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Sample records for urea creatinine uric

  1. Plasma Levels of Uric Acid, Urea and Creatinine in Diabetics Who Visit the Clinical Analysis Laboratory (CAn-Lab) at Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Kumasi, Ghana

    PubMed Central

    Amartey, N.A.A.; Mensah, F.O.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Diabetes mellitus is one of the most common metabolic diseases worldwide. This metabolic disorder contributes greatly to the significant proportion of the burden of renal damage and dysfunction. The aim of the study was to investigate the renal function of the diabetic patients who visit the Clinical Analysis Laboratory (CAn-Lab) at the Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology (KNUST), Kumasi, Ghana. Materials and Methods: Demographic data as well as medical history were obtained through the administration of a questionnaire. Anthro-pometric measurements were taken and blood samples were analysed for glucose, uric acid, urea and creatinine. Data collected were analysed using SPSS version 16.0. Results: A total of 34 diabetic patients, aged from 40-77 y were recruited, 22 (64.7%) of them were males with mean age of 57.40 11.8 y (SD), while 12 (35.3%) were females with mean age of 58.17 7.47 y. There was a statistically significant difference between the mean duration of the disease, as the females had longer duration, 12.50 6.95 y, as compared to 7.32 4.48 y in males (p=0.033). The mean plasma creatinine level in the females was 84.17 54.73 ?mol/l. In the diabetic population, there was a positive correlation between age and plasma creatinine level, (r=0.375, p=0.029). In the female diabetics, there was a positive correlation between fasting blood sugar (FBS) and the measured metabolic end products (r>0.5, p<0.05), a positive correlation between body mass index (BMI) and uric acid (r=0.576, p=0.005) and a positive correlation between BMI and FBS (r= 0.625, p= 0.030). Conclusion: Our results on the parameters measured; show that the diabetic population was experiencing mild kidney dysfunction, compared to non-diabetic controls. PMID:25859443

  2. Study of serum uric acid and creatinine in hypertensive disorders of pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Vyakaranam, Sapna; Bhongir, Aparna Varma; Patlolla, Dakshayani; Chintapally, Rekha

    2016-01-01

    Background Renal dysfunction, increased xanthine oxidase activity and oxidative stress in placenta contributes to the elevated uric acid levels in preeclampsia (PE). Objective To determine serum uric acid and creatinine in hypertensive disorders of pregnancy and correlate with fetal outcome. Materials and Methods Pregnant women ≥32 weeks of gestation. Study population included 3 groups, 31 normotensive pregnant (NP) women as controls, 30 pregnant women with gestational hypertension (GH) and 30 with PE. Result Serum uric acid and creatinine levels were significantly elevated in PE (6.26±1.19 and 0.94±0.26 mg/dL) when compared with Pregnancy induced hypertension (PIH) (4.27± 1.0 and 0.66 ±0.19 mg/dL) and NP (4.25 ± 0.8 and 0.63± 0.13 mg/dL) (P-value <0.001 and <0.001) respectively. Receiver operation characteristics curves demonstrated greater sensitivity and specificity for uric acid (86.7% and 83.9%, respectively) in PE than for creatinine (80% and 77.4%, respectively). Uric acid had strong and negative correlation with fetal birth weight in PE (r = −0.59, P = 0.006), where as creatinine had negative but weak correlation (r= −0.03, P=0.87). Conclusion Serum uric acid is a better diagnostic and predictive marker for PE and fetal outcome respectively.

  3. The Urinary Uric Acid/Creatinine Ratio is An Adjuvant Marker for Perinatal Asphyxia

    PubMed Central

    Bhongir, Aparna Varma; Yakama, Akhil Varma Venkata; Saha, Subhajit; Radia, Sejal B.; Pabbati, Jayalakshmi

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess the urinary uric acid/creatinine ratio (UA/Cr) in relation to Apgar score and cord blood gas analysis in identification of perinatal asphyxia and to define the cutoff values. Design case control study. Setting The newborns admitted in the department of pediatrics and NICU of Mediciti Institute of Medical Science, Ghanpur, Medchal mandal, Telangana from May-July 2011 were enrolled. Participants/patients The study was conducted on 31 (18 males, 13 females) controls and 18 (12males, 6 females) asphyxiated neonates. Outcome Measure(s) 5ml of arterial cord blood of newborn collected at the time of birth and spot urine samples were collected within 24-72 hours of life. Cord blood gas analysis were done immediately and Urinary uric acid was measured by modified Uricase method, urinary creatinine by modified kinetic Jaffe's reaction. Results The mean urinary uric acid and creatinine ratio (2.58± 0.48 vs 1.89 ± 0.59) is significantly higher in Asphyxiated group than in the control group. The umbilical cord blood pH had significant positive correlation with 1st minute Apgar score (r= 0.41, p=0.003), 5th minute Apgar (r= 0.44, p=0.002), while urinary UA/Cr ratio had significant negative correlation with cord blood pH (r= -0.63, p=0.002). Urinary UA/Cr ratio with criterion of >2.43 had 80% sensitivity, 87.5% specificity with AUC of 0.84 (p=0.003) had a better predictive value. Conclusions Urinary UA/Cr ratio is easy, non-invasive, painless and economical adjuvant parameter with better predictive value for diagnosing perinatal asphyxia with simple diagnostic equipment.

  4. Quantifying creatinine and urea in human urine through Raman spectroscopy aiming at diagnosis of kidney disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saatkamp, Cassiano Junior; de Almeida, Maurício Liberal; Bispo, Jeyse Aliana Martins; Pinheiro, Antonio Luiz Barbosa; Fernandes, Adriana Barrinha; Silveira, Landulfo, Jr.

    2016-03-01

    Due to their importance in the regulation of metabolites, the kidneys need continuous monitoring to check for correct functioning, mainly by urea and creatinine urinalysis. This study aimed to develop a model to estimate the concentrations of urea and creatinine in urine by means of Raman spectroscopy (RS) that could be used to diagnose kidney disease. Midstream urine samples were obtained from 54 volunteers with no kidney complaints. Samples were subjected to a standard colorimetric assay of urea and creatinine and submitted to spectroscopic analysis by means of a dispersive Raman spectrometer (830 nm, 350 mW, 30 s). The Raman spectra of urine showed peaks related mainly to urea and creatinine. Partial least squares models were developed using selected Raman bands related to urea and creatinine and the biochemical concentrations in urine measured by the colorimetric method, resulting in r=0.90 and 0.91 for urea and creatinine, respectively, with root mean square error of cross-validation (RMSEcv) of 312 and 25.2 mg/dL, respectively. RS may become a technique for rapid urinalysis, with concentration errors suitable for population screening aimed at the prevention of renal diseases.

  5. Creatinine

    MedlinePlus

    ... panel to evaluate kidney function. Creatinine is a waste product produced by muscles from the breakdown of ... can be used by the body. The remaining waste forms urine. If the creatinine and BUN tests ...

  6. Spectroscopic and structural study of the newly synthesized heteroligand complex of copper with creatinine and urea.

    PubMed

    Gangopadhyay, Debraj; Singh, Sachin Kumar; Sharma, Poornima; Mishra, Hirdyesh; Unnikrishnan, V K; Singh, Bachcha; Singh, Ranjan K

    2016-02-01

    Study of copper complex of creatinine and urea is very important in life science and medicine. In this paper, spectroscopic and structural study of a newly synthesized heteroligand complex of copper with creatinine and urea has been discussed. Structural studies have been carried out using DFT calculations and spectroscopic analyses were carried out by FT-IR, Raman, UV-vis absorption and fluorescence techniques. The copper complex of creatinine and the heteroligand complex were found to have much increased water solubility as compared to pure creatinine. The analysis of FT-IR and Raman spectra helps to understand the coordination properties of the two ligands and to determine the probable structure of the heteroligand complex. The LIBS spectra of the heteroligand complex reveal that the complex is free from other metal impurities. UV-visible absorption spectra and the fluorescence emission spectra of the aqueous solution of Cu-Crn-urea heteroligand complex at different solute concentrations have been analyzed and the complex is found to be rigid and stable in its monomeric form at very low concentrations. PMID:26529636

  7. Spectroscopic and structural study of the newly synthesized heteroligand complex of copper with creatinine and urea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gangopadhyay, Debraj; Singh, Sachin Kumar; Sharma, Poornima; Mishra, Hirdyesh; Unnikrishnan, V. K.; Singh, Bachcha; Singh, Ranjan K.

    2016-02-01

    Study of copper complex of creatinine and urea is very important in life science and medicine. In this paper, spectroscopic and structural study of a newly synthesized heteroligand complex of copper with creatinine and urea has been discussed. Structural studies have been carried out using DFT calculations and spectroscopic analyses were carried out by FT-IR, Raman, UV-vis absorption and fluorescence techniques. The copper complex of creatinine and the heteroligand complex were found to have much increased water solubility as compared to pure creatinine. The analysis of FT-IR and Raman spectra helps to understand the coordination properties of the two ligands and to determine the probable structure of the heteroligand complex. The LIBS spectra of the heteroligand complex reveal that the complex is free from other metal impurities. UV-visible absorption spectra and the fluorescence emission spectra of the aqueous solution of Cu-Crn-urea heteroligand complex at different solute concentrations have been analyzed and the complex is found to be rigid and stable in its monomeric form at very low concentrations.

  8. The effects of a probiotic on blood urea nitrogen and creatinine concentrations in large felids.

    PubMed

    McCain, Stephanie; Allender, Matthew C; Schumacher, Juergen; Ramsay, Edward

    2011-09-01

    Chronic kidney disease is a common finding in older captive exotic felids. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a probiotic to reduce blood urea nitrogen and creatinine in large felids. Fifteen adult, large felids (6 tigers [Panthera tigris], 5 lions [Panthera leo], 3 cougars [Puma concolor], and 1 leopard [Panthera pardus]) were administered a probiotic twice daily after a baseline complete blood cell count and plasma chemistry panel was obtained. Plasma chemistry values were rechecked at 2 mo (n = 14) and 6 mo (n = 9). There was no significant change in blood urea nitrogen over time; however, there was a significant change in creatinine over time (P = 0.04). Creatinine concentration decreased significantly between 2 and 6 mo (P = 0.02), and a decrease was seen between 0 and 6 mo, but this change was not significant (P = 0.05). There was no significant difference noted for creatinine concentration between 0 and 2 mo (P = 0.35). This probiotic may be helpful in large felids with elevated creatinine concentrations because of chronic kidney disease; however, further studies are warranted. PMID:22950314

  9. Creatinine and urea biosensors based on a novel ammonium ion-selective copper-polyaniline nano-composite.

    PubMed

    Zhybak, M; Beni, V; Vagin, M Y; Dempsey, E; Turner, A P F; Korpan, Y

    2016-03-15

    The use of a novel ammonium ion-specific copper-polyaniline nano-composite as transducer for hydrolase-based biosensors is proposed. In this work, a combination of creatinine deaminase and urease has been chosen as a model system to demonstrate the construction of urea and creatinine biosensors to illustrate the principle. Immobilisation of enzymes was shown to be a crucial step in the development of the biosensors; the use of glycerol and lactitol as stabilisers resulted in a significant improvement, especially in the case of the creatinine, of the operational stability of the biosensors (from few hours to at least 3 days). The developed biosensors exhibited high selectivity towards creatinine and urea. The sensitivity was found to be 85 ± 3.4 mAM(-1)cm(-2) for the creatinine biosensor and 112 ± 3.36 mAM(-1)cm(-2) for the urea biosensor, with apparent Michaelis-Menten constants (KM,app), obtained from the creatinine and urea calibration curves, of 0.163 mM for creatinine deaminase and 0.139 mM for urease, respectively. The biosensors responded linearly over the concentration range 1-125 µM, with a limit of detection of 0.5 µM and a response time of 15s. The performance of the biosensors in a real sample matrix, serum, was evaluated and a good correlation with standard spectrophotometric clinical laboratory techniques was found. PMID:26457736

  10. Determination of creatinine, uric and ascorbic acid in bovine milk and orange juice by hydrophilic interaction HPLC.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Ruiting; Zhou, Si; Zuo, Yuegang; Deng, Yiwei

    2015-09-01

    Creatinine (Cr), uric (UA) and ascorbic acid (AA) are common constituents in human fluids. Their abnormal concentrations in human fluids are associated with various diseases. Thus, apart from the endogenous formation in human body, it is also important to examine their sources from food products. In this study, a rapid and accurate HILIC method was developed for simultaneous determination of Cr, UA and AA in bovine milk and orange juice. Milk samples were pretreated by protein precipitation, centrifugation and filtration, followed by HPLC separation and quantification using a Waters Spherisorb S5NH2 column. The developed method has been successfully applied to determine the concentration of UA, AA and Cr in milk and fruit juice samples. The milk samples tested were found to contain UA and creatinine in the concentration range of 24.1-86.0 and 5.07-11.2 μg mL(-1), respectively. The orange juices contain AA over 212 μg mL(-1). PMID:25842333

  11. Estimation of amino acids, urea and uric acid in tasar silkworm, Antheraea mylitta Drury.

    PubMed

    Shamitha, G; Rao, A Purushotham

    2008-11-01

    The tasar silkworm, Antheraea mylitta Drury, Andhra local ecorace is an exclusive race of Andhra Pradesh. It is on the verge of extinction due to difficulty of acclimatisation at breeding and rearing stages. As an attempt to protect this race, a method of total indoor rearing has been done. In this context, the estimation of free amino acids, excretory products- urea and uric acid were compared during the fourth and fifth instars of tasar silkworm, reared under outdoor and indoor conditions. The study has revealed that amino acids decreased in the fat body in outdoor and indoor reared larvae in contrast to that in the haemolymph where it has gradually increased from first to third crops. This is an important finding as it reveals that indoor worms seem to adopt proteolytic activity in the haemolymph. Secondly, in the fifth instar the excretory products are more compared to fourth instar in the indoor reared worms. During fifth instar, formation of nitrogenous products lessens as silk synthesis enhances. The present study reveals that decrease in uric acid in fifth instar implies increase in growth rate and silk synthesis in both outdoor and indoor worms. The findings of the present investigation is helpful in the conservation and protection of the A. mylitta, Andhra local ecorace. PMID:19297987

  12. Analytical nanosphere sensors using quantum dot-enzyme conjugates for urea and creatinine.

    PubMed

    Ruedas-Rama, Maria J; Hall, Elizabeth A H

    2010-11-01

    An enzyme-linked analytical nanosphere sensor (ANSor) is described, responding to enzyme-substrate turnover in the vicinity of a quantum dot (QD) due to coimmobilized enzyme and pH sensitive ligand. QD capping by mercapto-alkanoic acids were rejected as a pH sensitive ligand, but with the use of a layer-by-layer assembly on mercaptopropionic capped QDs and an intermediate poly(allylamine hydrochloride) layer, anthraquinone sulfonate (calcium red, CaR) was introduced to modify the pKa in the immobilized system > 8. QD-CaR absorption shows spectral overlap with QD530 emission at all pHs and gives a complex pH dependent fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) efficiency, due to excited state proton transfer (?(ex) = 540 nm; ?(em) = 585 nm). In contrast QD615-CaR with spectral overlap between the QD and CaR gave a strong and reproducible pH response. QD-urease and QD-creatinine deiminase conjugates could be linked with pH changes produced by enzyme degradation of urea and creatinine, respectively. Close coupling between the pH sensitive QD and enzyme conjugate maximized signal compared with solution based assays: QD-urease and QD-CD bioconjugates were tested in model biological media (Dulbecco's modified Eagle's Medium and fetal calf serum) and in urine, showing a response in 3-4 min. PMID:20939534

  13. Ammonia production from uric acid, urea, and amino acids and its absorption from the ceca of the cockerel.

    TOXLINE Toxicology Bibliographic Information

    Karasawa Y

    1989-01-01

    Experiments were conducted in situ and in vitro in the ceca to measure ammonia production from uric acid, urea, and amino acids and its absorption. When uric acid was injected into a cecal sac containing mixed cecal microfloras, 77% disappeared within 1 hour, with a concomitant increase in ammonia concentration. When [15N]uric acid was added to the ceca in situ, 28% was converted to ammonia after 30 minutes. About 92% of the ammonia introduced into a cecal sac disappeared from the lumen fluid within 30 minutes. About 43% of each of urea nitrogen and glutamine-amide nitrogen was converted to ammonia-nitrogen, and 25% of uric acid-nitrogen and epsilon nitrogen of the arginine was found in ammonia. The conversion of aminonitrogen of glutamic acid and glycine to ammonia amounted to 19-20%, whereas that of alpha-alanine totaled 11%. It is concluded that dietary and urinary nitrogenous compounds that find their way into the ceca are useful nitrogen sources for ammonia production by microflora in the ceca of the chicken, and that ammonia is absorbed rapidly from the ceca.

  14. Effects of Bed-Rest on Urea and Creatinine: Correlation with Changes in Fat-Free Mass

    PubMed Central

    Bilancio, Giancarlo; Lombardi, Cinzia; Pisot, Rado; De Santo, Natale G.; Cavallo, Pierpaolo; Cirillo, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    Background Bed-rest experiments are designed for investigation on catabolic effects of hypokinetic conditions and/or for microgravity simulation in on-ground aerospace research. Bed-rest effects include a reduction in fat-free mass and muscle mass. Urea and creatinine are catabolites of endogenous protein and of muscular energetic metabolism which are excreted mainly by the kidney. The study investigated on urea, creatinine, and kidney function during bed-rest. Methods Twenty healthy young men underwent a 7-day adaptation period (day-6 to day-0) and a 35-day bed-rest experiment (day1 to day35) during normocaloric diet. Urine were collected from day-3 to day0 (baseline) and from day1 to day35. Blood samples and anthropometrical data were collected at day0 (baseline) and bed-rest days 7, 14, 21, 28, and 35. Results Bed-rest reduced plasma volume, weight, fat-free mass, and muscle mass (P<0.001). During bed-rest there was a transient increase in plasma and urinary urea, a decrease in plasma creatinine, and no change in urinary creatinine. The overall integral of changes from day0 to day35 was on average +101.7 mg/dL for plasma urea (95%CI = +43.4/+159.9), +82.2 g/24 h for urinary urea (95%CI = +55.8/+108.7), −2.5 mg/dL for plasma creatinine (95%CI = −3.1/−1.9). Bed-rest reduced plasma cistatyn C also, which was used as mass-independent marker of glomerular filtration rate (−13.1%, P<0.05). Correlations with final reduction in fat-free mass and muscle mass were significant for the overall integral of changes in urinary urea from day0 to day35 (R = 0.706, P<0.001) and for early changes in urinary urea and plasma urea from day0 to day7 (R = 0.566, P = 0.009 and R = 0.715, P<0.001, respectively). Conclusions Study results shows that urea is a marker of catabolic conditions secondary to hypokinetic conditions. PMID:25265226

  15. A multi-functional electrochemical sensing system using microfluidic technology for the detection of urea and creatinine.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chao-June; Lin, Jiun-Lin; Chen, Ping-Hong; Syu, Mei-Jywan; Lee, Gwo-Bin

    2011-04-01

    This study presents a new microfluidic system capable of precise measurements of two important biomarkers, urea and creatinine, automatically. In clinical applications, high levels of these two biomarkers are early indicators of nephropathy or renal failure and should be monitored on a regular basis. The microfluidic system is composed of a microfluidic chip, a control circuit system, a compressed air source and several electromagnetic valves to form a handheld system. The microfluidic chip is fabricated by using micro-electromechanical systems and microfluidic techniques comprising electrochemical sensor arrays and polydimethylsiloxane-based microfluidic structures such as micropumps/micromixers, normally closed valves and microchannels. The microfluidic system performs a variety of critical processes including sample pretreatment, mixing, transportation and detection on a single chip. The experimental results show that the entire procedure takes approximately 40 min, which is much faster than the traditional method (more than 6 h). Furthermore, the total sample volume consumed in each operation is only 0.1 mL, which is significantly less than that required in a large system (5 mL). The developed automatic microfluidic system may provide a powerful platform for further clinical applications. PMID:21437917

  16. Simultaneous determination of creatinine and uric acid in urine by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry with polarity switching electrospray ionization.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Woonyong; Kim, Jin Young; Suh, Sungill; In, Moon Kyo

    2012-09-10

    A simple liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometric (LC-MS/MS) method was developed and validated to simultaneously determine creatinine (Cr) and uric acid (UA) levels as a confirmatory method for adulteration or dilution of urine. Centrifuged urine samples (10μL) were diluted with 390μL of distilled water. 30μL of internal standard solution (Cr-d(3), 5μg/mL) and 10μL of acetonitrile were added to 20μL aliquots of diluted urine samples and filtered. The samples (1μL) were introduced into LC-MS/MS with no further pretreatment. Cr and UA were separated on a multi-mode ODS column (Scherzo SM-C18, 75mm×2.0mm I.D., 3μm) and quantified by LC-MS/MS with polarity-switching electrospray ionization. Cr requires the positive-ion mode, whereas the negative-ion mode is required for the analysis of UA. The linear ranges were 1.0-300mg/dL for Cr and 0.5-300mg/dL for UA, with good determination coefficients (R(2)≥0.9988). The intra-day and inter-day precision of the analytes was within 13.0% and 14.4%, respectively. The intra-day and inter-day accuracy was -8.8 to 3.7% and -0.3 to 6.6%, respectively. The lower limits of detection (LLODs) were 0.3mg/dL for Cr and 0.07mg/dL for UA. The applicability of the developed method was examined by analyzing urine samples from suspected drug abusers (n=46). PMID:22503624

  17. Reduced hydration status characterized by disproportionate elevation of blood urea nitrogen to serum creatinine among the patients with cerebral infarction.

    PubMed

    Akimoto, Tetsu; Ito, Chiharu; Kato, Maki; Ogura, Manabu; Muto, Shigeaki; Kusano, Eiji

    2011-10-01

    The significance of fluid metabolism among the patients with cerebral infarction has barely mentioned in the literature despite the several reports suggesting the potential risk of reduced hydration status for the development of cerebral infarction. The aim of the this study is to explore the validity of the presumable relationship between hydration status and cerebral infarction. Ninety-seven patients with cerebral infarction from April 1, 2008 to March 31, 2009 were retrospectively investigated, and their hydration status were evaluated by using several clinical parameters such as a blood urea nitrogen to serum creatinine (BUN/Cr) ratio of >25 and plasma osmolality. Subjects with active infection, congestive heart failure, hepatic failure, gastrointestinal bleeding, or a malignancy were excluded since these conditions should modulate the absolute value of BUN/Cr ratio without a change in hydration status. Twenty-eight patients (29%) were considered as having reduced hydration status. The BUN/Cr ratio decreased significantly after the initiation of medical support (median 21.3; IR: 18.1-24.6), including oral or parenteral fluid supplementation, in comparison to the values at the time of patient admission (median 30.0; IR: 26.8-40.7; p<0.0001). Similar decreases were also observed in the hematocrit, hemoglobin, and plasma osmolality. The group considered to have reduced hydration status had a significantly higher prevalence of cardioembolic stroke than the other subjects. The hydration status may be a contributing factor to subtypes of cerebral infarction. Whether our findings are also the case with overall patients with cerebral infarction should be evaluated in greater detail. PMID:21778021

  18. Validation of a multi-analyte HPLC-DAD method for determination of uric acid, creatinine, homovanillic acid, niacinamide, hippuric acid, indole-3-acetic acid and 2-methylhippuric acid in human urine.

    PubMed

    Remane, Daniela; Grunwald, Soeren; Hoeke, Henrike; Mueller, Andrea; Roeder, Stefan; von Bergen, Martin; Wissenbach, Dirk K

    2015-08-15

    During the last decades exposure sciences and epidemiological studies attracts more attention to unravel the mechanisms for the development of chronic diseases. According to this an existing HPLC-DAD method for determination of creatinine in urine samples was expended for seven analytes and validated. Creatinine, uric acid, homovanillic acid, niacinamide, hippuric acid, indole-3-acetic acid, and 2-methylhippuric acid were separated by gradient elution (formate buffer/methanol) using an Eclipse Plus C18 Rapid Resolution column (4.6mm×100mm). No interfering signals were detected in mobile phase. After injection of blank urine samples signals for the endogenous compounds but no interferences were detected. All analytes were linear in the selected calibration range and a non weighted calibration model was chosen. Bias, intra-day and inter-day precision for all analytes were below 20% for quality control (QC) low and below 10% for QC medium and high. The limits of quantification in mobile phase were in line with reported reference values but had to be adjusted in urine for homovanillic acid (45mg/L), niacinamide 58.5(mg/L), and indole-3-acetic acid (63mg/L). Comparison of creatinine data obtained by the existing method with those of the developed method showing differences from -120mg/L to +110mg/L with a mean of differences of 29.0mg/L for 50 authentic urine samples. Analyzing 50 authentic urine samples, uric acid, creatinine, hippuric acid, and 2-methylhippuric acid were detected in (nearly) all samples. However, homovanillic acid was detected in 40%, niacinamide in 4% and indole-3-acetic acid was never detected within the selected samples. PMID:26151191

  19. [Differences between the glomerular filtration rate estimated by the MDRD equation and the measurement of creatinine and urea clearance in unselected patients with terminal renal insufficiency].

