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Sample records for urea combustion route

  1. Synthesis of La{sup 3+} doped nanocrystalline ceria powder by urea-formaldehyde gel combustion route

    SciTech Connect

    Biswas, M.; Bandyopadhyay, S.

    2012-03-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nano LC synthesized by gel combustion, using urea-formaldehyde fuel for first time. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Largely single crystals were produced in average range of 20-30 nm. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer La{sup 3+} doping increases cell dimension linearly. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer La{sup 3+} doping introduces ionic point defects but does not change electronic band gap. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Presence of Ce{sup 3+} indicates that this synthesis route produces reactive powders. -- Abstract: Nanocrystalline ceria powders doped with various concentrations of lanthanum oxide have been prepared following gel combustion route using for the first time urea-formaldehyde as fuel. The synthesized products were characterized by XRD, FESEM, TEM, PL and UV-vis spectroscopy. Peak positions of XRD were refined and the lattice parameters were obtained by applying Cohen's method. Unit cell parameter increases with concentration of La{sup 3+} ion and the variation is consistently linear. XRD calculations showed the dependence of crystallite size on dopant concentrations at lower level. TEM observation revealed unagglomerated particles to be single crystals in the average range of 20-30 nm. Band gap of the La{sup 3+} doped ceria materials does not change with doping. Spectroscopic experiments proved the existence of Ce{sup 3+} in the formed powder.

  2. Urea Transporter Inhibitors: En Route to New Diuretics

    PubMed Central

    Sands, Jeff M.

    2013-01-01

    Summary A selective urea transporter UT-A1 inhibitor would be a novel type of diuretic, likely with less undesirable side-effects than conventional diureticssince it acts on the last portion of the nephron. Esteva-Font et al. (2013) develop suchan inhibitor by using a clever high-throughput screening assay, and document its selectivity. . PMID:24210002

  3. Urea

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    EPA / 635 / R - 10 / 005F www.epa.gov / iris TOXICOLOGICAL REVIEW OF UREA ( CAS No . 57 - 13 - 6 ) In Support of Summary Information on the Integrated Risk Information System ( IRIS ) July 2011 U.S . Environmental Protection Agency Washington , DC ii DISCLAIMER This document has been reviewed in acc

  4. Urea

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Urea ; CASRN : 57 - 13 - 6 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Effects ) a

  5. Novel route for layered double hydroxides preparation by enzymatic decomposition of urea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vial, S.; Prevot, V.; Forano, C.

    2006-05-01

    This study presents a new route for the preparation of a series of layered double hydroxide materials with controlled textural properties. It concerns the biogenesis of hydrotalcite like phases by Jack bean urease through the enzymatic decomposition process of urea. Different conditions of LDH biogenesis are investigated (urease activity, urea concentration). A comparative study with the precipitation method based on the thermal decomposition of urea (90 C) is conducted in order to asses the effect of the various urea hydrolysis conditions (kinetic, temperature) and the presence of enzyme in the reaction medium on the structural and textural properties of the as prepared LDH materials. Mechanisms of formation of the LDH phases for both synthesis processes are discussed on basis of their pH control. The PXRD and SEM analysis of samples prepared by the thermal process evidence higher crystallinity and greater particle sizes than LDH obtained in mild biogenic conditions. In the latter case, presence of urease or effect of some M(II) metals may inhibit the crystallization.

  6. TG-FTIR study on urea-formaldehyde resin residue during pyrolysis and combustion.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xuguang; Li, Chunyu; Chi, Yong; Yan, Jianhua

    2010-01-15

    The pyrolysis and combustion characteristics of urea-formaldehyde resin (UFR) residue were investigated by using thermogravimetric analysis, coupled with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (TG-FTIR). It is indicated that the pyrolysis process can be subdivided into three stages: drying the sample, fast thermal decomposition and further cracking process. The total weight loss of 90 wt.% at 950 degrees C is found in pyrolysis, while 74 wt.% of the original mass lost in the second stage is between 195 degrees C and 430 degrees C. The emissions of carbon dioxide, isocyanic acid, ammonia, hydrocyanic acid and carbon monoxide are identified in UFR residue pyrolysis, moreover, isocyanic acid emitted at low temperature is found as the most important nitrogen-containing gaseous product in UFR residue pyrolysis, and there is a large amount of hydrocyanic acid emitted at high temperature. The similar TG and emission characteristics as the first two stages during pyrolysis are found in UFR residue combustion at low temperature. The combustion process almost finishes at 600 degrees C; moreover, carbon dioxide and water are identified as the main gaseous products at high temperature. It is indicated that the UFR residue should be pyrolyzed at low temperature to remove the initial nitrogen, and the gaseous products during pyrolysis should be burnt in high temperature furnace under oxygen-rich conditions for pollutant controlling. PMID:19735979

  7. Route to chaos for combustion instability in ducted laminar premixed flames.

    PubMed

    Kabiraj, Lipika; Saurabh, Aditya; Wahi, Pankaj; Sujith, R I

    2012-06-01

    Complex thermoacoustic oscillations are observed experimentally in a simple laboratory combustor that burns lean premixed fuel-air mixture, as a result of nonlinear interaction between the acoustic field and the combustion processes. The application of nonlinear time series analysis, particularly techniques based on phase space reconstruction from acquired pressure data, reveals rich dynamical behavior and the existence of several complex states. A route to chaos for thermoacoustic instability is established experimentally for the first time. We show that, as the location of the heat source is gradually varied, self-excited periodic thermoacoustic oscillations undergo transition to chaos via the Ruelle-Takens scenario. PMID:22757536

  8. Route to chaos for combustion instability in ducted laminar premixed flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabiraj, Lipika; Saurabh, Aditya; Wahi, Pankaj; Sujith, R. I.

    2012-06-01

    Complex thermoacoustic oscillations are observed experimentally in a simple laboratory combustor that burns lean premixed fuel-air mixture, as a result of nonlinear interaction between the acoustic field and the combustion processes. The application of nonlinear time series analysis, particularly techniques based on phase space reconstruction from acquired pressure data, reveals rich dynamical behavior and the existence of several complex states. A route to chaos for thermoacoustic instability is established experimentally for the first time. We show that, as the location of the heat source is gradually varied, self-excited periodic thermoacoustic oscillations undergo transition to chaos via the Ruelle-Takens scenario.

  9. A novel synthetic route for magnesium aluminate (MgAl2O4) nanoparticles using sol-gel auto combustion method and their photocatalytic properties.

    PubMed

    Nassar, Mostafa Y; Ahmed, Ibrahim S; Samir, Ihab

    2014-10-15

    In this paper a novel and inexpensive route for the preparation of spinel magnesium aluminate nanoparticles (MgAl2O4) is proposed. Magnesium aluminate photocatalyst was synthesized via sol-gel auto combustion method using oxalic acid, urea, and citric acid fuels at 350°C. Subsequently, the burnt samples were calcined at different temperatures. The pure spinel MgAl2O4 with average crystallite size 27.7, 14.6 and 15.65nm was obtained at 800°C calcinations using the aforementioned fuels, respectively. The obtained samples were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared, UV-Vis spectroscopy, transmission electron microscope, scanning electron microscope. The photo catalytic activity of MgAl2O4 product was studied by performing the decomposition of Reactive Red Me 4BL dye under UV illumination or sunlight irradiation. The dye considerably photocatalytically degraded by 90.0% and 95.45% under UV and sunlight irradiation, respectively, within ca. 5h with pseudo first order rate constants of 5.85×10(-3) and 8.38×10(-3)min(-1), respectively. PMID:24835935

  10. A novel synthetic route for magnesium aluminate (MgAl2O4) nanoparticles using sol-gel auto combustion method and their photocatalytic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nassar, Mostafa Y.; Ahmed, Ibrahim S.; Samir, Ihab

    2014-10-01

    In this paper a novel and inexpensive route for the preparation of spinel magnesium aluminate nanoparticles (MgAl2O4) is proposed. Magnesium aluminate photocatalyst was synthesized via sol-gel auto combustion method using oxalic acid, urea, and citric acid fuels at 350 C. Subsequently, the burnt samples were calcined at different temperatures. The pure spinel MgAl2O4 with average crystallite size 27.7, 14.6 and 15.65 nm was obtained at 800 C calcinations using the aforementioned fuels, respectively. The obtained samples were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared, UV-Vis spectroscopy, transmission electron microscope, scanning electron microscope. The photo catalytic activity of MgAl2O4 product was studied by performing the decomposition of Reactive Red Me 4BL dye under UV illumination or sunlight irradiation. The dye considerably photocatalytically degraded by 90.0% and 95.45% under UV and sunlight irradiation, respectively, within ca. 5 h with pseudo first order rate constants of 5.85 10-3 and 8.38 10-3 min-1, respectively.

  11. Synthesis of monodisperse spherical nanometer ZrO{sub 2} (Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}) powders via the coupling route of w/o emulsion with urea homogenous precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Ying; Dong, Shijie; Wang, Huihu; Du, Kuanhe; Zhu, Qingbiao; Luo, Ping

    2012-03-15

    Graphical abstract: In this paper, the weight loss and reaction evolution of ZrO{sub 2} precursor powders are determined by TG-DTA, and 600 Degree-Sign C is the most reasonable calcination temperature of precursor according to the TG-DTA. At the same time, we study the effect of reaction conditions upon the particle sizes, such as concentration of zirconium nitrate solution, reaction temperature and urea content. TEM micrographs of zirconia powders indicated that ZrO{sub 2} nano-powders prepared via the coupling route of w/o emulsion with homogenous precipitation possess spherical shape and excellent dispersing. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The monodisperse spherical nanometer ZrO{sub 2} (Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}) powders have been prepared via the coupling route of w/o emulsion with urea homogenous precipitation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The principle of the coupling route of emulsion with homogenous precipitation has been studied. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The concentration of zirconium nitrate, reaction temperature of water bath and the quantity of urea effect regularly on the average particle size of products. -- Abstract: Using xylol as the oil phase, span-80 as the surfactant, and an aqueous solution containing zirconium (3 mol% Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}) and urea as the water phase, tetragonal phase ZrO{sub 2} nano-powders have been prepared via the coupling route of w/o emulsion with urea homogenous precipitation. The effects of the zirconium concentration, the reaction temperature and the urea content on the average size of the products have been examined. The as-prepared ZrO{sub 2} powders and the precursor powders were characterized by TGA-DTA, XRD, TEM and BET. Experimental results indicate that ZrO{sub 2} powders prepared via the coupling route of w/o emulsion with urea homogenous precipitation possess some excellent characteristics, such as well-rounded spherical shape and excellent dispersing.

  12. Landslide remediation on Ohio State Route 83 using clean coal combustion by-products

    SciTech Connect

    Payette, R.; Chen, X.Y.; Wolfe, W.; Beeghly, J.

    1995-12-31

    In the present work, a flue gas desulfurization (FGD) by-product was used to reconstruct the failed portion of a highway embankment. The construction process and the stability of the repaired embankment are examined. State Route 83 in Cumberland, Ohio has been damaged by a slow moving slide which has forced the Ohio Department of Transportation to repair the roadway several times. In the most recent repair FGD by-products obtained from American Electric Power`s Tidd PFBC plant were used to construct a wall through the failure plane to prevent further slippage. In order to evaluate the utility of using coal combustion by-products in this type of highway project the site was divided into three test sections. In the first repair section, natural soil removed form the slide area was recompacted and replaced according to standard ODOT construction practices. In the second section the natural soil was field mixed with the Tidd PFBC ash in approximately equal proportions. The third section was all Tidd ash. The three test sections were capped by a layer of compacted Tidd ash or crushed stone to provide a wearing surface to allow ODOT to open the roadway before applying a permanent asphalt surface. Measurement of slope movement as well as water levels and quality have begun at the site in order to evaluate long term project performance. The completion of this project should lead to increased acceptance of FGD materials in construction projects. Monetary savings will be realized in avoiding some of the disposal costs for the waste, as well as in the reduced reliance on alternative engineering materials.

  13. Influence of fuel on phase formation of ZnFe2O4 prepared by self-propagated combustion route

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkatesan, K.; Babu, D. Rajan

    2015-06-01

    Zinc iron oxide (ZnFe2O4) nanoparticles were prepared by self-propagated combustion route.The fuel plays a major role on the formation of structure and particle size. Here three different fuels like alanine, glycine and proline were used to synthesis the zinc iron oxide nanoparticle. Influence of combustion nature through the fuel, the phase formation, particle size, band gap and surface morphology has been modified. The prepared powder was characterized by powder X-ray diffraction method (PXRD), field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and the composition of the material was analysed by X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDAX).The elemental mapping was confirmed the uniform distribution of Zn, Fe and O elements in the prepared material of ZnFe2O4.

  14. Banyan latex: a facile fuel for the multifunctional properties of MgO nanoparticles prepared via auto ignited combustion route

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, M. R. Anil; Nagaswarupa, H. P.; Anantharaju, K. S.; Gurushantha, K.; Pratapkumar, C.; Prashantha, S. C.; Shashishekar, T. R.; Nagabhushana, H.; Sharma, S. C.; Vidya, Y. S.; Daruka Prasad, B.; Vivek Babu, C. S.; Vishnu Mahesh, K. R.

    2015-09-01

    MgO nanoparticles (MNPs) were prepared by a solution combustion route using banyan tree (BT) latex and glycine as fuels. The powder x-ray diffraction results indicate the formation of a single cubic phase and the crystallite size obtained from transmission electron microscopy was found to be ˜10-15 nm. Scanning electron microscopy result reveals spherical-shaped particles obtained with BT latex. However, in a chemical route, porous and agglomerated particles were obtained. The energy band gap of MNPs obtained using BT latex and a chemical route were found to be in the range 4.85-5.0 eV. Photoluminescence peaks observed at 473, 514, and 588 nm when excited at 433 nm, which were attributed to surface defects. The enhanced photocatalytic activities of spherical MgO were due to smaller crystallite size, higher surface defects, dye sensitization, and capability to reduce the electron-hole pair recombination. Further, green-synthesized MNPs exhibit superior antifungal activity against various plant pathogens. The present studies demonstrated a green engineering route for the synthesis of multifunctional MNPs using BT latex.

  15. Structural, dielectric and magnetic properties of cobalt ferrite prepared using auto combustion and ceramic route

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murugesan, C.; Perumal, M.; Chandrasekaran, G.

    2014-09-01

    Cobalt ferrite is synthesized by using low temperature auto combustion and high temperature ceramic methods. The prepared samples have values of lattice constant equal to 8.40 Å and 8.38 Å for auto combustion and ceramic methods respectively. The FTIR spectrum of samples of the auto combustion method shows a high frequency vibrational band at 580 cm-1 assigned to tetrahedral site and a low frequency vibrational band at 409 cm-1 assigned to octahedral site which are shifted to 590 cm-1 and 412 cm-1 for the ceramic method sample. SEM micrographs of samples show a substantial difference in surface morphology and size of the grains between the two methods. The frequency dependent dielectric constant and ac conductivity of the samples measured from 1 Hz to 2 MHz at room temperature are reported. The room temperature magnetic hysteresis parameters of the samples are measured using VSM. The measured values of saturation magnetization, coercivity and remanent magnetization are 42 emu/g, 1553 Oe, 18.5 emu/g for the auto combustion method, 66.7 emu/g, 379.6 Oe, and 17.3 emu/g for the ceramic method, respectively. The difference in preparation methods and size of the grains causes interesting changes in electrical and magnetic properties.

  16. Hydrogen-Assisted IC Engine Combustion as a Route to Hydrogen Implementation

    SciTech Connect

    Andre Boehman; Daniel Haworth

    2008-09-30

    The 'Freedom Car' Initiative announced by the Bush Administration has placed a significant emphasis on development of a hydrogen economy in the United States. While the hydrogen-fueled fuel-cell vehicle that is the focus of the 'Freedom Car' program would rely on electrochemical energy conversion, and despite the large amount of resources being devoted to its objectives, near-term implementation of hydrogen in the transportation sector is not likely to arise from fuel cell cars. Instead, fuel blending and ''hydrogen-assisted'' combustion are more realizable pathways for wide-scale hydrogen utilization within the next ten years. Thus, a large potential avenue for utilization of hydrogen in transportation applications is through blending with natural gas, since there is an existing market for natural-gas vehicles of various classes, and since hydrogen can provide a means of achieving even stricter emissions standards. Another potential avenue is through use of hydrogen to 'assist' diesel combustion to permit alternate combustion strategies that can achieve lower emissions and higher efficiency. This project focused on developing the underlying fundamental information to support technologies that will facilitate the introduction of coal-derived hydrogen into the market. Two paths were envisioned for hydrogen utilization in transportation applications. One is for hydrogen to be mixed with other fuels, specifically natural gas, to enhance performance in existing natural gas-fueled vehicles (e.g., transit buses) and provide a practical and marketable avenue to begin using hydrogen in the field. A second is to use hydrogen to enable alternative combustion modes in existing diesel engines, such as homogeneous charge compression ignition, to permit enhanced efficiency and reduced emissions. Thus, this project on hydrogen-assisted combustion encompassed two major objectives: (1) Optimization of hydrogen-natural gas mixture composition and utilization through laboratory studies of spark-ignition engine operation on H{sub 2}-NG and numerical simulation of the impact of hydrogen blending on the physical and chemical processes within the engine; and (2) Examination of hydrogen-assisted combustion in advanced compression-ignition engine processes. To that end, numerical capabilities were applied to the study of hydrogen assisted combustion and experimental facilities were developed to achieve the project objectives.

  17. New pseudopeptidic cross-linker containing urea bonds: study of its degradation routes in aqueous media using capillary electrophoresis-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Prez, Paloma; Sim, Carolina; Neusss, Christian; Pelzing, Matthias; San Roman, Julio; Cifuentes, Alejandro; Gallardo, Alberto

    2006-03-01

    An accelerated degradation study has been performed on TLT, a pseudopeptide that includes esterified tyrosine and lysine linked by urea bonds, as well as on their derivatives, i.e., a dimethacrylic cross-linker (DMTLT) and a poly(dimethylacrylamide) cross-linked with DMTLT. The monitoring and analytical characterization has been carried out by capillary electrophoresis-mass spectrometry (CE-MS), using ion trap and time-of-flight MS analyzers. Several degradative species have been identified, and a kinetic analysis of the variation of their concentration with time has been obtained. During the initial stages of degradation, there is a competition between hydrolysis of the ester groups and cyclization by nucleophilic attack of the NHs of the urea groups to the carbonyl ester group. At higher degradation time (weeks or months), evidences of backbone breakdown, including urea hydrolysis, have been found. PMID:16529406

  18. Spray-combustion synthesis: efficient solution route to high-performance oxide transistors.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xinge; Smith, Jeremy; Zhou, Nanjia; Zeng, Li; Guo, Peijun; Xia, Yu; Alvarez, Ana; Aghion, Stefano; Lin, Hui; Yu, Junsheng; Chang, Robert P H; Bedzyk, Michael J; Ferragut, Rafael; Marks, Tobin J; Facchetti, Antonio

    2015-03-17

    Metal-oxide (MO) semiconductors have emerged as enabling materials for next generation thin-film electronics owing to their high carrier mobilities, even in the amorphous state, large-area uniformity, low cost, and optical transparency, which are applicable to flat-panel displays, flexible circuitry, and photovoltaic cells. Impressive progress in solution-processed MO electronics has been achieved using methodologies such as sol gel, deep-UV irradiation, preformed nanostructures, and combustion synthesis. Nevertheless, because of incomplete lattice condensation and film densification, high-quality solution-processed MO films having technologically relevant thicknesses achievable in a single step have yet to be shown. Here, we report a low-temperature, thickness-controlled coating process to create high-performance, solution-processed MO electronics: spray-combustion synthesis (SCS). We also report for the first time, to our knowledge, indium-gallium-zinc-oxide (IGZO) transistors having densification, nanoporosity, electron mobility, trap densities, bias stability, and film transport approaching those of sputtered films and compatible with conventional fabrication (FAB) operations. PMID:25733848

  19. Spray-combustion synthesis: Efficient solution route to high-performance oxide transistors

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xinge; Smith, Jeremy; Zhou, Nanjia; Zeng, Li; Guo, Peijun; Xia, Yu; Alvarez, Ana; Aghion, Stefano; Lin, Hui; Yu, Junsheng; Chang, Robert P. H.; Bedzyk, Michael J.; Ferragut, Rafael; Marks, Tobin J.; Facchetti, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Metal-oxide (MO) semiconductors have emerged as enabling materials for next generation thin-film electronics owing to their high carrier mobilities, even in the amorphous state, large-area uniformity, low cost, and optical transparency, which are applicable to flat-panel displays, flexible circuitry, and photovoltaic cells. Impressive progress in solution-processed MO electronics has been achieved using methodologies such as sol gel, deep-UV irradiation, preformed nanostructures, and combustion synthesis. Nevertheless, because of incomplete lattice condensation and film densification, high-quality solution-processed MO films having technologically relevant thicknesses achievable in a single step have yet to be shown. Here, we report a low-temperature, thickness-controlled coating process to create high-performance, solution-processed MO electronics: spray-combustion synthesis (SCS). We also report for the first time, to our knowledge, indium-gallium-zinc-oxide (IGZO) transistors having densification, nanoporosity, electron mobility, trap densities, bias stability, and film transport approaching those of sputtered films and compatible with conventional fabrication (FAB) operations. PMID:25733848

  20. Comparison of structural and luminescence properties of Dy{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanopowders synthesized by co-precipitation and green combustion routes

    SciTech Connect

    Chandrasekhar, M.; Nagabhushana, H.; Sudheerkumar, K.H.; Dhananjaya, N.; Sharma, S.C.; Kavyashree, D.; Shivakumara, C.; Nagabhushana, B.M.

    2014-07-01

    Highlights: Dy{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanopowders were prepared by co-precipitation and eco-friendly green combustion route using plant latex. Both the products show excellent chromaticity coordinates in the white region, which were quite useful for white LEDs. Thermoluminescence response of the Dy{sub 2}O{sub 3} product prepared by green synthesis was higher when compared to co-precipitation route. Structural parameters of Dy{sub 2}O{sub 3} were estimated using Rietveld refinement. The development of nanosize materials using eco-friendly resources was an attractive non-hazardous chemical route. - Abstract: Dysprosium oxide (Dy{sub 2}O{sub 3}) nanopowders were prepared by co-precipitation (CP) and eco-friendly green combustion (GC) routes. SEM micrographs prepared by CP route show smooth rods with various lengths and diameters while, GC route show porous, agglomerated particles. The results were further confirmed by TEM. Thermoluminescence (TL) responses of the nanopowder prepared by both the routes were studied using ?-rays. A well resolved glow peak at 353 C along with less intense peak at 183 C was observed in GC route while, in CP a single glow peak at 364 C was observed. The kinetic parameters were estimated using Chens glow peak route. Photoluminescence (PL) of Dy{sub 2}O{sub 3} shows peaks at 481, 577, 666 and 756 nm which were attributed to Dy{sup 3+} transitions of {sup 4}F{sub 9/2}?{sup 6}H{sub 15/2}, {sup 6}H{sub 13/2}, {sup 6}H{sub 11/2} and {sup 6}H{sub 9/2}, respectively. Color co-ordinate values were located in the white region as a result the product may be useful for the fabrication of WLEDS.

  1. Nano crystalline ceria-neodymia solid solutions by combustion route: effect of agglomeration on powder properties.

    PubMed

    Bedekar, Vinila; Tyagi, A K

    2007-09-01

    About 8 compositions in the system Ce(1-x)Nd(x)O(2-x/2) (0.0 < or = x < or = 0.50) were prepared by the combustion process using glycine as a fuel and corresponding metal nitrates as the oxidants. The oxidant-to-fuel ratio was taken as 1:1.0. The products were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), surface area, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), dynamic light scattering, sinterability etc. The crystallite size of powders, as obtained by the line broadening method, was typically in the range of 7 to 16 nm. The deagglomeration studies carried out showed that the average agglomerate size of these powders increases with increasing content of Nd in CeO2. The powders were sintered at 1200 degrees C to yield densities in the range of 80-95% of theoretical densities. This wide variation in the sintered density was explained based on the powder properties. An interesting observation was that the nature and size of the agglomerates plays an important role in governing properties such as sintered density and in turn ionic conductivity of nano ceramics. PMID:18019152

  2. Combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bulzan, Dan

    2007-01-01

    An overview of the emissions related research being conducted as part of the Fundamental Aeronautics Subsonics Fixed Wing Project is presented. The overview includes project metrics, milestones, and descriptions of major research areas. The overview also includes information on some of the emissions research being conducted under NASA Research Announcements. Objective: Development of comprehensive detailed and reduced kinetic mechanisms of jet fuels for chemically-reacting flow modeling. Scientific Challenges: 1) Developing experimental facilities capable of handling higher hydrocarbons and providing benchmark combustion data. 2) Determining and understanding ignition and combustion characteristics, such as laminar flame speeds, extinction stretch rates, and autoignition delays, of jet fuels and hydrocarbons relevant to jet surrogates. 3) Developing comprehensive kinetic models for jet fuels.

  3. A single phase, red emissive Mg2SiO4:Sm3+ nanophosphor prepared via rapid propellant combustion route

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naik, Ramachandra; Prashantha, S. C.; Nagabhushana, H.; Sharma, S. C.; Nagaswarupa, H. P.; Anantharaju, K. S.; Nagabhushana, B. M.; Premkumar, H. B.; Girish, K. M.

    2015-04-01

    Mg2SiO4:Sm3+ (1-11 mol%) nanoparticles were prepared by a rapid low temperature solution combustion route. The powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) patterns exhibit orthorhombic structure with α-phase. The average crystallite size estimated using Scherer's method, W-H plot and strain-size plots were found to be in the range 25-50 nm and the same was confirmed by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) pictures show porous structure and crystallites were agglomerated. The effect of Sm3+ cations on luminescence of Mg2SiO4 was well studied. Interestingly the samples could be effectively excited with 315 nm and emitted light in the red region, which was suitable for the demands of high efficiency WLEDs. The emission spectra consists of four main peaks which can be assigned to the intra 4-f orbital transitions of Sm3+ ions 4G5/2 → 6H5/2 (576 nm), 4G5/2 → 6H7/2 (611 nm), 4G5/2 → 6H9/2 (656 nm) and 4G5/2 → 6H11/2 (713 nm). The optimal luminescence intensity was obtained for 5 mol% Sm3+ ions. The CIE (Commission International de I'Eclairage) chromaticity co-ordinates were calculated from emission spectra, the values (0.588, 0.386) were close to the NTSC (National Television Standard Committee) standard value of red emission. Coordinated color temperature (CCT) was found to be 1756 K. Therefore optimized Mg2SiO4:Sm3+ (5 mol%) phosphor was quite useful for solid state lighting.

  4. A single phase, red emissive Mg2SiO4:Sm3+ nanophosphor prepared via rapid propellant combustion route.

    PubMed

    Naik, Ramachandra; Prashantha, S C; Nagabhushana, H; Sharma, S C; Nagaswarupa, H P; Anantharaju, K S; Nagabhushana, B M; Premkumar, H B; Girish, K M

    2015-04-01

    Mg2SiO4:Sm3+ (1-11 mol%) nanoparticles were prepared by a rapid low temperature solution combustion route. The powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) patterns exhibit orthorhombic structure with α-phase. The average crystallite size estimated using Scherer's method, W-H plot and strain-size plots were found to be in the range 25-50 nm and the same was confirmed by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) pictures show porous structure and crystallites were agglomerated. The effect of Sm3+ cations on luminescence of Mg2SiO4 was well studied. Interestingly the samples could be effectively excited with 315 nm and emitted light in the red region, which was suitable for the demands of high efficiency WLEDs. The emission spectra consists of four main peaks which can be assigned to the intra 4-f orbital transitions of Sm3+ ions 4G5/2→6H5/2 (576 nm), 4G5/2→6H7/2 (611 nm), 4G5/2→6H9/2 (656 nm) and 4G5/2→6H11/2 (713 nm). The optimal luminescence intensity was obtained for 5 mol% Sm3+ ions. The CIE (Commission International de I'Eclairage) chromaticity co-ordinates were calculated from emission spectra, the values (0.588, 0.386) were close to the NTSC (National Television Standard Committee) standard value of red emission. Coordinated color temperature (CCT) was found to be 1756 K. Therefore optimized Mg2SiO4:Sm3+ (5 mol%) phosphor was quite useful for solid state lighting. PMID:25638435

  5. Investigation of structural and luminescence properties of Ho3+ doped YAlO3 nanophosphors synthesized through solution combustion route

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Premkumar, H. B.; Ravikumar, B. S.; Sunitha, D. V.; Nagabhushana, H.; Sharma, S. C.; Savitha, M. B.; Mohandas Bhat, S.; Nagabhushana, B. M.; Chakradhar, R. P. S.

    2013-11-01

    YAlO3:Ho3+ (1-5 mol%) nanophosphors have been prepared by solution combustion route using oxalyl dihydrazide (ODH) as a fuel. The final product was well characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), UV-Vis, etc. PXRD patterns confirm the formation of highly crystalline orthorhombic phase structure. SEM and TEM studies show the particles are dumbbell shape, highly agglomerated and nano-size (?30 nm). The direct energy band gap (Eg) values estimated from Tauc's relation were found to be in the range 5.76-5.99 eV. Photoluminescence (PL) studies show green (540 and 548 nm) and red (645 and 742 nm) emissions upon excited at 452 nm wavelength. The emission peaks at ?742 and 645 nm was associated with the transitions of 5F4 ? 5I7 and 5F5 ? 5I8 respectively. The higher energy bands located at 540 and 548 nm were associated with 5F4, 5S2 ? 5I8 transitions. Thermoluminescence (TL) studies of ?-irradiated YAlO3:Ho3+ (1-5 mol%) show two glow peaks at 223 and 325 C recorded at a heating rate of 2.5 C s-1. The 223 C glow peak follow linear behavior up to 1 kGy and after that, it showed sub-linearity. Up to 1 kGy, the phosphor is quite useful in radiation dosimetry. The kinetic parameters (E, b and s) were estimated from glow peak shape method. The CIE coordinate values lies within the green region. Therefore, the present phosphors may have potential application in WLEDs as green phosphor.

  6. UREA INFRASTRUCTURE FOR UREA SCR NOX REDUCTION

    SciTech Connect

    Bunting, Bruce G.

    2000-08-20

    Urea SCR is currently the only proven NOX aftertreatment for diesel engines - high NOX reduction possible - some SCR catalyst systems are robust against fuel sulfur - durability has been demonstrated - many systems in the field - long history in other markets - Major limitations to acceptance - distribution of urea solution to end user - ensuring that urea solution is added to vehicle.

  7. Xenobiotic-urea conjugates; chemical or biological?

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Stephen C

    2014-12-01

    1. Although the major pathways involved in drug metabolism have been elucidated, there remain those routes that may be considered as minor, esoteric, or even artifactual. 2. Conjugation with urea, an abundant, non-toxic, small water soluble molecule, is such a disputed and debatable Phase II pathway. 3. The present article collates data gleaned from the literature concerning xenobiotic-urea conjugation, presents pertinent information resurrecting the controversy and poses questions as to the nature of the phenomenon. PMID:25144804

  8. A facile gel-combustion route for fine particle synthesis of spinel ferrichromite: X-ray and Mssbauer study on effect of Mg and Ni content

    SciTech Connect

    Vader, V.T.; Achary, S.N.; Meena, S.S.

    2014-02-01

    Highlights: A novel and facile synthesis route. Transformation of system from random to inverse spinel. Appearance of superparamagnetism phase. - Abstract: A novel nitratecitrate gel combustion route was used to prepare fine particle of a series Mg{sub 1?x}Ni{sub x}FeCrO{sub 4} (0.0 ? x ? 1.0) and its structural properties were investigated. The in situ oxidizing environment provided by the nitrate ions in the gel increases the rate of oxidation and lowers the decomposition temperature of component. All the samples after sintering were characterized at room temperature by X-ray diffraction (XRD) method and Mssbauer spectroscopy techniques. The X-ray and Mssbauer studies confirmed the single phase cubic spinel structure with all Fe ions in 3+ charge state. XRD and Mssbauer studies revealed that the samples of x = 0.0, and 0.2 are random spinel and show rather broad lines, while x = 0.41.0 are inverse spinel.

  9. SOURCE ASSESSMENT: UREA MANUFACTURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of an evaluation of the potential environmental effects of air emissions from the production of urea. Urea production in the U.S. was 3.45 million metric tons in 1975. Major products were urea solution (38%), granulated solid material (53%), and prilled s...

  10. A new solution combustion route to synthesize LiCoO 2 and LiMn 2O 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalyani, P.; Kalaiselvi, N.; Muniyandi, N.

    Commercially important, high-voltage, lithium cathodes, such as LiCoO 2 and LiMn 2O 4 have been synthesized from nitrates, following the 'soft-chemistry' approach using starch as the combustion-assisting component. The minimum temperature required for phase formation and the degree of crystallinity has been evaluated from thermal studies and X-ray diffraction analysis, respectively. The starch-assisted combustion (SAC) method produces mono-dispersed powders of grain size below 1.5 μm as observed from scanning electron microscopy and particle-size analysis. The electrochemical activity of the synthesized oxide powders has been examined via cyclic voltammetric and charge-discharge studies using lithium coin cells. Cyclic voltammetric data shows excellent reversibility with respect to Li + and confirms the effect of crystallinity of the compounds on the electrochemical performance of the cathode materials. The electrochemical stability and performance of the cathodes over 30 cycles have been demonstrated with a capacity fade of <10% of the initial capacity. The simplicity and flexibility of this approach towards the synthesis of various other cathode materials is also discussed.

  11. Optical properties and chemical composition analyses of mixed rare earth oxyorthosilicate (R2SiO5, R=La, Gd and Y) doped Dy3+ phosphors prepared by urea-assisted solution combustion method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogugua, S. N.; Shaat, S. K. K.; Swart, H. C.; Ntwaeaborwa, O. M.

    2015-08-01

    Dysprosium (Dy3+) doped lanthanum gadolinium oxyorthosilicate (LaGdSiO5), lanthanum yttrium oxyorthosilicate (LaYSiO5) and gadolinium yttrium oxyorthosilicate (GdYSiO5) phosphors (in powder form) were synthesized by urea-assisted combustion method. The X-ray diffractometer analysis confirmed that the LaGdSiO5, LaYSiO5 and GdYSiO5 crystalized in monoclinic phases. The chemical composition of the phosphors was analyzed by measuring the atomic and molecular ionic species using the time of flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy (ToF SIMS). In addition, ToF SIMS imaging technique was used to determine the distribution of the Dy3+ dopant ions on the surface on the phosphors. The average crystallite sizes and lattice strains of the phosphor were increased by Dy3+ doping. The field emission scanning electron microscope images showed that the powders were made up of an agglomeration of particles with no regular shape. The photoluminescence data showed narrow line emission peaks at the wavelengths of 485 nm (minor emission) and 573 nm (major emission) associated with the f?f transitions of Dy3+. The photoluminescence (PL) measurements showed that the emission peak of LaGdSiO5:Dy3+ was ~3 more intense than those of LaYSiO5:Dy3+ and GdYSiO5:Dy3+ when excited using monochromatic xenon lamp with a wavelength of 241 nm. However, when the powders were excited using a 325 nm He-Cd laser, the highest PL emission intensity was observed from GdYSiO5:Dy3+.

  12. EPR investigation on synthesis of Lithium zinc vanadate using sol-gel-combustion route and its optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathak, Nimai; Gupta, Santosh K.; Prince, Angelina; Kadam, R. M.; Natarajan, V.

    2014-01-01

    The present work describes the synthesis of Lithium zinc vanadate (LiZnVO4) nanophosphor prepared by sol-gel-combustion method and its optical properties. The prepared sample was characterized by X-ray diffraction, SEM, electron paramagnetic resonance and photoluminescence spectroscopy. X-ray diffraction study showed the formation of pure LiZnVO4 at 600 C with distorted phenacite structure. SEM investigation revealed that the phosphor powder has spherical morphology with particle size of about 100-200 nm. EPR study showed the change of coordination sphere around vanadium from axially distorted octahedral symmetry to tetrahedral geometry along with the change in oxidation state of vanadium ion from +4 to +5. The emission spectrum showed a broad emission at 543 nm with ?ex = 375 nm. The decay time obtained on mono-exponential fitting was 8.3 ?s. The colour coordinates of the system were evaluated using CIE index diagram to be 0.31 and 0.41, which suggest that the prepared material is a potential green emitting phosphor. A bright green colour emission was also observed directly from this phosphor upon excitation with an UV source.

  13. Phase evolution and morphology of nanocrystalline BaCe0.9Er0.1O3-? proton conducting oxide synthesised by a novel modified solution combustion route

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babu, A. S.; Bauri, Ranjit

    2015-12-01

    Pure BaCeO3 and 10 mol% Er2O3 doped BaCeO3 (BCE) was synthesised by a novel modified solution combustion synthesis (MCS) route wherein the pH of the precursor solution was varied and the phase formation and morphology were compared with those obtained in conventional solution combustion synthesis (SCS). X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies confirmed the presence of the undesirable BaCO3 phase in the calcined powders prepared using SCS route whereas the powders synthesised with the modified (MCS) route exhibited a single perovskite phase after calcination. Variation in the pH of the precursor solution resulted in a morphology change from a mix of irregular and globular at pH 4 to more spherical at pH 6 and 8. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) studies revealed that calcination time has more pronounced effect on phase formation than calcination temperature. A calcination time of 10 h at 1000 C resulted in negligible amount of BaCO3. Such prolonged calcination treatment resulted in substantial grain growth in the SCS sample while the MCS samples were still in the nanocrystalline form. Absence of the ceria peak (464 cm-1) in the Raman spectra confirmed the presence of a single perovskite BaCeO3 phase in the sintered pellets as well.

  14. Flash synthesis of Li2TiO3 powder by microwave-induced solution combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Qilai; Tao, Liyao; Gao, Yue; Xue, Lihong; Yan, Youwei

    2014-12-01

    Nano-crystalline Li2TiO3 powder was prepared by a microwave-induced solution combustion synthesis (MSCS) route using urea as fuel. It is observed that combustion reaction, which did not occur by conventional heating, happened when microwave heating was induced. The as-synthesized Li2TiO3 powder exhibits a narrow size distribution. In MSCS, the total metal ion concentration (Cm) in the starting solution plays an important role. By changing Cm values in starting solution, SCS process including ignition time, combustion period and reaction rate can be controlled. The as-prepared powder could be sintered up to 92.6% of the theoretical density at 1223 K.

  15. Chemiresistor urea sensor

    DOEpatents

    Glass, Robert S. (Livermore, CA)

    1997-01-01

    A sensor to detect and quantify urea in fluids resulting from hemodialysis procedures, and in blood and other body fluids. The sensor is based upon a chemiresistor, which consists of an interdigitated array of metal fingers between which a resistance measured. The interdigitated array is fabricated on a suitable substrate. The surface of the array of fingers is covered with a coating containing the enzyme urease which catalyzes the hydrolysis of urea to form the ammonium ion, the bicarbonate ion, and hydroxide-chemical products which provide the basis for the measured signal. In a typical application, the sensor could be used at bedside, in conjunction with an appropriate electronics/computer system, in order to determine the hemodialysis endpoint. Also, the chemiresistor used to detect urea, can be utilized with a reference chemiresistor which does not contain urease, and connected in a differential measurement arrangement, such that the reference chemiresistor would cancel out any fluctuations due to background effects.

  16. [Monitoring urea content during hemodialysis].

    PubMed

    Eventov, V L; Andrianova, M Iu; Nefedkin, S I; Eventova, O V

    2003-01-01

    The urea content monitoring during hemodialysis enables the feed-back within the system "patient--artificial kidney--patient". The existing methods of determining the concentration of urea in the dialyzing solution require an expendable reagent, i.e. urease, they are discrete and need often a calibration. The electrochemical urea analyzer, worked out by the authors, is easy in use, it provides a continues information about the urea concentration and does not virtually need any calibration. Besides, the plotter, belonging to the set, provides the graphic information about the dynamic changes of urea content. PMID:12924215

  17. Chemiresistor urea sensor

    DOEpatents

    Glass, R.S.

    1997-12-16

    A sensor is disclosed to detect and quantify urea in fluids resulting from hemodialysis procedures, and in blood and other body fluids. The sensor is based upon a chemiresistor, which consists of an interdigitated array of metal fingers between which a resistance measured. The interdigitated array is fabricated on a suitable substrate. The surface of the array of fingers is covered with a coating containing the enzyme urease which catalyzes the hydrolysis of urea to form the ammonium ion, the bicarbonate ion, and hydroxide-chemical products which provide the basis for the measured signal. In a typical application, the sensor could be used at bedside, in conjunction with an appropriate electronics/computer system, in order to determine the hemodialysis endpoint. Also, the chemiresistor used to detect urea, can be utilized with a reference chemiresistor which does not contain urease, and connected in a differential measurement arrangement, such that the reference chemiresistor would cancel out any fluctuations due to background effects. 16 figs.

  18. Structural and magnetic properties of Ni0.8Co0.2-2xCuxMnxFe2O4 spinel ferrites prepared via solution combustion route

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jadhav, Pragati; Patankar, Ketaki; Mathe, Vikas; Tarwal, N. L.; Jang, Jae-Hung; Puri, Vijaya

    2015-07-01

    Ni0.8Co0.2-2xCuxMnxFe2O4 ferrites (with x=0.01, 0.03, 0.05, 0.07 and 0.09) were prepared using solution combustion route. X-ray diffraction analysis indicates the presence of the characteristic most intense (311) peak along with other reflections confirming the formation of spinel ferrite in each composition. SEM images show formation of porous structured agglomerates with submicron sized grains. The microstrain measurement of ferrite series is non-linear with variation in dopant concentration for a given magnetic field. The magnetic hysteresis at room temperature indicates the ferrimagnetic behavior of synthesized ferrite system. The magnetic and mechanical properties were seen to be comparatively higher for x=0.07 composition. The presence of sexset in Mssbauer spectra confirms the ferrimagnetic nature of all the ferrites.

  19. Study of influence of fuel on dielectric and ferroelectric properties of bismuth titanate ceramics synthesized using solution based combustion technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subohi, Oroosa; Kumar, G. S.; Malik, M. M.; Kurchania, Rajnish

    2015-03-01

    The effect of fuel characteristics on the processing and properties of bismuth titanate (BIT) ceramics obtained by solution combustion route using different fuels are reported in this paper. Dextrose, urea and glycine were used as fuel in this study. The obtained bismuth titanate ceramics were characterized by using XRD, SEM at different stages of sample preparation. It was observed that BIT obtained by using dextrose as fuel shows higher dielectric constant and higher remnant polarization due to smaller grain size and lesser c-axis growth as compared to the samples with urea and glycine as fuel. The electrical behavior of the samples with respect to temperature and frequency was also investigated to understand relaxation phenomenon.

  20. Synthesis of LiCo 1- xNi xO 2 from a low temperature solution combustion route and characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suresh, P.; Rodrigues, S.; Shukla, A. K.; Shivashankar, S. A.; Munichandraiah, N.

    Nickel substituted lithium-cobalt oxides, LiCo 1- xNi xO 2 (0< x<0.4), have been synthesized in a very short time by a solution combustion method at 350 C using diformyl hydrazine as a fuel. Pure phases with hexagonal lattice structure have been obtained. These compounds facilitate reversible insertion/extraction of Li + ions with good discharge capacity between 3.0 and 4.4 V versus Li/Li +. Results of the studies by powder X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, cyclic voltammetry, galvanostatic charge-discharge cycling and ac impedance measurements are presented.

  1. Solution combustion synthesis of CeO{sub 2}-CeAlO{sub 3} nano-composites by mixture-of-fuels approach

    SciTech Connect

    Aruna, S.T.; Kini, N.S. Rajam, K.S.

    2009-04-02

    Nano-composites of CeO{sub 2}-CeAlO{sub 3} are synthesised by solution combustion method employing (a) urea and (b) a mixture of urea and glycine as fuels with corresponding metal nitrates. The as-prepared powders are all nano-sized (5-30 nm) and the same is confirmed by broadening of the X-ray diffraction peaks and transmission electron microscopy. A starting composition of Ce:Al in the atomic ratio 4:6 gives rise to different phases depending on the fuel being used for combustion. When urea alone is used as fuel, nano-crystalline CeO{sub 2} phase is formed with Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} being in the amorphous state. When the mixture of fuels is used, a mixture of nano-sized CeO{sub 2} and CeAlO{sub 3} phases is obtained. However, upon sintering at 1400 deg. C in air, the stable phases CeO{sub 2} and {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} are formed in both the cases. Combustion synthesis using mixture-of-fuels is proposed to be a route to stabilise low oxidation compounds such as CeAlO{sub 3}.

  2. Preparation of a Library of Unsymmetrical Ureas Based on 8-Azabicyclo [3.2.1]Octane Scaffold

    PubMed Central

    Agarkov, Anton; Gilbertson, Scott R.

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports the preparation of a library of unsymmetrical ureas based on 8-azabicyclo [3.2.1]octane scaffold. The reported synthetic route uses nortropane-8-carbonyl chlorides as key intermediates that, when treated with a slight excess of amine, give the corresponding ureas in high yield (129 examples). PMID:18611055

  3. Toxicology of urea formaldehyde and polyurethane foam insulation

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, J.C.; Rumack, B.H.; Aldrich, F.D.

    1981-01-16

    Two types of foam insulation are in wide use. Urea formaldehyde foam is a relatively inexpensive, easily installed, and efficient insulation. Toxicity from this insulation is related to release of free formaldehyde into the home. Mild to incapacitating symptoms have been reported in occupants of urea formaldehyde-insulated homes. Airborne formaldehyde levels frequently have exceeded standards set for occupational exposure. The long-term consequences of such exposure are unknown. Because of publicity over the toxicity of urea formaldehyde foam, many physicians and patients have confused urea formaldehyde and polyurethane foam. Unlike urea formaldehyde, polyurethane foam is fully cured before construction. Toxicity occurs only during manufacture and curing. To date, there have been no reports to our knowledge of toxicity in occupants of polyurethane-insulated homes. However, toxicity caused by pyrolysis products may occur during combustion in homes insulated with either type of insulation. This report details 48 patients in whom complete medical data were obtained out of the first 100 patients contacting the Rocky Mountain Poison Center.

  4. Quantum chemistry-assisted synthesis route development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hori, Kenji; Sumimoto, Michinori; Murafuji, Toshihiro

    2015-12-01

    We have been investigating "quantum chemistry-assisted synthesis route development" using in silico screenings and applied the method to several targets. Another example was conducted to develop synthesis routes for a urea derivative, namely 1-(4-(trifluoromethyl)-2-oxo-2H-chromen-7-yl)urea. While five synthesis routes were examined, only three routes passed the second in silico screening. Among them, the reaction of 7-amino-4-(trifluoromethyl)-2H-chromen-2-one and O-methyl carbamate with BF3 as an additive was ranked as the first choice for synthetic work. We were able to experimentally obtain the target compound even though its yield was as low as 21 %. The theoretical result was thus consistent with that observed. The summary of transition state data base (TSDB) is also provided. TSDB is the key to reducing time of in silico screenings.

  5. Physiological and molecular ontogeny of branchial and extra-branchial urea excretion in posthatch rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Zimmer, Alex M; Wood, Chris M

    2016-02-01

    All teleost fish produce ammonia as a metabolic waste product. In embryos, ammonia excretion is limited by the chorion, and fish must detoxify ammonia by synthesizing urea via the ornithine urea cycle (OUC). Although urea is produced by embryos and larvae, urea excretion (Jurea) is typically low until yolk sac absorption, increasing thereafter. The aim of this study was to determine the physiological and molecular characteristics of Jurea by posthatch rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Following hatch, whole body urea concentration decreased over time, while Jurea increased following yolk sac absorption. From 12 to 40 days posthatch (dph), extra-branchial routes of excretion accounted for the majority of Jurea, while the gills became the dominant site for Jurea only after 55 dph. This represents the most delayed branchial ontogeny of any process studied to date. Urea transporter (UT) gene expression in the gills and skin increased over development, consistent with increases in branchial and extra-branchial Jurea. Following exposure to 25 mmol/l urea, the accumulation and subsequent elimination of exogenous urea was much greater at 55 dph than 12 dph, consistent with increased UT expression. Notably, UT gene expression in the gills of 55 dph larvae increased in response to high urea. In summary, there is a clear increase in urea transport capacity over posthatch development, despite a decrease in OUC activity. PMID:26608657

  6. New enzymatic assay for serum urea nitrogen using urea amidolyase.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Shigeki; Iyama, Shigeru; Yamaguchi, Yoshihisa; Kanakura, Yuzuru

    2003-01-01

    We established an enzymatic assay for measurement of serum urea nitrogen using urea amidolyase (EC 3.5.1.45) from yeast species. The method is based on hydrolysis of urea by the enzyme. In this assay, we eliminated endogenous ammonium ion by use of glutamate dehydrogenase (EC 1.4.1.4). Then in the presence of urea amido-lyase, ATP, bicarbonate, magnesium, and potassium ions, ammonium ion was produced proportionally to urea concentration in serum. The concentra-tion of ammonium ion formed was determined by adding GLDH to produce NADP(+) in the presence of 2-oxoglutarate and NADPH. We then monitored the change of absorbance at 340 nm. The inhibitory effect of calcium ion on this assay was eliminated by adding glyco-letherdiamine-N, N, N', N'-tetraacetic acid to the reaction system. The with-in-assay coefficient of variations (CVs) of the present method were 1.80-3.76% (n = 10) at 2.8-19.0 mmol/L, respectively. The day-to-day CVs were 2.23-4.59%. Analytical recovery was 92-115%. The presence of ascorbic acid, bilirubin, hemoglobin, lipemic material, ammo-nium ion, or calcium ion did not affect this assay system. The correlation be-tween values obtained with the present method (y) and those by another enzy-matic method (x) was 0.997 (y = 1.02x - 0.10 mmol/L, Sy/x = 0.841, n = 100), with a mean difference of -0.18 +/- 0.86 mmol/L [(values by reference method - that of present method) +/- SD] using the Bland-Altman technique. J. Clin. Lab. Anal. 17:52-56, 2003. PMID:12640627

  7. What Is a Urea Cycle Disorder?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... like schizophrenia or bipolar disorder. What is the incidence of these disorders? Urea cycle disorders are included ... and death among newborns and infants. The estimated incidence of urea cycle disorders is 1 in 8500 ...

  8. Urea Biosynthesis Using Liver Slices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teal, A. R.

    1976-01-01

    Presented is a practical scheme to enable introductory biology students to investigate the mechanism by which urea is synthesized in the liver. The tissue-slice technique is discussed, and methods for the quantitative analysis of metabolites are presented. (Author/SL)

  9. Studies on Eu doped Ba and Zn aluminate phosphors prepared by combustion synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Vijay; Natarajan, V.; Zhu, Jun-Jie

    2007-07-01

    BaAl2O4:Eu2+ and ZnAl2O4:Eu3+ phosphors were prepared by urea combustion route. The formation of crystalline aluminates was confirmed by X-ray diffraction. The X-band EPR spectra of BaAl2O4:Eu2+ showed the presence of Eu2+ ions, while in the case of ZnAl2O4:Eu3+, no signal attributable to Eu2+ was observed. The broad band UV excited luminescence of BaAl2O4:Eu2+ was observed at the blue region (?max = 439 nm) due to transitions from the 4f65d1 to the 4f7 configuration of the Eu2+ ion, whereas ZnAl2O4:Eu3+ gave an emission at 613 nm attributed to 5D0-7F2 transition of Eu3+ ions.

  10. Phytotoxicity of foliar-applied urea.

    PubMed

    Krogmeier, M J; McCarty, G W; Bremner, J M

    1989-11-01

    Recent work in our laboratory showed that the adverse effect of urea fertilizer on seed germination and seedling growth in soil is due to ammonia produced through hydrolysis of urea by soil urease (NH(2)CONH(2) + H(2)O --> 2NH(3) + CO(2)) and can be eliminated by amending the fertilizer with a small amount of a urease inhibitor such as phenylphosphorodiamidate. Because the leaf-tip necrosis often observed after foliar fertilization of plants with urea is usually attributed to ammonia formed through hydrolysis of urea by plant urease, we studied the possibility that this necrosis could be eliminated or reduced by adding phenylphosphorodiamidate to the urea fertilizer. We found that, although addition of this urease inhibitor to foliar-applied urea increased the urea content and decreased the ammonia content and urease activity of soybean [Glycine max. (L.) Merr.] leaves fertilized with urea, it increased the leaf-tip necrosis observed after fertilization. We conclude that this necrosis resulted from accumulation of toxic amounts of urea rather than from formation of toxic amounts of ammonia. This conclusion was supported by our finding that the necrotic areas of soybean leaves treated with urea or with urea and phenylphosphorodiamidate contained much higher concentrations of urea than did the nonnecrotic areas. PMID:16594077

  11. Urea biosensor for hemodialysis monitoring

    DOEpatents

    Glass, Robert S. (Livermore, CA)

    1999-01-01

    An electrochemical sensor capable of detecting and quantifying urea in fluids resulting from hemodialysis procedures. The sensor is based upon measurement of the pH change produced in an aqueous environment by the products of the enzyme-catalyzed hydrolysis of urea. The sensor may be fabricated using methods amenable to mass fabrication, resulting in low-cost sensors and thus providing the potential for disposable use. In a typical application, the sensor could be used in treatment centers, in conjunction with an appropriate electronics/computer system, in order to determine the hemodialysis endpoint. The sensor can also be utilized to allow at-home testing to determine if dialysis was necessary. Such a home monitor is similar, in principle, to devices used for blood glucose testing by diabetics, and would require a blood droplet sample by using a finger prick.

  12. Urea biosensor for hemodialysis monitoring

    DOEpatents

    Glass, R.S.

    1999-01-12

    This research discloses an electrochemical sensor capable of detecting and quantifying urea in fluids resulting from hemodialysis procedures. The sensor is based upon measurement of the pH change produced in an aqueous environment by the products of the enzyme-catalyzed hydrolysis of urea. The sensor may be fabricated using methods amenable to mass fabrication, resulting in low-cost sensors and thus providing the potential for disposable use. In a typical application, the sensor could be used in treatment centers, in conjunction with an appropriate electronics/computer system, in order to determine the hemodialysis endpoint. The sensor can also be utilized to allow at-home testing to determine if dialysis was necessary. Such a home monitor is similar, in principle, to devices used for blood glucose testing by diabetics, and would require a blood droplet sample by using a finger prick. 9 figs.

  13. Combustion noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strahle, W. C.

    1977-01-01

    A review of the subject of combustion generated noise is presented. Combustion noise is an important noise source in industrial furnaces and process heaters, turbopropulsion and gas turbine systems, flaring operations, Diesel engines, and rocket engines. The state-of-the-art in combustion noise importance, understanding, prediction and scaling is presented for these systems. The fundamentals and available theories of combustion noise are given. Controversies in the field are discussed and recommendations for future research are made.

  14. An efficient combustion process for synthesis of YBa2Cu3O7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rambabu, D.

    1990-03-01

    A novel combustion process which saves time and energy for the synthesis of YBa2Cu3O7 superconductor is reported. The process involves ignition of metal nitrates-urea mixture which results in an intimate mixture of partially reacted oxides. After another combustion with ammonium nitrate and urea and subsequent heat treatment and oxygenation, this gives single phase superconducting YBa2Cu3O7 powder.

  15. 21 CFR 184.1923 - Urea.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Urea. 184.1923 Section 184.1923 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DIRECT FOOD SUBSTANCES AFFIRMED AS GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS 184.1923 Urea. (a) Urea (CO(NH2)2, CAS Reg. No....

  16. Urea in rainwater and atmospheric aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornell, S. E.; Jickells, T. D.; Thornton, C. A.

    The measurement of urea (CO(NH 2) 2) in rainwater samples from predominantly marine-influenced locations in Bermuda, and Ireland, and in rains and aqueous aerosol extracts from a rural site at UEA, Norwich indicates that urea is not generally a major contributor to atmospheric water-soluble organic nitrogen. At UEA, where anthropogenic and natural sources of urea are expected to be most intense, urea accounts for <10% of rainwater dissolved organic nitrogen (DON), and <1% of the water-soluble fraction of aerosol organic nitrogen. The analysis of size-segregated aerosol samples indicates that the size distribution of urea is quite different from those of ammonium and nitrate. In the less anthropogenically impacted Atlantic sites, rainwater urea was below the detection limits of the colorimetric method used in this study, consistent with expected dilution processes or reaction of urea during transport. However, in a small set of rain samples collected in Tahiti, urea concentrations ranged from 1 to 8 ?mol l -1, accounting for >40% of the DON measured in those samples. This may be a consequence of strong local sources, or it could possibly result from the partial breakdown of other DON compounds to urea during sample transport and storage. However, the similarity in urea concentrations observed in Pacific samples in this present study and in a previous one ( Timperley et al., 1985, Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Science42, 1171-1177) suggests that this may reflect a difference in rain chemistry between Atlantic and Pacific rains, perhaps resulting from differences in levels of agricultural urea usage between Asia and the rest of the world.

  17. Urea-acetylene dicarboxylic acid reaction: A likely pathway for prebiotic uracil formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subbaraman, A. S.; Kazi, Z. A.; Choughuley, A. S. U.; Chadha, M. S.

    1980-12-01

    A number of routes have been suggested for the prebiotic synthesis of uracil involving the reaction of urea with malic acid, propiolic acid, cyanoacetylene and others. Cyanoacetylene has been detected in the interstellar medium as well as simulated prebiotic experiments. It is therefore plausible that dicyanoacetylene and its hydrolytic product acetylene dicarboxylic acid, (ADCA) may have played a role in chemical evolution. This aspect has been examined in the present work for the synthesis of uracil from ADCA and urea reaction. It was found that when ADCA reacted with urea, uracil was formed only in the presence of phosphoric acid and phosphates. Ammonium phosphates gave higher yields of uracil than other phosphates. In the absence of phosphoric acid or phosphates no uracil formation took place. This type of synthesis could have taken place in prebiotic oceans which contained ammonium phosphates and other salts.

