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Sample records for uraniferous bog deposit

  1. The Robinson and Weatherly uraniferous pyrobitumen deposits near Placerville, San Miguel County, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilmarth, V.R.; Vickers, R.C.

    1952-01-01

    Uranium deposits that contain uraniferous pyrobitumen of possible hydrothermal origin occur at the Weatherly and Robinson properties near Placerville, San Miguel County, Colo. These deposits were mined for copper, silver, and gold more than 50 years ago and were developed for uranium in 1950.

  2. Geology and recognition criteria for uraniferous humate deposits, Grants Uranium Region, New Mexico. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, S.S.; Saucier, A.E.

    1981-01-01

    The geology of the uraniferous humate uranium deposits of the Grants Uranium Region, northwestern New Mexico, is summarized. The most important conclusions of this study are enumerated. Although the geologic characteristics of the uraniferous humate deposits of the Grants Uranium Region are obviously not common in the world, neither are they bizarre or coincidental. The source of the uranium in the deposits of the Grants Uranium Region is not known with certainty. The depositional environment of the host sediments was apparently the mid and distal portions of a wet alluvial fan system. The influence of structural control on the location and accumulation of the host sediments is now supported by considerable data. The host sediments possess numerous important characteristics which influenced the formation of uraniferous humate deposits. Ilmenite-magnetite distribution within potential host sandstones is believed to be the simplest and most useful regional alteration pattern related to this type of uranium deposit. A method is presented for organizing geologic observations into what is referred to as recognition criteria. The potential of the United States for new districts similar to the Grants Uranium Region is judged to be low based upon presently available geologic information. Continuing studies on uraniferous humate deposits are desirable in three particular areas.

  3. Possibilities for detailed dating of peat bog deposits

    SciTech Connect

    Punning, J.; Ilomets, M.; Koff, T. )

    1993-01-01

    Geochemical and palynological data as well as radiocarbon dating were used to study the peat bog deposits in Niinsarre bog, northeast Estonia. The aim of this study was to establish criteria for determining a detailed chronology, which is important, for example, in studying paleoevents and historical monitoring. In some cases, they can use cumulative pollen data, as well as cumulative chemical and peat bulk density data. Material was gathered for [sup 14]C dating from three parallel samples taken from cores ca. 10--20 cm apart using a Russian peat sampler. Samples for peat bulk density, palynological and chemical measurements were taken from the same cores. To measure peat bulk density, the authors used a continuous sampling method. Sampling frequency was calculated to cover layers formed over 50 yr.

  4. The Robinson and Weatherly uraniferous pyrobitumen deposits near Placerville, San Miguel County, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilmarth, V.R.; Vickers, R.C.

    1953-01-01

    Uranium deposits that contain uraniferous pyrobitumen of possible hydrothermal origin occur at the Weatherly and Robinson properties near Placerville, San Miguel County, Colo. These deposits were mined for copper, silver, and gold more than 50 years ago and were developed for uranium in 1950. The Robinson property, half a mile east of Placerville, consists of the White Spar, New Discovery Lode, and Barbara Jo claims. The rocks in this area are nearly horizontal sandstones, shales, limestones, and conglomerates of the Cutler formation of Permian age and the Dolores formation of Triassic and Jurassic (?) age. These rocks have been faulted extensively and intruded by a Tertiary (?) andesite porphyry dike. Uranium-bearing pyrobitumen associated with tennantite, tetrahedrite, galena, sphalerite, chalcopyrite, bornite, azurite, malachite, calcite, barite, and quartz occurs in a lenticular body as much as 40 feet long and 6 feet wide along a northwest-trending, steeply dipping normal fault. The uranium content of eleven samples from the uranium deposit ranges from 0.001 to 0.045 percent uranium and averages about 0.02 percent uranium. The Weatherly property, about a mile northwest of Placerville, consists of the Black King claims nos. 1, 4, and 5. The rocks in this area include the complexly faulted Cutler formation of Permian age and the Dolores formation of Triassic and Jurassic (?) age. Uranium-bearing pyrobitumen arid uranophane occur, along a northwest-trending, steeply dipping normal fault and in the sedimentary rocks on the hanging wall of the fault. Lens-shaped deposits in the fault zone are as much as 6 feet long and 2 feet wide and contain as much as 9 percent uranium; whereas channel samples across the fault zone contain from 0.001 to 0.014 percent uranium. Tetrahedrite, chalcopyrite, galena, sphalerite, fuchsite, malachite, azurite, erythrite, bornite, and molybdite in a gangue of pyrite, calcite, barite, and quartz are associated with the uraniferous material

  5. The biogeochemistry of an ombrotrophic bog: Evaluation of use as an archive of atmospheric mercury deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Benoit, J.M.; Fitzgerald, W.F.; Damman, A.W.H.

    1998-08-01

    The utility of ombrotrophic bogs as archives of atmospheric mercury deposition was assessed with an investigation in Arlberg Bog, Minnesota, US. Since the use of ombrotrophic bogs as archives depends on the immobility of deposited trace metals, the authors examined the postdepositional transport processes revealed by the solid-phase distributions of mercury and ancillary metals in this bog. They modeled metal speciation in bog pore-waters as a function of pe in order to understand metal behavior in ombrotrophic peat. Specifically, they considered the effect of water movement and resultant shifts in redox potential gradients on metal retention. The results indicate that Hg and Pb are immobile in ombrotrophic peat, so their distribution can be used to determine temporal changes in deposition. To substantiate the deposition estimates determined in this study, they emphasized the importance of confirming the validity of the dating scheme, assessing the degree of horizontal homogeneity in the accumulation record, and providing evidence for retention of Hg based on geochemical modeling. As recorded in Arlberg Bog, historic atmospheric Hg deposition increased gradually after the mid-1800s, peaked between 1950 and 1960, and may have declined thereafter. Preindustrial deposition was about 4 {micro}g/m{sup 2} year and recent deposition about 19 {micro}g/m{sup 2} year. The results of this study indicate that deposition at Arlberg Bog has been influenced by a regional and/or local-scale source.

  6. Bog bodies.

    PubMed

    Lynnerup, Niels

    2015-06-01

    In northern Europe during the Iron Age, many corpses were deposited in bogs. The cold, wet and anaerobic environment leads in many cases to the preservation of soft tissues, so that the bodies, when found and excavated several thousand years later, are remarkably intact. Since the 19th century the bog bodies have been studied using medical and natural scientific methods, and recently many bog bodies have been re-examined using especially modern, medical imaging techniques. Because of the preservation of soft tissue, especially the skin, it has been possible to determine lesions and trauma. Conversely, the preservation of bones is less good, as the mineral component has been leached out by the acidic bog. Together with water-logging of collagenous tissue, this means that if the bog body is simply left to dry out when found, as was the case pre-19th century, the bones may literally warp and shrink, leading to potential pitfalls in paleopathological diagnostics. Bog bodies have in several instances been crucial in determining the last meal, as gut contents may be preserved, and thus augment our knowledge on pre-historic diet by adding to, for example, stable isotope analyses. This article presents an overview of our knowledge about the taphomic processes as well as the methods used in bog body research. PMID:25998635

  7. Could Poor Fens BE More Sensitive than Bogs to Elevated N Deposition in the Oil Sands Region of Northern Alberta?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wieder, R. K.; Vile, M. A.; Scott, K. D.

    2015-12-01

    Bogs and fens cover 29% of the 140,000 km2 Oil Sands Administrative Area (OSAA) in northern Alberta, a region characterized by quite low background N deposition (1-2 kg/ha/yr). However, development of the oil sands resource has led to increasing emission of nitrogen oxides, which are then returned to regional ecosystems as elevated atmospheric N deposition. Given the nutrient deficient nature of bogs and poor fens, elevated N deposition from oil sands development could potentially affect peatland ecosystem structure and function. To evaluate the ecosystem-level effects of N deposition, since 2011, we have experimentally applied N to a bog and a poor fen near Mariana Lakes, Alberta, located far enough from the OSAA to be unaffected by oil sands emissions. Treatments include simulated rainfall equivalent to N deposition of 0, 5, 10, 15, 20, and 25 kg/ha/yr, plus control plots receiving no added water (3 replicate plots per site per N treatment). Concentrations of NH4+-N, NO3- N, and DON at the top of the peatland water table did not increase with increasing N deposition, averaging 0.61, 0.09, and 1.07 mg/L, respectively, in the bog, and 0.53, 0.10, and 0.81 mg/L, respectively, in the poor fen. Ericaceous shrub abundance increased with increasing N deposition in both the bog and the poor fen, although plot-scale greenness (hand-held spectral measurement of the Normalized Difference Red Edge (NDRE) index) increased with N deposition in the poor fen, but not in the bog. Segmented regression indicated that in the poor fen, at N deposition above 14-16 kg/ha/yr, total microbial, bacterial, and fungal biomass in the top 5 cm of peat increased with N deposition, with no effect at lower N deposition. No effect of N deposition on microbial, bacterial, or fungal biomass was observed at 5-10 cm in the poor fen, or at either 0-5 or 5-10 cm in the bog. In the poor fen, microbial, bacterial, and fungal biomass increased with NDRE, but the effect was not significant in the bog

  8. Impact of catchment degree on peat properties in peat deposits of eutrophic bog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inisheva, L. I.; Golubina, O. A.; Rodikova, A. V.; Shinkeeva, N. A.; Bubina, A. B.

    2010-05-01

    Fundamental works of many investigators show that according to the biophysical properties peat deposit (PD) is divided into 2 layers: active and inert. It is interesting to analyze the supposed changes in PD of eutrophic bog according to different data (physical, chemical and biological). The researches were carried out at two plots of one bog (points 1 and 2, positions 56° 21' NL, 84° 47' EL, Russia, Siberia). Agricultural afforestation (pine planting) was made at one of them (point 2) 60 years ago. Now this plot is absolutely identical in ground cover to 1 point, but other conditions are significantly changed. In spring bog water level is at the depth of 20cm at 2 point (at 1 point it is near water face), it lows up to 53 cm during summer time (at 1 point - up to 37 cm). According to redox conditions zone of anoxic-oxic conditions reaches meter depth at 2 points. PDs don't significantly differ in activity of ammonifiers but in activity of cellulose-lytic aerobic microflora it follows that it is more active at 2 point in PD active layer. In spite of good aeration, more favorable conditions were created also for anaerobic cellulose-fermenting microflora in PD of 2 point in comparison with 1 one. Activity analysis of denitrifying agents and microflora of other physiological groups also showed high activity of biota at the plot with afforestation amelioration. This fact was confirmed by high coefficient of mineralization. Time of drainage effect created by afforestation amelioration influenced group composition of peat organic matter which builds up PD of examined plots. According to fractional and group composition data fracture of hard-to-hydrolyze organic matters decreased during the process of microflora activating at the plot with afforestation amelioration but FA content increased. Fractional composition of nitrogen showed that content of mineral nitrogen compounds definitely increased. Thus, 60 years of surface drainage influenced composition change of peat

  9. Atmospheric Mercury Transfer to Peat Bogs Dominated by Gaseous Elemental Mercury Dry Deposition.

    PubMed

    Enrico, Maxime; Roux, Gaël Le; Marusczak, Nicolas; Heimbürger, Lars-Eric; Claustres, Adrien; Fu, Xuewu; Sun, Ruoyu; Sonke, Jeroen E

    2016-03-01

    Gaseous elemental mercury (GEM) is the dominant form of mercury in the atmosphere. Its conversion into oxidized gaseous and particulate forms is thought to drive atmospheric mercury wet deposition to terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems, where it can be subsequently transformed into toxic methylmercury. The contribution of mercury dry deposition is however largely unconstrained. Here we examine mercury mass balance and mercury stable isotope composition in a peat bog ecosystem. We find that isotope signatures of living sphagnum moss (Δ(199)Hg = -0.11 ± 0.09‰, Δ(200)Hg = 0.03 ± 0.02‰, 1σ) and recently accumulated peat (Δ(199)Hg = -0.22 ± 0.06‰, Δ(200)Hg = 0.00 ± 0.04‰, 1σ) are characteristic of GEM (Δ(199)Hg = -0.17 ± 0.07‰, Δ(200)Hg = -0.05 ± 0.02‰, 1σ), and differs from wet deposition (Δ(199)Hg = 0.73 ± 0.15‰, Δ(200)Hg = 0.21 ± 0.04‰, 1σ). Sphagnum covered during three years by transparent and opaque surfaces, which eliminate wet deposition, continue to accumulate Hg. Sphagnum Hg isotope signatures indicate accumulation to take place by GEM dry deposition, and indicate little photochemical re-emission. We estimate that atmospheric mercury deposition to the peat bog surface is dominated by GEM dry deposition (79%) rather than wet deposition (21%). Consequently, peat deposits are potential records of past atmospheric GEM concentrations and isotopic composition. PMID:26849121

  10. Biological N2-Fixation Increases with Peatland Age and Decreases with N Deposition in Bogs of Western Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fillingim, H.; Popma, J. M.; Dynarski, K. A.; Wieder, R.; Vile, M. A.

    2013-12-01

    Most terrestrial ecosystems are thought be limited primarily by nitrogen, including boreal peatlands located in pristine regions. Bogs receive nutrients solely from atmospheric deposition. Because of the historically low rates of atmospheric nitrogen deposition in Alberta, Canada, the Sphagnum mosses that dominate bog ground cover in this region have formed relationships with diazotrophs in order to meet their nitrogen needs, making biological N2- fixation the dominant input of new nitrogen to these bogs. The process of N2-fixation is highly variable and is governed by a number of environmental factors. In Alberta, one factor is water availability, as these bogs occur in some of the driest climates in which peatlands are known to exist. More recent factors with the potential to greatly alter N2-fixation dynamics include increasing nitrogen deposition associated with the growing oil sands mining operations and wildfires increasing in frequency and severity with global climate change. To determine the potential importance of N2-fixation to the overall peatland nitrogen balance under current and future conditions, we incubated the moss Sphagnum fuscum, using the acetylene reduction assay calibrated with 15N2, from 3 bogs representing ages of 3, 13, and 30 years since fire. Each bog was fertilized 8 times throughout the growing season with 0, 10, and 20 kg N/ha/yr. N2-fixation rates were measured 5 times at each site throughout the summer of 2013 to account for variation due to season and weather. Mean rates of N2-fixation increased with bog age, with higher rates in the 30 year old bog (36.90 × 8.38) and subsequently lower rates in the 13 yr (25.08 × 5.63) and 3 yr (11.58 × 6.33) old bogs. As expected, we saw decreasing rates of N2-fixation in the 10 (16.96 × 5.39) and 20 kg N/ha/yr treatments (3.35 × 1.34), as compared to water-only controls (47.62 × 12.18). These results indicate that N2-fixation supplies abundant N to support net primary productivity for bogs

  11. Current and historical record of indium deposition from the atmosphere to an ombrotrophic bog in northeastern United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, S. O.; Keach, C.; Hemond, H.

    2012-12-01

    The industrial production of indium is increasing dramatically due to new uses in the rapidly growing electronics, photovoltaic, and LED industries. Little is known, however, about the natural or industrial cycling of indium or its environmental behavior, despite the fact that industrial emissions to the atmosphere appear to have already exceeded natural emissions. The history of metal deposition from the atmosphere is often reflected in the vertical profiles of the metals in ombrotrophic bogs, which by definition do not receive surface or subsurface runoff. Analysis of a peat core obtained using a novel freeze corer at Thoreau's Bog in Concord, MA shows that the rate of indium deposition to the bog increased beginning in the early 1900s, peaked in the early 1970s, and then decreased dramatically to pre-1900 values by the present time. This profile is counter to the pattern of indium's industrial use, which has increased only in the past 30-40 years. The profile coincides well, however, with the estimated history of particulate emissions from smelting and from coal combustion in North America. Back-trajectory analysis suggests that smelting was the dominant source of atmospheric particles with high indium concentrations deposited to the bog. This study suggests that metal smelting and coal burning are currently indium's primary industrial environmental sources. While releases from the semiconductor and electronics industries are comparatively small at present, this scenario may change with the rapid growth of indium use in these industries.

  12. Peat bog records of dust deposition over the last 2000 years in the Dolomites (NE Italian Alps)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poto, Luisa; Segnana, Michela; Gabrieli, Jacopo; Zaccone, Claudio; Barbante, Carlo

    2016-04-01

    The reconstruction of dust composition and fluxes is crucial to help to understand climate variability and climate changes. Dust fluctuations, linked to changes in dry and wet depositions, can indicate more humid or arid conditions, changes in temperature, vegetation cover and wind regimes. Peatlands are unique terrestrial archives that can capture changes in atmospheric deposition over time. Among them, ombrotrophic environments are hydrologically isolated from the surrounding landscapes receiving all the nutrients from precipitation and wind, with no influence from streams and groundwater. In recent decades biological and chemical proxies from peat bogs were extensively used to trace past climate changes, and rare earth elements (REE) in particular have been developed as inorganic geochemical proxies of mineral dust input in the atmosphere that plays an important role in the marine and terrestrial biogeochemical cycle as source for both major and trace elements. Dust deposition in the Italian Alps during the last 2000 years is estimated from the geochemical signature of two ombrotrophic peatlands. The first bog is located in Danta di Cadore (Belluno province, 1400 m a.s.l.), the second one in Coltrondo (Belluno province, 1800 m a.s.l.): they both allow us to have new insights into climate variability in the Eastern sector of the Italian Alps. The REE and the lithogenic elements concentration, as well as the lead isotopic composition were determined by CRC-ICP-QMS along the first meter of each core. For both the archives chronology is based upon independent 14C and 210Pb measurements. Changes in REE concentration through the bogs were related with those of lithogenic elements in order to test the immobility of the REE. Moreover peat humification degree was used to evaluate the hydroclimatic conditions of the bogs and Pb isotopic signature were used to trace dust deposited at Danta di Cadore and Coltrondo bogs and to discriminate natural from anthropogenic source

  13. Mercury deposition in ombrotrophic bogs in New Brunswick, Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island. Atlantic region surveillance report number EPS-5-AR-98-4

    SciTech Connect

    Rutherford, L.A.; Matthews, S.L.

    1998-12-31

    A study was conducted to determine historical atmospheric mercury deposition patterns in the Maritime Provinces. Investigators measured mercury concentrations in peat cores from five ombrotrophic bogs in Kejimkujik, Fundy, Kouchibougouac, and Cape Breton Highlands national parks and in East Baltic Bog, Prince Edward Island. Results presented and discussed include deposition rates calculated using lead-210 date estimates, temporal trends in mercury concentrations, and spatial patterns of mercury deposition.

  14. Small scale controls of greenhouse gas release under elevated N deposition rates in a restoring peat bog in NW Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glatzel, S.; Forbrich, I.; Krüger, C.; Lemke, S.; Gerold, G.

    2008-06-01

    In Central Europe, most bogs have a history of drainage and many of them are currently being restored. Success of restoration as well as greenhouse gas exchange of these bogs is influenced by environmental stress factors as drought and atmospheric nitrogen deposition. We determined the methane and nitrous oxide exchange of sites in the strongly decomposed center and less decomposed edge of the Pietzmoor bog in NW Germany in 2004. Also, we examined the methane and nitrous oxide exchange of mesocosms from the center and edge before, during, and following a drainage experiment as well as carbon dioxide release from disturbed unfertilized and nitrogen fertilized surface peat. In the field, methane fluxes ranged from 0 to 3.8 mg m-2 h-1 and were highest from hollows. Field nitrous oxide fluxes ranged from 0 to 574 μg m-2 h-1 and were elevated at the edge. A large Eriophorum vaginatum tussock showed decreasing nitrous oxide release as the season progressed. Drainage of mesocosms decreased methane release to 0, even during rewetting. There was a tendency for a decrease of nitrous oxide release during drainage and for an increase in nitrous oxide release during rewetting. Nitrogen fertilization did not increase decomposition of surface peat. Our examinations suggest a competition between vascular vegetation and denitrifiers for excess nitrogen. We also provide evidence that the von Post humification index can be used to explain nitrous oxide release from bogs, if the role of vascular vegetation is also considered. An assessment of the greenhouse gas release from nitrogen saturated restoring bogs needs to take into account elevated release from fresh Sphagnum peat as well as from sedges growing on decomposed peat. Given the high atmospheric nitrogen deposition, restoration will not be able to achieve an oligotrophic ecosystem in the short term.

  15. Recent atmospheric dust deposition in an ombrotrophic peat bog in Great Hinggan Mountain, Northeast China.

    PubMed

    Bao, Kunshan; Xing, Wei; Yu, Xiaofei; Zhao, Hongmei; McLaughlin, Neil; Lu, Xianguo; Wang, Guoping

    2012-08-01

    Recent deposition of atmospheric soil dust (ASD) was studied using (210)Pb-dated Sphagnum-derived peat sequences from Great Hinggan Mountain in northeast China. Physicochemical indices of peat including dry bulk density, water content, ash content, total organic carbon and mass magnetic susceptibility were measured. Acid-insoluble concentration of lithogenic metals (Al, Ca, Fe, Mn, V and Ti) were measured using ICP-AES. The basic physicochemical properties were used to assess the peat trophic status and indicated that the sections above 45-60 cm are rain-fed peat. A continuous record of ASD fluxes over the past 150 years was reconstructed based on the geochemical data obtained from the ombrotrophic zone, and the average input rate of ASD is 13.4-68.1 g m(-2) year(-1). The source of soil dust deposited in peat was dominated by the long-range transport of mineral aerosol from the drylands in north China and Mongolia. The temporal variation of ASD fluxes in the last 60 years coincides well with the meteorological records of dust storm frequency during 1954-2002 in north China. This suggests that the reconstructed sequence of atmospheric dust deposition is reliable and we can look back in time at the dust evolution before 1949. Dust storm events were observed occasionally in the late Qing dynasty, and their frequency and intensity were smaller than dust weather occurring in recent times. Four peaks of ASD fluxes were distinguished and correlated with the historical events at that time. This study presents the first atmospheric soil dust data in peat records in northeast China, and complements a global database of peat bog archives of atmospheric deposition. The results reflect the patterns of local environmental change over the past century in north China and will be helpful in formulating policies to achieve sustainable and healthy development. PMID:22664536

  16. Elevated Nitrogen Deposition Enhances the Net CO2 Sink Strength in Alberta Bogs along a Post-fire Chronosequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wieder, R. K.; Vile, M. A.; Albright, C. M.; Scott, K. D.

    2014-12-01

    About 30% of the landscape of northern Alberta, Canada is occupied by peatlands, which persist at the low end range of both mean annual precipitation (<500 mm/yr) and mean annual atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition (< 1 kg/ha/yr) across which peatlands are found globally. Ombrotrophic bogs in this region function as a net sink for atmospheric CO2 of over 75 g/m2/yr, taking into consideration changes in CO2 sink strength as a function of time since fire. In addition to fire, a new disturbance is emerging in the Athabasca Oil Sands Region (AOSR) of northern Alberta, where development of the oil sands resource has increased atmospheric N deposition to as much as 2.5 kg/ha/yr. To examine the effects of elevated N deposition on bog C cycling, we experimentally applied N (as NH4NO3 solutions) to replicated plots at levels equivalent to 0 (water added with no N), 10, and 20 kg/ha/yr, and controls (no waher, no N added) at five bog sites, aged at 2, 12, 32, 73, and 113 years since fire in 2013 (6 plots per N treatment per site). Understory net ecosystem exchange of CO2 (NEE) was measured repeatedly throughout the 2013 and 2014 growing season (and in 2011 and 2012 at the most recently burned site) using the closed chamber approach. Using a rectangular hyperbola equation to characterize NEE as a function of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) and near-surface air temperature (T), monthly and annual NEE was estimated based on hourly measurements of PAR and T at each site. Across all sites, a general pattern emerged that N additions enhanced the net CO2 sink strength of the bogs, with no effect on ecosystem respiration. Net primary production of Sphagnum fuscum, the dominant peat-forming moss, was not affected by N addition, suggesting that the overall response of NEE to N addition is the result of enhanced growth of ericaceous shrubs. These findings suggest that while elevated N deposition in the AOSR may enhance the strength of the overall CO2 sink of bogs in the short

  17. Ombrotrophic peat bogs are not suited as natural archives to investigate the historical atmospheric deposition of perfluoroalkyl substances.

    PubMed

    Dreyer, Annekatrin; Thuens, Sabine; Kirchgeorg, Torben; Radke, Michael

    2012-07-17

    As ombrotrophic peat bogs receive only atmospheric input of contaminants, they have been identified as suitable natural archives for investigating historical depositions of airborne pollutants. To elucidate their suitability for determining the historical atmospheric contamination with perfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS), two peat cores were sampled at Mer Bleue, a bog located close to Ottawa, Canada. Peat cores were segmented, dried, and analyzed in duplicate for 25 PFASs (5 perfluororalkyl sulfonates (PFSAs), 13 perfluoroalkyl carboxylates (PFCAs), 7 perfluororalkyl sulfonamido substances). Peat samples were extracted by ultrasonication, cleaned up using a QuEChERS method, and PFASs were measured by HPLC-MS/MS. Twelve PFCAs and PFSAs were detected regularly in peat samples with perfluorooctane sulfonate (85-655 ng kg(-1)), perfluorooctanoate (150-390 ng kg(-1)), and perfluorononanoate (45-320 ng kg(-1)) at highest concentrations. Because of post depositional relocation processes within the peat cores, true or unbiased deposition fluxes (i.e., not affected by post depositional changes) could not be calculated. Apparent or biased deposition rates (i.e., affected by post depositional changes) were lower than measured/calculated deposition rates for similar urban or near-urban sites. Compared to PFAS production, PFAS concentration and deposition maxima were shifted about 30 years toward the past and some analytes were detected even in the oldest segments from the beginning of the 20th century. This was attributed to PFAS mobility in the peat profile. Considerable differences were observed between both peat cores and different PFASs. Overall, this study demonstrates that ombrotrophic bogs are not suited natural archives to provide authentic and reliable temporal trend data of historical atmospheric PFAS deposition. PMID:22680699

  18. Mercury in a spanish peat bog: archive of climate change and atmospheric metal deposition

    PubMed

    Martinez-Cortizas; Pontevedra-Pombal; Garcia-Rodeja; Novoa-Munoz; Shotyk

    1999-05-01

    A peat core from a bog in northwest Spain provides a record of the net accumulation of atmospheric mercury since 4000 radiocarbon years before the present. It was found that cold climates promoted an enhanced accumulation and the preservation of mercury with low thermal stability, and warm climates were characterized by a lower accumulation and the predominance of mercury with moderate to high thermal stability. This record can be separated into natural and anthropogenic components. The substantial anthropogenic mercury component began approximately 2500 radiocarbon years before the present, which is near the time of the onset of mercury mining in Spain. Anthropogenic mercury has dominated the deposition record since the Islamic period (8th to 11th centuries A.D.). The results shown here have implications for the global mercury cycle and also imply that the thermal lability of the accumulated mercury can be used not only to quantify the effects of human activity, but also as a new tool for quantitative paleotemperature reconstruction. PMID:10320369

  19. Determination of atmospheric nitrogen deposition to a semi-natural peat bog site in an intensively managed agricultural landscape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurkuck, Miriam; Brümmer, Christian; Mohr, Karsten; Grünhage, Ludger; Flessa, Heinz; Kutsch, Werner L.

    2014-11-01

    Rising levels of atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition have been found to affect the primary productivity and species composition of most terrestrial ecosystems. Highly vulnerable ecosystems such as nutrient-poor bogs are expected to respond to increasing N input rates with a decrease in plant species diversity. Our study site - a moderately drained raised bog and one of only very few remaining protected peatland areas in Northwestern Germany - is surrounded by highly fertilised agricultural land and intensive livestock production. We quantified the annual deposition of atmospheric N over a period of two years. Dry deposition rates of different N species and their reactants were calculated from day and night-time concentrations measured by a KAPS denuder filter system. Dry N deposition amounted to 10.9 ± 1.0 kg N ha-1 yr-1 (year 1) and 10.5 ± 1.0 kg N ha-1 yr-1 (year 2). More than 80% of total deposited N was attributed to ammonia (NH3). A strong seasonality in NH3 concentrations and depositions could be observed. Day and night-time concentrations and depositions, however, did not differ significantly. Total N deposition including bulk N deposition resulted in about 25 kg N ha-1 yr-1. Our results suggest that the intensive agricultural land management of surrounding areas and strongly emitting animal husbandry lead to N inputs into the protected peatland area that exceed the ecosystem's specific critical load up to fivefold. This gives rise to the assumption that a further shift in plant species composition with a subsequent alteration of the local hydrological regime can be expected.

  20. Retention of As and Sb in ombrotrophic peat bogs: records of As, Sb, and Pb deposition at four Scottish sites.

    PubMed

    Cloy, Joanna M; Farmer, John G; Graham, Margaret C; MacKenzie, Angus B

    2009-03-15

    Possible postdepositional As migration in ombrotrophic peat bogs was investigated by comparing depth profiles of As with those of Sb and Pb, two elements considered to be essentially immobile in peat, and those of redox-sensitive, potentially mobile nutrient elements such as Mn, Fe, P, and S in 210Pb-dated cores from four Scottish bogs. Concentration profiles of As were similar to those of Sb and Pb rather than these other elements, indicating that As is bound strongly to organic matter and is relatively immobile in ombrotrophic peat. Historical records of atmospheric anthropogenic As, Sb, and Pb deposition during the industrial and postindustrial periods were derived, site-specific maxima (up to 1.55, 1.33, and 45 mg m(-2) y(-1), respectively) occurring between the late 1890s and 1960s, reflecting emissions from diverse sources such as mining and smelting, coal combustion, and also, in the case of Pb, exhaust emissions from the use of leaded gasoline. Since the mid-1980s, fluxes of Pb decreased (4-7 fold) more rapidly than those of As and Sb (2-3 fold), attributable to both the gradual elimination of leaded gasoline and recent new sources of the latter elements. Relative trends in derived anthropogenic As, Sb, and Pb deposition largely agreed with other Scottish peat and moss archive records, direct measurements of deposition, and UK emissions, i.e., four different types of data source. PMID:19368168

  1. Retention of As and Sb in ombrotrophic peat bogs: records of As, Sb, and Pb deposition at four Scottish sites

    SciTech Connect

    Joanna M. Cloy; John G. Farmer; Margaret C. Graham; Angus B. MacKenzie

    2009-03-15

    Possible postdepositional As migration in ombrotrophic peat bogs was investigated by comparing depth profiles of As with those of Sb and Pb, two elements considered to be essentially immobile in peat, and those of redox-sensitive, potentially mobile nutrient elements such as Mn, Fe, P, and S in {sup 210}Pb-dated cores from four Scottish bogs. Concentration profiles of As were similar to those of Sb and Pb rather than these other elements, indicating that As is bound strongly to organic matter and is relatively immobile in ombrotrophic peat. Historical records of atmospheric anthropogenic As, Sb, and Pb deposition during the industrial and postindustrial periods were derived, site-specific maxima (up to 1.55, 1.33, and 45 mg m{sup -2} y{sup -1}, respectively) occurring between the late 1890s and 1960s, reflecting emissions from diverse sources such as mining and smelting, coal combustion, and also, in the case of Pb, exhaust emissions from the use of leaded gasoline. Since the mid-1980s, fluxes of Pb decreased (4-7 fold) more rapidly than those of As and Sb (2-3 fold), attributable to both the gradual elimination of leaded gasoline and recent new sources of the latter elements. Relative trends in derived anthropogenic As, Sb, and Pb deposition largely agreed with other Scottish peat and moss archive records, direct measurements of deposition, and UK emissions, i.e., four different types of data source. 36 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Bog Plant Tissue Chemistry as Indicators of Regionally Elevated Atmospheric N and S Deposition in the Alberta Oil Sands Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wieder, R.; Vile, M. A.; Scott, K. D.; Vitt, D. H.; Quinn, J.

    2011-12-01

    Nitrogen oxide and sulfur oxide emission from ongoing development of oil sands in northern Alberta results in regionally elevated atmospheric deposition of N and S in an area where background deposition of both N and S is exceptionally low (less than 1 kg/ha/yr). Because bogs, which represent major landforms in the Alberta oil sands region, are believed to be N-limited and potentially sensitive to S inputs, we have been investigating the effects of elevated N deposition on C, N, and S cycling in bogs, as well as the potential of bogs to serve as monitors of N and S deposition. Toward this latter end, we have measured seasonal variation (5 sampling dates between June and October 2009) concentrations of N and S, as well as δ15N value, in leaf tissues (Picea mariana (ectomycorrhizal); Ledum groenlandicum, Oxycoccos microcarpon, Vaccinium vitis-idaea (ericoid mycorrhizal); Rubus chamaemorus, and Smilacina trifolia (nonmycorrhizal), Sphagnum (S. fuscum, S. capillifolium, S. magellanicum, S. angustifolium) moss capitula (top 1-cm of plant) and lichens (Cladina mitis and Evernia mesomorpha) at 5 bogs at distances ranging from 14 to 300 km from the heart of the oil sands mining area. Averaged across all sites and sampling dates, N concentrations in ectomycorrhizal, ericoid mycorrhizal, nonmycorrhizal, Sphagnum, and lichens was 8.6 + 0.2, 11.9 + 0.2, 26.3 + 0.6, 10.2 + 0.1, 7.2 + 0.2 mg/g, respectively; δ15N values were -10.3 + 0.1, -6.0 + 0.1, 1.7 + 0.2, -5.3 + 0.1, -4.7 + 0.1 mg/g, respectively, and S concentrations were 1.07 + 0.2, 1.31 + 0.2, 1.94 + 0.6, 1.46 + 0.2, 1.11 + 0.3 mg/g, respectively. Plant functional groups and individual species behaved differently with respect to both seasonal variation and site differences, often with significant interactions when analyzed using two-way analyses of variance. Some species exhibited seasonal variation in some aspects

  3. Geochemical Evidence for Periods of Increased Mineral Dust Deposition in Patagonian Peat Bogs Since the Last Deglaciation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanneste, H.; De Vleeschouwer, F.; Mattielli, N. D.; Vanderstraeten, A.; von Scheffer, C.; Piotrowska, N.; Coronato, A.; Le Roux, G.

    2013-12-01

    Atmospheric mineral dust plays an important role in the earth's climate system, influencing atmospheric parameters such as cloud condensation as well as biogeochemical cycles, affecting atmospheric CO2 levels. Antarctic ice core records show that mineral dust deposition has varied in the Southern Hemisphere over glacial-interglacial stages, suggesting major changes in atmospheric circulation. Nevertheless, to make predictions for the near future possible, a better understanding of atmospheric dust load and transport variability in the recent past, is essential. Ombrotrophic peat bogs have proven to provide excellent records of atmospheric dust deposition for the Holocene as their accumulation rates are higher than any other archive. Hence two ombrotrophic peat bogs, located southwest (Karukinka) and southeast (Harberton) on Isla Grande de Tierra del Fuego, were sampled to investigate dust-palaeoclimatic interactions in southern South America since the last deglaciation. Here we present a detailed geochemical (major, trace elements and Nd isotopes) record for both sites. The base of the peat sequences in Karukinka and Harberton were dated by 14C at ca. 8,000 cal yr BP and ca. 16,500 cal yr BP, respectively. The distribution of trace elemental (Sc, REE) concentrations within the cores indicates, besides tephra layers, episodes of increased mineral dust deposition at Harberton and Karukinka. The glacial-interglacial transition can be observed in the Harberton record (at ca. 11,500 cal yr BP), marked by a drop in the dust flux from 102 g/m2/yr to 10 g/m2/yr. The most significant episode of mineral dust deposition at Karukinka is concentrated around 1,600 cal yr BP with a maximum dust flux of 108 g/m2/yr. Its neodymium isotopic signature of -1 suggests crustal admixing, compared to the ɛNd values of ˜2, for both tephra layers.

  4. Controls on suppression of methane flux from a peat bog subjected to simulated acid rain sulfate deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauci, Vincent; Dise, Nancy; Fowler, David

    2002-01-01

    The effect of acid rain SO42- deposition on peatland CH4 emissions was examined by manipulating SO42- inputs to a pristine raised peat bog in northern Scotland. Weekly pulses of dissolved Na2SO4 were applied to the bog over two years in doses of 25, 50, and 100 kg S ha-1 yr-1, reflecting the range of pollutant S deposition loads experienced in acid rain-impacted regions of the world. CH4 fluxes were measured at regular intervals using a static chamber/gas chromatographic flame ionization detector method. Total emissions of CH4 were reduced by between 21 and 42% relative to controls, although no significant differences were observed between treatments. Estimated total annual fluxes during the second year of the experiment were 16.6 g m-2 from the controls and (in order of increasing SO42- dose size) 10.7, 13.2, and 9.8 g m-2 from the three SO42- treatments, respectively. The relative extent of CH4 flux suppression varied with changes in both peat temperature and peat water table with the largest suppression during cool periods and episodes of falling water table. Our findings suggest that low doses of SO42- at deposition rates commonly experienced in areas impacted by acid rain, may significantly affect CH4 emissions from wetlands in affected areas. We propose that SO42- from acid rain can stimulate sulfate-reducing bacteria into a population capable of outcompeting methanogens for substrates. We further propose that this microbially mediated interaction may have a significant current and future effect on the contribution of northern peatlands to the global methane budget.

  5. Atmospheric Pb deposition in Spain during the last 4600 years recorded by two ombrotrophic peat bogs and implications for the use of peat as archive.

    PubMed

    Martinez Cortiza, A; García-Rodeja, E; Pontevedra Pombal, X; Nóvoa Muñoz, J C; Weiss, D; Cheburkin, A

    2002-06-20

    Two ombrotrophic peat bogs in Northwestern Spain provided a history of 4600 years of Pb accumulation. Highest Pb concentrations (84-87 microg g(-1)) were found near the bogs' surface, but there were also other significant peaks (6-14 microg g(-1)), indicating pre-industrial atmospheric pollution. The enrichment factors (EFs) in both cores show a remarkably similar record. Atmospheric Pb pollution dates back to at least approximately 2500 years ago, reaching a first maximum during the Roman period. For the last 300 years, Pb EFs significantly increased due to industrial development, but the uppermost samples of the bogs show decreasing Pb EFs, probably due to the phasing out of leaded gasoline. These results are also supported by 206Pb/207Pb isotope ratios, as they continuously decrease from ca. 3000 BP until 2000 BP (from 1.275 at 4070 14C years BP to 1.182), indicating the growing importance of nonradiogenic Pb released from Iberian ores by ancient mining. Peat samples at a 3-5-cm depth are even less radiogenic (206Pb/107Pb = 1.157), indicating the strong influence of leaded gasoline. Despite the common history shared by the two bogs, striking differences were found for Pb enrichment, whether this was calculated by normalising to the Pb/Ti ratio of the upper continental crust or to the Pb/Ti ratios of peats from pre-anthropogenic times. This effect seems to be related to differences in Ti accumulation in both bogs, possibly due to physical fractionation of the airborne dust during wind transport. Enrichment has to be carefully considered when comparing the results obtained for different bogs, since our results suggest that normalising to crustal proportions is meaningless when the bulk of the deposition in an area is strongly influenced by short- and medium-range dust transport. PMID:12108443

  6. Reconnaissance of Colorado Front Range bogs for uranium and other elements

    SciTech Connect

    Owen, D.E.; Schumann, R.R.; Otton, J.K.

    1987-08-01

    Alpine bogs form along spring-fed valley floors and in steam drainages restricted by moraines, slides, and beaver dams. The bogs are generally young (Holocene) and contain a few tens of centimeters to several meters of peat and organic-rich muck. Organic matter has a great affinity for cations such as uranium; the geochemical enrichment factor between the peats and uraniferous ground water can approach 10,000 to 1. Because the bog sediments are geologically young, the uranium is in gross disequilibrium and has low radioactivity, thus it is undetectable by ground and aerial gamma surveys. Communities that derive a part of their water supplies from drainages containing uraniferous bogs face a potential health threat because the uranium is loosely bound and may easily be remobilized by ground water moving through the bogs. Reconnaissance sampling of bogs was conducted in the Colorado Front Range from the South Park area to the Colorado-Wyoming state line. Several bogs have uranium concentrations of 1000-3000 ppm, but most bogs have uranium concentrations in the 10-100 ppm range. Zinc concentrations of 100-1000 ppm are found in some bogs and many other metallic elements are present in concentrations between 10 and 100 ppm. Concentrations between 100 and 1000 ppm of some of the rare earth elements (e.g., Ce, La, Nd, Yb) were found in the Cripple Creek area.

  7. Bog Plant Tissue Chemistry and N and S Accumulation in Peat are Influenced by Elevated N and S Deposition from Alberta Oil Sands Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wieder, R.; Vile, M. A.; Quinn, J.; Albright, C. M.; Scott, K. D.; Vitt, D. H.

    2013-12-01

    Development of the oil sands resource in northern Alberta, Canada has led to elevated atmospheric N and S deposition, the N coming mainly from the exhaust of diesel fueled-trucks that haul the raw oil sands from the mine sites and the S coming mainly from refining. Against a background deposition of < 1 kg/ha/yr for both N and S, at sites within 15 km of the oil sands mining region we have measured current N and S deposition to be as high as 2 and 27 kg/ha/yr. With a goal of developing monitoring tools to assess the spatial extent of elevated N and S deposition in the region, we collected leaves, needles, or whole plants of 12 bog species (lichens: Cladina mitis and Evernia mesomorpha; Sphagnum mosses: S. capillifolium and S. fuscum; a tree: Picea mariana; ericaceous shrubs: Ledum groenlandicum, Oxycoccos microcarpus and Vaccinium vitis-idaea; deciduous forbs: Rubus chamaemorus and Smilacina trifolia) from 5 bogs ranging from 11 to over 250 km from the oil sands mining area. Samples were collected on 23 dates between May and October of 2009-2012 and were analyzed for C, N, and S concentrations. Six species (C. mitis, E. mesomorpha, S. fuscum, O. microcarpus, V. vitis-idaea, and R. chamaemorus) exhibited statistically significant increases in C:N ratio with increasing distance from the oil sands mining area. Five species (C. mitis, E. mesomorpha, S. fuscum, S. capillifolium, O. microcarpus) exhibited statistically significant increases in C:S ratio with increasing distance from the oil sands mining area. For three species (S. fuscum, E. mesomorpha, O. microcarpus), N concentrations gradually and significantly increased (C:N ratios decreased) over the four years of the study, with the rate of increase as high as 1 mg/g/yr at sites in close proximity to the oil sands mining area. In contrast, S concentrations in plant tissues generally did not increase over the four years, possibly because of increasing efforts to control S emissions from stacks. Using 210Pb

  8. Grass species influence on plant N uptake - Determination of atmospheric N deposition to a semi-natural peat bog site using a 15N labelling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurkuck, Miriam; Brümmer, Christian; Spott, Oliver; Flessa, Heinz; Kutsch, Werner L.

    2014-05-01

    Large areas of natural peat bogs in Northwestern Germany have been converted to arable land and were subjected to draining and peat cutting in the past. The few protected peatland areas remaining are affected by high nitrogen (N) deposition. Our study site - a moderately drained raised bog - is surrounded by highly fertilized agricultural land and livestock production. In this study, we used a 15N pool dilution technique called 'Integrated Total Nitrogen Input' (ITNI) to quantify annual deposition of atmospheric N into biomonitoring pots over a two-year period. Since it considers direct N uptake by plants, it was expected to result in higher N input than conventional methods for determination of N deposition (e.g. micrometeorological approaches, bulk N samplers). Using Lolium multiflorum and Eriophorum vaginatum as monitor plants and low, medium and high levels of fertilization, we aimed to simulate increasing N deposition to planted pots and to allocate airborne N after its uptake by the soil-plant system in aboveground biomass, roots and soil. Increasing N fertilization was positively correlated with biomass production of Eriophorum vaginatum, whereas atmospheric plant N uptake decreased and highest airborne N input of 899.8 ± 67.4 µg N d-1 pot-1 was found for low N fertilization. In contrast, Lolium multiflorum showed a clear dependency of N supply on plant N uptake and was highest (688.7 ± 41.4 µg N d-1 pot-1) for highly fertilized vegetation pots. Our results suggest that grass species respond differently to increasing N input. While crop grasses such as Lolium multiflorum take up N according to N availability, species adopted to nutrient-limited conditions like Eriophorum vaginatum show N saturation effects with increasing N supply. Total airborne N input ranged from about 24 to 66 kg N ha-1 yr-1 dependent on the used indicator plant and the amount of added fertilizer. Parallel determination of atmospheric N deposition using a micrometeorological approach

  9. Recent atmospheric lead deposition recorded in an ombrotrophic peat bog of Great Hinggan Mountains, Northeast China, from 210Pb and 137Cs dating.

    PubMed

    Bao, K; Xia, W; Lu, X; Wang, G

    2010-09-01

    Radioactive markers are useful in dating lead deposition patterns from industrialization in peat archive. Peat cores were collected in an ombrotrophic peat bog in the Great Hinggan Mountains in Northeast China in September 2008 and dated using (210)Pb and (137)Cs radiometric techniques. The mosses in both cores were examined systematically for dry bulk density, water and ash content. Lead also was measured using atomic emission spectroscopy with inductively coupled plasma (ICP-AES). Both patterned peat profiles were preserved well without evident anthropogenic disturbance. Unsupported (210)Pb and (137)Cs decreased with the depth in both of the two sample cores. The (210)Pb chronologies were established using the constant rate of supply model (CRS) and are in good agreement with the (137)Cs time marker. Recent atmospheric (210)Pb flux in Great Hinggan Mountains peat bog was estimated to be 337 Bq m(-2)y(-1), which is consistent with published data for the region. Lead deposition rate in this region was also derived from these two peat cores and ranged from 24.6 to 55.8 mg m(-2)y(-1) with a range of Pb concentration of 14-262 microg g(-1). The Pb deposition patterns were consistent with increasing industrialization over the last 135-170 y, with a peak of production and coal burning in the last 50 y in Northeast China. This work presents a first estimation of atmospheric Pb deposition rate in peatlands in China and suggests an increasing trend of environmental pollution due to anthropogenic contaminants in the atmosphere. More attention should be paid to current local pollution problems, and society should take actions to seek a balance between economic development and environmental protection. PMID:20621757

  10. Bog iron formation in the Nassawango Creek watershed, Maryland, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bricker, O.P.; Newell, W.L.; Simon, N.S.

