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Sample records for upland peat soils

  1. Land management as a factor controlling dissolved organic carbon release from upland peat soils 2: changes in DOC productivity over four decades.

    PubMed

    Clutterbuck, B; Yallop, A R

    2010-11-15

    Increasing DOC concentrations in surface waters have been observed across parts of Europe and North America over the past few decades. Most proposed explanations for these widespread trends invoke climate change or reductions in sulphate deposition. However, these factors do not seem apposite to explain either the fine-scale (within kilometres) or regional-scale spatial variation in DOC concentrations observed across the UK. We have reconstructed DOC concentrations and land use for one North Pennine and five South Pennine catchments (UK), located in three discrete areas, over the last four decades. Rainfall, temperature and sulphate deposition data, where available, were also collated and the potential influence of these factors on surface water DOC concentrations was assessed. Four of the six catchments examined showed highly significant (p<0.001) increases (53-92%) in humic coloured DOC (hDOC) concentrations in drainage waters over the period 1990-2005. Changes in temperature and sulphate deposition may explain 20-30% of this trend in these four catchments. However, the rapid expansion of new moorland burn on blanket peat can explain a far greater degree (>80%) of the change in hDOC. Far smaller increases in hDOC (10-18%) were identified for the two remaining catchments. These two sites experienced similar changes in sulphur deposition and temperature to those that had seen largest increases in DOC, but contained little or no moorland burn management on blanket peat. This study shows that regional-scale factors undoubtedly underlie some of the recent observed increases in drainage humic coloured DOC. However, changes in land management, in this case the extensive use of fire management on blanket peat, are a far more important driver of increased hDOC release from upland catchments in some parts of the UK. It suggests that the recent rapid increase in the use of burning on blanket peat moorland has implications for ecosystem services and carbon budgets. PMID

  2. Decomposition of peat from upland boreal forest: Temperature dependence and sources of respired carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dioumaeva, Irina; Trumbore, Susan; Schuur, Edward A. G.; Goulden, Michael L.; Litvak, Marcy; Hirsch, Adam I.

    2002-02-01

    The response of large stores of carbon in boreal forest soils to global warming is a major uncertainty in predicting the future carbon budget. We measured the temperature dependence of decomposition for upland boreal peat under black spruce forest with sphagnum and feather moss understory using incubation experiments. CO2 efflux rates clearly responded to temperature, which ranged from -10° to +8°C by ˜2°C increments. At temperatures below 0°C, significant decomposition was observed in feather moss peat but not in wetter sphagnum peat. Above 0°C, decomposition was exponentially related to temperature, corresponding to a Q(10) (the ratio of the rate of CO2 evolution at one temperature divided by that at a temperature 10°C cooler) of 4.4 for feather moss and 3.1 for sphagnum peat. The greatest change in CO2 evolution rate with temperature occurred between -2° and 0°C, which coincided with the phase transition of soil water. We saw no large change in the rate of CO2 evolution between incubation experiments separated by a 6 month storage period for feather moss peat. Stable C isotope measurements of evolved CO2 and the rate of change of CO2 evolution with time suggest different substrates are used to sustain heterotrophic respiration above and below freezing. Radiocarbon signatures of CO2 respired from both types of peat reflected significant contributions from C fixed in the last 35 years ("bomb" 14C) as well as C fixed prior to 1950. We observed no change in the Δ14C of respired CO2 with temperature. Isotopic signatures of peat components showed that a combination of substrates must contribute to the CO2 evolved in our incubations. Decomposition of fine roots (which made up less than 7% of the total peat C) accounted for ˜50% of respired CO2 in feather moss peat and for ˜30% of respired CO2 in sphagnum peat. Fine-grained (<1 mm), more humified material that makes up 60-70% of the bulk peat organic carbon contributed significantly to heterotrophic

  3. Decomposition of peat from upland boreal forest: Temperature dependence and sources of respired carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dioumaeva, Irina; Trumbore, Susan; Schuur, Edward A. G.; Goulden, Michael L.; Litvak, Marcy; Hirsch, Adam I.

    2003-02-01

    The response of large stores of carbon in boreal forest soils to global warming is a major uncertainty in predicting the future carbon budget. We measured the temperature dependence of decomposition for upland boreal peat under black spruce forest with sphagnum and feather moss understory using incubation experiments. CO2 efflux rates clearly responded to temperature, which ranged from -10° to +8°C by ~2°C increments. At temperatures below 0°C, significant decomposition was observed in feather moss peat but not in wetter sphagnum peat. Above 0°C, decomposition was exponentially related to temperature, corresponding to a Q(10) (the ratio of the rate of CO2 evolution at one temperature divided by that at a temperature 10°C cooler) of 4.4 for feather moss and 3.1 for sphagnum peat. The greatest change in CO2 evolution rate with temperature occurred between -2° and 0°C, which coincided with the phase transition of soil water. We saw no large change in the rate of CO2 evolution between incubation experiments separated by a 6 month storage period for feather moss peat. Stable C isotope measurements of evolved CO2 and the rate of change of CO2 evolution with time suggest different substrates are used to sustain heterotrophic respiration above and below freezing. Radiocarbon signatures of CO2 respired from both types of peat reflected significant contributions from C fixed in the last 35 years (``bomb'' 14C) as well as C fixed prior to 1950. We observed no change in the Δ14C of respired CO2 with temperature. Isotopic signatures of peat components showed that a combination of substrates must contribute to the CO2 evolved in our incubations. Decomposition of fine roots (which made up less than 7% of the total peat C) accounted for ~50% of respired CO2 in feather moss peat and for ~30% of respired CO2 in sphagnum peat. Fine-grained (<1 mm), more humified material that makes up 60-70% of the bulk peat organic carbon contributed significantly to heterotrophic

  4. Peat

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Apodaca, Lori E.

    2013-01-01

    The article looks at the U.S. peat market as of July 2013. Peat is produced from deposits of plant organic materials in wetlands and includes varieties such as reed-sedge, sphagnum moss, and humus. Use for peat include horticultural soil additives, filtration, and adsorbents. Other topics include effects of environmental protection regulations on peat extraction, competition from products such as coir, composted organic waste, and wood products, and peatland carbon sinks.

  5. Peat soil organic matter composition depth profiles - is the diplotelmic model real?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boothroyd, Ian; Clay, Gareth; Moody, Catherine; Archer, Elaine; Dixon, Simon; Worrall, Fred

    2016-04-01

    Measures of bulk density and organic matter composition provide important insights into peat formation, degradation and hydrology as well as carbon and nutrient cycles, and indeed underpin the diplotelmic model of peat formation. This study presents soil core data from 23 upland and lowland peat sites across the United Kingdom. A series of soil cores up to ~3m depth were analysed for bulk density, gross heat value (energy content) and carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen and oxygen composition. Atomic ratios of C/N, H/C and O/C were used as indicators of the origin and quality of soil organic matter. Results show no consistent soil depth profiles evident across multiple sites, this challenges whether historical interpretations of peat soil formation and structure are appropriate.

  6. Impacts of peat restoration on peak flow characteristics of upland headwater catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allott, Tim; Evans, Martin; Agnew, Clive; Milledge, Dave; Pilkington, Mike; Maskill, Rachael

    2014-05-01

    As part of the current focus on ecosystem services provided by peatlands, there is renewed interest in the hydrology of upland blanket peats and more specifically in the hydrological changes associated with peat erosion and restoration. Peat restoration has often been cited as having potential benefits for downstream flood risk through the reduction of peak flows and increases in storm hydrograph lag times. However, evidence of the impacts of peatland restoration practices on storm hydrology and downstream discharge peaks has been limited by lack of measurement of flow response following restoration programmes. This paper reports a hydrological monitoring programme associated with the restoration of a blanket peatland in the Peak District, UK through the practices of erosion gully blocking and the re-vegetation of bare peat. The main component of the project is a before-after-control-impact (BACI) study on three hectare-scale eroded, bare peat catchments, two of which have been restored and one of which is acting as an unmodified control. Monitoring commenced in early summer 2010, and restoration of the experimental sites by reseeding and gully blocking took place between July 2011 and March 2012. To complement the main study, a broader spatial comparison of the hydrological behaviour of catchments with different degradation and restoration conditions has been made, including (i) an intact reference peatland, (ii) the eroded/bare peat sites, and (iii) a 'late stage' restored area of peatland which was re-vegetated in 2003. Results reveal significant differences between the storm hydrograph characteristics of intact, eroded and restored catchments consistent with the hypotheses that (a) peat erosion significantly decreases storm flow lag times and increases storm flow peaks in these peatland systems and (b) peat restoration reverses these effects. Associated overland flow data suggest that gully blocking and re-vegetation within gully systems are crucial controls on

  7. Spatial variation in concentrations of dissolved nitrogen species in an upland blanket peat catchment.

    PubMed

    Cundill, A P; Chapman, P J; Adamson, J K

    2007-02-01

    The concentration of nitrogen (N), particularly as nitrate (NO3-N), in upland streams, lakes and rivers is frequently used as a diagnostic of the vulnerability of upland ecosystems to increased atmospheric nitrogen deposition and N saturation. The N content of running waters, however, is generally assessed on the basis of sampling at a limited number of points in space and time within the catchment under investigation. The current study was conducted at Trout Beck, an 11.5 km2 blanket peat-dominated catchment in the North Pennine uplands of the UK. Results from sampling at 33 sites within this catchment demonstrated that the concentrations of all dissolved N species were highly variable, even over short distances. Statistical relationships between the concentrations of NO3-N and dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) and percentage catchment cover of Calluna/Eriophorum and Eriophorum vegetation were found. However, it was also noted that in catchments containing limestone outcrops, NO3-N concentration was much higher than in catchments where runoff was sourced directly from the blanket peat surface. It is possible that NH4-N and DON leached from the blanket peat are mineralised and nitrified, providing a source for the NO3-N found in the river channels. Overall, the current study suggests that interpretations of N-saturation based on river water chemistry measurements at a single point must be treated cautiously, and that the influence of catchment-scale physical factors, such as vegetation and geology cover on the concentration of dissolved N species in upland river waters should not be ignored. PMID:17182088

  8. The erodibility of upland soils and the design of preafforestation drainage networks in the United Kingdom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carling, Paul A.; Glaister, Mark S.; Flintham, Tim P.

    1997-12-01

    Hydraulic thresholds for erosion of fourteen upland mineral and organic soils were determined in a hydraulic flume. These soils are from areas to be afforested in the United Kingdom. Some of the group are erosion resistant but others are susceptible to erosion once denuded of vegetation; for example, by preafforestation ploughing. These threshold data were required to calibrate a hydraulic model for effective design of preafforestation drainage networks on a variety of soils. However, simple field measures of soil properties indicative of erosion potential would be of value to the forestry industry for management purposes. Consequently, hydraulic threshold data were related by linear regression methods to basic soil properties, including organic content, grain size, bulk density, compression strength and penetration resistance.The investigation concluded that four peat soils are not eroded by clear water velocities up to 5·7 m s-1, although a mineral bedload might induce erosion at lesser current speeds. Penetration resistance is a good field indicator of the degree of humification of the peat soils. Although selected physical parameters contribute resistance to water erosion, an increased organic content is pre-eminent in reducing erosion susceptibility in both organic and mineral soils. Although compressive strength was not indicative of soil erodibility, field measurements of penetration resistance on a variety of soils could be related to hydraulic thresholds of erosion; albeit through the construction of discriminant functions interpolated by eye. Consequently, organic content (laboratory) or penetration resistance (field) might form the basis of classifying upland soils in terms of erodibility.Mineral soils differ widely in terms of their erodibility, so that subject to further consideration, the use of ploughing for forestry cultivation might be appropriate in wider circumstances than presently recommended by the Forests and Water Guidelines. Ploughing

  9. Effects of Redox on Aggregate Stability of Upland Soils.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Upland soils in the US Midwest often undergo reducing conditions when soils are temporally flooded during the spring. The redox effect on the aggregate/structural stability of upland soils is not well understood. We hypothesized that aggregate stability would decrease under reducing conditions. Thre...

  10. A Digital Soil Mapping approach using neural networks for peat depth mapping in Scotland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aitkenhead, Matt; Saunders, Matt; Yeluripati, Jagadeesh

    2014-05-01

    Spatially explicit and accurate peat depth estimates are required for carbon stock assessment, carbon management stategies , hydrological modelling, ecosystem service assessment and land management (e.g. wind farms). In Scotland, a number of surveys have taken place over the years that have produced data on peat depth, and while many of these surveys have focussed on specific locations or peat bogs, a substantial proportion of the data produced is relatively old and has not been digitised, thus limiting its visibility and utility in new research activities, policy development and land management decision making. Here we describe ongoing work where the key objective is to integrate multiple peat survey datasets with existing spatial datasets of climate, vegetation, topography and geology. The dataset produced is generated from a small number of isolated surveys and while it is not representative of all of Scotland's soils, it is sufficient to demonstrate the conceptual basis for model development. It has been used to develop a neural network model of peat depth that has been applied across Scotland's peat bogs at 100m resolution. The resulting map gives an early indication of the variation of peat depth across the country, and allows us to produce an estimate of mean peat bog depth across the country. This estimate will improve with additional data and will contribute to improving our ability to undertake activities that depend on this kind of information. We have identified data gaps that need to be addressed in order to improve this model, in particular peat depth survey data from a wider range of peat types across the country and in particular, blanket bog and upland peat areas. Ongoing work to identify and integrate additional peat bog depth data is described. We also identify potential uses for the existing maps of peat depth, and areas of future model development.

  11. Characterizing Pb mobilization from upland soils to streams using (206)Pb/(207)Pb isotopic ratios.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Julian J C; Tetzlaff, Doerthe; Carey, Anne-Marie; Raab, Andrea; Soulsby, Chris; Killham, Kenneth; Meharg, Andrew A

    2010-01-01

    Anthropogenically deposited lead (Pb) binds efficiently to soil organic matter, which can be mobilized through hydrologically mediated mechanisms, with implications for ecological and potable quality of receiving waters. Lead isotopic ((206)Pb/(207)Pb) ratios change down peat profiles as a consequence of long-term temporal variation in depositional sources, each with distinctive isotopic signatures. This study characterizes differential Pb transport mechanisms from deposition to streams at two small catchments with contrasting soil types in upland Wales, U.K., by determining Pb concentrations and (206)Pb/(207)Pb ratios from soil core profiles, interstitial pore waters, and stream water. Hydrological characteristics of soils are instrumental in determining the location in soil profiles of exported Pb and hence concentration and (206)Pb/(207)Pb ratios in surface waters. The highest Pb concentrations from near-surface soils are mobilized, concomitant with high dissolved organic carbon (DOC) exports, from hydrologically responsive peat soils with preferential shallow subsurface flows, leading to increased Pb concentrations in stream water and isotopic signatures more closely resembling recently deposited Pb. In more minerogenic soils, percolation of water allows Pb, bound to DOC, to be retained in mineral horizons and combined with other groundwater sources, resulting in Pb being transported from throughout the profile with a more geogenic isotopic signature. This study shows that (206)Pb/(207)Pb ratios can enhance our understanding of the provenances and transport mechanisms of Pb and potentially organic matter within upland soils. PMID:19954181

  12. Regulation of nitrification in upland forest soils

    SciTech Connect

    Donaldson, J.M.

    1987-01-01

    Forest soils often have low nitrate levels and are slow to produce NO/sub 3//sup -/-N when incubated in the laboratory or after site disturbance. Several hypotheses have been proposed to explain the patterns of nitrification that have been observed in forests ecosystems. These hypotheses suggest that nitrification is limited by low soil pH, NH/sub 4//sup +/-N availability, the presence of allelopathic inhibitors or low levels of other nutrients, such as phosphorus. In this study, experiments were designed to determine if nitrate production in forest soils is regulated by soil pH, NH/sub 4//sup +/ of allelopathic compounds. Three sites representing secondary succession in upland oak-hickory forests were sampled five times during a one-year period. Sampling dates coincided with important stages in the phenological development of the site vegetation. Soils were incubated for up to six weeks in the laboratory. This allowed accurate definition of the potential for nitrogen mineralization and nitrification. Results of laboratory incubation and field-treatment experiments indicate that HN/sub 4//sup +/-N availability is the main factor regulating NH/sub 4//sup +/-oxidizer populations and nitrification in the forest soils investigated. Ammonium is the substrate of nitrification.

  13. Metatranscriptomic Analysis of Arctic Peat Soil Microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Tveit, Alexander T.

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in meta-omics and particularly metatranscriptomic approaches have enabled detailed studies of the structure and function of microbial communities in many ecosystems. Molecular analyses of peat soils, ecosystems important to the global carbon balance, are still challenging due to the presence of coextracted substances that inhibit enzymes used in downstream applications. We sampled layers at different depths from two high-Arctic peat soils in Svalbard for metatranscriptome preparation. Here we show that enzyme inhibition in the preparation of metatranscriptomic libraries can be circumvented by linear amplification of diluted template RNA. A comparative analysis of mRNA-enriched and nonenriched metatranscriptomes showed that mRNA enrichment resulted in a 2-fold increase in the relative abundance of mRNA but biased the relative distribution of mRNA. The relative abundance of transcripts for cellulose degradation decreased with depth, while the transcripts for hemicellulose debranching increased, indicating that the polysaccharide composition of the peat was different in the deeper and older layers. Taxonomic annotation revealed that Actinobacteria and Bacteroidetes were the dominating polysaccharide decomposers. The relative abundances of 16S rRNA and mRNA transcripts of methanogenic Archaea increased substantially with depth. Acetoclastic methanogenesis was the dominating pathway, followed by methanogenesis from formate. The relative abundances of 16S rRNA and mRNA assigned to the methanotrophic Methylococcaceae, primarily Methylobacter, increased with depth. In conclusion, linear amplification of total RNA and deep sequencing constituted the preferred method for metatranscriptomic preparation to enable high-resolution functional and taxonomic analyses of the active microbiota in Arctic peat soil. PMID:25015892

  14. Metatranscriptomic analysis of arctic peat soil microbiota.

    PubMed

    Tveit, Alexander T; Urich, Tim; Svenning, Mette M

    2014-09-01

    Recent advances in meta-omics and particularly metatranscriptomic approaches have enabled detailed studies of the structure and function of microbial communities in many ecosystems. Molecular analyses of peat soils, ecosystems important to the global carbon balance, are still challenging due to the presence of coextracted substances that inhibit enzymes used in downstream applications. We sampled layers at different depths from two high-Arctic peat soils in Svalbard for metatranscriptome preparation. Here we show that enzyme inhibition in the preparation of metatranscriptomic libraries can be circumvented by linear amplification of diluted template RNA. A comparative analysis of mRNA-enriched and nonenriched metatranscriptomes showed that mRNA enrichment resulted in a 2-fold increase in the relative abundance of mRNA but biased the relative distribution of mRNA. The relative abundance of transcripts for cellulose degradation decreased with depth, while the transcripts for hemicellulose debranching increased, indicating that the polysaccharide composition of the peat was different in the deeper and older layers. Taxonomic annotation revealed that Actinobacteria and Bacteroidetes were the dominating polysaccharide decomposers. The relative abundances of 16S rRNA and mRNA transcripts of methanogenic Archaea increased substantially with depth. Acetoclastic methanogenesis was the dominating pathway, followed by methanogenesis from formate. The relative abundances of 16S rRNA and mRNA assigned to the methanotrophic Methylococcaceae, primarily Methylobacter, increased with depth. In conclusion, linear amplification of total RNA and deep sequencing constituted the preferred method for metatranscriptomic preparation to enable high-resolution functional and taxonomic analyses of the active microbiota in Arctic peat soil. PMID:25015892

  15. Laboratory evaporation experiments in undisturbed peat columns for determining peat soil hydraulic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dettmann, Ullrich; Frahm, Enrico; Bechtold, Michel

    2013-04-01

    One of the key parameters controlling greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from organic soils is water table depth. Thus, a detailed analysis of the hydrology is essential for an accurate spatial upscaling of the information of local GHG emission measurements to the regional and national scale. For the interpretation and numerical modeling of water table fluctuations, knowledge about soil hydraulic parameters is crucial. In contrast to mineral soils, the hydraulic properties of organic soils differ in several aspects. Due to the high amount of organic components, strong heterogeneity, and shrinkage and swelling of peat, accompanied by changing soil volume and bulk density, it is difficult to describe peat soil moisture dynamics with standard hydraulic functions developed for mineral soils. The objective of this study was to determine soil hydraulic properties for various undisturbed peat columns (diameter: 30 cm, height: 20 cm). Laboratory evaporation experiments were conducted for peat soils from five different test sites of the German joint research project "Organic Soils". Due to different land use histories, the peat samples covered a broad range of degradation states, which is known to strongly influence peat soil hydraulic properties. Pressure head, moisture content, weight loss and water level were monitored during the evaporation experiment. In numerical simulations using HYDRUS-1D the experimental data were used for an inverse-estimation of the soil hydraulic parameters using "shuffled complex evolution" and "covariance matrix adaption" optimization schemes. Besides the commonly applied van Genuchten-Mualem parameterization, several alternative soil parameterizations are evaluated.

  16. Climate mitigation scenarios of drained peat soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasimir Klemedtsson, Åsa; Coria, Jessica; He, Hongxing; Liu, Xiangping; Nordén, Anna

    2014-05-01

    The national inventory reports (NIR) submitted to the UNFCCC show Sweden - which as many other countries has wetlands where parts have been drained for agriculture and forestry purposes, - to annually emit 12 million tonnes carbon dioxide equivalents, which is more GHG'es than industrial energy use release in Sweden. Similar conditions can be found in other northern countries, having cool and wet conditions, naturally promoting peat accumulation, and where land use management over the last centuries have promoted draining activities. These drained peatland, though covering only 2% of the land area, have emissions corresponding to 20% of the total reported NIR emissions. This substantial emission contribution, however, is hidden within the Land Use Land Use Change and Forestry sector (LULUCF) where the forest Carbon uptake is even larger, which causes the peat soil emissions become invisible. The only drained soil emission accounted in the Swedish Kyoto reporting is the N2O emission from agricultural drained organic soils of the size 0.5 million tonnes CO2e yr-1. This lack of visibility has made incentives for land use change and management neither implemented nor suggested, however with large potential. Rewetting has the potential to decrease soil mineralization, why CO2 and N2O emissions are mitigated. However if the soil becomes very wet CH4 emission will increase together with hampered plant growth. By ecological modeling, using the CoupModel the climate change mitigation potential have been estimated for four different land use scenarios; 1, Drained peat soil with Spruce (business as usual scenario), 2, raised ground water level to 20 cm depth and Willow plantation, 3, raised ground water level to 10 cm depth and Reed Canary Grass, and 4, rewetting to an average water level in the soil surface with recolonizing wetland plants and mosses. We calculate the volume of biomass production per year, peat decomposition, N2O emission together with nitrate and DOC

  17. Aerobic and microaerophilic actinomycetes of typical agropeat and peat soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zenova, G. M.; Gryadunova, A. A.; Pozdnyakov, A. I.; Zvyagintsev, D. G.

    2008-02-01

    A high number (from tens of thousands to millions of CFU/g of soil) of actinomycetes and a high diversity of genera were found in typical peat and agropeat soils. Agricultural use increases the number and diversity of the actinomycete complexes of the peat soils. In the peat soils, the actinomycete complex is represented by eight genera: Streptomyces, Micromonospora, Streptosporangium, Actinomadura, Microbispora, Saccharopolyspora, Saccharomonospora, and Microtetraspora. A considerable share of sporangial forms in the actinomycete complex of the peat soils not characteristic of the zonal soils was revealed. The number of actinomycetes that develop under aerobic conditions is smaller by 10-100 times than that of aerobic forms in the peat soils. Among the soil actinomycetes of the genera Streptomyces, Micromonospora, Streptosporangium, Actinomadura, Microbispora, and Microtetraspora, the microaerophilic forms were found; among the Saccharopolyspora and Saccharomonospora, no microaerophilic representatives were revealed.

  18. Comparative characteristic of the sphagnum moss and peat of upland bogs in Siberia, Russia and central part of Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mezhibor, Antonina; Podkozlin, Ivan

    2013-04-01

    This research represents the results of the ICP-MS study for the moss and peat samples from two upland bogs of Germany and one bog from Siberia, Russia (Tomsk region). Moss and upland peat are widely used for ecological studies. These substances enable to detect atmospheric pollution because of the peculiar structure of sphagnum moss. According to the obtained results, we can resume that moss and peat in Tomsk region are more enriched in such chemical elements as Cr, Fe, As, Sr, Y, Zr, Ba, La, Ce, Nd, Sm, Eu, Tb, Yb, Lu, Hf, Hg, Th, and U. The samples from Germany are more enriched in Mn, Cu, Zn, and Se. The geochemical composition of the bogs reflects the specificity of industries that pollute the atmosphere with definite chemical elements. Thus, REE, Th and U in the moss and peat of Tomsk region can originate from nuclear facility near the Tomsk city. Coal combustion in power stations can be the source of Cr, As, Sr and REE as well. Mn, Cu, Zn, and Se possibly can originate from metallurgical facilities in Germany.

  19. DOC export from an upland peat catchment in the Flow Country, northern Scotland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinjili, Shailaja; Robinson Robinson, Ruth; Arn Teh, Yit; Waldron, Susan; Singer, Michael

    2010-05-01

    Flow Country blanket bogs in northern Scotland are the most expansive in Europe covering an area of ~4000 km2, and they significantly impact the global carbon cycle because of their high rates of carbon production and storage, as well as their role in the transfer of carbon to oceans through rivers or greenhouse gas exchange (Moore et al., 1998). These upland areas are highly susceptible to climatic and landuse changes, and currently, large areas of previously drained and forested peatlands are being felled and blocked to increase the water table level and rejuvenate the peatlands (LIFE Peatlands Project 2001-2006; Holden et al., 2004). This study is examining the event-based export of dissolved and particulate organic carbon (DOC and POC) from one of the main upland Flow Country catchments that drains into the north-draining Halladale River. For a time-series of summer rainfall events, we have focussed particularly on a comparison of DOC/POC exports from three different land use areas in the catchment: forested plots, felled to waste (restoration) plots (felled between 2005-2007), and near-pristine bog sites. DOC concentrations have been measured using a combination of methods including TOC and EA analyses, and in situ absorbance measurements using a spectrophotometer (Thurman, 1985; Worrall et al., 2002). Our results show that the stream water draining the felled to waste site records the highest levels of DOC concentration (and DOC variability), and the near-pristine site has the lowest export rate of DOC (and lowest variability). All sites exhibit positive DOC responses to the flood hydrograph, and the near-pristine and forested sites have a similar maximum concentrations of DOC. The felled site concentrations are about 2times greater than the near-pristine and forested sites, and the non-linear response to flow reflects the hydrophobic nature of peats after a period of drought, and the lag time required for them to saturate. The integrated downstream DOC

  20. Greenhouse Gas Fluxes from Forested Wetland and Upland Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savage, K. E.; Davidson, E. A.

    2015-12-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4), and nitrous oxide (N2O) are the most important greenhouse gases. Soils are the dominant natural source of N2O, and have been shown to be a small sink under N-limited conditions. Wetlands are a significant natural source of CH4, and dry upland soils a natural CH4 sink. Soils release CO2 produced by both autotrophic (root) and heterotrophic (microbial) respiration processes. Variation in soil moisture can be very dynamic, and it is one of the dominant factors controlling soil aeration, and hence the balance between aerobic (predominantly CO2 producing) and anaerobic (both CO2 and CH4 producing) respiration. The production and consumption of N2O is also highly dependent on spatial and temporal variation in soil moisture. Howland forest, ME is a mosaic of well drained upland, wetland and small transitional upland/wetland soils which makes for a unique and challenging environment to measure the effects of soil moisture on the net exchange of these important greenhouse gases. To quantify the flux of CO2, CH4 and N2O from the Howland forest soils, we utilized a previously developed automated chamber system for measuring CO2 efflux (Licor 6252 IRGA) from soils, and configured it to run in-line with a new model quantum cascade laser (QCL) system which measures N2O and CH4 (Aerodyne model QC-TILDAS-CS). This system allowed for simultaneous, high frequency, continuous measurement of all three greenhouse gases. Fourteen sampling chambers were deployed in an upland soil (8), nearby wetland (3) and a transitional upland/wetland (3). Each chamber was measured every 90 minutes. Upland soils were consistent sources of CO2 and sinks for CH4, however the N2O fluxes were transient between sources and sinks. The wetland soils were consistent sources of high CH4 emissions, low CO2 emissions and a consistently small N2O sink. The transitional upland/wetland soil was a consistent source of CO2 but was much more transient between CH4 and N2O sources and

  1. Organic matter loss from cultivated peat soils in Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berglund, Örjan; Berglund, Kerstin

    2015-04-01

    The degradation of drained peat soils in agricultural use is an underestimated source of loss of organic matter. Oxidation (biological degradation) of agricultural peat soils causes a loss of organic matter (OM) of 11 - 22 t ha-1 y-1 causing a CO2 emission of 20 - 40 t ha-1 y-1. Together with the associated N2O emissions from mineralized N this totals in the EU to about 98.5 Mton CO2 eq per year. Peat soils are very prone to climate change and it is expected that at the end of this century these values are doubled. The degradation products pollute surface waters. Wind erosion of peat soils in arable agriculture can cause losses of 3 - 30 t ha-1 y-1 peat also causing air pollution (fine organic particles). Subsidence rates are 1 - 2 cm per year which leads to deteriorating drainage effect and make peat soils below sea or inland water levels prone to flooding. Flooding agricultural peat soils is in many cases not possible without high costs, high GHG emissions and severe water pollution. Moreover sometimes cultural and historic landscapes are lost and meadow birds areas are lost. In areas where the possibility to regulate the water table is limited the mitigation options are either to increase biomass production that can be used as bioenergy to substitute some fossil fuel, try to slow down the break-down of the peat by different amendments that inhibit microbial activity, or permanent flooding. The negative effects of wind erosion can be mitigated by reducing wind speed or different ways to protect the soil by crops or fiber sheets. In a newly started project in Sweden a typical peat soil with and without amendment of foundry sand is cropped with reed canary grass, tall fescue and timothy to investigate the yield and greenhouse gas emissions from the different crops and how the sand effect the trafficability and GHG emissions.

  2. The Influence of Dam Removal on Upland Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lafrenz, M. D.; Bean, R. A.; Uthman, D.

    2011-12-01

    Driven largely by anadromous fish passage issues, several dams have been removed in the Pacific Northwest and several more are slated to be removed there and in other regions of North America. While much effort has gone into modeling and monitoring the geomorphic and ecologic response of stream channels to dam removal, little research has investigated changes in upland soils following inundation resulting from dam construction, and none had evaluated how these upland soils would respond to dewatering following dam removal. The removal of a relatively large dam - Marmot Dam on the Sandy River in Northwest Oregon, presented an opportunity to evaluate the effect of dewatering on what were formerly upland rather than floodplain soils. We compared the dewatered soils to downstream upland soils that had not been inundated and modified a "ripening" index, which had been developed to characterize dewatered estuary soils in Dutch polders, in order to evaluate the physical and chemical changes taking place in these soils. Two years following dam removal, the previously inundated soils have higher organic matter percentage, cation exchange capacity, and nitrogen levels than downstream soils that were not inundated; yet, this new riparian area is largely devoid of vegetation while the downstream soils maintain a thick (10 cm) O horizon. The carbon to nitrogen ratios (C:N) of upstream surface horizons are low (13:1) and increase markedly with soil depth (54:1); the C:N ratios of downstream soils are typical of other forested soils in this region (28:1 at the surface and 26:1 at depth). Prior to dam removal, it is likely that all upstream, inundated soils had high C:N ratios due to the persistent anaerobic conditions under the reservoir. Following dam removal, soil microbes needing to supplement their nitrogen consumption with soluble nitrogen likely out-competed higher plants for plant available nitrogen. The C:N ratio should have dropped to an equilibrium; this was not

  3. Investigating the impact of land cover change on peak river flow in UK upland peat catchments, based on modelled scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Jihui; Holden, Joseph; Kirkby, Mike

    2014-05-01

    Changes to land cover can influence the velocity of overland flow. In headwater peatlands, saturation means that overland flow is a dominant source of runoff, particularly during heavy rainfall events. Human modifications in headwater peatlands may include removal of vegetation (e.g. by erosion processes, fire, pollution, overgrazing) or pro-active revegetation of peat with sedges such as Eriophorum or mosses such as Sphagnum. How these modifications affect the river flow, and in particular the flood peak, in headwater peatlands is a key problem for land management. In particular, the impact of the spatial distribution of land cover change (e.g. different locations and sizes of land cover change area) on river flow is not clear. In this presentation a new fully distributed version of TOPMODEL, which represents the effects of distributed land cover change on river discharge, was employed to investigate land cover change impacts in three UK upland peat catchments (Trout Beck in the North Pennines, the Wye in mid-Wales and the East Dart in southwest England). Land cover scenarios with three typical land covers (i.e. Eriophorum, Sphagnum and bare peat) having different surface roughness in upland peatlands were designed for these catchments to investigate land cover impacts on river flow through simulation runs of the distributed model. As a result of hypothesis testing three land cover principles emerged from the work as follows: Principle (1): Well vegetated buffer strips are important for reducing flow peaks. A wider bare peat strip nearer to the river channel gives a higher flow peak and reduces the delay to peak; conversely, a wider buffer strip with higher density vegetation (e.g. Sphagnum) leads to a lower peak and postpones the peak. In both cases, a narrower buffer strip surrounding upstream and downstream channels has a greater effect than a thicker buffer strip just based around the downstream river network. Principle (2): When the area of change is equal

  4. Peat

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jasinski, S.M.

    2006-01-01

    In 2005, peat was harvested in 15 US states. Florida, Michigan and Minnesota accounted for more than 80% of the US production. Reed-sedge was the dominant variety of peat harvested in the United States. More than 56% of all peat used in the US was imported from Canada. With the growing interest in gardening, landscaping related to home construction and golf courses, peat usage is expected to remain near current levels during the next several years.

  5. The molecular properties of humic substances isolated from a UK upland peat system: a temporal investigation.

    PubMed

    Scott, M J; Jones, M N; Woof, C; Simon, B; Tipping, E

    2001-12-01

    The study concerns the possible changes in the molecular characteristics of humic materials isolated from the same source as a function of time. A great deal of data has been reported concerning the contrast in molecular characteristics of humic substances isolated from different environments. This has primarily been an attempt to identify source-specific molecular characteristics. However, data presented in this paper suggests that humic substances isolated from a single catchment have significant changes in molecular characteristics over time. Two naturally occurring peat pools (X and Y) situated upon a small organic catchment on Great Dun Fell, Cumbria, UK were sampled monthly between November 1994 and November 1996. Dissolved organic matter (DOM) from the pool water samples was fractionated using macroporous nonionic resins (XAD8 and 4), and the humic, fulvic and hydrophilic acids were collected. These fractions were analysed for elemental composition (C, H and N), weight average molecular weight, functional group content and adsorption (340 nm) of a 1 g l(-1) solution measured in a 1-cm spectrophotometer cell. The molecular characteristics were compared to those of natural DOM described by Scott et al. (1998). Scott et al. reported that drought conditions and seasonal climatic changes could have appreciable effects upon molecular characteristics of natural DOM. Results showed that the atomic H/C ratio of the humic substances increased immediately after strong drought conditions experienced in the summer of 1995. This change was temporary with atomic H/C ratio decreasing gradually over the following months. A similar decrease was observed in the carboxyl group content of the isolated compounds. The data set suggested that atomic H/C ratio in the fulvic and hydrophilic fractions exhibited seasonal characteristics of higher ratios during the late summer/early autumn months. This was not observed in the humic fraction. Humic acids exhibited a seasonal pattern of

  6. Laboratory evaporation experiments in undisturbed peat columns for determining peat soil hydraulic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dettmann, U.; Frahm, E.; Bechtold, M.

    2013-12-01

    Knowledge about hydraulic properties of organic soils is crucial for the interpretation of the hydrological situation in peatlands. This in turn is the basis for designing optimal rewetting strategies, for assessing the current and future climatic water balance and for quantifying greenhouse gas emissions of CO2, CH4 and N2O, which are strongly controlled by the depth of the peat water table. In contrast to mineral soils, the hydraulic properties of organic soils differ in several aspects. Due to the high amount of organic components, strong heterogeneity, and shrinkage and swelling of peat, accompanied by changing soil volume and bulk density, the applicability of standard hydraulic functions developed for mineral soils for describing peat soil moisture dynamics is often questioned. Hence, the objective of this study was to investigate the applicability of the commonly applied van Genuchten-Mualem (VGM) parameterization and to evaluate model errors for various peat types. Laboratory column experiments with undisturbed peat soils (diameter: 30 cm, height: 20 cm) from 5 different peatlands in Germany were conducted. In numerical simulations using HYDRUS-1D the experimental data were used for an inverse estimation of the soil hydraulic parameters. Using the VGM parameterization, the model errors between observed and measured pressure heads were quantified with a root mean square error (RMSE) of 20 - 65 cm. The RMSE increased for soils with higher organic carbon content and higher porosity. Optimizing the VGM 'tortuosity' parameter (τ) instead of fixing it to its default of 0.5 strongly reduced the RMSE, especially for the soils that showed high pressure head gradients during the experiment. Due to the fact, that very negative pressure heads in peatlands occur rarely, we reduced the range of pressured heads in the inversion to a 'field-relevant' range from 0 to -200 cm which strongly reduced the RMSE to 6 - 12 cm and makes the VGM parameterization applicable for all

  7. High potential for iron reduction in upland soils.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wendy H; Liptzin, Daniel

    2015-07-01

    Changes in the redox state of iron (Fe) can be coupled to the biogeochemical cycling of carbon (C), nitrogen, and phosphorus, and thus regulate soil C, ecosystem nutrient availability, and greenhouse gas production. However, its importance broadly in non-flooded upland terrestrial ecosystems is unknown. We measured Fe reduction in soil samples from an annual grassland, a drained peatland, and a humid tropical forest We incubated soil slurries in an anoxic glovebox for 5.5 days and added sodium acetate daily at rates up to 0.4 mg C x (g soil)(-1) x d(-1). Soil moisture, poorly crystalline Fe oxide concentrations, and Fe(II) concentrations differed among study sites in the following order: annual grassland < drained peatland < tropical forest (P < 0.001 for all characteristics). All of the soil samples demonstrated high Fe reduction potential with maximum rates over the course of the incubation averaging 1706 ± 66, 2016 ± 12, and 2973 ± 115 μg Fe x (g soil)(-1) x d(-1) (mean ± SE) for the tropical forest, annual grassland, and drained peatland, respectively. Our results suggest that upland soils from diverse ecosystems have the potential to exhibit high short-term rates of Fe reduction that may play an important role in driving soil biogeochemical processes during periods of anaerobiosis. PMID:26378323

  8. Diversity and Activity of Methanotrophic Bacteria in Different Upland Soils

    PubMed Central

    Knief, Claudia; Lipski, André; Dunfield, Peter F.

    2003-01-01

    Samples from diverse upland soils that oxidize atmospheric methane were characterized with regard to methane oxidation activity and the community composition of methanotrophic bacteria (MB). MB were identified on the basis of the detection and comparative sequence analysis of the pmoA gene, which encodes a subunit of particulate methane monooxygenase. MB commonly detected in soils were closely related to Methylocaldum spp., Methylosinus spp., Methylocystis spp., or the “forest sequence cluster” (USC α), which has previously been detected in upland soils and is related to pmoA sequences of type II MB (Alphaproteobacteria). As well, a novel group of sequences distantly related (<75% derived amino acid identity) to those of known type I MB (Gammaproteobacteria) was often detected. This novel “upland soil cluster γ” (USC γ) was significantly more likely to be detected in soils with pH values of greater than 6.0 than in more acidic soils. To identify active MB, four selected soils were incubated with 13CH4 at low mixing ratios (<50 ppm of volume), and extracted methylated phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) were analyzed by gas chromatography-online combustion isotope ratio mass spectrometry. Incorporation of 13C into PLFAs characteristic for methanotrophic Gammaproteobacteria was observed in all soils in which USC γ sequences were detected, suggesting that the bacteria possessing these sequences were active methanotrophs. A pattern of labeled PLFAs typical for methanotrophic Alphaproteobacteria was obtained for a sample in which only USC α sequences were detected. The data indicate that different MB are present and active in different soils that oxidize atmospheric methane. PMID:14602631

  9. Deccesion of peat-moorsh soils under different land use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipka, K.; Zając, E.

    2009-04-01

    Use of peatlands has a serious impact on soil properties as well as on loss of organic matter. On the basis of survey carried out in 1976, 1993 and 2001 in the Mrowla river valley near Rzeszow, authors analysed changes of the peat-moorsh soils under different land use. The 25- year period was analysed. Survey results comprised: loss of organic matter, advance of moorsh forming process and change of prognostic soil-moisture complexes (after Okruszko). Stratigraphic profiles made in the years1996-2001 were compared and rate of organic mass loss was calculated. The highest values were stated for ploughfields with crop rotation (root plants, industrial plants and cereals). Intensified soil aeration and moorsh forming process as well as wind erosion caused gradual lowering of ground level. Depth of degraded peat layer in roof of surveyed peat deposits was between 0,2 and 0,8 m. Ground surface was lowering of 1,68 cm per year. It was found that, for ploughfields especially, peat-moorhs soil showing medium degree of moorsh forming process (MtII) and prognostic soil-moisture complex BC (periodically drying), after 17 years already, had changed into a soil with high degree of moorsh forming process (MtIII) and prognostic soil-moisture complex C (drying). For meadows and pastures land used such evident change wasn't noticed. During the whole investigation period (25 years) mean lowering of the peat-moorsh soils level along transects lines for different land use was: 1,15 cm per year for meadows and pastures, 1,58 cm pea year for plougfields and 1,38 cm per year for alder wood.

  10. Thermal properties of degraded lowland peat-moorsh soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnatowski, Tomasz

    2016-04-01

    Soil thermal properties, i.e.: specific heat capacity (c), thermal conductivity (K), volumetric heat capacity (C) govern the thermal environment and heat transport through the soil. Hence the precise knowledge and accurate predictions of these properties for peaty soils with high amount of organic matter are especially important for the proper forecasting of soil temperature and thus it may lead to a better assessment of the greenhouse gas emissions created by microbiological activity of the peatlands. The objective of the study was to develop the predictive models of the selected thermal parameters of peat-moorsh soils in terms of their potential applicability for forecasting changes of soil temperature in degraded ecosystems of the Middle Biebrza River Valley area. Evaluation of the soil thermal properties was conducted for the parameters: specific heat capacity (c), volumetric heat capacities of the dry and saturated soil (Cdry, Csat) and thermal conductivities of the dry and saturated soil (Kdry, Ksat). The thermal parameters were measured using the dual-needle probe (KD2-Pro) on soil samples collected from seven peaty soils, representing total 24 horizons. The surface layers were characterized by different degrees of advancement of soil degradation dependent on intensiveness of the cultivation practises (peaty and humic moorsh). The underlying soil layers contain peat deposits of different botanical composition (peat-moss, sedge-reed, reed and alder) and varying degrees of decomposition of the organic matter, from H1 to H7 (von Post scale). Based on the research results it has been shown that the specific heat capacity of the soils differs depending on the type of soil (type of moorsh and type of peat). The range of changes varied from 1276 J.kg‑1.K‑1 in the humic moorsh soil to 1944 J.kg‑1.K‑1 in the low decomposed sedge-moss peat. It has also been stated that in degraded peat soils with the increasing of the ash content in the soil the value of

  11. Peat

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jasinski, S.M.

