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Sample records for upstream start codons

  1. Translation initiation in Drosophila melanogaster is reduced by mutations upstream of the AUG initiator codon

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Yue; Gunter, L.E.; Organ, E.L.; Cavener, D.R. )

    1991-04-01

    The importance to in vivo translation of sequences immediately upstream of the Drosophila alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) start codon was examined at two developmental stages. Mutations were introduced into the Adh gene in vitro, and the mutant gene was inserted into the genome via germ line transformation. An A-to-T substitution at the [minus]3 position did not affect relative translation of ADH at the adult stage. A second mutant gene, containing five mutations in the region [minus]1 to [minus]9, was designed to completely block translation initiation. However, transformant lines bearing these mutations still exhibit detectable ADH, albeit at substantially reduced levels. The average fold reduction at the second-instar larval stage was 5.9, while at the adult stage a 12.5-fold reduction was observed.

  2. Regulation of translation by upstream translation initiation codons of surfactant protein A1 splice variants.

    PubMed

    Tsotakos, Nikolaos; Silveyra, Patricia; Lin, Zhenwu; Thomas, Neal; Vaid, Mudit; Floros, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    Surfactant protein A (SP-A), a molecule with roles in lung innate immunity and surfactant-related functions, is encoded by two genes in humans: SFTPA1 (SP-A1) and SFTPA2 (SP-A2). The mRNAs from these genes differ in their 5'-untranslated regions (5'-UTR) due to differential splicing. The 5'-UTR variant ACD' is exclusively found in transcripts of SP-A1, but not in those of SP-A2. Its unique exon C contains two upstream AUG codons (uAUGs) that may affect SP-A1 translation efficiency. The first uAUG (u1) is in frame with the primary start codon (p), but the second one (u2) is not. The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of uAUGs on SP-A1 expression. We employed RT-qPCR to determine the presence of exon C-containing SP-A1 transcripts in human RNA samples. We also used in vitro techniques including mutagenesis, reporter assays, and toeprinting analysis, as well as in silico analyses to determine the role of uAUGs. Exon C-containing mRNA is present in most human lung tissue samples and its expression can, under certain conditions, be regulated by factors such as dexamethasone or endotoxin. Mutating uAUGs resulted in increased luciferase activity. The mature protein size was not affected by the uAUGs, as shown by a combination of toeprint and in silico analysis for Kozak sequence, secondary structure, and signal peptide and in vitro translation in the presence of microsomes. In conclusion, alternative splicing may introduce uAUGs in SP-A1 transcripts, which in turn negatively affect SP-A1 translation, possibly affecting SP-A1/SP-A2 ratio, with potential for clinical implication. PMID:25326576

  3. High-level tetracycline resistance mediated by efflux pumps Tet(A) and Tet(A)-1 with two start codons.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weixia; Guo, Qinglan; Xu, Xiaogang; Sheng, Zi-ke; Ye, Xinyu; Wang, Minggui

    2014-11-01

    Efflux is the most common mechanism of tetracycline resistance. Class A tetracycline efflux pumps, which often have high prevalence in Enterobacteriaceae, are encoded by tet(A) and tet(A)-1 genes. These genes have two potential start codons, GTG and ATG, located upstream of the genes. The purpose of this study was to determine the start codon(s) of the class A tetracycline resistance (tet) determinants tet(A) and tet(A)-1, and the tetracycline resistance level they mediated. Conjugation, transformation and cloning experiments were performed and the genetic environment of tet(A)-1 was analysed. The start codons in class A tet determinants were investigated by site-directed mutagenesis of ATG and GTG, the putative translation initiation codons. High-level tetracycline resistance was transferred from the clinical strain of Klebsiella pneumoniae 10-148 containing tet(A)-1 plasmid pHS27 to Escherichia coli J53 by conjugation. The transformants harbouring recombinant plasmids that carried tet(A) or tet(A)-1 exhibited tetracycline MICs of 256-512 µg ml(-1), with or without tetR(A). Once the ATG was mutated to a non-start codon, the tetracycline MICs were not changed, while the tetracycline MICs decreased from 512 to 64 µg ml(-1) following GTG mutation, and to ?4 µg ml(-1) following mutation of both GTG and ATG. It was presumed that class A tet determinants had two start codons, which are the primary start codon GTG and secondary start codon ATG. Accordingly, two putative promoters were predicted. In conclusion, class A tet determinants can confer high-level tetracycline resistance and have two start codons. PMID:25102906

  4. Reinitiation at non-canonical start codons leads to leak expression when incorporating unnatural amino acids

    PubMed Central

    Kalstrup, Tanja; Blunck, Rikard

    2015-01-01

    With the rapid development of a continuously growing selection of unnatural amino acids (UAAs), UAA insertion becomes increasingly popular for investigating proteins. However, it can prove problematic to ensure the homogeneity of the expressed proteins, when homogeneity is compromised by “leak expression”. Here, we show that leak expression may be mediated by reinitiation and can result in unwanted proteins when stop codons for UAA insertion are mutated into the N-terminus of proteins. We demonstrate that up to 25% of leak expression occurs through reinitiation in the Shaker-Kv channel when stop codons are located within the first 70 amino acids. Several non-canonical start codons were identified as translation reinitaition sites, and by removing the start codons, we were able to decrease leak expression to less than 1%. Our study emphasizes the need to carefully inspect for leak expression when inserting UAAs and demonstrates how leak expression can be eliminated. PMID:26153354

  5. Reinitiation at non-canonical start codons leads to leak expression when incorporating unnatural amino acids.

    PubMed

    Kalstrup, Tanja; Blunck, Rikard

    2015-01-01

    With the rapid development of a continuously growing selection of unnatural amino acids (UAAs), UAA insertion becomes increasingly popular for investigating proteins. However, it can prove problematic to ensure the homogeneity of the expressed proteins, when homogeneity is compromised by "leak expression". Here, we show that leak expression may be mediated by reinitiation and can result in unwanted proteins when stop codons for UAA insertion are mutated into the N-terminus of proteins. We demonstrate that up to 25% of leak expression occurs through reinitiation in the Shaker-Kv channel when stop codons are located within the first 70 amino acids. Several non-canonical start codons were identified as translation reinitaition sites, and by removing the start codons, we were able to decrease leak expression to less than 1%. Our study emphasizes the need to carefully inspect for leak expression when inserting UAAs and demonstrates how leak expression can be eliminated. PMID:26153354

  6. The Effect of an Alternate Start Codon on Heterologous Expression of a PhoA Fusion Protein in Mycoplasma gallisepticum

    PubMed Central

    Panicker, Indu S.; Browning, Glenn F.; Markham, Philip F.

    2015-01-01

    While the genomes of many Mycoplasma species have been sequenced, there are no collated data on translational start codon usage, and the effects of alternate start codons on gene expression have not been studied. Analysis of the annotated genomes found that ATG was the most prevalent translational start codon among Mycoplasma spp. However in Mycoplasma gallisepticum a GTG start codon is commonly used in the vlhA multigene family, which encodes a highly abundant, phase variable lipoprotein adhesin. Therefore, the effect of this alternate start codon on expression of a reporter PhoA lipoprotein was examined in M. gallisepticum. Mutation of the start codon from ATG to GTG resulted in a 2.5 fold reduction in the level of transcription of the phoA reporter, but the level of PhoA activity in the transformants containing phoA with a GTG start codon was only 63% of that of the transformants with a phoA with an ATG start codon, suggesting that GTG was a more efficient translational initiation codon. The effect of swapping the translational start codon in phoA reporter gene expression was less in M. gallisepticum than has been seen previously in Escherichia coli or Bacillus subtilis, suggesting the process of translational initiation in mycoplasmas may have some significant differences from those used in other bacteria. This is the first study of translational start codon usage in mycoplasmas and the impact of the use of an alternate start codon on expression in these bacteria. PMID:26010086

  7. Genetic diversity of mango cultivars estimated using Start Codon Targeted (SCoT) markers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Diversity and genetic relationships among 23 mango germplasm accessions, collected from different locations in Guangxi province in China, were analyzed by using a novel and simple gene targeted DNA marker: Start Codon Targeted (SCoT) markers. This technique uses a single, 18-mer primer PCR amplifica...

  8. Examining weak protein-protein interactions in start codon recognition via nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Luna, Rafael E.; Akabayov, Sabine R.; Ziarek, Joshua J.; Wagner, Gerhard

    2014-01-01

    Weak protein-protein interactions are critical in numerous biological processes. Unfortunately, they are difficult to characterize due to the high concentrations required for the production and detection of the complex population. The inherent sensitivity of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to the chemical environment makes it an excellent tool to tackle this problem. NMR permits the exploration of interactions over a range of affinities, yielding essential insights into dynamic biological processes. The conversion of mRNA to protein is one such process that requires the coordinated association of many low affinity proteins. During start codon recognition, eukaryotic initiation factors assemble into high-order complexes that bind mRNA and bring it to the ribosome for decoding. Many of the structures of the eukaryotic initiation factors have been determined; however, only little is known regarding the weak binary complexes formed and their structure-function mechanisms. Herein, we use start codon recognition as a model system to review the relevant NMR methods for the characterization of weak interactions and the development of small molecule inhibitors. PMID:24393460

  9. A start codon mutation of the FRMD7 gene in two Korean families with idiopathic infantile nystagmus

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jae-Hwan; Shin, Jin-Hong; Seo, Je Hyun; Jung, Jae-Ho; Choi, Kwang-Dong

    2015-01-01

    Idiopathic infantile nystagmus (IIN) is the involuntary oscillation of the eyes with onset in the first few months of life. The most common form of inheritance is X-linked, and mutations in FRMD7 gene are a major cause. To identify the FRMD7 gene mutations associated with X-linked IIN, we performed PCR-based DNA direct sequencing in 4 affected subjects from 2 Korean families. We also assessed structural abnormalities of retina and optic nerve head using optical coherence tomography (OCT). Genetic analysis revealed a A>G transversion at nucleotide c.1, the first base of the start codon. This mutation leads to the loss of the primary start codon ATG for methionine, which is replaced by a triplet GTG for valine. The alternative in-frame start codon is not present around a mutation. OCT revealed the morphological changes within the optic nerve head, including shallow cup depth and small cup-to-disc ratio. In summary, we identified a novel start codon mutation within the FRMD7 gene of 2 Korean families. Our data expands the mutation spectrum of FRMD7 causing IIN. We also demonstrated abnormal developments of afferent system in patients with FRMD7 mutations using OCT, which may help to understand the etiological factor in development of nystagmus. PMID:26268155

  10. A precursor form of vascular endothelial growth factor arises by initiation from an upstream in-frame CUG codon.

    PubMed Central

    Tee, M K; Jaffe, R B

    2001-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a mitogen in physiological and pathological angiogenesis. Understanding the expression of different VEGF isoforms might be important for distinguishing angiogenesis in tissue development, vascular remodelling and tumour formation. We examined its expression and noted the presence of the isoforms VEGF(121) and VEGF(165) (121 and 165 residues long respectively) in fetal heart, lung, ovary, spleen, placenta and ovarian tumours. Unexpectedly, a 47 kDa species predominated in fetal intestine and muscle. The presumed initiation site in VEGF is an AUG codon (AUG(1039)), 1039 nt from its main transcriptional start site. AUG(1039) is preceded in the 5' untranslated region by an in-frame CUG at nt 499 (CUG(499)), which could produce the 47 kDa form with a 180-residue N-terminal extension. We therefore assessed whether CUG(499) functions as an initiator. CUG(499) initiation produced the 47 kDa VEGF(165) precursor, which was processed at two sites to yield VEGF and three N-terminal fragments. When CTG(499) was mutated to CGC, the precursor and N-terminal fragments were barely detectable. Although the precursor form was predominant in VEGF(165), both CUG(499) and AUG(1039) forms were found in VEGF(121). VEGF precursor induced neither the proliferation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells nor the expression of angiopoietin 2, which can be induced by, and act with, VEGF to induce tumour angiogenesis. The precursor also adheres to the extracellular matrix (ECM), suggesting that it might be a storage form for generating active VEGF in the cell or ECM. Alternate CUG(499) and AUG(1039) initiation and processing of the inactive precursor and its products might be important in regulating angiogenesis. PMID:11563986

  11. Genetic Analysis of Diversity within a Chinese Local Sugarcane Germplasm Based on Start Codon Targeted Polymorphism

    PubMed Central

    Que, Youxiong; Pan, Yongbao; Lu, Yunhai; Yang, Cui; Yang, Yuting; Huang, Ning; Xu, Liping

    2014-01-01

    In-depth information on sugarcane germplasm is the basis for its conservation and utilization. Data on sugarcane molecular markers are limited for the Chinese sugarcane germplasm collections. In the present study, 20 start codon targeted (SCoT) marker primers were designed to assess the genetic diversity among 107 sugarcane accessions within a local sugarcane germplasm collection. These primers amplified 176 DNA fragments, of which 163 were polymorphic (92.85%). Polymorphic information content (PIC) values ranged from 0.783 to 0.907 with a mean of 0.861. Unweighted pair group method of arithmetic averages (UPGMA) cluster analysis of the SCoT marker data divided the 107 sugarcane accessions into six clusters at 0.674 genetic similarity coefficient level. Relatively abundant genetic diversity was observed among ROC22, ROC16, and ROC10, which occupied about 80% of the total sugarcane acreage in China, indicating their potential breeding value on Mainland China. Principal component analysis (PCA) partitioned the 107 sugarcane accessions into two major groups, the Domestic Group and the Foreign Introduction Group. Each group was further divided based on institutions, where the sugarcane accessions were originally developed. The knowledge of genetic diversity among the local sugarcane germplasm provided foundation data for managing sugarcane germplasm, including construction of a core collection and regional variety distribution and subrogation. PMID:24779012

  12. Conserved residues in yeast initiator tRNA calibrate initiation accuracy by regulating preinitiation complex stability at the start codon.

    PubMed

    Dong, Jinsheng; Munoz, Antonio; Kolitz, Sarah E; Saini, Adesh K; Chiu, Wen-ling; Rahman, Hafsa; Lorsch, Jon R; Hinnebusch, Alan G

    2014-03-01

    Eukaryotic initiator tRNA (tRNAi) contains several highly conserved unique sequence features, but their importance in accurate start codon selection was unknown. Here we show that conserved bases throughout tRNAi, from the anticodon stem to acceptor stem, play key roles in ensuring the fidelity of start codon recognition in yeast cells. Substituting the conserved G31:C39 base pair in the anticodon stem with different pairs reduces accuracy (the Sui(-) [suppressor of initiation codon] phenotype), whereas eliminating base pairing increases accuracy (the Ssu(-) [suppressor of Sui(-)] phenotype). The latter defect is fully suppressed by a Sui(-) substitution of T-loop residue A54. These genetic data are paralleled by opposing effects of Sui(-) and Ssu(-) substitutions on the stability of methionylated tRNAi (Met-tRNA(i)) binding (in the ternary complex [TC] with eIF2-GTP) to reconstituted preinitiation complexes (PICs). Disrupting the C3:G70 base pair in the acceptor stem produces a Sui(-) phenotype and also reduces the rate of TC binding to 40S subunits in vitro and in vivo. Both defects are suppressed by an Ssu(-) substitution in eIF1A that stabilizes the open/P(OUT) conformation of the PIC that exists prior to start codon recognition. Our data indicate that these signature sequences of tRNA(i) regulate accuracy by distinct mechanisms, promoting the open/P(OUT) conformation of the PIC (for C3:G70) or destabilizing the closed/P(IN) state (for G31:C39 and A54) that is critical for start codon recognition. PMID:24589778

  13. A start codon CMT1X mutation associated with transient encephalomyelitis causes complete loss of Cx32.

    PubMed

    Sargiannidou, Irene; Kim, Gun-Ha; Kyriakoudi, Styliana; Eun, Baik-Lin; Kleopa, Kleopas A

    2015-07-01

    X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMTX1) results from numerous mutations in the GJB1 gene encoding the gap junction protein connexin32 (Cx32) and is one of the commonest forms of inherited neuropathy. Owing to the expression of Cx32 not only in Schwann cells but also in oligodendrocytes, a subset of CMT1X patients develops central nervous system (CNS) clinical manifestations in addition to peripheral neuropathy. While most GJB1 mutations appear to cause peripheral neuropathy through loss of Cx32 function, the cellular mechanisms underlying the CNS manifestations remain controversial. A novel start codon GJB1 mutation (p.Met1Ile) has been found in a CMT1X patient presenting with recurrent episodes of transient encephalomyelitis without apparent signs of peripheral neuropathy. In order to clarify the functional consequences of this mutation, we examined the cellular expression of two different constructs cloned from genomic DNA including the mutated start codon. None of the cloned constructs resulted in detectable expression of Cx32 by immunocytochemistry or immunoblot, although mRNA was produced at normal levels. Furthermore, co-expression with the other major oligodendrocyte connexin, Cx47, had no negative effect on GJ formation by Cx47. Finally, lysosomal and proteasomal inhibition in cells expressing the start codon mutant constructs failed to recover any detection of Cx32 as a result of impaired protein degradation. Our results indicate that the Cx32 start codon mutation is equivalent to a complete loss of the protein with failure of translation, although transcription is not impaired. Thus, complete loss of Cx32 function is sufficient to produce CNS dysfunction with clinical manifestations. PMID:25771809

  14. The AUG start codon of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae NFS1 gene can be substituted for by UUG without increased initiation of translation at

    E-print Network

    Trumpower, Bernard L.

    to be unable to efficiently use non-AUG codons as start sites of translation initiation [2,8,9]. The Nifs gene of the human Nifs gene leads to translation of proteins of varying lengths and the localiz- ation

  15. The Enterococcus faecalis EbpA Pilus Protein: Attenuation of Expression, Biofilm Formation, and Adherence to Fibrinogen Start with the Rare Initiation Codon ATT

    PubMed Central

    Montealegre, Maria Camila; La Rosa, Sabina Leanti; Roh, Jung Hyeob; Harvey, Barrett R.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The endocarditis and biofilm-associated pili (Ebp) are important in Enterococcus faecalis pathogenesis, and the pilus tip, EbpA, has been shown to play a major role in pilus biogenesis, biofilm formation, and experimental infections. Based on in silico analyses, we previously predicted that ATT is the EbpA translational start codon, not the ATG codon, 120 bp downstream of ATT, which is annotated as the translational start. ATT is rarely used to initiate protein synthesis, leading to our hypothesis that this codon participates in translational regulation of Ebp production. To investigate this possibility, site-directed mutagenesis was used to introduce consecutive stop codons in place of two lysines at positions 5 and 6 from the ATT, to replace the ATT codon in situ with ATG, and then to revert this ATG to ATT; translational fusions of ebpA to lacZ were also constructed to investigate the effect of these start codons on translation. Our results showed that the annotated ATG does not start translation of EbpA, implicating ATT as the start codon; moreover, the presence of ATT, compared to the engineered ATG, resulted in significantly decreased EbpA surface display, attenuated biofilm, and reduced adherence to fibrinogen. Corroborating these findings, the translational fusion with the native ATT as the initiation codon showed significantly decreased expression of ?-galactosidase compared to the construct with ATG in place of ATT. Thus, these results demonstrate that the rare initiation codon of EbpA negatively regulates EbpA surface display and negatively affects Ebp-associated functions, including biofilm and adherence to fibrinogen. PMID:26015496

  16. Stress-induced Start Codon Fidelity Regulates Arsenite-inducible Regulatory Particle-associated Protein (AIRAP) Translation*

    PubMed Central

    Zach, Lolita; Braunstein, Ilana; Stanhill, Ariel

    2014-01-01

    Initial steps in protein synthesis are highly regulated processes as they define the reading frame of the translation machinery. Eukaryotic translation initiation is a process facilitated by numerous factors (eIFs), aimed to form a “scanning” mechanism toward the initiation codon. Translation initiation of the main open reading frame (ORF) in an mRNA transcript has been reported to be regulated by upstream open reading frames (uORFs) in a manner of re-initiation. This mode of regulation is governed by the phosphorylation status of eIF2? and controlled by cellular stresses. Another mode of translational initiation regulation is leaky scanning, and this regulatory process has not been extensively studied. We have identified arsenite-inducible regulatory particle-associated protein (AIRAP) transcript to be translationally induced during arsenite stress conditions. AIRAP transcript contains a single uORF in a poor-kozak context. AIRAP translation induction is governed by means of leaky scanning and not re-initiation. This induction of AIRAP is solely dependent on eIF1 and the uORF kozak context. We show that eIF1 is phosphorylated under specific conditions that induce protein misfolding and have biochemically characterized this site of phosphorylation. Our data indicate that leaky scanning like re-initiation is responsive to stress conditions and that leaky scanning can induce ORF translation by bypassing poor kozak context of a single uORF transcript. PMID:24898249

  17. Nucleotides Flanking the Start Codon in hsp70 mRNAs with Very Short 5’-UTRs Greatly Affect Gene Expression in Haloarchaea

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wenchao; Yang, Guopeng; He, Yue; Zhang, Shaoming; Chen, Haiyan; Shen, Ping; Chen, Xiangdong; Huang, Yu-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Leaderless translation is prevalent in haloarchaea, with many of these leaderless transcripts possessing short 5’-untranslated regions (UTRs) less than 10 nucleotides. Whereas, little is known about the function of this very short 5’-UTR. Our previous studies determined that just four nucleotides preceded the start codon of hsp70 mRNA in Natrinema sp. J7, with residues -3A and +4G, relative to the A of the ATG start codon, acting as the preferred bases around the start codon of all known haloarchaeal hsp70 genes. Here, we examined the effects of nucleotides flanking the start codon on gene expression. The results revealed that shortening and deletion of the short 5’-UTR enhanced transcript levels; however, it led to significant reductions in overall translational efficiency. AUG was efficiently used as start codons, in both the presence and absence of short 5’-UTRs. GUG also could initiate translation, even though it was so inefficient that it would not be detected without considerably elevated transcript. Nucleotide substitutions at position -4 to +6 were shown to affect gene expression by transcript and/or translational levels. Notably, -3A and A/U nucleotides at position +4~+6 were more optimal for gene expression. Nucleotide transversions of -3A to -3C and +4G to +4T with hsp70 promoter from either Haloferax volcanii DS70 or Halobacterium salinarum NRC-1 showed the same effects on gene expression as that of Natrinema sp. J7. Taken together, our results suggest that the nucleotides flanking the start codon in hsp70 mRNAs with very short 5’-UTRs play an important role in haloarchaeal gene expression. PMID:26379277

  18. The C-Terminal Domain of Eukaryotic Initiation Factor 5 Promotes Start Codon Recognition by Its Dynamic Interplay with eIF1 and eIF2?

    E-print Network

    Luna, Rafael E.

    Recognition of the proper start codon on mRNAs is essential for protein synthesis, which requires scanning and involves eukaryotic initiation factors (eIFs) eIF1, eIF1A, eIF2, and eIF5. The carboxyl terminal domain (CTD) ...

  19. The antibiotic Furvina® targets the P-site of 30S ribosomal subunits and inhibits translation initiation displaying start codon bias

    PubMed Central

    Fabbretti, Attilio; Brandi, Letizia; Petrelli, Dezemona; Pon, Cynthia L.; Castañedo, Nilo R.; Medina, Ricardo; Gualerzi, Claudio O.

    2012-01-01

    Furvina®, also denominated G1 (MW 297), is a synthetic nitrovinylfuran [2-bromo-5-(2-bromo-2-nitrovinyl)-furan] antibiotic with a broad antimicrobial spectrum. An ointment (Dermofural®) containing G1 as the only active principle is currently marketed in Cuba and successfully used to treat dermatological infections. Here we describe the molecular target and mechanism of action of G1 in bacteria and demonstrate that in vivo G1 preferentially inhibits protein synthesis over RNA, DNA and cell wall synthesis. Furthermore, we demonstrate that G1 targets the small ribosomal subunit, binds at or near the P-decoding site and inhibits its function interfering with the ribosomal binding of fMet-tRNA during 30S initiation complex (IC) formation ultimately inhibiting translation. Notably, this G1 inhibition displays a bias for the nature (purine vs. pyrimidine) of the 3?-base of the codon, occurring efficiently only when the mRNA directing 30S IC formation and translation contains the canonical AUG initiation triplet or the rarely found AUA triplet, but hardly occurs when the mRNA start codon is either one of the non-canonical triplets AUU or AUC. This codon discrimination by G1 is reminiscent, though of opposite type of that displayed by IF3 in its fidelity function, and remarkably does not occur in the absence of this factor. PMID:22941660

  20. Expression of bicistronic measles virus P/C mRNA by using hybrid adenoviruses: levels of C protein synthesized in vivo are unaffected by the presence or absence of the upstream P initiator codon.

    PubMed Central

    Alkhatib, G; Massie, B; Briedis, D J

    1988-01-01

    The measles virus (MV) P/C mRNA is functionally bicistronic. Translation is presumed to initiate at both the first and second 5'-proximal AUG codons, leading, respectively, to synthesis of the P and C polypeptides from different overlapping reading frames. To study the function and differential expression of these polypeptides, we have constructed hybrid human adenoviruses capable of expressing high levels of P and C together or of C alone. Cloned cDNA corresponding to the MV P/C gene was coupled to the adenovirus type 2 (Ad2) major late promoter, most of the Ad2 tripartite leader sequence, and the simian virus 40 3'-end processing signal and then used to replace most of the E1a-E1b region of the Ad5 genome in two hybrid adenoviruses: one (Ad5MV/PC13) which contained both 5'-proximal AUG codons of the P/C mRNA and another (Ad5MV/C3) which retained only the second. The sequence context for the P protein initiator AUG codon in Ad5MV/PC13 was made more favorable (GAGAUGG) than the relatively unfavorable context (CCGAUGG) seen in the native MV P/C mRNA. After infection of 293 cells (which provide complementary E1a-E1b functions), both viruses directed equal amounts of P/C-specific mRNA transcription. Ad5MV/PC13 directed the synthesis of both P and C proteins, while Ad5MV/C3 directed the synthesis of C protein alone. Ad5-expressed P protein was phosphorylated, while C was not. C protein had a similar diffuse cytoplasmic localization in both MV and Ad5-infected cells. Ad5MV/C3 and Ad5MV/PC13 directed equal amounts of C protein expression in 293 cells at a level approximately 15 times greater than that seen in MV-infected cells. Thus the level of C protein expression was unaffected by the presence or absence of an out-of-frame upstream AUG codon in a favorable sequence context. This observation cannot be explained by the scanning model for ribosomal initiation and suggests that ribosomes may be binding directly at an internal mRNA site at or near the initiator AUG codon for the C protein. Images PMID:3050147

  1. Upstream open reading frames cause widespread reduction of protein expression and are polymorphic among humans

    E-print Network

    Calvo, Sarah E.

    Upstream ORFs (uORFs) are mRNA elements defined by a start codon in the 5? UTR that is out-of-frame with the main coding sequence. Although uORFs are present in approximately half of human and mouse transcripts, no study ...

  2. Start codon targeted (SCoT) polymorphism reveals genetic diversity in wild and domesticated populations of ramie (Boehmeria nivea L. Gaudich.), a premium textile fiber producing species.

    PubMed

    Satya, Pratik; Karan, Maya; Jana, Sourav; Mitra, Sabyasachi; Sharma, Amit; Karmakar, P G; Ray, D P

    2015-02-01

    Twenty-four start codon targeted (SCoT) markers were used to assess genetic diversity and population structure of indigenous, introduced and domesticated ramie (Boehmeria nivea L. Gaudich.). A total of 155 genotypes from five populations were investigated for SCoT polymorphism, which produced 136 amplicons with 87.5% polymorphism. Polymorphism information content and resolving power of the SCoT markers were 0.69 and 3.22, respectively. The Indian ramie populations exhibited high SCoT polymorphism (> 50%), high genetic differentiation (GST = 0.27) and moderate gene flow (Nm = 1.34). Analysis of molecular variance identified significant differences for genetic polymorphism among the populations explaining 13.1% of the total variation. The domesticated population exhibited higher genetic polymorphism and heterozygosity compared to natural populations. Cluster analysis supported population genetic analysis and suggested close association between introduced and domesticated genotypes. The present study shows effectiveness of employing SCoT markers in a cross pollinated heterozygous species like Boehmeria, and would be useful for further studies in population genetics, conservation genetics and cultivar improvement. PMID:25750860

  3. Start codon targeted (SCoT) polymorphism reveals genetic diversity in wild and domesticated populations of ramie (Boehmeria nivea L. Gaudich.), a premium textile fiber producing species

    PubMed Central

    Satya, Pratik; Karan, Maya; Jana, Sourav; Mitra, Sabyasachi; Sharma, Amit; Karmakar, P.G.; Ray, D.P.

    2015-01-01

    Twenty-four start codon targeted (SCoT) markers were used to assess genetic diversity and population structure of indigenous, introduced and domesticated ramie (Boehmeria nivea L. Gaudich.). A total of 155 genotypes from five populations were investigated for SCoT polymorphism, which produced 136 amplicons with 87.5% polymorphism. Polymorphism information content and resolving power of the SCoT markers were 0.69 and 3.22, respectively. The Indian ramie populations exhibited high SCoT polymorphism (> 50%), high genetic differentiation (GST = 0.27) and moderate gene flow (Nm = 1.34). Analysis of molecular variance identified significant differences for genetic polymorphism among the populations explaining 13.1% of the total variation. The domesticated population exhibited higher genetic polymorphism and heterozygosity compared to natural populations. Cluster analysis supported population genetic analysis and suggested close association between introduced and domesticated genotypes. The present study shows effectiveness of employing SCoT markers in a cross pollinated heterozygous species like Boehmeria, and would be useful for further studies in population genetics, conservation genetics and cultivar improvement. PMID:25750860

  4. Characterization of genetic diversity in chickpea using SSR markers, Start Codon Targeted Polymorphism (SCoT) and Conserved DNA-Derived Polymorphism (CDDP).

    PubMed

    Hajibarat, Zahra; Saidi, Abbas; Hajibarat, Zohreh; Talebi, Reza

    2015-07-01

    To evaluate the genetic diversity among 48 genotypes of chickpea comprising cultivars, landraces and internationally developed improved lines genetic distances were evaluated using three different molecular marker techniques: Simple Sequence Repeat (SSR); Start Codon Targeted (SCoT) and Conserved DNA-derived Polymorphism (CDDP). Average polymorphism information content (PIC) for SSR, SCoT and CDDP markers was 0.47, 0.45 and 0.45, respectively, and this revealed that three different marker types were equal for the assessment of diversity amongst genotypes. Cluster analysis for SSR and SCoT divided the genotypes in to three distinct clusters and using CDDP markers data, genotypes grouped in to five clusters. There were positive significant correlation (r?=?0.43, P?

  5. The in Vivo TRPV6 Protein Starts at a Non-AUG Triplet, Decoded as Methionine, Upstream of Canonical Initiation at AUG*

    PubMed Central

    Fecher-Trost, Claudia; Wissenbach, Ulrich; Beck, Andreas; Schalkowsky, Pascal; Stoerger, Christof; Doerr, Janka; Dembek, Anna; Simon-Thomas, Martin; Weber, Armin; Wollenberg, Peter; Ruppert, Thomas; Middendorff, Ralf; Maurer, Hans H.; Flockerzi, Veit

    2013-01-01

    TRPV6 channels function as epithelial Ca2+ entry pathways in the epididymis, prostate, and placenta. However, the identity of the endogenous TRPV6 protein relies on predicted gene coding regions and is only known to a certain level of approximation. We show that in vivo the TRPV6 protein has an extended N terminus. Translation initiates at a non-AUG codon, at ACG, which is decoded by methionine and which is upstream of the annotated AUG, which is not used for initiation. The in vitro properties of channels formed by the extended full-length TRPV6 proteins and the so-far annotated and smaller TRPV6 are similar, but the extended N terminus increases trafficking to the plasma membrane and represents an additional scaffold for channel assembly. The increased translation of the smaller TRPV6 cDNA version may overestimate the in vivo situation where translation efficiency may represent an additional mechanism to tightly control the TRPV6-mediated Ca2+ entry to prevent deleterious Ca2+ overload. PMID:23612980

  6. Eukaryotic translation initiation factor eIF5 promotes the accuracy of start codon recognition by regulating Pi release and conformational transitions of the preinitiation complex.

    PubMed

    Saini, Adesh K; Nanda, Jagpreet S; Martin-Marcos, Pilar; Dong, Jinsheng; Zhang, Fan; Bhardwaj, Monika; Lorsch, Jon R; Hinnebusch, Alan G

    2014-09-01

    eIF5 is the GTPase activating protein (GAP) for the eIF2 · GTP · Met-tRNAi (Met) ternary complex with a critical role in initiation codon selection. Previous work suggested that the eIF5 mutation G31R/SUI5 elevates initiation at UUG codons by increasing GAP function. Subsequent work implicated eIF5 in rearrangement of the preinitiation complex (PIC) from an open, scanning conformation to a closed state at AUG codons, from which Pi is released from eIF2 · GDP · Pi. To identify eIF5 functions crucial for accurate initiation, we investigated the consequences of G31R on GTP hydrolysis and Pi release, and the effects of intragenic G31R suppressors on these reactions, and on the partitioning of PICs between open and closed states. eIF5-G31R altered regulation of Pi release, accelerating it at UUG while decreasing it at AUG codons, consistent with its ability to stabilize the closed complex at UUG. Suppressor G62S mitigates both defects of G31R, accounting for its efficient suppression of UUG initiation in G31R,G62S cells; however suppressor M18V impairs GTP hydrolysis with little effect on PIC conformation. The strong defect in GTP hydrolysis conferred by M18V likely explains its broad suppression of Sui(-) mutations in numerous factors. We conclude that both of eIF5's functions, regulating Pi release and stabilizing the closed PIC conformation, contribute to stringent AUG selection in vivo. PMID:25114053

  7. Looking Upstream

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Looking upstream from gage house at Marmarth on the Little Missouri. The mean streamflow for September 18, 2002 was 1.00 cfsLong-term streamflow for September 18 is 42.8 cfsbased on 63 years of record (according to NWIS). On September 18, 2002, the Little Missouri River at Marmarth was flowingat 2.3...

  8. Looking Upstream

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Looking upstream from US Highway 12 bridge at Marmarth on the Little Missouri. The mean streamflow for September 18, 2002 was 1.00 cfs. Long-term streamflow for September 18 is 42.8 cfs based on 63 years of record (according to NWIS). On September 18, 2002, the Little Missouri River at Marmarth was ...

  9. Problem-Solving Test: The Effect of Synonymous Codons on Gene Expression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szeberenyi, Jozsef

    2009-01-01

    Terms to be familiar with before you start to solve the test: the genetic code, codon, degenerate codons, protein synthesis, aminoacyl-tRNA, anticodon, antiparallel orientation, wobble, unambiguous codons, ribosomes, initiation, elongation and termination of translation, peptidyl transferase, translocation, degenerate oligonucleotides, green…

  10. Genetic diversity analysis among male and female Jojoba genotypes employing gene targeted molecular markers, start codon targeted (SCoT) polymorphism and CAAT box-derived polymorphism (CBDP) markers

    PubMed Central

    Heikrujam, Monika; Kumar, Jatin; Agrawal, Veena

    2015-01-01

    To detect genetic variations among different Simmondsia chinensis genotypes, two gene targeted markers, start codon targeted (SCoT) polymorphism and CAAT box-derived polymorphism (CBDP) were employed in terms of their informativeness and efficiency in analyzing genetic relationships among different genotypes. A total of 15 SCoT and 17 CBDP primers detected genetic polymorphism among 39 Jojoba genotypes (22 females and 17 males). Comparatively, CBDP markers proved to be more effective than SCoT markers in terms of percentage polymorphism as the former detecting an average of 53.4% and the latter as 49.4%. The Polymorphic information content (PIC) value and marker index (MI) of CBPD were 0.43 and 1.10, respectively which were higher than those of SCoT where the respective values of PIC and MI were 0.38 and 1.09. While comparing male and female genotype populations, the former showed higher variation in respect of polymorphic percentage and PIC, MI and Rp values over female populations. Nei's diversity (h) and Shannon index (I) were calculated for each genotype and found that the genotype “MS F” (in both markers) was highly diverse and genotypes “Q104 F” (SCoT) and “82–18 F” (CBDP) were least diverse among the female genotype populations. Among male genotypes, “32 M” (CBDP) and “MS M” (SCoT) revealed highest h and I values while “58-5 M” (both markers) was the least diverse. Jaccard's similarity co-efficient of SCoT markers ranged from 0.733 to 0.922 in female genotypes and 0.941 to 0.746 in male genotype population. Likewise, CBDP data analysis also revealed similarity ranging from 0.751 to 0.958 within female genotypes and 0.754 to 0.976 within male genotype populations thereby, indicating genetically diverse Jojoba population. Employing the NTSYS (Numerical taxonomy and multivariate analysis system) Version 2.1 software, both the markers generated dendrograms which revealed that all the Jojoba genotypes were clustered into two major groups, one group consisting of all female genotypes and another group comprising of all male genotypes. During the present investigation, CBDP markers proved more informative in studying genetic diversity among Jojoba. Such genetically diverse genotypes would thus be of great significance for breeding, management and conservation of elite (high yielding) Jojoba germplasm. PMID:26110116

  11. Codon usage in plant genes.

    PubMed Central

    Murray, E E; Lotzer, J; Eberle, M

    1989-01-01

    We have examined codon bias in 207 plant gene sequences collected from Genbank and the literature. When this sample was further divided into 53 monocot and 154 dicot genes, the pattern of relative use of synonymous codons was shown to differ between these taxonomic groups, primarily in the use of G + C in the degenerate third base. Maize and soybean codon bias were examined separately and followed the monocot and dicot codon usage patterns respectively. Codon preference in ribulose 1,5 bisphosphate and chlorophyll a/b binding protein, two of the most abundant proteins in leaves was investigated. These highly expressed are more restricted in their codon usage than plant genes in general. PMID:2644621

  12. A Comprehensive Analysis of Codon Usage Patterns in Blunt Snout Bream (Megalobrama amblycephala) Based on RNA-Seq Data

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Xiaoke; Yi, Shaokui; Guo, Xianwu; Wang, Weimin

    2015-01-01

    Blunt snout bream (Megalobrama amblycephala) is an important fish species for its delicacy and high economic value in China. Codon usage analysis could be helpful to understand its codon biology, mRNA translation and vertebrate evolution. Based on RNA-Seq data for M. amblycephala, high-frequency codons (CUG, AGA, GUG, CAG and GAG), as well as low-frequency ones (NUA and NCG codons) were identified. A total of 724 high-frequency codon pairs were observed. Meanwhile, 14 preferred and 199 avoided neighboring codon pairs were also identified, but bias was almost not shown with one or more intervening codons inserted between the same pairs. Codon usage bias in the regions close to start and stop codons indicated apparent heterogeneity, which even occurs in the flanking nucleotide sequence. Codon usage bias (RSCU and SCUO) was related to GC3 (GC content of 3rd nucleotide in codon) bias. Six GO (Gene ontology) categories and the number of methylation targets were influenced by GC3. Codon usage patterns comparison among 23 vertebrates showed species specificities by using GC contents, codon usage and codon context analysis. This work provided new insights into fish biology and new information for breeding projects. PMID:26016504

  13. Primary acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells use a novel promoter and 5'noncoding exon for the human reduced folate carrier that encodes a modified carrier translated from an upstream translational start.

    PubMed

    Flatley, Robin M; Payton, Scott G; Taub, Jeffrey W; Matherly, Larry H

    2004-08-01

    The human reduced folate carrier (hRFC) is reported to be regulated by up to seven alternatively spliced noncoding exons (A1, A2, A, B, C, D, and E). Noncoding exon and promoter usage was analyzed in RNAs from 27 childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) specimens by real-time PCR and/or 5' rapid amplification of cDNA ends (5' RACE) assay. By real-time PCR, total hRFC transcripts in ALL spanned a 289-fold range. Over 90% of hRFC transcripts were transcribed with A1, A2, and B 5' untranslated regions (UTRs). Analysis of 5' RACE clones showed that the A1 + A2 5'UTRs contained A1 sequence alone or a fusion of A1 and A2, implying the existence of a single, alternatively spliced 1021-bp A1/A2 noncoding region. High frequency sequence polymorphisms (AGG deletion, C/T transition) identified in the A1/A2 region by 5'RACE were confirmed in normal DNAs. By reporter assays in HepG2 hepatoma and Jurkat leukemia cells, A1/A2 promoter activity was localized to a 134-bp minimal region. Translation from an upstream AUG in the A1/A2 noncoding region in-frame with the normal translation start resulted in synthesis of a larger ( approximately 7 kDa) hRFC protein with transport properties altered from those for wild-type hRFC. Although there was no effect on transcript or protein stabilities, in vitro translation from A1/A2 transcripts was decreased compared with those with the B 5'UTR. Our results document the importance of the hRFC A1/A2 upstream region in childhood ALL and an intricate transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulation of hRFC-A1/A2 mRNAs. Furthermore, they suggest that use of the A1/A2 5'UTR may confer a transport phenotype distinct from the other 5'UTRs due to altered translation efficiency and transport properties. PMID:15297414

  14. Codon usage bias in Archaea 

    E-print Network

    Emery, Laura R.

    2011-01-01

    Synonymous codon usage bias has been extensively studied in Bacteria and Eukaryotes and yet there has been little investigation in the third domain of life, the Archaea. In this thesis I therefore examine the coding ...

  15. FoxA2, Nkx2.2, and PDX-1 Regulate Islet ?-Cell-Specific mafA Expression through Conserved Sequences Located between Base Pairs ?8118 and ?7750 Upstream from the Transcription Start Site

    PubMed Central

    Raum, Jeffrey C.; Gerrish, Kevin; Artner, Isabella; Henderson, Eva; Guo, Min; Sussel, Lori; Schisler, Jonathan C.; Newgard, Christopher B.; Stein, Roland

    2006-01-01

    The MafA transcription factor is both critical to islet ?-cell function and has a unique pancreatic cell-type-specific expression pattern. To localize the potential transcriptional regulatory region(s) involved in directing expression to the ? cell, areas of identity within the 5? flanking region of the mouse, human, and rat mafA genes were found between nucleotides ?9389 and ?9194, ?8426 and ?8293, ?8118 and ?7750, ?6622 and ?6441, ?6217 and ?6031, and ?250 and +56 relative to the transcription start site. The identity between species was greater than 75%, with the highest found between bp ?8118 and ?7750 (?94%, termed region 3). Region 3 was the only upstream mammalian conserved region found in chicken mafA (88% identity). In addition, region 3 uniquely displayed ?-cell-specific activity in cell-line-based reporter assays. Important regulators of ?-cell formation and function, PDX-1, FoxA2, and Nkx2.2, were shown to specifically bind to region 3 in vivo using the chromatin immunoprecipitation assay. Mutational and functional analyses demonstrated that FoxA2 (bp ?7943 to ?7910), Nkx2.2 (bp ?7771 to ?7746), and PDX-1 (bp ?8087 to ?8063) mediated region 3 activation. Consistent with a role in transcription, small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of PDX-1 led to decreased mafA mRNA production in INS-1-derived ?-cell lines (832/13 and 832/3), while MafA expression was undetected in the pancreatic epithelium of Nkx2.2 null animals. These results suggest that ?-cell-type-specific mafA transcription is principally controlled by region 3-acting transcription factors that are essential in the formation of functional ? cells. PMID:16847327

  16. The C-terminal region of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 3a (eIF3a) promotes mRNA recruitment, scanning, and, together with eIF3j and the eIF3b RNA recognition motif, selection of AUG start codons.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Wen-Ling; Wagner, Susan; Herrmannová, Anna; Burela, Laxminarayana; Zhang, Fan; Saini, Adesh K; Valásek, Leos; Hinnebusch, Alan G

    2010-09-01

    The C-terminal domain (CTD) of the a/Tif32 subunit of budding yeast eukaryotic translation initiation factor 3 (eIF3) interacts with eIF3 subunits j/Hcr1 and b/Prt1 and can bind helices 16 to 18 of 18S rRNA, suggesting proximity to the mRNA entry channel of the 40S subunit. We have identified substitutions in the conserved Lys-Glu-Arg-Arg (KERR) motif and in residues of the nearby box6 element of the a/Tif32 CTD that impair mRNA recruitment by 43S preinitiation complexes (PICs) and confer phenotypes indicating defects in scanning and start codon recognition. The normally dispensable CTD of j/Hcr1 is required for its binding to a/Tif32 and to mitigate the growth defects of these a/Tif32 mutants, indicating physical and functional interactions between these two domains. The a/Tif32 CTD and the j/Hcr1 N-terminal domain (NTD) also interact with the RNA recognition motif (RRM) in b/Prt1, and mutations in both subunits that disrupt their interactions with the RRM increase leaky scanning of an AUG codon. These results, and our demonstration that the extreme CTD of a/Tif32 binds to Rps2 and Rps3, lead us to propose that the a/Tif32 CTD directly stabilizes 43S subunit-mRNA interaction and that the b/Prt1-RRM-j/Hcr1-a/Tif32-CTD module binds near the mRNA entry channel and regulates the transition between scanning-conducive and initiation-competent conformations of the PIC. PMID:20584985

  17. Introns are cis effectors of the nonsense-codon-mediated reduction in nuclear mRNA abundance.

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, J; Belgrader, P; Zhou, X; Maquat, L E

    1994-01-01

    The translation of human triosephosphate isomerase (TPI) mRNA normally terminates at codon 249 within exon 7, the final exon. Frameshift and nonsense mutations of the type that cause translation to terminate prematurely at or upstream of codon 189 within exon 6 reduce the level of nuclear TPI mRNA to 20 to 30% of normal by a mechanism that is not a function of the distance of the nonsense codon from either the translation initiation or termination codon. In contrast, frameshift and nonsense mutations of another type that cause translation to terminate prematurely at or downstream of codon 208, also within exon 6, have no effect on the level of nuclear TPI mRNA. In this work, quantitations of RNA that derived from TPI alleles in which nonsense codons had been generated between codons 189 and 208 revealed that the boundary between the two types of nonsense codons resides between codons 192 and 195. The analysis of TPI gene insertions and deletions indicated that the positional feature differentiating the two types of nonsense codons is the distance of the nonsense codon upstream of intron 6. For example, the movement of intron 6 to a position downstream of its normal location resulted in a concomitant downstream movement of the boundary between the two types of nonsense codons. The analysis of intron 6 mutations indicated that the intron 6 effect is stipulated by the 88 nucleotides residing between the 5' and 3' splice sites. Since the deletion of intron 6 resulted in only partial abrogation of the nonsense codon-mediated reduction in the level of TPI mRNA, other sequences within TPI pre-mRNA must function in the effect. One of these sequences may be intron 2, since the deletion of intron 2 also resulted in partial abrogation of the effect. In experiments that switched introns 2 and 6, the replacement of intron 6 with intron 2 was of no consequence to the effect of a nonsense codon within either exon 1 or exon 6. In contrast, the replacement of intron 2 with intron 6 was inconsequential to the effect of a nonsense codon in exon 6 but resulted in partial abrogation of a nonsense codon in exon 1. Images PMID:8065363

  18. Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus phages: effect of translation initiation efficiency on differential codon adaptation mediated by virulent and temperate lifestyles

    PubMed Central

    Prabhakaran, Ramanandan; Chithambaram, Shivapriya

    2015-01-01

    Rapid biosynthesis is key to the success of bacteria and viruses. Highly expressed genes in bacteria exhibit a strong codon bias corresponding to the differential availability of tRNAs. However, a large clade of lambdoid coliphages exhibits relatively poor codon adaptation to the host translation machinery, in contrast to other coliphages that exhibit strong codon adaptation to the host. Three possible explanations were previously proposed but dismissed: (1) the phage-borne tRNA genes that reduce the dependence of phage translation on host tRNAs, (2) lack of time needed for evolving codon adaptation due to recent host switching, and (3) strong strand asymmetry with biased mutation disrupting codon adaptation. Here, we examined the possibility that phages with relatively poor codon adaptation have poor translation initiation which would weaken the selection on codon adaptation. We measured translation initiation by: (1) the strength and position of the Shine–Dalgarno (SD) sequence, and (2) the stability of the secondary structure of sequences flanking the SD and start codon known to affect accessibility of the SD sequence and start codon. Phage genes with strong codon adaptation had significantly stronger SD sequences than those with poor codon adaptation. The former also had significantly weaker secondary structure in sequences flanking the SD sequence and start codon than the latter. Thus, lambdoid phages do not exhibit strong codon adaptation because they have relatively inefficient translation initiation and would benefit little from increased elongation efficiency. We also provided evidence suggesting that phage lifestyle (virulent versus temperate) affected selection intensity on the efficiency of translation initiation and elongation. PMID:25614589

  19. Incorporation of fluorescent non-natural amino acids into N-terminal tag of proteins in cell-free translation and its dependence on position and neighboring codons.

    PubMed

    Abe, Ryoji; Shiraga, Kaori; Ebisu, Shogo; Takagi, Hiroaki; Hohsaka, Takahiro

    2010-07-01

    Fluorescence labeling is a useful technique for structural and functional analyses of proteins. In a previous study, we developed position-specific incorporation of visible wavelength fluorescent non-natural amino acids carrying relatively small BODIPY fluorophores into proteins, in response to a four-base codon CGGG. Here, we have expanded this position-specific fluorescence labeling method to include relatively large non-natural amino acids carrying photostable rhodamine dyes. TAMRA-linked aminophenylalanine was synthesized and attached to a tRNA having a four-base anticodon, and its incorporation into proteins was examined in an Escherichia coli cell-free translation system. TAMRA-labeled amino acids were successfully incorporated into proteins, although incorporation was allowed only at the N-terminal region. Insertion of two codons encoding a stop codon in the +1 frame before four-base codon suppressed the expression of non-labeled proteins that may have been produced by spontaneous +1 frameshift upstream of the four-base codon. Alternation of the incorporation position affected the expression level of the TAMRA-labeled protein. In addition, alternation of upstream and downstream codons affected the efficiency and accuracy of TAMRA-labeled amino acid incorporation. Based on these results, a novel tag peptide was developed; it contained the four-base codon at the 9th position with optimized upstream and downstream codons. This tag peptide was effective for producing proteins with various fluorescent labels at the N-terminal region. PMID:20541112

  20. Aminoglycoside antibiotics mediate context-dependent suppression of termination codons in a mammalian translation system.

    PubMed Central

    Manuvakhova, M; Keeling, K; Bedwell, D M

    2000-01-01

    The translation machinery recognizes codons that enter the ribosomal A site with remarkable accuracy to ensure that polypeptide synthesis proceeds with a minimum of errors. When a termination codon enters the A site of a eukaryotic ribosome, it is recognized by the release factor eRF1. It has been suggested that the recognition of translation termination signals in these organisms is not limited to a simple trinucleotide codon, but is instead recognized by an extended tetranucleotide termination signal comprised of the stop codon and the first nucleotide that follows. Interestingly, pharmacological agents such as aminoglycoside antibiotics can reduce the efficiency of translation termination by a mechanism that alters this ribosomal proofreading process. This leads to the misincorporation of an amino acid through the pairing of a near-cognate aminoacyl tRNA with the stop codon. To determine whether the sequence context surrounding a stop codon can influence aminoglycoside-mediated suppression of translation termination signals, we developed a series of readthrough constructs that contained different tetranucleotide termination signals, as well as differences in the three bases upstream and downstream of the stop codon. Our results demonstrate that the sequences surrounding a stop codon can play an important role in determining its susceptibility to suppression by aminoglycosides. Furthermore, these distal sequences were found to influence the level of suppression in remarkably distinct ways. These results suggest that the mRNA context influences the suppression of stop codons in response to subtle differences in the conformation of the ribosomal decoding site that result from aminoglycoside binding. PMID:10917599

  1. Codon usage pattern in human SPANX genes

    PubMed Central

    Choudhury, Monisha Nath; Chakraborty, Supriyo

    2015-01-01

    Background: SPANX (sperm protein coupled with the nucleus in the X chromosome) genes play a crucial role in human spermatogenesis. Codon usage bias (CUB) is a well-known phenomenon that exists in many genomes and mainly determined by mutation and selection. CUB is species specific and a unique characteristic of a genome. Analysis of compositional features and codon usage pattern of SPANX genes in human has contributed to explore the molecular biology of this gene. In our current study, we have retrieved the sequences of different variants of SPANX gene from NCBI using accession number and a perl script was used to analyze the nucleotide composition and the parameters for codon usage bias. Results: Our results showed that codon usage bias is low as measured by codon bias index (CBI) and most of the GC ending codons were positively correlated with GC bias as indicated by GC3. That mutation pressure and natural selection affect the codon usage pattern were revealed by correspondence analysis (COA) and neutrality plot. Moreover, the neutrality plot further suggested that the role of natural selection is higher than mutation pressure on SPANX genes. Conclusions: The codon usage bias in SPANX genes is not very high and the role of natural selection dominates over mutation pressure in the codon usage of human SPANX genes. PMID:26664029

  2. Upstream waves at Uranus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, C. T.; Lepping, R. P.; Smith, C. W.

    1990-01-01

    Since the Mach number of the solar wind increases with increasing heliocentric distance, the ratio of thermal to magnetic pressure, or beta, of the Uranian magnetosheath is expected to be much higher than in the terrestrial magnetosheath. Consistent with this expectation, the magnetosheat is observed to be extremely turbulent, and many particles may leak back upstream into the solar wind and/or be scattered from the bow shock. In accord with the expected presence of backstreaming particles, waves of the type associated with terrestrial backstreaming particles are seen outbound along the trajectory of Voyager in the preshock solar wind with frequencies close to 0.001 Hz. The wave frequency is close to that expected for upstream waves based on measurements closer to the sun. Upstream from the bow shock, the magnetic field was found to be much weaker than expected from observations in the inner solar system. The cause of this depression is unlikely to be the upstream particles; rather, the cause is probably intrinsic to the solar wind such as reconnection across the heliospheric current sheet.

  3. Missouri River Looking Upstream

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    This is a comparison between the top photo taken on September 27, 2006 and the bottom photo taken June 8, 2011. These photos where both taken from the Double Ditch Indian Village, Bismarck, ND. This is the Missouri River at Double Ditch Indian Village looking north, upstream. Due to the flooding of ...

  4. Universality and Shannon entropy of codon usage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frappat, L.; Minichini, C.; Sciarrino, A.; Sorba, P.

    2003-12-01

    The distribution functions of codon usage probabilities, computed over all the available GenBank data for 40 eukaryotic biological species and five chloroplasts, are best fitted by the sum of a constant, an exponential, and a linear function in the rank of usage. For mitochondria the analysis is not conclusive. These functions are characterized by parameters that strongly depend on the total guanine and cytosine (GC) content of the coding regions of biological species. It is predicted that the codon usage is the same in all exonic genes with the same GC content. The Shannon entropy for codons, also strongly dependent on the exonic GC content, is computed.

  5. Universality and Shannon entropy of codon usage.

    PubMed

    Frappat, L; Minichini, C; Sciarrino, A; Sorba, P

    2003-12-01

    The distribution functions of codon usage probabilities, computed over all the available GenBank data for 40 eukaryotic biological species and five chloroplasts, are best fitted by the sum of a constant, an exponential, and a linear function in the rank of usage. For mitochondria the analysis is not conclusive. These functions are characterized by parameters that strongly depend on the total guanine and cytosine (GC) content of the coding regions of biological species. It is predicted that the codon usage is the same in all exonic genes with the same GC content. The Shannon entropy for codons, also strongly dependent on the exonic GC content, is computed. PMID:14754237

  6. An improved implementation of effective number of codons (nc).

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaoyan; Yang, Qun; Xia, Xuhua

    2013-01-01

    The effective number of codons (N(c)) is a widely used index for characterizing codon usage bias because it does not require a set of reference genes as does codon adaptation index (CAI) and because of the freely available computational tools such as CodonW. However, N(c), as originally formulated has many problems. For example, it can have values far greater than the number of sense codons; it treats a 6-fold compound codon family as a single-codon family although it is made of a 2-fold and a 4-fold codon family that can be under dramatically different selection for codon usage bias; the existing implementations do not handle all different genetic codes; it is often biased by codon families with a small number of codons. We developed a new N(c) that has a number of advantages over the original N(c). Its maximum value equals the number of sense codons when all synonymous codons are used equally, and its minimum value equals the number of codon families when exactly one codon is used in each synonymous codon family. It handles all known genetic codes. It breaks the compound codon families (e.g., those involving amino acids coded by six synonymous codons) into 2-fold and 4-fold codon families. It reduces the effect of codon families with few codons by introducing pseudocount and weighted averages. The new N(c) has significantly improved correlation with CAI than the original N(c) from CodonW based on protein-coding genes from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Caenorhabditis elegans, Drosophila melanogaster, Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis, Micrococcus luteus, and Mycoplasma genitalium. It also correlates better with protein abundance data from the yeast than the original N(c). PMID:22915832

  7. Asc1, homolog of human RACK1, prevents frameshifting in yeast by ribosomes stalled at CGA codon repeats.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Andrew S; Grayhack, Elizabeth J

    2015-05-01

    Quality control systems monitor and stop translation at some ribosomal stalls, but it is unknown if halting translation at such stalls actually prevents synthesis of abnormal polypeptides. In yeast, ribosome stalling occurs at Arg CGA codon repeats, with even two consecutive CGA codons able to reduce translation by up to 50%. The conserved eukaryotic Asc1 protein limits translation through internal Arg CGA codon repeats. We show that, in the absence of Asc1 protein, ribosomes continue translating at CGA codons, but undergo substantial frameshifting with dramatically higher levels of frameshifting occurring with additional repeats of CGA codons. Frameshifting depends upon the slow or inefficient decoding of these codons, since frameshifting is suppressed by increased expression of the native tRNA(Arg(ICG)) that decodes CGA codons by wobble decoding. Moreover, the extent of frameshifting is modulated by the position of the CGA codon repeat relative to the translation start site. Thus, translation fidelity depends upon Asc1-mediated quality control. PMID:25792604

  8. Combinatorial codon-based amino acid substitutions

    PubMed Central

    Yáñez, Jorge; Argüello, Martha; Osuna, Joel; Soberón, Xavier; Gaytán, Paul

    2004-01-01

    Twenty Fmoc-protected trinucleotide phosphoramidites representing a complete set of codons for the natural amino acids were chemically synthesized for the first time. A pool of these reagents was incorporated into oligonucleotides at substoichiometric levels to generate two libraries of variants that randomly carry either few or many codon replacements on a region encoding nine amino acids of the bacterial enzyme TEM-1 ?-lactamase. Assembly of the libraries was performed in a completely automated mode through a simple modification of ordinary protocols. This technology eliminates codon redundancy, stop codons and enables complete exploration of sequence space for single, double and triple mutations throughout a protein region spanning several residues. Sequence analysis of many non-selected clones revealed a good incorporation of the trinucleotides, producing combinations of mutations quite different from those obtained using conventional degenerate oligonucleotides. Ceftazidime-selection experiments yielded several never before reported variants containing novel amino acid combinations in the ?-lactamase omega loop region. PMID:15537836

  9. The imprint of codons on protein structure.

    PubMed

    Deane, Charlotte M; Saunders, Rhodri

    2011-06-01

    The "central dogma" of biology outlines the unidirectional flow of interpretable data from genetic sequence to protein sequence. This has led to the idea that a protein's structure is dependent only on its amino acid sequence and not its genetic sequence. Recently, however, a more than transient link between the coding genetic sequence and the protein structure has become apparent. The two interact at the ribosome via the process of co-translational protein folding. Evidence for co-translational folding is growing rapidly, but the influence of codons on the protein structure attained is still highly contentious. It is theorised that the speed of codon translation modulates the time available for protein folding and hence the protein structure. Here, past and present research regarding synonymous codons and codon translation speed are reviewed within the context of protein structure attainment. PMID:21567957

  10. Optimal codons in Tremella fuciformis end in C/G, a strong difference with known Tremella species.

    PubMed

    Deng, Youjin; Huang, Xiaoxing; Ruan, Banzhan; Xie, Baogui; van Peer, Arend Frans; Jiang, Yuji

    2015-11-01

    Tremella fuciformis is a popular edible fungus with fruiting bodies that can be produced in large quantities at low costs, while it is easy to transform and cultivate as yeast. This makes it an attractive potential bioreactor. Enhanced heterologous gene expression through codon optimization would be useful, but until now codon usage preferences in T. fuciformis remain unknown. To precisely determine the preferred codon usage of T. fuciformis we sequenced the genome of strain Tr26 resulting in a 24.2 Mb draft genome with 10,040 predicted genes. 3288 of the derived predicted proteins matched the UniProtKB/Swiss-Prot databases with 40 % or more similarity. Corresponding gene models of this subset were subsequently optimized through repetitive comparison of alternative start codons and selection of best length matching gene models. For experimental confirmation of gene models, 96 random clones from an existing T. fuciformis cDNA library were sequenced, generating 80 complete CDSs. Calculated optimal codons for the 3288 predicted and the 80 cloned CDSs were highly similar, indicating sufficient accuracy of predicted gene models for codon usage analysis. T. fuciformis showed a strong preference for C and then G at the third base pair position of used codons, while average GC content of predicted genes was slightly higher than the total genome sequence average. Most optimal codons ended in C or G except for one, and an increased frequency of C ending codons was observed in genes with higher expression levels. Surprisingly, the preferred codon usage in T. fuciformis strongly differed from T. mesenterica and C. neoformans. Instead, optimal codon usage was similar to more distant related species such as Ustilago maydis and Neurospora crassa. Despite much higher overall sequence homology between T. fuciformis and T. mesenterica, only 7 out of 21 optimal codons were equal, whereas T. fuciformis shared up to 20 out of 21 optimal codons with other species. Clearly, codon usage in Tremella can differ largely and should be estimated for individual species. The precise identification of optimal and high expression related codons is therefore an important step in the development of T. fuciformis as a bioreactor system. PMID:26253954

  11. Maximizing Transcription Efficiency Causes Codon Usage Bias

    PubMed Central

    Xia, X.