  18. Urea Transporter Physiology Studied in Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xuechen; Chen, Guangping; Yang, Baoxue

    2012-01-01

    In mammals, there are two types of urea transporters; urea transporter (UT)-A and UT-B. The UT-A transporters are mainly expressed in kidney epithelial cells while UT-B demonstrates a broader distribution in kidney, heart, brain, testis, urinary tract, and other tissues. Over the past few years, multiple urea transporter knockout mouse models have been generated enabling us to explore the physiological roles of the different urea transporters. In the kidney, deletion of UT-A1/UT-A3 results in polyuria and a severe urine concentrating defect, indicating that intrarenal recycling of urea plays a crucial role in the overall capacity to concentrate urine. Since UT-B has a wide tissue distribution, multiple phenotypic abnormalities have been found in UT-B null mice, such as defective urine concentration, exacerbated heart blockage with aging, depression-like behavior, and earlier male sexual maturation. This review summarizes the new insights of urea transporter functions in different organs, gleaned from studies of urea transporter knockout mice, and explores some of the potential pharmacological prospects of urea transporters. PMID:22745630

  19. 21 CFR 184.1923 - Urea.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Urea. 184.1923 Section 184.1923 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) DIRECT FOOD SUBSTANCES AFFIRMED AS GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS 184.1923 Urea....

  20. 21 CFR 184.1923 - Urea.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Urea. 184.1923 Section 184.1923 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) DIRECT FOOD SUBSTANCES AFFIRMED AS GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1923 Urea....

  1. Urea transport through composite polyallylamine membranes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ballou, E. V.; Kubo, L. Y.; Spitze, L. A.; Wydeven, T.; Clark, J. A.

    1977-01-01

    Polyallylamine composite reverse osmosis membranes were prepared by plasma polymerization and deposition onto small-pored cellulose acetate/cellulose nitrate films. The polyallylamine coated the porous substrate with a thin uniform polymer film which exhibited water permeability and urea rejection, of interest because of the potential application of reverse osmosis to urine purification in closed environmental systems. The flux of C-14 labeled urea was studied under the influence of osmotic gradients provided by sodium chloride solutions. The urea flux was found to be enhanced by an osmotic pressure gradient in the same direction and diminished, but not prevented, by an opposing osmotic pressure gradient. Consideration is given to the mechanism of the urea transport, as well as to the influence of concentration polarization on the experimental results. The minimization of coupled flow in pores of a critical size range is apparently necessary to improve urea rejection.

  2. Simulating Combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merker, G.; Schwarz, C.; Stiesch, G.; Otto, F.

    The content spans from simple thermodynamics of the combustion engine to complex models for the description of the air/fuel mixture, ignition, combustion and pollutant formation considering the engine periphery of petrol and diesel engines. Thus the emphasis of the book is on the simulation models and how they are applicable for the development of modern combustion engines. Computers can be used as the engineers testbench following the rules and recommendations described here.

  3. Transport characteristics of urea transporter-B.

    PubMed

    Yang, Baoxue

    2014-01-01

    UT-B represents the major urea transporter in erythrocytes, in addition to being expressed in kidney descending vasa recta, brain, spleen, ureter, bladder, and testis. Expression of urea transporter UT-B confers high urea permeability to mammalian erythrocytes. Erythrocyte membranes are also permeable to various urea analogues, suggesting common transport pathways for urea and structurally similar solutes. UT-B is highly permeable to urea and the chemical analogues formamide, acetamide, methylurea, methylformamide, ammonium carbamate, and acrylamide, each with a Ps > 5.0 10(-6) cm/s at 10 C. The amides formamide, acetamide, acrylamide, and butyramide efficiently diffuse across lipid bilayers. The urea analogues dimethylurea, acryalmide, methylurea, thiourea, and methylformamide inhibit UT-B-mediated urea transport by >60 % by a pore-blocking mechanism. UT-B is also a water channel in erythrocytes and has a single-channel water permeability that is similar to aquaporin-1. Whether UT-B is an NH3 channel still needs further study. Urea permeability (Purea) in erythrocytes differs between different mammals. Carnivores (dog, fox, cat) exhibit high Purea. In contrast, herbivores (cow, donkey, sheep) show much lower Purea. Erythrocyte Purea in human and pig (omnivores) was intermediate. Rodents and lagomorphs (mouse, rat, rabbit) have Purea intermediate between carnivores and omnivores. Birds that do not excrete urea and do not express UT-B in their erythrocytes have very low values. In contrast to Purea, water permeability is relatively similar in all mammals studied. This chapter will provide information about the transporter characteristics of UT-B. PMID:25298342

  4. Isotopic Analysis of the Explosive Urea Nitrate and Its Component Ions for Forensic Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aranda, R.; Stern, L. A.; McCormick, M. C.; Mothershead, R. F.; Barrow, J. A.

    2008-12-01

    Urea nitrate (UN) is an explosive used in improvised explosive devices. UN (CH5N2O+NO3-) can be synthesized from readily available chemicals and was the main explosive used in the 1993 bombing of the World Trade Center. Isotopic analysis of this explosive has the potential to elucidate the isotopic ratios of the starting materials and geographic information on the location of synthesis. However, depending on the synthesis of the explosive, variable amounts of residual nitric acid may remain, yielding differing contributions of the components to the bulk UN ?15N values. Since ?15N nitrate values cannot be extrapolated from a single component and the bulk value, it is critical to separate the explosive into urea and potassium nitrate. Therefore, we developed a method to isolate the components of UN for isotopic analysis through the neutralization of urea and separation via methanol washes. The urea in the explosive is neutralized with a 1.1:1 mole ratio of potassium hydroxide:urea in water resulting in urea and potassium nitrate. The solution is then dried and the urea and potassium nitrate are separated using methanol. Urea and nitrate were isolated from samples of pre-blast UN and the completeness of the extraction was confirmed with a urease assay and a nitrate detection assay on the appropriate components. Isotopic analysis of the isolated urea and potassium nitrate were performed using an EA-IRMS, with the addition of sucrose to the potassium nitrate to aid combustion. For samples of relatively pure UN, the bulk UN ?15N value is stoichiometrically equivalent to the measured ?15N values of the isolated urea and nitrate in a 2:1 ratio. However, some explosive samples contained an excess of nitric acid due to poor preparation. As a result, the bulk UN ?15N values were biased towards the ?15N value of the nitrate. We are conducting experiments to compare the isotopic values of the initial starting reactants in the UN synthesis and the isotopic composition of the end products in order to test the forensic utility for linking the starting reactants to recovered UN. We are also investigating the extent of oxygen isotope exchange of nitrate and water during UN synthesis. This may provide constraints on the location of UN production, which will be useful in a forensic investigation.

  5. Ammonia sanitisation of sewage sludge using urea.

    PubMed

    Fidjeland, Jørgen; Lalander, Cecilia; Jönsson, Håkan; Vinnerås, Björn

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to develop a simple, low-cost treatment for sewage sludge using urea as a sanitising agent. Sewage sludge was spiked with Enterococcus faecalis and Salmonella typhimurium, treated with 0.5, 1, 1.5 and 2% w/w urea at laboratory scale, and the viability was monitored during 4 months of storage at 4, 10 and 22 °C (only 0.5%). A linear relationship was identified between Salmonella spp. inactivation rate and ammonia (NH3) concentration. Temperature had a positive impact on Salmonella spp. inactivation at higher temperatures, but in the range 4-10 °C temperature influenced this inactivation merely by its impact on the ammonia equilibrium. Enterococcus spp. was more persistent and a lag phase of up to 11 weeks was observed. Higher temperature and ammonia concentration reduced the lag phase duration significantly, and also had a clear effect on the inactivation rate for the treatments with 0.5% urea at 22 °C and 2% urea at 4 and 10 °C. Urea sanitisation of sewage sludge can give a 2 log10 reduction of Enterococcus spp. and more than a 5 log10 reduction of Salmonella spp. within 6 weeks with either 0.5% w/w urea at 22 °C or 2% urea at 10 °C. PMID:24185072

  6. Rapid dissolution of cellulose in LiOH/urea and NaOH/urea aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Cai, Jie; Zhang, Lina

    2005-06-24

    Rapid dissolution of cellulose in LiOH/urea and NaOH/urea aqueous solutions was studied systematically. The dissolution behavior and solubility of cellulose were evaluated by using (13)C NMR, optical microscopy, wide-angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD), FT-IR spectroscopy, DSC, and viscometry. The experiment results revealed that cellulose having viscosity-average molecular weight ((overline) M eta) of 11.4 x 104 and 37.2 x 104 could be dissolved, respectively, in 7% NaOH/12% urea and 4.2% LiOH/12% urea aqueous solutions pre-cooled to -10 degrees C within 2 min, whereas all of them could not be dissolved in KOH/urea aqueous solution. The dissolution power of the solvent systems was in the order of LiOH/urea > NaOH/urea > KOH/urea aqueous solution. The results from DSC and (13)C NMR indicated that LiOH/urea and NaOH/urea aqueous solutions as non-derivatizing solvents broke the intra- and inter-molecular hydrogen bonding of cellulose and prevented the approach toward each other of the cellulose molecules, leading to the good dispersion of cellulose to form an actual solution. PMID:15954076

  7. Urea and deuterium mixtures at high pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Donnelly, M. Husband, R. J.; Frantzana, A. D.; Loveday, J. S.; Bull, C. L.; Klotz, S.

    2015-03-28

    Urea, like many network forming compounds, has long been known to form inclusion (guest-host) compounds. Unlike other network formers like water, urea is not known to form such inclusion compounds with simple molecules like hydrogen. Such compounds if they existed would be of interest both for the fundamental insight they provide into molecular bonding and as potential gas storage systems. Urea has been proposed as a potential hydrogen storage material [T. A. Strobel et al., Chem. Phys. Lett. 478, 97 (2009)]. Here, we report the results of high-pressure neutron diffraction studies of urea and D{sub 2} mixtures that indicate no inclusion compound forms up to 3.7 GPa.

  8. Urea and deuterium mixtures at high pressures.

    PubMed

    Donnelly, M; Bull, C L; Husband, R J; Frantzana, A D; Klotz, S; Loveday, J S

    2015-03-28

    Urea, like many network forming compounds, has long been known to form inclusion (guest-host) compounds. Unlike other network formers like water, urea is not known to form such inclusion compounds with simple molecules like hydrogen. Such compounds if they existed would be of interest both for the fundamental insight they provide into molecular bonding and as potential gas storage systems. Urea has been proposed as a potential hydrogen storage material [T. A. Strobel et al., Chem. Phys. Lett. 478, 97 (2009)]. Here, we report the results of high-pressure neutron diffraction studies of urea and D2 mixtures that indicate no inclusion compound forms up to 3.7 GPa. PMID:25833592

  9. Coulometric titration of urea with electrogenerated hypobromite.

    PubMed

    Kato, Jun; Koseki, Takuma; Aoki, Yukie; Yamada, Ayako; Tanaka, Tatsuhiko

    2013-01-01

    A definitive method is described for the indirect assay of several tens of milligrams of urea by coulometric titration. Urea was decomposed in concentrated sulfuric acid using a Kjeldahl flask. Subsequently, the formed ammonium ion was titrated with electrogenerated hypobromite ion in a sodium bromide-sodium tetraborate medium of pH 8.6, with amperometric end-point detection. Parameters affecting the pretreatment procedure were evaluated. The optimized conditions included the heating of 2 g of urea at around 300C for 2 h with 10 cm(3) of sulfuric acid. Under the proposed conditions, the assay value with expanded uncertainty (k = 2), 99.870 0.026%, agreed well with the certified value of NIST SRM 912a urea, 99.9 0.1%. PMID:23842420

  10. Nutritional management of urea cycle disorders.

    PubMed

    Singh, Rani H; Rhead, William J; Smith, Wendy; Lee, Brendan; Sniderman King, Lisa; Summar, Marshall

    2005-10-01

    Nutritional management of patients who have urea cycle disorders is one of the most challenging tasks in clinical nutrition. The degree to which protein intake should be restricted in urea cycle disorders requires complex calculations which depend on many variables such as specific enzyme defect, age-related growth rate, current health status, level of physical activity, amount of free amino acids administered, energy intake, residual urea cycle function, family lifestyle, use of nitrogen-scavenging medications, and the patient's eating behaviors. This paper presents two case histories and a series of recommendations outlining the nutrition management of urea cycle disorders. It also identifies difficulties that arise in the course of treatment, and suggests practical solutions for overcoming them. PMID:16227113

  11. Method for reducing nitrogen oxides in combustion effluents

    DOEpatents

    Zauderer, Bert

    2000-01-01

    Method for reducing nitrogen oxides (NO.sub.x) in the gas stream from the combustion of fossil fuels is disclosed. In a narrow gas temperature zone, NO.sub.x is converted to nitrogen by reaction with urea or ammonia with negligible remaining ammonia and other reaction pollutants. Specially designed injectors are used to introduce air atomized water droplets containing dissolved urea or ammonia into the gaseous combustion products in a manner that widely disperses the droplets exclusively in the optimum reaction temperature zone. The injector operates in a manner that forms droplet of a size that results in their vaporization exclusively in this optimum NO.sub.x -urea/ammonia reaction temperature zone. Also disclosed is a design of a system to effectively accomplish this injection.

  12. Molecular dynamics simulation of aqueous urea solution: is urea a structure breaker?

    PubMed

    Bandyopadhyay, Dibyendu; Mohan, Sadhana; Ghosh, Swapan K; Choudhury, Niharendu

    2014-10-01

    An aqueous solution of urea is a very important mixture of biological relevance because of the definitive role of urea as protein denaturant at high concentrations. There has been an extended debate over the years on urea's influence on the structure of water. On the basis of a variety of analysis methods employed, urea has been described as a structure-breaker, a structure-maker, or as neutral toward water structure. Using molecular dynamics simulation and a nearest neighbor approach of analyzing water structure, we present here a detailed analysis of the effect of urea on water structure. By carefully choosing the nearest neighbors, allowing urea also to be a neighbor of a reference water molecule, we have conclusively shown that urea does not break the local tetrahedral structure of water even at high concentrations. A slight change in the distribution of tetrahedral order parameters as a function of urea concentration has been shown to be a result of change in the proportions of n-hydrogen-bonded water molecules. The present result thus suggests that urea is able to substitute for water in the hydrogen-bonded network nicely without breaking the tetrahedral, hydrogen-bonded structure of water. PMID:25257762

  13. 21 CFR 862.1770 - Urea nitrogen test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Urea nitrogen test system. 862.1770 Section 862....1770 Urea nitrogen test system. (a) Identification. A urea nitrogen test system is a device intended to measure urea nitrogen (an end-product of nitrogen metabolism) in whole blood, serum, plasma, and...

  14. 21 CFR 862.1770 - Urea nitrogen test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Urea nitrogen test system. 862.1770 Section 862....1770 Urea nitrogen test system. (a) Identification. A urea nitrogen test system is a device intended to measure urea nitrogen (an end-product of nitrogen metabolism) in whole blood, serum, plasma, and...

  15. 21 CFR 862.1770 - Urea nitrogen test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Urea nitrogen test system. 862.1770 Section 862....1770 Urea nitrogen test system. (a) Identification. A urea nitrogen test system is a device intended to measure urea nitrogen (an end-product of nitrogen metabolism) in whole blood, serum, plasma, and...

  16. Combustion detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trimpi, R. L.; Nealy, J. E.; Grose, W. L. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A device has been developed for generating a rapid response signal upon the radiation-emitting combustion reaction of certain gases in order to provide a means for the detection and identification of such reaction and concurrently discriminate against spurious signals. This combustion might be the first stage of a coal mine explosion process, and thereby this device could provide a warning of the impending explosion in time to initiate quenching action. This device has the capability of distinguishing between the light emitted from a combustion reaction and the light emitted by miners' lamps, electric lamps, welding sparks or other spurious events so that the quenching mechanism is triggered only when an explosion-initiating combustion occurs.

  17. Combustion physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, A. R.

    1985-11-01

    Over 90% of our energy comes from combustion. By the year 2000 the figure will still be 80%, even allowing for nuclear and alternative energy sources. There are many familiar examples of combustion use, both domestic and industrial. These range from the Bunsen burner to large flares, from small combustion chambers, such as those in car engines, to industrial furnaces for steel manufacture or the generation of megawatts of electricity. There are also fires and explosions. The bountiful energy release from combustion, however, brings its problems, prominent among which are diminishing fuel resources and pollution. Combustion science is directed towards finding ways of improving efficiency and reducing pollution. One may ask, since combustion is a chemical reaction, why physics is involved: the answer is in three parts. First, chemicals cannot react unless they come together. In most flames the fuel and air are initially separate. The chemical reaction in the gas phase is very fast compared with the rate of mixing. Thus, once the fuel and air are mixed the reaction can be considered to occur instantaneously and fluid mechanics limits the rate of burning. Secondly, thermodynamics and heat transfer determine the thermal properties of the combustion products. Heat transfer also plays a role by preheating the reactants and is essential to extracting useful work. Fluid mechanics is relevant if work is to be performed directly, as in a turbine. Finally, physical methods, including electric probes, acoustics, optics, spectroscopy and pyrometry, are used to examine flames. The article is concerned mainly with how physics is used to improve the efficiency of combustion.

  18. Transport of sodium and urea in outer medullary descending vasa recta.

    PubMed Central

    Pallone, T L; Work, J; Myers, R L; Jamison, R L

    1994-01-01

    We dissected and perfused outer medullary vasa recta (OMVR) from vascular bundles in the rat. Permeabilities of sodium (PNa) and urea (Pu) were simultaneously determined from the lumen-to-bath efflux of 22Na and [14C]urea. PNa and Pu were also measured by in vivo microperfusion of descending (DVR) and ascending vasa recta (AVR) at the papillary tip of Munich-Wistar rats. In some OMVR PNa was indistinguishable from zero. The mean +/- SE of PNa (x 10(-5), cm/s) in OMVR was 76 +/- 9. Pu in OMVR was always very high (x 10(-5), cm/s), 360 +/- 14. There was no correlation between OMVR PNa and Pu. Inner medullary AVR and DVR had PNa of 115 +/- 10 and 75 +/- 10, respectively, and Pu of 121 +/- 10 and 76 +/- 11, respectively. PNa and Pu in papillary vasa recta were always nearly identical and highly correlated. Transport of [14C] urea in OMVR was reversibly inhibited by addition of unlabeled urea or phloretin to the bath and lumen, providing evidence for carrier-mediated transport. These data suggest that sodium and urea might traverse the wall of inner medullary vasa recta by a paracellular pathway while urea also crosses by a transcellular route in OMVR. Electron microscopic examination of seven in vitro perfused OMVR revealed no fenestrations and exposure of these vessels to 10 microM calcium ionophore A23187 or 1 nM angiotensin II resulted in reversible contraction, suggesting that in vitro perfused OMVR are DVR only. Images PMID:8282790

  19. Winter Wheat and Maize Response to Urea Ammonium Nitrate and a New Urea Formaldehyde Polymer Fertilizer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Slow release nitrogen (N) fertilizers have potential to improve yield and nitrogen use efficiency (NUE) in winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) and maize (Zea mays L.). A slow release urea formaldehyde polymer (UFP) was compared with conventional aqueous urea-ammonium nitrate (UAN) [(NH2)2CO, NH4NO3]...

  20. Synthesis and Characterization of Branched Poly(ester urea)s with Different Branch Density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jiayi; Becker, Matthew

    2015-03-01

    A new class of L-phenylalanine-based poly(ester urea)s (PEU) was developed that possess tunable mechanical properties, water uptake ability and degradation rates. Our preliminary data has shown that 1,6-hexanediol L - phenylalanine-based poly(ester urea)s possesses an elastic modulus nearly double that of poly(lactic acid). My work details the synthesis of a series of L - phenylalanine-based poly(ester urea)s possessing a variation in diol chain length and in branch density and shows how these subtle structural differences influence the mechanical properties and in vitro biodegradation rates. The elastic moduli span a range of values that overlap with several currently clinically available degradable polymers. Increasingly the diol chain lengths increases the amount of flexible segment in the chemical structure, which results in reduced elastic modulus values and increased values of elongation at break. Increasing the amount of branch monomer incorporated into the system reduces the molecular entanglement, which also results in decreased elastic modulus values and increased values of elongation at break. The L - phenylalanine-based poly(ester urea)s also exhibited a diol length dependent degradation process that varied between 1-5 % over 16 weeks. Compared with PLLA, PEUs degrade more quickly and the rate can be tuned by changing the diol chain length. PEUs absorb more water and the water uptake ability can be tuned by changing the branch density. This work was supported by Akron Functional Materials Center.

  1. Nitrous Oxide Gas Fluxes in a Potato Field Following Application of Urea and Coated Urea Fertilizers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Application of urea and other forms of nitrogen (N) fertilizer can generate atmospheric emissions of nitrous oxide (N2O), which is a potent greenhouse gas. Field experiments were conducted on a loamy sand soil in Becker, Minnesota to evaluate the effects of soluble and coated forms of urea on N2O fl...

  2. Evolutionary aspects of urea utilization by fungi

    PubMed Central

    Navarathna, Dhammika H.M.L.P.; Harris, Steven D.; Roberts, David D.; Nickerson, Kenneth W.

    2009-01-01

    The higher fungi exhibit a dichotomy with regard to urea utilization. The hemiascomycetes use urea amidolyase (DUR1,2) whereas all other higher fungi use the nickel-containing urease. Urea amidolyase is an energy dependent biotin-containing enzyme. It likely arose prior to the Euascomycete/Hemiascomycete divergence ca. 350 million years ago by insertion of an unknown gene into one copy of a duplicated methylcrotonyl CoA carboxylase (MccA). The dichotomy between urease and urea amidolyase coincides precisely with that for the Ni/Co transporter (Nic1p) which is present in the higher fungi that use urease and absent in those that do not. We suggest that the selective advantage for urea amidolyase is that it allowed the hemiascomycetes to jettison all Ni2+ and Co2+ dependent metabolism and thus to have two fewer transition metals whose concentrations need to be regulated. Also, the absence of MccA in the hemiascomycetes coincides with and may explain their production of fusel alcohols. PMID:20100286

  3. Biofuels Combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westbrook, Charles K.

    2013-04-01

    This review describes major features of current research in renewable fuels derived from plants and from fatty acids. Recent and ongoing fundamental studies of biofuel molecular structure, oxidation reactions, and biofuel chemical properties are reviewed, in addition to combustion applications of biofuels in the major types of engines in which biofuels are used. Biofuels and their combustion are compared with combustion features of conventional petroleum-based fuels. Two main classes of biofuels are described, those consisting of small, primarily alcohol, fuels (particularly ethanol, n-butanol, and iso-pentanol) that are used primarily to replace or supplement gasoline and those derived from fatty acids and used primarily to replace or supplement conventional diesel fuels. Research efforts on so-called second- and third-generation biofuels are discussed briefly.

  4. Biofuels combustion.

    PubMed

    Westbrook, Charles K

    2013-01-01

    This review describes major features of current research in renewable fuels derived from plants and from fatty acids. Recent and ongoing fundamental studies of biofuel molecular structure, oxidation reactions, and biofuel chemical properties are reviewed, in addition to combustion applications of biofuels in the major types of engines in which biofuels are used. Biofuels and their combustion are compared with combustion features of conventional petroleum-based fuels. Two main classes of biofuels are described, those consisting of small, primarily alcohol, fuels (particularly ethanol, n-butanol, and iso-pentanol) that are used primarily to replace or supplement gasoline and those derived from fatty acids and used primarily to replace or supplement conventional diesel fuels. Research efforts on so-called second- and third-generation biofuels are discussed briefly. PMID:23298249

  5. Bubble Combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corrigan, Jackie

    2004-01-01

    A method of energy production that is capable of low pollutant emissions is fundamental to one of the four pillars of NASA s Aeronautics Blueprint: Revolutionary Vehicles. Bubble combustion, a new engine technology currently being developed at Glenn Research Center promises to provide low emissions combustion in support of NASA s vision under the Emissions Element because it generates power, while minimizing the production of carbon dioxide (CO2) and nitrous oxides (NOx), both known to be Greenhouse gases. and allows the use of alternative fuels such as corn oil, low-grade fuels, and even used motor oil. Bubble combustion is analogous to the inverse of spray combustion: the difference between bubble and spray combustion is that spray combustion is spraying a liquid in to a gas to form droplets, whereas bubble combustion involves injecting a gas into a liquid to form gaseous bubbles. In bubble combustion, the process for the ignition of the bubbles takes place on a time scale of less than a nanosecond and begins with acoustic waves perturbing each bubble. This perturbation causes the local pressure to drop below the vapor pressure of the liquid thus producing cavitation in which the bubble diameter grows, and upon reversal of the oscillating pressure field, the bubble then collapses rapidly with the aid of the high surface tension forces acting on the wall of the bubble. The rapid and violent collapse causes the temperatures inside the bubbles to soar as a result of adiabatic heating. As the temperatures rise, the gaseous contents of the bubble ignite with the bubble itself serving as its own combustion chamber. After ignition, this is the time in the bubble s life cycle where power is generated, and CO2, and NOx among other species, are produced. However, the pollutants CO2 and NOx are absorbed into the surrounding liquid. The importance of bubble combustion is that it generates power using a simple and compact device. We conducted a parametric study using CAVCHEM, a computational model developed at Glenn, that simulates the cavitational collapse of a single bubble in a liquid (water) and the subsequent combustion of the gaseous contents inside the bubble. The model solves the time-dependent, compressible Navier-Stokes equations in one-dimension with finite-rate chemical kinetics using the CHEMKIN package. Specifically, parameters such as frequency, pressure, bubble radius, and the equivalence ratio were varied while examining their effect on the maximum temperature, radius, and chemical species. These studies indicate that the radius of the bubble is perhaps the most critical parameter governing bubble combustion dynamics and its efficiency. Based on the results of the parametric studies, we plan on conducting experiments to study the effect of ultrasonic perturbations on the bubble generation process with respect to the bubble radius and size distribution.

  6. A perfusion study of the handling of urea and urea analogues by the gills of the dogfish shark (Squalus acanthias).

    PubMed

    Wood, Chris M; Liew, Hon Jung; De Boeck, Gudrun; Walsh, Patrick J

    2013-01-01

    The branchial mechanism of urea retention in elasmobranchs was investigated using an in vitro isolated-perfused head preparation, as well as in vivo samples, in the spiny dogfish shark. Both in vivo and in control saline perfusions containing 350mmolL(-1) urea, calculated intracellular urea concentrations in gill epithelial cells were close to extracellular concentrations. Urea efflux to the external water fell only non-significantly, and calculated gill intracellular urea concentration did not change when perfusate urea concentration was reduced from 350 to 175mmol?L(-1) with osmotic compensation by 175mmolL(-1) mannitol. However, when the urea analogues thiourea or acetamide were present in the perfusate at concentrations equimolar (175mmolL(-1)) to those of urea (175mmolL(-1)), urea efflux rates were increased 4-fold and 6.5-fold respectively, and calculated gill intracellular urea concentrations were depressed by about 55%. Analogue efflux rates were similar to urea efflux rates. Previous studies have argued that either the basolateral or apical membranes provided the limiting permeability barrier, and/or that a back-transporter on the basolateral membranes of gill cells is responsible for urea retention. The present results provide new evidence that the apical membrane is the limiting factor in maintaining gill urea impermeability, and raise the prospect that a urea back-transporter, which can be competitively inhibited by thiourea and acetamide, operates at the apical membrane. PMID:23638369

  7. Urea synthesis in enterocytes of developing pigs.

    PubMed

    Wu, G

    1995-12-15

    Urea synthesis from ammonia, glutamine and arginine was determined in enterocytes from newborn (0-day-old), 2-21-day-old suckling, and 29-58-day-old post-weaning pigs. Pigs were weaned at 21 days of age. Cells were incubated for 30 min at 37 degrees C in Krebs-Henseleit bicarbonate buffer (pH 7.4) containing (i) 0.5-2 mM NH4Cl plus 0.05-2 mM ornithine and 2 mM aspartate, (ii) 1-5 mM glutamine, or (iii) 0.5-2 mM arginine. In enterocytes from newborn and suckling pigs, there was no measurable synthesis of urea from ammonia, glutamine or arginine, and analysis of amino acids by a sensitive fluorimetric HPLC method revealed the formation of negligible amounts of ornithine from arginine. In contrast, in cells from post-weaning pigs, relatively large amounts of urea and ornithine were produced from ammonia, glutamine and arginine in a dose-dependent manner. To elucidate the mechanism of the developmental change of urea synthesis in pig enterocytes, the activities of urea-cycle enzymes were determined. The activities of enterocyte carbamoyl phosphate synthase I and ornithine carbamoyltransferase were lower in post-weaning pigs than in suckling ones, whereas there was no difference in arginino-succinate lyase. The activities of argininosuccinate synthase and arginase were increased by 4-fold and 50-100-fold, respectively, in enterocytes from post-weaning pigs compared with suckling pigs. The induction of arginase appears to be sufficient to account for the formation of urea from ammonia, glutamine and arginine in post-weaning pig enterocytes. These results demonstrate for the first time the presence of synthesis of urea from extracellular or intramitochondrially generated ammonia in enterocytes of post-weaning pigs. This hitherto unrecognized urea synthesis in these cells may be a first line of defence against the potential toxicity of ammonia produced by the extensive intestinal degradation of glutamine (a major fuel for enterocytes) and derived from diet and luminal micro-organisms. PMID:8554511

  8. Urea recycling from the renal pelvis in sheep: A study with ( sup 14 C)urea

    SciTech Connect

    Cirio, A.; Boivin, R. )

    1990-05-01

    To test the hypothesis that urea can be recycled from the renal pelvis, (14C)urea diluted in native urine (1 microCi/ml) was perfused (0.5 ml/min) into one of the pelvises of sheep fed either normal (NP) or low (LP)-protein diets. Blood samples were obtained from the ipsilateral renal vein and from the carotid artery throughout the perfusions. 14C activity determinations in urine and plasma demonstrated a flux of (14C)urea from the pelvis to renal vein blood (40,000 in NP and 130,000 disintegrations/min in LP sheep, P less than 0.01). The corresponding flux of native urea was only 1.5 times higher in NP than in LP sheep (6.8 +/- 1.1 vs. 4.7 +/- 2.9 mumol/min, not significant) despite their 8 times higher urinary concentration of urea. The fraction of filtered urea that was reabsorbed in the pelvis was larger in LP sheep (7.5 +/- 3.7 vs. 1.9 +/- 0.7% in NP sheep, P less than 0.05). A fraction of urea is thus actually recycled from the renal pelvis in sheep, and this pelvic retention is enhanced in LP animals. The importance of this phenomenon in the nitrogen economy is discussed.

  9. [Effects of urea and coated urea on harmful gases concentrations in plastic greenhouse].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xihong; Zeng, Qingru; Mao, Xiaoyun; Zhang, Litian; Liao, Bohan; Tie, Baiqing; Liao, Zongwen

    2006-09-01

    With simulation test and plastic greenhouse experiment, this paper studied the effects of urea and minerals- coated urea on the soil pH and harmful gases concentrations in plastic greenhouse. The results showed that under simulated condition, the application of these'two N fertilizers led to an initial increase of soil pH, which reached the maximum (an increment of > 50%) within the first week and dropped to the initial level by the end of the fifth week. In plastic greenhouse, applying urea and coated urea resulted in the increase of NH3, NO2 and O3 concentrations. The daily volatilization amount of NH3 and NO2 was higher in urea treatment than in coated urea treatment, and the highest value in urea treatment was 42.36 microg x m(-3) x d(-1) for NH3, 41.95 microg x m(-3) x d(-1) for NO2, and 86.00 microg x m(-3) x d(-1) for O3. The volatilization intensity of NH3 and NO2 was influenced by temperature and sunlight, while the O3 concentration was influenced by sunlight. PMID:17147165

  10. Role of thin descending limb urea transport in renal urea handling and the urine concentrating mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Tianluo; Zhou, Lei; Layton, Anita T.; Zhou, Hong; Zhao, Xuejian; Bankir, Lise

    2011-01-01

    Urea transporters UT-A2 and UT-B are expressed in epithelia of thin descending limb of Henle's loop and in descending vasa recta, respectively. To study their role and possible interaction in the context of the urine concentration mechanism, a UT-A2 and UT-B double knockout (UT-A2/B knockout) mouse model was generated by targeted deletion of the UT-A2 promoter in embryonic stem cells with UT-B gene knockout. The UT-A2/B knockout mice lacked detectable UT-A2 and UT-B transcripts and proteins and showed normal survival and growth. Daily urine output was significantly higher in UT-A2/B knockout mice than that in wild-type mice and lower than that in UT-B knockout mice. Urine osmolality in UT-A2/B knockout mice was intermediate between that in UT-B knockout and wild-type mice. The changes in urine osmolality and flow rate, plasma and urine urea concentration, as well as non-urea solute concentration after an acute urea load or chronic changes in protein intake suggested that UT-A2 plays a role in the progressive accumulation of urea in the inner medulla. These results suggest that in wild-type mice UT-A2 facilitates urea absorption by urea efflux from the thin descending limb of short loops of Henle. Moreover, UT-A2 deletion in UT-B knockout mice partially remedies the urine concentrating defect caused by UT-B deletion, by reducing urea loss from the descending limbs to the peripheral circulation; instead, urea is returned to the inner medulla through the loops of Henle and the collecting ducts. PMID:21849488

  11. Turbulent combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Talbot, L.; Cheng, R.K.

    1993-12-01

    Turbulent combustion is the dominant process in heat and power generating systems. Its most significant aspect is to enhance the burning rate and volumetric power density. Turbulent mixing, however, also influences the chemical rates and has a direct effect on the formation of pollutants, flame ignition and extinction. Therefore, research and development of modern combustion systems for power generation, waste incineration and material synthesis must rely on a fundamental understanding of the physical effect of turbulence on combustion to develop theoretical models that can be used as design tools. The overall objective of this program is to investigate, primarily experimentally, the interaction and coupling between turbulence and combustion. These processes are complex and are characterized by scalar and velocity fluctuations with time and length scales spanning several orders of magnitude. They are also influenced by the so-called {open_quotes}field{close_quotes} effects associated with the characteristics of the flow and burner geometries. The authors` approach is to gain a fundamental understanding by investigating idealized laboratory flames. Laboratory flames are amenable to detailed interrogation by laser diagnostics and their flow geometries are chosen to simplify numerical modeling and simulations and to facilitate comparison between experiments and theory.

  12. [Determination and stability studies of urea in urea creams by high-performance liquid chromatography].

    PubMed

    Yasuda, T; Akama, T; Ikawa, H

    1992-02-01

    A method was developed for determining urea in urea creams by high-performance liquid chromatography using strong acidic cation exchange gel. Elution was carried out with 0.05 M phosphate buffer (pH 3.4) at 40 degrees C, and detection was made with a UV-spectrometer at 200 nm. This method was used for studying and comparing the stability of urea creams produced by ourselves and by other manufactures. The assay showed that there were differences in the stability of the tested creams. PMID:1517978

  13. Generation of semicarbazide from natural azine development in foods, followed by reaction with urea compounds.

    PubMed

    Abernethy, Grant A

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a mechanism to explain the trace levels of natural semicarbazide occasionally observed in foods. The analytical derivative of semicarbazide, 2-nitrobenzaldehyde semicarbazone, is often measured as a metabolite marker to detect the widely banned antibiotic nitrofurazone. However, this marker is not specific as semicarbazide may be present in foods for several reasons other than exposure to nitrofurazone. In some cases, an entirely natural origin of semicarbazide is suspected, although up until now there was no explanation about how semicarbazide could occur naturally. In this work, semicarbazide is proposed as being generated from natural food compounds via an azine intermediate. Hydrazine, in the form of azines or hydrazones, may be generated in dilute aqueous solution from the natural food compounds ammonia, hydrogen peroxide and acetone, following known oxidation chemistry. When this mixture was prepared in the presence of ureas such as allantoin, urea, biuret or hydroxyurea, and then analysed by the standard method for the determination of semicarbazide, 2-nitrobenzaldehyde semicarbazone was detected. 2-Nitrobenzaldehyde aldazine was also found, and it may be a general marker for azines in foods. This proposal, that azine formation is central to semicarbazide development, provides a convergence of the published mechanisms for semicarbazide. The reaction starts with hydrogen peroxide, peracetic acid, atmospheric oxygen or hypochlorite; generates hydrazine either by an oxaziridine intermediate or via the chlorination of ammonia; and then either route may converge on azine formation, followed by reaction with a urea compound. Additionally, carbamate ion may speculatively generate semicarbazide by reaction with hydrazine, which might be a significant route in the case of the hypochlorite treatment of foods or food contact surfaces. Significantly, detection of 2-nitrobenzaldehyde semicarbazone may be somewhat artefactual because semicarbazide can form during the acid conditions of analysis, which can free hydrazine in the presence of urea compounds. PMID:26140456

  14. APPLICATION OF MILK UREA NITROGEN VALUES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Statistical analyses using both linear and multi-component regression and mixed effects models have been applied to a number of databases relating milk urea nitrogen (MUN) to factors important for N utilization in lactating dairy cows. Concentrations of MUN are highly correlated to BUN, which is a s...

  15. 21 CFR 184.1923 - Urea.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Urea. 184.1923 Section 184.1923 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) DIRECT FOOD SUBSTANCES AFFIRMED AS GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Listing of...

  16. 21 CFR 184.1923 - Urea.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Urea. 184.1923 Section 184.1923 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) DIRECT FOOD SUBSTANCES AFFIRMED AS GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Listing of...

  17. Aldehyde-containing urea-absorbing polysaccharides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, W. A.; Hsu, G. C.; Marsh, H. E., Jr. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A novel aldehyde containing polymer (ACP) is prepared by reaction of a polysaccharide with periodate to introduce aldehyde groups onto the C2 - C3 carbon atoms. By introduction of ether and ester groups onto the pendant primary hydroxyl solubility characteristics are modified. The ACP is utilized to absorb nitrogen bases such as urea in vitro or in vivo.

  18. Characterization of urease from Sporosarcina ureae.

    PubMed

    McCoy, D D; Cetin, A; Hausinger, R P

    1992-01-01

    Alkaline stable (pH 7.75-12.5) urease from Sporosarcina ureae was purified over 400-fold by ion exchange and hydrophobic interaction chromatography. The cytoplasmic enzyme was remarkably active with a specific activity of greater than 9300 mumol urea degraded min-1 mg protein-1 at pH 7.5, where it has optimal activity. Although S. ureae is closely related to Bacillus pasteurii, known to possess a homopolymeric urease containing 1 nickel per subunit [M(r) = 65000], the S. ureae enzyme is comprised of three subunits [apparent M(r) = 63,100 (alpha), 14,500 (beta), and 8500 (gamma)] in an estimated alpha beta gamma 2 stoichiometry and contains 2.1 +/- 0.6 nickel ions per alpha beta gamma 2 unit as measured by atomic absorption spectrometry. Stationary phase cultures sometimes possessed low levels of urease activity, but the specific activity of cell extracts of partially purified urease preparations from such cultures could be elevated by heat treatment, dilution, or dialysis to values comparable to those observed in samples from exponentially grown cells. PMID:1510567

  19. Continuous Crystallization of Urea-Water Mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hokamura, Taku; Ohkubo, Hidetoshi; Watanabe, Satoshi; Seki, Mitsuo; Murakoshi, Hiromichi

    Ice slurries have been used as environmentally-friendly secondary refrigerants. In addition to such ice slurries, aqueous solutions in slurry-state have also been put to practical use at temperatures below 0 oC. Urea-water mixture is a multi-component substance that has a eutectic point. If we can form a two-phase fluid substance by the liquid-solid phases at the eutectic point, it can be used as a fluid latent heat storage material, which will maintain the secondary refrigerant in a heat exchanger at constant temperature. In the present study, we propose a urea-water mixture as a novel functional thermal fluid that can be used as a fluid latent heat material. To demonstrate its feasibility, we first measured the latent heat and density of a urea-water mixture, and then used a counter-flow double tube heat exchanger to produce a liquid-solid two-phase flow of the urea-water mixture. This work demonstrates that it is possible to make a fluid latent heat storage material continuously from an aqueous solution at the eutectic point by flowing it through a double tube heat exchanger equipped with a stirrer.

  20. Urea retranslocation from senescing Arabidopsis leaves is promoted by DUR3-mediated urea retrieval from leaf apoplast.

    PubMed

    Bohner, Anne; Kojima, Soichi; Hajirezaei, Mohammad; Melzer, Michael; von Wirén, Nicolaus

    2015-02-01

    In plants, urea derives either from root uptake or protein degradation. Although large quantities of urea are released during senescence, urea is mainly seen as a short-lived nitrogen (N) catabolite serving urease-mediated hydrolysis to ammonium. Here, we investigated the roles of DUR3 and of urea in N remobilization. During natural leaf senescence urea concentrations and DUR3 transcript levels showed a parallel increase with senescence markers like ORE1 in a plant age- and leaf age-dependent manner. Deletion of DUR3 decreased urea accumulation in leaves, whereas the fraction of urea lost to the leaf apoplast was enhanced. Under natural and N deficiency-induced senescence DUR3 promoter activity was highest in the vasculature, but was also found in surrounding bundle sheath and mesophyll cells. An analysis of petiole exudates from wild-type leaves revealed that N from urea accounted for >13% of amino acid N. Urea export from senescent leaves further increased in ureG-2 deletion mutants lacking urease activity. In the dur3 ureG double insertion line the absence of DUR3 reduced urea export from leaf petioles. These results indicate that urea can serve as an early metabolic marker for leaf senescence, and that DUR3-mediated urea retrieval contributes to the retranslocation of N from urea during leaf senescence. PMID:25440717

  1. Urea retranslocation from senescing Arabidopsis leaves is promoted by DUR3-mediated urea retrieval from leaf apoplast

    PubMed Central

    Bohner, Anne; Kojima, Soichi; Hajirezaei, Mohammad; Melzer, Michael; von Wirén, Nicolaus

    2015-01-01

    In plants, urea derives either from root uptake or protein degradation. Although large quantities of urea are released during senescence, urea is mainly seen as a short-lived nitrogen (N) catabolite serving urease-mediated hydrolysis to ammonium. Here, we investigated the roles of DUR3 and of urea in N remobilization. During natural leaf senescence urea concentrations and DUR3 transcript levels showed a parallel increase with senescence markers like ORE1 in a plant age- and leaf age-dependent manner. Deletion of DUR3 decreased urea accumulation in leaves, whereas the fraction of urea lost to the leaf apoplast was enhanced. Under natural and N deficiency-induced senescence DUR3 promoter activity was highest in the vasculature, but was also found in surrounding bundle sheath and mesophyll cells. An analysis of petiole exudates from wild-type leaves revealed that N from urea accounted for >13% of amino acid N. Urea export from senescent leaves further increased in ureG-2 deletion mutants lacking urease activity. In the dur3 ureG double insertion line the absence of DUR3 reduced urea export from leaf petioles. These results indicate that urea can serve as an early metabolic marker for leaf senescence, and that DUR3-mediated urea retrieval contributes to the retranslocation of N from urea during leaf senescence. PMID:25440717

  2. Synthesis, thermal and spectral characterization of nanosized Ni(x)Mg(1-x)Al2O4 powders as new ceramic pigments via combustion route using 3-methylpyrozole-5-one as fuel.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Ibrahim S; Shama, Sayed A; Dessouki, Hassan A; Ali, Ayman A

    2011-10-15

    New Ni(x)Mg(1-x)Al(2)O(4) nanosized in different composition (0.1?x?0.8) powders have been synthesized successively for first time by using low temperature combustion reaction (LTCR) of corresponding metal chlorides, carbonates and nitrates as salts with 3-methylpyrozole-5-one (3MP5O) as fuel at 300C in open air furnace. Magnesium aluminate spinel (MgAl(2)O(4)) was used as crystalline host network for the synthesis of nickel-based nano ceramic pigments. The structure of prepared samples was characterized by using different techniques such as thermal analysis (TG-DTG/DTA), X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). UV/Visible and Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) using CIE-L*a*b* parameters methods have been used for color measurements. The obtained results reveal that Ni(x)Mg(1-x)Al(2)O(4) powder of samples is formed in the single crystalline and pure phase with average particle size of 6.35-33.11 nm in the temperature range 500-1200C. The density, particle size, shape and color are determined for all prepared samples with different calcination time and temperature. PMID:21783407

  3. 21 CFR 176.320 - Sodium nitrate-urea complex.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Sodium nitrate-urea complex. 176.320 Section 176... Substances for Use Only as Components of Paper and Paperboard § 176.320 Sodium nitrate-urea complex. Sodium... the provisions of this section. (a) Sodium nitrate-urea complex is a clathrate of approximately...

  4. 21 CFR 176.320 - Sodium nitrate-urea complex.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Sodium nitrate-urea complex. 176.320 Section 176... Paperboard § 176.320 Sodium nitrate-urea complex. Sodium nitrate-urea complex may be safely used as a..., packaging, transporting, or holding food, subject to the provisions of this section. (a) Sodium...

  5. 21 CFR 176.320 - Sodium nitrate-urea complex.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Sodium nitrate-urea complex. 176.320 Section 176... Substances for Use Only as Components of Paper and Paperboard § 176.320 Sodium nitrate-urea complex. Sodium... the provisions of this section. (a) Sodium nitrate-urea complex is a clathrate of approximately...

  6. 21 CFR 176.320 - Sodium nitrate-urea complex.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sodium nitrate-urea complex. 176.320 Section 176... Substances for Use Only as Components of Paper and Paperboard 176.320 Sodium nitrate-urea complex. Sodium nitrate-urea complex may be safely used as a component of articles intended for use in...

  7. 21 CFR 176.320 - Sodium nitrate-urea complex.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Sodium nitrate-urea complex. 176.320 Section 176... Substances for Use Only as Components of Paper and Paperboard 176.320 Sodium nitrate-urea complex. Sodium nitrate-urea complex may be safely used as a component of articles intended for use in...

  8. MICROWAVE-ASSISTED PREPARATION OF CYCLIC UREAS FROM DIAMINES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rajender S. Varma* and Yong-Jin Kim
    Cyclic ureas are useful intermediates for a variety of pharmaceuticals and pesticides. One of the attractive approaches for the synthesis of cyclic ureas uses condensation of diamines with urea as a carbonyl source under dynamic evacuation. ...

  9. Estimation of urea production rate with [(15)n(2)]urea and [(13)c]urea to measure catabolic rates in diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Freyse, E J; Knospe, S

    1997-07-01

    Abstract For verifying catabolic states in insulin-dependent patients and dogs the method estimating urea production rates with (13)C and with doubly (15)N labeled urea, respectively, has been established. For a fast steady state of urea tracer dilution, a prime of 600 times the continuous infusion rate had to be injected. Urea was isolated from plasma samples by protein precipitation and cation exchange chromatography with a consecutive derivatization of the dried urea fraction (trimethylsilyl derivatives). The masses of the fragment ions m/z 189 ((14)N(14)N), 190 ((14)N(15)N) and 191 ((15)N(15)N) urea are monitored to estimate the [(15)N(2)]urea frequency in the overall body urea pool in mol percent excess (MPE). 1 to 15 ng of derivatized urea were measured efficiently. An excellent correlation between expected standard and measured MPE (r = 0.9977) was achieved from solutions containing 1 to 7% [(15)N(2)]urea. The interassay coefficient of variation amounted to < 10% for a [(15)N(2)]urea portion of ? 3%. Normoglycemic diabetic patients who were treated with insulin overnight showed significantly higher urea production compared to healthy controls (9.22 2.07 vs. 5.4 0.32 ?molkg(-1) min(-1); p < 0.05). Measurements in chronic diabetic dogs proved an increased rate of amino acid catabolism (+ 20% urea production) in systemic versus portal application of insulin in paired studies. This increased nitrogen load in diabetics may accelerate progression of diabetic nephropathy. - Thus, the established stable isotope technique may serve as a sensitive and useful indicator of amino acid catabolism in clinical and experimental research. PMID:22087488

  10. Estimation of urea production rate with [15N2]urea and [13C]urea to measure catabolic rates in diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Freyse, E J; Knospe, S

    1998-01-01

    For verifying catabolic states in insulin-dependent patients and dogs the method estimating urea production rates with 13C and with doubly 15N labeled urea, respectively, has been established. For a fast steady state of urea tracer dilution, a prime of 600 times the continuous infusion rate had to be injected. Urea was isolated from plasma samples by protein precipitation and cation exchange chromatography with a consecutive derivatization of the dried urea fraction (trimethylsilyl derivatives). The masses of the fragment ions m/z 189 (14N14N), 190 (14N15N) and 191 (15N15N) urea are monitored to estimate the [15N2] urea frequency in the overall body urea pool in mol percent excess (MPE). 1 to 15 ng of derivatized urea were measured efficiently. An excellent correlation between expected standard and measured MPE (r = 0.9977) was achieved from solutions containing 1 to 7% [15N2]urea. The interassay coefficient of variation amounted to < 10% for a [15N2]urea portion of > or = 3%. Normoglycemic diabetic patients who were treated with insulin overnight showed significantly higher urea production compared to healthy controls (9.22 +/- 2.07 vs. 5.4 +/- 0.32 mumol.kg-1.min-1; p < 0.05). Measurements in chronic diabetic dogs proved an increased rate of amino acid catabolism (+20% urea production) in systemic versus portal application of insulin in paired studies. This increased nitrogen load in diabetics may accelerate progression of diabetic nephropathy. Thus, the established stable isotope technique may serve as a sensitive and useful indicator of amino acid catabolism in clinical and experimental research. PMID:9854845

  11. Regenerative combustion device

    DOEpatents

    West, Phillip B.

    2004-03-16

    A regenerative combustion device having a combustion zone, and chemicals contained within the combustion zone, such as water, having a first equilibrium state, and a second combustible state. Means for transforming the chemicals from the first equilibrium state to the second combustible state, such as electrodes, are disposed within the chemicals. An igniter, such as a spark plug or similar device, is disposed within the combustion zone for igniting combustion of the chemicals in the second combustible state. The combustion products are contained within the combustion zone, and the chemicals are selected such that the combustion products naturally chemically revert into the chemicals in the first equilibrium state following combustion. The combustion device may thus be repeatedly reused, requiring only a brief wait after each ignition to allow the regeneration of combustible gasses within the head space.

  12. Advanced Combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, Gordon R.

    2013-03-11

    The activity reported in this presentation is to provide the mechanical and physical property information needed to allow rational design, development and/or choice of alloys, manufacturing approaches, and environmental exposure and component life models to enable oxy-fuel combustion boilers to operate at Ultra-Supercritical (up to 650{degrees}C & between 22-30 MPa) and/or Advanced Ultra-Supercritical conditions (760{degrees}C & 35 MPa).

  13. Solution combustion synthesis of strontium aluminate, SrAl2O4, powders: single-fuel versus fuel-mixture approach.

    PubMed

    Ianoş, Robert; Istratie, Roxana; Păcurariu, Cornelia; Lazău, Radu

    2015-12-23

    The solution combustion synthesis of strontium aluminate, SrAl2O4, via the classic single-fuel approach and the modern fuel-mixture approach was investigated in relation to the synthesis conditions, powder properties and thermodynamic aspects. The single-fuel approach (urea or glycine) did not yield SrAl2O4 directly from the combustion reaction. The absence of SrAl2O4 was explained by the low amount of energy released during the combustion process, in spite of the highly negative values of the standard enthalpy of reaction and standard Gibbs free energy. In the case of single-fuel recipes, the maximum combustion temperatures measured by thermal imaging (482 °C - urea, 941 °C - glycine) were much lower than the calculated adiabatic temperatures (1864 °C - urea, 2147 °C - glycine). The fuel-mixture approach (urea and glycine) clearly represented a better option, since (α,β)-SrAl2O4 resulted directly from the combustion reaction. The maximum combustion temperature measured in the case of a urea and glycine fuel mixture was the highest one (1559 °C), which was relatively close to the calculated adiabatic temperature (1930 °C). The addition of a small amount of flux, such as H3BO3, enabled the formation of pure α-SrAl2O4 directly from the combustion reaction. PMID:26661942

  14. 3. VIEW WEST, ROUTE 130 SOUTH FROM ROUTE 30 EAST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. VIEW WEST, ROUTE 130 SOUTH FROM ROUTE 30 EAST ISLAND - White Horse Pike Rond Point, Intersection of Crescent Boulevard (U.S. Route 130), White Horse Pike (U.S. Route 30), & Clay Avenue, Collingswood, Camden County, NJ

  15. 12. VIEW EAST, ROUTE 30 EAST FROM ROUTE 130 SOUTH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. VIEW EAST, ROUTE 30 EAST FROM ROUTE 130 SOUTH ISLAND - White Horse Pike Rond Point, Intersection of Crescent Boulevard (U.S. Route 130), White Horse Pike (U.S. Route 30), & Clay Avenue, Collingswood, Camden County, NJ

  16. 4. VIEW SOUTH, ROUTE 30 EAST FROM ROUTE 130 NORTH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. VIEW SOUTH, ROUTE 30 EAST FROM ROUTE 130 NORTH ISLAND - White Horse Pike Rond Point, Intersection of Crescent Boulevard (U.S. Route 130), White Horse Pike (U.S. Route 30), & Clay Avenue, Collingswood, Camden County, NJ

  17. 2. VIEW SOUTHEAST, ROUTE 30 EAST FROM ROUTE 30 EAST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. VIEW SOUTHEAST, ROUTE 30 EAST FROM ROUTE 30 EAST ISLAND - White Horse Pike Rond Point, Intersection of Crescent Boulevard (U.S. Route 130), White Horse Pike (U.S. Route 30), & Clay Avenue, Collingswood, Camden County, NJ

  18. 1. VIEW NORTH, ROUTE 130 NORTH FROM ROUTE 30 EAST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. VIEW NORTH, ROUTE 130 NORTH FROM ROUTE 30 EAST ISLAND - White Horse Pike Rond Point, Intersection of Crescent Boulevard (U.S. Route 130), White Horse Pike (U.S. Route 30), & Clay Avenue, Collingswood, Camden County, NJ

  19. 13. VIEW SOUTH, ROUTE 130 SOUTH FROM ROUTE 130 SOUTH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. VIEW SOUTH, ROUTE 130 SOUTH FROM ROUTE 130 SOUTH ISLAND - White Horse Pike Rond Point, Intersection of Crescent Boulevard (U.S. Route 130), White Horse Pike (U.S. Route 30), & Clay Avenue, Collingswood, Camden County, NJ

  20. State alternative route designations

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-07-01

    Pursuant to the Hazardous Materials Transportation Act (HMTA), the Department of Transportation (DOT) has promulgated a comprehensive set of regulations regarding the highway transportation of high-level radioactive materials. These regulations, under HM-164 and HM-164A, establish interstate highways as the preferred routes for the transportation of radioactive materials within and through the states. The regulations also provide a methodology by which a state may select alternative routes. First,the state must establish a state routing agency,'' defined as an entity authorized to use the state legal process to impose routing requirements on carriers of radioactive material (49 CFR 171.8). Once identified, the state routing agency must select routes in accordance with Large Quantity Shipments of Radioactive Materials or an equivalent routing analysis. Adjoining states and localities should be consulted on the impact of proposed alternative routes as a prerequisite of final route selection. Lastly, the states must provide written notice of DOT of any alternative route designation before the routes are deemed effective.

  1. State alternative route designations

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-07-01

    Pursuant to the Hazardous Materials Transportation Act (HMTA), the Department of Transportation (DOT) has promulgated a comprehensive set of regulations regarding the highway transportation of high-level radioactive materials. These regulations, under HM-164 and HM-164A, establish interstate highways as the preferred routes for the transportation of radioactive materials within and through the states. The regulations also provide a methodology by which a state may select alternative routes. First,the state must establish a ``state routing agency,`` defined as an entity authorized to use the state legal process to impose routing requirements on carriers of radioactive material (49 CFR 171.8). Once identified, the state routing agency must select routes in accordance with Large Quantity Shipments of Radioactive Materials or an equivalent routing analysis. Adjoining states and localities should be consulted on the impact of proposed alternative routes as a prerequisite of final route selection. Lastly, the states must provide written notice of DOT of any alternative route designation before the routes are deemed effective.

  2. Defining Dynamic Route Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zelinski, Shannon; Jastrzebski, Michael

    2011-01-01

    This poster describes a method for defining route structure from flight tracks. Dynamically generated route structures could be useful in guiding dynamic airspace configuration and helping controllers retain situational awareness under dynamically changing traffic conditions. Individual merge and diverge intersections between pairs of flights are identified, clustered, and grouped into nodes of a route structure network. Links are placed between nodes to represent major traffic flows. A parametric analysis determined the algorithm input parameters producing route structures of current day flight plans that are closest to todays airway structure. These parameters are then used to define and analyze the dynamic route structure over the course of a day for current day flight paths. Route structures are also compared between current day flight paths and more user preferred paths such as great circle and weather avoidance routing.