    2004-01-01

    The Nassawango bog ores in the modern environment for surficial geochemical processes were studied. The formation of Nassawango bog ores was suggested to be due to inorganic oxidation when groundwater rich in ferrous iron emerges into the oxic, surficial environment. It was suggested that the process, providing a phosphorus sink, may be an unrecognized benefit for mitigating nutrient loading from agricultural lands. It is found that without the effect of iron fixing bacteria, bog deposites could not form at significant rates.

  11. Uraniferous bitumen nodules in the Talvivaara Ni-Zn-Cu-Co deposit (Finland): influence of metamorphism on uranium mineralization in black shales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lecomte, Andreï; Cathelineau, Michel; Deloule, Etienne; Brouand, Marc; Peiffert, Chantal; Loukola-Ruskeeniemi, Kirsti; Pohjolainen, Esa; Lahtinen, Hannu

    2014-04-01

    In the central part of the Fennoscandian Shield, the Talvivaara Ni-Zn-Cu-Co deposit, hosted by Palaeoproterozoic metamorphosed black schists, contains low uranium concentrations ranging from 10 to 30 ppm. The Talvivaara black schists were deposited 2.0-1.9 Ga ago and underwent subsequent metamorphism during the 1.9-1.79 Ga Svecofennian orogeny. Anhedral uraninite crystals rimmed by bitumen constitute the main host of uranium. U-Pb secondary ion mass spectrometry dating indicates that uraninite crystals were formed between 1,878 ± 17 and 1,871 ± 43 Ma, during peak metamorphism. Rare earth element patterns and high Th content (average 6.38 wt%) in disseminated uraninite crystals indicate that U was concentrated during high temperature metamorphism (>400 °C). The formation of bitumen rims around uraninite may be explained by two distinct scenarios: (a) a transport of U coincident with the migration of hydrocarbons or (b) post-metamorphic formation of bitumen rims, through radiolytic polymerization of gaseous hydrocarbons at the contact with uraninite.

  12. Historical records of atmospheric Pb deposition in four Scottish ombrotrophic peat bogs: An isotopic comparison with other records from western Europe and Greenland - article no. GB2016

    SciTech Connect

    Cloy, J.M.; Farmer, J.G.; Graham, M.C.; MacKenzie, A.B.; Cook, G.T.

    2008-05-15

    Cores collected from ombrotrophic peat bogs in west central, east central, northeast and southwest Scotland were dated (C-14, Pb-210) and analyzed (ICP-OES, ICP-MS) to derive and compare their historical records of atmospheric anthropogenic Pb deposition over the past 2500 years. On the basis of Pb isotopic composition (e. g., Pb-206/Pb-207), clear indications of Pb contamination during the pre-Roman/Roman, post-Roman and medieval periods were attributed to the mining and smelting of Pb ores from Britain and elsewhere in Europe. Between the 17th and early 20th centuries, during the industrial period, the mining and smelting of indigenous Scottish Pb ores were the most important sources of anthropogenic Pb deposition at three of the sites. In contrast, at the most southerly site, influences from the use of both British Pb ores and imported Australian Pb ores (in more southern parts of Britain) since the late 19th century were evident. At each of the sites, Australian-Pb-influenced car exhaust emissions (from the 1930s to late 1990s), along with significant contributions from coal combustion (until the late 1960s and onset of the post industrial period), were evident. Atmospheric anthropogenic Pb deposition across Scotland was greatest (similar to 10 to 40 mg m{sup -2} a{sup -1}) between the late 1880s and late 1960s, increasing southward, declining to 0.44 to 5.7 mg m{sup 2} a{sup -1} by the early 2000s.

  13. The Vanishing Bog.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanif, Muhammad

    1990-01-01

    Directions for the construction of a model bog habitat are provided including examples of plants and animals which may be suitable. Activities that use this model are suggested. Background information on the ecology and chemistry of the bog is included. (CW)

  14. Nature and origins of acidity in bogs

    SciTech Connect

    Urban, N.R.

    1987-01-01

    To elucidate the causes of acidity in bogs, all of the processes generating and consuming acidity in a small peat bog in northern Minnesota were measured. These processes include ion exchange, plant nutrient uptake, atmospheric deposition, decomposition, organic acid production, sulfate reduction, and denitrification. Organic acid production was found to be the dominant source of acidity, responsible for the low pH of bog waters and the high acidity in the outflow. Net biological uptake (NBU) is the next largest source of acidity. Ion exchange accounts for only about 40% of the NBU-acidity. Plant uptake and ion exchange are much larger sources of acidity on an annual basis, but much of this acidity is neutralized by decomposition. Sulfate reduction and denitrification are quantitatively unimportant at this site because inputs (NO/sub 3//sup -/ and SO/sub 4/=) are low. Bog water samples and peat cores from bogs across northeastern North America were analyzed to determine if geographic trends in the rates of acidity-generating and -consuming processes exist. Rates of organic acid production varied little across the transect. Higher values of NBU-acidity were observed in maritime bogs than in midcontinental bogs. The effects of transformations of sulfur and nitrogen on the hydrogen-ion cycle were examined in detail. Nitrate appears to be taken up by bryophytes and little is lost to denitrification. Alkalinity from nitrate uptake is low. In contrast, there is a dynamic cycle of oxidation and reduction of sulfur within bogs. Inorganic forms of sulfur are not important storage pools in peat; 35% of the total sulfur input is accumulated as organic S.

  15. Investigating Bogs: An Interdisciplinary Adventure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pankiewicz, Philip R.; Schneider, Lois

    1995-01-01

    Presents the case for the use of bogs as ideal sites for hundreds of interdisciplinary lessons that combine chemistry, geology, various branches of biology, and wetlands archaeology. Includes general guidelines to aid in the design of interdisciplinary bog studies. (DDR)

  16. Rare earth element and Nd isotope geochemistry of an ombrotrophic peat bog at Karukinka (Chile, 53.9° S): a palaeo-record of Holocene dust deposition in Tierra del Fuego.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanneste, Heleen; De Vleeschouwer, François; Vanderstraeten, Aubry; Mattielli, Nadine; Triquet, Delphine; Piotrowska, Natalia; Le Roux, Gael

    2013-04-01

    The value of ombrotrophic peat bogs as past atmospheric dust records, has been increasingly recognized over the past 10 years. Their high accumulation rates provide high resolution archives of natural atmospheric dust deposition since the Late Glacial, often missing in marine, lake and ice core records. Consequently, peat deposits can be used as a proxy for atmospheric circulation patterns and thus palaeoclimate. In the Southern Hemisphere, the climate is considered to be driven by the Southern Westerly Wind belt (SSW), as it significantly affects the Antarctic Circumpolar Current and hence atmospheric CO2 levels. Palaeo SSW belt migrations have been observed in palaeoclimate records but, reconstructions of SSW shifts and associated climatic changes are incoherent, in particular for the Holocene. As peatlands thrive in southwest Tierra del Fuego due to its high annual precipitation, a remote ombrotrophic peat bog at Karukinka (southwest on the Isla Grande de Tierra del Fuego) was sampled, to investigate the Holocene palaeoclimate in southern South America based on dust deposition records. A 4,5 m long Russian D-core was recovered and subsequently subsampled for elemental and isotope geochemistry in addition to density and radiocarbon dating measurements. Initial results show a number of layers enriched in scandium, indicating the presence of lithogenic material, i.e. dust. Rare earth element patterns indicate at least 2 different sources. The most significant dust peak occurs at the base of the core at ~7300 Cal years B.P and has a neodymium isotopic composition of 2.2, suggesting a volcanic origin.

  17. Uraniferous opal, Virgin Valley, Nevada: conditions of formation and implications for uranium exploration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zielinski, R.A.

    1982-01-01

    Uraniferous, fluorescent opal, which occurs in tuffaceous sedimentary rocks at Virgin Valley, Nevada, records the temperature and composition of uranium-rich solutions as well as the time of uranium-silica coprecipitation. Results are integrated with previous geologic and geochronologic data for the area to produce a model for uranium mobility that may be used to explore for uranium deposits in similar geologic settings. Uraniferous opal occurs as replacements of diatomite, or silicic air-fall ash layers in tuffaceous lakebeds of the Virgin Valley Formation (Miocene) of Merriam (1907). Fission-track radiography shows uranium to be homogeneously dispersed throughout the opal structure, suggesting coprecipitation of dissolved uranium and silica gel. Fluid inclusions preserved within opal replacements of diatomite have homogenization temperatures in the epithermal range and are of low salinity. Four samples of opal from one locality all have U-Pb apparent ages which suggest uraniferous opal precipitation in late Pliocene time. These ages correspond to a period of local, normal faulting, and highangle faults may have served as vertical conduits for transport of deep, thermalized ground water to shallower levels. Lateral migration of rising solutions occurred at intersections of faults with permeable strata. Silica and some uranium were dissolved from silica-rich host strata of 5-20 ppm original uranium content and reprecipitated as the solutions cooled. The model predicts that in similar geologic settings, ore-grade concentrations of uranium will occur in permeable strata that intersect high-angle faults and that contain uranium source rocks as well as efficient reductant traps for uranium. In the absence of sufficient quantities of reductant materials, uranium will be flushed from the system or will accumulate in low-grade disseminated hosts such as uraniferous opal. ?? 1982.

  18. Consequences of marginal drainage from a raised bog and understanding the hydrogeological dynamics as a basis for restoration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regan, Shane; Johnston, Paul

    2010-05-01

    of vertical water losses in the peat profile not confined to the bog margins. Distinct zones of groundwater seepage in the marginal drains have been mapped based on hydrochemical and stable isotopic composition of the water and occur where drains have cut into permeable subsoil beneath the peat substrate and where the potentiometric surface of the regional groundwater table is below, or coincident with, the elevation at the base of the drain. Groundwater as a ‘supporting' ecological condition is usually confined to the perimeter of a raised bog, where peat and underlying clay thin towards the margin, allowing regional groundwater and peat water to converge and mix, thereby giving rise to characteristic nutrient rich ‘lagg' zone vegetation. However, in Clara Bog West it appears there is also a connection between the regional groundwater table and the high bog. Such a connection appears to be unique to Clara Bog West as a result of the prevailing geological conditions. A succession of Carboniferous Limestone to relatively permeable glacial till deposits to low permeability lacustrine clay sediment is the predominant underlying geology of the bog. However, there are areas where the glacial till protrudes through the lacustrine clay, which ordinarily isolates the high bog from underlying groundwater, thereby engendering a dependency on regional groundwater conditions. The hydrogeological data now suggest that drainage at the bog margin has created a hydraulic connection between these ‘subsoil subcrops' and the marginal drains, developed within the same subsoil, thereby lowering the regional groundwater table, steepening the hydraulic gradient and resulting in significant water loss from the main bog body. As such, understanding this hydrogeological connection is central to restoration activities that will aim to arrest subsidence and restore water levels that are indicative for ecotope development, on the high bog. Acknowledgements Clara Restoration Group: Jan

  19. Effects of grass species and grass growth on atmospheric nitrogen deposition to a bog ecosystem surrounded by intensive agricultural land use

    PubMed Central

    Hurkuck, Miriam; Brümmer, Christian; Mohr, Karsten; Spott, Oliver; Well, Reinhard; Flessa, Heinz; Kutsch, Werner L

    2015-01-01

    We applied a 15N dilution technique called “Integrated Total Nitrogen Input” (ITNI) to quantify annual atmospheric N input into a peatland surrounded by intensive agricultural practices over a 2-year period. Grass species and grass growth effects on atmospheric N deposition were investigated using Lolium multiflorum and Eriophorum vaginatum and different levels of added N resulting in increased biomass production. Plant biomass production was positively correlated with atmospheric N uptake (up to 102.7 mg N pot−1) when using Lolium multiflorum. In contrast, atmospheric N deposition to Eriophorum vaginatum did not show a clear dependency to produced biomass and ranged from 81.9 to 138.2 mg N pot−1. Both species revealed a relationship between atmospheric N input and total biomass N contents. Airborne N deposition varied from about 24 to 55 kg N ha−1 yr−1. Partitioning of airborne N within the monitor system differed such that most of the deposited N was found in roots of Eriophorum vaginatum while the highest share was allocated in aboveground biomass of Lolium multiflorum. Compared to other approaches determining atmospheric N deposition, ITNI showed highest airborne N input and an up to fivefold exceedance of the ecosystem-specific critical load of 5–10 kg N ha−1 yr−1. PMID:26257870

  20. Carbon dynamics in peat bogs: Insights from substrate macromolecular chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuder, Tomasz; Kruge, Michael A.

    2001-09-01

    The macromolecular compositions of subfossil plants from boreal Sphagnum bogs and restiad bogs (New Zealand) have been studied by pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry to evaluate the extent of degradation in the anoxic zone (catotelm) of a peat bog. Degradation of vascular plant polysaccharides was apparent only into the upper catotelm. Sphagnum was degraded more slowly than vascular plants, but no cessation of degradation was observed. The inferred rate of degradation varied depending on type of plant, extent of aerobic, precatotelmic degradation, and mode of litter deposition (rooting versus at the surface). Environmental forcing on anaerobic carbon dynamics would potentially be largest if the hydrology was disturbed at a wet and vascular plant-rich site. Peat deposited under a dry regime would be relatively inert in anaerobic conditions. Although catotelmic degradation is usually not extensive, in some cases, if labile organic matter is retained in the aerobic phase (e.g., restiad bogs) a major fraction of peat is degraded in catotelm, potentially resulting in a delayed major export of 14C-old methane.

  1. Large uraniferous springs and associated uranium minerals, Shirley Mountains, Carbon County, Wyoming -- A preliminary report

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Love, J.D.

    1963-01-01

    Ten springs along the southeast flank of the Shirley Mountains, Carbon County, Wyoming, have water containing from 12 to 27 parts per billion uranium, have a total estimated flow of 3 million gallons of clear fresh water per day, and have a combined annual output that may be as much as 166 pounds of uranium. These springs emerge from Pennsylvanian, Permian, and Triassic rocks on the east flank of a faulted anticlinal fold. In the vicinity of several springs, metatyuyamunite occurs locally in crystalline calcite veins averaging 3 feet in width but reaching a maximum of 24 feet. The veins are as much as several hundred feet long-and cut vertically through sandstones of Pennsylvanian age overlying the Madison Limestone (Mississippian). This limestone is believed to be the source of the calcite. A 3-foot channel sample cross one calcite vein contains 0.089 percent uranium. Lesser amounts of uranium were obtained from other channel samples. Selected samples contain from 0.39 to 2.2 percent uranium and from 0.25 to 0.86 percent vanadium. Three possible sources of the uranium are: (1) Precambrian rocks, (2) Paleozoic rocks, (3) Pliocene(?) tuffaceous strata that were deposited unconformably across older .rocks in both the graphically high and low parts of the area, but were subsequently removed by erosion except for a few small remnants, one of which contains carnotite. There is apparently a close genetic relation between the uraniferous springs and uranium mineralization in the calcite veins. Data from this locality illustrate how uraniferous ground water can be used as a guide in the exploration for areas where uranium deposits may occur. Also demonstrated is the fact that significant quantities of uranium are present in water of some large flowing springs.

  2. Anthropogenic degradation of mountainous raised bogs. Case study of the Polish Carpathians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lajczak, Adam

    2016-04-01

    Publications on the human impact on peat bogs pay a lot of attention to peat erosion, peat burning and changes in the physical and chemical properties of peat deposits that indicate pollution in the environment, but a more detailed analysis of current changes in the peat bog relief as a result of peat deposit extraction and drying is omitted. Compared to other areas of the world, the level of knowledge on anthropogenic changes in the relief of peat bogs in some areas of Poland may be considered advanced. This applies not only to peat bogs in northern Poland but also southern Poland, where peat bogs in the Carpathians and the Sudetes are also found. The best analyzed peat bogs in southern Poland are the raised bogs in the Orawsko-Nowotarska Basin (Western Carpathians) and in valleys in the Bieszczady Mts. (Eastern Carpathians). Both areas are impacted by deep precipitation shadow. The purpose of this paper is: (1) to assess the rate of shrinkage in the surface area of peat domes in the mentioned areas, (2) to describe the rate of growth in the surface area of older and younger post-peat areas, (3) to explain current changes in peat bogs morphology, (4) to explain changes in water retention in peat deposit, (5) to separate phases in peat bogs relief changes. With that in mind, the direction and rate of change of landforms typical of younger post-peat areas, such as peat extraction scarps, post-extraction hollows, drainage systems including ditches and regulated stream channels, were analyzed. A special emphasis was placed on the period of time when the restoration of such areas has taken place. The paper is based on an analysis of maps produced over the last 230 years as well as on aerial photographs taken since 1965 and on LiDAR data. Fieldwork included the geomorphological and hydrographic mapping of specified landforms within peat bogs using GPS methods. In period prior to human activity peat domes were larger than today and were surrounded by lagg fens and were

  3. Exploring climatic controls on blanket bog litter decomposition across an altitudinal gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Michael; Ritson, Jonathan P.; Clark, Joanna M.; Verhoef, Anne; Brazier, Richard E.

    2016-04-01

    The hydrological and ecological functioning of blanket bogs is strongly coupled, involving multiple ecohydrological feedbacks which can affect carbon cycling. Cool and wet conditions inhibit decomposition, and favour the growth of Sphagnum mosses which produce highly recalcitrant litter. A small but persistent imbalance between production and decomposition has led to blanket bogs in the UK accumulating large amounts of carbon. Additionally, healthy bogs provide a suite of other ecosystems services including water regulation and drinking water provision. However, there is concern that climate change could increase rates of litter decomposition and disrupt this carbon sink. Furthermore, it has been argued that the response of these ecosystems in the warmer south west and west of the UK may provide an early analogue for later changes in the more extensive northern peatlands. In order to investigate the effects of climate change on blanket bog litter decomposition, we set-up a litter bag experiment across an altitudinal gradient spanning 200 m of elevation (including a transition from moorland to healthy blanket bog) on Dartmoor, an area of hitherto unstudied, climatically marginal blanket bog in the south west of the UK. At seven sites, water table depth and soil and surface temperature were recorded continuously. Litter bags filled with the litter of three vegetation species dominant on Dartmoor were incubated just below the bog surface and retrieved over a period of 12 months. We found significant differences in the rate of decomposition between species. At all sites, decomposition progressed in the order Calluna vulgaris (dwarf shrub) > Molinia caerulea (graminoid) > Sphagnum (bryophyte). However, while soil temperature did decrease along the altitudinal gradient, being warmer in the lower altitudes, a hypothesised accompanying decrease in decomposition rates did not occur. This could be explained by greater N deposition at the higher elevation sites (estimated

  4. Paired charcoal and tree-ring records of high-frequency Holocene fire from two New Mexico bog sites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Allen, C.D.; Anderson, R. Scott; Jass, R.B.; Toney, J.L.; Baisan, C.H.

    2008-01-01

    Two primary methods for reconstructing paleofire occurrence include dendrochronological dating of fire scars and stand ages from live or dead trees (extending back centuries into the past) and sedimentary records of charcoal particles from lakes and bogs, providing perspectives on fire history that can extend back for many thousands of years. Studies using both proxies have become more common in regions where lakes are present and fire frequencies are low, but are rare where high-frequency surface fires dominate and sedimentary deposits are primarily bogs and wetlands. Here we investigate sedimentary and fire-scar records of fire in two small watersheds in northern New Mexico, in settings recently characterised by relatively high-frequency fire where bogs and wetlands (Chihuahuen??os Bog and Alamo Bog) are more common than lakes. Our research demonstrates that: (1) essential features of the sedimentary charcoal record can be reproduced between multiple cores within a bog deposit; (2) evidence from both fire-scarred trees and charcoal deposits documents an anomalous lack of fire since ???1900, compared with the remainder of the Holocene; (3) sedimentary charcoal records probably underestimate the recurrence of fire events at these high-frequency fire sites; and (4) the sedimentary records from these bogs are complicated by factors such as burning and oxidation of these organic deposits, diversity of vegetation patterns within watersheds, and potential bioturbation by ungulates. We consider a suite of particular challenges in developing and interpreting fire histories from bog and wetland settings in the Southwest. The identification of these issues and constraints with interpretation of sedimentary charcoal fire records does not diminish their essential utility in assessing millennial-scale patterns of fire activity in this dry part of North America. ?? IAWF 2008.

  5. Estimating methane production rates in bogs and landfills by deuterium enrichment of pore water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Siegel, D.I.; Chanton, J.P.; Glaser, P.H.; Chasar, L.S.; Rosenberry, D.O.

    2001-01-01

    Raised bogs and municipal waste landfills harbor large populations of methanogens within their domed deposits of anoxic organic matter. Although the methane emissions from these sites have been estimated by various methods, limited data exist on the activity of the methanogens at depth. We therefore analyzed the stable isotopic signature of the pore waters in two raised bogs from northern Minnesota to identify depth intervals in the peat profile where methanogenic metabolism occurs. Methanogenesis enriched the deuterium (2H) content of the deep peat pore waters by as much as +11% (Vienna Standard Mean Sea Water), which compares to a much greater enrichment factor of +70% in leachate from New York City's Fresh Kills landfill. The bog pore waters were isotopically dated by tritium (3H) to be about 35 years old at 1.5 m depth, whereas the landfill leachate was estimated as ~ 17 years old from Darcy flow calculations. According to an isotopic mass balance the observed deuterium enrichment indicates that about 1.2 g of CH4m-3 d-1 were produced within the deeper peat, compared to about 2.8 g CH4 m-3 d-1 in the landfill. The values for methane production in the bog peat are substantially higher than the flux rates measured at the surface of the bogs or at the landfill, indicating that deeper methane production may be much higher than was previously assumed.

  6. Atmospheric carbonyl sulfide exchange in bog microcosms

    SciTech Connect

    Fried, A.; Klinger, L.F.; Erickson, D.J. III )

    1993-01-22

    Measurements of Carbonyl sulfide (OCS) fluxes were carried out on bog microcosms using chamber sampling and tunable diode laser analysis. Intact bog microcosms (vascular plants, mosses, and peat) removed ambient levels of OCS in the light and dark with rates from [minus]2.4 to [minus]8.1 ng S min[sup [minus]1] m[sup [minus]2]. Peat and peat plus mosses emitted OCS in the light with rates of 17.4 and 10.9 ng S min[sup [minus]1] m[sup [minus]2], respectively. In the dark, the mosses apparently removed OCS at a rate equivalent to the peat emissions. A 3-D numerical tracer model using this data indicated that boreal bog ecosystems remove at most 1% of ambient OCS, not sufficient to account for an observed OCS depletion in boreal air masses. 13 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  7. Ferricrete, manganocrete, and bog iron occurrences with selected sedge bogs and active iron bogs and springs in the upper Animas River watershed, San Juan County, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yager, Douglas B.; Church, Stanley E.; Verplanck, Philip L.; Wirt, Laurie

    2003-01-01

    During 1996 to 2000, the Bureau of Land Management, National Park Service, Environmental Protection Agency, United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Forest Service, and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) developed a coordinated strategy to (1) study the environmental effects of historical mining on Federal lands, and (2) remediate contaminated sites that have the greatest impact on water quality and ecosystem health. This dataset provides information that contributes to these overall objectives and is part of the USGS Abandoned Mine Lands Initiative. Data presented here represent ferricrete occurrences and selected iron bogs and springs in the upper Animas River watershed in San Juan County near Silverton, Colorado. Ferricretes (stratified iron and manganese oxyhydroxide-cemented sedimentary deposits) are one indicator of the geochemical baseline conditions as well as the effect that weathering of mineralized rocks had on water quality in the Animas River watershed prior to mining. Logs and wood fragments preserved in several ferricretes in the upper Animas River watershed, collected primarily along streams, yield radiocarbon ages of modern to 9,580 years B.P. (P.L. Verplanck, D.B. Yager, and S.E. Church, work in progress). The presence of ferricrete deposits along the current stream courses indicates that climate and physiography of the Animas River watershed have been relatively constant throughout the Holocene and that weathering processes have been ongoing for thousands of years prior to historical mining activities. Thus, by knowing where ferricrete is preserved in the watershed today, land-management agencies have an indication of (1) where metal precipitation from weathering of altered rocks has occurred in the past, and (2) where this process is ongoing and may confound remediation efforts. These data are included as two coverages-a ferricrete coverage and a bogs and springs coverage. The coverages are included in ArcInfo shapefile and Arc

  8. Environmental controls of greenhouse gas release in a restoring peat bog in NW Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glatzel, S.; Forbrich, I.; Krüger, C.; Lemke, S.; Gerold, G.

    2008-01-01

    In Central Europe, most bogs have a history of drainage and many of them are currently being restored. Success of restoration as well as greenhouse gas exchange of these bogs is influenced by environmental stress factors as drought and atmospheric nitrogen deposition. We determined the methane and nitrous oxide exchange of sites in the strongly decomposed center and less decomposed edge of the Pietzmoor bog in NW Germany in 2004. Also, we examined the methane and nitrous oxide exchange of mesocosms from the center and edge before, during, and following a drainage experiment as well as carbon dioxide release from disturbed unfertilized and nitrogen fertilized surface peat. In the field, methane fluxes ranged from 0 to 3.8 mg m-2 h-1 and were highest from hollows. Field nitrous oxide fluxes ranged from 0 to 574 μg m-2 h-1 and were elevated at the edge. A large Eriophorum vaginatum tussock showed decreasing nitrous oxide release as the season progressed. Drainage of mesocosms decreased methane release to 0, even during rewetting. There was a tendency for a decrease of nitrous oxide release during drainage and for an increase in nitrous oxide release during rewetting. Nitrogen fertilization did not increase decomposition of surface peat. Our examinations suggest a competition between vascular vegetation and denitrifiers for excess nitrogen. We also provide evidence that the von Post humification index can be used to explain greenhouse gas release from bogs, if the role of vascular vegetation is also considered. An assessment of the greenhouse gas release from nitrogen saturated restoring bogs needs to take into account elevated release from fresh Sphagnum peat as well as from sedges growing on decomposed peat. Given the high atmospheric nitrogen deposition, restoration will not be able to achieve an oligotrophic ecosystem in the short term.

  9. Late Holocene palaeoclimate variability: The significance of bog pine dendrochronology related to peat stratigraphy. The Puścizna Wielka raised bog case study (Orawa - Nowy Targ Basin, Polish Inner Carpathians)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krąpiec, Marek; Margielewski, Włodzimierz; Korzeń, Katarzyna; Szychowska-Krąpiec, Elżbieta; Nalepka, Dorota; Łajczak, Adam

    2016-09-01

    The results of dendrochronological and palynological analyses of subfossil pine trees occurring in the peat deposits of the Puścizna Wielka raised bog (Polish Carpathians, Southern Poland) - the only site with numerous subfossil pine trees in the mountainous regions of Central Europe presently known - indicate that the majority of the tree populations grew in the peat bog during the periods ca 5415-3940 cal BP and 3050-2560 cal BP. Several forestless episodes, dated to 5245-5155 cal BP, 4525-4395 cal BP and 3940-3050 cal BP, were preceded by tree dying-off phases caused by an extreme periodical increase in humidity and general climate cooling trends. These events are documented based on analyses of pollen and non-pollen palynomorph assemblages, dendrochronological analyses of the trees, as well as numerous radiocarbon datings of the sediment horizons occurring within the peat bog profile. The phases of germinations, and, in turn, of tree and shrub invasions of the peat bog areas have been closely connected to drying and occasional warming of the regional climate. The last of the forestless periods began about 2600 years ago and continued up to the very recent times. Currently, as a result of desiccation of the peat bog and the lowering of the groundwater level (due to improved water drainage system), pine trees have returned the peat bog again. These results demonstrate that studies of subfossil bog-pine trees are quite effective in documenting and reconstructing periods of humidity fluctuation that occurred within the Carpathian region over the last several millennia.

  10. Pre- and syn-ore zonation in Precambrian uraniferous sodic metasomatities

    SciTech Connect

    Omel'yanenko, B.I.; Mineyeva, I.G.

    1982-04-01

    Uraniferous-sodic metasomatites in Precambrian basement faults, in which a regular change in the mineral composition in vertical section has been established are described. The authors attempt to show that this pattern is controlled by the evolution of the solutions in time and space, and that it is an expression of a verticle metasomatic zonation. (JMT)

  11. Bog discharge from different viewpoints: comparison of Ingram's theory with observations from an Estonian raised bog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oosterwoud, Marieke; van der Ploeg, Martine; van der Zee, Sjoerd

    2013-04-01

    Raised bogs are typically dome shaped and have a groundwater level located close to the soil surface. Besides their typical dome shape, these peatlands are often characterized by a pronounced surface topography consisting of pools, wet depressions (hollows), stretches of Sphagnum species (lawns), drier mounds (hummocks) and higher drier areas with terrestrial vegetation (ridges). These peat bodies drain laterally by gravity to adjacent areas with lower groundwater levels. The integrity of these bogs is only ascertained when water is stored in the peat body in periods of precipitation deficit and efficiently removed in wet periods. This is realized by the fact that the bog's top layer, often called acrotelm, has a variable hydraulic conductivity. In response to precipitation its hydraulic conductivity increases, whereas, under evaporative demand the water table lowers and therefore also the hydraulic conductivity decreases. Ingram proposed a model based on the Dupuit-Forchheimer approximation for Darcy's law that assumes vertical flow is negligible, and the slope of the water table is equal to the hydraulic gradient. U- Hm2- K = L2 (1) where U is net recharge (P-ET), K is horizontal hydraulic conductivity, Hm is hydraulic head above a flat bottom at the centre of the bog, L is half the width of the bog along the cross section. This model incorporates the assumption that all net rainfall reaching the water table will be discharged to the stream. Ingram's model does not consider local heterogeneities in surface topography, like pool-ridge patterns. We hypothesize that under drier conditions it is likely that pool-ridge patterning will inhibit water from flowing along the surface gradient. Under wet conditions, however, pools can become connected and water can move through the upper highly permeable layer of ridges. In this study, we investigated the influence of ridge-pool patterning on the horizontal water flow through a raised bog and compared it with Ingram

  12. Peat bogs and their organic soils: Archives of atmospheric change and global environmentalsignificance (Philippe Duchaufour Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shotyk, William

    2013-04-01

    A bog is much more than a waterlogged ecosystem where organic matter accumulates as peat. Peatlands such as bogs represent a critical link between the atmosphere, hydrosphere, and biosphere. Plants growing at the surface of ombrotrophic bogs receive nutrients exclusively from the atmosphere. Despite the variations in redox status caused by seasonal fluctuations in depth to water table, the low pHof the waters, and abundance of dissolved organic matter, bogs preserve a remarkably reproducible history of atmospheric pollution, climate change, landscape evolution and human history. For example, peat cores from bogs in Europe and North America have provided detailed reconstructions of the changing rates and sources of Ag, Cd, Hg, Pb, Sb, and Tl, providing new insights into the geochemical cycles of these elements, including the massive perturbations induced by human activities beginning many thousands of years ago. Despite the low pH, and perhaps because of the abundance of dissolved organic matter, bogs preserve many silicate and aluminosilicate minerals which renders them valuable archives of atmospheric dust deposition and the climate changes which drive them. In the deeper, basal peat layers of the bog, in the minerotrophic zone where pore waters are affected bymineral-water interactions in the underlying and surrounding soils and sediments, peat serves as animportant link to the hydrosphere, efficiently removing from the imbibed groundwaters such trace elements as As, Cu, Mo, Ni, Se, V, and U. These removal processes, while incompletely understood, are so effective that measuring the dissolved fraction of trace elements in the pore waters becomes a considerable challenge even for the most sophisticated analytical laboratories. While the trace elements listed above are removed from groundwaters (along with P and S), elements such as Fe and Mn are added to the waters because of reductive dissolution, an important first step in the formation of lacustrine Fe and Mn

  13. Isotopic evidence for nitrogen mobility in peat bogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novak, Martin; Stepanova, Marketa; Jackova, Ivana; Vile, Melanie A.; Wieder, R. Kelman; Buzek, Frantisek; Adamova, Marie; Erbanova, Lucie; Fottova, Daniela; Komarek, Arnost

    2014-05-01

    Elevated nitrogen (N) input may reduce carbon (C) storage in peat. Under low atmospheric deposition, most N is bound in the moss layer. Under high N inputs, Sphagnum is not able to prevent penetration of dissolved N to deeper peat. Nitrogen may become available to the roots of invading vascular plants. The concurrent oxygenation of deeper peat layers, along with higher supply of labile organic C, may enhance microbial decomposition and lead to peat thinning. The resulting higher emissions of greenhouse gases may accelerate global warming. Seepage of N to deeper peat has never been quantified. Here we present evidence for post-depositional mobility of atmogenic N in peat, based on natural-abundance N isotope ratios. We conducted a reciprocal peat transplant experiment between two Sphagnum-dominated peat bogs in the Czech Republic (Central Europe), differing in anthropogenic N inputs. The northern site VJ received as much as 33 kg N ha-1 yr-1 via spruce canopy throughfall. The southern site was less polluted (17.6 kg N ha-1 yr-1). Isotope signatures of living moss differed between the two sites (δ15N of -3‰ and -7‰ at VJ and CB, respectively). After 18 months, an isotope mass balance was constructed. In the CB-to-VJ transplant, a significant portion of original CB nitrogen (98-31%) was removed and replaced by nitrogen of the host site throughout the top 10 cm of the profile. Nitrogen, deposited at VJ, was immobilized in imported CB peat that was up to 20 years old. Additionally, we compared N concentration and N accumulation rates in 210Pb-dated peat profiles with well-constrained data on historical atmospheric N pollution. Nationwide N emissions peaked in 1990, while VJ exhibited the highest N content in peat that formed in 1930. This de-coupling of N inputs and N retention in peat might be interpreted as a result of translocation of dissolved pollutant N downcore, corroborating our δ15N results at VJ and CB. Data from a variety of peat bogs along pollution

  14. Bog breath: Sleeper factor in global warming?

    SciTech Connect

    Benyus, J.M.

    1995-04-01

    This artical examines the emission of gases from northern peatlands as plants grow and decay and its implication in the global increase in greenhouse gases, particularly carbon dioxide and methane. Bogs do extract carbon dioxide from the air, incorporating it into green plants which become buried for a long time. However, the cold, wet conditions are ideal for microbes which emit methane. Global climate change models indicate that Minnesota, for example will be 5 degrees warmer and somewhat wetter in future years. As a result bacterial metabolism and methane generation may increase considerably. This paper discusses current research and speculation and looks at possible solutions, both man-created and natural.

  15. Geoinformatics meets education for a peat bog information system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, Ulrich; Fiene, Christina; Plass, Christian

    2010-10-01

    Within the project "Expedition Bog: Young researchers are experimenting, exploring and discovering" a bog-information- system is developed by the Department of Geography (University of Education Heidelberg, Germany), the Institute for Geoinformatics and Remote Sensing (University of Osnabrueck, Germany; the NABU Umweltpyramide gGmbH. This information system will be available for schools and to the public. It is supplemented by teaching units on various topics around the bog via an online platform. The focus of the project, however, is the original encounter with the bog habitat. This is realized by a GPS scavenger hunt with small research tasks and observations, mapping and experiments. The project areas are the Huvenhoops bog and the Lauenbruecker bog in Rotenburg in Lower Saxony, Germany. Equipped with a researcher backpack, GPS device and a mobile bog book by means of a pocket PC, students can discover different learning stations in the project bogs. In our areas the students can learn more about different topics such as "the historical memory of the bog", "water", "peat moss and other plants" and "animals of the bog". Moreover small inquiry research projects can be executed. Experimenting on site helps students to develop important scientific findings and increases their curiosity and enthusiasm for nature. It also promotes a number of other basic skills such as literacy, language skills, social skills or fine motor skills. Moreover it also fosters the development of a positive attitude to science in general. The main objective of the project is to promote sustainable environmental education, as well as the development of environmental awareness. This will be accomplished through the imparting of knowledge but also through experiencing nature with all senses in the context of original encounters.

  16. Comparisons of soil nitrogen mass balances for an ombrotrophic bog and a minerotrophic fen in northern Minnesota.

    PubMed

    Hill, Brian H; Jicha, Terri M; Lehto, LaRae L P; Elonen, Colleen M; Sebestyen, Stephen D; Kolka, Randall K

    2016-04-15

    We compared nitrogen (N) storage and flux in soils from an ombrotrophic bog with that of a minerotrophic fen to quantify the differences in N cycling between these two peatlands types in northern Minnesota (USA). Precipitation, atmospheric deposition, and bog and fen outflows were analyzed for nitrogen species. Upland and peatland soil samples were analyzed for N content, and for ambient (DN) and potential (DEA) denitrification rates. Annual atmospheric deposition was: 0.88-3.07kg NH4(+)ha(-1)y(-1); 1.37-1.42kg NO3(-)ha(-1)y(-1); 2.79-4.69kg TNha(-1)y(-1). Annual N outflows were: bog-0.01-0.04kg NH4(+)ha(-1)y(-1), NO3(-) 0.01-0.06kgha(-1)y(-1), and TN 0.11-0.69kgha(-1)y(-1); fen-NH4(+) 0.01-0.16kgha(-1)y(-1), NO3(-) 0.29-0.48kgha(-1)y(-1), and TN 1.14-1.61kgha(-1)y(-1). Soil N content depended on location within the bog or fen, and on soil depth. DN and DEA rates were low throughout the uplands and peatlands, and were correlated with atmospheric N deposition, soil N storage, and N outflow. DEA was significantly greater than DN indicating C or N limitation of the denitrification process. We highlight differences between the bog and fen, between the upland mineral soils and peat, and the importance of biogeochemical hotspots within the peatlands. We point out the importance of organic N storage, as a source of N for denitrification, and propose a plausible link between organic N storage, denitrification and N export from peatlands. Finally, we considered the interactions of microbial metabolism with nutrient availability and stoichiometry, and how N dynamics might be affected by climate change in peatland ecosystems. PMID:26851760

  17. Experimental study on performance of BOG compressor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Bin; Wang, Tao; Peng, Xueyuan; Feng, Jianmei

    2015-08-01

    The boil-off gas (BOG) compressor is widely used for recycling the excessive boil-off gas of liquefied natural gas (LNG), and the extra-low suction temperature brings about great challenges to design of the BOG compressor. In this paper, a test system was built to examine the effects of low suction temperature on the compressor performance, in which the lowest temperature reached -178°C by means of a plate-fin heat exchanger with liquefied nitrogen. The test results showed that, as the suction temperature decreased from 20°C to -150°C, the volumetric efficiency of the compressor dropped by 37.0%, and the power consumption decreased by 10.0%. The preheat of the gas by the pipe through the suction flange to suction valve was larger than 20°C as the suction temperature was -150°C, and this value increased with the decreased suction temperature. The pressure loss through the suction valve at lower suction temperature was larger than that at ambient temperature while the volume flow rate was kept the same.

  18. Can a bog drained for forestry be a stronger carbon sink than a natural bog forest?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hommeltenberg, J.; Schmid, H. P.; Drösler, M.; Werle, P.

    2014-07-01

    This study compares the CO2 exchange of a natural bog forest, and of a bog drained for forestry in the pre-Alpine region of southern Germany. The sites are separated by only 10 km, they share the same soil formation history and are exposed to the same climate and weather conditions. In contrast, they differ in land use history: at the Schechenfilz site a natural bog-pine forest (Pinus mugo ssp. rotundata) grows on an undisturbed, about 5 m thick peat layer; at Mooseurach a planted spruce forest (Picea abies) grows on drained and degraded peat (3.4 m). The net ecosystem exchange of CO2 (NEE) at both sites has been investigated for 2 years (July 2010-June 2012), using the eddy covariance technique. Our results indicate that the drained, forested bog at Mooseurach is a much stronger carbon dioxide sink (-130 ± 31 and -300 ± 66 g C m-2 a-1 in the first and second year, respectively) than the natural bog forest at Schechenfilz (-53 ± 28 and -73 ± 38 g C m-2 a-1). The strong net CO2 uptake can be explained by the high gross primary productivity of the 44-year old spruces that over-compensates the two-times stronger ecosystem respiration at the drained site. The larger productivity of the spruces can be clearly attributed to the larger plant area index (PAI) of the spruce site. However, even though current flux measurements indicate strong CO2 uptake of the drained spruce forest, the site is a strong net CO2 source when the whole life-cycle since forest planting is considered. It is important to access this result in terms of the long-term biome balance. To do so, we used historical data to estimate the difference between carbon fixation by the spruces and the carbon loss from the peat due to drainage since forest planting. This rough estimate indicates a strong carbon release of +134 t C ha-1 within the last 44 years. Thus, the spruces would need to grow for another 100 years at about the current rate, to compensate the potential peat loss of the former years. In

  19. Can a bog drained for forestry be a stronger carbon sink than a natural bog forest?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hommeltenberg, J.; Schmid, H. P.; Droesler, M.; Werle, P.

    2014-02-01

    This study compares the CO2 exchange of a natural bog forest, and of a bog drained for forestry in the pre-alpine region of southern Germany. The sites are separated by only ten kilometers, they share the same formation history and are exposed to the same climate and weather conditions. In contrast, they differ in land use history: at the Schechenfilz site a natural bog-pine forest (Pinus mugo rotundata) grows on an undisturbed, about 5 m thick peat layer; at Mooseurach a planted spruce forest (Picea abies) grows on drained and degraded peat (3.4 m). The net ecosystem exchange of CO2 (NEE) at both sites has been investigated for two years (July 2010 to June 2012), using the eddy covariance technique. Our results indicate that the drained, forested bog at Mooseurach is a much stronger carbon dioxide sink (-130 ± 31 and -300 ± 66 g C m-2 a-1 in the first and second year respectively) than the natural bog forest at Schechenfilz (-53 ± 28 and -73±38 g C m-2 a-1). The strong net CO2 uptake can be explained by the high gross primary productivity of the spruces that over-compensates the two times stronger ecosystem respiration at the drained site. The larger productivity of the spruces can be clearly attributed to the larger LAI of the spruce site. However, even though current flux measurements indicate strong CO2 uptake of the drained spruce forest, the site is a strong net CO2 source, if the whole life-cycle, since forest planting is considered. We determined the difference between carbon fixation by the spruces and the carbon loss from the peat due to drainage since forest planting. The estimate resulted in a strong carbon release of +156 t C ha-1 within the last 44 yr, means the spruces would need to grow for another 100 yr, at the current rate, to compensate the peat loss of the former years. In contrast, the natural bog-pine ecosystem has likely been a small but consistent carbon sink for decades, which our results suggest is very robust regarding short

  20. Nest-site characteristics of Glyptemys muhlenbergii (Bog Turtle) in New Jersey and Pennsylvania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zappalorti, Robert T.; Lovich, Jeffrey E.; Farrell, Ray F.; Torocco, Michael E.

    2015-01-01

    Nest-site selection can affect both the survival and fitness of female turtles and their offspring. In many turtle species, the nest environment determines the thermal regime during incubation, length of incubation period, sex ratio of the hatchlings, and exposure to predators and other forms of mortality for both mothers and their offspring. Between 1974 and 2012, we collected detailed data on habitat variables at 66 Glyptemys muhlenbergii (Bog Turtle) nests in 9 different bogs, fens, and wetland complexes in New Jersey and Pennsylvania. The nests had a mean elevation above the substrate of 8.2 cm, and many were shallow and located in raised tussocks of grass or sedges. Females covered most nests, but we also observed partially or completely uncovered eggs. Some females deposited eggs in communal nests; we found 4 nests with 2 separate clutches, and 2 nests with 3 clutches. Principal component analysis confirmed the importance of cover and vegetation to nest-site selection in this species. Availability of open, shade-free, wet nesting areas is an important habitat requirement for Bog Turtles.

  1. U-Pb ages of uraniferous opals and implications for the history of beryllium, fluorine, and uranium mineralization at Spor Mountain, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ludwig, K. R.; Lindsey, D.A.; Zielinski, R.A.; Simmons, K.R.

    1980-01-01

    The U-Pb isotope systematics of uraniferous opals from Spor Mountain, Utah, were investigated to determine the suitability of such material for geochronologic purposes, and to estimate the timing of uranium and associated beryllium and fluorine mineralization. The results indicate that uraniferous opals can approximate a closed system for uranium and uranium daughters, so that dating samples as young as ???1 m.y. should be possible. In addition, the expected lack of initial 230Th and 231Pa in opals permits valuable information on the initial 234U/238U to be obtained on suitable samples of ???10 m.y. age. The oldest 207Pb/235U apparent age observed, 20.8 ?? 1 m.y., was that of the opal-fluorite core of a nodule from a beryllium deposit in the Spor Mountain Formation. This age is indistinguishable from that of fission-track and K-Ar ages from the host rhyolite, and links the mineralization to the first episode of alkali rhyolite magmatism and related hydrothermal activity at Spor Mountain. Successively younger ages of 13 m.y. and 8-9 m.y. on concentric outer zones of the same nodule indicate that opal formed either episodically or continuously for over 10 m.y. Several samples of both fracture-filling and massive-nodule opal associated with beryllium deposits gave 207Pb/235U apparent ages of 13-16 m.y., which may reflect a restricted period of mineralization or perhaps an averaging of 21- and <13-m.y. periods of opal growth. Several samples of fracture-filling opal in volcanic rocks as young as 6 m.y. gave 207Pb/235U ages of 3.4-4.8 m.y. These ages may reflect hot-spring activity after the last major eruption of alkali rhyolite. ?? 1980.

