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1

Dis-integrated policy: welfare-to-work participants' experiences of integrating paid work and unpaid family work  

Microsoft Academic Search

Using a critical feminist theoretical lens, we followed 17 families for one year – as they attempted to make the transition from welfare to work – eliciting narrative accounts of their day-to-day lives. We used an institutional–ethnographic methodology to analyse the data. Our study shows that the juncture at which unpaid caring work and paid employment meet may be more

Rhonda S. Breitkreuz; Deanna L. Williamson; Kim D. Raine

2010-01-01

2

The Influence of Unpaid Work on the Transition out of Full-Time Paid Work  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: Continued employment after retirement and engagement in unpaid work are both important ways of diminishing the negative economic effects of the retirement of baby boomer cohorts on society. Little research, however, examines the relationship between paid and unpaid work at the transition from full-time work. Using a resource perspective…

Carr, Dawn C.; Kail, Ben Lennox

2013-01-01

3

Midcourse in the United States: Does unpaid community participation replace paid work?  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examines the links between formal community participation (defined as volunteer work for an organization) in the\\u000a United States and psychological well-being, focusing on retirement as a key status transition. It draws on data from 762 American\\u000a retirees and not-yet-retired older workers in the midcourse years (in their 50s, 60s, and early 70s) to examine: (1) whether\\u000a unpaid community

Phyllis Moen; Vivian Fields

2002-01-01

4

How does the stork delegate work? Childbearing and the gender division of paid and unpaid labour  

Microsoft Academic Search

I estimate the relationship between fertility and the allocation of paid and unpaid labour among couples, accounting for the\\u000a potentially endogenous nature of fertility with two instruments. Additional children lead to a reduction in paid hours and\\u000a to an even larger increase in unpaid hours among mothers. An increase in fertility also leads to a decline in the proportion\\u000a of

Marc Frenette

2011-01-01

5

Labor Market Work and Home Care's Unpaid Caregivers: A Systematic Review of Labor Force Participation Rates, Predictors of Labor Market Withdrawal, and Hours of Work  

PubMed Central

As people continue to age and receive complex health care services at home, concern has arisen about the availability of family caregivers and their ability to combine employment with caregiving. This article evaluates the international research on unpaid caregivers and their labor market choices, highlighting three conclusions: first, caregivers in general are equally as likely to be in the labor force as noncaregivers; second, caregivers are more likely to work fewer hours in the labor market than noncaregivers, particularly if their caring commitments are heavy; and finally, only those heavily involved in caregiving are significantly more likely to withdraw from the labor market than noncaregivers. Policy recommendations are targeting greater access to formal care for “intensive” caregivers and developing workplace policies for employed caregivers. PMID:18070333

Lilly, Meredith B; Laporte, Audrey; Coyte, Peter C

2007-01-01

6

The academic effects of after-school paid and unpaid work among 14-year-old students in TIMSS countries  

PubMed Central

What it means to be a ‘student’ varies within and between countries. Apart from the wide variety of school types and school quality that is experienced by young people, there also is, accompanying increased rates of school participation, a growing population of students who work part-time. The theoretical and actual consequences of student work have long been in dispute. This article reformulates the dispute as an empirical question that can be addressed using cross-national testing data and student background information from the Trends in International Math and Science Study (TIMSS). Drawing information from 20 countries with distinctive proportions of students who reported paid and unpaid work, this study first compares their academic achievement in each country. Next, regression analysis is used to control for students’ home resources, and estimates are made of the effects of work and the differences in these effects cross-nationally. Finally, hierarchical linear models are estimated in each country so as to control for school effects, and to take into account the fact that working students may be clustered in lower-achieving schools. The results show that work after school, whether paid or unpaid, never positively affects academic achievement. However, after controlling for home resources and school effects, work negatively affects achievement only in certain countries. The article concludes with a discussion of the ways to interpret international differences in the effect of students’ work.

Post, David; Pong, Suet-ling

2014-01-01

7

Slave Labor on Campus: The Unpaid Postdoc.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses unpaid postdoctoral researchers, especially those in biology and medicine, addressing reasons why they work without pay, how they receive funding, efforts to help them, their impacts on the field, and personal concerns. (DC)

Broad, William J.

1982-01-01

8

This document was last updated April 2014 Unpaid Internships  

E-print Network

This document was last updated April 2014 Unpaid Internships There are many exceptions where an unpaid internship is permitted. When you are applying for an opportunity, you should the organization and internship provide you with valuable work experience? Is the opportunity a good fit for you

Boonstra, Rudy

9

Work Cultures and Work/Family Balance.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

For 179 workers with family responsibilities, flexibility of work was associated with job satisfaction and family well-being, flexible work schedules were not. Supportive supervision was associated only with increased employee citizenship and did not increase work-family balance of those at risk. Family-friendly culture did not appear to benefit…

Clark, Sue Campbell

2001-01-01

10

Work - Family Researchers Electronic Network  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Sponsored by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation and maintained by the Center for Work and Family at Boston College, this site was established to facilitate information dissemination for work-family researchers. The Work-Family Researchers Electronic Network is comprised of four major components: the Work-Family Research Literature Database, the Work-Family Researchers' Discussion Groups, the Work-Family Research Newsletter, and Sloan Grantee Information. The searchable literature database contains over 1,000 bibliographic citations with annotations for selected articles, books, book chapters, reports, and papers in the work-family field. The discussion group section currently provides four fora for exchanging ideas on work and family. The Work-Family Research Newsletter recently posted its first issue online. Information about Sloan grantees and their projects are available in the final section.

11

The Academic Effects of After-School Paid and Unpaid Work among 14-Year-Old Students in TIMSS Countries  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

What it means to be a "student" varies within and between countries. Apart from the wide variety of school types and school quality that is experienced by young people, there also is, accompanying increased rates of school participation, a growing population of students who work part-time. The theoretical and actual consequences of student work

Post, David; Pong, Suet-ling

2009-01-01

12

Work-family conflicts and work performance.  

PubMed

Prior research indicates that work-family conflict interferes with family far more than it interferes with work. Conservation of resources provides a possible explanation: when shifting resources from family is no longer sufficient to maintain satisfactory work performance, then workers must acquire additional resources or reduce investments in work. One source of such additional resources could be high performance peers in the work group. The performance of workers with resource-rich peers may be less adversely affected by work-family conflict. In this study, 136 employees of a wholesale distribution firm (61% women, 62% minority) working in groups of 7 to 11 in manual labor and low-level administrative jobs rated their own work-to-family conflict. Their supervisors rated workers' performance. Hierarchical regression analysis indicated that work-to-family conflict increasingly adversely affected job performance as work group performance decreased. Hence, work group performance may be an important moderator of the effects of work-family conflict. PMID:19810435

Roth, Lawrence; David, Emily M

2009-08-01

13

WORK FAMILY LIFE !"#"$%&$'()*!("$+(,-./*$"#(.-/,*$/&!&#&0&-/  

E-print Network

, China adopted its strict one-child policy in 1979. 5=F%B9%;=B9%=>GG8EBEH%E--and they feel they can manage this with one child, but not more. Many families would like to have more kids toward one-child families. The U.S. Census Bureau reports that, in the last 20 years, the number

Ginzel, Matthew

14

Social Work Patient & Family Services  

E-print Network

Social Work and Patient & Family Services 601 Elmwood Avenue RM. 1-1450 P. O. Box 650 Rochester, NY Social Work office lo- cated? The Social Work office is located on the first floor of Strong Memorial Hospital, Rm. 1-1450 How do I get in touch with a social worker? The social work department is open Monday

Goldman, Steven A.

15

Work-Family Facilitation and Conflict, Working Fathers and Mothers, Work-Family Stressors and Support  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Work-family research frequently focuses on the conflict experienced by working mothers. Using data from the National Study of the Changing Workforce (N = 1,314), this study also examined work-family facilitation and working fathers. Ecological systems, family stress, family resilience, and sex role theories were used to organize the data and…

Hill, E. Jeffrey

2005-01-01

16

Dual-Earner Families: Conflict between Work and Family.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Implications of the dual-earner life-style as compared with other work/family types are presented. Ten work/family types are presented with predictions of future trends of each type. Suggestions are given for ways professionals can recognize the characteristics and needs of the dual-earner family. (Author/CH)

Kingsbury, Nancy M.

1987-01-01

17

Work, Welfare, and Family Well-Being.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

As more families move from welfare to work, little is known about the implications of employment for family well-being. This survey and case study examined the effects of employment on the economic, social, and emotional well-being of parents, children, and families. Survey respondents received assistance through Iowa's Family Investment Program…

Sing, Merrile; Hill, Heather; Mendenko, Linda

18

Religion, resources, and work-family balance  

Microsoft Academic Search

It is increasingly recognised that work and family roles are interconnected. This is one reason why researchers and practitioners are working to understand and facilitate balance between work and nonwork roles. Most existing literature defines inter-role balance by emphasising work and family roles alone; unfortunately, this narrow focus prevents us from recognising individuals’ engagements in many other roles that may

Shivani P. Patel; Christopher J. L. Cunningham

2011-01-01

19

Religion, resources, and work-family balance  

Microsoft Academic Search

It is increasingly recognised that work and family roles are interconnected. This is one reason why researchers and practitioners are working to understand and facilitate balance between work and nonwork roles. Most existing literature defines inter-role balance by emphasising work and family roles alone; unfortunately, this narrow focus prevents us from recognising individuals’ engagements in many other roles that may

Shivani P. Patel; Christopher J. L. Cunningham

2012-01-01

20

Work-Family Conflict among Female Teachers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Work-family conflict was investigated among 187 Israeli women teachers to better understand relationships between teachers' professional and family lives. The research examined perceived importance of work and family roles and effects of stress and support variables on W->F and F->W conflict. Additionally, effects of teachers' years of experience…

Cinamon, R.G.; Rich, Y.

2005-01-01

21

Work-Family Conflict and Working Conditions in Western Europe  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article explores the influence of working conditions on work-family conflict (WFC) among married/cohabiting employees across seven European countries. Using data from the European Social Survey, the paper first investigates the role of working conditions relative to household level characteristics in mediating work-family conflict at the…

Gallie, Duncan; Russell, Helen

2009-01-01

22

Connecting Families and Work: Family Literacy Bridges the Gap.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Noting that the need for basic skills education among the current labor force cannot be easily met by vocational training alone, this booklet presents the case for family literacy education to improve the skills of unemployed workers and describes the work of the National Center for Family Literacy (NCFL). Family literacy is defined as having four…

National Center for Family Literacy, Louisville, KY.

23

Gender Differences in the Importance of Work and Family Roles: Implications for Work–Family Conflict  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this study we explored between- and within-gender differences in the importance of life roles and their implications for work–family conflict. In earlier research (Cinamon & Rich, 2002) we found 3 profiles of workers who differ in attributions of importance to work and family roles: persons who assigned high importance to both the work role and the family role (“Dual”

Rachel Gali Cinamon; Yisrael Rich

2002-01-01

24

34 CFR 685.216 - Unpaid refund discharge.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-07-01 false Unpaid refund discharge. 685.216 Section 685.216 Education...Provisions § 685.216 Unpaid refund discharge. (a)(1) Unpaid refunds in closed...school that has closed, the Secretary discharges a former or current...

2010-07-01

25

Administrative Policy: Graduate Assistant Employment July 2009 Paid and Unpaid Leaves of Absence for Graduate Assistants  

E-print Network

of the department, up to three workdays paid bereavement leave provided upon the death of an immediate family member) making necessary arrangement; (3) travel related to the death; and (4) bereavement time. Responsible, and Civic Duty Leaves. Parental Leave Graduate assistants May be eligible for paid and/or unpaid parental

Thomas, David D.

26

The Role of Identity and Work-Family Support in Work-Family Enrichment and Its Work-Related Consequences  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Despite growing research on the positive connections between work and family, antecedents and consequences of work-family enrichment are understudied. Using a sample of employees from a major insurance company, we assessed the relationship of (i) individual (i.e., work and family identities), (ii) family (emotional and instrumental support), and…

Wayne, Julie Holliday; Randel, Amy E.; Stevens, Jaclyn

2006-01-01

27

The Relationship Among Work–Family Conflict and Enhancement, Organizational Work–Family Culture, and Work Outcomes for Older Working Women  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article examines the relationship among work–family conflict and enhancement, organizational work–family culture, and four work outcomes for 489 working women over the age of 50. Survey results from two U.S. health care organizations and one U.S. financial services organization indicate that older working women experience differing amounts of work-to-family conflict, family-to-work conflict, work-to-family enhancement, and family-to-work enhancement. Hypotheses relating

Judith R. Gordon; Karen S. Whelan-Berry; Elizabeth A. Hamilton

2007-01-01

28

The work–family interface in Korea: can family life enrich work life?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Using data obtained from 363 Korean civil servants, we examine the mechanism of family-to-work enrichment. Although individualistic Western work–family literature predicts that resources from the family role, both instrumental and affective, will improve the work role by mitigating the negative job stress–job satisfaction relationship, data from collectivistic Korean society show an unexpected opposite effect – an accentuating, not a mitigating

Eun-Suk Lee; Jae Yoon Chang; Hyosun Kim

2011-01-01

29

Designing Work, Family & Health Organizational Change Initiatives  

PubMed Central

Executive Summary For decades, leaders and scholars have been advocating change efforts to improve work-life relationships. Yet most initiatives have lacked rigor and not been developed using scientific principles. This has created an evidence gap for employer support of work and personal life as a win–win for productivity and employees’ well-being. This paper examines the approach used by the U.S. Work Family Health Network (WFRN) to develop an innovative workplace intervention to improve employee and family health. The change initiative was designed to reduce organizationally based work-family conflict in two contrasting contexts representative of major segments of today’s U.S. workforce: health care employees and informational technology professionals. The WFRN Intervention (called STAR) had three theoretically based change elements. They were: 1) increase job control over work time and schedule; 2) increase supervisor social support for family and job effectiveness; and 3) improve organizational culture and job design processes to foster results orientation. Seven practical lessons for developing work-life interventions emerged from this groundbreaking endeavor. PMID:24683279

Hammer, Leslie B.; Kelly, Erin L.; Moen, Phyllis

2014-01-01

30

Letter to Placement Employers Guidelines for Workplace Insurance for Postsecondary Students on Unpaid Placements  

E-print Network

Letter to Placement Employers Guidelines for Workplace Insurance for Postsecondary Students placements with employers who are either compulsorily covered or have voluntarily applied to have Workplace in unpaid work/school placements with employers that are not required to have compulsory coverage under

Abolmaesumi, Purang

31

The Impact of Emotional Labor on Work-Family Outcomes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Theory and research on emotional labor at work is applied to the study of the work-family interface to explore how emotional experiences in both the work and the family domain relate to the experience of work-family conflict and work-family enrichment, and ultimately attitudinal and health outcomes. Emotional intelligence is also examined as a…

Yanchus, Nancy J.; Eby, Lilian T.; Lance, Charles E.; Drollinger, Sabrina

2010-01-01

32

Community as a Context for the Work-Family Interface  

Microsoft Academic Search

Workplaces, families, and individuals attempt to coordinate work and family opportunities and responsibilities within the context of communities. Workplaces and families are embedded in the communities in which they are located. Work, family, and individual relationships are intertwined with relationships among members of various communities. Communities may both help and hinder the efforts of work organizations, families, and individuals to

Patricia Voydanoff

2004-01-01

33

Teachers' Occupation-Specific Work-Family Conflict  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

To expand work-family conflict (WFC) research to specific occupations, this study investigated how work and family generic and occupation-specific stressors and support variables related to family interfering with work (F [right arrow] W) and work interfering with family (W [right arrow] F) among 230 Israeli high school teachers. Further expanding…

Cinamon, Rachel Gali; Rich, Yisrael; Westman, Mina

2007-01-01

34

Work-Family Planning Attitudes among Emerging Adults  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Using social learning theory as a framework, we explore two sets of antecedents to work and family role planning attitudes among emerging adults: their work-family balance self-efficacy and their perceptions of their parents' work-to-family conflict. A total of 187 college students completed a questionnaire concerning their work-family balance…

Basuil, Dynah A.; Casper, Wendy J.

2012-01-01

35

JOB OPENING POSITION: TV WeatherCenter Intern (unpaid internship)  

E-print Network

JOB OPENING POSITION: TV WeatherCenter Intern (unpaid internship) JOB NUMBER: 12081 DIVISION/DEPARTMENT: WRAL-TV - Weather DESCRIPTION: THIS IS AN UNPAID INTERNSHIP. Interns in the WRAL HD Weather of North Carolina. The internship will feature hands-on experience in all aspects of television and radio

Parker, Matthew D. Brown

36

Family Care Responsibilities and Employment: Exploring the Impact of Type of Family Care on Work-Family and Family-Work Conflict  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study compared work-family and family-work conflict for employed family caregivers with disability-related care responsibilities in contrast to employed family caregivers with typical care responsibilities. Using data from the 2002 National Study of the Changing Workforce, a population-based survey of the U.S. workforce, formal and informal…

Stewart, Lisa M.

2013-01-01

37

Single Mothers, Social Capital, and Work--Family Conflict  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this article is to examine work-family conflict among low-income, unmarried mothers. Analyzing the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study, a national sample of nonmarital births, I examine how social capital affects work-family conflict and how both social capital and work-family conflict affect employment. Results show that…

Ciabattari, Teresa

2007-01-01

38

Work, Family and Community Support as Predictors of Work-Family Conflict: A Study of Low-Income Workers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examines relationships between support from work, family and community domains with time- and strain-based work-family conflict in a sample of low-income workers. Results reveal significant within-domain and cross-domain relationships between support from all three life domains with work--family conflict. With respect to family support,…

Griggs, Tracy Lambert; Casper, Wendy J.; Eby, Lillian T.

2013-01-01

39

Family Structure, Gender, and the Work–Family Interface: Work-to-Family Conflict Among Single and Partnered Parents  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined whether single parents experience greater reductions in work-to-family conflict from using resources than\\u000a partnered parents do. The question of whether single mothers, single fathers, partnered mothers, or partnered fathers experienced\\u000a differing levels of work-to-family conflict was also addressed. Data were from the 2002 National Study of the Changing Workforce,\\u000a and only those respondents with at least one

Krista Lynn Minnotte

2012-01-01

40

The labour market impact of the working families’ tax credit  

Microsoft Academic Search

In October 1999, the working families’ tax credit (WFTC) replaced family credit as the main package of in-work support for families with children. Among a range of stated aims, the WFTC is intended to ‘... improve work incentives, encouraging people without work to move into employment’. In this paper, we consider the impact of WFTC on hours and participation. To

Richard Blundell; Alan Duncan; Julian McCrae; Costas Meghir

2000-01-01

41

Linking Team Resources to Work-Family Enrichment and Satisfaction  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Work-family scholars now recognize the potential positive effects of participation in one life domain (i.e., work or family) on performance in other life domains. We examined how employees might benefit from team resources, which are highly relevant to the modern workplace, in both work and nonwork domains via work-family enrichment. Using the…

Hunter, Emily M.; Perry, Sara Jansen; Carlson, Dawn S.; Smith, Steven A.

2010-01-01

42

Work-Family Balance: Perspectives from Higher Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The article examines different types of work-family pressures amongst people working within the Australian university sector. We were specifically interested in work-family experiences between domestic and migrant Australians. Among the major findings, domestic Australians experience greater levels of work-family imbalance across most of the…

Pillay, Soma; Abhayawansa, Subhash

2014-01-01

43

Rational Versus Gender Role Explanations for Work–Family Conflict  

Microsoft Academic Search

Two conflicting frameworks for understanding work–family conflict are proposed. According to the rational view, conflict is related linearly to the total amount of time spent in paid and family work. According to the gender role perspective, gender role expectations mute the relationship between hours expended and perceived work–family conflict, and gender interacts with number of hours worked and work–family conflict.

Barbara A. Gutek; Sabrina Searle; Lilian Klepa

1991-01-01

44

The State of Working Families in Massachusetts  

E-print Network

The Massachusetts economy, workforce, and families have all undergone substantial changes over the past two decades. This paper, focusing on the labor market pressures facing families, employers, and ...

Fogg, Neeta

2004-12-10

45

Religious Influences on Work-Family Trade-Offs  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Despite a large body of research on the influences of religion on family life and gender ideology, few studies examined how religion affects work-family strategies. One set of strategies involves making employment or family trade-off--strategies of devoting time or attention to either work or family in a situation in which one cannot devote the…

Ammons, Samantha K.; Edgell, Penny

2007-01-01

46

Work/Family Balance for Men in Student Affairs  

E-print Network

This qualitative study will examine the concept of work/family demand specifically through the lens of male student affairs practitioners. Work family balance has been identified as a critical issue for the field of HRD impacting both individual...

Singh, Shailendra Mohan

2012-07-16

47

When Family Considerations Influence Work Decisions: Decision-Making Processes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The work-family literature has provided an abundance of evidence that various family factors are linked to various work decisions, suggesting that the "family-relatedness" of work decisions is a prevalent phenomenon (Greenhaus & Powell, 2012). However, the cognitive processes by which such linkages occur have received little attention. We offer a…

Powell, Gary N.; Greenhaus, Jeffrey H.

2012-01-01

48

Women, family, and work in Indonesian transmigration.  

PubMed

The gender contribution to employment may be a critical factor in determining household economic viability. The significance for the resettlement program of the poor and landless from Indonesia's Inner Islands to the Outer Islands is clear. The aim of this paper is to examine the nature and extent of the role of women in off-farm employment (OFE) in a sample of South Sumatra, Indonesia transmigrants during the summer of 1989 at 9 different sites with different agricultural environments, settlement histories, and access to markets. A summary is provided of the literature on women's work and peasant household economies in Indonesia. Spatial and structural characteristics of employment among transmigrant women are described as well as life course influences on men's and women's OFE. A descriptive and explanatory model is presented that characterizes women's work and includes the influences of changing family structure on time allocation. Women's work appears fundamentally different from men's; household domestic work has a degree of flexibility in timing and tasks can be accomplished simultaneously. The hypothesis is that women will try to maximize their levels of flexibility and simultaneity in their income generating efforts. Discussion focuses on several theories of peasant household economies: 1) the Chayanov peasant model which posits that labor allocation for farm production in order to satisfy consumption needs is dependent on household demographic structure and the consumer labor balance; and 2) the New Home Economics theory which emphasizes the single utility function of the household. The villages represent 3 irrigated rice-growing and double cropping areas with established infrastructures and access to markets; 3 area with tidal swamp rice production and few resources; and area with rainfed rice production and limited resources and an area with ample resources; and 2 areas with smallholder rubber production. There were 560 ethnically Javanese households included in the sample, with an average proportion of 10% in each settlement. OFE is either on scheme, which means within the transmigration scheme and involves short distances to work, or off scheme, which entails longer work trips. 61% of the sample were involved in on scheme and 42% were involved in off scheme OFE, of which 10% were heads of households and 4% were spouses. PMID:12286576

Watkins, J F; Leinbach, T R; Falconer, K F

1993-04-01

49

Unsociable Work? Nonstandard Work Schedules, Family Relationships, and Children's Well-Being  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Many children live in families where one or both parents work evenings, nights, or weekends. Do these work schedules affect family relationships or well-being? Using cross-sectional survey data from dual-earner Canadian families (N=4,306) with children aged 2-11 years (N=6,156), we compared families where parents worked standard weekday times with…

Strazdins, Lyndall; Clements, Mark S.; Korda, Rosemary J.; Broom, Dorothy H.; D'Souza, Rennie M.

2006-01-01

50

Preparing Infant-Family Practitioners: A Work in Progress  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article explores what it takes to prepare practitioners to work effectively in the infant-family field and describes efforts to meet training needs. A multifaceted effort to prepare and support practitioners who work with infants, toddlers, and families has been central to the growth of the infant-family field. Part C of IDEA and Early Head…

Eggbeer, Linda; Mann, Tammy; Gilkerson, Linda

2003-01-01

51

The Work, Family, and Equity Index  

E-print Network

, overtime limits, annual leave, mandatory day of rest and other standards; paid leave and flexibility for health care support for adult family members, family events and other extraordinary circumstances, the Institute is committed to the creation of a unique health and social policy data center that can be used

Volesky, Bohumil

52

Work-Family Conflict and the Perception of Departmental and Institutional Work-Family Policies in Collegiate Athletic Trainers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Employees throughout the United States struggle to balance their work and family commitments, in part because the workforce makeup has changed significantly over the last half century. The evolving family structure also has contributed to this struggle. This research seeks to build on previous work-family literature by incorporating the six…

Godek, Michelle M.

2012-01-01

53

Relations of Work Identity, Family Identity, Situational Demands, and Sex with Employee Work Hours  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined relations of multiple indicators of work identity and family identity with the number of weekly hours worked by 193 married business professionals. We found that men generally worked long hours regardless of the situational demands to work long hours and the strength of their work and family identities. Women's work hours, on…

Greenhaus, Jeffrey H.; Peng, Ann C.; Allen, Tammy D.

2012-01-01

54

Coworker Informal Work Accommodations to Family: Scale Development and Validation  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Drawing on research regarding the utility of coworker support in mitigating work/family conflict, the authors developed a scale to measure Coworker-enacted Informal Work Accommodations to Family (C-IWAF). C-IWAF differs from coworker support in that it describes actual behaviors coworkers engage in to help one another deal with incompatible work

Mesmer-Magnus, Jessica; Murase, Toshio; DeChurch, Leslie A.; Jimenez, Miliani

2010-01-01

55

Work—Family Facilitation: Expanding Theoretical Understanding Through Qualitative Exploration  

Microsoft Academic Search

The problem and the solution. Work—family scholarly research is often dominated by a conflict perspective. In this study, employees of a large multinational corporation were asked to describe the positive influences of their work life on their home life and vice versa. Participants most frequently mentioned work place flexibility, financial benefits, and the ability to keep family commitments as important

E. Jeffrey Hill; Sarah Allen; Jenet Jacob; Ashley Ferrin Bair; Sacha Leah Bikhazi; Alisa Van Langeveld; Giuseppe Martinengo; Taralyn Trost Parker; Eric Walker

2007-01-01

56

Work-family balance after childbirth: the association between employer-offered leave characteristics and maternity leave duration.  

PubMed

Early return to work after childbirth has been increasing among working mothers in the US. We assessed the relationship between access to employer-offered maternity leave (EOML) (both paid and unpaid) and uptake and duration of maternity leave following childbirth in a socio-economically diverse sample of full-time working women. We focus on California, a state that has long provided more generous maternity leave benefits than those offered by federal maternity leave policies through the State Disability Insurance program. The sample included 691 mothers who gave birth in Southern California in 2002-2003. Using weighted logistic regression, we examined the EOML-maternity leave duration relationship, controlling for whether the leave was paid, as well as other occupational, personality and health-related covariates. Compared with mothers who were offered more than 12 weeks of maternity leave, mothers with <6 weeks of EOML and those offered 6-12 weeks had five times higher odds of returning to work within 12 weeks; those offered no leave had six times higher odds of an early return. These relationships were similar after controlling for whether the leave was paid and after controlling for other occupational and health characteristics. Access to and duration of employer-offered maternity leave significantly determine timing of return to work following childbirth, potentially affecting work-family balance. Policy makers should recognize the pivotal role of employers in offering job security during and after maternity leave and consider widening the eligibility criteria of the Family and Medical Leave Act. PMID:23504130

Guendelman, Sylvia; Goodman, Julia; Kharrazi, Martin; Lahiff, Maureen

2014-01-01

57

Taking stock of work-family initiatives: How announcements of \\  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examines share price reactions to 231 work-family human resource policies adopted by Fortune 500 companies and announced in the Wall Street Journal between 1971 and 1996. Consistent with past research, the results suggest that firm announcements of work-family initiatives positively affected shareholder return. The authors also empirically test three hypotheses concerning how the timing of work-family initiatives influences

Michelle M. Arthur; Alison Cook

2004-01-01

58

Family, Work, and Infant Care in Limited Income Latino Migrant Farm-Working and Anglo Non-Migrant Families  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Changes in the policy context of limited income families' lives have created new stresses at the intersection of work and family. This research used detailed interviews with limited income working mothers of infants 4 to 18 months old to learn about their work experiences, individual well-being, and perceptions of their infants' experiences in…

Meece, Darrell; Barratt, Marguerite; Kossek, Ellen

2003-01-01

59

A cross-cultural study of work\\/family demands, work\\/family conflict and wellbeing: the Taiwanese vs  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose - The aim of the research is twofold: to explore relations between work\\/family demands, work-family conflict (WFC), family-work conflict (FWC) and wellbeing outcomes, and to contrast employees from an individualistic (UK) and a collectivistic (Taiwan) society. Design\\/methodology\\/approach - Heterogeneous samples of full-time employees in Taiwan and UK were surveyed using structured questionnaires. Findings - For both the Taiwanese and

British Luo Lu; Robin Gilmour; Shu-Fang Kao

60

The Relationship Between Work-to-Family Conflict and Family-to-Work Conflict: A Longitudinal Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

The relationship between work-to-family conflict and family-to-work conflict was tested using a longitudinal research design with 234 dual-earner couples caring for both children and aging parents. Two waves of mailed survey data were collected. The mediating effects of role-related satisfaction were hypothesized to link these two forms of work-family conflict. The analytical steps for determining mediating effects followed suggestions by

Yueng-Hsiang Huang; Leslie B. Hammer; Margaret B. Neal; Nancy A. Perrin

2004-01-01

61

29 CFR 1400.735-12 - Outside employment, business activities, or interests (paid or unpaid).  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...employment, business activities, or interests (paid or unpaid). 1400...business activities, or interests (paid or unpaid). (a...payment of expense, or any other thing of monetary value in circumstances...appearance of, conflicts of interests; or (ii) Outside...

2011-07-01

62

29 CFR 1400.735-12 - Outside employment, business activities, or interests (paid or unpaid).  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...employment, business activities, or interests (paid or unpaid). 1400...business activities, or interests (paid or unpaid). (a...payment of expense, or any other thing of monetary value in circumstances...appearance of, conflicts of interests; or (ii) Outside...

2013-07-01

63

29 CFR 1400.735-12 - Outside employment, business activities, or interests (paid or unpaid).  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...employment, business activities, or interests (paid or unpaid). 1400...business activities, or interests (paid or unpaid). (a...payment of expense, or any other thing of monetary value in circumstances...appearance of, conflicts of interests; or (ii) Outside...

2010-07-01

64

29 CFR 1400.735-12 - Outside employment, business activities, or interests (paid or unpaid).  

...employment, business activities, or interests (paid or unpaid). 1400...business activities, or interests (paid or unpaid). (a...payment of expense, or any other thing of monetary value in circumstances...appearance of, conflicts of interests; or (ii) Outside...

2014-07-01

65

29 CFR 1400.735-12 - Outside employment, business activities, or interests (paid or unpaid).  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...employment, business activities, or interests (paid or unpaid). 1400...business activities, or interests (paid or unpaid). (a...payment of expense, or any other thing of monetary value in circumstances...appearance of, conflicts of interests; or (ii) Outside...

2012-07-01

66

46 CFR 545.2 - Interpretation of Shipping Act of 1984-Unpaid ocean freight charges.  

...Interpretation of Shipping Act of 1984-Unpaid ocean freight charges. 545.2 Section 545...MARITIME COMMISSION REGULATIONS AFFECTING OCEAN SHIPPING IN FOREIGN COMMERCE INTERPRETATIONS...Interpretation of Shipping Act of 1984—Unpaid ocean freight charges. Section...

2014-10-01

67

46 CFR 545.2 - Interpretation of Shipping Act of 1984-Unpaid ocean freight charges.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Interpretation of Shipping Act of 1984-Unpaid ocean freight charges. 545.2 Section 545...MARITIME COMMISSION REGULATIONS AFFECTING OCEAN SHIPPING IN FOREIGN COMMERCE INTERPRETATIONS...Interpretation of Shipping Act of 1984—Unpaid ocean freight charges. Section...

2011-10-01

68

46 CFR 545.2 - Interpretation of Shipping Act of 1984-Unpaid ocean freight charges.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Interpretation of Shipping Act of 1984-Unpaid ocean freight charges. 545.2 Section 545...MARITIME COMMISSION REGULATIONS AFFECTING OCEAN SHIPPING IN FOREIGN COMMERCE INTERPRETATIONS...Interpretation of Shipping Act of 1984—Unpaid ocean freight charges. Section...

2012-10-01

69

46 CFR 545.2 - Interpretation of Shipping Act of 1984-Unpaid ocean freight charges.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Interpretation of Shipping Act of 1984-Unpaid ocean freight charges. 545.2 Section 545...MARITIME COMMISSION REGULATIONS AFFECTING OCEAN SHIPPING IN FOREIGN COMMERCE INTERPRETATIONS...Interpretation of Shipping Act of 1984—Unpaid ocean freight charges. Section...

2010-10-01

70

46 CFR 545.2 - Interpretation of Shipping Act of 1984-Unpaid ocean freight charges.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Interpretation of Shipping Act of 1984-Unpaid ocean freight charges. 545.2 Section 545...MARITIME COMMISSION REGULATIONS AFFECTING OCEAN SHIPPING IN FOREIGN COMMERCE INTERPRETATIONS...Interpretation of Shipping Act of 1984—Unpaid ocean freight charges. Section...

2013-10-01

71

Let Knowledge Serve the City For-Profit Employers: Guidelines for Unpaid  

E-print Network

Let Knowledge Serve the City For-Profit Employers: Guidelines for Unpaid Internships While most for-profit by the Portland State University Career Center for determining the appropriateness of unpaid internships with for-profit

72

Group work with families of nursing home residents  

E-print Network

was to organize, carry out, and then compare two different group approaches to working with the families of nursing home residents. A five-week experimental group composed of family representatives was presented with appropriate educational materials combined..., and that discussion among participants would be encouraged (Greene, 1982; LeSage, 1978). Other researchers have suggested that family group meetings or workshops be organized such that family representatives could be joined by nursing home personnel to mutually...