  3. Osmoregulation in Drosophila melanogaster selected for urea tolerance.

    PubMed

    Pierce, V A; Mueller, L D; Gibbs, A G

    1999-09-01

    Animals may adapt to hyperosmolar environments by either osmoregulating or osmoconforming. Osmoconforming animals generally accumulate organic osmolytes including sugars, amino acids or, in a few cases, urea. In the latter case, they also accumulate 'urea-counteracting' solutes to mitigate the toxic effects of urea. We examined the osmoregulatory adaptation of Drosophila melanogaster larvae selected to live in 300 mmol l(-)(1) urea. Larvae are strong osmoregulators in environments with high NaCl or sucrose levels, but have increased hemolymph osmolarity on urea food. The increase in osmolarity on urea food is smaller in the selected larvae relative to unselected control larvae, and their respective hemolymph urea concentrations can account for the observed increases in total osmolarity. No other hemolymph components appear to act as urea-counteractants. Urea is calculated to be in equilibrium across body compartments in both selected and control larvae, indicating that the selected larvae are not sequestering it to lower their hemolymph osmolarity. The major physiological adaptation to urea does not appear to involve increased tolerance or improved osmoregulation per se, but rather mechanisms (e.g. metabolism, decreased uptake or increased excretion) that reduce overall urea levels and the consequent toxicity. PMID:10441086

  4. Atomic scale insights into urea-peptide interactions in solution.

    PubMed

    Steinke, Nicola; Gillams, Richard J; Pardo, Luis Carlos; Lorenz, Christian D; McLain, Sylvia E

    2016-01-27

    The mechanism by which proteins are denatured by urea is still not well understood, especially on the atomic scale where these interactions occur in vivo. In this study, the structure of the peptide GPG has been investigated in aqueous urea solutions in order to understand the combination of roles that both urea and water play in protein unfolding. Using a combination of neutron diffraction enhanced by isotopic substitution and computer simulations, it was found, in opposition with previous simulations studies, that urea is preferred over water around polar and charged portions of the peptides. Further, it appears that while urea directly replaces water around the nitrogen groups on GPG that urea and water occupy different positions around the peptide bond carbonyl groups. This suggests that urea may in fact weaken the peptide bond, disrupting the peptide backbone, thus ultimately causing denaturation. PMID:26764567

  5. Renal urea transporters. Direct and indirect regulation by vasopressin.

    PubMed

    Bankir, L T; Trinh-Trang-Tan, M M

    2000-03-01

    Urea is the most abundant urinary solute and is excreted in urine at a much higher concentration than in other body fluids. Urea concentration is achieved in the kidney through complex urea movements between blood vessels and renal tubules, which involve facilitated urea transport. Three major urea transporters expressed in the kidney have been cloned, UT-A1, UT-A2 and UT-B1, the first two derived from the same gene by differential transcription. These membrane proteins enable facilitated diffusion of urea through specific parts of the nephron (UT-A) and through renal vasculature (UT-B) in the medulla. UT-A1 is localised in the terminal part of the inner medullary collecting ducts and accounts for the vasopressin-dependent increase in urea permeability of this segment. UT-A2 is found in the descending thin limbs of Henle's loops. UT-B1 is expressed in the endothelium of the descending vasa recta supplying blood to the renal medulla, and in red cells. All three urea transporters are primarily involved in the process of intrarenal urea recycling, which enables the establishment, and prevents the dissipation, of a high concentration of urea in the inner medulla. This is an essential feature for producing a concentrated urine and thus for water economy in mammals. Vasopressin, upon binding to V2 receptors in the inner medullary collecting ducts, increases urea permeability through activation of UT-A1 molecules, thus enabling urea to diffuse into the inner medullary interstitium. Urea then taken up in ascending vasa recta is returned to the inner medulla via UT-A2 and UT-B1 by countercurrent exchange. These latter two urea transporters are not influenced acutely by vasopressin, but UT-A2 expression is markedly increased in the descending thin limbs of the loops of Henle after sustained exposure to vasopressin or its V2 agonist dDAVP. This effect is indirect because vasopressin receptors are lacking in the descending limbs. The acute direct and delayed indirect actions of vasopressin on renal urea transporters will increase medullary urea accumulation and thus the ability of the kidney to conserve water. Atrial natriuretic peptide inhibits the vasopressin-dependent increase in urea permeability in the inner medullary collecting ducts. The interruption of urea recycling probably contributes to the natriuresis. Impairing in this way the capacity of the kidney to concentrate urea enhances its capacity to concentrate sodium in the urine. PMID:10795928

  6. Combustibility of titanium powders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Popov, Ye. I.; Poyarkov, V. G.; Finayev, Yu. A.

    1989-01-01

    The combustion of compact samples was studied; the mechanism of autoignition is defined. Several studies are made of the combustibility of titanium using 50 samples. The data provide a clear idea of the combustibility of titanium powders.

  7. Synthesis of functional materials in combustion reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuravlev, V. D.; Bamburov, V. G.; Ermakova, L. V.; Lobachevskaya, N. I.

    2015-12-01

    The conditions for obtaining oxide compounds in combustion reactions of nitrates of metals with organic chelating-reducing agents such as amino acids, urea, and polyvinyl alcohol are reviewed. Changing the nature of internal fuels and the reducing agent-to-oxidizing agent ratio makes possible to modify the thermal regime of the process, fractal dimensionality, morphology, and dispersion of synthesized functional materials. This method can be used to synthesize simple and complex oxides, composites, and metal powders, as well as ceramics and coatings. The possibilities of synthesis in combustion reactions are illustrated by examples of αand γ-Al2O3, YSZ composites, uranium oxides, nickel powder, NiO and NiO: YSZ composite, TiO2, and manganites, cobaltites, and aluminates of rare earth elements.

  8. The effect of urea:nitrate ratio on the structure and luminescence properties of YVO4:Dy3+ phosphors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foka, K. E.; Dejene, B. F.; Swart, H. C.

    2016-01-01

    YVO4:Dy3+ phosphor has been successfully synthesised using combustion method. The dependence of the properties of YVO4:Dy3+ phosphor upon urea:nitrate concentration was investigated. The single tetragonal phase was observed by x-ray diffraction spectra. A highly crystalline YVO4:Dy3+ sample was obtained when increasing the ratio of the urea to 2. The estimated crystalline sizes from the Scherrer's formula were found to be 20, 38, 33, 30, and 27 nm for the sample prepared with the ratio of 1, 2, 2.5, 3 and 4, respectively. The formation of agglomerated particles was observed by Scanning electron microscope images and it was observed that when increasing the concentration of urea further, flake-like particles formed. The diffuse reflectance spectra of YVO4:Dy3+ with various ratios of urea indicated that the determined optical band gap was ranging from 3.3 to 2.3 eV. Luminescence properties of YVO4:Dy3+ showed that the phosphor emit yellow colour at 573 nm and blue colour at 482 nm corresponding to 4F9/2→6H13/2 and 4F9/2→6H15/2 transitions, respectively. A very weak band at 663 nm which correspond to the 4F9/2→6H11/2 transition was also observed. It was found that the Photoluminescent emission intensity increased with an increase in the ratio of urea and reached a maximum at 2 then decreased when increasing the ratio of urea further.

  9. Visualizing Internet routing changes.

    PubMed

    Lad, Mohit; Massey, Dan; Zhang, Lixia

    2006-01-01

    Today's Internet provides a global data delivery service to millions of end users and routing protocols play a critical role in this service. It is important to be able to identify and diagnose any problems occurring in Internet routing. However, the Internet's sheer size makes this task difficult. One cannot easily extract out the most important or relevant routing information from the large amounts of data collected from multiple routers. To tackle this problem, we have developed Link-Rank, a tool to visualize Internet routing changes at the global scale. Link-Rank weighs links in a topological graph by the number of routes carried over each link and visually captures changes in link weights in the form of a topological graph with adjustable size. Using Link-Rank, network operators can easily observe important routing changes from massive amounts of routing data, discover otherwise unnoticed routing problems, understand the impact of topological events, and infer root causes of observed routing changes. PMID:17073368

  10. Contact Graph Routing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burleigh, Scott C.

    2011-01-01

    Contact Graph Routing (CGR) is a dynamic routing system that computes routes through a time-varying topology of scheduled communication contacts in a network based on the DTN (Delay-Tolerant Networking) architecture. It is designed to enable dynamic selection of data transmission routes in a space network based on DTN. This dynamic responsiveness in route computation should be significantly more effective and less expensive than static routing, increasing total data return while at the same time reducing mission operations cost and risk. The basic strategy of CGR is to take advantage of the fact that, since flight mission communication operations are planned in detail, the communication routes between any pair of bundle agents in a population of nodes that have all been informed of one another's plans can be inferred from those plans rather than discovered via dialogue (which is impractical over long one-way-light-time space links). Messages that convey this planning information are used to construct contact graphs (time-varying models of network connectivity) from which CGR automatically computes efficient routes for bundles. Automatic route selection increases the flexibility and resilience of the space network, simplifying cross-support and reducing mission management costs. Note that there are no routing tables in Contact Graph Routing. The best route for a bundle destined for a given node may routinely be different from the best route for a different bundle destined for the same node, depending on bundle priority, bundle expiration time, and changes in the current lengths of transmission queues for neighboring nodes; routes must be computed individually for each bundle, from the Bundle Protocol agent's current network connectivity model for the bundle s destination node (the contact graph). Clearly this places a premium on optimizing the implementation of the route computation algorithm. The scalability of CGR to very large networks remains a research topic. The information carried by CGR contact plan messages is useful not only for dynamic route computation, but also for the implementation of rate control, congestion forecasting, transmission episode initiation and termination, timeout interval computation, and retransmission timer suspension and resumption.

  11. Combustion chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, N.J.

    1993-12-01

    This research is concerned with the development and use of sensitivity analysis tools to probe the response of dependent variables to model input variables. Sensitivity analysis is important at all levels of combustion modeling. This group`s research continues to be focused on elucidating the interrelationship between features in the underlying potential energy surface (obtained from ab initio quantum chemistry calculations) and their responses in the quantum dynamics, e.g., reactive transition probabilities, cross sections, and thermal rate coefficients. The goals of this research are: (i) to provide feedback information to quantum chemists in their potential surface refinement efforts, and (ii) to gain a better understanding of how various regions in the potential influence the dynamics. These investigations are carried out with the methodology of quantum functional sensitivity analysis (QFSA).

  12. Gaseous emissions from waste combustion.

    PubMed

    Werther, Joachim

    2007-06-18

    An overview is given on methods and technologies for limiting the gaseous emissions from waste combustion. With the guideline 2000/76/EC recent European legislation has set stringent limits not only for the mono-combustion of waste in specialized incineration plants but also for co-combustion in coal-fired power plants. With increased awareness of environmental issues and stepwise decrease of emission limits and inclusion of more and more substances into the network of regulations a multitude of emission abatement methods and technologies have been developed over the last decades. The result is the state-of-the-art waste incinerator with a number of specialized process steps for the individual components in the flue gas. The present work highlights some new developments which can be summarized under the common goal of reducing the costs of flue gas treatment by applying systems which combine the treatment of several noxious substances in one reactor or by taking new, simpler routes instead of the previously used complicated ones or - in the case of flue gas desulphurisation - by reducing the amount of limestone consumption. Cost reduction is also the driving force for new processes of conditioning of nonhomogenous waste before combustion. Pyrolysis or gasification is used for chemical conditioning whereas physical conditioning means comminution, classification and sorting processes. Conditioning yields a fuel which can be used in power plants either as a co-fuel or a mono-fuel and which will burn there under much better controlled conditions and therefore with less emissions than the nonhomogeneous waste in a conventional waste incinerator. Also for cost reasons, co-combustion of wastes in coal-fired power stations is strongly pressing into the market. Recent investigations reveal that the co-firing of waste can also have beneficial effects on the operating behavior of the boiler and on the gaseous emissions. PMID:17339077

  13. Functional Nanomaterials from Bis-urea Macrocycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawn, Sandipan

    Self-assembly of bis-urea macrocycles usually give tubular crystals with nano-sized channels that we use as molecular container. These molecular containers alter the reactivity, stability, and chemical behavior of the reactants entrapped within them. This dissertation is focused on bulk synthesis, material characterization and applications of a self-assembled tubular molecular container. This crystalline straw-like container is developed from cyclic bis-urea macrocycles containing two C-shaped phenylethynylene units and two urea groups. These macrocycles afford a large open channel with a diameter of 9 A and it can accommodate larger solid guests such as coumarin and its methylated derivatives, stilbenes, acenaphthylene and styrenes. We developed the method to introduce these solid guests into the channel from its solution. We characterized the tubular host as well as different host*guest complexes by solid-state techniques including PXRD, CP MAS 13C NMR, fluorescence and UV-vis spectroscopy. These guests usually undergo non selective photoreaction in solid-state with very low percent conversion and produce different photodimers and/or isomers. Within our molecular container, a number of guests showed photo-dimerization with amazing selectivity and enhanced conversion in the solid-state. We also performed molecular modeling studies to find out the reason behind this unprecedented selectivity. We found the orientation of the guest molecules inside the channel as well as the stability of the photoproducts within the confinement determines the outcome of the reactions. We also developed a 5,5'-bipyridine containing bis-urea macrocycle and formed its complexes with metals. These complexes have potential to further assemble through dative bonds, hydrogen bonding and aryl stacking interactions to afford metal organic framework (MOF). We found the Ag complex forms oligomers and polymers. In the polymer structure it forms infinite chains comprised of "box" like unit cell. In one unit cell, two silver atoms are 3.13 A apart suggesting a very interesting Ag-Ag bond interaction. We probed the Ag-Ag interaction by solid-state spectroscopic techniques as well as ESI-MS and Raman spectroscopy. The results indicate that there is indeed an interaction between the two silver atoms and their proximity is not merely a packing artifact.

  14. Urea formaldehyde foam: a dangerous insulation

    SciTech Connect

    Keough, C.

    1980-12-01

    Insulating a home with urea formaldehyde foam can lead to severe health problems due to poisoning from formaldehyde gas. Respiratory problems, allergies, memory loss, and mental problems can result from exposure to foam insulation fumes. Research is now under way at the Chemical Industry Inst., Univ. of Washington, and other institutions to learn more about the health effects of formaldehyde foam and to develop possible remedies to these problems. Several states are either banning or controlling the use of this type of home insulation.

  15. Genetic counseling issues in urea cycle disorders.

    PubMed

    Sniderman King, Lisa; Singh, Rani H; Rhead, William J; Smith, Wendy; Lee, Brendan; Summar, Marshall L

    2005-10-01

    The goal of counseling families that have a urea cycle disorder (UCD) is to facilitate the process of scientific understanding, emotional acceptance, and decision-making in a nondirective way. A proper understanding of the genes involved, inheritance patterns, available testing, and complicating factors is critical to serving the families' needs. This article summarizes the needed information, in particular describing the complexities of prenatal testing and counseling issues for each UCD. Included case histories illustrate the genetic counseling process and the decision-making scenarios for two families. PMID:16227114

  16. Urea kinetics of a carnivore, Felis silvestris catus.

    PubMed

    Russell, K; Lobley, G E; Rawlings, J; Millward, D J; Harper, E J

    2000-11-01

    The effect of two levels of dietary protein energy, moderate (20%; MP) and high (70%; HP), on urea kinetics in eleven domestic cats was studied. After a 3-week prefeed, a single dose of [(15)N(15)N]urea was administered, and urine and faeces collected over the subsequent 5 d. For each 24 h period, total urea and enrichment of [(15)N(15)N]- and [(15)N(14)N]urea in urine were determined, and a model applied to calculate urea production, entry into the gastrointestinal tract, recycling to urine or faeces and, by difference, retention by the body and potentially available for anabolism. Urea production and excretion increased with dietary protein level Most of the urea produced was excreted, with only a small proportion entering the gut, and with the pattern of urea disposal not significantly different between the HP and MP diets. Thus, the percentages of urea production available to the gut were 15% (MP) and 12% (HP), of which 57% (MP) and 59% (HP) was recycled in the ornithine cycle, 40% (MP and HP) was potentially available for anabolism and the rest lost as faecal N. As a percentage of urea produced the amount potentially available for anabolism was very low at 6.41% (MP diet) and 4.79% (HP diet). In absolute terms urea entering the gut, being recycled in the ornithine cycle and potentially available for anabolism was significantly higher on the HP diet These results show that cats operate urea turnover, but at a lower rate, and with less nutritional sensitivity than has been reported for other species. PMID:11177172

  17. The SLC14 gene family of urea transporters.

    PubMed

    Shayakul, Chairat; Hediger, Matthias A

    2004-02-01

    Carrier-mediated urea transport allows rapid urea movement across the cell membrane, which is particularly important in the process of urinary concentration and for rapid urea equilibrium in non-renal tissues. Urea transporters mediate passive urea uptake that is inhibited by phloretin and urea analogues. Facilitated urea transporters are divided into two classes: (1) the renal tubular/testicular type of urea transporter, UT-A1 to -A5, encoded by alternative splicing of the SLC14A2 gene, and (2) the erythrocyte urea transporter UT-B1 encoded by the SLC14A1 gene. The primary structure of urea transporters is unique, consisting of two extended, hydrophobic, membrane-spanning domains and an extracellular glycosylated-connecting loop. UT-A1 is the result of a gene duplication of this two-halves-structure, and the duplicated portions are linked together by a large intracellular hydrophilic loop, carrying several putative protein kinase A (PKA) and -C (PKC) phosphorylation sites. UT-A1 is located in the apical membrane of the kidney inner medullary collecting duct cells, where it is stimulated acutely by cAMP-mediated phosphorylation in response to the antidiuretic hormone vasopressin. Vasopressin also up-regulates UT-A2 mRNA/protein expression in the descending thin limb of the loops of Henle. UT-A1 and UT-A2 are regulated independently and respond differently to changes in dietary protein content. UT-A3 and UT-A4 are located in the rat kidney medulla and UT-A5 in the mouse testis. The widely expressed UT-B participates in urea recycling in the descending vasa recta, as demonstrated by a relatively mild "urea-selective" urinary concentrating defect in transgenic UT-B null mice and individuals with the Jk(null) blood group. PMID:12856182

  18. ROUTE-SPECIFIC DOSIMETRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The capacity to perform route-to-route extrapolation of toxicity data is becoming increasingly crucial to the Agency, with a number of strategies suggested and demonstrated. One strategy involves using a combination of existing data and modeling approaches. This strategy propos...

  19. Rotary internal combustion engine

    SciTech Connect

    Le, L.K.

    1990-11-20

    This patent describes an internal combustion engine comprising; a rotary compressor mechanism; a rotary expander mechanism; and combustion chamber means disposed between the compressor mechanism and the expander mechanism, whereby compressed air is delivered to the combustion chamber through the compressor discharge port, and pressurized gas is delivered from the combustion chamber into the expander mechanism through the pressurized gas intake port.

  20. Combustion. Second edition

    SciTech Connect

    Glassman, I.

    1986-01-01

    This book describes the fundamental physical and chemical phenomena underlying the basic aspects of combustion. Major topics include: hydrocarbon oxidation processes; diffusion flames and surface combustion; premixed laminar and turbulent flame phenomena; environmental combustion considerations-NO/sub x/, SO/sub x/, and soot; and combustion thermodynamics and kinetics.

  1. Coal combustion science

    SciTech Connect

    Hardesty, D.R.; Baxter, L.L.; Fletcher, T.H.; Mitchell, R.E.

    1990-11-01

    The objective of this activity is to support the Office of Fossil Energy in executing research on coal combustion science. This activity consists of basic research on coal combustion that supports both the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) Direct Utilization Advanced Research and Technology Development Program, and the International Energy Agency (IEA) Coal Combustion Science Project. Specific tasks include: coal devolatilization, coal char combustion, and fate of mineral matter during coal combustion. 91 refs., 40 figs., 9 tabs.

  2. Combustion Fundamentals Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Increased emphasis is placed on fundamental and generic research at Lewis Research Center with less systems development efforts. This is especially true in combustion research, where the study of combustion fundamentals has grown significantly in order to better address the perceived long term technical needs of the aerospace industry. The main thrusts for this combustion fundamentals program area are as follows: analytical models of combustion processes, model verification experiments, fundamental combustion experiments, and advanced numeric techniques.

  3. Understanding individual routing behaviour.

    PubMed

    Lima, Antonio; Stanojevic, Rade; Papagiannaki, Dina; Rodriguez, Pablo; González, Marta C

    2016-03-01

    Knowing how individuals move between places is fundamental to advance our understanding of human mobility (González et al. 2008 Nature 453, 779-782. (doi:10.1038/nature06958)), improve our urban infrastructure (Prato 2009 J. Choice Model. 2, 65-100. (doi:10.1016/S1755-5345(13)70005-8)) and drive the development of transportation systems. Current route-choice models that are used in transportation planning are based on the widely accepted assumption that people follow the minimum cost path (Wardrop 1952 Proc. Inst. Civ. Eng. 1, 325-362. (doi:10.1680/ipeds.1952.11362)), despite little empirical support. Fine-grained location traces collected by smart devices give us today an unprecedented opportunity to learn how citizens organize their travel plans into a set of routes, and how similar behaviour patterns emerge among distinct individual choices. Here we study 92 419 anonymized GPS trajectories describing the movement of personal cars over an 18-month period. We group user trips by origin-destination and we find that most drivers use a small number of routes for their routine journeys, and tend to have a preferred route for frequent trips. In contrast to the cost minimization assumption, we also find that a significant fraction of drivers' routes are not optimal. We present a spatial probability distribution that bounds the route selection space within an ellipse, having the origin and the destination as focal points, characterized by high eccentricity independent of the scale. While individual routing choices are not captured by path optimization, their spatial bounds are similar, even for trips performed by distinct individuals and at various scales. These basic discoveries can inform realistic route-choice models that are not based on optimization, having an impact on several applications, such as infrastructure planning, routing recommendation systems and new mobility solutions. PMID:26962031

  4. Routing Vehicles with Ants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Wen Fang; Lee, Lai Soon; Majid, Zanariah Abdul; Seow, Hsin Vonn

    Routing vehicles involve the design of an optimal set of routes for a fleet of vehicles to serve a number of customers with known demands. This research develops an Ant Colony Optimization for the vehicle routing with one central depot and identical vehicles. The procedure simulates the behavior of real ants that always find the shortest path between their nest and a food source through a form of communication, pheromone trail. Finally, preliminary results on the learning of the algorithm testing on benchmark data set will be presented in this paper.

  5. Ammonia and urea excretion in the tidepool sculpin (Oligocottus maculosus): sites of excretion, effects of reduced salinity and mechanisms of urea transport.

    PubMed

    Wright, P A; Part, P; Wood, C M

    1995-04-01

    Tidepool sculpins live in a variable environment where water temperature, salinity, gas tensions, and pH can change considerably with the daily tide cycle. Tidepool sculpins are primarily ammoniotelic, with 8-17% of nitrogen wastes excreted as urea. The majority of net ammonia (J(net) amm; 85%) and urea (J(net) urea; 74%) excretion occurred across the gill, with the remainder excreted across the skin, the kidney, and/or gut. Acute (2h) exposure to 50% seawater significantly increased J(net) urea (2.8-fold), but reduced J(net) amm (3.5-fold). In fish exposed to 50% seawater for 1 week, J(net) urea returned to control values, but J(net) amm remained slightly depressed. Unidirectional urea influx (J(in) urea) and efflux (J(out) urea) were measured using(14)C-urea to determine if urea was excreted across the gills by simple diffusion or by a carrier-mediated mechanism. J(in) urea increased in a linear manner with increasing urea water levels (0-11 mmol N l(-1)), while J(out) urea was independent of external urea concentrations. As well, J(net) urea and J(out inurea) were not significantly different from one another, indicating the absence of "back transport". Urea analogs and transport inhibitors added to the water did not have any consistent effect on unidirectional urea flux. These results demonstrate that ammonia and urea excretion rates and sites of excretion in tidepool sculpins are very similar to those found in other marine and freshwater teleosts. Urea and ammonia may play a role in osmoregulation as excretion rates and tissue levels were influenced by changes in water salinity. Finally, we found no evidence for a specific urea carrier; branchial urea excretion is likely dependent on simple diffusion. PMID:24197359

  6. Combustion 2000

    SciTech Connect

    2000-06-30

    This report presents work carried out under contract DE-AC22-95PC95144 ''Combustion 2000 - Phase II.'' The goals of the program are to develop a coal-fired high performance power generation system (HIPPS) that is capable of: {lg_bullet} thermal efficiency (HHV) {ge} 47% {lg_bullet} NOx, SOx, and particulates {le} 10% NSPS (New Source Performance Standard) {lg_bullet} coal providing {ge} 65% of heat input {lg_bullet} all solid wastes benign {lg_bullet} cost of electricity {le} 90% of present plants Phase I, which began in 1992, focused on the analysis of various configurations of indirectly fired cycles and on technical assessments of alternative plant subsystems and components, including performance requirements, developmental status, design options, complexity and reliability, and capital and operating costs. Phase I also included preliminary R&D and the preparation of designs for HIPPS commercial plants approximately 300 MWe in size. Phase II, had as its initial objective the development of a complete design base for the construction and operation of a HIPPS prototype plant to be constructed in Phase III. As part of a descoping initiative, the Phase III program has been eliminated and work related to the commercial plant design has been ended. The rescoped program retained a program of engineering research and development focusing on high temperature heat exchangers, e.g. HITAF development (Task 2); a rescoped Task 6 that is pertinent to Vision 21 objectives and focuses on advanced cycle analysis and optimization, integration of gas turbines into complex cycles, and repowering designs; and preparation of the Phase II Technical Report (Task 8). This rescoped program deleted all subsystem testing (Tasks 3, 4, and 5) and the development of a site specific engineering design and test plan for the HIPPS prototype plant (Task 7). Work reported herein is from: {lg_bullet} Task 2.2.4 Pilot Scale Testing {lg_bullet} Task 2.2.5.2 Laboratory and Bench Scale Activities

  7. Combustion 2000

    SciTech Connect

    A. Levasseur; S. Goodstine; J. Ruby; M. Nawaz; C. Senior; F. Robson; S. Lehman; W. Blecher; W. Fugard; A. Rao; A. Sarofim; P. Smith; D. Pershing; E. Eddings; M. Cremer; J. Hurley; G. Weber; M. Jones; M. Collings; D. Hajicek; A. Henderson; P. Klevan; D. Seery; B. Knight; R. Lessard; J. Sangiovanni; A. Dennis; C. Bird; W. Sutton; N. Bornstein; F. Cogswell; C. Randino; S. Gale; Mike Heap

    2001-06-30

    This report is a presentation of work carried out on Phase II of the HIPPS program under DOE contract DE-AC22-95PC95144 from June 1995 to March 2001. The objective of this report is to emphasize the results and achievements of the program and not to archive every detail of the past six years of effort. These details are already available in the twenty-two quarterly reports previously submitted to DOE and in the final report from Phase I. The report is divided into three major foci, indicative of the three operational groupings of the program as it evolved, was restructured, or overtaken by events. In each of these areas, the results exceeded DOE goals and expectations. HIPPS Systems and Cycles (including thermodynamic cycles, power cycle alternatives, baseline plant costs and new opportunities) HITAF Components and Designs (including design of heat exchangers, materials, ash management and combustor design) Testing Program for Radiative and Convective Air Heaters (including the design and construction of the test furnace and the results of the tests) There are several topics that were part of the original program but whose importance was diminished when the contract was significantly modified. The elimination of the subsystem testing and the Phase III demonstration lessened the relevance of subtasks related to these efforts. For example, the cross flow mixing study, the CFD modeling of the convective air heater and the power island analysis are important to a commercial plant design but not to the R&D product contained in this report. These topics are of course, discussed in the quarterly reports under this contract. The DOE goal for the High Performance Power Plant System ( HIPPS ) is high thermodynamic efficiency and significantly reduced emissions. Specifically, the goal is a 300 MWe plant with > 47% (HHV) overall efficiency and {le} 0.1 NSPS emissions. This plant must fire at least 65% coal with the balance being made up by a premium fuel such as natural gas. To achieve these objectives requires a change from complete reliance of coal-fired systems on steam turbines (Rankine cycles) and moving forward to a combined cycle utilizing gas turbines (Brayton cycles) which offer the possibility of significantly greater efficiency. This is because gas turbine cycles operate at temperatures well beyond current steam cycles, allowing the working fluid (air) temperature to more closely approach that of the major energy source, the combustion of coal. In fact, a good figure of merit for a HIPPS design is just how much of the enthalpy from coal combustion is used by the gas turbine. The efficiency of a power cycle varies directly with the temperature of the working fluid and for contemporary gas turbines the optimal turbine inlet temperature is in the range of 2300-2500 F (1260-1371 C). These temperatures are beyond the working range of currently available alloys and are also in the range of the ash fusion temperature of most coals. These two sets of physical properties combine to produce the major engineering challenges for a HIPPS design. The UTRC team developed a design hierarchy to impose more rigor in our approach. Once the size of the plant had been determined by the choice of gas turbine and the matching steam turbine, the design process of the High Temperature Advanced Furnace (HITAF) moved ineluctably to a down-fired, slagging configuration. This design was based on two air heaters: one a high temperature slagging Radiative Air Heater (RAH) and a lower temperature, dry ash Convective Air Heater (CAH). The specific details of the air heaters are arrived at by an iterative sequence in the following order:-Starting from the overall Cycle requirements which set the limits for the combustion and heat transfer analysis-The available enthalpy determined the range of materials, ceramics or alloys, which could tolerate the temperatures-Structural Analysis of the designs proved to be the major limitation-Finally the commercialization issues of fabrication and reliability, availability and maintenance. The program that has sought to develop and implement these HIPPS designs is outlined below.

  8. 21 CFR 862.1770 - Urea nitrogen test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Urea nitrogen test system. 862.1770 Section 862.1770 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... measure urea nitrogen (an end-product of nitrogen metabolism) in whole blood, serum, plasma, and...

  9. 21 CFR 862.1770 - Urea nitrogen test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Urea nitrogen test system. 862.1770 Section 862.1770 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... measure urea nitrogen (an end-product of nitrogen metabolism) in whole blood, serum, plasma, and...

  10. Nonhepatic hyperammonemic encephalopathy due to undiagnosed urea cycle disorder

    PubMed Central

    Nugent, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    Ornithine transcarbamoylase deficiency is the most common inherited urea cycle disorder. In adults, its phenotypes are diverse. In asymptomatic patients with late presentations, symptom onset is often associated with a precipitating factor. We present a case of a woman with urea cycle disorder diagnosed after an acute peptic ulcer bleed and fasting. PMID:26130895

  11. Final report of the safety assessment of Urea.

    PubMed

    2005-01-01

    Although Urea is officially described as a buffering agent, humectant, and skin-conditioning agent-humectant for use in cosmetic products, there is a report stating that Urea also is used in cosmetics for its desquamating and antimicrobial action. In 2001, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) reported that Urea was used in 239 formulations. Concentrations of use for Urea ranged from 0.01% to 10%. Urea is generally recognized as safe by FDA for the following uses: side-seam cements for food contact; an inhibitor or stabilizer in pesticide formulations and formulations applied to animals; internal sizing for paper and paperboard and surface sizing and coating of paper and paper board that contact water-in-oil dairy emulsions, low-moisture fats and oils, moist bakery products, dry solids with surface containing no free fats or oil, and dry solids with the surface of fat or oil; and to facilitate fermentation of wine. Urea is the end product of mammalian protein metabolism and the chief nitrogenous compound of urine. Urea concentrations in muscle, liver, and fetuses of rats increased after a subcutaneous injection of Urea. Urea diffused readily through the placenta and into other maternal and fetal organs. The half-life of Urea injected into rabbits was on the order of several hours, and the reutilization rate was 32.2% to 88.8%. Urea given to rats by a bolus injection or continuous infusion resulted in distribution to the following brain regions: frontal lobe, caudate nucleus, hippocampus, thalamus plus hypothalamus, pons and white matter (corpus callosum). The permeability constant after treatment with Urea of whole skin and the dermis of rabbits was 2.37 +/- 0.13 (x 10(6)) and 1.20 +/- 0.09 (x10(3)) cm/min, respectively. The absorption of Urea across normal and abraded human skin was 9.5% +/- 2.3% and 67.9% +/- 5.6%, respectively. Urea increased the skin penetration of other compounds, including hydrocortisone. No toxicity was observed for Urea at levels as high as 2000 mg/kg in acute oral studies using female rats or mice. No signs of toxicity were observed in male piglets dosed orally with up to 4 g/kg Urea for 5 days. Dogs dosed orally with 5 to 30 g/L Urea for 4 to 10 days had signs of toxicity, including weakness, anorexia, vomiting and retching, diarrhea and a decreased body temperature, which led to a deep torpor or coma. No significant microscopic changes were observed in the skin of male nude mice dermally exposed to 100% Urea for 24 h. No observable effect on fetal development was seen in rats and mice dosed orally with an aqueous solution of Urea (2000 mg/kg) on days 10 and 12 of gestation. The mean number of implants, live fetuses, percent fetal resorptions, mean fetal weight, and percent fetuses malformed were comparable to control group. A detergent containing 15% Urea was injected into pregnant ICR-JCl mice and dams and fetuses had no significant differences when compared to control animals. Urea given orally did not enhance the developmental toxicity of N-nitrosomethylurea. Female Sprague-Dawley rats injected in the uterine horn with 0.05 ml Urea on day 3 (preimplantation) or on day 7 (post implantation) exhibited no maternal mortality or morbidity; a dose-dependent reduction in embryo survival was seen with preimplantation treatment. Urea injected intra-amniotically induces mid-trimester abortions in humans. Urea was not genotoxic in several bacterial and mammalian assays; although in assays where Urea was used at a high concentration, genotoxicity was found, many in in vitro assays. Urea is commonly used in studies of DNA because it causes uncoiling of DNA molecules. Urea was not carcinogenic in Fisher 344 rats or C57B1/6 mice fed diets containing up to 4.5% Urea. Exposure of normal human skin to 60% Urea produced no significant irritation in one study, but 5% Urea was slightly irritating and 20% Urea was irritating in other reports. Burning sensations are the most frequently reported effect of Urea used alone or with other agents in treatment of diseased skin. Overall, there are few reports of sensiti

  12. Measuring urea persistence, distribution and transport on coastal plain soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The persistence and mobility of urea, an organic form of nitrogen present in animal manures and commercial fertilizers, has rarely been studied and measured, because it is assumed to undergo rapid hydrolysis to ammonia. However, preliminary studies have shown urea to exist in leachate and runoff sev...

  13. 76 FR 15339 - Solid Urea From Russia and Ukraine

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-21

    ... its notice of institution (75 FR 74746, December 1, 2010) were adequate and that the respondent... COMMISSION Solid Urea From Russia and Ukraine AGENCY: United States International Trade Commission. ACTION... orders on solid urea from Russia and Ukraine. SUMMARY: The Commission hereby gives notice that it...

  14. Molecular Basis of the Apparent Near Ideality of Urea Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Kokubo, Hironori; Rsgen, Jrg; Bolen, D. Wayne; Pettitt, B. Montgomery

    2007-01-01

    Activity coefficients of urea solutions are calculated to explore the mechanism of its solution properties, which form the basis for its well-known use as a strong protein denaturant. We perform free energy simulations of urea solutions in different urea concentrations using two urea models (OPLS and KBFF models) to calculate and decompose the activity coefficients. For the case of urea, we clarify the concept of the ideal solution in different concentration scales and standard states and its effect on our subsequent analysis. The analytical form of activity coefficients depends on the concentration units and standard states. For both models studied, urea displays a weak concentration dependence for excess chemical potential. However, for the OPLS force-field model, this results from contributions that are independent of concentration to the van der Waals and electrostatic components whereas for the KBFF model those components are nontrivial but oppose each other. The strong ideality of urea solutions in some concentration scales (incidentally implying a lack of water perturbation) is discussed in terms of recent data and ideas on the mechanism of urea denaturation of proteins. PMID:17693466

  15. Class network routing

    DOEpatents

    Bhanot, Gyan; Blumrich, Matthias A.; Chen, Dong; Coteus, Paul W.; Gara, Alan G.; Giampapa, Mark E.; Heidelberger, Philip; Steinmacher-Burow, Burkhard D.; Takken, Todd E.; Vranas, Pavlos M.

    2009-09-08

    Class network routing is implemented in a network such as a computer network comprising a plurality of parallel compute processors at nodes thereof. Class network routing allows a compute processor to broadcast a message to a range (one or more) of other compute processors in the computer network, such as processors in a column or a row. Normally this type of operation requires a separate message to be sent to each processor. With class network routing pursuant to the invention, a single message is sufficient, which generally reduces the total number of messages in the network as well as the latency to do a broadcast. Class network routing is also applied to dense matrix inversion algorithms on distributed memory parallel supercomputers with hardware class function (multicast) capability. This is achieved by exploiting the fact that the communication patterns of dense matrix inversion can be served by hardware class functions, which results in faster execution times.

  16. Urea enhances the photodynamic efficiency of methylene blue.

    PubMed

    Nuez, Silvia C; Yoshimura, Tania M; Ribeiro, Martha S; Junqueira, Helena C; Maciel, Cleiton; Coutinho-Neto, Maurcio D; Baptista, Maurcio S

    2015-09-01

    Methylene blue (MB) is a well-known photosensitizer used mostly for antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (APDT). MB tends to aggregate, interfering negatively with its singlet oxygen generation, because MB aggregates lean towards electron transfer reactions, instead of energy transfer with oxygen. In order to avoid MB aggregation we tested the effect of urea, which destabilizes solute-solute interactions. The antimicrobial efficiency of MB (30 ?M) either in water or in 2M aqueous urea solution was tested against a fungus (Candida albicans). Samples were kept in the dark and irradiation was performed with a light emitting diode (? = 645 nm). Without urea, 9 min of irradiation was needed to achieve complete microbial eradication. In urea solution, complete eradication was obtained with 6 min illumination (light energy of 14.4 J). The higher efficiency of MB/urea solution was correlated with a smaller concentration of dimers, even in the presence of the microorganisms. Monomer to dimer concentration ratios were extracted from the absorption spectra of MB solutions measured as a function of MB concentration at different temperatures and at different concentrations of sodium chloride and urea. Dimerization equilibrium decreased by 3 and 6 times in 1 and 2M urea, respectively, and increased by a factor of 6 in 1M sodium chloride. The destabilization of aggregates by urea seems to be applied to other photosensitizers, since urea also destabilized aggregation of Meso-tetra(4-n-methyl-pyridyl)porphyrin, which is a positively charged porphyrin. We showed that urea destabilizes MB aggregates mainly by causing a decrease in the enthalpic gain of dimerization, which was exactly the opposite of the effect of sodium chloride. In order to understand this phenomenon at the molecular level, we computed the free energy for the dimer association process (?G(dimer)) in aqueous solution as well as its enthalpic component in aqueous and in aqueous/urea solutions by molecular dynamics simulations. In 2M-urea solution the atomistic picture revealed a preferential solvation of MB by urea compared with MB dimers while changes in ?H(dimer) values demonstrated a clear shift favoring MB monomers. Therefore, MB monomers are more stable in urea solutions, which have significantly better photophysics and higher antimicrobial activity. This information can be of use for dental and medical professionals that are using MB based APDT protocols. PMID:25862463

  17. Railroad Routing Model

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1995-01-05

    INTERLINE/PC is an interactive program designed to simulate the routing practices of the United States rail system. The rail industry is divided into a large number of independent competing companies. The INTERLINE data base represents these rail companies as 94 separate subnetworks. An additional two subnetworks represent navigable inland/intracoastal and deep draft marine routes. Interchange points between individual rail systems and waterway systems are also identified.

  18. Structure and permeation mechanism of a mammalian urea transporter

    SciTech Connect

    Levin, Elena J.; Cao, Yu; Enkavi, Giray; Quick, Matthias; Pan, Yaping; Tajkhorshid, Emad; Zhou, Ming

    2012-09-17

    As an adaptation to infrequent access to water, terrestrial mammals produce urine that is hyperosmotic to plasma. To prevent osmotic diuresis by the large quantity of urea generated by protein catabolism, the kidney epithelia contain facilitative urea transporters (UTs) that allow rapid equilibration between the urinary space and the hyperosmotic interstitium. Here we report the first X-ray crystal structure of a mammalian UT, UT-B, at a resolution of 2.36 {angstrom}. UT-B is a homotrimer and each protomer contains a urea conduction pore with a narrow selectivity filter. Structural analyses and molecular dynamics simulations showed that the selectivity filter has two urea binding sites separated by an approximately 5.0 kcal/mol energy barrier. Functional studies showed that the rate of urea conduction in UT-B is increased by hypoosmotic stress, and that the site of osmoregulation coincides with the location of the energy barrier.

  19. Structure and permeation mechanism of a mammalian urea transporter

    PubMed Central

    Levin, Elena J.; Cao, Yu; Enkavi, Giray; Quick, Matthias; Pan, Yaping; Tajkhorshid, Emad; Zhou, Ming

    2012-01-01

    As an adaptation to infrequent access to water, terrestrial mammals produce urine that is hyperosmotic to plasma. To prevent osmotic diuresis by the large quantity of urea generated by protein catabolism, the kidney epithelia contain facilitative urea transporters (UTs) that allow rapid equilibration between the urinary space and the hyperosmotic interstitium. Here we report the first X-ray crystal structure of a mammalian UT, UT-B, at a resolution of 2.36?. UT-B is a homotrimer and each protomer contains a urea conduction pore with a narrow selectivity filter. Structural analyses and molecular dynamics simulations showed that the selectivity filter has two urea binding sites separated by an approximately 5.0kcal/mol energy barrier. Functional studies showed that the rate of urea conduction in UT-B is increased by hypoosmotic stress, and that the site of osmoregulation coincides with the location of the energy barrier. PMID:22733730

  20. Regeneration of hemofiltrate by anodic oxidation of urea.

    PubMed

    Kster, K; Wendt, H; Gallus, J; Krisam, G; Lehmann, H D

    1983-05-01

    Urea can be oxidized electrochemically in a chloride solution to carbon dioxide, water, and nitrogen. The microkinetics of this hypochlorite-mediated urea oxidation are elucidated. Based on this kinetic information, the optimal conditions and construction principles for an electrochemical reactor are deduced. The construction of a cheap, disposable oxidation cell and necessary auxiliary equipment are described. In vitro data are reported for urea removal. A 36-L volume was used to simulate a 60-kg patient; 18 L was recirculated through a 0.12-m2 oxidation cell. Within 3 h, 35 g urea could be removed from the system. The technical and economic possibilities as well as safety requirements for hemofiltrate regeneration to a reinfusable substitution solution by anodic urea oxidation are discussed critically. Although the process does not appear to be economically practical for discontinuous hemofiltration, it might be desirable for continuous (24 h/day) treatment. PMID:6307234

  1. Functionalized multilayered graphene platform for urea sensor.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Rajesh K; Srivastava, Saurabh; Narayanan, Tharangattu N; Mahlotra, Bansi D; Vajtai, Robert; Ajayan, Pulickel M; Srivastava, Anchal

    2012-01-24

    Multilayered graphene (MLG) is an interesting material for electrochemical sensing and biosensing because of its very large 2D electrical conductivity and large surface area. We propose a less toxic, reproducible, and easy method for producing functionalized multilayer graphene from multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) in mass scale using only concentrated H(2)SO(4)/HNO(3). Electron microscopy results show the MLG formation, whereas FTIR and XPS data suggest its carboxylic and hydroxyl-functionalized nature. We utilize this functionalized MLG for the fabrication of a novel amperometric urea biosensor. This biosensor shows linearity of 10-100 mg dL(-1), sensitivity of 5.43 ?A mg(-1) dL cm(-2), lower detection limit of 3.9 mg dL(-1), and response time of 10 s. Our results suggest that MLG is a promising material for electrochemical biosensing applications. PMID:22117758

  2. Combustion 2000

    SciTech Connect

    1999-12-31

    This report presents work carried out under contract DE-AC22-95PC95144 ''Combustion 2000 - Phase II.'' The goals of the program are to develop a coal-fired high performance power generation system (HIPPS) that is capable of: {lg_bullet} thermal efficiency (HHV) {ge} 47% {lg_bullet} NOx, SOx, and particulates {le} 10% NSPS (New Source Performance Standard) {lg_bullet} coal providing {ge} 65% of heat input {lg_bullet} all solid wastes benign {lg_bullet} cost of electricity {le} 90% of present plants Phase I, which began in 1992, focused on the analysis of various configurations of indirectly fired cycles and on technical assessments of alternative plant subsystems and components, including performance requirements, developmental status, design options, complexity and reliability, and capital and operating costs. Phase I also included preliminary R&D and the preparation of designs for HIPPS commercial plants approximately 300 MWe in size. Phase II, had as its initial objective the development of a complete design base for the construction and operation of a HIPPS prototype plant to be constructed in Phase III. As part of a descoping initiative, the Phase III program has been eliminated and work related to the commercial plant design has been ended. The rescoped program retained a program of engineering research and development focusing on high temperature heat exchangers, e.g. HITAF development (Task 2); a rescoped Task 6 that is pertinent to Vision 21 objectives and focuses on advanced cycle analysis and optimization, integration of gas turbines into complex cycles, and repowering designs; and preparation of the Phase II Technical Report (Task 8). This rescoped program deleted all subsystem testing (Tasks 3, 4, and 5) and the development of a site-specific engineering design and test plan for the HIPPS prototype plant (Task 7). Work reported herein is from: {lg_bullet} Task 2.2.4 Pilot Scale Testing {lg_bullet} Task 2.2.5.2 Laboratory and Bench Scale Activities

  3. 8. VIEW NORTHEAST, ROUTE 130 NORTH FROM ROUTE 30 WEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. VIEW NORTHEAST, ROUTE 130 NORTH FROM ROUTE 30 WEST FROM WOODLYNNE AVENUE ISLAND - White Horse Pike Rond Point, Intersection of Crescent Boulevard (U.S. Route 130), White Horse Pike (U.S. Route 30), & Clay Avenue, Collingswood, Camden County, NJ

  4. Nitrogen metabolism in soybean tissue culture: I. Assimilation of urea.

    PubMed

    Polacco, J C

    1976-09-01

    Cultured soybean (Glycine max, Kanrich variety) cells grow with 25 mm urea as the sole nitrogen source but at a slower rate than with the Murashige and Skoog (MS) (Physiol. Plant. 15: 473-497, 1962) nitrogen source of 18.8 mm KNO(3) and 20.6 mm NH(4)NO(3). Growth with urea is restricted by 18.8 mm NO(3) (-), 50 mm methylammonia, 10 mm citrate or 100 mum hydroxyurea, substances which are much less restrictive or nonrestrictive in the presence of ammonia nitrogen source. The restrictive conditions of urea assimilation were examined as possible bases for selection schemes to recover urease-overproducing mutants. Since urease has higher methionine levels than the soybean seed proteins among which it is found, such selections may be a model for improving seed protein quality by plant cell culture techniques.Callus will not grow with 1 mm urea plus 18.8 mm KNO(3). Urease levels decrease 80% within two divisions after transfer from MS nitrogen source to 1 mm urea plus 18.8 mm KNO(3). Hydroxyurea is a potent inhibitor of soybean urease and this appears to be the basis for its inhibition of urea utilization by callus cells.Stationary phase suspension cultures grown with MS nitrogen source exhibit trace or zero urease levels. Soon after transfer to fresh medium (24 hours after escape from lag), urease levels increase in the presence of both MS or urea nitrogen source. However, the increase is 10 to 20 times greater in the presence of urea. NH(4)Cl (50 mm) lowers urease induction by 50% whereas 50 mm methylammonium chloride results in more drastic reductions in urea-stimulated urease levels. Citrate (10 mm) completely blocks urease synthesis in the presence of urea.Ammonia and methylammonia do not inhibit soybean urease nor do they appreciably inhibit urea uptake by suspension cultures. It appears likely that methylammonia inhibits urea utilization in cultured soybean cells primarily due to its "repressive" effect on urease synthesis.Citrate does not inhibit urease activity in vitro and exhibits only a partial inhibition (0-50% in several experiments) of urea uptake. It appears likely that the citrate elimination of urease production by cultured soybean cells is due to its chelation of trace Ni(2+) in the growth medium. Dixon et al. (J. Am. Chem. Soc. 97: 4131-4133, 1975) have reported that jack bean (Canavalia ensiformis) urease contains nickel at the active site. PMID:16659677

  5. Fundamentals of Gas Turbine combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerstein, M.

    1979-01-01

    Combustion problems and research recommendations are discussed in the areas of atomization and vaporization, combustion chemistry, combustion dynamics, and combustion modelling. The recommendations considered of highest priority in these areas are presented.

  6. Combustion oscillation control

    SciTech Connect

    Richards, G.A.; Janus, M.C.

    1996-12-31

    Premixing of fuel and air can avoid high temperatures which produce thermal NOx, but oscillating combustion must be eliminated. Combustion oscillations can also occur in Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle turbines. As an alternative to design or operating modifications, METC is investigating active combustion control (ACC) to eliminate oscillations; ACC uses repeated adjustment of some combustion parameter to control the variation in heat release that drives oscillations.

  7. Kinetic study on urea uptake with chitosan based sorbent materials.

    PubMed

    Xue, Chen; Wilson, Lee D

    2016-01-01

    A one-pot kinetic uptake study of urea in aqueous solution with various chitosan sorbent materials such as pristine chitosan, cross-linked chitosan with glutaraldehyde from low (C-1) to higher (C-2) glutaraldehyde content, and a Cu(II) complex of a glutaraldehyde cross-linked chitosan material (C-3) is reported herein. The kinetic uptake profiles were analyzed by the pseudo-first order (PFO) and pseudo-second-order (PSO) models, respectively. The uptake rate constant of urea and the sorption capacity (qe) of high molecular weight (HMW) chitosan, C-1, C-2, and C-3 were best described by the PFO model. The uptake rate constant of urea with the various sorbents is listed in ascending order: HMW chitosanurea/g sorbent) for the sorbent/urea systems are listed in ascending order: HMW chitosan (48.1)?C-1 (44.7)urea uptake and greater adsorption capacity when compared with pristine chitosan. The observed trends are in agreement with the greater surface accessibility and pore structure properties of cross-linked chitosan based on scanning electron microscopy studies. These results further illustrate the rational design of chitosan-based materials for the controlled uptake of urea in aquatic environments. PMID:26453866

  8. Urea production and salvage during pregnancy in normal Jamaican women.

    PubMed

    Forrester, T; Badaloo, A V; Persaud, C; Jackson, A A

    1994-09-01

    The pattern of aggregate nitrogen demand during pregnancy and the fetal and maternal components are unclear. Excess demand enhances efficiency of nitrogen utilization. Urea salvage contributes to enhanced efficiency. Dietary protein intake, urea production, and salvage of urea nitrogen were measured in eight nonpregnant control subjects, and trimesterly in nine pregnant women. Production was measured after prime-intermittent intravenous doses of [15N 15N]-urea by dilution of label in urinary urea. Dietary protein intake was greater in trimester 1 than in nonpregnant women (167 +/- 36 vs 224 +/- 60 mg N.kg-1.d-1), and increased further in trimester 2 (266 +/- 59 mg N.kg-1.d-1). Urea production was not higher during pregnancy. Despite higher protein intake, urea salvage was higher in pregnancy (40 +/- 24 nonpregnant vs 77 +/- 23, 61 +/- 31, and 51 +/- 12 mg N.kg-1.d-1). Therefore, the demand-supply gap for nitrogen was greatest early in pregnancy when fetoplacental growth is slowest, and implies heightened maternal demand. PMID:8074063

  9. Combustion of plasticized nitrocellulose

    SciTech Connect

    Arkhipov, A.G.; Denisyuk, A.P.; Kondrikov, B.N.

    1987-11-01

    The authors study the effects of composition, temperature, and pressure on the combustion kinetics of a mixture of nitrocellulose and a plasticizer consisting of propanetriol trinitrate for a wide range of concentration ratios of the components. Limiting values are established for combustion stability and the stabilizing effects of soot on combustion kinetics of the plastic are also determined.

  10. Combustion. Second edition

    SciTech Connect

    Glassman, I.

    1987-01-01

    This book presents papers on combustion kinetics. Topics considered include reaction heat, flame temperature calculations, pressure effects, explosions, oxidation, flame propagation, detonations, diffusion flames, turbulent fuel jets, fuel droplets, convection, ignition by shock waves, environmental combustion considerations, nitrogen oxide formation and reduction, sulfur dioxide emissions, and combustion control.

  11. Urea encapsulation in modified starch matrix for nutrients retention

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naz, Muhammad Yasin; Sulaiman, Shaharin Anwar; Ariff, Mohd. Hazwan Bin Mohd.; Ariwahjoedi, Bambang

    2014-10-01

    It has been estimated that 20-70% of the used urea goes to the environment via leaching, nitrification and volatilization which not only harms the environment but also reduces the urea efficiency. By coating the urea granules, the farmers can achieve high urea performance through controlling the excess release of nitrogen. Up until now, different materials have been tested for nutrients retention. However, most of them are either expensive or unfriendly to the environment. Being cheap and biodegradable materials, the starches may also be used to coat the urea fertilizer for controlling the nutrients release. However, the pure starches do not meet the standards set by many industrial processes due to their slow tacking and too low viscosities and should be modified for getting smooth, compact and mechanically stronger coatings. In these studies, the tapioca starch was modified by reacting it with urea and different masses of borax. The prepared solutions were used to coat the urea granules of 3.45 mm average diameter. Different volumes (1, 1.5 and 2 mL) of each solution were used to coat 30 g of urea fluidized above the minimum level of fluidization. It was noticed that the coating thickness, percent coating, dissolution rate and percent release follow an increasing trend with an increase of solution volume; however, some random results were obtained while investigating the solution volume effects on the percent release. It was seen that the nutrients percent release over time increases with an increase in solution volume from 1 to 1.5 mL and thereafter reaches to a steady state. It confirms that the 1.5 mL of solution for 30 g urea samples will give the optimized coating results.

  12. Collective network routing

    DOEpatents

    Hoenicke, Dirk

    2014-12-02

    Disclosed are a unified method and apparatus to classify, route, and process injected data packets into a network so as to belong to a plurality of logical networks, each implementing a specific flow of data on top of a common physical network. The method allows to locally identify collectives of packets for local processing, such as the computation of the sum, difference, maximum, minimum, or other logical operations among the identified packet collective. Packets are injected together with a class-attribute and an opcode attribute. Network routers, employing the described method, use the packet attributes to look-up the class-specific route information from a local route table, which contains the local incoming and outgoing directions as part of the specifically implemented global data flow of the particular virtual network.

  13. Route based forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuurendonk, I. W.; Wokke, M. J. J.

    2009-09-01

    Road surface temperatures can differ several degrees on a very short distance due to local effects. In order to get more insight in the local temperature differences and to develop safer gritting routes, Meteogroup has developed a system for route based temperature forecasting. The standard version of the road model is addressed to forecast road surface temperature and condition for a specific location. This model consists of two parts. First a physical part, based on the energy balance equations. The second part of the model performs a statistical correction on the calculated physical road surface temperature. The road model is able to create a forecast for one specific location. From infrared measurements, we know that large local differences in road surface temperature exist on a route. Differences can be up to 5 degrees Celsius over a distance of several hundreds of meters. Based on those measurements, the idea came up to develop a system that forecasts road surface temperature and condition for an entire route: route based forecasting. The route is split up in sections with equal properties. For each section a temperature and condition will be calculated. The main factors that influence the road surface temperature are modelled in this forecasting system: The local weather conditions: temperature, dew point temperature, wind, precipitation, weather type, cloudiness. The sky view: A very sheltered place will receive less radiation during daytime and emit less radiation during nighttime. For a very open spot, the effects are reversed. The solar view: A road section with trees on the southern side, will receive less solar radiation during daytime than a section with tress on the southern side. The route based forecast shows by means of a clear Google Maps presentation which sections will be slippery at what time of the coming night. The final goal of this type of forecast, is to make dynamical gritting possible: a variable salt amount and a different gritting route. This will contribute to safety on the roads (colder spots will be treated earlier) and also it is financially interesting (less salt necessary and fewer kilometers to drive).

  14. Structural Characterization of Apomyoglobin Self-Associated Species in Aqueous Buffer and Urea Solution

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Charles; Kurt, Neşe; Murphy, Regina M.; Cavagnero, Silvia

    2006-01-01

    The biophysical characterization of nonfunctional protein aggregates at physiologically relevant temperatures is much needed to gain deeper insights into the kinetic and thermodynamic relationships between protein folding and misfolding. Dynamic and static laser light scattering have been employed for the detection and detailed characterization of apomyoglobin (apoMb) soluble aggregates populated at room temperature upon dissolving the purified protein in buffer at pH 6.0, both in the presence and absence of high concentrations of urea. Unlike the β-sheet self-associated aggregates previously reported for this protein at high temperatures, the soluble aggregates detected here have either α-helical or random coil secondary structure, depending on solvent and solution conditions. Hydrodynamic diameters range from 80 to 130 nm, with semiflexible chain-like morphology. The combined use of low pH and high urea concentration leads to structural unfolding and complete elimination of the large aggregates. Even upon starting from this virtually monomeric unfolded state, however, protein refolding leads to the formation of severely self-associated species with native-like secondary structure. Under these conditions, kinetic apoMb refolding proceeds via two parallel routes: one leading to native monomer, and the other leading to a misfolded and heavily self-associated state bearing native-like secondary structure. PMID:16214860

  15. 9. BUILDING NO. 424, ORDNANCE FACILITY (COMBUSTIBLE CARTRIDGE CASE FACTORY), ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. BUILDING NO. 424, ORDNANCE FACILITY (COMBUSTIBLE CARTRIDGE CASE FACTORY), VIEW EAST LOOKING AT NORTHWEST AND SOUTHWEST FACADES. BUILDING NO. 427-A, MAGAZINE, IN LEFT BACKGROUND; BUILDING NO.S 424-E, MIX HOUSE, AND 424-D, MAGAZINE, IN RIGHT BACKGROUND. - Picatinny Arsenal, 400 Area, Gun Bag Loading District, State Route 15 near I-80, Dover, Morris County, NJ

  16. Combustion and core noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahan, J. Robert; Karchmer, Allen

    1991-08-01

    Two types of aircraft power plant are considered: the gas turbine and the reciprocating engine. The engine types considered are: the reciprocating engine, the turbojet engine, the turboprop engine, and the turbofan engine. Combustion noise in gas turbine engines is discussed, and reciprocating-engine combustion noise is also briefly described. The following subject areas are covered: configuration variables, operational variables, characteristics of combustion and core noise, sources of combustion noise, combustion noise theory and comparison with experiment, available prediction methods, diagnostic techniques, measurement techniques, data interpretation, and example applications.

