposed mediated process while controlling for perceived organizational support and perceived managerial effectiveness. We also demonstrated that family-supportive supervisor behaviors are distinguishable from general supervisor behaviors. In Study 2 (N = 1,640), using multigroup structural equation modeling, we validated and extended Study 1 results by examining how the mediated model varied based on 2 contextualizing constructs: (a) dependent care responsibilities and (b) availability of family-friendly benefits. Although the mediational results were contextually dependent, they were not necessarily consistent with hypothesizing based on conservation of resources theory. Practical implications are emphasized in addition to future research directions. PMID:24730426

  11. Working Families at the Margins: The Uncertain Future of America's Small Towns. Hearing Before the Select Committee on Children, Youth, and Families. House of Representatives, One Hundred First Congress, First Session.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Select Committee on Children, Youth, and Families.

    Poverty affects many rural two-parent families, even with one or both parents working. High suicide rates, increased violence, families separated in order to find work, homelessness, and hunger afflict the rural and small town poor. This document contains testimony from poor and homeless rural people; the director of the Center on Budget and…

  12. Service needs among Latino immigrant families: implications for social work practice.

    PubMed

    Ayón, Cecilia

    2014-01-01

    This study sought to learn from Latino immigrant families what services they need to promote their families' well-being within a context of stringent anti-immigrant legislation. Fifty-two Latino immigrant parents participated in focus groups. Focus groups took place following the passage of Senate Bill 1070. Findings reveal five major categories of need: mental health, physical health care, education, information and support services, and community efforts. Participants' experiences as immigrants played a significant role in their narratives. The narratives reveal that families need assistance navigating systems of care, coping with discrimination and oppressive environments, strengthening ties among community members, and advocating for policy change. Social workers are called to address the needs of this community and advocate for human rights and social justice. PMID:24640227

  13. Is family-friendly policy (FFP) working in the private sector of South Korea?

    PubMed

    Kang, Young-Hee

    2013-01-01

    Using the Korean Labor and Income Panel Study (KLIPS), I investigated the impact of family-friendly policies (FFPs) on job satisfaction and organizational commitment in the private sector of South Korea. Paid leave, childcare leave, and support for housing are positively related to both job satisfaction and organizational commitment. Sick leave is positively related to organizational commitment. However, subsidized family event cost is a marginally significant predictor of job satisfaction and organizational commitment. In addition, the relationships between subsidized childcare cost and employee attitudes were not supported. Implications and suggestions for future research are discussed. PMID:24255855

  14. 29 CFR 825.100 - The Family and Medical Leave Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... appropriate paid leave if the employee has earned or accrued it, for up to a total of 12 workweeks in any 12... a covered employer may take job-protected, unpaid leave, or substitute appropriate paid leave if the... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false The Family and Medical Leave Act. 825.100 Section...

  15. 29 CFR 825.100 - The Family and Medical Leave Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... appropriate paid leave if the employee has earned or accrued it, for up to a total of 12 workweeks in any 12... a covered employer may take job-protected, unpaid leave, or substitute appropriate paid leave if the... 29 Labor 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false The Family and Medical Leave Act. 825.100 Section...

  16. CARNEGIE MELLON UNIVERSITY APPLICATION FOR FAMILY AND MEDICAL LEAVE OF ABSENCE

    E-print Network

    , for Short-term Disability benefits? yes no Care of a seriously ill family member (select one) child spouse parent Care for a new child: Birth Adoption Foster care of a child Expected Date of birth, adoption or entrusted with foster care Call to Duty Leave: Eligible employees may take up to 12 weeks of unpaid leave

  17. Illusions of Prosperity: America's Working Families in an Age of Economic Insecurity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blau, Joel

    This book examines the political and economic consequences of the United States' growing reliance on the market and the effects that this growing reliance is having on U.S. workers and their families. The following are among the topics discussed in the book's 10 chapters: (1) consequences of the turn to the market (disinvestment, imbalance between…

  18. Women at the Top: Powerful Leaders Define Success as Work + Family in a Culture of Gender

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheung, Fanny M.; Halpern, Diane F.

    2010-01-01

    How do women rise to the top of their professions when they also have significant family care responsibilities? This critical question has not been addressed by existing models of leadership. In a review of recent research, we explore an alternative model to the usual notion of a Western male as the prototypical leader. The model includes (a)…

  19. Working with Korean-American Families: Multicultural Hermeneutics in Understanding and Dealing with Marital Domestic Violence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Sang Bok

    2003-01-01

    Multicultural hermeneutics is introduced as a method of understanding and dealing with marital domestic violence. One Korean-American family case is presented to show how marital domestic violence can be evaluated and treated better from the perspective of multicultural hermeneutics. A number of recommendations are also suggested to change the…

  20. Caring for Children with Special Needs. BNA Special Report Series on Work & Family. Special Report #43.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ott-Worrow, Karen; Baldassano, Victoria A.

    This report examines day care needs and services for families with handicapped children. A section providing background information identifies barriers to finding day care for these children and discusses the relevance of federal legislation, especially the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990. The next section presents information on standards…

  1. Role of Early Family Configuration and Hours Worked on Student Success in Two-Year Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boswell, Robert A.; Passmore, David L.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine factors that influence student success in two-year colleges, community colleges, or junior colleges. In determining the purpose of the study, a research framework is established to review the relationships between student success and biological children, marriage/co-habitation, early family configuration,…

  2. Life-Course Effects of Work and Family Circumstances on Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooksey, Elizabeth C.; Menaghan, Elizabeth G.; Jekielek, Susan M.

    1997-01-01

    Data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth on 2,342 children aged 6-7 and born between 1979 and 1984 suggest that children's behavior problems are related to current family and parental employment conditions and earlier maternal resources and vulnerabilities (early deviance, self-esteem in 1980, smoking during pregnancy, cognitive…

  3. Family Networks and School Enrolment: Evidence from a Randomized Social Experiment. NBER Working Paper No. 14949

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Angelucci, Manuela; DeGiorgi, Giacomo; Rangel, Marcos A.; Rasul, Imran

    2009-01-01

    We present evidence on whether and how a household's behavior is influenced by the presence and characteristics of its extended family. Using household panel data from the Progresa program in rural Mexico, we exploit information on the paternal and maternal surnames of heads and spouses in conjunction with the Spanish naming convention to identify…

  4. Influencing Preservice Teachers' Attitudes about Working with Low-Income and/or Ethnic Minority Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amatea, Ellen S.; Cholewa, Blaire; Mixon, Kacy A.