    2000-01-01

    The United States continued to be significant producer and consumer of peat for horticultural and industrial applications in 1999. Florida, Michigan and Minnesota were the largest producing states, in order of output.

  12. Genesis of peat-bog soils in the northern taiga spruce forests of the Kola Peninsula

    SciTech Connect

    Nikonov, V.V.

    1981-01-01

    The characteristics of soil formation processes in the Peat-Bog soils of waterlogged spruce phytocenoses on the Kola Peninsula are investigated. It is found that the ash composition of the peat layer is determined primarily by the composition of the buried plant residues. The effect of the chemical composition of water feeding the peat bogs is determined. (Refs. 7).

  13. Phenol oxidase activity in secondary transformed peat-moorsh soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Styła, K.; Szajdak, L.

    2009-04-01

    The chemical composition of peat depends on the geobotanical conditions of its formation and on the depth of sampling. The evolution of hydrogenic peat soils is closely related to the genesis of peat and to the changes in water conditions. Due to a number of factors including oscillation of ground water level, different redox potential, changes of aerobic conditions, different plant communities, and root exudes, and products of the degradation of plant remains, peat-moorsh soils may undergo a process of secondary transformation conditions (Sokolowska et al. 2005; Szajdak et al. 2007). Phenol oxidase is one of the few enzymes able to degrade recalcitrant phenolic materials as lignin (Freeman et al. 2004). Phenol oxidase enzymes catalyze polyphenol oxidation in the presence of oxygen (O2) by removing phenolic hydrogen or hydrogenes to from radicals or quinines. These products undergo nucleophilic addition reactions in the presence or absence of free - NH2 group with the eventual production of humic acid-like polymers. The presence of phenol oxidase in soil environments is important in the formation of humic substances a desirable process because the carbon is stored in a stable form (Matocha et al. 2004). The investigations were carried out on the transect of peatland 4.5 km long, located in the Agroecological Landscape Park host D. Chlapowski in Turew (40 km South-West of Poznań, West Polish Lowland). The sites of investigation were located along Wyskoć ditch. The following material was taken from four chosen sites marked as Zbechy, Bridge, Shelterbelt and Hirudo in two layers: cartel (0-50cm) and cattle (50-100cm). The object of this study was to characterize the biochemical properties by the determination of the phenol oxidize activity in two layers of the four different peat-moors soils used as meadow. The phenol oxidase activity was determined spectrophotometrically by measuring quinone formation at λmax=525 nm with catechol as substrate by method of Perucci

  14. Comparison of heavy metal immobilization in contaminated soils amended with peat moss and peat moss-derived biochar.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin Hee; Lee, Seul-Ji; Lee, Myoung-Eun; Chung, Jae Woo

    2016-04-20

    There have been contradictory viewpoints whether soil amendments immobilize or mobilize heavy metals. Therefore, this study evaluated the mobility and bioavailability of Pb, Cu, and Cd in contaminated soil (1218 mg Pb per kg, 63.2 mg Cu per kg, 2.8 mg Cd per kg) amended with peat moss (0.22, 0.43, and 1.29% carbon ratio) and peat moss-derived biochar (0.38, 0.75, and 2.26% carbon ratio) at 0.5, 1, 3% levels. The more peat moss added, the stronger both mobility and bioavailability of Pb, Cu, and Cd would be. In contrast, the addition of peat moss-derived biochar significantly reduced both mobility and bioavailability of heavy metals through the coordination of metal electrons to C[double bond, length as m-dash]C (π-electron) bonds and increased pH. Maximum immobilization was observed in 3% peat moss-derived biochar treatment after 10 days of incubation, which was measured at 97.8%, 100%, and 77.2% for Pb, Cu, and Cd, respectively. Since peat moss and peat moss-derived biochar showed conflicting effectiveness in mobility and bioavailability of heavy metals, soil amendments should be carefully applied to soils for remediation purposes. PMID:27055368

  15. Peat

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jasinski, S.M.

    1998-01-01

    The United States continued as a significant producer and consumer of peat for horticultural, agricultural and industrial applications in 1997. Several operations in the Great Lakes and the Southeast regions dominated US production. Florida, Michigan and Minnesota were the largest producing states.

  16. Peat

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jasinski, S.M.

    2003-01-01

    Peat is a natural organic material of botanical origin and commercial significance. Peatlands are situated predominately in shallow wetland areas of the Northern Hemisphere. Commercial deposits are formed from the gradual decomposition of plant matter under anaerobic conditions over about a 5,000-year period.

  17. Uncertainty of upland soil carbon sink estimate for Finland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehtonen, Aleksi; Heikkinen, Juha

    2016-04-01

    Changes in the soil carbon stock of Finnish upland soils were quantified using forest inventory data, forest statistics, biomass models, litter turnover rates, and the Yasso07 soil model. Uncertainty in the estimated stock changes was assessed by combining model and sampling errors associated with the various data sources into variance-covariance matrices that allowed computationally efficient error propagation in the context of Yasso07 simulations. In sensitivity analysis, we found that the uncertainty increased drastically as a result of adding random year-to-year variation to the litter input. Such variation is smoothed out when using periodic inventory data with constant biomass models and turnover rates. Model errors (biomass, litter, understorey vegetation) and the systematic error of total drain had a marginal effect on the uncertainty regarding soil carbon stock change. Most of the uncertainty appears to be related to uncaptured annual variation in litter amounts. This is due to fact that variation in the slopes of litter input trends dictates the uncertainty of soil carbon stock change. If we assume that there is annual variation only in foliage and fine root litter rates and that this variation is less than 10% from year to year, then we can claim that Finnish upland forest soils have accumulated carbon during the first Kyoto period (2008-2012). The results of the study underline superiority of permanent sample plots compared to temporary ones, when soil model litter input trends have been estimated from forest inventory data. In addition, we also found that the use of IPCC guidelines leads to underestimation of the uncertainty of soil carbon stock change. This underestimation of the error results from the guidance to remove inter-annual variation from the model inputs, here illustrated with constant litter life spans. Model assumptions and model input estimation should be evaluated critically, when GHG-inventory results are used for policy planning

  18. Biological Chlorine Cycling in Arctic Peat Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zlamal, J. E.; Raab, T. K.; Lipson, D.

    2014-12-01

    Soils of the Arctic tundra near Barrow, Alaska are waterlogged and anoxic throughout most of the profile due to underlying permafrost. Microbial communities in these soils are adapted for the dominant anaerobic conditions and are capable of a surprising diversity of metabolic pathways. Anaerobic respiration in this environment warrants further study, particularly in the realm of electron cycling involving chlorine, which preliminary data suggest may play an important role in arctic anaerobic soil respiration. For decades, Cl was rarely studied outside of the context of solvent-contaminated sites due to the widely held belief that it is an inert element. However, Cl has increasingly become recognized as a metabolic player in microbial communities and soil cycling processes. Organic chlorinated compounds (Clorg) can be made by various organisms and used metabolically by others, such as serving as electron acceptors for microbes performing organohalide respiration. Sequencing our arctic soil samples has uncovered multiple genera of microorganisms capable of participating in many Cl-cycling processes including organohalide respiration, chlorinated hydrocarbon degradation, and perchlorate reduction. Metagenomic analysis of these soils has revealed genes for key enzymes of Cl-related metabolic processes such as dehalogenases and haloperoxidases, and close matches to genomes of known organohalide respiring microorganisms from the Dehalococcoides, Dechloromonas, Carboxydothermus, and Anaeromyxobacter genera. A TOX-100 Chlorine Analyzer was used to quantify total Cl in arctic soils, and these data were examined further to separate levels of inorganic Cl compounds and Clorg. Levels of Clorg increased with soil organic matter content, although total Cl levels lack this trend. X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) was used to provide information on the structure of Clorg in arctic soils, showing great diversity with Cl bound to both aromatic and alkyl groups

  19. Characterization of Soil Organic Matter in Peat Soil with Different Humification Levels using FTIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teong, I. T.; Felix, N. L. L.; Mohd, S.; Sulaeman, A.

    2016-07-01

    Peat soil is defined as an accumulation of the debris and vegetative under the water logging condition. Soil organic matter of peat soil was affected by the environmental, weather, types of vegetative. Peat soil was normally classified based on its level of humification. Humification can be defined as the transformation of numerous group of substances (proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, etc.) and individual molecules present in living organic matter into group of substances with similar properties (humic substances). During the peat transformation process, content of soil organic matter also will change. Hence, that is important to determine out the types of the organic compound. FTIR (Fourier Transform Infrared) is a machine which is used to differential soil organic matter by using infrared. Infrared is a types of low energy which can determine the organic minerals. Hence, FTIR can be suitable as an indicator on its level of humification. The main objective of this study is to identify an optimized method to characterization of the soil organic content in different level of humification. The case study areas which had been chosen for this study are Parit Sulong, Batu Pahat and UCTS, Sibu. Peat soil samples were taken by every 0.5 m depth until it reached the clay layer. However, the soil organic matter in different humification levels is not significant. FTIR is an indicator which is used to determine the types of soil, but it is unable to differentiate the soil organic matter in peat soil FTIR can determine different types of the soil based on different wave length. Generally, soil organic matter was found that it is not significant to the level of humification.

  20. Field portable XRF as a tool for the assessment of contaminated peat soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuttleworth, Emma; Evans, Martin; Rothwell, James; Hutchinson, Simon

    2013-04-01

    Upland blanket bogs in the UK have suffered severe erosion over the last millennium but there is evidence to show that this has increased in intensity in the last 250 years, coinciding with increased pressures on the land during the British Industrial Revolution. Upland peat soils in close proximity to urban and industrial areas can be contaminated with - and act as sinks for - high concentrations of atmospherically deposited lead. Atmospheric pollution has been shown to have had significant effects on blanket bog vegetation, the damage and removal of which makes the peat mass highly susceptible to erosion. Erosion of these soils has the potential to release lead into the fluvial system. Detailed quantification of lead concentrations across the surface of actively eroding peatlands is vital in order to understand lead storage and release in such environments. Previous attempts to quantify peatland lead pollution have been undertaken using the inventory approach. However, there can be significant within-site spatial heterogeneity in lead concentrations, highlighting the need for multiple samples to properly quantify lead storage. Lead concentrations in peat are traditionally derived through acid extraction followed by ICP-OES or AAS analyses, but these can be time consuming, expensive and destructive. By contrast, field portable x-ray fluorescence (FPXRF) analysers are relatively inexpensive, allow a large number of samples to be processed in a comparatively short time, giving a high level of detail with little disturbance to the surrounding area. FPXRF continues to gain acceptance in the study of metal contaminated soil but has not been used to conduct field surveys of contaminated peat soils due to their high moisture content. This study compares lead concentration data obtained in situ using a handheld Niton XL3t 900 XRF analyser with data derived from ex situ lab based analyses. In situ measurements were acquired across degraded and intact peatland sites in the

  1. Peat soil composition as indicator of plants growth environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noormets, M.; Tonutare, T.; Kauer, K.; Szajdak, L.; Kolli, R.

    2009-04-01

    Exhausted milled peat areas have been left behind as a result of decades-lasting intensive peat production in Estonia and Europe. According to different data there in Estonia is 10 000 - 15 000 ha of exhausted milled peat areas that should be vegetated. Restoration using Sphagnum species is most advantageous, as it creates ecological conditions closest to the natural succession towards a natural bog area. It is also thought that the large scale translocation of vegetation from intact bogs, as used in some Canadian restoration trials, is not applicable in most of European sites due to limited availability of suitable donor areas. Another possibility to reduce the CO2 emission in these areas is their use for cultivation of species that requires minimum agrotechnical measures exploitation. It is found by experiments that it is possible to establish on Vaccinium species for revegetation of exhausted milled peat areas. Several physiological activity of the plant is regulated by the number of phytohormones. These substances in low quantities move within the plant from a site of production to a site of action. Phytohormone, indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) is formed in soils from tryptophane by enzymatic conversion. This compound seems to play an important function in nature as result to its influence in regulation of plant growth and development. A principal feature of IAA is its ability to affect growth, development and health of plants. This compound activates root morphology and metabolic changes in the host plant. The physiological impact of this substance is involved in cell elongation, apical dominance, root initiation, parthenocarpy, abscission, callus formation and the respiration. The investigation areas are located in the county of Tartu (58˚ 22' N, 26˚ 43' E), in the southern part of Estonia. The soil of the experimental fields belongs according to the WRB soil classification, to the soils subgroups of Fibri-Dystric Histosols. The investigation areas were

  2. Is the blocking of drainage channels in upland peats an effective means of reducing DOC loss at the catchment scale?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Kate; Worrall, Fred

    2010-05-01

    Only 3% of the earths land surface is covered by peatland yet boreal and subarctic peatlands store approximately 15-30% of the World's soil carbon as peat (Limpens et al. 2008). In comparison British bogs store carbon equivalent to 20 years worth of national emissions. The loss of carbon from these areas in the form of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) is increasing and it is expected to have grown by up to 40% by 2018. Extensive drainage of UK peatlands has been associated with dehydration of the peat, an increase in water colour and a loss of carbon storage. It has been considered that the blocking of these drainage channels represents a means of peat restoration and a way of reducing DOC loss. This study aims to assess the effectiveness of this drain blocking at both an individual drain scale and at a larger catchment scale. Gibson et al. (2009) considered the effects of blocking at a solely individual drain scale finding that a 20% drop in DOC export was recorded post blocking however this decrease was due to a reduction in water yield rather than a reduction in DOC concentration with the concentration record showing no significant reduction. The effect of external parameters become more pronounced as the DOC record is examined at larger scales. The catchment is an open system and water chemistry will be influence by mixing with water from other sources. Also it is likely that at some point the drains will cut across slope leading to the flow of any highly coloured water down slope, bypassing the blockages, and entering the surface waters downstream. Degradation of DOC will occur naturally downstream due to the effects of light and microbial activity. There is, consequently, a need to examine the wider effects of drain blocking at a catchment scale to ensure that what is observed for one drain transfers to the whole catchment. A series of blocked and unblocked catchments were studied in Upper Teesdale, Northern England. Drain water samples were taken at least

  3. Projected irrigation requirements for upland crops using soil moisture model under climate change in South Korea

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An increase in abnormal climate change patterns and unsustainable irrigation in uplands cause drought and affect agricultural water security, crop productivity, and price fluctuations. In this study, we developed a soil moisture model to project irrigation requirements (IR) for upland crops under cl...

  4. Peat

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Apodaca, L.E.

    2012-01-01

    In 2011, domestic production of peat, excluding Alaska, was estimated to be 605 kt (667,000 st), compared with 628 kt (629,000 st) in 2010. In 2011, imports increased to 1.1. Mt (1.2 million st) compared with 947 kt (1 million st) in 2010, and exports were estimated to have decreased to 39 kt (43,000 st) in 2011. U.S. apparent consumption for 2011 was estimated to have increased to 1.6 Mt (1.7 million st). World production was estimated to be about 22 Mt (24 million st) in 2011, which was 6 percent lower than 2010.

  5. Peat

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Apodaca, L.E.

    2010-01-01

    In 2009, domestic production of peat, excluding Alaska, was estimated to be 610 kt (672,000 st), compared with 615 kt (678,000 st) in 2008. In 2009, imports decreased to 906 kt (999,000 st) compared with 936 kt (1 million st) in 2008, and exports were estimated to have increased to 77 kt (85,000 st) in 2009. U.S. apparent consumption for 2009 was estimated to be about the same as in 2008. World production was estimated to be about 25 Mt (27.5 million st) in 2009, which is about the same as 2008.

  6. Peat

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Apodaca, L.E.

    2013-01-01

    In 2012, domestic production of peat, excluding Alaska, was estimated to be 560 kt (617,000 st), compared with 568 kt (626,000 st) in 2011. In 2012, imports decreased to 940 kt (1 million st) compared with 982 kt (1.1 million st) in 2011, and exports were estimated to have increased to 75 kt (82,600 st) in 2012. U.S. apparent consumption for 2012 was estimated to have remained the same as that of 2011. World production was estimated to be about 27 Mt (30 million st) in 2012, which was slightly higher than 2011.

  7. Peat

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Apodaca, L.E.

    2011-01-01

    In 2010, domestic production of peat, excluding Alaska, was estimated to be 612 kt (674,600 st), compared with 609 kt (671,300 st) in 2009. In 2010, imports increased to 947 kt (1.04 million st), compared with 906 kt (998,600 st) in 2009. Exports were estimated to have decreased to 69 kt (76,000 st) in 2010. U.S. apparent consumption for 2010 was estimated to have increased to 1.5 Mt (1.65 million st). World production was estimated to be about 23 Mt (25 million st) in 2010, which is 8 percent lower than in 2009.

  8. Microbial phototrophic fixation of atmospheric CO2 in China subtropical upland and paddy soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Tida; Wu, Xiaohong; Chen, Xiaojuan; Yuan, Hongzhao; Zou, Ziying; Li, Baozhen; Zhou, Ping; Liu, Shoulong; Tong, Chengli; Brookes, Phil; Wu, Jinshui

    2013-07-01

    Autotrophic microorganisms, which can fix atmospheric CO2 to synthesize organic carbon, are numerous and widespread in soils. However, the extent and the mechanism of CO2 fixation in soils remain poorly understood. We incubated five upland and five paddy soils from subtropical China in an enclosed, continuously 14CO2-labeled, atmosphere and measured 14CO2 incorporated into soil organic matter (SOC14) and microbial biomass (MBC14) after 110 days. The five upland soils supported dominant crops soils (maize, wheat, sweet potato, and rapeseed) in the region, while all paddy soils were cultivated in a regime consisting of permanently-flooded double-cropping rice cultivation. The upland and paddy soils represented typical soil types (fluvisols and ultisols) and three landforms (upland, hill, and low mountain), ranging in total carbon from low (<10 g kg-1 soil organic carbon) to medium (10-20 g kg-1) to high (>20 g kg-1). Substantial amounts of 14CO2 were fixed into SOC14 (mean 20.1 ± 7.1 mg C kg-1 in upland soil, 121.1 ± 6.4 mg C kg-1 in paddy soil) in illuminated soils (12 h light/12 h dark), whereas no 14C was fixed in soils incubated in continuous darkness. We concluded that the microbial CO2 fixation was almost entirely phototrophic rather than chemotrophic. The rate of SOC14 synthesis was significantly higher in paddy soils than in upland soils. The SOC14 comprised means of 0.15 ± 0.01% (upland) and 0.65 ± 0.03% (paddy) of SOC. The extent of 14C immobilized as MBC14 and that present as dissolved organic C (DOC14) differed between soil types, accounting for 15.69-38.76% and 5.54-18.37% in upland soils and 15.57-40.03% and 3.67-7.17% of SOC14 in paddy soils, respectively. The MBC14/MBC and DOC14/DOC were 1.76-5.70% and 1.69-5.17% in the upland soils and 4.23-28.73% and 5.65-14.30% in the paddy soils, respectively. Thus, the newly-incorporated C stimulated the dynamics of DOC and MBC more than the dynamics of SOC. The SOC14 and MBC14 concentrations were highly

  9. Nitrous oxide fluxes from upland soils in central Hokkaido, Japan.

    PubMed

    Mu, Zhijian; Kimura, Sonoko D; Toma, Yo; Hatano, Ryusuke

    2008-01-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) fluxes from soils were measured using the closed chamber method during the snow-free seasons (middle April to early November), for three years, in a total of 11 upland crop fields in central Hokkaido, Japan. The annual mean N2O fluxes ranged from 2.95 to 164.17 microgN/(m2 x h), with the lowest observed in a grassland and the highest in an onion field. The instantaneous N2O fluxes showed a large temporal variation with peak emissions generally occurring following fertilization and heavy rainfall events around harvesting in autumn. No clear common factor regulating instantaneous N2O fluxes was found at any of the study sites. Instead, instantaneous N2O fluxes at different sites were affected by different soil variables. The cumulative N2O emissions during the study period within each year varied from 0.15 to 7.05 kgN/hm2 for different sites, which accounted for 0.33% to 5.09% of the applied fertilizer N. No obvious relationship was observed between cumulative N2O emission and applied fertilizer N rate (P > 0.4). However, the cumulative N2O emission was significantly correlated with gross mineralized N as estimated by CO2 emissions from bare soils divided by C/N ratios of each soil, and with soil mineral N pool (i.e., the sum of gross mineralized N and fertilizer N) (P < 0.001). PMID:19202870

  10. Global Change Simulations Affect Potential Methane Oxidation in Upland Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blankinship, J. C.; Hungate, B. A.

    2004-12-01

    Atmospheric concentrations of methane (CH4) are higher now than they have ever been during the past 420,000 years. However, concentrations have remained stable since 1999. Emissions associated with livestock husbandry are unlikely to have changed, so some combination of reduced production in wetlands, more efficient capture by landfills, or increased consumption by biological CH4 oxidation in upland soils may be responsible. Methane oxidizing bacteria are ubiquitous in upland soils and little is known about how these bacteria respond to anthropogenic global change, and how they will influence - or already are influencing - the radiative balance of the atmosphere. Might ongoing and future global changes increase biological CH4 oxidation? Soils were sampled from two field experiments to assess changes in rates of CH4 oxidation in response to global change simulations. Potential activities of CH4 oxidizing bacterial communities were measured through laboratory incubations under optimal temperature, soil moisture, and atmospheric CH4 concentrations (~18 ppm, or 10x ambient). The ongoing 6-year multifactorial Jasper Ridge Global Change Experiment (JRGCE) simulates warming, elevated precipitation, elevated atmospheric CO2, elevated atmospheric N deposition, and increased wildfire frequency in an annual grassland in a Mediterranean-type climate in central California. The ongoing 1-year multifactorial Merriam Climate Change Experiment (MCCE) simulates warming, elevated precipitation, and reduced precipitation in four different types of ecosystems along an elevational gradient in a semi-arid climate in northern Arizona. The high desert grassland, pinyon-juniper woodland, ponderosa pine forest, and mixed conifer forest ecosystems range in annual precipitation from 100 to 1000 mm yr-1, and from productivity being strongly water limited to strongly temperature limited. Among JRGCE soils, elevated atmospheric CO2 increased potential CH4 oxidation rates (p=0.052) and wildfire

  11. Soil Physicochemical and Biological Properties of Paddy-Upland Rotation: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Teng-Fei; Chen, Yong; Westby, Anthony P.; Ren, Wan-Jun

    2014-01-01

    Paddy-upland rotation is an unavoidable cropping system for Asia to meet the increasing demand for food. The reduction in grain yields has increased the research interest on the soil properties of rice-based cropping systems. Paddy-upland rotation fields are unique from other wetland or upland soils, because they are associated with frequent cycling between wetting and drying under anaerobic and aerobic conditions; such rotations affect the soil C and N cycles, make the chemical speciation and biological effectiveness of soil nutrient elements varied with seasons, increase the diversity of soil organisms, and make the soil physical properties more difficult to analyze. Consequently, maintaining or improving soil quality at a desirable level has become a complicated issue. Therefore, fully understanding the soil characteristics of paddy-upland rotation is necessary for the sustainable development of the system. In this paper, we offer helpful insight into the effect of rice-upland combinations on the soil chemical, physical, and biological properties, which could provide guidance for reasonable cultivation management measures and contribute to the improvement of soil quality and crop yield. PMID:24995366

  12. Effects of peat fires on the characteristics of humic acid extracted from peat soil in Central Kalimantan, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Yustiawati; Kihara, Yusuke; Sazawa, Kazuto; Kuramitz, Hideki; Kurasaki, Masaaki; Saito, Takeshi; Hosokawa, Toshiyuki; Syawal, M Suhaemi; Wulandari, Linda; Hendri I; Tanaka, Shunitz

    2015-02-01

    When peat forest fires happen, it leads to burn soil and also humic acids as a dominant organic matter contained in peat soil as well as the forest. The structure and properties of humic acids vary depending on their origin and environment, therefore the transformation of humic acid is also diverse. The impacts of the peat fires on peat soil from Central Kalimantan, Indonesia were investigated through the characterization of humic acids, extracted from soil in burnt and unburnt sites. The characterization of humic acids was performed by elemental composition, functional groups, molecular weight by HPSEC, pyrolysate compounds by pyrolysis-GC/MS, fluorescence spectrum by 3DEEM spectrofluorometer, and thermogravimetry. The elemental composition of each humic substance indicated that the value of H/C and O/C of humic acids from burnt sites were lower than that from unburnt sites. The molecular weight of humic acids from burnt sites was also lower than that from unburnt sites. Pyrolysate compounds of humic acids from unburnt sites differed from those of humic acids from burnt soil. The heating experiment showed that burning process caused the significant change in the properties of humic acids such as increasing the aromaticity and decreasing the molecular weight. PMID:24781330

  13. Soil hydraulic properties of sphagnum moss and peat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Tobias K. D.; Iden, Sascha C.; Scharnagl, Benedikt; Durner, Wolfgang

    2015-04-01

    The moisture state of the vadose zone (acrotelm) of ombrotrophic peatlands decisively determines whether carbon is contained in soil organic matter or released to the atmosphere. As the pore space is variably saturated with water throughout the year, oxygen diffusion, heat, and solute transport and thus the redox state are a function of water content over time. For prediction purposes, the hydrological processes must be epitomised in computer models which establish a link between the terrestrial water cycle and the carbon cycle. This requires a proper representation of effective soil hydraulic properties which are a mandatory input to the Richards equation, the standard model for variably-saturated flow processes in porous media. By applying the Richards equation to peatlands, one assumes that the acrotelm can be conceptualised as a rigid porous material. To test this approximation and select the most adequate set of soil hydraulic property functions, we conducted a series of specifically designed laboratory evaporation experiments on sphagnum moss and decomposed sphagnum peat. Sampling was carried out in five centimeter depth increments of an ombrotrophic bog profile in the Harz mountains. We selected sphagnum moss as it is a predominant plant species colonising bogs of the Boreal. Inverse modelling was used to test the adequacy of different parameterizations of soil hydraulic property functions. We used pressure head data measured by two tensiometers in the objective function to identify soil hydraulic properties. The Richards equation was used as process model. We critically assess the applicability of the van Genuchten/Mualem model, which finds frequent application in peatland hydrology, and discuss alternatives which account for (1) multimodal pore size distributions, (2) physical plausibility towards the dry end, (3) capillary and non-capillary storage and flow, and (4) isothermal flow of water vapour. Finally, our results indicate that applying the Richards

  14. Can carbon offsetting pay for upland ecological restoration?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worrall, F.

    2012-04-01

    Upland peat soils represent a large terrestrial carbon store and as such have the potential to be either an ongoing net sink of carbon or a significant net source of carbon. In the UK many upland peats are managed for a range of purposes but these purposes have rarely included carbon stewardship. However, there is now an opportunity to consider whether management practices could be altered to enhance storage of carbon in upland peats. Further, there are now voluntary and regulated carbon trading schemes operational throughout Europe that mean stored carbon, if verified, could have an economic and tradeable value. This means that new income streams could become available for upland management. The 'Sustainable Uplands' RELU project has developed a model for calculating carbon fluxes from peat soils that covers all carbon uptake and release pathways (e.g. fluvial and gaseous pathways). The model has been developed so that the impact of common management options within UK upland peats can be considered. The model was run for a decade from 1997-2006 and applied to an area of 550 km2 of upland peat soils in the Peak District. The study estimates that the region is presently a net sink of -62 Ktonnes CO2 equivalent at an average export of -136 tonnes CO2 equivalent/km2/yr.. If management interventions were targeted across the area the total sink could increase to -160 Ktonnes CO2/yr at an average export of -219 tonnes CO2 equivalent/km2/yr. However, not all interventions resulted in a benefit; some resulted in increased losses of CO2 equivalents. Given present costs of peatland restoration and value of carbon offsets, the study suggests that 51% of those areas, where a carbon benefit was estimated by modelling for targeted action of management interventions, would show a profit from carbon offsetting within 30 years. However, this percentage is very dependent upon the price of carbon used.

  15. Can carbon offsetting pay for upland ecological restoration?

    PubMed

    Worrall, Fred; Evans, Martin G; Bonn, Aletta; Reed, Mark S; Chapman, Daniel; Holden, Joseph

    2009-12-15

    Upland peat soils represent a large terrestrial carbon store and as such have the potential to be either an ongoing net sink of carbon or a significant net source of carbon. In the UK many upland peats are managed for a range of purposes but these purposes have rarely included carbon stewardship. However, there is now an opportunity to consider whether management practices could be altered to enhance storage of carbon in upland peats. Further, there are now voluntary and regulated carbon trading schemes operational throughout Europe that mean stored carbon, if verified, could have an economic and tradeable value. This means that new income streams could become available for upland management. The 'Sustainable Uplands' RELU project has developed a model for calculating carbon fluxes from peat soils that covers all carbon uptake and release pathways (e.g. fluvial and gaseous pathways). The model has been developed so that the impact of common management options within UK upland peats can be considered. The model was run for a decade from 1997-2006 and applied to an area of 550 km2 of upland peat soils in the Peak District. The study estimates that the region is presently a net sink of -62 ktonnes CO2 equivalent at an average export of -136 tonnes CO2 equivalent/km2/yr. If management interventions were targeted across the area the total sink could increase to -160 ktonnes CO2/yr at an average export of -219 tonnes CO2 equivalent/km2/yr. However, not all interventions resulted in a benefit; some resulted in increased losses of CO2 equivalents. Given present costs of peatland restoration and value of carbon offsets, the study suggests that 51% of those areas, where a carbon benefit was estimated by modelling for targeted action of management interventions, would show a profit from carbon offsetting within 30 years. However, this percentage is very dependent upon the price of carbon used. PMID:19818993

  16. Actinomycetal complexes in drained peat soils of the taiga zone upon pyrogenic succession

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zenova, G. M.; Glushkova, N. A.; Bannikov, M. V.; Shvarov, A. P.; Pozdnyakov, A. I.; Zvyagintsev, D. G.

    2008-04-01

    The number and diversity of actinomycetes in peat soils vary in dependence on the stage of pyrogenic succession. In the cultivated peat soil, the number of actinomycetes after fires decreases by three-four times, mainly at the expense of acidophilic and neutrophilic groups. An increase in the number of mycelial prokaryotes (at the expense of alkaliphilic forms) is seen on the fifth year of functioning of the pyrogenic peat soil. The species diversity of streptomycetes in peat soils also decreases after fires. An increase in the range of streptomycetal species at the expense of neutrophilic and alkaliphilic forms takes place on the fifth year of the pyrogenic succession. Parameters of the actinomycetal complex—the population density, species composition, and ecological features—are the criteria whose changes allow us to judge the state of peat soils in the course of their pyrogenic succession.

  17. Distribution of tetraether lipids in agricultural soils - differentiation between paddy and upland management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller-Niggemann, C.; Utami, S. R.; Marxen, A.; Mangelsdorf, K.; Bauersachs, T.; Schwark, L.

    2015-10-01

    Insufficient knowledge of the composition and variation of isoprenoid and branched glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers (GDGTs) in agricultural soils exists, despite of the potential effect of different management types (e.g. soil/water and redox conditions, cultivated plants) on GDGT distribution. Here, we determined the influence of different soil management types on the GDGT composition in paddy (flooded) and adjacent upland (non-flooded) soils, and if available also forest, bushland and marsh soils. To compare the local effects on GDGT distribution patterns, we collected comparable soil samples in various locations from tropical (Indonesia, Vietnam and Philippines) and subtropical (China and Italy) sites. We found that differences in the distribution of isoprenoid GDGTs (iGDGTs) as well as of branched GDGTs (brGDGTs) are predominantly controlled by management type and only secondarily by climatic exposition. In general upland soil had higher crenarchaeol contents than paddy soil, which on the contrary was more enriched in GDGT-0. The GDGT-0 / crenarchaeol ratio was 3-27 times higher in paddy soil and indicates the enhanced presence of methanogenic archaea, which were additionally linked to the number of rice cultivation cycles per year (higher number of cycles was coupled with an increase in the ratio). The TEX86 values were 1.3 times higher in upland, bushland and forest soils than in paddy soils. In all soils brGDGT predominated over iGDGTs, with the relative abundance of brGDGTs increasing from subtropical to tropical soils. Higher BIT values in paddy soils compared to upland soils together with higher BIT values in soil from subtropical climates indicate effects on the amounts of brGDGT through differences in management as well as climatic zones. In acidic soil CBT values correlated well with soil pH. In neutral to alkaline soils, however, no apparent correlation but an offset between paddy and upland managed soils was detected, which may suggest that soil

  18. Changes in Flow and Transport Patterns in Fen Peat as a Result of Soil Degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Haojie; Janssen, Manon; Lennartz, Bernd

    2016-04-01

    The preferential movement of water and transport of substances play an important role in soils and are not yet fully understood especially in degraded peat soils. In this study, we aimed at deducing changes in flow and transport patterns in the course of soil degradation as resulting from peat drainage, using titanium dioxide (TiO2) as a dye tracer. The dye tracer experiments were conducted on columns of eight types of differently degraded peat soils from three sites taken both in vertical and horizontal directions. The titanium dioxide suspension (average particle size of 0.3 μm; 10 g l‑1) was applied in a pulse of 40 mm to each soil core. Twenty-four hours after the application of the tracer, cross sections of the soil cores were prepared for photo documentation. In addition, the saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ks) was determined. Preferential flow occurred in all investigated peat types. From the stained soil structural elements, we concluded that undecomposed plant remains are the major preferential flow pathways in less degraded peat. For more strongly degraded peat, bio-pores, such as root and earthworm channels, operated as the major transport domain. Results show that Ks and the effective pore network in less degraded peat soils are anisotropic. With increasing peat degradation, the Ks and cross section of effective pore network decreased. The results also indicate a strong positive relationship between Ks and number of macropores as well as pore continuity. Hence, we conclude that changes in flow and transport pathways as well as Ks with an increasing peat degradation are due to the disintegration of the peat forming plant material and decrement of number and continuity of macropores after drainage.

  19. Soil erosion predictions from upland areas – a discussion of selected RUSLE2 advances and needs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Obtaining more accurate soil loss estimates from upland areas is important for improving management practices on agricultural fields. Much of the soil erosion prediction research of the last 25 years has been concerned with this goal. The most widely used predictive relationships have been the Unive...

  20. Morphodynamics of headcut development and soil erosion in upland concentrated flows

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In agricultural regions, gully erosion is now recognized as becoming a dominant source of soil loss, and the development and upstream migration of headcuts is critical to the initiation, incision, and dissection of these upland areas. The present investigation sought to examine the effect of soil t...

  1. Effect of Soil Stratification on the Development and Migration of Headcuts in Upland Concentrated Flows

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Experiments were conducted to examine the effect of vertical stratification in soil erodibility on the development and migration of steady-state headcut scour holes in upland concentrated flows typical of agricultural fields. Packed soil beds with a pre-formed step were subjected to identical simul...

  2. Analysing flow patterns in degraded peat soils using TiO2 dye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Haojie; Lennartz, Bernd

    2014-05-01

    Dye tracing is a valuable method for studying the flow patterns in soils. However, limited information is available on water flow and solute transport pathways in dark colored peat soils because the frequently used Brilliant Blue FCF dye does not visibly stain the soil. In this study, we were aiming at testing the suitability of Titanium dioxide (TiO2) as a dye tracer for dark peat soils. The objectives were to quantify the physical properties of different degraded peat soils and visualize the flow patterns. Soil samples were collected from two low-lying fen sites, where the top soil was highly degraded, while lower horizons were less decomposed. Dye tracer experiments were conducted at both sites by applying a TiO2 suspension (10 g/l) with a pulse of 40 mm. Soil profiles were prepared for photo documentation the following day. It was found that the physical and hydraulic properties of peat were significantly influenced by the degree of peat decomposition and degradation. Higher decomposed and degraded peat soils had a higher bulk density, lower organic matter content and lower porosity. Moreover, higher decomposition and degradation resulted in a lower saturated hydraulic conductivity as long as investigated samples originated from the same site. In addition, degraded peat soils showed less anisotropy than un-degraded peat. It turned out that TiO2 is a suitable dye tracer to visualize the flow paths in peat soils. Although dye patterns differed within the same plot and between different plots, most of the flow patterns indicated a preferential flow situation. The distribution of TiO2 in the soil profile, as analyzed from 5 by 5 cm grid cells, compared to the distribution of bromide, which was applied along with the dye confirming the suitability of the dye tracer. Un-decomposed plant structures, such as wood branches and leaves, were identified as the major preferential flow path in un-degraded peat. For degraded peat, bio-pores, such as root and earthworm

  3. Estimating methane gas production in peat soils of the Florida Everglades using hydrogeophysical methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, William; Comas, Xavier

    2016-04-01

    The spatial and temporal variability in production and release of greenhouse gases (such as methane) in peat soils remains uncertain, particularly for low-latitude peatlands like the Everglades. Ground penetrating radar (GPR) is a hydrogeophysical tool that has been successfully used in the last decade to noninvasively investigate carbon dynamics in peat soils; however, application in subtropical systems is almost non-existent. This study is based on four field sites in the Florida Everglades, where changes in gas content within the soil are monitored using time-lapse GPR measurements and gas releases are monitored using gas traps. A weekly methane gas production rate is estimated using a mass balance approach, considering gas content estimated from GPR, gas release from gas traps and incorporating rates of diffusion, and methanotrophic consumption from previous studies. Resulting production rates range between 0.02 and 0.47 g CH4 m-2 d-1, falling within the range reported in literature. This study shows the potential of combining GPR with gas traps to monitor gas dynamics in peat soils of the Everglades and estimate methane gas production. We also show the enhanced ability of certain peat soils to store gas when compared to others, suggesting that physical properties control biogenic gas storage in the Everglades peat soils. Better understanding biogenic methane gas dynamics in peat soils has implications regarding the role of wetlands in the global carbon cycle, particularly under a climate change scenario.

  4. Investigating variability of biogenic gas dynamics in peat soils using high temporal frequency hydrogeophysical methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, William J.

    Peat soils are known to be a significant source of atmospheric greenhouse gasses. However, the releases of methane and carbon dioxide gasses from peat soils are currently not well understood, particularly since the timing of the releases are poorly constrained. Furthermore, most research work performed on peatlands has been focused on temperate to sub-arctic peatlands, while recent works have suggested that gas production rates from low-latitude peat soils are higher than those from colder climates. The purpose of the work proposed here is to introduce an autonomous Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) method for investigating the timing of gas releases from peat soils at the lab scale utilizing samples originating from Maine and the Florida Everglades, and at the field scale in a Maine peatland. Geophysical data are supported by direct gas flux measurements using the flux chamber method enhanced by timelapse photography, and terrestrial LiDAR (TLS) monitoring surface deformation.

  5. Dynamics of organic carbon stock of Estonian arable and grassland peat soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kauer, Karin; Tammik, Kerttu; Penu, Priit

    2016-04-01

    Peat soils represent globally a major reserve of soil organic carbon (SOC). Estimation of changes in SOC stocks is important for understanding soil carbon sequestration and dynamics of greenhouse gas emissions. The aim of this study was to estimate the SOC stock of Estonian agricultural peat soils and SOC stock change depending on land use type (arable land and long-term grasslands (over 5 years)). The soils were classified as Histosols according to WRB classification. Generally the arable land was used for growing cereals, oilseed rape, legumes and used as ley in crop rotation. The main technique of soil cultivation was ploughing. During 2002-2015 the soil samples of 0-20 cm soil layer (one average soil sample per 1-5 ha) were collected. The SOC content was measured by NIRS method. The SOC stock was calculated by assuming that soil mean bulk density is 0.3 g cm-3. The SOC stock change in arable land was estimated during 3-13 years (N=91) and in grassland 4-13 year (N=163). The average SOC content of peat soils varied from 150.6 to 549.0 mg g-1. The initial SOC stock of arable land was 271.3 t ha-1 and of grassland 269.3 t ha-1. The SOC stock declined in arable peat soils faster (-2.57 t ha-1 y-1) compared to the changes in grassland peat soils (-0.67 t ha-1 y-1). According to the length of the study period the SOC stock change per year varied from -5.14 to 6.64 t ha-1 y-1 in grasslands and from -14.78 to 0.83 t ha-1 y-1 in arable land, although there was no clear relationship between the SOC stock change and the length of the study period. More detailed information about the properties of agricultural land and land use history is needed to analyse the causes of the SOC stock changes in agricultural peat soils. However, from the current research we can conclude that the SOC stock of arable and grassland peat soils is declining during the cultivation. These decreases are important to specify when considering the role of peat soils in atmospheric greenhouse gas

  6. Saprophytic and Potentially Pathogenic Fusarium Species from Peat Soil in Perak and Pahang

    PubMed Central

    Karim, Nurul Farah Abdul; Mohd, Masratulhawa; Nor, Nik Mohd Izham Mohd; Zakaria, Latiffah

    2016-01-01

    Isolates of Fusarium were discovered in peat soil samples collected from peat swamp forest, waterlogged peat soil, and peat soil from oil palm plantations. Morphological characteristics were used to tentatively identify the isolates, and species confirmation was based on the sequence of translation elongation factor-1α (TEF-1α) and phylogenetic analysis. Based on the closest match of Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLAST) searches against the GenBank and Fusarium-ID databases, five Fusarium species were identified, namely F. oxysporum (60%), F. solani (23%), F. proliferatum (14%), F. semitectum (1%), and F. verticillioides (1%). From a neighbour-joining tree of combined TEF-1α and β-tubulin sequences, isolates from the same species were clustered in the same clade, though intraspecies variations were observed from the phylogenetic analysis. The Fusarium species isolated in the present study are soil inhabitants and are widely distributed worldwide. These species can act as saprophytes and decomposers as well as plant pathogens. The presence of Fusarium species in peat soils suggested that peat soils could be a reservoir of plant pathogens, as well-known plant pathogenic species such F. oxysporum, F. solani, F. proliferatum, and F. verticillioides were identified. The results of the present study provide knowledge on the survival and distribution of Fusarium species. PMID:27019679

  7. Thermomagnetic properties of peat-soil layers from Sag pond near Lembang Fault, West Java, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iryanti, Mimin; Wibowo, Dimas Maulana; Bijaksana, Satria

    2015-09-01

    Sag pond is a body of water near fault system as water flows blocked by the fault. Sag pond is a special type of environment for peat formation as peat layers in were deposited as the fault moves in episodic fashion. Depending on the history of the fault, peat layers are often interrupted by soil layers. In this study, core of peat-soil layers from a Sag pond in Karyawangi Village near Lembang Fault was obtained and analyzed for its magnetic properties. The 5 m core was obtained using a hand auger. Individual samples were obtained every cm and measured for their magnetic susceptibility. In general, there are three distinct magnetic susceptibility layers that were associated with peat and soil layers. The upper first 1 m is unconsolidated mud layer with its relatively high magnetic susceptibility. Between 1-2.81 m, there is consolidated mud layer and the lowest part (2.82-5) m is basically peat layer. Six samples were then measured for their thermomagnetic properties by measuring their susceptibility during heating and cooling from room temperature to 700°C. The thermomagnetic profiles provide Curie temperatures for various magnetic minerals in the cores. It was found that the upper part (unconsolidated mud) contains predominantly iron-oxides, such as magnetite while the lowest part (peat layer) contains significant amount of iron-sulphides, presumably greigite.