Duncan, Richard Tillett

1985-01-01

73

Understanding Work-Family Spillover in Hotel Managers  

PubMed Central

The present study examined the experience of work-family spillover among 586 hotel managers (HMs) working in 50 full-service hotels throughout the U.S. Work-family spillover occurs when behaviors, moods, stresses, and emotions from work spill over into family. We first investigated which hotel managers were more likely to experience spillover and stressful work conditions based on their life circumstances (gender, parental status, age, decision-making latitude at work). Second, we investigated which work conditions (hours worked per week, organizational time expectations, emotional labor, and permeable boundaries) predicted more work-family spillover. Women, employees without children at home, and younger adults experienced the highest levels of negative work-family spillover. Work conditions, particularly organizational time expectations, put HMs at risk for experiencing more negative and less positive work-family spillover. The results provide evidence that modifying certain work conditions in the hotel industry may be helpful in improving the quality of HMs’ jobs and retention. PMID:23888092

Lawson, Katie M.; Davis, Kelly D.; Crouter, Ann C.; O’Neill, John W.

2013-01-01

74

Understanding Work-Family Spillover in Hotel Managers.  

PubMed

The present study examined the experience of work-family spillover among 586 hotel managers (HMs) working in 50 full-service hotels throughout the U.S. Work-family spillover occurs when behaviors, moods, stresses, and emotions from work spill over into family. We first investigated which hotel managers were more likely to experience spillover and stressful work conditions based on their life circumstances (gender, parental status, age, decision-making latitude at work). Second, we investigated which work conditions (hours worked per week, organizational time expectations, emotional labor, and permeable boundaries) predicted more work-family spillover. Women, employees without children at home, and younger adults experienced the highest levels of negative work-family spillover. Work conditions, particularly organizational time expectations, put HMs at risk for experiencing more negative and less positive work-family spillover. The results provide evidence that modifying certain work conditions in the hotel industry may be helpful in improving the quality of HMs' jobs and retention. PMID:23888092

Lawson, Katie M; Davis, Kelly D; Crouter, Ann C; O'Neill, John W

2013-06-01

75

Piecing Together Family Social Work in Mainland China  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

As rapid economic and sociopolitical development brings about drastic changes in family structure and processes in China, many social concerns arise. Through a review of journal articles published over a period of 28 years (1979-2006) in social work and related disciplines in China, this article presents a glimpse of family social work using the…

Sim, Timothy

2008-01-01

76

Anticipated Work-Family Conflict: A Construct Investigation  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

To date, little is known about how work-family issues impact the career development process. In the current paper, we explore this issue by investigating a relatively unstudied construct: anticipated work-family conflict. We found that this construct can be represented by the same six-dimensional factor structure used to assess concurrent…

Westring, Alyssa Friede; Ryan, Ann Marie

2011-01-01

77

Are Difficulties Balancing Work and Family Associated with Subsequent Fertility?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Despite considerable interest in the causes and consequences of work-family conflict, and the frequent suggestion in fertility research that difficulty in balancing work and family is one of the factors leading to low fertility rates in several developed countries, little research uses longitudinal data to examine whether women who report…

Liu, Siwei; Hynes, Kathryn

2012-01-01

78

Social Work Practice with Polygamous Families  

Microsoft Academic Search

Data are based on student files of 25 Bedouin-Arab children born to senior mothers of polygamous families, and interviews with the children's teachers and mothers. Mothers complained of somatic symptoms, economic problems, poor relations with the husband, and competition and jealousy between the co-wives and among the co-wives' children. Children had a variety of behavioural problems, and below average academic

Alean Al-Krenawi; John R. Graham; Salem Al-Krenawi

1997-01-01

79

From "Work-Family" to "Work-Life": Broadening Our Conceptualization and Measurement  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Despite frequent reference to "work-life" issues in the organizational literature, little theoretical or empirical attention has been paid to nonwork areas beyond family. The purpose of the research described here is to move beyond work-family conflict to a broader conceptualization and measurement of work interference with life. A measure of work

Keeney, Jessica; Boyd, Elizabeth M.; Sinha, Ruchi; Westring, Alyssa F.; Ryan, Ann Marie

2013-01-01

80

Improving the Health of Working Families: Research Connections Between Work and Health. NPA Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document contains two papers on connections between work and health and policy options for improving the health of working families. "Foreword" (James A. Auerbach) places the two papers in the context of recent research on the connections between work, family, and health. Chapter 1's overview addresses the changing nature of work, the new…

Yen, Irene H.; Frank, John W.

81

High involvement work system, work–family conflict, and expatriate performance – examining Taiwanese expatriates in China  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study explores the effects of multinational companies (MNC) implementation of a high involvement work system (HIWS) for their expatriates on both expatriate work–family conflict (WFC) and their performance. We surveyed 174 Taiwanese expatriates stationed in China. Data were collected on: (1) perceived human resource management (HRM) practices concerning ‘high involvement work system’; (2) perceived work–family conflict; (3) job satisfaction;

Hsi-An Shih; Yun-Hwa Chiang; Chu-Chun Hsu

2010-01-01

82

Adolescent Work Experiences and Family Formation Behavior  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A long-standing critique of adolescent employment is that it engenders a precocious maturity of more adult-like roles and behaviors, including school disengagement, substance use, sexual activity, inadequate sleep and exercise, and work-related stress. Though negative effects of high-intensity work on adolescent adjustment have been found, little…

Staff, Jeremy; VanEseltine, Matthew; Woolnough, April; Silver, Eric; Burrington, Lori

2012-01-01

83

Families at Work: Strengths and Strains. The General Mills American Family Report 1980-81.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Fourth in a series of studies on the American family conducted for General Mills Corporation, this publication provides findings from a survey exploring the relationship between work and the family in contemporary society. Specifically, the survey explores how changes in the work force, especially the increase in numbers of working wives and…

General Mills, Inc., Minneapolis, Minn.

84

Convergence between Measures of Work-to-Family and Family-to-Work Conflict: A Meta-Analytic Examination  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The overlap between measures of work-to-family (WFC) and family-to-work conflict (FWC) was meta-analytically investigated. Researchers have assumed WFC and FWC to be distinct, however, this assumption requires empirical verification. Across 25 independent samples (total N=9079) the sample size weighted mean observed correlation was .38 and the…

Mesmer-Magnus, Jessica R.; Viswesvaran, Chockalingam

2005-01-01

85

Social Support from Work and Family Domains as an Antecedent or Moderator of Work-Family Conflicts?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

On the basis of Conservation of Resources theory, we investigated how social support from supervisor, co-workers, life partner, and family members is associated with work-family conflicts in N=107 working mothers. We used data from a cross-sectional questionnaire and a standardized diary to examine two possible forms of interplay: (a) Social…

Seiger, Christine P.; Wiese, Bettina S.

2009-01-01

86

Hardships in America: The Real Story of Working Families  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This 115-page report, released by Economic Policy Institute (EPI) at the end of July 2001, "is the most comprehensive study of family hardships ever published." The report examines the plight of the working poor by determining basic family budgets for communities across the nation -- the amount of money a family needs for food, housing, utilities, child care, transportation, and health care -- and comparing these figures to wage statistics. The report concludes that two-and-a-half times more families fall beneath the basic family budget levels for their communities than fall below the federal poverty line.

Bernstein, Jared.

2001-01-01

87

The effects of organizational and community embeddedness on work-to-family and family-to-work conflict.  

PubMed

The present study offers competing hypotheses regarding the relationships of changes in organizational and community embeddedness with changes in work-to-family and family-to-work conflict. Data were collected from 250 U.S. and 165 Chinese managers and professionals, all of whom were married, at 3 points in time over a 10-month period. Results suggest that increases in perceptions of organizational and community embeddedness are associated with increases in work-to-family conflict and family-to-work conflict over time. Further, we found that these effects were even stronger for employees with highly individualistic values. Thus, although much of the previous research has focused on the positive effects of employee embeddedness for individuals' work lives, the present study provides some evidence of the potentially negative effects of employee embeddedness for individuals' family lives. PMID:22730902

Ng, Thomas W H; Feldman, Daniel C

2012-11-01

88

How to Fund an Unpaid CCE-administered programs  

E-print Network

How to Fund an Unpaid Internship #12;Overview · CCE-administered programs ­ Summer Interns Living/howtointernship Fellowships Office Database: http://www.college.columbia.edu/students/ fellowships/catalog #12;Summer Interns & student professional development #12;Summer Interns Living & Learning Program · Housing in Broadway Hall

Hone, James

89

How to Fund an Unpaid CCE-administered programs  

E-print Network

How to Fund an Unpaid Internship #12;Overview · CCE-administered programs ­ Summer Interns Living/howtointernship Fellowships Office Database: http://www.college.columbia.edu/students/ fellowships/catalog #12;Summer Interns development programs throughout the summer · Gain exposure to a variety of industries #12;Summer Interns

Hone, James

90

A short and valid measure of work-family enrichment.  

PubMed

The stream of research concerning work-family enrichment has generated a significant body of research because it plays an important role in occupational health (Masuda, McNall, Allen, & Nicklin, 2012). work-family enrichment has been defined as "the extent to which experiences in one role improve the quality of life in the other role" (Greenhaus & Powell, 2006, p. 73). Within work-family enrichment, there are two directions: work to family and family to work. Carlson, Kacmar, Wayne, and Grzywacz (2006) developed an 18-item scale to measure this construct. Although the scale has been shown to be both reliable and valid, it also requires work-family researchers to include a proportionally large number of items to capture this construct in a study. The goal of the current study was to isolate a subset of the items in this measure that produces results similar to the full version thereby providing a more streamlined scale for researchers. Using a five-sample study that follows the scale reduction procedures offered by Stanton, Sinar, Balzer, and Smith (2002), we provide evidence that scales containing only three items for each direction of enrichment produce results equivalent to the full scale with respect to reliability and discriminant, convergent, and predictive validity. Reducing the original scale by two thirds, without losing explanatory power, allows scholars to measure enrichment in the work and family domains more efficiently, which should help minimize survey time, lower refusal rates, and generate less missing data. PMID:24447219

Kacmar, K Michele; Crawford, Wayne S; Carlson, Dawn S; Ferguson, Merideth; Whitten, Dwayne

2014-01-01

91

Gender and the Work-Family Interface: Exploring Differences across the Family Life Course  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examines gender differences in the work-family interface across six family life stages using a global sample of IBM employees in 79 countries (N = 41,813). Family life stage was constructed using the age of respondent and age of youngest child. Results revealed that having young children at home was the critical catalyst for gender…

Martinengo, Giuseppe; Jacob, Jenet I.; Hill, E. Jeffrey

2010-01-01

92

Spousal Support and Work--Family Balance in Launching a Family Business  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examines whether emotional spousal support contributes to business owners' perceived work-family balance while launching a family business. Hobfoll's Conservation of Resources theory of stress is applied to 109 family business owners and their spouses. Results from structural equation models support several hypotheses. First, reports of…

Gudmunson, Clinton G.; Danes, Sharon M.; Werbel, James D.; Loy, Johnben Teik-Cheok

2009-01-01

93

Work Social Supports, Role Stressors, and Work-Family Conflict: The Moderating Effect of Age  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The current study examined whether important distinctions are masked if participant age is ignored when modeling relationships among constructs associated with the work-family interface. An initial omnibus model of social support, work role stressors, and work-family conflict was tested. Multiple groups analyses were then conducted to investigate…

Matthews, Russell A.; Bulger, Carrie A.; Barnes-Farrell, Janet L.

2010-01-01

94

[The family-friendly hospital: (how) does it work?].  

PubMed

The demographic development in Germany is heading towards a significant shortage in specialists within the next 10-15 years with an increased demand for health services at the same time. The three-stage model of family life planning (work, family phase, return) will also be gradually replaced by a model of simultaneous compatibility of family and work. This change in values, although initiated by the parents themselves, may turn out to be a crucial countermeasure in national economy against the demography-related loss of qualified personnel. For these three trends the economic need arises to minimize family-related absence of our well-trained, motivated and reliable doctors from the clinical departments through implementation of family-friendly human resources policies and supporting measures by the employers. In a representative survey 26% of respondents with children had in the past already changed their workplace to ensure a better match of work and family duties. In this regard the compatibility of family and professional responsibilities had a higher impact on the selection of the employer than a high income. Accordingly, a work-life competence oriented business plan will represent the crucial factor within the competition between universities, hospitals and professional disciplines to attract high potential bearers although a sustained change of the traditional hospital culture is mandatory. Anaesthesia-related fields of development regarding family-friendly corporate governance are working hours and organization of work, part-time jobs even for managers and fathers, and staff development. In the hospital daily routine, in particular, creative solutions meeting the local demands are deemed necessary that do not involve the use of high financial resources. Family-friendly personnel policy not only arises from altruistic enthusiasm but also pays off economically. This article discusses the necessity, opportunities and threads of family-oriented hospital management and fields of action for anaesthesia departments. PMID:19484192

Heller, A R; Heller, S C

2009-06-01

95

Family support work at the anna freud centre  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper outlines the context for the emergence and development of a family support service at the Anna Freud Centre. Its main aim is that of helping us think about the therapeutic space to which family support work belongs. Drawing on a range of case material, it describes a flexible and somewhat open-ended model of practice that is emerging in

Mary Donovan

1999-01-01

96

A model of work-family dynamics of hotel managers  

Microsoft Academic Search

The tourism industry is well known as one where operating managers have had to make sacrifices in their family and personal lives. This article reviews what is known about the work-family interface in relation to hotel managers in an effort to identify ways to gain a strategic advantage in this competitive sector. By integrating research from several disciplines, this article

John W. O’Neill; Jeanette N. Cleveland; Ann C. Crouter

2007-01-01

97

Poverty Among Working Families: Findings From Experimental Poverty Measures  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This report from the US Census Bureau explores poverty among working families. The report uses experimental measures based on recommendations from the National Academy of Sciences Panel of Poverty and Family Assistance, including the following elements: noncash government benefits, job-related expenses, child care costs, social security taxes, and out-of-pocket medical expenses.

98

Resilience across Contexts: Family, Work, Culture, and Community.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Noting that much is known from research and practice regarding what works to promote resilience of children and families in a variety of high-risk life situations, this book considers the impact of culture, economy, employment, poverty, family structure, and social policy on parenting, child development, education, and the life success of youth.…

Taylor, Ronald D., Ed.; Wang, Margaret C., Ed.

99

Indirect cost in economic evaluation: the opportunity cost of unpaid inputs.  

PubMed

Unpaid time represents a potentially significant input into the health production function. The paper sets out the basis for valuation of time inputs consistent with the notion of opportunity cost. Such analysis requires consideration of whether time displaced in the production of health involves lost work or lost leisure. Furthermore, because valuation of opportunity cost requires the consistent treatment of costs and benefits, the study also considers the valuation of outputs. The basis for valuing the shadow price of work time is examined by firstly assuming perfect competition. The analysis then considers the presence of monopoly and monopsony in product markets and income and sales taxes. The basis for valuing the shadow price of leisure ("leisure' being all uses of time except paid employment) is restricted to an examination of methods previously used to value unpaid housework. The two methods examined are the replacement cost and the opportunity cost method. As the methods are not equivalent, the circumstances where each is appropriate vary depending on whether the output lost in producing health is replaced. Although not set out as the primary focus of the paper, the issues surrounding the valuation of outputs generated by non-market and quasi-market activity are examined. In particular, where activities such as informal care result in indirect utility to the carers (and patients) themselves, it is likely the full market wage provides a lower bound estimate of the value of marginal benefit. Finally the paper provides a practical approach to examining opportunity cost of unpaid inputs consistent with the concepts set out in preceding sections. PMID:8653189

Posnett, J; Jan, S

1996-01-01

100

Social Work Practice with Native American Families: A Handbook.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A handbook on social work practice with Native American families, developed for use by students in undergraduate social work programs and by social service practitioners who work with Native American people, is divided into four sections. The first section contains four articles, written by Joseph A. Dudley (Methodist minister and Yankton Sioux)…

Wintemute, Ginger, Ed.; Messer, Bonnie, Ed.

101

Work Values and Job Satisfaction of Family Physicians  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Theory and prior research suggest linkages between work values and job satisfaction. The present study examined such linkages in a group of workers in a professional occupation. Family physicians (134 women, 206 men, 88% Caucasian) responded to context-specific measures of work values and job satisfaction. ANOVA results indicated a work values…

Bouwkamp-Memmer, Jennifer C.; Whiston, Susan C.; Hartung, Paul J.

2013-01-01

102

Reducing Work-Family Conflict May Improve Sleep  

MedlinePLUS

... Reducing Work-Family Conflict May Improve Sleep When managers and employees got more support in workplace, everyone ... University. The study included hundreds of randomly selected managers and employees at an information technology firm in ...

103

Correlates of work-family conflicts among managers in Egypt  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – The work-family interface has received considerable attention during the past two decades but inconsistent findings have been reported. Reasons for this include the use of different work-family conflict (WFC) measures, samples, outcomes, and countries and cultures. Carlson et al. developed and provided an initial validation of a new comprehensive measure of bi-directional WFC having three forms: time-, strain-,

Ronald J. Burke; Ghada El-Kot

2010-01-01

104

Investigating work-family policy aims and employee experiences  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – This study seeks systematically to investigate the extent to which the documented aims of formal work-family policies are being achieved at the level of individual employees. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – Consistency between policy and practice in the case study organization was explored via an analysis of organizational documents which described work-family policies and 20 interviews with employed women with dependent

Paula McDonald; Diane Guthrie; Lisa Bradley; Jane Shakespeare-Finch

2005-01-01

105

Work-family conflict, family-supportive supervisor behaviors (FSSB), and sleep outcomes.  

PubMed

Although critical to health and well-being, relatively little research has been conducted in the organizational literature on linkages between the work-family interface and sleep. Drawing on conservation of resources theory, we use a sample of 623 information technology workers to examine the relationships between work-family conflict, family-supportive supervisor behaviors (FSSB), and sleep quality and quantity. Validated wrist actigraphy methods were used to collect objective sleep quality and quantity data over a 1 week period of time, and survey methods were used to collect information on self-reported work-family conflict, FSSB, and sleep quality and quantity. Results demonstrated that the combination of predictors (i.e., work-to-family conflict, family-to-work conflict, FSSB) was significantly related to both objective and self-report measures of sleep quantity and quality. Future research should further examine the work-family interface to sleep link and make use of interventions targeting the work-family interface as a means for improving sleep health. PMID:24730425

Crain, Tori L; Hammer, Leslie B; Bodner, Todd; Kossek, Ellen Ernst; Moen, Phyllis; Lilienthal, Richard; Buxton, Orfeu M

2014-04-01

106

Balancing Work and Family. A Working Curriculum To Assist Vocational Parent and Family Educators in Designing and Delivering Employer-Sponsored Work and Family Seminars.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This curriculum guide was developed to help vocational teachers and family educators to design and deliver employer-sponsored seminars for employees as well as community-based adult education programs. The curriculum is intended to help working parents improve their ability to meet their personal wants and needs as well as the demands of their…

Burns, Mary Dooley; And Others

107

Working Hard, Falling Short: America's Working Families and the Pursuit of Economic Security  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The United States of America is often called the "land of opportunity," a place where hard work and sacrifice lead to economic success. Across generations, countless families have been able to live out that promise. However, more than one out of four American working families now earn wages so low that they have difficulty surviving financially.…

Waldron, Tom; Roberts, Brandon; Reamer, Andrew

2004-01-01

108

Balancing Work and Family: How Female Superintendents Succeed at Work and Home  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Women leaders in education struggle to balance work and family life. Historically, this struggle has stemmed from attempts to manage societal expectations of balancing work and family. In managing these expectations, women leaders face many challenges, which have made it difficult to maintain home responsibilities and deal with increasing demands…

Olesniewicz, Julie

2012-01-01

109

Beyond Conflict: Functional Facets of the Work-Family Interplay  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The present paper deals with three positive facets of the work-family interplay, i.e., transfer of competencies, transfer of positive mood, and cross-domain compensation. The latter refers to the experience that engagement in one domain helps dealing with failures in the other domain. In two correlational studies (N[subscript 1] = 107 working

Wiese, Bettina S.; Seiger, Christine P.; Schmid, Christian M.; Freund, Alexandra M.

2010-01-01

110

After the Baby: Work-Family Conflict and Working Mothers' Psychological Health  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examines work and family characteristics and depressive symptomatology among over 700 working mothers of infants. Working mothers in poorer quality jobs, as well as working mothers who were single or whose infant's health was poorer than that of other infants, reported greater depressive symptomatology. The effect of job quality on…

Marshall, Nancy L.; Tracy, Allison J.

2009-01-01

111

When Family-Supportive Supervision Matters: Relations between Multiple Sources of Support and Work-Family Balance  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examines the mechanisms by which family-supportive supervision is related to employee work-family balance. Based on a sample of 170 business professionals, we found that the positive relation between family-supportive supervision and balance was fully mediated by work interference with family (WIF) and partially mediated by family

Greenhaus, Jeffrey H.; Ziegert, Jonathan C.; Allen, Tammy D.

2012-01-01

112

7?Getting There from Here: Research on the Effects of Work–Family Initiatives on Work–Family Conflict and Business Outcomes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Many employing organizations have adopted work–family policies, programs, and benefits. Yet managers in employing organizations simply do not know what organizational initiatives actually reduce work–family conflict and how these changes are likely to impact employees and the organization. We examine scholarship that addresses two broad questions: first, do work–family initiatives reduce employees’ work–family conflict and\\/or improve work–family enrichment? Second, does

Erin L. Kelly; Ellen Ernst Kossek; Leslie B. Hammer; Mary Durham; Jeremy Bray; Kelly Chermack; Lauren A. Murphy; Dan Kaskubar

2008-01-01

113

Support, Demands, and Gender Ideology: Exploring Work–Family Facilitation and Work–Family Conflict Among Older Workers  

Microsoft Academic Search

Only recently have researchers begun to investigate issues surrounding the work experiences of individuals in late midlife. This article contributes to the literature on work–family facilitation and conflict among older workers. I focus specifically on the extent to which gender ideology is associated with facilitation and conflict and whether that relationship differs for women and men. Using a sample of

Shannon N. Davis

2011-01-01

114

Balancing Work and Family. Learning Guide 5. Project Connect. Linking Self-Family-Work.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This learning guide is designed to connect personal, family, and job responsibilities for adults and out-of-school youth in economically depressed areas of the state (including transitional ex-offenders and corrections populations) so that these individuals learn to manage and balance these aspects of their lives in order to prepare for or…

Emily Hall Tremaine Foundation, Inc., Hartford, CT.

115

77 FR 23238 - Guidelines for Home Energy Professionals: Standard Work Specifications for Single Family Energy...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...for Home Energy Professionals: Standard Work Specifications for Single Family Energy...for Home Energy Professionals: Standard Work Specifications for Single Family Energy...for Home Energy Professionals: Standard Work Specifications for Single Family...

2012-04-18

116

WorkLife Programs -Family Friendly Services Child Care Services Flexible Work Arrangements (FWA)  

E-print Network

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Fernández-Juricic, Esteban

117

Best Practices in Working with Linguistically Diverse Families  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Many schools face the challenge of forging partnerships with families from linguistically diverse backgrounds. Effective communication, funds of knowledge, culturally relevant teaching, and extending and accepting assistance are best practices that have been used successfully by school personnel when working with students who are identified as…

Araujo, Blanca E.

2009-01-01

118

Work/Family Benefits: Variables Related to Employees' Fairness Perceptions.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A study of 283 workers showed that younger people, minorities, those who used flexible work arrangements, and those whose jobs required greater interdependence had more favorable perceptions of family-related benefits. Gender and children's ages influenced perceptions of the fairness of benefits. (Contains 37 references.) (SK)

Parker, Lauren; Allen, Tammy D.

2001-01-01

119

Daily Management of Work and Family Goals in Employed Parents  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study uses one-week time-sampling information from 104 employed parents with pre-school children to examine the association between daily workloads, control strategies, and goal progress. In addition, it examines relationships between work- and family-goal progress and important stress indices such as positive/negative affect and cortisol…

Hoppmann, Christiane A.; Klumb, Petra L.

2012-01-01

120

Mexican American Women: Schooling, Work, and Family. ERIC Digest.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This digest examines the interdependence of schooling, work, and family in the lives of Mexican American women. Mexican Americans have lower educational achievement than other Hispanic subgroups and the total U.S. population, although females do somewhat better than males. Hispanic students are overrepresented in classes for special education,…

Ortiz, Flora Ida

121

Work-Family Balance and Academic Advancement in Medical Schools  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: This study examines various options that a faculty member might exercise to achieve work-family balance in academic medicine and their consequences for academic advancement. Method: Three data sets were analyzed: an anonymous web-administered survey of part-time tenure track-eligible University of Illinois College of Medicine (UI-COM)…

Fox, Geri; Schwartz, Alan; Hart, Katherine M.

2006-01-01

122

Health Coverage Instability for Mothers in Working Families  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, the authors examined the health insurance coverage stability of 1,667 women in working families over a three-year period (1995-1997). Findings revealed that coverage instability is common. Nearly one-half of low-income women experienced health coverage instability over the three-year study…

Anderson, Steven G.; Eamon, Mary Keegan

2004-01-01

123

The Internet and Academics' Workload and Work-Family Balance  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The aim of this article is to analyse whether the Internet and other ICT technologies support a work-family balance amongst academics. The study is based on 20 in-depth interviews with academics in Iceland and analysed according to the Grounded Theory Approach. This study challenges the notion that the Internet, as part of ICT technology, makes it…

Heijstra, Thamar M.; Rafnsdottir, Gudbjorg Linda

2010-01-01

124

The Relationship between Core Self-Evaluations and Work and Family Satisfaction: The Mediating Role of Work-Family Conflict and Facilitation  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examines the impact of work-family conflict and work-family facilitation on work and family outcomes and explores the influence of core self-evaluations (CSE) among these relationships. CSE is comprised of self-esteem, neuroticism, locus of control, and general self-efficacy. CSE was found to be negatively related to work interfering…

Boyar, Scott L.; Mosley, Donald C., Jr.

2007-01-01

125

Economic Hardship and Family-to-Work Conflict: The Importance of Gender and Work Conditions  

Microsoft Academic Search

Using data from a 2007 national survey of working Americans, we examine the association between economic hardship and family-to-work\\u000a conflict (FWC). We also assess contingencies of this association, focusing particularly on gender and several work conditions.\\u000a Findings indicate that economic hardship is associated with higher FWC; this pattern is stronger among men. Three work conditions\\u000a also function as effect modifiers:

Scott Schieman; Marisa Young

2011-01-01

126

Parental employment and work-family stress: Associations with family food environments  

PubMed Central

Parental employment provides many benefits to children's health. However, an increasing number of studies have observed associations between mothers' full-time employment and less healthful family food environments. Few studies have examined other ways in which parental employment may be associated with the family food environment, including the role of fathers' employment and parents' stress balancing work and home obligations. This study utilized data from Project F-EAT, a population-based study of a socio-demographically diverse sample of 3709 parents of adolescents living in a metropolitan area in the Midwestern United States, to examine cross-sectional associations between mothers' and fathers' employment status and parents' work-life stress with multiple aspects of the family food environment. Among parents participating in Project F-EAT, 64% of fathers and 46% of mothers were full-time employed, while 25% of fathers and 37% of mothers were not employed. Results showed that full-time employed mothers reported fewer family meals, less frequent encouragement of their adolescents' healthful eating, lower fruit and vegetable intake, and less time spent on food preparation, compared to part-time and not-employed mothers, after adjusting for socio-demographics. Full-time employed fathers reported significantly fewer hours of food preparation; no other associations were seen between fathers' employment status and characteristics of the family food environment. In contrast, higher work-life stress among both parents was associated with less healthful family food environment characteristics including less frequent family meals and more frequent sugar-sweetened beverage and fast food consumption by parents. Among dual-parent families, taking into account the employment characteristics of the other parent did not substantially alter the relationships between work-life stress and family food environment characteristics. While parental employment is beneficial for many families, identifying policy and programmatic strategies to reduce parents' work-life stress may have positive implications for the family food environment and for the eating patterns and related health outcomes of children and parents. PMID:22591825

Bauer, Katherine W.; Hearst, Mary O.; Escoto, Kamisha; Berge, Jerica M.; Neumark-Sztainer, Dianne

2013-01-01

127

Family Policy in Hungary: How to Improve the Reconciliation between Work and Family? OECD Economics Department Working Papers, No. 566  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Hungarian family policy focuses on providing generous options to take time off work to look after children. This system not only contributes to Hungary's low employment rate but encourages long separation from the labour market, has largely failed to significantly influence fertility rates and is relatively expensive to run. This paper looks at…

Hemmings, Philip

2007-01-01

128

WORKPLACE SOCIAL SUPPORT AND WORK–FAMILY CONFLICT: A META-ANALYSIS CLARIFYING THE INFLUENCE OF GENERAL AND WORK–FAMILY-SPECIFIC SUPERVISOR AND ORGANIZATIONAL SUPPORT  

PubMed Central

This article uses meta-analysis to develop a model integrating research on relationships between employee perceptions of general and work–family-specific supervisor and organizational support and work–family conflict. Drawing on 115 samples from 85 studies comprising 72,507 employees, we compared the relative influence of 4 types of workplace social support to work–family conflict: perceived organizational support (POS); supervisor support; perceived organizational work–family support, also known as family-supportive organizational perceptions (FSOP); and supervisor work–family support. Results show work–family-specific constructs of supervisor support and organization support are more strongly related to work–family conflict than general supervisor support and organization support, respectively. We then test a mediation model assessing the effects of all measures at once and show positive perceptions of general and work–family-specific supervisor indirectly relate to work–family conflict via organizational work–family support. These results demonstrate that work–family-specific support plays a central role in individuals’ work–family conflict experiences. PMID:21691415

KOSSEK, ELLEN ERNST; PICHLER, SHAUN; BODNER, TODD; HAMMER, LESLIE B.

2011-01-01

129

The effect of positive and negative work-family interaction on exhaustion : Does work social support make a difference?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to develop and test a conceptual model, which investigates the effects of work-family conflict, family-work conflict, work-family facilitation, and family-work facilitation simultaneously on exhaustion. This study also aims to examine work social support as a moderator in the relationship between two directions of conflict and facilitation and exhaustion. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – Data for

Osman M. Karatepe

2010-01-01

130

Work and family life: parental work schedules and child academic achievement  

Microsoft Academic Search

This review essay deals with interconnectivity between work life and family life. Specifically, it explores the relationship between parental work schedules and child academic achievement. Existing research focused on that relationship has been somewhat narrow in scope and has largely ignored the issue of underlying mechanisms. This review essay seeks to address those shortcomings by introducing a conceptual framework that

Chrissy D. Vincent; Barbara L. Neis

2011-01-01

131

Longitudinal Associations between Maternal Work Stress, Negative Work-Family Spillover, and Depressive Symptoms  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The current study examined associations over an 18-month period between maternal work stressors, negative work-family spillover, and depressive symptoms in a sample of 414 employed mothers with young children living in six predominantly nonmetropolitan counties in the Eastern United States. Results from a one-group mediation model showed that a…

Goodman, W. Benjamin; Crouter, Ann C.

2009-01-01

132

7 CFR 1962.7 - Securing unpaid balances on unsecured loans.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Securing unpaid balances on unsecured loans. 1962.7 Section 1962.7 Agriculture...Liquidation of Chattel Security § 1962.7 Securing unpaid balances on unsecured loans. The County Supervisor will take a...

2010-01-01

133

7 CFR 1962.7 - Securing unpaid balances on unsecured loans.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Securing unpaid balances on unsecured loans. 1962.7 Section 1962.7 Agriculture...Liquidation of Chattel Security § 1962.7 Securing unpaid balances on unsecured loans. The County Supervisor will take a...

2013-01-01

134

7 CFR 1962.7 - Securing unpaid balances on unsecured loans.  

... 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Securing unpaid balances on unsecured loans. 1962.7 Section 1962.7 Agriculture...Liquidation of Chattel Security § 1962.7 Securing unpaid balances on unsecured loans. The County Supervisor will take a...

2014-01-01

135

7 CFR 1962.7 - Securing unpaid balances on unsecured loans.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

... 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Securing unpaid balances on unsecured loans. 1962.7 Section 1962.7 Agriculture...Liquidation of Chattel Security § 1962.7 Securing unpaid balances on unsecured loans. The County Supervisor will take a...

2012-01-01

136

7 CFR 1962.7 - Securing unpaid balances on unsecured loans.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Securing unpaid balances on unsecured loans. 1962.7 Section 1962.7 Agriculture...Liquidation of Chattel Security § 1962.7 Securing unpaid balances on unsecured loans. The County Supervisor will take a...

2011-01-01

137

Gender-Specific Perceptions of Four Dimensions of the Work/Family Interaction  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The aim of this study was twofold. The first intention was to examine the factorial validity of a work/family interaction in terms of the direction of influence (work-to-family vs. family-to-work) and type of effect (conflict vs. facilitation). Second, gender differences along these four dimensions of work/family interaction were explored. Data…

Innstrand, Siw Tone; Langballe, Ellen Melbye; Falkum, Erik; Espnes, Geir Arild; Aasland, Olaf Gjerlow

2009-01-01

138

Leadership Style of School Head-Teachers and Their Colleague's Work-Family Conflict  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper aims to investigate the relationship of people-oriented and task-oriented leadership styles with the work-family and family-work conflicts and the intensity of mutual relationship between work-family and family-work conflicts. Data for the research were collected through a survey of public sector elementary and secondary school teachers…

Tatlah, Ijaz Ahmed; Quraishi, Uzma

2010-01-01

139

Strategies for Promoting a Work-Family Agenda. Report Number 973.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document, which is intended to help individual managers and task forces committed to development of a work-family agenda, is based on recommendations of the Work and Family Research Council, which is composed of 35 advocates of work-family policies within U.S. firms. Basic strategies for promoting (marketing) work-family programs within…

Friedman, Dana E.; Johnson, Arlene A.

140

Social support, work-family conflict, and emotional exhaustion in South Korea.  

PubMed

With an increase of female workforce and dual-earner families, work-family conflict has received particular attention. Using a sample of 159 employees in South Korea, this study examined whether work-family conflict mediated the relationship between social support and emotional exhaustion. Supervisor and family support were found to be related negatively to two different aspects of work-family conflict, i.e., work interference with family and family interference with work, respectively. Also, each dimension of work-family conflict was associated with employees emotional exhaustion. The relationship between supervisor support and emotional exhaustion was mediated by work interference with family; whereas, the relationship between family support and emotional exhaustion was mediated by family interference with work. Implications and future research directions are discussed. PMID:24597453

Lee, Soojin; Kim, Seckyoung Loretta; Park, Eun Kyung; Yun, Seokhwa

2013-10-01

141

What the Person Brings to the Table: Personality, Coping, and Work-Family Conflict  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Employees (N = 291) of various industries and companies were surveyed to study how individual factors (coping and personality) affect work-family conflict: strain-based work-to-family conflict (S-WFC), time-based work-to-family conflict (T-WFC), strain-based family-to-work conflict (S-FWC), and time-based family-to-work conflict (T-FWC). As…

Andreassi, Jeanine K.