  2. Near-neutral carbon dioxide balance at a seminatural, temperate bog ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurkuck, Miriam; Brümmer, Christian; Kutsch, Werner L.

    2016-02-01

    The majority of peatlands in the temperate zone is subjected to drainage and agricultural land use and have been found to be anthropogenic emission hot spots for greenhouse gases. At the same time, many peatlands receive increased atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition by intensive agricultural practices. Here we provide eddy covariance measurements determining net ecosystem carbon dioxide (CO2) exchange at a protected but moderately drained ombrotrophic bog in Northwestern Germany over three consecutive years. The region is dominated by intensive agricultural land use with total (wet and dry) atmospheric N deposition being about 25 kg N ha-1 yr-1. The investigated peat bog was a small net CO2 sink during all three years ranging from -9 to -73 g C m-2 yr-1. We found temperature- and light-dependent ecosystem respiration (Reco) and gross primary production, respectively, but only weak correlations to water table depths despite large interannual and seasonal variability. Significant short-term effects of atmospheric N deposition on CO2 flux components could not be observed, as the primary controlling factors for N deposition and C sequestration, i.e., fertilization of adjacent fields as well as temperature and light availability, respectively, exceeded potential interactions between the two.

  3. Peat Bogs as Hotspots for Organoarsenical Formation and Persistence.

    PubMed

    Mikutta, Christian; Rothwell, James J

    2016-04-19

    Peatlands have received significant atmospheric inputs of As and S since the onset of the Industrial Revolution, but the effect of S deposition on the fate of As is largely unknown. It may encompass the formation of As sulfides and organosulfur-bound As, or the indirect stimulation of As biotransformation processes, which are presently not considered as important As immobilization pathways in wetlands. To investigate the immobilization mechanisms of anthropogenically derived As in peatlands subjected to long-term atmospheric pollution, we explored the solid-phase speciation of As, Fe, and S in English peat bogs by X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Additionally, we analyzed the speciation of As in pore- and streamwaters. Linear combination fits of extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) data imply that 62-100% (average: 82%) of solid-phase As (Astot: 9-92 mg/kg) was present as organic As(V) and As(III). In agreement with appreciable concentrations of organoarsenicals in surface waters (pH: 4.0-4.4, Eh: 165-190 mV, average Astot: 1.5-129 μg/L), our findings reveal extensive biotransformation of atmospheric As and the enrichment of organoarsenicals in the peat, suggesting that the importance of organometal(loid)s in wetlands subjected to prolonged air pollution is higher than previously assumed. PMID:27034028

  4. Radioactive waste disposal in simulated peat bog repositories

    SciTech Connect

    Schell, W.R.; Massey, C.D.

    1987-01-01

    The Low Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1980 and the Low Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 have required state governments to be responsible for providing low-level waste (LLW) disposal facilities in their respective areas. Questions are (a) is the technology sufficiently advanced to ensure that radioactive wastes can be stored for 300 to 1000 yr without entering into any uncontrolled area. (b) since actual experience does not exist for nuclear waste disposal over this time period, can the mathematical models developed be tested and verified using unequivocal data. (c) how can the public perception of the problem be addressed and the potential risk assessment of the hazards be communicated. To address the technical problems of nuclear waste disposal in the acid precipitation regions of the Northern Hemisphere, a project was initiated in 1984 to evaluate an alternative method of nuclear waste disposal that may not rely completely on engineered barriers to protect the public. Certain natural biogeochemical systems have been retaining deposited materials since the last Ice Age (12,000 to 15,000 yr). It is the authors belief that the biogeochemical system of wetlands and peat bogs may provide an example of an analogue for a nuclear waste repository system that can be tested and verified over a sufficient time period, at least for the LLW disposal problem.

  5. Peat Bog Archives: from human history, vegetation change and Holocene climate, to atmospheric dusts and trace elements of natural and anthropogenic origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shotyk, William

    2010-05-01

    For at least two centuries, peat has been recognized as an excellent archive of environmental change. William Rennie (1807), for example, interpreted stratigraphic changes in Scottish bogs not only in terms of natural changes in paleoclimate, but was also able to identify environmental changes induced by humans, namely deforestation and the hydrological impacts which result from such activities. The use of bogs as archives of climate change in the early 20th century was accelerated by studies of fossil plant remains such as those by Lewis in Scotland, and by systematic investigations of pollen grains pioneered by von Post in Sweden. In Denmark, Glob outlined the remarkably well-preserved remains of bog bodies and associated artefacts (of cloth, wood, ceramic and metal) in Danish bogs. In Britain, Godwin provided an introduction to the use of bogs as archives of human history, vegetation change, and Holocene climate, with a more recent survey provided by Charman. Recent decades have provided many mineralogical studies of peat and there is growing evidence that many silicate minerals, whether derived from the surrounding watershed or the atmosphere (soil-derived dusts and particles emitted from volcanoes), also are well preserved in anoxic peatland waters. Similarly, geochemical studies have shown that a long list of trace metals, of both natural and anthropogenic origin, also are remarkably well preserved in peat bogs. Thus, there is growing evidence that ombrotrophic (ie 'rain-fed') peat bogs are reliable archives of atmospheric deposition of a wide range of trace elements, including conservative, lithogenic metals such as Al, Sc, Ti, Y, Zr, Hf and the REE, but also the potentially toxic Class B, or 'heavy metals' such as Cu, Ag, Hg, Pb, Sb and Tl. When high quality measurements of these elements is combined with accurate radiometric age dating, it becomes possible to create high resolution reconstructions of atmospheric soil dust fluxes, ancient and modern metal

  6. Ecoenzymatic stoichiometry and microbial processing of organic matter in northern bogs and fens reveals a common P limitation among peatland types

    EPA Science Inventory

    We compared C, N, and P concentrations in atmospheric deposition, runoff, and soil standing stocks with microbial respiration (DHA) and ecoenzyme activity (EEA) in an ombrotrophic bog (S2) and a minerotrophic fen (S3) to investigate the environmental drivers of biogeochemical cyc...

  7. Nitrogen dynamics in peat bogs: Comparison of sites with contrasting pollution levels (Central Europe)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novak, Martin; Bohdalkova, Leona; Stepanova, Marketa; Vile, Melanie A.; Wieder, Kelman R.

    2013-04-01

    Nitrogen belongs to chemical elements whose biogeochemical cycles are most heavily disturbed by human activities, and large regions worlwide experience elevated depositions of reactive N (NO3-, NH4+). Peatlands contain as much as 15 % of the world's soil N. It it is unclear whether fertilizing by anthopogenic N will lead to higher storage of C in wetlands. Elevated N input may lead to both higher net primary productivity, but will also augment microbial decomposition. Here we discuss two aspects of N cycling in Sphagnum-dominated bogs in the Czech Republic, an area characterized by a steep north-south pollution gradient and high annual N deposition (60 kg ha-1). These two aspects are N inventory in 210Pb-dated peat cores, and post-depositional mobility of N in peat. We compared the N inventory in two Czech bogs, differing in pollution, with cumulative atmospheric N input. We hypothesized that the total amount of N in the peat cores would be smaller than the cumulative N input (leaching of excess N from the bog, denitrification). The two bogs were VJ (industrial north) and CB (rural south). The investigated period was 1885-2002. The total amount of N was 4020 kg ha-1 at VJ and 1530 kg ha-1 at CB. Peat in the north contained 2.6 times more N than in the south. Historical rates of N deposition in the Czech Republic are well known (numerous papers by Kopacek). To estimate cumulative N inputs into the bogs, we also used the monthly N depositions between 1994 and 2002, measured in two nearby catchments. The estimated cumulative atmospheric N input was 1350 kg ha-1 at VJ, and 530 kg ha-1 at CB. In both cases, the amount of N found in peat was 3 times higher than the estimated atmospheric N input. Such high storage of N in peat is surprising. Post-depositional mobility of N may help to explain the discrepancies between atmospheric N inputs and N storage in peat. We found two-fold evidence for post-depositional mobility of N. Maximum N concentrations at VJ were observed in

  8. Hydrologic conditions in Connors Bog Area, Anchorage, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Glass, R.L.

    1986-01-01

    Connors Bog is a wetland in Anchorage, Alaska, which provides a habitat for many wildlife species and is a popular area for driving off-road vehicles. A landfill, and residential and commercial developments are present in areas which were once wetland. The main source of water is precipitation, which averages about 15 in/yr. Estimates of evapotranspiration, which is the main component of water outflow, range from 10 to 20 in/yr. Minor amounts of groundwater and surface runoff flow into the area from the northeast and southwest and flow out of the area to the northwest and south. Within the wetland, water in peat and sand is unconfined and becomes more mineralized with depth. A leachate beneath and near an abandoned landfill is characterized by concentrations of dissolved solids, dissolved chloride, and total organics that are higher than those of the area 's natural water. The maximum lateral extent of detectable contamination in 1984 was < 500 ft from the landfill 's edge. Water in glacial deposits that underlie a poorly permeable layer of silt and clay is confined. A well completed in this confined aquifer yielded water that had a low concentration of dissolved solids, 150 mg/L. The potentiometric surface of this aquifer was about 20 ft lower than the water table during 1984. Connors Lake occupies a depression that extends below adjacent groundwater levels. The 40-acre lake has a maximum depth of about 9 ft and a low rate of biological production. The quality of water in the lake has not been adversely impacted by nearby residential development or landfill operations. Lake levels appear to be influenced by precipitation and adjacent groundwater levels. (Author 's abstract)

  9. Atmospheric Feedbacks By Greenhouse Gases From Baltic Bogs During Late Holocene Reconstructed Using Wetness Anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alm, J.; Sillasoo, Ü.; Endjärv, E.; Lode, E.; Blundell, A.; Charman, D.; Väliranta, M.; Laine, J. K.; Tuittila, E.; Seppä, H.; Korhola, A.; Karofeld, E.

    2006-12-01

    Climate changes are documented in multiple proxies in sediments such as peat. At the same time, information on ecosystem feedbacks in terms of greenhouse gas balances can be derived from the proxies. As part of the EU-project ACCROTELM, we headed to building peat-based multi-proxy datasets from Finnish and Estonian sites over the past 4500 years. The cores were 14C-dated using AMS, and the high resolution age-depth curves were assumed by wiggle matching. We sampled the peat cores with a resolution of 1 cm at least every at 4th cm and analyzed plant macrofossils, testate amoebae, and carbon accumulation rates. At least a decadal resolution was obtained for the 1 cm sample slices throughout the cores. We also sampled current testate amoebae communities at different microsites of vegetation varying in moisture conditions, in order to compile a transfer function for water tables. These reconstructions were attributed with spatial proportions of mire microsites, derived in GIS from aerial images. We reviewed the methane emission and carbon accumulation history of the bog landscape as GWP using the time series of GHG balances over the 4,5 millennia. Special attention was paid for the periods of rapid climatic excursions with wet or dry shifts. The climatic feedbacks, i.e. CO2 deposition from bulk density and C content, and CH4 modeled as function of wetness, were combined in CO2 equivalents. Although the bogs were carbon sinks, the apparent impact was net atmospheric warming, through the dynamics of CH4 release. Burning of peat in the fires located in the sediment cores must have increased the net warming effect. The temporal correlations between the bogs south and north from the Gulf of Finland are inspected.

  10. Soil data for a collapse-scar bog chronosequence in Koyukuk Flats National Wildlife Refuge, Alaska, 2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O’Donnell, Jonathan A.; Harden, Jennifer W.; Manies, Kristen L.; Jorgenson, M. Torre

    2012-01-01

    Peatlands in the northern permafrost region store large amounts of organic carbon, most of which is currently stored in frozen peat deposits. Recent warming at high-latitudes has accelerated permafrost thaw in peatlands, which will likely result in the loss of soil organic carbon from previously frozen peat deposits to the atmosphere. Here, we report soil organic carbon inventories, soil physical data, and field descriptions from a collapse-scar bog chronosequence located in a peatland ecosystem at Koyukuk Flats National Wildlife Refuge in Alaska.

  11. Biogeochemistry of carbon and related major and trace elements in peat bog soils of the middle taiga of Western Siberia (Russia).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanova, V. A.; Mironycheva-Tokareva, N. P.; Pokrovsky, O. S.

    2012-04-01

    Global climate changes impact the status of wetland ecosystems shifting the balances of the carbon, macro-, and microelements cycles. This study aims to establish the features of accumulation and distribution of major- and trace elements in the organic layer of peat bog soils, belonging to different ecosystems of the oligotrophic bog complex located in the middle taiga of Western Siberia (Khanty-Mansiysk region, Russia). Key areas which are selected for this study include the following bog conjugate elementary ecosystems: higher ryam, lower ryam, ridge-hollow complex, and oligotrophic poor fen as characterized previously [1]. We have sampled various peat types along the entire length of the soil column (every 10 cm down to 3 m). Peat samples were analyzed for a wide range of macro- and microelements using an ICP-MS technique following full acid digestion in a microwave oven. These measurements allowed quantitative estimates of major- and trace elements in the peat deposits within the whole bog complex and individual elementary landscapes. Based on the data obtained, the lateral and radial geochemical structures of the bog landscapes were determined and clarified for the first time for middle taiga of the West Siberian plain. The similar regime of mineral nutrition during the complete bog landscape formation was detected for the peat deposits based on the measurements of some major- and trace elements (Ca, Fe, Mg, etc.). The vertical distribution of some major and some trace elements along the profile of peat column is rather uniform with relatively strong increase in the bottom organic layers. This strongly suggests the similarity of the processes of element accumulation in the peat and relatively weak post depositional redistribution of elements within the peat soil profile. Overall, obtained corroborate the existing view on chemical composition of peats being determined by botanical peat's components (which forms this peat deposit), atmospheric precipitation

  12. Response of douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) to uraniferous groundwater in a small glaciated drainage, Northeastern Washington State

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zielinski, R.A.; Schumann, R.R.

    1987-01-01

    Douglas fir trees and associated soils were sampled from the slopes of a small (???4 km2) drainage basin in northeastern Washington to investigate the biogeochemical response to locally uraniferous groundwater. Uranium is preferentially incorporated in needles and twigs compared to larger branches or the trunk. The U concentration in needle ash ranges from 0.2 to 5.8??g g-1 (ppm) and shows no correlation with the U concentration in associated soils. Rather, the distribution of anomalously uraniferous douglas fir (> 1.0??g g-1 U in needle ash) appears to be controlled by observed or readily inferred pathways of near-surface groundwater movement in the drainage. These pathways include: (1) general downslope movement of subsurface runoff; (2) increased flux of near-surface groundwater near the toe of an alluvial fan; and (3) emergence of uraniferous (100-150 ng ml-1 [ppb] groundwater in the vicinity of a slope spring. The data also indicate the presence of near-surface uraniferous groundwater along a structurally controlled zone that parallels the north-south strike of the valley, and that includes the slope spring. The results suggest that biogeochemical sampling may be used to supplement more direct, but more limited, measurements of groundwater quality and flow regime in areas of near-surface contaminated groundwater. ?? 1987.

  13. Response of douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) to uraniferous groundwater in a small glaciated drainage, Northeastern Washington State

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zielinski, R.A.; Schumann, R.R.

    1987-01-01

    Douglas fir trees and associated soils were sampled from the slopes of a small (??? 4 km2) drainage basin in northeastern Washington to investigate the biogeochemical response to locally uraniferous groundwater. Uranium is preferentially incorporated in needles and twigs compared to larger branches or the trunk. The U concentration in needle ash ranges from 0.2 to 5.8 ??g g-1 (ppm) and shows no correlation with the U concentration in associated soils. Rather, the distribution of anomalously uraniferous douglas fir (>1.0??g g-1 U in needle ash) appears to be controlled by observed or readily inferred pathways of near-surface groundwater movement in the drainage. These pathways include: (1) general downslope movement of subsurface runoff; (2) increased flux of near-surface groundwater near the toe of an alluvial fan; and (3) emergence of uraniferous (100-150 ng ml-1 [ppb] groundwater in the vicinity of a slope spring. The data also indicate the presence of near-surface uraniferous groundwater along a structurally controlled zone that parallels the north-south strike of the valley, and that includes the slope spring. The results suggest that biogeochemical sampling may be used to supplement more direct, but more limited, measurements of groundwater quality and flow regime in areas of near-surface contaminated groundwater. ?? 1987.

  14. Holocene Landscape Dynamics in the Ammer Rv. Catchment (Bavarian Alps) - Influence of extreme weather events and land use on soil erosion using peat bogs as geoarchives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwindt, Daniel; Manthe, Pierre; Völkel, Jörg

    2016-04-01

    Soil degradation and the loss of soil organic carbon (SOC) induced by erosion events significantly influence soils and fertility as parts of the ecosystem services and play an important role with regard to global carbon dynamics. Soil erosion is strongly correlated with anthropogenic land use since the Neolithic Revolution around 8.000 BP. Likewise the effect of extreme weather events on soil erosion is of great interest with regard to the recent climate change debate, predicting a strong increase of extreme weather events. Aim of this study is the reconstruction of the Holocene landscape dynamic as influenced by land use and climate conditions. In this study peat bogs containing layers of colluvial sediments directly correlated to soil erosion were used as geoarchives for landscape dynamics. A temporal classification of extreme erosion events was established by dating organic material via 14C within both, colluvial layers as well as their direct peat surroundings. Detection and characterization of peat bogs containing colluvial sediments was based on geomorphological mapping, the application of geophysical methods (ERT - electrical resistivity tomography, GPR - ground penetrating radar) and core soundings. Laboratory analysis included the analysis of particle sizes and the content of organic material. We investigated 16 peat bogs following the altitudinal gradient of the Ammer River from alpine and subalpine towards lowland environments. A deposition of colluvial material could be detected in 4 peat bogs, all situated in the lower parts of the catchment. The minerogenic entry into peat bogs occurred throughout the Holocene as revealed by radiocarbon dating. A distinct cluster of erosional events e.g. during the little ice age could not be detected. Therefore, soil erosion dynamics and the appearance of colluvial sediments within peat bogs must rather be regarded as an effect of land use, actually farming and crop cultivation, or small-scale morphodynamic like

  15. GHG emissions from temperate lowland bog under contrasting land use: insights from the Defra Lowland Bog Project.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worrall, Fred; dIXON, Simon

    2015-04-01

    The Defra lowland peat project was established 3 years ago in response to the estimation that while lowland peat soils represent only 15% of the area of UK peat they represented 75% of the greenhouse gas emissions. The study has considered a range of settings, including: restored raised bog; extracted bare peat; and peat soil converted for arable. The sites were instrumented to cover as complete a range of greenhouse gases as possible and this included N2O as well as fluvial carbon fluxes. This talk will review results with particular emphasis on problems of understanding fluvial carbon fluxes from lowland raised bogs where flow directions are complex.

  16. Tracing of ca 800 yr old mining activity in peat bog using Pb elemental concentrations and isotope compositions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baron, S.; Carignan, J.; Ploquin, A.

    2003-04-01

    Sixty sites of slags have been documented on the Mont-Lozère in southern France. The petrographic analysis shows that slags are metallurgical wastes (800 to 850 yr BP) which certainly result from smelting activity for lead and silver extraction (Ploquin et al., 2001). The aims of this study are: 1) to trace the source of Pb ores which supplied the smelting sites, by using the Pb isotopic composition of several surrounding Pb deposits, 2) to evaluate the actual pollution caused by these slags, by using elemental and isotopic compositions of soils, water and vegetation, and 3) to document the pollution history of the region, by using elemental and isotopic compositions of peat bog cores collected in the neighbourhood of the historical smelting sites. The lead isotopic composition of galena collected in most surrounding ores is very similar to that of different slag samples. On the other hand, the high precision of the results allowed us to select the mineralised areas which were probably the ore sources. The Pb isotopic composition of slags is even more homogeneous: 208/206 Pb: 2.092±0.002; 206/207 Pb: 1.179±0.001; 208/204 Pb: 38.663±0.025; 207/204 Pb: 15.665±0.006; 206/204 Pb: 18.476±0.023, and will allow source tracing in the environment. The "Narses Mortes" peat bog, around which two smelting sites have been reported, is strongly minerotrophic and contains 8 to 60% ash. A 1.40 m core have been retrieved and divided into 58 individual samples. Minerotrophic peat bog records both atmospheric deposition, soils leaching and the grounwater influence. The measured metal concentrations are normalised to Al contents of peat bog samples and the metal/Al ratios are compared to that of the Mont-Lozère granite: relative excess in metal concentrations are found in peat bog samples. An increasing excess of most metals (Pb, Zn, Cd...) was measured for surface samples, from 55 cm depth to the top of the core (23 cm depth). This profil might be attributed to atmospheric

  17. Nutrient availability at Mer Bleue bog measured by PRSTM probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, M.; Moore, T. R.; Talbot, J.

    2015-12-01

    Bogs, covering ~0.7 million km2 in Canada, store a large amount of C and N. As nutrient deficient ecosystems, it's critical to examine the nutrient availabilities and seasonal dynamics. We used Plant Root Simulators (PRSTM) at Mer Bleue bog to provide some baseline data on nutrient availability and its variability. In particular, we focused on ammonium, nitrate, phosphate, calcium, magnesium and potassium, iron, sulphate and aluminum. We placed PRS probes at a depth of 5 - 15 cm in pristine plots and plots with long term N, P and K fertilization for 4 weeks and determined the availability of these nutrients, from spring through to fall. Probes were also placed beneath the water table in hummock and hollow microtopography and along a transect including part of the bog which had been drained through the creation of a ditch 80 years ago. The result showed that there was limited available ammonium, nitrate and phosphate in the bog, the seasonal variation of nutrient availabilities probably due to mineralization, an increase in the availability of some nutrients between different water table depths or as a result of drainage, and the relative availability of nutrients compared to the input from fertilization. We suggest that PRS probes could be a useful tool to examine nutrient availability and dynamics in wetlands, with careful consideration of installing condition, for example, proper exposure period, depth relative to water table etc.

  18. Oribatid mite species numbers increase, densities decline and parthenogenetic species suffer during bog degradation.

    PubMed

    Seniczak, Anna; Seniczak, Stanisław; Maraun, Mark; Graczyk, Radomir; Mistrzak, Marcin

    2016-04-01

    This study compared the oribatid mites in two natural and four industrially exploited bogs. One natural bog (Zakręt, Z) was located in northeastern Poland and the other one (Toporowy Staw Niżni, TSN), in southern Poland. The four exploited bogs were also located in southern Poland and can be ranked from least to most degraded as follows: Łysa Puścizna (LP), Baligówka (B), Puścizna Mała (PM) and Kaczmarka (K). In the natural bogs, the water pH was higher than in the degraded ones, but other parameters were lower (conductivity, colour value, oxygen demand, and concentration of chlorides). In the natural bogs, the Oribatida were highly abundant (average density was 169,100 ind./m(2)), but with low species diversity and one dominating species. In bog Z the most abundant was Limnozetes foveolatus that had dominance of 75 % and in bog TSN, located at higher altitude, Trimalaconothrus maior dominated (73 %). In two degraded bogs that had still good water conditions (LP and B) the oribatid communities resembled those from the natural bogs; in LP the most abundant species was Hydrozetes lacustris and in bog B, L. foveolatus. In contrast, in two more degraded bogs (PM and K) the abundance of mites was lower (average density was 17,850 ind./m(2)), species diversity of the Oribatida was higher, and no species achieved a high dominance like in the natural bogs. Additionally, in more degraded bogs the abundance of parthenogenetic species was lower than in the natural bogs. PMID:26846473

  19. A Regional Comparison of the Long-Term Carbon Dynamics Within Maritime Peat Bogs Along the St. Lawrence North Shore, Northeastern Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magnan, G.; Garneau, M.

    2013-12-01

    We have reconstructed the long-term carbon (C) dynamics within maritime bogs from two ecoclimatic regions between the Estuary (Baie-Comeau) and the Gulf of St. Lawrence (Havre-St.-Pierre) in northeastern Canada. The long-term average rates of C accumulation (LORCA) were calculated for eight peatlands. We also compared the Holocene variations in C sequestration between the peatlands to evaluate the influence of climate variability on their long-term C balance. The accumulation/decay processes were linked with changes in vegetation and water table depth. Overall, the LORCA decrease with the age of the peat deposits likely due to constant anoxic decay but they are significantly lower in Havre-St.-Pierre (16-46 g C m-2 yr-1) than in Baie-Comeau (53-68 g C m-2 yr-1). The regional differences in the LORCA reveal a pervasive climatic control on the long-term C balance. Our data suggest that the C accumulation in these bogs was driven by complex interactions between the peat accumulation/decay processes and the climate-mediated water table fluctuations. The higher C accumulation rates in the bogs of Baie-Comeau were promoted by stable ecohydrological conditions whereas the C balance in the bogs of Havre-St.-Pierre was more easily disrupted by past hydroclimatic changes especially during the Neoglacial cooling.

  20. New geological model of the Lagoa Real uraniferous albitites from Bahia (Brazil)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira Chaves, Alexandre

    2013-09-01

    New evidence supported by petrography (including mineral chemistry), lithogeochemistry, U-Pb geochronology by Laser Ablation Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS), and physicochemical study of fluid and melt inclusions by LA-ICP-MS and microthermometry, point to an orogenic setting of Lagoa Real (Bahia-Brazil) involving uraniferous mineralization. Unlike the previous models in which uraniferous albitites represent Na-metasomatised 1.75 Ga anorogenic granitic rocks, it is understood here that they correspond to metamorphosed sodium-rich and quartz-free 1.9 Ga late-orogenic syenitic rocks (Na-metasyenites). These syenitic rocks are rich not only in albite, but also in U-rich titanite (source of uranium). The interpretation of geochemical data points to a petrogenetic connection between alkali-diorite (local amphibolite protolith) and sodic syenite by fractional crystallization through a transalkaline series. This magmatic differentiation occurred either before or during shear processes, which in turn led to albitite and amphibolite formation. The metamorphic reactions, which include intense recrystallization of magmatic minerals, led uraninite to precipitate at 1.87 Ga under Oxidation/Reduction control. A second population of uraninites was also generated by the reactivation of shear zones during the 0.6 Ga Brasiliano Orogeny. The geotectonic implications include the importance of the Orosirian event in the Paramirim Block during paleoproterozoic Săo Francisco Craton edification and the influence of the Brasiliano event in the Paramirim Block during the West-Gondwana assembly processes. The regional microcline-gneiss, whose protolith is a 2.0 Ga syn-collisional potassic granite, represents the albitite host rock. The microcilne-gneiss has no petrogenetic association to the syenite (albitite protolith) in magmatic evolutionary terms.

  1. Dynamics of biochemical processes and redox conditions in geochemically linked landscapes of oligotrophic bogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inisheva, L. I.; Szajdak, L.; Sergeeva, M. A.

    2016-04-01

    The biological activity in oligotrophic peatlands at the margins of the Vasyugan Mire has been studied. It is shown found that differently directed biochemical processes manifest themselves in the entire peat profile down to the underlying mineral substrate. Their activity is highly variable. It is argued that the notion about active and inert layers in peat soils is only applicable for the description of their water regime. The degree of the biochemical activity is specified by the physical soil properties. As a result of the biochemical processes, a micromosaic aerobic-anaerobic medium is developed under the surface waterlogged layer of peat deposits. This layer contains the gas phase, including oxygen. It is concluded that the organic and mineral parts of peat bogs represent a single functional system of a genetic peat profile with a clear record of the history of its development.

  2. Mid- and late Holocene human impact recorded by the Coltrondo peat bog (NE Italian Alps)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segnana, Michela; Poto, Luisa; Gabrieli, Jacopo; Martino, Matteo; Oeggl, Klaus; Barbante, Carlo

    2016-04-01

    Peat bogs are ideal archives for the study of environmental changes, whether these are natural or human induced. Indeed, receiving water and nutrients exclusively from dry and wet atmospheric depositions, they are among the most suitable matrices for palaeoenvironmental reconstruction. The present study is focused on the Eastern sector of the Italian Alps, where we sampled the Coltrondo peat bog, in the Comelico area (ca. 1800 m a.s.l.) The knowledge of the human history in this area is rather scarce: the only pieces of archaeological evidence found in this area dates back to the Mesolithic and the absence of later archaeological finds makes it difficult to reconstruct the human settlement in the valley. With the main aim to obtain information about the human settlement in that area we selected a multi-proxy approach, combining the study of biotic and abiotic sedimentary components archived in the 7900 years-peat bog record. Pollen analysis is performed along the core registering human impacts on the area from ca. 2500 cal BP, when land-use changes are well evidenced by the presence of human-related pollen and non-pollen palynomorphs (NPPs), as well as by the increase in micro-charcoal particles. Periods of increased human impact are recorded at the end of the Middle Ages and later, at the end of the 19th century. The analysis of trace elements, such as lead, is performed by means of ICP-MS technique and its enrichment factor (EF) is calculated. A first slight increase of Pb EF during Roman Times is possibly related to mining activities carried out by the Romans. Mining activities carried out in the area are registered during the Middle Ages, while the advent of the industrialization in the 20th century is marked by the highest EF values registered on the top of the core. To help and support the interpretation of geochemical data, lead isotopes ratios are also measured using ICP-MS to discriminate between natural and anthropogenic sources of lead. The 206Pb/207Pb

  3. Bog bilberry phenolics, antioxidant capacity and nutrient profile.

    PubMed

    Colak, Nesrin; Torun, Hülya; Gruz, Jiri; Strnad, Miroslav; Hermosín-Gutiérrez, Isidro; Hayirlioglu-Ayaz, Sema; Ayaz, Faik Ahmet

    2016-06-15

    Phenolics and nutrient profiles of bog bilberry (Vaccinium uliginosum L.) collected from high mountain pastures in northeast Anatolia (Turkey) were examined for the first time in this study. The major soluble sugar identified in the berry was fructose, following by glucose, and the main organic acid identified was citric acid, followed by malic acid. Eleven phenolic acids and 17 anthocyanin 3-glycosides were identified and quantified. Caffeic acid in the free and glycoside forms and syringic acid in the ester form were the major phenolic acids, and the major individual anthocyanin present in the berry was malvidin 3-glucoside (24%). The highest total phenolics and anthocyanin contents were obtained from the anthocyanin fraction in conjunction with the highest antioxidant capacity, followed by the polyphenolic and aqueous fractions, FRAP, ORAC and DPPH, in that order. Our findings can be used to compare bog bilberry with other Vaccinium berries and to help clarify the relative potential health benefits of different berries. PMID:26868586

  4. Modelling alternative states of an ombrotrophic bog with experimentally deposed nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yuanqiao; Keller, Philipp; Blodau, Christian

    2015-04-01

    Nitrogen (N) pollution of peatlands alters their vegetation composition and carbon (C) sequestration. We applied a coupled carbon and nitrogen wetland model (PEATBOG) to analyse alternative steady states of an ombrotrophic bog exposed to experimentally deposited N at 1.6, 3.2 and 6.4 gN m-2 yr-1. The study predicted discontinuous responses of the peatland ecosystem to differing N deposition and a lack of recovery after 15 years of fertilization with 6.4 gN m-2 yr-1, which indicated a regime shift of the modelled ecosystem. In combination drought, as concurrent disturbance, reduced the resilience of the system and contributed to the regime shift. Internal feedbacks may interact with the direct feedback of the external disturbances from nitrogen and climatic drivers and alter the responses of the ecosystem. The result suggested that the state of a peatland exposed to N deposition may be highly uncertain due to a dominant feedback loop that emerged from all disturbances. The finding highlighted the need for systematically quantifying the relative importance of multiple disturbances to predict the potential shift of a peatland ecosystem to alternative states as response to N deposition in a changing environment.

  5. Properties and structure of raised bog peat humic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klavins, Maris; Purmalis, Oskars

    2013-10-01

    Humic substances form most of the organic components of soil, peat and natural waters, and their structure and properties differ very much depending on their source. The aims of this study are to characterize humic acids (HAs) from raised bog peat, to evaluate the homogeneity of peat HAs within peat profiles, and to study peat humification impact on properties of HAs. A major impact on the structure of peat HAs have lignin-free raised bog biota (dominantly represented by bryophytes of different origin). On diagenesis scale, peat HAs have an intermediate position between the living organic matter and coal organic matter, and their structure is formed in a process in which more labile structures (carbohydrates, amino acids, etc.) are destroyed, while thermodynamically more stable aromatic and polyaromatic structures emerge as a result of abiotic synthesis. However, in comparison with soil, aquatic and other HAs, aromaticity of peat HAs is much lower. Comparatively, the raised bog peat HAs are at the beginning of the transformation process of living organic matter. Concentrations of carboxyl and phenolic hydroxyl groups change depending on the peat age and decomposition degree from where HAs have been isolated, and carboxylic acidity of peat HAs increases with peat depth and humification degree.

  6. Geochemical and mineralogical composition of bog iron ore as a resource for prehistoric iron production - A case study of the Widawa catchment area in Eastern Silesia, Poland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thelemann, Michael; Bebermeier, Wiebke; Hoelzmann, Philipp

    2016-04-01

    Spreading from the Near East in the declining Bronze Age from the 2nd millennium BCE onwards, the technique of iron smelting reached Eastern Silesia, Poland, in approximately the 2nd century BCE (pre-Roman Iron Age). At this time the region of the Widawa catchment area was inhabited by the Przeworsk culture. While the older moraine landscape of the study area lacks ores from geological rock formations, bog iron ores were relatively widespread and, due to their comparatively easy accessibility, were commonly exploited for early iron production. In this poster the mineralogical and elemental composition of local bog iron ore deposits and iron slag finds, as a by-product of the smelting process, are investigated. The crystalline mineralogical composition of local bog iron ores is dominated by quartz (SiO2) and goethite (α FeO(OH)), in contrast to slag samples in which fayalite (Fe2SiO4), wüstite (FeO) and quartz, with traces of goethite, represent the main minerals. Ores and slags are both characterized by notable hematite (Fe2O3), magnetite (Fe3O4) and maghemite (γ-Fe2O3) contents. Analyzed bog iron ore samples show iron contents of up to 64.9 mass% Fe2O3 (45.4 mass% Fe), whereas the iron contents of bloomery slags vary between 48.7 and 72.0 mass% FeO (37.9 and 56.0 mass% Fe). A principal component analysis of the element contents, which were quantified by portable energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (p-ED-XRF), indicates local variations in the elemental composition. Our results show that bog iron ores are relatively widely distributed with spatially varying iron contents along the Widawa floodplain but present-day formation conditions (e.g. different ground-water levels) are negatively affected by modern land-use practices, such as agriculture and melioration measures.

  7. Animal and vegetation patterns in natural and man-made bog pools: implications for restoration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mazerolle, M.J.; Poulin, M.; Lavoie, C.; Rochefort, L.; Desrochers, A.; Drolet, B.

    2006-01-01

    1. Peatlands have suffered great losses following drainage for agriculture, forestry, urbanisation, or peat mining, near inhabited areas. We evaluated the faunal and vegetation patterns after restoration of a peatland formerly mined for peat. We assessed whether bog pools created during restoration are similar to natural bog pools in terms of water chemistry, vegetation structure and composition, as well as amphibian and arthropod occurrence patterns. 2. Both avian species richness and peatland vegetation cover at the site increased following restoration. Within bog pools, however, the vegetation composition differed between natural and man-made pools. The cover of low shrubs, Sphagnum moss, submerged, emergent and floating vegetation in man-made pools was lower than in natural pools, whereas pH was higher than in typical bog pools. Dominant plant species also differed between man-made and natural pools. 3. Amphibian tadpoles, juveniles and adults occurred more often in man-made pools than natural bog pools. Although some arthropods, including Coleoptera bog specialists, readily colonised the pools, their abundance was two to 26 times lower than in natural bog pools. Plant introduction in bog pools, at the stocking densities we applied, had no effect on the occurrence of most groups. 4. We conclude that our restoration efforts were partially successful. Peatland-wide vegetation patterns following restoration mimicked those of natural peatlands, but 4 years were not sufficient for man-made pools to fully emulate the characteristics of natural bog pools.

  8. Key plant species and succession patterns associated to past fen-bog transitions - perspective to future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Väliranta, Minna; Luoto, Miska; Juutinen, Sari; Korhola, Atte; Tuittila, Eeva-stiina

    2016-04-01

    Minerotrophic fens and ombrotrophic bogs differ in their hydrology, vegetation and carbon dynamics and their geographical distribution seems to be linked to certain climate parameters, such as temperature and effective precipitation. Currently bogs dominate the southern boreal zone but the climate warming with altered temperature and effective precipitation may shift the distribution of bog zone northwards. In this study, we first used plant macrofossil method and radiocarbon analysis to identify and date past fen-bog transitions. These transitions were compared to major Holocene climate phases. Subsequently, palaeoecological data were associated to ecological and environmental data collected along the current fen-bog ecotone in Finland. We identified three successional phases 1) initial minerotrophic fen phase 2) Eriophorum vaginatum-dominated oligotrophic fen phase which was followed by 3) ombrorophic bog phase. Duration of these phases varied but late Holocene timing of fen-bog transition showed some consistency. Based on palaeoecological data 57 % of the modern ecotone peatlands were classified to be in a fen phase, 10 % were in an Eriophorum-dominated phase and 33 % were going through a transition from fen to bog. The study showed that regime shifts are driven by autogenic succession and climate but also fires may efficiently control succession pathways. Our results support the hypothesis that climate change can promote the ombrotrophication process in the southern border of the fen-bog ecotone due to changes in hydrology balance.

  9. Terrestrial isopod community as indicator of succession in a peat bog

    PubMed Central

    Antonović, Ivan; Brigić, Andreja; Sedlar, Zorana; Bedek, Jana; Šoštarić, Renata

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Terrestrial isopods were studied in the Dubravica peat bog and surrounding forest in the northwestern Croatia. Sampling was conducted using pitfall traps over a two year period. Studied peat bog has a history of drastically decrease in area during the last five decades mainly due to the process of natural succession and changes in the water level. A total of 389 isopod individuals belonging to 8 species were captured. Species richness did not significantly differ between bog, edge and surrounding forest. High species richness at the bog is most likely the result of progressive vegetation succession, small size of the bog and interspecific relationships, such as predation. With spreading of Molinia grass on the peat bog, upper layers of Sphagnum mosses become less humid and probably more suitable for forest species that slowly colonise bog area. The highest diversity was found at the edge mainly due to the edge effect and seasonal immigration, but also possibly due to high abundance and predator pressure of the Myrmica ants and lycosid spiders at the bog site. The most abundant species were Trachelipus rathkii and Protracheoniscus politus, in the bog area and in the forest, respectively. Bog specific species were not recorded and the majority of the species collected belong to the group of tyrphoneutral species. However, Hyloniscus adonis could be considered as a tyrphoxenous species regarding its habitat preferences. Most of collected isopod species are widespread eurytopic species that usually inhabit various habitats and therefore indicate negative successive changes or degradation processes in the peat bog. PMID:22536107

  10. Geochemical evidence for the hydrology of a Tamarack-peat bog, Brimfield Township, Portage County, Ohio

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, T.P.; Miller, L.A. . Dept. of Geology and Water Resources)

    1992-01-01

    Peat Bogs and wetlands represent unique environmental settings what are increasingly subjected to anthropogenic stresses involving inputs of water and chemicals. This study used geochemical and hydrologic monitoring to determine the inputs and fates of elements of the Kent-Brimfield bog located in Portage County, Ohio. Based on physical and chemical information collected over one year, a model is proposed here describing the hydrologic connection between a bog and shallow ground water surrounding the bog. The chemical composition of precipitation, soil water and ground water in the bog vicinity were monitored for one year. Field measurements included water levels, pH, Eh, alkalinity and temperature. Trace metal content of the peat, the pore waters, soil water and ground waters were determined by GFAA, ICP and LIC methods. This bog was found to function as part of a perched water table aquifer. Water in the upper 3 m of the bog is found to be chemically similar to precipitation, but modified by reactions involving dissolution of mineral matter and biologic processes. The chemistry of water deeper in the bog (> 3m) resembles shallow ground water surrounding the bog, modified by weathering of underlying geologic materials and sulfate reduction. This similarity, along with ground water elevations within and outside of the bog, supports that shallow ground water interacts with, and helps maintain water levels in the upper surface of the bog. From these results, a model is proposed for the seasonal variations in hydrologic processes operating in the wetland and surrounding basin, and describes how wetlands may change seasonally from being influent to effluent systems.

  11. Mineralogy and geochemistry of a uraniferous coal from the Red Desert Area, Sweetwater County, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Breger, Irving A.; Deul, Maurice; Meyrowitz, Robert; Rubinstein, Samuel

    1953-01-01

    A sample of subbituminous uraniferous coal from the Red Desert, Sweetwater County, Wyo., was studied mineralogically. The coal contains gypsum (6 percent), kaolinite (1 percent), quartz (0.3 percent), calcite (trace), and limonite (trace). This suite of minerals and the absence of pyrite show that the coal has been subjected to weathering and oxidation. No uranium minerals have been found; mechanical fractionation has indicated that the uranium is associated with the organic constituents of the coal. The minerals that have been isolated contain 0.0006 percent uranium, a content which is to be expected for nonuraniferous sedimentary rocks. The organic components of the coal contain approximately 0.002 percent uranium. On the basis of material balance calculations, the organic components carry 98 percent of the uranium in the coal. Fischer assays of this weathered coal from the Red Desert indicate a yield of 16.7 gallons of tar per ton on low-temperature retorting. In view of the large reserve of subbituminous coal in the Red Desert, its probable ease of mining, and its tar yield, it may be desirable to carry out further evaluation of the coal as a fuel or raw material for the manufacture of tar or chemicals. If economic factors permit utilization of the coal, the uranium, although present in small percentages, could be recovered as a byproduct.

  12. Features of water chemical composition of oligotrophic and eutrophic bogs in the South of the Tomsk region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naymushina, O.

    2016-03-01

    On the basis of the actual material the analysis of chemical composition of bog waters in the territory of the South of the Tomsk region is carried out. The data on average concentration of macro and trace components, organic matter, pH of bog waters are obtained. Significant distinctions in a chemical composition of surface water for different types of bogs are revealed. The composition and macrostructure of humic acids by the example of eutrophic bogs is studied.

  13. Isotope evidence for N2-fixation in Sphagnum peat bogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novak, Martin; Jackova, Ivana; Buzek, Frantisek; Stepanova, Marketa; Veselovsky, Frantisek; Curik, Jan; Prechova, Eva

    2016-04-01

    Waterlogged organic soils store as much as 30 % of the world's soil carbon (C), and 15 % of the world's soil nitrogen (N). In the era of climate change, wetlands are vulnerable to increasing temperatures and prolonged periods of low rainfall. Higher rates of microbial processes and/or changing availability of oxygen may lead to peat thinning and elevated emissions of greenhouse gases (mostly CO2, but also CH4 and N2O). Biogeochemical cycling of C and N in peat bogs is coupled. Under low levels of pollution by reactive nitrogen (NO3-, NH4+), increasing N inputs may positively affect C storage in peat. Recent studies in North America and Scandinavia have suggested that pristine bogs are characterized by significant rates of microbial N2 fixation that augments C storage in the peat substrate. We present a nitrogen isotope study aimed at corroborating these findings. We conducted an isotope inventory of N fluxes and pools at two Sphagnum-dominated ombrotrophic peat bogs in the Czech Republic (Central Europe). For the first time, we present a time-series of del15N values of atmospheric input at the same locations as del15N values of living Sphagnum and peat. The mean del15N values systematically increased in the order: input NH4+ (-10.0 ‰) < input NO3- (-7.9 ‰) < peat porewater (-5.6 ‰) < Sphagnum (-5.0 ‰) < shallow peat (-4.2 ‰) < deep peat (-2.2 ‰) < runoff (-1.4 ‰) < porewater N2O (1.4 ‰). Importantly, N of Sphagnum was isotopically heavier than N of the atmospheric input (p < 0.001). If partial incorporation of reactive N from the atmosphere into Sphagnum was isotopically selective, the residual N would have to be isotopically extremely light. Such N, however, was not identified anywhere in the ecosystem. Alternatively, Sphagnum may have contained an admixture of isotopically heavier N from atmospheric N2 (del15N N2 = 0 ‰). We conlude that the N isotope systematics at the two Czech sites is consistent with the concept of significant N2 fixation

  14. EVALUATING CUMULATIVE EFFECTS OF DISTURBANCE ON THE HYDROLOGIC FUNCTION OF BOGS, FENS, AND MIRES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Few quantitative studies have been done on the hydrology of fens, bogs and mires, and consequently any predictions of the cumulative impacts of disturbances on their hydrologic functions is extremely difficult. or example, few data are available on the role of bogs and fens with ...

  15. The bog landforms of continental western Canada in relation to climate and permafrost patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Vitt, D.H.; Halsey, L.A. ); Zoltai, S.C. )

    1994-02-01

    In continental western Canada, discontinuous permafrost is almost always restricted to ombrotrophic peatlands (bogs). Bogs occur mostly as islands or peninsulas in large, often complex fens or are confined to small basins. Permafrost may be present in extensive peat plateaus (or more locally as palsas) and was preceded by a well-developed layer of Sphagnum that served to insulate the peat and lower the pore water temperatures. Air photo interpretation reveals the occurrence of bogs with five types of surface physiography. Concentrated to the south are bogs without internal patterns that have never had permafrost. Dominating the mid-latitudes are bogs with internal lawns and fens with internal lawns (mostly representing former bogs) that had permafrost lenses in the past that have recently degraded. Concentrated in the northwest are peat plateaus without internal lawns or distinct collapse scars, but with permafrost; dominating in the northernmost area are peat plateaus with extensive permafrost and collapse scars. Relationships are apparent between the current - 1[degrees]C isotherm and the southern occurrence of peat plateaus and between the 0[degrees]C isotherm and the southern edge of bogs and fens with internal lawns. We interpret bogs and fens with internal lawns to represent areas where permafrost degradation is currently occurring at a greater rate than aggradation, seemingly in response to warmer regional climate, although fire frequency may also be of local importance. 54 refs., 21 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Genesis of peat-bog soils in the northern taiga spruce forests of the Kola Peninsula

    SciTech Connect

    Nikonov, V.V.