  8. Polyphenols as enzyme inhibitors in different degraded peat soils: Implication for microbial metabolism in rewetted peatlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zak, Dominik; Roth, Cyril; Gelbrecht, Jörg; Fenner, Nathalie; Reuter, Hendrik

    2015-04-01

    Recently, more than 30,000 ha of drained minerotrophic peatlands (= fens) in NE Germany were rewetted to restore their ecological functions. Due to an extended drainage history, a re-establishment of their original state is not expected in the short-term. Elevated concentrations of dissolved organic carbon, ammonium and phosphate have been measured in the soil porewater of the upper degraded peat layers of rewetted fens at levels of one to three orders higher than the values in pristine systems; an indicator of increased microbial activity in the upper degraded soil layers. On the other hand there is evidence that the substrate availability within the degraded peat layer is lowered since the organic matter has formerly been subject to intense decomposition over the decades of drainage and intense agricultural use of the areas. Previously however, it was suggested that inhibition of hydrolytic enzymes by polyphenolic substances is suspended during aeration of peat soils mainly due to the decomposition of the inhibiting polyphenols by oxidising enzymes such as phenol oxidase. Accordingly we hypothesised a lack of enzyme inhibiting polyphenols in degraded peat soils of rewetted fens compared to less decomposed peat of more natural fens. We collected both peat samples at the soil surface (0-20 cm) and fresh roots of dominating vascular plants and mosses (as peat parent material) from five formerly drained rewetted sites and five more natural sites of NE Germany and NW Poland. Less decomposed peat and living roots were used to obtain an internal standard for polyphenol analysis and to run enzyme inhibition tests. For all samples we determined the total phenolic contents and in addition we distinguished between the contents of hydrolysable and condensed tannic substances. From a methodical perspective the advantage of internal standards compared to the commercially available standards cyanidin chloride and tannic acid became apparent. Quantification with cyanidin or

  9. Micromonospora humi sp. nov., isolated from peat swamp forest soil.

    PubMed

    Songsumanus, Apakorn; Tanasupawat, Somboon; Thawai, Chitti; Suwanborirux, Khanit; Kudo, Takuji

    2011-05-01

    A novel actinomycete, strain P0402(T), was isolated from peat swamp forest soil collected in Thailand. Its taxonomic position was determined by using a polyphasic taxonomic approach. The chemotaxonomic characteristics of this strain matched those of the genus Micromonospora, i.e. the presence of meso-diaminopimelic acid and N-glycolyl muramic acid in the peptidoglycan, whole-cell sugar pattern D, phospholipid type II, and cellular fatty acid type 3b. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed a close relationship between strain P0402(T) and Micromonospora coxensis JCM 13248(T) (99.0 % similarity), Micromonospora eburnea JCM 12345(T) (99.0 %), Micromonospora marina JCM 12870(T) (98.9 %), Micromonospora halophytica JCM 3125(T) (98.7 %), Micromonospora chalcea JCM 3031(T) (98.7 %), Micromonospora purpureochromogenes JCM 3156(T) (98.6 %) and Micromonospora aurantiaca JCM 10878(T) (98.5 %). It could be clearly distinguished from these type strains based on low levels of DNA-DNA relatedness and phenotypic differences. On the basis of the data presented, strain P0402(T) is suggested to represent a novel species of the genus Micromonospora, for which the name Micromonospora humi sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is P0402(T) ( = JCM 15292(T)  = PCU 315(T)  = TISTR 1883(T)). PMID:20562246

  10. Nutrient dynamics from broiler litter applied to no-till cotton in an upland soil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Surface-applying broiler litter to a no-till cotton field increases the potential for loss of manure nutrients from the fields in runoff events and volitization of the NH4-N. An experiment was conducted on an upland Atwood silt loam soil (fine-silty, mixed, thermic Typic Paleududalfs) at the Pontoto...

  11. Macronutrient concentration in plant parts of cotton fertilized with broiler Litter in a marginal upland Soil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Effectiveness of surface-applied unincorporated litter relative to conventional inorganic fertilizers under no-till or conventional-till cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) production systems and the magnitude of litter benefit reduction associated with lack of incorporation in the upland soils of the so...

  12. Variations in soil microbial community structure induced by the conversion from paddy fields to upland fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, X.

    2015-12-01

    Land-use conversion is an important factor influencing the carbon and nitrogen gas exchange between land and atmosphere, and soil microorganisms is main driver of soil carbon and nitrogen gas production. Understanding the effect of land-use conversion on soil microbial communities and its influencing factor is important for greenhouse gas emission reduction and soil organic carbon and nitrogen sequestration and stability. The influence of land use conversion on soil process was undergoing a dynamic change, but little research has been done to understand the effect on soil microbial communities during the initial years after land conversion. In the study, the influences of land-use conversion from double rice cropping (RR) to maize-maize (MM) and soybean-peanut (SP) double cropping systems on soil physical and chemical properties, and microbial community structure was studied after two years of the conversion in southern China. The results showed that land use conversion significantly changed soil properties, microbial communities and biomass. Soil pH significantly decreased by 0.50 and 0.52 after conversion to MM and SP, respectively. Soil TN and NH4-N also significantly decreased by 9%-15% and 60% after conversion to upland fields, respectively. The total PLFAs, bacterial, gram-positive bacterial (G+), gram-negative bacterial (G-) and actinomycetic PLFAs decreased significantly. The ng g-1 soil concentration of monounsaturated chain PLFAs 16:1ω7c and 18:1ω9t were significantly higher at paddy fields than at upland fields. No significant differences in soil properties, microbial communities and biomass were found between conversed MM and SP. Our results indicated that land use conversion, not crop type conversed had a significant effects on soil properties and microbial communities at the initial of land conversion. And soil pH was the key factor regulating the variations in soil microbial community structure after land use conversion from paddy to upland fields.

  13. Distribution of tetraether lipids in agricultural soils - differentiation between paddy and upland management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller-Niggemann, Cornelia; Rahayu Utami, Sri; Marxen, Anika; Mangelsdorf, Kai; Bauersachs, Thorsten; Schwark, Lorenz

    2016-03-01

    Rice paddies constitute almost a fifth of global cropland and provide more than half of the world's population with staple food. At the same time, they are a major source of methane and therewith significantly contribute to the current warming of Earth's atmosphere. Despite their apparent importance in the cycling of carbon and other elements, however, the microorganisms thriving in rice paddies are insufficiently characterized with respect to their biomolecules. Hardly any information exists on human-induced alteration of biomolecules from natural microbial communities in paddy soils through varying management types (affecting, e.g., soil or water redox conditions, cultivated plants). Here, we determined the influence of different land use types on the distribution of glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers (GDGTs), which serve as molecular indicators for microbial community structures, in rice paddy (periodically flooded) and adjacent upland (non-flooded) soils and, for further comparison, forest, bushland and marsh soils. To differentiate local effects on GDGT distribution patterns, we collected soil samples in locations from tropical (Indonesia, Vietnam and Philippines) and subtropical (China and Italy) sites. We found that differences in the distribution of isoprenoid GDGTs (iGDGTs) as well as of branched GDGTs (brGDGTs) are predominantly controlled by management type and only secondarily by climatic exposition. In general, upland soil had higher crenarchaeol contents than paddy soil, which by contrast was more enriched in GDGT-0. The GDGT-0 / crenarchaeol ratio, indicating the enhanced presence of methanogenic archaea, was 3-27 times higher in paddy soils compared to other soils and increased with the number of rice cultivation cycles per year. The index of tetraethers consisting of 86 carbons (TEX86) values were 1.3 times higher in upland, bushland and forest soils than in paddy soils, potentially due to differences in soil temperature. In all soils br

  14. Predicting the impact of anaerobic microsites on soil organic matter mineralization rates in upland soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gee, K. E.; Keiluweit, M.; Denney, A.; Fendorf, S. E.

    2015-12-01

    Soils are a crucial component of the global carbon (C) cycle, representing a highly dynamic and large reservoir of C stored as soil organic matter (SOM). An important control on SOM residence time is microbial mineralization. While the impact of climactic and site-specific constraints on SOM mineralization rates are recognized, the role of oxygen limitations remains elusive. If oxygen consumption (via heterotrophic respiration) outpaces supply (via diffusion), anaerobic microsites can occur even within seemingly well-aerated upland soils. Under anaerobic conditions, SOM mineralization rates are expected to be slower due to metabolic constraints on microbial C oxidation. Process-based C cycling models have begun to incorporate the inhibiting effect of oxygen limitations by estimating anaerobic pore volume. However, such model predictions still lack experimental validation and research on environmental controls thus far has largely been focused on soil moisture. Here we aimed to determine the extent of anaerobic microsites within seemingly well-aerated upland soils experimentally and identify whether texture, SOM content, and microbial biomass can act as useful predictors in modeling frameworks. To this end, we monitored oxygen dynamics in soils spanning natural and artificial gradients in texture, SOM content and microbial biomass. Anaerobic microsites was visualized using a planar optode imaging system. Oxygen consumption rates were determined using gas chromatography, while oxygen diffusion rates were estimated based on porosity and pore-size distribution quantified by x-ray microtomography. Our results show that bulk oxygen concentrations ranged from 70% to as low as 20% saturation. However, all soils showed substantial micro-scale variability in oxygen concentrations, leading to the formation of anaerobic microsites even at modest moisture content. The extent of anaerobic microsites correlated with an overall reduction in SOM mineralization rates, and depended

  15. Permafrost collapse alters soil carbon stocks, respiration, CH4 , and N2O in upland tundra.

    PubMed

    Abbott, Benjamin W; Jones, Jeremy B

    2015-12-01

    Release of greenhouse gases from thawing permafrost is potentially the largest terrestrial feedback to climate change and one of the most likely to occur; however, estimates of its strength vary by a factor of thirty. Some of this uncertainty stems from abrupt thaw processes known as thermokarst (permafrost collapse due to ground ice melt), which alter controls on carbon and nitrogen cycling and expose organic matter from meters below the surface. Thermokarst may affect 20-50% of tundra uplands by the end of the century; however, little is known about the effect of different thermokarst morphologies on carbon and nitrogen release. We measured soil organic matter displacement, ecosystem respiration, and soil gas concentrations at 26 upland thermokarst features on the North Slope of Alaska. Features included the three most common upland thermokarst morphologies: active-layer detachment slides, thermo-erosion gullies, and retrogressive thaw slumps. We found that thermokarst morphology interacted with landscape parameters to determine both the initial displacement of organic matter and subsequent carbon and nitrogen cycling. The large proportion of ecosystem carbon exported off-site by slumps and slides resulted in decreased ecosystem respiration postfailure, while gullies removed a smaller portion of ecosystem carbon but strongly increased respiration and N2 O concentration. Elevated N2 O in gully soils persisted through most of the growing season, indicating sustained nitrification and denitrification in disturbed soils, representing a potential noncarbon permafrost climate feedback. While upland thermokarst formation did not substantially alter redox conditions within features, it redistributed organic matter into both oxic and anoxic environments. Across morphologies, residual organic matter cover, and predisturbance respiration explained 83% of the variation in respiration response. Consistent differences between upland thermokarst types may contribute to the

  16. [Influences of biochar and nitrogen fertilizer on soil nematode assemblage of upland red soil].

    PubMed

    Lu, Yan-yan; Wang, Ming-wei; Chen, Xiao-vun; Liu, Man-qiang; Chen, Xiao-min; Cheng, Yan-hong; Huang, Qian-ru; Hu, Feng

    2016-01-01

    The use of biochar as soil remediation amendment has received more and more concerns, but little attention has been paid to its effect on soil fauna. Based on the field experiment in an upland red soil, we studied the influences of different application rates of biochar (0, 10, 20, 30, 40 t · hm⁻²) and nitrogen fertilizer (60, 90, 120 kg N · hm⁻²) on soil basic properties and nematode assemblages during drought and wet periods. Our results showed that the biochar amendment significantly affect soil moisture and pH regardless of drought or wet period. With the increasing of biochar application, soil pH significantly increased, while soil moisture increased first and then decreased. Soil microbial properties (microbial biomass C, microbial biomass N, microbial biomass C/N, basal respiration) were also significantly affected by the application of biochar and N fertilizer. Low doses of biochar could stimulate the microbial activity, while high doses depressed microbial activity. For example, averaged across different N application rates, biochar amendment at less than 30 t · hm⁻² could increase microbial activity in the drought and wet periods. Besides, the effects of biochar also depended on wet or drought period. When the biochar application rate higher than 30 t · hm⁻², the microbial biomass C was significantly higher in the drought period than the control, but no differences were observed in the wet period. On the contrary, microbial biomass N showed a reverse pattern. Dissolved organic matter and mineral N were affected by biochar and N fertilizer significantly in the drought period, however, in the wet period they were only affected by N fertilizer rather than biochar. There was significant interaction between biochar and N fertilizer on soil nematode abundance and nematode trophic composition independent of sampling period. Combined high doses of both biochar and N fertilization promoted soil nematode abundance. Moreover, the biochar amendment

  17. Soil quality assessment for peat-mineral mix cover soil used in oil sands reclamation.

    PubMed

    Ojekanmi, A A; Chang, S X

    2014-09-01

    A soil quality (SQ) assessment and rating framework that is quantitative, iterative, and adaptable, with justifiable weighting for quality scores, is required for evaluating site-specific SQ at land reclamation sites. Such a framework needs to identify the minimum dataset that reflects the current knowledge regarding relationships between SQ indicators and relevant measures of ecosystem performance. Our objective was to develop nonlinear scoring functions for assessing the impact on SQ of peat-mineral mix (PMM) used as a cover soil at land reclamation sites. Soil functional indicators affected by PMM were extracted from existing databases and correlated with soil organic carbon (SOC). Based on defined objectives for SQ assessment, indicators with significant correlation ( < 0.05) to SOC were selected, normalized, and fitted to sigmoid functions using nonlinear regression procedure to establish SQ functions (SQFs) that can analyze changes in field capacity, permanent wilting point, soil nitrogen, and cation exchange capacity of PMM using SOC as input parameter. Application of the SQFs to an independent dataset produced ratings with mean differences similar to the treatment effects of mixing three levels of peat and mineral soil. These results show that derived ratings and weighing factors using SOC reflect the relationship between PMM treatment and other SQ indicators. Applying the developed SQFs to a long-term soil monitoring dataset shows that an increase or decrease in SOC from 10 to 20 g kg causes a significant change in SQ. This identifies the need for further nutrient and moisture management of PMM to support long-term SQ development in land reclamation. PMID:25603242

  18. Soil erosion on upland areas by rainfall and overland flow

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil erosion in agricultural watersheds is a systemic problem that has plagued mankind ever since the practice of agriculture began some 9,000 years ago. It is a worldwide problem, the severity of which varies from location to location depending on weather, soil type, topography, cropping practices,...

  19. Buffer capacities of podzolic and peat gleyic podzolic soils to sulfuric and nitric acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, N. B.; Alekseeva, S. A.; Shashkova, G. V.; Dronova, T. Ya.; Sokolova, T. A.

    2007-04-01

    Soil samples from the main genetic horizons of pale podzolic and peat gleyic podzolic soils from the Central Forest Reserve were subjected to a continuous potentiometric titration by sulfuric and nitric acids. The sulfate sorption capacity was determined in soil mineral horizons. The buffer capacity of mineral horizons of both soils to sulfuric acid was found to be higher than that to the nitric acid. This is explained by the sorption of sulfates via the mechanism of ligand exchange with the release of hydroxyl groups from the surfaces of Fe and Al hydroxide particles and edge faces of clay crystallites. The buffer capacity of organic horizons of the pale podzolic soil to sulfuric acid proved to be higher than that to nitric acid; in organic horizons of the peat gleyic podzolic soil, the buffer capacity to sulfuric acid was lower than that to nitric acid. The reasons for this phenomenon have yet to be investigated.

  20. High Potential for Iron Reduction in Upland Soils from Diverse Terrestrial Ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, W. H.; Liptzin, D.

    2014-12-01

    Changes in the redox state of iron (Fe) can be coupled to the biogeochemical cycling of carbon (C), nitrogen, and phosphorus. The importance of Fe in catalyzing redox-driven biogeochemical cycling has been underappreciated in terrestrial ecosystems because they are not typically thought of as anaerobic environments. However, upland soils can experience anaerobic conditions following rainfall events or in microsites of high biological oxygen consumption. Measurements of Fe reduction rates in soils are difficult to compare among studies from different ecosystems, so we used the same assay to quantify potential Fe reduction in soils from upland environments (annual grassland, drained peatland pasture, and a rainforest) that varied in poorly crystalline Fe and total C. We slurried the soils and incubated them in a glovebox with a dinitrogen headspace. To evaluate the role of C availability in potential Fe reduction, we added sodium acetate daily at rates up to 0.6 mg C/g soil/d. We measured methane (CH4) production, acid- extractable Fe(II), citrate-ascorbate extractable Fe oxides, and pH over 5 days to determine the timing and magnitude of Fe reduction. In relatively dry soils (< 20 % gravimetric soil moisture), Fe reduction began after one day of anaerobic incubation as slurries, but all of the soils demonstrated high Fe reduction potential. On day 3, Fe reduction rates for the 0.05 mg C/g soil/d treatment were 1535 ± 51 μg Fe(III) g-1 d-1 in the annual grassland soil, 1205 ± 42 μg Fe(III) g-1 d-1 in the drained peatland soil, and 826 ± 54 μg Fe(III) g-1 d-1 in the rainforest soil. This contrasts with the trend in poorly crystalline Fe oxide pools across the sites: 3.87 ± 0.06 μg Fe(III) g-1 in the annual grassland, 7.49 μg Fe(III) g-1 in the drained peatland, and 20.84 ± 0.19 μg Fe(III) g-1 in the rainforest soil. Across all sites, small C additions (< 0.05 mg C/g soil/day) increased Fe reduction rates while larger C additions decreased Fe reduction. Iron

  1. Comparisons of soil nitrogen mass balances for an ombrotrophic bog and a minerotrophic fen in northern Minnesota

    EPA Science Inventory

    We compared the N budgets of an ombrotrophic bog and a minerotrophic fen to quantify the importance of denitrification in peatlands and their watersheds. We also compared the watershed upland mineral soils to bog/fen peat; lagg and transition zone peat to central bog/fen peat; an...

  2. Effectiveness of lime and peat applications on cadmium availability in a paddy soil under various moisture regimes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yanhui; Xie, Tuanhui; Liang, Qiaofeng; Liu, Mengjiao; Zhao, Mingliu; Wang, Mingkuang; Wang, Guo

    2016-04-01

    In paddy soils, amendments and moisture play important role in the immobilization of cadmium (Cd). The effects of applying lime, peat, and a combination of both on soil Eh, pH, and Cd availability in contaminated soils were investigated under wetted (80 ± 5 % of water holding capacity) and flooded (completely submerged) conditions. In wetted soils, there was little change in Eh, compared to flooded soils where Eh reduced rapidly. Amendments of lime only or in a mixture with peat increased soil pH to different degrees, depending on the lime application rate. However, peat addition only slightly affected soil pH. The decreased Cd availability in flooded soils was related to submergence duration and was significantly lower than that in wetted soils after 14 days. Liming wetted and flooded soils decreased exchangeable Cd and increased carbonates or Fe-Mn oxides bound fractions, while peat addition transformed Cd from carbonates to organic matter bound fractions. The combined application of peat and lime generally showed better inhibitory effects on the availability of Cd than separately application of lime or peat. Higher application rates of lime, peat, or their mixture were more effective at reducing Cd contamination in flooded soil. This indicates that application of peat and lime mixture under flooded conditions was most effective for in situ remediation of Cd-contaminated soils. Further studies are required to assess the long-term effectiveness of the peat and lime mixture on Cd availability in paddy soils. PMID:26755172

  3. Organic carbon transformations in high-Arctic peat soils: key functions and microorganisms

    PubMed Central

    Tveit, Alexander; Schwacke, Rainer; Svenning, Mette M; Urich, Tim

    2013-01-01

    A substantial part of the Earths' soil organic carbon (SOC) is stored in Arctic permafrost peatlands, which represent large potential sources for increased emissions of the greenhouse gases CH4 and CO2 in a warming climate. The microbial communities and their genetic repertoire involved in the breakdown and mineralisation of SOC in these soils are, however, poorly understood. In this study, we applied a combined metagenomic and metatranscriptomic approach on two Arctic peat soils to investigate the identity and the gene pool of the microbiota driving the SOC degradation in the seasonally thawed active layers. A large and diverse set of genes encoding plant polymer-degrading enzymes was found, comparable to microbiotas from temperate and subtropical soils. This indicates that the metabolic potential for SOC degradation in Arctic peat is not different from that of other climatic zones. The majority of these genes were assigned to three bacterial phyla, Actinobacteria, Verrucomicrobia and Bacteroidetes. Anaerobic metabolic pathways and the fraction of methanogenic archaea increased with peat depth, evident for a gradual transition from aerobic to anaerobic lifestyles. A population of CH4-oxidising bacteria closely related to Methylobacter tundripaludum was the dominating active group of methanotrophs. Based on the in-depth characterisation of the microbes and their genes, we conclude that these Arctic peat soils will turn into CO2 sources owing to increased active layer depth and prolonged growing season. However, the extent of future CH4 emissions will critically depend on the response of the methanotrophic bacteria. PMID:22955232

  4. Effect of fire on phosphorus forms in Sphagnum moss and peat soils of ombrotrophic bogs.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guoping; Yu, Xiaofei; Bao, Kunshan; Xing, Wei; Gao, Chuanyu; Lin, Qianxin; Lu, Xianguo

    2015-01-01

    The effect of burning Sphagnum moss and peat on phosphorus forms was studied with controlled combustion in the laboratory. Two fire treatments, a light fire (250 °C) and a severe fire (600 °C), were performed in a muffle furnace with 1-h residence time to simulate the effects of different forest fire conditions. The results showed that fire burning Sphagnum moss and peat soils resulted in losses of organic phosphorus (Po), while inorganic phosphorus (Pi) concentrations increased. Burning significantly changed detailed phosphorus composition and availability, with severe fires destroying over 90% of organic phosphorus and increasing the availability of inorganic P by more than twofold. Our study suggest that, while decomposition processes in ombrotrophic bogs occur very slowly, rapid changes in the form and availability of phosphorus in vegetation and litter may occur as the result of forest fires on peat soils. PMID:24630445

  5. Factors affecting the mobilization of DOC and metals in a peat soil under a warmer scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrera, Noela; Barreal, María. Esther; Briones, María. Jesús I.

    2010-05-01

    Most climate change models predict an increase of temperature of 3-5°C in Southern Europe by the end of this century (IPCC 2007). However, changes in summer precipitations are more uncertain, and although a decrease in rainfall inputs is forecasted by most models, the magnitude of this effect has not been assessed properly (Rowell & Jones 2006). Peatland areas are very sensitive to climate change. In Galicia they survive in upland areas where cold temperatures and continuous moisture supply allow their presence. Besides abiotic factors, alterations in soil fauna activities can also affect peat turnover. Among them, enchytraeids are usually the most numerous invertebrate group in these systems and both temperature and moisture content regulate their abundances and vertical distribution. Previous studies have demonstrated that changes in their populations associated to increasing temperatures can significantly affect metal mobilization, namely iron and aluminium, together with an important decline in the acidity of the soil solution, which possibly eliminates one of the critical mechanisms restricting DOC release (Carrera et al., 2009). In this study we investigated whether changes in water content of the peat soil and soil invertebrate activities associated to increasing temperatures could alter the mobilization rates of Fe and Al and in turn, DOC. 72 undisturbed soil cores (6 cm diameter x 10 cm deep) with their associated vegetation were taken from a blanket bog in Galicia (NW Spain). Back at the laboratory they were sliced horizontally into two layers, (0-5cm and 5-10cm) which were defaunated by means of a wet extraction. Thereafter, the two soil layers derived from the same core were introduced in each microcosm by placing them in their original position but separated by a 1 mm nylon mesh to allow the vertical movements of the organisms. Half of the experimental units were adjusted to the used moisture values observed in the field (80% SWC, H1), whereas in the

  6. Impact of drainage on wettability of fen peat-moorsh soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szajdak, L.; Szatyłowicz, J.; Brandyk, T.

    2009-04-01

    High water retention in peat is attributed to structural voids (macro-pores) due to the partial degradation of the structure of peat-forming plants, and molecular absorption sites (micro-pores) associated with the formation of humic substances. Water retention by the heterogeneously-structured system in peat organic matter depends on the chemical structure of solid surfaces. These naturally wet solids, if dried sufficiently, lose the ability to rewet quickly when immersed in water. The ability of peat surfaces to attract and hold water is attributed to hydrophilic functional groups which characterize the organic substances of peat. The investigations of chemical and physical properties were performed for three different peat-moorsh soils located in the Biebrza River Valley in Poland. All examined soils were used as meadow. Soil samples were taken from two depths: 5-10 cm (moorsh) and 50-80 cm (peat). Total organic carbon (TOC), dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and humic acids (HA) extracted from these samples were analysed. Also basic physical properties such as ash content and bulk density were measured. Wetting behavior of soils was quantified using water drop penetration time test (WDPT) and measured values of the soil-water contact angle using sessile drop method. The measurements were conducted on air-dry soil samples which volumetric moisture content was not exceeding 7%. The significant differences in the concentrations of TOC, DOC and properties of HA between two investigated depth of among peat and moorsh samples were observed. The measured concentrations of total organic carbon in the considered soils ranged from 37.2 to 45.6%. Generally, the decrease of total organic carbon concentration with depth of profiles was observed. The contents of dissolved organic carbon in the soils ranged from 5.3 to 19.4%. The quantities of dissolved organic carbon decreased simultaneously with E4/E6 values and with the depth of the soil profiles. For the investigated peat

  7. [Chelate-induced phytoextraction of copper contaminated upland red soil].

    PubMed

    Wu, L; Luo, Y; Huang, H

    2001-06-01

    A copper spiked red soil was used in pot experiment to study the effects of EDTA and low molecule weight organic acids on Cu speciation in soil, and Cu uptake by Brassica juncea. The results showed that the mobility of Cu in soil was improved obviously when EDTA was added at the vigorous growth stage. Both water-extractable and exchangeable Cu concentration increased significantly following EDTA addition. Citric acid and malic acid only had an effect on water-extractable Cu, and no effect on Cu uptake by the plant. EDTA significantly increased the concentration of Cu in plant leaves and roots, and the Cu uptake by Brassica juncea. All of these indicated the chelate-induced phytoextraction. PMID:11758431

  8. Contrasting denitrifier communities relate to contrasting N2O emission patterns from acidic peat soils in arctic tundra

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Katharina; Biasi, Christina; Horn, Marcus A

    2012-01-01

    Cryoturbated peat circles (that is, bare surface soil mixed by frost action; pH 3–4) in the Russian discontinuous permafrost tundra are nitrate-rich ‘hotspots' of nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions in arctic ecosystems, whereas adjacent unturbated peat areas are not. N2O was produced and subsequently consumed at pH 4 in unsupplemented anoxic microcosms with cryoturbated but not in those with unturbated peat soil. Nitrate, nitrite and acetylene stimulated net N2O production of both soils in anoxic microcosms, indicating denitrification as the source of N2O. Up to 500 and 10 μ nitrate stimulated denitrification in cryoturbated and unturbated peat soils, respectively. Apparent maximal reaction velocities of nitrite-dependent denitrification were 28 and 18 nmol N2O gDW−1 h−1, for cryoturbated and unturbated peat soils, respectively. Barcoded amplicon pyrosequencing of narG, nirK/nirS and nosZ (encoding nitrate, nitrite and N2O reductases, respectively) yielded ≈49 000 quality-filtered sequences with an average sequence length of 444 bp. Up to 19 species-level operational taxonomic units were detected per soil and gene, many of which were distantly related to cultured denitrifiers or environmental sequences. Denitrification-associated gene diversity in cryoturbated and in unturbated peat soils differed. Quantitative PCR (inhibition-corrected per DNA extract) revealed higher copy numbers of narG in cryoturbated than in unturbated peat soil. Copy numbers of nirS were up to 1000 × higher than those of nirK in both soils, and nirS nirK−1 copy number ratios in cryoturbated and unturbated peat soils differed. The collective data indicate that the contrasting N2O emission patterns of cryoturbated and unturbated peat soils are associated with contrasting denitrifier communities. PMID:22134649

  9. Grain yield and arsenic uptake of upland rice inoculated with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in As-spiked soils.

    PubMed

    Wu, Fuyong; Hu, Junli; Wu, Shengchun; Wong, Ming Hung

    2015-06-01

    A pot trial was conducted to investigate the effects of three arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi species, including Glomus geosporum BGC HUN02C, G. versiforme BGC GD01B, and G. mosseae BGC GD01A, on grain yield and arsenic (As) uptake of upland rice (Zhonghan 221) in As-spiked soils. Moderate levels of AM colonization (24.1-63.1 %) were recorded in the roots of upland rice, and up to 70 mg kg(-1) As in soils did not seem to inhibit mycorrhizal colonization. Positive mycorrhizal growth effects in grain, husk, straw, and root of the upland rice, especially under high level (70 mg kg(-1)) of As in soils, were apparent. Although the effects varied among species of AM fungi, inoculation of AM fungi apparently enhanced grain yield of upland rice without increasing grain As concentrations in As-spiked soils, indicating that AM fungi could alleviate adverse effects on the upland rice caused by As in soils. The present results also show that mycorrhizal inoculation significantly (p < 0.05) decreased As concentrations in husk, straw, and root in soils added with 70 mg kg(-1) As. The present results suggest that AM fungi are able to mitigate the adverse effects with enhancing rice production when growing in As-contaminated soils. PMID:23292227

  10. Effects of copper and aluminum on the adsorption of sulfathiazole and tylosin on peat and soil.

    PubMed

    Pei, Zhiguo; Yang, Shuang; Li, Lingyun; Li, Chunmei; Zhang, Shuzhen; Shan, Xiao-quan; Wen, Bei; Guo, Baoyuan

    2014-01-01

    Effects of copper (Cu) and aluminum (Al) on the adsorption of sulfathiazole (STZ) and tylosin (T) to peat and soil were investigated using a batch equilibration method. Results show that Cu suppressed STZ adsorption onto peat and soil at pH < 5.0 because of the electrostatic competition, while increased STZ adsorption at pH > 5.0 due to the formation of STZ-Cu complexes and/or Cu bridge. In contrast, Al only decreased STZ adsorption at pH < 6.0, and exerted slight effect on STZ adsorption at >6.0. As for T, both Cu and Al suppressed its adsorption over the entire pH range owing to three reasons: 1) electrostatic competition between Cu/Al and T(+); 2) Cu/Al adsorption made the soil and peat surface less negatively charged, which was unfavorable for T(+) adsorption; 3) the shrunken pore size of peat and soil retarded the diffusion of large-sized T into these pores. PMID:24201036

  11. Large contribution of boreal upland forest soils to a catchment-scale CH4 balance in a wet year

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lohila, Annalea; Aalto, Tuula; Aurela, Mika; Hatakka, Juha; Tuovinen, Juha-Pekka; Kilkki, Juho; Penttilä, Timo; Vuorenmaa, Jussi; Hänninen, Pekka; Sutinen, Raimo; Viisanen, Yrjö; Laurila, Tuomas

    2016-03-01

    Upland forest soils affect the atmospheric methane (CH4) balance, not only through the soil sink but also due to episodic high emissions in wet conditions. We measured methane fluxes and found that during a wet fall the forest soil turned from a CH4 sink into a large source for several months, while the CH4 emissions from a nearby wetland did not increase. When upscaled to the whole catchment area the contribution of forests amounted to 60% of the annual CH4 emission from the wetlands, while in a normal year the forest soil consumes 10% of the wetland emission. The period of high upland soil emission was also captured by the nearby atmospheric concentration measurement station. Since the land cover within the catchment is representative of larger regions, our findings imply that upland forests in the boreal zone constitute an important part in the global CH4 cycle not previously accounted for.

  12. Physical and analytical modeling of upland soil erosion due to headcut migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, S. J.; Alonso, C. V.

    2002-12-01

    On hillslopes and agricultural fields, discrete areas of intense, localized soil erosion commonly take place in the form of migrating headcuts. These erosional features significantly increase soil loss and landscape degradation, yet the unsteady, transient, and migratory habits of headcuts complicate their phenomenological and erosional characterization. Here a unique experimental facility was constructed to examine actively migrating headcuts typical of upland concentrated flows. Essential components of the facility include a deep soil cavity with external drainage, rainfall simulator, overland flow, and a video recording technique for data collection. These experiments provided unrivalled insight into steady state soil erosion processes, self-similarity of migrating headcuts, and integral time and length scales for headcut development. Several examples of migrating headcuts and their salient characteristics will be shown using the video recordings, including the effects of flow rate, bed slope, and initial step height on headcut dimensions, turbulent flow structure within the scour hole, and the distribution of bed pressure along the headcut face. It will be shown that erosion processes are controlled by the characteristics of the overfall nappe and wall jets within the plunge pool and that modified jet impingement theory can be successfully applied to a migrating headcut. These experiments provided the insight as well as the conceptual framework for a complete analytical solution for predicting headcut migration rate, equilibrium scour depth, and total sediment flux in upland concentrated flows. Without such experiments, the formative processes of headcut erosion in soils would remain speculative at best.

  13. Applied K fertilizer use efficiency in pineapples grown on a tropical peat soil under residues removal.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Osumanu H; Ahmad, Husni M H; Musa, Hanafi M; Rahim, Anuar A; Rastan, Syed Omar S

    2005-01-21

    In Malaysia, pineapples are grown on peat soils, but most K fertilizer recommendations do not take into account K loss through leaching. The objective of this study was to determine applied K use efficiency under a conventionally recommended fertilization regime in pineapple cultivation with residues removal. Results showed that K recovery from applied K fertilizer in pineapple cultivation on tropical peat soil was low, estimated at 28%. At a depth of 0-10 cm, there was a sharp decrease of soil total K, exchangeable K, and soil solution K days after planting (DAP) for plots with K fertilizer. This decline continued until the end of the study. Soil total, exchangeable, and solution K at the end of the study were generally lower than prior values before the study. There was no significant accumulation of K at depths of 10-25 and 25-45 cm. However, K concentrations throughout the study period were generally lower or equal to their initial status in the soil indicating leaching of the applied K and partly explained the low K recovery. Potassium losses through leaching in pineapple cultivation on tropical peat soils need to be considered in fertilizer recommendations for efficient recovery of applied K. PMID:15674449

  14. Shergottite Impact Melt Glasses Contain Soil from Martian Uplands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, M. N.; McKay, D. S.

    2002-01-01

    Martian meteorite (shergottite) impact melt glasses that contain high concentrations of martian atmospheric noble gases and show significant variations in Sr-87/Sr-86 isotopic ratios are likely to contain Martian surface fines mixed with coarser regolith materials. The mixed soil constituents were molten due to shock at the time of meteoroid impact near the Martian surface and the molten glass got incorporated into the voids and cracks in some shergottite meteorites. Earlier, Rao et al. found large enrichments of sulfur (sulfate) during an electron-microprobe study of several impact melt glass veins and pods in EET79001,LithC thin sections. As sulfur is very abundant in Martian soil, these S excesses were attributed to the mixing of a soil component containing aqueously altered secondary minerals with the LithC precursor materials prior to impact melt generation. Recently, we studied additional impact melt glasses in two basaltic shergottites, Zagami and Shergotty using procedures similar to those described. Significant S enrichments in Zagami and Shergotty impact melt glass veins similar to the EET79001, LithC glasses were found. In addition, we noticed the depletion of the mafic component accompanied by the enrichment of felsic component in these impact melt glass veins relative to the bulk host rock in the shergottites. To explain these observations, we present a model based on comminution of basaltic rocks due to meteoroid bombardment on martian regolith and mechanical fractionation leading to enrichment of felsics and depletion of mafics in the fine grained dust which is locally mobilized as a result of saltation and deflation due to the pervasive aeolian activity on Mars.

  15. Shergottite Impact Melt Glasses Contain Soil from Martian Uplands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, M. N.; McKay, D. S.

    2002-01-01

    Martian meteorite (shergottite) impact melt glasses that contain high concentrations of martian atmospheric noble gases and show significant variations in Sr-87/Sr-86 isotopic ratios are likely to contain Martian surface fines mixed with coarser regolith materials. The mixed soil constituents were molten due to shock at the time of meteoroid impact near the Martian surface and the molten glass got incorporated into the voids and cracks in some shergottite meteorites. Earlier, Rao et al. found large enrichments of sulfur (sulfate) during an electron-microprobe study of several impact melt glass veins and pods in EET79001,LithC thin sections. As sulfur is very abundant in Martian soil, these S excesses were attributed to the mixing of a soil component containing aqueously altered secondary minerals with the LithC precursor materials prior to impact melt generation. Recently, we studied additional impact melt glasses in two basaltic shergottites, Zagami and Shergotty using procedures similar to those described by Rao et al. Significant S enrichments in Zagami and Shergotty impact melt glass veins similar to the EET79001, LithC glasses were found. In addition, we noticed the depletion of the mafic component accompanied by the enrichment of felsic component in these impact melt glass veins relative to the bulk host rock in the shergottites. To explain these observations, we present a model based on comminution of basaltic rocks due to meteroid bombardment on martian regolith and mechanical fractionation leading to enrichment of felsics and depletion of mafics in the fine grained dust which is locally mobilized as a result of saltation and deflation due to the pervasive aeolian activity on Mars.

  16. Effect of simulated tillage on microbial autotrophic CO2 fixation in paddy and upland soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Tida; Wu, Xiaohong; Liu, Qiong; Zhu, Zhenke; Yuan, Hongzhao; Wang, Wei; Whiteley, A. S.; Wu, Jinshui

    2016-01-01

    Tillage is a common agricultural practice affecting soil structure and biogeochemistry. To evaluate how tillage affects soil microbial CO2 fixation, we incubated and continuously labelled samples from two paddy soils and two upland soils subjected to simulated conventional tillage (CT) and no-tillage (NT) treatments. Results showed that CO2 fixation (14C-SOC) in CT soils was significantly higher than in NT soils. We also observed a significant, soil type- and depth-dependent effect of tillage on the incorporation rates of labelled C to the labile carbon pool. Concentrations of labelled C in the carbon pool significantly decreased with soil depth, irrespective of tillage. Additionally, quantitative PCR assays revealed that for most soils, total bacteria and cbbL-carrying bacteria were less abundant in CT versus NT treatments, and tended to decrease in abundance with increasing depth. However, specific CO2 fixation activity was significantly higher in CT than in NT soils, suggesting that the abundance of cbbL-containing bacteria may not always reflect their functional activity. This study highlights the positive effect of tillage on soil microbial CO2 fixation, and the results can be readily applied to the development of sustainable agricultural management.

  17. Effect of simulated tillage on microbial autotrophic CO2 fixation in paddy and upland soils.

    PubMed

    Ge, Tida; Wu, Xiaohong; Liu, Qiong; Zhu, Zhenke; Yuan, Hongzhao; Wang, Wei; Whiteley, A S; Wu, Jinshui

    2016-01-01

    Tillage is a common agricultural practice affecting soil structure and biogeochemistry. To evaluate how tillage affects soil microbial CO2 fixation, we incubated and continuously labelled samples from two paddy soils and two upland soils subjected to simulated conventional tillage (CT) and no-tillage (NT) treatments. Results showed that CO2 fixation ((14)C-SOC) in CT soils was significantly higher than in NT soils. We also observed a significant, soil type- and depth-dependent effect of tillage on the incorporation rates of labelled C to the labile carbon pool. Concentrations of labelled C in the carbon pool significantly decreased with soil depth, irrespective of tillage. Additionally, quantitative PCR assays revealed that for most soils, total bacteria and cbbL-carrying bacteria were less abundant in CT versus NT treatments, and tended to decrease in abundance with increasing depth. However, specific CO2 fixation activity was significantly higher in CT than in NT soils, suggesting that the abundance of cbbL-containing bacteria may not always reflect their functional activity. This study highlights the positive effect of tillage on soil microbial CO2 fixation, and the results can be readily applied to the development of sustainable agricultural management. PMID:26795428

  18. Effect of simulated tillage on microbial autotrophic CO2 fixation in paddy and upland soils

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Tida; Wu, Xiaohong; Liu, Qiong; Zhu, Zhenke; Yuan, Hongzhao; Wang, Wei; Whiteley, A. S.; Wu, Jinshui

    2016-01-01

    Tillage is a common agricultural practice affecting soil structure and biogeochemistry. To evaluate how tillage affects soil microbial CO2 fixation, we incubated and continuously labelled samples from two paddy soils and two upland soils subjected to simulated conventional tillage (CT) and no-tillage (NT) treatments. Results showed that CO2 fixation (14C-SOC) in CT soils was significantly higher than in NT soils. We also observed a significant, soil type- and depth-dependent effect of tillage on the incorporation rates of labelled C to the labile carbon pool. Concentrations of labelled C in the carbon pool significantly decreased with soil depth, irrespective of tillage. Additionally, quantitative PCR assays revealed that for most soils, total bacteria and cbbL-carrying bacteria were less abundant in CT versus NT treatments, and tended to decrease in abundance with increasing depth. However, specific CO2 fixation activity was significantly higher in CT than in NT soils, suggesting that the abundance of cbbL-containing bacteria may not always reflect their functional activity. This study highlights the positive effect of tillage on soil microbial CO2 fixation, and the results can be readily applied to the development of sustainable agricultural management. PMID:26795428

  19. A process-based model of methane consumption by upland soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabrekov, A. F.; Glagolev, M. V.; Alekseychik, P. K.; Smolentsev, B. A.; Terentieva, I. E.; Krivenok, L. A.; Maksyutov, S. S.

    2016-07-01

    This study combines a literature survey and field observation data in an ad initio attempt to construct a process-based model of methane sink in upland soils including both the biological and physical aspects of the process. Comparison is drawn between the predicted sink rates and chamber measurements in several forest and grassland sites in the southern part of West Siberia. CH4 flux, total respiration, air and soil temperature, soil moisture, pH, organic content, bulk density and solid phase density were measured during a field campaign in summer 2014. Two datasets from literature were also used for model validation. The modeled sink rates were found to be in relatively good correspondence with the values obtained in the field. Introduction of the rhizospheric methanotrophy significantly improves the match between the model and the observations. The Q10 values of methane sink observed in the field were 1.2–1.4, which is in good agreement with the experimental results from the other studies. Based on modeling results, we also conclude that soil oxygen concentration is not a limiting factor for methane sink in upland forest and grassland ecosystems.

  20. Continuous measurements of CO2 emission from cultivated peat soil - effect of tillage intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berglund, Örjan; Berglund, Kerstin

    2014-05-01

    Peatlands process and transfer significant quantities of greenhouse gases (GHG) such as CO2, CH4 and N2O. Most natural water-saturated peatlands sequester large amounts of CO2 from the atmosphere and emit CH4. Drainage and cultivation of peat soils increase soil aeration and reverse the carbon flux into net CO2 emissions, while CH4 emissions decrease and cultivated peat soils may even act as sinks for CH4. Fertile peat soils are potential sources of N2O when drained. In this investigation we used automatic dark chambers (ADC BioScientific Ltd) to measure CO2 emissions from plots with different soil tillage intensities. The field trial is located on the island Gotland east of the Swedish main land (57.584825N 18.47691E) and the soil is a peat soil with high pH (7.5) and organic content of 46.4 % (loss on ignition). The set-up was 4 treatments repeated in 4 blocks. Each plot was 18 by 25 meters and the following treatments were tested: A. Ploughing every year B. Ploughing 1 out of 4 years C. Only stubble cultivation D. Permanent ley One chamber was put in each plot and connected to a master control unit to create a network with 16 chambers. Measurements were made every hour during most of 2012 (17/4- 6/11 with some gaps) and every second hour during 2013 (22/4-27/6). Higher emissions could be observed just after cultivation and that effect lasted for about one day. The average emission was highest from treatment D during 2012 (4.53 μmol m-2 s-1) and treatment C and D during 2013 (3.85 μmol m-2 s-1).