2011-01-01

142

The Real-World Problem of Care Coordination: A Longitudinal Qualitative Study with Patients Living with Advanced Progressive Illness and Their Unpaid Caregivers  

PubMed Central

Objectives To develop a model of care coordination for patients living with advanced progressive illness and their unpaid caregivers, and to understand their perspective regarding care coordination. Design A prospective longitudinal, multi-perspective qualitative study involving a case-study approach. Methods Serial in-depth interviews were conducted, transcribed verbatim and then analyzed through open and axial coding in order to construct categories for three cases (sites). This was followed by continued thematic analysis to identify underlying conceptual coherence across all cases in order to produce one coherent care coordination model. Participants Fifty-six purposively sampled patients and 27 case-linked unpaid caregivers. Settings Three cases from contrasting primary, secondary and tertiary settings within Britain. Results Coordination is a deliberate cross-cutting action that involves high-quality, caring and well-informed staff, patients and unpaid caregivers who must work in partnership together across health and social care settings. For coordination to occur, it must be adequately resourced with efficient systems and services that communicate. Patients and unpaid caregivers contribute substantially to the coordination of their care, which is sometimes volunteered at a personal cost to them. Coordination is facilitated through flexible and patient-centered care, characterized by accurate and timely information communicated in a way that considers patients’ and caregivers’ needs, preferences, circumstances and abilities. Conclusions Within the midst of advanced progressive illness, coordination is a shared and complex intervention involving relational, structural and information components. Our study is one of the first to extensively examine patients’ and caregivers’ views about coordination, thus aiding conceptual fidelity. These findings can be used to help avoid oversimplifying a real-world problem, such as care coordination. Avoiding oversimplification can help with the development, evaluation and implementation of real-world coordination interventions for patients and their unpaid caregivers in the future. PMID:24788451

Daveson, Barbara A.; Harding, Richard; Shipman, Cathy; Mason, Bruce L.; Epiphaniou, Eleni; Higginson, Irene J.; Ellis-Smith, Clare; Henson, Lesley; Munday, Dan; Nanton, Veronica; Dale, Jeremy R.; Boyd, Kirsty; Worth, Allison; Barclay, Stephen; Donaldson, Anne; Murray, Scott

2014-01-01

143

Job Level, Demands, and Resources as Antecedents of Work-Family Conflict  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Although substantial research has examined the conflict that employees experience between their work and family roles, the literature has not investigated the prevalence and antecedents of work-family conflict for individuals who work at different levels of an organization. This study examines differences in work-family conflict (work interference…

DiRenzo, Marco S.; Greenhaus, Jeffrey H.; Weer, Chisty H.

2011-01-01

144

77 FR 19008 - Guidelines for Home Energy Professionals: Standard Work Specifications for Single Family Energy...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...for Home Energy Professionals: Standard Work Specifications for Single Family Energy...for Home Energy Professionals: Standard Work Specifications for Single Family Energy Upgrades. This document is a set of work specifications applicable to energy...

2012-03-29

145

78 FR 18576 - Guidelines for Home Energy Professionals: Standard Work Specifications for Single Family Energy...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...for Home Energy Professionals: Standard Work Specifications for Single Family Energy...for Home Energy Professionals: Standard Work Specifications for Single Family Energy...This content is a set of recommended work specifications applicable to energy...

2013-03-27

146

Honoring Work in Wisconsin: State Policies To Promote Self-Sufficiency for Working Families.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Many of Wisconsin's working families face economic distress, living from paycheck to paycheck and being forced to choose between paying their rent or buying food for their children. Parents under stress often cannot support their children with time, energy or resources. In order to affirm the importance of children in the state, and to help build…

Wisconsin Univ., Madison. Center on Wisconsin Strategy.

147

Women, men, work, and family. An expansionist theory.  

PubMed

The lives of women and men, the relationships that they establish, and their work have changed dramatically in the past 50 years, but the dominant theories driving research in these areas have not. In this article, the authors argue that the facts underlying the assumptions of the classical theories of gender and multiple roles have changed so radically as to make the theories obsolete. Moreover, a large body of empirical data fails to support the predictions flowing from these theories. Yet the development of new theory for guiding research and clinical practice has not kept pace. The authors attempt to fill this theoretical gap by reviewing the research literature and articulating an expansionist theory of gender, work, and family that includes four empirically derived and empirically testable principles better matched to today's realities. PMID:11675985

Barnett, R C; Hyde, J S

2001-10-01

148

45 CFR 261.25 - Do we count Tribal families in calculating the work participation rate?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-10-01 false Do we count Tribal families in calculating the work participation...Relating to Public Welfare OFFICE OF FAMILY ASSISTANCE (ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS), ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN AND FAMILIES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN...

2010-10-01

149

Family Mastery Enhances Work Engagement in Chinese Nurses: A Cross-Lagged Analysis  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Based on Greenhaus and Powell's (2006) theory of work-family enrichment and the job demands-resources (JD-R) model of work engagement (Bakker & Demerouti, 2008), this study focused on the family-to-work enrichment process by investigating the effect of family mastery on work engagement in a Chinese context. A sample of 279 Chinese female nurses…

Lu, Chang-qin; Siu, Oi-ling; Chen, Wei-qing; Wang, Hai-jiang

2011-01-01

150

Positive and Negative Effects of Family Involvement on Work-Related Burnout  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We aimed to explain the influence of family involvement on feelings of burnout among employees who combine work and family tasks. As proxies for family involvement, we used the family structure (partner, number and age of children) and family tasks (e.g. hours spent on household chores). We compared conflict theory and enrichment theory, and…

ten Brummelhuis, Lieke L.; van der Lippe, Tanja; Kluwer, Esther S.; Flap, Henk

2008-01-01

151

Partnerships at Work: Lessons Learned from Programs and Practices of Families, Professionals and Communities.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Designed to celebrate family/interprofessional collaborative partnerships, this publication describes high-quality examples of how families and professionals at the family, community, state, and national levels have worked together to create programs and practices that are family-friendly and responsive to what families have said they want and…

Bishop, Kathleen Kirk, Ed.; Taylor, Mary Skidmore, Ed.; Arango, Polly, Ed.

152

Work Roles, Management and Perceived Well-being for Married Women within Family Businesses  

Microsoft Academic Search

The study uses the National Family Business Survey and is grounded in the systemic Sustainable Family Business Model. It investigated the relationship between management activity of married women within family businesses and perceived well-being controlling for work roles, family context, personal and financial resources. Statistical analyses indicated that successfully achieving the most important family goal was positively related to management

Yoon G. Lee; Sharon M. Danes; Mack C. Shelley

2006-01-01

153

Supervisor Support, Work-Family Conflict, and Satisfaction Outcomes: An Empirical Study in the Hotel Industry  

Microsoft Academic Search

The current study developed and tested a model that investigated the relationship of supervisor support with work-family conflict and family-work conflict and the effects of both directions of conflict with family satisfaction, career satisfaction, and life satisfaction. The model also examined the impact of supervisor support on family and career satisfaction outcomes and the effects of these satisfaction variables on

Osman M. Karatepe; Orhan Uludag

2008-01-01

154

SINGAPORE'S FALLING FERTILITY: EXPLORING THE INFLUENCE OF THE WORK-FAMILY INTERFACE  

Microsoft Academic Search

Since the 1950s, Singapore has experienced a precipitous fertility decline. While studies have addressed this decline, none has explored the influence of the work-family interface. Using a nationally representative sample of 706 Singaporeans, we explored work and family variables associated with actual and desired family size. Results showed Singaporeans tend not to achieve their ideal family size; financial constraint is

LINDSAY LARSON CALL; RACHEL SHEFFIELD; ELISABETH TRAIL; KEITARO YOSHIDA; E. JEFFREY HILL

2008-01-01

155

An Examination of the Selected Antecedents and Outcomes of Work-Family Conflict and Family-Work Conflict in Frontline Service Jobs  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study is to develop and test a model that investigates the selected antecedents and consequences of work-family conflict and family-work conflict in frontline service jobs. Data were obtained from a sample of full-time frontline employees in Northern Cyprus hotels as its setting. The results of the path analysis showed that negative affectivity (NA) amplified employees' work-family

Osman M. Karatepe; Hasan Kilic; Bengi Isiksel

2008-01-01

156

Working with Military Families Through Deployment and Beyond  

Microsoft Academic Search

Military families experience considerable stress, periods of long separation, and changes to the family system due to family\\u000a members planning to enter a war zone, actively living in a war zone, and reuniting after being in a war zone. Anticipation\\u000a and understanding of the stages of deployment improves family, couple and individual functioning. The issues that the family\\u000a and the

Julie Anne Laser; Paul M. Stephens

2011-01-01

157

Work and Family Commitment and Decision-Making Status Among Emerging Adults  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study was designed to investigate work–family attitudes among emerging adults. Participants were 46 male and 49 female college juniors and seniors. Men and women had similar levels of work and family commitment. For women there was a negative correlation between work and family commitment. Exploratory analyses indicated different relationships between work decision-making status and commitment and family decision-making status

Stacey R. Friedman; Carol S. Weissbrod

2005-01-01

158

Comparing in-work benefits and the reward to work for families with children in the US and the UK  

Microsoft Academic Search

The income transfer systems for low-income families in the US and the UK try both to reduce poverty and to encourage work. In-work benefits are a key part of both countries' strategies through the earned income tax credit and the working families' tax credit (and predecessors) respectively. But tax credits are only one part of the whole tax and welfare

Mike Brewer

2001-01-01

159

Work-Family Conflict, Resources, and Role Set Density: Assessing Their Effects on Distress among Working Mothers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We explored the relationships between the experience of work-family conflict and levels of distress in the family and at work among a sample of 227 Israeli working mothers. We also examined how role set density (RSD, the number of roles they perform) and personal and environmental resources are related to the women's experience of distress.…

Kulik, Liat; Liberman, Gabriel

2013-01-01

160

Trait Mindfulness and Work-Family Balance among Working Parents: The Mediating Effects of Vitality and Sleep Quality  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The present study investigates the relationship between trait mindfulness and work-family balance among a sample of working parents. Sleep quality and vitality are tested as mediators of this relationship. Results indicate that those with greater mindfulness report greater work-family balance, better sleep quality, and greater vitality. As…

Allen, Tammy D.; Kiburz, Kaitlin M.

2012-01-01

161

Work-Family Boundary Strategies: Stability and Alignment between Preferred and Enacted Boundaries  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Are individuals bounding work and family the way they would like? Much of the work-family boundary literature focuses on whether employees are segmenting or integrating work with family, but does not explore the boundaries workers would like to have, nor does it examine the fit between desired and enacted boundaries, or assess boundary stability.…

Ammons, Samantha K.

2013-01-01

162

Antecedents and outcomes of a fourfold taxonomy of work-family balance in Chinese employed parents.  

PubMed

The study provided validity evidence for a fourfold taxonomy of work-family balance that comprises direction of influence (work to family vs. family to work) and types of effect (work-family conflict vs. work-family facilitation). Data were collected from 189 employed parents in China. The results obtained from a confirmatory factor analysis supported the factorial validity of the fourfold taxonomy of work-family balance with a Chinese sample. Child care responsibilities, working hours, monthly salary, and organizational family-friendly policy were positively related to the conflict component of work-family balance; whereas new parental experience, spouse support, family-friendly supervisors and coworkers had significant positive effects on the facilitation component of work-family balance. In comparison with the inconsistent effects of work-family conflict, work to family facilitation had consistent positive effects on work and life attitudes. The implications of findings in relation to China and other countries are discussed in the paper. PMID:19331479

Lu, Jia-Fang; Siu, Oi-Ling; Spector, Paul E; Shi, Kan

2009-04-01

163

Reducing Work-Family Conflict through Different Sources of Social Support  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The present study examines the relationship between four sources of social support (i.e., spouse, relatives and friends, supervisor, and colleagues) and time and strain-based work-to-family and family-to-work conflict among 444 dual-earners. Gender differences with respect to the relationship between social support and work-family conflict were…

van Daalen, Geertje; Willemsen, Tineke M.; Sanders, Karin

2006-01-01

164

Work and Family Plans among At-Risk Israeli Adolescents: A Mixed-Methods Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Quantitative methods were used to investigate attributions of importance to work and family roles and anticipated work--family conflict and facilitation among 353 at-risk Israeli male and female adolescents. Qualitative interviews conducted with 26 of the at-risk youth explored future work and family perceptions. Findings indicated that both sexes…

Cinamon, Rachel Gali; Rich, Yisrael

2014-01-01

165

Examining the Constructs of Work-to-Family Enrichment and Positive Spillover  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper reports three studies examining construct validity evidence for two recently developed measures of the positive side of the work-family interface: work-to-family positive spillover (WFPS; Hanson, Hammer, & Colton, 2006) and work-to-family enrichment (WFE; Carlson, Kacmar, Wayne, & Grzywacz, 2006). Using confirmatory factor analysis, the…

Masuda, Aline D.; McNall, Laurel A.; Allen, Tammy D.; Nicklin, Jessica M.

2012-01-01

166

Teaching Work and Family to Undergraduate Students: Catalyzing Pedagogical, Curricular, and Programmatic Innovations  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In 2006 and 2007, two workshops on teaching work-family courses were held at the annual meetings of the American Sociological Association. This article examines the current challenges and strategies of teaching work-family, as identified by workshop participants, and the resources that are available through the Sloan Work and Family Research…

Sweet, Stephen; Mumm, Joshua; Pitt-Catsouphes, Marcie; Casey, Judith

2008-01-01

167

"Flexible Work Arrangements: Managing the Work-Family Boundary" by B. Gottlieb, E. K. Kelloway, and E. Barham. Book Review.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Finds that Gottlieb et al.'s work provides an excellent overview of flexible work arrangements in a variety of work organizations for managers, human-resources professionals, and employees. Considers the work an excellent primer presenting useful information about alternative work arrangements, factors involved in work/family clashes,…

Daly, Kerry

1999-01-01

168

Opening Doors: Students' Perspectives on Juggling Work, Family, and College  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

A Manpower Demonstration Research Corporation's report, Opening Doors: Students' Perspectives on Juggling Work, Family, and College sheds light on factors sometimes overlooked by legislators and policymakers as they seek to better the circumstances of America's underclass. Recognizing the critical role of education and vocational training in improving upward mobility, key players effectively fail to appreciate that access to higher education means very little to those already overburdened with substantial work and childcare responsibilities. Focusing exclusively on educational opportunities afforded by large metropolitan community college systems, the study examined an ethnically diverse array of students grouped in three categories: one currently attending a community college, one that had failed to complete a degree or certificate program, and one that had never matriculated in such a program but which hoped to at some point. As readers of the report will discover, the desire to move up the socio-economic ladder through higher education is pronounced across a broad spectrum of America's low-wage population, if only they can find the time, the money, and the broader systemic support necessary to realize such achievements.

Diaz, Melisa.; Gooden, Susan.; Matus-Grossman, Lisa.; Seupersad, Reishma.; Wavelet, Melissa.

2002-01-01

169

Sustaining Families: Why the Life Course Development Approach Works.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A life-course development perspective depicts stages of family development with tasks for each stage. It addresses the diversity of family relationships and illustrates how human development includes individual, generational, and historical time. (Contains 14 references.) (SK)

Price, Sharon J.; McKenry, Patrick C.

2003-01-01

170

Work-family conflict in context: The impact of structural and perceived neighborhood disadvantage on work-family conflict.  

PubMed

Despite increasing levels of work-family conflict (WFC) among North Americans, few scholars examine the broader contexts in which these conflicts occur. I address this gap by examining how the neighborhood of residence impacts WFC, with a focus on social inequality and disadvantage across neighborhoods. I hypothesize that neighborhood disadvantage may impact WFC directly-by introducing ambient stressors that inhibit individuals from successfully balancing competing domain demands, and indirectly-by undermining the psychological resources that would combat the harmful effects of disadvantaged contexts. Using individual and census-level data from Canada, I consider both objective and subjective measures of neighborhood disadvantage and find that, overall, individuals in more disadvantaged neighborhoods are worse off because these contexts increase WFC, while reducing the psychological resources that would otherwise buffer these deleterious effects. However, some of these associations vary by gender. I discuss the broader implications of these findings for neighborhood effects and WFC research. PMID:25592939

Young, Marisa

2015-03-01

171

The Work-Family Support Roles of Child Care Providers across Settings  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper presents a qualitative investigation of the work-family support roles of a sample of 29 child care providers serving low-income families in the Chicago area (16 family, friend, and neighbor providers (FFN), 7 licensed family child care providers (FCC), and 6 center-based teachers). Providers report offering low-income parents…

Bromer, Juliet; Henly, Julia R.

2009-01-01

172

Immigrant women in Australia: resources, family and work.  

PubMed

Using the 1% public use sample of individual records from the 1981 census and adopting direct standardization for age and sex regression techniques, this paper describes differences among native born Australians and immigrants from English-speaking countries, Northwestern Europe, Eastern Europe, the Mediterranean region and the Third World, in areas of labor participation, unemployment, occupational status, entrepreneurship, and income. While Eastern European women are the most likely to be in the labor force, are the most likely to be unemployed and are the highest paid, Mediterranean women are the least likely to be in the labor force, have fairly low unemployment rates and occupy the lowest status positions and receive the lowest wages. Native born Australians and immigrants from English-speaking and Third World countries and Northwestern Europe are intermediate between these 2 extremes on most dimensions. Some of the differences are not large. In particular, labor force participation only ranges from 49% to 59% and self employment from 9% to 14%. The most apparent differences in work patterns of the various groups of immigrants stem from differences in their own resources and constranits, or from different modes of adaptation to the Australian society, rather than from differential treatment in the labor market. Although family roles affect aspects of work differently, in general, marriage reduces labor force participation by more than 10% among all groups, except for East Europeans and the Mediterraneans, among whom it has no effect. While East European women hold on to their jobs as a potential source of livelihood in the event of divorce which is common among this group, the Mediterraneans view jobs as a means of achieving a measure of economic security. The effect of length of stay in Australia on labor market participation is somewhat larger for women from non-English speaking countries, whose adaptation process includes a slow improvement in language skills. In general, the Australian labor market appears to treat all immigrants equally without regard to their country of origin. PMID:12340229

Evans, M D

1984-01-01

173

Family and Work Influences on the Transition to College among Latina Adolescents  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigates the effect of family obligations and part-time work on Latina adolescents' stress and academic achievement during the transition to college. One hundred seventeen Latina college students from immigrant families completed surveys assessing the mother-daughter relationship, family obligations, work-school conflict, school and…

Sy, Susan R.

2006-01-01

174

Relationship between Work Interference with Family and Parent-Child Interactive Behavior: Can Guilt Help?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Despite its theoretical and practical importance, behavioral consequences of work-family conflict that reside in the family domain rarely have been examined. Based on two studies, the current research investigated the relationship of work-interference-with-family (WIF) with parent-child interactive behavior (i.e., educational, recreational, and…

Cho, Eunae; Allen, Tammy D.

2012-01-01

175

Relationship-Centered Practices in Early Childhood: Working with Families, Infants, and Young Children at Risk  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Strong working relationships with diverse families and children are the foundation of successful early intervention. Discover fresh, practical ways to build these relationships in this essential guidebook, every professional's blueprint for working with children and families within the specific context of their culture, family structure, and risk…

Ensher, Gail L.; Clark, David A.

2011-01-01

176

A qualitative examination of the work–family interface: Parents of children with autism spectrum disorder  

Microsoft Academic Search

Within the work–family literature little is known about the work–family challenges and opportunities faced by families that have one or more children with autism spectrum disorder. However, it has been consistently demonstrated that parents of children with autism spectrum disorder are at a higher risk of experiencing a host of negative outcomes. Using a qualitative design, within grounded theory, the

Russell A. Matthews; Suzanne M. Booth; Claire F. Taylor; Tracy Martin

2011-01-01

177

Not Babysitting: Work Stress and Well-Being for Family Child Care Providers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Family child care providers contend with a number of work stressors related to the dual roles of operating a small business and providing child care in their home. Research has documented many sources of work related stress for family child care providers; however, research examining family child care providers' experiences outside of the…

Gerstenblatt, Paula; Faulkner, Monica; Lee, Ahyoung; Doan, Linh Thy; Travis, Dnika

2014-01-01

178

The health effects of work and family role characteristics: Gender and race comparisons  

Microsoft Academic Search

Many studies have documented the benefits of work and family roles for both physical and mental health. A number of these studies have suggested that work and family roles are beneficial to the degree that they entail rewarding relationships and activities. Using data from the National Survey of Families and Households (N = 10633; 17 percent African-American), this paper examines

Beth Rushing; Annette Schwabe

1995-01-01

179

Health and turnover of working mothers after childbirth via the work-family interface: an analysis across time.  

PubMed

This study examined organizational levers that impact work-family experiences, participant health, and subsequent turnover. Using a sample of 179 women returning to full-time work 4 months after childbirth, we examined the associations of 3 job resources (job security, skill discretion, and schedule control) with work-to-family enrichment and the associations of 2 job demands (psychological requirements and nonstandard work schedules) with work-to-family conflict. Further, we considered subsequent impact of work-to-family conflict and enrichment on women's health (physical and mental health) 8 months after women returned to work and the impact of health on voluntary turnover 12 months after women returned to work. Having a nonstandard work schedule was directly and positively related to conflict, whereas schedule control buffered the effect of psychological requirements on conflict. Skill discretion and job security, both job resources, directly and positively related to enrichment. Work-to-family conflict was negatively related to both physical and mental health, but work-to-family enrichment positively predicted only physical health. Physical health and mental health both negatively influenced turnover. We discuss implications and opportunities for future research. PMID:21604833

Carlson, Dawn S; Grzywacz, Joseph G; Ferguson, Merideth; Hunter, Emily M; Clinch, C Randall; Arcury, Thomas A

2011-09-01

180

Working with Families of Young Children with Special Needs  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This user-friendly book presents research-based best practices for serving families of children with special needs from birth to age 6. Expert contributors demonstrate how early intervention and early childhood special education can effectively address a wide range of family concerns, which in turn optimizes children's development and learning.…

McWilliam, R. A., Ed.

2010-01-01

181

Working with Different Cultural Patterns & Beliefs: Teachers & Families Learning Together  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Rogoff (2003) argues that "Human development is a cultural process….People develop as participants in cultural communities" (p. 3). Children develop within families, and different cultures reflect differences in how they structure activity for this development. For example, middle class North American families generally would not permit…

Purcell-Gates, Victoria; Lenters, Kimberly; McTavish, Marianne; Anderson, Jim

2014-01-01

182

Children, Families & Cities: Programs That Work at the Local Level.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This book profiles over 30 local programs and policies designed to meet the needs of children and families in cities and towns. The first chapter concerns the examination of issues related to children and families in the context of policy and planning. It calls attention to the need for comprehensiveness and coordination in the strategic…

Kyle, John E., Ed.

183

Leaving Family for Work: Ambivalence and Mental Health Among Mexican Migrant Farmworker Men  

Microsoft Academic Search

Men migrating to the United States from Mexico and Central America confront opposing family norms. They need to leave their\\u000a families to gain family economic security; yet, leaving renders their families vulnerable. We examined the mental health implications\\u000a of the opposing family norms inherent in migration using an ambivalence framework. We interviewed 60 Latino migrant farmworkers\\u000a working in North Carolina.

Joseph G. Grzywacz; Sara A. Quandt; Julie Early; Janeth Tapia; Christopher N. Graham; Thomas A. Arcury

2006-01-01

184

Work-family climate, organizational commitment, and turnover: Multilevel contagion effects of leaders.  

PubMed

This paper presents empirical research analyzing the relationship between work-family climate (operationalized in terms of three work-family climate sub-scales), organizational leadership (i.e., senior manager) characteristics, organizational commitment and turnover intent among 526 employees from 37 different hotels across the US. Using multilevel modeling, we found significant associations between work-family climate, and both organizational commitment and turnover intent, both within and between hotels. Findings underscored the importance of managerial support for employee work-family balance, the relevance of senior managers' own work-family circumstances in relation to employees' work outcomes, and the existence of possible contagion effects of leaders in relation to work-family climate. PMID:19412351

O'Neill, John W; Harrison, Michelle M; Cleveland, Jeannette; Almeida, David; Stawski, Robert; Crouter, Anne C

2009-01-01

185

Work–family climate, organizational commitment, and turnover: Multilevel contagion effects of leaders ?  

PubMed Central

This paper presents empirical research analyzing the relationship between work–family climate (operationalized in terms of three work–family climate sub-scales), organizational leadership (i.e., senior manager) characteristics, organizational commitment and turnover intent among 526 employees from 37 different hotels across the US. Using multilevel modeling, we found significant associations between work–family climate, and both organizational commitment and turnover intent, both within and between hotels. Findings underscored the importance of managerial support for employee work–family balance, the relevance of senior managers’ own work–family circumstances in relation to employees’ work outcomes, and the existence of possible contagion effects of leaders in relation to work–family climate. PMID:19412351

O’Neill, John W.; Harrison, Michelle M.; Cleveland, Jeannette; Almeida, David; Stawski, Robert; Crouter, Anne C.

2009-01-01

186

Rhythms of life: antecedents and outcomes of work-family balance in employed parents.  

PubMed

This study examined antecedents and outcomes of a fourfold taxonomy of work-family balance in terms of the direction of influence (work-family vs. family-work) and type of effect (conflict vs. facilitation). Respondents were full-time employed parents in India. Confirmatory factor analysis results provided evidence for the discriminant validity of M. R. Frone's (2003) fourfold taxonomy of work-family balance. Results of moderated regression analysis revealed that different processes underlie the conflict and facilitation components. Furthermore, gender had only a limited moderating influence on the relationships between the antecedents and the components of work-family balance. Last, work-family facilitation was related to the work outcomes of job satisfaction and organizational commitment. PMID:15641894

Aryee, Samuel; Srinivas, E S; Tan, Hwee Hoon

2005-01-01

187

Examining Behavioural Coping Strategies as Mediators between Work-Family Conflict and Psychological Distress  

PubMed Central

We examined the mediating role of behavioral coping strategies in the association between work-family conflict and psychological distress. In particular, we examined the two directions of work-family conflict, namely, work interference into family and family interference into work. Furthermore, two coping styles in this study were adaptive and maladaptive coping strategies. This cross-sectional study was conducted among 429 Malaysian working women using self-reported data. The results of mediational analysis in the present study showed that adaptive coping strategy does not significantly mediate the effect of work-family conflict on psychological distress. However, maladaptive coping strategies significantly mediate the effect of work-family conflict on psychological distress. These results show that adaptive coping strategies, which aimed to improve the stressful situation, are not effective in managing stressor such as work-family conflict. We found that experiencing interrole conflict steers employees toward frequent use of maladaptive coping strategies which in turn lead to psychological distress. Interventions targeted at improvement of coping skills which are according to individual's needs and expectation may help working women to balance work and family demands. The important issue is to keep in mind that effective coping strategies are to control the situations not to eliminate work-family conflict.

Shamsuddin, Khadijah

2015-01-01

188

Family Literacy Funding Reductions and Work-First Welfare Policies: Adaptations and Consequences in Family Literacy Programs  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article examines the consequences of two concurrent policy changes for family literacy programs in Pennsylvania: (1) the transition from federal (Even Start) to state funding and (2) the elimination of adult education as a work activity for welfare recipients over 22 years of age. Using qualitative data from 10 family literacy programs, the…

Prins, Esther; Gungor, Ramazan

2011-01-01

189

Working with Families Living with Autism: Potential Contributions of Marriage and Family Therapists  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article introduces marriage and family therapists (MFT) to some of the common issues faced by families that have a child with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). First, autism is defined and common myths surrounding it are discussed. Next, relational challenges are presented that families report experiencing during early childhood through the…

Neely, Jason; Amatea, Ellen S.; Echevarria-Doan, Silvia; Tannen, Tina

2012-01-01

190

Questions and Answers about Child Care: A Sloan Work and Family Research Network Fact Sheet  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Sloan Work and Family Research Network has prepared Fact Sheets that provide statistical answers to some important questions about work-family and work-life issues. This Fact Sheet includes statistics about Child Care, and answers the following questions about child care: (1) How many children are in child care?; (2) How many hours per week do…

Sloan Work and Family Research Network, 2008

2008-01-01

191

Effects of Work-Related Absences on Families: Evidence from the Gulf War  

Microsoft Academic Search

Labor economists and policy makers have long been interested in work-family interactions. Work generates income but also reduces the time families have to spend together. Many soldiers who were mobilized for Gulf War service were away from home for an extended period of time, so Gulf War mobilization makes for an interesting case study of work-related absences by both husbands

Joshua D. Angrist; John H. Johnson IV

1998-01-01

192

Work-Family Relations among Mothers of Children with Learning Disorders  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The study examined conflict and facilitation in work-family relations among working mothers of children with learning disorders (LD) or with typical development. The study also focused on three maternal personal resources (maternal anxious/avoidant attachment security, affect and sense of coherence) as antecedents of these work-family relations,…

Al-Yagon, Michal; Cinamon, Rachel Gali

2008-01-01

193

The Impact of Human Resource Policies on EmployeesBalancing Work\\/Family Life  

Microsoft Academic Search

Using a number of empirical studies of human resource policies in Fortune 500 companies, this article focuses on (a) the major work\\/family problems faced by employees, (b) how work\\/family programs affect productivity, (c) what trends are emerging among companies, and (d) how a subsample of leading scientific companies and universities are responding to work\\/family issues. The seven major issues employees

ELLEN GALINSKY; PETER J. STEIN

1990-01-01

194

A study of work-family conflict, family-work conflict and the contingent effect of self-efficacy of retail salespeople in a transitional economy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – The present study aims to contribute to the growing cross-national body of literature on work-family conflict (WFC) and family-work conflict (FWC) issues by examining the interrelationship of these constructs with other variables in the context of a transitional economy. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – Data were collected using self-report questionnaires distributed to retail salespeople in Hungary. Hypothesis tests were conducted using

Cristian Chelariu; Rodney Stump

2011-01-01

195

Between Hope and Hard Times: New York's Working Families in Economic Distress  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Today, many jobs that once could support a family barely suffice to keep that family out of poverty. The implied bargain America offers its citizens is supposed to be that anyone who works hard and plays by the rules can support his or her family and move onward and upward. But for millions of New Yorkers, that bargain is out of reach; the uphill…

Fischer, David J.; Colton, Tara; Kleiman, Neil S.; Schimke, Karen

2004-01-01

196

We Are Not Babysitters: Family Child Care Providers Redefine Work and Care.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Drawing on in-depth interviews with 20 family child care providers of diverse race, ethnicity, immigrant status, and social class, this book explores the social, political, and economic forces and processes that draw women into the work of family child care. The articles dispel not only myths about why women choose to be family child care…

Tuominen, Mary C.

197

Strategies and Practices for Working with Immigrant Families in Early Education Programs  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study explores how early childhood education programs engage immigrant families in their children's learning, how programs learn about these families and incorporate their cultures into the classrooms, and what programs are doing in terms of their staff's professional development related to working with immigrant children and families. The…

Vesely, Colleen K.; Ginsberg, Mark R.

2011-01-01

198

A dyadic model of the work-family interface: a study of dual-earner couples in China.  

PubMed

This study adopted a spillover-crossover model to examine the roles of personality and perceived social support as antecedents of the work-family interface among dual-earner couples in China. Married couples (N = 306) from 2 major cities in China (Shanghai and Jinan) completed questionnaires measuring a relationship-oriented personality trait (i.e., family orientation), perceived family and work support, and work-family conflict and enhancement. The results showed that family orientation and perceived family support was positively associated with family-to-work enhancement and negatively associated with family-to-work conflict for both husbands and wives. Perceived work support was positively associated with family-to-work enhancement for wives and negatively associated with work-to-family conflict for husbands. Similarities in family orientation between partners were positively correlated with the individual's family-to-work enhancement. This study also illustrated the crossover of the work-family interface between dual-earner couples by using the actor-partner interdependence model. The pattern of associations between personality trait and perceived social support varied by gender. Husbands' family orientation was negatively correlated with work-to-family enhancement experienced by wives, and husbands' perceived work support was positively correlated with work-to-family enhancement experienced by wives. Wives' perceived work support was positively correlated with family-to-work conflict experienced by husbands. PMID:23276195

Ho, Man Yee; Chen, Xuefei; Cheung, Fanny M; Liu, Huimin; Worthington, Everett L

2013-01-01

199

Fragile Families and Welfare Reform: An Introduction. JCPR Working Paper.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper summarizes a collection of papers in a special issue that examines what resources and capabilities parents likely to be affected by Temporary Assistance for Needy Families have; whether these parents are likely to be good parents; the nature of parents' relationships and whether they will be able to cooperate in raising their children;…

Garfinkel, Irwin; McLanahan, Sara S.; Tienda, Marta; Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne

200

Workforce Issues in the Greater Boston Health Care Industry: Implications for Work and Family  

E-print Network

This working paper synthesizes critical problems identified by interviews with more than 40 leaders in the Boston area health care industry and places them in the context of work and family issues. At ...

Harrington, Mona

2004-12-10

201

Family Dynamics of the Stay-at-Home Father and Working Mother Relationship.  

PubMed

A phenomenological qualitative study was utilized to explore family dynamics in stay-at-home father and working mother households. A total of 20 working mothers were asked to describe family interactions and daily routines with regard to their stay-at-home father and working mother dynamic. All participants were married, heterosexual women with biological children ages 1 to 4 and who worked outside the home and the father stayed home as primary caretaker and did not contribute financially. The study indicated that the family dynamic of a working mother and stay-at-home father provided a positive parent-child relationship, enhanced parenting cohesion, and enhanced quality time. PMID:25204589

Rushing, Cassie; Powell, Lisa

2014-09-01

202

Training Family Therapists to Work with Children and Families: A Modified Delphi Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined child inclusion issues and training marriage and family therapists (MFTs) to treat children. This modified Delphi study utilized a panel of experts, and gathered data through questionnaires and qualitative interviews. Panelists believe children should participate in family therapy sessions for both child and adult problems,…

Sori, Catherine Ford; Sprenkle, Douglas H.