    2012-01-01

    There is a growing literature revealing the complexity of family-school relationships and the significant power imbalances and mismatches between the role expectations of caregivers and teachers who differ by class and race. This study investigates a course at a large research university in the Southeastern United States designed to influence the…

  5. Working with Latino Families: Challenges Faced by Educators and Civic Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lieshoff, Sylvia Cobos

    2007-01-01

    This article analyzes a subset of data gathered during a survey of 155 school systems and communities across the nation. The data were obtained from a capability survey as part of the application for a Toyota Family Literacy Program (TFLP) grant. Educators and civic leaders in 38 states responded to questions about their five greatest challenges…

  6. Love and work: feminism, family and ideas of equality and citizenship, Britain 1900-39. 

    E-print Network

    Innes, Susan K

    1998-01-01

    The thesis is a political history and a history of ideas. It is an account of social feminism in the early twentieth century as it sought to extend the ideal of equality to the family and social citizenshp to women in ...

  7. Working Together with Children and Families: Case Studies in Early Intervention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McWilliam, P. J., Ed.; Bailey, Donald B., Jr., Ed.

    This book presents 21 case studies of young children with disabilities in a variety of family situations and settings, for early interventionists to study in planning and applying recommended practices. Section I, "Defining and Delivering Quality Services in Early Intervention," provides two introductory chapters: "The Search for Quality…

  8. Transitions to Adulthood in a Changing Economy: No Work, No Family, No Future?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Booth, Alan, Ed.; Crouter, Ann C., Ed.; Shanahan, Michael J., Ed.

    This book contains 17 papers devoted to the following four aspects of the transition to adulthood: effects of alterations in the structure of opportunity; effects of prior experiences in the family; effects of prior experience in the workplace; and career development and marriage formation during a period of rising inequality. The following papers…

  9. Who Goes to College? Differential Enrollment by Race and Family Background. NBER Working Paper Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black, Sandra E.; Sufi, Amir

    While trends in college enrollment for Blacks and Whites have been the subject of study for many years, little attention has been paid to variation in college enrollment by socioeconomic status (SES). It is well documented that, controlling for family background, Blacks are more likely to enroll in college than Whites. This relationship is…

  10. The Effect of Family Member Migration on Education and Work among Nonmigrant Youth in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Halpern-Manners, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    While academic and policy circles have given much attention to the assimilatory experiences of Mexican immigrants in the United States, less is known about those who stay behind—an especially unfortunate oversight given the increasing number of Mexican youth with migrant family members. Of the studies that do exist, most have sought to identify the effect migration has on youths’ migratory and educational aspirations, often using qualitative methods in single sending communities. The present article supplements this research in two ways: (1) in addition to assessing educational outcomes, the scope of the analysis is expanded to include nonmigrants’ interaction with another homeland institution of upward mobility—the labor market; and (2) using a large demographic data set, statistical techniques are employed to adjust for unobserved selectivity into the migrant family-member population, thus accounting for a potentially serious source of bias. The results suggest that youth in migrant-sending families are less likely to complete the educational transitions leading up to post-secondary school, and have a lower probability of participating in the local economy. The results also indicate that unobserved factors play a “nonignorable” role in sorting youth into migrant and nonmigrant families. PMID:21347807

  11. Birth-to-Work: A Systems Framework for Individual, Family, and Community Development

    E-print Network

    and rebuildingg · Economic and entrepreneurial development · Education and technology · Family development over understand the factors that contribute to their situation. · Help community members understand the economic Characteristics ­ Children of alcoholics and other drug-using parents ­ Children of parents with antisocial

  12. A Language of Families: English, Hausa and Wolof. Sociolinguistic Working Paper Number 90.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wills, Dorothy Davis

    Study of the use of baby talk in parental speech can illuminate the parent-child relationship, acquisition of adult language, the permissible modifications to language structure without diminishing meaning, and code-switching. This is illustrated in the baby talk embedded in adult-child conversation in the context of family and household in three…

  13. AdvoCasey: Documenting Programs That Work for Kids and Families, 1999-2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    AdvoCasey, 2000

    2000-01-01

    This periodical provides accessible, in-depth profiles of programs and policies that have made measurable differences in the lives of children and families. A particular focus is on initiatives that have helped reform child-serving institutions and systems and that have strengthened the physical infrastructure, economic vitality, and social fabric…

  14. Recruit, Respect, Respond: A Model for Working with Low-Income Families and Their Preschoolers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    France, Marycarolyn G.; Hager, Jane Meeks

    1993-01-01

    Describes the International Reading Project, a series of six weekly one-hour sessions that focus on teaching parents with limited reading skills how to read aloud to their children. Notes that (1) choral reading is a major part of the program; and (2) the low-income families and their children who participated in the program were all African…

  15. Work-Family Imagery and Gender Stereotypes: Television and the Reproduction of Difference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coltrane, Scott; Adams, Michele

    1997-01-01

    Analysis of cultural imagery in 1,699 television commercials from 1992-94 showed that women were less prevalent, more likely to be shown in families, less likely to hold jobs or be in professional occupations, less likely to exercise authority, and more likely to be depicted as sex objects. Results suggest that sex stereotypes in media imagery…

  16. International Perspectives on Work-Family Policies: Lessons from the World's Most Competitive Economies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Earle, Alison; Mokomane, Zitha; Heymann, Jody

    2011-01-01

    The United States does not guarantee families a wide range of supportive workplace policies such as paid maternity and paternity leave or paid leave to care for sick children. Proposals to provide such benefits are invariably met with the complaint that the costs would reduce employment and undermine the international competitiveness of American…

