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Sample records for upstream start codons

  1. Fusion activity of African henipavirus F proteins with a naturally occurring start codon directly upstream of the signal peptide.

    PubMed

    Weis, Michael; Behner, Laura; Binger, Tabea; Drexler, Jan Felix; Drosten, Christian; Maisner, Andrea

    2015-04-01

    Compared to the fusion proteins of pathogenic Nipah and Hendra viruses, the F protein of prototype African henipavirus GH-M74a displays a drastically reduced surface expression and fusion activity. A probable reason for limited F expression is the unusually long sequence located between the gene start and the signal peptide (SP) not present in other henipaviruses. Such a long pre-SP extension can prevent efficient ER translocation or protein maturation and processing. As its truncation can therefore enhance surface expression, the recent identification of a second in-frame start codon directly upstream of the SP in another African henipavirus F gene (GH-UP28) raised the question if such a naturally occurring minor sequence variation can lead to the synthesis of a pre-SP truncated translation product, thereby increasing the production of mature F proteins. To test this, we analyzed surface expression and biological activity of F genes carrying the second SP-proximal start codon of GH-UP28. Though we observed minor differences in the expression levels, introduction of the additional start codon did not result in an increased fusion activity, even if combined with further mutations in the pre-SP region. Thus, limited bioactivity of African henipavirus F protein is maintained even after sequence changes that alter the gene start allowing the production of F proteins without an unusually long pre-SP. PMID:25725148

  2. Translation initiation in Drosophila melanogaster is reduced by mutations upstream of the AUG initiator codon

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Yue; Gunter, L.E.; Organ, E.L.; Cavener, D.R. )

    1991-04-01

    The importance to in vivo translation of sequences immediately upstream of the Drosophila alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) start codon was examined at two developmental stages. Mutations were introduced into the Adh gene in vitro, and the mutant gene was inserted into the genome via germ line transformation. An A-to-T substitution at the [minus]3 position did not affect relative translation of ADH at the adult stage. A second mutant gene, containing five mutations in the region [minus]1 to [minus]9, was designed to completely block translation initiation. However, transformant lines bearing these mutations still exhibit detectable ADH, albeit at substantially reduced levels. The average fold reduction at the second-instar larval stage was 5.9, while at the adult stage a 12.5-fold reduction was observed.

  3. Regulation of translation by upstream translation initiation codons of surfactant protein A1 splice variants

    PubMed Central

    Tsotakos, Nikolaos; Silveyra, Patricia; Lin, Zhenwu; Thomas, Neal; Vaid, Mudit

    2014-01-01

    Surfactant protein A (SP-A), a molecule with roles in lung innate immunity and surfactant-related functions, is encoded by two genes in humans: SFTPA1 (SP-A1) and SFTPA2 (SP-A2). The mRNAs from these genes differ in their 5′-untranslated regions (5′-UTR) due to differential splicing. The 5′-UTR variant ACD′ is exclusively found in transcripts of SP-A1, but not in those of SP-A2. Its unique exon C contains two upstream AUG codons (uAUGs) that may affect SP-A1 translation efficiency. The first uAUG (u1) is in frame with the primary start codon (p), but the second one (u2) is not. The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of uAUGs on SP-A1 expression. We employed RT-qPCR to determine the presence of exon C-containing SP-A1 transcripts in human RNA samples. We also used in vitro techniques including mutagenesis, reporter assays, and toeprinting analysis, as well as in silico analyses to determine the role of uAUGs. Exon C-containing mRNA is present in most human lung tissue samples and its expression can, under certain conditions, be regulated by factors such as dexamethasone or endotoxin. Mutating uAUGs resulted in increased luciferase activity. The mature protein size was not affected by the uAUGs, as shown by a combination of toeprint and in silico analysis for Kozak sequence, secondary structure, and signal peptide and in vitro translation in the presence of microsomes. In conclusion, alternative splicing may introduce uAUGs in SP-A1 transcripts, which in turn negatively affect SP-A1 translation, possibly affecting SP-A1/SP-A2 ratio, with potential for clinical implication. PMID:25326576

  4. DHX29 reduces leaky scanning through an upstream AUG codon regardless of its nucleotide context

    PubMed Central

    Pisareva, Vera P.; Pisarev, Andrey V.

    2016-01-01

    During eukaryotic translation initiation, the 43S preinitiation complex (43S PIC), consisting of the 40S ribosomal subunit, eukaryotic initiation factors (eIFs) and initiator tRNA scans mRNA to find an appropriate start codon. Key roles in the accuracy of initiation codon selection belong to eIF1 and eIF1A, whereas the mammalian-specific DHX29 helicase substantially contributes to ribosomal scanning of structured mRNAs. Here, we show that DHX29 stimulates the recognition of the AUG codon but not the near-cognate CUG codon regardless of its nucleotide context during ribosomal scanning. The stimulatory effect depends on the contact between DHX29 and eIF1A. The unique DHX29 N-terminal domain binds to the ribosomal site near the mRNA entrance, where it contacts the eIF1A OB domain. UV crosslinking assays revealed that DHX29 may rearrange eIF1A and eIF2α in key nucleotide context positions of ribosomal complexes. Interestingly, DHX29 impedes the 48S initiation complex formation in the absence of eIF1A perhaps due to forming a physical barrier that prevents the 43S PIC from loading onto mRNA. Mutational analysis allowed us to split the mRNA unwinding and codon selection activities of DHX29. Thus, DHX29 is another example of an initiation factor contributing to start codon selection. PMID:27067542

  5. DHX29 reduces leaky scanning through an upstream AUG codon regardless of its nucleotide context.

    PubMed

    Pisareva, Vera P; Pisarev, Andrey V

    2016-05-19

    During eukaryotic translation initiation, the 43S preinitiation complex (43S PIC), consisting of the 40S ribosomal subunit, eukaryotic initiation factors (eIFs) and initiator tRNA scans mRNA to find an appropriate start codon. Key roles in the accuracy of initiation codon selection belong to eIF1 and eIF1A, whereas the mammalian-specific DHX29 helicase substantially contributes to ribosomal scanning of structured mRNAs. Here, we show that DHX29 stimulates the recognition of the AUG codon but not the near-cognate CUG codon regardless of its nucleotide context during ribosomal scanning. The stimulatory effect depends on the contact between DHX29 and eIF1A. The unique DHX29 N-terminal domain binds to the ribosomal site near the mRNA entrance, where it contacts the eIF1A OB domain. UV crosslinking assays revealed that DHX29 may rearrange eIF1A and eIF2α in key nucleotide context positions of ribosomal complexes. Interestingly, DHX29 impedes the 48S initiation complex formation in the absence of eIF1A perhaps due to forming a physical barrier that prevents the 43S PIC from loading onto mRNA. Mutational analysis allowed us to split the mRNA unwinding and codon selection activities of DHX29. Thus, DHX29 is another example of an initiation factor contributing to start codon selection. PMID:27067542

  6. The Stringency of Start Codon Selection in the Filamentous Fungus Neurospora crassa*

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Jiajie; Zhang, Ying; Ivanov, Ivaylo P.; Sachs, Matthew S.

    2013-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells initiation may occur from near-cognate codons that differ from AUG by a single nucleotide. The stringency of start codon selection impacts the efficiency of initiation at near-cognate codons and the efficiency of initiation at AUG codons in different contexts. We used a codon-optimized firefly luciferase reporter initiated with AUG or each of the nine near-cognate codons in preferred context to examine the stringency of start codon selection in the model filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa. In vivo results indicated that the hierarchy of initiation at start codons in N. crassa (AUG ≫ CUG > GUG > ACG > AUA ≈ UUG > AUU > AUC) is similar to that in human cells. Similar results were obtained by translating mRNAs in a homologous N. crassa in vitro translation system or in rabbit reticulocyte lysate. We next examined the efficiency of initiation at AUG, CUG, and UUG codons in different contexts in vitro. The preferred context was more important for efficient initiation from near-cognate codons than from AUG. These studies demonstrated that near-cognate codons are used for initiation in N. crassa. Such events could provide additional coding capacity or have regulatory functions. Analyses of the 5′-leader regions in the N. crassa transcriptome revealed examples of highly conserved near-cognate codons in preferred contexts that could extend the N termini of the predicted polypeptides. PMID:23396971

  7. A non-canonical start codon in the Drosophila fragile X gene yields two functional isoforms.

    PubMed

    Beerman, R W; Jongens, T A

    2011-05-01

    Fragile X syndrome is caused by the loss of expression of the fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP). As a RNA binding protein, FMRP functions in translational regulation, localization, and stability of its neuronal target transcripts. The Drosophila homologue, dFMR1, is well conserved in sequence and function with respect to human FMRP. Although dFMR1 is known to express two main isoforms, the mechanism behind production of the second, more slowly migrating isoform has remained elusive. Furthermore, it remains unknown whether the two isoforms may also contribute differentially to dFMR1 function. We have found that this second dFMR1 isoform is generated through an alternative translational start site in the dfmr1 5'UTR. This 5'UTR coding sequence is well conserved in the melanogaster group. Translation of the predominant, smaller form of dFMR1 (dFMR1-S(N)) begins at a canonical start codon (ATG), whereas translation of the minor, larger form (dFMR1-L(N)) begins upstream at a non-canonical start codon (CTG). To assess the contribution of the N-terminal extension toward dFMR1 activity, we generated transgenic flies that exclusively express either dFMR1-S(N) or dFMR1-L(N). Expression analyses throughout development revealed that dFMR1-S(N) is required for normal dFMR1-L(N) expression levels in adult brains. In situ expression analyses showed that either dFMR1-S(N) or dFMR1-L(N) is individually sufficient for proper dFMR1 localization in the nervous system. Functional studies demonstrated that both dFMR1-S(N) and dFMR1-L(N) can function independently to rescue dfmr1 null defects in synaptogenesis and axon guidance. Thus, dfmr1 encodes two functional isoforms with respect to expression and activity throughout neuronal development. PMID:21333716

  8. Molecular Mechanism of Scanning and Start Codon Selection in Eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Hinnebusch, Alan G.

    2011-01-01

    Summary: The correct translation of mRNA depends critically on the ability to initiate at the right AUG codon. For most mRNAs in eukaryotic cells, this is accomplished by the scanning mechanism, wherein the small (40S) ribosomal subunit attaches to the 5′ end of the mRNA and then inspects the leader base by base for an AUG in a suitable context, using complementarity with the anticodon of methionyl initiator tRNA (Met-tRNAiMet) as the key means of identifying AUG. Over the past decade, a combination of yeast genetics, biochemical analysis in reconstituted systems, and structural biology has enabled great progress in deciphering the mechanism of ribosomal scanning. A robust molecular model now exists, describing the roles of initiation factors, notably eukaryotic initiation factor 1 (eIF1) and eIF1A, in stabilizing an “open” conformation of the 40S subunit with Met-tRNAiMet bound in a low-affinity state conducive to scanning and in triggering rearrangement into a “closed” conformation incompatible with scanning, which features Met-tRNAiMet more tightly bound to the “P” site and base paired with AUG. It has also emerged that multiple DEAD-box RNA helicases participate in producing a single-stranded “landing pad” for the 40S subunit and in removing the secondary structure to enable the mRNA to traverse the 40S mRNA-binding channel in the single-stranded form for base-by-base inspection in the P site. PMID:21885680

  9. The NEMO Mutation Creating the Most-Upstream Premature Stop Codon Is Hypomorphic Because of a Reinitiation of Translation

    PubMed Central

    Puel, Anne; Reichenbach, Janine; Bustamante, Jacinta; Ku, Cheng-Lung; Feinberg, Jacqueline; Döffinger, Rainer; Bonnet, Marion; Filipe-Santos, Orchidée; Beaucoudrey, Ludovic de; Durandy, Anne; Horneff, Gerd; Novelli, Francesco; Wahn, Volker; Smahi, Asma; Israel, Alain; Niehues, Tim; Casanova, Jean-Laurent

    2006-01-01

    Amorphic mutations in the NF-κB essential modulator (NEMO) cause X-dominant incontinentia pigmenti, which is lethal in males in utero, whereas hypomorphic mutations cause X-recessive anhidrotic ectodermal dysplasia with immunodeficiency, a complex developmental disorder and life-threatening primary immunodeficiency. We characterized the NEMO mutation 110_111insC, which creates the most-upstream premature translation termination codon (at codon position 49) of any known NEMO mutation. Surprisingly, this mutation is associated with a pure immunodeficiency. We solve this paradox by showing that a Kozakian methionine codon located immediately downstream from the insertion allows the reinitiation of translation. The residual production of an NH2-truncated NEMO protein was sufficient for normal fetal development and for the subsequent normal development of skin appendages but was insufficient for the development of protective immune responses. PMID:16532398

  10. The Effect of an Alternate Start Codon on Heterologous Expression of a PhoA Fusion Protein in Mycoplasma gallisepticum.

    PubMed

    Panicker, Indu S; Browning, Glenn F; Markham, Philip F

    2015-01-01

    While the genomes of many Mycoplasma species have been sequenced, there are no collated data on translational start codon usage, and the effects of alternate start codons on gene expression have not been studied. Analysis of the annotated genomes found that ATG was the most prevalent translational start codon among Mycoplasma spp. However in Mycoplasma gallisepticum a GTG start codon is commonly used in the vlhA multigene family, which encodes a highly abundant, phase variable lipoprotein adhesin. Therefore, the effect of this alternate start codon on expression of a reporter PhoA lipoprotein was examined in M. gallisepticum. Mutation of the start codon from ATG to GTG resulted in a 2.5 fold reduction in the level of transcription of the phoA reporter, but the level of PhoA activity in the transformants containing phoA with a GTG start codon was only 63% of that of the transformants with a phoA with an ATG start codon, suggesting that GTG was a more efficient translational initiation codon. The effect of swapping the translational start codon in phoA reporter gene expression was less in M. gallisepticum than has been seen previously in Escherichia coli or Bacillus subtilis, suggesting the process of translational initiation in mycoplasmas may have some significant differences from those used in other bacteria. This is the first study of translational start codon usage in mycoplasmas and the impact of the use of an alternate start codon on expression in these bacteria. PMID:26010086

  11. The Effect of an Alternate Start Codon on Heterologous Expression of a PhoA Fusion Protein in Mycoplasma gallisepticum

    PubMed Central

    Panicker, Indu S.; Browning, Glenn F.; Markham, Philip F.

    2015-01-01

    While the genomes of many Mycoplasma species have been sequenced, there are no collated data on translational start codon usage, and the effects of alternate start codons on gene expression have not been studied. Analysis of the annotated genomes found that ATG was the most prevalent translational start codon among Mycoplasma spp. However in Mycoplasma gallisepticum a GTG start codon is commonly used in the vlhA multigene family, which encodes a highly abundant, phase variable lipoprotein adhesin. Therefore, the effect of this alternate start codon on expression of a reporter PhoA lipoprotein was examined in M. gallisepticum. Mutation of the start codon from ATG to GTG resulted in a 2.5 fold reduction in the level of transcription of the phoA reporter, but the level of PhoA activity in the transformants containing phoA with a GTG start codon was only 63% of that of the transformants with a phoA with an ATG start codon, suggesting that GTG was a more efficient translational initiation codon. The effect of swapping the translational start codon in phoA reporter gene expression was less in M. gallisepticum than has been seen previously in Escherichia coli or Bacillus subtilis, suggesting the process of translational initiation in mycoplasmas may have some significant differences from those used in other bacteria. This is the first study of translational start codon usage in mycoplasmas and the impact of the use of an alternate start codon on expression in these bacteria. PMID:26010086

  12. Genetic analysis of diversity within a Chinese local sugarcane germplasm based on start codon targeted polymorphism

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In-depth information on sugarcane germplasm is the basis for its conservation and utilization. Data on sugarcane molecular markers are limited for the Chinese sugarcane germplasm collections. In the present study, 20 start codon targeted (SCoT) marker primers were designed to assess the genetic dive...

  13. Genetic diversity of mango cultivars estimated using Start Codon Targeted (SCoT) markers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Diversity and genetic relationships among 23 mango germplasm accessions, collected from different locations in Guangxi province in China, were analyzed by using a novel and simple gene targeted DNA marker: Start Codon Targeted (SCoT) markers. This technique uses a single, 18-mer primer PCR amplifica...

  14. Structural Changes Enable Start Codon Recognition by the Eukaryotic Translation Initiation Complex

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Tanweer; Llácer, Jose L.; Fernández, Israel S.; Munoz, Antonio; Martin-Marcos, Pilar; Savva, Christos G.; Lorsch, Jon R.; Hinnebusch, Alan G.; Ramakrishnan, V.

    2014-01-01

    Summary During eukaryotic translation initiation, initiator tRNA does not insert fully into the P decoding site on the 40S ribosomal subunit. This conformation (POUT) is compatible with scanning mRNA for the AUG start codon. Base pairing with AUG is thought to promote isomerization to a more stable conformation (PIN) that arrests scanning and promotes dissociation of eIF1 from the 40S subunit. Here, we present a cryoEM reconstruction of a yeast preinitiation complex at 4.0 Å resolution with initiator tRNA in the PIN state, prior to eIF1 release. The structure reveals stabilization of the codon-anticodon duplex by the N-terminal tail of eIF1A, changes in the structure of eIF1 likely instrumental in its subsequent release, and changes in the conformation of eIF2. The mRNA traverses the entire mRNA cleft and makes connections to the regulatory domain of eIF2α, eIF1A, and ribosomal elements that allow recognition of context nucleotides surrounding the AUG codon. PMID:25417110

  15. Start/stop codon like trinucleotides extensions in primate alpha satellites.

    PubMed

    Rosandić, Marija; Glunčić, Matko; Paar, Vladimir

    2013-01-21

    The centromeres remain "the final frontier" in unexplored segments of genome landscape in primate genomes, characterized by 2-5 Mb arrays of evolutionary rapidly evolving alpha satellite (AS) higher order repeats (HORs). Alpha satellites as specific noncoding sequences may be also significant in light of regulatory role of noncoding sequences. Using the Global Repeat Map (GRM) algorithm we identify in NCBI assemblies of chromosome 5 the species-specific alpha satellite HORs: 13mer in human, 5mer in chimpanzee, 14mer in orangutan and 3mers in macaque. The suprachromosomal family (SF) classification of alpha satellite HORs and surrounding monomeric alpha satellites is performed and specific segmental structure was found for major alpha satellite arrays in chromosome 5 of primates. In the framework of our novel concept of start/stop Codon Like Trinucleotides (CLTs) as a "new DNA language in noncoding sequences", we find characteristics and differences of these species in CLT extensions, in particular the extensions of stop-TGA CLT. We hypothesize that these are regulators in noncoding sequences, acting at a distance, and that they can amplify or weaken the activity of start/stop codons in coding sequences in protein genesis, increasing the richness of regulatory phenomena. PMID:23026763

  16. Effect of the nucleotides surrounding the start codon on the translation of foot-and-mouth disease virus RNA.

    PubMed

    Ma, X X; Feng, Y P; Gu, Y X; Zhou, J H; Ma, Z R

    2016-06-01

    As for the alternative AUGs in foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV), nucleotide bias of the context flanking the AUG(2nd) could be used as a strong signal to initiate translation. To determine the role of the specific nucleotide context, dicistronic reporter constructs were engineered to contain different versions of nucleotide context linking between internal ribosome entry site (IRES) and downstream gene. The results indicate that under FMDV IRES-dependent mechanism, the nucleotide contexts flanking start codon can influence the translation initiation efficiencies. The most optimal sequences for both start codons have proved to be UUU AUG(1st) AAC and AAG AUG(2nd) GAA. PMID:27265464

  17. A start codon mutation of the FRMD7 gene in two Korean families with idiopathic infantile nystagmus

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jae-Hwan; Shin, Jin-Hong; Seo, Je Hyun; Jung, Jae-Ho; Choi, Kwang-Dong

    2015-01-01

    Idiopathic infantile nystagmus (IIN) is the involuntary oscillation of the eyes with onset in the first few months of life. The most common form of inheritance is X-linked, and mutations in FRMD7 gene are a major cause. To identify the FRMD7 gene mutations associated with X-linked IIN, we performed PCR-based DNA direct sequencing in 4 affected subjects from 2 Korean families. We also assessed structural abnormalities of retina and optic nerve head using optical coherence tomography (OCT). Genetic analysis revealed a A>G transversion at nucleotide c.1, the first base of the start codon. This mutation leads to the loss of the primary start codon ATG for methionine, which is replaced by a triplet GTG for valine. The alternative in-frame start codon is not present around a mutation. OCT revealed the morphological changes within the optic nerve head, including shallow cup depth and small cup-to-disc ratio. In summary, we identified a novel start codon mutation within the FRMD7 gene of 2 Korean families. Our data expands the mutation spectrum of FRMD7 causing IIN. We also demonstrated abnormal developments of afferent system in patients with FRMD7 mutations using OCT, which may help to understand the etiological factor in development of nystagmus. PMID:26268155

  18. Crystal structure of the HCV IRES central domain reveals strategy for start-codon positioning.

    PubMed

    Berry, Katherine E; Waghray, Shruti; Mortimer, Stefanie A; Bai, Yun; Doudna, Jennifer A

    2011-10-12

    Translation of hepatitis C viral proteins requires an internal ribosome entry site (IRES) located in the 5' untranslated region of the viral mRNA. The core domain of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) IRES contains a four-way helical junction that is integrated within a predicted pseudoknot. This domain is required for positioning the mRNA start codon correctly on the 40S ribosomal subunit during translation initiation. Here, we present the crystal structure of this RNA, revealing a complex double-pseudoknot fold that establishes the alignment of two helical elements on either side of the four-helix junction. The conformation of this core domain constrains the open reading frame's orientation for positioning on the 40S ribosomal subunit. This structure, representing the last major domain of HCV-like IRESs to be determined at near-atomic resolution, provides the basis for a comprehensive cryoelectron microscopy-guided model of the intact HCV IRES and its interaction with 40S ribosomal subunits. PMID:22000514

  19. Alternative Start Codon Connects eIF5A to Mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Karina Danielle; Tamborlin, Letícia; Meneguello, Letícia; de Proença, André Ricardo Gomes; Almeida, Isadora Cristina de Paula Andrade; Lourenço, Rogério Ferreira; Luchessi, Augusto Ducati

    2016-12-01

    Eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5A (eIF5A), a protein containing the amino acid residue hypusine required for its activity, is involved in a number of physiological and pathological cellular processes. In humans, several EIF5A1 transcript variants encode the canonical eIF5A1 isoform B, whereas the hitherto uncharacterized variant A is expected to code for a hypothetical eIF5A1 isoform, referred to as isoform A, which has an additional N-terminal extension. Herein, we validate the existence of eIF5A1 isoform A and its production from transcript variant A. In fact, variant A was shown to encode both eIF5A1 isoforms A and B. Mutagenic assays revealed different efficiencies in the start codons present in variant A, contributing to the production of isoform B at higher levels than isoform A. Immunoblotting and mass spectrometric analyses showed that isoform A can undergo hypusination and acetylation at specific lysine residues, as observed for isoform B. Examination of the N-terminal extension suggested that it might confer mitochondrial targeting. Correspondingly, we found that isoform A, but not isoform B, co-purified with mitochondria when the proteins were overproduced. These findings suggest that eIF5A1 isoform A has a role in mitochondrial function. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2682-2689, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27414022

  20. A novel start codon mutation of the MERTK gene in a patient with retinitis pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Jinda, Worapoj; Poungvarin, Naravat; Taylor, Todd D.; Suzuki, Yutaka; Thongnoppakhun, Wanna; Limwongse, Chanin; Lertrit, Patcharee; Suriyaphol, Prapat

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of inherited retinal degenerations characterized by progressive loss of photoreceptor cells and RPE functions. More than 70 causative genes are known to be responsible for RP. This study aimed to identify the causative gene in a patient from a consanguineous family with childhood-onset severe retinal dystrophy. Methods To identify the defective gene, whole exome sequencing was performed. Candidate causative variants were selected and validated using Sanger sequencing. Segregation analysis of the causative gene was performed in additional family members. To verify that the mutation has an effect on protein synthesis, an expression vector containing the first ten amino acids of the mutant protein fused with the DsRed2 fluorescent protein was constructed and transfected into HEK293T cells. Expression of the fusion protein in the transfected cells was measured using fluorescence microscopy. Results By filtering against public variant databases, a novel homozygous missense mutation (c.3G>A) localized in the start codon of the MERTK gene was detected as a potentially pathogenic mutation for autosomal recessive RP. The c.3G>A mutation cosegregated with the disease phenotype in the family. No expression of the first ten amino acids of the MerTK mutant fused with the DsRed2 fluorescent protein was detected in HEK293T cells, indicating that the mutation affects the translation initiation site of the gene that may lead to loss of function of the MerTK signaling pathway. Conclusions We report a novel missense mutation (c.3G>A, p.0?) in the MERTK gene that causes severe vision impairment in a patient. Taken together with previous reports, our results expand the spectrum of MERTK mutations and extend our understanding of the role of the MerTK protein in the pathogenesis of retinitis pigmentosa. PMID:27122965

  1. Should I stay or should I go? Eukaryotic translation initiation factors 1 and 1A control start codon recognition.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Sarah F; Lorsch, Jon R

    2008-10-10

    Start codon selection is a key step in translation initiation as it sets the reading frame for decoding. Two eukaryotic initiation factors, eIF1 and eIF1A, are key actors in this process. Recent work has elucidated many details of the mechanisms these factors use to control start site selection. eIF1 prevents the irreversible GTP hydrolysis that commits the ribosome to initiation at a particular codon. eIF1A both promotes and inhibits commitment through the competing influences of its two unstructured termini. Both factors perform their tasks through a variety of interactions with other components of the initiation machinery, in many cases mediated by the unstructured regions of the two proteins. PMID:18593708

  2. Translation Regulation of the Glutamyl-prolyl-tRNA Synthetase Gene EPRS through Bypass of Upstream Open Reading Frames with Noncanonical Initiation Codons.

    PubMed

    Young, Sara K; Baird, Thomas D; Wek, Ronald C

    2016-05-13

    In the integrated stress response, phosphorylation of eIF2α (eIF2α-P) reduces protein synthesis while concomitantly promoting preferential translation of specific transcripts associated with stress adaptation. Translation of the glutamyl-prolyl-tRNA synthetase gene EPRS is enhanced in response to eIF2α-P. To identify the underlying mechanism of translation control, we employed biochemical approaches to determine the regulatory features by which upstream ORFs (uORFs) direct downstream translation control and expression of the EPRS coding region. Our findings reveal that translation of two inhibitory uORFs encoded by noncanonical CUG and UUG initiation codons in the EPRS mRNA 5'-leader serve to dampen levels of translation initiation at the EPRS coding region. By a mechanism suggested to involve increased translation initiation stringency during stress-induced eIF2α-P, we observed facilitated ribosome bypass of these uORFs, allowing for increased translation of the EPRS coding region. Importantly, EPRS protein expression is enhanced through this preferential translation mechanism in response to multiple known activators of eIF2α-P and likely serves to facilitate stress adaptation in response to a variety of cellular stresses. The rules presented here for the regulated ribosome bypass of noncanonical initiation codons in the EPRS 5'-leader add complexity into the nature of uORF-mediated translation control mechanisms during eIF2α-P and additionally illustrate the roles that previously unexamined uORFs with noncanonical initiation codons can play in modulating gene expression. PMID:27002157

  3. Stress-induced Start Codon Fidelity Regulates Arsenite-inducible Regulatory Particle-associated Protein (AIRAP) Translation*

    PubMed Central

    Zach, Lolita; Braunstein, Ilana; Stanhill, Ariel

    2014-01-01

    Initial steps in protein synthesis are highly regulated processes as they define the reading frame of the translation machinery. Eukaryotic translation initiation is a process facilitated by numerous factors (eIFs), aimed to form a “scanning” mechanism toward the initiation codon. Translation initiation of the main open reading frame (ORF) in an mRNA transcript has been reported to be regulated by upstream open reading frames (uORFs) in a manner of re-initiation. This mode of regulation is governed by the phosphorylation status of eIF2α and controlled by cellular stresses. Another mode of translational initiation regulation is leaky scanning, and this regulatory process has not been extensively studied. We have identified arsenite-inducible regulatory particle-associated protein (AIRAP) transcript to be translationally induced during arsenite stress conditions. AIRAP transcript contains a single uORF in a poor-kozak context. AIRAP translation induction is governed by means of leaky scanning and not re-initiation. This induction of AIRAP is solely dependent on eIF1 and the uORF kozak context. We show that eIF1 is phosphorylated under specific conditions that induce protein misfolding and have biochemically characterized this site of phosphorylation. Our data indicate that leaky scanning like re-initiation is responsive to stress conditions and that leaky scanning can induce ORF translation by bypassing poor kozak context of a single uORF transcript. PMID:24898249

  4. Nucleotides Flanking the Start Codon in hsp70 mRNAs with Very Short 5’-UTRs Greatly Affect Gene Expression in Haloarchaea

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wenchao; Yang, Guopeng; He, Yue; Zhang, Shaoming; Chen, Haiyan; Shen, Ping; Chen, Xiangdong; Huang, Yu-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Leaderless translation is prevalent in haloarchaea, with many of these leaderless transcripts possessing short 5’-untranslated regions (UTRs) less than 10 nucleotides. Whereas, little is known about the function of this very short 5’-UTR. Our previous studies determined that just four nucleotides preceded the start codon of hsp70 mRNA in Natrinema sp. J7, with residues -3A and +4G, relative to the A of the ATG start codon, acting as the preferred bases around the start codon of all known haloarchaeal hsp70 genes. Here, we examined the effects of nucleotides flanking the start codon on gene expression. The results revealed that shortening and deletion of the short 5’-UTR enhanced transcript levels; however, it led to significant reductions in overall translational efficiency. AUG was efficiently used as start codons, in both the presence and absence of short 5’-UTRs. GUG also could initiate translation, even though it was so inefficient that it would not be detected without considerably elevated transcript. Nucleotide substitutions at position -4 to +6 were shown to affect gene expression by transcript and/or translational levels. Notably, -3A and A/U nucleotides at position +4~+6 were more optimal for gene expression. Nucleotide transversions of -3A to -3C and +4G to +4T with hsp70 promoter from either Haloferax volcanii DS70 or Halobacterium salinarum NRC-1 showed the same effects on gene expression as that of Natrinema sp. J7. Taken together, our results suggest that the nucleotides flanking the start codon in hsp70 mRNAs with very short 5’-UTRs play an important role in haloarchaeal gene expression. PMID:26379277

  5. Patterns of variation in DNA segments upstream of transcription start sites

    PubMed Central

    Labuda, Damian; Labbé, Catherine; Langlois, Sylvie; Lefebvre, Jean-Francois; Freytag, Virginie; Moreau, Claudia; Sawicki, Jakub; Beaulieu, Patrick; Pastinen, Tomi; Hudson, Thomas J; Sinnett, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    It is likely that evolutionary differences among species are driven by sequence changes in regulatory regions. Likewise, polymorphisms in the promoter regions may be responsible for interindividual differences at the level of populations. We present an unbiased survey of genetic variation in 2-kb segments upstream of the transcription start sites of 28 protein-coding genes, characterized in five population groups of different geographic origin. On average, we found 9.1 polymorphisms and 8.8 haplotypes per segment with corresponding nucleotide and haplotype diversities of 0.082% and 58%, respectively. We characterized these segments through different summary statistics, Hardy-Weinberg equilibria fixation index (Fst) estimates, and neutrality tests, as well as by analyzing the distributions of haplotype allelic classes, introduced here to assess the departure from neutrality and examined by coalescent simulations under a simple population model, assuming recombinations or different demography. Our results suggest that genetic diversity in some of these regions could have been shaped by purifying selection and driven by adaptive changes in the other, thus explaining the relatively large variance in the corresponding genetic diversity indices loci. However, some of these effects could be also due to linkage with surrounding sequences, and the neutralists' explanations cannot be ruled out given uncertainty in the underlying demographic histories and the possibility of random effects due to the small size of the studied segments. Hum Mutat 28(5), 441–450, 2007. © 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc. PMID:17274005

  6. Potential of Start Codon Targeted (SCoT) markers to estimate genetic diversity and relationships among Chinese Elymus sibiricus accessions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Junchao; Xie, Wengang; Wang, Yanrong; Zhao, Xuhong

    2015-01-01

    Elymus sibiricus as an important forage grass and gene pool for improving cereal crops, that is widely distributed in West and North China. Information on its genetic diversity and relationships is limited but necessary for germplasm collection, conservation and future breeding. Start Codon Targeted (SCoT) markers were used for studying the genetic diversity and relationships among 53 E. sibiricus accessions from its primary distribution area in China. A total of 173 bands were generated from 16 SCoT primers, 159 bands of which were polymorphic with the percentage of polymorphic bands (PPB) of 91.91%. Based upon population structure analysis five groups were formed. The cluster analysis separated the accessions into two major clusters and three sub-clusters, similar to results of principal coordinate analysis (PCoA). The molecular variance analysis (AMOVA) showed that genetic variation was greater within geographical regions (50.99%) than between them (49.01%). Furthermore, the study also suggested that collecting and evaluating E. sibiricus germplasm for major geographic regions and special environments broadens the available genetic base and illustrates the range of variation. The results of the present study showed that SCoT markers were efficient in assessing the genetic diversity among E. sibiricus accessions. PMID:25853316

  7. eIF3 Peripheral Subunits Rearrangement after mRNA Binding and Start-Codon Recognition.

    PubMed

    Simonetti, Angelita; Brito Querido, Jailson; Myasnikov, Alexander G; Mancera-Martinez, Eder; Renaud, Adeline; Kuhn, Lauriane; Hashem, Yaser

    2016-07-21

    mRNA translation initiation in eukaryotes requires the cooperation of a dozen eukaryotic initiation factors (eIFs) forming several complexes, which leads to mRNA attachment to the small ribosomal 40S subunit, mRNA scanning for start codon, and accommodation of initiator tRNA at the 40S P site. eIF3, composed of 13 subunits, 8 core (a, c, e, f, h, l, k, and m) and 5 peripheral (b, d, g, i, and j), plays a central role during this process. Here we report a cryo-electron microscopy structure of a mammalian 48S initiation complex at 5.8 Å resolution. It shows the relocation of subunits eIF3i and eIF3g to the 40S intersubunit face on the GTPase binding site, at a late stage in initiation. On the basis of a previous study, we demonstrate the relocation of eIF3b to the 40S intersubunit face, binding below the eIF2-Met-tRNAi(Met) ternary complex upon mRNA attachment. Our analysis reveals the deep rearrangement of eIF3 and unravels the molecular mechanism underlying eIF3 function in mRNA scanning and timing of ribosomal subunit joining. PMID:27373335

  8. Start codon targeted (SCoT) and target region amplification polymorphism (TRAP) for evaluating the genetic relationship of Dendrobium species.

    PubMed

    Feng, Shangguo; He, Refeng; Yang, Sai; Chen, Zhe; Jiang, Mengying; Lu, Jiangjie; Wang, Huizhong

    2015-08-10

    Two molecular marker systems, start codon targeted (SCoT) and target region amplification polymorphism (TRAP), were used for genetic relationship analysis of 36 Dendrobium species collected from China. Twenty-two selected SCoT primers produced 337 loci, of which 324 (96%) were polymorphic, whereas 13 TRAP primer combinations produced a total of 510 loci, with 500 (97.8%) of them being polymorphic. An average polymorphism information content of 0.953 and 0.983 was detected using the SCoT and TRAP primers, respectively, showing that a high degree of genetic diversity exists among Chinese Dendrobium species. The partition of clusters in the unweighted pair group method with arithmetic mean dendrogram and principal coordinate analysis plot based on the SCoT and TRAP markers was similar and clustered the 36 Dendrobium species into four main groups. Our results will provide useful information for resource protection and will also be useful to improve the current Dendrobium breeding programs. Our results also demonstrate that SCoT and TRAP markers are informative and can be used to evaluate genetic relationships between Dendrobium species. PMID:25936992

  9. The antibiotic Furvina® targets the P-site of 30S ribosomal subunits and inhibits translation initiation displaying start codon bias

    PubMed Central

    Fabbretti, Attilio; Brandi, Letizia; Petrelli, Dezemona; Pon, Cynthia L.; Castañedo, Nilo R.; Medina, Ricardo; Gualerzi, Claudio O.

    2012-01-01

    Furvina®, also denominated G1 (MW 297), is a synthetic nitrovinylfuran [2-bromo-5-(2-bromo-2-nitrovinyl)-furan] antibiotic with a broad antimicrobial spectrum. An ointment (Dermofural®) containing G1 as the only active principle is currently marketed in Cuba and successfully used to treat dermatological infections. Here we describe the molecular target and mechanism of action of G1 in bacteria and demonstrate that in vivo G1 preferentially inhibits protein synthesis over RNA, DNA and cell wall synthesis. Furthermore, we demonstrate that G1 targets the small ribosomal subunit, binds at or near the P-decoding site and inhibits its function interfering with the ribosomal binding of fMet-tRNA during 30S initiation complex (IC) formation ultimately inhibiting translation. Notably, this G1 inhibition displays a bias for the nature (purine vs. pyrimidine) of the 3′-base of the codon, occurring efficiently only when the mRNA directing 30S IC formation and translation contains the canonical AUG initiation triplet or the rarely found AUA triplet, but hardly occurs when the mRNA start codon is either one of the non-canonical triplets AUU or AUC. This codon discrimination by G1 is reminiscent, though of opposite type of that displayed by IF3 in its fidelity function, and remarkably does not occur in the absence of this factor. PMID:22941660

  10. The antibiotic Furvina® targets the P-site of 30S ribosomal subunits and inhibits translation initiation displaying start codon bias.