    TOXLINE Toxicology Bibliographic Information

    Caravaca F; Arrobas M; Luna E; Naranjo M; Pizarro JL; Sánchez-Casado E

    2002-01-01

    From the results of the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD) study, a prediction equation for a more accurate estimate of glomerular filtration rate (GFR), was developed. The present study ais to compare the GFR estimated by MDRD formula and that calculated by the average of creatinine and urea clearances in unselected patients with advanced renal failure. The study group consisted of 320 (163 males) with advanced renal failure not yet on dialysis. Their mean age was 63 +/- 14 years. Diabetic nephropathy was the most common etiology of renal failure (25%). Significant comorbidity was observed in 115 patients. Serum creatinine (Cr), urea and albumin were determined in all patients. Creatinine (Ccr) and urea clearance (Cu) were calculated on a 24-hour urine collection. The GFR was estimated by summing Ccr and Cu, and dividing by two (Ccr-Cu). THe clearances were corrected for a body surface area of 1.73 m2. The MDRD formula for the estimation of GFR included the following parameters: serum Cr, BUN, age, gender and serum albumin. Linear regression analysis and Bland-Altmann plot were utilized to establish the degree of correlation and agreement between both estimations of GFR. The percent differences between the two estimations of GFR was especially analyzed in those subgroups of patients which were not included in the MDRD study (patients older than 70 years, diabetics and those with comorbid conditions). The mean GFR estimated by Ccr-Cu and by MDRD formula were 10.04 +/- 3.10 ml/min and 10.55 +/- 3.60 ml/min, respectively (p < 0.0001). The two parameters correlated significantly (R = 0.76, p < 0.0001). GFR by the MDRD formula tended to overestimate the highest values of Ccr-Cu. The mean percent difference between both methods was 6.5 +/- 23.6. MDRD predictive equation overestimated significantly Ccr-Cu in patients older than 70 years (mean overestimation of 15%), males (10%), diabetics (10%), and mainly in patients with comorbidity (17%). In conclusion, the GFR estimated by MDRD formula is very similar to Ccr-Cu in young uremic patients without comorbidity. However, major discrepancies between these two methods could be observed in older patients, and mainly in those with comorbidity.

  20. Urea

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Urea ; CASRN : 57 - 13 - 6 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Effects ) a

  1. Atorvastatin Combining with Probucol: A New Way to Reduce Serum Uric Acid Level during Perioperative Period of Interventional Procedure

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hong; Li, Ximing; Ma, Hongjun; Wang, Yiran; Fu, Naikuan; Jin, Dongxia; Cong, Hongliang

    2014-01-01

    Uric acid has ever been considered as one of contrast induced acute kidney injury's risk factors. Atorvastatin and probucol can both improve contrast induced acute kidney injury separately. This prospective study is to assess their effect on reducing serum uric acid level and contrast induced acute kidney injury during perioperative period of interventional procedure. On the basis of different doses of atorvastatin and probucol, 208 cases admitted for coronary angiography or percutaneous coronary intervention were randomly classified into standard combined group (S-C group), intensive combined group (I-C group), and intensive atorvastatin group (I-A group). Patients' blood urea nitrogen, serum creatinine, and serum uric acid were measured and estimated glomerular filtration rate was evaluated 24 hours before and after the procedure. After procedure, blood urea nitrogen in all the three groups decreased; Scr of S-C group and I-A group increased significantly, while estimated glomerular filtration decreased in the S-C group (P < 0.05); serum uric acid in S-C group and I-C group decreased significantly (P < 0.05). Combination treatment of atorvastatin and probucol before intervention could reduce perioperative serum uric acid level; meanwhile, the intensive combined treatment can improve the contrast induced acute kidney injury. The result was the same for hypertensive patients. PMID:24672331

  2. Influence of urate-lowering therapies on renal handling of uric acid.

    PubMed

    Ma, Lili; Wei, Lei; Chen, Huiyong; Zhang, Zhuojun; Yu, Qiang; Ji, Zongfei; Jiang, Lindi

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of urate-lowering therapies (ULTs) on renal uric acid excretion in gout patients. This prospective observational study involved 106 primary gout patients and 51 healthy controls. Gout patients received ULT with either xanthine oxidase inhibitors or the uricosuric agent benzbromarone. Parameters such as 24-h urinary uric acid, creatinine clearance, uric acid clearance, glomerular filtration load of uric acid, fractional excretion of uric acid, excretion of uric acid per volume of glomerular filtration, and urinary uric acid to urinary creatinine ratio were used to evaluate the pre- and post-treatment renal capacity for uric acid clearance in gout patients and were compared with the values in the healthy controls. Compared to healthy controls, gout patients had higher glomerular filtration load of uric acid and lower uric acid clearance, creatinine clearance, and fractional uric acid excretion. After ULT, both the xanthine oxidase inhibitor group and benzbromarone group patients showed reduction in glomerular filtration load of uric acid. Creatinine clearance was significantly improved in the xanthine oxidase inhibitor group. Excretion function was remarkably enhanced in patients who reached the treatment target (serum uric acid <6 mg/dl). Changes in glomerular uric acid filtration load were significantly correlated with changes in serum urate levels. Gout patients have impaired renal uric acid excretion. ULTs reduce renal urate load and enhance the renal capacity of uric acid clearance. Xanthine oxidase inhibitors showed superiority over benzbromarone in improving renal function. PMID:25373449

  3. Correlating the amount of urea, creatinine, and glucose in urine from patients with diabetes mellitus and hypertension with the risk of developing renal lesions by means of Raman spectroscopy and principal component analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bispo, Jeyse Aliana Martins; de Sousa Vieira, Elzo Everton; Silveira, Landulfo; Fernandes, Adriana Barrinha

    2013-08-01

    Patients with diabetes mellitus and hypertension (HT) diseases are predisposed to kidney diseases. The objective of this study was to identify potential biomarkers in the urine of diabetic and hypertensive patients through Raman spectroscopy in order to predict the evolution to complications and kidney failure. Urine samples were collected from control subjects (CTR) and patients with diabetes and HT with no complications (lower risk, LR), high degree of complications (higher risk, HR), and doing blood dialysis (DI). Urine samples were stored frozen (-20°C) before spectral analysis. Raman spectra were obtained using a dispersive spectrometer (830-nm, 300-mW power, and 20-s accumulation). Spectra were then submitted to principal component analysis (PCA) followed by discriminant analysis. The first PCA loading vectors revealed spectral features of urea, creatinine, and glucose. It has been found that the amounts of urea and creatinine decreased as disease evoluted from CTR to LR/HR and DI (PC1, p<0.05), and the amount of glucose increased in the urine of LR/HR compared to CTR (PC3, p<0.05). The discriminating model showed better overall classification rate of 70%. These results could lead to diagnostic information of possible complications and a better disease prognosis.

  4. Association of uric acid with traditional inflammatory factors in stroke.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Aiqun; Zou, Ting; Xiong, Guangzhong; Zhang, Jingping

    2016-04-01

    Uric acid (UA) plays an important role in the oxidant stress that causes inflammation. We assessed the association between UA and neutrophil ratio, white blood cell (WBC) count and blood lipid in 524 patients admitted with stroke. Stroke patients with a neutrophil ratio >70% displayed significantly lower UA levels than those with a neutrophil ratio ≤70% (p < 0.05). According to UA quartiles, neutrophil ratio, WBC count, and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol in the UA grade 1 group (≤214.10 μmol/L) were significantly increased over those in other UA grade groups. The results of stepwise regression analysis found that UA levels were inversely associated with neutrophil ratios (B ± SE = -1.11 ± 0.35), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (B ± SE = -46.18 ± 14.17), total cholesterol (B ± SE = 9.82 ± 3.66), blood urea nitrogen (B ± SE = 6.30 ± 1.73), and creatinine (B ± SE = 0.63 ± 0.10). There is a correlationship between lower serum uric acid with neutrophil ratios in inflammation associated with stroke and the reasons need to be investigated further. PMID:26001205

  5. Uric acid test (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Uric acid urine test is performed to check for the amount of uric acid in urine. Urine is collected over a 24 ... testing. The most common reason for measuring uric acid levels is in the diagnosis or treatment of ...

  6. Folic acid reverses uric acid crystal-induced surface OAT1 internalization by inhibiting RhoA activity in uric acid nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xinlin; Liu, Jianxiang; Zhang, Jianqing; Liu, Heng; Yan, Miansheng; Liang, Birong; Xie, Hongbo; Zhang, Shijun; Sun, Baoguo; Zhou, Houming

    2016-03-01

    To investigate how organic anion transporter (OAT)-1 is involved in uric acid nephropathy (UAN), a rat model for UAN was established and the serum uric acid, blood urea nitrogen and serum creatinine levels were all measured, and observed to be increased. It was additionally identified that in UAN rats the surface OAT1 expression levels were reduced. By treating HEK cells with monosodium urate (MSU) crystals, it was observed that the cells exhibited a reduction in OAT1 levels. Furthermore, MSU crystals were observed to recruit Ras homolog family member A (RhoA), a small guanosine triphosphatase, to the membrane and activate it. Following RhoA activation, the OAT1 internalization rate was identified to be increased. The dominant‑negative RhoA N19 mutation was able to block MSU‑induced OAT1 internalization, indicating that the process was RhoA‑dependent. Finally, the results indicated that folic acid, a daily nutritional supplement, was capable of rescuing MSU‑induced nephropathy and OAT1 internalization. These observations indicated that uric acid crystals were able to reduce the OAT1 membrane distribution through activating RhoA, and that folic acid was capable of preventing MSU-induced OAT1 relocation by inhibiting the RhoA signaling pathway. PMID:26846716

  7. Folic acid reverses uric acid crystal-induced surface OAT1 internalization by inhibiting RhoA activity in uric acid nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    WU, XINLIN; LIU, JIANXIANG; ZHANG, JIANQING; LIU, HENG; YAN, MIANSHENG; LIANG, BIRONG; XIE, HONGBO; ZHANG, SHIJUN; SUN, BAOGUO; ZHOU, HOUMING

    2016-01-01

    To investigate how organic anion transporter (OAT)-1 is involved in uric acid nephropathy (UAN), a rat model for UAN was established and the serum uric acid, blood urea nitrogen and serum creatinine levels were all measured, and observed to be increased. It was additionally identified that in UAN rats the surface OAT1 expression levels were reduced. By treating HEK cells with monosodium urate (MSU) crystals, it was observed that the cells exhibited a reduction in OAT1 levels. Furthermore, MSU crystals were observed to recruit Ras homolog family member A (RhoA), a small guanosine triphosphatase, to the membrane and activate it. Following RhoA activation, the OAT1 internalization rate was identified to be increased. The dominant-negative RhoA N19 mutation was able to block MSU-induced OAT1 internalization, indicating that the process was RhoA-dependent. Finally, the results indicated that folic acid, a daily nutritional supplement, was capable of rescuing MSU-induced nephropathy and OAT1 internalization. These observations indicated that uric acid crystals were able to reduce the OAT1 membrane distribution through activating RhoA, and that folic acid was capable of preventing MSU-induced OAT1 relocation by inhibiting the RhoA signaling pathway. PMID:26846716

  8. Uric acid utilization by Mycobacterium intracellulare and Mycobacterium scrofulaceum isolates.

    PubMed Central

    Falkinham, J O; George, K L; Parker, B C; Gruft, H

    1983-01-01

    Forty-nine human and environmental isolates of Mycobacterium intracellulare and Mycobacterium scrofulaceum were tested for their ability to grow on uric acid and a number of its degradation products. Nearly all (88 to 90%) strains used uric acid or allantoin as a sole nitrogen source; fewer (47 to 69%) used allantoate, urea, or possibly ureidoglycollate. Enzymatic activities of one representative isolate demonstrated the existence of a uric acid degradation pathway resembling that in other aerobic microorganisms. PMID:6863220

  9. Effect of urea inclusion in diets containing corn dried distillers grains on feedlot cattle performance, carcass characteristics, ruminal fermentation, total tract digestibility, and purine derivatives-to-creatinine index.

    PubMed

    Ceconi, I; Ruiz-Moreno, M J; DiLorenzo, N; DiCostanzo, A; Crawford, G I

    2015-01-01

    Increased availability of rapidly fermentable carbohydrates and a great proportion of corn-derived CP in the diet may result in a degradable intake protein (DIP) deficit. Therefore, ruminal DIP deficit may result from high dietary inclusion of processed corn grain and small to moderate inclusion of corn distillers grains (DG). Two experiments were conducted to evaluate the effect of increasing dietary DIP concentration through the inclusion of urea on feedlot cattle performance, carcass characteristics, ruminal fermentation, total tract digestibility, and purine derivatives-to-creatinine (PDC) index. In Exp. 1, 42 steers (428 ± 5 kg initial BW) were assigned randomly to 1 of 3 diets containing (DM basis) 0 (control [CON]), 0.4 (low urea [LU]), or 0.6% urea (high urea [HU]) to provide 6.4, 7.5, or 8.0% dietary DIP, respectively, and 12% high-moisture corn (HMC), 20% corn dried DG with solubles (DDGS), 10% ryegrass haylage, 2.9% dry supplement, and dry-rolled corn (DRC). Steers were fed ad libitum once daily using a Calan gate system. Carcass-adjusted final BW and DMI were similar among treatments (P ≥ 0.58). Carcass-adjusted ADG was greater (P ≤ 0.04) for the HU diet compared with the LU and CON diets and was similar (P = 0.73) between the LU and CON diets. Carcass-adjusted G:F was greater (P = 0.03) for the HU diet compared with the LU diet, tended (P = 0.09) to be greater compared with the CON diet, and was similar (P = 0.61) between the LU and CON diets. Carcass characteristics were similar (P ≥ 0.34) among treatments. In Exp. 2, 4 ruminally cannulated steers (347 ± 18 kg initial BW) were randomly assigned to a replicated 2 × 2 Latin square design. Steers were fed the same CON or HU diet used in Exp. 1 ad libitum once daily. Differences in the PDC index were used as indicators of differences in microbial CP synthesis. Ruminal pH, OM intake, and starch and CP digestibility were not affected by treatment (P ≥ 0.13). Digestibility of OM and NDF and ruminal concentration of ammonia-N and total VFA were greater (P ≤ 0.04) for the HU diet compared with the CON diet. The PDC index was similar (P = 0.81) between treatments at 2 h before feed delivery: 4% lower and 14% greater for the HU diet compared with the CON diet at 4 and 10 h after feed delivery, respectively (P < 0.01). These results suggest that, due to limited DIP supplied by a DRC- and HMC-based feedlot diet containing 20% DDGS, urea supplementation resulted in improved ruminal fermentation and feed digestibility, which may explain the concurrently improved cattle performance. PMID:25412747

  10. Creatinine urine test

    MedlinePlus

    Urine creatinine test ... Creatinine is a chemical waste product of creatine. Creatine is a chemical the body makes to supply ... done to see how well your kidneys work. Creatinine is removed by the body entirely by the ...

  11. Creatinine blood test

    MedlinePlus

    Serum creatinine ... Creatinine is a chemical waste product of creatine. Creatine is a chemical made by the body and ... done to see how well your kidneys work. Creatinine is removed from the body entirely by the ...

  12. Creatinine clearance test

    MedlinePlus

    Creatinine is a chemical waste product of creatine. Creatine is a chemical the body makes to supply energy, mainly to muscles. By comparing the creatinine level in urine with the creatinine level in blood , this test estimates the ...

  13. Dietary, anthropometric, and biochemical determinants of uric acid in free-living adults

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background High plasma uric acid (UA) is a prerequisite for gout and is also associated with the metabolic syndrome and its components and consequently risk factors for cardiovascular diseases. Hence, the management of UA serum concentrations would be essential for the treatment and/or prevention of human diseases and, to that end, it is necessary to know what the main factors that control the uricemia increase. The aim of this study was to evaluate the main factors associated with higher uricemia values analyzing diet, body composition and biochemical markers. Methods 415 both gender individuals aged 21 to 82 years who participated in a lifestyle modification project were studied. Anthropometric evaluation consisted of weight and height measurements with later BMI estimation. Waist circumference was also measured. The muscle mass (Muscle Mass Index – MMI) and fat percentage were measured by bioimpedance. Dietary intake was estimated by 24-hour recalls with later quantification of the servings on the Brazilian food pyramid and the Healthy Eating Index. Uric acid, glucose, triglycerides (TG), total cholesterol, urea, creatinine, gamma-GT, albumin and calcium and HDL-c were quantified in serum by the dry-chemistry method. LDL-c was estimated by the Friedewald equation and ultrasensitive C-reactive protein (CRP) by the immunochemiluminiscence method. Statistical analysis was performed by the SAS software package, version 9.1. Linear regression (odds ratio) was performed with a 95% confidence interval (CI) in order to observe the odds ratio for presenting UA above the last quartile (♂UA > 6.5 mg/dL and ♀ UA > 5 mg/dL). The level of significance adopted was lower than 5%. Results Individuals with BMI ≥ 25 kg/m2 OR = 2.28(1.13-4.6) and lower MMI OR = 13.4 (5.21-34.56) showed greater chances of high UA levels even after all adjustments (gender, age, CRP, gamma-gt, LDL, creatinine, urea, albumin, HDL-c, TG, arterial hypertension and glucose). As regards biochemical markers, higher triglycerides OR = 2.76 (1.55-4.90), US-CRP OR = 2.77 (1.07-7.21) and urea OR = 2.53 (1.19-5.41) were associated with greater chances of high UA (adjusted for gender, age, BMI, waist circumference, MMI, glomerular filtration rate, and MS). No association was found between diet and UA. Conclusions The main factors associated with UA increase were altered BMI (overweight and obesity), muscle hypotrophy (MMI), higher levels of urea, triglycerides, and CRP. No dietary components were found among uricemia predictors. PMID:23311699

  14. Distribution of creatinine following intravenous and oral administration to rats.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, J; Hirate, J; Iwamoto, K; Ozeki, S

    1981-05-01

    To evaluate the distribution of creatinine in rats, urinary, fecal and expiratory excretion, plasma levels and whole-body autoradiography following intravenous or oral administration of [carbonyl-14C]creatinine was investigated. More than 90% of the exogeneous creatinine was excreted in the urine in 24 hr following intravenous administration, and both fecal and expiratory excretion were only about 1%. In case of oral administration, however, it was found that expiratory excretion could not be neglected, ranging from about 1 to 30%. Plasma creatinine concentration-time curves following the intravenous administration (70.4 micrograms/kg or 400 mg/kg as creatinine) were analyzed according to a two-compartment open model. There were significant but very small differences in the pharmacokinetic parameters for these two doses. When these parameters were compared with those of urea, k12 and k21, which are transfer rate constants between compartment 1 and 2, for creatinine were significantly smaller than those of urea. On the other hand, k10 was larger in creatinine. Furthermore, (V'd)extrap for creatinine was about three times that of urea. Whole-body autoradiograms at 5 minutes following intravenous administration showed that exogeneous creatinine distributes with higher concentrations in liver, lung and kidney than in muscle and fat. This results was remarkably different from that of urea which distributes almost uniformly throughout the body at the same time. This difference observed in the autoradiograms would be the consequence of the fact that urea has larger k12 and k21 than creatinine. PMID:7288550

  15. Uric Acid Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... services. Advertising & Sponsorship: Policy | Opportunities PLEASE NOTE: Your web browser does not have JavaScript enabled. Unless you enable Javascript , your ability to navigate and ... page helpful? Also known as: Serum Urate; UA Formal name: Uric Acid Related tests: Synovial Fluid Analysis , Kidney Stone Analysis , Kidney Stone Risk Panel At ...

  16. Imprinted zeolite modified carbon paste electrode as a potentiometric sensor for uric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khasanah, Miratul; Widati, Alfa Akustia; Fitri, Sarita Aulia

    2016-03-01

    Imprinted zeolite modified carbon paste electrode (carbon paste-IZ) has been developed and applied to determine uric acid by potentiometry. The imprinted zeolite (IZ) was synthesized by the mole ratio of uric acid/Si of 0.0306. The modified electrode was manufactured by mass ratio of carbon, IZ and solid paraffin was 40:25:35. The modified electrode had shown the measurement range of 10-5 M to 10-2 M with Nernst factor of 28.6 mV/decade, the detection limit of 5.86 × 10-6 M and the accuracy of 95.3 - 105.0%. Response time of the electrode for uric acid 10-5 M - 10-2 M was 25 - 44 s. The developed electrode showed the high selectivity toward uric acid in the urea matrix. Life time of the carbon paste-IZ electrode was 10 weeks.

  17. Stamping SERS for creatinine sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ming; Du, Yong; Zhao, Fusheng; Zeng, Jianbo; Santos, Greggy M.; Mohan, Chandra; Shih, Wei-Chuan

    2015-03-01

    Urine can be obtained easily, readily and non-invasively. The analysis of urine can provide metabolic information of the body and the condition of renal function. Creatinine is one of the major components of human urine associated with muscle metabolism. Since the content of creatinine excreted into urine is relatively constant, it is used as an internal standard to normalize water variations. Moreover, the detection of creatinine concentration in urine is important for the renal clearance test, which can monitor the filtration function of kidney and health status. In more details, kidney failure can be imminent when the creatinine concentration in urine is high. A simple device and protocol for creatinine sensing in urine samples can be valuable for point-of-care applications. We reported quantitative analysis of creatinine in urine samples by using stamping surface enhanced Raman scattering (S-SERS) technique with nanoporous gold disk (NPGD) based SERS substrate. S-SERS technique enables label-free and multiplexed molecular sensing under dry condition, while NPGD provides a robust, controllable, and high-sensitivity SERS substrate. The performance of S-SERS with NGPDs is evaluated by the detection and quantification of pure creatinine and creatinine in artificial urine within physiologically relevant concentration ranges.

  18. Uric acid and evolution.

    PubMed

    Álvarez-Lario, Bonifacio; Macarrón-Vicente, Jesús

    2010-11-01

    Uric acid (UA) is the end product of purine metabolism in humans due to the loss of uricase activity by various mutations of its gene during the Miocene epoch, which led to humans having higher UA levels than other mammals. Furthermore, 90% of UA filtered by the kidneys is reabsorbed, instead of being excreted. These facts suggest that evolution and physiology have not treated UA as a harmful waste product, but as something beneficial that has to be kept. This has led various researchers to think about the possible evolutionary advantages of the loss of uricase and the subsequent increase in UA levels. It has been argued that due to the powerful antioxidant activity of UA, the evolutionary benefit could be the increased life expectancy of hominids. For other authors, the loss of uricase and the increase in UA could be a mechanism to maintain blood pressure in times of very low salt ingestion. The oldest hypothesis associates the increase in UA with higher intelligence in humans. Finally, UA has protective effects against several neurodegenerative diseases, suggesting it could have interesting actions on neuronal development and function. These hypotheses are discussed from an evolutionary perspective and their clinical significance. UA has some obvious harmful effects, and some, not so well-known, beneficial effects as an antioxidant and neuroprotector. PMID:20627967

  19. Urine Albumin and Albumin/ Creatinine Ratio

    MedlinePlus

    ... limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? Urine Albumin and Albumin/Creatinine Ratio Share this page: Was this page ... known as: Microalbumin; ACR; UACR Formal name: Urine Albumin; Albumin-to-Creatinine Ratio Related tests: Albumin ; Creatinine ; ...

  20. Recognition and Sensing of Creatinine.

    PubMed

    Guinovart, Tomàs; Hernández-Alonso, Daniel; Adriaenssens, Louis; Blondeau, Pascal; Martínez-Belmonte, Marta; Rius, F Xavier; Andrade, Francisco J; Ballester, Pablo

    2016-02-01

    Current methods for creatinine quantification suffer from significant drawbacks when aiming to combine accuracy, simplicity, and affordability. Here, an unprecedented synthetic receptor, an aryl-substituted calix[4]pyrrole with a monophosphonate bridge, is reported that displays remarkable affinity for creatinine and the creatininium cation. The receptor works by including the guest in its deep and polar aromatic cavity and establishing directional interactions in three dimensions. When incorporated into a suitable polymeric membrane, this molecule acts as an ionophore. A highly sensitive and selective potentiometric sensor suitable for the determination of creatinine levels in biological fluids, such as urine or plasma, in an accurate, fast, simple, and cost-effective way has thus been developed. PMID:26749029

  1. Fructose and uric acid in diabetic nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Bjornstad, Petter; Lanaspa, Miguel A.; Ishimoto, Takuji; Kosugi, Tomoki; Kume, Shinji; Jalal, Diana; Maahs, David M.; Snell-Bergeon, Janet K.; Johnson, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    Clinical studies have reported associations between serum uric acid levels and the development of diabetic nephropathy, but the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. There is evidence from animal studies that blocking uric acid production protects the kidney from tubulointerstitial injury, which may suggest a causal role for uric acid in the development of diabetic tubular injury. In turn, when fructose, which is endogenously produced in diabetes via the polyol pathway, is metabolised, uric acid is generated from a side-chain reaction driven by ATP depletion and purine nucleotide turnover. For this reason, uric acid derived from endogenous fructose could cause tubulointerstitial injury in diabetes. Accordingly, our research group recently demonstrated that blocking fructose metabolism in a diabetic mouse model mitigated the development of tubulointerstitial injury by lowering tubular uric acid production. In this review we discuss the relationship between uric acid and fructose as a novel mechanism for the development of diabetic tubular injury. PMID:26049401

  2. The cystatin C/creatinine ratio, a marker of glomerular filtration quality: associated factors, reference intervals, and prediction of morbidity and mortality in healthy seniors.