    1996-01-01

    The rate of protein synthesis depends on both the rate of initiation of translation and the rate of elongation of the peptide chain. The rate of initiation depends on the encountering rate between ribosomes and mRNA; this rate in turn depends on the concentration of ribosomes and mRNA. Thus, patterns of codon usage that increase transcriptional efficiency should increase mRNA concentration, which in turn would increase the initiation rate and the rate of protein synthesis. An optimality model of the transcriptional process is presented with the prediction that the most frequently used ribonucleotide at the third codon sites in mRNA molecules should be the same as the most abundant ribonucleotide in the cellular matrix where mRNA is transcribed. This prediction is supported by four kinds of evidence. First, A-ending codons are the most frequently used synonymous codons in mitochondria, where ATP is much more abundant than that of the three other ribonucleotides. Second, A-ending codons are more frequently used in mitochondrial genes than in nuclear genes. Third, protein genes from organisms with a high metabolic rate use more A-ending codons and have higher A content in their introns than those from organisms with a low metabolic rate. PMID:8913770

  12. Codon discrimination and anticodon structural context.

    PubMed Central

    Lustig, F; Borén, T; Guindy, Y S; Elias, P; Samuelsson, T; Gehrke, C W; Kuo, K C; Lagerkvist, U

    1989-01-01

    Site-directed mutagenesis has been used to change the nucleotide C in the wobble position of tRNA(1Gly) (CCC) to U. The mutated tRNA was tested for its ability to read glycine codons in an in vitro protein-synthesizing system programmed with the phage message MS2-RNA that had been modified by site-directed mutagenesis so as to make it possible to monitor conveniently the reading of all four glycine codons. The results showed that while the efficiency of tRNA(1Gly) (UCC) was comparable to that of mycoplasma tRNA(Gly) (UCC) in the reading of the codon GGA, the mycoplasma tRNA(Gly) was far more efficient than the tRNA(1Gly) (UCC) in the reading of the codons GGU and GGC. Thus, the anticodon UCC, when present in the structural context of the tRNA(1Gly) molecule, behaved as predicted by the wobble rules while in the structural context of the mycoplasma tRNA(Gly) it read without discrimination between the nucleotides in the third codon position, in violation of the wobble restrictions. The result with the codon GGG showed that the anticodon UCC, when present in tRNA(1Gly), was considerably less efficient in reading this codon than it was in the structural context of the mycoplasma tRNA(Gly). It would therefore seem that the anticodon UCC, when present in a certain tRNA, can be an efficient wobbler, while in the molecular environment of another tRNA it is markedly restricted in its ability to wobble. Images PMID:2674936

  13. Codon bias signatures, organization of microorganisms in codon space, and lifestyle.

    PubMed

    Carbone, A; Képès, F; Zinovyev, A

    2005-03-01

    New and simple numerical criteria based on a codon adaptation index are applied to the complete genomic sequences of 80 Eubacteria and 16 Archaea, to infer weak and strong genome tendencies toward content bias, translational bias, and strand bias. These criteria can be applied to all microbial genomes, even those for which little biological information is known, and a codon bias signature, that is the collection of strong biases displayed by a genome, can be automatically derived. A codon bias space, where genomes are identified by their preferred codons, is proposed as a novel formal framework to interpret genomic relationships. Principal component analysis confirms that although GC content has a dominant effect on codon bias space, thermophilic and mesophilic species can be identified and separated by codon preferences. Two more examples concerning lifestyle are studied with linear discriminant analysis: suitable separating functions characterized by sets of preferred codons are provided to discriminate: translationally biased (hyper)thermophiles from mesophiles, and organisms with different respiratory characteristics, aerobic, anaerobic, facultative aerobic and facultative anaerobic. These results suggest that codon bias space might reflect the geometry of a prokaryotic "physiology space." Evolutionary perspectives are noted, numerical criteria and distances among organisms are validated on known cases, and various results and predictions are discussed both on methodological and biological grounds. PMID:15537809

  14. Evidence that Natural Selection on Codon Usage in Drosophila pseudoobscura Varies Across Codons

    PubMed Central

    Kliman, Richard M.

    2014-01-01

    Like other species of Drosophila, Drosophila pseudoobscura has a distinct bias toward the usage of C- and G-ending codons. Previous studies have indicated that this bias is due, at least in part, to natural selection. Codon bias clearly differs among amino acids (and other codon classes) in Drosophila, which may reflect differences in the intensity of selection on codon usage. Ongoing natural selection on synonymous codon usage should be reflected in the shapes of the site frequency spectra of derived states at polymorphic positions. Specifically, regardless of other demographic effects on the spectrum, it should be shifted toward higher values for changes from less-preferred to more-preferred codons, and toward lower values for the converse. If the intensity of natural selection is increased, shifts in the site frequency spectra should be more pronounced. A total of 33,729 synonymous polymorphic sites on Chromosome 2 in D. pseudoobscura were analyzed. Shifts in the site frequency spectra are consistent with differential intensity of natural selection on codon usage, with stronger shifts associated with higher codon bias. The shifts, in general, are greater for polymorphic synonymous sites than for polymorphic intron sites, also consistent with natural selection. However, unlike observations in D. melanogaster, codon bias is not reduced in areas of low recombination in D. pseudoobscura; the site frequency spectrum signal for selection on codon usage remains strong in these regions. However, diversity is reduced, as expected. It is possible that estimates of low recombination reflect a recent change in recombination rate. PMID:24531731

  15. Codon Pair Bias Is a Direct Consequence of Dinucleotide Bias.

    PubMed

    Kunec, Dusan; Osterrieder, Nikolaus

    2016-01-01

    Codon pair bias is a remarkably stable characteristic of a species. Although functionally uncharacterized, robust virus attenuation was achieved by recoding of viral proteins using underrepresented codon pairs. Because viruses replicate exclusively inside living cells, we posited that their codon pair preferences reflect those of their host(s). Analysis of many human viruses showed, however, that the encoding of viruses is influenced only marginally by host codon pair preferences. Furthermore, examination of codon pair preferences of vertebrate, insect, and arthropod-borne viruses revealed that the latter do not utilize codon pairs overrepresented in arthropods more frequently than other viruses. We found, however, that codon pair bias is a direct consequence of dinucleotide bias. We conclude that codon pair bias does not play a major role in the encoding of viral proteins and that virus attenuation by codon pair deoptimization has the same molecular underpinnings as attenuation based on an increase in CpG/TpA dinucleotides. PMID:26725119

  16. The Effects of Codon Context on In Vivo Translation Speed

    PubMed Central

    Chevance, Fabienne F. V.; Le Guyon, Soazig; Hughes, Kelly T.

    2014-01-01

    We developed a bacterial genetic system based on translation of the his operon leader peptide gene to determine the relative speed at which the ribosome reads single or multiple codons in vivo. Low frequency effects of so-called “silent” codon changes and codon neighbor (context) effects could be measured using this assay. An advantage of this system is that translation speed is unaffected by the primary sequence of the His leader peptide. We show that the apparent speed at which ribosomes translate synonymous codons can vary substantially even for synonymous codons read by the same tRNA species. Assaying translation through codon pairs for the 5?- and 3?- side positioning of the 64 codons relative to a specific codon revealed that the codon-pair orientation significantly affected in vivo translation speed. Codon pairs with rare arginine codons and successive proline codons were among the slowest codon pairs translated in vivo. This system allowed us to determine the effects of different factors on in vivo translation speed including Shine-Dalgarno sequence, rate of dipeptide bond formation, codon context, and charged tRNA levels. PMID:24901308

  17. Universality and Shannon entropy of codon usage

    E-print Network

    Frappat, L; Sciarrino, A; Sorba, Paul

    2003-01-01

    The distribution functions of the codon usage probabilities, computed over all the available GenBank data, for 40 eukaryotic biological species and 5 chloroplasts, do not follow a Zipf law, but are best fitted by the sum of a constant, an exponential and a linear function in the rank of usage. For mitochondriae the analysis is not conclusive. A quantum-mechanics-inspired model is proposed to describe the observed behaviour. These functions are characterized by parameters that strongly depend on the total GC content of the coding regions of biological species. It is predicted that the codon usage is the same in all exonic genes with the same GC content. The Shannon entropy for codons, also strongly depending on the exonic GC content, is computed.

  18. Balanced Codon Usage Optimizes Eukaryotic Translational Efficiency

    E-print Network

    Zhang, Jianzhi

    ) Balanced Codon Usage Optimizes Eukaryotic Translational Efficiency. PLoS Genet 8(3): e1002603. doi:10.1371/journal.pgen.1002603 Editor: Harmit S. Malik, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, United States Qian et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons

  19. Selection on codon bias in yeast: a transcriptional hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Trotta, Edoardo

    2013-01-01

    Codons that code for the same amino acid are often used with unequal frequencies. This phenomenon is termed codon bias. Here, we report a computational analysis of codon bias in yeast using experimental and theoretical genome-wide data. We show that the most used codons in highly expressed genes can be predicted by mRNA structural data and that the codon choice at each synonymous site within an mRNA is not random with respect to the local secondary structure. Because we also found that the folding stability of intron sequences is strongly correlated with codon bias and mRNA level, our results suggest that codon bias is linked to mRNA folding structure through a mechanism that, at least partially, operates before pre-mRNA splicing. Consistent with this, we report evidence supporting the adaptation of the tRNA pool to the codon profile of the most expressed genes rather than vice versa. We show that the correlation of codon usage with the gene expression level also includes the stop codons that are normally not decoded by aminoacyl-tRNAs. The results reported here are consistent with a role for transcriptional forces in driving codon usage bias via a mechanism that improves gene expression by optimizing mRNA folding structures. PMID:23945943

  20. A critical analysis of codon optimization in human therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Mauro, Vincent P; Chappell, Stephen A

    2014-11-01

    Codon optimization describes gene engineering approaches that use synonymous codon changes to increase protein production. Applications for codon optimization include recombinant protein drugs and nucleic acid therapies, including gene therapy, mRNA therapy, and DNA/RNA vaccines. However, recent reports indicate that codon optimization can affect protein conformation and function, increase immunogenicity, and reduce efficacy. We critically review this subject, identifying additional potential hazards including some unique to nucleic acid therapies. This analysis highlights the evolved complexity of codon usage and challenges the scientific bases for codon optimization. Consequently, codon optimization may not provide the optimal strategy for increasing protein production and may decrease the safety and efficacy of biotech therapeutics. We suggest that the use of this approach is reconsidered, particularly for in vivo applications. PMID:25263172

  1. Upstream swimming in microbiological flows

    E-print Network

    Arnold J. T. M. Mathijssen; Tyler N. Shendruk; Julia M. Yeomans; Amin Doostmohammadi

    2015-11-17

    Interactions between microorganisms and their complex flowing environments are essential in many biological systems. We develop a model for microswimmer dynamics in non-Newtonian Poiseuille flows. We predict that swimmers in shear-thickening (-thinning) fluids migrate upstream more (less) quickly than in Newtonian fluids and demonstrate that viscoelastic normal stress differences reorient swimmers causing them to migrate upstream at the centreline, in contrast to well-known boundary accumulation in quiescent Newtonian fluids. Based on these observations, we suggest a sorting mechanism to select microbes by swimming speed.

  2. Upstream swimming in microbiological flows

    E-print Network

    Mathijssen, Arnold J T M; Yeomans, Julia M; Doostmohammadi, Amin

    2015-01-01

    Interactions between microorganisms and their complex flowing environments are essential in many biological systems. We develop a model for microswimmer dynamics in non-Newtonian Poiseuille flows. We predict that swimmers in shear-thickening (-thinning) fluids migrate upstream more (less) quickly than in Newtonian fluids and demonstrate that viscoelastic normal stress differences reorient swimmers causing them to migrate upstream at the centreline, in contrast to well-known boundary accumulation in quiescent Newtonian fluids. Based on these observations, we suggest a sorting mechanism to select microbes by swimming speed.

  3. Mammalian nonsense codons can be cis effectors of nuclear mRNA half-life.

    PubMed Central

    Belgrader, P; Cheng, J; Zhou, X; Stephenson, L S; Maquat, L E

    1994-01-01

    Frameshift and nonsense mutations within the gene for human triosephosphate isomerase (TPI) that generate a nonsense codon within the first three-fourths of the protein coding region have been found to reduce the abundance of the product mRNA that copurifies with nuclei. The cellular process and location of the nonsense codon-mediated reduction have proven difficult to elucidate for technical reasons. We show here, using electron microscopy to judge the purity of isolated nuclei, that the previously established reduction to 25% of the normal mRNA level is evident for nuclei that are free of detectable cytoplasmic contamination. Therefore, the reduction is likely to be characteristic of bona fide nuclear RNA. Fully spliced nuclear mRNA is identified by Northern (RNA) blot hybridization and a reverse transcription-PCR assay as the species that undergoes decay in experiments that used the human c-fos promoter to elicit a burst and subsequent shutoff of TPI gene transcription upon the addition of serum to serum-deprived cells. Finally, the finding that deletion of a 5' splice site of the TPI gene results predominantly but not exclusively in the removal by splicing (i.e., skipping) of the upstream exon as a part of the flanking introns has been used to demonstrate that decay is specific to those mRNA products that maintain the nonsense codon. This result, together with our previous results that implicate translation by ribosomes and charged tRNAs in the decay mechanism, indicate that nonsense codon recognition takes place after splicing and triggers decay solely in cis. The possibility that decay takes place during the process of mRNA export from the nucleus to the cytoplasm is discussed. Images PMID:7969159

  4. Causal signals between codon bias, mRNA structure, and the efficiency of translation and elongation

    PubMed Central

    Pop, Cristina; Rouskin, Silvi; Ingolia, Nicholas T; Han, Lu; Phizicky, Eric M; Weissman, Jonathan S; Koller, Daphne

    2014-01-01

    Ribosome profiling data report on the distribution of translating ribosomes, at steady-state, with codon-level resolution. We present a robust method to extract codon translation rates and protein synthesis rates from these data, and identify causal features associated with elongation and translation efficiency in physiological conditions in yeast. We show that neither elongation rate nor translational efficiency is improved by experimental manipulation of the abundance or body sequence of the rare AGG tRNA. Deletion of three of the four copies of the heavily used ACA tRNA shows a modest efficiency decrease that could be explained by other rate-reducing signals at gene start. This suggests that correlation between codon bias and efficiency arises as selection for codons to utilize translation machinery efficiently in highly translated genes. We also show a correlation between efficiency and RNA structure calculated both computationally and from recent structure probing data, as well as the Kozak initiation motif, which may comprise a mechanism to regulate initiation. PMID:25538139

  5. Evaluating Sense Codon Reassignment with a Simple Fluorescence Screen.

    PubMed

    Biddle, Wil; Schmitt, Margaret A; Fisk, John D

    2015-12-22

    Understanding the interactions that drive the fidelity of the genetic code and the limits to which modifications can be made without breaking the translational system has practical implications for understanding the molecular mechanisms of evolution as well as expanding the set of encodable amino acids, particularly those with chemistries not provided by Nature. Because 61 sense codons encode 20 amino acids, reassigning the meaning of sense codons provides an avenue for biosynthetic modification of proteins, furthering both fundamental and applied biochemical research. We developed a simple screen that exploits the absolute requirement for fluorescence of an active site tyrosine in green fluorescent protein (GFP) to probe the pliability of the degeneracy of the genetic code. Our screen monitors the restoration of the fluorophore of GFP by incorporation of a tyrosine in response to a sense codon typically assigned another meaning in the genetic code. We evaluated sense codon reassignment at four of the 21 sense codons read through wobble interactions in Escherichia coli using the Methanocaldococcus jannaschii orthogonal tRNA/aminoacyl tRNA synthetase pair originally developed and commonly used for amber stop codon suppression. By changing only the anticodon of the orthogonal tRNA, we achieved sense codon reassignment efficiencies between 1% (Phe UUU) and 6% (Lys AAG). Each of the orthogonal tRNAs preferentially decoded the codon traditionally read via a wobble interaction in E. coli with the exception of the orthogonal tRNA with an AUG anticodon, which incorporated tyrosine in response to both the His CAU and His CAC codons with approximately equal frequencies. We applied our screen in a high-throughput manner to evaluate a 10(9)-member combined tRNA/aminoacyl tRNA synthetase library to identify improved sense codon reassigning variants for the Lys AAG codon. A single rapid screen with the ability to broadly evaluate reassignable codons will facilitate identification and improvement of the combinations of sense codons and orthogonal pairs that display efficient reassignment. PMID:26536053

  6. Codon usage patterns in Nematoda: analysis based on over 25 million codons in thirty-two species

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Background Codon usage has direct utility in molecular characterization of species and is also a marker for molecular evolution. To understand codon usage within the diverse phylum Nematoda, we analyzed a total of 265,494 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) from 30 nematode species. The full genomes of Caenorhabditis elegans and C. briggsae were also examined. A total of 25,871,325 codons were analyzed and a comprehensive codon usage table for all species was generated. This is the first codon usage table available for 24 of these organisms. Results Codon usage similarity in Nematoda usually persists over the breadth of a genus but then rapidly diminishes even within each clade. Globodera, Meloidogyne, Pristionchus, and Strongyloides have the most highly derived patterns of codon usage. The major factor affecting differences in codon usage between species is the coding sequence GC content, which varies in nematodes from 32% to 51%. Coding GC content (measured as GC3) also explains much of the observed variation in the effective number of codons (R = 0.70), which is a measure of codon bias, and it even accounts for differences in amino acid frequency. Codon usage is also affected by neighboring nucleotides (N1 context). Coding GC content correlates strongly with estimated noncoding genomic GC content (R = 0.92). On examining abundant clusters in five species, candidate optimal codons were identified that may be preferred in highly expressed transcripts. Conclusion Evolutionary models indicate that total genomic GC content, probably the product of directional mutation pressure, drives codon usage rather than the converse, a conclusion that is supported by examination of nematode genomes. PMID:26271136

  7. eCodonOpt: a systematic computational framework for optimizing codon usage in directed evolution experiments

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Gregory L.; Maranas, Costas D.

    2002-01-01

    We present a systematic computational framework, eCodonOpt, for designing parental DNA sequences for directed evolution experiments through codon usage optimization. Given a set of homologous parental proteins to be recombined at the DNA level, the optimal DNA sequences encoding these proteins are sought for a given diversity objective. We find that the free energy of annealing between the recombining DNA sequences is a much better descriptor of the extent of crossover formation than sequence identity. Three different diversity targets are investigated for the DNA shuffling protocol to showcase the utility of the eCodonOpt framework: (i) maximizing the average number of crossovers per recombined sequence; (ii) minimizing bias in family DNA shuffling so that each of the parental sequence pair contributes a similar number of crossovers to the library; and (iii) maximizing the relative frequency of crossovers in specific structural regions. Each one of these design challenges is formulated as a constrained optimization problem that utilizes 0–1 binary variables as on/off switches to model the selection of different codon choices for each residue position. Computational results suggest that many-fold improvements in the crossover frequency, location and specificity are possible, providing valuable insights for the engineering of directed evolution protocols. PMID:12034828

  8. Synonymous codon usage is subject to selection in thermophilic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Lynn, David J; Singer, Gregory A C; Hickey, Donal A

    2002-10-01

    The patterns of synonymous codon usage, both within and among genomes, have been extensively studied over the past two decades. Despite the accumulating evidence that natural selection can shape codon usage, it has not been possible to link a particular pattern of codon usage to a specific external selective force. Here, we have analyzed the patterns of synonymous codon usage in 40 completely sequenced prokaryotic genomes. By combining the genes from several genomes (more than 80 000 genes in all) into a single dataset for this analysis, we were able to investigate variations in codon usage, both within and between genomes. The results show that synonymous codon usage is affected by two major factors: (i) the overall G+C content of the genome and (ii) growth at high temperature. This study focused on the relationship between synonymous codon usage and the ability to grow at high temperature. We have been able to eliminate both phylogenetic history and lateral gene transfer as possible explanations for the characteristic pattern of codon usage among the thermophiles. Thus, these results demonstrate a clear link between a particular pattern of codon usage and an external selective force. PMID:12364606

  9. Upstream open reading frames regulate the expression of the nuclear Wnt13 isoforms

    SciTech Connect

    Tang Tao; Rector, Kyle; Barnett, Corey D.; Mao, Catherine D.

    2008-02-22

    Wnt proteins control cell survival and cell fate during development. Although Wnt expression is tightly regulated in a spatio-temporal manner, the mechanisms involved both at the transcriptional and translational levels are poorly defined. We have identified a downstream translation initiation codon, AUG(+74), in Wnt13B and Wnt13C mRNAs responsible for the expression of Wnt13 nuclear forms. In this report, we demonstrate that the expression of the nuclear Wnt13C form is translationally regulated in response to stress and apoptosis. Though the 5'-leaders of both Wnt13C and Wnt13B mRNAs have an inhibitory effect on translation, they did not display an internal ribosome entry site activity as demonstrated by dicistronic reporter assays. However, mutations or deletions of the upstream AUG(-99) and AUG(+1) initiation codons abrogate these translation inhibitory effects, demonstrating that Wnt13C expression is controlled by upstream open reading frames. Since long 5'-untranslated region with short upstream open reading frames characterize other Wnt transcripts, our present data on the translational control of Wnt13 expression open the way to further studies on the translation control of Wnt expression as a modulator of their subcellular localization and activity.

  10. Partial attenuation of Marek's disease virus by manipulation of Di-codon bias

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    All species studied to date demonstrate a preference for certain codons over other synonymous codons (codon bias), a preference which is also observed for pairs of codons (di-codon bias). Previous studies using poliovirus and influenza virus as models have demonstrated the ability to cause attenuat...

  11. [Codon usage bias in the straw mushroom Volvariella volvacea].

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wei; Lü, Beibei; He, Jianhua; Wang, Jinbin; Wu, Xiao; Wu, Guogan; Bao, Dapeng; Chen, Mingjie; Zhang, Jinsong; Tan, Qi; Tang, Xueming

    2014-09-01

    We analyzed the whole genome coding sequence of Volvariella volvacea to study the pattern utilization of codons by Codon W 1.4.2. As results, 24 optimal codons were identified. Moreover, the frequency of codons usage was calculated by CUSP program. We compared the frequency of codons usage of V. volvacea with other organisms including 6 modal value species (Homo sapiens, Saccharomys cerevisiae, Arabidopsis thalian, Mus musculus, Danio rerio and Drosophila melanogaster) and 4 edible fungi (Coprinopsis cinerea, Agaricus bisporus, Lentinula edodes and Pleurotus ostreatus). We found that there were less differences in 3 edible fungi (excluding Pleurotus ostreatus) than 6 modal value species, comparing with the frequency of codons usage of V. volvacea. With software SPSS16.0, cluster analysis which showed differences in the size of codon bias, reflects the evolutionary relationships between species, which can be used as a reference of evolutionary relationships of species. This was the first time for analysis the codon preference among the whole coding sequences of edible fungi, serving as theoretical basis to apply genetic engineering of V. volvacea. PMID:25720157

  12. Codon Bias Patterns of E. coli’s Interacting Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Dilucca, Maddalena; Cimini, Giulio; Semmoloni, Andrea; Deiana, Antonio; Giansanti, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Synonymous codons, i.e., DNA nucleotide triplets coding for the same amino acid, are used differently across the variety of living organisms. The biological meaning of this phenomenon, known as codon usage bias, is still controversial. In order to shed light on this point, we propose a new codon bias index, CompAI, that is based on the competition between cognate and near-cognate tRNAs during translation, without being tuned to the usage bias of highly expressed genes. We perform a genome-wide evaluation of codon bias for E.coli, comparing CompAI with other widely used indices: tAI, CAI, and Nc. We show that CompAI and tAI capture similar information by being positively correlated with gene conservation, measured by the Evolutionary Retention Index (ERI), and essentiality, whereas, CAI and Nc appear to be less sensitive to evolutionary-functional parameters. Notably, the rate of variation of tAI and CompAI with ERI allows to obtain sets of genes that consistently belong to specific clusters of orthologous genes (COGs). We also investigate the correlation of codon bias at the genomic level with the network features of protein-protein interactions in E.coli. We find that the most densely connected communities of the network share a similar level of codon bias (as measured by CompAI and tAI). Conversely, a small difference in codon bias between two genes is, statistically, a prerequisite for the corresponding proteins to interact. Importantly, among all codon bias indices, CompAI turns out to have the most coherent distribution over the communities of the interactome, pointing to the significance of competition among cognate and near-cognate tRNAs for explaining codon usage adaptation. Notably, CompAI may potentially correlate with translation speed measurements, by accounting for the specific delay induced by wobble-pairing between codons and anticodons. PMID:26566157

  13. A codon model of nucleotide substitution with selection on synonymous codon usage.

    PubMed

    Kubatko, Laura; Shah, Premal; Herbei, Radu; Gilchrist, Michael A

    2016-01-01

    The quality of phylogenetic inference made from protein-coding genes depends, in part, on the realism with which the codon substitution process is modeled. Here we propose a new mechanistic model that combines the standard M0 substitution model of Yang (1997) with a simplified model from Gilchrist (2007) that includes selection on synonymous substitutions as a function of codon-specific nonsense error rates. We tested the newly proposed model by applying it to 104 protein-coding genes in brewer's yeast, and compared the fit of the new model to the standard M0 model and to the mutation-selection model of Yang and Nielsen (2008) using the AIC. Our new model provided significantly better fit in approximately 85% of the cases considered for the basic M0 model and in approximately 25% of the cases for the M0 model with estimated codon frequencies, but only in a few cases when the mutation-selection model was considered. However, our model includes a parameter that can be interpreted as a measure of the rate of protein production, and the estimates of this parameter were highly correlated with an independent measure of protein production for the yeast genes considered here. Finally, we found that in some cases the new model led to the preference of a different phylogeny for a subset of the genes considered, indicating that substitution model choice may have an impact on the estimated phylogeny. PMID:26358614

  14. AUG sequences are required to sustain nonsense-codon-mediated suppression of splicing

    PubMed Central

    Kamhi, Eyal; Yahalom, Galit; Kass, Gideon; Hacham, Yael; Sperling, Ruth; Sperling, Joseph

    2006-01-01

    More than 90% of human genes are rich in intronic latent 5? splice sites whose utilization in pre-mRNA splicing would introduce in-frame stop codons into the resultant mRNAs. We have therefore hypothesized that suppression of splicing (SOS) at latent 5? splice sites regulates alternative 5? splice site selection in a way that prevents the production of toxic nonsense mRNAs and verified this idea by showing that the removal of such in-frame stop codons is sufficient to activate latent splicing. Splicing control by SOS requires recognition of the mRNA reading frame, presumably recognizing the start codon sequence. Here we show that AUG sequences are indeed essential for SOS. Although protein translation does not seem to be required for SOS, the first AUG is shown here to be necessary but not sufficient. We further show that latent splicing can be elicited upon treatment with pactamycin—a drug known to block translation by its ability to recognize an RNA fold—but not by treatment with other drugs that inhibit translation through other mechanisms. The effect of pactamycin on SOS is dependent neither on steady-state translation nor on the pioneer round of translation. This effect is found for both transfected and endogenous genes, indicating that SOS is a natural mechanism. PMID:16855285

  15. Analysis of amino acid and codon usage in Paramecium bursaria.

    PubMed

    Dohra, Hideo; Fujishima, Masahiro; Suzuki, Haruo

    2015-10-01

    The ciliate Paramecium bursaria harbors the green-alga Chlorella symbionts. We reassembled the P. bursaria transcriptome to minimize falsely fused transcripts, and investigated amino acid and codon usage using the transcriptome data. Surface proteins preferentially use smaller amino acid residues like cysteine. Unusual synonymous codon and amino acid usage in highly expressed genes can reflect a balance between translational selection and other factors. A correlation of gene expression level with synonymous codon or amino acid usage is emphasized in genes down-regulated in symbiont-bearing cells compared to symbiont-free cells. Our results imply that the selection is associated with P. bursaria-Chlorella symbiosis. PMID:26341535

  16. The Start of Head Start

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neugebauer, Roger

    2010-01-01

    The creation of the Head Start program occurred at break-neck speed with many dramatic turns and many colorful players. No one tells the story better than Edward Zigler in "Head Start: The Inside Story of America's Most Successful Educational Experiment"--a detailed and personal, behind the scenes look at the program's inception. From this…

  17. Evidence of efficient stop codon readthrough in four mammalian genes

    E-print Network

    Loughran, Gary

    Stop codon readthrough is used extensively by viruses to expand their gene expression. Until recent discoveries in Drosophila, only a very limited number of readthrough cases in chromosomal genes had been reported. Analysis ...

  18. Heterologous Stop Codon Readthrough of Metazoan Readthrough Candidates in Yeast

    E-print Network

    Jungreis, Irwin

    Recent analysis of genomic signatures in mammals, flies, and worms indicates that functional translational stop codon readthrough is considerably more abundant in metazoa than previously recognized, but this analysis ...

  19. Properties and determinants of codon decoding time distributions

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Codon decoding time is a fundamental property of mRNA translation believed to affect the abundance, function, and properties of proteins. Recently, a novel experimental technology--ribosome profiling--was developed to measure the density, and thus the speed, of ribosomes at codon resolution. Specifically, this method is based on next-generation sequencing, which theoretically can provide footprint counts that correspond to the probability of observing a ribosome in this position for each nucleotide in each transcript. Results In this study, we report for the first time various novel properties of the distribution of codon footprint counts in five organisms, based on large-scale analysis of ribosomal profiling data. We show that codons have distinctive footprint count distributions. These tend to be preserved along the inner part of the ORF, but differ at the 5' and 3' ends of the ORF, suggesting that the translation-elongation stage actually includes three biophysical sub-steps. In addition, we study various basic properties of the codon footprint count distributions and show that some of them correlate with the abundance of the tRNA molecule types recognizing them. Conclusions Our approach emphasizes the advantages of analyzing ribosome profiling and similar types of data via a comparative genomic codon-distribution-centric view. Thus, our methods can be used in future studies related to translation and even transcription elongation. PMID:25572668

  20. A Model of Proto-Anti-Codon RNA Enzymes Requiring L-Amino Acid Homochirality

    E-print Network

    Erives, Albert J.

    A Model of Proto-Anti-Codon RNA Enzymes Requiring L-Amino Acid Homochirality Albert Erives Received natural amino acid units of polypeptides using a universal scheme of triplet nucleotide ``codons) the absence of any codons for D-amino acids; (ii) the odd combination of alternate codon patterns for some

  1. Four-base codon mediated mRNA display to construct peptide libraries that contain multiple nonnatural amino acids

    PubMed Central

    Muranaka, Norihito; Hohsaka, Takahiro; Sisido, Masahiko

    2006-01-01

    In vitro selection and directed evolution of peptides from mRNA display are powerful strategies to find novel peptide ligands that bind to target biomolecules. In this study, we expanded the mRNA display method to include multiple nonnatural amino acids by introducing three different four-base codons at a randomly selected single position on the mRNA. Another nonnatural amino acid may be introduced by suppressing an amber codon that may appear from a (NNK)n nucleotide sequence on the mRNA. The mRNA display was expressed in an Escherichia coli in vitro translation system in the presence of three types of tRNAs carrying different four-base anticodons and a tRNA carrying an amber anticodon, the tRNAs being chemically aminoacylated with different nonnatural amino acids. The complexity of the starting mRNA-displayed peptide library was estimated to be 1.1 × 1012 molecules. The effectiveness of the four-base codon mediated mRNA display method was demonstrated in the selection of biocytin-containing peptides on streptavidin-coated beads. Moreover, a novel streptavidin-binding nonnatural peptide containing benzoylphenylalanine was obtained from the nonnatural peptide library. The nonnatural peptide library from the four-base codon mediated mRNA display provides much wider functional and structural diversity than conventional peptide libraries that are constituted from 20 naturally occurring amino acids. PMID:16397292

  2. Start Young!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubin, Penni

    2002-01-01

    Discusses the importance of early interest in science and how effective it is on career choice in adult stages of life. Recommends starting mathematics and science activities in preschool and kindergarten. Describes how to create a career-oriented learning center in the classroom with examples of kitchen chemistry, nutrition/botany, zoology,…

  3. Press Start

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harteveld, Casper

    This level sets the stage for the design philosophy called “Triadic Game Design” (TGD). This design philosophy can be summarized with the following sentence: it takes two to tango, but it takes three to design a meaningful game or a game with a purpose. Before the philosophy is further explained, this level will first delve into what is meant by a meaningful game or a game with a purpose. Many terms and definitions have seen the light and in this book I will specifically orient at digital games that aim to have an effect beyond the context of the game itself. Subsequently, a historical overview is given of the usage of games with a serious purpose which starts from the moment we human beings started to walk on our feet till our contemporary society. It turns out that we have been using games for all kinds of non-entertainment purposes for already quite a long time. With this introductory material in the back of our minds, I will explain the concept of TGD by means of a puzzle. After that, the protagonist of this book, the game Levee Patroller, is introduced. Based on the development of this game, the idea of TGD, which stresses to balance three different worlds, the worlds of Reality, Meaning, and Play, came into being. Interested? Then I suggest to quickly “press start!”

  4. Codon Bias as a Means to Fine-Tune Gene Expression.

    PubMed

    Quax, Tessa E F; Claassens, Nico J; Söll, Dieter; van der Oost, John

    2015-07-16

    The redundancy of the genetic code implies that most amino acids are encoded by multiple synonymous codons. In all domains of life, a biased frequency of synonymous codons is observed at the genome level, in functionally related genes (e.g., in operons), and within single genes. Other codon bias variants include biased codon pairs and codon co-occurrence. Although translation initiation is the key step in protein synthesis, it is generally accepted that codon bias contributes to translation efficiency by tuning the elongation rate of the process. Moreover, codon bias plays an important role in controlling a multitude of cellular processes, ranging from differential protein production to protein folding. Here we review currently known types of codon bias and how they may influence translation. We discuss how understanding the principles of codon bias and translation can contribute to improved protein production and developments in synthetic biology. PMID:26186290

  5. A model for codon position bias in RNA editing

    E-print Network

    Liu, T; Liu, Tsunglin; Bundschuh, Ralf

    2005-01-01

    RNA editing can be crucial for the expression of genetic information via inserting, deleting, or substituting a few nucleotides at specific positions in an RNA sequence. Within coding regions in an RNA sequence, editing usually occurs with a certain bias in choosing the positions of the editing sites. In the mitochondrial genes of {\\it Physarum polycephalum}, many more editing events have been observed at the third codon position than at the first and second, while in some plant mitochondria the second codon position dominates. Here we propose an evolutionary model that explains this bias as the basis of selection at the protein level. The model predicts a distribution of the three positions rather close to the experimental observation in {\\it Physarum}. This suggests that the codon position bias in {\\it Physarum} is mainly a consequence of selection at the protein level.

  6. Model for Codon Position Bias in RNA Editing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Tsunglin; Bundschuh, Ralf

    2005-08-01

    RNA editing can be crucial for the expression of genetic information via inserting, deleting, or substituting a few nucleotides at specific positions in an RNA sequence. Within coding regions in an RNA sequence, editing usually occurs with a certain bias in choosing the positions of the editing sites. In the mitochondrial genes of Physarum polycephalum, many more editing events have been observed at the third codon position than at the first and second, while in some plant mitochondria the second codon position dominates. Here we propose an evolutionary model that explains this bias as the basis of selection at the protein level. The model predicts a distribution of the three positions rather close to the experimental observation in Physarum. This suggests that the codon position bias in Physarum is mainly a consequence of selection at the protein level.

  7. A model for codon position bias in RNA editing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bundschuh, Ralf; Liu, Tsunglin

    2006-03-01

    RNA editing can be crucial for the expression of genetic information via inserting, deleting, or substituting a few nucleotides at specific positions in an RNA sequence. Within coding regions in an RNA sequence, editing usually occurs with a certain bias in choosing the positions of the editing sites. In the mitochondrial genes of Physarum polycephalum, many more editing events have been observed at the third codon position than at the first and second, while in some plant mitochondria the second codon position dominates. Here we propose an evolutionary model that explains this bias as the basis of selection at the protein level. The model predicts a distribution of the three positions rather close to the experimental observation in Physarum. This suggests that the codon position bias in Physarum is mainly a consequence of selection at the protein level.

  8. Codon-reading specificities of mitochondrial release factors and translation termination at non-standard stop codons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lind, Christoffer; Sund, Johan; Åqvist, Johan

    2013-12-01

    A key feature of mitochondrial translation is the reduced number of transfer RNAs and reassignment of codons. For human mitochondria, a major unresolved problem is how the set of stop codons are decoded by the release factors mtRF1a and mtRF1. Here we present three-dimensional structural models of human mtRF1a and mtRF1 based on their homology to bacterial RF1 in the codon recognition domain, and the strong conservation between mitochondrial and bacterial ribosomal RNA in the decoding region. Sequence changes in the less homologous mtRF1 appear to be correlated with specific features of the mitochondrial rRNA. Extensive computer simulations of the complexes with the ribosomal decoding site show that both mitochondrial factors have similar specificities and that neither reads the putative vertebrate stop codons AGA and AGG. Instead, we present a structural model for a mechanism by which the ICT1 protein causes termination by sensing the presence of these codons in the A-site of stalled ribosomes.

  9. UPSTREAM MOTIONS IN STRATIFIED FLOW (JOURNAL VERSION)

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the paper experimental measurements of the time-dependent velocity and density perturbations upstream of obstacles in linearly stratified flow are presented. Attention is concentrated on obstacles which generate turbulent separated wakes at Froude numbers, based on velocity an...

  10. Damping and spectral formation of upstream whistlers

    SciTech Connect

    Orlowski, D.S.; Russell, C.T.; Krauss-Varban, D.

    1995-09-01

    Previous studies have indicated that damping rates of upstream whistlers strongly depend on the details of the electron distribution function. Moreover, detailed analysis of Doppler shift and the whistler dispersion relation indicate that upstream whistlers propagate obliquely in a finite band of frequencies. In this paper we present results of a kinetic calculation of damping lengths of wideband whistlers using the sum of seven drifting bi-Maxwellian electron distributions as a best fit to the ISEE 1 electron data. For two cases, when upstream whistlers are observed, convective damping lengths derived from ISEE magnetic field and ephemeris data are compared with theoretical results. We find that the calculated convective damping lengths are consistent with the data and that upstream whistlers remain marginally stable. We also show that the slope of plasma frame spectra of upstream whistlers, obtained by direct fitting of the observed spectra, is between 5 and 7. The overall spectral, wave, and particle characteristics, proximity to the shock, as well as propagation and damping properties indicated that these waves cannot be generated locally. Instead, the observed upstream whistlers arise in the shock ramp, most likely by a variety of cross-field drift and/or anisotropy driven instabilities. 57 refs., 11 figs.

  11. Starting motor

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, T.; Hamano, I

    1989-05-23

    This patent describes a starting motor having a housing, planetary reduction gears including an internal gear in the housing. The improvement consists of an elastic member having a first annular portion mounted in engagement with a fixed annular member of the housing and a plurality of protruding axially extending elastic portions providing a corrugated surface pressed into engagement with an end portion of the internal gear, the elastic member being sandwiched between the internal gear and the housing member, the protruding axially extending elastic portions providing resilient means which flex and incline circumferentially under turning force from the internal gear and exert reactive thrust on the internal gear elastically so that the frictional force at the abutting surfaces of the protruding portions holds the internal gear in resilient engagement with the elastic member and the resilient means acts as a buffer to absorb rotary impact force developing in the planetary reduction gears.

  12. Ribosome collisions and Translation efficiency: Optimization by codon usage and mRNA destabilization

    E-print Network

    Namiko Mitarai; Kim Sneppen; Steen Pedersen

    2008-09-25

    Individual mRNAs are translated by multiple ribosomes that initiate translation with a few seconds interval. The ribosome speed is codon dependant, and ribosome queuing has been suggested to explain specific data for translation of some mRNAs in vivo. By modelling the stochastic translation process as a traffic problem, we here analyze conditions and consequences of collisions and queuing. The model allowed us to determine the on-rate (0.8 to 1.1 initiations per sec) and the time (1 sec) the preceding ribosome occludes initiation for Escherichia coli lacZ mRNA in vivo. We find that ribosome collisions and queues are inevitable consequences of a stochastic translation mechanism that reduce the translation efficiency substantially on natural mRNAs. The cells minimize collisions by having its mRNAs being unstable and by a highly selected codon usage in the start of the mRNA. The cost of mRNA breakdown is offset by the concomitant increase in translational efficiency.

  13. Use and misuse of correspondence analysis in codon usage studies

    E-print Network

    Thioulouse, Jean

    ,10), Chlamydia trachomatis (11), Mycoplasma genitalium (12), Helicobacter pylori (13) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa still is) very popular for analysing codon usage biases in microbial genomes: it has been applied different examples taken from the genomes of B.subtilis, E.coli, B.burgdorferi and M

  14. All-codon scanning identifies p53 cancer rescue mutations

    E-print Network

    Lathrop, Richard H.

    All-codon scanning identifies p53 cancer rescue mutations Roberta Baronio1 , Samuel A. Danziger1 encoding the entire p53 core domain. Identification of several novel p53 cancer rescue mutations against cancer (11). p53 mutations occur in $50% of human cancers, and about three-quarters of those *To

  15. DOI: 10.1002/cbic.201402104 A Bacterial Strain with a Unique Quadruplet Codon

    E-print Network

    Church, George M.

    . Schultz*[a] The addition of noncanonical amino acids to the genetic code requires unique codons" codons have been used to encode non-native amino acids. Use of quadruplet "frame-shift" suppressor codons that a Metha- nocaldococcus jannaschii-derived frame-shift suppressor tRNA/ aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase pair

  16. REVISITING THE CODON ADAPTATION INDEX FROM A WHOLE-GENOME PERSPECTIVE

    E-print Network

    Carbone, Alessandra

    at the interface between sequence analysis, gene expression prediction and genome comparison carried on in ourREVISITING THE CODON ADAPTATION INDEX FROM A WHOLE-GENOME PERSPECTIVE: GENE EXPRESSION, CODON BIAS functions. Statistical analysis of DNA sequences and in particular of codon bias were performed from

  17. Prokaryotic Gene Finding Based on Physicochemical Characteristics of Codons Calculated from Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    E-print Network

    Jayaram, Bhyravabotla

    Prokaryotic Gene Finding Based on Physicochemical Characteristics of Codons Calculated from An ab initio model for gene prediction in prokaryotic genomes is proposed based on physicochemical prediction in prokaryotic genomes based on a set of three physicochemical characteristics of codons--by codon

  18. The Highly Conserved Codon following the Slippery Sequence Supports ?1 Frameshift Efficiency at the HIV-1 Frameshift Site

    PubMed Central

    Mathew, Suneeth F.; Crowe-McAuliffe, Caillan; Graves, Ryan; Cardno, Tony S.; McKinney, Cushla; Poole, Elizabeth S.; Tate, Warren P.

    2015-01-01

    HIV-1 utilises ?1 programmed ribosomal frameshifting to translate structural and enzymatic domains in a defined proportion required for replication. A slippery sequence, U UUU UUA, and a stem-loop are well-defined RNA features modulating ?1 frameshifting in HIV-1. The GGG glycine codon immediately following the slippery sequence (the ‘intercodon’) contributes structurally to the start of the stem-loop but has no defined role in current models of the frameshift mechanism, as slippage is inferred to occur before the intercodon has reached the ribosomal decoding site. This GGG codon is highly conserved in natural isolates of HIV. When the natural intercodon was replaced with a stop codon two different decoding molecules—eRF1 protein or a cognate suppressor tRNA—were able to access and decode the intercodon prior to ?1 frameshifting. This implies significant slippage occurs when the intercodon is in the (perhaps distorted) ribosomal A site. We accommodate the influence of the intercodon in a model of frame maintenance versus frameshifting in HIV-1. PMID:25807539

  19. Genome-wide analysis of synonymous codon usage in Huaiyangshan virus and other bunyaviruses.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xuelian; Liu, Qingzhen; Xiong, Yanwen; Ye, Changyun; Jin, Dong; Xu, Jianguo

    2015-12-01

    Huaiyangshan virus (HYSV) is a newly discovered bunyavirus, which is transmitted by ticks and causes hemorrhagic fever-like illness in human. The interplay of codon usage among viruses and their hosts is expected to affect viral survival, evasion from host's immune system and evolution. However, little is known about the codon usage in HYSV genome. In the present study, we analyzed synonymous codon usage in 120 available full-length HYSV sequences and performed a comparative analysis of synonymous codon usage patterns in HYSV and 42 other bunyaviruses. The relative synonymous codon usage (RSCU) analysis showed that the preferred synonymous codons were G/C-ended. A comparative analysis of RSCU between HYSV and its hosts reflected that codon usage patterns of HYSV were mostly coincident with that of its hosts. Our data suggested that although mutational bias dominated codon usage, patterns of codon usage in HYSV were also under the influence of nature selection. Phylogenetic analysis based on RSCU values across different HYSV strains and 42 other bunyaviruses suggested that codon usage pattern in HYSV was the most similar with that of Uukuniemi virus among these bunyaviruses and that viruses belonged to Phlebovirus showed a diversity of codon usage patterns. PMID:26173646

  20. Synonymous codon usage in Bacillus subtilis reflects both translational selection and mutational biases.

    PubMed Central

    Shields, D C; Sharp, P M

    1987-01-01

    Codon usage data for 56 Bacillus subtilis genes show that synonymous codon usage in B. subtilis is less biased than in Escherichia coli, or in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Nevertheless, certain genes with a high codon bias can be identified by correspondence analysis, and also by various indices of codon bias. These genes are very highly expressed, and a general trend (a decrease) in codon bias across genes seems to correspond to decreasing expression level. This, then, may be a general phenomenon in unicellular organisms. The unusually small effect of translational selection on the pattern of codon usage in lowly expressed genes in B. subtilis yields similar dinucleotide frequencies among different codon positions, and on complementary strands. These patterns could arise through selection on DNA structure, but more probably are largely determined by mutation. This prevalence of mutational bias could lead to difficulties in assessing whether open reading frames encode proteins. PMID:3118331

  1. Data in support of large scale comparative codon usage analysis in Leishmania and Trypanosomatids

    PubMed Central

    Subramanian, Abhishek; Rup Sarkar, Ram

    2015-01-01

    This data article contains data related to the article “Comparison of codon usage bias across Leishmania and Trypanosomatids to understand mRNA secondary structure, relative protein abundance and pathway functions” by Subramanian and Sarkar, Genomics, 2015 (10.1016/j.ygeno.2015.05.009). The data comprises of sequence-based measures that quantify the effect of codon usage across genomes. The data thus generated represents computed values of codon usage indices like relative synonymous codon usage (RSCU), effective number of codons (ENC), and codon adaptation index (CAI), a set of single copy orthologous genes common to the 13 Trypanosomatids, and comparisons of CAI between genes of different functions. This forms a basis of comparison to infer the causes and consequences of codon usage bias in Leishmania and other Trypanosomatids. PMID:26217801

  2. Codon Optimisation Is Key for Pernisine Expression in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Šnajder, Marko; Miheli?, Marko; Turk, Dušan; Ulrih, Nataša Poklar

    2015-01-01

    Background Pernisine is an extracellular serine protease from the hyperthermophilic Archaeon Aeropyrum pernix K1. Low yields from the natural host and expression problems in heterologous hosts have limited the potential applications of pernisine in industry. Methodology/ Principal Findings The challenges of pernisine overexpression in Escherichia coli were overcome by codon preference optimisation and de-novo DNA synthesis. The following forms of the pernisine gene were cloned into the pMCSGx series of vectors and expressed in E. coli cells: wild-type (pernisinewt), codon-optimised (pernisineco), and codon-optimised with a S355A mutation of a predicted active site (pernisineS355Aco). The fusion-tagged pernisines were purified using fast protein liquid chromatography equipped with Ni2+ chelate and gel filtration chromatography columns. The identities of the resultant proteins were confirmed with N-terminal sequencing, tandem mass spectrometry analysis, and immunodetection. Pernisinewt was not expressed in E. coli at detectable levels, while pernisineco and pernisineS355Aco were expressed and purified as 55-kDa proforms with yields of around 10 mg per litre E. coli culture. After heat activation of purified pernisine, the proteolytic activity of the mature pernisineco was confirmed using zymography, at a molecular weight of 36 kDa, while the mutant pernisineS355Aco remained inactive. Enzymatic performances of pernisine evaluated under different temperatures and pHs demonstrate that the optimal enzymatic activity of the recombinant pernisine is ca. 100°C and pH 7.0, respectively. Conclusions/ Significance These data demonstrate that codon optimisation is crucial for pernisine overexpression in E. coli, and that the proposed catalytic Ser355 has an important role in pernisine activity, but not in its activation process. Pernisine is activated by autoproteolytical cleavage of its N-terminal proregion. We have also confirmed that the recombinant pernisine retains the characteristics of native pernisine, as a calcium modulated thermostable serine protease. PMID:25856104

  3. Trends in codon and amino acid usage in Thermotoga maritima.

    PubMed

    Zavala, Alejandro; Naya, Hugo; Romero, Héctor; Musto, Héctor

    2002-05-01

    The usage of synonymous codons and the frequencies of amino acids were investigated in the complete genome of the bacterium Thermotoga maritima using a multivariate statistical approach. The GC3 content of each gene was the most prominent source of variation of codon usage. Surprisingly the usage of UGU and UGC (synonymous triplets coding for Cys, the least frequent amino acid in this species) was detected as the second most prominent source of variation. However, this result is probably an artifact due to the very low frequency of Cys together with the nonbiased composition of this genome. The third trend was related to the preferential usage of a subset of codons among highly expressed genes, and these triplets are presumed to be translationally optimal. Concerning the amino acid usage, the hydropathy level of each protein (and therefore the frequency of charged residues) was the main trend, while the second factor was related to the frequency of usage of the smaller residues, suggesting that the cell economy strongly influences the architecture of the proteins. The third axis of the analysis discriminated the usage of Phe, Tyr, Trp (aromatic residues) plus Cys, Met, and His. These six residues have in common the property of being the preferential targets of reactive oxygen species, and therefore the anaerobic condition of T. maritima is an important factor for the amino acid frequencies. Finally, the Cys content of each protein was the fourth trend. PMID:11965430

  4. Nucleotide sequence conservation in paramyxoviruses; the concept of codon constellation.

    PubMed

    Rima, Bert K

    2015-05-01

    The stability and conservation of the sequences of RNA viruses in the field and the high error rates measured in vitro are paradoxical. The field stability indicates that there are very strong selective constraints on sequence diversity. The nature of these constraints is discussed. Apart from constraints on variation in cis-acting RNA and the amino acid sequences of viral proteins, there are other ones relating to the presence of specific dinucleotides such CpG and UpA as well as the importance of RNA secondary structures and RNA degradation rates. Recent other constraints identified in other RNA viruses, such as effects of secondary RNA structure on protein folding or modification of cellular tRNA complements, are also discussed. Using the family Paramyxoviridae, I show that the codon usage pattern (CUP) is (i) specific for each virus species and (ii) that it is markedly different from the host - it does not vary even in vaccine viruses that have been derived by passage in a number of inappropriate host cells. The CUP might thus be an additional constraint on variation, and I propose the concept of codon constellation to indicate the informational content of the sequences of RNA molecules relating not only to stability and structure but also to the efficiency of translation of a viral mRNA resulting from the CUP and the numbers and position of rare codons. PMID:25406175

  5. Inducible Suppression of Global Translation by Overuse of Rare Codons

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Recently, artificial gene networks have been developed in synthetic biology to control gene expression and make organisms as controllable as robots. Here, I present an artificial posttranslational gene-silencing system based on the codon usage bias and low tRNA content corresponding to minor codons. I engineered the green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene to inhibit translation indirectly with the lowest-usage codons to monopolize various minor tRNAs (lgfp). The expression of lgfp interfered nonspecifically with the growth of Escherichia coli, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, human HeLa cervical cancer cells, MCF7 breast cancer cells, and HEK293 kidney cells, as well as phage and adenovirus expansion. Furthermore, insertion of lgfp downstream of a phage response promoter conferred phage resistance on E. coli. Such engineered gene silencers could act as components of biological networks capable of functioning with suitable promoters in E. coli, S. cerevisiae, and human cells to control gene expression. The results presented here show general suppressor artificial genes for live cells and viruses. This robust system provides a gene expression or cell growth control device for artificially synthesized gene networks. PMID:25636849

  6. Inducible suppression of global translation by overuse of rare codons.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Hideki

    2015-04-01

    Recently, artificial gene networks have been developed in synthetic biology to control gene expression and make organisms as controllable as robots. Here, I present an artificial posttranslational gene-silencing system based on the codon usage bias and low tRNA content corresponding to minor codons. I engineered the green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene to inhibit translation indirectly with the lowest-usage codons to monopolize various minor tRNAs (lgfp). The expression of lgfp interfered nonspecifically with the growth of Escherichia coli, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, human HeLa cervical cancer cells, MCF7 breast cancer cells, and HEK293 kidney cells, as well as phage and adenovirus expansion. Furthermore, insertion of lgfp downstream of a phage response promoter conferred phage resistance on E. coli. Such engineered gene silencers could act as components of biological networks capable of functioning with suitable promoters in E. coli, S. cerevisiae, and human cells to control gene expression. The results presented here show general suppressor artificial genes for live cells and viruses. This robust system provides a gene expression or cell growth control device for artificially synthesized gene networks. PMID:25636849

  7. Reselection of a Genomic Upstream Open Reading Frame in Mouse Hepatitis Coronavirus 5?-Untranslated-Region Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hung-Yi; Guan, Bo-Jhih; Su, Yu-Pin; Fan, Yi-Hsin

    2014-01-01

    An AUG-initiated upstream open reading frame (uORF) encoding a potential polypeptide of 3 to 13 amino acids (aa) is found within the 5? untranslated region (UTR) of >75% of coronavirus genomes based on 38 reference strains. Potential CUG-initiated uORFs are also found in many strains. The AUG-initiated uORF is presumably translated following genomic 5?-end cap-dependent ribosomal scanning, but its function is unknown. Here, in a reverse-genetics study with mouse hepatitis coronavirus, the following were observed. (i) When the uORF AUG-initiating codon was replaced with a UAG stop codon along with a U112A mutation to maintain a uORF-harboring stem-loop 4 structure, an unimpaired virus with wild-type (WT) growth kinetics was recovered. However, reversion was found at all mutated sites within five virus passages. (ii) When the uORF was fused with genomic (main) ORF1 by converting three in-frame stop codons to nonstop codons, a uORF-ORF1 fusion protein was made, and virus replicated at WT levels. However, a frameshifting G insertion at virus passage 7 established a slightly 5?-extended original uORF. (iii) When uAUG-eliminating deletions of 20, 30, or 51 nucleotides (nt) were made within stem-loop 4, viable but debilitated virus was recovered. However, a C80U mutation in the first mutant and an A77G mutation in the second appeared by passage 10, which generated alternate uORFs that correlated with restored WT growth kinetics. In vitro, the uORF-disrupting nondeletion mutants showed enhanced translation of the downstream ORF1 compared with the WT. These results together suggest that the uORF represses ORF1 translation yet plays a beneficial but nonessential role in coronavirus replication in cell culture. PMID:24173235

  8. Estradiol-dependent transcription initiation upstream from the chicken apoVLDLII gene coding for the very-low-density apolipoprotein II.

    PubMed

    Strijker, R; Blom van Assendelft, G; Dikkeschei, B D; Gruber, M; Ab, G

    1986-01-01

    We have investigated RNAs originating from the 5'-flanking region of the chicken very-low-density apolipoprotein II (apoVLDLII) gene. S1 nuclease mapping and primer extension experiments revealed two minor upstream transcription start points located 1105 and 1530 nucleotides in front of the apoVLDLII gene. Transcription starting at these points is dependent upon estradiol as is transcription from the major start points. The transcripts are polyadenylated, but are not detectable in polysomes. Run-on assays indicated that the low concentration of the upstream initiated transcripts is due both to low transcription levels and to low transcript stability. The sequence around the upstream start points does not show strong homologies with consensus sequences of promoters for eukaryotic protein encoding genes. Nevertheless, the upstream sequences are transcribed in vivo by RNA polymerase II. PMID:3781248

  9. Patterns of Synonymous Codon Usage on Human Metapneumovirus and Its Influencing Factors

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Qiao; Xu, Weidong; Wu, Yuanjian; Xu, Hongxing

    2012-01-01

    Human metapneumovirus (HMPV) is an important agent of acute respiratory tract infection in children, while its pathogenicity and molecular evolution are lacking. Herein, we firstly report the synonymous codon usage patterns of HMPV genome. The relative synonymous codon usage (RSCU) values, effective number of codon (ENC) values, nucleotide contents, and correlation analysis were performed among 17 available whole genome of HMPV, including different genotypes. All preferred codons in HMPV are ended with A/U nucleotide and exhibited a great association with its high proportion of these two nucleotides in their genomes. Mutation pressure rather than natural selection is the main influence factor that determines the bias of synonymous codon usage in HMPV. The complementary pattern of codon usage bias between HMPV and human cell was observed, and this phenomenon suggests that host cells might be also act as an important factor to affect the codon usage bias. Moreover, the codon usage biases in each HMPV genotypes are separated into different clades, which suggest that phylogenetic distance might involve in codon usage bias formation as well. These analyses of synonymous codon usage bias in HMPV provide more information for better understanding its evolution and pathogenicity. PMID:23193361

  10. Evolution of Advection Upstream Splitting Method Schemes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, Meng-Sing

    2010-01-01

    This paper focuses on the evolution of advection upstream splitting method(AUSM) schemes. The main ingredients that have led to the development of modern computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods have been reviewed, thus the ideas behind AUSM. First and foremost is the concept of upwinding. Second, the use of Riemann problem in constructing the numerical flux in the finite-volume setting. Third, the necessity of including all physical processes, as characterised by the linear (convection) and nonlinear (acoustic) fields. Fourth, the realisation of separating the flux into convection and pressure fluxes. The rest of this review briefly outlines the technical evolution of AUSM and more details can be found in the cited references. Keywords: Computational fluid dynamics methods, hyperbolic systems, advection upstream splitting method, conservation laws, upwinding, CFD

  11. Admissible upstream conditions for slender compressible vortices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, C. H.; Krause, E.; Menne, S.

    1986-01-01

    The influence of the compressibility on the flow in slender vortices is being studied. The dependence of the breakdown of the slender-vortex approximation on the upstream conditions is demonstrated for various Reynolds numbers and Mach numbers. Compatibility conditions, which have to be satisfied if the vortex is to remain slender, are discussed in detail. The general discussions are supplemented by several sample calculations.

  12. Comparative Analysis of Codon Usage Bias Patterns in Microsporidian Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Heng; Zhang, Ruizhi; Butler, Robert R.; Liu, Tie; Zhang, Li; Pombert, Jean-François; Zhou, Zeyang

    2015-01-01

    The sub-3 Mbp genomes from microsporidian species of the Encephalitozoon genus are the smallest known among eukaryotes and paragons of genomic reduction and compaction in parasites. However, their diminutive stature is not characteristic of all Microsporidia, whose genome sizes vary by an order of magnitude. This large variability suggests that different evolutionary forces are applied on the group as a whole. In this study, we have compared the codon usage bias (CUB) between eight taxonomically distinct microsporidian genomes: Encephalitozoon intestinalis, Encephalitozoon cuniculi, Spraguea lophii, Trachipleistophora hominis, Enterocytozoon bieneusi, Nematocida parisii, Nosema bombycis and Nosema ceranae. While the CUB was found to be weak in all eight Microsporidia, nearly all (98%) of the optimal codons in S. lophii, T. hominis, E. bieneusi, N. parisii, N. bombycis and N. ceranae are fond of A/U in third position whereas most (64.6%) optimal codons in the Encephalitozoon species E. intestinalis and E. cuniculi are biased towards G/C. Although nucleotide composition biases are likely the main factor driving the CUB in Microsporidia according to correlation analyses, directed mutational pressure also likely affects the CUB as suggested by ENc-plots, correspondence and neutrality analyses. Overall, the Encephalitozoon genomes were found to be markedly different from the other microsporidians and, despite being the first sequenced representatives of this lineage, are uncharacteristic of the group as a whole. The disparities observed cannot be attributed solely to differences in host specificity and we hypothesize that other forces are at play in the lineage leading to Encephalitozoon species. PMID:26057384

  13. Genetic code supports targeted insertion of two amino acids by one codon.

    PubMed

    Turanov, Anton A; Lobanov, Alexey V; Fomenko, Dmitri E; Morrison, Hilary G; Sogin, Mitchell L; Klobutcher, Lawrence A; Hatfield, Dolph L; Gladyshev, Vadim N

    2009-01-01

    Strict one-to-one correspondence between codons and amino acids is thought to be an essential feature of the genetic code. However, we report that one codon can code for two different amino acids with the choice of the inserted amino acid determined by a specific 3' untranslated region structure and location of the dual-function codon within the messenger RNA (mRNA). We found that the codon UGA specifies insertion of selenocysteine and cysteine in the ciliate Euplotes crassus, that the dual use of this codon can occur even within the same gene, and that the structural arrangements of Euplotes mRNA preserve location-dependent dual function of UGA when expressed in mammalian cells. Thus, the genetic code supports the use of one codon to code for multiple amino acids. PMID:19131629

  14. SCUMBLE: a method for systematic and accurate detection of codon usage bias by maximum likelihood estimation

    PubMed Central

    Kloster, Morten; Tang, Chao

    2008-01-01

    The genetic code is degenerate—most amino acids can be encoded by from two to as many as six different codons. The synonymous codons are not used with equal frequency: not only are some codons favored over others, but also their usage can vary significantly from species to species and between different genes in the same organism. Known causes of codon bias include differences in mutation rates as well as selection pressure related to the expression level of a gene, but the standard analysis methods can account for only a fraction of the observed codon usage variation. We here introduce an explicit model of codon usage bias, inspired by statistical physics. Combining this model with a maximum likelihood approach, we are able to clearly identify different sources of bias in various genomes. We have applied the algorithm to Saccharomyces cerevisiae as well as 325 prokaryote genomes, and in most cases our model explains essentially all observed variance. PMID:18495752

  15. Synonymous Codon Usage in TTSuV2: Analysis and Comparison with TTSuV1

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Dingzhen

    2013-01-01

    Two species of the DNA virus Torque teno sus virus (TTSuV), TTSuV1 and TTSuV2, have become widely distributed in pig-farming countries in recent years. In this study, we performed a comprehensive analysis of synonymous codon usage bias in 41 available TTSuV2 coding sequences (CDS), and compared the codon usage patterns of TTSuV2 and TTSuV1. TTSuV codon usage patterns were found to be phylogenetically conserved. Values for the effective number of codons (ENC) indicated that the overall extent of codon usage bias in both TTSuV2 and TTSuV1 was not significant, the most frequently occurring codons had an A or C at the third codon position. Correspondence analysis (COA) was performed and TTSuV2 and TTSuV1 sequences were located in different quadrants of the first two major axes. A plot of the ENC revealed that compositional constraint was the major factor determining the codon usage bias for TTSuV2. In addition, hierarchical cluster analysis of 41 TTSuV2 isolates based on relative synonymous codon usage (RSCU) values suggested that there was no association between geographic distribution and codon bias of TTSuV2 sequences. Finally, the comparison of RSCU for TTSuV2, TTSuV1 and the corresponding host sequence indicated that the codon usage pattern of TTSuV2 was similar to that of TTSuV1. However the similarity was low for each virus and its host. These conclusions provide important insight into the synonymous codon usage pattern of TTSuV2, as well as better understangding of the molecular evolution of TTSuV2 genomes. PMID:24303050

  16. Eukaryotic Evolutionary Transitions Are Associated with Extreme Codon Bias in Functionally-Related Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Hudson, Nicholas J.; Gu, Quan; Nagaraj, Shivashankar H.; Ding, Yong-Sheng; Dalrymple, Brian P.; Reverter, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    Codon bias in the genome of an organism influences its phenome by changing the speed and efficiency of mRNA translation and hence protein abundance. We hypothesized that differences in codon bias, either between-species differences in orthologous genes, or within-species differences between genes, may play an evolutionary role. To explore this hypothesis, we compared the genome-wide codon bias in six species that occupy vital positions in the Eukaryotic Tree of Life. We acquired the entire protein coding sequences for these organisms, computed the codon bias for all genes in each organism and explored the output for relationships between codon bias and protein function, both within- and between-lineages. We discovered five notable coordinated patterns, with extreme codon bias most pronounced in traits considered highly characteristic of a given lineage. Firstly, the Homo sapiens genome had stronger codon bias for DNA-binding transcription factors than the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome, whereas the opposite was true for ribosomal proteins – perhaps underscoring transcriptional regulation in the origin of complexity. Secondly, both mammalian species examined possessed extreme codon bias in genes relating to hair – a tissue unique to mammals. Thirdly, Arabidopsis thaliana showed extreme codon bias in genes implicated in cell wall formation and chloroplast function – which are unique to plants. Fourthly, Gallus gallus possessed strong codon bias in a subset of genes encoding mitochondrial proteins – perhaps reflecting the enhanced bioenergetic efficiency in birds that co-evolved with flight. And lastly, the G. gallus genome had extreme codon bias for the Ciliary Neurotrophic Factor – which may help to explain their spontaneous recovery from deafness. We propose that extreme codon bias in groups of genes that encode functionally related proteins has a pathway-level energetic explanation. PMID:21966531

  17. Control of ribosome traffic by position-dependent choice of synonymous codons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitarai, Namiko; Pedersen, Steen

    2013-10-01

    Messenger RNA (mRNA) encodes a sequence of amino acids by using codons. For most amino acids, there are multiple synonymous codons that can encode the amino acid. The translation speed can vary from one codon to another, thus there is room for changing the ribosome speed while keeping the amino acid sequence and hence the resulting protein. Recently, it has been noticed that the choice of the synonymous codon, via the resulting distribution of slow- and fast-translated codons, affects not only on the average speed of one ribosome translating the mRNA but also might have an effect on nearby ribosomes by affecting the appearance of ‘traffic jams’ where multiple ribosomes collide and form queues. To test this ‘context effect’ further, we here investigate the effect of the sequence of synonymous codons on the ribosome traffic by using a ribosome traffic model with codon-dependent rates, estimated from experiments. We compare the ribosome traffic on wild-type (WT) sequences and sequences where the synonymous codons were swapped randomly. By simulating translation of 87 genes, we demonstrate that the WT sequences, especially those with a high bias in codon usage, tend to have the ability to reduce ribosome collisions, hence optimizing the cellular investment in the translation apparatus. The magnitude of such reduction of the translation time might have a significant impact on the cellular growth rate and thereby have importance for the survival of the species.