    PubMed

    Fabbretti, Attilio; Brandi, Letizia; Petrelli, Dezemona; Pon, Cynthia L; Castañedo, Nilo R; Medina, Ricardo; Gualerzi, Claudio O

    2012-11-01

    Furvina®, also denominated G1 (MW 297), is a synthetic nitrovinylfuran [2-bromo-5-(2-bromo-2-nitrovinyl)-furan] antibiotic with a broad antimicrobial spectrum. An ointment (Dermofural®) containing G1 as the only active principle is currently marketed in Cuba and successfully used to treat dermatological infections. Here we describe the molecular target and mechanism of action of G1 in bacteria and demonstrate that in vivo G1 preferentially inhibits protein synthesis over RNA, DNA and cell wall synthesis. Furthermore, we demonstrate that G1 targets the small ribosomal subunit, binds at or near the P-decoding site and inhibits its function interfering with the ribosomal binding of fMet-tRNA during 30S initiation complex (IC) formation ultimately inhibiting translation. Notably, this G1 inhibition displays a bias for the nature (purine vs. pyrimidine) of the 3'-base of the codon, occurring efficiently only when the mRNA directing 30S IC formation and translation contains the canonical AUG initiation triplet or the rarely found AUA triplet, but hardly occurs when the mRNA start codon is either one of the non-canonical triplets AUU or AUC. This codon discrimination by G1 is reminiscent, though of opposite type of that displayed by IF3 in its fidelity function, and remarkably does not occur in the absence of this factor. PMID:22941660

  11. A mutation of the start codon in the X region of hepatitis B virus DNA in a patient with non-B, non-C chronic hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Fujise, Kiyotaka; Tatsuzawa, Keiko; Kono, Midori; Hoshina, Sadayori; Tsubota, Akihito; Niiya, Minoru; Namiki, Yoshihisa; Tada, Norio; Tajiri, Hisao

    2011-02-27

    There are cases of hepatitis involving occult hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection in which, even though the HB surface antigen (HBsAg) is negative, HBV-DNA is detected by a polymerase chain reaction (PCR). We conducted a sequence analysis of the entire HBV region in a case of non-B non-C chronic hepatitis in a 46-year-old female. A diagnosis of non-B non-C chronic hepatitis was made. Although HBV markers, such as HBs antibody (anti-HBs), anti-HBc, HBeAg and anti-HBe, were negative, HBV-DNA was positive. Nested PCR was performed to amplify the precore region of HBV-DNA and all remaining regions by long nested PCR. Sequence analysis of the two obtained bands was conducted by direct sequencing. Compared with the control strains, the ATG (Methionine) start codon in the X region had mutated to GTG (Valine). It is assumed that a mutation at the start codon in the X region may be the reason why HBV markers are negative in some cases of hepatitis that involve occult HBV infection. PMID:21423595

  12. Consequences of germline variation disrupting the constitutional translational initiation codon start sites of MLH1 and BRCA2: use of potential alternative start sites and implications for predicting variant pathogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Parsons, Michael T.; Whiley, Phillip J.; Beesley, Jonathan; Drost, Mark; de Wind, Niels; Thompson, Bryony A.; Marquart, Louise; Hopper, John L.; Jenkins, Mark A.; Brown, Melissa A.; Tucker, Kathy; Warwick, Linda; Buchanan, Daniel D.; Spurdle, Amanda B.

    2014-01-01

    Variants that disrupt the translation initiation sequences in cancer predisposition genes are generally assumed to be deleterious. However few studies have validated these assumptions with functional and clinical data. Two cancer syndrome gene variants likely to affect native translation initiation were identified by clinical genetic testing: MLH1:c.1A>G p.(Met1?) and BRCA2:c.67+3A>G. In vitro GFP-reporter assays were conducted to assess the consequences of translation initiation disruption on alternative downstream initiation codon usage. Analysis of MLH1:c.1A>G p.(Met1?) showed that translation was mostly initiated at an in-frame position 103 nucleotides downstream, but also at two ATG sequences downstream. The protein product encoded by the in-frame transcript initiating from position c.103 showed loss of in vitro mismatch repair activity comparable to known pathogenic mutations. BRCA2:c.67+3A>G was shown by mRNA analysis to result in an aberrantly spliced transcript deleting exon 2 and the consensus ATG site. In the absence of exon 2, translation initiated mostly at an out-of-frame ATG 323 nucleotides downstream, and to a lesser extent at an in-frame ATG 370 nucleotides downstream. Initiation from any of the downstream alternative sites tested in both genes would lead to loss of protein function, but further clinical data is required to confirm if these variants are associated with a high cancer risk. Importantly, our results highlight the need for caution in interpreting the functional and clinical consequences of variation that leads to disruption of the initiation codon, since translation may not necessarily occur from the first downstream alternative start site, or from a single alternative start site. PMID:24302565

  13. Start codon targeted (SCoT) polymorphism reveals genetic diversity in wild and domesticated populations of ramie (Boehmeria nivea L. Gaudich.), a premium textile fiber producing species.

    PubMed

    Satya, Pratik; Karan, Maya; Jana, Sourav; Mitra, Sabyasachi; Sharma, Amit; Karmakar, P G; Ray, D P

    2015-02-01

    Twenty-four start codon targeted (SCoT) markers were used to assess genetic diversity and population structure of indigenous, introduced and domesticated ramie (Boehmeria nivea L. Gaudich.). A total of 155 genotypes from five populations were investigated for SCoT polymorphism, which produced 136 amplicons with 87.5% polymorphism. Polymorphism information content and resolving power of the SCoT markers were 0.69 and 3.22, respectively. The Indian ramie populations exhibited high SCoT polymorphism (> 50%), high genetic differentiation (GST = 0.27) and moderate gene flow (Nm = 1.34). Analysis of molecular variance identified significant differences for genetic polymorphism among the populations explaining 13.1% of the total variation. The domesticated population exhibited higher genetic polymorphism and heterozygosity compared to natural populations. Cluster analysis supported population genetic analysis and suggested close association between introduced and domesticated genotypes. The present study shows effectiveness of employing SCoT markers in a cross pollinated heterozygous species like Boehmeria, and would be useful for further studies in population genetics, conservation genetics and cultivar improvement. PMID:25750860

  14. Start codon targeted (SCoT) polymorphism reveals genetic diversity in wild and domesticated populations of ramie (Boehmeria nivea L. Gaudich.), a premium textile fiber producing species

    PubMed Central

    Satya, Pratik; Karan, Maya; Jana, Sourav; Mitra, Sabyasachi; Sharma, Amit; Karmakar, P.G.; Ray, D.P.

    2015-01-01

    Twenty-four start codon targeted (SCoT) markers were used to assess genetic diversity and population structure of indigenous, introduced and domesticated ramie (Boehmeria nivea L. Gaudich.). A total of 155 genotypes from five populations were investigated for SCoT polymorphism, which produced 136 amplicons with 87.5% polymorphism. Polymorphism information content and resolving power of the SCoT markers were 0.69 and 3.22, respectively. The Indian ramie populations exhibited high SCoT polymorphism (> 50%), high genetic differentiation (GST = 0.27) and moderate gene flow (Nm = 1.34). Analysis of molecular variance identified significant differences for genetic polymorphism among the populations explaining 13.1% of the total variation. The domesticated population exhibited higher genetic polymorphism and heterozygosity compared to natural populations. Cluster analysis supported population genetic analysis and suggested close association between introduced and domesticated genotypes. The present study shows effectiveness of employing SCoT markers in a cross pollinated heterozygous species like Boehmeria, and would be useful for further studies in population genetics, conservation genetics and cultivar improvement. PMID:25750860

  15. Start codon targeted (SCoT) polymorphism in toxic and non-toxic accessions of Jatropha curcas L. and development of a codominant SCAR marker.

    PubMed

    Mulpuri, Sujatha; Muddanuru, Tarakeswari; Francis, George

    2013-06-01

    Thirty six start codon targeted (SCoT) primers were used for characterization of 48 accessions of Jatropha curcas from different countries and include material with genetic variation for levels of phorbol esters, yield, seed oil content, test weight and plant type. SCoT analysis revealed high polymorphism and 74% of the primers generated polymorphic profiles. The SCoT6 primer discriminated edible and toxic accessions in a single reaction while the SCoT26 and 27 primers produced amplicons specific to toxic and non-toxic accessions, respectively. The polymorphic SCoT markers obtained with these three primers were converted to sequence characterized amplicon regions (SCARs) which resulted in codominant SCARs with SCoT6 primer and dominant SCARs with SCoT 26 and 27 primers. The codominant nature of SCoT6 primer and the resultant SCAR6 primer were validated on intraspecific hybrids derived from a cross between non-toxic and toxic accessions. The accession JP38 from Madagascar was found to be distinct and showed accession specific bands with 9 different SCoT primers. Sequence analysis of polymorphic amplicons obtained with SCoT6 primer showed a 65 bp deletion in accessions with low/zero phorbol esters. Diversity analysis separated the toxic and non-toxic accessions into two groups and the accessions JP29 and JP48 from Mexico formed a third cluster. PMID:23602106

  16. Modal Codon Usage: Assessing the Typical Codon Usage of a Genome

    PubMed Central

    Davis, James J.; Olsen, Gary J.

    2010-01-01

    Most genomes are heterogeneous in codon usage, so a codon usage study should start by defining the codon usage that is typical to the genome. Although this is commonly taken to be the genomewide average, we propose that the mode—the codon usage that matches the most genes—provides a more useful approximation of the typical codon usage of a genome. We provide a method for estimating the modal codon usage, which utilizes a continuous approximation to the number of matching genes and a simplex optimization. In a survey of bacterial and archaeal genomes, as many as 20% more of the genes in a given genome match the modal codon usage than the average codon usage. We use the mode to examine the evolution of the multireplicon genomes of Agrobacterium tumefaciens C58 and Borrelia burgdorferi B31. In A. tumefaciens, the circular and linear chromosomes are characterized by a common “chromosome-like” codon usage, whereas both plasmids share a distinct “plasmid-like” codon usage. In B. burgdorferi, in addition to different codon-usage biases on the leading and lagging strands of DNA replication found by McInerney (McInerney JO. 1998. Replicational and transcriptional selection on codon usage in Borrelia burgdorferi. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA. 95:10698–10703), we also detect a codon-usage similarity between linear plasmid lp38 and the leading strand of the chromosome and a high similarity among the cp32 family of plasmids. PMID:20018979

  17. Saccharomyces cerevisiae ribosomes recognize non-AUG initiation codons.

    PubMed Central

    Zitomer, R S; Walthall, D A; Rymond, B C; Hollenberg, C P

    1984-01-01

    A series of Saccharomyces cerevisiae plasmids and mutant derivatives containing fusions of the Escherichia coli galactokinase gene, galK, to the yeast iso-1-cytochrome c CYC1 transcription unit were used to study the sequences affecting the initiation of translation in S. cerevisiae. When the CYC1 AUG initiation codon preceded the galK AUG codon and coding sequence and either the two AUGs were out of frame with each other or a nonsense codon was located between them, the expression of the galK gene was extremely low. Deletion of the CYC1 AUG and its surrounding sequences resulted in a 100-fold increase in galK expression. This dependence of galK expression on the elimination of the CYC1 AUG codon was used to select mutations in that codon. Then the ability of these altered initiation codons to serve in translational initiation was determined by reconstruction of the CYC1 gene 3' to and in frame with them. Initiation was found to occur at the codons UUG and AUA, but not at the codons AAA and AUC. Furthermore the codon UUG, when preceded by an A three nucleotides upstream, served as a better initiation codon than when a U was substituted for the A. The efficiency of translation from these non-AUG codons was quantitated by using a CYC1/galK protein-coding fusion and measuring cellular galactokinase levels. Initiation at the UUG codon was 6.9% as efficient as initiation at the wild-type AUG codon when preceded by an A three nucleotides upstream, but was over 10-fold less efficient when a U was substituted for that A. Initiation at AUA was 0.5% as efficient as at AUG. The effects of the sequences preceding the initiation codon are discussed in light of these results. PMID:6390186

  18. Genetic diversity analysis among male and female Jojoba genotypes employing gene targeted molecular markers, start codon targeted (SCoT) polymorphism and CAAT box-derived polymorphism (CBDP) markers

    PubMed Central

    Heikrujam, Monika; Kumar, Jatin; Agrawal, Veena

    2015-01-01

    To detect genetic variations among different Simmondsia chinensis genotypes, two gene targeted markers, start codon targeted (SCoT) polymorphism and CAAT box-derived polymorphism (CBDP) were employed in terms of their informativeness and efficiency in analyzing genetic relationships among different genotypes. A total of 15 SCoT and 17 CBDP primers detected genetic polymorphism among 39 Jojoba genotypes (22 females and 17 males). Comparatively, CBDP markers proved to be more effective than SCoT markers in terms of percentage polymorphism as the former detecting an average of 53.4% and the latter as 49.4%. The Polymorphic information content (PIC) value and marker index (MI) of CBPD were 0.43 and 1.10, respectively which were higher than those of SCoT where the respective values of PIC and MI were 0.38 and 1.09. While comparing male and female genotype populations, the former showed higher variation in respect of polymorphic percentage and PIC, MI and Rp values over female populations. Nei's diversity (h) and Shannon index (I) were calculated for each genotype and found that the genotype “MS F” (in both markers) was highly diverse and genotypes “Q104 F” (SCoT) and “82–18 F” (CBDP) were least diverse among the female genotype populations. Among male genotypes, “32 M” (CBDP) and “MS M” (SCoT) revealed highest h and I values while “58-5 M” (both markers) was the least diverse. Jaccard's similarity co-efficient of SCoT markers ranged from 0.733 to 0.922 in female genotypes and 0.941 to 0.746 in male genotype population. Likewise, CBDP data analysis also revealed similarity ranging from 0.751 to 0.958 within female genotypes and 0.754 to 0.976 within male genotype populations thereby, indicating genetically diverse Jojoba population. Employing the NTSYS (Numerical taxonomy and multivariate analysis system) Version 2.1 software, both the markers generated dendrograms which revealed that all the Jojoba genotypes were clustered into two major groups

  19. Initiation codon selection is accomplished by a scanning mechanism without crucial initiation factors in Sindbis virus subgenomic mRNA

    PubMed Central

    Sanz, Miguel Angel

    2015-01-01

    Translation initiation of alphavirus subgenomic mRNA (sgmRNA) can occur in the absence of several initiation factors (eIFs) in infected cells; however, the precise translation mechanism is still poorly understood. In this study, we have examined the mechanism of initiation and AUG selection in Sindbis virus (SINV) sgmRNA. Our present findings suggest that sgmRNA is translated via a scanning mechanism, since the presence of a hairpin structure before the initiation codon hampers protein synthesis directed by this mRNA. In addition, translation is partially recovered when an in-frame AUG codon is placed upstream of this hairpin. This scanning process takes place without the participation of eIF4A and active eIF2. These results, combined with our findings through modifying the SINV sgmRNA leader sequence, do not support the possibility of a direct initiation from the start codon without previous scanning, or a shunting mechanism. Moreover, studies carried out with sgmRNAs containing two alternative AUG codons within a good context for translation reveal differences in AUG selection which are dependent on the cellular context and the phosphorylation state of eIF2α. Thus, initiation at the additional AUG is strictly dependent on active eIF2, whereas the genuine AUG codon can start translation following eIF2α inactivation. Collectively, our results suggest that SINV sgmRNA is translated by a scanning mechanism without the potential participation of crucial eIFs. A model is presented that explains the mechanism of initiation of mRNAs bearing two alternative initiation codons. PMID:25404563

  20. Initiation codon selection is accomplished by a scanning mechanism without crucial initiation factors in Sindbis virus subgenomic mRNA.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Moreno, Manuel; Sanz, Miguel Angel; Carrasco, Luis

    2015-01-01

    Translation initiation of alphavirus subgenomic mRNA (sgmRNA) can occur in the absence of several initiation factors (eIFs) in infected cells; however, the precise translation mechanism is still poorly understood. In this study, we have examined the mechanism of initiation and AUG selection in Sindbis virus (SINV) sgmRNA. Our present findings suggest that sgmRNA is translated via a scanning mechanism, since the presence of a hairpin structure before the initiation codon hampers protein synthesis directed by this mRNA. In addition, translation is partially recovered when an in-frame AUG codon is placed upstream of this hairpin. This scanning process takes place without the participation of eIF4A and active eIF2. These results, combined with our findings through modifying the SINV sgmRNA leader sequence, do not support the possibility of a direct initiation from the start codon without previous scanning, or a shunting mechanism. Moreover, studies carried out with sgmRNAs containing two alternative AUG codons within a good context for translation reveal differences in AUG selection which are dependent on the cellular context and the phosphorylation state of eIF2α. Thus, initiation at the additional AUG is strictly dependent on active eIF2, whereas the genuine AUG codon can start translation following eIF2α inactivation. Collectively, our results suggest that SINV sgmRNA is translated by a scanning mechanism without the potential participation of crucial eIFs. A model is presented that explains the mechanism of initiation of mRNAs bearing two alternative initiation codons. PMID:25404563

  1. Re-exploration of the Codon Context Effect on Amber Codon-Guided Incorporation of Noncanonical Amino Acids in Escherichia coli by the Blue-White Screening Assay.

    PubMed

    Xu, Huan; Wang, Yan; Lu, Jiaqi; Zhang, Bo; Zhang, Ziwei; Si, Longlong; Wu, Ling; Yao, Tianzhuo; Zhang, Chuanling; Xiao, Sulong; Zhang, Lihe; Xia, Qing; Zhou, Demin

    2016-07-01

    The effect of codon context on amber codon-guided incorporation of noncanonical amino acids (NAAs) has been previously examined by antibiotic selection. Here, we re-explored this effect by screening a library in which three nucleotides upstream and downstream of the amber codon were randomised, and inserted within the lacZ-α gene. Thousands of clones were obtained and distinguished by the depth of blue colour upon exposure to X-gal. Large-scale sequencing revealed remarkable preferences in nucleotides downstream of the amber codon, and moderate preferences for upstream nucleotides. Nucleotide preference was quantified by a dual-luciferase assay, which verified that the optimum context for NAA incorporation, AATTAGACT, was applicable to different proteins. Our work provides a general guide for engineering amber codons into genes of interest in bacteria. PMID:27028123

  2. Problem-Solving Test: The Effect of Synonymous Codons on Gene Expression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szeberenyi, Jozsef

    2009-01-01

    Terms to be familiar with before you start to solve the test: the genetic code, codon, degenerate codons, protein synthesis, aminoacyl-tRNA, anticodon, antiparallel orientation, wobble, unambiguous codons, ribosomes, initiation, elongation and termination of translation, peptidyl transferase, translocation, degenerate oligonucleotides, green…

  3. Codon Adaptation of Plastid Genes.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Haruo; Morton, Brian R

    2016-01-01

    Codon adaptation is codon usage bias that results from selective pressure to increase the translation efficiency of a gene. Codon adaptation has been studied across a wide range of genomes and some early analyses of plastids have shown evidence for codon adaptation in a limited set of highly expressed plastid genes. Here we study codon usage bias across all fully sequenced plastid genomes which includes representatives of the Rhodophyta, Alveolata, Cryptophyta, Euglenozoa, Glaucocystophyceae, Rhizaria, Stramenopiles and numerous lineages within the Viridiplantae, including Chlorophyta and Embryophyta. We show evidence that codon adaptation occurs in all genomes except for two, Theileria parva and Heicosporidium sp., both of which have highly reduced gene contents and no photosynthesis genes. We also show evidence that selection for codon adaptation increases the representation of the same set of codons, which we refer to as the adaptive codons, across this wide range of taxa, which is probably due to common features descended from the initial endosymbiont. We use various measures to estimate the relative strength of selection in the different lineages and show that it appears to be fairly strong in certain Stramenopiles and Chlorophyta lineages but relatively weak in many members of the Rhodophyta, Euglenozoa and Embryophyta. Given these results we propose that codon adaptation in plastids is widespread and displays the same general features as adaptation in eubacterial genomes. PMID:27196606

  4. Codon Adaptation of Plastid Genes

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Haruo; Morton, Brian R.

    2016-01-01

    Codon adaptation is codon usage bias that results from selective pressure to increase the translation efficiency of a gene. Codon adaptation has been studied across a wide range of genomes and some early analyses of plastids have shown evidence for codon adaptation in a limited set of highly expressed plastid genes. Here we study codon usage bias across all fully sequenced plastid genomes which includes representatives of the Rhodophyta, Alveolata, Cryptophyta, Euglenozoa, Glaucocystophyceae, Rhizaria, Stramenopiles and numerous lineages within the Viridiplantae, including Chlorophyta and Embryophyta. We show evidence that codon adaptation occurs in all genomes except for two, Theileria parva and Heicosporidium sp., both of which have highly reduced gene contents and no photosynthesis genes. We also show evidence that selection for codon adaptation increases the representation of the same set of codons, which we refer to as the adaptive codons, across this wide range of taxa, which is probably due to common features descended from the initial endosymbiont. We use various measures to estimate the relative strength of selection in the different lineages and show that it appears to be fairly strong in certain Stramenopiles and Chlorophyta lineages but relatively weak in many members of the Rhodophyta, Euglenozoa and Embryophyta. Given these results we propose that codon adaptation in plastids is widespread and displays the same general features as adaptation in eubacterial genomes. PMID:27196606

  5. Comprehensive translational control of tyrosine kinase expression by upstream open reading frames

    PubMed Central

    Wethmar, K; Schulz, J; Muro, E M; Talyan, S; Andrade-Navarro, M A; Leutz, A

    2016-01-01

    Post-transcriptional control has emerged as a major regulatory event in gene expression and often occurs at the level of translation initiation. Although overexpression or constitutive activation of tyrosine kinases (TKs) through gene amplification, translocation or mutation are well-characterized oncogenic events, current knowledge about translational mechanisms of TK activation is scarce. Here, we report the presence of translational cis-regulatory upstream open reading frames (uORFs) in the majority of transcript leader sequences of human TK mRNAs. Genetic ablation of uORF initiation codons in TK transcripts resulted in enhanced translation of the associated downstream main protein-coding sequences (CDSs) in all cases studied. Similarly, experimental removal of uORF start codons in additional non-TK proto-oncogenes, and naturally occurring loss-of-uORF alleles of the c-met proto-oncogene (MET) and the kinase insert domain receptor (KDR), was associated with increased CDS translation. Based on genome-wide sequence analyses we identified polymorphisms in 15.9% of all human genes affecting uORF initiation codons, associated Kozak consensus sequences or uORF-related termination codons. Together, these data suggest a comprehensive role of uORF-mediated translational control and delineate how aberrant induction of proto-oncogenes through loss-of-function mutations at uORF initiation codons may be involved in the etiology of cancer. We provide a detailed map of uORFs across the human genome to stimulate future research on the pathogenic role of uORFs. PMID:26096937

  6. Comprehensive translational control of tyrosine kinase expression by upstream open reading frames.

    PubMed

    Wethmar, K; Schulz, J; Muro, E M; Talyan, S; Andrade-Navarro, M A; Leutz, A

    2016-03-31

    Post-transcriptional control has emerged as a major regulatory event in gene expression and often occurs at the level of translation initiation. Although overexpression or constitutive activation of tyrosine kinases (TKs) through gene amplification, translocation or mutation are well-characterized oncogenic events, current knowledge about translational mechanisms of TK activation is scarce. Here, we report the presence of translational cis-regulatory upstream open reading frames (uORFs) in the majority of transcript leader sequences of human TK mRNAs. Genetic ablation of uORF initiation codons in TK transcripts resulted in enhanced translation of the associated downstream main protein-coding sequences (CDSs) in all cases studied. Similarly, experimental removal of uORF start codons in additional non-TK proto-oncogenes, and naturally occurring loss-of-uORF alleles of the c-met proto-oncogene (MET) and the kinase insert domain receptor (KDR), was associated with increased CDS translation. Based on genome-wide sequence analyses we identified polymorphisms in 15.9% of all human genes affecting uORF initiation codons, associated Kozak consensus sequences or uORF-related termination codons. Together, these data suggest a comprehensive role of uORF-mediated translational control and delineate how aberrant induction of proto-oncogenes through loss-of-function mutations at uORF initiation codons may be involved in the etiology of cancer. We provide a detailed map of uORFs across the human genome to stimulate future research on the pathogenic role of uORFs. PMID:26096937

  7. Codon usage patterns in Chinese bayberry (Myrica rubra) based on RNA-Seq data

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Codon usage analysis has been a classical topic for decades and has significances for studies of evolution, mRNA translation, and new gene discovery, etc. While the codon usage varies among different members of the plant kingdom, indicating the necessity for species-specific study, this work has mostly been limited to model organisms. Recently, the development of deep sequencing, especial RNA-Seq, has made it possible to carry out studies in non-model species. Result RNA-Seq data of Chinese bayberry was analyzed to investigate the bias of codon usage and codon pairs. High frequency codons (AGG, GCU, AAG and GAU), as well as low frequency ones (NCG and NUA codons) were identified, and 397 high frequency codon pairs were observed. Meanwhile, 26 preferred and 141 avoided neighboring codon pairs were also identified, which showed more significant bias than the same pairs with one or more intervening codons. Codon patterns were also analyzed at the plant kingdom, organism and gene levels. Changes during plant evolution were evident using RSCU (relative synonymous codon usage), which was even more significant than GC3s (GC content of 3rd synonymous codons). Nine GO categories were differentially and independently influenced by CAI (codon adaptation index) or GC3s, especially in 'Molecular function’ category. Within a gene, the average CAI increased from 0.720 to 0.785 in the first 50 codons, and then more slowly thereafter. Furthermore, the preferred as well as avoided codons at the position just following the start codon AUG were identified and discussed in relation to the key positions in Kozak sequences. Conclusion A comprehensive codon usage Table and number of high-frequency codon pairs were established. Bias in codon usage as well as in neighboring codon pairs was observed, and the significance of this in avoiding DNA mutation, increasing protein production and regulating protein synthesis rate was proposed. Codon usage patterns at three levels were

  8. Role of codon choice in the leader region of the ilvGMEDA operon of Serratia marcescens.

    PubMed Central

    Harms, E; Umbarger, H E

    1987-01-01

    Leucine participates in multivalent repression of the Serratia marcescens ilvGMEDA operon by attenuation (J.-H. Hsu, E. Harms, and H.E. Umbarger, J. Bacteriol. 164:217-222, 1985), although there is only one single leucine codon that could be involved in this type of control. This leucine codon is the rarely used CUA. The contribution of this leucine codon to the control of transcription by attenuation was examined by replacing it with the commonly used leucine codon CUG and with a nonregulatory proline codon, CCG. These changes left intact the proposed secondary structure of the leader. The effects of the codon changes were assessed by placing the mutant leader regions upstream of the ilvGME structural genes or the cat gene and measuring acetohydroxy acid synthase II, transaminase B, or chloramphenicol acetyltransferase activities in cells grown under limiting and repressing conditions. The presence of the common leucine codon in place of the rare leucine codon reduced derepression by about 70%. Eliminating the leucine codon by converting it to proline abolished leucine control. Furthermore, a possible context effect of the adjacent upstream serine codon on leucine control was examined by changing it into a glycine codon. PMID:2824442

  9. FoxA2, Nkx2.2, and PDX-1 Regulate Islet β-Cell-Specific mafA Expression through Conserved Sequences Located between Base Pairs −8118 and −7750 Upstream from the Transcription Start Site

    PubMed Central

    Raum, Jeffrey C.; Gerrish, Kevin; Artner, Isabella; Henderson, Eva; Guo, Min; Sussel, Lori; Schisler, Jonathan C.; Newgard, Christopher B.; Stein, Roland

    2006-01-01

    The MafA transcription factor is both critical to islet β-cell function and has a unique pancreatic cell-type-specific expression pattern. To localize the potential transcriptional regulatory region(s) involved in directing expression to the β cell, areas of identity within the 5′ flanking region of the mouse, human, and rat mafA genes were found between nucleotides −9389 and −9194, −8426 and −8293, −8118 and −7750, −6622 and −6441, −6217 and −6031, and −250 and +56 relative to the transcription start site. The identity between species was greater than 75%, with the highest found between bp −8118 and −7750 (∼94%, termed region 3). Region 3 was the only upstream mammalian conserved region found in chicken mafA (88% identity). In addition, region 3 uniquely displayed β-cell-specific activity in cell-line-based reporter assays. Important regulators of β-cell formation and function, PDX-1, FoxA2, and Nkx2.2, were shown to specifically bind to region 3 in vivo using the chromatin immunoprecipitation assay. Mutational and functional analyses demonstrated that FoxA2 (bp −7943 to −7910), Nkx2.2 (bp −7771 to −7746), and PDX-1 (bp −8087 to −8063) mediated region 3 activation. Consistent with a role in transcription, small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of PDX-1 led to decreased mafA mRNA production in INS-1-derived β-cell lines (832/13 and 832/3), while MafA expression was undetected in the pancreatic epithelium of Nkx2.2 null animals. These results suggest that β-cell-type-specific mafA transcription is principally controlled by region 3-acting transcription factors that are essential in the formation of functional β cells. PMID:16847327

  10. Bacterial start site prediction.

    PubMed

    Hannenhalli, S S; Hayes, W S; Hatzigeorgiou, A G; Fickett, J W

    1999-09-01

    With the growing number of completely sequenced bacterial genes, accurate gene prediction in bacterial genomes remains an important problem. Although the existing tools predict genes in bacterial genomes with high overall accuracy, their ability to pinpoint the translation start site remains unsatisfactory. In this paper, we present a novel approach to bacterial start site prediction that takes into account multiple features of a potential start site, viz., ribosome binding site (RBS) binding energy, distance of the RBS from the start codon, distance from the beginning of the maximal ORF to the start codon, the start codon itself and the coding/non-coding potential around the start site. Mixed integer programing was used to optimize the discriminatory system. The accuracy of this approach is up to 90%, compared to 70%, using the most common tools in fully automated mode (that is, without expert human post-processing of results). The approach is evaluated using Bacillus subtilis, Escherichia coli and Pyrococcus furiosus. These three genomes cover a broad spectrum of bacterial genomes, since B.subtilis is a Gram-positive bacterium, E.coli is a Gram-negative bacterium and P. furiosus is an archaebacterium. A significant problem is generating a set of 'true' start sites for algorithm training, in the absence of experimental work. We found that sequence conservation between P. furiosus and the related Pyrococcus horikoshii clearly delimited the gene start in many cases, providing a sufficient training set. PMID:10446249

  11. Unique Translation Initiation at the Second AUG Codon Determines Mitochondrial Localization of the Phage-Type RNA Polymerases in the Moss Physcomitrella patens1

    PubMed Central

    Kabeya, Yukihiro; Sato, Naoki

    2005-01-01

    The nuclear genome of the moss Physcomitrella patens contains two genes encoding phage-type RNA polymerases (PpRPOT1 and PpRPOT2). Each of the PpRPOT1 and PpRPOT2 transcripts possesses two in-frame AUG codons at the 5′ terminus that could act as a translational initiation site. Observation of transient and stable Physcomitrella transformants expressing the 5′ terminus of each PpRPOT cDNA fused with the green fluorescent protein gene suggested that both PpRPOT1 and PpRPOT2 are not translated from the first (upstream) AUG codon in the natural context but translated from the second (downstream) one, and that these enzymes are targeted only to mitochondria, although they are potentially targeted to plastids when translation is forced to start from the first AUG codon. The influence of the 5′-upstream sequence on the translation efficiency of the two AUG codons in PpRPOT1 and PpRPOT2 was quantitatively assessed using a β-glucuronidase reporter. The results further supported that the second AUG codon is the sole translation initiation site in Physcomitrella cells. An Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) RPOT homolog AtRpoT;2 that possesses two initiation AUG codons in its transcripts, as do the RPOTs of P. patens, has been regarded as a dually targeted protein. When the localization of AtRpoT;2 was tested using green fluorescent protein in a similar way, AtRpoT;2 was also observed only in mitochondria in many Arabidopsis tissues. These results suggest that, despite the presence of two in-frame AUGs at the 5′ termini of RPOTs in Physcomitrella and Arabidopsis, the second AUG is specifically recognized as the initiation site in these organisms, resulting in expression of a protein that is targeted to mitochondria. This finding may change the current framework of thinking about the transcription machinery of plastids in land plants. PMID:15834007

  12. Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus phages: effect of translation initiation efficiency on differential codon adaptation mediated by virulent and temperate lifestyles

    PubMed Central

    Prabhakaran, Ramanandan; Chithambaram, Shivapriya

    2015-01-01

    Rapid biosynthesis is key to the success of bacteria and viruses. Highly expressed genes in bacteria exhibit a strong codon bias corresponding to the differential availability of tRNAs. However, a large clade of lambdoid coliphages exhibits relatively poor codon adaptation to the host translation machinery, in contrast to other coliphages that exhibit strong codon adaptation to the host. Three possible explanations were previously proposed but dismissed: (1) the phage-borne tRNA genes that reduce the dependence of phage translation on host tRNAs, (2) lack of time needed for evolving codon adaptation due to recent host switching, and (3) strong strand asymmetry with biased mutation disrupting codon adaptation. Here, we examined the possibility that phages with relatively poor codon adaptation have poor translation initiation which would weaken the selection on codon adaptation. We measured translation initiation by: (1) the strength and position of the Shine–Dalgarno (SD) sequence, and (2) the stability of the secondary structure of sequences flanking the SD and start codon known to affect accessibility of the SD sequence and start codon. Phage genes with strong codon adaptation had significantly stronger SD sequences than those with poor codon adaptation. The former also had significantly weaker secondary structure in sequences flanking the SD sequence and start codon than the latter. Thus, lambdoid phages do not exhibit strong codon adaptation because they have relatively inefficient translation initiation and would benefit little from increased elongation efficiency. We also provided evidence suggesting that phage lifestyle (virulent versus temperate) affected selection intensity on the efficiency of translation initiation and elongation. PMID:25614589

  13. Cotranslational insertion of selenocysteine into formate dehydrogenase from Escherichia coli directed by a UGA codon

    SciTech Connect

    Zinoni, F.; Birkmann, A.; Leinfelder, W.; Boeck, A.

    1987-05-01

    The structural gene (fdhF) for the 80-kDa selenopolypeptide of formate dehydrogenase from Escherichia coli contains an in-frame UGA codon at amino acid position 140 that is translated. Translation of gene fusions between N-terminal parts of fdhF with lacZ depends on the availability of selenium in the medium when the hybrid gene contains the UGA codon; it is independent of the presence of selenium when an fdhF portion upstream of the UGA position is fused to lacZ. Transcription does not require the presence of selenium in either case. By localized mutagenesis, the UGA codon was converted into serine (UCA) and cysteine (UGC and UGU) codons. Each mutagion relieved the selenium dependency of fdhF mRNA translation. Selenium incorporation was completely abolished in the case of the UCA insertion and was reduced to about 10% when the UGA was replaced by a cysteine codon. Insertion of UCA yielded an inactive fdhF gene product, while insertion of UGC and UGU resulted in polypeptides with lowered activities as components in the system formerly known as formate hydrogenlyase. Altogether the results indicate that the UGA codon at position 140 directs the cotranslational insertion of selenocysteine into the fdhF polypeptide chain.

  14. Upstream waves at Uranus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, C. T.; Lepping, R. P.; Smith, C. W.

    1990-01-01

    Since the Mach number of the solar wind increases with increasing heliocentric distance, the ratio of thermal to magnetic pressure, or beta, of the Uranian magnetosheath is expected to be much higher than in the terrestrial magnetosheath. Consistent with this expectation, the magnetosheat is observed to be extremely turbulent, and many particles may leak back upstream into the solar wind and/or be scattered from the bow shock. In accord with the expected presence of backstreaming particles, waves of the type associated with terrestrial backstreaming particles are seen outbound along the trajectory of Voyager in the preshock solar wind with frequencies close to 0.001 Hz. The wave frequency is close to that expected for upstream waves based on measurements closer to the sun. Upstream from the bow shock, the magnetic field was found to be much weaker than expected from observations in the inner solar system. The cause of this depression is unlikely to be the upstream particles; rather, the cause is probably intrinsic to the solar wind such as reconnection across the heliospheric current sheet.

  15. Codon preferences in free-living microorganisms.

    PubMed Central

    Andersson, S G; Kurland, C G

    1990-01-01

    A popular interpretation of the major codon preference is that it reflects the operation of a regulatory device that controls the expression of individual proteins. In this popular model, rapidly translated codons are thought to promote the accumulation of the highly expressed proteins and slowly translated codons are thought to retard the expression of poorly expressed proteins. However, this widely accepted model is not supported by kinetic theory or by experimental results. A less fashionable model in which the major codon preference has nothing to do with the expression level of the individual proteins is forwarded. In this model, the major codon preference is viewed as a global strategy to support the efficient function of the translation system and thereby to maximize the growth rates of cells under favorable conditions. PMID:2194095

  16. Codon information value and codon transition-probability distributions in short-term evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez-Montaño, M. A.; Coronel-Brizio, H. F.; Hernández-Montoya, A. R.; Ramos-Fernández, A.