    PubMed

    Purde, Mette-Triin; Nock, Stefan; Risch, Lorenz; Medina Escobar, Pedro; Grebhardt, Chris; Nydegger, Urs E; Stanga, Zeno; Risch, Martin

    2016-03-01

    The ratio of cystatin C (cysC) to creatinine (crea) is regarded as a marker of glomerular filtration quality associated with cardiovascular morbidities. We sought to determine reference intervals for serum cysC-crea ratio in seniors. Furthermore, we sought to determine whether other low-molecular weight molecules exhibit a similar behavior in individuals with altered glomerular filtration quality. Finally, we investigated associations with adverse outcomes. A total of 1382 subjectively healthy Swiss volunteers aged 60 years or older were enrolled in the study. Reference intervals were calculated according to Clinical & Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) guideline EP28-A3c. After a baseline exam, a 4-year follow-up survey recorded information about overall morbidity and mortality. The cysC-crea ratio (mean 0.0124 ± 0.0026 mg/μmol) was significantly higher in women and increased progressively with age. Other associated factors were hemoglobin A1c, mean arterial pressure, and C-reactive protein (P < 0.05 for all). Participants exhibiting shrunken pore syndrome had significantly higher ratios of 3.5-66.5 kDa molecules (brain natriuretic peptide, parathyroid hormone, β2-microglobulin, cystatin C, retinol-binding protein, thyroid-stimulating hormone, α1-acid glycoprotein, lipase, amylase, prealbumin, and albumin) and creatinine. There was no such difference in the ratios of very low-molecular weight molecules (urea, uric acid) to creatinine or in the ratios of molecules larger than 66.5 kDa (transferrin, haptoglobin) to creatinine. The cysC-crea ratio was significantly predictive of mortality and subjective overall morbidity at follow-up in logistic regression models adjusting for several factors. The cysC-crea ratio exhibits age- and sex-specific reference intervals in seniors. In conclusion, the cysC-crea ratio may indicate the relative retention of biologically active low-molecular weight compounds and can independently predict the risk for overall mortality and morbidity in the elderly. PMID:26637934

  3. Total saponins from dioscorea septemloba thunb reduce serum uric acid levels in rats with hyperuricemia through OATP1A1 up-regulation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yan; Chen, Xiao-Lin; Xiang, Ting; Sun, Bao-Guo; Luo, Hao-Xuan; Liu, Meng-Ting; Chen, Ze-Xiong; Zhang, Shi-Jun; Wang, Chang-Jun

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of total saponins of Dioscorea (TSD), an extract of the Chinese herbal Bi Xie, on hyperuricemia and to elucidate the underlying mechanisms. The rat hyperuricemia model was established by administration of adenine. Thirty-two rats were randomly allocated into 4 groups: model group, low/high-dose TSD-treated groups, and allopurinol-treated group. Meanwhile, 8 rats were used as normal controls. Serum uric acid (UA), blood urea nitrogen (BUN), serum creatinine (Scr), and organic anion transporting polypeptide 1A1 (OATP1A1) levels were measured. Comparison between the model group and treatment (allopurinol and TSD) groups showed the serum UA levels were significantly decreased in treatment groups. TSD had similar effects to allopurinol. It was found that the OATP1A1 protein expression levels in treatment groups were higher than in model group and normal controls. And different from the allopurinol-treated groups, TSD-treated group had elevated OATP1A1 expression levels in the stomach, liver, small intestine and large intestine tissues. It was suggested that TSD may facilitate the excretion of UA and lower UA levels by up-regulating OATP1A1 expression. PMID:27072969

  4. Does the adequacy parameter Kt/V(urea) reflect uremic toxin concentrations in hemodialysis patients?

    PubMed

    Eloot, Sunny; Van Biesen, Wim; Glorieux, Griet; Neirynck, Nathalie; Dhondt, Annemieke; Vanholder, Raymond

    2013-01-01

    Hemodialysis aims at removing uremic toxins thus decreasing their concentrations. The present study investigated whether Kt/V(urea), used as marker of dialysis adequacy, is correlated with these concentrations. Predialysis blood samples were taken before a midweek session in 71 chronic HD patients. Samples were analyzed by colorimetry, HPLC, or ELISA for a broad range of uremic solutes. Solute concentrations were divided into four groups according to quartiles of Kt/V(urea), and also of different other parameters with potential impact, such as age, body weight (BW), Protein equivalent of Nitrogen Appearance (PNA), Residual Renal Function (RRF), and dialysis vintage. Dichotomic concentration comparisons were performed for gender and Diabetes Mellitus (DM). Analysis of Variance in quartiles of Kt/V(urea) did not show significant differences for any of the solute concentrations. For PNA, however, concentrations showed significant differences for urea (P<0.001), uric acid (UA), p-cresylsulfate (PCS), and free PCS (all P<0.01), and for creatinine (Crea) and hippuric acid (HA) (both P<0.05). For RRF, concentrations varied for β₂-microglobulin (P<0.001), HA, free HA, free indoxyl sulfate, and free indole acetic acid (all P<0.01), and for p-cresylglucuronide (PCG), 3-carboxy-4-methyl-5-propyl-2-furanpropionic acid (CMPF), free PCS, and free PCG (all P<0.05). Gender and body weight only showed differences for Crea and UA, while age, vintage, and diabetes mellitus only showed differences for one solute concentration (UA, UA, and free PCS, respectively). Multifactor analyses indicated a predominant association of concentration with protein intake and residual renal function. In conclusion, predialysis concentrations of uremic toxins seem to be dependent on protein equivalent of nitrogen appearance and residual renal function, and not on dialysis adequacy as assessed by Kt/V(urea). Efforts to control intestinal load of uremic toxin precursors by dietary or other interventions, and preserving RRF seem important approaches to decrease uremic solute concentration and by extension their toxicity. PMID:24236005

  5. A creatinine biosensor based on admittance measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ching, Congo Tak-Shing; Sun, Tai-Ping; Jheng, Deng-Yun; Tsai, Hou-Wei; Shieh, Hsiu-Li

    2015-08-01

    Regular check of blood creatinine level is very important as it is a measurement of renal function. Therefore, the objective of this study is to develop a simple and reliable creatinine biosensor based on admittance measurement for precise determination of creatinine. The creatinine biosensor was fabricated with creatinine deiminase immobilized on screen-printed carbon electrodes. Admittance measurement at a specific frequency ranges (22.80 - 84.71 Hz) showed that the biosensor has an excellent linear (r2 > 0.95) response range (50 - 250 uM), which covers the normal physiological and pathological ranges of blood creatinine levels. Intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) showed that the biosensor has excellent reliability and validity (ICC = 0.98). In conclusion, a simple and reliable creatinine biosensor was developed and it is capable of precisely determining blood creatinine levels in both the normal physiological and pathological ranges.

  6. Online measurement of urea concentration in spent dialysate during hemodialysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olesberg, Jonathon T.; Armitage, Ben; Arnold, Mark A.; Flanigan, Michael

    2002-05-01

    We describe on-line optical measurements of urea concentration during the regular hemodialysis treatment of several patients. The spectral measurements were performed in the effluent dialysate stream after the dialysis membrane using an FTIR spectrometer equipped with a flow-through cell. Spectra were recorded across the 5000-4000 cm-1 (2.0-2.5 micrometers at 1-minute intervals. Optically determined concentrations matched concentrations obtained from standard chemical assays with a root-mean-square error of 0.29 mM for urea (0.8 mg/dl urea nitrogen), 0.03 mM for creatinine, 0.11 mM for lactate, and 0.22 mM for glucose. The observed concentration ranges were 0-11 mM for urea, 0-0.35 mM for creatinine, 0-0.75 mM for lactate, and 9-12.5 mM for glucose.

  7. Type 2 Diabetes and Uric Acid Nephrolithiasis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maalouf, Naim M.

    2008-09-01

    Type 2 diabetes is associated with an increased propensity for uric acid nephrolithiasis. In individuals with diabetes, this increased risk is due to a lower urine pH that results from obesity, dietary factors, and impaired renal ammoniagenesis. The epidemiology and pathogenesis of uric acid stone disease in patients with diabetes are hereby reviewed, and potential molecular mechanisms are proposed.

  8. Uric acid and fructose: potential biological mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Lanaspa, Miguel A; Tapia, Edilia; Soto, Virgilia; Sautin, Yuri; Sánchez-Lozada, Laura Gabriela

    2011-09-01

    Excessive fructose consumption is associated with the development of metabolic syndrome and type II diabetes. Both conditions are well-known risk factors for cardiovascular and renal diseases. Uric acid synthesis is linked biochemically to fructose metabolism, thus the widespread consumption of this monosaccharide has been related to steady increasing levels of serum uric acid during the past few decades. Recent evidence has suggested that uric acid may act as a cardiorenal toxin. In this regard, experimental studies have suggested that the primary noxious effect of uric acid occurs inside the cell and is likely the stimulation of oxidative stress. More studies to disclose the harmful mechanisms associated with increasing intracellular uric acid levels after a fructose load are warranted. PMID:22000649

  9. Quantification of urinary uric acid in the presence of thymol and thimerosal by high-performance liquid chromatography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Y.; Pietrzyk, R. A.; Whitson, P. A.

    1997-01-01

    A high-performance liquid chromatographic method was developed as an alternative to automated enzymatic analysis of uric acid in human urine preserved with thymol and/or thimerosal. Uric acid (tR = 10 min) and creatinine (tR = 5 min) were separated and quantified during isocratic elution (0.025 M acetate buffer, pH 4.5) from a mu Bondapak C18 column. The uric-acid peak was identified chemically by incubating urine samples with uricase. The thymol/thimerosal peak appeared at 31 min during the washing step and did not interfere with the analysis. We validated the high-performance liquid chromatographic method for linearity, precision and accuracy, and the results were found to be excellent.

  10. UREA INFRASTRUCTURE FOR UREA SCR NOX REDUCTION

    SciTech Connect

    Bunting, Bruce G.

    2000-08-20

    Urea SCR is currently the only proven NOX aftertreatment for diesel engines - high NOX reduction possible - some SCR catalyst systems are robust against fuel sulfur - durability has been demonstrated - many systems in the field - long history in other markets - Major limitations to acceptance - distribution of urea solution to end user - ensuring that urea solution is added to vehicle.

  11. 21 CFR 862.1775 - Uric acid test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Uric acid test system. 862.1775 Section 862.1775....1775 Uric acid test system. (a) Identification. A uric acid test system is a device intended to measure uric acid in serum, plasma, and urine. Measurements obtained by this device are used in the...

  12. 21 CFR 862.1775 - Uric acid test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Uric acid test system. 862.1775 Section 862.1775....1775 Uric acid test system. (a) Identification. A uric acid test system is a device intended to measure uric acid in serum, plasma, and urine. Measurements obtained by this device are used in the...

  13. Theobromine Inhibits Uric Acid Crystallization. A Potential Application in the Treatment of Uric Acid Nephrolithiasis

    PubMed Central

    Grases, Felix; Rodriguez, Adrian; Costa-Bauza, Antonia

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To assess the capacity of methylxanthines (caffeine, theophylline, theobromine and paraxanthine) to inhibit uric acid crystallization, and to evaluate their potential application in the treatment of uric acid nephrolithiasis. Materials and Methods The ability of methylxathines to inhibit uric acid nucleation was assayed turbidimetrically. Crystal morphology and its modification due to the effect of theobromine were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The ability of theobromine to inhibit uric acid crystal growth on calculi fragments resulting from extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) was evaluated using a flow system. Results The turbidimetric assay showed that among the studied methylxanthines, theobromine could markedly inhibit uric acid nucleation. SEM images showed that the presence of theobromine resulted in thinner uric acid crystals. Furthermore, in a flow system theobromine blocked the regrowth of post-ESWL uric acid calculi fragments. Conclusions Theobromine, a natural dimethylxanthine present in high amounts in cocoa, acts as an inhibitor of nucleation and crystal growth of uric acid. Therefore, theobromine may be clinically useful in the treatment of uric acid nephrolithiasis. PMID:25333633

  14. Uric acid lowering therapy in cardiovascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Volterrani, Maurizio; Iellamo, Ferdinando; Sposato, Barbara; Romeo, Franco

    2016-06-15

    Recent evidence would indicate that high serum uric acid (SUA) levels can be a significant and independent risk factor for hypertension and cardiovascular diseases, such as ischemic heart disease and heart failure. In the last few years an independent risk relationship between hyperuricemia, cardiovascular disease and mortality has also been reported. Hyperuricemia has been shown as an independent risk factor for acute myocardial infarction and an independent and conjoint association of either gout and SUA with total and cardiovascular mortality has been reported, with mortality impact in gout patients increasing with rising SUA concentrations, even for SUA levels in the normal to high range. These findings prompted a growing research interest on the possible benefits of uric acid lowering drugs in cardiovascular diseases. Indeed, clinical studies have reported on the beneficial effects of uric acid lowering drugs, in particular of xanthine oxidase inhibitors, in hypertension, ischemic heart disease and heart failure. Two main mechanisms have been claimed to explain the dangerous effects of hyperuricemia and, as a consequence, the benefits of uric acid lowering therapy: endothelial dysfunction and systemic inflammation. This brief review aims to summarize current evidence from human studies on the role of acid uric lowering therapy in cardiovascular diseases for practical and clinical purposes. The possible mechanisms underlying the benefits of acid uric lowering therapy are also addressed. PMID:26386814

  15. Uric Acid, Hyperuricemia and Vascular Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Ming; Yang, Fan; Yang, Irene; Yin, Ying; Luo, Jin Jun; Wang, Hong; Yang, Xiao-Feng

    2011-01-01

    Uric acid is the product of purine metabolism. It is known that hyperuricemia, defined as high levels of blood uric acid, is the major etiological factor of gout. A number of epidemiological reports have increasingly linked hyperuricemia with cardiovascular and neurological diseases. Studies highlighting the pathogenic mechanisms of uric acid point to an inflammatory response as the primary mechanism for inducing gout and possibly contributing to uric acid's vascular effects. Monosodium urate (MSU) crystals induce an inflammatory reaction, which are recognized by Toll-like receptors (TLRs). These TLRs then activate NALP3 inflammasome. MSU also triggers neutrophil activation and further produces immune mediators, which lead to a proinflammatory response. In addition, soluble uric acid can also mediate the generation of free radicals and function as a pro-oxidant. This review summarizes the epidemiological studies of hyperuricemia and cardiovascular disease, takes a brief look at hyperuricemia and its role in neurological diseases, and highlights the studies of the advanced pathological mechanisms of uric acid and inflammation. PMID:22201767

  16. Decrease in Urinary Creatinine Excretion in Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tynkevich, Elena; Flamant, Martin; Haymann, Jean-Philippe; Metzger, Marie; Thervet, Eric; Boffa, Jean-Jacques; Vrtovsnik, François; Houillier, Pascal; Froissart, Marc; Stengel, Bénédicte

    2014-01-01

    Background Little is known about muscle mass loss in early stage chronic kidney disease (CKD). We used 24-hour urinary creatinine excretion rate to assess determinants of muscle mass and its evolution with kidney function decline. We also described the range of urinary creatinine concentration in this population. Methods We included 1072 men and 537 women with non-dialysis CKD stages 1 to 5, all of them with repeated measurements of glomerular filtration rate (mGFR) by 51Cr-EDTA renal clearance and several nutritional markers. In those with stage 1 to 4 at baseline, we used a mixed model to study factors associated with urinary creatinine excretion rate and its change over time. Results Baseline mean urinary creatinine excretion decreased from 15.3±3.1 to 12.1±3.3 mmol/24 h (0.20±0.03 to 0.15±0.04 mmol/kg/24 h) in men, with mGFR falling from ≥60 to <15 mL/min/1.73 m2, and from 9.6±1.9 to 7.6±2.5 (0.16±0.03 to 0.12±0.03) in women. In addition to mGFR, an older age, diabetes, and lower levels of body mass index, proteinuria, and protein intake assessed by urinary urea were associated with lower mean urinary creatinine excretion at baseline. Mean annual decline in mGFR was 1.53±0.12 mL/min/1.73 m2 per year and that of urinary creatinine excretion rate, 0.28±0.02 mmol/24 h per year. Patients with fast annual decline in mGFR of 5 mL/min/1.73 m2 had a decrease in urinary creatinine excretion more than twice as big as in those with stable mGFR, independent of changes in urinary urea as well as of other determinants of low muscle mass. Conclusions Decrease in 24-hour urinary creatinine excretion rate may appear early in CKD patients, and is greater the more mGFR declines independent of lowering protein intake assessed by 24-hour urinary urea. Normalizing urine analytes for creatininuria may overestimate their concentration in patients with reduced kidney function and low muscle mass. PMID:25401694

  17. Pretransplant uric acid levels may be predictive for prognosis of renal transplant donors.

    PubMed

    Kulah, Eyup

    2016-05-01

    Background The living kidney donor counseling prior to the operation may be helpful to learn how to properly care for the remaining single kidney for the rest of their lives. Worsening kidney function is associated with elevated serum uric acid (UA) levels. In this study, we compared the baseline laboratory findings of renal transplant donors with their follow-up laboratory values. Methods The study consisted of 173 adult donors including 91 females and 82 males with a mean age of 46.82 ± 11.31 years. The follow-up clinical and laboratory examinations were performed on the third day at the end of the first and the sixth months of the surgery. According to donor's creatinine levels we constituted two groups: high creatinine and normal creatinine. Results Patients within the high creatinine group had significantly higher mean serum UA levels when compared with the normal creatinine group. In multivariate analysis, among the other effective variables, UA level alone was found to be the most effective parameter predicting the post-transplant creatinine levels (p = 0.004, odds ratio: 12.4, 95% CI: 2.3-68.3) at sixth month post-transplantation. In the ROC analysis for the effects of UA, the following cutoff values were found: >6 mg/dL in men (sensitivity 81.3%, specificity 76.9%, positive predictive value 89.7%, negative predictive value 62.5%, accuracy 80%) and ≥5 mg/dL in women (sensitivity 72.2, specificity 74.4%, positive predictive value 89.7%, negative predictive value 62.5%, accuracy: 73.7%). Conclusion Pretransplant serum UA levels can give important clues regarding the renal functions of the donors during the postoperative period. PMID:26888379

  18. 21 CFR 862.1225 - Creatinine test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Creatinine test system. 862.1225 Section 862.1225....1225 Creatinine test system. (a) Identification. A creatinine test system is a device intended to measure creatinine levels in plasma and urine. Creatinine measurements are used in the diagnosis...

  19. 21 CFR 862.1225 - Creatinine test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Creatinine test system. 862.1225 Section 862.1225....1225 Creatinine test system. (a) Identification. A creatinine test system is a device intended to measure creatinine levels in plasma and urine. Creatinine measurements are used in the diagnosis...

  20. Regulation of uric acid metabolism and excretion.

    PubMed

    Maiuolo, Jessica; Oppedisano, Francesca; Gratteri, Santo; Muscoli, Carolina; Mollace, Vincenzo

    2016-06-15

    Purines perform many important functions in the cell, being the formation of the monomeric precursors of nucleic acids DNA and RNA the most relevant one. Purines which also contribute to modulate energy metabolism and signal transduction, are structural components of some coenzymes and have been shown to play important roles in the physiology of platelets, muscles and neurotransmission. All cells require a balanced quantity of purines for growth, proliferation and survival. Under physiological conditions the enzymes involved in the purine metabolism maintain in the cell a balanced ratio between their synthesis and degradation. In humans the final compound of purines catabolism is uric acid. All other mammals possess the enzyme uricase that converts uric acid to allantoin that is easily eliminated through urine. Overproduction of uric acid, generated from the metabolism of purines, has been proven to play emerging roles in human disease. In fact the increase of serum uric acid is inversely associated with disease severity and especially with cardiovascular disease states. This review describes the enzymatic pathways involved in the degradation of purines, getting into their structure and biochemistry until the uric acid formation. PMID:26316329

  1. Uric Acid Nephrolithiasis: A Systemic Metabolic Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Moe, Orson W.

    2014-01-01

    Uric acid nephrolithiasis is characteristically a manifestation of a systemic metabolic disorder. It has a prevalence of about 10% among all stone formers, the third most common type of kidney stone in the industrialized world. Uric acid stones form primarily due to an unduly acid urine; less deciding factors are hyperuricosuria and a low urine volume. The vast majority of uric acid stone formers have the metabolic syndrome, and not infrequently, clinical gout is present as well. A universal finding is a low baseline urine pH plus insufficient production of urinary ammonium buffer. Persons with gastrointestinal disorders, in particular chronic diarrhea or ostomies, and patients with malignancies with a large tumor mass and high cell turnover comprise a less common but nevertheless important subset. Pure uric acid stones are radiolucent but well visualized on renal ultrasound. A 24 h urine collection for stone risk analysis provides essential insight into the pathophysiology of stone formation and may guide therapy. Management includes a liberal fluid intake and dietary modification. Potassium citrate to alkalinize the urine to a goal pH between 6 and 6.5 is essential, as undissociated uric acid deprotonates into its much more soluble urate form. PMID:25045326

  2. Plasma Creatinine Clearance in the Dog

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frazier, Loy W.

    1977-01-01

    Lists materials and methods for an experiment that demonstrates the concept of glomerular filtration rate (GFR) using anesthesized dogs. In the dog, GFR is equivalent to the renal plasma clearance of exogenous creatinine. (CS)

  3. Reduction of urinary uric acid excretion in patients with proteinuria.

    PubMed

    Zou, Huiqing; Xiang, Mingfeng; Ye, Xinming; Xiong, Yuanzhen; Xie, Baogang; Shao, Jianghua

    2015-12-01

    Serum uric acid (UA) concentration is positively associated with proteinuria. However, the relationship between proteinuria and urinary metabolites of purine metabolism remains unknown. This study developed a hydrophilic interaction chromatography (HILIC)-based HPLC method with ultraviolet detection (UV) to quantify creatinine (Cr), UA, xanthine, and hypoxanthine in human urine simultaneously. The urinary concentrations of UA and Cr obtained by our method are consistent with those measured by an autoanalyzer. The HPLC-HILIC-UV method was validated as selective and robust with simple sample preparation for measuring UA, xanthine, hypoxanthine and Cr, which is suitable for large clinical studies. The UA/Cr ratios in random urine samples were 5.5 times lower in proteinuria patients (0.077±0.008) than in healthy individuals (0.424±0.037). Moreover, the UA/hypoxanthine ratio in proteinuria patients was approximately 10 times lower than that in healthy individuals. Our findings revealed a reduced urinary UA excretion, which is one of the factors leading to increased serum UA in proteinuria patients. PMID:26523664

  4. Relation of serum uric acid to cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Wu, Audrey H; Gladden, James D; Ahmed, Mustafa; Ahmed, Ali; Filippatos, Gerasimos

    2016-06-15

    This review summarizes recent published literature on the association between serum uric acid and cardiovascular disease, a relationship which is complex and not fully elucidated. Uric acid may be a marker for risk, a causative agent in cardiovascular disease, or both. Various biologic factors can influence serum uric acid levels, and serum uric acid level itself is closely related to conditions such as hypertension, dyslipidemia, obesity, and impaired glucose metabolism, that contribute to cardiovascular disease pathophysiology. Serum uric acid levels have been found to be associated with adverse outcomes, including mortality, in the general population. In addition, serum uric acid is associated with increased risk for incident coronary heart disease, heart failure, and atrial fibrillation. In the setting of established systolic heart failure, serum uric acid is positively associated with disease severity and mortality risk. Whether targeting treatment based on uric acid levels might affect clinical outcomes is still being studied. PMID:26341316

  5. Uric acid protects erythrocytes from ozone-induced changes

    SciTech Connect

    Meadows, J.; Smith, R.C.

    1987-08-01

    Uric acid effectively reduced hemolysis and methemoglobin formation in bovine and swine erythrocytes bubbled with ozone in vitro. In bovine erythrocytes, formation of thiobarbituric acid-reactive material was inhibited by uric acid, but there was little immediate protection for the swine cells. Antioxidant protection was due to preferential degradation of the uric acid by ozone. These results provide evidence to support the hypothesis that in plasma, uric acid can provide antioxidant protection for erythrocytes.

