Science.gov

Sample records for upper limb muscle

  1. Upper Limb Muscle and Brain Activity in Light Assembly Task on Different Load Levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zadry, Hilma Raimona; Dawal, Siti Zawiah Md.; Taha, Zahari

    2010-10-01

    A study was conducted to investigate the effect of load on upper limb muscles and brain activities in light assembly task. The task was conducted at two levels of load (Low and high). Surface electromyography (EMG) was used to measure upper limb muscle activities of twenty subjects. Electroencephalography (EEG) was simultaneously recorded with EMG to record brain activities from Fz, Pz, O1 and O2 channels. The EMG Mean Power Frequency (MPF) of the right brachioradialis and the left upper trapezius activities were higher on the high-load task compared to low-load task. The EMG MPF values also decrease as time increases, that reflects muscle fatigue. Mean power of the EEG alpha bands for the Fz-Pz channels were found to be higher on the high-load task compared to low-load task, while for the O1-O2 channels, they were higher on the low-load task than on the high-load task. These results indicated that the load levels effect the upper limb muscle and brain activities. The high-load task will increase muscle activities on the right brachioradialis and the left upper tapezius muscles, and will increase the awareness and motivation of the subjects. Whilst the low-load task can generate drowsiness earlier. It signified that the longer the time and the more heavy of the task, the subjects will be more fatigue physically and mentally.

  2. Partial weight support differentially affects corticomotor excitability across muscles of the upper limb

    PubMed Central

    Runnalls, Keith D.; Anson, Greg; Wolf, Steven L.; Byblow, Winston D.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Partial weight support may hold promise as a therapeutic adjuvant during rehabilitation after stroke by providing a permissive environment for reducing the expression of abnormal muscle synergies that cause upper limb impairment. We explored the neurophysiological effects of upper limb weight support in 13 healthy young adults by measuring motor‐evoked potentials (MEPs) from transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) of primary motor cortex and electromyography from anterior deltoid (AD), biceps brachii (BB), extensor carpi radialis (ECR), and first dorsal interosseous (FDI). Five levels of weight support, varying from none to full, were provided to the arm using a commercial device (Saebo Mobile Arm Support). For each level of support, stimulus–response (SR) curves were derived from MEPs across a range of TMS intensities. Weight support affected background EMG activity in each of the four muscles examined (P <0.0001 for each muscle). Tonic background activity was primarily reduced in the AD. Weight support had a differential effect on the size of MEPs across muscles. After curve fitting, the SR plateau for ECR increased at the lowest support level (P =0.004). For FDI, the SR plateau increased at the highest support level (P =0.0003). These results indicate that weight support of the proximal upper limb modulates corticomotor excitability across the forearm and hand. The findings support a model of integrated control of the upper limb and may inform the use of weight support in clinical settings. PMID:25501435

  3. Muscle fatigue evaluation of astronaut upper limb based on sEMG and subjective assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zu, Xiaoqi; Zhou, Qianxiang; Li, Yun

    2012-07-01

    All movements are driven by muscle contraction, and it is easy to cause muscle fatigue. Evaluation of muscle fatigue is a hot topic in the area of astronaut life support training and rehabilitation. If muscle gets into fatigue condition, it may reduce work efficiency and has an impact on psychological performance. Therefore it is necessary to develop an accurate and usable method on muscle fatigue evaluation of astronaut upper limb. In this study, we developed a method based on surface electromyography (sEMG) and subjective assessment (Borg scale) to evaluate local muscle fatigue. Fifteen healthy young male subjects participated in the experiment. They performed isometric muscle contractions of the upper limb. sEMG of the biceps brachii were recorded during the entire process of isotonic muscle contraction and Borg scales of muscle fatigue were collected in certain times. sEMG were divided into several parts, and then mean energy of each parts were calculated by the one-twelfth band octave method. Equations were derived based on the relationship between the mean energy of sEMG and Borg scale. The results showed that cubic curve could describe the degree of local muscle fatigue, and could be used to evaluate and monitor local muscle fatigue during the entire process.

  4. The effect of arm weight support on upper limb muscle synergies during reaching movements

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Compensating for the effect of gravity by providing arm-weight support (WS) is a technique often utilized in the rehabilitation of patients with neurological conditions such as stroke to facilitate the performance of arm movements during therapy. Although it has been shown that, in healthy subjects as well as in stroke survivors, the use of arm WS during the performance of reaching movements leads to a general reduction, as expected, in the level of activation of upper limb muscles, the effects of different levels of WS on the characteristics of the kinematics of motion and of the activity of upper limb muscles have not been thoroughly investigated before. Methods In this study, we systematically assessed the characteristics of the kinematics of motion and of the activity of 14 upper limb muscles in a group of 9 healthy subjects who performed 3-D arm reaching movements while provided with different levels of arm WS. We studied the hand trajectory and the trunk, shoulder, and elbow joint angular displacement trajectories for different levels of arm WS. Besides, we analyzed the amplitude of the surface electromyographic (EMG) data collected from upper limb muscles and investigated patterns of coordination via the analysis of muscle synergies. Results The characteristics of the kinematics of motion varied across WS conditions but did not show distinct trends with the level of arm WS. The level of activation of upper limb muscles generally decreased, as expected, with the increase in arm WS. The same eight muscle synergies were identified in all WS conditions. Their level of activation depended on the provided level of arm WS. Conclusions The analysis of muscle synergies allowed us to identify a modular organization underlying the generation of arm reaching movements that appears to be invariant to the level of arm WS. The results of this study provide a normative dataset for the assessment of the effects of the level of arm WS on muscle synergies in stroke survivors and other patients who could benefit from upper limb rehabilitation with arm WS. PMID:24594139

  5. Decoding upper limb residual muscle activity in severe chronic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Ramos-Murguialday, Ander; García-Cossio, Eliana; Walter, Armin; Cho, Woosang; Broetz, Doris; Bogdan, Martin; Cohen, Leonardo G; Birbaumer, Niels

    2015-01-01

    Objective Stroke is a leading cause of long-term motor disability. Stroke patients with severe hand weakness do not profit from rehabilitative treatments. Recently, brain-controlled robotics and sequential functional electrical stimulation allowed some improvement. However, for such therapies to succeed, it is required to decode patients' intentions for different arm movements. Here, we evaluated whether residual muscle activity could be used to predict movements from paralyzed joints in severely impaired chronic stroke patients. Methods Muscle activity was recorded with surface-electromyography (EMG) in 41 patients, with severe hand weakness (Fugl-Meyer Assessment [FMA] hand subscores of 2.93 ± 2.7), in order to decode their intention to perform six different motions of the affected arm, required for voluntary muscle activity and to control neuroprostheses. Decoding of paretic and nonparetic muscle activity was performed using a feed-forward neural network classifier. The contribution of each muscle to the intended movement was determined. Results Decoding of up to six arm movements was accurate (>65%) in more than 97% of nonparetic and 46% of paretic muscles. Interpretation These results demonstrate that some level of neuronal innervation to the paretic muscle remains preserved and can be used to implement neurorehabilitative treatments in 46% of patients with severe paralysis and extensive cortical and/or subcortical lesions. Such decoding may allow these patients for the first time after stroke to control different motions of arm prostheses through muscle-triggered rehabilitative treatments. PMID:25642429

  6. Long-Latency Feedback Coordinates Upper-Limb and Hand Muscles during Object Manipulation Tasks123

    PubMed Central

    Thonnard, Jean-Louis; Scott, Stephen H.

    2016-01-01

    Suppose that someone bumps into your arm at a party while you are holding a glass of wine. Motion of the disturbed arm will engage rapid and goal-directed feedback responses in the upper-limb. Although such responses can rapidly counter the perturbation, it is also clearly desirable not to destabilize your grasp and/or spill the wine. Here we investigated how healthy humans maintain a stable grasp following perturbations by using a paradigm that requires spatial tuning of the motor response dependent on the location of a virtual target. Our results highlight a synchronized expression of target-directed feedback in shoulder and hand muscles occurring at ∼60 ms. Considering that conduction delays are longer for the more distal hand muscles, these results suggest that target-directed responses in hand muscles were initiated before those for the shoulder muscles. These results show that long-latency feedback can coordinate upper limb and hand muscles during object manipulation tasks. PMID:27022624

  7. Predictive Value of Upper Limb Muscles and Grasp Patterns on Functional Outcome in Cervical Spinal Cord Injury.

    PubMed

    Velstra, Inge-Marie; Bolliger, Marc; Krebs, Jörg; Rietman, Johan S; Curt, Armin

    2016-05-01

    Objective To determine which single or combined upper limb muscles as defined by the International Standards for the Neurological Classification of Spinal Cord Injury (ISNCSCI); upper extremity motor score (UEMS) and the Graded Redefined Assessment of Strength, Sensibility, and Prehension (GRASSP), best predict upper limb function and independence in activities of daily living (ADLs) and to assess the predictive value of qualitative grasp movements (QlG) on upper limb function in individuals with acute tetraplegia.Method As part of a Europe-wide, prospective, longitudinal, multicenter study ISNCSCI, GRASSP, and Spinal Cord Independence Measure (SCIM III) scores were recorded at 1 and 6 months after SCI. For prediction of upper limb function and ADLs, a logistic regression model and unbiased recursive partitioning conditional inference tree (URP-CTREE) were used.Results Logistic regression and URP-CTREE revealed that a combination of ISNCSCI and GRASSP muscles (to a maximum of 4) demonstrated the best prediction (specificity and sensitivity ranged from 81.8% to 96.0%) of upper limb function and identified homogenous outcome cohorts at 6 months. The URP-CTREE model with the QlG predictors for upper limb function showed similar results.Conclusion Prediction of upper limb function can be achieved through a combination of defined, specific upper limb muscles assessed in the ISNCSCI and GRASSP. A combination of a limited number of proximal and distal muscles along with an assessment of grasping movements can be applied for clinical decision making for rehabilitation interventions and clinical trials. PMID:26156192

  8. Volitional walking via upper limb muscle-controlled stimulation of the lumbar locomotor center in man.

    PubMed

    Sasada, Syusaku; Kato, Kenji; Kadowaki, Suguru; Groiss, Stefan J; Ugawa, Yoshikazu; Komiyama, Tomoyoshi; Nishimura, Yukio

    2014-08-13

    Gait disturbance in individuals with spinal cord lesion is attributed to the interruption of descending pathways to the spinal locomotor center, whereas neural circuits below and above the lesion maintain their functional capability. An artificial neural connection (ANC), which bridges supraspinal centers and locomotor networks in the lumbar spinal cord beyond the lesion site, may restore the functional impairment. To achieve an ANC that sends descending voluntary commands to the lumbar locomotor center and bypasses the thoracic spinal cord, upper limb muscle activity was converted to magnetic stimuli delivered noninvasively over the lumbar vertebra. Healthy participants were able to initiate and terminate walking-like behavior and to control the step cycle through an ANC controlled by volitional upper limb muscle activity. The walking-like behavior stopped just after the ANC was disconnected from the participants even when the participant continued to swing arms. Furthermore, additional simultaneous peripheral electrical stimulation to the foot via the ANC enhanced this walking-like behavior. Kinematics of the induced behaviors were identical to those observed in voluntary walking. These results demonstrate that the ANC induces volitionally controlled, walking-like behavior of the legs. This paradigm may be able to compensate for the dysfunction of descending pathways by sending commands to the preserved locomotor center at the lumbar spinal cord and may enable individuals with paraplegia to regain volitionally controlled walking. PMID:25122909

  9. Muscle fiber conduction velocity of the upper trapezius muscle during dynamic contraction of the upper limb in patients with chronic neck pain.

    PubMed

    Falla, Deborah; Farina, Dario

    2005-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare average muscle fiber conduction velocity (CV) and its changes over time in the upper trapezius muscle during a repetitive upper limb task in people with chronic neck pain and in healthy controls. Surface EMG signals were detected bilaterally from the upper trapezius muscle of 19 patients and nine healthy controls using linear adhesive arrays of four electrodes. Subjects were asked to tap their hands in a cyclic manner between targets positioned mid-thigh and 120 degrees of shoulder flexion, to the beat of a metronome set at 88 beats/min for up to 5 min. Muscle fiber CV and instantaneous mean power spectral frequency were estimated for each cycle at the time instant corresponding to 90 degrees of shoulder flexion. Average muscle fiber CV of the upper trapezius muscle was higher in people with chronic neck pain (mean+/-SE, 4.8+/-0.1m/s) than in control subjects (4.4+/-0.1 m/s; P<0.05). Furthermore, the exercise-induced decrease in CV over time was enhanced in the patient group (P<0.05). It was concluded that membrane muscle fiber properties of the upper trapezius and their changes over time during dynamic contraction of the upper limb are different in a sample of people with chronic neck pain with respect to controls. This may be associated with the histological and morphological changes, which have previously been identified in people with pain over the trapezius muscle. PMID:15927379

  10. Classification of Upper Limb Motions from Around-Shoulder Muscle Activities: Hand Biofeedback

    PubMed Central

    González, Jose; Horiuchi, Yuse; Yu, Wenwei

    2010-01-01

    Mining information from EMG signals to detect complex motion intention has attracted growing research attention, especially for upper-limb prosthetic hand applications. In most of the studies, recordings of forearm muscle activities were used as the signal sources, from which the intention of wrist and hand motions were detected using pattern recognition technology. However, most daily-life upper limb activities need coordination of the shoulder-arm-hand complex, therefore, relying only on the local information to recognize the body coordinated motion has many disadvantages because natural continuous arm-hand motions can’t be realized. Also, achieving a dynamical coupling between the user and the prosthesis will not be possible. This study objective was to investigate whether it is possible to associate the around-shoulder muscles’ Electromyogram (EMG) activities with the different hand grips and arm directions movements. Experiments were conducted to record the EMG of different arm and hand motions and the data were analyzed to decide the contribution of each sensor, in order to distinguish the arm-hand motions as a function of the reaching time. Results showed that it is possible to differentiate hand grips and arm position while doing a reaching and grasping task. Also, these results are of great importance as one step to achieve a close loop dynamical coupling between the user and the prosthesis. PMID:20721299

  11. Simulation of Upper Limb Movements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uherčík, Filip; Hučko, Branislav

    2011-12-01

    The paper deals with controlling an upper limb prosthesis based on the measurement of myoelectric signals (MES) while drinking. MES signals have been measured on healthy limbs to obtain the same response for the prosthesis. To simulate the drinking motion of a healthy upper limb, the program ADAMS was used, with all degrees of freedom and a hand after trans-radial amputation with an existing hand prosthesis. Modification of the simulation has the exact same logic of control, where the muscle does not have to be strenuous all the time, but it is the impulse of the muscle which drives the motor even though the impulse disappears and passed away.

  12. Upper-limb muscle responses to epidural, subdural and intraspinal stimulation of the cervical spinal cord

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharpe, Abigail N.; Jackson, Andrew

    2014-02-01

    Objective. Electrical stimulation of the spinal cord has potential applications following spinal cord injury for reanimating paralysed limbs and promoting neuroplastic changes that may facilitate motor rehabilitation. Here we systematically compare the efficacy, selectivity and frequency-dependence of different stimulation methods in the cervical enlargement of anaesthetized monkeys. Approach. Stimulating electrodes were positioned at multiple epidural and subdural sites on both dorsal and ventral surfaces, as well as at different depths within the spinal cord. Motor responses were recorded from arm, forearm and hand muscles. Main results. Stimulation efficacy increased from dorsal to ventral stimulation sites, with the exception of ventral epidural electrodes which had the highest recruitment thresholds. Compared to epidural and intraspinal methods, responses to subdural stimulation were more selective but also more similar between adjacent sites. Trains of stimuli delivered to ventral sites elicited consistent responses at all frequencies whereas from dorsal sites we observed a mixture of short-latency facilitation and long-latency suppression. Finally, paired stimuli delivered to dorsal surface and intraspinal sites exhibited symmetric facilitatory interactions at interstimulus intervals between 2-5 ms whereas on the ventral side interactions tended to be suppressive for near-simultaneous stimuli. Significance. We interpret these results in the context of differential activation of afferent and efferent roots and intraspinal circuit elements. In particular, we propose that distinct direct and indirect actions of spinal cord stimulation on motoneurons may be advantageous for different applications, and this should be taken into consideration when designing neuroprostheses for upper-limb function.

  13. The effect of muscle fatigue on position sense in an upper limb multi-joint task.

    PubMed

    Vafadar, Amirhossein K; Côté, Julie N; Archambault, Philippe S

    2012-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to estimate the extent to which muscle fatigue can impact on the position sense in the upper limb. Twelve healthy volunteers were asked to do a reaching task while grasping a wooden block and match the block's position with a corresponding target displayed on a flat screen, without vision. Following that, subjects performed resistive exercises with Thera-band strips until fatigue was induced and then the position sense task was repeated. A significant change in the endpoint position was observed after fatigue, in the up/down direction (p ≤ .001). The variability of endpoint positions in up/down direction was also significantly increased after fatigue (p ≤.03). There was no significant change in endpoint orientation but there was a significant fatigue × orientation effect on endpoint rotational variability. In a follow-up experiment, a group of subjects repeated the same protocol, but with a period of quiet rest between the two position sense tasks. In that group, there were no differences in endpoint position, orientation or variability. Muscle fatigue is an important factor that should be taken into consideration during the treatment of musculoskeletal injuries as well as athletic training. PMID:22357216

  14. Upper limb joint muscle/tendon injury and anthropometric adaptations in French competitive tennis players.

    PubMed

    Rogowski, Isabelle; Creveaux, Thomas; Genevois, Cyril; Klouche, Shahnaz; Rahme, Michel; Hardy, Philippe

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between the upper limb anthropometric dimensions and a history of dominant upper limb injury in tennis players. Dominant and non-dominant wrist, forearm, elbow and arm circumferences, along with a history of dominant upper limb injuries, were assessed in 147 male and female players, assigned to four groups based on location of injury: wrist (n = 9), elbow (n = 25), shoulder (n = 14) and healthy players (n = 99). From anthropometric dimensions, bilateral differences in circumferences and in proportions were calculated. The wrist group presented a significant bilateral difference in arm circumference, and asymmetrical bilateral proportions between wrist and forearm, as well as between elbow and arm, compared to the healthy group (6.6 ± 3.1% vs. 4.9 ± 4.0%, P < 0.01; -3.6 ± 3.0% vs. -0.9 ± 2.9%, P < 0.05; and -2.2 ± 2.2% vs. 0.1 ± 3.4%, P < 0.05, respectively). The elbow group displayed asymmetrical bilateral proportions between forearm and arm compared to the healthy group (-0.4 ± 4.3% vs. 1.5 ± 4.0%, P < 0.01). The shoulder group showed significant bilateral difference in elbow circumference, and asymmetrical bilateral proportions between forearm and elbow when compared to the healthy group (5.8 ± 4.7% vs. 3.1 ± 4.8%, P < 0.05 and -1.7 ± 4.5% vs. 1.4 ± 4.3%, P < 0.01, respectively). These findings suggest that players with a history of injury at the upper limb joint present altered dominant upper limb proportions in comparison with the non-dominant side, and such asymmetrical proportions would appear to be specific to the location of injury. Further studies are needed to confirm the link between location of tennis injury and asymmetry in upper limb proportions using high-tech measurements in symptomatic tennis players. PMID:25881663

  15. Prediction of upper limb muscle activity from motor cortical discharge during reaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohlmeyer, Eric A.; Solla, Sara A.; Perreault, Eric J.; Miller, Lee E.

    2007-12-01

    Movement representation by the motor cortex (M1) has been a theoretical interest for many years, but in the past several years it has become a more practical question, with the advent of the brain-machine interface. An increasing number of groups have demonstrated the ability to predict a variety of kinematic signals on the basis of M1 recordings and to use these predictions to control the movement of a cursor or robotic limb. We, on the other hand, have undertaken the prediction of myoelectric (EMG) signals recorded from various muscles of the arm and hand during button pressing and prehension movements. We have shown that these signals can be predicted with accuracy that is similar to that of kinematic signals, despite their stochastic nature and greater bandwidth. The predictions were made using a subset of 12 or 16 neural signals selected in the order of each signal's unique, output-related information content. The accuracy of the resultant predictions remained stable through a typical experimental session. Accuracy remained above 80% of its initial level for most muscles even across periods as long as two weeks. We are exploring the use of these predictions as control signals for neuromuscular electrical stimulation in quadriplegic patients.

  16. Effect of muscular fatigue on fractal upper limb coordination dynamics and muscle synergies.

    PubMed

    Bueno, Diana R; Lizano, J M; Montano, L

    2015-08-01

    Rehabilitation exercises cause fatigue because tasks are repetitive. Therefore, inevitable human motion performance changes occur during the therapy. Although traditionally fatigue is considered an event that occurs in the musculoskeletal level, this paper studies whether fatigue can be regarded as context that influences lower-dimensional motor control organization and coordination at neural level. Non Negative Factorization Matrix (NNFM) and Detrended Fluctuations Analysis (DFA) are the tools used to analyze the changes in the coordination of motor function when someone is affected by fatigue. The study establishes that synergies remain fairly stable with the onset of fatigue, but the fatigue affects the dynamical coordination understood as a cognitive process. These results have been validated with 9 healthy subjects for three representative exercises for upper limb: biceps, triceps and deltoid. PMID:26737679

  17. Study on the description method of upper limb's muscle force levels during simulated in-orbit operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yan; Li, DongXu; Liu, ZhiZhen; Liu, Liang

    2013-03-01

    The dexterous upper limb serves as the most important tool for astronauts to implement in-orbit experiments and operations. This study developed a simulated weightlessness experiment and invented new measuring equipment to quantitatively evaluate the muscle ability of the upper limb. Isometric maximum voluntary contractions (MVCs) and surface electromyography (sEMG) signals of right-handed pushing at the three positions were measured for eleven subjects. In order to enhance the comprehensiveness and accuracy of muscle force assessment, the study focused on signal processing techniques. We applied a combination method, which consists of time-, frequency-, and bi-frequency-domain analyses. Time- and frequency-domain analyses estimated the root mean square (RMS) and median frequency (MDF) of sEMG signals, respectively. Higher order spectra (HOS) of bi-frequency domain evaluated the maximum bispectrum amplitude ( B max), Gaussianity level (Sg) and linearity level (S l ) of sEMG signals. Results showed that B max, S l , and RMS values all increased as force increased. MDF and Sg values both declined as force increased. The research demonstrated that the combination method is superior to the conventional time- and frequency-domain analyses. The method not only described sEMG signal amplitude and power spectrum, but also deeper characterized phase coupling information and non-Gaussianity and non-linearity levels of sEMG, compared to two conventional analyses. The finding from the study can aid ergonomist to estimate astronaut muscle performance, so as to optimize in-orbit operation efficacy and minimize musculoskeletal injuries.

  18. Warm-up with weighted bat and adjustment of upper limb muscle activity in bat swinging under movement correction conditions.

    PubMed

    Ohta, Yoichi; Ishii, Yasumitsu; Ikudome, Sachi; Nakamoto, Hiroki

    2014-02-01

    The effects of weighted bat warm-up on adjustment of upper limb muscle activity were investigated during baseball bat swinging under dynamic conditions that require a spatial and temporal adjustment of the swinging to hit a moving target. Seven male college baseball players participated in this study. Using a batting simulator, the task was to swing the standard bat coincident with the arrival timing and position of a moving target after three warm-up swings using a standard or weighted bat. There was no significant effect of weighted bat warm-up on muscle activity before impact associated with temporal or spatial movement corrections. However, lower inhibition of the extensor carpi ulnaris muscle activity was observed in a velocity-changed condition in the weighted bat warm-up, as compared to a standard bat warm-up. It is suggested that weighted bat warm-up decreases the adjustment ability associated with inhibition of muscle activation under movement correction conditions. PMID:24724516

  19. The effects of upper limb posture and a sub-maximal gripping task on corticospinal excitability to muscles of the forearm.

    PubMed

    Forman, Davis A; Baarbé, Julianne; Daligadu, Julian; Murphy, Bernadette; Holmes, Michael W R

    2016-04-01

    Variations in handgrip force influences shoulder muscle activity, and this effect is dependent upon upper limb position. Previous work suggests that neural coupling between proximal and distal muscles with changes in joint position is a possible mechanism but these studies tend to use artificially constrained postures that do not reflect activities of daily living. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of upper limb posture on corticospinal excitability to the forearm muscles during workplace relevant arm positions. Motor evoked potentials (MEPs) were elicited in four forearm muscles via transcranial magnetic stimulation at six arm positions (45°, 90° and 120° of humeral elevation in both the flexion and abduction planes). MEPs were delivered as stimulus-response curves (SRCs) at rest and at constant intensity during two gripping tasks. Boltzmann plateau levels were smaller for the flexor carpi radialis in flexion at 45° versus 90° (p=0.0008). Extensor carpi radialis had a greater plateau during flexion than abduction (p=0.0042). Corticospinal excitability to the forearm muscles were influenced by upper limb posture during both the resting and gripping conditions. This provides further evidence that upper limb movements are controlled as a whole rather than segmentally and is relevant for workplace design considerations. PMID:26946146

  20. Alterations in upper limb muscle synergy structure in chronic stroke survivors

    PubMed Central

    Rymer, William Z.; Perreault, Eric J.; Yoo, Seng Bum; Beer, Randall F.

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies in neurologically intact subjects have shown that motor coordination can be described by task-dependent combinations of a few muscle synergies, defined here as a fixed pattern of activation across a set of muscles. Arm function in severely impaired stroke survivors is characterized by stereotypical postural and movement patterns involving the shoulder and elbow. Accordingly, we hypothesized that muscle synergy composition is altered in severely impaired stroke survivors. Using an isometric force matching protocol, we examined the spatial activation patterns of elbow and shoulder muscles in the affected arm of 10 stroke survivors (Fugl-Meyer <25/66) and in both arms of six age-matched controls. Underlying muscle synergies were identified using non-negative matrix factorization. In both groups, muscle activation patterns could be reconstructed by combinations of a few muscle synergies (typically 4). We did not find abnormal coupling of shoulder and elbow muscles within individual muscle synergies. In stroke survivors, as in controls, two of the synergies were comprised of isolated activation of the elbow flexors and extensors. However, muscle synergies involving proximal muscles exhibited consistent alterations following stroke. Unlike controls, the anterior deltoid was coactivated with medial and posterior deltoids within the shoulder abductor/extensor synergy and the shoulder adductor/flexor synergy in stroke was dominated by activation of pectoralis major, with limited anterior deltoid activation. Recruitment of the altered shoulder muscle synergies was strongly associated with abnormal task performance. Overall, our results suggest that an impaired control of the individual deltoid heads may contribute to poststroke deficits in arm function. PMID:23155178

  1. Development of Activity-Related Muscle Fatigue during Robot-Mediated Upper Limb Rehabilitation Training in Persons with Multiple Sclerosis: A Pilot Trial

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Robot-assisted rehabilitation facilitates high-intensity training of the impaired upper limb in neurological rehabilitation. It has been clinically observed that persons with Multiple Sclerosis (MS) have difficulties in sustaining the training intensity during a session due to the development of activity-related muscle fatigue. An experimental observational pilot study was conducted to examine whether or not the muscle fatigue develops in MS patients during one session of robot-assisted training within a virtual learning environment. Six MS patients with upper limb impairment (motricity index ranging from 50 to 91/100) and six healthy persons completed five training bouts of three minutes each performing lifting tasks, while EMG signals of anterior deltoid and lower trapezius muscles were measured and their subjective perceptions on muscle fatigue were registered. Decreased performance and higher subjective fatigue perception were present in the MS group. Increased mean EMG amplitudes and subjective perception levels on muscle fatigue were observed in both groups. Muscle fatigue development during 15′ training has been demonstrated in the arm of MS patients, which influences the sustainability of training intensity in MS patients. To optimize the training performance, adaptivity based on the detection of MS patient's muscle fatigue could be provided by means of training program adjustment. PMID:26090229

  2. Movement-related cortical potentials during muscle fatigue induced by upper limb submaximal isometric contractions.

    PubMed

    Guo, Feng; Wang, Ji-Ya; Sun, Yong-Jun; Yang, A-Li; Zhang, Ri-Hui

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the central neurophysiological mechanisms during fatigue induced by submaximal isometric contractions. A total of 23 individuals participated in the study and were assigned to fatigue and nonfatigue groups. Handgrip force, root mean square (RMS) of surface electromyography (sEMG) signal and movement-related cortical potentials during self-paced submaximal handgrip isometric contractions were assessed for each participant. The experimental data showed significant decreases in both maximal voluntary contraction [-24.3%; F(3,?42)=19.62, P<0.001, ?p=0.48] and RMS [-30.1%; F(3,?42)=19.01, P<0.001, ?p=0.57] during maximal voluntary contractions and a significant increase [F(3,?42)=14.27, P<0.001, ?p=0.50] in the average RMS of sEMG over four blocks in the fatigue group. There was no significant difference in the readiness potential between the fatigue and the nonfatigue groups at early stages, and at late stages, significant differences were observed only at the Fp1 and FC1 sites. Motor potential amplitudes were significantly higher in the fatigue group than in the nonfatigue group irrespective of block or electrode positions. Positive waveforms were observed in the prefrontal cortex in states without muscle fatigue, whereas a negative waveform pattern was observed with muscle fatigue. Significant within-subject correlations were observed between motor potential at the C1 site and RMS of sEMG (r=-0.439, P=0.02, ?p=0.11). Neurophysiological evidence indicates that cortical activity increases in the prefrontal cortex, primary motor cortex and supplementary motor cortex with muscle fatigue. Muscle fatigue appears to have considerable effects on the components of movement-related cortical potentials during movement execution, whereas the readiness potential before movement is sensitive to cognitive demands during prolonged exercise. Our results provide additional evidence for a link between central motor command during movement execution and motor unit recruitment. PMID:25089802

  3. Influence of mental practice on upper limb muscle activity and activities of daily living in chronic stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Park, JuHyung

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to determine the effects of mental practice on muscle activity of the upper extremity and performance of daily activities in chronic stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] In this research, mental practice was conducted by 2 chronic hemiplegic stroke patients. Mental practice was conducted 30 minutes a day, 5 times a week, for 2 weeks. Evaluation was conducted 4 times before and after intervention. Muscle activity was measured using a surface electromyogram test, and the Modified Barthel Index was used to measure changes in the ability to carry out daily activities. [Results] Both the muscle activity of the upper extremity and capability to perform daily activities showed improved outcomes after mental practice was conducted. [Conclusion] Through this research, mental practice was proven to be effective in improving the muscle activity of upper extremity and capability to perform daily activities in chronic hemiplegic stroke patients. PMID:27134412

  4. Reflections on the present and future of upper limb prostheses.

    PubMed

    Farina, Dario; Amsüss, Sebastian

    2016-04-01

    Despite progress in research and media attention on active upper limb prostheses, presently the most common commercial upper limb prosthetic devices are not fundamentally different from solutions offered almost one century ago. Limited information transfer for both control and sensory-motor integration and challenges in socket technology have been major obstacles. By analysing the present state-of-the-art and academic achievements, we provide our opinion on the future of upper limb prostheses. We believe that surgical procedures for muscle reinnervation and osseointegration will become increasingly clinically relevant; muscle electrical signals will remain the main clinical means for prosthetic control; and chronic electrode implants, first in muscles (control), then in nerves (sensory feedback), will become viable clinical solutions. After decades of suspended clinically relevant progress, it is foreseeable that a new generation of upper limb prostheses will enter the market in the near future based on such advances, thereby offering substantial clinical benefit for patients. PMID:26924191

  5. Soft-tissue anatomy of the primates: phylogenetic analyses based on the muscles of the head, neck, pectoral region and upper limb, with notes on the evolution of these muscles

    PubMed Central

    Diogo, R; Wood, B

    2011-01-01

    Apart from molecular data, nearly all the evidence used to study primate relationships comes from hard tissues. Here, we provide details of the first parsimony and Bayesian cladistic analyses of the order Primates based exclusively on muscle data. The most parsimonious tree obtained from the cladistic analysis of 166 characters taken from the head, neck, pectoral and upper limb musculature is fully congruent with the most recent evolutionary molecular tree of Primates. That is, this tree recovers not only the relationships among the major groups of primates, i.e. Strepsirrhini {Tarsiiformes [Platyrrhini (Cercopithecidae, Hominoidea)]}, but it also recovers the relationships within each of these inclusive groups. Of the 301 character state changes occurring in this tree, ca. 30% are non-homoplasic evolutionary transitions; within the 220 changes that are unambiguously optimized in the tree, ca. 15% are reversions. The trees obtained by using characters derived from the muscles of the head and neck are more similar to the most recent evolutionary molecular tree than are the trees obtained by using characters derived from the pectoral and upper limb muscles. It was recently argued that since the Pan/Homo split, chimpanzees accumulated more phenotypic adaptations than humans, but our results indicate that modern humans accumulated more muscle character state changes than chimpanzees, and that both these taxa accumulated more changes than gorillas. This overview of the evolution of the primate head, neck, pectoral and upper limb musculature suggests that the only muscle groups for which modern humans have more muscles than most other extant primates are the muscles of the face, larynx and forearm. PMID:21689100

  6. Idiopathic spinal cord herniation of the cervical cord: unusual cause of proximal muscle weakness in upper limbs.

    PubMed

    Rajapakse, Dilina; Mapara, Leah; Maniharan, Sathiyaseelan

    2016-01-01

    Idiopathic spinal cord herniation (ISCH) is a recognised rare cause of progressive and potentially curable myelopathy. Around 170 cases have been described in the literature, all to be found between the T2 and T8 vertebrae. We report a case of ISCH in the cervical region. A 23-year-old man with no history of trauma presented with a 6-year history of bilateral mild resting hand tremor and left scapular pain radiating to the left arm for a duration of 8 months. Nerve conduction studies showed some denervation changes of the upper limbs and bulbar regions. MRI of the spine showed anterior midline herniation of the spinal cord at the level of C7 vertebra with an associated collection of cerebrospinal fluid in the extradural space in the cervical region. Owing to the non-progressive nature of symptoms, currently the patient is managed conservatively. PMID:27190115

  7. Influence of complementing a robotic upper limb rehabilitation system with video games on the engagement of the participants: a study focusing on muscle activities.

    PubMed

    Li, Chong; Rusák, Zoltán; Horváth, Imre; Ji, Linhong

    2014-12-01

    Efficacious stroke rehabilitation depends not only on patients' medical treatment but also on their motivation and engagement during rehabilitation exercises. Although traditional rehabilitation exercises are often mundane, technology-assisted upper-limb robotic training can provide engaging and task-oriented training in a natural environment. The factors that influence engagement, however, are not fully understood. This paper therefore studies the relationship between engagement and muscle activities as well as the influencing factors of engagement. To this end, an experiment was conducted using a robotic upper limb rehabilitation system with healthy individuals in three training exercises: (a) a traditional exercise, which is typically used for training the grasping function, (b) a tracking exercise, currently used in robot-assisted stroke patient rehabilitation for fine motor movement, and (c) a video game exercise, which is a proliferating approach of robot-assisted rehabilitation enabling high-level active engagement of stroke patients. These exercises differ not only in the characteristics of the motion that they use but also in their method of triggering engagement. To measure the level of engagement, we used facial expressions, motion analysis of the arm movements, and electromyography. The results show that (a) the video game exercise could engage the participants for a longer period than the other two exercises, (b) the engagement level decreased when the participants became too familiar with the exercises, and (c) analysis of normalized root mean square in electromyographic data indicated that muscle activities were more intense when the participants are engaged. This study shows that several sub-factors on engagement, such as versatility of feedback, cognitive tasks, and competitiveness, may influence engagement more than the others. To maintain a high level of engagement, the rehabilitation system needs to be adaptive, providing different exercises to engage the participants. PMID:25221845

  8. The effects of co-ordinating postures with shoulder and elbow flexion angles on maximum grip strength and upper-limb muscle activity in standing and sitting postures.

    PubMed

    Kong, Yong-Ku

    2014-01-01

    Eighteen co-ordination postures with shoulder flexion angles (0°, 45° and 90°) and elbow flexion angles (0°, 45° and 90°) in standing and sitting positions were evaluated to identify the effects of co-ordination postures on maximum grip strength and muscle activities of the upper limb in this study. Thirty-nine subjects were recruited and their maximum grip strengths were measured. According to the analysis of grip strength, grip strength was shown to be stronger in a standing posture (297.4 N) than in a sitting posture (274.6 N). In addition, grip strength (293.8 N) at 90° shoulder flexion angle was significantly higher than that at 0° and 45° shoulder angles. There was no statistically significant difference in grip strength from the effects of elbow angles in this study. The results of muscle activities for all muscle groups showed a similar trend with the results of grip strength associated with shoulder angles. PMID:25513795

  9. An investigation of fatigue phenomenon in the upper limb muscle due to short duration pulses in an FES system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naeem, Jannatul; Wong Azman, Amelia; Khan, Sheroz; Mohd Mustafah, Yasir

    2013-12-01

    Functional Electrical Stimulation (FES) is a method of artificially stimulating muscles or nerves in order to result in contraction or relaxation of muscles. Many studies have shown that FES system has helped patients to live a better lives especially those who are suffering from physical mobility. Unfortunately, one of the main limitations of an FES system besides of its high cost is largely due to muscle fatigue. Muscle fatigue will affect the training duration which could delay patients' recovery rate. In this paper, we analyzed the occurrence of this fatigue phenomenon in terms of stimulator parameters such as amplitude, frequency, pulse width and pulse shape. The objective of this investigation is to identify other key features of the FES system parameters in order to prolong the training duration among patients. The experiment has been done on a healthy person for the duration of one minute and later the muscles response will be observed. Resultant muscle response is recorded as force using force resistive sensor. The experimental results show muscles will get fatigue at a different rate as the frequency increases. The experiment also shows that the duty cycle is reciprocal to the resultant force.

  10. Surgical Treatment of Pediatric Upper Limb Spasticity: The Shoulder.

    PubMed

    Seruya, Mitchel; Johnson, Joshua D

    2016-02-01

    The shoulder joint is essential for placing the hand in a functional position for reach and overhead activities. This depends on the delicate balance between abductor/adductor and internal/external rotator muscles. Spasticity alters this equilibrium, limiting the interaction of the upper limb with the environment. Classically, pediatric patients with upper limb spasticity present with an adduction and internal rotation contracture of the shoulder. These contractures are typically secondary to spasticity of the pectoralis major and subscapularis muscles and sometimes attributed to the latissimus dorsi muscle. Fractional lengthening, Z-step lengthening, or tendon release of the contributing muscle groups may help correct the adduction and internal rotation contractures. With proper diagnosis, a well-executed surgical plan, and a consistent hand rehabilitation regimen, successful surgical outcomes can be achieved. PMID:26869863

  11. Evaluation of upper-limb body postures based on the effects of back and shoulder flexion angles on subjective discomfort ratings, heart rates and muscle activities.

    PubMed

    Lim, Cheol-Min; Jung, Myung-Chul; Kong, Yong-Ku

    2011-09-01

    A possible limitation of many ergonomics checklists that evaluate postures is an independent evaluation of each body segment without considering the coordination between body segments and resulting in the under-/over-estimation of body postures. A total of 20 men were selected to evaluate the effects of shoulder and back flexion angles on the upper-limb muscle activities, subjective discomforts and heart rates. Interesting findings were obtained from the coordination between back flexion angles and shoulder flexion angles. At a back flexion angle of 45°, the discomfort and heart rates were the least at a shoulder flexion angle of 45°. The %MVC also showed a similar trend. It could be inferred that the 0° shoulder flexion angle would be a natural posture, when the back flexion angle is 0°, whereas 45° shoulder flexion might be a more natural posture when the back flexion angle is 45°. STATEMENT OF RELEVANCE: This study evaluated the effects of back and shoulder flexion angles on subjective as well as objective measures. The findings of this study considered the coordination between two body flexion angles and could be used to improve the accuracy of existing ergonomics evaluation methods for body postures. PMID:21943119

  12. CONGENITAL DEFORMITIES OF THE UPPER LIMBS.

    PubMed Central

    Bisneto, Edgard Novaes França

    2015-01-01

    This article, divided into three parts, had the aims of reviewing the most common upper-limb malformations and describing their treatments. In this first part, failure of formation is discussed. The bibliography follows after the first part. PMID:27047864

  13. The Profile of Patients and Current Practice of Treatment of Upper Limb Muscle Spasticity with Botulinum Toxin Type A: An International Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bakheit, Abdel Magid

    2010-01-01

    To document the current practice in relation with the treatment of patients with upper limb spasticity with botulinum toxin type A to inform future research in this area. We designed an international, cross-sectional, noninterventional survey of current practice. Nine hundred and seventy-four patients from 122 investigational centres in 31…

  14. Congenital cervical spinal muscular atrophy: a non-familial, non progressive condition of the upper limbs.

    PubMed Central

    Hageman, G; Ramaekers, V T; Hilhorst, B G; Rozeboom, A R

    1993-01-01

    Two patients with congenital cervical spinal muscular atrophy had symmetrical severe muscle weakness and wasting confined to the upper limbs, areflexia and congenital contractures. The shoulders were internally rotated, elbows extended and wrists flexed. There were no sensory or bulbar symptoms, scoliosis, long tract signs or lower limb involvement. This condition should be regarded as a neurogenic type of arthrogryposis, limited to the upper limbs. Images PMID:8482956

  15. Effect of Upper Limb Deformities on Gross Motor and Upper Limb Functions in Children with Spastic Cerebral Palsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Eun Sook; Sim, Eun Geol; Rha, Dong-wook

    2011-01-01

    The aims of this study were to investigate the nature and extent of upper limb deformities via the use of various classifications, and to analyze the relationship between upper limb deformities and gross motor or upper limb functionality levels. Upper extremity data were collected from 234 children with spastic cerebral palsy (CP) who were…

  16. Effect of Upper Limb Deformities on Gross Motor and Upper Limb Functions in Children with Spastic Cerebral Palsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Eun Sook; Sim, Eun Geol; Rha, Dong-wook

    2011-01-01

    The aims of this study were to investigate the nature and extent of upper limb deformities via the use of various classifications, and to analyze the relationship between upper limb deformities and gross motor or upper limb functionality levels. Upper extremity data were collected from 234 children with spastic cerebral palsy (CP) who were

  17. SPORTS INJURIES OF THE UPPER LIMBS

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Rogerio Teixeira

    2015-01-01

    Sports injuries of the upper limbs are very common in physical activities and therefore, they need to be studied in detail, taking into consideration specific aspects of the types of sports practiced. Special attention should be paid to the dynamics of the shoulder girdle and the entire scapular belt, since the most appropriate treatment for athletes can only be provided in this manner. This can also help to prevent recurrences, which can occur in some cases because athletes always seek to return to their pre-injury level of sports activity. This article will focus primarily on the management of upper-limb tendon injuries, from the physiopathology through to the new methods of injury treatment that are more prevalent in sports practice in Brazil. PMID:27022529

  18. The upper limb of Australopithecus sediba.

    PubMed

    Churchill, Steven E; Holliday, Trenton W; Carlson, Kristian J; Jashashvili, Tea; Macias, Marisa E; Mathews, Sandra; Sparling, Tawnee L; Schmid, Peter; de Ruiter, Darryl J; Berger, Lee R

    2013-04-12

    The evolution of the human upper limb involved a change in function from its use for both locomotion and prehension (as in apes) to a predominantly prehensile and manipulative role. Well-preserved forelimb remains of 1.98-million-year-old Australopithecus sediba from Malapa, South Africa, contribute to our understanding of this evolutionary transition. Whereas other aspects of their postcranial anatomy evince mosaic combinations of primitive (australopith-like) and derived (Homo-like) features, the upper limbs (excluding the hand and wrist) of the Malapa hominins are predominantly primitive and suggest the retention of substantial climbing and suspensory ability. The use of the forelimb primarily for prehension and manipulation appears to arise later, likely with the emergence of Homo erectus. PMID:23580536

  19. Effect of limb immobilization on skeletal muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Booth, F. W.

    1982-01-01

    Current knowledge and questions remaining concerning the effects of limb immobilization on skeletal muscle is reviewed. The most dramatic of these effects is muscle atrophy, which has been noted in cases of muscles fixed at or below their resting length. Immobilization is also accompanied by a substantial decrease in motoneuronal discharges, which results in the conversion of slow-twitch muscle to muscle with fast-twitch characteristics. Sarcolemma effects include no change or a decrease in resting membrane potential, the appearance of extrajunctional acetylcholine receptors, and no change in acetylcholinesterase activity. Evidence of changes in motoneuron after hyperpolarization characteristics suggests that the muscle inactivity is responsible for neuronal changes, rather than vice versa. The rate of protein loss from atrophying muscles is determined solely by the first-order rate constant for degradation. Various other biochemical and functional changes have been noted, including decreased insulin responsiveness and protein synthesis. The model of limb immobilization may also be useful for related studies of muscle adaptation.

  20. Upper limb kinematics after cervical spinal cord injury: a review.

    PubMed

    Mateo, Sébastien; Roby-Brami, Agnès; Reilly, Karen T; Rossetti, Yves; Collet, Christian; Rode, Gilles

    2015-01-01

    Although a number of upper limb kinematic studies have been conducted, no review actually addresses the key-features of open-chain upper limb movements after cervical spinal cord injury (SCI). The aim of this literature review is to provide a clear understanding of motor control and kinematic changes during open-chain upper limb reaching, reach-to-grasp, overhead movements, and fast elbow flexion movements after tetraplegia. Using data from MEDLINE between 1966 and December 2014, we examined temporal and spatial kinematic measures and when available electromyographic recordings. We included fifteen control case and three series case studies with a total of 164 SCI participants and 131 healthy control participants. SCI participants efficiently performed a broad range of tasks with their upper limb and movements were planned and executed with strong kinematic invariants like movement endpoint accuracy and minimal cost. Our review revealed that elbow extension without triceps brachii relies on increased scapulothoracic and glenohumeral movements providing a dynamic coupling between shoulder and elbow. Furthermore, contrary to normal grasping patterns where grasping is prepared during the transport phase, reaching and grasping are performed successively after SCI. The prolonged transport phase ensures correct hand placement while the grasping relies on wrist extension eliciting either whole hand or lateral grip. One of the main kinematic characteristics observed after tetraplegia is motor slowing attested by increased movement time. This could be caused by (i) decreased strength, (ii) triceps brachii paralysis which disrupts normal agonist-antagonist co-contractions, (iii) accuracy preservation at movement endpoint, and/or (iv) grasping relying on tenodesis. Another feature is a reduction of maximal superior reaching during overhead movements which could be caused by i) strength deficit in agonist muscles like pectoralis major, ii) strength deficit in proximal synergic muscles responsible for scapulothoracic and glenohumeral joint stability, iii) strength deficit in distal synergic muscles preventing the maintenance of elbow extension by shoulder elbow dynamic coupling, iv) shoulder joint ankyloses, and/or v) shoulder pain. Further studies on open chain movements are needed to identify the contribution of each of these factors in order to tailor upper limb rehabilitation programs for SCI individuals. PMID:25637224

  1. Balneotherapy in Treatment of Spastic Upper Limb after Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Erceg-Rukavina, Tatjana; Stefanovski, Mihajlo

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: After stroke, spasticity is often the main problem that prevents functional recovery. Pain occurs in up to 70% of patients during the first year post-stroke. Materials and methods: A total of 70 patients (30 female and 45 male) mean age (65.67) participated in prospective, controlled study. Inclusion criteria: ischaemic stroke, developed spasticity of upper limb, post-stroke interval <6 months. Exclusion criteria: contraindications for balneotherapy and inability to follow commands. Experimental group (Ex) (n=35) was treated with sulphurous baths (31°-33°C) and controlled group (Co) with taped water baths, during 21 days. All patients were additionally treated with kinesitherapy and cryotherapy. The outcome was evaluated using Modified Ashworth scale for spasticity and VAS scale for pain. The significance value was sat at p<0.05. Goal: To find out the effects of balneotherapy with sulphurous bath on spasticity and pain in affected upper limb. Results: Reduction in tone of affected upper limb muscles was significant in Ex group (p<0.05). Pain decreased significantly in Ex-group (p<0.01). Conclusion: Our results show that balneotherapy with sulphurous water reduces spasticity and pain significantly and can help in treatment of post-stroke patients. PMID:25870474

  2. Muscles of the Upper Extremity

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home » Cancer Registration & Surveillance Modules » Anatomy & Physiology » Muscular System » Muscle Groups » Upper Extremity Cancer Registration & Surveillance Modules Anatomy & Physiology Intro to the Human Body Body Functions & Life Process Anatomical Terminology Review Quiz ...

  3. Prevalence and Characteristics of Phantom Limb Pain and Residual Limb Pain in the Long Term after Upper Limb Amputation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Desmond, Deirdre M.; MacLachlan, Malcolm

    2010-01-01

    This study aims to describe the prevalence and characteristics of phantom limb pain and residual limb pain after upper limb amputation. One-hundred and forty-one participants (139 males; mean age 74.8 years; mean time since amputation 50.1 years) completed a self-report questionnaire assessing residual and phantom limb pain experience. Prevalence…

  4. Prevalence and Characteristics of Phantom Limb Pain and Residual Limb Pain in the Long Term after Upper Limb Amputation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Desmond, Deirdre M.; MacLachlan, Malcolm

    2010-01-01

    This study aims to describe the prevalence and characteristics of phantom limb pain and residual limb pain after upper limb amputation. One-hundred and forty-one participants (139 males; mean age 74.8 years; mean time since amputation 50.1 years) completed a self-report questionnaire assessing residual and phantom limb pain experience. Prevalence

  5. Functional outcome following traumatic upper limb amputation and prosthetic limb fitting.

    PubMed

    Pinzur, M S; Angelats, J; Light, T R; Izuierdo, R; Pluth, T

    1994-09-01

    Nineteen consecutive patients underwent traumatic upper limb amputation for nonreconstructible or replantible upper limb injury at a Level I trauma center over a 9-year-period. Eleven amputations were at the transradial level, five were transhumeral, and three were shoulder disarticulation. Eighteen patients underwent prosthetic limb fitting. Fifteen of the 18 initially underwent preparatory prosthetic limb fitting within 30 days following amputation with a body-powered, cable-driven prosthesis. Seventeen of the 18 achieved sufficient proficiency with their prostheses to allow them to return to work. Of these, 15 maintained daily functional prosthetic use of at least 8 hours daily at a followup examination of 12 to 110 months. Use of prosthetic limb following traumatic upper limb amputation carries a high probability for functional rehabilitation if limb fitting and prosthetic training are instituted as soon as the residual limb can tolerate the prosthetic socket as opposed to waiting for the residual limb to "mature". PMID:7806814

  6. Chronic Pain Associated with Upper-Limb Loss

    PubMed Central

    Hanley, Marisol A.; Ehde, Dawn M.; Jensen, Mark; Czerniecki, Joseph; Smith, Douglas G.; Robinson, Lawrence R.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To describe the prevalence, intensity, and functional impact of the following types of pain associated with upper-limb loss: phantom limb, residual limb, back, neck, and nonamputated-limb pain. Design Cross-sectional survey; 104 respondents with upper-limb loss at least 6 months postamputation completed measures of pain intensity, interference, disability, and health-related quality-of-life. Results Nearly all (90%) of the respondents reported pain, with 76% reporting more than one pain type. Phantom-limb pain and residual-limb pain were the most prevalent (79% and 71%, respectively), followed by back (52%), neck (43%), and nonamputated-limb pain (33%). Although nonamputated-limb pain was least prevalent, it was reported to cause the highest levels of interference and pain-related disability days. Self-reported quality-of-life was significantly lower for individuals with each type of pain compared with those without any pain. Age, time since amputation, and cause of amputation were not associated with pain. Conclusions In addition to pain in the phantom and residual limb, back, neck, and nonamputated-limb pain are also common after upper-limb loss. All of these pain types are associated with significant disability and activity interference for some individuals, suggesting that assessment of multiple pain types in persons with upper-limb amputation may be important. PMID:19692791

  7. Sensory feedback in upper limb prosthetics.

    PubMed

    Antfolk, Christian; D'Alonzo, Marco; Rosén, Birgitta; Lundborg, Göran; Sebelius, Fredrik; Cipriani, Christian

    2013-01-01

    One of the challenges facing prosthetic designers and engineers is to restore the missing sensory function inherit to hand amputation. Several different techniques can be employed to provide amputees with sensory feedback: sensory substitution methods where the recorded stimulus is not only transferred to the amputee, but also translated to a different modality (modality-matched feedback), which transfers the stimulus without translation and direct neural stimulation, which interacts directly with peripheral afferent nerves. This paper presents an overview of the principal works and devices employed to provide upper limb amputees with sensory feedback. The focus is on sensory substitution and modality matched feedback; the principal features, advantages and disadvantages of the different methods are presented. PMID:23278223

  8. Sensory feedback for upper limb prostheses.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Steven S; Fettiplace, Michael; Darbandi, Bejan

    2011-01-01

    In this chapter, we discuss the neurophysiological basis of how to provide sensory feedback to users with an upper limb prosthesis and discuss some of the theoretical issues that need to be considered when directly stimulating neurons in the somatosensory system. We focus on technologies that are currently available and discuss approaches that are most likely to succeed in providing natural perception from the artificial hand to the user. First, we discuss the advantages and disadvantages of providing feedback by stimulating directly the remaining afferents that originally innervated the arm and hand. In particular, we pay close attention to the normal functional roles that the peripheral afferents play in perception. What are the consequences and implications of stimulating these afferents? We then discuss whether it is reasonable to stimulate neurons in the ascending pathways that carry the information from the afferents to the cortex or directly in neurons in the primary somatosensory cortex. We show that for some modalities there are advantages for stimulating in the spinal cord, while for others it is advantageous to stimulate directly in the somatosensory cortex. Finally, we discuss results from a current experiment in which we used electrical stimuli in primary somatosensory cortex to restore the percept of the intensity of a mechanical probe indented into the hand. The results suggest that the simple percept of stimulus intensity can be provided to the animal from a single finger using four electrodes. We propose that significantly more electrodes will be needed to reproduce more complex aspects of tactile perception. PMID:21763519

  9. Glucose uptake and glycogen synthesis in muscles from immobilized limbs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicholson, W. F.; Watson, P. A.; Booth, F. W.

    1984-01-01

    Defects in glucose metabolism in muscles of immobilized limbs of mice were related to alterations in insulin binding, insulin responsiveness, glucose supply, and insulin activation of glycogen synthase. These were tested by in vitro methodology. A significant lessening in the insulin-induced maximal response of 2-deoxyglucose uptake into the mouse soleus muscle occurred between the 3rd and 8th h of limb immobilization, suggesting a decreased insulin responsiveness. Lack of change in the specific binding of insulin to muscles of 24-h immobilized limbs indicates that a change in insulin receptor number did not play a role in the failure of insulin to stimulate glucose metabolism. Its inability to stimulate glycogen synthesis in muscle from immobilized limbs is due, in part, to a lack of glucose supply to glycogen synthesis and also to the ineffectiveness of insulin to increase the percentage of glycogen synthase in its active form in muscles from 24-h immobilized limbs.

  10. Measurement of synergy and spasticity during functional movement of the post-stoke hemiplegic upper limb.

    PubMed

    Ohn, Suk Hooh; Yoo, Woo-Kyoung; Kim, Deog Young; Ahn, Seungho; Jung, Bora; Choi, Ikjun; Lee, Nam Jae; Jung, Kwang-Ik

    2013-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to measure the muscle-contraction patterns of the hemiplegic upper limb using electromyography (EMG) and to investigate the relationship between muscle co-contraction and functional recovery in stroke patients presenting with synergy and spasticity. The muscle-contraction patterns of the upper limb of 12 chronic stroke patients and 10 normal volunteers were measured, and the co-contraction in the distal and proximal muscles was simultaneously quantified, while the participants performed hand-grasp and shoulder flexion tasks. The spasticity and hemiplegic arm function were evaluated, respectively, on a modified Ashworth scale (MAS) and by means of Fugl-Meyer motor assessment (FMA). The correlation between the MAS and FMA values was analyzed. Increased co-contraction (66-555%) was observed in both the proximal and distal upper limbs, and was positively correlated with spasticity of the elbow flexor (r = 0.944 on shoulder flexion, r = 0.741 on hand grasping, p < 0.01) and negatively correlated with functional recovery of the upper limb (r = -0.670 ∼ -0.884, p < 0.05). Specific movement patterns influenced by synergy and spasticity were confirmed by EMG. These results might prove useful to the formulation of appropriate management plans such as those involving botulinum toxin injection or nerve block. PMID:23146551

  11. Critical analysis of musculoskeletal modelling complexity in multibody biomechanical models of the upper limb.

    PubMed

    Quental, Carlos; Folgado, João; Ambrósio, Jorge; Monteiro, Jacinto

    2015-01-01

    The inverse dynamics technique applied to musculoskeletal models, and supported by optimisation techniques, is used extensively to estimate muscle and joint reaction forces. However, the solutions of the redundant muscle force sharing problem are sensitive to the detail and modelling assumptions of the models used. This study presents four alternative biomechanical models of the upper limb with different levels of discretisation of muscles by bundles and muscle paths, and their consequences on the estimation of the muscle and joint reaction forces. The muscle force sharing problem is solved for the motions of abduction and anterior flexion, acquired using video imaging, through the minimisation of an objective function describing muscle metabolic energy consumption. While looking for the optimal solution, not only the equations of motion are satisfied but also the stability of the glenohumeral and scapulothoracic joints is preserved. The results show that a lower level of muscle discretisation provides worse estimations regarding the muscle forces. Moreover, the poor discretisation of muscles relevant to the joint in analysis limits the applicability of the biomechanical model. In this study, the biomechanical model of the upper limb describing the infraspinatus by a single bundle could not solve the complete motion of anterior flexion. Despite the small differences in the magnitude of the forces predicted by the biomechanical models with more complex muscular systems, in general, there are no significant variations in the muscular activity of equivalent muscles. PMID:24156405

  12. Surgical Treatment of Pediatric Upper Limb Spasticity: The Wrist and Hand.

    PubMed

    Seruya, Mitchel; Dickey, Ryan M; Fakhro, Abdulla

    2016-02-01

    The wrist and hand are essential in the placement of the upper extremity in a functional position for grasp, pinch, and release activities. This depends on the delicate balance between the extrinsic and intrinsic muscles of the wrist and hand. Spasticity alters this equilibrium, limiting the interaction of the upper limb with the environment. Classically, pediatric patients with upper limb spasticity present with a flexed wrist, thumb-in-palm, and flexed finger posture. These contractures are typically secondary to spasticity of the extrinsic flexor muscles of the wrist and hand and intrinsic muscles of the thumb and digits. Tendon release, lengthening, or transfer procedures may help correct the resultant abnormal postures. A total wrist arthrodesis with or without proximal row carpectomy may help address the severely flexed wrist deformity. With proper diagnosis, a well-executed surgical plan, and a consistent hand rehabilitation regimen, successful surgical outcomes can be achieved. PMID:26869861

  13. [Tests of hand functionality in upper limb amputation with prosthesis].

    PubMed

    Bazzini, G; Orlandini, D; Moscato, T A; Nicita, D; Panigazzi, M

    2007-01-01

    The need for standardized instruments for clinical measurements has become pressing in the fields of occupational rehabilitation and ergonomics. This is particularly the case for instruments that allow a quantitative evaluation of upper limb function, and especially hand function in patients who have undergone an amputation and then application of an upper limb prosthesis. This study presents a review of the main tests used to evaluate hand function, with a critical analysis of their use in subjects with an upper limb prosthesis. The tests are divided into: tests to evaluate strength, tests to evaluate co-ordination and dexterity, tests of global or overall function, and tests proposed specifically for subjects with an upper limb prosthesis. Of the various tests presented, the authors give their preference to the Bimanual Functional Assessment, Abilhand and/or the ADL Questionnaire, because of the practical usefulness, clinimetric features, simplicity and ease of administration of these tests. PMID:17886763

  14. Experimental Study and Characterization of SEMG Signals for Upper Limbs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veer, Karan

    2015-04-01

    Surface electromyogram (SEMG) is used to measure the activity of superficial muscles and is an essential tool to carry out biomechanical assessments required for prosthetic design. Many previous attempts suggest that, electromyogram (EMG) signals have random nature. Here, dual channel evaluation of EMG signals acquired from the amputed subjects using computational techniques for classification of arm motion are presented. After recording data from four predefined upper arm motions, interpretation of signal was done for six statistical features. The signals are classified by the neural network (NN) and then interpretation was done using statistical technique to extract the effectiveness of recorded signals. The network performances are analyzed by considering the number of input features, hidden layer, learning algorithm and mean square error. From the results, it is observed that there exists calculative difference in amplitude gain across different motions and have great potential to classify arm motions. The outcome indicates that NN algorithm performs significantly better than other algorithms with classification accuracy (CA) of 96.40%. Analysis of variance technique presents the results to validate the effectiveness of recorded data to discriminate SEMG signals. Results are of significant thrust in identifying the operations that can be implemented for classifying upper limb movements suitable for prostheses design.

  15. Sonic hedgehog acts cell-autonomously on muscle precursor cells to generate limb muscle diversity

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Claire; Williams, Victoria C.; Moyon, Benjamin; Daubas, Philippe; Tajbakhsh, Shahragim; Buckingham, Margaret E.; Shiroishi, Toshihiko; Hughes, Simon M.; Borycki, Anne-Gaëlle

    2012-01-01

    How muscle diversity is generated in the vertebrate body is poorly understood. In the limb, dorsal and ventral muscle masses constitute the first myogenic diversification, as each gives rise to distinct muscles. Myogenesis initiates after muscle precursor cells (MPCs) have migrated from the somites to the limb bud and populated the prospective muscle masses. Here, we show that Sonic hedgehog (Shh) from the zone of polarizing activity (ZPA) drives myogenesis specifically within the ventral muscle mass. Shh directly induces ventral MPCs to initiate Myf5 transcription and myogenesis through essential Gli-binding sites located in the Myf5 limb enhancer. In the absence of Shh signaling, myogenesis is delayed, MPCs fail to migrate distally, and ventral paw muscles fail to form. Thus, Shh production in the limb ZPA is essential for the spatiotemporal control of myogenesis and coordinates muscle and skeletal development by acting directly to regulate the formation of specific ventral muscles. PMID:22987640

  16. Design and preliminary evaluation of an exoskeleton for upper limb resistance training

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Tzong-Ming; Chen, Dar-Zen

    2012-06-01

    Resistance training is a popular form of exercise recommended by national health organizations, such as the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) and the American Heart Association (AHA). This form of training is available for most populations. A compact design of upper limb exoskeleton mechanism for homebased resistance training using a spring-loaded upper limb exoskeleton with a three degree-of-freedom shoulder joint and a one degree-of-freedom elbow joint allows a patient or a healthy individual to move the upper limb with multiple joints in different planes. It can continuously increase the resistance by adjusting the spring length to train additional muscle groups and reduce the number of potential injuries to upper limb joints caused by the mass moment of inertia of the training equipment. The aim of this research is to perform a preliminary evaluation of the designed function by adopting an appropriate motion analysis system and experimental design to verify our prototype of the exoskeleton and determine the optimal configuration of the spring-loaded upper limb exoskeleton.

  17. Multibody system of the upper limb including a reverse shoulder prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Quental, C; Folgado, J; Ambrósio, J; Monteiro, J

    2013-11-01

    The reverse shoulder replacement, recommended for the treatment of several shoulder pathologies such as cuff tear arthropathy and fractures in elderly people, changes the biomechanics of the shoulder when compared to the normal anatomy. Although several musculoskeletal models of the upper limb have been presented to study the shoulder joint, only a few of them focus on the biomechanics of the reverse shoulder. This work presents a biomechanical model of the upper limb, including a reverse shoulder prosthesis, to evaluate the impact of the variation of the joint geometry and position on the biomechanical function of the shoulder. The biomechanical model of the reverse shoulder is based on a musculoskeletal model of the upper limb, which is modified to account for the properties of the DELTA® reverse prosthesis. Considering two biomechanical models, which simulate the anatomical and reverse shoulder joints, the changes in muscle lengths, muscle moment arms, and muscle and joint reaction forces are evaluated. The muscle force sharing problem is solved for motions of unloaded abduction in the coronal plane and unloaded anterior flexion in the sagittal plane, acquired using video-imaging, through the minimization of an objective function related to muscle metabolic energy consumption. After the replacement of the shoulder joint, significant changes in the length of the pectoralis major, latissimus dorsi, deltoid, teres major, teres minor, coracobrachialis, and biceps brachii muscles are observed for a reference position considered for the upper limb. The shortening of the teres major and teres minor is the most critical since they become unable to produce active force in this position. Substantial changes of muscle moment arms are also observed, which are consistent with the literature. As expected, there is a significant increase of the deltoid moment arms and more fibers are able to elevate the arm. The solutions to the muscle force sharing problem support the biomechanical advantages attributed to the reverse shoulder design and show an increase in activity from the deltoid, teres minor, and coracobrachialis muscles. The glenohumeral joint reaction forces estimated for the reverse shoulder are up to 15% lower than those in the normal shoulder anatomy. The data presented here complements previous publications, which, all together, allow researchers to build a biomechanical model of the upper limb including a reverse shoulder prosthesis. PMID:24008920

  18. Cortical motor activity and reorganization following upper-limb amputation and subsequent targeted reinnervation☆

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Albert; Yao, Jun; Kuiken, Todd; Dewald, Julius P.A.

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have postulated that the amount of brain reorganization following peripheral injuries may be correlated with negative symptoms or consequences. However, it is unknown whether restoring effective limb function may then be associated with further changes in the expression of this reorganization. Recently, targeted reinnervation (TR), a surgical technique that restores a direct neural connection from amputated sensorimotor nerves to new peripheral targets such as muscle, has been successfully applied to upper-limb amputees. It has been shown to be effective in restoring both peripheral motor and sensory functions via the reinnervated nerves as soon as a few months after the surgery. However, it was unclear whether TR could also restore normal cortical motor representations for control of the missing limb. To answer this question, we used high-density electroencephalography (EEG) to localize cortical activity related to cued motor tasks generated by the intact and missing limb. Using a case study of 3 upper-limb amputees, 2 of whom went through pre and post-TR experiments, we present unique quantitative evidence for the re-mapping of motor representations for the missing limb closer to their original locations following TR. This provides evidence that an effective restoration of peripheral function from TR can be linked to the return of more normal cortical expression for the missing limb. Therefore, cortical mapping may be used as a potential guide for monitoring rehabilitation following peripheral injuries. PMID:24273732

  19. Muscle phenotype remains unaltered after limb autotomy and unloading.

    PubMed

    Griffis, B; Moffett, S B; Cooper, R L

    2001-01-01

    Loss of chelipeds in crustaceans results in severe atrophy of the major muscle responsible for lifting the limb, the anterior levator. We decided to test if this loss of mechanical load altered muscle phenotype as measured by SDS-PAGE analysis of levator total protein and actomyosin fractions. Levator muscles of adult crayfish, Procambarus clarkii, with either functional regenerate limbs or lack of limb buds (papilla stage) were compared with those from normal contralateral limbs and those from pristine animals. We find that there is no difference in protein profiles among the three conditions. However, the total protein profile for the dually excited levator muscle is unique compared to those of fast or slow muscles of the abdomen (L and SEL, respectively), which receive only phasic or tonic excitatory innervation. The levator myosin heavy chain profile is similar to that of slow phenotype muscles such as the SEL and opener. We conclude that load does not influence levator phenotype. This is likely due either to the intact innervation and continued activation of the levator during atrophy or to the maintenance of passive tension on the muscle. J. Exp. Zool. 289:10-22, 2001. PMID:11169489

  20. Skeletal muscle responses to lower limb suspension in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hather, Bruce M.; Adams, Gregory R.; Tesch, Per A.; Dudley, Gary A.

    1992-01-01

    The morphological responses of human skeletal muscle to unweighting were assessed by analyzing multiple transaxial magnetic resonance (MR) images of both lower limbs and skeletal muscle biopsies of the unweighted lower limb before and after six weeks of unilaterial (left) lower limb suspension (ULLS). Results indicated that, as a results of 6 weeks of unweighting (by the subjects walking on crutches using only one limb), the cross sectional area (CSA) of the thigh muscle of the unweighted left limb decreased 12 percent, while the CSA of the right thigh muscle did not change. The decrease was due to a twofold greater response of the knee extensors than the knee flexors. The pre- and post-ULLS biopsies of the left vastus lateralis showed a 14 percent decrease in average fiber CSA due to unweighting. The number of capillaries surrounding the different fiber types was unchanged after ULLS. Results showed that the adaptive responses of human skeletal muscle to unweighting are qualitatively, but not quantitatively, similar to those of lower mammals and not necessarily dependent on the fiber-type composition.

  1. Feasibility of a biomechatronic EPP Upper Limb Prosthesis Controller.

    PubMed

    Moutopoulou, Efie; Bertos, Georgios A; Mablekos-Alexiou, Anestis; Papadopoulos, Evangelos G

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, we examine the feasibility of an implantable topology of a Biomechatronic Extended Physiological Proprioception (EPP) Upper Limb Prosthesis Controller. Initial findings support the hypothesis that the topology is safe and feasible. This novel controller topology can maintain the advantages of EPP, but without its inherent disadvantages i.e. of the existence of unaesthetic cables, or mechanical linkages. PMID:26736790

  2. [Congenital malformations of the upper limb. General considerations].