2004-01-01

203

A Cross-Cultural Test of the Work-Family Interface in 48 Countries  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study tests a cross-cultural model of the work-family interface. Using multigroup structural equation modeling with IBM survey responses from 48 countries (N= 25,380), results show that the same work-family interface model that fits the data globally also fits the data in a four-group model composed of culturally related groups of countries,…

Jeffrey Hill, E.; Yang, Chongming; Hawkins, Alan J.; Ferris, Maria

2004-01-01

204

A Two-Study Examination of Work-Family Conflict, Production Deviance and Gender  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Building on the spillover and crossover literatures of work-family conflict and the theoretical framework of Conservation of Resources Theory (Hobfoll, 1989) we examine the effects of conflict on production deviance. Using a two-study constructive replication and extension design, we examine how partner work-to-family conflict contributes to job…

Ferguson, Merideth; Carlson, Dawn; Hunter, Emily M.; Whitten, Dwayne

2012-01-01

205

High School Work and Family Life ITAC [Integrated Technical & Academic Competencies] for Career-Focused Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document contains a guide to implementing the Ohio Work and Family Life ITAC (Integrated Technical and Academic Competencies), which connects to the Ohio Model Competency-Based Program documents in arts, foreign languages, language arts, mathematics, science, and social studies, as well as the Core ITAC document. The Work and Family Life ITAC…

Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

206

Traditional and Nontraditional Gender Roles and Work-Family Interface for Men and Women  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this article, we examine traditional and nontraditional gender roles and work-family interface for men and women. Recent empirical literature is reviewed and implications for career counselors are discussed. We discuss changing gender roles in career, marriage, and parenting and provide strategies for helping clients to cope with work-family

Perrone, Kristin M.; Wright, Stephen L.; Jackson, Z. Vance

2009-01-01

207

Balancing Work and Family Responsibilities as an Extension 4-H Agent  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A career with Extension can be very rewarding, but also very demanding, as employees have to balance job stress and time demands with family goals and demands. The very nature of Extension work brings some tension between the job and family, and employees need to be equipped to make decisions about personal and work time. If the Extension System…

Rhea, Joseph Richard, Jr.

2009-01-01

208

Conflict between Work and Family: An Investigation of Four Policy Measures  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Welfare states enact a range of policies aimed at reducing work-family conflict. While welfare state policies have been assessed at the macro-level and work-family conflict at the individual-level, few studies have simultaneously addressed these relationships in a cross-national multi-level model. This study addresses this void by assessing the…

Ruppanner, Leah

2013-01-01

209

Work–family facilitation: A theoretical explanation and model of primary antecedents and consequences  

Microsoft Academic Search

Researchers have begun to test the idea that work and family can benefit, rather than just conflict with one another; yet, theoretical development is lacking. In this paper, we define work–family facilitation — or the positive influence of an individual's engagement in a domain on functioning of another life system. We merge and extend ideas from Positive Organizational Scholarship [Cameron,

Julie Holliday Wayne; Joseph G. Grzywacz; Dawn S. Carlson; K. Michele Kacmar

2007-01-01

210

Work-Family Climate, Organizational Commitment, and Turnover: Multilevel Contagion Effects of Leaders  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper presents empirical research analyzing the relationship between work-family climate (operationalized in terms of three work-family climate sub-scales), organizational leadership (i.e., senior manager) characteristics, organizational commitment and turnover intent among 526 employees from 37 different hotels across the US. Using…

O'Neill, John W.; Harrison, Michelle M.; Cleveland, Jeannette; Almeida, David; Stawski, Robert; Crouter, Anne C.

2009-01-01

211

Work and Career Experiences of Men from Families without College Experience  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A dearth of research exists exploring the career and work development of adult men and the influence of family-of-origin on that development. In this qualitative study, the researchers used a phenomenological approach to examine the career and work experiences of men whose parents have no education beyond high school and the influences of family

Woodside, Marianne; Gibbons, Melinda M.; Davison, John; Hannon, Christine; Sweeney, Jeffrey R.

2012-01-01

212

Work-family conflict and career success: the effects of domain-specific determinants  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – Despite widespread acknowledgement that work-family conflict and career success are salient issues that impact individual wellbeing and organizational effectiveness, there is little research that studies how the two concepts are related. The purpose of this paper is to develop and present a tentative framework for understanding the relationships among antecedents of interrole conflict between work and family and

Hassan I. Ballout

2008-01-01

213

Work–Family Conflict and Job Withdrawal Intentions: The Moderating Effect of Cultural Differences  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined the interactive effects of individual cultural orientation with work–family conflict on employees' job withdrawal intentions. Using a sample of 394 employees from the banking sector in the United States and China, the authors found that work interfering with family (WIF) was more positively related to job withdrawal intentions among individuals scoring high on idiocentrism. It is interesting

Peng Wang; John J. Lawler; Fred O. Walumbwa; Kan Shi

2004-01-01

214

An Exploratory Study into Work/Family Balance within the Australian Higher Education Sector  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The higher education landscape is undergoing major transformation, with a significant impact on the work and family practices of academics and professional staff. The purpose of this exploratory study is to examine the extent to which (1) time-related, (2) strain-related and (3) demographical variables impact on the work/family balance of academic…

Pillay, Soma; Kluvers, Ron; Abhayawansa, Subhash; Vranic, Vedran

2013-01-01

215

The Work-Family Interface as a Mediator between Job Demands and Employee Behaviour.  

PubMed

In this investigation, we draw from the job demands-resource model and conservation of resources theory to examine the relationship between job demands, the work-family interface and worker behaviours. Data collected from an online survey of workers revealed that hindrance demands indirectly increase interpersonal and organizational deviance through work interference with family and family interference with work. Challenge demands indirectly predict interpersonal and organizational deviance through work interference with family. Finally, hindrance demands indirectly decreased individual-directed organizational citizenship behaviours through work-to-family enrichment. Taken together, these results stress the relevance of job demand management and resource drain/acquisition to counterproductive and extra-role behaviours. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:24917073

Jenkins, Jade S; Heneghan, Camille J; Bailey, Sarah F; Barber, Larissa K

2014-06-11

216

The work-family interface in the United States and Singapore: conflict across cultures.  

PubMed

This article examines the work-family interface in a cross-cultural comparison between two nationally representative samples from the United States (n = 1,860) and Singapore (n = 1,035) with emphasis on work-family conflict. Family-to-work conflict was negatively related to marital satisfaction in both Singapore and the United States, although the effect was stronger in the United States. Similarly, family-to-work conflict was positively related to job satisfaction in the United States but was negatively related in Singapore. As expected, schedule flexibility was negatively related to depression in the United States, but in Singapore the relationship was positive. These findings suggest that theoretical relationships in the work-family interface developed in the more culturally individualistic West may need to be adapted when studying populations in the more collectivist East. PMID:20954775

Galovan, Adam M; Fackrell, Tamara; Buswell, Lydia; Jones, Blake L; Hill, E Jeffrey; Carroll, Sarah June

2010-10-01

217

Sensemaking in a High-Risk Lifestyle: The Relationship Between Work and Family for Public Safety Families  

E-print Network

relatively little stress in participating in multiple roles, and derive high self-esteem from the competence they achieve in work and family activities (Marks & MacDermid, 1996). Work-life balance initiatives have been instituted by organizations to help... to their employees, they may not be offering them equally to all employees. Although some research has been conducted on how organizations implement work- life balance programs, relatively little research has been conducted on the process by which 10 individuals...

Bochantin, Jaime Elizabeth

2011-10-21

218

Adolescent Work and Alcohol Use Revisited: Variations by Family Structure  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Previous research finds adolescent work hours to be associated with increased alcohol use. Most studies, however, fail to account for possible selection effects that lead youth to both work and substance use. Using data from the first two waves of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (N = 12,620), a fixed effects regression method…

Rocheleau, Gregory C.; Swisher, Raymond R.

2012-01-01

219

Head Start: Helping Families Move from Welfare to Work.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report describes some of the ways in which Head Start agencies are helping to set parents on the path to self-sufficiency. The report is intended to illustrate the variety of initiatives that are underway and to highlight the important work all Head Start agencies are doing to support parents as they move from welfare to work. The…

Finlay, Belva; Blank, Helen; Poersch, Nicole Oxendine

220

Thirty-Five Years of Studying Work and Family  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The author and Karen Gyllstrom began working on the study that resulted in the highly cited article entitled, "Working Men and Women: Inter-and Intra-role Conflict" (Herman & Gyllstrom, "Psychology of Women Quarterly" 1977) probably more for personal than professional reasons. The study was based on Gyllstrom's master's thesis. The focus of…

Brett, Jeanne M.

2011-01-01

221

76 FR 65545 - Notice of Revision of Standard Form 1152: Unpaid Compensation of Deceased Civilian Employee  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...OPM) has revised Standard Form (SF) 1152, Unpaid Compensation...the employee's death. The form relates solely to money due as...under the Retirement or Group Life Insurance Acts applicable to...Government service. The revised form is PDF fillable and is...

2011-10-21

222

Work-Family Conflict: An Exploration of the Differential Effects of a Dependent Childs Age on Working Parents  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose--The purpose of this article is to explore the impact of life cycle stage, specifically parenting stage, on work-family conflict among working parents to determine whether discernible differences are evident among those individuals at the early stage of their parenting cycle compared with those with older children.…

Darcy, Colette; McCarthy, Alma

2007-01-01

223

When Flexibility Helps: Another Look at the Availability of Flexible Work Arrangements and Work-Family Conflict  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Despite the positive press given to flexible work arrangements (FWA), empirical research investigating the link between the availability of these policies and work-family conflict is largely equivocal. The purpose of the present study was to begin to reconcile these mixed results through more precise measurement and the examination of moderators.…

Shockley, Kristen M.; Allen, Tammy D.

2007-01-01

224

Work-family conflict : An exploration of the differential effects of a dependent child's age on working parents  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – The purpose of this article is to explore the impact of life cycle stage, specifically parenting stage, on work-family conflict among working parents to determine whether discernible differences are evident among those individuals at the early stage of their parenting cycle compared with those with older children. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – An explorative study was undertaken among parents employed within

Colette Darcy; Alma McCarthy

2007-01-01

225

Predictors of Family Strength: The Integrated Spiritual-Religious/Resilient Perspective for Understanding the Healthy/Strong Family  

PubMed Central

Objective: The present study aimed to investigate the effects of spiritual well-being and family protective factors on the family strength in a propositional structural model. Methods: The research population consisted of all the married people of the Isfahan, Iran, in 2012 with preschool-aged children and in the first decade of marriage with at least eight grades of educational level. Three hundred and ninety five voluntary and unpaid participants were selected randomly through multi-stage sampling from seven regions of the city. The instruments used were the Spiritual Well-being Scale, Inventory of Family Protective Factors, and Family Strength Scale. Descriptive statistics and a structural equation modeling analytic approach were used. Results: The analytic model predicted 82% of the variance of the family strength. The total effect of the spiritual well-being on the family strength was higher compared to the family protective factors. Furthermore, spiritual well-being predicted 43% of the distribution of the family protective factors and had indirect effect on the family strength through the family protective factors (p < 0.001). Conclusions: The results of this study confirmed the interrelationships among spiritual well-being and family protective factors, and their simultaneous effects on family strength. Family counselors may employ an integrated spiritual-religious/resilient perspective to inform their strength-based work with individuals and their families. Declaration of interest: None. PMID:24644511

Ghaffari, Majid; Fatehizade, Maryam; Ahmadi, Ahmad; Ghasemi, Vahid; Baghban, Iran

2013-01-01

226

How Work–Family Research Can Finally Have an Impact in Organizations  

PubMed Central

Although work–family research has mushroomed over the past several decades, an implementation gap persists in putting work–family research into practice. Because of this, work–family researchers have not made a significant impact in improving the lives of employees relative to the amount of research that has been conducted. The goal of this article is to clarify areas where implementation gaps between work–family research and practice are prevalent, discuss the importance of reducing these gaps, and make the case that both better and different research should be conducted. We recommend several alternative but complementary actions for the work–family researcher: (a) work with organizations to study their policy and practice implementation efforts, (b) focus on the impact of rapid technological advances that are blurring work–family boundaries, (c) conduct research to empower the individual to self-manage the work–family interface, and (d) engage in advocacy and collaborative policy research to change institutional contexts and break down silos. Increased partnerships between industrial–organizational (I–O) psychology practitioners and researchers from many industries and disciplines could break down silos that we see as limiting development of the field. PMID:22247737

Kossek, Ellen Ernst; Baltes, Boris B.; Matthews, Russell A.

2011-01-01

227

Work–family interface from a life and career stage perspective: The role of demands and resources  

Microsoft Academic Search

Work–family conflict and enrichment are experiences that occur daily and have substantial consequences for employees, their families, and the organizations that employ them. The aim of the current review is to make a link between life and career stage, work and family conditions, and the work–family interface. The basic proposition is that life stages partly determine career development, and consequently

Evangelia Demerouti; Maria C. W. Peeters; Beatrice I. J. M. van der Heijden

2012-01-01

228

Work-family conflict and burnout among Chinese female nurses: the mediating effect of psychological capital  

PubMed Central

Background Burnout among nurses not only threatens their own health, but also that of their patients. Exploring risk factors of nurse’ burnout is important to improve nurses’ health and to increase the quality of health care services. This study aims to explore the relationship between work-family conflict and burnout among Chinese female nurses and the mediating role of psychological capital in this relationship. Methods This cross-sectional study was performed during the period of September and October 2010. A questionnaire that consisted of the Maslach Burnout Inventory-General Survey (MBI-GS), the work-family conflict scale and the psychological capital questionnaire (PCQ-24) scale, as well as demographic and working factors, was distributed to nurses in Liaoning province, China. A total of 1,332 individuals (effective response rate: 78.35%) became our subjects. Hierarchical linear regression analyses were performed to explore the mediating role of psychological capital. Results Both work interfering family conflict and family interfering work conflict were positively related with emotional exhaustion and cynicism. However, work interfering family conflict was positively related with professional efficacy whereas family interfering work conflict was negatively related with it. Psychological capital partially mediated the relationship of work interfering family conflict with emotional exhaustion and cynicism; and partially mediated the relationship of family interfering work conflict with emotional exhaustion, cynicism and professional efficacy. Conclusion Work-family conflict had effects on burnout and psychological capital was a mediator in this relationship among Chinese nurses. Psychological capital was a positive resource for fighting against nurses’ burnout. PMID:23107113

2012-01-01

229

Work–family conflicts and job attitudes of single women: a developing country perspective  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study addresses work–family conflicts and job attitudes of white-collar single women and the ensuing work-related attitudes in a developing country context. After an overview of gender roles in Arab society, several hypotheses were advanced and tested. Although married females reported higher family–work conflicts than single females, the latter group faced a host of strains, which are presented and analyzed.

Yusuf M. Sidani; Zeina T. Al Hakim

2011-01-01

230

Work–family conflicts and job attitudes of single women: a developing country perspective  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study addresses work–family conflicts and job attitudes of white-collar single women and the ensuing work-related attitudes in a developing country context. After an overview of gender roles in Arab society, several hypotheses were advanced and tested. Although married females reported higher family–work conflicts than single females, the latter group faced a host of strains, which are presented and analyzed.

Yusuf M. Sidani; Zeina T. Al Hakim

2012-01-01

231

Family-to-work Spillover Stress: Coping Communicatively in the Workplace  

Microsoft Academic Search

One career path that sheds light on the relationship between work and family for women is that of care-giving professionals. Because of the stressful nature of their socialized roles as caregivers at work and at home, these women constitute a unique population. This interpretive study investigated female care-giving professionals' family-to-work spillover stress and revealed eight communication strategies the women used

S. S. Krouse; T. D. Afifi

2007-01-01

232

Examining the relationship between work-family spillover and sleep quality.  

PubMed

The present study examined the relationship between work-family spillover, job characteristics, and sleep quality in a sample of health care workers (N = 168) recruited from 3 Canadian hospitals. A multiple regression analysis revealed that positive family-to-work spillover is associated with better sleep quality, after controlling for age, physical health, depressive symptomatology, work situation, and number of children. These findings are discussed within a theoretical framework drawing on the concepts of effort and recovery. PMID:16551172

Williams, Alysha; Franche, Renée-Louise; Ibrahim, Selahadin; Mustard, Cameron A; Layton, Francine Roussy

2006-01-01

233

Work–family relations among mothers of children with learning disorders  

Microsoft Academic Search

The study examined conflict and facilitation in work–family relations among working mothers of children with learning disorders (LD) or with typical development. The study also focused on three maternal personal resources (maternal anxious\\/avoidant attachment security, affect and sense of coherence) as antecedents of these work–family relations, and examined outcomes of such conflict and facilitation between the two life domains, as

Rachel Gali Cinamon

2008-01-01

234

Self-Employment, Work–Family Fit and Mental Health Among Female Workers  

Microsoft Academic Search

We used the 2002 National Study of the Changing Workforce to investigate the effects of work type on women’s lives. Specifically,\\u000a we hypothesized that self-employed women have better work–family fit than organizationally employed women. We also hypothesized\\u000a that as a result of better work–family fit, self-employed women would report better mental health than organizationally employed\\u000a women. The analysis shows limited

Robert Tuttle; Michael Garr

2009-01-01

235

It starts with access! A grounded theory of family members working to get through critical illness.  

PubMed

The critical illness of an adult constitutes a crisis for the patient's family. They relinquish primary responsibility for the physical well-being of the patient to health providers, but remain involved, working to get through the situation. What constitutes this "work"? Results of two grounded theory studies revealed that family members were engaged first in the pivotal work of gaining access because of their overarching need to be present with and for their critically ill relative. Other work included patient-related work, nurse/physician-related work, and self-related work. These findings extend our understanding of their experiences beyond current knowledge and paternalistic perceptions of burden, stress and coping, and need recognition and fulfillment. Critical care nurses are exhorted to support family members in their work by removing barriers to patient, staff, and information access and to partnering opportunities. PMID:21531855

Vandall-Walker, Virginia; Clark, Alexander M

2011-05-01

236

Expanding the Psychosocial Work Environment: Workplace Norms and Work-Family Conflict as Correlates of Stress and Health  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined the contributions of organizational level norms about work requirements and social relations, and work-family conflict, to job stress and subjective health symptoms, controlling for Karasek's job demand-control-support model of the psychosocial work environment, in a sample of 1,346 employees from 56 firms in the Norwegian food and beverage industry. Hierarchical linear modeling analyses showed that organizational norms

Tove Helland Hammer; Per Øystein Saksvik; Kjell Nytrø; Hans Torvatn; Mahmut Bayazit

2004-01-01

237

Knowledge Work, Working Time, and Use of Time among Finnish Dual-Earner Families: Does Knowledge Work Require the Marginalization of Private Life?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The industrial working-time regime is dissolving--not dramatically, but rather as a trend. A new trend is that those in dynamic sectors and in a good labor market position work long hours: Demanding knowledge work appears to require the marginalization of private life. This study investigates the family situation of knowledge workers, the…

Natti, Jouko; Anttila, Timo; Tammelin, Mia

2012-01-01

238

Women, Men, Work, and Family: An Expansionist Theory  

Microsoft Academic Search

The lives of women and men, the relationships that they establish, and their work have changed dramatically in the past 50 years, but the dominant theories driving research in these areas have not. In this article, the authors argue that the facts underlying the assumptions of the classical theories of gender and multiple roles have changed so radically as to

Rosalind Chait Barnett; Janet Shibley Hyde

2001-01-01

239

Children and Families' Involvement in Social Work Decision Making  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This review summarises the research literature on children's and parents' involvement in social work decision making, which is regarded, in policy terms, as increasingly important. In practice, however, it tends to be messy, difficult and compromised. Different individuals or groups may have different understandings of participation and related…

Gallagher, Michael; Smith, Mark; Hardy, Mark; Wilkinson, Heather

2012-01-01

240

Women, Work, and Family: Dimensions of Change in American Society.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The research presented in this volume considers a number of factors associated with women's participation in the labor market. These include the educational and training experiences of women now reaching adulthood, the rationales associated with work attachment during the early years of marriage, and the implications of marital breakdown and of…

Mott, Frank L.; And Others

241

Predictors of Negative Spillover from Family to Work  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Prior research has inconsistently documented the gendered nature of negative spillover between the domains of home and work. Little is known about predictors of negative spillover for employed mothers and fathers. Using the 1997 wave of the National Study of the Changing Workforce, this study's purpose was twofold: to determine if a difference…

Dilworth, Jennie E. Long

2004-01-01

242

Managing Individual and Family Resources. Learning Guide 7. Project Connect. Linking Self-Family-Work.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This learning guide is designed to connect personal, family, and job responsibilities for adults and out-of-school youth in economically depressed areas of the state (including transitional ex-offenders and corrections populations) so that these individuals learn to manage and balance these aspects of their lives in order to prepare for or…

Emily Hall Tremaine Foundation, Inc., Hartford, CT.

243

Understanding resilience in same-sex parented families: the work, love, play study  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: While families headed by same-sex couples have achieved greater public visibility in recent years, there are still many challenges for these families in dealing with legal and community contexts that are not supportive of same-sex relationships. The Work, Love, Play study is a large longitudinal study of same-sex parents. It aims to investigate many facets of family life among

Jennifer J Power; Amaryll Perlesz; Margot J Schofield; Marian K Pitts; Rhonda Brown; Ruth McNair; Anna Barrett; Andrew Bickerdike

2010-01-01

244

45 CFR 286.95 - What, if any, are the special rules concerning counting work for two-parent families?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...concerning counting work for two-parent families? 286.95 Section 286.95 Public...Relating to Public Welfare OFFICE OF FAMILY ASSISTANCE (ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS), ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN AND FAMILIES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN...

2010-10-01

245

Balancing Work and Family: A Panel Analysis of the Impact of Part-Time Work on the Experience of Time Pressure  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this article we consider the consequences of work-family reconciliation, in terms of the extent to which the adjustment of the labour market career to family demands (by women) contributes to a better work-life balance. Using the Flemish SONAR-data, we analyse how changes in work and family conditions between the age of 26 and 29 are related to…

Laurijssen, Ilse; Glorieux, Ignace

2013-01-01

246

Considering the role of personality in the work–family experience: Relationships of the big five to work–family conflict and facilitation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Using a national, random sample (N=2130), we investigated the relationship between each of the Big Five personality traits and conflict and facilitation between work and family roles. Extraversion was related to greater facilitation between roles but was not related to conflict, whereas neuroticism was related to greater conflict but only weakly related to facilitation. Conscientiousness was related to less conflict,

Julie Holliday Wayne; Nicholas Musisca; William Fleeson

2004-01-01

247

Work-Family Interface for Same-Sex, Dual-Earner Couples: Implications for Counselors  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The author highlights information for career counselors to consider when addressing work-family interface with individuals who are members of same-sex, dual-earner couples or families. D. E. Super's (1990) life-span, life-space theory is the framework used to organize the literature review and discussion of current trends. Issues related to the…

Perrone, Kristin M.

2005-01-01

248

Marriage and Family Therapists Working with Couples Who Have Children with Autism  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Current research about families and couples who have children with autism is discussed using the Double ABCX model as a guide. A case study is presented along with recommendations for therapists who work with couples who have children with autism. Marriage and family therapists are encouraged to use the Double ABCX model as both an assessment tool…

Ramisch, Julie

2012-01-01

249

Childhood family relationships, marital and work conflict, and mental health distress in Mexican immigrants  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present study examined the associations among childhood family relationships, adult conflict in marriage and work relationships, and mental health distress in Mexican immigrants. The sample consisted of 135 married Mexican immigrants recruited from an ESL program in Southern California. Structural equation modeling was used to test theoretical hypotheses. The model revealed that dysfunctional childhood family relationships predicted dissatisfaction and

Silvia J. Santos; Lisa M. Bohon

1998-01-01

250

The Family-Relatedness of Work Decisions: A Framework and Agenda for Theory and Research  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Due to global trends such as the increased labor force participation of women, the growing presence of dual-earner couples and single parents in the labor force, and changing values regarding the importance of life balance, individuals' work decisions are being increasingly influenced by family considerations. However, the "family-relatedness" of…

Greenhaus, Jeffrey H.; Powell, Gary N.

2012-01-01

251

Rewarding the Work of Individuals: A Counterintuitive Approach to Reducing Poverty and Strengthening Families  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Gordon Berlin discusses the nation's long struggle to reduce poverty in families with children, and proposes a counterintuitive solution--rewarding the work of individuals. He notes that policymakers' difficulty in reducing family poverty since 1973 is attributable to two intertwined problems--falling wages among low-skilled workers and the…

Berlin, Gordon L.

2007-01-01

252

The Use of Non-Verbal and Body Movement Techniques in Working with Families with Infants.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents an experiential-educational approach to families with infants integrating dance and movement therapy with family therapy theories and techniques. Nonverbal techniques are the only possible methods of working directly with infants present with their parents in these workshops. The focus is on negotiations and exchanges of feelings in…

Murphy, James M.

1979-01-01

253

Work and family demands: predictors of all-cause sickness absence in the GAZEL cohort  

E-print Network

and Development Studies, Cambridge, MA, USA Correspondence: Lisa F. Berkman, Harvard Center for Population occupational cohort. Keywords: absenteeism, family demands, job strain, sickness absence, work­family conflict psychological demands (i.e. workload) and low decision latitude (i.e. job control)7 --is a well-studied risk

Boyer, Edmond

254

Small Family, Smart Family? Family Size and the IQ Scores of Young Men. NBER Working Paper No. 13336  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

How do families influence the ability of children? Cognitive skills have been shown to be a strong predictor of educational attainment and future labor market success; as a result, understanding the determinants of cognitive skills can lead to a better understanding of children's long run outcomes. This paper uses a large dataset on the male…

Black, Sandra E.; Devereux, Paul J.; Salvanes, Kjell G.

2007-01-01

255

Women Leaders in High-Poverty Community Schools: Work-Related Stress and Family Impact  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This qualitative study explores the experiences of women administrators in high-poverty community schools, investigating four women's perspectives on work demands and the impact on their families. Their work demands are related to the characteristics of impoverished communities, whereas their work resources are based on intrinsic rewards and…

Lawson, Jennifer E.

2008-01-01

256

Work Valence as a Predictor of Academic Achievement in the Family Context  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study asserts a theoretical model of academic and work socialization within the family setting. The presumed associations between parents' work valences, children's work valences and valence perceptions, and children's academic interest and achievement are tested. The results suggest that children's perceptions of parents…

Porfeli, Erik; Ferrari, Lea; Nota, Laura

2013-01-01

257

Family Interference with Work and Workplace Cognitive Failure: The Mitigating Role of Recovery Experiences  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The first goal of this study was to test whether family interference with work (FIW) is positively related to increased workplace cognitive failure (WCF), which is defined as errors made at work that indicate lapses in memory (e.g., failing to recall work procedures), attention (e.g., not fully listening to instruction), and motor function (e.g.,…

Lapierre, Laurent M.; Hammer, Leslie B.; Truxillo, Donald M.; Murphy, Lauren A.

2012-01-01

258

Poverty Trends for Families Headed by Working Single Mothers, 1993-1999.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This analysis examines poverty in families headed by working single mothers, addressing whether and to what degree their economic situations have improved. It investigates the effect of the 1996 Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act, which moved single mothers from welfare to work. Poverty data from the annual Census…

Porter, Kathryn H.; Dupree, Allen

259

3 CFR - White House Task Force on Middle-Class Working Families  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...policy proposals that can be of special importance to middle-class working families. The...in addition to regular meetings, shall conduct outreach with representatives of labor, business, nonprofit organizations, State and...

2010-01-01

260

Rosabeth Moss Kanter Keynotes Boston College Center for Work & Family 20th Anniversary Celebration  

E-print Network

Rosabeth Moss Kanter Keynotes Boston College Center for Work & Family and esteemed Harvard Business School Professor Rosabeth Moss Kanter provided her insights thought leadership and for providing the inspiration for the Rosabeth Moss Kanter

Huang, Jianyu

261

Work-family boundary strategies: Stability and alignment between preferred and enacted boundaries  

PubMed Central

Are individuals bounding work and family the way they would like? Much of the work-family boundary literature focuses on whether employees are segmenting or integrating work with family, but does not explore the boundaries workers would like to have, nor does it examine the fit between desired and enacted boundaries, or assess boundary stability. In this study, 23 respondents employed at a large Fortune 500 company were interviewed about their work-family boundaries before and after their teams underwent a cultural change initiative that sought to loosen workplace norms and allow employees more autonomy to decide when and where they performed their job tasks. Four distinct boundary strategies emerged from the data, with men and parents of young children having better alignment between preferred and enacted boundaries than women and those without these caregiving duties. Implications for boundary theory and research are discussed.

Ammons, Samantha K.

2015-01-01

262

Working Families Tax Relief Act of 2004 (released in AEO2005)  

EIA Publications

The Working Families Tax Relief Act of 2004 was signed into law on October 13, 2004. Primarily, the Act reduces taxes for individuals and businesses. At least two provisions relate to energy: Depletion of marginal properties and qualified vehicles.

2005-01-01

263

Work-family Conflict and Alcohol Use: Examination of a Moderated Mediation Model  

PubMed Central

Research consistently documents the negative effects of work-family conflict; however, little focuses on alcohol use. This study embraces a tension-reduction theory of drinking, wherein alcohol use is thought to reduce the negative effects of stress. The purpose of the present study was to test a moderated mediation model of the relationship between work-family conflict and alcohol use in a Chicagoland community sample of 998 caregivers. Structural equation models showed that distress mediated the relationship between work-family conflict and alcohol use. Furthermore, tension reduction expectancies of alcohol exacerbated the relationship between distress and alcohol use. The results advance the study of work-family conflict and alcohol use, helping explain this complicated relationship using sophisticated statistical techniques. Implications for theory and practice are discussed. PMID:23480251

Wolff, Jennifer M.; Rospenda, Kathleen M.; Richman, Judith A.; Liu, Li; Milner, Lauren A.

2013-01-01

264

The Interface of Work to Family Conflict and Racioethnic Identification: An Analysis of Hispanic Business Professionals  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article examines work to family conflict for Hispanic Business Professionals with varied levels of Hispanic identity.\\u000a Based on this study of 971 Hispanics from across the United States, results show that level of Hispanic identity moderates\\u000a the relationship between work to family conflict and job satisfaction. The authors posit that identification with a culture\\u000a of collectivism may attenuate the

Robert Gregory DelCampo; Kristie M. Rogers; Andrew T. Hinrichs

2011-01-01

265

Work-to-family enrichment and voice behavior in China: The role of modernity  

Microsoft Academic Search

There is a lack of knowledge in the literature regarding the effects of the work-family interface on employees’ behaviors\\u000a while taking into consideration of cultural values in developing countries. This study investigates the impact of work-to-family\\u000a enrichment on employees’ voice behavior by focusing on the moderating role of modernity in a Chinese setting. Results from\\u000a a survey of 230 Chinese

Haina Zhang; Xia Zhou; Ying Wang; Malcolm H. Cone

2011-01-01

266

20 CFR 664.460 - What are work experiences for youth?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...skills into work activities; (6) Supported work, work adjustment, and other transition activities; (7) Entrepreneurship; (8) Service learning; (9) Paid and unpaid community service; and (10) Other elements designed...

2012-04-01

267

20 CFR 664.460 - What are work experiences for youth?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...skills into work activities; (6) Supported work, work adjustment, and other transition activities; (7) Entrepreneurship; (8) Service learning; (9) Paid and unpaid community service; and (10) Other elements designed...

2010-04-01

268

Working with Adolescents: A Guide for Practitioners. Social Work Practice with Children and Families Series  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This state-of-the-art practitioner resource and course text provides a comprehensive view of adolescent development and spells out effective ways to help teens who are having difficulties. The book illuminates protective and risk factors in the many contexts of adolescents' lives, from individual attributes to family, school, neighborhood, and…

Laser, Julie Anne; Nicotera, Nicole

2010-01-01

269

Balancing work and family: effect of employment characteristics on breastfeeding.  

PubMed

This article describes an investigation of the effect of postpartum employment and occupational type on breastfeeding initiation and duration. Data were from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study-Birth Cohort. Postpartum employment status was classified as full-time, part-time, and not employed. Among postpartum workers, occupational type was classified as management, professional, service, sales, administrative, and "other." In adjusted analysis, professional women had a 20% greater likelihood of initiating breastfeeding than administrative workers (risk ratio [RR] 1.20; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.06-1.30). Full-time workers had a 10% lower likelihood of initiating breastfeeding than those not employed (RR 0.90; 95% CI, 0.82-0.97). Among breastfeeding initiators, full-time workers had a 19% lower likelihood of any breastfeeding beyond 6 months than those not employed (RR 0.81; 95% CI, 0.65-0.99). To improve breastfeeding initiation and duration in the United States, part-time options may be an effective solution for working mothers. PMID:21393503

Ogbuanu, Chinelo; Glover, Saundra; Probst, Janice; Hussey, James; Liu, Jihong

2011-08-01

270

Gender difference in work-family conflict among Japanese information technology engineers with preschool children.  

PubMed

Since the Family Policy Act, which requires companies to develop action plans to support their employees who have children in an attempt to reverse the declining birthrate in Japan, was enacted in 2003, many Japanese organizations and occupational health staff have become interested in work-family conflict (WFC), especially WFC in employees with young children. A cross-sectional survey of regularly employed information technology (IT) engineers with preschool children in Japan was conducted to examine the gender difference in WFC, relationship of WFC with outcomes, and predictors of WFC by gender. Data from 78 male and 102 female respondents were analyzed. There was no significant gender difference in total level of WFC. However, the level of work interference with family (WIF) was significantly higher in males than in females and the level of family interference with work (FIW) was significantly higher in females. Regarding outcomes, WIF was significantly related to depression and fatigue in both genders. Moreover, different predictors were related to WIF and FIW by gender. A family-friendly culture in the company was related to WIF only in males. To prevent depression and cumulative fatigue in employees with young children, occupational practitioners have to pay attention to not only employees' work stress but also their family stress or amount of family role in both genders. PMID:18493112

Watai, Izumi; Nishikido, Noriko; Murashima, Sachiyo

2008-01-01

271

Work Experience Guidance for Managers  

E-print Network

Work Experience Guidance for Managers When approached with a request for work experience, managers any work, paid or unpaid: Before 7am or after 7pm For more than two hours on a school day or Sunday, they must have a two week break from any work during the school holiday For those aged between 16 and 17

272

Work-family conflict, locus of control, and women's well-being: tests of alternative pathways.  