    1981-01-01

    The characteristics of soil formation processes in the Peat-Bog soils of waterlogged spruce phytocenoses on the Kola Peninsula are investigated. It is found that the ash composition of the peat layer is determined primarily by the composition of the buried plant residues. The effect of the chemical composition of water feeding the peat bogs is determined. (Refs. 7).

  17. Comparisons of soil nitrogen mass balances for an ombrotrophic bog and a minerotrophic fen in northern Minnesota

    EPA Science Inventory

    We compared the N budgets of an ombrotrophic bog and a minerotrophic fen to quantify the importance of denitrification in peatlands and their watersheds. We also compared the watershed upland mineral soils to bog/fen peat; lagg and transition zone peat to central bog/fen peat; an...

  18. 76 FR 77814 - Cameron LNG, LLC; Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental Assessment for the Proposed BOG...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-14

    ... for the Proposed BOG Liquefaction Project, and Request for Comments on Environmental Issues The staff... assessment (EA) that will discuss the environmental impacts of the BOG Liquefaction Project involving... construct and operate facilities necessary to liquefy boil-off gas (BOG) at its existing liquefied...

  19. 77 FR 2970 - Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental Assessment for the Proposed Elba BOG Compressor...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-20

    ... Elba BOG Compressor Project and Request for Comments on Environmental Issues; Southern LNG Company, L.L... Environmental Assessment (EA) that will discuss the environmental impacts of the Elba BOG Compressor Project... (BOG) compression facilities at its liquefied natural gas (LNG) marine terminal on Elba Island...

  20. Environmental assessment of remedial action at the inactive uraniferous lignite processing sites at Belfield and Bowman, North Dakota. [UMTRA Project

    SciTech Connect

    Beranich, S.; Berger, N.; Bierley, D.; Bond, T.M.; Burt, C.; Caldwell, J.A.; Dery, V.A.; Dutcher, A.; Glover, W.A.; Heydenburg, R.J.; Larson, N.B.; Lindsey, G.; Longley, J.M.; Millard, J.B.; Miller, M.; Peel, R.C.; Persson-Reeves, C.H.; Titus, F.B.; Wagner, L.

    1989-09-01

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 (UMTRCA), to clean up the Belfield and Bowman, North Dakota, uraniferous lignite processing sites to reduce the potential health impacts associated with the residual radioactive materials remaining at these sites. Remedial action at these sites must be performed in accordance with the US Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) standards promulgated for the remedial action and with the concurrence of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the state of North Dakota. The inactive Belfield uraniferous lignite processing site is one mile southeast of Belfield, North Dakota. The inactive Bowman uraniferous lignite processing site at the former town of Griffin, is seven miles northwest of Bowman, North Dakota and 65 road miles south of Belfield. Lignite ash from the processing operations has contaminated the soils over the entire 10.7-acre designated Belfield site and the entire 12.1-acre designated Bowman site. Dispersion of the ash has contaminated an additional 20.6 acres surrounding the Belfield processing site and an additional 59.2 acres surrounding the Bowman processing site. The proposed remedial action is to relocate the contaminated materials at the Belfield processing site to the Bowman processing/disposal site for codisposal with the Bowman contaminated soils. The environmental impacts assessed in this EA were evaluated for the proposed remedial action and the no action alternative and demonstrate that the proposed action would not significantly affect the quality of the human environment and would be performed in compliance with applicable environmental laws. The no action alternative would not be consistent with the intent of Public Law 95-604 and would not comply with the EPA standards. 48 refs., 10 figs., 7 tabs.

  1. Fate of silicate minerals in a peat bog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, Philip C.; Siegel, Donald I.; Hill, Barbara M.; Glaser, Paul H.

    1991-04-01

    An investigation of silicate weathering in a Minnesota mire indicates that quartz and aluminosilicates rapidly dissolve in anoxic, organic-rich, neutral- pH environments. Vertical profiles of pH, dissolved silicon, and major cations were obtained at a raised bog and a spring fen and compared. Profiles of readily extractable silicon, diatom abundance, ash mineralogy, and silicate surface texture were determined from peat cores collected at each site. In the bog, normally a recharge mound, dissolved silicon increases with depth as pH increases, exceeding the background silicon concentration by a factor of two. Silicate grain surfaces, including quartz, are chemically etched at this location, despite being in contact with pore water at neutral pH with dissolved silicon well above the equilibrium solubility of quartz. The increasing silica concentrations at circum-neutral pH are consistent with a system where silicate solubility is influenced by silica-organic-acid complexes. Silica-organic-acid complexes therefore may be the cause of the almost complete absence of diatoms in decomposed peat and contribute to the formation of silica-depleted underclays commonly found beneath coal.

  2. Electrocoagulation treatment of peat bog drainage water containing humic substances.

    PubMed

    Kuokkanen, V; Kuokkanen, T; Rämö, J; Lassi, U

    2015-08-01

    Electrocoagulation (EC) treatment of 100 mg/L synthetic wastewater (SWW) containing humic acids was optimized (achieving 90% CODMn and 80% DOC removal efficiencies), after which real peat bog drainage waters (PBDWs) from three northern Finnish peat bogs were also treated. High pollutant removal efficiencies were achieved: Ptot, TS, and color could be removed completely, while Ntot, CODMn, and DOC/TOC removal efficiencies were in the range of 33-41%, 75-90%, and 62-75%, respectively. Al and Fe performed similarly as the anode material. Large scale experiments (1 m(3)) using cold (T = 10-11 °C) PBDWs were also conducted successfully, with optimal treatment times of 60-120 min (applying current densities of 60-75 A/m(2)). Residual values of Al and Fe (complete removal) were lower than their initial values in the EC-treated PBDWs. Electricity consumption and operational costs in optimum conditions were found to be low and similar for all the waters studied: 0.94 kWh/m(3) and 0.15 €/m(3) for SWW and 0.35-0.70 kWh/m(3) and 0.06-0.12 €/m(3) for the PBDWs (large-scale). Thus, e.g. solar cells could be considered as a power source for this EC application. In conclusion, EC treatment of PBDW containing humic substances was shown to be feasible. PMID:25973580

  3. No limits to peat bog growth? Transport and thermodynamic constraints on anaerobic organic matter decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blodau, C.; Julia, B.; Siems, M.

    2009-05-01

    In diffusion dominated systems, for which many thick peat deposits provide a model, slowness of transport and lack of free energy may pose a limit to methanogenic decomposition of organic matter and ultimately to closing the carbon cycle. To test this hypothesis we (I) conducted controlled column experiments with homogenized peat over an 18 month period, (II) investigated transport, in situ respiration pathways, rates and thermodynamic conditions in a nothern peatland, and (III) modelled depth profiles of CO2 and CH4 in the deposits. Vertical transport in the peatland was dominated by diffusion leading to the buildup of DIC and CH4 with depth (5500 µmol L 1 DIC, 500 µmol L 1 CH4). Highest DIC and CH4 production rates occurred close to the water table (decomposition constant kd ~10-3 to 10 4 a-1) and decreased to about kd = 10-7 a-1. The accumulation of metabolic end-products diminished in situ energy yields of acetoclastic methanogenesis to the threshold for microbially mediated processes (-20 to -25 kJ mol-1 CH4). The methanogenic precursor acetate also accumulated (150 µmol L 1). In line with these findings, CH4 was formed by hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis at Gibbs free energies of 35 to 40 kJ mol-1 CH4. This was indicated by an isotopic fractionation αCO2-CH4 of 1.069 to 1.079. Fermentative degradation of acetate, propionate and butyrate attained Gibbs free energies close to 0 kJ mol-1 substrate. In peat columns with homogenenous peat-sand mixtures of 50%, 15% and 5% dry weight, steady state CO2 production also decreased from about 10 to 0 nmol cm-3 d-1 and of CH4 from 1 to 0 nmol cm-3 d-1 with depth. Very similar depth profiles of concentrations and volumetric rates developed near endproduct thresholds of 600µmol CH4 and 10 mmol L-1 CO2, despite the differences in organic matter content. The modeling exercise showed that a consistent development of CH4 concentration profiles over time in the columns could only be accomplished with rates of acetoclastic

  4. Radionuclide release from simulated waste material after biogeochemical leaching of uraniferous mineral samples.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Aimee Lynn; Caron, François; Spiers, Graeme

    2014-12-01

    Biogeochemical mineral dissolution is a promising method for the released of metals in low-grade host mineralization that contain sulphidic minerals. The application of biogeochemical mineral dissolution to engineered leach heap piles in the Elliot Lake region may be considered as a promising passive technology for the economic recovery of low grade Uranium-bearing ores. In the current investigation, the decrease of radiological activity of uraniferous mineral material after biogeochemical mineral dissolution is quantified by gamma spectroscopy and compared to the results from digestion/ICP-MS analysis of the ore materials to determine if gamma spectroscopy is a simple, viable alternative quantification method for heavy nuclides. The potential release of Uranium (U) and Radium-226 ((226)Ra) to the aqueous environment from samples that have been treated to represent various stages of leaching and passive closure processes are assessed. Dissolution of U from the solid phase has occurred during biogeochemical mineral dissolution in the presence of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans, with gamma spectroscopy indicating an 84% decrease in Uranium-235 ((235)U) content, a value in accordance with the data obtained by dissolution chemistry. Gamma spectroscopy data indicate that only 30% of the (226)Ra was removed during the biogeochemical mineral dissolution. Chemical inhibition and passivation treatments of waste materials following the biogeochemical mineral dissolution offer greater protection against residual U and (226)Ra leaching. Pacified samples resist the release of (226)Ra contained in the mineral phase and may offer more protection to the aqueous environment for the long term, compared to untreated or inhibited residues, and should be taken into account for future decommissioning. PMID:24726552

  5. Nutrient Addition Leads to a Weaker CO2 Sink and Higher CH4 Emissions through Vegetation-Microclimate Feedbacks at Mer Bleue Bog, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bubier, J. L.; Arnkil, S.; Humphreys, E.; Juutinen, S.; Larmola, T.; Moore, T. R.

    2015-12-01

    Atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition has led to nutrient enrichment in wetlands globally, affecting plant community composition, carbon (C) cycling, and microbial dynamics. Nutrient-limited boreal bogs are long-term sinks of carbon dioxide (CO2), but sources of methane (CH4), an important greenhouse gas. We fertilized Mer Bleue Bog, a Sphagnum moss and evergreen shrub-dominated ombrotrophic bog near Ottawa, Ontario, for 10-15 years with N as NO3 and NH4 at 5, 10 and 20 times ambient N deposition (0.6-0.8 g N m-2 y-1), with and without phosphorus (P) and potassium (K). Treatments were applied to triplicate plots (3 x 3 m) from May - August 2000-2015 and control plots received distilled water. We measured net ecosystem CO2 exchange (NEE), ecosystem photosynthesis and respiration, and CH4 flux with climate-controlled chambers; leaf-level CO2 exchange and biochemistry; substrate-induced respiration, CH4 production and consumption potentials with laboratory incubations; plant species composition and abundance; and microclimate (peat temperature, moisture, light interception). After 15 years, we have found that NEE has decreased, and CH4 emissions have increased, in the highest nutrient treatments owing to changes in vegetation, microtopography, and peat characteristics. Vegetation changes include a loss of Sphagnum moss and introduction of new deciduous species. Simulated atmospheric N deposition has not benefitted the photosynthetic apparatus of the dominant evergreen shrubs, but resulted in higher foliar respiration, contributing to a weaker ecosystem CO2 sink. Loss of moss has led to wetter near-surface substrate, higher rates of decomposition and CH4 emission, and a shift in microbial communities. Thus, elevated atmospheric deposition of nutrients may endanger C storage in peatlands through a complex suite of feedbacks and interactions among vegetation, microclimate, and microbial communities.

  6. Microform-related community patterns of methane-cycling microbes in boreal Sphagnum bogs are site specific.

    PubMed

    Juottonen, Heli; Kotiaho, Mirkka; Robinson, Devin; Merilä, Päivi; Fritze, Hannu; Tuittila, Eeva-Stiina

    2015-09-01

    Vegetation and water table are important regulators of methane emission in peatlands. Microform variation encompasses these factors in small-scale topographic gradients of dry hummocks, intermediate lawns and wet hollows. We examined methane production and oxidization among microforms in four boreal bogs that showed more variation of vegetation within a bog with microform than between the bogs. Potential methane production was low and differed among bogs but not consistently with microform. Methane oxidation followed water table position with microform, showing higher rates closer to surface in lawns and hollows than in hummocks. Methanogen community, analysed by mcrA terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism and dominated by Methanoregulaceae or 'Methanoflorentaceae', varied strongly with bog. The extent of microform-related variation of methanogens depended on the bog. Methanotrophs identified as Methylocystis spp. in pmoA denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis similarly showed effect of bog, and microform patterns were stronger within individual bogs. Our results suggest that methane-cycling microbes in boreal Sphagnum bogs with seemingly uniform environmental conditions may show strong site-dependent variation. The bog-intrinsic factor may be related to carbon availability but contrary to expectations appears to be unrelated to current surface vegetation, calling attention to the origin of carbon substrates for microbes in bogs. PMID:26220310

  7. Species Identification of Archaeological Skin Objects from Danish Bogs: Comparison between Mass Spectrometry-Based Peptide Sequencing and Microscopy-Based Methods

    PubMed Central

    Brandt, Luise Ørsted; Schmidt, Anne Lisbeth; Mannering, Ulla; Sarret, Mathilde; Kelstrup, Christian D.; Olsen, Jesper V.; Cappellini, Enrico

    2014-01-01

    Denmark has an extraordinarily large and well-preserved collection of archaeological skin garments found in peat bogs, dated to approximately 920 BC – AD 775. These objects provide not only the possibility to study prehistoric skin costume and technologies, but also to investigate the animal species used for the production of skin garments. Until recently, species identification of archaeological skin was primarily performed by light and scanning electron microscopy or the analysis of ancient DNA. However, the efficacy of these methods can be limited due to the harsh, mostly acidic environment of peat bogs leading to morphological and molecular degradation within the samples. We compared species assignment results of twelve archaeological skin samples from Danish bogs using Mass Spectrometry (MS)-based peptide sequencing, against results obtained using light and scanning electron microscopy. While it was difficult to obtain reliable results using microscopy, MS enabled the identification of several species-diagnostic peptides, mostly from collagen and keratins, allowing confident species discrimination even among taxonomically close organisms, such as sheep and goat. Unlike previous MS-based methods, mostly relying on peptide fingerprinting, the shotgun sequencing approach we describe aims to identify the complete extracted ancient proteome, without preselected specific targets. As an example, we report the identification, in one of the samples, of two peptides uniquely assigned to bovine foetal haemoglobin, indicating the production of skin from a calf slaughtered within the first months of its life. We conclude that MS-based peptide sequencing is a reliable method for species identification of samples from bogs. The mass spectrometry proteomics data were deposited in the ProteomeXchange Consortium with the dataset identifier PXD001029. PMID:25260035

  8. Species identification of archaeological skin objects from Danish bogs: comparison between mass spectrometry-based peptide sequencing and microscopy-based methods.

    PubMed

    Brandt, Luise Ørsted; Schmidt, Anne Lisbeth; Mannering, Ulla; Sarret, Mathilde; Kelstrup, Christian D; Olsen, Jesper V; Cappellini, Enrico

    2014-01-01

    Denmark has an extraordinarily large and well-preserved collection of archaeological skin garments found in peat bogs, dated to approximately 920 BC - AD 775. These objects provide not only the possibility to study prehistoric skin costume and technologies, but also to investigate the animal species used for the production of skin garments. Until recently, species identification of archaeological skin was primarily performed by light and scanning electron microscopy or the analysis of ancient DNA. However, the efficacy of these methods can be limited due to the harsh, mostly acidic environment of peat bogs leading to morphological and molecular degradation within the samples. We compared species assignment results of twelve archaeological skin samples from Danish bogs using Mass Spectrometry (MS)-based peptide sequencing, against results obtained using light and scanning electron microscopy. While it was difficult to obtain reliable results using microscopy, MS enabled the identification of several species-diagnostic peptides, mostly from collagen and keratins, allowing confident species discrimination even among taxonomically close organisms, such as sheep and goat. Unlike previous MS-based methods, mostly relying on peptide fingerprinting, the shotgun sequencing approach we describe aims to identify the complete extracted ancient proteome, without preselected specific targets. As an example, we report the identification, in one of the samples, of two peptides uniquely assigned to bovine foetal haemoglobin, indicating the production of skin from a calf slaughtered within the first months of its life. We conclude that MS-based peptide sequencing is a reliable method for species identification of samples from bogs. The mass spectrometry proteomics data were deposited in the ProteomeXchange Consortium with the dataset identifier PXD001029. PMID:25260035

  9. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the inactive uraniferous lignite ashing site near Bowman, North Dakota

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-11-01

    This baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the inactive uraniferous lignite ashing site near Bowman, North Dakota, evaluates the potential impacts to public health or the environment from contaminated ground water at this site. This contamination is a result of the uraniferous lignite ashing process, when coal containing uranium was burned to produce uranium. Potential risk is quantified only for constituents introduced by the processing activities and not for the constituents naturally occurring in background ground water in the site vicinity. Background ground water, separate from any site-related contamination, imposes a percentage of the overall risk from ground water ingestion in the Bowman site vicinity. The US Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project is developing plans to address soil and ground water contamination at the site. The UMTRA Surface Project involves the determination of the extent of soil contamination and design of an engineered disposal cell for long-term storage of contaminated materials. The UMTRA Ground Water Project evaluates ground water contamination. Based on results from future site monitoring activities as defined in the site observational work plan and results from this risk assessment, the DOE will propose an approach for managing contaminated ground water at the Bowman site.

  10. Effect of mineral constituents in the bioleaching of uranium from uraniferous sedimentary rock samples, Southwestern Sinai, Egypt.

    PubMed

    Amin, Maisa M; Elaassy, Ibrahim E; El-Feky, Mohamed G; Sallam, Abdel Sattar M; Talaat, Mona S; Kawady, Nilly A

    2014-08-01

    Bioleaching, like Biotechnology uses microorganisms to extract metals from their ore materials, whereas microbial activity has an appreciable effect on the dissolution of toxic metals and radionuclides. Bioleaching of uranium was carried out with isolated fungi from uraniferous sedimentary rocks from Southwestern Sinai, Egypt. Eight fungal species were isolated from different grades of uraniferous samples. The bio-dissolution experiments showed that Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus terreus exhibited the highest leaching efficiencies of uranium from the studied samples. Through monitoring the bio-dissolution process, the uranium grade and mineralogic constituents of the ore material proved to play an important role in the bioleaching process. The tested samples asserted that the optimum conditions of uranium leaching are: 7 days incubation time, 3% pulp density, 30 °C incubation temperature and pH 3. Both fungi produced the organic acids, namely; oxalic, acetic, citric, formic, malonic, galic and ascorbic in the culture filtrate, indicating an important role in the bioleaching processes. PMID:24682031

  11. Ecology and hydrology of pristine and cutover lowland raised bogs: relationships and implications for restoration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labadz, Jillian; Hart, Roger; Robbins, Jane; Butcher, David; Topliss, David

    2013-04-01

    This paper will examine relationships in vegetation communities and hydrological conditions on areas of lowland raised bog in north west England, comparing damaged and relatively intact sites on two adjacent bogs in Cumbria. Walton Moss is a relatively pristine site whilst and Bolton Fell Moss has a small nature reserve area with remnant vegetation which is surrounded by commercial peat cutting. The intended outcome is to provide a mechanism to inform management decisions, with a view to assisting in the long-term protection and rehabilitation of lowland raised bogs.

  12. Fate and Transport of Road Salt During Snowmelt Through a Calcareous Fen: Kampoosa Bog, Stockbridge, Massachusetts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhodes, A. L.; Guswa, A. J.; Pufall, A.

    2007-12-01

    Kampoosa Bog is the largest and most ecologically diverse calcareous lake-basin fen in Massachusetts. Situated within a 4.7 km2 drainage basin, the open fen (approx. 20 acres) consists of a floating mat of sedges (incl. Carex aquatilis and Cladium mariscoides) that overlie peat and lake clay deposits. Mineral weathering of marble bedrock within the drainage basin supplies highly alkaline ground and surface waters to the fen basin. The natural chemistry has been greatly altered by road salt runoff from the Massaschusetts Turnpike, and in question is whether disturbance from the Turnpike and a gas pipline has facilitated aggressive growth by the invasive species Phragmites australis. Considered to be one of the most significant rare species habitats in the state, Massachusetts has designated Kampoosa Bog an Area of Critical Environmental Concern, and a committee representing several local, regional, and state agencies, organizations, and citizens manages the wetland. The purpose of this study is to characterize the hydrologic and chemical response of the wetland during snowmelt events to understand the fate and movement of road salt (NaCl). Concentrations of Na and Cl in the fen groundwater are greatest close to the Turnpike. Concentrations decrease with distance downstream but are still greatly elevated relative to sites upstream of the Turnpike. During snowmelt events, the fen's outlet shows a sharp rise in Na and Cl concentrations at the onset of melting that is soon diluted by the added meltwater. The Na and Cl flux, however, is greatest at peak discharge, suggesting that high-flow events are significant periods of export of dissolved salts from the fen. Pure dissolution of rock salt produces an equal molar ratio between Na and Cl, and sodium and chloride imbalances in stream and ground waters suggest that ~20% of the Na is stored on cation exchange sites within the peat. The largest imbalances between Na and Cl occur deeper within the peat, where the peat is

  13. Uranium accumulation in aquatic macrophytes in an uraniferous region: Relevance to natural attenuation.

    PubMed

    Cordeiro, Cristina; Favas, Paulo J C; Pratas, João; Sarkar, Santosh Kumar; Venkatachalam, Perumal

    2016-08-01

    Phytoremediation potential of uranium (U) was investigated by submerged, free-floating and rooted emergent native aquatic macrophytes inhabiting along the streams of Horta da Vilariça, a uraniferous geochemical region of NE Portugal. The work has been undertaken with the following objectives: (i) to relate the U concentrations in water-sediment-plant system; and (ii) to identify the potentialities of aquatic plants to remediate U-contaminated waters based on accumulation pattern. A total of 25 plant species culminating 233 samples was collected from 15 study points along with surface water and contiguous sediments. Concentrations of U showed wide range of variations both in waters (0.61-5.56 μg L(-1), mean value 1.98 μg L(-1)) and sediments (124-23,910 μg kg(-1), mean value 3929 μg kg(-1)) and this is also reflected in plant species examined. The plant species exhibited the ability to accumulate U several orders of magnitude higher than the surrounding water. Maximum U concentrations was recorded in the bryophyte Scorpiurium deflexifolium (49,639 μg kg(-1)) followed by Fontinalis antipyretica (35,771 μg kg(-1)), shoots of Rorippa sylvestris (33,837 μg kg(-1)), roots of Oenanthe crocata (17,807 μg kg(-1)) as well as in Nasturtium officinale (10,995 μg kg(-1)). Scorpiurium deflexifolium displayed a high bioconcentration factor (BF) of ∼2.5 × 10(4) (mean value). The species Fontinalis antipyretica, Nasturtium officinale (roots) and Rorippa sylvestris (shoots) exhibited the mean BFs of 1.7 × 10(4), 5 × 10(3) and 4.8 × 10(3) respectively. Maximum translocation factor (TF) was very much pronounced in the rooted perennial herb Rorippa sylvestris showing extreme ability to transport U for the shoots and seems to be promising candidate to be used as bioindicator species. PMID:27164268

  14. Climate-driven expansion of blanket bogs in Britain during the Holocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallego-Sala, A. V.; Charman, D. J.; Harrison, S. P.; Li, G.; Prentice, I. C.

    2016-01-01

    Blanket bog occupies approximately 6 % of the area of the UK today. The Holocene expansion of this hyperoceanic biome has previously been explained as a consequence of Neolithic forest clearance. However, the present distribution of blanket bog in Great Britain can be predicted accurately with a simple model (PeatStash) based on summer temperature and moisture index thresholds, and the same model correctly predicts the highly disjunct distribution of blanket bog worldwide. This finding suggests that climate, rather than land-use history, controls blanket-bog distribution in the UK and everywhere else. We set out to test this hypothesis for blanket bogs in the UK using bioclimate envelope modelling compared with a database of peat initiation age estimates. We used both pollen-based reconstructions and climate model simulations of climate changes between the mid-Holocene (6000 yr BP, 6 ka) and modern climate to drive PeatStash and predict areas of blanket bog. We compiled data on the timing of blanket-bog initiation, based on 228 age determinations at sites where peat directly overlies mineral soil. The model predicts that large areas of northern Britain would have had blanket bog by 6000 yr BP, and the area suitable for peat growth extended to the south after this time. A similar pattern is shown by the basal peat ages and new blanket bog appeared over a larger area during the late Holocene, the greatest expansion being in Ireland, Wales, and southwest England, as the model predicts. The expansion was driven by a summer cooling of about 2 °C, shown by both pollen-based reconstructions and climate models. The data show early Holocene (pre-Neolithic) blanket-bog initiation at over half of the sites in the core areas of Scotland and northern England. The temporal patterns and concurrence of the bioclimate model predictions and initiation data suggest that climate change provides a parsimonious explanation for the early Holocene distribution and later expansion of

  15. Climate-driven expansion of blanket bogs in Britain during the Holocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallego-Sala, A. V.; Charman, D. J.; Harrison, S. P.; Li, G.; Prentice, I. C.

    2015-10-01

    Blanket bog occupies approximately 6 % of the area of the UK today. The Holocene expansion of this hyperoceanic biome has previously been explained as a consequence of Neolithic forest clearance. However, the present distribution of blanket bog in Great Britain can be predicted accurately with a simple model (PeatStash) based on summer temperature and moisture index thresholds, and the same model correctly predicts the highly disjunct distribution of blanket bog worldwide. This finding suggests that climate, rather than land-use history, controls blanket-bog distribution in the UK and everywhere else. We set out to test this hypothesis for blanket bogs in the UK using bioclimate envelope modelling compared with a database of peat initiation age estimates. We used both pollen-based reconstructions and climate model simulations of climate changes between the mid-Holocene (6000 yr BP, 6 ka) and modern climate to drive PeatStash and predict areas of blanket bog. We compiled data on the timing of blanket-bog initiation, based on 228 age determinations at sites where peat directly overlies mineral soil. The model predicts large areas of northern Britain would have had blanket bog by 6000 yr BP, and the area suitable for peat growth extended to the south after this time. A similar pattern is shown by the basal peat ages and new blanket bog appeared over a larger area during the late Holocene, the greatest expansion being in Ireland, Wales and southwest England, as the model predicts. The expansion was driven by a summer cooling of about 2 °C, shown by both pollen-based reconstructions and climate models. The data show early Holocene (pre-Neolithic) blanket-bog initiation at over half of the sites in the core areas of Scotland, and northern England. The temporal patterns and concurrence of the bioclimate model predictions and initiation data suggest that climate change provides a parsimonious explanation for the early Holocene distribution and later expansion of blanket

  16. Functional diversity, succession, and human-mediated disturbances in raised bog vegetation.

    PubMed

    Dyderski, Marcin K; Czapiewska, Natalia; Zajdler, Mateusz; Tyborski, Jarosław; Jagodziński, Andrzej M

    2016-08-15

    Raised and transitional bogs are one of the most threatened types of ecosystem, due to high specialisation of biota, associated with adaptations to severe environmental conditions. The aim of the study was to characterize the relationships between functional diversity (reflecting ecosystem-shaping processes) of raised bog plant communities and successional gradients (expressed as tree dimensions) and to show how impacts of former clear cuts may alter these relationships in two raised bogs in 'Bory Tucholskie' National Park (N Poland). Herbaceous layers of the plant communities were examined by floristic relevés (25m(2)) on systematically established transects. We also assessed patterns of tree ring widths. There were no relationships between vegetation functional diversity components and successional progress: only functional dispersion was negatively, but weakly, correlated with median DBH. Lack of these relationships may be connected with lack of prevalence of habitat filtering and low level of competition over all the successional phases. Former clear cuts, indicated by peaks of tree ring width, influenced the growth of trees in the bogs studied. In the bog with more intensive clear cuts we found more species with higher trophic requirements, which may indicate nutrient influx. However, we did not observe differences in vegetation patterns, functional traits or functional diversity indices between the two bogs studied. We also did not find an influence of clear cut intensity on relationships between functional diversity indices and successional progress. Thus, we found that alteration of the ecosystems studied by neighbourhood clear cuts did not affect the bogs strongly, as the vegetation was resilient to these impacts. Knowledge of vegetation resilience after clear cuts may be crucial for conservation planning in raised bog ecosystems. PMID:27110977

  17. The Auchenorrhyncha fauna of peat bogs in the Austrian part of the Bohemian Forest (Insecta, Hemiptera).

    PubMed

    Holzinger, Werner E; Schlosser, Lydia

    2013-01-01

    The first overview on the Auchenorrhyncha fauna of peat bogs of the Austrian Bohemian Forest is presented. Seven oligotrophic peat bog sites were studied in 2011 by suction sampler ("G-Vac") and 93 Auchenorrhyncha species (with 7465 adult specimens) were recorded. Eleven species (about 18 % of the individuals) are tyrphobiontic or tyrphophilous. The relative species abundance plot is not very steep; the six most abundant species represent 50 % of the individuals. The most common species is Conomelus anceps (17 % of the individuals). Compared to the whole Austrian Auchenorrhyncha fauna, the fauna of peat bogs comprises distinctly more univoltine species and more species hibernating in nymphal stage. Densities of adult Auchenorrhyncha in peat bogs are low in spring (about 10-60 individuals per m²) and high in July, with up to 180 (±50) individuals per m². Disturbed peat bogs have higher species numbers and higher Auchenorrhyncha densities in total, but lower numbers and densities in peat bog specialists. PMID:24039517

  18. The water balance as an approach to assessing groundwater dependency in raised bog wetlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regan, Shane

    2014-05-01

    The management of raised bogs, as active peat-forming ecosystems, requires an understanding of the relationships between regional hydrology and wetland ecohydrological processes. Marginal drainage, < 20 years, of Clara Bog, Ireland, has resulted in dramatic morphological changes. Differential peat consolidation has fragmented what was one topographic catchment area into four distinct catchment areas. Runoff has reduced by c. 40% from the original main catchment area and there has been a c. 25% decrease of suitably saturated areas supporting the growth of sphagnum moss species. In undisturbed bog systems the recharge rate of water seeping through the bog body to the regional groundwater table is in the order of 40 mm/ year. The downward seepage rate in Clara is > 100 mm/ year. A reduction in pore water pressure, due to drainage of the regional groundwater table, has disturbed the structure of the peat substratum and induced water loss from peat storage, resulting in the ecohydrological modification of the bog surface. Numerical modelling of a simulated raised groundwater table reduces the leakage rate to between 30 and 50 mm/ year. The significance is that the hydraulic gradient of the regional groundwater table is an important environmental supporting condition in raised bog ecosystems, implying indirect groundwater dependence.

  19. Responses of Bog Vegetation and CO2 Exchange to Experimental N and PK Addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juutinen, S.; Bubier, J. L.; Shrestha, P.; Smith, R.; Moore, T.

    2008-12-01

    Atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition has the potential to alter the structure and functioning of nutrient poor wetland ecosystems. It is important to quantify the effect of N input on ecosystem carbon (C) sequestration in these globally important C storages. We address this issue at the temperate Mer Bleue bog, ON, Canada. After 6 years of experimental fertilization, we saw that high N deposition can change mixed Sphagnum and dwarf shrub dominated communities to taller and denser dwarf shrub communities that are losing moss cover, and which might have even lower net C uptake. Now, after 8 years of fertilization and with new treatments we quantify the relationship between the plant community structure and ecosystem CO2 exchange. Three levels of N fertilization were applied with or without phosphorus and potassium (PK) into triplicate plots. We measured light saturated net ecosystem CO2 exchange (NEE), and its components ecosystem respiration and gross photosynthesis using clear and dark chambers (May-August). Vegetation characteristics were quantified by measuring foliage cover (LAI), amount of woody and foliar biomass, and abundance of moss species (point interception technique), moss growth (cranked wires) and green area of vascular leaves and moss. Addition of PK fertilizer did not alter NEE or its components relative to the control. The 8-year low N addition alone and with PK, and the 4-year fertilization with high N levels resulted in the highest net ecosystem CO2 uptake relative to the control. The ecosystem respiration increased with increasing N input rate. All levels of N fertilization resulted in higher gross photosynthesis than the control, but there was no increasing trend with increasing N input. Vascular foliage increased, while moss cover drastically decreased with increasing levels of N fertilization. At the highest level of N (and PK) addition woody biomass increased at the expense of leaf increment. Dependencies of ecosystem CO2 exchange on the

  20. Can continental bogs withstand the pressures from climate change?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roulet, Nigel; Humphreys, Elyn; Wu, Jianghua; Frolking, Steve; Talbot, Julie; Lafleur, Peter; Moore, Tim

    2016-04-01

    Not all peatlands are alike. Theoretical and process based models suggest that ombrogenic, oligotrophic peatlands can withstand the pressures due to climate change because of the feedbacks among ecosystem production, decomposition and water storage. Although there have been many inductive explanations inferring from paleo-records, there is a lack of deductive empirical tests of the models predictions of these systems' stability and there are few records of the changes in the net ecosystem carbon balance (NECB) of peatlands that are long enough to examine the dynamics of the NECB in relation to climate variability. Continuous measurements of all the components of the NECB and the associated general climatic and environmental conditions have been made at the Mer Bleue (MB) peatland, a large, 28 km2, 5 m deep, raised ombro-oligotrophic, shrub and Sphagnum covered bog, near Ottawa, Canada from May 1, 1998 until the present. The sixteen-year daily CO2, CH4, and DOC flux and NECB covers a wide range of variability in peatland water storage from very dry to very wet growing seasons. We used the MB data to test the extent of MB peatland's stability and the strength of the underlying key feedback between the NECB and changes in water storage projected by the models. In 2007 we published a six-year (1999-2004) net ecosystem carbon balance (NECB) for MB of ~22 ± 40 g C m-2 yr-1, but we have since recalculated the 1998-2004 NECB to be 32 ± 40 g C m-2 yr-1 based on a reanalyzed average NEP of 51 ± 41 g C m-2 yr-1. Over the same period the net loss of C via the CH4 and DOC fluxes were -4 ± 1 and -15 ± 3 g C m-2 yr-1. The 1998-2004 six-year MB average NECB is similar to the long-term C accumulation rate, estimated from MB peat cores, for the last 3,000 years. The post 2004 MB NEP has increased to an average of ~96 ± 32 g C m-2 yr-1 largely to there being generally wetter growing seasons. The losses of C via DOC (18 ± 1 g C m-2 yr-1) and CH4 (7 ± 4 g C m-2 yr-1) while

  1. The hydrology of natural and artificial bog pools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holden, Joseph; Turner, Ed; McKenzie, Rebecca; Baird, Andy; Billett, Mike; Chapman, Pippa; Dinsmore, Kerry; Dooling, Gemma

    2016-04-01

    Twelve bog pools were monitored over a 3.5-year period (2012-2015) in the Cross Lochs blanket peatland in the Flow Country of northern Scotland. Six pools were located in a natural pool complex while the other six were in an adjacent area where the peat had been ditched in the 1970s. The ditches had been subsequently dammed with peat in 2002 resulting in dozens of artificial pools along each ditch, with one pool upslope of each dam. The natural pools ranged in area from 15 m2 to 850 m2, while the artificial pools are a more uniform size at c.3 - 4 m2. Following a dry first summer, water levels in the 12 pools were lower throughout the subsequent winter and spring than they were in proceeding years showing strong inter-annual variability in pool levels even for winter months. Over the three year study, water level fluctuations in the natural pools were very different to those in the artificial pools. The natural pools showed subdued responses to rainfall and, after rainfall, slow falls in water level dominated by evaporation; the hydraulic conductivity of the peat was very low at depths of 30 and 50 cm below the peat surface around the pools (median values of 2.49 × 10-5 and 1.09 × 10-5 cm s-1 respectively). The artificial pools had much larger monthly interquartile ranges of water levels and a greater rise and fall of pool water level in response to each individual rainfall event compared with the natural pools. Thus the biogeochemistry and carbon cycling processes that occur within the natural pools is not likely to be replicated in the artificial pools as their hydrological behaviour is quite different. Slope position was a factor in terms of hydrological response of pools with those further downslope having higher relative water levels for longer periods of time compared to upslope pools. Thus we anticipate that local biogeochemical processes in and around bog pools may be impacted by slope position and by whether they are natural pools or artificial pools

  2. The growth of permafrost-free bogs at the southern margin of permafrost, 1947-2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinton, W. L.; Sonnentag, O.; Connon, R.; Chasmer, L.

    2013-12-01

    In the high-Boreal region of NW Canada, permafrost occurs predominantly in the form of tree-covered peat plateaus within a permafrost-free and treeless terrain dominated by flat bogs. This region is experiencing unprecedented rates of thaw. Over the last several decades, such thaw has significantly expanded the permafrost-free, treeless terrain at the expense of the plateaus. This rapid change in land-cover has raised concerns over its impact on northern water resources, since remotely sensed data and ground observations indicate that the two major land-covers in this region have very different hydrological functions. Peat plateaus have a limited capacity to store water, a relatively large snowmelt water supply and hydraulic gradients that direct excess water into adjacent permafrost-free wetlands. As such, the plateaus function primarily as runoff generators. Plateaus also obstruct and redirect water movement in adjacent wetlands since the open water surfaces of the latter occupy an elevation below the permafrost table. By contrast, bogs are primarily water storage features since they are surrounded by raised permafrost and therefore less able to exchange surface and near-surface flows with the basin drainage network. Accurate estimate of the permafrost and permafrost-free areas is needed for accurate predictions of basin runoff and storage. This study examines the perimeter-area characteristics of bogs and permafrost plateaus, using fractal geometry as a basis for quantifying these properties. Image analyses are applied to aerial photographs and satellite imagery of Scotty Creek, NWT over the period 1947-2010. Preliminary analyses suggest that the expanding bogs and shrinking permafrost plateaus behave as fractals, meaning that their perimeter-area characteristics can be described by simple power equations. The area-frequency characteristics of bogs and plateaus have a hyperbolic distribution with relatively few large bogs and plateaus and numerous small ones

  3. Bog Manganese Ore: A Resource for High Manganese Steel Making

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pani, Swatirupa; Singh, Saroj K.; Mohapatra, Birendra K.

    2016-05-01

    Bog manganese ore, associated with the banded iron formation of the Iron Ore Group (IOG), occurs in large volume in northern Odisha, India. The ore is powdery, fine-grained and soft in nature with varying specific gravity (2.8-3.9 g/cm3) and high thermo-gravimetric loss, It consists of manganese (δ-MnO2, manganite, cryptomelane/romanechite with minor pyrolusite) and iron (goethite/limonite and hematite) minerals with sub-ordinate kaolinite and quartz. It shows oolitic/pisolitic to globular morphology nucleating small detritus of quartz, pyrolusite/romanechite and hematite. The ore contains around 23% Mn and 28% Fe with around 7% of combined alumina and silica. Such Mn ore has not found any use because of its sub-grade nature and high iron content, and is hence considered as waste. The ore does not respond to any physical beneficiation techniques because of the combined state of the manganese and iron phases. Attempts have been made to recover manganese and iron value from such ore through smelting. A sample along with an appropriate charge mix when processed through a plasma reactor, produced high-manganese steel alloy having 25% Mn within a very short time (<10 min). Minor Mn content from the slag was recovered through acid leaching. The aim of this study has been to recover a value-added product from the waste.

  4. Hydrologic conditions in the Klatt Bog area, Anchorage, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Glass, R.L.

    1986-01-01

    Klatt Bog is a 2.3 sq mi wetland in Anchorage, Alaska which provides habitat for many wildlife species but also offers potential sites for residential, commercial, and agricultural developments. Precipitation, the main source of water for the area, averages 15 in/yr; during the 1983 study period, precipitation was 12.16 inches. Estimates of evapotranspiration, considered to be the major component of water outflow, range from 10 to 20 inches. Surface runoff and groundwater outflow during 1983 are estimated to be 2.8 and < 0.2 inches, respectively. During summer, most of the runoff is derived from groundwater discharge near the upgradient eastern edge of the wetland. The wetland 's aquifer system is composed of fibrous peat which overlies a poorly permeable layer of silt and clay. The aquifer is recharged by infiltration of precipitation and inflow of groundwater from upland areas east of the wetland. During 1983 the water table was at or within 3 ft of land surface in most areas and its seasonal fluctuation was < 2 feet. Water collected from four shallow observation wells, two ponds, and two sites on a stream had concentrations of dissolved iron ranging from 2,300 to 6,100 micrograms/L. (Author 's abstract)

  5. Bog Manganese Ore: A Resource for High Manganese Steel Making

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pani, Swatirupa; Singh, Saroj K.; Mohapatra, Birendra K.

    2016-06-01

    Bog manganese ore, associated with the banded iron formation of the Iron Ore Group (IOG), occurs in large volume in northern Odisha, India. The ore is powdery, fine-grained and soft in nature with varying specific gravity (2.8-3.9 g/cm3) and high thermo-gravimetric loss, It consists of manganese (δ-MnO2, manganite, cryptomelane/romanechite with minor pyrolusite) and iron (goethite/limonite and hematite) minerals with sub-ordinate kaolinite and quartz. It shows oolitic/pisolitic to globular morphology nucleating small detritus of quartz, pyrolusite/romanechite and hematite. The ore contains around 23% Mn and 28% Fe with around 7% of combined alumina and silica. Such Mn ore has not found any use because of its sub-grade nature and high iron content, and is hence considered as waste. The ore does not respond to any physical beneficiation techniques because of the combined state of the manganese and iron phases. Attempts have been made to recover manganese and iron value from such ore through smelting. A sample along with an appropriate charge mix when processed through a plasma reactor, produced high-manganese steel alloy having 25% Mn within a very short time (<10 min). Minor Mn content from the slag was recovered through acid leaching. The aim of this study has been to recover a value-added product from the waste.

  6. Increased tree establishment in Lithuanian peat bogs--insights from field and remotely sensed approaches.

    PubMed

    Edvardsson, Johannes; Šimanauskienė, Rasa; Taminskas, Julius; Baužienė, Ieva; Stoffel, Markus

    2015-02-01

    Over the past century an ongoing establishment of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.), sometimes at accelerating rates, is noted at three studied Lithuanian peat bogs, namely Kerėplis, Rėkyva and Aukštumala, all representing different degrees of tree coverage and geographic settings. Present establishment rates seem to depend on tree density on the bog surface and are most significant at sparsely covered sites where about three-fourth of the trees have established since the mid-1990s, whereas the initial establishment in general was during the early to mid-19th century. Three methods were used to detect, compare and describe tree establishment: (1) tree counts in small plots, (2) dendrochronological dating of bog pine trees, and (3) interpretation of aerial photographs and historical maps of the study areas. In combination, the different approaches provide complimentary information but also weigh up each other's drawbacks. Tree counts in plots provided a reasonable overview of age class distributions and enabled capturing of the most recently established trees with ages less than 50 years. The dendrochronological analysis yielded accurate tree ages and a good temporal resolution of long-term changes. Tree establishment and spread interpreted from aerial photographs and historical maps provided a good overview of tree spread and total affected area. It also helped to verify the results obtained with the other methods and an upscaling of findings to the entire peat bogs. The ongoing spread of trees in predominantly undisturbed peat bogs is related to warmer and/or drier climatic conditions, and to a minor degree to land-use changes. Our results therefore provide valuable insights into vegetation changes in peat bogs, also with respect to bog response to ongoing and future climatic changes. PMID:25310886

  7. Can restoration convert a degraded bog in southern Bavaria to a carbon sink and climate cooler?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Förster, Christoph; Drösler, Matthias

    2014-05-01

    The peatland area of Germany is about 14.000 km² (Succow & Joosten 2001) with 8% natural like bogs and 4% natural like fens (Höper 2006). All other peatland areas are more or less intensively used and thus, lost their sink function for carbon. If, theoretically, all German peatlands would be rewetted, this restoration would lead to a carbon mitigation of 9.5 Mio. t CO2-C equivalents (Freibauer et al. 2009). In test areas like the studied bog, the viability and potential of peatland restoration for climate mitigation can be proofed. The investigated bog is situated close to the Bavarian Alps; one part of this bog is extensively used and had been rewetted in 1993 except of a small stripe; management was stopped totally at another stripe. The second part of this bog had been drained without any further use. Here a Calluna heath established, accompanied by Pine trees. The restoration of this bog heath was done in two time steps; here a chronosequence of succession after restoration at different water table levels was investigated. To get to the greenhouse gas (GHG) balances of CO2 CH4 and N2O, gas flux measurements were done for two years using the chamber technique of Drösler (2005). At both areas, the degraded sites were sources for GHG (+203 to +736 g CO2-C-equiv m-2 a-1). Restoration reduced these emissions depending on water table and succession of bog species (-51 to +557 g CO2-C-equiv m-2 a-1). Depending on the vegetation's vitality GHG balances of already established natural like sites varied in between the years (-189 to +264 g CO2-C-equiv m-2 a-1) mainly driven by the oscillation of their water table. Stop of management and development of Sphagnum communities turned most of the sites into sinks for GHG (-216 to +7 g CO2-C-equiv m-2 a-1). Thus restoration turned degraded bogs efficiently to carbon sinks and climate coolers in dependence of a proper water table management, withdrawal of land use and vegetation succession. Key words: bog, greenhouse gases

  8. A new peat bog testate amoeba transfer function and quantitative palaeohydrological reconstructions from southern Patagonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Bellen, S.; Mauquoy, D.; Payne, R.; Roland, T. P.; Hughes, P. D.; Daley, T. J.; Street-Perrot, F. A.; Loader, N.