    PubMed

    Henriques, M; Ferreira, A C

    1998-12-01

    The authors develop same general considerations about history, embryology, classification and treatment of congenital upper limb anomalies. They review 62 clinical cases of operated patients in Unit Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery of Santa Maria Hospital and show same cases. PMID:10192983

  3. Upper limb erythema nodosum: the first presentation of Crohn's disease

    PubMed Central

    Faulkes, R E

    2014-01-01

    Key Clinical Message Inflammatory bowel disease can present with extraintestinal features as the patient's only complaint. The erythema nodosum (EN) initially affected the upper limbs only, reminding us that signs do not always present in a classical fashion. The presence of EN should prompt the clinician to look for any underlying cause. PMID:25614807

  4. The artery blood supply variant of the upper limb

    PubMed Central

    MASLARSKI, IVAN

    2015-01-01

    Variations of arterial patterns in the upper limb have represented the most common subject of vascular anatomy. Different types of artery branching pattern of the upper limb are very important for orthopedists in angiographic and microvascular surgical practice. The brachial artery (BA) is the most important vessel in the normal vascular anatomy of the upper limb. The classical pattern of the palmar hand region distribution shows the superficial palmar arch. Normally this arch is formed by the superficial branch of the ulnar artery and completed on the lateral side by one of these arteries: the superficial palmar branch of the radial artery, the princeps pollicis artery, the superficial palmar branch of the radial artery or the median artery. After the routine dissection of the right upper limb of an adult male cadaver, we found a very rare variant of the superficial arch artery – a division in a higher level brachial artery. We found this division at 10.4 cm from the beginning of the brachial artery. This superficial brachial artery became a radial artery and was not involved in the formation of the palm arch. In the forearm region, the artery variant was present with the median artery and the ulnar artery, which form the superficial palm arch. PMID:26733754

  5. The formation of skeletal muscle: from somite to limb.

    PubMed

    Buckingham, Margaret; Bajard, Lola; Chang, Ted; Daubas, Philippe; Hadchouel, Juliette; Meilhac, Sigolène; Montarras, Didier; Rocancourt, Didier; Relaix, Frédéric

    2003-01-01

    During embryogenesis, skeletal muscle forms in the vertebrate limb from progenitor cells originating in the somites. These cells delaminate from the hypaxial edge of the dorsal part of the somite, the dermomyotome, and migrate into the limb bud, where they proliferate, express myogenic determination factors and subsequently differentiate into skeletal muscle. A number of regulatory factors involved in these different steps have been identified. These include Pax3 with its target c-met, Lbx1 and Mox2 as well as the myogenic determination factors Myf5 and MyoD and factors required for differentiation such as Myogenin, Mrf4 and Mef2 isoforms. Mutants for genes such as Lbx1 and Mox2, expressed uniformly in limb muscle progenitors, reveal unexpected differences between fore and hind limb muscles, also indicated by the differential expression of Tbx genes. As development proceeds, a secondary wave of myogenesis takes place, and, postnatally, satellite cells become located under the basal lamina of adult muscle fibres. Satellite cells are thought to be the progenitor cells for adult muscle regeneration, during which similar genes to those which regulate myogenesis in the embryo also play a role. In particular, Pax3 as well as its orthologue Pax7 are important. The origin of secondary/fetal myoblasts and of adult satellite cells is unclear, as is the relation of the latter to so-called SP or stem cell populations, or indeed to potential mesangioblast progenitors, present in blood vessels. The oligoclonal origin of postnatal muscles points to a small number of founder cells, whether or not these have additional origins to the progenitor cells of the somite which form the first skeletal muscles, as discussed here for the embryonic limb. PMID:12587921

  6. Prosthetic rehabilitation of the upper limb amputee

    PubMed Central

    O’Keeffe, Bernard

    2011-01-01

    The loss of all or part of the arm is a catastrophic event for a patient and a significant challenge to rehabilitation professionals and prosthetic engineers. The large, upper extremity amputee population in India has, historically, been poorly served, with most having no access to support or being provided with ineffective prostheses. In recent years, the arrival of organisations like Otto Bock has made high quality service standards and devices accessible to more amputees. This review attempts to provide surgeons and other medical professionals with an overview of the multidisciplinary, multistage rehabilitation process and the solution options available. With worldwide upper extremity prosthesis rejection rates at significant levels, the review also describes some of the factors which influence the outcome. This is particularly relevant in the Indian context where the service can involve high cost investments. It is the responsibility of all contributing professionals to guide vulnerable patients through the process and try to maximise the benefit that can be obtained within the resources available. PMID:22022035

  7. MR Imaging of Brachial Plexus and Limb-Girdle Muscles in Patients with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Gerevini, Simonetta; Agosta, Federica; Riva, Nilo; Spinelli, Edoardo G; Pagani, Elisabetta; Caliendo, Giandomenico; Chaabane, Linda; Copetti, Massimiliano; Quattrini, Angelo; Comi, Giancarlo; Falini, Andrea; Filippi, Massimo

    2016-05-01

    Purpose To assess brachial plexus magnetic resonance (MR) imaging features and limb-girdle muscle abnormalities as signs of muscle denervation in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Materials and Methods This study was approved by the local ethical committees on human studies, and written informed consent was obtained from all subjects before enrollment. By using an optimized protocol of brachial plexus MR imaging, brachial plexus and limb-girdle muscle abnormalities were evaluated in 23 patients with ALS and clinical and neurophysiologically active involvement of the upper limbs and were compared with MR images in 12 age-matched healthy individuals. Nerve root and limb-girdle muscle abnormalities were visually evaluated by two experienced observers. A region of interest-based analysis was performed to measure nerve root volume and T2 signal intensity. Measures obtained at visual inspection were analyzed by using the Wald χ(2) test. Mean T2 signal intensity and volume values of the regions of interest were compared between groups by using a hierarchical linear model, accounting for the repeated measurement design. Results The level of interrater agreement was very strong (κ = 0.77-1). T2 hyperintensity and volume alterations of C5, C6, and C7 nerve roots were observed in patients with ALS (P < .001 to .03). Increased T2 signal intensity of nerve roots was associated with faster disease progression (upper-limb Medical Research Council scale progression rate, r = 0.40; 95% confidence interval: 0.001, 0.73). Limb-girdle muscle alterations (ie, T2 signal intensity alteration, edema, atrophy) and fat infiltration also were found, in particular, in the supraspinatus muscle, showing more frequent T2 signal intensity alterations and edema (P = .01) relative to the subscapularis and infraspinatus muscles. Conclusion Increased T2 signal intensity and volume of brachial nerve roots do not exclude a diagnosis of ALS and suggest involvement of the peripheral nervous system in the ALS pathogenetic cascade. MR imaging of the peripheral nervous system and the limb-girdle muscle may be useful for monitoring the evolution of ALS and distinguishing patients with ALS from those with inflammatory neuropathy, respectively. (©) RSNA, 2015. PMID:26583760

  8. UPPER LIMB TRACTION DEVICE FOR ANTEROGRADE INTRAMEDULLARY LOCKED NAIL OF HUMERAL SHAFT FRACTURES

    PubMed Central

    Corrêa, Mário Chaves; Gomes, Felipe Antônio; Linhares, Daniel Campos; Gonçalves, Lucas Braga Jacques; Vilela, José Carlos Souza; de Andrade, Ronaldo Percopi

    2015-01-01

    Diaphyseal fractures of the femur and tibia in adults are mostly treated surgically, usually by means of intramedullary locked-nail osteosynthesis. Some comminuted and/or highly deviated shaft fractures may present a veritable technical challenge. Fracture (or orthopedic) tables, which enable vertical, horizontal and rotational instrumental stabilization of the limb, greatly facilitate reduction and implant placement maneuvers and are widely used by orthopedic surgeons. Humeral shaft fractures are mostly treated nonsurgically. However, some cases with indications that are well defined in the literature require surgical treatment. They can be fixed by means of plates or intramedullary nails, using anterograde or retrograde routes. In the humerus, fracture reduction and limb stabilization maneuvers for implantation of intramedullary nails are done manually, usually by two assistants. Because muscle fatigue may occur, this option may be less efficient. The aim of this paper is to present an external upper-limb traction device for use in anterograde intramedullary locked-nail osteosynthesis of humeral shaft fractures that enables vertical, horizontal and rotational stabilization of the upper limb, in a manner similar to the device used for the lower limbs. The device is portable, of simple construction, and can be installed on any operating table equipped with side rails. It was used for surgical treatment of 29 humeral shaft fractures using an anterograde locked intramedullary nail. Our experience was extremely positive. We did not have any complications relating to its use and we believe that it notably facilitated the surgical procedures. PMID:27022560

  9. Micro movements of the upper limb in fibromyalgia: The relation to proprioceptive accuracy and visual feedback.

    PubMed

    Bardal, Ellen Marie; Roeleveld, Karin; Ihlen, Espen; Mork, Paul Jarle

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the role of visual and proprioceptive feedback in upper limb posture control in fibromyalgia (FM) and to assess the coherence between acceleration measurements of upper limb micro movements and surface electromyography (sEMG) of shoulder muscle activity (upper trapezius and deltoid). Twenty-five female FM patients and 25 age- and sex-matched healthy controls (HCs) performed three precision motor tasks: (1) maintain a steady shoulder abduction angle of 45° while receiving visual feedback about upper arm position and supporting external loads (0.5, 1, or 2kg), (2) maintain the same shoulder abduction angle without visual feedback (eyes closed) and no external loading, and (3) a joint position sense test (i.e., assessment of proprioceptive accuracy). Patients had more extensive increase in movement variance than HCs when visual feedback was removed (P<0.03). Proprioceptive accuracy was related to movement variance in HCs (R⩾0.59, P⩽0.002), but not in patients (R⩽0.25, P⩾0.24). There was no difference between patients and HCs in coherence between sEMG and acceleration data. These results may indicate that FM patients are more dependent on visual feedback and less reliant on proprioceptive information for upper limb posture control compared to HCs. PMID:26790141

  10. Coordinated upper limb training assisted with an electromyography (EMG)-driven hand robot after stroke.

    PubMed

    Hu, X L; Tong, K Y; Wei, X J; Rong, W; Susanto, E A; Ho, S K

    2013-01-01

    An electromyography (EMG)-driven hand robot had been developed for post-stroke rehabilitation training. The effectiveness of the hand robot assisted whole upper limb training on muscular coordination was investigated on persons with chronic stroke (n=10) in this work. All subjects attended a 20-session training (3-5 times/week) by using the hand robot to practice object grasp/release and arm transportation tasks. Improvements were found in the muscle co-ordination between the antagonist muscle pair (flexor digitorum and extensor digitorum) as measured by muscle co-contractions in EMG signals; and also in the reduction of excessive muscle activities in the biceps brachii. Reduced spasticity in the fingers was also observed as measured by the Modified Ashworth Score. PMID:24111082

  11. Objective Assessment of Upper-Limb Mobility for Poststroke Rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhe; Fang, Qiang; Gu, Xudong

    2016-04-01

    The assessment of the limb mobility of stroke patients is an essential part of poststroke rehabilitation. Conventionally, the assessment is manually performed by clinicians using chart-based ordinal scales, which can be subjective and inefficient. By introducing quantitative evaluation measures, the sensitivity and efficiency of the assessment process can be significantly improved. In this paper, a novel single-index-based assessment approach for quantitative upper-limb mobility evaluation has been proposed for poststroke rehabilitation. Instead of the traditional human-observation-based measures, the proposed assessment system utilizes the kinematic information automatically collected during a regular rehabilitation training exercise using a wearable inertial measurement unit. By calculating a single index, the system can efficiently generate objective and consistent quantitative results that can reflect the stroke patient's upper-limb mobility. In order to verify and validate the proposed assessment system, experiments have been conducted using 145 motion samples collected from 21 stroke patients (12 males, nine females, mean age 58.7±19.3) and eight healthy participants. The results have suggested that the proposed assessment index can not only differentiate the levels of limb function impairment clearly ( , two-tailed Welch's t-test), but also strongly correlate with the Brunnstrom stages of recovery ( r = 0.86 , ). The assessment index is also proven to have great potential in automatic Brunnstrom stage classification application with an 82.1% classification accuracy, while using a K-nearest-neighbor classifier. PMID:26357394

  12. [Anatomo-functional aspects and diagnostic algorithm (of the upper limb pathologies secondary to repeated trauma)].

    PubMed

    Bazzini, G

    2001-01-01

    The epidemiology of work-related musculo-skeletal pathologies of the upper limbs has become significantly relevant in the last years, and a sharp increasing trend can be observed. This paper mainly focuses on the chronic inflammatory and degenerative conditions, which are more complex and difficult to accurately diagnose and treat. A synthesis of the diagnostic picture of the different types, involving the joints, muscles and tendons, and peripheral nerves is provided, with mention of the sensitivity and specificity of the main diagnostic tests. The possible entrapments of the radial, median and ulnar nerves are described in detail. Finally, a brief critical review on the principal movements of the upper limbs which are responsible of the onset of such conditions is presented. PMID:11505781

  13. Motor Impairment Evaluation for Upper Limb in Stroke Patients on the Basis of a Microsensor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Shuai; Luo, Chun; Ye, Shiwei; Liu, Fei; Xie, Bin; Wang, Caifeng; Yang, Li; Huang, Zhen; Wu, Jiankang

    2012-01-01

    There has been an urgent need for an effective and efficient upper limb rehabilitation method for poststroke patients. We present a Micro-Sensor-based Upper Limb rehabilitation System for poststroke patients. The wearable motion capture units are attached to upper limb segments embedded in the fabric of garments. The body segment orientation…

  14. Motor Impairment Evaluation for Upper Limb in Stroke Patients on the Basis of a Microsensor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Shuai; Luo, Chun; Ye, Shiwei; Liu, Fei; Xie, Bin; Wang, Caifeng; Yang, Li; Huang, Zhen; Wu, Jiankang

    2012-01-01

    There has been an urgent need for an effective and efficient upper limb rehabilitation method for poststroke patients. We present a Micro-Sensor-based Upper Limb rehabilitation System for poststroke patients. The wearable motion capture units are attached to upper limb segments embedded in the fabric of garments. The body segment orientation

  15. Quantification of upper limb kinetic asymmetries in front crawl swimming.

    PubMed

    Morouço, Pedro G; Marinho, Daniel A; Fernandes, Ricardo J; Marques, Mário C

    2015-04-01

    This study aimed at quantifying upper limb kinetic asymmetries in maximal front crawl swimming and to examine if these asymmetries would affect the contribution of force exertion to swimming performance. Eighteen high level male swimmers with unilateral breathing patterns and sprint or middle distance specialists, volunteered as participants. A load-cell was used to quantify the forces exerted in water by completing a 30s maximal front crawl tethered swimming test and a maximal 50 m free swimming was considered as a performance criterion. Individual force-time curves were obtained to calculate the mean and maximum forces per cycle, for each upper limb. Following, symmetry index was estimated and breathing laterality identified by questionnaire. Lastly, the pattern of asymmetries along the test was estimated for each upper limb using linear regression of peak forces per cycle. Asymmetrical force exertion was observed in the majority of the swimmers (66.7%), with a total correspondence of breathing laterality opposite to the side of the force asymmetry. Forces exerted by the dominant upper limb presented a higher decrease than from the non-dominant. Very strong associations were found between exerted forces and swimming performance, when controlling the isolated effect of symmetry index. Results point that force asymmetries occur in the majority of the swimmers, and that these asymmetries are most evident in the first cycles of a maximum bout. Symmetry index stood up as an influencing factor on the contribution of tethered forces over swimming performance. Thus, to some extent, a certain degree of asymmetry is not critical for short swimming performance. PMID:25591132

  16. The association of gegenhalten in the upper limbs with dyspraxia.

    PubMed Central

    Tyrrell, P; Rossor, M

    1988-01-01

    Ten patients with gegenhalten of the upper limb of mixed aetiology were studied, in nine of whom an association with dyspraxia was found. In four of the patients, the rigidity became more pronounced after the instruction to relax, and only one patient showed improvement after this instruction. In these patients, the resistance to movement, evident as gegenhalten, may be a direct consequence of the dyspraxia. PMID:3204407

  17. Reliability of the Melbourne assessment of unilateral upper limb function.

    PubMed

    Randall, M; Carlin, J B; Chondros, P; Reddihough, D

    2001-11-01

    This study examines the reliability of the Melbourne Assessment of Unilateral Upper Limb Function: a quantitative test of quality of movement in children with neurological impairment. The assessment was administered to 20 children aged from 5 to 16 years (mean age 9 years 10 months, SD 2 years 10 months) who had various types and degrees of cerebral palsy (CP). The performances of the 20 children during assessment were videotaped for subsequent scoring by 15 occupational therapists. Scores were analyzed for internal consistency of test items, inter- and intrarater reliability of scorings of the same videotapes, and test-retest reliability using repeat videotaping. Results revealed very high internal consistency of test items (alpha=0.96), moderate to high agreement both within and between raters for all test items (intraclass correlations of at least 0.7) apart from item 16 (hand to mouth and down), and high interrater reliability (0.95) and intrarater reliability (0.97) for total test scores. Test-retest results revealed moderate to high intrarater reliability for item totals (mean of 0.83 and 0.79) for each rater and high reliability for test totals (0.98 and 0.97). These findings indicate that the Melbourne Assessment of Unilateral Upper Limb Function is a reliable tool for measuring the quality of unilateral upper-limb movement in children with CP. PMID:11730151

  18. Robotic upper-limb neurorehabilitation in chronic stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Macclellan, Leah R; Bradham, Douglas D; Whitall, Jill; Volpe, Bruce; Wilson, P David; Ohlhoff, Jill; Meister, Christine; Hogan, Neville; Krebs, Hermano I; Bever, Christopher T

    2005-01-01

    This pilot study tested the effectiveness of an intense, short-term upper-limb robotic therapy for improvement in motor outcomes among chronic stroke patients. We enrolled 30 subjects with upper-limb deficits due to stroke of at least 6 mo duration and with a Motor Power Assessment grade of 3 or less. Over 3 wk, 18 sessions of robot-assisted task-specific therapy were delivered with the use of a robotic exercise device that simulates a conventional therapy known as skateboard therapy. Primary outcome measures included reliable, validated impairment and disability measures of upper-limb motor function. Statistically significant improvements were observed for severely impaired participants when we compared baseline and posttreatment outcomes (p < 0.05). These results are important because they indicate that improvement is not limited to those with moderate impairments but is possible among severely impaired chronic stroke patients as well. Moderately and severely impaired patients in our study were able to tolerate a massed-practice therapy paradigm with intensive, frequent, and repetitive treatment. This information is useful in determining the optimal target population, intensity, and duration of robotic therapy and sample size for a planned larger trial. PMID:16680609

  19. Shaping muscle bioarchitecture for the fin to limb transition

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Nicholas J.; Currie, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Our recent paper examined how pelvic fins and their musculature form developmentally and how these mechanisms have evolved within the vertebrate lineage, a process fundamental to the tetrapod transition. The transition from the water onto the land is among one of the most well studied steps in the evolutionary history of vertebrates, yet the genetic basis of this evolutionary transition is little studied and ill-defined. The advent of these terrestrial species resulted in a shift in locomotor strategies from the rhythmic undulating muscles of the fish body to a reliance upon powerful weight bearing muscles of the limbs to generate movement. We demonstrated that the pelvic fin muscles of bony fish are generated by a mechanism that has features of both of limb/fin muscle formation in tetrapods and primitive cartilaginous fish. We hypothesize that the adoption of the fully derived mode of hindlimb muscle formation, was a further modification of the mode of development deployed to generate pelvic fin muscles, a shift in overall muscle bioarchitecture we believe was critical to the success of the tetrapod transition. PMID:22880150

  20. A myoelectric-controlled virtual hand for the assessment and treatment of phantom limb pain in trans-radial upper extremity amputees: a research protocol.

    PubMed

    Gaggioli, Andrea; Amoresano, Amedeo; Gruppioni, Emanuele; Verni, Gennaro; Riva, Giuseppe

    2010-01-01

    At least 90% of individuals of limb amputees experience phantom limb pain (PLP). Recent clinical research suggests that providing patients with the mirror image representation of the amputated limb may alleviate PLP. However, mirror therapy cannot be used with bilateral amputees, as visual feedback is dependent on the movement of the intact limb. To overcome this limitation, we designed a novel myoelectric-controlled virtual reality (VR) system for the treatment of phantom limb pain in trans-radial upper extremity amputees. The proposed system allows the patient to directly control the virtual limb by recognizing stump muscle patterns recorded with EMG sensors. The hypothesis behind this strategy is that the VR image of the amputated limb induces better limb imagery than the reflected image of their intact limb and, therefore, is more effective in reducing PLP. A research protocol to test this hypothesis is described. PMID:20543301

  1. Long-Duration Muscle Dedifferentiation during Limb Regeneration in Axolotls

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Cheng-Han; Huang, Ting-Yu; Chen, Bo-Sung; Chiou, Ling-Ling; Lee, Hsuan-Shu

    2015-01-01

    Although still debated, limb regeneration in salamanders is thought to depend on the dedifferentiation of remnant tissue occurring early after amputation and generating the progenitor cells that initiate regeneration. This dedifferentiation has been demonstrated previously by showing the fragmentation of muscle fibers into mononucleated cells and by revealing the contribution of mature muscle fibers to the regenerates by using lineage-tracing studies. Here, we provide additional evidence of dedifferentiation by showing that Pax7 (paired-box protein-7) transcripts are expressed at the ends of remnant muscle fibers in axolotls by using in situ hybridization and by demonstrating the presence of Pax7+ muscle-fiber nuclei in the early bud and mid-bud stages by means of immunohistochemical staining. During the course of regeneration, the remnant muscles did not progress; instead, muscle progenitors migrated out from the remnants and proliferated and differentiated in the new tissues at an early stage of differentiation. The regenerating muscles and remnant muscles were largely disconnected, and this left a gap between them until extremely late in the late stage of differentiation, at which point the new and old muscles connected together. Notably, Pax7 transcripts were detected in the regions of muscles that faced these gaps; thus, Pax7 expression might indicate dedifferentiation in the remnant-muscle ends and partial differentiation in the regenerating muscles. The roles of this long-duration dedifferentiation in the remnants remain unknown. However, the results presented here could support the hypothesis that long-duration muscle dedifferentiation facilitates the connection and fusion between the new and old muscles that are both in an immature state; this is because immature Pax7+ myoblasts readily fuse during developmental myogenesis. PMID:25671422

  2. Long-duration muscle dedifferentiation during limb regeneration in axolotls.

    PubMed

    Wu, Cheng-Han; Huang, Ting-Yu; Chen, Bo-Sung; Chiou, Ling-Ling; Lee, Hsuan-Shu

    2015-01-01

    Although still debated, limb regeneration in salamanders is thought to depend on the dedifferentiation of remnant tissue occurring early after amputation and generating the progenitor cells that initiate regeneration. This dedifferentiation has been demonstrated previously by showing the fragmentation of muscle fibers into mononucleated cells and by revealing the contribution of mature muscle fibers to the regenerates by using lineage-tracing studies. Here, we provide additional evidence of dedifferentiation by showing that Pax7 (paired-box protein-7) transcripts are expressed at the ends of remnant muscle fibers in axolotls by using in situ hybridization and by demonstrating the presence of Pax7+ muscle-fiber nuclei in the early bud and mid-bud stages by means of immunohistochemical staining. During the course of regeneration, the remnant muscles did not progress; instead, muscle progenitors migrated out from the remnants and proliferated and differentiated in the new tissues at an early stage of differentiation. The regenerating muscles and remnant muscles were largely disconnected, and this left a gap between them until extremely late in the late stage of differentiation, at which point the new and old muscles connected together. Notably, Pax7 transcripts were detected in the regions of muscles that faced these gaps; thus, Pax7 expression might indicate dedifferentiation in the remnant-muscle ends and partial differentiation in the regenerating muscles. The roles of this long-duration dedifferentiation in the remnants remain unknown. However, the results presented here could support the hypothesis that long-duration muscle dedifferentiation facilitates the connection and fusion between the new and old muscles that are both in an immature state; this is because immature Pax7+ myoblasts readily fuse during developmental myogenesis. PMID:25671422

  3. Mitochondrial Regulation of the Muscle Microenvironment in Critical Limb Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Terence E.; Schmidt, Cameron A.; Green, Tom D.; Brown, David A.; Neufer, P. Darrell; McClung, Joseph M.

    2015-01-01

    Critical limb ischemia (CLI) is the most severe clinical presentation of peripheral arterial disease and manifests as chronic limb pain at rest and/or tissue necrosis. Current clinical interventions are largely ineffective and therapeutic angiogenesis based trials have shown little efficacy, highlighting the dire need for new ideas and novel therapeutic approaches. Despite a decade of research related to skeletal muscle as a determinant of morbidity and mortality outcomes in CLI, very little progress has been made toward an effective therapy aimed directly at the muscle myopathies of this disease. Within the muscle cell, mitochondria are well positioned to modulate the ischemic cellular response, as they are the principal sites of cellular energy production and the major regulators of cellular redox charge and cell death. In this mini review, we update the crucial importance of skeletal muscle to CLI pathology and examine the evolving influence of muscle and endothelial cell mitochondria in the complex ischemic microenvironment. Finally, we discuss the novelty of muscle mitochondria as a therapeutic target for ischemic pathology in the context of the complex co-morbidities often associated with CLI. PMID:26635622

  4. Advances in upper limb stroke rehabilitation: a technology push.

    PubMed

    Loureiro, Rui C V; Harwin, William S; Nagai, Kiyoshi; Johnson, Michelle

    2011-10-01

    Strokes affect thousands of people worldwide leaving sufferers with severe disabilities affecting their daily activities. In recent years, new rehabilitation techniques have emerged such as constraint-induced therapy, biofeedback therapy and robot-aided therapy. In particular, robotic techniques allow precise recording of movements and application of forces to the affected limb, making it a valuable tool for motor rehabilitation. In addition, robot-aided therapy can utilise visual cues conveyed on a computer screen to convert repetitive movement practice into an engaging task such as a game. Visual cues can also be used to control the information sent to the patient about exercise performance and to potentially address psychosomatic variables influencing therapy. This paper overviews the current state-of-the-art on upper limb robot-mediated therapy with a focal point on the technical requirements of robotic therapy devices leading to the development of upper limb rehabilitation techniques that facilitate reach-to-touch, fine motor control, whole-arm movements and promote rehabilitation beyond hospital stay. The reviewed literature suggest that while there is evidence supporting the use of this technology to reduce functional impairment, besides the technological push, the challenge ahead lies on provision of effective assessment of outcome and modalities that have a stronger impact transferring functional gains into functional independence. PMID:21773806

  5. Presynaptic inhibition of monosynaptic reflexes in the lower limbs of subjects with upper motoneuron disease.

    PubMed Central

    Iles, J F; Roberts, R C

    1986-01-01

    Presynaptic inhibition of muscle spindle Ia afferents by group I afferents from the same and other muscles has been studied in the lower limbs of subjects with upper motoneuron lesions. The experiments utilised conditioning of soleus test monosynaptic reflexes during controlled voluntary contraction. The protocol was designed to isolate presynaptic inhibition from postsynaptic components. The relation between estimate of inhibition and test reflex amplitude was examined. The subjects showed less inhibition than controls at all levels of voluntary torque investigated (less than or equal 15 Nm). Two thirds had weak inhibition which did not show the decrease during muscle contraction characteristic of controls. The degree of difference from the normal situation correlated with severity of the clinical sign (weakness of voluntary ankle flexion). PMID:2943875

  6. Differences in childhood adiposity influence upper limb fracture site

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Rebecca J; Lim, Adelynn; Farmer, Megan; Segaran, Avinash; Clarke, Nicholas MP; Dennison, Elaine M; Harvey, Nicholas C; Cooper, Cyrus; Davies, Justin H

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Although it has been suggested that overweight and obese children have an increased risk of fracture, recent studies in post-menopausal women have shown that the relationship between obesity and fracture risk varies by fracture site. We therefore assessed whether adiposity and overweight/obesity prevalence differed by upper limb fracture site in children. Methods Height, weight, BMI, triceps and subscapular skinfold thickness (SFT) were measured in children aged 3-18 years with an acute upper limb fracture. Data was compared across three fracture sites (hand, forearm and upper arm/shoulder [UA]), and to published reference data. Results 401 children (67.1% male, median age 11.71 years (range 3.54-17.27 years) participated. 34.2%, 50.6% and 15.2% had fractures of the hand, forearm and UA, respectively. Children with forearm fractures had higher weight, BMI and SFT z-scores than those with UA fractures (p<0.05 for all). SFT z-scores were also higher in children with forearm fractures compared to hand fractures, but children withor hand and UA fractures did not differ. Overweight and obesity prevalence was higher in children with forearm fractures (37.6%) than those with UA fractures (19.0%, p=0.009). This prevalence was also higher than the published United Kingdom population prevalence (27.9%, p=0.003), whereas that of children with either UA (p=0.13) or hand fractures (29.1%, p=0.76) did not differ. The differences in anthropometry and overweight/obesity were similar for boys, but not present in girls. Conclusion Measurements of adiposity and the prevalence of overweight/obesity differ by fracture site in children, and in particular boys, with upper limb fractures. PMID:26027507

  7. Occupational musculoskeletal disorders in the neck and upper limbs of forestry workers exposed to hand-arm vibration.

    PubMed

    Bovenzi, M; Zadini, A; Franzinelli, A; Borgogni, F

    1991-05-01

    An epidemiologic and clinical study of neck and upper limb musculoskeletal disorders was carried out on 65 vibration-exposed forestry operators using chain-saws and 31 comparable control subjects (maintenance workers) performing manual activity and not exposed to vibration. Upper limb function was evaluated by measuring finger and wrist circumference size, maximal hand grip strength and range of motion manoeuvres in both the controls and the exposed workers. Vibration from two chain-saws was measured, and vibration exposure for each forestry worker was assessed in terms of 4 h energy-equivalent frequency-weighted acceleration according to ISO 5349. Job analysis indicated a slight excess risk of upper extremity cumulative trauma disorders (CTDs) in the forestry operators compared with the control workers. After adjustment for age and body constitution, significantly higher prevalence rates of persistent upper limb pain, muscle-tendon syndromes and carpal tunnel syndrome were observed among the forestry workers than among the controls. In the forestry operators, the occurrence of upper limb musculoskeletal disorders increased with increasing vibration exposure. Upper limb function was found to be impaired in the forestry workers compared with the controls. Vibration exposure was significantly related to increased finger circumference size, diminished muscle force and reduced joint function. Even though it is difficult to establish the relative importance of vibration and ergonomic factors in the aetiology of CTDs, nevertheless the results of this study indicate that musculoskeletal impairment to the upper limbs was more severe in the forestry operators than in the controls who did solely manual work. This finding and the observed dose-effect relationships suggest that vibration stress is an important contributor to the development of musculoskeletal disorders in workers using hand-held vibrating tools. PMID:1653132

  8. Unilateral hip osteoarthritis: Its effects on preoperative lower limb muscle activation and intramuscular coordination patterns.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, André; Stief, Felix; Lenarz, Katharina; Froemel, Dara; Lutz, Frederick; Barker, John; Meurer, Andrea

    2016-03-01

    The objective of this study was to test if patients with unilateral hip osteoarthritis (OA) show greater muscle activity asymmetry between their affected and non-affected limbs than healthy controls between their left and right limbs. Seventeen patients with unilateral hip OA (7 females, 10 males) and 17 age-matched healthy controls (7 females, 10 males) participated in this study. Both groups performed instrumented gait analysis at comparable speeds. Muscle activity was recorded simultaneously for the tibialis anterior (TA), gastrocnemius medialis (GM), vastus lateralis (VL), semitendinosus (ST), tensor fasciae latae (TFL), and gluteus medius (GLM) muscles. In hip OA patients, EMG data showed greater activity of the TA muscle in the non-affected limb, and greater TFL muscle activity in the affected limb. Compared to healthy controls, greater asymmetries between paired limbs were observed for the TA and GM muscles. Finally, the TFL muscle of the affected limb contributed more to the total limb muscle activity than did the non-affected limb. The observed alterations in TA and GM muscle activity in hip OA patients may be due to the greater peak braking and peak vertical forces measured in the non-affected limb. Contrary to this, greater TLF muscle activity of the affected limb indicates the demands put on stabilizing the hip during stance phase. Further studies are necessary to test whether leg length discrepancy affects muscle activation alterations between the affected and non-affected limb in unilateral hip OA patients. PMID:26979904

  9. Anatomical Network Comparison of Human Upper and Lower, Newborn and Adult, and Normal and Abnormal Limbs, with Notes on Development, Pathology and Limb Serial Homology vs. Homoplasy.

    PubMed

    Diogo, Rui; Esteve-Altava, Borja; Smith, Christopher; Boughner, Julia C; Rasskin-Gutman, Diego

    2015-01-01

    How do the various anatomical parts (modules) of the animal body evolve into very different integrated forms (integration) yet still function properly without decreasing the individual's survival? This long-standing question remains unanswered for multiple reasons, including lack of consensus about conceptual definitions and approaches, as well as a reasonable bias toward the study of hard tissues over soft tissues. A major difficulty concerns the non-trivial technical hurdles of addressing this problem, specifically the lack of quantitative tools to quantify and compare variation across multiple disparate anatomical parts and tissue types. In this paper we apply for the first time a powerful new quantitative tool, Anatomical Network Analysis (AnNA), to examine and compare in detail the musculoskeletal modularity and integration of normal and abnormal human upper and lower limbs. In contrast to other morphological methods, the strength of AnNA is that it allows efficient and direct empirical comparisons among body parts with even vastly different architectures (e.g. upper and lower limbs) and diverse or complex tissue composition (e.g. bones, cartilages and muscles), by quantifying the spatial organization of these parts-their topological patterns relative to each other-using tools borrowed from network theory. Our results reveal similarities between the skeletal networks of the normal newborn/adult upper limb vs. lower limb, with exception to the shoulder vs. pelvis. However, when muscles are included, the overall musculoskeletal network organization of the upper limb is strikingly different from that of the lower limb, particularly that of the more proximal structures of each limb. Importantly, the obtained data provide further evidence to be added to the vast amount of paleontological, gross anatomical, developmental, molecular and embryological data recently obtained that contradicts the long-standing dogma that the upper and lower limbs are serial homologues. In addition, the AnNA of the limbs of a trisomy 18 human fetus strongly supports Pere Alberch's ill-named "logic of monsters" hypothesis, and contradicts the commonly accepted idea that birth defects often lead to lower integration (i.e. more parcellation) of anatomical structures. PMID:26452269

  10. Anatomical Network Comparison of Human Upper and Lower, Newborn and Adult, and Normal and Abnormal Limbs, with Notes on Development, Pathology and Limb Serial Homology vs. Homoplasy

    PubMed Central

    Diogo, Rui; Esteve-Altava, Borja; Smith, Christopher; Boughner, Julia C.; Rasskin-Gutman, Diego

    2015-01-01

    How do the various anatomical parts (modules) of the animal body evolve into very different integrated forms (integration) yet still function properly without decreasing the individual’s survival? This long-standing question remains unanswered for multiple reasons, including lack of consensus about conceptual definitions and approaches, as well as a reasonable bias toward the study of hard tissues over soft tissues. A major difficulty concerns the non-trivial technical hurdles of addressing this problem, specifically the lack of quantitative tools to quantify and compare variation across multiple disparate anatomical parts and tissue types. In this paper we apply for the first time a powerful new quantitative tool, Anatomical Network Analysis (AnNA), to examine and compare in detail the musculoskeletal modularity and integration of normal and abnormal human upper and lower limbs. In contrast to other morphological methods, the strength of AnNA is that it allows efficient and direct empirical comparisons among body parts with even vastly different architectures (e.g. upper and lower limbs) and diverse or complex tissue composition (e.g. bones, cartilages and muscles), by quantifying the spatial organization of these parts—their topological patterns relative to each other—using tools borrowed from network theory. Our results reveal similarities between the skeletal networks of the normal newborn/adult upper limb vs. lower limb, with exception to the shoulder vs. pelvis. However, when muscles are included, the overall musculoskeletal network organization of the upper limb is strikingly different from that of the lower limb, particularly that of the more proximal structures of each limb. Importantly, the obtained data provide further evidence to be added to the vast amount of paleontological, gross anatomical, developmental, molecular and embryological data recently obtained that contradicts the long-standing dogma that the upper and lower limbs are serial homologues. In addition, the AnNA of the limbs of a trisomy 18 human fetus strongly supports Pere Alberch's ill-named "logic of monsters" hypothesis, and contradicts the commonly accepted idea that birth defects often lead to lower integration (i.e. more parcellation) of anatomical structures. PMID:26452269

  11. Effect of STS space suit on astronaut dominant upper limb EVA work performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenisen, Michael C.

    1987-01-01

    The STS Space Suited and unsuited dominant upper limb performance was evaluated in order to quantify future EVA astronaut skeletal muscle upper limb performance expectations. Testing was performed with subjects standing in EVA STS foot restraints. Data was collected with a CYBEX Dynamometer enclosed in a waterproof container. Control data was taken in one g. During one g testing, weight of the Space Suit was relieved from the subject via an overhead crane with a special connection to the PLSS of the suit. Experimental data was acquired during simulated zero g, accomplished by neutral buoyancy in the Weightless Environment Training Facility. Unsuited subjects became neutrally buoyant via SCUBA BC vests. Actual zero g experimental data was collected during parabolic arc flights on board NASA's modified KC-135 aircraft. During all test conditions, subjects performed five EVA work tasks requiring dominant upper limb performance and ten individual joint articulation movements. Dynamometer velocities for each tested movement were 0 deg/sec, 30 or 60 deg/sec and 120 or 180 deg/sec, depending on the test, with three repetitions per test. Performance was measured in foot pounds of torque.

  12. Upper limb stroke rehabilitation: the effectiveness of Stimulation Assistance through Iterative Learning (SAIL).

    PubMed

    Meadmore, Katie L; Cai, Zhonglun; Tong, Daisy; Hughes, Ann-Marie; Freeman, Chris T; Rogers, Eric; Burridge, Jane H

    2011-01-01

    A novel system has been developed which combines robotic therapy with electrical stimulation (ES) for upper limb stroke rehabilitation. This technology, termed SAIL: Stimulation Assistance through Iterative Learning, employs advanced model-based iterative learning control (ILC) algorithms to precisely assist participant's completion of 3D tracking tasks with their impaired arm. Data is reported from a preliminary study with unimpaired participants, and also from a single hemiparetic stroke participant with reduced upper limb function who has used the system in a clinical trial. All participants completed tasks which involved moving their (impaired) arm to follow an image of a slowing moving sphere along a trajectory. The participants' arm was supported by a robot and ES was applied to the triceps brachii and anterior deltoid muscles. During each task, the same tracking trajectory was repeated 6 times and ILC was used to compute the stimulation signals to be applied on the next iteration. Unimpaired participants took part in a single, one hour training session and the stroke participant undertook 18, 1 hour treatment sessions composed of tracking tasks varying in length, orientation and speed. The results reported describe changes in tracking ability and demonstrate feasibility of the SAIL system for upper limb rehabilitation. PMID:22275698

  13. Duodenal atresia with a deletion of midgut associated with left lung, kidney, and upper limb absences and right upper limb malformation.

    PubMed

    Masumoto, Kouji; Arima, Tohru; Nakatsuji, Takanori; Kukita, Joji; Toyoshima, Satoshi

    2003-11-01

    Duodenal atresia with midgut deletion without abdominal wall defects is extremely rare. The authors report a newborn boy with this disease associated with left pulmonary, kidney, and upper limb absences and a contralateral upper limb malformation. At autopsy, agenesis of the arteries to such organs was confirmed. A fetal vascular disruption is presumed to be the main cause of these anomalies. PMID:14614732

  14. Electromyography-based analysis of human upper limbs during 45-day head-down bed-rest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Anshuang; Wang, Chunhui; Qi, Hongzhi; Li, Fan; Wang, Zheng; He, Feng; Zhou, Peng; Chen, Shanguang; Ming, Dong

    2016-03-01

    Muscle deconditioning occurs in response to simulated or actual microgravity. In spaceflight, astronauts become monkey-like for mainly using their upper limbs to control the operating system and to complete corresponding tasks. The changes of upper limbs' athletic ability will directly affect astronauts' working performance. This study investigated the variation trend of surface electromyography (sEMG) during prolonged simulated microgravity. Eight healthy males participating in this study performed strict 45-day head-down bed-rest (HDBR). On the 5th day of pre-HDBR, and the 15th, the 30th and the 45th days of HDBR, the subjects performed maximum pushing task and maximum pulling task, and sEMG was collected from upper limbs synchronously. Each subject's maximum volunteer contractions of both the tasks during these days were compared, showing no significant change. However, changes were detected by sEMG-based analysis. It was found that integrated EMG, root mean square, mean frequency, fuzzy entropy of deltoid, and fuzzy entropy of triceps brachii changed significantly when comparing pre-HDBR with HDBR. The variation trend showed a recovery tendency after significant decline, which is inconsistent with the monotonic variation of lower limbs that was proved by previous research. These findings suggest that EMG changes in upper limbs during prolonged simulated microgravity, but has different variation trend from lower limbs.

  15. A solitary fibrous tumor of the upper limb.

    PubMed

    Al-Shanawani, Bisher N; Al-Qattan, Mohammad M; Arafah, Maha M; Al-Motairi, Muhammed I

    2015-02-01

    Solitary fibrous tumors (SFT) of the upper limb are extremely rare, and we report this tumor in the arm of a 30-year-old male. He is presented with a 22 cm painless mass. Complete surgical excision was performed. The histological diagnosis of SFT was based on the presence of ectatic blood vessels and positive staining for CD34 and vimentin. He remains disease-free at the 3-year follow-up interval. The report aims to increase the awareness of the criteria for the histological diagnosis of SFT, as well as the principles of their surgical excision and follow-up.  PMID:25719592

  16. Work-related posttraumatic upper limb disorder. A case report.

    PubMed

    Capodaglio, P; Nigrelli, M P; Malaguti, S; Panigazzi, M; Pierobon, A

    1999-01-01

    In this paper we describe a patient with mor-sensory loss in the right forearm and hand, which persisted more than 2 years after work-related crush trauma of the left hand. Radiographic and electromyographic investigations, somatosensory evoked potentials, CT scans of the encephalus as well as the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory and the Roarschach test have been performed. On the basis of these investigations, we think this represents a case of conversion disorder with somatic features. Included is a brief overview of other psychological illness with physical findings involving the upper limb. PMID:10771717

  17. The Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite microwave limb sounder instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barath, F. T.; Chavez, M. C.; Cofield, R. E.; Flower, D. A.; Frerking, M. A.; Gram, M. B.; Harris, W. M.; Holden, J. R.; Jarnot, R. F.; Kloezeman, W. G.

    1993-01-01

    The microwave limb sounder (MLS) on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) is the first satellite experiment using limb sounding techniques at microwave frequencies. Primary measurement objectives are stratospheric ClO, O3, H2O, temperature, and pressure. Measurements are of thermal emission: all are performed simultaneously and continuously and are not degraded by ice clouds or volcanic aerosols. The instrument has a 1.6-m mechanically scanning antenna system and contains heterodyne radiometers in spectral bands centred near 63, 183, and 205 GHz. The radiometers operate at ambient temperature and use Schottky-diode mixers with local oscillators derived from phase-locked Gunn oscillators. Frequency tripling by varactor multipliers generates the 183- and 205-GHz local oscillators, and quasi-optical techniques inject these into the mixers. Six 15-channel filter banks spectrally resolve stratospheric thermal emission lines and produce an output spectrum every 2 s. Thermal stability is sufficient for 'total power' measurements which do not require fast chopping. Radiometric calibration, consisting of measurements of cold space and an internal target, is performed every 65-s limb scan. Instrument in-orbit performance has been excellent, and all objectives are being met.

  18. The Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite microwave limb sounder instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barath, F. T.; Chavez, M. C.; Cofield, R. E.; Flower, D. A.; Frerking, M. A.; Gram, M. B.; Harris, W. M.; Holden, J. R.; Jarnot, R. F.; Kloezeman, W. G.

    1993-06-01

    The microwave limb sounder (MLS) on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) is the first satellite experiment using limb sounding techniques at microwave frequencies. Primary measurement objectives are stratospheric ClO, O3, H2O, temperature, and pressure. Measurements are of thermal emission: all are performed simultaneously and continuously and are not degraded by ice clouds or volcanic aerosols. The instrument has a 1.6-m mechanically scanning antenna system and contains heterodyne radiometers in spectral bands centred near 63, 183, and 205 GHz. The radiometers operate at ambient temperature and use Schottky-diode mixers with local oscillators derived from phase-locked Gunn oscillators. Frequency tripling by varactor multipliers generates the 183- and 205-GHz local oscillators, and quasi-optical techniques inject these into the mixers. Six 15-channel filter banks spectrally resolve stratospheric thermal emission lines and produce an output spectrum every 2 s. Thermal stability is sufficient for 'total power' measurements which do not require fast chopping. Radiometric calibration, consisting of measurements of cold space and an internal target, is performed every 65-s limb scan. Instrument in-orbit performance has been excellent, and all objectives are being met.

  19. A survey on robotic devices for upper limb rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The existing shortage of therapists and caregivers assisting physically disabled individuals at home is expected to increase and become serious problem in the near future. The patient population needing physical rehabilitation of the upper extremity is also constantly increasing. Robotic devices have the potential to address this problem as noted by the results of recent research studies. However, the availability of these devices in clinical settings is limited, leaving plenty of room for improvement. The purpose of this paper is to document a review of robotic devices for upper limb rehabilitation including those in developing phase in order to provide a comprehensive reference about existing solutions and facilitate the development of new and improved devices. In particular the following issues are discussed: application field, target group, type of assistance, mechanical design, control strategy and clinical evaluation. This paper also includes a comprehensive, tabulated comparison of technical solutions implemented in various systems. PMID:24401110

  20. A survey on robotic devices for upper limb rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Maciejasz, Paweł; Eschweiler, Jörg; Gerlach-Hahn, Kurt; Jansen-Troy, Arne; Leonhardt, Steffen

    2014-01-01

    The existing shortage of therapists and caregivers assisting physically disabled individuals at home is expected to increase and become serious problem in the near future. The patient population needing physical rehabilitation of the upper extremity is also constantly increasing. Robotic devices have the potential to address this problem as noted by the results of recent research studies. However, the availability of these devices in clinical settings is limited, leaving plenty of room for improvement. The purpose of this paper is to document a review of robotic devices for upper limb rehabilitation including those in developing phase in order to provide a comprehensive reference about existing solutions and facilitate the development of new and improved devices. In particular the following issues are discussed: application field, target group, type of assistance, mechanical design, control strategy and clinical evaluation. This paper also includes a comprehensive, tabulated comparison of technical solutions implemented in various systems. PMID:24401110

  1. Global optimization method for combined spherical-cylindrical wrapping in musculoskeletal upper limb modelling.

    PubMed

    Audenaert, A; Audenaert, E

    2008-10-01

    In musculoskeletal modelling, many muscles cannot be represented as straight lines from origin to insertion because the bony and musculotendinous morphology of neighboring structures causes them to wrap. The majority of these passive structures can be adequately described as simple geometric shapes such as spheres and cylinders. Techniques for describing smooth muscle paths around multiple obstacles have been developed for modelling use. Until now obstacle-set methods have combined the path of single structures. This does not analytically define the shortest smooth path around multiple objects. When a sphere is included in a multiple-object wrapping algorithm, muscle paths around that sphere are restricted to a bundle of planes containing the sphere center. This assumed restriction can compromise the iterative process for finding the true shortest muscle path that satisfies all restrictions of a smooth path. This can cause model instability. The new method involves the determination of the shortest smooth muscle path in a spherical and cylindrical wrapping algorithm. A typical example is musculoskeletal modelling of the upper limb, where the muscle fibers have to wrap over this combination of obstacles. PMID:18606476

  2. Literature Review on Needs of Upper Limb Prosthesis Users

    PubMed Central

    Cordella, Francesca; Ciancio, Anna Lisa; Sacchetti, Rinaldo; Davalli, Angelo; Cutti, Andrea Giovanni; Guglielmelli, Eugenio; Zollo, Loredana

    2016-01-01

    The loss of one hand can significantly affect the level of autonomy and the capability of performing daily living, working and social activities. The current prosthetic solutions contribute in a poor way to overcome these problems due to limitations in the interfaces adopted for controlling the prosthesis and to the lack of force or tactile feedback, thus limiting hand grasp capabilities. This paper presents a literature review on needs analysis of upper limb prosthesis users, and points out the main critical aspects of the current prosthetic solutions, in terms of users satisfaction and activities of daily living they would like to perform with the prosthetic device. The ultimate goal is to provide design inputs in the prosthetic field and, contemporary, increase user satisfaction rates and reduce device abandonment. A list of requirements for upper limb prostheses is proposed, grounded on the performed analysis on user needs. It wants to (i) provide guidelines for improving the level of acceptability and usefulness of the prosthesis, by accounting for hand functional and technical aspects; (ii) propose a control architecture of PNS-based prosthetic systems able to satisfy the analyzed user wishes; (iii) provide hints for improving the quality of the methods (e.g., questionnaires) adopted for understanding the user satisfaction with their prostheses.

  3. Effect of Kayak Ergometer Elastic Tension on Upper Limb EMG Activity and 3D Kinematics

    PubMed Central

    Fleming, Neil; Donne, Bernard; Fletcher, David

    2012-01-01

    Despite the prevalence of shoulder injury in kayakers, limited published research examining associated upper limb kinematics and recruitment patterns exists. Altered muscle recruitment patterns on-ergometer vs. on-water kayaking were recently reported, however, mechanisms underlying changes remain to be elucidated. The current study assessed the effect of ergometer recoil tension on upper limb recruitment and kinematics during the kayak stroke. Male kayakers (n = 10) performed 4 by 1 min on-ergometer exercise bouts at 85%VO2max at varying elastic recoil tension; EMG, stroke force and three-dimensional 3D kinematic data were recorded. While stationary recoil forces significantly increased across investigated tensions (125% increase, p < 0.001), no significant differences were detected in assessed force variables during the stroke cycle. In contrast, increasing tension induced significantly higher Anterior Deltoid (AD) activity in the latter stages (70 to 90%) of the cycle (p < 0.05). No significant differences were observed across tension levels for Triceps Brachii or Latissimus Dorsi. Kinematic analysis revealed that overhead arm movements accounted for 39 ± 16% of the cycle. Elbow angle at stroke cycle onset was 144 ± 10°; maximal elbow angle (151 ± 7°) occurred at 78 ± 10% into the cycle. All kinematic markers moved to a more anterior position as tension increased. No significant change in wrist marker elevation was observed, while elbow and shoulder marker elevations significantly increased across tension levels (p < 0.05). In conclusion, data suggested that kayakers maintained normal upper limb kinematics via additional AD recruitment despite ergometer induced recoil forces. Key pointsKayak ergometer elastic tension significantly alters Anterior Deltoid recruitment patterns.Kayakers maintain optimal arm kinematics despite changing external forces via altered shoulder muscle recruitment.Overhead arm movements account for a high proportion of the kayak stroke cycle. PMID:24149350

  4. The Armeo Spring as training tool to improve upper limb functionality in multiple sclerosis: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Few research in multiple sclerosis (MS) has focused on physical rehabilitation of upper limb dysfunction, though the latter strongly influences independent performance of activities of daily living. Upper limb rehabilitation technology could hold promise for complementing traditional MS therapy. Consequently, this pilot study aimed to examine the feasibility of an 8-week mechanical-assisted training program for improving upper limb muscle strength and functional capacity in MS patients with evident paresis. Methods A case series was applied, with provision of a training program (3×/week, 30 minutes/session), supplementary on the customary maintaining care, by employing a gravity-supporting exoskeleton apparatus (Armeo Spring). Ten high-level disability MS patients (Expanded Disability Status Scale 7.0-8.5) actively performed task-oriented movements in a virtual real-life-like learning environment with the affected upper limb. Tests were administered before and after training, and at 2-month follow-up. Muscle strength was determined through the Motricity Index and Jamar hand-held dynamometer. Functional capacity was assessed using the TEMPA, Action Research Arm Test (ARAT) and 9-Hole Peg Test (9HPT). Results Muscle strength did not change significantly. Significant gains were particularly found in functional capacity tests. After training completion, TEMPA scores improved (p = 0.02), while a trend towards significance was found for the 9HPT (p = 0.05). At follow-up, the TEMPA as well as ARAT showed greater improvement relative to baseline than after the 8-week intervention period (p = 0.01, p = 0.02 respectively). Conclusions The results of present pilot study suggest that upper limb functionality of high-level disability MS patients can be positively influenced by means of a technology-enhanced physical rehabilitation program. PMID:21261965

  5. The effects of prism glasses and intensive upper limb exercise on hemineglect, upper limb function, and activities of daily living in stroke patients: a case series.

    PubMed

    Oh, Se-Il; Kim, Jin-Kyung; Park, So-Yeon

    2015-12-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to examine the effects of visual field with prism glasses, and intensive upper limb functional training on reduction of hemineglect and improvement in upper limb function and activities of daily living in three stroke patients with hemineglect. [Subjects] This study included three stroke patients hospitalized in a sanatorium. [Methods] Intervention treatment involving prism glass use for 12 hours and 30 minutes and paretic side upper limb training was conducted 5 days a week for 15 weeks. Three upper limb training tasks (hitting a balloon, passing through a ring, and reading a newspaper) were performed for 10 minutes each session, for a total of 30 minutes. Line by Section, Motor-Free Visual Perception Test-3 (MVPT-3), Manual Function Test (MFT), Box & Block Test (BBT), and Assessment of Motor and Process Skills (AMPS) were conducted before and after intervention. [Results] Subjects' hemineglect decreased and upper limb function on the paretic side improved after intervention, which enhanced activities of daily living. [Conclusion] Prism glass use and paretic upper limb functional training effectively ameliorated stroke patients' hemineglect and improved upper limb function. Future research should focus on prism glasses that provide a wide visual field for use in patients with different conditions. PMID:26834386

  6. The effects of prism glasses and intensive upper limb exercise on hemineglect, upper limb function, and activities of daily living in stroke patients: a case series

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Se-Il; Kim, Jin-Kyung; Park, So-Yeon

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to examine the effects of visual field with prism glasses, and intensive upper limb functional training on reduction of hemineglect and improvement in upper limb function and activities of daily living in three stroke patients with hemineglect. [Subjects] This study included three stroke patients hospitalized in a sanatorium. [Methods] Intervention treatment involving prism glass use for 12 hours and 30 minutes and paretic side upper limb training was conducted 5 days a week for 15 weeks. Three upper limb training tasks (hitting a balloon, passing through a ring, and reading a newspaper) were performed for 10 minutes each session, for a total of 30 minutes. Line by Section, Motor-Free Visual Perception Test-3 (MVPT-3), Manual Function Test (MFT), Box & Block Test (BBT), and Assessment of Motor and Process Skills (AMPS) were conducted before and after intervention. [Results] Subjects’ hemineglect decreased and upper limb function on the paretic side improved after intervention, which enhanced activities of daily living. [Conclusion] Prism glass use and paretic upper limb functional training effectively ameliorated stroke patients’ hemineglect and improved upper limb function. Future research should focus on prism glasses that provide a wide visual field for use in patients with different conditions. PMID:26834386

  7. Disuse osteoporosis of the upper limb: assessment of thirty patients

    PubMed Central

    Giannotti, Stefano; Bottai, Vanna; Dell’Osso, Giacomo; De Paola, Gaia; Bugelli, Giulia; Pini, Erica; Guido, Giulio

    2013-01-01

    Summary Osteoporosis is a multifactorial skeletal disorder characterized by the decrease of bone mass and the alteration of bone microarchitecture that leads to the increase of fracture risks. Traditionally, osteoporosis has been classified into primary and secondary osteoporosis. Primary osteoporosis refers to osteoporotic conditions which are not related to other chronic illnesses and is usually associated with aging and decreased gonadal function, such as decreased level of estrogen, whereas secondary osteoporosis is the type of osteoporosis caused by other health problems. Disuse is one of the many reasons inducing bone loss and resulting in secondary osteoporosis. The disuse osteoporosis appeared for the first time in the literature in 1974 when Minaire reported some histomorphometric analysis of iliac crest bone biopsies performed after a spinal cord injury. The most common skeleton sites in which disuse osteoporosis can be observed are knees and ankles. There are three clinical situation in which this disease can be observed: neurological or muscular disease that causes a pathological and prolonged immobilization. The most frequent is caused by a spinal cord injury, long term bed rest or space flight that causes the immobilization linked to changes in mechanical environment and experimental immobilizations in healthy subjects. Physical exercise is essential for increasing or maintaining bone mass and strength. In our study we wondered if the disuse of the upper limbs of a certain entity, lasting for a long time, can cause a decrease in BMD quantifiable with a densitometric evaluation of the distal radius and with an evaluation of the humeral cortical index such as to define a real osteoporosis from disuse. We analyzed 30 female patients without secondary osteoporosis older than 60 years: everyone underwent to vit D evaluation, densitometric exams of spine, hip and distal radius, Constant score and femoral and humeral cortical index evaluation. We observed that the distal radius BMD and humeral cortical index were worse in patients with low upper limb functionality than in patients with normal shoulder function. The results of this study suggest that humeral cortical index and radial BMD can be useful methods of upper limb bone density evaluation and that they can be useful to select a correct surgical treatment in orthopaedic and traumatologic diseases. PMID:24133531

  8. The effect of upper limb casting on gait pattern.

    PubMed

    Dreyfuss, Daniel; Elbaz, Avi; Mor, Amit; Segal, Ganit; Calif, Edward

    2016-06-01

    Casting of the arm may interfere with normal walking patterns because of additional load of the cast or prevention of arm swing. This study aimed to determine the effect of applying various casts on temporospatial walking parameters, including gait velocity and cadence, step length, and single limb support. A computerized gait system was used to assess these variables for 23 healthy individuals in four walking modes: normal walking, with a cast above the elbow and a sling, and with a cast below the elbow, with and without a sling. Thirteen participants had their dominant hand casted and 10 had their nondominant hand casted. On average, casted participants took significantly smaller steps with the leg on the casted side and spent less time supported on the casted side. The least changes were noted with the arm in a cast below the elbow and no sling, and the greatest changes were noted with the arm in a cast above the elbow and in a sling. This difference was heightened when the dominant hand was casted and lessened when the nondominant hand was casted. No differences were found in walking velocity or cadence between the walking modes. Casting of the upper limb has significant effects on gait, which should be taken into consideration, especially in individuals with previous gait abnormalities. PMID:26855024

  9. Benign monomelic amyotrophy in a 7-year-old girl with proximal upper limb involvement: case report.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Oznur; Alemdaroğlu, Ipek; Karaduman, Ayşe; Haliloğlu, Göknur; Topaloğlu, Haluk

    2011-01-01

    Monomelic amyotrophy (MMA) is a benign motor neuron disease characterized by neurogenic amyotrophy, which usually affects one of the upper or lower extremities. Progression is slow and symptoms are clinically stable. Symptoms are seen in the second or third decades of life. In this study, we present a seven-year-old girl who was diagnosed and directed to the Physiotherapy Department at the age of 5 years and had unilateral proximal upper limb involvement. Family history of the case was recorded. Neurologic evaluation was performed. Range of joint motion, muscle shortness and strength, posture, extremity lengths, gait, timed performance, arm function, and motor and mental maturation were assessed. The physiotherapy program was designed progressively as strengthening and resistive exercises. Motor and mental developmental milestones were normal. There was no limitation in active or passive motion of all joints. She had more flexible joints, scapula alata, asymmetry between shoulder levels, and weakness on proximal muscles of the right upper extremity. In the follow-up assessment at eight months, there was no asymmetry between shoulder levels and scapular symmetry began to improve. Female gender and involvement restricted to one proximal upper limb are rare in the literature. This patient demonstrates the positive effects of physical therapy with early diagnosis of MMA. The rapid recovery of muscle weakness shows the importance of strengthening and resistive exercises applied to specific muscles in the treatment. PMID:21980856

  10. Decline in voluntary activation contributes to reduced maximal performance of fatigued human lower limb muscles.

    PubMed

    Mileva, K N; Sumners, D P; Bowtell, J L

    2012-12-01

    In upper limb muscles, altered corticospinal excitability and reduction in neural drive are observed in parallel with peripheral fatigue during prolonged and/or repeated contractions. However, the fatigue-induced adaptations of central and peripheral elements and their relative contribution to lower limb muscle performance are yet to be fully explored. In the present study, corticospinal excitability and peripheral contractility of ankle flexor muscles were quantified before, during and after repeated brief unilateral maximal dorsiflexions to fatigue in eleven healthy volunteers. Transcranial magnetic stimulation of the motor cortex area related to lower limb muscles was performed, and the evoked twitch and EMG responses in tibialis anterior (TA) and soleus (SOL) were measured. The motor evoked potentials (MEPs) in fatigued TA during post-exercise maximal dorsiflexions were smaller (-20 ± 6 %, p = 0.026) and remained depressed for at least 5 min. Post-exercise MEPs in fatigued SOL and silent periods in TA and SOL were not different compared to pre-exercise. These changes were accompanied by lower voluntary torque (-8 ± 3 %, p = 0.013), estimated resting twitch (-36 ± 5 %, p = 0.003) and voluntary activation (-17 ± 9 %, p = 0.021) versus pre-exercise. During last versus first maximal contraction in the fatiguing protocol lower voluntary torque (-40 ± 4 %, p = 0.003), higher MEP amplitudes (>+49 %, p < 0.021) and longer silent periods (>+24 %, p < 0.004) were recorded in both muscles. Decreased corticospinal excitability contributes significantly to the reduced maximal performance of fatigued lower limb muscles. During prolonged intermittent maximal dorsiflexions the performance of ankle muscles declines despite enhanced corticospinal excitability presumably due to deficient descending drive and/or spinal motoneuron responsiveness to the cortical drive. PMID:22434254

  11. Protein synthesis rates in atrophied gastrocnemius muscles after limb immobilization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, K. R.; Seider, M. J.; Booth, F. W.

    1981-01-01

    Noting that protein synthesis declines in the gastrocnemius 6 hr after immobilization, the study sought to detect an increase of protein synthesis when the limb was freed, and to examine the effects of exercise on the rate of increase. Rats were used as subjects, with their hind legs in plaster of Paris in plantar flexion to eliminate strain on the gastrocnemius. Periods of immobilization were varied and samples of blood from the muscle were taken to track protein synthesis rates for different groups in immobilization and exercise regimens (running and weightlifting). Synthesis rates declined 3.6% during time in the cast, then increased 6.3%/day after the casts were removed. Both running and weightlifting were found to increase the fractional rate of protein formation in the gastrocnemius muscle when compared with contralateral muscles that were not exercised and were used as controls, suggesting that the mechanism controlling protein synthesis in skeletal muscles is rapidly responsive to changes in muscular contractile activity.

  12. Modulation of the Cutaneous Silent Period in the Upper-Limb with Whole-Body Instability

    PubMed Central

    Eckert, Nathanial R.; Poston, Brach; Riley, Zachary A.

    2016-01-01

    The silent period induced by cutaneous electrical stimulation of the digits has been shown to be task-dependent, at least in the grasping muscles of the hand. However, it is unknown if the cutaneous silent period is adaptable throughout muscles of the entire upper limb, in particular when the task requirements are substantially altered. The purpose of the present study was to examine the characteristics of the cutaneous silent period in several upper limb muscles when introducing increased whole-body instability. The cutaneous silent period was evoked in 10 healthy individuals with electrical stimulation of digit II of the right hand when the subjects were seated, standing, or standing on a wobble board while maintaining a background elbow extension contraction with the triceps brachii of ~5% of maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) strength. The first excitatory response (E1), first inhibitory response (CSP), and second excitatory response (E2) were quantified as the percent change from baseline and by their individual durations. The results showed that the level of CSP suppression was lessened (47.7 ± 7.7% to 33.8 ± 13.2% of baseline, p = 0.019) and the duration of the CSP inhibition decreased (p = 0.021) in the triceps brachii when comparing the seated and wobble board tasks. For the wobble board task the amount of cutaneous afferent inhibition of EMG activity in the triceps brachii decreased; which is proposed to be due to differential weighting of cutaneous feedback relative to the corticospinal drive, most likely due to presynaptic inhibition, to meet the demands of the unstable task. PMID:26981863

  13. Modulation of the Cutaneous Silent Period in the Upper-Limb with Whole-Body Instability.

    PubMed

    Eckert, Nathanial R; Poston, Brach; Riley, Zachary A

    2016-01-01

    The silent period induced by cutaneous electrical stimulation of the digits has been shown to be task-dependent, at least in the grasping muscles of the hand. However, it is unknown if the cutaneous silent period is adaptable throughout muscles of the entire upper limb, in particular when the task requirements are substantially altered. The purpose of the present study was to examine the characteristics of the cutaneous silent period in several upper limb muscles when introducing increased whole-body instability. The cutaneous silent period was evoked in 10 healthy individuals with electrical stimulation of digit II of the right hand when the subjects were seated, standing, or standing on a wobble board while maintaining a background elbow extension contraction with the triceps brachii of ~5% of maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) strength. The first excitatory response (E1), first inhibitory response (CSP), and second excitatory response (E2) were quantified as the percent change from baseline and by their individual durations. The results showed that the level of CSP suppression was lessened (47.7 ± 7.7% to 33.8 ± 13.2% of baseline, p = 0.019) and the duration of the CSP inhibition decreased (p = 0.021) in the triceps brachii when comparing the seated and wobble board tasks. For the wobble board task the amount of cutaneous afferent inhibition of EMG activity in the triceps brachii decreased; which is proposed to be due to differential weighting of cutaneous feedback relative to the corticospinal drive, most likely due to presynaptic inhibition, to meet the demands of the unstable task. PMID:26981863

  14. Early prediction of long-term upper limb spasticity after stroke

    PubMed Central

    Danielsson, Anna; Alt Murphy, Margit; Persson, Hanna C.; Sunnerhagen, Katharina Stibrant

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To identify predictors and the optimal time point for the early prediction of the presence and severity of spasticity in the upper limb 12 months poststroke. Methods: In total, 117 patients in the Gothenburg area who had experienced a stroke for the first time and with documented arm paresis day 3 poststroke were consecutively included. Assessments were made at admission and at 3 and 10 days, 4 weeks, and 12 months poststroke. Upper limb spasticity in elbow flexion/extension and wrist flexion/extension was assessed with the modified Ashworth Scale (MAS). Any spasticity was regarded as MAS ≥1, and severe spasticity was regarded as MAS ≥2 in any of the muscles. Sensorimotor function, sensation, pain, and joint range of motion in the upper limb were assessed with the Fugl-Meyer assessment scale, and, together with demographic and diagnostic information, were included in both univariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis models. Seventy-six patients were included in the logistic regression analysis. Results: Sensorimotor function was the most important predictor both for any and severe spasticity 12 months poststroke. In addition, spasticity 4 weeks poststroke was a significant predictor for severe spasticity. The best prediction model for any spasticity was observed 10 days poststroke (85% sensitivity, 90% specificity). The best prediction model for severe spasticity was observed 4 weeks poststroke (91% sensitivity, 92% specificity). Conclusions: Reduced sensorimotor function was the most important predictor both for any and severe spasticity, and spasticity could be predicted with high sensitivity and specificity 10 days poststroke. PMID:26276377

  15. An admittance control scheme for a robotic upper- limb stroke rehabilitation system.

    PubMed

    Culmer, P; Jackson, A; Levesley, M C; Savage, J; Richardson, R; Cozens, J A; Bhakta, B B

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents a control scheme for a dual robot upper-limb stroke rehabilitation system. A model of the human arm is outlined and used to formulate an admittance controller operating in human upper-limb joint space. Initial results are provided together with a discrussion of future work. PMID:17281389

  16. Feasibility of using MIRA with adult patients presenting with upper limb motor dysfunction post neurological damage.

    PubMed

    McGlinchey, Mark; Curtis, Alexandra; Ritchie, Rachel; Jones, Gareth D

    2015-01-01

    Computer-based technology is an emerging modality to facilitate upper limb rehabilitation post neurological damage. A feasibility project using MIRA technology in an adult outpatient neurophysiotherapy service was conducted. Ten patients trialled nine MIRA games that promoted discrete and continuous unilateral and bilateral upper limb movements. The effect of MIRA use on usual service operation as well as any adverse events was noted. Patient views of using MIRA were explored through self-reported questionnaires. For six patients, comparison of amount and frequency of active upper limb exercises using MIRA and typical prescribed upper limb exercises was made. Use of MIRA did not negatively affect service operation and was not associated with any adverse event reporting. The majority of patients enjoyed using MIRA and felt that it was a useful modality to supplement existing prescribed upper limb exercises. Those with previous experience of technology expressed the most positive feedback. There is evidence that MIRA tasks may facilitate intensive repetitive upper limb movements, although some patients reported in-exercise discomfort. In conclusion, it was feasible to use MIRA with adult patients post neurological damage presenting with upper limb motor dysfunction, particularly those patients with proximal upper limb motor dysfunction previously familiar with computer use or gaming experience. PMID:26294550

  17. EEG controlled neuromuscular electrical stimulation of the upper limb for stroke patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Hock Guan; Shee, Cheng Yap; Kong, Keng He; Guan, Cuntai; Ang, Wei Tech

    2011-03-01

    This paper describes the Brain Computer Interface (BCI) system and the experiments to allow post-acute (<3 months) stroke patients to use electroencephalogram (EEG) to trigger neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES)-assisted extension of the wrist/fingers, which are essential pre-requisites for useful hand function. EEG was recorded while subjects performed motor imagery of their paretic limb, and then analyzed to determine the optimal frequency range within the mu-rhythm, with the greatest attenuation. Aided by visual feedback, subjects then trained to regulate their mu-rhythm EEG to operate the BCI to trigger NMES of the wrist/finger. 6 post-acute stroke patients successfully completed the training, with 4 able to learn to control and use the BCI to initiate NMES. This result is consistent with the reported BCI literacy rate of healthy subjects. Thereafter, without the loss of generality, the controller of the NMES is developed and is based on a model of the upper limb muscle (biceps/triceps) groups to determine the intensity of NMES required to flex or extend the forearm by a specific angle. The muscle model is based on a phenomenological approach, with parameters that are easily measured and conveniently implemented.

  18. Differential diagnosis of a rare case of upper limb pain: Paget-Schroetter syndrome in a doner kebab chef

    PubMed Central

    Aytekin, Ebru; Dogan, Yasemin Pekin; Okur, Sibel Caglar; Burnaz, Ozer; Caglar, Nil Sayiner

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] Paget-Schroetter syndrome (PSS) is an uncommon deep vein thrombosis of the axillary and subclavian veins which may occur spontaneously, but is usually caused by excessive upper limb activity. PSS is clinically similar to other upper limb musculoskeletal disorders and soft tissue infections, and this may lead to delay in correct diagnosis in its early stages. The aim of our case report is to discuss this rare condition with reference to the available literature. [Subjects and Methods] Here we report the case of a doner kebab chef who complained of swelling and pain in his right arm around the biceps muscle. The initial diagnosis was biceps tendon rupture, for which the patient underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the right arm and shoulder. Since the MRI revealed no pathological findings, right upper limb venous Doppler ultrasound analysis was performed. Subacute thrombosis materials were detected in the subclavian, axillary, and brachial veins. [Results] With rapid anticoagulant therapy, the patient’s symptoms quickly improved. [Conclusion] Early diagnosis and treatment of PSS is critical for preventing potentially fatal complications such as pulmonary embolism. Prophylaxis is important for preventing recurrent thrombosis and for avoiding the development of post-thrombotic syndrome. PSS should be considered a possible cause of painful swelling of the upper limbs, especially in young, active patients who use their arms excessively. PMID:26644704

  19. Differential diagnosis of a rare case of upper limb pain: Paget-Schroetter syndrome in a doner kebab chef.

    PubMed

    Aytekin, Ebru; Dogan, Yasemin Pekin; Okur, Sibel Caglar; Burnaz, Ozer; Caglar, Nil Sayiner

    2015-10-01

    [Purpose] Paget-Schroetter syndrome (PSS) is an uncommon deep vein thrombosis of the axillary and subclavian veins which may occur spontaneously, but is usually caused by excessive upper limb activity. PSS is clinically similar to other upper limb musculoskeletal disorders and soft tissue infections, and this may lead to delay in correct diagnosis in its early stages. The aim of our case report is to discuss this rare condition with reference to the available literature. [Subjects and Methods] Here we report the case of a doner kebab chef who complained of swelling and pain in his right arm around the biceps muscle. The initial diagnosis was biceps tendon rupture, for which the patient underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the right arm and shoulder. Since the MRI revealed no pathological findings, right upper limb venous Doppler ultrasound analysis was performed. Subacute thrombosis materials were detected in the subclavian, axillary, and brachial veins. [Results] With rapid anticoagulant therapy, the patient's symptoms quickly improved. [Conclusion] Early diagnosis and treatment of PSS is critical for preventing potentially fatal complications such as pulmonary embolism. Prophylaxis is important for preventing recurrent thrombosis and for avoiding the development of post-thrombotic syndrome. PSS should be considered a possible cause of painful swelling of the upper limbs, especially in young, active patients who use their arms excessively. PMID:26644704

  20. Biomechanical model of pronation efficiency: new insight into skeletal adaptation of the hominoid upper limb.

    PubMed

    Galtés, Ignasi; Jordana, Xavier; Cos, Mònica; Malgosa, Assumpció; Manyosa, Joan

    2008-03-01

    Despite considerable literature on the functional anatomy of the hominoid upper limb, there are no quantitative approaches relating to bone design and the resulting muscular-activity enhancement. The purpose of this study is to quantitatively analyze the relationship between the rotational efficiency of the pronator teres muscle and the design of the skeletal structures on which it acts. Using conventional scan images of a human forearm for three rotational positions, this study develops an original biomechanical model that defines rotational efficiency as a mathematical function expressing a geometrical relationship between the origin and insertion muscular sites. The results show that this parameter varies throughout the entire pronation range, being maximal when the forearm lies around its functional position. Moreover, the rotational-efficiency formula allows us to demonstrate, by several simulation conditions, that an improvement in pronation efficiency is derived from a large shaft radius curvature, a large humeral medial epicondyle, and a more proximal pronator teres radial attachment. The fact that forearm pronation efficiency can be inferred, even quantified, throughout the entire rotational range, by applying the biomechanical model developed here allows us to undertake anatomical approaches in the field of Evolutionary Anthropology, to interpret more precisely how skeletal design is related to upper-limb function in extant and fossil primate taxa. PMID:18000889

  1. Posture-movement responses to stance perturbations and upper limb fatigue during a repetitive pointing task.

    PubMed

    Fuller, Jason R; Fung, Joyce; Côté, Julie N

    2013-08-01

    Localized muscle fatigue and postural perturbation have separately been shown to alter whole-body movement but little is known about how humans respond when subjected to both factors combined. Here we sought to quantify the kinematics of postural control and repetitive upper limb movement during standing surface perturbations and in the presence of fatigue. Subjects stood on a motion-based platform and repetitively reached between two shoulder-height targets until noticeably fatigued (rating of perceived exertion=8/10). Every minute, subjects experienced a posterior and an anterior platform translation while reaching to the distal target. Outcomes were compared prior to and with fatigue (first vs. final minute data). When fatigued, regardless of the perturbation condition, subjects decreased their shoulder abduction and increased contralateral trunk flexion, a strategy that may relieve the load on the fatiguing upper limb musculature. During perturbations, kinematic adaptations emerged across the trunk and arm to preserve task performance. In contrast to our expectation, the kinematic response to the perturbations did not alter in the presence of fatigue. Kinematic adaptations in response to the perturbation predominantly occurred in the direction of the reach whereas fatigue adaptations occurred orthogonal to the reach. These findings suggest that during repetitive reaching, fatigue and postural perturbation compensations organize so as to minimize interaction with each other and preserve the global task characteristics of endpoint motion. PMID:24054899

  2. The formation of muscles in regenerating limbs of the newt after denervation of the blastema.

    PubMed

    Grim, M; Carlson, B M

    1979-12-01

    The purpose of this experiment was to examine the relationship, if any, between nerve fibers and the formation of muscle pattern in the regenerating amphibian limb. During embryogenesis, nerve fibers grow into the limb bud at the time when the common muscle blastemas subdivide into individual muscle primordia, whereas in regeneration nerve fibers are always present. In order to learn whether or not the muscle pattern could be laid down in the absence of nerves we amputated 58 limbs of newts (Notophthalmus viridescens) at the mid humeral level and allowed them to regenerate to the medium-bud or late-bud stage. The limbs were then denervated. The majority of limbs denervated at the medium-bud stage either regressed or failed to regenerate further. Regeneration after denervation failed in 9 of 25 limbs denervated at the late-bud stages. In those limbs that continued to regenerate after denervation, the formation of individual muscle primordia did occur, following the same sequence with respect to the gross stage of regeneration as innervated regenerates. In comparing these results with our previous results on the development of muscular pattern in aneurogenic limbs of the axolotl, we conclude that in neither the embryonic nor the regenerating amphibian limb are nerve fibers directly involved in the subdivision of common muscle blastemas into the primordia of individual muscles. PMID:528874

  3. Synaptic Differentiation in a Regenerating Crab-Limb Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Govind, C. K.; Atwood, H. L.; Lang, Fred

    1973-01-01

    Properties of synapses on regenerating nerve terminals of the single excitatory axon to the stretcher muscle were studied in the regenerating second walking leg of the shore crab, Grapsus. In the adult condition these synapses vary in physiological properties, ranging from high release, poorly facilitating types to low release, highly facilitating types. Synapses on regenerating stretcher-muscle fibers show a distinct temporal pattern of differentiation. In early limb buds, a characteristic fluctuating, excitatory postsynaptic potential, punctuated by failures of transmission, is seen, indicating a developmentally “naive” synapse with low quantal content. In these early stages proportionately more synapses are of the poorly facilitating type; the highly facilitating synapses appear increasingly in later stages. Thus, the type of synapse that will form seems likely to be related to the time of innervation. Synapses of early developmental stages found by electron microscopy are significantly smaller than those seen in adult muscles; thus, the synaptic contact area must increase during development. We postulate that contacts formed by the primary branches of the axon early in development differentiate into relatively large, poorly facilitating synapses, while contacts formed by secondary branches slightly later in development differentiate into smaller, highly facilitating synapses. Images PMID:4514993

  4. Ultrasound Guided Low Approach Interscalene Brachial Plexus Block for Upper Limb Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sun Kyung; Sung, Min Ha; Suh, Hae Jin

    2016-01-01

    Background The interscalene brachial plexus block is widely used for pain control and anesthetic purposes during shoulder arthroscopic surgeries and surgeries of the upper extremities. However, it is known that interscalene brachial plexus block is not appropriate for upper limb surgeries because it does not affect the lower trunk (C8-T1, ulnar nerve) of the brachial plexus. Methods A low approach, ultrasound-guided interscalene brachial plexus block (LISB) was performed on twenty-eight patients undergoing surgery of the upper extremities. The patients were assessed five minutes and fifteen minutes after the block for the degree of block in each nerve and muscle as well as for any complications. Results At five minutes and fifteen minutes after the performance of the block, the degree of the block in the ulnar nerve was found to be 2.8 ± 2.6 and 1.1 ± 1.8, respectively, based on a ten-point scale. Motor block occurred in the median nerve after fifteen minutes in 26 of the 28 patients (92.8%), and in all of the other three nerves in all 28 patients. None of the patients received additional analgesics, and none experienced complications. Conclusions The present study confirmed the achievement of an appropriate sensory and motor block in the upper extremities, including the ulnar nerve, fifteen minutes after LISB, with no complications. PMID:26839666

  5. Upper limb malformations in chromosome 22q11 deletions

    SciTech Connect

    Shalev, S.A.; Dar, H.; Barel, H.; Borochowitz, Z.