  17. Method of regulating combustion in the combustion chambers of an internal combustion engine

    SciTech Connect

    Burkel, R.; Eckert, K.; Franke, H.; Linder, E.; Maurer, H.; Moser, W.; Muller, K.; Peter, C.; Rieger, F.

    1983-05-03

    A method is proposed for regulating the combustion of operating mixtures in the combustion chambers of internal combustion engines. The course of the light intensity of the light resulting from combustion in the combustion chamber is detected and evaluated over the course of combustion; reference control variables derived therefrom are formed for use by subsequently disposed closed-loop control devices of the engine.

  18. Hydrolyzable polyureas bearing hindered urea bonds.

    PubMed

    Ying, Hanze; Cheng, Jianjun

    2014-12-10

    Hydrolyzable polymers are widely used materials that have found numerous applications in biomedical, agricultural, plastic, and packaging industrials. They usually contain ester and other hydrolyzable bonds, such as anhydride, acetal, ketal, or imine, in their backbone structures. Here, we report the first design of hydrolyzable polyureas bearing dynamic hindered urea bonds (HUBs) that can reversibly dissociate to bulky amines and isocyanates, the latter of which can be further hydrolyzed by water, driving the equilibrium to facilitate the degradation of polyureas. Polyureas bearing 1-tert-butyl-1-ethylurea bonds that show high dynamicity (high bond dissociation rate), in the form of either linear polymers or cross-linked gels, can be completely degraded by water under mild conditions. Given the simplicity and low cost for the production of polyureas by simply mixing multifunctional bulky amines and isocyanates, the versatility of the structures, and the tunability of the degradation profiles of HUB-bearing polyureas, these materials are potentially of very broad applications. PMID:25406025

  19. Hydrolyzable Polyureas Bearing Hindered Urea Bonds

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Hydrolyzable polymers are widely used materials that have found numerous applications in biomedical, agricultural, plastic, and packaging industrials. They usually contain ester and other hydrolyzable bonds, such as anhydride, acetal, ketal, or imine, in their backbone structures. Here, we report the first design of hydrolyzable polyureas bearing dynamic hindered urea bonds (HUBs) that can reversibly dissociate to bulky amines and isocyanates, the latter of which can be further hydrolyzed by water, driving the equilibrium to facilitate the degradation of polyureas. Polyureas bearing 1-tert-butyl-1-ethylurea bonds that show high dynamicity (high bond dissociation rate), in the form of either linear polymers or cross-linked gels, can be completely degraded by water under mild conditions. Given the simplicity and low cost for the production of polyureas by simply mixing multifunctional bulky amines and isocyanates, the versatility of the structures, and the tunability of the degradation profiles of HUB-bearing polyureas, these materials are potentially of very broad applications. PMID:25406025

  20. Development of novel chemical synthetic routes for nanocrystalline VN, Mo2N, and W2N nitride materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Pragnya Paramita; Panda, Rabi Narayan

    2015-06-01

    In this study, novel synthetic routes for the synthesis of VN, Mo2N and W2N binary nitrides have been presented. We have synthesized new precursors, i.e.V2O5 from citric acid based sol-gel method and Mo, W based ethylenediamine complex which are used for the nitridation experiments using solid urea (NH2CONH2) or ammonia (NH3(g)). We have successfully prepared phase pure nano-dimensional nitride materials. The estimated crystallite sizes and SEM particle sizes were found in the range of 4-16 nm and 111-870 nm, respectively. VN, Mo2N and W2N nitrides crystallize in fcc-cubic structures with the values of lattice parameters; 4.128, 4.165 and 4.175 for urea route and 4.112, 4.196 and 4.150 for ammonia route, respectively.

  1. IRIS TOXICOLOGICAL REVIEW OF UREA (EXTERNAL REVIEW DRAFT)

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA is conducting a peer review and public comment of the scientific basis supporting the human health hazard and dose-response assessment of Urea that when finalized will appear on the Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) database.

  2. Hydrogen production via urea electrolysis using a gel electrolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Rebecca L.; Botte, Gerardine G.

    2011-03-01

    A technology was demonstrated for the production of hydrogen and other valuable products (nitrogen and clean water) through the electrochemical oxidation of urea in alkaline media. In addition, this process remediates toxic nitrates and prevents gaseous ammonia emissions. Improvements to urea electrolysis were made through replacement of aqueous KOH electrolyte with a poly(acrylic acid) gel electrolyte. A small volume of poly(acrylic acid) gel electrolyte was used to accomplish the electrochemical oxidation of urea improving on the previous requirement for large amounts of aqueous potassium hydroxide. The effect of gel composition was investigated by varying polymer content and KOH concentrations within the polymer matrix in order to determine which is the most advantageous for the electrochemical oxidation of urea and production of hydrogen.

  3. Online measurement of urea concentration in spent dialysate during hemodialysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olesberg, Jonathon T.; Armitage, Ben; Arnold, Mark A.; Flanigan, Michael

    2002-05-01

    We describe on-line optical measurements of urea concentration during the regular hemodialysis treatment of several patients. The spectral measurements were performed in the effluent dialysate stream after the dialysis membrane using an FTIR spectrometer equipped with a flow-through cell. Spectra were recorded across the 5000-4000 cm-1 (2.0-2.5 micrometers at 1-minute intervals. Optically determined concentrations matched concentrations obtained from standard chemical assays with a root-mean-square error of 0.29 mM for urea (0.8 mg/dl urea nitrogen), 0.03 mM for creatinine, 0.11 mM for lactate, and 0.22 mM for glucose. The observed concentration ranges were 0-11 mM for urea, 0-0.35 mM for creatinine, 0-0.75 mM for lactate, and 9-12.5 mM for glucose.

  4. Microdetermination of urea in urine using p-dimethylaminobenzaldehyde /PDAB/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geiger, P. J.

    1969-01-01

    Adaptation of the p-dimethylaminobenzaldehyde method for determining urea concentration in urine is an improved micromechanical method. Accuracy and precision are satisfactory. This method avoids extra steps of deproteinizing or removing normal urinary chromogens.

  5. Opportunities in pulse combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Brenchley, D.L.; Bomelburg, H.J.

    1985-10-01

    In most pulse combustors, the combustion occurs near the closed end of a tube where inlet valves operate in phase with the pressure amplitude variations. Thus, within the combustion zone, both the temperature and the pressure oscillate around a mean value. However, the development of practical applications of pulse combustion has been hampered because effective design requires the right combination of the combustor's dimensions, valve characteristics, fuel/oxidizer combination, and flow pattern. Pulse combustion has several additional advantages for energy conversion efficiency, including high combustion and thermal efficiency, high combustion intensity, and high convective heat transfer rates. Also, pulse combustion can be self-aspirating, generating a pressure boost without using a blower. This allows the use of a compact heat exchanger that may include a condensing section and may obviate the need for a chimney. In the last decade, these features have revived interest in pulse combustion research and development, which has resulted in the development of a pulse combustion air heater by Lennox, and a pulse combustion hydronic unit by Hydrotherm, Inc. To appraise this potential for energy savings, a systematic study was conducted of the many past and present attempts to use pulse combustion for practical purposes. The authors recommended areas where pulse combustion technology could possibly be applied in the future and identified areas in which additional R and D would be necessary. Many of the results of the study project derived from a special workshop on pulse combustion. This document highlights the main points of the study report, with particular emphasis on pulse combustion application in chemical engineering.

  6. Hydrologic Flood Routing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heggen, Richard J.

    1982-01-01

    Discusses a short classroom-based BASIC program which routes stream flow through a system of channels and reservoirs. The program is suitable for analyses of open channel conveyance systems, flood detention reservoirs, and combinations of the two. (Author/JN)

  7. Submarine cable route survey

    SciTech Connect

    Herrouin, G.; Scuiller, T.

    1995-12-31

    The growth of telecommunication market is very significant. From the beginning of the nineties, more and more the use of optical fiber submarine cables is privileged to that of satellites. These submarine telecommunication highways require accurate surveys in order to select the optimum route and determine the cable characteristics. Advanced technology tools used for these surveys are presented along with their implementation.

  8. Ammonia volatilization and nitrogen retention: how deep to incorporate urea?

    PubMed

    Rochette, Philippe; Angers, Denis A; Chantigny, Martin H; Gasser, Marc-Olivier; MacDonald, J Douglas; Pelster, David E; Bertrand, Normand

    2013-11-01

    Incorporation of urea decreases ammonia (NH) volatilization, but field measurements are needed to better quantify the impact of placement depth. In this study, we measured the volatilization losses after banding of urea at depths of 0, 2.5, 5, 7.5, and 10 cm in a slightly acidic (pH 6) silt loam soil using wind tunnels. Mineral nitrogen (N) concentration and pH were measured in the top 2 cm of soil to determine the extent of urea N migration and the influence of placement depth on the availability of ammoniacal N for volatilization near the soil surface. Ammonia volatilization losses were 50% of applied N when urea was banded at the surface, and incorporation of the band decreased emissions by an average of 7% cm (14% cm when expressed as a percentage of losses after surface banding). Incorporating urea at depths >7.5 cm therefore resulted in negligible NH emissions and maximum N retention. Cumulative losses increased exponentially with increasing maximum NH-N and pH values measured in the surface soil during the experiment. However, temporal variations in these soil properties were poorly related to the temporal variations in NH emission rates, likely as a result of interactions with other factors (e.g., water content and NH-N adsorption) on, and fixation by, soil particles. Laboratory and field volatilization data from the literature were summarized and used to determine a relationship between NH losses and depth of urea incorporation. When emissions were expressed as a percentage of losses for a surface application, the mean reduction after urea incorporation was approximately 12.5% cm. Although we agree that the efficiency of urea incorporation to reduce NH losses varies depending on several soil properties, management practices, and climatic conditions, we propose that this value represents an estimate of the mean impact of incorporation depth that could be used when site-specific information is unavailable. PMID:25602404

  9. Urea channel inhibitors (UCIs): A new functional class of aquaretics

    PubMed Central

    Knepper, Mark A.; Miranda, Carlos A.

    2013-01-01

    Using large-scale small molecule screening techniques, Li et al. have identified a compound that inhibits the UT-B urea channel. They propose that this or similar compounds could be used as aquaretic agents to increase water excretion without changes in electrolyte excretion. Such compounds would potentially be useful in treatment of hyponatremic disorders. Here we review the physiological basis for the action of urea channel inhibitors in the kidney and assess their clinical potential. PMID:23728001

  10. Urea Metabolism in Beef Steers Fed Tall Fescue, Orchardgrass, or Gamagrass Hays

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two experiments were conducted to assess effects of endophyte treatments (Exp. 1), forage species, and supplementation (Exp. 2) on urea production, excretion, and recycling in beef steers. Infusion of 15,15N-urea and enrichment of urea in urine samples were used to calculate urea N entry and recyc...

  11. Active urea transport in lower vertebrates and mammals.

    PubMed

    Bankir, Lise

    2014-01-01

    Some unicellular organisms can take up urea from the surrounding fluids by an uphill pumping mechanism. Several active (energy-dependent) urea transporters (AUTs) have been cloned in these organisms. Functional studies show that active urea transport also occurs in elasmobranchs, amphibians, and mammals. In the two former groups, active urea transport may serve to conserve urea in body fluids in order to balance external high ambient osmolarity or prevent desiccation. In mammals, active urea transport may be associated with the need to either store and/or reuse nitrogen in the case of low nitrogen supply, or to excrete nitrogen efficiently in the case of excess nitrogen intake. There are probably two different families of AUTs, one with a high capacity able to establish only a relatively modest transepithelial concentration difference (renal tubule of some frogs, pars recta of the mammalian kidney, early inner medullary collecting duct in some mammals eating protein-poor diets) and others with a low capacity but able to maintain a high transepithelial concentration difference that has been created by another mechanism or in another organ (elasmobranch gills, ventral skin of some toads, and maybe mammalian urinary bladder). Functional characterization of these transporters shows that some are coupled to sodium (symports or antiports) while others are sodium-independent. In humans, only one genetic anomaly, with a mild phenotype (familial azotemia), is suspected to concern one of these transporters. In spite of abundant functional evidence for such transporters in higher organisms, none have been molecularly identified yet. PMID:25298347

  12. Analysis of the Sub-Millimeter Rotational Spectrum of Urea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Jessica R.; Fosnight, Alyssa M.; Medvedev, Ivan R.

    2013-06-01

    Urea, ((NH_{2})_{2}CO), has broad presence in biological species. As a byproduct of human metabolism, this molecule is commonly tested for in blood to diagnose different pathologies. Furthermore, urea is seen in interstellar medium and its detection could yield valuable insight into the mechanisms governing star formation. Despite the prevalence of urea, an absence exists in recorded frequencies of this molecule. The new generation of the sub-millimeter telescopes, such as ALMA, HERSCHEL, and SOFIA, allows detection of interstellar molecular spectra at unprecedented spatial and spectral resolutions. The knowledge of the precise frequencies of spectra transitions present in interstellar molecular clouds would alleviate the problem of spectral congestion and aid in molecular identification. This paper reports the most recent investigation of the submillimeter/terahertz gas phase spectrum of urea. Up until now, only the microwave laboratory spectrum of urea's vibrational ground state has been available. This paper reports the high-resolution spectra of urea in the sub-millimeter range, and extends the spectroscopic assignment of the rotational transitions in the vibrational ground state. Additionally, the assignment of the first vibrational state and tentative assignments of two additional vibrational states have been made.

  13. Urea-induced oxidative damage in Elodea densa leaves.

    PubMed

    Maleva, Maria; Borisova, Galina; Chukina, Nadezda; Prasad, M N V

    2015-09-01

    Urea being a fertilizer is expected to be less toxic to plants. However, it was found that urea at 100mgL(-1) caused the oxidative stress in Elodea leaves due to the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and lipid peroxidation that are known to stimulate antioxidant pathway. Urea at a concentration of 500 and 1000mgL(-1) decreased low-molecular-weight antioxidants. In this case, the antioxidant status of plants was supported by the activity of antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase and guaiacol peroxidase. A significant increase in the soluble proteins and -SH groups was observed with high concentrations of urea (30-60% of control). Thus, the increased activity of antioxidant enzymes, low-molecular-weight antioxidants, and induced soluble protein thiols are implicated in plant resistance to oxidative stress imposed by urea. We found that guaiacol peroxidase plays an important role in the removal of the peroxide in Elodea leaves exposed to 1000mgL(-1)of urea. PMID:25943514

  14. Molecular Complexation and Phase Diagrams of Urea/PEG Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Guoepeng; Kyu, Thein

    2014-03-01

    Polyethylene glycol (PEG) and urea complexation has been known to form a stable crystal due to molecular complexation. The effect of molecular weight of PEG on the phase diagrams of its blends with urea has been explored. In the case of high molecular weight PEG8k/urea, the observed phase diagram is azeotrope, accompanied by eutectoid reactions in the submerged phases such as induced stable ``alpha'' phase crystals and metastable ``beta'' phase crystals. The metastable crystal can transform to stable crystal under a certain thermal annealing condition. However, the phase diagram of PEG1k/urea is of coexistence loop, whereas PEG400/urea exhibits eutectic character. Subsequently, the change of azeotrope to eutectic behavior with PEG molecular weight is analyzed in the context of the combined Flory-Huggins theory of liquid-liquid demixing and phase field theory of crystal solidification. Of particular interest is that only a very small urea amount (2 wt%) is needed to form a stable inclusion crystal via complexation with PEG. Potential application in lithium battery is discussed based on AC impedance spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry. Supported by NSF-DMR 1161070.

  15. Combustion modeling in internal combustion engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeleznik, F. J.

    1976-01-01

    The fundamental assumptions of the Blizard and Keck combustion model for internal combustion engines are examined and a generalization of that model is derived. The most significant feature of the model is that it permits the occurrence of unburned hydrocarbons in the thermodynamic-kinetic modeling of exhaust gases. The general formulas are evaluated in two specific cases that are likely to be significant in the applications of the model.

  16. Laser applications in combustion and combustion diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Liou, L.C.

    1993-01-01

    Lasers have become one of the most widely used tools in the scientific community, particularly in the field of combustion. Since the laser is a nonintrusive source of high-intensity energy that can be precisely controlled, it can be used as an ignition source in applications such as solid or liquid rockets, supersonic jet engines, and space-based microgravity experiments. Furthermore, due to the unique characteristics of lasers they are ideally suited for combustion diagnostics. The laser is an invaluable tool for studying the complex physical aspects of the combustion process in systems from boiler furnaces to rocket engines because parameters such as spray patterns, drop sizes, and the interactions between the fuel and oxidizer can readily be determined. This conference was the first of its kind, providing a forum for researchers in this field to exchange information and engage in technical discussions. It also underlined the importance of laser applications in combustion and combustion diagnostics. The papers in this proceedings are organized into three topical sessions: Laser Ignition, which includes theoretical and experimental results, and design considerations for various applications of laser ignition; Combustion Diagnostics, which presents well-established methods such as laser Doppler velocimetry, laser-induced fluorescence, Raman scattering and Raleigh scattering; and Droplet Diagnostics and Scattering, which studies the interaction between electromagnetic waves and droplets, and the hydrodynamics of a droplet. Papers have been processed for inclusion on the data base.

  17. Recycling of polyurethane-urea RIM

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, H.X.; Kresta, J.E.; Suthar, B.; Li, X.H.

    1997-12-31

    Polyurethane-urea (PUU) RIM are crosslinked materials, which cannot be reprocessed or recycled by using the conventional process. The chemical decrosslinking reaction or transesterification of themosetting polyurethanes by using various inorganic and organic catalysts were investigated. The recycling of waste PUU RIM materials (unpainted, painted and filler reinforced) through decrosslinking (transesterification) using low molecular weight glycols in presence of catalyst was evaluated. It was established that the transestification of PUU RIM can be carried out at the low glycol (EG)/RIM ratio (15/84.5) and that the usual recovery step for the excess glycol (EG) can be avoided resulting in an economical process. The process was scaled up in a 50 gallon reactor at the LymTal International Inc. successfully. It was established that the products from the decrosslinking of PUU RIM are a mixture of the liquid oligomers (LOs) containing urethane, OH and NH{sub 2} groups. These functional groups in LOs exhibit many potential applications as raw materials in the preparation of RIM coatings, adhesives, foams, sealants and composites. PUU RIM made from LOs exhibited promising and interesting results. Both solvent-based and waterborne urethane coatings could be made from LOs. Urethane adhesives made from LOs showed improvement of properties with increasing amounts of LOs. Structural adhesives based on epoxy and LOs were prepared and the effects of equivalent ratios and curing conditions on the adhesive strength of the epoxy/LO adhesives were investigated. Solvent-free coating based on epoxy and LOs was prepared and their properties were determined. Both wood fiber and glass fabric reinforced composites were prepared by using epoxy and LOs and they exhibited interesting properties for different potential applications.

  18. Combustion of Micropowdered Biomass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geil, Ethan; Thorne, Robert

    2009-03-01

    Combustion of finely powdered biomass has the potential to replace heating oil, which accounts for a significant fraction of US oil consumption, in heating, cooling and local power generation applications. When ground to 30-150 micron powders and dispersed in air, wood and other biomass can undergo deflagrating combustion, as occurs with gaseous and dispersed liquid fuels. Combustion is very nearly complete, and in contrast to sugar/starch or cellulose-derived ethanol, nearly all of the available plant mass is converted to usable energy so the economics are much more promising. We are exploring the fundamental combustion science of biomass powders in this size range. In particular, we are examining how powder size, powder composition (including the fraction of volatile organics) and other parameters affect the combustion regime and the combustion products.

  19. Lump wood combustion process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubesa, Petr; Hork, Ji?; Branc, Michal; Krpec, Kamil; Hopan, Frantiek; Koloni?n, Jan; Ochodek, Tade; Drastichov, Vendula; Martink, Lubomr; Malcho, Milan

    2014-08-01

    The article deals with the combustion process for lump wood in low-power fireplaces (units to dozens of kW). Such a combustion process is cyclical in its nature, and what combustion facility users are most interested in is the frequency, at which fuel needs to be stoked to the fireplace. The paper defines the basic terms such as burnout curve and burning rate curve, which are closely related to the stocking frequency. The fuel burning rate is directly dependent on the immediate thermal power of the fireplace. This is also related to the temperature achieved in the fireplace, magnitude of flue gas losses and the ability to generate conditions favouring the full burnout of the fuel's combustible component, which, at once ensures the minimum production of combustible pollutants. Another part of the paper describes experiments conducted in traditional fireplaces with a grate, at which well-dried lump wood was combusted.

  20. Coal combustion products

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kalyoncu, R.S.; Olson, D.W.

    2001-01-01

    Coal-burning powerplants, which supply more than half of U.S. electricity, also generate coal combustion products, which can be both a resource and a disposal problem. The U.S. Geological Survey collaborates with the American Coal Ash Association in preparing its annual report on coal combustion products. This Fact Sheet answers questions about present and potential uses of coal combustion products.

  1. Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Ziemkiewicz; Tamara Vandivort; Debra Pflughoeft-Hassett; Y. Paul Chugh; James Hower

    2008-08-31

    Ashlines: To promote and support the commercially viable and environmentally sound recycling of coal combustion byproducts for productive uses through scientific research, development, and field testing.

  2. Tripropellant combustion process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kmiec, T. D.; Carroll, R. G.

    1988-01-01

    The addition of small amounts of hydrogen to the combustion of LOX/hydrocarbon propellants in large rocket booster engines has the potential to enhance the system stability. Programs being conducted to evaluate the effects of hydrogen on the combustion of LOX/hydrocarbon propellants at supercritical pressures are described. Combustion instability has been a problem during the development of large hydrocarbon fueled rocket engines. At the higher combustion chamber pressures expected for the next generation of booster engines, the effect of unstable combustion could be even more destructive. The tripropellant engine cycle takes advantage of the superior cooling characteristics of hydrogen to cool the combustion chamber and a small amount of the hydrogen coolant can be used in the combustion process to enhance the system stability. Three aspects of work that will be accomplished to evaluate tripropellant combustion are described. The first is laboratory demonstration of the benefits through the evaluation of drop size, ignition delay and burning rate. The second is analytical modeling of the combustion process using the empirical relationship determined in the laboratory. The third is a subscale demonstration in which the system stability will be evaluated. The approach for each aspect is described and the analytical models that will be used are presented.

  3. Diesel engine combustion processes

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    Diesel Engine Combustion Processes guides the engineer and research technician toward engine designs which will give the ``best payoff`` in terms of emissions and fuel economy. Contents include: Three-dimensional modeling of soot and NO in a direct-injection diesel engine; Prechamber for lean burn for low NOx; Modeling and identification of a diesel combustion process with the downhill gradient search method; The droplet group micro-explosions in W/O diesel fuel emulsion sprays; Combustion process of diesel spray in high temperature air; Combustion process of diesel engines at regions with different altitude; and more.

  4. Mixing in combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimotakis, Paul

    2013-11-01

    Mixing of reactants represents an important element in both non-premixed and premixed turbulent combustion. In non-premixed combustion, molecular mixing is a necessary first step that brings reactants together. In premixed combustion with local flame extinction and reignition, turbulent mixing of hot products with as-yet unburnt fluid is important to combustion behavior. The discussion on mixing will cover the role of entrainment, effects of Reynolds number and the mixing transition, effects of Schmidt number and gas- vs. liquid-phase reacting flows, heat release, Damkoehler-number (finite kinetic-rate) effects, and Mach-number effects. Support by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research.

  5. Droplet Combustion Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nayagam, Vedha

    1998-01-01

    Liquid fuel combustion provides a major portion of the world's energy supply. In most practical combustion devices, liquid burns after being separated into a droplet spray. Essential to the design of efficient combustion systems is a knowledge of droplet combustion behavior. The microgravity environment aboard spacecraft provides an opportunity to investigate the complex interactions between the physical and chemical combustion processes involved in droplet combustion without the complications of natural buoyancy. Launched on STS-83 and STS-94 (April 4 and July 1, 1997), the Droplet Combustion Experiment (DCE) investigated the fundamentals of droplet combustion under a range of pressures (0.25 to 1 atm), oxygen mole fractions (<0.5), and droplet sizes (1.5 to 5 mm). Principal DCE flight hardware features were a chamber to supply selected test environments, the use of crew-inserted bottles, and a vent system to remove unwanted gaseous combustion products. The internal apparatus contained the droplet deployment and ignition mechanisms to burn single, freely deployed droplets in microgravity. Diagnostics systems included a 35-mm high-speed motion picture camera (see the following sequence of photos) with a backlight to photograph burning droplets and a camcorder to monitor experiment operations. Additional diagnostics included an ultraviolet-light-sensitive CCD (charge couple discharge) camera to obtain flame radiation from hydroxyl radicals (see the final figure) and a 35-mm SLR (single-lens-reflex) camera to obtain color still photographs of the flames.

  6. Salvage of blood urea nitrogen in sheep is highly dependent on plasma urea concentration and the efficiency of capture within the diegestive tract

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective was to establish the relationships between transfer of blood urea-N to the digestive tract (GIT) and utilisation of recycled urea-N within the GIT, and to determine which of these two mechanisms of the urea recycling process places greater limits on N salvage by growing sheep. Four gro...

  7. Catalytic hydrolysis of urea with fly ash for generation of ammonia in a batch reactor for flue gas conditioning and NOx reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Sahu, J.N.; Gangadharan, P.; Patwardhan, A.V.; Meikap, B.C.

    2009-01-15

    Ammonia is a highly volatile noxious material with adverse physiological effects, which become intolerable even at very low concentrations and present substantial environmental and operating hazards and risk. Yet ammonia has long been known to be used for feedstock of flue gas conditioning and NOx reduction. Urea as the source of ammonia for the production of ammonia has the obvious advantages that no ammonia shipping, handling, and storage is required. The process of this invention minimizes the risks and hazards associated with the transport, storage, and use of anhydrous and aqueous ammonia. Yet no such rapid urea conversion process is available as per requirement of high conversion in shorter time, so here we study the catalytic hydrolysis of urea for fast conversion in a batch reactor. The catalyst used in this study is fly ash, a waste material originating in great amounts in combustion processes. A number of experiments were carried out in a batch reactor at different catalytic doses, temperatures, times, and at a constant concentration of urea solution 10% by weight, and equilibrium and kinetic studies have been made.

  8. Ionic liquid self-combustion synthesis of BiOBr/Bi24O31Br10 heterojunctions with exceptional visible-light photocatalytic performances.

    PubMed

    Li, Fa-tang; Wang, Qing; Ran, Jingrun; Hao, Ying-juan; Wang, Xiao-jing; Zhao, Dishun; Qiao, Shi Zhang

    2015-01-21

    Heterostructured BiOBr/Bi24O31Br10 nanocomposites with surface oxygen vacancies are constructed by a facile in situ route of one-step self-combustion of ionic liquids. The compositions can be easily controlled by simply adjusting the fuel ratio of urea and 2-bromoethylamine hydrobromide (BTH). BTH serves not only as a fuel, but also as a complexing agent for ionic liquids and a reactant to supply the Br element. The heterojunctions show remarkable adsorptive ability for both the cationic dye of rhodamine B (RhB) and the anionic dye of methylene orange (MO) at high concentrations, which is attributed to the abundant surface oxygen vacancies. The sample containing 75.2% BiOBr and 24.8% Bi24O31Br10 exhibits the highest photocatalytic activity. Its reaction rate constant is 4.0 and 9.0 times that of pure BiOBr in degrading 50 mg L(-1) of RhB and 30 mg L(-1) of MO under visible-light (? > 400 nm) irradiation, respectively, which is attributed to the narrow band gap and highly efficient transfer efficiency of charge carriers. Different photocatalytic reaction processes and mechanisms over pure BiOBr and heterojunctions are proposed. PMID:25482071

  9. Robustness of airline route networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lordan, Oriol; Sallan, Jose M.; Escorihuela, Nuria; Gonzalez-Prieto, David

    2016-03-01

    Airlines shape their route network by defining their routes through supply and demand considerations, paying little attention to network performance indicators, such as network robustness. However, the collapse of an airline network can produce high financial costs for the airline and all its geographical area of influence. The aim of this study is to analyze the topology and robustness of the network route of airlines following Low Cost Carriers (LCCs) and Full Service Carriers (FSCs) business models. Results show that FSC hubs are more central than LCC bases in their route network. As a result, LCC route networks are more robust than FSC networks.

  10. Urea-formaldehyde resins and free formaldehyde content.

    PubMed

    Vargha, V

    1998-01-01

    Specifications of wood adhesives must be in correlation with the requirements for the corresponding wood products, for which they will be used. Formaldehyde emission of wood products bonded with urea-formaldehyde resin based adhesives is strictly regulated by standards and there is a compromise is between formaldehyde emission and performance, such as strength, or water resistance. Since values of formaldehyde emission depend on the test method used, in Europe urea-formaldehyde resins for adhesives may generally be classified according to HCHO emission in the particleboard rating of Emission 0 to Emission I class (E-0 to E-1). According to DIN EN 120, particleboard quality E1 emits <6.5 mg/100 g dry article determined with the perforator method. Although a great number of factors effect the formaldehyde emission of the cured products, such as the hardener system, the type of wood etc., the emission of formaldehyde is in strict correlation with the free formaldehyde content of the resin before the curing process. E1 emission class can be achieved, if the free formaldehyde content of the resin is lower than 0.2% by mass. Urea-formaldehyde resins containing. higher than 0.5% free formaldehyde by mass exceed emission class E2, and are not accepted. Since the free formaldehyde content of the urea-formaldehyde resin effects the emission of formaldehyde in the cured product, low formaldehyde content must be ensured during resin synthesis. This can be achieved by properly selecting synthesis conditions as well as raw materials. The quality of raw materials is an essential and determining factor for the synthesis of urea formaldehyde resins. The principal changes which may take place in the formaldehyde solution on storage are the polymerization and precipitation of the polymer, Cannizzaro reaction, methylal formation, oxydation to formic acid, condensation to hydroxyaldehydes and sugars. Any of these reactions are detrimental to product quality. The state of formaldehyde is also an essential factor, since the reaction of poly(methylene glycol)s with urea leads to methylene ether linkages resulting in emission of formaldehyde during storage and later on during the process of curing. Hydrolysis, isomerisation and decomposition of urea may take place simultaneously during improper storage conditions, such as high humidity, high temperatures, industrial atmosphere. The side products formed affect the reaction with formaldehyde during the synthesis resulting in high free formaldehyde content of urea-formaldehyde resins. The relation between synthesis conditions, free formaldehyde content and performance of urea-formaldehyde resins are discussed in detail. PMID:10526993

  11. Porous Cross-Linked Polyimide-Urea Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Mary Ann B. (Inventor); Nguyen, Baochau N. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Porous cross-linked polyimide-urea networks are provided. The networks comprise a subunit comprising two anhydride end-capped polyamic acid oligomers in direct connection via a urea linkage. The oligomers (a) each comprise a repeating unit of a dianhydride and a diamine and a terminal anhydride group and (b) are formulated with 2 to 15 of the repeating units. The subunit was formed by reaction of the diamine and a diisocyanate to form a diamine-urea linkage-diamine group, followed by reaction of the diamine-urea linkage-diamine group with the dianhydride and the diamine to form the subunit. The subunit has been cross-linked via a cross-linking agent, comprising three or more amine groups, at a balanced stoichiometry of the amine groups to the terminal anhydride groups. The subunit has been chemically imidized to yield the porous cross-linked polyimide-urea network. Also provided are wet gels, aerogels, and thin films comprising the networks, and methods of making the networks.

  12. THE REGULATION OF UREA-BIOSYNTHESIS ENZYMES IN VERTEBRATES.

    PubMed

    MORA, J; MARTUSCELLI, J; ORTIZ PINEDA, J; SOBERON, G

    1965-07-01

    1. Carbamoyl phosphate synthetase, ornithine transcarbamoylase, the arginine-synthetase system and arginase were measured in the livers of ammoniotelic, ureotelic and uricotelic animals. The chelonian reptiles, whose nitrogen excretory patterns vary according to the habitat, and the Mexican axolotl, a neotenic species, were also studied. 2. The levels of the activities of the first three enzymes mentioned correlate with the amount of nitrogen excreted as urea. 3. The terrestrial turtle, which excretes mainly uric acid, maintains a high arginase activity but has very low levels of the activities of the other three enzymes. 4. The first three enzymes of the urea cycle vary in the phylogenic scale in a co-ordinated manner, which suggests that they are under the same regulatory mechanism. 5. Urea formation from endogenous arginine in vitro has a low efficiency in the Mexican axolotl. 6. The induction of metamorphosis in the Mexican axolotl by the administration of l-tri-iodothyronine, which causes a shift from ammonio-ureotelism to complete ureotelism, is accompanied by an increase mainly in carbamoyl phosphate synthetase and also by an improvement in the efficiency of hydrolysis of endogenous arginine in vitro to give urea. 7. The results obtained by differential centrifugation of the urea-cycle enzymes in rat and Mexican-axolotl livers are presented. The location requirements for the integration of a metabolic cycle are discussed. PMID:14343146

  13. Ammonium assimilation in Proteus vulgaris, Bacillus pasteurii, and Sporosarcina ureae.

    PubMed

    Mrsdorf, G; Kaltwasser, H

    1989-01-01

    No active uptake of ammonium was detected in Proteus vulgaris, Bacillus pasteurii, and Sporosarcina ureae, which indicates that these bacteria depend on the passive diffusion of ammonia across the cell membrane. In P. vulgaris the glutamine synthetase-glutamate synthase (GS-GOGAT) pathway and glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) were present, and these enzymes exhibited high affinities for ammonium. In B. pasteurii and S. ureae, however, no GS activity was detected, and GOGAT activity was only present in S. ureae. GDH enzymes were present in these two organisms, but showed only low affinity for ammonium, with apparent Km-values of 55.2 mM in B. pasteurii and 36.7 mM in S. ureae, respectively. These observations explain why P. vulgaris is able to grow at neutral pH and low ammonium concentration (2 mM), while B. pasteurii and S. ureae require high ammonium concentration (40 mM) and alkaline pH for growth. PMID:2570557

  14. Ocean urea fertilization for carbon credits poses high ecological risks.

    PubMed

    Glibert, Patricia M; Azanza, Rhodora; Burford, Michele; Furuya, Ken; Abal, Eva; Al-Azri, Adnan; Al-Yamani, Faiza; Andersen, Per; Anderson, Donald M; Beardall, John; Berg, G Mine; Brand, Larry; Bronk, Deborah; Brookes, Justin; Burkholder, Joann M; Cembella, Allan; Cochlan, William P; Collier, Jackie L; Collos, Yves; Diaz, Robert; Doblin, Martina; Drennen, Thomas; Dyhrman, Sonya; Fukuyo, Yasuwo; Furnas, Miles; Galloway, James; Granli, Edna; Ha, Dao Viet; Hallegraeff, Gustaaf; Harrison, John; Harrison, Paul J; Heil, Cynthia A; Heimann, Kirsten; Howarth, Robert; Jauzein, Ccile; Kana, Austin A; Kana, Todd M; Kim, Hakgyoon; Kudela, Raphael; Legrand, Catherine; Mallin, Michael; Mulholland, Margaret; Murray, Shauna; O'Neil, Judith; Pitcher, Grant; Qi, Yuzao; Rabalais, Nancy; Raine, Robin; Seitzinger, Sybil; Salomon, Paulo S; Solomon, Caroline; Stoecker, Diane K; Usup, Gires; Wilson, Joanne; Yin, Kedong; Zhou, Mingjiang; Zhu, Mingyuan

    2008-06-01

    The proposed plan for enrichment of the Sulu Sea, Philippines, a region of rich marine biodiversity, with thousands of tonnes of urea in order to stimulate algal blooms and sequester carbon is flawed for multiple reasons. Urea is preferentially used as a nitrogen source by some cyanobacteria and dinoflagellates, many of which are neutrally or positively buoyant. Biological pumps to the deep sea are classically leaky, and the inefficient burial of new biomass makes the estimation of a net loss of carbon from the atmosphere questionable at best. The potential for growth of toxic dinoflagellates is also high, as many grow well on urea and some even increase their toxicity when grown on urea. Many toxic dinoflagellates form cysts which can settle to the sediment and germinate in subsequent years, forming new blooms even without further fertilization. If large-scale blooms do occur, it is likely that they will contribute to hypoxia in the bottom waters upon decomposition. Lastly, urea production requires fossil fuel usage, further limiting the potential for net carbon sequestration. The environmental and economic impacts are potentially great and need to be rigorously assessed. PMID:18439628

  15. Combustion Synthesis of Magnesium Aluminate

    SciTech Connect

    Kale, M. A.; Joshi, C. P.; Moharil, S. V.

    2011-10-20

    In the system MgO-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, three compounds MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}, MgAl{sub 6}O{sub 10}(also expressed as-Mg{sub 0.4}Al{sub 2.4}O{sub 4}) and MgAl{sub 26}O{sub 40} are well known. Importance of the first two is well established. Magnesium aluminate (MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}) spinel is a technologically important material due to its interesting thermal properties. The MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} ceramics also find application as humidity sensors. Apart from the luminescence studies, the interest in MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} is due to various applications such as humidity-sensing and PEM fuel cells, TL/OSL dosimetry of the ionizing radiations, white light source. Interest in the MgAl{sub 6}O{sub 10} has aroused due to possible use as a substrate for GaN growth. Attempt was made to synthesize these compounds by the combustion synthesis using metal nitrates as oxidizer and urea as a fuel. Compounds MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} and MgAl{sub 6}O{sub 10} were formed in a single step, while MgAl{sub 26}O{sub 40} was not formed by this procedure. Activation of MgAl{sub 6}O{sub 10} by rare earth ions like Ce{sup 3+}, Eu{sup 3+} and Tb{sup 3+} and ns{sup 2} ion Pb{sup 2+} could be achieved. Excitation bands for MgAl{sub 6}O{sub 10} are at slightly shorter wavelengths compared to those reported for MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}.

  16. Combustion Synthesis of Magnesium Aluminate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kale, M. A.; Joshi, C. P.; Moharil, S. V.

    2011-10-01

    In the system MgO-Al2O3, three compounds MgAl2O4, MgAl6O10 (also expressed as- Mg0.4Al2.4O4) and MgAl26O40 are well known. Importance of the first two is well established. Magnesium aluminate (MgAl2O4) spinel is a technologically important material due to its interesting thermal properties. The MgAl2O4 ceramics also find application as humidity sensors. Apart from the luminescence studies, the interest in MgAl2O4 is due to various applications such as humidity-sensing and PEM fuel cells, TL/OSL dosimetry of the ionizing radiations, white light source. Interest in the MgAl6O10 has aroused due to possible use as a substrate for GaN growth. Attempt was made to synthesize these compounds by the combustion synthesis using metal nitrates as oxidizer and urea as a fuel. Compounds MgAl2O4 and MgAl6O10 were formed in a single step, while MgAl26O40 was not formed by this procedure. Activation of MgAl6O10 by rare earth ions like Ce3+, Eu3+ and Tb3+ and ns2 ion Pb2+ could be achieved. Excitation bands for MgAl6O10 are at slightly shorter wavelengths compared to those reported for MgAl2O4.

  17. Crystal structure of a bacterial homologue of the kidney urea transporter

    SciTech Connect

    Levin, Elena J.; Quick, Matthias; Zhou, Ming

    2010-03-19

    Urea is highly concentrated in the mammalian kidney to produce the osmotic gradient necessary for water re-absorption. Free diffusion of urea across cell membranes is slow owing to its high polarity, and specialized urea transporters have evolved to achieve rapid and selective urea permeation. Here we present the 2.3 {angstrom} structure of a functional urea transporter from the bacterium Desulfovibrio vulgaris. The transporter is a homotrimer, and each subunit contains a continuous membrane-spanning pore formed by the two homologous halves of the protein. The pore contains a constricted selectivity filter that can accommodate several dehydrated urea molecules in single file. Backbone and side-chain oxygen atoms provide continuous coordination of urea as it progresses through the filter, and well-placed {alpha}-helix dipoles provide further compensation for dehydration energy. These results establish that the urea transporter operates by a channel-like mechanism and reveal the physical and chemical basis of urea selectivity.

  18. Improving Ammonium and Nitrate Release from Urea Using Clinoptilolite Zeolite and Compost Produced from Agricultural Wastes

    PubMed Central

    Omar, Latifah; Ahmed, Osumanu Haruna; Majid, Nik Muhamad Ab.

    2015-01-01

    Improper use of urea may cause environmental pollution through NH3 volatilization and NO3− leaching from urea. Clinoptilolite zeolite and compost could be used to control N loss from urea by controlling NH4+ and NO3− release from urea. Soil incubation and leaching experiments were conducted to determine the effects of clinoptilolite zeolite and compost on controlling NH4+ and NO3− losses from urea. Bekenu Series soil (Typic Paleudults) was incubated for 30, 60, and 90 days. A soil leaching experiment was conducted for 30 days. Urea amended with clinoptilolite zeolite and compost significantly reduced NH4+ and NO3− release from urea (soil incubation study) compared with urea alone, thus reducing leaching of these ions. Ammonium and NO3− leaching losses during the 30 days of the leaching experiment were highest in urea alone compared with urea with clinoptilolite zeolite and compost treatments. At 30 days of the leaching experiment, NH4+ retention in soil with urea amended with clinoptilolite zeolite and compost was better than that with urea alone. These observations were because of the high pH, CEC, and other chemical properties of clinoptilolite zeolite and compost. Urea can be amended with clinoptilolite zeolite and compost to improve NH4+ and NO3− release from urea. PMID:25793220

  19. Improving ammonium and nitrate release from urea using clinoptilolite zeolite and compost produced from agricultural wastes.

    PubMed

    Omar, Latifah; Ahmed, Osumanu Haruna; Ab Majid, Nik Muhamad

    2015-01-01

    Improper use of urea may cause environmental pollution through NH3 volatilization and NO3 (-) leaching from urea. Clinoptilolite zeolite and compost could be used to control N loss from urea by controlling NH4 (+) and NO3 (-) release from urea. Soil incubation and leaching experiments were conducted to determine the effects of clinoptilolite zeolite and compost on controlling NH4 (+) and NO3 (-) losses from urea. Bekenu Series soil (Typic Paleudults) was incubated for 30, 60, and 90 days. A soil leaching experiment was conducted for 30 days. Urea amended with clinoptilolite zeolite and compost significantly reduced NH4 (+) and NO3 (-) release from urea (soil incubation study) compared with urea alone, thus reducing leaching of these ions. Ammonium and NO3 (-) leaching losses during the 30 days of the leaching experiment were highest in urea alone compared with urea with clinoptilolite zeolite and compost treatments. At 30 days of the leaching experiment, NH4 (+) retention in soil with urea amended with clinoptilolite zeolite and compost was better than that with urea alone. These observations were because of the high pH, CEC, and other chemical properties of clinoptilolite zeolite and compost. Urea can be amended with clinoptilolite zeolite and compost to improve NH4 (+) and NO3 (-) release from urea. PMID:25793220

  20. Coal Combustion Science

    SciTech Connect

    Hardesty, D.R.; Fletcher, T.H.; Hurt, R.H.; Baxter, L.L. )

    1991-08-01

    The objective of this activity is to support the Office of Fossil Energy in executing research on coal combustion science. This activity consists of basic research on coal combustion that supports both the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center Direct Utilization Advanced Research and Technology Development Program, and the International Energy Agency Coal Combustion Science Project. Specific tasks for this activity include: (1) coal devolatilization - the objective of this risk is to characterize the physical and chemical processes that constitute the early devolatilization phase of coal combustion as a function of coal type, heating rate, particle size and temperature, and gas phase temperature and oxidizer concentration; (2) coal char combustion -the objective of this task is to characterize the physical and chemical processes involved during coal char combustion as a function of coal type, particle size and temperature, and gas phase temperature and oxygen concentration; (3) fate of mineral matter during coal combustion - the objective of this task is to establish a quantitative understanding of the mechanisms and rates of transformation, fragmentation, and deposition of mineral matter in coal combustion environments as a function of coal type, particle size and temperature, the initial forms and distribution of mineral species in the unreacted coal, and the local gas temperature and composition.

  1. Catalytically enhanced combustion process

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, C.

    1992-05-26

    This patent describes a fuel having improved combustion efficiency. It comprises a petroleum based liquid hydrocarbon; and a combustion catalyst comprising from about 18 to about 21 weight percent naphthalene, from about 75 to about 80 weight percent toluene, and from about 2.8 to about 3.2 weight percent benzyl alcohol.

  2. Fifteenth combustion research conference

    SciTech Connect

    1993-06-01

    The BES research efforts cover chemical reaction theory, experimental dynamics and spectroscopy, thermodynamics of combustion intermediates, chemical kinetics, reaction mechanisms, combustion diagnostics, and fluid dynamics and chemically reacting flows. 98 papers and abstracts are included. Separate abstracts were prepared for the papers.

  3. VHDL Control Routing Simulator

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1995-07-10

    The control router simulates a backplane consisting of up to 16 slot. Slot 0, reserved for a control module (cr-ctrl), generates the system clocks and provides the serial interface to the Gating Logic. The remaining 15 slots (1-15) contain routing modules (cr mod), each having up to 64 serial inputs and outputs with FIFOs. Messages to be transmitted to the Control Router are taken from text files. There are currently 17 such source files. Inmorethe model, the serial output of each source is connected to multiple receivers, so that there are 8 identical messages transmitted to the router for each message file entry.less

  4. VHDL Control Routing Simulator

    SciTech Connect

    Venard, J.

    1995-07-10

    The control router simulates a backplane consisting of up to 16 slot. Slot 0, reserved for a control module (cr-ctrl), generates the system clocks and provides the serial interface to the Gating Logic. The remaining 15 slots (1-15) contain routing modules (cr mod), each having up to 64 serial inputs and outputs with FIFOs. Messages to be transmitted to the Control Router are taken from text files. There are currently 17 such source files. In the model, the serial output of each source is connected to multiple receivers, so that there are 8 identical messages transmitted to the router for each message file entry.

  5. [The clinical spectrum of urea cycle defects in adult patients].

    PubMed

    Mller-Marbach, Alex Michael; Keitel, V; Gbel, T; Jensen, B-E; Gbels, S; Baur, C; Schneitler, S; Schneitler, V; Behm, P; Becker, M; Brinkmeyer, C; Foede, M; Httig, F; Beyer, M; Breuer, M; Filke, S; Giesecke, C; Haars, U; Haes, J; Heinzel-Pleines, U; Kann, S; Kocheril, S J; Mallach, S; Sagert, C; Qvartskhava, N; Winzer, R; Donner, M G

    2011-07-01

    Urea cycle defects belong to the most common metabolic disorders with a cumulative incidence of 1:8000. A common trait of urea cycle defects is a disturbed detoxification of ammonia leading to hyperammonemia in the event of a high nitrogen load. Most patients develop symptoms in the neonatal period or in infancy, e. g. vomiting, seizures and disturbed consciousness. Depending on the affected enzyme and its residual activity, patients differ in the age at first presentation, the character and severity of symptoms and in the susceptibility to metabolic derangement. The presence of hyperammonemia and an altered plasma amino acid profile give the essential diagnostic clues. Since modern therapeutic measures have prolonged the life expectancy of these patients and provided the possibility of a first presentation in adulthood, patients with urea cycle defects have become an increasing challenge in internal medicine. The reported case series illustrates the heterogeneous clinical course of these disorders from childhood to adulthood. PMID:22139877

  6. Japan's microgravity combustion science program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sato, Junichi

    1993-01-01

    Most of energy used by us is generated by combustion of fuels. On the other hand, combustion is responsible for contamination of our living earth. Combustion, also, gives us damage to our life as fire or explosive accidents. Therefore, clean and safe combustion is now eagerly required. Knowledge of the combustion process in combustors is needed to achieve proper designs that have stable operation, high efficiency, and low emission levels. However, current understanding on combustion is far from complete. Especially, there is few useful information on practical liquid and solid particle cloud combustion. Studies on combustion process under microgravity condition will provide many informations for basic questions related to combustors.

  7. New Routing Metrics for ADHOC Network Routing Protocols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, P. C.

    2014-12-01

    The performance and reliability of Internet is measured using different quantities. When the quantities measured are essential and have wide range of acceptance then they are called metrics. Performance metrics enable comparison and selection among the alternatives. In computer networks, metrics are used to evaluate an application, protocol etc. Routing in adhoc networks is nontrivial. Routing protocols for adhoc networks are still evolving and there is need for continuous evaluation of them. In the literature existing, several routing protocols are evaluated using standard metrics under different conditions. This paper proposes new metrics for evaluation of routing protocols and uses them to evaluate the adhoc network routing protocols AODV, DSR, DSDV and TORA. Simulation environment is created using NS-2 simulator. Typical range of speeds, pause times and data rates are used. The results provide new insights in to the working of the routing protocols.

  8. Intelligent route surveillance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoemaker, Robin; Sandbrink, Rody; van Voorthuijsen, Graeme

    2009-05-01

    Intelligence on abnormal and suspicious behaviour along roads in operational domains is extremely valuable for countering the IED (Improvised Explosive Device) threat. Local sensor networks at strategic spots can gather data for continuous monitoring of daily vehicle activity. Unattended intelligent ground sensor networks use simple sensing nodes, e.g. seismic, magnetic, radar, or acoustic, or combinations of these in one housing. The nodes deliver rudimentary data at any time to be processed with software that filters out the required information. At TNO (Netherlands Organisation for Applied Scientific Research) research has started on how to equip a sensor network with data analysis software to determine whether behaviour is suspicious or not. Furthermore, the nodes should be expendable, if necessary, and be small in size such that they are hard to detect by adversaries. The network should be self-configuring and self-sustaining and should be reliable, efficient, and effective during operational tasks - especially route surveillance - as well as robust in time and space. If data from these networks are combined with data from other remote sensing devices (e.g. UAVs (Unmanned Aerial Vehicles)/aerostats), an even more accurate assessment of the tactical situation is possible. This paper shall focus on the concepts of operation towards a working intelligent route surveillance (IRS) research demonstrator network for monitoring suspicious behaviour in IED sensitive domains.

  9. Urea cycle disorders: clinical presentation outside the newborn period.

    PubMed

    Smith, Wendy; Kishnani, Priya S; Lee, Brendan; Singh, Rani H; Rhead, William J; Sniderman King, Lisa; Smith, Michael; Summar, Marshall

    2005-10-01

    Although most commonly associated with infancy, the majority of individuals with urea cycle disorders (UCDs) present outside the neonatal period, frequently in childhood. Signs and symptoms are often vague, but recurrent; fulminant presentations associated with acute illness are also common. A disorder of urea cycle metabolism should be considered in children who have recurrent symptoms, especially neurologic abnormalities associated with periods of decompensation. Routine laboratory tests, including measurement of plasma ammonia concentrations, can indicate a potential UCD; however, specific metabolic testing and ultimately enzymatic or molecular confirmation are necessary to establish a diagnosis. Treatment with dietary protein restriction and medications may be challenging in children. PMID:16227115

  10. Photoluminescence of Eu{sup 3+}-doped LaPO{sub 4} nanocrystals synthesized by combustion method

    SciTech Connect

    Xiu Zhiliang; Liu Suwen; Lue Mengkai . E-mail: mklu@icm.sdu.edu.cn; Zhang Haiping; Zhou Guangjun

    2006-03-09

    Eu{sup 3+}-doped LaPO{sub 4} nanocrystals were synthesized for the first time by a combustion method with urea as a fuel calcined at 700 deg. C. The diffraction profile of the obtained sample was indexed as a monoclinic monazite-structure by X-ray diffraction (XRD) data. The obtained nanocrystals appeared to be short rod-like with diameters of 5-10 nm and lengths of 20-70 nm. The luminescence intensities of Eu{sup 3+}-doped LaPO{sub 4} nanocrystals were found to be strongly dependent on the quantities of urea added and the concentration of Eu{sup 3+}.

  11. Design and testing of an independently controlled urea SCR retrofit system for the reduction of NOx emissions from marine diesels.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Derek R; Bedick, Clinton R; Clark, Nigel N; McKain, David L

    2009-05-15

    Diesel engine emissions for on-road, stationary and marine applications are regulated in the United States via standards set by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). A major component of diesel exhaust that is difficult to reduce is nitrogen oxides (NOx). Selective catalytic reduction (SCR) has been in use for many years for stationary applications, including external combustion boilers, and is promising for NOx abatement as a retrofit for mobile applications where diesel compression ignition engines are used. The research presented in this paper is the first phase of a program focused on the reduction of NOx by use of a stand-alone urea injection system, applicable to marine diesel engines typical of work boats (e.g., tugs). Most current urea SCR systems communicate with engine controls to predict NOx emissions based on signals such as torque and engine speed, however many marine engines in use still employ mechanical injection technology and lack electronic communication abilities. The system developed and discussed in this paper controls NOx emissions independentof engine operating parameters and measures NOx and exhaust flow using the following exhaust sensor inputs: absolute pressure, differential pressure, temperature, and NOx concentration. These sensor inputs were integrated into an independent controller and open loop architecture to estimate the necessary amount of urea needed, and the controller uses pulse width modulation (PWM) to power an automotive fuel injector for airless urea delivery. The system was tested in a transient test cell on a 350 hp engine certified at 4 g/bhp-hr of NOx, with a goal of reducing the engine out NOx levels by 50%. NOx reduction capabilities of 41-67% were shown on the non road transient cycle (NRTC) and ICOMIA E5 steady state cycles with system optimization during testing to minimize the dilute ammonia slip to cycle averages of 5-7 ppm. The goal of 50% reduction of NOx can be achieved dependent upon cycle. Further research with control optimization, urea distribution and possible use of oxidation catalysts is recommended to improve the NOx reduction capabilities while minimizing ammonia slip. PMID:19544914

  12. The Modification of Polyurethane Foams Using New Boroorganic Polyols (II) Polyurethane Foams from Boron-Modified Hydroxypropyl Urea Derivatives

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The work focuses on research related to determination of application possibility of new, ecofriendly boroorganic polyols in rigid polyurethane foams production. Polyols were obtained from hydroxypropyl urea derivatives esterified with boric acid and propylene carbonate. The influence of esterification type on properties of polyols and next on polyurethane foams properties was determined. Nitrogen and boron impacts on the foams' properties were discussed, for instance, on their physical, mechanical, and electric properties. Boron presence causes improvement of dimensional stability and thermal stability of polyurethane foams. They can be applied even at temperature 150C. Unfortunately, introducing boron in polyurethanes foams affects deterioration of their water absorption, which increases as compared to the foams that do not contain boron. However, presence of both boron and nitrogen determines the decrease of the foams combustibility. Main impact on the decrease combustibility of the obtained foams has nitrogen presence, but in case of proper boron and nitrogen ratio their synergic activity on the combustibility decrease can be easily seen. PMID:24587721

  13. Combustion in supersonic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Northam, G. B.

    1985-01-01

    A workshop on combustion in supersonic flow was held in conjunction with the 21st JANNAF Combustion Meeting at Laurel, Maryland on October 3 to 4 1984. The objective of the workshop was to establish the level of current understanding of supersonic combustion. The workshop was attended by approximately fifty representatives from government laboratories, engine companies, and universities. Twenty different speakers made presentations in their area of expertise during the first day of the workshop. On the second day, the presentations were discussed, deficiencies in the current understanding defined, and a list of recommended programs generated to address these deficiencies. The agenda for the workshop is given.

  14. Gas turbine combustion instability

    SciTech Connect

    Richards, G.A.; Lee, G.T.

    1996-09-01

    Combustion oscillations are a common problem in development of LPM (lean premix) combustors. Unlike earlier, diffusion style combustors, LPM combustors are especially susceptible to oscillations because acoustic losses are smaller and operation near lean blowoff produces a greater combustion response to disturbances in reactant supply, mixing, etc. In ongoing tests at METC, five instability mechanisms have been identified in subscale and commercial scale nozzle tests. Changes to fuel nozzle geometry showed that it is possible to stabilize combustion by altering the timing of the feedback between acoustic waves and the variation in heat release.

  15. Biohydrogen production: strategies to improve process efficiency through microbial routes.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekhar, Kuppam; Lee, Yong-Jik; Lee, Dong-Woo

    2015-01-01

    The current fossil fuel-based generation of energy has led to large-scale industrial development. However, the reliance on fossil fuels leads to the significant depletion of natural resources of buried combustible geologic deposits and to negative effects on the global climate with emissions of greenhouse gases. Accordingly, enormous efforts are directed to transition from fossil fuels to nonpolluting and renewable energy sources. One potential alternative is biohydrogen (H2), a clean energy carrier with high-energy yields; upon the combustion of H2, H2O is the only major by-product. In recent decades, the attractive and renewable characteristics of H2 led us to develop a variety of biological routes for the production of H2. Based on the mode of H2 generation, the biological routes for H2 production are categorized into four groups: photobiological fermentation, anaerobic fermentation, enzymatic and microbial electrolysis, and a combination of these processes. Thus, this review primarily focuses on the evaluation of the biological routes for the production of H2. In particular, we assess the efficiency and feasibility of these bioprocesses with respect to the factors that affect operations, and we delineate the limitations. Additionally, alternative options such as bioaugmentation, multiple process integration, and microbial electrolysis to improve process efficiency are discussed to address industrial-level applications. PMID:25874756

  16. Biohydrogen Production: Strategies to Improve Process Efficiency through Microbial Routes

    PubMed Central

    Chandrasekhar, Kuppam; Lee, Yong-Jik; Lee, Dong-Woo

    2015-01-01

    The current fossil fuel-based generation of energy has led to large-scale industrial development. However, the reliance on fossil fuels leads to the significant depletion of natural resources of buried combustible geologic deposits and to negative effects on the global climate with emissions of greenhouse gases. Accordingly, enormous efforts are directed to transition from fossil fuels to nonpolluting and renewable energy sources. One potential alternative is biohydrogen (H2), a clean energy carrier with high-energy yields; upon the combustion of H2, H2O is the only major by-product. In recent decades, the attractive and renewable characteristics of H2 led us to develop a variety of biological routes for the production of H2. Based on the mode of H2 generation, the biological routes for H2 production are categorized into four groups: photobiological fermentation, anaerobic fermentation, enzymatic and microbial electrolysis, and a combination of these processes. Thus, this review primarily focuses on the evaluation of the biological routes for the production of H2. In particular, we assess the efficiency and feasibility of these bioprocesses with respect to the factors that affect operations, and we delineate the limitations. Additionally, alternative options such as bioaugmentation, multiple process integration, and microbial electrolysis to improve process efficiency are discussed to address industrial-level applications. PMID:25874756

  17. Vertex routing models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markovic, D.; Gros, C.

    2009-07-01

    A class of models describing the flow of information within networks via routing processes is proposed and investigated, concentrating on the effects of memory traces on the global properties. The long-term flow of information is governed by cyclic attractors, allowing to define a measure for the information centrality of a vertex given by the number of attractors passing through this vertex. We find the number of vertices having a nonzero information centrality to be extensive/subextensive for models with/without a memory trace in the thermodynamic limit. We evaluate the distribution of the number of cycles, of the cycle length and of the maximal basins of attraction, finding a complete scaling collapse in the thermodynamic limit for the latter. Possible implications of our results for the information flow in social networks are discussed.