  6. Reagent- and separation-free measurements of urine creatinine concentration using stamping surface enhanced Raman scattering (S-SERS)

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ming; Du, Yong; Zhao, Fusheng; Zeng, Jianbo; Mohan, Chandra; Shih, Wei-Chuan

    2015-01-01

    We report a novel reagent- and separation-free method for urine creatinine concentration measurement using stamping surface enhanced Raman scattering (S-SERS) technique with nanoporous gold disk (NPGD) plasmonic substrates, a label-free, multiplexed molecular sensing and imaging technique recently developed by us. The performance of this new technology is evaluated by the detection and quantification of creatinine spiked in three different liquids: creatinine in water, mixture of creatinine and urea in water, and creatinine in artificial urine within physiologically relevant concentration ranges. Moreover, the potential application of our method is demonstrated by creatinine concentration measurements in urine samples collected from a mouse model of nephritis. The limit of detection of creatinine was 13.2 nM (0.15 µg/dl) and 0.68 mg/dl in water and urine, respectively. Our method would provide an alternative tool for rapid, cost-effective, and reliable urine analysis for non-invasive diagnosis and monitoring of renal function. PMID:25798309

  7. Reagent- and separation-free measurements of urine creatinine concentration using stamping surface enhanced Raman scattering (S-SERS).

    PubMed

    Li, Ming; Du, Yong; Zhao, Fusheng; Zeng, Jianbo; Mohan, Chandra; Shih, Wei-Chuan

    2015-03-01

    We report a novel reagent- and separation-free method for urine creatinine concentration measurement using stamping surface enhanced Raman scattering (S-SERS) technique with nanoporous gold disk (NPGD) plasmonic substrates, a label-free, multiplexed molecular sensing and imaging technique recently developed by us. The performance of this new technology is evaluated by the detection and quantification of creatinine spiked in three different liquids: creatinine in water, mixture of creatinine and urea in water, and creatinine in artificial urine within physiologically relevant concentration ranges. Moreover, the potential application of our method is demonstrated by creatinine concentration measurements in urine samples collected from a mouse model of nephritis. The limit of detection of creatinine was 13.2 nM (0.15 µg/dl) and 0.68 mg/dl in water and urine, respectively. Our method would provide an alternative tool for rapid, cost-effective, and reliable urine analysis for non-invasive diagnosis and monitoring of renal function. PMID:25798309

  8. Association of uric acid, atherogenic index of plasma and albuminuria in diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Akbas, Emin Murat; Timuroglu, Aysu; Ozcicek, Adalet; Ozcicek, Fatih; Demirtas, Levent; Gungor, Adem; Akbas, Nergis

    2014-01-01

    Background: The associations of serum uric acid (UA), atherogenic index of plasma (AIP) and albuminuria with cardiovascular disease have been shown. Several studies focused on association of serum UA and dyslipidemia, serum UA and renal impairment, dyslipidemia and renal impairment. However, to date, in literature, there have been no studies demonstrating the relationship between these parameters in diabetic patients together. Aims: We aimed to investigate the association between serum UA, albuminuria and AIP in diabetic patients. Methods: This was a retrospective study involving data of 645 diabetic patients. The patients were separated into groups according to their serum uric acid and AIP levels. The quantitative urine albumin/creatinine ratio in morning spot urine samples were used for standard albuminuria determination. Serum uric acid levels under 6 mg/dL were considered as normal. AIP was calculated as the logarithmically transformed ratio of triglyceride to high density lipoprotein cholesterol. Results: AIP and albuminuria levels were high in high serum UA group compared to normal UA group. Uric acid and albuminuria tended to increase with increasing AIP. Correlation analysis showed that albuminuria, AIP and UA were significantly correlated with each other. Additionally, in binary logistic regression analysis, AIP was found to be independently associated with high UA levels. Conclusions: Present study reveals that serum UA, AIP and albuminuria are closely related. Physicians should be aware that patients with concomitant hyperuricemia, albuminuria and high AIP are at increased risk of developing cardiovascular disease. Our study confirms that there is a need for larger prospective studies to determine the mechanisms underlying the association of serum UA, AIP and albuminuria. PMID:25664100

  9. Dogmas and controversies in the handling of nitrogenous wastes: the effect of feeding and fasting on the excretion of ammonia, urea and other nitrogenous waste products in rainbow trout.

    PubMed

    Kajimura, Makiko; Croke, Sara J; Glover, Chris N; Wood, Chris M

    2004-05-01

    Ammonia and urea are the primary forms of nitrogen excretion in teleost fish. There exists, however, a discrepancy between the sum of ammonia plus urea nitrogen and total nitrogen, indicating that 'unknown' nitrogen end products may play an important role in nitrogen metabolism. The current study analysed a wide range of nitrogen end products in both fed and fasted juvenile rainbow trout. Ammonia-N (53-68%) and urea-N (6-10%) were confirmed as the most important forms of nitrogenous waste, but an interesting finding was the considerable excretion of nitrogen as amino acids (4-10%), via the gills, and as protein (3-11%), probably via the body mucus. Use of anal sutures delineated an important role for the gastrointestinal tract in the production of ammonia-N and urea-N in fed fish, but amino acid-N and protein-N output by this route were both negligible. Alternative nitrogen products - trimethylamine, trimethylamine oxide, uric acid, and nitrite + nitrate - were not excreted in detectable quantities. Creatine-N and creatinine-N outputs were detected but contributed only a small fraction to total nitrogen excretion (<1.4%). Despite the wide scope of nitrogenous end products investigated, a considerable proportion (12-20%) of nitrogen excretion remains unknown. Possible alternative end products and methodological considerations are proposed to explain this phenomenon. The findings described above were used to recalculate the nitrogen quotient (NQ=(N)/(O(2))) on trout that had been either fasted or fed various daily rations (1%, 3% or 5% dry food per unit wet body mass per day). Feeding increased oxygen consumption ((O(2))) and total-N excretion ((N)). The NQ is often used as a measure of protein utilisation in aerobic metabolism and assumes that all protein (and amino acid) fuels are converted by oxidation to nitrogenous waste products that are excreted. However, the results showed that calculation of the NQ based on total nitrogen excretion may overestimate protein utilisation in aerobic metabolism because of significant excretion of N in the form of proteins and amino acids, whereas the use of summed ammonia-N and urea-N excretion probably underestimates the contribution of protein towards aerobic metabolism. These errors increase as ration increases, because the discrepancy between total-N excretion and ammonia-N + urea-N excretion increases. PMID:15143133

  10. Picric acid capped silver nanoparticles as a probe for colorimetric sensing of creatinine in human blood and cerebrospinal fluid samples.

    PubMed

    Parmar, Ankita K; Valand, Nikunj N; Solanki, Kalpesh B; Menon, Shobhana K

    2016-02-01

    Creatinine is the most important parameter to be determined in the diagnosis of renal, muscular and thyroid function. The most common method for the determination of creatinine is Jaffe's reaction, a routine practice for blood and urine analysis. However, in cases of icteric and haemolyzed blood samples, interference occurs during the estimation of creatinine by other constituents present in the blood like bilirubin, creatine, and urea, which lead to wrong diagnosis. To overcome such difficulty, we have developed a silver nanoparticle (Ag NPs) based sensor for the selective determination of creatinine. In this study, a new approach has been given to the traditional Jaffe's reaction, by coating Ag NPs with picric acid (PA) to form an assembly that can selectively detect creatinine. The Ag NPs based sensor proficiently and selectively recognizes creatinine due to the ability of picric acid to bind with it and form a complex. The nanoassembly and the interactions were investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), dynamic light scattering (DLS) analysis, UV-Vis spectroscopy, FT-IR spectroscopy and ESI-MS, which demonstrated the binding affinity of creatinine with PA-capped Ag NPs. A linear correlation was obtained in the range of 0.01 μM-1 μM with an R(2) value of 0.9998 and a lower detection limit of 8.4 nM. The sensor was successfully applied to different types of blood and CSF samples for the determination of creatinine, and the results were compared to that of the Jaffe's method. With the advantages of high sensitivity, selectivity and low sample volume, this method is potentially suitable for the on-site monitoring of creatinine. PMID:26793795

  11. THE REGULATION OF UREA-BIOSYNTHESIS ENZYMES IN VERTEBRATES.

    PubMed

    MORA, J; MARTUSCELLI, J; ORTIZ PINEDA, J; SOBERON, G

    1965-07-01

    1. Carbamoyl phosphate synthetase, ornithine transcarbamoylase, the arginine-synthetase system and arginase were measured in the livers of ammoniotelic, ureotelic and uricotelic animals. The chelonian reptiles, whose nitrogen excretory patterns vary according to the habitat, and the Mexican axolotl, a neotenic species, were also studied. 2. The levels of the activities of the first three enzymes mentioned correlate with the amount of nitrogen excreted as urea. 3. The terrestrial turtle, which excretes mainly uric acid, maintains a high arginase activity but has very low levels of the activities of the other three enzymes. 4. The first three enzymes of the urea cycle vary in the phylogenic scale in a co-ordinated manner, which suggests that they are under the same regulatory mechanism. 5. Urea formation from endogenous arginine in vitro has a low efficiency in the Mexican axolotl. 6. The induction of metamorphosis in the Mexican axolotl by the administration of l-tri-iodothyronine, which causes a shift from ammonio-ureotelism to complete ureotelism, is accompanied by an increase mainly in carbamoyl phosphate synthetase and also by an improvement in the efficiency of hydrolysis of endogenous arginine in vitro to give urea. 7. The results obtained by differential centrifugation of the urea-cycle enzymes in rat and Mexican-axolotl livers are presented. The location requirements for the integration of a metabolic cycle are discussed. PMID:14343146

  12. The regulation of urea-biosynthesis enzymes in vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Mora, J.; Martuscelli, J.; Ortiz-Pineda, Juana; Soberón, G.

    1965-01-01

    1. Carbamoyl phosphate synthetase, ornithine transcarbamoylase, the arginine-synthetase system and arginase were measured in the livers of ammoniotelic, ureotelic and uricotelic animals. The chelonian reptiles, whose nitrogen excretory patterns vary according to the habitat, and the Mexican axolotl, a neotenic species, were also studied. 2. The levels of the activities of the first three enzymes mentioned correlate with the amount of nitrogen excreted as urea. 3. The terrestrial turtle, which excretes mainly uric acid, maintains a high arginase activity but has very low levels of the activities of the other three enzymes. 4. The first three enzymes of the urea cycle vary in the phylogenic scale in a co-ordinated manner, which suggests that they are under the same regulatory mechanism. 5. Urea formation from endogenous arginine in vitro has a low efficiency in the Mexican axolotl. 6. The induction of metamorphosis in the Mexican axolotl by the administration of l-tri-iodothyronine, which causes a shift from ammonio-ureotelism to complete ureotelism, is accompanied by an increase mainly in carbamoyl phosphate synthetase and also by an improvement in the efficiency of hydrolysis of endogenous arginine in vitro to give urea. 7. The results obtained by differential centrifugation of the urea-cycle enzymes in rat and Mexican-axolotl livers are presented. The location requirements for the integration of a metabolic cycle are discussed. PMID:14343146

  13. The Effects of Lead Exposure on Serum Uric Acid and Hyperuricemia in Chinese Adults: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Haijiang; Huang, Zhijun; Deng, Qihong; Li, Ying; Xiao, Ting; Ning, Xingping; Lu, Yao; Yuan, Hong

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the correlation between blood lead levels and both serum uric acid and hyperuricemia in adult residents living within an area of China with lead pollution.  We conducted a cross-sectional analysis of 2120 subjects (1180 of whom were male) between the ages of 20 and 75 years who had undergone health examinations at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in a lead-polluted area of China between January 2013 and August 2014. Blood lead was positively correlated with serum uric acid in both males (r = 0.095, p = 0.001) and females (r = 0.134, p < 0.001). Multivariate linear regression analysis demonstrated that for males, blood lead (p = 0.006), age (p = 0.001), current smoking (p = 0.012), education (p = 0.001), triglycerides (TG) (p < 0.001), and serum creatinine (p < 0.001) were independently associated with serum uric acid. For females, blood lead (p < 0.001), body mass index (BMI) (p = 0.009), and TG (p < 0.001) were independently associated with serum uric acid. After multiple adjustments, blood lead was significantly associated with a higher prevalence of hyperuricemia when female subjects were categorized into quartiles (for the highest quartile vs. the lowest quartile, odds ratio (OR) = 2.190; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.106–4.338; p = 0.025); however, no such association was observed for male subjects. Continuous lead exposure has an independent impact on serum uric acid for both males and females, although this impact is more pronounced for females than for males. Lead exposure is significantly associated with hyperuricemia for females but not for males. PMID:26295243

  14. Plasma exogenous creatinine clearance in clinically healthy cats: comparison with urinary exogenous creatinine clearance, tentative reference intervals and indexation to bodyweight.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, B S; Massal, M R; Nguyen, P; Grégoire, L L; Périgaud, A E; Concordet, D; Biourge, V; Lefebvre, H P

    2014-10-01

    Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) is considered to be the best indicator of overall kidney function. The major objectives of this study were to compare plasma exogenous creatinine clearance (PECC) with a reference method, to establish reference intervals (RIs) for PECC and to assess the effects of indexation of GFR to bodyweight (BW) in cats. PECC was compared with urinary clearance of exogenous creatinine (UECC) in six clinically healthy domestic shorthair cats (experiment 1). Tentative RIs were determined according to current guidelines and the effects of indexation to BW and of covariables on GFR were assessed in 43 clinically healthy cats of various breeds (experiment 2). PECC was 15% higher than UECC (P <0.01), but the two estimates were strongly correlated (r(2)=0.97, P = 0.001). RIs for PECC were 6.4-21.3 mL/min or 1.2-4.9 mL/min/kg. The absolute (i.e. non-indexed) GFR value was not dependent on BW. Thus, indexation of GFR to BW in cats would not standardize the GFR value, but could introduce bias in clinical interpretation. Significant effects of breed, plasma protein concentration and plasma albumin concentration on GFR were demonstrated. Plasma concentrations of urea and creatinine, when assessed separately, were also weakly correlated with GFR in healthy cats. These combined findings contribute to a better understanding of renal function assessment in cats. PMID:25193408

  15. Increased production and excretion of urea in the kuruma shrimp (Marsupenaeus japonicus) exposed to combined environments of increased ammonia and nitrite.

    PubMed

    Cheng, S-Y; Lee, W C; Shieh, L W; Chen, J-C

    2004-10-01

    Marsupenaeus japonicus (6.37 +/- 1.29 g) individually exposed to 9 different combined solutions of ambient ammonia (C) and nitrite (C') ammonia at 0.003 [control], 0.39, and 1.49 mmol/L combined with nitrite at 0.001 [control], 0.38, and 1.49 mmol/L in 30 ppt were examined for nitrogenous excretion accumulations of ammonia, nitrite, urea, and uric acid in tissues after 48 hours. M. japonicus exposed to 0.39 mmol/L ammonia-0.38 mmol/L nitrite displayed higher levels of urea-nitrogen (UNE) and organic-N (ONE) excretion by a factor of 2.2 and 5.7, respectively, compared with shrimp exposed only to 0.39 mmol/L ammonia. Exposure to 0.39 mmol/L ammonia-0.38 mmol/L nitrite resulted in lower levels of hemolymph uric acid (HUA), gill ammonia (GAM), gill urea (GUE), gill uric acid (GUA), hepatopancreas ammonia (HPAM), hepatopancreas urea (HPUE), and hepatopancreas uric acid (APUA), respectively, compared with shrimp exposed only to 0.39 mmol/L ammonia. We concluded that M. japonicus exposed to combined environments of ammonia and nitrite display increased nitrogen metabolism and production of urea-N and other organic-N. PMID:15386129

  16. Creatinine Diffusion Modeling in Capacitive Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohabbati-Kalejahi, Elham; Azimirad, Vahid; Bahrami, Manouchehr

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, creatinine diffusion in capacitive sensors is discussed. The factors influencing the response time of creatinine biosensors are mathematically formulated and then three novel approaches for decreasing the response time are presented. At first, a piezoelectric actuator is used to vibrate the microtube that contains the blood sample, in order to reduce the viscosity of blood, and thus to increase the coefficient of diffusion. Then, the blood sample is assumed to be pushed through a porous medium, and the relevant conditions are investigated. Finally, the effect of the dentate shape of dielectric on response time is studied. The algorithms and the mathematical models are presented and discussed, and the results of simulations are illustrated. The response times for the first, second and third method are 60, 0.036 and about 31 s, respectively. It is also found that pumping results in very fast responses.

  17. A review on creatinine measurement techniques.

    PubMed

    Mohabbati-Kalejahi, Elham; Azimirad, Vahid; Bahrami, Manouchehr; Ganbari, Ahmad

    2012-08-15

    This paper reviews the entire recent global tendency for creatinine measurement. Creatinine biosensors involve complex relationships between biology and micro-mechatronics to which the blood is subjected. Comparison between new and old methods shows that new techniques (e.g. Molecular Imprinted Polymers based algorithms) are better than old methods (e.g. Elisa) in terms of stability and linear range. All methods and their details for serum, plasma, urine and blood samples are surveyed. They are categorized into five main algorithms: optical, electrochemical, impedometrical, Ion Selective Field-Effect Transistor (ISFET) based technique and chromatography. Response time, detection limit, linear range and selectivity of reported sensors are discussed. Potentiometric measurement technique has the lowest response time of 4-10 s and the lowest detection limit of 0.28 nmol L(-1) belongs to chromatographic technique. Comparison between various techniques of measurements indicates that the best selectivity belongs to MIP based and chromatographic techniques. PMID:22841040

  18. Independent associations of urine neutrophil gelatinase–associated lipocalin and serum uric acid with interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy in primary glomerulonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Lertrit, Amornpan; Worawichawong, Suchin; Vanavanan, Somlak; Chittamma, Anchalee; Muntham, Dittapol; Radinahamed, Piyanuch; Nampoon, Aumporn; Kitiyakara, Chagriya

    2016-01-01

    The degree of interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy (IFTA) is one of the strongest prognostic factors in glomerulonephritis (GN). In experimental models, high serum uric acid (UA) could contribute to IFTA through direct effects on the renal tubules, but the significance of this process has not been evaluated in patients. Urine neutrophil gelatinase–associated lipocalin (NGAL) is produced by renal tubules following acute or chronic damage. We investigated the relationship between UA and NGAL excretion in primary GN and tested whether these biomarkers are independently associated with IFTA. Urine and blood were collected from patients on the day of kidney biopsy. IFTA was assessed semi-quantitatively. Fifty-one patients with primary GN were enrolled. NGAL/creatinine correlated significantly with proteinuria but not with glomerular filtration rate (GFR). By contrast, UA correlated with GFR but not with proteinuria. NGAL/creatinine did not correlate with UA. Both NGAL/creatinine and UA increased with the severity of IFTA. By multivariate analysis, GFR, NGAL/creatinine, and UA were independently associated with moderate-to-severe IFTA. Combining UA and NGAL/creatinine with classical predictors (proteinuria and GFR) tended to improve discrimination for moderate-to-severe IFTA. Findings that UA was unrelated to urinary NGAL excretion suggest that the two biomarkers reflect different pathways related to the development of IFTA in primary GN. Both NGAL/creatinine and UA were independently associated with moderate-to-severe IFTA. PMID:27143950

  19. Urea Utilization by Leptospira

    PubMed Central

    Kadis, Solomon; Pugh, William L.

    1974-01-01

    One representative of each of five different pathogenic serotypes of Leptospira as well as one saprophytic strain were capable of growing on medium containing urea in place of an ammonium salt as a nitrogen source. Growth of all of the organisms tested on 1% urea was substantial, but only those that exhibited strong urease activity could grow to any appreciable extent on urea at a concentration as high as 2%. Intact urea-grown cells of the pathogenic serotypes tested (grippotyphosa and icterohaemorrhagiae) exhibited urease activity, with the level of activity of the former being considerably greater. No urease could be detected in cells of the saprophytic strain. When the pathogenic leptospires were sonicated or treated with toluene, the urease activity was greatly enhanced. When cultivated on NH4Cl, neither intact nor disrupted cells of any of the strains tested exhibited any urease activity. Cells of the grippotyphosa and icterohaemorrhagiae strains exhibited diauxic growth when cultivated in the presence of both NH4Cl and urea, whereas only monophasic growth could be detected for the saprophytic test strain. The experimental data on urea utilization and urease activity, when considered in the light of previously reported findings on leptospiral pathology, renal physiology, and the role of urease in other bacterial infections, suggests a significant role for leptospiral urease (in addition to other factors) in determining localization of the organism in the kidney and contributing to the resultant kidney pathology. PMID:4426709

  20. Quantification of creatinine in biological samples based on the pseudoenzyme activity of copper-creatinine complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagaraja, Padmarajaiah; Avinash, Krishnegowda; Shivakumar, Anantharaman; Krishna, Honnur

    Glomerular filtration rate (GFR), the marker of chronic kidney disease can be analyzed by the concentration of cystatin C or creatinine and its clearance in human urine and serum samples. The determination of cystatin C alone as an indicator of GFR does not provide high accuracy, and is more expensive, thus measurement of creatinine has an important role in estimating GFR. We have made an attempt to quantify creatinine based on its pseudoenzyme activity of creatinine in the presence of copper. Creatinine in the presence of copper oxidizes paraphenylenediamine dihydrochloride (PPDD) which couples with dimethylamino benzoicacid (DMAB) giving green colored chromogenic product with maximum absorbance at 710 nm. Kinetic parameters relating this reaction were evaluated. Analytical curves of creatinine by fixed time and rate methods were linear at 8.8-530 μmol L-1 and 0.221-2.65 mmol L-1, respectively. Recovery of creatinine varied from 97.8 to 107.8%. Limit of detection and limit of quantification were 2.55 and 8.52 μmol L-1 respectively whereas Sandell's sensitivity and molar absorption coefficient values were 0.0407 μg cm-2 and 0.1427 × 104 L mol-1 cm-1 respectively. Precision studies showed that within day imprecision was 0.745-1.26% and day-to-day imprecision was 1.55-3.65%. The proposed method was applied to human urine and serum samples and results were validated in accordance with modified Jaffe's procedure. Wide linearity ranges with good recovery, less tolerance from excipients and application of the method to serum and urine samples are the claims which ascertain much advantage to this method.

  1. Urine Protein and Urine Protein to Creatinine Ratio

    MedlinePlus

    ... limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? Urine Protein and Urine Protein to Creatinine Ratio Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: 24-Hour Urine Protein; Urine Total Protein; Urine Protein to Creatinine Ratio; ...