    1996-03-29

    We read with interest the report of Cormier-Daire et al. in a recent issue of the journal, describing upper limb malformations in DiGeorge syndrome. We observed a family with this group of rare clinical expression of chromosome 22q11 deletions. The proposita was examined in our clinic when she was 4 years old. She was mildly mentally retarded. Clinical evaluation showed normal growth, long thin nose with squared tip, nasal speech, and abundant scalp hair and no cardiac anomalies. The girl was accompanied by her mother. Facial similarities were noted between the two. The mother reported to be treated with oral calcium due to hypoparathyroidism, diagnosed several years ago. Clinical evaluation showed wide flat face, short stature, mild mental retardation, slight hypertelorism, peculiar nose similar to her daughter`s, and nasal speech. No cardiac anomalies were found. Recently, a brother was born. Clinical examination documented large ventriculo-septal defect, retrognathia, narrow palpebral fissures, and long thin nose with squared tip. 1 ref.

  6. Work related upper limb disorders in telecommunication workers in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Premalatha, G D; Noor Hassim, I

    1999-06-01

    A total of 323 workers from 5 different occupational groups in the telecommunication industry were studied in this cross sectional study, which sought to determine the prevalence of Work Related Upper Limb Disorders (WRULD) in 5 occupational groups; operators using the Video Display Terminals, switchboard operators, clerks, data entry processors and the supervisors. WRULD was also studied with regard to factors such as sex, race, height, age, stress and the discomfort perceived due to the work station design. The possibility of WRULD was determined from a self-administered questionnaire and confirmed by history and physical examination. Psychological stress and the discomfort due to the workstation were measured from the questionnaire. The overall prevalence was found to be 31.2% and the prevalence among the various occupations differed with it being the highest in the switchboard operators and data processors and the lowest in the supervisors. The older workers and the female workers were found to have higher prevalences of WRULD. It was also found that a higher stress score and a higher score of discomfort perceived at the work station were associated with higher prevalences of WRULD. PMID:10972037

  7. Temporal alignment of electrocorticographic recordings for upper limb movement

    PubMed Central

    Talakoub, Omid; Popovic, Milos R.; Navaro, Jessie; Hamani, Clement; Fonoff, Erich T.; Wong, Willy

    2015-01-01

    The detection of movement-related components of the brain activity is useful in the design of brain-machine interfaces. A common approach is to classify the brain activity into a number of templates or states. To find these templates, the neural responses are averaged over each movement task. For averaging to be effective, one must assume that the neural components occur at identical times over repeated trials. However, complex arm movements such as reaching and grasping are prone to cross-trial variability due to the way movements are performed. Typically initiation time, duration of movement and movement speed are variable even as a subject tries to reproduce the same task identically across trials. Therefore, movement-related neural activity will tend to occur at different times across the trials. Due to this mismatch, the averaging of neural activity will not bring into salience movement-related components. To address this problem, we present a method of alignment that accounts for the variabilities in the way the movements are conducted. In this study, arm speed was used to align neural activity. Four subjects had electrocorticographic (ECoG) electrodes implanted over their primary motor cortex and were asked to perform reaching and retrieving tasks using the upper limb contralateral to the site of electrode implantation. The arm speeds were aligned using a non-linear transformation of the temporal axes resulting in average spectrograms with superior visualization of movement-related neural activity when compared to averaging without alignment. PMID:25628522

  8. Early specification of limb muscle precursor cells by the homeobox gene Lbx1h.

    PubMed

    Schäfer, K; Braun, T

    1999-10-01

    During vertebrate embryogenesis, myogenic precursor cells of limb muscles delaminate from the ventro-lateral edge of the somitic dermomyotome and migrate to the limb buds, where they congregate into dorsal and ventral muscle masses. It has been proposed that the surrounding connective tissue controls muscle pattern formation in limbs. Regulatory molecules such as receptor tyrosine kinases like c-Met ( ref. 6) and those encoded by homeobox-containing genes, including c-Met (ref. 6), Tbx1 (ref. 7), Mox2 (ref. 8), Six1 and Six2 (ref. 9), Pitx2, Pax3 (refs 10,11) and Lbx1h (refs 12,13), are expressed in migrating limb precursor cells. The role of these genes in the patterning of limb muscles is unknown, although mutation of Pax3 or Met causes disruption of limb muscle development at an initial step, disturbing the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition of the somitic epithelium. No limb muscle cells form in these mutants, and the early loss of myogenic precursor cells prevented an analysis of later functions of these genes during limb muscle development. Based on quail-chick chimaera studies, it was assumed that a cell-autonomous contribution of myogenic cells to the formation of individual limb muscles is negligible, and that an instructive role of limb mesenchyme is critical in this process. Here we show that Lbx1h determines migratory routes of muscle precursor cells in a cell-autonomous manner, thereby leading to the formation of distinct limb muscle patterns. Inactivation of Lbx1h, which is specifically expressed in migrating muscle precursor cells, led to a lack of extensor muscles in forelimbs and an absence of muscles in hindlimbs. The defect was caused by the failure of all muscle precursor cells of hindlimbs and of precursor cells of extensor muscles of forelimbs to migrate to their corresponding muscle anlagen. Our results demonstrate that Lbx1h is a key regulator of muscle precursor cell migration and is required for the acquisition of dorsal identities of forelimb muscles. PMID:10508520

  9. Computationally efficient modeling of proprioceptive signals in the upper limb for prostheses: a simulation study

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Ian; Constandinou, Timothy G.

    2014-01-01

    Accurate models of proprioceptive neural patterns could 1 day play an important role in the creation of an intuitive proprioceptive neural prosthesis for amputees. This paper looks at combining efficient implementations of biomechanical and proprioceptor models in order to generate signals that mimic human muscular proprioceptive patterns for future experimental work in prosthesis feedback. A neuro-musculoskeletal model of the upper limb with 7 degrees of freedom and 17 muscles is presented and generates real time estimates of muscle spindle and Golgi Tendon Organ neural firing patterns. Unlike previous neuro-musculoskeletal models, muscle activation and excitation levels are unknowns in this application and an inverse dynamics tool (static optimization) is integrated to estimate these variables. A proprioceptive prosthesis will need to be portable and this is incompatible with the computationally demanding nature of standard biomechanical and proprioceptor modeling. This paper uses and proposes a number of approximations and optimizations to make real time operation on portable hardware feasible. Finally technical obstacles to mimicking natural feedback for an intuitive proprioceptive prosthesis, as well as issues and limitations with existing models, are identified and discussed. PMID:25009463

  10. A study of the anthropometric correlations between upper limb measurements for personal identification in Sudanese population.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, A A

    2014-12-01

    The presence of multiple isolated commingled fleshed limbs or limb parts generates a significant challenge for forensic investigators in wars, mass disasters, and criminal assaults in the process of identification. Although upper limb measurements have been used to establish individual identity in terms of sex and stature with high success, there is a scarcity of data concerning the correlations within upper limb parts. Hence, this study aims to assess the relationships within upper limb parts and develop regression formulae to reconstruct the parts from one another. The study participants were 376 Sudanese adults (187 males and 189 females). The results of this study indicated significant sexual dimorphism for all variables. The results indicated a significant correlation within the upper limb parts. Linear and multiple regression equations were developed to reconstruct the upper limb parts in the presence of a single or multiple dimension(s) from the identical limb. Multiple regression equations generated better reconstructions than simple equations. These results are significant in forensics and orthopedic reconstructive surgery. PMID:25277498

  11. Neuromuscular Activity of Upper and Lower Limbs during two Backstroke Swimming Start Variants

    PubMed Central

    De Jesus, Karla; De Jesus, Kelly; Medeiros, Alexandre I. A.; Gonçalves, Pedro; Figueiredo, Pedro; Fernandes, Ricardo J.; Vilas-Boas, João Paulo

    2015-01-01

    A proficient start is decisive in sprint competitive swimming events and requires swimmers’ to exert maximal forces in a short period to complete the task successfully. The aim of this study was to compare the electromyographic (EMG) activity in-between the backstroke start with feet positioned parallel and partially emerged performed with the hands on the highest horizontal and on the vertical handgrip at hands-off, take-off, flight and entry start phases. EMG comparisons between starting variants were supported by upper and lower limb joint angles at starting position and 15 m start time data. Following a four-week start training to familiarize participants with each start variant, 10 male competitive backstroke swimmers performed randomly six 15 m maximal trials, being three of each start variant. Surface EMG of Biceps Brachii, Triceps Brachii, Rectus Femoris, Biceps Femoris, Gastrocnemius Medialis and Tibialis Anterior was recorded and processed using the time integral EMG (iEMG). Eight video cameras (four surface and four underwater) were used to determine backstroke start phases and joint angles at starting position. EMG, joint angles and temporal parameters have not evidenced changes due to the different handgrips. Nevertheless, clear differences were observed in both variants for upper and lower limb muscles activity among starting phases (e.g. Biceps Brachii at take-off vs. flight phase, 15.17% ± 2.76% and 22.38% ± 4.25%; 14.24% ± 7.11% and 25.90% ± 8.65%, for variant with hands horizontal and vertically positioned, respectively). It was concluded that different handgrips did not affect EMG, kinematics and temporal profile in backstroke start. Despite coaches might plan similar strength training for both start variants, further attention should be given on the selection of proper exercises to maximize the contribution of relevant muscles at different starting phases. Key points An effective swim start component (from the starting signal until the swimmers’ vertex reaches the 15 m mark) is decisive in short distance events. In 2008, FINA approved the Omega OSB11 starting block (Swiss Timing Ltd., Switzerland) with two horizontal and one vertical backstroke start handgrip and currently swimmers can adopt different starting variants. The start performance is related to the exertion of maximal force in the shortest time, as other high-velocity movements; thus, the study of the current variants in-between them from a neuromuscular standpoint is indispensable for training support. The use of different handgrips did not affect upper and lower limb electromyographic activity; angular kinematics and overall 15 m backstroke start profile. Independent of the start variant selected, the role played by each upper and lower limb muscles at different starting phases should be considered in specific resistance training program to optimize backstroke start performance. PMID:26336346

  12. Upper limb dynamic responses to impulsive forces for selected assembly workers.

    PubMed

    Sesto, Mary E; Radwin, Robert G; Block, Walter F; Best, Thomas M

    2006-02-01

    This study evaluated the upper limb, dynamic, mechanical response parameters for 14 male assembly workers recruited from selected jobs based on power tool use. It was hypothesized that the type of power tool operation would affect stiffness, effective mass, and damping of the upper extremity; and workers with symptoms and positive physical examination findings would have different mechanical responses than asymptomatic workers without physical examination findings. Participants included operators who regularly used torque reaction power hand tools, such as nutrunners and screwdrivers, and nontorque reaction power hand tools, such as riveters. The mechanical parameters of the upper limb were characterized from the loading response of an apparatus having known dynamic properties while worker grasps an oscillating handle in free vibration. In addition, all workers underwent a physical examination, magnetic resonance imaging, and completed a symptom survey. Workers were categorized as controls or cases based on reported forearm symptoms and physical exam findings. A total of seven workers were categorized as cases and had less average mechanical stiffness (46%, p > 0.01), damping (74%, p > 0.01), and effective mass (59%, p > 0.05) than the seven workers categorized as controls. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings suggestive of muscle edema were observed for two workers classified as cases and who regularly used torque reaction power tools. No MRI enhancement was observed in the seven subjects who did not regularly use torque reaction power tools. The ergonomic consequences of less stiffness, effective mass, and damping in symptomatic workers may include reduced capacity to react against rapidly building torque reaction forces encountered when operating power hand tools. PMID:16361220

  13. Acupuncture in the Treatment of Upper-Limb Lymphedema

    PubMed Central

    Cassileth, Barrie R; Van Zee, Kimberly J; Yeung, K Simon; Coleton, Marci I; Cohen, Sara; Chan, Yi H; Vickers, Andrew J; Sjoberg, Daniel D; Hudis, Clifford A

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Current treatments for lymphedema after breast cancer treatment are expensive and require ongoing intervention. Clinical experience and our preliminary published results suggest that acupuncture is safe and potentially useful. This study evaluates the safety and potential efficacy of acupuncture on upper-limb circumference in women with lymphedema. METHODS Women with a clinical diagnosis of breast cancer−related lymphedema (BCRL) for 0.5-5 years and with affected arm circumference ≥2 cm larger than unaffected arm received acupuncture treatment twice weekly for 4 weeks. Affected and unaffected arm circumferences were measured before and after each acupuncture treatment. Response, defined as ≥30% reduction in circumference difference between affected/unaffected arms, was assessed. Monthly follow-up calls for 6 months thereafter were made to document any complications and self-reported lymphedema status. RESULTS Among 37 enrolled patients, 33 were evaluated; 4 discontinued due to time constraints. Mean reduction in arm circumference difference was 0.90 cm (95% CI, 0.72-1.07; P < .0005). Eleven patients (33%) exhibited a reduction of ≥30% after acupuncture treatment. Seventy-six percent of patients received all treatments; 21% missed 1 treatment, and another patient missed 2 treatments. During the treatment period, 14 of the 33 patients reported minor complaints, including mild local bruising or pain/tingling. There were no serious adverse events and no infections or severe exacerbations after 255 treatment sessions and 6 months of follow-up interviews. CONCLUSIONS Acupuncture for BCRL appears safe and may reduce arm circumference. Although these results await confirmation in a randomized trial, acupuncture can be considered for women with no other options for sustained arm circumference reduction. Cancer 2013;119:2455-2461. © 2013 American Cancer Society. PMID:23576267

  14. Muscle architecture and functional anatomy of the pelvic limb of the ostrich (Struthio camelus)

    PubMed Central

    Smith, N C; Wilson, A M; Jespers, K J; Payne, R C

    2006-01-01

    The functional anatomy of the pelvic limb of the ostrich (Struthio camelus) was investigated in order to assess musculoskeletal specialization related to locomotor performance. The pelvic limbs of ten ostriches were dissected and detailed measurements of all muscle tendon units of the pelvic limb were made, including muscle mass, muscle length, fascicle length, pennation angle, tendon mass and tendon length. From these measurements other muscle properties such as muscle volume, physiological cross-sectional area (PCSA), tendon cross-sectional area, maximum isometric muscle force and tendon stress were derived, using standard relationships and published muscle data. Larger muscles tended to be located more proximally and had longer fascicle lengths and lower pennation angles. This led to an expected proximal to distal reduction in total muscle mass. An exception to this trend was the gastrocnemius muscle, which was found to have the largest volume and PCSA and also had the highest capacity for both force and power production. Generally high-power muscles were located more proximally in the limb, while some small distal muscles (tibialis cranialis and flexor perforatus digiti III), with short fibres, were found to have very high force generation capacities. The greatest proportion of pelvic muscle volume was for the hip extensors, while the highest capacity for force generation was observed in the extensors of the ankle, many of which were also in series with long tendons and thus were functionally suited to elastic energy storage. PMID:17118064

  15. Analysis of Neurotrophic Factors in Limb and Extraocular Muscles of Mouse Model of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Harandi, Vahid M.; Lindquist, Susanne; Kolan, Shrikant Shantilal; Brännström, Thomas; Liu, Jing-Xia

    2014-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is currently an incurable fatal motor neuron syndrome characterized by progressive weakness, muscle wasting and death ensuing 3–5 years after diagnosis. Neurotrophic factors (NTFs) are known to be important in both nervous system development and maintenance. However, the attempt to translate the potential of NTFs into the therapeutic options remains limited despite substantial number of approaches, which have been tested clinically. Using quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) technique, the present study investigated mRNA expression of four different NTFs: brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), neurotrophin-3 (NT-3), neurotrophin-4/5 (NT-4) and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) in limb muscles and extraocular muscles (EOMs) from SOD1G93A transgenic mice at early and terminal stages of ALS. General morphological examination revealed that muscle fibres were well preserved in both limb muscles and EOMs in early stage ALS mice. However, in terminal ALS mice, most muscle fibres were either atrophied or hypertrophied in limb muscles but unaffected in EOMs. qRT-PCR analysis showed that in early stage ALS mice, NT-4 was significantly down-regulated in limb muscles whereas NT-3 and GDNF were markedly up-regulated in EOMs. In terminal ALS mice, only GDNF was significantly up-regulated in limb muscles. We concluded that the early down-regulation of NT-4 in limb muscles is closely associated with muscle dystrophy and dysfunction at late stage, whereas the early up-regulations of GDNF and NT-3 in EOMs are closely associated with the relatively well-preserved muscle morphology at late stage. Collectively, the data suggested that comparing NTFs expression between limb muscles and EOMs from different stages of ALS animal models is a useful method in revealing the patho-physiology and progression of ALS, and eventually rescuing motor neuron in ALS patients. PMID:25334047

  16. A systematic review of prognostic factors for distal upper limb pain

    PubMed Central

    Whibley, Daniel; Martin, Kathryn R; Lovell, Karina; Jones, Gareth T

    2015-01-01

    Background: Musculoskeletal pain in the distal upper limb is relatively common, can be a cause of disability, presents a high cost to society and is clinically important. Previous reviews of prognostic factors have focused on pain in the proximal upper limb, whole upper extremity or isolated regions of the distal upper limb. Aim: To identify factors that predict outcome of distal upper limb pain. Study design: Systematic review Method: Eight bibliographic databases were searched from inception to March 2014. Eligible articles included adults with pain anywhere in the distal upper limb at baseline from randomised controlled trials with a waiting list, expectant policy or usual care group, or observational studies where no treatment or usual care was provided. Data describing the association between a putative prognostic factor and pain or functional outcome at follow-up were required. Quality was assessed using the Quality in Prognostic Studies tool. Results: Seven articles reporting on six studies were identified. Heterogeneity of study populations and outcome measures prevented a meta-analysis so a narrative synthesis of results was undertaken. Three factors (being female, a longer duration of the complaint at initial presentation and having musculoskeletal pain in multiple locations) were significantly associated with poor pain outcome in more than one study. Being female was the only factor significantly associated with poor functional outcome in more than one study. Conclusions: A range of sociodemographic, pain-related, occupational and psychosocial prognostic factors for distal upper limb pain outcomes were investigated in studies included in the review. However, due to the lack of commonality of factors investigated and lack of consistency of results across studies, there is limited evidence for predictors of distal upper limb pain outcomes. Further research is required to identify prognostic factors of distal upper limb pain, particularly modifiable factors that may influence management. PMID:26526466

  17. The effect of perinatal brachial plexus lesion on upper limb development

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Deficiency in upper limb development is a sequel of the perinatal brachial plexus palsy. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of brachial plexus birth lesion on upper limb development. Methods Forty-four patients with unilateral obstetric brachial plexus palsy underwent measurements of both upper extremities. The average age at the time of evaluation was 6.8 years. Active motion was assessed using Gilbert-Raimondi, the modified MRC, and Al-Qattan scales. Paired t test was used for statistical analysis. Correlation between limb length / circumference discrepancy and age / time of surgery was assessed using Pearson correlation coefficient. Results A decrease in the circumference and length was observed in all limbs with brachial plexus lesion. We found a statistically significant difference between degree of hand length and width decrease and its useful and useless function. We observed a statistically significant difference in measurement: forearm length, hand length and width dependent on the type of surgical procedure (neurolysis, reconstruction). We observed no correlation between age and limb length / circumference discrepancy. We also observed no correlation between time of surgery and limb length / circumference discrepancy. Conclusions The decrease in dimensions of the affected limbs occurred predominantly during the period of early childhood. Disparities in dimensions are observed in both cases of deficiency of useful function of upper limb and cases in which functional efficiency appears. PMID:24694070

  18. Neuronox versus BOTOX in the Treatment of Post-Stroke Upper Limb Spasticity: A Multicenter Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Han Gil; Paik, Nam-Jong; Lee, Shi-Uk; Oh, Byung-Mo; Chun, Min Ho; Kwon, Bum Sun; Bang, Moon Suk

    2015-01-01

    Background Botulinum toxin type A is widely used for treating spasticity. Neuronox (Neu-BoNT/A), a newly manufactured botulinum toxin a, has not yet been investigated for its efficacy and safety in the treatment of post-stroke upper limb spasticity. Objective We evaluated the efficacy and safety of Neuronox (Neu-BoNT/A) compared with BOTOX (onabotulinum toxin A) for treating post-stroke upper limb spasticity. Methods In total, 196 stroke patients with moderate to severe upper limb spasticity were randomly assigned to either Neuronox or BOTOX intervention. The wrist flexors were mandatory and elbow, finger, and thumb flexors were optional muscles to be injected. Assessments were performed at baseline and 4, 8, and 12 weeks after the intervention. The primary outcome measure was the change from baseline of the Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS) at the wrist flexors at week 4. Secondary outcome measures included the change of MAS at each visit, response rate, Disability Assessment Scale (DAS), Carer Burden Scale, and Global Assessment of treatment benefit. Results Primary outcome measures were -1.39±0.79 and -1.56±0.81 in the Neuronox and BOTOX groups, respectively. The difference was within the noninferiority margin of 0.45 (95% upper limit=0.40). There were no significant differences between the groups in the secondary outcome and safety measures, except the change of the MAS at the elbow flexors at week 12 (-0.88±0.75 in the Neuronox group, -0.65±0.74 in the BOTOX group; P=0.0429). Both groups showed significant improvements in the MAS, DAS, and Carer Burden Scale at weeks 4, 8, and 12. Conclusion Neuronox showed equivalent efficacy and safety compared with BOTOX for treating post-stroke upper limb spasticity. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01313767 PMID:26030192

  19. [Hand-arm vibration syndrome and upper limbs diseases in the forest workers of Italia meridionale].

    PubMed

    Fenga, C; Rapisarda, V; Valentino, M; Cacciola, A; Deboli, R; Calvo, A; Germanò, D

    2007-01-01

    Vibration exposure of the hand-arm system is associated with an increased risk of upper-limb vascular, neurological and musculoskeletal lesions, or hand-arm vibration syndrome (HAVS). The prevalence of occupational HAVS and upper-limb disorders was studied among 278 Forestry Service workers in Sicily and Calabria. Subjects who used chain-saws (18 weeks/year) had a greater prevalence of peripheral sensory-neural disturbances (28%), upper-limb musculoskeletal disorders (33%) and carpal tunnel syndrome (19%) compared with 260 manual workers from the same Corps not exposed to hand-transmitted vibration. Raynaud's phenomenon was comparable in exposed and control subjects (5.3% vs. 4.7%.) Upper-limb neuropathies were significantly associated with energy-equivalent frequency-weighted acceleration; exposure duration; and cumulative vibration dose (m2/s4h). The variable "years of work with vibrating tools" was strongly associated with peripheral neuropathies; carpal tunnel syndrome; and upper-limb musculotendinous syndromes. Data suggest that in Sicily and Calabria, where the climate is milder than in other areas of Italy, forestry work with hand-held vibrating tools does not entail a greater prevalence of peripheral vascular disorders (Raynaud's phenomenon), while the prevalence of occupational upper-limb neurological and musculoskeletal disorders, in which combined ergonomic and mechanical risk factors have a large pathogenic role, is significantly increased. PMID:18409849

  20. The determination of correlation between stature and upper limb and hand measurements in Iranian adults.

    PubMed

    Mahakizadeh, S; -Ghoroghi, F Moghani; Moshkdanian, Gh; Mokhtari, T; Hassanzadeh, G

    2016-03-01

    Estimation of stature is an important issue, which is significantly considered in forensic anthropology. It will be difficult to predict the identification of an individual when only some parts of dead body are discovered following disasters or criminal events. The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between stature and upper limb and hand length in Iranian adults to generate regression formulae for stature estimation. Three anthropometric measurements; Stature, Upper Limb Length (ULL) and Hand Length (HL) were taken on subjects, comprising 142 male students (18-25 years) using standard measuring instruments. The data were analysed using SPSS 16. Then linear regression models were used to estimate stature. The results indicated a positive correlation between stature and upper limb and hand measurements. The correlation coefficient with upper limb length was r= 0.89 & p =0.0001 and with hand length was r= 0.78 & p =0.0001. In conclusion, we found a strong correlation between stature and upper limb and hand length. The regression analysis also showed that the Upper Limb Length give better prediction of stature compared to Hand length measurements. PMID:26795396

  1. Influence of Position and Power Output on Upper Limb Kinetics in Cycling.

    PubMed

    Costes, Antony; Turpin, Nicolas A; Villeger, David; Moretto, Pierre; Watier, Bruno

    2016-04-01

    Several suggestions on the upper limb involvement in cycling exist but, to date, no study has quantified upper limb kinetics in this task. The aim of this study was to determine how crank power and pedaling position (seated or standing) affect upper limb kinetics. Handlebar loadings and upper limb kinematics were collected from 17 participants performing seated or standing pedaling trials in a random order at 6 crank powers ranging from 20% (112 ± 19 W) to 120% (675 ± 113 W) of their spontaneous sit-to-stand transition power. An inverse dynamics approach was used to compute 3D moments, powers, and works at the wrist, elbow, and shoulder joints. Over 29 parameters investigated, increases in crank power were associated with increases in the magnitudes of 23 and 20 of the kinetic variables assessed in seated and standing positions, respectively. The standing position was associated with higher magnitudes of upper limb kinetics. These results suggest that both upper and lower limbs should be considered in future models to better understand whole body coordination in cycling. PMID:26575861

  2. Upper Limb Static-Stretching Protocol Decreases Maximal Concentric Jump Performance

    PubMed Central

    Marchetti, Paulo H.; Silva, Fernando H. D. de Oliveira; Soares, Enrico G.; Serpa, Érica P.; Nardi, Priscyla S. M.; Vilela, Guanis de B.; Behm, David G.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the acute effects of an upper limb static-stretching (SS) protocol on the maximal concentric jump performance. We recruited 25 young healthy, male, resistance trained individuals (stretched group, n = 15 and control group, n = 10) in this study. The randomized between group experimental protocol consisted of a three trials of maximal concentric jump task, before and after a SS of the upper limb. Vertical ground reaction forces (vGRF) and surface electromyography (sEMG) of both gastrocnemius lateralis (GL) and vastus lateralis (VL) were acquired. An extensive SS was employed consisting of ten stretches of 30 seconds, with 15 seconds of rest, and 70-90% of the point of discomfort (POD). ANOVA (2x2) (group x condition) was used for shoulder joint range of motion (ROM), vGRF and sEMG. A significant interaction for passive ROM of the shoulder joint revealed significant increases between pre- and post-SS protocol (p < 0.001). A significant interaction demonstrated decreased peak force and an increased peak propulsion duration between pre- and post-stretching only for stretch group (p = 0.021, and p = 0.024, respectively. There was a significant main effect between groups (stretch and control) for peak force for control group (p = 0.045). Regarding sEMG variables, there were no significant differences between groups (control versus stretched) or condition (pre-stretching versus post-stretching) for the peak amplitude of RMS and IEMG for both muscles (VL and GL). In conclusion, an acute extensive SS can increase the shoulder ROM, and negatively affect both the propulsion duration and peak force of the maximal concentric jump, without providing significant changes in muscle activation. Key points The jump performance can be affected negatively by an intense extensive static-stretching protocol. An intense acute extensive SS protocol can affect positively the shoulder ROM. The intense acute extensive SS protocol does not change the level of muscle activation for vastus lateralis and gastrocnemius lateralis. PMID:25435789

  3. Phantom limb perception interferes with motor imagery after unilateral upper-limb amputation.

    PubMed

    Lyu, Yuanyuan; Guo, Xiaoli; Bekrater-Bodmann, Robin; Flor, Herta; Tong, Shanbao

    2016-01-01

    A potential contributor to impaired motor imagery in amputees is an alteration of the body schema as a result of the presence of a phantom limb. However, the nature of the relationship between motor imagery and phantom experiences remains unknown. In this study, the influence of phantom limb perception on motor imagery was investigated using a hand mental rotation task by means of behavioral and electrophysiological measures. Compared with healthy controls, significantly prolonged response time for both the intact and missing hand were observed specifically in amputees who perceived a phantom limb during the task but not in amputees without phantom limb perception. Event-related desynchronization of EEG in the beta band (beta-ERD) in central and parietal areas showed an angular disparity specifically in amputees with phantom limb perception, with its source localized in the right inferior parietal lobule. The response time as well as the beta-ERD values were significantly positively correlated with phantom vividness. Our results suggest that phantom limb perception during the task is an important interferential factor for motor imagery after amputation and the interference might be related to a change of the body representation resulting from an unnatural posture of the phantom limb. PMID:26879749

  4. Phantom limb perception interferes with motor imagery after unilateral upper-limb amputation

    PubMed Central

    Lyu, Yuanyuan; Guo, Xiaoli; Bekrater-Bodmann, Robin; Flor, Herta; Tong, Shanbao

    2016-01-01

    A potential contributor to impaired motor imagery in amputees is an alteration of the body schema as a result of the presence of a phantom limb. However, the nature of the relationship between motor imagery and phantom experiences remains unknown. In this study, the influence of phantom limb perception on motor imagery was investigated using a hand mental rotation task by means of behavioral and electrophysiological measures. Compared with healthy controls, significantly prolonged response time for both the intact and missing hand were observed specifically in amputees who perceived a phantom limb during the task but not in amputees without phantom limb perception. Event-related desynchronization of EEG in the beta band (beta-ERD) in central and parietal areas showed an angular disparity specifically in amputees with phantom limb perception, with its source localized in the right inferior parietal lobule. The response time as well as the beta-ERD values were significantly positively correlated with phantom vividness. Our results suggest that phantom limb perception during the task is an important interferential factor for motor imagery after amputation and the interference might be related to a change of the body representation resulting from an unnatural posture of the phantom limb. PMID:26879749

  5. An EMG-controlled neuroprosthesis for daily upper limb support: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Ambrosini, Emilia; Ferrante, Simona; Tibiletti, Marta; Schauer, Thomas; Klauer, Christian; Ferrigno, Giancarlo; Pedrocchi, Alessandra

    2011-01-01

    MUNDUS is an assistive platform for recovering direct interaction capability of severely impaired people based on upper limb motor functions. Its main concept is to exploit any residual control of the end-user, thus being suitable for long term utilization in daily activities. MUNDUS integrates multimodal information (EMG, eye tracking, brain computer interface) to control different actuators, such as a passive exoskeleton for weight relief, a neuroprosthesis for arm motion and small motors for grasping. Within this project, the present work integreted a commercial passive exoskeleton with an EMG-controlled neuroprosthesis for supporting hand-to-mouth movements. Being the stimulated muscle the same from which the EMG was measured, first it was necessary to develop an appropriate digital filter to separate the volitional EMG and the stimulation response. Then, a control method aimed at exploiting as much as possible the residual motor control of the end-user was designed. The controller provided a stimulation intensity proportional to the volitional EMG. An experimental protocol was defined to validate the filter and the controller operation on one healthy volunteer. The subject was asked to perform a sequence of hand-to-mouth movements holding different loads. The movements were supported by both the exoskeleton and the neuroprosthesis. The filter was able to detect an increase of the volitional EMG as the weight held by the subject increased. Thus, a higher stimulation intensity was provided in order to support a more intense exercise. The study demonstrated the feasibility of an EMG-controlled neuroprosthesis for daily upper limb support on healthy subjects, providing a first step forward towards the development of the final MUNDUS platform. PMID:22255280

  6. An Upper-Limb Power-Assist Exoskeleton Using Proportional Myoelectric Control

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Zhichuan; Zhang, Kejun; Sun, Shouqian; Gao, Zenggui; Zhang, Lekai; Yang, Zhongliang

    2014-01-01

    We developed an upper-limb power-assist exoskeleton actuated by pneumatic muscles. The exoskeleton included two metal links: a nylon joint, four size-adjustable carbon fiber bracers, a potentiometer and two pneumatic muscles. The proportional myoelectric control method was proposed to control the exoskeleton according to the user's motion intention in real time. With the feature extraction procedure and the classification (back-propagation neural network), an electromyogram (EMG)-angle model was constructed to be used for pattern recognition. Six healthy subjects performed elbow flexion-extension movements under four experimental conditions: (1) holding a 1-kg load, wearing the exoskeleton, but with no actuation and for different periods (2-s, 4-s and 8-s periods); (2) holding a 1-kg load, without wearing the exoskeleton, for a fixed period; (3) holding a 1-kg load, wearing the exoskeleton, but with no actuation, for a fixed period; (4) holding a 1-kg load, wearing the exoskeleton under proportional myoelectric control, for a fixed period. The EMG signals of the biceps brachii, the brachioradialis, the triceps brachii and the anconeus and the angle of the elbow were collected. The control scheme's reliability and power-assist effectiveness were evaluated in the experiments. The results indicated that the exoskeleton could be controlled by the user's motion intention in real time and that it was useful for augmenting arm performance with neurological signal control, which could be applied to assist in elbow rehabilitation after neurological injury. PMID:24727501

  7. A novel transgenic marker for migrating limb muscle precursors and for vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Tidhar, A; Reichenstein, M; Cohen, D; Faerman, A; Copeland, N G; Gilbert, D J; Jenkins, N A; Shani, M

    2001-01-01

    A unique pattern of LacZ expression was found in a transgenic mouse line, likely due to regulatory elements at the site of integration. Two new genes flanking the transgene were identified. At early stages of development, the transgene is transiently expressed in ventro-lateral demomyotomal cells migrating from the somites into the limb buds. At late developmental stages and in the adult, lacZ staining marks vascular smooth muscle cells throughout the vascular bed, with the exception of the major elastic arteries, and in pericytes. No expression was detected in skeletal and smooth muscles. Different patterns of expression in vascular smooth muscles was observed at distinct levels of the vascular tree, in arteries as well as in veins. Vessel injury, resulting in stimulation of smooth muscle cells proliferation and migration, is associated with transgene down-regulation. After the formation of neointima thickening, it is reactivated. This transgenic insertion may therefore be used as a useful marker to identify novel physiological cues or genetic elements involved in the regulation of the vascular smooth muscle phenotype(s). It may also provide an experimental tool for studying vasculature and the involvement of pericytes in regulating microvascular homeostasis. PMID:11146508

  8. Cancer cachexia decreases specific force and accelerates fatigue in limb muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, B.M.; Frye, G.S.; Ahn, B.; Ferreira, L.F.; Judge, A.R.

    2013-06-07

    Highlights: •C-26 cancer cachexia causes a significant decrease in limb muscle absolute force. •C-26 cancer cachexia causes a significant decrease in limb muscle specific force. •C-26 cancer cachexia decreases fatigue resistance in the soleus muscle. •C-26 cancer cachexia prolongs time to peak twitch tension in limb muscle. •C-26 cancer cachexia prolongs one half twitch relaxation time in limb muscle. -- Abstract: Cancer cachexia is a complex metabolic syndrome that is characterized by the loss of skeletal muscle mass and weakness, which compromises physical function, reduces quality of life, and ultimately can lead to mortality. Experimental models of cancer cachexia have recapitulated this skeletal muscle atrophy and consequent decline in muscle force generating capacity. However, more recently, we provided evidence that during severe cancer cachexia muscle weakness in the diaphragm muscle cannot be entirely accounted for by the muscle atrophy. This indicates that muscle weakness is not just a consequence of muscle atrophy but that there is also significant contractile dysfunction. The current study aimed to determine whether contractile dysfunction is also present in limb muscles during severe Colon-26 (C26) carcinoma cachexia by studying the glycolytic extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle and the oxidative soleus muscle, which has an activity pattern that more closely resembles the diaphragm. Severe C-26 cancer cachexia caused significant muscle fiber atrophy and a reduction in maximum absolute force in both the EDL and soleus muscles. However, normalization to muscle cross sectional area further demonstrated a 13% decrease in maximum isometric specific force in the EDL and an even greater decrease (17%) in maximum isometric specific force in the soleus. Time to peak tension and half relaxation time were also significantly slowed in both the EDL and the solei from C-26 mice compared to controls. Since, in addition to postural control, the oxidative soleus is also important for normal locomotion, we further performed a fatigue trial in the soleus and found that the decrease in relative force was greater and more rapid in solei from C-26 mice compared to controls. These data demonstrate that severe cancer cachexia causes profound muscle weakness that is not entirely explained by the muscle atrophy. In addition, cancer cachexia decreases the fatigue resistance of the soleus muscle, a postural muscle typically resistant to fatigue. Thus, specifically targeting contractile dysfunction represents an additional means to counter muscle weakness in cancer cachexia, in addition to targeting the prevention of muscle atrophy.

  9. The effects of post-stroke upper-limb training with an electromyography (EMG)-driven hand robot.

    PubMed

    Hu, X L; Tong, K Y; Wei, X J; Rong, W; Susanto, E A; Ho, S K

    2013-10-01

    Loss of hand function and finger dexterity are main disabilities in the upper limb after stroke. An electromyography (EMG)-driven hand robot had been developed for post-stroke rehabilitation training. The effectiveness of the hand robot assisted whole upper limb training was investigated on persons with chronic stroke (n=10) in this work. All subjects attended a 20-session training (3-5times/week) by using the hand robot to practice object grasp/release and arm transportation tasks. Significant motor improvements were observed in the Fugl-Meyer hand/wrist and shoulder/elbow scores (p<0.05), and also in the Action Research Arm Test and Wolf Motor Function Test (p<0.05). Significant reduction in spasticity of the fingers as was measured by the Modified Ashworth Score (p<0.05). The training improved the muscle co-ordination between the antagonist muscle pair (flexor digitorum (FD) and extensor digitorum (ED)), associated with a significant reduction in the ED EMG level (p<0.05) and a significant decrease of ED and FD co-contraction during the training (p<0.05); the excessive muscle activities in the biceps brachii were also reduced significantly after the training (p<0.05). PMID:23932795

  10. The role of the extrinsic thoracic limb muscles in equine locomotion

    PubMed Central

    Payne, R C; Veenman, P; Wilson, A M

    2004-01-01

    Muscles have two major roles in locomotion: to generate force and to absorb/generate power (do work). Economical force generation is achieved by short-fibred pennate muscle while the maximum power output of a muscle is architecture independent. In this study we tested the hypothesis that there is an anatomical and structural separation between the force-generating anti-gravity muscles and the propulsive (limb/trunk moving) muscles of the equine forelimb. Muscle mass and fascicle length measurements were made on the thoracic limb extrinsic muscles of six fresh horse cadavers. Physiological cross-sectional area and maximum isometric force were then estimated. Maximum power was estimated from muscle volume and published contraction velocity data. The majority of extrinsic forelimb muscles were large with long fascicles arranged in parallel to the long axis of the muscle. Muscles arranged in this way are optimised for doing work. The architecture of serratus ventralis thoracis (SVT) was unique. It had short (48 ± 17 mm) fascicles, arranged at about 45° to the long axis of the muscle, which would suggest a force-generating, anti-gravity role. The muscle belly of SVT was sandwiched between two broad, thick sheets of aponeurosis. Hence, SVT could make a significant contribution to the overall elastic properties of the thoracic limb. PMID:15610395

  11. The role of the extrinsic thoracic limb muscles in equine locomotion

    PubMed Central

    Payne, RC; Veenman, P; Wilson, AM

    2005-01-01

    Muscles have two major roles in locomotion: to generate force and to absorb/generate power (do work). Economical force generation is achieved by short-fibred pennate muscle while the maximum power output of a muscle is architecture independent. In this study we tested the hypothesis that there is an anatomical and structural separation between the force-generating anti-gravity muscles and the propulsive (limb/trunk moving) muscles of the equine forelimb. Muscle mass and fascicle length measurements were made on the thoracic limb extrinsic muscles of six fresh horse cadavers. Physiological cross-sectional area and maximum isometric force were then estimated. Maximum power was estimated from muscle volume and published contraction velocity data. The majority of extrinsic forelimb muscles were large with long fascicles arranged in parallel to the long axis of the muscle. Muscles arranged in this way are optimised for doing work. The architecture of serratus ventralis thoracis (SVT) was unique. It had short (48 ± 17 mm) fascicles, arranged at about 45° to the long axis of the muscle, which would suggest a force-generating, anti-gravity role. The muscle belly of SVT was sandwiched between two broad, thick sheets of aponeurosis. Hence, SVT could make a significant contribution to the overall elastic properties of the thoracic limb. PMID:15730484

  12. The role of the extrinsic thoracic limb muscles in equine locomotion.

    PubMed

    Payne, R C; Veenman, P; Wilson, A M

    2005-02-01

    Muscles have two major roles in locomotion: to generate force and to absorb/generate power (do work). Economical force generation is achieved by short-fibred pennate muscle while the maximum power output of a muscle is architecture independent. In this study we tested the hypothesis that there is an anatomical and structural separation between the force-generating anti-gravity muscles and the propulsive (limb/trunk moving) muscles of the equine forelimb. Muscle mass and fascicle length measurements were made on the thoracic limb extrinsic muscles of six fresh horse cadavers. Physiological cross-sectional area and maximum isometric force were then estimated. Maximum power was estimated from muscle volume and published contraction velocity data. The majority of extrinsic forelimb muscles were large with long fascicles arranged in parallel to the long axis of the muscle. Muscles arranged in this way are optimised for doing work. The architecture of serratus ventralis thoracis (SVT) was unique. It had short (48 +/- 17 mm) fascicles, arranged at about 45 degrees to the long axis of the muscle, which would suggest a force-generating, anti-gravity role. The muscle belly of SVT was sandwiched between two broad, thick sheets of aponeurosis. Hence, SVT could make a significant contribution to the overall elastic properties of the thoracic limb. PMID:15730484

  13. The role of the extrinsic thoracic limb muscles in equine locomotion.

    PubMed

    Payne, R C; Veenman, P; Wilson, A M

    2004-12-01

    Muscles have two major roles in locomotion: to generate force and to absorb/generate power (do work). Economical force generation is achieved by short-fibred pennate muscle while the maximum power output of a muscle is architecture independent. In this study we tested the hypothesis that there is an anatomical and structural separation between the force-generating anti-gravity muscles and the propulsive (limb/trunk moving) muscles of the equine forelimb. Muscle mass and fascicle length measurements were made on the thoracic limb extrinsic muscles of six fresh horse cadavers. Physiological cross-sectional area and maximum isometric force were then estimated. Maximum power was estimated from muscle volume and published contraction velocity data. The majority of extrinsic forelimb muscles were large with long fascicles arranged in parallel to the long axis of the muscle. Muscles arranged in this way are optimised for doing work. The architecture of serratus ventralis thoracis (SVT) was unique. It had short (48 +/- 17 mm) fascicles, arranged at about 45 degrees to the long axis of the muscle, which would suggest a force-generating, anti-gravity role. The muscle belly of SVT was sandwiched between two broad, thick sheets of aponeurosis. Hence, SVT could make a significant contribution to the overall elastic properties of the thoracic limb. PMID:15610395

  14. Mechanisms underlying the sparing of masticatory versus limb muscle function in an experimental critical illness model.

    PubMed

    Aare, Sudhakar; Ochala, Julien; Norman, Holly S; Radell, Peter; Eriksson, Lars I; Göransson, Hanna; Chen, Yi-Wen; Hoffman, Eric P; Larsson, Lars

    2011-12-16

    Acute quadriplegic myopathy (AQM) is a common debilitating acquired disorder in critically ill intensive care unit (ICU) patients that is characterized by tetraplegia/generalized weakness of limb and trunk muscles. Masticatory muscles, on the other hand, are typically spared or less affected, yet the mechanisms underlying this striking muscle-specific difference remain unknown. This study aims to evaluate physiological parameters and the gene expression profiles of masticatory and limb muscles exposed to factors suggested to trigger AQM, such as mechanical ventilation, immobilization, neuromuscular blocking agents, corticosteroids (CS), and sepsis for 5 days by using a unique porcine model mimicking the ICU conditions. Single muscle fiber cross-sectional area and force-generating capacity, i.e., maximum force normalized to fiber cross-sectional area (specific force), revealed maintained masseter single muscle fiber cross-sectional area and specific-force after 5 days' exposure to all triggering factors. This is in sharp contrast to observations in limb and trunk muscles, showing a dramatic decline in specific force in response to 5 days' exposure to the triggering factors. Significant differences in gene expression were observed between craniofacial and limb muscles, indicating a highly complex and muscle-specific response involving transcription and growth factors, heat shock proteins, matrix metalloproteinase inhibitor, oxidative stress responsive elements, and sarcomeric proteins underlying the relative sparing of cranial vs. spinal nerve innervated muscles during exposure to the ICU intervention. PMID:22010006

  15. Mox2 is a component of the genetic hierarchy controlling limb muscle development.

    PubMed

    Mankoo, B S; Collins, N S; Ashby, P; Grigorieva, E; Pevny, L H; Candia, A; Wright, C V; Rigby, P W; Pachnis, V

    1999-07-01

    The skeletal muscles of the limbs develop from myogenic progenitors that originate in the paraxial mesoderm and migrate into the limb-bud mesenchyme. Among the genes known to be important for muscle development in mammalian embryos are those encoding the basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) myogenic regulatory factors (MRFs; MyoD, Myf5, myogenin and MRF4) and Pax3, a paired-type homeobox gene that is critical for the development of limb musculature. Mox1 and Mox2 are closely related homeobox genes that are expressed in overlapping patterns in the paraxial mesoderm and its derivatives. Here we show that mice homozygous for a null mutation of Mox2 have a developmental defect of the limb musculature, characterized by an overall reduction in muscle mass and elimination of specific muscles. Mox2 is not needed for the migration of myogenic precursors into the limb bud, but it is essential for normal appendicular muscle formation and for the normal regulation of myogenic genes, as demonstrated by the downregulation of Pax3 and Myf5 but not MyoD in Mox2-deficient limb buds. Our findings show that the MOX2 homeoprotein is an important regulator of vertebrate limb myogenesis. PMID:10403250

  16. Upper limb swelling following mastectomy: lymphedema or not?

    PubMed

    Armer, Jane

    2007-04-01

    Having experienced an excisional biopsy, sentinel lymph node biopsy, and mastectomy, BH is at lifetime risk of developing post-breast cancer lymphedema in the arm on the side where her breast cancer was treated. She has two additional risk factors, among those documented in the literature: history of an infection (specifically a systemic infection, significant in that it required hospitalization for intravenous antibiotics) in the postsurgery period, and a moderate increase in bilateral limb volume and weight (body mass index) over the months and years following the breast cancer diagnosis. Further, the patient-reported transient hand swelling on the affected side and gradual weight increase are cues indicating a need for patient vigilance and careful monitoring by the health-care team. Preventing future infections, managing weight at an optimal level, and preventing trauma or injury to the affected arm and chest are important self-management precautions to reduce risk of chronic lymphedema development. BH needs continued support in reviewing evidence-based risk-reduction guidelines and understanding ways to apply them to her lifestyle. In the absence of preoperative baseline or contralateral limb measurements (with circumferences or perometry or water displacement), assessment of limb change at a level identified as diagnostic of lymphedema (commonly, 200-mL volume or 2-cm girth increase from baseline or as compared to the contralateral limb) is very challenging. Without bilateral preop limb measurements for baseline and contralateral limb comparisons, BH might have been diagnosed with lymphedema at postop or at 48 months, when both limbs increased symmetrically. Symptom assessment is also crucial, as symptom report of heaviness and swelling is found to be associated with limb volume changes indicative of lymphedema. Transient hand swelling may be evidence of latent lymphedema and cause for increased risk-reduction education and vigilance in assessment for emergence of nonresolving chronic lymphedema. million American women are breast cancer survivors. According to the American Cancer Society, every person treated for cancer with lymph node removal, surgery, or radiation has a lifetime risk for lymphedema, swelling caused by an increase in protein-rich interstitial fluid. Some will develop lymphedema soon after cancer treatment (within weeks or months) and others may not experience PMID:17508496

  17. Prediction of prognosis of ALS: Importance of active denervation findings of the cervical-upper limb area and trunk area

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Yoko; Nakatani, Eiji; Watanabe, Yasuhiro; Fukushima, Masanori; Nakashima, Kenji; Kannagi, Mari; Kanatani, Yasuhiro; Mizushima, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Summary Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a motor neuron disease characterized by serious muscle atrophy and weakness. The purpose of this study was to find prognostic factors in patients with mild ALS using application forms for the Specified Disease Treatment Research Program in Japan. We classified ALS as mild, moderate and severe. The subjects consisted of 363 patients with mild ALS who underwent needle electromyography at registration and were followed for more than one year. Time to progression to severe ALS and time to deterioration of activities of daily living such as speech dysfunction, upper limb dysfunction, and walking disability were used as outcomes. Cox proportional hazards model analysis was performed to identify prognostic factors. Of the patients with initially mild ALS, 38.3% (139/363) had progressed severe ALS at the last follow-up. In multivariate analysis of time to progression to severe ALS, bulbar onset (hazard ratio [95% confidence interval]: 1.68 [1.13–2.49], p = 0.010), tongue atrophy (1.69 [1.14–2.51], p = 0.009), dyspnea (1.57 [1.02–2.41], p = 0.042) and active denervation findings (ADFs) of the cervical-upper limb area (1.81 [1.25–2.63], p = 0.002) emerged as prognostic factors. Furthermore ADFs in the trunk area were prognostic factors for upper limb dysfunction and walking disability (1.72 [1.05–2.81], p = 0.031, and 1.97 [1.09–3.59], p = 0.026). In conclusion ADFs of the cervical-upper limb area and trunk area were prognostic factors in ALS patients. PMID:26668778

  18. Subsistence activities and the sexual division of labor in the European Upper Paleolithic and Mesolithic: evidence from upper limb enthesopathies.

    PubMed

    Villotte, Sébastien; Churchill, Steven E; Dutour, Olivier J; Henry-Gambier, Dominique

    2010-07-01

    Studies of cultural artifacts and faunal remains from European Upper Paleolithic and Mesolithic sites indicate a shift in hunter gatherer subsistence strategies, involving an intensification and diversification of resource exploitation relative to earlier foragers during the Tardiglacial and Postglacial periods. This trend has been recognized as well through the analysis of non-pathological skeletal adaptations of the upper limbs of European Upper Paleolithic human fossils. These paleoanthropological studies of adaptive bone modeling also raise the question of female use of throwing-based weapon technology in the Upper Paleolithic. Here, we studied another type of osteological marker of activity, enthesopathies, of the upper limb remains of 37 European Upper Paleolithic and Mesolithic human fossils, with the goal of testing two hypotheses: 1) that activity levels were heightened at the end of Upper Paleolithic and into the Mesolithic relative to earlier foragers of the Gravettian, and 2) that there was an absence of a marked sexual division of labor in European hunter-gatherers during this time span. Our results are consistent with the first hypothesis; upper limb enthesopathies are significantly less frequent in the Gravettian group, but raise doubts about the second hypothesis. Four males exhibit lesions that can be confidently associated with throwing activities, while no females exhibit such lesions. PMID:20602985

  19. Changes in growth-related kinases in head, neck and limb muscles with age

    PubMed Central

    Rahnert, Jill A.; Luo, Qingwei; Balog, Edward M.; Sokoloff, Alan J.; Burkholder, Thomas J.

    2010-01-01

    Sarcopenia coincides with declines in several systemic processes that signal through the MAP kinase and Akt-mTOR-p70S6k cascades typically associated with muscle growth. Effects of aging on these pathways have primarily been examined in limb muscles, which experience substantial activity and neural changes in addition to systemic hormonal and metabolic changes. Head and neck muscles are reported to undergo reduced sarcopenia and disuse with age relative to limb muscles, suggesting muscle activity may contribute to maintaining mass with age. However many head and neck muscles derive from embryonic branchial arches, rather than the somites from which limb muscles originate, suggesting that developmental origin may be important. This study compares the expression and phosphorylation of MAP kinase and mTOR networks in head, neck, tongue, and limb muscles from 8- and 26-month old F344 rats to test the hypothesis that physical activity and developmental origin contribute to preservation of muscle mass with age. Phosphorylation of p38 was exaggerated in aged branchial arch muscles. Phosphorylation of ERK and p70S6k T421/S424 declined with age only in the biceps brachii. Expression of p70S6k declined in all head and neck, tongue and limb muscles although no change in phosphorylation of p70S6k on T389 could be resolved. A systemic change that results in a loss of p70S6k protein expression may reduce the capacity to respond to acute hypertrophic stimuli, while the exaggerated p38 signaling in branchial arch muscles may reflect more active muscle remodeling. PMID:21095226

  20. Thermographic Patterns of the Upper and Lower Limbs: Baseline Data

    PubMed Central

    Cassar, Kevin; Camilleri, Kenneth P.; De Raffaele, Clifford; Mizzi, Stephen; Cristina, Stefania

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. To collect normative baseline data and identify any significant differences between hand and foot thermographic distribution patterns in a healthy adult population. Design. A single-centre, randomized, prospective study. Methods. Thermographic data was acquired using a FLIR camera for the data acquisition of both plantar and dorsal aspects of the feet, volar aspects of the hands, and anterior aspects of the lower limbs under controlled climate conditions. Results. There is general symmetry in skin temperature between the same regions in contralateral limbs, in terms of both magnitude and pattern. There was also minimal intersubject temperature variation with a consistent temperature pattern in toes and fingers. The thumb is the warmest digit with the temperature falling gradually between the 2nd and the 5th fingers. The big toe and the 5th toe are the warmest digits with the 2nd to the 4th toes being cooler. Conclusion. Measurement of skin temperature of the limbs using a thermal camera is feasible and reproducible. Temperature patterns in fingers and toes are consistent with similar temperatures in contralateral limbs in healthy subjects. This study provides the basis for further research to assess the clinical usefulness of thermography in the diagnosis of vascular insufficiency. PMID:25648145

  1. Thermographic patterns of the upper and lower limbs: baseline data.

    PubMed

    Gatt, Alfred; Formosa, Cynthia; Cassar, Kevin; Camilleri, Kenneth P; De Raffaele, Clifford; Mizzi, Anabelle; Azzopardi, Carl; Mizzi, Stephen; Falzon, Owen; Cristina, Stefania; Chockalingam, Nachiappan

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. To collect normative baseline data and identify any significant differences between hand and foot thermographic distribution patterns in a healthy adult population. Design. A single-centre, randomized, prospective study. Methods. Thermographic data was acquired using a FLIR camera for the data acquisition of both plantar and dorsal aspects of the feet, volar aspects of the hands, and anterior aspects of the lower limbs under controlled climate conditions. Results. There is general symmetry in skin temperature between the same regions in contralateral limbs, in terms of both magnitude and pattern. There was also minimal intersubject temperature variation with a consistent temperature pattern in toes and fingers. The thumb is the warmest digit with the temperature falling gradually between the 2nd and the 5th fingers. The big toe and the 5th toe are the warmest digits with the 2nd to the 4th toes being cooler. Conclusion. Measurement of skin temperature of the limbs using a thermal camera is feasible and reproducible. Temperature patterns in fingers and toes are consistent with similar temperatures in contralateral limbs in healthy subjects. This study provides the basis for further research to assess the clinical usefulness of thermography in the diagnosis of vascular insufficiency. PMID:25648145

  2. Principles of Tendon Reconstruction Following Complex Trauma of the Upper Limb

    PubMed Central

    Chattopadhyay, Arhana; McGoldrick, Rory; Umansky, Elise; Chang, James

    2015-01-01

    Reconstruction of tendons following complex trauma to the upper limb presents unique clinical and research challenges. In this article, the authors review the principles guiding preoperative assessment, surgical reconstruction, and postoperative rehabilitation and management of the upper extremity. Tissue engineering approaches to address tissue shortages for tendon reconstruction are also discussed. PMID:25685101

  3. Redox balance and carbonylated proteins in limb and heart muscles of cachectic rats.

    PubMed

    Marin-Corral, Judith; Fontes, Cibely C; Pascual-Guardia, Sergi; Sanchez, Francisco; Olivan, Mireia; Argilés, Josep M; Busquets, Sílvia; López-Soriano, Francisco J; Barreiro, Esther

    2010-03-01

    In fast- and slow-twitch limb and heart muscles of cachectic rats, redox balance and muscle structure were explored. The nature of the oxidatively modified proteins also was identified in these muscles. Reactive carbonyls, hydroxynonenal (HNE)- and malondialdehyde (MDA)-protein adducts, and antioxidant enzyme levels were determined in limb and heart muscles of cachectic (7 days after inoculation of Yoshida AH-130 ascites hepatoma) and control rats. Moreover, carbonylated proteins were identified (proteomics), and fiber-type composition evaluated (morphometry) in these muscles. In cachectic rats, compared with the controls: (a) HNE- and MDA-protein adducts levels were greater in gastrocnemius, tibialis anterior, soleus, and heart; (b) in the gastrocnemius, type II fiber size was reduced, and the intensity of carbonylated protein immunostaining was significantly greater in these fibers; and (c) proteins involved in glycolysis, ATP production and distribution, carbon dioxide hydration, muscle contraction, and mitochondrial metabolism were significantly more carbonylated in limb and heart muscles. Cancer cachexia alters redox balance in fast- and slow-twitch limb and heart muscles of rats, inducing increased oxidative modifications of key proteins involved in muscle structure and function. Additionally, it induces a reduction in type II fiber size in the gastrocnemius, which is associated with increased protein oxidation. PMID:19737087

  4. Upper Limb Portable Motion Analysis System Based on Inertial Technology for Neurorehabilitation Purposes

    PubMed Central

    Pérez, Rodrigo; Costa, Úrsula; Torrent, Marc; Solana, Javier; Opisso, Eloy; Cáceres, César; Tormos, Josep M.; Medina, Josep; Gómez, Enrique J.

    2010-01-01

    Here an inertial sensor-based monitoring system for measuring and analyzing upper limb movements is presented. The final goal is the integration of this motion-tracking device within a portable rehabilitation system for brain injury patients. A set of four inertial sensors mounted on a special garment worn by the patient provides the quaternions representing the patient upper limb’s orientation in space. A kinematic model is built to estimate 3D upper limb motion for accurate therapeutic evaluation. The human upper limb is represented as a kinematic chain of rigid bodies with three joints and six degrees of freedom. Validation of the system has been performed by co-registration of movements with a commercial optoelectronic tracking system. Successful results are shown that exhibit a high correlation among signals provided by both devices and obtained at the Institut Guttmann Neurorehabilitation Hospital. PMID:22163496

  5. Connective tissue cells, but not muscle cells, are involved in establishing the proximo-distal outcome of limb regeneration in the axolotl.

    PubMed

    Nacu, Eugen; Glausch, Mareen; Le, Huy Quang; Damanik, Febriyani Fiain Rochel; Schuez, Maritta; Knapp, Dunja; Khattak, Shahryar; Richter, Tobias; Tanaka, Elly M

    2013-02-01

    During salamander limb regeneration, only the structures distal to the amputation plane are regenerated, a property known as the rule of distal transformation. Multiple cell types are involved in limb regeneration; therefore, determining which cell types participate in distal transformation is important for understanding how the proximo-distal outcome of regeneration is achieved. We show that connective tissue-derived blastema cells obey the rule of distal transformation. They also have nuclear MEIS, which can act as an upper arm identity regulator, only upon upper arm amputation. By contrast, myogenic cells do not obey the rule of distal transformation and display nuclear MEIS upon amputation at any proximo-distal level. These results indicate that connective tissue cells, but not myogenic cells, are involved in establishing the proximo-distal outcome of regeneration and are likely to guide muscle patterning. Moreover, we show that, similarly to limb development, muscle patterning in regeneration is influenced by β-catenin signalling. PMID:23293283

  6. A developmentally regulated switch from stem cells to dedifferentiation for limb muscle regeneration in newts

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Hibiki Vincent; Ng, Nathaniel Chuen Yin; Yang Yu, Zhan; Casco-Robles, Martin Miguel; Maruo, Fumiaki; Tsonis, Panagiotis A.; Chiba, Chikafumi

    2016-01-01

    The newt, a urodele amphibian, is able to repeatedly regenerate its limbs throughout its lifespan, whereas other amphibians deteriorate or lose their ability to regenerate limbs after metamorphosis. It remains to be determined whether such an exceptional ability of the newt is either attributed to a strategy, which controls regeneration in larvae, or on a novel one invented by the newt after metamorphosis. Here we report that the newt switches the cellular mechanism for limb regeneration from a stem/progenitor-based mechanism (larval mode) to a dedifferentiation-based one (adult mode) as it transits beyond metamorphosis. We demonstrate that larval newts use stem/progenitor cells such as satellite cells for new muscle in a regenerated limb, whereas metamorphosed newts recruit muscle fibre cells in the stump for the same purpose. We conclude that the newt has evolved novel strategies to secure its regenerative ability of the limbs after metamorphosis. PMID:27026263

  7. A developmentally regulated switch from stem cells to dedifferentiation for limb muscle regeneration in newts.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Hibiki Vincent; Ng, Nathaniel Chuen Yin; Yang Yu, Zhan; Casco-Robles, Martin Miguel; Maruo, Fumiaki; Tsonis, Panagiotis A; Chiba, Chikafumi

    2016-01-01

    The newt, a urodele amphibian, is able to repeatedly regenerate its limbs throughout its lifespan, whereas other amphibians deteriorate or lose their ability to regenerate limbs after metamorphosis. It remains to be determined whether such an exceptional ability of the newt is either attributed to a strategy, which controls regeneration in larvae, or on a novel one invented by the newt after metamorphosis. Here we report that the newt switches the cellular mechanism for limb regeneration from a stem/progenitor-based mechanism (larval mode) to a dedifferentiation-based one (adult mode) as it transits beyond metamorphosis. We demonstrate that larval newts use stem/progenitor cells such as satellite cells for new muscle in a regenerated limb, whereas metamorphosed newts recruit muscle fibre cells in the stump for the same purpose. We conclude that the newt has evolved novel strategies to secure its regenerative ability of the limbs after metamorphosis. PMID:27026263

  8. Upper Limb Posture Estimation in Robotic and Virtual Reality-Based Rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Cortés, Camilo; Ardanza, Aitor; Molina-Rueda, F.; Cuesta-Gómez, A.; Ruiz, Oscar E.

    2014-01-01

    New motor rehabilitation therapies include virtual reality (VR) and robotic technologies. In limb rehabilitation, limb posture is required to (1) provide a limb realistic representation in VR games and (2) assess the patient improvement. When exoskeleton devices are used in the therapy, the measurements of their joint angles cannot be directly used to represent the posture of the patient limb, since the human and exoskeleton kinematic models differ. In response to this shortcoming, we propose a method to estimate the posture of the human limb attached to the exoskeleton. We use the exoskeleton joint angles measurements and the constraints of the exoskeleton on the limb to estimate the human limb joints angles. This paper presents (a) the mathematical formulation and solution to the problem, (b) the implementation of the proposed solution on a commercial exoskeleton system for the upper limb rehabilitation, (c) its integration into a rehabilitation VR game platform, and (d) the quantitative assessment of the method during elbow and wrist analytic training. Results show that this method properly estimates the limb posture to (i) animate avatars that represent the patient in VR games and (ii) obtain kinematic data for the patient assessment during elbow and wrist analytic rehabilitation. PMID:25110698

  9. Upper limb posture estimation in robotic and virtual reality-based rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Cortés, Camilo; Ardanza, Aitor; Molina-Rueda, F; Cuesta-Gómez, A; Unzueta, Luis; Epelde, Gorka; Ruiz, Oscar E; De Mauro, Alessandro; Florez, Julian

    2014-01-01

    New motor rehabilitation therapies include virtual reality (VR) and robotic technologies. In limb rehabilitation, limb posture is required to (1) provide a limb realistic representation in VR games and (2) assess the patient improvement. When exoskeleton devices are used in the therapy, the measurements of their joint angles cannot be directly used to represent the posture of the patient limb, since the human and exoskeleton kinematic models differ. In response to this shortcoming, we propose a method to estimate the posture of the human limb attached to the exoskeleton. We use the exoskeleton joint angles measurements and the constraints of the exoskeleton on the limb to estimate the human limb joints angles. This paper presents (a) the mathematical formulation and solution to the problem, (b) the implementation of the proposed solution on a commercial exoskeleton system for the upper limb rehabilitation, (c) its integration into a rehabilitation VR game platform, and (d) the quantitative assessment of the method during elbow and wrist analytic training. Results show that this method properly estimates the limb posture to (i) animate avatars that represent the patient in VR games and (ii) obtain kinematic data for the patient assessment during elbow and wrist analytic rehabilitation. PMID:25110698

  10. Towards Electrocorticographic Control of a Dexterous Upper Limb Prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Fifer, Matthew S.; Acharya, Soumyadipta; Benz, Heather L.; Mollazadeh, Mohsen; Crone, Nathan E.; Thakor, Nitish V.

    2012-01-01

    One of the most exciting and compelling areas of research and development is building brain-machine interfaces (BMIs) for controlling prosthetic limbs. Prosthetic limb technology is advancing rapidly, and the Johns Hopkins University/Applied Physics Lab (JHU/APL) Modular Prosthetic Limb (MPL) permits actuation with 17 degrees of freedom in 26 articulating joints. There are many signals from the brain that can be leveraged, including the spiking rates of neurons in the cortex, electrocorticographic (ECoG) signals from the surface of the cortex, and electroencephalographic (EEG) signals from the scalp. Unlike microelectrodes which record spikes, ECoG does not penetrate the cortex and also has higher spatial specificity, signal-to-noise ratio, and bandwidth than EEG signals. We have implemented an ECoG-based system for controlling the MPL in the Johns Hopkins Hospital Epilepsy Monitoring Unit, where patients are implanted with ECoG electrode grids for clinical seizure mapping and asked to perform various recorded finger or grasp movements. We have shown that low frequency local motor potentials and ECoG power in the high gamma frequency (70–150 Hz) range correlates well with grasping parameters and they stand out as good candidate features for closed-loop control of the MPL. PMID:22344950

  11. A Systematic Review of Bilateral Upper Limb Training Devices for Poststroke Rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    van Delden, A. (Lex) E. Q.; Peper, C. (Lieke) E.; Kwakkel, Gert; Beek, Peter J.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. In stroke rehabilitation, bilateral upper limb training is gaining ground. As a result, a growing number of mechanical and robotic bilateral upper limb training devices have been proposed. Objective. To provide an overview and qualitative evaluation of the clinical applicability of bilateral upper limb training devices. Methods. Potentially relevant literature was searched in the PubMed, Web of Science, and Google Scholar databases from 1990 onwards. Devices were categorized as mechanical or robotic (according to the PubMed MeSH term of robotics). Results. In total, 6 mechanical and 14 robotic bilateral upper limb training devices were evaluated in terms of mechanical and electromechanical characteristics, supported movement patterns, targeted part and active involvement of the upper limb, training protocols, outcomes of clinical trials, and commercial availability. Conclusion. Initial clinical results are not yet of such caliber that the devices in question and the concepts on which they are based are firmly established. However, the clinical outcomes do not rule out the possibility that the concept of bilateral training and the accompanied devices may provide a useful extension of currently available forms of therapy. To actually demonstrate their (surplus) value, more research with adequate experimental, dose-matched designs, and sufficient statistical power are required. PMID:23251833

  12. Estimation of stature from the upper limb measurements of Sudanese adults.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Altayeb Abdalla

    2013-05-10

    The estimation of stature using different parts of the body is crucial for formulating a biological profile during the process of personal identification, especially when mutilated and amputated limbs or body parts are found. Hand anthropometry has been reported in the literature including limited range of populations to be promising for stature prediction, but few studies have attempted to link upper limb anthropometry to stature. No previous research on this topic has been reported for modern Sudanese adults. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess the relationship between the upper limb dimensions and stature in Sudanese adults and to develop regression formulae to estimate stature from these dimensions. The stature, upper arm length, ulnar length, wrist breadth, hand length, and hand breadth of 200 right-handed subjects, comprising 100 males and 100 females (aged 25-30 years), were measured. Initially, the data were analyzed using basic univariate analysis and independent t-tests; then sex-specific simple and multiple linear regression models were used to estimate stature. The results indicated significant sexual dimorphism for all measurements. There was a positive correlation between upper limb measurements and stature (p<0.01), which was highest for ulnar length. The accuracy of stature prediction ranged from ±3.54 to 5.85 cm. The use of multiple regression equations gave better results than simple regression equations. This study provides new forensic standards for stature estimation from the upper limb measurements of Sudanese adults. PMID:23528834

  13. A method for measuring vertical forces applied to the upper limb during sit-to-stand.

    PubMed

    Turner, H C; Yate, R M; Giddins, G E B; Miles, A W

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a basic measurement system to estimate the vertical loading of the upper limb during the sit-to-stand activity, with a view to increasing the understanding of the loading of the wrist in daily living activities. A chair was adapted and instrumented with strain gauges and position sensors so that the force applied through the upper limbs to the arms of the chair could be calculated. Four aspects of the chair's geometry could be varied. A force plate was positioned on the floor between the legs of the chair to record the corresponding foot loading. Twenty normal subjects (22-56 years, mean 32.7 years) participated in a pilot study in which loading through the upper and lower limbs was recorded for a range of chair geometries. The vertical force transmitted through each upper limb was typically 20-30 per cent of bodyweight. The vertical upper limb load averaged across all subjects showed a small reduction when either the seat height or the height of the chair arms was increased. PMID:15648670

  14. Clinical evaluation of upper limb function: Patient’s impairment, disability and health-related quality of life

    PubMed Central

    Roh, Young Hak

    2013-01-01

    Musculoskeletal disorders substantially impacts physical activity, mental state, and quality of life (QOL). Generally, comprehensive assessment of upper limb function requires measures of impairment or disability as well as health-related quality of life. A growing number of outcome instrument have been introduced to evaluate upper limb function and disability, and these measures can be categorized as patient- or clinician-based, and as condition specific or general health-related QOL evaluations. The upper limb outcome instruments reviewed in this article assess different aspect of upper limb conditions, and the measures are affected by differences in cultural, psychological, and gender aspect of illness perception and behavior. Therefore, physician should select/interpret the outcome instruments addressing their primary purpose of research. Information about regional instruments for upper limb condition and health-related QOL in upper limb disorder may help us in decision-making for treatment priority or in interpretation of the treatment outcomes. PMID:24278892

  15. Limb congestion enhances the synchronization of sympathetic outflow with muscle contraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mostoufi-Moab, S.; Herr, M. D.; Silber, D. H.; Gray, K. S.; Leuenberger, U. A.; Sinoway, L. I.

    2000-01-01

    In this report, we examined if the synchronization of muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) with muscle contraction is enhanced by limb congestion. To explore this relationship, we applied signal-averaging techniques to the MSNA signal obtained during short bouts of forearm contraction (2-s contraction/3-s rest cycle) at 40% maximal voluntary contraction for 5 min. We performed this analysis before and after forearm venous congestion; an intervention that augments the autonomic response to sustained static muscle contractions via a local effect on muscle afferents. There was an increased percentage of the MSNA noted during second 2 of the 5-s contraction/rest cycles. The percentage of total MSNA seen during this particular second increased from minute 1 to 5 of contraction and was increased further by limb congestion (control minute 1 = 25.6 +/- 2.0%, minute 5 = 32.8 +/- 2.2%; limb congestion minute 1 = 29.3 +/- 2.1%, minute 5 = 37.8 +/- 3.9%; exercise main effect <0.005; limb congestion main effect P = 0.054). These changes in the distribution of signal-averaged MSNA were seen despite the fact that the mean number of sympathetic discharges did not increase over baseline. We conclude that synchronization of contraction and MSNA is seen during short repetitive bouts of handgrip. The sensitizing effect of contraction time and limb congestion are apparently due to feedback from muscle afferents within the exercising muscle.