    2013-12-01

    Testate amoebae have been used extensively as proxies for environmental change and palaeoclimate reconstructions in European and North American peatlands. The presence of these micro-organisms in surface samples is generally significantly linked to the local water table depth (WTD) and preservation of the amoeba shells downcore allows for millennial length water table reconstructions. Peat bog archive records in southern Patagonia are increasingly the focus of palaeoecological research due to the possibility of detecting changes in the Southern Westerlies. These Sphagnum magellanicum-dominated peat bogs are characterised by a wide range of water table depths, from wet hollows to high hummocks (>100 cm above the water table). Here we present the first transfer function for this region along with ~2k-year palaeorecords from local peat bogs. A modern dataset (155 samples) was sampled along transects from five bogs in 2012 and 2013. Measurements of WTD, pH and conductivity were taken for all samples. The transfer function model was based on the 2012 dataset, while the 2013 samples served as an independent test set to validate the model. Besides the standard leave-one-out cross-validation, we applied leave-one-site-out and leave-one transect-out cross-validation, which are effective means of verifying the degree of clustering in the dataset. To ensure that the environmental gradient had been evenly sampled we quantified the root-mean-squared error of prediction (RMSEP) individually for segments of this gradient. Ordinations showed a clear hydrological gradient in amoeba assemblages, with the dominant Assulina muscorum at the dry end and Amphitrema wrightianum and Difflugia globulosa at the wet end. Canonical correspondence analysis showed that WTD was the most important environmental variable, accounting for 18% of the variance in amoeba assemblages. A weighted averaging-partial least squares model showed best performance in cross-validation, using the 2013 data as an

  9. CO2 and CH4 fluxes of contrasting pristine bogs in southern Patagonia (Tierra del Fuego, Argentina)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Münchberger, Wiebke; Blodau, Christian; Kleinebecker, Till; Pancotto, Veronica

    2015-04-01

    South Patagonian peatlands cover a wide range of the southern terrestrial area and thus are an important component of the terrestrial global carbon cycle. These extremely southern ecosystems have been accumulating organic material since the last glaciation up to now and are - in contrast to northern hemisphere bogs - virtually unaffected by human activities. So far, little attention has been given to these pristine ecosystems and great carbon reservoirs which will potentially be affected by climate change. We aim to fill the knowledge gap in the quantity of carbon released from these bogs and in what controls their fluxes. We study the temporal and spatial variability of carbon fluxes in two contrasting bog ecosystems in southern Patagonia, Tierra del Fuego. Sphagnum-dominated bog ecosystems in Tierra del Fuego are similar to the ones on the northern hemisphere, while cushion plant-dominated bogs can almost exclusively be found in southern Patagonia. These unique cushion plant-dominated bogs are found close to the coast and their occurrence changes gradually to Sphagnum-dominated bogs with increasing distance from the coast. We conduct closed chamber measurements and record relevant environmental variables for CO2 and CH4 fluxes during two austral vegetation periods from December to April. Chamber measurements are performed on microforms representing the main vegetation units of the studied bogs. Gas concentrations are measured with a fast analyzer (Los Gatos Ultraportable Greenhouse Gas Analyzer) allowing to accurately record CH4 fluxes in the ppm range. We present preliminary results of the carbon flux variability from south Patagonian peat bogs and give insights into their environmental controls. Carbon fluxes of these two bog types appear to be highly different. In contrast to Sphagnum-dominated bogs, cushion plant-dominated bogs release almost no CH4 while their CO2 flux in both, photosynthesis and respiration, can be twice as high as for Sphagnum

  10. Lead isotope ratios in bone ash of blesbok (Damaliscus pygargus phillipsi): a means of screening for the accumulation of contaminants from uraniferous rocks.

    PubMed

    Nöthling, Johan O; Du Toit, Johannes S; Myburgh, Jan G

    2014-09-19

    This study was done to determine whether blesbok (Damaliscus pygargus phillipsi) from the Krugersdorp Game Reserve (KGR) in Gauteng Province, South Africa have higher concentrations of (238)U and higher (206)Pb/(204)Pb and (207)Pb/(204)Pb ratios in their bone ash than blesbok from a nearby control reserve that is not exposed to mine water and has no outcrops of uraniferous rocks. Eight blesbok females from the KGR and seven from the control site, all killed with a brain shot, were used. A Thermo X-series 2 quadrupole ICPMS was used to measure the concentrations of (238)U and lead and a Nu Instruments NuPlasma HR MC-ICP-MS to measure the lead isotope ratios in the tibial ash from each animal. KGR blesbok had higher mean concentrations of (238)U (P = 0.02) and ratios of (206)Pb/(204)Pb and (207)Pb/(204)Pb (P < 0.00001) than the control blesbok. The probability of rejecting the false null hypothesis of no difference in the (206)Pb/(204)Pb or (207)Pb/(204)Pb ratios between KGR and control reserve animals (the power of the test) was 0.999. The blesbok from the KGR accumulated contaminants from an uraniferous environment. The (206)Pb/(204)Pb and (207)Pb/(204)Pb ratios in tibial ash proved effective in confirming accumulation of contaminants from uraniferous rocks. PMID:24967558

  11. The Sphagnum microbiome supports bog ecosystem functioning under extreme conditions.

    PubMed

    Bragina, Anastasia; Oberauner-Wappis, Lisa; Zachow, Christin; Halwachs, Bettina; Thallinger, Gerhard G; Müller, Henry; Berg, Gabriele

    2014-09-01

    Sphagnum-dominated bogs represent a unique yet widely distributed type of terrestrial ecosystem and strongly contribute to global biosphere functioning. Sphagnum is colonized by highly diverse microbial communities, but less is known about their function. We identified a high functional diversity within the Sphagnum microbiome applying an Illumina-based metagenomic approach followed by de novo assembly and MG-RAST annotation. An interenvironmental comparison revealed that the Sphagnum microbiome harbours specific genetic features that distinguish it significantly from microbiomes of higher plants and peat soils. The differential traits especially support ecosystem functioning by a symbiotic lifestyle under poikilohydric and ombrotrophic conditions. To realise a plasticity-stability balance, we found abundant subsystems responsible to cope with oxidative and drought stresses, to exchange (mobile) genetic elements, and genes that encode for resistance to detrimental environmental factors, repair and self-controlling mechanisms. Multiple microbe-microbe and plant-microbe interactions were also found to play a crucial role as indicated by diverse genes necessary for biofilm formation, interaction via quorum sensing and nutrient exchange. A high proportion of genes involved in nitrogen cycle and recycling of organic material supported the role of bacteria for nutrient supply. 16S rDNA analysis indicated a higher structural diversity than that which had been previously detected using PCR-dependent techniques. Altogether, the diverse Sphagnum microbiome has the ability to support the life of the host plant and the entire ecosystem under changing environmental conditions. Beyond this, the moss microbiome presents a promising bio-resource for environmental biotechnology - with respect to novel enzymes or stress-protecting bacteria. PMID:25113243

  12. Draft Genome Sequences of Three Chromobacterium subtsugae Isolates from Wild and Cultivated Cranberry Bogs in Southeastern Massachusetts

    PubMed Central

    Vöing, Kristin; Harrison, Alisha

    2015-01-01

    Chromobacterium subtsugae was isolated from cranberry bogs in Massachusetts. While it is unknown what environmental role these bacteria play in bog soils, they hold potential as biological control agents against the larvae of insect pests. Potential virulence genes were identified, including the violacein synthesis pathway, siderophores, and several chitinases. PMID:26358592

  13. Changing sources of respiration between a black spruce forest and thermokarst bog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waldrop, M. P.; McFarland, J.; Czimczik, C. I.; Euskirchen, E. S.; Amendolara, T.; Scott, G. J.; Turetsky, M. R.; Harden, J. W.; McGuire, A. D.

    2011-12-01

    Permafrost thaw in lowland black spruce forests (Picea mariana) which develop into thermokarst bogs can alter ecosystem carbon balance through positive or negative feedbacks to climate warming. In this context, the responses of plant and soil microbial communities to permafrost thaw, and their roles in altered carbon balance, need to be understood. In addition, gross changes in microbial community composition, such as fungal:bacterial ratios and their temperature response functions, are poorly characterized in permafrost thaw experiments. In this study, we compared carbon fluxes between a lowland black spruce forest with intact permafrost and an adjacent thermokarst bog that developed 20-30 years ago located near the Bonanza Creek Experimental Forest in Alaska. We quantified net ecosystem exchange (NEE), ecosystem respiration (ER), and gross primary productivity (GPP) using flux autochambers, and partitioned sources of ecosystem respiration into autotrophic vs. heterotrophic sources using radiocarbon analysis of ecosystem and microbial respiration, and atmospheric CO2. We further partitioned microbial respiration into fungal vs. bacterial sources using substrate inhibition techniques. Preliminary results indicate that in mid summer of 2011 the thermokarst bog was a source of CO2 to the atmosphere. NEE data indicated that the black spruce understory was a source of CO2. However, because flux tower data showed that the black spruce ecosystem was actually a net sink, GPP by the black spruce trees must have been large. In the black spruce forest ER was dominated by plant respiration in the spring and by microbial respiration in the fall whereas in the thermokarst bog CO2 was derived from deeper soil C sources. Although microbial respiration was roughly balanced between fungi and bacteria in the black spruce forest, respiration was dominantly bacterial in the thermokarst bog. Our initial results show that thermokarst bogs are source of C to the atmosphere during summer

  14. Holocene Carbon Accumulation Rates in the SPRUCE Bog Prior to Warming and Elevated CO2 Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McFarlane, K. J.; Iversen, C. M.; Phillips, J. R.; Brice, D. J.; Hanson, P. J.

    2015-12-01

    In the Spruce and Peatland Responses Under Climatic and Environmental Change (SPRUCE) experiment warming and elevated CO2 treatments are being applied to an ombrotrophic spruce bog: the S1 Bog (S1) at Marcell Experimental Forest in northern Minnesota. To provide a historical context for recent and expected experimentally-induced changes in the bog's belowground carbon balance, we reconstructed historical carbon accumulation rates in peat using radiocarbon from 19 peat cores collected from randomly distributed SPRUCE plots. This unusually high number of cores allows us to assess spatial variability in age-depth profiles and accumulation rates across the SPRUCE study area within S1. This data, along with recent C flux measurements, show that the bog has been accumulating carbon for at least 12,0000 years and has continued to be a sink for atmospheric carbon of approximately 150 g C m-2 yr-1 in recent decades. Early Holocene accumulation rates are similar to those reported for other northern peatlands (approximately 25 g C m-2 yr-1), but apparent carbon accumulation decreased substantially around 3,000 years ago (to 5-15 g C m-2 yr-1) and stayed low until the last century. This decrease is considerably larger than that reported for other peatlands and is therefore unlikely to result only from cooling during the Holocene or bog succession. Although no charcoal has been found in peat at this site, evidence from a neighboring bog indicates a considerable amount of peat formed during this period was consumed by fire and it is possible that smoldering fires consumed peat, resulting in low apparent accumulation rates. Past droughts may have also contributed to observed trends by lowering the acrotelm/catotelm boundary, allowing for enhanced aerobic peat decomposition. This work provides important background information on spatial variability and carbon biogeochemistry that will aid in interpretation of climate change simulation experiments at S1.

  15. The core microbiome bonds the Alpine bog vegetation to a transkingdom metacommunity.

    PubMed

    Bragina, Anastasia; Berg, Christian; Berg, Gabriele

    2015-09-01

    Bog ecosystems fulfil important functions in Earth's carbon and water turnover. While plant communities and their keystone species Sphagnum have been well studied, less is known about the microbial communities associated with them. To study our hypothesis that bog plants share an essential core of their microbiome despite their different phylogenetic origins, we analysed four plant community plots with 24 bryophytes, vascular plants and lichen species in two Alpine bogs in Austria by 16S rDNA amplicon sequencing followed by bioinformatic analyses. The overall bog microbiome was classified into 32 microbial phyla, while Proteobacteria (30.8%), Verrucomicrobia (20.3%) and Planctomycetes (15.1%) belonged to the most abundant groups. Interestingly, the archaeal phylum Euryarcheota represented 7.2% of total microbial abundance. However, a high portion of micro-organisms remained unassigned at phylum and class level, respectively. The core microbiome of the bog vegetation contained 177 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) (150 526 seq.) and contributed to 49.5% of the total microbial abundance. Only a minor portion of associated core micro-organisms was host specific for examined plant groups (5.9-11.6%). Using our new approach to analyse plant-microbial communities in an integral framework of ecosystem, vegetation and microbiome, we demonstrated that bog vegetation harboured a core microbiome that is shared between plants and lichens over the whole ecosystem and formed a transkingdom metacommunity. All micro- and macro-organisms are connected to keystone Sphagnum mosses via set of microbial species, for example Burkholderia bryophila which was found associated with a wide spectrum of host plants and is known for a beneficial plant-microbe interaction. PMID:26335913

  16. Hydrology controls methane and nitrous oxide fluxes in swamp and bog forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mander, Ülo; Pärn, Jaan; Maddison, Martin; Soosaar, Kaido; Salm, Jüri-Ott; Sohar, Kristina; Teemusk, Alar

    2016-04-01

    We used data from a global soil, and N2O and CH4 gas sampling campaign. The objective was to analyse N2O and CH4 emissions related to peat conditions in swamp and bog forests. Altogether, we studied 21 swamp and bog forest sites under various climates: 3 alder swamps and 3 artificially drained bog pine forests in Estonia (Jan.-Dec. 2009), 2 bog forests in Transylvania/Romania (Apr. 2012 & June 2014), 3 cypress swamps in the Everglades (Apr. & Dec. 2013), 2 bog forests in West Siberia (July 2013) and a bog forest in Tasmania (Jan.-Feb. 2014). The N2O and CH4 effluxes were measured during 5-6 days with 8-10 opaque static chambers per site. Soil samples were taken for further analysis of pHKCl, NO3-N, NH4-N, soluble P, K, Ca and Mg, totN and C. Groundwater was measured from sampling wells. The most significant independent factor for site average CH4 fluxes was groundwater depth - an exponential relationship; R2=0.42; p=0.0007; n=21. The N2O fluxes showed a decreasing (power) relationship with the C/N ratio - R2=0.53; p<0.0001; n=21. Related to groundwater level, the N2O fluxes peak at around -40cm. Variation in greenhouse gas fluxes was largest at the more favourable conditions - at optimal water table (+5 to -20cm) for CH4 and at low C/N for N2O. The results agree with previous literature but they are the first to draw such conclusions from a global campaign following a uniform protocol.

  17. Relationship between peat geochemistry and depositional environments, Cranberry Island, Maine

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Raymond, R., Jr.; Cameron, C.C.; Cohen, A.D.

    1987-01-01

    The Heath, Great Cranberry Island, Maine, offers a unique locality for studying lateral and vertical relationships between radically different peat types within 1 km2. The majority of The Heath is a Sphagnum moss-dominated raised bog. Surrounding the raised bog is a swamp/marsh complex containing grass, sedge, Sphagnum moss, alder, tamarack, and skunk cabbage. Swamp/ marsh-deposited peat occurs both around the margins of The Heath and under Sphagnum-dominated peat, which was deposited within the raised bog. A third peat type, dominated by herbaceous aquatics, is present underlying the swamp/marsh-dominated peat but is not present as a dominant botanical community of The Heath. The three peat types have major differences in petrographic characteristics, ash contents, and associated minerals. Sulfur contents range from a low of 0.19 wt.% (dry) within the raised bog to a high of 4.44 wt% (dry) near the west end of The Heath, where swamp/marsh peat occurring directly behind a storm beach berm has been influenced by marine waters. The presence of major geochemical variations within a 1-km2 peat deposit suggests the need for in-depth characterization of potential peat resources prior to use. ?? 1987.

  18. Geology and recognition criteria for uranium deposits of the quartz-pebble conglomerate type. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Button, A.; Adams, S.S.

    1981-03-01

    This report is concerned with Precambrian uraniferous conglomerates. This class of deposit has been estimated to contain between approximately 16 and 35 percent of the global uranium reserve in two rather small areas, one in Canada, the other in South Africa. Similar conglomerates, which are often gold-bearing, are, however, rather widespread, being found in parts of most Precambrian shield areas. Data have been synthesized on the geologic habitat and character of this deposit type. The primary objective has been to provide the most relevant geologic observations in a structural fashion to allow resource studies and exploration to focus on the most prospective targets in the shortest possible time.

  19. Processes in the pore waters of peat deposits

    SciTech Connect

    Levshenko, T.V.; Efremova, A.G.; Galkina, Z.M.; Surkova, T.E.; Tolstov, K.A.

    1983-01-01

    The composition of the waters of modern peat bogs that have developed in the intracontinental regions under the conditions of bogs of the high-moor, mixed, and lowmoor types have been investigated for the case of a number of peat deposits of the Smolensk, Volgorad, and Pskov provinces. During the work the pH of the deposits and the C1-, Alk, SO/sup 2/-, Ca/sup 2 +/, Mg/sup 2 +/, K- contents of the pore water of modern peat beds were studied. The thickness of the deposits studied amounted to 5-7 m. Samples were taken every 0.5 m in depth. The water was separated from the deposits by pressing out.

  20. Interactions between Nitrogen Fixation and Methane Cycling in Northern Minnesota Peat Bogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, M. J.; Gaby, J. C.; Lin, X.; Morton, P. L.; Kostka, J. E.; Glass, J. B.

    2014-12-01

    Peatlands cover only 3% of the Earth's surface, yet store a third of soil carbon. Increasing global temperatures have the potential to change peatlands from a net sink to a net source of atmospheric carbon. N is a limiting nutrient in oligotrophic Sphagnum-dominated peatlands and biological N2 fixation likely supplies a significant but unknown fraction of N inputs. Moreover, environmental controls on diazotrophic community composition in N-limited peatlands are poorly constrained. Thus, improved understanding of feedbacks between the CH4 and N cycles is critical for predicting future changes to CH4 flux from peat bogs. We coupled measurements of N2 fixation activity measured by the acetylene (C2H2) reduction assay (ARA) with molecular analyses of expression and diversity of nifH genes encoding the molybdenum (Mo)-containing nitrogenase from two peat bogs in the Marcell Experimental Forest, Minnesota, USA. The top 10 cm of peat was sampled from the high CH4 flux S1 bog and the low CH4 flux Zim bog in April and June 2014. Despite similar N concentrations in the top 10 cm of both bogs (0.5-1.0 μM NO2-+NO3- and 2-3 μM NH4+), the S1 bog displayed variable ARA activity (1-100 nmol C2H4 h-1 g-1) whereas the Zim bog had consistently low ARA activity (<1 nmol C2H4 h-1 g-1). Highest ARA activity was measured in June from S1 bog hollows with higher moisture content incubated without O2 in the light (20-100 nmol C2H4 h-1 g-1). Dissolved Fe (1-25 μM) was higher in hollow vs. hummock samples, and at S1 vs. Zim bog, while dissolved V (4-14 nM) was consistently higher than Mo (1-4 nM), suggesting that alternative V or Fe-containing nitrogenases might be present in these bogs. In contrast, Cu, an essential micronutrient for aerobic methanotrophs, was higher in hummocks (25-48 nM) than hollows (6-17 nM). The facultative methanotroph Methylocella was the dominant diazotroph in the S1 bog based on high throughput next generation sequencing of nifH cDNA amplicons. Given previous

  1. Radioactive deposits of Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lovering, T.G.

    1953-01-01

    Thirty-five occurrences of radioactive rocks had been reported from Nevada prior to 1952. Twenty-five of these had been investigated by the U. S. Geological Survey and the U. S. Atomic Energy Commission. Of those investigated, uranium minerals were identified in 13; two contained a thorium mineral (monazite); the source of radioactivity on 7 properties was not ascertained; and one showed no abnormal radioactivity. Of the other reported occurrences, one is said to contain uraniferous hydrocarbons and 9 are placers containing thorian monazite. Pitchblende occurs at two localities; the East Walker River area, and the Stalin's Present prospect, where it is sparsely disseminated in tabular bodies cutting granitic rocks. Other uranium minerals found in the state include: carnotite, tyuyamunite, autunite, torbernite, gummite, uranophane, kasolite, and an unidentified mineral which may be dumontit. Monazite is the only thorium mineral of possible economic importance that has been reported. From an economic standpoint 9 only 4 of the properties examined showed reserves of uranium ore in 1952; these are: the Green Monster mine, which shipped 5 tons of ore to Marysvale, Utah, during 1951, the Majuba Hill mine, the Stalin's Present prospect, and the West Willys claim in the Washington district. Reserves of ore grade are small on all of these properties and probably cannot be developed commercially unless an ore-buying station is set up nearby. No estimate has been made of thorium reserves and no commercial deposits of thorium are known.

  2. Environmental assessment of no remedial action at the inactive uraniferous lignite ashing sites at Belfield and Bowman, North Dakota

    SciTech Connect

    1997-06-01

    The Belfield and Bowman sites were not included on the original congressional list of processing sites to be designated by the Secretary of Energy. Instead, the sites were nominated for designation by the Dakota Resource Council in a letter to the DOE (September 7, 1979). In a letter to the DOE (September 12, 1979), the state of North Dakota said that it did not believe the sites would qualify as processing sites under the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) because the activities at the sites involved only the ashing of uraniferous lignite coal and the ash was shipped out of state for actual processing. Nevertheless, on October 11, 1979, the state of North Dakota agreed to the designation of the sites because they met the spirit of the law (reduce public exposure to radiation resulting from past uranium operations). Therefore, these sites were designated by the Secretary of Energy for remedial action. Because of the relatively low health impacts determined for these sites, they were ranked as low priority and scheduled to be included in the final group of sites to be remediated.

  3. Environmental assessment of remedial action at the inactive uraniferous lignite ashing sites at Belfield and Bowman, North Dakota

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) of 1978 authorized the US Department of Energy (DOE) to perform remedial actions at Belfield and Bowman inactive lignite ashing sites in southwestern North Dakota to reduce the potential public health impacts from the residual radioactivity remaining at the sites. The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) promulgated standards (40 CFR 192) that contain measures to control the residual radioactive materials and other contaminated materials, and proposed standards to protect the groundwater from further degradation. Remedial action at the Belfield and Bowman sites must be performed in accordance with these standards and with the concurrence of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the state of North Dakota. The Belfield and Bowman designated sites were used by Union Carbide and Kerr-McGee, respectively, to process uraniferous lignite in the 1960s. Uranium-rich ash from rotary kiln processing of the lignite was loaded into rail cars and transported to uranium mills in Rifle, Colorado, and Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico, respectively. As a result of the ashing process, there is a total of 158,400 cubic yards (yd{sup 3}) [121,100 cubic meters (m{sup 3})] of radioactive ash-contaminated soils at the two sites. Windblown ash-contaminated soil covers an additional 21 acres (8.5 ha) around the site, which includes grazing land, wetlands, and a wooded habitat.

  4. Uranium deposits in Grant County, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Granger, Harry C.; Bauer, Herman L., Jr.; Lovering, Tom G.; Gillerman, Elliot

    1952-01-01

    The known uranium deposits of Grant county, N. Mex., are principally in the White Signal and Black Hawk districts. Both districts are within a northwesterly-trending belt of pre-Cambrian rocks, composed chiefly of granite with included gneisses, schists, and quartzites. Younger dikes and stocks intrude the pre-Cambrian complex. The White Signal district is on the southeast flanks of the Burro Mountains; the Black Hawk district is about 18 miles northwest of the town of White Signal. In the White Signal district the seconday uranium phosphates--autunite and torbernite--occur as fracture coatings and disseminations in oxidized parts of quartz-pyrite veins, and in the adjacent mafic dikes and granites; uraniferous limonite is common locally. Most of the known uraniferous deposits are less that 50 feet in their greatest dimension. The most promising deposits in the district are on the Merry Widow and Blue Jay claims. The richest sample taken from the Merry Widow mine contained more than 2 percent uranium and a sample from the Blue Jay property contained as much as 0.11 percent; samples from the other properties were of lower grade. In the Black Hawk district pitchblende is associated with nickel, silver, and cobalt minerals in fissure veins. The most promising properties in the Black Hawk district are the Black Hawk, Alhambra, and Rose mines. No uranium analyses from this district were available in 1951. There are no known minable reserves of uranium ore in either district, although there is some vein material at the Merry Widow mine of ore grade, if a market were available in the region.

  5. Lake or bog? Reconstructing baseline ecological conditions for the protected Galápagos Sphagnum peatbogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coffey, Emily E. D.; Froyd, Cynthia A.; Willis, Katherine J.

    2012-10-01

    This paper documents the first 10,000 year old plant macrofossil record of vegetation changes on the central island of Santa Cruz, providing information on Sphagnum bog vegetation patterns, local extinction of key taxa, and temporal successions in the Galápagos humid highlands. Vegetation change is reconstructed through examination of Holocene sedimentary sequences obtained from three Sphagnum bogs located within volcanic caldera forming the high elevation central ridge system of Santa Cruz Island. Results indicate that these specialized Sphagnum bog ecosystems are dynamic and have undergone considerable changes in vegetation composition, transitioning from diverse hygrophilous herbs and submerged aquatic ecosystems to drier Sphagnum/Pteridium bog systems, during the last 10,000 cal yr BP. Additionally a new aquatic genus previously undocumented on the islands, Elatine, was discovered at two of the study sites, but it is now extinct on the archipelago. Some of the observed vegetation successions may have been driven by climatic shifts occurring within the eastern equatorial Pacific (EEP). Other drivers including anthropogenic change are also considered significant over the last hundred years, placing strain on this naturally dynamic system. This study helps reveal patterns of change in the humid highlands over the last 10,000 cal yr BP regarding vegetation variability, climatic shifts, the historical influence of fire, tortoise disturbance, and recent anthropogenic impacts on the island.

  6. Peat bog Records of Atmospheric Dust fluxes - Holocene palaeoenvironmental and paleoclimatic implications for South America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Vleeschouwer, François; Vanneste, Heleen; Bertrand, Sébastien; Coronata, Andrea; Gaiero, Diego; Le Roux, Gael

    2013-04-01

    Little attention has been given to pre-anthropogenic signals recorded in peat bogs, especially in the Southern Hemisphere. Yet they are important to 1/ better understand the different particle sources during the Holocene and 2/ to tackle the linkage between atmospheric dust loads and climate change and 3/ to better understand the impact of dust on Holocene palaeoclimate and palaeoenvironments in a critical area for ocean productivity. In the PARAD project, we will explore the use of a broad range of trace elements and radiogenic isotopes (Pb, Nd, Hf) as dust proxies. Coupling these findings with biological proxies (plant macrofossils, pollen) and detailed age-depth modelling, we expect not only to identify and interpret new links between atmospheric dust chemistry and climate change. In this contribution, we will present the preliminary results on two peat records of natural atmospheric dust using the elemental and isotopic signature in Tierra del Fuego. Preliminary results on two peat sections covering the Holocene (Karukinka Bog, Chile, 8kyrs and Harberton bog, Argentina, 14kyrs) will be discussed. This encompasses density, ash content, elemental and isotopic geochemistry, macrofossil determination and radiocarbon dating. More specifically, Karukinka bog display several mineral peaks, which possible origin (soil particles, volcanism, cosmogenic dusts, marine aerosols…) will be discussed here as well as in Vanneste et al. (this conference, session Aeolian dust: Initiator, Player, and Recorder of Environmental Change).

  7. Ecology of southeastern shrub bogs (pocosins) and Carolina bays: a community profile

    SciTech Connect

    Sharitz, R.R.; Gibbons, J.W.

    1982-11-01

    Shrub bogs of the Southeast occur in areas of poorly developed internal drainage that typically but not always have highly developed organic or peat soils. Pocosins and Carolina bays are types or subclasses of shrub bogs on the coastal plains of the Carolinas and Georgia. They share roughly the same distribution patterns, soil types, floral and faunal species composition and other community attributes, but differ in geological formation. Carolina bays may contain pocosin as well as other communities, but are defined more by their unique elliptical shape and geomorphometry. The pocosin community is largely defined by its vegetation, a combination of a dense shrub understory and a sparser canopy. The community is part of a complex successional sequence of communities (sedge bogs, savannas, cedar bogs, and bay forests) that may be controlled by such factors as fire, hydroperiod, soil type, and peat depth. Pocosins and Carolina bays harbor a number of animal groups and may be locally important in their ecology. Although few species are endemic to these habitats, they may provide important refuges for a number of species. These communities are simultaneously among the least understood and most rapidly disappearing habitats of the Southeast. Forestry and agricultural clearage are current impacts.

  8. Role and Responsibility of Board of Governors [BOG] in Ensuring Educational Quality in Colleges & Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naik, B. M.

    2012-01-01

    The paper presents in brief the need and importance of effective, imaginative and responsible governing boards in colleges and universities, so as to ensure educational quality. BOG should engage fruitfully with the principal and activities in college/ university. UGC, AICTE have now prescribed creation of effective boards for both government and…

  9. A probe for sampling interstitial waters of stream sediments and bog soils

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nowlan, G.A.; Carollo, C.

    1974-01-01

    A probe for sampling interstitial waters of stream sediments and bog soils is described. Samples can be obtained within a stratigraphic interval of 2-3 cm, to a depth of 60-80 cm, and with little or no contamination of the samples by sediment or air. ?? 1974.

  10. Nutrient load can lead to enhanced CH4 fluxes through changes in vegetation, peat surface elevation and water table depth in ombrotrophic bog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juutinen, Sari; Bubier, Jill; Larmola, Tuula; Humphreys, Elyn; Arnkil, Sini; Roy, Cameron; Moore, Tim

    2016-04-01

    Atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition has led to nutrient enrichment in wetlands, particularly in temperate areas, affecting plant community composition, carbon (C) cycling, and microbial dynamics. It is vital to understand the temporal scales and mechanisms of the changes, because peatlands are long-term sinks of C, but sources of methane (CH4), an important greenhouse gas. Rainwater fed (ombrotrophic) bogs are considered to be vulnerable to nutrient loading due to their natural nutrient poor status. We fertilized Mer Bleue Bog, a Sphagnum moss and evergreen shrub-dominated ombrotrophic bog near Ottawa, Ontario, now for 11-16 years with N (NO3 NH4) at 0.6, 3.2, and 6.4 g N m-2 y-1 (~5, 10 and 20 times ambient N deposition during summer months) with and without phosphorus (P) and potassium (K). Treatments were applied to triplicate plots (3 x 3 m) from May - August 2000-2015 and control plots received distilled water. We measured CH4 fluxes with static chambers weekly from May to September 2015 and peat samples were incubated in laboratory to measure CH4 production and consumption potentials. Methane fluxes at the site were generally low, but after 16 years, mean CH4 emissions have increased and more than doubled in high nitrogen addition treatments if P and K input was also increased (3.2 and 6.4 g N m-2yr-1 with PK), owing to drastic changes in vegetation and soil moisture. Vegetation changes include a loss of Sphagnum moss and introduction of new species, typical to minerogenic mires, which together with increased decomposition have led to decreased surface elevation and to higher water table level relative to the surface. The trajectories indicate that the N only treatments may result in similar responses, but only over longer time scales. Elevated atmospheric deposition of nutrients to peatlands may increase loss of C not only due to changes in CO2 exchange but also due to enhanced CH4 emissions in peatlands through a complex suite of feedbacks and interactions

  11. Small is beautiful: why microtopography should be included in bog hydrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appels, Willemijn; van der Ploeg, Martine; Oosterwoud, Marieke; Cirkel, Gijsbert; van der Zee, Sjoerd; Witte, Jan-Philip

    2014-05-01

    Microtopography can have a large effect on flow processes at the soil surface and the composition of soil water. In peat areas, microtopography is shaped by differences in species, the growth rate and transpiration of the vegetation, and the amount of water flowing from higher areas. Microtopography is often represented by a roughness parameter in hillslope hydrological models. In areas without a strong topographical gradient however, microtopography may be underestimated when accumulated in a single parameter, especially in the presence of shallow groundwater systems. In this study, we review the intricate relationships between microtopography, surface runoff, and ecohydrology in systems featuring shallow water tables. In an analogy to surface runoff, the hydrology of a raised bog can be described as a combination of open water flow on a saturated medium, instead of the traditional acrotelm-catotelm concept that only acknowledges the saturated medium. We explored water flow through the microtopography of a raised bog with a simple conceptual model that accounts explicitly for microtopographic features and the changing flow directions these may cause. With this approach we were able to investigate the activation of fast flow paths on different areas of the bog as a function of their wetness level and bog-specific morphological features, such as hummocks and hollows. Our type of approach could be used to improve the understanding of the spatial and temporal variability of rainfall-runoff responses on raised bogs. In addition, similar approaches could be used to investigate how various runoff regimes affect the mixing of water with different chemical signatures, another driver of variations of the occurrence of plant species.

  12. Spatial and temporal performance of the miniface (free air CO2 enrichment) system on Bog Ecosystems in northern and Central Europe.

    PubMed

    Miglietta, F; Hoosbeek, M R; Foot, J; Gigon, F; Hassinen, A; Heijmans, M; Peressotti, A; Saarinen, T; Van Breemen, N; Wallén, B

    2001-01-01

    The Bog Ecosystem Research Initiative (BERI) project was initiated to investigate, at five climatically different sites across Europe, the effects of elevated CO2 and N deposition on the net exchange of CO2 and CH4 between bogs and the atmosphere, and to study the effects of elevated CO2 and N deposition on the plant biodiversity of bog communities. A major challenge to investigate the effects of elevated CO2 on vegetation and ecosystems is to apply elevated CO2 concentrations to growing vegetation without changing the physical conditions like climate and radiation. Most available CO2 enrichment methods disturb the natural conditions to some degree, for instance closed chambers or open top chambers. Free Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) systems have proven to be suitable to expose plants to elevated CO2 concentrations with minimal disturbance of their natural environment. The size and spatial scale of the vegetation studied within the BERI project allowed the use of a modified version of a small FACE system called MiniFACE. This paper describes the BERI MiniFACE design as well as its temporal and spatial performance at the five BERI field locations. The temporal performance of the MiniFACE system largely met the quality criteria defined by the FACE Protocol. One minute average CO2 concentrations measured at the centre of the ring stayed within 20% of the pre-set target for more than 95% of the time. Increased wind speeds were found to improve the MiniFACE system's temporal performance. Spatial analyses showed no apparent CO2 gradients across a ring during a 4 day period and the mean differences between each sampling point and the centre of the ring did not exceed 10%. Observations made during a windy day, causing a CO2 concentration gradient, and observations made during a calm day indicated that short term gradients tend to average out over longer periods of time. On a day with unidirectional strong winds, CO2 concentrations at the upwind side of the ring centre were

  13. High potential of nitrogen fixation in pristine, ombrotrophic bogs in Southern Patagonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knorr, Klaus-Holger; Horn, Marcus A.; Bahamonde Aguilar, Nelson A.; Borken, Werner

    2015-04-01

    Nitrogen (N) input in pristine peatlands occurs via natural input of inorganic N through atmospheric deposition or biological dinitrogen (N2) fixation. However, N2 fixation is to date mostly attributed to bacteria and algae associated to Sphagnum and its contribution to plant productivity and peat buildup has been often underestimated in previous studies. Based on net N storage, exceptionally low N deposition, and high abundance of vascular plants at pristine peatlands in Southern Patagonia, we hypothesized that there must be a high potential of non-symbiotic N2 fixation not limited to the occurrence of Sphagnum. To this end, we chose two ombrotrophic bogs with spots that are dominated either by Sphagnum or by vascular, cushion-forming plants and sampled peat from different depths for incubation with 15N2 to determine N2 fixation potentials. Moreover, we analyzed 15N2 fixation by a nodule-forming, endemic conifer inhabiting the peatlands. Results from 15N2 uptake were compared to the conventional approach to study N2 fixation by the acetylene reduction assay (ARA). Using 15N2 as a tracer, high non-symbiotic N2 fixation rates of 0.3-1.4 μmol N g-1 d-1 were found down to 50 cm under micro-oxic conditions (2 vol.%) in samples from both plots either covered by Sphagnum magellanicum or by vascular cushion plants. Peat N concentrations suggested a higher potential of non-symbiotic N2 fixation under cushion plants, likely because of the availability of easily decomposable organic compounds as substrates and oxic conditions in the rhizosphere. In the Sphagnum plots, high N2 fixation below 10 cm depth would rather reflect a potential fixation that may switch on during periods of low water levels when oxygen penetrates deeper into the peat. 15N natural abundance of live Sphagnum from 0-10 cm pointed to N uptake solely from atmospheric deposition and non-symbiotic N2 fixation. 15N signatures of peat from the cushion plant plots indicated additional N supply from N

  14. Factors affecting the sorption of cesium in a nutrient-poor boreal bog.

    PubMed

    Lusa, M; Bomberg, M; Virtanen, S; Lempinen, J; Aromaa, H; Knuutinen, J; Lehto, J

    2015-09-01

    (135)Cs is among the most important radionuclides in the long-term safety assessments of spent nuclear fuel, due to its long half-life of 2.3 My and large inventory in spent nuclear fuel. Batch sorption experiments were conducted to evaluate the sorption behavior of radiocesium ((134)Cs) in the surface moss, peat, gyttja, and clay layers of 7-m-deep profiles taken from a nutrient-poor boreal bog. The batch distribution coefficient (Kd) values of radiocesium increased as a function of sampling depth. The highest Kd values, with a geometric mean of 3200 L/kg dry weight (DW), were observed in the bottom clay layer and the lowest in the 0.5-1.0 m peat layer (50 L/kg DW). The maximum sorption in all studied layers was observed at a pH between 7 and 9.5. The in situ Kd values of (133)Cs in surface Sphagnum moss, peat and gyttja samples were one order of magnitude higher than the Kd values obtained using the batch method. The highest in situ Kd values (9040 L/kg DW) were recorded for the surface moss layer. The sterilization of fresh surface moss, peat, gyttja and clay samples decreased the sorption of radiocesium by 38%, although the difference was not statistically significant. However, bacteria belonging to the genera Pseudomonas, Paenibacillus, Rhodococcus and Burkholderia isolated from the bog were found to remove radiocesium from the solution under laboratory conditions. The highest biosorption was observed for Paenibacillus sp. V0-1-LW and Pseudomonas sp. PS-0-L isolates. When isolated bacteria were added to sterilized bog samples, the removal of radiocesium from the solution increased by an average of 50% compared to the removal recorded for pure sterilized peat. Our results demonstrate that the sorption of radiocesium in the bog environment is dependent on pH and the type of the bog layer and that common environmental bacteria prevailing in the bog can remove cesium from the solution phase. PMID:26010098

  15. Deciphering human-climate interactions in ombrotrophic peat record : REE, Nd and Pb isotope signatures of dust supplies over the last 2500 years (Misten bog, Belgium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fagel, Nathalie; Allan, Mohamed; Le Roux, Gael; Mattielli, Nadine; Piotrowska, Natalia; Sikorski, Jarek

    2013-04-01

    A core of 173 cm of ombrotrophic Misten peat bog from the Hautes-Fagnes Plateau in Eastern Belgium provides a record of Rare Earth Elements (REE) deposition allowing to trace dust fluxes in West Europe during the historical record (last 2500 years). REE and lithogenic element analyses, as well as the Nd isotopes, were performed by HR-ICP-MS and MC-ICP-MS, respectively in peat layers dated by 210Pb and 14C. The parallel variations of REE concentration with lithogenic conservative elements confirms that REE are immobile in the studied peat bog and can be used as tracers of dust deposition. Dust fluxes show pronounced increase at BC300, AD600, 1000AD, 1200AD and from 1700AD, recording either influence of human activities (regional erosion due to forest clearing and soil cultivation activities) or local and regional climate changes. Using Nd isotope allows to decipher between local and distal causes. The ENd variability (-13 to -9) is interpreted by a mixing between dust sources from local soils and desert particles. Three periods characterised by dominant-distal sources (at 320AD, 1000 AD and 1700AD) are consistent with local wetter intervals as indicated by lower humification degree. Local erosion prevails durier drier (higher humification) intervals (-100AD, 600AD). On a global scale more distal supplies are driven during colder periods, in particular Oort and Maunder minima. Combining geochemical elementary content and isotope data in ombrotrophic peat allows to decipher between dust flux changes related to human and climate forcing.

  16. Tracing decadal environmental change in ombrotrophic bogs using diatoms from herbarium collections and transfer functions.

    PubMed

    Poulíčková, Aloisie; Hájková, Petra; Kintrová, Kateřina; Bat'ková, Romana; Czudková, Markéta; Hájek, Michal

    2013-08-01

    Central European mountain bogs, among the most valuable and threatened of habitats, were exposed to intensive human impact during the 20th century. We reconstructed the subrecent water chemistry and water-table depths using diatom based transfer functions calibrated from modern sampling. Herbarium Sphagnum specimens collected during the period 1918-1998 were used as a source of historic diatom samples. We classified samples into hummocks and hollows according to the identity of dominant Sphagnum species, to reduce bias caused by uneven sampling of particular microhabitats. Our results provide clear evidence for bog pollution by grazing during the period 1918-1947 and by undocumented aerial liming in the early 90-ies. We advocate use of herbarized epibryon as a source of information on subrecent conditions in recently polluted mires. PMID:23688732

  17. Factors Controlling Diffusive CO2 Transport and Production in the Cedarburg Bog, Saukville, Wisconsin: Field Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joynt, E.; Han, W. S.; Gulbranson, E. L.; Graham, J. P.

    2015-12-01

    Wetland ecosystems are vital components of the carbon cycle containing an estimated 20-30% of the global soil carbon store. The Cedarburg Bog of southeastern Wisconsin boasts a myriad of wetland habitats including the southernmost string bog found in North America. The behavior of carbon dioxide (CO2) in these systems is the response of multiple interdependent variables that are, collectively, not well understood. Modeling this behavior in future climate scenarios requires detailed representation of such relationships within highly diverse environments. In 2014 a LI-COR 8100A automated soil gas flux system was installed in a hollow of the Cedarburg Bog string bog and collectively measured diffusive CO2 concentration and flux. Supplemental groundwater data, soil temperature, and weather data (temperature, pressure, precipitation, etc.) were also included to elucidate correlations between soil CO2 flux/CO2 concentration and external forces. In 2015 field data were complemented with soil moisture data and depth profile sampling of pore water chemistry and stable carbon isotopes from peat and gaseous media in order to discern the source and evolution of CO2 at depth. Preliminary LI-COR data analysis reveals distinct diurnal and seasonal trends; CO2 concentration builds overnight while flux increases during the day, both peaking in mid-summer. Flux events average 405 mg CO2/m2 per hour but reach over 31,800 mg CO2/m2 per hour in a single event and in several instances negative flux events are observed. Correlation significance also yields a wide array of strengths among variables. Initial δ13C data from gaseous CO2 infer, on average, a more positive δ13C signature in the atmosphere compared to the surface and shallow subsurface. Temporal trends of these parameters are similar to one another, becoming depleted in δ13C through time. Further interpretation of data trends will utilize the HYDRUS-1D model to quantify relationships under changing environmental conditions.

  18. Functional Diversity of Boreal Bog Plant Species Decreases Seasonal Variation of Ecosystem Carbon Sink Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korrensalo, A.

    2015-12-01

    Species diversity has been found to decrease the temporal variance of productivity of a plant community, and diversity in species responses to environmental factors seems to make a plant community more stable in changing conditions. Boreal bogs are nutrient poor peatland ecosystems where the number of plant species is low but the species differ greatly in their growth form. In here we aim to assess the role of the variation in photosynthesis between species for the temporal variation in ecosystem carbon sink function. To quantify the photosynthetic properties and their seasonal variation for different bog plant species we measured photosynthetic parameters and stress-inducing chlorophyll fluorescence of vascular plant and Sphagnum moss species in a boreal bog over a growing season. We estimated monthly gross photosynthesis (PG) of the whole study site based on species level light response curves and leaf area development. The estimated PG was further compared with a gross primary production (GPP) estimate measured by eddy covariance (EC) technique. The sum of upscaled PG estimates agreed well with the GPP estimate measured by the EC technique. The contributions of the species and species groups to the ecosystem level PG changed over the growing season. The sharp mid-summer peak in sedge PG was balanced by more stable PG of evergreen shrubs and Sphagna. Species abundance rather than differences in photosynthetic properties between species and growth forms determined the most productive plants on the ecosystem scale. Sphagna had lower photosynthesis and clorophyll fluorescence than vascular plants but were more productive on the ecosystem scale throughout the growing season due to their high areal coverage. These results show that the diversity of growth forms stabilizes the seasonal variation of the ecosystem level PG in an ombrotrophic bog ecosystem. This may increase the resilience of the ecosystem to changing environmental conditions.

  19. Properties and structure of peat humic acids depending on humification and precursor biota in bogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klavins, Maris; Purmalis, Oskars

    2013-04-01

    Humic substances form most of the organic component of soil, peat and natural waters, but their structure and properties very much differs depending on their source. The aim of this study is to characterize humic acids from raised bog peat profiles to evaluate the homogeneity of humic acids isolated from the bog bodies and study peat humification impact on properties of humic acids. A major impact on the structure of peat humic acids have raised bog biota (dominantly represented by bryophytes of different origin) void of lignin. For characterization of peat humic acids their elemental (CHNOS), functional (-COOH, phenolic OH) analysis, spectroscopic characterization (UV, fluorescence, FTIR, 1H NMR, CP/MAS 13C NMR, ESR) and degradation studies (Py-GC/MS) were done. Peat humic acids (HA) have an intermediate position between the living organic matter and coal organic matter and their structure is formed in a process in which more labile structures (carbohydrates, amino acids, etc.) are destroyed, but thermodynamically more stable aromatic and polyaromatic structures emerge. Comparatively, the studied peat HAs are at the start of the transformation process of living organic matter. Concentrations of carboxyl and phenolic hydroxyl groups changes depending on the depth of peat from which HAs have been isolated: and carboxylic acidity is increasing with depth of peat location and the humification degree. The ability to influence the surface tension of peat humic acids isolated from a well-characterized bog profile demonstrates dependence on age and humification degree. With increase of the humification degree and age of humic acids, their molecular complexity and ability to influence surface tension decreases; even so, the impact of the biological precursor (peat-forming bryophytes and plants) can be identified.