  2. Serum Uric Acid Levels and Outcomes After Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhongchao; Lin, Yanlin; Liu, Yuxiu; Chen, Ying; Wang, Bin; Li, Changgui; Yan, Shengli; Wang, Yangang; Zhao, Wenjuan

    2016-04-01

    Previous studies assessing the association between serum uric acid levels and neurological outcome after acute ischemic stroke reported conflicting results. A systematic review and meta-analysis were conducted to assess the impact of serum uric acid levels on outcome after acute ischemic stroke. Pubmed, Embase, Web of Science, and Google scholar were searched through September 26, 2014 to identify eligible published or unpublished studies on the association between serum uric acid levels and outcome after acute ischemic stroke. Hazard ratio (HR) for poor outcome or mean differences of serum uric acid levels with 95 % confidence intervals (95 % CIs) were pooled using meta-analysis. The primary outcome was occurrence of poor outcomes, while the secondary outcome was the mean differences of serum uric acid levels in patients with good or poor outcomes. Ten eligible studies with a total of 8131 acute ischemic stroke patients were included into the meta-analysis. Compared with low serum uric acid level, high serum uric acid level was associated better outcome after acute ischemic stroke (HR = 0.77, 95 % CI 0.68-0.88, P = 0.0001). Sensitivity analysis further identified the prognostic role of serum uric acid levels on outcome after acute ischemic stroke. Patients with good outcomes had a higher serum uric acid level compared with those with poor outcome (mean difference = 30.61 μmol/L, 95 % CI 20.13-41.08, P < 0.00001). There was no obvious risk of publication bias in the meta-analysis. This meta-analysis supports that serum uric acid level has a protective effect on neurological outcome after acute ischemic stroke. High uric acid level at the onset is a biomarker of better prognosis in patients with acute ischemic stroke. PMID:25744569

  3. Down-regulation of Hepatic Urea Synthesis by Oxypurines

    PubMed Central

    Nissim, Itzhak; Horyn, Oksana; Nissim, Ilana; Daikhin, Yevgeny; Caldovic, Ljubica; Barcelona, Belen; Cervera, Javier; Tuchman, Mendel; Yudkoff, Marc

    2011-01-01

    We previously reported that isobutylmethylxanthine (IBMX), a derivative of oxypurine, inhibits citrulline synthesis by an as yet unknown mechanism. Here, we demonstrate that IBMX and other oxypurines containing a 2,6-dione group interfere with the binding of glutamate to the active site of N-acetylglutamate synthetase (NAGS), thereby decreasing synthesis of N-acetylglutamate, the obligatory activator of carbamoyl phosphate synthase-1 (CPS1). The result is reduction of citrulline and urea synthesis. Experiments were performed with 15N-labeled substrates, purified hepatic CPS1, and recombinant mouse NAGS as well as isolated mitochondria. We also used isolated hepatocytes to examine the action of various oxypurines on ureagenesis and to assess the ameliorating affect of N-carbamylglutamate and/or l-arginine on NAGS inhibition. Among various oxypurines tested, only IBMX, xanthine, or uric acid significantly increased the apparent Km for glutamate and decreased velocity of NAGS, with little effect on CPS1. The inhibition of NAGS is time- and dose-dependent and leads to decreased formation of the CPS1-N-acetylglutamate complex and consequent inhibition of citrulline and urea synthesis. However, such inhibition was reversed by supplementation with N-carbamylglutamate. The data demonstrate that xanthine and uric acid, both physiologically occurring oxypurines, inhibit the hepatic synthesis of N-acetylglutamate. An important and novel concept emerging from this study is that xanthine and/or uric acid may have a role in the regulation of ureagenesis and, thus, nitrogen homeostasis in normal and disease states. PMID:21540182

  4. Replication of the effect of SLC2A9 genetic variation on serum uric acid levels in American Indians

    PubMed Central

    Voruganti, V Saroja; Franceschini, Nora; Haack, Karin; Laston, Sandra; MacCluer, Jean W; Umans, Jason G; Comuzzie, Anthony G; North, Kari E; Cole, Shelley A

    2014-01-01

    Increased serum uric acid (SUA) or hyperuricemia, a risk factor for gout, renal and cardiovascular diseases, is caused by either increased production or decreased excretion of uric acid or a mix of both. The solute carrier protein 2 family, member 9 (SLC2A9) gene encodes a transporter that mediates urate flux across the renal proximal tubule. Genome-wide association studies have consistently shown the association of single-nucleotide polymorphisms in this gene with SUA in majority populations. American Indian participants of the Strong Heart Family Study, belonging to multigenerational families, have high prevalence of hyperuricemia. We conducted measured genotype analyses, based on variance components decomposition method and accounting for family relationships, to assess whether the association between SUA and SLC2A9 gene polymorphisms generalized to American Indians (n=3604) of this study. Seven polymorphisms were selected for genotyping based on their association with SUA levels in other populations. A strong association was found between SLC2A9 gene polymorphisms and SUA in all centers combined (P-values: 1.3 × 10−31–5.1 × 10−23) and also when stratified by recruitment center; P-values: 1.2 × 10−14–1.0 × 10−5. These polymorphisms were also associated with the estimated glomerular filtration rate and serum creatinine but not albumin–creatinine ratio. In summary, the association of polymorphisms in the uric acid transporter gene with SUA levels extends to a new population of American Indians. PMID:24301058

  5. Uric Acid Levels in Normotensive Children of Hypertensive Parents

    PubMed Central

    Yildirim, Ali; Keles, Fatma; Kosger, Pelin; Ozdemir, Gokmen; Ucar, Birsen; Kilic, Zubeyir

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated uric acid concentrations in normotensive children of parents with hypertension. Eighty normotensive children from families with and without a history of essential hypertension were included. Concentrations of lipid parameters and uric acid were compared. Demographic and anthropometric characteristics were similar in the groups. Systolic and diastolic blood pressure were higher in the normotensive children of parents with hypertension without statistically significant difference (P > 0.05). Uric acid concentrations were higher in the normotensive children of parents with hypertension (4.61 versus 3.57 mg/dL, P < 0.01). Total cholesterol and triglyceride concentrations were similar in the two groups. Systolic and diastolic blood pressure were significantly higher in control children aged >10 years (P < 0.01). Uric acid levels were significantly higher in all children with more pronounced difference after age 10 of years (P < 0.001). Positive correlations were found between the level of serum uric acid and age, body weight, body mass index, and systolic and diastolic blood pressure in the normotensive children of parents. The higher uric acid levels in the normotensive children of hypertensive parents suggest that uric acid may be a predeterminant of hypertension. Monitoring of uric acid levels in these children may allow for prevention or earlier treatment of future hypertension. PMID:26464873

  6. Chemiresistor urea sensor

    DOEpatents

    Glass, Robert S.

    1997-01-01

    A sensor to detect and quantify urea in fluids resulting from hemodialysis procedures, and in blood and other body fluids. The sensor is based upon a chemiresistor, which consists of an interdigitated array of metal fingers between which a resistance measured. The interdigitated array is fabricated on a suitable substrate. The surface of the array of fingers is covered with a coating containing the enzyme urease which catalyzes the hydrolysis of urea to form the ammonium ion, the bicarbonate ion, and hydroxide-chemical products which provide the basis for the measured signal. In a typical application, the sensor could be used at bedside, in conjunction with an appropriate electronics/computer system, in order to determine the hemodialysis endpoint. Also, the chemiresistor used to detect urea, can be utilized with a reference chemiresistor which does not contain urease, and connected in a differential measurement arrangement, such that the reference chemiresistor would cancel out any fluctuations due to background effects.

  7. Recent Developments In Urea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosker, Mark J.

    1987-03-01

    Recent developments relating to the application of the urea crystal to non-linear optics reviewed. The urea crystal has been shown to be a useful material for non-linear optics applications. Urea has been studied within the context of both frequency upconversion1 and, more recently, optical parametric oscillation (0P0).2-4 It is particularly the latter application which will be discussed. Urea is an organic crystal within the 42m space group class, the same as the ADP ismorphs. It is optically clear from 200 nm to 1.4 μm, which is consistent with parametric oscillation in the visible and near infrared. Its birefringence is approximately twice that of ADP, which leads to an OPO producing light at shorter wavelengths than for most other non-linear crystals. The non-linear coefficient of urea is approximately 2.5 times that of ADP. While a relatively soft crystal, urea can be optically polished to a flatness of less than an optical wavelength using methods similar to those of ADP. The thermal behavior of urea is excellent; the temperature-dependence of the phase-matching angle is much smaller then ADP. Urea is a hygroscopic crystal, a fact which complicates its practical use. Typically, this problem is overcome by immersing the crystal in an index matching liquid such as hexane. The most difficult problem with regards to the use of urea has been and continues to crystal growth. However, high quality urea crystals of length greater than 20 mm in the (110) direction have been grown from solution in the laboratory. Solution growth requires precise temperature control over very long growth times (on the order of one year). Recently, crystal sizes on the order of 1 cm3 have become commercially available. The urea crystal is positive uniaxial, a characteristic which is advantageous for OPO ications. By utilizing type II (o -> o + e) phase-matching and resonating the ordinary wave, the degree of Poynting vector walk-off of the signal from the pump due to double action is significantly reduced. Furthermore, noncritical phase matching is allowed use the effective d coefficient is a maximum at 90°. The urea optical parametric oscillator has generally consisted of a very simple design. Feedback is accomplished by the use of flat dichroic mirrors, which allow for only one of the generated waves to be resonated. The pump wave is collinear with these generated waves. The pump frequency has usually been 355 nm. Frequency tuning is accomplished through the angular rotation of the crystal. The frequency range covered extends from 498 to 1.23 μm, which is obtained with a single crystal and a single set of dichroic mirrors. Never, a small gap between 640 and 790 nm exists in this range; this is due to metrical obstructions of the particular crystals used and is not thought to be intrinsic.) The mirror reflectivity at the resonated wavelength need not be high, as the total number of round trips allowed during the 7 ns pump pulse is small. The linewidth of the oscillator output was measured to be about 1.2 A near 90° phase-matching.

  8. Urea Cycle Disorders.

    PubMed

    Kleppe, Soledad; Mian, Asad; Lee, Brendan

    2003-07-01

    Urea cycle disorders comprise a group of inborn errors of metabolism that represent unique gene-nutrient interactions whose significant morbidity arises from acute and chronic neurotoxicity associated with often massive hyperammonemia. Current paradigms of treatment are focused on controlling the flux of nitrogen transfer through the hepatic urea cycle by a combination of dietary and pharmacologic approaches. Evolving paradigms include the development of cell and gene therapies. Current research is focused on understanding the pathophysiology of ammonia-mediated toxicity and prevention of neural injury. PMID:12791198

  9. Mechanisms Underlying Early Rapid Increases in Creatinine in Paraquat Poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed, Fahim; Endre, Zoltan; Jayamanne, Shaluka; Pianta, Timothy; Peake, Philip; Palangasinghe, Chathura; Chathuranga, Umesh; Jayasekera, Kithsiri; Wunnapuk, Klintean; Shihana, Fathima; Shahmy, Seyed; Buckley, Nicholas

    2015-01-01

    Background Acute kidney injury (AKI) is common after severe paraquat poisoning and usually heralds a fatal outcome. The rapid large increases in serum creatinine (Cr) exceed that which can be explained by creatinine kinetics based on loss of glomerular filtration rate (GFR). Methods and Findings This prospective multi-centre study compared the kinetics of two surrogate markers of GFR, serum creatinine and serum cystatin C (CysC), following paraquat poisoning to understand and assess renal functional loss after paraquat poisoning. Sixty-six acute paraquat poisoning patients admitted to medical units of five hospitals were included. Relative changes in creatinine and CysC were monitored in serial blood and urine samples, and influences of non-renal factors were also studied. Results Forty-eight of 66 patients developed AKI (AKIN criteria), with 37 (56%) developing moderate to severe AKI (AKIN stage 2 or 3). The 37 patients showed rapid increases in creatinine of >100% within 24 hours, >200% within 48 hours and >300% by 72 hours and 17 of the 37 died. CysC concentration increased by 50% at 24 hours in the same 37 patients and then remained constant. The creatinine/CysC ratio increased 8 fold over 72 hours. There was a modest fall in urinary creatinine and serum/urine creatinine ratios and a moderate increase in urinary paraquat during first three days. Conclusion Loss of renal function contributes modestly to the large increases in creatinine following paraquat poisoning. The rapid rise in serum creatinine most probably represents increased production of creatine and creatinine to meet the energy demand following severe oxidative stress. Minor contributions include increased cyclisation of creatine to creatinine because of acidosis and competitive or non-competitive inhibition of creatinine secretion. Creatinine is not a good marker of renal functional loss after paraquat poisoning and renal injury should be evaluated using more specific biomarkers of renal injury. PMID:25815837

  10. Inaccuracies of creatinine and creatinine-based equations in candidates for liver transplantation with low creatinine: impact on the model for end-stage liver disease score.

    PubMed

    Francoz, Claire; Prié, Dominique; Abdelrazek, Wael; Moreau, Richard; Mandot, Ameet; Belghiti, Jacques; Valla, Dominique; Durand, François

    2010-10-01

    Renal function has a significant impact on early mortality in patients with cirrhosis. However, creatinine and creatinine-based equations are inaccurate markers of renal function in cirrhosis. The aim of this study was to reassess correlations between creatinine-based equations and measured glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and to investigate the impact of inaccuracies on the Model for End-Stage Liver Disease (MELD) score. GFR was measured using iohexol clearance and calculated with creatinine-based equations in 157 patients with cirrhosis during pretransplant evaluation. We compared the accuracy of creatinine to that of true GFR in a prognostic score also including bilirubin and the international normalized ratio. In patients with creatinine below 1 mg/dL, true GFR ranged from 34-163 mL/minute/1.73 m(2). Cockcroft and Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD) significantly overestimated true GFR. On multivariate analysis, younger age and ascites were significantly correlated with the overestimation of true GFR by 20% or more. Body mass index was an independent risk factor of overestimation of GFR with Cockcroft but not with MDRD. The accuracy of a prognostic score combining bilirubin, international normalized ratio, and true GFR was superior to that of MELD, whether creatinine was rounded to 1 mg/dL when lower than 1 mg/dL or not (c-statistic of 0.8 versus 0.75 and 0.73, respectively). Creatinine-based formulas overestimate true GFR, especially in patients younger than 50 years or with ascites. In patients with serum creatinine below 1 mg/dL, the spectrum of true GFR is large. True GFR seems to have a better prognostic value than creatinine and creatinine-based equations. Specific equations are needed in patients with cirrhosis to improve prognostic scores. PMID:20879015

  11. Hereditary urea cycle abnormality

    MedlinePlus

    ... and get enough fluids. Most patients with urea cycle disorders will need to stay in the hospital at some point. During such times, they may be treated with medicines that help the body remove nitrogen-containing wastes. Dialysis may help rid the body ...

  12. Uric acid as a modulator of glucose and lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Lima, William Gustavo; Martins-Santos, Maria Emlia Soares; Chaves, Valria Ernestnia

    2015-09-01

    In humans, uric acid is the final oxidation product of purine catabolism. The serum uric acid level is based on the balance between the absorption, production and excretion of purine. Uric acid is similarly produced in the liver, adipose tissue and muscle and is primarily excreted through the urinary tract. Several factors, including a high-fructose diet and the use of xenobiotics and alcohol, contribute to hyperuricaemia. Hyperuricaemia belongs to a cluster of metabolic and haemodynamic abnormalities, called metabolic syndrome, characterised by abdominal obesity, glucose intolerance, insulin resistance, dyslipidaemia and hypertension. Hyperuricaemia reduction in the Pound mouse or fructose-fed rats, as well as hyperuricaemia induction by uricase inhibition in rodents and studies using cell culture have suggested that uric acid plays an important role in the development of metabolic syndrome. These studies have shown that high uric acid levels regulate the oxidative stress, inflammation and enzymes associated with glucose and lipid metabolism, suggesting a mechanism for the impairment of metabolic homeostasis. Humans lacking uricase, the enzyme responsible for uric acid degradation, are susceptible to these effects. In this review, we summarise the current knowledge of the effects of uric acid on the regulation of metabolism, primarily focusing on liver, adipose tissue and skeletal muscle. PMID:26133655

  13. The correlates of urinary albumin to creatinine ratio (ACR) in a high risk Australian aboriginal community

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Albuminuria marks renal disease and cardiovascular risk. It was estimated to contribute 75% of the risk of all-cause natural death in one Aboriginal group. The urine albumin/creatinine ratio (ACR) is commonly used as an index of albuminuria. This study aims to examine the associations between demographic factors, anthropometric index, blood pressure, lipid-protein measurements and other biomarkers and albuminuria in a cross-sectional study in a high-risk Australian Aboriginal population. The models will be evaluated for albuminuria at or above the microalbuminuria threshold, and at or above the “overt albuminuria” threshold with the potential to distinguish associations they have in common and those that differ. Methods This was a cross-sectional study of 598 adults aged 18–76 years. All participants were grouped into quartiles by age. Logistic regression models were used to explore the correlates of ACR categories. Results The significant correlates were systolic blood pressure (SBP), C-reactive protein (CRP), uric acid, diabetes, gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT) (marginally significant, p = 0.054) and serum albumin (negative association) for ACR 17+ (mg/g) for men and 25+ for women. Independent correlates were SBP, uric acid, diabetes, total cholesterol, alanine amino transferase (ALT), Cystatin C and serum albumin (negative association) for overt albuminuria; and SBP, CRP and serum albumin only for microalbuminuria. Conclusions This is the most detailed modelling of pathologic albuminuria in this setting to date. The somewhat variable association with risk factors suggests that microalbuminuria and overt albuminuria might reflect different as well as shared phenomena. PMID:23947772

  14. [Monitoring urea content during hemodialysis].

    PubMed

    Eventov, V L; Andrianova, M Iu; Nefedkin, S I; Eventova, O V

    2003-01-01

    The urea content monitoring during hemodialysis enables the feed-back within the system "patient--artificial kidney--patient". The existing methods of determining the concentration of urea in the dialyzing solution require an expendable reagent, i.e. urease, they are discrete and need often a calibration. The electrochemical urea analyzer, worked out by the authors, is easy in use, it provides a continues information about the urea concentration and does not virtually need any calibration. Besides, the plotter, belonging to the set, provides the graphic information about the dynamic changes of urea content. PMID:12924215

  15. High Uric-Acid Levels, Lower Risk of Parkinson's?

    MedlinePlus

    ... html High Uric-Acid Levels, Lower Risk of Parkinson's? Link found only in men, researchers say To ... their blood may be less likely to develop Parkinson's disease, a new study suggests. Researchers compared about ...

  16. Chemiresistor urea sensor

    DOEpatents

    Glass, R.S.

    1997-12-16

    A sensor is disclosed to detect and quantify urea in fluids resulting from hemodialysis procedures, and in blood and other body fluids. The sensor is based upon a chemiresistor, which consists of an interdigitated array of metal fingers between which a resistance measured. The interdigitated array is fabricated on a suitable substrate. The surface of the array of fingers is covered with a coating containing the enzyme urease which catalyzes the hydrolysis of urea to form the ammonium ion, the bicarbonate ion, and hydroxide-chemical products which provide the basis for the measured signal. In a typical application, the sensor could be used at bedside, in conjunction with an appropriate electronics/computer system, in order to determine the hemodialysis endpoint. Also, the chemiresistor used to detect urea, can be utilized with a reference chemiresistor which does not contain urease, and connected in a differential measurement arrangement, such that the reference chemiresistor would cancel out any fluctuations due to background effects. 16 figs.

  17. Low plasma uric acid level in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Annanmaki, Tua; Muuronen, Antti; Murros, Kari

    2007-06-15

    Earlier studies suggest that low plasma uric acid level is a risk factor for Parkinson's disease (PD), and that uric acid associates with iron-binding proteins. We therefore decided to examine plasma uric acid levels and markers of peripheral iron metabolism in PD patients and healthy controls. For the study, 40 patients with PD and 29 controls underwent clinical screening, laboratory testing, and body mass index (BMI) measurement. The average consumption of different foodstuffs and dairy products was estimated. Plasma uric acid level was significantly lower in the patients than in the controls. There were no significant differences in the levels of plasma iron parameters, but plasma uric acid correlated strongly with serum ferritin both in the patient and the control group. The BMI was slightly lower in the patients compared with the controls despite equal daily calorie consumption. Plasma uric acid level is low in patients with PD, which may have implications for both the disease pathogenesis and treatment recommendations. PMID:17443703

  18. Use of polyurea from urea for coating of urea granules.

    PubMed

    Lu, Panfang; Zhang, Yanfei; Jia, Cong; Li, Yufeng; Mao, Zhiquan

    2016-01-01

    A new type of controlled release fertilizers coated with polyurea was prepared. The granulated urea was firstly changed into a liquid urea by heating as the coating liquid. By spraying uniformly the urea was coated with the polyurea synthesized by the reaction of isocyanates with a liquid urea. The effects of different modifiers on N release characteristics of polyurea-coated urea (PCU) were studied. The morphology and chemical structure of PCU coating materials was investigated by SEM and FTIR. We studied the nitrogen release characteristics of the PCU applied in both water and soil, and the biodegradability of PCU coating after buried in soil. The results showed that PCU reduced nitrogen release rate and exhibited excellent controlled release property. The PCU coating materials could biodegrade in soil. This indicated that the low cost PCU products from urea are expected to use in agricultural and horticultural applications. PMID:27119061

  19. Increasing the sensitivity of the Jaffe reaction for creatinine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tom, H. Y.

    1973-01-01

    Study of analytical procedure has revealed that linearity of creatinine calibration curve can be extended by using 0.03 molar picric acid solution made up in 70 percent ethanol instead of water. Three to five times more creatinine concentration can be encompassed within linear portion of calibration curve.

  20. Scale control in urea solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Dubin, L.; Diep, D.V.

    1997-08-01

    Legislation to control NO{sub x} emissions, one cause of acid rain and ozone induced smog, has created an impetus to control NO{sub x} emissions. Selective Non Catalytic Reduction (SNCR) using urea chemistry is utilized to control NO{sub x} emissions from boilers, municipal waste incinerators, refinery furnaces, recovery boilers, utilities and other stationary combustion sources. Control requires injecting urea-based solutions into the flue gas at specified temperatures. Urea solutions accelerate CaCO{sub 3} precipitation in industrial waters used for dilution, and thereby interfere with proper application of the urea solution. The negative effect of urea solutions on hardness stability is discussed as well as how CaCO{sub 3} precipitation in urea solution can be controlled by suitable scale inhibitors.

  1. Creatinine Deiminase Adsorption onto Silicalite-Modified pH-FET for Creation of New Creatinine-Sensitive Biosensor.

    PubMed

    Marchenko, Svitlana V; Soldatkin, Oleksandr O; Kasap, Berna Ozansoy; Kurc, Burcu Akata; Soldatkin, Alexei P; Dzyadevych, Sergei V

    2016-12-01

    In the work, silicalite particles were used for the surface modification of pH-sensitive field-effect transistors (pH-FETs) with the purpose of developing new creatinine-sensitive biosensor. Creatinine deiminase (CD) adsorbed on the surface of silicalite-coated pH-FET served as a bioselective membrane. The biosensor based on CD immobilized in glutaraldehyde vapor (GA) was taken as control. The creatinine-sensitive biosensor obtained by adsorption on silicalite was shown to have better analytical characteristics (two- to threefold increased sensitivity to creatinine, three- to fourfold lesser response and recovery times, a decrease of the detection limit of creatinine determination to 5 μM, etc.).Additionally, the biosensor based on CD adsorbed on silicalite (Sil/CD) was characterized by high signal reproducibility (relative standard deviation (RSD) for creatinine measurement = 2.6 %) and stability during storage (over 13 months). It was experimentally confirmed that the proposed biosensor was not sensitive either to high concentrations of sodium chloride or to the macromolecular protein fractions and can be used for direct quantitative analysis of creatinine in the blood serum.It was concluded that the method of CD adsorption on silicalite is well-suited for the creation of creatinine-sensitive biosensor with improved working characteristics. PMID:27033849

  2. Creatinine Deiminase Adsorption onto Silicalite-Modified pH-FET for Creation of New Creatinine-Sensitive Biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchenko, Svitlana V.; Soldatkin, Oleksandr O.; Kasap, Berna Ozansoy; Kurc, Burcu Akata; Soldatkin, Alexei P.; Dzyadevych, Sergei V.

    2016-03-01

    In the work, silicalite particles were used for the surface modification of pH-sensitive field-effect transistors (pH-FETs) with the purpose of developing new creatinine-sensitive biosensor. Creatinine deiminase (CD) adsorbed on the surface of silicalite-coated pH-FET served as a bioselective membrane. The biosensor based on CD immobilized in glutaraldehyde vapor (GA) was taken as control. The creatinine-sensitive biosensor obtained by adsorption on silicalite was shown to have better analytical characteristics (two- to threefold increased sensitivity to creatinine, three- to fourfold lesser response and recovery times, a decrease of the detection limit of creatinine determination to 5 μM, etc.).