  16. Restoration of upper limb movement via artificial corticospinal and musculospinal connections in a monkey with spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Nishimura, Yukio; Perlmutter, Steve I.; Fetz, Eberhard E.

    2013-01-01

    Functional loss of limb control in individuals with spinal cord injury or stroke can be caused by interruption of corticospinal pathways, although the neural circuits located above and below the lesion remain functional. An artificial neural connection that bridges the lost pathway and connects cortical to spinal circuits has potential to ameliorate the functional loss. We investigated the effects of introducing novel artificial neural connections in a paretic monkey that had a unilateral spinal cord lesion at the C2 level. The first application bridged the impaired spinal lesion. This allowed the monkey to drive the spinal stimulation through volitionally controlled power of high-gamma activity in either the premotor or motor cortex, and thereby to acquire a force-matching target. The second application created an artificial recurrent connection from a paretic agonist muscle to a spinal site, allowing muscle-controlled spinal stimulation to boost on-going activity in the muscle. These results suggest that artificial neural connections can compensate for interrupted descending pathways and promote volitional control of upper limb movement after damage of descending pathways such as spinal cord injury or stroke. PMID:23596396

  17. Functional electrical stimulation for upper limb strengthening in traumatic quadriplegia.

    PubMed

    Seeger, B R; Law, D; Creswell, J E; Stern, L M; Potter, G

    1989-09-01

    The hypothesis of this study was that the functional electrical stimulation (FES)-assisted exercise of partially paralyzed arm muscles would result in significantly greater muscle strength in the arms of spinal cord injured quadriplegics than equal periods of conventional isotonic exercise. Single muscles were studied in seven subjects in a crossover design consisting of equal periods of FES-assisted exercise and conventional exercise. It was concluded that for these subjects using this exercise regime, neither FES-assisted exercise nor conventional exercise produced improvements in maximum voluntary force that were either statistically or functionally significant. The results, although disappointing, have helped these subjects to be more realistic about the potential therapeutic benefits of FES. PMID:2789028

  18. Management of the upper-limb-deficient child with a powered prosthetic device.

    PubMed

    Glynn, M K; Galway, H R; Hunter, G; Sauter, W F

    1986-08-01

    A long-term survey of a large number of children fitted with an electrically powered upper-limb prosthesis seems not to have been reported in the literature. Children with upper-limb deficiencies (congenital or traumatic) were fitted with an electrically powered upper-limb prosthesis in Ontario during the 18-year period of 1965-1983. Seventy-eight patients responded to a questionnaire or were interviewed by telephone. The dropout rate in children with a below-elbow amputation was similar to that reported in below-elbow child amputees wearing a conventional body-powered prosthesis (10% vs. 13%). The acceptance rate in children with above-elbow amputations was higher in those wearing an electrically powered prosthesis than in those using the conventional prosthesis, testifying for improved prosthetic function in the former group. PMID:3731596

  19. Effective Management of Upper Limb Parkinsonian Tremor by IncobotulinumtoxinA Injections Using Sensor-based Biomechanical Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Rahimi, Fariborz; Samotus, Olivia; Lee, Jack; Jog, Mandar

    2015-01-01

    Background Focal treatment of Parkinson’s disease tremor by botulinum toxin type A incobotulinumtoxinA (BoNT-A) injections has been inadequately investigated and at best provides modest relief with significant muscle weakness. Complexity of multi-joint tremulous movements results in non-individualized dosing regimens. This 38-week open-label study used kinematic technology to guide muscle selection and improve efficacy of incobotulinumtoxinA (BoNT-A) injections for Parkinson’s disease tremor. Methods Participants (n=28) attended study visits at weeks 0, 6, 16, 22, 32, and 38, and were injected with BoNT-A at weeks 0, 16, and 32. During each visit, clinical tremor scales, the Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) and the Fahn–Tolosa–Marin (FTM), and kinematic assessments were conducted. Participants performed rest and postural scripted tasks with motion sensors placed over the wrist, elbow, and shoulder joints where tremor was quantified by angular root mean square (RMS) amplitude in multiple degrees of freedom at each joint. Injection parameters were determined using the clinician’s interpretation of which muscles would contribute to the upper limb tremor biomechanics analyzed kinematically. Results Kinematic measures of tremor amplitude allowed detailed segmentation of tremor into directional components at each arm joint permitting a statistically significant decrease in mean UPDRS item 20 (rest tremor) at week 16 (p=0.006) and at week 32 (p=0.014), and in FTM tremor severity scores at week 6 (p=0.024). Ten participants perceived mild muscle weakness following the third treatment, which did not interfere with performing activities of daily living. Discussion Kinematics is a simple method for standardizing assessments and treatment of upper limb Parkinson’s disease tremor, thereby personalizing tremor therapy and optimizing the effect of BoNT-A injections for Parkinson’s disease tremor. PMID:26566459

  20. Acute upper limb ischemia, a rare presentation of giant cell arteritis.

    PubMed

    Almeida-Morais, Luís; Galego, Sofia; Marques, Nélia; Pack, Tiago; Rodrigues, Hugo; Abreu, Rodolfo; Vasconcelos, Leonor; Marques, Hugo; Sousa Guerreiro, António

    2016-04-01

    Giant cell arteritis (GCA) is a systemic large vessel vasculitis, with extracranial arterial involvement described in 10-15% of cases, usually affecting the aorta and its branches. Patients with GCA are more likely to develop aortic aneurysms, but these are rarely present at the time of the diagnosis. We report the case of an 80-year-old Caucasian woman, who reported proximal muscle pain in the arms with morning stiffness of the shoulders for eight months. In the previous two months, she had developed worsening bilateral arm claudication, severe pain, cold extremities and digital necrosis. She had no palpable radial pulses and no measurable blood pressure. The patient had normochromic anemia, erythrocyte sedimentation rate of 120 mm/h, and a negative infectious and autoimmune workup. Computed tomography angiography revealed concentric wall thickening of the aorta extending to the aortic arch branches, particularly the subclavian and axillary arteries, which were severely stenotic, with areas of bilateral occlusion and an aneurysm of the ascending aorta (47 mm). Despite corticosteroid therapy there was progression to acute critical ischemia. She accordingly underwent surgical revascularization using a bilateral carotid-humeral bypass. After surgery, corticosteroid therapy was maintained and at six-month follow-up she was clinically stable with reduced inflammatory markers. GCA, usually a chronic benign vasculitis, presented exceptionally in this case as acute critical upper limb ischemia, resulting from a massive inflammatory process of the subclavian and axillary arteries, treated with salvage surgical revascularization. PMID:27006059

  1. Development of a sheep hind-limb muscle preparation for metabolic studies.

    PubMed

    Teleni, E; Annison, E F

    1986-01-01

    A sheep hind-limb preparation used for the study of muscle metabolism by arteriovenous (AV) difference procedures was validated by identifying the muscles which contribute to venous drainage at different positions along the lateral saphenous vein. Dissection of the hind limbs of six mature sheep (three wethers and three ewes) showed that venous blood from the plantar group (M. gastrocnemius, M. soleus, M. plantaris, M. flexo digitorum profundus), and from M. semitendinosus, M. biceps femoris, M. gracilis, M. pectineus and M. adductor muscles entered the lateral saphenous vein but the position of the tip of the blood sampling catheter was found to be critical. In order to sample venous blood from all of the muscles listed above, and to minimize the contribution of blood from non-muscular tissues, blood samples must be taken 25-26 cm from the junction of the cranial and caudal branches of the lateral saphenous vein (for average size sheep of body length about 108 cm and height at withers about 73 cm). The estimation of sheep hind-limb muscle mass is a necessary concomitant of AV difference studies, and a combined tritiated water and dye-dilution procedure has been used to measure both muscle mass and blood flow. The muscle mass estimated in vivo by this technique was closely similar to the true muscle mass obtained by dissection, the range of values of the difference between true and calculated muscle mass expressed as percentage of the true mass being 0.5-16%. It is concluded that these techniques are sufficiently accurate for use in the quantitation of exchange of metabolites across the hind-limb muscle preparation. Patterns of amino acid uptake and release by muscle need to be related to the amino acid profile of the tissue, and the amino acid content of a representative muscle, M. biceps femoris, was determined, and the results compared with published data. PMID:3548680

  2. Application of the rubber hand illusion paradigm: comparison between upper and lower limbs.

    PubMed

    Flögel, Mareike; Kalveram, Karl Theodor; Christ, Oliver; Vogt, Joachim

    2016-03-01

    The "rubber hand illusion (RHI)" is a perceptual illusion, which allows the integration of artificial limbs into the body representation of a person by means of combined visual and tactile stimulation. The illusion has been frequently replicated but always concerning the upper limbs. The present study verified an analog illusion that can be called the "rubber foot illusion" (RFI). In a conjoint experiment using both a rubber hand and a rubber foot, brushstrokes were applied to the respective real and rubber limb placed alongside the real one. However, only the artificial limb's handling was visible. The brushstrokes were given either synchronously, with a delay of ±0.5 s, or without tactile stimulation of the real limb. Questionnaire data and the proprioceptive drift towards the rubber limb (determined by calling on the subjects to show where they locate their unseen limb) defined the illusion strength. Results revealed that the illusion was induced in both limbs with comparable strength, but only in the synchronous condition. PMID:25656162

  3. Technology that Touches Lives: Teleconsultation to Benefit Persons with Upper Limb Loss

    PubMed Central

    Whelan, Lynsay R.; Wagner, Nathan

    2011-01-01

    While over 1.5 million individuals are living with limb loss in the United States (Ziegler-Graham et al., 2008), only 10% of these individuals have a loss that affects an upper limb. Coincident with the relatively low incidence of upper limb loss, is a shortage of the community-based prosthetic rehabilitation experts that can help prosthetic users to more fully integrate their devices into their daily routines. This article describes how expert prosthetists and occupational therapists at Touch Bionics, a manufacturer of advanced upper limb prosthetic devices, employ Voice over the Internet Protocol (VoIP) videoconferencing software telehealth technologies to engage in remote consultation with users of prosthetic devices and/or their local practitioners. The Touch Bionics staff provide follow-up expertise to local prosthetists, occupational therapists, and other health professionals. Contrasted with prior telephone-based consultations, the video-enabled approach provides enhanced capabilities to benefit persons with upper limb loss. Currently, the opportunities for Touch Bionics occupational therapists to fully engage in patient-based services delivered through telehealth technologies are significantly reduced by their need to obtain and maintain professional licenses in multiple states. PMID:25945186

  4. Technology that Touches Lives: Teleconsultation to Benefit Persons with Upper Limb Loss.

    PubMed

    Whelan, Lynsay R; Wagner, Nathan

    2011-01-01

    While over 1.5 million individuals are living with limb loss in the United States (Ziegler-Graham et al., 2008), only 10% of these individuals have a loss that affects an upper limb. Coincident with the relatively low incidence of upper limb loss, is a shortage of the community-based prosthetic rehabilitation experts that can help prosthetic users to more fully integrate their devices into their daily routines. This article describes how expert prosthetists and occupational therapists at Touch Bionics, a manufacturer of advanced upper limb prosthetic devices, employ Voice over the Internet Protocol (VoIP) videoconferencing software telehealth technologies to engage in remote consultation with users of prosthetic devices and/or their local practitioners. The Touch Bionics staff provide follow-up expertise to local prosthetists, occupational therapists, and other health professionals. Contrasted with prior telephone-based consultations, the video-enabled approach provides enhanced capabilities to benefit persons with upper limb loss. Currently, the opportunities for Touch Bionics occupational therapists to fully engage in patient-based services delivered through telehealth technologies are significantly reduced by their need to obtain and maintain professional licenses in multiple states. PMID:25945186

  5. Primed Physical Therapy Enhances Recovery of Upper Limb Function in Chronic Stroke Patients.

    PubMed

    Ackerley, Suzanne J; Byblow, Winston D; Barber, P Alan; MacDonald, Hayley; McIntyre-Robinson, Andrew; Stinear, Cathy M

    2016-05-01

    Background Recovery of upper limb function is important for regaining independence after stroke.Objective To test the effects of priming upper limb physical therapy with intermittent theta burst stimulation (iTBS), a form of noninvasive brain stimulation.Methods Eighteen adults with first-ever chronic monohemispheric subcortical stroke participated in this randomized, controlled, triple-blinded trial. Intervention consisted of priming with real or sham iTBS to the ipsilesional primary motor cortex immediately before 45 minutes of upper limb physical therapy, daily for 10 days. Changes in upper limb function (Action Research Arm Test [ARAT]), upper limb impairment (Fugl-Meyer Scale), and corticomotor excitability, were assessed before, during, and immediately, 1 month and 3 months after the intervention. Functional magnetic resonance images were acquired before and at one month after the intervention.Results Improvements in ARAT were observed after the intervention period when therapy was primed with real iTBS, but not sham, and were maintained at 1 month. These improvements were not apparent halfway through the intervention, indicating a dose effect. Improvements in ARAT at 1 month were related to balancing of corticomotor excitability and an increase in ipsilesional premotor cortex activation during paretic hand grip.Conclusions Two weeks of iTBS-primed therapy improves upper limb function at the chronic stage of stroke, for at least 1 month postintervention, whereas therapy alone may not be sufficient to alter function. This indicates a potential role for iTBS as an adjuvant to therapy delivered at the chronic stage. PMID:26180053

  6. Salamander limb regeneration involves the activation of a multipotent skeletal muscle satellite cell population

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, Jamie I.; Lööf, Sara; He, Pingping; Simon, András

    2006-01-01

    In contrast to mammals, salamanders can regenerate complex structures after injury, including entire limbs. A central question is whether the generation of progenitor cells during limb regeneration and mammalian tissue repair occur via separate or overlapping mechanisms. Limb regeneration depends on the formation of a blastema, from which the new appendage develops. Dedifferentiation of stump tissues, such as skeletal muscle, precedes blastema formation, but it was not known whether dedifferentiation involves stem cell activation. We describe a multipotent Pax7+ satellite cell population located within the skeletal muscle of the salamander limb. We demonstrate that skeletal muscle dedifferentiation involves satellite cell activation and that these cells can contribute to new limb tissues. Activation of salamander satellite cells occurs in an analogous manner to how the mammalian myofiber mobilizes stem cells during skeletal muscle tissue repair. Thus, limb regeneration and mammalian tissue repair share common cellular and molecular programs. Our findings also identify satellite cells as potential targets in promoting mammalian blastema formation. PMID:16449193

  7. Assessment of neuromuscular activation of the upper limbs in children with spastic hemiparetic cerebral palsy during a dynamical task.

    PubMed

    Feltham, Max G; Ledebt, Annick; Deconinck, Frederik J A; Savelsbergh, Geert J P

    2010-06-01

    This study compared the intensity, co-activity and frequency content of the electromyography (EMG) signals recorded bilaterally from six muscles of the upper limbs in children with spastic hemiparetic cerebral palsy (SHCP) and typically developing (TD) children during a bilateral movement. It was found that children with SHCP executed the bimanual circular movement with higher intensities of mean neuromuscular activity in both arms compared to TD children. Furthermore, the movement was performed with longer phases of concentric and eccentric activity in children with SHCP, indicating more co-activation, especially in the more impaired arm. The EMG signals yielded a higher mean power frequency in all the muscles of the more impaired arm and the wrist and elbow flexors of the less impaired arm, which was interpreted as a relatively higher contribution of type II muscle fibres compared to TD children. These observations suggest that in children with SHCP bimanual coordination requires higher neuromuscular activation in the muscles of both arms. Furthermore, SHCP also seems to involve structural changes to the muscle properties, which differ between arms. PMID:19666231

  8. Lymphoedema of the upper limb: a rare complication of thyroid surgery?

    PubMed

    Stephen, Christopher; Munnoch, David Alexander

    2016-01-01

    A 40-year-old woman underwent an elective thyroidectomy for a non-toxic, multinodular goitre. In the early postoperative period, the patient developed a significant unilateral swelling of the right upper limb, which was subsequently confirmed to be lymphoedema. This was eventually treated successfully using liposuction and compression garment therapies. We report the case due to its rarity and present a possible explanation for such an unexpected complication based on known anatomical variations of lymphatic drainage of the upper limb. PMID:27090542

  9. Exoskeleton robots for upper-limb rehabilitation: state of the art and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Lo, Ho Shing; Xie, Sheng Quan

    2012-04-01

    Current health services are struggling to provide optimal rehabilitation therapy to victims of stroke. This has motivated researchers to explore the use of robotic devices to provide rehabilitation therapy for strokepatients. This paper reviews the recent progress of upper limb exoskeleton robots for rehabilitation treatment of patients with neuromuscular disorders. Firstly, a brief introduction to rehabilitation robots will be given along with examples of existing commercial devices. The advancements in upper limb exoskeleton technology and the fundamental challenges in developing these devices are described. Potential areas for future research are discussed. PMID:22051085

  10. Upper limb musculoskeletal complaints among technicians working in a diagnostic tuberculosis laboratory: two case reports.

    PubMed

    Wong, Joyce Y P; Chin, David; Fung, Henry; Li, Ann; Wong, Marcus M S; Kwok, Henry K H

    2014-01-01

    Upper limb musculoskeletal complaints are common among certain health professionals. We report two cases, both involving technicians working in a diagnostic tuberculosis laboratory in Hong Kong. A work process evaluation suggest that the need to repeatedly open and close small bottles, as well as to work for prolonged periods of time in confined areas, could be related to the workers' clinical presentation. The cases are also compatible with the diagnosis of repetitive strain injury (RSI) of the upper limb, but this term is not commonly used nowadays because of various definitional issues. A review of the various diagnostic issues in RSI is presented. PMID:24346264

  11. Passive resting state and history of antagonist muscle activity shape active extensions in an insect limb.

    PubMed

    Ache, Jan M; Matheson, Thomas

    2012-05-01

    Limb movements can be driven by muscle contractions, external forces, or intrinsic passive forces. For lightweight limbs like those of insects or small vertebrates, passive forces can be large enough to overcome the effects of gravity and may even generate limb movements in the absence of active muscle contractions. Understanding the sources and actions of such forces is therefore important in understanding motor control. We describe passive properties of the femur-tibia joint of the locust hind leg. The resting angle is determined primarily by passive properties of the relatively large extensor tibiae muscle and is influenced by the history of activation of the fast extensor tibiae motor neuron. The resting angle is therefore better described as a history-dependent resting state. We selectively stimulated different flexor tibiae motor neurons to generate a range of isometric contractions of the flexor tibiae muscle and then stimulated the fast extensor tibiae motor neuron to elicit active tibial extensions. Residual forces in the flexor muscle have only a small effect on subsequent active extensions, but the effect is larger for distal than for proximal flexor motor neurons and varies with the strength of flexor activation. We conclude that passive properties of a lightweight limb make substantial and complex contributions to the resting state of the limb that must be taken into account in the patterning of neuronal control signals driving its active movements. Low variability in the effects of the passive forces may permit the nervous system to accurately predict their contributions to behavior. PMID:22357791

  12. Passive resting state and history of antagonist muscle activity shape active extensions in an insect limb

    PubMed Central

    Ache, Jan M.

    2012-01-01

    Limb movements can be driven by muscle contractions, external forces, or intrinsic passive forces. For lightweight limbs like those of insects or small vertebrates, passive forces can be large enough to overcome the effects of gravity and may even generate limb movements in the absence of active muscle contractions. Understanding the sources and actions of such forces is therefore important in understanding motor control. We describe passive properties of the femur-tibia joint of the locust hind leg. The resting angle is determined primarily by passive properties of the relatively large extensor tibiae muscle and is influenced by the history of activation of the fast extensor tibiae motor neuron. The resting angle is therefore better described as a history-dependent resting state. We selectively stimulated different flexor tibiae motor neurons to generate a range of isometric contractions of the flexor tibiae muscle and then stimulated the fast extensor tibiae motor neuron to elicit active tibial extensions. Residual forces in the flexor muscle have only a small effect on subsequent active extensions, but the effect is larger for distal than for proximal flexor motor neurons and varies with the strength of flexor activation. We conclude that passive properties of a lightweight limb make substantial and complex contributions to the resting state of the limb that must be taken into account in the patterning of neuronal control signals driving its active movements. Low variability in the effects of the passive forces may permit the nervous system to accurately predict their contributions to behavior. PMID:22357791

  13. Sensory cortical re-mapping following upper-limb amputation and subsequent targeted reinnervation: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Jun; Chen, Albert; Kuiken, Todd; Carmona, Carolina; Dewald, Julius

    2015-01-01

    This case study demonstrates the change of sensory cortical representations of the residual parts of the arm in an individual who underwent a trans-humeral amputation and subsequent targeted reinnervation (TR). As a relatively new surgical technique, TR restores a direct neural connection from amputated sensorimotor nerves to specific target muscles. This method has been successfully applied to upper-limb and lower-limb amputees, and has shown effectiveness in regaining control signals via the newly re-innervated muscles. Correspondingly, recent study results have shown that motor representations for the missing limb move closer to their original locations following TR. Besides regaining motor control signals, TR also restores the sensation in the re-innervated skin areas. We therefore hypothesize that TR causes analogous cortical sensory remapping that may return closer to their original locations. In order to test this hypothesis, cortical activity in response to sensory-level electrical stimulation in different parts of the arm was studied longitudinally in one amputated individual before and up to 2 years after TR. Our results showed that 1) before TR, the cortical response to sensory electrical stimulation in the residual limb showed a diffuse bilateral pattern without a clear focus in either the time or spatial domain; and 2) 2 years after TR, the sensory map of the reinnervated median nerve reorganized, showing predominant activity over the contralateral S1 hand area as well as moderate activity over the ipsilateral S1. Therefore, this work provides new evidence for long-term sensory cortical plasticity in the human brain after TR. PMID:26106558

  14. Sensory cortical re-mapping following upper-limb amputation and subsequent targeted reinnervation: A case report.

    PubMed

    Yao, Jun; Chen, Albert; Kuiken, Todd; Carmona, Carolina; Dewald, Julius

    2015-01-01

    This case study demonstrates the change of sensory cortical representations of the residual parts of the arm in an individual who underwent a trans-humeral amputation and subsequent targeted reinnervation (TR). As a relatively new surgical technique, TR restores a direct neural connection from amputated sensorimotor nerves to specific target muscles. This method has been successfully applied to upper-limb and lower-limb amputees, and has shown effectiveness in regaining control signals via the newly re-innervated muscles. Correspondingly, recent study results have shown that motor representations for the missing limb move closer to their original locations following TR. Besides regaining motor control signals, TR also restores the sensation in the re-innervated skin areas. We therefore hypothesize that TR causes analogous cortical sensory remapping that may return closer to their original locations. In order to test this hypothesis, cortical activity in response to sensory-level electrical stimulation in different parts of the arm was studied longitudinally in one amputated individual before and up to 2 years after TR. Our results showed that 1) before TR, the cortical response to sensory electrical stimulation in the residual limb showed a diffuse bilateral pattern without a clear focus in either the time or spatial domain; and 2) 2 years after TR, the sensory map of the reinnervated median nerve reorganized, showing predominant activity over the contralateral S1 hand area as well as moderate activity over the ipsilateral S1. Therefore, this work provides new evidence for long-term sensory cortical plasticity in the human brain after TR. PMID:26106558

  15. Upper Limb Assessment in Tetraplegia: Clinical, Functional and Kinematic Correlations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cacho, Enio Walker Azevedo; de Oliveira, Roberta; Ortolan, Rodrigo L.; Varoto, Renato; Cliquet, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to correlate clinical and functional evaluations with kinematic variables of upper limp reach-to-grasp movement in patients with tetraplegia. Twenty chronic patients were selected to perform reach-to-grasp kinematic assessment using a target placed at a distance equal to the arm's length. Kinematic variables (hand peak…

  16. Upper Limb Assessment in Tetraplegia: Clinical, Functional and Kinematic Correlations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cacho, Enio Walker Azevedo; de Oliveira, Roberta; Ortolan, Rodrigo L.; Varoto, Renato; Cliquet, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to correlate clinical and functional evaluations with kinematic variables of upper limp reach-to-grasp movement in patients with tetraplegia. Twenty chronic patients were selected to perform reach-to-grasp kinematic assessment using a target placed at a distance equal to the arm's length. Kinematic variables (hand peak

  17. Myosin expression and specialization among the earliest muscle fibers of the developing avian limb.

    PubMed

    Crow, M T; Stockdale, F E

    1986-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies specific to the light- and heavy-chain subunits of chicken skeletal muscle myosin have been used to identify fast and slow myosin-containing fibers in the thigh muscles of embryonic and adult chickens and to determine when in development diversification of muscle fiber types first occurs. Primary generation fibers which expressed different MLC and MHC types were evident within the dorsal and ventral premuscle masses and in the first muscles to form in the limb. These early embryonic muscle fiber types became distributed among and within the individual muscles of the thigh in a characteristic spatial pattern which served as a "blueprint" for guiding future muscle development and predicting the future fiber composition of the muscle. Despite the continuous addition of muscle fibers to the limb throughout development, the pattern remained unchanged. Neither the time of appearance, initial specialization, nor characteristic distribution of these primary fiber types within the limb was altered during the early embryonic period by chronic neuromuscular paralysis induced by D-tubocurarine. In contrast, muscles at later stages of embryonic development were markedly affected by such treatments and underwent atrophy and loss of differential staining characteristics. These results demonstrate that diversification of fibers in terms of myosin content is one of the earliest events in the formation of these muscles and suggest that the development of avian muscles be divided into two phases: an embryonic phase during which fibers of differing myosin content appear independently of innervation to become distributed in a specific topographic pattern within each muscle as it forms, followed by a fetal phase during which innervation becomes essential for maintaining this pattern and modulating the myosin content of its fibers. PMID:3943663

  18. The application of precisely controlled functional electrical stimulation to the shoulder, elbow and wrist for upper limb stroke rehabilitation: a feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Functional electrical stimulation (FES) during repetitive practice of everyday tasks can facilitate recovery of upper limb function following stroke. Reduction in impairment is strongly associated with how closely FES assists performance, with advanced iterative learning control (ILC) technology providing precise upper-limb assistance. The aim of this study is to investigate the feasibility of extending ILC technology to control FES of three muscle groups in the upper limb to facilitate functional motor recovery post-stroke. Methods Five stroke participants with established hemiplegia undertook eighteen intervention sessions, each of one hour duration. During each session FES was applied to the anterior deltoid, triceps, and wrist/finger extensors to assist performance of functional tasks with real-objects, including closing a drawer and pressing a light switch. Advanced model-based ILC controllers used kinematic data from previous attempts at each task to update the FES applied to each muscle on the subsequent trial. This produced stimulation profiles that facilitated accurate completion of each task while encouraging voluntary effort by the participant. Kinematic data were collected using a Microsoft Kinect, and mechanical arm support was provided by a SaeboMAS. Participants completed Fugl-Meyer and Action Research Arm Test clinical assessments pre- and post-intervention, as well as FES-unassisted tasks during each intervention session. Results Fugl-Meyer and Action Research Arm Test scores both significantly improved from pre- to post-intervention by 4.4 points. Improvements were also found in FES-unassisted performance, and the amount of arm support required to successfully perform the tasks was reduced. Conclusions This feasibility study indicates that technology comprising low-cost hardware fused with advanced FES controllers accurately assists upper limb movement and may reduce upper limb impairments following stroke. PMID:24981060

  19. Successful Salvage of the Upper Limb After Crush Injury Requiring Nine Operations: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Qingmin; Cai, Guoping; Liu, Dechang; Wang, Kun; Zhang, Xinchao

    2015-01-01

    Emergency treatment of amputation is one of the most frequently used therapeutic methods for patients with severe upper limb crush injury with a mangled extremity severity score (MESS) of more than 7. With the development of advanced surgical repair techniques and reconstructive technology, cases that once required amputation can now be salvaged with appropriate management, and some limb functions may also be reserved. A patient with a severe upper limb crush injury with a MESS score of 10 was treated in our hospital. The limb was salvaged after 9 surgeries over 10 months. The follow-up visits over the next 18 months post-injury showed that the shoulder joint functions were rated as “excellent” (90) according to the Neer score, the Harris hip evaluation (HHS) for elbow joint functions was “good” (80), and the patient was very satisfied with the overall therapeutic outcome. We conclude from the successful outcome of this extreme injury that salvage attempts should be the first management choice for upper limbs with complex injuries to save as much function as possible. Amputation should only be adopted when the injury is life-threatening or no more function can be saved. The level of evidence was V. PMID:25785341

  20. First Neuromuscular Contact Correlates with Onset of Primary Myogenesis in Rat and Mouse Limb Muscles

    PubMed Central

    Duxson, Marilyn J.; Deries, Marianne

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal muscle development has been the focus of intensive study for many decades. Recent advances in genetic manipulation of the mouse have increased our understanding of the cell signalling involved in the development of muscle progenitors which give rise to adult skeletal muscles and their stem cell populations. However, the influence of a vital tissue type – the peripheral nerve—has largely been ignored since its earliest descriptions. Here we carefully describe the timing in which myogenic progenitors expressing Pax3 and Pax7 (the earliest markers of myogenic cells) enter the limb buds of rat and mouse embryos, as well as the spatiotemporal relationship between these progenitors and the ingrowing peripheral nerve. We show that progenitors expressing Pax3 enter the limb bud one full day ahead of the first neurites and that Pax7-expressing progenitors (associated with secondary myogenesis in the limb) are first seen in the limb bud at the time of nerve entry and in close proximity to the nerve. The initial entry of the nerve also coincides with the first expression of myosin heavy chain showing that the first contact between nerves and myogenic cells correlates with the onset of myogenic differentiation. Furthermore, as the nerve grows into the limb, Pax3 expression is progressively replaced by Pax7 expression in myogenic progenitors. These findings indicate that the ingrowing nerve enters the limb presumptive muscle masses earlier than what was generally described and raises the possibility that nerve may influence the differentiation of muscle progenitors in rodent limbs. PMID:26207754

  1. Calibration of the Microwave Limb Sounder on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jarnot, R. F.; Cofield, R. E.; Waters, J. W.; Flower, D. A.; Peckham, G. E.

    1996-01-01

    The Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) is a three-radiometer, passive, limb emission instrument onboard the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS). Radiometric, spectral and field-of-view calibrations of the MLS instrument are described in this paper. In-orbit noise performance, gain stability, spectral baseline and dynamic range are described, as well as use of in-flight data for validation and refinement of prelaunch calibrations. Estimated systematic scaling uncertainties (3 sigma) on calibrated limb radiances from prelaunch calibrations are 2.6% in bands 1 through 3, 3.4% in band 4, and 6% in band 5. The observed systematic errors in band 6 are about 15%, consistent with prelaunch calibration uncertainties. Random uncertainties on individual limb radiance measurements are very close to the levels predicted from measured radiometer noise temperature, with negligible contribution from noise and drifts on the regular in-flight gain calibration measurements.

  2. Phantom hand and wrist movements in upper limb amputees are slow but naturally controlled movements.

    PubMed

    De Graaf, J B; Jarrassé, N; Nicol, C; Touillet, A; Coyle, T; Maynard, L; Martinet, N; Paysant, J

    2016-01-15

    After limb amputation, patients often wake up with a vivid perception of the presence of the missing limb, called "phantom limb". Phantom limbs have mostly been studied with respect to pain sensation. But patients can experience many other phantom sensations, including voluntary movements. The goal of the present study was to quantify phantom movement kinematics and relate these to intact limb kinematics and to the time elapsed since amputation. Six upper arm and two forearm amputees with various delays since amputation (6months to 32years) performed phantom finger, hand and wrist movements at self-chosen comfortable velocities. The kinematics of the phantom movements was indirectly obtained via the intact limb that synchronously mimicked the phantom limb movements, using a Cyberglove® for measuring finger movements and an inertial measurement unit for wrist movements. Results show that the execution of phantom movements is perceived as "natural" but effortful. The types of phantom movements that can be performed are variable between the patients but they could all perform thumb flexion/extension and global hand opening/closure. Finger extension movements appeared to be 24% faster than finger flexion movements. Neither the number of types of phantom movements that can be executed nor the kinematic characteristics were related to the elapsed time since amputation, highlighting the persistence of post-amputation neural adaptation. We hypothesize that the perceived slowness of phantom movements is related to altered proprioceptive feedback that cannot be recalibrated by lack of visual feedback during phantom movement execution. PMID:26556065

  3. [Longitudinal study of a population exposed to risk of biomechanical overload of the upper limb].

    PubMed

    Martmelli, R; Tobia, L; Lupi, A; Monaco, M; Capitano, T; Ponzi, I; Paoletti, A

    2005-01-01

    One of the most important factors of the work-related musculoskeletal disorders of the upper extremities (WMSDs) is the biomechanical overload. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the possibility of the worker fitting to the job, to decrease the upper limb repetitive stress. In order to this aim, we have collected and compared, in different controls at the distance of two years, the clinical-anamnestic and instrumental data of a cohort of workers in a car industry. PMID:16124537

  4. Entrapment Neuropathies in the Upper and Lower Limbs: Anatomy and MRI Features

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Qian; Jacobson, Jon A.; Jamadar, David A.; Gandikota, Girish; Brandon, Catherine; Morag, Yoav; Fessell, David P.; Kim, Sung-Moon

    2012-01-01

    Peripheral nerve entrapment occurs at specific anatomic locations. Familiarity with the anatomy and the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of nerve entrapment syndromes is important for accurate diagnosis and early treatment of entrapment neuropathies. The purpose of this paper is to illustrate the normal anatomy of peripheral nerves in the upper and lower limbs and to review the MRI features of common disorders affecting the peripheral nerves, both compressive/entrapment and noncompressive, involving the suprascapular nerve, the axillary nerve, the radial nerve, the ulnar nerve, and the median verve in the upper limb and the sciatic nerve, the common peroneal nerve, the tibial nerve, and the interdigital nerves in the lower limb. PMID:23125929

  5. The Impact of Upper Tropospheric Humidity from Microwave Limb Sounder on the Midlatitude Greenhouse Effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, Hua; Liu, W. Timothy

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of upper tropospheric humidity, as measured by the Microwave Limb Sounder, and the impact of the humidity on the greenhouse effect in the midlatitudes. Enhanced upper tropospheric humidity and an enhanced greenhouse effect occur over the storm tracks in the North Pacific and North Atlantic. In these areas, strong baroclinic activity and the large number of deep convective clouds transport more water vapor to the upper troposphere, and hence increase greenhouse trapping. The greenhouse effect increases with upper tropospheric humidity in areas with a moist upper troposphere (such as areas over storm tracks), but it is not sensitive to changes in upper tropospheric humidity in regions with a dry upper troposphere, clearly demonstrating that there are different mechanisms controlling the geographical distribution of the greenhouse effect in the midlatitudes.

  6. Mouse limb muscle is determined in the absence of the earliest myogenic factor myf-5.

    PubMed Central

    Tajbakhsh, S; Buckingham, M E

    1994-01-01

    myf-5 is the only member of the MyoD family of myogenic regulatory genes to be expressed in the mouse embryo prior to muscle cell differentiation. We have used the developing limb as a model in which to follow the formation of peripheral muscle, to address the question of whether myogenic precursor cells are already present in the limb bud before expression of myf-5. The lacZ reporter gene has been introduced into the myf-5 gene by homologous recombination so that its expression is under the control of the endogenous myf-5 locus. beta-Galactosidase (beta-gal) coloration provides a sensitive assay for myf-5+ cells. Embryos were generated from embryonic stem cells carrying this mutation, and the appearance of beta-gal+ (myf-5+) cells was followed during limb development in vivo. Limb buds, at a stage when they are beta-gal-, were cultured in vitro. After several days, beta-gal+ cells accumulated in the premuscle mass. We conclude that determined muscle precursor cells in the limb bud do not initially express any member of the MyoD family. Furthermore, myogenic precursor cells in the somite, which, according to the avian model, migrate from the ventral/lateral edge of the dermomyotome to form peripheral muscle masses, are also negative for these factors. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:8290594

  7. Predictive classification of self-paced upper-limb analytical movements with EEG.

    PubMed

    Ibáñez, Jaime; Serrano, J I; del Castillo, M D; Minguez, J; Pons, J L

    2015-11-01

    The extent to which the electroencephalographic activity allows the characterization of movements with the upper limb is an open question. This paper describes the design and validation of a classifier of upper-limb analytical movements based on electroencephalographic activity extracted from intervals preceding self-initiated movement tasks. Features selected for the classification are subject specific and associated with the movement tasks. Further tests are performed to reject the hypothesis that other information different from the task-related cortical activity is being used by the classifiers. Six healthy subjects were measured performing self-initiated upper-limb analytical movements. A Bayesian classifier was used to classify among seven different kinds of movements. Features considered covered the alpha and beta bands. A genetic algorithm was used to optimally select a subset of features for the classification. An average accuracy of 62.9 ± 7.5% was reached, which was above the baseline level observed with the proposed methodology (30.2 ± 4.3%). The study shows how the electroencephalography carries information about the type of analytical movement performed with the upper limb and how it can be decoded before the movement begins. In neurorehabilitation environments, this information could be used for monitoring and assisting purposes. PMID:25980505

  8. Estimation of sex from the upper limb measurements of Sudanese adults.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Altayeb Abdalla

    2013-11-01

    Sex estimation is the first biological attribute needed for personal identification from mutilated and amputated limbs or body parts in medical-legal autopsies. Populations have different sizes and proportions that affect the anthropometric assessment of sex. Relatively few published works assess the accuracy of sex estimation from soft tissue measurements of upper limb parts, except for the hand and its components, but these studies involve a limited range of global populations. The current study aimed to assess the degree of sexual dimorphism in upper limb measurements and the accuracy of using these measurements for sex estimation in a contemporary adult Sudanese population. The upper arm length, ulnar length, wrist breadth, hand length, and hand breadth of 240 right-handed Sudanese subjects (120 males and 120 females) aged between 25 and 30 years were measured by international anthropometric standards. Demarking points, sexual dimorphism indices and discriminant functions were developed from 200 subjects (100 males and 100 females) who composed the study group. All variables were sexually dimorphic. The ulnar length, wrist breadth and hand breadth significantly contributed to sex estimation. Forearm dimensions showed a higher accuracy for sex estimation than hand dimensions. Cross-validated sex classification accuracy ranged between 78.5% and 89.5%. The reliability of these standards was assessed in a test sample of 20 males and 20 females, and the results showed accuracy between 77.5% and 90%. This study provides new forensic standards for sex estimation from upper limb measurements of Sudanese adults. PMID:24237816

  9. The Corticospinal Tract: A Biomarker to Categorize Upper Limb Functional Potential in Unilateral Cerebral Palsy

    PubMed Central

    Jaspers, Ellen; Byblow, Winston D.; Feys, Hilde; Wenderoth, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    Children with unilateral cerebral palsy (CP) typically present with largely divergent upper limb sensorimotor deficits and individual differences in response to upper limb rehabilitation. This review summarizes how early brain damage can cause dramatic deviations from the normal anatomy of sensory and motor tracts, resulting in unique “wiring patterns” of the sensorimotor system in CP. Based on the existing literature, we suggest that corticospinal tract (CST) anatomy and integrity constrains sensorimotor function of the upper limb and potentially also the response to treatment. However, it is not possible to infer CST (re)organization from clinical presentation alone and conventional biomarkers, such as time of insult, location, and lesion extent seem to have limited clinical utility. Here, we propose a theoretical framework based on a detailed examination of the motor system using behavioral, neurophysiological, and magnetic resonance imaging measures, akin to those used to predict potential for upper limb recovery of adults after stroke. This theoretical framework might prove useful because it provides testable hypotheses for future research with the goal to develop and validate a clinical assessment flowchart to categorize children with unilateral CP. PMID:26779464

  10. Upper Limb Immobilisation: A Neural Plasticity Model with Relevance to Poststroke Motor Rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Furlan, Leonardo; Conforto, Adriana Bastos; Cohen, Leonardo G.; Sterr, Annette

    2016-01-01

    Advances in our understanding of the neural plasticity that occurs after hemiparetic stroke have contributed to the formulation of theories of poststroke motor recovery. These theories, in turn, have underpinned contemporary motor rehabilitation strategies for treating motor deficits after stroke, such as upper limb hemiparesis. However, a relative drawback has been that, in general, these strategies are most compatible with the recovery profiles of relatively high-functioning stroke survivors and therefore do not easily translate into benefit to those individuals sustaining low-functioning upper limb hemiparesis, who otherwise have poorer residual function. For these individuals, alternative motor rehabilitation strategies are currently needed. In this paper, we will review upper limb immobilisation studies that have been conducted with healthy adult humans and animals. Then, we will discuss how the findings from these studies could inspire the creation of a neural plasticity model that is likely to be of particular relevance to the context of motor rehabilitation after stroke. For instance, as will be elaborated, such model could contribute to the development of alternative motor rehabilitation strategies for treating poststroke upper limb hemiparesis. The implications of the findings from those immobilisation studies for contemporary motor rehabilitation strategies will also be discussed and perspectives for future research in this arena will be provided as well. PMID:26843992

  11. Robot-Mediated Upper Limb Physiotherapy: Review and Recommendations for Future Clinical Trials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peter, Orsolya; Fazekas, Gabor; Zsiga, Katalin; Denes, Zoltan

    2011-01-01

    Robot-mediated physiotherapy provides a new possibility for improving the outcome of rehabilitation of patients who are recovering from stroke. This study is a review of robot-supported upper limb physiotherapy focusing on the shoulder, elbow, and wrist. A literature search was carried out in PubMed, OVID, and EBSCO for clinical trials with robots

  12. A novel motion tracking system for evaluation of functional rehabilitation of the upper limbs

    PubMed Central

    Gil-Agudo, Ángel; de los Reyes-Guzmán, Ana; Dimbwadyo-Terrer, Iris; Peñasco-Martín, Benito; Bernal-Sahún, Alberto; López-Monteagudo, Patricia; del Ama-Espinosa, Antonio; Pons, José Luis

    2013-01-01

    Upper limb function impairment is one of the most common sequelae of central nervous system injury, especially in stroke patients and when spinal cord injury produces tetraplegia. Conventional assessment methods cannot provide objective evaluation of patient performance and the tiveness of therapies. The most common assessment tools are based on rating scales, which are inefficient when measuring small changes and can yield subjective bias. In this study, we designed an inertial sensor-based monitoring system composed of five sensors to measure and analyze the complex movements of the upper limbs, which are common in activities of daily living. We developed a kinematic model with nine degrees of freedom to analyze upper limb and head movements in three dimensions. This system was then validated using a commercial optoelectronic system. These findings suggest that an inertial sensor-based motion tracking system can be used in patients who have upper limb impairment through data integration with a virtual reality-based neuroretation system. PMID:25206474

  13. The 6 Minute Walk Test and Performance of Upper Limb in Ambulant Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Boys

    PubMed Central

    Pane, Marika; Mazzone, Elena Stacy; Sivo, Serena; Fanelli, Lavinia; De Sanctis, Roberto; DAmico, Adele; Messina, Sonia; Battini, Roberta; Bianco, Flaviana; Scutifero, Marianna; Petillo, Roberta; Frosini, Silvia; Scalise, Roberta; Vita, Gian Luca; Bruno, Claudio; Pedemonte, Marina; Mongini, Tiziana; Pegoraro, Elena; Brustia, Francesca; Gardani, Alice; Berardinelli, Angela; Lanzillotta, Valentina; Viggiano, Emanuela; Cavallaro, Filippo; Sframeli, Maria; Bello, Luca; Barp, Andrea; Busato, Fabio; Bonfiglio, Serena; Rolle, Enrica; Colia, Giulia; Bonetti, Annamaria; Palermo, Concetta; Graziano, Alessandra; DAngelo, Grazia; Pini, Antonella; Corlatti, Alice; Gorni, Ksenija; Baranello, Giovanni; Antonaci, Laura; Bertini, Enrico; Politano, Luisa; Mercuri, Eugenio

    2014-01-01

    The Performance of Upper Limb (PUL) test was specifically developed for the assessment of upper limbs in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). The first published data have shown that early signs of involvement can also be found in ambulant DMD boys. The aim of this longitudinal Italian multicentric study was to evaluate the correlation between the 6 Minute Walk Test (6MWT) and the PUL in ambulant DMD boys. Both 6MWT and PUL were administered to 164 ambulant DMD boys of age between 5.0 and 16.17 years (mean 8.82). The 6 minute walk distance (6MWD) ranged between 118 and 557 (mean: 376.38, SD: 90.59). The PUL total scores ranged between 52 and 74 (mean: 70.74, SD: 4.66). The correlation between the two measures was 0.499. The scores on the PUL largely reflect the overall impairment observed on the 6MWT but the correlation was not linear. The use of the PUL appeared to be less relevant in the very strong patients with 6MWD above 400 meters, who, with few exceptions had near full scores. In patients with lower 6MWD the severity of upper limb involvement was more variable and could not always be predicted by the 6MWD value or by the use of steroids. Our results confirm that upper limb involvement can already be found in DMD boys even in the ambulant phase. PMID:25642376

  14. Robot-Mediated Upper Limb Physiotherapy: Review and Recommendations for Future Clinical Trials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peter, Orsolya; Fazekas, Gabor; Zsiga, Katalin; Denes, Zoltan

    2011-01-01

    Robot-mediated physiotherapy provides a new possibility for improving the outcome of rehabilitation of patients who are recovering from stroke. This study is a review of robot-supported upper limb physiotherapy focusing on the shoulder, elbow, and wrist. A literature search was carried out in PubMed, OVID, and EBSCO for clinical trials with robots…

  15. Risking Life and Limb: A Case of Spontaneous Diabetic Muscle Infarction (Diabetic Myonecrosis).

    PubMed

    Cumberledge, Jeremy; Kumar, Bharat; Rudy, David

    2016-06-01

    Diabetic muscle infarction, also known as diabetic myonecrosis, is a microvascular complication of poorly controlled diabetes mellitus characterized by unilateral limb pain and swelling. Because these symptoms closely mimic cellulitis and thromboembolism, diagnosis is often delayed or missed altogether, leading to increased morbidity and inappropriate treatment. We describe a case of unilateral limb pain and swelling due to diabetic muscle infarction in a 36-year-old patient with poorly controlled diabetes mellitus. We also review the literature on the diagnosis, prognosis, and management of this under-recognized condition. PMID:26643376

  16. Towards a more relevant hind limb model of muscle ischaemia.

    PubMed

    Lotfi, Shamim; Patel, Ashish S; Mattock, Katherine; Egginton, Stuart; Smith, Alberto; Modarai, Bijan

    2013-03-01

    Critical limb ischaemia is a severe manifestation of peripheral arterial disease characterised by intractable pain and tissue gangrene. Conventional treatments include percutaneous angioplasty and surgical bypass but up to one third of patients are not amenable to these interventions and will ultimately require amputation. Therapeutic neovascularisation has been proposed as an alternative treatment in these 'no option' patients and both cytokines and cells have shown impressive efficacy in the laboratory. Clinical trials in man, however, have had modest results. This discrepancy has put into question the relevance of the pre-clinical assays that are used to test potential agents. One of the most widely used of these assays is the hind limb ischaemia model that is often performed in young, healthy animals. This review critiques the techniques used to induce and assess ischaemia in this model and outlines the reasons why healthy rodents cannot fully recapitulate critical limb ischaemia in aged patients. Strategies that may produce a hind limb model that better simulates the human condition are proposed. PMID:23177969

  17. Intra-arterial Autologous Bone Marrow Cell Transplantation in a Patient with Upper-extremity Critical Limb Ischemia

    SciTech Connect

    Madaric, Juraj; Klepanec, Andrej; Mistrik, Martin; Altaner, Cestmir; Vulev, Ivan

    2013-04-15

    Induction of therapeutic angiogenesis by autologous bone marrow mononuclear cell transplantation has been identified as a potential new option in patients with advanced lower-limb ischemia. There is little evidence of the benefit of intra-arterial cell application in upper-limb critical ischemia. We describe a patient with upper-extremity critical limb ischemia with digital gangrene resulting from hypothenar hammer syndrome successfully treated by intra-arterial autologous bone marrow mononuclear cell transplantation.

  18. Modeling the Step-like Response in the Upper Limbs of Hemiplegic Subjects for Evaluation of Spasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchiyama, Takanori; Uchida, Ryusei

    The purpose of this study is to develop a new modeling technique for quantitative evaluation of spasticity in the upper limbs of hemiplegic patients. Each subject lay on a bed, and his forearm was supported with a jig to measure the elbow joint angle. The subject was instructed to relax and not to resist the step-like load which was applied to extend the elbow joint. The elbow joint angle and electromyogram (EMG) of the biceps muscle, triceps muscle and brachioradialis muscle were measured. First, the step-like response was approximated with a proposed mathematical model based on musculoskeletal and physiological characteristics by the least square method. The proposed model involved an elastic component depending on both muscle activities and elbow joint angle. The responses were approximated well with the proposed model. Next, the torque generated by the elastic component was estimated. The normalized elastic torque was approximated with a dumped sinusoid by the least square method. The reciprocal of the time constant and the natural frequency of the normalized elastic torque were calculated and they varied depending on the grades of the modified Ashworth scale of the subjects. It was suggested that the proposed modeling technique would provide a good quantitative index of spasticity as shown in the relationship between the reciprocal of the time constant and the natural frequency.

  19. Salutary Effects of Cepharanthine against Skeletal Muscle and Kidney Injuries following Limb Ischemia/Reperfusion

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Ming-Chang; Chung, Chih-Yang; Chang, Ya-Ying; Lin, Chih-Kung; Sheu, Joen-Rong; Huang, Chun-Jen

    2015-01-01

    Limb ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) causes oxidation and inflammation and subsequently induces muscle and kidney injuries. Cepharanthine, a natural plant alkaloid, possesses anti-inflammatory and antioxidative properties. We elucidated the salutary effects of cepharanthine against muscle and kidney injuries following limb I/R. Adult male rats were randomized to receive I/R or I/R plus cepharanthine. I/R was achieved by applying tourniquet high around each thigh for 3 hours followed by reperfusion for 24 hours. Cepharanthine (10 mg/kg, intraperitoneal) was injected immediately before reperfusion. After euthanization, degrees of tissue injury, inflammation, and oxidation were examined. Our data revealed that the I/R group had significant increases in injury biomarker concentrations of muscle (creatine kinase and lactate dehydrogenase) and kidney (creatinine, neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin, and kidney injury molecule-1). Histological assays revealed moderate muscle and kidney injury characteristics in the I/R group. The I/R group also had significant increases in concentrations of inflammatory molecules (interleukin-6, macrophage inflammatory protein-2, and prostaglandin E2) and reactive nitrogen species (nitric oxide) as well as lipid peroxidation (malondialdehyde). Of note, these effects of limb I/R could be mitigated by cepharanthine. These data confirmed that cepharanthine attenuated muscle and kidney injuries induced by limb I/R. The mechanisms may involve its anti-inflammatory and antioxidative capacities. PMID:26587045

  20. Effectiveness of the Virtual Reality System Toyra on Upper Limb Function in People with Tetraplegia: A Pilot Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Dimbwadyo-Terrer, I.; Gil-Agudo, A.; Segura-Fragoso, A.; de los Reyes-Guzmán, A.; Trincado-Alonso, F.; Piazza, S.; Polonio-López, B.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of a virtual reality program combined with conventional therapy in upper limb function in people with tetraplegia and to provide data about patients' satisfaction with the virtual reality system. Thirty-one people with subacute complete cervical tetraplegia participated in the study. Experimental group received 15 sessions with Toyra® virtual reality system for 5 weeks, 30 minutes/day, 3 days/week in addition to conventional therapy, while control group only received conventional therapy. All patients were assessed at baseline, after intervention, and at three-month follow-up with a battery of clinical, functional, and satisfaction scales. Control group showed significant improvements in the manual muscle test (p = 0,043, partial η2 = 0,22) in the follow-up evaluation. Both groups demonstrated clinical, but nonsignificant, changes to their arm function in 4 of the 5 scales used. All patients showed a high level of satisfaction with the virtual reality system. This study showed that virtual reality added to conventional therapy produces similar results in upper limb function compared to only conventional therapy. Moreover, the gaming aspects incorporated in conventional rehabilitation appear to produce high motivation during execution of the assigned tasks. This trial is registered with EudraCT number 2015-002157-35. PMID:26885511

  1. Neurophysiological and behavioural effects of dual-hemisphere transcranial direct current stimulation on the proximal upper limb.

    PubMed

    McCambridge, Alana B; Stinear, James W; Byblow, Winston D

    2016-06-01

    Dual-hemisphere transcranial direct current stimulation over the primary motor cortex (M1-M1 tDCS) is assumed to modulate neural excitability in a polarity-dependent manner and improve motor performance of the hand. In the proximal upper limb, the neurophysiological and behavioural after-effects of M1-M1 tDCS are not well known. This study investigated the after-effects of M1-M1 tDCS on contralateral, ipsilateral and transcallosal excitability to the proximal upper limb muscle biceps brachii (BB). Circle tracing was used to assess motor performance before and after tDCS as this task requires coordination of proximal and distal musculature. Sixteen healthy right-handed adults participated in the study, each receiving M1-M1 tDCS (1 mA, 15 min) or sham tDCS in separate sessions. The anode was positioned over right M1 and cathode over left M1. M1-M1 tDCS suppressed transcallosal inhibition from the M1 under the cathode (P < 0.045). No other neurophysiologic or behavioural effects were observed (P > 0.6). The study provides important information regarding inconsistent neurophysiological and behavioural changes following tDCS that have implications for future tDCS research on the motor system. PMID:26749182

  2. Biomedical research on the International Space Station postural and manipulation problems of the human upper limb in weightlessness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neri, Gianluca; Zolesi, Valfredo

    2000-01-01

    Accumulated evidence, based on information gathered on space flight missions and ground based models involving both humans and animals, clearly suggests that exposure to states of microgravity conditions for varying duration induces certain physiological changes; they involve cardiovascular deconditioning, balance disorders, bone weakening, muscle hypertrophy, disturbed sleep patterns and depressed immune responses. The effects of the microgravity on the astronauts' movement and attitude have been studied during different space missions, increasing the knowledge of the human physiology in weightlessness. The purpose of the research addressed in the present paper is to understand and to assess the performances of the upper limb, especially during grasp. Objects of the research are the physiological changes related to the long-term duration spaceflight environment. Specifically, the changes concerning the upper limb are investigated, with particular regard to the performances of the hand in zero-g environments. This research presents also effects on the Earth, improving the studies on a number of pathological states, on the health care and the rehabilitation. In this perspective, a set of experiments are proposed, aimed at the evaluation of the effects of the zero-g environments on neurophysiology of grasping movements, fatigue assessment, precision grip. .

  3. Upper Limb Biomechanics During the Volleyball Serve and Spike

    PubMed Central

    Reeser, Jonathan C.; Fleisig, Glenn S.; Bolt, Becky; Ruan, Mianfang

    2010-01-01

    Background: The shoulder is the third-most commonly injured body part in volleyball, with the majority of shoulder problems resulting from chronic overuse. Hypothesis: Significant kinetic differences exist among specific types of volleyball serves and spikes. Study Design: Controlled laboratory study. Methods: Fourteen healthy female collegiate volleyball players performed 5 successful trials of 4 skills: 2 directional spikes, an off-speed roll shot, and the float serve. Volunteers who were competent in jump serves (n, 5) performed 5 trials of that skill. A 240-Hz 3-dimensional automatic digitizing system captured each trial. Multivariate analysis of variance and post hoc paired t tests were used to compare kinetic parameters for the shoulder and elbow across all the skills (except the jump serve). A similar statistical analysis was performed for upper extremity kinematics. Results: Forces, torques, and angular velocities at the shoulder and elbow were lowest for the roll shot and second-lowest for the float serve. No differences were detected between the cross-body and straight-ahead spikes. Although there was an insufficient number of participants to statistically analyze the jump serve, the data for it appear similar to those of the cross-body and straight-ahead spikes. Shoulder abduction at the instant of ball contact was approximately 130° for all skills, which is substantially greater than that previously reported for female athletes performing tennis serves or baseball pitches. Conclusion: Because shoulder kinetics were greatest during spiking, the volleyball player with symptoms of shoulder overuse may wish to reduce the number of repetitions performed during practice. Limiting the number of jump serves may also reduce the athlete’s risk of overuse-related shoulder dysfunction. Clinical Relevance: Volleyball-specific overhead skills, such as the spike and serve, produce considerable upper extremity force and torque, which may contribute to the risk of shoulder injury. PMID:23015961

  4. Hands in motion: an upper-limb-selective area in the occipitotemporal cortex shows sensitivity to viewed hand kinematics.

    PubMed

    Orlov, Tanya; Porat, Yuval; Makin, Tamar R; Zohary, Ehud

    2014-04-01

    Regions in the occipitotemporal cortex (OTC) show clear selectivity to static images of human body parts, and upper limbs in particular, with respect to other object categories. Such selectivity was previously attributed to shape aspects, which presumably vary across categories. Alternatively, it has been proposed that functional selectivity for upper limbs is driven by processing of their distinctive motion features. In the present study we show that selectivity to static upper-limb images and motion processing go hand in hand. Using resting-state and task-based functional MRI, we demonstrate that OTC voxels showing greater preference to static images of arms and hands also show stronger functional connectivity with motion coding regions within the human middle temporal complex (hMT+), but not with shape-selective midtier areas, such as hV4 or LO-1, suggesting a tight link between upper-limb selectivity and motion processing. To test this directly, we created a set of natural arm-movement videos where kinematic patterns were parametrically manipulated, while keeping shape information constant. Using multivariate pattern analysis, we show that the degree of (dis)similarity in arm-velocity profiles across the video set predicts, to a significant extent, the degree of (dis)similarity in multivoxel activation patterns in both upper-limb-selective OTC regions and the hMT+. Together, these results suggest that the functional specificity of upper-limb-selective regions may be partially determined by their involvement in the processing of upper-limb dynamics. We propose that the selectivity to static upper-limb images in the OTC may be a result of experience-dependent association between shape elements, which characterize upper limbs, and upper-limb-specific motion patterns. PMID:24695707

  5. Bioelectrical activity of limb muscles during cold shivering of stimulation of the vestibular apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuzmina, G. I.

    1980-01-01

    The effects of caloric and electric stimulation of the vestibular receptors on the EMG activity of limb muslces in anesthetized cats during cold induced shivering involved flexor muscles alone. Both types of stimulation suppressed bioelectrical activity more effectively in the ipsilateral muscles. The suppression of shivering activity seems to be due to the increased inhibitory effect of descending labyrinth pathways on the function of flexor motoneurons.

  6. The Muscle Machine and Upper Body Strength.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    English, Agnes

    1989-01-01

    This article describes successful efforts by physical education teachers at Elberton Elementary School (GA) to construct an affordable pull-up board that could be used to help improve students' arm and upper body strength. An explanation is given of how to use the machine, and the benefits to students are briefly discussed. (IAH)

  7. Normative Data for an Instrumental Assessment of the Upper-Limb Functionality

    PubMed Central

    Caimmi, Marco; Guanziroli, Eleonora; Malosio, Matteo; Pedrocchi, Nicola; Vicentini, Federico; Molinari Tosatti, Lorenzo; Molteni, Franco

    2015-01-01

    Upper-limb movement analysis is important to monitor objectively rehabilitation interventions, contributing to improving the overall treatments outcomes. Simple, fast, easy-to-use, and applicable methods are required to allow routinely functional evaluation of patients with different pathologies and clinical conditions. This paper describes the Reaching and Hand-to-Mouth Evaluation Method, a fast procedure to assess the upper-limb motor control and functional ability, providing a set of normative data from 42 healthy subjects of different ages, evaluated for both the dominant and the nondominant limb motor performance. Sixteen of them were reevaluated after two weeks to perform test-retest reliability analysis. Data were clustered into three subgroups of different ages to test the method sensitivity to motor control differences. Experimental data show notable test-retest reliability in all tasks. Data from older and younger subjects show significant differences in the measures related to the ability for coordination thus showing the high sensitivity of the method to motor control differences. The presented method, provided with control data from healthy subjects, appears to be a suitable and reliable tool for the upper-limb functional assessment in the clinical environment. PMID:26539500

  8. A Brain Motor Control Assessment (BMCA) Protocol for Upper Limb Function

    PubMed Central

    Zoghi, Maryam; Galea, Mary; Morgan, David

    2013-01-01

    The Brain Motor Control Assessment (BMCA) protocol is a surface electromyography (sEMG)-based measure of motor output from central nervous system during a variety of reflex and voluntary motor tasks performed under strictly controlled conditions. The aim of this study was to evaluate the BMCA protocol for upper limb with the addition of shoulder voluntary tasks. The voluntary response index (VRI) was calculated from quantitative analysis of sEMG data during defined voluntary movement in neurologically intact people for comparison with that of patients after neurological injuries. The BMCA protocol included one bilateral and 4 unilateral voluntary tasks at different joints of both arms. The VRI, measured from 19 neurologically intact participants, comprises the total muscle activity recorded for the voluntary motor task (magnitude). The calculated similarity index (SI) for each phase of each task show the similarity of “the distribution of activity across the recorded muscles” for that task in this group off participants. Results: The VRI magnitude values from right and left sides for different tasks showed no significant difference (ANOVA: FSide: 0.09, P = 0.77). Therefore these values were pooled before calculating SI. SI values were higher for tasks against gravity: elbow flexion (0.99±0.03), wrist flexion with palm up (0.98±0.03) and wrist extension with palm down (0.97±0.07). On the other hand, the SI values were the lowest for bilateral shoulder abduction (0.84±0.08) and shoulder adduction (0.84±0.08). Conclusion: To validate this index for clinical use, serial studies on patients with neurological impairments should be performed. Tasks involving movement against gravity may be more suitable in future BMCAs. PMID:24223953

  9. Fatigue alters in vivo function within and between limb muscles during locomotion

    PubMed Central

    Higham, Timothy E.; Biewener, Andrew A.

    2008-01-01

    Muscle fatigue, a reduction in force as a consequence of exercise, is an important factor for any animal that moves, and can result from both peripheral and/or central mechanisms. Although much is known about whole-limb force generation and activation patterns in fatigued muscles under sustained isometric contractions, little is known about the in vivo dynamics of limb muscle function in relation to whole-body fatigue. Here we show that limb kinematics and contractile function in the lateral (LG) and medial (MG) gastrocnemius of helmeted guineafowl (Numida meleagris) are significantly altered following fatiguing exercise at 2 m s−1 on an inclined treadmill. The two most significant findings were that the variation in muscle force generation, measured directly from the muscles' tendons, increased significantly with fatigue, and fascicle shortening in the proximal MG, but not the distal MG, decreased significantly with fatigue. We suggest that the former is a potential mechanism for decreased stability associated with fatigue. The region-specific alteration of fascicle behaviour within the MG as a result of fatigue suggests a complex response to fatigue that probably depends on muscle–aponeurosis and tendon architecture not previously explored. These findings highlight the importance of studying the integrative in vivo dynamics of muscle function in response to fatigue. PMID:19129096

  10. Electromyographic analysis of lower limb muscles during the golf swing performed with three different clubs.

    PubMed

    Marta, Sérgio; Silva, Luís; Vaz, João Rocha; Castro, Maria António; Reinaldo, Gustavo; Pezarat-Correia, Pedro

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to describe and compare the EMG patterns of select lower limb muscles throughout the golf swing, performed with three different clubs, in non-elite middle-aged players. Fourteen golfers performed eight swings each using, in random order, a pitching wedge, 7-iron and 4-iron. Surface electromyography (EMG) was recorded bilaterally from lower limb muscles: tibialis anterior, peroneus longus, gastrocnemius medialis, gastrocnemius lateralis, biceps femoris, semitendinosus, gluteus maximus, vastus medialis, rectus femoris and vastus lateralis. Three-dimensional high-speed video analysis was used to determine the golf swing phases. Results showed that, in average handicap golfers, the highest muscle activation levels occurred during the Forward Swing Phase, with the right semitendinosus and the right biceps femoris muscles producing the highest mean activation levels relative to maximal electromyography (70-76% and 68-73% EMGMAX, respectively). Significant differences between the pitching wedge and the 4-iron club were found in the activation level of the left semitendinosus, right tibialis anterior, right peroneus longus, right vastus medialis, right rectus femuris and right gastrocnemius muscles. The lower limb muscles showed, in most cases and phases, higher mean values of activation on electromyography when golfers performed shots with a 4-iron club. PMID:26197882

  11. Wii balance board exercise improves balance and lower limb muscle strength of overweight young adults

    PubMed Central

    Siriphorn, Akkradate; Chamonchant, Dannaovarat

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The potential health benefits of the Nintendo Wii balance board exercise have been widely investigated. However, no study has been conducted to examine the benefits of Wii exercise for overweight young adults. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of exercise performed on a Nintendo Wii balance board on the balance and lower limb muscle strength in overweight young adults. [Subjects and Methods] Within-subject repeated measures analysis was used. Sixteen young adults (aged 21.87±1.13 years, body mass index 24.15 ± 0.50 kg/m2) were recruited. All subjects performed an exercise program on a Wii balance board for 8 weeks (30 min/session, twice a week for 8 weeks). A NeuroCom Balance Master and a hand-held dynamometer were used to measure balance performance and lower limb muscle strength. [Results] According to the comparison of pre- and post-intervention measurements, the Wii balance board exercise program significantly improved the limit of stability parameters. There was also a significant increase in strength of four lower-limb muscle groups: the hip flexor, knee flexor, ankle dorsiflexor and ankle plantarflexor. [Conclusion] These findings suggest that a Wii balance board exercise program can be used to improve the balance and lower limb muscle strength of overweight young adults. PMID:25642034

  12. [The individual muscles of the shoulder limb of Pudu pudu (Molina 1782)].

    PubMed

    Wissdorf, H; Butendieck, E

    1988-01-01

    The present study gives a topographic description of the muscles of the thoracic limb of Pudu pudu (Molina 1782). This description is intended as basis for surgery, but is also to be rated as a morphological study. The results are therefore discussed together with findings in Dama dama, Capreolus capreolus, Ovis aries, Capra hircus, and also with findings in cattle and pigs. PMID:3224788

  13. Wii balance board exercise improves balance and lower limb muscle strength of overweight young adults.

    PubMed

    Siriphorn, Akkradate; Chamonchant, Dannaovarat

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The potential health benefits of the Nintendo Wii balance board exercise have been widely investigated. However, no study has been conducted to examine the benefits of Wii exercise for overweight young adults. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of exercise performed on a Nintendo Wii balance board on the balance and lower limb muscle strength in overweight young adults. [Subjects and Methods] Within-subject repeated measures analysis was used. Sixteen young adults (aged 21.87±1.13 years, body mass index 24.15 ± 0.50 kg/m(2)) were recruited. All subjects performed an exercise program on a Wii balance board for 8 weeks (30 min/session, twice a week for 8 weeks). A NeuroCom Balance Master and a hand-held dynamometer were used to measure balance performance and lower limb muscle strength. [Results] According to the comparison of pre- and post-intervention measurements, the Wii balance board exercise program significantly improved the limit of stability parameters. There was also a significant increase in strength of four lower-limb muscle groups: the hip flexor, knee flexor, ankle dorsiflexor and ankle plantarflexor. [Conclusion] These findings suggest that a Wii balance board exercise program can be used to improve the balance and lower limb muscle strength of overweight young adults. PMID:25642034

  14. Free Functional Muscle Transfers to Restore Upper Extremity Function.

    PubMed

    Krauss, Emily M; Tung, Thomas H; Moore, Amy M

    2016-05-01

    Free functional muscle transfer provides an option for functional restoration when nerve reconstruction and tendon transfers are not feasible. To ensure a successful outcome, many factors need to be optimized, including proper patient selection, timing of intervention, donor muscle and motor nerve selection, optimal microneurovascular technique and tension setting, proper postoperative management, and appropriate rehabilitation. Functional outcomes of various applications to the upper extremity and the authors' algorithm for the use of free functional muscle transfer are also included in this article. PMID:27094895

  15. Examination of Force Discrimination in Human Upper Limb Amputees With Reinnervated Limb Sensation Following Peripheral Nerve Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Sensinger, Jonathon W.; Schultz, Aimee E.; Kuiken, Todd A.

    2011-01-01

    Artificial limbs allow amputees to manipulate objects, but the loss of a limb severs the sensory link between a subject and objects they touch. A novel surgical technique we term targeted reinnervation (TR) allows severed cutaneous nerves to reinnervate skin on a different portion of the body. This technique provides a physiologically appropriate portal to the sensory pathways of the missing limb through the reinnervated skin. This study quantified the ability of three amputee subjects who had undergone TR surgery on the chest (two subjects) and upper arm (one subject) to discriminate changes in graded force on their reinnervated skin over a range of 1–4 N using a stochastic staircase approach. These values were compared to those from sites on their intact contralateral skin and index fingers, and from the chests and index fingers of a control population (n = 10). Weber’s ratio (WR) was used to examine the subjects’ abilities to discriminate between a baseline force and subsequent forces of different magnitudes. WRs of 0.22, 0.25, and 0.12 were measured on the reinnervated skin of the three TR subjects, whereas WRs of 0.25,0.23, and 0.12 were measured on their contralateral skin. TR subjects did not have substantially different WRs on their reinnervated versus their contralateral normal side and did not appear to exhibit a trend towards impaired sensation. No significant difference was found between the WR of the chest and index finger of the control subjects, which ranged between 0.09 and 0.21. WR of reinnervated skin for TR subjects were within the 95% confidence interval of the control group. These data suggest that subjects with targeted reinnervation have unimpaired ability to discriminate gradations in force. PMID:19775983

  16. Ultrasound guided distal peripheral nerve block of the upper limb: A technical review

    PubMed Central

    Sehmbi, Herman; Madjdpour, Caveh; Shah, Ushma Jitendra; Chin, Ki Jinn

    2015-01-01

    Upper extremity surgery is commonly performed under regional anesthesia. The advent of ultrasonography has made performing upper extremity nerve blocks relatively easy with a high degree of reliability. The proximal approaches to brachial plexus block such as supraclavicular plexus block, infraclavicular plexus block, or the axillary block are favored for the most surgical procedures of distal upper extremity. Ultrasound guidance has however made distal nerve blocks of the upper limb a technically feasible, safe and efficacious option. In recent years, there has thus been a resurgence of distal peripheral nerve blocks to facilitate hand and wrist surgery. In this article, we review the technical aspects of performing the distal blocks of the upper extremity and highlight some of the clinical aspects of their usage. PMID:26330706

  17. Comparison of sEMG-Based Feature Extraction and Motion Classification Methods for Upper-Limb Movement

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Shuxiang; Pang, Muye; Gao, Baofeng; Hirata, Hideyuki; Ishihara, Hidenori

    2015-01-01

    The surface electromyography (sEMG) technique is proposed for muscle activation detection and intuitive control of prostheses or robot arms. Motion recognition is widely used to map sEMG signals to the target motions. One of the main factors preventing the implementation of this kind of method for real-time applications is the unsatisfactory motion recognition rate and time consumption. The purpose of this paper is to compare eight combinations of four feature extraction methods (Root Mean Square (RMS), Detrended Fluctuation Analysis (DFA), Weight Peaks (WP), and Muscular Model (MM)) and two classifiers (Neural Networks (NN) and Support Vector Machine (SVM)), for the task of mapping sEMG signals to eight upper-limb motions, to find out the relation between these methods and propose a proper combination to solve this issue. Seven subjects participated in the experiment and six muscles of the upper-limb were selected to record sEMG signals. The experimental results showed that NN classifier obtained the highest recognition accuracy rate (88.7%) during the training process while SVM performed better in real-time experiments (85.9%). For time consumption, SVM took less time than NN during the training process but needed more time for real-time computation. Among the four feature extraction methods, WP had the highest recognition rate for the training process (97.7%) while MM performed the best during real-time tests (94.3%). The combination of MM and NN is recommended for strict real-time applications while a combination of MM and SVM will be more suitable when time consumption is not a key requirement. PMID:25894941

  18. Low-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation and intensive occupational therapy for poststroke patients with upper limb hemiparesis: preliminary study of a 15-day protocol.

    PubMed

    Kakuda, Wataru; Abo, Masahiro; Kobayashi, Kazushige; Momosaki, Ryo; Yokoi, Aki; Fukuda, Akiko; Ishikawa, Atsushi; Ito, Hiroshi; Tominaga, Ayumi

    2010-12-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine the safety and feasibility of a 15-day protocol of low-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) combined with intensive occupational therapy (OT) on motor function and spasticity in hemiparetic upper limbs in poststroke patients.Fifteen poststroke patients (age at study entry 55 ± 17years, time after stroke 57± 55 months) with upper limb hemiparesis categorized as Brunnstrom stages 3–5 forhand–fingers were recruited. They were considered to have reached a plateau state at study entry, based on the lack of any increase in Fugl–Meyer Assessment (FMA) Score inthe last 3 months. During the 15-day hospitalization, each patient received 22 sessions of rTMS with 1 Hz applied to the contralesional cerebral hemisphere, followed by intensive OT (one-to-one training including shaping techniques and self training). Upper limb motor function was evaluated by FMA and Wolf Motor Function Test at admission and discharge. The spasticity of finger flexors,wrist flexors and elbow flexors in the affected upper limb was also evaluated with Modified Ashworth Scale. The15-day protocol was well tolerated by all patients. Atdischarge, the FMA Score was increased in all 15 patients(17–57 to 18–61 points). Shortening of performance time on Wolf Motor Function Test was noted in 12 patients(44–1584 to 39–1485 s). The Modified Ashworth ScaleScore for some flexor muscles decreased in 12 patients.In conclusion, our 15-day protocol of low-frequency rTMS combined with intensive OT seems feasible not only for improving motor function, but also for reducing spasticity in the affected upper limb in post stroke hemiparetic patients. PMID:20613547

  19. Effects of stretching and disuse on amino acids in muscles of rat hind limbs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaspers, Stephen R.; Henriksen, Erik J.; Satarug, Soisungwan; Tischler, Marc E.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of disuse and passive stretch on the concentrations of amino acids and ammonia in the unloaded soleus muscle was investigated in hindquarter-suspended (for six days by casting one foot in dorsiflexion) tail-casted rats. For a comparison with the condition of unloading, amino acids and ammonia were also measured in shortened extensor digitorum longus in the same casted limb and in denervated leg muscles. The results obtained suggest that passive stretch diminishes some of the characteristic alterations of amino acid concentrations due to unloading. This effect of stretch is considered to be due to the maintenance of muscle tension.