  18. Dry low combustion system with means for eliminating combustion noise

    DOEpatents

    Verdouw, Albert J.; Smith, Duane; McCormick, Keith; Razdan, Mohan K.

    2004-02-17

    A combustion system including a plurality of axially staged tubular premixers to control emissions and minimize combustion noise. The combustion system includes a radial inflow premixer that delivers the combustion mixture across a contoured dome into the combustion chamber. The axially staged premixers having a twist mixing apparatus to rotate the fluid flow and cause improved mixing without causing flow recirculation that could lead to pre-ignition or flashback.

  19. 21 CFR 177.1900 - Urea-formaldehyde resins in molded articles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... conditions: (a) For the purpose of this section, urea-formaldehyde resins are those produced when 1 mole of urea is made to react with not more than 2 moles of formaldehyde in water solution. (b) The resins...

  20. 21 CFR 177.1900 - Urea-formaldehyde resins in molded articles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... conditions: (a) For the purpose of this section, urea-formaldehyde resins are those produced when 1 mole of urea is made to react with not more than 2 moles of formaldehyde in water solution. (b) The resins...

  1. 21 CFR 177.1900 - Urea-formaldehyde resins in molded articles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... section, urea-formaldehyde resins are those produced when 1 mole of urea is made to react with not more than 2 moles of formaldehyde in water solution. (b) The resins may be mixed with refined wood pulp...

  2. 21 CFR 177.1900 - Urea-formaldehyde resins in molded articles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... conditions: (a) For the purpose of this section, urea-formaldehyde resins are those produced when 1 mole of urea is made to react with not more than 2 moles of formaldehyde in water solution. (b) The resins...

  3. 21 CFR 177.1900 - Urea-formaldehyde resins in molded articles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... conditions: (a) For the purpose of this section, urea-formaldehyde resins are those produced when 1 mole of urea is made to react with not more than 2 moles of formaldehyde in water solution. (b) The resins...

  4. 40 CFR 418.30 - Applicability; description of the urea subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS FERTILIZER MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Urea Subcategory § 418.30... battery limits of the urea manufacturing operations, and cooling tower blowdown are excluded. (Sec....

  5. NEW QUATERNARY AMMONIUM ION REAGENTS FROM UREA FOR FABRIC TREATMENT

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recently, we showed a one step conversion of urea to tertiary amines in water (J. Org. Chem., 2000, 65, 9234-9237). Of these, we used triallylamine to quaternize PEG, PPG, and aryl bromides (Figure 1). One and two-dimensional NMR and chemical ionization mass spectrometries were used to characteriz...

  6. New urea-absorbing polymers for artificial kidney machines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, W. A.; Hsu, G. C.; Marsh, H. E., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    Etherified polymer is made from modified cellulose derivative which is reacted with periodate. It will absorb 2 grams of urea per 100 grams of polymer. Indications are that polymers could be used to help remove uremic wastes in artificial kidneys, or they could be administered orally as therapy for uremia.

  7. Peptidyl-urea based inhibitors of soluble epoxide hydrolases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We prepared a series of amino acid derived cyclohexyl and adamantyl ureas and tested them as inhibitors of the human soluble epoxide hydrolase, and obtained very potent compounds (K(I)=15nM) that are >10-fold more soluble than previously described sEH inhibitors. While our lead compound 2 showed low...

  8. Spectrophotometric determination of urea in dermatologic formulations and cosmetics.

    PubMed

    Bojic, Jorgovanka; Radovanovic, Blaga; Dimitrijevic, Jasmina

    2008-06-01

    A rapid, relatively sensitive, and low-cost method for the determination of water-soluble urea content in dermatological therapy products and cosmetics is proposed using a new spectrophotometric assay with water as the only extraction solvent. Spectrophotometric methods involve addition of a known excess of bromate to urea in an acid medium, followed by the determination of residual bromine and chlorine reacting with methyl orange and measurement of absorbance at 505 nm. The absorbance increases linearly with urea concentration (r = 0.9998). The systems obey Beer's law for 6 - 90 microg ml(-1). The calculated apparent molar absorbance values are found to be 4.537 x 10(3) dm(3) mol(-1) cm(-1) and the Sandell's sensitivity is 0.013 microg cm(-2). The variables affecting the rate of the reaction were investigated. The relative standard deviation for five-replication determination of 60 microg ml(-1) urea was 2.1% and the detection limit of the method is 0.34 ng ml(-1). PMID:18544867

  9. Tailoring of analytical performances of urea biosensors using nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nouira, W.; Barhoumi, H.; Maaref, A.; Jaffrzic Renault, N.; Siadat, M.

    2013-03-01

    This paper is a contribution to the study of enzymatic sensors based on nanoparticles of iron oxide (FeNPs). Urease enzyme was immobilized on FeNPs using layer-by-layer (LbL) deposition method. FeNPs were first coated with polyelectrolytes (PE): Poly (allylamine hydrochloride), PAH and Poly (sodium 4-styrenesulfonate), PSS for enzyme immobilization and then with enzyme. It has been confirmed through zeta potential measurements of FeNPs that the enzyme is immobilized on the surface. We evaluated the sensitivity of biosensors for urea by potentiometric and capacitive measurements on silicon / silica / FeNP-LBL-urease structures. The recorded capacity-potential curves (C-V) show a significant shift of flat band potential towards negative potentials in the presence of urea, the observed values of sensitivity vary between 30 and 40 mV/p[urea]. It has been shown that the proposed method for the immobilization of urease can increase the dynamic range of urea detection (10-4M to 10-1M) compared to the immobilization of urease without FeNP (10-3.5 M to 10-2.5 M). When the number of PAH-PSS layers was increased the sensitivity of detection was modified. This effect is due to partial inhibition of the enzyme in presence of FeNPs, which was shown by measurements in homogeneous phase.

  10. Reduction in slow intercompartmental clearance of urea during dialysis

    SciTech Connect

    Bowsher, D.J.; Krejcie, T.C.; Avram, M.J.; Chow, M.J.; Del Greco, F.; Atkinson, A.J. Jr.

    1985-04-01

    The kinetics of urea and inulin were analyzed in five anesthetized dogs during sequential 2-hour periods before, during, and after hemodialysis. The distribution of both compounds after simultaneous intravenous injection was characterized by three-compartment models, and the total volumes of urea (0.66 +/- 0.05 L/kg) and inulin (0.19 +/- 0.01 L/kg) distribution were similar to expected values for total body water and extravascular space, respectively. Intercompartmental clearances calculated before dialysis were used to estimate blood flows to the fast and slow equilibrating compartments. In agreement with previous results, the sum of these flows was similar to cardiac output, averaging 101% of cardiac output measured before dialysis (range 72% to 135%). Dialysis was accompanied by reductions in the slow intercompartmental clearances of urea (81%) and inulin (47%), which reflected a 90% attenuation in blood flow supplying the slow equilibrating compartments. This was estimated to result in a 10% average reduction in the efficiency with which urea was removed by dialysis (range 2.0% to 16.4%). Mean arterial pressure fell by less than 5% during dialysis, but total peripheral resistance increased by 47% and cardiac output fell by 35%. In the postdialysis period, total peripheral resistance and cardiac output returned toward predialysis values, but blood flow to the slow equilibrating peripheral compartment was still reduced by 80%. These changes parallel activation of the renin-angiotensin system, but further studies are required to establish causality.

  11. ANTIMICROBIAL ACTIVITIES OF N-CHLORAMINES AND DIAZOLIDINYL UREA

    EPA Science Inventory

    A combination of MICs of an N-chloramine, a simple chlorinated amino acid, and diazolidinyl urea gave synergistic activity against bacteria, but not fungi. The two compounds at a higher concentration, 0.1 and 0.3%, respectively, gave synergistic inhibition of fungi; kill times we...

  12. Gelation by supramolecular dimerization of mono(urea)s.

    PubMed

    Hooper, Abigail E; Kennedy, Stuart R; Jones, Christopher D; Steed, Jonathan W

    2015-12-15

    Mono-ureido salicylic acid derivatives form hydrogen bonded dimers that mimic the gelation behaviour of covalently linked bis(urea)s. The 5-ureido salicylic acid isomers are much more effective gelators because of the lowered conjugation and less planar geometry, resulting in stronger ureaurea ?-tape hydrogen bonding interactions. PMID:26540132

  13. IRIS Toxicological Review of Urea (Interagency Science Consultation Draft)

    EPA Science Inventory

    On September 28, 2010, the Toxicological Review of Urea and the charge to external peer reviewers were released for external peer review and public comment. The Toxicological Review and charge were reviewed internally by EPA and by other federal agencies and White House Of...

  14. IRIS Toxicological Review of Urea (Interagency Science Discussion Draft)

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA is releasing the draft report, Toxicological Review of Urea,, that was distributed to Federal agencies and White House Offices for comment during the Science Discussion step of the IRIS Assessment Development Process. C...

  15. 75 FR 74746 - Solid Urea From Russia and Ukraine

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-01

    ... solid urea from the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (``USSR'') (52 FR 26367). On June 29, 1992... part 207), as most recently amended at 74 FR 2847 (January 16, 2009). \\1\\ No response to this request... state (57 FR 28828). Following first five-year reviews by Commerce and the Commission,...

  16. Sandia Combustion Research: Technical review

    SciTech Connect

    1995-07-01

    This report contains reports from research programs conducted at the Sandia Combustion Research Facility. Research is presented under the following topics: laser based diagnostics; combustion chemistry; reacting flow; combustion in engines and commercial burners; coal combustion; and industrial processing. Individual projects were processed separately for entry onto the DOE databases.

  17. Studies in premixed combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Sivashinsky, G.I.

    1992-01-01

    This report discusses the following topics on premixed combustion: theory of turbulent flame propagation; pattern formation in premixed flames and related problems; and pattern formation in extended systems. (LSP)

  18. Combustion theory. Second edition

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, F.

    1985-01-01

    This systematic, high-level presentation of the theory of combustion covers advances made in the field since 1965 and includes a discussion of areas such as thermodynamics, fluid dynamics, chemical kinetics and transport processes.

  19. COMBUSTION - RISK MANAGEMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This research involves the characterization of waste combustion systems and their emissions along with the development and evaluation of techniques to prevent emissions formation and/or control their release. This area addresses incinerators and industrial systems burning wastes...

  20. Performance of cellulose acetate butyrate membranes in hyperfiltration of sodium chloride and urea feed solution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wydeven, T.; Leban, M.

    1973-01-01

    Cellulose acetate butyrate (CAB) membranes are shown to give high salt and urea rejection with water flux of about 3 gallons/sq ft per day at 600 psig. Membranes prepared from a formulation containing glyoxal show a significant increase in flux and decrease in salt and urea rejection with drying time. Zero drying time gives maximum urea and salt rejection and is therefore most suitable for hyperfiltration of sodium chloride and urea feed solution.

  1. Urea in dry-rolled corn diets: finishing steer performance, nutrient digestion, and microbial protein production.

    PubMed

    Milton, C T; Brandt, R T; Titgemeyer, E C

    1997-05-01

    In Exp. 1, 88 yearling steers (332 kg) were fed dry-rolled corn finishing diets to evaluate effects of dietary urea level on performance and carcass characteristics. Diets contained 0, .5, 1.0, or 1.5% urea (DM basis), which supplied all supplemental N, and 10% chopped prairie hay. Gains (P = .10) and gain efficiency (G/F; P < .05) were increased by .5% urea, with little improvement by additional urea. Regression analysis estimated optimal dietary urea at .9% of DM for ADG and G/F. Fat thickness (P < .05) and yield grade (P < .10) increased linearly with dietary urea level. In Exp. 2, four ruminally and duodenally cannulated steers (557 kg) were fed the diets used in Exp. 1 to evaluate effects of dietary urea on site and extent of digestion. True ruminal OM and starch digestion were increased 25 and 37%, respectively, by .5% urea, but higher urea levels did not differ from .5%. Flows of total N and microbial N to the duodenum were not affected by urea level. In Exp. 3, 100 yearling steers (347 kg) were fed dry-rolled corn finishing diets that contained 10% alfalfa hay as the dietary roughage to evaluate effects of dietary urea level on performance and carcass characteristics. Urea levels were 0, .35, .70, 1.05, or 1.40% urea (DM basis), with no other supplemental N provided. Dry matter intake (P = .10), ADG (P < .05), and G/F (P < .05) increased with intermediate concentrations of urea but decreased with the highest concentration. Regression analysis indicated that the optimal dietary urea level was .5% of DM for ADG and G/F. Urea increased dietary energy utilization but not metabolizable protein supply. PMID:9159292

  2. Erythrocyte permeability to urea and water: comparative study in rodents, ruminants, carnivores, humans, and birds.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lifeng; Lei, Tianluo; Bankir, Lise; Zhao, Dan; Gai, Xiaodong; Zhao, Xuejian; Yang, Baoxue

    2011-01-01

    Mammalian erythrocytes exhibit high urea permeability (P (urea)) due to UT-B expression in their cytoplasmic membrane. This high P (urea) allows fast equilibration of urea in erythrocytes during their transit in the hyperosmotic renal medulla. It also allows more urea (in addition to that in plasma) to participate in counter-current exchange between ascending and descending vasa recta, thus improving the trapping of urea in the medulla and improving urine concentrating ability. To determine if P (urea) in erythrocytes is related to diet and urine concentrating ability, we measured P (urea) in erythrocytes from 11 different mammals and 5 birds using stopped-flow light scattering. Carnivores (dog, fox, cat) exhibited high P (urea) (in x10(-5) cm/s, 5.3 0.6, 3.8 0.5 and 2.8 0.7, respectively). In contrast, herbivores (cow, donkey, sheep) showed much lower P (urea) (0.8 0.2, 0.7 0.2, 1.0 0.1, respectively). Erythrocyte P (urea) in human (1.1 0.2), and pig (1.5 0.1), the two omnivores, was intermediate. Rodents and lagomorphs (mouse, rat, rabbit) had P (urea) intermediate between carnivores and omnivores (3.3 0.4, 2.5 0.3 and 2.4 0.3, respectively). Birds that do not excrete urea and do not express UT-B in their erythrocytes had very low values (<0.1 10(-5) cm/s). In contrast to P (urea), water permeability, measured simultaneously, was relatively similar in all mammals. The species differences in erythrocytes P (urea) most probably reflect adaptation to the different types of diet and resulting different needs for concentrating urea in the urine. PMID:20878327

  3. Sandia Combustion Research Program

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, S.C.; Palmer, R.E.; Montana, C.A.

    1988-01-01

    During the late 1970s, in response to a national energy crisis, Sandia proposed to the US Department of Energy (DOE) a new, ambitious program in combustion research. Shortly thereafter, the Combustion Research Facility (CRF) was established at Sandia's Livermore location. Designated a ''user facility,'' the charter of the CRF was to develop and maintain special-purpose resources to support a nationwide initiative-involving US inventories, industry, and national laboratories--to improve our understanding and control of combustion. This report includes descriptions several research projects which have been simulated by working groups and involve the on-site participation of industry scientists. DOE's Industry Technology Fellowship program, supported through the Office of Energy Research, has been instrumental in the success of some of these joint efforts. The remainder of this report presents results of calendar year 1988, separated thematically into eleven categories. Referred journal articles appearing in print during 1988 and selected other publications are included at the end of Section 11. Our traditional'' research activities--combustion chemistry, reacting flows, diagnostics, engine and coal combustion--have been supplemented by a new effort aimed at understanding combustion-related issues in the management of toxic and hazardous materials.

  4. Coal combustion system

    DOEpatents

    Wilkes, Colin (Lebanon, IN); Mongia, Hukam C. (Carmel, IN); Tramm, Peter C. (Indianapolis, IN)

    1988-01-01

    In a coal combustion system suitable for a gas turbine engine, pulverized coal is transported to a rich zone combustor and burned at an equivalence ratio exceeding 1 at a temperature above the slagging temperature of the coal so that combustible hot gas and molten slag issue from the rich zone combustor. A coolant screen of water stretches across a throat of a quench stage and cools the combustible gas and molten slag to below the slagging temperature of the coal so that the slag freezes and shatters into small pellets. The pelletized slag is separated from the combustible gas in a first inertia separator. Residual ash is separated from the combustible gas in a second inertia separator. The combustible gas is mixed with secondary air in a lean zone combustor and burned at an equivalence ratio of less than 1 to produce hot gas motive at temperature above the coal slagging temperature. The motive fluid is cooled in a dilution stage to an acceptable turbine inlet temperature before being transported to the turbine.

  5. EFFECT OF FOLIAR APPLICATION OF UREA WITH NBPT ON THE PHYSIOLOGY AND YIELD OF COTTON

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Urea is the most recommended foliar N source, due to its relatively low toxicity, quick absorption, and low cost. However, reports of yield improvements with foliar urea application are not consistent. The objectives of this research were to study foliar urea assimilation in cotton and to test the ...

  6. Use of natural and biobased materials for controlled-release of urea in water: Environmental applications

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Urea pearls were encapsulated in cloisite-based matrices using different natural materials (lignin, beeswax and latex) to control the release of urea over time. It was found that all cloisite-based fertilizer tablets showed better release profiles than neat urea tablets. The best release profile was...

  7. 40 CFR 721.9920 - Urea, (hexahydro-6-methyl-2-oxopyrimidinyl)-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Urea, (hexahydro-6-methyl-2... Specific Chemical Substances 721.9920 Urea, (hexahydro-6-methyl-2-oxopyrimidinyl)-. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance urea,...

  8. 40 CFR 721.9920 - Urea, (hexahydro-6-methyl-2-oxopyrimidinyl)-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Urea, (hexahydro-6-methyl-2... Specific Chemical Substances 721.9920 Urea, (hexahydro-6-methyl-2-oxopyrimidinyl)-. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance urea,...

  9. PHYSIOLOGY AND YIELD RESPONSES OF COTTON TO FOLIAR UREA WITH NBPT

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Urea is the most recommended foliar N source, due to its relatively low toxicity, quick absorption, and low cost. However, in the literature reports of yield increments with foliar urea application are not consistent. The objectives of this research were to study foliar urea assimilation in cotton...

  10. Fate and surface transport of urea in a coastal plain soil: a rainfall simulation study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The surface transport of urea has rarely been studied since it is assumed to undergo rapid hydrolysis to ammonia. However, studies have shown urea to exist in estuarine and coastal waters. Urea in small amounts can trigger the diatom Pseudo-nitzschia spp. to produce the toxin domoic acid, which is o...

  11. 76 FR 35405 - Solid Urea From the Russian Federation: Preliminary Results of Antidumping Duty Administrative...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-17

    ... solid urea from the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (Soviet Union). See Antidumping Duty Order; Urea From the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, 52 FR 26367 (July 14, 1987). Following the break-up of the Soviet Union, the antidumping duty order on solid urea from the Soviet Union was transferred...

  12. Dynamic Message Routing Using Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheibler, Thorsten; Karastoyanova, Dimka; Leymann, Frank

    The Enterprise Service Bus (ESB) is composable middleware that provides applications with services such as message routing and transformation, service composition, dynamic discovery, transactional support, coordination, security features, and others. In an ESB supporting SOAP message exchange, routing algorithms typically follow the sequential SOAP message processing model, where SOAP headers are the main artefacts used to specify the message route and the processing of the payload by intermediaries along that route. This model supports neither alternative nor parallel message routes. In the case of a failing intermediary node this leads to a failure in the message delivery. Moreover, the execution order of services on SOAP message payloads at the intermediaries cannot be prescribed. In this paper, we demonstrate how these deficiencies of the SOAP message processing model can be addressed. We introduce an approach that allows for specifying SOAP message routing logic in terms of BPEL processes. We show that parallel and alternative routes for SOAP messages can be modelled and executed, and the order of services that process a message at intermediaries can be predefined to accommodate the correct processing sequence as required by the concrete application domain. Features like dynamic discovery of services and flexible service composition are leveraged to enable flexible SOAP message routing.

  13. Modelling Routes towards Learning Goals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tattersall, Colin; Janssen, Jose; van den Berg, Bert; Koper, Rob

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to define the need for a route modelling language in e-learning, identifying requirements and candidate languages, before providing a recommended approach. Design/methodology/approach: Several sources of requirements are drawn from the literature then used to review available approaches to route modelling. The best

  14. Evaluation of the Determination of Free Urea in Water-Soluble Liquid Fertilizers Containing Urea and Ureaforms by Urease and HPLC Methods.

    PubMed

    Hojjatie, Michael M; Abrams, Dean

    2015-01-01

    Currently there are three AOAC Official Methods for the determination of urea in fertilizers. AOAC Official Method 959.03, Urea in Fertilizers, Urease Method, First Action 1959, Final Action 1960, is based on the use of fresh commercial 1% urease solution, or preparation of such solution from urease powder in water, or from jack bean meal in water. AOAC Official Method 983.01, Urea and Methyleneureas (Water-Soluble) in Fertilizers, First Action 1983, Final Action 1984, is based on LC with a refractive index detector using water as the mobile phase and a C18 column. AOAC Official Method 2003.14, Determination of Urea in Water- Soluble Urea-Formaldehyde Fertilizer Products and in Aqueous Urea Solutions, First Action 2003, Final Action 2008, is based on LC with a UV detector using acetonitrile-water (85+15, v/v) mobile phase and a propylamine column. The urea method, AOAC Official Method 959.03, is very much dependent on the nature of the urease enzyme. The method was developed in 1960 and used for simple urea fertilizer solutions. With the advent of complex fertilizer compositions, especially with the class of liquid triazone fertilizers and water-soluble urea forms, the analyses of free urea in these fertilizers by the urease method is often inaccurate and inconsistent. AOAC Official Method 983.01 is not always reliable due to the interference of some of the components of these fertilizers, and due to the fact that the use of water as the mobile phase does not always separate the free urea from other components. AOAC Official Method 2003.14 was subjected to ring test studies that showed it could be used for the determination of "free urea" in these classes of fertilizers with good accuracy and precision. PMID:26651558

  15. Past Tense Route Priming

    PubMed Central

    Cohen-Shikora, Emily R.; Balota, David A.

    2013-01-01

    The present research examined whether lexical (whole word) or more rule-based (morphological constituent) processes can be locally biased by experimental list context in past tense verb inflection. In Experiment 1, younger and older adults completed a past tense inflection task in which list context was manipulated across blocks containing regular past tense verbs (e.g. REACH-REACHED) or irregular past tense verbs (TEACH-TAUGHT). Critical targets, consisting of half regular and half irregular verbs, were embedded within blocks and participants' inflection response latency and accuracy were assessed. The results yielded a cross-over interaction in response latencies. In the regular context there was a robust regularity effect: regular target verbs were conjugated faster than irregular target verbs. In contrast, in the irregular context, irregular target verbs were conjugated faster than regular target verbs. Experiment 2 used the same targets but in the context of either standard nonwords or nonwords ending in “-ED” to test the possibility of a phonological basis for the effect. The effect of context was eliminated. The results support the notion that distinct processes in past tense verb production can be locally biased by list context and, as shown in Experiment 2, this route priming effect was not due to phonological priming. PMID:23291293

  16. Structure Study of Cellulose Fibers Wet-Spun from Environmentally Friendly NaOH/Urea Aqueous Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Chen,X.; Burger, C.; Wan, F.; Zhang, J.; Rong, L.; Hsiao, B.; Chu, B.; Cai, J.; Zhang, L.

    2007-01-01

    In this study, structure changes of regenerated cellulose fibers wet-spun from a cotton linter pulp (degree of polymerization {approx}620) solution in an NaOH/urea solvent under different conditions were investigated by simultaneous synchrotron wide-angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD) and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). WAXD results indicated that the increase in flow rate during spinning produced a better crystal orientation and a higher degree of crystallinity, whereas a 2-fold increase in draw ratio only affected the crystal orientation. When coagulated in a H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}/Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} aqueous solution at 15 {sup o}C, the regenerated fibers exhibited the highest crystallinity and a crystal orientation comparable to that of commercial rayon fibers by the viscose method. SAXS patterns exhibited a pair of meridional maxima in all regenerated cellulose fibers, indicating the existence of a lamellar structure. A fibrillar superstructure was observed only at higher flow rates (>20 m/min). The conformation of cellulose molecules in NaOH/urea aqueous solution was also investigated by static and dynamic light scattering. It was found that cellulose chains formed aggregates with a radius of gyration, R{sub g}, of about 232 nm and an apparent hydrodynamic radius, R{sub h}, of about 172 nm. The NaOH/urea solvent system is low-cost and environmentally friendly, which may offer an alternative route to replace more hazardous existing methods for the production of regenerated cellulose fibers.

  17. Rotary internal combustion engine

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, J.L.

    1993-07-20

    A multi bank power plant is described comprising at least a first and a second rotary internal combustion engine connectable together in series, each of the engines comprising: a housing; a cam track internally disposed within the housing and adapted to receive a cam follower; an engine block disposed within the housing and rotatable about a central axis; an output shaft extending axially from each the engine block, each output shaft being coaxial with the other; means for coupling the output shafts together so that the output shafts rotate together in the same direction at the same speed; at least one radially arranged cylinder assembly on each block, each cylinder assembly including a cylinder having a longitudinal axis extending generally radially outwardly from the rotational axis of the block, the cylinder including means defining an end wall, a piston member disposed within the cylinder and adapted to reciprocate within the cylinder; a combustion chamber, means permitting periodic introduction of air and fuel into the combustion chamber, means for causing combustion of a compressed mixture of air and fuel within the combustion chamber, means permitting periodic exhaust of products of combustion of air and fuel from the combustion chamber, and means for imparting forces and motions of the piston within the cylinder to and from the cam track, the means comprising a cam follower operatively connected to the piston; wherein the cam track includes at least a first segment and at least a second segment thereof, the first segment having a generally positive slope wherein the segment has a generally increasing radial distance from the rotational axis of the engine block whereby as a piston moves outwardly in a cylinder on a power stroke while the cam follower is in radial register with the cam track segment, the reactive force of the respective cam follower against the cam track segment acts in a direction tending to impart rotation to the engine block.

  18. Internal combustion engine system

    SciTech Connect

    Nam, C.W.

    1987-01-27

    This patent describes an internal combustion engine system comprising: an engine body including a main combustion engine for transmitting the power generated by explosion pressure to a pumping piston and a power transmission apparatus for transmitting to a power crank shaft power that is increased by the ratio of the cross-sectional area of a combustion chamber piston to a power piston. The stroke distance of the combustion chamber piston is equal to that of the power piston; a swash plate-type stirling engine coupled to an exhaust gas outlet of the main combustion engine to be driven by exhaust heat therefrom; a one-stage screw-type compressor coupled by a driving shaft to the swash plate-type stirling engine, thereby generating a great amount of compressed air; a turbo-charger mounted adjacent to a gas outlet of the stirling engine to force a supply of fresh air into the combustion chamber of the main combustion engine; a booster being mounted between a compressed air source and the power transmission apparatus to amplify the air pressure derived from the compressed air source and then provide the amplified air pressure to the power transmission apparatus by operation of a cam in accordance with the rotation of the first crankshaft; compressed air sources being mounted between the compressor and the booster for storing a great amount of compressed air from the compressor; and an accumulator in communication with the power transmission apparatus through a fluid oil pipe, thereby maintaining constant control of the oil pressure in the power transmission apparatus.

  19. Modelling and mutational analysis of Aspergillus nidulans UreA, a member of the subfamily of urea/H+ transporters in fungi and plants

    PubMed Central

    Sanguinetti, Manuel; Amillis, Sotiris; Pantano, Sergio; Scazzocchio, Claudio; Ramn, Ana

    2014-01-01

    We present the first account of the structurefunction relationships of a protein of the subfamily of urea/H+ membrane transporters of fungi and plants, using Aspergillus nidulans UreA as a study model. Based on the crystal structures of the Vibrio parahaemolyticus sodium/galactose symporter (vSGLT) and of the Nucleobase-Cation-Symport-1 benzylhydantoin transporter from Microbacterium liquefaciens (Mhp1), we constructed a three-dimensional model of UreA which, combined with site-directed and classical random mutagenesis, led to the identification of amino acids important for UreA function. Our approach allowed us to suggest roles for these residues in the binding, recognition and translocation of urea, and in the sorting of UreA to the membrane. Residues W82, Y106, A110, T133, N275, D286, Y388, Y437 and S446, located in transmembrane helixes 2, 3, 7 and 11, were found to be involved in the binding, recognition and/or translocation of urea and the sorting of UreA to the membrane. Y106, A110, T133 and Y437 seem to play a role in substrate selectivity, while S446 is necessary for proper sorting of UreA to the membrane. Other amino acids identified by random classical mutagenesis (G99, R141, A163, G168 and P639) may be important for the basic transporter's structure, its proper folding or its correct traffic to the membrane. PMID:24966243

  20. Combustion synthesis of YAG:Ce and related phosphors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, K. V. K.; Muley, A.; Yadav, P.; Joshi, C. P.; Moharil, S. V.

    2011-11-01

    YAG:Ce is an important phosphor having applications in various fields ranging from solid state lighting to scintillation detectors. YAG phosphors doped with activators are mainly synthesized by solid state reaction techniques that require high sintering temperatures (above 1500C) to eliminate YAM and YAP phases. Though several soft chemical routes have been explored for synthesis of YAG, most of these methods are complex and phase pure materials are not obtained in one step, but prolonged annealing at temperatures around 1000C or above become necessary. One step combustion synthesis of YAG:Ce3+ and related phosphors carried out at 500C furnace temperature is reported here. Activation with Ce3+ could be achieved during the synthesis without taking recourse to any post-combustion thermal treatment. LEDs prepared from the combustion synthesized YAG:Ce3+, exhibited properties comparable to those produced from the commercial phosphor.

  1. Effect of time duration of ruminal urea infusions on ruminal ammonia concentrations and portal-drained visceral extraction of arterial urea-N in lactating Holstein cows.

    PubMed

    Rjen, B A; Kristensen, N B

    2012-03-01

    The effects of a 6 versus 24h ruminal urea infusion in lactating dairy cows fed a basal diet deficient in N on ruminal ammonia concentration, arterial urea-N concentration, net portal-drained viscera (PDV) urea-N flux, arterial urea-N extraction across the PDV, and renal urea-N kinetics were investigated. Three Danish Holstein cows fitted with ruminal cannulas and permanent indwelling catheters in major splanchnic blood vessels were randomly allocated to a 3 3 Latin square design with 21-d periods. Treatments were ventral ruminal infusion of water for 24h (water INF), 24-h infusion of 15 g of urea/kg of dry matter intake (DMI; 24-h INF), and 6-h infusion of 15 g of urea/kg of DMI (6-h INF). The 6-h INF was initiated 0.5h after the afternoon feeding, and ran until 2230 h. Eight sample sets of arterial, portal, and hepatic blood, ruminal fluid, and urine were obtained at 0.5h before the morning feeding and 0.5, 1.5, 2.5, 3.5, 4.5, 5.5, and 6.5h after feeding (i.e., 9 to 15.5h after the 6h infusion was terminated). A substantial decrease in DMI for 6-h INF compared with 24-h INF and water INF was observed, and it has to be recognized that DMI may have confounding effects. However, the experimental setting plan was met (i.e., to cause changes in the daily pattern of ruminal ammonia and blood urea-N concentrations). The arterial urea-N concentration for 24-h INF and 6-h INF were greater than the arterial urea-N concentration with water INF throughout the sampling window. However, the arterial urea-N concentration for 6-h INF decreased steadily with sampling time reflecting a carryover effect from the ruminal urea infusion. The ruminal ammonia concentration and net portal flux of ammonia for 6-h INF were not different from water INF; hence, no carryover effect on ruminal ammonia concentration was observed. The portal flux of urea-N was not affected by treatment (i.e., even the combination of low ruminal ammonia and high arterial urea-N concentration with 6-h INF was not used by the cow to increase the uptake of urea-N across the PDV). Arterial urea-N extraction across the PDV was increased with water INF especially from 0.5 to 3.5h postprandial relative to the urea infusion treatments, reflecting increased epithelial permeability for urea-N. This indicates that daily ruminal peak of ammonia or blood urea-N concentrations overruled potential signals from low ruminal ammonia concentration observed during the sampling window. In conclusion, dairy cows appear unable to increase transport of urea-N from blood to gut in periods with low ruminal ammonia concentrations, even in a situation with infrequent N supply and apparent carryover effects on blood urea-N. It is speculated that mechanisms responsible for downregulation of epithelial urea-N transport based on daily maximum concentrations of ammonia in the rumen or urea-N in the blood suppresses any short-term signal from low ruminal ammonia during periods with low ruminal N supply. PMID:22365222

  2. Chelate effects in sulfate binding by amide/urea-based ligands.

    PubMed

    Jia, Chuandong; Wang, Qi-Qiang; Begum, Rowshan Ara; Day, Victor W; Bowman-James, Kristin

    2015-07-01

    The influence of chelate and mini-chelate effects on sulfate binding was explored for six amide-, amide/amine-, urea-, and urea/amine-based ligands. Two of the urea-based hosts were selective for SO4(2-) in water-mixed DMSO-d6 systems. Results indicated that the mini-chelate effect provided by a single urea group with two NH binding sites appears to provide enhanced binding over two amide groups. Furthermore, additional urea binding sites incorporated into the host framework appeared to overcome to some extent competing hydration effects with increasing water content. PMID:25966663

  3. Synthesis and stacked conformations of symmetrical and unsymmetrical oligo-ureas of metaphenylenediamine.

    PubMed

    Clayden, Jonathan; Lemiègre, Loïc; Helliwell, Madeleine

    2007-03-30

    The addition of substituted anilines to nitro-substituted isocyanates followed by reduction generates new aniline-substituted ureas, which can be further extended in a one- or two-directional iterative manner to form oligomeric ureas based on a m-phenylenediamine monomer. Oligo-ureas with up to eight urea linkages are reported. Fully N-substituted oligo-ureas are crystalline, and the X-ray crystal structures display ring-stacked conformations. 1H NMR studies indicate that the stacked conformation persists in solution. PMID:17343415

  4. Carboxyl functionalization of carbon fibers via aryl diazonium reaction in molten urea to enhance interfacial shear strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuwei; Meng, Linghui; Fan, Liquan; Wu, Guangshun; Ma, Lichun; Zhao, Min; Huang, Yudong

    2016-01-01

    Using molten urea as the solvent, carbon fibers were functionalized with carboxylic acid groups via aryl diazonium reaction in 15 min to improve their interfacial bonding with epoxy resin. The surface functionalization was quantified by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, which showed that the relative surface coverage of carboxylic acid groups increased from an initial percentage of 3.17-10.41%. Mechanical property test results indicated that the aryl diazonium reaction in this paper could improve the interfacial shear strength by 66%. Meanwhile, the technique did not adopt any pre-oxidation step to produce functional groups prior to grafting and was shown to maintain the tensile strength of the fibers. This methodology provided a rapid, facile and economically viable route to produce covalently functionalized carbon fibers in large quantities with an eco-friendly method.

  5. Combustion in fluidized beds

    SciTech Connect

    Dry, F.J.; La Nauze, R.D. )

    1990-07-01

    Circulating fluidized-bed (CFB) combustion systems have become popular since the late 1970s, and, given the current level of activity in the area,it is clear that this technology has a stable future in the boiler market. For standard coal combustion applications, competition is fierce with mature pulverized-fuel-based (PF) technology set to maintain a strong profile. CFB systems, however, can be more cost effective than PF systems when emission control is considered, and, as CFB technology matures, it is expected that an ever-increasing proportion of boiler installations will utilize the CFB concept. CFB systems have advantages in the combustion of low-grade fuels such as coal waste and biomass. In competition with conventional bubbling beds, the CFB boiler often demonstrates superior carbon burn-out efficiency. The key to this combustion technique is the hydrodynamic behavior of the fluidized bed. This article begins with a description of the fundamental fluid dynamic behavior of the CFB system. This is followed by an examination of the combustion process in such an environment and a discussion of the current status of the major CFB technologies.

  6. Advanced Subsonic Combustion Rig

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Chi-Ming

    1998-01-01

    Researchers from the NASA Lewis Research Center have obtained the first combustion/emissions data under extreme future engine operating conditions. In Lewis' new world-class 60-atm combustor research facility--the Advanced Subsonic Combustion Rig (ASCR)--a flametube was used to conduct combustion experiments in environments as extreme as 900 psia and 3400 F. The greatest challenge for combustion researchers is the uncertainty of the effects of pressure on the formation of nitrogen oxides (NOx). Consequently, U.S. engine manufacturers are using these data to guide their future combustor designs. The flametube's metal housing has an inside diameter of 12 in. and a length of 10.5 in. The flametube can be used with a variety of different flow paths. Each flow path is lined with a high-temperature, castable refractory material (alumina) to minimize heat loss. Upstream of the flametube is the injector section, which has an inside diameter of 13 in. and a length of 0.5-in. It was designed to provide for quick changeovers. This flametube is being used to provide all U.S. engine manufacturers early assessments of advanced combustion concepts at full power conditions prior to engine production. To date, seven concepts from engine manufacturers have been evaluated and improved. This collaborated development can potentially give U.S. engine manufacturers the competitive advantage of being first in the market with advanced low-emission technologies.

  7. Microgravity Combustion Diagnostics Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santoro, Gilbert J. (editor); Greenberg, Paul S. (editor); Piltch, Nancy D. (editor)

    1988-01-01

    Through the Microgravity Science and Applications Division (MSAD) of the Office of Space Science and Applications (OSSA) at NASA Headquarters, a program entitled, Advanced Technology Development (ATD) was promulgated with the objective of providing advanced technologies that will enable the development of future microgravity science and applications experimental flight hardware. Among the ATD projects one, Microgravity Combustion Diagnostics (MCD), has the objective of developing advanced diagnostic techniques and technologies to provide nonperturbing measurements of combustion characteristics and parameters that will enhance the scientific integrity and quality of microgravity combustion experiments. As part of the approach to this project, a workshop was held on July 28 and 29, 1987, at the NASA Lewis Research Center. A small group of laser combustion diagnosticians met with a group of microgravity combustion experimenters to discuss the science requirements, the state-of-the-art of laser diagnostic technology, and plan the direction for near-, intermediate-, and long-term programs. This publication describes the proceedings of that workshop.

  8. Choline chloride/urea as an effective plasticizer for production of cellulose films.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sha; Peng, Xinwen; Zhong, Linxin; Jing, Shuangshuang; Cao, Xuefei; Lu, Fachuang; Sun, Runcang

    2015-03-01

    Recently, choline chloride/urea (ChCl/urea), a typical deep eutectic solvent (DES), has been found to possess various applications in organic synthesis, electrochemistry, and nanomaterial preparation. Herein we reported the first attempt to plasticize regenerated cellulose film (RCF) using ChCl/urea as an effective plasticizer. Meanwhile, RCFs plasticized with glycerol and sorbitol were also prepared for comparison. The plasticized RCFs were investigated by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, wide-angle X-ray diffraction (XRD), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and mechanical testing. Transparent and soft RCFs could be successfully prepared in the presence of ChCl/urea, and high elongation at break (34.88%) suggested a significant plasticizing efficiency. No new crystal and phase separation occurred to ChCl/urea plasticized RCFs. The thermal stability of ChCl/urea plasticized RCF was lowered. These results indicated that ChCl/urea was an effective plasticizer for producing cellulose films. PMID:25498618

  9. The use of urea by Evernia prunastri thalli.

    PubMed

    Blanco, M J; Suárez, C; Vicente, C

    1984-10-01

    Thalli of Evernia prunastri floated on 40 mM urea synthesize urease (EC3.5.1.5) which is, in part, retained in the cells as well as secreted into the external medium. By using [(14)C]urea, it has been shown that the (14)CO2 evolved by the action of urease is mainly incorporated into phenolic compounds. Evernic acid has the highest radioactivity when incubations are carried out in the light. The orsellinate moiety of this molecule contains ten times more radioactivity than the everninic acid moiety. This could be explained by the assumption that orsellinic acid is the first product of cyclisation of the polyketide chain in the biosynthetic pathway. PMID:24253163

  10. Molecular-dynamics simulations of urea nucleation from aqueous solution

    PubMed Central

    Salvalaglio, Matteo; Perego, Claudio; Giberti, Federico; Mazzotti, Marco; Parrinello, Michele

    2015-01-01

    Despite its ubiquitous character and relevance in many branches of science and engineering, nucleation from solution remains elusive. In this framework, molecular simulations represent a powerful tool to provide insight into nucleation at the molecular scale. In this work, we combine theory and molecular simulations to describe urea nucleation from aqueous solution. Taking advantage of well-tempered metadynamics, we compute the free-energy change associated to the phase transition. We find that such a free-energy profile is characterized by significant finite-size effects that can, however, be accounted for. The description of the nucleation process emerging from our analysis differs from classical nucleation theory. Nucleation of crystal-like clusters is in fact preceded by large concentration fluctuations, indicating a predominant two-step process, whereby embryonic crystal nuclei emerge from dense, disordered urea clusters. Furthermore, in the early stages of nucleation, two different polymorphs are seen to compete. PMID:25492932

  11. CVD synthesis of nitrogen-doped graphene using urea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, CanKun; Lin, WeiYi; Zhao, ZhiJuan; Zhuang, PingPing; Zhan, LinJie; Zhou, YingHui; Cai, WeiWei

    2015-10-01

    This work provides an effective low-cost synthesis and in-depth mechanistic study of high quality large-area nitrogen-doped graphene (NG) films. These films were synthesized using urea as nitrogen source and methane as carbon source, and were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Raman spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The N doping level was determined to be 3.72 at.%, and N atoms were suggested to mainly incorporated in a pyrrolic N configuration. All distinct Raman peaks display a shift due to the nitrogen-doping and compressive strain. The increase in urea concentration broadens the D and 2 D peak's Full Width at Half Maximum (FWHM), due to the decrease of mean free path of phonons. The N-doped graphene exhibited an n-type doping behavior with a considerably high carrier mobility of about 74.1 cm2/(V s), confirmed by electrical transport measurements.

  12. 46 CFR 45.175 - Applicable routes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Barges on Lake Michigan Routes § 45.175 Applicable routes. This subpart applies to the following routes, including intermediate ports, on Lake Michigan, between Calumet Harbor, IL, and— (a) Milwaukee, WI...

  13. 46 CFR 45.175 - Applicable routes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Barges on Lake Michigan Routes § 45.175 Applicable routes. This subpart applies to the following routes, including intermediate ports, on Lake Michigan, between Calumet Harbor, IL, and— (a) Milwaukee, WI...

  14. 46 CFR 45.175 - Applicable routes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Barges on Lake Michigan Routes § 45.175 Applicable routes. This subpart applies to the following routes, including intermediate ports, on Lake Michigan, between Calumet Harbor, IL, and— (a) Milwaukee, WI...

  15. 46 CFR 45.175 - Applicable routes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Barges on Lake Michigan Routes § 45.175 Applicable routes. This subpart applies to the following routes on Lake Michigan, between Chicago (Calumet Harbor), IL, and— (a) Milwaukee, WI (the “Milwaukee...

  16. 46 CFR 45.175 - Applicable routes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Barges on Lake Michigan Routes § 45.175 Applicable routes. This subpart applies to the following routes, including intermediate ports, on Lake Michigan, between Calumet Harbor, IL, and— (a) Milwaukee, WI...

  17. Combustible structural composites and methods of forming combustible structural composites

    DOEpatents

    Daniels, Michael A.; Heaps, Ronald J.; Steffler, Eric D.; Swank, W. David

    2013-04-02

    Combustible structural composites and methods of forming same are disclosed. In an embodiment, a combustible structural composite includes combustible material comprising a fuel metal and a metal oxide. The fuel metal is present in the combustible material at a weight ratio from 1:9 to 1:1 of the fuel metal to the metal oxide. The fuel metal and the metal oxide are capable of exothermically reacting upon application of energy at or above a threshold value to support self-sustaining combustion of the combustible material within the combustible structural composite. Structural-reinforcing fibers are present in the composite at a weight ratio from 1:20 to 10:1 of the structural-reinforcing fibers to the combustible material. Other embodiments and aspects are disclosed.

  18. Combustible structural composites and methods of forming combustible structural composites

    DOEpatents

    Daniels, Michael A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Heaps, Ronald J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Steffler, Eric D (Idaho Falls, ID); Swank, William D. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2011-08-30

    Combustible structural composites and methods of forming same are disclosed. In an embodiment, a combustible structural composite includes combustible material comprising a fuel metal and a metal oxide. The fuel metal is present in the combustible material at a weight ratio from 1:9 to 1:1 of the fuel metal to the metal oxide. The fuel metal and the metal oxide are capable of exothermically reacting upon application of energy at or above a threshold value to support self-sustaining combustion of the combustible material within the combustible structural composite. Structural-reinforcing fibers are present in the composite at a weight ratio from 1:20 to 10:1 of the structural-reinforcing fibers to the combustible material. Other embodiments and aspects are disclosed.

  19. Combustion synthesis process for the rapid preparation of high-purity SrO powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granados-Correa, Francisco; Bonifacio-Martnez, Juan

    2014-12-01

    A rapid, safe and simple technique for the production of high purity strontium oxide powders via a chemical combustion process is reported. The combustion reactions were performed to optimize the fuel to oxidizer ratios in the reaction mixtures required to obtain pure SrO powders by varying the molar ratio of chemical precursors and the temperature. The synthesized powders were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry, infrared spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, thermogravimetric analysis, and N2-physisorption measurements. The results indicate that crystalline SrO was obtained using a 1:1 strontium nitrate: urea molar ratio at 1000 C after 5 minutes. In addition, high-purity, homogeneous and crystalline SrO powders were easily produced in a short time via a chemical combustion process.

  20. Reliable, rapid and simple voltammetric detection of urea nitrate explosive.

    PubMed

    Cagan, Avi; Lu, Donglai; Cizek, Karel; La Belle, Jeff; Wang, Joseph

    2008-05-01

    A highly selective and rapid electrochemical assay of the improvised explosive urea nitrate (UN) is reported. The method involves a short ( approximately 10 s) acid-catalyzed reaction of UN with 4-nitrotoluene (NT) followed by a rapid ( approximately 2 s) square-wave voltammetric (SWV) detection of the 2,4-dinitrotoluene (DNT) product. The new protocol offers great promise for a reliable field detection of UN, with significant advantages of speed, sensitivity, portability, simplicity, and cost. PMID:18427677

  1. Reverse osmosis membrane of high urea rejection properties. [water purification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, C. C.; Wydeven, T. J. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    Polymeric membranes suitable for use in reverse osmosis water purification because of their high urea and salt rejection properties are prepared by generating a plasma of an unsaturated hydrocarbon monomer and nitrogen gas from an electrical source. A polymeric membrane is formed by depositing a polymer of the unsaturated monomer from the plasma onto a substrate, so that nitrogen from the nitrogen gas is incorporated within the polymer in a chemically combined form.

  2. 49 CFR 356.9 - Elimination of routing restrictions-regular route carriers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Elimination of routing restrictions-regular route... REGULATIONS MOTOR CARRIER ROUTING REGULATIONS § 356.9 Elimination of routing restrictions—regular route carriers. (a) Regular route authorities—construction. All certificates that, either singly or...

  3. 49 CFR 356.9 - Elimination of routing restrictions-regular route carriers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Elimination of routing restrictions-regular route... REGULATIONS MOTOR CARRIER ROUTING REGULATIONS § 356.9 Elimination of routing restrictions—regular route carriers. (a) Regular route authorities—construction. All certificates that, either singly or...

  4. 49 CFR 356.9 - Elimination of routing restrictions-regular route carriers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Elimination of routing restrictions-regular route... REGULATIONS MOTOR CARRIER ROUTING REGULATIONS § 356.9 Elimination of routing restrictions—regular route carriers. (a) Regular route authorities—construction. All certificates that, either singly or...

  5. 49 CFR 356.9 - Elimination of routing restrictions-regular route carriers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Elimination of routing restrictions-regular route... REGULATIONS MOTOR CARRIER ROUTING REGULATIONS § 356.9 Elimination of routing restrictions—regular route carriers. (a) Regular route authorities—construction. All certificates that, either singly or...

  6. 49 CFR 356.9 - Elimination of routing restrictions-regular route carriers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Elimination of routing restrictions-regular route... REGULATIONS MOTOR CARRIER ROUTING REGULATIONS § 356.9 Elimination of routing restrictions—regular route carriers. (a) Regular route authorities—construction. All certificates that, either singly or...

  7. Internal combustion engine

    DOEpatents

    Baker, Quentin A.; Mecredy, Henry E.; O'Neal, Glenn B.

    1991-01-01

    An improved engine is provided that more efficiently consumes difficult fuels such as coal slurries or powdered coal. The engine includes a precombustion chamber having a portion thereof formed by an ignition plug. The precombustion chamber is arranged so that when the piston is proximate the head, the precombustion chamber is sealed from the main cylinder or the main combustion chamber and when the piston is remote from the head, the precombustion chamber and main combustion chamber are in communication. The time for burning of fuel in the precombustion chamber can be regulated by the distance required to move the piston from the top dead center position to the position wherein the precombustion chamber and main combustion chamber are in communication.

  8. Droplet Combustion Experiment movie

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The Droplet Combustion Experiment (DCE) was designed to investigate the fundamental combustion aspects of single, isolated droplets under different pressures and ambient oxygen concentrations for a range of droplet sizes varying between 2 and 5 mm. The DCE principal investigator was Forman Williams, University of California, San Diego. The experiment was part of the space research investigations conducted during the Microgravity Science Laboratory-1 mission (STS-83, April 4-8 1997; the shortened mission was reflown as MSL-1R on STS-94). Advanced combustion experiments will be a part of investigations plarned for the International Space Station. (1.1 MB, 12-second MPEG, screen 320 x 240 pixels; downlinked video, higher quality not available)A still JPG composite of this movie is available at http://mix.msfc.nasa.gov/ABSTRACTS/MSFC-0300164.html.

  9. Thermodynamics and combustion modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeleznik, Frank J.

    1986-01-01

    Modeling fluid phase phenomena blends the conservation equations of continuum mechanics with the property equations of thermodynamics. The thermodynamic contribution becomes especially important when the phenomena involve chemical reactions as they do in combustion systems. The successful study of combustion processes requires (1) the availability of accurate thermodynamic properties for both the reactants and the products of reaction and (2) the computational capabilities to use the properties. A discussion is given of some aspects of the problem of estimating accurate thermodynamic properties both for reactants and products of reaction. Also, some examples of the use of thermodynamic properties for modeling chemically reacting systems are presented. These examples include one-dimensional flow systems and the internal combustion engine.

  10. Hybrid rocket combustion study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strand, L. D.; Ray, R. L.; Cohen, N. S.

    1993-01-01

    The objectives of this study of 'pure' or 'classic' hybrids are to (1) extend our understanding of the boundary layer combustion process and the critical engineering parameters that define this process, (2) develop an up-to-date hybrid fuel combustion model, and (3) apply the model to correlate the regression rate and scaling properties of potential fuel candidates. Tests were carried out with a hybrid slab window motor, using several diagnostic techniques, over a range of motor pressure and oxidizer mass flux conditions. The results basically confirmed turbulent boundary layer heat and mass transfer as the rate limiting process for hybrid fuel decomposition and combustion. The measured fuel regression rates showed good agreement with the analytical model predictions. The results of model scaling calculations to Shuttle SRM size conditions are presented.

  11. Droplet Combustion Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The Droplet Combustion Experiment (DCE) was designed to investigate the fundamental combustion aspects of single, isolated droplets under different pressures and ambient oxygen concentrations for a range of droplet sizes varying between 2 and 5 mm. The DCE principal investigator was Forman Williams, University of California, San Diego. The experiment was part of the space research investigations conducted during the Microgravity Science Laboratory-1 mission (STS-83, April 4-8 1997; the shortened mission was reflown as MSL-1R on STS-94). Advanced combustion experiments will be a part of investigations plarned for the International Space Station. (199KB JPEG, 1311 x 1477 pixels; downlinked video, higher quality not available) The MPG from which this composite was made is available at http://mix.msfc.nasa.gov/ABSTRACTS/MSFC-0300165.html.

  12. Droplet Combustion Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The Droplet Combustion Experiment (DCE) was designed to investigate the fundamental combustion aspects of single, isolated droplets under different pressures and ambient oxygen concentrations for a range of droplet sizes varying between 2 and 5 mm. The DCE principal investigator was Forman Williams, University of California, San Diego. The experiment was part of the space research investigations conducted during the Microgravity Science Laboratory-1R mission (STS-94, July 1-17 1997). Advanced combustion experiments will be a part of investigations plarned for the International Space Station. (120KB JPEG, 655 x 736 pixels; downlinked video, higher quality not available) The MPG from which this composite was made is available at http://mix.msfc.nasa.gov/ABSTRACTS/MSFC-0300167.html.

  13. Combustion synthesis of fullerenes

    SciTech Connect

    Mckinnon, J.T.; Bell, W.L. ); Barkley, R.M. )

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports the isolation of C{sub 60} and C{sub 70} from combustion soot that is produced in high-temperature, low-pressure premixed flat flames. A critical parameter for high fullerene yields in combustion appears to be a very high flame temperature. Equilibrium calculations indicate that low pressures are important, but the experimental evidence is not clear at this time. Combustion synthesis yields fullerenes with a C{sub 70}/C{sub 60} ratio of about 40%, as compared with the 12% reported for electric-arc-generated fullerenes. The overall yields from carbon are very low (ca. 0.03%) but the soot studied had been produced in flames that were in no way optimized for fullerene production.

  14. Fluidized-bed combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Botros, P E

    1990-04-01

    This report describes the activities of the Morgantown Energy Technology Center's research and development program in fluidized-bed combustion from October 1, 1987, to September 30, 1989. The Department of Energy program involves atmospheric and pressurized systems. Demonstrations of industrial-scale atmospheric systems are being completed, and smaller boilers are being explored. These systems include vortex, multi-solid, spouted, dual-sided, air-cooled, pulsed, and waste-fired fluidized-beds. Combustion of low-rank coal, components, and erosion are being studied. In pressurized combustion, first-generation, combined-cycle power plants are being tested, and second-generation, advanced-cycle systems are being designed and cost evaluated. Research in coal devolatilization, metal wastage, tube corrosion, and fluidization also supports this area. 52 refs., 24 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. Ames Hybrid Combustion Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zilliac, Greg; Karabeyoglu, Mustafa A.; Cantwell, Brian; Hunt, Rusty; DeZilwa, Shane; Shoffstall, Mike; Soderman, Paul T.; Bencze, Daniel P. (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    The report summarizes the design, fabrication, safety features, environmental impact, and operation of the Ames Hybrid-Fuel Combustion Facility (HCF). The facility is used in conducting research into the scalability and combustion processes of advanced paraffin-based hybrid fuels for the purpose of assessing their applicability to practical rocket systems. The facility was designed to deliver gaseous oxygen at rates between 0.5 and 16.0 kg/sec to a combustion chamber operating at pressures ranging from 300 to 900. The required run times were of the order of 10 to 20 sec. The facility proved to be robust and reliable and has been used to generate a database of regression-rate measurements of paraffin at oxygen mass flux levels comparable to those of moderate-sized hybrid rocket motors.