    2016-07-01

    To understand the way the Genetic Code and the physical-chemical properties of coded amino acids affect accepted amino acid substitutions in short-term protein evolution, taking into account only overall amino acid conservation, we consider an underlying codon-level model. This model employs codon pair-substitution frequencies from an empirical matrix in the literature, modified for single-base mutations only. Ordering the degenerated codons according to their codon information value (Volkenstein, 1979), we found that three-fold and most of four-fold degenerated codons, which have low codon values, were best fitted to rank-frequency distributions with constant failure rate (exponentials). In contrast, almost all two-fold degenerated codons, which have high codon values, were best fitted to rank-frequency distributions with variable failure rate (inverse power-laws). Six-fold degenerated codons are considered to be doubly assigned. The exceptional behavior of some codons, including non-degenerate codons, is discussed.

  17. Upstream waves at Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, C. T.; Luhmann, J. G.; Schwingenschuh, K.; Riedler, W.; Eroshenko, E.

    1992-01-01

    Weak, about 0.15 nT, narrow band emissions at the proton gyro frequency are observed by the Phobos magnetometer MAGMA, upstream from the bow shock of Mars. These waves are left-hand elliptically polarized. They may be associated with the pick up of protons from the Martian hydrogen exosphere. Strong turbulence, similar to that observed at the terrestrial bow shock, is found on occasion in the upstream region when the IMF connects to the bow shock. On two occasions this turbulence occurred when the spacecraft crossed the orbit of Phobos. This coincidence raises the possibility that material in the orbits of Phobos interacts with the solar wind in such a way to either affect the direction of the IMF or to cause instabilities in the solar wind plasma. However, since on a third occasion these waves did not occur, these waves may be shock associated rather than Phobos associated.

  18. CodonPhyML: Fast Maximum Likelihood Phylogeny Estimation under Codon Substitution Models

    PubMed Central

    Gil, Manuel; Zoller, Stefan; Anisimova, Maria

    2013-01-01

    Markov models of codon substitution naturally incorporate the structure of the genetic code and the selection intensity at the protein level, providing a more realistic representation of protein-coding sequences compared with nucleotide or amino acid models. Thus, for protein-coding genes, phylogenetic inference is expected to be more accurate under codon models. So far, phylogeny reconstruction under codon models has been elusive due to computational difficulties of dealing with high dimension matrices. Here, we present a fast maximum likelihood (ML) package for phylogenetic inference, CodonPhyML offering hundreds of different codon models, the largest variety to date, for phylogeny inference by ML. CodonPhyML is tested on simulated and real data and is shown to offer excellent speed and convergence properties. In addition, CodonPhyML includes most recent fast methods for estimating phylogenetic branch supports and provides an integral framework for models selection, including amino acid and DNA models. PMID:23436912

  19. Upstream health law.

    PubMed

    Sage, William M; McIlhattan, Kelley

    2014-01-01

    For the first time, entrepreneurs are aggressively developing new technologies and business models designed to improve individual and population health, not just to deliver specialized medical care. Consumers of these goods and services are not yet "patients"; they are simply people. As this sector of the health care industry expands, it is likely to require new forms of legal governance, which we term "upstream health law." PMID:25565619

  20. Quality control of transcription start site selection by nonsense-mediated-mRNA decay.

    PubMed

    Malabat, Christophe; Feuerbach, Frank; Ma, Laurence; Saveanu, Cosmin; Jacquier, Alain

    2015-01-01

    Nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) is a translation-dependent RNA quality-control pathway targeting transcripts such as messenger RNAs harboring premature stop-codons or short upstream open reading frame (uORFs). Our transcription start sites (TSSs) analysis of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells deficient for RNA degradation pathways revealed that about half of the pervasive transcripts are degraded by NMD, which provides a fail-safe mechanism to remove spurious transcripts that escaped degradation in the nucleus. Moreover, we found that the low specificity of RNA polymerase II TSSs selection generates, for 47% of the expressed genes, NMD-sensitive transcript isoforms carrying uORFs or starting downstream of the ATG START codon. Despite the low abundance of this last category of isoforms, their presence seems to constrain genomic sequences, as suggested by the significant bias against in-frame ATGs specifically found at the beginning of the corresponding genes and reflected by a depletion of methionines in the N-terminus of the encoded proteins. PMID:25905671

  1. Di-codon Usage for Gene Classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Minh N.; Ma, Jianmin; Fogel, Gary B.; Rajapakse, Jagath C.

    Classification of genes into biologically related groups facilitates inference of their functions. Codon usage bias has been described previously as a potential feature for gene classification. In this paper, we demonstrate that di-codon usage can further improve classification of genes. By using both codon and di-codon features, we achieve near perfect accuracies for the classification of HLA molecules into major classes and sub-classes. The method is illustrated on 1,841 HLA sequences which are classified into two major classes, HLA-I and HLA-II. Major classes are further classified into sub-groups. A binary SVM using di-codon usage patterns achieved 99.95% accuracy in the classification of HLA genes into major HLA classes; and multi-class SVM achieved accuracy rates of 99.82% and 99.03% for sub-class classification of HLA-I and HLA-II genes, respectively. Furthermore, by combining codon and di-codon usages, the prediction accuracies reached 100%, 99.82%, and 99.84% for HLA major class classification, and for sub-class classification of HLA-I and HLA-II genes, respectively.

  2. Codon compression algorithms for saturation mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Pines, Gur; Pines, Assaf; Garst, Andrew D; Zeitoun, Ramsey I; Lynch, Sean A; Gill, Ryan T

    2015-05-15

    Saturation mutagenesis is employed in protein engineering and genome-editing efforts to generate libraries that span amino acid design space. Traditionally, this is accomplished by using degenerate/compressed codons such as NNK (N = A/C/G/T, K = G/T), which covers all amino acids and one stop codon. These solutions suffer from two types of redundancy: (a) different codons for the same amino acid lead to bias, and (b) wild type amino acid is included within the library. These redundancies increase library size and downstream screening efforts. Here, we present a dynamic approach to compress codons for any desired list of amino acids, taking into account codon usage. This results in a unique codon collection for every amino acid to be mutated, with the desired redundancy level. Finally, we demonstrate that this approach can be used to design precise oligo libraries amendable to recombineering and CRISPR-based genome editing to obtain a diverse population with high efficiency. PMID:25303315

  3. Codon usage trend in mitochondrial CYB gene.

    PubMed

    Uddin, Arif; Chakraborty, Supriyo

    2016-07-15

    Here we reported the pattern of codon usage and the factors which influenced the codon usage pattern in mitochondrial cytochrome B (MT-CYB) gene among pisces, aves and mammals. The F1 axis of correspondence analysis showed highly significant positive correlation with nucleobases A3, C and C3 and significant negative correlation with T and T3 while F2 of correspondence analysis showed significant positive correlation with C and C3 and significant negative correlation with A and A3. From the neutrality plot, it was evident that the GC12 was influenced by mutation pressure and natural selection with a ratio of 0.10/0.90=0.11 in pisces, 0.024/0.976=0.0245 in aves and in mammals 0.215/0.785=0.273, which indicated that the role of natural selection was more than mutation pressure on structuring the bases at the first and second codon positions. Natural selection played the major role; but compositional constraint and mutation pressure also played a significant role in codon usage pattern. Analysis of codon usage pattern has contributed to the better understanding of the mechanism of distribution of codons and the evolution of MT-CYB gene. PMID:27063508

  4. The effect of context on synonymous codon usage in genes with low codon usage bias.

    PubMed Central

    Bulmer, M

    1990-01-01

    The effect of neighbouring bases on the usage of synonymous codons in genes with low codon usage bias in yeast and E. coli is examined. The codon adaptation index is employed to identify a group of genes in each organism with low codon usage bias, which are likely to be weakly expressed. A similar pattern is found in complementary sequences with respect to synonymous usage of A vs G or of U vs C. It is suggested that this may reflect an effect of context on mutation rates in weakly expressed genes. PMID:2190183

  5. Expression System for High Levels of GAG Lyase Gene Expression and Study of the hepA Upstream Region in Flavobacterium heparinum

    PubMed Central

    Blain, Françoise; Tkalec, A. Lydia; Shao, Zhongqi; Poulin, Catherine; Pedneault, Marc; Gu, Kangfu; Eggimann, Bernhard; Zimmermann, Joe; Su, Hongsheng

    2002-01-01

    A system for high-level expression of heparinase I, heparinase II, heparinase III, chondroitinase AC, and chondroitinase B in Flavobacterium heparinum is described. hepA, along with its regulatory region, as well as hepB, hepC, cslA, and cslB, cloned downstream of the hepA regulatory region, was integrated in the chromosome to yield stable transconjugant strains. The level of heparinase I and II expression from the transconjugant strains was approximately fivefold higher, while heparinase III expression was 10-fold higher than in wild-type F. heparinum grown in heparin-only medium. The chondroitinase AC and B transconjugant strains, grown in heparin-only medium, yielded 20- and 13-fold increases, respectively, in chondroitinase AC and B expression, compared to wild-type F. heparinum grown in chondroitin sulfate A-only medium. The hepA upstream region was also studied using cslA as a reporter gene, and the transcriptional start site was determined to be 26 bp upstream of the start codon in the chondroitinase AC transconjugant strain. The transcriptional start sites were determined for hepA in both the wild-type F. heparinum and heparinase I transconjugant strains and were shown to be the same as in the chondroitinase AC transconjugant strain. The five GAG lyases were purified from these transconjugant strains and shown to be identical to their wild-type counterparts. PMID:12029040

  6. Expression system for high levels of GAG lyase gene expression and study of the hepA upstream region in Flavobacterium heparinum.

    PubMed

    Blain, Françoise; Tkalec, A Lydia; Shao, Zhongqi; Poulin, Catherine; Pedneault, Marc; Gu, Kangfu; Eggimann, Bernhard; Zimmermann, Joe; Su, Hongsheng

    2002-06-01

    A system for high-level expression of heparinase I, heparinase II, heparinase III, chondroitinase AC, and chondroitinase B in Flavobacterium heparinum is described. hepA, along with its regulatory region, as well as hepB, hepC, cslA, and cslB, cloned downstream of the hepA regulatory region, was integrated in the chromosome to yield stable transconjugant strains. The level of heparinase I and II expression from the transconjugant strains was approximately fivefold higher, while heparinase III expression was 10-fold higher than in wild-type F. heparinum grown in heparin-only medium. The chondroitinase AC and B transconjugant strains, grown in heparin-only medium, yielded 20- and 13-fold increases, respectively, in chondroitinase AC and B expression, compared to wild-type F. heparinum grown in chondroitin sulfate A-only medium. The hepA upstream region was also studied using cslA as a reporter gene, and the transcriptional start site was determined to be 26 bp upstream of the start codon in the chondroitinase AC transconjugant strain. The transcriptional start sites were determined for hepA in both the wild-type F. heparinum and heparinase I transconjugant strains and were shown to be the same as in the chondroitinase AC transconjugant strain. The five GAG lyases were purified from these transconjugant strains and shown to be identical to their wild-type counterparts. PMID:12029040

  7. Optimal codons in Tremella fuciformis end in C/G, a strong difference with known Tremella species.

    PubMed

    Deng, Youjin; Huang, Xiaoxing; Ruan, Banzhan; Xie, Baogui; van Peer, Arend Frans; Jiang, Yuji

    2015-11-01

    Tremella fuciformis is a popular edible fungus with fruiting bodies that can be produced in large quantities at low costs, while it is easy to transform and cultivate as yeast. This makes it an attractive potential bioreactor. Enhanced heterologous gene expression through codon optimization would be useful, but until now codon usage preferences in T. fuciformis remain unknown. To precisely determine the preferred codon usage of T. fuciformis we sequenced the genome of strain Tr26 resulting in a 24.2 Mb draft genome with 10,040 predicted genes. 3288 of the derived predicted proteins matched the UniProtKB/Swiss-Prot databases with 40% or more similarity. Corresponding gene models of this subset were subsequently optimized through repetitive comparison of alternative start codons and selection of best length matching gene models. For experimental confirmation of gene models, 96 random clones from an existing T. fuciformis cDNA library were sequenced, generating 80 complete CDSs. Calculated optimal codons for the 3288 predicted and the 80 cloned CDSs were highly similar, indicating sufficient accuracy of predicted gene models for codon usage analysis. T. fuciformis showed a strong preference for C and then G at the third base pair position of used codons, while average GC content of predicted genes was slightly higher than the total genome sequence average. Most optimal codons ended in C or G except for one, and an increased frequency of C ending codons was observed in genes with higher expression levels. Surprisingly, the preferred codon usage in T. fuciformis strongly differed from T. mesenterica and C. neoformans. Instead, optimal codon usage was similar to more distant related species such as Ustilago maydis and Neurospora crassa. Despite much higher overall sequence homology between T. fuciformis and T. mesenterica, only 7 out of 21 optimal codons were equal, whereas T. fuciformis shared up to 20 out of 21 optimal codons with other species. Clearly, codon usage in

  8. SENCA: A Multilayered Codon Model to Study the Origins and Dynamics of Codon Usage.

    PubMed

    Pouyet, Fanny; Bailly-Bechet, Marc; Mouchiroud, Dominique; Guéguen, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    Gene sequences are the target of evolution operating at different levels, including the nucleotide, codon, and amino acid levels. Disentangling the impact of those different levels on gene sequences requires developing a probabilistic model with three layers. Here we present SENCA (site evolution of nucleotides, codons, and amino acids), a codon substitution model that separately describes 1) nucleotide processes which apply on all sites of a sequence such as the mutational bias, 2) preferences between synonymous codons, and 3) preferences among amino acids. We argue that most synonymous substitutions are not neutral and that SENCA provides more accurate estimates of selection compared with more classical codon sequence models. We study the forces that drive the genomic content evolution, intraspecifically in the core genome of 21 prokaryotes and interspecifically for five Enterobacteria. We retrieve the existence of a universal mutational bias toward AT, and that taking into account selection on synonymous codon usage has consequences on the measurement of selection on nonsynonymous substitutions. We also confirm that codon usage bias is mostly driven by selection on preferred codons. We propose new summary statistics to measure the relative importance of the different evolutionary processes acting on sequences. PMID:27401173

  9. SENCA: A Multilayered Codon Model to Study the Origins and Dynamics of Codon Usage

    PubMed Central

    Pouyet, Fanny; Bailly-Bechet, Marc; Mouchiroud, Dominique; Guéguen, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    Gene sequences are the target of evolution operating at different levels, including the nucleotide, codon, and amino acid levels. Disentangling the impact of those different levels on gene sequences requires developing a probabilistic model with three layers. Here we present SENCA (site evolution of nucleotides, codons, and amino acids), a codon substitution model that separately describes 1) nucleotide processes which apply on all sites of a sequence such as the mutational bias, 2) preferences between synonymous codons, and 3) preferences among amino acids. We argue that most synonymous substitutions are not neutral and that SENCA provides more accurate estimates of selection compared with more classical codon sequence models. We study the forces that drive the genomic content evolution, intraspecifically in the core genome of 21 prokaryotes and interspecifically for five Enterobacteria. We retrieve the existence of a universal mutational bias toward AT, and that taking into account selection on synonymous codon usage has consequences on the measurement of selection on nonsynonymous substitutions. We also confirm that codon usage bias is mostly driven by selection on preferred codons. We propose new summary statistics to measure the relative importance of the different evolutionary processes acting on sequences. PMID:27401173

  10. Hand gesture recognition by analysis of codons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramachandra, Poornima; Shrikhande, Neelima

    2007-09-01

    The problem of recognizing gestures from images using computers can be approached by closely understanding how the human brain tackles it. A full fledged gesture recognition system will substitute mouse and keyboards completely. Humans can recognize most gestures by looking at the characteristic external shape or the silhouette of the fingers. Many previous techniques to recognize gestures dealt with motion and geometric features of hands. In this thesis gestures are recognized by the Codon-list pattern extracted from the object contour. All edges of an image are described in terms of sequence of Codons. The Codons are defined in terms of the relationship between maxima, minima and zeros of curvature encountered as one traverses the boundary of the object. We have concentrated on a catalog of 24 gesture images from the American Sign Language alphabet (Letter J and Z are ignored as they are represented using motion) [2]. The query image given as an input to the system is analyzed and tested against the Codon-lists, which are shape descriptors for external parts of a hand gesture. We have used the Weighted Frequency Indexing Transform (WFIT) approach which is used in DNA sequence matching for matching the Codon-lists. The matching algorithm consists of two steps: 1) the query sequences are converted to short sequences and are assigned weights and, 2) all the sequences of query gestures are pruned into match and mismatch subsequences by the frequency indexing tree based on the weights of the subsequences. The Codon sequences with the most weight are used to determine the most precise match. Once a match is found, the identified gesture and corresponding interpretation are shown as output.

  11. Codon catalog usage and the genome hypothesis.

    PubMed Central

    Grantham, R; Gautier, C; Gouy, M; Mercier, R; Pavé, A

    1980-01-01

    Frequencies for each of the 61 amino acid codons have been determined in every published mRNA sequence of 50 or more codons. The frequencies are shown for each kind of genome and for each individual gene. A surprising consistency of choices exists among genes of the same or similar genomes. Thus each genome, or kind of genome, appears to possess a "system" for choosing between codons. Frameshift genes, however, have widely different choice strategies from normal genes. Our work indicates that the main factors distinguishing between mRNA sequences relate to choices among degenerate bases. These systematic third base choices can therefore be used to establish a new kind of genetic distance, which reflects differences in coding strategy. The choice patterns we find seem compatible with the idea that the genome and not the individual gene is the unit of selection. Each gene in a genome tends to conform to its species' usage of the codon catalog; this is our genome hypothesis. PMID:6986610

  12. Hydroxylation and translational adaptation to stress: some answers lie beyond the STOP codon.

    PubMed

    Katz, M J; Gándara, L; De Lella Ezcurra, A L; Wappner, P

    2016-05-01

    Regulation of protein synthesis contributes to maintenance of homeostasis and adaptation to environmental changes. mRNA translation is controlled at various levels including initiation, elongation and termination, through post-transcriptional/translational modifications of components of the protein synthesis machinery. Recently, protein and RNA hydroxylation have emerged as important enzymatic modifications of tRNAs, elongation and termination factors, as well as ribosomal proteins. These modifications enable a correct STOP codon recognition, ensuring translational fidelity. Recent studies are starting to show that STOP codon read-through is related to the ability of the cell to cope with different types of stress, such as oxidative and chemical insults, while correlations between defects in hydroxylation of protein synthesis components and STOP codon read-through are beginning to emerge. In this review we will discuss our current knowledge of protein synthesis regulation through hydroxylation of components of the translation machinery, with special focus on STOP codon recognition. We speculate on the possibility that programmed STOP codon read-through, modulated by hydroxylation of components of the protein synthesis machinery, is part of a concerted cellular response to stress. PMID:26874685

  13. Use of molecular beacons to probe for messenger RNA release from ribosomes during 5'-translational blockage by consecutive low-usage codons in Escherichia coli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Wenwu; Tyagi, Sanjay; Kramer, Fred R.; Goldman, Emanuel

    2000-03-01

    In `5'-translational blockage,' significantly reduced yields of proteins are synthesized in Escherichia coli when consecutive low-usage codons are inserted near translation starts of messages (with reduced or no effect when these same codons are inserted downstream). We tested the hypothesis that ribosomes encountering these low-usage codons prematurely release the mRNA. RNA from polysome gradients was fractionated into pools of polysomes, monosomes and ribosomes-free. New hybridization probes, called `molecular beacons,' and standard slot-blots, were used to detect test messages containing either consecutive low-usage AGG (arginine) or synonymous high-usage CGU insertions near the 5' end. The results show an approximately twofold increase in the ratio of free to bound mRNA when the low-usage codons were present compared to high-usage codons. In contrast, there was no difference in the ratio of free to bound mRNA when consecutive low-usage CUA or high-usage CUG (leucine) codons were inserted, or when the arginine codons were inserted near the 3' end. These data indicate that at least some mRNA is released from ribosomes during 5'-translational blockage by arginine but not leucine codons, and they support proposals that premature termination of translation can occur in some conditions in vivo in the absence of a stop codon.

  14. Stop Codon Reassignment in the Wild

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanova, Natalia; Schwientek, Patrick; Tripp, H. James; Rinke, Christian; Pati, Amrita; Huntemann, Marcel; Visel, Axel; Woyke, Tanja; Kyrpides, Nikos; Rubin, Edward

    2014-03-21

    Since the discovery of the genetic code and protein translation mechanisms (1), a limited number of variations of the standard assignment between unique base triplets (codons) and their encoded amino acids and translational stop signals have been found in bacteria and phages (2-3). Given the apparent ubiquity of the canonical genetic code, the design of genomically recoded organisms with non-canonical codes has been suggested as a means to prevent horizontal gene transfer between laboratory and environmental organisms (4). It is also predicted that genomically recoded organisms are immune to infection by viruses, under the assumption that phages and their hosts must share a common genetic code (5). This paradigm is supported by the observation of increased resistance of genomically recoded bacteria to phages with a canonical code (4). Despite these assumptions and accompanying lines of evidence, it remains unclear whether differential and non-canonical codon usage represents an absolute barrier to phage infection and genetic exchange between organisms. Our knowledge of the diversity of genetic codes and their use by viruses and their hosts is primarily derived from the analysis of cultivated organisms. Advances in single-cell sequencing and metagenome assembly technologies have enabled the reconstruction of genomes of uncultivated bacterial and archaeal lineages (6). These initial findings suggest that large scale systematic studies of uncultivated microorganisms and viruses may reveal the extent and modes of divergence from the canonical genetic code operating in nature. To explore alternative genetic codes, we carried out a systematic analysis of stop codon reassignments from the canonical TAG amber, TGA opal, and TAA ochre codons in assembled metagenomes from environmental and host-associated samples, single-cell genomes of uncultivated bacteria and archaea, and a collection of phage sequences

  15. Sure Start

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moss, Peter

    2004-01-01

    This paper outlines what is involved in Sure Start, one of New Labour's key social policy interventions. It is argued that there are policy continuities with older redemptive policies which focus on young children. It is also argued that Sure Start could provide a bridgehead for a more socially democratic orientation into early childhood policy.

  16. Hydraulic jumps with upstream shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogden, Kelly; Helfrich, Karl

    2013-11-01

    Hydraulic jumps in flows with background shear are investigated, motivated by applications such as the flow over sills in Knight Inlet and the Pre-Bosphorus Channel. The full solution space and allowable solutions to several two-layer theories for hydraulic jumps with upstream shear are identified. The two-layer theories considered, including a recent theory by Borden et al. (JFM, 2012), are distinguished by how dissipation is partitioned between the layers. It is found that upstream shear with a faster and thinner lower layer causes an increase in bore speed, for a given jump height. Further, these two-layer solutions only exist for a limited range of upstream shear. 2D numerical simulations are conducted, guided by the two-layer theory solution space, and the results are compared to the theories. The simulations show the qualitative types of hydraulic transitions that occur, including undular bores, fully turbulent jumps, and conjugate state-like solutions; the type depends on the jump height and upstream shear for fixed upstream layer depths. Numerical simulations are used to investigate the mixing. Finally, a few 3D numerical simulations were made and are found to be consistent with the 2D results.

  17. The Start of Head Start

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neugebauer, Roger

    2010-01-01

    The creation of the Head Start program occurred at break-neck speed with many dramatic turns and many colorful players. No one tells the story better than Edward Zigler in "Head Start: The Inside Story of America's Most Successful Educational Experiment"--a detailed and personal, behind the scenes look at the program's inception. From this…

  18. Upstream Swimming in Microbiological Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathijssen, Arnold J. T. M.; Shendruk, Tyler N.; Yeomans, Julia M.; Doostmohammadi, Amin

    2016-01-01

    Interactions between microorganisms and their complex flowing environments are essential in many biological systems. We develop a model for microswimmer dynamics in non-Newtonian Poiseuille flows. We predict that swimmers in shear-thickening (-thinning) fluids migrate upstream more (less) quickly than in Newtonian fluids and demonstrate that viscoelastic normal stress differences reorient swimmers causing them to migrate upstream at the centerline, in contrast to well-known boundary accumulation in quiescent Newtonian fluids. Based on these observations, we suggest a sorting mechanism to select microbes by swimming speed.

  19. Upstream Swimming in Microbiological Flows.

    PubMed

    Mathijssen, Arnold J T M; Shendruk, Tyler N; Yeomans, Julia M; Doostmohammadi, Amin

    2016-01-15

    Interactions between microorganisms and their complex flowing environments are essential in many biological systems. We develop a model for microswimmer dynamics in non-Newtonian Poiseuille flows. We predict that swimmers in shear-thickening (-thinning) fluids migrate upstream more (less) quickly than in Newtonian fluids and demonstrate that viscoelastic normal stress differences reorient swimmers causing them to migrate upstream at the centerline, in contrast to well-known boundary accumulation in quiescent Newtonian fluids. Based on these observations, we suggest a sorting mechanism to select microbes by swimming speed. PMID:26824571

  20. Upstream open reading frames: Molecular switches in (patho)physiology

    PubMed Central

    Wethmar, Klaus; Smink, Jeske J; Leutz, Achim

    2010-01-01

    Conserved upstream open reading frames (uORFs) are found within many eukaryotic transcripts and are known to regulate protein translation. Evidence from genetic and bioinformatic studies implicates disturbed uORF-mediated translational control in the etiology of human diseases. A genetic mouse model has recently provided proof-of-principle support for the physiological relevance of uORF-mediated translational control in mammals. The targeted disruption of the uORF initiation codon within the transcription factor CCAAT/enhancer binding protein β (C/EBPβ) gene resulted in deregulated C/EBPβ protein isoform expression, associated with defective liver regeneration and impaired osteoclast differentiation. The high prevalence of uORFs in the human transcriptome suggests that intensified search for mutations within 5′ RNA leader regions may reveal a multitude of alterations affecting uORFs, causing pathogenic deregulation of protein expression. PMID:20726009

  1. Genome-wide analysis of codon usage bias in Ebolavirus.

    PubMed

    Cristina, Juan; Moreno, Pilar; Moratorio, Gonzalo; Musto, Héctor

    2015-01-22

    Ebola virus (EBOV) is a member of the family Filoviridae and its genome consists of a 19-kb, single-stranded, negative sense RNA. EBOV is subdivided into five distinct species with different pathogenicities, being Zaire ebolavirus (ZEBOV) the most lethal species. The interplay of codon usage among viruses and their hosts is expected to affect overall viral survival, fitness, evasion from host's immune system and evolution. In the present study, we performed comprehensive analyses of codon usage and composition of ZEBOV. Effective number of codons (ENC) indicates that the overall codon usage among ZEBOV strains is slightly biased. Different codon preferences in ZEBOV genes in relation to codon usage of human genes were found. Highly preferred codons are all A-ending triplets, which strongly suggests that mutational bias is a main force shaping codon usage in ZEBOV. Dinucleotide composition also plays a role in the overall pattern of ZEBOV codon usage. ZEBOV does not seem to use the most abundant tRNAs present in the human cells for most of their preferred codons. PMID:25445348

  2. Evaluating Sense Codon Reassignment with a Simple Fluorescence Screen.

    PubMed

    Biddle, Wil; Schmitt, Margaret A; Fisk, John D

    2015-12-22

    Understanding the interactions that drive the fidelity of the genetic code and the limits to which modifications can be made without breaking the translational system has practical implications for understanding the molecular mechanisms of evolution as well as expanding the set of encodable amino acids, particularly those with chemistries not provided by Nature. Because 61 sense codons encode 20 amino acids, reassigning the meaning of sense codons provides an avenue for biosynthetic modification of proteins, furthering both fundamental and applied biochemical research. We developed a simple screen that exploits the absolute requirement for fluorescence of an active site tyrosine in green fluorescent protein (GFP) to probe the pliability of the degeneracy of the genetic code. Our screen monitors the restoration of the fluorophore of GFP by incorporation of a tyrosine in response to a sense codon typically assigned another meaning in the genetic code. We evaluated sense codon reassignment at four of the 21 sense codons read through wobble interactions in Escherichia coli using the Methanocaldococcus jannaschii orthogonal tRNA/aminoacyl tRNA synthetase pair originally developed and commonly used for amber stop codon suppression. By changing only the anticodon of the orthogonal tRNA, we achieved sense codon reassignment efficiencies between 1% (Phe UUU) and 6% (Lys AAG). Each of the orthogonal tRNAs preferentially decoded the codon traditionally read via a wobble interaction in E. coli with the exception of the orthogonal tRNA with an AUG anticodon, which incorporated tyrosine in response to both the His CAU and His CAC codons with approximately equal frequencies. We applied our screen in a high-throughput manner to evaluate a 10(9)-member combined tRNA/aminoacyl tRNA synthetase library to identify improved sense codon reassigning variants for the Lys AAG codon. A single rapid screen with the ability to broadly evaluate reassignable codons will facilitate

  3. The Mechanisms of Codon Reassignments in Mitochondrial Genetic Codes

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, Supratim; Yang, Xiaoguang

    2007-01-01

    Many cases of nonstandard genetic codes are known in mitochondrial genomes. We carry out analysis of phylogeny and codon usage of organisms for which the complete mitochondrial genome is available, and we determine the most likely mechanism for codon reassignment in each case. Reassignment events can be classified according to the gain-loss framework. The “gain” represents the appearance of a new tRNA for the reassigned codon or the change of an existing tRNA such that it gains the ability to pair with the codon. The “loss” represents the deletion of a tRNA or the change in a tRNA so that it no longer translates the codon. One possible mechanism is codon disappearance (CD), where the codon disappears from the genome prior to the gain and loss events. In the alternative mechanisms the codon does not disappear. In the unassigned codon mechanism, the loss occurs first, whereas in the ambiguous intermediate mechanism, the gain occurs first. Codon usage analysis gives clear evidence of cases where the codon disappeared at the point of the reassignment and also cases where it did not disappear. CD is the probable explanation for stop to sense reassignments and a small number of reassignments of sense codons. However, the majority of sense-to-sense reassignments cannot be explained by CD. In the latter cases, by analysis of the presence or absence of tRNAs in the genome and of the changes in tRNA sequences, it is sometimes possible to distinguish between the unassigned codon and the ambiguous intermediate mechanisms. We emphasize that not all reassignments follow the same scenario and that it is necessary to consider the details of each case carefully. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s00239-006-0284-7) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:17541678

  4. Codon usage patterns in Nematoda: analysis based on over 25 million codons in thirty-two species

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Background Codon usage has direct utility in molecular characterization of species and is also a marker for molecular evolution. To understand codon usage within the diverse phylum Nematoda, we analyzed a total of 265,494 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) from 30 nematode species. The full genomes of Caenorhabditis elegans and C. briggsae were also examined. A total of 25,871,325 codons were analyzed and a comprehensive codon usage table for all species was generated. This is the first codon usage table available for 24 of these organisms. Results Codon usage similarity in Nematoda usually persists over the breadth of a genus but then rapidly diminishes even within each clade. Globodera, Meloidogyne, Pristionchus, and Strongyloides have the most highly derived patterns of codon usage. The major factor affecting differences in codon usage between species is the coding sequence GC content, which varies in nematodes from 32% to 51%. Coding GC content (measured as GC3) also explains much of the observed variation in the effective number of codons (R = 0.70), which is a measure of codon bias, and it even accounts for differences in amino acid frequency. Codon usage is also affected by neighboring nucleotides (N1 context). Coding GC content correlates strongly with estimated noncoding genomic GC content (R = 0.92). On examining abundant clusters in five species, candidate optimal codons were identified that may be preferred in highly expressed transcripts. Conclusion Evolutionary models indicate that total genomic GC content, probably the product of directional mutation pressure, drives codon usage rather than the converse, a conclusion that is supported by examination of nematode genomes. PMID:26271136

  5. Start Young!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubin, Penni

    2002-01-01

    Discusses the importance of early interest in science and how effective it is on career choice in adult stages of life. Recommends starting mathematics and science activities in preschool and kindergarten. Describes how to create a career-oriented learning center in the classroom with examples of kitchen chemistry, nutrition/botany, zoology,…

  6. Codon Usage Domains over Bacterial Chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Bailly-Bechet, Marc; Danchin, Antoine; Iqbal, Mudassar; Marsili, Matteo; Vergassola, Massimo

    2006-01-01

    The geography of codon bias distributions over prokaryotic genomes and its impact upon chromosomal organization are analyzed. To this aim, we introduce a clustering method based on information theory, specifically designed to cluster genes according to their codon usage and apply it to the coding sequences of Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis. One of the clusters identified in each of the organisms is found to be related to expression levels, as expected, but other groups feature an over-representation of genes belonging to different functional groups, namely horizontally transferred genes, motility, and intermediary metabolism. Furthermore, we show that genes with a similar bias tend to be close to each other on the chromosome and organized in coherent domains, more extended than operons, demonstrating a role of translation in structuring bacterial chromosomes. It is argued that a sizeable contribution to this effect comes from the dynamical compartimentalization induced by the recycling of tRNAs, leading to gene expression rates dependent on their genomic and expression context. PMID:16683018

  7. Kinetics of Stop Codon Recognition by Release Factor 1

    PubMed Central

    Hetrick, Byron; Lee, Kristin; Joseph, Simpson

    2009-01-01

    Recognition of stop codons by class I release factors is a fundamental step in the termination phase of protein synthesis. Since premature termination is costly to the cell, release factors have to efficiently discriminate between stop and sense codons. In order to understand the mechanism of discrimination between stop and sense codons, we developed a new, pre-steady state kinetic assay to monitor the interaction of RF1 with the ribosome. Our results show that RF1 associates with similar association rate constants to ribosomes programmed with a stop or sense codons. However, dissociation of RF1 from sense codons is as much as three orders of magnitude faster than from stop codons. Interestingly, the affinity of RF1 for ribosomes programmed with different sense codons does not correlate with the defects in peptide release. Thus, discrimination against sense codons is achieved, both, by increasing the dissociation rates and by decreasing the rate of peptide release. These results suggest that sense codons inhibit conformational changes necessary for RF1 to stably bind to the ribosome and catalyze peptide release. PMID:19874047

  8. A computer program to display codon changes caused by mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Sirotkin, K

    1988-04-01

    A FORTRAN program for displaying the correspondence between codon changes and different possible base changes is presented. Changes of both single bases and dimers are considered. The user can specify the mutagenesis spectrum. Additionally, the user can choose whether or not to consider single or double events in a codon and whether or not to consider the possibility that the change of two bases (a dimer) can overlap a codon boundary. Furthermore, a variety of ways may be chosen to display and summarize the codon changes that can result from the specified mutagenesis. A user-supplied sequence or the genetic code table can be analyzed. PMID:3167596

  9. Comparative context analysis of codon pairs on an ORFeome scale

    PubMed Central

    Moura, Gabriela; Pinheiro, Miguel; Silva, Raquel; Miranda, Isabel; Afreixo, Vera; Dias, Gaspar; Freitas, Adelaide; Oliveira, José L; Santos, Manuel AS

    2005-01-01

    Codon context is an important feature of gene primary structure that modulates mRNA decoding accuracy. We have developed an analytical software package and a graphical interface for comparative codon context analysis of all the open reading frames in a genome (the ORFeome). Using the complete ORFeome sequences of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Candida albicans and Escherichia coli, we show that this methodology permits large-scale codon context comparisons and provides new insight on the rules that govern the evolution of codon-pair context. PMID:15774029

  10. Press Start

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harteveld, Casper

    This level sets the stage for the design philosophy called “Triadic Game Design” (TGD). This design philosophy can be summarized with the following sentence: it takes two to tango, but it takes three to design a meaningful game or a game with a purpose. Before the philosophy is further explained, this level will first delve into what is meant by a meaningful game or a game with a purpose. Many terms and definitions have seen the light and in this book I will specifically orient at digital games that aim to have an effect beyond the context of the game itself. Subsequently, a historical overview is given of the usage of games with a serious purpose which starts from the moment we human beings started to walk on our feet till our contemporary society. It turns out that we have been using games for all kinds of non-entertainment purposes for already quite a long time. With this introductory material in the back of our minds, I will explain the concept of TGD by means of a puzzle. After that, the protagonist of this book, the game Levee Patroller, is introduced. Based on the development of this game, the idea of TGD, which stresses to balance three different worlds, the worlds of Reality, Meaning, and Play, came into being. Interested? Then I suggest to quickly “press start!”