  20. Characteristics of human knee muscle coordination during isometric contractions in a standing posture: the effect of limb task.

    PubMed

    MacLeod, Toran D; Manal, Kurt; Silbernagel, Karin Grävare; Snyder-Mackler, Lynn; Buchanan, Thomas S

    2013-12-01

    Different functional roles for the hands have been demonstrated, however leg control is not as well understood. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate bilateral knee neuromuscular control to determine if the limb receiving greater attention would have more well-tuned control compared to an unattended limb. Surface electrodes were placed on seven muscles of each limb, before standing on two force platforms. Visual feedback was given of the forces and moments of the "focus limb," but not the "unattended limb." Static isometric forces were matched with their focus limb, requiring their unattended limb to push in the opposite direction, using a combination of forward-backward-medial-lateral shear forces while muscle activity was collected bilaterally. There was a significant main effect for limb task (p = 0.02), with the medial hamstrings being more specific (p = 0.001) while performing the unattended limb and the lateral hamstring being more well-tuned (p = 0.007) while performing the focus limb task. The focus limb's medial and lateral gastrocnemius were principally active in the forwards direction, but only the unattended limb's lateral gastrocnemius was active in the backwards direction. Findings suggest unique neuromuscular control strategies are used for the legs depending on limb task. PMID:23790392

  1. P-31 Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS) of limb muscles during bedrest with exercise countermeasures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, P.; Berry, I.; Arnaud, S.; Moseley, M.

    1987-01-01

    Nineteen volunteers in bed with head down tilt (-6 deg) for 1 month and doing or not exercise training while in bed (lido or ergometer) had their limb muscle studied by magnetic resonance spectroscopy. A protocol of repetitive exercise in the magnet was set and a wooden probe designed to support the limb and to allow exercise. Spectra were recorded continuously during the protocol. In each spectrum, inorganic phosphate, phosphocreatin, adenosin triphosphate, and pH were measured. All the subjects were studied before, after bedrest, and 6 weeks later. After 1 month, the lido group show no changes in the spectra of their leg muscles while the group doing no exercise or ergometer do. For the arms, a loss of muscle function is only seen in the group doing no exercise.

  2. Functional trade-offs in the limb muscles of dogs selected for running vs. fighting.

    PubMed

    Pasi, B M; Carrier, D R

    2003-03-01

    The physical demands of rapid and economical running differ from those of physical fighting such that functional trade-offs may prevent simultaneous evolution of optimal performance in both behaviours. Here we test three hypotheses of functional trade-off by measuring determinants of limb musculoskeletal function in two breeds of domestic dogs that have undergone intense artificial selection for running (Greyhound) or fighting performance (Pit Bull). We found that Greyhounds differ from Pit Bulls in having relatively less muscle mass distally in their limbs, weaker muscles in their forelimbs than their hindlimbs, and a much greater capacity for elastic storage in the in-series tendons of the extensor muscles of their ankle joints. These observations are consistent with the hypothesis that specialization for rapid or economical running can limit fighting performance and vice versa. We suggest that functional trade-offs that prevent simultaneous evolution of optimal performance in both locomotor and fighting abilities are widespread taxonomically. PMID:14635871

  3. Selective impairment of sensorimotor representations following short-term upper-limb immobilization.

    PubMed

    Meugnot, Aurore; Agbangla, Nounagnon Frutueux; Toussaint, Lucette

    2016-09-01

    In the present experiment, we examined whether short-term upper-limb immobilization would selectively affect the representation of the immobilized limb (using a hand laterality task) or whether the effect of immobilization would extend to another body part (using a foot laterality task). A rigid splint placed on the participants' left hand was used for immobilization. A control group did not undergo the immobilization procedure. We compared the participants' performances on the hand and foot laterality tasks before (T1) and after (T2) a 48-hour delay, corresponding to the immobilization period. For controls, response time analysis indicated a benefit of task repetition for the recognition of both hand and foot images. For the immobilized group, a slowdown of performance appeared in T2 for hand images, but not for foot images. The reduced benefit of task repetition following left-hand immobilization appeared for both the immobilized and non-immobilized hand images. These findings revealed that the general cognitive representation of upper-limb movements is affected by the decrease in input/output signal processing due to the left-hand immobilization, while the cognitive representation of lower-limb movements is not. PMID:26642973

  4. Comparison of laterality index of upper and lower limb movement using brain activated fMRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harirchian, Mohammad Hossein; Oghabian, Mohammad Ali; Rezvanizadeh, Alireza; Bolandzadeh, Niousha

    2008-03-01

    Asymmetry of bilateral cerebral function, i.e. laterality, is an important phenomenon in many brain actions such as motor functions. This asymmetry maybe altered in some clinical conditions such as Multiple Sclerosis (MS). The aim of this study was to delineate the laterality differences for upper and lower limbs in healthy subjects to compare this pattern with subjects suffering from MS in advance. Hence 9 Male healthy subjects underwent fMRI assessment, while they were asked to move their limbs in a predetermined pattern. The results showed that hands movement activates the brain with a significant lateralization in pre-motor cortex in comparison with lower limb. Also, dominant hands activate brain more lateralized than the non-dominant hand. In addition, Left basal ganglia were observed to be activated regardless of the hand used, While, These patterns of Brain activation was not detected in lower limbs. We hypothesize that this difference might be attributed to this point that hand is usually responsible for precise and fine voluntary movements, whereas lower limb joints are mainly responsible for locomotion, a function integrating voluntary and automatic bilateral movements.

  5. Proprioceptive Rehabilitation of Upper Limb Dysfunction in Movement Disorders: A Clinical Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Abbruzzese, Giovanni; Trompetto, Carlo; Mori, Laura; Pelosin, Elisa

    2014-01-01

    Movement disorders (MDs) are frequently associated with sensory abnormalities. In particular, proprioceptive deficits have been largely documented in both hypokinetic (Parkinson’s disease) and hyperkinetic conditions (dystonia), suggesting a possible role in their pathophysiology. Proprioceptive feedback is a fundamental component of sensorimotor integration allowing effective planning and execution of voluntary movements. Rehabilitation has become an essential element in the management of patients with MDs, and there is a strong rationale to include proprioceptive training in rehabilitation protocols focused on mobility problems of the upper limbs. Proprioceptive training is aimed at improving the integration of proprioceptive signals using “task-intrinsic” or “augmented feedback.” This perspective article reviews the available evidence on the effects of proprioceptive stimulation in improving upper limb mobility in patients with MDs and highlights the emerging innovative approaches targeted to maximizing the benefits of exercise by means of enhanced proprioception. PMID:25505402

  6. [Kinematics Modeling and Analysis of Central-driven Robot for Upper Limb Rehabilitation after Stroke].

    PubMed

    Yi, Jinhua; Yu, Hongliu; Zhang, Ying; Hu, Xin; Shi, Ping

    2015-12-01

    The present paper proposed a central-driven structure of upper limb rehabilitation robot in order to reduce the volume of the robotic arm in the structure, and also to reduce the influence of motor noise, radiation and other adverse factors on upper limb dysfunction patient. The forward and inverse kinematics equations have been obtained with using the Denavit-Hartenberg (D-H) parameter method. The motion simulation has been done to obtain the angle-time curve of each joint and the position-time curve of handle under setting rehabilitation path by using Solid Works software. Experimental results showed that the rationality with the central-driven structure design had been verified by the fact that the handle could move under setting rehabilitation path. The effectiveness of kinematics equations had been proved, and the error was less than 3° by comparing the angle-time curves obtained from calculation with those from motion simulation. PMID:27079086

  7. Study of the different types of actuators and mechanisms for upper limb prostheses.

    PubMed

    Cura, Vanderlei O Del; Cunha, Fransérgio L; Aguiar, Manoel L; Cliquet, Alberto

    2003-06-01

    Research in the area of actuators and mechanisms has shown steadily growing technological advances in externally activated upper limb prostheses. From among the actuators, advances include the use of piezoelectric materials, special metal alloys, polymers, and new motor applications, while the advances in mechanisms include mechanical designs based on the anatomy of the human hand and improvements in the way these components are combined. These efforts are aimed at meeting the need for anthropomorphic and functional prosthetic devices that enable patients to carry out basic daily tasks more easily and reduce the rejection rate of prostheses. This article technically discusses the several types of actuators and mechanisms, listing their main characteristics, applications, and advantages and disadvantages, and the current state of research in the area of rehabilitation of upper limb functions through the use of active prostheses. Comparisons of these devices are made with regard to the main criteria of construction and operation required to achieve optimal prosthetic performance. PMID:12780505

  8. A Case of Upper Limb Compartment Syndrome following Snake Envenomation: Measure Twice, Cut Once.

    PubMed

    Thomas, D K; Budhoo, E J; Mencia, M M; Ali, T F; Santana, D

    2014-08-01

    We report a case of a 16-year old male patient who sustained a poisonous bite from a mapepire balsain snake on the dorsum of his left hand. The subject presented within one hour of envenomation and subsequently developed clinical features of acute compartment syndrome in the involved upper limb. Early diagnosis and emergency fasciotomy effectively treated his condition. Aggressive physiotherapy coupled with this ensured best functional outcome. PMID:25429488

  9. A Case of Upper Limb Compartment Syndrome following Snake Envenomation Measure Twice, Cut Once

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, DK; Budhoo, EJ; Mencia, MM; Ali, TF; Santana, D

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of a 16-year old male patient who sustained a poisonous bite from a mapepire balsain snake on the dorsum of his left hand. The subject presented within one hour of envenomation and subsequently developed clinical features of acute compartment syndrome in the involved upper limb. Early diagnosis and emergency fasciotomy effectively treated his condition. Aggressive physiotherapy coupled with this ensured best functional outcome. PMID:25429488

  10. Upper Limb Outcome Measures Used in Stroke Rehabilitation Studies: A Systematic Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Santisteban, Leire; Térémetz, Maxime; Bleton, Jean-Pierre; Baron, Jean-Claude; Maier, Marc A.; Lindberg, Påvel G.

    2016-01-01

    Background Establishing which upper limb outcome measures are most commonly used in stroke studies may help in improving consensus among scientists and clinicians. Objective In this study we aimed to identify the most commonly used upper limb outcome measures in intervention studies after stroke and to describe domains covered according to ICF, how measures are combined, and how their use varies geographically and over time. Methods Pubmed, CinHAL, and PeDRO databases were searched for upper limb intervention studies in stroke according to PRISMA guidelines and477 studies were included. Results In studies 48different outcome measures were found. Only 15 of these outcome measures were used in more than 5% of the studies. The Fugl-Meyer Test (FMT)was the most commonly used measure (in 36% of studies). Commonly used measures covered ICF domains of body function and activity to varying extents. Most studies (72%) combined multiple outcome measures: the FMT was often combined with the Motor Activity Log (MAL), the Wolf Motor Function Test and the Action Research Arm Test, but infrequently combined with the Motor Assessment Scale or the Nine Hole Peg Test. Key components of manual dexterity such as selective finger movements were rarely measured. Frequency of use increased over a twelve-year period for the FMT and for assessments of kinematics, whereas other measures, such as the MAL and the Jebsen Taylor Hand Test showed decreased use over time. Use varied largely between countries showing low international consensus. Conclusions The results showed a large diversity of outcome measures used across studies. However, a growing number of studies used the FMT, a neurological test with good psychometric properties. For thorough assessment the FMT needs to be combined with functional measures. These findings illustrate the need for strategies to build international consensus on appropriate outcome measures for upper limb function after stroke. PMID:27152853

  11. Efficacy and safety of NABOTA in post-stroke upper limb spasticity: a phase 3 multicenter, double-blinded, randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Nam, Hyung Seok; Park, Yoon Ghil; Paik, Nam-Jong; Oh, Byung-Mo; Chun, Min Ho; Yang, Hea-Eun; Kim, Dae Hyun; Yi, Youbin; Seo, Han Gil; Kim, Kwang Dong; Chang, Min Cheol; Ryu, Jae Hak; Lee, Shi-Uk

    2015-10-15

    Botulinum toxin A is widely used in the clinics to reduce spasticity and improve upper limb function for post-stroke patients. Efficacy and safety of a new botulinum toxin type A, NABOTA (DWP450) in post-stroke upper limb spasticity was evaluated in comparison with Botox (onabotulinum toxin A). A total of 197 patients with post-stroke upper limb spasticity were included in this study and randomly assigned to NABOTA group (n=99) or Botox group (n=98). Wrist flexors with modified Ashworth Scale (MAS) grade 2 or greater, and elbow flexors, thumb flexors and finger flexors with MAS 1 or greater were injected with either drug. The primary outcome was the change of wrist flexor MAS between baseline and 4weeks post-injection. MAS of each injected muscle, Disability Assessment Scale (DAS), and Caregiver Burden Scale were also assessed at baseline and 4, 8, and 12weeks after the injection. Global Assessment Scale (GAS) was evaluated on the last visit at 12weeks. The change of MAS for wrist flexor between baseline and 4weeks post-injection was -1.440.72 in the NABOTA group and -1.460.77 in the Botox group. The difference of change between both groups was 0.0129 (95% confidence interval -0.2062-0.2319), within the non-inferiority margin of 0.45. Both groups showed significant improvements regarding MAS of all injected muscles, DAS, and Caregiver Burden Scale at all follow-up periods. There were no significant differences in all secondary outcome measures between the two groups. NABOTA demonstrated non-inferior efficacy and safety for improving upper limb spasticity in stroke patients compared to Botox. PMID:26233808

  12. Effects of immobilization on rat hind limb muscles under non-weight-bearing conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaspers, Stephen R.; Fagan, Julie M.; Satarug, Soisungwan; Cook, Paul H.; Tischler, Marc E.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of stretched and unstretched immobilization of a hind limb on the concentration and the metabolism of proteins in the hind-limb muscles of rats was investigated. The animals were divided into three groups: (1) weight-bearing controls, (2) tail-cast-suspended, and (3) suspended, with one hind limb immobilized with the ankle in dorsiflexion (30-40 deg angle) and the other freely moving. It was found that unloading the hind limbs for 6 days by tail cast suspension caused soleus to atrophy and reduced growth of the gastrocnemius and plantaris muscles; unloading resulted in a higher degradation rate and lower synthesis rate in both in vitro and in vivo. Chronic stretch of the unloaded soleus not only prevented its atrophy but led to significant hypertrophy, relative to weight-bearing controls, with increases in both the sarcoplasmic and myofibrillar protein fractions. Immobilizing one ankle in dorsiflexion prevented the inhibition of growth in the plantaris and gastrocnemius muscles due to unloading.

  13. Assessing movement factors in upper limb kinematics decoding from EEG signals.

    PubMed

    Úbeda, Andrés; Hortal, Enrique; Iáñez, Eduardo; Perez-Vidal, Carlos; Azorín, Jose M

    2015-01-01

    The past decades have seen the rapid development of upper limb kinematics decoding techniques by performing intracortical recordings of brain signals. However, the use of non-invasive approaches to perform similar decoding procedures is still in its early stages. Recent studies show that there is a correlation between electroencephalographic (EEG) signals and hand-reaching kinematic parameters. From these studies, it could be concluded that the accuracy of upper limb kinematics decoding depends, at least partially, on the characteristics of the performed movement. In this paper, we have studied upper limb movements with different speeds and trajectories in a controlled environment to analyze the influence of movement variability in the decoding performance. To that end, low frequency components of the EEG signals have been decoded with linear models to obtain the position of the volunteer's hand during performed trajectories grasping the end effector of a planar manipulandum. The results confirm that it is possible to obtain kinematic information from low frequency EEG signals and show that decoding performance is significantly influenced by movement variability and tracking accuracy as continuous and slower movements improve the accuracy of the decoder. This is a key factor that should be taken into account in future experimental designs. PMID:26020525

  14. Quantitative assessment of upper limb motion in neurorehabilitation utilizing inertial sensors.

    PubMed

    Bai, Lu; Pepper, Matthew G; Yan, Yong; Spurgeon, Sarah K; Sakel, Mohamed; Phillips, Malcolm

    2015-03-01

    Two inertial sensor systems were developed for 3-D tracking of upper limb movement. One utilizes four sensors and a kinematic model to track the positions of all four upper limb segments/joints and the other uses one sensor and a dead reckoning algorithm to track a single upper limb segment/joint. Initial evaluation indicates that the system using the kinematic model is able to track orientation to 1 degree and position to within 0.1 cm over a distance of 10 cm. The dead reckoning system combined with the "zero velocity update" correction can reduce errors introduced through double integration of errors in the estimate in offsets of the acceleration from several meters to 0.8% of the total movement distance. Preliminary evaluation of the systems has been carried out on ten healthy volunteers and the kinematic system has also been evaluated on one patient undergoing neurorehabilitation over a period of ten weeks. The initial evaluation of the two systems also shows that they can monitor dynamic information of joint rotation and position and assess rehabilitation process in an objective way, providing additional clinical insight into the rehabilitation process. PMID:25420266

  15. A Framework to Automate Assessment of Upper-Limb Motor Function Impairment: A Feasibility Study

    PubMed Central

    Otten, Paul; Kim, Jonghyun; Son, Sang Hyuk

    2015-01-01

    Standard upper-limb motor function impairment assessments, such as the Fugl-Meyer Assessment (FMA), are a critical aspect of rehabilitation after neurological disorders. These assessments typically take a long time (about 30 min for the FMA) for a clinician to perform on a patient, which is a severe burden in a clinical environment. In this paper, we propose a framework for automating upper-limb motor assessments that uses low-cost sensors to collect movement data. The sensor data is then processed through a machine learning algorithm to determine a score for a patient’s upper-limb functionality. To demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed approach, we implemented a system based on the proposed framework that can automate most of the FMA. Our experiment shows that the system provides similar FMA scores to clinician scores, and reduces the time spent evaluating each patient by 82%. Moreover, the proposed framework can be used to implement customized tests or tests specified in other existing standard assessment methods. PMID:26287206

  16. A Framework to Automate Assessment of Upper-Limb Motor Function Impairment: A Feasibility Study.

    PubMed

    Otten, Paul; Kim, Jonghyun; Son, Sang Hyuk

    2015-01-01

    Standard upper-limb motor function impairment assessments, such as the Fugl-Meyer Assessment (FMA), are a critical aspect of rehabilitation after neurological disorders. These assessments typically take a long time (about 30 min for the FMA) for a clinician to perform on a patient, which is a severe burden in a clinical environment. In this paper, we propose a framework for automating upper-limb motor assessments that uses low-cost sensors to collect movement data. The sensor data is then processed through a machine learning algorithm to determine a score for a patient's upper-limb functionality. To demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed approach, we implemented a system based on the proposed framework that can automate most of the FMA. Our experiment shows that the system provides similar FMA scores to clinician scores, and reduces the time spent evaluating each patient by 82%. Moreover, the proposed framework can be used to implement customized tests or tests specified in other existing standard assessment methods. PMID:26287206

  17. The pedicled thoraco-umbilical flap: A versatile technique for upper limb coverage

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Sharad; Sharma, Ramesh Kumar

    2009-01-01

    Injuries to upper limb has been on the increase and is invariably associated with significant soft tissue loss requiring a flap cover. Local tissue may not be available for cover in a majority of situations, necessitating import of tissue from a distant source. We have utilized the thoraco-umbilical flap taken from the trunk for this purpose. This flap is based on the perforators of the deep inferior epigastric artery that are maximally centred on the periumbilical region. This flap was used in 83 patients. The patients were observed for at least 3 weeks and any flap or donor site complications were recorded. The patients were again followed up at 3 months interval and the donor site scar was assessed. The flaps survived in 81 patients; there was marginal flap necrosis in five patients and partial flap necrosis in two patients. None of these patients required any additional procedure for coverage. The flap is technically easy to plan, almost effortless to drape around upper limb defects, with no significant donor site morbidity and also the post operative immobilization was fairly comfortable. The thoraco-umbilical flap thus is a very useful technique for coverage of the upper limb and is recommended as a first line flap for this purpose. PMID:20368851

  18. Gesture recognition in upper-limb prosthetics: a viability study using dynamic time warping and gyroscopes.

    PubMed

    Dermitzakis, Konstantinos; Arieta, Alejandro Hernandez; Pfeifer, Rolf

    2011-01-01

    One of the significant challenges in the upper-limb-prosthetics research field is to identify appropriate interfaces that utilize the full potential of current state-of-the-art neuroprostheses. As the new generation of such prostheses paces towards approximating the human physiological performance in terms of movement dexterity and sensory feedback, it is clear that current non-invasive interfaces are still severely limited. Surface electromyography, the interface ubiquitously used in the field, is riddled with several shortcomings. Gesture recognition, an interface pervasively used in wearables and mobile devices, shows a strong potential as a non-invasive upper-limb prosthetic interface. This study aims at showcasing its potential in the field by using gyroscope sensors. To this end, we (1) explore the viability of Dynamic Time Warping as a classification method for upper-limb prosthetics and (2) look for appropriate sensor locations on the body. Results indicate an optimal classification rate of 97.53%, σ = 8.74 using a sensor located proximal to the endpoint performing a gesture. PMID:22255345

  19. Comparative study of upper limb load assessment and occurrence of musculoskeletal disorders at repetitive task workstations.

    PubMed

    Roman-Liu, Danuta; Bugajska, Joanna; Tokarski, Tomasz

    2014-01-01

    This study explored the relationship between subjectively assessed complaints of pain in the arm, forearm and hand, and musculoskeletal load caused by repetitive tasks. Workers (n=942) were divided into 22 subgroups, according to the type of their workstations. They answered questions on perceived musculoskeletal pain of upper limbs. Basic and aggregate indices from a questionnaire on the prevalence, intensity and frequency of pain were compared with an upper limb load indicator (repetitive task index, RTI) calculated with the recently developed Upper Limb Risk Assessment (ULRA). There was relatively strong correlation of RTI and general intensity and frequency of pain in the arm, and general intensity and frequency of pain in the arm and forearm or prevalence of pain in the arm. Frequency and intensity of pain in the arm were weakly correlated. An aggregate indicator of evaluation of MSDs, which was calculated on the basis of the prevalence, intensity and frequency of pain, was to a higher degree associated with the musculoskeletal load of a task than basic evaluative parameters. Thus, such an aggregate indicator can be an alternative in comparing subjectively assessed MSDs with task-related musculoskeletal load and in establishing limit levels for that load. PMID:24975106

  20. Action observation for upper limb function after stroke: evidence-based review of randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Kim, KyeongMi

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to suggest evidenced information about action observation to improve upper limb function after stroke. [Methods] A systematic review of randomized controlled trials involving adults aged 18 years or over and including descriptions of action observation for improving upper limb function was undertaken. Electronic databases were searched, including MEDLINE, CINAHL, and PEDro (the Physiotherapy Evidence Database), for articles published between 2000 to 2014. Following completion of the searches, two reviewers independently assessed the trials and extracted data using a data extraction form. The same two reviewers independently documented the methodological quality of the trials by using the PEDro scale. [Results] Five randomized controlled trials were ultimately included in this review, and four of them (80%) reported statistically significant effects for motor recovery of upper limb using action observation intervention in between groups. [Conclusion] This review of the literature presents evidence attesting to the benefits conferred on stroke patints resulting from participation in an action observation intervention. The body of literature in this field is growing steadily. Further work needs to be done to evaluate the evidence for different conditions after stroke and different duration of intervention. PMID:26644700

  1. Comparative Study of Upper Limb Load Assessment and Occurrence of Musculoskeletal Disorders at Repetitive Task Workstations

    PubMed Central

    ROMAN-LIU, Danuta; BUGAJSKA, Joanna; TOKARSKI, Tomasz

    2014-01-01

    This study explored the relationship between subjectively assessed complaints of pain in the arm, forearm and hand, and musculoskeletal load caused by repetitive tasks. Workers (n=942) were divided into 22 subgroups, according to the type of their workstations. They answered questions on perceived musculoskeletal pain of upper limbs. Basic and aggregate indices from a questionnaire on the prevalence, intensity and frequency of pain were compared with an upper limb load indicator (repetitive task index, RTI) calculated with the recently developed Upper Limb Risk Assessment (ULRA). There was relatively strong correlation of RTI and general intensity and frequency of pain in the arm, and general intensity and frequency of pain in the arm and forearm or prevalence of pain in the arm. Frequency and intensity of pain in the arm were weakly correlated. An aggregate indicator of evaluation of MSDs, which was calculated on the basis of the prevalence, intensity and frequency of pain, was to a higher degree associated with the musculoskeletal load of a task than basic evaluative parameters. Thus, such an aggregate indicator can be an alternative in comparing subjectively assessed MSDs with task-related musculoskeletal load and in establishing limit levels for that load. PMID:24975106

  2. Postoperative Massive Pulmonary Embolism Due to Superficial Vein Thrombosis of the Upper Limb.

    PubMed

    Cascella, Marco; Viscardi, Daniela; Bifulco, Francesca; Cuomo, Arturo

    2016-04-01

    It is well known that deep vein thrombosis of the upper extremities is linked to high morbidity/mortality, resulting in 12-20% of all documented pulmonary embolism; however, there are few data about thromboembolism originating from a vein and/or a branch of a superficial vein of the upper extremities. Pulmonary embolism secondary to upper limb superficial vein thrombosis (not combined with upper extremities deep vein thrombosis) is a very rare clinical manifestation with few cases reported in the literature. We report a rare case of thrombophlebitis in departure from a superficial branch of the cephalic vein of the right arm, complicated by cardiac arrest secondary to a massive pulmonary embolism in a patient who underwent major surgery for ovarian cancer. We discuss on the numerous thrombotic risk factors, triggering a cascade of reactions and resulting in a potential fatal clinical manifestation. PMID:26985256

  3. Postoperative Massive Pulmonary Embolism Due to Superficial Vein Thrombosis of the Upper Limb

    PubMed Central

    Cascella, Marco; Viscardi, Daniela; Bifulco, Francesca; Cuomo, Arturo

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that deep vein thrombosis of the upper extremities is linked to high morbidity/mortality, resulting in 12-20% of all documented pulmonary embolism; however, there are few data about thromboembolism originating from a vein and/or a branch of a superficial vein of the upper extremities. Pulmonary embolism secondary to upper limb superficial vein thrombosis (not combined with upper extremities deep vein thrombosis) is a very rare clinical manifestation with few cases reported in the literature. We report a rare case of thrombophlebitis in departure from a superficial branch of the cephalic vein of the right arm, complicated by cardiac arrest secondary to a massive pulmonary embolism in a patient who underwent major surgery for ovarian cancer. We discuss on the numerous thrombotic risk factors, triggering a cascade of reactions and resulting in a potential fatal clinical manifestation. PMID:26985256

  4. An Official American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society Statement: Update on Limb Muscle Dysfunction in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Maltais, François; Decramer, Marc; Casaburi, Richard; Barreiro, Esther; Burelle, Yan; Debigaré, Richard; Dekhuijzen, P. N. Richard; Franssen, Frits; Gayan-Ramirez, Ghislaine; Gea, Joaquim; Gosker, Harry R.; Gosselink, Rik; Hayot, Maurice; Hussain, Sabah N. A.; Janssens, Wim; Polkey, Micheal I.; Roca, Josep; Saey, Didier; Schols, Annemie M. W. J.; Spruit, Martijn A.; Steiner, Michael; Taivassalo, Tanja; Troosters, Thierry; Vogiatzis, Ioannis; Wagner, Peter D.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Limb muscle dysfunction is prevalent in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and it has important clinical implications, such as reduced exercise tolerance, quality of life, and even survival. Since the previous American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society (ATS/ERS) statement on limb muscle dysfunction, important progress has been made on the characterization of this problem and on our understanding of its pathophysiology and clinical implications. Purpose: The purpose of this document is to update the 1999 ATS/ERS statement on limb muscle dysfunction in COPD. Methods: An interdisciplinary committee of experts from the ATS and ERS Pulmonary Rehabilitation and Clinical Problems assemblies determined that the scope of this document should be limited to limb muscles. Committee members conducted focused reviews of the literature on several topics. A librarian also performed a literature search. An ATS methodologist provided advice to the committee, ensuring that the methodological approach was consistent with ATS standards. Results: We identified important advances in our understanding of the extent and nature of the structural alterations in limb muscles in patients with COPD. Since the last update, landmark studies were published on the mechanisms of development of limb muscle dysfunction in COPD and on the treatment of this condition. We now have a better understanding of the clinical implications of limb muscle dysfunction. Although exercise training is the most potent intervention to address this condition, other therapies, such as neuromuscular electrical stimulation, are emerging. Assessment of limb muscle function can identify patients who are at increased risk of poor clinical outcomes, such as exercise intolerance and premature mortality. Conclusions: Limb muscle dysfunction is a key systemic consequence of COPD. However, there are still important gaps in our knowledge about the mechanisms of development of this problem. Strategies for early detection and specific treatments for this condition are also needed. PMID:24787074

  5. Intuitive, online, simultaneous, and proportional myoelectric control over two degrees-of-freedom in upper limb amputees.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Ning; Rehbaum, Hubertus; Vujaklija, Ivan; Graimann, Bernhard; Farina, Dario

    2014-05-01

    We propose an approach for online simultaneous and proportional myoelectric control of two degrees-of-freedom (DoF) of the wrist, using surface electromyographic signals. The method is based on the nonnegative matrix factorization (NMF) of the wrist muscle activation to extract low-dimensional control signals translated by the user into kinematic variables. This procedure does not need a training set of signals for which the kinematics is known (labeled dataset) and is thus unsupervised (although it requires an initial calibration without labeled signals). The estimated control signals using NMF are used to directly control two DoFs of wrist. The method was tested on seven subjects with upper limb deficiency and on seven able-bodied subjects. The subjects performed online control of a virtual object with two DoFs to achieve goal-oriented tasks. The performance of the two subject groups, measured as the task completion rate, task completion time, and execution efficiency, was not statistically different. The approach was compared, and demonstrated to be superior to the online control by the industrial state-of-the-art approach. These results show that this new approach, which has several advantages over the previous myoelectric prosthetic control systems, has the potential of providing intuitive and dexterous control of artificial limbs for amputees. PMID:23996582

  6. Role of Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor in Beneficial Effects of Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation for Upper Limb Hemiparesis after Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Kakuda, Wataru; Miyano, Satoshi; Momosaki, Ryo; Abo, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    Background Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) can improve upper limb hemiparesis after stroke but the mechanism underlying its efficacy remains elusive. rTMS seems to alter brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and such effect is influenced by BDNF gene polymorphism. Objectives To investigate the molecular effects of rTMS on serum levels of BDNF, its precursor proBDNF and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) in poststroke patients with upper limb hemiparesis. Methods Poststroke patients with upper limb hemiparesis were studied. Sixty-two patients underwent rehabilitation plus rTMS combination therapy and 33 patients underwent rehabilitation monotherapy without rTMS for 14 days at our hospital. One Hz rTMS was applied over the motor representation of the first dorsal interosseous muscle on the non-lesional hemisphere. Fugl-Meyer Assessment and Wolf Motor Function (WMFT) were used to evaluate motor function on the affected upper limb before and after intervention. Blood samples were collected for analysis of BDNF polymorphism and measurement of BDNF, proBDNF and MMP-9 levels. Results Two-week combination therapy increased BDNF and MMP-9 serum levels, but not serum proBDNF. Serum BDNF and MMP-9 levels did not correlate with motor function improvement, though baseline serum proBDNF levels correlated negatively and significantly with improvement in WMFT (ρ = -0.422, p = 0.002). The outcome of rTMS therapy was not altered by BDNF gene polymorphism. Conclusions The combination therapy of rehabilitation plus low-frequency rTMS seems to improve motor function in the affected limb, by activating BDNF processing. BDNF and its precursor proBDNF could be potentially suitable biomarkers for poststroke motor recovery. PMID:27007747

  7. Relationships between Lower Limb Muscle Strength and Locomotor Capacity in Children and Adolescents with Cerebral Palsy Who Walk Independently

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferland, Chantale; Lepage, Celine; Moffet, Helene; Maltais, Desiree B.

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to quantify relationships between lower limb muscle strength and locomotor capacity for children and adolescents with cerebral palsy (CP) to identify key muscle groups for strength training. Fifty 6- to 16-year-olds with CP (Gross Motor Function Classification System level I or II) participated. Isometric muscle strength of hip

  8. Relationships between Lower Limb Muscle Strength and Locomotor Capacity in Children and Adolescents with Cerebral Palsy Who Walk Independently

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferland, Chantale; Lepage, Celine; Moffet, Helene; Maltais, Desiree B.

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to quantify relationships between lower limb muscle strength and locomotor capacity for children and adolescents with cerebral palsy (CP) to identify key muscle groups for strength training. Fifty 6- to 16-year-olds with CP (Gross Motor Function Classification System level I or II) participated. Isometric muscle strength of hip…

  9. Impact of early applied upper limb stimulation: The EXPLICIT-stroke programme design

    PubMed Central

    Kwakkel, Gert; Meskers, Carel GM; van Wegen, Erwin E; Lankhorst, Guus J; Geurts, Alexander CH; van Kuijk, Annet A; Lindeman, Eline; Visser-Meily, Anne; de Vlugt, Erwin; Arendzen, J Hans

    2008-01-01

    Background Main claims of the literature are that functional recovery of the paretic upper limb is mainly defined within the first month post stroke and that rehabilitation services should preferably be applied intensively and in a task-oriented way within this particular time window. EXplaining PLastICITy after stroke (acronym EXPLICIT-stroke) aims to explore the underlying mechanisms of post stroke upper limb recovery. Two randomized single blinded trials form the core of the programme, investigating the effects of early modified Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy (modified CIMT) and EMG-triggered Neuro-Muscular Stimulation (EMG-NMS) in patients with respectively a favourable or poor probability for recovery of dexterity. Methods/design 180 participants suffering from an acute, first-ever ischemic stroke will be recruited. Functional prognosis at the end of the first week post stroke is used to stratify patient into a poor prognosis group for upper limb recovery (N = 120, A2 project) and a group with a favourable prognosis (N = 60, A1 project). Both groups will be randomized to an experimental arm receiving respectively modified CIMT (favourable prognosis) or EMG-NMS (poor prognosis) for 3 weeks or to a control arm receiving usual care. Primary outcome variable will be the Action Research Arm Test (ARAT), assessed at 1,2,3,4,5, 8, 12 and 26 weeks post stroke. To study the impact of modified CIMT or EMG-NMS on stroke recovery mechanisms i.e. neuroplasticity, compensatory movements and upper limb neuromechanics, 60 patients randomly selected from projects A1 and A2 will undergo TMS, kinematical and haptic robotic measurements within a repeated measurement design. Additionally, 30 patients from the A1 project will undergo fMRI at baseline, 5 and 26 weeks post stroke. Conclusion EXPLICIT stroke is a 5 year translational research programme which main aim is to investigate the effects of early applied intensive intervention for regaining dexterity and to explore the underlying mechanisms that are involved in regaining upper limb function after stroke. EXPLICIT-stroke will provide an answer to the key question whether therapy induced improvements are due to either a reduction of basic motor impairment by neural repair i.e. restitution of function and/or the use of behavioural compensation strategies i.e. substitution of function. EXPLICIT is registered at the Netherlands Trial Register (NTR, ., TC 1424) PMID:19091088

  10. Muscle moment arms of the gibbon hind limb: implications for hylobatid locomotion.

    PubMed

    Channon, Anthony J; Crompton, Robin H; Günther, Michael M; Vereecke, Evie E

    2010-04-01

    Muscles facilitate skeletal movement via the production of a torque or moment about a joint. The magnitude of the moment produced depends on both the force of muscular contraction and the size of the moment arm used to rotate the joint. Hence, larger muscle moment arms generate larger joint torques and forces at the point of application. The moment arms of a number of gibbon hind limb muscles were measured on four cadaveric specimens (one Hylobates lar, one H. moloch and two H. syndactylus). The tendon travel technique was used, utilizing an electro-goniometer and a linear voltage displacement transducer. The data were analysed using a technique based on a differentiated cubic spline and normalized to remove the effect of body size. The data demonstrated a functional differentiation between voluminous muscles with short fascicles having small muscle moment arms and muscles with longer fascicles and comparatively smaller physiological cross-sectional area having longer muscle moment arms. The functional implications of these particular configurations were simulated using a simple geometric fascicle strain model that predicts that the rectus femoris and gastrocnemius muscles are more likely to act primarily at their distal joints (knee and ankle, respectively) because they have short fascicles. The data also show that the main hip and knee extensors maintain a very small moment arm throughout the range of joint angles seen in the locomotion of gibbons, which (coupled to voluminous, short-fascicled muscles) might help facilitate rapid joint rotation during powerful movements. PMID:20447251

  11. Necrotising soft-tissue infections of the upper limb: risk factors for amputation and death.

    PubMed

    Uehara, K; Yasunaga, H; Morizaki, Y; Horiguchi, H; Fushimi, K; Tanaka, S

    2014-11-01

    Necrotising soft-tissue infections (NSTIs) of the upper limb are uncommon, but potentially life-threatening. We used a national database to investigate the risk factors for amputation of the limb and death. We extracted data from the Japanese Diagnosis Procedure Combination database on 116 patients (79 men and 37 women) who had a NSTI of the upper extremity between 2007 and 2010. The overall in-hospital mortality was 15.5%. Univariate analysis of in-hospital mortality showed that the significant variables were age (p = 0.015), liver dysfunction (p = 0.005), renal dysfunction (P < 0.001), altered consciousness (p = 0.049), and sepsis (p = 0.021). Logistic regression analysis showed that the factors associated with death in hospital were age over 70 years (Odds Ratio (OR) 6.6; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.5 to 28.2; p = 0.011) and renal dysfunction (OR 15.4; 95% CI 3.8 to 62.8; p < 0.001). Univariate analysis of limb amputation showed that the significant variables were diabetes (p = 0.017) mellitus and sepsis (p = 0.001). Multivariable logistic regression analysis showed that the factors related to limb amputation were sepsis (OR 1.8; 95% CI 1.5 to 24.0; p = 0.013) and diabetes mellitus (OR 1.6; 95% CI 1.1 to 21.1; p = 0.038). For NSTIs of the upper extremity, advanced age and renal dysfunction are both associated with a higher rate of in-hospital mortality. Sepsis and diabetes mellitus are both associated with a higher rate of amputation. PMID:25371469

  12. Effects of craniocervical flexion exercise on upper-limb postural stability during a goal-directed pointing task

    PubMed Central

    Yong, Min-Sik; Lee, Hae-Yong; Ryu, Young-Uk; Lee, Mi-Young

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the effects of craniocervical flexion exercise on upper-limb postural stability by measuring upper-limb postural tremor during a goal-directed pointing task. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-four subjects were randomly assigned to the exercise or control group. The exercise group performed craniocervical flexion exercise four days per week for five weeks. Upper-limb postural tremor was measured by using a three-dimensional electromagnetic motion tracking system (trakSTAR™, Ascension Technology Corporation, Burlington, VT, USA) during a goal-directed pointing task. [Results] In the exercise group, the range and velocity of the trajectories of the shoulder, wrist, and finger in the lateral direction improved significantly. However, no significant changes were observed in the control group. [Conclusion] Craniocervical flexion exercise reduces the range and velocity of upper-limb postural tremor, thereby increasing postural stability. PMID:26180368

  13. Kinematic upper limb evaluation of children and adolescents with cerebral palsy: a systematic review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Franco de Moura, Renata Calhes; Almeida, Cibele Santos; Dumont, Arislander Jonatan Lopes; Lazzari, Roberta Delasta; Lopes, Jamile Benite Palma; Duarte, Natalia Almeida de Carvalho; Braun, Luiz Ferreira; Oliveira, Claudia Santos

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of the present study was to perform a review of the literature on objective measures of upper limb movements in children and adolescents with cerebral palsy and describe the methods used to investigate upper limb kinematics in this population. [Materials and Methods] An extensive database search was performed using the keywords kinematics, upper limb, and cerebral palsy. A total of 146 papers were identified, but only five met the inclusion criteria. [Results] No consensus was found regarding the data collection, processing, and analysis procedures or reporting of the results. [Conclusion] Standardization of the protocol for 3D upper limb movement analysis will provide the foundation for comparable, reproducible results and eventually facilitate the planning of treatment interventions. PMID:27065566

  14. Differences in myoelectric and body-powered upper-limb prostheses: Systematic literature review.

    PubMed

    Carey, Stephanie L; Lura, Derek J; Highsmith, M Jason

    2015-01-01

    The choice of a myoelectric or body-powered upper-limb prosthesis can be determined using factors including control, function, feedback, cosmesis, and rejection. Although body-powered and myoelectric control strategies offer unique functions, many prosthesis users must choose one. A systematic review was conducted to determine differences between myoelectric and body-powered prostheses to inform evidence-based clinical practice regarding prescription of these devices and training of users. A search of 9 databases identified 462 unique publications. Ultimately, 31 of them were included and 11 empirical evidence statements were developed. Conflicting evidence has been found in terms of the relative functional performance of body-powered and myoelectric prostheses. Body-powered prostheses have been shown to have advantages in durability, training time, frequency of adjustment, maintenance, and feedback; however, they could still benefit from improvements of control. Myoelectric prostheses have been shown to improve cosmesis and phantom-limb pain and are more accepted for light=intensity work. Currently, evidence is insufficient to conclude that either system provides a significant general advantage. Prosthetic selection should be based on a patient's individual needs and include personal preferences, prosthetic experience, and functional needs. This work demonstrates that there is a lack of empirical evidence regarding functional differences in upper-limb prostheses. PMID:26230500

  15. Support of the upper limbs of office workers during a daily work journey.

    PubMed

    Filgueiras, Ernesto; Rebelo, Francisco; da Silva, Moreira

    2012-01-01

    Generally, the studies assess the upper limbs postures during the work with Visual Display Terminal - VDT through the measurement of the angles formed by the segments or through the relation with the pre-defined anatomical postures (e.g., flexion, extension, abduction). However, few studies were found in the literature which had focused in the measurement of the upper limbs support during a real situation of work with VDT and in the definition of analysis categories for this kind of behavior. The main objective of this study was to measure, in a real situation and using a systematic observation method through video analysis, the main kinds of support for the upper limbs. The analysis was done considering 480 work hours of 30 office workers. Data were collected using a methodology proposed by Rebelo, Filgueiras & Soares [1] and related with the work organization and workspace conditions, the participants had: a) minimum of eight hours daily of work; b) similar activities, characterized as office work; c) same furniture and equipment; and, d) computers with the same hardware, software and peripherals. Results were analyzed 46554 dynamic events, considering only the fourteen Interaction Categories - ICs, for upper limps support. In this way, percentage was computed, considering the total number of occurrence, for the Right arm is: arm support (0.06%); forearm support (31,8%); elbow support (31,92%); hand support (7,41%); multiple supports (12,32%) and without support 16,41%- For the Left arm the results is: forearm support (0,11%); arm support (53,69%); elbow support (8,70%); hand support (7,97%); multiple supports (8,43%) e without support (21,11%). This systemic and ecological approach was obtained through a method which enables experimental Biomechanics and Physiology methods to develop more efficient functional requirements and recommendations for the work with VDTs. PMID:22316800

  16. Methods for Dynamic Characterization of the Major Muscles Activating the Lower Limb Joints in Cycling Motion

    PubMed Central

    Roth, Navit; Wiener, Avi

    2014-01-01

    The functional activation, through electrical stimulation, of the lower limb consisting of several deficient muscles requires well-patterned and coordinated activation of these muscles. This study presents a method for characterizing the parameters of the major muscle groups controlling the ankle and knee joints in cycling motion, the latter having particular significance in the rehabilitation of locomotion. To lower mechanical indeterminacy in the joints the system is reduced by grouping the muscles acting in synergism. The joint torques were calculated by inverse dynamics methods from cycling motion data, including kinematics and foot/pedal reaction loads (forces, moments). The mechanical indeterminacy was resolved by applying optimization criteria and the individual muscle torques were parceled-out from the joint torques. System identification of the individual muscles, part of which being bi-articular, in this non-isometric condition was performed from the relationship between the evaluated force and the measured EMG of each the muscles, using both first and second order linear transfer functions. Feasibility of the presented method was demonstrated through the computation of the coefficients of the muscles involved and validating the results on the experimental data obtained from one subject. PMID:26913135

  17. Inferring muscle functional roles of the ostrich pelvic limb during walking and running using computer optimization.

    PubMed

    Rankin, Jeffery W; Rubenson, Jonas; Hutchinson, John R

    2016-05-01

    Owing to their cursorial background, ostriches (Struthio camelus) walk and run with high metabolic economy, can reach very fast running speeds and quickly execute cutting manoeuvres. These capabilities are believed to be a result of their ability to coordinate muscles to take advantage of specialized passive limb structures. This study aimed to infer the functional roles of ostrich pelvic limb muscles during gait. Existing gait data were combined with a newly developed musculoskeletal model to generate simulations of ostrich walking and running that predict muscle excitations, force and mechanical work. Consistent with previous avian electromyography studies, predicted excitation patterns showed that individual muscles tended to be excited primarily during only stance or swing. Work and force estimates show that ostrich gaits are partially hip-driven with the bi-articular hip-knee muscles driving stance mechanics. Conversely, the knee extensors acted as brakes, absorbing energy. The digital extensors generated large amounts of both negative and positive mechanical work, with increased magnitudes during running, providing further evidence that ostriches make extensive use of tendinous elastic energy storage to improve economy. The simulations also highlight the need to carefully consider non-muscular soft tissues that may play a role in ostrich gait. PMID:27146688

  18. Central Sensitization and Perceived Indoor Climate among Workers with Chronic Upper-Limb Pain: Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Sundstrup, Emil; Jakobsen, Markus D.; Brandt, Mikkel; Jay, Kenneth; Persson, Roger; Andersen, Lars L.

    2015-01-01

    Monitoring of indoor climate is an essential part of occupational health and safety. While questionnaires are commonly used for surveillance, not all workers may perceive an identical indoor climate similarly. The aim of this study was to evaluate perceived indoor climate among workers with chronic pain compared with pain-free colleagues and to determine the influence of central sensitization on this perception. Eighty-two male slaughterhouse workers, 49 with upper-limb chronic pain and 33 pain-free controls, replied to a questionnaire with 13 items of indoor climate complaints. Pressure pain threshold (PPT) was measured in muscles of the arm, shoulder, and lower leg. Cross-sectional associations were determined using general linear models controlled for age, smoking, and job position. The number of indoor climate complaints was twice as high among workers with chronic pain compared with pain-free controls (1.8 [95% CI: 1.3–2.3] versus 0.9 [0.4–1.5], resp.). PPT of the nonpainful leg muscle was negatively associated with the number of complaints. Workers with chronic pain reported more indoor climate complaints than pain-free controls despite similar actual indoor climate. Previous studies that did not account for musculoskeletal pain in questionnaire assessment of indoor climate may be biased. Central sensitization likely explains the present findings. PMID:26425368

  19. Diagnosis and treatment of hind limb muscle strain injuries in 22 dogs.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, C; Pluhar, G E

    2005-01-01

    The anamnesis was obtained from the medical records of 22 dogs diagnosed with hind limb muscle strain injury over a four-year period. The signalment, history, diagnostic imaging and clinical findings, treatment and outcome are described. The affected dogs were primarily from large breeds. Although only a few clients reported a specific injury, 11 dogs were admitted for an acute onset of lameness of unknown origin. The hip adductor muscles were affected in 21 dogs, and 11 dogs had previously undergone orthopaedic surgery of the affected limb. The dogs were primarily diagnosed by physical examination, although the diagnosis was confirmed with ultrasound imaging in the two most recent cases. Neither concurrent orthopoedic nor neurological disease was found during the study period in four of 22 dogs, and another three dogs had only mild radiographic coxofemoral osteoarthritis that did not cause any clinical signs during the study period. All of the dogs were treated medically with some combination of rest, physical therapy, methocarbamol, and a non-steroidol anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID). The injury-associated lameness improved, or completely resolved, with conservative, non-surgical therapy in most dogs. Of the 15 dogs available for follow-up (mean 577 days), eight had complete resolution of their clinical signs, two showed significant improvement, and one showed some improvement. Muscle strain injury may be an under-diagnosed cause or contributor to acute hind limb lameness in large breed dogs, either alone or following orthopoedic surgery. PMID:16594394

  20. A comparison between handgrip strength, upper limb fat free mass by segmental bioelectrical impedance analysis (SBIA) and anthropometric measurements in young males

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-Correa, C. H.; Caicedo-Eraso, J. C.; Varon-Serna, D. R.

    2013-04-01

    The mechanical function and size of a muscle may be closely linked. Handgrip strength (HGS) has been used as a predictor of functional performing. Anthropometric measurements have been made to estimate arm muscle area (AMA) and physical muscle mass volume of upper limb (ULMMV). Electrical volume estimation is possible by segmental BIA measurements of fat free mass (SBIA-FFM), mainly muscle-mass. Relationship among these variables is not well established. We aimed to determine if physical and electrical muscle mass estimations relate to each other and to what extent HGS is to be related to its size measured by both methods in normal or overweight young males. Regression analysis was used to determine association between these variables. Subjects showed a decreased HGS (65.5%), FFM, (85.5%) and AMA (74.5%). It was found an acceptable association between SBIA-FFM and AMA (r2 = 0.60) and poorer between physical and electrical volume (r2 = 0.55). However, a paired Student t-test and Bland and Altman plot showed that physical and electrical models were not interchangeable (pt<0.0001). HGS showed a very weak association with anthropometric (r2 = 0.07) and electrical (r2 = 0.192) ULMMV showing that muscle mass quantity does not mean muscle strength. Other factors influencing HGS like physical training or nutrition require more research.

  1. Correlation between upper limb function and oral health impact in stroke survivors

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Fernanda C.; da Silva, Daniela F. T.; Mesquita-Ferrari, Raquel A.; Fernandes, Kristianne P. S.; Bussadori, Sandra K.

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of the present study was to evaluate the relationship between upper limb impairment and oral health impact in individuals with hemiparesis stemming from a stroke. [Subjects and Methods] The study subjects were conducted with a sample of 27 stroke survivors with complete or partial hemiparesis with brachial or crural predominance. The 14-item short version of the Oral Health Impact Profile was used to evaluate perceptions of oral health. The Brazilian version of the Stroke Specific Quality of Life Scale was used to evaluate perceptions regarding quality of life. [Results] A statistically significant association was found between the upper extremity function subscale of the SSQOL-Brazil and the impact of oral health evaluated using the OHIP-14, with a strong correlation found for the physical pain subscale, moderate correlations with the functional limitation, psychological discomfort, physical disability, social disability and social handicap subscales as well as a weak correlation with the psychological disability subscale. Analyzing the OHIP-14 scores with regard to the impact of oral health on quality of life, the most frequent classification was weak impact, with small rates of moderate and strong impact. [Conclusion] Compromised upper limb function and self-perceived poor oral health, whether due to cultural resignation or functional disability, exert a negative impact on the quality of life of individuals with hemiparesis stemming from a stroke. PMID:26310352

  2. Aftereffects in the responses of cat muscle spindles and errors of limb position sense in man.

    PubMed

    Gregory, J E; Morgan, D L; Proske, U

    1988-04-01

    1. This is a report of two series of experiments, one, observations on muscle spindles in the anesthetized cat, the other, based on the animal observations, concerned with limb-position sense in human subjects. 2. When the cat soleus muscle is contracted at a short length and then after a brief period is brought to an intermediate length, the integrated afferent activity recorded in dorsal roots is maintained at a high level. If the contraction is applied while the muscle is held at a long length, the subsequent level of afferent activity back at the intermediate length is much lower. A similar result is obtained if large amplitude vibration of the muscle is used instead of contraction. Recordings from single afferents confirm that these alterations in discharge could be attributed to the primary and secondary endings of muscle spindles. 3. Following the proposal that the resting discharge of muscle spindles contributes to the sense of limb position in man, we have used a sequence of contractions or periods of vibration of biceps and triceps brachii followed by an arm-matching task to look for errors in limb position consistent with the patterns of muscle afferent discharge observed in the animal experiments. 4. Blindfolded subjects were told to contract biceps of one, the test arm, with the arm flexed. After the arm had relaxed, it was placed by the experimenter at an intermediate angle that the subject was asked to match with the other, indicator arm. Then the subject was asked to contract triceps with the arm extended, and the matching task was repeated. 5. The hypothesis was that contracting a muscle while it was short raised the level of afferent discharge coming from it when the arm was moved to an intermediate position so that the muscle would be perceived as more stretched and the arm felt to be displaced further than it really was. Thus, when biceps was contracted with the arm flexed, this would lead the arm in the intermediate position to be perceived as more extended than it really was. When triceps was contracted with the arm extended, this would lead the arm in the intermediate position to be perceived as more flexed than it really was.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:3373276

  3. An Acute Bout of Barefoot Running Alters Lower-limb Muscle Activation for Minimalist Shoe Users.

    PubMed

    Snow, N J; Basset, F A; Byrne, J

    2016-05-01

    Despite the abundance of barefoot running-related research, there have been no electromyography studies evaluating the effects of this mode of exercise on habitual users of minimalist footwear. The present study investigated differences in muscle activation during acute bouts of barefoot and shod running, in minimalist shoe users. 8 male participants ran on a motorized treadmill for 10 min under both conditions, at 70% maximal aerobic speed. Electromyographic data were sampled from the biceps femoris, gluteus maximus, gastrocnemius medialis, tibialis anterior, and vastus lateralis during both swing and stance. Root-mean-square analysis of electromyographic data was conducted to compare muscle activation between conditions. During stance, barefoot running resulted in greater muscle activity in gastrocnemius medialis and gluteus maximus, and lower muscle activity in tibialis anterior. During swing, barefoot running resulted in increased muscle activity in vastus lateralis and gastrocnemius medialus. These results indicate that, for minimalist shoe users, an acute bout of barefoot running results in significantly different lower-limb muscle activity. Increased activation in the above muscles presents a possible mechanism for injury, which should be considered during exercise prescription. PMID:26837932

  4. Experimental development of a sensory control system for an upper limb myoelectric prosthesis with cosmetic covering.

    PubMed

    Tura, A; Lamberti, C; Davalli, A; Sacchetti, R

    1998-01-01

    A sensory control system based on the force-sensing resistor (FSR) for an upper limb prosthesis has been designed for application to a commercial prosthetic hand of proven reliability. In particular, FSR sensors have been used to control the strength of the grip on objects. Moreover, the problem of the object possibly slipping from the grip has been addressed by a system based on an optical sensor for detecting movement. Tests on different everyday objects have shown the feasibility of the above approach, given the constraints of the limited dimensions of the prosthesis and the presence of a cosmetic glove. PMID:9505249

  5. Gesture therapy: an upper limb virtual reality-based motor rehabilitation platform.

    PubMed

    Sucar, Luis Enrique; Orihuela-Espina, Felipe; Velazquez, Roger Luis; Reinkensmeyer, David J; Leder, Ronald; Hernández-Franco, Jorge

    2014-05-01

    Virtual reality platforms capable of assisting rehabilitation must provide support for rehabilitation principles: promote repetition, task oriented training, appropriate feedback, and a motivating environment. As such, development of these platforms is a complex process which has not yet reached maturity. This paper presents our efforts to contribute to this field, presenting Gesture Therapy, a virtual reality-based platform for rehabilitation of the upper limb. We describe the system architecture and main features of the platform and provide preliminary evidence of the feasibility of the platform in its current status. PMID:24760913

  6. A Kinect-based upper limb rehabilitation system to assist people with cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yao-Jen; Han, Wen-Ying; Tsai, Yu-Chi

    2013-11-01

    This study assessed the possibility of rehabilitating two adolescents with cerebral palsy (CP) using a Kinect-based system in a public school setting. The system provided 3 degrees of freedom for prescribing a rehabilitation program to achieve customized treatment. This study was carried out according to an ABAB reversal replication design in which A represented the baseline and B represented intervention phases. Data showed that the two participants significantly increased their motivation for upper limb rehabilitation, thus improving exercise performance during the intervention phases. Practical and developmental implications of the findings are discussed. PMID:24012594

  7. Upper limb compartment syndrome after an adder bite: a case report.

    PubMed

    Hamdi, Mohamed Faouzi; Baccari, Sayed; Daghfous, Mehdi; Tarhouni, Lamjed

    2010-04-01

    Compartment syndrome after an adder bite is extremely rare, whose effects are only secondary to the cytotoxic and hemorrhagic effects of venom. Here we reported a case of compartment syndrome in the upper limb following an adder bite in the thenar eminence. Elevated compartment pressure was documented and immediate surgical fasciotomy was practiced. The patient achieved complete recovery with a good functional result. We discussed the controversies on fasciotomy and non-invasive measures in such a situation, and recommended intracompartmental pressure monitoring during the management of compartment syndrome following adder bites. PMID:20356449

  8. Sensory capacity of reinnervated skin after redirection of amputated upper limb nerves to the chest

    PubMed Central

    Schultz, Aimee E.; Kuiken, Todd A.

    2009-01-01

    Targeted reinnervation is a new neural-machine interface that has been developed to help improve the function of new-generation prosthetic limbs. Targeted reinnervation is a surgical procedure that takes the nerves that once innervated a severed limb and redirects them to proximal muscle and skin sites. The sensory afferents of the redirected nerves reinnervate the skin overlying the transfer site. This creates a sensory expression of the missing limb in the amputee's reinnervated skin. When these individuals are touched on this reinnervated skin they feel as though they are being touched on their missing limb. Targeted reinnervation takes nerves that once served the hand, a skin region of high functional importance, and redirects them to less functionally relevant skin areas adjacent to the amputation site. In an effort to better understand the sensory capacity of the reinnervated target skin following this procedure, we examined grating orientation thresholds and point localization thresholds on two amputees who had undergone the targeted reinnervation surgery. Grating orientation thresholds and point localization thresholds were also measured on the contralateral normal skin of the targeted reinnervation amputees and on analogous sites in able-bodied controls. Grating orientation thresholds for the reinnervated skin of the targeted reinnervation amputees were found to be similar to normal ranges for both the amputees’ contralateral skin and also for the control population. Point localization thresholds for these amputees were found to be lower for their reinnervated skin than for their contralateral skin. Reinnervated point localization thresholds values were also lower in comparison to homologous chest sites on the control population. Mechanisms appear to be in place to maximize re-established touch input in targeted reinnervation amputees. It seems that sound sensory function is provided to the denervated skin of the residual limb when connected to afferent pathways once serving highly functionally relevant regions of the brain. This suggests that tactile interface devices could be used to give a physiologically appropriate sense of touch to a prosthetic limb, which would likely help with better functional utilization of the prosthetic device and possibly help to more effectively integrate the device with the user's self-image. PMID:19369486

  9. Metabolism of valine and the exchange of amino acids across the hind-limb muscles of fed and starved sheep.

    PubMed

    Teleni, E; Annison, E F; Lindsay, D B

    1986-01-01

    A combination of the isotope-dilution and arterio-venous (AV) difference techniques was used to study simultaneously the metabolism of valine in the whole body and in the hind-limb muscles of fed and starved (40 h) sheep. The net exchange of gluconeogenic amino acids across hind-limb muscles was also studied. Valine entry rate was unaffected by nutritional status. There was significant extraction of valine by hind-limb muscles in both fed and starved sheep. The percentage of valine uptake decarboxylated was higher (P less than 0.05) in fed sheep but the amount of valine decarboxylated was not significantly different. The proportion of valine uptake that was transaminated was about 30 times higher in starved sheep. About 54% of valine taken up by hind-limb muscle of starved sheep was metabolized. The corresponding value for fed sheep was 21%. The contribution of CO2 from valine decarboxylation to total hind-limb muscle CO2 output was about 0.2%. The output of alanine in both fed and starved sheep was low but the output of glutamine was relatively high and roughly equivalent to the amounts of aspartate, glutamate and branched-chain amino acids that were catabolized. This study has confirmed that valine is catabolized in sheep skeletal muscle, and shown that glutamine is a major carrier of amino nitrogen out of muscle. PMID:3593118

  10. Feasibility of Video Clip Analysis on Effect of Botulinum Toxin-A Injection for Post-Stroke Upper Limb Spasticity

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Woo-Jin; Kumthornthip, Witsanu; Oh, Byung Mo; Yang, Eun Joo; Paik, Nam-Jong

    2013-01-01

    Existing functional evaluation tools do not accurately reveal the improved function following botulinum toxin A (BTX-A) injection for post-stroke upper limb spasticity. With the aim of developing an alternate method of measuring functional improvement following BTX-A injection, this study tested the feasibility, validity and reliability of video clip analysis performed by the clinicians. Seventy-nine patients administered BTX-A due to post-stroke upper limb spasticity, were retrospectively evaluated using video clip analysis. Pre- and post-injection video clips recorded at 1-month intervals were randomly allocated and sent to three blinded physician evaluators who were asked to choose the one that seemed more improved in terms of hand motion and associated upper limb reaction during gait. The three physicians chose the post-injection video clip as depicting improved hand motion (82.3%, 79.7%, and 72.2%) and associated upper limb reaction during gait (73.4%, 70.9%, and 70.9%). Kappa and intraclass correlation coefficient as a measure of interrater reliability among the three physicians was 0.86 and 0.79 for the hand, and 0.92 and 0.92 for associated upper limb reaction during gait, respectively. The percent overall agreement of the physicians was 78.1% and 71.7% for hand function and associated upper limb reaction, respectively. Retrospective pre- and post-BTX-A injection video clip analyses is a clinically feasible alternative method to evaluate the improvement following BTX-A injection for post-stroke upper limb spasticity, especially in busy clinical practice setting. PMID:23666198

  11. Bilateral force transients in the upper limbs evoked by single-pulse microstimulation in the pontomedullary reticular formation

    PubMed Central

    Hirschauer, Thomas J.

    2015-01-01

    Neurons in the pontomedullary reticular formation (PMRF) give rise to the reticulospinal tract. The motor output of the PMRF was investigated using stimulus-triggered averaging of electromyography (EMG) and force recordings in two monkeys (M. fascicularis). EMG was recorded from 12 pairs of upper limb muscles, and forces were detected using two isometric force-sensitive handles. Of 150 stimulation sites, 105 (70.0%) produced significant force responses, and 139 (92.5%) produced significant EMG responses. Based on the average flexor EMG onset latency of 8.3 ms and average force onset latency of 15.9 ms poststimulation, an electromechanical delay of ∼7.6 ms was calculated. The magnitude of force responses (∼10 mN) was correlated with the average change in EMG activity (P < 0.001). A multivariate linear regression analysis was used to estimate the contribution of each muscle to force generation, with flexors and extensors exhibiting antagonistic effects. A predominant force output pattern of ipsilateral flexion and contralateral extension was observed in response to PMRF stimulation, with 65.3% of significant ipsilateral force responses directed medially and posteriorly (P < 0.001) and 78.6% of contralateral responses directed laterally and anteriorly (P < 0.001). This novel approach permits direct measurement of force outputs evoked by central nervous system microstimulation. Despite the small magnitude of poststimulus EMG effects, low-intensity single-pulse microstimulation of the PMRF evoked detectable forces. The forces, showing the combined effect of all muscle activity in the arms, are consistent with reciprocal pattern of force outputs from the PMRF detectable with stimulus-triggered averaging of EMG. PMID:25652926

  12. Inverse dynamics modelling of upper-limb tremor, with cross-correlation analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ketteringham, Laurence P.; Neild, Simon A.; Hyde, Richard A.; Jones, Rosie J.S.; Davies-Smith, Angela M.

    2014-01-01

    A method to characterise upper-limb tremor using inverse dynamics modelling in combination with cross-correlation analyses is presented. A 15 degree-of-freedom inverse dynamics model is used to estimate the joint torques required to produce the measured limb motion, given a set of estimated inertial properties for the body segments. The magnitudes of the estimated torques are useful when assessing patients or evaluating possible intervention methods. The cross-correlation of the estimated joint torques is proposed to gain insight into how tremor in one limb segment interacts with tremor in another. The method is demonstrated using data from a single patient presenting intention tremor because of multiple sclerosis. It is shown that the inertial properties of the body segments can be estimated with sufficient accuracy using only the patient's height and weight as a priori knowledge, which ensures the method's practicality and transferability to clinical use. By providing a more detailed, objective characterisation of patient-specific tremor properties, the method is expected to improve the selection, design and assessment of treatment options on an individual basis. PMID:26609379

  13. Upper limb amputees can be induced to experience a rubber hand as their own

    PubMed Central

    Rosén, Birgitta; Stockselius, Anita; Ragnö, Christina; Köhler, Peter; Lundborg, Göran

    2008-01-01

    We describe how upper limb amputees can be made to experience a rubber hand as part of their own body. This was accomplished by applying synchronous touches to the stump, which was out of view, and to the index finger of a rubber hand, placed in full view (26 cm medial to the stump). This elicited an illusion of sensing touch on the artificial hand, rather than on the stump and a feeling of ownership of the rubber hand developed. This effect was supported by quantitative subjective reports in the form of questionnaires, behavioural data in the form of misreaching in a pointing task when asked to localize the position of the touch, and physiological evidence obtained by skin conductance responses when threatening the hand prosthesis. Our findings outline a simple method for transferring tactile sensations from the stump to a prosthetic limb by tricking the brain, thereby making an important contribution to the field of neuroprosthetics where a major goal is to develop artificial limbs that feel like a real parts of the body. PMID:19074189

  14. [Unidimensionality of a functional measure for patient with an injured upper limb].

    PubMed

    Luquet, C; Chau, N; Nadif, M; Guillemin, F; Gavillot, C; Petry, D; Moreau, T; Bourgkard, E; Hecquet, B; André, J M; Mur, J M

    1996-06-01

    The construction of an instrument including a number of tests requires an analysis of its structure and its unidimensionality (which allows calculation of global score), and the determination of the difficulty level of various tests. This study examined a tool including 67 tests designed to evaluate the functional ability of patients with an injured upper limb. The patients seen in a rehabilitation centre during 12 months (173 subjects) were evaluated by the occupational therapists familiar with the tool. The statistical analyses were made using the principal component analysis method (PCAM), the Cronbach's coefficient and the Rasch model. The PCAM showed 3 principal factors which explained 44%, 10% and 4% of the total variance respectively in the case of patients with injured dominant limb. The predominance of the first axis and the high ratio of first by second eigenvalues suggested the unidimensionality of the tool. The Cronbach's value of 0.97 attested the good congruence of the items. The results obtained with the Rasch model seemed to be consistent with the hypothesis of the unidimensionality of the tool. This analysis also provided the difficulty scale of various tests. Similar results were obtained in patients with injured non dominant limb or with all the sample. The methods used provide complementary results. PMID:8766984

  15. Spaceflight and hind limb unloading induce similar changes in electrical impedance characteristics of mouse gastrocnemius muscle

    PubMed Central

    Sung, M.; Li, J.; Spieker, A.J.; Spatz, J.; Ellman, R.; Ferguson, V.L.; Bateman, T.A.; Rosen, G.D.; Bouxsein, M.; Rutkove, S.B.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess the potential of electrical impedance myography (EIM) to serve as a marker of muscle fiber atrophy and secondarily as an indicator of bone deterioration by assessing the effects of spaceflight or hind limb unloading. Methods In the first experiment, 6 mice were flown aboard the space shuttle (STS-135) for 13 days and 8 earthbound mice served as controls. In the second experiment, 14 mice underwent hind limb unloading (HLU) for 13 days; 13 additional mice served as controls. EIM measurements were made on ex vivo gastrocnemius muscle. Quantitative microscopy and areal bone mineral density (aBMD) measurements of the hindlimb were also performed. Results Reductions in the multifrequency phase-slope parameter were observed for both the space flight and HLU cohorts compared to their respective controls. For ground control and spaceflight groups, the values were 24.7±1.3°/MHz and 14.1±1.6°/MHz, respectively (p=0.0013); for control and HLU groups, the values were 23.9±1.6°/MHz and 19.0±1.0°/MHz, respectively (p=0.014). This parameter also correlated with muscle fiber size (ρ=0.65, p=0.011) for spaceflight and hind limb aBMD (ρ=0.65, p=0.0063) for both groups. Conclusions These data support the concept that EIM may serve as a useful tool for assessment of muscle disuse secondary to immobilization or microgravity. PMID:24292610

  16. Limb and back muscle activity adaptations to tripedal locomotion in dogs.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Aniela; Anders, Alexandra; Nolte, Ingo; Schilling, Nadja

    2015-10-01

    Alterations in muscle recruitment are key to the functional plasticity of the mammalian locomotor system. One particularly challenging situation quadrupeds may face is when the functionality of a limb is reduced or lost. To better understand how mammals manage in such situations and which muscular adaptations they exhibit when locomoting on three legs, we recorded the activity patterns of two limb and one back extensor muscle in nine dogs using surface electromyography. We compared the timing and the level of recruitment before and after the loss of a hindlimb was simulated. Both the intensity and the timing of the activity changed significantly in the m. vastus lateralis of the remaining hindlimb, consistent with this limb bearing a greater proportion of the body weight as well as with previously reported kinematic changes. In accordance with the greater body weight supported by the forelimbs, the m. triceps brachii showed first and foremost an increased level of excitation. The very asymmetrical changes in the timing and the level of activity in the m. longissimus dorsi reflects the highly asymmetrical functional requirements imposed on the trunk and the pelvis when one hindlimb is no longer involved in the production of locomotor work while the other hindlimb partially compensates the loss. Integration of our electromyographical findings with kinetic and kinematic results illustrates that dogs exhibited a well-coordinated response to the functional requirements of tripedalism and underlines the importance of moment-to-moment modulation in muscular recruitment for the functional plasticity of the mammalian locomotor system. PMID:26200094

  17. Are determinants for new and persistent upper limb pain different? An analysis based on anatomical sites

    PubMed Central

    Vargas-Prada, Sergio; Serra, Consol; Coggon, David; Martínez, José Miguel; Ntani, Georgia; Delclos, George; Palmer, Keith T.; Benavides, Fernando G.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Only few longitudinal studies have explored separately predictors of pain incidence and persistence. OBJECTIVE To investigate whether biological, lifestyle, occupational and psychological risk factors for the development of new episodes of upper limb pain (ULP) differ from those for its persistence. METHODS 1105 Spanish nurses and office workers were asked at baseline about biological, lifestyle, occupational and psychological risk factors and pain in the past month at six anatomical sites in the upper limb (left and right shoulder, elbow and wrist/hand). At follow up, 12 months later, pain in the past month was again ascertained. Analysis was based on anatomical sites clustered by person. Associations were assessed by multilevel logistic regression models. RESULTS 971 participants (87.9%) completed follow-up. Job dissatisfaction and older age carried higher risk of new ULP. Somatising tendency (OR 2.2, 95%CI 1.6-3.1) was the strongest predictor of new ULP, with a risk estimate which differed significantly from that for the same exposure and persistence of ULP. Having adverse beliefs about the work-relatedness of ULP carried a significantly reduced risk for persistence of ULP. CONCLUSION Our study provides only limited evidence that risk factors predicting new ULP differ from those predicting its persistence. PMID:26409386

  18. A Pre-Clinical Framework for Neural Control of a Therapeutic Upper-Limb Exoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Blank, Amy; O'Malley, Marcia K; Francisco, Gerard E; Contreras-Vidal, Jose L

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we summarize a novel approach to robotic rehabilitation that capitalizes on the benefits of patient intent and real-time assessment of impairment. Specifically, an upper-limb, physical human-robot interface (the MAHI EXO-II robotic exoskeleton) is augmented with a non-invasive brain-machine interface (BMI) to include the patient in the control loop, thereby making the therapy 'active' and engaging patients across a broad spectrum of impairment severity in the rehabilitation tasks. Robotic measures of motor impairment are derived from real-time sensor data from the MAHI EXO-II and the BMI. These measures can be validated through correlation with widely used clinical measures and used to drive patient-specific therapy sessions adapted to the capabilities of the individual, with the MAHI EXO-II providing assistance or challenging the participant as appropriate to maximize rehabilitation outcomes. This approach to robotic rehabilitation takes a step towards the seamless integration of BMIs and intelligent exoskeletons to create systems that can monitor and interface with brain activity and movement. Such systems will enable more focused study of various issues in development of devices and rehabilitation strategies, including interpretation of measurement data from a variety of sources, exploration of hypotheses regarding large scale brain function during robotic rehabilitation, and optimization of device design and training programs for restoring upper limb function after stroke. PMID:24887296

  19. Chondroitinase gene therapy improves upper limb function following cervical contusion injury

    PubMed Central

    James, Nicholas D.; Shea, Jessie; Muir, Elizabeth M.; Verhaagen, Joost; Schneider, Bernard L.; Bradbury, Elizabeth J.