PubMed

The author tested for the 3 possible pathways (i.e., direct, moderator, and mediator effects) in which locus of control can influence the relationship between work-family conflict and well-being. The author predicted that work-family conflict would be negatively correlated with well-being. In a sample of 310 Malaysian employed women with families, work-family conflict was a significant predictor of both job satisfaction and distress--negatively related to job satisfaction and positively related to symptoms of distress. More important, the results provided support for the effects of all 3 pathways of control on the relationship between work-family conflict and well-being, depending on the outcome measure: For job satisfaction, locus of control had direct effects, acted as a partial mediator, and played a significant moderating role. In contrast, only the direct effect of locus of control predicted distress. The author discusses those findings with reference to the literature on work-family conflict, locus of control, and the issue of stress-distress specificity. PMID:12236473

Noor, Noraini M

2002-10-01

273

Psychosocial work environment, organisational justice and work family conflict as predictors of Malaysian worker wellbeing.  

E-print Network

??This thesis investigates the predictors of Malaysian employee wellbeing, specifically, whether the psychosocial work environment (job demands, job control, social support), organisational justice (procedural, interactional,… (more)

R. Ibrahim, R. Z. Aida

2012-01-01

274

Work-family conflict and well-being in university employees.  

PubMed

This is one of the first reported studies to have reviewed the role of work-family conflict in university employees, both academic and nonacademic. The goal of this research was to examine the role of work-family conflict as a mediator of relationships between features of the work environment and worker well-being and organizational outcomes. A sample of 3,326 Australian university workers responded to an online survey. Work-family conflict added substantially to the explained variance in physical symptoms and psychological strain after taking account of job demands and control, and to a lesser extent to the variance in job performance. However, it had no extra impact on organizational commitment, which was most strongly predicted by job autonomy. Despite differing in workloads and work-family conflict, academic ("faculty") and nonacademic staff demonstrated similar predictors of worker and organizational outcomes. Results suggest two pathways through which management policies may be effective in improving worker well-being and productivity: improving job autonomy has mainly direct effects, while reducing job demands is mediated by consequent reductions in work-family conflict. PMID:25175890

Winefield, Helen R; Boyd, Carolyn; Winefield, Anthony H

2014-01-01

275

Work Socialization and Adolescents' Work-Related Values in Single-Mother African American Families  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined African American mothers' work socialization messages in relation to adolescents' work-related values. Moderation effects of mother-adolescent relation quality on the linkage between maternal socialization messages and adolescents' outcomes were also examined. Participants were 245 single African American mothers and their…

Toyokawa, Teru; McLoyd, Vonnie C.

2013-01-01

276

Las obreras: Chicana Politics of Work and Family. Aztlan Anthology Series, Volume 1.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this anthology, Chicana voices of the past and present illuminate the experiences of Mexican American women as they strive to integrate wage work, family life, and community engagement. Sections cover confrontations with the state through community action, court litigation, and union organizing; negotiating work, marriage, and children; stories…

Ruiz, Vicki L., Ed.

277

School Social Work and Early Childhood Student's Attitudes toward Gay and Lesbian Families  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The present study assessed the attitudes of school professionals in training at an American university toward homosexuality and their comfort, action-related disposition, and preparation to work with gay and lesbian (GL) families and their children. Fifty-nine students specializing in birth through kindergarten education and school social work

Averett, Paige E.; Hegde, Archana

2012-01-01

278

Shift Work, Parenting Behaviors, and Children's Socioemotional Well-Being: A Within-Family Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Many U.S. employees with children work nonstandard hours, yet we know little about the linkages among maternal shift schedules, mothers' and fathers' parenting behaviors, and children's socioemotional outcomes. In a sample of 55 dual-earner families with children age 8 to 14 years and mothers working day versus evening shifts, the authors found…

Barnett, Rosalind Chait; Gareis, Karen C.

2007-01-01

279

Implications of Shift Work for Parent-Adolescent Relationships in Dual-Earner Families  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This investigation examined the implications of shift work for parent-adolescent relationship quality--intimacy, conflict, parental knowledge, and involvement--in a sample of 376 dual-earner families. The findings suggested that mothers' relationships with their adolescents were not negatively impacted by their working nonstandard schedules but…

Davis, Kelly D.; Crouter, Ann C.; McHale, Susan M.

2006-01-01

280

The Organization of Work, Schooling and Family Life in Philadelphia, 1838-1920.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Thirteen papers which analyze the relations of work, schooling and family life in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, from 1838 to 1920, are provided in this report. The papers (and their authors) are the following: (1) "The Transition to Adulthood Among White Philadelphians, 1850-1880" (Michael B. Katz and John Modell); (2) "Work, Household, and the…

Katz, Michael B.; And Others

281

Work-family conflict in Japan: how job and home demands affect psychological distress.  

PubMed

The aim of the present study was to examine how job and home demands are related to psychological distress in a sample of Japanese working parents with preschool children (n=196). We expected that job and home demands are partially related to psychological distress through work-to-family conflict (WFC) and family-to-work conflict (FWC), respectively. Structural equation modeling showed that, as expected, home demands were partially related to psychological distress, both directly and indirectly through FWC. In contrast, job demands were only directly related to psychological distress. The differences between the roles of FWC and WFC are discussed using identity theory. PMID:20616471

Shimazu, Akihito; Bakker, Arnold B; Demerouti, Evangelia; Peeters, Maria C W

2010-01-01

282

Working at the Weekend: Fathers’ Time with Family in the United Kingdom  

PubMed Central

Whereas most resident fathers are able to spend more time with their children on weekends than on weekdays, many fathers work on the weekends spending less time with their children on these days. There are conflicting findings about whether fathers are able to make up for lost weekend time on weekdays. Using unique features of the United Kingdom’s National Survey of Time Use 2000 (UKTUS) I examine the impact of fathers’ weekend work on the time fathers spend with their children, family, and partners (N = 595 fathers). I find that weekend work is common among fathers and is associated with less time with children, families, and partners. Fathers do not recover lost time with children on weekdays, largely because weekend work is a symptom of overwork. Findings also reveal that even if fathers had compensatory time, they are unlikely to recover lost time spent as a family or couple. PMID:22844157

Hook, Jennifer L.

2012-01-01

283

Work-family conflict and job satisfaction: emotional intelligence as a moderator.  

PubMed

The negative impact of work-family conflict (WFC) on employees' well-being and job-related outcomes has attracted much research attention recently. A major gap in the literature is which factors could potentially buffer its negative effect on employees. The present study examined the moderating effect of emotional intelligence on the relationship between WFC and job satisfaction in a sample of 212 Chinese high school teachers. On the basis of conservation of resource theory, we hypothesized that emotional intelligence would weaken the negative effect of family-to-work and work-to-family interference on job satisfaction. Results suggested that WFC (work-to-family interference and family-to-work interference) was negatively related to job satisfaction and that emotional intelligence weakened the effect of WFC on job satisfaction. These findings provide implications for theories on WFC and emotional intelligence, such as conservation of resource theory. The current study also provides a test of these theories in Chinese culture to support the generalizability of theories developed in previous research. Practical implications for reducing the negative influence of WFC on employees' job satisfaction are also provided, such as the potential value of emotional intelligence for the training and development of employees in teaching professions. PMID:23015466

Gao, Yongdong; Shi, Junqi; Niu, Qikun; Wang, Lei

2013-08-01

284

A Study of Work-Family Conflict Among IT Professionals: Job Characteristics, Individual Values, and Management Practices  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this study, we develop a model that explains the work-family conflict experienced by IT professionals. We propose two major sources of work-family conflict: the structure of work and individual mindsets toward work. Furthermore, we examine beliefs about the employer that can diminish work-family conflict. We test our hypotheses using data gathered from 126 IT professionals. Our model explains more

Michael Dinger; Jason Bennett Thatcher; Lee P. Stepina

2010-01-01

285

Personal experience in professional narratives: the role of helpers' families in their work with terror victims.  

PubMed

This article describes research on the narratives of social workers who help terror victims, focusing on the relationship between the helpers' families and their work. Qualitative analysis of three training groups of social workers who are responsible for helping in the event of terror attacks in different parts of Israel, and of three debriefing groups for social workers after terror attacks, reveals that the helpers' families play a role in the narratives constructed by the helpers. Two main themes were identified. The first centers on the interaction between work and the family, and shows that in the situation of a terror attack, the conflict between the two disappears and the family often serves as a support system for the helpers. The second theme refers to the family dimension alone, and focuses on the dichotomy between vitality and loss. The way that family life events affect helpers'professional intervention is described. The findings are discussed in light of Conservation of Resources Theory, the fight-flight response to threat, and the concept of the family as a source of safety and risk taking. PMID:16013746

Shamai, Michal

2005-06-01

286

The cosmos of the Paris apartment: working-class family life in the nineteenth century.  

PubMed

Drawing on Bachelard's notion of “cosmicity” this article investigates the living conditions of Parisian working-class families in the second half of the nineteenth century. Nineteenth-century social critics claimed that the lack of privacy in urban apartments made decent family life impossible. However, evidence from judicial dossiers concerning attentat à la pudeur (intimate assault against children) illuminates the lived experience of children and their families in Paris apartments. Rather than a sharp divide between public and private, children experienced their apartment homes as the core of a social and spatial world under the surveillance of parents, neighbors, and other children. PMID:21158198

Ferguson, Eliza

2011-01-01

287

The Role of Maternal Employment, Role-Altering Strategies, and Gender in College Students’ Expectations of Work–Family Conflict  

Microsoft Academic Search

We examined the relationship between maternal employment and college students’ expected work–family conflict as well as the\\u000a relationship between expected conflict and the anticipated use of family-altering and career-altering strategies. Results\\u000a indicated a positive relationship between the extensiveness of maternal employment and expected work–family conflict only\\u000a for men. In addition, students who expected extensive work–family conflict anticipated delaying marriage, limiting

Christy H. Weer; Jeffrey H. Greenhaus; S. Nihal Colakoglu; Sharon Foley

2006-01-01

288

Work and Family in the United States: A Policy Initiative. A Report of the Family Policy Panel of the Economic Policy Council of UNA-USA.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

As part of its world employment project, the Economic Policy Council of the United Nations Association of the United States formed the family policy panel to further examine the extent of ongoing changes affecting the family, the workplace, and the economy. In its work, the family policy panel concentrated on five issues considered central to the…

United Nations Association of the United States of America, New York, NY.

289

Children, Families and Interagency Work: Experiences of Partnership Work in Primary Education Settings  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Despite UK government initiatives intended to address social exclusion, those with poor access to social and economic resources continue to experience unresponsive services. In these circumstances, small inter-agency projects may offer accessible alternatives. This article explores the implementation of inter-agency work at a local level, focusing…

Milbourne, Linda

2005-01-01

290

The psychological well-being of disability caregivers: Examining the roles of family strain, family-to-work conflict, and perceived supervisor support.  

PubMed

We draw on the cross-domain model of work-family conflict and conservation of resources theory to examine the relationship between disability caregiving demands and the psychological well-being of employed caregivers. Using a sample of employed disability caregivers from a national survey, we found that the relationship between caregiving demands and family-to-work conflict was stronger when employees experienced high levels of strain from family. Additionally, we found high levels of family to-work conflict were subsequently associated with decreases in life satisfaction and increases in depression, but only when perceived supervisor support was low. Overall, our findings suggest an indirect relationship between caregiving demands and psychological well-being that is mediated by family-to-work conflict and is conditional on family strain and perceived supervisor support. The theoretical and practical implications of these findings are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved). PMID:25181282

Li, Andrew; Shaffer, Jonathan; Bagger, Jessica

2015-01-01

291

"Preventing the pain" when working with family and sexual violence in primary care.  

PubMed

Primary care professionals (PCPs) are increasingly being expected to identify and respond to family and sexual violence as the chronic nature and severity of the long-term health impacts are increasingly recognized. This discussion paper reports the authors' expert opinion from their experiences running international workshops to prevent trauma among those who work and research sexual violence. It describes the burnout and secondary traumatic stress literature which provides the evidence supporting their work. Implications for practicing basic training in response to trauma and ongoing education are a key area for responding to family violence and preventing professional stress. A professional culture that supports and values caring well for those who have experienced family violence as well as "caring for the carer" is needed. Working in teams and having more support systems in place are likely to protect PCPs from secondary traumatic stress and burnout. Undergraduate and postgraduate training of PCPs to develop trauma knowledge and the skills to ask about and respond to family violence safely are essential. In addition, the healthcare system, workplace, and the individual practitioner support structures need to be in place to enable PCPs to provide safe and effective long-term care and access to other appropriate services for those who have experienced family violence. PMID:23533754

Coles, Jan; Dartnall, Elizabeth; Astbury, Jill

2013-01-01

292

“Preventing the Pain” When Working with Family and Sexual Violence in Primary Care  

PubMed Central

Primary care professionals (PCPs) are increasingly being expected to identify and respond to family and sexual violence as the chronic nature and severity of the long-term health impacts are increasingly recognized. This discussion paper reports the authors' expert opinion from their experiences running international workshops to prevent trauma among those who work and research sexual violence. It describes the burnout and secondary traumatic stress literature which provides the evidence supporting their work. Implications for practicing basic training in response to trauma and ongoing education are a key area for responding to family violence and preventing professional stress. A professional culture that supports and values caring well for those who have experienced family violence as well as “caring for the carer” is needed. Working in teams and having more support systems in place are likely to protect PCPs from secondary traumatic stress and burnout. Undergraduate and postgraduate training of PCPs to develop trauma knowledge and the skills to ask about and respond to family violence safely are essential. In addition, the healthcare system, workplace, and the individual practitioner support structures need to be in place to enable PCPs to provide safe and effective long-term care and access to other appropriate services for those who have experienced family violence. PMID:23533754

Dartnall, Elizabeth

2013-01-01

293

Experiences of Marriage and Family Therapists Working with Intimate Partner Violence.  

PubMed

The purpose of our study was to explore the experiences of marriage and family therapists in working with violent couples. In particular, we focused on therapists' questions and feelings of competency pertaining to violence assessment and treatment, the difficulties they face during their practices, and the factors that affect their practice. Data for this study was collected via a focus group that lasted approximately an hour. The participants included five marriage and family therapists. A set of questions were used to explore experiences of therapists who were working with clients who are experiencing domestic violence. The research team recorded the answers to these questions as well as associated discussion. A grounded theory approach was used to analyze the data. Six themes were derived from the coded data: acknowledgment and reliance on systemic foundations, therapist factors, assessment, treatment considerations, sex of batterers, and training in Marriage and Family Therapy programs. PMID:24817787

Karakurt, Gunnur; Dial, Shannonn; Korkow, Hannah; Mansfield, Ty; Banford, Alyssa

2013-01-01

294

Experiences of Marriage and Family Therapists Working with Intimate Partner Violence  

PubMed Central

The purpose of our study was to explore the experiences of marriage and family therapists in working with violent couples. In particular, we focused on therapists’ questions and feelings of competency pertaining to violence assessment and treatment, the difficulties they face during their practices, and the factors that affect their practice. Data for this study was collected via a focus group that lasted approximately an hour. The participants included five marriage and family therapists. A set of questions were used to explore experiences of therapists who were working with clients who are experiencing domestic violence. The research team recorded the answers to these questions as well as associated discussion. A grounded theory approach was used to analyze the data. Six themes were derived from the coded data: acknowledgment and reliance on systemic foundations, therapist factors, assessment, treatment considerations, sex of batterers, and training in Marriage and Family Therapy programs. PMID:24817787

Karakurt, Gunnur; Dial, Shannonn; Korkow, Hannah; Mansfield, Ty; Banford, Alyssa

2014-01-01

295

Standard Work Specifications for Single-Family Home Energy Upgrades Summary (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and numerous industry stakeholders developed the Standard Work Specifications for Single-Family Home Energy Upgrades to define the minimum requirements for high-quality residential energy upgrades. Today, the Standard Work Specifications provide a unique source for defining high-quality home energy upgrades, establishing clear expectations for homeowners, contractors, trainers, workers, program administrators, and organizations that provide financing for energy upgrades.

Not Available

2012-11-01

296

"I Am-We Are": Personal and Social Pathways to Further Study, Work and Family Life  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This project explores the apparent layers in motivation for young people's plans in order to extend Pathways Theory. We bring together personal, relational and group motivation to explain the planned pathways to study, work and family life. Location was an Australian town, close to the national socio-economic average, to control broad social…

Bornholt, L. J.; Maras, P. M.; Robinson, R. A.

2009-01-01

297

Mediating and moderating processes in the relation between problem customer perceptions and work–family conflict  

Microsoft Academic Search

Deploying the emotion regulation perspective, this study examined the process linking the relationship between problem customer perceptions (PCPs) and work–family conflict (WFC) by focusing on the mediating influence of surface acting (SA) and the moderating role of distress tolerance (DT). Data were obtained from 265 frontline service clerks located in the banking industry throughout 71 different local banks in Taiwan.

Hsiu-Hua Hu; Chin-Tien Hsu; Wen-Ruey Lee; Jui-Huang Chang; Meng-Hui Hsu

2011-01-01

298

California's Working Families and Their Uninsured Children: A Big Problem with an Affordable Solution.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Although California lags behind other states in insuring children of low-income working families, the state could provide assistance by building on existing public health programs. This report provides a primer on the problems of low-income uninsured children and explores the public policy building blocks needed to adequately and affordably insure…

O'Sullivan, Maryann; Burgmaier, Michael; Freeman, Patricia; Reich, Jessica

299

A family of new working materials for solid sorption air conditioning systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this communication a family of new working materials, so called selective water sorbents, is presented for sorption air conditioning. These materials are composites “hygroscopic salt inside porous matrix with open pores” and possess intermediate behaviour between solid adsorbents, salt hydrates and liquid absorbents, so that their water sorption properties can be controllably modified by varying (a) porous structure of

Yu. I Aristov; G Restuccia; G Cacciola; V. N Parmon

2002-01-01

300

Teachers' Perspectives on Their Work with Families in a Bilingual Community.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Reviews research on teacher-parent relations, integrating three teachers' perspectives on their work with families in a bilingual community. Describes observations and interviews with teachers and parents over a school year that offer data for an in-depth analysis of teachers' perspectives on teacher-parent interactions in this setting. Discusses…

Allexsaht-Snider, Martha

1995-01-01

301

When Work Enriches Family-Life: The Mediational Role of Professional Development Opportunities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: Several studies have pointed out the importance of work-family enrichment (WFE) for individuals' well-being and organizations and for this reason, it seems important to understand how organizations may promote it. This study attempts to understand the role of organizational resources and, particularly, of opportunities for professional…

Molino, Monica; Ghislieri, Chiara; Cortese, Claudio G.

2013-01-01

302

The Impact of Role Modeling on Proteges' Personal Learning and Work-to-Family Enrichment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The present study investigates the impact of role modeling as perceived by proteges on their personal learning (i.e., relational job learning and personal skill development) and work-to-family enrichment (WFE). Results from a two-wave field survey of 173 proteges in the People's Republic of China indicate that role modeling positively affects…

Kwan, Ho Kwong; Mao, Yina; Zhang, Haina

2010-01-01

303

Our Basic Dream: Keeping Faith with America's Working Families and Their Children.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

To commemorate the Centennial of the Foundation for Child Development, this report tells the story of American families who cannot lift themselves out of poverty despite honest, hard work and proposes an agenda for change that reflects the focus of the foundation's grantmaking. The report draws heavily on recent research including that sponsored…

Shore, Rima

304

Professional work and the timing of family formation among young lawyers in US and German cities  

Microsoft Academic Search

There is little cross-national empirical research on which to develop our understanding of the relationship between family formation among lawyers and the organization of work in the legal profession. This study compares young German lawyers practicing in Frankfurt and Berlin with young US lawyers practicing in New York and Washington, DC at similar career stages when they are most likely

Gabriele Plickert; John Hagan

2011-01-01

305

Emerging Adults in Sweden: Identity Formation in the Light of Love, Work, and Family  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this study, the identity formation of emerging adults in Sweden was investigated in order to discover how identity issues concerning love, work and family are handled. The study group comprised 136 24- to 26-year-olds. The results revealed differences between men and women with regard to their position in the identity formation process. While…

Frisen, Ann; Wangqvist, Maria

2011-01-01

306

Focus Groups with Working Parents of School-Aged Children: What's Needed to Improve Family Meals?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: To conduct focus groups to identify parents' perceptions of barriers to family meals and elucidate ideas to guide the development of interventions to overcome barriers. Methods: Focus groups were conducted with a convenience sample of 27 working parents in urban community settings. Results: Parents reported enjoying the sharing/bonding…

Fulkerson, Jayne A.; Kubik, Martha Y.; Rydell, Sarah; Boutelle, Kerri N.; Garwick, Ann; Story, Mary; Neumark-Sztainer, Dianne; Dudovitz, Bonnie

2011-01-01

307

Nonstandard Schedules and Young Children's Behavioral Outcomes among Working Low-Income Families  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article focuses on how maternal employment in nonstandard schedules at night, on the weekends, or that rotate on a weekly basis influence preschoolers' behavioral outcomes. Examining low-income working mothers and their children aged 2-4 years from the Welfare, Children, and Families: A Three-City Study (N = 206), we find that maternal…

Joshi, Pamela; Bogen, Karen

2007-01-01

308

Effects of work-related absences on families: Evidence from the Gulf War  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Gulf War provides an opportunity to estimate the effect of work-related separations on military families. Using data from the 1992 Survey of Officers and Enlisted Personnel, the authors estimate the effect of Gulf War deployment on divorce rates, spousal employment, and children's disability rates. Deployment of male soldiers had no effect on marital dissolution, though it did lead soldiers'

Joshua D. Angrist; John H. Johnson

2000-01-01

309

Job Adequacy and Work-Family Balance: Looking at Jobs as a Whole  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Using an ecological person-process-context model and recent conceptualization of the "employment continuum," this study examines differences in components of work-family balance among individuals in diverse types of jobs ranging from "inadequate" to "optimal." Cross-sectional data from the 1997 National Study of the Changing Workforce (n = 2,877)…

Bass, Brenda L.; Grzywacz, Joseph G.

2011-01-01

310

Developing Cross-Cultural Competence: A Guide for Working with Children and Their Families. Fourth Edition  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

As the U.S. population grows more and more diverse, how can professionals who work with young children and families deliver the best services while honoring different customs, beliefs, and values? The answers are in the fourth edition of this bestselling textbook, fully revised to reflect nearly a decade of population changes and best practices in…

Lynch, Eleanor W., Ed.; Hanson, Marci J., Ed.

2011-01-01

311

Struggling for balance amid turbulence on international assignments: work–family conflict, support and commitment  

Microsoft Academic Search

Using human capital theory, we develop hypotheses about the impact of perceived organizational support and two forms of work–family conflict on the psychological withdrawal of expatriates. We also consider the exacerbating effects of commitment to either domain. To test these hypotheses, we collected multisource data from 324 expatriates in 46 countries. Results indicate that perceived organizational support and the interplay

Margaret A. Shaffer; David A. Harrison; K. Matthew Gilley; Dora M. Luka

2001-01-01

312

Introduction to the special issue: work-family research in occupational health psychology.  

PubMed

In this introduction, the authors discuss work-family research in the context of occupational health psychology (OHP), describe the special contributions of articles in this special issue, and outline directions for the next generation of research in the field of OHP. PMID:10526834

Westman, M; Piotrkowski, C S

1999-10-01

313

Role Salience and Anticipated Work-Family Relations among Young Adults with and without Hearing Loss  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined the effect of hearing status on role salience and anticipated work-family relations among 101 unmarried young adults aged 20-33 years: 35 with hearing loss (19 hard of hearing and 16 deaf) and 66 hearing. Participants completed the Life Role Salience scale, anticipated conflictual relations scale, anticipated facilitory…

Cinamon, Rachel Gali; Most, Tova; Michael, Rinat

2008-01-01

314

Aspiring Law and Business Professionals' Orientations to Work and Family Life  

Microsoft Academic Search

Findings are presented from a study of 43 advanced professional school students in law and business using in-depth interviews to investigate their orientations to work and family life. Thematic types are developed that identify the orientations of segments within the sample. These types draw on respondents' implicit and explicit definitions of the situation, paying special attention to key assumptions about

ROBERT M. ORRANGE

2002-01-01

315

The Department of the Army Social Work Service Management Information System (family advocacy)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Social Work Service Management Information System (SWSMIS) is an automated clinical case record and case management system for the Department of the Army and the US Army Medical Command (MEDCOM) Family Advocacy Program (FAP). Development is ongoing at the European Medical Command (ERMC) and moved to the continental United States (CONUS) in August 1998. If accepted by the US

K. Ekwurzel

1998-01-01

316

Working with American Indian Students and Families: Disabilities, Issues, and Interventions  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Although most American Indian students are educated in the public school system, there is limited literature regarding (a) how general and special educators can effectively meet the unique educational needs of these students or (b) what strategies educators can use while working with their families. Additionally, there are limited resources…

Pewewardy, Cornel; Fitzpatrick, Michael

2009-01-01

317

Does Fertility Respond to Work and Family-life Reconciliation Policies in France?  

E-print Network

231 Does Fertility Respond to Work and Family-life Reconciliation Policies in France? Olivier Thévenon In Noriyuki Takayama and Martin Werding (eds., 2009), Fertility and Public Policy: How To Reverse For the past two years, France has enjoyed fertility rates approaching replacement level, with a total

Boyer, Edmond

318

Work-Family Enrichment and Conflict: Additive Effects, Buffering, or Balance?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We used data from the Midlife Development in the United States (MIDUS I) (N = 2,031) to compare three models of how work-family conflict and enrichment might operate to predict well-being (mental health, life satisfaction, affect balance, partner relationship quality). We found no support for a relative-difference model in which the…

Gareis, Karen C.; Barnett, Rosalind Chait; Ertel, Karen A.; Berkman, Lisa F.

2009-01-01

319

Anticipated Work-Family Conflict: Effects of Role Salience and Self-Efficacy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The current study investigated how male and female university students' self-efficacy and their role salience contributed to the variance in their anticipated work-family conflict (WFC). Participants comprised 387 unmarried students (mean age 24 years). Cluster analysis yielded four profiles of participants who differed in their attributions of…

Cinamon, Rachel Gali

2010-01-01

320

Stress Reduction for Family Caregivers in Chronic Mental Illness: Implications of a Work Stress Management Perspective  

Microsoft Academic Search

In several studies involving a total of 291 family caregivers for schizophrenia sufferers, the stressors that arise from caregiving were identified. Also identified were the outcomes for caregivers, which often include psychological distress. Caregivers develop various stress-reduction techniques, but this article explores the utility of applying the principles of work stress management to caregiver well-being. An organizational psychology perspective suggests

Helen R. Winefield

2000-01-01

321

Time with Children, Children's Well-Being, and Work-Family Balance among Employed Parents  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Cultural imperatives for "good" parenting include spending time with children and ensuring that they do well in life. Knowledge of how these factors influence employed parents' work-family balance is limited. Analyses using time diary and survey data from the 2000 National Survey of Parents (N = 933) indicate that how time with children relates to…

Milkie, Melissa A.; Kendig, Sarah M.; Nomaguchi, Kei M.; Denny, Kathleen E.

2010-01-01

322

Resilience across Contexts: Family, Work, Culture, and Community. Recommendations from a National Invitational Conference.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this issue of the "CEIC Review," commissioned papers for a national invitational conference on student resilience developed across contexts of family, work, culture, and community are summarized. The concept of resilience-promoting interventions has emerged from research and indicates that some children survive adversity without lasting damage.…

Russell, Sue, Ed.; Sullivan, Robert, Ed.

1998-01-01

323

Participants' Experiences in Hellinger's Family Constellation Work: A Grounded Theory Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

As a recently introduced to the U.S. model of intergenerational systemic therapy from Germany, Bert Hellinger's Family Constellation Work (FCW) has very limited research support. Hellinger himself has authored a number of publications referencing hundreds of cases, where he implemented his method to approach a broad array of physical,…

Georgiadou, Sofia

2012-01-01

324

Education and Work-Family Conflict: Explanations, Contingencies and Mental Health Consequences  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Using data from a representative sample of American workers, we examine the association between education and work-to-family conflict--a form of inter-role conflict in which role pressures from each domain are incompatible in some way. The well-educated tend to occupy professional jobs with more income and pressures, and experience more…

Schieman, Scott; Glavin, Paul

2011-01-01

325

Vanishing Complainants: The Place of Violence in Family, Gender, Work, and Law  

Microsoft Academic Search

Why is it that wherever and whenever scholars have looked in the English speaking Caribbean, domestic violence complainants vanish from the courts? In pursuit of the answer to this question, I marshal two types of evidence. First, I review interdisciplinary research by scholars who have written about family, gender, and work in this region. I find that there is a

Mindie Lazarus-Black

2008-01-01

326

"They Talked as Industriously as They Worked": Reforming the Family and its Labor in Louisa May Alcott's Work: A Story of Experience  

E-print Network

As my title suggests, this project examines Alcott's vision of the family in Work (1873). Her characters do indeed "talk as industriously as they work" as a means of creating the circumstances necessary for the achievement ...

Isaac, Jessica A.

2009-04-27

327

Impact of value congruence on work-family conflicts: the mediating role of work-related support.  

PubMed

Based on past research regarding the relationship between person-environment fit and work-family conflict (WFC), we examined the mediating effects of perceived organization/supervisor support on the relationship between person-organization/supervisor value congruence and WFC. A structural equation model was used to test three hypotheses using data collected from 637 workers in Taiwan. Person-organization value congruence regarding role boundaries was found to be positively correlated with employee perception of organizational support, resulting in reduced WFC. Person-supervisor value congruence regarding role boundaries also increased employee perception of organizational support, mediated by perceived supervisor support. Research and managerial implications are discussed. PMID:22558824

Pan, Su-Ying; Yeh, Ying-Jung Yvonne

2012-01-01

328

Do positive affectivity and boundary preferences matter for work-family enrichment? A study of human service workers.  

PubMed

More individuals than ever are managing work and family roles, but relatively little research has been done exploring whether boundary preferences help individuals benefit from multiple role memberships. Drawing on Greenhaus and Powell's (2006) work-family enrichment theory, along with Boundary Theory (Ashforth, Kreiner, & Fugate, 2000) and Conservation of Resources Theory (Hobfoll, 2002), we explore the impact of personal characteristics as enablers of work-family enrichment, and in turn, work outcomes relevant to human service workers: turnover intentions and emotional exhaustion. In a 2-wave study of 161 human service employees, we found that individuals high in positive affectivity were more likely to experience both work-to-family and family to-work enrichment, whereas those with preferences toward integration were more likely to experience work-to-family enrichment (but not family to-work enrichment). In turn, work-to-family enrichment (but not family to-work enrichment) was related to lower turnover intentions and emotional exhaustion. Enrichment served as a mediating mechanism for only some of the hypothesized relationships. Implications for theory and practice are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved). PMID:25347683

McNall, Laurel A; Scott, Lindsay D; Nicklin, Jessica M

2015-01-01

329

Self-Efficacy for Managing Work-Family Conflict: Validating the English Language Version of a Hebrew Scale  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Self-Efficacy for Work-Family Conflict Management Scale (SE-WFC), developed in Israel, was designed to assess beliefs regarding one's ability to manage conflict between work and family roles. This study examined the factor structure, reliability, and validity of an English language version of the SE-WFC in a sample of 159 working mothers in…

Hennessy, Kelly D.; Lent, Robert W.

2008-01-01

330

Atypical frontal lobe activity during verbal working memory in youth with a family history of alcoholism  

PubMed Central

Background Abnormal brain functioning during verbal working memory tasks has been shown in individuals with alcohol use disorders (AUDs). Since adolescents with a familial history of alcoholism (FHP) are at high risk for developing an AUD, it is important to consider whether atypical brain activity during verbal working memory may help to explain FHP vulnerability toward developing alcoholism. Methods To that end, using functional magnetic resonance imaging, we examined brain response during a verbal working memory 2-back task in 19 FHP adolescents and 16 age and gender-matched family history negative (FHN) controls. Results Despite no group differences in task accuracy, FHP youth had significantly slower average reaction time when making correct responses during the 2-back condition than FHN youth. In contrast to a vigilance control condition, while covarying for reaction time, FHP adolescents showed less activation during verbal working memory than FHN youth in multiple areas of the prefrontal cortex (PFC) – a brain region crucial to intact working memory skills. Conclusions These results suggest that even prior to heavy alcohol use, FHP adolescents show atypical executive brain functioning during verbal working memory, and that these differences are independent of slower working memory reaction time in FHP youth. Given the importance of working memory in numerous areas of day-to-day functioning, such as adaptive decision-making, these abnormalities may contribute to FHP youth vulnerability toward developing AUDs. PMID:22088655

Cservenka, Anita; Herting, Megan M.; Nagel, Bonnie J.

2011-01-01

331

Designation of Beneficiary for Unpaid Compensation Upon the death of a University of Memphis employee who was in active pay status at the time of death, the  

E-print Network

Designation of Beneficiary for Unpaid Compensation Upon the death of a University of Memphis employee who was in active pay status at the time of death, the University of Memphis will pay unpaid compensation, which may include annual leave, sick leave, and/or earnings, due at the time of death

Dasgupta, Dipankar

332

Sex differences in physical and mental functioning of Japanese civil servants: explanations from work and family characteristics.  