  17. What works in family planning interventions: A systematic review of the evidence

    PubMed Central

    Mwaikambo, Lisa; Speizer, Ilene S.; Schurmann, Anna; Morgan, Gwen; Fikree, Fariyal

    2013-01-01

    This study presents findings from a systematic review of evaluations of family planning interventions published between 1995 and 2008. Studies that used an experimental or quasi-experimental design or had another way to attribute program exposure to observed changes in fertility or family planning outcomes at the individual or population levels were included and ranked by strength of evidence. A total of 63 studies were found that met the inclusion criteria. The findings from this review are summarized in tabular format by the type of intervention (classified as supply-side or demand-side). About two-thirds of the studies found were on demand generation type-programs. Findings from all programs revealed significant improvements in knowledge, attitudes, discussion, and intentions. Program impacts on contraceptive use and use of family planning services were less consistently found and less than half of the studies that measured fertility or pregnancy-related outcomes found an impact. Based on the review findings, we identify promising programmatic approaches and propose directions for future evaluation research of family planning interventions. PMID:21834409

  18. Preventing Teen Pregnancy. Learning Guide 4. Project Connect. Linking Self-Family-Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emily Hall Tremaine Foundation, Inc., Hartford, CT.

    This learning guide is designed to connect personal, family, and job responsibilities for adults and out-of-school youth in economically depressed areas of the state (including transitional ex-offenders and corrections populations) so that these individuals learn to manage and balance these aspects of their lives in order to prepare for or…

  19. Integrating Social Work into Palliative Care for Lung Cancer Patients and Families: A Multi-Dimensional Approach

    PubMed Central

    Otis-Green, Shirley; Sidhu, Rupinder K.; Ferraro, Catherine Del; Ferrell, Betty

    2014-01-01

    Lung cancer patients and their family caregivers face a wide range of potentially distressing symptoms across the four domains of quality of life. A multi-dimensional approach to addressing these complex concerns with early integration of palliative care has proven beneficial. This article highlights opportunities to integrate social work using a comprehensive quality of life model and a composite patient scenario from a large lung cancer educational intervention National Cancer Institute-funded program project grant. PMID:24797998

  20. Leadership Characteristics and Work Ethic of Extension Family and Consumer Science Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hollingsworth, Connie; Brewer, Ernest W.; Petty, Gregory C.

    2002-01-01

    Instruments completed by 166 Tennessee extension educators revealed a significant relationship between leadership orientation and work ethic. Their preferred leadership orientation was human relations; work ethic preferences included dependability and interpersonal skills. Higher work ethic scores predicted leadership effectiveness. (Contains 23…

  1. Are Teens in Low-Income and Welfare Families Working Too Much? New Federalism: National Survey of America's Families, Series B, No. B-25. Assessing the New Federalism: An Urban Institute Program To Assess Changing Social Policies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lerman, Robert I.

    This brief examines the work patterns of 16- to 17-year-old high school students, focusing on: whether teens in low-income families work as much as or more than other teens; how high school students' work patterns vary by race and gender; and whether work by teenagers is associated with negative school-related outcomes. Research indicates that…

  2. Work Activity and Obstacles to Work among TANF Recipients. New Federalism: National Survey of America's Families, Series B, No. B-2. Assessing the New Federalism: An Urban Institute Program To Assess Changing Social Policies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zedlewski, Sheila R.

    Dramatic shifts from cash assistance to work, embodied in the 1996 replacement of Aid to Families with Dependent Children with Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF), highlight the need to understand how current cash assistance recipients participate in required work-related activities and obstacles faced in getting and keeping jobs. The…

  3. Balancing Work and Family Life is a four-part brown bag series designed to support families by providing information for various stages of family life including pregnancy disability benefits, nutrition

    E-print Network

    November 19 / 11:00 a.m. ­ 1:00 p.m. / HUB 367 UCR Child Development Center Time Management Tips Stress IV - Preparing Your Child for College December 2 / 11:00 a.m. ­ 1:00 p.m. / HUB 269 Financial Aid, nutrition and health, time and stress management, and preparing your child for college. Work and Family Life

  4. Out of the Comfort Zone: Enhancing Work-Based Learning about Employability through Student Reflection on Work Placements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eden, Sally

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines the work-based learning about employability reported by 26 undergraduate Geography and Environmental Management students on part-time, unpaid work placements. The students' "reflective essays" emphasized their learning more in terms of emotional challenges than in terms of skills, as being pushed out of their…

  5. Nurses' Practice Environment and Work-Family Conflict in Relation to Burn Out: A Multilevel Modelling Approach

    PubMed Central

    Leineweber, Constanze; Westerlund, Hugo; Chungkham, Holendro Singh; Lindqvist, Rikard; Runesdotter, Sara; Tishelman, Carol

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To investigate associations between nurse work practice environment measured at department level and individual level work-family conflict on burnout, measured as emotional exhaustion, depersonalization and personal accomplishment among Swedish RNs. Methods A multilevel model was fit with the individual RN at the 1st, and the hospital department at the 2nd level using cross-sectional RN survey data from the Swedish part of RN4CAST, an EU 7th framework project. The data analysed here is based on a national sample of 8,620 RNs from 369 departments in 53 hospitals. Results Generally, RNs reported high values of personal accomplishment and lower values of emotional exhaustion and depersonalization. High work-family conflict increased the risk for emotional exhaustion, but for neither depersonalization nor personal accomplishment. On department level adequate staffing and good leadership and support for nurses reduced the risk for emotional exhaustion and depersonalization. Personal accomplishment was statistically significantly related to staff adequacy. Conclusions The findings suggest that adequate staffing, good leadership, and support for nurses are crucial for RNs' mental health. Our findings also highlight the importance of hospital managers developing policies and practices to facilitate the successful combination of work with private life for employees. PMID:24820972

  6. Using Interactive Family Science Shows to Improve Public Knowledge on Antibiotic Resistance: Does It Work?

    PubMed Central

    Lecky, Donna M.; Hawking, Meredith K. D.; Verlander, Neville Q.; McNulty, Cliodna A. M.