  11. Stop codons in bacteria are not selectively equivalent

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The evolution and genomic stop codon frequencies have not been rigorously studied with the exception of coding of non-canonical amino acids. Here we study the rate of evolution and frequency distribution of stop codons in bacterial genomes. Results We show that in bacteria stop codons evolve slower than synonymous sites, suggesting the action of weak negative selection. However, the frequency of stop codons relative to genomic nucleotide content indicated that this selection regime is not straightforward. The frequency of TAA and TGA stop codons is GC-content dependent, with TAA decreasing and TGA increasing with GC-content, while TAG frequency is independent of GC-content. Applying a formal, analytical model to these data we found that the relationship between stop codon frequencies and nucleotide content cannot be explained by mutational biases or selection on nucleotide content. However, with weak nucleotide content-dependent selection on TAG, -0.5 < Nes < 1.5, the model fits all of the data and recapitulates the relationship between TAG and nucleotide content. For biologically plausible rates of mutations we show that, in bacteria, TAG stop codon is universally associated with lower fitness, with TAA being the optimal for G-content < 16% while for G-content > 16% TGA has a higher fitness than TAG. Conclusions Our data indicate that TAG codon is universally suboptimal in the bacterial lineage, such that TAA is likely to be the preferred stop codon for low GC content while the TGA is the preferred stop codon for high GC content. The optimization of stop codon usage may therefore be useful in genome engineering or gene expression optimization applications. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Michail Gelfand, Arcady Mushegian and Shamil Sunyaev. For the full reviews, please go to the Reviewers’ Comments section. PMID:22974057

  12. Nonsense codons trigger an RNA partitioning shift.

    PubMed

    Bhalla, Angela D; Gudikote, Jayanthi P; Wang, Jun; Chan, Wai-Kin; Chang, Yao-Fu; Olivas, O Renee; Wilkinson, Miles F

    2009-02-13

    T-cell receptor-beta (TCRbeta) genes naturally acquire premature termination codons (PTCs) as a result of programmed gene rearrangements. PTC-bearing TCRbeta transcripts are dramatically down-regulated to protect T-cells from the deleterious effects of the truncated proteins that would otherwise be produced. Here we provide evidence that two responses collaborate to elicit this dramatic down-regulation. One is rapid mRNA decay triggered by the nonsense-mediated decay (NMD) RNA surveillance pathway. We demonstrate that this occurs in highly purified nuclei lacking detectable levels of three different cytoplasmic markers, but containing an outer nuclear membrane marker, suggesting that decay occurs either in the nucleoplasm or at the outer nuclear membrane. The second response is a dramatic partitioning shift in the nuclear fraction-to-cytoplasmic fraction mRNA ratio that results in few TCRbeta transcripts escaping to the cytoplasmic fraction of cells. Analysis of TCRbeta mRNA kinetics after either transcriptional repression or induction suggested that this nonsense codon-induced partitioning shift (NIPS) response is not the result of cytoplasmic NMD but instead reflects retention of PTC(+) TCRbeta mRNA in the nuclear fraction of cells. We identified TCRbeta sequences crucial for NIPS but found that NIPS is not exclusively a property of TCRbeta transcripts, and we identified non-TCRbeta sequences that elicit NIPS. RNA interference experiments indicated that NIPS depends on the NMD factors UPF1 and eIF4AIII but not the NMD factor UPF3B. We propose that NIPS collaborates with NMD to retain and degrade a subset of PTC(+) transcripts at the outer nuclear membrane and/or within the nucleoplasm. PMID:19091751

  13. Synonymous codon usage pattern in glycoprotein gene of rabies virus.

    PubMed

    Morla, Sudhir; Makhija, Aditi; Kumar, Sachin

    2016-06-10

    Rabies virus (RABV) is the causative agent of a fatal nervous system ailment. The disease is zoonotic and prevalent in many developing countries. The glycoprotein (G) of RABV is the major antigenic determinant of the virus and plays a pivotal role in its neurovirulence. Various aspects of 'G' protein biology have been explored, but the factors affecting the nucleotide choice and synonymous codon usage have never been reported. In the present study, we have analyzed the relative synonymous codon usage and effective number of codons (Nc) using 132 'G' protein genes of RABV. Corresponding analysis was used to calculate major trends in codon usage. The correlation between base composition and codon usage as well as the plot between Nc and GC3 suggest that mutational pressure is the major factor that influences the codon usage in the G gene of RABV. In addition, factors like aromaticity, aliphatic index and hydropathy have shown slight correlation suggesting that natural selection also contributes to the codon usage variations of the 'G' gene. In conclusion, codon usage bias in 'G' gene of RABV is mainly by mutational pressure and natural selection. PMID:26945626

  14. [Codon usage bias in the straw mushroom Volvariella volvacea].

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wei; Lü, Beibei; He, Jianhua; Wang, Jinbin; Wu, Xiao; Wu, Guogan; Bao, Dapeng; Chen, Mingjie; Zhang, Jinsong; Tan, Qi; Tang, Xueming

    2014-09-01

    We analyzed the whole genome coding sequence of Volvariella volvacea to study the pattern utilization of codons by Codon W 1.4.2. As results, 24 optimal codons were identified. Moreover, the frequency of codons usage was calculated by CUSP program. We compared the frequency of codons usage of V. volvacea with other organisms including 6 modal value species (Homo sapiens, Saccharomys cerevisiae, Arabidopsis thalian, Mus musculus, Danio rerio and Drosophila melanogaster) and 4 edible fungi (Coprinopsis cinerea, Agaricus bisporus, Lentinula edodes and Pleurotus ostreatus). We found that there were less differences in 3 edible fungi (excluding Pleurotus ostreatus) than 6 modal value species, comparing with the frequency of codons usage of V. volvacea. With software SPSS16.0, cluster analysis which showed differences in the size of codon bias, reflects the evolutionary relationships between species, which can be used as a reference of evolutionary relationships of species. This was the first time for analysis the codon preference among the whole coding sequences of edible fungi, serving as theoretical basis to apply genetic engineering of V. volvacea. PMID:25720157

  15. Upstream waves in Saturn's foreshock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bavassano Cattaneo, M. B.; Cattaneo, P.; Moreno, G.; Lepping, R. P.

    1991-01-01

    An analysis based on plasma and magnetic-field data obtained from Voyager 1 during its Saturn encounter is reported. The plasma data provided every 96 sec and magnetic-field data averaged over 48 sec are utilized. The evidence of upstream waves at Saturn are detected. The waves have a period, in the spacecraft frame, of about 550 sec and a relative amplitude larger than 0.3, are left- and right-hand elliptically polarized, and propagate at about 30 deg with respect to the average magnetic field. The appearance of the waves is correlated with the spacecraft being magnetically connected to the bow shock.

  16. Structural basis for stop codon recognition in eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Jason; Hegde, Ramanujan S.; Ramakrishnan, V.

    2015-01-01

    Termination of protein synthesis occurs when a translating ribosome encounters one of three universally conserved stop codons: UGA, UAA, or UAG. Release factors recognise stop codons in the ribosomal A site to mediate release of the nascent chain and recycling of the ribosome. Bacteria decode stop codons using two separate release factors with differing specificities for the second and third bases1. By contrast, eukaryotes rely on an evolutionarily unrelated omnipotent release factor (eRF1) to recognise all three stop codons2. The molecular basis of eRF1 discrimination for stop codons over sense codons is not known. Here, we present electron cryo-microscopy (cryo-EM) structures at 3.5 – 3.8 Å resolution of mammalian ribosomal complexes containing eRF1 interacting with each of the three stop codons in the A site. Binding of eRF1 flips nucleotide A1825 of 18S rRNA so that it stacks on the second and third stop codon bases. This configuration pulls the fourth position base into the A site, where it is stabilised by stacking against G626 of 18S rRNA. Thus, eRF1 exploits two rRNA nucleotides also used during tRNA selection to drive mRNA compaction. Stop codons are favoured in this compacted mRNA conformation by a hydrogen-bonding network with essential eRF1 residues that constrains the identity of the bases. These results provide a molecular framework for eukaryotic stop codon recognition and have implications for future studies on the mechanisms of canonical and premature translation termination3,4. PMID:26245381

  17. Codon Bias Patterns of E. coli’s Interacting Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Dilucca, Maddalena; Cimini, Giulio; Semmoloni, Andrea; Deiana, Antonio; Giansanti, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Synonymous codons, i.e., DNA nucleotide triplets coding for the same amino acid, are used differently across the variety of living organisms. The biological meaning of this phenomenon, known as codon usage bias, is still controversial. In order to shed light on this point, we propose a new codon bias index, CompAI, that is based on the competition between cognate and near-cognate tRNAs during translation, without being tuned to the usage bias of highly expressed genes. We perform a genome-wide evaluation of codon bias for E.coli, comparing CompAI with other widely used indices: tAI, CAI, and Nc. We show that CompAI and tAI capture similar information by being positively correlated with gene conservation, measured by the Evolutionary Retention Index (ERI), and essentiality, whereas, CAI and Nc appear to be less sensitive to evolutionary-functional parameters. Notably, the rate of variation of tAI and CompAI with ERI allows to obtain sets of genes that consistently belong to specific clusters of orthologous genes (COGs). We also investigate the correlation of codon bias at the genomic level with the network features of protein-protein interactions in E.coli. We find that the most densely connected communities of the network share a similar level of codon bias (as measured by CompAI and tAI). Conversely, a small difference in codon bias between two genes is, statistically, a prerequisite for the corresponding proteins to interact. Importantly, among all codon bias indices, CompAI turns out to have the most coherent distribution over the communities of the interactome, pointing to the significance of competition among cognate and near-cognate tRNAs for explaining codon usage adaptation. Notably, CompAI may potentially correlate with translation speed measurements, by accounting for the specific delay induced by wobble-pairing between codons and anticodons. PMID:26566157

  18. Harvey ras genes transform without mutant codons, apparently activated by truncation of a 5' exon (exon -1).

    PubMed Central

    Cichutek, K; Duesberg, P H

    1986-01-01

    The hypothesis is tested that the ras gene of Harvey sarcoma virus (Ha-SV) and the proto-ras DNAs from certain tumor cells derive transforming function from specific codons in which they differ from normal proto-ras genes. Molecularly cloned Harvey proviral vectors carrying viral ras, normal rat proto-ras, and recombinant ras genes in which the virus-specific ras codons 12 and 59 were replaced by proto-ras equivalents each transformed aneuploid mouse 3T3 cells after latent periods that ranged from 4 to 10 days. Viruses with or without virus-specific ras codons all transformed diploid rat cells in 3-5 days equally well. However, in the absence of virus replication, mutant codons were beneficial for transforming function. Deletion of non-ras regions of Ha-SV did not affect transforming function. We conclude that specific ras codons are not necessary for transforming function. Comparisons of the ras sequences of Ha-SV, BALB SV, and Rasheed SV with sequences of proto-ras genes from rat and man revealed an upstream proto-ras exon, termed exon -1. The 3' end of this exon is present in all three viruses and in a ras pseudogene of the rat. Since ras genes transform without mutation and since exon -1 is truncated in viral ras genes and all transforming proto-ras DNAs of the Harvey and the Kirsten ras family, we propose that ras genes are activated by truncation of exon -1 either via viral transduction or artificially via cloning and transfection. The proposal implies that untruncated proto-ras genes with point mutations may not be cellular cancer genes. Images PMID:3517865

  19. Structural Basis for Translation Termination on a Pseudouridylated Stop Codon.

    PubMed

    Svidritskiy, Egor; Madireddy, Rohini; Korostelev, Andrei A

    2016-05-22

    Pseudouridylation of messenger RNA emerges as an abundant modification involved in gene expression regulation. Pseudouridylation of stop codons in eukaryotic and bacterial cells results in stop-codon read through. The structural mechanism of this phenomenon is not known. Here we present a 3.1-Å crystal structure of Escherichia coli release factor 1 (RF1) bound to the 70S ribosome in response to the ΨAA codon. The structure reveals that recognition of a modified stop codon does not differ from that of a canonical stop codon. Our in vitro biochemical results support this finding by yielding nearly identical rates for peptide release from E. coli ribosomes programmed with pseudouridylated and canonical stop codons. The crystal structure also brings insight into E. coli RF1-specific interactions and suggests involvement of L27 in bacterial translation termination. Our results are consistent with a mechanism in which read through of a pseudouridylated stop codon in bacteria results from increased decoding by near-cognate tRNAs (miscoding) rather than from decreased efficiency of termination. PMID:27107638

  20. Premature termination codons in modern human genomes

    PubMed Central

    Fujikura, Kohei

    2016-01-01

    The considerable range of genetic variation in human populations may partly reflect distinctive processes of adaptation to variable environmental conditions. However, the adaptive genomic signatures remain to be completely elucidated. This research explores candidate loci under selection at the population level by characterizing recently arisen premature termination codons (PTCs), some of which indicate a human knockout. From a total of 7595 participants from two population exome projects, 246 PTCs were found where natural selection has resulted in new alleles with a high frequency (from 1% to 96%) of derived alleles and various levels of population differentiation (FST = 0.00139–0.626). The PTC genes formed protein and regulatory networks limited to 15 biological processes or gene families, of which seven categories were previously unreported. PTC mutations have a strong tendency to be introduced into members of the same gene family, even during modern human evolution, although the exact nature of the selection is not fully known. The findings here suggest the ongoing evolutionary plasticity of modern humans at the genetic level and also partly provide insights into common human knockouts. PMID:26932450

  1. Premature termination codons in modern human genomes.

    PubMed

    Fujikura, Kohei

    2016-01-01

    The considerable range of genetic variation in human populations may partly reflect distinctive processes of adaptation to variable environmental conditions. However, the adaptive genomic signatures remain to be completely elucidated. This research explores candidate loci under selection at the population level by characterizing recently arisen premature termination codons (PTCs), some of which indicate a human knockout. From a total of 7595 participants from two population exome projects, 246 PTCs were found where natural selection has resulted in new alleles with a high frequency (from 1% to 96%) of derived alleles and various levels of population differentiation (FST = 0.00139-0.626). The PTC genes formed protein and regulatory networks limited to 15 biological processes or gene families, of which seven categories were previously unreported. PTC mutations have a strong tendency to be introduced into members of the same gene family, even during modern human evolution, although the exact nature of the selection is not fully known. The findings here suggest the ongoing evolutionary plasticity of modern humans at the genetic level and also partly provide insights into common human knockouts. PMID:26932450

  2. Analysis of amino acid and codon usage in Paramecium bursaria.

    PubMed

    Dohra, Hideo; Fujishima, Masahiro; Suzuki, Haruo

    2015-10-01

    The ciliate Paramecium bursaria harbors the green-alga Chlorella symbionts. We reassembled the P. bursaria transcriptome to minimize falsely fused transcripts, and investigated amino acid and codon usage using the transcriptome data. Surface proteins preferentially use smaller amino acid residues like cysteine. Unusual synonymous codon and amino acid usage in highly expressed genes can reflect a balance between translational selection and other factors. A correlation of gene expression level with synonymous codon or amino acid usage is emphasized in genes down-regulated in symbiont-bearing cells compared to symbiont-free cells. Our results imply that the selection is associated with P. bursaria-Chlorella symbiosis. PMID:26341535

  3. Genetic Code Expansion by Degeneracy Reprogramming of Arginyl Codons.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ki Baek; Hou, Chen Yuan; Kim, Chae-Eun; Kim, Dong-Myung; Suga, Hiroaki; Kang, Taek Jin

    2016-07-01

    The genetic code in most organisms codes for 20 proteinogenic amino acids or translation stop. In order to encode more than 20 amino acids in the coding system, one of stop codons is usually reprogrammed to encode a non-proteinogenic amino acid. Although this approach works, usually only one amino acid is added to the amino acid repertoire. In this study, we incorporated non-proteinogenic amino acids into a protein by using a sense codon. As all the codons are allocated in the universal genetic code, we destroyed all the tRNA(Arg) in a cell-free protein synthesis system by using a tRNA(Arg) -specific tRNase, colicin D. Then by supplementing the system with tRNACCU , the translation system was partially restored. Through this creative destruction, reprogrammable codons were successfully created in the system to encode modified lysines along with the 20 proteinogenic amino acids. PMID:27151886

  4. 20. WEST CONFEDERATE AVENUE BRIDGE SPANNING CODON'S RUN, ARCH DETAIL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. WEST CONFEDERATE AVENUE BRIDGE SPANNING CODON'S RUN, ARCH DETAIL SHOWING BRICK ARCH FOR MAIN SPAN AND STONE VOUSSOIRS. VIEW W. - Gettysburg National Military Park Tour Roads, Gettysburg, Adams County, PA

  5. Mononucleotide and dinucleotide frequencies, and codon usage in poliovirion RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Rothberg, P G; Wimmer, E

    1981-01-01

    The polio type 1 (Mahoney) RNA sequence (1) has been analyzed in terms of the distribution of its mononucleotides, dinucleotides and trinucleotides (codons). The distribution of adenosine in the sequence is nonuniform, being lower at the 5' end and higher at the 3' end. The dinucleotide CG is relatively rare and the dinucleotides UG and CA are relatively more common than expected. Codon usage is decidedly nonrandom. Codons containing CG are avoided and those ending in adenosine are favored. The asymmetric use of mononucleotides, dinucleotides and codons in polio RNA is unexplained at the present time although the lowered CG frequency may be the result of a DNA origin for polio RNA. PMID:6275352

  6. Codon Usage Bias and Determining Forces in Taenia solium Genome.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xing; Ma, Xusheng; Luo, Xuenong; Ling, Houjun; Zhang, Xichen; Cai, Xuepeng

    2015-12-01

    The tapeworm Taenia solium is an important human zoonotic parasite that causes great economic loss and also endangers public health. At present, an effective vaccine that will prevent infection and chemotherapy without any side effect remains to be developed. In this study, codon usage patterns in the T. solium genome were examined through 8,484 protein-coding genes. Neutrality analysis showed that T. solium had a narrow GC distribution, and a significant correlation was observed between GC12 and GC3. Examination of an NC (ENC vs GC3s)-plot showed a few genes on or close to the expected curve, but the majority of points with low-ENC (the effective number of codons) values were detected below the expected curve, suggesting that mutational bias plays a major role in shaping codon usage. The Parity Rule 2 plot (PR2) analysis showed that GC and AT were not used proportionally. We also identified 26 optimal codons in the T. solium genome, all of which ended with either a G or C residue. These optimal codons in the T. solium genome are likely consistent with tRNAs that are highly expressed in the cell, suggesting that mutational and translational selection forces are probably driving factors of codon usage bias in the T. solium genome. PMID:26797435

  7. Codon Usage Bias and Determining Forces in Taenia solium Genome

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xing; Ma, Xusheng; Luo, Xuenong; Ling, Houjun; Zhang, Xichen; Cai, Xuepeng

    2015-01-01

    The tapeworm Taenia solium is an important human zoonotic parasite that causes great economic loss and also endangers public health. At present, an effective vaccine that will prevent infection and chemotherapy without any side effect remains to be developed. In this study, codon usage patterns in the T. solium genome were examined through 8,484 protein-coding genes. Neutrality analysis showed that T. solium had a narrow GC distribution, and a significant correlation was observed between GC12 and GC3. Examination of an NC (ENC vs GC3s)-plot showed a few genes on or close to the expected curve, but the majority of points with low-ENC (the effective number of codons) values were detected below the expected curve, suggesting that mutational bias plays a major role in shaping codon usage. The Parity Rule 2 plot (PR2) analysis showed that GC and AT were not used proportionally. We also identified 26 optimal codons in the T. solium genome, all of which ended with either a G or C residue. These optimal codons in the T. solium genome are likely consistent with tRNAs that are highly expressed in the cell, suggesting that mutational and translational selection forces are probably driving factors of codon usage bias in the T. solium genome. PMID:26797435

  8. The Effect of Codon Mismatch on the Protein Translation System

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Liaoran; Li, Guohui; Cheng, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Incorrect protein translation, caused by codon mismatch, is an important problem of living cells. In this work, a computational model was introduced to quantify the effects of codon mismatch and the model was used to study the protein translation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. According to simulation results, the probability of codon mismatch will increase when the supply of amino acids is unbalanced, and the longer is the codon sequence, the larger is the probability for incorrect translation to occur, making the synthesis of long peptide chain difficult. By comparing to simulation results without codon mismatch effects taken into account, the fraction of mRNAs with bound ribosome decrease faster along the mRNAs, making the 5’ ramp phenomenon more obvious. It was also found in our work that the premature mechanism resulted from codon mismatch can reduce the proportion of incorrect translation when the amino acid supply is extremely unbalanced, which is one possible source of high fidelity protein synthesis after peptidyl transfer. PMID:26840415

  9. Enhanced expression of codon optimized interferon gamma in CHO cells.

    PubMed

    Chung, Bevan Kai-Sheng; Yusufi, Faraaz N K; Mariati; Yang, Yuansheng; Lee, Dong-Yup

    2013-09-10

    The human interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) is a potential drug candidate for treating various diseases due to its immunomodulatory properties. The efficient production of this protein can be achieved through a popular industrial host, Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. However, recombinant expression of foreign proteins is typically suboptimal possibly due to the usage of non-native codon patterns within the coding sequence. Therefore, we demonstrated the application of a recently developed codon optimization approach to design synthetic IFN-γ coding sequences for enhanced heterologous expression in CHO cells. For codon optimization, earlier studies suggested to establish the target usage distribution pattern in terms of selected design parameters such as individual codon usage (ICU) and codon context (CC), mainly based on the host's highly expressed genes. However, our RNA-Seq based transcriptome profiling indicated that the ICU and CC distribution patterns of different gene expression classes in CHO cell are relatively similar, unlike other microbial expression hosts, Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This finding was further corroborated through the in vivo expression of various ICU and CC optimized IFN-γ in CHO cells. Interestingly, the CC-optimized genes exhibited at least 13-fold increase in expression level compared to the wild-type IFN-γ while a maximum of 10-fold increase was observed for the ICU-optimized genes. Although design criteria based on individual codons, such as ICU, have been widely used for gene optimization, our experimental results suggested that codon context is relatively more effective parameter for improving recombinant IFN-γ expression in CHO cells. PMID:23876479

  10. Upstream Waves and Particles at the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harada, Y.; Halekas, J. S.

    2016-02-01

    This chapter presents an up-to-date catalog of Moon-related particle populations and lunar upstream waves obtained from in situ measurements at low (<˜100 km) and high altitudes, aimed at organizing and clarifying the currently available information on this complex region, where multiple categories of waves and particles coexist. It then briefly outlines the observed properties of a variety of classes of lunar upstream waves, as well as their generation mechanisms currently proposed, in association with the lunar upstream particle distributions. The lunar upstream region magnetically connected to the Moon and its wake, the fore-moon, represents a remarkably rich zoo of different classes of waves and different types of particles. Although recent observations have substantially enhanced our knowledge by revealing a number of new categories of upstream particles and waves at the Moon, many fundamental questions remain unanswered, and these are outlined in the chapter.

  11. A Novel Mutation in the Upstream Open Reading Frame of the CDKN1B Gene Causes a MEN4 Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Occhi, Gianluca; Regazzo, Daniela; Trivellin, Giampaolo; Boaretto, Francesca; Ciato, Denis; Bobisse, Sara; Ferasin, Sergio; Cetani, Filomena; Pardi, Elena; Korbonits, Márta; Pellegata, Natalia S.; Sidarovich, Viktoryia; Quattrone, Alessandro; Opocher, Giuseppe; Mantero, Franco; Scaroni, Carla

    2013-01-01

    The CDKN1B gene encodes the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27KIP1, an atypical tumor suppressor playing a key role in cell cycle regulation, cell proliferation, and differentiation. Impaired p27KIP1 expression and/or localization are often observed in tumor cells, further confirming its central role in regulating the cell cycle. Recently, germline mutations in CDKN1B have been associated with the inherited multiple endocrine neoplasia syndrome type 4, an autosomal dominant syndrome characterized by varying combinations of tumors affecting at least two endocrine organs. In this study we identified a 4-bp deletion in a highly conserved regulatory upstream ORF (uORF) in the 5′UTR of the CDKN1B gene in a patient with a pituitary adenoma and a well-differentiated pancreatic neoplasm. This deletion causes the shift of the uORF termination codon with the consequent lengthening of the uORF–encoded peptide and the drastic shortening of the intercistronic space. Our data on the immunohistochemical analysis of the patient's pancreatic lesion, functional studies based on dual-luciferase assays, site-directed mutagenesis, and on polysome profiling show a negative influence of this deletion on the translation reinitiation at the CDKN1B starting site, with a consequent reduction in p27KIP1 expression. Our findings demonstrate that, in addition to the previously described mechanisms leading to reduced p27KIP1 activity, such as degradation via the ubiquitin/proteasome pathway or non-covalent sequestration, p27KIP1 activity can also be modulated by an uORF and mutations affecting uORF could change p27KIP1 expression. This study adds the CDKN1B gene to the short list of genes for which mutations that either create, delete, or severely modify their regulatory uORFs have been associated with human diseases. PMID:23555276

  12. Genome-Wide Analysis of Codon Usage Bias in Epichloë festucae.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiuzhang; Song, Hui; Kuang, Yu; Chen, Shuihong; Tian, Pei; Li, Chunjie; Nan, Zhibiao

    2016-01-01

    Analysis of codon usage data has both practical and theoretical applications in understanding the basics of molecular biology. Differences in codon usage patterns among genes reflect variations in local base compositional biases and the intensity of natural selection. Recently, there have been several reports related to codon usage in fungi, but little is known about codon usage bias in Epichloë endophytes. The present study aimed to assess codon usage patterns and biases in 4870 sequences from Epichloë festucae, which may be helpful in revealing the constraint factors such as mutation or selection pressure and improving the bioreactor on the cloning, expression, and characterization of some special genes. The GC content with 56.41% is higher than the AT content (43.59%) in E. festucae. The results of neutrality and effective number of codons plot analyses showed that both mutational bias and natural selection play roles in shaping codon usage in this species. We found that gene length is strongly correlated with codon usage and may contribute to the codon usage patterns observed in genes. Nucleotide composition and gene expression levels also shape codon usage bias in E. festucae. E. festucae exhibits codon usage bias based on the relative synonymous codon usage (RSCU) values of 61 sense codons, with 25 codons showing an RSCU larger than 1. In addition, we identified 27 optimal codons that end in a G or C. PMID:27428961

  13. Genome-Wide Analysis of Codon Usage Bias in Epichloë festucae

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiuzhang; Song, Hui; Kuang, Yu; Chen, Shuihong; Tian, Pei; Li, Chunjie; Nan, Zhibiao

    2016-01-01

    Analysis of codon usage data has both practical and theoretical applications in understanding the basics of molecular biology. Differences in codon usage patterns among genes reflect variations in local base compositional biases and the intensity of natural selection. Recently, there have been several reports related to codon usage in fungi, but little is known about codon usage bias in Epichloë endophytes. The present study aimed to assess codon usage patterns and biases in 4870 sequences from Epichloë festucae, which may be helpful in revealing the constraint factors such as mutation or selection pressure and improving the bioreactor on the cloning, expression, and characterization of some special genes. The GC content with 56.41% is higher than the AT content (43.59%) in E. festucae. The results of neutrality and effective number of codons plot analyses showed that both mutational bias and natural selection play roles in shaping codon usage in this species. We found that gene length is strongly correlated with codon usage and may contribute to the codon usage patterns observed in genes. Nucleotide composition and gene expression levels also shape codon usage bias in E. festucae. E. festucae exhibits codon usage bias based on the relative synonymous codon usage (RSCU) values of 61 sense codons, with 25 codons showing an RSCU larger than 1. In addition, we identified 27 optimal codons that end in a G or C. PMID:27428961

  14. An Engineered Rare Codon Device for Optimization of Metabolic Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Wang, You; Li, Chunying; Khan, Md. Rezaul Islam; Wang, Yushu; Ruan, Yunfeng; Zhao, Bin; Zhang, Bo; Ma, Xiaopan; Zhang, Kaisi; Zhao, Xiwen; Ye, Guanhao; Guo, Xizhi; Feng, Guoyin; He, Lin; Ma, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Rare codons generally arrest translation due to rarity of their cognate tRNAs. This property of rare codons can be utilized to regulate protein expression. In this study, a linear relationship was found between expression levels of genes and copy numbers of rare codons inserted within them. Based on this discovery, we constructed a molecular device in Escherichia coli using the rare codon AGG, its cognate tRNA (tRNAArg (CCU)), modified tRNAAsp (GUC → CCU), and truncated aspartyl-tRNA synthetase (TDRS) to switch the expression of reporter genes on or off as well as to precisely regulate their expression to various intermediate levels. To underscore the applicability of our work, we used the rare codon device to alter the expression levels of four genes of the fatty acid synthesis II (FASII) pathway (i.e. fabZ, fabG, fabI, and tesA’) in E. coli to optimize steady-state kinetics, which produced nearly two-fold increase in fatty acid yield. Thus, the proposed method has potential applications in regulating target protein expression at desired levels and optimizing metabolic pathways by precisely tuning in vivo molar ratio of relevant enzymes. PMID:26852704

  15. Design, synthesis, and testing toward a 57-codon genome.

    PubMed

    Ostrov, Nili; Landon, Matthieu; Guell, Marc; Kuznetsov, Gleb; Teramoto, Jun; Cervantes, Natalie; Zhou, Minerva; Singh, Kerry; Napolitano, Michael G; Moosburner, Mark; Shrock, Ellen; Pruitt, Benjamin W; Conway, Nicholas; Goodman, Daniel B; Gardner, Cameron L; Tyree, Gary; Gonzales, Alexandra; Wanner, Barry L; Norville, Julie E; Lajoie, Marc J; Church, George M

    2016-08-19

    Recoding--the repurposing of genetic codons--is a powerful strategy for enhancing genomes with functions not commonly found in nature. Here, we report computational design, synthesis, and progress toward assembly of a 3.97-megabase, 57-codon Escherichia coli genome in which all 62,214 instances of seven codons were replaced with synonymous alternatives across all protein-coding genes. We have validated 63% of recoded genes by individually testing 55 segments of 50 kilobases each. We observed that 91% of tested essential genes retained functionality with limited fitness effect. We demonstrate identification and correction of lethal design exceptions, only 13 of which were found in 2229 genes. This work underscores the feasibility of rewriting genomes and establishes a framework for large-scale design, assembly, troubleshooting, and phenotypic analysis of synthetic organisms. PMID:27540174

  16. Model for Codon Position Bias in RNA Editing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Tsunglin; Bundschuh, Ralf

    2005-08-01

    RNA editing can be crucial for the expression of genetic information via inserting, deleting, or substituting a few nucleotides at specific positions in an RNA sequence. Within coding regions in an RNA sequence, editing usually occurs with a certain bias in choosing the positions of the editing sites. In the mitochondrial genes of Physarum polycephalum, many more editing events have been observed at the third codon position than at the first and second, while in some plant mitochondria the second codon position dominates. Here we propose an evolutionary model that explains this bias as the basis of selection at the protein level. The model predicts a distribution of the three positions rather close to the experimental observation in Physarum. This suggests that the codon position bias in Physarum is mainly a consequence of selection at the protein level.

  17. A model for codon position bias in RNA editing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bundschuh, Ralf; Liu, Tsunglin

    2006-03-01

    RNA editing can be crucial for the expression of genetic information via inserting, deleting, or substituting a few nucleotides at specific positions in an RNA sequence. Within coding regions in an RNA sequence, editing usually occurs with a certain bias in choosing the positions of the editing sites. In the mitochondrial genes of Physarum polycephalum, many more editing events have been observed at the third codon position than at the first and second, while in some plant mitochondria the second codon position dominates. Here we propose an evolutionary model that explains this bias as the basis of selection at the protein level. The model predicts a distribution of the three positions rather close to the experimental observation in Physarum. This suggests that the codon position bias in Physarum is mainly a consequence of selection at the protein level.

  18. Codon-reading specificities of mitochondrial release factors and translation termination at non-standard stop codons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lind, Christoffer; Sund, Johan; Åqvist, Johan

    2013-12-01

    A key feature of mitochondrial translation is the reduced number of transfer RNAs and reassignment of codons. For human mitochondria, a major unresolved problem is how the set of stop codons are decoded by the release factors mtRF1a and mtRF1. Here we present three-dimensional structural models of human mtRF1a and mtRF1 based on their homology to bacterial RF1 in the codon recognition domain, and the strong conservation between mitochondrial and bacterial ribosomal RNA in the decoding region. Sequence changes in the less homologous mtRF1 appear to be correlated with specific features of the mitochondrial rRNA. Extensive computer simulations of the complexes with the ribosomal decoding site show that both mitochondrial factors have similar specificities and that neither reads the putative vertebrate stop codons AGA and AGG. Instead, we present a structural model for a mechanism by which the ICT1 protein causes termination by sensing the presence of these codons in the A-site of stalled ribosomes.

  19. A backtranslation method based on codon usage strategy.

    PubMed Central

    Pesole, G; Attimonelli, M; Liuni, S

    1988-01-01

    This study describes a method for the backtranslation of an aminoacidic sequence, an extremely useful tool for various experimental approaches. It involves two computer programs CLUSTER and BACKTR written in Fortran 77 running on a VAX/VMS computer. CLUSTER generates a reliable codon usage table through a cluster analysis, based on a chi 2-like distance between the sequences. BACKTR produces backtranslated sequences according to different options when use is made of the codon usage table obtained in addition to selecting the least ambiguous potential oligonucleotide probes within an aminoacidic sequence. The method was tested by applying it to 158 yeast genes. PMID:3281142

  20. UPSTREAM MOTIONS IN STRATIFIED FLOW (JOURNAL VERSION)

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the paper experimental measurements of the time-dependent velocity and density perturbations upstream of obstacles in linearly stratified flow are presented. Attention is concentrated on obstacles which generate turbulent separated wakes at Froude numbers, based on velocity an...

  1. Direct Upstream Motility in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Kaya, Tolga; Koser, Hur

    2012-01-01

    We provide an experimental demonstration of positive rheotaxis (rapid and continuous upstream motility) in wild-type Escherichia coli freely swimming over a surface. This hydrodynamic phenomenon is dominant below a critical shear rate and robust against Brownian motion and cell tumbling. We deduce that individual bacteria entering a flow system can rapidly migrate upstream (>20 μm/s) much faster than a gradually advancing biofilm. Given a bacterial population with a distribution of sizes and swim speeds, local shear rate near the surface determines the dominant hydrodynamic mode for motility, i.e., circular or random trajectories for low shear rates, positive rheotaxis for moderate flow, and sideways swimming at higher shear rates. Faster swimmers can move upstream more rapidly and at higher shear rates, as expected. Interestingly, we also find on average that both swim speed and upstream motility are independent of cell aspect ratio. PMID:22500751

  2. Damping and spectral formation of upstream whistlers

    SciTech Connect

    Orlowski, D.S.; Russell, C.T.; Krauss-Varban, D.

    1995-09-01

    Previous studies have indicated that damping rates of upstream whistlers strongly depend on the details of the electron distribution function. Moreover, detailed analysis of Doppler shift and the whistler dispersion relation indicate that upstream whistlers propagate obliquely in a finite band of frequencies. In this paper we present results of a kinetic calculation of damping lengths of wideband whistlers using the sum of seven drifting bi-Maxwellian electron distributions as a best fit to the ISEE 1 electron data. For two cases, when upstream whistlers are observed, convective damping lengths derived from ISEE magnetic field and ephemeris data are compared with theoretical results. We find that the calculated convective damping lengths are consistent with the data and that upstream whistlers remain marginally stable. We also show that the slope of plasma frame spectra of upstream whistlers, obtained by direct fitting of the observed spectra, is between 5 and 7. The overall spectral, wave, and particle characteristics, proximity to the shock, as well as propagation and damping properties indicated that these waves cannot be generated locally. Instead, the observed upstream whistlers arise in the shock ramp, most likely by a variety of cross-field drift and/or anisotropy driven instabilities. 57 refs., 11 figs.

  3. The Starting Early Starting Smart Story.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casey Family Programs, Seattle, WA.

    Starting Early Starting Smart (SESS) is an early childhood public/private initiative designed to identify new, empirical knowledge about the effectiveness of integrating substance abuse prevention, addictions treatment, and mental health services with primary health care and childcare service settings (e.g., Head Start, day care, preschool) to…

  4. Gene classification using codon usage and support vector machines.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jianmin; Nguyen, Minh N; Rajapakse, Jagath C

    2009-01-01

    A novel approach for gene classification, which adopts codon usage bias as input feature vector for classification by support vector machines (SVM) is proposed. The DNA sequence is first converted to a 59-dimensional feature vector where each element corresponds to the relative synonymous usage frequency of a codon. As the input to the classifier is independent of sequence length and variance, our approach is useful when the sequences to be classified are of different lengths, a condition that homology-based methods tend to fail. The method is demonstrated by using 1,841 Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) sequences which are classified into two major classes: HLA-I and HLA-II; each major class is further subdivided into sub-groups of HLA-I and HLA-II molecules. Using codon usage frequencies, binary SVM achieved accuracy rate of 99.3% for HLA major class classification and multi-class SVM achieved accuracy rates of 99.73% and 98.38% for sub-class classification of HLA-I and HLA-II molecules, respectively. The results show that gene classification based on codon usage bias is consistent with the molecular structures and biological functions of HLA molecules. PMID:19179707

  5. Sliding of a 43S ribosomal complex from the recognized AUG codon triggered by a delay in eIF2-bound GTP hydrolysis

    PubMed Central

    Terenin, Ilya M.; Akulich, Kseniya A.; Andreev, Dmitry E.; Polyanskaya, Sofya A.; Shatsky, Ivan N.; Dmitriev, Sergey E.