  3. Incidence and Risk Factors of Acute Kidney Injury after Radical Cystectomy: Importance of Preoperative Serum Uric Acid Level

    PubMed Central

    Joung, Kyoung-Woon; Choi, Seong-Soo; Kong, Yu-Gyeong; Yu, Jihion; Lim, Jinwook; Hwang, Jai-Hyun; Kim, Young-Kug

    2015-01-01

    Background: Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common complication after surgery and increases costs, morbidity, and mortality of hospitalized patients. While radical cystectomy associates significantly with an increased risk of serious complications, including AKI, risk factors of AKI after radical cystectomy has not been reported. This study was performed to determine the incidence and independent predictors of AKI after radical cystectomy. Methods: All consecutive patients who underwent radical cystectomy in 2001-2013 in a single tertiary-care center were identified. Their demographics, laboratory values, and intraoperative data were recorded. Postoperative AKI was defined and staged according to the Acute Kidney Injury Network criteria on the basis of postoperative changes in creatinine levels. Independent predictors of AKI were identified by univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses. Results: Of the 238 patients who met the eligibility criteria, 91 (38.2%) developed AKI. Univariate logistic regression analyses showed that male gender, high serum uric acid level, and long operation time associated with the development of AKI. On multivariate logistic regression analysis, preoperative serum uric acid concentration (odds ratio [OR] = 1.251; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.048-1.493; P = 0.013) and operation time (OR = 1.005; 95% CI = 1.002-1.008; P = 0.003) remained as independent predictors of AKI after radical cystectomy. Conclusions: AKI after radical cystectomy was a relatively common complication. Its independent risk factors were high preoperative serum uric acid concentration and long operation time. These observations can help to prevent AKI after radical cystectomy. PMID:26283877

  4. Uric acid and chronic kidney disease: which is chasing which?

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Richard J.; Nakagawa, Takahiko; Jalal, Diana; Sánchez-Lozada, Laura Gabriela; Kang, Duk-Hee; Ritz, Eberhard

    2013-01-01

    Serum uric acid is commonly elevated in subjects with chronic kidney disease (CKD), but was historically viewed as an issue of limited interest. Recently, uric acid has been resurrected as a potential contributory risk factor in the development and progression of CKD. Most studies documented that an elevated serum uric acid level independently predicts the development of CKD. Raising the uric acid level in rats can induce glomerular hypertension and renal disease as noted by the development of arteriolosclerosis, glomerular injury and tubulointerstitial fibrosis. Pilot studies suggest that lowering plasma uric acid concentrations may slow the progression of renal disease in subjects with CKD. While further clinical trials are necessary, uric acid is emerging as a potentially modifiable risk factor for CKD. Gout was considered a cause of CKD in the mid-nineteenth century [1], and, prior to the availability of therapies to lower the uric acid level, the development of end-stage renal disease was common in gouty patients. In their large series of gouty subjects Talbott and Terplan found that nearly 100% had variable degrees of CKD at autopsy (arteriolosclerosis, glomerulosclerosis and interstitial fibrosis) [2]. Additional studies showed that during life impaired renal function occurred in half of these subjects [3]. As many of these subjects had urate crystals in their tubules and interstitium, especially in the outer renal medulla, the disease became known as gouty nephropathy. The identity of this condition fell in question as the presence of these crystals may occur in subjects without renal disease; furthermore, the focal location of the crystals could not explain the diffuse renal scarring present. In addition, many subjects with gout also had coexistent conditions such as hypertension and vascular disease, leading some experts to suggest that the renal injury in gout was secondary to these latter conditions rather than to uric acid per se [4]. Indeed, gout was removed from the textbooks as a cause of CKD, and the common association of hyperuricemia with CKD was solely attributed to the retention of serum uric acid that is known to occur as the glomerular filtration rate falls. Renewed interest in uric acid as a cause of CKD occurred when it was realized that invalid assumptions had been made in the arguments to dismiss uric acid as a risk factor for CKD [5]. The greatest assumption was that the mechanism by which uric acid would cause kidney disease would be via the precipitation as crystals in the kidney, similar to the way it causes gout. However, when laboratory animals with CKD were made hyperuricemic, the renal disease progressed rapidly despite an absence of crystals in the kidney [6]. Since this seminal study, there has been a renewed interest in the potential role uric acid may have in both acute and CKD. We briefly review some of the major advances that have occurred in this field in the last 15 years. PMID:23543594

  5. Uric Acid Nephrolithiasis: Recent Progress and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Ngo, Tin C; Assimos, Dean G

    2007-01-01

    The prevalence of urolithiasis has been increasing for the past few decades in industrialized nations. Uric acid calculi account for a significant percentage of urinary stones. Certain risk factors may be involved in the pathogenesis of uric acid nephrolithiasis, including hyperuricosuria, low urinary volume, and persistently low urinary pH. Patients with medical conditions that promote profound hyperuricosuria are at high risk of developing uric acid calculi. These conditions include chronic diarrheal states; myeloproliferative disorders; insulin resistance, including diabetes mellitus; and monogenic metabolic disorders, such as Lesch-Nyhan syndrome. Computed tomography can provide a definitive diagnosis. Except in cases in which there is severe obstruction, progressive azotemia, serious infection, or unremitting pain, the initial treatment of patients with uric acid nephrolithiasis should be medical dissolution therapy because this approach is successful in the majority of cases. A thorough review of the epidemiology and pathophysiology of uric acid nephrolithiasis is crucial for the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of stones in patients with this condition. PMID:17396168

  6. Increased Levels of Serum Uric Acid among Ex-smokers

    PubMed Central

    Tomita, Masako; Mizuno, Shoichi; Yokota, Kazuhiko

    2008-01-01

    Background It remains unclear whether serum uric acid level increases after the cessation of smoking. Methods In 2000, we conducted a cross-sectional study on the effects of smoking cessation on serum uric acid levels by analyzing the results of annual health check-ups in the Japanese male working population (n = 16,642). Results The serum uric acid level (6.18 mg/dL) was the highest in ex-smokers, followed by that in never-smokers (6.10 mg/dL) and that in current smokers (5.98 mg/dL). Ex-smokers weighed 0.6 kg more than the never-smokers and 1.5 kg more than the current smokers. The frequency of alcohol intake was closely correlated to the smoking habits. The serum uric acid levels declined in all groups, after adjustments for age, body mass index, and alcohol intake, though the levels in ex-smokers were 0.2 mg/dL higher than those in current smokers. Conclusion The results suggested that alcohol intake contributed considerably to the serum uric acid levels and that smoking itself may have suppressed these levels via metabolic effects or the action of superoxides. PMID:18469491

  7. Uric acid, hypertension, and cardiovascular and renal complications.

    PubMed

    Zoccali, Carmine; Mallamaci, Francesca

    2013-12-01

    Over the last decade, the biologic interference of uric acid with the cardiovascular (CV) system and the kidney has been intensively investigated, and several experimental studies in animal models and in vitro documented that hyperuricemia may trigger hypertension and incite endothelial dysfunction, vascular damage and renal disease. A substantial proportion of epidemiological studies are compatible with the hypothesis that hyperuricemia may be noxious to the CV system and the kidney as well. However, there are still no well-powered trials testing whether uric acid-lowering interventions may reduce BP or attenuate the risk for adverse CV and renal outcomes. Evidence still remains largely insufficient to recommend changes in the current policy of not prescribing uric acid-lowering drugs to individuals with asymptomatic hyperuricemia. PMID:24072559

  8. Liver Enzymes and Uric acid in Acute Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Vakilian, Farveh; Rafighdoost, Abbas Ali; Rafighdoost, Amir Hossein; Amin, Ahmad; Salehi, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    Background: Acute heart failure (AHF) is defined as the new onset or recurrence of gradual or rapidly worsening signs and symptoms of heart failure, requiring urgent or emergent therapy. Objectives: This study attempts to assess the association of liver function tests (LFT) and uric acid level with in hospital outcome and echocardiography parameters, in patients with acute decompensated heart failure. Patients and Methods: A total of 100 patients (aged 16 - 90 years, 60% men) admitted with AHF were enrolled. LFTs and uric acid levels were assessed on first day and before discharge, and patients were followed for 3 months. Results: In-hospital outcomes were considered. Mean Left Ventricular Ejection Fraction (LVEF) was 35% (20 - 45%). Mean Uric acid level was 8.4 mg/dL, significantly higher than chronic HF and normal groups (P < 0.02). Elevated liver enzymes were seen in 52% patients, mostly (87%) in transaminases. Liver enzymes were decreased in 85% patients before discharge. LFT and uric acid levels were inversely and significantly correlated with LVEF on echocardiography (P = 0.02), but not with diastolic parameters. Although there was no significant correlation between uric acid level and in-hospital mortality, risk of intubation and rehospitalization in 3 months, enzyme levels increased in these groups. Increased aspartate transaminase (AST level) was associated with inotrope infusion in AHF patients (42 vs. 82 mg/dL, P = 0.03). Conclusions: Abnormal transaminases and uric acid levels are seen in AHF patients. Increased AST levels may be a predictor of the need for inotrope during hospital course in these patients. PMID:26528447

  9. Quantitative analysis of creatinine in urine by metalized nanostructured parylene.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Malvadkar, Niranjan; Koytek, S; Bylander, J; Reeves, W Brian; Demirel, Melik C

    2010-01-01

    A highly accurate, real-time multisensor agent monitor for biomarker detection is required for early detection of kidney diseases. Urine creatinine level can provide useful information on the status of the kidney. We prepare nanostructured surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) substrates without template or lithography, which provides controllable, well-organized nanostructures on the surface, for the quantitative analysis of creatinine concentration in urine. We present our work on sensitivity of the SERS substrate to urine samples collected from diabetic patients and healthy persons. We report the preparation of a new type of SERS substrate, which provides fast (<10 s), highly sensitive (creatinine concentration <0.5 microg/mL) and reproducible (<5% variation) detection of urine. Our method to analyze the creatinine level in urine is in good agreement with the enzymatic method. PMID:20459278

  10. A Double-edged Sword: Uric Acid and Neurological Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Pu; Li, Xinyuan; Luo, Jin Jun; Wang, Hong; Yang, Xiao-feng

    2014-01-01

    Uric Acid (UA), historically considered as a waste of cellular metabolism, has now received increasing attention because it was found to directly participate in the pathogenesis of many human diseases including neurological disorders. On one hand, low levels of UA are detrimental to the neurons because of its induction it impairs antioxidant capacity in the cell. High levels of UA, on the other hand, lead to an inflammatory response contributing to gout or neuroprotection. In this review, we summarize this biphasic function of uric acid and highlight potential therapeutic targets to treat UA-related neurological diseases. PMID:24511458

  11. Prolonged winter undernutrition and the interpretation of urinary allantoin: creatinine ratios in ungulates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DelGiudice, G.G.; Kerr, K.D.; Mech, L.D.; Seal, U.S.

    2000-01-01

    The urinary allantoin:creatinine (A:C) ratio (expressed in micromoles of allantoin to micromoles of creatinine) has shown potential as an index of recent winter energy intake in preliminary controlled studies of elk (Cervus elaphus) involving mild condition deterioration (up to 11% loss of body mass). To ensure reliable nutritional assessments of free-ranging cervids by measuring A:C ratios of urine in snow, it is essential to extend this work. We assessed the effect of moderate and severe winter nutritional restriction on urinary A:C ratios of captive white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) that lost up to 32% body mass and related these ratios to metabolizable energy intake (MEI), body-mass loss, and other reported nutritional indicators. Deer in the control group were fed a low-protein, low-energy diet ad libitum, whereas deer in the treatment group were fed restricted amounts of the same diet. MEI was below the winter maintenance requirement for all deer, but was lower (P = 0.029) in treatment deer than in control deer. Percent body-mass loss differed between the two groups as the study progressed, and represented the full range of physiological tolerance (0-32% loss). Mean A:C ratios of control deer, which lost up to 17.4% body mass, showed a slight increasing (P = 0.086) trend, whereas initially similar A:C ratios of severely restricted deer increased (P = 0.0002) markedly by the eighth week (0.52 vs. 0.09 |mol:|mol). The urinary A:C ratio was not related (P = 0.839) to recent (2 days prior to urine sampling) MEI, but there was a marginally significant relation (r2 = 0.42, P = 0.110) between the A:C ratio and cumulative percent mass loss. The urinary A:C ratio was directly related to urinary urea nitrogen: creatinine (r2 = 0.59, P < 0.0001) and 3-methylhistidine:creatinine (r2 = 0.43, P < 0.0001) ratios. This study confirms that elevated and increasing A:C ratios may be due either to increasing energy intake or to accelerated tissue catabolism and increased endogenous contributions to urinary allantoin excretion.

  12. Dietary protein-induced increases in urinary calcium are accompanied by similar increases in urinary nitrogen and urinary urea: a controlled clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Bihuniak, Jessica D; Simpson, Christine A; Sullivan, Rebecca R; Caseria, Donna M; Kerstetter, Jane E; Insogna, Karl L

    2013-03-01

    To determine the usefulness of urinary urea as an index of dietary protein intake, 10 postmenopausal women were enrolled in and completed a randomized, double-blind, cross-over feeding trial from September 2008 to May 2010 that compared 10 days of a 45-g whey supplement with 10 days of a 45-g maltodextrin control. Urinary nitrogen, urinary calcium, urinary urea, and bone turnover markers were measured at days 0, 7, and 10. Paired sample t tests, Pearson's correlation statistic, and simple linear regression were used to assess differences between treatments and associations among urinary metabolites. Urinary nitrogen/urinary creatinine rose from 12.3±1.7 g/g (99.6±13.8 mmol/mmol) to 16.8±2.2 g/g (135.5±17.8 mmol/mmol) with whey supplementation, but did not change with maltodextrin. Whey supplementation caused urinary calcium to rise by 4.76±1.84 mg (1.19±0.46 mmol) without a change in bone turnover markers. Because our goal was to estimate protein intake from urinary nitrogen/urinary creatinine, we used our data to develop the following equation: protein intake (g/day)=71.221+1.719×(urinary nitrogen, g)/creatinine, g) (R=0.46, R(2)=0.21). As a more rapid and less costly alternative to urinary nitrogen/urinary creatinine, we next determined whether urinary urea could predict protein intake and found that protein intake (g/day)=63.844+1.11×(urinary urea, g/creatinine, g) (R=0.58, R(2)=0.34). These data indicate that urinary urea/urinary creatinine is at least as good a marker of dietary protein intake as urinary nitrogen and is easier to quantitate in nutrition intervention trials. PMID:23438496

  13. Relationship between Uric Acid Level and Achievement Motivation. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mueller, Ernst F.; French, John R. P., Jr.

    In an investigation of the relationship of uric acid (a metabolic end product) to achievement, this study hypothesized that a person's serum urate level (a factor often associated with gout) is positively related to achievement need as well as indicators of actual achievement. (Speed of promotion and number of yearly publications were chosen as…

  14. Salivary uric acid as a noninvasive biomarker of metabolic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Elevated serum uric acid is associated with obesity, hypertension and metabolic syndrome. Because a linear relationship exists between serum and salivary uric acid (SUA) concentration, saliva testing may be a useful noninvasive approach for monitoring cardiometabolic risk. The goal of this pilot study was to determine if SUA is increased in patients with metabolic syndrome and to investigate correlations between SUA and individual cardiometabolic risk factors. Findings Volunteers between the ages of 18 and 65 without conditions known to affect serum uric acid levels were recruited. Height, weight, blood pressure and waist circumference were measured and a full lipid panel along with fasting blood glucose was obtained. Saliva samples were collected and uric acid levels were determined. 78 volunteers, 35% of whom had metabolic syndrome, completed the study. SUA was significantly elevated in patients with metabolic syndrome (p=.002). The incidence of metabolic syndrome in the 4th quartile for SUA was 67% compared to 25% in quartiles1-3 combined. Significant correlations were seen between SUA and systolic blood pressure (r=.440, p=.000), diastolic blood pressure ( r=.304, p=.007), waist circumference (r=.332, p=.003), BMI ( r=.269, p=.018), fasting blood glucose ( r=.341, p=.002), triglycerides (r=.410, p=.000), HDL ( r=.237, p=.036) and the number of cardiometabolic risk factors present (r=0.257, p=.023). Conclusions These results suggest that SUA may be a useful biomarker for noninvasive monitoring of cardiometabolic risk. Larger studies are needed to validate this approach. PMID:22515434

  15. [Tables estimating glomerular filtration rate from plasma creatinine].

    PubMed

    Canal, C; Pellicer, R; Rocha, C I; Calero, F; Gracia, S; Montañés, R; Ballarín, J; Bover, J

    2008-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) and its related complications have become an important health and social problem. Very expensive resources are required in end-stage renal disease, and both complications of CKD as well as the important associated cardiovascular risk demand for interventions long before renal substitution therapies are needed. Thus, early diagnosis of CKD is currently considered of paramount importance, and it is based essentially upon the estimation of the glomerular filtration rate by formulae such as the abbreviated equation of the MDRD study. Nevertheless, in spite of international published recommendations, an automatic calculation to estimate the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) from serum creatinine is not reported by most laboratories yet and the need for creatinine assay standardisation is far from being implemented. Thus, we have designed some tables to show the creatinine value corresponding to different GFR for ages between 20 and 90 y/o, at 5 years intervals and in both sexes with both the MDRD-4 and MDRD-IDMS equations (Modification of Diet in Renal Disease-Isotope Dilution Mass Spectrometry). Moreover, we have created a global table including an estimation of GFR from plasma creatinine, age and sex by the MDRD-IDMS formula, the recommended for those laboratories which measure serum creatinine with assays aligned to the reference method. These tables aim to increase the awareness of the different assays for serum creatinine and to facilitate the diagnosis of CKD converting serum creatinine into GFR. This action should allow not only the early detection but also the possibility to establish the appropriate medical actions recommended after CKD detection. PMID:18590499

  16. Serum uric acid level, blood pressure, and vascular angiotensin II responsiveness in healthy men and women

    PubMed Central

    Samimi, Arian; Ramesh, Sharanya; Turin, Tanvir C.; MacRae, Jennifer M.; Sarna, Magdalena A.; Reimer, Raylene A.; Hemmelgarn, Brenda R.; Sola, Darlene Y.; Ahmed, Sofia B.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Uric acid is associated with hypertension and increased renin–angiotensin system activity, although this relationship diminishes after chronic exposure to high levels. Uric acid is more strongly associated with poor outcomes in women compared to men, although whether this is due to a sex‐specific uric acid‐mediated pathophysiology or reflects sex differences in baseline uric acid levels remains unknown. We examined the association between uric acid and vascular measures at baseline and in response to angiotensin‐II challenge in young healthy humans. Fifty‐two subjects (17 men, 35 premenopausal women) were studied in high‐salt balance. Serum uric acid levels were significantly higher in men compared to women (328 ± 14 μmol/L vs. 248 ± 10 μmol/L, P < 0.001), although all values were within normal sex‐specific range. Men demonstrated no association between uric acid and blood pressure, either at baseline or in response to angiotensin‐II. In stark contrast, a significant association was observed between uric acid and blood pressure at baseline (systolic blood pressure, P = 0.005; diastolic blood pressure, P = 0.02) and in response to angiotensin‐II (systolic blood pressure, P = 0.035; diastolic blood pressure, P = 0.056) in women. However, this sex difference lost significance after adjustment for baseline uric acid. When all subjects were stratified according to high (>300 μmol/L) or low (≤300 μmol/L) uric acid levels, only the low uric acid group showed a positive association between uric acid and measures of vascular tone at baseline and in response to angiotensin‐II. Differences in uric acid‐mediated outcomes between men and women likely reflect differences in exposure to increased uric acid levels, rather than a sex‐specific uric acid‐mediated pathophysiology. PMID:25501427

  17. Serum uric acid level, blood pressure, and vascular angiotensin II responsiveness in healthy men and women.

    PubMed

    Samimi, Arian; Ramesh, Sharanya; Turin, Tanvir C; MacRae, Jennifer M; Sarna, Magdalena A; Reimer, Raylene A; Hemmelgarn, Brenda R; Sola, Darlene Y; Ahmed, Sofia B

    2014-12-01

    Uric acid is associated with hypertension and increased renin-angiotensin system activity, although this relationship diminishes after chronic exposure to high levels. Uric acid is more strongly associated with poor outcomes in women compared to men, although whether this is due to a sex-specific uric acid-mediated pathophysiology or reflects sex differences in baseline uric acid levels remains unknown. We examined the association between uric acid and vascular measures at baseline and in response to angiotensin-II challenge in young healthy humans. Fifty-two subjects (17 men, 35 premenopausal women) were studied in high-salt balance. Serum uric acid levels were significantly higher in men compared to women (328 ± 14 μmol/L vs. 248 ± 10 μmol/L, P < 0.001), although all values were within normal sex-specific range. Men demonstrated no association between uric acid and blood pressure, either at baseline or in response to angiotensin-II. In stark contrast, a significant association was observed between uric acid and blood pressure at baseline (systolic blood pressure, P = 0.005; diastolic blood pressure, P = 0.02) and in response to angiotensin-II (systolic blood pressure, P = 0.035; diastolic blood pressure, P = 0.056) in women. However, this sex difference lost significance after adjustment for baseline uric acid. When all subjects were stratified according to high (>300 μmol/L) or low (≤300 μmol/L) uric acid levels, only the low uric acid group showed a positive association between uric acid and measures of vascular tone at baseline and in response to angiotensin-II. Differences in uric acid-mediated outcomes between men and women likely reflect differences in exposure to increased uric acid levels, rather than a sex-specific uric acid-mediated pathophysiology. PMID:25501427

  18. Anaerobic Degradation of Uric Acid by Gut Bacteria of Termites †

    PubMed Central

    Potrikus, C. J.; Breznak, John A.

    1980-01-01

    A study was done of anaerobic degradation of uric acid (UA) by representative strains of uricolytic bacteria isolated from guts of Reticulitermes flavipes termites. Streptococcus strain UAD-1 degraded UA incompletely, secreting a fluorescent compound into the medium, unless formate (or a formicogenic compound) was present as a cosubstrate. Formate functioned as a reductant, and its oxidation to CO2 by formate dehydrogenase provided 2H+ + 2e− needed to drive uricolysis to completion. Uricolysis by Streptococcus UAD-1 thus corresponded to the following equation: 1UA + 1formate → 4CO2 + 1acetate + 4NH3. Urea did not appear to be an intermediate in CO2 and NH3 formation during uricolysis by strain UAD-1. Formate dehydrogenase and uricolytic activities of strain UAD-1 were inducible by growth of cells on UA. Bacteroides termitidis strain UAD-50 degraded UA as follows: 1UA → 3.5 CO2 + 0.75acetate + 4NH3. Exogenous formate was neither required for nor stimulatory to uricolysis by strain UAD-50. Studies of UA catabolism by Citrobacter strains were limited, because only small amounts of UA were metabolized by cells in liquid medium. Uricolytic activity of such bacteria in situ could be important to the carbon, nitrogen, and energy economy of R. flavipes. PMID:16345588

  19. Two novel creatinine adducts of andrographolide in human urine.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Feng; Cui, Liang; Chen, Lixia; Sun, Jiawen; Yao, Xinsheng

    2012-09-01

    Andrographolide is a major labdane diterpenoid of the traditional Chinese and Ayurvedic medicine. Andrographis paniculate (Burm) Nees, is used in clinical situations in China mainly to treat fever, cold, and inflammation. In our previous study, fifteen metabolites of andrographolide were identified in human urine. However, there are still two other unknown metabolites. The aim of this study was to elucidate the structures of these two metabolites. 3. The two metabolites which are probably epimers were identified as creatinine adducts, and their structures were determined to be 14-deoxy-12-(creatinine-5-yl)-andrographolide-19-O-β-D-glucuronide A (Metabolite 1) and 14-deoxy-12-(creatinine-5-yl)-andrographolide-19-O-β-D-glucuronide B (Metabolite 2) by means of spectroscopic evidences. 4. It is for the first time that the formation of creatinine adducts as a novel metabolic pathway is reported. The mechanism was presumed that β-carbon (C-12) of α, β-unsaturated carbonyl was attacked by a 5-anion intermediate of creatinine formed through elimination of a proton, followed by the double bond migration from 12(13) to 13(14) and elimination of the hydroxyl group at C-14. PMID:22568631

  20. Chemiluminescence of creatinine/H2O2/Co(2+) and its application for selective creatinine detection.

    PubMed

    Hanif, Saima; John, Peter; Gao, Wenyue; Saqib, Muhammad; Qi, Liming; Xu, Guobao

    2016-01-15

    Creatinine is an important biomarker in clinical diagnosis and biomonitoring programs as well as urinary metabolomic/metabonomics research. Current methods are either nonselective, time consuming or require heavy and expensive instruments. In this study, chemiluminescence of creatinine with hydrogen peroxide has been reported for the first time, and its chemiluminescence is remarkably enhanced in the presence of cobalt ions. By utilizing these phenomena, we have developed a sensitive and selective chemiluminescence method for creatinine determination by coupling with flow injection analysis. The calibration curve is linear in the range of 1×10(-7)-3×10(-5)mol/L with a limit of detection (S/N=3) of 7.2×10(-8)mol/L, which is adequate for detecting creatinine in the clinically accepted range. The relative standard deviation for seven measurements of 3×10(-5)mol/L creatinine is 1.2%. The chemiluminescence method was then utilized to detect creatinine in human urine samples after simple dilution with water. It takes less than 1min each measurement and the recoveries for spiked urine samples were 100-103%. The interference study demonstrates that some common species in urine, such as amino acids, ascorbic acid and creatine, have negligible effects on creatinine detection. The present method does not use expensive instruments, enzymes and separation technique. This method has the advantages of sensitivity, selectivity, simplicity, rapidity, and low cost. It holds great promise for basic or comprehensive metabolic panel, drug screening, anti-dopping, and urinary metabolomic/metabonomics research. PMID:26339931

  1. Serum uric acid and AKI: is it time?

    PubMed Central

    Kaushik, Manish; Choo, Jason Chon Jun

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a well-recognized complication in hospitalized patients, with associated mortality and morbidity. Studies that aim to prevent or reverse AKI using pharmacological and interventional therapies in clinical practice have been disappointing. Work is continuing to identify potentially modifiable risk factors for AKI. Early identification and modification of these risk factors may help prevent or favorably influence the outcome of AKI. The role of uric acid as a potential risk factor is being revisited in chronic kidney disease and AKI. Apart from the established crystal precipitation with profound hyperuricemia, various non-crystal mechanisms have also been proposed in the pathogenesis of AKI. The association of serum uric acid levels with the development of AKI has been reported in various clinical settings. Together, the results of these studies highlight hyperuricemia as a potential risk factor of AKI and the need for further work on this subject. PMID:26798460

  2. URIC ACID: A NEW ANTIOXIDANT IN PATIENTS WITH PEMPHIGUS VULGARIS

    PubMed Central

    Yousefi, Maryam; Rahimi, Hoda; Barikbin, Behrooz; Toossi, Parviz; Lotfi, Sara; Hedayati, Mehdi; Younespour, Shima

    2011-01-01

    Background: Increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) and lipid peroxidation are seen in many dermatologic disorders, for example, atopic dermatitis, psoriasis, vitiligo, acne vulgaris, pemphigus vulgaris (PV), lichen planus, and alopecia areata. ROS has an important role in the inflammation process. In PV, increased production of ROS leads to decline of antioxidants in plasma and red blood cells which results in oxidative stress. We aimed to evaluate the level of these antioxidants in PV patients and compare it to the controls. Materials and Methods: Among patients attending the dermatology clinics, 30 patients with PV, who had never been on treatment, were enrolled to the study. The control group consisted of 30 age- and sex-matched healthy non-smoker individuals. Venous blood was collected from the subjects for the evaluation of plasma levels of glutathione peroxidase, vitamin C, selenium, bilirubin, and uric acid. Results: Age mean and standard deviation of the patients (40.83, 12.74) was comparable to the controls (41.96, 13.08). Mean level of uric acid was significantly lower in PV patients compared to the controls (P = 0.006). Other antioxidants were not different between the two groups. Uric acid of the patients with mucosal involvement was significantly lower than patients with mucocutaneous involvement (P = 0.049). Limitations: The blood level of other antioxidants (e.g. malondialdehyde) was not evaluated. Conclusions: Uric acid as an antioxidant in our study had similar changes to previous studies in the field of other diseases but selenium, bilirubin, and glutathione peroxidase did not differ between patients and controls. PMID:21772587

  3. 21 CFR 862.1225 - Creatinine test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Creatinine test system. 862.1225 Section 862.1225 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems §...