  18. Codon 219 polymorphism of PRNP in healthy caucasians and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease patients

    SciTech Connect

    Petraroli, R.; Pocchiari, M.

    1996-04-01

    A number of point and insert mutations of the PrP gene (PRNP) have been linked to familial Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) and Gerstmann-Straussler-Scheinker disease (GSS). Moreover, the methionine/valine homozygosity at the polymorphic codon 129 of PRNP may cause a predisposition to sporadic and iatrogenic CJD or may control the age at onset of familial cases carrying either the 144-bp insertion or codon 178, codon 198, and codon 210 pathogenic mutations in PRNP. In addition, the association of methionine or valine at codon 129 and the point mutation at codon 178 on the same allele seem to play an important role in determining either fatal familial insomnia or CJD. However, it is noteworthy that a relationship between codon 129 polymorphism and accelerated pathogenesis (early age at onset or shorter duration of the disease) has not been seen in familial CJD patients with codon 200 mutation or in GSS patients with codon 102 mutation, arguing that other, as yet unidentified, gene products or environmental factors, or both, may influence the clinical expression of these diseases. 17 refs.

  19. Analysis of synonymous codon usage in spike protein gene of infectious bronchitis virus.

    PubMed

    Makhija, Aditi; Kumar, Sachin

    2015-12-01

    Infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) is responsible for causing respiratory, renal, and urogenital diseases in poultry. IBV infection in poultry leads to high mortality rates in affected flocks and to severe economic losses due to a drop in egg production and a reduced gain in live weight of the broiler birds. IBV-encoded spike protein (S) is the major protective immunogen for the host. Although the functions of the S protein have been well studied, the factors shaping synonymous codon usage bias and nucleotide composition in the S gene have not been reported yet. In the present study, we analyzed the relative synonymous codon usage and effective number of codons (Nc) using the 53 IBV S genes. The major trend in codon usage variation was studied using correspondence analysis. The plot of Nc values against GC3 as well as the correlation between base composition and codon usage bias suggest that mutational pressure rather than natural selection is the main factor that determines the codon usage bias in the S gene. Interestingly, no association of aromaticity, degree of hydrophobicity, and aliphatic index was observed with the codon usage variation in IBV S genes. The study represents a comprehensive analysis of IBV S gene codon usage patterns and provides a basic understanding of the codon usage bias. PMID:26452019

  20. Control of ribosome traffic by position-dependent choice of synonymous codons

    E-print Network

    Namiko Mitarai; Steen Pedersen

    2013-09-04

    Messenger RNA encodes a sequence of amino acids by using codons. For most amino acids there are multiple synonymous codons that can encode the amino acid. The translation speed can vary from one codon to another, thus there is room for changing the ribosome speed while keeping the amino acid sequence and hence the resulting protein. Recently, it has been noticed that the choice of the synonymous codon, via the resulting distribution of slow- and fast-translated codons, affects not only on the average speed of one ribosome translating the messenger RNA (mRNA) but also might have an effect on nearby ribosomes by affecting the appearance of "traffic jams" where multiple ribosomes collide and form queues. To test this "context effect" further, we here investigate the effect of the sequence of synonymous codons on the ribosome traffic by using a ribosome traffic model with codon-dependent rates, estimated from experiments. We compare the ribosome traffic on wild type sequences and sequences where the synonymous codons were swapped randomly. By simulating translation of 87 genes, we demonstrate that the wild type sequences, especially those with a high bias in codon usage, tend to have the ability to reduce ribosome collisions, hence optimizing the cellular investment in the translation apparatus. The magnitude of such reduction of the translation time might have a significant impact on the cellular growth rate and thereby have importance for the survival of the species.

  1. Intragenic spatial patterns of codon usage bias in prokaryotic and eukaryotic Hong Qin*,1

    E-print Network

    Wu, Wei-Biao

    1 Intragenic spatial patterns of codon usage bias in prokaryotic and eukaryotic genomes Hong Qin*,1, Sulfolobus tokodaii, and Thermotoga maritima) and two eukaryotic (Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Drosophila

  2. p53 codon 72 polymorphism and risk of cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Ojeda, José M; Ampuero, Sandra; Rojas, Patricio; Prado, Rodrigo; Allende, Jorge E; Barton, Sara A; Chakraborty, Ranajit; Rothhammer, Francisco

    2003-01-01

    Storey et al. (1998) implicated the proline/argine polymorphism of the codon 72 of the tumor-suppressor gene p53 in the development of cervical cancer (CC) with the observation that the p53 protein is more efficiently inactivated by the E6 oncoprotein of human papillomavirus in p53 arginine as compared with its proline isoform. These authors further noted that in the United Kingdom, individuals homozygous for the arginine allele were several times more susceptible to HPV-associated tumorigenesis that proline/arginine heterozygotes. Subsequent studies in different countries failed to unanimously confirm this association. Motivated by the high incidence of CC in Chile, we undertook a case control study obtaining the following frequencies for genotypes PP, AP and AA in 60 ICC cases and 53 carefully selected controls: 0.067, 0.250, 0.683 and 0.075, 0.453, 0.472 respectively. A significant difference (X2 = 3.19 p < 0.02) and an odds ratio of 2.62 supported Storey et al (1998)'s results. In addition, rejecting previous hypotheses about the world distribution of the p53 codon 72 polymorphism, we conclude that this distribution most likely represents ancient human dispersal routes. Several methodological and biological explanations for the results obtained in previous negative association studies are briefly discussed. PMID:14513722

  3. Prion protein gene analysis in three kindreds with fatal familial insomnia (FFI): Codon 178 mutation and codon 129 polymorphism

    SciTech Connect

    Medori, R.; Tritschler, H.J. )

    1993-10-01

    Fatal familial insomnia (FFI) is a disease linked to a GAC(Asp) [yields] AAC(Asn) mutation in codon 178 of the prion protein (PrP) gene. FFI is characterized clinically by untreatable progressive insomnia, dysautonomia, and motor dysfunctions and is characterized pathologically by selective thalamic atrophy. The authors confirmed the 178[sup Asn] mutation in the PrP gene of a third FFI family of French ancestry. Three family members who are under 40 years of age and who inherited the mutation showed only reduced perfusion in the basal ganglia on single photon emission computerized tomography. Some FFI features differ from the clinical and neuropathologic findings associated with 178[sup Asn] reported elsewhere. However, additional intragenic mutations accounting for the phenotypic differences were not observed in two affected individuals. In other sporadic and familial forms of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and Gerstmann-Straeussler syndrome, Met or Val homozygosity at polymorphic codon 129 is associated with a more severe phenotype, younger age at onset, and faster progression. In FFI, young and old individuals at disease onset had 129[sup Met/Val]. Moreover, of five 178[sup Asn] individuals who are above age-at-onset range and who are well, two have 129[sup Met] and three have 129[sup Met/Val], suggesting that polymorphic site 129 does not modulate FFI phenotypic expression. Genetic heterogeneity and environment may play an important role in inter- and intrafamilial variability of the 178[sup Asn] mutation. 32 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Codon Usage Patterns in Corynebacterium glutamicum: Mutational Bias, Natural Selection and Amino Acid Conservation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guiming; Wu, Jinyu; Yang, Huanming; Bao, Qiyu

    2010-01-01

    The alternative synonymous codons in Corynebacterium glutamicum, a well-known bacterium used in industry for the production of amino acid, have been investigated by multivariate analysis. As C. glutamicum is a GC-rich organism, G and C are expected to predominate at the third position of codons. Indeed, overall codon usage analyses have indicated that C and/or G ending codons are predominant in this organism. Through multivariate statistical analysis, apart from mutational selection, we identified three other trends of codon usage variation among the genes. Firstly, the majority of highly expressed genes are scattered towards the positive end of the first axis, whereas the majority of lowly expressed genes are clustered towards the other end of the first axis. Furthermore, the distinct difference in the two sets of genes was that the C ending codons are predominate in putatively highly expressed genes, suggesting that the C ending codons are translationally optimal in this organism. Secondly, the majority of the putatively highly expressed genes have a tendency to locate on the leading strand, which indicates that replicational and transciptional selection might be invoked. Thirdly, highly expressed genes are more conserved than lowly expressed genes by synonymous and nonsynonymous substitutions among orthologous genes fromthe genomes of C. glutamicum and C. diphtheriae. We also analyzed other factors such as the length of genes and hydrophobicity that might influence codon usage and found their contributions to be weak. PMID:20445740

  5. New insights into the interplay between codon bias determinants in plants

    PubMed Central

    Camiolo, S.; Melito, S.; Porceddu, A.

    2015-01-01

    Codon bias is the non-random use of synonymous codons, a phenomenon that has been observed in species as diverse as bacteria, plants and mammals. The preferential use of particular synonymous codons may reflect neutral mechanisms (e.g. mutational bias, G|C-biased gene conversion, genetic drift) and/or selection for mRNA stability, translational efficiency and accuracy. The extent to which these different factors influence codon usage is unknown, so we dissected the contribution of mutational bias and selection towards codon bias in genes from 15 eudicots, 4 monocots and 2 mosses. We analysed the frequency of mononucleotides, dinucleotides and trinucleotides and investigated whether the compositional genomic background could account for the observed codon usage profiles. Neutral forces such as mutational pressure and G|C-biased gene conversion appeared to underlie most of the observed codon bias, although there was also evidence for the selection of optimal translational efficiency and mRNA folding. Our data confirmed the compositional differences between monocots and dicots, with the former featuring in general a lower background compositional bias but a higher overall codon bias. PMID:26546225

  6. New insights into the interplay between codon bias determinants in plants.

    PubMed

    Camiolo, S; Melito, S; Porceddu, A

    2015-12-01

    Codon bias is the non-random use of synonymous codons, a phenomenon that has been observed in species as diverse as bacteria, plants and mammals. The preferential use of particular synonymous codons may reflect neutral mechanisms (e.g. mutational bias, G|C-biased gene conversion, genetic drift) and/or selection for mRNA stability, translational efficiency and accuracy. The extent to which these different factors influence codon usage is unknown, so we dissected the contribution of mutational bias and selection towards codon bias in genes from 15 eudicots, 4 monocots and 2 mosses. We analysed the frequency of mononucleotides, dinucleotides and trinucleotides and investigated whether the compositional genomic background could account for the observed codon usage profiles. Neutral forces such as mutational pressure and G|C-biased gene conversion appeared to underlie most of the observed codon bias, although there was also evidence for the selection of optimal translational efficiency and mRNA folding. Our data confirmed the compositional differences between monocots and dicots, with the former featuring in general a lower background compositional bias but a higher overall codon bias. PMID:26546225

  7. Codon Usage Influences the Local Rate of Translation Elongation to Regulate Co-translational Protein Folding.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chien-Hung; Dang, Yunkun; Zhou, Zhipeng; Wu, Cheng; Zhao, Fangzhou; Sachs, Matthew S; Liu, Yi

    2015-09-01

    Codon usage bias is a universal feature of eukaryotic and prokaryotic genomes and has been proposed to regulate translation efficiency, accuracy, and protein folding based on the assumption that codon usage affects translation dynamics. The roles of codon usage in translation, however, are not clear and have been challenged by recent ribosome profiling studies. Here we used a Neurospora cell-free translation system to directly monitor the velocity of mRNA translation. We demonstrated that the preferred codons enhance the rate of translation elongation, whereas non-optimal codons slow elongation. Codon usage also controls ribosome traffic on mRNA. These conclusions were supported by ribosome profiling results in vitro and in vivo with template mRNAs designed to increase the signal-to-noise ratio. Finally, we demonstrate that codon usage regulates protein function by affecting co-translational protein folding. These results resolve a long-standing fundamental question and suggest the existence of a codon usage code for protein folding. PMID:26321254

  8. TRENDS IN CODON AND AMINO ACID USAGE IN HUMAN PATHOGEN TROPHERYMA WHIPPLEI, THE ONLY KNOWN

    E-print Network

    Wong, Limsoon

    TRENDS IN CODON AND AMINO ACID USAGE IN HUMAN PATHOGEN TROPHERYMA WHIPPLEI, THE ONLY KNOWN Institute of Chemical Biology, Kolkata ­700032, India The factors governing codon and amino acid usages pressure has little influence on the amino acid usage, for which the mean hydropathy level and aromaticity

  9. Gene expression level influences amino acid usage, but not codon usage, in the tsetse fly

    E-print Network

    Herbeck, Joshua

    Gene expression level influences amino acid usage, but not codon usage, in the tsetse fly and genetic drift shape synonymous codon usage and amino acid usage of Wigglesworthia. The results show across the genome also drives relative amino acid usage, but predicted high-expression genes (ribosomal

  10. Short spacing between the Shine-Dalgarno sequence and P codon destabilizes codon-anticodon pairing in the P site to promote +1 programmed frameshifting

    PubMed Central

    Devaraj, Aishwarya; Fredrick, Kurt

    2010-01-01

    Summary Programmed frameshifting in the RF2 gene (prfB) involves an intragenic Shine-Dalgarno (SD) sequence. To investigate the role of SD-ASD pairing in the mechanism of frameshifting, we have analyzed the effect of spacing between the SD sequence and P codon on P-site tRNA binding and RF2-dependent termination. When the spacing between an extended SD sequence and the P codon is decreased from 4 to 1 nucleotides (nt), the dissociation rate (koff) for P-site tRNA increases by >100-fold. Toeprinting analysis shows that pretranslocation complexes cannot be formed when the spacer sequence is ? 2 nt. Instead, the tRNA added secondarily to fill the A site and its corresponding codon move spontaneously into the P site, resulting in a complex with a 3-nt longer spacer between the SD-ASD helix and the P codon. While close proximity of the SD clearly destabilizes P-site tRNA, RF2-dependent termination and EF-Tu-dependent decoding are largely unaffected in analogous complexes. These data support a model in which formation of the SD-ASD helix in ribosomes stalled at the in-frame UGA codon of prfB generates tension on the mRNA that destabilizes codon-anticodon pairing in the P site and promotes slippage of the mRNA in the 5? direction. PMID:21143320

  11. INFLUENCE OF UPSTREAM WIND SHEAR AND TURBULENCE ON THE WIND PATTERN AND POLLUTANT CONCENTRATING WITHIN STREET CANYONS: A NUMERICAL STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study serves as a start of future research on the subject. his study shows that the canyon geometry and the upstream boundary conditions have significant influences on the flow and concentration fields in the vicinity of urban street canyons. ollutants emitted within a canyo...

  12. An empirical test of the concomitantly variable codon hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Merlo, Lauren M. F.; Lunzer, Mark; Dean, Antony M.

    2007-01-01

    A central assumption of models of molecular evolution, that each site in a sequence evolves independently of all other sites, lacks empirical support. We investigated the extent to which sites evolve codependently in triosephosphate isomerase (TIM), a ubiquitous glycolytic enzyme conserved in both structure and function. Codependencies among sites, or concomitantly variable codons (covarions), are evident from the reduced function and misfolding of hybrid TIM proteins. Although they exist, we find covarions are relatively rare, and closely related proteins are unlikely to have developed them. However, the potential for covarions increases with genetic distance so that highly divergent proteins may have evolved codependencies between many sites. The evolution of covarions undermines a key assumption in phylogenetics and calls into question our ability to disentangle ancient relationships among major taxonomic groups. PMID:17578921

  13. TP53 codon 72 polymorphisms in favorable histology Wilms tumors.

    PubMed

    Cost, Nicholas G; Mitui, Midori; Khokhar, Shama; Wickiser, Jonathan E; Baker, Linda A; Rakheja, Dinesh

    2012-08-01

    In Wilms tumor (WT), mutations in the gene encoding p53, TP53, are correlated with anaplasia; however TP53 variants have not been studied in favorable histology (FH) WTs. A single nucleotide polymorphism of TP53 encoding either arginine or proline at codon 72 is suggested to alter in vitro p53 behavior. Therefore, we analyzed tissue from 23 consecutive patients with FHWT to determine allelic and genotypic frequencies of Pro72 and Arg72 variants and correlate this with clinical outcomes. Interestingly, our cohort showed a statistically significant over-representation of the Arg allele and Arg/Arg genotype. However, the genotypic and allelic frequencies showed no significant correlation with age, stage, or disease recurrence. PMID:22052810

  14. When a ribosome encounters a premature termination codon.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jungwook; Kim, Yoon Ki

    2013-01-01

    In mammalian cells, aberrant transcripts harboring a premature termination codon (PTC) can be generated by abnormal or inefficient biogenesis of mRNAs or by somatic mutation. Truncated polypeptides synthesized from these aberrant transcripts could be toxic to normal cellular functions. However, mammalian cells have evolved sophisticated mechanisms for monitoring the quality of mRNAs. The faulty transcripts harboring PTC are subject to nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD), nonsense-mediated translational repression (NMTR), nonsense-associated alternative splicing (NAS), or nonsense-mediated transcriptional gene silencing (NMTGS). In this review, we briefly outline the molecular characteristics of each pathway and suggest mRNA quality control mechanisms as a means to regulate normal gene expression. PMID:23351378

  15. Importance of codon usage for the temporal regulation of viral gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Young C.; Bischof, Georg F.; Lauer, William A.; Desrosiers, Ronald C.

    2015-01-01

    The glycoproteins of herpesviruses and of HIV/SIV are made late in the replication cycle and are derived from transcripts that use an unusual codon usage that is quite different from that of the host cell. Here we show that the actions of natural transinducers from these two different families of persistent viruses (Rev of SIV and ORF57 of the rhesus monkey rhadinovirus) are dependent on the nature of the skewed codon usage. In fact, the transinducibility of expression of these glycoproteins by Rev and by ORF57 can be flipped simply by changing the nature of the codon usage. Even expression of a luciferase reporter could be made Rev dependent or ORF57 dependent by distinctive changes to its codon usage. Our findings point to a new general principle in which different families of persisting viruses use a poor codon usage that is skewed in a distinctive way to temporally regulate late expression of structural gene products. PMID:26504241

  16. Genetic code supports targeted insertion of two amino acids by one codon

    PubMed Central

    Turanov, Anton A.; Lobanov, Alexey V.; Fomenko, Dmitri E.; Morrison, Hilary G.; Sogin, Mitchell L.; Klobutcher, Lawrence A.; Hatfield, Dolph L.; Gladyshev, Vadim N.

    2011-01-01

    Strict one-to-one correspondence between codons and amino acids is thought to be an essential feature of the genetic code. However, here we report that one codon can code for two different amino acids with the choice of the inserted amino acid determined by a specific 3?-UTR structure and location of the dual-function codon within the mRNA. We found that UGA specifies insertion of selenocysteine and cysteine in the ciliate Euplotes crassus, that the dual use of this codon can occur even within the same gene, and that the structural arrangements of Euplotes mRNA preserve location-dependent dual function of UGA when expressed in mammalian cells. Thus, the genetic code supports the use of one codon to code for multiple amino acids. PMID:19131629

  17. Moving stormwater P management upstream (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, L. A.; Hobbie, S. E.; Finlay, J. C.; Kalinosky, P.; Janke, B.

    2013-12-01

    Reducing stormwater phosphorus loading using current approaches, which focus on treatment at the end of the pipe, is unlikely to reduce P loads enough to restore nutrient-impaired urban lakes. An indication of this is that of the nearly 150 nutrient impaired lakes in the Twin Cities region, only one has been restored. We hypothesize that substantial reduction of eutrophication will require reductions of P inputs upstream from storm drains. Developing source reduction strategies will required a shift in thinking about system boundaries, moving upstream from the storm drain to the curb, and from the curb to the watershed. Our Prior Lake Street Sweeping Project, a 2-year study of enhanced street sweeping, will be used to illustrate the idea of moving the system boundary to the curb. This study showed that P load recovery from sweeping increases with both sweeping frequency and overhead tree canopy cover. For high canopy streets, coarse organic material (tree leaves; seed pods, etc.) comprised 42% of swept material. We estimate that P inputs from trees may be half of measured storm P yields in 8 urban catchments in St. Paul, MN. Moreover, the cost of removing P during autumn was often < 100/pound P, compared with > 1000/lb P for stormwater ponds. We can also move further upstream, to the watershed boundary. P inputs to urban watersheds that enter lawns include lawn fertilizer, polyphosphates added to water supplies (and hence to lawns via irrigation), and pet food (transformed to pet waste). Minnesota enacted a lawn P fertilizer restriction in 2003, but early reductions in stormwater P loads were modest, probably reflecting reduction in direct wash-off of applied fertilizer. Because urban soils are enriched in P, growing turf has continued to extract available soil P. When turf is mowed, cut grass decomposes, generating P in runoff. As soil P becomes depleted, P concentrations in lawn runoff will gradually decline. Preliminary modeling suggests that substantial reductions in P export from lawns may take a decade or more. Our Twin Cities Household Ecosystem Project has shown that with the P fertilizer law in effect, the main source of P to lawns is now pet wastes left on lawns. Among lawns, P export to streets is likely highly disproportionate, depending on both social factors such as fertilization rates (even for N) and mulching; and biophysical factors such as slope and soil texture. Modeling these fluxes at the lawn scale could be used to target high-risk sites and tailor messages to homeowners that match their lawn management goals. In summary, urban ecologists and engineers are rethinking strategies for reducing urban P inputs to surface waters. As we develop better understanding of flowpaths of P through urban watersheds, we can use this knowledge to move P reduction strategies upstream, shifting the focus from removing P from stormwater to preventing it from entering stormwater in the first place.

  18. Suprathermal ions upstream from interplanetary shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gosling, J. T.; Bame, S. J.; Feldman, W. C.; Paschmann, G.; Sckopke, N.; Russell, C. T.

    1984-01-01

    Low energy (10 eV-30 keV) observations of suprathermal ions ahead of outward propagating interplanetary shock waves (ISQ) are reported. The data were taken with the fast plasma experiment on ISEE 1 and 2 during 17 events. Structure was more evident in the suprathermal ion distribution in the earth bow shock region than in the upstream region. Isotropic distributions were only observed ahead of ISW, although field alignment, kidney-bean distributions, ion shells in velocity space and bunches of gyrating ions were not. The data suggest that the solar wind ions are accelerated to suprathermal energies in the vicinity of the shocks, which feature low and subcritical Mach numbers at 1 AU.

  19. Codon bias and gene expression of mitochondrial ND2 gene in chordates

    PubMed Central

    Uddin, Arif; Mazumder, Tarikul Huda; Choudhury, Monisha Nath; Chakraborty, Supriyo

    2015-01-01

    Background: Mitochondrial ND gene, which encodes NADH dehydrogenase, is the first enzyme of the mitochondrial electron transport chain. Leigh syndrome, a neurodegenerative disease caused by mutation in the ND2 gene (T4681C), is associated with bilateral symmetric lesions in basal ganglia and subcortical brain regions. Therefore, it is of interest to analyze mitochondrial DNA to glean information for evolutionary relationship. This study highlights on the analysis of compositional dynamics and selection pressure in shaping the codon usage patterns in the coding sequence of MT-ND2 gene across pisces, aves and mammals by using bioinformatics tools like effective number of codons (ENC), codon adaptation index (CAI), relative synonymous codon usage (RSCU) etc. Results: We observed a low codon usage bias as reflected by high ENC values in MT-ND2 gene among pisces, aves and mammals. The most frequently used codons were ending with A/C at the 3rd position of codon and the gene was AT rich in all the three classes. The codons TCA, CTA, CGA and TGA were over represented in all three classes. The F1 correspondence showed significant positive correlation with G, T3 and CAI while the F2 axis showed significant negative correlation with A and T but significant positive correlation with G, C, G3, C3, ENC, GC, GC1, GC2 and GC3. Conclusions: The codon usage bias in MTND2 gene is not associated with expression level. Mutation pressure and natural selection affect the codon usage pattern in MT-ND 2 gene. PMID:26420922

  20. Evolutionary characterization of Tembusu virus infection through identification of codon usage patterns.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hao; Yan, Bing; Chen, Shun; Wang, Mingshu; Jia, Renyong; Cheng, Anchun

    2015-10-01

    Tembusu virus (TMUV) is a single-stranded, positive-sense RNA virus. As reported, TMUV infection has resulted in significant poultry losses, and the virus may also pose a threat to public health. To characterize TMUV evolutionarily and to understand the factors accounting for codon usage properties, we performed, for the first time, a comprehensive analysis of codon usage bias for the genomes of 60 TMUV strains. The most recently published TMUV strains were found to be widely distributed in coastal cities of southeastern China. Codon preference among TMUV genomes exhibits a low bias (effective number of codons (ENC)=53.287) and is maintained at a stable level. ENC-GC3 plots and the high correlation between composition constraints and principal component factor analysis of codon usage demonstrated that mutation pressure dominates over natural selection pressure in shaping the TMUV coding sequence composition. The high correlation between the major components of the codon usage pattern and hydrophobicity (Gravy) or aromaticity (Aromo) was obvious, indicating that properties of viral proteins also account for the observed variation in TMUV codon usage. Principal component analysis (PCA) showed that CQW1 isolated from Chongqing may have evolved from GX2013H or GX2013G isolated from Guangxi, thus indicating that TMUV likely disseminated from southeastern China to the mainland. Moreover, the preferred codons encoding eight amino acids were consistent with the optimal codons for human cells, indicating that TMUV may pose a threat to public health due to possible cross-species transmission (birds to birds or birds to humans). The results of this study not only have theoretical value for uncovering the characteristics of synonymous codon usage patterns in TMUV genomes but also have significant meaning with regard to the molecular evolutionary tendencies of TMUV. PMID:26205688

  1. Evidence for Stabilizing Selection on Codon Usage in Chromosomal Rearrangements of Drosophila pseudoobscura

    PubMed Central

    Fuller, Zachary L.; Haynes, Gwilym D.; Zhu, Dianhui; Batterton, Matthew; Chao, Hsu; Dugan, Shannon; Javaid, Mehwish; Jayaseelan, Joy C.; Lee, Sandra; Li, Mingmei; Ongeri, Fiona; Qi, Sulan; Han, Yi; Doddapaneni, Harshavardhan; Richards, Stephen; Schaeffer, Stephen W.

    2014-01-01

    There has been a renewed interest in investigating the role of stabilizing selection acting on genome-wide traits such as codon usage bias. Codon bias, when synonymous codons are used at unequal frequencies, occurs in a wide variety of taxa. Standard evolutionary models explain the maintenance of codon bias through a balance of genetic drift, mutation and weak purifying selection. The efficacy of selection is expected to be reduced in regions of suppressed recombination. Contrary to observations in Drosophila melanogaster, some recent studies have failed to detect a relationship between the recombination rate, intensity of selection acting at synonymous sites, and the magnitude of codon bias as predicted under these standard models. Here, we examined codon bias in 2798 protein coding loci on the third chromosome of D. pseudoobscura using whole-genome sequences of 47 individuals, representing five common third chromosome gene arrangements. Fine-scale recombination maps were constructed using more than 1 million segregating sites. As expected, recombination was demonstrated to be significantly suppressed between chromosome arrangements, allowing for a direct examination of the relationship between recombination, selection, and codon bias. As with other Drosophila species, we observe a strong mutational bias away from the most frequently used codons. We find the rate of synonymous and nonsynonymous polymorphism is variable between different amino acids. However, we do not observe a reduction in codon bias or the strength of selection in regions of suppressed recombination as expected. Instead, we find that the interaction between weak stabilizing selection and mutational bias likely plays a role in shaping the composition of synonymous codons across the third chromosome in D. pseudoobscura. PMID:25326424

  2. STARTING EXCAVATION PIER 2. This view is roughly northeast, with ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    STARTING EXCAVATION PIER 2. This view is roughly northeast, with Pier 2 on the Trinity County end of the bridge. The old suspension bridge, at upper right, was upstream of new bridge - South Fork Trinity River Bridge, State Highway 299 spanning South Fork Trinity River, Salyer, Trinity County, CA

  3. Absence of TP53 codon 249 mutations in young Guinean children with high aflatoxin exposure.

    PubMed

    Turner, Paul C; Sylla, Abdoulaye; Kuang, Shuang-Yuan; Marchant, Clare L; Diallo, Mamadou S; Hall, Andrew J; Groopman, John D; Wild, Christopher P

    2005-08-01

    Infection with hepatitis viruses and chronic exposure to high levels of dietary aflatoxins are the major etiologic agents for hepatocellular carcinoma in west Africa. A challenge for the prevention of hepatocellular carcinoma in this region is that both hepatitis B virus and aflatoxin exposures start early in life; indeed, aflatoxin exposures can start in utero and continue unabated throughout childhood. A mutation in the TP53 tumor suppressor gene at codon 249 (TP53 Ser249 mutation) has been reported previously for hepatocellular carcinoma tumors and matched plasma DNA samples in individuals from areas with high aflatoxin exposure. We examined whether the TP53 Ser249 mutation could be observed in DNA found in plasma of young children (ages 2-5 years) from Guinea, west Africa, a region of high aflatoxin exposure. Plasma aflatoxin-albumin adducts were present in 119 of 124 (96%) of the children, geometric mean of positives 9.9 pg/mg albumin (95% confidence interval, 8.8-11.0 pg/mg). This is the level and prevalence of exposure observed previously in adults. Following PCR amplification of plasma-derived DNA and detection using mass spectrometry, none of the samples were found to contain the TP53 Ser249 mutation. Because approximately 50% of the hepatocellular carcinomas in adults in west Africa have this specific TP53 Ser249 mutation, a lack of detection in samples from children ages <5 years may indicate that a window of opportunity for intervention exists that could be exploited to lower hepatocellular carcinoma risk. PMID:16103461

  4. The 17 nucleotides downstream from the env gene stop codon are important for murine leukemia virus packaging.

    PubMed

    Yu, S S; Kim, J M; Kim, S

    2000-09-01

    We have identified a previously unknown nucleotide sequence important for the packaging of murine leukemia virus. This nucleotide sequence is located downstream from the stop codon of the env gene but does not overlap the polypurine tract. Deletion of 17 bp from this region resulted in a more than 10-fold decrease in viral titer. Consistent with this result, the deletion mutant showed a 20- to 30-fold drop in the amount of virion RNA in the culture supernatant. The total amount of virion protein in the culture supernatant was comparable for the deletion mutant and the parental virus, suggesting that the mutant construct could release the empty viral particles. These results suggested that the packaging signal sequence might be present at the two extreme sites of the viral genome, one in the region around the splice donor sequence downstream from the 5' long terminal repeat (LTR) and the other immediately upstream from the 3' LTR. Implications for gene therapy, especially in regard to construction of retroviral vectors and packaging constructs, are discussed. PMID:10954583

  5. Gaining Insights into the Codon Usage Patterns of TP53 Gene across Eight Mammalian Species

    PubMed Central

    Mazumder, Tarikul Huda; Chakraborty, Supriyo

    2015-01-01

    TP53 gene is known as the “guardian of the genome” as it plays a vital role in regulating cell cycle, cell proliferation, DNA damage repair, initiation of programmed cell death and suppressing tumor growth. Non uniform usage of synonymous codons for a specific amino acid during translation of protein known as codon usage bias (CUB) is a unique property of the genome and shows species specific deviation. Analysis of codon usage bias with compositional dynamics of coding sequences has contributed to the better understanding of the molecular mechanism and the evolution of a particular gene. In this study, the complete nucleotide coding sequences of TP53 gene from eight different mammalian species were used for CUB analysis. Our results showed that the codon usage patterns in TP53 gene across different mammalian species has been influenced by GC bias particularly GC3 and a moderate bias exists in the codon usage of TP53 gene. Moreover, we observed that nature has highly favored the most over represented codon CTG for leucine amino acid but selected against the ATA codon for isoleucine in TP53 gene across all mammalian species during the course of evolution. PMID:25807269

  6. Analysis of Codon Usage Patterns in Herbaceous Peony (Paeonia lactiflora Pall.) Based on Transcriptome Data

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yanqing; Zhao, Daqiu; Tao, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Codon usage bias, which exists in many genomes, is mainly determined by mutation and selection. To elucidate the genetic features and evolutionary history of herbaceous peony (Paeonia lactiflora), a well-known symbol of prosperity in China, we examined synonymous codon usage in 24,216 reconstructed genes from the P. lactiflora transcriptome. The mean GC content was 44.4%, indicating that the nucleotide content of P. lactiflora genes is slightly AT rich and GC poor. The P. lactiflora genome has a wide range of GC3 (GC content at the third synonymous codon position) distribution, with a significant correlation between GC12 and GC3. ENC (effective number of codons) analysis suggested that mutational bias played a major role in shaping codon usage. Parity Rule 2 (PR2) analysis revealed that GC and AU were not used proportionally. We identified 22 “optimal codons”, most ending with an A or U. Our results suggested that nucleotide composition mutation bias and translational selection were the main driving factors of codon usage bias in P. lactiflora. These results lay the foundation for exploring the evolutionary mechanisms and heterologous expression of functionally-important proteins in P. lactiflora. PMID:26506393

  7. Thermophilic prokaryotes have characteristic patterns of codon usage, amino acid composition and nucleotide content.

    PubMed

    Singer, Gregory A C; Hickey, Donal A

    2003-10-23

    A number of recent studies have shown that thermophilic prokaryotes have distinguishable patterns of both synonymous codon usage and amino acid composition, indicating the action of natural selection related to thermophily. On the other hand, several other studies of whole genomes have illustrated that nucleotide bias can have dramatic effects on synonymous codon usage and also on the amino acid composition of the encoded proteins. This raises the possibility that the thermophile-specific patterns observed at both the codon and protein levels are merely reflections of a single underlying effect at the level of nucleotide composition. Moreover, such an effect at the nucleotide level might be due entirely to mutational bias. In this study, we have compared the genomes of thermophiles and mesophiles at three levels: nucleotide content, codon usage and amino acid composition. Our results indicate that the genomes of thermophiles are distinguishable from mesophiles at all three levels and that the codon and amino acid frequency differences cannot be explained simply by the patterns of nucleotide composition. At the nucleotide level, we see a consistent tendency for the frequency of adenine to increase at all codon positions within the thermophiles. Thermophiles are also distinguished by their pattern of synonymous codon usage for several amino acids, particularly arginine and isoleucine. At the protein level, the most dramatic effect is a two-fold decrease in the frequency of glutamine residues among thermophiles. These results indicate that adaptation to growth at high temperature requires a coordinated set of evolutionary changes affecting (i) mRNA thermostability, (ii) stability of codon-anticodon interactions and (iii) increased thermostability of the protein products. We conclude that elevated growth temperature imposes selective constraints at all three molecular levels: nucleotide content, codon usage and amino acid composition. In addition to these multiple selective effects, however, the genomes of both thermophiles and mesophiles are often subject to superimposed large changes in composition due to mutational bias. PMID:14604790

  8. An upstream open reading frame is essential for feedback regulation of ascorbate biosynthesis in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Laing, William A; Martínez-Sánchez, Marcela; Wright, Michele A; Bulley, Sean M; Brewster, Di; Dare, Andrew P; Rassam, Maysoon; Wang, Daisy; Storey, Roy; Macknight, Richard C; Hellens, Roger P

    2015-03-01

    Ascorbate (vitamin C) is an essential antioxidant and enzyme cofactor in both plants and animals. Ascorbate concentration is tightly regulated in plants, partly to respond to stress. Here, we demonstrate that ascorbate concentrations are determined via the posttranscriptional repression of GDP-l-galactose phosphorylase (GGP), a major control enzyme in the ascorbate biosynthesis pathway. This regulation requires a cis-acting upstream open reading frame (uORF) that represses the translation of the downstream GGP open reading frame under high ascorbate concentration. Disruption of this uORF stops the ascorbate feedback regulation of translation and results in increased ascorbate concentrations in leaves. The uORF is predicted to initiate at a noncanonical codon (ACG rather than AUG) and encode a 60- to 65-residue peptide. Analysis of ribosome protection data from Arabidopsis thaliana showed colocation of high levels of ribosomes with both the uORF and the main coding sequence of GGP. Together, our data indicate that the noncanonical uORF is translated and encodes a peptide that functions in the ascorbate inhibition of translation. This posttranslational regulation of ascorbate is likely an ancient mechanism of control as the uORF is conserved in GGP genes from mosses to angiosperms. PMID:25724639

  9. Upstream/downstream: Issues in environmental ethics

    SciTech Connect

    Scherer, D.

    1991-01-01

    Upstream/Downstream reminds us that there are four issues that are more or less distinctive to environmental ethics. First, and most distinctively, environmental issues involve the standing of nonhuman living things and systems. Thus, environmental politics is only partly a clash among the interest of the parties involved; it often involves actions on behalf of the existence rights of nonhuman life forms. Second, environmental ethics concern the intergenerational distribution of benefits more explicitly than do most other ethical issues, which brings out serious weaknesses in legal frameworks that rely on claims for damages. Third, the complexity and indirectness of many environmental impacts introduces a high degree of uncertainty and thus technical as well as ethical issues of prudent behavior. Specifically, where science may not fully reveal environmental risks, should development proceed; should analysis proceed if it is known to have a Pollyanna bias Fourth, insofar as environmental damage is typically done to common property, and thus its regulation is generally a matter for governmental regulation, the obligations of private actors to make sacrifices beyond what government requires is at issue - an issue that one would expect to be taken up at length in the other volumes.

  10. BIOPROSPECTOR: DISCOVERING CONSERVED DNA MOTIFS IN UPSTREAM REGULATORY REGIONS

    E-print Network

    Liu, Jun

    sequencing and DNA microarray analysis of gene expression gives rise to the demand for data-mining tools. Bio in the upstream region of genes in the same expression group. There are generally two strategies for DNA sequence the upstream region of genes in the same expression pattern group and look for sequence motifs. These motifs

  11. The unfolded protein response affects readthrough of premature termination codons

    PubMed Central

    Oren, Yifat S; McClure, Michelle L; Rowe, Steven M; Sorscher, Eric J; Bester, Assaf C; Manor, Miriam; Kerem, Eitan; Rivlin, Joseph; Zahdeh, Fouad; Mann, Matthias; Geiger, Tamar; Kerem, Batsheva

    2014-01-01

    One-third of monogenic inherited diseases result from premature termination codons (PTCs). Readthrough of in-frame PTCs enables synthesis of full-length functional proteins. However, extended variability in the response to readthrough treatment is found among patients, which correlates with the level of nonsense transcripts. Here, we aimed to reveal cellular pathways affecting this inter-patient variability. We show that activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR) governs the response to readthrough treatment by regulating the levels of transcripts carrying PTCs. Quantitative proteomic analyses showed substantial differences in UPR activation between patients carrying PTCs, correlating with their response. We further found a significant inverse correlation between the UPR and nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD), suggesting a feedback loop between these homeostatic pathways. We uncovered and characterized the mechanism underlying this NMD-UPR feedback loop, which augments both UPR activation and NMD attenuation. Importantly, this feedback loop enhances the response to readthrough treatment, highlighting its clinical importance. Altogether, our study demonstrates the importance of the UPR and its regulatory network for genetic diseases caused by PTCs and for cell homeostasis under normal conditions. PMID:24705877

  12. The Head Start Debates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zigler, Edward, Ed.; Styfco, Sally J., Ed.

    2004-01-01

    The future of Head Start depends on how well people learn from and apply the lessons from its past. That's why everyone involved in early education needs this timely, forward-thinking book from the leader of Head Start. The first book to capture the Head Start debates in all their complexity and diversity, this landmark volume brings together the…

  13. tRNAomics: tRNA gene copy number variation and codon use provide bioinformatic evidence of a new anticodon:codon wobble pair in a eukaryote.

    PubMed

    Iben, James R; Maraia, Richard J

    2012-07-01

    tRNA genes are interspersed throughout eukaryotic DNA, contributing to genome architecture and evolution in addition to translation of the transcriptome. Codon use correlates with tRNA gene copy number in noncomplex organisms including yeasts. Synonymous codons impact translation with various outcomes, dependent on relative tRNA abundances. Availability of whole-genome sequences allowed us to examine tRNA gene copy number variation (tgCNV) and codon use in four Schizosaccharomyces species and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. tRNA gene numbers vary from 171 to 322 in the four Schizosaccharomyces despite very high similarity in other features of their genomes. In addition, we performed whole-genome sequencing of several related laboratory strains of Schizosaccharomyces pombe and found tgCNV at a cluster of tRNA genes. We examined for the first time effects of wobble rules on correlation of tRNA gene number and codon use and showed improvement for S. cerevisiae and three of the Schizosaccharomyces species. In contrast, correlation in Schizosaccharomyces japonicus is poor due to markedly divergent tRNA gene content, and much worsened by the wobble rules. In japonicus, some tRNA iso-acceptor genes are absent and others are greatly reduced relative to the other yeasts, while genes for synonymous wobble iso-acceptors are amplified, indicating wobble use not apparent in any other eukaryote. We identified a subset of japonicus-specific wobbles that improves correlation of codon use and tRNA gene content in japonicus. We conclude that tgCNV is high among Schizo species and occurs in related laboratory strains of S. pombe (and expectedly other species), and tRNAome-codon analyses can provide insight into species-specific wobble decoding. PMID:22586155

  14. Evidence of abundant stop codon readthrough in Drosophila and other Metazoa

    E-print Network

    Jungreis, Irwin

    While translational stop codon readthrough is often used by viral genomes, it has been observed for only a handful of eukaryotic genes. We previously used comparative genomics evidence to recognize protein-coding regions ...

  15. Identifying protein-coding genes and synonymous constraint elements using phylogenetic codon models

    E-print Network

    Lin, Michael F. (Michael Fong-Jay)

    2012-01-01

    We develop novel methods for comparative genomics analysis of protein-coding genes using phylogenetic codon models, in pursuit of two main lines of biological investigation: First, we develop PhyloCSF, an algorithm based ...

  16. Three-dimensional eukaryotic genomic organization is strongly correlated with codon usage expression and function.

    PubMed

    Diament, Alon; Pinter, Ron Y; Tuller, Tamir

    2014-01-01

    It has been shown that the distribution of genes in eukaryotic genomes is not random; however, formerly reported relations between gene function and genomic organization were relatively weak. Previous studies have demonstrated that codon usage bias is related to all stages of gene expression and to protein function. Here we apply a novel tool for assessing functional relatedness, codon usage frequency similarity (CUFS), which measures similarity between genes in terms of codon and amino acid usage. By analyzing chromosome conformation capture data, describing the three-dimensional (3D) conformation of the DNA, we show that the functional similarity between genes captured by CUFS is directly and very strongly correlated with their 3D distance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Arabidopsis thaliana, mouse and human. This emphasizes the importance of three-dimensional genomic localization in eukaryotes and indicates that codon usage is tightly linked to genome architecture. PMID:25510862

  17. Selection on synonymous codons in mammalian rhodopsins: a possible role in optimizing translational processes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Synonymous codon usage can affect many cellular processes, particularly those associated with translation such as polypeptide elongation and folding, mRNA degradation/stability, and splicing. Highly expressed genes are thought to experience stronger selection pressures on synonymous codons. This should result in codon usage bias even in species with relatively low effective population sizes, like mammals, where synonymous site selection is thought to be weak. Here we use phylogenetic codon-based likelihood models to explore patterns of codon usage bias in a dataset of 18 mammalian rhodopsin sequences, the protein mediating the first step in vision in the eye, and one of the most highly expressed genes in vertebrates. We use these patterns to infer selection pressures on key translational mechanisms including polypeptide elongation, protein folding, mRNA stability, and splicing. Results Overall, patterns of selection in mammalian rhodopsin appear to be correlated with post-transcriptional and translational processes. We found significant evidence for selection at synonymous sites using phylogenetic mutation-selection likelihood models, with C-ending codons found to have the highest relative fitness, and to be significantly more abundant at conserved sites. In general, these codons corresponded with the most abundant tRNAs in mammals. We found significant differences in codon usage bias between rhodopsin loops versus helices, though there was no significant difference in mean synonymous substitution rate between these motifs. We also found a significantly higher proportion of GC-ending codons at paired sites in rhodopsin mRNA secondary structure, and significantly lower synonymous mutation rates in putative exonic splicing enhancer (ESE) regions than in non-ESE regions. Conclusions By focusing on a single highly expressed gene we both distinguish synonymous codon selection from mutational effects and analytically explore underlying functional mechanisms. Our results suggest that codon bias in mammalian rhodopsin arises from selection to optimally balance high overall translational speed, accuracy, and proper protein folding, especially in structurally complicated regions. Selection at synonymous sites may also be contributing to mRNA stability and splicing efficiency at exonic-splicing-enhancer (ESE) regions. Our results highlight the importance of investigating highly expressed genes in a broader phylogenetic context in order to better understand the evolution of synonymous substitutions. PMID:24884412

  18. Codon and Amino Acid Usage Are Shaped by Selection Across Divergent Model Organisms of the Pancrustacea

    PubMed Central

    Whittle, Carrie A.; Extavour, Cassandra G.

    2015-01-01

    In protein-coding genes, synonymous codon usage and amino acid composition correlate to expression in some eukaryotes, and may result from translational selection. Here, we studied large-scale RNA-seq data from three divergent arthropod models, including cricket (Gryllus bimaculatus), milkweed bug (Oncopeltus fasciatus), and the amphipod crustacean Parhyale hawaiensis, and tested for optimization of codon and amino acid usage relative to expression level. We report strong signals of AT3 optimal codons (those favored in highly expressed genes) in G. bimaculatus and O. fasciatus, whereas weaker signs of GC3 optimal codons were found in P. hawaiensis, suggesting selection on codon usage in all three organisms. Further, in G. bimaculatus and O. fasciatus, high expression was associated with lowered frequency of amino acids with large size/complexity (S/C) scores in favor of those with intermediate S/C values; thus, selection may favor smaller amino acids while retaining those of moderate size for protein stability or conformation. In P. hawaiensis, highly transcribed genes had elevated frequency of amino acids with large and small S/C scores, suggesting a complex dynamic in this crustacean. In all species, the highly transcribed genes appeared to favor short proteins, high optimal codon usage, specific amino acids, and were preferentially involved in cell-cycling and protein synthesis. Together, based on examination of 1,680,067, 1,667,783, and 1,326,896 codon sites in G. bimaculatus, O. fasciatus, and P. hawaiensis, respectively, we conclude that translational selection shapes codon and amino acid usage in these three Pancrustacean arthropods. PMID:26384771

  19. Codon and Amino Acid Usage Are Shaped by Selection Across Divergent Model Organisms of the Pancrustacea.

    PubMed

    Whittle, Carrie A; Extavour, Cassandra G

    2015-01-01

    In protein-coding genes, synonymous codon usage and amino acid composition correlate to expression in some eukaryotes, and may result from translational selection. Here, we studied large-scale RNA-seq data from three divergent arthropod models, including cricket (Gryllus bimaculatus), milkweed bug (Oncopeltus fasciatus), and the amphipod crustacean Parhyale hawaiensis, and tested for optimization of codon and amino acid usage relative to expression level. We report strong signals of AT3 optimal codons (those favored in highly expressed genes) in G. bimaculatus and O. fasciatus, whereas weaker signs of GC3 optimal codons were found in P. hawaiensis, suggesting selection on codon usage in all three organisms. Further, in G. bimaculatus and O. fasciatus, high expression was associated with lowered frequency of amino acids with large size/complexity (S/C) scores in favor of those with intermediate S/C values; thus, selection may favor smaller amino acids while retaining those of moderate size for protein stability or conformation. In P. hawaiensis, highly transcribed genes had elevated frequency of amino acids with large and small S/C scores, suggesting a complex dynamic in this crustacean. In all species, the highly transcribed genes appeared to favor short proteins, high optimal codon usage, specific amino acids, and were preferentially involved in cell-cycling and protein synthesis. Together, based on examination of 1,680,067, 1,667,783, and 1,326,896 codon sites in G. bimaculatus, O. fasciatus, and P. hawaiensis, respectively, we conclude that translational selection shapes codon and amino acid usage in these three Pancrustacean arthropods. PMID:26384771

  20. Codon usage biases of transposable elements and host nuclear genes in Arabidopsis thaliana and Oryza sativa.

    PubMed

    Jia, Jia; Xue, Qingzhong

    2009-12-01

    Transposable elements (TEs) are mobile genetic entities ubiquitously distributed in nearly all genomes. High frequency of codons ending in A/T in TEs has been previously observed in some species. In this study, the biases in nucleotide composition and codon usage of TE transposases and host nuclear genes were investigated in the AT-rich genome of Arabidopsis thaliana and the GC-rich genome of Oryza sativa. Codons ending in A/T are more frequently used by TEs compared with their host nuclear genes. A remarkable positive correlation between highly expressed nuclear genes and C/G-ending codons were detected in O. sativa (r=0.944 and 0.839, respectively, P<0.0001) but not in A. thaliana, indicating a close association between the GC content and gene expression level in monocot species. In both species, TE codon usage biases are similar to that of weakly expressed genes. The expression and activity of TEs may be strictly controlled in plant genomes. Mutation bias and selection pressure have simultaneously acted on the TE evolution in A. thaliana and O. sativa. The consistently observed biases of nucleotide composition and codon usage of TEs may also provide a useful clue to accurately detect TE sequences in different species. PMID:20172490

  1. Reassignment of a rare sense codon to a non-canonical amino acid in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Mukai, Takahito; Yamaguchi, Atsushi; Ohtake, Kazumasa; Takahashi, Mihoko; Hayashi, Akiko; Iraha, Fumie; Kira, Satoshi; Yanagisawa, Tatsuo; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Hoshi, Hiroko; Kobayashi, Takatsugu; Sakamoto, Kensaku

    2015-01-01

    The immutability of the genetic code has been challenged with the successful reassignment of the UAG stop codon to non-natural amino acids in Escherichia coli. In the present study, we demonstrated the in vivo reassignment of the AGG sense codon from arginine to l-homoarginine. As the first step, we engineered a novel variant of the archaeal pyrrolysyl-tRNA synthetase (PylRS) able to recognize l-homoarginine and l-N6-(1-iminoethyl)lysine (l-NIL). When this PylRS variant or HarRS was expressed in E. coli, together with the AGG-reading tRNAPylCCU molecule, these arginine analogs were efficiently incorporated into proteins in response to AGG. Next, some or all of the AGG codons in the essential genes were eliminated by their synonymous replacements with other arginine codons, whereas the majority of the AGG codons remained in the genome. The bacterial host's ability to translate AGG into arginine was then restricted in a temperature-dependent manner. The temperature sensitivity caused by this restriction was rescued by the translation of AGG to l-homoarginine or l-NIL. The assignment of AGG to l-homoarginine in the cells was confirmed by mass spectrometric analyses. The results showed the feasibility of breaking the degeneracy of sense codons to enhance the amino-acid diversity in the genetic code. PMID:26240376

  2. Translation initiation factor eIF3 promotes programmed stop codon readthrough

    PubMed Central

    Beznosková, Petra; Wagner, Susan; Jansen, Myrte Esmeralda; von der Haar, Tobias; Valášek, Leoš Shivaya

    2015-01-01

    Programmed stop codon readthrough is a post-transcription regulatory mechanism specifically increasing proteome diversity by creating a pool of C-terminally extended proteins. During this process, the stop codon is decoded as a sense codon by a near-cognate tRNA, which programs the ribosome to continue elongation. The efficiency of competition for the stop codon between release factors (eRFs) and near-cognate tRNAs is largely dependent on its nucleotide context; however, the molecular mechanism underlying this process is unknown. Here, we show that it is the translation initiation (not termination) factor, namely eIF3, which critically promotes programmed readthrough on all three stop codons. In order to do so, eIF3 must associate with pre-termination complexes where it interferes with the eRF1 decoding of the third/wobble position of the stop codon set in the unfavorable termination context, thus allowing incorporation of near-cognate tRNAs with a mismatch at the same position. We clearly demonstrate that efficient readthrough is enabled by near-cognate tRNAs with a mismatch only at the third/wobble position. Importantly, the eIF3 role in programmed readthrough is conserved between yeast and humans. PMID:25925566

  3. Catalytic Ignition and Upstream Reaction Propagation in a Platinum Tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Struk, P. M.; Dietrich, D. L.; Mellish, B. P.; Miller, F. J.; T'ien, J. S.

    2007-01-01

    A challenge for catalytic combustion in monolithic reactors at elevated temperatures is the start-up or "light-off" from a cold initial condition. In this work, we demonstrate a concept called "back-end catalytic ignition that potentially can be utilized in the light-off of catalytic monoliths. An external downstream flame or Joule heating raises the temperature of a small portion of the catalyst near the outlet initiating a localized catalytic reaction that propagates upstream heating the entire channel. This work uses a transient numerical model to demonstrate "back-end" ignition within a single channel which can characterize the overall performance of a monolith. The paper presents comparisons to an experiment using a single non-adiabatic channel but the concept can be extended to the adiabatic monolith case. In the model, the time scales associated with solid heat-up are typically several orders of magnitude larger than the gas-phase and chemical kinetic time-scales. Therefore, the model assumes a quasi-steady gas-phase with respect to a transient solid. The gas phase is one-dimensional. Appropriate correlations, however, account for heat and mass transfer in a direction perpendicular to the flow. The thermally-thin solid includes axial conduction. The gas phase, however, does not include axial conduction due to the high Peclet number flows. The model includes both detailed gas-phase and catalytic surface reactions. The experiment utilizes a pure platinum circular channel oriented horizontally though which a CO/O2 mixture (equivalence ratios ranging from 0.6 to 0.9) flows at 2 m/s.

  4. New insights into the incorporation of natural suppressor tRNAs at stop codons in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Blanchet, Sandra; Cornu, David; Argentini, Manuela; Namy, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    Stop codon readthrough may be promoted by the nucleotide environment or drugs. In such cases, ribosomes incorporate a natural suppressor tRNA at the stop codon, leading to the continuation of translation in the same reading frame until the next stop codon and resulting in the expression of a protein with a new potential function. However, the identity of the natural suppressor tRNAs involved in stop codon readthrough remains unclear, precluding identification of the amino acids incorporated at the stop position. We established an in vivo reporter system for identifying the amino acids incorporated at the stop codon, by mass spectrometry in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We found that glutamine, tyrosine and lysine were inserted at UAA and UAG codons, whereas tryptophan, cysteine and arginine were inserted at UGA codon. The 5? nucleotide context of the stop codon had no impact on the identity or proportion of amino acids incorporated by readthrough. We also found that two different glutamine tRNAGln were used to insert glutamine at UAA and UAG codons. This work constitutes the first systematic analysis of the amino acids incorporated at stop codons, providing important new insights into the decoding rules used by the ribosome to read the genetic code. PMID:25056309

  5. View of upstream face of Grand Coulee Dam, looking northeast. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of upstream face of Grand Coulee Dam, looking northeast. This image features a cloudless sky.) - Columbia Basin Project, Grand Coulee Dam & Franklin D. Roosevelt Lake, Across Columbia River, Southeast of Town of Grand Coulee, Grand Coulee, Grant County, WA

  6. 8. VIEW LOOKING UPSTREAM FROM THE RIVER ARM OF THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. VIEW LOOKING UPSTREAM FROM THE RIVER ARM OF THE COFFERDAM NEAR STATION (September 1936) - Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel Project, Lock & Dam No. 13, Upper Mississippi River, Fulton, Whiteside County, IL

  7. OVERALL VIEW OF CASCADE CANAL COMPANY CRIB DAM, LOOKING UPSTREAM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OVERALL VIEW OF CASCADE CANAL COMPANY CRIB DAM, LOOKING UPSTREAM FROM DIRECTION OF KACHESS DAM. VIEW TO NORTH - Kachess Dam, 1904 Cascade Canal Company Crib Dam, Kachess River, 1.5 miles north of Interstate 90, Easton, Kittitas County, WA

  8. Evaluating upstream supply chain disruptions with partial availability

    E-print Network

    Yip, Jennifer J. (Jennifer Jaclyn)

    2015-01-01

    Globalization, outsourcing, and the emphasis on lean supply chains continue to shape the supply chain industry. These trends have increased the prevalence and severity of disruptions to upstream supply. Disruptions to ...

  9. 4. VIEW SHOWING UPSTREAM FACE OF DAM, LOOKING NORTHEAST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. VIEW SHOWING UPSTREAM FACE OF DAM, LOOKING NORTHEAST - High Mountain Dams in Upalco Unit, Kidney Lake Dam, Ashley National Forest, 4.7 miles North of Miners Gulch Campground, Mountain Home, Duchesne County, UT

  10. 3. OVERALL VIEW OF DAM, SHOWING UPSTREAM FACE, LOOKING EAST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. OVERALL VIEW OF DAM, SHOWING UPSTREAM FACE, LOOKING EAST - High Mountain Dams in Upalco Unit, Kidney Lake Dam, Ashley National Forest, 4.7 miles North of Miners Gulch Campground, Mountain Home, Duchesne County, UT

  11. 7. DETAIL CENTRAL PIER (SKEWBACK) WITH BREAKWATER, UPSTREAM (EAST) SIDE. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. DETAIL CENTRAL PIER (SKEWBACK) WITH BREAKWATER, UPSTREAM (EAST) SIDE. NOTE FRACTURES ALONG BARREL ARCH EXTRADOS. - Roaring Creek Bridge, State Road 2005 spanning Roaring Creek in Locust Township, Slabtown, Columbia County, PA

  12. 2. VIEW OF MAIN STORAGE RESERVOIR, SHOWING UPSTREAM SIDE OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. VIEW OF MAIN STORAGE RESERVOIR, SHOWING UPSTREAM SIDE OF DAM AND DISCHARGE GATE (LEFT), LOOKING SOUTHWEST (October 1991) - Bonanza Hydraulic Mining Site, Main Storage Reservoir, Swamp Gulch, Salmon, Lemhi County, ID

  13. Direct Estimate of Lateral Eddy Diffusivity Upstream of Drake Passage

    E-print Network

    Tulloch, Ross

    The first direct estimate of the rate at which geostrophic turbulence mixes tracers across the Antarctic Circumpolar Current is presented. The estimate is computed from the spreading of a tracer released upstream of Drake ...