    2016-01-01

    During eukaryotic translation initiation, 43S ribosomal complex scans mRNA leader unless an AUG codon in an appropriate context is found. Establishing the stable codon–anticodon base-pairing traps the ribosome on the initiator codon and triggers structural rearrangements, which lead to Pi release from the eIF2-bound GTP. It is generally accepted that AUG recognition by the scanning 43S complex sets the final point in the process of start codon selection, while latter stages do not contribute to this process. Here we use translation reconstitution approach and kinetic toe-printing assay to show that after the 48S complex is formed on an AUG codon, in case GTP hydrolysis is impaired, the ribosomal subunit is capable to resume scanning and slides downstream to the next AUG. In contrast to leaky scanning, this sliding is not limited to AUGs in poor nucleotide contexts and occurs after a relatively long pause at the recognized AUG. Thus, recognition of an AUG per se does not inevitably lead to this codon being selected for initiation of protein synthesis. Instead, it is eIF5-induced GTP hydrolysis and Pi release that irreversibly trap the 48S complex, and this complex is further stabilized by eIF5B and 60S joining. PMID:26717981

  6. Ribosome collisions and translation efficiency: optimization by codon usage and mRNA destabilization.

    PubMed

    Mitarai, Namiko; Sneppen, Kim; Pedersen, Steen

    2008-09-26

    Individual mRNAs are translated by multiple ribosomes that initiate translation with an interval of a few seconds. The ribosome speed is codon dependent, and ribosome queuing has been suggested to explain specific data for translation of some mRNAs in vivo. By modeling the stochastic translation process as a traffic problem, we here analyze conditions and consequences of collisions and queuing. The model allowed us to determine the on-rate (0.8 to 1.1 initiations/s) and the time (1 s) the preceding ribosome occludes initiation for Escherichia coli lacZ mRNA in vivo. We find that ribosome collisions and queues are inevitable consequences of a stochastic translation mechanism that reduce the translation efficiency substantially on natural mRNAs. The cells minimize collisions by having its mRNAs being unstable and by a highly selected codon usage in the start of the mRNA. The cost of mRNA breakdown is offset by the concomitant increase in translation efficiency. PMID:18619977

  7. Propagation and damping of broadband upstream whistlers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orlowski, D. S.; Russell, C. T.; Krauss-Varban, D.; Omidi, N.; Thomsen, M. F.

    1995-01-01

    Previous studies indicated that damping rates of upstream whistlers strongly depend on the details of the electron distribution function. Moreover, detailed analysis of Doppler-shift and whistler dispersion relation indicated that upstream whistlers propagate obliquely in a broad band. In this paper we present results of a kinetic calculation of damping lengths of wide-band whistlers using the sum of 7-drifting bi-Maxwellian electron distributions as a best fit to the International Sun Earth Explorer (ISEE) 1 electron data. For 2 cases, when upstream whistlers are observed, convective damping lengths derived from ISEE magnetic field and ephemeris data are compared with theoretical results. We find that the calculated convective damping lengths are consistent with the data and that upstream whistlers remain marginally stable. We also show that the slope of plasma frame spectra of upstream whistlers, obtained by direct fitting of the observed spectra is between 5 and 7 with a sharp lower frequency cutoff corresponding to a wavelength of about one ion inertial length. When the solar wind velocity is directed largely along the wave normal of the upstream whistlers the polariztion of the right hand waves becomes reversed and low frequencies are switched to high resulting in a peaked spectrum with a strong high frequency cutoff. The overall spectral, wave and particle characteristics, proximity to the shock as well as propagation and damping properties indicate that these waves cannot be generated locally. Instead the observed upstream whistlers arise in the shock ramp most likely by a variety of cross-field drift and/or anisotropy driven instabilities.

  8. Expression of a Chimeric Allergen with High Rare Codons Content in Codon Bias-Adjusted Escherichia coli: Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3)-Codon Plus RIL as an Efficient Host.

    PubMed

    Nouri, Hamid Reza; Karkhah, Ahmad; Varasteh, Abdolreza; Sankian, Mojtaba

    2016-07-01

    The expression of heterologous proteins in Escherichia coli (E. coli) is importantly affected by codon bias. Hence, the aim of the current study was to determine which codon bias-adjusted E. coli strain is sufficient for expression of a chimeric allergen coded by high rare codon content. To investigate the expression level, a chimeric protein of Chenopodium album (C. album) was used as an appropriate model. An expression construct was assembled and was transformed to four strains of codon bias-adjusted E. coli including origami, BL21 (DE3), BL21 (DE3)-codon plus RIL, and Rosetta. The level of expression and solubility of the chimeric allergen was analyzed by SDS-PAGE. In addition, the allergenicity of chimeric allergen was determined using immunoblotting. Our results showed that the chimeric allergen was expressed at high level in E. coli BL21 (DE3)-codon plus RIL and Rosetta. In detail, this recombinant allergen was isolated from soluble fraction in the codon bias-adjusted strains of E. coli BL21 (DE3)-codon plus RIL and Rosetta. Moreover, some lower molecular weight proteins were observed in Rosetta, which could be related to inappropriate expression or broken compartments of the chimeric allergen. The immunoblotting assay confirmed that the IgE-specific immune reactivity of our chimeric allergen expressed in BL21 (DE3)-codon plus RIL was significantly higher than the other strains. Our results showed that the expression of the chimeric allergen with high rare codons content in a codon bias-adjusted strain E. coli BL21 (DE3)-codon plus RIL improves the quality and solubility of the heterologous protein production. PMID:27040822

  9. Clustering of classical swine fever virus isolates by codon pair bias

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The genetic code consists of non-random usage of synonymous codons for the same amino acids, termed codon bias or codon usage. Codon juxtaposition is also non-random, referred to as codon context bias or codon pair bias. The codon and codon pair bias vary among different organisms, as well as with viruses. Reasons for these differences are not completely understood. For classical swine fever virus (CSFV), it was suggested that the synonymous codon usage does not significantly influence virulence, but the relationship between variations in codon pair usage and CSFV virulence is unknown. Virulence can be related to the fitness of a virus: Differences in codon pair usage influence genome translation efficiency, which may in turn relate to the fitness of a virus. Accordingly, the potential of the codon pair bias for clustering CSFV isolates into classes of different virulence was investigated. Results The complete genomic sequences encoding the viral polyprotein of 52 different CSFV isolates were analyzed. This included 49 sequences from the GenBank database (NCBI) and three newly sequenced genomes. The codon usage did not differ among isolates of different virulence or genotype. In contrast, a clustering of isolates based on their codon pair bias was observed, clearly discriminating highly virulent isolates and vaccine strains on one side from moderately virulent strains on the other side. However, phylogenetic trees based on the codon pair bias and on the primary nucleotide sequence resulted in a very similar genotype distribution. Conclusion Clustering of CSFV genomes based on their codon pair bias correlate with the genotype rather than with the virulence of the isolates. PMID:22126254

  10. Whistler waves observed upstream from collisionless shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fairfield, D. H.

    1973-01-01

    Waves in the frequency range 0.5 - 4 Hz were studied in the region upstream of the earth's bow shock using data from the fluxgate magnetic field experiment on IMP-6. Analysis of 150 examples of these waves during a three month interval indicates that amplitudes are generally less than 1 or 2 gammas and propagation directions generally make angles of between 20 and 40 degrees with the field direction. The waves as measured in the spacecraft frame of reference are either left or right hand polarized with respect to the average field direction. It is concluded that the observed waves are right handed waves in the plasma frame of reference with wavelengths of approximately 100 km propagating upstream in the whistler mode. Doppler shifting reduces the observed frequencies in the spacecraft frame and reverses the observed polarization for those waves propagating more directly upstream. Similar waves are seen ahead of most interplanetary shocks.

  11. Genome-Wide Analysis of Codon Usage and Influencing Factors in Chikungunya Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Yigang

    2014-01-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is an arthropod-borne virus of the family Togaviridae that is transmitted to humans by Aedes spp. mosquitoes. Its genome comprises a 12 kb single-strand positive-sense RNA. In the present study, we report the patterns of synonymous codon usage in 141 CHIKV genomes by calculating several codon usage indices and applying multivariate statistical methods. Relative synonymous codon usage (RSCU) analysis showed that the preferred synonymous codons were G/C and A-ended. A comparative analysis of RSCU between CHIKV and its hosts showed that codon usage patterns of CHIKV are a mixture of coincidence and antagonism. Similarity index analysis showed that the overall codon usage patterns of CHIKV have been strongly influenced by Pan troglodytes and Aedes albopictus during evolution. The overall codon usage bias was low in CHIKV genomes, as inferred from the analysis of effective number of codons (ENC) and codon adaptation index (CAI). Our data suggested that although mutation pressure dominates codon usage in CHIKV, patterns of codon usage in CHIKV are also under the influence of natural selection from its hosts and geography. To the best of our knowledge, this is first report describing codon usage analysis in CHIKV genomes. The findings from this study are expected to increase our understanding of factors involved in viral evolution, and fitness towards hosts and the environment. PMID:24595095

  12. Evolution of Synonymous Codon Usage in Neurospora tetrasperma and Neurospora discreta

    PubMed Central

    Whittle, C. A.; Sun, Y.; Johannesson, H.

    2011-01-01

    Neurospora comprises a primary model system for the study of fungal genetics and biology. In spite of this, little is known about genome evolution in Neurospora. For example, the evolution of synonymous codon usage is largely unknown in this genus. In the present investigation, we conducted a comprehensive analysis of synonymous codon usage and its relationship to gene expression and gene length (GL) in Neurospora tetrasperma and Neurospora discreta. For our analysis, we examined codon usage among 2,079 genes per organism and assessed gene expression using large-scale expressed sequenced tag (EST) data sets (279,323 and 453,559 ESTs for N. tetrasperma and N. discreta, respectively). Data on relative synonymous codon usage revealed 24 codons (and two putative codons) that are more frequently used in genes with high than with low expression and thus were defined as optimal codons. Although codon-usage bias was highly correlated with gene expression, it was independent of selectively neutral base composition (introns); thus demonstrating that translational selection drives synonymous codon usage in these genomes. We also report that GL (coding sequences [CDS]) was inversely associated with optimal codon usage at each gene expression level, with highly expressed short genes having the greatest frequency of optimal codons. Optimal codon frequency was moderately higher in N. tetrasperma than in N. discreta, which might be due to variation in selective pressures and/or mating systems. PMID:21402862

  13. The highly conserved codon following the slippery sequence supports -1 frameshift efficiency at the HIV-1 frameshift site.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Suneeth F; Crowe-McAuliffe, Caillan; Graves, Ryan; Cardno, Tony S; McKinney, Cushla; Poole, Elizabeth S; Tate, Warren P

    2015-01-01

    HIV-1 utilises -1 programmed ribosomal frameshifting to translate structural and enzymatic domains in a defined proportion required for replication. A slippery sequence, U UUU UUA, and a stem-loop are well-defined RNA features modulating -1 frameshifting in HIV-1. The GGG glycine codon immediately following the slippery sequence (the 'intercodon') contributes structurally to the start of the stem-loop but has no defined role in current models of the frameshift mechanism, as slippage is inferred to occur before the intercodon has reached the ribosomal decoding site. This GGG codon is highly conserved in natural isolates of HIV. When the natural intercodon was replaced with a stop codon two different decoding molecules-eRF1 protein or a cognate suppressor tRNA-were able to access and decode the intercodon prior to -1 frameshifting. This implies significant slippage occurs when the intercodon is in the (perhaps distorted) ribosomal A site. We accommodate the influence of the intercodon in a model of frame maintenance versus frameshifting in HIV-1. PMID:25807539

  14. Visualization of codon-dependent conformational rearrangements during translation termination

    PubMed Central

    He, Shan L.; Green, Rachel

    2010-01-01

    While the recognition of stop codons by class 1 release factors (RFs) on the ribosome takes place with extremely high fidelity, the molecular mechanisms behind this remarkable process are poorly understood. Here we performed structural probing experiments with Fe(II)-derivatized RFs to compare the conformation of cognate and near-cognate ribosome termination complexes. The structural differences that we document provide an unprecedented view of signal transduction on the ribosome that depends on authentic stop codon recognition. These events initiate with very close interactions between RF and the small subunit decoding center (DC), lead to increased interactions between the switch loop of the RF and specific regions of the subunit interface and end in the precise orientation of the RF for maximal catalytic activity in the large subunit peptidyl transferase center (PTC). PMID:20208546

  15. Multiple Evolutionary Selections Involved in Synonymous Codon Usages in the Streptococcus agalactiae Genome

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yan-Ping; Ke, Hao; Liang, Zhi-Ling; Liu, Zhen-Xing; Hao, Le; Ma, Jiang-Yao; Li, Yu-Gu

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae is an important human and animal pathogen. To better understand the genetic features and evolution of S. agalactiae, multiple factors influencing synonymous codon usage patterns in S. agalactiae were analyzed in this study. A- and U-ending rich codons were used in S. agalactiae function genes through the overall codon usage analysis, indicating that Adenine (A)/Thymine (T) compositional constraints might contribute an important role to the synonymous codon usage pattern. The GC3% against the effective number of codon (ENC) value suggested that translational selection was the important factor for codon bias in the microorganism. Principal component analysis (PCA) showed that (i) mutational pressure was the most important factor in shaping codon usage of all open reading frames (ORFs) in the S. agalactiae genome; (ii) strand specific mutational bias was not capable of influencing the codon usage bias in the leading and lagging strands; and (iii) gene length was not the important factor in synonymous codon usage pattern in this organism. Additionally, the high correlation between tRNA adaptation index (tAI) value and codon adaptation index (CAI), frequency of optimal codons (Fop) value, reinforced the role of natural selection for efficient translation in S. agalactiae. Comparison of synonymous codon usage pattern between S. agalactiae and susceptible hosts (human and tilapia) showed that synonymous codon usage of S. agalactiae was independent of the synonymous codon usage of susceptible hosts. The study of codon usage in S. agalactiae may provide evidence about the molecular evolution of the bacterium and a greater understanding of evolutionary relationships between S. agalactiae and its hosts. PMID:26927064

  16. The Fungus Candida albicans Tolerates Ambiguity at Multiple Codons

    PubMed Central

    Simões, João; Bezerra, Ana R.; Moura, Gabriela R.; Araújo, Hugo; Gut, Ivo; Bayes, Mónica; Santos, Manuel A. S.

    2016-01-01

    The ascomycete Candida albicans is a normal resident of the gastrointestinal tract of humans and other warm-blooded animals. It occurs in a broad range of body sites and has high capacity to survive and proliferate in adverse environments with drastic changes in oxygen, carbon dioxide, pH, osmolarity, nutrients, and temperature. Its biology is unique due to flexible reassignment of the leucine CUG codon to serine and synthesis of statistical proteins. Under standard growth conditions, CUG sites incorporate leucine (3% of the times) and serine (97% of the times) on a proteome wide scale, but leucine incorporation fluctuates in response to environmental stressors and can be artificially increased up to 98%. In order to determine whether such flexibility also exists at other codons, we have constructed several serine tRNAs that decode various non-cognate codons. Expression of these tRNAs had minor effects on fitness, but growth of the mistranslating strains at different temperatures, in medium with different pH and nutrients composition was often enhanced relatively to the wild type (WT) strain, supporting our previous data on adaptive roles of CUG ambiguity in variable growth conditions. Parallel evolution of the recombinant strains (100 generations) followed by full genome resequencing identified various strain specific single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) and one SNP in the deneddylase (JAB1) gene in all strains. Since JAB1 is a subunit of the COP9 signalosome complex, which interacts with cullin (Cdc53p) to mediate degradation of a variety of cellular proteins, our data suggest that neddylation plays a key role in tolerance and adaptation to codon ambiguity in C. albicans. PMID:27065968

  17. The Fungus Candida albicans Tolerates Ambiguity at Multiple Codons.

    PubMed

    Simões, João; Bezerra, Ana R; Moura, Gabriela R; Araújo, Hugo; Gut, Ivo; Bayes, Mónica; Santos, Manuel A S

    2016-01-01

    The ascomycete Candida albicans is a normal resident of the gastrointestinal tract of humans and other warm-blooded animals. It occurs in a broad range of body sites and has high capacity to survive and proliferate in adverse environments with drastic changes in oxygen, carbon dioxide, pH, osmolarity, nutrients, and temperature. Its biology is unique due to flexible reassignment of the leucine CUG codon to serine and synthesis of statistical proteins. Under standard growth conditions, CUG sites incorporate leucine (3% of the times) and serine (97% of the times) on a proteome wide scale, but leucine incorporation fluctuates in response to environmental stressors and can be artificially increased up to 98%. In order to determine whether such flexibility also exists at other codons, we have constructed several serine tRNAs that decode various non-cognate codons. Expression of these tRNAs had minor effects on fitness, but growth of the mistranslating strains at different temperatures, in medium with different pH and nutrients composition was often enhanced relatively to the wild type (WT) strain, supporting our previous data on adaptive roles of CUG ambiguity in variable growth conditions. Parallel evolution of the recombinant strains (100 generations) followed by full genome resequencing identified various strain specific single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) and one SNP in the deneddylase (JAB1) gene in all strains. Since JAB1 is a subunit of the COP9 signalosome complex, which interacts with cullin (Cdc53p) to mediate degradation of a variety of cellular proteins, our data suggest that neddylation plays a key role in tolerance and adaptation to codon ambiguity in C. albicans. PMID:27065968

  18. Decoding RAS isoform and codon-specific signalling

    PubMed Central

    Newlaczyl, Anna U.; Hood, Fiona E.; Coulson, Judy M.; Prior, Ian A.

    2014-01-01

    RAS proteins are key signalling hubs that are oncogenically mutated in 30% of all cancer cases. Three genes encode almost identical isoforms that are ubiquitously expressed, but are not functionally redundant. The network responses associated with each isoform and individual oncogenic mutations remain to be fully characterized. In the present article, we review recent data defining the differences between the RAS isoforms and their most commonly mutated codons and discuss the underlying mechanisms. PMID:25109951

  19. Codon Distribution in Error-Detecting Circular Codes

    PubMed Central

    Fimmel, Elena; Strüngmann, Lutz

    2016-01-01

    In 1957, Francis Crick et al. suggested an ingenious explanation for the process of frame maintenance. The idea was based on the notion of comma-free codes. Although Crick’s hypothesis proved to be wrong, in 1996, Arquès and Michel discovered the existence of a weaker version of such codes in eukaryote and prokaryote genomes, namely the so-called circular codes. Since then, circular code theory has invariably evoked great interest and made significant progress. In this article, the codon distributions in maximal comma-free, maximal self-complementary C3 and maximal self-complementary circular codes are discussed, i.e., we investigate in how many of such codes a given codon participates. As the main (and surprising) result, it is shown that the codons can be separated into very few classes (three, or five, or six) with respect to their frequency. Moreover, the distribution classes can be hierarchically ordered as refinements from maximal comma-free codes via maximal self-complementary C3 codes to maximal self-complementary circular codes. PMID:26999215

  20. Computational codon optimization of synthetic gene for protein expression

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The construction of customized nucleic acid sequences allows us to have greater flexibility in gene design for recombinant protein expression. Among the various parameters considered for such DNA sequence design, individual codon usage (ICU) has been implicated as one of the most crucial factors affecting mRNA translational efficiency. However, previous works have also reported the significant influence of codon pair usage, also known as codon context (CC), on the level of protein expression. Results In this study, we have developed novel computational procedures for evaluating the relative importance of optimizing ICU and CC for enhancing protein expression. By formulating appropriate mathematical expressions to quantify the ICU and CC fitness of a coding sequence, optimization procedures based on genetic algorithm were employed to maximize its ICU and/or CC fitness. Surprisingly, the in silico validation of the resultant optimized DNA sequences for Escherichia coli, Lactococcus lactis, Pichia pastoris and Saccharomyces cerevisiae suggests that CC is a more relevant design criterion than the commonly considered ICU. Conclusions The proposed CC optimization framework can complement and enhance the capabilities of current gene design tools, with potential applications to heterologous protein production and even vaccine development in synthetic biotechnology. PMID:23083100

  1. Novel small molecules potentiate premature termination codon readthrough by aminoglycosides.

    PubMed

    Baradaran-Heravi, Alireza; Balgi, Aruna D; Zimmerman, Carla; Choi, Kunho; Shidmoossavee, Fahimeh S; Tan, Jason S; Bergeaud, Célia; Krause, Alexandra; Flibotte, Stéphane; Shimizu, Yoko; Anderson, Hilary J; Mouly, Vincent; Jan, Eric; Pfeifer, Tom; Jaquith, James B; Roberge, Michel

    2016-08-19

    Nonsense mutations introduce premature termination codons and underlie 11% of genetic disease cases. High concentrations of aminoglycosides can restore gene function by eliciting premature termination codon readthrough but with low efficiency. Using a high-throughput screen, we identified compounds that potentiate readthrough by aminoglycosides at multiple nonsense alleles in yeast. Chemical optimization generated phthalimide derivative CDX5-1 with activity in human cells. Alone, CDX5-1 did not induce readthrough or increase TP53 mRNA levels in HDQ-P1 cancer cells with a homozygous TP53 nonsense mutation. However, in combination with aminoglycoside G418, it enhanced readthrough up to 180-fold over G418 alone. The combination also increased readthrough at all three nonsense codons in cancer cells with other TP53 nonsense mutations, as well as in cells from rare genetic disease patients with nonsense mutations in the CLN2, SMARCAL1 and DMD genes. These findings open up the possibility of treating patients across a spectrum of genetic diseases caused by nonsense mutations. PMID:27407112

  2. Genome-wide analysis of synonymous codon usage in Huaiyangshan virus and other bunyaviruses.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xuelian; Liu, Qingzhen; Xiong, Yanwen; Ye, Changyun; Jin, Dong; Xu, Jianguo

    2015-12-01

    Huaiyangshan virus (HYSV) is a newly discovered bunyavirus, which is transmitted by ticks and causes hemorrhagic fever-like illness in human. The interplay of codon usage among viruses and their hosts is expected to affect viral survival, evasion from host's immune system and evolution. However, little is known about the codon usage in HYSV genome. In the present study, we analyzed synonymous codon usage in 120 available full-length HYSV sequences and performed a comparative analysis of synonymous codon usage patterns in HYSV and 42 other bunyaviruses. The relative synonymous codon usage (RSCU) analysis showed that the preferred synonymous codons were G/C-ended. A comparative analysis of RSCU between HYSV and its hosts reflected that codon usage patterns of HYSV were mostly coincident with that of its hosts. Our data suggested that although mutational bias dominated codon usage, patterns of codon usage in HYSV were also under the influence of nature selection. Phylogenetic analysis based on RSCU values across different HYSV strains and 42 other bunyaviruses suggested that codon usage pattern in HYSV was the most similar with that of Uukuniemi virus among these bunyaviruses and that viruses belonged to Phlebovirus showed a diversity of codon usage patterns. PMID:26173646

  3. Revelation of Influencing Factors in Overall Codon Usage Bias of Equine Influenza Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Bhatia, Sandeep; Sood, Richa; Selvaraj, Pavulraj

    2016-01-01

    Equine influenza viruses (EIVs) of H3N8 subtype are culprits of severe acute respiratory infections in horses, and are still responsible for significant outbreaks worldwide. Adaptability of influenza viruses to a particular host is significantly influenced by their codon usage preference, due to an absolute dependence on the host cellular machinery for their replication. In the present study, we analyzed genome-wide codon usage patterns in 92 EIV strains, including both H3N8 and H7N7 subtypes by computing several codon usage indices and applying multivariate statistical methods. Relative synonymous codon usage (RSCU) analysis disclosed bias of preferred synonymous codons towards A/U-ended codons. The overall codon usage bias in EIVs was slightly lower, and mainly affected by the nucleotide compositional constraints as inferred from the RSCU and effective number of codon (ENc) analysis. Our data suggested that codon usage pattern in EIVs is governed by the interplay of mutation pressure, natural selection from its hosts and undefined factors. The H7N7 subtype was found less fit to its host (horse) in comparison to H3N8, by possessing higher codon bias, lower mutation pressure and much less adaptation to tRNA pool of equine cells. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report describing the codon usage analysis of the complete genomes of EIVs. The outcome of our study is likely to enhance our understanding of factors involved in viral adaptation, evolution, and fitness towards their hosts. PMID:27119730

  4. Codon usage and protein sequence pattern dependency in different organisms: A Bioinformatics approach.

    PubMed

    Foroughmand-Araabi, Mohammad-Hadi; Goliaei, Bahram; Alishahi, Kasra; Sadeghi, Mehdi; Goliaei, Sama

    2015-04-01

    Although it is known that synonymous codons are not chosen randomly, the role of the codon usage in gene regulation is not clearly understood, yet. Researchers have investigated the relation between the codon usage and various properties, such as gene regulation, translation rate, translation efficiency, mRNA stability, splicing, and protein domains. Recently, a universal codon usage based mechanism for gene regulation is proposed. We studied the role of protein sequence patterns on the codons usage by related genes. Considering a subsequence of a protein that matches to a pattern or motif, we showed that, parts of the genes, which are translated to this subsequence, use specific ratios of synonymous codons. Also, we built a multinomial logistic regression statistical model for codon usage, which considers the effect of patterns on codon usage. This model justifies the observed codon usage preference better than the classic organism dependent codon usage. Our results showed that the codon usage plays a role in controlling protein levels, for genes that participate in a specific biological function. This is the first time that this phenomenon is reported. PMID:25409941

  5. Analysis of synonymous codon usage in porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yong-sheng; Zhou, Jian-hua; Chen, Hao-tai; Ma, Li-na; Ding, Yao-zhong; Wang, Meng; Zhang, Jie

    2010-08-01

    In this study, we calculated the relative synonymous codon usage (RSCU) values and codon usage bias (CUB) values to implement a comparative analysis of codon usage pattern of open reading frames (ORFs) which belong to the two main genotypes of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV). By analysis of synonymous codon usage values in each ORF of PRRSV, the optimal codons for most amino acids were all C or G-ended codons except GAU for Asp, CAU for His, UUU for Phe and CCU for Pro. The synonymous codon usage patterns in different ORFs of PRRSV were different and genetically conserved. Among them, ORF1a, ORF4, ORF5 and ORF7 could cluster these strains into the two main serotypes (EU and US). Due to mutational pressure, compositional constraint played an important role in shaping the synonymous codon usage pattern in different ORFs, and the synonymous codon usage diversity in ORFs was correlated with gene function. The degree of CUB for some particular amino acids under strong selection pressure probably served as a potential genetic marker for each ORF in PRRSV. However, gene length and translational selection in nature had no effect on the synonymous codon usage pattern in PRRSV. These conclusions could not only offer an insight into the synonymous codon usage pattern and differentiation of gene function, but also assist in understanding the discrepancy of evolution among ORFs in PRRSV. PMID:20438864

  6. Local slowdown of translation by nonoptimal codons promotes nascent-chain recognition by SRP in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Pechmann, Sebastian; Chartron, Justin W; Frydman, Judith

    2015-01-01

    The genetic code allows most amino acids a choice of optimal and nonoptimal codons. We report that synonymous codon choice is tuned to promote interaction of nascent polypeptides with the signal recognition particle (SRP), which assists in protein translocation across membranes. Cotranslational recognition by the SRP in vivo is enhanced when mRNAs contain nonoptimal codon clusters 35–40 codons downstream of the SRP-binding site, the distance that spans the ribosomal polypeptide exit tunnel. A local translation slowdown upon ribosomal exit of SRP-binding elements in mRNAs containing these nonoptimal codon clusters is supported experimentally by ribosome profiling analyses in yeast. Modulation of local elongation rates through codon choice appears to kinetically enhance recognition by ribosome-associated factors. We propose that cotranslational regulation of nascent-chain fate may be a general constraint shaping codon usage in the genome. PMID:25420103

  7. Local slowdown of translation by nonoptimal codons promotes nascent-chain recognition by SRP in vivo.

    PubMed

    Pechmann, Sebastian; Chartron, Justin W; Frydman, Judith

    2014-12-01

    The genetic code allows most amino acids a choice of optimal and nonoptimal codons. We report that synonymous codon choice is tuned to promote interaction of nascent polypeptides with the signal recognition particle (SRP), which assists in protein translocation across membranes. Cotranslational recognition by the SRP in vivo is enhanced when mRNAs contain nonoptimal codon clusters 35-40 codons downstream of the SRP-binding site, the distance that spans the ribosomal polypeptide exit tunnel. A local translation slowdown upon ribosomal exit of SRP-binding elements in mRNAs containing these nonoptimal codon clusters is supported experimentally by ribosome profiling analyses in yeast. Modulation of local elongation rates through codon choice appears to kinetically enhance recognition by ribosome-associated factors. We propose that cotranslational regulation of nascent-chain fate may be a general constraint shaping codon usage in the genome. PMID:25420103

  8. Bioinformatics analysis of codon usage patterns and influencing factors in Penaeus monodon nudivirus.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, Anuj; Singh, Niraj K; Gurtler, Volker; Karunasagar, Indrani

    2016-02-01

    Penaeus monodon nudivirus (PmNV) is one of the most important and most commonly reported shrimp viruses. In the present study, codon usage of PmNV was studied in detail. Based on effective number of codons (ENC) values, strong to low codon usage bias was observed in PmNV genes. Nucleotide composition-ENC correlation analysis and the GC3 versus ENC relationship indicated that compositional constraint has a major effect on codon usage of PmNV. At the whole-genome level, relative synonymous codon usage (RSCU) analysis showed almost complete antagonism between the codon usage pattern of PmNV and its host P. monodon. However, codon adaptive index (CAI) values indicated that forces of selective/translational constraints have been able to overcome this antagonism in some genes. PMID:26586333

  9. The Rare Codon AGA Is Involved in Regulation of Pyoluteorin Biosynthesis in Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5.

    PubMed

    Yan, Qing; Philmus, Benjamin; Hesse, Cedar; Kohen, Max; Chang, Jeff H; Loper, Joyce E

    2016-01-01

    The soil bacterium Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5 can colonize root and seed surfaces of many plants, protecting them from infection by plant pathogenic fungi and oomycetes. The capacity to suppress disease is attributed to Pf-5's production of a large spectrum of antibiotics, which is controlled by complex regulatory circuits operating at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. In this study, we analyzed the genomic sequence of Pf-5 for codon usage patterns and observed that the six rarest codons in the genome are present in all seven known antibiotic biosynthesis gene clusters. In particular, there is an abundance of rare codons in pltR, which encodes a member of the LysR transcriptional regulator family that controls the expression of pyoluteorin biosynthetic genes. To test the hypothesis that rare codons in pltR influence pyoluteorin production, we generated a derivative of Pf-5 in which 23 types of rare codons in pltR were substituted with synonymous preferred codons. The resultant mutant produced pyoluteorin at levels 15 times higher than that of the wild-type Pf-5. Accordingly, the promoter activity of the pyoluteorin biosynthetic gene pltL was 20 times higher in the codon-modified stain than in the wild-type. pltR has six AGA codons, which is the rarest codon in the Pf-5 genome. Substitution of all six AGA codons with preferred Arg codons resulted in a variant of pltR that conferred increased pyoluteorin production and pltL promoter activity. Furthermore, overexpression of tRNA[Formula: see text], the cognate tRNA for the AGA codon, significantly increased pyoluteorin production by Pf-5. A bias in codon usage has been linked to the regulation of many phenotypes in eukaryotes and prokaryotes but, to our knowledge, this is the first example of the role of a rare codon in the regulation of antibiotic production by a Gram-negative bacterium. PMID:27148187

  10. The Rare Codon AGA Is Involved in Regulation of Pyoluteorin Biosynthesis in Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Qing; Philmus, Benjamin; Hesse, Cedar; Kohen, Max; Chang, Jeff H.; Loper, Joyce E.

    2016-01-01

    The soil bacterium Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5 can colonize root and seed surfaces of many plants, protecting them from infection by plant pathogenic fungi and oomycetes. The capacity to suppress disease is attributed to Pf-5's production of a large spectrum of antibiotics, which is controlled by complex regulatory circuits operating at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. In this study, we analyzed the genomic sequence of Pf-5 for codon usage patterns and observed that the six rarest codons in the genome are present in all seven known antibiotic biosynthesis gene clusters. In particular, there is an abundance of rare codons in pltR, which encodes a member of the LysR transcriptional regulator family that controls the expression of pyoluteorin biosynthetic genes. To test the hypothesis that rare codons in pltR influence pyoluteorin production, we generated a derivative of Pf-5 in which 23 types of rare codons in pltR were substituted with synonymous preferred codons. The resultant mutant produced pyoluteorin at levels 15 times higher than that of the wild-type Pf-5. Accordingly, the promoter activity of the pyoluteorin biosynthetic gene pltL was 20 times higher in the codon-modified stain than in the wild-type. pltR has six AGA codons, which is the rarest codon in the Pf-5 genome. Substitution of all six AGA codons with preferred Arg codons resulted in a variant of pltR that conferred increased pyoluteorin production and pltL promoter activity. Furthermore, overexpression of tRNAUCUArg, the cognate tRNA for the AGA codon, significantly increased pyoluteorin production by Pf-5. A bias in codon usage has been linked to the regulation of many phenotypes in eukaryotes and prokaryotes but, to our knowledge, this is the first example of the role of a rare codon in the regulation of antibiotic production by a Gram-negative bacterium. PMID:27148187

  11. Different sequence signatures in the upstream regions of plant and animal tRNA genes shape distinct modes of regulation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Gong; Lukoszek, Radoslaw; Mueller-Roeber, Bernd; Ignatova, Zoya

    2011-04-01

    In eukaryotes, the transcription of tRNA genes is initiated by the concerted action of transcription factors IIIC (TFIIIC) and IIIB (TFIIIB) which direct the recruitment of polymerase III. While TFIIIC recognizes highly conserved, intragenic promoter elements, TFIIIB binds to the non-coding 5'-upstream regions of the tRNA genes. Using a systematic bioinformatic analysis of 11 multicellular eukaryotic genomes we identified a highly conserved TATA motif followed by a CAA-motif in the tRNA upstream regions of all plant genomes. Strikingly, the 5'-flanking tRNA regions of the animal genomes are highly heterogeneous and lack a common conserved sequence signature. Interestingly, in the animal genomes the tRNA species that read the same codon share conserved motifs in their upstream regions. Deep-sequencing analysis of 16 human tissues revealed multiple splicing variants of two of the TFIIIB subunits, Bdp1 and Brf1, with tissue-specific expression patterns. These multiple forms most likely modulate the TFIIIB-DNA interactions and explain the lack of a uniform signature motif in the tRNA upstream regions of animal genomes. The anticodon-dependent 5'-flanking motifs provide a possible mechanism for independent regulation of the tRNA transcription in various human tissues. PMID:21138970

  12. Different sequence signatures in the upstream regions of plant and animal tRNA genes shape distinct modes of regulation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Gong; Lukoszek, Radoslaw; Mueller-Roeber, Bernd; Ignatova, Zoya

    2011-01-01

    In eukaryotes, the transcription of tRNA genes is initiated by the concerted action of transcription factors IIIC (TFIIIC) and IIIB (TFIIIB) which direct the recruitment of polymerase III. While TFIIIC recognizes highly conserved, intragenic promoter elements, TFIIIB binds to the non-coding 5′-upstream regions of the tRNA genes. Using a systematic bioinformatic analysis of 11 multicellular eukaryotic genomes we identified a highly conserved TATA motif followed by a CAA-motif in the tRNA upstream regions of all plant genomes. Strikingly, the 5′-flanking tRNA regions of the animal genomes are highly heterogeneous and lack a common conserved sequence signature. Interestingly, in the animal genomes the tRNA species that read the same codon share conserved motifs in their upstream regions. Deep-sequencing analysis of 16 human tissues revealed multiple splicing variants of two of the TFIIIB subunits, Bdp1 and Brf1, with tissue-specific expression patterns. These multiple forms most likely modulate the TFIIIB–DNA interactions and explain the lack of a uniform signature motif in the tRNA upstream regions of animal genomes. The anticodon-dependent 5′-flanking motifs provide a possible mechanism for independent regulation of the tRNA transcription in various human tissues. PMID:21138970

  13. Evolution of Advection Upstream Splitting Method Schemes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, Meng-Sing

    2010-01-01

    This paper focuses on the evolution of advection upstream splitting method(AUSM) schemes. The main ingredients that have led to the development of modern computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods have been reviewed, thus the ideas behind AUSM. First and foremost is the concept of upwinding. Second, the use of Riemann problem in constructing the numerical flux in the finite-volume setting. Third, the necessity of including all physical processes, as characterised by the linear (convection) and nonlinear (acoustic) fields. Fourth, the realisation of separating the flux into convection and pressure fluxes. The rest of this review briefly outlines the technical evolution of AUSM and more details can be found in the cited references. Keywords: Computational fluid dynamics methods, hyperbolic systems, advection upstream splitting method, conservation laws, upwinding, CFD

  14. High time resolution studies of upstream ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, K. A.; Levedahl, W. K.; Lin, R. P.; Parks, G. K.

    1984-01-01

    The influence of phi, the angle between the interplanetary magnetic field and the earth-sun vector on ions and electrons in the earth's bow shock, was investigated in terms of ISEE 2 data. A small phi was associated with intermediate energy upstream ions and reduced populations of low energy, about 1.6 keV, ion fluxes. The magnitude of phi was closely related to particular, constant energy levels, e.g., a phi of 40 deg and an energy of 30 keV and a phi of 75 deg and an energy of 6 keV. Ion fluxes are high in the angles form 60-80 deg and feature energies of 55-280 keV. The acceleration process up to the high energy levels in the 1-3 min interval from upstream to downstream occurs more rapidly than could be accounted for by a first-order Fermi process.