  1. Upland forest soils have a significant contribution to a catchment-scale CH4 balance in a wet year

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lohila, Annalea; Aalto, Tuula; Aurela, Mika; Hatakka, Juha; Tuovinen, Juha-Pekka; Kilkki, Juho; Penttilä, Timo; Vuorenmaa, Jussi; Hänninen, Pekka; Sutinen, Raimo; Viisanen, Yrjö; Laurila, Tuomas

    2016-04-01

    Upland forest soils affect the atmospheric methane (CH4) balance, not only through the soil sink, but also due to episodic high emissions in wet conditions. We measured methane fluxes in a northern boreal catchment and found that during a wet autumn the forest soil turned from a CH4 sink into a large source for several months, while the CH4 emissions from a nearby wetland did not increase. When upscaled to the whole catchment area with ca. 4/5 of the total area consisting of upland forests and the rest being wetlands, forests contributed 60% of the annual CH4 emission from the wetlands. In a normal year, the forest soil consumes 10% of the wetland emission. In a monthly scale, the autumn emissions from the upland forests were twice as high as those from wetlands within the same catchment. The period of unusually high upland soil emission was also captured by the nearby atmospheric concentration measurement station. Moreover, the monthly atmospheric CH4 anomalies in autumn were positively correlated with the water level of the lake collecting waters from the catchment. Since the land cover within our study catchment is representative of larger regions, our findings imply that upland forests in the boreal zone constitute an important part in the global CH4 cycle not previously accounted for.

  2. Screening of herbaceous plants for peat-enhanced rehabilitation of contaminated soil with oily sludge.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shijie; Zhang, Chao; Lu, Guilan; Li, Fasheng; Guo, Guanlin

    2016-01-01

    A batch pot experiment using nine herbaceous species were conducted for peat enhanced rehabilitation of contaminated soil with oily sludge in the initial contents of 0%, 1.3%, 7.4%, and 12.2%, respectively. The results showed that petroleum hydrocarbons removal, plant growth indices and enzyme activities varied depending on plant species and oil contents. Cotton, ryegrass and tall fescue were effective in the rehabilitation of oily sludge contaminated soils. The total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) removal ranged from 30.0% to 40.0% after 170 days of treatment. Plant biomass was shown to be the preferred indicator for screening phytoremediation plant because it was closely correlated with TPH removal and enzyme activities. Peat-enhanced plant rehabilitation could be a good strategy for the treatment of oily sludge contaminated saline soils. PMID:26114406

  3. Permafrost thaw and soil moisture driving CO2 and CH4 release from upland tundra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natali, Susan M.; Schuur, Edward A. G.; Mauritz, Marguerite; Schade, John D.; Celis, Gerardo; Crummer, Kathryn G.; Johnston, Catherine; Krapek, John; Pegoraro, Elaine; Salmon, Verity G.; Webb, Elizabeth E.

    2015-03-01

    As permafrost degrades, the amount of organic soil carbon (C) that thaws during the growing season will increase, but decomposition may be limited by saturated soil conditions common in high-latitude ecosystems. However, in some areas, soil drying is expected to accompany permafrost thaw as a result of increased water drainage, which may enhance C release to the atmosphere. We examined the effects of ecosystem warming, permafrost thaw, and soil moisture changes on C balance in an upland tundra ecosystem. This study was conducted at a water table drawdown experiment, established in 2011 and located within the Carbon in Permafrost Experimental Heating Research project, an ecosystem warming and permafrost thawing experiment in Alaska. Warming and drying increased cumulative growing season ecosystem respiration by ~20% over 3 years of this experiment. Warming caused an almost twofold increase in decomposition of a common substrate in surface soil (0-10 cm) across all years, and drying caused a twofold increase in decomposition (0-20 cm) relative to control after 3 years of drying. Decomposition of older C increased in the dried and in the combined warmed + dried plots based on soil pore space 14CO2. Although upland tundra systems have been considered CH4 sinks, warming and ground thaw significantly increased CH4 emission rates. Water table depth was positively correlated with monthly respiration and negatively correlated with CH4 emission rates. These results demonstrate that warming and drying may increase loss of old permafrost C from tundra ecosystems, but the form and magnitude of C released to the atmosphere will be driven by changes in soil moisture.

  4. SEASONAL PHOSPHATASE ACTIVITY IN THREE CHARACTERISTIC SOILS OF THE ENGLISH UPLANDS POLLUTED BY LONG-TERM ATMOSPHERIC NITROGEN DEPOSITION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phosphomonoesterase activities were determined monthly during a seasonal cycle in three characteristic soil types of the English uplands that have been subject to long-term atmospheric nitrogen deposition. Activities (µmol para-nitrophenol per gram soil dry wt per hour) ranged between 83.9 - 307 in...

  5. No-till and conventional-till cotton response to broiler litter fertilization in an upland soil: lint yield

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effectiveness of poultry litter as cotton fertilizer is not well documented for upland soils in the southeastern USA where cotton may be grown under no-till and other soil conservation practices. The objective of this research was to measure the response of cotton to broiler litter fertilization...

  6. Prevalence and Contribution of Anaerobic Microsites to Carbon Mineralization in Upland Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fendorf, S. E.; Keiluweit, M.; Gee, K. E.; Kleber, M.; Wanzek, T.; Nico, P. S.

    2015-12-01

    Soil organic matter (SOM) storage, or residence time, is dominantly controlled by the mineralization (oxidation) rate, which is affected by climatic factors (particularly temperature and rainfall) influencing microbial metabolic rates as well as SOM chemistry, mineral-organic associations, and physical protection. Variation in anaerobic respiratory pathways can further, and dramatically, impact carbon oxidation rates. Within the aggregated structure of soils, steep chemical gradients arise from the supply of oxygen and nutrients along macropores that are rapidly consumed (relative to supply) within the micropore domains of aggregate interiors. As a consequence of demand exceeding oxygen supply within soil aggregates and peds, an appreciable fraction of the soil volume may persist in an anaerobic state within upland, agriculturally productive system. Factors limiting oxygen diffusion and availability such as soil texture, soil moisture content, organic matter input, and aggregate size (soil structure) provide central controls on microbial carbon mineralization rates. Here, we combine laboratory studies with manipulations of field samples and in-field measurements to illustrate how soil structure and carbon availability interact to impose anaerobic conditions and associated respiratory constraints on organic matter mineralization rates and thus storage within soils.

  7. Distribution of radiocesium in the soil-plant systems of upland areas of Europe

    SciTech Connect

    Livens, F.R.; Horrill, A.D.; Singleton, D.L. )

    1991-04-01

    The distribution and behavior of Cs in the soil-plant systems at some upland sites in Northeastern Italy, Scotland, and Norway have been investigated. From the limited range of samples taken, there appears to be no dominant physicochemical control on the plant availability of Cs. The presence of micaceous minerals or illitic clays does not significantly inhibit Cs uptake, either because of recycling in the organic surface horizons or because of clay-organic complex formation. Lower plants (bryophytes and lichens) show the highest Cs accumulation. Of the higher plants, ericaceous species take up Cs more than the others.

  8. Methane emissions from the trunks of living trees on upland soils.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhi-Ping; Gu, Qian; Deng, Feng-Dan; Huang, Jian-Hui; Megonigal, J Patrick; Yu, Qiang; Lü, Xiao-Tao; Li, Ling-Hao; Chang, Scott; Zhang, Yun-Hai; Feng, Jin-Chao; Han, Xing-Guo

    2016-07-01

    Upland forests are traditionally thought to be net sinks for atmospheric methane (CH4 ). In such forests, in situ CH4 fluxes on tree trunks have been neglected relative to soil and canopy fluxes. We measured in situ CH4 fluxes from the trunks of living trees and other surfaces, such as twigs and soils, using a static closed-chamber method, and estimated the CH4 budget in a temperate upland forest in Beijing. We found that the trunks of Populus davidiana emitted large quantities of CH4 during July 2014-July 2015, amounting to mean annual emissions of 85.3 and 103.1 μg m(-2)  h(-1) on a trunk surface area basis on two replicate plots. The emission rates were similar in magnitude to those from tree trunks in wetland forests. The emitted CH4 was derived from the heartwood of trunks. On a plot or ecosystem scale, trunk CH4 emissions were equivalent to c. 30-90% of the amount of CH4 consumed by soils throughout the year, with an annual average of 63%. Our findings suggest that wet heartwoods, regardless of rot or not, occur widely in living trees on various habitats, where CH4 can be produced. PMID:26918765

  9. Gas Diffusion Coefficient in Variably Saturated Peat Soil: Development and Tests of Predictive Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unno, M.; Kawamoto, K.; Moldrup, P.; Komatsu, T.

    2008-12-01

    The soil-gas diffusion coefficient (Dp) and its dependency on air-filled porosity (ɛ) govern gas diffusion and reaction processes in soil. Accurate Dp(ɛ) prediction models for variably saturated peat soils are needed to evaluate vadose zone transport and fate of greenhouse gases such as methane in peaty wetlands. In this study, we measured Dp on undisturbed peat soil samples at different soil-water matric potentials, and developed new, linear and nonlinear expressions for describing and predicting Dp(ɛ). The new Dp(ɛ) models together with existing Dp(ɛ) models were tested against both measured data and independent data sets from literature. Twelve undisturbed 100cm3 peat soil cores were taken between the soil surface and down to 30-cm depth at Bibai wetland, Hokkaido, Japan. The soil cores were initially saturated with water, and drained at given matric potentials, pF=1.0, 1.5, 1.8, 2.0, 3.0, and 4.1 (where pF equals to log | Ψ | , Ψ: the soil-water matric potential in cm H2O), using the hanging water and pressure plate methods. At each matric potential, simultaneous measurements of volume shrinkage, soil-water retention, and Dp were conducted. Literature datasets of Dp(ɛ) for peat soil cores taken from different areas within the same wetland, specifically 12 samples from Iiyama and Hasegawa (2005) and 12 samples from Iiduka et al. (2008), were also used. A total of 191 measurements of Dp(ɛ) at pF ≤ 2.0 were applied for developing new Dp(ɛ) models for pF ≤ 2.0 where effects of shrinkage on Dp were assumed negligible. By modifying 3 existing Dp(ɛ) models, the Buckingham (1904) model, the Macroporosity-Dependent Model (MPD; Moldrup et al., 2000), and the Penman-Call model (Moldrup et al., 2005), we suggested 3 new Dp(ɛ) expressions for peat soil. In the Buckingham-based Dp(ɛ) model, a variable X(ɛ"w relationship (where X is the pore connectivity factor) derived from measurements was introduced in the Dp(ɛ) expression. In the Penman-Call-based Dp

  10. Imaging tropical peatlands in Indonesia using ground-penetrating radar (GPR) and electrical resistivity imaging (ERI): implications for carbon stock estimates and peat soil characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comas, X.; Terry, N.; Slater, L.; Warren, M.; Kolka, R.; Kristiyono, A.; Sudiana, N.; Nurjaman, D.; Darusman, T.

    2015-05-01

    Current estimates of carbon (C) storage in peatland systems worldwide indicate that tropical peatlands comprise about 15% of the global peat carbon pool. Such estimates are uncertain due to data gaps regarding organic peat soil thickness, volume and C content. We combined a set of indirect geophysical methods (ground-penetrating radar, GPR, and electrical resistivity imaging, ERI) with direct observations using core sampling and C analysis to determine how geophysical imaging may enhance traditional coring methods for estimating peat thickness and C storage in a tropical peatland system in West Kalimantan, Indonesia. Both GPR and ERI methods demonstrated their capability to estimate peat thickness in tropical peat soils at a spatial resolution not feasible with traditional coring methods. GPR is able to capture peat thickness variability at centimeter-scale vertical resolution, although peat thickness determination was difficult for peat columns exceeding 5 m in the areas studied, due to signal attenuation associated with thick clay-rich transitional horizons at the peat-mineral soil interface. ERI methods were more successful for imaging deeper peatlands with thick organomineral layers between peat and underlying mineral soil. Results obtained using GPR methods indicate less than 3% variation in peat thickness (when compared to coring methods) over low peat-mineral soil interface gradients (i.e., below 0.02°) and show substantial impacts in C storage estimates (i.e., up to 37 MgC ha-1 even for transects showing a difference between GPR and coring estimates of 0.07 m in average peat thickness). The geophysical data also provide information on peat matrix attributes such as thickness of organomineral horizons between peat and underlying substrate, the presence of buried wood, buttressed trees or tip-up pools and soil type. The use of GPR and ERI methods to image peat profiles at high resolution can be used to further constrain quantification of peat C pools and

  11. Effect of peat on the accumulation and translocation of heavy metals by maize grown in contaminated soils.

    PubMed

    Stanislawska-Glubiak, Ewa; Korzeniowska, Jolanta; Kocon, Anna

    2015-03-01

    Incorporation of organic materials into soil improves the soil sorption capacity, while limiting the mobility of metals in soil and their availability to plants. These effects can be taken advantage for remediation of soils polluted with heavy metals. The objective of this study is to assess the remediatory potential of peat applied to soils with concomitant pollution with Cd, Pb, and Zn. Two 1-year experiments were run in microplots in which maize was grown as the test plant. The following treatments were compared on two soils (sandy soil and loess): (1) control, (2) heavy metals (HM), (3) HM + peat in a single dose, and (4) HM + peat in a double dose. Maize was harvested in the maturity stage; the biomass of roots and aerial parts, including grain and cobs, was measured. Besides, concentration of metals in all those plant parts and the net photosynthetic rate and transpiration rate were determined. The approach of using peat in soil remediation led to satisfactory results on sandy soil only. The application of peat to sandy soil caused significant changes in the accumulation of the metals and their translocation from roots to other parts of plants, which resulted in a higher intensity of photosynthesis and an increase in the maize biomass compared to the HM treatment. PMID:25331526

  12. Delineating Climatic Regions Where Upland Soil Iron Reduction Is Potentially Important At The Ecosystem Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, A.; Hodges, C. A.; Chadwick, O.

    2015-12-01

    Microbial iron(III) reduction is often coupled to carbon mineralization, resulting in net CO2 efflux from the soil profile. Recent reports of iron reduction in upland ecosystems suggests this process is not limited to flooded soils and sediments. However, quantifying ecosystem-scale iron reduction rates is challenging because the intermittent anoxia (low-oxygen) that facilitates iron reduction varies spatially throughout the landscape. To approach this challenge, we have measured the soil iron reduction potential using localized passive redox sensors across four climate gradients ranging from <600 mm y-1 to >4000 mm y-1 rainfall on soils derived from Hawaiian basalt aged 0.3 to 4,100 ky. At each site we installed ten iron metal-rods with a uniform surface coating of Fe(III)-oxyhydroxide. The rods were pushed into the soil to a depth of 90 cm and left in place for 14 d. Extracted rods were washed and imaged to quantify the fraction of Fe(III)-oxyhydroxide coating that was dissolved. In addition, we have characterized the iron mineral composition from surface and sub-surface horizons at similar sites using Mössbauer spectroscopy. Our results suggest that when annual rainfall exceeds 1800 - 2000 mm y-1, iron reduction is a common feature within the soil profile, regardless of soil age. In addition, we find that the pedogenesis of iron minerals proceeds along distinct trajectories above and below this iron reduction threshold.

  13. [Distribution characteristics of soil profile nitrous oxide concentration in paddy fields with different rice-upland crop rotation systems].

    PubMed

    Liu, Ping-li; Zhang, Xiao-lin; Xiong, Zheng-qin; Huang, Tai-qing; Ding, Min; Wang, Jin-yang

    2011-09-01

    To investigate the dynamic distribution patterns of nitrous oxide (N2O) in the soil profiles in paddy fields with different rice-upland crop rotation systems, a special soil gas collection device was adopted to monitor the dynamics of N2O at the soil depths 7, 15, 30, and 50 cm in the paddy fields under both flooding and drainage conditions. Two rotation systems were installed, i.e., wheat-single rice and oilseed rape-double rice, each with or without nitrogen (N) application. Comparing with the control, N application promoted the N2O production in the soil profiles significantly (P < 0.01), and there existed significant correlations in the N2O concentration among the four soil depths during the whole observation period (P < 0.01). In the growth seasons of winter wheat and oilseed rape under drainage condition and with or without N application, the N2O concentrations at the soil depths 30 cm and 50 cm were significantly higher than those at the soil depths 7 cm and 15 cm; whereas in the early rice growth season under flooding condition and without N application, the N2O concentrations at the soil depth 7 cm and 15 cm were significantly higher than those at the soil depths 30 cm and 50 cm (P < 0.05). No significant differences were observed in the N2O concentrations at the test soil depths among the other rice cropping treatments. The soil N2O concentrations in the treatments without N application peaked in the transitional period from the upland crops cropping to rice planting, while those in the treatments with N application peaked right after the second topdressing N of upland crops. Relatively high soil N2O concentrations were observed at the transitional period from the upland crops cropping to rice planting. PMID:22126049

  14. 226Ra/238U disequilibrium in an upland organic soil exhibiting elevated natural radioactivity.

    PubMed

    Dowdall, Mark; O'Dea, John

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a study into the anomalous 226Ra/238U disequilibrium (226Ra/238U of 0.5-9) exhibited by an upland organic soil in Co. Donegal, Ireland. Radiochemical speciation of 226Ra, 238U and 225Ra indicates that in this organic soil the high 226Ra/238U ratio is due to loss of 235U relative to 226Ra via oxidation and mobilisation of 238U in the upper layers of the soil and subsequent loss in solution. At the lower, more reducing depths of the soil profile, 238U and 226Ra are essentially in equilibrium. Loss of 238U appears to occur primarily from the easily oxidised organic and iron oxide fractions of the soil, samples exhibiting high 226Ra/238U ratios displaying significantly lower 238U levels in these fractions than samples whose ratio is below the average value for the soil of the valley. Selective enrichment of 226Ra by plants or preferential leaching of 226Ra from the underlying rock is not supported by the results of this study. PMID:11848154

  15. Autonomous ground penetrating radar (GPR) measurements for exploring biogenic gas dynamics of peat soils in a northern peatland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, W. J.; Comas, X.; Heij, G.; Slater, L. D.; Schafer, K. V.; Reeve, A. S.

    2012-12-01

    It is widely accepted that northern peat soils are responsible for up to 10% of methane flux to the atmosphere yet act as a net sink for as much as 75% of the global mass of atmospheric carbon. A better understanding of the processes by which peat soils store and release carbon products must be gained in order to more accurately model the contributions that peatlands make to global atmospheric carbon budgets. Rapid ebullition events of biogenic methane and carbon dioxide gases from peat soils are currently not well understood, particularly since the timing of the releases are poorly constrained. Ground penetrating radar (GPR) is a geophysical tool that has successfully been used in the past to non-invasively investigate the release of biogenic gasses from peat soils. In the work presented here, measurement frequency is expanded by including daily arrays of common offset and common midpoint GPR measurements combined with hourly autonomous GPR measurements to investigate biogenic gas dynamics during times of variable atmospheric pressure in a northern peatland in Maine. Geophysical data were supported by peat matrix deformation measurements using terrestrial LiDAR (TLS) and direct gas flux measurements using gas traps combined with time-lapse cameras at the sub-daily scale. A vertical array of moisture probes was also used to further constrain GPR measurements. Results from this study show the viability of autonomous GPR methods for improving temporal resolution of geophysical data in order to better understand the dynamics of biogenic gas releases from peat soils.

  16. Dissolved organic carbon and disinfection by-product precursor release from managed peat soils.

    PubMed

    Fleck, J A; Bossio, D A; Fujii, R

    2004-01-01

    A wetland restoration demonstration project examined the effects of a permanently flooded wetland on subsidence of peat soils. The project, started in 1997, was done on Twitchell Island, in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta of California. Conversion of agricultural land to a wetland has changed many of the biogeochemical processes controlling dissolved organic carbon (DOC) release from the peat soils, relative to the previous land use. Dissolved organic C in delta waters is a concern because it reacts with chlorine, added as a disinfectant in municipal drinking waters, to form carcinogenic disinfection byproducts (DBPs), including trihalomethanes (THMs) and haloacetic acids (HAAs). This study explores the effects of peat soil biogeochemistry on DOC and DBP release under agricultural and wetland management. Results indicate that organic matter source, extent of soil organic matter decomposition, and decomposition pathways all are factors in THM formation. The results show that historical management practices dominate the release of DOC and THM precursors. However, within-site differences indicate that recent management decisions can contribute to changes in DOC quality and THM precursor formation. Not all aromatic forms of carbon are highly reactive and certain environmental conditions produce the specific carbon structures that form THMs. Both HAA and THM precursors are elevated in the DOC released under wetland conditions. The findings of this study emphasize the need to further investigate the roles of organic matter sources, microbial decomposition pathways, and decomposition status of soil organic matter in the release of DOC and DBP precursors from delta soils under varying land-use practices. PMID:15074797

  17. Dissolved Organic Carbon and Disinfection By-Product Precursor Release from Managed Peat Soils

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fleck, J.A.; Bossio, D.A.; Fujii, R.

    2004-01-01

    A wetland restoration demonstration project examined the effects of a permanently flooded wetland on subsidence of peat soils. The project, started in 1997, was done on Twitchell Island, in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta of California. Conversion of agricultural land to a wetland has changed many of the biogeochemical processes controlling dissolved organic carbon (DOC) release from the peat soils, relative to the previous land use. Dissolved organic C in delta waters is a concern because it reacts with chlorine, added as a disinfectant in municipal drinking waters, to form carcinogenic disinfection byproducts (DBPs), including trihalomethanes (THMs) and haloacetic acids (HAAs). This study explores the effects of peat soil biogeochemistry on DOC and DBP release under agricultural and wetland management. Results indicate that organic matter source, extent of soil organic matter decomposition, and decomposition pathways all are factors in THM formation. The results show that historical management practices dominate the release of DOC and THM precursors. However, within-site differences indicate that recent management decisions can contribute to changes in DOC quality and THM precursor formation. Not all aromatic forms of carbon are highly reactive and certain environmental conditions produce the specific carbon structures that form THMs. Both HAA and THM precursors are elevated in the DOC released under wetland conditions. The findings of this study emphasize the need to further investigate the roles of organic matter sources, microbial decomposition pathways, and decomposition status of soil organic matter in the release of DOC and DBP precursors from delta soils under varying land-use practices.

  18. The xanthine oxidase activity in different of secondary transformed peat-moorsh soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Styła, Katarzyna; Wojciech Szajdak, Lech

    2010-05-01

    The investigations were carried out on the transect of peatland 4.5 km long, located in the Agroecological Landscape Park host D. Chlapowski in Turew (40 km South-West of Poznań, West Polish Lowland). The sites investigation were located along Wyskoć ditch. The following material was taken from four chosen sites marked as Zbęchy, Bridge, Shelterbelt and Hirudo in two layers: acrotelm (0-50 cm) and catotelm (50-100 cm). The object of this study was to characterize the biochemical properties by the determination of the xanthine oxidase activity in two layers (acrotelm and catotelm) of the four different peat-moorsh soils used as meadow. The xanthine oxidase activity was determined spectrophotometrically by measuring uric acid formation at λmax=290 nm with xanthine as substrate. In peat-moorsh soil the highest activities of xanthine oxidasewas observed in the Shelterbelt and whereas the lowest - in Zbęchy, Bridge and Hirudo. Activities of this enzyme in peat-moorsh soil ranged from 5.96 to 19.51 μmol h-1g d.m soil. Increased activities of xanthine oxidase have been recorded on the depth 50-100 cm - catotelm (from 11.71 to 19.51 μmol h-1g d.m soil) in comparison with the depth 0-50 cm - acrotelm (from 5.96 to 14.64 μmol h-1g d.m soil). This work was supported by a grant No. N N305 3204 36 founded by Polish Ministry of Education.

  19. Mississippi Basin Carbon Project: upland soil database for sites in Nishnabotna River basin, Iowa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harden, J.W.; Fries, T.L.; Haughy, R.; Kramer, L.; Zheng, Shuhui

    2001-01-01

    The conversion of land from its native state to an agricultural use commonly results in a significant loss of soil carbon (Mann, 1985; Davidson and Ackerman, 1993). Globally, this loss is estimated to account for as much as 1/3 of the net CO2 emissions for the period of 1850 to 1980 (Houghton and others, 1983). Roughly 20 to 40 percent of original soil carbon is estimated to be lost as CO2 as a result of agricultural conversion, or "decomposition enhancement". Global models use this estimate along with land conversion data to provide agricultural contributions of CO2 emissions for global carbon budgets (Houghton and others, 1983; Schimel, 1995). Soil erosion rates are significantly (10X) higher on croplands than on their undisturbed equivalents (Dabney and others, 1997). Most of the concern over erosion is related to diminished productivity of the uplands (Stallings, 1957; McGregor and others, 1969; Rhoton, 1990) or to increased hazards and navigability of the lowlands in the late 1800's to early 1900's. Yet because soil carbon is concentrated at the soil surface, with an exponential decline in concentration with depth (Harden et al, 1999), it is clear that changes in erosion rates seen on croplands must also impact soil carbon storage and terrestrial carbon budgets as well. As yet, erosional losses of carbon are not included in global carbon budgets explicitly as a factor in land conversion nor implicitly as a portion of the decomposition enhancement. However, recent work by Lal and others (1995) and by Stallard (1998) suggests that significant amounts of eroded soil may be stored in man-made reservoirs and depositional environments as a result of agricultural conversion. Moreover, Stallard points out that eroding soils have the potential for replacing part of the carbon trapped in man-made reservoirs. If true, then the global carbon budget may grossly underestimate or ignore a significant sink term resulting from the burial of eroded soil.

  20. Mississippi Basin Carbon Project; upland soil database for sites in Yazoo Basin, northern Mississippi

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harden, J.W.; Fries, T.L.; Huntington, T.G.

    1999-01-01

    The conversion of land from its native state to an agricultural use commonly results in a significant loss of soil carbon (Mann, 1985; Davidson and Ackerman, 1993). Globally, this loss is estimated to account for as much as 1/3 of the net CO2 emissions for the period of 1850 to 1980 (Houghton et al, 1983). Roughly 20 to 40 percent of original soil carbon is estimated to be lost as CO2 as a result of agricultural conversion, or 'decomposition enhancement', and global models use this estimate along with land conversion data to provide agricultural contributions of CO2 emissions for global carbon budgets (Houghton and others, 1983; Schimel, 1995). As yet, erosional losses of carbon are not included in global carbon budgets explicitly as a factor in land conversion nor implicitly as a portion of the decomposition enhancement. However, recent work by Lal et al (1995) and by Stallard (1998) suggests that significant amounts of eroded soil may be stored in man-made reservoirs and depositional environments as a result of agricultural conversion. Moreover, Stallard points out that if eroding soils have the potential for replacing part of the carbon trapped in man-made reservoirs, then the global carbon budget may grossly underestimate or ignore a significant sink term resulting from the burial of eroded soil. Soil erosion rates are significantly (10X) higher on croplands than on their undisturbed equivalents (Dabney et al, 1997). Most of the concern over erosion is related to diminished productivity of the uplands (Stallings, 1957; McGregor et al, 1993; Rhoton and Tyler, 1990) or to increased hazards and navigability of the lowlands in the late 1800's to early 1900's. Yet because soil carbon is concentrated at the soil surface, with an exponential decline in concentration with depth, it is clear that changes in erosion rates seen on croplands must also impact soil carbon storage and terrestrial carbon budgets as well.

  1. Conversion of upland to paddy field specifically alters the community structure of archaeal ammonia oxidizers in an acid soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, M. S.; Ren, G. D.; Lu, L.; Zheng, Y.; Peng, X. H.; Jia, Z. J.

    2013-08-01

    The function of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and bacteria (AOB) depends on the major energy-generating compounds (i.e., ammonia and oxygen). The diversification of AOA and AOB communities along ecological gradients of substrate availability in a complex environment have been much debated but rarely tested. In this study, two ecosystems of maize and rice crops under different fertilization regimes were selected to investigate the community diversification of soil AOA and AOB upon conversion of an upland field to a paddy field and long-term field fertilization in an acid soil. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction of ammonia monooxygenase (amoA) genes demonstrated that the abundance of AOA was significantly stimulated after conversion of upland to paddy soils for more than 100 yr, whereas a slight decline in AOB numbers was observed. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis fingerprints of amoA genes further revealed remarkable changes in the community compositions of AOA after conversion of aerobic upland to flooded paddy field. Sequencing analysis revealed that upland soil was dominated by AOA within the soil group 1.1b lineage, whereas the marine group 1.1a-associated lineage predominated in AOA communities in paddy soils. Irrespective of whether the soil was upland or paddy soil, long-term field fertilization led to increased abundance of amoA genes in AOA and AOB compared with control treatments (no fertilization), whereas archaeal amoA gene abundances outnumbered their bacterial counterparts in all samples. Phylogenetic analyses of amoA genes showed that Nitrosospira cluster-3-like AOB dominated bacterial ammonia oxidizers in both paddy and upland soils, regardless of fertilization treatment. The results of this study suggest that the marine group 1.1a-associated AOA will be better adapted to the flooded paddy field than AOA ecotypes of the soil group 1.1b lineage, and indicate that long-term flooding is the dominant selective force driving the

  2. Fire effects on peat and organo-mineral soils of Meshchera plain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsibart, Anna; Koshovskii, Timur; Gamova, Natalia; Kovach, Roman

    2015-04-01

    The fire effects the soil properties depend on soil type and on their vulnerability to fires. The most of available data is devoted to changes in organo-mineral soils. But the peat fires can cause deeper changes in soil profiles, especially in case of drained peat soils. Now the lack of information exists in the sphere of the comparison of these fire types on soil cover. Meshchera plain (Moscow and Ryazan Regions, Russia) has different soil types. Moreover peatlands were partly drained, and the plain was affected by numerous fires of different time. So there is a need of detailed post-fire soil investigations in this region. During current research the soils Meshchera plain subjected by wildfires of 2002, 2007, 2010 and 2012 were studied. A total of 32 profiles including background and post-fire histosols, histic and sod podzols were investigated. Moreover the detailed description of vegetation cover was conducted. The samples were taken from genetic horizons. The morfological properties of soil profiles were sudied and the samples were analysed on organic carbon, pH, macroelements, magnetic susceptibility. After the wildfires changes in morfological and physico-chemical properties of soils were detected in most cases. The formation of ash and charry horizons was observed only in cases of peat soils affecetd by intense fires, and all post-fire drained peat soils had thick ash horizons even after 10 years after the fires. The significant loss of organic matter took place after burning. But almost immediately after the fires new stage of humus formation usually started. For instance, in post-fire histosols in 2 years after the burning the content of organic carbon reached to 10-12 % in upper horizons. ph values in background histosols were approximately 4-5. After the fire pH increased in these soil type to 8, and two years after the fire event pH decreased to 6-7. In podzols pH values returned to the pre-fire level 4-5 in two years. The magnetic susceptibility of

  3. Biochar as a Substitute for Peat in Greenhouse Growing Media: Soil Water Characteristics and Carbon Leaching Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, M. S.; Hilbert, I.; Jollymore, A. J.

    2012-12-01

    Biochar (charcoal derived from waste biomass via pyrolysis) has the potential to be used as part of regional scale carbon sequestration strategies. By providing a stable form of carbon that is resistant to decay in soils, biochar can be utilized in a wide range of applications to improve the sustainability of land use management practices. Due to its high water holding capacity, surface area and charge density, it could provide a substitute for peat that is widely used in horticultural activities. Globally, peat production in 2010 amounted to 23.4 Mt, with more than a third of this used for horticulture. In Canada, essentially all peat produced is used for horticulture, with each ton of peat extracted also contributing about 0.7 t CO2e in combined greenhouse gas emissions related to production, transportation and use of peat. We evaluated biochar produced on farm from red alder as a peat substitute in terms of soil water characteristics and carbon leaching in greenhouse growing media (e.g. potting mix). Biochar mixing ratios of 10% (v/v) and greater provided water holding capacity equivalent to peat-based potting mixes. We also present results from a laboratory wetting experiment in which we characterized leachate for dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration and DOC characteristics using spectral methods (uV-Vis and fluorescence spectroscopy).

  4. Emissions of N2O from peat soils under different cropping systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norberg, Lisbet; Berglund, Örjan; Berglund, Kerstin

    2016-04-01

    Drainage of peatlands for agriculture use leads to an increase in nitrogen turnover rate causing emissions of N2O to the atmosphere. Agriculture contributes to a substantial part of the anthropogenic emissions of N2O therefore mitigation options for the farmers are important. Here we present a field study with the aim to investigate if the choice of cropping system can mitigate the emission of N2O from cultivated organic soils. The sites used in the study represent fen peat soils with a range of different soil properties located in different parts of southern Sweden. All sites are on active farms with good drainage. N2O emissions from the soil under two different crops grown on the same field, with the same soil type, drainage intensity and weather conditions, are compared by gas sampling. The crops included are oat, barley, carrot, potato and grassland. Three or four sampling occasions during the growing season in 2010 were carried out with static chambers. The N2O emission is calculated from the linear increase of gas concentration in the chamber headspace during the incubation time of 40 minutes. Parallel to the gas sampling soil temperature and soil moisture are measured and some soil properties determined. The result from the gas sampling and measurements show no significant difference in seasonal average N2O emission between the compared crops at any site. There are significant differences in N2O emissions between the compared crops at some of the single sampling occasions but the result vary and no crop can be pointed out as a mitigation option. The seasonal average N2O emissions varies from 16±17 to 1319±1971 μg N2O/m2/h with peaks up to 3317 μg N2O/m2/h. The N2O emission rate from peat soils are determined by other factors than the type of crops grown on the field. The emission rates vary during the season and especially between sites. Although all sites are fen peat soil the soil properties are different, e.g. carbon content varies between 27-43% and

  5. Substrate Geochemistry and Soil Development in Boreal Forest and Tundra Ecosystems in the Yukon-Tanana Upland and Seward Peninsula, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gough, L.P.; Crock, J.G.; Wang, B.; Day, W.C.; Eberl, D.D.; Sanzolone, R.F.; Lamothe, P.J.

    2008-01-01

    We report on soil development as a function of bedrock type and the presence of loess in two high latitude ecosystems (boreal forest and tundra) and from two regions in Alaska?the Yukon-Tanana Upland (YTU, east-central Alaska) and the Seward Peninsula (SP, far-west coastal Alaska). This approach to the study of 'cold soils' is fundamental to the quantification of regional geochemical landscape patterns. Of the five state factors in this study, bedrock and biota (ecosystem; vegetation zone) vary whereas climate (within each area) and topography are controlled. The influence of time is assumed to be controlled, as these soils are thousands of years old (late Quaternary to Holocene). The primary minerals in soils from YTU, developed over loess and crystalline bedrock (metamorphic and intrusive), are quartz, plagioclase, and 2:1 clays; whereas in the SP, where loess and metasedimentary bedrock (schist and quartzite) predominate, they are quartz and muscovite. The A horizon of both regions is rich in peat. Examination of the ratio of mobile (K2O, CaO, and Fe2O3) to immobile (TiO2) major oxides, within each region, shows that very little difference exists in the chemical weathering of soils developed between the two ecosystems examined. Differences were observed between tundra soils developed in the two regions. These differences are most probably due to the dissimilarity in the geochemical importance of both loess and bedrock. A minimal loss of cadmium with soil depth is seen for soils developed over YTU crystalline bedrock in the boreal forest environments. This trend is related to the mobility of cadmium in these soils as well as to its biogenic cycling. Major differences were observed in the proportion of cadmium and zinc among the A, B, and C horizon material sequestered in various soil fractions as measured by sequential soil extractions. These trends followed such variables as the decrease with depth in organic matter, the change in clay minerals, and the change

  6. EVALUATION OF ENHANCED VOC REMOVAL WITH SOIL FRACTURING IN THE SRS UPLAND UNIT

    SciTech Connect

    Riha, B

    2005-10-31

    The Environmental Restoration Technology Section (ERTS) of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) conducted pilot scale testing to evaluate the effectiveness of using hydraulic fracturing as a means to improve soil vapor extraction (SVE) system performance. Laboratory and field research has shown that significant amounts of solvents can be entrapped in low permeability zones by capillary forces and removal by SVE can be severely limited due to low flow rates, mass transfer resistance of the hydrophobic compounds by trapped interparticle water, and diffusion resistance. Introducing sand-filled fractures into these tight zones improves the performance of SVE by (1) increasing the overall permeability of the formation and thereby increasing SVE flow rates, (2) shortening diffusion pathways, and (3) increasing air permeability by improving pore water removal. The synergistic effect of the fracture well completion methods, fracture and flow geometry, and pore water removal appears to increase the rate of solvent mass removal over that of increasing flow rate alone. A field test was conducted where a conventional well in the SRS Upland Unit was tested before and after hydraulic fracturing. ERTS teamed with Clemson University through the South Carolina University and Education Foundation (SCUREF) program utilizing their expertise in fracturing and fracture modeling. The goals of the fracturing pilot testing were to evaluate the following: (1) The effect of hydraulic fractures on the performance of a conventional well. This was the most reliable way to remove the effects of spatial variations in permeability and contaminant distribution on relative well performance. It also provided data on the option of improving the performance of existing wells using hydraulic fractures. (2) The relative performance of a conventional SVE well and isolated hydraulic fractures. This was the most reliable indicator of the performance of hydraulic fractures that could be created in a

  7. Does Miscanthus cultivation on organic soils compensate for carbon loss from peat oxidation? A dual label study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bader, Cédric; Leifeld, Jens; Müller, Moritz; Schulin, Rainer

    2016-04-01

    Agricultural use of organic soils requires drainage and thereby changes conditions in these soils from anoxic to oxic. As a consequence, organic carbon that had been accumulated over millennia is rapidly mineralized, so that these soils are converted from a CO2 sink to a source. The peat mineralization rate depends mainly on drainage depth, but also on crop type. Various studies show that Miscanthus, a C4 bioenergy plant, shows potential for carbon sequestration in mineral soils because of its high productivity, its dense root system, absence of tillage and high preharvest litterfall. If Miscanthus cropping would have a similar effect in organic soils, peat consumption and thus CO2 emissions might be reduced. For our study we compared two adjacent fields, on which organic soil is cultivated with Miscanthus (since 20 years) and perennial grass (since 6 years). Both sites are located in the Bernese Seeland, the largest former peatland area of Switzerland. To determine wether Miscanthus-derived carbon accumulated in the organic soil, we compared the stable carbon isotopic signatures of the experimental soil with those of an organic soil without any C4-plant cultivation history. To analyze the effect of C4-C accumulation on peat degradability we compared the CO2 emissions by incubating 90 soil samples of the two fields for more than one year. Additionally, we analysed the isotopic CO2 composition (13C, 14C) during the first 25 days of incubation after trapping the emitted CO2 in NaOH and precipitating it as BaCO3. The ∂13C values of the soil imply, that the highest share of C4-C of around 30% is situated at a depth of 10-20 cm. Corn that used to be cultivated on the grassland field before 2009 still accounts for 8% of SOC. O/C and H/C ratios of the peat samples indicate a stronger microbial imprint of organic matter under Miscanthus cultivation. The amount of CO2 emitted was not affected by the cultivation type. On average 57% of the CO2 was C4 derived in the

  8. Modeling relationships between water table depth and peat soil carbon loss in Southeast Asian plantations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, Kimberly M.; Goodman, Lael K.; May-Tobin, Calen C.

    2015-07-01

    Plantation-associated drainage of Southeast Asian peatlands has accelerated in recent years. Draining exposes the upper peat layer to oxygen, leading to elevated decomposition rates and net soil carbon losses. Empirical studies indicate positive relationships between long-term water table (WT) depth and soil carbon loss rate in peatlands. These correlations potentially enable using WT depth as a proxy for soil carbon losses from peatland plantations. Here, we compile data from published research assessing WT depth and carbon balance in tropical plantations on peat. We model net carbon loss from subsidence studies, as well as soil respiration (heterotrophic and total) from closed chamber studies, as a function of WT depth. WT depth across all 12 studies and 59 sites is 67 ± 20 cm (mean ± standard deviation). Mean WT depth is positively related to net carbon loss, as well as soil respiration rate. Our models explain 45% of net carbon loss variation and 45-63% of soil respiration variation. At a 70 cm WT depth, the subsidence model suggests net carbon loss of 20 tC ha-1 yr-1 (95% confidence interval (CI) 18-22 tC ha-1 yr-1) for plantations drained for >2 yr. Closed chamber-measured total soil respiration at this depth is 20 tC-CO2 ha-1 yr-1 (CI 17-24 tC-CO2 ha-1 yr-1) while heterotrophic respiration is 17 tC-CO2 ha-1 yr-1 (CI 14-20 tC-CO2 ha-1 yr-1), ˜82% of total respiration. While land use is not a significant predictor of soil respiration, WT depths are greater at acacia (75 ± 16 cm) than oil palm (59 ± 15 cm) sample sites. Improved spatio-temporal sampling of the full suite of peat soil carbon fluxes—including fluvial carbon export and organic fertilizer inputs—will clarify multiple mechanisms leading to carbon loss and gain, supporting refined assessments of the global warming potential of peatland drainage.

  9. Spatial Heterogeneity in the Properties of High-Moor Peat Soils under Local Pyrogenesis in Northeastern Sakhalin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipatov, D. N.; Shcheglov, A. I.; Manakhov, D. V.; Brekhov, P. T.

    2016-02-01

    The structure and properties of oligotrophic peat, oligotrophic peat gley, and pyrogenic oligotrophic peat soils identified on a plot 0.5 km2 in area in the northeast of Sakhalin Island have been studied. The vertical distributions of physicochemical, chemical, and ecotoxicological parameters in the profiles of some bog soil groups have been considered. An increase in ash content, a less acid reaction, and a deficit of available nitrogen and potassium have been revealed in the upper horizons of pyrogenic soils. No accumulation of mobile heavy metals is manifested in the pyrogenic horizons of peat soils. Statistical parameters of the spatial variation in pHKCl and total acidity, as well as the contents of ash, available phosphorus, exchangeable potassium, ammonium and nitrate nitrogen, mobile heavy metals (Cr, Ni, Cu, Zn, Cd, Pb), and benzo[ a]pyrene, have been calculated for the moss and sublitter horizons. The variation coefficients are 30-100% for most of the studied parameters and reach 100-200% for available phosphorus; ammonium nitrogen; and mobile Ni, Cu, Zn, and Cd. An increase in the content of benzo[ a]pyrene, although without MPC exceedance, is noted in the moss of pyrogenic soils and the peat horizons untouched by fires.

  10. Multiple season, field scale exploration of biogenic gas dynamics in two peat soils of the Florida Everglades using hydrogeophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, W. J.; Comas, X.; Mount, G. J.; McClellan, M. D.