PubMed

Poor physical and mental functioning are more common among women than men and those with disadvantaged work and family characteristics. This study aims to clarify whether sex differences in health functioning can be explained by sex differences in work and family characteristics. The subjects were 3787 civil servants (2525 men and 1262 women), aged 20-65, working in a local government on the west coast of Japan. A questionnaire survey was conducted in January 2003. Low employment grade, high demands, long work hours, shift work, being unmarried, having no young children, high family-to-work conflict and high work-to-family conflict were more common among women than men and were independently associated with poor physical and mental functioning. The age-adjusted odds ratios (ORs) of women for poor health functioning were 1.80 for poor physical functioning and 1.77 for poor mental functioning. When adjusted for employment grade and work characteristics (control, demand, support, work hours, and shift work), the sex differences in health functioning attenuated. When adjusted for family characteristics (family structure and work-family conflicts), the sex differences in health functioning further attenuated and were no longer statistically significant. Sex differences in family characteristics contributed more to sex difference in mental functioning than sex differences in work characteristics. Japan belongs to conservative welfare regimes. In such countries, men are able to concentrate on their work with relative freedom from their family tasks and responsibilities, whereas women feel difficulties in maintaining their work-life balances. Such sex differences in work- and family-related stresses may contribute to sex difference in health. Longitudinal research is necessary to clarify the causal nature of these associations. PMID:21041011

Sekine, Michikazu; Chandola, Tarani; Martikainen, Pekka; Marmot, Michael; Kagamimori, Sadanobu

2010-12-01

333

Infant sleep, parental sleep and parenting stress in families of mothers on maternity leave and in families of working mothers.  

PubMed

The purpose of the present study was to investigate the links between infants' sleep and their parents' sleep and to assess the links between infant/parent sleep and parenting stress. Furthermore, we explored whether the links between sleep and parenting stress are moderated by maternal leave status. Participants were 50 families with an infant between the ages of 4-5 months. Half of the mothers were on maternity leave while the others returned to work. Parents completed daily sleep logs about infants' and their own sleep for 4 consecutive nights. Each parent also completed the Parenting Stress Index. Infant sleep was associated with sleep of both mothers and fathers, but the correlations with maternal sleep were stronger. Parental perceptions of their infant's sleep as problematic were associated with higher parenting stress. Poorer infant and maternal sleep patterns were associated with parenting stress only in families with mothers on maternity leave, probably because these mothers need to provide intensive caregiving "around the clock" without sufficient opportunities to rest. PMID:22306183

Sinai, Dana; Tikotzky, Liat

2012-04-01

334

Does It Matter Where You Work? A Comparison of How Three Work Venues (Traditional Office, Virtual Office, and Home Office) Influence Aspects of Work and Personal/Family Life.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A comparison was made of IBM employees in traditional offices (n=4,316), virtual offices (n=767), and home offices (n=441). Home office teleworking helped balance work and family and enhanced business performance with cost savings. Virtual office teleworking was associated with less work-family balance and less successful personal/family life.…

Hill, E. Jeffrey; Ferris, Maria; Martinson, Vjollca

2003-01-01

335

Page 1 of 2 To allow employees to be away from work upon the death of a family member.  

E-print Network

Page 1 of 2 Purpose To allow employees to be away from work upon the death of a family member. Policy Georgia Southern University allows funeral/bereavement time-off to all employees when a death, parent, grandparent, brother/ sister, and step-child Extended Family- The extended family includes legal

Hutcheon, James M.

336

Effects of Family History of Alcohol Use Disorders on Spatial Working Memory BOLD Response in Adolescents  

PubMed Central

Background A positive family history (FH) of alcohol use disorders (AUD) has been linked to increased risk for the development of AUD, and neurocognitive factors have been postulated as important underlying mechanisms of familial alcoholism transmission. Methods We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) during a spatial working memory (SWM) and vigilance paradigm to investigate potential neurodevelopmental differences linked to familial density of AUD in 72 adolescents aged 12 to 14 years. Results Youth with denser family histories of AUD showed less activation during a simple vigilance condition relative to SWM in cingulate and medial frontal gyri (? = 0.28, p = 0.03), and a trend for more relative activity during rest (? = ?0.25, p = 0.07) in this cluster. Conclusions Youth with greater familial densities of AUD may be less successful at modulating activity of the default network, potentially indicating a greater propensity for task-independent thought or reduced inhibition of task-irrelevant processing. Failure to moderate activation of the default network may have implications for cognitive efficiency and goal directed behavior in youth with dense FH. Further, aberrant activation in cingulate regions may be linked to genetic variation in GABA receptor units, suggesting a useful endophenotype for risk associated with alcohol dependence. PMID:18540914

Spadoni, Andrea D.; Norman, Andria L.; Schweinsburg, Alecia D.; Tapert, Susan F.

2008-01-01

337

Women at the top: powerful leaders define success as work + family in a culture of gender.  

PubMed

How do women rise to the top of their professions when they also have significant family care responsibilities? This critical question has not been addressed by existing models of leadership. In a review of recent research, we explore an alternative model to the usual notion of a Western male as the prototypical leader. The model includes (a) relationship-oriented leadership traits, (b) the importance of teamwork and consensus building, and (c) an effective work-family interface that women with family care responsibilities create and use to break through the glass ceiling. We adopted a cross-cultural perspective to highlight the importance of relational orientation and work-family integration in collectivistic cultures, which supplements models of leadership based on Western men. Our expanded model of leadership operates in the context of a "culture of gender" that defines expectations for women and men as leaders. This complex model includes women in diverse global contexts and enriches our understanding of the interplay among personal attributes, processes, and environments in leadership. PMID:20350017

Cheung, Fanny M; Halpern, Diane F

2010-04-01

338

Work, family and social environment in patients with Fibromyalgia in Spain: an epidemiological study: EPIFFAC study.  

PubMed

BackgroundFibromyalgia (FM) is a condition characterized by widespread pain, estimated to affect 2.4% of the Spanish population. Nowadays, there are no consistent epidemiological studies on the actual impact of the disease on work and family of these patients in a representative manner; therefore, the purpose of the study is to analyze the impact on family, employment and social environment in a representative sample of patients with FM attending Primary Public Care Centers in Spain.MethodsWe carried out an epidemiological study, with a probability sampling procedure, stratified, relative to the municipality size and the number of health centres, seeking territorial representation. The survey was conducted using a self-administered structured questionnaire.ResultsA sample of 325 patients with FM was studied in 35 Primary Health Care Centers (PHCCs). The sample is composed of 96.6% of women, 51.9 (8) years of mean (standard deviation- sd) age. Ninety-three percent of the patients have worked throughout their life. Mean (sd) age onset of symptoms was 37 (11) years and diagnosis of FM was established 6.6 (8) years later. Family Environment: Fifty-nine percent of patients have difficulties with their partner. Forty-four percent of the patients report to be fairly or totally dependent on a family member in household chores. The household income decreased a mean (sd) of 708 (504) Euros/month in 65% of the patients. In 81% of the patients, there was an increase in extra expenses related to the disease with a mean (sd) of 230 (192) Euros/month. Working environment: At the moment of the study, 45% of the patients had work activity (34% were working and 11% were at sick leave), 13% were unemployed seeking job and 42% were not in the labor force. Twenty-three percent of patients had some degree of permanent work disability pension. Social Environment: The degree of satisfaction with health care professionals was low and twenty-six percent of the patients were members of specific patients associations.ConclusionsThis study finds that people with FM who visit PHCCs of Spain experience a high impact on families and employment with heavy loss of ability to work. PMID:25385047

Collado, Antonio; Gomez, Emili; Coscolla, Rosa; Sunyol, Ruth; Solé, Emília; Rivera, Javier; Altarriba, Emília; Carbonell, Jordi; Castells, Xavier

2014-11-11

339

The Growing Costs and Burden of Family Caregiving of Older Adults: A Review of Paid Sick Leave and Family Leave Policies.  

PubMed

Many family caregivers of older adults suffer from a high burden of care and struggle with the balance of jobs and caregiving tasks. However, the United States is the only developed country without paid sick leave policies for all workers and their families. The purpose of this article is to review the federal Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) and empirical studies about paid sick policy, propose policy recommendations, and provide a starting point for future research. The result has shown that the FMLA only applies to certain employees and the provided leave is unpaid under the act. Working women, Latinos, low-wage workers, and less-educated employees are less likely to access paid sick leave and family leave. Obviously, social injustice exists in the FMLA and paid sick leave policies. This article proposes that the Family and Medical Leave Act coverage should be expanded to protect all workers, especially for primary family caregivers of older adults, regardless of family relationships. Also, paid sick and family leave laws should be passed, and requirements to contribute to a family-friendly workplace added to relieve the growing burden of family caregiving of older adults. Policy recommendations including the exemplar of the San Francisco Paid Sick Leave Ordinance, and suggestions for more comprehensive policies are proposed for federal, state, or/and city legislation. PMID:25335873

Chen, Mei-Lan

2014-10-21

340

Family Life and Work Experience before 1918: An oral history research project  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site from Qualidata, the ESRC Qualitative Data Archival Resource Centre of University of Essex in the United Kingdom, provides the methodology used, as well as samples of the work, from Family Life and Work Experience before 1918, the first national oral history study in Britain which was performed from 1970 to 1973. The site for the project includes samples of the occupation and geographical classifications used in the study, the original interview schedule, and the transcripts, summary sheet, and index card for a sample interview with "Emmie Durham." The site is accompanied by an extensive bibliography on oral history methodology.

341

Examining the Relationships Between Personality, Coping Strategies, and Work–Family Conflict  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose  The purpose of this study was to examine the processes through which personality characteristics may influence work–family\\u000a conflict (WFC). Specifically, the mediating effects of selection, optimization, and compensation (SOC) behavioral stress-coping\\u000a strategies on the relationship between personality characteristics and WFC were tested.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Design\\/Methodology\\/Approach  A snowball sampling technique was used to recruit 289 working adults, who completed online questionnaires. The proposed model

Boris B. BaltesLudmila; Ludmila S. Zhdanova; Malissa A. Clark

342

Work Characteristics and Fathers’ Vocabulary to Infants in African American Families  

PubMed Central

Fathers’ vocabulary to infants has been linked in the literature to early child language development, however, little is known about the variability in fathers’ language behavior. This study considered associations between fathers’ work characteristics and fathers’ vocabulary among a sample of employed African American fathers of 6-month old infants who were living in low-income rural communities. After controlling for family and individual factors, we found that fathers who worked nonstandard shifts and reported more job flexibility used more diverse vocabulary with their infants. PMID:23483822

Pancsofar, Nadya; Vernon-Feagans, Lynne; Odom, Erika C.

2012-01-01

343

Construct Validation of the Translated Version of the Work-Family Conflict Scale for Use in Korea  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Recently, the stress of work-family conflict has been a critical workplace issue for Asian countries, especially within those cultures experiencing rapid economic development. Our research purpose is to translate and establish construct validity of a Korean-language version of the Multi-Dimensional Work-Family Conflict (WFC) scale used in the U.S.…

Lim, Doo Hun; Morris, Michael Lane; McMillan, Heather S.

2011-01-01

344

Factor Structure and Psychometric Properties of the Work-Family Balance Scale in an Urban Chinese Sample  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to explore the factor structure of the Work-Family Balance Scale (WFBS) and examine its reliability and validity in use in the urban Chinese population. The scale was validated using a sample of 605 urban Chinese residents from 7 cities. Exploratory factor analysis identified two factors: work-family conflict and…

Zhang, Huiping; Yip, Paul S. F.; Chi, Peilian; Chan, Kinsun; Cheung, Yee Tak; Zhang, Xiulan

2012-01-01

345

Academic Fathers Pursuing Tenure: A Qualitative Study of Work-Family Conflict, Coping Strategies, and Departmental Culture  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although past research has emphasized considerable strain and institutional biases for female academics balancing work and family, research on male academics with young children is limited. This qualitative study addressed this void by examining how junior male tenure-track faculty with children negotiated work and family responsibilities. Analysis of in-depth interviews (n = 12) revealed three broad, nonoverlapping themes regarding men's

Richard J. Reddick; Aaron B. Rochlen; Joseph R. Grasso; Erin D. Reilly; Daniel D. Spikes

2012-01-01

346

What works for therapists conducting family meetings: treatment integrity in family-focused grief Therapy during palliative care and bereavement  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the treatment integrity of Family-Focused Grief Therapy (FFGT), a preventive intervention designed for families at high risk of poor functioning during palliative care and bereavement. From the 81 families participating in a randomized controlled trial (53 assigned to therapy), 28 were randomly selected for this study of treatment fidelity using the FFGT

Eunice K. H. Chan; Imogen O'Neill; Maria McKenzie; Anthony Love; David W. Kissane

2004-01-01

347

Working with families on an inpatient psychiatric unit for children: Hospital staff members are family therapists, too  

Microsoft Academic Search

Inpatient psychiatric units for children can be potent agents for family change. The activities of nursing, education, and activity therapy staff are an important addition to a program of formal family therapy in psychiatric hospitals. These modalities must be organized into a family framework so that insights and achievements from one arena may be generalized to another.

Paul A. Mansheim

1989-01-01

348

Going Back Part-time: Family Leave Legislation and Women’s Return to Work  

PubMed Central

Using a multinomial logit model with data from the Survey of Income and Program Participation, this paper tests whether the implementation of the Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) is associated with an increase in return to work at part-time status among first-time mothers working full-time during their pregnancy. I find a statistically significant trend of increasingly higher odds of returning to work at part-time status relative to return at full-time status, beginning in 1993 (the year in which the FMLA is implemented). Furthermore, an additional week of either state or federal leave is significantly associated with a higher odds of return at part-time status. This article provides evidence that job protection and leave legislation may help facilitate higher levels of labor force participation among women with small children, through more flexible work arrangements. PMID:22685365

2012-01-01

349

Florida Atlantic University School of Social Work  

E-print Network

Florida Atlantic University School of Social Work 1 Rev. 10-20-09 Own Agency Placement (OAP) - Policy Overview: Traditionally, Social Work field placements are educationally focused, unpaid training experiences in social work settings which are selected on the basis of the student's level and

Fernandez, Eduardo

350

Understanding resilience in same-sex parented families: the work, love, play study  

PubMed Central

Background While families headed by same-sex couples have achieved greater public visibility in recent years, there are still many challenges for these families in dealing with legal and community contexts that are not supportive of same-sex relationships. The Work, Love, Play study is a large longitudinal study of same-sex parents. It aims to investigate many facets of family life among this sample and examine how they change over time. The study focuses specifically on two key areas missing from the current literature: factors supporting resilience in same-sex parented families; and health and wellbeing outcomes for same-sex couples who undergo separation, including the negotiation of shared parenting arrangements post-separation. The current paper aims to provide a comprehensive overview of the design and methods of this longitudinal study and discuss its significance. Methods/Design The Work, Love, Play study is a mixed design, three wave, longitudinal cohort study of same-sex attracted parents. The sample includes lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender parents in Australia and New Zealand (including single parents within these categories) caring for any children under the age of 18 years. The study will be conducted over six years from 2008 to 2014. Quantitative data are to be collected via three on-line surveys in 2008, 2010 and 2012 from the cohort of parents recruited in Wave1. Qualitative data will be collected via interviews with purposively selected subsamples in 2012 and 2013. Data collection began in 2008 and 355 respondents to Wave One of the study have agreed to participate in future surveys. Work is currently underway to increase this sample size. The methods and survey instruments are described. Discussion This study will make an important contribution to the existing research on same-sex parented families. Strengths of the study design include the longitudinal method, which will allow understanding of changes over time within internal family relationships and social supports. Further, the mixed method design enables triangulation of qualitative and quantitative data. A broad recruitment strategy has already enabled a large sample size with the inclusion of both gay men and lesbians. PMID:20211027

2010-01-01

351

The impact of work-family policies on women's employment: a review of research from OECD countries  

Microsoft Academic Search

All industrialized countries, as well as many developing and transition countries, have policies in place to support work-family reconciliation such as care-related leaves, policies that increase the quality or availability of flexible and alternative work arrangements, and childcare supports. While work-family policies share common elements across borders, the extent and nature of supports vary widely across countries. This cross-national diversity

Ariane Hegewisch; Janet C. Gornick

2011-01-01

352

Comparison of burnout pattern between hospital physicians and family physicians working in Suez Canal University Hospitals  

PubMed Central

Introduction The burnout syndrome is characterized by emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and low personal accomplishment. It is associated with impaired job performance. Methods This descriptive study examined 171 physicians for the presence of burnout and its related risk factors. The evaluation of burnout was through Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI). The participant was considered to meet the study criteria for burnout if he or she got a “high“ score on at least 2 of the three dimensions of MBI. Results In the current study, the prevalence of burnout in hospital physicians (53.9%) was significantly higher than family physicians (41.94%) with (p=0.001). Participants who work in the internal medicine department scored the highest prevalence (69.64%) followed by Surgeons (56.50%) and Emergency doctors (39.39%). On the other hand, Pediatricians got the lowest prevalence (18.75%). Working in the teaching hospital and being married are strong predictors for occurrence of burnout. Conclusion There is a significant difference of burnout between hospital physicians and family physicians among the study subjects. Working in the teaching hospital and being married are strong predictors for occurrence of burnout. PMID:25422682

Kotb, Amany Ali; Mohamed, Khalid Abd-Elmoez; Kamel, Mohammed Hbany; Ismail, Mosleh Abdul Rahman; Abdulmajeed, Abdulmajeed Ahmed

2014-01-01

353

The correlation of family physician work with submitted codes and fees.  

PubMed

Objectives The income disparity between primary care and other physicians has been attributed in part to the evaluation and management (E/M) rules written by CMS. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between family physicians' work and their actual coding practices and fees collected under these widely used rules. Study Design This was a direct observational time-motion study. Methods A diverse group of 15 family physicians were shadowed over consecutive patient visits at their ambulatory practices, usually for a half-day of clinic. Data about each visit were recorded, including time parameters; number of issues covered; number of labs, images, and chronic prescriptions ordered; the physician fee code from the Current Procedural Terminology (CPT) system that was submitted; the actual payer for each patient; and the actual fee collected. The primary outcome was the correlation between the time spent for each patient's care and coding/financial measures. Results The average total time a physician spent per patient including documentation time was 20.0 minutes. The average fee collected was $101.40, including patient co-pays. The correlation between the actual fee collected and the physician's time spent working on each patient's behalf was poor (R2 = 0.137, P < .001). There was a wide variation in times and fees for each CPT code category. Conclusions The existing E/M rules and CPT coding system have created office visit fees that correlate poorly with family physician work. These findings provide another justification for disruptive primary care payment reform. PMID:25495108

Young, Richard; Overton, Tiffany L

2014-11-01

354

Improving Responses to Individual and Family Crises. Learning Guide 10. Project Connect. Linking Self-Family-Work.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This learning guide on improving responses to individual and family crises is part of a series of learning guides developed for competency-based adult consumer and homemaking education programs in community colleges, adult education centers, community centers, and the workplace. Focus is on the connections among personal, family, and job…

Emily Hall Tremaine Foundation, Inc., Hartford, CT.

355

Effects of Maternal Work Status in Single-Parent Families on Children's Perception of Self and Family and School Achievement.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Mothers from low-income, single-parent families and their 10- to 12-year-old children were interviewed to assess their beliefs. Findings indicated that children with employed mothers perceived more cohesion in their families, had greater self-esteem, and were more accurate in predicting maternal beliefs than children with unemployed mothers. (LB)

Alessandri, Steven M.

1992-01-01

356

Work-family conflicts and self-rated health among middle-aged municipal employees in finland  

Microsoft Academic Search

Work-family conflicts are common, but their effects on health are not well known. The aim of this study was to examine the\\u000a associations between work-family conflicts and self-rated health among middle-aged municipal employees. In addition, the effect\\u000a of social background factors on the association between work-family conflicts and self-rated health were examined. The data\\u000a were based on cross-sectional postal surveys,

Torsten Winter; Eva Roos; Ossi Rahkonen; Pekka Martikainen; Eero Lahelma

2006-01-01

357

Strategies for managing work/life interaction among women and men with variable and unpredictable work hours in retail sales in Québec, Canada.  

PubMed

Increasingly, work schedules in retail sales are generated by software that takes into account variations in predicted sales. The resulting variable and unpredictable schedules require employees to be available, unpaid, over extended periods. At the request of a union, we studied schedule preferences in a retail chain in Québec using observations, interviews, and questionnaires. Shift start times had varied on average by four hours over the previous week; 83 percent had worked at least one day the previous weekend. Difficulties with work/life balance were associated with schedules and, among women, with family responsibilities. Most workers wanted: more advance notice; early shifts; regular schedules; two days off in sequence; and weekends off. Choices varied, so software could be adapted to take preferences into account. Also, employers could give better advance notice and establish systems for shift exchanges. Governments could limit store hours and schedule variability while prolonging the minimum sequential duration of leave per week. PMID:25085829

Messing, Karen; Tissot, France; Couture, Vanessa; Bernstein, Stephanie

2014-01-01

358

Work and family life of childrearing women workers in Japan: comparison of non-regular employees with short working hours, non-regular employees with long working hours, and regular employees.  

PubMed

This study assessed the working and family life characteristics, and the degree of domestic and work strain of female workers with different employment statuses and weekly working hours who are rearing children. Participants were the mothers of preschoolers in a large Japanese city. We classified the women into three groups according to the hours they worked and their employment conditions. The three groups were: non-regular employees working less than 30 h a week (n=136); non-regular employees working 30 h or more per week (n=141); and regular employees working 30 h or more a week (n=184). We compared among the groups the subjective values of work, financial difficulties, childcare and housework burdens, psychological effects, and strains such as work and family strain, work-family conflict, and work dissatisfaction. Regular employees were more likely to report job pressures and inflexible work schedules and to experience more strain related to work and family than non-regular employees. Non-regular employees were more likely to be facing financial difficulties. In particular, non-regular employees working longer hours tended to encounter socioeconomic difficulties and often lacked support from family and friends. Female workers with children may have different social backgrounds and different stressors according to their working hours and work status. PMID:16788279

Seto, Masako; Morimoto, Kanehisa; Maruyama, Soichiro

2006-05-01

359

"Doing the Job as a Parent": Parenting Alone, Work, and Family Policy in Ireland  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Recent studies of family life in Ireland have focused on changes in "traditional" family structures, including the increase in one-parent families. This article illustrates the impact dominant conceptions in Irish society that privilege the family based on marriage have on one-parent family policy. The authors focus on two key areas of social…

Millar, Michelle; Coen, Liam; Bradley, Ciara; Rau, Henrike

2012-01-01

360

Role salience and anticipated work--family relations among young adults with and without hearing loss.  

PubMed

This study examined the effect of hearing status on role salience and anticipated work-family relations among 101 unmarried young adults aged 20-33 years: 35 with hearing loss (19 hard of hearing and 16 deaf) and 66 hearing. Participants completed the Life Role Salience scale, anticipated conflictual relations scale, anticipated facilitory relations scale, and a background questionnaire. The deaf participants demonstrated a significantly higher level of commitment to work but anticipated the significantly lowest level of conflict. Hearing status was a significant variable in predicting anticipated conflictual relations among all participants. Mode of communication was a significant predictor of conflictual relations among the hearing loss group. Implications for theory and practice were discussed. PMID:18209020

Cinamon, Rachel Gali; Most, Tova; Michael, Rinat

2008-01-01

361

Role Salience and Anticipated Work–Family Relations Among Young Adults With and Without Hearing Loss  

PubMed Central

This study examined the effect of hearing status on role salience and anticipated work–family relations among 101 unmarried young adults aged 20–33 years: 35 with hearing loss (19 hard of hearing and 16 deaf) and 66 hearing. Participants completed the Life Role Salience scale, anticipated conflictual relations scale, anticipated facilitory relations scale, and a background questionnaire. The deaf participants demonstrated a significantly higher level of commitment to work but anticipated the significantly lowest level of conflict. Hearing status was a significant variable in predicting anticipated conflictual relations among all participants. Mode of communication was a significant predictor of conflictual relations among the hearing loss group. Implications for theory and practice were discussed. PMID:18209020

Most, Tova; Michael, Rinat

2008-01-01

362

Will Family Health History Tools Work for Complex Families? Scenario-Based Testing of a Web-Based Consumer Application  

PubMed Central

Objective: Identify challenges that people from complex families may encounter when using traditional consumer family health history (FHH) applications and examine assumptions on which the applications are based. Method: Scenario-based testing was employed in which three evaluators used a consumer FHH application guided by four scenarios, recording the challenges they encountered and time required. Challenges identified were analyzed through qualitative content analysis of field notes. Results: Several types of FHH information deemed important in the scenarios could not be entered into the traditional FHH. Evaluators reported frustration at being unable to enter some information and perceived the resulting FHH as less accurate than it could be. These observations challenge certain implicit assumptions about families and consumers on which FHH applications are based. Conclusion: Current consumer FHH applications mirror clinical FHH tools, which may not be the most appropriate approach for consumers, especially for people from complex and diverse families. PMID:23304344

Peace, Jane; Bisanar, William; Licht, Nathan

2012-01-01

363

The Occupational Safety of Health Professionals Working at Community and Family Health Centers  

PubMed Central

Background: Healthcare professionals encounter many medical risks while providing healthcare services to individuals and the community. Thus, occupational safety studies are very important in health care organizations. They involve studies performed to establish legal, technical, and medical measures that must be taken to prevent employees from sustaining physical or mental damage because of work hazards. Objectives: This study was conducted to determine if the occupational safety of health personnel at community and family health centers (CHC and FHC) has been achieved. Martials and Methods: The population of this cross-sectional study comprised 507 nurses, 199 physicians, and 237 other medical personnel working at a total of 18 family health centers (FHC) and community health centers (CHC) in Trabzon, Turkey. The sample consisted of a total of 418 nurses, 156 physicians, and 123 other medical personnel. Sampling method was not used, and the researchers tried to reach the whole population. Data were gathered with the Occupational Safety Scale (OSS) and a questionnaire regarding demographic characteristics and occupational safety. Results: According to the evaluations of all the medical personnel, the mean ± SD of total score of the OSS was 3.57 ± 0.98; of the OSS’s subscales, the mean ± SD of the health screening and registry systems was 2.76 ± 1.44, of occupational diseases and problems was 3.04 ± 1.3 and critical fields control was 3.12 ± 1.62. In addition, occupational safety was found more insufficient by nurses (F = 14.18; P < 0.001). Conclusions: All healthcare personnel, particularly nurses working in CHCs and FHCs found occupational safety to be insufficient as related to protective and supportive activities.

Ozturk, Havva; Babacan, Elif

2014-01-01

364

A work-family conflict/subjective well-being process model: A test of competing theories of longitudinal effects.  

PubMed

In the present study, we examine competing predictions of stress reaction models and adaptation theories regarding the longitudinal relationship between work-family conflict and subjective well-being. Based on data from 432 participants over 3 time points with 2 lags of varying lengths (i.e., 1 month, 6 months), our findings suggest that in the short term, consistent with prior theory and research, work-family conflict is associated with poorer subjective well-being. Counter to traditional work-family predictions but consistent with adaptation theories, after accounting for concurrent levels of work-family conflict as well as past levels of subjective well-being, past exposure to work-family conflict was associated with higher levels of subjective well-being over time. Moreover, evidence was found for reverse causation in that greater subjective well-being at 1 point in time was associated with reduced work-family conflict at a subsequent point in time. Finally, the pattern of results did not vary as a function of using different temporal lags. We discuss the theoretical, research, and practical implications of our findings. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved). PMID:24773400

Matthews, Russell A; Wayne, Julie Holliday; Ford, Michael T

2014-11-01

365

Work Based Learning Policy Definition, focus and scope  

E-print Network

Work Based Learning Policy Definition, focus and scope Learning through working means learning that normally has been achieved by learners in and through paid or unpaid work, which can be assessed as being institutions of higher education but may also be gained outside them through experiential learning within work

Aickelin, Uwe

366

Encouraging Strong Family Relationships. State Policies That Work. Brief Number 6  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The relational well-being of families is an important factor affecting a family's economic success, physical and mental heath, the readiness and success of children in school, and the engagement of youth in positive and productive roles. In short, the strength of family bonds is crucial to a family's capacity to provide, nurture, and care for its…

Center for the Study of Social Policy, 2012

2012-01-01

367

Hidden Knowing of Working-Class Transnational Mexican Families in Schools: Bridge-Building, Nepantlera Knowers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Reframing immigrant families as transnationals, this article highlights transnational families' ways of knowing. This study is based on a three-year, multi-sited critical ethnographic set of case studies of four families in the USA and Mexico. Transnational families in this study demonstrated Nepantlera knowing, or liminal, bridge-building…

Kasun, G. Sue

2014-01-01

368

“A lot of sacrifices:” Work-family spillover and the food choice coping strategies of low wage employed parents  

PubMed Central

Integrating their work and family lives is an everyday challenge for employed parents. Competing demands for parents’ time and energy may contribute to fewer meals prepared or eaten at home and poorer nutritional quality of meals. Thus, work-family spillover (feelings, attitudes, and behaviors carried over from one role to another) is a phenomenon with implications for nutrition and health. The aim of this theory-guided constructivist research was to understand how low-wage employed parents’ experiences of work-family spillover affected their food choice coping strategies. Participants were 69 black, white and Latino mothers and fathers in a Northeastern U.S. city. We explored participants’ understandings of family and work roles, spillover, and food choice strategies using open-ended qualitative interviews. Data analysis was based on the constant comparative method. These parents described affective, evaluative, and behavioral instances of work-family spillover and role overload as normative parts of everyday life and dominant influences on their food choices. They used food choice coping strategies to: 1) manage feelings of stress and fatigue, 2) reduce the time and effort for meals, 3) redefine meanings and reduce expectations for food and eating, and 4) set priorities and trade off food and eating against other family needs. Only a few parents used adaptive strategies that changed work or family conditions to reduce the experience of conflict. Most coping strategies were aimed at managing feelings and redefining meanings, and were inadequate for reducing the everyday hardships from spillover and role overload. Some coping strategies exacerbated feelings of stress. These findings have implications for family nutrition, food expenditures, nutritional self-efficacy, social connections, food assistance policy, and work place strategies. PMID:16889881

Devine, Carol M.; Jastran, Margaret; Jabs, Jennifer A; Wethington, Elaine; Farrell, Tracy J; Bisogni, Carole A

2006-01-01

369

Improving Individual, Child, and Family Nutrition, Health and Wellness. Learning Guide 8. Project Connect. Linking Self-Family-Work.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This learning guide is designed to connect personal, family, and job responsibilities for adults and out-of-school youth in economically depressed areas of the state (including transitional ex-offenders and corrections populations) so that these individuals learn to manage and balance these aspects of their lives in order to prepare for or…

Emily Hall Tremaine Foundation, Inc., Hartford, CT.

370

Improving Individual, Child, and Family Nutrition, Health and Wellness. Secondary Learning Guide 8. Project Connect. Linking Self-Family-Work.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This competency-based secondary learning guide on improving individual, child, and family nutrition is part of a series that are adaptations of guides developed for adult consumer and homemaking education programs. The guides provide students with experiences that help them learn to do the following: make decisions; use creative approaches to…

Emily Hall Tremaine Foundation, Inc., Hartford, CT.

371

How important are work-family support policies? A meta-analytic investigation of their effects on employee outcomes.  

PubMed

This meta-analysis examines relationships between work-family support policies, which are policies that provide support for dependent care responsibilities, and employee outcomes by developing a conceptual model detailing the psychological mechanisms through which policy availability and use relate to work attitudes. Bivariate results indicated that availability and use of work-family support policies had modest positive relationships with job satisfaction, affective commitment, and intentions to stay. Further, tests of differences in effect sizes showed that policy availability was more strongly related to job satisfaction, affective commitment, and intentions to stay than was policy use. Subsequent meta-analytic structural equation modeling results indicated that policy availability and use had modest effects on work attitudes, which were partially mediated by family-supportive organization perceptions and work-to-family conflict, respectively. Additionally, number of policies and sample characteristics (percent women, percent married-cohabiting, percent with dependents) moderated the effects of policy availability and use on outcomes. Implications of these findings and directions for future research on work-family support policies are discussed. PMID:23106685

Butts, Marcus M; Casper, Wendy J; Yang, Tae Seok

2013-01-01

372

Extended family caring for children orphaned by AIDS: balancing essential work and caregiving in a high HIV prevalence nations  

Microsoft Academic Search

While over 90 per cent of the 15 million children who have been orphaned by HIV\\/AIDS are cared for by family members, there is little information about whether adults can meet orphans’ essential caregiving needs while working to economically survive. Using a survey we conducted in Botswana of 1033 working adults, we analyse the experience of adults who are caring

J. Heymann; A. Earle; D. Rajaraman; C. Miller; K. Bogen

2007-01-01

373

Exploring core competencies for mental health and addictions work within a Family Health Team setting  

PubMed Central

Approximately 200 Family Health Teams (FHTs) have been implemented in Ontario to improve access to primary healthcare, including mental health and addiction. The objectives of this project were to examine, through a focus group and qualitative methodology with three FHTs, the profile of patients' mental health and addiction-related needs and to identify the implications for the development of core competencies in these innovative organisations. A spectrum of needs and service trajectories was identified, as well as the importance of a wide range of clinical skills and knowledge. The results indicate that ‘core’ competencies for mental health work in the context of an FHT go well beyond those required for an embedded mental health ‘programme’ or specialised mental health counsellors, but rather they relate to the core and discipline-specific competencies of members of the entire team. In addition to specific knowledge and skills, competencies include common attitudes and values relating to teamwork, good communication and collaboration. Challenges were noted with regard to working with some community service providers, especially addiction services. Implications for core competencies at the individual and organisational level were identified. PMID:24427175

2013-01-01

374

Women Who Maintain Families. Facts on Working Women No. 93-3.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In 1992, 12 million families were maintained by women in the United States--a figure that more than doubled since 1970 when there were only 5.6 million such families. They accounted for 14.8 percent of all families in 1980 and 17.6 percent in 1992. Women maintained 3.5 million Black families in 1992; this represented nearly half of all Black…

Women's Bureau (DOL), Washington, DC.

375

Does Family Structure Affect Children's Educational Outcomes? NBER Working Paper Series.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper examines correlations between children's educational outcomes and family structure. Although popular discussions focus on distinctions between two-parent and single-parent families, earlier research shows that outcomes for stepchildren are similar to outcomes for children in single-parent families, and earlier researchers suggested that…

Pollak, Robert A.; Ginther, Donna K.