  15. A small RNA regulates multiple ABC transporter mRNAs by targeting C/A-rich elements inside and upstream of ribosome-binding sites

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Cynthia M.; Darfeuille, Fabien; Plantinga, Titia H.; Vogel, Jörg

    2007-01-01

    The interactions of numerous regulatory small RNAs (sRNAs) with target mRNAs have been characterized, but how sRNAs can regulate multiple, structurally unrelated mRNAs is less understood. Here we show that Salmonella GcvB sRNA directly acts on seven target mRNAs that commonly encode periplasmic substrate-binding proteins of ABC uptake systems for amino acids and peptides. Alignment of GcvB homologs of distantly related bacteria revealed a conserved G/U-rich element that is strictly required for GcvB target recognition. Analysis of target gene fusion regulation in vivo, and in vitro structure probing and translation assays showed that GcvB represses its target mRNAs by binding to extended C/A-rich regions, which may also serve as translational enhancer elements. In some cases (oppA, dppA), GcvB repression can be explained by masking the ribosome-binding site (RBS) to prevent 30S subunit binding. However, GcvB can also effectively repress translation by binding to target mRNAs at upstream sites, outside the RBS. Specifically, GcvB represses gltI mRNA translation at the C/A-rich target site located at positions −57 to −45 relative to the start codon. Taken together, our study suggests highly conserved regions in sRNAs and mRNA regions distant from Shine-Dalgarno sequences as important elements for the identification of sRNA targets. PMID:17974919

  16. Upgrade of the Upstream Tracker at LHCb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, Jason; LHCb Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    The LHCb detector will be upgraded to allow it operate at higher collider luminosity without the need for a hardware trigger stage. Flavor enriched events will be selected in a software based, high level trigger, using fully reconstructed events. This presentation will describe the design, optimization and the expected performance of the Upstream Tracker (UT), which has a critical role in high level trigger scheme.

  17. Admissible upstream conditions for slender compressible vortices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, C. H.; Krause, E.; Menne, S.

    1986-01-01

    The influence of the compressibility on the flow in slender vortices is being studied. The dependence of the breakdown of the slender-vortex approximation on the upstream conditions is demonstrated for various Reynolds numbers and Mach numbers. Compatibility conditions, which have to be satisfied if the vortex is to remain slender, are discussed in detail. The general discussions are supplemented by several sample calculations.

  18. Characterization of Codon usage bias in the newly identified DEV UL18 gene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiwen; Cheng, Anchun; Wang, Mingshu; Xiang, Jun

    2011-10-01

    In this study, Codon usage bias (CUB) of DEV UL18 gene was analyzed, the results showed that codon usage bias in the DEV UL18 gene was strong bias towards the synonymous codons with A and T at the third codon position. Phylogenetic tree based on the amino acid sequences of the DEV UL18 gene and the 27 other herpesviruses revealed that UL18 gene of the DEV CHv strain and some fowl herpesviruses such as MeHV-1, GaHV-2 and GaHV-3 were clustered within a monophyletic clade and grouped within alphaherpesvirinae. The ENC-GC3S plot indicated that codon usage bias has strong species-specificity between DEV and 27 reference herpesviruses, and suggests that factors other than gene composition, such as translational selection leading to the codon usage variation among genes in different organisms, contribute to the codon usage among the different herpesviruses. Comparison of codon preferences of DEV UL18 gene with those of E. coli , yeast and humans showed that there were 20 codons showing distinct usage differences between DEV UL18 and yeast, 22 between DEV UL18 and humans, 23 between DEV UL18 and E.coli, which indicated the codon usage bias pattern in the DEV UL18 gene was similar to that of yeast. It is infered that the yeast expression system may be more suitable for the DEV UL18 expression.

  19. Analysis of synonymous codon usage patterns in seven different citrus species.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chen; Dong, Jing; Tong, Chunfa; Gong, Xindong; Wen, Qiang; Zhuge, Qiang

    2013-01-01

    We used large samples of expressed sequence tags to characterize the patterns of codon usage bias (CUB) in seven different Citrus species and to analyze their evolutionary effect on selection and base composition. We found that A- and T-ending codons are predominant in Citrus species. Next, we identified 21 codons for 18 different amino acids that were considered preferred codons in all seven species. We then performed correspondence analysis and constructed plots for the effective number of codons (ENCs) to analyze synonymous codon usage. Multiple regression analysis showed that gene expression in each species had a constant influence on the frequency of optional codons (FOP). Base composition differences between the proportions were large. Finally, positive selection was detected during the evolutionary process of the different Citrus species. Overall, our results suggest that codon usages were the result of positive selection. Codon usage variation among Citrus genes is influenced by translational selection, mutational bias, and gene length. CUB is strongly affected by selection pressure at the translational level, and gene length plays only a minor role. One possible explanation for this is that the selection-mediated codon bias is consistently strong in Citrus, which is one of the most widely cultivated fruit trees. PMID:23761955

  20. Comprehensive Analysis of Stop Codon Usage in Bacteria and Its Correlation with Release Factor Abundance*

    PubMed Central

    Korkmaz, Gürkan; Holm, Mikael; Wiens, Tobias; Sanyal, Suparna

    2014-01-01

    We present a comprehensive analysis of stop codon usage in bacteria by analyzing over eight million coding sequences of 4684 bacterial sequences. Using a newly developed program called “stop codon counter,” the frequencies of the three classical stop codons TAA, TAG, and TGA were analyzed, and a publicly available stop codon database was built. Our analysis shows that with increasing genomic GC content the frequency of the TAA codon decreases and that of the TGA codon increases in a reciprocal manner. Interestingly, the release factor 1-specific codon TAG maintains a more or less uniform frequency (∼20%) irrespective of the GC content. The low abundance of TAG is also valid with respect to expression level of the genes ending with different stop codons. In contrast, the highly expressed genes predominantly end with TAA, ensuring termination with either of the two release factors. Using three model bacteria with different stop codon usage (Escherichia coli, Mycobacterium smegmatis, and Bacillus subtilis), we show that the frequency of TAG and TGA codons correlates well with the relative steady state amount of mRNA and protein for release factors RF1 and RF2 during exponential growth. Furthermore, using available microarray data for gene expression, we show that in both fast growing and contrasting biofilm formation conditions, the relative level of RF1 is nicely correlated with the expression level of the genes ending with TAG. PMID:25217634

  1. A detailed comparative analysis of codon usage bias in Zika virus.

    PubMed

    Cristina, Juan; Fajardo, Alvaro; Soñora, Martín; Moratorio, Gonzalo; Musto, Héctor

    2016-09-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is a member of the family Flaviviridae and its genome consists of a single-stranded positive sense RNA molecule with 10,794 nucleotides. Clinical manifestations of disease caused by ZIKV infection range from asymptomatic cases to an influenza-like syndrome. There is an increasing concern about the possible relation among microcephaly and ZIKV infection. To get insight into the relation of codon usage among viruses and their hosts is extremely important to understand virus survival, fitness, evasion from host's immune system and evolution. In this study, we performed a comprehensive analysis of codon usage and composition of ZIKV. The overall codon usage among ZIKV strains is similar and slightly biased. Different codon preferences in ZIKV genes in relation to codon usage of human, Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus genes were found. Most of the highly frequent codons are A-ending, which strongly suggests that mutational bias is the main force shaping codon usage in this virus. G+C compositional constraint as well as dinucleotide composition also influence the codon usage of ZIKV. The results of these studies suggest that the emergence of ZIKV outside Africa, in the Pacific and the Americas may also be reflected in ZIKV codon usage. No significant differences were found in codon usage among strains isolated from microcephaly cases and the rest of strains from the Asian cluster enrolled in these studies. PMID:27449601

  2. Head Start Facilities Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Research Assessment Management, Inc., Silver Spring, MD.

    A quality Head Start facility should provide a physical environment responsive both to the needs of the children and families served and to the needs of staff, volunteers, and community agencies that share space with Head Start. This manual is a tool for Head Start grantees and delegate agencies for assessing existing facilities, making…

  3. The Head Start Debates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zigler, Edward, Ed.; Styfco, Sally J., Ed.

    2004-01-01

    The future of Head Start depends on how well people learn from and apply the lessons from its past. That's why everyone involved in early education needs this timely, forward-thinking book from the leader of Head Start. The first book to capture the Head Start debates in all their complexity and diversity, this landmark volume brings together the…

  4. Codon bias and gene ontology in holometabolous and hemimetabolous insects.

    PubMed

    Carlini, David B; Makowski, Matthew

    2015-12-01

    The relationship between preferred codon use (PCU), developmental mode, and gene ontology (GO) was investigated in a sample of nine insect species with sequenced genomes. These species were selected to represent two distinct modes of insect development, holometabolism and hemimetabolism, with an aim toward determining whether the differences in developmental timing concomitant with developmental mode would be mirrored by differences in PCU in their developmental genes. We hypothesized that the developmental genes of holometabolous insects should be under greater selective pressure for efficient translation, manifest as increased PCU, than those of hemimetabolous insects because holometabolism requires abundant protein expression over shorter time intervals than hemimetabolism, where proteins are required more uniformly in time. Preferred codon sets were defined for each species, from which the frequency of PCU for each gene was obtained. Although there were substantial differences in the genomic base composition of holometabolous and hemimetabolous insects, both groups exhibited a general preference for GC-ending codons, with the former group having higher PCU averaged across all genes. For each species, the biological process GO term for each gene was assigned that of its Drosophila homolog(s), and PCU was calculated for each GO term category. The top two GO term categories for PCU enrichment in the holometabolous insects were anatomical structure development and cell differentiation. The increased PCU in the developmental genes of holometabolous insects may reflect a general strategy to maximize the protein production of genes expressed in bursts over short time periods, e.g., heat shock proteins. J. Exp. Zool. (Mol. Dev. Evol.) 324B: 686-698, 2015. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26498580

  5. Synthetic approach to stop-codon scanning mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Nie, Lihua; Lavinder, Jason J; Sarkar, Mohosin; Stephany, Kimberly; Magliery, Thomas J

    2011-04-27

    A general combinatorial mutagenesis strategy using common dimethoxytrityl-protected mononucleotide phosphoramidites and a single orthogonally protected trinucleotide phosphoramidite (Fmoc-TAG; Fmoc = 9-fluorenylmethoxycarbonyl) was developed to scan a gene with the TAG amber stop codon with complete synthetic control. In combination with stop-codon suppressors that insert natural (e.g., alanine) or unnatural (e.g., p-benzoylphenylalanine, Bpa) amino acids, a single DNA library can be used to incorporate different amino acids for diverse purposes. Here, we scanned TAG codons through part of the gene for a model four-helix bundle protein, Rop, which regulates the copy number of ColE1 plasmids. Alanine was incorporated into Rop for mapping its binding site using an in vivo activity screen, and subtle but important differences from in vitro gel-shift studies of Rop function are evident. As a test, Bpa was incorporated using a Phe14 amber mutant isolated from the scanning library. Surprisingly, Phe14Bpa-Rop is weakly active, despite the critical role of Phe14 in Rop activity. Bpa is a photoaffinity label unnatural amino acid that can form covalent bonds with adjacent molecules upon UV irradiation. Irradiation of Phe14Bpa-Rop, which is a dimer in solution like wild-type Rop, results in covalent dimers, trimers, and tetramers. This suggests that Phe14Bpa-Rop weakly associates as a tetramer in solution and highlights the use of Bpa cross-linking as a means of trapping weak and transient interactions. PMID:21452871

  6. Comparative Analysis of Codon Usage Bias Patterns in Microsporidian Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Heng; Zhang, Ruizhi; Butler, Robert R.; Liu, Tie; Zhang, Li; Pombert, Jean-François; Zhou, Zeyang

    2015-01-01

    The sub-3 Mbp genomes from microsporidian species of the Encephalitozoon genus are the smallest known among eukaryotes and paragons of genomic reduction and compaction in parasites. However, their diminutive stature is not characteristic of all Microsporidia, whose genome sizes vary by an order of magnitude. This large variability suggests that different evolutionary forces are applied on the group as a whole. In this study, we have compared the codon usage bias (CUB) between eight taxonomically distinct microsporidian genomes: Encephalitozoon intestinalis, Encephalitozoon cuniculi, Spraguea lophii, Trachipleistophora hominis, Enterocytozoon bieneusi, Nematocida parisii, Nosema bombycis and Nosema ceranae. While the CUB was found to be weak in all eight Microsporidia, nearly all (98%) of the optimal codons in S. lophii, T. hominis, E. bieneusi, N. parisii, N. bombycis and N. ceranae are fond of A/U in third position whereas most (64.6%) optimal codons in the Encephalitozoon species E. intestinalis and E. cuniculi are biased towards G/C. Although nucleotide composition biases are likely the main factor driving the CUB in Microsporidia according to correlation analyses, directed mutational pressure also likely affects the CUB as suggested by ENc-plots, correspondence and neutrality analyses. Overall, the Encephalitozoon genomes were found to be markedly different from the other microsporidians and, despite being the first sequenced representatives of this lineage, are uncharacteristic of the group as a whole. The disparities observed cannot be attributed solely to differences in host specificity and we hypothesize that other forces are at play in the lineage leading to Encephalitozoon species. PMID:26057384

  7. Comparative Analysis of Codon Usage Bias Patterns in Microsporidian Genomes.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Heng; Zhang, Ruizhi; Butler, Robert R; Liu, Tie; Zhang, Li; Pombert, Jean-François; Zhou, Zeyang

    2015-01-01

    The sub-3 Mbp genomes from microsporidian species of the Encephalitozoon genus are the smallest known among eukaryotes and paragons of genomic reduction and compaction in parasites. However, their diminutive stature is not characteristic of all Microsporidia, whose genome sizes vary by an order of magnitude. This large variability suggests that different evolutionary forces are applied on the group as a whole. In this study, we have compared the codon usage bias (CUB) between eight taxonomically distinct microsporidian genomes: Encephalitozoon intestinalis, Encephalitozoon cuniculi, Spraguea lophii, Trachipleistophora hominis, Enterocytozoon bieneusi, Nematocida parisii, Nosema bombycis and Nosema ceranae. While the CUB was found to be weak in all eight Microsporidia, nearly all (98%) of the optimal codons in S. lophii, T. hominis, E. bieneusi, N. parisii, N. bombycis and N. ceranae are fond of A/U in third position whereas most (64.6%) optimal codons in the Encephalitozoon species E. intestinalis and E. cuniculi are biased towards G/C. Although nucleotide composition biases are likely the main factor driving the CUB in Microsporidia according to correlation analyses, directed mutational pressure also likely affects the CUB as suggested by ENc-plots, correspondence and neutrality analyses. Overall, the Encephalitozoon genomes were found to be markedly different from the other microsporidians and, despite being the first sequenced representatives of this lineage, are uncharacteristic of the group as a whole. The disparities observed cannot be attributed solely to differences in host specificity and we hypothesize that other forces are at play in the lineage leading to Encephalitozoon species. PMID:26057384

  8. Association of HER2 codon 655 polymorphism with ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Watrowski, Rafał; Castillo-Tong, Dan Cacsire; Schuster, Eva; Fischer, Michael B; Speiser, Paul; Zeillinger, Robert

    2016-06-01

    The role of the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) codon 655 (Ile655Val) polymorphism in ovarian cancer is not fully understood. Two studies indicated a possible association between the Val allele and elevated risk or reduced prognosis of ovarian cancer. We investigated the HER2 codon 655 (rs1136201) polymorphism in 242 Austrian women-142 ovarian cancer patients and 100 healthy controls-by polymerase chain reaction and pyrosequencing. Associations between Ile655Val polymorphism and clinicopathological variables (e.g., age, FIGO stage, grading, serous vs. non-serous histology) were evaluated. The genotype distributions in ovarian cancer patients and controls were: AA; 66.2 %, AG; 25.35 %, GG; 8.45 %, and AA; 63 %, AG; 34 %, GG; 3.7 %, respectively (OR 1.15, CI 95 % 0.67-1.96). We observed a non-significant trend toward elevated cancer risk in Val/Val genotype (OR 2.98, CI 95 % 0.82-10.87, p = 0.10). Of note, 11 out of 12 Val/Val homozygotes were postmenopausal. The link between the Val/Val homozygosity and age over 50 years at diagnosis (OR 0.15, CI 95 % 0.02-1.2) was barely significant (p = 0.056). Summarizing, our data indicated a non-significant trend toward increased ovarian cancer risk in the Val/Val homozygosity, especially in women aged above 50 years. Further large-cohort studies focusing on the role of the HER2 codon 655 Val allele are needed. PMID:26666819

  9. Translational readthrough potential of natural termination codons in eucaryotes – The impact of RNA sequence

    PubMed Central

    Dabrowski, Maciej; Bukowy-Bieryllo, Zuzanna; Zietkiewicz, Ewa

    2015-01-01

    Termination of protein synthesis is not 100% efficient. A number of natural mechanisms that suppress translation termination exist. One of them is STOP codon readthrough, the process that enables the ribosome to pass through the termination codon in mRNA and continue translation to the next STOP codon in the same reading frame. The efficiency of translational readthrough depends on a variety of factors, including the identity of the termination codon, the surrounding mRNA sequence context, and the presence of stimulating compounds. Understanding the interplay between these factors provides the necessary background for the efficient application of the STOP codon suppression approach in the therapy of diseases caused by the presence of premature termination codons. PMID:26176195

  10. Selection at the amino acid level can influence synonymous codon usage: implications for the study of codon adaptation in plastid genes.

    PubMed Central

    Morton, B R

    2001-01-01

    A previously employed method that uses the composition of noncoding DNA as the basis of a test for selection between synonymous codons in plastid genes is reevaluated. The test requires the assumption that in the absence of selective differences between synonymous codons the composition of silent sites in coding sequences will match the composition of noncoding sites. It is demonstrated here that this assumption is not necessarily true and, more generally, that using compositional properties to draw inferences about selection on silent changes in coding sequences is much more problematic than commonly assumed. This is so because selection on nonsynonymous changes can influence the composition of synonymous sites (i.e., codon usage) in a complex manner, meaning that the composition biases of different silent sites, including neutral noncoding DNA, are not comparable. These findings also draw into question the commonly utilized method of investigating how selection to increase translation accuracy influences codon usage. The work then focuses on implications for studies that assess codon adaptation, which is selection on codon usage to enhance translation rate, in plastid genes. A new test that does not require the use of noncoding DNA is proposed and applied. The results of this test suggest that far fewer plastid genes display codon adaptation than previously thought. PMID:11560910

  11. Eukaryotic Evolutionary Transitions Are Associated with Extreme Codon Bias in Functionally-Related Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Hudson, Nicholas J.; Gu, Quan; Nagaraj, Shivashankar H.; Ding, Yong-Sheng; Dalrymple, Brian P.; Reverter, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    Codon bias in the genome of an organism influences its phenome by changing the speed and efficiency of mRNA translation and hence protein abundance. We hypothesized that differences in codon bias, either between-species differences in orthologous genes, or within-species differences between genes, may play an evolutionary role. To explore this hypothesis, we compared the genome-wide codon bias in six species that occupy vital positions in the Eukaryotic Tree of Life. We acquired the entire protein coding sequences for these organisms, computed the codon bias for all genes in each organism and explored the output for relationships between codon bias and protein function, both within- and between-lineages. We discovered five notable coordinated patterns, with extreme codon bias most pronounced in traits considered highly characteristic of a given lineage. Firstly, the Homo sapiens genome had stronger codon bias for DNA-binding transcription factors than the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome, whereas the opposite was true for ribosomal proteins – perhaps underscoring transcriptional regulation in the origin of complexity. Secondly, both mammalian species examined possessed extreme codon bias in genes relating to hair – a tissue unique to mammals. Thirdly, Arabidopsis thaliana showed extreme codon bias in genes implicated in cell wall formation and chloroplast function – which are unique to plants. Fourthly, Gallus gallus possessed strong codon bias in a subset of genes encoding mitochondrial proteins – perhaps reflecting the enhanced bioenergetic efficiency in birds that co-evolved with flight. And lastly, the G. gallus genome had extreme codon bias for the Ciliary Neurotrophic Factor – which may help to explain their spontaneous recovery from deafness. We propose that extreme codon bias in groups of genes that encode functionally related proteins has a pathway-level energetic explanation. PMID:21966531

  12. 8. GENERAL EXTERIOR VIEW LOOKING SOUTH, SHOWING UPSTREAM FACE OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. GENERAL EXTERIOR VIEW LOOKING SOUTH, SHOWING UPSTREAM FACE OF DAM/SPILLWAY; THE VIEW HIGHLIGHTS THE UPSTREAM APPEARANCE OF THE PIERS SUPPORTING THE MOVABLE STONEY GATES. - Bonneville Project, Bonneville Dam, Columbia River, Bonneville, Multnomah County, OR

  13. Codon optimality is a major determinant of mRNA stability

    PubMed Central

    Presnyak, Vladimir; Alhusaini, Najwa; Chen, Ying-Hsin; Martin, Sophie; Morris, Nathan; Kline, Nicholas; Olson, Sara; Weinberg, David; Baker, Kristian E.; Graveley, Brenton R.; Coller, Jeff

    2015-01-01

    Messenger RNA degradation represents a critical regulated step in gene expression. While the major pathways in turnover have been identified, accounting for disparate half-lives has been elusive. We show that codon optimality is one feature that contributes greatly to mRNA stability. Genome-wide RNA decay analysis revealed that stable mRNAs are enriched in codons designated optimal, whereas unstable mRNAs contain predominately non-optimal codons. Substitution of optimal codons with synonymous, non-optimal codons results in dramatic mRNA destabilization, while the converse substitution significantly increases stability. Further, we demonstrate that codon optimality impacts ribosome translocation, connecting the processes of translation elongation and decay through codon optimality. Finally, we show that optimal codon content accounts for the similar stabilities observed in mRNAs encoding proteins with coordinated physiological function. This work demonstrates that codon optimization exists as an mechanism to finely tune levels of mRNAs, and ultimately, proteins. PMID:25768907

  14. Control of ribosome traffic by position-dependent choice of synonymous codons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitarai, Namiko; Pedersen, Steen

    2013-10-01

    Messenger RNA (mRNA) encodes a sequence of amino acids by using codons. For most amino acids, there are multiple synonymous codons that can encode the amino acid. The translation speed can vary from one codon to another, thus there is room for changing the ribosome speed while keeping the amino acid sequence and hence the resulting protein. Recently, it has been noticed that the choice of the synonymous codon, via the resulting distribution of slow- and fast-translated codons, affects not only on the average speed of one ribosome translating the mRNA but also might have an effect on nearby ribosomes by affecting the appearance of ‘traffic jams’ where multiple ribosomes collide and form queues. To test this ‘context effect’ further, we here investigate the effect of the sequence of synonymous codons on the ribosome traffic by using a ribosome traffic model with codon-dependent rates, estimated from experiments. We compare the ribosome traffic on wild-type (WT) sequences and sequences where the synonymous codons were swapped randomly. By simulating translation of 87 genes, we demonstrate that the WT sequences, especially those with a high bias in codon usage, tend to have the ability to reduce ribosome collisions, hence optimizing the cellular investment in the translation apparatus. The magnitude of such reduction of the translation time might have a significant impact on the cellular growth rate and thereby have importance for the survival of the species.

  15. Codon 219 polymorphism of PRNP in healthy caucasians and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease patients

    SciTech Connect

    Petraroli, R.; Pocchiari, M.

    1996-04-01

    A number of point and insert mutations of the PrP gene (PRNP) have been linked to familial Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) and Gerstmann-Straussler-Scheinker disease (GSS). Moreover, the methionine/valine homozygosity at the polymorphic codon 129 of PRNP may cause a predisposition to sporadic and iatrogenic CJD or may control the age at onset of familial cases carrying either the 144-bp insertion or codon 178, codon 198, and codon 210 pathogenic mutations in PRNP. In addition, the association of methionine or valine at codon 129 and the point mutation at codon 178 on the same allele seem to play an important role in determining either fatal familial insomnia or CJD. However, it is noteworthy that a relationship between codon 129 polymorphism and accelerated pathogenesis (early age at onset or shorter duration of the disease) has not been seen in familial CJD patients with codon 200 mutation or in GSS patients with codon 102 mutation, arguing that other, as yet unidentified, gene products or environmental factors, or both, may influence the clinical expression of these diseases. 17 refs.

  16. A novel nuclear genetic code alteration in yeasts and the evolution of codon reassignment in eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Mühlhausen, Stefanie; Findeisen, Peggy; Plessmann, Uwe; Urlaub, Henning; Kollmar, Martin

    2016-07-01

    The genetic code is the cellular translation table for the conversion of nucleotide sequences into amino acid sequences. Changes to the meaning of sense codons would introduce errors into almost every translated message and are expected to be highly detrimental. However, reassignment of single or multiple codons in mitochondria and nuclear genomes, although extremely rare, demonstrates that the code can evolve. Several models for the mechanism of alteration of nuclear genetic codes have been proposed (including "codon capture," "genome streamlining," and "ambiguous intermediate" theories), but with little resolution. Here, we report a novel sense codon reassignment in Pachysolen tannophilus, a yeast related to the Pichiaceae. By generating proteomics data and using tRNA sequence comparisons, we show that Pachysolen translates CUG codons as alanine and not as the more usual leucine. The Pachysolen tRNACAG is an anticodon-mutated tRNA(Ala) containing all major alanine tRNA recognition sites. The polyphyly of the CUG-decoding tRNAs in yeasts is best explained by a tRNA loss driven codon reassignment mechanism. Loss of the CUG-tRNA in the ancient yeast is followed by gradual decrease of respective codons and subsequent codon capture by tRNAs whose anticodon is not part of the aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase recognition region. Our hypothesis applies to all nuclear genetic code alterations and provides several testable predictions. We anticipate more codon reassignments to be uncovered in existing and upcoming genome projects. PMID:27197221

  17. Translationally optimal codons associate with aggregation-prone sites in proteins.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yaelim; Zhou, Tong; Tartaglia, Gian Gaetano; Vendruscolo, Michele; Wilke, Claus O

    2010-12-01

    We analyze the relationship between codon usage bias and residue aggregation propensity in the genomes of four model organisms, Escherichia coli, yeast, fly, and mouse, as well as the archaeon Halobacterium species NRC-1. Using the Mantel-Haenszel procedure, we find that translationally optimal codons associate with aggregation-prone residues. Our results are qualitatively and quantitatively similar to those of an earlier study where we found an association between translationally optimal codons and buried residues. We also combine the aggregation-propensity data with solvent-accessibility data. Although the resulting data set is small, and hence statistical power low, results indicate that the association between optimal codons and aggregation-prone residues exists both at buried and at exposed sites. By comparing codon usage at different combinations of sites (exposed, aggregation-prone sites versus buried, non-aggregation-prone sites; buried, aggregation-prone sites versus exposed, non-aggregation-prone sites), we find that aggregation propensity and solvent accessibility seem to have independent effects of (on average) comparable magnitude on codon usage. Finally, in fly, we assess whether optimal codons associate with sites at which amino acid substitutions lead to an increase in aggregation propensity, and find only a very weak effect. These results suggest that optimal codons may be required to reduce the frequency of translation errors at aggregation-prone sites that coincide with certain functional sites, such as protein-protein interfaces. Alternatively, optimal codons may be required for rapid translation of aggregation-prone regions. PMID:21046618

  18. Prevalent Accumulation of Non-Optimal Codons through Somatic Mutations in Human Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xudong; Li, Guohui

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is characterized by uncontrolled cell growth, and the cause of different cancers is generally attributed to checkpoint dysregulation of cell proliferation and apoptosis. Recent studies have shown that non-optimal codons were preferentially adopted by genes to generate cell cycle-dependent oscillations in protein levels. This raises the intriguing question of how dynamic changes of codon usage modulate the cancer genome to cope with a non-controlled proliferative cell cycle. In this study, we comprehensively analyzed the somatic mutations of codons in human cancers, and found that non-optimal codons tended to be accumulated through both synonymous and non-synonymous mutations compared with other types of genomic substitution. We further demonstrated that non-optimal codons were prevalently accumulated across different types of cancers, amino acids, and chromosomes, and genes with accumulation of non-optimal codons tended to be involved in protein interaction/signaling networks and encoded important enzymes in metabolic networks that played roles in cancer-related pathways. This study provides insights into the dynamics of codons in the cancer genome and demonstrates that accumulation of non-optimal codons may be an adaptive strategy for cancerous cells to win the competition with normal cells. This deeper interpretation of the patterns and the functional characterization of somatic mutations of codons will help to broaden the current understanding of the molecular basis of cancers. PMID:27513638

  19. Analysis of codon usage pattern evolution in avian rotaviruses and their preferred host.

    PubMed

    Kattoor, Jobin Jose; Malik, Yashpal Singh; Sasidharan, Aravind; Rajan, Vishnuraj Mangalathu; Dhama, Kuldeep; Ghosh, Souvik; Bányai, Krisztián; Kobayashi, Nobumichi; Singh, Raj Kumar

    2015-08-01

    Rotavirus infection is a worldwide problem, with occurrence of highly divergent viruses classified in 8 species (A-H). We report here the evolution assessment of codon usage patterns in virus-host system in avian rotavirus (AvRV) of species RVA, RVD, RVF and RVG (preferentially affecting birds). The nucleotide contents, codon usage bias (CUB), relative synonymous codon usage (RSCU), and effective number of codons (ENCs) values were investigated targeting overexpressing major inner capsid viral protein (VP6) of these AvRV species. The results confirm that the evolutionary characteristics influences the rotavirus (RV) genetic diversity and impact of host's natural selection on the AvRVs codons. Synonymous codon usage patterns were evaluated following multivariate statistical procedures on all available AvRV coding gene sequences. RSCU trees accommodated all AvRV species and preferred host sequences in one topology confirming greater imminence of AvRVs with the host chicken cell genes. Similarly, the codon adaptation index (CAI) results also displayed a higher adaptation of AvRVs to its chicken host. The codon preference analysis of RVs revealed that VP6 gene express more proficiently in the yeast system, whereas, codon optimization might be required for the effectual expression in Escherichia coli and Homo sapiens. The findings provide basic evidence on the dynamics of AvRV evolution and its host adaptation, which could be exploited for additional research on avian species in future. PMID:26086995

  20. Analysis of synonymous codon usage in spike protein gene of infectious bronchitis virus.

    PubMed

    Makhija, Aditi; Kumar, Sachin

    2015-12-01

    Infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) is responsible for causing respiratory, renal, and urogenital diseases in poultry. IBV infection in poultry leads to high mortality rates in affected flocks and to severe economic losses due to a drop in egg production and a reduced gain in live weight of the broiler birds. IBV-encoded spike protein (S) is the major protective immunogen for the host. Although the functions of the S protein have been well studied, the factors shaping synonymous codon usage bias and nucleotide composition in the S gene have not been reported yet. In the present study, we analyzed the relative synonymous codon usage and effective number of codons (Nc) using the 53 IBV S genes. The major trend in codon usage variation was studied using correspondence analysis. The plot of Nc values against GC3 as well as the correlation between base composition and codon usage bias suggest that mutational pressure rather than natural selection is the main factor that determines the codon usage bias in the S gene. Interestingly, no association of aromaticity, degree of hydrophobicity, and aliphatic index was observed with the codon usage variation in IBV S genes. The study represents a comprehensive analysis of IBV S gene codon usage patterns and provides a basic understanding of the codon usage bias. PMID:26452019

  1. Upstream waves at Mars - Phobos observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, C. T.; Luhmann, J. G.; Schwingenschuh, K.; Riedler, W.; Eroshenko, E.

    1990-01-01

    The region upstream from the Mars subsolar bow shock is surveyed for the presence of MHD wave phenomena using the high temporal resolution data from the Magma magnetometer. Strong turbulence is observed when the magnetic field is connected to the Mars bow shock in such a way as to allow diffuse ions to reach the spacecraft. Also weak waves are observed at the proton gyro frequency. These waves are left-hand elliptically polarized and may be associated with the pick-up of protons from the Mars hydrogen exosphere.

  2. Prion protein gene analysis in three kindreds with fatal familial insomnia (FFI): codon 178 mutation and codon 129 polymorphism.

    PubMed Central

    Medori, R; Tritschler, H J

    1993-01-01

    Fatal familial insomnia (FFI) is a disease linked to a GAC(Asp)-->AAC(Asn) mutation in codon 178 of the prion protein (PrP) gene. FFI is characterized clinically by untreatable progressive insomnia, dysautonomia, and motor dysfunctions and is characterized pathologically by selective thalamic atrophy. We confirmed the 178Asn mutation in the PrP gene of a third FFI family of French ancestry. Three family members who are under 40 years of age and who inherited the mutation showed only reduced perfusion in the basal ganglia on single photon emission computerized tomography. Some FFI features differ from the clinical and neuropathologic findings associated with 178Asn reported elsewhere. However, additional intragenic mutations accounting for the phenotypic differences were not observed in two affected individuals. In other sporadic and familial forms of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and Gerstmann-Sträussler syndrome, Met or Val homozygosity at polymorphic codon 129 is associated with a more severe phenotype, younger age at onset, and faster progression. In FFI, young and old individuals at disease onset had 129Met/Val. Moreover, of five 178Asn individuals who are above age-at-onset range and who are well, two have 129Met and three have 129Met/Val, suggesting that polymorphic site 129 does not modulate FFI phenotypic expression. Genetic heterogeneity and environment may play an important role in inter- and intrafamilial variability of the 178Asn mutation. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:8105681

  3. Prion protein gene analysis in three kindreds with fatal familial insomnia (FFI): Codon 178 mutation and codon 129 polymorphism

    SciTech Connect

    Medori, R.; Tritschler, H.J. )

    1993-10-01

    Fatal familial insomnia (FFI) is a disease linked to a GAC(Asp) [yields] AAC(Asn) mutation in codon 178 of the prion protein (PrP) gene. FFI is characterized clinically by untreatable progressive insomnia, dysautonomia, and motor dysfunctions and is characterized pathologically by selective thalamic atrophy. The authors confirmed the 178[sup Asn] mutation in the PrP gene of a third FFI family of French ancestry. Three family members who are under 40 years of age and who inherited the mutation showed only reduced perfusion in the basal ganglia on single photon emission computerized tomography. Some FFI features differ from the clinical and neuropathologic findings associated with 178[sup Asn] reported elsewhere. However, additional intragenic mutations accounting for the phenotypic differences were not observed in two affected individuals. In other sporadic and familial forms of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and Gerstmann-Straeussler syndrome, Met or Val homozygosity at polymorphic codon 129 is associated with a more severe phenotype, younger age at onset, and faster progression. In FFI, young and old individuals at disease onset had 129[sup Met/Val]. Moreover, of five 178[sup Asn] individuals who are above age-at-onset range and who are well, two have 129[sup Met] and three have 129[sup Met/Val], suggesting that polymorphic site 129 does not modulate FFI phenotypic expression. Genetic heterogeneity and environment may play an important role in inter- and intrafamilial variability of the 178[sup Asn] mutation. 32 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Whistler waves observed upstream from collisionless shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fairfield, D. H.

    1974-01-01

    Waves in the frequency range 0.5-4. Hz have been studied in the region upstream of the earth's bow shock with data from the flux-gate magnetic field experiment on Imp 6. Such waves are invariably detected adjacent to the shock, persisting upstream for intervals often less than a minute but occasionally of the order of many hours. Analysis of 150 examples of these waves during a 3-month interval indicates that propagation directions generally make angles of between 20 and 40 deg with the field direction. The waves as measured in the spacecraft frame of reference are either left- or right-hand-polarized with respect to the average field direction. The left-handed waves generally have lower frequencies than the right-handed waves, and the left-handed frequencies never exceed 2.5 Hz. The measured sense of polarization is found to depend on the propagation direction (or alternatively, the field direction) relative to the solar wind direction.

  5. Internal hydraulic jumps with large upstream shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogden, Kelly; Helfrich, Karl

    2015-11-01

    Internal hydraulic jumps in approximately two-layered flows with large upstream shear are investigated using numerical simulations. The simulations allow continuous density and velocity profiles, and a jump is forced to develop by downstream topography, similar to the experiments conducted by Wilkinson and Wood (1971). High shear jumps are found to exhibit significantly more entrainment than low shear jumps. Furthermore, the downstream structure of the flow has an important effect on the jump properties. Jumps with a slow upper (inactive) layer exhibit a velocity minimum downstream of the jump, resulting in a sub-critical downstream state, while flows with the same upstream vertical shear and a larger barotropic velocity remain super-critical downstream of the jump. A two-layer theory is modified to account for the vertical structure of the downstream density and velocity profiles and entrainment is allowed through a modification of the approach of Holland et al. (2002). The resulting theory can be matched reasonably well with the numerical simulations. However, the results are very sensitive to how the downstream vertical profiles of velocity and density are incorporated into the layered model, highlighting the difficulty of the two layer approximation when the shear is large.