  14. DOG HOUSE AT UPSTREAM LOCK GATE. ALSO SEEN AT LEFT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DOG HOUSE AT UPSTREAM LOCK GATE. ALSO SEEN AT LEFT IN PHOTO NO. IL-164-A-23. - Illinois Waterway, La Grange Lock and Dam, 3/4 mile south of Country 795N at Illinois River, Versailles, Brown County, IL

  15. UPSTREAM LOCK GATE DETAIL AND DOG HOUSE. NOTE ARM AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    UPSTREAM LOCK GATE DETAIL AND DOG HOUSE. NOTE ARM AND GEARING FOR CONTROLLING LOCK GATE. LOOKING WEST SOUTHWEST. - Illinois Waterway, Brandon Road Lock and Dam , 1100 Brandon Road, Joliet, Will County, IL

  16. 6. CREST ROAD ON UPPER EMBANKMENT, SHOWING MASONRY UPSTREAM PARAPET ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. CREST ROAD ON UPPER EMBANKMENT, SHOWING MASONRY UPSTREAM PARAPET WALL (LEFT) AND ENTRANCE TO DEER FLAT NAMPA CANAL HEADWORKS (ALSO LEFT). VIEW TO WEST. - Boise Project, Deer Flat Embankments, Lake Lowell, Nampa, Canyon County, ID

  17. 11. DETAIL OF UPSTREAM FACE OF SLUICE GATE CONTROLS FROM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. DETAIL OF UPSTREAM FACE OF SLUICE GATE CONTROLS FROM CATWALK, SHOWING GATE LIFTING GEARS (TOP) AND GEAR SHAFTS (BOTTOM). VIEW TO SOUTHWEST. - Boise Project, Boise River Diversion Dam, Across Boise River, Boise, Ada County, ID

  18. 41. Upstream end of emergency spillway excavation. Photographer unknown, 1929. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    41. Upstream end of emergency spillway excavation. Photographer unknown, 1929. Source: Arizona Department of Water Resources (ADWR). - Waddell Dam, On Agua Fria River, 35 miles northwest of Phoenix, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  19. 3. AN IMAGE LOOKING SOUTH, TOWARD THE UPSTREAM SIDE OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. AN IMAGE LOOKING SOUTH, TOWARD THE UPSTREAM SIDE OF THE CENTRAL PIER AND SHOWING THE SOUTHEAST ABUTMENT AND ERODED STARLING. - Cement Plant Road Bridge, Spanning Leatherwood Creek on County Road 50 South, Bedford, Lawrence County, IN

  20. 5. A VIEW LOOKING WEST, TOWARD THE UPSTREAM SIDE OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. A VIEW LOOKING WEST, TOWARD THE UPSTREAM SIDE OF THE PIER, SHOWING THE DETERIORATED SHEARWATER EDGE, THE NORTHEAST ABUTMENT AND WING WALL. - Cement Plant Road Bridge, Spanning Leatherwood Creek on County Road 50 South, Bedford, Lawrence County, IN

  1. 6. VIEW OF UPSTREAM FACE OF HORSE MESA, SHOWING CONCRETE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. VIEW OF UPSTREAM FACE OF HORSE MESA, SHOWING CONCRETE BEING PLACED. PENSTOCK OPENINGS ARE VISIBLE AT CENTER LEFT. August 24, 1926 - Horse Mesa Dam, Salt River, 65 miles East of Phoenix, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  2. 18. VIEW OF SETTLING BASIN FROM UPSTREAM TRESTLE, SHOWING BULKHEAD ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. VIEW OF SETTLING BASIN FROM UPSTREAM TRESTLE, SHOWING BULKHEAD ON RIGHT AND SAND BANK ON LEFT, LOOKING NORTHWEST - Electron Hydroelectric Project, Along Puyallup River, Electron, Pierce County, WA

  3. 65. VIEW LOOKING UPSTREAM FROM FLUME SUBSTRUCTURE, SHOWING COLUMBIA IMPROVEMENT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    65. VIEW LOOKING UPSTREAM FROM FLUME SUBSTRUCTURE, SHOWING COLUMBIA IMPROVEMENT COMPANY'S NEISSON CREEK SAWMILL. Print No. 177, November 1903 - Electron Hydroelectric Project, Along Puyallup River, Electron, Pierce County, WA

  4. 15. OVERALL VIEW OF UPSTREAM FACE OF LIFT GATE SECTION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. OVERALL VIEW OF UPSTREAM FACE OF LIFT GATE SECTION WITH TAINTER GATE SECTION OF SPILLWAY TO THE LEFT. VIEW TO SOUTHWEST. - Starved Rock Locks & Dam, Illinois Waterway River mile 231, Peru, La Salle County, IL

  5. STEEL ERECTION. View of upstream side of bridge, looking north ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    STEEL ERECTION. View of upstream side of bridge, looking north from the old suspension bridge at unjoined cantilever arms - South Fork Trinity River Bridge, State Highway 299 spanning South Fork Trinity River, Salyer, Trinity County, CA

  6. 2. UPSTREAM SIDE OF DIVERSION DAM ON THE SNAKE RIVER, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. UPSTREAM SIDE OF DIVERSION DAM ON THE SNAKE RIVER, LOOKING SOUTH-SOUTHWEST. NOTE BANK REINFORCEMENT ON LEFT AND SPILLWAY ON RIGHT. - Snake River Ditch, Headgate on north bank of Snake River, Dillon, Summit County, CO

  7. 24. VIEW FROM EAST BANK, LOOKING UPSTREAM, SHOWING RECONSTRUCTED MAIN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. VIEW FROM EAST BANK, LOOKING UPSTREAM, SHOWING RECONSTRUCTED MAIN AND DIVERSION DAMS IN BACKGROUND WITH WATER-GATE AND BEGINNING OF HEAD-RACE IN LEFT FOREGROUND. - Forge Creek Dam-John Cable Mill, Townsend, Blount County, TN

  8. 23. VIEW LOOKING UPSTREAM FROM WEST BANK OF HEADRACE SHOWING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. VIEW LOOKING UPSTREAM FROM WEST BANK OF HEAD-RACE SHOWING RECONSTRUCTED MAIN AND DIVERSION DAMS; HEAD-RACE IS JUST OUT OF PICTURE AT LEFT. - Forge Creek Dam-John Cable Mill, Townsend, Blount County, TN

  9. 5. UPSTREAM (WEST) VIEW OF SPILLWAY, WITH COOKE DAM POND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. UPSTREAM (WEST) VIEW OF SPILLWAY, WITH COOKE DAM POND IN FOREGROUND AND NORTH EMBANKMENT (MI-98-A) AT LEFT. VIEW TO NORTHEAST. - Cooke Hydroelectric Plant, Spillway, Cook Dam Road at Au Sable River, Oscoda, Iosco County, MI

  10. 6. DETAIL OF UPSTREAM (WEST) SIDE OF SPILLWAY SHOWING WALKWAY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. DETAIL OF UPSTREAM (WEST) SIDE OF SPILLWAY SHOWING WALKWAY AND CONCRETE SPILLWAY PIERS. VIEW TO NORTH. - Cooke Hydroelectric Plant, Spillway, Cook Dam Road at Au Sable River, Oscoda, Iosco County, MI

  11. 5. DETAIL OF PENSTOCK OPENINGS AND HEADGATE DECK FROM UPSTREAM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. DETAIL OF PENSTOCK OPENINGS AND HEADGATE DECK FROM UPSTREAM (WEST) SIDE, WITH SOUTH EMBANKMENT (MI-98-E) COREWALL AT RIGHT. VIEW TO NORTH. - Cooke Hydroelectric Plant, Powerhouse, Cook Dam Road at Au Sable River, Oscoda, Iosco County, MI

  12. 7. Detail view of reinforced concrete archrings comprising dam's upstream ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Detail view of reinforced concrete arch-rings comprising dam's upstream face. Impressions of the wooden formwork used in construction are visible in the concrete. - Little Rock Creek Dam, Little Rock Creek, Littlerock, Los Angeles County, CA

  13. 2. OVERALL VIEW OF LOWWATER DAM, LOOKING UPSTREAM. CHAIN OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. OVERALL VIEW OF LOW-WATER DAM, LOOKING UPSTREAM. CHAIN OF ROCKS BRIDGE AND ST. LOUIS WATER DEPARTMENT INTAKE IN BACKGROUND, LOOKING NORTHWEST - Upper Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel Project, Lock & Dam 27, Granite City, Madison County, IL

  14. 10. DETAIL OF UPSTREAM FACE OF NEW YORK CANAL HEADWORKS, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. DETAIL OF UPSTREAM FACE OF NEW YORK CANAL HEADWORKS, SHOWING GATE LIFTING GEARS (TOP), WORM GEAR SHAFTS (CENTER) AND SLIDE GATES (BOTTOM). VIEW TO NORTHWEST. - Boise Project, Boise River Diversion Dam, Across Boise River, Boise, Ada County, ID

  15. 3. General view of upstream face, looking northwest. Spillway is ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. General view of upstream face, looking northwest. Spillway is at the far end of the dam. The Antelope Valley is visible in center background. - Little Rock Creek Dam, Little Rock Creek, Littlerock, Los Angeles County, CA

  16. 1. GENERAL VIEW OF BRIDGE AND ENVIRONS, LOCATED UPSTREAM FROM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. GENERAL VIEW OF BRIDGE AND ENVIRONS, LOCATED UPSTREAM FROM BOATHOUSE, DAM, AND ELECTRIC POWER GENERATING MILL RUINS - Ricks Estate, Stone Bridge, Ricks Pond, Ricks Road, Hot Springs, Garland County, AR

  17. GC-Content of Synonymous Codons Profoundly Influences Amino Acid Usage

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jing; Zhou, Jun; Wu, Ying; Yang, Sihai; Tian, Dacheng

    2015-01-01

    Amino acids typically are encoded by multiple synonymous codons that are not used with the same frequency. Codon usage bias has drawn considerable attention, and several explanations have been offered, including variation in GC-content between species. Focusing on a simple parameter—combined GC proportion of all the synonymous codons for a particular amino acid, termed GCsyn—we try to deepen our understanding of the relationship between GC-content and amino acid/codon usage in more details. We analyzed 65 widely distributed representative species and found a close association between GCsyn, GC-content, and amino acids usage. The overall usages of the four amino acids with the greatest GCsyn and the five amino acids with the lowest GCsyn both vary with the regional GC-content, whereas the usage of the remaining 11 amino acids with intermediate GCsyn is less variable. More interesting, we discovered that codon usage frequencies are nearly constant in regions with similar GC-content. We further quantified the effects of regional GC-content variation (low to high) on amino acid usage and found that GC-content determines the usage variation of amino acids, especially those with extremely high GCsyn, which accounts for 76.7% of the changed GC-content for those regions. Our results suggest that GCsyn correlates with GC-content and has impact on codon/amino acid usage. These findings suggest a novel approach to understanding the role of codon and amino acid usage in shaping genomic architecture and evolutionary patterns of organisms. PMID:26248983

  18. Emergence of upstream swimming via a hydrodynamic transition.

    PubMed

    Tung, Chih-Kuan; Ardon, Florencia; Roy, Anubhab; Koch, Donald L; Suarez, Susan S; Wu, Mingming

    2015-03-13

    We demonstrate that upstream swimming of sperm emerges via an orientation disorder-order transition. The order parameter, the average orientation of the sperm head against the flow, follows a 0.5 power law with the deviation from the critical flow shear rate (?-?_{c}). This transition is successfully explained by a hydrodynamic bifurcation theory, which extends the sperm upstream swimming to a broad class of near surface microswimmers that possess front-back asymmetry and circular motion. PMID:25815969

  19. Emergence of Upstream Swimming via a Hydrodynamic Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tung, Chih-kuan; Ardon, Florencia; Roy, Anubhab; Koch, Donald L.; Suarez, Susan S.; Wu, Mingming

    2015-03-01

    We demonstrate that upstream swimming of sperm emerges via an orientation disorder-order transition. The order parameter, the average orientation of the sperm head against the flow, follows a 0.5 power law with the deviation from the critical flow shear rate (? -?c ). This transition is successfully explained by a hydrodynamic bifurcation theory, which extends the sperm upstream swimming to a broad class of near surface microswimmers that possess front-back asymmetry and circular motion.

  20. Smart Start News, 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Monica, Ed.

    1999-01-01

    Smart Start is a comprehensive public-private initiative to help all North Carolina children enter school healthy and ready to succeed, and provides children from birth to age five access to high-quality and affordable child care, health care, and other critical services. This document comprises the first two issues of "Smart Start News," a…

  1. Codon expansion and systematic transcriptional deletions produce tetra-, pentacoded mitochondrial peptides.

    PubMed

    Seligmann, Hervé

    2015-12-21

    Genes include occasionally isolated codons with a fourth (and fifth) silent nucleotide(s). Assuming tetracodons, translated hypothetical peptides align with regular GenBank proteins; predicted tetracodons coevolve with predicted tRNAs with expanded anticodons in each mammal, Drosophila and Lepidosauria mitogenomes, GC contents and with lepidosaurian body temperatures, suggesting that expanded codons are an adaptation of translation to high temperature. Hypothetically, continuous stretches of tetra- and pentacodons code for peptides. Both systematic nucleotide deletions during transcription, and translation by tRNAs with expanded anticodons could produce these peptides. Reanalyses of human nanoLc mass spectrometry peptidome data detect numerous tetra- and pentapeptides translated from the human mitogenome. These map preferentially on (BLAST-detected) human RNAs matching the human mitogenome, assuming systematic mono- and dinucleotide deletions after each third nucleotide (delRNAs). Translation by expanded anticodons is incompatible with silent nucleotides in the midst rather than at codon 3' extremity. More than 1/3 of detected tetra- and pentapeptides assume silent positions at codon extremity, suggesting that both mechanisms, regular translation of delRNAs and translation of regular RNAs by expanded anticodons, produce this peptide subgroup. Results show that systematically deleting polymerization occurs, and confirm serial translation of expanded codons. Non-canonical transcriptions and translations considerably expand the coding potential of DNA and RNA sequences. PMID:26456204

  2. The effect of tRNA levels on decoding times of mRNA codons

    PubMed Central

    Dana, Alexandra; Tuller, Tamir

    2014-01-01

    The possible effect of transfer ribonucleic acid (tRNA) concentrations on codons decoding time is a fundamental biomedical research question; however, due to a large number of variables affecting this process and the non-direct relation between them, a conclusive answer to this question has eluded so far researchers in the field. In this study, we perform a novel analysis of the ribosome profiling data of four organisms which enables ranking the decoding times of different codons while filtering translational phenomena such as experimental biases, extreme ribosomal pauses and ribosome traffic jams. Based on this filtering, we show for the first time that there is a significant correlation between tRNA concentrations and the codons estimated decoding time both in prokaryotes and in eukaryotes in natural conditions (?0.38 to ?0.66, all P values <0.006); in addition, we show that when considering tRNA concentrations, codons decoding times are not correlated with aminoacyl-tRNA levels. The reported results support the conjecture that translation efficiency is directly influenced by the tRNA levels in the cell. Thus, they should help to understand the evolution of synonymous aspects of coding sequences via the adaptation of their codons to the tRNA pool. PMID:25056313

  3. p53 codon 72 polymorphism and breast cancer risk: A meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    HOU, JING; JIANG, YUAN; TANG, WENRU; JIA, SHUTING

    2013-01-01

    p53 is a tumor suppressor gene and plays important roles in the etiology of breast cancer. Studies have produced conflicting results concerning the role of p53 codon 72 polymorphism (G>C) on the risk of breast cancer; therefore, a meta-analysis was performed to estimate the association between the p53 codon 72 polymorphism and breast cancer. Screening of the PubMed database was conducted to identify relevant studies. Studies containing available genotype frequencies of the p53 codon 72 polymorphism were selected and a pooled odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence interval (CI) was used to assess the association. Sixty-one published studies, including 28,539 breast cancer patients and 32,788 controls were identified. The results suggest that variant genotypes are not associated with breast cancer risk (Pro/Pro + Arg/Pro vs. Arg/Arg: OR=1.016, 95% CI=0.931–1.11, P=0.722). The symmetric funnel plot, Egger’s test (P=0.506) and Begg’s test (P=0.921) were all suggestive of the lack of publication bias. This meta-analysis suggests that the p53 codon 72 Pro/Pro + Arg/Pro genotypes are not associated with an increased risk of breast cancer. To validate the association between the p53 codon 72 polymorphism and breast cancer, further studies with larger numbers of participants worldwide are required. PMID:23737888

  4. Two-codon T-box riboswitch binding two tRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Saad, Nizar Y.; Stamatopoulou, Vassiliki; Brayé, Mélanie; Drainas, Denis; Stathopoulos, Constantinos; Becker, Hubert Dominique

    2013-01-01

    T-box riboswitches control transcription of downstream genes through the tRNA-binding formation of terminator or antiterminator structures. Previously reported T-boxes were described as single-specificity riboswitches that can bind specific tRNA anticodons through codon–anticodon interactions with the nucleotide triplet of their specifier loop (SL). However, the possibility that T-boxes might exhibit specificity beyond a single tRNA had been overlooked. In Clostridium acetobutylicum, the T-box that regulates the operon for the essential tRNA-dependent transamidation pathway harbors a SL with two potential overlapping codon positions for tRNAAsn and tRNAGlu. To test its specificity, we performed extensive mutagenic, biochemical, and chemical probing analyses. Surprisingly, both tRNAs can efficiently bind the SL in vitro and in vivo. The dual specificity of the T-box is allowed by a single base shift on the SL from one overlapping codon to the next. This feature allows the riboswitch to sense two tRNAs and balance the biosynthesis of two amino acids. Detailed genomic comparisons support our observations and suggest that “flexible” T-box riboswitches are widespread among bacteria, and, moreover, their specificity is dictated by the metabolic interconnection of the pathways under control. Taken together, our results support the notion of a genome-dependent codon ambiguity of the SLs. Furthermore, the existence of two overlapping codons imposes a unique example of tRNA-dependent regulation at the transcriptional level. PMID:23858450

  5. Cloning and expression of codon-optimized recombinant darbepoetin alfa in Leishmania tarentolae T7-TR.

    PubMed

    Kianmehr, Anvarsadat; Golavar, Raziyeh; Rouintan, Mandana; Mahrooz, Abdolkarim; Fard-Esfahani, Pezhman; Oladnabi, Morteza; Khajeniazi, Safoura; Mostafavi, Seyede Samaneh; Omidinia, Eskandar

    2016-02-01

    Darbepoetin alfa is an engineered and hyperglycosylated analog of recombinant human erythropoietin (EPO) which is used as a drug in treating anemia in patients with chronic kidney failure and cancer. This study desribes the secretory expression of a codon-optimized recombinant form of darbepoetin alfa in Leishmania tarentolae T7-TR. Synthetic codon-optimized gene was amplified by PCR and cloned into the pLEXSY-I-blecherry3 vector. The resultant expression vector, pLEXSYDarbo, was purified, digested, and electroporated into the L. tarentolae. Expression of recombinant darbepoetin alfa was evaluated by ELISA, reverse-transcription PCR (RT-PCR), Western blotting, and biological activity. After codon optimization, codon adaptation index (CAI) of the gene raised from 0.50 to 0.99 and its GC% content changed from 56% to 58%. Expression analysis confirmed the presence of a protein band at 40 kDa. Furthermore, reticulocyte experiment results revealed that the activity of expressed darbepoetin alfa was similar to that of its equivalent expressed in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. These data suggested that the codon optimization and expression in L. tarentolae host provided an efficient approach for high level expression of darbepoetin alfa. PMID:26546410

  6. Analysis of synonymous codon usage patterns in sixty-four different bivalve species

    PubMed Central

    De Moro, Gianluca; Venier, Paola; Pallavicini, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Synonymous codon usage bias (CUB) is a defined as the non-random usage of codons encoding the same amino acid across different genomes. This phenomenon is common to all organisms and the real weight of the many factors involved in its shaping still remains to be fully determined. So far, relatively little attention has been put in the analysis of CUB in bivalve mollusks due to the limited genomic data available. Taking advantage of the massive sequence data generated from next generation sequencing projects, we explored codon preferences in 64 different species pertaining to the six major evolutionary lineages in Bivalvia. We detected remarkable differences across species, which are only partially dependent on phylogeny. While the intensity of CUB is mild in most organisms, a heterogeneous group of species (including Arcida and Mytilida, among the others) display higher bias and a strong preference for AT-ending codons. We show that the relative strength and direction of mutational bias, selection for translational efficiency and for translational accuracy contribute to the establishment of synonymous codon usage in bivalves. Although many aspects underlying bivalve CUB still remain obscure, we provide for the first time an overview of this phenomenon in this large, commercially and environmentally important, class of marine invertebrates. PMID:26713259

  7. Codon Usage in Signal Sequences Affects Protein Expression and Secretion Using Baculovirus/Insect Cell Expression System

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Shiheng; Chen, Hongying

    2015-01-01

    By introducing synonymous mutations into the coding sequences of GP64sp and FibHsp signal peptides, the influences of mRNA secondary structure and codon usage of signal sequences on protein expression and secretion were investigated using baculovirus/insect cell expression system. The results showed that mRNA structural stability of the signal sequences was not correlated with the protein production and secretion levels, and FibHsp was more tolerable to codon changes than GP64sp. Codon bias analyses revealed that codons for GP64sp were well de-optimized and contained more non-optimal codons than FibHsp. Synonymous mutations in GP64sp sufficiently increased its average codon usage frequency and resulted in dramatic reduction of the activity and secretion of luciferase. Protein degradation inhibition assay with MG-132 showed that higher codon usage frequency in the signal sequence increased the production as well as the degradation of luciferase protein, indicating that the synonymous codon substitutions in the signal sequence caused misfolding of luciferase instead of slowing down the protein production. Meanwhile, we found that introduction of more non-optimal codons into FibHsp could increase the production and secretion levels of luciferase, which suggested a new strategy to improve the production of secretory proteins in insect cells. PMID:26697848

  8. Barriers impede upstream spawning migration of flathead chub

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walters, David M.; Zuellig, Robert E.; Crockett, Harry J.; Bruce, James F.; Lukacs, Paul M.; Fitzpatrick, Ryan M.

    2014-01-01

    Many native cyprinids are declining throughout the North American Great Plains. Some of these species require long reaches of contiguous, flowing riverine habitat for drifting eggs or larvae to develop, and their declining populations have been attributed to habitat fragmentation or barriers (e.g., dams, dewatered channels, and reservoirs) that restrict fish movement. Upstream dispersal is also needed to maintain populations of species with passively drifting eggs or larvae, and prior researchers have suggested that these fishes migrate upstream to spawn. To test this hypothesis, we conducted a mark–recapture study of Flathead Chub Platygobio gracilis within a 91-km reach of continuous riverine habitat in Fountain Creek, Colorado. We measured CPUE, spawning readiness (percent of Flathead Chub expressing milt), and fish movement relative to a channel-spanning dam. Multiple lines of evidence indicate that Flathead Chub migrate upstream to spawn during summer. The CPUE was much higher at the base of the dam than at downstream sites; the seasonal increases in CPUE at the dam closely tracked seasonal increases in spawning readiness, and marked fish moved upstream as far as 33 km during the spawning run. The upstream migration was effectively blocked by the dam. The CPUE of Flathead Chub was much lower upstream of the OHDD than at downstream sites, and <0.2% of fish marked at the dam were recaptured upstream. This study provides the first direct evidence of spawning migration for Flathead Chub and supports the general hypothesis that barriers limit adult dispersal of these and other plains fishes.

  9. ANT: Software for Generating and Evaluating Degenerate Codons for Natural and Expanded Genetic Codes.

    PubMed

    Engqvist, Martin K M; Nielsen, Jens

    2015-08-21

    The Ambiguous Nucleotide Tool (ANT) is a desktop application that generates and evaluates degenerate codons. Degenerate codons are used to represent DNA positions that have multiple possible nucleotide alternatives. This is useful for protein engineering and directed evolution, where primers specified with degenerate codons are used as a basis for generating libraries of protein sequences. ANT is intuitive and can be used in a graphical user interface or by interacting with the code through a defined application programming interface. ANT comes with full support for nonstandard, user-defined, or expanded genetic codes (translation tables), which is important because synthetic biology is being applied to an ever widening range of natural and engineered organisms. The Python source code for ANT is freely distributed so that it may be used without restriction, modified, and incorporated in other software or custom data pipelines. PMID:25901796

  10. Frameshift Mutations (Deletion at Codon 1309 and Codon 849) in the APC Gene in Iranian FAP Patients: a Case Series and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Kashfi, Seyed Mohammad Hossein; Behboudi Farahbakhsh, Faeghe; Golmohammadi, Mina; Nazemalhosseini Mojarad, Ehsan; Azimzadeh, Pedram; Asadzadeh Aghdaie, Hamid

    2014-01-01

    Familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) is responsible for <1% of colorectal cancer (CRC) cases and is inherited an autosomal dominant trait. Patients generally present hundreds to thousands of adenomas and develop colorectal cancer by age 35- 40 if left untreated. Here we report four patients with germline frameshift mutation (small deletion) at exon 15 of adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) tumor suppressor gene. Peripheral blood samples were collected from patients and Exon 15 of the APC gene was studied by direct sequencing after genomic DNA extraction. Four frameshift mutations were detected. Two patients had 5 bp deletion, c.3927_3931delAAAGA and two siblings presented deletion at codon 849 (c.2547_2548delTA p.Asp849fsX62). This study was the first report of genetic screening in Iranian FAP patients. In contrast to other studies we revealed that one patient with mutation at codon 1309 had an attenuated phenotype. PMID:25317407

  11. Frameshift Mutations (Deletion at Codon 1309 and Codon 849) in the APC Gene in Iranian FAP Patients: a Case Series and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Kashfi, Seyed Mohammad Hossein; Behboudi Farahbakhsh, Faeghe; Golmohammadi, Mina; Nazemalhosseini Mojarad, Ehsan; Azimzadeh, Pedram; Asadzadeh Aghdaie, Hamid

    2014-01-01

    Familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) is responsible for <1% of colorectal cancer (CRC) cases and is inherited an autosomal dominant trait. Patients generally present hundreds to thousands of adenomas and develop colorectal cancer by age 35- 40 if left untreated. Here we report four patients with germline frameshift mutation (small deletion) at exon 15 of adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) tumor suppressor gene. Peripheral blood samples were collected from patients and Exon 15 of the APC gene was studied by direct sequencing after genomic DNA extraction. Four frameshift mutations were detected. Two patients had 5 bp deletion, c.3927_3931delAAAGA and two siblings presented deletion at codon 849 (c.2547_2548delTA p.Asp849fsX62). This study was the first report of genetic screening in Iranian FAP patients. In contrast to other studies we revealed that one patient with mutation at codon 1309 had an attenuated phenotype. PMID:25317407

  12. GC constituents and relative codon expressed amino acid composition in cyanobacterial phycobiliproteins.

    PubMed

    Kannaujiya, Vinod K; Rastogi, Rajesh P; Sinha, Rajeshwar P

    2014-08-10

    The genomic as well as structural relationship of phycobiliproteins (PBPs) in different cyanobacterial species are determined by nucleotides as well as amino acid composition. The genomic GC constituents influence the amino acid variability and codon usage of particular subunit of PBPs. We have analyzed 11 cyanobacterial species to explore the variation of amino acids and causal relationship between GC constituents and codon usage. The study at the first, second and third levels of GC content showed relatively more amino acid variability on the levels of G3+C3 position in comparison to the first and second positions. The amino acid encoded GC rich level including G rich and C rich or both correlate the codon variability and amino acid availability. The fluctuation in amino acids such as Arg, Ala, His, Asp, Gly, Leu and Glu in ? and ? subunits was observed at G1C1 position; however, fluctuation in other amino acids such as Ser, Thr, Cys and Trp was observed at G2C2 position. The coding selection pressure of amino acids such as Ala, Thr, Tyr, Asp, Gly, Ile, Leu, Asn, and Ser in ? and ? subunits of PBPs was more elaborated at G3C3 position. In this study, we observed that each subunit of PBPs is codon specific for particular amino acid. These results suggest that genomic constraint linked with GC constituents selects the codon for particular amino acids and furthermore, the codon level study may be a novel approach to explore many problems associated with genomics and proteomics of cyanobacteria. PMID:24933001

  13. INFLUENCE OF UPSTREAM WIND SHEAR AND TURBULENCE ON THE WIND PATTERN AND POLLUTANT CONCENTRATIONS WITHIN STREET CANYONS: A NUMERICAL SIMULATION STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study serves as a start of future research on the subject. his study shows that the canyon geometry and the upstream boundary conditions have significant influences on the flow and concentration fields in the vicinity of urban street canyons. ollutants emitted within a canyo...

  14. High resolution transcriptome maps for wild-type and NMD mutant C. elegans through development

    E-print Network

    Ramani, Arun K.; Nelson, Andrew C.; Kapranov, Philipp; Bell, Ian; Gingeras, Thomas R.; Fraser, Andrew G.

    2009-09-24

    splicing errors, NMD targets are enriched for transcripts containing open reading frames upstream of the predicted translational start (uORFs). We identify a relationship between the Kozak consensus surrounding the true start codon and the degree to which u...

  15. Sense codon emancipation for proteome-wide incorporation of noncanonical amino acids: rare isoleucine codon AUA as a target for genetic code expansion

    PubMed Central

    Bohlke, Nina; Budisa, Nediljko

    2014-01-01

    One of the major challenges in contemporary synthetic biology is to find a route to engineer synthetic organisms with altered chemical constitution. In terms of core reaction types, nature uses an astonishingly limited repertoire of chemistries when compared with the exceptionally rich and diverse methods of organic chemistry. In this context, the most promising route to change and expand the fundamental chemistry of life is the inclusion of amino acid building blocks beyond the canonical 20 (i.e. expanding the genetic code). This strategy would allow the transfer of numerous chemical functionalities and reactions from the synthetic laboratory into the cellular environment. Due to limitations in terms of both efficiency and practical applicability, state-of-the-art nonsense suppression- or frameshift suppression-based methods are less suitable for such engineering. Consequently, we set out to achieve this goal by sense codon emancipation, that is, liberation from its natural decoding function – a prerequisite for the reassignment of degenerate sense codons to a new 21st amino acid. We have achieved this by redesigning of several features of the post-transcriptional modification machinery which are directly involved in the decoding process. In particular, we report first steps towards the reassignment of 5797 AUA isoleucine codons in Escherichia coli using efficient tools for tRNA nucleotide modification pathway engineering. PMID:24433543

  16. Pseudoresonant interaction between flame and upstream velocity fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Karlin, V

    2006-01-01

    This work is dedicated to the analysis of the delicate details of the effect of upstream velocity fluctuations on the flame propagation speed. The investigation was carried out using the Sivashinsky model of cellularization of hydrodynamically unstable flame fronts. We identified the perturbations of the steadily propagating flames which can be significantly amplified over finite periods of time. These perturbations were used to model the effect of upstream velocity fluctuations on the flame front dynamics and to study a possibility to control the flame propagation speed. PMID:16486275

  17. Transition duct with divided upstream and downstream portions

    DOEpatents

    McMahan, Kevin Weston; LeBegue, Jeffrey Scott; Maldonado, Jaime Javier; Dillard, Daniel Jackson; Flanagan, James Scott

    2015-07-14

    Turbine systems are provided. In one embodiment, a turbine system includes a transition duct comprising an inlet, an outlet, and a duct passage extending between the inlet and the outlet and defining a longitudinal axis, a radial axis, and a tangential axis. The outlet of the transition duct is offset from the inlet along the longitudinal axis and the tangential axis. The duct passage includes an upstream portion extending from the inlet and a downstream portion extending from the outlet. The turbine system further includes a rib extending from an outer surface of the duct passage, the rib dividing the upstream portion and the downstream portion.

  18. PCR-RFLP to Detect Codon 248 Mutation in Exon 7 of "p53" Tumor Suppressor Gene

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ouyang, Liming; Ge, Chongtao; Wu, Haizhen; Li, Suxia; Zhang, Huizhan

    2009-01-01

    Individual genome DNA was extracted fast from oral swab and followed up with PCR specific for codon 248 of "p53" tumor suppressor gene. "Msp"I restriction mapping showed the G-C mutation in codon 248, which closely relates to cancer susceptibility. Students learn the concepts, detection techniques, and research significance of point mutations or…

  19. Identification of a Rare ?(0)-Thalassemia Mutation, Codon 54 (-T) (HBB: c.165delT) in an Iranian Family.

    PubMed

    Ghasemian Dastjerdy, Nadia; Banihashemi, Ali; Azizi, Mandana; Akhavan-Niaki, Haleh

    2015-12-01

    ?-Thalassemia (?-thal) is the most widespread autosomal recessive disorder worldwide. The present study describes a very rare ?-globin gene mutation, codon 54 (-T) (HBB: c.165delT), in a family from northern Iran. Nucleotide sequencing of amplified DNA obtained from a 28-year-old man revealed a deletion (-T) at codon 54 of the ?-globin gene that results in a nonsense sequence at codon 60 and inphase termination at codon 59. Moreover, the haplotype combination of six different restriction enzyme sites in the ?-globin cluster was determined for this mutation. To the best of our knowledge, this is the second article reporting the codon 54 mutation worldwide and the first report of this mutation in the Iranian population, emphasizing the high heterogeneity of this population. PMID:26290442

  20. PHP: Getting Started Introduction

    E-print Network

    Vander Zanden, Brad

    PHP: Getting Started Introduction This document describes: 1. the basic syntax for PHP code, 2. how to execute PHP scripts, 3. methods for sending output to the browser, 4. the handling of whitespace, and 5. how to comment your code. Basic PHP syntax PHP code typically resides in a plaintext file with a .php

  1. Starting Material Silicon substrate

    E-print Network

    Healy, Kevin Edward

    Starting Material Silicon substrate 150 mm, p-type, , 36-63 ohm-cm Attila Horvath 2005 #12;Pad Oxidation and Nitride Deposition Silicon substrate Pad oxide = 250A Silicon nitride = 2200A Attila Horvath 2005 #12;N-Well Photo and Nitride Etch Silicon substrate Pad oxide Silicon nitride Photo resist Attila

  2. Codon 249 mutations of p53 gene in non-neoplastic liver tissues

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Xiao-Mou; Yao, Chun-Lan; Chen, Xue-Juan; Peng, Wen-Wei; Gao, Zhi-Liang

    1999-01-01

    AIM: To study the significance of p53 gene in hepatocarcino genesis through analyzing codon 249 mutations of p53 gene in non-neoplastic liver tissues. METHODS: Codon 249 mutation was detected using single-strande d conformational polymorphism analysis and allele-specific PCR in liver tissues from 10 cases of chronic hepatitis, 5 cases of cirrhosis and 20 cases of HCCs. RESULTS: The detection rate of codon 249 mutation in chronic hepatitis, cirrhosis and pericancerous tissues was 70% (7/10), 100% (5/5) and 70% (14/20), respectively by AS-PCR. These mutations could not be detected b y SSCP analysis. The detection rates were 65% (13/20) and 45% (9/20) in cancerous tissues by AS-PCR and SSCP analysis. CONCLUSION: Codon 249 mutations of p53 gene were very popular in non-neoplastic liver tissues though the number of those mutant cells was only in subsection. Those mutations in cancerous tissues might take place in the stage before the formation of tumor. PMID:11819458

  3. A model for codon position bias in RNA editing Tsunglin Liu and Ralf Bundschuh

    E-print Network

    Bundschuh, Ralf

    a protein, i.e., a sequence of amino acids, following the instructions contained in the sequence of the messenger RNA. During translation groups of three consecutive bases of the messenger RNA -- the codons -- are read in order to determine which of the 20 amino acids is to be appended to the protein being

  4. Evolving Protein Motifs Using a Stochastic Regular Language with Codon-Level Probabilities

    E-print Network

    Ross, Brian J.

    equivalents. Koza et al. apply GP towards motif synthesis for a number of protein families [7]. Their targetEvolving Protein Motifs Using a Stochastic Regular Language with Codon-Level Probabilities Brian J@cosc.brocku.ca ABSTRACT Experiments involving the evolution of protein motifs using genetic programming are presented

  5. Synonymous Codon Usage in Escherichia coli: Selection for Translational Nina Stoletzki* and Adam Eyre-Walker

    E-print Network

    Eyre-Walker, Adam

    Synonymous Codon Usage in Escherichia coli: Selection for Translational Accuracy Nina Stoletzki use in Escherichia coli is biased to reduce the costs of both missense and nonsense translational for this is two-fold. First, in several organisms, including Escherichia coli, Saccharomyces cerevisiae

  6. Role of PRNP codon 129 genotype in defining strain transmission properties of human transmissible spongiform encephalopathy 

    E-print Network

    Bishop, Matthew T.

    2009-01-01

    three codon 129 genotype mice are susceptible with a ranking of transmission efficiency of HuMM>HuMV>HuVV. HuMM mice develop the most widespread neuropathology with features similar to human vCJD. Subclinical infection was noted in each mouse line...

  7. Effective population size does not predict codon usage bias in mammals

    PubMed Central

    Kessler, Michael D; Dean, Matthew D

    2014-01-01

    Synonymous codons are not used at equal frequency throughout the genome, a phenomenon termed codon usage bias (CUB). It is often assumed that interspecific variation in the intensity of CUB is related to species differences in effective population sizes (Ne), with selection on CUB operating less efficiently in species with small Ne. Here, we specifically ask whether variation in Ne predicts differences in CUB in mammals and report two main findings. First, across 41 mammalian genomes, CUB was not correlated with two indirect proxies of Ne (body mass and generation time), even though there was statistically significant evidence of selection shaping CUB across all species. Interestingly, autosomal genes showed higher codon usage bias compared to X-linked genes, and high-recombination genes showed higher codon usage bias compared to low recombination genes, suggesting intraspecific variation in Ne predicts variation in CUB. Second, across six mammalian species with genetic estimates of Ne (human, chimpanzee, rabbit, and three mouse species: Mus musculus, M. domesticus, and M. castaneus), Ne and CUB were weakly and inconsistently correlated. At least in mammals, interspecific divergence in Ne does not strongly predict variation in CUB. One hypothesis is that each species responds to a unique distribution of selection coefficients, confounding any straightforward link between Ne and CUB. PMID:25505518

  8. Expanding the Genetic Code: Selection of Efficient Suppressors of Four-base Codons and Identification

    E-print Network

    Magliery, Thomas J.

    and Identification of ``Shifty'' Four-base Codons with a Library Approach in Escherichia coli Thomas J. Magliery2 , J 1 frameshifting is most favorable in the absence of suppressor tRNAs in Escherichia coli. We intend III tau and gamma units, and the self-regulating RF2 protein in Escherichia coli (Gesteland et al

  9. Adaptation to Different Human Populations by HIV-1 Revealed by Codon-Based Analyses

    E-print Network

    Brown, Andrew Leigh

    Adaptation to Different Human Populations by HIV-1 Revealed by Codon-Based Analyses Sergei L populations. Applying these methods to two HIV populations infecting genetically distinct human hosts, we have differentially in the two samples, demonstrating specific population-level adaptation of HIV to human populations

  10. Upstream particle events close to the bow shock and 200 earth radii upstream - ISEE-1 and ISEE-3 observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scholer, M.; Hovestadt, D.; Klecker, B.; Ipavich, F. M.; Gloeckler, G.

    1980-01-01

    Two energetic particle events (28 keV - 145 keV) upstream of the earth's bow shock have been investigated with two identical experiments of the Max-Planck-Institut/University of Maryland on ISEE-1 and ISEE-3. Close to the bow shock the particle distribution is more or less isotropic and indicates strong scattering of these particles in the upstream wave field. At ISEE-3 the particles move essentially scatter-free from the general bow shock direction. The temporal evolution of the particle bursts is discussed in terms of the interplanetary magnetic field topology and the scattering conditions.

  11. 8. GENERAL EXTERIOR VIEW LOOKING NORTHWEST TOWARD UPSTREAM END OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. GENERAL EXTERIOR VIEW LOOKING NORTHWEST TOWARD UPSTREAM END OF NAVIGATION LOCK #1; SOUTH END OF POWERHOUSE #1 IS VISIBLE ON RIGHT; BRADFORD SLOUGH IS VISIBLE IN FOREGROUND. - Bonneville Project, Navigation Lock No. 1, Oregon shore of Columbia River near first Powerhouse, Bonneville, Multnomah County, OR

  12. View of upstream face of Grand Coulee Dam, looking northeast. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of upstream face of Grand Coulee Dam, looking northeast. This image features a partially cloudy sky.) - Columbia Basin Project, Grand Coulee Dam & Franklin D. Roosevelt Lake, Across Columbia River, Southeast of Town of Grand Coulee, Grand Coulee, Grant County, WA

  13. 4. AERATOR AT 525, CONSTRUCTED 19371938, VIEW FROM UPSTREAM (TRASH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. AERATOR AT 525, CONSTRUCTED 1937-1938, VIEW FROM UPSTREAM (TRASH SCREEN REMOVED FOR CLARITY), WATER FROM INTAKE FLOWS THROUGH FLUME, THEN DAMS, AND SPILLS OVER STEPS TO MIX WITH OXYGEN, THUS REDUCING ACIDITY LEVELS. ACID INDUCES FASTER CORROSION OF PIPES AND SPOILS TASTE. - Kalaupapa Water Supply System, Waikolu Valley to Kalaupapa Settlement, Island of Molokai, Kalaupapa, Kalawao County, HI

  14. View of upstream face of the forebay dam of Grand ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of upstream face of the forebay dam of Grand Coulee Dam, looking west. Construction of the forebay dam, which replaced the eastern end of the original Grand Coulee Dam, was completed in 1974. - Columbia Basin Project, Grand Coulee Dam & Franklin D. Roosevelt Lake, Across Columbia River, Southeast of Town of Grand Coulee, Grand Coulee, Grant County, WA

  15. 12. Upstream view showing thelower log pond log chute in ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. Upstream view showing thelower log pond log chute in the main channel of the Hudson River. The log chute in the dam can be seen in the background. Facing southwest. - Glens Falls Dam, 100' to 450' West of U.S. Route 9 Bridge Spanning Hudson River, Glens Falls, Warren County, NY

  16. View of Stehr Lake from FS 502 looking upstream (northeast). ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of Stehr Lake from FS 502 looking upstream (northeast). Vehicle at right center is parked on earthen Upper Stehr Lake Dam. - Childs-Irving Hydroelectric Project, Childs System, Stehr Lake & Dams, Forest Service Road 708/502, Camp Verde, Yavapai County, AZ

  17. 13. Detail, upper chord connection point on upstream side of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. Detail, upper chord connection point on upstream side of truss, showing connection of upper chord, laced vertical compression member, knee-braced strut, counters, and laterals. - Red Bank Creek Bridge, Spanning Red Bank Creek at Rawson Road, Red Bluff, Tehama County, CA

  18. 2. UPSTREAM SIDE OF DAM AND BRIDGE WITH ABANDONED SAN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. UPSTREAM SIDE OF DAM AND BRIDGE WITH ABANDONED SAN TAN FLOOD-WATER HEADGATE IN FOREGROUND. TAKEN FROM NORTH END OF DAM - San Carlos Irrigation Project, Sacaton Dam & Bridge, Gila River, T4S R6E S12/13, Coolidge, Pinal County, AZ

  19. 10. VIEW UPSTREAM OF PIPELINE SECTION AT JUNCTION OF HUME ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. VIEW UPSTREAM OF PIPELINE SECTION AT JUNCTION OF HUME CEMENT PIPE AND CAST-IRON (460'). NOTE CYLINDRICAL COLLAR OF CEMENT SECTIONS AND BELL JUNCTIONS OF IRON PIPE. - Kalaupapa Water Supply System, Waikolu Valley to Kalaupapa Settlement, Island of Molokai, Kalaupapa, Kalawao County, HI

  20. 14. VIEW SHOWING UPSTREAM FACE OF HORSE MESA. TRACK FROM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. VIEW SHOWING UPSTREAM FACE OF HORSE MESA. TRACK FROM AGGREGATE BARGES TO MIXING PLANT IS AT LOWER LEFT, RIGHT SPILLWAY CHUTE IS TAKING FORM AT UPPER RIGHT April 29, 1927 - Horse Mesa Dam, Salt River, 65 miles East of Phoenix, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  1. 2. VIEW OF UPSTREAM SIDE OF HISTORIC OUTLET WORKS TAKEN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. VIEW OF UPSTREAM SIDE OF HISTORIC OUTLET WORKS TAKEN FROM CENTER OF THE CHANNEL FROM TWIN LAKES. VIEW LOOKING EAST. - Twin Lakes Dam & Outlet Works, Beneath Twin Lakes Reservoir, T11S, R80W, S22, Twin Lakes, Lake County, CO

  2. Ecologic Genomics of DNA: Upstream Bending in Prokaryotic Promoters

    E-print Network

    Bolshoy, Alexander

    Ecologic Genomics of DNA: Upstream Bending in Prokaryotic Promoters Alexander Bolshoy1 of the distribution of predicted intrinsic curvature along all available complete prokaryotic genomes, the genomes were divided into two groups. Curvature distribution in all prokaryotes of the first group indicated

  3. 3. FORMER INTAKE DAM NO. 2, VIEW LOOKING UPSTREAM AT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. FORMER INTAKE DAM NO. 2, VIEW LOOKING UPSTREAM AT LEFT IS RUBBLE MASONRY COVERING INTERSECTION OF THE TWO IRON PIPES FROM NEW DAM ENTERING OLD INTAKE OPENING AT RIGHT IS BOX FLUME LEADING TO AERATOR. - Kalaupapa Water Supply System, Waikolu Valley to Kalaupapa Settlement, Island of Molokai, Kalaupapa, Kalawao County, HI

  4. UPSTREAM (WEST) VIEW SHOWING SOUTH EMBANKMENT BERM AND CONCRETE COREWALL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    UPSTREAM (WEST) VIEW SHOWING SOUTH EMBANKMENT BERM AND CONCRETE COREWALL AT CENTER, WITH COOKE DAM POND AT LEFT AND POWERHOUSE (MI-98-C) AND SPILLWAY (MI-98-B) IN BACKGROUND. VIEW TO NORTHEAST - Cooke Hydroelectric Plant, South Embankment, Cook Dam Road at Au Sable River, Oscoda, Iosco County, MI

  5. COOKE DAM POND AND UPSTREAM (WEST) SIDE OF (LR) NORTH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    COOKE DAM POND AND UPSTREAM (WEST) SIDE OF (L-R) NORTH EMBANKMENT (MI-98-A), SPILLWAY (MI-98-B), PENSTOCK ENTRANCES, POWERHOUSE (MI-98-C), AND SOUTH EMBANKMENT (MI-98-E). VIEW TO NORTHEAST - Cooke Hydroelectric Plant, Cook Dam Road at Au Sable River, Oscoda, Iosco County, MI

  6. 1. View looking upstream (southwest) at diversion dam. Water enters ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. View looking upstream (southwest) at diversion dam. Water enters half-round flume on right. Break in diversion structure provides a view of water flow in flume during the high water runoff in June. - Rock Creek Hydroelectric Project, Rock Creek, Baker County, OR

  7. 32. AERIAL VIEW OF TIETON DAM, UPSTREAM FACE OF DAM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    32. AERIAL VIEW OF TIETON DAM, UPSTREAM FACE OF DAM (Trashrack-structure for outlet at lower left in reservoir, spillway at upper left. Reservoir nearly empty due to drought.) - Tieton Dam, South & East of State Highway 12, Naches, Yakima County, WA

  8. 8. Upstream face of Mormon Flat, both concrete placement tower ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Upstream face of Mormon Flat, both concrete placement tower and 105 foot derrick are visible. Photographer unknown, June 8, 1924. Source: Salt River Project. - Mormon Flat Dam, On Salt River, Eastern Maricopa County, east of Phoenix, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  9. 23. VIEW LOOKING UPSTREAM AND TOWARD LEFT ABUTMENT OF DAM. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. VIEW LOOKING UPSTREAM AND TOWARD LEFT ABUTMENT OF DAM. NOTE FORMS FOR LEFT GRAVITY ABUTMENT AT UPPER RIGHT CORNER OF PICTURE. ARCHES 3, 4, 5, AND 7 COMPLETED TO ELEVATION 1795. 5 OR 7.5 FEET BELOW TOP OF PARAPET WALL. November 29, 1938 - Bartlett Dam, Verde River, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  10. 25. UPSTREAM VIEW OF LOWER END OF OUTLET STRUCTURE SHOWING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    25. UPSTREAM VIEW OF LOWER END OF OUTLET STRUCTURE SHOWING FORMS IN PLACE FOR GRAVITY WALL SECTIONS.... Volume XVI, No. 16, August 16, 1939. - Prado Dam, Outlet Works, Santa Ana River near junction of State Highways 71 & 91, Corona, Riverside County, CA

  11. 42. VIEW OF STAGE RECORDER AT END OF UPSTREAM GUIDE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    42. VIEW OF STAGE RECORDER AT END OF UPSTREAM GUIDE WALL, LOOKING NORTHEAST. (Several hours after this view was taken, the stage recorder was hit a~d heavily damaged by a grain barge.) - Upper Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel, Lock & Dam No. 9, Lynxville, Crawford County, WI

  12. Structural characterization of eRF1 mutants indicate a complex mechanism of stop codon recognition.

    PubMed

    Pillay, Shubhadra; Li, Yan; Wong, Leo E; Pervushin, Konstantin

    2016-01-01

    Eukarya translation termination requires the stop codon recognizing protein eRF1. In contrast to the multiple proteins required for translation termination in Bacteria, eRF1 retains the ability to recognize all three of the stop codons. The details of the mechanism that eRF1 uses to recognize stop codons has remained elusive. This study describes the structural effects of mutations in the eRF1 N-domain that have previously been shown to alter stop codon recognition specificity. Here, we propose a model of eRF1 binding to the pre-translation termination ribosomal complex that is based in part on our solution NMR structures of the wild-type and mutant eRF1 N-domains. Since structural perturbations induced by these mutations were spread throughout the protein structure, residual dipolar coupling (RDC) data were recorded to establish the long-range effects of the specific mutations, E55Q, Y125F, Q(122)FM(Y)F(126). RDCs were recorded on (15)N-labeled eRF1 N-domain weakly aligned in either 5% w/v n-octyl-penta (ethylene glycol)/octanol (C8E5) or the filamentous phage Pf1. These data indicate that the mutations alter the conformation and dynamics of the GTS loop that is distant from the mutation sites. We propose that the GTS loop forms a switch that is key for the multiple codon recognition capability of eRF1. PMID:26725946

  13. Sucrose Control of Translation Mediated by an Upstream Open Reading Frame-Encoded Peptide1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Rahmani, Fatemeh; Hummel, Maureen; Schuurmans, Jolanda; Wiese-Klinkenberg, Anika; Smeekens, Sjef; Hanson, Johannes

    2009-01-01

    Regulation of gene expression through translational control is common in many organisms. The Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) transcription factor bZIP11 is translational repressed in response to sucrose (Suc), resulting in Suc-regulated changes in amino acid metabolism. The 5? leader of the bZIP11 mRNA harbors several upstream open reading frames (uORFs), of which the second uORF is well conserved among bZIP11 homologous genes. The uORF2 element encodes a Suc control peptide (SC-peptide) of 28 residues that is sufficient for imposing Suc-induced repression of translation (SIRT) on a heterologous mRNA. Detailed analysis of the SC-peptide suggests that it functions as an attenuator peptide. Results suggest that the SC-peptide inhibits bZIP11 translation in response to high Suc levels by stalling the ribosome on the mRNA. The conserved noncanonical AUG contexts of bZIP11 uORFs allow inefficient translational initiation of the uORF, resulting in translation initiation of the scanning ribosome at the AUG codon of the bZIP11 main ORF. The results presented show that Suc-dependent signaling mediates differential translation of mRNAs containing SC-peptides encoding uORFs. PMID:19403731

  14. Detecting floodplain inundation based on the upstream-downstream relationship

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Tongtiegang; Shao, Quanxi

    2015-11-01

    The rise in river stage (water depth) can lead to disastrous floodplain inundation. On the basis of hydraulic simulation data, this study proposes novel data-analytical methods to infer the threshold river stage and detect floodplain inundation. A quasi-Muskingum model is derived from the classical Muskingum model to characterise the relationship between upstream and downstream river stages. Based on this model, F-test and modified Akaike information criterion AICc are introduced to test if there is a change of the upstream-downstream relationship. Furthermore, a bootstrap-based calibration-validation experiment is set up to evaluate the performance of the quasi-Muskingum model. The proposed methods are applied to a case study of the 1991 and 2001 floods in the Flinders and Norman Rivers in Northern Australia. The results show that floodplain inundation does change the upstream-downstream relationship as it drastically alters the stage-discharge relationship. To combine the quasi-Muskingum model with F-test and AICc facilitates an efficient approach to detect the change and infer the threshold river stage. The analytical testing is in concert with visual examination - the time when the river stage becomes higher than the detected threshold coincides with the beginning of floodplain inundation. Despite the change, the quasi-Muskingum model effectively captures the upstream-downstream relationship and requires a small number of samples in calibration. This study highlights the effectiveness of the data-analytical methods in dealing with the change of the upstream-downstream relationship.

  15. Purification and characterization of chicken ovalbumin gene upstream promoter transcription factor from homologous oviduct cells.

    PubMed Central

    Bagchi, M K; Tsai, S Y; Tsai, M J; O'Malley, B W

    1987-01-01

    Previous studies established that the chicken ovalbumin gene upstream promoter (COUP) sequence, which lies between -70 and -90 base pairs upstream from the cap site, is essential for the efficient transcription of the ovalbumin gene. A transcription factor which binds to this sequence has been purified from the homologous chicken oviduct cells. The purification scheme starting from oviduct nuclear extract involved a combination of conventional column and sequence-specific DNA affinity chromatography steps. Using gel retardation and DNase I footprinting techniques to assay COUP-binding activity, we achieved extensive purification of this factor. Binding competition studies with the purified factor indicated that it bound specifically to the COUP sequence and that the binding could be competed for only by the promoter DNA fragments or synthetic oligonucleotides containing the COUP sequence. The purified protein preparation showed multiple polypeptide bands on polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Renaturation of separated polypeptides after extraction from the gel matrix was carried out. The majority of renatured polypeptides exhibited specific binding to the COUP sequence. Images PMID:3437886

  16. Mutations to nonsense codons in human genetic disease: implications for gene therapy by nonsense suppressor tRNAs.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, J; Martin, R

    1994-04-25

    Nonsense suppressor tRNAs have been suggested as potential agents for human somatic gene therapy. Recent work from this laboratory has described significant effects of 3' codon context on the efficiency of human nonsense suppressors. A rapid increase in the number of reports of human diseases caused by nonsense codons, prompted us to determine how the spectrum of mutation to either UAG, UAA or UGA codons and their respective 3' contexts, might effect the efficiency of human suppressor tRNAs employed for purposes of gene therapy. This paper presents a survey of 179 events of mutations to nonsense codons which cause human germline or somatic disease. The analysis revealed a ratio of approximately 1:2:3 for mutation to UAA, UAG and UGA respectively. This pattern is similar, but not identical, to that of naturally occurring stop codons. The 3' contexts of new mutations to stop were also analysed. Once again, the pattern was similar to the contexts surrounding natural termination signals. These results imply there will be little difference in the sensitivity of nonsense mutations and natural stop codons to suppression by nonsense suppressor tRNAs. Analysis of the codons altered by nonsense mutations suggests that efforts to design human UAG suppressor tRNAs charged with Trp, Gln, and Glu; UAA suppressors charged with Gln and Glu, and UGA suppressors which insert Arg, would be an essential step in the development of suppressor tRNAs as agents of human somatic gene therapy. PMID:8190621

  17. Translation start site multiplicity of the CCAAT/enhancer binding protein alpha mRNA is dictated by a small 5' open reading frame.

    PubMed

    Calkhoven, C F; Bouwman, P R; Snippe, L; Ab, G

    1994-12-25

    The CCAAT/enhancer binding proteins (C/EBP) alpha and beta of the bZIP family of transcription factors each occur as multiple forms due to translation initiation at different in-frame AUG codons from the same messenger RNA. The C/EBP alpha mRNAs of chicken, rat and Xenopus all contain a small 5' open reading frame (5'ORF) whose size (18 nucleotides) and distance (seven nucleotides) to the C/EBP alpha cistron has been conserved in vertebrate evolution. The present studies shows that the small 5'ORF is crucial to the leaky scanning mechanism of ribosomes causing a fraction of them to ignore the first C/EBP alpha AUG codon and to start at internal AUGs. Our data challenge the view that translational start site multiplicity is mainly governed by the sequence context of the potential initiation codons. Western analysis showed that the two major chicken C/EBP alpha translation products, the full-length cC/EBP alpha-42 which acts a trans-activator in liver and the N-terminally truncated cC/EBP alpha-29 which lacks transcription activation potential, occur in a fixed ratio which is similar in different expressing tissues, like liver, lung and small intestine. The presence of a similar, thusfar unnoticed, small ORF 5' to the major initiation codon of C/EBP beta mRNA suggests that start site multiplicity from this mRNA may be governed by the same mechanism. PMID:7838705

  18. Mutations to Less-Preferred Synonymous Codons in a Highly Expressed Gene of Escherichia coli: Fitness and Epistatic Interactions.

    PubMed

    Hauber, David J; Grogan, Dennis W; DeBry, Ronald W

    2016-01-01

    Codon-tRNA coevolution to maximize protein production has been, until recently, the dominant hypothesis to explain codon-usage bias in highly expressed bacterial genes. Two predictions of this hypothesis are 1) selection is weak; and 2) similar silent replacements at different codons should have similar fitness consequence. We used an allele-replacement strategy to change five specific 3rd-codon-position (silent) sites in the highly expressed Escherichia coli ribosomal protein gene rplQ from the wild type to a less-preferred alternative. We introduced the five mutations within a 10-codon region. Four of the silent sites were chosen to test the second prediction, with a CTG to CTA mutation being introduced at two closely linked leucine codons and an AAA to AAG mutation being introduced at two closely linked lysine codons. We also introduced a fifth silent mutation, a GTG to GTA mutation at a valine codon in the same genic region. We measured the fitness effect of the individual mutations by competing each single-mutant strain against the parental wild-type strain, using a disrupted form of the araA gene as a selectively neutral phenotypic marker to distinguish between strains in direct competition experiments. Three of the silent mutations had a fitness effect of |s| > 0.02, which is contradictory to the prediction that selection will be weak. The two leucine mutations had significantly different fitness effects, as did the two lysine mutations, contradictory to the prediction that similar mutations at different codons should have similar fitness effects. We also constructed a strain carrying all five silent mutations in combination. Its fitness effect was greater than that predicted from the individual fitness values, suggesting that negative synergistic epistasis acts on the combination allele. PMID:26727272

  19. Numeral series hidden in the distribution of atomic mass of amino acids to codon domains in the genetic code.

    PubMed

    Wohlin, Åsa

    2015-03-21

    The distribution of codons in the nearly universal genetic code is a long discussed issue. At the atomic level, the numeral series 2x(2) (x=5-0) lies behind electron shells and orbitals. Numeral series appear in formulas for spectral lines of hydrogen. The question here was if some similar scheme could be found in the genetic code. A table of 24 codons was constructed (synonyms counted as one) for 20 amino acids, four of which have two different codons. An atomic mass analysis was performed, built on common isotopes. It was found that a numeral series 5 to 0 with exponent 2/3 times 10(2) revealed detailed congruency with codon-grouped amino acid side-chains, simultaneously with the division on atom kinds, further with main 3rd base groups, backbone chains and with codon-grouped amino acids in relation to their origin from glycolysis or the citrate cycle. Hence, it is proposed that this series in a dynamic way may have guided the selection of amino acids into codon domains. Series with simpler exponents also showed noteworthy correlations with the atomic mass distribution on main codon domains; especially the 2x(2)-series times a factor 16 appeared as a conceivable underlying level, both for the atomic mass and charge distribution. Furthermore, it was found that atomic mass transformations between numeral systems, possibly interpretable as dimension degree steps, connected the atomic mass of codon bases with codon-grouped amino acids and with the exponent 2/3-series in several astonishing ways. Thus, it is suggested that they may be part of a deeper reference system. PMID:25623487

  20. Enceladus: Starting Hydrothermal Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matson, D. L.; Castillo-Rogez, J. C.; Johnson, T. V.; Lunine, J. I.; Davies, A. G.

    2011-01-01

    We describe a process for starting the hydrothermal activity in Enceladus' South Polar Region. The process takes advantage of fissures that reach the water table, about 1 kilometer below the surface. Filling these fissures with fresh ocean water initiates a flow of water up from an ocean that can be self-sustaining. In this hypothesis the heat to sustain the thermal anomalies and the plumes comes from a slightly warm ocean at depth. The heat is brought to the surface by water that circulates up, through the crust and then returns to the ocean.

  1. Torque fluctuations caused by upstream mean flow and turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farr, T. D.; Hancock, P. E.

    2014-12-01

    A series of studies are in progress investigating the effects of turbine-array-wake interactions for a range of atmospheric boundary layer states by means of the EnFlo meteorological wind tunnel. The small, three-blade model wind turbines drive 4-quadrant motor-generators. Only a single turbine in neutral flow is considered here. The motor-generator current can be measured with adequate sensitivity by means of a current sensor allowing the mean and fluctuating torque to be inferred. Spectra of torque fluctuations and streamwise velocity fluctuations ahead of the rotor, between 0.1 and 2 diameters, show that only the large-scale turbulent motions contribute significantly to the torque fluctuations. Time-lagged cross-correlation between upstream velocity and torque fluctuations are largest over the inner part of the blade. They also show the turbulence to be frozen in behaviour over the 2 diameters upstream of the turbine.

  2. EMMPRIN, an upstream regulator of MMPs, in CNS biology.

    PubMed

    Kaushik, Deepak Kumar; Hahn, Jennifer Nancy; Yong, V Wee

    2015-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are engaged in pathologies associated with infections, tumors, autoimmune disorders and neurological dysfunctions. With the identification of an upstream regulator of MMPs, EMMPRIN (Extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer, CD147), it is relevant to address if EMMPRIN plays a role in the pathology of central nervous system (CNS) diseases. This would enable the possibility of a more upstream and effective therapeutic target. Indeed, conditions including gliomas, Alzheimer's disease (AD), multiple sclerosis (MS), and other insults such as hypoxia/ischemia show elevated levels of EMMPRIN which correlate with MMP production. In contrast, given EMMPRIN's role in CNS homeostasis with respect to regulation of monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs) and interactions with adhesion molecules including integrins, we need to consider that EMMPRIN may also serve important regulatory or protective functions. This review summarizes the current understanding of EMMPRIN's involvement in CNS homeostasis, its possible roles in escalating or reducing neural injury, and the mechanisms of EMMPRIN including and apart from MMP induction. PMID:25644103

  3. 12. Detail, lower chord connection point on upstream side of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. Detail, lower chord connection point on upstream side of truss, showing pinned connection of lower chord eye bars, laced vertical compression member, diagonal eye bar tension members, turnbuckled diagonal counters, and floor beam. Note also timber floor stringers supported by floor beam, and exposed ends of timber deck members visible at left above lower chord eye bar. View to northwest. - Red Bank Creek Bridge, Spanning Red Bank Creek at Rawson Road, Red Bluff, Tehama County, CA

  4. 8. SEDIMENTATION CHAMBER, VIEW UPSTREAM (PLANK COVER REMOVED FOR CLARITY). ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. SEDIMENTATION CHAMBER, VIEW UPSTREAM (PLANK COVER REMOVED FOR CLARITY). BOX FLUME DROPS SLIGHTLY INTO CHAMBER ON LEFT SIDE. CHAMBER IS A SERIES OF BAFFLES DESIGNED TO SLOW THE FLOW OF WATER. FLOW IS REDUCED TO ALLOW PARTICULATES TO SETTLE TO THE BOTTOM. TWO SCREENS (NOT SHOWN) FILTER LARGER DEBRIS. - Kalaupapa Water Supply System, Waikolu Valley to Kalaupapa Settlement, Island of Molokai, Kalaupapa, Kalawao County, HI

  5. Steepened channels upstream of knickpoints: Controls on relict landscape response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berlin, Maureen M.; Anderson, Robert S.

    2009-09-01

    The morphology of a relict landscape provides important insight into erosion rates and processes prior to base level fall. Fluvial knickpoints are commonly thought to form a leak-proof moving boundary between a rejuvenated landscape below and a relict landscape above. We argue that fluvial rejuvenation may leak farther upstream, depending on the rate and style of knickpoint migration. The outer margin of a relict landscape should therefore be used with caution in tectonic geomorphology studies, as channel steepening upstream of knickpoints could reduce the relict area. We explore the response of the Roan Plateau to knickpoint retreat triggered by late Cenozoic upper Colorado River incision. Multiple knickpoints (100-m waterfalls) separate a low-relief, upper landscape from incised canyons below. Two digital elevation model data sets (10-m U.S. Geological Survey and 1-m Airborne Laser Swath Mapping) indicate steeper channels above waterfalls relative to concave channels farther upstream. The steepened reaches are several kilometers long, correspond to doubling of slope, and exhibit channel narrowing and an increase in hillslope angle. We compare two mechanisms for generating steepened reaches. The first uses a recent model for erosion amplification due to flow acceleration at the waterfall lip. The second acknowledges that waterfall lips may be limited to the outcrop of a resistant formation. Subtle structural warping of the stratigraphy can lead to lowering of the waterfall lip as it retreats, thus lowering base level for upstream channels. Results of numerical modeling experiments suggest the latter mechanism is more consistent with our observations of long, mildly steepened reaches.

  6. Missouri: Early Head Start Initiative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Law and Social Policy, Inc. (CLASP), 2012

    2012-01-01

    Missouri's Early Head Start/Child Care Partnership Project expands access to Early Head Start (EHS) services for children birth to age 3 by developing partnerships between federal Head Start, EHS contractors, and child care providers. Head Start and EHS contractors that participate in the initiative provide services through community child care…

  7. Minnesota: Early Head Start Initiatiive

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Law and Social Policy, Inc. (CLASP), 2012

    2012-01-01

    Minnesota provides supplemental state funding to existing federal Head Start and Early Head Start (EHS) grantees to increase their capacity to serve additional infants, toddlers, and pregnant women. The initiative was started in 1997 when the state legislature earmarked $1 million of the general state Head Start supplemental funds for children…

  8. The Azorhizobium caulinodans nifA gene: identification of upstream-activating sequences including a new element, the 'anaerobox'.