    2015-01-01

    Chondroitin sulphate proteoglycans (CSPGs) are known to be important contributors to the intensely inhibitory environment that prevents tissue repair and regeneration following spinal cord injury. The bacterial enzyme chondroitinase ABC (ChABC) degrades these inhibitory molecules and has repeatedly been shown to promote functional recovery in a number of spinal cord injury models. However, when used to treat more traumatic and clinically relevant spinal contusion injuries, findings with the ChABC enzyme have been inconsistent. We recently demonstrated that delivery of mammalian-compatible ChABC via gene therapy led to sustained and widespread digestion of CSPGs, resulting in significant functional repair of a moderate thoracic contusion injury in adult rats. Here we demonstrate that chondroitinase gene therapy significantly enhances upper limb function following cervical contusion injury, with improved forelimb ladder performance and grip strength as well as increased spinal conduction through the injury site and reduced lesion pathology. This is an important addition to our previous findings as improving upper limb function is a top priority for spinal injured patients. Additionally great importance is placed on replication in the spinal cord injury field. That chondroitinase gene therapy has now been shown to be efficacious in contusion models at either thoracic or cervical level is an important step in the further development of this promising therapeutic strategy towards the clinic. PMID:26044197

  20. Wearable kinesthetic system for capturing and classifying upper limb gesture in post-stroke rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Tognetti, Alessandro; Lorussi, Federico; Bartalesi, Raphael; Quaglini, Silvana; Tesconi, Mario; Zupone, Giuseppe; De Rossi, Danilo

    2005-01-01

    Background Monitoring body kinematics has fundamental relevance in several biological and technical disciplines. In particular the possibility to exactly know the posture may furnish a main aid in rehabilitation topics. In the present work an innovative and unobtrusive garment able to detect the posture and the movement of the upper limb has been introduced, with particular care to its application in post stroke rehabilitation field by describing the integration of the prototype in a healthcare service. Methods This paper deals with the design, the development and implementation of a sensing garment, from the characterization of innovative comfortable and diffuse sensors we used to the methodologies employed to gather information on the posture and movement which derive from the entire garments. Several new algorithms devoted to the signal acquisition, the treatment and posture and gesture reconstruction are introduced and tested. Results Data obtained by means of the sensing garment are analyzed and compared with the ones recorded using a traditional movement tracking system. Conclusion The main results treated in this work are summarized and remarked. The system was compared with a commercial movement tracking system (a set of electrogoniometers) and it performed the same accuracy in detecting upper limb postures and movements. PMID:15743530

  1. Impact of tactile function on upper limb motor function in children with Developmental Coordination Disorder.

    PubMed

    Cox, Lauren E; Harris, Elizabeth C; Auld, Megan L; Johnston, Leanne M

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the presence of, and relationship between tactile dysfunction and upper limb motor function in children with Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD) compared to typical developing (TD) children. Participants were 36 children aged 6-12 years. Presence of DCD (n=20) or TD (n=16) was confirmed using the Movement Assessment Battery for Children, second edition. All children participated in a comprehensive assessment of tactile registration (Semmes Weinstein Monofilaments); tactile spatial perception (Single Point Localisation (SPL) and two-point discrimination (2PD)); haptic perception (Stereognosis); speed of simple everyday manual tasks (Jebsen-Taylor Test of Hand Function (JTTHF)); and handwriting speed and accuracy (Evaluation Tool of Children's Handwriting (ETCH)). Compared to TD children, children with DCD demonstrated poorer localisation of touch in the non-dominant hand (p=0.04), slower speed of alphabet writing (p<0.05) and less legible handwriting (p<0.01), but no difference in speed of simple everyday manual tasks (JTTHF: p>0.05). Regression analysis showed that spatial tactile perception (SPL) predicted handwriting legibility (ETCH: r=0.11) and speed of functional tasks (JTTHF: r=0.33). These results suggest that tactile function, specifically single point localisation, should be a primary tactile assessment employed to determine reasons for upper limb motor difficulties experienced by children with DCD. PMID:26299639

  2. Bilateral robots for upper-limb stroke rehabilitation: State of the art and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Bo; Zhang, Yanxin; Meng, Wei; Deng, Chao; Xie, Shengquan

    2016-07-01

    Robot-assisted bilateral upper-limb training grows abundantly for stroke rehabilitation in recent years and an increasing number of devices and robots have been developed. This paper aims to provide a systematic overview and evaluation of existing bilateral upper-limb rehabilitation devices and robots based on their mechanisms and clinical-outcomes. Most of the articles studied here were searched from nine online databases and the China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) from year 1993 to 2015. Devices and robots were categorized as end-effectors, exoskeletons and industrial robots. Totally ten end-effectors, one exoskeleton and one industrial robot were evaluated in terms of their mechanical characteristics, degrees of freedom (DOF), supported control modes, clinical applicability and outcomes. Preliminary clinical results of these studies showed that all participants could gain certain improvements in terms of range of motion, strength or physical function after training. Only four studies supported that bilateral training was better than unilateral training. However, most of clinical results cannot definitely verify the effectiveness of mechanisms and clinical protocols used in robotic therapies. To explore the actual value of these robots and devices, further research on ingenious mechanisms, dose-matched clinical protocols and universal evaluation criteria should be conducted in the future. PMID:27117423

  3. Anatomical variations of the ulnar and median nerves in the upper limb.

    PubMed

    Artico, M; De Santis, S; Cavallotti, D; Cavallotti, C

    2000-01-01

    The aim of our study was the evaluation of the anatomy of ulnar and median nerves in the upper limb in order to ameliorate knowledge on the clinical anatomy of these nerves. In fact, further information on this topic may be useful owing to its possible clinical relevance when planning surgical anatomy and reconstructive surgery in tumor affected and injured patients. The relationships between ulnar and median nerve and neighbouring anatomical structures have been examined, together with the course and ramification of the ulnar and median nerves in six fresh cadavers. Moreover, we have performed a review of the literature. Four specific aspects were evaluated during dissection: 1) division modality of the ulnar nerve at the wrist; 2) anatomical details of the medial humeral epicondyle; 3) anatomical relationships between median nerve and retinaculum flexorum; 4) median-ulnar nerves anastomosis. Our results show that: the medial humeral epicondyle shows specific anatomical details in relation to the ulnar nerve; the relationships between the median nerve and the transverse carpal ligament may be characterized by one or two nerve trunks (two cases of bifid median nerve in our experience); median-ulnar nerve anastomosis may be also found at various levels. Comparing our results with those of the available literature we can conclude that anatomical variations of ulnar and median nerve in the upper limb are not an infrequent finding and their clinical, diagnostic and surgical relevance should be considered. PMID:11103856

  4. A Serious Game for Upper Limb Stroke Rehabilitation Using Biofeedback and Mirror-Neurons Based Training.

    PubMed

    Cargnin, Diego João; Cordeiro d'Ornellas, Marcos; Cervi Prado, Ana Lúcia

    2015-01-01

    Upper limb stroke rehabilitation requires early, intensive and repetitive practice to be effective. Consequently, it is often difficult to keep patients committed to their rehabilitation regimen. In addition to direct measures of rehabilitation achievable through targeted assessments, other factors can indirectly lead to rehabilitation. Current levels of integration between commodity graphics software, hardware, and body-tracking devices have provided a reliable tool to build what are referred to as serious games, focusing on the rehabilitation paradigm. More specifically, serious games can captivate and engage players for a specific purpose such as developing new knowledge or skills. This paper discusses a serious game application with a focus on upper limb rehabilitation in patients with hemiplegia or hemiparesis. The game makes use of biofeedback and mirror-neurons to enhance the patient's engagement. Results from the application of a quantitative self-report instrument to assess in-game engagement suggest that the serious game is a viable instructional approach rather than an entertaining novelty and, furthermore, demonstrates the future potential for dual action therapy-focused games. PMID:26262069

  5. [Coordination patterns assessed by a continuous measure of joints coupling during upper limb repetitive movements].

    PubMed

    Draicchio, F; Silvetti, A; Ranavolo, A; Iavicoli, S

    2008-01-01

    We analyzed the coordination patterns between elbow, shoulder and trunk in a motor task consisting of reaching out, picking up a cylinder, and transporting it back by using the Dynamical Systems Theory and calculating the continuous relative phase (CRP), a continuous measure of the coupling between two interacting joints. We used an optoelectronic motion analysis system consisting of eight infra-red ray cameras to detect the movements of nine skin-mounted markers. We calculated the root square of the adjusted coefficient of determination, the coefficient of multiple correlation (CMC), in order to investigate the repeatability of the joints coordination. The data confirm that the CNS establishes both synergic (i.e. coupling between shoulder and trunk on the frontal plane) and hierarchical (i.e. coupling between elbow-shoulder-trunk on the horizontal plane) relationships among the available degrees of freedom to overcome the complexity due to motor redundancy. The present study describes a method to investigate the organization of the kinematic degrees of freedom during upper limb multi-joint motor tasks that can be useful to assess upper limb repetitive movements. PMID:19288802

  6. A novel system for automatic classification of upper limb motor function after stroke: an exploratory study.

    PubMed

    Tedim Cruz, Vítor; Bento, Virgílio Ferro; Ribeiro, David Dieteren; Araújo, Isabel; Branco, Catarina Aguiar; Coutinho, Paula

    2014-12-01

    In the early post-stroke phase, when clinicians attempt to evaluate interventions and accurately measure motor performance, reliable tools are needed. Therefore, the development of a system capable of independent, repeated and automatic assessment of motor function is of increased importance. This manuscript explores the potential of a newly designed device for automatic assessment of motor impairment after stroke. A portable motion capture system was developed to acquire three-dimensional kinematics data of upper limb movements. These were then computed through an automatic decision tree classifier, with features inferred from the Functional Ability Score (FAS) of the Wolf Motor Function Test (WMFT). Five stroke patients were tested on both sides across five selected tasks. The system was compared against a trained clinician, operating simultaneously and blinded. Regarding performance time, the mean difference (system vs clinician) was 0.17s (sd=0.14s). For FAS evaluation, there was agreement in 4 out of 5 patients in the two tasks evaluated. The prototype tested was able to automatically classify upper limb movement, according to a widely used functional motor scale (WMFT) in a relevant clinical setting. These results represent an important step towards a system capable of precise and independent motor evaluation after stroke. The portability and low-cost design will contribute for its usability in ambulatory clinical settings and research trials. PMID:25280582

  7. Apparent and Actual Trajectory Control Depend on the Behavioral Context in Upper Limb Motor Tasks.

    PubMed

    Cluff, Tyler; Scott, Stephen H

    2015-09-01

    A central problem in motor neuroscience is to understand how we select, plan, and control motor actions. An influential idea is that the motor system computes and implements a desired limb trajectory, an intermediary control process between the behavioral goal (reach a spatial goal) and motor commands to move the limb. The most compelling evidence for trajectory control is that corrective responses are directed back toward the unperturbed trajectory when the limb is disturbed during movement. However, the idea of trajectory control conflicts with optimal control theories that emphasize goal-directed motor corrections. Here we show that corrective responses in human subjects can deviate back toward the unperturbed trajectory, but these reversals were only present when there were explicit limits on movement time. Our second experiment asked whether trajectory control could be generated if the trajectory was made an explicit goal of the task. Participants countered unexpected loads while reaching to a static goal, tracking a moving target, or maintaining their hand within a visually constrained path to a static goal. Corrective responses were directed back toward the constrained path or to intercept the moving target. However, corrections back to the unperturbed path disappeared when reaching to the static target. Long-latency muscle responses paralleled changes in the behavioral goal in both sets of experiments, but goal-directed responses were delayed by 15-25 ms when tracking the moving goal. Our results show the motor system can behave like a trajectory controller but only if a "desired trajectory" is the goal of the task. Significance statement: One of the most influential ideas in motor control is that the motor system computes a "desired trajectory" when reaching to a spatial goal. Here we revisit the experimental paradigm from seminal papers supporting trajectory control to illustrate that corrective responses appear to return to the original trajectory of the limb, but only if there is an imposed timing constraint. We then provide direct evidence that the human motor system can behave like a trajectory controller, and return the limb to its original trajectory when a specified trajectory is the goal of the task. Our results show that the motor system is capable of a spectrum of corrective responses that depend on the behavioral goal of the motor task. PMID:26354914

  8. Kinetics of the upper limb during table tennis topspin forehands in advanced and intermediate players.

    PubMed

    Iino, Yoichi; Kojima, Takeji

    2011-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the significance of mechanical energy generation and transfer in the upper limb in generating the racket speed during table tennis topspin forehands. Nine advanced and eight intermediate table tennis players performed the forehand stroke at maximum effort against light and heavy backspin balls. Five high-speed video cameras operating at 200 fps were used to record the motions of the upper body of the players. The joint forces and torques of the racket arm were determined with inverse dynamics, and the amount of mechanical energy generated and transferred in the arm was determined. The shoulder internal rotation torque exerted by advanced players was significantly larger than that exerted by the intermediate players. Owing to a larger shoulder internal rotation torque, the advanced players transferred mechanical energy from the trunk of the body to the upper arm at a higher rate than the intermediate players could. Regression of the racket speed at ball impact on the energy transfer to the upper arm suggests that increase in the energy transfer may be an important factor for enabling intermediate players to generate a higher racket speed at impact in topspin forehands. PMID:22303787

  9. Limb position sense, proprioceptive drift and muscle thixotropy at the human elbow joint

    PubMed Central

    Tsay, A; Savage, G; Allen, T J; Proske, U

    2014-01-01

    These experiments on the human forearm are based on the hypothesis that drift in the perceived position of a limb over time can be explained by receptor adaptation. Limb position sense was measured in 39 blindfolded subjects using a forearm-matching task. A property of muscle, its thixotropy, a contraction history-dependent passive stiffness, was exploited to place muscle receptors of elbow muscles in a defined state. After the arm had been held flexed and elbow flexors contracted, we observed time-dependent changes in the perceived position of the reference arm by an average of 2.8° in the direction of elbow flexion over 30 s (Experiment 1). The direction of the drift reversed after the arm had been extended and elbow extensors contracted, with a mean shift of 3.5° over 30 s in the direction of elbow extension (Experiment 2). The time-dependent changes could be abolished by conditioning elbow flexors and extensors in the reference arm at the test angle, although this led to large position errors during matching (±10°), depending on how the indicator arm had been conditioned (Experiments 3 and 4). When slack was introduced in the elbow muscles of both arms, by shortening muscles after the conditioning contraction, matching errors became small and there was no drift in position sense (Experiments 5 and 6). These experiments argue for a receptor-based mechanism for proprioceptive drift and suggest that to align the two forearms, the brain monitors the difference between the afferent signals from the two arms. PMID:24665096

  10. The effect of different skin-ankle brace application pressures on quiet single-limb balance and electromyographic activation onset of lower limb muscles

    PubMed Central

    Papadopoulos, Emmanuel S; Nikolopoulos, Christos; Badekas, Athanasios; Vagenas, George; Papadakis, Stamatios A; Athanasopoulos, Spyros

    2007-01-01

    Background Several studies have been carried out in order to investigate the effect of ankle bracing on ankle joint function and performance. However, no study so far has examined the role of skin-brace interface pressure in neuromuscular control. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of different skin-ankle brace interface pressures on quiet single limb balance and the electromyographic (EMG) activation sequence of four lower limb muscles. Methods Thirty three male physical education students who volunteered to take part in the study were measured under three ankle brace conditions: i) without brace, ii) with brace and 30 kPa application pressure and iii) with brace and 60 kPa application pressure. Single limb balance (anteroposterior and mediolateral parameter) was assessed on the dominant lower limb, with open and closed eyes, on a force platform, simultaneously with the EMG recording of four lower lower limb muscles' (gastrocnemius, peroneus longus, rectus femoris and biceps femoris) activation onset. Results The results showed that overall balance (total stability parameter) was not significantly affected in any of the three ankle brace conditions. However, the anteroposterior centre of pressure excursion and centre of pressure excursion velocity were significantly increased with the application of ankle brace, both with 30 and 60 kPa application pressures. Furthermore, it was found that single limb balance was significantly worse with closed eyes compared to open eyes. EMG measurements showed that the sequence of lower limb activation onset was not affected in any of the three ankle brace application conditions. The results of this study showed that the application of an ankle brace with two different skin-brace interface pressures had no effect on overall single limb balance and the sequence of lower limb muscle activation. Conclusion These findings suggest that peripheral joint receptors are either not adequately stimulated by the brace application and therefore are not able to alter the balance control strategy of the CNS, or that they play a less important role in the control of single limb balance. Further research is needed in this area with more dynamic and functional measurements, before the safe use of ankle bracing can be widely recommended. PMID:17850663

  11. Creatine monohydrate supplementation on lower-limb muscle power in Brazilian elite soccer players

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Studies involving chronic creatine supplementation in elite soccer players are scarce. Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine the effects of creatine monohydrate supplementation on lower-limb muscle power in Brazilian elite soccer players (n = 14 males) during pre-season training. Findings This was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled parallel-group study. Brazilian professional elite soccer players participated in this study. During the pre-season (7 weeks), all the subjects underwent a standardized physical and specific soccer training. Prior to and after either creatine monohydrate or placebo supplementation, the lower-limb muscle power was measured by countermovement jump performance. The Jumping performance was compared between groups at baseline (p = 0.99). After the intervention, jumping performance was lower in the placebo group (percent change = - 0.7%; ES = - 0.3) than in the creatine group (percent change = + 2.4%; ES = + 0.1), but it did not reach statistical significance (p = 0.23 for time x group interaction). Fisher’s exact test revealed that the proportion of subjects that experienced a reduction in jumping performance was significantly greater in the placebo group than in the creatine group (5 and 1, respectively; p = 0.05) after the training. The magnitude-based inferences demonstrated that placebo resulted in a possible negative effect (50%) in jumping performance, whereas creatine supplementation led to a very likely trivial effect (96%) in jumping performance in the creatine group. Conclusions Creatine monohydrate supplementation prevented the decrement in lower-limb muscle power in elite soccer players during a pre-season progressive training. PMID:24991195

  12. Upper limb joint motion of two different user groups during manual wheelchair propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Seonhong; Kim, Seunghyeon; Son, Jongsang; Lee, Jinbok; Kim, Youngho

    2013-02-01

    Manual wheelchair users have a high risk of injury to the upper extremities. Recent studies have focused on kinematic and kinetic analyses of manual wheelchair propulsion in order to understand the physical demands on wheelchair users. The purpose of this study was to investigate upper limb joint motion by using a motion capture system and a dynamometer with two different groups of wheelchair users propelling their wheelchairs at different speeds under different load conditions. The variations in the contact time, release time, and linear velocity of the experienced group were all larger than they were in the novice group. The propulsion angles of the experienced users were larger than those of the novices under all conditions. The variances in the propulsion force (both radial and tangential) of the experienced users were larger than those of the novices. The shoulder joint moment had the largest variance with the conditions, followed by the wrist joint moment and the elbow joint moment. The variance of the maximum shoulder joint moment was over four times the variance of the maximum wrist joint moment and eight times the maximum elbow joint moment. The maximum joint moments increased significantly as the speed and load increased in both groups. Quick and significant manipulation ability based on environmental changes is considered an important factor in efficient propulsion. This efficiency was confirmed from the propulsion power results. Sophisticated strategies for efficient manual wheelchair propulsion could be understood by observation of the physical responses of each upper limb joint to changes in load and speed. We expect that the findings of this study will be utilized for designing a rehabilitation program to reduce injuries.

  13. Muscle tone changes in the lower limbs of stroke patients induced by trunk stabilization exercises

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Min-Hyung; Kim, Laurentius Jongsoon

    2015-01-01

    bstract. [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to identify the effects of trunk stabilization exercises on the spasticity of the lower limbs in stroke patients. [Subject] The subject of this study was a 38-year-old male patient who experienced a spontaneous intracranial hemorrhage, and had motor paralysis symptoms and spasticity on the left side. [Methods] The Hmax/Mmax ratio was measured before and after the trunk stabilization exercises, by using proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation techniques. [Results] The Hmax/Mmax ratio changed from 37% to 20%. [Conclusion] Trunk stabilization exercises help control the muscle tone in stroke patients. PMID:26357455

  14. Atlas of the muscle motor points for the lower limb: implications for electrical stimulation procedures and electrode positioning.

    PubMed

    Botter, Alberto; Oprandi, Gianmosè; Lanfranco, Fabio; Allasia, Stefano; Maffiuletti, Nicola A; Minetto, Marco Alessandro

    2011-10-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the uniformity of the muscle motor point location for lower limb muscles in healthy subjects. Fifty-three subjects of both genders (age range: 18-50 years) were recruited. The muscle motor points were identified for the following ten muscles of the lower limb (dominant side): vastus medialis, rectus femoris, and vastus lateralis of the quadriceps femoris, biceps femoris, semitendinosus, and semimembranosus of the hamstring muscles, tibialis anterior, peroneus longus, lateral and medial gastrocnemius. The muscle motor point was identified by scanning the skin surface with a stimulation pen electrode and corresponded to the location of the skin area above the muscle in which an electrical pulse evoked a muscle twitch with the least injected current. For each investigated muscle, 0.15 ms square pulses were delivered through the pen electrode at low current amplitude (<10 mA) and frequency (2 Hz). 16 motor points were identified in the 10 investigated muscles of almost all subjects: 3 motor points for the vastus lateralis, 2 motor points for rectus femoris, vastus medialis, biceps femoris, and tibialis anterior, 1 motor point for the remaining muscles. An important inter-individual variability was observed for the position of the following 4 out of 16 motor points: vastus lateralis (proximal), biceps femoris (short head), semimembranosus, and medial gastrocnemius. Possible implications for electrical stimulation procedures and electrode positioning different from those commonly applied for thigh and leg muscles are discussed. PMID:21796408

  15. Developing a multi-joint upper limb exoskeleton robot for diagnosis, therapy, and outcome evaluation in neurorehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Ren, Yupeng; Kang, Sang Hoon; Park, Hyung-Soon; Wu, Yi-Ning; Zhang, Li-Qun

    2013-05-01

    Arm impairments in patients post stroke involve the shoulder, elbow and wrist simultaneously. It is not very clear how patients develop spasticity and reduced range of motion (ROM) at the multiple joints and the abnormal couplings among the multiple joints and the multiple degrees-of-freedom (DOF) during passive movement. It is also not clear how they lose independent control of individual joints/DOFs and coordination among the joints/DOFs during voluntary movement. An upper limb exoskeleton robot, the IntelliArm, which can control the shoulder, elbow, and wrist, was developed, aiming to support clinicians and patients with the following integrated capabilities: 1) quantitative, objective, and comprehensive multi-joint neuromechanical pre-evaluation capabilities aiding multi-joint/DOF diagnosis for individual patients; 2) strenuous and safe passive stretching of hypertonic/deformed arm for loosening up muscles/joints based on the robot-aided diagnosis; 3) (assistive/resistive) active reaching training after passive stretching for regaining/improving motor control ability; and 4) quantitative, objective, and comprehensive neuromechanical outcome evaluation at the level of individual joints/DOFs, multiple joints, and whole arm. Feasibility of the integrated capabilities was demonstrated through experiments with stroke survivors and healthy subjects. PMID:23096119

  16. Upper-limb stroke rehabilitation using electrode-array based functional electrical stimulation with sensing and control innovations.

    PubMed

    Kutlu, M; Freeman, C T; Hallewell, E; Hughes, A-M; Laila, D S

    2016-04-01

    Functional electrical stimulation (FES) has shown effectiveness in restoring upper-limb movement post-stroke when applied to assist participants' voluntary intention during repeated, motivating tasks. Recent clinical trials have used advanced controllers that precisely adjust FES to assist functional reach and grasp tasks with FES applied to three muscle groups, showing significant reduction in impairment. The system reported in this paper advances the state-of-the-art by: (1) integrating an FES electrode array on the forearm to assist complex hand and wrist gestures; (2) utilising non-contact depth cameras to accurately record the arm, hand and wrist position in 3D; and (3) employing an interactive touch table to present motivating virtual reality (VR) tasks. The system also uses iterative learning control (ILC), a model-based control strategy which adjusts the applied FES based on the tracking error recorded on previous task attempts. Feasibility of the system has been evaluated in experimental trials with 2 unimpaired participants and clinical trials with 4 hemiparetic, chronic stroke participants. The stroke participants attended 17, 1 hour training sessions in which they performed functional tasks, such as button pressing using the touch table and closing a drawer. Stroke participant results show that the joint angle error norm reduced by an average of 50.3% over 6 attempts at each task when assisted by FES. PMID:26947097

  17. Lower limb conduit artery endothelial responses to acute upper limb exercise in spinal cord injured and able-bodied men

    PubMed Central

    Totosy de Zepetnek, Julia O; Au, Jason S; Ditor, David S; MacDonald, Maureen J

    2015-01-01

    Vascular improvements in the nonactive regions during exercise are likely primarily mediated by increased shear rate (SR). Individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI) experience sublesional vascular deconditioning and could potentially benefit from upper body exercise-induced increases in lower body SR. The present study utilized a single bout of incremental arm-crank exercise to generate exercise-induced SR changes in the superficial femoral artery in an effort to evaluate the acute postexercise impact on superficial femoral artery endothelial function via flow-mediated dilation (FMD), and determine regulatory factors in the nonactive legs of individuals with and without SCI. Eight individuals with SCI and eight age, sex, and waist-circumference-matched able-bodied (AB) controls participated. Nine minutes of incremental arm-crank exercise increased superficial femoral artery anterograde SR (P = 0.02 and P < 0.01), retrograde SR (P < 0.01 and P < 0.01), and oscillatory shear index (OSI) (P < 0.001 and P < 0.001) in both SCI and AB, respectively. However, these SR alterations resulted in acute postexercise increases in FMD in the AB group only (SCI 6.0 ± 1.2% to 6.3 ± 2.7%, P = 0.74; AB 7.5 ± 1.4% to 11.2 ± 1.4%, P = 0.03). While arm exercise has many cardiovascular benefits and results in changes in SR patterns in the nonactive legs, these changes are not sufficient to induce acute changes in FMD among individuals with SCI, and therefore are less likely to stimulate exercise training-associated improvements in nonactive limb endothelial function. Understanding the role of SR patterns on FMD brings us closer to designing effective strategies to combat impaired vascular function in both healthy and clinical populations. PMID:25847920

  18. Upper limb motor rehabilitation impacts white matter microstructure in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Bonzano, Laura; Tacchino, Andrea; Brichetto, Giampaolo; Roccatagliata, Luca; Dessypris, Adriano; Feraco, Paola; Lopes De Carvalho, Maria L; Battaglia, Mario A; Mancardi, Giovanni L; Bove, Marco

    2014-04-15

    Upper limb impairments can occur in patients with multiple sclerosis, affecting daily living activities; however there is at present no definite agreement on the best rehabilitation treatment strategy to pursue. Moreover, motor training has been shown to induce changes in white matter architecture in healthy subjects. This study aimed at evaluating the motor behavioral and white matter microstructural changes following a 2-month upper limb motor rehabilitation treatment based on task-oriented exercises in patients with multiple sclerosis. Thirty patients (18 females and 12 males; age=43.3 ± 8.7 years) in a stable phase of the disease presenting with mild or moderate upper limb sensorimotor deficits were randomized into two groups of 15 patients each. Both groups underwent twenty 1-hour treatment sessions, three times a week. The "treatment group" received an active motor rehabilitation treatment, based on voluntary exercises including task-oriented exercises, while the "control group" underwent passive mobilization of the shoulder, elbow, wrist and fingers. Before and after the rehabilitation protocols, motor performance was evaluated in all patients with standard tests. Additionally, finger motor performance accuracy was assessed by an engineered glove. In the same sessions, every patient underwent diffusion tensor imaging to obtain parametric maps of fractional anisotropy, mean diffusivity, axial diffusivity, and radial diffusivity. The mean value of each parameter was separately calculated within regions of interest including the fiber bundles connecting brain areas involved in voluntary movement control: the corpus callosum, the corticospinal tracts and the superior longitudinal fasciculi. The two rehabilitation protocols induced similar effects on unimanual motor performance, but the bimanual coordination task revealed that the residual coordination abilities were maintained in the treated patients while they significantly worsened in the control group (p=0.002). Further, in the treatment group white matter integrity in the corpus callosum and corticospinal tracts was preserved while a microstructural integrity worsening was found in the control group (fractional anisotropy of the corpus callosum and corticospinal tracts: p=0.033 and p=0.022; radial diffusivity of the corpus callosum and corticospinal tracts: p=0.004 and p=0.008). Conversely, a significant increase of radial diffusivity was observed in the superior longitudinal fasciculi in both groups (p=0.02), indicating lack of treatment effects on this structure, showing damage progression likely due to a demyelination process. All these findings indicate the importance of administering, when possible, a rehabilitation treatment consisting of voluntary movements. We also demonstrated that the beneficial effects of a rehabilitation treatment are task-dependent and selective in their target; this becomes crucial towards the implementation of tailored rehabilitative approaches. PMID:24370819

  19. Comparing unilateral and bilateral upper limb training: The ULTRA-stroke program design

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background About 80% of all stroke survivors have an upper limb paresis immediately after stroke, only about a third of whom (30 to 40%) regain some dexterity within six months following conventional treatment programs. Of late, however, two recently developed interventions - constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT) and bilateral arm training with rhythmic auditory cueing (BATRAC) - have shown promising results in the treatment of upper limb paresis in chronic stroke patients. The ULTRA-stroke (acronym for Upper Limb TRaining After stroke) program was conceived to assess the effectiveness of these interventions in subacute stroke patients and to examine how the observed changes in sensori-motor functioning relate to changes in stroke recovery mechanisms associated with peripheral stiffness, interlimb interactions, and cortical inter- and intrahemispheric networks. The present paper describes the design of this single-blinded randomized clinical trial (RCT), which has recently started and will take several years to complete. Methods/Design Sixty patients with a first ever stroke will be recruited. Patients will be stratified in terms of their remaining motor ability at the distal part of the arm (i.e., wrist and finger movements) and randomized over three intervention groups receiving modified CIMT, modified BATRAC, or an equally intensive (i.e., dose-matched) conventional treatment program for 6 weeks. Primary outcome variable is the score on the Action Research Arm test (ARAT), which will be assessed before, directly after, and 6 weeks after the intervention. During those test sessions all patients will also undergo measurements aimed at investigating the associated recovery mechanisms using haptic robots and magneto-encephalography (MEG). Discussion ULTRA-stroke is a 3-year translational research program which aims (1) to assess the relative effectiveness of the three interventions, on a group level but also as a function of patient characteristics, and (2) to delineate the functional and neurophysiological changes that are induced by those interventions. The outcome on the ARAT together with information about changes in the associated mechanisms will provide a better understanding of how specific therapies influence neurobiological changes, and which post-stroke conditions lend themselves to specific treatments. Trial Registration The ULTRA-stroke program is registered at the Netherlands Trial Register (NTR, http://www.trialregister.nl, number NTR1665). PMID:19895679

  20. Classification of Posture in Poststroke Upper Limb Spasticity: A Potential Decision Tool for Botulinum Toxin A Treatment?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hefter, Harald; Jost, Wolfgang H.; Reissig, Andrea; Zakine, Benjamin; Bakheit, Abdel Magid; Wissel, Jorg

    2012-01-01

    A significant percentage of patients suffering from a stroke involving motor-relevant central nervous system regions will develop a spastic movement disorder. Hyperactivity of different muscle combinations forces the limbs affected into abnormal postures or movement patterns. As muscular hyperactivity can effectively and safely be treated with…

  1. Classification of Posture in Poststroke Upper Limb Spasticity: A Potential Decision Tool for Botulinum Toxin A Treatment?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hefter, Harald; Jost, Wolfgang H.; Reissig, Andrea; Zakine, Benjamin; Bakheit, Abdel Magid; Wissel, Jorg

    2012-01-01

    A significant percentage of patients suffering from a stroke involving motor-relevant central nervous system regions will develop a spastic movement disorder. Hyperactivity of different muscle combinations forces the limbs affected into abnormal postures or movement patterns. As muscular hyperactivity can effectively and safely be treated with

  2. A First Step for the Automation of Fugl-Meyer Assessment Scale for Stroke Subjects in Upper Limb Physical Neurorehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Villán-Villán, Mailin A; Pérez-Rodríguez, Rodrigo; Gómez, Cristina; Opisso, Eloy; Tormos, Jose; Medina, Josep; Gómez, Enrique J

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a first approach for the automation of the Fugl-Meyer assessment scale used in physical neurorehabilitation. The main goal of this research is to automatically estimate an objective measurement for five Fugl-Meyer scale items related to the assessment of the upper limb motion. An objective score has been calculated for 7 patients. Obtained results indicate that the automation of the scale can be a useful tool for the objective assessment of upper limb motion of stroke survivors. PMID:26152949

  3. Musculoskeletal stress markers in Natufian hunter-gatherers and Neolithic farmers in the Levant: the upper limb.

    PubMed

    Eshed, Vered; Gopher, Avi; Galili, Ehud; Hershkovitz, Israel

    2004-04-01

    This paper attempts to quantify the changes in activity patterns of early farming populations in the Levant through the musculoskeletal stress markers (MSM) of the upper limb as seen in skeletal remains. The transition to an agricultural way of life resulted in higher loads on the upper limb in Neolithic populations compared to the Natufian hunter-gatherer populations that preceded them. The MSM pattern for males and females indicates a gender-based division of labor both in the Natufian and the Neolithic. It may also suggest that people in the Neolithic period were engaged in different (new) activities and occupations compared to the Natufian. PMID:15022359

  4. Range of Motion Requirements for Upper-Limb Activities of Daily Living

    PubMed Central

    Walters, Lisa Smurr; Cowley, Jeffrey; Wilken, Jason M.; Resnik, Linda

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. We quantified the range of motion (ROM) required for eight upper-extremity activities of daily living (ADLs) in healthy participants. METHOD. Fifteen right-handed participants completed several bimanual and unilateral basic ADLs while joint kinematics were monitored using a motion capture system. Peak motions of the pelvis, trunk, shoulder, elbow, and wrist were quantified for each task. RESULTS. To complete all activities tested, participants needed a minimum ROM of −65°/0°/105° for humeral plane angle (horizontal abduction–adduction), 0°–108° for humeral elevation, −55°/0°/79° for humeral rotation, 0°–121° for elbow flexion, −53°/0°/13° for forearm rotation, −40°/0°/38° for wrist flexion–extension, and −28°/0°/38° for wrist ulnar–radial deviation. Peak trunk ROM was 23° lean, 32° axial rotation, and 59° flexion–extension. CONCLUSION. Full upper-limb kinematics were calculated for several ADLs. This methodology can be used in future studies as a basis for developing normative databases of upper-extremity motions and evaluating pathology in populations. PMID:26709433

  5. Detecting the Intention to Move Upper Limbs from Electroencephalographic Brain Signals

    PubMed Central

    Gudiño-Mendoza, Berenice; Sanchez-Ante, Gildardo; Antelis, Javier M.

    2016-01-01

    Early decoding of motor states directly from the brain activity is essential to develop brain-machine interfaces (BMI) for natural motor control of neuroprosthetic devices. Hence, this study aimed to investigate the detection of movement information before the actual movement occurs. This information piece could be useful to provide early control signals to drive BMI-based rehabilitation and motor assisted devices, thus providing a natural and active rehabilitation therapy. In this work, electroencephalographic (EEG) brain signals from six healthy right-handed participants were recorded during self-initiated reaching movements of the upper limbs. The analysis of these EEG traces showed that significant event-related desynchronization is present before and during the execution of the movements, predominantly in the motor-related α and β frequency bands and in electrodes placed above the motor cortex. This oscillatory brain activity was used to continuously detect the intention to move the limbs, that is, to identify the motor phase prior to the actual execution of the reaching movement. The results showed, first, significant classification between relax and movement intention and, second, significant detection of movement intention prior to the onset of the executed movement. On the basis of these results, detection of movement intention could be used in BMI settings to reduce the gap between mental motor processes and the actual movement performed by an assisted or rehabilitation robotic device. PMID:27217826

  6. Differences in motor recovery between upper and lower limbs: does stroke subtype make the difference?

    PubMed

    Paci, Matteo; Nannetti, Luca; Casavola, Davide; Lombardi, Bruna

    2016-06-01

    Previous studies comparing the patterns of recovery for upper (UL) and lower limbs (LL) reported similar patterns of motor recovery of extremities. However, the influence of clinical stroke subtypes on the difference between recovery of extremities has never been investigated. The aim of this study is to compare the time course of the UL and LL in a sample of patients who have had distinct subtypes of ischemic stroke. A total of 443 consecutive patients following ischemic stroke were assessed at admission, discharge, and 1 month after discharge with the arm and leg motor parts of the Fugl-Meyer scale. Separate analyses were carried out for the entire sample and for samples of each stroke subtype classified according to the Oxfordshire Community Stroke Project. All groups showed significant improvements in motor function (P<0.001). Within the group of patients with total anterior circulation infarcts, the LL showed greater improved motor recovery than the UL (P<0.001). No significant difference was found between the time course of UL and LL motor recovery in the entire sample and in the other groups. This study confirms similar motor recovery of limbs in the entire sample, but also shows that the LL has greater recovery than the UL in patients with total anterior circulation infarcts. Functional prognosis should take into account the distinct stroke subtypes. PMID:27096715

  7. Technological platform for biomechanical analysis of static and dynamic tests of upper and lower limbs.

    PubMed

    Alvarado, Rodrigo; Chairez, Isaac; Garcia, Alejandro; Luviano-Jurez, Alberto; Rivera, Adriana; Rodriguez, Alfredo; Gonzalez, Neftali

    2010-01-01

    One of the most important elements for the rehabilitation process regards to the correct evaluation of the biomechanical and the electrophysiological responses. This evaluation must be done during the therapy. In general, the improvements achieved by the treatment are slightly and difficult to be distinguished. This is a difficult task when the changes in the signals obtained by the bio-amplifiers (EMG, electro-goniometry, etc) are evaluated by a wired system because the patient cannot interact with its environment freely. The present work tackles the design, construction and implementation of a platform to carry out biomechanical analysis for upper and lower limbs. The included variables in the biomechanical system are the angular position, linear acceleration, electromyography signals and force executed by the limbs. The designed scheme considers the wireless monitoring of relevant signals; such variables allow us to analyze the effectiveness achieved by the therapy. Processing and data exhibition are carry out in a personal computer. Two application examples regarding the biomechanical wrist evaluation and the EMG correlation are presented. Nonlinear algorithms to analyze the information obtained in the system are used to evaluate the biomechanical responses produced in different patients. PMID:21095678

  8. Efficacy of a Modified Bier's Block in Patients Undergoing Upper Limb Bone Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Jafarian, Aliakbar; Hassani, Valiollah; Jesmi, Fatemeh; Ramezani, Koosha; Javaheri, Fereydoun; Shariatzadeh, Hooman

    2015-01-01

    Background: Intravenous regional block, called the Bier's block, refers to an analgesic technique applied for soft tissue surgeries and closed bone manipulations of the limbs. There are a number of complications in traditional method of block, including pain in tourniquet site, immediate return of pain after tourniquet deflation, wound hemostasis and some others. Objectives: The aim of this study was to assess the outcomes and complications of our new method of blockage. Patients and Methods: In this experimental study, twenty-five patients undergoing hand surgery were prospectively studied. Induced anesthesia was a modification of the Bier's block with two concurrent changes including insertion of the intravenous cannula at the antecubital region rather than distal and the proximal anesthetic direction by an elastic band wrapped tightly around the proximal forearm distal to the cannulation site. The pain relief was measured by the verbal descriptive scale at intervals after block, during the operation, after deflation of the tourniquet and one hour after the operation. Results: This study showed the presence of analgesia at surgical and tourniquet sites during the operation in 96% of patients, as well as considerable pain relief at surgical site during one hour after deflation of the tourniquet. Conclusions: The study indicated advantages of this modified Bier's block compared to the traditional one including ability to perform surgery on upper limb bones and considerable pain relief at surgical and tourniquet sites during the operation until one hour thereafter. PMID:25789235

  9. The application of shape memory actuators in anthropomorphic upper limb prostheses.

    PubMed

    dos Santos, Christian Mariani Lucas; da Cunha, Fransergio Leite; Dynnikov, Vladimir Ivanovitch

    2003-05-01

    In recent years, single crystal Cu-Al-Ni alloys with shape memory behavior (SMB) became generally commercialized. They achieved the level of extended application, including upper limb human prosthesis with anthropomorphic characteristics. An actuator based in single crystal Cu-Al-Ni alloy was tested as a prototype for prosthetic actuators. Their thermal cycle times remarkably define the actuator dynamics and the idea of preheating to reduce its response time was tested. To elaborate the heating conditions, the chemical composition of martensitic and austenitic single crystals, Cu-Al-Ni alloy samples were examined. The dynamic response of a martensitic actuator made with SMB and the power consumed with preheating was analyzed. It demonstrates that the presence of more elements in alloys may be fundamental to displace the heating diagram and to reduce the power consumed. PMID:12752212

  10. Tracing the pathways of the upper limb of the North Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkholder, Kristin C.; Lozier, M. Susan

    2014-06-01

    The warm sea surface temperatures (SSTs) of the eastern subpolar gyre (ESG) in the North Atlantic have been widely linked to the climate and climate variability of Great Britain and northwestern Europe. The source of the ESG waters, and its heat, has long been identified as surface subtropical waters that flow into the subpolar gyre as part of the upper limb of the Meridional Overturning Circulation. Recent studies, however, have cast doubt on that identification. Here we use synthetic floats launched in a high-resolution ocean general circulation model to identify the supply waters to the ESG and to determine the influence of those pathways on SSTs in that climatically important region. The synthetic floats reveal two pathways: a dominant subsurface subtropical to subpolar pathway and a less traveled surface pathway carrying recirculated waters eastward from the western subpolar gyre. The former pathway supplies anomalously warm water to the region; the latter pathway supplies anomalously cool water.

  11. Hematuria following Botox treatment for upper limb spasticity: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Tony CT; Yeung, Stephen T; Lee, Sujin; Chang, Eric Y

    2015-01-01

    Hematuria is a documented side effect of botulinum toxin injection and has only been reported when it is used for overactive bladder. Here we report a rare case of hematuria following onabotulinumtoxin A (Botox) injection for upper limb spasticity in a 29-year-old male with a history of traumatic brain injury and hemophilia. Hematuria resolved without further complication after self-injection of factor VIII as recommended by his hematologist. Botulinum toxin binds peripheral cholinergic nerve endings to prevent acetylcholine and norepinephrine exocytosis. Studies have shown that both of these compounds are involved in antifibrinolytic activation, suggesting botulinum toxin may play a role in the coagulation cascade by preventing formation of fibrin. This is further supported by resolution of hematuria in our patient after self-injection of factor VIII. As such, botulinum toxin injection may result in mild spontaneous hemorrhage in patients with underlying hematological deficiencies. Further studies are needed to elucidate its effects in coagulation. PMID:26396542

  12. Development of an upper limb patient simulator for physical therapy exercise.

    PubMed

    Takhashi, Yoshiyuki; Komeda, Takashi; Koyama, Hiroyuki; Yamamoto, S-Ichiro; Arimatsu, Takayuki; Kawakami, Yukio; Inoue, Kaoru; Ito, Yuko

    2011-01-01

    Physical therapist plays an important role to help people to regain the social life from disease and physical handicap. However, they can obtain their skills only from their practical experiences. The physical therapist trainee can enrich is experience only from the clinical practical training and this opportunity is limited. Therefore, we have been developing the upper limb patient simulator, which reproduce the stiffness of elbow joint to allow trainees to increase the opportunities to obtain the practical exercise of the physical therapy. The system reproduces the diseases by generating stiffness of the elbow joint, when the trainee tries to flex the elbow joint of the patient. We developed a mechanical part and a control system to realize the patient conditions and the full system has been evaluated by veteran physical therapists. PMID:22275706

  13. Adaptive control of 5 DOF upper-limb exoskeleton robot with improved safety.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hao-Bo; Wang, Jian-Hui

    2013-11-01

    This paper studies an adaptive control strategy for a class of 5 DOF upper-limb exoskeleton robot with a special safety consideration. The safety requirement plays a critical role in the clinical treatment when assisting patients with shoulder, elbow and wrist joint movements. With the objective of assuring the tracking performance of the pre-specified operations, the proposed adaptive controller is firstly designed to be robust to the model uncertainties. To further improve the safety and fault-tolerance in the presence of unknown large parameter variances or even actuator faults, the adaptive controller is on-line updated according to the information provided by an adaptive observer without additional sensors. An output tracking performance is well achieved with a tunable error bound. The experimental example also verifies the effectiveness of the proposed control scheme. PMID:23906739

  14. Robotic upper limb rehabilitation after acute stroke by NeReBot: evaluation of treatment costs.

    PubMed

    Stefano, Masiero; Patrizia, Poli; Mario, Armani; Ferlini, Gregorio; Rizzello, Roberto; Rosati, Giulio

    2014-01-01

    Stroke is the first cause of disability. Several robotic devices have been developed for stroke rehabilitation. Robot therapy by NeReBot is demonstrated to be an effective tool for the treatment of poststroke paretic upper limbs, able to improve the activities of daily living of stroke survivors when used both as additional treatment and in partial substitution of conventional rehabilitation therapy in the acute and subacute phases poststroke. This study presents the evaluation of the costs related to delivering such therapy, in comparison with conventional rehabilitation treatment. By comparing several NeReBot treatment protocols, made of different combinations of robotic and nonrobotic exercises, we show that robotic technology can be a valuable and economically sustainable aid in the management of poststroke patient rehabilitation. PMID:24967345

  15. Successful Revascularization of Near Total Amputation of the Upper Limb at the Sultan Qaboos Hospital, Salalah

    PubMed Central

    Nanda, Vipul; Alsafy, Taif; Jacob, Joe; Mohan, Lalit

    2009-01-01

    Severe crush injuries to the upper limb may require a formal amputation with devastating consequences to the patient. We report a patient with a near total amputation at the level of mid-forearm who underwent revascularization and salvage of his hand. The operative details of this case are described. It is the first time that such a patient has been treated successfully by plastic surgeons and orthopedic surgeons at the Sultan Qaboos Hospital, Salalah. Awareness of the possibility of salvage should be spread among health care personnel as well as the need for immediate attention by a multispeciality team. Literature related to the operative technique, contraindications and long term results is reviewed. PMID:22303510

  16. Design and analysis of an underactuated anthropomorphic finger for upper limb prosthetics.

    PubMed

    Omarkulov, Nurdos; Telegenov, Kuat; Zeinullin, Maralbek; Begalinova, Ainur; Shintemirov, Almas

    2015-08-01

    This paper presents the design of a linkage based finger mechanism ensuring extended range of anthropomorphic gripping motions. The finger design is done using a path-point generation method based on geometrical dimensions and motion of a typical index human finger. Following the design description, and its kinematics analysis, the experimental evaluation of the finger gripping performance is presented using the finger 3D printed prototype. The finger underactuation is achieved by utilizing mechanical linkage system, consisting of two crossed four-bar linkage mechanisms. It is shown that the proposed finger design can be used to design a five-fingered anthropomorphic hand and has the potential for upper limb prostheses development. PMID:26736795

  17. Perceived discomfort functions based on joint moment for various joint motion directions of the upper limb.

    PubMed

    Chihara, Takanori; Izumi, Taiki; Seo, Akihiko

    2014-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to formulate the relationship between the perceived discomfort and the joint moment ratio for twelve joint motion directions of the upper limb by considering the between-subject variability, and to investigate the effect of joint motion direction. Three approximation models (i.e., linear, exponential, and logistic function models) were compared in terms of the accuracy of predicting the perceived discomfort, and the logistic function was selected because its average error was lowest. The concept of L-R fuzzy number was used to consider the individual variability of perceived discomfort, and a simplified distribution of perceived discomfort was represented. Cluster analysis showed that the twelve discomfort functions formed two clusters: one for elbow flexion and a second for the remaining joint motions. The data show that elbow flexion is more sensitive than other joint motions to increases in the joint moment ratio. PMID:23684117

  18. The contribution of upper limb and total body movement to adolescents' energy expenditure whilst playing Nintendo Wii.

    PubMed

    Graves, Lee E F; Ridgers, Nicola D; Stratton, Gareth

    2008-11-01

    Little research documents the contribution of upper limb and total body movement to energy expenditure (EE) during active video gaming. To address this, EE, heart rate (HR), and, upper limb and total body movement were assessed in 11- to 17-year-old adolescents whilst playing three active (Nintendo Wii) and one sedentary (XBOX 360) video games. Non-dominant upper limb activity, EE and HR were significantly greater during Wii Sports boxing [mean 267.2 (SD 115.8) J kg(-1) min(-1); 136.7 (24.5) beats min(-1)] than tennis or bowling (P < or = 0.044). For all active games hip activity best predicted EE (R (2) > or = 0.53), with two-measure models of HR and single-site activity data, and multi-site activity data, similarly explaining the variance in EE (R (2) > or = 0.64). The physiological cost of upper-body orientated active video games increased when movement of both upper limbs was encouraged. Improvements in EE explanatory power provide support for multi-site activity monitoring during unique, non-ambulatory activities. PMID:18607619

  19. Consumer concerns and the functional value of prostheses to upper limb amputees.

    PubMed

    Kejlaa, G H

    1993-12-01

    This paper reports a study of 66 upper limb amputees in County Funen, Denmark who were visited in their homes by the author. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the consumer concerns about their prostheses and to see if these were related to cessation of prosthetic use. It was also intended to estimate functional levels of both prosthetic users and non-users. The number of amputees investigated corresponds to the annual number of persons becoming upper limb amputees in Denmark. There were 3 prosthetic systems in use, two active systems and one passive system. At review there was a group of 18 amputees which did not use a prosthesis at all. It appeared that active and partially active users are younger persons with a relatively short time-lapse since amputation. Passive users are older persons with a long time-lapse since amputation. Only 4 out of 18 prosthetic non-users stopped prosthetic use as a consequence of prosthetic problems or discomfort. Active prostheses had the highest number of consumer problems. Most problems were concerned with the socket, and for the body powered prostheses also with the suspension and control system. It was shown that an awareness of the amputee's working conditions is important at the fitting stage, especially the daily working situation. As a consequence strictly individual fitting is needed with attention being given to the manner in which the individual will use the prosthesis. This investigation clearly shows that active fitting is a worthy effort. In daily living the active users have a superior performance over the passive and non-users. It was observed that amputees despite many years of training still have problems with activities of daily living, particularly in relation to independent functions. PMID:8134275

  20. Activity-related sexual dimorphism in Alaskan foragers from Point Hope: Evidences from the upper limb.

    PubMed

    Ibáñez-Gimeno, Pere; Galtés, Ignasi; Jordana, Xavier; Manyosa, Joan; Malgosa, Assumpció

    2015-01-01

    Ipiutak (100BCE-500CE) and Tigara (1200 - 1700CE) are two populations from Point Hope, Alaska. As commonly observed in forager communities, it may be expected males and females to have been involved in markedly different daily activities. Nevertheless, activity-related sexual dimorphism in these populations has been scarcely studied. Using humeral diaphyseal cross-sectional properties and forearm rotational efficiency, which are activity-dependent characteristics, we aim to assess differences between sexes and discuss what activities could have triggered them. Our results suggest that in Ipiutak males and females did not differ meaningfully in their cross-sectional properties. Conversely, in Tigara males had a greater rigidity of the entire humeral diaphysis than females, which suggests the existence of greater relative activity levels and more physically demanding tasks, possibly related to hunting activities. Concerning the differences between sexes in the forearm rotational efficiency, in Tigara females rotational efficiency in elbow flexion is maximal in a more supinated position than in males, which leads to an improvement of efficiency in those stages related to manipulation, and so improves the manipulative capacities of the upper limb. These differences in efficiency are caused by a more proximally oriented humeral medial epicondyle in females, which is thus confirmed to be a good feature to assess differences in labor. Therefore females in Tigara probably performed in a daily basis household activities, such as hide processing and other manipulative labors. In Ipiutak, the analysis of forearm rotational efficiency did not reveal differences between sexes. Overall, the results suggest that division of labor in Ipiutak was not as marked as in Tigara, where upper limb skeletal structure supports the idea that both sexes were involved in different daily activities. Nevertheless, the generalized lack of results in Ipiutak could be due to the small sample size, and thus interpretations should be considered with caution. PMID:26482552

  1. Positive effects of robotic exoskeleton training of upper limb reaching movements after stroke.

    PubMed

    Frisoli, Antonio; Procopio, Caterina; Chisari, Carmelo; Creatini, Ilaria; Bonfiglio, Luca; Bergamasco, Massimo; Rossi, Bruno; Carboncini, Maria Chiara

    2012-01-01

    This study, conducted in a group of nine chronic patients with right-side hemiparesis after stroke, investigated the effects of a robotic-assisted rehabilitation training with an upper limb robotic exoskeleton for the restoration of motor function in spatial reaching movements. The robotic assisted rehabilitation training was administered for a period of 6 weeks including reaching and spatial antigravity movements. To assess the carry-over of the observed improvements in movement during training into improved function, a kinesiologic assessment of the effects of the training was performed by means of motion and dynamic electromyographic analysis of reaching movements performed before and after training. The same kinesiologic measurements were performed in a healthy control group of seven volunteers, to determine a benchmark for the experimental observations in the patients' group. Moreover degree of functional impairment at the enrolment and discharge was measured by clinical evaluation with upper limb Fugl-Meyer Assessment scale (FMA, 0-66 points), Modified Ashworth scale (MA, 0-60 pts) and active ranges of motion. The robot aided training induced, independently by time of stroke, statistical significant improvements of kinesiologic (movement time, smoothness of motion) and clinical (4.6 ± 4.2 increase in FMA, 3.2 ± 2.1 decrease in MA) parameters, as a result of the increased active ranges of motion and improved co-contraction index for shoulder extension/flexion. Kinesiologic parameters correlated significantly with clinical assessment values, and their changes after the training were affected by the direction of motion (inward vs. outward movement) and position of target to be reached (ipsilateral, central and contralateral peripersonal space). These changes can be explained as a result of the motor recovery induced by the robotic training, in terms of regained ability to execute single joint movements and of improved interjoint coordination of elbow and shoulder joints. PMID:22681653

  2. Early influence of auditory stimuli on upper-limb movements in young human infants: an overview

    PubMed Central

    Ferronato, Priscilla A. M.; Domellöf, Erik; Rönnqvist, Louise

    2014-01-01

    Given that the auditory system is rather well developed at the end of the third trimester of pregnancy, it is likely that couplings between acoustics and motor activity can be integrated as early as at the beginning of postnatal life. The aim of the present mini-review was to summarize and discuss studies on early auditory-motor integration, focusing particularly on upper-limb movements (one of the most crucial means to interact with the environment) in association with auditory stimuli, to develop further understanding of their significance with regard to early infant development. Many studies have investigated the relationship between various infant behaviors (e.g., sucking, visual fixation, head turning) and auditory stimuli, and established that human infants can be observed displaying couplings between action and environmental sensory stimulation already from just after birth, clearly indicating a propensity for intentional behavior. Surprisingly few studies, however, have investigated the associations between upper-limb movements and different auditory stimuli in newborns and young infants, infants born at risk for developmental disorders/delays in particular. Findings from studies of early auditory-motor interaction support that the developing integration of sensory and motor systems is a fundamental part of the process guiding the development of goal-directed action in infancy, of great importance for continued motor, perceptual, and cognitive development. At-risk infants (e.g., those born preterm) may display increasing central auditory processing disorders, negatively affecting early sensory-motor integration, and resulting in long-term consequences on gesturing, language development, and social communication. Consequently, there is a need for more studies on such implications. PMID:25278927

  3. Power hand tool kinetics associated with upper limb injuries in an automobile assembly plant.

    PubMed

    Ku, Chia-Hua; Radwin, Robert G; Karsh, Ben-Tzion

    2007-06-01

    This study investigated the relationship between pneumatic nutrunner handle reactions, workstation characteristics, and prevalence of upper limb injuries in an automobile assembly plant. Tool properties (geometry, inertial properties, and motor characteristics), fastener properties, orientation relative to the fastener, and the position of the tool operator (horizontal and vertical distances) were measured for 69 workstations using 15 different pneumatic nutrunners. Handle reaction response was predicted using a deterministic mechanical model of the human operator and tool that was previously developed in our laboratory, specific to the measured tool, workstation, and job factors. Handle force was a function of target torque, tool geometry and inertial properties, motor speed, work orientation, and joint hardness. The study found that tool target torque was not well correlated with predicted handle reaction force (r=0.495) or displacement (r=0.285). The individual tool, tool shape, and threaded fastener joint hardness all affected predicted forces and displacements (p<0.05). The average peak handle force and displacement for right-angle tools were twice as great as pistol grip tools. Soft-threaded fastener joints had the greatest average handle forces and displacements. Upper limb injury cases were identified using plant OSHA 200 log and personnel records. Predicted handle forces for jobs where injuries were reported were significantly greater than those jobs free of injuries (p<0.05), whereas target torque and predicted handle displacement did not show statistically significant differences. The study concluded that quantification of handle reaction force, rather than target torque alone, is necessary for identifying stressful power hand tool operations and for controlling exposure to forces in manufacturing jobs involving power nutrunners. Therefore, a combination of tool, work station, and task requirements should be considered. PMID:17474028

  4. Positive effects of robotic exoskeleton training of upper limb reaching movements after stroke

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    This study, conducted in a group of nine chronic patients with right-side hemiparesis after stroke, investigated the effects of a robotic-assisted rehabilitation training with an upper limb robotic exoskeleton for the restoration of motor function in spatial reaching movements. The robotic assisted rehabilitation training was administered for a period of 6 weeks including reaching and spatial antigravity movements. To assess the carry-over of the observed improvements in movement during training into improved function, a kinesiologic assessment of the effects of the training was performed by means of motion and dynamic electromyographic analysis of reaching movements performed before and after training. The same kinesiologic measurements were performed in a healthy control group of seven volunteers, to determine a benchmark for the experimental observations in the patients’ group. Moreover degree of functional impairment at the enrolment and discharge was measured by clinical evaluation with upper limb Fugl-Meyer Assessment scale (FMA, 0–66 points), Modified Ashworth scale (MA, 0–60 pts) and active ranges of motion. The robot aided training induced, independently by time of stroke, statistical significant improvements of kinesiologic (movement time, smoothness of motion) and clinical (4.6 ± 4.2 increase in FMA, 3.2 ± 2.1 decrease in MA) parameters, as a result of the increased active ranges of motion and improved co-contraction index for shoulder extension/flexion. Kinesiologic parameters correlated significantly with clinical assessment values, and their changes after the training were affected by the direction of motion (inward vs. outward movement) and position of target to be reached (ipsilateral, central and contralateral peripersonal space). These changes can be explained as a result of the motor recovery induced by the robotic training, in terms of regained ability to execute single joint movements and of improved interjoint coordination of elbow and shoulder joints. PMID:22681653

  5. Lateralized ictal immobility of the upper limb in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Kuba, R; Krízová, J; Brázdil, M; Tyrlíková, I; Rektor, I

    2005-11-01

    The primary aim of this study was to establish the incidence and the lateralizing value of 'lateralized ictal immobility of the upper limb' (LIL) in patients suffering from temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), and to describe the connection between LIL and other clinical ictal signs. We retrospectively reviewed video records of 87 patients with TLE. We reviewed a total of 276 focal epileptic seizures with or without secondary generalization. We studied the incidence of LIL, its lateralizing value, and its relationship to other ictal clinical signs. Of the 87 patients, 49 had undergone a successful resective surgery at least 1 year prior to the study. LIL is a late sign in the course of partial seizure. It occurred in 25 of our 87 patients (28.7%), and in 47 of 276 seizures (17.1%). In all of the evaluated seizures, LIL occurred contralateral to the side of seizure onset (P < 0.001). LIL was always associated with ipsilateral upper limb automatisms, and in 63.1% of the occurrences, it was immediately followed by ictal dystonia. LIL is a more accurate term to describe what has previously been called 'ictal paresis' in the literature. Due to the inability to execute proper testing during a partial seizure, it is better to use the term LIL when making a visual analysis of a seizure. LIL is a more suitable term to describe the studied ictal sign. It is a relatively frequent sign in patients with TLE. LIL has an excellent lateralizing value for the contralateral hemisphere. It is a negative motor sign, and its genesis is probably associated with the epileptic involvement of the contralateral frontal lobe. PMID:16241978

  6. Localization of exogenous DNA to mitochondria in skeletal muscle following hydrodynamic limb vein injection.

    PubMed

    Yasuzaki, Yukari; Yamada, Yuma; Kanefuji, Tsutomu; Harashima, Hideyoshi

    2013-12-28

    Mitochondrial genetic disorders are a major cause of mitochondrial diseases. It is therefore likely that mitochondrial gene therapy will be useful for the treatment of such diseases. Here, we report on the possibility of mitochondrial gene delivery in skeletal muscle using hydrodynamic limb vein (HLV) injection. The HLV injection procedure, a useful method for transgene expression in skeletal muscle, involves the rapid injection of a large volume of naked plasmid DNA (pDNA) into the distal vein of a limb. We hypothesized that the technique could be used to deliver pDNA not only to nuclei but also to mitochondria, since cytosolic pDNA that is internalized by the method may be able to overcome mitochondrial membrane. We determined if pDNA could be delivered to myofibrillar mitochondria by HLV injection by PCR analysis. Mitochondrial toxicity assays showed that the HLV injection had no influence on mitochondrial function. These findings indicate that HLV injection promises to be a useful technique for in vivo mitochondrial gene delivery. PMID:24100263

  7. Residual Upper Arm Motor Function Primes Innervation of Paretic Forearm Muscles in Chronic Stroke after Brain-Machine Interface (BMI) Training

    PubMed Central

    Curado, Marco Rocha; Cossio, Eliana Garcia; Broetz, Doris; Agostini, Manuel; Cho, Woosang; Brasil, Fabricio Lima; Yilmaz, Oezge; Liberati, Giulia; Lepski, Guilherme

    2015-01-01

    Background Abnormal upper arm-forearm muscle synergies after stroke are poorly understood. We investigated whether upper arm function primes paralyzed forearm muscles in chronic stroke patients after Brain-Machine Interface (BMI)-based rehabilitation. Shaping upper arm-forearm muscle synergies may support individualized motor rehabilitation strategies. Methods Thirty-two chronic stroke patients with no active finger extensions were randomly assigned to experimental or sham groups and underwent daily BMI training followed by physiotherapy during four weeks. BMI sessions included desynchronization of ipsilesional brain activity and a robotic orthosis to move the paretic limb (experimental group, n = 16). In the sham group (n = 16) orthosis movements were random. Motor function was evaluated with electromyography (EMG) of forearm extensors, and upper arm and hand Fugl-Meyer assessment (FMA) scores. Patients performed distinct upper arm (e.g., shoulder flexion) and hand movements (finger extensions). Forearm EMG activity significantly higher during upper arm movements as compared to finger extensions was considered facilitation of forearm EMG activity. Intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was used to test inter-session reliability of facilitation of forearm EMG activity. Results Facilitation of forearm EMG activity ICC ranges from 0.52 to 0.83, indicating fair to high reliability before intervention in both limbs. Facilitation of forearm muscles is higher in the paretic as compared to the healthy limb (p<0.001). Upper arm FMA scores predict facilitation of forearm muscles after intervention in both groups (significant correlations ranged from R = 0.752, p = 0.002 to R = 0.779, p = 0.001), but only in the experimental group upper arm FMA scores predict changes in facilitation of forearm muscles after intervention (R = 0.709, p = 0.002; R = 0.827, p<0.001). Conclusions Residual upper arm motor function primes recruitment of paralyzed forearm muscles in chronic stroke patients and predicts changes in their recruitment after BMI training. This study suggests that changes in upper arm-forearm synergies contribute to stroke motor recovery, and provides candidacy guidelines for similar BMI-based clinical practice. PMID:26495971

  8. Effect of recovery mode following hind-limb suspension on soleus muscle composition in the rat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McNulty, A. L.; Otto, A. J.; Kasper, C. E.; Thomas, D. P.

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of two different recovery modes from hind-limb suspension-induced hypodynamia on whole body and muscle (soleus) growth as well as soleus composition and size changes of different fiber types within this same muscle. Following 28 days of tail-suspension, rats were returned to their cages and sedentarily recovered (HS), or were exercised by running on a treadmill 5 days/wk, at progressively increasing workloads (HR) for one month. Sedentary and running control groups of animals (CS, CR) were also evaluated for comparative purposes. The exercise program, which was identical for CR and HR groups, had no effect on body wt., soleus wt., soleus muscle composition or fiber size in CR rats. Atrophied soleus muscle and reduced soleus wt./body wt. ratio (both 60% of control) had returned to control values by day 7 of recovery in both suspended groups despite the fact that whole body wt. gain was significantly reduced (p less than 0.05) in HR as compared to HS rats. Atrophied soleus Type I fiber mean cross-sectional area in both HR and HS groups demonstrated similar and significant (p less than 0.01) increases during recovery. Increases in Type IIa and IIc fiber area during this same period were significant only in the HR group. While the percentage area of muscle composed of Type I fibers increased in both hypodynamic groups during recovery, the reduction in area percentage of muscle made up of Type IIa fibers was again only significant in the HR group.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

  9. [Peculiarities of changes in circulatory parameters of microcirculation in local freezing injury of the upper limbs].

    PubMed

    Shapovalov, K G; Sizonenko, V A; Burdinskiĭ, E N

    2009-01-01

    The condition of the microcirculatory bed in frostbitten tissues has the decisive importance in the course of the injury. The objective of the work was to investigate the dynamics of the parameters of microcirculation in patients with an endured local frostbite injury of the upper extremities. Evaluated were oscillations of the bloodstream by means of laser Doppler flowmetry. The study was carried out in a total of sixty 18-to-45-year-old patients presenting with a degree II-IV local frostbite injury of the upper extremities at various periods of the injury. In the prereactive period, when there are no significant deviations of the blood-flow oscillation parameters, using the occlusion test makes it possible to reveal alterations in the condition of the microcirculatory bed. The early and late reactive periods of a localfrostbite injury of the upper limbs are characterized by an increase in the neurogenic and myogenic components of vascular tonicity, as well as the by-pass index, thus suggesting a vascular spasm and increased by-pass blood flow. Degree II-IV frostbites of the upper extremities in the early and late reactive periods of the injury are accompanied by decreased reactivity of the vascular wall in response to occlusion, decreased potential of the active mechanisms of regulation of vascular tonicity, and maintenance of an adequate tissue blood circulation, with a 1.5-2-fold decrease in the blood flow reserve. The revealed alterations in the parameters of microcirculation and regulation of vascular tonicity explain a lingering course of the wound process in frostbites. Using the method of laser Doppler flowmetry makes it possible to determine the condition of microcirculation and vascular tonicity, to evaluate efficiency of the methods of treatment, and to predict the course of frostbite. PMID:19791572

  10. Budget impact analysis of botulinum toxin A therapy for upper limb spasticity in the United Kingdom

    PubMed Central

    Abogunrin, Seye; Hortobagyi, Linda; Remak, Edit; Dinet, Jerome; Gabriel, Sylvie; Bakheit, Abdel Magid O

    2015-01-01

    Background Botulinum toxin A (BoNT-A) is an effective treatment for patients with upper limb spasticity (ULS), which is a debilitating feature of upper motor neuron lesions. BoNT-A preparations available in the UK are associated with different costs. Methods We developed a budget impact model to assess the effect of changing market shares of different BoNT-A formulations abobotulinumtoxinA, onabotulinumtoxinA, and incobotulinumtoxinA and best supportive care, from the UK payer perspective, over a 5-year time horizon. Epidemiological and resource use data were derived from published literature and clinical expert opinion. One-way sensitivity analyses were performed to determine parameters most influential on budget impact. Results Base-case assumptions showed that an increased uptake of abobotulinumtoxinA resulted in a 5-year savings of 6,283,829. Treatment with BoNT-A costs less than best supportive care per patient per year, although treating a patient with onabotulinumtoxinA (20,861) and incobotulinumtoxinA (20,717) cost more per patient annually than with abobotulinumtoxinA (19,800). Sensitivity analyses showed that the most influential parameters on budget were percentage of cerebral palsy and stroke patients developing ULS, and the prevalence of stroke. Conclusion Study findings suggest that increased use of abobotulinumtoxinA for ULS in the UK could potentially reduce total ULS cost for the health system and society. PMID:25878510

  11. Redundancy resolution of the human arm and an upper limb exoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyunchul; Miller, Levi Makaio; Byl, Nancy; Abrams, Gary M; Rosen, Jacob

    2012-06-01

    The human arm has 7 degrees of freedom (DOF) while only 6 DOF are required to position the wrist and orient the palm. Thus, the inverse kinematics of an human arm has a nonunique solution. Resolving this redundancy becomes critical as the human interacts with a wearable robot and the inverse kinematics solution of these two coupled systems must be identical to guarantee an seamless integration. The redundancy of the arm can be formulated by defining the swivel angle, the rotation angle of the plane defined by the upper and lower arm around a virtual axis that connects the shoulder and wrist joints. Analyzing reaching tasks recorded with a motion capture system indicates that the swivel angle is selected such that when the elbow joint is flexed, the palm points to the head. Based on these experimental results, a new criterion is formed to resolve the human arm redundancy. This criterion was implemented into the control algorithm of an upper limb 7-DOF wearable robot. Experimental results indicate that by using the proposed redundancy resolution criterion, the error between the predicted and the actual swivel angle adopted by the motor control system is less then 5°. PMID:22510944

  12. Emergence of Virtual Reality as a Tool for Upper Limb Rehabilitation: Incorporation of Motor Control and Motor Learning Principles

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Patrice L.; Keshner, Emily A.

    2015-01-01

    The primary focus of rehabilitation for individuals with loss of upper limb movement as a result of acquired brain injury is the relearning of specific motor skills and daily tasks. This relearning is essential because the loss of upper limb movement often results in a reduced quality of life. Although rehabilitation strives to take advantage of neuroplastic processes during recovery, results of traditional approaches to upper limb rehabilitation have not entirely met this goal. In contrast, enriched training tasks, simulated with a wide range of low- to high-end virtual reality–based simulations, can be used to provide meaningful, repetitive practice together with salient feedback, thereby maximizing neuroplastic processes via motor learning and motor recovery. Such enriched virtual environments have the potential to optimize motor learning by manipulating practice conditions that explicitly engage motivational, cognitive, motor control, and sensory feedback–based learning mechanisms. The objectives of this article are to review motor control and motor learning principles, to discuss how they can be exploited by virtual reality training environments, and to provide evidence concerning current applications for upper limb motor recovery. The limitations of the current technologies with respect to their effectiveness and transfer of learning to daily life tasks also are discussed. PMID:25212522

  13. Age Effects on Upper Limb Kinematics Assessed by the REAplan Robot in Healthy Subjects Aged 3 to 93 Years.

    PubMed

    Gilliaux, Maxime; Lejeune, Thierry M; Sapin, Julien; Dehez, Bruno; Stoquart, Gaëtan; Detrembleur, Christine

    2016-04-01

    Kinematics is recommended for the quantitative assessment of upper limb movements. The aims of this study were to determine the age effects on upper limb kinematics and establish normative values in healthy subjects. Three hundred and seventy healthy subjects, aged 3-93 years, participated in the study. They performed two unidirectional and two geometrical tasks ten consecutive times with the REAplan, a distal effector robotic device that allows upper limb displacements in the horizontal plane. Twenty-six kinematic indices were computed for the four tasks. For the four tasks, nineteen of the computed kinematic indices showed an age effect. Seventeen indices (the accuracy, speed and smoothness indices and the reproducibility of the accuracy, speed and smoothness) improved in young subjects aged 3-30 years, showed stabilization in adults aged 30-60 years and declined in elderly subjects aged 60-93 years. Additionally, for both geometrical tasks, the speed index exhibited a decrease throughout life. Finally, a principal component analysis provided the relations between the kinematic indices, tasks and subjects' age. This study is the first to assess age effects on upper limb kinematics and establish normative values in subjects aged 3-93 years. PMID:26208617

  14. Amplitude Manipulation Evokes Upper Limb Freezing during Handwriting in Patients with Parkinson’s Disease with Freezing of Gait

    PubMed Central

    Heremans, Elke; Nackaerts, Evelien; Vervoort, Griet; Vercruysse, Sarah; Broeder, Sanne; Strouwen, Carolien; Swinnen, Stephan P.; Nieuwboer, Alice

    2015-01-01

    Background Recent studies show that besides freezing of gait (FOG), many people with Parkinson’s disease (PD) also suffer from freezing in the upper limbs (FOUL). Up to now, it is unclear which task constraints provoke and explain upper limb freezing. Objective To investigate whether upper limb freezing and other kinematic abnormalities during writing are provoked by (i) gradual changes in amplitude or by (ii) sustained amplitude generation in patients with and without freezing of gait. Methods Thirty-four patients with PD, including 17 with and 17 without FOG, performed a writing task on a touch-sensitive writing tablet requiring writing at constant small and large size as well as writing at gradually increasing and decreasing size. Patients of both groups were matched for disease severity, tested while ‘on’ medication and compared to healthy age-matched controls. Results Fifty upper limb freezing episodes were detected in 10 patients, including 8 with and 2 without FOG. The majority of the episodes occurred when participants had to write at small or gradually decreasing size. The occurrence of FOUL and the number of FOUL episodes per patient significantly correlated with the occurrence and severity of FOG. Patients with FOUL also showed a significantly smaller amplitude in the writing parts outside the freezing episodes. Conclusions Corroborating findings of gait research, the current study supports a core problem in amplitude control underlying FOUL, both in maintaining as well as in flexibly adapting the cycle size. PMID:26580556

  15. Three-Dimensional Upper Limb Movement Characteristics in Children with Hemiplegic Cerebral Palsy and Typically Developing Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaspers, Ellen; Desloovere, Kaat; Bruyninckx, Herman; Klingels, Katrijn; Molenaers, Guy; Aertbelien, Erwin; Van Gestel, Leen; Feys, Hilde

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to measure which three-dimensional spatiotemporal and kinematic parameters differentiate upper limb movement characteristics in children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy (HCP) from those in typically developing children (TDC), during various clinically relevant tasks. We used a standardized protocol containing three reach…

  16. Sports Adaptations for Unilateral and Bilateral Upper-Limb Amputees: Archery/Badminton/Baseball/Softball/Bowling/Golf/Table Tennis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cowart, Jim

    1979-01-01

    The booklet discusses sports adaptations for unilateral and bilateral upper limb amputees. Designs for adapted equipment are illustrated and information on adaptations are described for archery (including an archery release aid and a stationary bow holder); badminton (serving tray); baseball/softball (adaptations for catching, throwing, and…

  17. Determining Specificity of Motor Imagery Training for Upper Limb Improvement in Chronic Stroke Patients: A Training Protocol and Pilot Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Craje, Celine

    2010-01-01

    Motor imagery (MI) refers to the mental rehearsal of a movement without actual motor output. MI training has positive effects on upper limb recovery after stroke. However, until now it is unclear whether this effect is specific to the trained task or a more general motor skill improvement. This study was set up to advance our insights into the

  18. Determining Specificity of Motor Imagery Training for Upper Limb Improvement in Chronic Stroke Patients: A Training Protocol and Pilot Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Craje, Celine

    2010-01-01

    Motor imagery (MI) refers to the mental rehearsal of a movement without actual motor output. MI training has positive effects on upper limb recovery after stroke. However, until now it is unclear whether this effect is specific to the trained task or a more general motor skill improvement. This study was set up to advance our insights into the…

  19. Three-Dimensional Upper Limb Movement Characteristics in Children with Hemiplegic Cerebral Palsy and Typically Developing Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaspers, Ellen; Desloovere, Kaat; Bruyninckx, Herman; Klingels, Katrijn; Molenaers, Guy; Aertbelien, Erwin; Van Gestel, Leen; Feys, Hilde

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to measure which three-dimensional spatiotemporal and kinematic parameters differentiate upper limb movement characteristics in children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy (HCP) from those in typically developing children (TDC), during various clinically relevant tasks. We used a standardized protocol containing three reach

  20. Electroencephalographic Changes of Brain Oscillatory Activity After Upper Limb Somatic Sensation Training in a Patient With Somatosensory Deficit After Stroke.