  16. High and Low Affinity Urea Root Uptake: Involvement of NIP5;1.

    PubMed

    Yang, Huayiu; Menz, Jochen; Hussermann, Iris; Benz, Martin; Fujiwara, Toru; Ludewig, Uwe

    2015-08-01

    Urea is the most widespread nitrogen (N) fertilizer worldwide and is rapidly degraded in soil to ammonium by urease. Ammonium is either taken up by plant roots or is further processed to nitrate by soil microorganisms. However, urea can be taken up by roots and is further degraded to ammonium by plant urease for assimilation. When urea is supplied under sterile conditions, it acts as a poor N source for seedlings or adult Arabidopsis thaliana plants. Here, the gene expression of young seedlings exposed to urea and ammonium nitrate nutrition was compared. Several primary metabolism and transport genes, including those for nitrate and urea, were differentially expressed in seedlings. However, urease and most major intrinsic proteins were not differentially expressed, with the exception of NIP6;1, a urea-permeable channel, which was repressed. Furthermore, little overlap with the gene expression with ammonium as the sole N source was observed, confirming that pure urea nutrition is not associated with the ammonium toxicity syndrome in seedlings. The direct root uptake of urea was increased under boron deficiency, in both the high and low affinity range. This activity was entirely mediated by the NIP5;1 channel, which was confirmed to transport urea when expressed in oocytes. The uptake of urea in the high and low affinity range was also determined for maize and wheat roots. The urea uptake by maize roots was only about half that of wheat, but was not stimulated by boron deficiency or N deficiency in either species. This analysis identifies novel components of the urea uptake systems in plants, which may become agronomically relevant to urea uptake and utilization, as stabilized urea fertilizers become increasingly popular. PMID:25957355

  17. Influence of papain urea copper chlorophyllin on wound matrix remodeling.

    PubMed

    Telgenhoff, Dale; Lam, Kan; Ramsay, Sarah; Vasquez, Valerie; Villareal, Kristine; Slusarewicz, Paul; Attar, Paul; Shroot, Braham

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the dermal and epidermal alterations associated with wound healing in wounds treated with papain urea copper chlorophyllin (PUC), papain-urea, copper chlorophyllin, or urea base ointment and compare these with moist wound care using a porcine full-thickness infected wound model. All the wounds were evaluated postsurgery for erythema, transepidermal water loss, microscopic morphology, and changes in protein expression. Examination of stained paraffin sections revealed an increase in the number of keratinocytes present in the epidermis of the PUC and papain-treated pigs, relative to moist control. This increase in keratinocyte number corresponded to an increase in the movement of the keratinocytes into the underlying dermis in the form of rete pegs. In the dermis, there appeared to be an increase in blood vessel formation, collagen I deposition, and mature collagen in the papain and PUC treated tissues. The quality of healing appears to be enhanced based on the number of keratinocytes present in the epidermis, the extensive rete peg formation, the increase in vasculature, and the increase in collagen birefringence. PMID:17971019

  18. Amperometric urea biosensors based on sulfonated graphene/polyaniline nanocomposite

    PubMed Central

    Das, Gautam; Yoon, Hyon Hee

    2015-01-01

    An electrochemical biosensor based on sulfonated graphene/polyaniline nanocomposite was developed for urea analysis. Oxidative polymerization of aniline in the presence of sulfonated graphene oxide was carried out by electrochemical methods in an aqueous environment. The structural properties of the nanocomposite were characterized by Fourier-transform infrared, Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy techniques. The urease enzyme-immobilized sulfonated graphene/polyaniline nanocomposite film showed impressive performance in the electroanalytical detection of urea with a detection limit of 0.050 mM and a sensitivity of 0.85 (μA · cm−2·mM−1. The biosensor achieved a broad linear range of detection (0.12–12.3 mM) with a notable response time of approximately 5 seconds. Moreover, the fabricated biosensor retained 81% of its initial activity (based on sensitivity) after 15 days of storage at 4°C. The ease of fabrication coupled with the low cost and good electrochemical performance of this system holds potential for the development of solid-state biosensors for urea detection. PMID:26346240

  19. Developing Hypothetical Inhibition Mechanism of Novel Urea Transporter B Inhibitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Min; Tou, Weng Ieong; Zhou, Hong; Li, Fei; Ren, Huiwen; Chen, Calvin Yu-Chian; Yang, Baoxue

    2014-07-01

    Urea transporter B (UT-B) is a membrane channel protein that specifically transports urea. UT-B null mouse exhibited urea selective urine concentrating ability deficiency, which suggests the potential clinical applications of the UT-B inhibitors as novel diuretics. Primary high-throughput virtual screening (HTVS) of 50000 small-molecular drug-like compounds identified 2319 hit compounds. These 2319 compounds were screened by high-throughput screening using an erythrocyte osmotic lysis assay. Based on the pharmacological data, putative UT-B binding sites were identified by structure-based drug design and validated by ligand-based and QSAR model. Additionally, UT-B structural and functional characteristics under inhibitors treated and untreated conditions were simulated by molecular dynamics (MD). As the result, we identified four classes of compounds with UT-B inhibitory activity and predicted a human UT-B model, based on which computative binding sites were identified and validated. A novel potential mechanism of UT-B inhibitory activity was discovered by comparing UT-B from different species. Results suggest residue PHE198 in rat and mouse UT-B might block the inhibitor migration pathway. Inhibitory mechanisms of UT-B inhibitors and the functions of key residues in UT-B were proposed. The binding site analysis provides a structural basis for lead identification and optimization of UT-B inhibitors.

  20. Antibacterial kaolinite/urea/chlorhexidine nanocomposites: Experiment and molecular modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holešová, Sylva; Valášková, Marta; Hlaváč, Dominik; Madejová, Jana; Samlíková, Magda; Tokarský, Jonáš; Pazdziora, Erich

    2014-06-01

    Clay minerals are commonly used materials in pharmaceutical production both as inorganic carriers or active agents. The purpose of this study is the preparation and characterization of clay/antibacterial drug hybrids which can be further included in drug delivery systems for treatment oral infections. Novel nanocomposites with antibacterial properties were successfully prepared by ion exchange reaction from two types of kaolinite/urea intercalates and chlorhexidine diacetate. Intercalation compounds of kaolinite were prepared by reaction with solid urea in the absence of solvents (dry method) as well as with urea aqueous solution (wet method). The antibacterial activity of two prepared samples against Enterococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa was evaluated by finding the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC). Antibacterial studies of both samples showed the lowest MIC values (0.01%, w/v) after 1 day against E. faecalis, E. coli and S. aureus. A slightly worse antibacterial activity was observed against P. aeruginosa (MIC 0.12%, w/v) after 1 day. Since samples showed very good antibacterial activity, especially after 1 day of action, this means that these samples can be used as long-acting antibacterial materials. Prepared samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The experimental data are supported by results of molecular modelling.

  1. Dichloridobis(thio­urea-κS)nickel(II)

    PubMed Central

    Zouihri, Hafid

    2012-01-01

    The title complex, [NiCl2(CH4N2S)2], has been synthesized from the previously reported (diamino­methyl­idene)sulfonium chloride–thio­urea (3/2) salt [Zouihri (2012b ▶). Acta Cryst. E68, o257]. The NiII ion is coordinated in a distorted tetra­hedral geometry by two mol­ecules of thio­urea [Ni—S = 2.3079 (7) and 2.3177 (6) Å] and two chloride anions [Ni—Cl = 2.2516 (7) and 2.2726 (7) Å]. The bond angles at the Ni atom lie between 96.69 (2) and 115.40 (3)°, while the dihedral angle between the mean planes of the two thio­urea ligands is 6.36 (15)°. The crystal structure is characterized by intra- and inter­molecular N—H⋯Cl hydrogen bonds, which lead to the formation of two-dimensional networks lying parallel to the ab plane. The networks are linked via classical N—H⋯Cl and N—H⋯S hydrogen bonds, forming a three-dimensional arrangement. PMID:22412454

  2. Thermal ignition combustion system

    DOEpatents

    Kamo, R.; Kakwani, R.M.; Valdmanis, E.; Woods, M.E.

    1988-04-19

    The thermal ignition combustion system comprises means for providing walls defining an ignition chamber, the walls being made of a material having a thermal conductivity greater than 20 W/m C and a specific heat greater than 480 J/kg C with the ignition chamber being in constant communication with the main combustion chamber, means for maintaining the temperature of the walls above a threshold temperature capable of causing ignition of a fuel, and means for conducting fuel to the ignition chamber. 8 figs.

  3. Thermal ignition combustion system

    DOEpatents

    Kamo, Roy; Kakwani, Ramesh M.; Valdmanis, Edgars; Woods, Melvins E.

    1988-01-01

    The thermal ignition combustion system comprises means for providing walls defining an ignition chamber, the walls being made of a material having a thermal conductivity greater than 20 W/m.degree. C. and a specific heat greater than 480 J/kg.degree. C. with the ignition chamber being in constant communication with the main combustion chamber, means for maintaining the temperature of the walls above a threshold temperature capable of causing ignition of a fuel, and means for conducting fuel to the ignition chamber.

  4. Combustibility of tetraphenylborate solids

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, D.D.

    1989-05-03

    Liquid slurries expected under normal in-tank processing (ITP) operations are not ignitible because of their high water content. However, deposits of dry solids from the slurries are combustible and produce dense, black smoke when burned. The dry solids burn similarly to Styrofoam and more easily than sawdust. It is the opinion of fire hazard experts that a benzene vapor deflagration could ignite the dry solids. A tetraphenylborate solids fire will rapidly plug the waste tank HEPA ventilation filters due to the nature of the smoke produced. To prevent ignition and combustion of these solids, the waste tanks have been equipped with a nitrogen inerting system.

  5. Studies in combustion dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Koszykowski, M.L.

    1993-12-01

    The goal of this program is to develop a fundamental understanding and a quantitative predictive capability in combustion modeling. A large part of the understanding of the chemistry of combustion processes comes from {open_quotes}chemical kinetic modeling.{close_quotes} However, successful modeling is not an isolated activity. It necessarily involves the integration of methods and results from several diverse disciplines and activities including theoretical chemistry, elementary reaction kinetics, fluid mechanics and computational science. Recently the authors have developed and utilized new tools for parallel processing to implement the first numerical model of a turbulent diffusion flame including a {open_quotes}full{close_quotes} chemical mechanism.

  6. Alternative Routes to Teacher Certification.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith-Davis, Judy

    This literature review examines alternative routes to teacher certification and presents alternative certification regulations and policies for 19 states. Three categories of nontraditional personnel preparation programs are noted: nontraditional recruitment programs, retraining programs, and alternative certification programs. A definition of

  7. In Route to Sampling Station

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    USGS scientists (from left) Judy Drexler, Brian Bergamaschi, Tamara Kraus, Bryan Downing and Katy O’Donnell in route to a sampling station aboard the USGS R/V Mary Landsteiner. Location: Northern San Francisco Estuary, CA...

  8. Effects of urethane, ambient temperature and injection route on rat body temperature and metabolism due to endotoxins.

    PubMed Central

    Bibby, D C; Grimble, R F

    1988-01-01

    1. We have investigated the influence of environmental temperature, anaesthesia and route of administration on rectal temperature and other metabolic responses to two preparations of bacterial endotoxin in male adult Wistar rats. 2. Urethane anaesthesia, environmental temperatures of 20 and 28 degrees C, subcutaneous (S.C.) and intraperitoneal (I.P.) routes of administration and butanol and trichloroacetic acid (TCA) extracts of E. coli endotoxin (1.2 mg/kg) were used. 3. In addition to rectal temperature, serum zinc, albumin and urea concentrations and liver protein, RNA and zinc contents were measured. 4. Fevers were produced by injections of both endotoxins, by either route at 28 degrees C. Butanol-extracted endotoxin produced a more rapid response than the TCA extract via the I.P. route whereas the TCA extract produced a higher temperature than the butanol extract when the S.C. route was used. 5. Fevers were inhibited at an environmental temperature of 20 degrees C and by anaesthesia, while the former had no effect on compositional changes the latter inhibited the fall in serum zinc in response to subcutaneous doses of either endotoxin and the increase in liver zinc content in response to the butanol extract of endotoxin. 6. At 20 degrees C a marked fall in rectal temperature occurred in conscious rats 2 h after receiving the TCA but not the butanol extract of endotoxin. Temperature depression was more severe when endotoxin was administered by the I.P. route. 7. Serum urea was elevated in conscious rats by the TCA extract of endotoxin via both routes but only by the I.P. route for the butanol extract of endotoxin. In anaesthetized animals only the TCA extract of endotoxin raised serum urea concentration when given intraperitoneally. 8. Serum albumin and liver protein and RNA were unaffected by endotoxin injections over the 7 h time course of the study. 9. Rectal temperature responses to endotoxins were influenced in direction and magnitude by all variables employed in the study, while compositional changes were unaffected by environmental temperature but influenced to varying degrees by urethane anaesthesia and the route of administration employed. PMID:2475610

  9. Simple solution routes for targeted carbonate phases and intricate carbonate and silicate morphologies.

    PubMed

    Kosma, Vassiliki A; Beltsios, Konstantinos G

    2013-01-01

    This work deals with the preparation of ceramic phases similar to those encountered in natural biocomposites through relatively fast and low-cost aqueous routes and various simple reactants and additives such as urea, commercial gelatin and hexamethyldiamine. In addition to the crystallographic (or amorphous) character of targeted phases (calcite, vaterite, aragonite, silica and silicates) particle morphology is also of interest and among others, we have obtained fractions of particles in the form of nanofibrilar calcite networks, calcium silicate doughnuts and Gordian knots, and diatom-like perforated silica cylinders. PMID:25428074

  10. Toxicology of Biodiesel Combustion products

    EPA Science Inventory

    1. Introduction The toxicology of combusted biodiesel is an emerging field. Much of the current knowledge about biological responses and health effects stems from studies of exposures to other fuel sources (typically petroleum diesel, gasoline, and wood) incompletely combusted. ...

  11. MUNICIPAL WASTEWATER SLUDGE COMBUSTION TECHNOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The publication describes and evaluates the various municipal sludge combustion systems. It also emphasizes the necessity for considering and evaluating the costs involved in the total sludge management train, including dewatering, combustion, air pollution control, and ash dispo...

  12. Combuster. [low nitrogen oxide formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckay, R. A. (inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A combuster is provided for utilizing a combustible mixture containing fuel and air, to heat a load fluid such as water or air, in a manner that minimizes the formation of nitrogen oxide. The combustible mixture passes through a small diameter tube where the mixture is heated to its combustion temperature, while the load fluid flows past the outside of the tube to receive heat. The tube is of a diameter small enough that the combustible mixture cannot form a flame, and yet is not subject to wall quench, so that combustion occurs, but at a temperature less than under free flame conditions. Most of the heat required for heating the combustible mixture to its combustion temperature, is obtained from heat flow through the walls of the pipe to the mixture.

  13. Heat regenerative external combustion engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duva, Anthony W.

    1993-03-01

    It is an object of the invention to provide an external combustion expander-type engine having improved efficiency. It is another object of the invention to provide an external combustion engine in which afterburning in the exhaust channel is substantially prevented. Yet another object of the invention is to provide an external combustion engine which is less noisy than an external combustion engine of conventional design. These and other objects of the invention will become more apparent from the following description. The above objects of the invention are realized by providing a heat regenerative external combustion engine. The heat regenerative external combustion engine of the invention comprises a combustion chamber for combusting a monopropellant fuel in order to form an energized gas. The energized gas is then passed through a rotary valve to a cylinder having a reciprocating piston disposed therein. The gas is spent in moving the piston, thereby driving a drive shaft.

  14. Combustion kinetics of coal dust

    SciTech Connect

    Sal`nikov, A.V.; Repic, B.S.; Radulovic, P.T.; Jovanovic, L.L.

    1995-10-01

    A method for determining parameters that are important for the combustion kinetics of coal dust is developed. Values of these parameters for six types of lignite are obtained from experimental results on combustion of coal dust in a laboratory furnace.

  15. A Combustion Laboratory for Undergraduates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peters, James E.

    1985-01-01

    Describes a combustion laboratory facility and experiments for a senior-level (undergraduate) course in mechanical engineering. The experiment reinforces basic thermodynamic concepts and provides many students with their first opportunity to work with a combustion system. (DH)

  16. Reverse flood routing with the inverted Muskingum storage routing scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koussis, A. D.; Mazi, K.; Lykoudis, S.; Argyriou, A.

    2010-09-01

    Motivation On occasion, flood related questions are posed in the reverse from the conventional sense, e.g.: Which inflow created the flow observed at cross-section X, or the flood profile observed along reach Y? This is a signal identification type problem (hydrologic forensics). A related question concerns the operation of a reservoir, via optimal outflow control, so as to minimise downstream flood damage. Solution of the aforementioned problems requires routing of floods in the upstream direction. This is an inverse problem, and as such it is not well posed. In routing against the wave propagation, small errors in the flow measurements, or rounding errors, are amplified leading to instability, i.e., to spurious, large changes in the response (inflow hydrograph). Therefore, for the reverse solution to be stable it must be constrained by a smoothness condition; this however does not ensure its uniqueness. Storage routing models as approximate diffusion wave models By appropriate choice of their parameter values, storage routing models approximate closely diffusion-wave (DW) behaviour, if dominant flood propagation mode is that of kinematic waves (KW), which is very often true. We solve the flood signal identification problem by reversing the Muskingum routing scheme. The Muskingum routing scheme derives from a first-order accurate FD discretisation of the KW equation yet yields second-order accurate DW solutions by matching the numerical diffusion coefficient of that KW equation solution scheme to the DW equations hydraulic diffusion coefficient. Formulation and testing of a reverse routing scheme based on Muskingum routing Theoretical analysis of the reversed Muskingum routing scheme yields nominal grid design rules; however, we study optimal grid design mainly by numerical experimentation. First, we reverse an exact outflow hydrograph (a single-wave solution of the convection-diffusion equation), and then demonstrate the schemes ability to reverse-resolve composite hydrographs, also generated analytically. In a range of grid parameters, the reverse routing scheme backtracks the wave propagation in both instances very well, regaining accurately the inflow signals. Seeding the generated field data with random error causes instability in the calculation. To cope with spurious oscillations, the reversed solutions are conditioned via smoothing, applying two methods of smoothing: (i) simple low-pass filtering and (ii) optimisation (second derivative control vs. minimum shape errors). The recovered inflow hydrographs are again of good quality. Finally, we compare our method to that of Bruen & Dooge (2007), who back-routed flow hydrographs in a prismatic channel using a scheme for the reverse solution of the St. Venant equations of flood wave motion. The reversed Muskingum routing scheme is shown to at least match the accuracy of the box-scheme for reverse routing with the St. Venant equations. This study leads us to conclude that the good fidelity of the inflow recovery rests on the simplicity of the Muskingum storage reverse routing scheme, which endows it with numerical robustness and computational efficiency.

  17. Expression of urea transporters in potassium-depleted mouse kidney.

    PubMed

    Jung, Ju-Young; Madsen, Kirsten M; Han, Ki-Hwan; Yang, Chul-Woo; Knepper, Mark A; Sands, Jeff M; Kim, Jin

    2003-12-01

    Urea transport in the kidney is mediated by a family of transporter proteins that include the renal urea transporter (UT-A) and the erythrocyte urea transporter (UT-B). The purpose of this study was to determine the location of the urea transporter isoforms in the mouse kidney and to examine the effects of prolonged potassium depletion on the expression and distribution of these transporters by ultrastructural immunocytochemistry. C57BL6 mice were fed a low-potassium diet for 2 wk, and control animals received normal chow. After 2 wk on a low-potassium diet, urinary volume increased and urinary osmolality decreased (833 +/- 30 vs. 1,919 +/- 174 mosmol/kgH2O), as previously demonstrated. Kidneys were processed for immunocytochemistry with antibodies against UT-A1 (L446), UT-A1 and UT-A2 (L194), UT-A3 (Q2), and UT-B. In normal mice, UT-A1 and UT-A3 were expressed mainly in the cytoplasm of the terminal inner medullary collecting duct (IMCD). UT-A2 immunoreactivity was observed mainly on the basolateral membrane of the type 1 epithelium of the descending thin limb (DTL) of short-looped nephrons. The intensity of UT-A1 and UT-A3 immunoreactivity in the IMCD was markedly reduced in potassium-depleted mice. In contrast, there was a significant increase in UT-A2 immunoreactivity in the DTL. The intensity of UT-B immunoreactivity in the descending vasa recta (DVR) was reduced in potassium-depleted animals compared with controls. In control animals, UT-B immunoreactivity was predominantly observed in the plasma membrane, whereas in potassium-depleted mice, it was mainly observed in cytoplasmic granules in endothelial cells of the DVR. In summary, potassium depletion is associated with reduced expression of UT-A1, UT-A3, and UT-B but increased expression of UT-A2. We conclude that reduced expression of urea transporters may play a role in the impaired urine-concentrating ability associated with potassium deprivation. PMID:12952854

  18. Fuel-Rich Catalytic Combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brabbs, Theodore A.; Olson, Sandra L.

    1987-01-01

    Two-stage combustion system reduces particulate emissions. Program on catalytic oxidation of iso-octane demonstrates feasibility of two-stage combustion system for reducing particulate emissions. With fuel-rich (fuel/air equivalence ratios of 4.8 to 7.8) catalytic-combustion preburner as first stage, combustion process free of soot at reactor-outlet temperatures of 1,200 K or less.

  19. Increased urea synthesis in insulin-dependent diabetic dogs maintained normoglycemic: effect of portal insulin administration and food protein content.

    PubMed

    Freyse, E J; Rebrin, K; Schneider, T; Petrzika, M; Fischer, U

    1996-05-01

    In IDDM, the gluconeogenic turnover of amino acids is increased even if glycemia is well controlled and may be restored to normal by means of prehepatic insulin substitution. Therefore, the present study was designed 1) to investigate the influence of route of insulin administration (portal versus peripheral) on the urea production rate, which is considered to measure amino acid catabolism, and 2) to elucidate the impact of different food-protein intake. Paired studies were conducted in chronic insulin-dependent diabetic dogs maintained normoglycemic. Diabetic animals and nondiabetic controls were fed either a high-protein diet (46% of energy intake provided by proteins; study 1) or a low-protein carbohydrate-supplemented diet (20% of energy intake provided by protein; study 2) for 2 days, and flux rates of glucose and urea were measured using isotope dilution techniques. In both studies, the diabetic animals were maintained normoglycemic by glucose-controlled insulin infusion delivered either systemically or portally. In study 1 versus study 2, the animals showed lower alpha-amino nitrogen levels and concentrations of gluconeogenic amino acids, predominantly alanine. There were no significant differences in plasma glucose and glucose turnover between the experimental groups on either systemic or portal insulin infusion versus controls; however, peripheral insulin levels were higher for diabetic animals maintained with systemic versus portal insulin delivery (P < 0.05). No significant differences in glucagon, lactate, pyruvate, nonesterified fatty acids, or beta-hydroxybutyrate were observed. Urea production was significantly higher in study 1 compared with study 2: 7.48 +/- 0.83 vs. 5.97 +/- 0.59 micromol / kg / min (normal dogs); 12.97 +/- 1.86 vs. 5.54 +/- 0.60 micromol / kg / min (diabetic dogs on portal insulin); 16.11 +/- 2.59 vs. 6.82 +/- 0.70 micromol / kg / min (diabetic dogs on systemic insulin infusion); P < 0.05 for all. The diabetic dogs maintained normoglycemic with systemic insulin infusions had significantly higher rates of urea synthesis than those with portal insulin infusion (P < 0.05). It is concluded that in IDDM, even if normoglycemia is managed, there is significantly increased amino acid catabolism with posthepatic systemic insulin treatment. This increased catabolic rate is more pronounced during high-protein nourishment. PMID:8621020

  20. Advances in Urea cycle Neuroimaging: Proceedings from the 4th International symposium on Urea cycle disorders, Barcelona, Spain, September 2013

    PubMed Central

    Pacheco-Colon, Ileana; Fricke, Stanley; VanMeter, John; Gropman, M.D.

    2014-01-01

    Our previous imaging research performed as part of a Urea Cycle Rare Disorders Consortium (UCRDC) grant, has identified specific biomarkers of neurologic injury in ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency, OTCD. While characterization of mutations can be achieved in most cases, this information does not necessarily predict the severity of the underlying neurological syndrome. The biochemical consequences of any mutation may be modified additionally by a large number of factors, including contributions of other enzymes and transport systems that mediate flux through the urea cycle, diet and other environmental factors. These factors likely vary from one patient to another, and they give rise to heterogeneity of clinical severity. Affected cognitive domains include non-verbal learning, fine motor processing, reaction time, visual memory, attention, and executive function. Deficits in these capacities may be seen in symptomatic patients, as well as asymptomatic carriers with normal IQ and correlate with variances in brain structure and function in these patients. Using neuroimaging we can identify biomarkers that reflect the downstream impact of UCDs on cognition. This manuscript is a summary of the presentation from the 4th International Consortium on Urea cycle disorders held in, Barcelona, Spain, September 2, 2014. PMID:25066103

  1. Advances in urea cycle neuroimaging: Proceedings from the 4th International Symposium on urea cycle disorders, Barcelona, Spain, September 2013.

    PubMed

    Pacheco-Colón, Ileana; Fricke, Stanley; VanMeter, John; Gropman, Andrea L

    2014-01-01

    Our previous imaging research performed as part of a Urea Cycle Rare Disorders Consortium (UCRDC) grant, has identified specific biomarkers of neurologic injury in ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency, OTCD. While characterization of mutations can be achieved in most cases, this information does not necessarily predict the severity of the underlying neurological syndrome. The biochemical consequences of any mutation may be modified additionally by a large number of factors, including contributions of other enzymes and transport systems that mediate flux through the urea cycle, diet and other environmental factors. These factors likely vary from one patient to another, and they give rise to heterogeneity of clinical severity. Affected cognitive domains include non-verbal learning, fine motor processing, reaction time, visual memory, attention, and executive function. Deficits in these capacities may be seen in symptomatic patients, as well as asymptomatic carriers with normal IQ and correlate with variances in brain structure and function in these patients. Using neuroimaging we can identify biomarkers that reflect the downstream impact of UCDs on cognition. This manuscript is a summary of the presentation from the 4th International Consortium on urea cycle disorders held in, Barcelona, Spain, September 2, 2014. PMID:25066103

  2. Protocol Independent Adaptive Route Update for VANET

    PubMed Central

    Rasheed, Asim; Qayyum, Amir

    2014-01-01

    High relative node velocity and high active node density have presented challenges to existing routing approaches within highly scaled ad hoc wireless networks, such as Vehicular Ad hoc Networks (VANET). Efficient routing requires finding optimum route with minimum delay, updating it on availability of a better one, and repairing it on link breakages. Current routing protocols are generally focused on finding and maintaining an efficient route, with very less emphasis on route update. Adaptive route update usually becomes impractical for dense networks due to large routing overheads. This paper presents an adaptive route update approach which can provide solution for any baseline routing protocol. The proposed adaptation eliminates the classification of reactive and proactive by categorizing them as logical conditions to find and update the route. PMID:24723807

  3. Protocol independent adaptive route update for VANET.

    PubMed

    Rasheed, Asim; Ajmal, Sana; Qayyum, Amir

    2014-01-01

    High relative node velocity and high active node density have presented challenges to existing routing approaches within highly scaled ad hoc wireless networks, such as Vehicular Ad hoc Networks (VANET). Efficient routing requires finding optimum route with minimum delay, updating it on availability of a better one, and repairing it on link breakages. Current routing protocols are generally focused on finding and maintaining an efficient route, with very less emphasis on route update. Adaptive route update usually becomes impractical for dense networks due to large routing overheads. This paper presents an adaptive route update approach which can provide solution for any baseline routing protocol. The proposed adaptation eliminates the classification of reactive and proactive by categorizing them as logical conditions to find and update the route. PMID:24723807

  4. Fossil fuel combustion, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Ruiz, R. )

    1991-01-01

    This book contain the following topics Lean premixed combustion for gas-turbines: Review and required research, The reflex burner, Radian hybrid low NO{sub x} process, Mathematical model of a ceramic burner radiant heater, Diconex{sup tan} coupon testing in controlled atmosphere furnaces.

  5. WASTE COMBUSTION SYSTEM ANALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a study of biomass combustion alternatives. The objective was to evaluate the thermal performance and costs of available and developing biomass systems. The characteristics of available biomass fuels were reviewed, and the performance parameters of alt...

  6. Monopropellant combustion system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berg, Gerald R. (Inventor); Mueller, Donn C. (Inventor); Parish, Mark W. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    An apparatus and method are provided for decomposition of a propellant. The propellant includes an ionic salt and an additional fuel. Means are provided for decomposing a major portion of the ionic salt. Means are provided for combusting the additional fuel and decomposition products of the ionic salt.

  7. Solid Surface Combustion Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This video describes the development of the Solid Surface Combustion Experiment (SSCE) by researchers at NASA LeRC. The experiment studies fire spreading over a small solid fuel sample subjected to microgravity conditions in Earth orbit. Buoyant convection, which determines the heat transfer in fires on Earth, disappears in microgravity; hence, this experiment will help researchers understand how fires act on Earth.

  8. Supersonic-combustion rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, R. J.; Franciscus, L. C. (inventors)

    1973-01-01

    A supersonic combustion rocket is provided in which a small rocket motor is substituted for heavy turbo pumps in a conventional rocket engine. The substitution results in a substantial reduction in rocket engine weight. The flame emanating from the small rocket motor can act to ignite non-hypergolic fuels.

  9. Combustible dust tests

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The sugar dust explosion in Georgia on February 7, 2008 killed 14 workers and injured many others (OSHA, 2009). As a consequence of this explosion, OSHA revised its Combustible Dust National Emphasis (NEP) program. The NEP targets 64 industries with more than 1,000 inspections and has found more tha...

  10. Combustion Fundamentals Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The various physical processes that occur in the gas turbine combustor and the development of analytical models that accurately describe these processes are discussed. Aspects covered include fuel sprays; fluid mixing; combustion dynamics; radiation and chemistry and numeric techniques which can be applied to highly turbulent, recirculating, reacting flow fields.

  11. Droplet Combustion Experiment Operates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Fuel ignites and burns in the Droplet Combustion Experiment (DCE) on STS-94 on July 12, 1997, MET:11/07:00 (approximate). DCE used various fuels -- in drops ranging from 1 mm (0.04 inches) to 5 mm (0.2 inches) -- and mixtures of oxidizers and inert gases to learn more about the physics of combustion in the simplest burning configuration, a sphere. The DCE was designed to investigate the fundamental combustion aspects of single, isolated droplets under different pressures and ambient oxygen concentrations for a range of droplet sizes varying between 2 and 5 mm. The experiment elapsed time is shown at the bottom of the composite image. The DCE principal investigator was Forman Williams, University of California, San Diego. The experiment was part of the space research investigations conducted during the Microgravity Science Laboratory-1R mission (STS-94, July 1-17 1997). Advanced combustion experiments will be a part of investigations plarned for the International Space Station. (119KB JPEG, 658 x 982 pixels; downlinked video, higher quality not available) The MPG from which this composite was made is available at http://mix.msfc.nasa.gov/ABSTRACTS/MSFC-0300171.html.

  12. Combustion, 2nd edition

    SciTech Connect

    Glassman, I.

    1987-01-01

    The uniqueness of this book centers on the presentation of physical insights that are essential to understanding combustion. The approach is to reduce complexity by stressing physical aspects. The second edition has added, in addition to selective material in each chapter, problem sets which makes the book more suitable for the classroom. The book is divided into nine chapters. Chapter 1 is devoted to fundamental thermodynamic concepts. Chemical kinetics are covered in Chapter 2. The general oxidation characteristics of fuels and explosions are covered in Chapter 3. Chapter 4 covers flame phenomena in premixed combustible gases. Detonation is covered in Chapter 5. Chapter 6 deals with diffusion flames. Ignition is covered in Chapter 7. Chapter 8 deals with environmental considerations in combustion processes. The combustion in nonvolatile fuels is presented in Chapter 9. The Appendices of the book include: thermochemical data; reaction rate constants; dissociation energies of various hydrocarbons; laminar flame speeds; flammability limits in air; spontaneous ignition temperature data; and minimum spark ignition energies and quenching distances.

  13. Synergistic behavior of glycine betaine-urea mixture: A molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Narendra; Kishore, Nand

    2013-09-01

    Glycine betaine (GB) is one of the most important osmolyte which is known to stabilize proteins as well as counteract the denaturing effect of urea. There have been many studies indicating protein stabilization and counteraction of the effect of urea by GB. However, the exact mechanism of counteraction is still debated and is of important research interest. In this study, distribution functions, hydrogen bonds, and energetics were analysed to understand different interactions between GB and urea, and their solvation properties in presence of each other. The results show that in the GB-urea mixture, GB acted as a stronger osmolyte and urea became a weaker denaturing agent than its individual counterparts. The increase in the solvation of urea and GB in GB-urea mixture and their mutual interactions through hydrogen bonding and coulombic energy resulted in more involvement of GB and urea with solvent as well as with themselves. This might result in the increase of the exclusion of GB from protein surface and decrease in the protein-urea interactions in the mixture. This synergistic behavior might be the prime reason for the counteraction of denaturing effect of urea by GB.

  14. Non-enzymatic detection of urea using unmodified gold nanoparticles based aptasensor.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Piyush; Lambadi, Paramesh Ramulu; Navani, Naveen Kumar

    2015-10-15

    Biosensing nitrogenous compounds like urea is required to control the incidents of Economically Motivated Adulteration (EMA). In this study, we report the FluMag Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential Enrichment (FluMag-SELEX) method to isolate a urea specific DNA aptamer with a dissociation constant (Kd) of 232 nM. The interaction of DNA aptamer with urea has been confirmed by affinity assay, CD analysis, melting curve analysis and truncation studies. Unlike other urea sensing methods reported so far, using this urea aptamer, we demonstrate a simple, 'non-enzymatic' easy-to-use, dual readout aptasensor that exploits unmodified gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) to transduce the signals of aptamer binding to urea in terms of intrinsic fluorescence differences and color changes simultaneously. This method is free from complicated sample processing and labeling steps. The urea aptasensor displays high selectivity for urea and is free from interference from common milk adulterants. The developed aptasensor reliably detects urea adulteration in milk. The response signals linearly correlate with the increasing concentrations of urea in milk ranging from 20mM to 150 mM with detection limit of 20mM. We also show that this aptasensor can also be used as a simple fluorescence based "turn-on" sensor. The results obtained in this study are comparable to the commercial urease based detection methods. PMID:26002019

  15. ENSURING THE AVAILABILITY AND RELIABILITY OF UREA DOSING FOR ON-ROAD AND NON-ROAD

    SciTech Connect

    Barton, G; Lonsdale, B

    2003-08-24

    The purpose of this presentation is to address two important issues. The first issue is nationwide availability of urea. The second is assurance by the engine maker that the engine cannot operate without urea. In regard to the first issue, North American urea production can support SCR needs for the Heavy Duty truck industry. The existing distribution methods, pathways and technology could be utilized for urea supply with no new invention required. Urea usage and storage capacity on vehicles would support long distances between tank refills, as SCR could be initially rolled out with a limited infrastructure. The price of urea should be less than diesel fuel and urea SCR should have a fuel economy advantage over competing technologies. It can be in place by 2007. In regard to the second issue, sensor technology exists to monitor urea tank level and verify that the fluid in the tank is urea. NOx sensors are available to monitor tailpipe NOx, ensuring the entire SCR system is functioning properly, and inferring that urea is in the system. The monitoring system could be used to monitor compliance, record faults, and initiate enforcement actions as necessary. The monitoring system could initiate actions to encourage compliance.

  16. Cow level sampling factors affecting analysis and interpretation of milk urea concentrations in 2 dairy herds.

    PubMed

    Eicher, R; Bouchard, E; Tremblay, A

    1999-07-01

    The goals of this study were to determine the influence of the variations among udder quarters, the somatic cell count, the time of sampling during the day, sample conservation, and centrifugation on milk urea (UREA) concentrations, and to propose a sample collection procedure for herds that are not on a Dairy Herd Improvement (DHI) program. Forty cows from 2 herds with different feeding practices were randomly selected. The quarter sampled and the somatic cell count did not significantly influence UREA concentrations. Milk urea concentrations were highest in the morning. The diurnal pattern was not influenced by intrinsic factors like parity, days postpartum, or daily milk yield. The UREA concentrations were significantly higher after refrigeration for one week (mean UREA change = +0.41 +/- 0.24 mmol/L, P = 0.0001) and freezing for one month (mean UREA change = +1.52 +/- 1.25 mmol/L, P = 0.0001). Urea concentrations were slightly higher in lactoserum than in whole milk (mean UREA difference = +0.17 +/- 0.24 mmol/L, P = 0.0001). Although this study included only 2 herds and does not allow extrapolation, differences were found in the diurnal pattern of UREA in these 2 herds, which possibly reflect differences in feeding strategy. With consideration of these results, a 6-point sampling procedure for herds that are not on a DHI program is proposed. PMID:10416068

  17. Cow level sampling factors affecting analysis and interpretation of milk urea concentrations in 2 dairy herds.

    PubMed Central

    Eicher, R; Bouchard, E; Tremblay, A

    1999-01-01

    The goals of this study were to determine the influence of the variations among udder quarters, the somatic cell count, the time of sampling during the day, sample conservation, and centrifugation on milk urea (UREA) concentrations, and to propose a sample collection procedure for herds that are not on a Dairy Herd Improvement (DHI) program. Forty cows from 2 herds with different feeding practices were randomly selected. The quarter sampled and the somatic cell count did not significantly influence UREA concentrations. Milk urea concentrations were highest in the morning. The diurnal pattern was not influenced by intrinsic factors like parity, days postpartum, or daily milk yield. The UREA concentrations were significantly higher after refrigeration for one week (mean UREA change = +0.41 +/- 0.24 mmol/L, P = 0.0001) and freezing for one month (mean UREA change = +1.52 +/- 1.25 mmol/L, P = 0.0001). Urea concentrations were slightly higher in lactoserum than in whole milk (mean UREA difference = +0.17 +/- 0.24 mmol/L, P = 0.0001). Although this study included only 2 herds and does not allow extrapolation, differences were found in the diurnal pattern of UREA in these 2 herds, which possibly reflect differences in feeding strategy. With consideration of these results, a 6-point sampling procedure for herds that are not on a DHI program is proposed. PMID:10416068

  18. Transport and transformation of de-icing urea from airport runways in a constructed wetland system.

    PubMed

    Thorén, A K; Legrand, C; Herrmann, J

    2003-01-01

    Urea, NH2-CO-NH2, is used as a de-icing agent at Kalmar Airport, southeast Sweden. During 1998-2001, urea contributed on average 30% of the yearly nitrogen (N) transport of 41,000 kg via Törnebybäcken stream to the coastal zone of the Baltic Sea. In order to reduce stream transport of N from airport, agricultural and other diffuse sources, a wetland was constructed in 1996. Annual wetland retention of total-N varied in the range of 2,500-8,100 kg (6-36% of influent) during 1998-2001, according to mass balances calculated from monthly sampling. During airport de-icing, January-March 2001,660 kg urea-N out of 2,600 kg applied urea-N reached the wetland according to daily sampling. This indicated that 75% of the urea was transformed before entering the wetland. Urea was found to be only a minor part (8%) of total-N in the wetland influent. Calculations of cumulative urea-N loads at the wetland inlet and outlet respectively, showed a significant urea transformation during February 2001 with approximately 40% of the incoming urea-N being transformed in the wetland system. These results show that significant amounts of urea can be transformed in a wetland system at air temperatures around 0 degree C. PMID:14621175

  19. Reversed flow fluidized-bed combustion apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Shang, Jer-Yu; Mei, Joseph S.; Wilson, John S.

    1984-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a fluidized-bed combustion apparatus provided with a U-shaped combustion zone. A cyclone is disposed in the combustion zone for recycling solid particulate material. The combustion zone configuration and the recycling feature provide relatively long residence times and low freeboard heights to maximize combustion of combustible material, reduce nitrogen oxides, and enhance sulfur oxide reduction.

  20. Low emission internal combustion engine

    DOEpatents

    Karaba, Albert M.

    1979-01-01

    A low emission, internal combustion compression ignition engine having a cylinder, a piston movable in the cylinder and a pre-combustion chamber communicating with the cylinder near the top thereof and in which low emissions of NO.sub.x are achieved by constructing the pre-combustion chamber to have a volume of between 70% and 85% of the combined pre-chamber and main combustion chamber volume when the piston is at top dead center and by variably controlling the initiation of fuel injection into the pre-combustion chamber.

  1. Mssbauer and magnetization studies of nickel ferrite nanoparticles synthesized by the microwave-combustion method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoud, M. H.; Elshahawy, A. M.; Makhlouf, Salah A.; Hamdeh, H. H.

    2013-10-01

    Nanocrystalline nickel ferrite was synthesized from its stoichiometric metal nitrates and urea mixtures, using a microwave assisted combustion method. The process was a convenient, inexpensive and an efficient method for formation of NiFe2O4 nanomaterials. Effect of urea/metal nitrates ratio on the obtained phases, particle size and magnetic properties has been investigated by various techniques. Saturation magnetization of 50 emu/g was observed at room temperature for larger particles, and it decreases with decreasing particle size. The coercivity attains a maximum value of 170 Oe when the particle size was ~20 nm, and decreases with increasing particle size. Mssbauer spectra measured at RT for some representative samples show a combination of ordered and superparamagnetic behavior, whereas those collected at 20 K elucidate the nature of the obtained phases and cation distribution.

  2. The Consistent Vehicle Routing Problem

    SciTech Connect

    Groer, Christopher S; Golden, Bruce; Edward, Wasil

    2009-01-01

    In the small package shipping industry (as in other industries), companies try to differentiate themselves by providing high levels of customer service. This can be accomplished in several ways, including online tracking of packages, ensuring on-time delivery, and offering residential pickups. Some companies want their drivers to develop relationships with customers on a route and have the same drivers visit the same customers at roughly the same time on each day that the customers need service. These service requirements, together with traditional constraints on vehicle capacity and route length, define a variant of the classical capacitated vehicle routing problem, which we call the consistent VRP (ConVRP). In this paper, we formulate the problem as a mixed-integer program and develop an algorithm to solve the ConVRP that is based on the record-to-record travel algorithm. We compare the performance of our algorithm to the optimal mixed-integer program solutions for a set of small problems and then apply our algorithm to five simulated data sets with 1,000 customers and a real-world data set with more than 3,700 customers. We provide a technique for generating ConVRP benchmark problems from vehicle routing problem instances given in the literature and provide our solutions to these instances. The solutions produced by our algorithm on all problems do a very good job of meeting customer service objectives with routes that have a low total travel time.

  3. Central East Pacific Flight Routing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grabbe, Shon; Sridhar, Banavar; Kopardekar, Parimal; Cheng, Nadia

    2006-01-01

    With the introduction of the Federal Aviation Administration s Advanced Technology and Oceanic Procedures system at the Oakland Oceanic Center, a level of automation now exists in the oceanic environment to potentially begin accommodating increased user preferred routing requests. This paper presents the results of an initial feasibility assessment which examines the potential benefits of transitioning from the fixed Central East Pacific routes to user preferred routes. As a surrogate for the actual user-provided routing requests, a minimum-travel-time, wind-optimal dynamic programming algorithm was developed and utilized in this paper. After first describing the characteristics (e.g., origin airport, destination airport, vertical distribution and temporal distribution) of the westbound flights utilizing the Central East Pacific routes on Dec. 14-16 and 19-20, the results of both a flight-plan-based simulation and a wind-optimal-based simulation are presented. Whereas the lateral and longitudinal distribution of the aircraft trajectories in these two simulations varied dramatically, the number of simulated first-loss-of-separation events remained relatively constant. One area of concern that was uncovered in this initial analysis was a potential workload issue associated with the redistribution of traffic in the oceanic sectors due to thc prevailing wind patterns.

  4. Dynamic urea bond for the design of reversible and self-healing polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ying, Hanze; Zhang, Yanfeng; Cheng, Jianjun

    2014-02-01

    Polymers bearing dynamic covalent bonds may exhibit dynamic properties, such as self-healing, shape memory and environmental adaptation. However, most dynamic covalent chemistries developed so far require either catalyst or change of environmental conditions to facilitate bond reversion and dynamic property change in bulk materials. Here we report the rational design of hindered urea bonds (urea with bulky substituent attached to its nitrogen) and the use of them to make polyureas and poly(urethane-urea)s capable of catalyst-free dynamic property change and autonomous repairing at low temperature. Given the simplicity of the hindered urea bond chemistry (reaction of a bulky amine with an isocyanate), incorporation of the catalyst-free dynamic covalent urea bonds to conventional polyurea or urea-containing polymers that typically have stable bulk properties may further broaden the scope of applications of these widely used materials.

  5. Effect of urea addition on giant reed ensilage and subsequent methane production by anaerobic digestion.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shan; Ge, Xumeng; Liew, Lo Niee; Liu, Zhe; Li, Yebo

    2015-09-01

    The effect of urea addition on giant reed ensilage and sequential anaerobic digestion (AD) of the ensiled giant reed was evaluated. The dry matter loss during ensilage (up to 90 days) with or without urea addition was about 1%. Addition of 2% urea enhanced production of lactic acid by about 4 times, and reduced production of propionic acid by 2-8 times. Besides, urea addition reduced degradation of cellulose and hemicellulose, and increased degradation of lignin in giant reed during ensilage. Ensilage with or without urea addition had no significant effects on the enzymatic digestibility of giant reed, but ensilage with urea addition achieved a cumulative methane yield of 173 L/kg VS, which was 18% higher than that of fresh giant reed. The improved methane yield of giant reed could be attributed to the production of organic acids and ethanol during ensilage. PMID:26094194

  6. [Rate of controlled-release urea pervasion through membrane determined by ultraviolet spectrophotometry].

    PubMed

    Zuo, Xiu-jin; Wang, Zhen-xin; Dai, Xiao-min; Zhou, Yi; Ma, Xiao-jun

    2006-06-01

    Application of controlled-release nitrogenous fertilizers can improve the efficiency of fertilizers and reduce the environmental pollution. Controlled-release urea (coated urea) is one of the controlled-release nitrogenous fertilizers developed quickly in the recent years. The rate of controlled-release urea pervasion through membrane is the most important index of the capacity of controlled release. There is a maximum absorption at lambda=426 nm with complex in acidic solution, using p-dimethylaminozenzaldehyde as color reagent, and the absorbance exhibits a linear reponses to the urea concentration over the range of 7.5-210 microg x mL(-1). The method for determining the rate of controlled-release urea pervasion through membrane was realized through determining the content of urea in the liquor, the recovery efficiency of the method is 96.1%-103.9%. PMID:16961255

  7. Unmasked adult-onset urea cycle disorders in the critical care setting.

    PubMed

    Summar, Marshall L; Barr, Frederick; Dawling, Sheila; Smith, Wendy; Lee, Brendan; Singh, Rani H; Rhead, William J; Sniderman King, Lisa; Christman, Brian W

    2005-10-01

    Most often, urea cycle disorders have been described as acute onset hyperammonemia in the newborn period; however, there is a growing awareness that urea cycle disorders can present at almost any age, frequently in the critical care setting. This article presents three cases of adult-onset hyperammonemia caused by inherited defects in nitrogen processing in the urea cycle, and reviews the diagnosis, management, and pathophysiology of adult-onset urea cycle disorders. Individuals who have milder molecular urea cycle defects can lead a relatively normal life until a severe environmental stress triggers a hyperammonemic crisis. Comorbid conditions such as physical trauma often delay the diagnosis of the urea cycle defect. Prompt recognition and treatment are essential in determining the outcome of these patients. PMID:16227111

  8. Remote calorimetric detection of urea via flow injection analysis.

    PubMed

    Gaddes, David E; Demirel, Melik C; Reeves, W Brian; Tadigadapa, Srinivas

    2015-12-01

    The design and development of a calorimetric biosensing system enabling relatively high throughput sample analysis are reported. The calorimetric biosensor system consists of a thin (?20 ?m) micromachined Y-cut quartz crystal resonator (QCR) as a temperature sensor placed in close proximity to a fluidic chamber packed with an immobilized enzyme. Layer by layer enzyme immobilization of urease is demonstrated and its activity as a function of the number of layers, pH, and time has been evaluated. This configuration enables a sensing system where a transducer element is physically separated from the analyte solution of interest and is thereby free from fouling effects typically associated with biochemical reactions occuring on the sensor surface. The performance of this biosensing system is demonstrated by detection of 1-200 mM urea in phosphate buffer via a flow injection analysis (FIA) technique. Miniaturized fluidic systems were used to provide continuous flow through a reaction column. Under this configuration the biosensor has an ultimate resolution of less than 1 mM urea and showed a linear response between 0-50 mM. This work demonstrates a sensing modality in which the sensor itself is not fouled or contaminated by the solution of interest and the enzyme immobilized Kapton fluidic reaction column can be used as a disposable cartridge. Such a system enables reuse and reliability for long term sampling measurements. Based on this concept a biosensing system is envisioned which can perform rapid measurements to detect biomarkers such as glucose, creatinine, cholesterol, urea and lactate in urine and blood continuously over extended periods of time. PMID:26479269

  9. N,N′-Diphenyl­thio­urea acetone monosolvate

    PubMed Central

    Okuniewski, Andrzej; Chojnacki, Jaroslaw; Becker, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    In the title compound, C13H12N2S·C3H6O, the phenyl rings of the thio­urea mol­ecule are in syn and anti positions in relation to the C=S bond. Two mol­ecules are connected by N—H⋯S=C hydrogen bonds into a centrosymmetric dimer. An additional N—H⋯O=C hydrogen bond to the acetone solvent mol­ecule and some weak C—H⋯π inter­actions reinforce the crystal structure. PMID:21522765

  10. Expression of urea transporters in the developing rat kidney.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Hee; Kim, Dong-Un; Han, Ki-Hwan; Jung, Ju-Young; Sands, Jeff M; Knepper, Mark A; Madsen, Kirsten M; Kim, Jin

    2002-03-01

    Urea transport in the kidney is mediated by a family of transporter proteins that includes renal urea transporters (UT-A) and erythrocyte urea transporters (UT-B). Because newborn rats are not capable of producing concentrated urine, we examined the time of expression and the distribution of UT-A and UT-B in the developing rat kidney by light and electron microscopic immunocytochemistry. Kidneys from 16-, 18-, and 20-day-old fetuses, 1-, 4-, 7-, 14-, and 21-day-old pups, and adult animals were studied. In the adult kidney, UT-A was expressed intensely in the inner medullary collecting duct (IMCD) and terminal portion of the short-loop descending thin limb (DTL) and weakly in long-loop DTL in the outer part of the inner medulla. UT-A immunoreactivity was not present in the fetal kidney but was observed in the IMCD and DTL in 1-day-old pups. The intensity of UT-A immunostaining in the IMCD gradually increased during postnatal development. In 4- and 7-day-old pups, UT-A immunoreactivity was present in the DTL at the border between the outer and inner medulla. In 14- and 21-day-old pups, strong UT-A immunostaining was observed in the terminal part of short-loop DTL in the outer medulla, and weak labeling remained in long-loop DTL descending into the outer part of the inner medulla. In the adult kidney, there was intense staining for UT-B in descending vasa recta (DVR) and weak labeling of glomeruli. In the developing kidney, UT-B was first observed in the DVR of a 20-day-old fetus. After birth there was a striking increase in the number of UT-B-positive DVR, in association with the formation of vascular bundles. The intensity of immunostaining remained strong in the outer medulla but gradually decreased in the inner medulla. We conclude that the expression of urea transporters in short-loop DTL and DVR coincides with the development of the ability to produce a concentrated urine. PMID:11832436

  11. Functional materials from self-assembled bis-urea macrocycles.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Linda S; Salpage, Sahan R; Korous, Arthur A

    2014-07-15

    CONSPECTUS: This Account highlights the work from our laboratories on bis-urea macrocycles constructed from two C-shaped spacers and two urea groups. These simple molecular units assembled with high fidelity into columnar structures guided by the three-centered urea hydrogen bonding motif and aryl stacking interactions. Individual columns are aligned and closely packed together to afford functional and homogeneous microporous crystals. This approach allows for precise and rational control over the dimensions of the columnar structure simply by changing the small molecular unit. When the macrocyclic unit lacks a cavity, columnar assembly gives strong pillars. Strong pillars with external functional groups such as basic lone pairs can expand like clays to accept guests between the pillars. Macrocycles that contain sizable interior cavities assemble into porous molecular crystals with aligned, well-defined columnar pores that are accessible to gases and guests. Herein, we examine the optimal design of the macrocyclic unit that leads to columnar assembly in high fidelity and probe the feasibility of incorporating a second functional group within the macrocycles. The porous molecular crystals prepared through the self-assembly of bis-urea macrocycles display surface areas similar to zeolites but lower than MOFs. Their simple one-dimensional channels are well-suited for studying binding, investigating transport, diffusion and exchange, and monitoring the effects of encapsulation on reaction mechanism and product distribution. Guests that complement the size, shape, and polarity of the channels can be absorbed into these porous crystals with repeatable stoichiometry to form solid host-guest complexes. Heating or extraction with an organic solvent enables desorption or removal of the guest and subsequent recovery of the solid host. Further, these porous crystals can be used as containers for the selective [2 + 2] cycloadditions of small enones such as 2-cyclohexenone or 3-methyl-cyclopentenone, while larger hosts bind and facilitate the photodimerization of coumarin. When the host framework incorporates benzophenone, a triplet sensitizer, UV-irradiation in the presence of oxygen efficiently generates singlet oxygen. Complexes of this host were employed to influence the selectivity of photooxidations of 2-methyl-2-butene and cumene with singlet oxygen. Small systematic changes in the channel and bound reactants should enable systematic evaluation of the effects of channel dimensions, guest dimensions, and channel-guest interactions on the processes of absorption, diffusion, and reaction of guests within these nanochannels. Such studies could help in the development of new materials for separations, gas storage, and catalysis. PMID:24784767

  12. Health effects of urea formaldehyde foam insulation: evidence of causation.

    PubMed Central

    Norman, G R; Newhouse, M T

    1986-01-01

    Studies of health effects of urea formaldehyde foam insulation (UFFI) were critically reviewed by means of accepted rules for evidence of causation. Three categories of health effects were examined: reported symptoms, primarily of the upper respiratory tract, lower respiratory tract disease and cancer. Most of the studies purporting to demonstrate health effects of UFFI failed to meet minimal methodologic criteria for evidence of causation. Evidence from the adequate studies provides little support for the hypothesis of a causative role of UFFI in health problems. PMID:3512066

  13. The Biginelli Reaction Is a Urea-Catalyzed Organocatalytic Multicomponent Reaction.

    PubMed

    Puripat, Maneeporn; Ramozzi, Romain; Hatanaka, Miho; Parasuk, Waraporn; Parasuk, Vudhichai; Morokuma, Keiji

    2015-07-17

    The recently developed artificial force induced reaction (AFIR) method was applied to search systematically all possible multicomponent pathways for the Biginelli reaction mechanism. The most favorable pathway starts with the condensation of the urea and benzaldehyde, followed by the addition of ethyl acetoacetate. Remarkably, a second urea molecule catalyzes nearly every step of the reaction. Thus, the Biginelli reaction is a urea-catalyzed multicomponent reaction. The reaction mechanism was found to be identical in both protic and aprotic solvents. PMID:26066623

  14. A current perspective on the compensatory effects of urea and methylamine on protein stability and function.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Safikur; Warepam, Marina; Singh, Laishram R; Dar, Tanveer Ali

    2015-11-01

    Urea is a strong denaturant and inhibits many enzymes but is accumulated intracellularly at very high concentrations (up to 3-4M) in mammalian kidney and in many marine fishes. It is known that the harmful effects of urea on the macromolecular structure and function is offset by the accumulation of an osmolytic agent called methylamine. Intracellular concentration of urea to methylamines falls in the ratio of 2:1 to 3:2 (molar ratio). At this ratio, the thermodynamic effects of urea and methylamines on protein stability and function are believed to be algebraically additive. The mechanism of urea-methylamine counteraction has been widely investigated on various approaches including, thermodynamic, structural and functional aspects. Recent advances have also revealed atomic level insights of counteraction and various molecular dynamic simulation studies have yielded significant molecular level informations on the interaction between urea and methylamines with proteins. It is worthwhile that urea-methylamine system not only plays pivotal role for the survival and functioning of the renal medullary cells but also is a key osmoregulatory component of the marine elasmobranchs, holocephalans and coelacanths. Therefore, it is important to combine all discoveries and discuss the developments in context to physiology of the mammalian kidney and adaptation of the marine organisms. In this article we have for the first time reviewed all major developments on urea-counteraction systems to date. We have also discussed about other additional urea-counteraction systems discovered so far including urea-NaCl, urea-myoinsoitol and urea-molecular chaperone systems. Insights for the possible future research have also been highlighted. PMID:26095775

  15. Juvenile amphibians do not avoid potentially lethal levels of urea on soil substrate.

    PubMed

    Hatch, A C; Belden, L K; Scheessele, E; Blaustein, A R

    2001-10-01

    We examined the effects of a forest fertilizer (urea) on newly metamorphosed terrestrial amphibians (Western toads, Bufo boreas; Cascades frogs, Rana cascadae; long-toed salamanders, Ambystoma macrodactylum; and roughskin newts, Taricha granulosa). We examined avoidance behavior of Western toads and Cascades frogs on both paper towel and soil substrates dosed with urea (control and 100 kg N/ha and an additional treatment of 50 kg N/ha for Western toads on soil substrate) and avoidance behavior of long-toed salamanders on soil substrate dosed with urea. We further examined the survival and feeding behavior of all four species exposed to urea on soil substrate (100 kg N/ha) for 5 d. Juvenile Western toads and Cascades frogs avoided paper towels dosed with urea but did not avoid urea-dosed soil substrate. However, Western toads and Cascades frogs both suffered significant mortality when exposed to urea on a soil substrate for 5 d. Furthermore, after adjusting for weight, we found that urea-exposed juvenile Western toads and Cascades frogs consumed significantly fewer prey items (crickets) compared with nonexposed control animals. Long-toed salamanders did not discriminate against soil substrate dosed with urea, and neither long-toed salamanders nor roughskin newts died or reduced prey consumption as a result of urea exposure. Juvenile amphibians may not be able to detect and avoid harmful levels of urea fertilizer on a natural substrate. Furthermore, anthropogenic stressors such as urea fertilizer can significantly reduce the survival and prey consumption of juvenile amphibians. These effects are important to consider in light of possible threats to the conservation status of many amphibian species. PMID:11596767

  16. Route Flap Damping Made Usable

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelsser, Cristel; Maennel, Olaf; Mohapatra, Pradosh; Bush, Randy; Patel, Keyur

    The Border Gateway Protocol (BGP), the de facto inter-domain routing protocol of the Internet, is known to be noisy. The protocol has two main mechanisms to ameliorate this, MinRouteAdvertisementInterval (MRAI), and Route Flap Damping (RFD). MRAI deals with very short bursts on the order of a few to 30 seconds. RFD deals with longer bursts, minutes to hours. Unfortunately, RFD was found to severely penalize sites for being well-connected because topological richness amplifies the number of update messages exchanged. So most operators have disabled it. Through measurement, this paper explores the avenue of absolutely minimal change to code, and shows that a few RFD algorithmic constants and limits can be trivially modified, with the result being damping a non-trivial amount of long term churn without penalizing well-behaved prefixes' normal convergence process.