    PubMed Central

    Nees, D W; Stein, P A; Ludwig, R A

    1988-01-01

    From nucleotide sequencing analyses, the A. caulinodans nifA gene seems to be under dual control by the Ntr (in response to available N) and Fnr (in response to available O2) transcriptional activation/repression systems. Because it fixes N2 in two contexts, the Ntr system might regulate A. caulinodans nif gene expression ex planta, while the Fnr system might similarly regulate in planta. As nifA upstream-activating elements, we have identified: (i) a gpNifA binding site allowing autogenous nifA regulation, (ii) an Ntr-dependent transcription start, presumably the target of gpNifA activation, and (iii) an "anaerobox" tetradecameric nucleotide sequence that is precisely conserved among O2 regulated enteric bacterial genes controlled by the gpFnr transcriptional activator. Because it is precisely positioned upstream of enteric bacterial transcriptional starts, the "anaerobox" sequence may constitute the gpFnr DNA binding site. If so, then a second, Ntr-independent nifA transcription start may exist. We have also deduced the A. caulinodans nifA open reading frame and have compared the gene product (gpNifA) with those of other N2-fixing organisms. These proteins exhibit strongly conserved motifs: (i) sites conserved among ATP-binding proteins, (ii) an interdomain linker region, and (iii) a C-terminal alpha-helix-turn-alpha-helix DNA binding site. PMID:3186446

  9. Interaction of upstream flow distortions with high Mach number cascades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Englert, G. W.

    1981-01-01

    Features of the interaction of flow distortions, such as gusts and wakes with blade rows of advance type fans and compressors having high tip Mach numbers are modeled. A typical disturbance was assumed to have harmonic time dependence and was described, at a far upstream location, in three orthogonal spatial coordinates by a double Fourier series. It was convected at supersonic relative to a linear cascade described as an unrolled annulus. Conditions were selected so that the component of this velocity parallel to the axis of the turbomachine was subsonic, permitting interaction between blades through the upstream as well as downstream flow media. A strong, nearly normal shock was considered in the blade passages which was allowed curvature and displacement. The flows before and after the shock were linearized relative to uniform mean velocities in their respective regions. Solution of the descriptive equations was by adaption of the Wiener-Hopf technique, enabling a determination of distortion patterns through and downstream of the cascade as well as pressure distributions on the blade and surfaces. Details of interaction of the disturbance with the in-passage shock were discussed. Infuences of amplitude, wave length, and phase of the disturbance on lifts and moments of cascade configurations are presented. Numerical results are clarified by reference to an especially orderly pattern of upstream vertical motion in relation to the cascade parameters.

  10. Hydraulics of floods upstream of horseshoe canyons and waterfalls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapotre, Mathieu G. A.; Lamb, Michael P.

    2015-07-01

    Horseshoe waterfalls are ubiquitous in natural streams, bedrock canyons, and engineering structures. Nevertheless, water flow patterns upstream of horseshoe waterfalls are poorly known and likely differ from the better studied case of a one-dimensional linear step because of flow focusing into the horseshoe. This is a significant knowledge gap because the hydraulics at waterfalls controls sediment transport and bedrock incision, which can compromise the integrity of engineered structures and influence the evolution of river canyons on Earth and Mars. Here we develop new semiempirical theory for the spatial acceleration of water upstream of, and the cumulative discharge into, horseshoe canyons and waterfalls. To this end, we performed 110 numerical experiments by solving the 2-D depth-averaged shallow-water equations for a wide range of flood depths, widths and discharges, and canyon lengths, widths and bed gradients. We show that the upstream, normal flow Froude number is the dominant control on lateral flow focusing and acceleration into the canyon head and that focusing is limited when the flood width is small compared to a cross-stream backwater length scale. In addition, for sheet floods much wider than the canyon, flow focusing into the canyon head leads to reduced discharge (and drying in cases) across the canyon sidewalls, which is especially pronounced for canyons that are much longer than they are wide. Our results provide new expectations for morphodynamic feedbacks between floods and topography, and thus canyon formation.

  11. Catalytic Ignition and Upstream Reaction Propagation in Monolith Reactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Struk, Peter M.; Dietrich, Daniel L.; Miller, Fletcher J.; T'ien, James S.

    2007-01-01

    Using numerical simulations, this work demonstrates a concept called back-end ignition for lighting-off and pre-heating a catalytic monolith in a power generation system. In this concept, a downstream heat source (e.g. a flame) or resistive heating in the downstream portion of the monolith initiates a localized catalytic reaction which subsequently propagates upstream and heats the entire monolith. The simulations used a transient numerical model of a single catalytic channel which characterizes the behavior of the entire monolith. The model treats both the gas and solid phases and includes detailed homogeneous and heterogeneous reactions. An important parameter in the model for back-end ignition is upstream heat conduction along the solid. The simulations used both dry and wet CO chemistry as a model fuel for the proof-of-concept calculations; the presence of water vapor can trigger homogenous reactions, provided that gas-phase temperatures are adequately high and there is sufficient fuel remaining after surface reactions. With sufficiently high inlet equivalence ratio, back-end ignition occurs using the thermophysical properties of both a ceramic and metal monolith (coated with platinum in both cases), with the heat-up times significantly faster for the metal monolith. For lower equivalence ratios, back-end ignition occurs without upstream propagation. Once light-off and propagation occur, the inlet equivalence ratio could be reduced significantly while still maintaining an ignited monolith as demonstrated by calculations using complete monolith heating.

  12. Lack of IRS-1 codon 513 and 972 polymorphism in Pima Indians

    SciTech Connect

    Celi, F.S.; Silver, K.; Walston, J.

    1995-09-01

    Insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1), a 1242 amino acid protein, an endogenous substrate for the insulin receptor tyrosine kinase, mediates many or all of the metabolic actions of insulin. Recently, polymorphism at codons 513 and 972 of the IRS-1 gene resulting in 2 amino acid substitutions that were associated with type II diabetes were found in a Caucasian population. Using allele specific oligonucleotide (ASO) hybridization, we screened 242 diabetic and 190 nondiabetic Pima Indians, a population with a very high prevalence of type II diabetes. Neither of the two mutations was present in either diabetic or nondiabetic subjects. We conclude that polymorphism at codons 513 and 972 of the IRS-1 gene observed in certain Caucasian populations is very rare or absent in Pima Indians. 20 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  13. When cells stop making sense: effects of nonsense codons on RNA metabolism in vertebrate cells.

    PubMed Central

    Maquat, L E

    1995-01-01

    It appears that no organism is immune to the effects of nonsense codons on mRNA abundance. The study of how nonsense codons alter RNA metabolism is still at an early stage, and our current understanding derives more from incidental vignettes than from experimental undertakings that address molecular mechanisms. Challenges for the future include identifying the gene products and RNA sequences that function in nonsense mediated RNA loss, resolving the cause and consequences of there apparently being more than one cellular site and mechanism for nonsense-mediated RNA loss, and understanding how these sites and mechanisms are related to both constitutive and specialized pathways of pre-mRNA processing and mRNA decay. PMID:7489507

  14. [BIG-H3 protein: mutation of codon 124 and corneal amyloidosis].

    PubMed

    Schmitt-Bernard, C-F; Pouliquen, Y; Argilès, A

    2004-05-01

    In 1997, a group of hereditary corneal dystrophies was related to mutations in the TGFBI (BIGH3) gene. Within this group, some corneal dystrophies present particular biochemical features in that they are characterized by corneal amyloid deposition. Contrary to clinical and genetic knowledge, the biochemical characteristics of the encoded protein (Big-h3) and the mechanisms of its amyloid conversion remain unclear. We review the current knowledge on the Big-h3 protein and focus on the behavior of the codon 124 region. We discuss this protein's mechanisms of amyloid conversion from our results and previous reports as well as from other types of amyloidosis. These data provide a better understanding of the putative processes leading to the phenotypic variations linked with their respective codon 124 mutation. PMID:15179309

  15. Identification of a novel first exon in the human dystrophin gene and of a new promoter located more than 500 kb upstream of the nearest known promoter

    SciTech Connect

    Yanagawa, H.; Nishio, H.; Takeshima, Y.

    1994-09-01

    The dystrophin gene, which is muted in patients with Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophies, is the largest known human gene. Five alternative promoters have been characterized until now. Here we show that a novel dystrophin isoform with a different first exon can be produced through transcription initiation at a previously-unidentified alternative promoter. The case study presented is that of patient with Duchenne muscular dystrophy who had a deletion extending from 5{prime} end of the dystrophin gene to exon 2, including all promoters previously mapped in the 5{prime} part of the gene. Transcripts from lymphoblastoid cells were found to contain sequences corresponding to exon 3, indicating the presence of new promoter upstream of this exon. The nucleotide sequence of amplified cDNA corresponding to the 5{prime} end of the new transcript indicated that the 5{prime} end of exon 3 was extended by 9 codons, only the last (most 3{prime}) of which codes for methionine. The genomic nucleotide sequence upstream from the new exon, as determined using inverse polymerase chain reaction, revealed the presence of sequences similar to a TATA box, an octamer motif and an MEF-2 element. The identified promoter/exon did not map to intron 2, as might have been expected, but to a position more than 500 kb upstream of the most 5{prime} of the previously-identified promoters, thereby adding 500 kb to the dystrophin gene. The sequence of part of the new promoter region is very similar to that of certain medium reiteration frequency repetitive sequences. These findings may help us understand the molecular evolution of the dystrophin gene.

  16. The Role of TP53 Gene Codon 72 Polymorphism in Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Ruan, Xiao-Lan; Li, Sheng; Meng, Xiang-Yu; Geng, Peiliang; Gao, Qing-Ping; Ao, Xu-Bin

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this meta-analysis was aimed to evaluate the association of tumor protein p53 (TP53) gene codon 72 polymorphism with leukemia susceptibility. We searched PubMed to identify relevant studies, and 16 case-control studies from 14 published articles were identified as eligible studies, including 2062 leukemia patients and 5826 controls. After extracting data, odds ratio (OR) with the corresponding 95% confidence interval (95%CI) was applied to assess the association between TP53 codon 72 polymorphism and leukemia susceptibility. The meta-analysis was performed with the Comprehensive Meta-Analysis software, version 2.2. Overall, no significant association between TP53 codon 72 polymorphism and leukemia susceptibility was found in this meta-analysis (Pro vs Arg: OR?=?1.05, 95%CI?=?0.90–1.21; Pro/Pro vs Arg/Arg: OR?=?1.13, 95%CI?=?0.84–1.52; Arg/Pro vs Arg/Arg: OR?=?0.94, 95%CI?=?0.76–1.15; [Pro/Pro?+?Arg/Pro] vs Arg/Arg: OR?=?0.99, 95%CI?=?0.80–1.21; Pro/Pro vs [Arg/Arg?+?Arg/Pro]: OR?=?1.19, 95%CI?=?0.93–1.51). Similar results were also found in subgroup analysis by ethnicity, source of controls, and types of leukemia (either acute myeloid leukemia or acute lymphocytic leukemia). Our meta-analysis demonstrates that TP53 codon 72 polymorphism may not be a risk factor for acute leukemia; however, due to the limitations of this study, it should be verified in future studies. PMID:26402821

  17. Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease (CJD) with a Mutation at Codon 148 of Prion Protein Gene

    PubMed Central

    Pastore, Manuela; Chin, Steven S.; Bell, Karen L.; Dong, Zhiqian; Yang, Qiwei; Yang, Lizhu; Yuan, Jue; Chen, Shu G.; Gambetti, Pierluigi; Zou, Wen-Quan

    2005-01-01

    Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD), the most common human prion disease, includes sporadic (s) and familial (f) forms. Regardless of etiology, both forms are thought to share the pathogenic mechanism whereby the cellular prion protein (PrPC) converts into its pathogenic isoform (PrPSc). While PrPC conversion is thought to be random in sCJD, conversion in fCJD is facilitated by the congenital presence of mutated PrP. Differences in PrP genotype (PRNP) and in conversion circumstances lead to PrPSc with distinct characteristics that elicit different disease phenotypes. Here, we describe a case of fCJD with a substitution of histidine (H) for arginine (R) at codon 148 (R148H) and heterozygosity of the methionine/valine (M/V) polymorphic codon 129, with the 129M allele coupled with the mutation. The disease phenotype and all major characteristics of PrPSc of fCJDR148H were virtually indistinguishable from those of sCJDMV2, which has features different from those of any other sCJD. Therefore, despite the differences in etiology, PRNP, and conversion process, the two forms of PrPSc had similar characteristics. Furthermore, comparison of fCJDR148H with a recently reported case carrying R148H and homozygosity at codon 129 suggests that codon 129 coupled with the mutation as well as that located on the normal allele can modify major phenotypic and PrPSc features of fCJDR148H. PMID:16314483

  18. START High Performance Discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gates, D. A.

    1997-11-01

    Improvements to START (Small Tight Aspect Ratio Tokamak), the first spherical tokamak in the world to achieve high plasma temperature with both a significant pulse length and confinement time, have been ongoing since 1991. Recent modifications include: expansion of the existing capacitor banks allowing plasma currents as high as 300kA, an increase in the available neutral beam heating power ( ~ 500kW), and improvements to the vacuum system. These improvements have led to the achievement of the world record plasma ? (? 2?_0 /B^2) of ~ 30% in a tokamak. The normalised ? ( ?N ? ? aB/I_p) reached 4.5 with q_95 = 2.3. Properties of the reconstructed equilibrium will be discussed in detail. The theoretical limit to ? is higher in a spherical tokamak than in a conventional machine, due to the higher values of normalised current (IN ? I_p/aB) achievable at low aspect ratio. The record ? was achieved with IN ~ 8 while conventional tokamaks are limited to IN ~ 3, or less. Calculations of the ideal MHD stability of the record discharge indicate high ? low-n kink modes are stable, but that the entire profile is at or near marginal stability for high-n ballooning modes. The phenomenology of the events leading up to the plasma termination is discussed. An important aspect of the START program is to explore the physics of neutral beam absorption at low aspect ratio. A passive neutral particle analyser has been used to study the temporal and spatial dependence of the fast hydrogen beam ions. These measurements have been used in conjunction with a single particle orbit code to estimate the fast ion losses due to collisions with slow neutrals from the plasma edge. Numerical analysis of neutral beam power deposition profiles are compared with the data from an instrumented beam stop. The global energy confinement time ?E in beam heated discharges on START is similar to that obtained in Ohmic discharges, even though the input power has roughly doubled over the Ohmic case. Analysis of the confinement properties of the discharge and a discussion of the scaling of confinement with global plasma parameters will be presented. Comparisons are made between the predictions of neoclassical transport theory and ion temperature measurements from a charge exchange spectrometer. These results indicate the ability of spherical tokamaks to support high ? operation with good confinement. Experiments in the MAST (Mega Amp Spherical Tokamak) device, currently under construction, will demonstrate spherical tokamak operations for significantly longer pulse lengths at high ( ~1-2MA) plasma current.

  19. Diverse bacterial genomes encode an operon of two genes, one of which is an unusual class-I release factor that potentially recognizes atypical mRNA signals other than normal stop codons

    PubMed Central

    Baranov, Pavel V; Vestergaard, Bente; Hamelryck, Thomas; Gesteland, Raymond F; Nyborg, Jens; Atkins, John F

    2006-01-01

    Background While all codons that specify amino acids are universally recognized by tRNA molecules, codons signaling termination of translation are recognized by proteins known as class-I release factors (RF). In most eukaryotes and archaea a single RF accomplishes termination at all three stop codons. In most bacteria, there are two RFs with overlapping specificity, RF1 recognizes UA(A/G) and RF2 recognizes U(A/G)A. The hypothesis First, we hypothesize that orthologues of the E. coli K12 pseudogene prfH encode a third class-I RF that we designate RFH. Second, it is likely that RFH responds to signals other than conventional stop codons. Supporting evidence comes from the following facts: (i) A number of bacterial genomes contain prfH orthologues with no discernable interruptions in their ORFs. (ii) RFH shares strong sequence similarity with other class-I bacterial RFs. (iii) RFH contains a highly conserved GGQ motif associated with peptidyl hydrolysis activity (iv) residues located in the areas supposedly interacting with mRNA and the ribosomal decoding center are highly conserved in RFH, but different from other RFs. RFH lacks the functional, but non-essential domain 1. Yet, RFH-encoding genes are invariably accompanied by a highly conserved gene of unknown function, which is absent in genomes that lack a gene for RFH. The accompanying gene is always located upstream of the RFH gene and with the same orientation. The proximity of the 3' end of the former with the 5' end of the RFH gene makes it likely that their expression is co-regulated via translational coupling. In summary, RFH has the characteristics expected for a class-I RF, but likely with different specificity than RF1 and RF2. Testing the hypothesis The most puzzling question is which signals RFH recognizes to trigger its release function. Genetic swapping of RFH mRNA recognition components with its RF1 or RF2 counterparts may reveal the nature of RFH signals. Implications of the hypothesis The hypothesis implies a greater versatility of release-factor like activity in the ribosomal A-site than previously appreciated. A closer study of RFH may provide insight into the evolution of the genetic code and of the translational machinery responsible for termination of translation. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Daniel Wilson (nominated by Eugene Koonin), Warren Tate (nominated by Eugene Koonin), Yoshikazu Nakamura (nominated by Eugene Koonin) and Eugene Koonin. PMID:16970810

  20. Recognition of the amber UAG stop codon by release factor RF1

    SciTech Connect

    Korostelev, Andrei; Zhu, Jianyu; Asahara, Haruichi; Noller, Harry F.

    2010-08-23

    We report the crystal structure of a termination complex containing release factor RF1 bound to the 70S ribosome in response to an amber (UAG) codon at 3.6-{angstrom} resolution. The amber codon is recognized in the 30S subunit-decoding centre directly by conserved elements of domain 2 of RF1, including T186 of the PVT motif. Together with earlier structures, the mechanisms of recognition of all three stop codons by release factors RF1 and RF2 can now be described. Our structure confirms that the backbone amide of Q230 of the universally conserved GGQ motif is positioned to contribute directly to the catalysis of the peptidyl-tRNA hydrolysis reaction through stabilization of the leaving group and/or transition state. We also observe synthetic-negative interactions between mutations in the switch loop of RF1 and in helix 69 of 23S rRNA, revealing that these structural features interact functionally in the termination process. These findings are consistent with our proposal that structural rearrangements of RF1 and RF2 are critical to accurate translation termination.

  1. Codon optimization significantly improves the expression level of a keratinase gene in Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Hu, Hong; Gao, Jie; He, Jun; Yu, Bing; Zheng, Ping; Huang, Zhiqing; Mao, Xiangbing; Yu, Jie; Han, Guoquan; Chen, Daiwen

    2013-01-01

    The main keratinase (kerA) gene from the Bacillus licheniformis S90 was optimized by two codon optimization strategies and expressed in Pichia pastoris in order to improve the enzyme production compared to the preparations with the native kerA gene. The results showed that the corresponding mutations (synonymous codons) according to the codon bias in Pichia pastoris were successfully introduced into keratinase gene. The highest keratinase activity produced by P. pastoris pPICZ?A-kerAwt, pPICZ?A-kerAopti1 and pPICZ?A-kerAopti2 was 195 U/ml, 324 U/ml and 293 U/ml respectively. In addition, there was no significant difference in biomass concentration, target gene copy numbers and relative mRNA expression levels of every positive strain. The molecular weight of keratinase secreted by recombinant P. pastori was approx. 39 kDa. It was optimally active at pH 7.5 and 50°C. The recombinant keratinase could efficiently degrade both ?-keratin (keratin azure) and ?-keratin (chicken feather meal). These properties make the P. pastoris pPICZ?A-kerAopti1 a suitable candidate for industrial production of keratinases. PMID:23472192

  2. Highly reproductive Escherichia coli cells with no specific assignment to the UAG codon

    PubMed Central

    Mukai, Takahito; Hoshi, Hiroko; Ohtake, Kazumasa; Takahashi, Mihoko; Yamaguchi, Atsushi; Hayashi, Akiko; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Sakamoto, Kensaku

    2015-01-01

    Escherichia coli is a widely used host organism for recombinant technology, and the bacterial incorporation of non-natural amino acids promises the efficient synthesis of proteins with novel structures and properties. In the present study, we developed E. coli strains in which the UAG codon was reserved for non-natural amino acids, without compromising the reproductive strength of the host cells. Ninety-five of the 273 UAG stop codons were replaced synonymously in the genome of E. coli BL21(DE3), by exploiting the oligonucleotide-mediated base-mismatch-repair mechanism. This genomic modification allowed the safe elimination of the UAG-recognizing cellular component (RF-1), thus leaving the remaining 178 UAG codons with no specific molecule recognizing them. The resulting strain B-95.?A grew as vigorously as BL21(DE3)?in rich medium at 25–42°C, and its derivative B-95.?A?fabR was better adapted to low temperatures and minimal media than B-95.?A. UAG was reassigned to synthetic amino acids by expressing the specific pairs of UAG-reading tRNA and aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase. Due to the preserved growth vigor, the B-95.?A strains showed superior productivities for hirudin molecules sulfonated on a particular tyrosine residue, and the Fab fragments of Herceptin containing multiple azido groups. PMID:25982672

  3. Enhanced expression of codon optimized Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis antigens in Lactobacillus salivarius

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Christopher D.; Bannantine, John P.; Govender, Rodney; Endersen, Lorraine; Pletzer, Daniel; Weingart, Helge; Coffey, Aidan; O'Mahony, Jim; Sleator, Roy D.

    2014-01-01

    It is well documented that open reading frames containing high GC content show poor expression in A+T rich hosts. Specifically, G+C-rich codon usage is a limiting factor in heterologous expression of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) proteins using Lactobacillus salivarius. However, re-engineering opening reading frames through synonymous substitutions can offset codon bias and greatly enhance MAP protein production in this host. In this report, we demonstrate that codon-usage manipulation of MAP2121c can enhance the heterologous expression of the major membrane protein (MMP), analogous to the form in which it is produced natively by MAP bacilli. When heterologously over-expressed, antigenic determinants were preserved in synthetic MMP proteins as shown by monoclonal antibody mediated ELISA. Moreover, MMP is a membrane protein in MAP, which is also targeted to the cellular surface of recombinant L. salivarius at levels comparable to MAP. Additionally, we previously engineered MAP3733c (encoding MptD) and show herein that MptD displays the tendency to associate with the cytoplasmic membrane boundary under confocal microscopy and the intracellularly accumulated protein selectively adheres to the MptD-specific bacteriophage fMptD. This work demonstrates there is potential for L. salivarius as a viable antigen delivery vehicle for MAP, which may provide an effective mucosal vaccine against Johne's disease. PMID:25237653

  4. Optimization of Codon Translation Rates via tRNA Modifications Maintains Proteome Integrity

    PubMed Central

    Nedialkova, Danny D.; Leidel, Sebastian A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Proteins begin to fold as they emerge from translating ribosomes. The kinetics of ribosome transit along a given mRNA can influence nascent chain folding, but the extent to which individual codon translation rates impact proteome integrity remains unknown. Here, we show that slower decoding of discrete codons elicits widespread protein aggregation in vivo. Using ribosome profiling, we find that loss of anticodon wobble uridine (U34) modifications in a subset of tRNAs leads to ribosome pausing at their cognate codons in S. cerevisiae and C. elegans. Cells lacking U34 modifications exhibit gene expression hallmarks of proteotoxic stress, accumulate aggregates of endogenous proteins, and are severely compromised in clearing stress-induced protein aggregates. Overexpression of hypomodified tRNAs alleviates ribosome pausing, concomitantly restoring protein homeostasis. Our findings demonstrate that modified U34 is an evolutionarily conserved accelerator of decoding and reveal an unanticipated role for tRNA modifications in maintaining proteome integrity. PMID:26052047

  5. Effect of Codon Optimisation on the Production of Recombinant Fish Growth Hormone in Pichia pastoris

    PubMed Central

    Rothan, Hussin A.; Ser Huy, Teh; Mohamed, Zulqarnain

    2014-01-01

    This study was established to test the hypothesis of whether the codon optimization of fish growth hormone gene (FGH) based on P. pastoris preferred codon will improve the quantity of secreted rFGH in culture supernatant that can directly be used as fish feed supplements. The optimized FGH coding sequence (oFGH) and native sequence (nFGH) of giant grouper fish (Epinephelus lanceolatus) were cloned into P. pastoris expression vector (pPICZ?A) downstream of alcohol oxidase gene (AOX1) for efficient induction of extracellular rFGH by adding 1% of absolute methanol. The results showed that recombinant P. pastoris was able to produce 2.80 ± 0.27?mg of oFGH compared to 1.75 ± 0.25 of nFGH in one litre of culture supernatant. The total body weight of tiger grouper fingerlings fed with oFGH increased significantly at third (P < 0.05) and fourth weeks (P < 0.01) of four-week experiment period compared to those fed with nFGH. Both oFGH and nFGH significantly enhanced the final biomass and fish survival percentage. In conclusion, codon optimization of FGH fragment was useful to increase rFGH quantity in the culture supernatant of P. pastoris that can be directly used as fish feed supplements. Further studies are still required for large scale production of rFGH and practical application in aquaculture production. PMID:25147851

  6. Trm9-Catalyzed tRNA Modifications Regulate Global Protein Expression by Codon-Biased Translation

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Wenjun; Babu, I. Ramesh; Su, Dan; Yin, Shanye; Begley, Thomas J.; Dedon, Peter C.

    2015-01-01

    Post-transcriptional modifications of transfer RNAs (tRNAs) have long been recognized to play crucial roles in regulating the rate and fidelity of translation. However, the extent to which they determine global protein production remains poorly understood. Here we use quantitative proteomics to show a direct link between wobble uridine 5-methoxycarbonylmethyl (mcm5) and 5-methoxy-carbonyl-methyl-2-thio (mcm5s2) modifications catalyzed by tRNA methyltransferase 9 (Trm9) in tRNAArg(UCU) and tRNAGlu(UUC) and selective translation of proteins from genes enriched with their cognate codons. Controlling for bias in protein expression and alternations in mRNA expression, we find that loss of Trm9 selectively impairs expression of proteins from genes enriched with AGA and GAA codons under both normal and stress conditions. Moreover, we show that AGA and GAA codons occur with high frequency in clusters along the transcripts, which may play a role in modulating translation. Consistent with these results, proteins subject to enhanced ribosome pausing in yeast lacking mcm5U and mcm5s2U are more likely to be down-regulated and contain a larger number of AGA/GAA clusters. Together, these results suggest that Trm9-catalyzed tRNA modifications play a significant role in regulating protein expression within the cell. PMID:26670883

  7. Mismatch repair at stop codons is directed independent of GATC methylation on the Escherichia coli chromosome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sneppen, Kim; Semsey, Szabolcs

    2014-12-01

    The mismatch repair system (MMR) corrects replication errors that escape proofreading. Previous studies on extrachromosomal DNA in Escherichia coli suggested that MMR uses hemimethylated GATC sites to identify the newly synthesized strand. In this work we asked how the distance of GATC sites and their methylation status affect the occurrence of single base substitutions on the E. coli chromosome. As a reporter system we used a lacZ gene containing an early TAA stop codon. We found that occurrence of point mutations at this stop codon is unaffected by GATC sites located more than 115 base pairs away. However, a GATC site located about 50 base pairs away resulted in a decreased mutation rate. This effect was independent of Dam methylation. The reversion rate of the stop codon increased only slightly in dam mutants compared to mutL and mutS mutants. We suggest that unlike on extrachromosomal DNA, GATC methylation is not the only strand discrimination signal for MMR on the E. coli chromosome.

  8. The codon 72 polymorphism of the TP53 gene and endometriosis risk: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yi; Wu, Yuan-Yuan; Li, Li; Luo, Zhi-Juan; Lin, Zhong; Zhou, Ying-Hui; Yi, Tao; Lin, Xiao-Juan; Zhao, Qian-Ying; Zhao, Xia

    2015-09-01

    Endometriosis is a chronic, inflammatory and common gynaecological disease. This study investigated the association between TP53 codon 72 polymorphism and the risk of endometriosis. A search for relevant articles was conducted in PubMed, Embase, CNKI, Wanfang, Weipu databases and Google Scholar. The strength of the relationships between TP53 codon 72 polymorphism and the risk of endometriosis was assessed by odds ratios (OR) and with 95% confidence intervals (CI). Sixteen case-control studies in 15 articles were included. Significant association was found in the dominant model (CC + GC versus GG) with an OR of 1.38 and 95% CI (1.14, 1.67). The results suggested that individuals who carried CC homozygote and heterozygote GC might have a 38% increased endometriosis risk when compared with the homozygote GG. In the subgroup analysis by ethnicity, significantly increased risk was observed among Asians (OR = 1.62, 95% CI = 1.18-2.23, P = 0.003) and Latin Americans (OR = 1.54, 95% CI = 1.16-2.03, P = 0.002) but not in Caucasians (OR = 1.02, 95% CI = 0.80-1.30) for the dominant model. The current meta-analysis suggested that TP53 codon 72 polymorphism was associated with the endometriosis risk, especially in Asians and Latin Americans. PMID:26194887

  9. Highly reproductive Escherichia coli cells with no specific assignment to the UAG codon.

    PubMed

    Mukai, Takahito; Hoshi, Hiroko; Ohtake, Kazumasa; Takahashi, Mihoko; Yamaguchi, Atsushi; Hayashi, Akiko; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Sakamoto, Kensaku

    2015-01-01

    Escherichia coli is a widely used host organism for recombinant technology, and the bacterial incorporation of non-natural amino acids promises the efficient synthesis of proteins with novel structures and properties. In the present study, we developed E. coli strains in which the UAG codon was reserved for non-natural amino acids, without compromising the reproductive strength of the host cells. Ninety-five of the 273 UAG stop codons were replaced synonymously in the genome of E. coli BL21(DE3), by exploiting the oligonucleotide-mediated base-mismatch-repair mechanism. This genomic modification allowed the safe elimination of the UAG-recognizing cellular component (RF-1), thus leaving the remaining 178 UAG codons with no specific molecule recognizing them. The resulting strain B-95.?A grew as vigorously as BL21(DE3) in rich medium at 25-42°C, and its derivative B-95.?A?fabR was better adapted to low temperatures and minimal media than B-95.?A. UAG was reassigned to synthetic amino acids by expressing the specific pairs of UAG-reading tRNA and aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase. Due to the preserved growth vigor, the B-95.?A strains showed superior productivities for hirudin molecules sulfonated on a particular tyrosine residue, and the Fab fragments of Herceptin containing multiple azido groups. PMID:25982672

  10. Codon 201 polymorphism of DCC gene is a prognostic factor in patients with colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hong; Arbman, Gunnar; Sun, Xiao-Feng

    2003-01-01

    The polymorphism at codon 201 of the "deleted in colorectal carcinoma" (DCC) gene has been liked to susceptibility to colorectal cancer. However, its clinicopathological significance has not been reported. We examined the codon 201 polymorphism and loss of heterozygosity (LOH) by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) in 59 colorectal cancers, 48 samples from transitional mucosa and 67 samples from normal mucosa. The frequencies of the polymorphism did not significantly differ from normal to transitional mucosa and to tumor, but LOH was increased from transitional mucosa to tumor. Almost all of the LOH cases showed the polymorphism. The polymorphism was increased from well/moderately to poorly differentiated and to mucinous carcinoma (P=0.03). The polymorphism was more frequently seen in advanced stages than in earlier stages (P=0.02), and further predicted worse survival (P=0.04). The data suggest that the codon 201 polymorphism of the DCC gene was a target of LOH, and predicted prognosis in colorectal cancer patients. PMID:12787729

  11. Effect of codon optimisation on the production of recombinant fish growth hormone in Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Rothan, Hussin A; Huy, Teh Ser; Mohamed, Zulqarnain

    2014-01-01

    This study was established to test the hypothesis of whether the codon optimization of fish growth hormone gene (FGH) based on P. pastoris preferred codon will improve the quantity of secreted rFGH in culture supernatant that can directly be used as fish feed supplements. The optimized FGH coding sequence (oFGH) and native sequence (nFGH) of giant grouper fish (Epinephelus lanceolatus) were cloned into P. pastoris expression vector (pPICZ?A) downstream of alcohol oxidase gene (AOX1) for efficient induction of extracellular rFGH by adding 1% of absolute methanol. The results showed that recombinant P. pastoris was able to produce 2.80 ± 0.27 mg of oFGH compared to 1.75 ± 0.25 of nFGH in one litre of culture supernatant. The total body weight of tiger grouper fingerlings fed with oFGH increased significantly at third (P < 0.05) and fourth weeks (P < 0.01) of four-week experiment period compared to those fed with nFGH. Both oFGH and nFGH significantly enhanced the final biomass and fish survival percentage. In conclusion, codon optimization of FGH fragment was useful to increase rFGH quantity in the culture supernatant of P. pastoris that can be directly used as fish feed supplements. Further studies are still required for large scale production of rFGH and practical application in aquaculture production. PMID:25147851

  12. Self-catalytic DNA depurination underlies human ?-globin gene mutations at codon 6 that cause anemias and thalassemias.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Dominguez, Juan R; Amosova, Olga; Fresco, Jacques R

    2013-04-19

    The human ?-globin gene contains an 18-nucleotide coding strand sequence centered at codon 6 and capable of forming a stem-loop structure that can self-catalyze depurination of the 5'G residue of that codon. The resultant apurinic lesion is subject to error-prone repair, consistent with the occurrence about this codon of mutations responsible for 6 anemias and ?-thalassemias and additional substitutions without clinical consequences. The 4-residue loop of this stem-loop-forming sequence shows the highest incidence of mutation across the gene. The loop and first stem base pair-forming residues appeared early in the mammalian clade. The other stem-forming segments evolved more recently among primates, thereby conferring self-depurination capacity at codon 6. These observations indicate a conserved molecular mechanism leading to ?-globin variants underlying phenotypic diversity and disease. PMID:23457306

  13. XPD codon 751 polymorphism, metabolism genes, smoking, and bladder cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Stern, Mariana C; Johnson, Laura R; Bell, Douglas A; Taylor, Jack A

    2002-10-01

    Cigarette smoking is the main risk factor for bladder cancer, accounting for at least 50% of bladder cancer in men. Cigarette smoke is a rich source of arylamines, which are detoxified by the NAT2 enzyme and activated by the NAT1 enzyme to highly reactive species that can form bulky adducts on DNA. DNA damage from such adducts is mainly repaired by the nucleotide excision repair pathway, in which the XPD protein functions in opening the DNA helix. We hypothesized that an XPD codon 751 polymorphism (Lys-to-Gln amino acid change) could affect the repair of smoking-induced DNA damage and could be associated with bladder-cancer risk. We also hypothesized that allelic variants of the NAT1 and NAT2 genes might modify the effect of the XPD codon 751 polymorphism on smoking-associated bladder-cancer risk. We determined the XPD codon 751 genotype for 228 bladder-cancer cases and 210 controls who were frequency-matched to cases by age, sex, and ethnicity, and we used our previously published data on the NAT1 and NAT2 genotypes for these same individuals (J. A. Taylor et al., Cancer Res., 58: 3603-3610, 1998). We found a slight decrease in risk for the XPD codon 751 Gln/Gln genotype (adjusted odds ratio: 0.8; 95% confidence interval: 0.4-1.3) compared with subjects with the Lys/Lys or Lys/Gln genotypes. The analysis with smoking showed that smokers with the Lys/Lys or Lys/Gln genotypes were twice as likely to have bladder cancer than smokers with the Gln/Gln genotype (test of interaction P = 0.03). The combined presence of the NAT1/NAT2 high-risk genotype and the XPD Lys/Lys or Lys/Gln genotypes ignoring smoking had an odds ratio that was only slightly higher than expected, assuming no genotype-genotype interaction (P = 0.52). We found little evidence for a gene-gene-exposure, three-way interaction among the XPD codon 751 genotype, smoking, and the NAT1/NAT2 genotype. PMID:12376500

  14. Synonymous codon bias and functional constraint on GC3-related DNA backbone dynamics in the prokaryotic nucleoid

    PubMed Central

    Babbitt, Gregory A.; Alawad, Mohammed A.; Schulze, Katharina V.; Hudson, André O.

    2014-01-01

    While mRNA stability has been demonstrated to control rates of translation, generating both global and local synonymous codon biases in many unicellular organisms, this explanation cannot adequately explain why codon bias strongly tracks neighboring intergene GC content; suggesting that structural dynamics of DNA might also influence codon choice. Because minor groove width is highly governed by 3-base periodicity in GC, the existence of triplet-based codons might imply a functional role for the optimization of local DNA molecular dynamics via GC content at synonymous sites (?GC3). We confirm a strong association between GC3-related intrinsic DNA flexibility and codon bias across 24 different prokaryotic multiple whole-genome alignments. We develop a novel test of natural selection targeting synonymous sites and demonstrate that GC3-related DNA backbone dynamics have been subject to moderate selective pressure, perhaps contributing to our observation that many genes possess extreme DNA backbone dynamics for their given protein space. This dual function of codons may impose universal functional constraints affecting the evolution of synonymous and non-synonymous sites. We propose that synonymous sites may have evolved as an ‘accessory’ during an early expansion of a primordial genetic code, allowing for multiplexed protein coding and structural dynamic information within the same molecular context. PMID:25200075

  15. Decoding system for the AUA codon by tRNAIle with the UAU anticodon in Mycoplasma mobile

    PubMed Central

    Taniguchi, Takaaki; Miyauchi, Kenjyo; Nakane, Daisuke; Miyata, Makoto; Muto, Akira; Nishimura, Susumu; Suzuki, Tsutomu

    2013-01-01

    Deciphering the genetic code is a fundamental process in all living organisms. In many bacteria, AUA codons are deciphered by tRNAIle2 bearing lysidine (L) at the wobble position. L is a modified cytidine introduced post-transcriptionally by tRNAIle-lysidine synthetase (TilS). Some bacteria, including Mycoplasma mobile, do not carry the tilS gene, indicating that they have established a different system to decode AUA codons. In this study, tRNAIle2 has been isolated from M. mobile and was found to contain a UAU anticodon without any modification. Mycoplasma mobile isoleucyl-tRNA synthetase (IleRS) recognized the UAU anticodon, whereas Escherichia coli IleRS did not efficiently aminoacylate tRNAIle2UAU. In M. mobile IleRS, a single Arg residue at position 865 was critical for specificity for the UAU anticodon and, when the corresponding site (W905) in E. coli IleRS was substituted with Arg, the W905R mutant efficiently aminoacylated tRNA with UAU anticodon. Mycoplasma mobile tRNAIle2 cannot distinguish between AUA and AUG codon on E. coli ribosome. However, on M. mobile ribosome, M. mobile tRNAIle2UAU specifically recognized AUA codon, and not AUG codon, suggesting M. mobile ribosome has a property that prevents misreading of AUG codon. These findings provide an insight into the evolutionary reorganization of the AUA decoding system. PMID:23295668

  16. Accuracy of initial codon selection by aminoacyl-tRNAs on the mRNA-programmed bacterial ribosome

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jingji; Ieong, Ka-Weng; Johansson, Magnus; Ehrenberg, Måns

    2015-01-01

    We used a cell-free system with pure Escherichia coli components to study initial codon selection of aminoacyl-tRNAs in ternary complex with elongation factor Tu and GTP on messenger RNA-programmed ribosomes. We took advantage of the universal rate-accuracy trade-off for all enzymatic selections to determine how the efficiency of initial codon readings decreased linearly toward zero as the accuracy of discrimination against near-cognate and wobble codon readings increased toward the maximal asymptote, the d value. We report data on the rate-accuracy variation for 7 cognate, 7 wobble, and 56 near-cognate codon readings comprising about 15% of the genetic code. Their d values varied about 400-fold in the 200–80,000 range depending on type of mismatch, mismatch position in the codon, and tRNA isoacceptor type. We identified error hot spots (d = 200) for U:G misreading in second and U:U or G:A misreading in third codon position by His-tRNAHis and, as also seen in vivo, Glu-tRNAGlu. We suggest that the proofreading mechanism has evolved to attenuate error hot spots in initial selection such as those found here. PMID:26195797

  17. From Head Start to Sure Start: Reflections on Policy Transfer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Welshman, John

    2010-01-01

    This article uses the history of debates over the US Head Start programme (1965), Early Head Start (1994) and the UK Sure Start initiative (1998), as a window on to policy transfer. In all the three, the aim was that early intervention could offer a means of boosting children's educational attainment and of countering the wider effects of poverty…

  18. Start and bomber survivability

    SciTech Connect

    Speed, R.D.

    1989-05-01

    The survivability of the strategic bombers, while important today, is likely to be viewed as being of even greater importance in the 1990s if the US makes drastic cuts in its strategic forces as proposed in START and possible follow-on treaties. The analysis in this paper indicates that the Soviets with only a few SSBNs could pose a serious threat to the survivability of the strategic bombers (as presently based) if they moved these SSBNs close to the coasts or developed short-time-of-flight trajectories for their SLBMs. In searching for ways to improve bomber survivability, the use of the proposed LPS (Limited Protection System) ABM to defend bomber bases was examined, but found to offer marginal improvement, at best. However, a significant improvement in survivability against even severe threats could be achieved if the alert bomber forces were rebased at a large number (preferably 40 or more) of separate bases distributed in a region in the interior of the country with the closest base being at least 500 nmi from the coasts.

  19. Starting physiology: bioelectrogenesis.

    PubMed

    Baptista, Vander

    2015-12-01

    From a Cartesian perspective of rational analysis, the electric potential difference across the cell membrane is one of the fundamental concepts for the study of physiology. Unfortunately, undergraduate students often struggle to understand the genesis of this energy gradient, which makes the teaching activity a hard task for the instructor. The topic of bioelectrogenesis encompasses multidisciplinary concepts, involves several mechanisms, and is a dynamic process, i.e., it never turns off during the lifetime of the cell. Therefore, to improve the transmission and acquisition of knowledge in this field, I present an alternative didactic model. The design of the model assumes that it is possible to build, in a series of sequential steps, an assembly of proteins within the membrane of an isolated cell in a simulated electrophysiology experiment. Initially, no proteins are inserted in the membrane and the cell is at a baseline energy state; the extracellular and intracellular fluids are at thermodynamic equilibrium. Students are guided through a sequence of four steps that add key membrane transport proteins to the model cell. The model is simple at the start and becomes progressively more complex, finally producing transmembrane chemical and electrical gradients. I believe that this didactic approach helps instructors with a more efficient tool for the teaching of the mechanisms of resting membrane potential while helping students avoid common difficulties that may be encountered when learning this topic. PMID:26628666

  20. Air jump start system

    SciTech Connect

    Kettler, E.H.

    1986-05-20

    An apparatus is described for jump starting the internal combustion engine of a motor vehicle equipped with an air starter comprising in combination: An engine air pressure starter tank mounted on the motor vehicle; A tire carried by the vehicle having an inflation valve; starter tank air inlet means connected in fluid relationship with the tank including a check valve member connected in fluid relationship to the tank, the check valve member normally biased in closed position to prevent air under pressure from discharging from the tank, and operable to be opened to allow pressurized air to enter the tank, and a first air inlet hose coupling connected in closed fluid communication with the check valve member; and starter tank air recharging means including a second hose coupling sealingly connected releasably in fluid relation to the first hose coupling, a length of flexible tubing connected in sealed air tight relation to the first hose coupling at one end thereof, and a coupling sealingly connected at the other end of the tubing operable to be sealingly connected to the inflation valve of the tire and to compress the valve stem thereof to open the inflation valve to allow pressurized air from the tire to enter the air starter tank through the check valve.

  1. POSTRANSLATIONAL MODIFICATIONS OF P53: UPSTREAM SIGNALING PATHWAYS.

    SciTech Connect

    ANDERSON,C.W.APPELLA,E.

    2003-10-23

    The p53 tumor suppressor is a tetrameric transcription factor that is posttranslational modified at >20 different sites by phosphorylation, acetylation, or sumoylation in response to various cellular stress conditions. Specific posttranslational modifications, or groups of modifications, that result from the activation of different stress-induced signaling pathways are thought to modulate p53 activity to regulate cell fate by inducing cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, or cellular senescence. Here we review recent progress in characterizing the upstream signaling pathways whose activation in response to various genotoxic and non-genotoxic stresses result in p53 posttranslational modifications.

  2. Hybrid simulation codes with application to shocks and upstream waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winske, D.

    1985-01-01

    Hybrid codes in which part of the plasma is represented as particles and the rest as a fluid are discussed. In the past few years such codes with particle ions and massless, fluid electrons have been applied to space plasmas, especially to collisionless shocks. All of these simulation codes are one-dimensional and similar in structure, except for how the field equations are solved. The various approaches that are used (resistive Ohm's law, predictor-corrector, Hamiltonian) are described in detail and results from the various codes are compared with examples taken from collisionless shocks and low frequency wave phenomena upstream of shocks.

  3. 2. View of Potomac River at Great Falls looking upstream ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. View of Potomac River at Great Falls looking upstream from Observation Tower. The majestic character of this wild and untrammeled spot is vividly shown. Scanty flow is evidenced by light colored normal water line markings on rock formation. Washington Agueduct Dam is shown in upper portion. Maryland on right and Virginia on left. Natives quoted as saying the water was as low or lower than during the drought conditions of 1930. Mr. Horyduzak, Photographer, 1943. - Potowmack Company: Great Falls Canal & Locks, Great Falls, Fairfax County, VA

  4. Maryland Early Head Start Initiative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Law and Social Policy, Inc. (CLASP), 2012

    2012-01-01

    Since 2000, Maryland has provided state supplemental funds to Head Start and Early Head Start (EHS) programs to improve access. Local EHS programs may use funds, through child care partnerships, to extend the EHS day or year. Maryland's approach to building on EHS includes: (1) Increase the capacity of existing Head Start and EHS programs to…

  5. The Bastille Day Magnetic Clouds and Upstream Shocks: Near Earth Interplanetary Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lepping, R. P.; Berdichevsky, D. B.; Burlaga, L. F.; Lazarus, A. J.; Kasper, J.; Desch, M. D.; Wu, C.-C.; Reames, D. V.; Singer, H. J.; Singer, H. J.; Vondrak, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The energetic charged particle, interplanetary magnetic field, and plasma characteristics of the 'Bastille Day' shock and ejecta/magnetic cloud events at 1 AU occurring over the days 14-16 July 2000 are described. Profiles of MeV (WIND/LEMT) energetic ions help to organize the overall sequence of events from the solar source to 1 AU. Stressed are analyses of an outstanding magnetic cloud (MC2) starting late on 15 July and its upstream shock about 4 hours earlier in WIND magnetic field and plasma data. Also analyzed is a less certain, but likely, magnetic cloud (MC1) occurring early on 15 July; this was separated from MC2 by its upstream shock and many heliospheric current sheet (HCS) crossings. Other HCS crossings occurred throughout the 3-day period. Overall this dramatic series of interplanetary events caused a large multi-phase magnetic storm with min Dst lower than -300 nT. The very fast solar wind speed (greater than or equal to 1100 km/s) in and around the front of MC2 (for near average densities) was responsible for a very high solar wind ram pressure driving in the front of the magnetosphere to geocentric distances estimated to be as low as approx. 5 R(sub E), much lower than the geosynchronous orbit radius. This was consistent with magnetic field observations from two GOES satellites which indicated they were in the magnetosheath for extended times. A static force free field model is used to fit the two magnetic cloud profiles providing estimates of the clouds' physical and geometrical properties. MC2 was much larger than MCI, but their axes were nearly antiparallel, and their magnetic fields had the same left-handed helicity. MC2's axis and its upstream shock normal were very close to being perpendicular to each other, as might be expected if the cloud were driving the shock at the time of observation. The estimated axial magnetic flux carried by MC2 was 52 x 10(exp 20) Mx, which is about 5 times the typical magnetic flux estimated for other magnetic clouds in the WIND data over its first 4 years and is 17 times the flux of MC1. This large flux is due to both the strong axially-directed field of MC2 (46.8 nT on the axis) and the large radius (R(sub 0) = 0.189 AU) of the flux tube. MC2's average speed is consistent with the expected transit time from a halo-CME to which it is apparently related.

  6. Limitations of the 'ambush hypothesis' at the single-gene scale: what codon biases are to blame?

    PubMed

    Bertrand, Robert L; Abdel-Hameed, Mona; Sorensen, John L

    2015-04-01

    Ribosomal frameshifting, a translational error, catastrophically alters the amino acid composition of the nascent protein by shifting the reading frame from the intended contiguous trinucleotide reading. Frameshift events waste energy and resources, and peptide products have unpredictable cytotoxic effects. The 'Ambush Hypothesis' (Seligmann and Pollock 2004, DNA Cell Biol 23:701-5) suggests there is a selective pressure favouring the evolution of out-of-frame ('hidden') stop codons. Although this hypothesis has gained empirical support through whole-genome studies, it is presently unknown whether it can be applied at a single-gene scale. Herein, we report such an investigation using the gene, polyketide synthase (PKS), among species of fungi. Contrary to expectation, genes presented with significantly lower number of hidden stop codons than expected in a selection-neutral model (p < 0.0005), suggesting both non-adherence to the ambush hypothesis as well as suppression of hidden stop codon evolution. It is known that there are multiple adaptive considerations determining codon selection during evolution, and that the information-holding potential of the genetic code is finite. We hypothesize that the reason for low hidden stops in PKS genes is due to competing 'codon biases' that are prioritized over the selective pressure favouring the emergence of hidden stops. Future studies of the ambush hypothesis in the context of other drivers of codon bias may allow this hypothesis to be molded into a comprehensive genetic theory that can be integrated within the broader genetic theory of codon bias and applied to the genetic code at any scale of analysis. PMID:25307067

  7. Multiscale Modeling of Metabolism and Macromolecular Synthesis in E. coli and Its Application to the Evolution of Codon Usage

    PubMed Central

    Thiele, Ines; Fleming, Ronan M. T.; Que, Richard; Bordbar, Aarash; Diep, Dinh; Palsson, Bernhard O.

    2012-01-01

    Biological systems are inherently hierarchal and multiscale in time and space. A major challenge of systems biology is to describe biological systems as a computational model, which can be used to derive novel hypothesis and drive experiments leading to new knowledge. The constraint-based reconstruction and analysis approach has been successfully applied to metabolism and to the macromolecular synthesis machinery assembly. Here, we present the first integrated stoichiometric multiscale model of metabolism and macromolecular synthesis for Escherichia coli K12 MG1655, which describes the sequence-specific synthesis and function of almost 2000 gene products at molecular detail. We added linear constraints, which couple enzyme synthesis and catalysis reactions. Comparison with experimental data showed improvement of growth phenotype prediction with the multiscale model over E. coli’s metabolic model alone. Many of the genes covered by this integrated model are well conserved across enterobacters and other, less related bacteria. We addressed the question of whether the bias in synonymous codon usage could affect the growth phenotype and environmental niches that an organism can occupy. We created two classes of in silico strains, one with more biased codon usage and one with more equilibrated codon usage than the wildtype. The reduced growth phenotype in biased strains was caused by tRNA supply shortage, indicating that expansion of tRNA gene content or tRNA codon recognition allow E. coli to respond to changes in codon usage bias. Our analysis suggests that in order to maximize growth and to adapt to new environmental niches, codon usage and tRNA content must co-evolve. These results provide further evidence for the mutation-selection-drift balance theory of codon usage bias. This integrated multiscale reconstruction successfully demonstrates that the constraint-based modeling approach is well suited to whole-cell modeling endeavors. PMID:23029152

  8. Selection of aminoacyl-tRNAs at sense codons: the size of the tRNA variable loop determines whether the immediate 3' nucleotide to the codon has a context effect.

    PubMed Central

    Curran, J F; Poole, E S; Tate, W P; Gross, B L

    1995-01-01

    Codon context can affect translational efficiency by several molecular mechanisms. The base stacking interactions between a codon-anticodon complex and the neighboring nucleotide immediately 3' can facilitate translation by amber suppressors and the tRNA structure is also known to modulate the sensitivity to context. In this study the relative rates of aminoacyl-tRNA selection were measured at four sense codons (UGG, CUC, UUC and UCA), in all four 3' nucleotide contexts, through direct competition with a programmed frameshift at a site derived from the release factor 2 gene. Two codons (UGG and UUC) are read by tRNAs with small variable regions and their rates of aminoacyl-tRNA selection correlated with the potential base stacking strength of the 3' neighboring nucleotide. The other two codons (CUC and UCA) are read by tRNAs with large variable regions and the rate of selection of the aminoacyl-tRNAs in these cases varied little among the four contexts. Re-examination of published data on amber suppression also revealed an inverse correlation between context sensitivity and the size of the variable region. Collectively the data suggest that a large variable loop in a tRNA decreases the influence of the 3' context on tRNA selection, probably by strengthening tRNA-ribosomal interactions. PMID:7479072

  9. The p53 Codon 72 Polymorphism Modifies the Cellular Response to Inflammatory Challenge in the Liver

    PubMed Central

    Leu, Julia I-Ju; Murphy, Maureen E; George, Donna L

    2013-01-01

    The p53 protein is a critical stress-response mediator and signal coordinator in cellular metabolism and environmental exposure to deleterious agents. In human populations, the p53 gene contains a common single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) affecting codon 72 that determines whether a proline (P72) or an arginine (R72) is present at this amino acid position of the polypeptide. Previous studies carried out using human populations, mouse models, and cell culture analyses have provided evidence that this amino acid difference can alter p53 functional activities, and potentially also can affect clinical presentation of disease. The clinical presentation associated with many forms of liver disease is variable, but few of the responsible underlying genetic factors or molecular pathways have been identified. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether the p53 codon 72 polymorphism influences the cellular response to hepatic stresses. A humanized p53 knock-in (Hupki) mouse model was used to address this issue. Mice expressing either the P72 or R72 normal variation of p53 were given an acute-, intermittent- or a chronic challenge, associated with exposure to lipopolysaccharide, D-galactosamine, or a high-fat diet. The results reveal that the livers of the P72 and R72 mice exhibit notable differences in inflammatory and apoptotic response to these distinct forms of stress. Interestingly the influence of this polymorphism on the response to stress is context dependent, with P72 showing increased response to liver toxins (lipopolysaccharide and D-galactosamine), but R72 showing increased response to metabolic stress (high fat diet). When taken together, these data point to the p53 codon 72 polymorphism as an important molecular mediator of events contributing to hepatic inflammation and metabolic homeostasis. PMID:23991369

  10. A flexible codon in genomically recoded Escherichia coli permits programmable protein phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Pirman, Natasha L.; Barber, Karl W.; Aerni, Hans R.; Ma, Natalie J.; Haimovich, Adrian D.; Rogulina, Svetlana; Isaacs, Farren J.; Rinehart, Jesse

    2015-01-01

    Biochemical investigation of protein phosphorylation events is limited by inefficient production of the phosphorylated and non-phosphorylated forms of full-length proteins. Here using a genomically recoded strain of E. coli with a flexible UAG codon we produce site-specific serine- or phosphoserine-containing proteins, with purities approaching 90%, from a single recombinant DNA. Specifically, we synthesize human MEK1 kinase with two serines or two phosphoserines, from one DNA template, and demonstrate programmable kinase activity. Programmable protein phosphorylation is poised to help reveal the structural and functional information encoded in the phosphoproteome. PMID:26350500

  11. Estimating Gene Expression and Codon-Specific Translational Efficiencies, Mutation Biases, and Selection Coefficients from Genomic Data Alone‡

    PubMed Central

    Gilchrist, Michael A.; Chen, Wei-Chen; Shah, Premal; Landerer, Cedric L.; Zaretzki, Russell

    2015-01-01

    Extracting biologically meaningful information from the continuing flood of genomic data is a major challenge in the life sciences. Codon usage bias (CUB) is a general feature of most genomes and is thought to reflect the effects of both natural selection for efficient translation and mutation bias. Here we present a mechanistically interpretable, Bayesian model (ribosome overhead costs Stochastic Evolutionary Model of Protein Production Rate [ROC SEMPPR]) to extract meaningful information from patterns of CUB within a genome. ROC SEMPPR is grounded in population genetics and allows us to separate the contributions of mutational biases and natural selection against translational inefficiency on a gene-by-gene and codon-by-codon basis. Until now, the primary disadvantage of similar approaches was the need for genome scale measurements of gene expression. Here, we demonstrate that it is possible to both extract accurate estimates of codon-specific mutation biases and translational efficiencies while simultaneously generating accurate estimates of gene expression, rather than requiring such information. We demonstrate the utility of ROC SEMPPR using the Saccharomyces cerevisiae S288c genome. When we compare our model fits with previous approaches we observe an exceptionally high agreement between estimates of both codon-specific parameters and gene expression levels (?>0.99 in all cases). We also observe strong agreement between our parameter estimates and those derived from alternative data sets. For example, our estimates of mutation bias and those from mutational accumulation experiments are highly correlated (?=0.95). Our estimates of codon-specific translational inefficiencies and tRNA copy number-based estimates of ribosome pausing time (?=0.64), and mRNA and ribosome profiling footprint-based estimates of gene expression (?=0.53?0.74) are also highly correlated, thus supporting the hypothesis that selection against translational inefficiency is an important force driving the evolution of CUB. Surprisingly, we find that for particular amino acids, codon usage in highly expressed genes can still be largely driven by mutation bias and that failing to take mutation bias into account can lead to the misidentification of an amino acid’s “optimal” codon. In conclusion, our method demonstrates that an enormous amount of biologically important information is encoded within genome scale patterns of codon usage, accessing this information does not require gene expression measurements, but instead carefully formulated biologically interpretable models. PMID:25977456

  12. Experience with the use of the Codonics Safe Label System(™) to improve labelling compliance of anaesthesia drugs.

    PubMed

    Ang, S B L; Hing, W C; Tung, S Y; Park, T

    2014-07-01

    The Codonics Safe Labeling System(™) (http://www.codonics.com/Products/SLS/flash/) is a piece of equipment that is able to barcode scan medications, read aloud the medication and the concentration and print a label of the appropriate concentration in the appropriate colour code. We decided to test this system in our facility to identify risks, benefits and usability. Our project comprised a baseline survey (25 anaesthesia cases during which 212 syringes were prepared from 223 drugs), an observational study (47 cases with 330 syringes prepared) and a user acceptability survey. The baseline compliance with all labelling requirements was 58%. In the observational study the compliance using the Codonics system was 98.6% versus 63.8% with conventional labelling. In the user acceptability survey the majority agreed the Codonics machine was easy to use, more legible and adhered with better security than the conventional preprinted label. However, most were neutral when asked about the likelihood of flexibility and customisation and were dissatisfied with the increased workload. Our findings suggest that the Codonics labelling machine is user-friendly and it improved syringe labelling compliance in our study. However, staff need to be willing to follow proper labelling workflow rather than batch label during preparation. Future syringe labelling equipment developers need to concentrate on user interface issues to reduce human factor and workflow problems. Support logistics are also an important consideration prior to implementation of any new labelling system. PMID:24967766

  13. Enhanced production of recombinant Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigens in Escherichia coli by replacement of low-usage codons.

    PubMed

    Lakey, D L; Voladri, R K; Edwards, K M; Hager, C; Samten, B; Wallis, R S; Barnes, P F; Kernodle, D S

    2000-01-01

    A major obstacle to development of subunit vaccines and diagnostic reagents for tuberculosis is the inability to produce large quantities of these proteins. To test the hypothesis that poor expression of some mycobacterial genes in Escherichia coli is due, in part, to the presence of low-usage E. coli codons, we used site-directed mutagenesis to convert low-usage codons to high-usage codons for the same amino acid in the Mycobacterium tuberculosis genes for antigens 85A and 85B and superoxide dismutase. Replacement of five codons in the wild-type gene for antigen 85B increased recombinant protein production in E. coli 54-fold. The recombinant antigen elicited proliferation and gamma interferon production by lymphocytes from healthy tuberculin reactors and was recognized by monoclonal antibodies to native antigen 85, indicating that the recombinant antigen contained T-cell and B-cell epitopes. Northern blotting demonstrated only a 1.7- to 2.5-fold increase in antigen 85B mRNA, suggesting that the enhanced protein production was due primarily to enhanced efficiency of translation. Codon replacement in the genes encoding antigen 85A and superoxide dismutase yielded four- to sixfold increases in recombinant protein production, suggesting that this strategy may be generally applicable to overexpression of mycobacterial genes in E. coli. PMID:10603393

  14. Association of TP53 codon 72 polymorphism and the outcome of adjuvant therapy in breast cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Toyama, Tatsuya; Zhang, Zhenhuan; Nishio, Mariko; Hamaguchi, Maho; Kondo, Naoto; Iwase, Hirotaka; Iwata, Hiroji; Takahashi, Satoru; Yamashita, Hiroko; Fujii, Yoshitaka

    2007-01-01

    Introduction Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in codon 72 of the TP53 (also known as p53) gene (rs1042522) and in the promoter region of the MDM2 gene (SNP309; rs2279744) have been suggested to play roles in many cancers. We investigated whether these SNPs were associated with patient outcome and the effect of adjuvant systemic therapy. Methods The genotypes of TP53 codon 72 and MDM2 SNP309 were defined among 557 primary Japanese breast cancer patients (median follow-up, 61.7 months). The effects of several variables on survival were tested by Cox's proportional hazards regression analysis. Results We showed that the Pro/Pro genotype of TP53 codon 72 was associated with poorer disease-free survival (DFS) than other genotypes by Kaplan-Meier analysis (P = 0.049) and multivariate Cox's proportional hazards regression analysis (P = 0.047, risk ratio of recurrence = 1.67), whereas MDM2 SNP309 status was not associated with DFS. The association of the Pro/Pro TP53 genotype with poorer DFS was especially significant in patients who received adjuvant chemotherapy (P = 0.009). In contrast, among the patients who had received adjuvant hormonal therapy or no adjuvant systemic therapy, TP53 codon 72 genotype was not associated with DFS. Conclusion The Pro/Pro genotype of TP53 codon 72 appears to be an independent prognostic marker in breast cancer patients. PMID:17537232

  15. Relation between mRNA expression and sequence information in Desulfovibrio vulgaris: Combinatorial contributions of upstream regulatory motifs and coding sequence features to variations in mRNA abundance

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Gang; Nie, Lei; Zhang, Weiwen

    2006-05-26

    ABSTRACT-The context-dependent expression of genes is the core for biological activities, and significant attention has been given to identification of various factors contributing to gene expression at genomic scale. However, so far this type of analysis has been focused whether on relation between mRNA expression and non-coding sequence features such as upstream regulatory motifs or on correlation between mRN abundance and non-random features in coding sequences (e.g. codon usage and amino acid usage). In this study multiple regression analyses of the mRNA abundance and all sequence information in Desulfovibrio vulgaris were performed, with the goal to investigate how much coding and non-coding sequence features contribute to the variations in mRNA expression, and in what manner they act together...

  16. Upstream Structures and Their Effects on the Magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sibeck, D. G.

    2011-01-01

    Kinetic processes within the Earth's foreshock generate a profusion of plasma and magnetic field structures with sizes and durations ranging from the microscale (e.g. SLAMs, solitons, and density holes) to the mesoscale (e.g. foreshock cavities or boundaries, hot flow anomalies, and bubbles). Swept into the bow shock by the solar wind flow, the perturbations associated with these features batter the magnetosphere, driving a wide variety of magnetospheric effects, including large amplitude magnetopause motion, bursty reconnection and the generation of flux transfer events, enhanced pulsation activity within the magnetosphere, diffusion and energization of radiation belt particles, enhanced particle precipitation resulting in dayside aurora and riometer absorption, and the generation of field-aligned currents and magnetic impulse events in high-latitude ground magnetometers. This talk reviews the ever growing menagery of structures observed upstream from the bow shock, examines their possible interrelationships, and considers their magnetospheric consequences.