    PubMed

    Gandolfi, Marialuisa; Formaggio, Emanuela; Geroin, Christian; Storti, Silvia Francesca; Boscolo Galazzo, Ilaria; Waldner, Andreas; Manganotti, Paolo; Smania, Nicola

    2015-10-01

    The development of an innovative functional assessment procedure based on the combination of electroencephalography (EEG) and robot-assisted upper limb devices may provide new insights into the dynamics of cortical reorganization promoted by rehabilitation. The aim of this study was to evaluate changes in event-related synchronization/desynchronization (ERS/ERD) in alpha and beta bands in a patient with pure sensory stroke who underwent a specific rehabilitation program for somatic sensation recovery. A 49-year-old, right-handed woman (time since stroke, 12 months) with severe upper limb somatic sensation deficits was tested using validated clinical scales and a standardized video-EEG system combined with the Bi-Manu-Track robot-assisted arm trainer protocol. The patient underwent a 3-month home-based rehabilitation program for promoting upper limb recovery (1 hour a day for 5 days a week). She was tested before treatment, at 1-month, and at 3-month during treatment. Results showed progressive recovery of upper limb function over time. These effects were associated with specific changes in the modulation of alpha and beta event-related synchronization/desynchronization. This unique study provides new perspectives for the assessment of functional deficits and changes in cortical activity promoted by rehabilitation in poststroke patients. PMID:25185438

  1. Coherence between the sympathetic drives to relaxed and contracting muscles of different limbs of human subjects.

    PubMed Central

    Wallin, B G; Burke, D; Gandevia, S C

    1992-01-01

    1. This study was undertaken to quantify the simultaneous sympathetic drives to muscles in the two legs of human subjects, and to elucidate the extent to which a common drive determines sympathetic outflow to different limbs at rest, during apnoea and during voluntary contractions. 2. Sympathetic efferent activity was recorded simultaneously from fascicles of both peroneal nerves, innervating the pretibial flexor muscles. At rest the similarity was quantified for a sample of records by manual measurement of equivalent bursts in the two recordings, and for all records by cross-correlation and power spectral analysis of the two recordings. During contractions, only the latter method was used. 3. At rest the correlation coefficient for the relationship between the burst amplitudes for the two recordings was 0.72 (S.D. 0.1). For the same sequences, the computed coherence between the two recordings was 85.6% (S.D. 6.7%) at the cardiac period. There was a statistically significant linear relationship between these two measures of similarity, and this was stronger when data from sequences recorded during apnoea were included in the analysis. At rest the mean difference in coherence between consecutive sequences with no intervening manoeuvre (apnoea, contraction, change in recording site) was 4.2% (S.D. 4.3%). In only two of forty-nine such instances was the difference in coherence > 10%. 4. Apnoea at end-expiration increased the amplitude and frequency of sympathetic bursts and increased the similarity between the two recordings. The correlation coefficients increased from a mean of 0.72 at rest to 0.89 during apnoea. Coherence increased from a mean of 82.1% at rest to 91.9% during apnoea. 5. On the right side, graded voluntary contractions were performed at 5, 10, 20 or 30% maximal force using the muscle innervated by the fascicle from which the recording was made. The coherence between the recordings made from the right and left legs decreased by > 10% at each contraction level. Pooling the data for all contractions, there was a significant decrease in power at the cardiac frequency in the sympathetic recording from the contracting leg. Contraction of a synergist or antagonist at 10% maximum produced negligible changes in coherence. 6. It is concluded that, at rest, homologous muscles of the lower limbs are subject to a common drive and that, during apnoea, this common drive can dominate the sympathetic outflow to the virtual exclusion of regional drives. During voluntary activity, the importance of this common drive is lessened, presumably because of regionally specific changes involving the contracting muscle.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) Images Fig. 8 PMID:1484355

  2. Function and position determine relative proportions of different fiber types in limb muscles of the lizard Tropidurus psammonastes.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Anieli G; Abdala, Virginia; Kohlsdorf, Tiana

    2015-02-01

    Skeletal muscles can be classified as flexors or extensors according to their function, and as dorsal or ventral according to their position. The latter classification evokes their embryological origin from muscle masses initially divided during limb development, and muscles sharing a given position do not necessarily perform the same function. Here, we compare the relative proportions of different fiber types among six limb muscles in the lizard Tropidurus psammonastes. Individual fibers were classified as slow oxidative (SO), fast glycolytic (FG) or fast oxidative-glycolytic (FOG) based on mitochondrial content; muscles were classified according to position and function. Mixed linear models considering one or both effects were compared using likelihood ratio tests. Variation in the proportion of FG and FOG fibers is mainly explained by function (flexor muscles have on average lower proportions of FG and higher proportions of FOG fibers), while variation in SO fibers is better explained by position (they are less abundant in ventral muscles than in those developed from a dorsal muscle mass). Our results clarify the roles of position and function in determining the relative proportions of the various muscle fibers and provide evidence that these factors may differentially affect distinct fiber types. PMID:25456976

  3. Condensation of Plasmid DNA Enhances Mitochondrial Association in Skeletal Muscle Following Hydrodynamic Limb Vein Injection

    PubMed Central

    Yasuzaki, Yukari; Yamada, Yuma; Fukuda, Yutaka; Harashima, Hideyoshi

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial gene therapy and diagnosis have the potential to provide substantial medical benefits. However, the utility of this approach has not yet been realized because the technology available for mitochondrial gene delivery continues to be a bottleneck. We previously reported on mitochondrial gene delivery in skeletal muscle using hydrodynamic limb vein (HLV) injection. HLV injection, a useful method for nuclear transgene expression, involves the rapid injection of a large volume of naked plasmid DNA (pDNA). Moreover, the use of a condensed form of pDNA enhances the nuclear transgene expression by the HLV injection. The purpose of this study was to compare naked pDNA and condensed pDNA for mitochondrial association in skeletal muscle, when used in conjunction with HLV injection. PCR analysis showed that the use of condensed pDNA rather than naked pDNA resulted in a more effective mitochondrial association with pDNA, suggesting that the physicochemical state of pDNA plays a key role. Moreover, no mitochondrial toxicities in skeletal muscle following the HLV injection of condensed pDNA were confirmed, as evidenced by cytochrome c oxidase activity and mitochondrial membrane potential. These findings have the potential to contribute to the development for in vivo mitochondrial gene delivery system. PMID:25195732

  4. Bihemispheric repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation combined with intensive occupational therapy for upper limb hemiparesis after stroke: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Naoki; Kakuda, Wataru; Kondo, Takahiro; Shimizu, Masato; Mitani, Sugao; Abo, Masahiro

    2013-12-01

    We investigated the safety, feasibility, and efficacy of the combination of bihemispheric repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) and intensive occupational therapy (OT) for upper limb hemiparesis in poststroke patients. The study participants were eight poststroke patients with upper limb hemiparesis (age at intervention: 62.8±4.9 years, time after stroke: 84.3±87.2 months, mean±SD). During 15 days of hospitalization, each patient received 10 sessions of 40-min bihemispheric rTMS and 240-min intensive OT (120-min one-to-one training and 120-min self-training). One session of bihemispheric rTMS comprised the application of both 1 and 10 Hz rTMS (2000 stimuli for each hemisphere). The Fugl-Meyer Assessment, Wolf Motor Function Test, and the Modified Ashworth Scale were administered on the day of admission and at discharge. All patients completed the treatment without any adverse effects. Motor function of the affected upper limb improved significantly, on the basis of changes in Fugl-Meyer Assessment and Wolf Motor Function Test (P<0.05, each). A significant decrease in the Modified Ashworth Scale score was noted in the elbow, wrist, and finger flexors of the affected upper limb (P<0.05, each). The combination of bihemispheric rTMS and intensive OT was safe and feasible therapy for poststroke hemiparetic patients, and improved motor function of the hemiparetic upper limb in poststroke patients. The findings provide a new avenue for the treatment of patients with poststroke hemiparesis. PMID:23797616

  5. Physiological properties of tandem muscle spindles in neck and hind-limb muscles.

    PubMed

    Price, R F; Dutia, M B

    1989-01-01

    Although tandem muscle spindle complexes are found in small but significant numbers in most muscles, experimental investigation of their properties has been problematic because of the difficulty of distinguishing their afferents from those of "normal" single spindles. Of particular interest are the afferents from b2c capsules of tandem spindles, which unlike normal spindles contain only a static b2 nuclear bag fibre and some nuclear chain fibres. The absence of a dynamic b1 nuclear bag fibre from b2c spindles has engendered much speculation as to their response properties and their possible role in motor control. We have recently developed a method for the identification of afferents from b2c spindles in electrophysiological experiments, using infusion or topical application of succinylcholine (SCh). SCh causes the contraction of the dynamic b1 and static b2 nuclear bag intrafusal fibres, and paralyses the nuclear chain fibres. Afferents from b2c spindles are characterized by a strong "biasing" of their discharge rate to about 100 impulses per second (i.p.s.) when activated by SCh (reflecting the contraction of the static b2 fibre), while primary afferents from normal b1b2c spindles show a large increase in dynamic sensitivity as well as "biasing" (reflecting the contraction of both dynamic b1 and static b2 bag fibres). Histological examination of tenuissimus spindles activated by SCh has confirmed this relationship between the pattern of activation by SCh and the number of intrafusal nuclear bag fibres in the spindle. In this paper we review the value of SCh as a means of testing spindle afferents for functional inputs from sensory terminals on the nuclear bag fibres, and discuss the properties of b2c afferents from tandem spindles in the context of their possible function. PMID:2699377

  6. Unilateral upper-limb loss: satisfaction and prosthetic-device use in veterans and servicemembers from Vietnam and OIF/OEF conflicts.

    PubMed

    McFarland, Lynne V; Hubbard Winkler, Sandra L; Heinemann, Allen W; Jones, Melissa; Esquenazi, Alberto

    2010-01-01

    Prosthetic use and satisfaction in wounded servicemembers and veterans with unilateral upper-limb loss has not been thoroughly explored. Through a national survey, we enrolled 47 participants from the Vietnam conflict and 50 from Operation Iraqi Freedom/Operation Enduring Freedom (OIF/OEF) with combat-associated major unilateral upper-limb loss. Upper-limb prosthetic devices were used by 70% of the Vietnam group and 76% of the OIF/OEF group. Mechanical/body-powered upper-limb devices were favored by the Vietnam group, while a combination of myoelectric/hybrid and mechanical/body-powered devices were favored by the OIF/OEF group. Upper-limb devices were completely abandoned in 30% of the Vietnam and 22% of the OIF/OEF groups. Abandonment was more frequent for transhumeral and more proximal levels (42% of Vietnam and 40% of OIF/OEF) than more distal limb-loss levels. Upper-limb prostheses were rejected because of dissatisfaction with the device by significantly fewer (23%) members of the Vietnam group than the OIF/OEF group (45%) (p < 0.001). Most common reasons for rejection included pain, poor comfort, and lack of functionality. A significant paradigm shift has been noted in the OIF/OEF group, who use a greater number and diversity of upper-limb prostheses than the Vietnam group. PMID:20803400

  7. Prosthetic management of children in The Netherlands with upper limb deficiencies.

    PubMed

    Kuyper, M A; Breedijk, M; Mulders, A H; Post, M W; Prevo, A J

    2001-12-01

    The aim of the study was to assess which children with congenital and acquired upper limb deficiencies were fitted with prostheses, what types of prostheses were prescribed as first, second and third prostheses, at what age prostheses were first prescribed and how long the children wore their prostheses. The design was a retrospective chart review at De Hoogstraat Rehabilitation Centre, Utrecht (The Netherlands). Medical files of all patients with congenital or acquired upper limb deficiencies who visited the outpatient clinic between 1972 and 1996 were reviewed, collecting data on patient characteristics, prosthesis prescription and use of prostheses. The group included 224 children, of whom 206 (92%) had congenital deficiencies. Of all children with unilateral congenital deficiencies, 54% had been fitted with prostheses, against 3% of all children with bilateral congenital deficiencies and 67% of all children with acquired deficiencies. In the congenital group, it was children with transverse defects of one-third or two-thirds of the forearm who had most frequently had prostheses fitted (85% of the children). Most of the children with unilateral congenital deficiencies had received passive prostheses as their first prostheses (80 of the 90 prescribed prostheses); children with acquired defects usually had active prostheses (8 of the 12 prescribed prostheses). Body-powered prostheses were most commonly prescribed as the second type of prosthesis. In the group of 119 children who had been seen before the age of 4 years and had been followed for at least three years, 63 had been fitted with one or more prostheses at a mean age of 2.6 (SD 2.5) years. Of the 46 children with congenital defects, 30 had been fitted with prostheses, and at the age of 12, two-thirds of them still used their prostheses (63%, 19/30). "De Hoogstraat" rehabilitation centre uses a restrained prosthesis prescription policy, depending on the type of deficiency and the expected functional benefits. Data on prosthesis use are encouraging, although a follow-up study is required to determine the functional outcome for prosthesis users and non-users. PMID:11860097

  8. Unconstrained muscle-tendon workloops indicate resonance tuning as a mechanism for elastic limb behavior during terrestrial locomotion

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Benjamin D.; Sawicki, Gregory S.

    2015-01-01

    In terrestrial locomotion, there is a missing link between observed spring-like limb mechanics and the physiological systems driving their emergence. Previous modeling and experimental studies of bouncing gait (e.g., walking, running, hopping) identified muscle-tendon interactions that cycle large amounts of energy in series tendon as a source of elastic limb behavior. The neural, biomechanical, and environmental origins of these tuned mechanics, however, have remained elusive. To examine the dynamic interplay between these factors, we developed an experimental platform comprised of a feedback-controlled servo-motor coupled to a biological muscle-tendon. Our novel motor controller mimicked in vivo inertial/gravitational loading experienced by muscles during terrestrial locomotion, and rhythmic patterns of muscle activation were applied via stimulation of intact nerve. This approach was based on classical workloop studies, but avoided predetermined patterns of muscle strain and activation—constraints not imposed during real-world locomotion. Our unconstrained approach to position control allowed observation of emergent muscle-tendon mechanics resulting from dynamic interaction of neural control, active muscle, and system material/inertial properties. This study demonstrated that, despite the complex nonlinear nature of musculotendon systems, cyclic muscle contractions at the passive natural frequency of the underlying biomechanical system yielded maximal forces and fractions of mechanical work recovered from previously stored elastic energy in series-compliant tissues. By matching movement frequency to the natural frequency of the passive biomechanical system (i.e., resonance tuning), muscle-tendon interactions resulting in spring-like behavior emerged naturally, without closed-loop neural control. This conceptual framework may explain the basis for elastic limb behavior during terrestrial locomotion. PMID:26460038

  9. Unconstrained muscle-tendon workloops indicate resonance tuning as a mechanism for elastic limb behavior during terrestrial locomotion.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Benjamin D; Sawicki, Gregory S

    2015-10-27

    In terrestrial locomotion, there is a missing link between observed spring-like limb mechanics and the physiological systems driving their emergence. Previous modeling and experimental studies of bouncing gait (e.g., walking, running, hopping) identified muscle-tendon interactions that cycle large amounts of energy in series tendon as a source of elastic limb behavior. The neural, biomechanical, and environmental origins of these tuned mechanics, however, have remained elusive. To examine the dynamic interplay between these factors, we developed an experimental platform comprised of a feedback-controlled servo-motor coupled to a biological muscle-tendon. Our novel motor controller mimicked in vivo inertial/gravitational loading experienced by muscles during terrestrial locomotion, and rhythmic patterns of muscle activation were applied via stimulation of intact nerve. This approach was based on classical workloop studies, but avoided predetermined patterns of muscle strain and activation-constraints not imposed during real-world locomotion. Our unconstrained approach to position control allowed observation of emergent muscle-tendon mechanics resulting from dynamic interaction of neural control, active muscle, and system material/inertial properties. This study demonstrated that, despite the complex nonlinear nature of musculotendon systems, cyclic muscle contractions at the passive natural frequency of the underlying biomechanical system yielded maximal forces and fractions of mechanical work recovered from previously stored elastic energy in series-compliant tissues. By matching movement frequency to the natural frequency of the passive biomechanical system (i.e., resonance tuning), muscle-tendon interactions resulting in spring-like behavior emerged naturally, without closed-loop neural control. This conceptual framework may explain the basis for elastic limb behavior during terrestrial locomotion. PMID:26460038

  10. Upper-limb kinematic reconstruction during stroke robot-aided therapy.

    PubMed

    Papaleo, E; Zollo, L; Garcia-Aracil, N; Badesa, F J; Morales, R; Mazzoleni, S; Sterzi, S; Guglielmelli, E

    2015-09-01

    The paper proposes a novel method for an accurate and unobtrusive reconstruction of the upper-limb kinematics of stroke patients during robot-aided rehabilitation tasks with end-effector machines. The method is based on a robust analytic procedure for inverse kinematics that simply uses, in addition to hand pose data provided by the robot, upper arm acceleration measurements for computing a constraint on elbow position; it is exploited for task space augmentation. The proposed method can enable in-depth comprehension of planning strategy of stroke patients in the joint space and, consequently, allow developing therapies tailored for their residual motor capabilities. The experimental validation has a twofold purpose: (1) a comparative analysis with an optoelectronic motion capturing system is used to assess the method capability to reconstruct joint motion; (2) the application of the method to healthy and stroke subjects during circle-drawing tasks with InMotion2 robot is used to evaluate its efficacy in discriminating stroke from healthy behavior. The experimental results have shown that arm angles are reconstructed with a RMSE of 8.3 10(-3) rad. Moreover, the comparison between healthy and stroke subjects has revealed different features in the joint space in terms of mean values and standard deviations, which also allow assessing inter- and intra-subject variability. The findings of this study contribute to the investigation of motor performance in the joint space and Cartesian space of stroke patients undergoing robot-aided therapy, thus allowing: (1) evaluating the outcomes of the therapeutic approach, (2) re-planning the robotic treatment based on patient needs, and (3) understanding pathology-related motor strategies. PMID:25861746

  11. Current Trends in Robot-Assisted Upper-Limb Stroke Rehabilitation: Promoting Patient Engagement in Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Blank, Amy A.; French, James A.; Pehlivan, Ali Utku

    2015-01-01

    Stroke is one of the leading causes of long-term disability today; therefore, many research efforts are focused on designing maximally effective and efficient treatment methods. In particular, robotic stroke rehabilitation has received significant attention for upper-limb therapy due to its ability to provide high-intensity repetitive movement therapy with less effort than would be required for traditional methods. Recent research has focused on increasing patient engagement in therapy, which has been shown to be important for inducing neural plasticity to facilitate recovery. Robotic therapy devices enable unique methods for promoting patient engagement by providing assistance only as needed and by detecting patient movement intent to drive to the device. Use of these methods has demonstrated improvements in functional outcomes, but careful comparisons between methods remain to be done. Future work should include controlled clinical trials and comparisons of effectiveness of different methods for patients with different abilities and needs in order to inform future development of patient-specific therapeutic protocols. PMID:26005600

  12. Study on development of active-passive rehabilitation system for upper limbs: Hybrid-PLEMO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, T.; Jin, Y.; Fukushima, K.; Akai, H.; Furusho, J.

    2009-02-01

    In recent years, many researchers have studied the potential of using robotics technology to assist and quantify the motor functions for neuron-rehabilitation. Some kinds of haptic devices have been developed and evaluated its efficiency with clinical tests, for example, upper limb training for patients with spasticity after stroke. Active-type (motor-driven) haptic devices can realize a lot of varieties of haptics. But they basically require high-cost safety system. On the other hand, passive-type (brake-based) haptic devices have inherent safety. However, the passive robot system has strong limitation on varieties of haptics. There are not sufficient evidences to clarify how the passive/active haptics effect to the rehabilitation of motor skills. In this paper, we developed an active-passive-switchable rehabilitation system with ER clutch/brake device named "Hybrid-PLEMO" in order to address these problems. In this paper, basic structures and haptic control methods of the Hybrid-PLEMO are described.

  13. Simplifying the upper limb peripheral motor screen: Proposing the "K" sign.

    PubMed

    Kurmis, A P; Kurmis, T P

    2016-01-01

    The well-recognized erosion of pathoanatomic correlations in basic medical training, combined with the increasing everyday pressures of time-efficacy in patient examination, continue to place strain on junior clinicians. Over the years, many refinements to tried-and-true basic physical examination techniques have been described, allowing improvement in diagnostic yield. A multitude of "screening" techniques are available for physical assessment; however, such approaches are often nonstandardized and inconsistently taught and applied in the clinical realm. Great interexaminer inconsistency in the documentation of many forms of screening techniques also substantively undermines their respective clinical value. The current work presents a novel refinement/combination of previously described examination approaches for the assessment of peripheral upper limb (UL) motor function - the "K" sign. Having been successfully applied in both the acute and ambulatory clinical settings for several years, we feel that the technique has a useful role as a rapid and specific screening technique that is easily taught, learnt, and applied. Arguably, its employment serves to improve time efficacy in the screening examination, and may even improve diagnostic yield through its reliable reproducibility and provision of direct bilateral comparison. Its inherent simplicity also lends itself well to high levels of uptake (and retention) by medical students and junior clinicians alike. On top of presenting the simple screening test itself, we offer a simple means of subsequent notation for the patient's case note record, again in the hope of standardization and endurance of clinical value beyond the time of patient examination. PMID:26732195

  14. Two-dimensional myoelectric control of a robotic arm for upper limb amputees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López Celani, Natalia M.; Soria, Carlos M.; Orosco, Eugenio C.; di Sciascio, Fernando A.; Valentinuzzi, Max E.

    2007-11-01

    Rehabilitation engineering and medicine have become integral and significant parts of health care services, particularly and unfortunately in the last three or four decades, because of wars, terrorism and large number of car accidents. Amputees show a high rate of rejection to wear prosthetic devices, often because of lack of an adequate period of adaptation. A robotic arm may appear as a good preliminary stage. To test the hypothesis, myoelectric signals from two upper limb amputees and from four normal volunteers were fed, via adequate electronic conditioning and using MATLAB, to an industrial robotic arm. Proportional strength control was used for two degrees of freedom (x-y plane) by means of eight signal features of control (four traditional statistics plus energy, integral of the absolute value, Willison's amplitude, waveform length and envelope) for comparison purposes, and selecting the best of them as final reference. Patients easily accepted the system and learned in short time how to operate it. Results were encouraging so that valuable training, before prosthesis is implanted, appears as good feedback; besides, these patients can be hired as specialized operators in semi-automatized industry.

  15. Task independent identification of sensor location on upper limb from orientation data.

    PubMed

    Lambrecht, S; Romero, J P; Benito-León, J; Rocon, E; Pons, J L

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we describe a novel method for sensor placement identification, and demonstrate the effectiveness of this method on an upper limb neuroprothesis for tremor suppression under a variety of tasks. Our objective is to facilitate long-term tremor monitoring; tremor is the most prevalent movement disorder. Two assumptions are made: 1) movement and tremor demonstrate an additive effect further down the kinematic chain; 2) most applications have chained or fixed sensor locations. These assumptions justify obtaining absolute location through identifying relative location and thus to allow us to simplify the classification algorithm. Seventeen tasks were performed by patients suffering from essential tremor or Parkinson's disease. Ten features were found that resulted in 98.30% average accuracy (min: 92.31%; max: 100%) for the best configuration, irrespective of the task being performed. The method presented here is an important step towards more user-friendly and context-aware neuroprostheses for tremor suppression and monitoring, and facilitates the use of wearable sensors by non-trained personnel. PMID:25571515

  16. Upper Limb Kinematics Using Inertial and Magnetic Sensors: Comparison of Sensor-to-Segment Calibrations

    PubMed Central

    Bouvier, Brice; Duprey, Sonia; Claudon, Laurent; Dumas, Raphaël; Savescu, Adriana

    2015-01-01

    Magneto-Inertial Measurement Unit sensors (MIMU) display high potential for the quantitative evaluation of upper limb kinematics, as they allow monitoring ambulatory measurements. The sensor-to-segment calibration step, consisting of establishing the relation between MIMU sensors and human segments, plays an important role in the global accuracy of joint angles. The aim of this study was to compare sensor-to-segment calibrations for the MIMU-based estimation of wrist, elbow, and shoulder joint angles, by examining trueness (“close to the reference”) and precision (reproducibility) validity criteria. Ten subjects performed five sessions with three different operators. Three classes of calibrations were studied: segment axes equal to technical MIMU axes (TECH), segment axes generated during a static pose (STATIC), and those generated during functional movements (FUNCT). The calibrations were compared during the maximal uniaxial movements of each joint, plus an extra multi-joint movement. Generally, joint angles presented good trueness and very good precision in the range 5°–10°. Only small discrepancy between calibrations was highlighted, with the exception of a few cases. The very good overall accuracy (trueness and precision) of MIMU-based joint angle data seems to be more dependent on the level of rigor of the experimental procedure (operator training) than on the choice of calibration itself. PMID:26263993

  17. Upper Limb Kinematics Using Inertial and Magnetic Sensors: Comparison of Sensor-to-Segment Calibrations.

    PubMed

    Bouvier, Brice; Duprey, Sonia; Claudon, Laurent; Dumas, Raphaël; Savescu, Adriana

    2015-01-01

    Magneto-Inertial Measurement Unit sensors (MIMU) display high potential for the quantitative evaluation of upper limb kinematics, as they allow monitoring ambulatory measurements. The sensor-to-segment calibration step, consisting of establishing the relation between MIMU sensors and human segments, plays an important role in the global accuracy of joint angles. The aim of this study was to compare sensor-to-segment calibrations for the MIMU-based estimation of wrist, elbow, and shoulder joint angles, by examining trueness ("close to the reference") and precision (reproducibility) validity criteria. Ten subjects performed five sessions with three different operators. Three classes of calibrations were studied: segment axes equal to technical MIMU axes (TECH), segment axes generated during a static pose (STATIC), and those generated during functional movements (FUNCT). The calibrations were compared during the maximal uniaxial movements of each joint, plus an extra multi-joint movement. Generally, joint angles presented good trueness and very good precision in the range 5°-10°. Only small discrepancy between calibrations was highlighted, with the exception of a few cases. The very good overall accuracy (trueness and precision) of MIMU-based joint angle data seems to be more dependent on the level of rigor of the experimental procedure (operator training) than on the choice of calibration itself. PMID:26263993

  18. Energy Harvesting from Upper-Limb Pulling Motions for Miniaturized Human-Powered Generators

    PubMed Central

    Yeo, Jeongjin; Ryu, Mun-ho; Yang, Yoonseok

    2015-01-01

    The human-powered self-generator provides the best solution for individuals who need an instantaneous power supply for travel, outdoor, and emergency use, since it is less dependent on weather conditions and occupies less space than other renewable power supplies. However, many commercial portable self-generators that employ hand-cranking are not used as much as expected in daily lives although they have enough output capacity due to their intensive workload. This study proposes a portable human-powered generator which is designed to obtain mechanical energy from an upper limb pulling motion for improved human motion economy as well as efficient human-mechanical power transfer. A coreless axial-flux permanent magnet machine (APMM) and a flywheel magnet rotor were used in conjunction with a one-way clutched power transmission system in order to obtain effective power from the pulling motion. The developed prototype showed an average energy conversion efficiency of 30.98% and an average output power of 0.32 W with a maximum of 1.89 W. Its small form factor (50 mm × 32 mm × 43.5 mm, 0.05 kg) and the substantial electricity produced verify the effectiveness of the proposed method in the utilization of human power. It is expected that the developed generator could provide a mobile power supply. PMID:26151204

  19. Energy Harvesting from Upper-Limb Pulling Motions for Miniaturized Human-Powered Generators.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Jeongjin; Ryu, Mun-ho; Yang, Yoonseok

    2015-01-01

    The human-powered self-generator provides the best solution for individuals who need an instantaneous power supply for travel, outdoor, and emergency use, since it is less dependent on weather conditions and occupies less space than other renewable power supplies. However, many commercial portable self-generators that employ hand-cranking are not used as much as expected in daily lives although they have enough output capacity due to their intensive workload. This study proposes a portable human-powered generator which is designed to obtain mechanical energy from an upper limb pulling motion for improved human motion economy as well as efficient human-mechanical power transfer. A coreless axial-flux permanent magnet machine (APMM) and a flywheel magnet rotor were used in conjunction with a one-way clutched power transmission system in order to obtain effective power from the pulling motion. The developed prototype showed an average energy conversion efficiency of 30.98% and an average output power of 0.32 W with a maximum of 1.89 W. Its small form factor (50 mm × 32 mm × 43.5 mm, 0.05 kg) and the substantial electricity produced verify the effectiveness of the proposed method in the utilization of human power. It is expected that the developed generator could provide a mobile power supply. PMID:26151204

  20. Autobiographical Memory and Psychological Distress in a Sample of Upper-Limb Amputees

    PubMed Central

    Luchetti, Martina; Montebarocci, Ornella; Rossi, Nicolino; Cutti, Andrea G.; Sutin, Angelina R.

    2014-01-01

    Amputation is a traumatic and life-changing event that can take years to adjust to. The present study (a) examines psychological adjustment in a specific trauma-exposed sample, (b) compares the phenomenology (e.g., vividness) of amputation-related memories to more recent memories, and (c) tests whether memory phenomenology is associated with psychological distress. A total of 24 upper-limb amputees recalled two autobiographical memories–an amputation-related memory and a recent memory–and rated the phenomenological qualities of each memory, including Vividness, Coherence, Emotional Intensity, Visual Perspective, and Distancing. Participants also completed self-rated measures of psychological distress and personality. The sample was generally well adjusted; participants showed no relevant symptoms of anxiety and depression, and personality scores were similar to the general population. There were no significant differences in phenomenology between the two types of memories recalled. Even though amputation-related memories were, on average, almost 20 years older than the recent memories, they retained their intense phenomenology. Despite the intensity of the memory, none of the phenomenological dimensions were associated with psychological distress. It is worth to further define which dimensions of phenomenology characterize memories of traumatic events, and their association with individuals' psychological reactions. PMID:24924483

  1. Customized device for pediatric upper limb rehabilitation in obstetric brachial palsy.

    PubMed

    López, Natalia M; de Diego, Nicolás; Hernández, Rafael; Pérez, Elisa; Ensinck, Gustavo; Valentinuzzi, Max E

    2014-03-01

    A 12-yr-old child, with a history of gestational Erb-Duchenne palsy and, later, musculoskeletal injuries in the left arm caused by a car accident, inspired the design of a customized exoskeleton-like device. Such piece, intended for rehabilitation, has one degree of freedom because the exercise routine involves elbow flexion-extension, which was indicated for the damaged muscular group. The device has two functioning modes, passive and assisted, in which the patient can trigger the movement by a biceps contraction, thus promoting the active role of the user in the rehabilitation process. The results were evaluated in terms of qualitative measures of the biceps and the triceps performed by the medical staff and by a questionnaire related to functional activities of the upper limb. A significant improvement in the arm movement and elbow angle was observed after 3 mos of assisted therapy, complementary to conventional exercises. In conclusion, a simple and low-cost device was designed and tested to complement the rehabilitation process of a pediatric patient with physical impairment. PMID:24561320

  2. Brain activity associated with painfully hot stimuli applied to the upper limb: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Farrell, Michael J; Laird, Angela R; Egan, Gary F

    2005-05-01

    The capacity of pain to alert against potential injury or focus attention on damaged tissue is enhanced by the intrinsically aversive nature of the experience. Finding methods to relieve pain will ultimately be facilitated by deeper understanding of the processes that contribute to the experience, and functional brain imaging has contributed substantially toward that end. An impressive body of literature has identified a distributed network of pain-related activity in the brain that is subject to considerable modulation by different stimulus parameters, contextual factors, and clinical conditions. The fundamental substrates of the pain network are yet to be distilled from the highly variable results of studies published thus far. Qualitative reviews of the pain-imaging literature have been contributory, but lack the greater surety of quantitative methods. We employ the activation likelihood estimation (ALE) meta-analytic technique to establish the most consistent activations among studies reporting brain responses subsequent to the application of noxious heat. A network of pain-related activity was replicated for stimuli to either upper limb that included two discernible regions of the mid-anterior cingulate cortex, bilateral thalami, insula, and opercula cortices, posterior parietal cortex, premotor cortex, supplementary motor area, and cerebellum. The findings of the meta-analysis resonate with other streams of information that continue to enhance our understanding of pain in the brain. The results also point toward new areas of research that may be fruitful for the exploration of central pain processing. PMID:15846813

  3. Late recurrent peripheral upper limb ischemia after non-union of a clavicle fracture.

    PubMed

    Stella, Marco; Santolini, Emmanuele; Briano, Stefania; Santolini, Federico

    2015-12-01

    A 74-year-old woman was referred to our hospital due to recurrent episodes of upper limb ischemia. Her past medical history included a clavicle non-union developed after a clavicle midshaft fracture that had occurred 30 years previously. After a long asymptomatic period, she started showing symptoms of chronic ischemia to the left arm that were misdiagnosed. Thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS) is a rare but possible complication of mal-union and non-union of clavicle fractures; symptoms related to arterial involvement (ATOS) amount to less than 1% of all existing forms of thoracic outlet syndrome. In case of clavicle non-union, local instability plays a key role in determining the initial injury to the vessels and the recurrence of symptoms. Restoration of local bone stability and anatomy, obtained by compression plating and autologous bone grafting, combined with an appropriate vascular surgery, is essential to achieve a clinical resolution of symptoms and to avoid the recurrence of symptomatology as seen in the herein case. PMID:26738457

  4. Autobiographical memory and psychological distress in a sample of upper-limb amputees.

    PubMed

    Luchetti, Martina; Montebarocci, Ornella; Rossi, Nicolino; Cutti, Andrea G; Sutin, Angelina R

    2014-01-01

    Amputation is a traumatic and life-changing event that can take years to adjust to. The present study (a) examines psychological adjustment in a specific trauma-exposed sample, (b) compares the phenomenology (e.g., vividness) of amputation-related memories to more recent memories, and (c) tests whether memory phenomenology is associated with psychological distress. A total of 24 upper-limb amputees recalled two autobiographical memories--an amputation-related memory and a recent memory--and rated the phenomenological qualities of each memory, including Vividness, Coherence, Emotional Intensity, Visual Perspective, and Distancing. Participants also completed self-rated measures of psychological distress and personality. The sample was generally well adjusted; participants showed no relevant symptoms of anxiety and depression, and personality scores were similar to the general population. There were no significant differences in phenomenology between the two types of memories recalled. Even though amputation-related memories were, on average, almost 20 years older than the recent memories, they retained their intense phenomenology. Despite the intensity of the memory, none of the phenomenological dimensions were associated with psychological distress. It is worth to further define which dimensions of phenomenology characterize memories of traumatic events, and their association with individuals' psychological reactions. PMID:24924483

  5. The Effects of Aging on Visuomotor Coordination and Proprioceptive Function in the Upper Limb

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Na Kyung; Kwon, Yong Hyun; Son, Sung Min; Nam, Seok Hyun; Kim, Jin Sang

    2013-01-01

    [Purpose] Sensorimotor processing, including motor performance, is altered during the process of normal aging. Previous studies have investigated tasks requiring complex visuomotor coordination and active joint reposition tests. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate age-related changes in upper limb tasks, such as visuomotor coordination and proprioceptive acuity. [Subjects and Methods] We recruited 20 healthy elderly subjects and 20 healthy young subjects. We evaluated a tracking task for visuomotor function and a joint reposition test for integrity of proprioceptive sense in both hands of the elderly subjects, and compared the results with those of the healthy young subjects. [Results] The accuracy index scores for the tracking task were significantly lower in both the dominant and non-dominant hands of the elderly subjects than those of the young group. In addition, the reposition error score in the joint reposition test was significantly higher in the elderly group than in the young group. [Conclusion] Sensorimotor functions of both the dominant and non-dominant hands showed a decline in the elderly group. This finding suggests that sensorimotor function deteriorates with advancing age. PMID:24259817

  6. Usability testing of gaming and social media applications for stroke and cerebral palsy upper limb rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Valdés, Bulmaro A; Hilderman, Courtney G E; Hung, Chai-Ting; Shirzad, Navid; Van der Loos, H F Machiel

    2014-01-01

    As part of the FEATHERS (Functional Engagement in Assisted Therapy Through Exercise Robotics) project, two motion tracking and one social networking applications were developed for upper limb rehabilitation of stroke survivors and teenagers with cerebral palsy. The project aims to improve the engagement of clients during therapy by using video games and a social media platform. The applications allow users to control a cursor on a personal computer through bimanual motions, and to interact with their peers and therapists through the social media. The tracking applications use either a Microsoft Kinect or a PlayStation Eye camera, and the social media application was developed on Facebook. This paper presents a usability testing of these applications that was conducted with therapists from two rehabilitation clinics. The "Cognitive Walkthrough" and "Think Aloud" methods were used. The objectives of the study were to investigate the ease of use and potential issues or improvements of the applications, as well as the factors that facilitate and impede the adoption of technology in current rehabilitation programs. PMID:25570770

  7. Prevalence of work-related upper limbs symptoms (WRULS) among office workers.

    PubMed

    Zairina Abdul Rahman; Abdul Sallam Atiya

    2009-07-01

    An analytical cross-sectional study was carried out to determine the prevalence of work-related upper limbs symptoms (WRULS) among office workers and factors associated with it. A self-administered questionnaire was used to collect the information. A total of 463 (87.7%) office workers from selected government agencies participated in this study. The mean age of the respondents was 34.1 years (range = 18-55 years). Majority (91.6%) were Malay and female (72.8%), and 58.1% were from clerical group. Mean duration of work was 8.7 years. This study found that prevalence of WRULS was 33.0% (95% CI [confidence interval] = 28.8%, 37.3%). Computer users at work had 2.0 (95% CI = 1.1, 3.4) higher odds ratio of developing WRULS and those who used it for 5 hours and more per day had 7.5 (95% CI = 2.3, 24.2) higher odds ratio of developing WRULS. Hand-intensive hobbies and higher education were also found to be associated with WRULS. PMID:19546127

  8. Validating ArmAssist Assessment as outcome measure in upper-limb post-stroke telerehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-de-Pablo, Cristina; Balasubramanian, Sivakumar; Savic, Andrej; Tomic, Tijana D; Konstantinovic, Ljubica; Keller, Thierry

    2015-08-01

    The ArmAssist is a low-cost robotic system for post-stroke upper-limb telerehabilitation based on serious games. The system incorporates a set of games for the assessment of arm function, the ArmAssist Assessment (AAA), which allows a remote monitoring of the progress of the patient and an automatic adaptation of the therapy. In this study, different components of the AAA are compared against three widely-used clinical tests, the Fugl-Meyer Assessment (FMA) [1], the Action Research Arm Test (ARAT) [2] and the Wolf Motor Function Test (WMFT) [3] in order to select the most clinically meaningful ones for the final score provided to patients and therapist, and evaluate their capability to predict or even improve some aspects of these standard scales. All four tests were performed in 38 separate sessions in 19 post-stroke individuals in their sub-acute phase, as part of a broader study. Statistically significant correlation could be shown with the three clinical tests. These preliminary results are promising for the validation of AAA as a fast, automatic and clinically meaningful tool for remote progress assessment and therapy adaptation; however, more data and further analysis is needed to confirm this. PMID:26737324

  9. Characteristics of upper limb muscular strength in male wheelchair tennis players

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Hyo-Bin; Park, Seung-Jae; Kim, Al-Chan; Jang, Jee-Hun

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the characteristics of muscular strength in upper limb and to present the preliminary information for development of sports injury prevention program and exercise rehabilitation program in wheelchair tennis players. Participants were 12 male wheelchair tennis players. Muscular strength was measured in shoulder and elbow joints with isokinetic dynamometer. Ipsilateral (IR) and bilateral (BR) balance ratio were calculated with isokinetic strength at 60°/sec. As a result, extension strength (ES) was significantly higher than flexion strength (FS) (P< 0.001), and IR in both sides and BR in ES were maintained within normal range whereas BR in FS was lower than normal range in shoulder joint. In elbow joint FS was significantly higher than ES (P< 0.05), and IR and BR were lower than normal range. Consequently, the different tendency in IR between shoulder and elbow joints and lower IR and BR in elbow joints could be the characteristics in male wheelchair tennis players. It is suggested that flexor strengthening program in nondominant shoulder joint, extensor strengthening program in both elbow joint, and flexor strengthening program in non-dominant elbow joint should be introduced for male wheelchair tennis players. PMID:24278887

  10. Time pressure and attention allocation effect on upper limb motion steadiness.

    PubMed

    Liu, Sicong; Eklund, Robert C; Tenenbaum, Gershon

    2015-01-01

    Following ironic process theory (IPT), the authors aimed at investigating how attentional allocation affects participants' upper limb motion steadiness under low and high levels of mental load. A secondary purpose was to examine the validity of skin conductance level in measuring perception of pressure. The study consisted of 1 within-participant factor (i.e., phase: baseline, test) and 4 between-participant factors (i.e., gender: male, female; mental load: fake time constraints, no time constraints; attention: positive, suppressive; order: baseline → → → test, test → → baseline). Eighty college students (40 men and 40 women, Mage = 20.20 years, SD(age) = 1.52 years) participated in the study. Gender-stratified random assignment was employed in a 2 × 2 × 2 × 2 × 2 mixed experimental design. The findings generally support IPT but its predictions on motor performance under mental load may not be entirely accurate. Unlike men, women's performance was not susceptible to manipulations of mental load and attention allocation. The validity of skin conductance readings as an index of pressure perception was called into question. PMID:25425341

  11. Cost-effectiveness of treating upper limb spasticity due to stroke with botulinum toxin type A: results from the botulinum toxin for the upper limb after stroke (BoTULS) trial.

    PubMed

    Shackley, Phil; Shaw, Lisa; Price, Christopher; van Wijck, Frederike; Barnes, Michael; Graham, Laura; Ford, Gary A; Steen, Nick; Rodgers, Helen

    2012-12-01

    Stroke imposes significant burdens on health services and society, and as such there is a growing need to assess the cost-effectiveness of stroke treatment to ensure maximum benefit is derived from limited resources. This study compared the cost-effectiveness of treating post-stroke upper limb spasticity with botulinum toxin type A plus an upper limb therapy programme against the therapy programme alone. Data on resource use and health outcomes were prospectively collected for 333 patients with post-stroke upper limb spasticity taking part in a randomized trial and combined to estimate the incremental cost per quality adjusted life year (QALY) gained of botulinum toxin type A plus therapy relative to therapy alone. The base case incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of botulinum toxin type A plus therapy was £93,500 per QALY gained. The probability of botulinum toxin type A plus therapy being cost-effective at the England and Wales cost-effectiveness threshold value of £20,000 per QALY was 0.36. The point estimates of the ICER remained above £20,000 per QALY for a range of sensitivity analyses, and the probability of botulinum toxin type A plus therapy being cost-effective at the threshold value did not exceed 0.39, regardless of the assumptions made. PMID:23342679

  12. Cost-Effectiveness of Treating Upper Limb Spasticity Due to Stroke with Botulinum Toxin Type A: Results from the Botulinum Toxin for the Upper Limb after Stroke (BoTULS) Trial

    PubMed Central

    Shackley, Phil; Shaw, Lisa; Price, Christopher; van Wijck, Frederike; Barnes, Michael; Graham, Laura; Ford, Gary A.; Steen, Nick; Rodgers, Helen

    2012-01-01

    Stroke imposes significant burdens on health services and society, and as such there is a growing need to assess the cost-effectiveness of stroke treatment to ensure maximum benefit is derived from limited resources. This study compared the cost-effectiveness of treating post-stroke upper limb spasticity with botulinum toxin type A plus an upper limb therapy programme against the therapy programme alone. Data on resource use and health outcomes were prospectively collected for 333 patients with post-stroke upper limb spasticity taking part in a randomized trial and combined to estimate the incremental cost per quality adjusted life year (QALY) gained of botulinum toxin type A plus therapy relative to therapy alone. The base case incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of botulinum toxin type A plus therapy was £93,500 per QALY gained. The probability of botulinum toxin type A plus therapy being cost-effective at the England and Wales cost-effectiveness threshold value of £20,000 per QALY was 0.36. The point estimates of the ICER remained above £20,000 per QALY for a range of sensitivity analyses, and the probability of botulinum toxin type A plus therapy being cost-effective at the threshold value did not exceed 0.39, regardless of the assumptions made. PMID:23342679

  13. The upper extremity of the professional tennis player: muscle volumes, fiber-type distribution and muscle strength.

    PubMed

    Sanchís-Moysi, J; Idoate, F; Olmedillas, H; Guadalupe-Grau, A; Alayón, S; Carreras, A; Dorado, C; Calbet, J A L

    2010-06-01

    The effects of professional tennis participation on dominant and non-dominant upper extremity muscle volumes, and on fiber types of triceps brachii (lateral head) and vastus lateralis muscles were assessed in 15 professional tennis players. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, n=8) examination and dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA, n=7) were used to assess muscle volumes and lean body mass. Muscle fiber-type distribution assessed by biopsy sampling was similar in both triceps brachii (2/3 were type 2 and 1/3 type 1 fibers). The VL was composed of 1/3 of type 2 and 2/3 of type 1 fibers. The dominant had 12-15% higher lean mass (DXA/MRI) than the non-dominant (P<0.05). Type 1, 2a and 2x muscle fibers of the dominant were hypertrophied compared with the non-dominant by 20%, 22% and 34% (all P<0.01), respectively. The deltoid, triceps brachii, arm flexors and forearm superficial flexor muscles of the dominant were hypertrophied (MRI) compared with the non-dominant by 11-15%. These muscles represented a similar fraction of the whole muscle volume in both upper extremities. Dominant muscle volume was correlated with 1RM on the one-arm cable triceps pushdown exercise (r=0.84, P<0.05). Peak power during vertical jump correlated with VL muscle fibers's cross-sectional area (r=0.82-0.95, P<0.05). PMID:19602193

  14. The Effects of Abdominal Hollowing in Lower-limb PNF Pattern Training on the Activation of Contralateral Muscles

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Byungho; Park, Hankyu; Heo, Kwangjin; Lee, Joongsook; Lee, Jaeseok; Oh, Taeyoung; Han, Dongwook

    2013-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of abdominal hollowing during lower-limb proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) training on the activation of contralateral muscles. [Subjects] Twenty male college students without symptoms or signs of muscular or nervous disease participated in this experiment after signing a consent form. [Methods] All the subjects were measured with electromyography (EMG) in a muscle activation test before and after abdominal hollowing. In the PNF program, the lower-limb pattern of PNF training, was maintained for 5 seconds, followed by a 2-minute break. This was repeated three times. The resting time between sets was 30 minutes. Surface EMG (Keypoint, Medtronic Inc., USA) was used for the measurements, and the highest value of three measurements was used in the analysis. [Result] The results revealed a significant change in the muscular activation of the opposite-side lower limbs. The muscular activations of the vastus lateralis, tibialis anterior, semitendinosus and gastrocnemius were increased significantly after the abdominal hollowing. [Conclusion] The findings suggest that abdominal hollowing in PNF pattern training can be effective at promoting muscular activation of the contralateral muscles. To promote muscular activation of the opposite side in lower-limb PNF pattern training, abdominal hollowing should be considered to improve the effect of PNF pattern training. PMID:24259788

  15. On the use of information theory for detecting upper limb motor dysfunction: An application to Parkinson’s disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Oliveira, M. Elias; Menegaldo, L. L.; Lucarelli, P.; Andrade, B. L. B.; Büchler, P.

    2011-11-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a chronic neurodegenerative disorder characterized by a selective loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra, decreased striatal dopamine levels, and consequent extrapyramidal motor dysfunctions. Several potential early diagnostic markers of PD have been proposed. Since they have not been validated in presymptomatic PD, the diagnosis and monitoring of the disease is based on subjective clinical assessment of cognitive and motor symptoms. In this study, we investigated interjoint coordination synergies in the upper limb of healthy and parkinsonian subjects during the performance of unconstrained linear-periodic movements in a horizontal plane using the mutual information (MI). We found that the MI is a sensitive metric in detecting upper limb motor dysfunction, thus suggesting that this method might be applicable to quantitatively evaluating the effects of the antiparkinsonian medication and to monitor the disease progression.

  16. Postoperative Development of Bone Mineral Density and Muscle Strength in the Lower Limb After Cemented and Uncemented Total Hip Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Lindner, Tobias; Krüger, Christine; Kasch, Cornelius; Finze, Susanne; Steens, Wolfram; Mittelmeier, Wolfram; Skripitz, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    Background : Numerous studies have shown reduction of periprosthetic bone mineral density (BMD) after hip replacement. The effect on the whole limb, however, is still unexplored. This study’s objective was to analyse the postoperative development of BMD and muscle strength of the limb after total hip replacement (THR) and to determine links between these parameters. Methods : 55 patients, who underwent THR, were included. Depending on therapeutic indication, either an uncemented stem (Group A, n=30) or a cemented stem (Group B, n=25) has been implanted. In the limbs, the measurement of BMD using DEXA and the maximum isometric muscle strength, detected by a leg press, were undertaken preoperatively and after 3, 6 and 12 months. Results : A total of 12 patients (Group A: n = 6, Group B: n = 6) were excluded due to reasons which were not relevant to the study. So, the results refer to the data of 43 patients. In Group A (uncemented, n = 24), a significant decrease of BMD on the operated extremity was seen after 3, 6 and 12 months compared with preoperative values. Isometric muscle strength on the affected extremity increased significantly after 6 and 12 months. In Group B (cemented, n = 19), with a lower baseline compared to group A, an increase in BMD of the affected limb was seen postoperatively. This rise was significant after 12 months. With regard to the isometric muscle strength, a significant increase could be observed in this group after 6 and 12 months. Conclusion : Analogous to postoperative reduction of periprosthetic bone density, a decrease of the entire limb BMD on the operated leg occurred after implantation of uncemented hip stems. In contrast, an increase in BMD was recorded for cemented stems. Regardless of the type of anchoring, a substantial increase in muscular strength could be observed postoperatively in both groups. PMID:25246993

  17. Continuous theta-burst stimulation combined with occupational therapy for upper limb hemiparesis after stroke: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Naoki; Kakuda, Wataru; Kondo, Takahiro; Shimizu, Masato; Sageshima, Masashi; Mitani, Sugao; Abo, Masahiro

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the safety, feasibility and efficacy of continuous theta-burst stimulation (cTBS) combined with intensive occupational therapy (OT) for upper limb hemiparesis after stroke. Ten patients with history of stroke and upper limb hemiparesis (age 62.0 ± 11.1 years, time since stroke 95.7 ± 70.2 months, mean ± SD) were studied. Each patient received 13 sessions, each comprising 160 s of cTBS applied to the skull on the area of the non-lesional hemisphere (using a 70-mm figure-8 coil, three pulse bursts at 50 Hz, repeated every 200 ms, i.e., 5 Hz, with total stimulation of 2,400 pulses), followed by intensive OT (comprising 120-min one-to-one training and 120-min self-training) during 15-day hospitalization. The motor function of the affected upper limb was evaluated by Fugl-Meyer Assessment (FMA) and Wolf Motor Function Test (WMFT) on the days of admission and discharge. All patients completed the 15-day protocol without any adverse effects. Treatment significantly increased the FMA score (from 46.6 ± 8.7 to 51.6 ± 8.2 points, p < 0.01) and shortened the log performance time of WMFT (from 2.5 ± 1.1 to 2.2 ± 1.2 s, p < 0.01). The 15-day protocol of cTBS combined with intensive OT is a safe and potentially useful therapeutic modality for upper limb hemiparesis after stroke. PMID:24696408

  18. Safety, Feasibility, and Efficacy of Vagus Nerve Stimulation Paired With Upper-Limb Rehabilitation After Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Pierce, David; Dixit, Anand; Kimberley, Teresa J.; Robertson, Michele; Tarver, Brent; Hilmi, Omar; McLean, John; Forbes, Kirsten; Kilgard, Michael P.; Rennaker, Robert L.; Cramer, Steven C.; Walters, Matthew; Engineer, Navzer

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose— Recent animal studies demonstrate that vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) paired with movement induces movement-specific plasticity in motor cortex and improves forelimb function after stroke. We conducted a randomized controlled clinical pilot study of VNS paired with rehabilitation on upper-limb function after ischemic stroke. Methods— Twenty-one participants with ischemic stroke >6 months before and moderate to severe upper-limb impairment were randomized to VNS plus rehabilitation or rehabilitation alone. Rehabilitation consisted of three 2-hour sessions per week for 6 weeks, each involving >400 movement trials. In the VNS group, movements were paired with 0.5-second VNS. The primary objective was to assess safety and feasibility. Secondary end points included change in upper-limb measures (including the Fugl–Meyer Assessment-Upper Extremity). Results— Nine participants were randomized to VNS plus rehabilitation and 11 to rehabilitation alone. There were no serious adverse device effects. One patient had transient vocal cord palsy and dysphagia after implantation. Five had minor adverse device effects including nausea and taste disturbance on the evening of therapy. In the intention-to-treat analysis, the change in Fugl–Meyer Assessment-Upper Extremity scores was not significantly different (between-group difference, 5.7 points; 95% confidence interval, −0.4 to 11.8). In the per-protocol analysis, there was a significant difference in change in Fugl–Meyer Assessment-Upper Extremity score (between-group difference, 6.5 points; 95% confidence interval, 0.4 to 12.6). Conclusions— This study suggests that VNS paired with rehabilitation is feasible and has not raised safety concerns. Additional studies of VNS in adults with chronic stroke will now be performed. Clinical Trial Registration— URL: https://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01669161. PMID:26645257

  19. Cross-cultural adaptation, reliability and validity of the Spanish version of the upper limb functional index

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The Upper Limb Functional Index (ULFI) is an internationally widely used outcome measure with robust, valid psychometric properties. The purpose of study is to develop and validate a ULFI Spanish-version (ULFI-Sp). Methods A two stage observational study was conducted. The ULFI was cross-culturally adapted to Spanish through double forward and backward translations, the psychometric properties were then validated. Participants (n = 126) with various upper limb conditions of >12 weeks duration completed the ULFI-Sp, QuickDASH and the Euroqol Health Questionnaire 5 Dimensions (EQ-5D-3 L). The full sample determined internal consistency, concurrent criterion validity, construct validity and factor structure; a subgroup (n = 35) determined reliability at seven days. Results The ULFI-Sp demonstrated high internal consistency (α = 0.94) and reliability (r = 0.93). Factor structure was one-dimensional and supported construct validity. Criterion validity with the EQ-5D-3 L was fair and inversely correlated (r = −0.59). The QuickDASH data was unavailable for analysis due to excessive missing responses. Conclusions The ULFI-Sp is a valid upper limb outcome measure with similar psychometric properties to the English language version. PMID:23889883

  20. Prosthetic use in adult upper limb amputees: a comparison of the body powered and electrically powered prostheses.

    PubMed

    Millstein, S G; Heger, H; Hunter, G A

    1986-04-01

    Three hundred and fourteen adult upper limb amputees were reviewed retrospectively at the Ontario Workers' Compensation Board. A questionnaire was used to evaluate the use of body and electrically powered prostheses. Follow-up ranged from 1 to 49 years with a mean of 15 years. Results indicated that complete or useful acceptance of an electrically powered prosthesis was reported by 69 of 83 amputees (83%); 199 of 291 amputees (68%) used the cable operated hook, 57 of 291 (20%) used the cable operated hand and 40 of 83 (48%) used the cosmetic prosthesis. The majority of amputees used more than one prosthesis for their functional needs and should be fitted with more than one type of prosthesis. Acceptance of an upper limb prosthesis by 89% (196/220) of below-elbow, 76% (56/74) of above-elbow and 60% (12/20) of high level amputees indicates that for most upper limb amputees, their prostheses are well used and essential to their personal and employment activities. PMID:3725563

  1. Upper limb amputation due to a brachial arterial embolism associated with a superior mesenteric arterial embolism: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Acute mesenteric ischemia due to an embolism of the superior mesenteric artery is associated with a high mortality rate. Over 20 percent of acute mesenteric embolism cases consist of multiple emboli, and the long-term prognosis depends on the incidence of subsequent embolic events at other sites. The incidence of emboli in the upper extremity associated with a superior mesenteric arterial embolism has rarely been described. The signs and symptoms of ischemic change in the upper limb can be masked by other circumstances, such as postoperative conditions or complications. In these cases, a late presentation or delayed diagnosis and treatment can result in limb loss. Case presentation We present a rare case of a 67-year-old Japanese woman with atrial fibrillation who developed an embolic occlusion of the brachial artery associated with a superior mesenteric arterial embolism. She developed gangrene in her right hand, which had progressed to the point that amputation was necessary by the time the gastrointestinal surgeon had consulted the Department of Orthopedic Surgery. The brachial arterial embolism diagnosis was delayed by the severe abdominal symptoms and shock conditions that followed the emergency enterectomy, resulting in amputation of the upper limb despite anticoagulation therapy. In this case, multiple infarctions of the spleen were also observed, indicating a shower embolism. Conclusions When treating a superior mesenteric arterial embolism in a patient with atrial fibrillation, the possibility of recurrent or multiple arterial thromboembolic events should be considered, even after the procedure is completed. PMID:22828325

  2. [Repetitive movements of the upper limbs: results of exposure evaluation and clinical investigation in refinishing ceramic ornaments].

    PubMed

    Arfaioli, C; Tartaglia, R; Lombardi, A; Ianniello, G; Camporeale, P

    1996-01-01

    An evaluation was made of the degree of exposure to risk and the frequency of disorders attributable to biomechanical overload of the upper limb in workers performing finishing operation on ceramic vases and cups in a ceramics factory. The risks were first evaluated against a checklist, then subsequently an assessment was made of the tasks found to feature the highest risks, using an ergonomic analysis method, which identified activities associated with a large number of actions per minute (> 50). The 22 female workers performing the tasks in question underwent a risk-targeted physical examination which included an electroneurographic test using surface electrodes. The clinical test detected an extremely high frequency of carpal tunnel syndrome cases, in addition to other upper limb disorders. In particular, nine female workers (41%) were found to be suffering from carpal tunnel syndrome, and five (22%) from other pathologies of the upper limbs (4 scapulo-humeral periarthritis, 1 epicondylitis). As a result of the findings arising out of this study, immediate preventive measures were adopted; moreover, it has become evident that further epidemiological studies on larger sample populations are needed. PMID:9148115

  3. Measurement of organ blood flow using tritiated water. I. Hind limb muscle blood flow in conscious ewes.

    PubMed

    Oddy, V H; Brown, B W; Jones, A W

    1981-01-01

    Blood flow rates to a hind limp preparation, consisting predominantly of muscle, were obtained with tritiated water (TOH) diffusion and radioactive microsphere technique in four conscious ewes (a total of seven comparisons). During the continuous infusion of TOH, equilibrium between muscle and its venous drainage was attained by 40--60 min after the start of the infusion. Total blood flow to the hind limb measured using TOH was corrected for arteriovenous anastomosis flow to provide a measure of capillary blood flow through the hind limb. The capillary blood flow rates so obtained using TOH were highly correlated with those measured directly in muscle with microspheres (ml min-1, r = 0.934; ml 100 g-1 min-1, r = 0.886, P less than 0.01, n = 7) and the corresponding mean flow values obtained with the two techniques (respectively, 104.6 +/- 15.1 v. 106.5 +/- 14.9 ml min-1 and 7.2 +/- 0.8 v. 7.3 +/- 0.8 ml 100 g-1 min-1) were not significantly different. There were substantial difference in the capillary blood flow rates for the individual muscles of the hind limb. PMID:7305757

  4. Impact of decline-board squat exercises and knee joint angles on the muscle activity of the lower limbs

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Daehee; Lee, Sangyong; Park, Jungseo

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aims to investigate how squat exercises on a decline board and how the knee joint angles affect the muscle activity of the lower limbs. [Subjects] The subjects were 26 normal adults. [Methods] A Tumble Forms wedge device was used as the decline board, and the knee joint angles were measured with a goniometer. To examine the muscle activity of the biceps femoris, rectus femoris, gastrocnemius lateralis, and tibialis anterior of the lower limbs, a comparison analysis with electromyography was conducted. [Results] The muscle activity of the biceps femoris, rectus femoris, gastrocnemius lateralis, and tibialis anterior increased with increased knee joint angles, both for squat exercises on the decline board and on a flat floor. When the knee joint angle was 45°, 60°, and 90°, the muscle activity of the rectus femoris was significantly higher and that of the tibialis anterior was significantly lower during squat exercises on the decline board than on the flat floor. When the knee joint angle was 90°, the muscle activity of the gastrocnemius lateralis was significantly lower. [Conclusion] Squat exercises on a decline board are an effective intervention to increase the muscle activity of the rectus femoris with increased knee joint angles. PMID:26357447

  5. Characterising Upper Limb Movements in Huntington's Disease and the Impact of Restricted Visual Cues

    PubMed Central

    Despard, Jessica; Ternes, Anne-Marie; Dimech-Betancourt, Bleydy; Poudel, Govinda; Churchyard, Andrew; Georgiou-Karistianis, Nellie

    2015-01-01

    Background Voluntary motor deficits are a common feature in Huntington's disease (HD), characterised by movement slowing and performance inaccuracies. This deficit may be exacerbated when visual cues are restricted. Objective To characterize the upper limb motor profile in HD with various levels of difficulty, with and without visual targets. Methods Nine premanifest HD (pre-HD), nine early symptomatic HD (symp-HD) and nine matched controls completed a motor task incorporating Fitts' law, a model of human movement enabling the quantification of movement timing, via the manipulation of task difficulty (i.e., target size, and distance between targets). The task required participants to make reciprocal movements under cued and blind conditions. Dwell times (time stationary between movements), speed, accuracy and variability of movements were compared between groups. Results Symp-HD showed significantly prolonged and less consistent movement times, compared with controls and pre-HD. Furthermore, movement planning and online control were significantly impaired in symp-HD, compared with controls and pre-HD, evidenced by prolonged dwell times and deceleration times. Speed and accuracy were comparable across groups, suggesting that group differences observed in movement time, variability, dwell time and deceleration time were evident over and above simple performance measures. The presence of cues resulted in greater movement time variability in symp-HD, compared with pre-HD and controls, suggesting that the deficit in movement consistency manifested only in response to targeted movements. Conclusions Collectively, these findings provide evidence of a deficiency in both motor planning, particularly in relation to movement timing and online control, which became exacerbated as a function of task difficulty during symp-HD stages. These variables may provide a more sensitive measure of motor dysfunction than speed and/or accuracy alone in symp-HD. PMID:26248012

  6. Therapists’ Perceptions of Social Media and Video Game Technologies in Upper Limb Rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Shirzad, Navid; Lohse, Keith R; Virji-Babul, Naznin; Hoens, Alison M; Holsti, Liisa; Li, Linda C; Miller, Kimberly J; Lam, Melanie Y; Van der Loos, HF Machiel

    2015-01-01

    Background The application of technologies, such as video gaming and social media for rehabilitation, is garnering interest in the medical field. However, little research has examined clinicians’ perspectives regarding technology adoption by their clients. Objective The objective of our study was to explore therapists’ perceptions of how young people and adults with hemiplegia use gaming and social media technologies in daily life and in rehabilitation, and to identify barriers to using these technologies in rehabilitation. Methods We conducted two focus groups comprised of ten occupational therapists/physiotherapists who provide neurorehabilitation to individuals with hemiplegia secondary to stroke or cerebral palsy. Data was analyzed using inductive thematic analysis. The diffusion of innovations theory provided a framework to interpret emerging themes. Results Therapists were using technology in a limited capacity. They identified barriers to using social media and gaming technology with their clients, including a lack of age appropriateness, privacy issues with social media, limited transfer of training, and a lack of accessibility of current systems. Therapists also questioned their role in the context of technology-based interventions. The opportunity for social interaction was perceived as a major benefit of integrated gaming and social media. Conclusions This study reveals the complexities associated with adopting new technologies in clinical practice, including the need to consider both client and clinician factors. Despite reporting several challenges with applying gaming and social media technology with clinical populations, therapists identified opportunities for increased social interactions and were willing to help shape the development of an upper limb training system that could more readily meet the needs of clients with hemiplegia. By considering the needs of both therapists and clients, technology developers may increase the likelihood that clinicians will adopt innovative technologies. PMID:25759148

  7. Brain Function and Upper Limb Outcome in Stroke: A Cross-Sectional fMRI Study

    PubMed Central

    Buma, Floor E.; Raemaekers, Mathijs; Kwakkel, Gert; Ramsey, Nick F.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The nature of changes in brain activation related to good recovery of arm function after stroke is still unclear. While the notion that this is a reflection of neuronal plasticity has gained much support, confounding by compensatory strategies cannot be ruled out. We address this issue by comparing brain activity in recovered patients 6 months after stroke with healthy controls. Methods We included 20 patients with upper limb paresis due to ischemic stroke and 15 controls. We measured brain activation during a finger flexion-extension task with functional MRI, and the relationship between brain activation and hand function. Patients exhibited various levels of recovery, but all were able to perform the task. Results Comparison between patients and controls with voxel-wise whole-brain analysis failed to reveal significant differences in brain activation. Equally, a region of interest analysis constrained to the motor network to optimize statistical power, failed to yield any differences. Finally, no significant relationship between brain activation and hand function was found in patients. Patients and controls performed scanner task equally well. Conclusion Brain activation and behavioral performance during finger flexion-extensions in (moderately) well recovered patients seems normal. The absence of significant differences in brain activity even in patients with a residual impairment may suggest that infarcts do not necessarily induce reorganization of motor function. While brain activity could be abnormal with higher task demands, this may also introduce performance confounds. It is thus still uncertain to what extent capacity for true neuronal repair after stroke exists. PMID:26440276

  8. Selected questions on biomechanical exposures for surveillance of upper-limb work-related musculoskeletal disorders

    PubMed Central

    Descatha, Alexis; Roquelaure, Yves; Evanoff, Bradley; Niedhammer, Isabelle; Chastang, Jean François; Mariot, Camille; Ha, Catherine; Imbernon, Ellen; Goldberg, Marcel; Leclerc, Annette

    2007-01-01

    Objective Questionnaires for assessment of biomechanical exposure are frequently used in surveillance programs, though few studies have evaluated which key questions are needed. We sought to reduce the number of variables on a surveillance questionnaire by identifying which variables best summarized biomechanical exposure in a survey of the French working population. Methods We used data from the 2002–2003 French experimental network of Upper-limb work-related musculoskeletal disorders (UWMSD), performed on 2685 subjects in which 37 variables assessing biomechanical exposures were available (divided into four ordinal categories, according to the task frequency or duration). Principal Component Analysis (PCA) with orthogonal rotation was performed on these variables. Variables closely associated with factors issued from PCA were retained, except those highly correlated to another variable (rho>0.70). In order to study the relevance of the final list of variables, correlations between a score based on retained variables (PCA score) and the exposure score suggested by the SALTSA group were calculated. The associations between the PCA score and the prevalence of UWMSD were also studied. In a final step, we added back to the list a few variables not retained by PCA, because of their established recognition as risk factors. Results According to the results of the PCA, seven interpretable factors were identified: posture exposures, repetitiveness, handling of heavy loads, distal biomechanical exposures, computer use, forklift operator specific task, and recovery time. Twenty variables strongly correlated with the factors obtained from PCA were retained. The PCA score was strongly correlated both with the SALTSA score and with UWMSD prevalence (p<0.0001). In the final step, six variables were reintegrated. Conclusion Twenty-six variables out of 37 were efficiently selected according to their ability to summarize major biomechanical constraints in a working population, with an approach combining statistical analyses and existing knowledge. PMID:17476519

  9. Real-World Affected Upper Limb Activity in Chronic Stroke: An Examination of Potential Modifying Factors

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Ryan R.; Birkenmeier, Rebecca L.; Lang, Catherine E.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Despite improvement in motor function after intervention, adults with chronic stroke experience disability in everyday activity. Factors other than motor function may influence affected upper limb (UL) activity. OBJECTIVE To characterize affected UL activity and examine potential modifying factors of affected UL activity in community-dwelling adults with chronic stroke. METHODS Forty-six adults with chronic stroke wore accelerometers on both ULs for 25 hours and provided information about potential modifying factors (time spent in sedentary activity, cognitive impairment, depressive symptomatology, number of comorbidities, motor dysfunction of the affected UL, age, activities of daily living (ADL) status, and living arrangement). Accelerometry was used to quantify duration of affected and unaffected UL activity. The ratio of affected-to-unaffected UL activity was also calculated. Associations within and between accelerometry-derived variables and potential modifying factors were examined. RESULTS Mean hours of affected and unaffected UL activity were 5.0 2.2 and 7.6 2.1 hours, respectively. The ratio of affected-to-unaffected UL activity was 0.64 0.19, and hours of affected and unaffected UL activity were strongly correlated (r=0.78). Increased severity of motor dysfunction and dependence in ADLs were associated with decreased affected UL activity. No other factors were associated with affected UL activity. CONCLUSIONS Severity of motor dysfunction and ADL status should be taken into consideration when setting goals for UL activity in people with chronic stroke. Given the strong, positive correlation between affected and unaffected UL activity, encouragement to increase activity of the unaffected UL may increase affected UL activity. PMID:25776118

  10. Relationships between upper-limb functional limitation and self-reported disability 3 months after stroke.

    PubMed

    Dromerick, Alexander W; Lang, Catherine E; Birkenmeier, Rebecca; Hahn, Michele G; Sahrmann, Shirley A; Edwards, Dorothy F

    2006-01-01

    This study explored relationships between upper-limb (UL) functional limitations and self-reported disability in stroke patients with relatively pure motor hemiparesis who were enrolled in an acute rehabilitation treatment trial. All participants were enrolled in the VECTORS (Very Early Constraint Treatment for Recovery from Stroke) study. VECTORS is a single-center pilot clinical trial of early application of constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT). All 39 subjects who completed 90 days of VECTORS were included in this analysis. Trained study personnel who were blinded to the treatment type performed all evaluations. Data in this article examine relationships between assessments performed 90 days after stroke. Functional limitation measures included the Action Research Arm (ARA) test and Wolf Motor Function Test (WMFT), and self-reported disability measures included the Functional Independence Measure (FIM) and Motor Activity Log (MAL) (by telephone). Mean plus or minus standard deviation time from stroke onset to randomization was 9.4 plus or minus 4.3 days, and median time to follow-up was 99 days (range 68-178). Subjects with perfect or near-perfect scores on the ARA test or WMFT reported residual disability on the FIM and MAL. Quality of movement on the WMFT (functional ability score) was not strongly associated with self-reported frequency, and speed of movement on the WMFT (timed score) was not associated with self-reported frequency (MAL amount of use). In this early UL intervention trial, we found that perceived disability measures captured information that was not assessed by functional limitation and impairment scales. Our results indicate that excellent motor recovery as measured by functional limitation and impairment scales did not equal restoration of everyday productive UL use and speed of task completion did not translate to actual use. Our results confirm the need for a measurement strategy that is sensitive to change, assesses a broad performance range, and detects meaningful clinical improvements in early rehabilitation intervention trials. PMID:17041825