376

Challenges to Adopting and Sustaining Family-Focused Competencies in Social Work Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Each of the presenters of the invitational symposium, State of the Science: Nurses and Social Workers Supporting Family Caregivers, identified the saliency of family caregiving issues for practice, research, and the education of professional social workers, caregivers, the business community, and the public to enhance support of family caregivers.…

Hooyman, Nancy

2008-01-01

377

Service Family Support -- A Small-Scale Project of Educational Psychologists Working with Parents  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Being in a Service family can be a difficult position for children and parents alike due to high levels of mobility, parental separation, and the remaining parent's stress and emotional well-being. A Service family is defined as a family with one or both parents employed by the Ministry of Defence (MOD). The current project looked at the…

Hogg, Jane; Hart, Anne; Collins, Zoe V.

2014-01-01

378

Women's Work, Education, and Family Welfare in Peru. World Bank Discussion Papers 116.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report examines ways of improving women's productivity and education and the consequences for development in Peru. The research finds that women account for about 39 percent of family income in Peru. They carry the main responsibility for child care and heavily influence family decisions on children's education and family size. Improving…

Herz, Barbara K., Ed.; Khandker, Shahidur R., Ed.

379

Applications of collaborative helping maps: supporting professional development, supervision and work teams in family-centered practice.  

PubMed

Collaborative, family-centered practice has become an influential approach in helping efforts across a broad spectrum of human services. This article draws from previous work that presented a principle-based, practice framework of Collaborative Helping and highlighted the use of Collaborative Helping maps as a tool both to help workers think their way through complex situations and to provide a guideline for constructive conversations between families and helpers about challenging issues. It builds on that work to examine ways to utilize Collaborative Helping maps at worker, supervisory, and organizational levels to enhance and sustain collaborative, family-centered practice and weave its core values and principles into the everyday fabric of organizational cultures in human service agencies and government agencies that serve poor and marginalized families and communities. PMID:24215323

Madsen, William C

2014-03-01

380

International perspectives on work-family policies: lessons from the world's most competitive economies.  

PubMed

The United States does not guarantee families a wide range of supportive workplace policies such as paid maternity and paternity leave or paid leave to care for sick children. Proposals to provide such benefits are invariably met with the complaint that the costs would reduce employment and undermine the international competitiveness of American businesses. In this article, Alison Earle, Zitha Mokomane, and Jody Heymann explore whether paid leave and other work-family policies that support children's development exist in countries that are economically competitive and have low unemployment rates. Their data show that the answer is yes. Using indicators of competitiveness gathered by the World Economic Forum, the authors identify fifteen countries, including the United States, that have been among the top twenty countries in competitiveness rankings for at least eight of ten years. To this group they add China and India, both rising competitors in the global economy. They find that every one of these countries, except the United States, guarantees some form of paid leave for new mothers as well as annual leave. And all but Switzerland and the United States guarantee paid leave for new fathers. The authors perform a similar exercise to identify thirteen advanced countries with consistently low unemployment rates, again including the United States. The majority of these countries provide paid leave for new mothers, paid leave for new fathers, paid leave to care for children's health care needs, breast-feeding breaks, paid vacation leave, and a weekly day of rest. Of these, the United States guarantees only breast-feeding breaks (part of the recently passed health care legislation). The authors' global examination of the most competitive economies as well as the economies with low unemployment rates makes clear that ensuring that all parents are available to care for their children's healthy development does not preclude a country from being highly competitive economically. PMID:22013634

Earle, Alison; Mokomane, Zitha; Heymann, Jody

2011-01-01

381

Socioeconomic and Gender Inequalities in Job Dissatisfaction among Japanese Civil Servants: The Roles of Work, Family and Personality Characteristics  

PubMed Central

Abstract: This study examines (1) whether there are employment grade and gender differences in job dissatisfaction and (2) whether work, family, and personality characteristics explain grade and gender differences in job dissatisfaction. The participants were 3,812 civil servants, aged 20–65, working at a local government in Japan. In both males and females, low control, low social support, work-to-family conflict, type A behaviour pattern and negative affectivity were significantly associated with job dissatisfaction. In females, high demands, long work hours and being unmarried were also associated with job dissatisfaction. Among males, in comparison with the highest grade employees, the age-adjusted odds ratio (OR) for job dissatisfaction in the lowest grade employees was 1.90 (95% CI: 1.40–2.59). The grade differences reduced to 1.08 (0.76–1.54) after adjustment for work, family and personality characteristics. Among females, similar grade differences were observed, although the differences were not statistically significant. In comparison with males, the age-adjusted OR in females for job dissatisfaction was 1.32 (1.14–1.52). This gender difference was reduced to 0.95 (0.79–1.14) following adjustment for the other factors. The majority of employees belong to low to middle grades, and female employees have increased. Reducing grade and gender differences in work and family characteristics is needed. PMID:25055848

SEKINE, Michikazu; TATSUSE, Takashi; CABLE, Noriko; CHANDOLA, Tarani; MARMOT, Michael

2014-01-01

382

Attitudes Toward Gender, Work, and Family among Female and Male Scientists in Germany and the United States  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This research used a comparative approach and an elite framework to look at attitudes toward gender, work, and family among male and female scientists. The data came from the 1994 International Social Survey Program module measuring family and changing gender roles in (the former) East Germany, West Germany, and the United States. Research questions focused on the variation between the three samples in male scientists' attitudes regarding gender, work, and family; women's representation in science occupations; and the relation between the two. Another major concern was the extent to which female scientists express attitudes regarding gender, work, and family that resemble those of male scientists and the implications of these processes for increasing women's access to science. As predicted, male scientists in East Germany tended to have the most progressive attitudes (especially those regarding gender and work), East German women had the greatest access to science occupations, and there were virtually no sex differences in attitudes of East German scientists. West German male scientists were the most traditional on attitudes regarding gender and work, and U. S. male scientists tended to be the most traditional on attitudes regarding family. The attitudes of female scientists in West Germany and the United States reflected this larger trend, but there were sex differences within countries, with female scientists being more progressive than male scientists. Thus, the findings suggest that women s representation in science is related to the attitudes of male scientists regarding gender, work, and family. And although female scientists often hold quite similar attitudes as male scientists, there is considerable cross-country variation in how progressive the attitudes are and how similar men's and women's attitudes are. Implications for women's access to elite science occupations are discussed.

Hanson, Sandra L.; Fuchs, Stefan; Aisenbrey, Silke; Kravets, Natalyia

383

How to add more "family" to the work-life-balance? - family friendliness in medical under- and postgraduate studies and the workplace.  

PubMed

Today universities have to compete for the best brains more than ever before. The issues of reconciliation of work/study and family and the work-life balance have become increasingly important recently in higher education policy development as higher education institutions in the competition for the best minds are already forced to tackle these issues, some of which are still novel to them, as they are faced with demographic change. High dropout rates among students with children, increasing shortages of physicians and high sector emigration and high levels of childlessness among graduates serve as indicators for urgent action towards more family-oriented university and faculty strategies. But how can medical schools, hospitals and (teaching) hospitals achieve a family-oriented profile? Which key players, which areas of higher education management are relevant to management and decision-making structures? What exemplary measures for designing family-friendly medical studies and work places offer success? The underrepresentation of women in the next generation of scientists also poses an additional challenge to the development of an innovative higher education policy if it is to be sustainable. Thus strategies promoting the next generation and family orientation are key factors for a future-oriented higher education policy. These factors should therefore be seen as leadership strategies which will introduce measures that will make (re)design the university's profile. To this end, a holistic approach which will lead to fundamental reforms of higher education structures which are outlined below and illustrated with examples are a prerequisite for successful implementation. PMID:22558028

De Ridder, Daniela

2012-01-01

384

Max's Family Experience: Web-Resources for Working with Special Education Students and Their Families  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Today's principals are required to put in longer hours, lead larger schools, and supervise more faculty and staff members. Additionally they need to create a positive learning environment for students, a productive work environment for their employees, and contend with a variety of student behaviors at the building level. Aside from the…

Theoharis, Raschelle; Fitzpatrick, Michael

2011-01-01

385

Working with Arab American Families: Culturally Competent Practice for School Psychologists  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Individuals of Arab descent residing within the United States currently number between 1.2 million and 3.9 million. These families are characterized by considerable diversity depending upon their nationality, religion, and extent of acculturation to both Western and Arab cultures. More recently, Arab families have immigrated to the United States…

Haboush, Karen L.

2007-01-01

386

Dependency or Self-Reliance? The Contradictory Case of Work in UK Small Business Families  

Microsoft Academic Search

The focus of this article is a relatively neglected area of social and family policy: its relationship with small business. Economic policy makers have encouraged “enterprise”, particularly in the form of small business, as a solution to problems of competitiveness and economic growth. The article uncovers what an enterprise culture actually means for some of those families who first embarked

Jane Wheelock; Susan Baines

1998-01-01

387

Family Engagement in Rural Schools. R[superscript 2]Ed Working Papers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The importance of family-school partnerships for student success is unequivocal. Given the limited resources evident in many rural communities, family-school partnerships can be especially beneficial for students in rural schools. Decades of research has documented the positive effects of parent participation in children's academic endeavors for…

Witte, Amanda L.; Sheridan, Susan M.

2011-01-01

388

SOCIAL WORK ROLE IN RESEARCH STUDIES OF FAMILIES HAVING HEREDITARY CANCER AND PRECANCER DIAGNOSES  

Microsoft Academic Search

The social worker's role in genetic counseling, both as a member of a clinical team and investigator in research including family studies, is demonstrated through description of research studies of families having heriditary cancer and pre-cancer diagnoses. Studies involve persons affected with a genetic disorder, those who are unaffected, health persons, all of whom may be asked to undergo uncomfortable

Anne J. Krush

1982-01-01

389

Working with Family, Friend, and Neighbor Caregivers: Lessons from Four Diverse Communities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article is excerpted from "Who's Watching the Babies? Improving the Quality of Family, Friend, and Neighbor Care" by Douglas R. Powell ("ZERO TO THREE," 2008). The article explores questions about program development and implementation strategies for supporting Family, Friend, and Neighbor (FFN) caregivers: How do programs and their host…

Powell, Douglas R.

2011-01-01

390

The Afro-American Work/Family Nexus: An Exploratory Analysis.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Sketches out a framework linking black labor market trends in the post World War II era to actual and potential changes in black family patterns. Summarizes selected scholarship and then provides a gender-specific analysis of the changing employment status of black Americans. Urgres that links be made between black family life and the political…

Collins, Patricia Hill

1986-01-01

391

Transnational Migratory Labor and Filipino Fathers: How Families Are Affected When Men Work Abroad  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Transnational migratory labor remains a primary method many Filipinos use in an effort to gain financial security for their families. Based on data collected from an urban Southern Visayan province during the summer of 2007, this study examined a sample of 116 OFW (Overseas Filipino Workers) families and a sample of 99 traditional two-parent…

Harper, Scott E.; Martin, Alan M.

2013-01-01

392

SEAFARERS' WIVES AND INTERMITTENT HUSBANDS- SOCIAL AND PSYCHOLOGICAL IMPACT OF A SUBGROUP OF NORWEGIAN SEAFARERS' WORK SCHEDULE ON THEIR FAMILIES  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective - To examine the psycho-social impact of work schedules (absence from home) on the families of a subgroup of Norwegian seafarers as reported by their wives (sea wives). Their husbands worked 4-6 weeks on and 4-6 weeks off Norwegian- registered multipurpose vessels (MPV) supporting the off-shore oil industry. Methods - Questionnaires addressing demographic characteristics, marital satisfaction, social support, subjective

ARNE JOHAN ULVEN; KNUT ARVE OMDAL; HENRIK HERLØV-NIELSEN; ÅGOT IRGENS; EILIF DAHL

2007-01-01

393

Attachment and Parenting: The Mediating Role of Work-Family Balance in Portuguese Parents of Preschool Children  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Given the increasingly challenging task of balancing multiple adult life roles in contemporary society, this study examined the influences of both conflicting and (positively) synergistic work and family roles in mediating associations between the quality of adult attachment and both parental satisfaction and parenting stress. Participants were…

Vieira, Joana Marina; AVila, Marisa; Matos, Paula Mena

2012-01-01

394

The "Insider/Outsider" Dilemma of Ethnography: Working with Young Children and Their Families in Cross-Cultural Contexts  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this article we unravel the difficulty of being researchers in the homes and classrooms of children and their families whose origins are, for one of us, very different and, for the other, very similar to our own. We first situate our work within theories of early socialization and literacy teaching which underpin our understanding of how young…

Gregory, Eve; Ruby, Mahera

2011-01-01

395

College Women in the 21st Century: A Closer Look at Academic, Family and Work Demands on Levels of Burnout  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study explored the contributions of background characteristics, family, academic, and work demands on levels of burnout among undergraduate females in an urban college setting and to what extent informal/formal support is related to levels of burnout. Data were obtained through the use of self-administered questionnaires, which were…

Valoy, Glenny A.

2012-01-01

396

Possible Futures for Social Work with Children and Families in Australia, the United Kingdom and the United States  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

There has been considerable interest in recent years in comparing the operation of social work services for children and families internationally, particularly between Australia, the United Kingdom and the United States. Reviewing the respective policy environments and drawing on recent research experience in these three nations, the author…

Spratt, Trevor

2008-01-01

397

Supporting Early Childhood Preservice Teachers in Their Work with Children and Families with Complex Needs: A Strengths Approach  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article explores the potential of tailoring the inherent principles of the Strengths Approach (McCashen, 2005) for preparing early childhood educators to work with children and families with complex needs. The term "Strengths Approach" (capitalized) is presented in the article as the name of a specific approach developed by St.…

Fenton, Angela; McFarland-Piazza, Laura

2014-01-01

398

Parental Involvement in Children's Education: Considerations for School Counselors Working with Latino Immigrant Families  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Hoover-Dempsey et al. (2005) model of parents' involvement in their children's schools has recently been applied to Latino immigrant families. This article reviews that literature and then describes culturally appropriate strategies for school counselors to work with this population, focusing on (a) teacher and counselor invitations…

Gonzalez, Laura M.; Borders, L. DiAnne; Hines, Erik M.; Villalba, Jose A.; Henderson, Alia

2013-01-01

399

Poor Families in 2001: Parents Working Less and Children Continue To Lag Behind. Child Trends Research Brief.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

With increasing unemployment in the United States, the nation has seen a drop in the percentage of children in poverty with one or more parents in the workforce, a reverse of trends evident in the late 1990s. This research brief presents a statistical snapshot of working poor families with children in 2001. Analyses revealed that in 2001 children…

Wertheimer, Richard

400

Do Female and Male Employees in Iran Experience Similar Work-Family Interference, Job, and Life Satisfaction?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study aims at examining gender differences in the experience of work-family interference and perceived job-life satisfaction in a group of Iranian employees. The participants in the study consist of 387 Iranian male and female employees from a variety of organizations. The results of t tests and multiple regression analysis using EQS 6.1…

Karimi, Leila

2009-01-01

401

Making Ends Meet: Six Programs That Help Working Families and Employers. A Guide for Business Leaders and Policymakers.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document is intended to provide business leaders, policymakers, and others with information about the operation and value of six work support programs designed to help low-income parents obtain the assistance needed to enter a job, retain employment, and better provide for their families' needs. The six programs profiled are as follows: the…

Patel, Nisha; Greenberg, Mark; Savner, Steve; Turetsky, Vicki

402

The Role of Ethnic Culture in Work-Family Balance among Armenian Women in Leadership Positions in Higher Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In contemporary society women leaders in education have struggled to balance work and family. While some women have succeeded in finding that balance, many others are still struggling. The purpose of this qualitative study was to examine the experiences of three Armenian women in senior-level leadership positions in higher education in the United…

Baran, Hasmig

2012-01-01

403

WORKING WITH LOW-INCOME FAMILIES, PROCEEDINGS OF THE AHEA WORKSHOP (UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO, MARCH 15-19, 1965).  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

WORK WITH LOW INCOME FAMILIES HAS BEEN PART OF THE BASIC PHILOSOPHY OF THE AMERICAN HOME ECONOMICS ASSOCIATION (AHEA) SINCE ITS INCEPTION. A NATIONAL WORKSHOP WAS ATTENDED BY STATE DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION AND U.S. OFFICE OF EDUCATION PERSONNEL, TEACHER-EDUCATORS, EXTENSION WORKERS, SOCIAL WORKERS, AND PERSONS WITH RELATED INTERESTS. TEXTS OF THE…

American Home Economics Association, Washington, DC.

404

Implementing family involvement in the treatment of patients with psychosis: a systematic review of facilitating and hindering factors  

PubMed Central

Objective To synthesise the evidence on implementing family involvement in the treatment of patients with psychosis with a focus on barriers, problems and facilitating factors. Design Systematic review of studies evaluating the involvement of families in tripartite communication between health professionals, ‘families’ (or other unpaid carers) and adult patients, in a single-family context. A theoretical thematic analysis approach and thematic synthesis were used. Data sources A systematic electronic search was carried out in seven databases, using database-specific search strategies and controlled vocabulary. A secondary manual search of grey literature was performed as well as using forwards and backwards snowballing techniques. Results A total of 43 studies were included. The majority featured qualitative data (n=42), focused solely on staff perspectives (n=32) and were carried out in the UK (n=23). Facilitating the training and ongoing supervision needs of staff are necessary but not sufficient conditions for a consistent involvement of families. Organisational cultures and paradigms can work to limit family involvement, and effective implementation appears to operate via a whole team coordinated effort at every level of the organisation, supported by strong leadership. Reservations about family involvement regarding power relations, fear of negative outcomes and the need for an exclusive patient–professional relationship may be explored and addressed through mutually trusting relationships. Conclusions Implementing family involvement carries additional challenges beyond those generally associated with translating research to practice. Implementation may require a cultural and organisational shift towards working with families. Family work can only be implemented if this is considered a shared goal of all members of a clinical team and/or mental health service, including the leaders of the organisation. This may imply a change in the ethos and practices of clinical teams, as well as the establishment of working routines that facilitate family involvement approaches. PMID:25280809

Eassom, Erica; Giacco, Domenico; Dirik, Aysegul; Priebe, Stefan

2014-01-01

405

Family Style Dining in the Child Care Center: Yes, It Can Work!  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes a nursery school director's successful experience with allowing children to serve themselves at snack and lunchtimes, and some of the problems the staff overcame to adapt family style dining to the abilities of small children. (HTH)

Bomba, Anne K.; Knight, Kathy B.

1993-01-01

406

Questions and Answers about School-Age Children in Self-Care: A Sloan Work and Family Research Network Fact Sheet  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Sloan Work and Family Research Network has prepared Fact Sheets that provide statistical answers to some important questions about work-family and work-life issues. This Fact Sheet includes statistics about Children in Self-Care, and answers the following questions about school-age children in self-care: (1) How many school-age children are in…

Sloan Work and Family Research Network, 2009

2009-01-01

407

The effects of supervisors' supportive role, job stress, and work-family conflicts on the nurses' attitudes.  

PubMed

This study developed and tested a research model that examined the effects of supervisor support (SUPPORT), work-family conflict (W-FCON), family-work conflict (F-WCON), and job stress (JSTRESS) on a number of selected consequences using data collected from nurses and nurse axillaries in Shiraz University of Medical Sciences hospitals in Fars province (south of Iran). The results demonstrated that W-FCON and F-WCON exerted a significant positive influence on JSTRESS. Contrary to the study hypothesis, the results did not provide any empirical support for the significant negative relationship between W-FCON, F-WCON, and JSTRESS with family satisfaction (FSAT). The findings further revealed that higher JSTRESS led to lower life satisfaction (LSAT). As expected, high levels of FSAT resulted in increased LSAT. However, this study failed to find significant negative relationships between conflicts in the work-family interface and LSAT. The results also revealed that JSTRESS was not significantly associated with LSAT. Consonant with the study hypotheses, W-FCON, F-WCON, and JSTRESS were found to be significant for turnover intentions, whereas LSAT did not. Implications for managers and future research directions are presented. PMID:23629033

Farhadi, Payam; Sharifian, Roxana; Feili, Ardalan; Shokrpour, Nasrin

2013-01-01

408

TASTE of WORK All participating Hosts have made a commitment to help you to  

E-print Network

TASTE of WORK All participating Hosts have made a commitment to help you to gain work place skills are representing University of Sheffield students when undertaking your TASTE of WORK. Terms and Conditions: · You in TASTE of WORK. · All sessions are unpaid and you will NOT be classed as employees of either

Stevenson, Mark

409

Family-supportive supervisor behaviors, work engagement, and subjective well-being: a contextually dependent mediated process.  

PubMed

Grounded in a multistudy framework, we examined the relationship between family-supportive supervisor behaviors, work engagement, and subjective well-being as a contextually dependent mediated process. In Study 1 (N = 310), based on broaden-and-build and conservation of resources theories, we tested the proposed mediated process while controlling for perceived organizational support and perceived managerial effectiveness. We also demonstrated that family-supportive supervisor behaviors are distinguishable from general supervisor behaviors. In Study 2 (N = 1,640), using multigroup structural equation modeling, we validated and extended Study 1 results by examining how the mediated model varied based on 2 contextualizing constructs: (a) dependent care responsibilities and (b) availability of family-friendly benefits. Although the mediational results were contextually dependent, they were not necessarily consistent with hypothesizing based on conservation of resources theory. Practical implications are emphasized in addition to future research directions. PMID:24730426

Matthews, Russell A; Mills, Maura J; Trout, Rachel C; English, Lucy

2014-04-01

410

Social work with Bosnian Muslim refugee children and families: a review of the literature.  

PubMed

More than two million Bosnian Muslims were ethnically cleansed in the Balkan region; of these, 200,000 were killed while the others were forced to flee their homes and become refugees. This article focuses on the influence of societal and cultural values coupled with wartime experiences on the transition of Bosnian refugee families to their new countries. Consideration is given to culturally competent theoretical frameworks and practice principles social workers can use to assist Bosnian Muslim children and families in their adaptation process within their resettlement communities. PMID:16435653

Snyder, Cindy S; May, J Dean; Zulcic, Nihada N; Gabbard, W Jay

2005-01-01

411

LEAP Works! Outcomes of a Family-based Nutrition Education and Physical Activity Promotion Program  

Microsoft Academic Search

Overweight is an endemic public health concern for children, adolescents, and adults. Reducing the prevalence of childhood overweight is a national health objective and nine million U.S. children, currently classified as overweight, require effective nutrition education and physical activity promotion services. The intent of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a family-based nutrition education and physical activity promotion

Michelle A. Monastra; Judith Bordin; Cindy B. Wolff

2005-01-01

412

The experiences of behavior interventionists who work with children with autism in families’ homes  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined the experiences of 65 behavior interventionists (BIs) who provide 1:1 home-based instruction to children with autism in two Canadian provinces. Dependent variables included occupational stress; the relationships among stress, strain, and coping; the relationship between stress and the characteristics of both challenging families and children with autism; and the most and least rewarding aspects of BIs’ jobs.

Miriam Elfert; Pat Mirenda

2006-01-01

413

Working with Latino Families: Challenges Faced by Educators and Civic Leaders  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article analyzes a subset of data gathered during a survey of 155 school systems and communities across the nation. The data were obtained from a capability survey as part of the application for a Toyota Family Literacy Program (TFLP) grant. Educators and civic leaders in 38 states responded to questions about their five greatest challenges…

Lieshoff, Sylvia Cobos

2007-01-01

414

Relationships between Perceptions of Personal and Family Functioning, Defensive Functioning, and Working Models of Caregiving.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Current psychological literature suggests that positive representations of self and others are associated with sensitivity of caregiving. This study was designed to examine the relationship among self-perceptions, perceptions of family functioning, and caregiving schemata in 618 undergraduates (437 females, 181 males) enrolled in Introductory…

Meyers, Steven A.; And Others

415

Cost of Children in Australia. Institute of Family Studies Working Paper No. 8.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report estimates costs of feeding and clothing Australian children at a basic survival level. Detailed information is provided on the types of costs incurred by families at different income levels and with children of different ages. After a brief introduction characterizing the study and summarizing findings, discussion focuses on the…

Lovering, Kerry

416

Numeracy: Families Working It out Together--The Opportunities Are Everywhere  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

There is ample evidence that positive involvement of families in children's learning can be a major contribution. Where to start is often a challenge, however, especially in the numeracy area. As part of the Australian Government's "Numeracy Research and Development Initiative" a team led by Beth Powell in Western Australia has developed a poster…

Morony, Will

2004-01-01

417

Illusions of Prosperity: America's Working Families in an Age of Economic Insecurity.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This book examines the political and economic consequences of the United States' growing reliance on the market and the effects that this growing reliance is having on U.S. workers and their families. The following are among the topics discussed in the book's 10 chapters: (1) consequences of the turn to the market (disinvestment, imbalance between…

Blau, Joel

418

Prenatal Diagnosis: Current Procedures and Implications for Early Interventionists Working with Families.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article provides an overview of procedures commonly used in prenatal screening and diagnosis including ultrasound, amniocentesis, chorionic villus biopsy, maternal serum alpha-fetoprotein, and deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) analysis. Emphasis is on the role of the early interventionist in supporting families during prenatal diagnosis. (Author/DB)

Blasco, Patricia M.; And Others

1994-01-01

419

Women at the Top: Powerful Leaders Define Success as Work + Family in a Culture of Gender  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

How do women rise to the top of their professions when they also have significant family care responsibilities? This critical question has not been addressed by existing models of leadership. In a review of recent research, we explore an alternative model to the usual notion of a Western male as the prototypical leader. The model includes (a)…

Cheung, Fanny M.; Halpern, Diane F.

2010-01-01

420

Daily work-family conflict and alcohol use: testing the cross-level moderation effects of peer drinking norms and social support.  

PubMed

In the current study, we conducted daily telephone interviews with a sample of Chinese workers (N = 57) for 5 weeks to examine relationships between daily work-family conflict and alcohol use. Drawn from the tension reduction theory and the stressor-vulnerability model, daily work-family conflict variables were hypothesized to predict employees' daily alcohol use. Further, social variables (i.e., peer drinking norms, family support, and coworker support) were hypothesized to moderate the relationship between work-family conflict and alcohol use. Results showed that daily work-to-family conflict but not family-to-work conflict had a significant within-subject main effect on daily alcohol use. In addition, there was significant between-subject variation in the relationship between work-to-family conflict and alcohol use, which was predicted by peer drinking norms, coworker support, and family support. The current findings shed light on the daily health behavior consequences of work-family conflict and provide important theoretical and practical implications. PMID:20230077

Wang, Mo; Liu, Songqi; Zhan, Yujie; Shi, Junqi

2010-03-01

421

Summer Internship for J.D. Credit Students may receive academic credit for unpaid summer internships for which credit is a  

E-print Network

Summer Internship for J.D. Credit Overview Students may receive academic credit for unpaid summer internships for which credit is a condition of employment. To receive credit, students must propose and get an HLS faculty member's approval of a one-credit paper prior to accepting the internship. The paper

Wolfe, Patrick J.

422

The Use of Boundaries by Self-employed, Home-Based Workers to Manage Work and Family: A Qualitative Study in Canada  

Microsoft Academic Search

This qualitative study used grounded theory methodology to explore the experiences of 30 self-employed, home-based workers\\u000a in Canada. Using boundary and work–family border theories as central theoretical constructs, this research examined the extent\\u000a to which workers used boundaries to manage work and family, the nature of these boundaries, and how they were negotiated by\\u000a the workers and their families. The

Jennifer Myrie; Kerry Daly

2009-01-01

423

Social and Civic Values of Young Italians and the Educational Role of the Family, the School, Local Bodies, Associations, and the Working World.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper briefly outlines Italian pedagogical research on youth since World War II and presents the sociological interaction of youth to family, friends, work, and current issues. A 1987 survey is reviewed with youth responses given in percentages and ranked according to the importance of family, work, friends, leisure activities, studies and…

Corradini, Luciano

424

Balancing Work and Family All of us must allocate 24 hours a day to the activities of life. How well we balance responsibilities with  

E-print Network

Balancing Work and Family All of us must allocate 24 hours a day to the activities of life. How well we balance responsibilities with doing things we truly enjoy directly affects our quality of life. It also helps manage stress. Are you satisfied with your balance of time between work and family? If you

Leistikow, Bruce N.

425

Respite Care: A Partnership Between a Veterans Administration Nursing Home and Families to Care for Frail Elders at Home.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes Respite Program which provided 4 weeks inpatient care over one year to frail older veterans who lived with unpaid caregiver. Program personnel taught 850 families health care delivery skills needed to maintain a disabled person at home and how to build community support systems. Program prevented inappropriate placement by providing…

Berman, Stephen; And Others

1987-01-01

426

Family and Medical Leave (FMLA) Request Form 1) Complete first page of form and sign on page two  

E-print Network

Family and Medical Leave (FMLA) Request Form 1) Complete first page of form and sign on page two 2: _____________ I HEREBY REQUEST THE FOLLOWING BENEFITS BE CONTINUED DURING AN UNPAID FMLA LEAVE: ______ Medical processing of my request. I am not required to provide details about my medical condition to my supervisor

He, Chuan

427

Making Ends Meet: Insufficiency and Work-Family Coordination in the New Economy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The "New Economy" features 24/7 employment, varied work schedules, job insecurity, and lower benefits and wages, which lead to disparities in experiences of security and sufficiency. This study investigates sufficiency concerns in the New Economy; who is having trouble making ends meet? Sufficiency concerns are subjective perceptions that work is…

Edgell, Penny; Ammons, Samantha K.; Dahlin, Eric C.

2012-01-01

428

Compassion fatigue and burnout in nurses who work with children with chronic conditions and their families  

Microsoft Academic Search

IntroductionWith the current and ever-growing shortage of nurses in the United States, it is imperative that nurses find ways to prevent burnout and effectively manage compassion fatigue that can result from working with traumatized populations. The aim of this study is to identify the triggers and coping strategies that nurses who work with children with chronic conditions use to manage

Jennifer C. Maytum; Mary Bielski Heiman; Ann W. Garwick

2004-01-01

429

Responding to Children's Everyday Transgressions in Chinese Working-Class Families  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examines how working-class mothers in the People's Republic of China respond to their young children's transgressions in everyday contexts. Twenty 4-year-old children and their mothers in a working-class neighbourhood were observed in their daily routines at home. When addressing children's transgressions and socialising desirable…

Wang, Xiao-lei; Bernas, Ronan; Eberhard, Philippe

2008-01-01

430

Burnout Among Social Workers Working with Physically Disable Persons and Bereaved Families  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present study investigated and compared the professional burnout level of rehabilitation social workers working in different rehabilitation agencies. The burnout level measured in the three groups of rehabilitation social workers was also compared to the burnout level experienced by a group of social workers working in social welfare agencies. One hundred and twelve subjects filled out the Maslach Burnout

Ariela Stav; Victor Florian; Esther Zernitsky Shurka

1987-01-01

431

Family, Work, and Migration: Transborder Networking among Tlapanecs from La Montaña  

E-print Network

thankful to Abel Barrera, the Cruz family in Iliatenco and Lawrence, Teresa de la Cruz, Jana Krentz, Lydia Leon, Guadalupe Gutierrez, Carlos L?pez, David L?pez, Margarita Nemecio, Marion Oettinger, Lisa Rausch, and Evie Schlife for their kind and useful... of Iliatenco (Photo by David L?pez)..51 Figure 5-Iliatenco from northeast (Photo by author)?????????????54 Figure 6-Tlapanec women (Photos by author)??????????????? 55 Figure 7-DVD and chocomil vendors (Photo by David L?pez)????????.56 Figure 8- Taxistas...

Blanchon, Grant Anthony

2009-01-20

432

Atypical spatial working memory and task-general brain activity in adolescents with a family history of alcoholism  

PubMed Central

Background Altered behavioral performance and brain activation during spatial working memory (SWM) tasks have been demonstrated in individuals with an alcohol use disorder (AUD). It is possible that alterations in processing during SWM may be present prior to initiation of heavy alcohol use in adolescents with a family history of AUDs (FHP) and therefore represent a premorbid neural phenotype that could increase risk for developing an AUD. The goal of our study was to investigate group differences in brain activation during a SWM task between FHP adolescents and adolescents with no family history of AUDs (FHN), as well as examine the relationship between brain activation and individual differences in family history density (FHD) of AUDs. Methods 18 FHP and 16 gender and age-matched FHN participants completed a SWM and vigilance task while undergoing a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) scan. Results There were no group differences in task performance. The FHN group demonstrated expected greater activation during the SWM than vigilance condition in the right middle frontal gyrus and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, whereas the FHP group demonstrated comparable brain activation for both the more demanding and simple task conditions. Additionally, FHD was associated with greater activation of the right superior parietal cortex and less activation of the right cerebellum during the SWM task, but not during the vigilance task. Conclusions Results suggest FHP adolescents demonstrate alterations in activation of prefrontal regions that are related more generally to the maintenance of top-down cognitive control and alterations in parietal and cerebellar regions that are specific to spatial working memory. Alterations in top-down cognitive control may be a general risk factor for FHP adolescents, whereas SWM-specific alterations are seen as a function of family history loading. PMID:23078615

Mackiewicz Seghete, Kristen L.; Cservenka, Anita; Herting, Megan M.; Nagel, Bonnie J.

2012-01-01

433

Workforce Issues in the Greater Boston Health Care Industry: Implications for Work and Family  

E-print Network

Interviews with more than 40 leaders in the Boston area health care industry have identified a range of broadly-felt critical problems. This document synthesizes these problems and places them in the context of work and ...

Harrington, Mona

434

7 CFR Exhibit K to Subpart A of... - Classifications for Multi-Family Residential Rehabilitation Work  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

7 Agriculture 12 2013-01-01...work o Wallpapering o Window shades and curtains o Door...or relocation o Storm windows and weatherstripping o Subfloor...exterior and interior o Window replacement o New or...

2013-01-01

435

7 CFR Exhibit K to Subpart A of... - Classifications for Multi-Family Residential Rehabilitation Work  

7 Agriculture 12 2014-01-01...work o Wallpapering o Window shades and curtains o Door...or relocation o Storm windows and weatherstripping o Subfloor...exterior and interior o Window replacement o New or...

2014-01-01

436

7 CFR Exhibit K to Subpart A of... - Classifications for Multi-Family Residential Rehabilitation Work  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

7 Agriculture 12 2012-01-01...work o Wallpapering o Window shades and curtains o Door...or relocation o Storm windows and weatherstripping o Subfloor...exterior and interior o Window replacement o New or...

2012-01-01

437

[Development of a Japanese Version of the Work-Family Conflict Scale (WFCS), and examination of its validity and reliability].  