  17. Ensemble streamflow prediction adjustment for upstream water use and regulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgakakos, Aris P.; Yao, Huaming; Georgakakos, Konstantine P.

    2014-11-01

    Hydrologic model forecasts are commonly biased in watersheds where water use and regulation activities cause flow alterations. Furthermore, direct accounting of such biases in forecast preparation is impractical as the information required is extensive and usually unavailable. This article introduces a new method to characterize the aggregate flow alteration biases and associated uncertainty in watersheds with important but largely undocumented water use and regulation activities. It also uses these assessments to adjust the ensemble streamflow predictions at downstream locations. The method includes procedures to (a) detect the presence of significant upstream regulation and water use influences; (b) correct the ensemble streamflow predictions and associated uncertainty for any biases in periods when such influences are detectable; and (c) assess the adjusted forecast reliability improvements. Applications in three watersheds of the American River in California demonstrate that the new method leads to significant forecast skill improvements and is also readily applicable to other regions.

  18. From Worker Health To Citizen Health: Moving Upstream

    PubMed Central

    Sepulveda, Martin-Jose

    2014-01-01

    New rapid growth economies, urbanization, health systems crises and “big data” are causing fundamental changes in social structures and systems including health. These forces for change have significant consequences for occupational and environmental medicine and will challenge the specialty to think beyond workers and workplaces as the principal locus of innovation for health and performance. These trends are placing great emphasis on upstream strategies for addressing the complex systems dynamics of the social determinants of health. The need to engage systems in communities for healthier workforces is a shift in orientation from worker and workplace centric to citizen and community centric. This change for occupational and environmental medicine requires extending systems approaches in the workplace to communities which are systems of systems and which require different skills, data, tools and partnerships. PMID:24284749

  19. From worker health to citizen health: moving upstream.

    PubMed

    Sepulveda, Martin-Jose

    2013-12-01

    New rapid growth economies, urbanization, health systems crises, and "big data" are causing fundamental changes in social structures and systems, including health. These forces for change have significant consequences for occupational and environmental medicine and will challenge the specialty to think beyond workers and workplaces as the principal locus of innovation for health and performance. These trends are placing great emphasis on upstream strategies for addressing the complex systems dynamics of the social determinants of health. The need to engage systems in communities for healthier workforces is a shift in orientation from worker and workplace centric to citizen and community centric. This change for occupational and environmental medicine requires extending systems approaches in the workplace to communities that are systems of systems and that require different skills, data, tools, and partnerships. PMID:24284749

  20. Upstream Swirl Effects on the Flow Inside a Labyrinth Seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Gerald L.; Johnson, Mark C.

    1997-01-01

    The flow field inside a seven cavity tooth on rotor labyrinth seal was measured using a 3D laser Doppler anemometer system. The seal was operated at a Reynolds number of 24,000 and a Taylor number of 6,600 using water as the working fluid. Swirl vanes were placed upstream of the seal to produce positive, negative, and no preswirl. It was found that the axial and radial velocities were minimally effected. The tangential velocity, both in the clearance region and the seal cavities on the rotor, were greatly altered by the preswirl. By applying negative preswirl, the tangential velocity was suppressed, even in the seventh cavity. The turbulence levels decreased as the preswirl varied from negative to positive.

  1. Hypersonic Flow Control Using Upstream Focused Energy Deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riggins David W.; Nelson, H. F.

    1999-01-01

    A numerical study of centerline and off-centerline power deposition at a point upstream of a two-dimensional blunt body at Mach 6.5 at 30 km altitude are presented. The full Navier-Stokes equations are used. Wave drag, lift, and pitching moment are presented as a function of amount of power absorbed in the flow and absorption point location. It is shown that wave drag is considerably reduced. Modifications to the pressure distribution in the flow field due to the injected energy create lift and a pitching moment when the injection is off-centerline. This flow control concept may lead to effective ways to improve the performance and to stabilize and control hypersonic vehicles.

  2. Start Date End Date Start Time End Time

    E-print Network

    Nicholson, Bruce J.

    in advance of the event. A $50 administration fee will be assessed to any event submitted less than 10 days prior to the event. hh:mm mm/dd/yyyy Est # of Vehicles Submit Form Clear Fields 000 - None Enter #s onlyEvent Name Start Date End Date Start Time End Time Event Location Building Room Other Est

  3. Explosion Clad for Upstream Oil and Gas Equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banker, John G.; Massarello, Jack; Pauly, Stephane

    2011-01-01

    Today's upstream oil and gas facilities frequently involve the combination of high pressures, high temperatures, and highly corrosive environments, requiring equipment that is thick wall, corrosion resistant, and cost effective. When significant concentrations of CO2 and/or H2S and/or chlorides are present, corrosion resistant alloys (CRA) can become the material of choice for separator equipment, piping, related components, and line pipe. They can provide reliable resistance to both corrosion and hydrogen embrittlement. For these applications, the more commonly used CRA's are 316L, 317L and duplex stainless steels, alloy 825 and alloy 625, dependent upon the application and the severity of the environment. Titanium is also an exceptional choice from the technical perspective, but is less commonly used except for heat exchangers. Explosion clad offers significant savings by providing a relatively thin corrosion resistant alloy on the surface metallurgically bonded to a thick, lower cost, steel substrate for the pressure containment. Developed and industrialized in the 1960's the explosion cladding technology can be used for cladding the more commonly used nickel based and stainless steel CRA's as well as titanium. It has many years of proven experience as a reliable and highly robust clad manufacturing process. The unique cold welding characteristics of explosion cladding reduce problems of alloy sensitization and dissimilar metal incompatibility. Explosion clad materials have been used extensively in both upstream and downstream oil, gas and petrochemical facilities for well over 40 years. The explosion clad equipment has demonstrated excellent resistance to corrosion, embrittlement and disbonding. Factors critical to insure reliable clad manufacture and equipment design and fabrication are addressed.

  4. Upstream Disaster Management to Support People Experiencing Homelessness

    PubMed Central

    Sundareswaran, Madura; Ghazzawi, Andrea; O'Sullivan, Tracey L.

    2015-01-01

    The unique context of day-to-day living for people who are chronically homeless or living with housing insecurity puts them at high risk during community disasters. The impacts of extreme events, such as flooding, storms, riots, and other sources of community disruption, underscore the importance of preparedness efforts and fostering community resilience. This study is part of larger initiative focused on enhancing resilience and preparedness among high risk populations. The purpose of this study was to explore critical issues and strategies to promote resilience and disaster preparedness among people who are homeless in Canada. A sample of interviews (n=21) from key informants across Canada was analyzed to explore existing programs and supports for homeless populations. The data was selected from a larger sample of (n=43) interviews focused on programs and supports for people who are at heightened risk for negative impacts during disasters. Qualitative content analysis was used to extract emergent themes and develop a model of multi-level collaboration to support disaster resilience among people who are homeless. The results indicate there is a need for more upstream continuity planning, collaboration and communication between the emergency management sector and community service organizations that support people who are homeless. Prioritization and investment in the social determinants of health and community supports is necessary to promote resilience among this high-risk population. The findings from this study highlight the importance of acknowledging community support organizations as assets in disaster preparedness. Day-to-day resilience is an ongoing theme for people who are chronically homeless or living with housing insecurity. Upstream investment to build adaptive capacity and collaborate with community organizations is an important strategy to enhance community resilience. PMID:26346842

  5. Assessing upstream fish passage connectivity with network analysis.

    PubMed

    McKay, S Kyle; Schramski, John R; Conyngham, Jock N; Fischenich, J Craig

    2013-09-01

    Hydrologic connectivity is critical to the structure, function, and dynamic process of river ecosystems. Dams, road crossings, and water diversions impact connectivity by altering flow regimes, behavioral cues, local geomorphology, and nutrient cycling. This longitudinal fragmentation of river ecosystems also increases genetic and reproductive isolation of aquatic biota such as migratory fishes. The cumulative effects on fish passage of many structures along a river are often substantial, even when individual barriers have negligible impact. Habitat connectivity can be improved through dam removal or other means of fish passage improvement (e.g., ladders, bypasses, culvert improvement). Environmental managers require techniques for comparing alternative fish passage restoration actions at alternative or multiple locations. Herein, we examined a graph-theoretic algorithm for assessing upstream habitat connectivity to investigate both basic and applied fish passage connectivity problems. First, we used hypothetical watershed configurations to assess general alterations to upstream fish passage connectivity with changes in watershed network topology (e.g., linear vs. highly dendritic) and the quantity, location, and passability of each barrier. Our hypothetical network modeling indicates that locations of dams with limited passage efficiency near the watershed outlet create a strong fragmentation signal but are not individually sufficient to disconnect the system. Furthermore, there exists a threshold in the number of dams beyond which connectivity declines precipitously, regardless of watershed topology and dam configuration. Watersheds with highly branched configurations are shown to be less susceptible to disconnection as measured by this metric. Second, we applied the model to prioritize barrier improvement in the mainstem of the Truckee River, Nevada, USA. The Truckee River application demonstrates the ability of the algorithm to address conditions common in fish passage projects including incomplete data, parameter uncertainty, and rapid application. This study demonstrates the utility of a graph-theoretic approach for assessing fish passage connectivity in dendritic river networks assuming full basin utilization for a given species, guild, or community of concern. PMID:24147411

  6. Explosion Clad for Upstream Oil and Gas Equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Banker, John G.; Massarello, Jack; Pauly, Stephane

    2011-01-17

    Today's upstream oil and gas facilities frequently involve the combination of high pressures, high temperatures, and highly corrosive environments, requiring equipment that is thick wall, corrosion resistant, and cost effective. When significant concentrations of CO{sub 2} and/or H{sub 2}S and/or chlorides are present, corrosion resistant alloys (CRA) can become the material of choice for separator equipment, piping, related components, and line pipe. They can provide reliable resistance to both corrosion and hydrogen embrittlement. For these applications, the more commonly used CRA's are 316L, 317L and duplex stainless steels, alloy 825 and alloy 625, dependent upon the application and the severity of the environment. Titanium is also an exceptional choice from the technical perspective, but is less commonly used except for heat exchangers. Explosion clad offers significant savings by providing a relatively thin corrosion resistant alloy on the surface metallurgically bonded to a thick, lower cost, steel substrate for the pressure containment. Developed and industrialized in the 1960's the explosion cladding technology can be used for cladding the more commonly used nickel based and stainless steel CRA's as well as titanium. It has many years of proven experience as a reliable and highly robust clad manufacturing process. The unique cold welding characteristics of explosion cladding reduce problems of alloy sensitization and dissimilar metal incompatibility. Explosion clad materials have been used extensively in both upstream and downstream oil, gas and petrochemical facilities for well over 40 years. The explosion clad equipment has demonstrated excellent resistance to corrosion, embrittlement and disbonding. Factors critical to insure reliable clad manufacture and equipment design and fabrication are addressed.

  7. Upstream Disaster Management to Support People Experiencing Homelessness.

    PubMed

    Sundareswaran, Madura; Ghazzawi, Andrea; O'Sullivan, Tracey L

    2015-01-01

    The unique context of day-to-day living for people who are chronically homeless or living with housing insecurity puts them at high risk during community disasters. The impacts of extreme events, such as flooding, storms, riots, and other sources of community disruption, underscore the importance of preparedness efforts and fostering community resilience. This study is part of larger initiative focused on enhancing resilience and preparedness among high risk populations. The purpose of this study was to explore critical issues and strategies to promote resilience and disaster preparedness among people who are homeless in Canada. A sample of interviews (n=21) from key informants across Canada was analyzed to explore existing programs and supports for homeless populations. The data was selected from a larger sample of (n=43) interviews focused on programs and supports for people who are at heightened risk for negative impacts during disasters. Qualitative content analysis was used to extract emergent themes and develop a model of multi-level collaboration to support disaster resilience among people who are homeless. The results indicate there is a need for more upstream continuity planning, collaboration and communication between the emergency management sector and community service organizations that support people who are homeless. Prioritization and investment in the social determinants of health and community supports is necessary to promote resilience among this high-risk population. The findings from this study highlight the importance of acknowledging community support organizations as assets in disaster preparedness. Day-to-day resilience is an ongoing theme for people who are chronically homeless or living with housing insecurity. Upstream investment to build adaptive capacity and collaborate with community organizations is an important strategy to enhance community resilience. PMID:26346842

  8. Expression of codon optimized genes in microbial systems: current industrial applications and perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Elena, Claudia; Ravasi, Pablo; Castelli, María E.; Peirú, Salvador; Menzella, Hugo G.

    2014-01-01

    The efficient production of functional proteins in heterologous hosts is one of the major bases of modern biotechnology. Unfortunately, many genes are difficult to express outside their original context. Due to their apparent “silent” nature, synonymous codon substitutions have long been thought to be trivial. In recent years, this dogma has been refuted by evidence that codon replacement can have a significant impact on gene expression levels and protein folding. In the past decade, considerable advances in the speed and cost of gene synthesis have facilitated the complete redesign of entire gene sequences, dramatically improving the likelihood of high protein expression. This technology significantly impacts the economic feasibility of microbial-based biotechnological processes by, for example, increasing the volumetric productivities of recombinant proteins or facilitating the redesign of novel biosynthetic routes for the production of metabolites. This review discusses the current applications of this technology, particularly those regarding the production of small molecules and industrially relevant recombinant enzymes. Suggestions for future research and potential uses are provided as well. PMID:24550894

  9. Angelman syndrome due to a termination codon mutation of the UBE3A gene.

    PubMed

    Al-Maawali, Almundher; Machado, Jerry; Fang, Ping; Dupuis, Lucie; Faghfoury, Hannaneh; Mendoza-Londono, Roberto

    2013-03-01

    Angelman syndrome is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by global developmental delay, mental retardation, seizures, microcephaly, and severe speech delay. It may be caused by deletion of chromosome region 15q11.2 of the maternally inherited chromosome, mutations in the UBE3A gene, uniparental disomy, or imprinting defects. Most patients with this diagnosis have a severe phenotype, and a few have a mild form of the disease. We report a patient with a novel mutation in the UBE3A gene that consists of a deletion of the termination codon (c.2556-*+6del GTAAAACAAA) and results in an elongated protein E3 ubiquitin-protein ligase. Our patient has a mild phenotype compared with other patients in general and specifically to patients with UBE3A mutations. He has mild developmental delay, moderate speech delay, and no seizures. Recognition of this genotype-phenotype correlation will allow better genetic counseling to other patients with similar stop codon mutations. PMID:22566713

  10. Reduced Efficacy of Natural Selection on Codon Usage Bias in Selfing Arabidopsis and Capsella Species

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Suo; Zeng, Kai; Slotte, Tanja; Wright, Stephen; Charlesworth, Deborah

    2011-01-01

    Population genetic theory predicts that the efficacy of natural selection in a self-fertilizing species should be lower than its outcrossing relatives because of the reduction in the effective population size (Ne) in the former brought about by inbreeding. However, previous analyses comparing Arabidopsis thaliana (selfer) with A. lyrata (outcrosser) have not found conclusive support for this prediction. In this study, we addressed this issue by examining silent site polymorphisms (synonymous and intronic), which are expected to be informative about changes in Ne. Two comparisons were made: A. thaliana versus A. lyrata and Capsella rubella (selfer) versus C. grandiflora (outcrosser). Extensive polymorphism data sets were obtained by compiling published data from the literature and by sequencing 354 exon loci in C. rubella and 89 additional loci in C. grandiflora. To extract information from the data effectively for studying these questions, we extended two recently developed models in order to investigate detailed selective differences between synonymous codons, mutational biases, and biased gene conversion (BGC), taking into account the effects of recent changes in population size. We found evidence that selection on synonymous codons is significantly weaker in the selfers compared with the outcrossers and that this difference cannot be fully accounted for by mutational biases or BGC. PMID:21856647

  11. Codon Optimization Significantly Improves the Expression Level of ?-Amylase Gene from Bacillus licheniformis in Pichia pastoris

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jian-Rong; Li, Yang-Yuan; Liu, Dan-Ni; Liu, Jing-Shan; Li, Peng; Chen, Li-Zhi; Xu, Shu-De

    2015-01-01

    ?-Amylase as an important industrial enzyme has been widely used in starch processing, detergent, and paper industries. To improve expression efficiency of recombinant ?-amylase from Bacillus licheniformis (B. licheniformis), the ?-amylase gene from B. licheniformis was optimized according to the codon usage of Pichia pastoris (P. pastoris) and expressed in P. pastoris. Totally, the codons encoding 305 amino acids were optimized in which a total of 328 nucleotides were changed and the G+C content was increased from 47.6 to 49.2%. The recombinants were cultured in 96-deep-well microplates and screened by a new plate assay method. Compared with the wild-type gene, the optimized gene is expressed at a significantly higher level in P. pastoris after methanol induction for 168?h in 5- and 50-L bioreactor with the maximum activity of 8100 and 11000?U/mL, which was 2.31- and 2.62-fold higher than that by wild-type gene. The improved expression level makes the enzyme a good candidate for ?-amylase production in industrial use. PMID:26171389

  12. A codon-optimized green fluorescent protein for live cell imaging in Zymoseptoria tritici.

    PubMed

    Kilaru, S; Schuster, M; Studholme, D; Soanes, D; Lin, C; Talbot, N J; Steinberg, G

    2015-06-01

    Fluorescent proteins (FPs) are powerful tools to investigate intracellular dynamics and protein localization. Cytoplasmic expression of FPs in fungal pathogens allows greater insight into invasion strategies and the host-pathogen interaction. Detection of their fluorescent signal depends on the right combination of microscopic setup and signal brightness. Slow rates of photo-bleaching are pivotal for in vivo observation of FPs over longer periods of time. Here, we test green-fluorescent proteins, including Aequorea coerulescens GFP (AcGFP), enhanced GFP (eGFP) from Aequorea victoria and a novel Zymoseptoria tritici codon-optimized eGFP (ZtGFP), for their usage in conventional and laser-enhanced epi-fluorescence, and confocal laser-scanning microscopy. We show that eGFP, expressed cytoplasmically in Z. tritici, is significantly brighter and more photo-stable than AcGFP. The codon-optimized ZtGFP performed even better than eGFP, showing significantly slower bleaching and a 20-30% further increase in signal intensity. Heterologous expression of all GFP variants did not affect pathogenicity of Z. tritici. Our data establish ZtGFP as the GFP of choice to investigate intracellular protein dynamics in Z. tritici, but also infection stages of this wheat pathogen inside host tissue. PMID:26092799

  13. Kras gene codon 12 mutation detection enabled by gold nanoparticles conducted in a nanobioarray chip.

    PubMed

    Sedighi, Abootaleb; Li, Paul C H

    2014-03-01

    This study employs a nanobioarray (NBA) chip for multiple biodetection of single base pair mutations at the Kras gene codon 12. To distinguish between the mutant and wild-type target DNAs, current bioarray methods use high-temperature hybridization of the targets to the allele-specific probes. However, these techniques need prior temperature optimization and become harder to implement in the case of the detection of multiple mutations. We aimed to detect these mutations at a single temperature (room temperature), enabled by the use of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) on the bioarray created within nanofluidic channels. In this method, a low amount of target oligonucleotides (5fmol) and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products (300pg) were first loaded on the AuNP surface, and then these AuNP-bound targets were introduced into the channels of a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) glass chip. The targets hybridized to their complementary probes at the intersection of the target channels to the pre-printed oligonucleotide probe lines on the glass surface, creating a bioarray. Using this technique, fast and high-throughput multiple discrimination of the Kras gene codon 12 were achieved at room temperature using the NBA chip, and the specificity of the method was proved to be as high as that with the temperature stringency method. PMID:24291640

  14. Association Between Specific Mutations in KRAS Codon 12 and Colorectal Liver Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Margonis, Georgios Antonios; Kim, Yuhree; Spolverato, Gaya; Ejaz, Aslam; Gupta, Rohan; Cosgrove, David; Anders, Robert; Karagkounis, Georgios; Choti, Michael A.; Pawlik, Timothy M.

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Currently, one of the most commonly available biomarkers in the treatment of patients with colorectal liver metastases (CRLM) is the Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (KRAS); however, the prognostic implications of specific mutations of the KRAS gene are still not well defined. OBJECTIVE To investigate the prognostic impact of specific KRAS mutations on patients undergoing liver resection for CRLM. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS This retrospective single-center study was conducted from January 1, 2003, to December 31, 2013. Data about specific KRAS mutations for 331 patients who underwent hepatic resection for CRLM at Johns Hopkins Hospital between 2003 and 2013 were analyzed. Clinicopathological characteristics, perioperative details, and outcomes were stratified by specific KRAS mutation at codons 12 and 13. INTERVENTION Resection of CRLM. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Overall survival (OS) and recurrence-free survival. RESULTS A mutated KRAS (mtKRAS) was identified in 91 patients (27.5%). At a median follow-up of 27.4 months, recurrence was observed in 48 patients (52.7%) with mtKRAS and 130 patients (54.2%) with wild-type KRAS (wtKRAS) (P = .82). Median and 5-year survival among patients with mtKRAS was 32.4 months and 32.7%, respectively, vs 58.5 months and 46.9%, respectively, for patients with wtKRAS (P = .02). Patients with KRAS codon 12 mutations had worse OS (hazard ratio [HR], 1.54; 95% CI, 1.05–2.27; P = .03) vs those with wtKRAS, whereas a KRAS codon 13 mutation was not associated with prognosis (HR, 1.47; 95% CI, 0.83–2.62; P = .19). Among the 6 most common mutations in codons 12 and 13, only G12V (HR, 1.78; 95% CI, 1.00–3.17; P = .05) and G12S (HR, 3.33; 95% CI, 1.22–9.10; P = .02) were associated with worse OS compared with patients with wtKRAS (both P < .05). Among patients who recurred, G12V (HR, 2.96; 95% CI, 1.32–6.61; P = .01), G12C (HR, 6.74; 95% CI, 2.05–22.2; P = .002), and G12S mutations (HR, 4.91; 95% CI, 1.52–15.8; P = .01) were associated with worse OS (both P < .05). CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE G12V and G12S mutations of codon 12 were independent prognostic factors of worse OS. Among patients who recurred after resection of CRLM, G12V, G12C, and G12S mutations were associated with worse OS. Information on specific KRAS mutations may help individualize therapeutic and surveillance strategies for patients with resected CRLM. PMID:26038887

  15. Upstream pressure variations associated with the bow shock and their effects on the magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fairfield, D. H.; Baumjohann, W.; Paschmann, G.; Luehr, H.; Sibeck, D. G.

    1990-01-01

    The AMPTE IRM solar wind data are analyzed to determine the relationship between upstream pressure fluctuations and magnetospheric perturbations. It is argued that the upstream pressure variations are not inherent in the solar wind but rather are associated with the bow shock. This conclusion follows from the fact that the upstream field strength and density associated with perturbations are highly correlated with each other, while they tend to be anticorrelated in the undisturbed solar wind, and that the upstream perturbations occur within the foreshock or at its boundary. The results imply a mode of interaction between the solar wind upstream and the magnetosphere whereby density changes produced in the foreshock subsequently convect through the bow shock and impinge on the magnetosphere. Upstream pressure perturbations should create significant effects on the magnetopause and at the foot of nearby field lines that lead to the polar cusp ionosphere.

  16. Nebraska: Early Head Start Initiative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Law and Social Policy, Inc. (CLASP), 2012

    2012-01-01

    Since 1999, Nebraska's Early Head Start Infant/Toddler Quality Initiative has supported Early Head Start (EHS) and community child care partnerships to improve the quality and professionalism of infant and toddler care. EHS programs apply to receive funding to establish partnerships with center-based or home-based child care.The initiative has…

  17. When to Start Antiretroviral Therapy

    MedlinePLUS

    HIV Treatment When to Start Antiretroviral Therapy (Last updated 4/28/2015; last reviewed 4/28/2015) Key Points Antiretroviral therapy (ART) is the use ... make adherence difficult. When is it time to start treatment with HIV medicines? Treatment with HIV medicines ( ...

  18. Maine: Early Head Start Initiatives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Law and Social Policy, Inc. (CLASP), 2012

    2012-01-01

    Maine has two initiatives that build on Early Head Start (EHS). The first initiative, Fund for a Healthy Maine, has since 2001 provided tobacco settlement money to existing Head Start and EHS programs to expand the number of children who receive full-day, full-year services. Local programs have the option of using these funds for EHS, depending on…

  19. Kansas: Early Head Start Initiative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Law and Social Policy, Inc. (CLASP), 2012

    2012-01-01

    Kansas Early Head Start (KEHS) provides comprehensive services following federal Head Start Program Performance Standards for pregnant women and eligible families with children from birth to age 4. KEHS was implemented in 1998 using Child Care and Development Block Grant (CCDBG) quality set-aside dollars augmented by a transfer of federal…

  20. Optimized codon usage enhances the expression and immunogenicity of DNA vaccine encoding Taenia solium oncosphere TSOL18 gene.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuan-Yuan; Chang, Xue-Lian; Tao, Zhi-Yong; Wang, Xiao-Li; Jiao, Yu-Meng; Chen, Yong; Qi, Wen-Juan; Xia, Hui; Yang, Xiao-Di; Sun, Xin; Shen, Ji-Long; Fang, Qiang

    2015-07-01

    Cysticercosis due to larval cysts of Taenia solium, is a serious public health problem affecting humans in numerous regions worldwide. The oncospheral stage-specific TSOL18 antigen is a promising candidate for an anti-cysticercosis vaccine. It has been reported that the immunogenicity of the DNA vaccine may be enhanced through codon optimization of candidate genes. The aim of the present study was to further increase the efficacy of the cysticercosis DNA vaccine; therefore, a codon optimized recombinant expression plasmid pVAX1/TSOL18 was developed in order to enhance expression and immunogenicity of TSOL18. The gene encoding TSOL18 of Taenia solium was optimized, and the resulting opt-TSOL18 gene was amplified and expressed. The results of the present study showed that the codon-optimized TSOL18 gene was successfully expressed in CHO-K1 cells, and immunized mice vaccinated with opt-TSOL18 recombinant expression plasmids demonstrated opt?TSOL18 expression in muscle fibers, as determined by immunohistochemistry. In addition, the codon-optimized TSOL18 gene produced a significantly greater effect compared with that of TSOL18 and active spleen cells were markedly stimulated in vaccinated mice. 3H-thymidine incorporation was significantly greater in the opt-TSOL18 group compared with that of the TSOL18, pVAX and blank control groups (P<0.01). In conclusion, the eukaryotic expression vector containing the codon-optimized TSOL18 gene was successfully constructed and was confirmed to be expressed in vivo and in vitro. The expression and immunogenicity of the codon-optimized TSOL18 gene were markedly greater compared with that of the un-optimized gene. Therefore, these results may provide the basis for an optimized TSOL18 gene vaccine against cysticercosis. PMID:25738605

  1. The surprising negative correlation of gene length and optimal codon use - disentangling translational selection from GC-biased gene conversion in yeast

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Surprisingly, in several multi-cellular eukaryotes optimal codon use correlates negatively with gene length. This contrasts with the expectation under selection for translational accuracy. While suggested explanations focus on variation in strength and efficiency of translational selection, it has rarely been noticed that the negative correlation is reported only in organisms whose optimal codons are biased towards codons that end with G or C (-GC). This raises the question whether forces that affect base composition - such as GC-biased gene conversion - contribute to the negative correlation between optimal codon use and gene length. Results Yeast is a good organism to study this as equal numbers of optimal codons end in -GC and -AT and one may hence compare frequencies of optimal GC- with optimal AT-ending codons to disentangle the forces. Results of this study demonstrate in yeast frequencies of GC-ending (optimal AND non-optimal) codons decrease with gene length and increase with recombination. A decrease of GC-ending codons along genes contributes to the negative correlation with gene length. Correlations with recombination and gene expression differentiate between GC-ending and optimal codons, and also substitution patterns support effects of GC-biased gene conversion. Conclusion While the general effect of GC-biased gene conversion is well known, the negative correlation of optimal codon use with gene length has not been considered in this context before. Initiation of gene conversion events in promoter regions and the presence of a gene conversion gradient most likely explain the observed decrease of GC-ending codons with gene length and gene position. PMID:21481245

  2. Innovation and performance: The case of the upstream petroleum sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persaud, A. C. Jai

    This thesis investigates innovation in the upstream crude oil and natural gas sector, a strategic part of the Canadian economy and a vital industry for North American energy trade and security. Significant interest exists in understanding innovation in this sector from a private and public policy perspective. Interest in the sector has intensified recently due to concerns about world oil supply, Canada's oil sands development, and the potential that Canada may become an "energy superpower." The study examines the factors that drive companies involved in exploration, development, and production in the upstream petroleum sector to innovate and the impact of their innovation activities through major technologies on their performance. The thesis focuses on process innovation, which involves the adoption of new or significantly improved production processes, and is distinct from product innovation, which is based on the development and commercialization of a product with improved product characteristics to deliver new services to the consumer. The thesis provides a comprehensive review of the literature and develops an investigative model framework to examine the drivers of innovation and the impact of innovation on performance in the upstream petroleum sector. The research employs a survey questionnaire that was developed to obtain data and information, which was missing in the literature or not publicly available to test key relationships of innovation and performance indicators. In addition to the survey questionnaire, a number of knowledgeable experts in the industry were also interviewed. A total of 68 respondents completed the survey questionnaire, accounting for 40 percent of the firms in the industry. This percentage goes up to over 50 percent when account is taken of extremely small firms who could not fill out the survey. Further, the 68 respondents account for most of the industry revenues, production, and employment. The respondents include most of the key explorers, developers, and producers as well as the owners of the major projects and oil sands developments. Almost all firms in the industry with revenues above $1B with employees above 1000 responded to the survey. As well, many companies have joint project arrangements and farm-in agreements with other companies in the industry. Hence, this survey is considered highly representative of the industry. Industry associations were very helpful in providing advice, and in endorsing the circulation of the questionnaire. The results show that the sector relies more heavily on acquiring advanced machinery and equipment, processes and other external knowledge than on internal R&D. Advanced machinery and equipment includes embedded R&D. 3D and 4D seismic stand out as the most relied upon in exploration, horizontal wells in development activities, and field recovery in production. Increasing productive capacity, reducing costs and reducing environmental impact are the three main drivers of innovation. Collaboration is important to the sector and agreements with competitors and suppliers are ranked as most important. The main reason for collaboration is to gain access to external knowledge. Government tax incentives (e.g., the Scientific Research and Experimental Development) (SR&ED) tax credit and its fiscal framework are important in spurring R&D. Fiscal policies, on the other hand, are more important for acquiring advanced machinery and equipment, advanced processes, and other external knowledge. The study has several broad implications with respect to the application of technologies: (1) Without the adoption of major technologies, costs would have been substantially higher and productive capacity and productivity much lower. This study also contributes to the view that resources should not be treated as a fixed stock but as flow which can be improved. (2) The environment is an important driver of innovation, particularly environmental regulation. Providing the right mix of regulation and leaving firms to undertake innovation may result in fav

  3. Hydrazine engine start system air start performance and controls sizing

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, A.T.

    1992-01-01

    Hydrazine has been used as an energy source in many applications to fuel in-flight main engine starting. In a current application, an existing hydrazine engine start system (ESS) design was adapted to meet new fuel control requirements. This paper presents a brief system description, historical context, and the motivating factors for the hydrazine controls changes and three case studies of controls design and analysis from the ESS program. 4 refs.

  4. The START III bargaining space

    SciTech Connect

    Karas, T.H.

    1998-08-01

    The declining state of the Russian military and precarious Russian economic condition will give the US considerable advantages at the START III bargaining table. Taking the US-RF asymmetries into account, this paper discusses a menu of START III measures the US could ask for, and measures it could offer in return, in attempting to negotiate an equitable treaty. Measures the US might seek in a START III treaty include: further reductions in deployed strategic nuclear warheads, irreversibility of reductions through warhead dismantlement; beginning to bring theater nuclear weapons under mutual control, and increased transparency into the Russian nuclear weapons complex. The US may, however, wish to apply its bargaining advantages to attempting to achieve the first steps toward two long-range goals that would enhance US security: bringing theater nuclear weapons into the US-RF arms control arena, and increasing transparency into the Russian nuclear weapons complex. In exchange for measures relating to these objectives, the US might consider offering to Russia: Further strategic weapons reductions approaching levels at which the Russians believe they could maintain a degree of parity with the US; Measures to decrease the large disparities in potential deliver-system uploading capabilities that appear likely under current START II/START III scenarios; and Financial assistance in achieving START II/START III reductions as rapidly as is technically possible.

  5. Natural selection retains overrepresented out-of-frame stop codons against frameshift peptides in prokaryotes

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Out-of-frame stop codons (OSCs) occur naturally in coding sequences of all organisms, providing a mechanism of early termination of translation in incorrect reading frame so that the metabolic cost associated with frameshift events can be reduced. Given such a functional significance, we expect statistically overrepresented OSCs in coding sequences as a result of a widespread selection. Accordingly, we examined available prokaryotic genomes to look for evidence of this selection. Results The complete genome sequences of 990 prokaryotes were obtained from NCBI GenBank. We found that low G+C content coding sequences contain significantly more OSCs and G+C content at specific codon positions were the principal determinants of OSC usage bias in the different reading frames. To investigate if there is overrepresentation of OSCs, we modeled the trinucleotide and hexanucleotide biases of the coding sequences using Markov models, and calculated the expected OSC frequencies for each organism using a Monte Carlo approach. More than 93% of 342 phylogenetically representative prokaryotic genomes contain excess OSCs. Interestingly the degree of OSC overrepresentation correlates positively with G+C content, which may represent a compensatory mechanism for the negative correlation of OSC frequency with G+C content. We extended the analysis using additional compositional bias models and showed that lower-order bias like codon usage and dipeptide bias could not explain the OSC overrepresentation. The degree of OSC overrepresentation was found to correlate negatively with the optimal growth temperature of the organism after correcting for the G+C% and AT skew of the coding sequence. Conclusions The present study uses approaches with statistical rigor to show that OSC overrepresentation is a widespread phenomenon among prokaryotes. Our results support the hypothesis that OSCs carry functional significance and have been selected in the course of genome evolution to act against unintended frameshift occurrences. Some results also hint that OSC overrepresentation being a compensatory mechanism to make up for the decrease in OSCs in high G+C organisms, thus revealing the interplay between two different determinants of OSC frequency. PMID:20828396

  6. Systematic Clustering of Transcription Start Site Landscapes

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xiaobei; Valen, Eivind; Parker, Brian J.; Sandelin, Albin

    2011-01-01

    Genome-wide, high-throughput methods for transcription start site (TSS) detection have shown that most promoters have an array of neighboring TSSs where some are used more than others, forming a distribution of initiation propensities. TSS distributions (TSSDs) vary widely between promoters and earlier studies have shown that the TSSDs have biological implications in both regulation and function. However, no systematic study has been made to explore how many types of TSSDs and by extension core promoters exist and to understand which biological features distinguish them. In this study, we developed a new non-parametric dissimilarity measure and clustering approach to explore the similarities and stabilities of clusters of TSSDs. Previous studies have used arbitrary thresholds to arrive at two general classes: broad and sharp. We demonstrated that in addition to the previous broad/sharp dichotomy an additional category of promoters exists. Unlike typical TATA-driven sharp TSSDs where the TSS position can vary a few nucleotides, in this category virtually all TSSs originate from the same genomic position. These promoters lack epigenetic signatures of typical mRNA promoters and a substantial subset of them are mapping upstream of ribosomal protein pseudogenes. We present evidence that these are likely mapping errors, which have confounded earlier analyses, due to the high similarity of ribosomal gene promoters in combination with known G addition bias in the CAGE libraries. Thus, previous two-class separations of promoter based on TSS distributions are motivated, but the ultra-sharp TSS distributions will confound downstream analyses if not removed. PMID:21887249

  7. A new Frameshift mutation on the ?2-globin gene causing ??-thalassemia: codon 43 (TTC>-TC or TTC>T-C).

    PubMed

    Joly, Philippe; Lacan, Philippe; Garcia, Caroline; Barro, Claire; Francina, Alain

    2012-01-01

    We report a new mutation on the ?2-globin gene causing ?(+)-thalassemia (?(+)-thal) with a deletion of a single nucleotide (T) at amino acid residue 43 [HBA2:c.130delT or HBA2:c.131delT]. This frameshift deletion gives rise to a premature termination codon at codon 47. PMID:22738776

  8. Codon usage bias and tRNA over-expression in Buchnera aphidicola after aromatic amino acid nutritional stress on its host Acyrthosiphon pisum

    PubMed Central

    Charles, Hubert; Calevro, Federica; Vinuelas, José; Fayard, Jean-Michel; Rahbe, Yvan

    2006-01-01

    Codon usage bias and relative abundances of tRNA isoacceptors were analysed in the obligate intracellular symbiotic bacterium, Buchnera aphidicola from the aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum, using a dedicated 35mer oligonucleotide microarray. Buchnera is archetypal of organisms living with minimal metabolic requirements and presents a reduced genome with high-evolutionary rate. Codonusage in Buchnera has been overcome by the high mutational bias towards AT bases. However, several lines of evidence for codon usage selection are given here. A significant correlation was found between tRNA relative abundances and codon composition of Buchnera genes. A significant codon usage bias was found for the choice of rare codons in Buchnera: C-ending codons are preferred in highly expressed genes, whereas G-ending codons are avoided. This bias is not explained by GC skew in the bacteria and might correspond to a selection for perfect matching between codon–anticodon pairs for some essential amino acids in Buchnera proteins. Nutritional stress applied to the aphid host induced a significant overexpression of most of the tRNA isoacceptors in bacteria. Although, molecular regulation of the tRNA operons in Buchnera was not investigated, a correlation between relative expression levels and organization in transcription unit was found in the genome of Buchnera. PMID:16963497

  9. The C-terminal amino acid sequence of nascent peptide is a major determinant of SsrA tagging at all three stop codons.

    PubMed Central

    Sunohara, Takafumi; Abo, Tatsuhiko; Inada, Toshifumi; Aiba, Hiroji

    2002-01-01

    Recent studies on endogenous SsrA-tagged proteins have revealed that the tagging could occur at a position corresponding to the normal termination codon. During the study of SsrA-mediated Lacl tagging (Abo et al., EMBO J, 2000 19:3762-3769), we found that a variant Lacl (Lacl deltaC1) lacking the last C-terminal amino acid residue is efficiently tagged in a stop codon-dependent manner. SsrA tagging of Lacl deltaC1 occurred efficiently without Lacl binding to the lac operators at any one of three stop codons. The C-terminal (R)LESG peptide of Lacl deltaC1 was shown to trigger the SsrA tagging of an unrelated protein (CRP) when fused to its C terminus. Mass spectrometry analysis of the purified fusion proteins revealed that SsrA tagging occurs at a position corresponding to the termination codon. The alteration of the amino acid sequence but not the nucleotide sequence of the C-terminal portion eliminated the tagging. We also showed that the tagging-provoking sequences cause an efficient translational readthrough at UGA but not UAA codons. In addition, we found that C-terminal dipeptides known to induce an efficient translation readthrough could cause an efficient tagging at stop codons. We conclude that the amino acid sequence of nascent polypeptide prior to stop codons is a major determinant for the SsrA tagging at all three stop codons. PMID:12458795

  10. Life without tRNA[superscript Ile]-lysidine synthetase: translation of the isoleucine codon AUA in Bacillus subtilis lacking the canonical tRNA[Ile over 2

    E-print Network

    Koehrer, Caroline

    Translation of the isoleucine codon AUA in most prokaryotes requires a modified C (lysidine or agmatidine) at the wobble position of tRNA[Ile over 2] to base pair specifically with the A of the AUA codon but not with the ...

  11. Rating Curve Estimation from Local Levels and Upstream Discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franchini, M.; Mascellani, G.

    2003-04-01

    Current technology allows for low cost and easy level measurements while the discharge measurements are still difficult and expensive. Thus, these are rarely performed and usually not in flood conditions because of lack of safety and difficulty in activating the measurement team in due time. As a consequence, long series of levels are frequently available without the corresponding discharge values. However, for the purpose of planning, management of water resources and real time flood forecasting, discharge is needed and it is therefore essential to convert local levels into discharge values by using the appropriate rating curve. Over this last decade, several methods have been proposed to relate local levels at a site of interest to data recorded at a river section located upstream where a rating curve is available. Some of these methods are based on a routing approach which uses the Muskingum model structure in different ways; others are based on the entropy concepts. Lately, fuzzy logic has been applied more and more frequently in the framework of hydraulic and hydrologic problems and this has prompted to the authors to use it for synthesising the rating curves. A comparison between all these strategies is performed, highlighting the difficulties and advantages of each of them, with reference to a long reach of the Po river in Italy, where several hydrometers and the relevant rating curves are available, thus allowing for both a parameterization and validation of the different strategies.

  12. Rheotaxis facilitates upstream navigation of mammalian sperm cells

    E-print Network

    Vasily Kantsler; Jörn Dunkel; Martyn Blayney; Raymond E. Goldstein

    2014-05-26

    A major puzzle in biology is how mammalian sperm determine and maintain the correct swimming direction during the various phases of the sexual reproduction process. Whilst chemotaxis is assumed to dominate in the immediate vicinity of the ovum, it is unclear which biochemical or physical cues guide spermatozoa on their long journey towards the egg cell. Currently debated mechanisms range from peristaltic pumping to temperature sensing (thermotaxis) and direct response to fluid flow variations (rheotaxis), but little is known quantitatively about their relative importance. Here, we report the first quantitative experimental study of mammalian sperm rheotaxis. Using microfluidic devices, we investigate systematically the swimming behavior of human and bull sperm over the whole range of physiologically relevant shear rates and viscosities. Our measurements show that the interplay of fluid shear, steric surface-interactions and chirality of the flagellar beat leads to a stable upstream spiraling motion of sperm cells, thus providing a generic and robust rectification mechanism to support mammalian fertilisation. To rationalise these findings, we identify a minimal mathematical model that is capable of describing quantitatively the experimental observations. The combined experimental and theoretical evidence supports the hypothesis that the shape and beat patterns of mammalian sperm cells have evolved to optimally exploit rheotaxis for long-distance navigation.

  13. Rheotaxis facilitates upstream navigation of mammalian sperm cells

    PubMed Central

    Kantsler, Vasily; Dunkel, Jörn; Blayney, Martyn; Goldstein, Raymond E

    2014-01-01

    A major puzzle in biology is how mammalian sperm maintain the correct swimming direction during various phases of the sexual reproduction process. Whilst chemotaxis may dominate near the ovum, it is unclear which cues guide spermatozoa on their long journey towards the egg. Hypothesized mechanisms range from peristaltic pumping to temperature sensing and response to fluid flow variations (rheotaxis), but little is known quantitatively about them. We report the first quantitative study of mammalian sperm rheotaxis, using microfluidic devices to investigate systematically swimming of human and bull sperm over a range of physiologically relevant shear rates and viscosities. Our measurements show that the interplay of fluid shear, steric surface-interactions, and chirality of the flagellar beat leads to stable upstream spiralling motion of sperm cells, thus providing a generic and robust rectification mechanism to support mammalian fertilisation. A minimal mathematical model is presented that accounts quantitatively for the experimental observations. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02403.001 PMID:24867640

  14. Rapid acceleration of protons upstream of earthward propagating dipolarization fronts

    PubMed Central

    Ukhorskiy, AY; Sitnov, MI; Merkin, VG; Artemyev, AV

    2013-01-01

    [1] Transport and acceleration of ions in the magnetotail largely occurs in the form of discrete impulsive events associated with a steep increase of the tail magnetic field normal to the neutral plane (Bz), which are referred to as dipolarization fronts. The goal of this paper is to investigate how protons initially located upstream of earthward moving fronts are accelerated at their encounter. According to our analytical analysis and simplified two-dimensional test-particle simulations of equatorially mirroring particles, there are two regimes of proton acceleration: trapping and quasi-trapping, which are realized depending on whether the front is preceded by a negative depletion in Bz. We then use three-dimensional test-particle simulations to investigate how these acceleration processes operate in a realistic magnetotail geometry. For this purpose we construct an analytical model of the front which is superimposed onto the ambient field of the magnetotail. According to our numerical simulations, both trapping and quasi-trapping can produce rapid acceleration of protons by more than an order of magnitude. In the case of trapping, the acceleration levels depend on the amount of time particles stay in phase with the front which is controlled by the magnetic field curvature ahead of the front and the front width. Quasi-trapping does not cause particle scattering out of the equatorial plane. Energization levels in this case are limited by the number of encounters particles have with the front before they get magnetized behind it. PMID:26167430

  15. Sewage sludge--looking upstream: the precautionary principle.

    PubMed

    Schettler, Ted

    2002-01-01

    The health care industry makes a unique contribution to the potential public health and environmental impacts of sewage sludge production and disposal. As materials flow into and out of health care facilities, potentially hazardous substances, like mercury, solvents, and pharmaceutical compounds, are introduced into the waste stream and ultimately into sewage sludge. Although the hazards posed by these practices are often not fully understood or the risks quantified, concern about impacts on public health and the environment is fully justified. How to deal with the uncertainties surrounding the impacts of these practices becomes an ethical as well as a scientific question. A precautionary approach to materials manufacture, use, and disposal encourages us to look upstream and to re-design products and systems in ways that primarily prevent problems rather than dealing with them at the "end of the pipe." Early warning systems, shifting the burden of proof, alternatives assessment, and monitoring programs are suggested as interventions that might be used as part of a precautionary approach to addressing the generation and disposal of sewage in an industrial society. PMID:17208781

  16. Dynamic meandering in response to upstream perturbations and floodplain formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuurman, F.; Shimizu, Y.; Iwasaki, T.; Kleinhans, M. G.

    2016-01-01

    River meandering results from spatially alternating bank erosion and bar growth. Recent flume experiments and theory suggest that a continuous inflow perturbation is a requirement for sustained meandering. Furthermore, flume experiments suggest that bar-floodplain conversion is an additional requirement. Here, we tested the effects of continuous inflow perturbation and bar-floodplain conversion on meander migration using three numerical morphodynamic models: a 1D-model, and two 2D-models with one of them using adaptive moving grid. We focused on the interaction between bars and bends that leads to meander initiation, and the effect of different methods to model bank erosion and floodplain accretion processes on meander migration. The results showed that inflow perturbations have large effects on meander dynamics of high-sinuosity channels, with strong excitation when the inflow is periodically perturbed. In contrast, inflow perturbations have rather small effect in low-sinuosity channels. Steady alternate bars alone are insufficient to cause high-sinuosity meandering. For high-sinuosity meandering, bar-floodplain conversion is required that prevents chute-cutoffs and enhances flow asymmetry, whilst meandering with chute-cutoffs requires merely weak floodplain formation, and braiding occurs without floodplain formation. Thus, this study demonstrated that both dynamic upstream inflow perturbation and bar-floodplain conversion are required for sustained high-sinuosity meandering.

  17. Harbor seal whiskers synchronize with frequency of upstream wake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beem, Heather; Triantafyllou, Michael

    2013-11-01

    Harbor seals are able to use their whiskers to track minute water movements, such as those left in the wake of a fish. The current study is a simple representation of what the whiskers experience as the seal chases a fish. A scaled whisker model (average cross-flow diameter: dw) is first tested in a towing tank by itself and then towed behind a larger cylinder (dc = 2 . 5dw), which serves as a wake generator. A flexing plate attached to the model base allows the whisker to freely vibrate in response to the flow. Measurements from strain gages on the plate are calibrated to tip deflections. While in the cylinder wake, the whisker vibrates with an amplitude up to ten times higher than it does on its own (A /dw = 0 . 15). Also, the whisker synchronizes with the vortex shedding frequency (fs =0/. 2 U dc) of the upstream cylinder over the range of reduced velocities tested, whereas on its own, the whisker oscillates around its own natural frequency in water. Seals may use the difference in vibration amplitude and frequency between these two cases to help detect the presence of a vortex wake.

  18. The muscle creatine kinase gene is regulated by multiple upstream elements, including a muscle-specific enhancer

    SciTech Connect

    Jaynes, J.B.; Johnson, J.E.; Buskin, J.N.; Gartside, C.L.; Hauschka, S.D.

    1988-01-01

    Muscle creatine kinase (MCK) is induced to high levels during skeletal muscle differentiation. The authors examined the upstream regulatory elements of the mouse MCK gene which specify its activation during myogenesis in culture. Fusion genes containing up to 3,300 nucleotides (nt) of MCK 5' flanking DNA in various positions and orientations relative to the bacterial chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) structural gene were transfected into cultured cells. Transient expression of CAT was compared between proliferating and differentiated MM14 mouse myoblasts and with nonmyogenic mouse L cells. The major effector of high-level expression was found to have the properties of a transcriptional enhancer. This element, located between 1,050 and 1,256 nt upstream of the transcription start site, was also found to have a major influence on the tissue and differentiation specificity of MCK expression; it activated either the MCK promoter or heterologous promoters only in differentiated muscle cells. Comparisons of viral and cellular enhancer sequences with the MCK enhancer revealed some similarities to essential regions of the simian virus 40 enhancer as well as to a region of the immunoglobulin heavy-chain enhancer, which has been implicated in tissue-specific protein binding. Even in the absence of the enhancer, low-level expression from a 776-nt MCK promoter retained differentiation specificity. In addition to positive regulatory elements, our data provide some evidence for negative regulatory elements with activity in myoblasts. These may contribute to the cell type and differentiation specificity of MCK expression.

  19. Mutations at a single codon in Mad homology 2 domain of SMAD4 cause Myhre syndrome.

    PubMed

    Le Goff, Carine; Mahaut, Clémentine; Abhyankar, Avinash; Le Goff, Wilfried; Serre, Valérie; Afenjar, Alexandra; Destrée, Anne; di Rocco, Maja; Héron, Delphine; Jacquemont, Sébastien; Marlin, Sandrine; Simon, Marleen; Tolmie, John; Verloes, Alain; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Munnich, Arnold; Cormier-Daire, Valérie

    2012-01-01

    Myhre syndrome (MIM 139210) is a developmental disorder characterized by short stature, short hands and feet, facial dysmorphism, muscular hypertrophy, deafness and cognitive delay. Using exome sequencing of individuals with Myhre syndrome, we identified SMAD4 as a candidate gene that contributes to this syndrome on the basis of its pivotal role in the bone morphogenetic pathway (BMP) and transforming growth factor (TGF)-? signaling. We identified three distinct heterozygous missense SMAD4 mutations affecting the codon for Ile500 in 11 individuals with Myhre syndrome. All three mutations are located in the region of SMAD4 encoding the Mad homology 2 (MH2) domain near the site of monoubiquitination at Lys519, and we found a defect in SMAD4 ubiquitination in fibroblasts from affected individuals. We also observed decreased expression of downstream TGF-? target genes, supporting the idea of impaired TGF-?-mediated transcriptional control in individuals with Myhre syndrome. PMID:22158539

  20. Recurrent positive selection and heterogeneous codon usage bias events leading to coexistence of divergent pigeon circoviruses.

    PubMed

    Liao, Pei-Chun; Wang, Kung-Kai; Tsai, Shinn-Shyong; Liu, Hung-Jen; Huang, Bing-Hong; Chuang, Kuo-Pin

    2015-08-01

    The capsid genes from 14 pigeon circovirus (PiCV) sequences, collected from Taiwan between 2009 and 2010, were sequenced and compared with 14 PiCV capsid gene sequences from GenBank. Based on pairwise comparison, PiCV strains from Taiwan shared 73.9-100% nucleotide identity and 72-100% amino acid identity with those of the 14 reported PiCV sequences. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that Taiwanese PiCV isolates can be grouped into two clades: clade 1 comprising isolates from Belgium, Australia, USA, Italy and China, and clade 2 showing close relation to isolates from Germany and France. Recurrent positive selection was detected in clade 1 PiCV lineages, which may contribute to the diversification of predominant PiCV sequences in Taiwan. Further observations suggest that synonymous codon usage variations between PiCV clade 1 and clade 2 may reflect the adaptive divergence on translation efficiency of capsid genes in infectious hosts. Variation in selective pressures acting on the evolutionary divergence and codon usage bias of both clades explains the regional coexistence of virus sequences congeners prevented from competitive exclusion within an island such as Taiwan. Our genotyping results also provide insight into the aetiological agents of PiCV outbreak in Taiwan and we present a comparative analysis of the central coding region of PiCV genome. From the sequence comparison results of 28 PiCVs which differs in regard to the geographical origin and columbid species, we identified conserved regions within the capsid gene that are likely to be suitable for primer selection and vaccine development. PMID:25911731

  1. Replicating reoviruses with a transgene replacing the codons for the head domain of the viral spike.

    PubMed

    van den Wollenberg, D J M; Dautzenberg, I J C; Ros, W; Lipi?ska, A D; van den Hengel, S K; Hoeben, R C

    2015-03-01

    The capacity to modify the reovirus genome facilitates generation of new therapeutic reoviruses. We describe a method for generating replication-competent reoviruses carrying a heterologous transgene. The strategy is based on the expanded-tropism reovirus mutant jin-3, which can infect cells independent of the reovirus receptor junction-adhesion molecule A (JAM-A). Jin-3 harbors a mutation in the S1 segment, resulting in a G196R substitution in the tail of the spike protein ?1. The use of the jin-3 tail-encoding S1 segment allows replacing the codons for the JAM-A-binding head domain by up to 522? nucleotides of foreign sequences, without exceeding the size of the wild-type S1 segment. We inserted the codons for the porcine teschovirus-1 2A element fused with those encoding the fluorescent protein iLOV. Replicating rS1His-2A-iLOV reoviruses were generated by co-transfection of expression plasmids for all reovirus segments. These reoviruses contain the S1His-2A-iLOV segment in the absence of the wild-type S1 segment. Density-gradient centrifugation confirmed the association of the ?1-tail fragment with the capsid. Both JAM-A-positive and -negative cells exposed to the rS1His-2A-iLOV reoviruses exhibited iLOV fluorescence, confirming the jin-3-derived expanded-tropism phenotype. These data demonstrated the feasibility of generating decapitated replication-competent T3D reoviruses carrying a heterologous transgene. PMID:25588743

  2. Functional studies of a germ-line polymorphism at codon 47 within the p53 gene

    SciTech Connect

    Felley-Bosco, E.; Weston, A.; Cawley, H.M.; Bennett, W.P.; Harris, C.C.

    1993-09-01

    A rare germ-line polymorphism in codon 47 of the p53 gene replaces the wild-type proline (CCG) with a serine (TCG). Restriction analysis of 101 human samples revealed the frequency of the rare allele to be 0% (n = 69) in Causasians and 4.7% (3/64, n = 32) among African-Americans. To investigate the consequence of this amino acid substitution, a cDNA construct (p53 mut47ser) containing the mutation was introduced into a lung adenocarcinoma cell line (Calu-6) that does not express p53. A growth suppression similar to that obtained after introduction of a wild-type p53 cDNA construct was observed, in contrast to the result obtained by introduction of p53 mut143ala. Furthermore, expression of neither p53 mut47ser nor wild-type p53 was tolerated by growing cells. In transient expression assays, both mut47ser and wild-type p53 activated the expression of a reporter gene linked to a p53 binding sequence (PG13-CAT) and inhibited the expression of the luciferase gene under the control of the Rous sarcoma virus promoter (RSVluc). In the same assay, mut143ala did not activate the expression of PG13-CAT and produced only a slight inhibitory effect on RSVluc. These findings indicate that the p53 variant with a serine at codon 47 should be considered as a rare germ-line polymorphism that does not alter the growth-suppression activity of p53. 30 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. Attenuation of Tick-Borne Encephalitis Virus Using Large-Scale Random Codon Re-encoding

    PubMed Central

    de Fabritus, Lauriane; Nougairède, Antoine; Aubry, Fabien; Gould, Ernest A; de Lamballerie, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    Large-scale codon re-encoding (i.e. introduction of a large number of synonymous mutations) is a novel method of generating attenuated viruses. Here, it was applied to the pathogenic flavivirus, tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV) which causes febrile illness and encephalitis in humans in forested regions of Europe and Asia. Using an infectious clone of the Oshima 5–10 strain ("wild-type virus"), a cassette of 1.4kb located in the NS5 coding region, was modified by randomly introducing 273 synonymous mutations ("re-encoded virus"). Whilst the in cellulo replicative fitness of the re-encoded virus was only slightly reduced, the re-encoded virus displayed an attenuated phenotype in a laboratory mouse model of non-lethal encephalitis. Following intra-peritoneal inoculation of either 2.105 or 2.106 TCID50 of virus, the frequency of viraemia, neurovirulence (measured using weight loss and appearance of symptoms) and neuroinvasiveness (detection of virus in the brain) were significantly decreased when compared with the wild-type virus. Mice infected by wild-type or re-encoded viruses produced comparable amounts of neutralising antibodies and results of challenge experiments demonstrated that mice previously infected with the re-encoded virus were protected against subsequent infection by the wild-type virus. This constitutes evidence that a mammalian species can be protected against infection by a virulent wild-type positive-stranded RNA virus following immunisation with a derived randomly re-encoded strain. Our results demonstrate that random codon re-encoding is potentially a simple and effective method of generating live-attenuated vaccine candidates against pathogenic flaviviruses. PMID:25734338

  4. Selective Targeting of the KRAS Codon?12 Mutation Sequence by Pyrrole-Imidazole Polyamide seco-CBI Conjugates.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Rhys D; Chandran, Anandhakumar; Kashiwazaki, Gengo; Hashiya, Kaori; Bando, Toshikazu; Nagase, Hiroki; Sugiyama, Hiroshi

    2015-10-12

    Mutation of KRAS is a key step in many cancers. Mutations occur most frequently at codon?12, but the targeting of KRAS is notoriously difficult. We recently demonstrated selective reduction in the volume of tumors harboring the KRAS codon?12 mutation in a mouse model by using an alkylating hairpin N-methylpyrrole-N-methylimidazole polyamide seco-1,2,9,9a-tetrahydrocyclopropa[1,2-c]benz[1,2-e]indol-4-one conjugate (conjugate 4) designed to target the KRAS codon?12 mutation sequence. Herein, we have compared the alkylating activity of 4 against three other conjugates that were also designed to target the KRAS codon?12 mutation sequence. Conjugate 4 displayed greater affinity for the G12D mutation sequence than for the G12V sequence. A computer-minimized model suggested that conjugate 4 could bind more efficiently to the G12D match sequence than to a one-base-pair mismatch sequence. Conjugate 4 was modified for next-generation sequencing. Bind-n-Seq analysis supported the evidence showing that conjugate 4 could target the G12D mutation sequence with exceptionally high affinity and the G12V mutation sequence with much higher affinity than that for the wild-type sequence. PMID:26306751

  5. CODON-BASED DETECTION OF POSITIVE SELECTION CAN BE BIASED BY HETEROGENEOUS DISTRIBUTION OF POLAR AMINO ACIDS ALONG PROTEIN

    E-print Network

    Xia, Xuhua

    1 CODON-BASED DETECTION OF POSITIVE SELECTION CAN BE BIASED BY HETEROGENEOUS DISTRIBUTION OF POLAR AMINO ACIDS ALONG PROTEIN SEQUENCES Xuhua Xia Department of Biology, University of Ottawa 30 Marie Curie selection, are associated with a high frequency of polar amino acids with a high mutability

  6. A Synthetic Approach to Stop Codon Scanning Mutagenesis Lihua Nie, Jason Lavinder, Mohosin Sarkar, Kimberly Stephany and Thomas J. Magliery*

    E-print Network

    Magliery, Thomas J.

    -held UV light was used for the irradiation. The cells were then lysed #12;S3 with 0.1 mm glass beadsS1 A Synthetic Approach to Stop Codon Scanning Mutagenesis Lihua Nie, Jason Lavinder, Mohosin and additional UV crosslinking experiments #12;S2 Part I: Additional detailed procedures 1 H and 31 P NMR

  7. Reduced Amino Acid Specificity of Mammalian Tyrosyl-tRNA Synthetase Is Associated with Elevated Mistranslation of Tyr Codons*

    PubMed Central

    Raina, Medha; Moghal, Adil; Kano, Amanda; Jerums, Mathew; Schnier, Paul D.; Luo, Shun; Deshpande, Rohini; Bondarenko, Pavel V.; Lin, Henry; Ibba, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Quality control operates at different steps in translation to limit errors to approximately one mistranslated codon per 10,000 codons during mRNA-directed protein synthesis. Recent studies have suggested that error rates may actually vary considerably during translation under different growth conditions. Here we examined the misincorporation of Phe at Tyr codons during synthesis of a recombinant antibody produced in tyrosine-limited Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. Tyr to Phe replacements were previously found to occur throughout the antibody at a rate of up to 0.7% irrespective of the identity or context of the Tyr codon translated. Despite this comparatively high mistranslation rate, no significant change in cellular viability was observed. Monitoring of Phe and Tyr levels revealed that changes in error rates correlated with changes in amino acid pools, suggesting that mischarging of tRNATyr with noncognate Phe by tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase was responsible for mistranslation. Steady-state kinetic analyses of CHO cytoplasmic tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase revealed a 25-fold lower specificity for Tyr over Phe as compared with previously characterized bacterial enzymes, consistent with the observed increase in translation error rates during tyrosine limitation. Functional comparisons of mammalian and bacterial tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase revealed key differences at residues responsible for amino acid recognition, highlighting differences in evolutionary constraints for translation quality control. PMID:24828507

  8. Codon modification for the DNA sequence of a single-chain Fv antibody against clenbuterol and expression in Pichia pastoris

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To improve expression efficiency of the recombinant single-chain variable fragment (scFv) against clenbuterol (CBL) obtained from mouse in the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris (P. pastoris) GS115, the DNA sequence encoding for CBL-scFv was designed and synthesized based on the codon bias of P. p...

  9. TP53 codon 72 Arg/Arg polymorphism is associated with a higher risk for inflammatory bowel disease development

    PubMed Central

    Volodko, Natalia; Salla, Mohamed; Eksteen, Bertus; Fedorak, Richard N; Huynh, Hien Q; Baksh, Shairaz

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the association between tumor protein 53 (TP53) codon 72 polymorphisms and the risk for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) development. METHODS: Numerous genetic and epigenetic drivers have been identified for IBD including the TP53 gene. Pathogenic mutations in TP53 gene have only been reported in 50% of colorectal cancer (CRC) patients. A single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the TP53 gene resulting in the presence of either arginine (Arg) or proline (Pro) or both at codon 72 was shown to alter TP53 tumor-suppressor properties. This SNP has been investigated as a risk factor for numerous cancers, including CRC. In this study we analyzed TP53 codon 72 polymorphism distribution in 461 IBD, 181 primary sclerosing cholangitis patients and 62 healthy controls. Genotyping of TP53 was performed by sequencing and restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of genomic DNA extracted from peripheral blood. RESULTS: The most frequent TP53 genotype in IBD patients was Arg/Arg occurring in 54%-64% of cases (and in only 32% of controls). Arg/Pro was the most prevalent genotype in controls (53%) and less common in patients (31%-40%). Pro/Pro frequency was not significantly different between controls and IBD patients. CONCLUSION: The data suggests that the TP53 codon 72 Arg/Arg genotype is associated with increased risk for IBD development. PMID:26420962

  10. Bicluster Pattern of Codon Context Usages between Flavivirus and Vector Mosquito Aedes aegypti: Relevance to Infection and Transcriptional Response of Mosquito Genes

    PubMed Central

    Behura, Susanta K.; Severson, David W.