  20. CO2 soil fluxes at bog and forest ecosystems in southern taiga of European Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Dmitrii; Ivanov, Aleksey; Vasenev, Ivan; Kurbatova, Juliya

    2015-04-01

    Bogs and spruce forests are typical natural ecosystems of the southern taiga of European Russia. They play an important role in carbon balance between soil and atmosphere. In the Central Forest Reserve (33°00' E, 56°30' N) for over 15 years conduct research of these processes. One of the research methods of CO2 emissions is the chamber method, which allows to analyze the local variation of the intensity of fluxes and its depending of the type of vegetation, microrelief and meteorological parameters. Period of measurements was 5 months - from June to November 2013-2014. In the bog were investigated 3 areas - pine boggy forest, as well as hummocks and hollows in the middle of bog. As the forest ecosystem was chosen paludified shallow-peat spruce forest. From the data obtained it can be concluded that in all ecosystems were observed 2 periods with a minimum values of CO2 emission: the first - in early July, associated with a high level of ground water and decrease the intensity of decomposition of organic matter, and the second - in November, associated with natural processes and seasonal cooling. The average intensity of CO2 emissions in summer-autumn season between all ecosystems varied greatly: in the boggy pine forest - 500 mgCO2/m2*h), hummocks - 550 mgCO2/m2*h, hollows - 290 mgCO2/m2*h) and paludified shallow-peat spruce forest - 750 mgCO2/m2*h. Based on these researches, it was found that the intensity of CO2 emissions significantly below in the bog than in paludified shallow-peat spruce forest because it is limited by the level of ground water. In the paludified shallow-peat spruce forest, fluxes are more depend on soil temperature and less on the groundwater level.

  1. Evaluating cumulative effects of disturbance on the hydrologic function of bogs, fens, and mires

    SciTech Connect

    Siegel, D.I.

    1988-01-01

    Few quantitative studies have been done on the hydrology of fens, bogs, and mires and, consequently, any predictions of the cumulative impacts of disturbances on their hydrologic functions is extremely difficult. Bogs and fens are, in a sense, hydrobiologic systems, and any evaluation of cumulative impacts on them will have to consider the complicated interactions, barely understood, among the wetland hydrology, water chemistry, and biota, and place the effect of individual wetland impacts within the context of the cumulative impacts contributed to the watershed from other geomorphic areas and land uses. It is difficult to evaluate the potential cumulative impacts on wetland hydrology because geologic settings of wetlands are often complex and the methods used to measure wetland stream flow, ground-water flow, and evapotranspiration are inexact. Their very scale makes it difficult to quantify the hydrologic function accurately. The paper reviews current understanding of the hydrologic function of bogs, fens, and mires at different scales and in different physiographic settings, and presents hypotheses on potential cumulative impacts on the hydrologic function that might occur with multiple disturbances.

  2. Photosynthetic properties of boreal bog plant species and their contribution to ecosystem level carbon sink

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korrensalo, Aino; Hájek, Tomas; Alekseychik, Pavel; Rinne, Janne; Vesala, Timo; Mehtätalo, Lauri; Mammarella, Ivan; Tuittila, Eeva-Stiina

    2016-04-01

    Boreal bogs have a low number of plant species, but a large diversity of growth forms. This heterogeneity might explain the seasonally less varying photosynthetic productivity of these ecosystems compared to peatlands with vegetation consisting of fewer growth forms. The differences in photosynthetic properties within bog species and phases of growing season has not been comprehensively studied. Also the role of different plant species for the ecosystem level carbon (C) sink function is insufficiently known. We quantified the seasonal variation of photosynthetic properties in bog plant species and assessed how this variation accounts for the temporal variation in the ecosystem C sink. Photosynthetic light response of 11 vascular plant and 8 Sphagnum moss species was measured monthly over the growing season of 2013. Based on the species' light response parameters, leaf area development and areal coverage, we estimated the ecosystem level gross photosynthesis rate (PG) over the growing season. The level of upscaled PG was verified by comparing it to the ecosystem gross primary production (GPP) estimate calculated based on eddy covariance (EC) measurements. Although photosynthetic parameters differed within plant species and months, these differences were of less importance than expected for the variation in ecosystem level C sink. The most productive plant species at the ecosystem scale were not those with the highest maximum potential photosynthesis per unit of leaf area (Pmax), but those having the largest areal coverage. Sphagnum mosses had 35% smaller Pmax than vascular plants, but had higher photosynthesis at the ecosystem scale throughout the growing season. The contribution of the bog plant species to the ecosystem level PG differed over the growing season. The seasonal variation in ecosystem C sink was mainly controlled by phenology. Sedge PG had a sharp mid-summer peak, but the PG of evergreen shrubs and Sphagna remained rather stable over the growing season

  3. A comparison of antimony and lead profiles over the past 2500 years in Flanders Moss ombrotrophic peat bog, Scotland.

    PubMed

    Cloy, Joanna M; Farmer, John G; Graham, Margaret C; MacKenzie, Angus B; Cook, Gordon T

    2005-12-01

    Two cores collected in 2001 and 2004 from Flanders Moss ombrotrophic peat bog in central Scotland were dated (14C, 210Pb) and analysed (ICP-OES, ICP-MS) to derive and compare the historical atmospheric deposition records of Sb and Pb over the past 2500 years. After correction, via Sc, for contributions from soil dust, depositional fluxes of Sb and Pb peaked from ca. 1920-1960 A.D., with >95% of the anthropogenic inventories deposited post-1800 A.D. Over the past two centuries, trends in Sb and Pb deposition have been broadly similar, with fluctuations in the anthropogenic Sb/Pb ratio reflecting temporal variations in the relative input from emission sources such as the mining and smelting of Pb ores (in which Sb is commonly present, as at Leadhills/Wanlockhead in southern Scotland), combustion of coal (for which the Sb/Pb ratio is approximately an order of magnitude greater than in Pb ores) and exhaust emissions (Pb from leaded petrol) and abrasion products from the brake linings (Sb from heat-resistant Sb compounds) of automobiles. The influence of leaded petrol has been most noticeable in recent decades, firstly through the resultant minima in Sb/Pb and 206Pb/207Pb ratios (the latter arising from the use of less radiogenic Australian Pb in alkylPb additives) and then, during its phasing out and the adoption of unleaded petrol, complete by 2000 A.D., the subsequent increase in both Sb/Pb and 206Pb/207Pb ratios. The extent of the 20th century maximum anthropogenic enrichment of Sb and Pb, relative to the natural Sc-normalised levels of the Upper Continental Crust, was similar at approximately 50- to 100-fold. Prior to 1800 A.D., the influence of metallurgical activities on Sb and Pb concentrations in the peat cores during both the Mediaeval and Roman/pre-Roman periods was discernible, small Sb and Pb peaks during the latter appearing attributable, on the basis of Pb isotopic composition, to the mining/smelting of Pb ores indigenous to Britain. PMID:16307064

  4. The new European Competence Centre for Moor and Climate - A European initiative for practical peat bog and climate protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smidt, Geerd; Tänzer, Detlef

    2013-04-01

    The new European Competence Centre for Moor and Climate (EFMK) is an initiative by different local communities, environmental protection NGOs, agricultural services, and partners from the peat and other industries in Lower Saxony (Germany). The Centre aims to integrate practical peat bog conservation with a focus on green house gas emission after drainage and after water logging activities. Together with our partners we want to break new ground to protect the remaining bogs in the region. Sphagnum mosses will be produced in paludiculture on-site in cooperation with the local peat industry to provide economic and ecologic alternatives for peat products used in horticulture business. Land-use changes are needed in the region and will be stimulated in cooperation with agricultural services via compensation money transfers from environmental protection funds. On a global scale the ideas of Carbon Credit System have to be discussed to protect the peat bogs for climate protection issues. Environmental education is an important pillar of the EFMK. The local society is invited to explore the unique ecosystem and to participate in peat bog protection activities. Future generations will be taught to understand that the health of our peat bogs is interrelated with the health of the local and global climate. Besides extracurricular classes for schools the centre will provide infrastructure for Master and PhD students, as well for senior researchers for applied research in the surrounding moor. International partners in the scientific and practical fields of peat bog ecology, renaturation, green house gas emissions from peat bogs, and environmental policy are invited to participate in the European Competence Center for Moor and Climate.

  5. Embryogenesis and tadpole description of Hyperolius castaneus Ahl, 1931 and H. jackie Dehling, 2012 (Anura, Hyperoliidae) from montane bog pools

    PubMed Central

    Lehr, Edgar; Dehling, J. Maximilian; Greenbaum, Eli; Sinsch, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Tadpoles of Hyperolius castaneus and Hyperolius jackie were found in the Nyungwe National Park in Rwanda and adjacent areas. Tadpoles of both species were identified by DNA-barcoding. At the shore of a bog pool three clutches of Hyperolius castaneus of apparently different age, all laid on moss pads (Polytrichum commune, Isotachis aubertii) or grass tussocks (Andropogon shirensis) 2–5 cm above the water level, were found. One clutch of Hyperolius castaneus was infested by larval dipterid flies. The most recently laid clutch contained about 20 eggs within a broad egg-jelly envelope. The eggs were attached to single blades of a tussock and distributed over a vertical distance of 8 cm. A pair of Hyperolius castaneus found in axillary amplexus was transported in a plastic container to the lab for observation. The pair deposited a total of 57 eggs (15 eggs attached to the upper wall of the transport container, 42 eggs floated in the water). Embryogenesis of the clutch was monitored in the plastic container at 20 ± 2 °C (air temperature) and documented by photos until Gosner Stage 25. The description of the tadpole of Hyperolius castaneus is based on a Gosner Stage 29 individual from a series of 57 tadpoles (Gosner stages 25–41). The description of the tadpole of Hyperolius jackie is based on a Gosner Stage 32 individual from a series of 43 tadpoles (Gosner stages 25–41). Egg laying behavior and embryogenesis are unknown for Hyperolius jackie. The labial tooth row formula for both species is 1/3(1) with a narrow median gap of the tooth row. Variation in external morphology was observed in size and labial tooth row formula within the species. With the tadpole descriptions of Hyperolius castaneus and Hyperolius jackie, 36 tadpoles of the 135 known Hyperolius species have been described, including five of the eleven Hyperolius species known from Rwanda. PMID:26798309

  6. Embryogenesis and tadpole description of Hyperolius castaneus Ahl, 1931 and H. jackie Dehling, 2012 (Anura, Hyperoliidae) from montane bog pools.

    PubMed

    Lehr, Edgar; Dehling, J Maximilian; Greenbaum, Eli; Sinsch, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    Tadpoles of Hyperolius castaneus and Hyperolius jackie were found in the Nyungwe National Park in Rwanda and adjacent areas. Tadpoles of both species were identified by DNA-barcoding. At the shore of a bog pool three clutches of Hyperolius castaneus of apparently different age, all laid on moss pads (Polytrichum commune, Isotachis aubertii) or grass tussocks (Andropogon shirensis) 2-5 cm above the water level, were found. One clutch of Hyperolius castaneus was infested by larval dipterid flies. The most recently laid clutch contained about 20 eggs within a broad egg-jelly envelope. The eggs were attached to single blades of a tussock and distributed over a vertical distance of 8 cm. A pair of Hyperolius castaneus found in axillary amplexus was transported in a plastic container to the lab for observation. The pair deposited a total of 57 eggs (15 eggs attached to the upper wall of the transport container, 42 eggs floated in the water). Embryogenesis of the clutch was monitored in the plastic container at 20 ± 2 °C (air temperature) and documented by photos until Gosner Stage 25. The description of the tadpole of Hyperolius castaneus is based on a Gosner Stage 29 individual from a series of 57 tadpoles (Gosner stages 25-41). The description of the tadpole of Hyperolius jackie is based on a Gosner Stage 32 individual from a series of 43 tadpoles (Gosner stages 25-41). Egg laying behavior and embryogenesis are unknown for Hyperolius jackie. The labial tooth row formula for both species is 1/3(1) with a narrow median gap of the tooth row. Variation in external morphology was observed in size and labial tooth row formula within the species. With the tadpole descriptions of Hyperolius castaneus and Hyperolius jackie, 36 tadpoles of the 135 known Hyperolius species have been described, including five of the eleven Hyperolius species known from Rwanda. PMID:26798309

  7. Spatial variation in rates of carbon and nitrogen accumulation in a boreal bog

    SciTech Connect

    Ohlson, M.; Oekland, R.H.

    1998-12-01

    Although previous studies hint at the occurrence of substantial spatial variation in the accumulation rates of C and N in bogs, the extent to which rates may vary on high-resolution spatial and temporal scales is not known. A main reason for the lack of knowledge is that it is problematic to determine the precise age of peat at a given depth. The authors determined rates of carbon and nitrogen accumulation in the uppermost decimeters of a bog ecosystem using the pine method, which enables accurate dating of surface peat layers. They combined accumulation data with numerical and geostatistical analyses of the recent vegetation to establish the relationship between bog vegetation and rate of peat accumulation. Use of a laser technique for spatial positioning of 151 age-determined peat cores within a 20 x 20 m plot made it possible to give the first tine-scaled account of spatial and temporal variation in rates of mass, carbon, and nitrogen accumulation during the last century. Rates of C and N accumulation were highly variable at all spatial scales studied. For example, after {approximately}125 yr of peat growth, C and N accumulation varied by factors of five and four, respectively, from 25 to 125 g/dm{sup 2} for C, and from 0.7 to 2.6 g/dm{sup 2} for N. It takes 40 yr of peat accumulation before significant amounts of C are lost through decay. Hummocks built up by Sphagnum fuscum and S. rubellum were able to maintain average rates of C accumulation that exceed 2 g{center_dot}dm{sup {minus}2}{center_dot} yr{sup {minus}1} during 50 yr of growth. The authors argue that data on spatial variation in rates of C accumulation are necessary to understand the role of boreal peatlands in the greenhouse effect and global climate.

  8. Reconstructing the environmental impact of smelters using Pb isotope analyses of peat cores from bogs: Flin Flon, Manitoba and Harjavalta, Finland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shotyk, W.

    2012-04-01

    provide a remarkably similar evolution of Pb isotopes, reaching values as low as 206Pb/207Pb = 1.151 (AD 1982) and 1.148 (AD 1984), respectively. At HAR, the minimum values are lower (206Pb/207Pb = 1.120) and earlier (AD 1954 -1967), presumably because of emissions from the smelter. The Pb concentrations in the porewaters from HAR are approximately an order of magnitude greater than the other sites, and the 206Pb/207Pb values significantly lower (ca. 1.12 vs. 1.15), because of the combined effects of greater Pb deposition and surface water acidification (pH 3.5 versus pH 4.0 in the other bogs).

  9. Eddy covariance measurements of greenhouse gases from a restored and rewetted raised bog ecosystem.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S. C.; Christen, A.; Black, T. A.; Johnson, M. S.; Ketler, R.; Nesic, Z.; Merkens, M.

    2015-12-01

    Wetland ecosystems play a significant role in the global carbon (C) cycle. Wetlands act as a major long-term storage of carbon by sequestrating carbon-dioxide (CO2) from the atmosphere. Meanwhile, they can emit significant amounts of methane (CH4) due to anaerobic microbial decomposition. The Burns Bog Ecological Conservancy Area (BBECA) is recognized as one of Canada's largest undeveloped natural areas retained within an urban area. Historically, it has been substantially reduced in size and degraded by peat mining and agriculture. Since 2005, the bog has been declared a conservancy area, and the restoration efforts in BBECA focus on rewetting the disturbed ecosystems to promote a transition back to a raised bog. A pilot study measured CH4, CO2 and N2O exchanges in 2014 and concluded to monitor CO2, CH4 fluxes continuously. From the perspective of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, CO2 sequestered in bog needs to be protected and additional CO2 and CH4 emissions due to land-cover change need to be reduced by wise management. In this study, we measured the growing-season (June-September) fluxes of CO2 and CH4 exchange using eddy covariance (EC). A floating platform with an EC system for both CO2 (closed-path) and CH4 (open-path) began operation in June 2015. During the growing-season, gross ecosystem photosynthesis (GEP) and ecosystem respiration (Re) averaged 5.87 g C m-2 day-1 and 2.02 g C m-2 day-1, respectively. The magnitude of GEP and Re were lower than in previous studies of pristine northern peatlands. The daily average CH4 emission was 0.99 (±1.14) g C m-2 day-1 and it was higher than in most previous studies. We also characterized how environmental factors affected the seasonal dynamics of these exchanges in this disturbed peatland. Our measurements showed that soil temperature and soil water content were major drivers of seasonal changes of GHG fluxes. The daily average GHG warming potential (GWP) of the emissions in the growing seasons (from CO2 and CH4

  10. Preliminary stable isotope results from the Mohos peat bog, East-Carpathians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Túri, Marianna; Palcsu, László; Futó, István; Hubay, Katalin; Molnár, Mihály; Rinyu, László; Braun, Mihály

    2016-04-01

    This work provides preliminary results of an isotope investigation carried out on a peat core drilled in the ombrotrophic Mohos peat bog, Ciomadul Mountain, (46°8'3.60"N, 25°54'19.43"E, 1050 m.a.s.l.), East Carpathians, Romania. The Ciomadul is a single dacitic volcano with two craters: the younger Saint Ana and the older Mohos which is a peat bog, and surrounded by a number of individual lava domes as well as a narrow volcaniclastic ring plain volcano. A 10 m long peat core has been taken previously, and is available for stable oxygen and carbon isotope analysis. It is known from our previous work (Hubay et al., 2015) that it covers a period from 11.500 cal year B.P. to present. The peat bog is composed mainly of Sphagnum, which has a direct relationship with the environment, making it suitable for examine the changes in the surrounding circumstances. Isotopic analysis of the prepared cellulose from Sphagnum moss has the attribute to provide such high resolution quantitative estimates of the past climate and there is no such climate studies in this area where the past climate investigations based on oxygen isotope analysis of the Sphagnum. Oxygen and carbon stable isotope analysis were carried out on the hemicellulose samples, which were chemically prepared for 14C dating and taken from every 30 cm of the 10 m long peat core. The oxygen isotope composition of the precipitation can be revealed from the δ18O values of the prepared cellulose samples, since, while carbon isotope ratio tells more about the wet and dry periods of the past. Studying both oxygen and carbon isotope signatures, slight fluctuations can be seen during the Holocene like some of the six periods of significant climate changes can be seen in this resolution during the time periods of 9000-8000, 6000-5000, 4200-3800, 3500-2500, 1200-1000, and 600-150 cal yr B.P. Additionally, the late Pleistocene - early Holocene environmental changes can be clearly observed as Pleistocene peat samples have

  11. Unexpected DNA-fingerprinting pattern in a deep peat bog: evidence for methanotrophs at the bottom?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinmann, P.; Rossi, P.; Huon, S.; Eilrich, B.; Casati, S.

    2003-04-01

    With the goal of a better understanding of the fate of methane in the deep layers of peat bogs, we analysed the microbial 16S rDNA gene pool and measured the stable carbon isotope composition of bulk peat of a deep (6 m) peat bog profile (Etang de la Gruyère, Switzerland). Both Bacterial and Archaean communities were assessed using respectively TTGE (Temporal Temperature Gradient Electrophoresis) and SSCP (Single Strand Conformation Polymorphism), with fragments of the V1-V3 region of the 16S rDNA gene. The "relative diversity" shown in the TTGE AND SSCP gel patterns is presented using indices and band numbers per sample (Simpson evenness). PCA was calculated on the basis of the intensities of all bands found in the TTGE and SSCP fingerprinting profiles. These DNA fingerprinting patterns reveal the presence of a structured microbial community throughout the whole depth profile. Clear differences can be observed between the communities found in the near surface layers and those found at depth. Surprisingly, for both Archaean and Bacterial communities, the deepest samples display a high similarity level with those found in the first 20 centimeters. The δ13C values of the peat are relatively constant from the surface of the bog down to a depth of 5 m (values between 25.5 ppm and 26.5 ppm). Below 5 m the values decrease considerably with depth ( 28.5 ppm). As a working hypothesis to explain the two observations, we consider the possibility of the presence of methanotrophs in the deepest parts of the bogs. The electron acceptors needed for methane oxidation could be derived from lateral advection of less reducing groundwater. However, available pore water analyses suggest that neither molecular oxygen, nor sulfate or nitrate are present. One possible oxidising agent would be trivalent iron (solid or colloidal). Indeed are the iron concentrations in the deeper pore waters are elevated. Such deep methanotrophic microbial community could be similar to those found near

  12. The impact of peat harvesting and natural regeneration on the water balance of an abandoned cutover bog, Quebec

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Seters, Tim E.; Price, Jonathan S.

    2001-02-01

    Harvested sites rarely return to functional ecosystems after abandonment because drainage and peat extraction lower the water table and expose relatively decomposed peat, which is hydrologically unsuitable for Sphagnum moss re-establishment. Some natural regeneration of Sphagnum has occurred in isolated pockets on traditionally harvested (block-cut) sites, for reasons that are poorly understood, but are related to natural functions that regulate runoff and evaporation. This study evaluates the water balance of a naturally regenerated cutover bog and compares it with a nearby natural bog of similar size and origin, near Riviere du Loup, Quebec. Water balance results indicated that evapotranspiration was the major water loss from the harvested bog, comprising 92 and 84% of total outputs (2·9 mm day-1) during the 1997 and 1998 seasons, respectively. Despite denser tree cover at the harvested site, evapotranspiration from the natural bog was similar, although less spatially variable. At the harvested site, evaporative losses ranged from 1·9 mm day-1 on raised baulks and roads to 3·6 mm day-1 from moist surfaces with Sphagnum. Although about half of the ditches were inactive or operating at only a fraction of their original efficiency, runoff was still significant at 12 and 24% of precipitation during the 1997 and 1998 study seasons, respectively. This compares with negligible rates of runoff at the natural bog. Thus the cutover bog, although abandoned over 25 years ago, has not regained its hydrological function. This is both a cause and effect of its inability to support renewed Sphagnum regeneration. Without suitable management (e.g. blocking ditches), this site is not likely to improve for a very long time.

  13. High-resolution Record of Holocene Climate, Vegetation, and Fire from a Raised Peat Bog, Prince Edward Island, Canadian Maritimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peros, M. C.; Chan, K.; Ponsford, L.; Carroll, J.; Magnan, G.

    2014-12-01

    Raised peat bogs receive all precipitation and nutrients from the atmosphere and are thus widely used archives for information on past environments and climates. In this paper we provide high-resolution multi-proxy data from a raised bog from northeastern Prince Edward Island, located in the Gulf of St. Lawrence, Canada. We studied testate amoeba (a proxy for water table depth), macrocharcoal (a proxy for local-scale fire), peat humification (a proxy for decomposition), plant macrofossils (indicative of local-scale vegetation), and organic matter content (yielding carbon accumulation rates) from a 5.5 m long core lifted from the center of Baltic Bog. Eleven AMS radiocarbon dates show that peat accumulation began before 9000 cal yr BP and continued almost uninterrupted until the present. The macrofossil data show that a transition from a sedge-dominated fen to a sphagnum-dominated bog occurred around 8000 cal yr BP, and sphagnum remained dominant in the bog throughout most of the Holocene. A testate amoeba-based reconstruction of water table depth indicates that conditions were drier during the early Holocene (~8000 to 5000 cal yr BP) and became gradually wetter into the late Holocene. In addition, a number of higher frequency shifts in precipitation are inferred throughout the Holocene on the basis of the testate amoeba and humification results. The macrocharcoal evidence indicates fire—probably in the surrounding forest—was relatively more common during the early Holocene, perhaps due to drier climate conditions. A large influx of charcoal at around 2000 cal yr BP suggests the presence of one or more major fires at this time, and a concurrent decrease in the rate of peat accumulation indicates the fire may have affected the bog itself. The data from Baltic Bog is broadly comparable to other proxy data (in particular pollen studies) from the Canadian Maritimes. This work is important because it: 1) helps us better understand the role of hydroclimatic

  14. Mictomys borealis (northern bog lemming) and the Wisconsin paleoecology of the east-central Great Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mead, Jim I.; Bell, Christopher J.; Murray, Lyndon K.

    1992-03-01

    Teeth of northern bog lemming, Mictomys borealis, are reported from Cathedral and Smith Creek caves and represent the first Wisconsin remains of the genus from the Great Basin. Specimens from Cathedral Cave, Snake Range, are associated with U-series ages of 24,000 to 15,000 yr B.P. Previous work with pollen and packrat middens, dating to the same age as the Mictomys, indicate that Smith Creek Canyon contained a riparian, locally mesic community, including Picea engelmannii (spruce), Betula sp. (birch), Cercocarpus sp. (mountain mahogany), and Artemisia sp. (sagebrush) among other species. Exposed canyon slopes and the adjacent valley apparently contained a more xeric steppe community including sagebrush and Chenopodiineae species; rocky outcrop permitted Pinus flexilis (limber pine) and P. longaeva (bristlecone pine) to grow adjacent to Lake Bonneville or low in the canyon. The region apparently experienced a dry climate (not necessarily drier than today); however, Smith Creek Canyon was fed by glacial meltwater from Mt. Moriah. The northern bog lemming probably lived only in the riparian community and possibly on the north-facing slope below Cathedral Cave. Few canyons of the Snake Range would have had the unusually mesic conditions found in Smith Creek Canyon.

  15. Multi-omics of Permafrost, Active Layer and Thermokarst Bog Soil Microbiomes

    SciTech Connect

    Hultman, Jenni; Waldrop, Mark P.; Mackelprang, Rachel; David, Maude; McFarland, Jack; Blazewicz, Steven J.; Harden, Jennifer W.; Turetsky, Merritt; McGuire, A. David; Shah, Manesh B.; VerBerkmoes, Nathan C.; Lee, Lang Ho; Mavrommatis, Konstantinos; Jansson, Janet K.

    2015-03-04

    Over 20% of Earth’s terrestrial surface is underlain by permafrost with vast stores of carbon that, if thawed may represent the largest future transfer of C from the biosphere to the atmosphere 1. This process is largely dependent on microbial responses, but we know little about microbial activity in intact, let alone in thawing permafrost. Molecular approaches have recently revealed the identities and functional gene composition of microorganisms in some permafrost soils 2-4 and a rapid shift in functional gene composition during short-term thaw experiments 3. However, the fate of permafrost C depends on climatic, hydrologic, and microbial responses to thaw at decadal scales 5, 6. Here the combination of several molecular “omics” approaches enabled us to determine the phylogenetic composition of the microbial community, including several draft genomes of novel species, their functional potential and activity in soils representing different states of thaw: intact permafrost, seasonally thawed active layer and thermokarst bog. The multi-omics strategy revealed a good correlation of process rates to omics data for dominant processes, such as methanogenesis in the bog, as well as novel survival strategies for potentially active microbes in permafrost.

  16. Multi-omics of permafrost, active layer and thermokarst bog soil microbiomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hultman, Jenni; Waldrop, Mark P.; Mackelprang, Rachel; David, Maude M.; McFarland, Jack; Blazewicz, Steven J.; Harden, Jennifer; Turetsky, Merritt R.; McGuire, A. David; Shah, Manesh B.; Verberkmoes, Nathan C.; Lee, Lang Ho; Mavrommatis, Kostas; Jansson, Janet K.

    2015-05-01

    Over 20% of Earth's terrestrial surface is underlain by permafrost with vast stores of carbon that, once thawed, may represent the largest future transfer of carbon from the biosphere to the atmosphere. This process is largely dependent on microbial responses, but we know little about microbial activity in intact, let alone in thawing, permafrost. Molecular approaches have recently revealed the identities and functional gene composition of microorganisms in some permafrost soils and a rapid shift in functional gene composition during short-term thaw experiments. However, the fate of permafrost carbon depends on climatic, hydrological and microbial responses to thaw at decadal scales. Here we use the combination of several molecular `omics' approaches to determine the phylogenetic composition of the microbial communities, including several draft genomes of novel species, their functional potential and activity in soils representing different states of thaw: intact permafrost, seasonally thawed active layer and thermokarst bog. The multi-omics strategy reveals a good correlation of process rates to omics data for dominant processes, such as methanogenesis in the bog, as well as novel survival strategies for potentially active microbes in permafrost.

  17. Multi-omics of permafrost, active layer and thermokarst bog soil microbiomes.

    PubMed

    Hultman, Jenni; Waldrop, Mark P; Mackelprang, Rachel; David, Maude M; McFarland, Jack; Blazewicz, Steven J; Harden, Jennifer; Turetsky, Merritt R; McGuire, A David; Shah, Manesh B; VerBerkmoes, Nathan C; Lee, Lang Ho; Mavrommatis, Kostas; Jansson, Janet K

    2015-05-14

    Over 20% of Earth's terrestrial surface is underlain by permafrost with vast stores of carbon that, once thawed, may represent the largest future transfer of carbon from the biosphere to the atmosphere. This process is largely dependent on microbial responses, but we know little about microbial activity in intact, let alone in thawing, permafrost. Molecular approaches have recently revealed the identities and functional gene composition of microorganisms in some permafrost soils and a rapid shift in functional gene composition during short-term thaw experiments. However, the fate of permafrost carbon depends on climatic, hydrological and microbial responses to thaw at decadal scales. Here we use the combination of several molecular 'omics' approaches to determine the phylogenetic composition of the microbial communities, including several draft genomes of novel species, their functional potential and activity in soils representing different states of thaw: intact permafrost, seasonally thawed active layer and thermokarst bog. The multi-omics strategy reveals a good correlation of process rates to omics data for dominant processes, such as methanogenesis in the bog, as well as novel survival strategies for potentially active microbes in permafrost. PMID:25739499

  18. Heat transport in the Red Lake Bog, Glacial Lake Agassiz Peatlands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McKenzie, J.M.; Siegel, D.I.; Rosenberry, D.O.; Glaser, P.H.; Voss, C.I.

    2007-01-01

    We report the results of an investigation on the processes controlling heat transport in peat under a large bog in the Glacial Lake Agassiz Peatlands. For 2 years, starting in July 1998, we recorded temperature at 12 depth intervals from 0 to 400 cm within a vertical peat profile at the crest of the bog at sub-daily intervals. We also recorded air temperature 1 m above the peat surface. We calculate a peat thermal conductivity of 0.5 W m-1 ??C-1 and model vertical heat transport through the peat using the SUTRA model. The model was calibrated to the first year of data, and then evaluated against the second year of collected heat data. The model results suggest that advective pore-water flow is not necessary to transport heat within the peat profile and most of the heat is transferred by thermal conduction alone in these waterlogged soils. In the spring season, a zero-curtain effect controls the transport of heat through shallow depths of the peat. Changes in local climate and the resulting changes in thermal transport still may cause non-linear feedbacks in methane emissions related to the generation of methane deeper within the peat profile as regional temperatures increase. Copyright ?? 2006 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Functioning of microbial complexes in aerated layers of a highmoor peat bog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golovchenko, A. V.; Bogdanova, O. Yu.; Stepanov, A. L.; Polyanskaya, L. M.; Zvyagintsev, D. G.

    2010-09-01

    Monitoring was carried out using the luminescent-microscopic method of the abundance parameters of different groups of microorganisms in a monolith and in the mixed layers of a highmoor peat bog (oligotrophic residual-eutrophic peat soil) in a year-long model experiment. The increase of the aeration as a result of mixing of the layers enhanced the activity of the soil fungi. This was attested to by the following changes: the increase of the fungal mycelium length by 6 times and of the fungal biomass by 4 times and the double decrease of the fraction of spores in the fungal complex. The response of the fungal complex to mixing was different in the different layers of the peat bog. The maximal effect was observed in the T1 layer and the minimal one in the T2 layer. The emission of CO2 in the mixed samples was 1.5-2 times higher than that from the undisturbed peat samples. In contrast with the fungi, the bacteria and actinomycetes were not affected by the aeration of the highmoor layers.

  20. Stable (206Pb, 207Pb, 208Pb) and radioactive (210Pb) lead isotopes in 1 year of growth of Sphagnum moss from four ombrotrophic bogs in southern Germany: Geochemical significance and environmental implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shotyk, William; Kempter, Heike; Krachler, Michael; Zaccone, Claudio

    2015-08-01

    The surfaces of Sphagnum carpets were marked with plastic mesh and 1 year later the production of plant matter was harvested in four ombrotrophic bogs from two regions of southern Germany: Upper Bavaria (Oberbayern, OB) and the Northern Black Forest (Nordschwarzwald, NBF). Radioactive, 210Pb was determined in solid samples using ultralow background gamma spectrometry while total Pb concentrations and stable isotopes (206Pb, 207Pb, 208Pb) were determined in acid digests using ICP-SMS. Up to 12 samples (40 × 40 cm) were collected per site, and 6-10 sites investigated per bog. The greatest variations within a given sampling site were in the range 212-532 Bq kg-1 for 210Pb activity, whereas 206Pb/207Pb and 208Pb/206Pb varied less than 1%. The median values of all parameters for the sites (6-10 per bog) were not significantly different. The median activities of 210Pb (Bq kg-1) in the mosses collected from the bogs in NBF (HO = 372 ± 56, n = 55; WI = 342 ± 58, n = 93) were slightly less from those in OB (GS = 394 ± 50, n = 55; KL = 425 ± 58, n = 24). However, the mosses in the NBF bogs exhibited much greater productivity (187-202 g m-2 a-1) compared to those of OB (71-91 g m-2 a-1), and this has a profound impact on the accumulation rates of 210Pb (Bq m-2 a-1), with the bogs in the NBF yielding fluxes (HO = 73 ± 30; WI = 65 ± 20) which are twice those of OB (GS = 29 ± 11; KL = 40 ± 13). Using the air concentrations of 210Pb measured at Schauinsland (SIL) in the southern Black Forest and average annual precipitation, the atmospheric fluxes of 210Pb at SIL (340 Bq m-2 a-1) exceeds the corresponding values obtained from the mosses by a factor of five, providing the first quantitative estimate of the net retention efficiency of 210Pb by Sphagnum. When the 210Pb activities of all moss samples are combined (n = 227), a significant decrease with increasing plant production rate is observed; in contrast, total Pb concentrations show the opposite trend. The contrasting

  1. Comparison of different methods to determine the degree of peat decomposition in peat bogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biester, H.; Knorr, K.-H.; Schellekens, J.; Basler, A.; Hermanns, Y.-M.

    2014-05-01

    Peat humification or decomposition is a frequently used proxy to extract past time changes in hydrology and climate from peat bogs. During the past century several methods to determine changes in peat decomposition have been introduced. Most of these methods are operationally defined only and the chemical changes underlying the decomposition process are often poorly understood and lack validation. Owing to the chemically undefined nature of many humification analyses the comparison of results obtained by different methods is difficult. In this study we compared changes in peat decomposition proxies in cores of two peat bogs (Königsmoor, KK; Kleines Rotes Bruch, KRB) from the Harz Mountains (Germany) using C / N ratios, Fourier transform infrared spectra absorption (FTIR) intensities, Rock Eva® oxygen and hydrogen indices, δ13C and δ15N isotopic signatures and UV-absorption (UV-ABS) of NaOH peat extracts. In order to explain parallels and discrepancies between these methods, one of the cores was additionally analysed by pyrolysis gas chromatography mass spectrometry (pyrolysis-GC-MS). Pyrolysis-GC-MS data provide detailed information on a molecular level, which allows differentiation of both changes attributed to decomposition processes and changes in vegetation. Principal component analysis was used to identify and separate the effects of changes in vegetation pattern and decomposition processes because both may occur simultaneously upon changes in bog hydrology. Records of decomposition proxies show similar historical development at both sites, indicating external forcing such as climate as controlling the process. All decomposition proxies except UV-ABS and δ15N isotopes show similar patterns in their records and reflect to different extents signals of decomposition. The molecular composition of the KK core reveals that these changes are mainly attributed to decomposition processes and to a lesser extent to changes in vegetation. Changes in the molecular

  2. Development of a high resolution modeling tool for prediction of waterflows through complex mires: Example of the Mukhrino bog complex in West Siberian middle Taiga Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarov, Evgeny A.; Schmitz, Oliver; Bleuten, Wladimir

    2015-04-01

    Water flow through peat bogs differ substantially from mineral soil landscapes. Permeability of the peatlayers decrease dramatically with depth within the permanently watersaturated peat layers (Catotelm), whereas the 10-60 cm thick superficial layer (Acrotelm) has a very high conductivity. Water flows predominantly in this acrotelm layer where an open structure of stems of mosses and few plants hardly limit water flow. By omitting this superficial flow infrastructures in many places block the waterflow. Moreover, the different bog types within a complex bog have different hydrological conductivities. Without considering the typical water-flow of bogs the construction of roads and platforms for oil and gas production threatens downhill mire ecosystems by partly drainage. The objective of our study was to develop a modeling tool which can be used to predict quantitatively spatially distributed water-flow of a bog complex. A part of the extensive bog complex "Mukhrino bog complex" located at the left bank of Irtysh river near the West Siberian town Khanty-Mansiysk' was chosen as modeling area. Water discharge from this bog catchment occurs by "waterfalls" at the East margin where a scarp with ca. 8 m elevation difference has been developed by backward erosion into the bog by the Mukhrino river. From field observations it was proven that no discharge of groundwater occurred at the margin of the bog catchment area. We used PCRaster-MODFLOW as modeling environment. The model area size was 3.8 km2, cell size 5 m and the model included 3 Acrotelm layers and 3 Catotelm layers. Thickness of Acrotelm and Catotelm have been measured by coring in transects. Input data of rain, snow have been recorded in the study area. Evapotranspiration was measured with small lysimeters and crop factors for different land unit types (open water, raised bog, patterned bog, poor fens) were elaborated by water balance modeling (1-D). Land unit types have been mapped by supervised classification

  3. Trench Logs and Scarp Data from an Investigation of the Steens Fault Zone, Bog Hot Valley and Pueblo Valley, Humboldt County, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Personius, Stephen F.; Crone, Anthony J.; Machette, Michael N.; Kyung, Jai Bok; Cisneros, Hector; Lidke, David J.; Mahan, Shannon

    2006-01-01

    Introduction: This report contains field and laboratory data from a study of the Steens fault zone near Denio, Nev. The 200-km-long Steens fault zone forms the longest, most topographically prominent fault-bounded escarpment in the Basin and Range of southern Oregon and northern Nevada. The down-to-the-east normal fault is marked by Holocene fault scarps along nearly half its length, including the southern one-third of the fault from the vicinity of Pueblo Mountain in southern Oregon to the southern margin of Bog Hot Valley (BHV) southwest of Denio, Nev. We studied this section of the fault to better constrain late Quaternary slip rates, which we hope to compare to deformation rates derived from a recently established geodetic network in the region (Hammond and Thatcher, 2005). We excavated a trench in May 2003 across one of a series of right-stepping fault scarps that extend south from the southern end of the Pueblo Mountains and traverse the floor of Bog Hot Valley, about 4 km south of Nevada State Highway 140. This site was chosen because of the presence of well-preserved fault scarps, their development on lacustrine deposits thought to be suitable for luminescence dating, and the proximity of two geodetic stations that straddle the fault zone. We excavated a second trench in the southern BHV, but the fault zone in this trench collapsed during excavation and thus no information about fault history was documented from this site. We also excavated a soil pit on a lacustrine barrier bar in the southern Pueblo Valley (PV) to better constrain the age of lacustrine deposits exposed in the trench. The purpose of this report is to present photomosaics and trench logs, scarp profiles and slip data, soils data, luminescence and radiocarbon ages, and unit descriptions obtained during this investigation. We do not attempt to use the data presented herein to construct a paleoseismic history of this part of the Steens fault zone; that history will be the subject of a future

  4. Carbon and Nitrogen Isotope Variation in Peat Bogs in the Midwestern US: Implications for Holocene Climate Reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, D.; Paytan, A.; Jackson, S.

    2008-12-01

    A peat core, from near the center of Minden Bog in Michigan, representing about 3500 years of accumulation was previously analyzed for plant macrofossils, colorimetric humification, and testate amoebae to yield three independent climate proxies (Booth and Jackson, 2003). The plant macrofossil data show the site to be sensitive to bog water table fluctuations. The data suggest that this may be related to regional climatic changes. We analyzed the carbon and nitrogen isotopes, as well as the carbon-nitrogen ratios in the bulk peat samples to determine if fluctuations of these records correspond to climate events as seen in the plant microfossil and amoebae records. The degree to which peat-based carbon and nitrogen isotope records reflect changes in the relative distribution of vegetation and, in turn, reflect temperature changes in effective precipitation (precipitation minus evapotranspiration) will be assessed. Peat carbon and nitrogen isotope records will be compared with existing proxy climate records and with a temperature reconstruction based on testate amoebae in bogs. We expect that climate-related changes, in the relative abundance of vegetation remains accumulating in the peat bogs, will be recorded in the organic matter in forms of carbon and nitrogen isotopes.

  5. A Holocene record of climate, vegetation change and peat bog development, east Otago, South Island, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGlone, Matt S.; Wilmshurst, Janet M.

    1999-05-01

    A Holocene record of pollen, macrofossils, testate amoebae and peat humification is presented from a small montane bog. Sediment accumulation began before 9000 yr BP, but peat growth not until ca. 7000 BP. From 12 000 to 7000 yr BP, a shrub-grassland dominated under a dry climate, with increasing conifer forest and tall scrub from ca. 9600 yr BP. At 7000 yr BP a dense montane-subalpine low conifer forest established under a moist, cool climatic regime. Between 7000 and 700 yr BP the bog surface was shrubby, tending to be dry but with highly variable surface wetness. The catchment was affected by major fire at least four times between 4000 and 1000 yr BP. Both fire and bog surface wetness may have been linked to ENSO-caused variations in rainfall. Cooler, cloudier winters and disturbance by fire promoted the expansion of the broadleaf tree Nothofagus menziesii between 4000 yr BP and 1300 yr BP at the expense of the previous conifer forest-scrub vegetation. Polynesian fires (ca. 700 yr BP) reduced the vegetation to tussock grassland and bracken. Deforestation did not markedly affect the hydrology of the site. European pastoralism since ad 1860 has increased run-off and rising water tables in the bog have led to a Sphagnum-dominated cover.

  6. Influence of selected environmental factors on the abundance of aerobic anoxygenic phototrophs in peat-bog lakes.

    PubMed

    Lew, Sylwia; Lew, Marcin; Koblížek, Michal

    2016-07-01

    Aerobic anoxygenic phototrophs (AAPs) are photoheterotrophic prokaryotes that are widespread in many limnic and marine environments. So far, little is known about their distribution in peat-bog lakes. Seventeen peat-bog lakes were sampled during three summer seasons 2009, 2011, and 2012, and the vertical distribution of AAPs was determined by infrared epifluorescence microscopy. The analysis demonstrated that in the surface layers of the studied lakes, AAP abundance ranged from 0.3 to 12.04 × 10(5) cells mL(-1), which represents <1 to 18.3 % of the total bacteria. The vertical distribution of AAPs confirmed their presence in the upper parts of the water column with minimum numbers in the anoxic bottom waters. We have shown that the AAP abundance was significantly positively correlated with the water pH, and the highest proportion of photoheterotrophs was found in peat-bog lakes with a pH between 6.7 and 7.6. Our results demonstrated an influence of water acidity on the abundance of AAPs, which may reflect a fundamental difference in the microbial composition between acidic and pH neutral peat-bog lakes. PMID:27032635

  7. Summer methane fluxes from a boreal bog in northern Quebec, Canada, using eddy covariance measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadeau, Daniel F.; Rousseau, Alain N.; Coursolle, Carole; Margolis, Hank A.; Parlange, Marc B.

    2013-12-01

    A boreal bog located in the James Bay lowlands, Canada, was instrumented with an open-path gas analyzer to monitor the turbulent fluxes of methane throughout the summer of 2012. The mostly continuous eddy covariance measurements permitted the study of methane dynamics at the hourly, daily and seasonal scales. To exclude data segments for which the biological methane fluxes were underestimated due to inefficient atmospheric transport under stable stratification, we applied a novel approach based on both the atmospheric stability parameter ζ = z/L and the friction velocity u∗, where z is the measurement height and L the Obukhov length. The field measurements revealed the existence of at least one sustained ebullition event, triggered by low barometric pressures, a declining water table and increasing mechanical turbulence - suggesting that large-scale release of methane bubbles can be an important transport mechanism of methane in boreal bogs. The validity of similarity scaling for atmospheric methane under convective conditions was also assessed and the normalized standard deviations of methane concentrations did not scale well with ζ, highlighting the heterogeneity in natural methane production and release across the bog. Overall the hourly emissions ranged between -2.0 and 32.1 mg CH4 m-2 h-1, with a summertime mean of 2.4 mg CH4 m-2 h-1. At the daily scale, the two main controls on methane emissions were found to be the water table position and the peat temperature at 0.3 m under the surface. Contrary to other studies, seasonal methane emissions peaked when the water table was at its maximum distance from the surface, around mid-August. No clear diurnal pattern could be found in methane emissions, indicating that methane was produced quite deep within the peat. The seasonal emissions were estimated at 4.4 g CH4 m-2, and compared well with other observations over similar landscapes using different measurement techniques. Given that methane releases and

  8. Purple Pitcher Plant (Sarracenia rosea) Dieback and Partial Community Disassembly following Experimental Storm Surge in a Coastal Pitcher Plant Bog

    PubMed Central

    Abbott, Matthew J.; Battaglia, Loretta L.