  6. Corporation-induced Diseases, Upstream Epidemiologic Surveillance, and Urban Health

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Corporation-induced diseases are defined as diseases of consumers, workers, or community residents who have been exposed to disease agents contained in corporate products. To study the epidemiology and to guide expanded surveillance of these diseases, a new analytical framework is proposed. This framework is based on the agent–host–environment model and the upstream multilevel epidemiologic approach and posits an epidemiologic cascade starting with government-sanctioned corporate profit making and ending in a social cost, i.e., harm to population health. Each of the framework’s levels addresses a specific level of analysis, including government, corporations, corporate conduits, the environment of the host, and the host. The explained variable at one level is also the explanatory variable at the next lower level. In this way, a causal chain can be followed along the epidemiologic cascade from the site of societal power down to the host. The framework thus describes the pathways by which corporate decisions filter down to disease production in the host and identifies opportunities for epidemiologic surveillance. Since the environment of city dwellers is strongly shaped by corporations that are far upstream and several levels away, the framework has relevance for the study of urban health. Corporations that influence the health of urban populations include developers and financial corporations that determine growth or decay of urban neighborhoods, as well as companies that use strategies based on neighborhood characteristics to sell products that harm consumer health. Epidemiological inquiry and surveillance are necessary at all levels to provide the knowledge needed for action to protect the health of the population. To achieve optimal inquiry and surveillance at the uppermost levels, epidemiologists will have to work with political scientists and other social scientists and to utilize novel sources of information. PMID:18437580

  7. Smart Start News, 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Monica, Ed.

    1999-01-01

    Smart Start is a comprehensive public-private initiative to help all North Carolina children enter school healthy and ready to succeed, and provides children from birth to age five access to high-quality and affordable child care, health care, and other critical services. This document comprises the first two issues of "Smart Start News," a…

  8. Starting School in August

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chmelynski, Carol

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses the controversial decision of the school board from the Broward County, Florida to start the school year on August 9. School boards across the country that are grappling with the idea of starting school earlier in the year are increasingly running up against strong opposition from parents. In many districts,…

  9. Start with Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erickson, Susan

    2012-01-01

    The author has found over her 13 years of teaching that starting off the school year with a science investigation has been a great method to learn about her students, to engage them about science before the school year even starts, and to build a foundation for a year of engaging science experiences. This article describes four such activities…

  10. A comparative analysis on the synonymous codon usage pattern in viral functional genes and their translational initiation region of ASFV.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jian-Hua; Gao, Zong-Liang; Sun, Dong-Jie; Ding, Yao-Zhong; Zhang, Jie; Stipkovits, Laszlo; Szathmary, Susan; Pejsak, Zygmunt; Liu, Yong-Sheng

    2013-04-01

    The synonymous codon usage pattern of African swine fever virus (ASFV), the similarity degree of the synonymous codon usage between this virus and some organisms and the synonymous codon usage bias for the translation initiation region of viral functional genes in the whole genome of ASFV have been investigated by some simply statistical analyses. Although both GC12% (the GC content at the first and second codon positions) and GC3% (the GC content at the third codon position) of viral functional genes have a large fluctuation, the significant correlations between GC12 and GC3% and between GC3% and the first principal axis of principle component analysis on the relative synonymous codon usage of the viral functional genes imply that mutation pressure of ASFV plays an important role in the synonymous codon usage pattern. Turning to the synonymous codon usage of this virus, the codons with U/A end predominate in the synonymous codon family for the same amino acid and a weak codon usage bias in both leading and lagging strands suggests that strand compositional asymmetry does not take part in the formation of codon usage in ASFV. The interaction between the absolute codon usage bias and GC3% suggests that other selections take part in the formation of codon usage, except for the mutation pressure. It is noted that the similarity degree of codon usage between ASFV and soft tick is higher than that between the virus and the pig, suggesting that the soft tick plays a more important role than the pig in the codon usage pattern of ASFV. The translational initiation region of the viral functional genes generally have a strong tendency to select some synonymous codons with low GC content, suggesting that the synonymous codon usage bias caused by translation selection from the host takes part in modulating the translation initiation efficiency of ASFV functional genes. PMID:23161403

  11. An empirical test of the concomitantly variable codon hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Merlo, Lauren M. F.; Lunzer, Mark; Dean, Antony M.

    2007-01-01

    A central assumption of models of molecular evolution, that each site in a sequence evolves independently of all other sites, lacks empirical support. We investigated the extent to which sites evolve codependently in triosephosphate isomerase (TIM), a ubiquitous glycolytic enzyme conserved in both structure and function. Codependencies among sites, or concomitantly variable codons (covarions), are evident from the reduced function and misfolding of hybrid TIM proteins. Although they exist, we find covarions are relatively rare, and closely related proteins are unlikely to have developed them. However, the potential for covarions increases with genetic distance so that highly divergent proteins may have evolved codependencies between many sites. The evolution of covarions undermines a key assumption in phylogenetics and calls into question our ability to disentangle ancient relationships among major taxonomic groups. PMID:17578921

  12. Transcription of the putative tumor suppressor gene HCCS1 requires binding of ETS-2 to its consensus near the transcription start site.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jing De; Fei, Qi; Wang, Peng; Lan, Fei; Mao, Da Qin; Zhang, Hong Yu; Yao, Xue Biao

    2006-09-01

    The hepatocellular carcinoma suppressor 1 (HCCS1) gene was identified by both positional cloning from a predominant region of loss of heterozygosity (17p13.3) in liver cancer and by functional screening for genes affecting cell proliferation in large-scale transfection assays. Its overexpression results in inhibition of cell proliferation in cell culture and tumor growth in nude mice. To understand its transcription regulation, the promoter architecture has been dissected in detail. The major start of transcription was mapped by primer extension to a C residue, 177 nucleotides upstream of the ATG codon. By assessing the promoter activity of a set of linker-scanning mutants of the minimal promoter (-60 to +148 region) in a transient transfection assay, we found that the +1 to + 40 region is critical to HCCS1 gene transcription, containing binding sites for transcription factors NF-kappaB (-21 to +7 and +40 to +26), p53 (+29 to +9) and ETS (+4 to +20 and +23 to +39). Biochemical and molecular analyses revealed that the ETS transcription factors ETS-2 and Elf-1 bind to the two ETS sites in situ and contribute significantly to the transcriptionally active state of the HCCS1 gene, while NF-kappaB, p53 and two other members of the ETS family (ETS-1 and NERF2) appear to play little role. Our observations provide insight into the mechanistic aspects of HCCS1 transcription regulation. PMID:16953216

  13. A micronucleus-specific sequence exists in the 5'-upstream region of calmodulin gene in Tetrahymena thermophila.

    PubMed Central

    Katoh, M; Hirono, M; Takemasa, T; Kimura, M; Watanabe, Y

    1993-01-01

    Tetrahymena thermophila possesses a transcriptionally inactive micronucleus and an active macronucleus. Both nuclei are developed from micronucleus-derived germ nuclei during conjugation. Extensive DNA rearrangement and transcriptional activation are known to be involved in macronuclear development, but little has been known about these processes in a particular functional gene. Therefore the micro- and macronuclear genomic DNAs for calmodulin gene were analyzed. A 1,384 bp micronucleus-specific sequence located about 3.5 kb upstream of calmodulin gene has been found, suggesting DNA rearrangement during macronuclear development. The micronucleus-specific sequence had 85% A + T, no extensive ORF, ATTAs at both ends, and two palindromic structures just outside of both ends. Interestingly, the micronucleus-specific sequence included a T-rich tract, T16CT5, in the middle, and a nearly complementary A-rich tract, A5TA10GA5, existed 7 bp upstream from the initiation codon. In addition, there was a 20 bp repetitive sequence TAAT(TAAC)4 about 100 bp upstream of the micronucleus-specific sequence and also in the promoter region of calmodulin gene. Although the functional significance of the micronucleus-specific sequence remains unclear, T16CT5 and TAAT(TAAC)4 elements might exert an influence on transcription of the calmodulin gene. Stringent Southern hybridization revealed that this micronucleus-specific sequence or very similar sequence(s) were abundant in the Tetrahymena micronuclear genome. Images PMID:8506136

  14. Upstream open reading frame in 5'-untranslated region reduces titin mRNA translational efficiency.

    PubMed

    Cadar, Adrian G; Zhong, Lin; Lin, Angel; Valenzuela, Mauricio O; Lim, Chee C

    2014-10-10

    Titin is the largest known protein and a critical determinant of myofibril elasticity and sarcomere structure in striated muscle. Accumulating evidence that mRNA transcripts are post-transcriptionally regulated by specific motifs located in the flanking untranslated regions (UTRs) led us to consider the role of titin 5'-UTR in regulating its translational efficiency. Titin 5'-UTR is highly homologous between human, mouse, and rat, and sequence analysis revealed the presence of a stem-loop and two upstream AUG codons (uAUGs) converging on a shared in frame stop codon. We generated a mouse titin 5'-UTR luciferase reporter construct and targeted the stem-loop and each uAUG for mutation. The wild-type and mutated constructs were transfected into the cardiac HL-1 cell line and primary neonatal rat ventricular myocytes (NRVM). SV40 driven 5'-UTR luciferase activity was significantly suppressed by wild-type titin 5'-UTR (∼ 70% in HL-1 cells and ∼ 60% in NRVM). Mutating both uAUGs was found to alleviate titin 5'-UTR suppression, while eliminating the stem-loop had no effect. Treatment with various growth stimuli: pacing, PMA or neuregulin had no effect on titin 5'-UTR luciferase activity. Doxorubicin stress stimuli reduced titin 5'-UTR suppression, while H2O2 had no effect. A reported single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs13422986 at position -4 of the uAUG2 was introduced and found to further repress titin 5'-UTR luciferase activity. We conclude that the uAUG motifs in titin 5'-UTR serve as translational repressors in the control of titin gene expression, and that mutations/SNPs of the uAUGs or doxorubicin stress could alter titin translational efficiency. PMID:25264194

  15. Vertebrate codon bias indicates a highly GC-rich ancestral genome.

    PubMed

    Nabiyouni, Maryam; Prakash, Ashwin; Fedorov, Alexei

    2013-04-25

    Two factors are thought to have contributed to the origin of codon usage bias in eukaryotes: 1) genome-wide mutational forces that shape overall GC-content and create context-dependent nucleotide bias, and 2) positive selection for codons that maximize efficient and accurate translation. Particularly in vertebrates, these two explanations contradict each other and cloud the origin of codon bias in the taxon. On the one hand, mutational forces fail to explain GC-richness (~60%) of third codon positions, given the GC-poor overall genomic composition among vertebrates (~40%). On the other hand, positive selection cannot easily explain strict regularities in codon preferences. Large-scale bioinformatic assessment, of nucleotide composition of coding and non-coding sequences in vertebrates and other taxa, suggests a simple possible resolution for this contradiction. Specifically, we propose that the last common vertebrate ancestor had a GC-rich genome (~65% GC). The data suggest that whole-genome mutational bias is the major driving force for generating codon bias. As the bias becomes prominent, it begins to affect translation and can result in positive selection for optimal codons. The positive selection can, in turn, significantly modulate codon preferences. PMID:23376453

  16. Codon optimization of the adenoviral fiber negatively impacts structural protein expression and viral fitness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villanueva, Eneko; Martí-Solano, Maria; Fillat, Cristina

    2016-06-01

    Codon usage adaptation of lytic viruses to their hosts is determinant for viral fitness. In this work, we analyzed the codon usage of adenoviral proteins by principal component analysis and assessed their codon adaptation to the host. We observed a general clustering of adenoviral proteins according to their function. However, there was a significant variation in the codon preference between the host-interacting fiber protein and the rest of structural late phase proteins, with a non-optimal codon usage of the fiber. To understand the impact of codon bias in the fiber, we optimized the Adenovirus-5 fiber to the codon usage of the hexon structural protein. The optimized fiber displayed increased expression in a non-viral context. However, infection with adenoviruses containing the optimized fiber resulted in decreased expression of the fiber and of wild-type structural proteins. Consequently, this led to a drastic reduction in viral release. The insertion of an exogenous optimized protein as a late gene in the adenovirus with the optimized fiber further interfered with viral fitness. These results highlight the importance of balancing codon usage in viral proteins to adequately exploit cellular resources for efficient infection and open new opportunities to regulate viral fitness for virotherapy and vaccine development.

  17. Selective Factors Associated with the Evolution of Codon Usage in Natural Populations of Arboviruses

    PubMed Central

    Velazquez-Salinas, Lauro; Zarate, Selene; Eschbaumer, Michael; Pereira Lobo, Francisco; Gladue, Douglas P.; Arzt, Jonathan; Novella, Isabel S.; Rodriguez, Luis L.

    2016-01-01

    Arboviruses (arthropod borne viruses) have life cycles that include both vertebrate and invertebrate hosts with substantial differences in vector and host specificity between different viruses. Most arboviruses utilize RNA for their genetic material and are completely dependent on host tRNAs for their translation, suggesting that virus codon usage could be a target for selection. In the current study we analyzed the relative synonymous codon usage (RSCU) patterns of 26 arboviruses together with 25 vectors and hosts, including 8 vertebrates and 17 invertebrates. We used hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) and principal component analysis (PCA) to identify trends in codon usage. HCA demonstrated that the RSCU of arboviruses reflects that of their natural hosts, but not that of dead-end hosts. Of the two major components identified by PCA, the first accounted for 62.1% of the total variance, and among the 59 codons analyzed in this study, the leucine codon CTG had the highest correlation with the first principal component, however isoleucine had the highest correlation during amino acid analysis. Nucleotide and dinucleotide composition were the variables that explained most of the total codon usage variance. The results suggest that the main factors driving the evolution of codon usage in arboviruses is based on the nucleotide and dinucleotide composition present in the host. Comparing codon usage of arboviruses and potential vector hosts can help identifying potential vectors for emerging arboviruses. PMID:27455096

  18. Codon usage affects the structure and function of the Drosophila circadian clock protein PERIOD.

    PubMed

    Fu, Jingjing; Murphy, Katherine A; Zhou, Mian; Li, Ying H; Lam, Vu H; Tabuloc, Christine A; Chiu, Joanna C; Liu, Yi

    2016-08-01

    Codon usage bias is a universal feature of all genomes, but its in vivo biological functions in animal systems are not clear. To investigate the in vivo role of codon usage in animals, we took advantage of the sensitivity and robustness of the Drosophila circadian system. By codon-optimizing parts of Drosophila period (dper), a core clock gene that encodes a critical component of the circadian oscillator, we showed that dper codon usage is important for circadian clock function. Codon optimization of dper resulted in conformational changes of the dPER protein, altered dPER phosphorylation profile and stability, and impaired dPER function in the circadian negative feedback loop, which manifests into changes in molecular rhythmicity and abnormal circadian behavioral output. This study provides an in vivo example that demonstrates the role of codon usage in determining protein structure and function in an animal system. These results suggest a universal mechanism in eukaryotes that uses a codon usage "code" within genetic codons to regulate cotranslational protein folding. PMID:27542830

  19. Enhanced expression of codon optimized Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis antigens in Lactobacillus salivarius

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We have previously identified the mycobacterial high G+C codon usage bias as a limiting factor in heterologous expression of MAP proteins from Lb.salivarius, and demonstrated that codon optimisation of a synthetic coding gene greatly enhances MAP protein production. Here, we effectively demonstrate ...

  20. Codon Usage Patterns in Corynebacterium glutamicum: Mutational Bias, Natural Selection and Amino Acid Conservation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guiming; Wu, Jinyu; Yang, Huanming; Bao, Qiyu

    2010-01-01

    The alternative synonymous codons in Corynebacterium glutamicum, a well-known bacterium used in industry for the production of amino acid, have been investigated by multivariate analysis. As C. glutamicum is a GC-rich organism, G and C are expected to predominate at the third position of codons. Indeed, overall codon usage analyses have indicated that C and/or G ending codons are predominant in this organism. Through multivariate statistical analysis, apart from mutational selection, we identified three other trends of codon usage variation among the genes. Firstly, the majority of highly expressed genes are scattered towards the positive end of the first axis, whereas the majority of lowly expressed genes are clustered towards the other end of the first axis. Furthermore, the distinct difference in the two sets of genes was that the C ending codons are predominate in putatively highly expressed genes, suggesting that the C ending codons are translationally optimal in this organism. Secondly, the majority of the putatively highly expressed genes have a tendency to locate on the leading strand, which indicates that replicational and transciptional selection might be invoked. Thirdly, highly expressed genes are more conserved than lowly expressed genes by synonymous and nonsynonymous substitutions among orthologous genes fromthe genomes of C. glutamicum and C. diphtheriae. We also analyzed other factors such as the length of genes and hydrophobicity that might influence codon usage and found their contributions to be weak. PMID:20445740

  1. Analysis of the synonymous codon usage bias in recently emerged enterovirus D68 strains.

    PubMed

    Karniychuk, Uladzimir U

    2016-09-01

    Understanding the codon usage pattern of a pathogen and relationship between pathogen and host's codon usage patterns has fundamental and applied interests. Enterovirus D68 (EV-D68) is an emerging pathogen with a potentially high public health significance. In the present study, the synonymous codon usage bias of 27 recently emerged, and historical EV-D68 strains was analyzed. In contrast to previously studied enteroviruses (enterovirus 71 and poliovirus), EV-D68 and human host have a high discrepancy between favored codons. Analysis of viral synonymous codon usage bias metrics, viral nucleotide/dinucleotide compositional parameters, and viral protein properties showed that mutational pressure is more involved in shaping the synonymous codon usage bias of EV-D68 than translation selection. Computation of codon adaptation indices allowed to estimate expression potential of the EV-D68 genome in several commonly used laboratory animals. This approach requires experimental validation and may provide an auxiliary tool for the rational selection of laboratory animals to model emerging viral diseases. Enterovirus D68 genome compositional and codon usage data can be useful for further pathogenesis, animal model, and vaccine design studies. PMID:27364082

  2. Selective Factors Associated with the Evolution of Codon Usage in Natural Populations of Arboviruses.

    PubMed

    Velazquez-Salinas, Lauro; Zarate, Selene; Eschbaumer, Michael; Pereira Lobo, Francisco; Gladue, Douglas P; Arzt, Jonathan; Novella, Isabel S; Rodriguez, Luis L

    2016-01-01

    Arboviruses (arthropod borne viruses) have life cycles that include both vertebrate and invertebrate hosts with substantial differences in vector and host specificity between different viruses. Most arboviruses utilize RNA for their genetic material and are completely dependent on host tRNAs for their translation, suggesting that virus codon usage could be a target for selection. In the current study we analyzed the relative synonymous codon usage (RSCU) patterns of 26 arboviruses together with 25 vectors and hosts, including 8 vertebrates and 17 invertebrates. We used hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) and principal component analysis (PCA) to identify trends in codon usage. HCA demonstrated that the RSCU of arboviruses reflects that of their natural hosts, but not that of dead-end hosts. Of the two major components identified by PCA, the first accounted for 62.1% of the total variance, and among the 59 codons analyzed in this study, the leucine codon CTG had the highest correlation with the first principal component, however isoleucine had the highest correlation during amino acid analysis. Nucleotide and dinucleotide composition were the variables that explained most of the total codon usage variance. The results suggest that the main factors driving the evolution of codon usage in arboviruses is based on the nucleotide and dinucleotide composition present in the host. Comparing codon usage of arboviruses and potential vector hosts can help identifying potential vectors for emerging arboviruses. PMID:27455096

  3. Polypeptide release factors and stop codon recognition in the apicoplast and mitochondrion of Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Vaishya, Suniti; Kumar, Vikash; Gupta, Ankit; Siddiqi, Mohammad Imran; Habib, Saman

    2016-06-01

    Correct termination of protein synthesis would be a critical step in translation of organellar open reading frames (ORFs) of the apicoplast and mitochondrion of the malaria parasite. We identify release factors (RFs) responsible for recognition of the UAA and UGA stop-codons of apicoplast ORFs and the sole UAA stop-codon that terminates translation from the three mitochondrial ORFs. A single nuclear-encoded canonical RF2, PfRF2Api , localizes to the apicoplast. It has a conserved tripeptide motif (SPF) for stop-codon recognition and is sufficient for peptidyl-tRNA hydrolysis (PTH) from both UAA and UGA. Two RF family proteins are targeted to the parasite mitochondrion; a canonical RF1, PfRF1Mit , with a variant codon-recognition motif (PxN instead of the conserved RF1 PxT) is the major peptidyl-hydrolase with specific recognition of the UAA codon relevant to mitochondrial ORFs. Mutation of the N residue of the PfRF1Mit PxN motif and two other conserved residues of the codon recognition domain lowers PTH activity from pre-termination ribosomes indicating their role in codon-recognition. The second RF imported by the mitochondrion is the non-canonical PfICT1 that functions as a dimer and mediates codon nonspecific peptide release. Our results help delineate a critical step in organellar translation in Plasmodium, which is an important target for anti-malarials. PMID:26946524

  4. Codon optimization of the adenoviral fiber negatively impacts structural protein expression and viral fitness.

    PubMed

    Villanueva, Eneko; Martí-Solano, Maria; Fillat, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Codon usage adaptation of lytic viruses to their hosts is determinant for viral fitness. In this work, we analyzed the codon usage of adenoviral proteins by principal component analysis and assessed their codon adaptation to the host. We observed a general clustering of adenoviral proteins according to their function. However, there was a significant variation in the codon preference between the host-interacting fiber protein and the rest of structural late phase proteins, with a non-optimal codon usage of the fiber. To understand the impact of codon bias in the fiber, we optimized the Adenovirus-5 fiber to the codon usage of the hexon structural protein. The optimized fiber displayed increased expression in a non-viral context. However, infection with adenoviruses containing the optimized fiber resulted in decreased expression of the fiber and of wild-type structural proteins. Consequently, this led to a drastic reduction in viral release. The insertion of an exogenous optimized protein as a late gene in the adenovirus with the optimized fiber further interfered with viral fitness. These results highlight the importance of balancing codon usage in viral proteins to adequately exploit cellular resources for efficient infection and open new opportunities to regulate viral fitness for virotherapy and vaccine development. PMID:27278133

  5. Codon optimization of the adenoviral fiber negatively impacts structural protein expression and viral fitness

    PubMed Central

    Villanueva, Eneko; Martí-Solano, Maria; Fillat, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Codon usage adaptation of lytic viruses to their hosts is determinant for viral fitness. In this work, we analyzed the codon usage of adenoviral proteins by principal component analysis and assessed their codon adaptation to the host. We observed a general clustering of adenoviral proteins according to their function. However, there was a significant variation in the codon preference between the host-interacting fiber protein and the rest of structural late phase proteins, with a non-optimal codon usage of the fiber. To understand the impact of codon bias in the fiber, we optimized the Adenovirus-5 fiber to the codon usage of the hexon structural protein. The optimized fiber displayed increased expression in a non-viral context. However, infection with adenoviruses containing the optimized fiber resulted in decreased expression of the fiber and of wild-type structural proteins. Consequently, this led to a drastic reduction in viral release. The insertion of an exogenous optimized protein as a late gene in the adenovirus with the optimized fiber further interfered with viral fitness. These results highlight the importance of balancing codon usage in viral proteins to adequately exploit cellular resources for efficient infection and open new opportunities to regulate viral fitness for virotherapy and vaccine development. PMID:27278133

  6. Codon Usage Influences the Local Rate of Translation Elongation to Regulate Co-translational Protein Folding.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chien-Hung; Dang, Yunkun; Zhou, Zhipeng; Wu, Cheng; Zhao, Fangzhou; Sachs, Matthew S; Liu, Yi

    2015-09-01

    Codon usage bias is a universal feature of eukaryotic and prokaryotic genomes and has been proposed to regulate translation efficiency, accuracy, and protein folding based on the assumption that codon usage affects translation dynamics. The roles of codon usage in translation, however, are not clear and have been challenged by recent ribosome profiling studies. Here we used a Neurospora cell-free translation system to directly monitor the velocity of mRNA translation. We demonstrated that the preferred codons enhance the rate of translation elongation, whereas non-optimal codons slow elongation. Codon usage also controls ribosome traffic on mRNA. These conclusions were supported by ribosome profiling results in vitro and in vivo with template mRNAs designed to increase the signal-to-noise ratio. Finally, we demonstrate that codon usage regulates protein function by affecting co-translational protein folding. These results resolve a long-standing fundamental question and suggest the existence of a codon usage code for protein folding. PMID:26321254

  7. Characterization of codon usage pattern and influencing factors in Japanese encephalitis virus.

    PubMed

    Singh, Niraj K; Tyagi, Anuj; Kaur, Rajinder; Verma, Ramneek; Gupta, Praveen K

    2016-08-01

    Recently, several outbreaks of Japanese encephalitis (JE), caused by Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), have been reported and it has become cause of concern across the world. In this study, detailed analysis of JEV codon usage pattern was performed. The relative synonymous codon usage (RSCU) values along with mean effective number of codons (ENC) value of 55.30 indicated the presence of low codon usages bias in JEV. The effect of mutational pressure on codon usage bias was confirmed by significant correlations of A3s, U3s, G3s, C3s, GC3s, ENC values, with overall nucleotide contents (A%, U%, G%, C%, and GC%). The correlation analysis of A3s, U3s, G3s, C3s, GC3s, with axis values of correspondence analysis (CoA) further confirmed the role of mutational pressure. However, the correlation analysis of Gravy values and Aroma values with A3s, U3s, G3s, C3s, and GC3s, indicated the presence of natural selection on codon usage bias in addition to mutational pressure. The natural selection was further confirmed by codon adaptation index (CAI) analysis. Additionally, relative dinucleotide frequencies, geographical distribution, and evolutionary processes also influenced the codon usage pattern to some extent. PMID:27189042

  8. Structural polymers in upstream production service

    SciTech Connect

    Dismukes, J.P.; Lustiger, A.; Chang, J.; Abrams, P.I.; Chiu, A.S.

    1993-12-31

    Polymers in the form of coatings, seals and composites for corrosion resistant and secondary load-bearing applications have been used in oilfield production operations for a number of years in specialty applications. The increasing needs of the industry for corrosion resistant piping, and for structural components combining corrosion resistance with high specific strength and weight, have now made the potential for use of polymer composites of increasing interest, for pipe and tubing and for load-bearing structural members. The purpose of this paper is to review the current status of structural polymer usage in the upstream, and to highlight major application areas where there is a strong economic incentive to evaluate the benefits for applying polymer composite. In addition, the underlying science and technology affecting composite properties, application life, environmental resistance and economics are assessed, since these issues need to be addressed in considering the decision to design-in composites, as compared to commonly used metals and alloys.

  9. Moving stormwater P management upstream (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, L. A.; Hobbie, S. E.; Finlay, J. C.; Kalinosky, P.; Janke, B.

    2013-12-01

    Reducing stormwater phosphorus loading using current approaches, which focus on treatment at the end of the pipe, is unlikely to reduce P loads enough to restore nutrient-impaired urban lakes. An indication of this is that of the nearly 150 nutrient impaired lakes in the Twin Cities region, only one has been restored. We hypothesize that substantial reduction of eutrophication will require reductions of P inputs upstream from storm drains. Developing source reduction strategies will required a shift in thinking about system boundaries, moving upstream from the storm drain to the curb, and from the curb to the watershed. Our Prior Lake Street Sweeping Project, a 2-year study of enhanced street sweeping, will be used to illustrate the idea of moving the system boundary to the curb. This study showed that P load recovery from sweeping increases with both sweeping frequency and overhead tree canopy cover. For high canopy streets, coarse organic material (tree leaves; seed pods, etc.) comprised 42% of swept material. We estimate that P inputs from trees may be half of measured storm P yields in 8 urban catchments in St. Paul, MN. Moreover, the cost of removing P during autumn was often < 100/pound P, compared with > 1000/lb P for stormwater ponds. We can also move further upstream, to the watershed boundary. P inputs to urban watersheds that enter lawns include lawn fertilizer, polyphosphates added to water supplies (and hence to lawns via irrigation), and pet food (transformed to pet waste). Minnesota enacted a lawn P fertilizer restriction in 2003, but early reductions in stormwater P loads were modest, probably reflecting reduction in direct wash-off of applied fertilizer. Because urban soils are enriched in P, growing turf has continued to extract available soil P. When turf is mowed, cut grass decomposes, generating P in runoff. As soil P becomes depleted, P concentrations in lawn runoff will gradually decline. Preliminary modeling suggests that substantial

  10. Suprathermal ions upstream from interplanetary shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gosling, J. T.; Bame, S. J.; Feldman, W. C.; Paschmann, G.; Sckopke, N.; Russell, C. T.

    1984-07-01

    Low energy (10 eV-30 keV) observations of suprathermal ions ahead of outward propagating interplanetary shock waves (ISQ) are reported. The data were taken with the fast plasma experiment on ISEE 1 and 2 during 17 events. Structure was more evident in the suprathermal ion distribution in the earth bow shock region than in the upstream region. Isotropic distributions were only observed ahead of ISW, although field alignment, kidney-bean distributions, ion shells in velocity space and bunches of gyrating ions were not. The data suggest that the solar wind ions are accelerated to suprathermal energies in the vicinity of the shocks, which feature low and subcritical Mach numbers at 1 AU.

  11. Suprathermal ions upstream from interplanetary shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gosling, J. T.; Bame, S. J.; Feldman, W. C.; Paschmann, G.; Sckopke, N.; Russell, C. T.

    1984-01-01

    Low energy (10 eV-30 keV) observations of suprathermal ions ahead of outward propagating interplanetary shock waves (ISQ) are reported. The data were taken with the fast plasma experiment on ISEE 1 and 2 during 17 events. Structure was more evident in the suprathermal ion distribution in the earth bow shock region than in the upstream region. Isotropic distributions were only observed ahead of ISW, although field alignment, kidney-bean distributions, ion shells in velocity space and bunches of gyrating ions were not. The data suggest that the solar wind ions are accelerated to suprathermal energies in the vicinity of the shocks, which feature low and subcritical Mach numbers at 1 AU.

  12. Importance of codon usage for the temporal regulation of viral gene expression.

    PubMed

    Shin, Young C; Bischof, Georg F; Lauer, William A; Desrosiers, Ronald C

    2015-11-10

    The glycoproteins of herpesviruses and of HIV/SIV are made late in the replication cycle and are derived from transcripts that use an unusual codon usage that is quite different from that of the host cell. Here we show that the actions of natural transinducers from these two different families of persistent viruses (Rev of SIV and ORF57 of the rhesus monkey rhadinovirus) are dependent on the nature of the skewed codon usage. In fact, the transinducibility of expression of these glycoproteins by Rev and by ORF57 can be flipped simply by changing the nature of the codon usage. Even expression of a luciferase reporter could be made Rev dependent or ORF57 dependent by distinctive changes to its codon usage. Our findings point to a new general principle in which different families of persisting viruses use a poor codon usage that is skewed in a distinctive way to temporally regulate late expression of structural gene products. PMID:26504241

  13. Cytochrome P450 genes in coronary artery diseases: Codon usage analysis reveals genomic GC adaptation.

    PubMed

    Malakar, Arup Kumar; Halder, Binata; Paul, Prosenjit; Chakraborty, Supriyo

    2016-09-15

    Establishing codon usage biases are imperative for understanding the etiology of coronary artery diseases (CAD) as well as the genetic factors associated with these diseases. The aim of this study was to evaluate the contribution of 18 responsible cytochrome P450 (CYP) genes for the risk of CAD. Effective number of codon (Nc) showed a negative correlation with both GC3 and synonymous codon usage order (SCUO) suggesting an antagonistic relationship between codon usage and Nc of genes. The dinucleotide analysis revealed that CG and TA dinucleotides have the lowest odds ratio in these genes. Principal component analysis showed that GC composition has a profound effect in separating the genes along the first major axis. Our findings revealed that mutational pressure and natural selection could possibly be the major factors responsible for codon bias in these genes. The study not only offers an insight into the mechanisms of genomic GC adaptation, but also illustrates the complexity of CYP genes in CAD. PMID:27275533

  14. Evidence for Stabilizing Selection on Codon Usage in Chromosomal Rearrangements of Drosophila pseudoobscura

    PubMed Central

    Fuller, Zachary L.; Haynes, Gwilym D.; Zhu, Dianhui; Batterton, Matthew; Chao, Hsu; Dugan, Shannon; Javaid, Mehwish; Jayaseelan, Joy C.; Lee, Sandra; Li, Mingmei; Ongeri, Fiona; Qi, Sulan; Han, Yi; Doddapaneni, Harshavardhan; Richards, Stephen; Schaeffer, Stephen W.

    2014-01-01

    There has been a renewed interest in investigating the role of stabilizing selection acting on genome-wide traits such as codon usage bias. Codon bias, when synonymous codons are used at unequal frequencies, occurs in a wide variety of taxa. Standard evolutionary models explain the maintenance of codon bias through a balance of genetic drift, mutation and weak purifying selection. The efficacy of selection is expected to be reduced in regions of suppressed recombination. Contrary to observations in Drosophila melanogaster, some recent studies have failed to detect a relationship between the recombination rate, intensity of selection acting at synonymous sites, and the magnitude of codon bias as predicted under these standard models. Here, we examined codon bias in 2798 protein coding loci on the third chromosome of D. pseudoobscura using whole-genome sequences of 47 individuals, representing five common third chromosome gene arrangements. Fine-scale recombination maps were constructed using more than 1 million segregating sites. As expected, recombination was demonstrated to be significantly suppressed between chromosome arrangements, allowing for a direct examination of the relationship between recombination, selection, and codon bias. As with other Drosophila species, we observe a strong mutational bias away from the most frequently used codons. We find the rate of synonymous and nonsynonymous polymorphism is variable between different amino acids. However, we do not observe a reduction in codon bias or the strength of selection in regions of suppressed recombination as expected. Instead, we find that the interaction between weak stabilizing selection and mutational bias likely plays a role in shaping the composition of synonymous codons across the third chromosome in D. pseudoobscura. PMID:25326424

  15. Evolutionary characterization of Tembusu virus infection through identification of codon usage patterns.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hao; Yan, Bing; Chen, Shun; Wang, Mingshu; Jia, Renyong; Cheng, Anchun

    2015-10-01

    Tembusu virus (TMUV) is a single-stranded, positive-sense RNA virus. As reported, TMUV infection has resulted in significant poultry losses, and the virus may also pose a threat to public health. To characterize TMUV evolutionarily and to understand the factors accounting for codon usage properties, we performed, for the first time, a comprehensive analysis of codon usage bias for the genomes of 60 TMUV strains. The most recently published TMUV strains were found to be widely distributed in coastal cities of southeastern China. Codon preference among TMUV genomes exhibits a low bias (effective number of codons (ENC)=53.287) and is maintained at a stable level. ENC-GC3 plots and the high correlation between composition constraints and principal component factor analysis of codon usage demonstrated that mutation pressure dominates over natural selection pressure in shaping the TMUV coding sequence composition. The high correlation between the major components of the codon usage pattern and hydrophobicity (Gravy) or aromaticity (Aromo) was obvious, indicating that properties of viral proteins also account for the observed variation in TMUV codon usage. Principal component analysis (PCA) showed that CQW1 isolated from Chongqing may have evolved from GX2013H or GX2013G isolated from Guangxi, thus indicating that TMUV likely disseminated from southeastern China to the mainland. Moreover, the preferred codons encoding eight amino acids were consistent with the optimal codons for human cells, indicating that TMUV may pose a threat to public health due to possible cross-species transmission (birds to birds or birds to humans). The results of this study not only have theoretical value for uncovering the characteristics of synonymous codon usage patterns in TMUV genomes but also have significant meaning with regard to the molecular evolutionary tendencies of TMUV. PMID:26205688

  16. Escape of heated ions upstream of quasi-parallel shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edmiston, J. P.; Kennel, C. F.; Eichler, D.

    1982-01-01

    A simple theoretical criterion by which quasi-parallel and quasi-perpendicular collisionless shocks may be distinguished is proposed on the basis of an investigation of the free escape of ions from the post-shock plasma into the region upstream of a fast collisionless shock. It was determined that the accessibility of downstream ions to the upstream region depends on upstream magnetic field shock normal angle, in addition to the upstream plasma parameters, with post-shock ions escaping upstream for shock normal angles of less than 45 deg, in agreement with the observed transition between quasi-parallel and quasi-perpendicular shock structure. Upstream ion distribution functions resembling those of observed intermediate ions and beams are also calculated.

  17. Upstream/downstream: Issues in environmental ethics

    SciTech Connect

    Scherer, D.

    1991-01-01

    Upstream/Downstream reminds us that there are four issues that are more or less distinctive to environmental ethics. First, and most distinctively, environmental issues involve the standing of nonhuman living things and systems. Thus, environmental politics is only partly a clash among the interest of the parties involved; it often involves actions on behalf of the existence rights of nonhuman life forms. Second, environmental ethics concern the intergenerational distribution of benefits more explicitly than do most other ethical issues, which brings out serious weaknesses in legal frameworks that rely on claims for damages. Third, the complexity and indirectness of many environmental impacts introduces a high degree of uncertainty and thus technical as well as ethical issues of prudent behavior. Specifically, where science may not fully reveal environmental risks, should development proceed; should analysis proceed if it is known to have a Pollyanna bias Fourth, insofar as environmental damage is typically done to common property, and thus its regulation is generally a matter for governmental regulation, the obligations of private actors to make sacrifices beyond what government requires is at issue - an issue that one would expect to be taken up at length in the other volumes.