    2014-01-01

    The public plays an important role in controlling the emergence and spread of antibiotic resistance. A large British survey showed that there is still public misunderstanding about microbes and antibiotics. e-Bug, a European DG Sanco sponsored project, aims to disseminate a school antibiotic and hygiene educational pack and website across Europe. Interactive science shows based on the e-Bug educational packs were developed to take the key health and hygiene messages from the e-Bug school resources to families. The science show was evaluated to assess public knowledge and understanding of antibiotics and antibiotic resistance pre and post intervention. An interactive stall comprised of a 3×2 m backing stand with background information, an interactive activity and discussions with a trained demonstrator was on display at a family holiday resort. Pre-piloted knowledge questionnaires were completed by parents and children pre and post intervention. Adult (?19 years) baseline knowledge regarding antibiotics and antibiotic resistance was high although significant knowledge improvement was observed where baseline knowledge was low. Children's (5–11 years) knowledge around antibiotics and antibiotic resistance was significantly improved for all questions. The science show can be viewed as a success in improving parents' and children's knowledge of antibiotic use thereby highlighting the importance of educating the public through interaction. PMID:25162505

  7. Work-Family Interaction among Faculty: A Systematic Literature Review and a Phenomenological Study 

    E-print Network

    Beigi, Mina

    2015-08-13

    Employment as a university professor is unique in that the work schedules are not typically from nine-to-five and allow flexibility in time use. Professors are not obligated to stay at school while conducting research, ...

  8. Work-Family Conflict and Well-Being in Northern Europe

    E-print Network

    Scott, Jacqueline; Plagnol, Anke C.

    2012-01-01

    of relationships between and across generations – within partnerships and between parents and children. Traditionally it was the woman who took responsibility for the home, while the man provided the income on which home- life depends. As dual- earner... (not living together) were asked how many hours a week are usually spent on activities such as cooking, washing, cleaning, shopping and maintenance of property Table 7.1 Paid work strategies Paid work hours strategy: His weekly hours Her weekly...

  9. Part-time work and job sharing in health care: is the NHS a family-friendly employer?

    PubMed

    Branine, Mohamed

    2003-01-01

    This paper examines the nature and level of flexible employment in the National Health Service (NHS) by investigating the extent to which part-time work and job sharing arrangements are used in the provision and delivery of health care. It attempts to analyse the reasons for an increasing number of part-timers and a very limited number of job sharers in the NHS and to explain the advantages and disadvantages of each pattern of employment. Data collected through the use of questionnaires and interviews from 55 NHS trusts reveal that the use of part-time work is a tradition that seems to fit well with the cost-saving measures imposed on the management of the service but at the same time it has led to increasing employee dissatisfaction, and that job sharing arrangements are suitable for many NHS employees since the majority of them are women with a desire to combine family commitments with career prospects but a very limited number of employees have had the opportunity to job share. Therefore it is concluded that to attract and retain the quality of staff needed to ensure high performance standards in the provision and delivery of health care the NHS should accept the diversity that exists within its workforce and take a more proactive approach to promoting a variety of flexible working practices and family-friendly policies. PMID:12800280

  10. Family and Medical Leave (FMLA) Request Form 1) Complete first page of form and sign on page two

    E-print Network

    He, Chuan

    Family and Medical Leave (FMLA) Request Form 1) Complete first page of form and sign on page two 2: _____________ I HEREBY REQUEST THE FOLLOWING BENEFITS BE CONTINUED DURING AN UNPAID FMLA LEAVE: ______ Medical processing of my request. I am not required to provide details about my medical condition to my supervisor

  11. Coworking as a Career Strategy: Implications for the Work and Family Lives of University Employees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweet, Stephen; Moen, Phyllis

    2004-01-01

    This study of 276 couples compares coworking couples, which means both partners work for the same university, with noncoworking couples, those couples in which only one partner is employed at a university. Among the employees at the two universities studied, one in seven dual-earner couples cowork. These couples are more educated and are less…

  12. Juggling the Balls--Study, Work, Family and Play: Student Perspectives on Flexible and Blended Heutagogy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashton, Jean; Elliott, Roslyn

    2007-01-01

    This article draws on research with the student cohort in one of the early childhood teacher education programmes at the University of Western Sydney, Australia. It explores students' perceptions of a flexible and blended pedagogy, or "heutagogy" which combines online work with face-to-face lectures and tutorials. Research into teaching and…

  13. Contemporary Work and Family Issues Affecting Marriage and Cohabitation among Low-Income Single Mothers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joshi, Pamela; Quane, James M.; Cherlin, Andrew J.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we advance and test an integrative model of the effects of employment status, nonstandard work schedules, male employment, and women's perceptions of economic instability on union formation among low-income single mothers. On the basis of the longitudinal data from 1,299 low-income mothers from the Three-City Welfare Study, results…

  14. 3 CFR - White House Task Force on Middle-Class Working Families

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...) restore labor standards, including workplace safety; (d) protect the incomes of middle-class working... facilitate the posting on the Internet of submissions by outside parties and engage in an open, two-way... available to the public and posted on the Internet. Sec. 5. General Provisions. (a) The heads of...

  15. Working on the Weekend: Fathers' Time with Family in the United Kingdom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hook, Jennifer L.