    2014-12-01

    Peatlands are known to release significant amounts of methane (CH4) and carbon dioxide (CO2) to the atmosphere. However, uncertainties still remain regarding the spatio-temporal distribution and triggering mechanisms of gas releasing events from peat soils. Furthermore, most research regarding peatland gas dynamics has historically been focused on high latitude peatlands, while recent works have suggested gas production rates from low-latitude peat soils may be higher than those from colder climates. Varying temporal and spatial scales have also shown marked differences in flux rates, thus questioning the appropriate scale for gas flux quantification. Ground penetrating radar (GPR) is a geophysical tool that has successfully been used in the past to non-invasively investigate the release of biogenic gasses from northern peat soils, and has only recently been used in the subtropical Florida Everglades. This study is based on an array of measurements at four field sites, spanning two different peat types (Loxahatchee and Everglades peats) of the Florida Everglades over a period of two years. At each site, gas contents within the soil are monitored using the GPR method, which is supported by direct gas flux measurements using flux chambers and time-lapse photography, and surface deformation is monitored using differential leveling. Resulting data highlight the variability of gas dynamics based on spatial, temporal, and soil compositional differences.

  11. Differential effects of surface and peat fire on soil constituents in a degraded wetland of the northern Florida Everglades.

    PubMed

    Smith, S M; Newman, S; Garrett, P B; Leeds, J A

    2001-01-01

    The effects of surface (aboveground) and peat (belowground) fire on a number of soil constituents were examined within a hydrologically altered marsh in the northern Florida Everglades. Peat fire resulted in losses of total carbon (TC), total nitrogen (TN), and organic phosphorus (Po), while inorganic phosphorus (Pi) and total calcium (TCa) concentrations increased. In addition, peat fire led to a more pronounced vertical gradient in constituent concentrations between upper and lower soil layers. Surface fire also affected soil constituents, but impacts were small relative to peat fire. The effects of physical versus chemical processes during burning were assessed using ratios of constituent to TCa concentrations. This measure indicated that increases in the levels of total phosphorus (TP) in peat-burned areas were due primarily to the physical reduction of soil, while decreases in TN and TC were the result of volatilization. Increases in concentrations of Pi fractions arose from both chemically and physically mediated processes. In an ecological context, the observed soil transformations may encourage the growth of invasive plant species, such as southern narrow-leaved cattail (Typha domingensis Pers.), which exhibits high growth rates in response to increased P availability. PMID:11790006

  12. Erosion of upland hillslope soil organic carbon: Coupling field measurements with a sediment transport model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Kyungsoo; Amundson, Ronald; Heimsath, Arjun M.; Dietrich, William E.

    2005-09-01

    Little is known about the role of vegetated hillslope sediment transport in the soil C cycle and soil-atmosphere C exchange. We combined a hillslope sediment transport model with empirical soil C measurements to quantify the erosion and temporal storage of soil organic carbon (SOC) within two grasslands in central California. The sites have contrasting erosional mechanisms: biological perturbation (Tennessee Valley (TV)) versus clay-rich soil creep (Black Diamond (BD)). The average SOC erosion rates from convex slopes were 1.4-2.7 g C m-2 yr-1 at TV and 5-8 g C m-2 yr-1 at BD, values that are <10% of above ground net primary productivity (ANPP) at both sites. The eroded soil accumulates on depositional slopes. The long term SOC accumulation (or C sink) rates are ˜1.9 g C m-2 yr-1 in the TV hollow and 1.7-2.8 g C m-2 yr-1 in the BD footslope. We found that the hillslope C sink is driven primarily by the burial of in situ plant production rather than preservation of eroded SOC, a finding that differs from existing hypotheses. At TV, the net sequestration of atmospheric C by long-term hollow evacuation and refilling depends on the fate of the C exported from the zero order watershed. This study suggests that erosion and deposition are coupled processes that create a previously unrecognized C sink in undisturbed upland watersheds, with a potential to substantially affect the global C balance presently, and over geological timescales.

  13. The Dependence of Peat Soil Hydraulic Conductivity on Dominant Vegetation Type in Mountain Fens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crockett, A. C.; Ronayne, M. J.; Cooper, D. J.

    2014-12-01

    The peat soil within fen wetlands provides water storage that can substantially influence the hydrology of mountain watersheds. In this study, we investigated the relationship between hydraulic conductivity and vegetation type for fens occurring in Rocky Mountain National Park (RMNP), Colorado, USA. Vegetation in RMNP fens can be dominated by woody plants and shrubs, such as willows; by mosses; or by herbaceous plants such as sedges. Fens dominated by each vegetation type were selected for study. Six fens were investigated, all of which are in the Colorado River watershed on the west side of RMNP. For each site, soil hydraulic conductivity was measured at multiple locations using a single-ring infiltrometer. As a result of the shallow water table in these fens (the water table was always within 10 cm of the surface), horizontal hydraulic gradients were produced during the field tests. The measured infiltration rates were analyzed using the numerical model HYDRUS. In order to determine the hydraulic conductivity, a parameter estimation problem was solved using HYDRUS as the forward simulator. Horizontal flow was explicitly accounted for in the model. This approach produced more accurate estimates of hydraulic conductivity than would be obtained using an analytical solution that assumes strictly vertical flow. Significant differences in hydraulic properties between fens appear to result at least in part from the effects of different dominant vegetation types on peat soil formation.

  14. Ground-based structure from motion - multi view stereo (SFM-MVS) for upland soil erosion assessment.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McShane, Gareth; James, Mike; Quniton, John; Farrow, Luke; Glendell, Miriam; Jones, Lee; Kirkham, Matthew; Morgan, David; Evans, Martin; Anderson, Karen; Lark, Murray; Rawlins, Barry; Rickson, Jane; Quine, Timothy; Benaud, Pia; Brazier, Richard

    2016-04-01

    In upland environments, quantifying soil loss through erosion processes at a high resolution can be time consuming, costly and logistically difficult. In this pilot study 'A cost effective framework for monitoring soil erosion in England and Wales', funded by the UK Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra), we evaluate the use of annually repeated ground-based photography surveys, processed using structure-from-motion and multi-view stereo (SfM-MVS) 3-D reconstruction software (Agisoft Photoscan). The aim is to enable efficient but detailed site-scale studies of erosion forms in inaccessible UK upland environments, in order to quantify dynamic processes, such as erosion and mass movement. The evaluation of the SfM-MVS technique is particularly relevant in upland landscapes, where the remoteness and inaccessibility of field sites may render some of the more established survey techniques impractical. We present results from 5 upland sites across the UK, acquired over a 2-year period. Erosion features of varying width (3 m to 35 m) and length (20 m to 60 m), representing a range of spatial scales (from 100 m2 to 1000 m2) were surveyed, in upland habitats including bogs, peatland, upland grassland and moorland. For each feature, around 150 to 600 ground-based photographs were taken at oblique angles over a 10 to 20 minute period, using an uncalibrated Canon 600D SLR camera with a 28 mm lens (focal length set to infinity). Camera settings varied based upon light conditions (exposure 100-400 ISO, aperture F4.5 to F8, shutter speed 1/100 to 1/250 second). For inter-survey comparisons, models were geo-referenced using 20 to 30 ground control points (numbered black markers with a white target) placed around and within the feature, with their co-ordinates measured by survey-grade differential GNSS (Trimble R4). Volumetric estimates of soil loss were quantified using digital surface models (DSMs) derived from the repeat survey data and subtracted from a

  15. Plant soil interactions alter carbon cycling in an upland grassland soil

    PubMed Central

    Thomson, Bruce C.; Ostle, Nick J.; McNamara, Niall P.; Oakley, Simon; Whiteley, Andrew S.; Bailey, Mark J.; Griffiths, Robert I.

    2013-01-01

    Soil carbon (C) storage is dependent upon the complex dynamics of fresh and native organic matter cycling, which are regulated by plant and soil-microbial activities. A fundamental challenge exists to link microbial biodiversity with plant-soil C cycling processes to elucidate the underlying mechanisms regulating soil carbon. To address this, we contrasted vegetated grassland soils with bare soils, which had been plant-free for 3 years, using stable isotope (13C) labeled substrate assays and molecular analyses of bacterial communities. Vegetated soils had higher C and N contents, biomass, and substrate-specific respiration rates. Conversely, following substrate addition unlabeled, native soil C cycling was accelerated in bare soil and retarded in vegetated soil; indicative of differential priming effects. Functional differences were reflected in bacterial biodiversity with Alphaproteobacteria and Acidobacteria dominating vegetated and bare soils, respectively. Significant isotopic enrichment of soil RNA was found after substrate addition and rates varied according to substrate type. However, assimilation was independent of plant presence which, in contrast to large differences in 13CO2 respiration rates, indicated greater substrate C use efficiency in bare, Acidobacteria-dominated soils. Stable isotope probing (SIP) revealed most community members had utilized substrates with little evidence for competitive outgrowth of sub-populations. Our findings support theories on how plant-mediated soil resource availability affects the turnover of different pools of soil carbon, and we further identify a potential role of soil microbial biodiversity. Specifically we conclude that emerging theories on the life histories of dominant soil taxa can be invoked to explain changes in soil carbon cycling linked to resource availability, and that there is a strong case for considering microbial biodiversity in future studies investigating the turnover of different pools of soil

  16. Annual sulfate budgets for Dutch lowland peat polders: The soil is a major sulfate source through peat and pyrite oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vermaat, Jan E.; Harmsen, Joop; Hellmann, Fritz A.; van der Geest, Harm G.; de Klein, Jeroen J. M.; Kosten, Sarian; Smolders, Alfons J. P.; Verhoeven, Jos T. A.; Mes, Ron G.; Ouboter, Maarten

    2016-02-01

    Annual sulfate mass balances have been constructed for four low-lying peat polders in the Netherlands, to resolve the origin of high sulfate concentrations in surface water, which is considered a water quality problem, as indicated amongst others by the absence of sensitive water plant species. Potential limitation of these plants to areas with low sulfate was analyzed with a spatial match-up of two large databases. The peat polders are generally used for dairy farming or nature conservation, and have considerable areas of shallow surface water (mean 16%, range 6-43%). As a consequence of continuous drainage, the peat in these polders mineralizes causing subsidence rates generally ranging between 2 and 10 mm y-1. Together with pyrite oxidation, this peat mineralization the most important internal source of sulfate, providing an estimated 96 kg SO4 ha-1 mm-1 subsidence y-1. External sources are precipitation and water supplied during summer to compensate for water shortage, but these were found to be minor compared to internal release. The most important output flux is discharge of excess surface water during autumn and winter. If only external fluxes in and out of a polder are evaluated, inputs average 37 ± 9 and exports 169 ± 17 kg S ha-1 y-1. During summer, when evapotranspiration exceeds rainfall, sulfate accumulates in the unsaturated zone, to be flushed away and drained off during the wet autumn and winter. In some polders, upward seepage from early Holocene, brackish sediments can be a source of sulfate. Peat polders export sulfate to the regional water system and the sea during winter drainage. The available sulfate probably only plays a minor role in the oxidation of peat: we estimate that this is less than 10% whereas aerobic mineralization is the most important. Most surface waters in these polders have high sulfate concentrations, which generally decline during the growing season when aquatic sediments are a sink. In the sediment, this sulfur is

  17. CARBON MONOXIDE FLUXES OF DIFFERENT SOIL LAYERS IN UPLAND CANADIAN BOREAL FORESTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dark or low-light carbon monoxide fluxes at upland Canadian boreal forest sites were measured on-site with static chambers and with a laboratory incubation technique using cores from different depths at the same sites. Three different upland black spruce sites, burned in 1987,199...

  18. The influence of aeration and temperature on the structure of bacterial complexes in high-moor peat soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kukharenko, O. S.; Pavlova, N. S.; Dobrovol'Skaya, T. G.; Golovchenko, A. V.; Pochatkova, T. N.; Zenova, G. M.; Zvyagintsev, D. G.

    2010-05-01

    The number and taxonomic structure of the heterotrophic block of aerobic and facultative anaerobic bacteria were studied in monoliths from a high-moor peat (stored at room temperature and in a refrigerator) and in the peat horizons mixed in laboratory vessels. The monitoring lasted for a year. In the T0 horizon, spirilla predominated at room and low temperatures; in the T1 and T2 horizons, bacilli were the dominants. The continuous mixing of the peat layers increased the oxygen concentration and the peat decomposition; hence, the shares of actinomycetes and bacilli (bacteria of the hydrolytic complex) increased. In the peat studied, the bacilli were in the active state; i.e., vegetative cells predominated, whose amount ranged from 65 to 90%. The representatives of the main species of bacilli (the facultative anaerobic forms prevailed) hydrolyzed starch, pectin, and carboxymethylcellulose. Thus, precisely sporiferous bacteria can actively participate in the decomposition of plant polysaccharides in high-moor peat soils that are characterized by low temperatures and an oxygen deficit. The development of actinomycetes is inhibited by low temperatures; they can develop only under elevated temperature and better aeration.

  19. Soil-atmosphere trace gas exchange from tropical oil palm plantations on peat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arn Teh, Yit; Manning, Frances; Zin Zawawi, Norliyana; Hill, Timothy; Chocholek, Melanie; Khoon Kho, Lip

    2015-04-01

    Oil palm is the largest agricultural crop in the tropics, accounting for 13 % of all tropical land cover. Due to its large areal extent, oil palm cultivation may have important implications not only for terrestrial stores of C and N, but may also impact regional and global exchanges of material and energy, including fluxes of trace gases and water vapor. In particular, recent expansion of oil palm into tropical peatlands has raised concerns over enhanced soil C emissions from degradation of peat, and elevated N-gas fluxes linked to N fertilizer application. Here we report our preliminary findings on soil carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) fluxes from a long-term, multi-scale project investigating the C, N and greenhouse gas (GHG) dynamics of oil palm ecosystems established on peat soils in Sarawak, Malaysian Borneo. Flux chamber measurements indicate that soil CO2, CH4 and N2O fluxes averaged 20.0 ± 16.0 Mg CO2-C ha-1 yr-1, 37.4 ± 29.9 kg CH4-C ha-1 yr-1 and 4.7 ± 4.2 g N2O-N ha-1 yr-1, respectively. Soil CO2 fluxes were on par with other drained tropical peatlands; whereas CH4 fluxes exceeded observations from similar study sites elsewhere. Nitrous oxide fluxes were in a similar range to fluxes from other drained tropical peatlands, but lower than emissions from mineral-soil plantations by up to three orders of magnitude. Fluxes of soil CO2 and N2O were spatially stratified, and contingent upon the distribution of plants, deposited harvest residues, and soil moisture. Soil CO2 fluxes were most heavily influenced by the distribution of palms and their roots. On average, autotrophic (root) respiration accounted for approximately 78 % of total soil CO2 flux, and total soil respiration declined steeply away from palms; e.g. soil CO2 fluxes in the immediate 1 m radius around palms were up to 6 times greater than fluxes in inter-palm spaces due to higher densities of roots. Placement of harvest residues played an important - but secondary

  20. Nitrogen Turnover Processes in Low Temperatures in an Agricultural Peat Soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silvennoinen, H. M.; Hämäläinen, R.; Koponen, H. T.; Martikainen, P. J.

    2009-12-01

    Nitrogen (N) cycling in agricultural soils has a key impact on the environment. Agricultural ecosystems are the most important sources of nitrous oxide (N2O), an important greenhouse gas, to the atmosphere. Additionally N fertilizers used to improve plant growth lead to enhanced N leaching and thereby to eutrophication of surrounding aquatic ecosystems. Microbial processes are normally enhanced by increase in temperature. Several recent studies have shown that although N2O emissions from agricultural soils are of microbiological origin, produced mainly in microbial reduction of nitrate (NO3-) via nitric oxide (NO) and N2O to molecular nitrogen (N2) (denitrification), the temperature response of N2O emissions is greatly variable and there is a lot of evidence of high emissions during cold periods (Koponen et al. 2006). Denitrification is, however, regulated by availability of inorganic N and therefore dependant not only on N fertilization but also on N turnover processes in soil. These processes include mineralization of organic N to ammonium (NH4+), oxidation of NH4+ to nitrite and NO3- (nitrification). These processes and their regulation especially in low temperatures are yet poorly understood. In this experiment, gross rates of N mineralization and nitrification and carbon dioxide production were studied in various temperatures ranging from -1.5 to 15 °C. Soil samples were taken from grassland on peat soil in Southern Finland (60o49’N, 23o30’E) on September 8th 2008 from depths of 0-10 cm. Temperature responses of N gross mineralization and nitrification and of microbial respiration were measured in a laboratory experiment. The incubation temperatures used for experiments were 15, 5, 2.5, 1.5, 0.5, 0, -0.5 and -1.5 °C. After 7 d temperature-specific incubation, gross rates of N mineralization and nitrification were determined with pool dilution technique in a 24 h incubation experiment. This study showed that N turnover processes in agricultural peat soil

  1. Temperature, Water Content and Wet-Dry Cycle Effects on DOC Production and Carbon Mineralization in Agricultural Peat Soils.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A series of controlled laboratory experiments were utilized to examine factors affecting dissolved organic carbon (DOC) production and C mineralization rates over a range of conditions experienced resulting from agricultural practices in peat soils from the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta. We conclude...

  2. Use of Computer-Aided Tomography (CT) Imaging for Quantifying Coarse Roots, Rhizomes, Peat, and Particle Densities in Marsh Soils

    EPA Science Inventory

    Computer-aided Tomography (CT) imaging was utilized to quantify wet mass of coarse roots, rhizomes, and peat in cores collected from organic-rich (Jamaica Bay, NY) and mineral (North Inlet, SC) Spartina alterniflora soils. Calibration rods composed of materials with standard dens...

  3. Raman spectroscopic study of amorphous and crystalline hydrocarbons from soils, peats and lignite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jehlička, Jan; Edwards, Howell G. M.; Villar, Susana E. J.; Pokorný, Jan

    2005-08-01

    FT-Raman spectra were obtained from the natural hydrocarbon mixtures ozokerite and hatchettite as well as from the terpenoid minerals fichtelite (norabietane) and hartite (α-phyllocladane). Some of these hydrocarbons occur in soil and peat environments of Holocene age. However, hartite occurs in lignite, in fossilised Glyptostrobus ( Taxodiaceae) trees and in pelosiderites of the Bílina Miocene series (about 20 Ma); it represents the accumulated and crystallised product of diagenetic transformation of precursor biogenic terpenoids. Raman spectra of earth waxes investigated confirm their dominantly aliphatic character and oxidative degradation (related to weathering and/or subaerial alteration in museum cabinets). Vibrational assignments are proposed and differences in Raman spectra of fichtelite and hartite discussed. Some of the individual features can be used for discrimination (e.g., hartite bands at 1480, 1310, 1287, 1041, 729 and 693 cm -1 and fichtelite bands at 1302, 836, 717 and 533 cm -1).

  4. Time-scales of hydrological forcing on the geochemistry and bacterial community structure of temperate peat soils

    PubMed Central

    Nunes, Flavia L. D.; Aquilina, Luc; de Ridder, Jo; Francez, André-Jean; Quaiser, Achim; Caudal, Jean-Pierre; Vandenkoornhuyse, Philippe; Dufresne, Alexis

    2015-01-01

    Peatlands are an important global carbon reservoir. The continued accumulation of carbon in peatlands depends on the persistence of anoxic conditions, in part induced by water saturation, which prevents oxidation of organic matter, and slows down decomposition. Here we investigate how and over what time scales the hydrological regime impacts the geochemistry and the bacterial community structure of temperate peat soils. Peat cores from two sites having contrasting groundwater budgets were subjected to four controlled drought-rewetting cycles. Pore water geochemistry and metagenomic profiling of bacterial communities showed that frequent water table drawdown induced lower concentrations of dissolved carbon, higher concentrations of sulfate and iron and reduced bacterial richness and diversity in the peat soil and water. Short-term drought cycles (3–9 day frequency) resulted in different communities from continuously saturated environments. Furthermore, the site that has more frequently experienced water table drawdown during the last two decades presented the most striking shifts in bacterial community structure, altering biogeochemical functioning of peat soils. Our results suggest that the increase in frequency and duration of drought conditions under changing climatic conditions or water resource use can induce profound changes in bacterial communities, with potentially severe consequences for carbon storage in temperate peatlands. PMID:26440376

  5. Time-scales of hydrological forcing on the geochemistry and bacterial community structure of temperate peat soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunes, Flavia L. D.; Aquilina, Luc; De Ridder, Jo; Francez, André-Jean; Quaiser, Achim; Caudal, Jean-Pierre; Vandenkoornhuyse, Philippe; Dufresne, Alexis

    2015-10-01

    Peatlands are an important global carbon reservoir. The continued accumulation of carbon in peatlands depends on the persistence of anoxic conditions, in part induced by water saturation, which prevents oxidation of organic matter, and slows down decomposition. Here we investigate how and over what time scales the hydrological regime impacts the geochemistry and the bacterial community structure of temperate peat soils. Peat cores from two sites having contrasting groundwater budgets were subjected to four controlled drought-rewetting cycles. Pore water geochemistry and metagenomic profiling of bacterial communities showed that frequent water table drawdown induced lower concentrations of dissolved carbon, higher concentrations of sulfate and iron and reduced bacterial richness and diversity in the peat soil and water. Short-term drought cycles (3-9 day frequency) resulted in different communities from continuously saturated environments. Furthermore, the site that has more frequently experienced water table drawdown during the last two decades presented the most striking shifts in bacterial community structure, altering biogeochemical functioning of peat soils. Our results suggest that the increase in frequency and duration of drought conditions under changing climatic conditions or water resource use can induce profound changes in bacterial communities, with potentially severe consequences for carbon storage in temperate peatlands.

  6. Time-scales of hydrological forcing on the geochemistry and bacterial community structure of temperate peat soils.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Flavia L D; Aquilina, Luc; de Ridder, Jo; Francez, André-Jean; Quaiser, Achim; Caudal, Jean-Pierre; Vandenkoornhuyse, Philippe; Dufresne, Alexis

    2015-01-01

    Peatlands are an important global carbon reservoir. The continued accumulation of carbon in peatlands depends on the persistence of anoxic conditions, in part induced by water saturation, which prevents oxidation of organic matter, and slows down decomposition. Here we investigate how and over what time scales the hydrological regime impacts the geochemistry and the bacterial community structure of temperate peat soils. Peat cores from two sites having contrasting groundwater budgets were subjected to four controlled drought-rewetting cycles. Pore water geochemistry and metagenomic profiling of bacterial communities showed that frequent water table drawdown induced lower concentrations of dissolved carbon, higher concentrations of sulfate and iron and reduced bacterial richness and diversity in the peat soil and water. Short-term drought cycles (3-9 day frequency) resulted in different communities from continuously saturated environments. Furthermore, the site that has more frequently experienced water table drawdown during the last two decades presented the most striking shifts in bacterial community structure, altering biogeochemical functioning of peat soils. Our results suggest that the increase in frequency and duration of drought conditions under changing climatic conditions or water resource use can induce profound changes in bacterial communities, with potentially severe consequences for carbon storage in temperate peatlands. PMID:26440376

  7. Characteristics, genesis and classification of a basin peat soil under negative human impact in Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dengiz, Orhan; Ozaytekin, H. Huseyin; Cayci, Gokhan; Baran, Abdullah

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this research was to investigate the morphology, genesis and classification of organic soils formed on depression and flat land around Lake Yenicaga, west-central Turkey. Formation of the area has been influenced by tectonic and karst processes. This peatland is important in this area due to its extensive use as a horticultural plant growth medium resulting from positive physical and chemical properties. Organic soils in the study area were formed in nutrient-rich conditions and it is classified as typical basin peat. Four representative pedons were excavated in the study area based on extensive observations performed with random grid method using an auger. Samples were taken from horizons in each profile for laboratory analyses. Organic matter contents ranged from 12.5 to 91.5% across all four pedons. Fiber contents were between 4.3 and 91.5%, and N ranged from 0.56 to 2.19%. Cation exchange capacity ranged from 37 to 222 cmol kg-1, bulk density from 0.09 to 0.78 g cm-3, lime from 0.15 to 2.62%. The pH and ECe values ranged from 5.38 to 7.92 and 0.50 to 3.80 dS m-1, respectively. Sand, silt and clay contents of the organic soils ranged between 0.75-3.92, 40.70-74.77 and 24.15-57.30%, respectively. Differences in organic soils were found to depend on the environment, botanical origins, decomposition degrees, and groundwater composition. The organic soils of the research area were classified in the typic, hemic and hydric subgroups of Medifibrists (Soil Taxonomy 1999).

  8. Heavy metal contamination from historic mining in upland soil and estuarine sediments of Egypt Bay, Maine, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osher, L. J.; Leclerc, L.; Wiersma, G. B.; Hess, C. T.; Guiseppe, V. E.

    2006-10-01

    Concentrations of Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn in sediments of Egypt Bay in Hancock County, Maine, are elevated above background levels. The source of the contamination is Cu mining that occurred in the uplands adjacent to Egypt Stream between 1877 and 1885. Egypt Stream is a tributary to Egypt Bay. Egypt Bay is part of the Taunton Bay estuary system. The Hagan Mine was one of the mines extracting metals from the sulfide deposits in Downeast Maine north of Penobscot Bay. Metal concentrations were determined using ICP-AES after sample digestion with nitric acid. Soil collected from the coarse textured mine tailings pile contained elevated concentrations of Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn, but the majority of the surface soils at the Hagan Mine site were not contaminated. Estuary sediments from the surface to 100 cm depth were collected in four locations within Egypt Bay. Below 40 cm, metal concentrations in sediments were similar to those in uncontaminated upland soils. Metal concentrations in the estuary sediments between the surface and 26 cm were above background levels. According to 210Pb dating, the sediment at 26-34 cm depth was likely to have been deposited at the time the historic mines were in operation. Concentrations of Cd, Cu, Pb, and Zn in sediment from the 32-34 cm depth interval are similar to concentrations in the upland soil sample from the mine tailings pile. Elevated Pb concentrations in sediments from the surface to 24 cm are from atmospheric Pb deposition from anthropogenic sources. Sediment in the top 10 cm of the estuary has been mixed both by the polychaete worm Nereis virens and by those harvesting the worms for sale as fish bait.

  9. Secondary successions of biota in oil-polluted peat soil upon different biological remediation methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melekhina, E. N.; Markarova, M. Yu.; Shchemelinina, T. N.; Anchugova, E. M.; Kanev, V. A.

    2015-06-01

    The effects of different bioremediation methods on restoration of the oil-polluted peat soil (Histosol) in the northernmost taiga subzone of European Russia was studied. The population dynamics of microorganisms belonging to different trophic groups (hydrocarbon-oxidizing, ammonifying, nitrifying, and oligonitrophilic) were analyzed together with data on the soil enzyme (catalase and dehydrogenase) activities, population densities of soil microfauna groups, their structures, and states of phytocenoses during a sevenyear-long succession. The remediation with biopreparations Roder composed of oil-oxidizing microorganisms-Roder with Rhodococcus rubber and R. erythropolis and Universal with Rhodotorula glutinis and Rhodococcus sp.-was more efficient than the agrochemical and technical remediation. It was concluded that the biopreparations activate microbiological oil destruction, thereby accelerating restoration succession of phytocenosis and zoocenosis. The succession of dominant microfauna groups was observed: the dipteran larvae and Mesostigmata mites predominant at the early stages were replaced by collembolans at later stages. The pioneer oribatid mite species were Tectocepheus velatus, Oppiella nova, Liochthonius sellnicki, Oribatula tibialis, and Eupelops sp.

  10. Imaging tropical peatlands in Indonesia using ground penetrating radar (GPR) and electrical resistivity imaging (ERI): implications for carbon stock estimates and peat soil characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comas, X.; Terry, N.; Slater, L.; Warren, M.; Kolka, R.; Kristijono, A.; Sudiana, N.; Nurjaman, D.; Darusman, T.

    2015-01-01

    Current estimates of carbon (C) storage in peatland systems worldwide indicate tropical peatlands comprise about 15% of the global peat carbon pool. Such estimates are uncertain due to data gaps regarding organic peat soil thickness and C content. Indonesian peatlands are considered the largest pool of tropical peat carbon (C), accounting for an estimated 65% of all tropical peat while being the largest source of carbon dioxide emissions from degrading peat worldwide, posing a major concern regarding long-term sources of greenhouse gases to the atmosphere. We combined a set of indirect geophysical methods (ground penetrating radar, GPR, and electrical resistivity imaging, ERI) with direct observations from core samples (including C analysis) to better understand peatland thickness in West Kalimantan (Indonesia) and determine how geophysical imaging may enhance traditional coring methods for estimating C storage in peatland systems. Peatland thicknesses estimated from GPR and ERI and confirmed by coring indicated variation by less than 3% even for small peat-mineral soil interface gradients (i.e. below 0.02°). The geophysical data also provide information on peat matrix attributes such as thickness of organomineral horizons between peat and underlying substrate, the presence of wood layers, buttressed trees and soil type. These attributes could further constrain quantification of C content and aid responsible peatland management in Indonesia.

  11. Function of peatland located on secondary transformed peat-moorsh soils on groundwater purification processes and the elution of soil organic matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szczepański, M.; Szajdak, L.; Bogacz, A.

    2009-04-01

    The investigation of peatland is used to show the water quality functioning with respect to different forms of nitrogen and carbon. The purification of ground water by the transect of 4.5 km long consisting organic soils (peat-moorsh soils) was estimated. This transect is located in the Agroecological Landscape Park in Turew, 40 km South-West of Poznan, West Polish Lowland. There is this transect along Wyskoć ditch. pH, the contents of total and dissolved organic carbon, total nitrogen, N-NO3-, N-NH4+ was measured. Additionally C/N factors of peats were estimated. The investigation has shown the impact of the peatland located on the secondary transformed peat - moorsh soils on the lowering of total nitrogen, ammonium, and nitrates as well as total and dissolved organic carbon in ground water. Peat-moorsh soils were described and classified according to Polish hydrogenic soil classification and World Reference Base Soil Notation. There are these investigated points along to Wyskoc ditch. Two times a month during entire vegetation season the following material was taken from four chosen sites marked as Zbechy, Bridge, Shelterbelt and Hirudo: samples of peat, from the depth of 0-20 cm, samples of water from the ditch, samples of ground water from wells established for this investigation. Samples of peat-moorsh soils were collected at the depth 0-20 cm. Soils were sampled two times a month from 10 sites of each site. Samples were air dried and crushed to pass a 1 mm-mesh sieve. These 10 sub-samples were mixed for the reason of preparing a "mean sample", which used for the determination of pH (in 1M KCl), dissolved organic carbon (DOC), total organic carbon (TOC), total nitrogen (Ntotal), and N-NO3- as well as N-NH4+. In water from Wyskoć ditch pH, Ntotal, N-NO3-, N-NH4+, DTC (dissolved total carbon) and DOC (dissolved organic carbon) was measured. Ground water samples were collected from four wells established for this investigation. The water was filtered by the

  12. Soil cover in the southern forest-steppe of the Central Russian Upland against the background of centennial climate fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnova, L. G.; Kukharuk, N. S.; Chendev, Yu. G.

    2016-07-01

    Special approaches and algorithms for studying the response of zonal soils and the soil cover of the forest-steppe zone to climate fluctuations were developed on the basis of data of repeated soil surveys. They made it possible to analyze the particular transformations of the soil cover as indicators of short-term climate fluctuations in the southern forest-steppe of the Central Russian Upland. Vector soil maps and related databases on soil polygons were developed using GIS technologies. Changes in the climatic conditions between two rounds of large-scale soil surveys in 1971 and 1991 reflecting the so-called Brückner cycles were identified. A characteristic feature of climate change during that period was the rise in the mean annual air temperature by 0.2°C and an increase in the mean annual precipitation by 83 mm. In response to this change, the area of leached chernozems (Luvic Chernozems) on the interfluves somewhat increased, whereas the area of typical chernozems (Haplic Chernozems) decreased.

  13. Uncertainties in peat volume and soil carbon estimated using ground penetrating radar and probing

    SciTech Connect

    Parsekian, Andrew D.; Slater, Lee; Ntarlagiannis, Dimitrios; Nolan, James; Sebestyen, Stephen D; Kolka, Randall K; Hanson, Paul J

    2012-01-01

    We evaluate the uncertainty in calculations of peat basin volume using high-resolution data . to resolve the three-dimensional structure of a peat basin using both direct (push probes) and indirect geophysical (ground penetrating radar) measurements. We compared volumetric estimates from both approaches with values from literature. We identified subsurface features that can introduce uncertainties into direct peat thickness measurements including the presence of woody peat and soft clay or gyttja. We demonstrate that a simple geophysical technique that is easily scalable to larger peatlands can be used to rapidly and cost effectively obtain more accurate and less uncertain estimates of peat basin volumes critical to improving understanding of the total terrestrial carbon pool in peatlands.

  14. Effect of peat characteristics on P, N and DOC mobilization from re-wetted peat soils - a laboratory column study for the impacts of restoration on forestry-drained peatlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koskinen, Markku; Kaila, Annu; Asam, Zaki; Uusitalo, Risto; Smolander, Aino; Kiikkilä, Oili; Sarkkola, Sakari; Kitunen, Veikko; Fritze, Hannu; Nousiainen, Hannu; Tervahauta, Arja; Xiao, Liwen; Nieminen, Mika

    2016-04-01

    Peatlands are an integral part of the hydrological cycle in the boreal and temperate zones, providing ecosystem services such as water filtering. From the mid to late 1900's, over 15 ha of peatlands and wetlands were drained for forestry in the temperate and boreal zones, causing deterioration of biodiversity and loss of ecosystem services. They are now being restored in order to reverse this development. Restoration of pealands has been found to cause leaching of DOC and nutrients after water level rise and expansion of reducing conditions in the peat. A molar ratio between redox-sensitive Fe and P in the peat of < 10 has been previously suggested as a limit value indicating risk of high P export. The ratio, however, does not predict the level of P release well when the value is < 10. It has also been suggested that redox-sensitive Fe is involved in the export of DOC via consumption of protons during reduction reactions of Fe, which reduces the soil positive charge and makes the DOC molecules more electronegative, which makes them repeal each other. An incubation experiment was conducted to study factors affecting P, N and DOC release from inundated peat from forestry-drained peatlands of several fertility classes. It was discovered that in addition to Fe, a high ratio of Al to P in the peat reduces P export under reducing conditions. High peat Fe content was also found to predict high DOC export, suggesting that minerotrophic sites are susceptible to post-restoration DOC leaching due to the Fe in their peat. Microbial biomass and mineralization potential of the peat were not found to be important for the export of DOC or P. High NO3 content in the peat predicted high export of NH4 under reducing conditions.

  15. Restoration of Upland Hardwood Tree Species on the Formerly Cultivated Soils in the Coastal Plain of South Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, R.H.; Waldrop, T.A.

    2001-08-03

    The authors studied various approaches to restore upland hardwood species to formerly cultivated soils at the SRS. Studies with direct seedling were largely a failure and resulted in very low rates of establishment. Failure was a result of predation and drought. Growth and survival of planted oaks, dogwood and pine did not vary between hardwood overstory and pine overstory conditions. Soil trenching in a forty year old loblolly stand demonstrated dramatic increases in growth of planted oaks and dogwood. When compared, survival is similar if not slightly better when seedlings are planted in the understory of canopies vs. clearcuts. However, growth is better in recent clearcuts for dogwood and white oaks. Hickory does better underplanted.

  16. Streptomyces actinomycinicus sp. nov., isolated from soil of a peat swamp forest.

    PubMed

    Tanasupawat, Somboon; Phongsopitanun, Wongsakorn; Suwanborirux, Khanit; Ohkuma, Moriya; Kudo, Takuji

    2016-01-01

    A novel actinomycete, strain RCU-197T, was isolated from soil of a peat swamp forest in Rayong Province, Thailand. Using a polyphasic approach, the strain was classified in the genus Streptomyces. It contained ll-diaminopimelic acid in the cell-wall peptidoglycan. No diagnostic sugars were detected in whole-cell hydrolysates and there was a lack of mycolic acids. The major menaquinones were MK-9(H6) and MK-9(H8). The predominant cellular fatty acids were iso-C14 : 0, iso-C15 : 0, anteiso-C15 : 0 and iso-C16 : 0. The polar lipids profile consisted of diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylinositol, phosphatidylglycerol and phosphatidylinositol mannoside, an unknown aminolipid and two unknown phospholipids. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences showed the strain formed distinct clade within the genus Streptomyces and was closely related to Streptomyces echinatus NBRC 12763T (98.78 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity). According to the polyphasic approach as well as DNA-DNA relatedness, the strain could be clearly differentiated from closely related species and represents a novel species of the genus Streptomyces, for which the name Streptomyces actinomycinicus sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is RCU-197T ( = JCM 30864T = TISTR 2208T = PCU 342T). PMID:26510888

  17. Biogeochemistry of carbon and related major and trace elements in peat bog soils of the middle taiga of Western Siberia (Russia).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanova, V. A.; Mironycheva-Tokareva, N. P.; Pokrovsky, O. S.

    2012-04-01

    Global climate changes impact the status of wetland ecosystems shifting the balances of the carbon, macro-, and microelements cycles. This study aims to establish the features of accumulation and distribution of major- and trace elements in the organic layer of peat bog soils, belonging to different ecosystems of the oligotrophic bog complex located in the middle taiga of Western Siberia (Khanty-Mansiysk region, Russia). Key areas which are selected for this study include the following bog conjugate elementary ecosystems: higher ryam, lower ryam, ridge-hollow complex, and oligotrophic poor fen as characterized previously [1]. We have sampled various peat types along the entire length of the soil column (every 10 cm down to 3 m). Peat samples were analyzed for a wide range of macro- and microelements using an ICP-MS technique following full acid digestion in a microwave oven. These measurements allowed quantitative estimates of major- and trace elements in the peat deposits within the whole bog complex and individual elementary landscapes. Based on the data obtained, the lateral and radial geochemical structures of the bog landscapes were determined and clarified for the first time for middle taiga of the West Siberian plain. The similar regime of mineral nutrition during the complete bog landscape formation was detected for the peat deposits based on the measurements of some major- and trace elements (Ca, Fe, Mg, etc.). The vertical distribution of some major and some trace elements along the profile of peat column is rather uniform with relatively strong increase in the bottom organic layers. This strongly suggests the similarity of the processes of element accumulation in the peat and relatively weak post depositional redistribution of elements within the peat soil profile. Overall, obtained corroborate the existing view on chemical composition of peats being determined by botanical peat's components (which forms this peat deposit), atmospheric precipitation

  18. Coevolution of topography, soils, and vegetation in upland landscapes: Using cinder cones to elucidate ecohydrogeomorphic feedback mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuire, L.; Pelletier, J. D.; Rasmussen, C.

    2013-12-01

    The study of landscape evolution in upland environments requires analysis of complex interactions among topography, soil development, and vegetation cover under changing climatic conditions. Earth surface scientists lack a comprehensive understanding of these interactions in part due to their interdisciplinary nature, our limited ability to reconstruct the progression of landscape states through time, and the limited spatially-distributed data available for paleoclimate conditions. In this study, we investigate the interactions and feedbacks among topography, soil development, and vegetation cover in upland environments using remote sensing, geochemistry, and numerical modeling. We focus on quantifying the evolution of late Quaternary cinder cones within several volcanic fields, spanning a range of climates, as a function of age and microclimate, which varies with elevation and slope aspect. Cinder cones are excellent natural laboratories for studying the evolution of upland landscapes because they begin their evolution at a known time in the past (i.e. many cinder cones have been radiometrically dated) and because they often have unusually uniform initial conditions (i.e. they form close to the angle of repose and are comprised of well-sorted volcaniclastic parent materials). As such, cinder cones of different ages with similar size and climatic history can provide an approximate time progression illustrating how a dated hillslope has evolved over geologic time scales. Data suggest that rates of soil development and fluvial erosion are low on younger cones, which have surfaces consisting mostly of permeable cinders, but increase significantly after eolian deposits reduce the permeability of the cone surface. Further, data demonstrate that microclimatic differences between north and south facing slopes lead to systematic variations in biomass. Additionally, north-facing slopes on cinder cones are found to be steeper than corresponding south-facing slopes. The

  19. Influence of moisture on the vital activity of actinomycetes in a cultivated low-moor peat soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zenova, G. M.; Gryadunova, A. A.; Doroshenko, E. A.; Likhacheva, A. A.; Sudnitsyn, I. I.; Pochatkova, T. N.; Zvyagintsev, D. G.

    2007-05-01

    It was found that the actinomycetal complex of a cultivated low-moor peat soil is characterized by a high population density and diversity of actinomycetes; representatives of eleven genera were isolated from this soil: Streptomyces, Micromonospora, Actinomadura, Saccharopolyspora, Microbispora, Microtetraspora, Streptosporangium, Nocardioides, Saccharomonospora, Kibdelosporangium, and Thermomonospora. Some genera were isolated from the soil under all the studied levels of soil moisture. The so-called rare (rarely occurring) genera (Saccharomonospora, Kibdelosporangium, and Thermomonospora) were isolated upon the low level of soil moisture, which ensured an absence of competition from the more abundant actinomycetes. Spores of all the studied actinomycetes could germinate under the low moisture level (a w = 0.67). The level of moisture a w = 0.98 was found to be optimal for the development of the actinomycetes. The complete cycle of the development of all the actinomycetes up to spore formation occurring was only observed under the high moisture level (a w = 0.98).

  20. Hydrological, fine sediment and water colour response of managed upland wetlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holden, J.

    2003-04-01

    Many upland peats in the UK have been subject to artificial drainage mainly involving the cutting of ditches. The aim was to drain the ground for grazing and game but there is little evidence of any improvement for these purposes. Instead moorland ditching has been blamed for causing a wide range of problems including: increased flooding, decreased low flows, increased water discolouration (or loss of dissolved organic carbon), accelerated erosion and associated destruction of in-stream and wetland habitats and the removal of the terrestrial carbon store. However, there is conflicting evidence for the hydrological response of peatlands to drainage and little is known about the exact nature of the hydrological, fine sediment and water colour production, transport and storage processes involved. This poster presents the research outline for a new three year project that aims to examine the effects of wetland management (including ditch blocking and natural revegetation) on the production of runoff, fine sediment and water discolouration in upland blanket peats. Detailed process-based measurements will be combined with simultaneously collected yield data measured at a range of spatial and temporal scales. For example, monitoring of catchment outlets will be combined with measurement of hillslope flow processes including overland flow, subsurface pipeflow, and soil pore matrix and macropore flows. It is envisaged that the project will be extended to deal with the science of a detailed process-based carbon budget for managed upland peats.