  17. Thiomonas sp. CB2 is able to degrade urea and promote toxic metal precipitation in acid mine drainage waters supplemented with urea

    PubMed Central

    Farasin, Julien; Andres, Jérémy; Casiot, Corinne; Barbe, Valérie; Faerber, Jacques; Halter, David; Heintz, Dimitri; Koechler, Sandrine; Lièvremont, Didier; Lugan, Raphael; Marchal, Marie; Plewniak, Frédéric; Seby, Fabienne; Bertin, Philippe N.; Arsène-Ploetze, Florence

    2015-01-01

    The acid mine drainage (AMD) in Carnoulès (France) is characterized by the presence of toxic metals such as arsenic. Several bacterial strains belonging to the Thiomonas genus, which were isolated from this AMD, are able to withstand these conditions. Their genomes carry several genomic islands (GEIs), which are known to be potentially advantageous in some particular ecological niches. This study focused on the role of the “urea island” present in the Thiomonas CB2 strain, which carry the genes involved in urea degradation processes. First, genomic comparisons showed that the genome of Thiomonas sp. CB2, which is able to degrade urea, contains a urea genomic island which is incomplete in the genome of other strains showing no urease activity. The urease activity of Thiomonas sp. CB2 enabled this bacterium to maintain a neutral pH in cell cultures in vitro and prevented the occurrence of cell death during the growth of the bacterium in a chemically defined medium. In AMD water supplemented with urea, the degradation of urea promotes iron, aluminum and arsenic precipitation. Our data show that ureC was expressed in situ, which suggests that the ability to degrade urea may be expressed in some Thiomonas strains in AMD, and that this urease activity may contribute to their survival in contaminated environments. PMID:26441922

  18. Dynamic features of combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oppenheim, A. K.

    1985-01-01

    The dynamic features of combustion are discussed for four important cases: ignition, inflammation, explosion, and detonation. Ignition, the initiation of a self-sustained exothermic process, is considered in the simplest case of a closed thermodynamic system and its stochastic distribution. Inflammation, the initiation and propagation of self-sustained flames, is presented for turbulent flow. Explosion, the dynamic effects caused by the deposition of exothermic energy in a compressible medium, is illustrated by self-similar blast waves with energy deposition at the front and the adiabatic non-self-similar wave. Detonation, the most comprehensive illustration of all the dynamic effects of combustion, is discussed with a phenomenological account of the development and structure of the wave.

  19. Combustion engine system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houseman, John (Inventor); Voecks, Gerald E. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    A flow through catalytic reactor which selectively catalytically decomposes methanol into a soot free hydrogen rich product gas utilizing engine exhaust at temperatures of 200 to 650 C to provide the heat for vaporizing and decomposing the methanol is described. The reactor is combined with either a spark ignited or compression ignited internal combustion engine or a gas turbine to provide a combustion engine system. The system may be fueled entirely by the hydrogen rich gas produced in the methanol decomposition reactor or the system may be operated on mixed fuels for transient power gain and for cold start of the engine system. The reactor includes a decomposition zone formed by a plurality of elongated cylinders which contain a body of vapor permeable, methanol decomposition catalyst preferably a shift catalyst such as copper-zinc.

  20. Metabolic control of urea catabolism in Chlamydomonas reinhardi and Chlorella pyrenoidosa.

    PubMed Central

    Hodson, R C; Williams, S K; Davidson, W R

    1975-01-01

    In the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardi (strain y-1), synthesis of the enzymes required for urea hydrolysis is under substrate induction control by urea and under end product repression control by ammonia. Hydrolysis of urea if effected by the sequential action of the discrete enzymes urea carboxylase and allophanate lyase, collectively called urea amidolyase. The carboxylase converts urea to allophanate in a reaction requiring biotin, adenosine 5'-triphosphate, and Mg2+. The lyase hydrolzyes allophanate to ammonium ions and bicarbonate. Neither activity is present in more than trace amounts when cultures are grown with ammonia or urea plus ammonia, or when they are starved for nitrogen for 8 h. Urea in the absence of ammonia induces both activities 10 to 100 times the basal levels. Addition of ammonia to an induced culture causes complete cessation of carboxylase accumulation and an 80% depression of lyase accumulation. Ammonia does not reduce urea uptake by repressed cells, so it does not prevent induction by the mechanism of inducer exclusion. The unicellular green alga Chlorella pyrenoidosa (strain 3 Emerson) also has discrete carboxylase and lyase enzymes, but only the carboxylase exhibits metabolic control. PMID:1116994

  1. UREA: APPARENT CARRIER-MEDIATED TRANSPORT BY FACILITATED DIFFUSION IN DOGFISH ERYTHROCYTES.

    PubMed

    MURDAUGH, H V; ROBIN, E D; HEARN, C D

    1964-04-01

    The exposure of erythrocytes from the elasmobranch, Squalus acanthias, to solutions isosmotic with plasma (IM) but containing urea or hydroxyurea as the sole solute does not produce hemolysis. Exposure of these cells to IM methylurea, thiourea and acetamide does produce hemolysis. Low concentrations of urea, which are associated with hemolysis, protect dogfish red cells against hemolysis by methylurea and thiourea. Dogfish red cells exposed to mediums containing high concentrations of urea, or no urea, reach 95 percent of their equilibrium concentration in less than 5 minutes. PMID:14107461

  2. The emerging physiological roles of the SLC14A family of urea transporters

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Gavin

    2011-01-01

    In mammals, urea is the main nitrogenous breakdown product of protein catabolism and is produced in the liver. In certain tissues, the movement of urea across cell membranes is specifically mediated by a group of proteins known as the SLC14A family of facilitative urea transporters. These proteins are derived from two distinct genes, UT-A (SLC14A2) and UT-B (SLC14A1). Facilitative urea transporters play an important role in two major physiological processes urinary concentration and urea nitrogen salvaging. Although UT-A and UT-B transporters both have a similar basic structure and mediate the transport of urea in a facilitative manner, there are a number of significant differences between them. UT-A transporters are mainly found in the kidney, are highly specific for urea, have relatively lower transport rates and are highly regulated at both gene expression and cellular localization levels. In contrast, UT-B transporters are more widespread in their tissue location, transport both urea and water, have a relatively high transport rate, are inhibited by mercurial compounds and currently appear to be less acutely regulated. This review details the fundamental research that has so far been performed to investigate the function and physiological significance of these two types of urea transporters. PMID:21449978

  3. Routing Algorithm Exploits Spatial Relations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okino, Clayton; Jennings, Esther

    2004-01-01

    A recently developed routing algorithm for broadcasting in an ad hoc wireless communication network takes account of, and exploits, the spatial relationships among the locations of nodes, in addition to transmission power levels and distances between the nodes. In contrast, most prior algorithms for discovering routes through ad hoc networks rely heavily on transmission power levels and utilize limited graph-topology techniques that do not involve consideration of the aforesaid spatial relationships. The present algorithm extracts the relevant spatial-relationship information by use of a construct denoted the relative-neighborhood graph (RNG).

  4. Ionic liquid self-combustion synthesis of BiOBr/Bi24O31Br10 heterojunctions with exceptional visible-light photocatalytic performances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fa-Tang; Wang, Qing; Ran, Jingrun; Hao, Ying-Juan; Wang, Xiao-Jing; Zhao, Dishun; Qiao, Shi Zhang

    2014-12-01

    Heterostructured BiOBr/Bi24O31Br10 nanocomposites with surface oxygen vacancies are constructed by a facile in situ route of one-step self-combustion of ionic liquids. The compositions can be easily controlled by simply adjusting the fuel ratio of urea and 2-bromoethylamine hydrobromide (BTH). BTH serves not only as a fuel, but also as a complexing agent for ionic liquids and a reactant to supply the Br element. The heterojunctions show remarkable adsorptive ability for both the cationic dye of rhodamine B (RhB) and the anionic dye of methylene orange (MO) at high concentrations, which is attributed to the abundant surface oxygen vacancies. The sample containing 75.2% BiOBr and 24.8% Bi24O31Br10 exhibits the highest photocatalytic activity. Its reaction rate constant is 4.0 and 9.0 times that of pure BiOBr in degrading 50 mg L-1 of RhB and 30 mg L-1 of MO under visible-light (? > 400 nm) irradiation, respectively, which is attributed to the narrow band gap and highly efficient transfer efficiency of charge carriers. Different photocatalytic reaction processes and mechanisms over pure BiOBr and heterojunctions are proposed.Heterostructured BiOBr/Bi24O31Br10 nanocomposites with surface oxygen vacancies are constructed by a facile in situ route of one-step self-combustion of ionic liquids. The compositions can be easily controlled by simply adjusting the fuel ratio of urea and 2-bromoethylamine hydrobromide (BTH). BTH serves not only as a fuel, but also as a complexing agent for ionic liquids and a reactant to supply the Br element. The heterojunctions show remarkable adsorptive ability for both the cationic dye of rhodamine B (RhB) and the anionic dye of methylene orange (MO) at high concentrations, which is attributed to the abundant surface oxygen vacancies. The sample containing 75.2% BiOBr and 24.8% Bi24O31Br10 exhibits the highest photocatalytic activity. Its reaction rate constant is 4.0 and 9.0 times that of pure BiOBr in degrading 50 mg L-1 of RhB and 30 mg L-1 of MO under visible-light (? > 400 nm) irradiation, respectively, which is attributed to the narrow band gap and highly efficient transfer efficiency of charge carriers. Different photocatalytic reaction processes and mechanisms over pure BiOBr and heterojunctions are proposed. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: XRD pattern for composition calculation (Fig. S1), SEM photographs (Fig. S2), N2 absorption-desorption isotherms (Fig. S3), STEM images (Fig. S4), time-course variation of ln(C0/C) of dyes (Fig. S5), Appearance photographs for adsorption of dyes (Fig. S6), UV-Vis absorption spectra of NBT (Fig. S7), pseudo-first order rate constants for RhB and MO degradation (Tables S1 and S2), electronegativity, calculated CB and VB edge positions (Table S3). See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr05451b

  5. Combustion powered linear actuator

    DOEpatents

    Fischer, Gary J.

    2007-09-04

    The present invention provides robotic vehicles having wheeled and hopping mobilities that are capable of traversing (e.g. by hopping over) obstacles that are large in size relative to the robot and, are capable of operation in unpredictable terrain over long range. The present invention further provides combustion powered linear actuators, which can include latching mechanisms to facilitate pressurized fueling of the actuators, as can be used to provide wheeled vehicles with a hopping mobility.

  6. Spontaneous combustion of hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nusselt, Wilhelm; Pothmann, PH

    1923-01-01

    It is shown by the author's experiments that hydrogen which escapes to the atmosphere through openings in the system may burn spontaneously if it contains dust. Purely thermal reasoning can not account for the combustion. It seems to be rather an electrical ignition. In order to determine whether the cause of the spontaneous ignition was thermo-chemical, thermo-mechanical, or thermo-electrical, the experiments in this paper were performed.

  7. Spray atomization and combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faeth, G. M.

    1986-01-01

    New theoretical and experimental methods for studying sprays are reviewed. Common methods to analyze dilute sprays are described and used to interpret recent measurements of the structure of dilute sprays and related dispersed turbulent jets. Particle-laden jets, nonevaporating, evaporating, and combusting sprays, and noncondensing and condensing bubbly jets are examined and used to initially evaluate current analytical methods for a wide range of conditions. Dense sprays are briefly discussed.

  8. Combustion en micropesanteur

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prud'homme, Roger

    Microgravity (drop towers, parabolic flights, sounding rockets and space stations) is relevant for combustion problems with high density gradients and little forced convection. Some situations, complicated by Archimede forces, can be clarified in microgravity where one can also obtain ideal conditions corresponding to basic theoretical problems: spherical droplet combustion in an atmosphere at rest at infinity, Emmons problem for flame spreading, deflagration waves. A good chronological account on combustion microgravity studies has been made by F.A. Williams in 1995 and recommendations have been made in various prospect meetings. In France, the support and the research management are made, through CNES and CNRS, with the creation of research groups since 1992. Results and prospects are the following. Droplets: the ' D2 law' is well verified and high pressure behaviors have been quantified. The studies must be extended in to two directions: evaporation in mixtures near the critical line and collective effects in dense sprays. Flame spreading: blue flames governed by diffusion are in accordance with Emmons theory, but it is not the case for yellow flames where convection is important and with soot formation do not agree. Theoretical assumptions are controversial and radiation effects must be considered. Heterogeneous flames: two studies are starting, one in Poitiers and the other in Marseille, about flame/suspension interaction. Premixed and triple flames: the knowledge can be completed, triple flames must be studied and 'flame balls' could be approached.

  9. Engine combustion system

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence, K.E.; Shyu, T.P.

    1993-08-24

    An engine combustion system having a plurality of combustion chambers is described, each combustion chamber having an intake valve, an exhaust valve and a fuel injector, the improvement comprising: a plurality of discrete, separate control modules each being connectable to a respective one of the intake valve, exhaust valve, and fuel injector of a respective engine cylinder and connectable to one another in fluid communication, each of the control modules having a housing having three actuator cavities, three valve cavities, a high pressure major passageway, a low pressure major passageway, three high pressure intake passageways, three high pressure delivery passageways, three low pressure intake passageways and three low pressure discharge passageways; each of the actuator cavities being adapted to receive a actuator in fluid communication with the respective valve cavity; each of the valve cavities adapted to receive an on-off'' value; each of the high pressure intake passageways being in fluid communication with the high pressure major passageway and a respective valve cavity; each of the high pressure delivery passageways being in fluid communication with a respective valve cavity and, in the installed position, a respective one of the intake valve, exhaust valve and fuel injector; each of the low pressure intake passageways being in fluid communication with a respective one of the intake valve, exhaust valve, and fuel injector and with a respective valve cavity; and each of the low pressure discharge passageways being in fluid communication with a respective valve cavity and the low pressure major passageway.

  10. Device for improved combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Polomchak, R.W.; Yacko, M.

    1988-03-08

    A device for improved combustion is described comprising: a tubular housing member having a first end and a second end, the first and second ends each having a circular opening therethrough; a combustion chamber disposed about the second end of the-tubular-housing member; a first conduit member extending from the first end of the tubular housing member and in fluid communication with the circular opening in the first end of the tubular housing member so as to allow the passage of air therethrough; a second conduit member axially disposed within the first conduit member and extending through the first conduit member and through the tubular housing member to the circular opening the second end of the tubular housing member so as to allow the passage of fuel therethrough; means for effecting turbulence in the air passing through the tubular housing member; means for effecting turbulence in the fuel passing through the second conduit member; means for intermixing and emitting the turbulent air and the fuel in a mushroom shaped configuration with the turbulent air surrounding the mushroom shaped configuration so as to substantially eliminate noxious waste gases as by-product of combustion of the air and fuel mixture.

  11. Strobes: an oscillatory combustion.

    PubMed

    Corbel, Justine M L; Lingen, Joost N J; Zevenbergen, John F; Gijzeman, Onno L J; Meijerink, Andries

    2012-04-26

    Strobe compositions belong to the class of solid combustions. They are mixtures of powdered ingredients. When ignited, the combustion front evolves in an oscillatory fashion, and flashes of light are produced by intermittence. They have fascinated many scientists since their discovery at the beginning of the 20th century. However, the chemical and physical processes involved in this curious oscillatory combustion remain unknown. Several theories have been proposed: One claims that two different reactions occur: one during the slow dark phase and another during the fast flash phase. The alternation between the phases is ascribed to heat variations. Other theories suggest that the formation of intermediate species during the dark phase and the change of phase are caused by variations in their concentration. A ternary strobe composition with ammonium perchlorate, magnalium, and barium sulfate is analyzed. The role of barium sulfate is studied by replacing it by other metal sulfates that have different physical properties (melting points), and the burning of the compositions is recorded with a high-speed camera and a spectrometer coupled with a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera. Experimental results show noticeable differences in the physical and chemical processes involved in the strobe reactions. PMID:22486459

  12. Spray combustion modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bellan, J.

    1997-01-01

    Concern over the future availability of high quality liquid fuels or use in furnaces and boilers prompted the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) to consider alternate fuels as replacements for the high grade liquid fuels used in the 1970's and 1980's. Alternate fuels were defined to be combinations of a large percentage of viscous, low volatility fuels resulting from the low end of distillation mixed with a small percentage of relatively low viscosity, high volatility fuels yielded by the high end of distillation. The addition of high volatility fuels was meant to promote desirable characteristics to a fuel that would otherwise be difficult to atomize and burn and whose combustion would yield a high amount of pollutants. Several questions thus needed to be answered before alternate fuels became commercially viable. These questions were related to fuel atomization, evaporation, ignition, combustion and pollutant formation. This final report describes the results of the most significant studies on ignition and combustion of alternative fuels.

  13. Internal combustion engine using premixed combustion of stratified charges

    DOEpatents

    Marriott, Craig D.; Reitz, Rolf D. (Madison, WI

    2003-12-30

    During a combustion cycle, a first stoichiometrically lean fuel charge is injected well prior to top dead center, preferably during the intake stroke. This first fuel charge is substantially mixed with the combustion chamber air during subsequent motion of the piston towards top dead center. A subsequent fuel charge is then injected prior to top dead center to create a stratified, locally richer mixture (but still leaner than stoichiometric) within the combustion chamber. The locally rich region within the combustion chamber has sufficient fuel density to autoignite, and its self-ignition serves to activate ignition for the lean mixture existing within the remainder of the combustion chamber. Because the mixture within the combustion chamber is overall premixed and relatively lean, NO.sub.x and soot production are significantly diminished.

  14. The Diesel Combustion Collaboratory: Combustion Researchers Collaborating over the Internet

    SciTech Connect

    C. M. Pancerella; L. A. Rahn; C. Yang

    2000-02-01

    The Diesel Combustion Collaborator (DCC) is a pilot project to develop and deploy collaborative technologies to combustion researchers distributed throughout the DOE national laboratories, academia, and industry. The result is a problem-solving environment for combustion research. Researchers collaborate over the Internet using DCC tools, which include: a distributed execution management system for running combustion models on widely distributed computers, including supercomputers; web-accessible data archiving capabilities for sharing graphical experimental or modeling data; electronic notebooks and shared workspaces for facilitating collaboration; visualization of combustion data; and video-conferencing and data-conferencing among researchers at remote sites. Security is a key aspect of the collaborative tools. In many cases, the authors have integrated these tools to allow data, including large combustion data sets, to flow seamlessly, for example, from modeling tools to data archives. In this paper the authors describe the work of a larger collaborative effort to design, implement and deploy the DCC.

  15. Gaseous emissions during concurrent combustion of biomass and non-recyclable municipal solid waste

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Biomass and municipal solid waste offer sustainable sources of energy; for example to meet heat and electricity demand in the form of combined cooling, heat and power. Combustion of biomass has a lesser impact than solid fossil fuels (e.g. coal) upon gas pollutant emissions, whilst energy recovery from municipal solid waste is a beneficial component of an integrated, sustainable waste management programme. Concurrent combustion of these fuels using a fluidised bed combustor may be a successful method of overcoming some of the disadvantages of biomass (high fuel supply and distribution costs, combustion characteristics) and characteristics of municipal solid waste (heterogeneous content, conflict with materials recycling). It should be considered that combustion of municipal solid waste may be a financially attractive disposal route if a 'gate fee' value exists for accepting waste for combustion, which will reduce the net cost of utilising relatively more expensive biomass fuels. Results Emissions of nitrogen monoxide and sulphur dioxide for combustion of biomass are suppressed after substitution of biomass for municipal solid waste materials as the input fuel mixture. Interactions between these and other pollutants such as hydrogen chloride, nitrous oxide and carbon monoxide indicate complex, competing reactions occur between intermediates of these compounds to determine final resultant emissions. Conclusions Fluidised bed concurrent combustion is an appropriate technique to exploit biomass and municipal solid waste resources, without the use of fossil fuels. The addition of municipal solid waste to biomass combustion has the effect of reducing emissions of some gaseous pollutants. PMID:21284885

  16. Nitrogen leaching from Douglas-fir forests after urea fertilization.

    PubMed

    Flint, Cynthia M; Harrison, Rob B; Strahm, Brian D; Adams, A B

    2008-01-01

    Leaching of nitrogen (N) after forest fertilization has the potential to pollute ground and surface water. The purpose of this study was to quantify N leaching through the primary rooting zone of N-limited Douglas-fir [Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco] forests the year after fertilization (224 kg N ha(-1) as urea) and to calculate changes in the N pools of the overstory trees, understory vegetation, and soil. At six sites on production forests in the Hood Canal watershed, Washington, tension lysimeters and estimates of the soil water flux were used to quantify the mobilization and leaching of NO(3)-N, NH(4)-N, and dissolved organic nitrogen below the observed rooting depth. Soil and vegetation samples were collected before fertilization and 1 and 6 mo after fertilization. In the year after fertilization, the total leaching beyond the primary rooting zone in excess of control plots was 4.2 kg N ha(-1) (p = 0.03), which was equal to 2% of the total N applied. The peak NO(3)-N concentration that leached beyond the rooting zone of fertilized plots was 0.2 mg NO(3)-N L(-1). Six months after fertilization, 26% of the applied N was accounted for in the overstory, and 27% was accounted for in the O+A horizon of the soil. The results of this study indicate that forest fertilization can lead to small N leaching fluxes out of the primary rooting zone during the first year after urea application. PMID:18689739

  17. Voltamperometric Discrimination of Urea and Melamine Adulterated Skimmed Milk Powder

    PubMed Central

    Hilding-Ohlsson, Astrid; Fauerbach, Jonathan A.; Sacco, Natalia J.; Bonetto, M. Celina; Cortn, Eduardo

    2012-01-01

    Nitrogen compounds like urea and melamine are known to be commonly used for milk adulteration resulting in undesired intoxication; a well-known example is the Chinese episode occurred in 2008. The development of a rapid, reliable and economic test is of relevance in order to improve adulterated milk identification. Cyclic voltammetry studies using an Au working electrode were performed on adulterated and non-adulterated milk samples from different independent manufacturers. Voltammetric data and their first derivative were subjected to functional principal component analysis (f-PCA) and correctly classified by the KNN classifier. The adulterated and non-adulterated milk samples showed significant differences. Best results of prediction were obtained with first derivative data. Detection limits in milk samples adulterated with 1% of its total nitrogen derived from melamine or urea were as low as 85.0 mgL?1 and 121.4 mgL?1, respectively. We present this method as a fast and robust screening method for milk adulteration analysis and prevention of food intoxication. PMID:23112709

  18. Voltamperometric discrimination of urea and melamine adulterated skimmed milk powder.

    PubMed

    Hilding-Ohlsson, Astrid; Fauerbach, Jonathan A; Sacco, Natalia J; Bonetto, M Celina; Cortn, Eduardo

    2012-01-01

    Nitrogen compounds like urea and melamine are known to be commonly used for milk adulteration resulting in undesired intoxication; a well-known example is the Chinese episode occurred in 2008. The development of a rapid, reliable and economic test is of relevance in order to improve adulterated milk identification. Cyclic voltammetry studies using an Au working electrode were performed on adulterated and non-adulterated milk samples from different independent manufacturers. Voltammetric data and their first derivative were subjected to functional principal component analysis (f-PCA) and correctly classified by the KNN classifier. The adulterated and non-adulterated milk samples showed significant differences. Best results of prediction were obtained with first derivative data. Detection limits in milk samples adulterated with 1% of its total nitrogen derived from melamine or urea were as low as 85.0 mg L(-1) and 121.4 mg L(-1), respectively. We present this method as a fast and robust screening method for milk adulteration analysis and prevention of food intoxication. PMID:23112709

  19. [Electrochemical sensor based on photopolymeric membranes for determining urea].

    PubMed

    Rebriev, A V; Ivashkevich, S P; Starodub, N F; Kercha, S F; Masliuk, A F

    2001-01-01

    A new electrochemical enzymatic sensor based on the ion selective field effect transistors (ISFETs) and photocurable membrane was developed for the determination of urea. For the immobilization of urease on the gate surface of the ISFET a simple method, involving the use of liquid photocurable compositions on the basis of vinylpirollidone, oligouretanemetacrylate and oligocarbonatemetacrylate, was applied. The linearange of the response of the developed electrochemical sensor lies in the range 0.05-20 mM. The latter corresponds to the claims of the medical practice. The overall time of the analysis is 5-10 min. The effects of the buffer concentration and its pH as well as temperature and presence of ammonia ions in the measuring medium on the amplitude of the sensor response were estimated. The duration of sensor work is as shortest 40 days. The proposed sensor on the basis of the ISFET is promising for the express analysis of the level urea in blood, while the developed method of membrane preparation with entrapped enzyme can be combined with the integral technology of producing of the biosensors semiconductor transducers. PMID:11599418

  20. Gas separation process using membranes with permeate sweep to remove CO.sub.2 from gaseous fuel combustion exhaust

    DOEpatents

    Wijmans Johannes G. (Menlo Park, CA); Merkel, Timothy C. (Menlo Park, CA); Baker, Richard W. (Palo Alto, CA)

    2012-05-15

    A gas separation process for treating exhaust gases from the combustion of gaseous fuels, and gaseous fuel combustion processes including such gas separation. The invention involves routing a first portion of the exhaust stream to a carbon dioxide capture step, while simultaneously flowing a second portion of the exhaust gas stream across the feed side of a membrane, flowing a sweep gas stream, usually air, across the permeate side, then passing the permeate/sweep gas back to the combustor.

  1. A tool for debugging internet multicast routing

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwal, D.; Floyd, S.

    1994-03-01

    In this paper the authors describe a debugging tool that is an effective means of analyzing problems with multicast packet routing in a network. Multicast packet routing is a source-driven distributed calculation performed by the routers in a multicast network. The routes taken by multicast packets are difficult to predict manually due to the large number of variables that must be considered. The multicast route debugging tool allows off-line investigation of the route taken by a multicast packet and the effects of network modifications on that route. The tool has already proved useful in debugging the problems that have occurred in the experimental Internet Multicast Backbone. The multicast route debugging tool currently predicts multicast routes of packets using the distance-vector truncated-broadcast algorithm implemented for Internet multicast traffic. They will be upgrading the tool to allow the user to choose other multicast routing algorithms.

  2. Further routes to psychological constructionism.

    PubMed

    Humeny, Courtney; Kelly, Deirdre; Brook, Andrew

    2012-06-01

    In this commentary, we do two things. First, we sketch two further routes to psychological constructionism. They are complementary to Lindquist et al.'s meta-analyses and have potential to add new evidence. Second, we look at a challenging kind of case for constructionism, namely, emotional anomalies where there are correlated, and probably relevant, brain anomalies. Psychopaths are our example. PMID:22617661

  3. Roots/Routes: Part I

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swanson, Dalene M.

    2009-01-01

    This narrative and poetic rendering acts as an articulation of a journey of many routes. It is a storying of critical research issues and events as performances of lived experience. It is a metissage of hybrid, but interrelated, themes that find cohesion through fragmentation and coalescence, severance, and regrowth. These themes are invoked by

  4. Judaism and the Silk Route.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foltz, Richard

    1998-01-01

    Demonstrates that the Judeans traveled along the Ancient Silk Route. Discusses the Iranian influence on the formation of Jewish religious ideas. Considers the development of Jewish trade networks, focusing on the Radanites (Jewish traders), the Jewish presence in the Far East, and the survival of Judaism in central Asia. (CMK)

  5. Dynamic Weather Routes Architecture Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eslami, Hassan; Eshow, Michelle

    2014-01-01

    Dynamic Weather Routes Architecture Overview, presents the high level software architecture of DWR, based on the CTAS software framework and the Direct-To automation tool. The document also covers external and internal data flows, required dataset, changes to the Direct-To software for DWR, collection of software statistics, and the code structure.

  6. Genetic algorithms for route discovery.

    PubMed

    Gelenbe, Erol; Liu, Peixiang; Lain, Jeremy

    2006-12-01

    Packet routing in networks requires knowledge about available paths, which can be either acquired dynamically while the traffic is being forwarded, or statically (in advance) based on prior information of a network's topology. This paper describes an experimental investigation of path discovery using genetic algorithms (GAs). We start with the quality-of-service (QoS)-driven routing protocol called "cognitive packet network" (CPN), which uses smart packets (SPs) to dynamically select routes in a distributed autonomic manner based on a user's QoS requirements. We extend it by introducing a GA at the source routers, which modifies and filters the paths discovered by the CPN. The GA can combine the paths that were previously discovered to create new untested but valid source-to-destination paths, which are then selected on the basis of their "fitness." We present an implementation of this approach, where the GA runs in background mode so as not to overload the ingress routers. Measurements conducted on a network test bed indicate that when the background-traffic load of the network is light to medium, the GA can result in improved QoS. When the background-traffic load is high, it appears that the use of the GA may be detrimental to the QoS experienced by users as compared to CPN routing because the GA uses less timely state information in its decision making. PMID:17186801

  7. Roots/Routes: Part II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swanson, Dalene M.

    2009-01-01

    This narrative acts as an articulation of a journey of many routes. Following Part I of the same research journey of rootedness/routedness, it debates the nature of transformation and transcendence beyond personal and political paradoxes informed by neoliberalism and related repressive globalizing discourses. Through a more personal, descriptive,

  8. Planning Safe Routes to School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Appleyard, Bruce S.

    2003-01-01

    Describes "Safe Routes to School" efforts in the United States and other countries to make walking and biking to school the transportation of choice. Offers a plan of action for formulating and carrying out such a program and information on funding sources. (EV)

  9. [Source analysis of urea-N in Lake Taihu during summer].

    PubMed

    Han, Xiao-Xi; Zhu, Guang-Wei; Xu, Hai; Wilhelm, Steven W; Qin, Bo-Qiang; Li, Zhao-Fu

    2014-07-01

    To study the effect of urea nitrogen on the ecosystem of Lake Taihu, we conducted urea and various nitrogen analysis for the water samples collected from the lake and surrounding rivers during summer. The ecological index analysis of 82 sites in rivers and lake yielded the following results: (1) The urea nitrogen contents in Taihu ranged from 0.011 to 0.161 mg x L(-1), which was high in the northwest and low in the southeast, related to the main pollution sources distribution of its drainage basin. (2) The dissolved nitrogen was dominated by inorganic nitrogen and the ratio between ammonia nitrogen and nitrate nitrogen was 5: 1. The average percentage of urea nitrogen in total nitrogen, dissolved nitrogen, dissolved organic nitrogen and bioavailable nitrogen was respectively 2.28%, 5.91%, 15.86%, and 6.22%, which showed a significant ecological function in Taihu. (3) Urea nitrogen concentration in river was more than twice that in lake, and the lake river concentration was slightly higher than the river into the lake. (3) In Taihu, there was a transformation relationship between urea nitrogen and the nitrogen in other forms. It showed that urea nitrogen had a significant positive correlation with permanganate index and the other forms of nitrogen, and a significant negative correlation with dissolved oxygen. In addition, urea nitrogen was weakly and positively correlated with chlorophyll a, while closely related to the spatial distribution of benthos and zooplankton species. All the results above showed that urea nitrogen was the bridge of organic and inorganic nitrogen transformation, and was the sign of nitrogen cycle of Lake Taihu, which was controlled by the circulating rate. High nitrogen content (especially the organic nitrogen) and low dissolved oxygen content were the key contributors to the increased urea nitrogen content. In Taihu, the urea nitrogen content was affected by both exogenous input and endogenous release. PMID:25244836

  10. Examining urea flux across the intestine of the spiny dogfish, Squalus acanthias.

    PubMed

    Gary Anderson, W; McCabe, Chris; Brandt, Catherine; Wood, Chris M

    2015-03-01

    Recent examination of urea flux in the intestine of the spiny dogfish shark, Squalus acanthias, has shown that feeding significantly enhances urea uptake across the intestine, and this was significantly inhibited following mucosal addition of phloretin. The present study examined potential mechanisms of urea uptake across the dogfish intestine in starved and fed dogfish. Unidirectional flux chambers were used to examine the kinetics of urea uptake, and to determine the influence of sodium, ouabain, competitive urea analogues, and phloretin on urea uptake across the gut of fed dogfish. Intestinal epithelial preparations from starved and fed dogfish were mounted in Ussing chambers to examine the effect of phloretin on bidirectional solute transport across the intestine. In the unidirectional studies, the maximum uptake rate of urea was found to be 35.36.9 ?mol.cm(-2).h(-1) and Km was found to be 291.89.6 mM in fed fish, and there was a mild inhibition of urea uptake following mucosal addition of competitive agonists. Addition of phloretin, Na-free Ringers and ouabain to the mucosal side of intestinal epithelia also led to a significant reduction in urea uptake in fed fish. In the Ussing chamber studies there was a net influx of urea in fed fish and a small insignificant efflux in starved fish. Addition of phloretin blocked urea uptake in fed fish when added to the mucosal side. Furthermore, phloretin had no effect on ion transport across the intestinal epithelia with the exception of the divalent cations, magnesium and calcium. PMID:25479361

  11. Banding of urea increased ammonia volatilization in a dry acidic soil.

    PubMed

    Rochette, Philippe; Macdonald, J Douglas; Angers, Denis A; Chantigny, Martin H; Gasser, Marc-Olivier; Bertrand, Normand

    2009-01-01

    Volatilization of ammonia following application of urea contributes to smog formation and degradation of natural ecosystems. The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of (i) incorporation and banding of urea and (ii) surface broadcast of slow-release urea types on NH(3) volatilization in a dry acidic soil. Volatilization was measured using wind tunnels for 25 d after standard urea (140 kg N ha(-1)) was broadcast, broadcast and incorporated (0-5 cm), or incorporated in shallow bands (3-5 cm) to a conventionally tilled silty loam soil. Urea supplemented with a urease inhibitor or coated with a polymer was also broadcast at the soil surface. Little N diffused out of the polymer-coated granules and ammonia losses were low (4% of applied N). Use of a urease inhibitor also resulted in a low NH(3) loss (5% of applied N) while maintaining soil mineral N at levels similar to plots where untreated urea was broadcast. The rate of hydrolysis of urea broadcast at the soil surface was slowed by the lack of moisture and NH(3) loss (9% applied N) was the lowest of all treatments with standard urea. Incorporation of broadcast urea increased emissions (16% applied N) by increasing urea hydrolysis relative to surface application. Furthermore, incorporation in band also increased emissions (27% applied N) due to a localized increase in soil pH from 6.0 to 8.7. We conclude that incorporating urea in bands in a dry acidic soil can increase NH(3) volatilization compared to broadcast application followed by incorporation. PMID:19465713

  12. Fourth International Microgravity Combustion Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sacksteder, Kurt R. (Compiler)

    1997-01-01

    This Conference Publication contains 84 papers presented at the Fourth International Microgravity Combustion Workshop held in Cleveland, Ohio, from May 19 to 21, 1997. The purpose of the workshop was twofold: to exchange information about the progress and promise of combustion science in microgravity and to provide a forum to discuss which areas in microgravity combustion science need to be expanded profitably and which should be included in upcoming NASA Research Announcements (NRA).

  13. [Effects of coated controlled release urea combined with conventional urea on winter wheat growth and soil NO3- -N].

    PubMed

    Yi, Wen-ping; Sun, Zhe; Wu, Liang; Shi, Gui-fang; Zhu, Guo-liang; Li, Ya-xing; Gu, Jia-lin; Xu, Qiu-ming

    2011-03-01

    Field experiments were conducted to study the effects of different dosages coated controlled release urea (PCU60, 60 d release duration) combined with conventional urea (U) used as basal on the winter wheat grain yield, nitrogen (N) recovery rate, and soil NO3- -N content, etc. Five treatments were installed, i.e., U (CK), 10% PCU60+90% U (PU1), 20% PCU60+80% U (PU2), 30% PCU60+70% U (PU3), and 40% PCU60+60% U (PU4). In the meantime, a comparative analysis was also carried out on the PCU60 N release characteristics under field condition and in 25 "C static water. At the same N dosage, all the test indices in treatment PU4 were significantly higher, with the grain yield, N recovery rate, total N accumulation amount, total tiller number and aboveground biomass at ripening stage, and economic benefit increased by 5.6%, 14.6%, 7.2%, 2.6%, 7.5%, and 984.3 yuan x hm(-2), respectively, compared with those in treatment U. The accumulation amount of NO3- -N in 0-100 cm soil layer in all treatments ranged in 39.70-49.93 kg x hm-2, and was the lowest (39.70 kg x hm(-2)) in treatment PU4. The N release pattern of PCU60 under field condition better fitted the N absorption characteristics of winter wheat. PMID:21657025

  14. Pulse combustion residential water heater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolodgy, R. J.; Liljenberg, G. W.

    1982-09-01

    A domestic water heater based on the pulse combustion principle was developed, thus significantly reducing natural gas costs for the residential consumer. With the cost of natural gas rising, it is important to develop fuel efficient residential appliances which are economically attractive to the consumer. The pulse combustion principle was proven to reduce fuel consumption significantly in residential furnaces and is expected to show similar results when applied to domestic water heaters. Direct venting, which is possible with pulse combustion burners, provides an additional economic benefit: the consumer who elects to install a pulse combustion water heater and furnace in a new building will not require a chimney.

  15. Composite propellant combustion modeling studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramohalli, K.

    1977-01-01

    A review is presented of theoretical and experimental studies of composite propellant combustion. The theoretical investigations include a model of the combustion of a nonmetallized ammonium perchlorate (AP) propellant (noting time scales for vapor-phase combustion and the condensed phase) and response functions in pressure-coupled oscillations. The experimental studies are discussed with reference to scale-modeling apparatus, flame standoff distance versus velocity as a function of pressure, and results from T-burner firings of a nonmetallized AP/polysulfide propellant. Research applications including problems with nitramine propellants, the feasibility of stop-restart rockets with salt quench, and combustion problems in large boosters are outlined.

  16. Microgravity Smoldering Combustion Takes Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The Microgravity Smoldering Combustion (MSC) experiment lifted off aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour in September 1995 on the STS-69 mission. This experiment is part of series of studies focused on the smolder characteristics of porous, combustible materials in a microgravity environment. Smoldering is a nonflaming form of combustion that takes place in the interior of combustible materials. Common examples of smoldering are nonflaming embers, charcoal briquettes, and cigarettes. The objective of the study is to provide a better understanding of the controlling mechanisms of smoldering, both in microgravity and Earth gravity. As with other forms of combustion, gravity affects the availability of air and the transport of heat, and therefore, the rate of combustion. Results of the microgravity experiments will be compared with identical experiments carried out in Earth's gravity. They also will be used to verify present theories of smoldering combustion and will provide new insights into the process of smoldering combustion, enhancing our fundamental understanding of this frequently encountered combustion process and guiding improvement in fire safety practices.

  17. Flammability of Heterogeneously Combusting Metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Peter D.

    1998-01-01

    Most engineering materials, including some metals, most notably aluminum, burn in homogeneous combustion. 'Homogeneous' refers to both the fuel and the oxidizer being in the same phase, which is usually gaseous. The fuel and oxidizer are well mixed in the combustion reaction zone, and heat is released according to some relation like q(sub c) = delta H(sub c)c[((rho/rho(sub 0))]exp a)(exp -E(sub c)/RT), Eq. (1) where the pressure exponent a is usually close to unity. As long as there is enough heat released, combustion is sustained. It is useful to conceive of a threshold pressure beyond which there is sufficient heat to keep the temperature high enough to sustain combustion, and beneath which the heat is so low that temperature drains away and the combustion is extinguished. Some materials burn in heterogeneous combustion, in which the fuel and oxidizer are in different phases. These include iron and nickel based alloys, which burn in the liquid phase with gaseous oxygen. Heterogeneous combustion takes place on the surface of the material (fuel). Products of combustion may appear as a solid slag (oxide) which progressively covers the fuel. Propagation of the combustion melts and exposes fresh fuel. Heterogeneous combustion heat release also follows the general form of Eq.(1), except that the pressure exponent a tends to be much less than 1. Therefore, the increase in heat release with increasing pressure is not as dramatic as it is in homogeneous combustion. Although the concept of a threshold pressure still holds in heterogeneous combustion, the threshold is more difficult to identify experimentally, and pressure itself becomes less important relative to the heat transfer paths extant in any specific application. However, the constants C, a, and E(sub c) may still be identified by suitable data reduction from heterogeneous combustion experiments, and may be applied in a heat transfer model to judge the flammability of a material in any particular actual-use situation. In order to support the above assertions, two investigations are undertaken: 1) PCT data are examined in detail to discover the pressure dependence of heterogeneous combustion experiment results; and 2) heterogeneous combustion in a PCT situation is described by a heat transfer model, which is solved first in simplified form for a simple actual-use situation, and then extended to apply to PCT data reduction (combustion constant identification).

  18. Light Duty Efficient, Clean Combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Stanton, Donald W.

    2011-06-03

    Cummins has successfully completed the Light Duty Efficient Clean Combustion (LDECC) cooperative program with DoE. This program was established in 2007 in support of the Department of Energy’s Vehicles Technologies Advanced Combustion and Emissions Control initiative to remove critical barriers to the commercialization of advanced, high efficiency, emissions compliant internal combustion (IC) engines for light duty vehicles. Work in this area expanded the fundamental knowledge of engine combustion to new regimes and advanced the knowledge of fuel requirements for these diesel engines to realize their full potential. All of our objectives were met with fuel efficiency improvement targets exceeded.

  19. Combustion of Methane Hydrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roshandell, Melika

    A significant methane storehouse is in the form of methane hydrates on the sea floor and in the arctic permafrost. Methane hydrates are ice-like structures composed of water cages housing a guest methane molecule. This caged methane represents a resource of energy and a potential source of strong greenhouse gas. Most research related to methane hydrates has been focused on their formation and dissociation because they can form solid plugs that complicate transport of oil and gas in pipelines. This dissertation explores the direct burning of these methane hydrates where heat from the combustion process dissociates the hydrate into water and methane, and the released methane fuels the methane/air diffusion flame heat source. In contrast to the pipeline applications, very little research has been done on the combustion and burning characteristics of methane hydrates. This is the first dissertation on this subject. In this study, energy release and combustion characteristics of methane hydrates were investigated both theoretically and experimentally. The experimental study involved collaboration with another research group, particularly in the creation of methane hydrate samples. The experiments were difficult because hydrates form at high pressure within a narrow temperature range. The process can be slow and the resulting hydrate can have somewhat variable properties (e.g., extent of clathration, shape, compactness). The experimental study examined broad characteristics of hydrate combustion, including flame appearance, burning time, conditions leading to flame extinguishment, the amount of hydrate water melted versus evaporated, and flame temperature. These properties were observed for samples of different physical size. Hydrate formation is a very slow process with pure water and methane. The addition of small amounts of surfactant increased substantially the hydrate formation rate. The effects of surfactant on burning characteristics were also studied. One finding from the experimental component of the research was that hydrates can burn completely, and that they burn most rapidly just after ignition and then burn steadily when some of the water in the dissociated zone is allowed to drain away. Excessive surfactant in the water creates a foam layer around the hydrate that acts as an insulator. The layer prevents sufficient heat flux from reaching the hydrate surface below the foam to release additional methane and the hydrate flame extinguishes. No self-healing or ice-freezing processes were observed in any of the combustion experiments. There is some variability, but a typical hydrate flame is receiving between one and two moles of water vapor from the liquid dissociated zone of the hydrate for each mole of methane it receives from the dissociating solid region. This limits the flame temperature to approximately 1800 K. In the theoretical portion of the study, a physical model using an energy balance from methane combustion was developed to understand the energy transfer between the three phases of gas, liquid and solid during the hydrate burn. Also this study provides an understanding of the different factors impacting the hydrate's continuous burn, such as the amount of water vapor in the flame. The theoretical study revealed how the water layer thickness on the hydrate surface, and its effect on the temperature gradient through the dissociated zone, plays a significant role in the hydrate dissociation rate and methane release rate. Motivated by the above mentioned observation from the theoretical analysis, a 1-D two-phase numerical simulation based on a moving front model for hydrate dissociation from a thermal source was developed. This model was focused on the dynamic growth of the dissociated zone and its effect on the dissociation rate. The model indicated that the rate of hydrate dissociation with a thermal source is a function of the dissociated zone thickness. It shows that in order for a continuous dissociation and methane release, some of the water from the dissociated zone needs to be drained. The results

  20. Enhancing the urea-N use efficiency in maize (Zea mays) cultivation on acid soils amended with zeolite and TSP.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Osumanu H; Hussin, Aminuddin; Ahmad, Husni M H; Rahim, Anuar A; Majid, Nik Muhamad Abd

    2008-01-01

    Ammonia loss significantly reduces the urea-N use efficiency in crop production. Efforts to reduce this problem are mostly laboratory oriented. This paper reports the effects of urea amended with triple superphosphate (TSP) and zeolite (Clinoptilolite) on soil pH, nitrate, exchangeable ammonium, dry matter production, N uptake, fresh cob production, and urea-N uptake efficiency in maize (Zea mays) cultivation on an acid soil in actual field conditions. Urea-amended TSP and zeolite treatments and urea only (urea without additives) did not have long-term effect on soil pH and accumulation of soil exchangeable ammonium and nitrate. Treatments with higher amounts of TSP and zeolite significantly increased the dry matter (stem and leaf) production of Swan (test crop). All the treatments had no significant effect on urea-N concentration in the leaf and stem of the test crop. In terms of urea-N uptake in the leaf and stem tissues of Swan, only the treatment with the highest amount of TSP and zeolite significantly increased urea-N uptake in the leaf of the test crop. Irrespective of treatment, fresh cob production was statistically not different. However, all the treatments with additives improved urea-N uptake efficiency compared to urea without additives or amendment. This suggests that urea amended with TSP and zeolite has a potential of reducing ammonia loss from surface-applied urea. PMID:18454247

  1. Occurrence of benzo(a)pyrene in combustion effluents of kerosene and diesel burners

    SciTech Connect

    Gharaibeh, S.H.; Abuirjeie, M.A.; Hunaiti, A.A.

    1988-09-01

    Due to limited Jordanian resources, kerosene and diesel burners have been widely used for heating homes and water, warming bread, grilling meat and cooking food. Jordan annually imports and average of 204 tons of burners which corresponds to approximately 20,400 burners. Considerable amounts of combustion products are produced such as gases, aerosols and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), especially benzo(a)pyrene (Bp), the well known carcinogen for man and animal. Since most Jordanians use burners more than five months a year, a considerable amount of combustion effluents accumulate indoors. Some of these materials can enter the human body via various routes, and are potential health hazards. Little information is available about the chemical nature and amount of the combustion effluents produced by these burners; therefore the present study was designed to screen for benzo(a)pyrene in the indoor-accumulated combustion effluent.

  2. Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Ziemkiewicz; Tamara Vandivort; Debra Pflughoeft-Hassett; Y. Paul Chugh; James Hower

    2008-08-31

    Each year, over 100 million tons of solid byproducts are produced by coal-burning electric utilities in the United States. Annual production of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) byproducts continues to increase as the result of more stringent sulfur emission restrictions. In addition, stricter limits on NOx emissions mandated by the 1990 Clean Air Act have resulted in utility burner/boiler modifications that frequently yield higher carbon concentrations in fly ash, which restricts the use of the ash as a cement replacement. Controlling ammonia in ash is also of concern. If newer, 'clean coal' combustion and gasification technologies are adopted, their byproducts may also present a management challenge. The objective of the Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium (CBRC) is to develop and demonstrate technologies to address issues related to the recycling of byproducts associated with coal combustion processes. A goal of CBRC is that these technologies, by the year 2010, will lead to an overall ash utilization rate from the current 34% to 50% by such measures as increasing the current rate of FGD byproduct use and increasing in the number of uses considered 'allowable' under state regulations. Another issue of interest to the CBRC would be to examine the environmental impact of both byproduct utilization and disposal. No byproduct utilization technology is likely to be adopted by industry unless it is more cost-effective than landfilling. Therefore, it is extremely important that the utility industry provide guidance to the R&D program. Government agencies and private-sector organizations that may be able to utilize these materials in the conduct of their missions should also provide input. The CBRC will serve as an effective vehicle for acquiring and maintaining guidance from these diverse organizations so that the proper balance in the R&D program is achieved.

  3. Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Ziemkiewicz, Paul; Vandivort, Tamara; Pflughoeft-Hassett, Debra; Chugh, Y Paul; Hower, James

    2008-08-31

    Each year, over 100 million tons of solid byproducts are produced by coal-burning electric utilities in the United States. Annual production of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) byproducts continues to increase as the result of more stringent sulfur emission restrictions. In addition, stricter limits on NOx emissions mandated by the 1990 Clean Air Act have resulted in utility burner/boiler modifications that frequently yield higher carbon concentrations in fly ash, which restricts the use of the ash as a cement replacement. Controlling ammonia in ash is also of concern. If newer, “clean coal” combustion and gasification technologies are adopted, their byproducts may also present a management challenge. The objective of the Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium (CBRC) is to develop and demonstrate technologies to address issues related to the recycling of byproducts associated with coal combustion processes. A goal of CBRC is that these technologies, by the year 2010, will lead to an overall ash utilization rate from the current 34% to 50% by such measures as increasing the current rate of FGD byproduct use and increasing in the number of uses considered “allowable” under state regulations. Another issue of interest to the CBRC would be to examine the environmental impact of both byproduct utilization and disposal. No byproduct utilization technology is likely to be adopted by industry unless it is more cost-effective than landfilling. Therefore, it is extremely important that the utility industry provide guidance to the R&D program. Government agencies and privatesector organizations that may be able to utilize these materials in the conduct of their missions should also provide input. The CBRC will serve as an effective vehicle for acquiring and maintaining guidance from these diverse organizations so that the proper balance in the R&D program is achieved.

  4. Combustion Branch Website Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bishop, Eric

    2004-01-01

    The NASA combustion branch is a leader in developing and applying combustion science to focused aerospace propulsion systems concepts. It is widely recognized for unique facilities, analytical tools, and personnel. In order to better communicate the outstanding research being done in this Branch to the public and other research organization, a more substantial website was desired. The objective of this project was to build an up-to-date site that reflects current research in a usable and attractive manner. In order to accomplish this, information was requested from all researchers in the Combustion branch, on their professional skills and on the current projects. This information was used to fill in the Personnel and Research sections of the website. A digital camera was used to photograph all personnel and these photographs were included in the personnel section as well. The design of the site was implemented using the latest web standards: xhtml and external css stylesheets. This implementation conforms to the guidelines recommended by the w3c. It also helps to ensure that the web site is accessible by disabled users, and complies with Section 508 Federal legislation (which mandates that all Federal websites be accessible). Graphics for the new site were generated using the gimp (www.gimp.org) an open-source graphics program similar to Adobe Photoshop. Also, all graphics on the site were of a reasonable size (less than 20k, most less than 2k) so that the page would load quickly. Technologies such as Macromedia Flash and Javascript were avoided, as these only function on some clients which have the proper software installed or enabled. The website was tested on different platforms with many different browsers to ensure there were no compatibility issues. The website was tested on windows with MS IE 6, MSIE 5 , Netscape 7, Mozilla and Opera. On a Mac, the site was tested with MS IE 5 , Netscape 7 and Safari.

  5. 40 CFR 721.10533 - Amine-modified urea-formaldehyde polymer (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... polymer (generic). 721.10533 Section 721.10533 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10533 Amine-modified urea-formaldehyde polymer (generic). (a) Chemical... as amine-modified urea-formaldehyde polymer (PMN P-12-182) is subject to reporting under this...

  6. 40 CFR 721.10533 - Amine-modified urea-formaldehyde polymer (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... polymer (generic). 721.10533 Section 721.10533 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10533 Amine-modified urea-formaldehyde polymer (generic). (a) Chemical... as amine-modified urea-formaldehyde polymer (PMN P-12-182) is subject to reporting under this...

  7. CLINICAL CONSEQUENCES OF UREA CYCLE ENZYME DEFICIENCIES AND POTENTIAL LINKS TO ARGININE AND NITRIC OXIDE METABOLISM

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Urea cycle disorders (UCD) are human conditions caused by the dysregulation of nitrogen transfer from ammonia nitrogen into urea. The biochemistry and the genetics of these disorders were well elucidated. Earlier diagnosis and improved treatments led to an emerging, longer-lived cohort of patients. ...

  8. COMPARISON OF THREE ANALYTICAL METHODS TO ASSESS UREA NITROGEN IN COLOSTRUM

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Milk urea nitrogen (MUN) obtained from cows fed mid to late lactation diets has been used as an indicator of diet composition adequacy and can be used to predict urine urea nitrogen. However, recent research has suggested that in early lactation, MUN was positively correlated with feed efficiency (...

  9. Dialysis system. [using ion exchange resin membranes permeable to urea molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, W. A. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    The improved hemodialysis system utilizes a second polymeric membrane having dialyzate in contact with one surface and a urea decomposition solution in contact with the other surface. The membrane selectively passes urea from the dialyzate into the decomposition solution, while preventing passage of positively charged metal ions from the dialyzate into the solution and ammonium ions from the solution into the dialyzate.

  10. Evaluation of milk urea nitrogen as a management tool to reduce ammonia emissions from dairy farms

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The purpose of this study was to compile and evaluate relationships between feed nitrogen (N) intake, milk urea N (MUN), urinary urea N (UUN) and ammonia (NH3) emissions from dairy farms to aid policy development. Regression relationships between MUN (within the range of 10 to 25 mg/dL), UUN, and re...

  11. Role of rumen butyrate in regulation of nitrogen utilization and urea nitrogen kinetics in growing sheep

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Butyrate, a major rumen VFA, has been indirectly linked to enhancement of urea recycling based on increased expression of urea transporter (UT-B) in the rumen epithelia of steers fed a rumen butyrate-enhancing diet. Two studies were conducted to quantify the effect of elevated rumen butyrate concent...

  12. Biomechanical studies on aliphatic physically crosslinked poly(urethane urea) for blood contact applications.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Vinoy; Muthu, Jayabalan

    2008-07-01

    Hydrophobic and physically crosslinked (virtually crosslinked through hydrogen bonding) aliphatic poly(urethane urea)s were developed and characterized for its biomechanical properties. The aging under induced-stress (bend samples) condition reveals resistance of poly(urethane urea) to environmental stress corrosion cracking (ESC) in hydrolytic media, Ringer's solution and phosphate buffered saline at 50 degrees C. The strain-induced (20% tensile strain) and aged polymer in hydrolytic enzyme medium, papain and in buffer reveals increase of elastic modulus in papain enzyme and papain buffer. The increase of elastic modulus is attributed to unidirectional reorganisation of chains under continually strained conditions. The polymer exposed in boiling alcoholic potassium hydroxide solution (accelerated hydrolytic chemical degradation) reveals no degradation. A comparative evaluation of poly(ether urethane urea)s reveals inferior properties. Poly(ether urethane urea)s polymer undergo hydrolytic degradation in boiling alcoholic potassium hydroxide solution. The candidate poly(urethane urea) HFL 18-PUU is more promising elastomer for long-term biomechanically sensitive blood contact applications such as heart valve and blood pump diaphragm of left ventricular assist device. PMID:18305906

  13. A Gas-Sensor-Based Urea Enzyme Electrode: Its Construction and Use in the Undergraduate Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riechel, Thomas L.

    1984-01-01

    Describes an undergraduate experiment for the potentiometric determination of urea based on the physical entrapment of urease on the tip of an ammonia gas sensor. An advantage of this technique is the ease with which the ammonia electrode can be converted to a urea electrode. (JN)

  14. Crystalline Bis-urea Nanochannel Architectures Tailored for Single-File Diffusion Studies.

    PubMed

    Bowers, Clifford R; Dvoyashkin, Muslim; Salpage, Sahan R; Akel, Christopher; Bhase, Hrishi; Geer, Michael F; Shimizu, Linda S

    2015-06-23

    Urea is a versatile building block that can be modified to self-assemble into a multitude of structures. One-dimensional nanochannels with zigzag architecture and cross-sectional dimensions of only ?3.7 4.8 are formed by the columnar assembly of phenyl ether bis-urea macrocycles. Nanochannels formed by phenylethynylene bis-urea macrocycles have a round cross-section with a diameter of ?9.0 . This work compares the Xe atom packing and diffusion inside the crystalline channels of these two bis-ureas using hyperpolarized Xe-129 NMR. The elliptical channel structure of the phenyl ether bis-urea macrocycle produces a Xe-129 powder pattern line shape characteristic of an asymmetric chemical shift tensor with shifts extending to well over 300 ppm with respect to the bulk gas, reflecting extreme confinement of the Xe atom. The wider channels formed by phenylethynylene bis-urea, in contrast, present an isotropic dynamically average electronic environment. Completely different diffusion dynamics are revealed in the two bis-ureas using hyperpolarized spin-tracer exchange NMR. Thus, a simple replacement of phenyl ether with phenylethynylene as the rigid linker unit results in a transition from single-file to Fickian diffusion dynamics. Self-assembled bis-urea macrocycles are found to be highly suitable materials for fundamental molecular transport studies on micrometer length scales. PMID:26035000

  15. 75 FR 19610 - Solid Urea From the Russian Federation: Preliminary Results of Antidumping Duty Administrative...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-15

    ... of Soviet Socialist Republics (Soviet Union). See Antidumping Duty Order; Urea From the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, 52 FR 26367 (July 14, 1987). Following the break-up of the Soviet Union, the antidumping duty order on solid urea from the Soviet Union was transferred to the individual members of...

  16. Synthesis of urea in cometary model ices and implications for Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko.