    2012-01-01

    Whereas most resident fathers are able to spend more time with their children on weekends than on weekdays, many fathers work on the weekends, spending less time with their children on these days. There are conflicting findings about whether fathers are able to make up for lost weekend time on weekdays. Using unique features of the United…

  16. Work-Family Information for State Legislators. Policy Briefing Series. Issue 18

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curlew, Mary; Weber, Julie

    2009-01-01

    One of the most important factors in school performance is parental involvement. However, many parents do not have the flexibility in their work schedules or the leave policies necessary to attend school functions. As a result, legislators are creating policies to address this issue. This policy brief tackles the following questions: (1) What is…

  17. Preparing Professionals to Work with Infants, Toddlers, and Their Families: A Hybrid Approach to Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sass-Lehrer, Marilyn; Benedict, Beth S.; Hutchinson, Nicole

    2011-01-01

    A shortage of well-prepared professionals imposes limits on access to comprehensive and effective early intervention services to deaf and hard of hearing children. The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act expects states to ensure that professionals working with infants and toddlers have relevant skills, however, there are very few…

  18. Employment, Work Conditions, and the Home Environment in Single-Mother Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lleras, Christy

    2008-01-01

    This study investigates the impact of employment status and work conditions on the quality of the home environment provided by single mothers of preschool-age children. Multivariate analyses were conducted using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth. The results indicate that employment status is not a significant predictor of the…

  19. [Family Involvement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alliance: The Newsletter of the National Transition Alliance, 1996

    1996-01-01

    This theme issue provides four articles that address family involvement in the transition of youth with disabilities from school to work. The first article, "Family Involvement" by Marge Goldberg and Shauna McDonald, offers evidence of the importance of family involvement at this stage of the individual's life, reports on families' experiences,…

  20. 45 CFR 286.150 - Can a family, with a child under age 6, be penalized because a parent refuses to work because (s...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 true Can a family, with a child under age 6, be penalized because a...refuses to work because (s)he cannot find child care? 286.150 Section 286.150...ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS), ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN AND FAMILIES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH...

  1. 45 CFR 286.150 - Can a family, with a child under age 6, be penalized because a parent refuses to work because (s...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 true Can a family, with a child under age 6, be penalized because a...refuses to work because (s)he cannot find child care? 286.150 Section 286.150...ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS), ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN AND FAMILIES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH...

  2. 45 CFR 286.150 - Can a family, with a child under age 6, be penalized because a parent refuses to work because (s...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 false Can a family, with a child under age 6, be penalized because a...refuses to work because (s)he cannot find child care? 286.150 Section 286.150...ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS), ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN AND FAMILIES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH...

  3. Resource Management Resource Guide. A Resource for Teaching the Resource Management Core Course Area of Ohio's Work and Family Life Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kister, Joanna; And Others

    This Resource Management Resource Guide is intended to help teachers implement Ohio's Work and Family Life Program. Course content focuses on the practical problems related to managing human and material resources, making consumer decisions, and feeding, clothing, and housing the family. These practical problems are posed through case studies and…

  4. Linking families and facilities for care at birth: What works to avert intrapartum-related deaths?

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Anne CC; Lawn, Joy E.; Cousens, Simon; Kumar, Vishwajeet; Osrin, David; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A.; Wall, Steven N.; Nandakumar, Allyala K.; Syed, Uzma; Darmstadt, Gary L.

    2012-01-01

    Background Delays in receiving effective care during labor and at birth may be fatal for the mother and fetus, contributing to 2 million annual intrapartum stillbirths and intrapartum-related neonatal deaths each year. Objective We present a systematic review of strategies to link families and facilities, including community mobilization, financial incentives, emergency referral and transport systems, prenatal risk screening, and maternity waiting homes. Results There is moderate quality evidence that community mobilization with high levels of community engagement can increase institutional births and significantly reduce perinatal and early neonatal mortality. Meta-analysis showed a doubling of skilled birth attendance and a 35% reduction in early neonatal mortality. However, no data are available on intrapartum-specific outcomes. Evidence is limited, but promising, that financial incentive schemes and community referral/transport systems may increase rates of skilled birth attendance and emergency obstetric care utilization; however, impact on mortality is unknown. Current evidence for maternity waiting homes and risk screening is low quality. Conclusions Empowering communities is an important strategy to reduce the large burden of intrapartum complications. Innovations are needed to bring the poor closer to obstetric care, such as financial incentives and cell phone technology. New questions need to be asked of “old” strategies such as risk screening and maternity waiting homes. The effect of all of these strategies on maternal and perinatal mortality, particularly intrapartum-related outcomes, requires further evaluation. PMID:19815201

  5. Understanding Differential Organizational Responses to Work/Family Issues: The Role of Beliefs, Attitudes, and Decision-Making Styles of Chief Executive Officers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eversole, Barbara A. W.; Gloeckner, Gene; Banning, James H.

    2006-01-01

    Differential adoption of work/life programs by organizations was investigated by studying chief executive officers. A grounded theory was developed and differential adoption explained by the way CEOs made decisions. Implications for work/life program managers include suggestions for persuading CEOs to adopt work/family programs. The study adds to…

  6. 45 CFR 261.31 - How many hours must a work-eligible individual participate for the family to count in the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 2012-10-01 true How many hours must a work-eligible individual participate for the family to...HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES ENSURING THAT RECIPIENTS WORK What Are the Work Activities and How Do They Count? § 261.31...

  7. 45 CFR 261.32 - How many hours must work-eligible individuals participate for the family to count in the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false How many hours must work-eligible individuals participate for the family...HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES ENSURING THAT RECIPIENTS WORK What Are the Work Activities and How Do They Count? § 261.32...

  8. 45 CFR 261.32 - How many hours must work-eligible individuals participate for the family to count in the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false How many hours must work-eligible individuals participate for the family...HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES ENSURING THAT RECIPIENTS WORK What Are the Work Activities and How Do They Count? § 261.32...

  9. 45 CFR 261.31 - How many hours must a work-eligible individual participate for the family to count in the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false How many hours must a work-eligible individual participate for the family to...HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES ENSURING THAT RECIPIENTS WORK What Are the Work Activities and How Do They Count? § 261.31...

  10. 45 CFR 261.31 - How many hours must a work-eligible individual participate for the family to count in the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 2012-10-01 true How many hours must a work-eligible individual participate for the family to...HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES ENSURING THAT RECIPIENTS WORK What Are the Work Activities and How Do They Count? § 261.31...

  11. 45 CFR 261.31 - How many hours must a work-eligible individual participate for the family to count in the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false How many hours must a work-eligible individual participate for the family to...HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES ENSURING THAT RECIPIENTS WORK What Are the Work Activities and How Do They Count? § 261.31...