PubMed

The purposes of this study were to develop a Japanese version of the multi-dimensional Work-Family Conflict Scale (WFCS) and to examine its reliability and validity. The original 18-item WFCS (Carlson, et al., 2000) has six dimensions of conflict which consist of time-based work interference with family (WIF), time-based family interference with work (FIW), strain-based WIF, strain-based FIW, behavior based WIF, and behavior-based FIW. We developed a Japanese version of the WFCS from the original WFCS which is written in English by the following procedure: forward translation and back translation by several researchers including a native English speaker, and finally, gaining the approval of Carlson et al., the original authors. A self-administered questionnaire including the WFCS was distributed to 180 permanent contract, information technology (IT) engineers with pre-school children, who were employed at 24 IT companies, each with over 300 employees. Test-retest was conducted on a different group of 34 parents whose children were attending nursery school. Cronbach's reliability coefficients for the six subscales ranged from 0.77 to 0.92, showing sufficiently high internal consistency. Only the internal correlation coefficient between behavior-based WIF and behavior-based FIW was above 0.60, indicating that discriminant validity exists among most of the sub-scales. Also, upon comparison of confirmatory factor analysis results among five models, the six-factor model, which is the same model used in the original WFCS, showed the best fit (chi-square=231.82, df=129, CFI=0.95, AIC=315.82, RMSEA=0.07), demonstrating construct validity. On test-retest, weighted kappa coefficients of each item and the intra-class correlations of six subscales, indicated adequate reproducibility. These results suggest that the Japanese version of the WFCS may be a reliable and valid instrument for assessing the conflict between work and family in Japanese workers. PMID:16801732

Watai, Izumi; Nishikido, Noriko; Murashima, Sachiyo

2006-05-01

438

Inflammatory bowel disease: Greek patients’ perspective on quality of life, information on the disease, work productivity and family support  

PubMed Central

Background The aim of this study was to identify inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients’ perspectives regarding everyday life issues. Methods From October 2010 till April 2011, 1,181 IBD patients completed an anonymous questionnaire through the internet (827 cases) or at the outpatient clinic of the participating centers (354 cases), aiming to identify: a) the impact of disease on social life, emotional status and work productivity; b) the source of disease information; and c) the level of support from family members and friends. Results Fifty-five percent of the patients reported that IBD interferes with their social life, while 65% felt stressed, 60% depressed and 19% tired because of it. Disease information (physician/ internet) was reported only by 31%, while 26% admitted not discussing their therapy with their gastroenterologist. Forty percent felt that the health service they receive is not satisfactory, with 76% desiring more gastroenterologists, 67% more outpatient clinics, 49% more dieticians and 42% more psychologists specialized in IBD. IBD interfered with working capacity in 40% of the participants, while 57% needed time off of work (ranging from 1-20 days per year). One of three patients (32%) has not informed his work environment about the disease; however, 88% had the support of their family and friends for coping with it. Conclusions Greek IBD patients claim that health-related social life, emotional status and work productivity are severely affected by their disease, whereas they complain about lack of information regarding the therapy. These unmet demands call for immediate action by healthcare providers and society. PMID:24714294

Viazis, Nikos; Mantzaris, Gerasimos; Karmiris, Konstantinos; Polymeros, Dimitrios; Kouklakis, George; Maris, Theofanis; Karagiannis, John; Karamanolis, Dimitrios G.

2013-01-01

439

The changing gender contract as the engine of work-and-family policies  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper shifts the comparative analysis of gender and welfare states from a focus on differences to a search for common features. The rise in women's labor force participation and resulting tensions between time allocated to work and to caregiving have led to a search for policies to reconcile productive and reproductive roles and a quest for gender equality in

Janet Zollinger Giele

2006-01-01

440

Sexual Behavior, Sexual Knowledge, and Sexual Attitudes of Emerging Adult Women: Implications for Working with Families  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was twofold: first, to examine the sexual behavior of emerging adult women in relation to their sexual knowledge, sexual attitudes, and perceptions of their parents' sexual attitudes; and second, to discuss the implications of this research in working with young adult women. Three hundred and sixty-four college-age women…

Byno, Lucy H.; Mullis, Ronald L.; Mullis, Ann K.

2009-01-01

441

Preparing Professionals to Work with Infants, Toddlers, and Their Families: A Hybrid Approach to Learning  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A shortage of well-prepared professionals imposes limits on access to comprehensive and effective early intervention services to deaf and hard of hearing children. The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act expects states to ensure that professionals working with infants and toddlers have relevant skills, however, there are very few…

Sass-Lehrer, Marilyn; Benedict, Beth S.; Hutchinson, Nicole

2011-01-01

442

Family structure, women's education and work: Re-examining the high status of women in Kerala  

Microsoft Academic Search

Literacy, together with non-domestic employment, which gave women access to independent sources of income, have been regarded as important indicators of women's `status', which affected fertility and mortality outcomes. Since women in Kerala have on average, been the most literate when compared with women in other states of India (though the same could not be said of female work-participation rates),

Mridul Eapen; Praveena Kodoth

2002-01-01

443

Employment, Work Conditions, and the Home Environment in Single-Mother Families  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigates the impact of employment status and work conditions on the quality of the home environment provided by single mothers of preschool-age children. Multivariate analyses were conducted using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth. The results indicate that employment status is not a significant predictor of the…

Lleras, Christy

2008-01-01

444

Contemporary Work and Family Issues Affecting Marriage and Cohabitation among Low-Income Single Mothers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this paper, we advance and test an integrative model of the effects of employment status, nonstandard work schedules, male employment, and women's perceptions of economic instability on union formation among low-income single mothers. On the basis of the longitudinal data from 1,299 low-income mothers from the Three-City Welfare Study, results…

Joshi, Pamela; Quane, James M.; Cherlin, Andrew J.

2009-01-01

445

Maternal Working Conditions and Child Well-Being in Welfare-Leaving Families  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In the wake of welfare reform, thousands of low-income single mothers have transitioned into the labor market. In this article, the authors examine how the work conditions of mothers leaving welfare for employment are associated with the emotional well-being of 372 children ages 5 to 15 years. The authors examine the cumulative incidence, over a…

Dunifon, Rachel; Kalil, Ariel; Bajracharya, Ashish

2005-01-01

446

Juggling the Balls--Study, Work, Family and Play: Student Perspectives on Flexible and Blended Heutagogy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article draws on research with the student cohort in one of the early childhood teacher education programmes at the University of Western Sydney, Australia. It explores students' perceptions of a flexible and blended pedagogy, or "heutagogy" which combines online work with face-to-face lectures and tutorials. Research into teaching and…

Ashton, Jean; Elliott, Roslyn

2007-01-01

447

Working on the Weekend: Fathers' Time with Family in the United Kingdom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Whereas most resident fathers are able to spend more time with their children on weekends than on weekdays, many fathers work on the weekends, spending less time with their children on these days. There are conflicting findings about whether fathers are able to make up for lost weekend time on weekdays. Using unique features of the United…

Hook, Jennifer L.

2012-01-01

448

Social support and the working hours of employed mothers in Europe: The relevance of the state, the workplace, and the family.  

PubMed

This paper studies the influence of state, workplace, and family support on the working hours of employed mothers and how these different support sources interact. Data taken from the European Social Survey 2004/2005 as well as country-specific information were used to estimate several hierarchical models. We find evidence that the availability of supportive workplace arrangements and family support positively impact the working hours of employed mothers and that state policies facilitating the traditional family have a negative effect. There is weak support for a positive relationship between state policies facilitating the dual-earner family and working hours of employed mothers. In addition, most of the sources of support appear to be complementary. Supportive family role models and supportive workplace arrangements have a reinforcing relationship, as do publicly funded child care and supportive workplace arrangements. PMID:23017794

Abendroth, Anja-Kristin; van der Lippe, Tanja; Maas, Ineke

2012-05-01

449

Reforming Welfare and Rewarding Work: A Final Report on the Minnesota Family Investment Program  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Cited June 2000 in a printed statement on welfare reform from President Clinton, this new report offers a comprehensive assessment of Minnesota's welfare reform program. The report was produced by The Manpower Demonstration Research Corporation (MDRC), a "nonprofit, nonpartisan social policy research organization." MDRC found that Minnesota's reform program brought substantial, far-ranging improvements to the lives of single parents who were long-term welfare recipients, including increases in employment, reduction in poverty, decreased levels of domestic abuse, and improvements in children's behavior and school performance. Unlike many welfare reform programs, Minnesota's is premised upon a commitment to support people while they work. This welfare-plus-work dimension was emphasized by the MDRC as crucial to the reform's successes.

Berlin, Gordon L.

2000-01-01

450

Coping with Work and Family Role Conflict: Career Counselling Considerations for Women  

Microsoft Academic Search

The last several decades have seen a rapid increase of female workers joining the world of work. Women comprise a significant\\u000a portion of the workforce in the North American society today. In Canada, more than 78% of Canadian women between the age of\\u000a 25 and 54 are workers in the labour market (Statistics Canada, 2000). In 2001, 71% of women

Charles P. Chen

451

Career, Family, and Institutional Variables in the Work Lives of Academic Women in the Chemical Sciences  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This article presents quantitative results of a study of 139 academic women in the chemical sciences who participated in a professional development program sponsored by the Committee on the Advancement of Women Chemists. The study investigated variables frequently examined in the vocational psychology of women: approaches to achievement, coping strategies, career advancement, the home-work interface, workplace climate, and mentoring. The article presents and discusses results in the context of unique issues faced by women in scientific careers.

Fassinger, Ruth E.; Scantlebury, Kathryn; Richmond, Geraldine

452

Making Work Pay: How To Design and Implement Financial Work Supports To Improve Family and Child Well-Being and Reduce Poverty. How-To Guide: Technical Assistance for States and Localities.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This guide explains how to design and implement financial work supports in order to improve family and child well-being. The information provided draws heavily from the study of these three programs that increased employment and earnings while improving employment stability, boosting income, and reducing poverty: Minnesota Family Investment…

Greenberger, Debbie; Anselmi, Robert

453

When hard times take a toll: the distressing consequences of economic hardship and life events within the family-work interface.  

PubMed

Using two waves of data from a national survey of working Americans (N = 1,122), we examine the associations among economic hardship, negative life events, and psychological distress in the context of the family-work interface. Our findings demonstrate that family-to-work conflict mediates the effects of economic hardship and negative events to significant others on distress (net of baseline distress and hardship). Moreover, economic hardship and negative events to significant others moderate the association between family-to-work conflict and distress. While negative events to others exacerbate the positive effect of family-to-work conflict on distress, we find the opposite for economic hardship: The positive association between hardship and distress is weaker at higher levels of family-to-work conflict. These patterns hold across an array of family, work, and sociodemographic conditions. We discuss how these findings refine and extend ideas of the stress process model, including complex predictions related to processes of stress-buffering, resource substitution, and role multiplication. PMID:22336534

Young, Marisa; Schieman, Scott

2012-03-01

454

45 CFR 261.32 - How many hours must work-eligible individuals participate for the family to count in the...  

...2014-10-01 2012-10-01 true How many hours must work-eligible individuals participate for the family...HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES ENSURING THAT RECIPIENTS WORK What Are the Work Activities and How Do They Count? § 261.32...

2014-10-01

455

45 CFR 261.32 - How many hours must work-eligible individuals participate for the family to count in the...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false How many hours must work-eligible individuals participate for the family...HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES ENSURING THAT RECIPIENTS WORK What Are the Work Activities and How Do They Count? § 261.32...

2012-10-01

456

45 CFR 261.31 - How many hours must a work-eligible individual participate for the family to count in the...  

...2014-10-01 2012-10-01 true How many hours must a work-eligible individual participate for the family to...HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES ENSURING THAT RECIPIENTS WORK What Are the Work Activities and How Do They Count? § 261.31...

2014-10-01

457

45 CFR 261.32 - How many hours must work-eligible individuals participate for the family to count in the...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false How many hours must work-eligible individuals participate for the family...HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES ENSURING THAT RECIPIENTS WORK What Are the Work Activities and How Do They Count? § 261.32...

2011-10-01

458

45 CFR 261.31 - How many hours must a work-eligible individual participate for the family to count in the...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false How many hours must a work-eligible individual participate for the family to...HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES ENSURING THAT RECIPIENTS WORK What Are the Work Activities and How Do They Count? § 261.31...

2011-10-01

459

45 CFR 261.32 - How many hours must work-eligible individuals participate for the family to count in the...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-10-01 2012-10-01 true How many hours must work-eligible individuals participate for the family...HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES ENSURING THAT RECIPIENTS WORK What Are the Work Activities and How Do They Count? § 261.32...

2013-10-01

460

45 CFR 261.31 - How many hours must a work-eligible individual participate for the family to count in the...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-10-01 2012-10-01 true How many hours must a work-eligible individual participate for the family to...HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES ENSURING THAT RECIPIENTS WORK What Are the Work Activities and How Do They Count? § 261.31...

2013-10-01

461

45 CFR 261.31 - How many hours must a work-eligible individual participate for the family to count in the...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false How many hours must a work-eligible individual participate for the family to...HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES ENSURING THAT RECIPIENTS WORK What Are the Work Activities and How Do They Count? § 261.31...

2012-10-01

462

45 CFR 261.31 - How many hours must a work-eligible individual participate for the family to count in the...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false How many hours must a work-eligible individual participate for the family to...HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES ENSURING THAT RECIPIENTS WORK What Are the Work Activities and How Do They Count? § 261.31...

2010-10-01

463

45 CFR 261.32 - How many hours must work-eligible individuals participate for the family to count in the...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false How many hours must work-eligible individuals participate for the family...HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES ENSURING THAT RECIPIENTS WORK What Are the Work Activities and How Do They Count? § 261.32...

2010-10-01

464

Sharing the caring: State, family and gender equality in parental leave policy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Parental leave policies give parents a temporary leave from employment in order to care for a child. Secondary aims are to increase women’s attachment to the labour force as well as supporting gender equal roles in paid and unpaid work. This study researched parent satisfaction of parental leave policies in the United States of America and the Netherlands. Mothers and

Anmarie J. Widener

2006-01-01

465

Daily Work–Family Conflict and Alcohol Use: Testing the Cross-Level Moderation Effects of Peer Drinking Norms and Social Support  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the current study, we conducted daily telephone interviews with a sample of Chinese workers (N = 57) for 5 weeks to examine relationships between daily work–family conflict and alcohol use. Drawn from the tension reduction theory and the stressor–vulnerability model, daily work–family conflict variables were hypothesized to predict employees’ daily alcohol use. Further, social variables (i.e., peer drinking norms,

Mo Wang; Songqi Liu; Yujie Zhan; Junqi Shi

2010-01-01

466

The effects of burnout and supervisory social support on the relationship between work-family conflict and intention to leave : A study of Australian cancer workers  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – The aim of this paper is to examine the effects of burnout and supervisory social support on the relationship between work-family conflict, and intention to leave of cancer workers in an Australian health care setting. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – Data collected from a public hospital of 114 cancer workers were used to test a model of the consequences of work-family

P. Rani Thanacoody; Timothy Bartram; Gian Casimir

2009-01-01

467

Students, Scientists, and Family Commemorate the Life and Diverse Works of Jack Eddy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Eddy Cross-Disciplinary Symposium on Sun-Climate Research; Aspen, Colorado, 22-24 October 2010; In 1976, John Allen Eddy published a seminal article (see Science, 192(4245), 1189-1202) revealing a link between the Little Ice Age, which occurred during the sixteenth through nineteenth centuries, and a period of low sunspot activity, which Eddy called the “Maunder Minimum.” This work placed Sun-climate research on a firm scientific footing. Eddy passed away on 10 June 2009. Following Eddy's passions for education and cross-disciplinary research, a symposium was held to expose talented college students to the science and politics of Sun-climate research. Funding from NASA's Living With a Star Targeted Research and Technology program and from the High Altitude Observatory, Advanced Study Program, and Integrated Science Program of the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) supported keynote speakers and provided scholarships for 30 students (junior year to Ph.D.) from diverse disciplines. Eddy's wife, Barbara, led a session devoted to personal recollections. Spencer Weart (American Institute of Physics) gave an after-dinner tribute using recordings of Eddy from a 1999 interview.

Judge, Philip

2011-02-01

468

Making Families Work and What To Do When They Don't: Thirty Guides for Imperfect Parents of Imperfect Children.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Taking a sometimes unconventional view of parent-child and family matters, this book contends that the facts of family living do matter--but not to the all-or-nothing degree advocated by some experts. The book disputes many well established beliefs about the importance of family life and maintains that as the sacredness of family relationships is…

Borcherdt, Bill

469

[Family Involvement.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This theme issue provides four articles that address family involvement in the transition of youth with disabilities from school to work. The first article, "Family Involvement" by Marge Goldberg and Shauna McDonald, offers evidence of the importance of family involvement at this stage of the individual's life, reports on families' experiences,…

Alliance: The Newsletter of the National Transition Alliance, 1996

1996-01-01

470

Family Policies and Academic Achievement by Young Children in Single-Parent Families: An International Comparison. Population Research Institute Working Paper.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigates the differences in the degree of low academic achievement of third and fourth graders living with single-parent families from 11 industrialized countries. The United States ranks first among the countries compared in terms of the achievement gap for children in single- and two-parent families. After controlling for…

Pong, Suet-ling; Dronkers, Jaap; Hampden-Thompson, Gillian

471

Working Parents  

MedlinePLUS

... Go for a walk or go to the gym. Do some recreational reading. While family time is ... Every Parent Needs to Know Family Life Health Management - Medical Home Family Dynamics Media Work & Play Getting ...

472

A Geriatric Clinical Training Model for Social Workers/Students Working Together with the Alzheimer Patient and Family Caregiver(s).  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discussed in this report is a geriatric clinical training model for social workers and students dealing with Alzheimer patients and family caregivers. The project was conceived to develop student interest and competence to work in this specialized area. One goal was to incorporate relevant components in the social work curriculum in both classroom…

Long Island Jewish Medical Center, NY.

473

The Case for School-Based Integration of Services: Changing the Ways Students, Families and Communities Engage with Their Schools. GroundWork  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Public/Private Ventures' (P/PV's) "GroundWork" series summarizes available evidence on a variety of social policy topics, providing a solid foundation for future work. This first issue reviews the current literature about the potential benefits of simultaneously providing three services in school--healthcare, out-of-school-time learning and family

Grossman, Jean Baldwin; Vang, Zoua M.

2009-01-01

474

Education and Earning in Peru's Informal Nonfarm Family Enterprises. Living Standards Measurement Study Working Paper No. 64.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Data from the 1985 Living Standards Survey in Peru were studied in this analysis of non-farm family businesses from the informal sector in order to categorize 2,735 family enterprises and to explain the earnings per hour of family labor. Most of the existing research on the self-employed uses the individual as the unit of analysis; however, this…

Moock, Peter; And Others

475

Transforming Couples and Families: A TransFormative Therapeutic Model for Working with the Loved-Ones of Gender-Divergent Youth and Trans-Identified Adults  

Microsoft Academic Search

The recent emergence of gender-divergent youth and trans-identified adults presenting in therapy, in tandem with the scant clinical work with their partners and families, indicates a serious gap in the research literature. In addition, there is a critical need for an increase of clinically-sensitive and culturally-competent therapists who can provide support for these transforming couples and families. To be effective,

Rupert Raj

2008-01-01

476

Relative Contributions of Childcare, Spousal Support, and Organizational Support in Reducing Work–Family Conflict for Men and Women: The Case of Turkey  

Microsoft Academic Search

The overarching purpose of the study was to investigate the role of three types of social support (i.e., spousal, childcare,\\u000a and organizational support) in relation to work–family conflict (WFC) in dual-earner families with children ages 0–6 years.\\u000a The relationship of WFC to psychological well-being and well-being in the domain of family was explored. Finally, the relationship\\u000a of spousal support to

Zeynep Aycan; Mehmet Eskin

2005-01-01

477

Working  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

A new special section in the New York Times, Working, features articles on the American worker. For example, the current issue contains stories on the contrast between the recent trend in layoffs and employers's complaints that they are unable to fill job openings; what is "retaining and motivating...the American worker"; and the shortage of qualified legal talent. The site also offers a great deal of career and job advice such as an article on non-traditional jobs, job forecasts, and office design. Interviews include an audio piece with Robert B. Reich, the former US Secretary of Labor. And of course, what would a newspaper section on work be without a link to the Dilbert comic strip?

478

Associations between work family conflict, emotional exhaustion, musculoskeletal pain, and gastrointestinal problems in a sample of business travelers.  

PubMed

The aim of the study was to examine the associations among work-family conflict (WFC), emotional exhaustion, musculoskeletal (MS) pain, and gastrointestinal problems on a sample of business travelers (n = 2,093). An additional aim was to examine differences in the mentioned relationships among three traveler groups: commuters, national travelers, and international travelers. The study was conducted in a large Norwegian oil and gas company, and the company's business travel database was utilized to examine business travel. Structural equation modeling (SEM) revealed significant relations between WFC and emotional exhaustion and between emotional exhaustion and health problems. Contrary to the expectations, no direct association was found between WFC and health problems. However, we found that emotional exhaustion mediated the relation between WFC and health outcomes. The results from multi-group analysis revealed that associations among WFC, emotional exhaustion, and health-outcomes showed a similar pattern for commuters, national travelers, and international travelers. However, the association between emotional exhaustion and MS pain proved to be significantly stronger for the commuter group compared to the national and international travel groups. Practical implications and the consequences of these findings for future research are discussed. PMID:25363417

Jensen, Maria Therese; Rundmo, Torbjørn

2015-02-01

479

The parent-child activity group: Using activities to work with children and their families in residential treatment  

Microsoft Academic Search

The parent-child activity group combines the concepts of group and family systems theory with therapeutically planned activities as a tool for the assessment and treatment of behaviorally disordered children and their families. This paper describes the development of the group with its flexible and adaptive formats—task performance, family interaction, and parent education\\/training. An extended case vignette illustrates the effectiveness of

Gino DeSalvatore; Deborah Rosenman

1986-01-01

480

A Closer Look at Changes in Children's Living Arrangements in Low-Income Families. Working Paper. Welfare, Children, and Families: A Three-City Study.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined changes in low-income children's living arrangements over time. Caregivers of children in Boston, Chicago, and San Antonio completed interviews in 1999 and then again 16 months later as part of the Three-City Study of low-income families with children. The percentage of children living with single mothers who were not…

Cherlin, Andrew J.; Fomby, Paula

481

Family Planning Programs: The Clients' Perspective. World Bank Staff Working Papers No. 676 and Population and Development Series No. 1.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Lowering fertility will require both a reduction in desired family size and provision of family planning services that respond to clients' needs. The World Fertility Survey and the Contraceptive Prevalence Survey found sizable groups of women with an "unmet need" for contraception. Investigators have also found evidence of unanswered need among…

Ainsworth, Martha

482

Race, Class, and Schooling: Multicultural Families Doing the Hard Work of Home Literacy in America's Inner City  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Drawing on a larger ethnographic study, this article documents (a) how and for what purposes literacy is used in 3 culturally diverse families of low socioeconomic status and (b) what various cultural, socioeconomic, and environmental factors shape the families' literacy practices in their home milieus in an urban context. Data analysis revealed…

Li, Guofang

2010-01-01

483

Marriage and Family Therapists' Comfort Working with Lesbian and Gay Male Clients: The Influence of Religious Practices and Support for Lesbian and Gay Male Human Rights  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study was to explore potential influences on marriage and family therapists' comfort level when working with lesbian and gay male clients, including sex, age, race, sexual orientation, political orientation, religious practices of the therapist, as well as the level of support for lesbian and gay male human rights. Participants in this study were 199 experienced therapists.

Mary S. Green; Megan J. Murphy; Markie L. C. Blumer

2010-01-01

484

Visual Impairment in Young Children: A Review of the Literature with Implications for Working with Families of Diverse Cultural and Linguistic Backgrounds. Technical Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report identifies key issues for providing early childhood special education services to young children who are visually impaired and for working with families of culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds. First, it discusses the incidence of visual impairment and associated disabilities among young children, the process of early…

Chen, Deborah

485

Social Factors in the Health of Families: A Public Health Social Work Responsibility. Proceedings of a Conference (Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, March 23-26, 1986).  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document contains a list of planning committee members, institute participants, an introduction by Gerald C. St. Denis a program agenda, and institute presentations from this conference. The following presentations are included: (1) "Social Factors in the Health of Families: A Public Health Social Work Responsibility" (Stanley F. Battle); (2)…

St. Denis, Gerald C., Ed.

486

What is family support work? : a case study within the context of one local authority in Scotland   

E-print Network

The thesis investigates the development of family support within one local authority in Scotland and shows that it has emerged from a complex interplay of governmental, philosophical, policy and practice change.

Smith, Mary

2009-01-01

487

Can a Web-Based Family Problem-Solving Intervention Work for Children With Traumatic Brain Injury?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To examine the feasibility and efficacy of a Web-based intervention for children with traumatic brain injury (TBI). Participants: 6 families comprising 8 parents, 5 siblings, and 6 children with TBI (mean age = 10.5 years). Intervention: Families received computers, Web cameras, and Internet access. Participants completed 7–11 online sessions and accompanying weekly videoconferences with the therapist. Main Outcome Measures:

Shari L. Wade; Christopher R. Wolfe; Tanya Maines Brown; John P. Pestian

2005-01-01

488

A qualitative study of the interactions among the psychosocial work environment and family, community and services for workers with low mental health  

PubMed Central

Background The psychosocial work environment can benefit and harm mental health. Poor psychosocial work environments and high level work-family conflict are both associated with poor mental health, yet little is known about how people with poor mental health manage the interactions among multiple life domains. This study explores the interfaces among paid work, family, community and support services and their combined effects on mental health. Methods We conducted 21 in-depth semi-structured interviews with people identified as having poor mental health to examine their experiences of paid employment and mental health and wellbeing in the context of their daily lives. Results The employment-related psychosocial work environment, particularly workplace relationships, employment security and degree of control over hours, strongly affected participants’ mental health. The interfaces among the life domains of family, community and access to support services suggest that effects on mental health differ according to: time spent in each domain, the social, psychological and physical spaces where domain activities take place, life stage and the power available to participants in their multiple domains. This paper is based on a framework analysis of all the interviews, and vignettes of four cases. Cases were selected to represent different types of relationships among the domains and how interactions among them either mitigated and/or exacerbated mental health effects of psychosocial work environments. Conclusions Examining domain interactions provides greater explanatory capacity for understanding how people with low mental health manage their lives than restricting the research to the separate impacts of the psychosocial work environment or work-family conflict. The extent to which people can change the conditions under which they engage in paid work and participate in family and social life is significantly affected by the extent to which their employment position affords them latitude. Policies that provide psychosocial protections to workers that enable them to make changes or complaints without detrimental repercussions (such as vilification or job loss) and increase access to welfare benefits and support services could improve mental health among people with paid work. These policies would have particularly important effects for those in lower socioeconomic status positions. PMID:24004446

2013-01-01

489

Reaching out or missing out: approaches to outreach with family carers in social care organisations  

PubMed Central

Outreach is advocated as a way of improving the uptake of services among underserved populations and of filling the gaps between mainstream services and the populations they are intended to support. Despite the policy emphasis on providing better help for family carers, research consistently shows that many of those providing unpaid care to a family member or friend report difficulties in finding out about the assistance to which they are entitled. This article presents results from a concurrent mixed-methods study, which aimed to describe different ways of working with family carers in adult social care departments and to collect the views of a range of stakeholders about the advantages and disadvantages of the approaches that were identified. A total of 86 semi-structured face-to-face interviews were undertaken with a purposive sample of funders, carers' workers, representatives of voluntary organisations and family carers based in four contrasting localities. An email survey was sent to all local councils in England with social care responsibilities and resulted in a 53% response rate. Data collection took place in 2012, with a small number of interviews being completed in 2011. Our approach to data analysis combined methodological, data and theoretical triangulation. The findings presented here mainly draw on the interview data to highlight the different models of outreach that we identified. The article highlights important differences between outreach and the provision of information. It concludes that organisations providing support for carers need to consider the advantages and disadvantages of different models of outreach as they develop carers' support and the extent to which different models might be more effective than others in reaching particular types of carer. PMID:25331912

Moriarty, Jo; Manthorpe, Jill; Cornes, Michelle

2015-01-01

490

Family Psychology and Family Therapy in Japan.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Reviews the development of family psychology and family therapy in Japan, tracing the origins of these movements, explaining how these fields were activated by the problem of school refusal, and describing an approach to family therapy that has been developed to work with families confronting this problem, as well as preventive programs of family

Kameguchi, Kenji; Murphy-Shigematsu, Stephen

2001-01-01

491

Black-White Achievement Gap and Family Wealth. National Poverty Center Working Paper Series #07-02  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper examines the extent to which family wealth affects the race-child achievement association for young children based on data from the Panel Study of Income Dynamics. We found little evidence that wealth mediates the black-white test scores gap. However, liquid assets, particularly holding in stocks and mutual funds, are positively…

Yeung, W. Jean; Conley, Dalton

2006-01-01

492

Using Support Mechanisms to Balance Work and Family Life: How Mid and Senior Level Student Affairs Administrators Overcome Challenges  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Female student affairs leaders who also have family responsibilities find that a primary challenge they encounter is society's expectations concerning their roles and responsibilities in both realms. Research discovers that women experience internal and external barriers that hinder their advancement opportunities however; women's…

Cassell, Aba DeLynda

2012-01-01

493

How Working Poor Maya Migrant Families Acculturate to an Urban Setting--Daily Routines and Adaptation Strategies  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Globally, an increasing number of people migrate from their rural communities to large cities. Despite the pervasive thinking that indigenous communities are solidified in space and strictly conserve cultural traditions, indigenous individuals and families increasingly leave their homelands to set up a new life in an urban environment mostly…

Tovote, Katrin Erika

2012-01-01

494

Men Who Are Abusive to Their Female Intimate Partners: Incorporating Family of Origin Work into Group Treatment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper examines and provides a rationale for incorporating past victimization into group treatment for men who have been abusive to their female intimate partners. It begins with providing a general overview of the issue of family violence in Canada and in the U.S including statistics and an overview of group treatment effectiveness overall.…

Musick-Neily, Erin Francess; McBride, Dawn Lorraine

2012-01-01

495

Low-Skill Workers' Access to Quality Green Jobs. Perspectives on Low-Income Working Families. Brief 13  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This brief discusses strategies for improving access to green jobs among those with low skill levels, particularly jobs that can help improve workers' economic standing and better support their families. In order to understand where green jobs for low-skill individuals can be found, the first section provides an overview of green industries and…

Martinson, Karin; Stanczyk, Alexandra; Eyster; Lauren

2010-01-01

496

The Changing Role of Family Income and Ability in Determining Educational Achievement. NBER Working Paper No. 13527  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper uses data from the 1979 and 1997 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth cohorts (NLSY79 and NLSY97) to estimate changes in the effects of ability and family income on educational attainment for youth in their late teens during the early 1980s and early 2000s. Cognitive ability plays an important role in determining educational outcomes…

Belley, Philippe; Lochner, Lance

2007-01-01

497

Clarifying Parent Involvement and Family-School Partnership Intervention Research: A Preliminary Synthesis. CYFS Working Paper No. 2012-4  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Interactions and experiences within home and school systems, uniquely and together, form the foundation for developmental trajectories throughout students' educational careers. As a lifelong resource, families represent the first essential system and source of support for the learning and development of children and adolescents. When parents are…

Sheridan, Susan M.; Kim, Elizabeth Moorman; Coutts, Michael J.; Sjuts, Tara M.; Holmes, Shannon R.; Ransom, Kelly A.; Garbacz, S. Andrew

2012-01-01

498

Work Family liFeBalancing joB and personal responsiBilities continued on page 2...  

E-print Network

Es Look for warning signs of elder abuse 4 parEntIng Dads don't mother, they father...and that's good 5 Vol. 26, No. 1 Practical solutions for family, workplace and health issues what's insidE EldEr Issu

Ginzel, Matthew

499

Maternal Work Hours and Adolescents' School Outcomes among Low-Income Families in Four Urban Counties. National Poverty Center Working Paper Series #07-01  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We examine how changes in maternal work hours affect adolescent children's school participation and performance outcomes using data from interviews in 1998 and 2001 with 1,700 women who in May 1995 were welfare-reliant, single mothers of adolescents living in disadvantaged neighborhoods in four urban counties. We find unfavorable effects of…

Gennetian, Lisa A.; Lopoo, Leonard M.; London, Andrew S.

2007-01-01

500

What keeps family physicians busy in Portugal? A multicentre observational study of work other than direct patient contacts  

PubMed Central

Objectives To quantify the time spent by family physicians (FP) on tasks other than direct patient contact, to evaluate job satisfaction, to analyse the association between time spent on tasks and physician characteristics, the association between the number of tasks performed and physician characteristics and the association between time spent on tasks and job satisfaction. Design Cross-sectional, using time-and-motion techniques. Two workdays were documented by direct observation. A significance level of 0.05 was adopted. Setting Multicentric in 104 Portuguese family practices. Participants A convenience sample of FP, with lists of over 1000 patients, teaching senior medical students and first-year family medicine residents in 2012, was obtained. Of the 217 FP invited to participate, 155 completed the study. Main outcomes measured Time spent on tasks other than direct patient contact and on the performance of more than one task simultaneously, the number of direct patient contacts in the office, the number of indirect patient contacts, job satisfaction, demographic and professional characteristics associated with time spent on tasks and the number of different tasks performed, and the association between time spent on tasks and job satisfaction. Results FP (n=155) spent a mean of 143.6?min/day (95% CI 135.2 to 152.0) performing tasks such as prescription refills, teaching, meetings, management and communication with other professionals (33.4% of their workload). FP with larger patient lists spent less time on these tasks (p=0.002). Older FP (p=0.021) and those with larger lists (p=0.011) performed fewer tasks. The mean job satisfaction score was 3.5 (out of 5). No association was found between job satisfaction and time spent on tasks. Conclusions FP spent one-third of their workday in coordinating care, teaching and managing. Time devoted to these tasks decreases with increasing list size and physician age. PMID:24934208

Granja, Mónica; Ponte, Carla; Cavadas, Luís Filipe

2014-01-01