    PubMed

    Frstel, M; Maksyutenko, P; Jones, B M; Sun, B-J; Chang, A H H; Kaiser, R I

    2015-12-24

    Urea is considered a fundamental building block in prebiotic chemistry. Its formation on early Earth has not yet been explained satisfactorily and exogenous delivery has been considered. We report on the synthesis along with the first online and in situ identification of urea after exposing inorganic ices to ionizing radiation. PMID:26564002

  17. Label-free and pH-sensitive colorimetric materials for the sensing of urea.

    PubMed

    Li, Lu; Long, Yue; Gao, Jin-Ming; Song, Kai; Yang, Guoqiang

    2016-02-18

    This communication demonstrates a facile method for naked-eye detection of urea based on the structure color change of pH-sensitive photonic crystals. The insertion of urease provides excellent selectivity over other molecules. The detection of urea in different concentration ranges could be realized by changing the molar ratio between the functional monomer and cross-linker. PMID:26847584

  18. Acute poisoning of silver gulls (Larus novaehollandiae) following urea fertilizer spillage.

    PubMed

    Raidal, Shane R; Jaensch, Susan M

    2006-02-01

    Two episodes of accidental urea toxicosis are described in wild silver gulls (Larus novaehollandiae) following spillage of fertilizer grade urea at a commercial shipping facility near Perth, Western Australia. In both cases, urea spillage had been seen to contaminate freshwater wash-down pools on the wharves where ships were being unloaded and gulls were seen to be drinking and washing in the pools nearby the spillages. Affected birds were found moribund or dead. Necropsy and histopathological findings were non-specific and consisted of mild to moderate congestion of visceral organs and brain. Analysis of a water sample collected during Case 1 revealed a very high urea concentration of 4.124 mol/l (pH 5.5), and fluid from the proventriculus of two birds had urea concentrations of 382 and 308 mmol/l, respectively. Nine birds were examined during the second episode (Case 2) and, from heparinized heart blood samples collected (n = 5), the mean plasma urea (288 +/- 92.0 mmol/l), ammonia (43.9 +/- 34.2 mmol/l) and uric acid (7.45 +/- 1.99 mmol/l) concentrations were markedly elevated above the reference ranges for all bird species. Proventricular contents (n = 7) similarly contained high concentrations of urea (394 +/- 203 mmol/l) and ammonia (9.3 +/- 15 mmol/l). The probable mechanisms of urea and ammonia toxicity in these birds are discussed. PMID:16448941

  19. UREA PRODUCTION, RECYCLING AND EXCRETION IN FORAGE-FED BEEF STEERS.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two experiments with growing beef steers fed hays of warm season (gamagrass and switchgrass) or cool season (tall fescue) grasses showed a strong linear relationship between urea production by the animal and urinary urea excretion as functions of nitrogen (crude protein) intake. The nature of the r...

  20. 40 CFR 418.30 - Applicability; description of the urea subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Applicability; description of the urea subcategory. 418.30 Section 418.30 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS FERTILIZER MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Urea Subcategory §...

  1. 40 CFR 418.30 - Applicability; description of the urea subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Applicability; description of the urea subcategory. 418.30 Section 418.30 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS FERTILIZER MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Urea Subcategory §...

  2. 40 CFR 418.30 - Applicability; description of the urea subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2014-07-01 2012-07-01 true Applicability; description of the urea subcategory. 418.30 Section 418.30 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS FERTILIZER MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Urea Subcategory §...

  3. 40 CFR 418.30 - Applicability; description of the urea subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Applicability; description of the urea subcategory. 418.30 Section 418.30 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS FERTILIZER MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Urea Subcategory §...

  4. Emergency response mobile robot for operations in combustible atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, Henry W. (Inventor); Ohm, Timothy R. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A mobile, self-powered, self-contained, and remote-controlled robot is presented. The robot is capable of safely operating in a combustible atmosphere and providing information about the atmosphere to the operator. The robot includes non-sparking and non-arcing electro-mechanical and electronic components designed to prevent the robot from igniting the combustible atmosphere. The robot also includes positively pressurized enclosures that house the electromechanical and electronic components of the robot and prevent intrusion of the combustible atmosphere into the enclosures. The enclosures are interconnected such that a pressurized gas injected into any one of the enclosures is routed to all the other enclosures through the interconnections. It is preferred that one or more sealed internal channels through structures intervening between the enclosures be employed. Pressure transducers for detecting if the pressure within the enclosures falls below a predetermined level are included. The robot also has a sensing device for determining the types of combustible substances in the surrounding atmosphere, as well as the concentrations of each type of substance relative to a pre-determined lower explosive limit (LEL). In addition, the sensing device can determine the percent level of oxygen present in the surrounding atmosphere.

  5. An emergency response mobile robot for operations in combustible atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, Henry W. (Inventor); Ohm, Timothy R. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A mobile, self-powered, self-contained, and remote-controlled robot is presented. The robot is capable of safely operating in a combustible atmosphere and providing information about the atmosphere to the operator. The robot includes non-sparking and non-arcing electro-mechanical and electronic components designed to prevent the robot from igniting the combustible atmosphere. The robot also includes positively pressurized enclosures that house the electromechanical and electronic components of the robot and prevent intrusion of the combustible atmosphere into the enclosures. The enclosures are interconnected such that a pressurized gas injected into any one of the enclosures is routed to all the other enclosures through the interconnections. It is preferred that one or more sealed internal channels through structures intervening between the enclosures be employed. Pressure transducers for detecting if the pressure within the enclosures falls below a predetermined level are included. The robot also has a sensing device for determining the types of combustible substances in the surrounding atmosphere, as well as the concentrations of each type of substance relative to a pre-determined lower explosive limit (LEL). In addition, the sensing device can determine the percent level of oxygen present in the surrounding atmosphere.

  6. Stand-alone sensors monitor for combustible gas leaks

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    Elizabeth Gas Co., a gas distribution company in New Jersey, has added a network of combustible gas sensors to a computer system already in place for continuous monitoring of gas leaks. The computer center at the company's Erie St. facility controls all dispatching, which includes routing gas through the system and controlling gas pressure. The system uses redundant Hewlett-Packard A900 central processing units (CPU), 6 monitors, including a Mitsubishi 35-in. color monitor, and Fisher control software. The company's primary tank farm, which contains over a million gallons of propane and LNG, is located near several chemical plants, an oil refinery and a residential neighborhood. To monitor for combustible leaks at the site, the company installed 49 stand-alone combustible gas sensors manufactured by Mine Safety Appliances Co. (MSA) of Pittsburgh, Pa. The sensors are designed to measure the concentrations of propane and LNG and trigger alarms at 20% of the lower explosive limit (LEL). The sensors are diffusion types that sample ambient air rather than drawing in samples through a pump. Using the principle of catalytic oxidation, the sensors produce a signal proportional to the concentration of combustible gas in the atmosphere. If gas is detected above 20% of the LEL, a relay driver signal is sent into a remote annunciator panel which contains LED alarm displays for each sensor. The remote annunciator panel also houses a 24 VDC power supply.

  7. Internal combustion engine

    SciTech Connect

    Towner, S.J.; Zion, G.L.B.

    1992-08-04

    This patent describes a cylinder sleeve for use in an internal combustion engine, it comprises an engine block defining a cylinder bore and including an exhaust passage communicating with the cylinder bore, a generally cylindrical inner surface, and an endless surface which extends between the inner and outer surfaces, which defines an exhaust port adapted to communicate with the engine block exhaust passage, and which meets the outer surface at an endless intersection, a portion of the intersection being chamfered so as to define a space adjacent the exhaust port and between the cylinder sleeve and the engine block when the cylinder sleeve is housed in the cylinder bore.

  8. Hybrid fluidized bed combuster

    DOEpatents

    Kantesaria, Prabhudas P. (Windsor, CT); Matthews, Francis T. (Poquonock, CT)

    1982-01-01

    A first atmospheric bubbling fluidized bed furnace is combined with a second turbulent, circulating fluidized bed furnace to produce heat efficiently from crushed solid fuel. The bed of the second furnace receives the smaller sizes of crushed solid fuel, unreacted limestone from the first bed, and elutriated solids extracted from the flu gases of the first bed. The two-stage combustion of crushed solid fuel provides a system with an efficiency greater than available with use of a single furnace of a fluidized bed.

  9. Liquid propellant combustion waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, W. S.; Chung, T. J.

    1991-06-01

    Design of efficient and stable combustors depends on accurate analysis of flowfields. This study examines combustion waves arising from hydrogen-air reactions in the scramjet flame holders with various ramp angles. Two-step Taylor-Galerkin finite element methods are used to solve the Navier-Stokes system of equations. Fluctuation quantities are calculated from the Navier-Stokes solution as a function of time. From these data the energy growth rate parameters and energy growth factors using the entropy-controlled instability method are determined.

  10. Electron spin echo modulation study of sodium dodecyl sulfate and dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide micellar solutions in the presence of urea: Evidence for urea interaction at the micellar surface

    SciTech Connect

    Baglioni, P. ); Ferroni, E. ); Kevan, L. )

    1990-05-17

    Electron spin echo studies have been carried out for a series of x-doxylstearic acid (x-DSA, x = 5,7,10,12,16) and 4-octanoyl-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxy (C{sub 8}-TEMPO) spin probes in micellar solutions of anionic sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and cationic dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide (DTAB) in D{sub 2}O and in the presence of 2 or 6 M urea or urea-d{sub 4}. Modulation effects due to the interaction of the unpaired electron with urea and water deuteriums show that urea does not affect the bent conformation of the x-DSA probe in the micelle. The analysis of the deuterium modulation depth and the Fourier transformation of the two-pulse electron spin echo spectra show that urea interacts with the surfactant polar headgroups at the micelle surface. These results support recent molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo calculations of micellar systems and are in agreement with direct interaction of urea at micellar surfaces in which it replaces some water molecules in the surface region.

  11. MUNICIPAL WASTE COMBUSTION ASSESSMENT: TECHNICAL BASIS FOR GOOD COMBUSTION PRACTICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report defines good combustion practice GCP an sum approach used to implement CCP into proposed municipal waste combustion (MWC) standards and guidelines. The report identifies the minimum subset of GCP operating parameters that can be monitored continuously to ensure that th...

  12. Solution conformation of an oligonucleotide containing a urea deoxyribose residue in front of a thymine.

    PubMed Central

    Gervais, V; Guy, A; Téoule, R; Fazakerley, G V

    1992-01-01

    Urea residues are produced by ionizing radiation on thymine residues in DNA. We have studied an oligodeoxynucleotide containing a thymine opposite the urea residue, by one and two dimensional NMR spectroscopy. The urea deoxyribose exists as two isomers with respect to the orientation about the peptide bond. For the trans isomer we find that the thymine and urea site are positioned within the helix and are probably hydrogen bonded. The oligonucleotide adopts a globally B form structure although conformational changes are observed around the mismatch site. A minor species is observed, in which the urea deoxyribose and the opposite base adopt an extrahelical position and this corresponds to the isomer cis for the peptide bond. PMID:1480468

  13. Two different mechanisms for urea action at the LAC and TNA operons in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Blazy, B; Ullmann, A

    1990-02-01

    Urea, at concentrations which do not interfere with bacterial growth, specifically inhibits the expression of catabolite sensitive operons. To search for the target and the mechanism of urea action we measured lactose (lac) and tryptophanase (tna) specific mRNA synthesis in vivo and in vitro. We show that urea acts by two different mechanisms at these two catabolite sensitive operons, resembling the manner in which catabolite repression regulates lac and tna. At the lac promoter, urea abolishes transcription initiation or blocks an early step in mRNA elongation without interfering with the binding of RNA polymerase and catabolite gene activator protein (CAP). At the tna promoter, urea does not abolish transcription initiation but could interfere with tnaC translation. PMID:2160052

  14. Urea biosensors and their application in hemodialysis--perspective of EnFET application.

    PubMed

    Torbicz, W; Pijanowska, D G; Dawgul, M

    2000-01-01

    Parameters such as blood urea nitrogen concentration, normalized protein catabolic rate and Kt/V that are utilized for urea concentration measurements in blood and dialysate for the optimization of the hemodialysis process are reviewed in the paper. Basic methods of urea concentration measurement are described. Urea biosensors of the EnFET type based on the pH-sensitive Si3N4 gate FET and pNH4-sensitive FET with a Siloprene membrane containing nonactine, both of our own construction, are presented. Application of these biosensors for urea concentration measurement in blood and dialysate is described. An experimental microdialysis system with urease in detector solution and a pH-ISFET detector are described. A comparison of two dialysis procedures, with a commercial dialysate an initial of pH 5.6 and with pH kept lowered during the dialysis process applied to rats, is given. PMID:10898243

  15. Preliminary assessment of combustion modes for internal combustion wave rotors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nalim, M. Razi

    1995-01-01

    Combustion within the channels of a wave rotor is examined as a means of obtaining pressure gain during heat addition in a gas turbine engine. Several modes of combustion are considered and the factors that determine the applicability of three modes are evaluated in detail; premixed autoignition/detonation, premixed deflagration, and non-premixed compression ignition. The last two will require strong turbulence for completion of combustion in a reasonable time in the wave rotor. The compression/autoignition modes will require inlet temperatures in excess of 1500 R for reliable ignition with most hydrocarbon fuels; otherwise, a supplementary ignition method must be provided. Examples of combustion mode selection are presented for two core engine applications that had been previously designed with equivalent 4-port wave rotor topping cycles using external combustion.

  16. Some Factors Affecting Combustion in an Internal-Combustion Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothrock, A M; Cohn, Mildred

    1936-01-01

    An investigation of the combustion of gasoline, safety, and diesel fuels was made in the NACA combustion apparatus under conditions of temperature that permitted ignition by spark with direct fuel injection, in spite of the compression ratio of 12.7 employed. The influence of such variables as injection advance angle, jacket temperature, engine speed, and spark position was studied. The most pronounced effect was that an increase in the injection advance angle (beyond a certain minimum value) caused a decrease in the extent and rate of combustion. In almost all cases combustion improved with increased temperature. The results show that at low air temperatures the rates of combustion vary with the volatility of the fuel, but that at high temperatures this relationship does not exist and the rates depend to a greater extent on the chemical nature of the fuel.

  17. Motion Control of Urea-Powered Biocompatible Hollow Microcapsules.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xing; Wang, Xu; Hahn, Kersten; Sánchez, Samuel

    2016-03-22

    The quest for biocompatible microswimmers powered by compatible fuel and with full motion control over their self-propulsion is a long-standing challenge in the field of active matter and microrobotics. Here, we present an active hybrid microcapsule motor based on Janus hollow mesoporous silica microparticles powered by the biocatalytic decomposition of urea at physiological concentrations. The directional self-propelled motion lasts longer than 10 min with an average velocity of up to 5 body lengths per second. Additionally, we control the velocity of the micromotor by chemically inhibiting and reactivating the enzymatic activity of urease. The incorporation of magnetic material within the Janus structure provides remote magnetic control on the movement direction. Furthermore, the mesoporous/hollow structure can load both small molecules and larger particles up to hundreds of nanometers, making the hybrid micromotor an active and controllable drug delivery microsystem. PMID:26863183

  18. Macrocyclic bis(ureas) as ligands for anion complexation

    PubMed Central

    Kretschmer, Claudia; Dittmann, Gertrud

    2014-01-01

    Summary Two macrocyclic bis(ureas) 1 and 2, both based on diphenylurea, have been synthesized. Compound 1 represents the smaller ring with two ethynylene groups as linkers and 2 the larger ring with two butadiynylene groups. On thermal treatment to 130 C molecule 1 splits up into two dihydroindoloquinolinone (3) molecules. Both compounds 1 and 2 form adducts with polar molecules such as dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and dimethylformamide (DMF) and act as complexing agents towards a series of anions (Cl?, Br?, I?, NO3 ?, HSO4 ?). The crystal structures of 3, 22DMSO, 22DMF, and of the complex NEt4[Br2] have been determined. Quantitative investigations of the complexation equilibria were performed via 1H NMR titrations. While 1 is a rather weak complexing agent, the large ring of 2 binds anions with association constants up to log K = 7.93 for chloride ions. PMID:25161744

  19. Dichloridodiphenylbis(thiourea-?S)tin(IV)

    PubMed Central

    Sow, Yaya; Diop, Libasse; Molloy, Kieran C.; Kociok-Khn, Gabriele

    2013-01-01

    The title compound, [Sn(C6H5)2Cl2(CH4N2S)2], has been obtained from the reaction between Sn(C6H5)2Cl2 and SC(NH2)2. The asymmetric unit consists of one half of the molecular unit, the remainder generated by a twofold rotation axis located along the ClSnCl bonds. The SnIV atom is coordinated by two phenyl groups, two Cl atoms and two thiourea ligands in an all trans octahedral C2Cl2S2 environment. Individual molecules are connected through NH?Cl hydrogen bonds, leading to a three-dimensional network structure. Intramolecular NH?Cl hydrogen bonds are also present. PMID:24098172

  20. Description of microparticles in urea-formaldehyde foam insulation products

    SciTech Connect

    Nantel, A.J.; Huy, N.D.; Roy, P.E.; Duchesneau, L.; Weber, J.P.

    1985-04-01

    Thousands of families living in homes insulated with urea-formaldehyde foam (UFF) have complained of various health problems. This product is now banned from the market both in Canada and the United States. Formaldehyde gas emitted by the products has been considered to be the source of these health problems but this cause-effect relationship has not been confirmed as yet. It has been suggested that other contaminants released by the foam could be involved. Work initiated to verify this possibility has permitted the observation of microparticles of less than 1 ..mu..m in diameter in foam samples obtained from various houses. The microparticles can easily be removed from the foam by passing air through it or, simply, by immersing it in water. These particles have been studied by different microscopy techniques and their morphological characteristics are described. They may represent a potential health risk.

  1. Daisy Found on 'Route 66'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This composite image from the panoramic camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit gives an approximately true-color rendering of a daisy-like pattern of brushed circles that Spirit produced on a rock called 'Route 66.' Spirit used the rock abrasion tool to complete this 6-position 'RAT daisy' on sol 99. It took this image on sol 100, April 14, 2004.

    The purpose for these large brushings is to create a large enough patch of treated surface area for the miniature thermal emission spectrometer to analyze. Scientists had previously conducted a brushing like this one on the rock 'Mazatzal.' The brushed area of Route 66 looks very different from the brushed area of Mazatzal, leading scientists to think that the rocks although both light in tone actually have different coating types.

  2. Trace analysis of urea nitrate in post-blast debris by GC/MS.

    PubMed

    Almog, Joseph; Espino, Dario; Tamiri, Tsippy; Sonenfeld, Dana

    2013-01-10

    Urea nitrate (uronium nitrate, UN) is an improvised explosive that looks very much like sugar and is easily made from accessible starting materials, urea and nitric acid. During the last decade it has been frequently used by terrorists in the Israeli arena and in other countries as well. It is difficult to identify urea nitrate in post-explosion debris, since only a very small fraction survives the blast. Also, in the presence of water, it readily decomposes to its original components, urea and nitric acid, two ubiquitous substances with relatively low evidential value. By further modifying McCord's recent version of Clark's method for the detection of minute amounts of urea, we were able to identify with high degree of certainty traces of uronium ion, the main characteristic factor of urea nitrate, in post-blast residues by GC/MS. The analytical process is based on the initial formation of xanthenyl urea by the reaction of uronium cation with xanthydrol, followed by reaction with alcohol to form xanthylurethane, which is readily identified by GC/MS. The reaction mechanism was corroborated by the use of labeled (15)N-urea. By applying the technique to residues collected from scenes of controlled firing experiments, 4 out of 16 samples showed the presence of uronium cation as indicated by the formation of the corresponding xanthylurethane. Potential interferences such as urea and ammonium nitrate did not respond under standard conditions. However, under strongly acidic conditions (pH<2), urea is converted into uronium ion, which is a nuisance, since it behaves as an authentic uronium cation. Such conditions, however, do not prevail at common crime scenes. PMID:23182869

  3. Anion Binding in Metal-Organic Frameworks Functionalized with Urea Hydrogen-Bonding Groups

    SciTech Connect

    Custelcean, Radu; Moyer, Bruce A; Bryantsev, Vyacheslav S.; Hay, Benjamin P.

    2006-01-01

    A series of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) functionalized with urea hydrogen-bonding groups has been synthesized and structurally analyzed by single-crystal X-ray diffraction to evaluate the efficacy of anion coordination by urea within the structural constraints of the MOFs. We found that urea-based functionalities may be used for anion binding within metal-organic frameworks when the tendency for urea{hor_ellipsis}urea self-association is decreased by strengthening the intramolecular CH{hor_ellipsis}O hydrogen bonding of N-phenyl substituents to the carbonyl oxygen atom. Theoretical calculations indicate that N,N'-bis(m-pyridyl)urea (BPU) and N,N'-bis(m-cyanophenyl)urea (BCPU) should have enhanced hydrogen-bonding donor abilities toward anions and decreased tendencies to self-associate into hydrogen-bonded tapes compared to other disubstituted ureas. Accordingly, BPU and BCPU were incorporated in MOFs as linkers through coordination of various Zn, Cu, and Ag transition metal salts, including Zn(ClO{sub 4}){sub 2}, ZnSO{sub 4}, Cu(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}, Cu(CF{sub 3}SO{sub 3}){sub 2}, AgNO{sub 3}, and AgSO{sub 3}CH{sub 3}. Structural analysis by single-crystal X-ray diffraction showed that these linkers are versatile anion binders, capable of chelate hydrogen bonding to all of the oxoanions explored. Anion coordination by the urea functionalities was found to successfully compete with urea self-association in all cases except for that of charge-diffuse perchlorate.

  4. Sodium-dependent net urea transport in rat initial inner medullary collecting ducts.

    PubMed Central

    Isozaki, T; Lea, J P; Tumlin, J A; Sands, J M

    1994-01-01

    We reported that feeding rats 8% protein for 3 wk induces net urea transport and morphologic changes in initial inner medullary collecting ducts (IMCDs) which are not present in rats fed 18% protein. In this study, we measured net urea transport in microperfused initial IMCDs from rats fed 8% protein for > or = 3 wk and tested the effect of inhibiting Na+/K(+)-ATPase activity and found that adding 1 mM ouabain to the bath reversibly inhibited net urea transport from 14 +/- 3 to 6 +/- 2 pmol/mm per min (P < 0.01), and that replacing potassium (with sodium) in the bath reversibly inhibited net urea transport from 18 +/- 3 to 5 +/- 0 pmol/mm per min (P < 0.01). Replacing perfusate sodium with N-methyl-D-glucamine reversibly inhibited net urea transport from 12 +/- 2 to 0 +/- 1 pmol/mm per min (P < 0.01), whereas replacing bath sodium had no significant effect on net urea transport. Adding 10 nM vasopressin to the bath exerted no significant effect on net urea transport. Finally, we measured Na+/K(+)-ATPase activity in initial and terminal IMCDs from rats fed 18% or 8% protein and found no significant difference in either subsegment. Thus, net urea transport in initial IMCDs from rats fed 8% protein for > or = 3 wk requires sodium in the lumen, is reduced by inhibiting Na+/K(+)-ATPase, and is unchanged by vasopressin or phloretin. These results suggest that net urea transport may occur via a novel, secondary active, sodium-urea cotransporter. PMID:7929827

  5. AIR EMISSIONS FROM SCRAP TIRE COMBUSTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report discusses air emissions from two types of scrap tire combustion: uncontrolled and controlled. Uncontrolled sources are open tire fires, which produce many unhealthful products of incomplete combustion and release them directly into the atmosphere. Controlled combustion...

  6. Path planning during combustion mode switch

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Li; Ravi, Nikhil

    2015-12-29

    Systems and methods are provided for transitioning between a first combustion mode and a second combustion mode in an internal combustion engine. A current operating point of the engine is identified and a target operating point for the internal combustion engine in the second combustion mode is also determined. A predefined optimized transition operating point is selected from memory. While operating in the first combustion mode, one or more engine actuator settings are adjusted to cause the operating point of the internal combustion engine to approach the selected optimized transition operating point. When the engine is operating at the selected optimized transition operating point, the combustion mode is switched from the first combustion mode to the second combustion mode. While operating in the second combustion mode, one or more engine actuator settings are adjusted to cause the operating point of the internal combustion to approach the target operating point.

  7. Plasma igniter for internal-combustion engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breshears, R. R.; Fitzgerald, D. J.

    1978-01-01

    Hot ionized gas (plasma) ignites air/fuel mixture in internal combustion engines more effectively than spark. Electromagnetic forces propel plasma into combustion zone. Combustion rate is not limited by flame-front speed.

  8. Combustion driven oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mugridge, B. D.

    1980-06-01

    Combustion driven oscillations can occur when a turbulent flame is enclosed in a tube or cavity. Interaction between heat fluctuations and the internal standing wave field at one of the natural frequencies of the air column produces strong organ pipe tones. The sound power emitted by this thermal-acoustic interaction depends on the impedance either side of the combustion zone and on a transfer function defining the response of the flame to sound wave disturbances. If this power exceeds the rate at which energy is dissipated at the cavity boundaries then there is a growth of the internal pressure field and an increase in the radiated sound. Plane wave theory is used to calculate the flame transfer function and adjacent impedances for a simple gas fired tube assembly. The predicted instability frequencies are then compared with experimental data. The results indicate that the flame transfer function plays a dominant role in determining the acoustic stability of the cavity and that insufficient data is available for accurately predicting unsteady flame front behavior.

  9. Coal combustion ash haulback

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, R.E.; Gray, T.A.

    1998-12-31

    Coal mining disturbs large tracts of land which must be reclaimed. Unfortunately, iron sulfides which are common in most coals and the adjacent strata weather, forming acid mine drainage (AMD) which degrades surface and ground water. Burning of coal produces combustion by products, most of which are placed in ponds or landfills. Suitable disposal areas are difficult to find and permit, especially in urban areas. This has led to ash haulback--where the waste generated during coal burning is hauled back to a mine for disposal. The potential advantages of coal combustion ash haulback are: Disposal occurs in a disturbed area (mine) rather than disturb additional land near the power plant; The same vehicles used to haul coal from the mine can be used to return the ash to the mine; Ash, if alkaline, may provide neutralization of acidic water or mine overburden commonly found at coal mines; and Low permeability ash could reduce ground water flow through the mine backfill, thus reducing leaching of acid forming constituents or metals. Placement of ash in surface mines provides an efficient, cost-effective method of disposal while at the same time contributing to reclamation of the mine. Wise natural resource management suggests a reasonable approach to disposal of coal ash is to return it to its original location--the mine.

  10. PCI: Toward cleaner combustion

    SciTech Connect

    1997-01-01

    Westinghouse Electric Corp. and Precision Combustion Inc. (PCI) have announced that they will cooperate on the development of a catalytic combustion system for possible use in the upcoming A.T.S. engine. As we learned during a recent visit, this is only one of many catalyst applications being explored by PCI. This paper discuses these developments and applications, which include: an ultra-low-emission catalytic converter for reciprocating auto exhaust systems, which would meet the American U.L.E.V. (ultra-low emission vehicle) regulations (0.2 gm/mi NO{sub x}, 1.7 gm/mi CO, 0.04 gm/mi hydrocarbons). This is named Microlith{sup TM}; a `flashback arrestor` to limit flash-back in gas turbines; a catalytic igniter, particularly suited to aero gas turbines. This would replace the spark ignition system, and would provide lean flame stabilization, as well as re-ignition in case of a flameout; a catalytic glow plug for diesel engines; and a catalytic muffler for very small reciprocating engines, such as those on lawn mowers.

  11. Make phloroglucinol by hydroperoxide route

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-11-01

    This new industrial process produces phloroglucinol (1,3,5-trihydroxybenzene) from 1,3,5-triisopropylbenzene (TIP) by hydroperoxidation. Phloroglucinol is used as a pharmaceutical intermediate, and demand is expected to increase because of its application in diazo photo papers and intermediates for coupling agents. Phloroglucinol by the hydroperoxide route per se is known. However, these processes produce yields far too low for industrial practice. Phloroglucinol is presently manufactured in relatively small quantities from trinitrotoluene by a series of oxidation, decarbonylation, reduction and hydrolysis reactions. The process has safety and production cost problems. The application of phloroglucinol uses has not expanded because of these limitations. Development of a large-scale, more economical process was needed because there is a large potential market for phloroglucinol in photosensitive papers, photographic chemicals and other areas. Sumito Chemical has made extensive study of the hydroperoxide route to introduce hydroxyl groups into aromatic compounds. Commercial plants for cresol and resorcinol via the hydroperoxide route are in operation today.

  12. Smooth Side of 'Route 66'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This image was taken by the microscopic imager onboard NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit on sol 99 (April 13, 2004). It is a close-up look at a portion of the rock called 'Route 66,' which was brushed by the rover's rock abrasion tool.

    This image intrigues scientists because it looks very different from the microscopic images taken of other brushed rocks at the Gusev Crater location. The surface of Route 66 is very shiny and specularly reflective, which may indicate a glassy surface, or perhaps a very smooth, discontinuous coating. The unique coating appears mottled and may be multi-layered.

    Other interesting features in this brushed area of Route 66 are the very thin, arc-shaped lines that are visible in the upper left quadrant of the image. An initial hypothesis suggests that these arcs may have been caused by the rock abrasion tool when the instrument made its initial contact with the surface.

    Scientists will use the combined data from the rover's Moessbauer spectrometer and alpha particle X-ray spectrometer along with color versions of this image to try to reach stronger conclusions about what they are seeing and what processes caused the features.

  13. Method for in situ combustion

    DOEpatents

    Pasini, III, Joseph; Shuck, Lowell Z.; Overbey, Jr., William K.

    1977-01-01

    This invention relates to an improved in situ combustion method for the recovery of hydrocarbons from subterranean earth formations containing carbonaceous material. The method is practiced by penetrating the subterranean earth formation with a borehole projecting into the coal bed along a horizontal plane and extending along a plane disposed perpendicular to the plane of maximum permeability. The subterranean earth formation is also penetrated with a plurality of spaced-apart vertical boreholes disposed along a plane spaced from and generally parallel to that of the horizontal borehole. Fractures are then induced at each of the vertical boreholes which project from the vertical boreholes along the plane of maximum permeability and intersect the horizontal borehole. The combustion is initiated at the horizontal borehole and the products of combustion and fluids displaced from the earth formation by the combustion are removed from the subterranean earth formation via the vertical boreholes. Each of the vertical boreholes are, in turn, provided with suitable flow controls for regulating the flow of fluid from the combustion zone and the earth formation so as to control the configuration and rate of propagation of the combustion zone. The fractures provide a positive communication with the combustion zone so as to facilitate the removal of the products resulting from the combustion of the carbonaceous material.

  14. 75 FR 10739 - Combustible Dust

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-09

    ... hazards of combustible dust. OSHA plans to use the information gathered at these meetings in developing a... for combustible dust. (74 FR 54334, Oct. 21, 2009) II. Stakeholder Meetings OSHA conducted two... (72 FR 31160). Signed at Washington, DC, on March 2, 2010. David Michaels, Assistant Secretary...

  15. Liquid propellant rocket combustion instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrje, D. T.

    1972-01-01

    The solution of problems of combustion instability for more effective communication between the various workers in this field is considered. The extent of combustion instability problems in liquid propellant rocket engines and recommendations for their solution are discussed. The most significant developments, both theoretical and experimental, are presented, with emphasis on fundamental principles and relationships between alternative approaches.

  16. Mission Success for Combustion Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiland, Karen J.

    2004-01-01

    This presentation describes how mission success for combustion experiments has been obtained in previous spaceflight experiments and how it will be obtained for future International Space Station (ISS) experiments. The fluids and combustion facility is a payload planned for the ISS. It is composed of two racks: the fluids Integrated rack and the Combustion INtegrated Rack (CIR). Requirements for the CIR were obtained from a set of combustion basis experiments that served as surrogates for later experiments. The process for experiments that fly on the ISS includes proposal selection, requirements and success criteria definition, science and engineering reviews, mission operations, and postflight operations. By following this process, the microgravity combustion science program has attained success in 41 out of 42 experiments.

  17. Externally ignited internal combustion engine

    SciTech Connect

    Latsch, R.; Schlembach, H.

    1980-08-26

    An internal combustion engine in which each cylinder or combustion volume includes a separate ignition chamber which communicates with the main combustion chamber through a relatively narrow channel or channels is described. The combustible mixture is delivered to the separate chamber exclusively through these channels by the compressive action of the piston and is ignited there by a suitable electrical spark, for example. There is no additional admission of fuel or fuel mixture to the separate ignition chamber. The channel or channels terminate in the ignition chamber in such a manner, for example, tangentially, that one or more vortices are generated in the chamber prior to ignition. The channels are so oriented that the emerging igniter flames are directed to potential hot cells in the main combustion chamber where auto-ignition could occur.

  18. 76 FR 23835 - Solid Urea From Russia and Ukraine; Scheduling of Full Five-Year Reviews Concerning the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-28

    ... COMMISSION Solid Urea From Russia and Ukraine; Scheduling of Full Five-Year Reviews Concerning the Antidumping Duty Orders on Solid Urea From Russia and Ukraine AGENCY: United States International Trade... whether revocation of the antidumping duty orders on solid urea from Russia and Ukraine would be likely...

  19. Rotary fluidized bed combustion system

    SciTech Connect

    David, C.V.

    1987-07-28

    A method is described for burning fuel in the form of solid particles in a rotary fluidized bed combustion system comprising the steps of: introducing solid fuel in particulate form; introducing air for burning the fuel; enclosing by and containing within walls the mixture of air and fuel thus introduced in a combustion region where fuel and air chemically interact (burning process) in a fluidized bed generated by the manner in which the air and the fuel are introduced in the combustion region; generating an artificial gravity field substantially stronger than the earth gravitational field, the artificial gravity field being created by rotating the air/fuel mixture around an axis substantially orthogonal to the general direction followed by the combusted gases on their way out of the combustion region; preventing the fuel particles from contacting the walls surrounding the fuel burning process by means of balancing the centrifugal forces acting on the particles and caused by the artificially created gravity field against the opposing aerodynamic forces also acting on the particles and which are caused by the means for introducing some of the air for burning the fuel; segregating the fuel burning along the path followed by the particles as they burn and proceed toward the combustion system exhaust, and away from the walls around the combustion region; elongating the pathway generally followed by the particles during the burning process, thereby increasing their residence time in the combustion region until their burning is generally completed before the particles leave the combustion system; and exhausting the combusted gases.

  20. NASA Microgravity Combustion Science Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, Merrill K.

    1997-01-01

    Combustion is a key element of many critical technologies used by contemporary society. For example, electric power production, home heating, surface and air transportation, space propulsion, and materials synthesis all utilize combustion as a source of energy. Yet, although combustion technology is vital to our standard of living, it poses great challenges to maintaining a habitable environment. For example, pollutants, atmospheric change and global warming, unwanted fires and explosions, and the incineration of hazardous wastes are major problem areas which would benefit from improved understanding of combustion. Effects of gravitational forces impede combustion studies more than most other areas of science since combustion involves production of high-temperature gases whose low density results in buoyant motion, vastly complicating the execution and interpretation of experiments. Effects of buoyancy are so ubiquitous that their enormous negative impact on the rational development of combustion science is generally not recognized. Buoyant motion also triggers the onset of turbulence, yielding complicating unsteady effects. Finally, gravity forces cause particles and drops to settle, inhibiting deconvoluted studies of heterogeneous flames important to furnace, incineration and power generation technologies. Thus, effects of buoyancy have seriously limited our capabilities to carry out 'clean' experiments needed for fundamental understanding of flame phenomena. Combustion scientists can use microgravity to simplify the study of many combustion processes, allowing fresh insights into important problems via a deeper understanding of elemental phenomena also found in Earth-based combustion processes and to additionally provide valuable information concerning how fires behave in microgravity and how fire safety on spacecraft can be enhanced.

  1. The 17th JANNAF Combustion Meeting, Volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eggleston, D. S. (Editor)

    1980-01-01

    The combustion of solid rocket propellants and combustion in ramjets is addressed. Subjects discussed include metal burning, steady-state combustion of composite propellants, velocity coupling and nonlinear instability, vortex shedding and flow effects on combustion instability, combustion instability in solid rocket motors, combustion diagnostics, subsonic and supersonic ramjet combustion, characterization of ramburner flowfields, and injection and combustion of ramjet fuels.

  2. Optimization of OSPF Routing in IP Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bley, Andreas; Fortz, Bernard; Gourdin, Eric; Holmberg, Kaj; Klopfenstein, Olivier; Pióro, Michał; Tomaszewski, Artur; Ümit, Hakan

    The Internet is a huge world-wide packet switching network comprised of more than 13,000 distinct subnetworks, referred to as Autonomous Systems (ASs) autonomous system AS . They all rely on the Internet Protocol (IP) internet protocol IP for transport of packets across the network. And most of them use shortest path routing protocols shortest path routing!protocols , such as OSPF or IS-IS, to control the routing of IP packets routing!of IP packets within an AS. The idea of the routing is extremely simple — every packet is forwarded on IP links along the shortest route between its source and destination nodes of the AS. The AS network administrator can manage the routing of packets in the AS by supplying the so-called administrative weights of IP links, which specify the link lengths that are used by the routing protocols for their shortest path computations. The main advantage of the shortest path routing policy is its simplicity, allowing for little administrative overhead. From the network engineering perspective, however, shortest path routing can pose problems in achieving satisfactory traffic handling efficiency. As all routing paths depend on the same routing metric routing!metric , it is not possible to configure the routing paths for the communication demands between different pairs of nodes explicitly or individually; the routing can be controlled only indirectly and only as a whole by modifying the routing metric. Thus, one of the main tasks when planning such networks is to find administrative link weights that induce a globally efficient traffic routing traffic!routing configuration of an AS. It turns out that this task leads to very difficult mathematical optimization problems. In this chapter, we discuss and describe exact integer programming models and solution approaches as well as practically efficient smart heuristics for such shortest path routing problems shortest path routing!problems .

  3. Rotary internal combustion engine

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, J.L.; Mosca, J.O.

    1992-02-25

    This patent describes a rotary internal combustion engine. It includes a housing; a cam track internally disposed within the housing and adapted to receive a cam follower; an engine block disposed within the housing, the engine block being relatively rotatable within the housing about a central axis; means connectable to an external drive member for translating the relative rotation of the engine block with respect to the housing into useful work; at least one radially arranged cylinder assembly on the block, each cylinder assembly including a cylinder having a longitudinal axis extending generally radially outwardly from the rotational axis of the block, the cylinder including means defining an end wall, a piston member disposed within the cylinder and adapted to reciprocate within the cylinder; the piston, cylinder and cylinder end wall together.

  4. Combustion in porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Dillon, J.

    1999-09-01

    A 2.8-liter tube-shaped combustion vessel was constructed to study flame propagation and quenching in porous media. For this experiment, hydrogen-air flames propagating horizontally into abed of 6 mm diameter glass beads were studied. Measurements of pressure and temperature along the length of the tube were used to observe flame propagation of quenching. The critical hydrogen concentration for Hz-air mixtures was found to be 11.5%, corresponding to a critical Peclet number of Pe* = 37. This value is substantially less than the value of Pe* = 65 quoted in the literature, for example Babkin et al. (1991). It is hypothesized that buoyancy and a dependence of Pe on the Lewis number account for the discrepancy between these two results.

  5. HSR combustion analytical research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, H. Lee

    1992-01-01

    Increasing the pressure and temperature of the engines of a new generation of supersonic airliners increases the emissions of nitrogen oxides (NO(x)) to a level that would have an adverse impact on the Earth's protective ozone layer. In the process of evolving and implementing low emissions combustor technologies, NASA LeRC has pursued a combustion analysis code program to guide combustor design processes, to identify potential concepts of the greatest promise, and to optimize them at low cost, with short turnaround time. The computational analyses are evaluated at actual engine operating conditions. The approach is to upgrade and apply advanced computer programs for gas turbine applications. Efforts were made in further improving the code capabilities for modeling the physics and the numerical methods of solution. Then test cases and measurements from experiments are used for code validation.

  6. Dual-Mode Combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goyne, Christopher P.; McDaniel, James C.

    2002-01-01

    The Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering at the University of Virginia has conducted an investigation of the mixing and combustion processes in a hydrogen fueled dual-mode scramjet combustor. The experiment essentially consisted of the "direct connect" continuous operation of a Mach 2 rectangular combustor with a single unswept ramp fuel injector. The stagnation enthalpy of the test flow simulated a flight Mach number of 5. Measurements were obtained using conventional wall instrumentation and laser based diagnostics. These diagnostics included, pressure and wall temperature measurements, Fuel Plume Imaging (FPI) and Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). A schematic of the combustor configuration and a summary of the measurements obtained are presented. The experimental work at UVa was parallel by Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) work at NASA Langley. The numerical and experiment results are compared in this document.

  7. Space Station Freedom combustion research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faeth, G. M.

    1992-01-01

    Extended operations in microgravity, on board spacecraft like Space Station Freedom, provide both unusual opportunities and unusual challenges for combustion science. On the one hand, eliminating the intrusion of buoyancy provides a valuable new perspective for fundamental studies of combustion phenomena. On the other hand, however, the absence of buoyancy creates new hazards of fires and explosions that must be understood to assure safe manned space activities. These considerations - and the relevance of combustion science to problems of pollutants, energy utilization, waste incineration, power and propulsion systems, and fire and explosion hazards, among others - provide strong motivation for microgravity combustion research. The intrusion of buoyancy is a greater impediment to fundamental combustion studies than to most other areas of science. Combustion intrinsically heats gases with the resulting buoyant motion at normal gravity either preventing or vastly complicating measurements. Perversely, this limitation is most evident for fundamental laboratory experiments; few practical combustion phenomena are significantly affected by buoyancy. Thus, we have never observed the most fundamental combustion phenomena - laminar premixed and diffusion flames, heterogeneous flames of particles and surfaces, low-speed turbulent flames, etc. - without substantial buoyant disturbances. This precludes rational merging of theory, where buoyancy is of little interest, and experiments, that always are contaminated by buoyancy, which is the traditional path for developing most areas of science. The current microgravity combustion program seeks to rectify this deficiency using both ground-based and space-based facilities, with experiments involving space-based facilities including: laminar premixed flames, soot processes in laminar jet diffusion flames, structure of laminar and turbulent jet diffusion flames, solid surface combustion, one-dimensional smoldering, ignition and flame spread of liquids, drop combustion, and quenching of panicle-air flames. Unfortunately, the same features that make microgravity attractive for fundamental combustion experiments, introduce new fire and explosion hazards that have no counterpart on earth. For example, microgravity can cause broader flammability limits, novel regimes of flame spread, enhanced effects of flame radiation, slower fire detector response, and enhanced combustion upon injecting fire extinguishing agents, among others. On the other hand, spacecraft provide an opportunity to use 'fire-safe' atmospheres due to their controlled environment. Investigation of these problems is just beginning, with specific fire safety experiments supplementing the space based fundamental experiments listed earlier; thus, much remains to be done to develop an adequate technology base for fire and explosion safety considerations for spacecraft.

  8. Fluids and Combustion Facility-Combustion Integrated Rack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Francisco, David R.

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes in detail the concept of performing Combustion microgravity experiments in the Combustion Integrated Rack (CIR) of the Fluids and Combustion Facility (FCF) on the International Space Station (ISS). The extended duration microgravity environment of the ISS will enable microgravity research to enter into a new era of increased scientific and technological data return. The FCF is designed to increase the amount and quality of scientific and technological data and decrease the development cost of an individual experiment relative to the era of Space Shuttle experiments. This paper also describes how the FCF will cost effectively accommodate these experiments.

  9. Histopathological analysis of the olfactory epithelium of zebrafish (Danio rerio) exposed to sublethal doses of urea.

    PubMed

    Bettini, Simone; Lazzari, Maurizio; Ferrando, Sara; Gallus, Lorenzo; Franceschini, Valeria

    2016-01-01

    Chronic renal disease is known to alter olfactory function, but the specific changes induced in olfactory organs during this process remain unclear. Of the uraemic toxins generated during renal disease, high levels of urea are known to induce hyposmic conditions. In this study, the effects of environmental exposure to elevated concentrations of urea (7, 13.5 and 20 gL(-1) ) on the sensory mucosa of zebrafish in acute toxicity and chronic toxicity tests were described. It was observed that lamellae maintained structural integrity and epithelial thickness was slightly reduced, but only following exposure to the highest concentrations of urea. Pan-neuronal labelling with anti-Hu revealed a negative correlation with levels of urea, leading to investigation of whether distinct neuronal subtypes were equally sensitive. Using densitometric analysis of immunolabelled tissues, numbers of G? olf -, TRPC2- and TrkA-expressing cells were compared, representing ciliated, microvillous and crypt neurons, respectively. The three neuronal subpopulations responded differently to increasing levels of urea. In particular, crypt cells were more severely affected than the other cell types, and G? olf -immunoreactivity was found to increase when fish were exposed to low doses of urea. It can be concluded that exposure to moderate levels of urea leads to sensory toxicity directly affecting olfactory organs, in accordance with the functional olfactometric measurements previously reported in the literature. PMID:26510631

  10. [The assessment of the sensitivity of environmental fungi to urea phosphate].

    PubMed

    Krzy?ko-Lupicka, Teresa; Grata, Katarzyna

    2004-01-01

    In this paper the authors presented the influence of various urea phosphate doses, 1-12%, on the environmental fungi growth depending on its intensity and the type of created spore e.g. (Penicillium italicum, Aspergillusfumigatus, Aspergillus niger, Cladosporium resinae, Mucor hiemalis i Rhizopus nigricans). The result of urea phosphate effect on fungi was estimated by static culture method using dry mass increase change [g. dry mass/ldm3]. The control was created by the growth of the above mentioned fungi on the basis of urea phosphate free soil. The obtained results were worked out by a statistic method using Duncan's test. The tested fungi showed different sensitivity to the various urea phosphate doses. In the presence of 1% urea phosphate the fungi sensitivity depended on their growth intensity (Aspergillus niger, Mucor hiemalis i Rhizopus nigricans). Additionally, the stimulation of fungi growth with rapid vegetative structure progress was observed. Independently of their physiological properties, significant inhibition of dry mass increase in the range of 3-12% concentration urea phosphate was observed. The result of the use of 3% urea phosphate was the reduction of dry mass growth of all tested fungi. PMID:15732502

  11. Vehicle-controlled effect of urea on normal and SLS-irritated skin.

    PubMed

    Savica, S; Tamburic, S; Savic, M; Cekic, N; Milic, J; Vuleta, G

    2004-03-01

    It is known that, depending on the concentration, treatment with urea could improve skin barrier function, despite its penetration-enhancing properties. This controversial skin effect of urea has been explored systematically in this study in terms of the effect of vehicle on the performance of urea. In the first part, a series of four semi-solid emulsions with 5% (w/w) urea, varying in the type of emulsion, nature of emulsifier and polarity of oil ingredients, have been evaluated with regard to their skin hydrating and transepidermal water loss (TEWL)-modifying properties. Placebo samples were tested alongside the urea-containing ones. Two best performing moisturisers from the above were chosen for the second part of the study, in which sodium lauryl sulphate (SLS)-irritated skin was treated with both placebo and urea-containing samples. In addition to TEWL and skin hydration level, the erythema index (EI) was measured before, during and after the treatment. The results have shown that barrier-improving and hydrating abilities of urea are bi-directional and dependent on both the type of vehicle used for its delivery and the state of skin. PMID:15129994

  12. Vasopressin regulation of the renal UT-A3 urea transporter.

    PubMed

    Stewart, G S; Thistlethwaite, A; Lees, H; Cooper, G J; Smith, Craig

    2009-03-01

    Facilitative urea transporters in the mammalian kidney play a vital role in the urinary concentrating mechanism. The urea transporters located in the renal inner medullary collecting duct, namely UT-A1 and UT-A3, are acutely regulated by the antidiuretic hormone vasopressin. In this study, we investigated the vasopressin regulation of the basolateral urea transporter UT-A3 using an MDCK-mUT-A3 cell line. Within 10 min, vasopressin stimulates urea flux through UT-A3 transporters already present at the plasma membrane, via a PKA-dependent process. Within 1 h, vasopressin significantly increases UT-A3 localization at the basolateral membrane, causing a further increase in urea transport. While the basic trafficking of UT-A3 to basolateral membranes involves both protein kinase C and calmodulin, its regulation by vasopressin specifically occurs through a casein kinase II-dependent pathway. In conclusion, this study details the effects of vasopressin on UT-A3 urea transporter function and hence its role in regulating urea permeability within the renal inner medullary collecting duct. PMID:19052101

  13. [FTIR spectra study on the swellbility and controlled-release mechanism of polyurethane coated urea].

    PubMed

    Wu, Shu; Ru, Tie-Jun; Wang, Jin-Ming

    2013-05-01

    The nutrient release experiment of polyurethane coated urea (PCU) was carried out in pure water at 25 degrees C. With the release of urea, the structural variation of polyurethane coating was investigated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), then a series of curves were collated and compared so as to better reflect the relation between diffusion rate of urea and coating structure. It was found that when the nutrient was released by 50% wt, new absorption peaks at 3 435, 3 342, 1 671, 1 621, 1 448 and 1 159 cm(-1) appear in the FTIR spectra of polyurethane coating, moreover, the height of these absorption peaks was increased gradually when the nutrient was released by 70% wt, more importantly, these new absorption peaks are consistent with the characteristic absorption peaks of urea fertilizer, the spectra of urea were mainly characterized by bands at 3 440, 3 346, 1 672, 1 621 and 1 461 cm(-1). The results show that the IR spectra variation was caused by the content of urea, existing in the polyurethane coating, and was increased gradually, The more the urea content, the greater the swelling degree of the polyurethane coating. The swelling of polyurethane coating leads to the pores size change, and release rate is increased, so the "S" pattern curve of the nitrogen accumulative release is formed. PMID:23905318

  14. Adaptive network based on fuzzy inference system for equilibrated urea concentration prediction.

    PubMed

    Azar, Ahmad Taher

    2013-09-01

    Post-dialysis urea rebound (PDUR) has been attributed mostly to redistribution of urea from different compartments, which is determined by variations in regional blood flows and transcellular urea mass transfer coefficients. PDUR occurs after 30-90min of short or standard hemodialysis (HD) sessions and after 60min in long 8-h HD sessions, which is inconvenient. This paper presents adaptive network based on fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) for predicting intradialytic (Cint) and post-dialysis urea concentrations (Cpost) in order to predict the equilibrated (Ceq) urea concentrations without any blood sampling from dialysis patients. The accuracy of the developed system was prospectively compared with other traditional methods for predicting equilibrated urea (Ceq), post dialysis urea rebound (PDUR) and equilibrated dialysis dose (eKt/V). This comparison is done based on root mean squares error (RMSE), normalized mean square error (NRMSE), and mean absolute percentage error (MAPE). The ANFIS predictor for Ceq achieved mean RMSE values of 0.3654 and 0.4920 for training and testing, respectively. The statistical analysis demonstrated that there is no statistically significant difference found between the predicted and the measured values. The percentage of MAE and RMSE for testing phase is 0.63% and 0.96%, respectively. PMID:23806679

  15. Urea Monitor Based on Chemiluminescence and Electrolysis as a Marker for Dialysis Efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozaki, Masahiro; Okabayashi, Tohru; Ishimaru, Teppei; Hayashi, Kunihito; Hori, Jun'ya; Yamamoto, Isao; Nakagawa, Masuo

    We have developed a practical urea monitor based on a chemiluminescent (CL) reaction of urea and hypobromous acid produced by electrolysis of sodium bromide (NaBr) for measuring urea concentration in spent dialysate at set intervals. A reagent containing 410-2 M hypobromous acid is produced by electrolysis of an electrolyte containing 5.9 M NaBr and 0.2 M sodium hydroxide (NaOH). Chemiluminescence is emitted by injection of spent hemodialysis fluid (0.11 ml) into the reagent, and the CL-intensity is measured by a photomultiplier tube using the photon counting technique. The CL-intensity is proportional to the 0.9th power of the urea concentration between 710-4 and 210-2 M. The urea monitor can determine the urea concentration in spent dialysate samples collected from the waste line of a dialyzer, and the time for the intermittent measurements including the cleaning cycle of the reaction chamber is 3 min. The urea concentrations measured by the monitor are in close agreement with those measured by the conventional enzyme colorimetric method using urease for the spent dialysate collected during a hemodialysis treatment, and the correlation coefficient is 0.93.

  16. Slow release coating remedy for nitrogen loss from conventional urea: a review.

    PubMed

    Naz, Muhammad Yasin; Sulaiman, Shaharin Anwar

    2016-03-10

    Developing countries are consuming major part of the global urea production with an anticipated nitrogen use efficiency of 20 to 35%. The release of excess nitrogen in the soil is not only detrimental to the environment but also lessens the efficiency of the conventional urea. The urea performance can be enhanced by encapsulating it with slow release coating materials and synchronizing the nutrients' release with the plant up-taking. However, the present cost of most of the coated fertilizers is considerably higher than the conventional fertilizers. The high cost factor prevents their widespread use in mainstream agriculture. This paper documents a review of literature related to the global urea market, issues pertaining to the conventional urea use, natural and synthetic materials for slow release urea and fluidized bed spray coating process. The aim of the current review is to develop technical understanding of the conventional and non-conventional coating materials and associated spray coating mechanism for slow release urea production. The study also investigated the potential of starch as the coating material in relation to the coatings tested previously for controlled release fertilizers. PMID:26809006

  17. Urea hydration from dielectric relaxation spectroscopy: old findings confirmed, new insights gained.

    PubMed

    Agieienko, Vira; Buchner, Richard

    2016-01-20

    We report results on urea hydration obtained by dielectric relaxation spectroscopy (DRS) in a broad range of concentrations and temperatures. In particular, the effective hydration number and dipole moment of urea have been determined. The observed changes with composition and temperature were found to be insignificant and mainly caused by the changing number density of urea. Similarly, solute reorientation scaled simply with viscosity. In contrast, we find that water reorientation undergoes substantial changes in the presence of urea, resulting in two water fractions. The first corresponds to water molecules strongly bound to urea. These solvent molecules follow the reorientational dynamics of the solute. The second fraction exhibits only a minor increase of its relaxation time (in comparison with pure water) which is not linked to solution viscosity. Its activation energy decreases significantly with urea concentration, indicating a marked decrease of the number of H-bonds among the H2O molecules belonging to this fraction. Noncovalent interactions (NCI) analysis, capable to estimate the strength of the interactions within a cluster, shows that bound water molecules are most probably double-hydrogen bonded to urea via the oxygen atom of the carbonyl group and a cis-hydrogen atom. Due to the increased H-bond strength compared to the water dimer and the rigid position in the formed complex the reorientation of these bound H2O molecules is strongly impeded. PMID:26700870

  18. Renal excretion of urea and electrolytes in sheep and red deer

    PubMed Central

    Maloiy, G. M. O.; Scott, D.

    1969-01-01

    1. The effects of varying the intake of water and nitrogen on the renal excretion of urea and electrolytes has been studied in sheep and in red deer. 2. The concentration of urea in the urine of both sheep and deer decreased as the volume of urine increased and about eight times as much urea was excreted each day when a high-nitrogen diet was fed compared to when a low-nitrogen diet was fed. 3. Both the concentrations of sodium and potassium in the urine decreased as the urine volume increased but the total amounts excreted were independent of urine volume. 4. The osmotic concentration of the urine decreased as urine volume increased. 5. In both deer and sheep the concentration of urea in the plasma was considerably higher when a high-nitrogen diet was fed compared to when a low-nitrogen diet was fed but the rate of clearance of inulin from the plasma did not appear to be related to the diet. 6. Appreciably more urea was filtered at the glomerulus when a high-nitrogen diet was fed compared to when a low-nitrogen diet was fed but the percentage of filtered urea reabsorbed was not related to diet. 7. The results indicate no qualitative differences between deer and sheep in the renal excretion of urea and electrolytes. PMID:5347722

  19. Replacing soybean meal for wet brewer's grains or urea on the performance of lactating dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Imaizumi, Hugo; Batistel, Fernanda; de Souza, Jonas; Santos, Flvio Augusto Portela

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this research was to evaluate the partial replacement of soybean meal (SBM) for wet brewer's grains (WBG) or urea on the performance of lactating dairy cows. The second investigated whether WBG ensiled with corn kept animal performance in low- and high-producing dairy cows compared with WBG. In experiment I, 40 Holstein cows were used in 4??4 Latin square design. The treatments comprised WBG or urea as partial replacement for SBM, as follows: control (diet based on SBM and 1% of urea), 10% of WBG, 20% of WBG, and 2% of urea. Dry matter intake (DMI) was not affected by treatments. WBG increased milk yield linearly, but it decreased with urea. Milk fat content responded quadratically to WBG levels. Milk protein content decreased, while plasma urea nitrogen increased with high urea addition. In experiment II, 42 Holstein cows were divided into two groups according to production levels. Eighteen cows composed the group of low producing, while the high-producing group comprised 24 cows. The experimental design was a crossover with two periods of 14days. The experimental treatments consisted of feeding WBG or WBG ensiled with ground corn. Regardless of the production level, no difference in milk yield and milk composition between treatments was observed. PMID:25854784

  20. Do Australian desert frogs co-accumulate counteracting solutes with urea during aestivation?

    PubMed

    Withers, P C; Guppy, M

    1996-08-01

    Australian desert frogs of the genera Neobatrachus, Cyclorana and Heleioporus experience significant dehydration, and iono- and osmoconcentration, during aestivation in the laboratory and accumulate substantial amounts of urea (100-200 mmol)(l-1). We expected a priori that aestivating frogs probably would not need to accumulate balancing osmolytes but would accumulate trimethylamine oxide (TMAO) or betaine as counteracting solutes to urea. These aestivating frogs did not co-accumulate a substantial quantity of any particular balancing osmolyte or counteracting solute, such as a methylamine [TMAO, trimethylamine amine (TMA), betaine, sarcosine, glycerophosphorylcholine (GPC)] or polyol (inositol, mannitol, sorbitol) in plasma or muscle relative to urea accumulation. However, for aestivating frogs, the total concentration of all measured methylamines and polyols (TMAO + TMA + betaine + sarcosine + GPC + inositol) in muscle was approximately 35-45 mmol kg-1, and so it is possible that all of these solutes have a combined counteracting osmolyte role in aestivating frogs at a ratio to urea of approximately 1:2.5, as has been described for elasmobranch fishes. Alternatively, the absence of substantial co-accumulation with urea of any particular solute suggests that aestivating frogs might not require any major extracellular or intracellular counteracting solutes (TMAO, betaine, GPC). The enzyme systems of these aestivating frogs may be insensitive to the perturbing effects of urea, or the perturbing effects of accumulated urea may be a mechanism for metabolic depression, during aestivation. PMID:8708581