  12. 45 CFR 261.32 - How many hours must work-eligible individuals participate for the family to count in the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 2012-10-01 true How many hours must work-eligible individuals participate for the family...HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES ENSURING THAT RECIPIENTS WORK What Are the Work Activities and How Do They Count? § 261.32...

  13. 45 CFR 261.31 - How many hours must a work-eligible individual participate for the family to count in the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false How many hours must a work-eligible individual participate for the family to...HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES ENSURING THAT RECIPIENTS WORK What Are the Work Activities and How Do They Count? § 261.31...

  14. 45 CFR 261.32 - How many hours must work-eligible individuals participate for the family to count in the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 2012-10-01 true How many hours must work-eligible individuals participate for the family...HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES ENSURING THAT RECIPIENTS WORK What Are the Work Activities and How Do They Count? § 261.32...

  15. 45 CFR 261.32 - How many hours must work-eligible individuals participate for the family to count in the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false How many hours must work-eligible individuals participate for the family...HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES ENSURING THAT RECIPIENTS WORK What Are the Work Activities and How Do They Count? § 261.32...

  16. Learning by Experience, Work and Productivity: Theory and Empirical Evidence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pankhurst, K. V.

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines the nature and significance of learning by experience during work, both paid and unpaid. Data about the relationship between costs, especially labour costs, and output have come to be interpreted as evidence of learning by experience, but these grouped data are unable to explain the nature and process of individual experience…

  17. Families and elder care in the twenty-first century.

    PubMed

    Bookman, Ann; Kimbrel, Delia

    2011-01-01

    Although most Americans know that the U.S. population is aging, they are far less informed about the reality of providing elders with personal care, health care, and social support. Families-particularly women-have always been critical in providing elder care, but the entry of so many women into the paid labor force has made elder care increasingly difficult. Ann Bookman and Delia Kimbrel show how changes in both work and family life are complicating families' efforts to care for elderly relatives. Because almost 60 percent of elder caregivers today are employed, many forms of caregiving must now be "outsourced" to nonfamily members. And because elders are widely diverse by race and socioeconomic status, their families attach differing cultural meanings to care and have widely different resources with which to accomplish their care goals. Although the poorest elders have access to some subsidized services, and the wealthiest can pay for services, many middle-class families cannot afford services that allow elders to age in their homes and avoid even more costly institutional care. Six key groups--health care providers, nongovernmental community-based service providers, employers, government, families, and elders themselves--are engaged in elder care, but their efforts are often fragmented and uncoordinated. All six groups must be able to work in concert and to receive the resources they need. Both employer and government policies must be improved. Although large businesses have taken up the elder care challenge, most small and mid-sized firms still do not offer flexible work arrangements. Social Security and Medicare have provided critical support to families caring for elders, yet both face significant financial shortfalls. The Older American Act and the National Family Caregiver Support Program have broadened access to elder services, but need updating to address the needs of today's employed caregivers and elders who want to "age in place." And just over half of the nation's workforce is eligible for the unpaid leave benefits provided by the Family and Medical Leave Act. The authors close by reflecting on the need for a coordinated, cross-sector movement to create an "aging-friendly" society in the United States-a society that values well-being across the life span and supports citizens from diverse cultures and income levels as they age. PMID:22013631

  18. The trip to Bountiful: a study in family pathology in the work of Horton Foote.

    PubMed

    Morris, Muriel Gold

    2015-04-01

    This paper focusing on a major dramatic work by Horton Foote represents a compilation of many tragic themes he repeated over a lifetime of playwriting. The author pinpoints the psychological limitations of the characters and the problematic plot lines as they relate to Horton Foote in his own life experience. Psychoanalytic developmental theory is used to enlighten the reader with a powerful account of the playwright's struggle to fulfill his talent as well as to inform the public of the cultural problems underlying the life of the people and events of the time. PMID:25871694

  19. Making Families Work and What To Do When They Don't: Thirty Guides for Imperfect Parents of Imperfect Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borcherdt, Bill

    Taking a sometimes unconventional view of parent-child and family matters, this book contends that the facts of family living do matter--but not to the all-or-nothing degree advocated by some experts. The book disputes many well established beliefs about the importance of family life and maintains that as the sacredness of family relationships is…

  20. Family physician perceptions of working with LGBTQ patients: physician training needs

    PubMed Central

    Beagan, Brenda; Fredericks, Erin; Bryson, Mary

    2015-01-01

    Background Medical students and physicians report feeling under-prepared for working with patients who identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender or queer (LGBTQ). Understanding physician perceptions of this area of practice may aid in developing improved education. Method In-depth interviews with 24 general practice physicians in Halifax and Vancouver, Canada, were used to explore whether, when and how the gender identity and sexual orientation of LGBTQ women were relevant to good care. Inductive thematic analysis was conducted using ATLAS.ti data analysis software. Results Three major themes emerged: 1) Some physicians perceived that sexual/gender identity makes little or no difference; treating every patient as an individual while avoiding labels optimises care for everyone. 2) Some physicians perceived sexual/gender identity matters primarily for the provision of holistic care, and in order to address the effects of discrimination. 3) Some physicians perceived that sexual/gender identity both matters and does not matter, as they strove to balance the implications of social group membership with recognition of individual differences. Conclusions Physicians may be ignoring important aspects of social group memberships that affect health and health care. The authors hold that individual and socio-cultural differences are both important to the provision of quality health care. Distinct from stereotypes, generalisations about social group differences can provide valuable starting points, raising useful lines of inquiry. Emphasizing this distinction in medical education may help change physician approaches to the care of LGBTQ women. PMID:26451226

  1. Work characteristics and pesticide exposures among migrant agricultural families: a community-based research approach.