  1. Effect of long-term paddy-upland yearly rotations on rice (Oryza sativa) yield, soil properties, and bacteria community diversity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Song; Zheng, Xi; Wang, Dangying; Chen, Liping; Xu, Chunmei; Zhang, Xiufu

    2012-01-01

    A 10-year-long field trial (between 2001 and 2010) was conducted to investigate the effect of paddy-upland rotation on rice yield, soil properties, and bacteria community diversity. Six types of paddy-upland crop rotations were evaluated: rice-fallow (control; CK), rice-rye grass (RR), rice-potato with rice straw mulches (RP), rice-rapeseed with straw incorporated into soil at flowering (ROF), rice-rapeseed incorporated in soil after harvest (ROM), and rice-Chinese milk vetch (RC). Analysis of terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) was used to determine microbial diversity among rotations. Rice yield increased for upland crops planted during the winter. RC had the highest average yield of 7.74 t/ha, followed by RR, RP, ROM, and ROF. Soil quality differences among rotations were found. RC and RP improved the soil mean weight diameter (MWD), which suggested that rice rotated with milk vetch and potato might improve the paddy soil structure. Improved total nitrogen (TN) and soil organic matter (SOM) were also found in RC and RP. The positive relationship between yield and TN/SOM might provide evidence for the effect of RC rotation on rice yield. A strong time dependency of soil bacterial community diversity was also found. PMID:22919301

  2. Holocene Landscape Dynamics in the Ammer Rv. Catchment (Bavarian Alps) - Influence of extreme weather events and land use on soil erosion using peat bogs as geoarchives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwindt, Daniel; Manthe, Pierre; Völkel, Jörg

    2016-04-01

    Soil degradation and the loss of soil organic carbon (SOC) induced by erosion events significantly influence soils and fertility as parts of the ecosystem services and play an important role with regard to global carbon dynamics. Soil erosion is strongly correlated with anthropogenic land use since the Neolithic Revolution around 8.000 BP. Likewise the effect of extreme weather events on soil erosion is of great interest with regard to the recent climate change debate, predicting a strong increase of extreme weather events. Aim of this study is the reconstruction of the Holocene landscape dynamic as influenced by land use and climate conditions. In this study peat bogs containing layers of colluvial sediments directly correlated to soil erosion were used as geoarchives for landscape dynamics. A temporal classification of extreme erosion events was established by dating organic material via 14C within both, colluvial layers as well as their direct peat surroundings. Detection and characterization of peat bogs containing colluvial sediments was based on geomorphological mapping, the application of geophysical methods (ERT - electrical resistivity tomography, GPR - ground penetrating radar) and core soundings. Laboratory analysis included the analysis of particle sizes and the content of organic material. We investigated 16 peat bogs following the altitudinal gradient of the Ammer River from alpine and subalpine towards lowland environments. A deposition of colluvial material could be detected in 4 peat bogs, all situated in the lower parts of the catchment. The minerogenic entry into peat bogs occurred throughout the Holocene as revealed by radiocarbon dating. A distinct cluster of erosional events e.g. during the little ice age could not be detected. Therefore, soil erosion dynamics and the appearance of colluvial sediments within peat bogs must rather be regarded as an effect of land use, actually farming and crop cultivation, or small-scale morphodynamic like

  3. Sequence composition of BAC clones and SSR markers mapped to Upland cotton chromosomes 11 and 21 targeting resistance to soil-borne pathogens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genetic and physical framework mapping in cotton (Gossypium spp.) were used to discover putative gene sequences involved in resistance to common soil-borne pathogens. Chromosome (Chr) 11 and its homoeologous Chr 21 of Upland cotton (G. hirsutum) is a focus for discovery of resistance (R) or pathoge...

  4. Effect of soil texture, tailwater height, and pore-water pressure on the morphodynamics of migrating headcuts in upland concentrated flows

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rill and gully erosion in upland and agricultural areas can result in significant soil degradation worldwide, and headcuts are the primary mechanism by which this landscape dissection occurs. Experiments were conducted to further examine the morphodynamic behavior of actively migrating headcuts in u...

  5. Stable Isotope Probing of Peat and Forest Floor Amendments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quideau, Sylvie; Béasse, Mark

    2013-04-01

    In Alberta, Canada, land reclamation efforts utilize peat as an organic amendment to help reclaim decommissioned oil sands mine sites to upland boreal forests. This study investigates the rhizosphere microbial communities of two pioneer species, aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.), a species not known for strong associations with the soil microbial community, and alder (Alnus crispa Ait.), a species well known for mutualism with actinomycetes. Specifically, the objective was to determine how different organic amendments (peat versus forest floor) influenced the rhizosphere microbial communities and how this could be linked to plant growth. Seedlings were grown for 20 weeks in forest floor material, peat, and a combination of both. They were pulse labelled with 13CO2 (g) and subsequently harvested for plant growth measurements. While analysis of plant growth attributes did not indicate any effect of the organic amendment on aspen growth, alder reported significantly less growth in peat treatments. The rhizosphere soils were extracted for compound-specific analysis of δ13C in microbial phospholipid fatty acids. Stable isotope probing showed greater carbon flow between trees and their rhizosphere communities when seedlings were grown in forest floor material.

  6. Exploring the potential of the permanganate oxidation method as a tool to monitor soil quality in agricultural upland systems of Southeast Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hepp, Catherine M.; Bruun, Thilde Bech; de Neergaard, Andreas

    2014-05-01

    The transition to more intensified upland systems is having an impact on the soil quality, defined as the ability of a soil to both provide and maintain essential services to an ecosystem. As many tropical upland soils are inherently low in quality, it is essential that impacts be monitored. Soil quality is assessed by using a combination of parameters that serve as indicators and cover the soil chemical, biological and physical properties. An ideal indicator should be sensitive to changes in the environment and management practices and should be widely accessible, meaning low resource requirement (i.e. time and equipment). Total organic carbon (TOC) content is a commonly used indicator of soil quality as it is linked to many soil functions and processes; however analysis is costly and requires access to advanced instrumental facilities, rendering it unsuited for many developing countries. An alternative indicator is the soil fraction dominated by easily decomposable carbon; this may be measured by treating soil samples with 0.2M potassium permanganate (KMnO4), an oxidizing agent which is thought to mimic the enzymes released by the soil microbial community. The advantage of this method is that it is accessible: it is fast, requires little resource input and is field appropriate. There is no consensus however as to which soil carbon fraction the method targets. Furthermore Skjemstad et al. (2006) has indicated that KMnO4 may oxidise charcoal, a component of the non-labile carbon pool; this has implications for the suitability of the method when used for soils of shifting cultivation systems. The purpose of this study was to investigate the potential of permanganate oxidizable carbon (Pox C) as a reliable indicator of soil quality in agricultural upland systems in Northern Lao PDR. Focus was placed on the relations between Pox C and other soil quality parameters (bulk density, pH, CEC, TOC, total N, exchangeable K, plant available P) and upland rice yields. The

  7. Nocardia rayongensis sp. nov., isolated from Thai peat swamp forest soil.

    PubMed

    Tanasupawat, Somboon; Phongsopitanun, Wongsakorn; Suwanborirux, Khanit; Ohkuma, Moriya; Kudo, Takuji

    2016-05-01

    An actinomycete strain, RY45-3T, isolated from a peat swamp forest soil in Rayong Province, Thailand, was characterized using a polyphasic approach. The strain belonged to the genus Nocardia on the basis of morphological, physiological, biochemical and chemotaxonomic properties. Cell-wall peptidoglycan contained meso-diaminopimelic acid. The N-acyl group of muramic acid in the cell wall was glycolyl type. The diagnostic sugars in whole-cell hydrolysates were galactose and arabinose. MK-8 (H4ω-cycl) was the major menaquinone. The major fatty acids were C16 : 0 and C18 : 1ω9c. The major polar lipids were diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylinositol and phosphatidylinositol mannosides. The genomic DNA G+C content was 71 mol%. On the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity analysis, strain RY45-3T was closely related to Nocardia jiangxiensis JCM 12861T (98.9 %), Nocardia nova JCM 6044T (98.8 %) and Nocardia pseudobrasiliensis JCM 9894T (98.6 %). The strain showed low levels of DNA-DNA relatedness with N. jiangxiensis JCM 12861T, N. nova JCM 6044T and N. pseudobrasiliensis JCM 9894T (range from 3.6 to 55.3 %). On the basis of the phenotypic characteristics and the results mentioned, this strain could be differentiated from closely related type strains and represents a novel species of the genus Nocardia, for which the name Nocardia rayongensis sp. nov. (type strain RY45-3T = JCM 19832T = TISTR 2213T = PCU 334T) is proposed. PMID:26873179

  8. Methane Emissions from Upland Forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Megonigal, Patrick; Pitz, Scott; Wang, Zhi-Ping

    2016-04-01

    Global budgets ascribe 4-10% of atmospheric methane sinks to upland soils and assume that soils are the sole surface for methane exchange between upland forests and the atmosphere. The dogma that upland forests are uniformly atmospheric methane sinks was challenged a decade ago by the discovery of abiotic methane production from plant tissue. Subsequently a variety of relatively cryptic microbial and non-microbial methane sources have been proposed that have the potential to emit methane in upland forests. Despite the accumulating evidence of potential methane sources, there are few data demonstrating actual emissions of methane from a plant surface in an upland forest. We report direct observations of methane emissions from upland tree stems in two temperate forests. Stem methane emissions were observed from several tree species that dominate a forest located on the mid-Atlantic coast of North America (Maryland, USA). Stem emissions occurred throughout the growing season while soils adjacent to the trees simultaneously consumed methane. Scaling fluxes by stem surface area suggested the forest was a net methane source during a wet period in June, and that stem emissions offset 5% of the soil methane sink on an annual basis. High frequency measurements revealed diurnal cycles in stem methane emission rates, pointing to soils as the methane source and transpiration as the most likely pathway for gas transport. Similar observations were made in an upland forest in Beijing, China. However, in this case the evidence suggested the methane was not produced in soils, but in the heartwood by microbial or non-microbial processes. These data challenge the concept that forests are uniform sinks of methane, and suggest that upland forests are smaller methane sinks than previously estimated due to stem emissions. Tree emissions may be particularly important in upland tropical forests characterized by high rainfall and transpiration.

  9. Soil evolution and climate dynamics in dry steppes of the Privolzhskaya Upland during the last 3500 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demkin, V. A.; Demkina, T. S.; Khomutova, T. E.; El'tsov, M. V.

    2012-12-01

    The investigation of paleosols of different ages buried under archaeological monuments of the Bronze (16th-15th centuries BC), Early Iron (2nd-3rd centuries AD), and Medieval (14th century AD) ages demonstrated that the evolution of chestnut soils and solonetzes in the dry steppes of the southern part of the Privolzhskaya Upland during the past 3500 years manifested itself at the level of the genus and species characteristics of the soils, such as the degree of the solonetzicity, the humus content, and the content and composition of the soluble salts. The revealed regularities of the variations of the morphological, chemical, and microbiological soil properties in time allowed reconstructing the secular dynamics of the climatic humidity in the region. It was found that the humidization of the climate with a decrease in the degree of the climatic continentality took place in the middle of the second millennium BC. The Late Sarmatian Time (2nd-3rd centuries AD) was characterized by arid climatic conditions, whereas the Golden Horde time (13th-14th centuries AD) was marked by the general humidization of the climate. A gradual aridization of the climate began in the second half of the 14th century and continued in the 15th century AD.

  10. Effects of soils and grazing on breeding birds of uncultivated upland grasslands of the Northern Great Plains

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kantrud, H.A.; Kologiski, R.L.

    1982-01-01

    The principal use of uncultivated upland grasslands in the northern Great Plains is for livestock production. However, on lands set aside for wildlife or for scientific or recreational use, grazing by livestock may be used as a management measure to enhance populations of game species or to create conditions that increase the diversity of plant or animal species. To determine the effects of grazing on the avifauna of various types of Great Plains grasslands, we conducted bird censuses and plant surveys during 1974-78 on 615 plots of lightly, moderately, or heavily grazed native rangeland.Numbers of horned lark (Eremophila alpestris), western meadowlark (Sturnella neglecta), lark bunting (Calamospiza melanocorys), and chestnut-collared longspur (Calcarius ornatus) accounted for 65-75% of the total bird population, regardless of grazing intensity. For the entire area sampled (600,000 km2), horned lark, western meadowlark, and chestnut-collared longspur were the dominant birds. Major differences in composition of the dominant species and species richness occurred among the major soils. Increased mean annual soil temperature seemingly had a greater negative influence on avian species richness than did decreased soil moisture or organic matter content. Differences in total bird density were not significant among soils and among grazing intensities within most soils. For the area as a whole, light or moderate grazing resulted in increased species richness. Of the 29 species studied, 2 responded significantly to grazing for the area as a whole and 6 others to grazing on the soil in which peak densities occurred. Response of several other species to grazing effects evidently varied among strata.A list of plants with mean cover values of more than 1% in any of the 18 combinations of soils and grazing intensities contained less than 25 species, attesting to the relative simplicity of the grassland vegetation in the northern Great Plains. Agropyron spp. and Bouteloua gracilis

  11. Catchment disturbance and stream metabolism: Patterns in ecosystem respiration and gross primary production along a gradient of upland soil and vegetation disturbance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Houser, J.N.; Mulholland, P.J.; Maloney, K.O.

    2005-01-01

    Catchment characteristics determine the inputs of sediments and nutrients to streams. As a result, natural or anthropogenic disturbance of upland soil and vegetation can affect instream processes. The Fort Benning Military Installation (near Columbus, Georgia) exhibits a wide range of upland disturbance levels because of spatial variability in the intensity of military training. This gradient of disturbance was used to investigate the effect of upland soil and vegetation disturbance on rates of stream metabolism (ecosystem respiration rate [ER] and gross primary production rate [GPP]). Stream metabolism was measured using an open-system, single-station approach. All streams were net heterotrophic during all seasons. ER was highest in winter and spring and lowest in summer and autumn. ER was negatively correlated with catchment disturbance level in winter, spring, and summer, but not in autumn. ER was positively correlated with abundance of coarse woody debris, but not significantly related to % benthic organic matter. GPP was low in all streams and generally not significantly correlated with disturbance level. Our results suggest that the generally intact riparian zones of these streams were not sufficient to protect them from the effect of upland disturbance, and they emphasize the role of the entire catchment in determining stream structure and function. ?? 2005 by The North American Benthological Society.

  12. Mercury in mushrooms and soil from the Wieluńska Upland in south-central Poland.

    PubMed

    Falandysz, Jerzy; Bielawski, Leszek; Kawano, Masabide; Brzostowski, Andrzej; Chudzyński, Krzysztof

    2002-09-01

    Concentrations of mercury were determined in the fruiting bodies of 15 species of higher mushrooms and underlying soil substrate collected from Wieluńska Upland in northern part of Sandomierska Valley in south-central Poland in 1995. A total of 197 samples of caps, 197 stalks, 30 whole fruiting bodies and 227 soil (0-10 cm layer) were analyzed. Mean mercury concentrations in soil substrate corresponding to 15 mushroom species were between 28 +/- 17 and 85 +/- 62 ng/g dry matter (total range between 3.0-190 ng/g). The average cap to stalk concentration quotients of Hg were around 2 (range between 1.1 +/- 1.1 and 2.8 +/- 1.4). However, this quotient in Larch bolete (Suillus grevillei) was 4.4 +/- 6.3. Concentrations of Hg varied depending on the mushroom species. Parasol Mushroom (Macrolepiota procera) and Horse mushroom (Agaricus arvensis) contained the greatest mean mercury concentrations both in caps (between 4500 +/- 1700 and 4400 +/- 2400 ng/g dry matter) and stalks (between 2800 +/- 1300 and 3000 +/- 2000 ng/g dry matter). Both the Parasol Mushroom and Horse mushroom were characterised also by a greater potential to bioconcentrate mercury from soils as evidenced by great bioconcentration factors (BCFs), which were between 170 +/- 160 and 130 +/- 120 for caps, and 110 +/- 97 and 89 +/- 92 for stalks. Mercury concentrations in caps and stalks of False death cap (Amanita citrina) increased (p < 0.05) with increasing soil mercury contents. An opposite trend was observed for Quéleta brittle gills (Russula queleti), Grat knight-cap (Tricholoma terreum), Fly agaric (Amanita muscaria), Common scaber stalk (Leccinum scabrum) and Slippery jack (Suillus luteus). PMID:12369635

  13. Coevolution of soil and vegetation in the South Eastern Australian uplands with variable climate and fire regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inbar, Assaf; Petter, Nyman; Patrick, Lane; Gary, Sheridan

    2016-04-01

    The south east Australian forested uplands are characterized by complex and inter-correlated spatial patterns in forest types, soil depths and fire regimes, even within areas with similar sedimentary geology and catenary position. The ecohydrology of these system-state combinations varies markedly, and is difficult to predict. Here we present preliminary results from a soil and vegetation co-evolutionary framework that represents the key feedbacks that have resulted in the current quasi-equilibrium system states of standing biomass, soil depth and fire frequency. The model is based on a modification of an existing mechanistic model, and includes an ecohydrological engine that drives a vegetation dynamics and a geomorphic submodels. Five sites with similar parent material and slope along a rainfall gradient and opposing aspects were chosen to test the model outputs: soil depth and above-ground biomass. In three of the sites, microclimate conditions were extensively monitored in a clear ridge-top (Open), and North and South facing aspects. The data was used to calibrate and test the ecohydrology modelling according to landscape position. Geomorphic processes that control soil depth were modeled using existing transport functions which varied with climate and forest type, and fire regime was set to be a function of biomass state and water deficit. In the next step, the model will have the potential to be incorporated into a 2D landscape evolution model in order to route sediment and water in a dynamic landscape. Using this model allows us to explore how, and in what rate, did each of the different systems evolve into their current state, and what is the unique and combined part of climate and fire regimes in the coevolution process, and predict the response of the current systems to change in a changing climate.

  14. Upland Reticulate Mottling Reveals Soil Biophysical Processes across Scales: Development of Structured Heterogeneity in a Marine Terrace Chronosequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stonestrom, D. A.; Schulz, M. S.; Lawrence, C. R.; Bullen, T. D.; Fitzpatrick, J.; Kyker-Snowman, E.; Manning, J. E.; Mnich, M.

    2015-12-01

    Soils of the Santa Cruz (California, USA) marine terrace chronosequence display an evolving sequence of reticulate mottling from the youngest soil (65 ka) without mottles to the oldest soil (225 ka) with well-developed mottles. Mottles develop in soils forming from relatively uniform shoreline sediments, below the depth of bioturbation. Mottles consist of an interconnected network of low-chroma clay-and-carbon enriched central regions (gray; 2.5Y 6/1) bordered by bleached parent material (white; 2.5Y 8/1) within a diminishing matrix of high-chroma oxidized parent material (orange; 7.5YR 5/8). To explore the nature of mottle development, physical and chemical characteristics of mottle separates (orange, gray, and white) were compared through the deep time represented by the chronosequence. Mineralogical, isotopic, and surface-area differences among mottle separates indicate that centimeter-scale mass-transfer acting across millennia is an integral part of pedogenesis, weathering-front propagation, and carbon and nutrient transfer. Elemental analysis, electron microscopy, and iron-isotope systematics indicate that mottle development is driven by deep roots together with their fungal and microbial symbionts. The current work extends the known realm of upland mottling and shows that such features may be more common than previously recognized in semi-humid to arid regions. Deep soil horizons on old stable landforms develop reticulate mottling as the long-term imprint of rhizospheric processes that control pedogenesis, plant-community sustenance, and sequestration of carbon at depth in unsaturated zones.

  15. Simulating the effect of land use and climate change on upland soil carbon stock of Wales using ECOSSE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rani Nayak, Dali; Gottschalk, Pia; Evans, Chris; Smith, Pete; Smith, Jo

    2010-05-01

    Within Wales soils hold between 400-500 MtC, over half of this carbon is stored in organic and organo-mineral soil which cover less than 20% of the land area of Wales. It has been predicted that climate change will increasingly have an impact on the C stock of soils in Wales. Higher temperatures will increase the rate of decomposition of organic matter, leading to increased C losses. However increased net primary production (NPP), leading to increased inputs of organic matter, may offset this. Land use plays a major role in determining the level of soil C and the direction of change in status (soil as a source or sink). We present here an assessment of the effect of land use change and climate change on the upland soil carbon stock of Wales in 3 different catchments i.e. Migneint, Plynlimon and Pontbren using a process-based model of soil carbon and nitrogen dynamics, ECOSSE. The uncertainties introduced in the simulations by using only the data available at national scale are determined. The ECOSSE model (1,2) has been developed to simulate greenhouse gas emissions from both organic and mineral soils. ECOSSE was derived from RothC (3) and SUNDIAL (4,5) and predicts the impacts of changes in land use and climate on emissions and soil carbon stock. Simulated changes in soil C are dependent on the type of land use change, the soil type where the land use change is occurring, and the C content of soil under the initial and final land uses. At Migneint and Plynlimon, the major part of the losses occurs due to the conversion of semi-natural land to grassland. Reducing the land use change from semi-natural to grassland is the main measure needed to mitigate losses of soil C. At Pontbren, the model predicts a net gain in soil C with the predicted land use change, so there is no need to mitigate. Simulations of future changes in soil C to 2050 showed very small changes in soil C due to climate compared to changes due to land use change. At the selected catchments, changes

  16. Peat bogs and their organic soils: Archives of atmospheric change and global environmentalsignificance (Philippe Duchaufour Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shotyk, William

    2013-04-01

    A bog is much more than a waterlogged ecosystem where organic matter accumulates as peat. Peatlands such as bogs represent a critical link between the atmosphere, hydrosphere, and biosphere. Plants growing at the surface of ombrotrophic bogs receive nutrients exclusively from the atmosphere. Despite the variations in redox status caused by seasonal fluctuations in depth to water table, the low pHof the waters, and abundance of dissolved organic matter, bogs preserve a remarkably reproducible history of atmospheric pollution, climate change, landscape evolution and human history. For example, peat cores from bogs in Europe and North America have provided detailed reconstructions of the changing rates and sources of Ag, Cd, Hg, Pb, Sb, and Tl, providing new insights into the geochemical cycles of these elements, including the massive perturbations induced by human activities beginning many thousands of years ago. Despite the low pH, and perhaps because of the abundance of dissolved organic matter, bogs preserve many silicate and aluminosilicate minerals which renders them valuable archives of atmospheric dust deposition and the climate changes which drive them. In the deeper, basal peat layers of the bog, in the minerotrophic zone where pore waters are affected bymineral-water interactions in the underlying and surrounding soils and sediments, peat serves as animportant link to the hydrosphere, efficiently removing from the imbibed groundwaters such trace elements as As, Cu, Mo, Ni, Se, V, and U. These removal processes, while incompletely understood, are so effective that measuring the dissolved fraction of trace elements in the pore waters becomes a considerable challenge even for the most sophisticated analytical laboratories. While the trace elements listed above are removed from groundwaters (along with P and S), elements such as Fe and Mn are added to the waters because of reductive dissolution, an important first step in the formation of lacustrine Fe and Mn

  17. Impact of Heterobasidion root-rot on fine root morphology and associated fungi in Picea abies stands on peat soils.

    PubMed

    Gaitnieks, Talis; Klavina, Darta; Muiznieks, Indrikis; Pennanen, Taina; Velmala, Sannakajsa; Vasaitis, Rimvydas; Menkis, Audrius

    2016-07-01

    We examined differences in fine root morphology, mycorrhizal colonisation and root-inhabiting fungal communities between Picea abies individuals infected by Heterobasidion root-rot compared with healthy individuals in four stands on peat soils in Latvia. We hypothesised that decreased tree vitality and alteration in supply of photosynthates belowground due to root-rot infection might lead to changes in fungal communities of tree roots. Plots were established in places where trees were infected and in places where they were healthy. Within each stand, five replicate soil cores with roots were taken to 20 cm depth in each root-rot infected and uninfected plot. Root morphological parameters, mycorrhizal colonisation and associated fungal communities, and soil chemical properties were analysed. In three stands root morphological parameters and in all stands root mycorrhizal colonisation were similar between root-rot infected and uninfected plots. In one stand, there were significant differences in root morphological parameters between root-rot infected versus uninfected plots, but these were likely due to significant differences in soil chemical properties between the plots. Sequencing of the internal transcribed spacer of fungal nuclear rDNA from ectomycorrhizal (ECM) root morphotypes of P. abies revealed the presence of 42 fungal species, among which ECM basidiomycetes Tylospora asterophora (24.6 % of fine roots examined), Amphinema byssoides (14.5 %) and Russula sapinea (9.7 %) were most common. Within each stand, the richness of fungal species and the composition of fungal communities in root-rot infected versus uninfected plots were similar. In conclusion, Heterobasidion root-rot had little or no effect on fine root morphology, mycorrhizal colonisation and composition of fungal communities in fine roots of P. abies growing on peat soils. PMID:26861482

  18. Peat Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Humics, Inc. already had patented their process for separating wet peat into components and processing it when they consulted NERAC regarding possible applications. The NERAC search revealed numerous uses for humic acid extracted from peat. The product improves seed germination, stimulates root development, and improves crop yields. There are also potential applications in sewage disposal and horticultural peat, etc.

  19. Comparing terrestrial laser scanning with ground and UAV-based imaging for national-level assessment of upland soil erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McShane, Gareth; Farrow, Luke; Morgan, David; Glendell, Miriam; James, Mike; Quinton, John; Evans, Martin; Anderson, Karen; Rawlins, Barry; Quine, Timothy; Debell, Leon; Benaud, Pia; Jones, Lee; Kirkham, Matthew; Lark, Murray; Rickson, Jane; Brazier, Richard

    2015-04-01

    Quantifying soil loss through erosion processes at a high resolution can be a time consuming and costly undertaking. In this pilot study 'a cost effective framework for monitoring soil erosion in England and Wales', funded by the UK Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra), we compare methods for collecting suitable topographic measurements via remote sensing. The aim is to enable efficient but detailed site-scale studies of erosion forms in inaccessible UK upland environments, to quantify dynamic processes, such as erosion and mass movement. The techniques assessed are terrestrial laser scanning (TLS), and unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) photography and ground-based photography, both processed using structure-from-motion (SfM) 3D reconstruction software. Compared to other established techniques, such as expensive TLS, SfM offers a potentially low-cost alternative for the reconstruction of 3D high-resolution micro-topographic models from photographs taken with consumer grade cameras. However, whilst an increasing number of research papers examine the relative merits of these novel versus more established survey techniques, no study to date has compared both ground-based and aerial SfM photogrammetry with TLS scanning across a range of scales (from m2 to 16ha). The evaluation of these novel low cost techniques is particularly relevant in upland landscapes, where the remoteness and inaccessibility of field sites may render some of the more established survey techniques impractical. Volumetric estimates of soil loss are quantified using the digital surface models (DSMs) derived from the data from each technique and subtracted from a modelled pre-erosion surface. The results from each technique are compared. The UAV was able to capture information over a wide area, a range of altitudes and angles over the study area. Combined with automated SfM-based processing, this technique was able to produce rapid orthophotos to support ground-based data

  20. Inorganic and enzymatically hydrolyzable organic phosphorus of Alabama Decatur silt loam soils cropped with upland cotton

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Alabama is one of top cotton production states in the USA. It is believed that management practices would affect the distribution and fate of phosphorus (P) forms in these cotton soils. In this study, we assessed the forms and lability P in the Alabama Decatur silt loam cotton soils, and evaluated t...

  1. ERODIBILITY OF A SOIL DRAINAGE SEQUENCE IN THE LOESS UPLANDS OF MISSISSIPPI

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The susceptibility of loess soils in the lower Mississippi to runoff and erosion losses varies as a function of landscape position and mapping units. This study was conducted to determine the effects of soil drainage on physical and chemical properties that influence erodibility through their contr...

  2. The sensitivity of peat soil and peatland vegetation to drought: release of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) on rewetting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritson, Jonathan; Graham, Nigel; Templeton, Michael; Freeman, Christopher; Clark, Joanna

    2015-04-01

    Organic rich peat soils are a major store of carbon worldwide. Their existence is predicated on high year-round water tables which create an anoxic environment, thus limiting decay, and also to the recalcitrance of plant litter (dead plant material) commonly found in peatland areas. Climate change threatens the stability of peat soils by altering the biogeochemical cycles which control plant decay, lowering water tables so that oxic degradation can occur and by changing habitat niches such that less recalcitrant species can thrive in peatlands. One of the major fluxes of carbon from peatlands is through dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in surface waters. As peatland areas in the UK are often used as source waters for drinking water supply this presents a problem to water utilities as DOC must be effectively removed to limit colour, odour and the formation of potentially carcinogenic by-products on disinfection. Changes in catchment vegetation may occur due to climate change, nutrient deposition and changing bioclimatic envelopes. How different peatland vegetation contribute to DOC flux and how this may change in the future is therefore of interest. A six week laboratory simulation was performed on typical peatland litter (Sphagnum spp., Calluna vulgaris, Molinea caerulea, Juncus effusus) and a peat soil collected from Exmoor National Park, UK. The simulation monitored DOC flux from the decaying litter/soil and considered the impact of different drought severities using the 50th, 25th, 10th and 5th percentiles of the mean July/August monthly rainfall for Exmoor. On rewetting following the drought, all sources produced significantly different amounts of DOC (Tukey HSD p<0.05) in the order Molinia>Juncus>Calluna>Sphagnum>peat. The source also had a significant (ANOVA p<0.001) effect on coagulation removal efficiency, a typical method of removing DOC during drinking water treatment, with Juncus DOC proving the easiest to remove whilst Sphagnum DOC was the most difficult

  3. Sorption of selected organic compounds from water to a peat soil and its humic-acid and humin fractions: Potential sources of the sorption nonlinearity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chiou, C.T.; Kile, D.E.; Rutherford, D.W.; Sheng, G.; Boyd, S.A.

    2000-01-01

    The sorption isotherms of ethylene dibromide (EDB), diuron (DUN), and 3,5-dichlorophenol (DCP) from water on the humic acid and humin fractions of a peat soil and on the humic-acid of a muck soil have been measured. The data were compared with those of the solutes with the whole peat from which the humic-acid (HA) and humin (HM) fractions were derived and on which the sorption of the solutes exhibited varying extents of nonlinear capacities at low relative concentrations (C(e)/S(w)). The HA fraction as prepared by the density-fractionated method is relatively pure and presumably free of high- surface-area carbonaceous material (HSACM) that is considered to be responsible for the observed nonlinear sorption for nonpolar solutes (e.g., EDB) on the peat; conversely, the base-insoluble HM fraction as prepared is presumed to be enriched with HSACM, as manifested by the greatly higher BET- (N2) surface area than that of the whole peat. The sorption of EDB on HA exhibits no visible nonlinear effect, whereas the sorption on HM shows an enhanced nonlinearity over that on the whole peat. The sorption of polar DUN and DCP on HA and HM display nonlinear effects comparable with those on the whole peat; the effects are much more significant than those with nonpolar EDB. These results conform to the hypothesis that adsorption onto a small amount of strongly adsorbing HSACM is largely responsible for the nonlinear sorption of nonpolar solutes on soils and that additional specific interactions with the active groups of soil organic matter are responsible for the generally higher nonlinear sorption of the polar solutes.

  4. Acidification of soil-water in low base-saturated sand soils of the superior uplands under acid and normal precipitation.

    PubMed

    Harris, A R

    1989-04-01

    Lakes and streams are acidified by direct precipitation and water channeled through nearby soils, but water in low base-saturation soils can produce highly acidic percolate after prolonged contact and subsequent degassing in surface waters. Theories advanced by Reuss (1983), Reuss and Johnson (1985), and Seip and Rustad (1984) suggest that soils with less than 15% base saturation are susceptible to soil-water pH depression of up to 0.4 unit, which is sufficient to cause negative alkalinity in soil solutions. High concentrations of mobile anions (notably sulfate) are responsible for the negative alkalinity and these solutions on CO2 degassing in surface waters can retain acidities equivalent to a pH value of 5.0 or less. This mechanism purports to explain why some lakes acidify when they are surrounded by acid soils and cation leaching is not required.Ambient precipitation set to pH 5.4 and pH 4.2 was applied to columns of low base-saturated, sand, soils, starting in 1985. The columns (15 cm diameter and 150 cm long) were collected from soils with base saturations falling into one of three groups (0-10, 10-20, and 20-40%) from national forests in the Superior Uplands area (includes Boundary Waters Canoe Area, Rainbow Lakes, Sylvania, Moquah Barrens, and other Wilderness and Natural areas). The soils were Haplorthods and Udipsamments mainly from outwash plains.The soil columns were instrumented and reburied around a subterranean structure used to collect leachate water and to maintain natural temperature, air, and light conditions. Three humus treatments were applied to soil column (none, northern hardwood, and jack pine) to measure the effect of natural acidification compared to acidification by acid precipitation. The cores were treated with precipitation buffered to pH 5.4 to simulate natural rain and pH 4.2 to simulate acid rain.Columns were treated in 1985 and 1986 with approximately 200 cm of buffered precipitation each year over the frost-free season. Data is

  5. Time-lapse ground penetrating radar (GPR) measurements for exploring biogenic gas distribution and releases from peat soils in the Florida Everglades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, W. J.; Comas, X.; Berber, M.

    2013-12-01

    Peat soils are known to release significant amounts of methane (CH4) and carbon dioxide (CO2) to the atmosphere. However, uncertainties still remain regarding the spatio-temporal distribution of gas accumulations and the triggering mechanisms of gas releasing events. Furthermore, most peatland gas dynamics research has historically been focused on high latitude peatlands, while recent works have suggested that gas production rates from low-latitude peat soils may be higher than those from colder climates. Ground penetrating radar (GPR) is a geophysical tool that has successfully been used in the past to non-invasively investigate the release of biogenic gasses from peat soils. This study is conducted in the Loxahatchee Impoundment Landscape Assessment (LILA), a hydrologically controlled, landscape scale (30 HA) model of the Florida Everglades. Here, temporal and spatial heterogeneity of gas releases from peat soil at the plot scale (<100 m2) are shown using a time series of three-dimensional (3D) GPR measurements. GPR data are supported by direct gas flux measurements using flux chambers combined with time-lapse photography, and surface deformation measurements using terrestrial LiDAR scanning and differential leveling.

  6. Methane-Oxidizing Bacteria in a California Upland Grassland Soil: Diversity and Response to Simulated Global Change

    PubMed Central

    Horz, Hans-Peter; Rich, Virginia; Avrahami, Sharon; Bohannan, Brendan J. M.

    2005-01-01

    We investigated the diversity of methane-oxidizing bacteria (i.e., methanotrophs) in an annual upland grassland in northern California, using comparative sequence analysis of the pmoA gene. In addition to identifying type II methanotrophs commonly found in soils, we discovered three novel pmoA lineages for which no cultivated members have been previously reported. These novel pmoA clades clustered together either with clone sequences related to “RA 14” or “WB5FH-A,” which both represent clusters of environmentally retrieved sequences of putative atmospheric methane oxidizers. Conservation of amino acid residues and rates of nonsynonymous versus synonymous nucleotide substitution in these novel lineages suggests that the pmoA genes in these clades code for functionally active methane monooxygenases. The novel clades responded to simulated global changes differently than the type II methanotrophs. We observed that the relative abundance of type II methanotrophs declined in response to increased precipitation and increased atmospheric temperature, with a significant antagonistic interaction between these factors such that the effect of both together was less than that expected from their individual effects. Two of the novel clades were not observed to respond significantly to these environmental changes, while one of the novel clades had an opposite response, increasing in relative abundance in response to increased precipitation and atmospheric temperature, with a significant antagonistic interaction between these factors. PMID:15870356

  7. Lead content and isotopic composition in submound and recent soils of the Volga Upland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pampura, T. V.; Probst, A.; Ladonin, D. V.; Demkin, V. A.

    2013-11-01

    Literature data on the historical reconstructions of the atmospheric lead deposition in Europe and the isotopic composition of the ores that are potential sources of the anthropogenic lead in the atmospheric deposition in the lower Volga steppes during different time periods have been compiled. The effect of the increasing anthropogenic lead deposition recorded since the Bronze Age on the level of soil contamination has been investigated. For the first time paleosol buried under a burial mound of the Bronze Age has been used as a reference point to assess of the current contamination level. The contents and isotopic compositions of the mobile and total lead have been determined in submound paleosols of different ages and their recent remote and roadside analogues. An increase in the content and fraction of the mobile lead and a shift of its isotopic composition toward less radiogenic values (typical for lead from the recent anthropogenic sources) has been revealed when going from a Bronze-Age paleosol to a recent soil. In the Bronze-Age soil, the isotopic composition of the mobile lead is inherited from the parent rock to a greater extent than in the modern soils, where the lead is enriched with the less radiogenic component. The effect of the anthropogenic component is traced in the analysis of the mobile lead, but it is barely visible for the total lead. An exception is provided by the recent roadside soils characterized by increased contents and the significantly less radiogenic isotopic composition of the mobile and total lead.

  8. Soil Net Nitrification Rates and Exchangeable Calcium in Ten Small Upland Watersheds of the Northeastern USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, D.; Bailey, S.; Shanley, J.; Fredriksen, G.; Jamison, A.

    2004-05-01

    Possible links have been suggested between soil nitrification rates, soil calcium concentrations and tree species composition (e.g. sugar maple). We are measuring soil nitrification rates and stream nitrate export in ten watersheds in Vermont, New Hampshire and New York. These include relatively Ca-poor sites at Cone Pond NH and Ca-rich sites at Sleepers River, VT. Our objectives are to determine the relationship between nitrification rates and watershed characteristics (e.g. vegetation, soils, topography), and to explore the link between these rates and watershed nitrate export. Net nitrification rates are highly variable both within and among the eight sites and are related to the soil C/N ratio and vegetation characteristics at some, but not all, sites. Our preliminary results show distinct differences in exchangeable Ca concentrations among watersheds. Although some locations are enriched in Ca and high in sugar maple density, we have not found a good overall relationship between Ca and net nitrification rates. High rates can be found in Ca-enriched sites that are also relatively high in pH.

  9. Contemporary Subsoil Carbon Accumulation During Reforestation is Conditioned by Long-term, Coupled C-Fe Cycling in Upland Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacon, A. R.; Richter, D., Jr.; Heckman, K. A.; Veverica, T. J.; Nave, L. E.

    2014-12-01

    To understand deep soil carbon stabilization and change during reforestation we sampled bulk subsoils and individual redoximorphic features from a network of two meter deep soil pits along a gentle catena (3% slope) in the Southern Piedmont of North Carolina, USA. Until 1910, the catena was under cultivation. Since then, half of the soils we excavated have supported deeply rooted pine forests while the other half have continued to support relatively shallow rooted grasses and forbs. Across the catena, accordant with the divergent rooting regimes, subsoil roots were three times more abundant under forest than grass, and Δ14C in bulk subsoil samples was enriched by an average of 123‰ under forest relative to grass (p=0.0267). Bulk subsoils, however, were extremely heterogeneous and contained three well-defined redoximorphic feature microsites. Over the lifetime of these upland soils, coupled carbon-iron cycling during transient oxygen limitation created the microsites and thereby imparted subsoils with steep biogeochemical gradients millimeters to centimeters apart. Concentration of operationally defined crystalline iron-oxyhydroxides was on average ten times higher in Fe-enriched microsites (30.1 ± 2.5 mg/g, mean ± 1 SE) than Fe-depleted microsites (2.9 ± 0.3 mg/g) and gley microsites (3.3 ± 0.4 mg/g) across the catena. Under the deeply rooted forest Δ14C in gley microsites and Fe-depleted microsites was enriched by an average of 73‰ (p=0.0194) and 94‰ (p=0.0416), respectively relative to the same microsites under grass. Meanwhile, Δ14C in Fe-enriched microsites was unchanged by the divergent rooting regimes (p=0.1936). These microsite dependent patterns of radiocarbon enrichment indicate that subsoil C stabilization during reforestation of the catena was spatially conditioned by historic coupled carbon-iron cycling. We detail the mechanisms of this conditioning, and argue that similar long-term biogeochemical processes influence contemporary subsoil C

  10. On the applicability of unimodal and bimodal van Genuchten-Mualem based models to peat and other organic soils under evaporation conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dettmann, Ullrich; Bechtold, Michel; Frahm, Enrico; Tiemeyer, Bärbel

    2014-07-01

    Soil moisture is one of the key parameters controlling biogeochemical processes in peat and other organic soils. To understand and accurately model soil moisture dynamics and peatland hydrological functioning in general, knowledge about soil hydraulic properties is crucial. As peat differs in several aspects from mineral soils, the applicability of standard hydraulic functions (e.g. van Genuchten-Mualem model) developed for mineral soils to peat soil moisture dynamics might be questionable. In this study, the hydraulic properties of five types of peat and other organic soils from different German peatlands have been investigated by laboratory evaporation experiments. Soil hydraulic parameters of the commonly-applied van Genuchten-Mualem model and the bimodal model by Durner (1994) were inversely estimated using HYDRUS-1D and global optimization. The objective function included measured pressure heads and cumulative evaporation. The performance of eight model set-ups differing in the degree of complexity and the choice of fitting parameters were evaluated. Depending on the model set-up, botanical origin and degree of peat decomposition, the quality of the model results differed strongly. We show that fitted ‘tortuosity’ parameters τ of the van Genuchten-Mualem model can deviate very much from the default value of 0.5 that is frequently applied to mineral soils. Results indicate a rather small decrease of the hydraulic conductivity with increasing suction compared to mineral soils. Optimizing τ did therefore strongly reduce the model error at dry conditions when high pressure head gradients occurred. As strongly negative pressure heads in the investigated peatlands rarely occur, we also reduced the range of pressure heads in the inversion to a ‘wet range’ from 0 to -200 cm. For the ‘wet range’ model performance was highly dependent on the inclusion of macropores. Here, fitting only the macropore fraction of the bimodal model as immediately drainable

  11. Application of soil magnetometry on peat-bogs and soils in areas affected by historical and prehistoric ore mining and smelting.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magiera, Tadeusz; Mendakiewicz, Maria; Szuszkiewicz, Marcin; Chrost, Leszak

    2015-04-01

    The valleys of upper Brynica and Stoła located in northern part of Upper Silesia were areas of historical human activities since prehistoric times. Historically confirmed mining and smelting of iron, silver and lead ores on this areas has been dated back to early Middle Ages, however recently some geochemical and radiometric analyses suggest even prehistoric time of such activities. The aim of this study was to check if it is possible to find any magnetic signal suggesting such activities in peat-bogs and soils of this area. This magnetic properties would be a result of presence of historical Technogenic Magnetic Particles (TMPs) arisen during the primitive smelting processes in the past. Many different types of TMPs were separated from the depth of 15-30 cm of soil profiles and also were present in deeper parts of peat-bogs accompanied by fine charcoal particles. The peat-bog horizons dated by radiocarbon (C14) for 2000 BC were contaminated by some heavy metals (Cu, Zn, Cd, Ag, Pb, Mn, Fe, Sr, Sc) and slightly increased magnetic susceptibility signal was also observed. On the base of soil surface magnetic measurement using MS2D Bartington sensor complemented by magnetic gradiometer system Grad 601-02 for the deeper soil penetration, some local magnetic anomalies were detected. In areas of local 'hot spots', the vertical cores up to 30 cm in depth were collected using the HUMAX core sampler. Vertical distribution of magnetic susceptibility along the cores was measured in the laboratory using the MS2C Bartington core sensor. The core section with increased susceptibility values were analyzed and TMPs were separated using a hand magnet. The separation of fine fraction of TMPs was carried out in an ultrasonic bath from the fine soil material suspended in isopropanol to avoid their coagulation. Irregular ceramic particles, ash and ore particles, as well as strong magnetic particles of metallic iron; all with diameter up to 10 mm and almost regular shape and rounded

  12. Metal and arsenic impacts to soils, vegetation communities and wildlife habitat in southwest Montana uplands contaminated by smelter emissions. 1: Field evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Galbraith, H.; LeJeune, K.; Lipton, J.