    2014-01-01

    The mosquito Aedes aegypti is the primary vector of dengue virus (DENV) infection in most of the subtropical and tropical countries. Besides DENV, yellow fever virus (YFV) is also transmitted by A. aegypti. Susceptibility of A. aegypti to West Nile virus (WNV) has also been confirmed. Although studies have indicated correlation of codon bias between flaviviridae and their animal/insect hosts, it is not clear if codon sequences have any relation to susceptibility of A. aegypti to DENV, YFV and WNV. In the current study, usages of codon context sequences (codon pairs for neighboring amino acids) of the vector (A. aegypti) genome as well as the flaviviral genomes are investigated. We used bioinformatics methods to quantify codon context bias in a genome-wide manner of A. aegypti as well as DENV, WNV and YFV sequences. Mutual information statistics was applied to perform bicluster analysis of codon context bias between vector and flaviviral sequences. Functional relevance of the bicluster pattern was inferred from published microarray data. Our study shows that codon context bias of DENV, WNV and YFV sequences varies in a bicluster manner with that of specific sets of genes of A. aegypti. Many of these mosquito genes are known to be differentially expressed in response to flaviviral infection suggesting that codon context sequences of A. aegypti and the flaviviruses may play a role in the susceptible interaction between flaviviruses and this mosquito. The bias inusages of codon context sequences likely has a functional association with susceptibility of A. aegypti to flaviviral infection. The results from this study will allow us to conduct hypothesis driven tests to examine the role of codon contexts bias in evolution of vector-virus interactions at the molecular level. PMID:24838953

  11. Elimination of redundant and stop codons during the chemical synthesis of degenerate oligonucleotides. Combinatorial testing on the chromophore region of the red fluorescent protein mKate.

    PubMed

    Gaytán, Paul; Roldán-Salgado, Abigail

    2013-08-16

    Although some strategies have been reported for the elimination of stop and redundant codons during the chemical synthesis of degenerate oligonucleotides, incorporating an expensive cocktail of 20 trimer-phosphoramidites is currently a commonly employed and straightforward approach. As an alternative option, we describe here a cheaper strategy based on standard monomer-phosphoramidites and a simplified resin-splitting procedure. The accurate division of the resin, containing the growing oligonucleotide, into four columns represents the key step in this approach. The synthesis of the degenerate codon NDT in column 1, loaded with 60% of the resin, produces 12 codons, while a degenerate codon VMA in column 2, loaded with 30% of the resin, produces 6 codons. Codons ATG and TGG, independently synthesized in columns 3 and 4, respectively, and loaded with 5% each, completes the 20 different codons. The experimental frequency of each mutant codon in the library was assessed by randomizing 12 contiguous codons that encode for amino acids located in the chromophore region of the enhanced red fluorescent protein mKate-S158A. Furthermore, randomization of three contiguous codons that encode for the amino acids Phe62, Met63, and Tyr64, which are equivalent to Phe64, Ser65, and Tyr66 in GFP, gave rise to some red and golden yellow fluorescent mutants displaying interesting phenotypes and spectroscopic properties. The absorption and emission spectra of two of these mutants also suggested that the complete maturation of the red and golden yellow chromophores in mKate proceeds via the formation of a green-type chromophore and a cyan-type chromophore, respectively. PMID:23654278

  12. Short-Term Supply Chain Management in Upstream Natural Gas Systems

    E-print Network

    Short-Term Supply Chain Management in Upstream Natural Gas Systems by Ajay Selot Submitted Students #12;2 #12;Short-Term Supply Chain Management in Upstream Natural Gas Systems by Ajay Selot of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in Chemical Engineering Abstract Natural gas supply chain

  13. Upstream Neutral Modes in the Fractional Quantum Hall Effect Regime: Heat Waves or Coherent Dipoles

    E-print Network

    Heiblum, Mordehai "Moty"

    Upstream Neutral Modes in the Fractional Quantum Hall Effect Regime: Heat Waves or Coherent Dipoles (Received 19 September 2011; published 30 May 2012) Counterpropagating (upstream) chiral neutral edge modes that resulted after partitioning the neutral mode by a constriction (denoted, as N ! C). Particularly noticeable

  14. Upstream urbanization exacerbates urban heat island effects Da-Lin Zhang,1

    E-print Network

    Zhang, Da-Lin

    Upstream urbanization exacerbates urban heat island effects Da-Lin Zhang,1 Yi-Xuan Shou,1; published 19 December 2009. [1] Urban Heat Island (UHI) effects adversely impact weather, air quality find that upstream urbanization exacerbates UHI effects and that meteorological consequences of extra-urban

  15. Impact of Upstream Urbanization on the Urban Heat Island Effects along the WashingtonBaltimore Corridor

    E-print Network

    Zhang, Da-Lin

    Impact of Upstream Urbanization on the Urban Heat Island Effects along the Washington considerable research on urban heat island (UHI) effects, most of the previous studies have attributed UHI effects to localized, surface processes. In this study, the impact of upstream urbanization on enhanced

  16. Analysis of Yeast's ORF Upstream Regions by Parallel Processing, Microarrays, and Computational Methods

    E-print Network

    Kibler, Dennis F.

    Analysis of Yeast's ORF Upstream Regions by Parallel Processing, Microarrays, and Computational­ gions, gene regulation, DNA­microarrays, yeast, motifs, Markov models Abstract We use a network of workstations to compute all pairwise alignments of the 500 bp upstream regions of 6,225 yeast ORFs (Open

  17. Translation start site multiplicity of the CCAAT/enhancer binding protein alpha mRNA is dictated by a small 5' open reading frame.

    PubMed Central

    Calkhoven, C F; Bouwman, P R; Snippe, L; Ab, G

    1994-01-01

    The CCAAT/enhancer binding proteins (C/EBP) alpha and beta of the bZIP family of transcription factors each occur as multiple forms due to translation initiation at different in-frame AUG codons from the same messenger RNA. The C/EBP alpha mRNAs of chicken, rat and Xenopus all contain a small 5' open reading frame (5'ORF) whose size (18 nucleotides) and distance (seven nucleotides) to the C/EBP alpha cistron has been conserved in vertebrate evolution. The present studies shows that the small 5'ORF is crucial to the leaky scanning mechanism of ribosomes causing a fraction of them to ignore the first C/EBP alpha AUG codon and to start at internal AUGs. Our data challenge the view that translational start site multiplicity is mainly governed by the sequence context of the potential initiation codons. Western analysis showed that the two major chicken C/EBP alpha translation products, the full-length cC/EBP alpha-42 which acts a trans-activator in liver and the N-terminally truncated cC/EBP alpha-29 which lacks transcription activation potential, occur in a fixed ratio which is similar in different expressing tissues, like liver, lung and small intestine. The presence of a similar, thusfar unnoticed, small ORF 5' to the major initiation codon of C/EBP beta mRNA suggests that start site multiplicity from this mRNA may be governed by the same mechanism. Images PMID:7838705

  18. Deceleration of the solar wind upstream from the earth's bow shock and the origin of diffuse upstream ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bame, S. J.; Asbridge, J. R.; Feldman, W. C.; Gosling, J. T.; Paschmann, G.; Skopke, N.

    1980-01-01

    Observations with the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory/Max-Planck-Institut crossed-fan solar wind ion experiment on ISEE I reveal that the solar wind is decelerated and deflected away from the direction of the earth's bow shock as it enters that portion of the upstream region populated by diffuse bow shock ions and long-period (10-60 s) waves. Typically, the average directed velocity vector changes by 7-10 km/s as it enters the wave region. At times, average speed changes as large as 25-40 km/s are observed. Superposed upon these changes in average flow speed are large amplitude (+ or - 15) fluctuations in flow speed associated with the waves themselves. The observations suggest that the solar wind deceleration is the result of momentum transfer from reflected bow shock ions to the wind via the long-period waves as the reflected ion beams go unstable. The broad angular distributions of the diffuse ions thus appear to be produced as a consequence of the disruption of reflected ion beams.

  19. Antitrust Analysis for the Internet Upstream Market: a BGP Approach

    E-print Network

    D'Ignazio, Alessio; Giovannetti, Emanuele

    2006-03-14

    charges levied to small and larger providers, a process started in 1997 by UUNET’s decision of setting minimum traffic requirements for free peering with smaller ISP's. An early analysis was provided by Cave (1999) who analyzed the possible problems and... to destination through the Internet. An entire branch of research, Cybergeography, is devoted to the mapping of this physical-virtual world. The Cooperative Association for Internet Data Analysis, (CAIDA) constructed a global Internet topology focussing...

  20. 76 FR 70009 - Head Start Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-09

    ...This final rule amends the Head Start Program regulations to implement statutory provisions of the Improving Head Start for School Readiness Act of 2007 to establish a system of designation renewal to determine if Head Start and Early Head Start agencies are delivering high-quality and comprehensive Head Start and Early Head Start programs that meet the educational, health, nutritional, and......

  1. "Upstream Thinking": the catchment management approach of a water provider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grand-Clement, E.; Ross, M.; Smith, D.; Anderson, K.; Luscombe, D.; Le Feuvre, N.; Brazier, R. E.

    2012-04-01

    Human activities have large impacts on water quality and provision. Water companies throughout the UK are faced with the consequences of poor land management and need to find appropriate solutions to decreasing water quality. This is particularly true in the South West of England, where 93% of the drinking water is sourced from rivers and reservoirs: large areas of drained peatlands (i.e. Exmoor and Dartmoor National Parks) are responsible for a significant input of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) discolouring the water, whilst poorly managed farming activities can lead to diffuse pollution. Alongside the direct environmental implications, poor water quality is partly increasing water treatment costs and will drive significant future investment in additional water treatment, with further repercussions on customers. This highlights the need for water companies throughout the UK, and further afield, to be more involved in catchment management. "Upstream Thinking" is South West Water's (SWW) approach to catchment management, where working with stakeholders to improve water quality upstream aims to avoid increasingly costly solutions downstream. This approach has led the company to invest in two major areas of work: (1) The Farmland programme where problematic farm management practices and potential solutions are identified, typically 40% of the required investment is then offered in exchange for a legal undertaking to maintain the new farm assets in good condition for 25 years; (2) The Mires programme which involves heavy investment in peatland restoration through the blocking of open ditches in order to improve water storage and quality in the long term. From these two projects, it has been clear that stakeholder involvement of groups such as local farmers, the Westcountry Rivers Trust, the Exmoor National Park Authority, the Environment Agency, Natural England and the Exmoor Society is essential, first because it draws in catchment improvement expertise which is not directly held within the company, and second because it shows how local communities and groups are considered and valued by the company. Monitoring changes and providing a solid scientific base is also undertaken to prove the concept and justify any investment. The work carried out so far has highlighted that SWW's collaborative approach to catchment management is changing the relationship between private water suppliers in the UK and stakeholders or groups having an impact on water quality. This results in a progressive move from a situation where the polluter has to pay, to rewarding providers of clean water instead. The value of ecosystem payments of this kind is being discussed with the appropriate authorities (i.e. Natural England, and the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs) so that it can form part of ensuring sustainable water supplies in future, with all the environmental and ecological benefits of clear raw waters in rivers, lakes and streams.

  2. Augmented reality graphic interface for upstream dam inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cote, Jean; Lavallee, Jean

    1995-12-01

    This paper presents a 3D graphic interface for the inspection of cracks along a dam. The monitoring of concrete dams is restricted by the accessibility of the various parts of the structure. Since the upstream face of a dam is not usually exposed, as in our case at Hydro- Quebec, a systematic and even ad hoc inspection become extremely complex. The piloting of a ROV (Remotely Operated Vehicle) underwater is like driving in a snowstorm. The view from the camera is similar to the visibility a driver would have in a snowstorm. Sensor fusion has to be performed by the operator since each sensor is specialized for its task. Even with a 2D positioning system or sonar scan, the approach to the inspection area is very tedious. A new 3D interface has been developed using augmented reality since the position and orientation of the vehicle are known. The point of view of the observer can easily be changed during a manipulation of the ROV. A shared memory based server can access the position data of the ROV and update the graphics in real time. The graphic environment can be used as well to drive the ROV with computer generated trajectories. A video card will be added to the Silicon Graphics workstation to display the view of the camera fixed to the ROV. This visual feedback will only be available when the ROV is close enough to the dam. The images will be calibrated since the position of the camera is known. The operator interface also includes a set of stereoscopic camera, hydrophonic (sound) feedback and imaging tools for measuring cracks.

  3. Most Used Codons per Amino Acid and per Genome in the Code of Man Compared to Other Organisms According to the Rotating Circular Genetic Code

    PubMed Central

    Castro-Chavez, Fernando

    2011-01-01

    My previous theoretical research shows that the rotating circular genetic code is a viable tool to make easier to distinguish the rules of variation applied to the amino acid exchange; it presents a precise and positional bio-mathematical balance of codons, according to the amino acids they codify. Here, I demonstrate that when using the conventional or classic circular genetic code, a clearer pattern for the human codon usage per amino acid and per genome emerges. The most used human codons per amino acid were the ones ending with the three hydrogen bond nucleotides: C for 12 amino acids and G for the remaining 8, plus one codon for arginine ending in A that was used approximately with the same frequency than the one ending in G for this same amino acid (plus *). The most used codons in man fall almost all the time at the rightmost position, clockwise, ending either in C or in G within the circular genetic code. The human codon usage per genome is compared to other organisms such as fruit flies (Drosophila melanogaster), squid (Loligo pealei), and many others. The biosemiotic codon usage of each genomic population or ‘Theme’ is equated to a ‘molecular language’. The C/U choice or difference, and the G/A difference in the third nucleotide of the most used codons per amino acid are illustrated by comparing the most used codons per genome in humans and squids. The human distribution in the third position of most used codons is a 12-8-2, C-G-A, nucleotide ending signature, while the squid distribution in the third position of most used codons was an odd, or uneven, distribution in the third position of its most used codons: 13-6-3, U-A-G, as its nucleotide ending signature. These findings may help to design computational tools to compare human genomes, to determine the exchangeability between compatible codons and amino acids, and for the early detection of incompatible changes leading to hereditary diseases. PMID:22997484

  4. / http://www.sciencemag.org/content/early/recent / 26 September 2013 / Page 1 / 10.1126/science.1241934 Codon usage is biased in natural genes and can strongly affect heterolo-

    E-print Network

    Church, George M.

    ), conservation among species (4), or relatively small libraries of synthetic genes with synonymous codon changes.1241934 Codon usage is biased in natural genes and can strongly affect heterolo- gous expression (1). Many organisms are enriched for poorly-adapted codons at the N terminus of genes (2­5). Several studies suggest

  5. START Background Report START, April 2015 1 BACKGROUND REPORT

    E-print Network

    Hill, Wendell T.

    -Shabaab, which emerged from the Islamic Courts Union (ICU) in 2007, was among the most active terrorist groups in the world in 2014, according to preliminary data from START's Global Terrorism Database (GTD). While al to military missions in Somalia and hosts large numbers of Somali refugees. Since it emerged from the Islamic

  6. Codon Optimization of the Human Papillomavirus E7 Oncogene Induces a CD8+ T Cell Response to a Cryptic Epitope Not Harbored by Wild-Type E7

    PubMed Central

    Lorenz, Felix K. M.; Wilde, Susanne; Voigt, Katrin; Kieback, Elisa; Mosetter, Barbara; Schendel, Dolores J.; Uckert, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Codon optimization of nucleotide sequences is a widely used method to achieve high levels of transgene expression for basic and clinical research. Until now, immunological side effects have not been described. To trigger T cell responses against human papillomavirus, we incubated T cells with dendritic cells that were pulsed with RNA encoding the codon-optimized E7 oncogene. All T cell receptors isolated from responding T cell clones recognized target cells expressing the codon-optimized E7 gene but not the wild type E7 sequence. Epitope mapping revealed recognition of a cryptic epitope from the +3 alternative reading frame of codon-optimized E7, which is not encoded by the wild type E7 sequence. The introduction of a stop codon into the +3 alternative reading frame protected the transgene product from recognition by T cell receptor gene-modified T cells. This is the first experimental study demonstrating that codon optimization can render a transgene artificially immunogenic through generation of a dominant cryptic epitope. This finding may be of great importance for the clinical field of gene therapy to avoid rejection of gene-corrected cells and for the design of DNA- and RNA-based vaccines, where codon optimization may artificially add a strong immunogenic component to the vaccine. PMID:25799237

  7. Mass Spectrometry Approach and ELISA Reveal the Effect of Codon Optimization on N-Linked Glycosylation of HIV-1 gp120

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The genes encoding many viral proteins such as HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein gp120 have a tendency for codons that are poorly used by the human genome. Why these codons are frequently present in the HIV genome is not known. The presence of these codons limits expression of HIV-1 gp120 for biochemical studies. The poor codons are replaced by synonymous codons that are frequently present in the highly expressed human genes to overexpress this protein. Whether this codon optimization affects functional properties of gp120 such as its N-linked glycosylation is unknown. We applied a bottom-up mass-spectrometry-based workflow for the direct measurement of deglycosylated and unglycosylated peptides with putative N-linked glycosylation sites, that is, NxS/T motifs. Using this mass-spectrometry approach in combination with ELISA, it is found that codon optimization significantly reduces the frequency with which the dolichol pyrophosphate-linked oligosaccharide is added by the catalytic subunits of oligosaccharide transferase complex to the glycosylation sites. This reduction affects binding of glycan-dependent broadly neutralizing antibodies. These data are essential for biochemical studies of gp120 and successful development of a vaccine against HIV-1. Furthermore, they demonstrate a mass-spectrometry approach for studying the site-specific N-linked glycosylation efficiency of glycoproteins. PMID:25285362

  8. Mutational bias is the driving force for shaping the synonymous codon usage pattern of alternatively spliced genes in rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    PubMed

    Liu, Qingpo; Hu, Haichao; Wang, Hong

    2015-04-01

    Alternative splicing plays important roles in diverse aspects of plant development, metabolism, and stress responses. However, the regulatory mechanisms of alternative splicing of genes still remain incompletely elucidated, especially in plants. In this study, the synonymous codon usage pattern of alternatively spliced (AS) genes in rice was firstly explored using the combination of correspondence analysis (CA), internal CA, correlation and ANOVA analyses. The results show that alternatively and non-alternatively spliced (non-AS) genes have similar tendency for overall codon usage, but exhibit significant difference in 58 out of 64 codons. AS and non-AS genes are both under strong purifying selection, but the former ones have significant lower mutation rate and are prone to be enriched towards the chromosomal ends. In the group of AS genes, the variability in synonymous codon usage between genes is mainly due to the variations in GC content, CDS length, as well as gene functions. Mutational bias that accounts for 25.85 % of the total codon usage variability plays a major role in shaping the codon usage pattern of AS genes. In contrast, no obvious evidence is found for the contributions of translational selection, AS types, the conservation of AS events, and numbers of AS variants to the codon usage divergence between AS genes. These findings may be useful for further understanding the mechanisms of origination, differentiation and regulation of alternatively spliced genes in plants. PMID:25407289

  9. Upstream proton cyclotron waves at Venus near solar maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delva, M.; Bertucci, C.; Volwerk, M.; Lundin, R.; Mazelle, C.; Romanelli, N.

    2015-01-01

    magnetometer data of Venus Express are analyzed for the occurrence of waves at the proton cyclotron frequency in the spacecraft frame in the upstream region of Venus, for conditions of rising solar activity. The data of two Venus years up to the time of highest sunspot number so far (1 Mar 2011 to 31 May 2012) are studied to reveal the properties of the waves and the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) conditions under which they are observed. In general, waves generated by newborn protons from exospheric hydrogen are observed under quasi- (anti)parallel conditions of the IMF and the solar wind velocity, as is expected from theoretical models. The present study near solar maximum finds significantly more waves than a previous study for solar minimum, with an asymmetry in the wave occurrence, i.e., mainly under antiparallel conditions. The plasma data from the Analyzer of Space Plasmas and Energetic Atoms instrument aboard Venus Express enable analysis of the background solar wind conditions. The prevalence of waves for IMF in direction toward the Sun is related to the stronger southward tilt of the heliospheric current sheet for the rising phase of Solar Cycle 24, i.e., the "bashful ballerina" is responsible for asymmetric background solar wind conditions. The increase of the number of wave occurrences may be explained by a significant increase in the relative density of planetary protons with respect to the solar wind background. An exceptionally low solar wind proton density is observed during the rising phase of Solar Cycle 24. At the same time, higher EUV increases the ionization in the Venus exosphere, resulting in higher supply of energy from a higher number of newborn protons to the wave. We conclude that in addition to quasi- (anti)parallel conditions of the IMF and the solar wind velocity direction, the higher relative density of Venus exospheric protons with respect to the background solar wind proton density is the key parameter for the higher number of observable proton cyclotron waves near solar maximum.

  10. The 'upstream wake' of swimming and flying animals and its correlation with propulsive efficiency.

    PubMed

    Peng, Jifeng; Dabiri, John O

    2008-08-01

    The interaction between swimming and flying animals and their fluid environments generates downstream wake structures such as vortices. In most studies, the upstream flow in front of the animal is neglected. In this study, we demonstrate the existence of upstream fluid structures even though the upstream flow is quiescent or possesses a uniform incoming velocity. Using a computational model, the flow generated by a swimmer (an oscillating flexible plate) is simulated and a new fluid mechanical analysis is applied to the flow to identify the upstream fluid structures. These upstream structures show the exact portion of fluid that is going to interact with the swimmer. A mass flow rate is then defined based on the upstream structures, and a metric for propulsive efficiency is established using the mass flow rate and the kinematics of the swimmer. We propose that the unsteady mass flow rate defined by the upstream fluid structures can be used as a metric to measure and objectively compare the efficiency of locomotion in water and air. PMID:18689420

  11. PILOT TESTING OF MERCURY OXIDATION CATALYSTS FOR UPSTREAM OF WET FGD SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Gary M. Blythe

    2003-01-21

    This document summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185, Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems, during the time period October 1, 2002 through December 31, 2002. The objective of this project is to demonstrate at pilot scale the use of solid honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal combustion. The project is being funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185. EPRI, Great River Energy (GRE), and City Public Service (CPS) of San Antonio are project co-funders. URS Group is the prime contractor. The mercury catalytic oxidation process under development uses catalyst materials applied to honeycomb substrates to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal-fired power plants that have wet lime or limestone flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. Oxidized mercury is removed in the wet FGD absorbers and co-precipitates with the byproducts from the FGD system. The co-precipitated mercury does not appear to adversely affect the disposal or reuse properties of the FGD byproduct. The current project testing previously identified, effective catalyst materials at a larger, pilot scale and in a commercial form, to provide engineering data for future fullscale designs. The pilot-scale tests will continue for up to 14 months at each of two sites to provide longer-term catalyst life data. This is the fifth full reporting period for the subject Cooperative Agreement. During this period, project efforts included starting up the pilot unit with three catalysts at the first site, conducting catalyst activity measurements, completing comprehensive flue gas sampling and analyses, and procuring additional catalysts for the pilot unit. This technical progress report provides an update on these efforts.

  12. Heliospheric Termination Shock Motion Due to Fluctuations in the Solar Wind Upstream Conditions: Spherically Symmetric Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratkiewicz, R.; Barnes, A.; Molvik, G. A.; Spreiter, J. R.; Stahara, S. S.; Cuzzi, Jeffery N. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Large-scale fluctuations in the solar wind plasma upstream of the heliospheric termination shock (TS) will cause inward and outward motions of the shock. Using numerical techniques, we extend an earlier strictly one-dimensional (planar) analytic gas dynamic model to spherical symmetry to investigate the features of global behavior of shock motion. Our starting point is to establish a steady numerical solution of the gasdynamic equations describing the interaction between the solar wind and the interstellar medium. We then introduce disturbances of the solar wind dynamic pressure at an inner boundary, and follow the subsequent evolution of the system, especially the motion of the termination shock. Our model solves spherically symmetric gasdynamic equations as an initial-boundary value problem. The equations in conservative form are solved using a fully implicit Total Variation Diminishing (TVD) upwind scheme with Roe-type Riemann solver. Boundary conditions are given by the solar wind parameters on an inner spherical boundary, where they are allowed to vary with time for unsteady calculations, and by a constant pressure (roughly simulating the effect of the local interstellar medium) on an outer boundary. We find that immediately after the interaction, the shock moves with speeds given by the earlier analogous analytic models. However, as the termination shock propagates it begins to slow down, seeking a new equilibrium position. In addition, the disturbance transmitted through the TS, either a shock or rarefaction wave, will encounter the heliopause boundary and be reflected back. The reflected signal will encounter the TS, causing it to oscillate. The phenomenon may be repeated for a number of reflections, resulting in a "ringing" of the outer heliosphere.

  13. Head Start Dental Health Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Administration for Children, Youth, and Families (DHHS), Washington, DC. Head Start Bureau.

    This curriculum for Head Start programs provides preschool learning experiences that teach about dental health. The majority of the curriculum guide is devoted to the following lesson plans: (1) "Introduction of 'Smiley the Super Pup'," an optional puppet character which may be used to review the concepts covered in each lesson; (2) "Visiting the…

  14. Off to a Good Start.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Carl

    1994-01-01

    Caring Start is a mobile-clinic program that provides prenatal care, well-baby clinics, childhood immunizations, counseling services, and contraceptives to rural poor families in northwest Pennsylvania. Before the mobile clinic, many rural women (mostly teenagers) went without prenatal health care due to lack of transportation. (LP)

  15. Rigor Made Easy: Getting Started

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blackburn, Barbara R.

    2012-01-01

    Bestselling author and noted rigor expert Barbara Blackburn shares the secrets to getting started, maintaining momentum, and reaching your goals. Learn what rigor looks like in the classroom, understand what it means for your students, and get the keys to successful implementation. Learn how to use rigor to raise expectations, provide appropriate…

  16. Starting with the Business Basics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Carl

    1999-01-01

    A nonprofit community action agency, BusinesStart, provides business training and small loans to entrepreneurs in 18 rural counties in southwestern Virginia and northeastern Tennessee. The entrepreneurs, many with no previous business experience, cite the agency's basic business training as key to their success. (SV)

  17. Head Start Planned Variation Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, Jenny

    There is little agreement concerning which methods of preschool intervention are most effective. In order to evaluate several approaches to early childhood education, Project Head Start, in conjunction with Project Follow Through, has initiated the Planned Variation program. This year only a pilot project is underway with eight schools…

  18. Employment Obtaining and Business Starting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lan, Jian

    2009-01-01

    The implementation of business starting education in higher vocational colleges is of important and realistic meanings for cultivating advanced technology application-type talents and for releasing the employment obtaining pressure of higher vocational students. Based on the analysis on the employment situation of higher vocational graduates, this…

  19. Start Where Your Students Are

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Robyn R.

    2010-01-01

    Starting where your students are means understanding how currencies are negotiated and traded in the classroom. Any behavior that students use to acquire the knowledge and skills needed in the classroom functions as currency. Teachers communicate the kinds of currencies they accept in their classrooms, such as getting good grades; students do…

  20. Cloning and in vitro function analysis of codon-optimized FatI gene.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiao-Feng; Sun, Xing-Hong; Teng, Mei-Li; Liu, Huan-Qi; Min, Ling-Jiang; Pan, Qing-Jie; Qin, Guo-Qing; Shen, Wei; Li, Lan

    2014-01-01

    Currently, n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFAs) have attracted great attention because of their biological significance to organisms. In addition, PUFAs show an obvious impact on prevention and treatment of various diseases. Because n-3 PUFAs cannot be endogenously synthesized by mammals, mammals have to rely on a dietary supplement for sufficient supply. The finding and application of the fatty acid dehydrogenase I (FatI) gene are expected to change the current situation because it can convert n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-6 PUFAs) to n-3 PUFAs. Meanwhile, the gradual maturation of transgenic technology makes it possible to produce transgenic animals that can synthesize n-3 PUFAs by themselves. In this study, the DNA coding sequence of FatI was synthesized by a chemical method after codon optimization according to the mammal's codon bias. The synthesized DNA sequence was introduced into Boer goat fetal fibroblasts by the constructed recombinant eukaryotic expression vector pcDNA3.1(+)-FatI. Boer goat fetal fibroblasts were transfected by electroporation, and the stable transfected cell lines were obtained by G418 selection. Genomic DNA PCR and Southern blot were applied to verify that the foreign gene FatI was integrated into the genome of the Boer goat fibroblasts. RT-PCR results showed the expression of FatI gene at the mRNA level. The fatty acid profile of cells carrying the FatI gene revealed an increase in total n-3 PUFAs (from 0.61 to 0.95), but a decrease in n-6 PUFAs (from 10.34 to 9.85), resulting in a remarkable increase in the n-3:n-6 ratio (from 0.059 to 0.096). The n-3:n-6 ratio had a 63.49 percent increase, which is a precursor of the response of n-3 desaturase activity of the FatI gene. The study may provide a practical tool for producing transgenic animals that can produce n-3 PUFAs by themselves, and we hope that the application will lay the foundation for animals producing n-3 PUFAs, which will benefit human nutrition and wellness. PMID:24117953

  1. Defragged Binary I Ching Genetic Code Chromosomes Compared to Nirenberg’s and Transformed into Rotating 2D Circles and Squares and into a 3D 100% Symmetrical Tetrahedron Coupled to a Functional One to Discern Start From Non-Start Methionines through a Stella Octangula

    PubMed Central

    Castro-Chavez, Fernando

    2012-01-01

    Background Three binary representations of the genetic code according to the ancient I Ching of Fu-Xi will be presented, depending on their defragging capabilities by pairing based on three biochemical properties of the nucleic acids: H-bonds, Purine/Pyrimidine rings, and the Keto-enol/Amino-imino tautomerism, yielding the last pair a 32/32 single-strand self-annealed genetic code and I Ching tables. Methods Our working tool is the ancient binary I Ching's resulting genetic code chromosomes defragged by vertical and by horizontal pairing, reverse engineered into non-binaries of 2D rotating 4×4×4 circles and 8×8 squares and into one 3D 100% symmetrical 16×4 tetrahedron coupled to a functional tetrahedron with apical signaling and central hydrophobicity (codon formula: 4[1(1)+1(3)+1(4)+4(2)]; 5:5, 6:6 in man) forming a stella octangula, and compared to Nirenberg's 16×4 codon table (1965) pairing the first two nucleotides of the 64 codons in axis y. Results One horizontal and one vertical defragging had the start Met at the center. Two, both horizontal and vertical pairings produced two pairs of 2×8×4 genetic code chromosomes naturally arranged (M and I), rearranged by semi-introversion of central purines or pyrimidines (M' and I') and by clustering hydrophobic amino acids; their quasi-identity was disrupted by amino acids with odd codons (Met and Tyr pairing to Ile and TGA Stop); in all instances, the 64-grid 90° rotational ability was restored. Conclusions We defragged three I Ching representations of the genetic code while emphasizing Nirenberg's historical finding. The synthetic genetic code chromosomes obtained reflect the protective strategy of enzymes with a similar function, having both humans and mammals a biased G-C dominance of three H-bonds in the third nucleotide of their most used codons per amino acid, as seen in one chromosome of the i, M and M' genetic codes, while a two H-bond A-T dominance was found in their complementary chromosome, as seen in invertebrates and plants. The reverse engineering of chromosome I' into 2D rotating circles and squares was undertaken, yielding a 100% symmetrical 3D geometry which was coupled to a previously obtained genetic code tetrahedron in order to differentiate the start methionine from the methionine that is acting as a codifying non-start codon. PMID:23431415

  2. High-level periplasmic expression in Escherichia coli using a eukaryotic signal peptide: importance of codon usage at the 5' end of the coding sequence.

    PubMed

    Humphreys, D P; Sehdev, M; Chapman, A P; Ganesh, R; Smith, B J; King, L M; Glover, D J; Reeks, D G; Stephens, P E

    2000-11-01

    We investigated the ability of signal peptides of eukaryotic origin (human, mouse, and yeast) to efficiently direct model proteins to the Escherichia coli periplasm. These were compared against a well-characterized prokaryotic signal peptide-OmpA. Surprisingly, eukaryotic signal peptides can work very efficiently in E. coli, but require optimization of codon usage by codon-based mutagenesis of the signal peptide coding region. Analysis of the 5' of periplasmic and cytoplasmic E. coli genes shows some codon usage differences. PMID:11049749

  3. 7?-Hydroxypregnenolone, a key neuronal modulator of locomotion, stimulates upstream migration by means of the dopaminergic system in salmon.

    PubMed

    Haraguchi, Shogo; Yamamoto, Yuzo; Suzuki, Yuko; Hyung Chang, Joon; Koyama, Teppei; Sato, Miku; Mita, Masatoshi; Ueda, Hiroshi; Tsutsui, Kazuyoshi

    2015-01-01

    Salmon migrate upstream against an opposing current in their natal river. However, the molecular mechanisms that stimulate upstream migratory behavior are poorly understood. Here, we show that 7?-hydroxypregnenolone (7?-OH PREG), a newly identified neuronal modulator of locomotion, acts as a key factor for upstream migration in salmon. We first identified 7?-OH PREG and cytochrome P450 7?-hydroxylase (P4507?), a steroidogenic enzyme producing 7?-OH PREG, in the salmon brain and then found that 7?-OH PREG synthesis in the brain increases during upstream migration. Subsequently, we demonstrated that 7?-OH PREG increases upstream migratory behavior of salmon. We further found that 7?-OH PREG acts on dopamine neurons in the magnocellular preoptic nucleus during upstream migration. Thus, 7?-OH PREG stimulates upstream migratory behavior through the dopaminergic system in salmon. These findings provide new insights into the molecular mechanisms of fish upstream migration. PMID:26220247

  4. 7?-Hydroxypregnenolone, a key neuronal modulator of locomotion, stimulates upstream migration by means of the dopaminergic system in salmon

    PubMed Central

    Haraguchi, Shogo; Yamamoto, Yuzo; Suzuki, Yuko; Hyung Chang, Joon; Koyama, Teppei; Sato, Miku; Mita, Masatoshi; Ueda, Hiroshi; Tsutsui, Kazuyoshi

    2015-01-01

    Salmon migrate upstream against an opposing current in their natal river. However, the molecular mechanisms that stimulate upstream migratory behavior are poorly understood. Here, we show that 7?-hydroxypregnenolone (7?-OH PREG), a newly identified neuronal modulator of locomotion, acts as a key factor for upstream migration in salmon. We first identified 7?-OH PREG and cytochrome P450 7?-hydroxylase (P4507?), a steroidogenic enzyme producing 7?-OH PREG, in the salmon brain and then found that 7?-OH PREG synthesis in the brain increases during upstream migration. Subsequently, we demonstrated that 7?-OH PREG increases upstream migratory behavior of salmon. We further found that 7?-OH PREG acts on dopamine neurons in the magnocellular preoptic nucleus during upstream migration. Thus, 7?-OH PREG stimulates upstream migratory behavior through the dopaminergic system in salmon. These findings provide new insights into the molecular mechanisms of fish upstream migration. PMID:26220247

  5. Head Start Impact Study: First Year Findings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Puma, Michael; Bell, Stephen; Cook, Ronna; Heid, Camilla; Lopez, Michael

    2005-01-01

    The Congressionally-mandated Head Start Impact Study is being conducted across 84 nationally representative grantee/delegate agencies. Approximately 5,000 newly entering 3- and 4-year-old children applying for Head Start were randomly assigned to either a Head Start group that had access to Head Start program services or to a non-Head Start group…

  6. Starting apparatus for internal combustion engines

    DOEpatents

    Dyches, G.M.; Dudar, A.M.

    1995-01-01

    This report is a patent description for a system to start an internal combustion engine. Remote starting and starting by hearing impaired persons are addressed. The system monitors the amount of current being drawn by the starter motor to determine when the engine is started. When the engine is started the system automatically deactivates the starter motor. Five figures are included.

  7. UPSTREAM INVESTMENT IN HEALTH CARE: NATIONAL AND REGIONAL PERSPECTIVES

    PubMed Central

    Khalil, Mohamed; Nadrah, Hesham M.; Al-Yahia, Omer A.; Al-Segul, Abdulla

    2005-01-01

    Since the burden of disease has shifted towards non-communicable diseases and public health management, there is a greater need to direct resources to address risk factors of the diseases rather than the diseases themselves. The downstream agenda focused on treatment services and is still an important problem at the level of national health management. Much has been accomplished in preventive programs for infectious diseases in Saudi Arabia but a great deal more is needed to combat non-communicable diseases. While a national non-communicable diseases program is being established in the Kingdom, more advanced pilot projects of NCD can be started in the regions. A model for cardiovascular diseases in Qassim will be presented. PMID:23012073

  8. SwiftLib: rapid degenerate-codon-library optimization through dynamic programming

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Timothy M.; Yumerefendi, Hayretin; Kuhlman, Brian; Leaver-Fay, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Degenerate codon (DC) libraries efficiently address the experimental library-size limitations of directed evolution by focusing diversity toward the positions and toward the amino acids (AAs) that are most likely to generate hits; however, manually constructing DC libraries is challenging, error prone and time consuming. This paper provides a dynamic programming solution to the task of finding the best DCs while keeping the size of the library beneath some given limit, improving on the existing integer-linear programming formulation. It then extends the algorithm to consider multiple DCs at each position, a heretofore unsolved problem, while adhering to a constraint on the number of primers needed to synthesize the library. In the two library-design problems examined here, the use of multiple DCs produces libraries that very nearly cover the set of desired AAs while still staying within the experimental size limits. Surprisingly, the algorithm is able to find near-perfect libraries where the ratio of amino-acid sequences to nucleic-acid sequences approaches 1; it effectively side-steps the degeneracy of the genetic code. Our algorithm is freely available through our web server and solves most design problems in about a second. PMID:25539925

  9. Cancer, Warts, or Asymptomatic Infections: Clinical Presentation Matches Codon Usage Preferences in Human Papillomaviruses

    PubMed Central

    Félez-Sánchez, Marta; Trösemeier, Jan-Hendrik; Bedhomme, Stéphanie; González-Bravo, Maria Isabel; Kamp, Christel; Bravo, Ignacio G.

    2015-01-01

    Viruses rely completely on the hosts’ machinery for translation of viral transcripts. However, for most viruses infecting humans, codon usage preferences (CUPrefs) do not match those of the host. Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are a showcase to tackle this paradox: they present a large genotypic diversity and a broad range of phenotypic presentations, from asymptomatic infections to productive lesions and cancer. By applying phylogenetic inference and dimensionality reduction methods, we demonstrate first that genes in HPVs are poorly adapted to the average human CUPrefs, the only exception being capsid genes in viruses causing productive lesions. Phylogenetic relationships between HPVs explained only a small proportion of CUPrefs variation. Instead, the most important explanatory factor for viral CUPrefs was infection phenotype, as orthologous genes in viruses with similar clinical presentation displayed similar CUPrefs. Moreover, viral genes with similar spatiotemporal expression patterns also showed similar CUPrefs. Our results suggest that CUPrefs in HPVs reflect either variations in the mutation bias or differential selection pressures depending on the clinical presentation and expression timing. We propose that poor viral CUPrefs may be central to a trade-off between strong viral gene expression and the potential for eliciting protective immune response. PMID:26139833

  10. Cancer, Warts, or Asymptomatic Infections: Clinical Presentation Matches Codon Usage Preferences in Human Papillomaviruses.

    PubMed

    Félez-Sánchez, Marta; Trösemeier, Jan-Hendrik; Bedhomme, Stéphanie; González-Bravo, Maria Isabel; Kamp, Christel; Bravo, Ignacio G

    2015-08-01

    Viruses rely completely on the hosts' machinery for translation of viral transcripts. However, for most viruses infecting humans, codon usage preferences (CUPrefs) do not match those of the host. Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are a showcase to tackle this paradox: they present a large genotypic diversity and a broad range of phenotypic presentations, from asymptomatic infections to productive lesions and cancer. By applying phylogenetic inference and dimensionality reduction methods, we demonstrate first that genes in HPVs are poorly adapted to the average human CUPrefs, the only exception being capsid genes in viruses causing productive lesions. Phylogenetic relationships between HPVs explained only a small proportion of CUPrefs variation. Instead, the most important explanatory factor for viral CUPrefs was infection phenotype, as orthologous genes in viruses with similar clinical presentation displayed similar CUPrefs. Moreover, viral genes with similar spatiotemporal expression patterns also showed similar CUPrefs. Our results suggest that CUPrefs in HPVs reflect either variations in the mutation bias or differential selection pressures depending on the clinical presentation and expression timing. We propose that poor viral CUPrefs may be central to a trade-off between strong viral gene expression and the potential for eliciting protective immune response. PMID:26139833

  11. Premature Termination Codons Are Recognized in the Nucleus in A Reading-Frame Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Changlan; Sheng, Ke; Du, Yanhua; Wang, Ke; Dias, Anusha; Chen, She; Whitman, Malcolm; Wang, Enduo; Reed, Robin; Cheng, Hong

    2015-01-01

    mRNAs containing premature termination codons (PTCs) are known to be degraded via nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD). Unexpectedly, we found that mRNAs containing any type of PTC (UAA, UAG, UGA) are detained in the nucleus whereas their wild-type counterparts are rapidly exported. This retention is strictly reading-frame dependent. Strikingly, our data indicate that translating ribosomes in the nucleus proofread the frame and detect the PTCs in the nucleus. Moreover, the shuttling NMD protein Upf1 specifically associates with PTC+ mRNA in the nucleus and is required for nuclear retention of PTC+ mRNA. Together, our data lead to a working model that PTCs are recognized in the nucleus by translating ribosomes, resulting in recruitment of Upf1, which in turn functions in nuclear retention of PTC+ mRNA. Nuclear PTC recognition adds a new layer of proofreading for mRNA and may be vital for ensuring the extraordinary fidelity required for protein production. PMID:26491543

  12. Evidence of codon usage in the nearest neighbor spacing distribution of bases in bacterial genomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higareda, M. F.; Geiger, O.; Mendoza, L.; Méndez-Sánchez, R. A.

    2012-02-01

    Statistical analysis of whole genomic sequences usually assumes a homogeneous nucleotide density throughout the genome, an assumption that has been proved incorrect for several organisms since the nucleotide density is only locally homogeneous. To avoid giving a single numerical value to this variable property, we propose the use of spectral statistics, which characterizes the density of nucleotides as a function of its position in the genome. We show that the cumulative density of bases in bacterial genomes can be separated into an average (or secular) plus a fluctuating part. Bacterial genomes can be divided into two groups according to the qualitative description of their secular part: linear and piecewise linear. These two groups of genomes show different properties when their nucleotide spacing distribution is studied. In order to analyze genomes having a variable nucleotide density, statistically, the use of unfolding is necessary, i.e., to get a separation between the secular part and the fluctuations. The unfolding allows an adequate comparison with the statistical properties of other genomes. With this methodology, four genomes were analyzed Burkholderia, Bacillus, Clostridium and Corynebacterium. Interestingly, the nearest neighbor spacing distributions or detrended distance distributions are very similar for species within the same genus but they are very different for species from different genera. This difference can be attributed to the difference in the codon usage.

  13. Successful lateral transfer requires codon usage compatibility between foreign genes and recipient genomes.

    PubMed

    Medrano-Soto, Arturo; Moreno-Hagelsieb, Gabriel; Vinuesa, Pablo; Christen, J Andrés; Collado-Vides, Julio

    2004-10-01

    We present evidence supporting the notion that codon usage (CU) compatibility between foreign genes and recipient genomes is an important prerequisite to assess the selective advantage of imported functions, and therefore to increase the fixation probability of horizontal gene transfer (HGT) events. This contrasts with the current tendency in research to predict recent HGTs in prokaryotes by assuming that acquired genes generally display poor CU. By looking at the CU level (poor, typical, or rich) exhibited by putative xenologs still resembling their original CU, we found that most alien genes predominantly present typical CU immediately upon introgression, thereby suggesting that the role of CU amelioration in HGT has been overemphasized. In our strategy, we first scanned a representative set of 103 complete prokaryotic genomes for all pairs of candidate xenologs (exported/imported genes) displaying similar CU. We applied additional filtering criteria, including phylogenetic validations, to enhance the reliability of our predictions. Our approach makes no assumptions about the CU of foreign genes being typical or atypical within the recipient genome, thus providing a novel unbiased framework to study the evolutionary dynamics of HGT. PMID:15240837

  14. SwiftLib: rapid degenerate-codon-library optimization through dynamic programming.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Timothy M; Yumerefendi, Hayretin; Kuhlman, Brian; Leaver-Fay, Andrew

    2015-03-11

    Degenerate codon (DC) libraries efficiently address the experimental library-size limitations of directed evolution by focusing diversity toward the positions and toward the amino acids (AAs) that are most likely to generate hits; however, manually constructing DC libraries is challenging, error prone and time consuming. This paper provides a dynamic programming solution to the task of finding the best DCs while keeping the size of the library beneath some given limit, improving on the existing integer-linear programming formulation. It then extends the algorithm to consider multiple DCs at each position, a heretofore unsolved problem, while adhering to a constraint on the number of primers needed to synthesize the library. In the two library-design problems examined here, the use of multiple DCs produces libraries that very nearly cover the set of desired AAs while still staying within the experimental size limits. Surprisingly, the algorithm is able to find near-perfect libraries where the ratio of amino-acid sequences to nucleic-acid sequences approaches 1; it effectively side-steps the degeneracy of the genetic code. Our algorithm is freely available through our web server and solves most design problems in about a second. PMID:25539925

  15. A High-Fidelity Codon Set for the T4 DNA Ligase-Catalyzed Polymerization of Modified Oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Lei, Yi; Kong, Dehui; Hili, Ryan

    2015-12-14

    In vitro selection of nucleic acid polymers can readily deliver highly specific receptors and catalysts for a variety of applications; however, it is suspected that the functional group deficit of nucleic acids has limited their potential with respect to proteinogenic polymers. This has stimulated research toward expanding their chemical diversity to bridge the functional gap between nucleic acids and proteins to develop a superior biopolymer. In this study, we investigate the effect of codon library size and composition on the sequence specificity of T4 DNA ligase in the DNA-templated polymerization of both unmodified and modified oligonucleotides. Using high-throughput DNA sequencing of duplex pairs, we have uncovered a 256-membered codon set that yields sequence-defined modified ssDNA polymers in high yield and with high fidelity. PMID:26513677

  16. Received 28 May 2012 | Accepted 9 Nov 2012 | Published 18 Dec 2012 Extracting net current from an upstream neutral

    E-print Network

    Heiblum, Mordehai "Moty"

    from an upstream neutral mode in the fractional quantum Hall regime I. Gurman1,*, R. Sabo1,*, M. Heiblum1, V. Umansky1 & D. Mahalu1 Upstream neutral modes, counter propagating to charge modes upstream of an ohmic contact, which serves as a `neutral modes source'. We show that the neutral modes heat

  17. Managing Sure Start in partnership.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Lamiece; Spencer, Joy; Hogard, Elaine

    2006-08-01

    In March 2006, Sure Start programmes were mainstreamed, becoming 'Children's Centres' for which local authorities have assumed strategic responsibility. This paper describes an evaluation of a Sure Start local programme Management Board which was conducted in preparation for this transition. Focusing on practices relating to partnership working and community involvement, a distinctive trident evaluation model was used to explore outcomes, processes and multiple stakeholder perspectives through a multi-method approach (incorporating interviews, questionnaires and documentary analysis). This revealed that an effective, collaborative style of working had been fostered between board members, resulting in synergy. Furthermore, a number of governance arrangements were identified that specifically supported partnership developments, including quorum regulations and adherence to decision-making by consensus. A series of recommendations are presented that were made with the aim of strengthening the community voice on the board and preserving the most effective and empowering elements of practice following the transition. PMID:16922033

  18. Why I Started Studying Prejudice

    E-print Network

    Dovidio, John F.

    2005-01-01

    for local classroom use, whether in readers or reprinted volumes or other use, must contact the editors for permission. Why I Started Studying Prejudice John F. Dovidio I was born in 1951, and since then the United States has wrestled with profound... our society. Soon after, I entered graduate school. Sam Gaertner, who was studying aversive racism—racism among the well-intentioned—was my advisor. This confluence of personal experience, recent insights, new academic opportunities, and the support...

  19. 30 CFR 75.1913 - Starting aids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Starting aids. 75.1913 Section 75.1913 Mineral Resources...Diesel-Powered Equipment § 75.1913 Starting aids. (a) Volatile fuel starting aids shall be used in accordance with...

  20. 30 CFR 75.1913 - Starting aids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Starting aids. 75.1913 Section 75.1913 Mineral Resources...Diesel-Powered Equipment § 75.1913 Starting aids. (a) Volatile fuel starting aids shall be used in accordance with...

  1. 30 CFR 75.1913 - Starting aids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Starting aids. 75.1913 Section 75.1913 Mineral Resources...Diesel-Powered Equipment § 75.1913 Starting aids. (a) Volatile fuel starting aids shall be used in accordance with...

  2. 30 CFR 75.1913 - Starting aids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Starting aids. 75.1913 Section 75.1913 Mineral Resources...Diesel-Powered Equipment § 75.1913 Starting aids. (a) Volatile fuel starting aids shall be used in accordance with...

  3. 30 CFR 75.1913 - Starting aids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Starting aids. 75.1913 Section 75.1913 Mineral Resources...Diesel-Powered Equipment § 75.1913 Starting aids. (a) Volatile fuel starting aids shall be used in accordance with...

  4. Upstream Financial Review of the Global Oil and Natural Gas Industry

    EIA Publications

    2014-01-01

    This analysis focuses on financial and operating trends of the oil and natural gas production business segment, often referred to as upstream operations, of 42 global oil and natural gas producing companies

  5. Regulation of the human. beta. -actin promoter by upstream and intron domains

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, Sunyu )); Gunning, P.; Kedes, L. ); Liu, Shuhui National Tsing Hua Univ., Hsinchu ); Leavitt, J. )

    1989-01-25

    The authors have identified three regulatory domains of the complex human {beta}-actin gene promoter. They span a region of about 3,000 bases, from not more than {minus}2,011 bases upstream of the mRNA cap site to within the 5{prime} intron (832 bases long). A distal upstream domain contains at least one enhancer-like element. A proximal upstream domain, with a CArG (for CC(A+T rich){sub 6}GG) motif found in all known mammalian actin genes, seems to confer serum, but not growth factor, inducibility. The third domain is within the evolutionarily conserved 3{prime} region of the first intron and contains a 13 base-pair sequence, identical to the upstream sequence with the CArG motif. This domain also contains sequences that are both serum and fibroblast growth inducible.

  6. Measurement of Emissions from Produced Water Ponds: Upstream Oil and Gas Study #1; Final Report

    EPA Science Inventory

    Significant uncertainty exists regarding air pollutant emissions from upstream oil and gas production operations. Oil and gas operations present unique and challenging emission testing issues due to the large variety and quantity of potential emissions sources. This report summ...

  7. Effects of upstream wake phasing on the performance of transonic compressors

    E-print Network

    Nolan, Sean Patrick Rock

    2009-01-01

    The effect of the upstream wake phase on the work input (i.e., rise in stagnation enthalpy across the blade row) of a transonic rotor is examined computationally and analytically. It is found that the compressor work depends ...

  8. Seasonal variation of upper-level mobile trough development upstream of the Pacific storm track 

    E-print Network

    Myoung, Boksoon

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis is to investigate seasonal and interannual statistics of troughs associated with the Pacific storm track and quantify the influence of deformation on trough development upstream of the western Pacific. The goal...

  9. Association Between TP53 Gene Codon 72 Polymorphism and Acute Myeloid Leukemia Susceptibility: Evidence Based on a Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ruan, Xiao-Lan; Li, Sheng; Geng, Peiliang; Zeng, Xian-Tao; Yu, Guo-Zheng; Meng, Xiang-Yu; Gao, Qing-Ping; Ao, Xu-Bin

    2015-01-01

    Background Many studies have reported that the p53 codon 72 polymorphism is associated with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) susceptibility; however, the conclusions are inconsistent. Therefore, we performed this meta-analysis to obtain a more precise result. Material/Methods We searched PubMed to identify relevant studies, and 6 published case-control studies were retrieved, including 924 AML patients and 3832 controls. Odds ratio (OR) with corresponding 95% confidence interval (95%CI) was applied to assess the association between p53 codon 72 polymorphism and AML susceptibility. The meta-analysis was performed with Comprehensive Meta-Analysis software, version 2.2. Results Overall, no significant association between p53 codon 72 polymorphism and AML susceptibility was found in this meta-analysis (Pro vs. Arg: OR=0.94, 95%CI=0.81–1.10; Pro/Pro vs. Arg/Arg: OR=0.93, 95%CI=0.71–1.22; Arg/Pro vs. Arg/Arg: OR=0.79, 95%CI=0.55–1.13; (Pro/Pro + Arg/Pro) vs. Arg/Arg: OR=0.84, 95%CI=0.62–1.13; Pro/Pro vs. (Arg/Arg + Arg/Pro): OR=1.06, 95%CI=0.83–1.35). Similar results were also found in stratified analysis according to ethnicity and source of controls. Conclusions Our meta-analysis demonstrates that p53 codon 72 polymorphism may not be a risk factor for AML, which should be verified in future studies. PMID:26451982

  10. Translation initiation at non-AUG codons mediated by weakened association of eukaryotic initiation factor (eIF) 2 subunits.

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto, Nilce N; Carnevalli, Larissa S; Castilho, Beatriz A

    2002-01-01

    The heterotrimeric eukaryotic initiation factor (eIF) 2 binds the initiator methionyl-tRNA in a GTP-dependent mode and delivers it to the 40 S ribosomal subunit. In the present study, we have identified amino acid residues in eIF2beta required for binding to eIF2gamma in yeast. Alteration of six residues in the central region of eIF2beta abolished this interaction, as determined by GST-pull down and two-hybrid assays, and leads to cell lethality. Substitution of (131)Tyr and (132)Ser by alanine residues ((131)YS), although abolishing the binding to eIF2gamma in these assays, resulted in a functional but defective protein in vivo, imparting a temperature-sensitive growth phenotype to cells. A dramatically weakened association of this mutant protein with eIF2gamma in vivo was shown by co-immunoprecipitation. The (131)YS mutation in eIF2beta allows translation to initiate at non-AUG codons, as defined by the ability of cells carrying an initiator codon mutation in the HIS4 mRNA to grow in the absence of histidine. The combination of this mutation with the (264)Ser-->Tyr alteration, a previously isolated suppressor of initiator codon mutations which has been shown to increase the spontaneous GTP hydrolysis in the ternary complex, caused a recessive lethality, suggesting additive defects. Thus the impaired interaction of these two subunits represents a novel type of defect in eIF2 function, providing in vivo evidence that the strength of interaction between eIF2beta and eIF2gamma defines the correct usage of the AUG codon for translation initiation. PMID:12137565

  11. School start times for adolescents.

    PubMed

    2014-09-01

    The American Academy of Pediatrics recognizes insufficient sleep in adolescents as an important public health issue that significantly affects the health and safety, as well as the academic success, of our nation's middle and high school students. Although a number of factors, including biological changes in sleep associated with puberty, lifestyle choices, and academic demands, negatively affect middle and high school students' ability to obtain sufficient sleep, the evidence strongly implicates earlier school start times (ie, before 8:30 am) as a key modifiable contributor to insufficient sleep, as well as circadian rhythm disruption, in this population. Furthermore, a substantial body of research has now demonstrated that delaying school start times is an effective countermeasure to chronic sleep loss and has a wide range of potential benefits to students with regard to physical and mental health, safety, and academic achievement. The American Academy of Pediatrics strongly supports the efforts of school districts to optimize sleep in students and urges high schools and middle schools to aim for start times that allow students the opportunity to achieve optimal levels of sleep (8.5-9.5 hours) and to improve physical (eg, reduced obesity risk) and mental (eg, lower rates of depression) health, safety (eg, drowsy driving crashes), academic performance, and quality of life. PMID:25156998

  12. Power efficient and colorless PON upstream system using asymmetric clipping optical OFDM and TDMA technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yuan; Qiao, Yaojun; Ji, Yuefeng

    2012-04-01

    Asymmetric clipping optical orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (ACO-OFDM) based time division multiple access (TDMA) Passive Optical Network (PON) upstream transmission architecture is proposed. The system features low power consumption, colorless, and cost effectiveness. Performance and validity of 10 Gb/s upstream transmission are studied and confirmed by simulation. Performance degradation due to interference from rogue Optical Network Unit (ONU) is also studied.

  13. Phylotranscriptomics: Saturated Third Codon Positions Radically Influence the Estimation of Trees Based on Next-Gen Data

    PubMed Central

    Breinholt, Jesse W.; Kawahara, Akito Y.

    2013-01-01

    Recent advancements in molecular sequencing techniques have led to a surge in the number of phylogenetic studies that incorporate large amounts of genetic data. We test the assumption that analyzing large number of genes will lead to improvements in tree resolution and branch support using moths in the superfamily Bombycoidea, a group with some interfamilial relationships that have been difficult to resolve. Specifically, we use a next-gen data set that included 19 taxa and 938 genes (?1.2M bp) to examine how codon position and saturation might influence resolution and node support among three key families. Maximum likelihood, parsimony, and species tree analysis using gene tree parsimony, on different nucleotide and amino acid data sets, resulted in largely congruent topologies with high bootstrap support compared with prior studies that included fewer loci. However, for a few shallow nodes, nucleotide and amino acid data provided high support for conflicting relationships. The third codon position was saturated and phylogenetic analysis of this position alone supported a completely different, potentially misleading sister group relationship. We used the program RADICAL to assess the number of genes needed to fix some of these difficult nodes. One such node originally needed a total of 850 genes but only required 250 when synonymous signal was removed. Our study shows that, in order to effectively use next-gen data to correctly resolve difficult phylogenetic relationships, it is necessary to assess the effects of synonymous substitutions and third codon positions. PMID:24148944

  14. XPC codon 939 polymorphism is associated with susceptibility to DNA damage induced by aflatoxin B1 exposure

    PubMed Central

    Long, Xi-Dai; Huang, Hong-Dong; Huang, Xiao-Ying; Yao, Jin-Guang; Xia, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1), resulting in the formation of AFB1-DNA adducts, is a known human carcinogen. AFB1-exposure individuals with inherited susceptible carcinogen-repairing genotypes may experience an increased risk of genotoxicity. This study was aimed to investigate whether DNA repair gene xerodermapigmentosum complementation group C codon 939 polymorphism (rs2228001) affected the levels of AFB1-DNA adducts in Guangxi Population (n = 2558), from an AFB1-exposure area. AFB1-DNA adducts were measured by ELISA, and XPC codon 939 genotypes were identified by TaqMan-PCR. We found that longer AFB1-exposure years significantly increased XPC genotypes with codon 939 Gln alleles (namely, XPC-LG and -GG, odds ratios [95% confidence intervals] were 1.37 (1.15-1.63) and 1.99 (1.55-2.55), respectively) was significantly associated with higher levels of AFB1-DNA adducts. Furthermore, there was a positive joint effect between XPC genotypes and long-year AFB1 exposure in the formation of AFB1-DNA adducts. These results suggest that individuals with susceptible genotypes XPC-LG and -GG may experience an increased risk of DNA damage elicited by AFB1 exposure. PMID:25785113

  15. Synonymous Codon Usage Bias in the Plastid Genome is Unrelated to Gene Structure and Shows Evolutionary Heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Yueying; Xu, Wenjing; Xing, Tian; Zhao, Mingming; Li, Nana; Yan, Li; Xia, Guangmin; Wang, Mengcheng

    2015-01-01

    Synonymous codon usage bias (SCUB) is the nonuniform usage of codons, occurring often in nearly all organisms. Our previous study found that SCUB is correlated with intron number, is unequal among exons in the plant nuclear genome, and mirrors evolutionary specialization. However, whether this rule exists in the plastid genome has not been addressed. Here, we present an analysis of SCUB in the plastid genomes of 25 species from lower to higher plants (algae, bryophytes, pteridophytes, gymnosperms, and spermatophytes). We found NNA and NNT (A- and T-ending codons) are preferential in the plastid genomes of all plants. Interestingly, this preference is heterogeneous among taxonomies of plants, with the strongest preference in bryophytes and the weakest in pteridophytes, suggesting an association between SCUB and plant evolution. In addition, SCUB frequencies are consistent among genes with varied introns and among exons, indicating that the bias of NNA and NNT is unrelated to either intron number or exon position. Further, SCUB is associated with DNA methylation–induced conversion of cytosine to thymine in the vascular plants but not in algae or bryophytes. These data demonstrate that these SCUB profiles in the plastid genome are distinctly different compared with the nuclear genome. PMID:25922569

  16. Synonymous Codon Usage Bias in Plant Mitochondrial Genes Is Associated with Intron Number and Mirrors Species Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Mingming; Yin, Xunhao; Xia, Guangmin; Wang, Mengcheng

    2015-01-01

    Synonymous codon usage bias (SCUB) is a common event that a non-uniform usage of codons often occurs in nearly all organisms. We previously found that SCUB is correlated with both intron number and exon position in the plant nuclear genome but not in the plastid genome; SCUB in both nuclear and plastid genome can mirror the evolutionary specialization. However, how about the rules in the mitochondrial genome has not been addressed. Here, we present an analysis of SCUB in the mitochondrial genome, based on 24 plant species ranging from algae to land plants. The frequencies of NNA and NNT (A- and T-ending codons) are higher than those of NNG and NNC, with the strongest preference in bryophytes and the weakest in land plants, suggesting an association between SCUB and plant evolution. The preference for NNA and NNT is more evident in genes harboring a greater number of introns in land plants, but the bias to NNA and NNT exhibits even among exons. The pattern of SCUB in the mitochondrial genome differs in some respects to that present in both the nuclear and plastid genomes. PMID:26110418

  17. TP53 codon 72 polymorphism and susceptibility to cervical cancer in the Chinese population: an update meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bing; Wang, Xin; Chen, Hong; Shang, Li-Xin; Wu, Nan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Although many epidemiologic studies investigated the TP53 codon 72 polymorphism and its association with cervical cancer (CC), definite conclusions cannot be drawn. Aim of the study: To evaluate the association between TP53 codon 72 polymorphism and risk of cervical cancer in the Chinese population. Methods: A computerized literature search was carried out in PubMed, Springer Link, Ovid, Chinese Biomedical Database (CBM), Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI), and Chinese Wanfang Database to collect relevant articles. Odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were used to calculate the strength of association. Results: A total of 16 studies including 1684 CC cases and 1178 controls were involved in this meta-analysis. Overall, significant increased association was found between the Pro/Pro carriers and CC risk when all studies in Chinese population pooled into the meta-analysis (heterozygous model: OR = 1.22, 95% CI: 1.01-1.46). In subgroup analyses stratified by ethnicity and source of controls, the same results were observed in Han and in hospital-based studies. Conclusion: Our results suggest that the TP53 codon 72 polymorphism may be potential biomarkers for CC risk in the Chinese population, especially for Han Chinese, and studies with wider spectrum of population are required for definite conclusions. PMID:26309559

  18. Pyrosequencing analysis for mutations in embB codon306 among clinical mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from Qingdao, China

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Huaqiang; Chen, Xiaoguang; Wang, Zhongdong; Ren, Zhisheng; Wu, Jie; Sun, Haiyan; Bai, Xue

    2015-01-01

    In this study, our objectives was to analyze the molecular characteristics of mutation at embB codon306 in Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Qingdao by pyrosequencing technology, and to assess the value of embB codon306 used as a molecular marker to diagnose multidrug resistant (MDR) TB strains. Pyrosequencing was used to detect mutations at embB codon306 among M. tuberculosis isolates from tuberculosis (TB) patients in Qingdao. The correlation between embB306 mutation and MDR phenotype was evaluated by comparing with conventional drug susceptibility testing results. 60.9% of MDR strains and 15.2% of non-MDR strains carried embB306 mutation, respectively. The percentage of MDR-TB harboring embB306 mutation was significantly higher than that of non- MDR-TB (?2=15.09, P < 0.01). EmbB306 mutation serving as a marker to diagnose MDR-TB comparing with the traditional susceptibility test, the specificity, sensitivity and accuracy were 85%, 61%, and 77%, respectively. EmbB306 mutation is the main mechanism of TB resistance to multidrug in Qingdao, showing an association with the MDR. Pyrosequencing should be a good diagnostic tool for MDR-TB in Qingdao. PMID:26379935

  19. Cold start fuel/air mixture supply device for spark ignition internal combustion engines

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, G.E.D.