    PubMed Central

    McCauley, L A; Lasarev, M R; Higgins, G; Rothlein, J; Muniz, J; Ebbert, C; Phillips, J

    2001-01-01

    There are few data on pesticide exposures of migrant Latino farmworker children, and access to this vulnerable population is often difficult. In this paper we describe a community-based approach to implement culturally appropriate research methods with a migrant Latino farmworker community in Oregon. Assessments were conducted in 96 farmworker homes and 24 grower homes in two agricultural communities in Oregon. Measurements included surveys of pesticide use and work protection practices and analyses of home-dust samples for pesticide residues of major organophosphates used in area crops. Results indicate that migrant farmworker housing is diverse, and the amounts and types of pesticide residues found in homes differ. Azinphos-methyl (AZM) was the pesticide residue found most often in both farmworker and grower homes. The median level of AZM in farmworker homes was 1.45 ppm compared to 1.64 ppm in the entry area of grower homes. The median level of AZM in the play areas of grower homes was 0.71 ppm. The levels of AZM in migrant farmworker homes were most associated with the distance from fields and the number of agricultural workers in the home. Although the levels of AZM in growers and farmworker homes were comparable in certain areas, potential for disproportionate exposures occur in areas of the homes where children are most likely to play. The relationship between home resident density, levels of pesticide residues, and play behaviors of children merit further attention. PMID:11401767

  2. Students, Scientists, and Family Commemorate the Life and Diverse Works of Jack Eddy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Judge, Philip

    2011-02-01

    Eddy Cross-Disciplinary Symposium on Sun-Climate Research; Aspen, Colorado, 22-24 October 2010; In 1976, John Allen Eddy published a seminal article (see Science, 192(4245), 1189-1202) revealing a link between the Little Ice Age, which occurred during the sixteenth through nineteenth centuries, and a period of low sunspot activity, which Eddy called the “Maunder Minimum.” This work placed Sun-climate research on a firm scientific footing. Eddy passed away on 10 June 2009. Following Eddy's passions for education and cross-disciplinary research, a symposium was held to expose talented college students to the science and politics of Sun-climate research. Funding from NASA's Living With a Star Targeted Research and Technology program and from the High Altitude Observatory, Advanced Study Program, and Integrated Science Program of the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) supported keynote speakers and provided scholarships for 30 students (junior year to Ph.D.) from diverse disciplines. Eddy's wife, Barbara, led a session devoted to personal recollections. Spencer Weart (American Institute of Physics) gave an after-dinner tribute using recordings of Eddy from a 1999 interview.

  3. The determinants of time off work after childbirth.

    PubMed

    McGovern, P; Dowd, B; Gjerdingen, D; Moscovice, I; Kochevar, L; Murphy, S

    2000-06-01

    Relatively little is known about the role that leave policies--family, parental, or maternity-leave policies--play in facilitating time off work after childbirth. Yet time off is a critical element of leave policies, as it facilitates the mother's recovery from childbirth and promotes maternal-infant attachment. Using data from Minnesota, the state with the highest rate of female labor force participation, we examine the extent to which policies, relative to personal, job, and workplace characteristics, determine the duration of women's childbirth-related leaves from work. A random sample of women identified from vital statistics records is used to estimate the relationship between leave policies and time off work after childbirth. Of our sample 85 percent had access to some paid leave benefits, although only 46 percent had paid maternity leave benefits. The difference in duration of leave between women with and without paid leave policies was approximately four weeks, a substantial difference for most women and their infants. Paid leave policies and spousal earnings as primary determinants of maternal time off work, suggest problems in the use of unpaid leave for economically vulnerable women. PMID:10946388

  4. The 88-Hour Family: Effects of the 80-Hour Work Week on Marriage and Childbirth in a Surgical Residency

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Arden M; Jones, Kevin B

    2007-01-01

    The restriction of the resident physician work week to 80 hours has had dramatic affects on resident education and life-style. While effects on mood, psychological distress, and burn-out have been studied, the resultant changes in tangible quality of life have received little attention. birth rate was considered a measurable, relevant outcome. The resident marital and parental status by duty month was collected from a single orthopaedic surgical residency program for the four academic years preceding and following the implementation of the 80-hour work week. the number of births to residents during these periods were also tallied. The relative prevalence of positive marital status changed very little between residents in the two time durations from 66 to 71 percent, but parental status increased from 27 to 43 percent. The number of births per married resident duty year also increased from 0.23 pre-restrictions to 0.32 post-restrictions. While the individual decisions involved in generating these observed changes are complex and difficult to entirely decipher, it is thought that an increased perception of life-control within the work-hour restrictions may have prompted the dramatic changes in birth rate among resident families. PMID:17907445

  5. What Works and Why We Don't Have Enough of It: Voices of Families from Allegheny County's Family Support Centers. Phase I Evaluation: What Matters Most to Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Sheila; Li, Junlei

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to listen to families about "what" mattered most to them and "how" family support has impacted their lives. The findings of this report represent a synthesis of families' voices from 8 focus groups and 35 individual interviews, conducted at centers, office meetings, and homes--with over 100 family members across 13…

  6. 34 CFR Appendix E to Part 674 - Examples for Computing Maximum Penalty Charges (6 Months Unpaid Overdue Payments) on Direct Loans...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Months Unpaid Overdue Payments) on Direct Loans Made for Periods of Enrollment Before January 1, 1986 E Appendix E to Part 674 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FEDERAL PERKINS LOAN PROGRAM Pt. 674, App....

  7. 34 CFR Appendix E to Part 674 - Examples for Computing Maximum Penalty Charges (6 Months Unpaid Overdue Payments) on Direct Loans...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Months Unpaid Overdue Payments) on Direct Loans Made for Periods of Enrollment Before January 1, 1986 E Appendix E to Part 674 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FEDERAL PERKINS LOAN PROGRAM Pt. 674, App....

  8. 34 CFR Appendix E to Part 674 - Examples for Computing Maximum Penalty Charges (6 Months Unpaid Overdue Payments) on Direct Loans...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Months Unpaid Overdue Payments) on Direct Loans Made for Periods of Enrollment Before January 1, 1986 E Appendix E to Part 674 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FEDERAL PERKINS LOAN PROGRAM Pt. 674, App....