  11. When does action comprehension need motor involvement? Evidence from upper limb aplasia.

    PubMed

    Vannuscorps, Gilles; Andres, Michael; Pillon, Agnesa

    2013-01-01

    Motor theories of action comprehension claim that comprehending the meaning of an action performed by a conspecific relies on the perceiver's own motor representation of the same action. According to this view, whether an action belongs to the motor repertoire of the perceiver should impact the ease by which this action is comprehended. We tested this prediction by assessing the ability of an individual (D.C.) born without upper limbs to comprehend actions involving hands (e.g., throwing) or other body parts (e.g., jumping). The tests used a range of different visual stimuli differing in the kind of information provided. The results showed that D.C. was as accurate and fast as control participants in comprehending natural video and photographic presentations of both manual and nonmanual actions, as well as pantomimes. However, he was selectively impaired at identifying point-light animations of manual actions. This impairment was not due to a difficulty in processing kinematic information per se. D.C. was indeed as accurate as control participants in two additional tests requiring a fine-grained analysis of an actor's arm or whole-body movements. These results challenge motor theories of action comprehension by showing that the visual analysis of body shape and motion provides sufficient input for comprehending observed actions. However, when body shape information is sparsely available, motor involvement becomes critical to interpret observed actions. We suggest that, with natural human movement stimuli, motor representations contribute to action comprehension each time visual information is incomplete or ambiguous. PMID:24215324

  12. Childhood obesity affects postural control and aiming performance during an upper limb movement.

    PubMed

    Boucher, François; Handrigan, Grant A; Mackrous, Isabelle; Hue, Olivier

    2015-07-01

    Obesity reduces the efficiency of postural and movement control mechanisms. However, the effects of obesity on a functional motor task and postural control in standing and seated position have not been closely quantified among children. The aim of this study is to examine the effects of obesity on the execution of aiming tasks performed in standing and seated conditions in children. Twelve healthy weight children and eleven obese children aged between 8 and 11 years pointed to a target in standing and seated position. The difficulty of the aiming task was varied by using 2 target sizes (1.0 cm and 5.0 cm width; pointing to the smaller target size needs a more precise movement and constitutes a more difficult task). Hand movement time (MT) and its phases were measured to quantify the aiming task. Mean speed of the center of pressure displacement (COP speed) was calculated to assess postural stability during the movement. Obese children had significantly higher MTs compared to healthy-weight children in seated and standing conditions explained by greater durations of deceleration phase when aiming. Concerning the COP speed during the movement, obese children showed significantly higher values when standing compared to healthy-weight children. This was also observed in the seated position. In conclusion, obesity adds a postural constraint during an aiming task in both seated and standing conditions and requires obese children to take more time to correct their movements due to a greater postural instability of the body when pointing to a target with the upper-limb. PMID:26002603

  13. Scaling and kinematics optimisation of the scapula and thorax in upper limb musculoskeletal models.

    PubMed

    Prinold, Joe A I; Bull, Anthony M J

    2014-08-22

    Accurate representation of individual scapula kinematics and subject geometries is vital in musculoskeletal models applied to upper limb pathology and performance. In applying individual kinematics to a model's cadaveric geometry, model constraints are commonly prescriptive. These rely on thorax scaling to effectively define the scapula's path but do not consider the area underneath the scapula in scaling, and assume a fixed conoid ligament length. These constraints may not allow continuous solutions or close agreement with directly measured kinematics. A novel method is presented to scale the thorax based on palpated scapula landmarks. The scapula and clavicle kinematics are optimised with the constraint that the scapula medial border does not penetrate the thorax. Conoid ligament length is not used as a constraint. This method is simulated in the UK National Shoulder Model and compared to four other methods, including the standard technique, during three pull-up techniques (n=11). These are high-performance activities covering a large range of motion. Model solutions without substantial jumps in the joint kinematics data were improved from 23% of trials with the standard method, to 100% of trials with the new method. Agreement with measured kinematics was significantly improved (more than 10° closer at p<0.001) when compared to standard methods. The removal of the conoid ligament constraint and the novel thorax scaling correction factor were shown to be key. Separation of the medial border of the scapula from the thorax was large, although this may be physiologically correct due to the high loads and high arm elevation angles. PMID:25011621

  14. Upper limb kinematic differences between breathing and non-breathing conditions in front crawl sprint swimming.

    PubMed

    McCabe, Carla B; Sanders, Ross H; Psycharakis, Stelios G

    2015-11-26

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether the breathing action in front crawl (FC) sprint swimming affects the ipsilateral upper limb kinematics relative to a non-breathing stroke cycle (SC). Ten male competitive swimmers performed two 25m FC sprints: one breathing to their preferred side (Br) and one not breathing (NBr). Both swim trials were performed through a 6.75m(3) calibrated space and recorded by six gen-locked JVC KY32 CCD cameras. A paired t-test was used to assess statistical differences between the trials, with a confidence level of p<0.05 accepted as significant. Swimmers were slower (3%) when breathing. Within the entry phase, swimmers had a slower COM horizontal velocity (3.3%), less shoulder flexion (8%), abduction (33%) and roll (4%) when breathing. The pull phase was longer in duration (14%) swimmers had a shallower hand path (11%), less shoulder abduction (11%), a slower hand vertical acceleration (30%) and slower centre of mass (COM) horizontal velocity (3%) when breathing. In the push phase, swimmers had a smaller elbow range of motion (ROM) (38%), faster backwards hand speed (25%) and faster hand vertical acceleration (33%) when breathing. Swimmers rolled their shoulders more (12%) in the recovery phase when breathing. This study confirms that swim performance is compromised by the inclusion of taking a breath in sprint FC swimming. It was proposed that swimmers aim to orient their ipsilateral shoulder into a stronger position by stretching and rolling the shoulders more in the entry phase whilst preparing to take a breath. Swimmers should focus on lengthening the push phase by extending the elbow more and not accelerating the hand too quickly upwards when preparing to inhale. PMID:26456423

  15. High-density surface EMG maps from upper-arm and forearm muscles

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background sEMG signal has been widely used in different applications in kinesiology and rehabilitation as well as in the control of human-machine interfaces. In general, the signals are recorded with bipolar electrodes located in different muscles. However, such configuration may disregard some aspects of the spatial distribution of the potentials like location of innervation zones and the manifestation of inhomogineties in the control of the muscular fibers. On the other hand, the spatial distribution of motor unit action potentials has recently been assessed with activation maps obtained from High Density EMG signals (HD-EMG), these lasts recorded with arrays of closely spaced electrodes. The main objective of this work is to analyze patterns in the activation maps, associating them with four movement directions at the elbow joint and with different strengths of those tasks. Although the activation pattern can be assessed with bipolar electrodes, HD-EMG maps could enable the extraction of features that depend on the spatial distribution of the potentials and on the load-sharing between muscles, in order to have a better differentiation between tasks and effort levels. Methods An experimental protocol consisting of isometric contractions at three levels of effort during flexion, extension, supination and pronation at the elbow joint was designed and HD-EMG signals were recorded with 2D electrode arrays on different upper-limb muscles. Techniques for the identification and interpolation of artifacts are explained, as well as a method for the segmentation of the activation areas. In addition, variables related to the intensity and spatial distribution of the maps were obtained, as well as variables associated to signal power of traditional single bipolar recordings. Finally, statistical tests were applied in order to assess differences between information extracted from single bipolar signals or from HD-EMG maps and to analyze differences due to type of task and effort level. Results Significant differences were observed between EMG signal power obtained from single bipolar configuration and HD-EMG and better results regarding the identification of tasks and effort levels were obtained with the latter. Additionally, average maps for a population of 12 subjects were obtained and differences in the co-activation pattern of muscles were found not only from variables related to the intensity of the maps but also to their spatial distribution. Conclusions Intensity and spatial distribution of HD-EMG maps could be useful in applications where the identification of movement intention and its strength is needed, for example in robotic-aided therapies or for devices like powered- prostheses or orthoses. Finally, additional data transformations or other features are necessary in order to improve the performance of tasks identification. PMID:23216679

  16. The role of ventral and preventral organs as attachment sites for segmental limb muscles in Onychophora

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The so-called ventral organs are amongst the most enigmatic structures in Onychophora (velvet worms). They were described as segmental, ectodermal thickenings in the onychophoran embryo, but the same term has also been applied to mid-ventral, cuticular structures in adults, although the relationship between the embryonic and adult ventral organs is controversial. In the embryo, these structures have been regarded as anlagen of segmental ganglia, but recent studies suggest that they are not associated with neural development. Hence, their function remains obscure. Moreover, their relationship to the anteriorly located preventral organs, described from several onychophoran species, is also unclear. To clarify these issues, we studied the anatomy and development of the ventral and preventral organs in several species of Onychophora. Results Our anatomical data, based on histology, and light, confocal and scanning electron microscopy in five species of Peripatidae and three species of Peripatopsidae, revealed that the ventral and preventral organs are present in all species studied. These structures are covered externally with cuticle that forms an internal, longitudinal, apodeme-like ridge. Moreover, phalloidin-rhodamine labelling for f-actin revealed that the anterior and posterior limb depressor muscles in each trunk and the slime papilla segment attach to the preventral and ventral organs, respectively. During embryonic development, the ventral and preventral organs arise as large segmental, paired ectodermal thickenings that decrease in size and are subdivided into the smaller, anterior anlagen of the preventral organs and the larger, posterior anlagen of the ventral organs, both of which persist as paired, medially-fused structures in adults. Our expression data of the genes Delta and Notch from embryos of Euperipatoides rowelli revealed that these genes are expressed in two, paired domains in each body segment, corresponding in number, position and size with the anlagen of the ventral and preventral organs. Conclusions Our findings suggest that the ventral and preventral organs are a common feature of onychophorans that serve as attachment sites for segmental limb depressor muscles. The origin of these structures can be traced back in the embryo as latero-ventral segmental, ectodermal thickenings, previously suggested to be associated with the development of the nervous system. PMID:24308783

  17. Electroencephalographic markers of robot-aided therapy in stroke patients for the evaluation of upper limb rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Sale, Patrizio; Infarinato, Francesco; Del Percio, Claudio; Lizio, Roberta; Babiloni, Claudio; Foti, Calogero; Franceschini, Marco

    2015-12-01

    Stroke is the leading cause of permanent disability in developed countries; its effects may include sensory, motor, and cognitive impairment as well as a reduced ability to perform self-care and participate in social and community activities. A number of studies have shown that the use of robotic systems in upper limb motor rehabilitation programs provides safe and intensive treatment to patients with motor impairments because of a neurological injury. Furthermore, robot-aided therapy was shown to be well accepted and tolerated by all patients; however, it is not known whether a specific robot-aided rehabilitation can induce beneficial cortical plasticity in stroke patients. Here, we present a procedure to study neural underpinning of robot-aided upper limb rehabilitation in stroke patients. Neurophysiological recordings use the following: (a) 10-20 system electroencephalographic (EEG) electrode montage; (b) bipolar vertical and horizontal electrooculographies; and (c) bipolar electromyography from the operating upper limb. Behavior monitoring includes the following: (a) clinical data and (b) kinematic and dynamic of the operant upper limb movements. Experimental conditions include the following: (a) resting state eyes closed and eyes open, and (b) robotic rehabilitation task (maximum 80 s each block to reach 4-min EEG data; interblock pause of 1 min). The data collection is performed before and after a program of 30 daily rehabilitation sessions. EEG markers include the following: (a) EEG power density in the eyes-closed condition; (b) reactivity of EEG power density to eyes opening; and (c) reactivity of EEG power density to robotic rehabilitation task. The above procedure was tested on a subacute patient (29 poststroke days) and on a chronic patient (21 poststroke months). After the rehabilitation program, we observed (a) improved clinical condition; (b) improved performance during the robotic task; (c) reduced delta rhythms (1-4 Hz) and increased alpha rhythms (8-12 Hz) during the resting state eyes-closed condition; (d) increased alpha desynchronization to eyes opening; and (e) decreased alpha desynchronization during the robotic rehabilitation task. We conclude that the present procedure is suitable for evaluation of the neural underpinning of robot-aided upper limb rehabilitation. PMID:26317486

  18. Effect of muscle fatigue on the sense of limb position and movement.

    PubMed

    Allen, T J; Proske, U

    2006-03-01

    We have recently shown that in an unsupported forearm-matching task blindfolded human subjects are able to achieve an accuracy of 2-3 degrees . If one arm was exercised to produce significant fatigue and the matching task was repeated, it led subjects to make position-matching errors. Here that result is confirmed using fatigue from a simple weight-lifting exercise. A 30% drop in maximum voluntary force after the exercise was accompanied by a significant matching error of 1.7 degrees in the direction of extension when the reference arm had been fatigued, and 1.9 degrees in the direction of flexion when the indicator arm had been fatigued. We also tested the effect of fatigue on a simple movement tracking task where the reference forearm was moved into extension at a range of speeds from 10 to 50 degrees s(-1). Fatigue was found not to significantly reduce the movement-tracking accuracy. In a second experiment, movement tracking was measured while one arm was vibrated. When it was the reference arm, the subject perceived the movement to be significantly faster (3.7 degrees s(-1)) than it actually was. When it was the indicator, it was perceived to be slower (4.6 degrees s(-1)). The data supports the view that muscle spindles are responsible for the sense of movement, and that this sense is not prone to the disturbance from fatigue. By contrast, the sense of position can be disturbed by muscle fatigue. It is postulated, that the sense of effort experienced by holding the arm against the force of gravity is able to provide information about the position in space of the limb and that the increased effort from fatigue produces positional errors. PMID:16328298

  19. Influences of neck vibration on lower limb extensor muscles in man.

    PubMed

    Rossi, A; Rossi, B; Santarcangelo, E

    1985-11-01

    The effects of neck vibration were studied in ten healthy subjects standing in unrestrained or restrained conditions. An involuntary slow and gradual displacement of the body axis associated with a subjective experience of forward tilt occurred during vibration of the dorsal surface of the neck. This effect was associated with a decreased tonic contration of the antigravitary lower limb musculature. The amplitude of the H-reflex from the soleus muscle, recorded at progressively increasing time interval after the onset of the vibratory stimulus, showed complex interactions: in particular, in unrestrained conditions an early inhibitory phase occurred at about 100 msec, followed by a short-lasting facilitatory phase between 150-300 msec and by a late long-lasting excitatory component which started 500-600 msec after the onset of vibratory stimulus. In restrained subjects, the late excitatory phase disappeared and was substituted by a delayed depression. In this instance, the short-lasting facilitatory phase appeared to be superimposed on a background of inhibition. The effects produced by the neck input on the H-reflex were attenuated during vibration of the dorsal muscolature at L4-L5. The mechanisms involved in the cervical control of posture and reflex movements following neck vibration are discussed. PMID:3835844

  20. Muscular Activity and Fatigue in Lower-Limb and Trunk Muscles during Different Sit-To-Stand Tests

    PubMed Central

    Roldán-Jiménez, Cristina; Bennett, Paul; Cuesta-Vargas, Antonio I.

    2015-01-01

    Sit-to-stand (STS) tests measure the ability to get up from a chair, reproducing an important component of daily living activity. As this functional task is essential for human independence, STS performance has been studied in the past decades using several methods, including electromyography. The aim of this study was to measure muscular activity and fatigue during different repetitions and speeds of STS tasks using surface electromyography in lower-limb and trunk muscles. This cross-sectional study recruited 30 healthy young adults. Average muscle activation, percentage of maximum voluntary contraction, muscle involvement in motion and fatigue were measured using surface electrodes placed on the medial gastrocnemius (MG), biceps femoris (BF), vastus medialis of the quadriceps (QM), the abdominal rectus (AR), erector spinae (ES), rectus femoris (RF), soleus (SO) and the tibialis anterior (TA). Five-repetition STS, 10-repetition STS and 30-second STS variants were performed. MG, BF, QM, ES and RF muscles showed differences in muscle activation, while QM, AR and ES muscles showed significant differences in MVC percentage. Also, significant differences in fatigue were found in QM muscle between different STS tests. There was no statistically significant fatigue in the BF, MG and SO muscles of the leg although there appeared to be a trend of increasing fatigue. These results could be useful in describing the functional movements of the STS test used in rehabilitation programs, notwithstanding that they were measured in healthy young subjects. PMID:26506612

  1. The effects of progressive functional training on lower limb muscle architecture and motor function in children with spastic cerebral palsy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, MiHye; Ko, YoungJun; Shin, Mary Myong Sook; Lee, Wanhee

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] To investigate the effects of progressive functional training on lower limb muscle architecture and motor function of children with spastic cerebral palsy (CP). [Subjects] The subjects of this study were 26 children with spastic CP. [Methods] Thirteen subjects in the experimental group performed general neurodevelopmental treatment (NDT) and additional progressive functional trainings and 13 subjects in the control group performed only general NDT 3 times a week for 6 weeks. Ultrasonography, gross motor function measurement (GMFM) and the mobility questionnaire (MobQue) were evaluated. [Results] After the intervention, the muscle thickness of the quadriceps femoris (QF), cross-sectional area of the rectus femoris (RF), pennation angle of the gastrocnemius (GCM) and the MobQue score of the experimental group were significantly greater than those of the control group. The muscle thickness of QF correlated with the cross-sectional area (CSA) of RF and the pennation angle of GCM, and GMFM score correlated with the pennation angle of GCM. [Conclusion] Progressive functional training can increase muscle thickness, CSA, and the pennation angle of the lower limb muscles, and improve the mobility of spastic CP children making it useful as a practical adjunct to rehabilitation therapy. PMID:26157267

  2. Side-to-side comparisons of bone mineral density in upper and lower limbs of collegiate athletes.

    PubMed

    McClanahan, Barbara S; Harmon-Clayton, Karen; Ward, Kenneth D; Klesges, Robert C; Vukadinovich, Christopher M; Cantler, Edwin D

    2002-11-01

    This cross-sectional study investigated the effects of participation in various sports on side-to-side (contralateral) differences in bone mineral density (BMD) of the upper and lower limbs. The BMD of the arms and legs was measured using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry. The subjects were 184 collegiate athletes, both men and women, who participated in NCAA Division I-A baseball, basketball, football, golf, soccer, tennis, cross-country, indoor/outdoor track, and volleyball. Results revealed greater BMD of the right arms compared with the left arms for all teams, with the most pronounced differences observed in men's and women's tennis and men's baseball. Differences in the lower limbs were less common. No significant differences in lower limb BMD were found in the women. In men, differences in lower limb BMD were found in the football and tennis teams, with the nondominant leg having greater bone mass. Recognition of contralateral differences in bone density may be of particular interest to strength and conditioning professionals as they consider the need to include bilateral and unilateral training programs in an effort to maximize performance and minimize stress-related injuries. PMID:12423190

  3. A Multi-Class Proportional Myocontrol Algorithm for Upper Limb Prosthesis Control: Validation in Real-Life Scenarios on Amputees.

    PubMed

    Amsuess, Sebastian; Goebel, Peter; Graimann, Bernhard; Farina, Dario

    2015-09-01

    Functional replacement of upper limbs by means of dexterous prosthetic devices remains a technological challenge. While the mechanical design of prosthetic hands has advanced rapidly, the human-machine interfacing and the control strategies needed for the activation of multiple degrees of freedom are not reliable enough for restoring hand function successfully. Machine learning methods capable of inferring the user intent from EMG signals generated by the activation of the remnant muscles are regarded as a promising solution to this problem. However, the lack of robustness of the current methods impedes their routine clinical application. In this study, we propose a novel algorithm for controlling multiple degrees of freedom sequentially, inherently proportionally and with high robustness, allowing a good level of prosthetic hand function. The control algorithm is based on the spatial linear combinations of amplitude-related EMG signal features. The weighting coefficients in this combination are derived from the optimization criterion of the common spatial patterns filters which allow for maximal discriminability between movements. An important component of the study is the validation of the method which was performed on both able-bodied and amputee subjects who used physical prostheses with customized sockets and performed three standardized functional tests mimicking daily-life activities of varying difficulty. Moreover, the new method was compared in the same conditions with one clinical/industrial and one academic state-of-the-art method. The novel algorithm outperformed significantly the state-of-the-art techniques in both subject groups for tests that required the activation of more than one degree of freedom. Because of the evaluation in real time control on both able-bodied subjects and final users (amputees) wearing physical prostheses, the results obtained allow for the direct extrapolation of the benefits of the proposed method for the end users. In conclusion, the method proposed and validated in real-life use scenarios, allows the practical usability of multifunctional hand prostheses in an intuitive way, with significant advantages with respect to previous systems. PMID:25296406

  4. Mechanism of Kinect-based virtual reality training for motor functional recovery of upper limbs after subacute stroke

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Xiao; Mao, Yurong; Lin, Qiang; Qiu, Yunhai; Chen, Shaozhen; Li, Le; Cates, Ryan S.; Zhou, Shufeng; Huang, Dongfeng

    2013-01-01

    The Kinect-based virtual reality system for the Xbox 360 enables users to control and interact with the game console without the need to touch a game controller, and provides rehabilitation training for stroke patients with lower limb dysfunctions. However, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. In this study, 18 healthy subjects and five patients after subacute stroke were included. The five patients were scanned using functional MRI prior to training, 3 weeks after training and at a 12-week follow-up, and then compared with healthy subjects. The Fugl-Meyer Assessment and Wolf Motor Function Test scores of the hemiplegic upper limbs of stroke patients were significantly increased 3 weeks after training and at the 12-week follow-up. Functional MRI results showed that contralateral primary sensorimotor cortex was activated after Kinect-based virtual reality training in the stroke patients compared with the healthy subjects. Contralateral primary sensorimotor cortex, the bilateral supplementary motor area and the ipsilateral cerebellum were also activated during hand-clenching in all 18 healthy subjects. Our findings indicate that Kinect-based virtual reality training could promote the recovery of upper limb motor function in subacute stroke patients, and brain reorganization by Kinect-based virtual reality training may be linked to the contralateral sensorimotor cortex. PMID:25206611

  5. Biomechanical study of upper-limb exoskeleton for resistance training with three-dimensional motion analysis system.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tzong-Ming; Chen, Dar-Zen

    2014-01-01

    The world's population is aging rapidly, particularly in developed countries. The trend toward prolonged life expectancy will increase the elderly population and thereby lead to an increase in occurrences of age-related health problems such as chronic disease. Healthcare services and home-based rehabilitation are in high demand, and the demand for professional physical therapy is imposing an increasing burden on the healthcare system. Rehabilitation training devices must keep pace with standards of care, be cost effective, and meet the home-based training requirements of today's rehabilitation trends. This article presents an experimental study of a novel spring-loaded upper-limb exoskeleton meant to enable a patient or nondisabled individual to move a limb at multiple joints in different planes for resistance training in a free and unconstrained environment. To assess the functionality of the design, we have measured its kinematic data while performing designated movements and adopted a motion-capture system to verify the function of our mechanism. The collected data and analysis of the kinematic and dynamic joint torques may not only verify our mechanism but also provide a profound understanding of the design requirements for an appropriate spring-loaded exoskeleton for upper-limb resistance training. PMID:24805898

  6. Corticospinal excitability modulation in resting digit muscles during cyclical movement of the digits of the ipsilateral limb

    PubMed Central

    Muraoka, Tetsuro; Sakamoto, Masanori; Mizuguchi, Nobuaki; Nakagawa, Kento; Kanosue, Kazuyuki

    2015-01-01

    We investigated how corticospinal excitability of the resting digit muscles was modulated by the digit movement in the ipsilateral limb. Subjects performed cyclical extension-flexion movements of either the right toes or fingers. To determine whether corticospinal excitability of the resting digit muscles was modulated on the basis of movement direction or action coupling between ipsilateral digits, the right forearm was maintained in either the pronated or supinated position. During the movement, the motor evoked potential (MEP) elicited by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) was measured from either the resting right finger extensor and flexor, or toe extensor and flexor. For both finger and toe muscles, independent of forearm position, MEP amplitude of the flexor was greater during ipsilateral digit flexion as compared to extension, and MEP amplitude of the extensor was greater during ipsilateral digit extension as compared to flexion. An exception was that MEP amplitude of the toe flexor with the supinated forearm did not differ between during finger extension and flexion. These findings suggest that digit movement modulates corticospinal excitability of the digits of the ipsilateral limb such that the same action is preferred. Our results provide evidence for a better understanding of neural interactions between ipsilateral limbs, and may thus contribute to neurorehabilitation after a stroke or incomplete spinal cord injury. PMID:26582985

  7. Epidemiology of Congenital Upper Limb Anomalies in a Midwest United States Population: An Assessment Using the OMT Classification

    PubMed Central

    Goldfarb, Charles A.; Wall, Lindley B.; Bohn, Deborah C.; Moen, Patrick; Van Heest, Ann E.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To examine the relative presentation frequency of children with upper limb congenital anomalies at 3 Midwestern referral centers using the Oberg, Manske, and Tonkin (OMT) classification and to assess the utility of this new classification system. Methods 641 individuals with 653 congenital upper extremity anomalies were identified at 3 hospitals in 2 large metropolitan areas during a 1-year interval. Patients were identified prospectively and the specific upper extremity anomaly and any associated syndromes were confirmed using medical records and radiographs. We applied the OMT classification that categorizes anomalies using a dysmorphology outline as malformations, dysplasias, deformations, and syndromes, and assessed its utility and ease of use. Results There were 480 extremities (74%) with a limb malformation including 184 involving the entire limb. Arthrogryposis was the most common of these (53 extremities). Anomalies affecting only the hand plate accounted for 62% (296) of the malformations. Of these, radial polydactyly (15%) was the most common specific anomaly, followed by symbrachydactyly (13%) and cleft hand (11%). Dysplasias were noted in 86 extremities; 55 of these were multiple hereditary exostoses. There were 87 extremities with deformations and 58 of these were trigger digits. A total of 98 children had a syndrome or association. Constriction ring sequence was most common. The OMT was straightforward to use and most anomalies could be easily assigned. There were a few conditions, such as Madelung deformity and symbrachydactyly, that would benefit from clarification on how to best classify them. Conclusions Malformations were the most common congenital anomalies in the 653 upper extremities evaluated over a 1-year period at 3 institutions. We were able to classify all individuals using the OMT classification system. PMID:25534840

  8. Upper limb performance and the structuring of joint movement in teenagers with cerebral palsy: the reciprocal role of task demands and action capabilities.

    PubMed

    Figueiredo, Priscilla Rezende Pereira; Silva, Paula Lanna; Avelar, Bruna Silva; da Fonseca, Sérgio Teixeira; Bootsma, Reinoud J; Mancini, Marisa Cotta

    2015-04-01

    Individuals with unilateral cerebral palsy (CP) demonstrate reduced performance in upper limb tasks compared to typically developing (TD) peers. We examined whether task conditions modify differences between teenagers with and without CP during a reciprocal aiming task. Twenty teenagers (nine CP and 11 TD) moved a pointer between two targets as fast as possible without missing a target. Task conditions were manipulated by changing the targets' size, by modifying the inertial properties of the pointer and by varying the upper limb used to perform the task (preferred/non-affected and non-preferred/affected upper limbs). While compared to TD peers, CP teenagers exhibited lower performance (longer movement times). Such differences were attenuated when the task was performed with the preferred upper limb and when accuracy requirements were less stringent. CP teenagers were not differentially affected by the pointer inertia manipulation. Task conditions not only affected performance but also joint kinematics. CP teenagers revealed less movement at the elbow and more movement at the shoulder when performing the task with their less skilled upper limb. However, both CP and TD teenagers demonstrated a larger contribution of trunk movement when facing more challenging task conditions. The overall pattern of results indicated that the joint kinematics employed by individuals with unilateral CP constituted adaptive responses to task requirements. Thus, the explanation of the effects of unilateral CP on upper limb behavior needs to go beyond a context-indifferent manifestation of the brain injury to include the interaction between task demands and action capabilities. PMID:25579662

  9. The development of an adaptive upper-limb stroke rehabilitation robotic system

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Stroke is the primary cause of adult disability. To support this large population in recovery, robotic technologies are being developed to assist in the delivery of rehabilitation. This paper presents an automated system for a rehabilitation robotic device that guides stroke patients through an upper-limb reaching task. The system uses a decision theoretic model (a partially observable Markov decision process, or POMDP) as its primary engine for decision making. The POMDP allows the system to automatically modify exercise parameters to account for the specific needs and abilities of different individuals, and to use these parameters to take appropriate decisions about stroke rehabilitation exercises. Methods The performance of the system was evaluated by comparing the decisions made by the system with those of a human therapist. A single patient participant was paired up with a therapist participant for the duration of the study, for a total of six sessions. Each session was an hour long and occurred three times a week for two weeks. During each session, three steps were followed: (A) after the system made a decision, the therapist either agreed or disagreed with the decision made; (B) the researcher had the device execute the decision made by the therapist; (C) the patient then performed the reaching exercise. These parts were repeated in the order of A-B-C until the end of the session. Qualitative and quantitative question were asked at the end of each session and at the completion of the study for both participants. Results Overall, the therapist agreed with the system decisions approximately 65% of the time. In general, the therapist thought the system decisions were believable and could envision this system being used in both a clinical and home setting. The patient was satisfied with the system and would use this system as his/her primary method of rehabilitation. Conclusions The data collected in this study can only be used to provide insight into the performance of the system since the sample size was limited. The next stage for this project is to test the system with a larger sample size to obtain significant results. PMID:21679457

  10. Upper limb aerobic training improves aerobic fitness and all-out performance of America's Cup grinders.

    PubMed

    Adami, Paolo Emilio; Delussu, Anna Sofia; Rodio, Angelo; Squeo, Maria Rosaria; Corsi, Loretta; Quattrini, Filippo Maria; Fattorini, Luigi; Bernardi, Marco

    2015-01-01

    This research on "America's Cup" grinders investigated the effects of a specific eight-week long-arm cranking ergometer (ACE) training on upper body (UB) aerobic fitness (ventilatory threshold - Tvent, respiratory compensation point- RCP, -oxygen uptake peak - VO₂peak) and high intensity working capacity. The training consisted of sessions carried out for 20-30 mins, three times per week, at an intensity between the UB-Tvent and UB-RCP, and replaced part of a typical lower limb aerobic training whilst maintaining the usual weekly schedule of callisthenics, resistance training and sailing. Seven sailors, including four grinders and three mastmen (age 30 ± 5.5 years, height 1.9 ± 0.04 m, body mass 102 ± 3.6 kg), were evaluated through both an ACE cardiopulmonary maximal exercise test (CPET) and an ACE all-out up to exhaustion exercise test, before and after the ACE training. UB aerobic fitness improved significantly: UB-VO₂peak increased from 4.29 ± 0.442 to 4.52 ± 0.522 l·min(-1) (6.4 ± 3.66%), VO₂ at UB-Tvent from 2.42 ± 0.282 to 2.97 ± 0.328 l·min(-1) (22.8 ± 5.09%) and VO₂ at UB-RCP from 3.25 ± 0.402 to 3.75 ± 0.352 l·min(-1) (16.1 ± 10.83%). Peak power at the ACE CPET increased from 351 ± 27.5 to 387 ± 33.5 W (10.5 ± 6.93%). The all-out test total mechanical work increased from 28.9 ± 2.35 to 40.1 ± 3.76 kJ (72.1 ± 4.67%). In conclusion, a high intensity aerobic ACE training can be effective in improving grinding performance by increasing UB aerobic fitness and all-out working capacity. PMID:25357134

  11. FAST INdiCATE Trial protocol. Clinical efficacy of functional strength training for upper limb motor recovery early after stroke: Neural correlates and prognostic indicators

    PubMed Central

    Pomeroy, Valerie M; Ward, Nick S; Johansen-Berg, Heidi; van Vliet, Paulette; Burridge, Jane; Hunter, Susan M; Lemon, Roger N; Rothwell, John; Weir, Christopher J; Wing, Alan; Walker, Andrew A; Kennedy, Niamh; Barton, Garry; Greenwood, Richard J; McConnachie, Alex

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Functional strength training in addition to conventional physical therapy could enhance upper limb recovery early after stroke more than movement performance therapy plus conventional physical therapy. Aims To determine (a) the relative clinical efficacy of conventional physical therapy combined with functional strength training and conventional physical therapy combined with movement performance therapy for upper limb recovery; (b) the neural correlates of response to conventional physical therapy combined with functional strength training and conventional physical therapy combined with movement performance therapy; (c) whether any one or combination of baseline measures predict motor improvement in response to conventional physical therapy combined with functional strength training or conventional physical therapy combined with movement performance therapy. Design Randomized, controlled, observer-blind trial. Study The sample will consist of 288 participants with upper limb paresis resulting from a stroke that occurred within the previous 60 days. All will be allocated to conventional physical therapy combined with functional strength training or conventional physical therapy combined with movement performance therapy. Functional strength training and movement performance therapy will be undertaken for up to 1·5 h/day, five-days/week for six-weeks. Outcomes and Analysis Measurements will be undertaken before randomization, six-weeks thereafter, and six-months after stroke. Primary efficacy outcome will be the Action Research Arm Test. Explanatory measurements will include voxel-wise estimates of brain activity during hand movement, brain white matter integrity (fractional anisotropy), and brain–muscle connectivity (e.g. latency of motor evoked potentials). The primary clinical efficacy analysis will compare treatment groups using a multilevel normal linear model adjusting for stratification variables and for which therapist administered the treatment. Effect of conventional physical therapy combined with functional strength training versus conventional physical therapy combined with movement performance therapy will be summarized using the adjusted mean difference and 95% confidence interval. To identify the neural correlates of improvement in both groups, we will investigate associations between change from baseline in clinical outcomes and each explanatory measure. To identify baseline measurements that independently predict motor improvement, we will develop a multiple regression model. PMID:24025033

  12. Assessment of Lower Limb Muscle Strength and Power Using Hand-Held and Fixed Dynamometry: A Reliability and Validity Study

    PubMed Central

    Perraton, Luke G.; Bower, Kelly J.; Adair, Brooke; Pua, Yong-Hao; Williams, Gavin P.; McGaw, Rebekah

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Hand-held dynamometry (HHD) has never previously been used to examine isometric muscle power. Rate of force development (RFD) is often used for muscle power assessment, however no consensus currently exists on the most appropriate method of calculation. The aim of this study was to examine the reliability of different algorithms for RFD calculation and to examine the intra-rater, inter-rater, and inter-device reliability of HHD as well as the concurrent validity of HHD for the assessment of isometric lower limb muscle strength and power. Methods 30 healthy young adults (age: 23±5yrs, male: 15) were assessed on two sessions. Isometric muscle strength and power were measured using peak force and RFD respectively using two HHDs (Lafayette Model-01165 and Hoggan microFET2) and a criterion-reference KinCom dynamometer. Statistical analysis of reliability and validity comprised intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC), Pearson correlations, concordance correlations, standard error of measurement, and minimal detectable change. Results Comparison of RFD methods revealed that a peak 200ms moving window algorithm provided optimal reliability results. Intra-rater, inter-rater, and inter-device reliability analysis of peak force and RFD revealed mostly good to excellent reliability (coefficients ≥ 0.70) for all muscle groups. Concurrent validity analysis showed moderate to excellent relationships between HHD and fixed dynamometry for the hip and knee (ICCs ≥ 0.70) for both peak force and RFD, with mostly poor to good results shown for the ankle muscles (ICCs = 0.31–0.79). Conclusions Hand-held dynamometry has good to excellent reliability and validity for most measures of isometric lower limb strength and power in a healthy population, particularly for proximal muscle groups. To aid implementation we have created freely available software to extract these variables from data stored on the Lafayette device. Future research should examine the reliability and validity of these variables in clinical populations. PMID:26509265

  13. Effects of the Racket Polar Moment of Inertia on Dominant Upper Limb Joint Moments during Tennis Serve

    PubMed Central

    Rogowski, Isabelle; Creveaux, Thomas; Chèze, Laurence; Macé, Pierre; Dumas, Raphaël

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the effect of the polar moment of inertia of a tennis racket on upper limb loading in the serve. Eight amateur competition tennis players performed two sets of 10 serves using two rackets identical in mass, position of center of mass and moments of inertia other than the polar moment of inertia (0.00152 vs 0.00197 kg.m2). An eight-camera motion analysis system collected the 3D trajectories of 16 markers, located on the thorax, upper limbs and racket, from which shoulder, elbow and wrist net joint moments and powers were computed using inverse dynamics. During the cocking phase, increased racket polar moment of inertia was associated with significant increases in the peak shoulder extension and abduction moments, as well the peak elbow extension, valgus and supination moments. During the forward swing phase, peak wrist extension and radial deviation moments significantly increased with polar moment of inertia. During the follow-through phase, the peak shoulder adduction, elbow pronation and wrist external rotation moments displayed a significant inverse relationship with polar moment of inertia. During the forward swing, the magnitudes of negative joint power at the elbow and wrist were significantly larger when players served using the racket with a higher polar moment of inertia. Although a larger polar of inertia allows players to better tolerate off-center impacts, it also appears to place additional loads on the upper extremity when serving and may therefore increase injury risk in tennis players. PMID:25117871

  14. High Intensity Physical Exercise and Pain in the Neck and Upper Limb among Slaughterhouse Workers: Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Sundstrup, Emil; Jakobsen, Markus D.; Jay, Kenneth; Brandt, Mikkel; Andersen, Lars L.

    2014-01-01

    Slaughterhouse work involves a high degree of repetitive and forceful upper limb movements and thus implies an elevated risk of work-related musculoskeletal disorders. High intensity strength training effectively rehabilitates musculoskeletal disorders among sedentary employees, but less is known about the effect among workers with repetitive and forceful work demands. Before performing randomized controlled trials it may be beneficial to assess the cross-sectional connection between exercise and musculoskeletal pain. We investigated the association between high intensity physical exercise and pain among 595 slaughterhouse workers in Denmark, Europe. Using logistic regression analyses, odds ratios for pain and work disability as a function of physical exercise, gender, age, BMI, smoking, and job position were estimated. The prevalence of pain in the neck, shoulder, elbow, and hand/wrist was 48%, 60%, 40%, and 52%, respectively. The odds for experiencing neck pain were significantly lower among slaughterhouse workers performing physical exercise (OR = 0.70, CI: 0.490.997), whereas the odds for pain in the shoulders, elbow, or hand/wrist were not associated with exercise. The present study can be used as general reference of pain in the neck and upper extremity among slaughterhouse workers. Future studies should investigate the effect of high intensity physical exercise on neck and upper limb pain in slaughterhouse workers. PMID:24527440

  15. Limb salvage in a child with severely injured mangled lower extremity and muscle rigor.

    PubMed

    Elsharawy, Mohamed A; Maher, Karay; Elsaid, Aymen S

    2012-12-01

    Most surgeons make their decision to amputate or perform limb salvage of a mangled extremity based on scoring systems and grading of acute ischemic limb. We report on a child in whom limb salvage was achieved in spite of a clinical picture of irreversible ischemia with high mangled severity scores. Attempts to revascularize the mangled extremity of children are recommended, regardless of their severity scores and condition of the foot. PMID:23019608

  16. Limitations to systemic and locomotor limb muscle oxygen delivery and uptake during maximal exercise in humans

    PubMed Central

    Mortensen, Stefan P; Dawson, Ellen A; Yoshiga, Chie C; Dalsgaard, Mads K; Damsgaard, Rasmus; Secher, Niels H; González-Alonso, José

    2005-01-01

    Reductions in systemic and locomotor limb muscle blood flow and O2 delivery limit aerobic capacity in humans. To examine whether O2 delivery limits both aerobic power and capacity, we first measured systemic haemodynamics, O2 transport and O2 uptake during incremental and constant (372 ± 11 W; 85% of peak power; mean ± s.e.m.) cycling exercise to exhaustion (n = 8) and then measured systemic and leg haemodynamics and during incremental cycling and knee-extensor exercise in male subjects (n = 10). During incremental cycling, cardiac output and systemic O2 delivery increased linearly to 80% of peak power (r2 = 0.998, P < 0.001) and then plateaued in parallel to a decline in stroke volume (SV) and an increase in central venous and mean arterial pressures (P < 0.05). In contrast, heart rate and increased linearly until exhaustion (r2 = 0.993; P < 0.001) accompanying a rise in systemic O2 extraction to 84 ± 2%. In the exercising legs, blood flow and O2 delivery levelled off at 73–88% of peak power, blunting leg per unit of work despite increasing O2 extraction. When blood flow increased linearly during one-legged knee-extensor exercise, per unit of work was unaltered on fatigue. During constant cycling, , SV, systemic O2 delivery and reached maximal values within ∼5 min, but dropped before exhaustion (P < 0.05) despite increasing or stable central venous and mean arterial pressures. In both types of maximal cycling, the impaired systemic O2 delivery was due to the decline or plateau in because arterial O2 content continued to increase. These results indicate that an inability of the circulatory system to sustain a linear increase in O2 delivery to the locomotor muscles restrains aerobic power. The similar impairment in SV and O2 delivery during incremental and constant load cycling provides evidence for a central limitation to aerobic power and capacity in humans. PMID:15860533

  17. Can sit-to-stand lower limb muscle power predict fall status?

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yuan-Yang; Wei, Shun-Hwa; Chen, Po-Yin; Tsai, Mei-Wun; Cheng, I-Chung; Liu, Ding-Hao; Kao, Chung-Lan

    2014-07-01

    Sit-to-stand (STS) movements are essential for daily activities. Failure to perform STS movements efficiently and smoothly may lead to falls. In this study, we developed a forceplate to analyze vertical ground reaction force (VGRF), STS duration and generated muscle power to investigate which parameters were fall status predictors. A total of 105 participants were included in this study and were grouped into those (1) aged between 20 and 30 years (Young), (2) aged above 65 years without a history of falling (Non-fallers) and (3) aged above 65 with a history of falling in the past 12 months (Fallers). The results indicated a significantly higher maximal lower limb muscle power (MP) for the Young (9.05 ± 3.66 W/kg), followed by Non-fallers (5.50 ± 2.02W/kg) and Fallers (3.66 ± 1.45 W/kg) as well as higher modified falls efficacy scale (MFES) scores for the Young (Young: 9.88 ± 0.10; Non-fallers: 6.27 ± 1.40; Fallers: 4.83 ± 0.89) and shorter times for the five times sit-to-stand test (FSTST) for the young (Young: 6.09 ± 2.20 s; Non-fallers: 15.65 ± 3.30s; Fallers: 19.82 ± 4.46 s). There was a significant difference between the Young group and the Non-fallers in the maximal vertical ground reaction force (VGRF) (138.79 ± 24.20 N/BW in Young, 117.51 ± 8.57 N/BW in old Non-fallers, p < 0.01), and there was a significant difference between the Non-fallers and the Fallers in the duration of the STS movement (2.74 ± 0.87 s for the Non-fallers, 4.27 ± 2.56 s for the Fallers, p < 0.01). The regression analysis results further indicated that only MP and the STS stabilization phase could differentiate individuals who had past fall events. Therefore, the equipment we developed could potentially be useful in the assessment and monitoring of balance and the risk of falling in older people. PMID:24974126

  18. Modifications in activation of lower limb muscles as a function of initial foot position in cycling.

    PubMed

    Padulo, Johnny; Powell, Douglas W; Ardigò, Luca P; Viggiano, Davide

    2015-08-01

    Cyclic movements, such as walking/cycling, require the activity of spinal-circuits, the central-pattern-generators (CPG). To our knowledge little work has been done to investigate the activation of these circuits, e.g., the muscular and kinematic activity during cycling initiation. This study aims to detail the muscle output properties as a function of the initial lower limb-position using a simple cycling paradigm. Therefore, subjects were required to pedal on a cycle-ergometer in seated position starting at different-crank-angles (0-150°). Surface-electromyography was recorded from the gluteus major (GL), vastus lateralis (VL), and gastrocnemius medialis (GM), while crank position was recorded using a linear-encoder. Gluteus major peak-activity (PA) occurred at 65.0±12.4° when starting with 0° initial crank position (ICP), while occurred maximally at 110.5±2.9 when starting with 70° ICP. Vastus lateralis PA occurred at 40.7±8.8° with 0° ICP, whereas with 70° ICP PA occurred at 103.4±4.0°. Similarly, GM PA occurred at 112.0±10.7° with 0° ICP, whereas with 70° ICP PA occurred at 142.5±4.2° PA. Gluteus major and gastrocnemius medialis showed similar PA phase shifts, which may suggest they are controlled by same local circuitry, in agreement with their common spinal origin, i.e., motoneurons pool in S1-S2. PMID:25921852

  19. Task-specific changes in motor evoked potentials of lower limb muscles after different training interventions.

    PubMed

    Beck, S; Taube, W; Gruber, M; Amtage, F; Gollhofer, A; Schubert, M

    2007-11-01

    This study aimed to identify sites and mechanisms of long-term plasticity following lower limb muscle training. Two groups performing either a postural stability maintenance training (SMT) or a ballistic ankle strength training (BST) were compared to a non-training group. The hypothesis was that practicing of a self-initiated voluntary movement would facilitate cortico-spinal projections, while practicing fast automatic adjustments during stabilization of stance would reduce excitatory influence from the primary motor cortex. Training effects were expected to be confined to the practiced task. To test for training specificity, motor evoked potentials (MEP) induced by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) were recorded at rest and during motor tasks that were similar to each training. Intracortical, cortico-spinal, as well as spinal parameters were assessed at rest and during these tasks. The results show high task and training specificity. Training effects were only observable during performance of the trained task. While MEP size was decreased in the SMT group for the trained tasks, MEP recruitment was increased in the BST group in the trained task only. The control group did not show any changes. Background electromyogram levels, M. soleus H-reflex amplitudes and intracortical parameters were unaltered. In summary, it is suggested that the changes of MEP parameters in both training groups, but not in the control group, reflect cortical motor plasticity. While cortico-spinal activation was enhanced in the BST group, SMT may be associated with improved motor control through increased inhibitory trans-cortical effects. Since spinal excitability remained unaltered, changes most likely occur on the supraspinal level. PMID:17889840

  20. Improving proprioceptive deficits after stroke through robot-assisted training of the upper limb: a pilot case report study.

    PubMed

    Colombo, R; Sterpi, I; Mazzone, A; Delconte, C; Pisano, F

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether a conventional robot-assisted therapy of the upper limb was able to improve proprioception and motor recovery of an individual after stroke who exhibited proprioceptive deficits. After robotic sensorimotor training, significant changes were observed in kinematic performance variables. Two quantitative parameters evaluating position sense improved after training. Range of motion during shoulder and wrist flexion improved, but only wrist flexion remained improved at 3-month follow-up. These preliminary results suggest that intensive robot-aided rehabilitation may play an important role in the recovery of sensory function. However, further studies are required to confirm these data. PMID:26565132

  1. Effector force requirements to enable robotic systems to provide assisted exercise in people with upper limb impairment after stroke.

    PubMed

    Jackson, A E; Culmer, P R; Levesley, M C; Cozens, J A; Makower, S G; Bhakta, B B

    2011-01-01

    iPAM (intelligent Pneumatic Arm Movement) is a dual robotic system that aims to assist in the recovery of upper-limb movement in people with all severities of motor impairment after stroke. This paper presents effector force data gathered during the course of a pilot clinical study. It identifies the forces and workspace required to facilitate reach-retrieve exercises in a range of patients as part of rehabilitation treatments. These findings have been used in further refinements of the iPAM system. PMID:22275595

  2. [Arteriovenous malformation of the left upper limb in stage II of Schbinger: A case report in Madagascar].

    PubMed

    Raherinantenaina, F; Rajaonanahary, T M A; Randriamandrato, T A V; Rakotomena, S D; Rajaonarivony, T; Rakoto Ratsimba, H N

    2015-09-01

    Arteriovenous malformations are the most unpredictable and dangerous congenital malformations. They consist of multiple arteriovenous shunts with high flow and can progress to heart failure. They are rarely localized in the upper limb and pose therapeutic problems. We report a new case in a 27-year old woman, admitted for pulsatile pain in the left elbow. The diagnosis was made by clinical examination and ultrasonography. The surgical treatment without embolization and sclerotherapy, consisted of a large resection of the nidus without postoperative complication. PMID:24035259

  3. Lingual Muscle Activity Across Sleep–Wake States in Rats with Surgically Altered Upper Airway

    PubMed Central

    Rukhadze, Irma; Kalter, Julie; Stettner, Georg M.; Kubin, Leszek

    2014-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) patients have increased upper airway muscle activity, including such lingual muscles as the genioglossus (GG), geniohyoid (GH), and hyoglossus (HG). This adaptation partially protects their upper airway against obstructions. Rodents are used to study the central neural control of sleep and breathing but they do not naturally exhibit OSA. We investigated whether, in chronically instrumented, behaving rats, disconnecting the GH and HG muscles from the hyoid (H) apparatus would result in a compensatory increase of other upper airway muscle activity (electromyogram, EMG) and/or other signs of upper airway instability. We first determined that, in intact rats, lingual (GG and intrinsic) muscles maintained stable activity levels when quantified based on 2 h-long recordings conducted on days 6 through 22 after instrumentation. We then studied five rats in which the tendons connecting the GH and HG muscles to the H apparatus were experimentally severed. When quantified across all recording days, lingual EMG during slow-wave sleep (SWS) was modestly but significantly increased in rats with surgically altered upper airway [8.6 ± 0.7% (SE) vs. 6.1 ± 0.7% of the mean during wakefulness; p = 0.012]. Respiratory modulation of lingual EMG occurred mainly during SWS and was similarly infrequent in both groups, and the incidence of sighs and central apneas also was similar. Thus, a weakened action of selected lingual muscles did not produce sleep-disordered breathing but resulted in a relatively elevated activity in other lingual muscles during SWS. These results encourage more extensive surgical manipulations with the aim to obtain a rodent model with collapsible upper airway. PMID:24803913

  4. Adaptations of upper trapezius muscle activity during sustained contractions in women with fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Falla, Deborah; Andersen, Helle; Danneskiold-Samsøe, Bente; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Farina, Dario

    2010-06-01

    The study compared the distribution of electromyographic (EMG) signal amplitude in the upper trapezius muscle in 10 women with fibromyalgia and in 10 healthy women before and after experimentally-induced muscle pain. Surface EMG signals were recorded over the right upper trapezius muscle with a 10 x 5 grid of electrodes during 90 degrees shoulder abduction sustained for 60s. The control subjects repeated the abduction task following injections of isotonic and hypertonic (painful) saline into the upper trapezius muscle. The EMG amplitude was computed for each electrode pair and provided a topographical map of the distribution of muscle activity. The pain level rated by the patients at the beginning of the sustained contraction was 5.9+/-1.5. The peak pain intensity for the control group following the injection of hypertonic saline was 6.0+/-1.6. During the sustained contractions, the EMG amplitude increased relatively more in the cranial than caudal region of the upper trapezius muscle for the control subjects (shift in the distribution of EMG amplitude: 2.3+/-1.3mm; P<0.01). The patient group showed lower average EMG amplitude than the controls during the contraction (P<0.05) and did not show different changes in EMG amplitude between different regions of the upper trapezius. A similar behavior was observed for the control group following injection of hypertonic saline. The results indicate that muscle pain prevents the adaptation of upper trapezius activity during sustained contractions as observed in non-painful conditions, which may induce overuse of similar muscle compartments with fatigue. PMID:19682926

  5. Swallowing activity of lip muscles in patients with a complete upper and a partial lower denture.

    PubMed

    Tallgren, A; Tryde, G

    1992-07-01

    In 30 partially edentulous subjects provided with an immediate complete upper and a partial lower free-end denture the lip activity in swallowing was studied before and after denture treatment and during a 2-year period of denture wearing. Electromyographic recordings of the right side upper and lower orbicularis oris, mentalis and anterior temporal muscles were obtained during swallowing saliva and during swallowing of water with and without the dentures in the mouth. In the different types of swallows recorded, the lower lip and mentalis muscles showed much stronger activity than the upper lip and anterior temporal muscles and also initiated the swallowing activity. No significant changes in mean voltages of the swallowing activity were observed during the 2-year observation period. On the other hand, the durations of the swallows showed marked increases after 1 year of denture use, when no further rebasings of the complete upper denture had been made. PMID:1432349

  6. Medium-latency stretch reflexes of foot and leg muscles analysed by cooling the lower limb in standing humans.

    PubMed Central

    Schieppati, M; Nardone, A

    1997-01-01

    1. In standing subjects, an ankle-dorsiflexing perturbation of the supporting surface evokes a short-latency response (SLR) and a medium-latency response (MLR) to stretch in both soleus (Sol) and flexor digitorum brevis (FDB) muscles. The SLR is the counterpart of the monosynaptic reflex, whilst the MLR might be either mediated by Ia fibres, the delay being due to a long-loop central circuit, or by fibres of slower conduction velocity. Since small afferents are slowed more than large ones by low temperature, a greater latency increment for the MLR than the SLR induced by cooling of the limb would point to a peripheral origin of the MLR. 2. In nine subjects, one limb was cooled by circulating water in a tube wrapped around it for about 120 min. Perturbations were delivered to the same limb prior to and during cooling, and after rewarming. EMG was recorded by surface electrodes from the Sol and FDB muscles. 3. The mean increase in latency of MLRs was significantly greater than that of SLRs in both muscles. On average, the Sol SLR increased from 42.4 to 47.0 ms and the Sol MLR from 72.0 to 82.3 ms. The FDB SLR increased from 58.1 to 66.5 ms and the FDB MLR from 94.9 to 110.5 ms. The mean difference (MLR minus SLR) increased from 29.6 to 35.2 ms for Sol, and from 36.8 to 43.9 ms for FDB at the end of cooling. After 30 min of rewarming, the responses of both muscles recovered towards control values. 4. The greater latency increment of the MLRs than of the SLRs favours the hypothesis of a slower conduction velocity of the responsible afferent fibres. The most likely candidate fibres are the spindle group II afferents. PMID:9379421

  7. Assessing the impact of upper limb disability following stroke: a qualitative enquiry using internet-based personal accounts of stroke survivors

    PubMed Central

    Poltawski, Leon; Allison, Rhoda; Briscoe, Simon; Freeman, Jennifer; Kilbride, Cherry; Neal, Debbie; Turton, Ailie J.; Dean, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Purpose: Upper limb disability following stroke may have multiple effects on the individual. Existing assessment instruments tend to focus on impairment and function and may miss other changes that are personally important. This study aimed to identify personally significant impacts of upper limb disability following stroke. Methods: Accounts by stroke survivors, in the form of web-based diaries (blogs) and stories, were sought using a blog search engine and in stroke-related web-sites. Thematic analysis using the World Health Organisation’s International Classification of Functioning Disability and Health (ICF) was used to identify personal impacts of upper limb disability following stroke. Results: Ninety-nine sources from at least four countries were analysed. Many impacts were classifiable using the ICF, but a number of additional themes emerged, including emotional, cognitive and behavioural changes. Blogs and other web-based accounts were easily accessible and rich sources of data, although using them raised several methodological issues, including potential sample bias. Conclusions: A range of impacts was identified, some of which (such as use of information technology and alienation from the upper limb) are not addressed in current assessment instruments. They should be considered in post-stroke assessments. Blogs may help in the development of more comprehensive assessments.Implications for RehabilitationA comprehensive assessment of the upper limb following stroke should include the impact of upper limb problems on social participation, as well as associated emotional, cognitive and behavioural changes.Using personalised assessment instruments alongside standardised measures may help ensure that these broader domains are considered in discussions between clinicians and patients.Rehabilitation researchers should investigate whether and how these domains could be addressed and operationalised in standard upper limb assessment instruments. PMID:26200448

  8. The neural correlates of upper limb motor blocks in Parkinson's disease and their relation to freezing of gait.

    PubMed

    Vercruysse, S; Spildooren, J; Heremans, E; Wenderoth, N; Swinnen, S P; Vandenberghe, W; Nieuwboer, A

    2014-12-01

    Due to basal ganglia dysfunction, bimanual motor performance in Parkinson patients reportedly relies on compensatory brain activation in premotor-parietal-cerebellar circuitries. A subgroup of Parkinson's disease (PD) patients with freezing of gait (FOG) may exhibit greater bimanual impairments up to the point that motor blocks occur. This study investigated the neural mechanisms of upper limb motor blocks and explored their relation with FOG. Brain activation was measured using functional magnetic resonance imaging during bilateral finger movements in 16 PD with FOG, 16 without FOG (PD + FOG and PD - FOG), and 16 controls. During successful movement, PD + FOG showed decreased activation in right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (PFC), left dorsal premotor cortex (PMd), as well as left M1 and bilaterally increased activation in dorsal putamen, pallidum, as well as subthalamic nucleus compared with PD - FOG and controls. On the contrary, upper limb motor blocks were associated with increased activation in right M1, PMd, supplementary motor area, and left PFC compared with successful movement, whereas bilateral pallidum and putamen activity was decreased. Complex striatofrontal activation changes may be involved in the difficulties of PD + FOG to perform bimanual movements, or sequential movements in general. These novel results suggest that, whatever the exact underlying cause, PD + FOG seem to have reached a saturation point of normal neural compensation and respond belatedly to actual movement breakdown. PMID:23861319

  9. Human upper-limb force capacities evaluation with robotic models for ergonomic applications: effect of elbow flexion.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, Vincent; Rezzoug, Nasser; Jacquier-Bret, Julien; Gorce, Philippe

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to apply models derived from the robotics field to evaluate the human upper-limb force generation capacity. Four models were compared: the force ellipsoid (FE) and force polytope (FP) based on unit joint torques and the scaled FE (SFE) and scaled FP (SFP) based on maximum isometric joint torques. The four models were assessed from four upper-limb postures with varying elbow flexion (40°, 60°, 80° and 100°) measured by an optoelectronic system and their corresponding isometric joint torques. Ten subjects were recruited. Three specific ellipsoids and polytopes parameters were compared: isotropy, principal force orientation and volume. Isotropy showed that the ellipsoids and polytopes were elongated. The angle between the two ellipsoids main axis and the two polytopes remained low but increased with the elbow flexion. The FE and FP volumes increased and those of SFE and SFP decreased with the elbow flexion. The interest and limits of such models are discussed in the framework of ergonomics and rehabilitation. PMID:26214374

  10. Correlations in between EAWS and OCRA Index concerning the repetitive loads of the upper limbs in automobile manufacturing industries.

    PubMed

    Lavatelli, Ivan; Schaub, Karlheinz; Caragnano, Gabriele

    2012-01-01

    Upper limbs repetitive tasks are one of the main sources of risk for the workers of the manufacturing industries and the standards ISO 11228-3 and EN 1005-5 addressed this issue since 2007. EAWS (European Assembly Worksheet) is a 1st level ergonomic risk assessment method and it provides in its 4th section a score to measure the load level for the upper limbs based on a traffic light scheme. According to the relevant ISO/CEN standards, the OCRA Index is the preferred system to refer to in the evaluation of the biomechanical stress of hand-harm-shoulder system. This correlation study is based on a 45 workstations sample coming from the automobile manufacturing industry. According to the results, EAWS4 shows an excellent correlation with OCRA index (Spearman's rho correlation index 0.95). Being EAWS based on biometric statistical data distribution, its typical application is the process design phase, but adopting a conservative approach in the interpretation of EAWS4 score for risk mapping purposes, it provides an equivalent "reaction" pattern (countermeasures to be taken in the production phase) with respect of OCRA Index with an Odds Ratio ranging from 0.89 (OR-matched) to 1.00 (OR-conservative). PMID:22317403

  11. A delayed diagnosis that altered the professional orientation of an athlete with upper limb chronic arterial embolization

    PubMed Central

    Ioannou, Christos V.; Kafetzakis, Alexandros; Kounnos, Christos; Koukoumtzis, Dimitris; Tavlas, Emmanuel; Kostas, Theodoros

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background Vascular disorders of the upper extremity in young and physically active patients present a complex and challenging problem for the treating physician. Initial presentation may often be subtle and the consequences of misdiagnosis, delayed diagnosis or mistreatment can be severe. Case Report In this report, we discuss a case of a young woman with chronic upper limb ischemia due to an arterial thoracic outlet syndrome in whom even though symptoms persisted over a number of years during which she frequently sought medical consultation, remained undiagnosed until finally presenting with limb-threatening ischemia. Furthermore, due to this delay, the patient was forced to withdraw from her professional carrier in athletics. Conclusions A thoughtful and through approach combining the history, physical findings, and use of appropriate diagnostic aids will provide the physician and patient with the greatest opportunity for a satisfactory outcome. Furthermore, a delay in definitive treatment may not only cause health deterioration, but may also incur social, economic and occupational consequences. PMID:22207121

  12. Computational models of upper-limb motion during functional reaching tasks for application in FES-based stroke rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Chris; Exell, Tim; Meadmore, Katie; Hallewell, Emma; Hughes, Ann-Marie

    2015-06-01

    Functional electrical stimulation (FES) has been shown to be an effective approach to upper-limb stroke rehabilitation, where it is used to assist arm and shoulder motion. Model-based FES controllers have recently confirmed significant potential to improve accuracy of functional reaching tasks, but they typically require a reference trajectory to track. Few upper-limb FES control schemes embed a computational model of the task; however, this is critical to ensure the controller reinforces the intended movement with high accuracy. This paper derives computational motor control models of functional tasks that can be directly embedded in real-time FES control schemes, removing the need for a predefined reference trajectory. Dynamic models of the electrically stimulated arm are first derived, and constrained optimisation problems are formulated to encapsulate common activities of daily living. These are solved using iterative algorithms, and results are compared with kinematic data from 12 subjects and found to fit closely (mean fitting between 63.2% and 84.0%). The optimisation is performed iteratively using kinematic variables and hence can be transformed into an iterative learning control algorithm by replacing simulation signals with experimental data. The approach is therefore capable of controlling FES in real time to assist tasks in a manner corresponding to unimpaired natural movement. By ensuring that assistance is aligned with voluntary intention, the controller hence maximises the potential effectiveness of future stroke rehabilitation trials. PMID:25355246

  13. Limb segment vibration modulates spinal reflex excitability and muscle mRNA expression after spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Shuo-Hsiu; Tseng, Shih-Chiao; McHenry, Colleen L.; Littmann, Andrew E.; Suneja, Manish; Shields, Richard K.

    2012-01-01

    Objective We investigated the effect of various doses of vertical oscillation (vibration) on soleus H-reflex amplitude and post-activation depression in individuals with and without SCI. We also explored the acute effect of short-term limb vibration on skeletal muscle mRNA expression of genes associated with spinal plasticity. Methods Six healthy adults and five chronic complete SCI subjects received vibratory stimulation of their tibia over three different gravitational accelerations (0.3g, 0.6g, and 1.2g) at a fixed frequency (30 Hz). Soleus H-reflexes were measured before, during, and after vibration. Two additional chronic complete SCI subjects had soleus muscle biopsies 3 h following a single bout of vibration. Results H-reflex amplitude was depressed over 83% in both groups during vibration. This vibratory-induced inhibition lasted over 2 min in the control group, but not in the SCI group. Post-activation depression was modulated during the long-lasting vibratory inhibition. A single bout of mechanical oscillation altered mRNA expression from selected genes associated with synaptic plasticity. Conclusions Vibration of the lower leg inhibits the H-reflex amplitude, influences post-activation depression, and alters skeletal muscle mRNA expression of genes associated with synaptic plasticity. Significance Limb segment vibration may offer a long term method to reduce spinal reflex excitability after SCI. PMID:21963319

  14. Neck proprioceptors contribute to the modulation of muscle sympathetic nerve activity to the lower limbs of humans.

    PubMed

    Bolton, P S; Hammam, E; Macefield, V G

    2014-07-01

    Several different strategies have now been used to demonstrate that the vestibular system can modulate muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) in humans and thereby contribute to the regulation of blood pressure during changes in posture. However, it remains to be determined how the brain differentiates between head-only movements that do not require changes in vasomotor tone in the lower limbs from body movements that do require vasomotor changes. We tested the hypothesis that neck movements modulate MSNA in the lower limbs of humans. MSNA was recorded in 10 supine young adult subjects, at rest, during sinusoidal stretching of neck muscles (100 cycles, 35° peak to peak at 0.37 ± 0.02 Hz) and during a ramp-and-hold (17.5° for 54 ± 9 s) static neck muscle stretch, while their heads were held fixed in space. Cross-correlation analysis revealed cyclical modulation of MSNA during sinusoidal neck muscle stretch (modulation index 45.4 ± 5.3 %), which was significantly less than the cardiac modulation of MSNA at rest (78.7 ± 4.2 %). Interestingly, cardiac modulation decreased significantly during sinusoidal neck displacement (63.0 ± 9.3 %). By contrast, there was no significant difference in MSNA activity during static ramp-and-hold displacements of the neck to the right or left compared with that with the head and neck aligned. These data suggest that dynamic, but not static, neck movements can modulate MSNA, presumably via projections of muscle spindle afferents to the vestibular nuclei, and may thus contribute to the regulation of blood pressure during orthostatic challenges. PMID:24691758

  15. Body Structures and Physical Complaints in Upper Limb Reduction Deficiency: A 24-Year Follow-Up Study

    PubMed Central

    Postema, Sietke G.; van der Sluis, Corry K.; Waldenlöv, Kristina; Norling Hermansson, Liselotte M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To describe upper body structures associated with upper limb reduction deficiency and the development of these structures over time, to examine the presence of physical complaints in this population, and to compare body structures and complaints between groups based on prosthesis use. Design Prospective cohort study with a follow-up period of 24 years, with matched able-bodied controls. Subjects Twenty-eight patients with unilateral below-elbow reduction deficiency fitted with myoelectric prostheses, aged 8–18 years at inclusion. Method Measurements of upper arm, trunk and spine were performed and study-specific questionnaires were answered at baseline and follow-up; the Brief Pain Inventory and the Quick Disability of Arm, Shoulder, and Hand questionnaires were answered at follow-up. Results Both at baseline and follow-up, within-subjects differences in structures of the arm and trunk were shown in patients but not in controls. Spinal deviations, although small, were greater in patients compared to controls. Self-reported disability was higher in patients compared to controls. Differences in back pain and effect of prostheses use could not be shown. Conclusions Patients with unilateral below-elbow reduction deficiency have consistent differences in upper body structures. Deviations of the spine, probably of functional origin, do not progress to clinically relevant scoliosis. PMID:23226218

  16. Gender-specific adaptations of upper trapezius muscle activity to acute nociceptive stimulation.

    PubMed

    Falla, Deborah; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Farina, Dario

    2008-08-15

    This study examined gender differences in the effect of experimental muscle pain on changes in the relative activation of regions of the upper trapezius muscle during a sustained contraction. Surface electromyographic (EMG) signals were recorded from multiple locations over the upper trapezius muscle with a 10 x 5 grid of electrodes from nine women and nine men during 90 degrees shoulder abduction sustained for 60s. Measurements were performed before and after the injection of 0.4 ml hypertonic (painful) and isotonic (control) saline into the cranial region of the upper trapezius muscle. The EMG root mean square (RMS) was computed for each location of the grid to form a map of the EMG amplitude distribution. The peak pain intensity following the injection of hypertonic saline was greater for women (numerical rating scale 0-10: women 6.0+/-2.1, men 4.2+/-0.9; P<0.01). For both genders, upper trapezius RMS averaged across the grid decreased following the injection of hypertonic saline (P<0.0001). Moreover, there was a relatively larger pain-induced decrease in RMS in the cranial region compared to the caudal region of the muscle for both genders. During the non-painful sustained contractions, the EMG RMS progressively increased more in the cranial than the caudal region, for both men and women, due to fatigue. This mechanism was maintained in men but not in women during the painful condition. The results demonstrate that muscle pain alters the normal adaptation of upper trapezius muscle activity to fatigue in women but not in men. PMID:18485595

  17. Kinematic Analysis of the Upper Limb Motor Strategies in Stroke Patients as a Tool towards Advanced Neurorehabilitation Strategies: A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Simbolotti, Chiara

    2014-01-01

    Advanced rehabilitation strategies of the upper limb in stroke patients focus on the recovery of the most important daily activities. In this study we analyzed quantitatively and qualitatively the motor strategies employed by stroke patients when reaching and drinking from a glass. We enrolled 6 hemiparetic poststroke patients and 6 healthy subjects. Motion analysis of the task proposed (reaching for the glass, bringing it to the mouth, and putting it back on the table) with the affected limb was performed. Clinical assessment using the Fugl-Meyer Assessment for Upper Extremity was also included. During the reaching for the glass the patients showed a reduced arm elongation and trunk axial rotation due to motor deficit. For this reason, as observed, they carried out compensatory strategies which included trunk forward displacement and head movements. These preliminary data should be considered to address rehabilitation treatment. Moreover, the kinematic analysis protocol developed might represent an outcome measure of upper limb rehabilitation processes. PMID:24868536

  18. Differences in Force-velocity Characteristics of Upper and Lower Limbs of Non-competitive Male Boxers

    PubMed Central

    GIOVANI, DANAI; NIKOLAIDIS, PANTELIS THEODOROS

    2012-01-01

    Despite the increasing popularity of boxing, only a few studies have been conducted on the physiology or the biomechanics of this sport. The aim of the present study is to examine the ratios of mechanical characteristics (maximal anaerobic power, Pmax, theoretical maximal force, F0, and velocity, v0) between upper and lower limbs of male boxers. Twelve male caucasians, all members of a local fitness club, aged 29.5 (3.2) yr [mean (standard deviation)], stature 1.74 (.05) m, body mass 77.9 (8.1) kg, body fat 22.4 (3.9) % and somatotype 5.5-5.5-1.1, performed a force-velocity (F-v) test for both legs and arms. The F-v test included five supramaximal pedal sprints, each lasting 7 sec, against incremental braking force of 20–60 N for arms and 30–70 N for legs, on modified arm-cranking and on cycle ergometer (Ergomedics 874, Monark, Sweden). The legs had higher Pmax (910 W vs. 445 W, t11=22.9, p<.001), Pmax expressed in relative to body mass values (rPmax, 11.8 W·kg−1 vs. 5.8 W·kg−1, t11=20.6, p<.001), F0 (168 N vs. 102 N, t11=21.7, p<.001), v0 (217 rpm vs. 177 rpm, t11=46.6, p<.001) and lower v0/F0 (1.33 rpm·N−1 vs. 1.82 rpm·N−1, t11=15.3, p<.001) than the arms. Pmax of upper limbs was associated with Pmax of lower limbs (r=.70, p<.05) and their ratio was .49 (.06). The respective values of rPmax was r=.76 (p<.01), F0, r=.35 (p=.26) and .61 (.13), and of velocity, v0, r=.17 (p=.59) and .812 (.10). In spite of moderate associations between upper and lower limbs’ F0 and v0, a stronger relationship was found with regard to Pmax. These findings emphasize the need for separate evaluation of arms’ and legs’ F-v characteristics on a regular basis and the consideration of these measures in training design.

  19. [The application of the concise exposure index to repetitive movement tasks of the upper limbs in various production settings: preliminary experience and validation].

    PubMed

    Colombini, D; Occhipinti, E

    1996-01-01

    A summary of eight investigations is presented, which were carried out using standardised methods, for the purpose of quantifying exposure to tasks involving repetitive movements of the upper limbs, as well as quantifying the prevalence of Work Related Musculo Skeletal Disorders of the upper limbs in groups of exposed workers. A total of 462 exposed workers were examined, and the study also took into account the data pertaining to a matched control group comprising 749 workers not exposed to any specific occupational risk. Regarding the quantification of exposure to increased risk, use was made of a Concise Index (OCRA), proposed by the Authors in a previous publication. The data resulting from the eight investigations were used for the study of measurements and models of association among the exposure variables (mainly represented by the OCRA index), as well as the effect variables represented by the prevalence of the various WMSDs of the upper limbs taken both individually and jointly. Significant associations were reported between the OCRA index and an effect indicator represented by the prevalence of all the WSMDs of the upper limbs, calculated on the number of upper limbs at risk. When a logarithmic conversion of the relative exposure (OCRA) and injury indices was carried out, a simple linear regression model resulted which seems to provide a satisfactory predictive performance of the risk of WMSDs of the upper limbs, based on the exposure index. The study confirmed the efficacy of various other models designed to predict effects based on multiple linear regression functions, in which the independent variables are represented by both the OCRA exposure index and by parameters relative to the breakdown by sex and age of the groups of exposed workers. PMID:9148127

  20. Comparison between upper and lower limb lengthening in patients with achondroplasia: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Kim, S-J; Agashe, M V; Song, S-H; Choi, H-J; Lee, H; Song, H-R

    2012-01-01

    Lengthening of the humerus is now an established technique. We compared the complications of humeral lengthening with those of femoral lengthening and investigated whether or not the callus formation in the humerus proceeds at a higher rate than that in the femur. A total of 24 humeral and 24 femoral lengthenings were performed on 12 patients with achondroplasia. We measured the pixel value ratio (PVR) of the lengthened area on radiographs and each radiograph was analysed for the shape, type and density of the callus. The quality of life (QOL) of the patients after humeral lengthening was compared with that prior to surgery. The complication rate per segment of humerus and femur was 0.87% and 1.37%, respectively. In the humerus the PVR was significantly higher than that of the femur. Lower limbs were associated with an increased inc