    1995-11-01

    Concentrations of arsenic and metals in soils surrounding a smelter in southwest Montana were correlated with vegetative community structure and composition and wildlife habitat quality. Soils in the uplands surrounding the smelter were highly enriched with arsenic and metals. Concentrations of these analytes decreased with distance from the smelter and with soil depth, suggesting that the smelter is the source of the enrichment. In enriched areas, marked modifications to the native vegetation community structure and composition were observed. These included replacement of evergreen forest with bare unvegetated ground; species impoverishment and increased dominance by weed species in grasslands; and reductions in the vertical complexity of the habitat. Significant negative correlations existed between soil arsenic and metals concentrations and the extent of vegetative cover and the vertical diversity of plant communities. Loss of vegetative cover in the affected areas has been accompanied by reductions in their capacity to support indigenous wildlife populations.

  13. The effects of ecological restoration, on soil-pore water quality and DOC concentrations, on a British upland blanket bog.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qassim, Suzane; Dixon, Simon; Rowson, James; Worrall, Fred; Evans, Martin

    2013-04-01

    Polluted by past atmospheric deposition, eroded and burnt, the Bleaklow plateau (Peak district National Park, UK) has long been degraded. Peatlands are important carbon reservoirs and can act as sources or sinks of carbon. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) is carbon lost from peatlands via the fluvial pathway and as the major component of water colour it is costly to remove during water treatment processes. The Bleaklow Summit peatlands, were subjected to a large wildfire in 2003 devegetating 5.5km2. This fire prompted stakeholders to initiate a large-scale programme of restoration of the plateau. This study considered restoration techniques across four sites: all four sites were seeded with lawn grass, limed and fertilised; to raise the pH and allow establishment of vegetation. In addition to these interventions, one site also had a mulch of Calluna vulgaris applied to the surface to allow soil stabilisation and promote vegetation establishment and another site had biodegradable geojute textile mesh installed, to stabilize the steep gully surfaces. Another site had a gully block installed, to reduce peat desiccation and erosion. This study will compare the four restored sites to two types of comparators: bare soil sites where no restoration was undertaken and a naturally vegetated site unaffected by the 2003 wildfire. Each site had six replicate dipwells, installed in two groups of three. The depth to the water table was monitored and soil water samples collected for analysis, monthly for 5 years, from Nov 2006 - Jan 2012. No significant difference in DOC concentration was found between control and treated sites. There was, however, a significant difference in DOC composition between sites and over the 5 year period of monitoring. UV-vis absorbance of the samples is used to quantify the fulvic to humic components of DOC. The vegetated control was not significantly different to the bare sites; however the vegetated control had a significantly greater humic fraction of

  14. Effects of land-use change and fungicide application on soil respiration in playa wetlands and adjacent uplands of the U.S. High Plains.

    PubMed

    Daniel, Dale W; Smith, Loren M; Belden, Jason B; McMurry, Scott T; Swain, Shella

    2015-05-01

    With the increased use of fungicides in cultivated regions such as the southern High Plains (SHP), U.S., unintentional runoff and drift as well as direct overspray during aerial application lead to environmental exposures that may influence soil microbial communities and related biogeochemical functioning. Our goal was to examine the effects of two popular fungicides Headline (pyraclostrobin) and Quilt (azoxystrobin/propiconazole) on respiration from soil microbial communities in playa wetlands embedded in cropland and native grassland and their adjacent watersheds. We monitored fungicide effects (at levels of 0, .1×, 1× and 10× the label rate) by measuring respiration from plant matter amended soils collected from 6 cropland and 6 grassland playas and uplands. In addition, differences in microbial community structure among land use types were determined by measuring ergosterol levels in cropland and native grassland playas and uplands. Native grassland playas and their associated watersheds had up to 43% higher soil respiration rates than cropland playas and watersheds, indicating higher soil microbial activity. Application of either fungicide had no effect on soil respiration at any concentration in either land use type or habitat type (playa/watershed). Native grassland playas and watersheds had 3 and 1.6 times higher ergosterol content than cropland playas and watersheds. The lack of soil respiration response to fungicide application does not necessarily suggest that fungicides used in this study do not affect non-target soil microbial communities due to potential compensation by other biota. Future studies should further elucidate existing microorganism communities in playas and their watersheds. PMID:25668281

  15. Peat hydraulic conductivity in different landuses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mustamo, Pirkko; Hyvärinen, Maarit; Ronkanen, Anna-Kaisa; Kløve, Bjørn

    2013-04-01

    Information on hydraulic conductivity and water retention properties of peatlands is needed, e.g., for modelling hydrology and soil carbon balance of peat soils. Ability to model the behaviour of peat soils, especially those drained for agricultural use, is important as cultivated peatlands act as a major source of CO2 and N2O emissions in Nordic countries. Peat soil hydraulic conductivity and water retention properties vary greatly, and their relationship to soil depth and degree of decomposition is not straightforward. The aim of this study was to produce new information about peat physical properties in different land uses and the relationship between peat soil hydraulic conductivity and variables such as soil porosity and degree of humification. Peat hydraulic conductivity was measured in situ with infiltrometer (direct push piezometer) in six study sites (two pristine bogs, two sites drained for forestry, a cultivated peat land site and a peat extraction site). Measurements were made in several depths according to soil profile. To examine relationship of soil properties and the hydraulic conductivity, undisturbed peat cores of known volume and also disturbed peat samples were collected from the study sites for determination of von Post humification factor, ash content, porosity and bulk density. Surface layer of the agricultural site had high ash content and bulk density and low porosity compared to the soil beneath it and the soil in other study sites. This was due to added sand and compaction by agricultural practice. Bog, in contrast, had very low bulk density and high porosity. Results show a great variation in hydraulic conductivity within the study sites even when the observations were in the same soil layer. Hydraulic conductivity was lowest in the peat extraction site and the agricultural site, and had higher correlation with study site (= landuse) and the measured layer than with soil porosity.

  16. Is it clean or contaminated soil? Using petrogenic versus biogenic GC-FID chromatogram patterns to mathematically resolve false petroleum hydrocarbon detections in clean organic soils: a crude oil-spiked peat microcosm experiment.

    PubMed

    Kelly-Hooper, Francine; Farwell, Andrea J; Pike, Glenna; Kennedy, Jocelyn; Wang, Zhendi; Grunsky, Eric C; Dixon, D George

    2013-10-01

    The Canadian Council of Ministers of the Environment (CCME) reference method for the Canada-wide standard (CWS) for petroleum hydrocarbon (PHC) in soil provides chemistry analysis standards and guidelines for the management of contaminated sites. However, these methods can coextract natural biogenic organic compounds (BOCs) from organic soils, causing false exceedences of toxicity guidelines. The present 300-d microcosm experiment used CWS PHC tier 1 soil extraction and gas chromatography-flame ionization detector (GC-FID) analysis to develop a new tier 2 mathematical approach to resolving this problem. Carbon fractions F2 (C10-C16), F3 (C16-C34), and F4 (>C34) as well as subfractions F3a (C16-C22) and F3b (C22-C34) were studied in peat and sand spiked once with Federated crude oil. These carbon ranges were also studied in 14 light to heavy crude oils. The F3 range in the clean peat was dominated by F3b, whereas the crude oils had approximately equal F3a and F3b distributions. The F2 was nondetectable in the clean peat but was a significant component in crude oil. The crude oil–spiked peat had elevated F2 and F3a distributions. The BOC-adjusted PHC F3 calculation estimated the true PHC concentrations in the spiked peat. The F2:F3b ratio of less than 0.10 indicated PHC absence in the clean peat, and the ratio of greater than or equal to 0.10 indicated PHC presence in the spiked peat and sand. Validation studies are required to confirm whether this new tier 2 approach is applicable to real-case scenarios. Potential adoption of this approach could minimize unnecessary ecological disruptions of thousands of peatlands throughout Canada while also saving millions of dollars in management costs. PMID:23703885

  17. The peats of Costa Rica

    SciTech Connect

    Obando A, L.; Malavassi R, L.; Ramirez E, O. ); Cohen, A. . Dept. of Geological Sciences); Raymond, R. Jr.; Thayer, G.R. )

    1991-04-01

    The objectives of this investigation were: (1) to locate potential peat deposits in Costa Rica; (2) to estimate as closely as possible by representative sampling the amount of peat present in each deposit, and (3) to make a preliminary evaluation of the quality of the peat in each deposit. With information from soil maps and a 3-week survey of Costa Rica, it is estimated that a potential area of about 1000 km{sup 2} is covered by peat. Most of the peat area (about 830 km{sup 2}) is in northeastern Costa Rica in the Tortuguero area. An aerial survey identified the potential peat areas by the exclusive presence of the Yolillo palm. The next largest potential area of peat (about 175 km{sup 2}) is in the cloud-covered areas of the Talamanca Mountains. Some reconnaissance has been done in the Talamanca Mountains, and samples of the peat indicate that it is very similar to the sphagnum peat moss found in Canada and the northern US. Smaller bogs have been discovered at Medio Queso, El Cairo, Moin, and the Limon airport. Two bogs of immediate interest are Medio Queso and El Cairo. The Medio Queso bog has been extensively sampled and contains about 182,000 metric tons (dry) of highly decomposed peat, which is being used as a carrier for nitrogen-fixing bacteria. The El Cairo bog is sparsely sampled and contains about 1,300,000 metric tons of slightly decomposed dry peat. Plans are to use this peat in horticultural applications on nearby farms. 10 refs., 11 figs., 7 tabs.

  18. The ectomycorrhizal community of conifer stands on peat soils 12 years after fertilization with wood ash.

    PubMed

    Klavina, Darta; Pennanen, Taina; Gaitnieks, Talis; Velmala, Sannakajsa; Lazdins, Andis; Lazdina, Dagnija; Menkis, Audrius

    2016-02-01

    We studied long-term effects of fertilization with wood ash on biomass, vitality and mycorrhizal colonization of fine roots in three conifer forest stands growing in Vacciniosa turf. mel. (V), Myrtillosa turf. mel. (M) and Myrtillosa turf. mel./Caricoso-phragmitosa (MC) forest types on peat soils. Fertilization trials amounting 5 kg/m(2) of wood ash were established 12 years prior to this study. A total of 63 soil samples with roots were collected and analysed. Ectomycorrhizal (ECM) fungi in roots were identified by morphotyping and sequencing of the fungal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region. In all forest types, fine root biomass was higher in fertilized plots than in control plots. In M forest type, proportion of living fine roots was greater in fertilized plots than in control plots, while in V and MC, the result was opposite. Fifty ECM species were identified, of which eight were common to both fertilized and control plots. Species richness and Shannon diversity index were generally higher in fertilized plots than in control plots. The most common species in fertilized plots were Amphinema byssoides (17.8%) and Tuber cf. anniae (12.2%), while in control plots, it was Tylospora asterophora (18.5%) and Lactarius tabidus (20.3%). Our results showed that forest fertilization with wood ash has long-lasting effect on diversity and composition of ECM fungal communities. PMID:26208815

  19. Simulating soil carbon accumulation in an upland black spruce ecosystem of interior Alaska: implications for permafrost carbon dynamics to climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X.; Yokozawa, M.; Toda, M.; Kushida, K.

    2015-12-01

    Boreal terrestrial ecosystems act as a huge reservoir of organic carbon, most of which is mainly stored in both active-layer soils and permafrost. Recently, many observational studies have revealed that ongoing climate warming has promoted changes in fire regime, which stimulates the permafrost thaw in the boreal area. Consequently, the decomposition rate of the organic and mineral soils will increase and a large amount of CO2 will be released into the atmosphere. The sustained CO2­ release from the soils may create a positive feedback in relation to carbon cycling between the atmosphere and boreal terrestrial ecosystems. However, there still remains substantial uncertainty for evaluating the mechanisms of the carbon cycle feedbacks over centuries. In the present study, we examined the effect of warming and fire episodes on soil carbon dynamics in an upland black spruce ecosystem in interior Alaska, by using a Physical and Biogeochemical Soil Dynamics Model (PB-SDM) which can simulate the feedback cycle of soil organic carbon accumulation with soil thermal and hydrological dynamics. The result indicates that soil carbon accumulation in the organic layer was strongly dominated by increased temperature. In addition, fire events by which a great number of soil layers burned contributed to decrease in soil carbon accumulation largely in the organic layer. On the other hand, remarkably increased temperature conditions (around 9.6℃ by 3000) controlled soil carbon accumulation in the mineral layer and changes in soil decomposition rate accompanying with the shift from frozen to thawed conditions with warming accelerated soil carbon decomposition. It is suggested that future climate warming would result in drastic decrease in the soil carbon stock, largely from the organic layer, whereas the vulnerability of deeper soil carbon to future warming is closely connected to permafrost degradation due to wildfire disturbance.

  20. The assessment of the organic matter state in drained peat soils as related to the environmental conditions by the methods of multidimensional statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efremova, T. T.; Ovchinnikova, T. M.

    2007-12-01

    The specificity of the group and fraction composition of the organic matter in peat soils drained to a different extent that have developed for a 20-to 25-year period of hydro-and forest amelioration was characterized using the methods of multidimensional statistics. The differences in the organic matter of the soils studied are mainly determined by the contents of humic and fulvic acid of fractions 1 and 3, as well as of hemicelluloses and cellulose. The degree and depth of the humification are inversely related to the soil moisture and directly related to the peroxidase activity.

  1. Dissolved organic carbon concentrations and compositions, and trihalomethane formation potentials in waters from agricultural peat soils, Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, California; implications for drinking-water quality

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fujii, Roger; Ranalli, Anthony J.; Aiken, George R.; Bergamaschi, Brian A.

    1998-01-01

    Water exported from the Sacramento-San Joaquin River delta (Delta) is an important drinking-water source for more than 20 million people in California. At times, this water contains elevated concentrations of dissolved organic carbon and bromide, and exceeds the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's maximum contaminant level for trihalomethanes of 0.100 milligrams per liter if chlorinated for drinking water. About 20 to 50 percent of the trihalomethane precursors to Delta waters originates from drainage water from peat soils on Delta islands. This report elucidates some of the factors and processes controlling and affecting the concentration and quality of dissolved organic carbon released from peat soils and relates the propensity of dissolved organic carbon to form trihalomethanes to its chemical composition.Soil water was sampled from near-surface, oxidized, well-decomposed peat soil (upper soil zone) and deeper, reduced, fibrous peat soil (lower soil zone) from one agricultural field in the west central Delta over 1 year. Concentrations of dissolved organic carbon in the upper soil zone were highly variable, with median concentrations ranging from 46.4 to 83.2 milligrams per liter. Concentrations of dissolved organic carbon in samples from the lower soil zone were much less variable and generally slightly higher than samples from the upper soil zone, with median concentrations ranging from 49.3 to 82.3 milligrams per liter. The dissolved organic carbon from the lower soil zone had significantly higher aromaticity (as measured by specific ultraviolet absorbance) and contained significantly greater amounts of aromatic humic substances (as measured by XAD resin fractionation and carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance analysis of XAD isolates) than the dissolved organic carbon from the upper soil zone. These results support the conclusion that more aromatic forms of dissolved organic carbon are produced under anaerobic conditions compared to aerobic conditions

  2. Microbial community dynamics and methane, carbon dioxide, oxygen, and nitrous oxide concentrations in upland forest and riparian soils across a seasonal gradient of fully saturated soils to completely dried soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, R. T.; McGlynn, B. L.; McDermott, T.; Dore, J. E.

    2015-12-01

    Gas concentrations (CH4, CO2, N2O, and O2), soil properties (soil water content and pH), and microbial community composition were measured from soils at 32 sites across the Stringer Creek Watershed in the Tenderfoot Creek Experimental Forest 7 times between June 3, 2013 and September 20, 2013. Soils were fully saturated during the initial sampling period and dried down over the course of the summer. Soils and gas were sampled from 5cm and 20cm at each site and also at 50cm at eight riparian sites. In total, 496 individual soil samples were collected. Soil moisture ranged from 3.7% to fully saturated; soil pH ranged from 3.60 to 6.68. Methane concentrations in soils ranged from 0.426 ppm to 218 ppm; Carbon dioxide concentrations ranged from 550 ppm to 42,990 ppm; Nitrous oxide concentrations ranged from 0.220 ppm to 2.111 ppm; Oxygen concentrations ranged from 10.2% to 21.5%. Soil microbial communities were characterized by DNA sequences covering the V4 region of the 16S rRNA gene. DNA sequences were generated (~30,000,000 sequences) from the 496 soil samples using the Illumina MiSeq platform. Operational Taxonomic Units were generated using USEARCH, and representative sequences were taxonomically classified according the Ribosomal Database Project's taxonomy scheme. Analysis of similarity revealed that microbial communities found within a landscape type (high upland forest, low upland forest, riparian) were more similar than among landscape types (R = 0.600; p<0.001). Similarly, communities from unique site x depths were similar across the 7 collection periods (R = 0.646; p<0.001) despite changes in soil moisture. Euclidean distances of soil properties and gas concentrations were compared to Bray-Curtis community dissimilarity matrices using Mantel tests to determine how community structure co-varies with the soil environment and gas concentrations. All variables measured significantly co-varied with microbial community membership (pH: R = 0.712, p < 0.001; CO2: R

  3. The impact of 90 years of drainage works on some chemical properties of raised peat bog organic soils - case study from valley of the Upper San river in Polish Bieszczady Mts. (Eastern Carpathians).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolarczyk, Mateusz

    2016-04-01

    Wetland ecosystems, including raised peat bogs are characterized by a specific water conditions and unique vegetation, which makes peatland highly important habitats due to protection of biodiversity. Transformation of peat bog areas is particularly related to changes in the environment e.g. according to reclamation works. Drainage of peatlands is directly associated to the decrease of groundwater levels and lead to a number of changes in the chemical and physical properties of peat material, included contents of exchangeable cations in the surface layers of peat soils in the decession phase of peat development and release above compounds from the soil to ground or surface waters. The aim of the research was to determine the impact of extended drainage works on chemical composition of sorption complex of raised peat bog organic soils and identification the potential environmental effects of alkaline cations leaching to the surface waters. Research was carried out on the peat bogs located in the Upper San valley in Polish Bieszczady Mts. (Eastern Carpathians). Soil samples used in this study were collected from 3 soil profiles in 10 or 20 cm intervals to the approximately 130 cm depth. Laboratory analyses included determination of basic properties of organic material such as the degree of peat decomposition, ash content, soil pH and carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen concentrations. Additionally the amount of alkaline cations, exchangeable and extractable acidity was determined. Furthermore, the degree of saturation of the sorption complex with alkaline cations (V) and cation exchange capacity (CEC) are calculated. In order to evaluate the impact of the examined peat bog to the environment, also water samples were collected and ions composition was measured. The obtained results show that studied organic soils are oligotrophic and strongly acidic. In the case of organic material related to decession phase of peat development, as a result of the lengthy drainage works

  4. Reorganization of vegetation, hydrology and soil carbon after permafrost degradation across heterogeneous boreal landscapes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jorgenson, M. Torre; Harden, Jennifer; Kanevskiy, Mikhail; O'Donnell, Jonathan; Wickland, Kim; Ewing, Stephanie; Manies, Kristen; Zhuang, Qianlai; Shur, Yuri; Striegl, Robert; Koch, Josh

    2013-01-01

    The diversity of ecosystems across boreal landscapes, successional changes after disturbance and complicated permafrost histories, present enormous challenges for assessing how vegetation, water and soil carbon may respond to climate change in boreal regions. To address this complexity, we used a chronosequence approach to assess changes in vegetation composition, water storage and soil organic carbon (SOC) stocks along successional gradients within four landscapes: (1) rocky uplands on ice-poor hillside colluvium, (2) silty uplands on extremely ice-rich loess, (3) gravelly–sandy lowlands on ice-poor eolian sand and (4) peaty–silty lowlands on thick ice-rich peat deposits over reworked lowland loess. In rocky uplands, after fire permafrost thawed rapidly due to low ice contents, soils became well drained and SOC stocks decreased slightly. In silty uplands, after fire permafrost persisted, soils remained saturated and SOC decreased slightly. In gravelly–sandy lowlands where permafrost persisted in drier forest soils, loss of deeper permafrost around lakes has allowed recent widespread drainage of lakes that has exposed limnic material with high SOC to aerobic decomposition. In peaty–silty lowlands, 2–4 m of thaw settlement led to fragmented drainage patterns in isolated thermokarst bogs and flooding of soils, and surface soils accumulated new bog peat. We were not able to detect SOC changes in deeper soils, however, due to high variability. Complicated soil stratigraphy revealed that permafrost has repeatedly aggraded and degraded in all landscapes during the Holocene, although in silty uplands only the upper permafrost was affected. Overall, permafrost thaw has led to the reorganization of vegetation, water storage and flow paths, and patterns of SOC accumulation. However, changes have occurred over different timescales among landscapes: over decades in rocky uplands and gravelly–sandy lowlands in response to fire and lake drainage, over decades to

  5. [Potential activity of methane production in soil, peat, and lacustrine sediments and in the Robert Bourassa hydro-electric reservoir in northern Canada].

    PubMed

    Jugnia, Louis-B; Roy, Réal; Planas, Dolors; Lucotte, Marc; Greer, Charles W

    2005-01-01

    Flooding of land associated with the creation of reservoirs may increase, at least in the short term, methane flux to the atmosphere. To evaluate the potential contribution of such land use on methane production, field samples were studied in vitro for the potential activity of methanogenic bacteria in unflooded or flooded boreal forest soils, together with lacustrine sediments. From this comparative study, periodically flooded or flooded peats contribute more to methane production than do unflooded peats, soils, and natural lake sediment. The intensity and temporal changes in the activity of methanogenic archaea in the different systems depended on a combination of environmental factors, such as the amount and quality of organic carbon, the water level, and the concentration of oxidizing ions (SO42-, Fe3+). PMID:15782237

  6. Influence of geology, regolith and soil on fluid flow pathways in an upland catchment in central NSW, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernardi, Tony

    2014-05-01

    Influence of geology, regolith and soil on fluid flow pathways in an upland catchment in central NSW, Australia. Tony Bernardi and Leah Moore Dryland Salinity Hazard Mitigation Program (DSHMP), University of Canberra, ACT 2601, AUSTRALIA The diversity of salt expression in central NSW has defied classification because salt expression, mobilisation and transport is highly variable and is typically site specific. Hydrological models are extensively used to simulate possible outcomes for a range of land use changes to mitigate the mobilisation and transport of salt into the streams or across the land surface. The ability of these models to mimic reality can be variable thereby reducing the confidence in the models outputs and uptake of strategic management changes by the community. This study focuses on a 250 ha semi-arid sub-catchment of Little River catchment in central west NSW in the Murray-Darling Basin, Australia. We propose that an understanding the structure of the landforms and configuration of rock, regolith and soil materials at the study site influences fluid flow pathways in the landscape and can be related to observed variations in the chemical composition and salinity of surface and aquifer water. Preliminary geological mapping of the site identified the dominant rock type as a pink and grey dacite and in localised mid-slope areas, a coarsely crystalline biotite-phyric granodiorite. Samples were taken at regular intervals from natural exposures in eroded stream banks and in excavations made during the installation of neutron moisture meter tubes. In order to establish mineral weathering pathways, samples were taken from the relatively unweathered core to the outer weathered 'onion skins' of corestones on both substrates, and then up through the regolith profile, including the soil zone, to the land surface. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis and X-ray fluorescence (XRF) was conducted on the rock and soil/saprock samples. Electromagnetic induction (EMI

  7. Copper tolerance of the biomass crops Elephant grass (Pennisetum purpureum Schumach), Vetiver grass (Vetiveria zizanioides) and the upland reed (Phragmites australis) in soil culture.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xinghua; Shen, Yixing; Lou, Laiqing; Ding, Chenglong; Cai, Qingsheng

    2009-01-01

    Pot trials were conducted to study the influence of copper (Cu) on the growth and biomass of Elephant grass (EG, Pennisetum purpureum Schumach), Vetiver grass (VG, Vetiveria zizanioides) and the upland reed (UR, Phragmites australis). Cu toxicity in EG, VG and UR was positively correlated with the total and bioavailable Cu concentrations in the soil. Based on the EC50, dry weights, Cu contents, chlorophyll contents and photosynthesis rates, the Cu tolerance of the three species followed the trend EGNVGNUR. There were no significant differences in the unit calorific values among the different plants, though the total calorific values of EG were higher than those of VG and UR due to its higher biomass. The addition of KH2PO4 to the soil decreased the bioavailability of Cu and the Cu uptake by plants. EG could therefore be a good candidate for growth on Cu-contaminated soils, especially those improved by phosphate. PMID:19393734

  8. Reducing Soil CO2 Emission and Improving Upland Rice Yield with no-Tillage, Straw Mulch and Nitrogen Fertilization in Northern Benin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dossou-Yovo, E.; Brueggemann, N.; Naab, J.; Huat, J.; Ampofo, E.; Ago, E.; Agbossou, E.

    2015-12-01

    To explore effective ways to decrease soil CO2 emission and increase grain yield, field experiments were conducted on two upland rice soils (Lixisols and Gleyic Luvisols) in northern Benin in West Africa. The treatments were two tillage systems (no-tillage, and manual tillage), two rice straw managements (no rice straw, and rice straw mulch at 3 Mg ha-1) and three nitrogen fertilizers levels (no nitrogen, recommended level of nitrogen: 60 kg ha-1, and high level of nitrogen: 120 kg ha-1). Potassium and phosphorus fertilizers were applied to be non-limiting at 40 kg K2O ha-1 and 40 kg P2O5 ha-1. Four replications of the twelve treatment combinations were arranged in a randomized complete block design. Soil CO2 emission, soil moisture and soil temperature were measured at 5 cm depth in 6 to 10 days intervals during the rainy season and every two weeks during the dry season. Soil moisture was the main factor explaining the seasonal variability of soil CO2 emission. Much larger soil CO2 emissions were found in rainy than dry season. No-tillage planting significantly reduced soil CO2 emissions compared with manual tillage. Higher soil CO2 emissions were recorded in the mulched treatments. Soil CO2 emissions were higher in fertilized treatments compared with non fertilized treatments. Rice biomass and yield were not significantly different as a function of tillage systems. On the contrary, rice biomass and yield significantly increased with application of rice straw mulch and nitrogen fertilizer. The highest response of rice yield to nitrogen fertilizer addition was obtained for 60 kg N ha-1 in combination with 3 Mg ha-1 of rice straw for the two tillage systems. Soil CO2 emission per unit grain yield was lower under no-tillage, rice straw mulch and nitrogen fertilizer treatments. No-tillage combined with rice straw mulch and 60 kg N ha-1 could be used by smallholder farmers to achieve higher grain yield and lower soil CO2 emission in upland rice fields in northern Benin.

  9. Effects of manure and mineral fertilization strategies on soil antibiotic resistance gene levels and microbial community in a paddy-upland rotation system.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hui; Sun, Wanchun; Zhang, Zulin; Chapman, Stephen J; Freitag, Thomas E; Fu, Jianrong; Zhang, Xin; Ma, Junwei

    2016-04-01

    This work investigated the responses of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) and the soil microbial community in a paddy-upland rotation system to mineral fertilizer (NPK) and different application dosages of manure combined with NPK. The occurrence of five tetracycline ARGs (tetA, tetB, tetC, tetG and tetW), two sulfonamide ARGs (sul1 and sul2) and one genetic element (IntI1) was quantified. NPK application showed only slight or no impact on soil ARGs abundances compared with the control without fertilizer. Soil ARGs abundances could be increased by manure-NPK application but was related to manure dosage (2250-9000 kg ha(-1)). Principal component analysis (PCA) showed that the soil ARG profile of the treatment with 9000 kg ha(-1) manure separated clearly from the other treatments; the ARGs that contributed most to the discrimination of this treatment were tetA, tetG, tetW, sul1, sul2 and IntI1. Community level physiological profile (CLPP) analysis showed that increasing manure dosage from 4500 kg ha(-1) to 9000 kg ha(-1) induced a sharp increase in almost all of the detected ARGs but would not change the microbial community at large. However, 9000 kg ha(-1) manure application produced a decline in soil microbial activity. Determination of antibiotics and heavy metals in soils suggested that the observed bloom of soil ARGs might associate closely with the accumulation of copper and zinc in soil. PMID:26774780

  10. Impact of electromagnetic microwaves on the germination of spores of Streptomyces xanthochromogenes in a peat soil and in a liquid nutrient medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komarova, A. S.; Likhacheva, A. A.; Lapygina, E. V.; Maksimova, I. A.; Pozdnyakov, A. I.

    2010-01-01

    The impact of microwaves on the germination of spores of Streptomyces xanthochromogenes in a liquid nutrient medium and in a peat soil was studied. The treatment of inoculums with microwave radiation affected the development of the microorganisms from the stage of spore germination to the stage of the formation of microcolonies of actinomycetes upon the spore cultivation in the liquid medium. Typical hypnum-herbaceous peat was used to study the rate of germination of the actinomycetal spores in soil. The study of the dynamics of the Streptomyces xanthochromogenes population in the control soil (without treatment with microwaves) showed that the most active development of the culture took place in the soil moistened to 60% of the maximum water capacity. When the soil was moistened to the minimum adsorption capacity, the streptomyces did not complete their full cycle of development. The stimulation of the spore germination and mycelium growth with microwaves in the soil medium required a longer period in comparison with that for the liquid medium. The stimulation of the spore germination was observed in the liquid nutrient medium in the case of 30-s treatment and in the soil in the case of 60-s treatment.

  11. Soil organic carbon sequestration in upland soils of northern China under variable fertilizer management and climate change scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Guiying; Xu, Minggang; He, Xinhua; Zhang, Wenju; Huang, Shaomin; Yang, Xueyun; Liu, Hua; Peng, Chang; Shirato, Yasuhito; Iizumi, Toshichika; Wang, Jinzhou; Murphy, Daniel V.

    2014-03-01

    We determined the historical change in soil organic carbon (SOC) stocks from long-term field trials that represent major soil types and climatic conditions of northern China. Soil carbon and general circulation models were validated using these field trial data sets. We then applied these models to predict future change in SOC stocks to 2100 using two net primary production (NPP) scenarios (i.e., current NPP or 1% year-1 NPP increase). The conversion rate of plant residues to SOC was higher in single-cropping sites than in double-cropping sites. The prediction of future SOC sequestration potential indicated that these soils will be a net source of carbon dioxide (CO2) under no fertilizer inputs. Even when inorganic nutrients were applied, the additional carbon input from increased plant residues could not meet the depletion of SOC in parts of northern China. Manure or straw application could however improve the SOC sequestration potential at all sites. The SOC sequestration potential in northern China was estimated to be -4.3 to 18.2 t C ha-1 by 2100. The effect of projected climate change on the annual rate of SOC change did not differ significantly between climate scenarios. The average annual rate of SOC change under current and increased NPP scenarios (at 850 ppm CO2) was approximately 0.136 t C ha-1 yr-1 in northern China. These findings highlight the need to maintain, and where possible increase, organic carbon inputs into these farming systems which are rapidly becoming inorganic fertilizer intensive.

  12. Evidence for an eolian origin for the silt-enriched soil mantles on the glaciated uplands of eastern Upper Michigan, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schaetzl, R.J.; Loope, W.L.

    2008-01-01

    We provide textural, geochemical, and mineralogical data on a thin, silty deposit that unconformably mantles glaciated uplands in the eastern Upper Peninsula of Michigan. Previous research on this deposit, which we hypothesize to be loess, is nonexistent. The uplands were islands or narrow peninsulas within one or more glacial lakes. We compare the distribution, likely source and nature of the 20-60??cm thick silty mantle by using the loess formation model of Mason et al. [Mason, J.A., Nater, E.A., Zanner, C.W., Bell, J.C., 1999. A new model of topographic effects on the distribution of loess. Geomorphology 28, 223-236], which focuses on the generation of eolian silt by saltating sand across upwind, barren surfaces. Parabolic dunes, with arms open to the NW, are common on former lake floors upwind of the silt-mantled uplands, attesting to the strength and direction of paleowinds. The abrupt termination of the dunes at the footslopes of the uplands, associated with silt deposition on upland soil surfaces in downwind locations, are both consistent with the model of Mason et al. [Mason, J.A., Nater, E.A., Zanner, C.W., Bell, J.C., 1999. A new model of topographic effects on the distribution of loess. Geomorphology 28, 223-236]. Sediments on former lake floors contain abundant strata of fine/medium sand and silt, and thus are likely sources for the silt and dune sand. The cap, dune and lake sediments are similar along many different geochemical axes, whereas the substrate sediment, i.e., the drift below the cap, is unique. Cap sediments, normally containing roughly 30% silt, are enriched in quartz and depleted in Ti and Zr, relative to dune sediment. The dune sediment, a more residual eolian deposit, is enriched in Ti and Zr, relative to the cap, probably due to its greater abundance of heavy minerals. Therefore, we conclude that the silty cap is loess that was deflated from abandoned lake floors after nearby glacial lakes drained, probably contemporaneously with dune

  13. Mycobiota of peat-gleyic soils during the process of recultivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibatullina, I.; Khabibullina, F.

    2009-04-01

    The experiments on the recultivation of oil-polluted soils and their self-rehabilitation were laid in 1995 at sites contaminated with oil in the area of Usinsk region, Komi Republic, Russia. There were taken different plots for the experiment with various amounts of contaminant. The investigations continued some years after the contamination. At this point, the concentration of residual oil in these areas significantly decreased. Microbiological activity increased 2-3 times in the most contaminated soil. We should note that the micromycets were marked only in the layer 0-5sm in contrast to background soil. There were 10 species of micromycets and most of them characterized as dark colored species, the dominants were Aspergillus fumigatus. Penicillium funiculosum, P. paxilli, P. lanosum, P. tardum, usual for contaminated anthropogenic soils. The same highly oil-polluted soil, where recultivation was held, is characterized with the wider specter of different physiological groups of microorganisms. Micobiota is quite reach, it represents 20 species from 8 types. In the composition of micromycets 40% are the representatives of Penicillium, sterile mycelium presents as dark colored forms so as light colored ones. But the micobiota is still reach in micromycets typical for disturbed anthropogenic soils. The most microbiologically active plot was a territory with low-contaminated self-recovered soil. The micobiota is represented of great amount of microorganisms and consists of 21 species, mostly formed with dark colored forms of sterile mycelium. During the process of recultivation the structure of micromyctes changed: regrouping of species and increase of biodiversity. We assume that a process of self-purification started. However we should notice that activation of biological processes doesn't occur deeper than 0-5sm. At the same time the roots of high plants are seen till the depth 7-10sm, they also participate in the cleaning of oil polluted soil. There was used a

  14. Soil data from fire and permafrost-thaw chronosequences in upland Picea mariana stands near Hess Creek and Tok, interior Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Donnell, Jonathan A.; Harden, Jennifer W.; Manies, Kristen L.; Jorgenson, M. Torre; Kanevskiy, Mikhail; Xu, Xiaomei

    2013-01-01

    Soils of the Northern Circumpolar Permafrost region harbor 1,672 petagrams (Pg) (1 Pg = 1,000,000,000 kilograms) of organic carbon (OC), nearly 50 percent of the global belowground OC pool (Tarnocai and others, 2009). Of that soil OC, nearly 88 percent is presently stored in perennially frozen ground. Recent climate warming at northern latitudes has resulted in warming and thawing of permafrost in many regions (Osterkamp, 2007), which might mobilize OC stocks from associated soil reservoirs via decomposition, leaching, or erosion. Warming also has increased the magnitude and severity of wildfires in the boreal region (Turetsky and others, 2011), which might exacerbate rates of permafrost degradation relative to warming alone. Given the size and vulnerability of the soil OC pool in permafrost soils, permafrost thaw will likely function as a strong positive feedback to the climate system (Koven and others, 2011; Schaefer and others, 2011). In this report, we report soil OC inventories from two upland fire chronosequences located near Hess Creek and Tok in Interior Alaska. We sampled organic and mineral soils in the top 2 meters (m) across a range of stand ages to evaluate the effects of wildfire and permafrost thaw on soil C dynamics. These data were used to parameterize a simple process-based fire-permafrost-carbon model, which is described in detail by O’Donnell and others (2011a, b). Model simulations examine long-term changes in soil OC storage in response to fire, permafrost thaw, and climate change. These data also have been used in other papers, including Harden and others (2012), which examines C recovery post-fire, and Johnson and others (2011), which synthesizes data within the Alaska Soil Carbon Database. Findings from these studies highlight the importance of climate and disturbance (wildfire, permafrost thaw) on soil C storage, and loss of soil C from high-latitude ecosystems.

  15. The pool of pedogenic carbon in the soils of different types and durations of use as croplands in the forest-steppe of the Central Russian Upland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khokhlova, O. S.; Chendev, Yu. G.; Myakshina, T. N.; Shishkov, V. A.

    2013-05-01

    Based on studying five agrochronoseries, including recent forest (dark) gray soils and soils plowed for 100, 150, and 200-240 and more years in the forest-steppe zone of the Central Russian Upland, the dynamics of the pedogenic carbon pool, including the Corg and Ccarb, are considered. In the 2-m-thick layer of the agrogenic soils studied, the pedogenic carbon pool was shown to increase by 15-30% (up to 50%) mainly due to the changes in the Ccarb content. The insignificant (by ˜10%) growth of the Corg content was found in the soils that were plowed for more than 200-250 years. As the hydrothermal regime changed when passing from the forest to croplands, the Ccarb reserves increased due to the ascending of carbonates from the parent rock through the capillary pores, probably, in colloid solution-suspensions. This process proceeded without exchange with the soil CO2, since the 14C age and the content of the newly formed carbonates became higher. These carbonates may be called pedogenic-lithogenic agrocarbonates, since they appear in soils as a result of the (agro-) pedogenesis. In this case, their additional source is the lithogenic carbonates, which bring in the "old" carbon. The process of carbonates ascending could be referred to the rapid soil-forming ones with their implementation time being close to ≤50 years.

  16. Metal and arsenic impacts to soils, vegetation communities and wildlife habitat in southwest Montana uplands contaminated by smelter emissions. 2: Laboratory phytotoxicity studies

    SciTech Connect

    Kapustka, L.A.; Lipton, J.; Galbraith, H.; Cacela, D.; LeJeune, K.

    1995-11-01

    Vegetation communities on metal- and arsenic-contaminated uplands surrounding a smelter in southwest Montana have been eliminated or highly modified. Laboratory toxicity tests were performed using site soils from the impacted areas to determine whether the soils limit the ability of plants to establish and grow. The germination and growth of alfalfa, lettuce, and wheat in impacted area soils was compared to germination and growth of the three species in reference soils. The degree of phytotoxicity was quantified using a species-endpoint toxicity score calculated on the magnitude of difference between germination and growth of plants in impacted and reference soils. The impacted soils exhibited substantial toxicity to plants: 5% of the sites were severely phytotoxic, 55% were highly phytotoxic, 10% were moderately phytotoxic, 20% were mildly phytotoxic, and 10% were nontoxic. Root growth was consistently the most affected endpoint (18 of 20 impacted soils) and reduction in root length and mass was observed. Correlation and partial correlation analysis was used to evaluate the causes of phytotoxicity. Concentrations of As, Cu, and Zn and, to a lesser extent, Pb and Cd were found to be positively correlated with phytotoxicity.

  17. Upland Impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    24 March 2006 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a relatively fresh crater with dark, rayed ejecta on an upland plain above one of the many depressions in the eastern Labyrinthus Noctis region. The presence of the dark rays emanating from the crater suggests that the impact was a relatively recent event compared to other craters of similar diameter in the scene. Over time, the dark ejecta will fade and blend in with its surroundings, owing to settling of dust from the atmosphere.

    Location near: 9.7oS, 94.8oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Summer

  18. A Novel Phytase Derived from an Acidic Peat-Soil Microbiome Showing High Stability under Acidic Plus Pepsin Conditions.

    PubMed

    Tan, Hao; Wu, Xiang; Xie, Liyuan; Huang, Zhongqian; Peng, Weihong; Gan, Bingcheng

    2016-01-01

    Four novel phytases of the histidine acid phosphatase family were identified in two publicly available metagenomic datasets of an acidic peat-soil microbiome in northeastern Bavaria, Germany. These enzymes have low similarity to all the reported phytases. They were overexpressed in Escherichia coli and purified. Catalytic efficacy in simulated gastric fluid was measured and compared among the four candidates. The phytase named rPhyPt4 was selected for its high activity. It is the first phytase identified from unculturable Acidobacteria. The phytase showed a longer half-life than all the gastric-stable phytases that have been reported to date, suggesting a strong resistance to low pH and pepsin. A wide pH profile was observed between pH 1.5 and 5.0. At the optimum pH (2.5) the activity was 2,790 μmol/min/mg at the physiological temperature of 37°C and 3,989 μmol/min/mg at the optimum temperature of 60°C. Due to the competent activity level as well as the high gastric stability, the phytase could be a potential candidate for practical use in livestock and poultry feeding. PMID:27336313

  19. [Oribatid mites (Acariformes, Oribatei) as an index of postpyrogenous changes in podzol and peat soils of boreal forests].

    PubMed

    Kudriasheva, I V; Laskova, L M

    2002-01-01

    Population changes of oribatid mites were studied in a bilberry-moss spruce stand and shrub-peat moss pine stand caused by ground fire. The fire resulted in a drop of population density and changes in the species composition of mites in both forest types. In the case of the spruce stand, the restoration of species composition proceeded parallel to the formation of a bilberry-moss cover and litter and became distinct four years after the fire. In the case of pine stand, the fire enveloped only the peripheral region. After the sphagnum cover burned out, the moor dehydration began and the mineralized organogenic substrate emerged. Here, the oribatid complex was significantly rearranged and the previously dominating moisture-loving species were replaced by the mesophilous-xerophilous species typical predominantly for mineralized soils. This explains why the oribatid species composition in the burned pine stand is more similar to that in the control spruce stand than to that in the control pine stand. PMID:12068434

  20. Chemically enhanced mixed region vapor stripping of TCE-contaminated saturated peat and silty clay soils

    SciTech Connect

    West, O.R.; Cameron, P.A.; Lucero, A.J.; Koran, L.J. Jr.

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this study was to conduct further testing of MRVS, chemically enhanced with calcium oxide conditioning, on field- contaminated soils collected from beneath the NASA Michoud Rinsewater Impoundment. In this study, residual soil VOC levels as a function of vapor stripping time were measured to quantify VOC removal rates. Physical and chemical soil parameters expected to affect MRVS efficiency were measures. The effects of varying the calcium oxide loadings as well as varying the vapor stripping flow rates on VOC removal were also evaluated. The results of this study will be used to determine whether acceptable removals can be achieved within reasonable treatment times, remediation costs being directly proportional to the latter. The purpose of this report is to document the experimental results of this study, as well as to address issues that were raised after completion of the previous Michoud treatability work.

  1. Effects of the Application of Digestates from Wet and Dry Anaerobic Fermentation to Japanese Paddy and Upland Soils on Short-Term Nitrification

    PubMed Central

    Sawada, Kozue; Toyota, Koki

    2015-01-01

    Wet and dry anaerobic fermentation processes are operated for biogas production from organic matter, resulting in wet and dry digestates as by-products, respectively. The application of these digestates to soil as fertilizer has increased in recent years. Therefore, we herein compared the effects of applying wet digestates (pH 8.2, C/N ratio 4.5), dry digestates (pH 8.8, C/N ratio 23.4), and a chemical fertilizer to Japanese paddy and upland soils on short-term nitrification under laboratory aerobic conditions. Chloroform-labile C, an indicator of microbial biomass, was only minimally affected by these applications, indicating that a small amount of labile N was immobilized by microbes. All applications led to rapid increases in NO3 -N contents in both soils, and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria, but not archaea may play a critical role in net nitrification in the amended soils. The net nitrification rates for both soils were the highest after the application of dry digestates, followed by wet digestates and then the chemical fertilizer in order of decreasing soil pH. These results suggest that the immediate effects of applying digestates, especially dry digestates with the highest pH, on nitrate leaching need to be considered when digestates are used as alternative fertilizers. PMID:25740173

  2. The Effect of Increased Salinity and Temperature in Peat Soils from the Everglades: Implications for Biogenic Gas Production and Release Under a Sea Level Rise Scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirianni, M.; Comas, X.