  9. UIC Theatre INTERNSHIP GUIDELINES 1. An internship is an unpaid placement at a professional, profit or not-for-profit organization. (If

    E-print Network

    Zhu, Zhichun

    UIC Theatre INTERNSHIP GUIDELINES 1. An internship is an unpaid placement at a professional, profit to as an apprenticeship and is not eligible for UIC credit.) All internships are graded and can earn up to 4 credits per semester (a total of 8 internship credits over the course of 4 years is allowed). 2. Who is eligible

  10. I. WHAT IS A JUDICIAL INTERNSHIP? A judicial internship is an unpaid position in which a law student acts as a quasi-law clerk to a

    E-print Network

    Shyu, Mei-Ling

    #12;I. WHAT IS A JUDICIAL INTERNSHIP? A judicial internship is an unpaid position in which a law student acts as a quasi-law clerk to a judge. Judicial internships are available during the summer on the court or judge, the internship experience provides an invaluable opportunity for law students to view

  11. 34 CFR 682.402 - Death, disability, closed school, false certification, unpaid refunds, and bankruptcy payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) FEDERAL FAMILY EDUCATION LOAN (FFEL) PROGRAM Administration of the Federal Family Education Loan... refunds, and bankruptcy payments. (a) General. (1) Rules governing the payment of claims based on filing... under paragraph (a)(5) (i) or (ii) of this section, the Secretary may authorize the payment of a...

  12. 34 CFR 682.402 - Death, disability, closed school, false certification, unpaid refunds, and bankruptcy payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) FEDERAL FAMILY EDUCATION LOAN (FFEL) PROGRAM Administration of the Federal Family Education Loan... refunds, and bankruptcy payments. (a) General. (1) Rules governing the payment of claims based on filing... claim under this section under conditions the Secretary considers appropriate. If the...

  13. 34 CFR 682.402 - Death, disability, closed school, false certification, unpaid refunds, and bankruptcy payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) FEDERAL FAMILY EDUCATION LOAN (FFEL) PROGRAM Administration of the Federal Family Education Loan... refunds, and bankruptcy payments. (a) General. (1) Rules governing the payment of claims based on filing... under paragraph (a)(5) (i) or (ii) of this section, the Secretary may authorize the payment of a...

  14. Work and Family: Sharing the Balance: The Union Gas Experience = Travail et la Famille: Un Equilibre a Partager: L'experience de Union Gas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ontario Women's Directorate, Toronto.

    Canadian business is changing. Competition is stiffer, markets are shifting. The workforce is also changing. Flexibility in when, where, and how work gets done is key to attracting the employees organizations need to gain a competitive edge. Many companies, organizations, and unions are recognizing the interdependence of work life and family life.…

  15. The Effects of Job Demands and Low Job Control on Work-Family Conflict: The Role of Fairness in Decision Making and Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heponiemi, Tarja; Elovainio, Marko; Pekkarinen, Laura; Sinervo, Timo; Kouvonen, Anne

    2008-01-01

    The present study examined whether perceptions of organizational fairness (the procedural and interactional components) were able to diminish the negative effects of high job demands and low job control on the balance between work and family. The study participants were 713 women working in long-term care for elderly people in Finland. The results…

  16. Executive functions and child problem behaviors are sensitive to family disruption: a study of children of mothers working overseas.

    PubMed

    Hewage, Chandana; Bohlin, Gunilla; Wijewardena, Kumudu; Lindmark, Gunilla

    2011-01-01

    Mothers in Sri Lanka are increasingly seeking overseas employment, resulting in disruption of the childcare environment. The present study was designed to evaluate the effects of maternal migration on executive function (EF) and behavior, thereby also contributing to the scientific understanding of environmental effects--or more specifically family effects--on children's neurocognitive functioning. A sample of 60 healthy 11-year-old children whose mothers had been working overseas for more than 1 year formed the study group, and a comparison group was recruited from the same schools. Evaluations were made twice over a 1-year interval with regard to the EF components inhibition and working memory as well as teacher ratings of internalizing and externalizing behavior. The children in the study group were found to have poorer EF and higher levels of externalizing behaviors. A composite score of inhibition partially mediated the group effect on externalizing behavior. Current home environment was assessed using the HOME scale, was poorer for the study group and was related to EF, but not to behavior problems. Keeping in mind the correlational nature of the present data, our results were discussed in relation to studies showing cognitive effects of stress. PMID:21159084

  17. An Analysis of Bronfenbrenner's Bio-Ecological Perspective for Early Childhood Educators: Implications for Working with Families Experiencing Stress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swick, Kevin James; Williams, Reginald D.

    2006-01-01

    Today's families face many stressors during the early childhood years. Particular stressors like homelessness, violence, and chemical dependence, play havoc with the family system. Urie Bronfenbrenner's bio-ecological perspective offers an insightful lens for understanding and supporting families under stress. This article presents the key…

  18. Changes in the Formation and Structure of Black Families: The Impact on Black Women. Working Paper No. 182.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAdoo, Harriette Pipes

    This paper attempts to dispel stereotypes about black family structures through an examination of the impact of demographic trends on black women. Topics covered include the following: (1) the structure of black families from the arrival of black slaves in North America through the 1950's; (2) the impact that the historical structure and…

  19. Words and Things: Recovering the Experience of Women in the Emerson Family, 1700-1863. Working Paper No. 168.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cole, Phyllis

    Based on the diary of Mary Moody Emerson (1771-1863), which was discovered in the Houghton Library at Harvard University among the Emerson family papers, as well as on hundreds of her letters and other records, the lives of five generations of women within the Emerson ministerial dynasty are recovered, and their religious and family experiences…

  20. Adoption Dynamics: An Update on the Impact of the Adoption and Safe Families Act. Chapin Hall Working Paper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wulczyn, Fred; Hislop, Kristen Brunner; Chen, Lijun

    2005-01-01

    The Adoption and Safe Families Act (ASFA) addresses issues pertaining to prevention of placement in the child welfare system, as well as family reunification, the specific provisions of ASFA that relate to the termination of parental rights and adoption are perhaps most central to the law's overarching purpose. This paper analyzes adoptions from…