  4. 21 CFR 862.1225 - Creatinine test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Creatinine test system. 862.1225 Section 862.1225 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems §...

  5. 21 CFR 862.1225 - Creatinine test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Creatinine test system. 862.1225 Section 862.1225 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems §...

  6. Evaluating an alternative method for rapid urinary creatinine determination

    EPA Science Inventory

    Creatinine (CR) is an endogenously-produced chemical routinely assayed in urine specimens to assess kidney function, sample dilution. The industry-standard method for CR determination, known as the kinetic Jaffe (KJ) method, relies on an exponential rate of a colorimetric change,...

  7. Urine Test: Microalbumin-to-Creatinine Ratio (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... involves measuring the amount of a protein called albumin in the urine (pee). The amount of urine albumin is compared with the quantity of a waste ... steady rate, so comparing the ratio of urine albumin with creatinine in the same urine specimen helps ...

  8. Uric Acid as a Target of Therapy in CKD

    PubMed Central

    Jalal, Diana I.; Chonchol, Michel; Chen, Wei; Targher, Giovanni

    2012-01-01

    The prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) has risen and will continue to rise in the United States and worldwide. This is alarming considering that CKD remains an irreversible condition and patients who progress to chronic kidney failure suffer reduced quality of life and high mortality rates. As such, it is imperative to identify modifiable risk factors to develop strategies to slow CKD progression. One such factor is hyperuricemia. Recent observational studies have associated hyperuricemia with kidney disease. In addition, hyperuricemia is largely prevalent in patients with CKD. Data from experimental studies have revealed several potential mechanisms by which hyperuricemia may contribute to the development and progression of CKD. In this manuscript we offer a critical review of the experimental evidence linking hyperuricemia to CKD, we highlight the gaps in our knowledge on the topic as it stands today, and we review the observational and interventional studies that have examined the potential nephro-protective effect of lowering uric acid in CKD patients . While uric acid may also be linked to cardiovascular disease and mortality in patients with CKD, this review will focus only on uric acid as a potential therapeutic target to prevent kidney disease onset and progression. PMID:23058478

  9. The effect of uric acid on outdoor copper and bronze.

    PubMed

    Bernardi, E; Bowden, D J; Brimblecombe, P; Kenneally, H; Morselli, L

    2009-03-15

    Bird droppings are often quoted as a decay agent for outdoor goods, in particular buildings and statues. Undoubtedly, they represent one of the major causes of aesthetic damage on outdoor materials, but the real chemical damage they are able to induce, in particular on metals, is not so well studied. This work focused on the short term role of uric acid, the main constituent of bird urine, with respect to copper, which make such an important contribution to architectural elements of buildings and outdoor sculpture. Preliminary results of laboratory tests and analyses on real exposed samples showed that uric acid chemically affects copper and bronzes: the surface of the metal is modified and copper urates formed. Also natural patina, formed on statues and roof, react with uric acid, even if it seems to afford some protection toward bird droppings. In general, experimental results confirm that the potential chemical damage by bird droppings is significant when considering external cultural heritage such as statues, metal monuments and buildings with historic copper roofs. PMID:19157513

  10. Sugar, Uric Acid, and the Etiology of Diabetes and Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Richard J.; Nakagawa, Takahiko; Sanchez-Lozada, L. Gabriela; Shafiu, Mohamed; Sundaram, Shikha; Le, Myphuong; Ishimoto, Takuji; Sautin, Yuri Y.; Lanaspa, Miguel A.

    2013-01-01

    The intake of added sugars, such as from table sugar (sucrose) and high-fructose corn syrup has increased dramatically in the last hundred years and correlates closely with the rise in obesity, metabolic syndrome, and diabetes. Fructose is a major component of added sugars and is distinct from other sugars in its ability to cause intracellular ATP depletion, nucleotide turnover, and the generation of uric acid. In this article, we revisit the hypothesis that it is this unique aspect of fructose metabolism that accounts for why fructose intake increases the risk for metabolic syndrome. Recent studies show that fructose-induced uric acid generation causes mitochondrial oxidative stress that stimulates fat accumulation independent of excessive caloric intake. These studies challenge the long-standing dogma that “a calorie is just a calorie” and suggest that the metabolic effects of food may matter as much as its energy content. The discovery that fructose-mediated generation of uric acid may have a causal role in diabetes and obesity provides new insights into pathogenesis and therapies for this important disease. PMID:24065788

  11. Blood pressure and serum creatinine in obese female.

    PubMed

    Asrin, M; Nessa, A; Hasan, M I; Das, R K

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is increasing in developed as well as in developing countries. This analytical cross sectional study was carried out to document the relation between blood pressure, serum creatinine and body mass index in female and to assess potential health differences among obese female and normal weight female. This study was done in the Department of Physiology, Mymensingh Medical College, Mymensingh, Bangladesh from July 2012 to June 2013. Seventy female persons volunteered as subjects. Among them 35 were within normal weight (BMI 18.5-24.9kg/m²) and 35 were obese (BMI≥30kg/m²). Non probability purposive type of sampling technique was used to select the subjects. Measurement of body mass index and blood pressure were done as per procedure. Serum creatinine level was estimated by enzymatic colorimetric method. The results were calculated and analyzed by using SPSS (statistical package for social science, version 17.0), scientific electronic calculator and simultaneously with a computer assisted program like Microsoft excel. Unpaired 't' test was applied to find the significance of difference regarding serum creatinine and blood pressure levels in obese female. The value of p was 1% to indicate highly significant and 5% to indicate simply significant or statistically significant. The mean±SE of systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure and serum creatinine levels were 135.71±1.58mmHg, 88.74±0.95mmHg and 1.03±0.01mg/dl respectively; significant at 1% level for obese group of BMI (p<0.0001). The examinations and biochemical investigations revealed that high BMI is significantly related to increased levels of serum creatinine & blood pressure in obese female which indicate the obese subjects are prone to cardiovascular & metabolic risk. PMID:25725665

  12. Impact of Different Creatinine Measurement Methods on Liver Transplant Allocation

    PubMed Central

    Kaiser, Thorsten; Kinny-Köster, Benedict; Bartels, Michael; Parthaune, Tanja; Schmidt, Michael; Thiery, Joachim

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The model for end-stage liver disease (MELD) score is used in many countries to prioritize organ allocation for the majority of patients who require orthotopic liver transplantation. This score is calculated based on the following laboratory parameters: creatinine, bilirubin and the international normalized ratio (INR). Consequently, high measurement accuracy is essential for equitable and fair organ allocation. For serum creatinine measurements, the Jaffé method and enzymatic detection are well-established routine diagnostic tests. Methods A total of 1,013 samples from 445 patients on the waiting list or in evaluation for liver transplantation were measured using both creatinine methods from November 2012 to September 2013 at the university hospital Leipzig, Germany. The measurements were performed in parallel according to the manufacturer’s instructions after the samples arrived at the institute of laboratory medicine. Patients who had required renal replacement therapy twice in the previous week were excluded from analyses. Results Despite the good correlation between the results of both creatinine quantification methods, relevant differences were observed, which led to different MELD scores. The Jaffé measurement led to greater MELD score in 163/1,013 (16.1%) samples with differences of up to 4 points in one patient, whereas differences of up to 2 points were identified in 15/1,013 (1.5%) samples using the enzymatic assay. Overall, 50/152 (32.9%) patients with MELD scores >20 had higher scores when the Jaffé method was used. Discussion Using the Jaffé method to measure creatinine levels in samples from patients who require liver transplantation may lead to a systematic preference in organ allocation. In this study, the differences were particularly pronounced in samples with MELD scores >20, which has clinical relevance in the context of urgency of transplantation. These data suggest that official recommendations are needed to determine which laboratory diagnostic methods should be used when calculating MELD scores. PMID:24587188

  13. Uric acid in metabolic syndrome: From an innocent bystander to a central player.

    PubMed

    Kanbay, Mehmet; Jensen, Thomas; Solak, Yalcin; Le, Myphuong; Roncal-Jimenez, Carlos; Rivard, Chris; Lanaspa, Miguel A; Nakagawa, Takahiko; Johnson, Richard J

    2016-04-01

    Uric acid, once viewed as an inert metabolic end-product of purine metabolism, has been recently incriminated in a number of chronic disease states, including hypertension, metabolic syndrome, diabetes, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, and chronic kidney disease. Several experimental and clinical studies support a role for uric acid as a contributory causal factor in these conditions. Here we discuss some of the major mechanisms linking uric acid to metabolic and cardiovascular diseases. At this time the key to understanding the importance of uric acid in these diseases will be the conduct of large clinical trials in which the effect of lowering uric acid on hard clinical outcomes is assessed. Elevated uric acid may turn out to be one of the more important remediable risk factors for metabolic and cardiovascular diseases. PMID:26703429

  14. Uric acid in metabolic syndrome: From an innocent bystander to a central player

    PubMed Central

    Kanbay, Mehmet; Jensen, Thomas; Solak, Yalcin; Le, Myphuong; Roncal-Jimenez, Carlos; Rivard, Chris; Lanaspa, Miguel A.; Nakagawa, Takahiko; Johnson, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    Uric acid, once viewed as an inert metabolic end-product of purine metabolism, has been recently incriminated in a number of chronic disease states, including hypertension, metabolic syndrome, diabetes, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, and chronic kidney disease. Several experimental and clinical studies support a role for uric acid as a contributory causal factor in these conditions. Here we discuss some of the major mechanisms linking uric acid to metabolic and cardiovascular diseases. At this time the key to understanding the importance of uric acid in these diseases will be the conduct of large clinical trials in which the effect of lowering uric acid on hard clinical outcomes is assessed. Elevated uric acid may turn out to be one of the more important remediable risk factors for metabolic and cardiovascular diseases. PMID:26703429

  15. Estimating Glomerular Filtration Rate from Serum Creatinine and Cystatin C

    PubMed Central

    Inker, Lesley A.; Schmid, Christopher H.; Tighiouart, Hocine; Eckfeldt, John H.; Feldman, Harold I.; Greene, Tom; Kusek, John W.; Manzi, Jane; Van Lente, Frederick; Zhang, Yaping Lucy; Coresh, Josef; Levey, Andrew S.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Estimates of glomerular filtration rate (GFR) that are based on serum creatinine are routinely used; however, they are imprecise, potentially leading to the overdiagnosis of chronic kidney disease. Cystatin C is an alternative filtration marker for estimating GFR. METHODS Using cross-sectional analyses, we developed estimating equations based on cystatin C alone and in combination with creatinine in diverse populations totaling 5352 participants from 13 studies. These equations were then validated in 1119 participants from 5 different studies in which GFR had been measured. Cystatin and creatinine assays were traceable to primary reference materials. RESULTS Mean measured GFRs were 68 and 70 ml per minute per 1.73 m2 of body-surface area in the development and validation data sets, respectively. In the validation data set, the creatinine–cystatin C equation performed better than equations that used creatinine or cystatin C alone. Bias was similar among the three equations, with a median difference between measured and estimated GFR of 3.9 ml per minute per 1.73 m2 with the combined equation, as compared with 3.7 and 3.4 ml per minute per 1.73 m2 with the creatinine equation and the cystatin C equation (P = 0.07 and P = 0.05), respectively. Precision was improved with the combined equation (inter-quartile range of the difference, 13.4 vs. 15.4 and 16.4 ml per minute per 1.73 m2, respectively [P = 0.001 and P<0.001]), and the results were more accurate (percentage of estimates that were >30% of measured GFR, 8.5 vs. 12.8 and 14.1, respectively [P<0.001 for both comparisons]). In participants whose estimated GFR based on creatinine was 45 to 74 ml per minute per 1.73 m2, the combined equation improved the classification of measured GFR as either less than 60 ml per minute per 1.73 m2 or greater than or equal to 60 ml per minute per 1.73 m2 (net reclassification index, 19.4% [P<0.001]) and correctly reclassified 16.9% of those with an estimated GFR of 45 to 59 ml per minute per 1.73 m2 as having a GFR of 60 ml or higher per minute per 1.73 m2. CONCLUSIONS The combined creatinine–cystatin C equation performed better than equations based on either of these markers alone and may be useful as a confirmatory test for chronic kidney disease. (Funded by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases.) PMID:22762315

  16. Urea Biosynthesis Using Liver Slices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teal, A. R.

    1976-01-01

    Presented is a practical scheme to enable introductory biology students to investigate the mechanism by which urea is synthesized in the liver. The tissue-slice technique is discussed, and methods for the quantitative analysis of metabolites are presented. (Author/SL)

  17. What Is a Urea Cycle Disorder?

    MedlinePlus

    ... urine and removed from the body. In urea cycle disorders, the nitrogen accumulates in the form of ammonia, a highly toxic substance, resulting in hyperammonemia (elevated blood ... and severity of urea cycle disorders is highly variable. This depends on the ...

  18. Pro-inflammatory effects of uric acid in the gastrointestinal tract

    PubMed Central

    Crane, John K.; Mongiardo, Krystin M.

    2014-01-01

    Uric acid can be generated in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract from the breakdown of nucleotides ingested in the diet or from purines released from host cells as a result of pathogen-induced cell damage. Xanthine oxidase (XO) is the enzyme that converts hypoxanthine or xanthine into uric acid, a reaction that also generates hydrogen peroxide. It has been assumed that the product of XO responsible for the pro-inflammatory effects of this enzyme is hydrogen peroxide. Recent literature on uric acid, however, has indicated that uric acid itself may have biological effects. We tested whether uric acid itself has detectable pro-inflammatory effects using an in vivo model using ligated rabbit intestinal segments (loops) as well as in vitro assays using cultured cells. Addition of exogenous uric acid increased the influx of heterophils into rabbit intestinal loops, as measured by myeloperoxidase activity. In addition, white blood cells adhered avidly to uric acid crystals, forming large aggregates of cells. Uric acid acts as a leukocyte chemoattractant in the GI tract. The role of uric acid in enteric infections and in non-infectious disorders of the GI tract deserves more attention. PMID:24377830

  19. Two-stage magnetic orientation of uric acid crystals as gout initiators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeuchi, Y.; Miyashita, Y.; Mizukawa, Y.; Iwasaka, M.

    2014-01-01

    The present study focuses on the magnetic behavior of uric acid crystals, which are responsible for gout. Under a sub-Tesla (T)-level magnetic field, rotational motion of the crystals, which were caused by diamagnetic torque, was observed. We used horizontal magnetic fields with a maximum magnitude of 500 mT generated by an electromagnet to observe the magnetic orientation of the uric acid microcrystals by a microscope. The uric acid crystals showed a perpendicular magnetic field orientation with a minimum threshold of 130 mT. We speculate that the distinct diamagnetic anisotropy in the uric acid crystals resulted in their rotational responses.

  20. Remote calorimetric detection of urea via flow injection analysis.

    PubMed

    Gaddes, David E; Demirel, Melik C; Reeves, W Brian; Tadigadapa, Srinivas

    2015-12-01

    The design and development of a calorimetric biosensing system enabling relatively high throughput sample analysis are reported. The calorimetric biosensor system consists of a thin (∼20 μm) micromachined Y-cut quartz crystal resonator (QCR) as a temperature sensor placed in close proximity to a fluidic chamber packed with an immobilized enzyme. Layer by layer enzyme immobilization of urease is demonstrated and its activity as a function of the number of layers, pH, and time has been evaluated. This configuration enables a sensing system where a transducer element is physically separated from the analyte solution of interest and is thereby free from fouling effects typically associated with biochemical reactions occuring on the sensor surface. The performance of this biosensing system is demonstrated by detection of 1-200 mM urea in phosphate buffer via a flow injection analysis (FIA) technique. Miniaturized fluidic systems were used to provide continuous flow through a reaction column. Under this configuration the biosensor has an ultimate resolution of less than 1 mM urea and showed a linear response between 0-50 mM. This work demonstrates a sensing modality in which the sensor itself is not fouled or contaminated by the solution of interest and the enzyme immobilized Kapton® fluidic reaction column can be used as a disposable cartridge. Such a system enables reuse and reliability for long term sampling measurements. Based on this concept a biosensing system is envisioned which can perform rapid measurements to detect biomarkers such as glucose, creatinine, cholesterol, urea and lactate in urine and blood continuously over extended periods of time. PMID:26479269

  1. Uric Acid and Coronary Artery Disease, Two Sides of a Single Coin: A Determinant of Antioxidant System or a Factor in Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Bagheri, Babak; Zargari, Mehryar; Meshkini, Fatemeh; Dinarvand, Kolsoum; Mokhberi, Vahid; Azizi, Soheil

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Uric acid has antioxidant activity and it is expected to protect against coronary artery disease (CAD). Contradictory, it is a component of metabolic syndrome and so a risk factor for CAD. The associations of plasma total antioxidant capacity (TAOC) and uric acid (UA) as well as other risk factors were investigated relative to the occurrence and severity of CAD. Materials and Methods The study population consisted of 148 males and 152 females aged 35-76 years who were classified as CAD cases and controls according to the results of coronary angiography. The severity of CAD was scored on the basis of the number and the extent of lesions at coronary arteries. The concentrations of UA and TAOC were measured by using of FRAP and enzymatic uricase methods. Results The prevalence of hypertension, cigarette smoking and diabetes mellitus was more frequent in CAD cases than controls. Patients with CAD when compared with the controls had increased levels of glucose, triglycerides, creatinine, UA, TAOC and decreased levels of HDL- cholesterol. Serum UA was high positive correlate of serum total and LDL-cholesterol, triglyceride, creatinine, BUN, bilirubin, TAOC and negative correlate of glucose and HDL-C. TAOC and its major determinant UA but not bilirubin and albumin are significantly associated with the prevalence and severity of CAD. In multivariate analysis and in the absence of hypertension, UA but not TAOC would remain and be associated with CAD by the OR of 1.57 (1.07-2.29), p=0.02. If the results adjusted for all major risk factors including hypertension, neither TAOC nor UA would remain in the regression equation. Conclusion The results suggest that TAOC and UA but not bilirubin and albumin are associated with CAD significantly. But, the correlation is not independent and is attributed to the metabolic syndrome. The measurement of UA and TAOC will not improve the prognostic power beyond the classical risk factors. PMID:27042498

  2. 40 CFR 721.9892 - Alkylated urea.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Alkylated urea. 721.9892 Section 721... Alkylated urea. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as an alkylated urea (PMN P-93-1649) is subject to reporting under...

  3. Potential mechanisms for low uric acid in Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Sampat, Radhika; Young, Sarah; Rosen, Ami; Bernhard, Douglas; Millington, David; Factor, Stewart; Jinnah, H A

    2016-04-01

    Several epidemiologic studies have described an association between low serum uric acid (UA) and Parkinson disease (PD). Uric acid is a known antioxidant, and one proposed mechanism of neurodegeneration in PD is oxidative damage of dopamine neurons. However, other complex metabolic pathways may contribute. The purpose of this study is to elucidate potential mechanisms of low serum UA in PD. Subjects who met diagnostic criteria for definite or probable PD (n = 20) and controls (n = 20) aged 55-80 years were recruited. Twenty-four hour urine samples were collected from all participants, and both uric acid and allantoin were measured and corrected for body mass index (BMI). Urinary metabolites were compared using a twoway ANOVA with diagnosis and sex as the explanatory variables. There were no significant differences between PD and controls for total UA (p = 0.60), UA corrected for BMI (p = 0.37), or in the interaction of diagnosis and sex on UA (p = 0.24). Similarly, there were no significant differences between PD and controls for allantoin (p = 0.47), allantoin corrected for BMI (p = 0.57), or in the interaction of diagnosis and sex on allantoin (p = 0.78). Allantoin/UA ratios also did not significantly differ by diagnosis (p = 0.99). Our results imply that low serum UA in PD may be due to an intrinsic mechanism that alters the homeostatic set point for serum UA in PD, and may contribute to relatively lower protection against oxidative damage. These findings provide indirect support for neuroprotection trials aimed at raising serum UA. PMID:26747026

  4. Metabolic Syndrome, Alcohol Consumption and Genetic Factors Are Associated with Serum Uric Acid Concentration

    PubMed Central

    Stibůrková, Blanka; Pavlíková, Markéta; Sokolová, Jitka; Kožich, Viktor

    2014-01-01

    Objective Uric acid is the end product of purine metabolism in humans, and increased serum uric acid concentrations lead to gout. The objective of the current study was to identify factors that are independently associated with serum uric acid concentrations in a cohort of Czech control individuals. Methods The cohort consisted of 589 healthy subjects aged 18–65 years. We studied the associations between the serum uric acid concentration and the following: (i) demographic, anthropometric and other variables previously reported to be associated with serum uric acid concentrations; (ii) the presence of metabolic syndrome and the levels of metabolic syndrome components; and (iii) selected genetic variants of the MTHFR (c.665C>T, c.1286A>C), SLC2A9 (c.844G>A, c.881G>A) and ABCG2 genes (c.421C>A). A backward model selection procedure was used to build two multiple linear regression models; in the second model, the number of metabolic syndrome criteria that were met replaced the metabolic syndrome-related variables. Results The models had coefficients of determination of 0.59 and 0.53. The serum uric acid concentration strongly correlated with conventional determinants including male sex, and with metabolic syndrome-related variables. In the simplified second model, the serum uric acid concentration positively correlated with the number of metabolic syndrome criteria that were met, and this model retained the explanatory power of the first model. Moderate wine drinking did not increase serum uric acid concentrations, and the urate transporter ABCG2, unlike MTHFR, was a genetic determinant of serum uric acid concentrations. Conclusion Metabolic syndrome, moderate wine drinking and the c.421C>A variant in the ABCG gene are independently associated with the serum uric acid concentration. Our model indicates that uric acid should be clinically monitored in persons with metabolic syndrome. PMID:24827988

  5. Direct determination of creatinine based on poly(ethyleneimine)/phosphotungstic acid multilayer modified electrode.

    PubMed

    Han, Ping; Xu, Shimei; Feng, Shun; Hao, Yanjun; Wang, Jide

    2016-05-01

    In this work, the direct determination of creatinine was achieved using a poly(ethyleneimine)/phosphotungstic acid multilayer modified electrode with the assistance of Copper(II) ions by cyclic voltammetry. The quantity of creatinine were determined by measuring the redox peak current of Cu(II)-creatinine complex/Cu(I)-creatinine complex. Factors affecting the response current of creatinine at the modified electrode were optimized. A linear relationship between the response current and the concentration of creatinine ranging from 0.125 to 62.5μM was obtained with a detection limit of 0.06μM. The proposed method was applied to determine creatinine in human urine, and satisfied results were gotten which was validated in accordance with high performance liquid chromatography. The proposed electrode provided a promising alternative in routine sensing for creatinine without enzymatic assistance. PMID:26946017

  6. Urea biosensor for hemodialysis monitoring

    DOEpatents

    Glass, R.S.

    1999-01-12

    This research discloses an electrochemical sensor capable of detecting and quantifying urea in fluids resulting from hemodialysis procedures. The sensor is based upon measurement of the pH change produced in an aqueous environment by the products of the enzyme-catalyzed hydrolysis of urea. The sensor may be fabricated using methods amenable to mass fabrication, resulting in low-cost sensors and thus providing the potential for disposable use. In a typical application, the sensor could be used in treatment centers, in conjunction with an appropriate electronics/computer system, in order to determine the hemodialysis endpoint. The sensor can also be utilized to allow at-home testing to determine if dialysis was necessary. Such a home monitor is similar, in principle, to devices used for blood glucose testing by diabetics, and would require a blood droplet sample by using a finger prick. 9 figs.

  7. Urea biosensor for hemodialysis monitoring

    DOEpatents

    Glass, Robert S.