    2015-01-01

    Sea-level rise and frequent intense hurricanes associated with climate change will result in recurrent flooding of inland systems such as Gulf Coastal pitcher plant bogs by storm surges. These surges can transport salt water and sediment to freshwater bogs, greatly affecting their biological integrity. Purple pitcher plants (Sarracenia rosea) are Gulf Coast pitcher plant bog inhabitants that could be at a disadvantage under this scenario because their pitcher morphology may leave them prone to collection of saline water and sediment after a surge. We investigated the effects of storm surge water salinity and sediment type on S. rosea vitality, plant community structure, and bog soil-water conductivity. Plots (containing ≥1 ramet of S. rosea) were experimentally flooded with fresh or saline water crossed with one of three sediment types (local, foreign, or no sediment). There were no treatment effects on soil-water conductivity; nevertheless, direct exposure to saline water resulted in significantly lower S. rosea cover until the following season when a prescribed fire and regional drought contributed to the decline of all the S. rosea to near zero percent cover. There were also significant differences in plant community structure between treatments over time, reflecting how numerous species increased in abundance and a few species decreased in abundance. However, in contrast to S. rosea, most of the other species in the community appeared resilient to the effects of storm surge. Thus, although the community may be somewhat affected by storm surge, those few species that are particularly sensitive to the storm surge disturbance will likely drop out of the community and be replaced by more resilient species. Depending on the longevity of these biological legacies, Gulf Coastal pitcher plant bogs may be incapable of fully recovering if they become exposed to storm surge more frequently due to climate change. PMID:25874369

  9. Purple pitcher plant (Sarracenia rosea) Dieback and partial community disassembly following experimental storm surge in a coastal pitcher plant bog.

    PubMed

    Abbott, Matthew J; Battaglia, Loretta L

    2015-01-01

    Sea-level rise and frequent intense hurricanes associated with climate change will result in recurrent flooding of inland systems such as Gulf Coastal pitcher plant bogs by storm surges. These surges can transport salt water and sediment to freshwater bogs, greatly affecting their biological integrity. Purple pitcher plants (Sarracenia rosea) are Gulf Coast pitcher plant bog inhabitants that could be at a disadvantage under this scenario because their pitcher morphology may leave them prone to collection of saline water and sediment after a surge. We investigated the effects of storm surge water salinity and sediment type on S. rosea vitality, plant community structure, and bog soil-water conductivity. Plots (containing ≥1 ramet of S. rosea) were experimentally flooded with fresh or saline water crossed with one of three sediment types (local, foreign, or no sediment). There were no treatment effects on soil-water conductivity; nevertheless, direct exposure to saline water resulted in significantly lower S. rosea cover until the following season when a prescribed fire and regional drought contributed to the decline of all the S. rosea to near zero percent cover. There were also significant differences in plant community structure between treatments over time, reflecting how numerous species increased in abundance and a few species decreased in abundance. However, in contrast to S. rosea, most of the other species in the community appeared resilient to the effects of storm surge. Thus, although the community may be somewhat affected by storm surge, those few species that are particularly sensitive to the storm surge disturbance will likely drop out of the community and be replaced by more resilient species. Depending on the longevity of these biological legacies, Gulf Coastal pitcher plant bogs may be incapable of fully recovering if they become exposed to storm surge more frequently due to climate change. PMID:25874369

  10. Simulated thaw development of a peat plateau-bog complex in a discontinuous permafrost region, Northwest Territories, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurylyk, Barret; Hayashi, Masaki; Quinton, William; Voss, Clifford

    2015-04-01

    Air temperatures at high latitudes have increased at rates that exceed globally averaged trends, and this warming has produced rapid permafrost degradation in many areas. In discontinuous permafrost regions of the Taiga Plains of northwestern Canada, past climate warming has created a complex landscape mosaic of fully thawed bogs/fens and remnant peat plateaus underlain by thin permafrost. The thawing of peat plateaus can alter the landscape hydrologic connectivity by creating pathways to efficiently convey water from bogs to nearby rivers and lakes. Extensive monitoring of the thermal regime of a peat plateau-bog complex in the Scotty Creek watershed (61.3° N, 121.3° W), Northwest Territories, Canada has identified rapid permafrost degradation in the past decade. In addition, satellite images indicate major landscape evolution due to permafrost thaw since 1970, and these changes have resulted in increased discharge at the watershed outlet. These long term comprehensive data facilitate the numerical modeling of idealized permafrost environments based on observed data. The objective of this research project is to elucidate fundamental processes that contribute to multi-dimensional permafrost thaw and associated hydrological changes in discontinuous permafrost regions. The thaw evolution in this peat plateau-bog complex is simulated using SUTRA, a numerical groundwater flow and coupled heat transport model that has been modified to include dynamic freeze-thaw processes. To accommodate complex surface processes, measured climate data from 1900-2010 are used to drive a separate soil-vegetation-atmosphere energy transfer model. Near-surface temperatures produced by the vertical transfer model for the peat plateau and bog are applied as the upper thermal boundary conditions for the multi-dimensional subsurface heat transport simulations in SUTRA (1900-2010). The simulated thaw development of this peat plateau will be compared to satellite imagery to assess the ability

  11. Comparison of different methods to determine the degree of peat decomposition in peat bogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biester, H.; Knorr, K.-H.; Schellekens, J.; Basler, A.; Hermanns, Y.-M.

    2013-11-01

    Peat humification or decomposition is a frequently used proxy to extract past time changes in hydrology and climate from peat bogs. During the past century several methods to determine changes in peat decomposition have been introduced. Most of these methods are operationally defined only and the chemical changes underlying the decomposition process are often poorly understood and lack validation. Due to the chemically undefined nature of many humification analyses the comparison of results obtained by different methods is difficult if not misleading. In this study we compared changes in peat decomposition in cores of two peat bogs (Königsmoor (KK), Kleines Rotes Bruch, KRB) from the Harz Mountains (Germany) using C / N ratios, Fourier Transform Infrared spectra absorption (FTIR) intensities, Rock Eval® oxygen- and hydrogen indices, δ13C and δ15N isotopic signatures and UV-absorption of NaOH peat extracts. In addition, one of the cores was analysed for changes in the peat's molecular composition using pyrolysis gas chromatography mass spectrometry (pyrolysis-GC-MS). Records of decomposition proxies show similar historical development at both sites, indicating external forcing such as climate as controlling process. Moreover, all decomposition proxies except UV-ABS and δ15N isotopes show similar patterns in their records and thus reflect in different extents signals of decomposition. Pyrolysis-GC-MS analyses of the KK core reveal that changes in peat molecular chemistry are mainly attributed to decomposition processes and to a lesser extend to changes in vegetation. Changes in the abundance of molecular compounds indicate that peat decomposition in the KK bog is mainly characterized by preferential decomposition of phenols and polysaccharides and relative enrichment of aliphatics during drier periods. Enrichment of lignin and other aromatics during decomposition was also observed but showed less variation, and presumably reflects changes in vegetation

  12. Effects of bryophytes on succession from alkaline marsh to Sphagnum bog

    SciTech Connect

    Glime, J.M.; Wetzel, R.G.; Kennedy, B.J.

    1982-10-01

    The alkaline eastern marsh of Lawrence Lake, a marl lake in southwestern Michigan, was sampled by randomly placed line transects to determine the bryophyte cover and corresponding vascular plant zones. Cluster analysis indicated three distinct bryophyte zones which correspond with the recognized vascular plant zones. Mosses occupied over 50% of the surface in some areas. Invasion of Sphagnum, vertical zonation of the mosses on hummocks, zonation with distance from the lake, the abundance of non-Sphagnum moss hummocks, and the ability of the non-Sphagnum species to lower the pH of marsh water during laboratory incubations are evidence that non-Sphagnum mosses facilitate succession from alkaline marsh to Sphagnum bog.

  13. Deciphering the environmental and landscape evolution of Sierra Nevada (S Iberia) from bog archives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia Alix, Antonio; Toney, Jaime L.; Jiménez-Moreno, Gonzalo; Ramos-Román, Maria J.; Anderson, R. Scott; Jiménez-Espejo, Francisco; Delgado Huertas, Antonio; Ruano, Patricia

    2016-04-01

    Sierra Nevada is the southernmost mountain range in the Iberian Peninsula and one of the highest in Europe. Its geomorphology was the result of Pleistocene glaciations that carved out depressions, valleys and cirques at high elevations in the metamorphic basement. Depressions gave rise to lakes and wetlands during the Holocene. Geophysical and organic geochemical analyses of biomarkers (n-alkanes) and bulk sediment (C and N ratio and isotopes) from two high elevation bogs (locally called "Borreguiles"): Borreguiles de la Virgen (BdlV) and Borreguiles de la Caldera (BdlC), have allowed us to track the hydrological evolution of the area and its relationship to climatic fluctuations of the western Mediterranean during the Holocene. Most of the bogs of this area resulted from the natural evolution of former small lakes. The records are 56 cm and 169 cm long, respectively. Geophysical data suggest that we recovered the whole sedimentary record from BdlC; however, there are some post-glacial sediments remaining below the BdlV core that we could not recover due to hard-ground conditions. During the early and middle Holocene, aquatic conditions predominated in BdlV compared to the most recent part of the record (low C/N values and high proportion of aquatic plants (Paq) deduced from the n-alkanes) suggesting a lake environment whose water level gradually decreased until ˜5.5 cal ky BP. This aridity trend is also observed in nearby records such as at Laguna de Río Seco (LdRS), a result of the African Humid Period demise. Carbon and nitrogen isotopes were higher during this interval, which might suggest more algae activity, in agreement with the highest concentrations of the algae Pediastrum in the area. There is an important development of terrestrial plants, a real bog stage (C/N higher than 20, high TOC, lower Paq) in both records from ˜5.5 to 3.5-3.0 cal ky BP. Those hydrological changes in the landscape might be related to a possible change in the source of

  14. Climate-growth relationships for bog-grown black spruce in northern Minnesota

    SciTech Connect

    Vogel, K.J. )

    1993-06-01

    Black spruce (Picea mariana) tree-ring chronologies were derived for three bogs in northern Minnesota. Standard chronologies were highly intercorrelated (0.72 to 0.87). The ring-width variability attributable to a common signal ranged from 38.6 to 56.8 percent which is large for closed canopy eastern forests. These chronologies exhibited great serial correlation, therefore all chronologies were autoregressively modelled prior to climatic analyses. Each chronology was compared to monthly temperature and precipitation data from a nearby weather station. Strengths of linear relationships were measured by the product-moment correlation coefficient. May and August temperatures from the previous year and March precipitation of the current year were significantly correlated with ring-width indices. These data suggest that tree-ring chronologies from mid-continental peatlands may be a valuable, though presently ignored, source of paleoclimatic data.

  15. Effect of fire on phosphorus forms in Sphagnum moss and peat soils of ombrotrophic bogs.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guoping; Yu, Xiaofei; Bao, Kunshan; Xing, Wei; Gao, Chuanyu; Lin, Qianxin; Lu, Xianguo

    2015-01-01

    The effect of burning Sphagnum moss and peat on phosphorus forms was studied with controlled combustion in the laboratory. Two fire treatments, a light fire (250 °C) and a severe fire (600 °C), were performed in a muffle furnace with 1-h residence time to simulate the effects of different forest fire conditions. The results showed that fire burning Sphagnum moss and peat soils resulted in losses of organic phosphorus (Po), while inorganic phosphorus (Pi) concentrations increased. Burning significantly changed detailed phosphorus composition and availability, with severe fires destroying over 90% of organic phosphorus and increasing the availability of inorganic P by more than twofold. Our study suggest that, while decomposition processes in ombrotrophic bogs occur very slowly, rapid changes in the form and availability of phosphorus in vegetation and litter may occur as the result of forest fires on peat soils. PMID:24630445

  16. High methane emissions dominate annual greenhouse gas balances 30 years after bog rewetting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanselow-Algan, M.; Schmidt, S. R.; Greven, M.; Fiencke, C.; Kutzbach, L.; Pfeiffer, E.-M.

    2015-02-01

    Natural peatlands are important carbon sinks and sources of methane (CH4). In contrast, drained peatlands turn from a carbon sink to a carbon source and potentially emit nitrous oxide (N2O). Rewetting of peatlands thus implies climate change mitigation. However, data about the time span that is needed for the re-establishment of the carbon sink function by restoration is scarce. We therefore investigated the annual greenhouse gas (GHG) balances of three differently vegetated bog sites 30 years after rewetting. All three vegetation communities turned out to be sources of carbon dioxide (CO2) ranging between 0.6 ± 1.43 t CO2 ha-2 yr-1 (Sphagnum-dominated vegetation) and 3.09 ± 3.86 t CO2 ha-2 yr-1 (vegetation dominated by heath). While accounting for the different global warming potential (GWP) of the three greenhouse gases, the annual GHG balance was calculated. Emissions ranged between 25 and 53 t CO2-eq ha-1 yr-1 and were dominated by large emissions of CH4 (22 up to 51 t CO2-eq ha-1 yr-1), while highest rates were found at purple moor grass (Molinia caerulea) stands. These are to our knowledge the highest CH4 emissions so far reported for bog ecosystems in temperate Europe. As the restored area was subject to large fluctuations in water table, we conclude that the high CH4 emission rates were caused by a combination of both the temporal inundation of the easily decomposable plant litter of this grass species and the plant-mediated transport through its tissues. In addition, as a result of the land use history, the mixed soil material can serve as an explanation. With regards to the long time span passed since rewetting, we note that the initial increase in CH4 emissions due to rewetting as described in the literature is not limited to a short-term period.

  17. Sorption of radioiodide in an acidic, nutrient-poor boreal bog: insights into the microbial impact.

    PubMed

    Lusa, M; Bomberg, M; Aromaa, H; Knuutinen, J; Lehto, J

    2015-05-01

    Batch sorption experiments were conducted to evaluate the sorption behaviour of iodide and the microbial impact on iodide sorption in the surface moss, subsurface peat, gyttja, and clay layers of a nutrient-poor boreal bog. The batch distribution coefficient (Kd) values of iodide decreased as a function of sampling depth. The highest Kd values, 4800 L/Kg dry weight (DW) (geometric mean), were observed in the fresh surface moss and the lowest in the bottom clay (geometric mean 90 mL/g DW). In the surface moss, peat and gyttja layers, which have a high organic matter content (on average 97%), maximum sorption was observed at a pH between ∼ 4 and 5 and in the clay layer at pH 2. The Kd values were significantly lower in sterilized samples, being 20-fold lower than the values found for the unsterilized samples. In addition, the recolonization of sterilized samples with a microbial population from the fresh samples restored the sorption capacity of surface moss, peat and gyttja samples, indicating that the decrease in the sorption was due to the destruction of microbes and supporting the hypothesis that microbes are necessary for the incorporation of iodide into the organic matter. Anoxic conditions reduced the sorption of iodide in fresh, untreated samples, similarly to the effect of sterilization, which supports the hypothesis that iodide is oxidized into I2/HIO before incorporation into the organic matter. Furthermore, the Kd values positively correlated with peroxidase activity in surface moss, subsurface peat and gyttja layers at +20 °C, and with the bacterial cell counts obtained from plate count agar at +4 °C. Our results demonstrate the importance of viable microbes for the sorption of iodide in the bog environment, having a high organic matter content and a low pH. PMID:25752706

  18. Ecohydrology by thinking outside the bog: Shifting paradigms in an era of shifting peatland ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waddington, James; Moore, Paul

    2016-04-01

    Large shifts in vegetation distributions are occurring worldwide and at unprecedented rates. The most extreme of these regime shifts are expected to occur at ecosystem boundaries of both semi-arid and semi-humid landscapes. Despite extensive hydrological research on the interactions between water and semi-arid ecosystems, research in peatlands on the wet end of ecosystem continuum has been "bogged down" (pun fully intended) by the traditional conceptual models (paradigms?) of peatland hydrology and ecology. The consequences of this "thinking" are large given that northern peatlands provide important global and regional ecosystem services (carbon storage, water storage, and biodiversity). This is especially true because peatlands face increases in the severity, areal extent, and frequency of climate-mediated (e.g., wildfire, drought) and land-use change (e.g., drainage, flooding, and mining) disturbances placing the future security of these critical ecosystem services in doubt. We use the word doubt because while numerical modelling studies predict peatland regime shifts and the demise of global peat stocks, there is growing evidence that peatlands are self-regulating ecosystems dominated by negative ecohydrological feedbacks that stabilize the aforementioned ecosystem services through high ecosystem resilience to disturbance. This raises several important hydrological questions? "Is there field evidence of peatland regime shifts? If so, what are the potential impacts of these shifts on water resources and watershed management? If not, are researchers actually looking in the right places (or times)? In this presentation we explore the need for a "thinking outside the bog" in order to understand the ecohydrological consequences of transformative landscape change caused by peatland regime shifts. With reference to over two decades of field research, recent advances with our Peatland Hydrological Impacts model and recent research examining primary peat formation, we

  19. Radioactive deposits in California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walker, George W.; Lovering, Tom G.

    1954-01-01

    containing rare earths. Secondary uranium minerals have been found as fracture coatings and as disseminations in various types of wall rock, although they are largely confined to areas of Tertiary volcanic rocks. Probably the uranium in the uraniferous deposits in California is related genetically to felsic crystalline rocks and felsic volcanic rocks; the present distribution of the secondary uranium minerals has been controlled, in part, by circulating ground waters and probably, in part, by magmatic waters related to the Tertiary volcanic activity. The thorium minerals are genetically related to the intrusion of pegmatite and plutonic crystalline rocks. None of the known deposits of radioactive minerals in California contain marketable reserves of uranium or thorium ore under economic conditions existing in 1952. With a favorable local market small lots of uranium ore may be available in the following places: the Rosamund prospect, the Rafferty and Chilson properties, the Lucky Star claim, and the Yerih group. The commercial production of thorium minerals will be possible, in the near future, only if these minerals can be recovered cheaply as a byproduct either from the mining of rare earths minerals at Mountain Pass or as a byproduct of placer mining for gold.

  20. The supply of trace elements from the atmosphere recorded in a natural archive by the example of the Ilas ombrotrophic bog in the White Sea drainage basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shevchenko, V. P.; Kusnetsov, O. L.; Politova, N. V.; Zaretskaya, N. E.; Kutenkov, S. A.; Lisitzin, A. P.; Pokrovsky, O. S.

    2015-12-01

    The results of studies are presented for the elemental composition of peat from the Ilas ombrotrophic bog (White Sea drainage basin). The calculations of enrichment factors of trace elements over the section of the bog peat relatively to the average composition of the Earth's continental crust showed that the concentrations of most of chemical elements is determined by the contributions of lithogenic and biogenic sources, and the content of trace elements is equal to the background level. Enrichment growth since the beginning of intense development of European industry until the early 21th century was revealed only for Zn, Sb, Pb, and Cd. These elements were supplied to the bog resulting from long-range air transport and precipitation from the atmosphere. No pronounced heavy-metal contamination caused by the Arkhangelsk agglomeration was revealed for the peat in the Ilas bog.

  1. Optimization of UA of heat exchangers and BOG compressor exit pressure of LNG boil-off gas reliquefaction system using exergy analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochunni, Sarun Kumar; Ghosh, Parthasarathi; Chowdhury, Kanchan

    2015-12-01

    Boil-off gas (BOG) generation and its handling are important issues in Liquefied natural gas (LNG) value chain because of economic, environment and safety reasons. Several variants of reliquefaction systems of BOG have been proposed by researchers. Thermodynamic analyses help to configure them and size their components for improving performance. In this paper, exergy analysis of reliquefaction system based on nitrogen-driven reverse Brayton cycle is carried out through simulation using Aspen Hysys 8.6®, a process simulator and the effects of heat exchanger size with and without related pressure drop and BOG compressor exit pressure are evaluated. Nondimensionalization of parameters with respect to the BOG load allows one to scale up or down the design. The process heat exchanger (PHX) requires much higher surface area than that of BOG condenser and it helps to reduce the quantity of methane vented out to atmosphere. As pressure drop destroys exergy, optimum UA of PHX decreases for highest system performance if pressure drop is taken into account. Again, for fixed sizes of heat exchangers, as there is a range of discharge pressures of BOG compressor at which the loss of methane in vent minimizes, the designer should consider choosing the pressure at lower value.

  2. The Permo-Triassic uranium deposits of Gondwanaland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    le Roux, J. P.; Toens, P. D.

    The world's uranium provinces are time bound and occur in five distinct periods ranging from the Proterozoic to the Recent. One of these periods embraces the time of Gondwana sedimentation and probably is related to the proliferation of land plants from the Devonian on-ward. Decaying vegetal matter produced reducing conditions that enhanced uranium precipitation. The association of uranium with molassic basins adjacent to uplifted granitic and volcanic arcs suggests that lithospheric plate subduction, leading to anatexis of basement rocks and andesitic volcanism, created favorable conditions for uranium mineralization. Uranium occurrences of Gondwana age are of four main types: sandstone-hosted, coal-hosted, pelite-hosted, and vein-type deposits. Sandstone-hosted deposits commonly occur in fluviodeltaic sediments and are related to the presence of organic matter. These deposits commonly are enriched in molybdenum and other base metal sulfides and have been found in South Africa, Zimbabwe, Zambia, Angola, Niger, Madagascar, India, Australia, Argentina, and Brazil. Coalhosted deposits contain large reserves of uranium but are of low grade. In Africa they are mostly within the Permian Ecca Group and its lateral equivalents, as in the Springbok Flats, Limpopo, Botswana, and Tanzania basins. Uraniferous black shales are present in the Gabon and Amazon basins but grades are low. Vein-type uranium is found in Argentina, where it occurs in clustered veins crosscutting sedimentary rocks and quartz porphyries.

  3. CO2 fluxes at northern fens and bogs have opposite responses to inter-annual fluctuations in water table

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulman, Benjamin N.; Desai, Ankur R.; Saliendra, Nicanor Z.; Lafleur, Peter M.; Flanagan, Lawrence B.; Sonnentag, Oliver; Mackay, D. Scott; Barr, Alan G.; van der Kamp, Garth

    2010-10-01

    This study compares eddy-covariance measurements of carbon dioxide fluxes at six northern temperate and boreal peatland sites in Canada and the northern United States of America, representing both bogs and fens. The two peatland types had opposite responses of gross ecosystem photosynthesis (GEP) and ecosystem respiration (ER) to inter-annual fluctuations in water table level. At fens, wetter conditions were correlated with lower GEP and ER, while at bogs wetter conditions were correlated with higher GEP and ER. We hypothesize that these contrasting responses are due to differences in the relative contributions of vascular plants and mosses. The coherence of our results between sites representing a range of average environmental conditions indicates ecosystem-scale differences in resilience to hydrological changes that should be taken into account when considering the future of peatland ecosystem services such as carbon sequestration under changing environmental conditions.

  4. Paleodrainage-unconformity model as guide to uranium deposits

    SciTech Connect

    Seeland, D.

    1984-04-01

    This paper considers a uranium occurrence model that shows how early Eocene and Oligocene depositional patterns and paleography can be used to identify favorable host rocks and to suggest where uraniferous ground water passed through these rocks. The uranium in the ground water was derived mostly from volcanic ash of the Oligocene White River Group. This model accounts for most known uranium deposits and occurrences in eastern Wyoming, western South Dakota, and western Nebraska. All major deposits in Eocene sandstones are in rocks of the fan-channel facies that were identified by sand grain size and shape studies, and most deposits are basinward of present-day major mountain valleys. Deposits occur only where rocks of this facies are less than 300 m (980 ft) below the reconstructed basal Oligocene surface, a distance calculated from roll-front migration and erosion rates. Uranium deposits in other than Eocene rocks also are related to the configuration of the pre-Oligocene surface. White River channel sandstones have deposits and occurrences along a 200-km (125-mi) section of a major Oligocene river in eastern Wyoming and Nebraska. Oligocene trans-mountain drainages localized uranium occurrences in Precambrian granitic rocks in the Laramie Mountains. Deposits in Cretaceous rocks in northern Colorado and along the flanks of the Black Hills lie beneath the axes of Oligocene channels. The channels were the major conduits that localized the movement of the uranium-bearing solutions. Rocks underlying the divides between the channels are unfavorable for uranium deposits where the channels are parallel to the regional dip, because the divides have a thick impervious lateritic soil cover.

  5. Parameter Calculation Technique for the Waste Treatment Facilities Using Naturally-Aerated Blocks in the Bog Ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhmed-Ogly, K. V.; Savichev, O. G.; Tokarenko, O. G.; Pasechnik, E. Yu; Reshetko, M. V.; Nalivajko, N. G.; Vlasova, M. V.

    2014-08-01

    Technique for the domestic wastewater treatment in the small residential areas and oil and gas facilities of the natural and man-made systems including a settling tank for mechanical treatment and a biological pond with peat substrate and bog vegetation for biological treatment has been substantiated. Technique for parameters calculation of the similar natural and man-made systems has been developed. It was proven that effective treatment of wastewater can be performed in Siberia all year round.

  6. Soil carbon balance on drained and afforested transitional bog in forest research station Vesetnieki in Latvia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lupiķis, Ainārs; Lazdiņš, Andis

    2015-04-01

    Around 0.8 mill. ha forests in Latvia are located on organic soils and 0.5 mill. ha of these forests are drained. Drainage of organic soils alters carbon stock and may has impact on the climate change. The aim of this study is to analyse the impact of drainage on a soil carbon stock in transitional bog (average growing stock before drainage 50 m3*ha-1) located in central part of Latvia in research station "Vesetnieki". Drainage was done in 1960. Average peat thickness is around 4.5 m; dominant tree species are pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) and spruce (Picea abies Karst.) with average growing stock 226 m3*ha-1 and 213 m3*ha-1. Volumetric peat samples were taken from soil surface down to 80 cm depth in 30 sample plots in drained sites and non-drained areas (transitional bog), which have been left as a control. Bulk density, carbon content in peat was determined to evaluate carbon stock changes in soil. Ground surface levelling in drained sites was done before drainage and repeatedly in 1966, 1970, 1975, 1977, 1982 and 2014 to calculate peat subsidence. The rate of peat subsidence after drainage increased rapidly, and 14 years after drainage 15.8 cm decrease of the surface level was found. The rate of the peat subsidence decreased later, and the ground level reduced by 9.9 cm in the following 40 years, reaching 25.7±3.5 cm from initial ground surface level in the 2014. The rapid decrease of the surface level after drainage can be explained by physical alters and by decomposition of the peat surface layers, however, it is not possible to assess now, which of these processes dominated. However, the significant (α=0.05) increase of the peat bulk density and carbon content in upper layers (0-80 cm) in drained sites compared to non-drained leads to conclusion that the compaction was the dominating process. Average carbon stock (0-80 cm deep soil layer) in non-drained areas is 339±29 tons*ha-1 and 513±27 tons*ha-1 in drained sites. We compared carbon stock in upper 80 cm

  7. Effects of land use intensity on the full greenhouse gas balance in an Atlantic peat bog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beetz, S.; Liebersbach, H.; Glatzel, S.; Jurasinski, G.; Buczko, U.; Höper, H.

    2013-02-01

    Wetlands can either be net sinks or net sources of greenhouse gases (GHGs), depending on the mean annual water level and other factors like average annual temperature, vegetation development, and land use. Whereas drained and agriculturally used peatlands tend to be carbon dioxide (CO2) and nitrous oxide (N2O) sources but methane (CH4) sinks, restored (i.e. rewetted) peatlands rather incorporate CO2, tend to be N2O neutral and release CH4. One of the aims of peatland restoration is to decrease their global warming potential (GWP) by reducing GHG emissions. We estimated the greenhouse gas exchange of a peat bog restoration sequence over a period of 2 yr (1 July 2007-30 June 2009) in an Atlantic raised bog in northwest Germany. We set up three study sites representing different land use intensities: intensive grassland (deeply drained, mineral fertilizer, cattle manure and 4-5 cuts per year); extensive grassland (rewetted, no fertilizer or manure, up to 1 cutting per year); near-natural peat bog (almost no anthropogenic influence). Daily and annual greenhouse gas exchange was estimated based on closed-chamber measurements. CH4 and N2O fluxes were recorded bi-weekly, and net ecosystem exchange (NEE) measurements were carried out every 3-4 weeks. Annual sums of CH4 and N2O fluxes were estimated by linear interpolation while NEE was modelled. Regarding GWP, the intensive grassland site emitted 564 ± 255 g CO2-C equivalents m-2 yr-1 and 850 ± 238 g CO2-C equivalents m-2 yr-1 in the first (2007/2008) and the second (2008/2009) measuring year, respectively. The GWP of the extensive grassland amounted to -129 ± 231 g CO2-C equivalents m-2 yr-1 and 94 ± 200 g CO2-C equivalents m-2 yr-1, while it added up to 45 ± 117 g CO2-C equivalents m-2 yr-1 and -101 ± 93 g CO2-C equivalents m-2 yr-1 in 2007/08 and 2008/09 for the near-natural site. In contrast, in calendar year 2008 GWP aggregated to 441 ± 201 g CO2-C equivalents m-2 yr-1, 14 ± 162 g CO2-C equivalents m-2 yr-1

  8. Low impact of dry conditions on the CO2 exchange of a Northern-Norwegian blanket bog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lund, Magnus; Bjerke, J. W.; Drake, B. G.; Engelsen, O.; Hansen, G. H.; Parmentier, F. J. W.; Powell, T. L.; Silvennoinen, H.; Sottocornola, M.; Tømmervik, H.; Weldon, S.; Rasse, D. P.

    2015-02-01

    Northern peatlands hold large amounts of organic carbon (C) in their soils and are as such important in a climate change context. Blanket bogs, i.e. nutrient-poor peatlands restricted to maritime climates, may be extra vulnerable to global warming since they require a positive water balance to sustain their moss dominated vegetation and C sink functioning. This study presents a 4.5 year record of land-atmosphere carbon dioxide (CO2) exchange from the Andøya blanket bog in northern Norway. Compared with other peatlands, the Andøya peatland exhibited low flux rates, related to the low productivity of the dominating moss and lichen communities and the maritime settings that attenuated seasonal temperature variations. It was observed that under periods of high vapour pressure deficit, net ecosystem exchange was reduced, which was mainly caused by a decrease in gross primary production. However, no persistent effects of dry conditions on the CO2 exchange dynamics were observed, indicating that under present conditions and within the range of observed meteorological conditions the Andøya blanket bog retained its C uptake function. Continued monitoring of these ecosystem types is essential in order to detect possible effects of a changing climate.

  9. Comparative characteristic of the sphagnum moss and peat of upland bogs in Siberia, Russia and central part of Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mezhibor, Antonina; Podkozlin, Ivan

    2013-04-01

    This research represents the results of the ICP-MS study for the moss and peat samples from two upland bogs of Germany and one bog from Siberia, Russia (Tomsk region). Moss and upland peat are widely used for ecological studies. These substances enable to detect atmospheric pollution because of the peculiar structure of sphagnum moss. According to the obtained results, we can resume that moss and peat in Tomsk region are more enriched in such chemical elements as Cr, Fe, As, Sr, Y, Zr, Ba, La, Ce, Nd, Sm, Eu, Tb, Yb, Lu, Hf, Hg, Th, and U. The samples from Germany are more enriched in Mn, Cu, Zn, and Se. The geochemical composition of the bogs reflects the specificity of industries that pollute the atmosphere with definite chemical elements. Thus, REE, Th and U in the moss and peat of Tomsk region can originate from nuclear facility near the Tomsk city. Coal combustion in power stations can be the source of Cr, As, Sr and REE as well. Mn, Cu, Zn, and Se possibly can originate from metallurgical facilities in Germany.

  10. The microbial impact on the sorption behaviour of selenite in an acidic, nutrient-poor boreal bog.

    PubMed

    Lusa, M; Bomberg, M; Aromaa, H; Knuutinen, J; Lehto, J

    2015-09-01

    (79)Se is among the most important long lived radionuclides in spent nuclear fuel and selenite, SeO3(2-), is its typical form in intermediate redox potential. The sorption behaviour of selenite and the bacterial impact on the selenite sorption in a 7-m-deep profile of a nutrient-poor boreal bog was studied using batch sorption experiments. The batch distribution coefficient (Kd) values of selenite decreased as a function of sampling depth and highest Kd values, 6600 L/kg dry weight (DW), were observed in the surface moss and the lowest in the bottom clay at 1700 L/kg DW. The overall maximum sorption was observed at pH between 3 and 4 and the Kd values were significantly higher in unsterilized compared to sterilized samples. The removal of selenite from solution by Pseudomonas sp., Burkholderia sp., Rhodococcus sp. and Paenibacillus sp. strains isolated from the bog was affected by incubation temperature and time. In addition, the incubation of sterilized surface moss, subsurface peat and gyttja samples with added bacteria effectively removed selenite from the solution and on average 65% of selenite was removed when Pseudomonas sp. or Burkholderia sp. strains were used. Our results demonstrate the important role of bacteria for the removal of selenite from the solution phase in the bog environment, having a high organic matter content and a low pH. PMID:26048060

  11. Sphagnum N and P Stoichiometry Indicates P-limitation on N2 Fixation in Ombrotrophic Bogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zivkovic, T.; Moore, T. R.; Disney, K.

    2015-12-01

    Biological N2 fixation is an important N input in ombrotrophic, nutrient poor and Sphagnum dominated bogs. As an energetically costly process, by which each N2 molecule is fixed to a cost of 16ATP molecules, N2 fixation might be P limited process. In this study we tested whether moss P and N concentrations, and N:P ratios could explain N2 fixation in the top 6cm photosynthetically active Sphagnum moss across eight ombrotrophic bogs along south-north geographical gradient in Ontario and Quebec. Under constant environmental conditions, we incubated subsamples of the surface Sphagnum mosses by using both, acetylene reduction assays (ARA) and 15N2 enriched method to measure N2 fixation rates. Same subsamples were later analyzed for N and P concentrations. Our preliminary data show that the increase of P concentration within moss capitula is related to a significant linear increase of ARA rates (R2=0.18, p<0.0001, N=150). N:P ratios showed a significant negative linear relationship with ARA (R2=0.34, p<0.0001, N=150) indicating that P limitation in the photosynthetically active part of mosses in bogs may also indicate P limitation on microbial N2 fixation

  12. High methane emissions dominated annual greenhouse gas balances 30 years after bog rewetting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanselow-Algan, M.; Schmidt, S. R.; Greven, M.; Fiencke, C.; Kutzbach, L.; Pfeiffer, E.-M.

    2015-07-01

    Natural peatlands are important carbon sinks and sources of methane (CH4). In contrast, drained peatlands turn from a carbon sink to a carbon source and potentially emit nitrous oxide (N2O). Rewetting of peatlands thus potentially implies climate change mitigation. However, data about the time span that is needed for the re-establishment of the carbon sink function by restoration are scarce. We therefore investigated the annual greenhouse gas (GHG) balances of three differently vegetated sites of a bog ecosystem 30 years after rewetting. All three vegetation communities turned out to be sources of carbon dioxide (CO2) ranging between 0.6 ± 1.43 t CO2 ha-2 yr-1 (Sphagnum-dominated vegetation) and 3.09 ± 3.86 t CO2 ha-2 yr-1 (vegetation dominated by heath). While accounting for the different global warming potential (GWP) of CO2, CH4 and N2O, the annual GHG balance was calculated. Emissions ranged between 25 and 53 t CO2-eq ha-1 yr-1 and were dominated by large emissions of CH4 (22-51 t CO2-eq ha-1 yr-1), with highest rates found at purple moor grass (Molinia caerulea) stands. These are to our knowledge the highest CH4 emissions so far reported for bog ecosystems in temperate Europe. As the restored area was subject to large fluctuations in the water table, we assume that the high CH4 emission rates were caused by a combination of both the temporal inundation of the easily decomposable plant litter of purple moor grass and the plant-mediated transport through its tissues. In addition, as a result of the land use history, mixed soil material due to peat extraction and refilling can serve as an explanation. With regards to the long time span passed since rewetting, we note that the initial increase in CH4 emissions due to rewetting as described in the literature is not inevitably limited to a short-term period.

  13. Effects of Nutrient Addition on Belowground Stoichiometry and Microbial Activity in an Ombrotrophic Bog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinsonneault, A. J.; Moore, T. R.; Roulet, N. T.

    2015-12-01

    Ombrotrophic bogs are both nutrient-poor systems and important carbon (C) sinks yet there remains a dearth of information on the stoichiometry of C, nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), and potassium (K), an important determinant of substrate quality for microorganisms, in these systems. In this study, we quantified the C, N, P, and K concentrations and stoichiometric ratios of both soil organic matter (SOM) and dissolved organic matter (DOM) as well as microbial extracellular enzyme activity from 0 - 10cm depth in a long-term fertilization experiment at Mer Bleue bog, Ontario, Canada. Though trends in C:N, C:P, and C:K between SOM and DOM seem to follow one another, preliminary results indicate that the stoichiometric ratios of DOM were at least an order of magnitude smaller than those of DOM suggesting that nutrient fertilization impacts the quality of DOM as a microbial substrate to a greater degree than SOM. C:N decreased with greater nitrogen addition but C:P and C:K increased; the magnitude of that increase being smaller in NPK treatments relative to N-only treatments suggesting co-limitation by P and/or K. This is further supported by the increase in activity of both the C-cycling enzyme, β-D-glucosidase (bdG), and the P-cycling enzyme, phosphatase (Phos), with greater nitrogen addition; particularly in NPK-treatments for bdG and N-only treatments for Phos. The activity of the N-cycling enzyme, N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase, and the C-cycling enzyme, phenol oxidase, with greater N-addition suggests a decreased need to breakdown organic nitrogen to meet microbial N-requirements in the former and N-inhibition in the latter consistent with findings in the literature. Taken together, these results suggest that higher levels of nutrients impact both microbial substrate quality as well as the activity of microbial enzymes that are key in the decomposition process which may ultimately decrease the ability of peatlands to sequester carbon.

  14. Water and Energy Exchanges over a Subarctic Bog in Northern Quebec, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isabelle, P.; Nadeau, D. F.; Rousseau, A. N.

    2013-12-01

    A significant fraction of the energy supply to eastern Canada and to the northeastern US comes from large hydropower plants located in the Canadian boreal shield. For instance, the La Grande River watershed near James Bay (Canada), hosts a hydropower complex producing nearly 40% of the overall peak load of Quebec. In this northern, remote and vast (≈100,000 km2) watershed, boreal forest is predominant, but wetlands (25% of the surface cover) are of key importance to the river's water budget. Unfortunately, little is known about how boreal wetlands affect regional hydrological processes, and hence, how they contribute to inflows to hydropower reservoirs. This study aims to gain a deeper understanding of evapotranspiration processes over boreal wetlands, based on field observations. The study site is a 60-ha bog (53.7°N, 78.2°W) located next to the Necopastic River, a tributary of the La Grande River. The peatland is of ombrotrophic type, meaning that it receives most of its water and nutrients from precipitation. The analysis relies on data collected by a flux tower during a field campaign throughout summer 2012., as well as detailed measurements of the water budget in this sub-watershed. One key finding is that the atmosphere is neutrally-stratified for more than 60% of the summer. The impact of this unusual feature of the atmospheric boundary layer on water vapor fluxes is carefully analyzed. As expected, eddy covariance evapotranspiration data compared well with classical formulas (Priestley-Taylor, Penman, Penman-Monteith, FAO), particularly with Priestley-Taylor. Given nearly all these formulations command direct measurements or estimations of net radiation, and that the cost of net radiometers is prohibitive, we tested the less frequently used profile method, which simply requires one or two additional measurement levels of wind speed, temperature and humidity. The latter method led to promising results, especially considering its ease of implementation

  15. Seasonal and interannual variation in water vapor and heat fluxes in a West Siberian continental bog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimoyama, K.; Hiyama, T.; Fukushima, Y.; Inoue, G.

    2003-10-01

    The seasonal and interannual variation in the energy fluxes of a West Siberian continental bog were measured from April to October in 1999 and 2000 using the eddy covariance method. The energy balance closure rate (=[sensible + latent heat fluxes]/[available energy]) ranged from ˜0.8 to 0.9 and showed a better energy balance and less scattering using the soil heat flux estimated from an area-averaged soil thermal parameter rather than from a plot-based measurement. The net radiation (Rn) increased drastically after snowmelt because the surface albedo (a) dropped from its highest value to its lowest value over the course of the snowmelt. The snowmelt water raised the water table (zwt) to its highest level; it then gradually decreased. The seasonal and interannual variation in a, which ranged from 0.09-0.19, depended on zwt, because surface wetness was closely related to zwt through the capillary uptake of Sphagnum moss. The seasonal variation in the latent heat flux (lE) was similar to that in Rn. The largest lE was observed in the middle of June, and was ˜120 Wm-2 (4.2 mm d-1) in both years. Conversely, the sensible heat flux (H) did not show an obvious seasonal pattern and was lower than lE during the growing season. The Bowen ratio (Br) in the early growing season was 0.57 and 0.60, and the values in the peak growing season were 0.65 and 0.78, in 1999 and 2000, respectively. The lower Br was related to the higher zwt; specifically, it was due to the wetter surface conditions. An interannual comparison of the monthly mean atmospheric water vapor deficit (δe) and lE showed a significant relationship with a higher lE observed in the year with a higher δe. Therefore in the bog studied the interannual variation in the water vapor flux was controlled mainly by zwt and δe.

  16. A stacked record of late-Holocene moisture variability from three raised bogs in Maine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clifford, M. J.; Booth, R. K.

    2011-12-01

    During the past century, drought has caused substantial social, economic, and ecological changes in North America. Semi-arid regions of the western United States have been particularly vulnerable to drought and drought impacts. However, drought has been less frequent and severe in humid regions of North America during the past century, leading to the perception that these regions are not particularly vulnerable to hydroclimatic change. Although the tree-ring record provides a detailed perspective on drought frequency and duration for the past millennium in the western US, much less is known about the long-term history of water balance in humid regions like the Northeast. To better understand the long-term history of moisture variability in this region, we developed records of past hydroclimate variability spanning the past 3000 years from three raised bogs in Maine. We used testate amoeba-inferred water table depths and measurements of the degree of peat decomposition to reconstruct the paleohydrology at each site. Proxy hydroclimate records from these bogs were combined (stacked), creating a single, regional record of hydroclimate variability. Our results reveal that droughts longer or more severe than any recorded during the 20th century have been common in the region, with particularly prominent multidecadal-to-centennial scale droughts centered on ~1800 yr BP, ~1650 yr BP, ~850 yr BP, and ~550 yr BP. Hydroclimate variability was greatest during the Medieval Climate Anomaly, a time period of relative warmth in much of the Northern Hemisphere. Droughts in Maine during the past century have been associated with northerly wind anomalies and anomalously cool sea surface temperatures in the adjacent northwestern North Atlantic, patterns that are likely associated with broader circulation features such as those associated with the North Atlantic Oscillation. Droughts of the past 3000 years may have been characterized by similar responses to the coupled ocean

  17. Characterization of Groundwater Flow Processes in the Cedar Creek Watershed and the Cedarburg Bog in Southeastern Wisconsin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, J. P.; Han, W. S.; Feinstein, D.; Hart, D. J.

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to characterize the geology and groundwater flow of the bog as well as the surrounding area, notably the Cedar Creek Watershed, a HUC (Hydrologic Unit Code) 12 watershed. The watershed is approximately 330 km2, and borders the sub-continental divide separating the Mississippi River Basin from the Great Lakes Basin. The Cedar Creek watershed is composed of mostly agricultural and urban land with a significant stress of groundwater withdrawal for both irrigation and residential use. This watershed has importance due to the contribution to both the Milwaukee River and Lake Michigan, and is integral in the study of regional groundwater flow of Southeastern Wisconsin. Furthermore, the Cedarburg Bog, located in the northeast corner of the Cedar Creek Watershed preserves diverse ecology and is recognized by the U.S. Department of Interior as a National Landmark. Groundwater is the primary driver for the diverse and unique ecology that is contained within the bog. Within the Cedar Creek Watershed, well data and glacial geology maps (Mickelson and Syverson, 1997) were integrated to develop a 3-dimensional subsurface map and watershed-scale groundwater flow model using the LAK3 and the SFR2 package to simulate surface water-aquifer interactions. The model includes 10 zones of the glacial sediments and the weathered and consolidated Silurian Dolomite bedrock. The hydraulic conductivity and storage parameters were calibrated with 203 head targets using universal parameter estimation code (PEST). Then, a series of future climate scenarios, developed by the Wisconsin Initiative on Climate Change Impact, were implemented to the USGS Soil-Water-Balance Code (SWB) to identify variations in recharge. The simulated recharge scenarios were adopted to predict the response of groundwater resources in the watershed and the Cedarburg Bog. Preliminary results produced from the MODFLOW model indicate the bog is acting as a recharge zone under current recharge

  18. Superfund record of decision (EPA Region 2): Burnt Fly Bog, Marlboro Township, NJ, September 30, 1998

    SciTech Connect

    1999-03-01

    This decision document presents the selected remedial action for the Westerly Wetlands, Northerly Wetlands, and Tar Patch Area at the Burnt Fly Bog Superfund Site. It addresses contaminated soil present on the three remaining contaminated areas on the Site, including the Westerly Wetlands, Northerly Wetlands, and Tar Patch Area. The major components of the selected remedy include: Excavation and off-site disposal of contaminated soil from the Northerly Wetlands; Excavation and off-site disposal of contaminated soil from the Tar Patch Area; Backfilling the excavated area in the Northerly Wetland and reestablishing wetlands; Backfilling the excavated area in the Tar Patch Area and creating wetlands; Provision of additional security fencing around the Westerly Wetlands, and the recording of a Deed Notice for the Westerly Wetlands, Northerly Wetlands, and Tar Patch Area; Monitoring of surface water and sediment in the Westerly Wetlands, surface water and sediment in the existing sedimentation basin located in the Downstream Area, and surface water, sediment and, if necessary, biota in Burnt Fly Brook; and Biological sampling in the Westerly Wetlands.