  18. Developmental Origins, Epigenetics, and Equity: Moving Upstream.

    PubMed

    Wallack, Lawrence; Thornburg, Kent

    2016-05-01

    The Developmental Origins of Health and Disease and the related science of epigenetics redefines the meaning of what constitutes upstream approaches to significant social and public health problems. An increasingly frequent concept being expressed is "When it comes to your health, your zip code may be more important than your genetic code". Epigenetics explains how the environment-our zip code-literally gets under our skin, creates biological changes that increase our vulnerability for disease, and even children's prospects for social success, over their life course and into future generations. This science requires us to rethink where disease comes from and the best way to promote health. It identifies the most fundamental social equity issue in our society: that initial social and biological disadvantage, established even prior to birth, and linked to the social experience of prior generations, is made worse by adverse environments throughout the life course. But at the same time, it provides hope because it tells us that a concerted focus on using public policy to improve our social, physical, and economic environments can ultimately change our biology and the trajectory of health and social success into future generations. PMID:27029539

  19. Codon-Driven Translational Efficiency Is Stable across Diverse Mammalian Cell States

    PubMed Central

    Villar, Diego; White, Robert J.; Marioni, John C.; Kutter, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Whether codon usage fine-tunes mRNA translation in mammals remains controversial, with recent papers suggesting that production of proteins in specific Gene Ontological (GO) pathways can be regulated by actively modifying the codon and anticodon pools in different cellular conditions. In this work, we compared the sequence content of genes in specific GO categories with the exonic genome background. Although a substantial fraction of variability in codon usage could be explained by random sampling, almost half of GO sets showed more variability in codon usage than expected by chance. Nevertheless, by quantifying translational efficiency in healthy and cancerous tissues in human and mouse, we demonstrated that a given tRNA pool can equally well translate many different sets of mRNAs, irrespective of their cell-type specificity. This disconnect between variations in codon usage and the stability of translational efficiency is best explained by differences in GC content between gene sets. GC variation across the mammalian genome is most likely a result of the interplay between genome repair and gene duplication mechanisms, rather than selective pressures caused by codon-driven translational rates. Consequently, codon usage differences in mammalian transcriptomes are most easily explained by well-understood mutational biases acting on the underlying genome. PMID:27166679

  20. Analysis of Codon Usage Patterns in Herbaceous Peony (Paeonia lactiflora Pall.) Based on Transcriptome Data.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yanqing; Zhao, Daqiu; Tao, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Codon usage bias, which exists in many genomes, is mainly determined by mutation and selection. To elucidate the genetic features and evolutionary history of herbaceous peony (Paeonia lactiflora), a well-known symbol of prosperity in China, we examined synonymous codon usage in 24,216 reconstructed genes from the P. lactiflora transcriptome. The mean GC content was 44.4%, indicating that the nucleotide content of P. lactiflora genes is slightly AT rich and GC poor. The P. lactiflora genome has a wide range of GC3 (GC content at the third synonymous codon position) distribution, with a significant correlation between GC12 and GC3. ENC (effective number of codons) analysis suggested that mutational bias played a major role in shaping codon usage. Parity Rule 2 (PR2) analysis revealed that GC and AU were not used proportionally. We identified 22 "optimal codons", most ending with an A or U. Our results suggested that nucleotide composition mutation bias and translational selection were the main driving factors of codon usage bias in P. lactiflora. These results lay the foundation for exploring the evolutionary mechanisms and heterologous expression of functionally-important proteins in P. lactiflora. PMID:26506393

  1. Expanding the amino acid repertoire of ribosomal polypeptide synthesis via the artificial division of codon boxes.

    PubMed

    Iwane, Yoshihiko; Hitomi, Azusa; Murakami, Hiroshi; Katoh, Takayuki; Goto, Yuki; Suga, Hiroaki

    2016-04-01

    In ribosomal polypeptide synthesis the library of amino acid building blocks is limited by the manner in which codons are used. Of the proteinogenic amino acids, 18 are coded for by multiple codons and therefore many of the 61 sense codons can be considered redundant. Here we report a method to reduce the redundancy of codons by artificially dividing codon boxes to create vacant codons that can then be reassigned to non-proteinogenic amino acids and thereby expand the library of genetically encoded amino acids. To achieve this, we reconstituted a cell-free translation system with 32 in vitro transcripts of transfer RNASNN (tRNASNN) (S = G or C), assigning the initiator and 20 elongator amino acids. Reassignment of three redundant codons was achieved by replacing redundant tRNASNNs with tRNASNNs pre-charged with non-proteinogenic amino acids. As a demonstration, we expressed a 32-mer linear peptide that consists of 20 proteinogenic and three non-proteinogenic amino acids, and a 14-mer macrocyclic peptide that contains more than four non-proteinogenic amino acids. PMID:27001726

  2. Gaining Insights into the Codon Usage Patterns of TP53 Gene across Eight Mammalian Species

    PubMed Central

    Mazumder, Tarikul Huda; Chakraborty, Supriyo

    2015-01-01

    TP53 gene is known as the “guardian of the genome” as it plays a vital role in regulating cell cycle, cell proliferation, DNA damage repair, initiation of programmed cell death and suppressing tumor growth. Non uniform usage of synonymous codons for a specific amino acid during translation of protein known as codon usage bias (CUB) is a unique property of the genome and shows species specific deviation. Analysis of codon usage bias with compositional dynamics of coding sequences has contributed to the better understanding of the molecular mechanism and the evolution of a particular gene. In this study, the complete nucleotide coding sequences of TP53 gene from eight different mammalian species were used for CUB analysis. Our results showed that the codon usage patterns in TP53 gene across different mammalian species has been influenced by GC bias particularly GC3 and a moderate bias exists in the codon usage of TP53 gene. Moreover, we observed that nature has highly favored the most over represented codon CTG for leucine amino acid but selected against the ATA codon for isoleucine in TP53 gene across all mammalian species during the course of evolution. PMID:25807269

  3. Genome-Wide Analysis of the Synonymous Codon Usage Patterns in Riemerella anatipestifer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jibin; Zhu, Dekang; Ma, Guangpeng; Liu, Mafeng; Wang, Mingshu; Jia, Renyong; Chen, Shun; Sun, Kunfeng; Yang, Qiao; Wu, Ying; Chen, Xiaoyue; Cheng, Anchun

    2016-01-01

    Riemerella anatipestifer (RA) belongs to the Flavobacteriaceae family and can cause a septicemia disease in poultry. The synonymous codon usage patterns of bacteria reflect a series of evolutionary changes that enable bacteria to improve tolerance of the various environments. We detailed the codon usage patterns of RA isolates from the available 12 sequenced genomes by multiple codon and statistical analysis. Nucleotide compositions and relative synonymous codon usage (RSCU) analysis revealed that A or U ending codons are predominant in RA. Neutrality analysis found no significant correlation between GC12 and GC3 (p > 0.05). Correspondence analysis and ENc-plot results showed that natural selection dominated over mutation in the codon usage bias. The tree of cluster analysis based on RSCU was concordant with dendrogram based on genomic BLAST by neighbor-joining method. By comparative analysis, about 50 highly expressed genes that were orthologs across all 12 strains were found in the top 5% of high CAI value. Based on these CAI values, we infer that RA contains a number of predicted highly expressed coding sequences, involved in transcriptional regulation and metabolism, reflecting their requirement for dealing with diverse environmental conditions. These results provide some useful information on the mechanisms that contribute to codon usage bias and evolution of RA. PMID:27517915

  4. A Comparative Analysis of Synonymous Codon Usage Bias Pattern in Human Albumin Superfamily

    PubMed Central

    Mirsafian, Hoda; Mat Ripen, Adiratna; Singh, Aarti; Teo, Phaik Hwan; Merican, Amir Feisal; Mohamad, Saharuddin Bin

    2014-01-01

    Synonymous codon usage bias is an inevitable phenomenon in organismic taxa across the three domains of life. Though the frequency of codon usage is not equal across species and within genome in the same species, the phenomenon is non random and is tissue-specific. Several factors such as GC content, nucleotide distribution, protein hydropathy, protein secondary structure, and translational selection are reported to contribute to codon usage preference. The synonymous codon usage patterns can be helpful in revealing the expression pattern of genes as well as the evolutionary relationship between the sequences. In this study, synonymous codon usage bias patterns were determined for the evolutionarily close proteins of albumin superfamily, namely, albumin, α-fetoprotein, afamin, and vitamin D-binding protein. Our study demonstrated that the genes of the four albumin superfamily members have low GC content and high values of effective number of codons (ENC) suggesting high expressivity of these genes and less bias in codon usage preferences. This study also provided evidence that the albumin superfamily members are not subjected to mutational selection pressure. PMID:24707212

  5. A bacterial strain with a unique quadruplet codon specifying non-native amino acids.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Abhishek; Lajoie, Marc J; Xiao, Han; Church, George M; Schultz, Peter G

    2014-08-18

    The addition of noncanonical amino acids to the genetic code requires unique codons not assigned to the 20 canonical amino acids. Among the 64 triplet codons, only the three nonsense "stop" codons have been used to encode non-native amino acids. Use of quadruplet "frame-shift" suppressor codons provides an abundant alternative but suffers from low suppression efficiency as a result of competing recognition of their first three bases by endogenous host tRNAs or release factors. Deletion of release factor 1 in a genomically recoded strain of E. coli (E. coli C321), in which all endogenous amber stop codons (UAG) are replaced with UAA, abolished UAG mediated translation termination. Here we show that a Methanocaldococcus jannaschii-derived frame-shift suppressor tRNA/aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase pair enhanced UAGN suppression efficiency in this recoded bacterial strain. These results demonstrate that efficient quadruplet codons for encoding non-native amino acids can be generated by eliminating competing triplet codon recognition at the ribosome. PMID:24867343

  6. Polymorphism distribution of prion protein codon 117, 129 and 171 in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kaw-Chen; Wang, Vinchi; Sun, Ming-Chieh; Chiueh, Ti-I; Soong, Bing-Wen; Shan, Din-E

    2007-01-01

    Prion diseases compass transmissible spongiform neurodegenerative diseases from various causes, including the genetic and infectious ones. We investigated the prevalence of codon 117, 129 and 171 polymorphism in prion protein (PrP) in Taiwanese, mainly for the sake of the informative absence of this genetic distribution. Our subjects were 419 aged ones of Han ethic origin. We evaluated the PrP gene (PRNP) polymorphism by restriction fragment length polymorphism, after amplification of their genomic DNAs by polymerase chain reactions with specific primers, digested by restriction enzyme PvuII (for codon 117), NspI (for codon 129), and BbvI (for codon 171), respectively, and confirmed by nucleotide sequencing. All of the subjects were homozygotes at codon 117 (Ala/Ala, gca/gca) and 171 (Asn/Asn, aac/aac). There were no valine homozygotes (Val/Val) in our 419 subjects, and nine subjects (2.1%) showed methionine-valine heterozygosity (Mal/Val, atg/gtg). The methionine homozygotes (Met/Met) comprised the major population (97.9%), and the prevalence of distribution is different to that seen in Caucasians. The almost 100% conservation of the domain from codon 117 to 171 implies the warranty of PrP in cellular functions. The high prevalence of Met/Met alleles in Taiwan did not imply an increased risk of CJD, and the genetic susceptibility of CJD by codon 129 of PrP may be still elusive for the infectivity. PMID:17410475

  7. Transcription attenuation in Salmonella typhimurium: the significance of rare leucine codons in the leu leader.

    PubMed Central

    Carter, P W; Bartkus, J M; Calvo, J M

    1986-01-01

    The leucine operon of Salmonella typhimurium is controlled by a transcription attenuation mechanism. Four adjacent leucine codons within a 160-nucleotide leu leader RNA are thought to play a central role in this mechanism. Three of the four codons are CUA, a rarely used leucine codon within enteric bacteria. To determine whether the nature of the leucine codon affects the regulation of the leucine operon, we used oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis to first convert one CUA of the leader to CUG and then convert all three CUA codons to CUG. CUG is the most frequently used leucine codon in enteric bacteria. A mutant having (CUA)2CUGCUC in place of (CUA)3CUC has an altered response to leucine limitation, requiring a slightly higher degree of limitation to effect derepression. Changing (CUA)3CUC to (CUG)3CUC has more dramatic effects upon operon expression. First, the basal level of expression is lowered to the point that the mutant grows more slowly than the parent in a minimal medium lacking leucine. Second, the response of the mutant to a leucine limitation is dramatically altered such that even a strong limitation elicits only a modest degree of derepression. If the mutant is grown under conditions of leucyl-tRNA limitation rather than leucine limitation, complete derepression can be achieved, but only at a much higher degree of limitation than for the wild-type operon. These results provide a clear-cut example of codon usage having a dramatic effect upon gene expression. PMID:3534884

  8. Genome-Wide Analysis of the Synonymous Codon Usage Patterns in Riemerella anatipestifer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jibin; Zhu, Dekang; Ma, Guangpeng; Liu, Mafeng; Wang, Mingshu; Jia, Renyong; Chen, Shun; Sun, Kunfeng; Yang, Qiao; Wu, Ying; Chen, Xiaoyue; Cheng, Anchun

    2016-01-01

    Riemerella anatipestifer (RA) belongs to the Flavobacteriaceae family and can cause a septicemia disease in poultry. The synonymous codon usage patterns of bacteria reflect a series of evolutionary changes that enable bacteria to improve tolerance of the various environments. We detailed the codon usage patterns of RA isolates from the available 12 sequenced genomes by multiple codon and statistical analysis. Nucleotide compositions and relative synonymous codon usage (RSCU) analysis revealed that A or U ending codons are predominant in RA. Neutrality analysis found no significant correlation between GC12 and GC₃ (p > 0.05). Correspondence analysis and ENc-plot results showed that natural selection dominated over mutation in the codon usage bias. The tree of cluster analysis based on RSCU was concordant with dendrogram based on genomic BLAST by neighbor-joining method. By comparative analysis, about 50 highly expressed genes that were orthologs across all 12 strains were found in the top 5% of high CAI value. Based on these CAI values, we infer that RA contains a number of predicted highly expressed coding sequences, involved in transcriptional regulation and metabolism, reflecting their requirement for dealing with diverse environmental conditions. These results provide some useful information on the mechanisms that contribute to codon usage bias and evolution of RA. PMID:27517915

  9. Adjacent Codons Act in Concert to Modulate Translation Efficiency in Yeast.

    PubMed

    Gamble, Caitlin E; Brule, Christina E; Dean, Kimberly M; Fields, Stanley; Grayhack, Elizabeth J

    2016-07-28

    Translation elongation efficiency is largely thought of as the sum of decoding efficiencies for individual codons. Here, we find that adjacent codon pairs modulate translation efficiency. Deploying an approach in Saccharomyces cerevisiae that scored the expression of over 35,000 GFP variants in which three adjacent codons were randomized, we have identified 17 pairs of adjacent codons associated with reduced expression. For many pairs, codon order is obligatory for inhibition, implying a more complex interaction than a simple additive effect. Inhibition mediated by adjacent codons occurs during translation itself as GFP expression is restored by increased tRNA levels or by non-native tRNAs with exact-matching anticodons. Inhibition operates in endogenous genes, based on analysis of ribosome profiling data. Our findings suggest translation efficiency is modulated by an interplay between tRNAs at adjacent sites in the ribosome and that this concerted effect needs to be considered in predicting the functional consequences of codon choice. PMID:27374328

  10. Mutation and Selection Cause Codon Usage and Bias in Mitochondrial Genomes of Ribbon Worms (Nemertea)

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Haixia; Sun, Shichun; Norenburg, Jon L.; Sundberg, Per

    2014-01-01

    The phenomenon of codon usage bias is known to exist in many genomes and it is mainly determined by mutation and selection. To understand the patterns of codon usage in nemertean mitochondrial genomes, we use bioinformatic approaches to analyze the protein-coding sequences of eight nemertean species. Neutrality analysis did not find a significant correlation between GC12 and GC3. ENc-plot showed a few genes on or close to the expected curve, but the majority of points with low-ENc values are below it. ENc-plot suggested that mutational bias plays a major role in shaping codon usage. The Parity Rule 2 plot (PR2) analysis showed that GC and AT were not used proportionally and we propose that codons containing A or U at third position are used preferentially in nemertean species, regardless of whether corresponding tRNAs are encoded in the mitochondrial DNA. Context-dependent analysis indicated that the nucleotide at the second codon position slightly affects synonymous codon choices. These results suggested that mutational and selection forces are probably acting to codon usage bias in nemertean mitochondrial genomes. PMID:24454907

  11. Mutation and selection cause codon usage and bias in mitochondrial genomes of ribbon worms (Nemertea).

    PubMed

    Chen, Haixia; Sun, Shichun; Norenburg, Jon L; Sundberg, Per

    2014-01-01

    The phenomenon of codon usage bias is known to exist in many genomes and it is mainly determined by mutation and selection. To understand the patterns of codon usage in nemertean mitochondrial genomes, we use bioinformatic approaches to analyze the protein-coding sequences of eight nemertean species. Neutrality analysis did not find a significant correlation between GC12 and GC3. ENc-plot showed a few genes on or close to the expected curve, but the majority of points with low-ENc values are below it. ENc-plot suggested that mutational bias plays a major role in shaping codon usage. The Parity Rule 2 plot (PR2) analysis showed that GC and AT were not used proportionally and we propose that codons containing A or U at third position are used preferentially in nemertean species, regardless of whether corresponding tRNAs are encoded in the mitochondrial DNA. Context-dependent analysis indicated that the nucleotide at the second codon position slightly affects synonymous codon choices. These results suggested that mutational and selection forces are probably acting to codon usage bias in nemertean mitochondrial genomes. PMID:24454907

  12. Expanding the amino acid repertoire of ribosomal polypeptide synthesis via the artificial division of codon boxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwane, Yoshihiko; Hitomi, Azusa; Murakami, Hiroshi; Katoh, Takayuki; Goto, Yuki; Suga, Hiroaki

    2016-04-01

    In ribosomal polypeptide synthesis the library of amino acid building blocks is limited by the manner in which codons are used. Of the proteinogenic amino acids, 18 are coded for by multiple codons and therefore many of the 61 sense codons can be considered redundant. Here we report a method to reduce the redundancy of codons by artificially dividing codon boxes to create vacant codons that can then be reassigned to non-proteinogenic amino acids and thereby expand the library of genetically encoded amino acids. To achieve this, we reconstituted a cell-free translation system with 32 in vitro transcripts of transfer RNASNN (tRNASNN) (S = G or C), assigning the initiator and 20 elongator amino acids. Reassignment of three redundant codons was achieved by replacing redundant tRNASNNs with tRNASNNs pre-charged with non-proteinogenic amino acids. As a demonstration, we expressed a 32-mer linear peptide that consists of 20 proteinogenic and three non-proteinogenic amino acids, and a 14-mer macrocyclic peptide that contains more than four non-proteinogenic amino acids.

  13. Efficient Reassignment of a Frequent Serine Codon in Wild-Type Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Ho, Joanne M; Reynolds, Noah M; Rivera, Keith; Connolly, Morgan; Guo, Li-Tao; Ling, Jiqiang; Pappin, Darryl J; Church, George M; Söll, Dieter

    2016-02-19

    Expansion of the genetic code through engineering the translation machinery has greatly increased the chemical repertoire of the proteome. This has been accomplished mainly by read-through of UAG or UGA stop codons by the noncanonical aminoacyl-tRNA of choice. While stop codon read-through involves competition with the translation release factors, sense codon reassignment entails competition with a large pool of endogenous tRNAs. We used an engineered pyrrolysyl-tRNA synthetase to incorporate 3-iodo-l-phenylalanine (3-I-Phe) at a number of different serine and leucine codons in wild-type Escherichia coli. Quantitative LC-MS/MS measurements of amino acid incorporation yields carried out in a selected reaction monitoring experiment revealed that the 3-I-Phe abundance at the Ser208AGU codon in superfolder GFP was 65 ± 17%. This method also allowed quantification of other amino acids (serine, 33 ± 17%; phenylalanine, 1 ± 1%; threonine, 1 ± 1%) that compete with 3-I-Phe at both the aminoacylation and decoding steps of translation for incorporation at the same codon position. Reassignments of different serine (AGU, AGC, UCG) and leucine (CUG) codons with the matching tRNA(Pyl) anticodon variants were met with varying success, and our findings provide a guideline for the choice of sense codons to be reassigned. Our results indicate that the 3-iodo-l-phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase (IFRS)/tRNA(Pyl) pair can efficiently outcompete the cellular machinery to reassign select sense codons in wild-type E. coli. PMID:26544153

  14. Tryptophan Codon-Dependent Transcription in Chlamydia pneumoniae during Gamma Interferon-Mediated Tryptophan Limitation.

    PubMed

    Ouellette, Scot P; Rueden, Kelsey J; Rucks, Elizabeth A

    2016-09-01

    In evolving to an obligate intracellular niche, Chlamydia has streamlined its genome by eliminating superfluous genes as it relies on the host cell for a variety of nutritional needs like amino acids. However, Chlamydia can experience amino acid starvation when the human host cell in which the bacteria reside is exposed to interferon gamma (IFN-γ), which leads to a tryptophan (Trp)-limiting environment via induction of the enzyme indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase (IDO). The stringent response is used to respond to amino acid starvation in most bacteria but is missing from Chlamydia Thus, how Chlamydia, a Trp auxotroph, responds to Trp starvation in the absence of a stringent response is an intriguing question. We previously observed that C. pneumoniae responds to this stress by globally increasing transcription while globally decreasing translation, an unusual response. Here, we sought to understand this and hypothesized that the Trp codon content of a given gene would determine its transcription level. We quantified transcripts from C. pneumoniae genes that were either rich or poor in Trp codons and found that Trp codon-rich transcripts were increased, whereas those that lacked Trp codons were unchanged or even decreased. There were exceptions, and these involved operons or large genes with multiple Trp codons: downstream transcripts were less abundant after Trp codon-rich sequences. These data suggest that ribosome stalling on Trp codons causes a negative polar effect on downstream sequences. Finally, reassessing previous C. pneumoniae microarray data based on codon content, we found that upregulated transcripts were enriched in Trp codons, thus supporting our hypothesis. PMID:27400720

  15. The unfolded protein response affects readthrough of premature termination codons

    PubMed Central

    Oren, Yifat S; McClure, Michelle L; Rowe, Steven M; Sorscher, Eric J; Bester, Assaf C; Manor, Miriam; Kerem, Eitan; Rivlin, Joseph; Zahdeh, Fouad; Mann, Matthias; Geiger, Tamar; Kerem, Batsheva

    2014-01-01

    One-third of monogenic inherited diseases result from premature termination codons (PTCs). Readthrough of in-frame PTCs enables synthesis of full-length functional proteins. However, extended variability in the response to readthrough treatment is found among patients, which correlates with the level of nonsense transcripts. Here, we aimed to reveal cellular pathways affecting this inter-patient variability. We show that activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR) governs the response to readthrough treatment by regulating the levels of transcripts carrying PTCs. Quantitative proteomic analyses showed substantial differences in UPR activation between patients carrying PTCs, correlating with their response. We further found a significant inverse correlation between the UPR and nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD), suggesting a feedback loop between these homeostatic pathways. We uncovered and characterized the mechanism underlying this NMD-UPR feedback loop, which augments both UPR activation and NMD attenuation. Importantly, this feedback loop enhances the response to readthrough treatment, highlighting its clinical importance. Altogether, our study demonstrates the importance of the UPR and its regulatory network for genetic diseases caused by PTCs and for cell homeostasis under normal conditions. PMID:24705877

  16. Suppression of Premature Termination Codons as a Therapeutic Approach

    PubMed Central

    Keeling, Kim M.; Wang, Dan; Conard, Sara E.; Bedwell, David M.

    2012-01-01

    In this review, we describe our current understanding of translation termination and pharmacological agents that influence the accuracy of this process. A number of drugs have been identified that induce suppression of translation termination at in-frame premature termination codons (PTCs; also known as nonsense mutations) in mammalian cells. We discuss efforts to utilize these drugs to suppress disease-causing PTCs that result in the loss of protein expression and function. In-frame PTCs represent a genotypic subset of mutations that make up ~11% of all known mutations that cause genetic diseases, and millions of patients have diseases attributable to PTCs. Current approaches aimed at reducing the efficiency of translation termination at PTCs (referred to as PTC suppression therapy) have the goal of alleviating the phenotypic consequences of a wide range of genetic diseases. Suppression therapy is currently in clinical trials for treatment of several genetic diseases caused by PTCs, and preliminary results suggest that some patients have shown clinical improvements. While current progress is promising, we discuss various approaches that may further enhance the efficiency of this novel therapeutic approach. PMID:22672057

  17. Atp2c2 Is Transcribed From a Unique Transcriptional Start Site in Mouse Pancreatic Acinar Cells.

    PubMed

    Fenech, Melissa A; Sullivan, Caitlin M; Ferreira, Lucimar T; Mehmood, Rashid; MacDonald, William A; Stathopulos, Peter B; Pin, Christopher L

    2016-12-01

    Proper regulation of cytosolic Ca(2+) is critical for pancreatic acinar cell function. Disruptions in normal Ca(2+) concentrations affect numerous cellular functions and are associated with pancreatitis. Membrane pumps and channels regulate cytosolic Ca(2+) homeostasis by promoting rapid Ca(2+) movement. Determining how expression of Ca(2+) modulators is regulated and the cellular alterations that occur upon changes in expression can provide insight into initiating events of pancreatitis. The goal of this study was to delineate the gene structure and regulation of a novel pancreas-specific isoform for Secretory Pathway Ca(2+) ATPase 2 (termed SPCA2C), which is encoded from the Atp2c2 gene. Using Next Generation Sequencing of RNA (RNA-seq), chromatin immunoprecipitation for epigenetic modifications and promoter-reporter assays, a novel transcriptional start site was identified that promotes expression of a transcript containing the last four exons of the Atp2c2 gene (Atp2c2c). This region was enriched for epigenetic marks and pancreatic transcription factors that promote gene activation. Promoter activity for regions upstream of the ATG codon in Atp2c2's 24th exon was observed in vitro but not in in vivo. Translation from this ATG encodes a protein aligned with the carboxy terminal of SPCA2. Functional analysis in HEK 293A cells indicates a unique role for SPCA2C in increasing cytosolic Ca(2+) . RNA analysis indicates that the decreased Atp2c2c expression observed early in experimental pancreatitis reflects a global molecular response of acinar cells to reduce cytosolic Ca(2+) levels. Combined, these results suggest SPCA2C affects Ca(2+) homeostasis in pancreatic acinar cells in a unique fashion relative to other Ca(2+) ATPases. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2768-2778, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27017909

  18. The characteristics of synonymous codon usage in the initial and terminal translation regions of encephalomyocarditis virus.

    PubMed

    Ma, X-X; Feng, Y-P; Liu, J-L; Zhao, Y-Q; Chen, L; Guo, P-H; Guo, J-Z; Ma, Z-R

    2014-01-01

    The synonymous codon usage patterns in the initial and terminal translation regions (ITR, TTR) of the whole coding sequence of encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV) were analyzed in relation to those in its natural hosts using the sequences accessible in databases. In general, some low-usage host codons were found over-represented in the ITR and TTR of the virus, while some high-usage host codons were found under-represented in the two viral regions. These relationships are thought to participate in the regulation of the speed of translation of viral proteins and in the suppression of ribosomal traffic jams, both aiming at the increase of virus yields. PMID:24720745

  19. Head Start Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Clare Coe; And Others

    One of a series of guides for preschool teachers and aides, the book offers a Head Start curriculum guide to help achieve goals regarding social behavior, general attitudes, academic skills, health, and parent development. Information on curriculum is divided into areas of bloc time outline, classroom arrangement, building concepts (such as…

  20. Home Start Evaluation Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    High/Scope Educational Research Foundation, Ypsilanti, MI.

    Case studies of seven Home Start programs are given as the third section of an evaluation study. Communities involved are Huntsville, Alabama; Fairbanks, Alaska; Fort Defiance, Arizona; Dardanelle, Arkansas; Wichita, Kansas; Gloucester, Massachusetts; and Reno, Nevada. Although each study varies in format, each describes in detail the degree and…

  1. Blogs: Getting Started

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dyrud, Marilyn A.; Worley, Rebecca B.; Schultz, Benjamin

    2005-01-01

    Blogs are communication tools, they serve as vehicles to transmit messages. Before deciding to blog, one needs to devise a strategy on how this medium will fit in with his or her communication needs. This will also help later in deciding which features one will need to include in his or her blog. This article discusses ways on how to start and…

  2. Where Do We Start?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zuk, Evelyn M.

    1976-01-01

    Guidelines for starting a public school adult education program are presented and discuss the collection of basic data on community characteristics, community involvement, program administration and funding, curriculum, teacher hiring, program-school relationship, enrollment, policies, and community advisory board. (LH)

  3. Starting in School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albertine, Susan

    2012-01-01

    Through its signature initiative, Liberal Education and America's Promise (LEAP), the Association of American Colleges and Universities (AAC&U) is promoting a vision for learning that begins in school: Starting in School . . . Rigorous and rich curriculum focused on the essential learning outcomes; comprehensive, individualized, and…

  4. Starting Trees from Cuttings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kramer, David C.

    1983-01-01

    Describes a procedure for starting tree cuttings from woody plants, explaining "lag time," recommending materials, and giving step-by-step instructions for rooting and planting. Points out species which are likely candidates for cuttings and provides tips for teachers for developing a unit. (JM)

  5. A partnership in upstream HSE technology transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Olszewski, R.E. Wahjosoedibjo, A.S.; Hunley, M.; Peargin, J.C.

    1996-11-01

    The oil and gas industry was for nearly two decades the dominant force in the Indonesian economy and the single largest contributor to the nation`s development. Because of the success of Indonesia`s long-term development and diversification program, this once-dominant sector today occupies a more equal but still vital position in a better-balanced economy. The Indonesian government understands the danger to the environment posed by rapid industrial expansion and has enacted laws and regulations to ensure the sustainable development of its resources while protecting its rain forest environment. In 1992, the government oil company approached Chevron and Texaco for assistance in training its Health, Safety, and Environment (HSE) professionals. The upstream environment, health and safety training program was developed to transfer HSE knowledge and technology to PERTAMINA, PT Caltex Pacific Indonesia, a C&T affiliate, and indirectly, to the entire Indonesian oil and gas industry and government ministries. The four companies have demonstrated the effectiveness of a partnership approach in developing and carrying out HSE training. During 1994 and 1995, four groups, each consisting of about twenty representatives from PERTAMINA, the Directorate of Oil and Gas (MIGAS), the Indonesian Environmental Impact Management Agency (BAPEDAL), CPI, and Chevron and Texaco worldwide subsidiaries, traveled to the United States for an intensive four-month program of study in HSE best practices and technology conducted by Chevron and Texaco experts. This paper describes the development and realization of The PERTAMINA/CPI Health, Safety and Environment Training Program, outlines subjects covered and explains the methodology used to ensure the effective transfer of HSE knowledge and technology. The paper also offers an evaluation of the sessions and presents the plans developed by participant-teams for follow up on their return to Indonesia.

  6. Expression of Human Hemojuvelin (HJV) Is Tightly Regulated by Two Upstream Open Reading Frames in HJV mRNA That Respond to Iron Overload in Hepatic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Onofre, Cláudia; Tomé, Filipa; Barbosa, Cristina; Silva, Ana Luísa

    2015-01-01

    The gene encoding human hemojuvelin (HJV) is one of the genes that, when mutated, can cause juvenile hemochromatosis, an early-onset inherited disorder associated with iron overload. The 5′ untranslated region of the human HJV mRNA has two upstream open reading frames (uORFs), with 28 and 19 codons formed by two upstream AUGs (uAUGs) sharing the same in-frame stop codon. Here we show that these uORFs decrease the translational efficiency of the downstream main ORF in HeLa and HepG2 cells. Indeed, ribosomal access to the main AUG is conditioned by the strong uAUG context, which results in the first uORF being translated most frequently. The reach of the main ORF is then achieved by ribosomes that resume scanning after uORF translation. Furthermore, the amino acid sequences of the uORF-encoded peptides also reinforce the translational repression of the main ORF. Interestingly, when iron levels increase, translational repression is relieved specifically in hepatic cells. The upregulation of protein levels occurs along with phosphorylation of the eukaryotic initiation factor 2α. Nevertheless, our results support a model in which the increasing recognition of the main AUG is mediated by a tissue-specific factor that promotes uORF bypass. These results support a tight HJV translational regulation involved in iron homeostasis. PMID:25666510

  7. An Upstream Open Reading Frame Is Essential for Feedback Regulation of Ascorbate Biosynthesis in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Laing, William A.; Martínez-Sánchez, Marcela; Wright, Michele A.; Bulley, Sean M.; Brewster, Di; Dare, Andrew P.; Rassam, Maysoon; Wang, Daisy; Storey, Roy; Macknight, Richard C.; Hellens, Roger P.

    2015-01-01

    Ascorbate (vitamin C) is an essential antioxidant and enzyme cofactor in both plants and animals. Ascorbate concentration is tightly regulated in plants, partly to respond to stress. Here, we demonstrate that ascorbate concentrations are determined via the posttranscriptional repression of GDP-l-galactose phosphorylase (GGP), a major control enzyme in the ascorbate biosynthesis pathway. This regulation requires a cis-acting upstream open reading frame (uORF) that represses the translation of the downstream GGP open reading frame under high ascorbate concentration. Disruption of this uORF stops the ascorbate feedback regulation of translation and results in increased ascorbate concentrations in leaves. The uORF is predicted to initiate at a noncanonical codon (ACG rather than AUG) and encode a 60- to 65-residue peptide. Analysis of ribosome protection data from Arabidopsis thaliana showed colocation of high levels of ribosomes with both the uORF and the main coding sequence of GGP. Together, our data indicate that the noncanonical uORF is translated and encodes a peptide that functions in the ascorbate inhibition of translation. This posttranslational regulation of ascorbate is likely an ancient mechanism of control as the uORF is conserved in GGP genes from mosses to angiosperms. PMID:25724639

  8. An upstream open reading frame is essential for feedback regulation of ascorbate biosynthesis in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Laing, William A; Martínez-Sánchez, Marcela; Wright, Michele A; Bulley, Sean M; Brewster, Di; Dare, Andrew P; Rassam, Maysoon; Wang, Daisy; Storey, Roy; Macknight, Richard C; Hellens, Roger P

    2015-03-01

    Ascorbate (vitamin C) is an essential antioxidant and enzyme cofactor in both plants and animals. Ascorbate concentration is tightly regulated in plants, partly to respond to stress. Here, we demonstrate that ascorbate concentrations are determined via the posttranscriptional repression of GDP-l-galactose phosphorylase (GGP), a major control enzyme in the ascorbate biosynthesis pathway. This regulation requires a cis-acting upstream open reading frame (uORF) that represses the translation of the downstream GGP open reading frame under high ascorbate concentration. Disruption of this uORF stops the ascorbate feedback regulation of translation and results in increased ascorbate concentrations in leaves. The uORF is predicted to initiate at a noncanonical codon (ACG rather than AUG) and encode a 60- to 65-residue peptide. Analysis of ribosome protection data from Arabidopsis thaliana showed colocation of high levels of ribosomes with both the uORF and the main coding sequence of GGP. Together, our data indicate that the noncanonical uORF is translated and encodes a peptide that functions in the ascorbate inhibition of translation. This posttranslational regulation of ascorbate is likely an ancient mechanism of control as the uORF is conserved in GGP genes from mosses to angiosperms. PMID:25724639

  9. Uncoupling Promoter Opening from Start-Site Scanning.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Kenji; Mattei, Pierre-Jean; Davis, Ralph E; Jin, Huiyan; Kaplan, Craig D; Kornberg, Roger D

    2015-07-01

    Whereas RNA polymerase II (Pol II) transcription start sites (TSSs) occur about 30-35 bp downstream of the TATA box in metazoans, TSSs are located 40-120 bp downstream in S. cerevisiae. Promoter melting begins about 12 bp downstream in all eukaryotes, so Pol II is presumed to "scan" further downstream before starting transcription in yeast. Here we report that removal of the kinase complex TFIIK from TFIIH shifts the TSS in a yeast system upstream to the location observed in metazoans. Conversely, moving the normal TSS to an upstream location enables a high level of TFIIK-independent transcription in the yeast system. We distinguish two stages of the transcription initiation process: bubble formation by TFIIH, which fills the Pol II active center with single-stranded DNA, and subsequent scanning downstream, also driven by TFIIH, which requires displacement of the initial bubble. Omission of TFIIK uncouples the two stages of the process. PMID:26073544

  10. Iteration SSII cancellation in DD-OFDM PON upstream scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ju, Cheng; Liu, Na; Chen, Xue

    2016-04-01

    Iteration interference cancellation algorithm is proposed in direct detection OFDM PON upstream scheme to mitigate subcarrier to subcarrier intermixing interference (SSII) caused by dispersion and square-law photo-detection. The receiver sensitivity is improved by 1 dB in 20-Gbps, 16-QAM OFDM PON upstream experiment after 100-km standard single mode fiber (SSMF) transmission.