    2015-12-01

    Sea level rise (SLR) is an increasingly important topic for many low-lying coastal areas such as South Florida. The United States Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) projects that sea level change in South Florida, over the next 50 years, will increase between 0.1 and 0.6 meters. Given the low elevation and its shallow slope, the Everglades region is highly susceptible to changes in sea level. Based on the USACE SLR projections it seems inevitable that previously unexposed freshwater areas of the southern Everglades will become increasingly exposed to saline water. The effects of such saline water intrusion into the current C dynamics of the Everglades (particularly in terms of biogenic gas production and emissions, i.e. CH4 and CO2) is however uncertain. As previously proposed by others, increases in salinity in peat soils will result in dilation of pore spaces and thus increases in hydraulic conductivity, while limiting methanogenesis. However, increases in temperature may induce the opposite effect, particularly in terms of methanogenic activity. Previous studies investigating the effects of increased salinity on freshwater peat soils in the Everglades are very limited, and to our knowledge none have intended to monitor the internal gas dynamics within the peat matrix using an array of geophysical and hydrological methods such as ground penetrating radar (GPR), time-lapse photography, gas chromatography, and constant head permeameter tests. Preliminary laboratory results showed (1) a progressive decrease in gas content within the peat matrix (i.e. production) and gas releases once fluid conductivity is increased; (2) a progressive increase in hydraulic conductivity once fluid conductivity is increased; and (3) maximum gas releases detected during early stages of pore dilation (after increasing salinity) followed by a progressive decrease in gas release as salinity increased. This study has implications for better understanding how C dynamics in the Everglades may be

  3. Metagenomic Insights into Anaerobic Metabolism along an Arctic Peat Soil Profile

    PubMed Central

    Lipson, David A.; Haggerty, John Matthew; Srinivas, Archana; Raab, Theodore K.; Sathe, Shashank; Dinsdale, Elizabeth A.

    2013-01-01

    A metagenomic analysis was performed on a soil profile from a wet tundra site in northern Alaska. The goal was to link existing biogeochemical knowledge of the system with the organisms and genes responsible for the relevant metabolic pathways. We specifically investigated how the importance of iron (Fe) oxides and humic substances (HS) as terminal electron acceptors in this ecosystem is expressed genetically, and how respiratory and fermentative processes varied with soil depth into the active layer and into the upper permafrost. Overall, the metagenomes reflected a microbial community enriched in a diverse range of anaerobic pathways, with a preponderance of known Fe reducing species at all depths in the profile. The abundance of sequences associated with anaerobic metabolic processes generally increased with depth, while aerobic cytochrome c oxidases decreased. Methanogenesis genes and methanogen genomes followed the pattern of CH4 fluxes : they increased steeply with depth into the active layer, but declined somewhat over the transition zone between the lower active layer and the upper permafrost. The latter was relatively enriched in fermentative and anaerobic respiratory pathways. A survey of decaheme cytochromes (MtrA, MtrC and their homologs) revealed that this is a promising approach to identifying potential reducers of Fe(III) or HS, and indicated a possible role for Acidobacteria as Fe reducers in these soils. Methanogens appear to coexist in the same layers, though in lower abundance, with Fe reducing bacteria and other potential competitors, including acetogens. These observations provide a rich set of hypotheses for further targeted study. PMID:23741360

  4. The decomposition of vegetation and soil in marginal peat-forming landscapes: climate simulations to quantify gaseous and dissolved carbon fluxes and the effects on peat accumulation and drinking water treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritson, J.; Bell, M.; Clark, J. M.; Graham, N.; Templeton, M.; Brazier, R.; Verhoef, A.; Freeman, C.

    2013-12-01

    Peatlands in the UK represent a large proportion of the soil carbon store, however there is concern that some systems may be switching from sinks to sources of carbon. The accumulation of organic material in peatlands results from the slow rates of decomposition typically occurring in these regions. Climate change may lead to faster decomposition which, if not matched by an equivalent increase in net primary productivity and litter fall, may tip the balance between source and sink. Recent trends have seen a greater flux of dissolved organic matter (DOM) from peatlands to surface waters and a change in DOM character, presenting challenges to water treatment, for example in terms of increased production of disinfectant by-products (DBPs). Peat systems border a large proportion of reservoirs in the UK so uncertainty regarding DOM quantity and quality is a concern for water utilities. This study considered five peatland vegetation types (Sphagnum spp., Calluna vulgaris, Molinea caerulea, peat soil and mixed litter) collected from the Exmoor National Park, UK where it is hypothesised that peat formation may be strongly affected by future changes to climate. A factorial experiment design to simulate climate was used, considering vegetation type, temperature and rainfall amount using a current baseline and predictions from the UKCP09 model. Gaseous fluxes of carbon were monitored over a two month period to quantify the effect on carbon mineralisation rates while 13C NMR analysis was employed to track which classes of compounds decayed preferentially. The DOM collected was characterised using UV and fluorescence techniques before being subject to standard drinking water treatment processes (coagulation/flocculation followed by chlorination). The effect of the experimental factors on DOM amenability to removal and propensity to form DBPs was then considered, with both trihalomethane (THM) and haloacetonitrile (HAN) DBP classes monitored. Initial results have shown a

  5. Soil microbial respiration from various microhabitats in Arctic landscape: impact of soil type, environmental conditions and soil age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biasi, Christina; Jokinen, Simo; Marushchak, Maija; Trubnikova, Tatiana; Hämäläinen, Kai; Oinonen, Markku; Martikainen, Pertti

    2014-05-01

    Soil respiration is the second largest C flux between atmosphere and terrestrial ecosystems after gross primary production. Carbon dioxide released from soils is thus a major contributor to the atmospheric CO2 concentration. Despite the global importance, soil respiration and its components (heterotrophic and autotrophic respiration) remain poorly understood and not well constrained fluxes of the terrestrial C cycle. This is particularly true for the Arctic, where huge amounts of the Earth's soil carbon is stored. Here, we report on heterotrophic soil respiration rates from various Arctic tundra microhabitats measured in situ. The study site was Seida (67°07'N, 62°57'E, 100 m a.s.l.) which is characterized by typical sub-arctic permafrost landscape which comprises raised, vegetated permafrost peat plateaus, interspersed with spots of bare peat surfaces (peat circles), and upland mineral soils. We used isotope partitioning approach based on differences in natural abundance of 14C between soil and plants to separate sources of soil-respired CO2. In addition, the tradition trenching approach was employed. Complementary laboratory incubations with homogenized soil were conducted to assess primary decomposability of the soils and to identify age of the CO2 released and thus get more information on the nature of the sources of respiration. The major aim was to link SMR rates with of soil type, land cover class, soil physic-chemical properties (e.g. water content), soil C stocks and age of soil. Results show that, despite profound differences in soil characteristics and primary decomposability of organic matter, surface CO2 fluxes derived from soil microbial respiration rates were rather similar between microhabitats. The only factor which influenced, at least to some extent, the respiration rates was total soil C (and N) stocks in surface soils. There was some evidence for reduced soil-related CO2 emissions from peatlands, though results were not consistent between the

  6. Effect of reed canary grass cultivation on greenhouse gas emission from peat soil at controlled rewetting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karki, S.; Elsgaard, L.; Lærke, P. E.

    2015-01-01

    Cultivation of bioenergy crops in rewetted peatland (paludiculture) is considered as a possible land use option to mitigate greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. However, bioenergy crops like reed canary grass (RCG) can have a complex influence on GHG fluxes. Here we determined the effect of RCG cultivation on GHG emission from peatland rewetted to various extents. Mesocosms were manipulated to three different ground water levels (GWLs), i.e. 0, -10 and -20 cm below the soil surface in a controlled semi-field facility. Emissions of CO2 (ecosystem respiration, ER), CH4 and N2O from mesocosms with RCG and bare soil were measured at weekly to fortnightly intervals with static chamber techniques for a period of 1 year. Cultivation of RCG increased both ER and CH4 emissions, but decreased the N2O emissions. The presence of RCG gave rise to 69, 75 and 85% of total ER at -20, -10 and 0 cm GWL, respectively. However, this difference was due to decreased soil respiration at the rising GWL as the plant-derived CO2 flux was similar at all three GWLs. For methane, 70-95% of the total emission was due to presence of RCG, with the highest contribution at -20 cm GWL. In contrast, cultivation of RCG decreased N2O emission by 33-86% with the major reductions at -10 and -20 cm GWL. In terms of global warming potential, the increase in CH4 emissions due to RCG cultivation was more than offset by the decrease in N2O emissions at -10 and -20 cm GWL; at 0 cm GWL the CH4 emissions was offset only by 23%. CO2 emissions from ER were obviously the dominant RCG-derived GHG flux, but above-ground biomass yields, and preliminary measurements of gross photosynthetic production, showed that ER could be more than balanced due to the photosynthetic uptake of CO2 by RCG. Our results support that RCG cultivation could be a good land use option in terms of mitigating GHG emission from rewetted peatlands, potentially turning these ecosystems into a sink of atmospheric CO2.

  7. A Greener Arctic: Vascular Plant Litter Input in Subarctic Peat Bogs Changes Soil Invertebrate Diets and Decomposition Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krab, E. J.; Berg, M. P.; Aerts, R.; van Logtestijn, R. S. P.; Cornelissen, H. H. C.

    2014-12-01

    Climate-change-induced trends towards shrub dominance in subarctic, moss-dominated peatlands will most likely have large effects on soil carbon (C) dynamics through an input of more easily decomposable litter. The mechanisms by which this increase in vascular litter input interacts with the abundance and diet-choice of the decomposer community to alter C-processing have, however, not yet been unraveled. We used a novel 13C tracer approach to link invertebrate species composition (Collembola), abundance and species-specific feeding behavior to C-processing of vascular and peat moss litters. We incubated different litter mixtures, 100% Sphagnum moss litter, 100% Betula leaf litter, and a 50/50 mixture of both, in mesocosms for 406 days. We revealed the transfer of C from the litters to the soil invertebrate species by 13C labeling of each of the litter types and assessed 13C signatures of the invertebrates Collembola species composition differed significantly between Sphagnum and Betula litter. Within the 'single type litter' mesocosms, Collembola species showed different 13C signatures, implying species-specific differences in diet choice. Surprisingly, the species composition and Collembola abundance changed relatively little as a consequence of Betula input to a Sphagnum based system. Their diet choice, however, changed drastically; species-specific differences in diet choice disappeared and approximately 67% of the food ingested by all Collembola originated from Betula litter. Furthermore, litter decomposition patterns corresponded to these findings; mass loss of Betula increased from 16.1% to 26.2% when decomposing in combination with Sphagnum, while Sphagnum decomposed even slower in combination with Betula litter (1.9%) than alone (4.7%). This study is the first to empirically show that collective diet shifts of the peatland decomposer community from mosses towards vascular plant litter may drive altered decomposition patterns. In addition, we showed that

  8. Utilization of subsurface microbial electrochemical systems to elucidate the mechanisms of competition between methanogenesis and microbial iron(III)/humic acid reduction in Arctic peat soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, E. S.; Miller, K.; Lipson, D.; Angenent, L. T.

    2012-12-01

    High-latitude peat soils are a major carbon reservoir, and there is growing concern that previously dormant carbon from this reservoir could be released to the atmosphere as a result of continued climate change. Microbial processes, such as methanogenesis and carbon dioxide production via iron(III) or humic acid reduction, are at the heart of the carbon cycle in Arctic peat soils [1]. A deeper understanding of the factors governing microbial dominance in these soils is crucial for predicting the effects of continued climate change. In previous years, we have demonstrated the viability of a potentiostatically-controlled subsurface microbial electrochemical system-based biosensor that measures microbial respiration via exocellular electron transfer [2]. This system utilizes a graphite working electrode poised at 0.1 V NHE to mimic ferric iron and humic acid compounds. Microbes that would normally utilize these compounds as electron acceptors donate electrons to the electrode instead. The resulting current is a measure of microbial respiration with the electrode and is recorded with respect to time. Here, we examine the mechanistic relationship between methanogenesis and iron(III)- or humic acid-reduction by using these same microbial-three electrode systems to provide an inexhaustible source of alternate electron acceptor to microbes in these soils. Chamber-based carbon dioxide and methane fluxes were measured from soil collars with and without microbial three-electrode systems over a period of four weeks. In addition, in some collars we simulated increased fermentation by applying acetate treatments to understand possible effects of continued climate change on microbial processes in these carbon-rich soils. The results from this work aim to increase our fundamental understanding of competition between electron acceptors, and will provide valuable data for climate modeling scenarios. 1. Lipson, D.A., et al., Reduction of iron (III) and humic substances plays a major

  9. Effects of Winter Flooding Peat Soils on Greenhouse Gas Emissions in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, F. E.; Pellerin, B. A.; Bergamaschi, B. A.; Sturtevant, C. S.; Verfaillie, J. G.; Knox, S. H.; Baldocchi, D. D.; Fujii, R.

    2013-12-01

    Harvested cornfields make up nearly 80% of cropland intentionally flooded during the winter (October through February) in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta to support waterfowl migration along the Pacific Flyway. This area is characterized by peat-rich islands that when flooded have the potential to be a source of methane production and emission, while reducing carbon dioxide respiration. Given the extent of winter flooding in the Delta, we evaluated the greenhouse gas emissions during this period and compared it to conventional winter fallow management. We constructed two eddy covariance towers on Staten Island, one in a cornfield flooded during the winter and the other one in a reference cornfield that remains fallow. Each tower included measurements of carbon dioxide, latent, sensible, and ground heat fluxes, as well as a suite of radiation measurements. A LI-COR Open Path Methane Analyzer (LI-7700) was initially installed at the flooded site and then alternated between the two sites every three to four weeks throughout the study. A second LI-7700 was deployed for continuous measurements at both towers in the winter of 2012/2013. Both fields have been under the same management for growing corn in the summer for the past twenty-five years. After harvest, the residual corn is chopped and then tilled into the soil before the winter season. Methane emissions slowly increased during the winter flooded period in 2011-2012, with maximum emissions (~234 mg-C m-2 day-1) occurring immediately following field drainage in mid-February. Methane emissions during the second winter period (e.g. 2012-2013) were similar to the first season in magnitude and timing, but showed two distinct events where emissions slowly increased followed by a maximum emission pulse and then a rapid decrease. Preliminary data analysis suggests the influence of strong Pacific storms occurring in the beginning of the second flooded season as a source of disturbance and agitating mechanism leading to

  10. Use of Computed Tomography Imaging for Qualifying Coarse Roots, Rhizomes, Peat, and Particle Densities in Marsh Soils

    EPA Science Inventory

    Computed tomography (CT) imaging has been used to describe and quantify subtidal, benthic animals such as polychaetes, amphipods, and shrimp. Here, for the first time, CT imaging is used to successfully quantify wet mass of coarse roots, rhizomes, and peat in cores collected from...

  11. XAFS Studies of Cobalt(II) Binding by Solid Peat and Soil-derived Humic Acids and Plant-derived Humic Acid-like Substances

    SciTech Connect

    Ghabbour,E.; Scheinost, A.; Davies, G.

    2007-01-01

    This work has examined cobalt(II) binding by a variety of solid humic acids (HAs) isolated from peat, plant and soil sources at temperatures down to 60 K. The results confirm that X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) measurements cannot distinguish between aquo and carboxylato ligands in the inner coordination sphere of Co(II). However, between 1 and 2 inner-sphere carboxylato ligands can be detected in all the peat, plant and soil-derived HA samples by extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) measurements, indicating inner-sphere coordination of HA-bound Co(II). The precision of C(carboxylate) detection is limited by the extent and quality of the data and the contribution from inner-sphere O to the Fourier transformed peaks used to detect carbon. Putative chelate ring formation is consistent with a relatively negative entropy change in step A, the stronger Co(II) binding step by HA functional groups, and could relate to 'non-exchangeable' metal binding by HSs.

  12. Sequence composition of BAC clones and SSR markers mapped to Upland cotton chromosomes 11 and 21 targeting resistance to soil-borne pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Congli; Ulloa, Mauricio; Shi, Xinyi; Yuan, Xiaohui; Saski, Christopher; Yu, John Z.; Roberts, Philip A.

    2015-01-01

    Genetic and physical framework mapping in cotton (Gossypium spp.) were used to discover putative gene sequences involved in resistance to common soil-borne pathogens. Chromosome (Chr) 11 and its homoeologous Chr 21 of Upland cotton (G. hirsutum) are foci for discovery of resistance (R) or pathogen-induced R (PR) genes underlying QTLs involved in response to root-knot nematode (Meloidogyne incognita), reniform nematode (Rotylenchulus reniformis), Fusarium wilt (Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. vasinfectum), Verticillium wilt (Verticillium dahliae), and black root rot (Thielaviopsis basicola). Simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers and bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones from a BAC library developed from the Upland cotton Acala Maxxa were mapped on Chr 11 and Chr 21. DNA sequence through Gene Ontology (GO) of 99 of 256 Chr 11 and 109 of 239 Chr 21 previously mapped SSRs revealed response elements to internal and external stimulus, stress, signaling process, and cell death. The reconciliation between genetic and physical mapping of gene annotations from new DNA sequences of 20 BAC clones revealed 467 (Chr 11) and 285 (Chr 21) G. hirsutum putative coding sequences, plus 146 (Chr 11) and 98 (Chr 21) predicted genes. GO functional profiling of Unigenes uncovered genes involved in different metabolic functions and stress response elements (SRE). Our results revealed that Chrs 11 and 21 harbor resistance gene rich genomic regions. Sequence comparisons with the ancestral diploid D5 (G. raimondii), A2 (G. arboreum) and domesticated tetraploid TM-1 AD1 (G. hirsutum) genomes revealed abundance of transposable elements and confirmed the richness of resistance gene motifs in these chromosomes. The sequence information of SSR markers and BAC clones and the genetic mapping of BAC clones provide enhanced genetic and physical frameworks of resistance gene-rich regions of the cotton genome, thereby aiding discovery of R and PR genes and breeding for resistance to cotton diseases. PMID

  13. Sequence composition of BAC clones and SSR markers mapped to Upland cotton chromosomes 11 and 21 targeting resistance to soil-borne pathogens.

    PubMed

    Wang, Congli; Ulloa, Mauricio; Shi, Xinyi; Yuan, Xiaohui; Saski, Christopher; Yu, John Z; Roberts, Philip A

    2015-01-01

    Genetic and physical framework mapping in cotton (Gossypium spp.) were used to discover putative gene sequences involved in resistance to common soil-borne pathogens. Chromosome (Chr) 11 and its homoeologous Chr 21 of Upland cotton (G. hirsutum) are foci for discovery of resistance (R) or pathogen-induced R (PR) genes underlying QTLs involved in response to root-knot nematode (Meloidogyne incognita), reniform nematode (Rotylenchulus reniformis), Fusarium wilt (Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. vasinfectum), Verticillium wilt (Verticillium dahliae), and black root rot (Thielaviopsis basicola). Simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers and bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones from a BAC library developed from the Upland cotton Acala Maxxa were mapped on Chr 11 and Chr 21. DNA sequence through Gene Ontology (GO) of 99 of 256 Chr 11 and 109 of 239 Chr 21 previously mapped SSRs revealed response elements to internal and external stimulus, stress, signaling process, and cell death. The reconciliation between genetic and physical mapping of gene annotations from new DNA sequences of 20 BAC clones revealed 467 (Chr 11) and 285 (Chr 21) G. hirsutum putative coding sequences, plus 146 (Chr 11) and 98 (Chr 21) predicted genes. GO functional profiling of Unigenes uncovered genes involved in different metabolic functions and stress response elements (SRE). Our results revealed that Chrs 11 and 21 harbor resistance gene rich genomic regions. Sequence comparisons with the ancestral diploid D5 (G. raimondii), A2 (G. arboreum) and domesticated tetraploid TM-1 AD1 (G. hirsutum) genomes revealed abundance of transposable elements and confirmed the richness of resistance gene motifs in these chromosomes. The sequence information of SSR markers and BAC clones and the genetic mapping of BAC clones provide enhanced genetic and physical frameworks of resistance gene-rich regions of the cotton genome, thereby aiding discovery of R and PR genes and breeding for resistance to cotton diseases. PMID

  14. Volcanic soil formation in Calabria (southern Italy): The Cecita Lake geosol in the late Quaternary geomorphological evolution of the Sila uplands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scarciglia, Fabio; De Rosa, Rosanna; Vecchio, Giuseppe; Apollaro, Carmine; Robustelli, Gaetano; Terrasi, Filippo

    2008-10-01

    This paper focuses on the main morphological, physical, chemical and mineralogical features of an andic-like soil, widely outcropping in the Sila upland plateau of Calabria (southern Italy), and its potential role in tephrostratigraphy. A multidisciplinary and multiscale approach allowed identification of this soil as a "masked" distal archive of volcanic products, developed on granite rocks and sediments with a coeval pyroclastic input during pedogenesis. The study demonstrates that the contribution of volcanic parent materials can be successfully hypothesized and assessed even in the absence, limited extent or poor preservation of primary eruptive products. The soil has an Andisol-like appearance, despite laboratory data that do not match the entire suite of diagnostic criteria for the Andisol taxonomic order. Geomorphological, stratigraphic and pedologic results, coupled with tephrostratigraphic and radiometric data, concur to suggest a Late Pleistocene(?) to Holocene age of the Andisol-like soil. In particular, the rhyolitic chemical composition of small-sized glass fragments (identified by SEM-EDS analyses) indicates soil genesis contributed by volcanic ash, probably sourced from Aeolian Arc explosive activity spanning the last 30 ka. Accordingly, the evidence of limited relict clay illuviation and the specific type of pedogenesis allowing the development of andic properties (in turn related to the neoformation of clay minerals from the weathering of volcanic glass) are consistent with a climatic shift from a seasonally-contrasted to a constantly humid pedoenvironment. This change can be ascribed to the Lateglacial(?) or Early-Middle Holocene to Late Holocene transition. Calibrated AMS 14C dates performed on charcoal fragments sampled from three representative soil profiles, provide Late Holocene ages (3136 ± 19, 343 ± 16 and 92 ± 24 yr BP), in accord with archaeological finds. On the basis of the consistent stratigraphic position, lateral continuity and

  15. [Influence of paddy rice-upland crop rotation of cold-waterlogged paddy field on crops produc- tion and soil characteristics].

    PubMed

    Wang, Fei; Li, Qing-hua; Lin, Cheng; He, Chun-mei; Zhong, Shao-jie; Li, Yu; Lin, Xin-jian; Huang, Jian-cheng

    2015-05-01

    Two consecutive years (4-crop) experiments were conducted to study the influence of different paddy rice-upland crop rotation in cold-waterlogged paddy field on the growth of crops and soil characteristics. The result showed that compared with the rice-winter fallow (CK) pattern, the two-year average yield of paddy rice under four rotation modes, including rape-rice (R-R), spring corn-rice (C-R), Chinese milk vetch-rice (M-R) and bean-rice (B-R), were increased by 5.3%-26.7%, with significant difference observed in C-R and R-R patterns. Except for M-R pattern, the annual average total economic benefits were improved by 79.0%-392.4% in all rotation pattern compared with the CK, and the ration of output/input was enhanced by 0.06-0.72 unit, with the most significant effect found in the C-R pattern. Likewise, compared with the CK, the contents of chlorophyll and carotenoid, and net photosynthetic rate (Pn) of rice plant were all increased during the full-tillering stage of rice in all rotation patterns. The rusty lines and rusty spots of soils were more obvious compared with the CK during the rice harvest, particularly in R-R, C-R and B-R patterns. The ratio of water-stable soil macro aggregates of plough layer of soil (> 2 mm) decreased at different levels in all rotation patterns while the ratios of middle aggregate (0.25-2 mm, expect for M-R) and micro aggregate of soil (< 0.25 mm) were opposite. There was a decreasing trend for soil active reducing agents in all rotation patterns, whereas the available nutrient increased. The amounts of soil bacteria in C-R and B-R patterns, fungi in B-R rotation pattern, cellulose bacteria in R-R, C-R and B-R patterns and N-fixing bacteria in B-R pattern were improved by 285.7%-403.0%, 221.7%, 64.6-92.2% and 162.2%, respectively. Moreover, the differences in all microorganisms were significant. Thus, based on the experimental results of cold-waterlogged paddy field, it was concluded that changing from single cropping rice system

  16. Diagnostics of hydromorphism in soils of autonomous positions on the Severo-Sos'vinsk Upland (Western Siberia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avetov, N. A.; Sopova, E. O.; Golovleva, Yu. A.; Kiryushin, A. V.; Krasilnikov, P. V.

    2014-11-01

    The complex studies of hydromorphism features in taiga weakly differentiated soils using morphological (color), chemical (iron content in different extracts, indicators of reducing conditions (IRIS)), and geobotanic (using the Ramenskii scale) methods have led to ambiguous conclusions. In all the soils, surface gleying was manifested. According to the results obtained by different methods, the maximum reduction processes were related to either the sublitter or the next deeper horizon. The Schwertmann coefficient, the criterion of Bodegom, and the Ramenskii scale indicated an increase of hydromorphism in the soils studied in the following sequence: the lower part of the ridge slopes drained by the small gullies < the middle part of the slopes < the flat tops of the ridges < the depression between the ridges. The morphological diagnostics of gleying proved to be a less sensitive method, which can recognize only the most contrasting hydromorphic soils. The lower horizons in some taiga soils have a bluish gray color probably not related to the recent soil hydromorphism.

  17. Small scale soil carbon and moisture gradients in a drained peat bog grassland and their influence on CO2, CH4 and N2O fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leiber-Sauheitl, K.; Fuß, R.; Freibauer, A.

    2012-04-01

    Due to the UNFCCC report requirements of each country on the emissions of greenhouse gases from key sources the joint research project "Organic Soils" was established in Germany. The project's objective is to improve the data set on greenhousegas emissions from organic soils in Germany. Within 12 German Project Catchments emissions from different types of organic soils, e.g. under different land uses and hydrological conditions, are measured. At the location "Großes Moor" near Gifhorn (Lower Saxony) the effects of small-scale soil organic carbon and groundwater level gradients on the GHG fluxes (CO2, CH4 and N2O) are quantified. The study area is located within a former peat bog altered by drainage and peat cutting, which is currently grassland under extensive agricultural use. The focus of the study is on the acquisition of CO2, CH4 and N2O fluxes on six sites via manual closed chambers. In order to calculate the annual CO2 exchange rate, values are interpolated on a 0.5 hour scale between measurement campaigns. In combination with continually logged meteorological parameters, such as the photosynthetic active radiation as well as air and soil temperatures, we calculate the daily CO2 ecosystem exchange of the different sites. During the 2011 campaign, CO2 was determined as the most important greenhouse gas. The groundwater table was the dominant variable influencing gas emissions. Another important factor was the vegetation composition. In detail, highest CO2 emissions occurred with a water table of 40-50 cm below ground level, temperatures above 10°C and low plant biomass amounts. Due to the more complex formation of N2O by a number of processes, each being promoted by different soil conditions, the measurement of N2O fluxes in the field was complemented by a laboratory experiment. In this, the use of stable isotope tracer techniques enabled us to quantify the contribution of single biochemical pathways to the overall formation of N2O under controlled

  18. Fiber Effects on Compressibility of Peat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johari, N. N.; Bakar, I.; Razali, S. N. M.; Wahab, N.

    2016-07-01

    Fibers found in the soil, especially in peaty soil play an important role in the determination of soil compressibility. Peat soils are the results from the decomposition of organic matter and the type of peat can be classified based on the fibrous material in the soil. In the engineering field, peat soil was mostly known as soils that has a serious settlement with high compressibility index. From the previous research, fibers in the soil were influenced in compressibility in terms of size, shape, fibric, soil arrangement and etc. Hence, this study attempts the determination of fibers effects on the compressibility of peat using a 1-D oedometer consolidation test. The reconstituted peat samples of different particle sizes were used to determine the consolidation parameters and the results obtained from reconstituted samples were also compared with the undisturbed sample. 1-D oedometer consolidation tests were performed on the samples by using the load increment method. The results shows, the higher particle size (R3.35), give higher moisture content (w = 401.20%) and higher initial void ratio (eo = 5.74). In settlement prediction, the higher the fiber content will results the higher the compression index, therefore, it will cause high of settlement.

  19. Properties and structure of raised bog peat humic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klavins, Maris; Purmalis, Oskars

    2013-10-01

    Humic substances form most of the organic components of soil, peat and natural waters, and their structure and properties differ very much depending on their source. The aims of this study are to characterize humic acids (HAs) from raised bog peat, to evaluate the homogeneity of peat HAs within peat profiles, and to study peat humification impact on properties of HAs. A major impact on the structure of peat HAs have lignin-free raised bog biota (dominantly represented by bryophytes of different origin). On diagenesis scale, peat HAs have an intermediate position between the living organic matter and coal organic matter, and their structure is formed in a process in which more labile structures (carbohydrates, amino acids, etc.) are destroyed, while thermodynamically more stable aromatic and polyaromatic structures emerge as a result of abiotic synthesis. However, in comparison with soil, aquatic and other HAs, aromaticity of peat HAs is much lower. Comparatively, the raised bog peat HAs are at the beginning of the transformation process of living organic matter. Concentrations of carboxyl and phenolic hydroxyl groups change depending on the peat age and decomposition degree from where HAs have been isolated, and carboxylic acidity of peat HAs increases with peat depth and humification degree.

  20. The composition and degradability of upland dissolved organic matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moody, Catherine; Worrall, Fred; Clay, Gareth

    2016-04-01

    In order to assess controls on the degradability of DOM in stream water, samples of dissolved organic matter (DOM) and particulate organic matter (POM) were collected every month for a period of 24 months from an upland, peat-covered catchment in northern England. Each month the degradability of the DOM was assessed by exposing river water to light for up to 24 hours, and the change in the dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration in the water was measured. To provide context for the analysis of DOM and its degradability, samples of peat, vegetation, and litter were also taken from the same catchment and analysed. The organic matter samples were analysed by several methods including: elemental analysis (CHN and O), bomb calorimetry, thermogravimetric analysis, pyrolysis GC/MS, ICP-OES, stable isotope analysis (13C and 15N) and 13C solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). The water samples were analysed for pH, conductivity, absorbance at 400nm, anions, cations, particulate organic carbon (POC) and DOC concentrations. River flow conditions and meteorology were also recorded at the site and included in the analysis of the composition and degradability of DOM. The results of multiple regression models showed that the rates of DOC degradation were affected by the N-alkyl, O-alkyl, aldehyde and aromatic relative intensities, gross heat, OR and C:N. Of these, the N-alkyl relative intensity had the greatest influence, and this in turn was found to be dependent on the rainfall and soil temperature in the week before sampling.

  1. The multi-annual nitrogen budget of a peat-covered catchment--changing from sink to source?

    PubMed

    Worrall, Fred; Clay, Gareth D; Burt, Tim P; Rose, Rob

    2012-09-01

    Only a few studies have considered the N budget of peat soils and this in turn has limited the ability of studies to consider the impact of changes in climate and atmospheric deposition upon the N budget of a peat soil. This study considered the total N budget of an upland peat-covered catchment over the period 1993 to 2009. The study has shown: i) Over the period of study the total N atmospheric deposition declined from 3.5 to 0.7 tonnes N/km2/yr. ii) The total fluvial export of N at soil source varied from 0.41 to 1.85 tonnes N/km2/yr with the fluvial flux being greater than the atmospheric input in 3 years of the study, implying significant internal processing. iii) Measuring the C:N ratio of organic matter pools in the ecosystem shows that gross primary productivity and litter decomposition represent outputs of N from the soil while DOC production and humification represent inputs of N. iv) Overall, the total N budget of the peat ecosystem varies from − 1.0 to + 2.5 tonnes N/km2/yr, i.e. in some years the ecosystem is a net source of N. The time series of the total N budget suggests that the ecosystem is responding to the occurrence of severe droughts with a long-term decline in N storage that could be interpreted as a response to long-term high N deposition rates, even if those rates have now diminished. PMID:22789818

  2. Time-Lapse Geophysical Measurements targeting Spatial and Temporal Variability in Biogenic Gas Production from Peat Soils in a Hydrologically Controlled Wetland in the Florida Everglades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, W. J.; Shahan, T.; Sharp, N.; Comas, X.

    2015-12-01

    Peat soils are known to release globally significant amounts of methane (CH4) and carbon dioxide (CO2) to the atmosphere. However, uncertainties still remain regarding the spatio-temporal distribution of gas accumulations and triggering mechanisms of gas releasing events. Furthermore, most research on peatland gas dynamics has traditionally been focused on high latitude peatlands. Therefore, understanding gas dynamics in low-latitude peatlands (e.g. the Florida Everglades) is key to global climate research. Recent studies in the Everglades have demonstrated that biogenic gas flux values may vary when considering different temporal and spatial scales of measurements. The work presented here targets spatial variability in gas production and release at the plot scale in an approximately 85 m2 area, and targets temporal variability with data collected during the spring months of two different years. This study is located in the Loxahatchee Impoundment Landscape Assessment (LILA), a hydrologically controlled, landscape scale (30 Ha) model of the Florida Everglades. Ground penetrating radar (GPR) has been used in the past to investigate biogenic gas dynamics in peat soils, and is used in this study to monitor changes of in situ gas storage. Each year, a grid of GPR profiles was collected to image changes in gas distribution in 2d on a weekly basis, and several flux chambers outfitted with time-lapse cameras captured high resolution (hourly) gas flux measurements inside the GPR grid. Combining these methods allows us to use a mass balance approach to estimate spatial variability in gas production rates, and capture temporal variability in gas flux rates.

  3. Metals in the soils of a small watershed in the forest-steppe zone of the central Russian upland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samonova, O. A.; Gennadiev, A. N.; Koshovskii, T. S.; Zhidkin, A. P.

    2015-06-01

    The spatial distributions of Mn, Cu, Ni, Co, Cr, Zn, Pb, Mo, Ti, Zr, and Fe, as well as particle sizes and humus, in the surface horizon of soils in the Lokna River small watershed (Tula oblast) have been studied. The relationships of the studied parameters have been characterized by statistical methods. Little change in particle size distribution in the humus horizons of soils is revealed from the geomorphological elements of the watershed. An increase in the content of most metals is observed in soils on the convex slopes and the bottom of the watershed balka compared to the autonomous positions. Positive correlations have been found between the contents of Co, Mn, Zr, Mo, and, to a lesser degree, Zn and Pb and the sand and coarse silt fractions; no correlations of Ni, Cr, Ti, and Fe with the particle size fractions were revealed.

  4. For peat's sake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    With climate models predicting a sharp increase in global temperature over the coming decades, three scientists are investigating how this warming trend will affect a huge band of peat wetlands that ring the Northern Hemisphere around Alaska, Canada, Scandinavia, and the former Soviet Union.“We are concerned about the impact of a major climate change on these ecosystems with tons of soil carbon,” says Scott Bridgham, a professor at the University of Notre Dame, who is a principal investigator in the study along with Jiquan Chen of Michigan Technological University and John Pastor of the University of Minnesota. Bridgham says that peatlands make up just 2.5% of the Earth's surface but contain about one-third of its soil carbon pool.

  5. Influence of Soil Structure, Pore-Water Pressure, and Tailwater Height on Headcut Migration in Upland Concentrated Flows

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil loss from arable fields caused by surface runoff erosion is composed of several components due to different erosion processes. Bennett et al. (2000) reported experimental data showing that actively migrating ephemeral-gully headcuts display steady-state migration and self-similar organization i...

  6. Changes in vegetation, peat properties and peat accumulation in Swedish peatlands as revealed by archive data.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoning, Kristian; Sohlenius, Gustav

    2016-04-01

    In this investigation we have studied patterns in peat accumulation and changes in mire status since the early 1900s for two areas in Sweden. In the early 1900s the Geological Survey of Sweden collected a vast amount of peat and peatland data, including information on vegetation and land-use. We have used this archive data to evaluate changes in mire vegetation, mire wetness and surface peat properties, rates of peat accumulation, succession in young wetlands and the effects of cultivation on peatlands. In total 156 mires in an uplift area of eastern middle Sweden were included in the data-set, including both pristine mires and peatlands used for agricultural purposes. In this area new peatlands have continuously been formed during the past 7 000 years making it possible to evaluate changes in peat accumulation over time. The other study area is situated in the south Swedish Uplands where we have revisited some larger bogs. The results from our investigation show that many of the peatlands have underwent major changes since the early 1900s. In most of the small peatlands we have found important changes in vegetation where mire vegetation has been replaced by nutrient demanding and/or dry species flora while the tree stand on large mires in south Sweden have increased. In some mires humification has increased in the uppermost peat-layers and the mire surface have become drier compared to the early 1900s. In eastern middle Sweden there are indications that the peat accumulation is lower 0,5 mm/year in older peatlands compared with younger ones 1,2 mm/year, although the mire vegetation in the older peatlands is dominated by sphagnum. The peat depth of the cultivated mires in this area shows a mean decrease of 40 cm since the early 1900s.

  7. Chromate reduction on humic acid derived from a peat soil--exploration of the activated sites on HAs for chromate removal.

    PubMed

    Huang, S W; Chiang, P N; Liu, J C; Hung, J T; Kuan, W H; Tzou, Y M; Wang, S L; Huang, J H; Chen, C C; Wang, M K; Loeppert, R H

    2012-05-01

    Humic substances are a major component of soil organic matter that influence the behavior and fate of heavy metals such as Cr(VI), a toxic and carcinogenic element. In the study, a repetitive extraction technique was used to fractionate humic acids (HAs) from a peat soil into three fractions (denoted as F1, F2, and F3), and the relative importance of O-containing aromatic and aliphatic domains in humic substances for scavenging Cr(VI) was addressed at pH 1. Spectroscopic analyses indicated that the concentrations of aromatic C and O-containing functional groups decreased with a progressive extraction as follows: F1>F2>F3. Cr(VI) removal by HA proceeded slowly, but it was enhanced when light was applied due to the production of efficient reductants, such as superoxide radical and H(2)O(2), for Cr(VI). Higher aromatic- and O-containing F1 fraction exhibited a greater efficiency for Cr(VI) reduction (with a removal rate of ca. 2.89 mmol g(-1) HA under illumination for 3 h). (13)C NMR and FTIR spectra further demonstrated that the carboxyl groups were primarily responsible for Cr(VI) reduction. This study implied the mobility and fate of Cr(VI) would be greatly inhibited in the environments containing such organic groups. PMID:22309710

  8. Newly Isolated Paenibacillus tyrfis sp. nov., from Malaysian Tropical Peat Swamp Soil with Broad Spectrum Antimicrobial Activity

    PubMed Central

    Aw, Yoong-Kit; Ong, Kuan-Shion; Lee, Learn-Han; Cheow, Yuen-Lin; Yule, Catherine M.; Lee, Sui-Mae

    2016-01-01

    Emergence of antimicrobial resistance coupled with the slowdown in discovery of new antimicrobial compounds points to serious consequences for human health. Therefore, scientists are looking for new antimicrobial compounds from unique and understudied ecosystems such as tropical peat swamp forests. Over the course of isolating antimicrobial producing bacteria from North Selangor tropical peat swamp forest, Malaysia, a Gram variable, rod shaped, endospore forming, facultative anaerobic novel strain MSt1T that exerts potent and broad spectrum antimicrobial activity was isolated. Phylogenetic analysis using 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that strain MSt1T belonged to the genus Paenibacillus with the highest similarity to Paenibacillus elgii SD17T (99.5%). Whole genome comparison between strain MSt1T with its closely related species using average nucleotide identity (ANI) revealed that similarity between strain MSt1T with P. elgii B69 (93.45%) and Paenibacillus ehimensis A2 (90.42%) was below the recommended threshold of 95%. Further analysis using in silico pairwise DDH also showed that similarity between strain MSt1T with P. elgii B69 (55.4%) and P. ehimensis A2 (43.7%) was below the recommended threshold of 70%. Strain MSt1T contained meso-diaminopilemic acid in the cell wall and MK-7 as the major menaquinone. The major fatty acids of strain MSt1T were anteiso-C15:0 (48.2%) and C16:0 (29.0%) whereas the polar lipid profile consisted of phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, diphosphatidylglycerol, one unknown lipid, two unknown glycolipids, and one unknown phospholipid. Total DNA G+C content of strain MSt1T was 51.5 mol%. The extract from strain MSt1T exerted strong antimicrobial activity against Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 (MIC = 1.5 μg/mL), MRSA ATCC 700699 (MIC = 25 μg/mL) and Candida albicans IMR (MIC = 12.5 μg/mL). Partially purified active fraction exerted a strong effect against E. coli ATCC 25922 resulting in cell rupture when viewed with SEM

  9. Inorganic contents of peats

    SciTech Connect

    Raymond, R. Jr.; Bish, D.L.; Cohen, A.D.

    1988-02-01

    Peat, the precursor of coal, is composed primarily of plant components and secondarily of inorganic matter derived from a variety of sources. The elemental, mineralogic, and petrographic composition of a peat is controlled by a combination of both its botanical and depositional environment. Inorganic contents of peats can vary greatly between geographically separated peat bogs as well as vertially and horizontally within an individual bog. Predicting the form and distribution of inorganic matter in a coal deposit requires understanding the distribution and preservation of inorganic matter in peat-forming environments and diagenetic alterations affecting such material during late-stage peatification and coalification processes. 43 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. Chemical properties of peat used in balneology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szajdak, L.; Hładoń, T.

    2009-04-01

    The physiological activity of peats is observed in human peat-bath therapy and in the promotion of growth in some plants. Balneological peat as an ecologically clean and natural substance is perceived as being more 'human friendly' than synthetic compounds. Poland has a long tradition of using balneological peat for therapeutic purposes. Balneological peat reveals a physical effect by altering temperature and biochemical effects through biologically active substances. It is mainly used for the treatment of rheumatic diseases that are quite common in Poland. Peat represents natural product. Physico-chemical properties of peat in particular surface-active, sorption and ion exchanges, defining their biological function, depend mainly on the chemical composition and molecular structure of humic substances representing the major constituent of organic soil (peat). The carbon of organic matter of peats is composed of 10 to 20% carbohydrates, primarily of microbial origin; 20% nitrogen-containing constituents, such as amino acids and amino sugars; 10 to 20% aliphatic fatty acids, alkanes, etc.; with the rest of carbon being aromatic. For balneology peat should be highly decomposed (preferably H8), natural and clean. The content of humic acids should exceed 20% of dry weight, ash content will be less than 15 15% of dry weight, sulphur content less than 0.3% of dry weight and the amount of water more than 85%. It will not contain harmful bacteria and heavy metals. Humic substances (HS) of peat are known to be macromolecular polydisperse biphyllic systems including both hydrophobic domains (saturated hydrocarbon chains, aromatic structural units) and hydrophilic functional groups, i. e having amphiphilic character. Amphiphilic properties of FA are responsible for their solubility, viscosity, conformation, surfactant-like character and a variety of physicochemical properties of considerable biologically practical significance. The chemical composition of peats depends