  19. Methanoregula boonei gen. nov., sp. nov., an acidiphilic methanogen isolated from an acidic peat bog.

    PubMed

    Bräuer, Suzanna L; Cadillo-Quiroz, Hinsby; Ward, Rebekah J; Yavitt, Joseph B; Zinder, Stephen H

    2011-01-01

    A novel acidiphilic, hydrogenotrophic methanogen, designated strain 6A8(T), was isolated from an acidic (pH 4.0-4.5) and ombrotrophic (rain-fed) bog located near Ithaca, NY, USA. Cultures were dimorphic, containing thin rods (0.2-0.3 μm in diameter and 0.8-3.0 μm long) and irregular cocci (0.2-0.8 μm in diameter). The culture utilized H(2)/CO(2) to produce methane but did not utilize formate, acetate, methanol, ethanol, 2-propanol, butanol or trimethylamine. Optimal growth conditions were near pH 5.1 and 35 °C. The culture grew in basal medium containing as little as 0.43 mM Na(+) and growth was inhibited completely by 50 mM NaCl. To our knowledge, strain 6A8(T) is one of the most acidiphilic (lowest pH optimum) and salt-sensitive methanogens in pure culture. Acetate, coenzyme M, vitamins and yeast extract were required for growth. It is proposed that a new genus and species be established for this organism, Methanoregula boonei gen. nov., sp. nov. The type strain of Methanoregula boonei is 6A8(T) (=DSM 21154(T) =JCM 14090(T)). PMID:20154331

  20. Palynology of cushion bogs of the Cordillera Pelada, Province of Valdivia, Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heusser, Calvin J.

    1982-01-01

    Fossil pollen identified in the earliest sediments of three cushion bogs in the Cordillera Pelada (40°10'S, 73°30'W) dated 10,425 14C yr B.P. includes the subantarctic species Dacrydium fonckii, Tetroncium magellanicum, Astelia pumila, Gaimardia australis, Donatia fascicularis, and Drosera uniflora. All grow today in the Cordillera Pelada and range poleward to the southernmost Province of Magallanes; one species, Drapetes muscosa, included with the pollen of these plants in the earliest record, is no longer a constituent of the flora but is limited only to subantarctic Chile. Available evidence indicates that plants survived the last glaciation north of the glacial border with the course of postglacial migration southward following the wastage of the glacier complex. Holocene climatic and vegetational changes in the Cordillera Pelada are interpreted in the context of regional reconstructions which show maximum warmth about 9000 yr ago with a pronounced dry period lasting from 9000 to 6500 yr B.P. Maximum precipitation was later reached around 4000 yr ago but has decreased overall since then. The regional decline of the endemic gymnosperm Fitzroya cupressoides, which today is extensively destroyed in the Cordillera Pelada, follows this decrease in precipitation. These climatic data suggest a net south ward shift in the zone of westerly winds that bring rainfall to the region over the past 4000 yr.

  1. Interactions between peat and salt-contaminated runoff in Alton Bog, Maine, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pugh, Alexander L.; Norton, Stephen A.; Schauffler, Molly; Jacobson, George L.; Kahl, Jeffrey S.; Brutsaert, Willem F.; Mason, Charles F.

    1996-07-01

    Year round, concentrations of base cations (Ca, Mg, Na, and K) and Cl - in surface and groundwater decline exponentially away from Interstate 95, a four-lane asphalt highway which bisects Alton Bog, a poor fen in Penobscot County, Maine, USA. The increased concentrations close to the highway are caused primarily by runoff of road-salt and weathering products of road-bed fill. Concentration ratios, constant with time, between base cations and H + at individual sites suggest that cation exchange reactions between peat and water achieve a state of equilibrium. These ratios change systematically with increasing distance from the highway, indicating systematic changes in the character of the peat exchange surfaces. The major change is a decrease in the occupancy of exchange sites by Na away from the road. These relationships and inferred processes have been duplicated with laboratory experiments. Base saturation of the peat, dominated by Ca, decreases with distance from the highway. Thus, in the short term, peat-water equilibration exerts strong controls on the water chemistry, particularly ion ratios. Long term exposure to elevated concentrations of Ca, Mg, and NaCl in the shallow ground waters has altered the peat chemistry. Availability of plant nutrients (Ca, Mg, and K) has been generally increased by the weathering of road-bed fill and equilibration of the NaCl salt with the peat.

  2. Ecosystem Phenology from Eddy-covariance Measurements: Spring Photosynthesis in a Cool Temperate Bog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lafleur, P.; Moore, T. R.; Poon, D.; Seaquist, J.

    2005-12-01

    The onset and increase of spring photosynthetic flux of carbon dioxide is an important attribute of the carbon budget of northern ecosystems and we used eddy-covariance measurements from March to May over 5 years at the Mer Bleue ombrotrophic bog to establish the important controls. The onset of ecosystem photosynthesis (day-of-year from 86 to 101) was associated with the disappearance on the snow cover and there is evidence that photosynthesis can continue after a thin new snowfall. The growth of photosynthesis during the spring period was partially associated with light (daily photosynthetically active radiation) but primarily with temperature, with the strongest correlation being observed with peat temperature at a depth of 5 and 10 cm, except in one year in which there was a long snow cover. The vegetation comprises mosses, which are able to photosynthesize very early, evergreen shrubs, which appear dependent on soil warming, and deciduous shrubs, which leaf-out only in late spring. We observed changes in shrub leaf colour from brown to green and concomitant increases in foliar nitrogen and chlorophyll concentrations during the spring in this "evergreen" system. We analyzed MODIS images for periods of overlap of tower and satellite data and found a generally strong correlation, though the infrequent satellite measurements were unable to pick out the onset and timing of rapid growth of photosynthesis in this ecosystem.

  3. Late Holocene peatland carbon dynamics inferred from Teringi Bog in southern Estonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Kristyn; Stansell, Nathan; Klein, Eric; Borges, Alberto

    2015-04-01

    Radiocarbon dated peat cores collected along a transect from Teringi Bog, an ombotrophic peatland, record changes in carbon accumulation rates during the late Holocene in response to shifting climatic conditions. Stable oxygen isotope records from nearby lakes indicate that periods of wetter conditions during the Holocene occurred at times when carbon accumulation rates were higher at Teringi. This suggests that shifting water table conditions drove much of the observed changes in carbon dynamics. Modern surface process observations indicate that carbon accumulation rates are indeed more variable at locations where the height of the water table is highly sensitive to rainfall amounts. In addition, carbon isotopes measured on water samples indicate that there is a close relationship between δ13C values and methane concentrations, suggesting that methanogenesis is strongly biomediated, and likewise varies as a function of the regional hydrology. Regardless, all of the cores collected indicate that there was a trend toward higher carbon accumulation rates from ~4.2 to 3.5 ka when precipitation amounts were higher, followed by lower values under drier conditions until ~2.8 ka. There was then a trend toward higher carbon accumulation rates through the remaining late Holocene. These observations further highlight the importance of high latitude peatland in global carbon dynamics as both a potential sink and source of CO2 and CH4.

  4. Atmospheric methane sources - Alaskan tundra bogs, an alpine fen, and a subarctic boreal marsh

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sebacher, D. I.; Harriss, R. C.; Grice, S. S.; Bartlett, K. B.; Sebacher, S. M.

    1986-01-01

    Methane (CH4) flux measurements from Alaska tundra bogs, an alpine fen, and a subarctic boreal marsh were obtained at field sites ranging from Prudhoe Bay on the coast of the Arctic Ocean to the Alaskan Range south of Fairbanks during August 1984. In the tundra, average CH4 emission rates varied from 4.9 mg CH4 per sq m per day (moist tundra) to 119 mg CH4 per sq m per day (waterlogged tundra). Fluxes averaged 40 mg CH4 per sq m per day from wet tussock meadows in the Brooks Range and 289 mg Ch4 per sq m per day from an alpine fen in the Alaskan Range. The boreal marsh had an average CH4 emission rate of 106 mg CH4 per sq m per day. Significant emissions were detected in tundra areas where peat temperatures were as low as 4 C, and permafrost was only 25 cm below the ground surface. Emission rates from the 17 sites sampled were found to be logarithmically related to water levels at the sites. Extrapolation of the data to an estimate of the total annual CH4 emission from all arctic and boreal wetlands suggests that these ecosystems are a major source of atmospheric CH4 and could account for up to 23 percent of global CH4 emissions from wetlands.

  5. The importance of dissolved free oxygen during formation of sandstone-type uranium deposits

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Granger, Harry Clifford; Warren, C.G.

    1979-01-01

    One factor which distinguishes t, he genesis of roll-type uranium deposits from the Uravan Mineral Belt and other sandstone-type uranium deposits may be the presence and concentration of dissolved free oxygen in the ore-forming. solutions. Although dissolved oxygen is a necessary prerequisite for the formation of roll-type deposits, it is proposed that a lack of dissolved oxygen is a prerequisite for the Uravan deposits. Solutions that formed both types of deposits probably had a supergene origin and originated as meteoric water in approximate equilibrium with atmospheric oxygen. Roll-type deposits were formed where the Eh dropped abruptly following consumption of the oxygen by iron sulfide minerals and creation of kinetically active sulfur species that could reduce uranium. The solutions that formed the Uravan deposits, on the other hand, probably first equilibrated with sulfide-free ferrous-ferric detrital minerals and fossil organic matter in the host rock. That is, the uraniferous solutions lost their oxygen without lowering their Eh enough to precipitate uranium. Without oxygen, they then. became incapable of oxidizing iron sulfide minerals. Subsequent localization and formation of ore bodies from these oxygen-depleted solutions, therefore, was not necessarily dependent on large reducing capacities.

  6. The formation of basal-type uranium deposits in south central British Columbia

    SciTech Connect

    Boyle, D.R.

    1982-08-01

    The basal-type uranium deposits in south central British Columbia occur within unconsolidated, late Miocene fluvial paleochannel sediments that overlie major fault zones within the Okanagan Highlands Intrusive Complex. Five uranium deposits have been outlined to date, of which the Blizzard (4,020 metric tons U) and Tyee (650 metric tons U) are the largest. The basement intrusive complex underlying the deposits varies in age from early Cretaceous to Eocene and is comprised of quartz monzonite, granodiorite, Coryell monzonite, porphyritic granite, and pegmatite. Uranium mineralization is present in the form of uranous (ningyoite) or uranyl (saleeite, autunite) phosphates coating clastic grains and filling voids. Because of very strong reducing conditions related to large concentrations of marcasite and organic material, ningyoite is the only uranium mineral in the Tyee deposit, whereas the Blizzard deposit contains a more complex assemblage of minerals (saleeite, autunite, ningyoite). The observed paragenetic sequence of mineral precipitation in the Blizzard deposit (autunite-saleeite-ningyoite) indicates that the uranyl minerals, saleeite and autunite, are primary. Investigations of the source of the ore-forming elements (U, Ca, Mg, PO/sub 4/) showed the deposits to be formed by the infiltration into fluvial sediments of deep-seated, structurally controlled, ground waters that migrated in a well-developed regional hydrologic system within the Complex. Research indicates that the ore-forming ground waters were cold, slightly bicarbonated (150-400 ppm), highly uraniferous (10-50 ppb), and slightly oxidizing (dissolved oxygen = 2-4 ppm).

  7. Anthropogenic Lead Deposition over the last 15,000 years in Northern New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cisneros-Dozal, L.; Fessenden, J.; Ray, C.

    2006-12-01

    Analyses of stable isotopes of lead (206Pb/207Pb) as well as lead concentrations in soil sediments provide a method to discern anthropogenic from natural sources of lead deposition. In order to distinguish natural from anthropogenic aerosol deposition over the Holocene in Northern New Mexico, isotopic analyses and total lead measurements were performed on bog sediments spanning 15,000 years before present. The bog core was collected in the Santa Fe National Forest at an elevation of 2925 m and comprises a depth of ~400 cm of sediments. Dry and homogenized sediments from depth intervals varying from 2 to 20 cm were extracted in a microwave-assisted digestion with nitric acid at 170 Celsius degree. The accuracy and precision of our method were determined by analyses of standard reference materials (National Institute of Standards and Technology 981, International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)-SL-1 and IAEA-soil-7) and replicated measurements respectively. The preliminary results from this study have shown influences from regional anthropogenic sources as well as environmental forcing on the lead concentrations and isotopic signatures. The dominant signals in this environment are believed to be the result of local conditions of the sediments through the Holocene (e.g. dry versus wet/bog environments). This will have a significant impact on lead concentration and isotope modeling as local environmental condition is the dominant control of these proxies.

  8. Vegetation drives belowground biogeochemical gradients and C accumulation in an ombrotrophic bog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knorr, Klaus-Holger; Galka, Mariusz; Borken, Werner

    2016-04-01

    Peat decomposition and C accumulation is determined by hydrology and climate and by concomitant changes in vegetation and changes in the quality of carbon inputs. Especially changes from moss dominated to vascular plant dominated vegetation affect belowground biogeochemistry and decomposition, as Sphagnum mosses provide refractory, nutrient poor litter, while vascular plants produce more labile litter and may have aerenchymatic rooting systems. In-site variability in moisture and vegetation, e.g. hummock-hollow structures, lawns, and medium scale surface topography, could thus cause large differences in decomposition and C accumulation within a site. In order to understand within-site variability and to see how C accumulation, common decomposition indices, and major biogeochemical parameters in the pore waters are affected by site specific conditions and vegetation, we investigated a moisture-vegetation gradient along a 800 m transect in an oceanic, ombrotrophic bog in Southern Patagonia. Along the transect, conditions changed from wet, Sphagnum dominated (S. magellanicum), to intermediate drier and wetter with Sphagnum/shrubs mixtures, sedges and rushes to more wind exposed, dominated by cushion plants (mainly Astelia pumila). We hypothesized that under arenchymatic vascular plants, decomposition is enhanced and C accumulation is decreased. Vegetation development was elucidated by plant macrofossils and carbon accumulation was attributed to the respective vegetation. The transect demonstrated a high variability of depth records within the bog. At the two most contrasting sites, the uppermost 1 meter persistently dominated by either Sphagnum magellanicum or Astelia pumila had accumulated over 2400 or 4200 years, respectively. Accordingly, the peat under cushion plants was much more decomposed, with C/N ratios of 20-50 compared to C/N ratios of 40-80 under Sphagnum patches. Mixed sites in between had C/N ratios of 30-90, depending on plant community, and

  9. Bioavailability of inorganic arsenic from bog ore-containing soil in the dog.

    PubMed Central

    Groen, K; Vaessen, H A; Kliest, J J; de Boer, J L; van Ooik, T; Timmerman, A; Vlug, R F

    1994-01-01

    In some parts of The Netherlands, bog ore-containing soils predominate, which have natural arsenic levels that exceed, by a factor of 10, existing standards for maximum allowable levels of inorganic arsenic in soil. These standards are based on the assumption that in humans the bioavailability of arsenic from ingested soil is equal to that from an aqueous solution. In view of the regulatory problem that the arsenic levels of these soils present, we questioned the validity of this assumption. To obtain a more realistic estimate, the bioavailability of inorganic arsenic from soil in a suitable animal model was studied. In this report, a study performed in six dogs in a two-way cross-over design is presented. The dogs received orally, in random order, arsenic both as an intravenous solution and as arsenic-containing soil. During a 120-hr period after administration urine was collected in 24-hr fractions. Levels of arsenic were determined using a method of wet digestion, isolation and complexation of arsine, followed by molecule absorption spectrometry. Within 120 hr after intravenous administration, 88 +/- 16% of the dose was excreted renally. After oral administration of arsenic-containing soil, only 7.0 +/- 1.5% was excreted renally. From the urinary excretion data for these two routes of administration, the calculated bioavailability of inorganic arsenic from soil was 8.3 +/- 2.0%. The results from this study demonstrate the need to reconsider the present risk assessment for arsenic in soil. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. PMID:8033848

  10. Characterization of the efficiency of sedimentation basins downstream of harvested peat bogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samson-Do, Myriam; St-Hilaire, André

    2015-04-01

    Peat harvesting is a very lucrative industry in the provinces of Quebec and New-Brunswick (Canada). Peat enters in many potting mix used for horticulture. However, harvesting this resource has some impacts on the environment. First, industries need to drain the peat bog to dry the superficial layer. Then, it is harvested with industrial vacuums and the underlying layer is allowed to dry. The drained water is laden with suspended sediments (mostly organic peat fibers) that may affect biota of the stream where it is discharged. To counter the problem, this water does not go directly on the stream but first flows through a sedimentation basin, built to reduce suspended sediment loads. This work focuses on characterizing and eventually modeling the efficiency of those sedimentation basins. Seven basins were studied in Rivière-du-Loup, St-Valère and Escoumins (Quebec, Canada). They each have a different ratio basin area/drained area (4.7 10-4 to 20.3 10-4). To continuously monitor the sediment loads (calculated from sediment concentrations and discharge) entering and leaving basins, a nephelometer and a level logger were installed in the water column upstream and downstream of sedimentation basins. Their trapping efficiency was measured during the ice-free period (May to October) and for each significant rain event, since it is known that the rain and subsequent runoff induce most of the peat transport in and out of the basin. Results show that the event efficiency decreases as the basin is filled up with trapped sediments. For one basin, the efficiency was 85August. Trapping efficiency can be used as a tool to estimate basin dimensions. This has been done for municipal sedimentation ponds that trap minerals and will be adapted to the current context, where the dominant sediment is organic.

  11. Carbon cycling responses to a water table drawdown and decadal vegetation changes in a bog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talbot, J.; Roulet, N. T.

    2009-12-01

    The quantity of carbon stored in peat depends on the imbalance between production and decomposition of organic matter. This imbalance is mainly controlled by the wetness of the peatland, usually described by the water table depth. However, long-term processes resulting from hydrological changes, such as vegetation succession, also play a major role in the biogeochemistry of peatlands. Previous studies have looked at the impact of a water table lowering on carbon fluxes in different types of peatlands. However, most of these studies were conducted within a time frame that did not allow the examination of vegetation changes due to the water table lowering. We conducted a study along a drainage gradient resulting from the digging of a drainage ditch 85 years ago in a portion of the Mer Bleue bog, located near Ottawa, Canada. According to water table reconstructions based on testate amoeba, the drainage dropped the water table by approximately 18 cm. On the upslope side of the ditch, the water table partly recovered and the vegetation changed only marginally. However, on the downslope side of the ditch, the water table stayed persistently lower and trees established (Larix and Betula). The importance of Sphagnum decreased with a lower water table, and evergreen shrubs were replaced by deciduous shrubs. The water table drop and subsequent vegetation changes had combined and individual effects on the carbon functioning of the peatland. Methane fluxes decreased because of the water table lowering, but were not affected by vegetation changes, whereas respiration and net ecosystem productivity were affected by both. The carbon storage of the system increased because of an increase in plant biomass, but the long-term carbon storage as peat decreased. The inclusion of the feedback effect that vegetation has on the carbon functioning of a peatland when a disturbance occurs is crucial to simulate the long-term carbon balance of this ecosystem.

  12. Influence of water table on carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, and methane fluxes from taiga bog microcosms

    SciTech Connect

    Funk, D.W.; Pullmann, E.R.; Peterson, K.M.

    1994-09-01

    Hydrological changes, particularly alterations in water table level, may largely overshadow the more direct effects of global temperature increase upon carbon cycling in arctic and subarctic wetlands. Frozen cores (n=40) of intact soils and vegetation were collected from a bog near Fairbanks, Alaska, and fluxes of CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, and Co in response to water table variation were studied under controlled conditions in the Duke University phytotron. Core microcosms thawed to a 20-cm depth over 30 days under a 20 hour photoperiod with a day/night temperature regime of 20/10{degrees}C. After 30 days the water table in 20 microcosms was decreased from the soil surface to -15 cm and maintained at the soil surface in 20 control cores. Outward fluxes of CO{sub 2} (9-16 g m{sup -2}d{sup -1}) and CO (3-4 mg m{sup -2}d{sup -1}) were greatest during early thaw and decreased to near zero for both gases before the water table treatment started. Lower water table tripled CO{sub 2} flux to the atmosphere when compared with control cores. Carbon monoxide was emitted at low rates from high water table cores and consumed by low water table cores. Methane fluxes were low (<1 mg m{sup -2}d{sup -1}) in all cores during thaw. High water table cores increased CH{sub 4} flux to 8-9 mg m{sup -2}d{sup -1} over 70 days and remained high relative to the low water table cores (<0.74 mg m{sup -2}d{sup -1}). Although drying of wetland taiga soils may decrease CH{sub 4} emissions to the atmosphere, the associated increase in CO{sub 2} due to aerobic respiration will likely increase the global warming potential of gas emissions from these soils. 43 refs., 4 figs.

  13. Linking glacial deposits and lake sediments for paleoclimate studies in the Northern Romanian Carpathians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamosteanu, Andrei; Mindrescu, Marcel; Anselmetti, Flavio; Akçar, Naki; Lowick, Sally E.; Vogel, Hendrik

    2015-04-01

    Timing and extent of glaciations in the Carpathian mountains are still controversely discussed, mostly due to the lack of well dated geomorphological and geochronological studies. We present the preliminary results of geomorphological and sedimentological analyses of glacial and lacustrine deposits in Bistricioara Valley located in the Rodna Mountains (Northern Romanian Carpathians). Most of the glacial deposits in the Romanian Carpathians, such as moraines, typically occur above 1600 m a.s.l. marking the maximum lowering of past glaciations. Most of the glacial lakes occur between 1800 and 2000 m a.s.l. Field surveys included mapping of moraines and erratic boulders using detailed topographical maps and aerial photos. A Digital Elevation Model (DEM) was derived using GIS (ArcMap 10.1) from 1:25000 topographic maps, which was further completed by field survey data. The resulting geomorphological map shows a series of moraines, which indicate the occurrence of several glacial phases in the study area. Sediment samples were collected from a peat bog (1630 m a.s.l.) dammed by a large lateral moraine within Bistricioara Mare, one of the largest glacial cirques in the Romanian Carpathians. A Russian corer was used to extract the sediment profile from the peat bog (approx. 5 m long sediment core). A X-ray computed tomography (CT) system was employed for the study of sedimentary and deformation structures and X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (XRF) for multi-element analysis at high resolution. Glacial deposits from the lateral moraine in front of the peat bog were also sampled, as well as from the frontal moraines, upstream and downstream of the peat bog. This set of samples from multiple archives allows to link and merge the chronologies and the paleoenvironmental records of glacial deposits and lake sediments. Moreover, we employed cosmogenic nuclide dating for the reconstruction of glacial stages and their paleoclimatic implications during deglaciation in this area of

  14. Modeling CH4 and CO2 cycling using porewater stable isotopes in a thermokarst bog, interior Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumann, R. B.; Blazewicz, S.; Waldrop, M. P.

    2014-12-01

    Methane emitted from wetlands represents the end product of various microbial processes operating within anaerobic wetland soils. Determining the rate at which these microbial reactions occur is challenging, making it difficult to gain a mechanistic understanding of the factors and conditions that influence microbial rates and ultimately methane emissions. One approach for estimating in-situ reaction rates involves tracking the time evolution of porewater concentrations and stable carbon isotopes of CH4 and CO2. Microbes preferentially use isotopically light carbon substrates, which causes the carbon product pool to become isotopically lighter and the carbon substrate pool become isotopically heavier. Different microbial biochemical pathways fractionate carbon to different extents, allowing for differentiation between microbial reactions. This is a powerful approach to estimate in-situ rates, but, as we show in our presentation, it is possible for different combinations of reaction rates to provide equally good fits to the evolution of these data. The solution is non-unique and depends on the set of considered reactions. We used two different reaction network models on a set of porewater data collected from a thermokarst bog at the Alaska Peatland Experiment (APEX) outside of Fairbanks, AK to estimate in-situ microbial reaction rates during the summer season. Both models included methane production, methane oxidation and fermentation/respiration, but only one model included homoacetogenesis. We found that both reaction networks explained the evolution of dissolved gas concentrations and stable carbon isotope data, but predicted rates that differed from each other by up to a factor of six. The methane production rates estimated by the model that included homoacetogenesis aligned better with measured rates of methane emission. Despite differences in the magnitude of modeled rates, results from the two models told a similar story about the spatial and temporal

  15. [Analysis of genetic structure and differentiation of the bog and dry land populations of Pinus sibirica du tour based on nuclear microsatellite loci].

    PubMed

    Oreshkova, N V; Sedel'nikova, T S; Pimenov, A V; Efremov, S P

    2014-09-01

    We evaluated the population structure of the bog and dry land populations of the Siberian pine Pinus sibirica (P. sibrica) in Western Siberia using nuclear genome markers. Six pairs of nuclear microsatellite loci were used for this analysis. We detected 30 allelic variants in 120 individuals of four populations of P. Sibirica. We established that the studied populations differ by genetic structure. The most essential differences were identified between the Siberian pine population from oligotrophic bog and the group of populations from dry land within eutrophic bogs and near settlements P. sibirica forest (F(ST) = 0.019; D(N) = 0.053). We estimated that diversification of the West Siberian populations of P. sibirica exceeded 2.4% (F(ST) = 0.024), based on an analysis of SSR markers. PMID:25735136

  16. Concentration and grain-size distribution of aeolian sands in peat bogs as an indicator of past storminess in coastal areas of Estonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandel, Egert; Vaasma, Tiit; Tõnisson, Hannes; Sugita, Shinya; Vilumaa, Kadri; Anderson, Agnes; Terasmaa, Jaanus; Kangur, Mihkel; Pensa, Margus; Küttim, Martin; Umbleja, Liisa; Puusepp, Liisa

    2016-04-01

    Storminess in the Baltic Sea region has significantly increased over the last 50 years. As we do not have meteorological data beyond 20th century, therefore the long-term changes in storminess (e.g., frequency and magnitude of the storms) and its impact on the coastal evolution are mostly unknown. This study aims to reconstruct the extreme storm events along the coast of Estonia in late Holocene, inferred from changes in grain-size distribution and concentration of aeolian sands preserved in peat deposits. Four cores in total were collected from bogs of coastal Estonia; three from west Estonian archipelago (Hiiumaa Island and Saaremaa Island); one from the northern coast of the mainland (Juminda Peninsula). Core from Saaremaa (166 cm) covers the last 2700 years, cores from Hiiumaa (171 cm and 330 cm) cover ca 4000 years, and core from Juminda (465 cm) covers ca 8500 years. All AMS dates (77) are converted to cal yrs BP. Analyses of LOI and grain size are carried out at every centimetre in order to obtain data for mineral matter content and concentration of sand particles. The Juminda core shows a consistently low content of mineral matter (LOI < 2%) without clear peaks over the last 8000 years. The LOI results at both Hiiumaa sites show that mineral matter content gradually decreases from 4000 to 1500 cal yrs BP and then becomes the lowest in the period of 1500-1000 cal yrs BP; since then, it becomes higher (up to 10%) with fluctuations and has a clear peak around 700 cal yrs BP. At Saaremaa, the overall trend of mineral matter content is similar to that at the Hiiumaa sites: gradual decline from 2700 to 1500 cal yrs BP, lowest in 1500-1000 cal yrs BP, and relatively high over the last millennium. Concentration of mineral particles reveal clear peaks of aeolian sands at each site. At northern Hiiumaa, concentration has peaks around 3500, 3000 and 2500 cal yrs BP and is relatively high over the last 700 years. At Saaremaa, concentration has peaked at 2100, 1600 and

  17. Acid Deposition

    EPA Science Inventory

    This indicator presents acid deposition trends in the contiguous U.S. from 1989 to 2007. Data are broken down by wet and dry deposition and deposition of nitrogen and sulfur compounds. Acid deposition is particularly damaging to lakes, streams, and forests and the plants and a...

  18. A 5 Year Study of Carbon Fluxes from a Restored English Blanket Bog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worrall, F.; Dixon, S.; Evans, M.

    2014-12-01

    , climatically marginal blanket bog. However, had water table restoration been conducted alongside revegetation then a significant decline in DOC concentrations could have also been realised.

  19. Biogeochemical indicators of peatland degradation - a case study of a temperate bog in northern Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruger, J. P.; Leifeld, J.; Glatzel, S.; Szidat, S.; Alewell, C.

    2015-05-01

    Organic soils in peatlands store a great proportion of the global soil carbon pool and can lose carbon via the atmosphere due to degradation. In Germany, most of the greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from organic soils are attributed to sites managed as grassland. Here, we investigated a land use gradient from near-natural wetland (NW) to an extensively managed (GE) to an intensively managed grassland site (GI), all formed in the same bog complex in northern Germany. Vertical depth profiles of δ13C, δ15N, ash content, C / N ratio and bulk density as well as radiocarbon ages were studied to identify peat degradation and to calculate carbon loss. At all sites, including the near-natural site, δ13C depth profiles indicate aerobic decomposition in the upper horizons. Depth profiles of δ15N differed significantly between sites with increasing δ15N values in the top soil layers paralleling an increase in land use intensity owing to differences in peat decomposition and fertilizer application. At both grassland sites, the ash content peaked within the first centimetres. In the near-natural site, ash contents were highest in 10-60 cm depth. The ash profiles, not only at the managed grassland sites, but also at the near-natural site indicate that all sites were influenced by anthropogenic activities either currently or in the past, most likely due to drainage. Based on the enrichment of ash content and changes in bulk density, we calculated the total carbon loss from the sites since the peatland was influenced by anthropogenic activities. Carbon loss at the sites increased in the following order: NW < GE < GI. Radiocarbon ages of peat in the topsoil of GE and GI were hundreds of years, indicating the loss of younger peat material. In contrast, peat in the first centimetres of the NW was only a few decades old, indicating recent peat growth. It is likely that the NW site accumulates carbon today but was perturbed by anthropogenic activities in the past. Together, all

  20. Evidence for Multiple Holocene Marine Impact Events: Ejecta in a Bog Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbott, D. H.; Courty, M.; Breger, D.; Costa, S.; Gerard-Little, P.; Burckle, L.; Pekar, S.

    2006-12-01

    In a core from Tamarack Pond (a former bog) in the Hudson Highlands of New York, we found two layers containing marine microfossils. Because carbon rich sediments can be bioturbated over 20 cm depths, we give the layer thicknesses as 20 cm. The first layer is at 332-354 cm depth. It contains a radiolarian with a splashed on coating of Fe-Cr-Ni metal. It also contains a benthonic foraminiferal fossil. The second layer is at 432-454 cm depth. The second layer contains a degraded radiolarian fossil, a silicate with a splashed on coating of Fe-Cr-Ni metal, a carbon rich spherule containing Fe-Cr-Ni metal, and a grain of titanomagnetite with multiple craters. It also contains organic matter with Sn in it. As Tamarack Pond is quite far from the ocean, the marine fossils in the cores are unlikely to be windblown debris of Holocene age. A benthonic foraminifera is particularly unlikely to be blown by the wind. This conclusion is strengthened by the observation that the splashed on coating of Fe-Cr-Ni metal occurs in chondritic relative abundances with Fe>Cr>Ni. In grains with a thick layer of splashed metal, the Ni is sufficiently abundant to produce 3 distinct Ni peaks in the X-ray analysis. Such a high abundance of Ni coupled with chondritic relative abundances suggests that the Fe-Cr- Ni splash is derived from the vaporization of an extraterrestrial impactor. If we assume that the sedimentation rate of the Tamarack Pond core is the same as that of a previously dated core from nearby Sutherland Pond, the two layers have an uncorrected C-14 age of around 900-1200 B.C. for the layer at 332-354 cm and 2100 to 2400 B.C. for the layer at 432-454 cm. Both ages have a rough correspondence with times of climate downturn recorded in tree ring data (1159 and 2354 B.C.). These climate downturns cannot be explained by volcanic eruptions and are proposed to be cosmogenic in origin[1]. The older layer also corresponds in components to a previously studied circa 2350 B.C. impact ejecta

  1. Seasonal Oxygen Dynamics in a Thermokarst Bog in Interior Alaska: Implications for Rates of Methane Oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumann, R. B.; Moorberg, C.; Wong, A.; Waldrop, M. P.; Turetsky, M. R.

    2015-12-01

    Methane is a potent greenhouse gas, and wetlands represent the largest natural source of methane to the atmosphere. However, much of the methane generated in anoxic wetlands never gets emitted to the atmosphere; up to >90% of generated methane can get oxidized to carbon dioxide. Thus, oxidation is an important methane sink and changes in the rate of methane oxidation can affect wetland methane emissions. Most methane is aerobically oxidized at oxic-anoxic interfaces where rates of oxidation strongly depend on methane and oxygen concentrations. In wetlands, oxygen is often the limiting substrate. To improve understanding of belowground oxygen dynamics and its impact on methane oxidation, we deployed two planar optical oxygen sensors in a thermokarst bog in interior Alaska. Previous work at this site indicated that, similar to other sites, rates of methane oxidation decrease over the growing season. We used the sensors to track spatial and temporal patterns of oxygen concentrations over the growing season. We coupled these in-situ oxygen measurements with periodic oxygen injection experiments performed against the sensor to quantify belowground rates of oxygen consumption. We found that over the season, the thickness of the oxygenated water layer at the peatland surface decreased. Previous research has indicated that in sphagnum-dominated peatlands, like the one studied here, rates of methane oxidation are highest at or slightly below the water table. It is in these saturated but oxygenated locations that both methane and oxygen are available. Thus, a seasonal reduction in the thickness of the oxygenated water layer could restrict methane oxidation. The decrease in thickness of the oxygenated layer coincided with an increase in the rate of oxygen consumption during our oxygen injection experiments. The increase in oxygen consumption was not explained by temperature; we infer it was due to an increase in substrate availability for oxygen consuming reactions and

  2. Bringing back the rare - biogeochemical constraints of peat moss establishment in restored cut-over bogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raabe, Peter; Blodau, Christian; Hölzel, Norbert; Kleinebecker, Till; Knorr, Klaus-Holger

    2016-04-01

    In rewetted cut-over bogs in north-western Germany and elsewhere almost no spontaneous recolonization of hummock peat mosses, such as Sphagnum magellanicum, S. papillosum or S. rubellum can be observed. However, to reach goals of climate protection every restoration of formerly mined peatlands should aim to enable the re-establishment of these rare but functionally important plant species. Besides aspects of biodiversity, peatlands dominated by mosses can be expected to emit less methane compared to sites dominated by graminoids. To assess the hydrological and biogeochemical factors constraining the successful establishment of hummock Sphagnum mosses we conducted a field experiment by actively transferring hummock species into six existing restoration sites in the Vechtaer Moor, a large peatland complex with active peat harvesting and parallel restoration efforts. The mosses were transferred as intact sods in triplicate at the beginning of June 2016. Six weeks (mid-July) and 18 weeks later (beginning of October) pore water was sampled in two depths (5 and 20 cm) directly beneath the inoculated Sphagnum sods as well as in untreated control plots and analysed for phosphate, ferrous iron, ammonia, nitrate and total organic carbon (TOC). On the same occasions and additionally in December, the vitality of mosses was estimated. Furthermore, the increment of moss height between July and December was measured by using cranked wires and peat cores were taken for lab analyses of nutrients and major element inventories at the depths of pore water sampling. Preliminary results indicate that vitality of mosses during the period of summer water level draw down was strongly negatively related to plant available phosphate in deeper layers of the residual peat. Furthermore, increment of moss height was strongly negatively related to TOC in the upper pore waters sampled in October. Concentration of ferrous iron in deeper pore waters was in general significantly higher beneath

  3. Methane production and oxidation patterns along a hydrological gradient in Luther Bog, Ontario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Praetzel, Leandra; Berger, Sina; Blodau, Christian

    2016-04-01

    Methane emissions from natural peatlands contribute significantly to the global budget of atmospheric CH4. In the northern hemisphere, where climate models predict rising temperatures and precipitation rates, these emissions are likely to rise. So far, little is known about the change of processes of methane production and oxidation, which influence the total amount of methane emissions, in peatland soils under warmer and wetter climate conditions. Our work focuses on anaerobic CH4 production and aerobic CH4 oxidation processes along a hydrological gradient in an ombotrophic bog in Ontario, Canada that was induced by creation of a reservoir in 1952. Along this transect, four sites were established differing in hydrologic conditions and vegetation patterns. We examined depth profiles of CO2 and CH4 concentrations and delta 13C isotope ratios in the peat using silicon samplers, dialysis chambers and multi-level piezometers. Chamber flux measurements were used to determine carbon fluxes. Isotope mass balances were calculated based on 13C isotope ratios and concentration profiles. By this approach the contribution of anaerobic CH4 and CO2 production to the total ER flux and the amount of oxidised CH4 can be determined. In addition meteorological data, soil temperatures, moisture and water table levels were recorded. By raising data at different sites and dates and with the help of the additionally recorded parameters, we will be able to make predictions about changing CH4 production and oxidation processes due to changing climate conditions. Preliminary results show that CH4 concentrations in the soil profile are higher at the sites which are exposed to stronger water table fluctuations, whereas CO2 concentration levels are lower at these sites. At all sites, CO2 concentrations in the peat are increasing but CH4 profiles are fairly stable. Moreover, isotopic signatures of 13CH4 indicate that the importance of the production pathway changes with depth from acetoclastic

  4. Geostatistical analysis of the spatial variation of the ash reserves in the litter of bog birch forests in Western Siberia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efremova, T. T.; Sekretenko, O. P.; Avrova, A. F.; Efremov, S. P.

    2013-01-01

    A typological series of native Betula pubescens Ehrh. dendrocenoses along the channel of a river crossing a bog was studied. The variability of the mineral element reserves is described by geostatistical methods as the sum of a trend, autocorrelation, and random components. The contribution of deterministic and random components has been assessed in the years with average precipitation and in the year of 2007 with high and long-term flooding. The empirical variograms and the parameters of the model variograms are presented. The class of the spatial correlation of the ash reserves is described. A primary cause of the ash content's variability is the specific water regime, which is determined by the following: (i) the abundance and duration of the spring floods responsible for the silt mass brought by the river and (ii) the draining effect of the intrabog river, the distance from which provided the formation in the forest of the ground cover with the specific species composition and ash content. The falloff of the arboreal layer in the bog birch forests formed the fundamental mineral background of the litter.

  5. Sphagnum mosses from 21 ombrotrophic bogs in the athabasca bituminous sands region show no significant atmospheric contamination of "heavy metals".

    PubMed

    Shotyk, William; Belland, Rene; Duke, John; Kempter, Heike; Krachler, Michael; Noernberg, Tommy; Pelletier, Rick; Vile, Melanie A; Wieder, Kelman; Zaccone, Claudio; Zhang, Shuangquan

    2014-11-01

    Sphagnum moss was collected from 21 ombrotrophic (rain-fed) peat bogs surrounding open pit mines and upgrading facilities of Athabasca bituminous sands in Alberta (AB). In comparison to contemporary Sphagnum moss from four bogs in rural locations of southern Germany (DE), the AB mosses yielded lower concentrations of Ag, Cd, Ni, Pb, Sb, and Tl, similar concentrations of Mo, but greater concentrations of Ba, Th, and V. Except for V, in comparison to the "cleanest", ancient peat samples ever tested from the northern hemisphere (ca. 6000-9000 years old), the concentrations of each of these metals in the AB mosses are within a factor of 3 of "natural, background" values. The concentrations of "heavy metals" in the mosses, however, are proportional to the concentration of Th (a conservative, lithophile element) and, therefore, contributed to the plants primarily in the form of mineral dust particles. Vanadium, the single most abundant trace metal in bitumen, is the only anomaly: in the AB mosses, V exceeds that of ancient peat by a factor of 6; it is therefore enriched in the mosses, relative to Th, by a factor of 2. In comparison to the surface layer of peat cores collected in recent years from across Canada, from British Columbia to New Brunswick, the Pb concentrations in the mosses from AB are far lower. PMID:25259407

  6. Atmospheric Deposition of Indium in the Northeastern United States: Flux and Historical Trends.

    PubMed

    White, Sarah Jane O; Keach, Carrie; Hemond, Harold F

    2015-11-01

    The metal indium is an example of an increasingly important material used in electronics and new energy technologies, whose environmental behavior and toxicity are poorly understood despite increasing evidence of detrimental health impacts and human-induced releases to the environment. In the present work, the history of indium deposition from the atmosphere is reconstructed from its depositional record in an ombrotrophic bog in Massachusetts. A novel freeze-coring technique is used to overcome coring difficulties posed by woody roots and peat compressibility, enabling retrieval of relatively undisturbed peat cores dating back more than a century. Results indicate that long-range atmospheric transport is a significant pathway for the transport of indium, with peak concentrations of 69 ppb and peak fluxes of 1.9 ng/cm2/yr. Atmospheric deposition to the bog began increasing in the late 1800s/early 1900s, and peaked in the early 1970s. A comparison of deposition data with industrial production and emissions estimates suggests that both coal combustion and the smelting of lead, zinc, copper, and tin sulfides are sources of indium to the atmosphere in this region. Deposition appears to have decreased considerably since the 1970s, potentially a visible effect of particulate emissions controls instated in North America during that decade. PMID:26426729

  7. Geology and recognition criteria for sandstone uranium deposits in mixed fluvial-shallow marine sedimentary sequences, South Texas. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, S.S.; Smith, R.B.

    1981-01-01

    Uranium deposits in the South Texas Uranium Region are classical roll-type deposits that formed at the margin of tongues of altered sandstone by the encroachment of oxidizing, uraniferous solutions into reduced aquifers containing pyrite and, in a few cases, carbonaceous plant material. Many of the uranium deposits in South Texas are dissimilar from the roll fronts of the Wyoming basins. The host sands for many of the deposits contain essentially no carbonaceous plant material, only abundant disseminated pyrite. Many of the deposits do not occur at the margin of altered (ferric oxide-bearing) sandstone tongues but rather occur entirely within reduced, pyurite-bearing sandstone. The abundance of pyrite within the sands probably reflects the introduction of H/sub 2/S up along faults from hydrocarbon accumulations at depth. Such introductions before ore formation prepared the sands for roll-front development, whereas post-ore introductions produced re-reduction of portions of the altered tongue, leaving the deposit suspended in reduced sandstone. Evidence from three deposits suggests that ore formation was not accompanied by the introduction of significant amounts of H/sub 2/S.

  8. How will the semi-natural vegetation of the UK have changed by 2030 given likely changes in nitrogen deposition?

    PubMed

    Stevens, Carly J; Payne, Richard J; Kimberley, Adam; Smart, Simon M

    2016-01-01

    Nitrogen deposition is known to have major impacts on contemporary ecosystems but few studies have addressed how these impacts will develop over coming decades. We consider likely changes to British semi-natural vegetation up to the year 2030 both qualitatively, based on knowledge of species responses from experimental and gradient studies, and quantitatively, based on modelling of species relationships in national monitoring data. We used historical N deposition trends and national predictions of changing deposition to calculate cumulative deposition from 1900 to 2030. Data from the Countryside Survey (1978, 1990 and 1998) was used to parameterise models relating cumulative N deposition to Ellenberg N which were then applied to expected future deposition trends. Changes to habitat suitability for key species of grassland, heathland and bog, and broadleaved woodland to 2030 were predicted using the MultiMOVE model. In UK woodlands by 2030 there is likely to be reduced occurrence of lichens, increased grass cover and a shift towards more nitrophilic vascular plant species. In grasslands we expect changing species composition with reduced occurrence of terricolous lichens and, at least in acid grasslands, reduced species richness. In heaths and bogs we project overall reductions in species richness with decreased occurrence of terricolous lichens and some bryophytes, reduced cover of dwarf shrubs and small increases in grasses. Our study clearly suggests that changes in vegetation due to nitrogen deposition are likely to continue through coming decades. PMID:26439678

  9. Rates and Controls of N2 Fixation in Sphagnum spp. along the Hydrological Gradient - Beaver Pond to Bog Transition at Mer Bleue, Ontario, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zivkovic, T.; Moore, T. R.

    2014-12-01

    Many northern bogs with low atmospheric N inputs acquire N only via N2-fixation. Little is known about rates and controls on N2-fixation in bogs. The aim of this study was to: 1) test the important ecological drivers for N2-fixation, 2) investigate seasonal and temporal patterns of N2 fixation, and 3) to estimate current N2-fixation rates at Mer Bleue bog. We used acetylene reduction assay (ARA) to measure N2-fixation from June-October 2013 and 2014 (currently ongoing field season) along a hydrological gradient (beaver pond, hollows and hummocks). The highest ARA rates in 2013 growing season occurred in the pond in floating Sphagnum cuspidatum mats (50.3 ± 12.9 μmol m-2 d-1 Mean ± Std Err) which were up to 2.5 times latger than the rates found in the hummock with the lowest water table depth throughout the season. Two rain events during the summer 2013 increased ARA rates in all plots by 1 to 4 times, suggesting that moisture availability may play a crucial role on N2 fixation potential in the field. We are currently investigating the role of moisture, temperature, PAR and nutrient content (N, phosphorous and metals) on ARA along the gradient. In addition, we are using 15N2 enrichment method to estimate N2 fixation rates and compare them to ARA method at Mer Bleue bog.

  10. Effect of trap color and height on captures of blunt-nosed and sharp-nosed leafhoppers (hemiptera: cicadellidae) and non-target arthropods in cranberry bogs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A series of field experiments were conducted in cranberry bogs in 2006-2010 to determine adult attraction of the two most economically important leafhopper pests of cultivated Vaccinium spp. in the northeast USA, the blunt-nosed leafhopper, Limotettix vaccinii, and sharp-nosed leafhopper, Scaphytopi...