    1984-06-05

    A combined accelerator pump and cold start fuel/air mixture supply device has an automatic throttle valve in a mixture supply passage, a fuel control valve controlling flow of fuel drawn into the passage through an inlet upstream of the throttle valve, and an air valve upstream of the fuel inlet. A primary spring tends to seat the air valve. A light, secondary spring urges a plunger against the air valve to augment the load of the primary spring for a predetermined time interval after the engine begins to run under its own power. A valve in a pipe opens automatically at the end of the predetermined time interval to apply engine inlet manifold depression to the end of the plunger remote from the air valve and thereby to separate the plunger from the air valve so that only the primary spring acts on the air valve.

  20. Resolving Discrepancy between Nucleotides and Amino Acids in Deep-Level Arthropod Phylogenomics: Differentiating Serine Codons in 21-Amino-Acid Models

    E-print Network

    Zwick, Andreas; Regier, Jerome C.; Zwickl, Derrick J.

    2012-11-20

    amino acids. This study investigates the cause of that discrepancy. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINIDINGS: The hypothesis is tested that failure to distinguish the serine residues encoded by two disjunct clusters of codons (TCN, AGY) in amino acid analyses...

  1. Upstream capacity upgrade in TDM-PON using RSOA based tunable fiber ring laser.

    PubMed

    Yi, Lilin; Li, Zhengxuan; Dong, Yi; Xiao, Shilin; Chen, Jian; Hu, Weisheng

    2012-04-23

    An upstream multi-wavelength shared (UMWS) time division multiplexing passive optical network (TDM-PON) is presented by using a reflective semiconductor amplifier (RSOA) and tunable optical filter (TOF) based directly modulated fiber ring laser as upstream laser source. The stable laser operation is easily achieved no matter what the bandwidth and shape of the TOF is and it can be directly modulated when the RSOA is driven at its saturation region. In this UMWS TDM-PON system, an individual wavelength can be assigned to the user who has a high bandwidth demand by tuning the central wavelength of the TOF in its upgraded optical network unit (ONU), while others maintain their traditional ONU structure and share the bandwidth via time slots, which greatly and dynamically upgrades the upstream capacity. We experimentally demonstrated the bidirectional transmission of downstream data at 10-Gb/s and upstream data at 1.25-Gb/s per wavelength over 25-km single mode fiber (SMF) with almost no power penalty at both ends. A stable performance is observed for the upstream wavelength tuned from 1530 nm to 1595 nm. Moreover, due to the high extinction ratio (ER) of the upstream signal, the burst-mode transmitting is successfully presented and a better time-division multiplexing performance can be obtained by turning off the unused lasers thanks to the rapid formation of the laser in the fiber ring. PMID:22535132

  2. Impact of rare codons and the functional coproduction of rate-limiting tRNAs on recombinant protein production in Bacillus megaterium.

    PubMed

    Finger, Constanze; Gamer, Martin; Klunkelfuß, Saskia; Bunk, Boyke; Biedendieck, Rebekka

    2015-11-01

    The Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus megaterium was systematically developed for the plasmid-based production of recombinant proteins at the gram-per-liter scale. The amount of protein produced per cell was found strongly correlated to the codon usage of the heterologous gene of interest in comparison to the codon usage of B. megaterium. For analyzing the influence of rare codons on the translational efficiency and protein production in B. megaterium, a test system using the gene for the green fluorescent protein (GFP) as reporter was established. For this purpose, four consecutive identical codons were introduced into the 5' end of gfp and the resulting variations in GFP formation were quantified. Introduction of the rare codons GCC, CGG, and ACC for alanine, arginine, and threonine reduced GFP production 2.1-, 3.3-, and 1.7-fold in comparison to the favored codons GCU, CGU, and ACA, respectively. Coexpression of the corresponding rare codon tRNA (rctRNA) genes improved GFP production 4.2-, 2.7-, and 1.7-fold, respectively. The system was applied to the production of a formate dehydrogenase (FDH) from Mycobacterium vaccae and an extracellular hydrolase (TFH) from Thermobifida fusca. Coexpression of one to three different rctRNA genes resulted in an up to 18-fold increased protein production. Interestingly, rctRNA gene coexpression also elevated the production of M. vaccae FDH and T. fusca TFH from codon optimized genes, indicating a general positive effect by rctRNA gene overexpression on the protein production in B. megaterium. Thus, the basis for a B. megaterium enhanced production strain coexpressing rctRNA genes was laid. PMID:26138251

  3. A search for upstream pressure pulses associated with flux transfer events: An AMPTE/ISEE case study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elphic, R. C.; Baumjohann, W.; Cattell, C. A.; Luehr, H.; Smith, M. F.

    1994-01-01

    On September 19, 1984, the Active Magnetospheric Particle Tracers Explorers (AMPTE) United Kingdom Satellite (UKS) and Ion Release Module (IRM) and International Sun Earth Explorers (ISEE) 1 and 2 spacecraft passed outbound through the dayside magnetopause at about the same time. The AMPTE spacecraft pair crossed first and were in the near-subsolar magnetosheath for more than an hour. Meanwhile the ISEE pair, about 5 R(sub E) to the south, observed flux transfer event (FTE) signatures. We use the AMPTE UKS and IRM plasma and field observations of magnetosheath conditions directly upstream of the subsolar magnetopause to check whether pressure pulses are responsible for the FTE signatures seen at ISEE. Pulses in both the ion thermal pressure and the dynamic pressure are observed in the magnetosheath early on when IRM and UKS are close to the magnetopause, but not later. These large pulses appear to be related to reconnection going on at the magnetopause nearby. AMPTE magnetosheath data far from the magnetopause do not show a pressure pulse correlation with FTEs at ISEE. Moreover, the magnetic pressure and tension effects seen in the ISEE FTEs are much larger than any pressure effects seen in the magnetosheath. A superposed epoch analysis based on small-amplitude peaks in the AMPTE magnetosheath total static pressure (nkT + B(exp 2)/2 mu(sub 0)) hint at some boundary effects, less than 5 nT peak-to-peak variations in the ISEE 1 and 2 B(sub N) signature starting about 1 min after the pressure peak epoch. However, these variations are much smaller than the standard deviations of the B(sub N) field component. Thus the evidence from this case study suggests that upstream magnetosheath pressure pulses do not give rise to FTEs, but may produce very small amplitude signatures in the magnetic field at the magnetopause.

  4. A far upstream cis-element is required for Wilms' tumor-1 (WT1) gene expression in renal cell culture.

    PubMed

    Scholz, H; Bossone, S A; Cohen, H T; Akella, U; Strauss, W M; Sukhatme, V P

    1997-12-26

    To identify novel cis-regulatory elements responsible for the tissue-restricted expression pattern of the Wilms' tumor-1 (WT1) gene, we mapped a total of 11 DNase I-hypersensitive sites in the 5'-flanking region and first intron of the human gene, six of which were specific for WT1 expressing cell lines. A 1.4-kilobase (kb) fragment from the mouse wt1 5'-flanking region contained cross-hybridizing sequence with significant homology to a region of DNase I hypersensitivity in the human WT1 gene which bound to nuclear matrix in human fetal kidney 293 cells. None of the DNase I-hypersensitive sites/matrix attachment regions, either alone or in combination, were sufficient for tissue-specific WT1 expression in transient and stably transfected cell lines. However, stable transfection of an approximately 620-kb yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) that carried the entire mouse wt1 locus into 293 cells resulted in wt1 (trans)gene expression at a level of approximately 30% of the endogenous human gene. Deletion of the 1.4-kb cross-hybridizing mouse fragment, located approximately 15 kb upstream of the transcription start site, caused complete loss of wt1 gene expression in the YAC-transfected 293 cells. In summary, we have identified a far upstream element that contains a region of DNase I hypersensitivity and that binds to nuclear matrix. This element includes phylogenetically conserved sequence and is required, although not sufficient, for mouse wt1 gene expression in human fetal kidney cells in culture. PMID:9407061

  5. A search for upstream pressure pulses associated with flux transfer events: An AMPTE/ISEE case study

    SciTech Connect

    Elphic, R.C.; Baumjohann, W.; Cattell, C.A.; Luehr, H.; Smith, M.F.

    1994-07-01

    On September 19, 1984, the Active Magnetospheric Particle Tracers Explorers (AMPTE) United Kingdom Satellite (UKS) and Ion Release Module (IRM) and ISEE 1 and 2 spacecraft passed outbound through the dayside magnetopause at about the same time. The AMPTE spacecraft pair crossed first and were in the near-subsolar magnetosheath for more than an hour. Meanwhile the ISEE pair, about 5 R{sub E} to the south, observed flux transfer event (FTE) signatures. The authors use the AMPTE UKS and IRM plasma and field observations of magnetosheath conditions directly upstream of the subsolar magnetopause to check whether pressure pulses are responsible for the FTE signatures seen at ISEE. Pulses in both the ion thermal pressure and the dynamic pressure are observed in the magnetosheath early on when IRM and UKS are close to the magnetopause, but not later. These large pulses appear to be related to reconnection going on at the magnetopause nearby. AMPTE magnetosheath data far from the magnetopause do not show a pressure pulse correlation with FTEs at ISEE. Moreover, the magnetic pressure and tension effects seen in the ISEE FTEs are much larger than any pressure effects seen in the magnetosheath. A superposed epoch analysis based on small-amplitude peaks in the AMPTE magnetosheath total static pressure (nkT + B{sup 2}/2{mu}{sub 0}) hint at some boundary effects, <5 nT peak-to-peak variations in the ISEE 1 and 2 B{sub N} signature starting about 1 min after the pressure peak epoch. However, these variations are much smaller than the standard deviations of the B{sub N} field component. Thus the evidence from this case study suggests that upstream magnetosheath pressure pulses do not give rise to FTEs, but may produce very small amplitude signatures in the magnetic field at the magnetopause. 19 refs., 8 figs.

  6. Codon-optimized human sodium iodide symporter (opt-hNIS) as a sensitive reporter and efficient therapeutic gene.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Hwa; Youn, Hyewon; Na, Juri; Hong, Kee-Jong; Kang, Keon Wook; Lee, Dong Soo; Chung, June-Key

    2015-01-01

    To generate a more efficient in vivo reporter and therapeutic gene, we optimized the coding sequence of the human sodium/iodide symporter (NIS) gene by replacing NIS DNA codons from wild type to new codons having the highest usage in human gene translation. The Codon Adaptation Index (CAI), representing the number of codons effective for human expression, was much improved (0.79 for hNIS, 0.97 for opt-hNIS). Both wild-type (hNIS) and optimized human NIS (opt-hNIS) were cloned into pcDNA3.1 and pMSCV vectors for transfection. Various cancer cell lines such as thyroid (TPC-1, FRO, B-CPAP), breast (MDA-MB-231), liver (Hep3B), cervical (HeLa), and glioma (U87MG) were transfected with pcDNA3.1/hNIS or pcDNA3.1/opt-hNIS. 125I uptake by opt-hNIS-expressing cells was 1.6~2.1 times higher than uptake by wild-type hNIS-expressing cells. Stable cell lines were also established by retroviral transduction using pMSCV/hNIS or pMSCV/opt-hNIS, revealing higher NIS protein levels and 125I uptake in opt-hNIS-expressing cells than in hNIS-expressing cells. Moreover, scintigraphic images from cell plates and mouse xenografts showed stronger signals from opt-hNIS-expressing cells than hNIS-expressing cells, and radioactivity uptake by opt-hNIS-expressing tumors was 2.3-fold greater than that by hNIS-expressing tumors. To test the efficacy of radioiodine therapy, mouse xenograft models were established with cancer cells expressing hNIS or opt-hNIS. 131I treatment reduced tumor sizes of hNIS- and opt-hNIS-expressing tumors to 0.57- and 0.27- fold, respectively, compared to their sizes before therapy, suggesting an improved therapeutic effect of opt-hNIS. In summary, this study shows that codon optimization strongly increases hNIS protein levels and radioiodine uptake, thus supporting opt-hNIS as a more sensitive reporter and efficient therapeutic gene. PMID:25553100

  7. Proteomics-based Refinement of Deinococcus deserti Genome Annotation Reveals an Unwonted Use of Non-canonical Translation Initiation Codons*

    PubMed Central

    Baudet, Mathieu; Ortet, Philippe; Gaillard, Jean-Charles; Fernandez, Bernard; Guérin, Philippe; Enjalbal, Christine; Subra, Gilles; de Groot, Arjan; Barakat, Mohamed; Dedieu, Alain; Armengaud, Jean

    2010-01-01

    Deinococcaceae are a family of extremely radiation-tolerant bacteria that are currently subjected to numerous studies aimed at understanding the molecular mechanisms for such radiotolerance. To achieve a comprehensive and accurate annotation of the Deinococcus deserti genome, we performed an N terminus-oriented characterization of its proteome. For this, we used a labeling reagent, N-tris(2,4,6-trimethoxyphenyl)phosphonium acetyl succinimide, to selectively derivatize protein N termini. The large scale identification of N-tris(2,4,6-trimethoxyphenyl)phosphonium acetyl succinimide-modified N-terminal-most peptides by shotgun liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analysis led to the validation of 278 and the correction of 73 translation initiation codons in the D. deserti genome. In addition, four new genes were detected, three located on the main chromosome and one on plasmid P3. We also analyzed signal peptide cleavages on a genome-wide scale. Based on comparative proteogenomics analysis, we propose a set of 137 corrections to improve Deinococcus radiodurans and Deinococcus geothermalis gene annotations. Some of these corrections affect important genes involved in DNA repair mechanisms such as polA, ligA, and ddrB. Surprisingly, experimental evidences were obtained indicating that DnaA (the protein involved in the DNA replication initiation process) and RpsL (the S12 ribosomal conserved protein) translation is initiated in Deinococcaceae from non-canonical codons (ATC and CTG, respectively). Such use may be the basis of specific regulation mechanisms affecting replication and translation. We also report the use of non-conventional translation initiation codons for two other genes: Deide_03051 and infC. Whether such use of non-canonical translation initiation codons is much more frequent than for other previously reported bacterial phyla or restricted to Deinococcaceae remains to be investigated. Our results demonstrate that predicting translation initiation codons is still difficult for some bacteria and that proteomics-based refinement of genome annotations may be helpful in such cases. PMID:19875382

  8. Life without tRNAArg–adenosine deaminase TadA: evolutionary consequences of decoding the four CGN codons as arginine in Mycoplasmas and other Mollicutes

    PubMed Central

    Yokobori, Shin-ichi; Kitamura, Aya; Grosjean, Henri; Bessho, Yoshitaka

    2013-01-01

    In most bacteria, two tRNAs decode the four arginine CGN codons. One tRNA harboring a wobble inosine (tRNAArgICG) reads the CGU, CGC and CGA codons, whereas a second tRNA harboring a wobble cytidine (tRNAArgCCG) reads the remaining CGG codon. The reduced genomes of Mycoplasmas and other Mollicutes lack the gene encoding tRNAArgCCG. This raises the question of how these organisms decode CGG codons. Examination of 36 Mollicute genomes for genes encoding tRNAArg and the TadA enzyme, responsible for wobble inosine formation, suggested an evolutionary scenario where tadA gene mutations first occurred. This allowed the temporary accumulation of non-deaminated tRNAArgACG, capable of reading all CGN codons. This hypothesis was verified in Mycoplasma capricolum, which contains a small fraction of tRNAArgACG with a non-deaminated wobble adenosine. Subsets of Mollicutes continued to evolve by losing both the mutated tRNAArgCCG and tadA, and then acquired a new tRNAArgUCG. This permitted further tRNAArgACG mutations with tRNAArgGCG or its disappearance, leaving a single tRNAArgUCG to decode the four CGN codons. The key point of our model is that the A-to-I deamination activity had to be controlled before the loss of the tadA gene, allowing the stepwise evolution of Mollicutes toward an alternative decoding strategy. PMID:23658230

  9. Toward a Rationale for the PTC124 (Ataluren) Promoted Readthrough of Premature Stop Codons: A Computational Approach and GFP-Reporter Cell-Based Assay

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The presence in the mRNA of premature stop codons (PTCs) results in protein truncation responsible for several inherited (genetic) diseases. A well-known example of these diseases is cystic fibrosis (CF), where approximately 10% (worldwide) of patients have nonsense mutations in the CF transmembrane regulator (CFTR) gene. PTC124 (3-(5-(2-fluorophenyl)-1,2,4-oxadiazol-3-yl)-benzoic acid), also known as Ataluren, is a small molecule that has been suggested to allow PTC readthrough even though its target has yet to be identified. In the lack of a general consensus about its mechanism of action, we experimentally tested the ability of PTC124 to promote the readthrough of premature termination codons by using a new reporter. The reporter vector was based on a plasmid harboring the H2B histone coding sequence fused in frame with the green fluorescent protein (GFP) cDNA, and a TGA stop codon was introduced in the H2B-GFP gene by site-directed mutagenesis. Additionally, an unprecedented computational study on the putative supramolecular interaction between PTC124 and an 11-codon (33-nucleotides) sequence corresponding to a CFTR mRNA fragment containing a central UGA nonsense mutation showed a specific interaction between PTC124 and the UGA codon. Altogether, the H2B-GFP-opal based assay and the molecular dynamics (MD) simulation support the hypothesis that PTC124 is able to promote the specific readthrough of internal TGA premature stop codons. PMID:24483936

  10. 77 FR 3838 - Notice of Availability of Proposed New Starts/Small Starts Policy Guidance

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-25

    ... Federal Transit Administration Notice of Availability of Proposed New Starts/Small Starts Policy Guidance... Policy Guidance on New Starts/Small Starts and requests your comments on it. This document compliments... measures proposed for evaluation of projects seeking New Starts and Small Starts funding and the way...

  11. The Home Start Demonstration Program: An Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Child Development (DHEW), Washington, DC.

    Following a discussion of the Home Start program and its evaluation plan, the 16 Office of Child Development-funded Home Start projects in the United States are described. Home start is a 3-year Head Start demonstration program, aimed at the 3-5 years of age range, which focuses on enhancing the quality of children's lives by building upon…

  12. 30 CFR 75.1913 - Starting aids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Starting aids. 75.1913 Section 75.1913 Mineral... SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Diesel-Powered Equipment § 75.1913 Starting aids. (a) Volatile fuel starting aids shall be used in accordance with recommendations provided by the starting...

  13. 30 CFR 75.1913 - Starting aids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Starting aids. 75.1913 Section 75.1913 Mineral... SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Diesel-Powered Equipment § 75.1913 Starting aids. (a) Volatile fuel starting aids shall be used in accordance with recommendations provided by the starting...

  14. 30 CFR 75.1913 - Starting aids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Starting aids. 75.1913 Section 75.1913 Mineral... SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Diesel-Powered Equipment § 75.1913 Starting aids. (a) Volatile fuel starting aids shall be used in accordance with recommendations provided by the starting...

  15. 30 CFR 75.1913 - Starting aids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Starting aids. 75.1913 Section 75.1913 Mineral... SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Diesel-Powered Equipment § 75.1913 Starting aids. (a) Volatile fuel starting aids shall be used in accordance with recommendations provided by the starting...

  16. 30 CFR 75.1913 - Starting aids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Starting aids. 75.1913 Section 75.1913 Mineral... SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Diesel-Powered Equipment § 75.1913 Starting aids. (a) Volatile fuel starting aids shall be used in accordance with recommendations provided by the starting...

  17. Rapid starting methanol reactor system

    DOEpatents

    Chludzinski, Paul J. (38 Berkshire St., Swampscott, MA 01907); Dantowitz, Philip (39 Nancy Ave., Peabody, MA 01960); McElroy, James F. (12 Old Cart Rd., Hamilton, MA 01936)

    1984-01-01

    The invention relates to a methanol-to-hydrogen cracking reactor for use with a fuel cell vehicular power plant. The system is particularly designed for rapid start-up of the catalytic methanol cracking reactor after an extended shut-down period, i.e., after the vehicular fuel cell power plant has been inoperative overnight. Rapid system start-up is accomplished by a combination of direct and indirect heating of the cracking catalyst. Initially, liquid methanol is burned with a stoichiometric or slightly lean air mixture in the combustion chamber of the reactor assembly. The hot combustion gas travels down a flue gas chamber in heat exchange relationship with the catalytic cracking chamber transferring heat across the catalyst chamber wall to heat the catalyst indirectly. The combustion gas is then diverted back through the catalyst bed to heat the catalyst pellets directly. When the cracking reactor temperature reaches operating temperature, methanol combustion is stopped and a hot gas valve is switched to route the flue gas overboard, with methanol being fed directly to the catalytic cracking reactor. Thereafter, the burner operates on excess hydrogen from the fuel cells.

  18. PILOT TESTING OF MERCURY OXIDATION CATALYSTS FOR UPSTREAM OF WET FGD SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Gary M. Blythe

    2003-10-01

    This document summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185, ''Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems,'' during the time-period July 1, 2003 through September 30, 2003. The objective of this project is to demonstrate at pilot scale the use of solid honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal combustion. The project is being funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185. EPRI, Great River Energy (GRE), and City Public Service (CPS) of San Antonio are project cofunders. URS Group is the prime contractor. The mercury control process under development uses catalyst materials applied to honeycomb substrates to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal-fired power plants that have wet lime or limestone flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. Oxidized mercury is removed in the wet FGD absorbers and co-precipitates with the byproducts from the FGD system. The current project is testing previously identified, effective catalyst materials at a larger, pilot scale and in a commercial form, to provide engineering data for future full-scale designs. The pilot-scale tests will continue for approximately 14 months at each of two sites to provide longer-term catalyst life data. This is the eighth full reporting period for the subject Cooperative Agreement. During this period, project efforts included continued operation of the first pilot unit at the GRE Coal Creek site with all four catalysts in service and sonic horns installed for on-line catalyst cleaning. During the quarter, a catalyst activity measurement trip and mercury SCEM relative accuracy tests were completed, and catalyst pressure drop was closely monitored with the sonic horns in operation. CPS completed the installation of the second mercury oxidation catalyst pilot unit at their Spruce Plant during the quarter, and the four catalysts to be tested in that unit were ordered. The pilot unit was started up with two of the four catalysts in service late in August, and initial catalyst activity results were measured in late September. The other two catalysts will not become available for testing until sometime in October. This technical progress report details these efforts at both sites.

  19. Preventing obesity starts with breastfeeding.

    PubMed

    Spatz, Diane L

    2014-01-01

    Preventing obesity starts with breastfeeding. An infant's nutrition at birth affects not only short-term health outcomes but also the health of that person as a child, adolescent, and adult. This article examines major findings that all conclude that any breastfeeding will help protect an infant from obesity and overweight. Research supports that the more exclusive and longer a child is breastfed, the more protection from overweight and obesity is conferred. Mechanisms of action are explored in this article. It is of paramount importance to provide evidence-based lactation support and care to families to improve the incidence, exclusivity, and duration of breastfeeding. Breastfeeding is one concrete method to address the obesity epidemic that is growing worldwide. PMID:24476651

  20. Geneva summit: a fresh start

    SciTech Connect

    Reagan, R.

    1985-01-01

    This address by the President occurred just after his return to the US following his talks with USSR General Secretary Gorbachev in Geneva. After briefly presenting the history and context of the summit, he notes that both he and Mr. Gorbachev were eager that their meeting give a push to important talks occurring then (in Geneva) on reducing nuclear weapons. He recouents their confronting the major issues, emphasizing his explanations to Mr. Gorbachev of our SDI. He notes the barriers to communications between the US and Soviet societies and the efforts necessary to dispel them and build a more stable relationship. Finally, he concludes that the summit was worthwhile - a good start - that a new realism spawned the summit, and now our byword must be: steady as we go.

  1. Magnetospheric particle injection and the upstream ion event of September 5, 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Krimigis, S.M.; Sibeck, D.G.; McEntire, R.W.

    1986-12-01

    Energetic particle data from the AMPTE Charge Composition Explorer (CCE) spacecraft in the outer dayside magnetosphere are examined during the period of an upstream ion event observed by AMPTE Ion Release Module (IRM) spacecraft on September 5, 1984 (Moebius et al., this issue). The CCE data reveal the following: (a) an ion enhancement was observed at --0040 UT in near coincidence with a substorm onset at --0035 UT, approximately 15 minutes prior to the onset of the event upstream of the shock; (b) ions of both solar wind (He/sup + +/, Fe-group) and ionospheric (O/sup +/) origin over a broad energy range (--20 keV to >1350 keV) were injected at substorm onset; (c) the time evolution of the H/sup +/, He/sup + +/, and O/sup +/ pitch angle distributions markedly differed, with O/sup +/ exhibiting mostly enhancements at off-90/sup 0/ angles for the first hour after injection; (d) an enhancement in the Fe-group ions inside the magnetosphere at L--6.4 occurred simultaneously with the appearance of an O/sup +/ burst upstream of the shock. The CCE observations, taken together with the simultaneously observed IRM ion event, suggest that a plausible explanation for the appearence of upstream ions is leakage from the magnetosphere into the upstream region, rather than the alternate explanation which requires in-situ acceleration of solar wind ions via the Fermi mechanism.

  2. Magnetospheric particle injection and the upstream ion event of September 5, 1984

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krimigis, S. M.; Sibeck, D. G.; Mcentire, R. W.

    1986-01-01

    Energetic particle data from the AMPTE Charge Composition Explorer (CCE) spacecraft in the outer dayside magnetosphere are examined during the period of an upstream ion event observed by the AMPTE Ion Release Module (IRM) spacecraft on September 5, 1984. The CCE data reveal the following: (1) an ion enhancement was observed at about 0040 UT in near coincidence with a substorm onset at about 0035 UT, approximately 15 minutes prior to the onset of the event upstream of the shock; (b) ions of both solar-wind - H(2+) Fe-group - and ionospheric O(+) - origin over a broad energy range (about 20 keV to greater than 1350 keV) were injected at substorm onset; (3) the time evolution of the H(+), He(2+), and O(+) pitch angle distributions markedly differed, with O(+) exhibiting mostly enhancements at off-90-deg angles for the first hour after injection; (4) an enhancement in the Fe-group ions inside the magnetosphere at L = about 6.4 occurred simultaneously with the appearance of an O(+) burst upstream of the shock. The CCE observations, taken together with the simultaneously observed IRM ion event, suggest that a plausible explanation for the appearance of upstream ions is leakage from the magnetosphere into the upstream region, rather than the alternative explanation which requires in situ acceleration of solar wind ions via the Fermi Mechanims.

  3. The evolution of codon usage in structural and non-structural viral genes: the case of Avian coronavirus and its natural host Gallus gallus.

    PubMed

    Brandão, Paulo Eduardo

    2013-12-26

    To assess the codon evolution in virus-host systems, Avian coronavirus and its natural host Gallus gallus were used as a model. Codon usage (CU) was measured for the viral spike (S), nucleocapsid (N), nonstructural protein 2 (NSP2) and papain-like protease (PL(pro)) genes from a diverse set of A. coronavirus lineages and for G. gallus genes (lung surfactant protein A, intestinal cholecystokinin, oviduct ovomucin alpha subunit, kidney vitamin D receptor and the ubiquitary beta-actin) for different A. coronavirus replicating sites. Relative synonymous codon usage (RSCU) trees accommodating all virus and host genes in a single topology showed a higher proximity of A. coronavirus CU to the respiratory tract for all genes. The codon adaptation index (CAI) showed a lower adaptation of S to G. gallus compared to NSP2, PL(pro) and N. The effective number of codons (Nc) and GC3% revealed that natural selection and genetic drift are the evolutionary forces driving the codon usage evolution of both A. coronavirus and G. gallus regardless of the gene being considered. The spike gene showed only one 100% conserved amino acid position coded by an A. coronavirus preferred codon, a significantly low number when compared to the three other genes (p<0.0001). Virus CU evolves independently for each gene in a manner predicted by the protein function, with a balance between natural selection and mutation pressure, giving further molecular basis for the viruses' ability to exploit the host's cellular environment in a concerted virus-host molecular evolution. PMID:24091362

  4. Association between p53 Codon 72 (Arg72Pro) Polymorphism and Primary Open-Angle Glaucoma in Iranian Patients

    PubMed Central

    Neamatzadeh, Hossein; Soleimanizad, Reza; Zare-Shehneh, Masoud; Gharibi, Saba; Shekari, Abolfazl; Bahman Rahimzadeh, Amir

    2015-01-01

    Background: Glaucomatous neuropathy is a type of cell death due to apoptosis. The p53 gene is one of the regulatory genes of apoptosis. Recently, the association between the p53 gene encoding for proline at codon 72 and primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) has been studied in some ethnic groups. This study is the first association analysis of POAG and p53 codon 72 polymorphism in Iranian patients. Methods: A cohort of 65 unrelated patients with POAG (age range from 12-62 years, mean ± SD of 40.16 ± 17.51 years) and 65 unrelated control subjects (without glaucoma, age range of 14-63 years, mean ± SD of 35.64 ± 13.61 years) were selected. In Iranian POAG patients and normal healthy controls, the p53 codon 72 polymorphism in exon 4 was amplified using polymerase chain reaction. The amplified DNA fragments were digested with the BstUI restriction enzyme, and the digestion patterns were used to identify the alleles for the polymorphic site. Results: Comparisons revealed significant differences in allele and genotype frequencies of Pro72Arg between POAG patients and control group. A higher risk of POAG was associated with allele Pro (OR = 2.1, 95% CI = 1.2–3.4) and genotype Pro/Pro (OR = 3.9, 95% CI = 0.13-12.7). Conclusion: The p53 Pro72 allele was more frequent in Iranian POAG patients than in the control group (P<0.05). The present findings show that the individuals with the Pro/Pro genotype may be more likely to develop POAG. However, additional studies are necessary to confirm this association. PMID:25605490

  5. p53 Codon 72 Genetic Polymorphism in Asthmatic Children: Evidence of Interaction With Acid Phosphatase Locus 1

    PubMed Central

    Verrotti, Alberto; Giannini, Cosimo; Verini, Marcello; Chiarelli, Francesco; Neri, Anna; Magrini, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Several lines of evidence are implicating an increased persistence of apoptotic cells in patients with asthma. This is largely due to a combination of inhibition, or defects in the apoptotic process and/or impaired apoptotic cell removal mechanisms. Among apoptosis-inducing genes, an important role is played by p53. In the present study, we have investigated the possible relationship between p53 codon 72 polymorphism and asthma and the interaction with ACP1, a genetic polymorphism involved in the susceptibility to allergic asthma. We studied 125 asthmatic children and 123 healthy subjects from the Caucasian population of Central Italy. p53 codon 72 and ACP1 polymorphisms were evaluated using a restriction fragment length polymorphism-polymerase chain reaction (RFLP-PCR) method. There is a statistically significant association between p53 codon 72 polymorphism and allergic asthma: Arg/Arg genotype is more represented in asthmatic patients than in controls (P=0.018). This association, however, is present in subjects with low ACP1 activity A/A and A/B only (P=0.023). The proportion of children with A/A and A/B genotype carrying Arg/Arg genotype is significantly high in asthmatic children than in controls (OR=1.941; 95% C.I. 1.042-3.628). Our finding could have important clinical implications since the subjects with A/A and A/B genotypes of ACP1 carrying Arg/Arg genotype are more susceptible to allergic asthma than Pro/Pro genotype. PMID:24843801

  6. Transfer RNA structural change is a key element in the reassignment of the CUG codon in Candida albicans.

    PubMed Central

    Santos, M A; Perreau, V M; Tuite, M F

    1996-01-01

    The human pathogenic yeast Candida albicans and a number of other Candida species translate the standard leucine CUG codon as serine. This is the latest addition to an increasing number of alterations to the standard genetic code which invalidate the theory that the code is frozen and universal. The unexpected finding that some organisms evolved alternative genetic codes raises two important questions: how have these alternative codes evolved and what evolutionary advantages could they create to allow for their selection? To address these questions in the context of serine CUG translation in C.albicans, we have searched for unique structural features in seryl-tRNA(CAG), which translates the leucine CUG codon as serine, and attempted to reconstruct the early stages of this genetic code switch in the closely related yeast species Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We show that a purine at position 33 (G33) in the C.albicans Ser-tRNA(CAG) anticodon loop, which replaces a conserved pyrimidine found in all other tRNAs, is a key structural element in the reassignment of the CUG codon from leucine to serine in that it decreases the decoding efficiency of the tRNA, thereby allowing cells to survive low level serine CUG translation. Expression of this tRNA in S.cerevisiae induces the stress response which allows cells to acquire thermotolerance. We argue that acquisition of thermotolerance may represent a positive selection for this genetic code change by allowing yeasts to adapt to sudden changes in environmental conditions and therefore colonize new ecological niches. Images PMID:8890179

  7. Measurement of turbulent flow upstream and downstream of a circular pipe bend

    SciTech Connect

    Sakakibara, Jun; Machida, Nobuteru

    2012-04-15

    We measured velocity distribution in cross sections of a fully developed turbulent pipe flow upstream and downstream of a 90 degree sign bend by synchronizing two sets of a particle image velocimetry (PIV) system. Unsteady undulation of Dean vortices formed downstream from the bend was characterized by the azimuthal position of the stagnation point found on the inner and outer sides of the bend. Linear stochastic estimation was applied to capture the upstream flow field conditioned by the azimuthal location of the stagnation point downstream from the bend. When the inner-side stagnation point stayed below (above) the symmetry plane, the conditional streamwise velocity upstream from the bend exhibited high-speed streaks extended in a quasi-streamwise direction on the outer side of the curvature above (below) the symmetry plane.

  8. Integrated upstream parasitic event building architecture for BTeV level 1 pixel trigger system

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Jin-Yuan; Wang, M.; Gottschalk, E.; Christian, D.; Li, X.; Shi, Z.; Pavlicek, V.; Cancelo, G.; /Fermilab

    2006-03-01

    Contemporary event building approaches use data switches, either homemade or commercial off-the-shelf ones, to merge data from different channels and distribute them among processor nodes. However, in many trigger and DAQ systems, the merging and distributing functions can often be performed in pre-processing stages. By carefully integrating these functions into the upstream pre-processing stages, the events can be built without dedicated switches. In addition to the cost reducing, extra benefits are gain when the event is built early upstream. In this document, an example of the integrated upstream parasitic event building architecture that has been studied for the BTeV level 1 pixel trigger system is described. Several design considerations that experimentalists of other projects might be interested in are also discussed.

  9. An experimental and numerical study of wave motion and upstream influence in a stratified fluid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurdis, D. A.

    1974-01-01

    A system consisting of two superimposed layers of liquid of different densities, with a thin transition layer at the interface, provides a good laboratory model of an ocean thermocline or of an atmospheric inversion layer. This research was to gain knowledge about the propagation of disturbances within these two geophysical systems. The technique used was to observe the propagation of internal waves and of upstream influence within the density-gradient region between the two layers of liquid. The disturbances created by the motion of a vertical flat plate, which was moved longitudinally through this region, were examined both experimentally and numerically. An upstream influence, which resulted from a balance of inertial and gravitational forces, was observed, and it was possible to predict the behavior of this influence with the numerical model. The prediction included a description of the propagation of the upstream influence to steadily increasing distances from the flat plate and the shapes and magnitudes of the velocity profiles.

  10. Modulation of Stop Codon Read-Through Efficiency and Its Effect on the Replication of Murine Leukemia Virus

    PubMed Central

    Csibra, Eszter; Brierley, Ian

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Translational readthrough—suppression of termination at a stop codon—is exploited in the replication cycles of several viruses and represents a potential target for antiviral intervention. In the gammaretroviruses, typified by Moloney murine leukemia virus (MuLV), gag and pol are in the same reading frame, separated by a UAG stop codon, and termination codon readthrough is required for expression of the viral Gag-Pol fusion protein. Here, we investigated the effect on MuLV replication of modulating readthrough efficiency. We began by manipulating the readthrough signal in the context of an infectious viral clone to generate a series of MuLV variants in which readthrough was stimulated or reduced. In carefully controlled infectivity assays, it was found that reducing the MuLV readthrough efficiency only 4-fold led to a marked defect and that a 10-fold reduction essentially abolished replication. However, up to an ?8.5-fold stimulation of readthrough (up to 60% readthrough) was well tolerated by the virus. These high levels of readthrough were achieved using a two-plasmid system, with Gag and Gag-Pol expressed from separate infectious clones. We also modulated readthrough by silencing expression of eukaryotic release factors 1 and 3 (eRF1 and eRF3) or by introducing aminoglycosides into the cells. The data obtained indicate that gammaretroviruses tolerate a substantial excess of viral Gag-Pol synthesis but are very sensitive to a reduction in levels of this polyprotein. Thus, as is also the case for ribosomal frameshifting, antiviral therapies targeting readthrough with inhibitory agents are likely to be the most beneficial. IMPORTANCE Many pathogenic RNA viruses and retroviruses use ribosomal frameshifting or stop codon readthrough to regulate expression of their replicase enzymes. These translational “recoding” processes are potential targets for antiviral intervention, but we have only a limited understanding of the consequences to virus replication of modulating the efficiency of recoding, particularly for those viruses employing readthrough. In this paper, we describe the first systematic analysis of the effect of increasing or decreasing readthrough efficiency on virus replication using the gammaretrovirus MuLV as a model system. We find unexpectedly that MuLV replication is only slightly inhibited by substantial increases in readthrough frequency, but as with other viruses that use recoding strategies, replication is quite sensitive to even modest reductions. These studies provide insights into both the readthrough process and MuLV replication and have implications for the selection of antivirals against gammaretroviruses. PMID:24991001

  11. Introduction of translation stop codons into the viral glycoprotein gene in a fish DNA vaccine eliminates induction of protective immunity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garver, K.A.; Conway, C.M.; Kurath, G.

    2006-01-01

    A highly efficacious DNA vaccine against a fish rhabdovirus, infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV), was mutated to introduce two stop codons to prevent glycoprotein translation while maintaining the plasmid DNA integrity and RNA transcription ability. The mutated plasmid vaccine, denoted pIHNw-G2stop, when injected intramuscularly into fish at high doses, lacked detectable glycoprotein expression in the injection site muscle, and did not provide protection against lethal virus challenge 7 days post-vaccination. These results suggest that the G-protein itself is required to stimulate the early protective antiviral response observed after vaccination with the nonmutated parental DNA vaccine. ?? Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. 2006.

  12. Method and system for control of upstream flowfields of vehicle in supersonic or hypersonic atmospheric flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daso, Endwell O. (Inventor); Pritchett, II, Victor E. (Inventor); Wang, Ten-See (Inventor); Farr, Rebecca Ann (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    The upstream flowfield of a vehicle traveling in supersonic or hypersonic atmospheric flight is actively controlled using attribute(s) experienced by the vehicle. Sensed attribute(s) include pressure along the vehicle's outer mold line, temperature along the vehicle's outer mold line, heat flux along the vehicle's outer mold line, and/or local acceleration response of the vehicle. A non-heated, non-plasma-producing gas is injected into an upstream flowfield of the vehicle from at least one surface location along the vehicle's outer mold line. The pressure of the gas so-injected is adjusted based on the attribute(s) so-sensed.

  13. Sound generation and upstream influence due to instability waves interacting with non-uniform mean flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstein, M. E.

    1984-12-01

    Attention is given to the sound produced by artificially excited, spatially growing instability waves on subsonic shear layers. Real flows that always diverge in the downstream direction allow sound to be produced by the interaction of the instability waves with the resulting streamwise variations of the flow. The upstream influence, or feedback, can interact with the splitter plate lip to produce a downstream-propagating instability wave that may under certain conditions be the same instability wave that originally generated the upstream influence. The present treatment is restricted to very low Mach number flows, so that compressibility effects can only become important over large distances.

  14. Sound generation and upstream influence due to instability waves interacting with non-uniform mean flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, M. E.

    1984-01-01

    Attention is given to the sound produced by artificially excited, spatially growing instability waves on subsonic shear layers. Real flows that always diverge in the downstream direction allow sound to be produced by the interaction of the instability waves with the resulting streamwise variations of the flow. The upstream influence, or feedback, can interact with the splitter plate lip to produce a downstream-propagating instability wave that may under certain conditions be the same instability wave that originally generated the upstream influence. The present treatment is restricted to very low Mach number flows, so that compressibility effects can only become important over large distances.

  15. 76 FR 37174 - Capital Investment Program-New Starts and Small Starts Program Funds

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-24

    ... Federal Transit Administration Capital Investment Program--New Starts and Small Starts Program Funds... Investment (New Starts and Small Starts) program funds. The funds will be used for construction of new fixed... Starts, contact Eric Hu, Office of Program Management, at (202) 366-0870, e-mail: Eric.Hu@dot.gov...

  16. Cold start fuel enrichment circuit

    SciTech Connect

    Staerzi, R.E.; Radtke, N.H.; Hummel, L.S.

    1988-08-16

    A cold start and knock prevention circuit is described having an output node providing a fuel enrichment signal for an internal combustion engine, comprising in combination: transducer means sensing audio signals indicative of engine combustion and occurring within a combustion chamber of the engine and converting the audio signals into an electrical output voltage including a portion representing background noise and a portion representing detonation; means for adjust the amplitude of the transducer output voltage; means sampling the portion of the transducer output voltage representing background noise and controlling the adjusting means to decrease the amplitude of the transducer output voltage for increased sensed background noise and to increase the amplitude of the transducer output voltage for decreased sensed background noise; detonation threshold means responsive to a predetermined increase in the amplitude of the portion of the transducer output voltage representing detonation above the amplitude of the portion of the transducer output voltage representing background noise, and outputting a fuel enrichment signal to the output node; a thermistor connected to the output node and sensing engine temperature; a voltage source biasing the thermistor such that the voltage across the thermistor varies with engine temperature and provides an output fuel enrichment signal at the output node.

  17. Genetic analysis of L123 of the tRNA-mimicking eukaryote release factor eRF1, an amino acid residue critical for discrimination of stop codons

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Kazuki; Ito, Koichi

    2015-01-01

    In eukaryotes, the tRNA-mimicking polypeptide-chain release factor, eRF1, decodes stop codons on the ribosome in a complex with eRF3; this complex exhibits striking structural similarity to the tRNA–eEF1A–GTP complex. Although amino acid residues or motifs of eRF1 that are critical for stop codon discrimination have been identified, the details of the molecular mechanisms involved in the function of the ribosomal decoding site remain obscure. Here, we report analyses of the position-123 amino acid of eRF1 (L123 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae eRF1), a residue that is phylogenetically conserved among species with canonical and variant genetic codes. In vivo readthrough efficiency analysis and genetic growth complementation analysis of the residue-123 systematic mutants suggested that this amino acid functions in stop codon discrimination in a manner coupled with eRF3 binding, and distinctive from previously reported adjacent residues. Furthermore, aminoglycoside antibiotic sensitivity analysis and ribosomal docking modeling of eRF1 in a quasi-A/T state suggested a functional interaction between the side chain of L123 and ribosomal residues critical for codon recognition in the decoding site, as a molecular explanation for coupling with eRF3. Our results provide insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying stop codon discrimination by a tRNA-mimicking protein on the ribosome. PMID:25897120

  18. Engine management during NTRE start up

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bulman, Mel; Saltzman, Dave

    1993-01-01

    The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: total engine system management critical to successful nuclear thermal rocket engine (NTRE) start up; NERVA type engine start windows; reactor power control; heterogeneous reactor cooling; propellant feed system dynamics; integrated NTRE start sequence; moderator cooling loop and efficient NTRE starting; analytical simulation and low risk engine development; accurate simulation through dynamic coupling of physical processes; and integrated NTRE and mission performance.

  19. The upstream muscle-specific enhancer of the rat muscle creatine kinase gene is composed of multiple elements.

    PubMed Central

    Horlick, R A; Benfield, P A

    1989-01-01

    A series of constructs that links the rat muscle creatine kinase promoter to the bacterial chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene was generated. These constructs were introduced into differentiating mouse C2C12 myogenic cells to localize sequences that are important for up-regulation of the creatine kinase gene during myogenic differentiation. A muscle-specific enhancer element responsible for induction of chloramphenicol acetyltransferase expression during myogenesis was localized to a 159-base-pair region from 1,031 to 1,190 base pairs upstream of the transcription start site. Analysis of transient expression experiments using promoters mutated by deletion indicated the presence of multiple functional domains within this muscle-specific regulatory element. A DNA fragment spanning this region was used in DNase I protection experiments. Nuclear extracts derived from C2 myotubes protected three regions (designated E1, E2, and E3) on this fragment from digestion, which indicated there may be three or more trans-acting factors that interact with the creatine kinase muscle enhancer. Gel retardation assays revealed that factors able to bind specifically to E1, E2, and E3 are present in a wide variety of tissues and cell types. Transient expression assays demonstrated that elements in regions E1 and E3, but not necessarily E2, are required for full enhancer activity. Images PMID:2761536

  20. 76 FR 14841 - Head Start Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-18

    ...and the legal consequences of committing fraud. The intent of this rule is to reduce...Head Start: Undercover Testing Finds Fraud and Abuse at Selected Head Start Centers...discussed new findings related to specific fraud allegations at two Head Start...

  1. 30 CFR 56.10010 - Starting precautions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Starting precautions. 56.10010 Section 56.10010 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE... Starting precautions. Where possible, aerial tramways shall not be started until the operator...

  2. 30 CFR 57.10010 - Starting precautions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Starting precautions. 57.10010 Section 57.10010 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE....10010 Starting precautions. Where possible, aerial tramways shall not be started until the operator...

  3. 34 CFR 200.16 - Starting points.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Starting points. 200.16 Section 200.16 Education... Programs Operated by Local Educational Agencies Adequate Yearly Progress (ayp) § 200.16 Starting points. (a) Using data from the 2001-2002 school year, each State must establish starting points in...

  4. Starting or building your business / social enterprise

    E-print Network

    Chittka, Lars

    , evaluate and test my idea? Researching the market is an important starting point. Consider your competitors begin to test the market, get feedback and refine your idea. Consider applying for the QM `Try it.uk/starting-up-a-business/start-with-an-idea and www.gov.uk/market-research-business What should I include in my business plan? To help consolidate

  5. Global identification of transcription start sites in the genome of Apis mellifera using 5'LongSAGE.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Huajun; Sun, Liangxian; Peng, Wenjun; Shen, Yan; Wang, Yuezhu; Xu, Baohua; Gu, Wenyi; Chen, Shuting; Huang, Zhouying; Wang, Shengyue

    2011-11-15

    The precise identification of the transcription start sites (TSSs) of genes in the honeybee genome will be helpful for inferring start codons and for determining promoter elements. The 5'SAGE approach provides a powerful tool for identifying TSSs in the sequenced genome. The main purpose of this study is to identify the actual TSSs of expressed genes as well as the usage of different TSSs in the Apis mellifera genome. We performed a 5'LongSAGE (5'LS) analysis for the adult drone head, and the TSSs of the expressed genes were determined by mapping the 5'LS tag sequences to the honeybee genome. A total of 8,280 unique 19 bp 5'LS tag sequences were identified that corresponded to 3,655 predicted genes. Out of these tags, 4,998 tags (60.4%) were mapped to a region from -1,000 bp to +100 bp of the start codon of 2,301 reference coding sequences. Notably, we observed that 28-47% of the 3,655 honeybee genes initiated transcription from alternative TSSs. The TSS consensus pattern of the honeybee genes, DT(rich) PyPu(G(rich))(T/A)(T(rich))(3), was obtained by aligning the sequences flanking the 5'LS-TSSs. We also identified three new genes in the regions downstream of 5'LS tags and validated 21 TSSs using RT-PCR amplification. Additionally, 17 genes identified by the 5'LS tags were associated with the Gene Ontology term "behavior." Mapping of the 5'LS tags on the genome not only provided direct evidence of expression for in silico predicted genes but also allowed for the identification of previously unrecognized, novel exons and alternative TSSs. PMID:21695780

  6. Asparaginase treatment side-effects may be due to genes with homopolymeric Asn codons (Review-Hypothesis)

    PubMed Central

    BANERJI, JULIAN

    2015-01-01

    The present treatment of childhood T-cell leukemias involves the systemic administration of prokary-otic L-asparaginase (ASNase), which depletes plasma Asparagine (Asn) and inhibits protein synthesis. The mechanism of therapeutic action of ASNase is poorly understood, as are the etiologies of the side-effects incurred by treatment. Protein expression from genes bearing Asn homopolymeric coding regions (N-hCR) may be particularly susceptible to Asn level fluctuation. In mammals, N-hCR are rare, short and conserved. In humans, misfunctions of genes encoding N-hCR are associated with a cluster of disorders that mimic ASNase therapy side-effects which include impaired glycemic control, dislipidemia, pancreatitis, compromised vascular integrity, and neurological dysfunction. This paper proposes that dysregulation of Asn homeostasis, potentially even by ASNase produced by the microbiome, may contribute to several clinically important syndromes by altering expression of N-hCR bearing genes. By altering amino acid abundance and modulating ribosome translocation rates at codon repeats, the microbiomic environment may contribute to genome decoding and to shaping the proteome. We suggest that impaired translation at poly Asn codons elevates diabetes risk and severity. PMID:26178806

  7. Modeling the effect of codon translation rates on co-translational protein folding mechanisms of arbitrary complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caniparoli, Luca; O'Brien, Edward P.

    2015-04-01

    In a cell, the folding of a protein molecule into tertiary structure can begin while it is synthesized by the ribosome. The rate at which individual amino acids are incorporated into the elongating nascent chain has been shown to affect the likelihood that proteins will populate their folded state, indicating that co-translational protein folding is a far from equilibrium process. Developing a theoretical framework to accurately describe this process is, therefore, crucial for advancing our understanding of how proteins acquire their functional conformation in living cells. Current state-of-the-art computational approaches, such as molecular dynamics simulations, are very demanding in terms of the required computer resources, making the simulation of co-translational protein folding difficult. Here, we overcome this limitation by introducing an efficient approach that predicts the effects that variable codon translation rates have on co-translational folding pathways. Our approach is based on Markov chains. By using as an input a relatively small number of molecular dynamics simulations, it allows for the computation of the probability that a nascent protein is in any state as a function of the translation rate of individual codons along a mRNA's open reading frame. Due to its computational efficiency and favorable scalability with the complexity of the folding mechanism, this approach could enable proteome-wide computational studies of the influence of translation dynamics on co-translational folding.

  8. Premature termination codons in the Type VII collagen gene (COL7A1) underlie severe, mutilating recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa

    SciTech Connect

    Christiano, A.M.; Uitto, J. ); Anhalt, G. ); Gibbons, S.; Bauer, E.A. )

    1994-05-01

    Epidermolysis bullosa (EB) is a group of heritable mechano-bullous skin diseases classified into three major categories on the basis of the level of tissue separation within the dermal-epidermal basement membrane zone. The most severe, dystrophic (scarring) forms of EB demonstrate blister formation below the cutaneous basement membrane at the level of the anchoring fibrils. Ultrastructural observations of altered anchoring fibrils and genetic linkage to the gene encoding type VII collagen (COL7A1), the major component of anchoring fibrils, have implicated COL7A1 as the candidate gene in the dystrophic forms of EB. The authors have recently cloned the entire cDNA and gene for human COL7A1, which has been mapped to 3p21. In this study, they describe mutations in four COL7A1 alleles in three patients with severe, mutilating recessive dystrophic EB (Hallopeau-Siemens type, HS-RDEB). Each of these mutations resulted in a premature termination codon (PTC) in the amino-terminal portion of COL7A1. One of the patients was a compound heterozygote for two different mutations. The heterozygous carriers showed an [approximately] 50% reduction in anchoring fibrils, yet were clinically unaffected. Premature termination codons in both alleles of COL7A1 may thus be a major underlying cause of the severe, recessive dystrophic forms of EB. 40 refs., 8 figs.

  9. Functional analysis of a proline to serine mutation in codon 453 of the thyroid hormone receptor {beta}1 gene

    SciTech Connect

    Ozata, M.; Suzuki, Satoru; Takeda, Teiji

    1995-10-01

    Mutations in the gene encoding human thyroid hormone receptor {beta}(hTR{beta}) have been associated with generalized resistance to thyroid hormone (GRTH). This disorder is associated with significant behavoral abnormalities. We examined the hTR{beta} gene in a family with members who manifest inappropriately normal TSH, elevated free T{sub 4}, and free and total T{sub 3}. Sequence analysis showed a cytosine to thymine transition at nucleotide 1642 in one allele of the index patient`s genomic DNA. This altered proline to serine at codon 453. The resulting mutant receptor when expressed in vitro bound DNA with high affinity, but the T{sub 3} affinity of the receptor was impaired. The mutant TR demonstrated a dominant negative effect when cotransfected with two isoforms of wild-type receptor and also in the presence of TR variant {alpha}2 in COS-1 cells. Mutations of codon 453 occur more frequently than at other sites, and four different amino acid substitutions have been reported. Significant differences in phenotype occur among affected individuals, varying from normality to moderately severe GRTH. There is no clear correlation between K{sub a} or in vitro function of the mutant receptor, and phenotype. This study extends the association between GRTH and illness, and indicates that early diagnosis and counseling are needed in families with TR{beta}1 abnormalities. 34 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Frequency and spectrum of mutations at codons 12 and 13 of the C-K-ras gene in human tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Capella, G.; Cronauer-Mitra, S.; Peinado, M.A.; Perucho, M. )

    1991-06-01

    The frequency of point mutations at codons 12 and 13 of the c-K-ras gene has been determined in a panel of more than 400 human tumors. Mutant c-K-ras genes were detected in about 75% of adenocarcinomas of the pancreas; 40% of adenomas and carcinomas of the colon and rectum; 30% of carcinomas of the bile duct; 25% of carcinomas of the lung, and in lower frequency in other carcinomas, including liver, stomach, and kidney. No mutations were found in carcinomas of the breast, prostate, esophagus, and gall bladder, among others. Comparative analysis of the spectrum of mutations show that while G to A transitions were the most frequent mutations in pancreatic and colo-rectal tumors, G to T transversions were more prevalent in lung carcinomas. The aspartic acid mutation at codon 13 (GGC {r arrow} GAC) was relatively frequent in colo-rectal tumors but rare in pancreatic and lung carcinomas. The differences in the mutation spectrum of the c-K-ras gene in cancers of the gastrointestinal and respiratory tracts are suggestive of differential exposure to genotoxic agents.

  11. Degradation of Stop Codon Read-through Mutant Proteins via the Ubiquitin-Proteasome System Causes Hereditary Disorders.

    PubMed

    Shibata, Norihito; Ohoka, Nobumichi; Sugaki, Yusuke; Onodera, Chiaki; Inoue, Mizuho; Sakuraba, Yoshiyuki; Takakura, Daisuke; Hashii, Noritaka; Kawasaki, Nana; Gondo, Yoichi; Naito, Mikihiko

    2015-11-20

    During translation, stop codon read-through occasionally happens when the stop codon is misread, skipped, or mutated, resulting in the production of aberrant proteins with C-terminal extension. These extended proteins are potentially deleterious, but their regulation is poorly understood. Here we show in vitro and in vivo evidence that mouse cFLIP-L with a 46-amino acid extension encoded by a read-through mutant gene is rapidly degraded by the ubiquitin-proteasome system, causing hepatocyte apoptosis during embryogenesis. The extended peptide interacts with an E3 ubiquitin ligase, TRIM21, to induce ubiquitylation of the mutant protein. In humans, 20 read-through mutations are related to hereditary disorders, and extended peptides found in human PNPO and HSD3B2 similarly destabilize these proteins, involving TRIM21 for PNPO degradation. Our findings indicate that degradation of aberrant proteins with C-terminal extension encoded by read-through mutant genes is a mechanism for loss of function resulting in hereditary disorders. PMID:26442586

  12. Codon-Optimized NADH Oxidase Gene Expression and Gene Fusion with Glycerol Dehydrogenase for Bienzyme System with Cofactor Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Qiang; Wang, Shizhen

    2015-01-01

    NADH oxidases (NOXs) play an important role in maintaining balance of NAD+/NADH by catalyzing cofactors regeneration. The expression of nox gene from Lactobacillus brevis in Escherichia coli BL21 (BL21 (DE3)) was studied. Two strategies, the high AT-content in the region adjacent to the initiation codon and codon usage of the whole gene sequence consistent with the host, obtained the NOX activity of 59.9 U/mg and 73.3 U/mg (crude enzyme), with enhanced expression level of 2.0 and 2.5-folds, respectively. Purified NOX activity was 213.8 U/mg. Gene fusion of glycerol dehydrogenase (GDH) and NOX formed bifuctional multi-enzymes for bioconversion of glycerol coupled with coenzyme regeneration. Kinetic parameters of the GDH-NOX for each substrate, glycerol and NADH, were calculated as Vmax(Glycerol) 20 ?M/min, Km(Glycerol) 19.4 mM, Vmax (NADH) 12.5 ?M/min and Km (NADH) 51.3 ?M, respectively, which indicated the potential application of GDH-NOX for quick glycerol analysis and dioxyacetone biosynthesis. PMID:26115038

  13. Asparaginase treatment side-effects may be due to genes with homopolymeric Asn codons (Review-Hypothesis).

    PubMed

    Banerji, Julian

    2015-09-01

    The present treatment of childhood T-cell leukemias involves the systemic administration of prokaryotic L-asparaginase (ASNase), which depletes plasma Asparagine (Asn) and inhibits protein synthesis. The mechanism of therapeutic action of ASNase is poorly understood, as are the etiologies of the side-effects incurred by treatment. Protein expression from genes bearing Asn homopolymeric coding regions (N-hCR) may be particularly susceptible to Asn level fluctuation. In mammals, N-hCR are rare, short and conserved. In humans, misfunctions of genes encoding N-hCR are associated with a cluster of disorders that mimic ASNase therapy side-effects which include impaired glycemic control, dislipidemia, pancreatitis, compromised vascular integrity, and neurological dysfunction. This paper proposes that dysregulation of Asn homeostasis, potentially even by ASNase produced by the microbiome, may contribute to several clinically important syndromes by altering expression of N-hCR bearing genes. By altering amino acid abundance and modulating ribosome translocation rates at codon repeats, the microbiomic environment may contribute to genome decoding and to shaping the proteome. We suggest that impaired translation at poly Asn codons elevates diabetes risk and severity. PMID:26178806

  14. The bow shocks and upstream waves of Venus and Mars D.A. Brain *

    E-print Network

    California at Berkeley, University of

    The bow shocks and upstream waves of Venus and Mars D.A. Brain * LASP/University of Colorado; accepted 14 May 2003 Abstract Because they both lack measurable magnetic fields, Venus and Mars are often waves are observed. In many respects the collisionless shocks at Venus and Mars are quite different

  15. Energy Policy 32 (2004) 11731184 A decision model for financial assurance instruments in the upstream

    E-print Network

    Vermont, University of

    2004-01-01

    -Brazilian Petroleum Agency, 2001; DTI--UK Department of Trade and Industry, 2001; BLM--US Bureau of Land Management in the upstream petroleum sector Doneivan Ferreiraa, *, Saul Suslicka,b , Joshua Farleyc , Robert Costanzac.O. Box 6152, 13083-970 Campinas, SP, Brazil b Center for Petroleum Studies (CEPETRO), P.O. Box 6052

  16. ORIGINAL PAPER Water temperature and upstream migration of glass eels in

    E-print Network

    Waikato, University of

    ORIGINAL PAPER Water temperature and upstream migration of glass eels in New Zealand: implications / Published online: 26 January 2007 Ó Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2007 Abstract Glass eels migrating that warmer temperatures associ- ated with global climate change might have a detrimental impact on glass eel

  17. A distant upstream enhancer at the maize domestication gene tb1 has pleiotropic effects

    E-print Network

    Doebley, John

    understanding of quantitative inheritance in plants is further limited in that most cloned QTLs are known fromA distant upstream enhancer at the maize domestication gene tb1 has pleiotropic effects on plant traits1­4, the molecular basis of quantitative variation is less well understood, especially in plants

  18. Langmuir waves upstream of interplanetary shocks: Dependence on shock and plasma parameters

    E-print Network

    California at Berkeley, University of

    waves undergo a mode conversion process and generate electromagnetic radio waves at the plasma frequency fp and 2fp. These radio waves propagate throughout the heliosphere and are used as a re- moteClick Here for Full Article Langmuir waves upstream of interplanetary shocks: Dependence on shock

  19. Effects of Upstream Turbulence on Measurement Uncertainty of Flow Rate by Venturi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jungho; Yoon, Seok Ho; Yu, Cheong-Hwan; Park, Sang-Jin; Chung, Chang-Hwan

    2010-06-01

    Venturi has been widely used for measuring flow rate in a variety of engineering applications since pressure loss is relatively small compared with other measuring method. The current study focuses on making detailed estimation of measured uncertainties as the upstream turbulence affects uncertainty levels of the water flows in the closed-loop testing. Upstream turbulences can be controlled by selecting 9 different swirl generators. Measurement uncertainty of flow rate has been estimated by a quantitative uncertainty analysis which is based on the ANSI/ASME PTC 19.1-2005 standard. The best way to reduce error in measuring flow rate was investigated for evaluating its measurement uncertainty. The results of flow rate uncertainty analysis show that the case with systematic error has higher than that without systematic error. Especially the result with systematic error exhibits that the uncertainty of flow rate was gradually increased by upstream turbulence. Uncertainty of flow rate measurement can be mainly affected by differential pressure and discharge coefficient. Flow disturbance can be also reduced by increasing of the upstream straight length of Venturi.

  20. Observations of low-frequency electromagnetic plasma waves upstream from the Martian shock

    E-print Network

    California at Berkeley, University of

    , electromagnetic 1. Introduction [2] One observational result of Mars missions has been the detection 2002. [1] We have analyzed magnetic field data returned from Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) for signatures from Mars. They are concentrated in two locations upstream of the Martian shock. PCWs were reported