    1999-01-01

    An electrochemical sensor capable of detecting and quantifying urea in fluids resulting from hemodialysis procedures. The sensor is based upon measurement of the pH change produced in an aqueous environment by the products of the enzyme-catalyzed hydrolysis of urea. The sensor may be fabricated using methods amenable to mass fabrication, resulting in low-cost sensors and thus providing the potential for disposable use. In a typical application, the sensor could be used in treatment centers, in conjunction with an appropriate electronics/computer system, in order to determine the hemodialysis endpoint. The sensor can also be utilized to allow at-home testing to determine if dialysis was necessary. Such a home monitor is similar, in principle, to devices used for blood glucose testing by diabetics, and would require a blood droplet sample by using a finger prick.

  8. Evaluation of Serum Creatinine Changes With Integrase Inhibitor Use in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-1 Infected Adults

    PubMed Central

    Lindeman, Tara A.; Duggan, Joan M.; Sahloff, Eric G.

    2016-01-01

    This retrospective chart review evaluated changes in serum creatinine and creatinine clearance (CrCl) after initiation of an integrase inhibitor (INSTI)-based regimen as initial treatment in human immunodeficiency virus-infected adults. Serum creatinine and CrCl changes were similar to those seen in clinical trials for INSTIs. No renal-related serious adverse events or discontinuations occurred. PMID:27092314

  9. Serum uric acid and cardiovascular risk: state of the art and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Fenech, Goël; Rajzbaum, Gérald; Mazighi, Mikaël; Blacher, Jacques

    2014-10-01

    Hyperuricaemia is commonly found in subjects with cardiovascular disease, but its role as risk factor is very controversial. Although several studies reported serum uric acid as a marker of an underlying pathophysiological process, other studies hypothesis a potential causal link between serum uric acid and cardiovascular diseases. Some studies suggest that uric acid is biologically active and may have an atherogenesis role in development of cardiovascular diseases, although the mechanisms are not fully understood. Other studies have shown that uric acid can independently predict the development of some cardiovascular risk factors such as hypertension and metabolic syndrome, as well as myocardial infarction and stroke. The relations between serum uric acid and established cardiovascular risk factors are complex, and these latter could be considered as confounding factors. In this report, we review the inextricably link of serum uric acid to known cardiovascular risk factors, and we describe the possible mechanisms and potential causative role between serum uric acid and cardiovascular events in the general population, in subjects with cardiovascular risk factors and in those with pre-existing cardiovascular diseases. Limited information however is available concerning the impact of urate-lowering treatments on cardiovascular events, whereas only a positive therapeutic trial could give definite answers to the difficult problem of causality of uric acid in relation to cardiovascular risk. Thus, it is time to propose the design of a therapeutic trial, integrating cardiologists and rheumatologists, in order to further decrease cardiovascular risk. PMID:24565888

  10. Wearable salivary uric acid mouthguard biosensor with integrated wireless electronics.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jayoung; Imani, Somayeh; de Araujo, William R; Warchall, Julian; Valdés-Ramírez, Gabriela; Paixão, Thiago R L C; Mercier, Patrick P; Wang, Joseph

    2015-12-15

    This article demonstrates an instrumented mouthguard capable of non-invasively monitoring salivary uric acid (SUA) levels. The enzyme (uricase)-modified screen printed electrode system has been integrated onto a mouthguard platform along with anatomically-miniaturized instrumentation electronics featuring a potentiostat, microcontroller, and a Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) transceiver. Unlike RFID-based biosensing systems, which require large proximal power sources, the developed platform enables real-time wireless transmission of the sensed information to standard smartphones, laptops, and other consumer electronics for on-demand processing, diagnostics, or storage. The mouthguard biosensor system offers high sensitivity, selectivity, and stability towards uric acid detection in human saliva, covering the concentration ranges for both healthy people and hyperuricemia patients. The new wireless mouthguard biosensor system is able to monitor SUA level in real-time and continuous fashion, and can be readily expanded to an array of sensors for different analytes to enable an attractive wearable monitoring system for diverse health and fitness applications. PMID:26276541

  11. Wearable salivary uric acid mouthguard biosensor with integrated wireless electronics

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jayoung; Imani, Somayeh; de Araujo, William R.; Warchall, Julian; Valdés-Ramírez, Gabriela; Paixão, Thiago R.L.C.; Mercier, Patrick P.; Wang, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    This article demonstrates an instrumented mouthguard capable of non-invasively monitoring salivary uric acid (SUA) levels. The enzyme (uricase)-modified screen printed electrode system has been integrated onto a mouthguard platform along with anatomically-miniaturized instrumentation electronics featuring a potentiostat, microcontroller, and a Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) transceiver. Unlike RFID-based biosensing systems, which require large proximal power sources, the developed platform enables real-time wireless transmission of the sensed information to standard smartphones, laptops, and other consumer electronics for on-demand processing, diagnostics, or storage. The mouthguard biosensor system offers high sensitivity, selectivity, and stability towards uric acid detection in human saliva, covering the concentration ranges for both healthy people and hyperuricemia patients. The new wireless mouthguard biosensor system is able to monitor SUA level in real-time and continuous fashion, and can be readily expanded to an array of sensors for different analytes to enable an attractive wearable monitoring system for diverse health and fitness applications. PMID:26276541

  12. Effects of varying ruminally undegradable protein supplementation on forage digestion, nitrogen metabolism, and urea kinetics in Nellore cattle fed low-quality tropical forage.

    PubMed

    Batista, E D; Detmann, E; Titgemeyer, E C; Valadares Filho, S C; Valadares, R F D; Prates, L L; Rennó, L N; Paulino, M F

    2016-01-01

    Effects of supplemental RDP and RUP on nutrient digestion, N metabolism, urea kinetics, and muscle protein degradation were evaluated in Nellore heifers () consuming low-quality signal grass hay (5% CP and 80% NDF, DM basis). Five ruminally and abomasally cannulated Nellore heifers (248 ± 9 kg) were used in a 5 × 5 Latin square. Treatments were the control (no supplement) and RDP supplementation to meet 100% of the RDP requirement plus RUP provision to supply 0, 50, 100, or 150% of the RUP requirement. Supplemental RDP (casein plus NPN) was ruminally dosed twice daily, and RUP supply (casein) was continuously infused abomasally. Jugular infusion of [NN]-urea with measurement of enrichment in urine was used to evaluate urea kinetics. The ratio of urinary 3-methylhistidine to creatinine was used to estimate skeletal muscle protein degradation. Forage NDF intake (2.48 kg/d) was not affected ( ≥ 0.37) by supplementation, but supplementation did increase ruminal NDF digestion ( < 0.01). Total N intake (by design) and N retention increased ( < 0.001) with supplementation and also linearly increased with RUP provision. Urea entry rate and gastrointestinal entry rate of urea were increased by supplementation ( < 0.001). Supplementation with RUP linearly increased ( = 0.02) urea entry rate and tended ( = 0.07) to linearly increase gastrointestinal entry rate of urea. Urea use for anabolic purposes tended ( = 0.07) to be increased by supplementation, and RUP provision also tended ( = 0.08) to linearly increase the amount of urea used for anabolism. The fraction of recycled urea N incorporated into microbial N was greater ( < 0.001) for control (22%) than for supplemented (9%) heifers. Urinary 3-methylhistidine:creatinine of control heifers was more than double that of supplemented heifers ( < 0.001). Control heifers reabsorbed a greater ( < 0.001) fraction of urea from the renal tubule than did supplemented heifers. Overall, unsupplemented heifers had greater mobilization of AA from myofibrillar protein, which provided N for urea synthesis and subsequent recycling. Supplemental RUP, when RDP was supplied, not only increased N retention but also supported increased urea N recycling and increased ruminal microbial protein synthesis. PMID:26812327

  13. Detection of urinary creatinine using gold nanoparticles after solid phase extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sittiwong, Jarinya; Unob, Fuangfa

    2015-03-01

    Label-free gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) were utilized in the detection of creatinine in human urine after a sample preparation by extraction of creatinine on sulfonic acid functionalized silica gel. With the proposed sample preparation method, the interfering effects of the urine matrix on creatinine detection by AuNPs were eliminated. Parameters affecting creatinine extraction were investigated. The aggregation of AuNPs induced by creatinine resulted in a change in the surface plasmon resonance signal with a concomitant color change that could be observed by the naked eye and quantified spectrometrically. The effect of AuNP concentration and reaction time on AuNP aggregation was investigated. The method described herein provides a determination of creatinine in a range of 15-40 mg L-1 with a detection limit of 13.7 mg L-1 and it was successfully used in the detection of creatinine in human urine samples.

  14. Influence of methoxyflurane-nitrous oxide analgesia during childbirth on renal and hepatic function.

    PubMed

    Dahlgren, B E

    1977-12-01

    Blood urea content and the serum concentrations of sodium, creatinine, uric acid, glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase (g.o.t.), glutamic pyruvate transaminase (g.p.t.) and bilirubin were measured before delivery, on the 2nd and 3rd days and on the 5th day after delivery. In two groups of mothers, one receiving nitrous oxide analgesia and the other a combination of nitrous oxide and methoxyflurane, blood urea and serum sodium and g.o.t. were increased following labour and nitrous oxide analgesia; s.g.p.t. was increased only in the late post-partum period. Serum sodium, creatinine, uric acid, urea, g.o.t. and g.p.t. increased following exposure to methoxyflurance. The increase in serum sodium, uric acid and urea was dose-dependent. Capillary concentrations of uric acid in the neonates showed dose-dependent changes in response to methoxyflurane. PMID:588403

  15. 21 CFR 184.1923 - Urea.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Urea. 184.1923 Section 184.1923 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DIRECT FOOD SUBSTANCES AFFIRMED AS GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1923 Urea. (a) Urea (CO(NH2)2, CAS Reg. No....

  16. 21 CFR 184.1923 - Urea.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Urea. 184.1923 Section 184.1923 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1923 Urea. (a) Urea (CO(NH2)2, CAS Reg. No. 57-13-6) is the diamide...

  17. Altered Serum Uric Acid Level in Lichen Planus Patients

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborti, Goutam; Biswas, Rabindranath; Chakraborti, Sandip; Sen, Pradyot Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Background: Lichen planus (LP) is a common disorder whose etiopathogenesis is not clear. Recently, it has been suggested that increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) play important roles in the underlying mechanism of LP. Objectives: The principal aim of this study was to evaluate serum uric acid (UA) levels as a measure of the antioxidant defense status in LP patients. Methods: Serum UA levels were determined in 58 LP patients and 61 controls. Results: Serum UA levels were significantly decreased in patients with respect to controls. Moreover, serum UA level was decreased according to increasing duration of disease. Conclusions: The results of our study suggest that LP is associated with decrease of UA levels in serum. UA may be a potential, useful biomarker of antioxidant status in LP for elaboration of treatment strategy and monitoring. PMID:25484383

  18. Molecularly imprinted titania nanoparticles for selective recognition and assay of uric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mujahid, Adnan; Khan, Aimen Idrees; Afzal, Adeel; Hussain, Tajamal; Raza, Muhammad Hamid; Shah, Asma Tufail; uz Zaman, Waheed

    2015-06-01

    Molecularly imprinted titania nanoparticles are su ccessfully synthesized by sol-gel method for the selective recognition of uric acid. Atomic force microscopy is used to study the morphology of uric acid imprinted titania nanoparticles with diameter in the range of 100-150 nm. Scanning electron microscopy images of thick titania layer indicate the formation of fine network of titania nanoparticles with uniform distribution. Molecular imprinting of uric acid as well as its subsequent washing is confirmed by Fourier transformation infrared spectroscopy measurements. Uric acid rebinding studies reveal the recognition capability of imprinted particles in the range of 0.01-0.095 mmol, which is applicable in monitoring normal to elevated levels of uric acid in human blood. The optical shift (signal) of imprinted particles is six times higher in comparison with non-imprinted particles for the same concentration of uric acid. Imprinted titania particles have shown substantially reduced binding affinity toward interfering and structurally related substances, e.g. ascorbic acid and guanine. These results suggest the possible application of titania nanoparticles in uric acid recognition and quantification in blood serum.

  19. Uric Acid Levels Can Predict Metabolic Syndrome and Hypertension in Adolescents: A 10-Year Longitudinal Study

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Hai-Lun; Pei, Dee; Lue, Ko-Huang; Chen, Yen-Lin

    2015-01-01

    The relationships between uric acid and chronic disease risk factors such as metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and hypertension have been studied in adults. However, whether these relationships exist in adolescents is unknown. We randomly selected 8,005 subjects who were between 10 to 15 years old at baseline. Measurements of uric acid were used to predict the future occurrence of metabolic syndrome, hypertension, and type 2 diabetes. In total, 5,748 adolescents were enrolled and followed for a median of 7.2 years. Using cutoff points of uric acid for males and females (7.3 and 6.2 mg/dl, respectively), a high level of uric acid was either the second or third best predictor for hypertension in both genders (hazard ratio: 2.920 for males, 5.222 for females; p<0.05). However, uric acid levels failed to predict type 2 diabetes mellitus, and only predicted metabolic syndrome in males (hazard ratio: 1.658; p<0.05). The same results were found in multivariate adjusted analysis. In conclusion, a high level of uric acid indicated a higher likelihood of developing hypertension in both genders and metabolic syndrome in males after 10 years of follow-up. However, uric acid levels did not affect the occurrence of type 2 diabetes in both genders. PMID:26618358

  20. Biological Activities of Uric Acid in Infection Due to Enteropathogenic and Shiga-Toxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Crane, John K; Broome, Jacqueline E; Lis, Agnieszka

    2016-04-01

    In previous work, we identified xanthine oxidase (XO) as an important enzyme in the interaction between the host and enteropathogenicEscherichia coli(EPEC) and Shiga-toxigenicE. coli(STEC). Many of the biological effects of XO were due to the hydrogen peroxide produced by the enzyme. We wondered, however, if uric acid generated by XO also had biological effects in the gastrointestinal tract. Uric acid triggered inflammatory responses in the gut, including increased submucosal edema and release of extracellular DNA from host cells. While uric acid alone was unable to trigger a chloride secretory response in intestinal monolayers, it did potentiate the secretory response to cyclic AMP agonists. Uric acid crystals were formedin vivoin the lumen of the gut in response to EPEC and STEC infections. While trying to visualize uric acid crystals formed during EPEC and STEC infections, we noticed that uric acid crystals became enmeshed in the neutrophilic extracellular traps (NETs) produced from host cells in response to bacteria in cultured cell systems and in the intestinein vivo Uric acid levels in the gut lumen increased in response to exogenous DNA, and these increases were enhanced by the actions of DNase I. Interestingly, addition of DNase I reduced the numbers of EPEC bacteria recovered after a 20-h infection and protected against EPEC-induced histologic damage. PMID:26787720

  1. A Mendelian Randomization Study of Circulating Uric Acid and Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Sluijs, Ivonne; Holmes, Michael V; van der Schouw, Yvonne T; Beulens, Joline W J; Asselbergs, Folkert W; Huerta, José María; Palmer, Tom M; Arriola, Larraitz; Balkau, Beverley; Barricarte, Aurelio; Boeing, Heiner; Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise; Fagherazzi, Guy; Franks, Paul W; Gavrila, Diana; Kaaks, Rudolf; Khaw, Kay Tee; Kühn, Tilman; Molina-Montes, Esther; Mortensen, Lotte Maxild; Nilsson, Peter M; Overvad, Kim; Palli, Domenico; Panico, Salvatore; Quirós, J Ramón; Rolandsson, Olov; Sacerdote, Carlotta; Sala, Núria; Schmidt, Julie A; Scott, Robert A; Sieri, Sabina; Slimani, Nadia; Spijkerman, Annemieke M W; Tjonneland, Anne; Travis, Ruth C; Tumino, Rosario; van der A, Daphne L; Sharp, Stephen J; Forouhi, Nita G; Langenberg, Claudia; Riboli, Elio; Wareham, Nicholas J

    2015-08-01

    We aimed to investigate the causal effect of circulating uric acid concentrations on type 2 diabetes risk. A Mendelian randomization study was performed using a genetic score with 24 uric acid-associated loci. We used data of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC)-InterAct case-cohort study, comprising 24,265 individuals of European ancestry from eight European countries. During a mean (SD) follow-up of 10 (4) years, 10,576 verified incident case subjects with type 2 diabetes were ascertained. Higher uric acid was associated with a higher diabetes risk after adjustment for confounders, with a hazard ratio (HR) of 1.20 (95% CI 1.11, 1.30) per 59.48 µmol/L (1 mg/dL) uric acid. The genetic score raised uric acid by 17 µmol/L (95% CI 15, 18) per SD increase and explained 4% of uric acid variation. By using the genetic score to estimate the unconfounded effect, we found that a 59.48 µmol/L higher uric acid concentration did not have a causal effect on diabetes (HR 1.01 [95% CI 0.87, 1.16]). Including data from the Diabetes Genetics Replication And Meta-analysis (DIAGRAM) consortium, increasing our dataset to 41,508 case subjects with diabetes, the summary odds ratio estimate was 0.99 (95% CI 0.92, 1.06). In conclusion, our study does not support a causal effect of circulating uric acid on diabetes risk. Uric acid-lowering therapies may therefore not be beneficial in reducing diabetes risk. PMID:25918230

  2. Uric Acid and the Risk of Alzheimer's Disease: Is There an Association?

    PubMed

    Yuan, Min; Xu, Lijun; Yin, Xiaoping

    2016-05-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a very common neurodegenerative disorder of the central nervous system, characterized by dementia, cognitive impairment, and memory loss, and the global prevalence is increasing. Many epidemiologic studies have considered the association between uric acid and AD, yet the relationship remains elusive. The objective of this study was to validate whether or not uric acid is indeed associated with AD. We compared different prospective studies and ultimately found that it is also a controversial issue. Further higher quality prospective evidence on the relationship between uric acid and AD in different age stage are needed to determine the causal association and its exact pathogenetic mechanisms. PMID:26385943

  3. Uric acid and coronary artery disease: An elusive link deserving further attention.

    PubMed

    Biscaglia, Simone; Ceconi, Claudio; Malagù, Michele; Pavasini, Rita; Ferrari, Roberto

    2016-06-15

    Uric acid is the final product of purine metabolism. Classically it is recognized as the cause of gouty arthritis and kidney stones. Western civilization has increased serum levels of uric acid which is no longer considered a benign plasma solute. It has been postulated and recently demonstrated that it can penetrate cell membrane and exerts damaging intracellular actions such as oxidation and inflammation. These observations have stimulated several epidemiological researches suggesting that hyperuricemia is linked or even provokes hypertension and coronary artery disease. In this review we summarize the current evidences regarding uric acid which contribute in the pathophysiology of coronary artery disease. PMID:26318389

  4. The association of vitamin C, alcohol, coffee, tea, milk and yogurt with uric acid and gout.

    PubMed

    Towiwat, Patapong; Li, Zhan-Guo

    2015-06-01

    About 2500 years ago, gout was observed by Hippocrates and many people suffered severe pain and deformity. Lifestyle and diet play a significant role in gout and serum uric acid levels. Epidemiological and research studies have supported this evidence. Many recommendations and guidelines from different parts of the world mention the impact of diet on gout. Recently, new research has shown associations between vitamin C, alcohol, coffee, tea, milk and yogurt with uric acid and the risk of gout. Our review summarizes recently published research regarding dietary impact on the risk of gout and serum uric acid levels. PMID:26082349

  5. Urinary creatinine concentrations in the U.S. population: implications for urinary biologic monitoring measurements.

    PubMed

    Barr, Dana B; Wilder, Lynn C; Caudill, Samuel P; Gonzalez, Amanda J; Needham, Lance L; Pirkle, James L

    2005-02-01

    Biologic monitoring (i.e., biomonitoring) is used to assess human exposures to environmental and workplace chemicals. Urinary biomonitoring data typically are adjusted to a constant creatinine concentration to correct for variable dilutions among spot samples. Traditionally, this approach has been used in population groups without much diversity. The inclusion of multiple demographic groups in studies using biomonitoring for exposure assessment has increased the variability in the urinary creatinine levels in these study populations. Our objectives were to document the normal range of urinary creatinine concentrations among various demographic groups, evaluate the impact that variations in creatinine concentrations can have on classifying exposure status of individuals in epidemiologic studies, and recommend an approach using multiple regression to adjust for variations in creatinine in multivariate analyses. We performed a weighted multivariate analysis of urinary creatinine concentrations in 22,245 participants of the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (1988-1994) and established reference ranges (10th-90th percentiles) for each demographic and age category. Significant predictors of urinary creatinine concentration included age group, sex, race/ethnicity, body mass index, and fat-free mass. Time of day that urine samples were collected made a small but statistically significant difference in creatinine concentrations. For an individual, the creatinine-adjusted concentration of an analyte should be compared with a "reference" range derived from persons in a similar demographic group (e.g., children with children, adults with adults). For multiple regression analysis of population groups, we recommend that the analyte concentration (unadjusted for creatinine) should be included in the analysis with urinary creatinine added as a separate independent variable. This approach allows the urinary analyte concentration to be appropriately adjusted for urinary creatinine and the statistical significance of other variables in the model to be independent of effects of creatinine concentration. PMID:15687057

  6. Rare mutations associating with serum creatinine and chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Sveinbjornsson, Gardar; Mikaelsdottir, Evgenia; Palsson, Runolfur; Indridason, Olafur S; Holm, Hilma; Jonasdottir, Aslaug; Helgason, Agnar; Sigurdsson, Snaevar; Jonasdottir, Adalbjorg; Sigurdsson, Asgeir; Eyjolfsson, Gudmundur Ingi; Sigurdardottir, Olof; Magnusson, Olafur Th; Kong, Augustine; Masson, Gisli; Sulem, Patrick; Olafsson, Isleifur; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Gudbjartsson, Daniel F; Stefansson, Kari

    2014-12-20

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a complex disorder with a strong genetic component. A number of common sequence variants have been found to associate with serum creatinine (SCr), estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and/or CKD. We imputed 24 million single-nucleotide polymorphisms and insertions/deletions identified by whole-genome sequencing of 2230 Icelanders into 81 656 chip-typed individuals and 112 630 relatives of genotyped individuals over the age of 18 with SCr measurements. The large set of sequenced individuals allowed accurate imputation of variants to a minor allele frequency (MAF) of 0.1%. We tested the imputed variants for association with SCr. In addition to replicating established loci, we discovered missense and loss-of-function variants associating with SCr in three solute carriers (SLC6A19, SLC25A45 and SLC47A1) and two E3 ubiquitin ligases (RNF186 and RNF128). All the variants are within coding sequences and all but one are rare (MAF <2%) with SCr effects between 0.085 and 0.129 standard deviations. These rare variants have a larger effect on SCr than previously reported common variants, explaining 0.5% of the variability of SCr in Icelanders in addition to the 1% already accounted for. We tested the five variants associating with SCr for association with CKD in an Icelandic sample of 15 594 cases and 291 428 controls. Three of the variants also associated with CKD. These variants may either affect kidney function or creatinine synthesis and excretion. Of note were four mutations in SLC6A19 that associate with reduced SCr, three of which have been shown to cause Hartnup disease. PMID:25082825

  7. Extraction of urea and ammonium ion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anselmi, R. T.; Husted, R. R.; Schulz, J. R.

    1977-01-01

    Water purification system keeps urea and ammonium ion concentration below toxic limits in recirculated water of closed loop aquatic habitat. Urea is first converted to ammonium ions and carbon dioxide by enzygmatic action. Ammonium ions are removed by ion exchange. Bioburden is controlled by filtration through 0.45 micron millipore filters.

  8. [Urea formation in the after operational liver].

    PubMed

    Savilov, P N

    2016-01-01

    The effect of resection of the left lobe of the liver (LR, 15-20% og the organ weight) on hepatic urea formation was investigated in 84 albino rats. The objects of study were the surgery left (LLP), inoperable middle (MLP) lobe of the liver, blood (aorta, v. hepatica, v. porta) and choledochal bile. They studied the urea content. Arginase activity was examined in liver homogenate. On the day 3 and day 7 after resection reduced arginase activity was detected. LR caused a decrease of urea in v. hepatica, but increased urea content in the arterial blood and v. porta. Increase in bile urea on day 7 it was replaced by a decrease observed on day 14 of the postsurgery period. The concentration of urea in the liver on the 3rd day after LR was below the norm, and on the 7th and 14th day was within it. The results indicate a violation of urea operated by hepatocytes of the liver and extrahepatic activation mechanisms of the formation of urea. PMID:26973192

  9. 21 CFR 184.1923 - Urea.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Urea. 184.1923 Section 184.1923 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) DIRECT FOOD SUBSTANCES AFFIRMED AS GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1923 Urea....

  10. Urea Transporter Physiology Studied in Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xuechen; Chen, Guangping; Yang, Baoxue

    2012-01-01

    In mammals, there are two types of urea transporters; urea transporter (UT)-A and UT-B. The UT-A transporters are mainly expressed in kidney epithelial cells while UT-B demonstrates a broader distribution in kidney, heart, brain, testis, urinary tract, and other tissues. Over the past few years, multiple urea transporter knockout mouse models have been generated enabling us to explore the physiological roles of the different urea transporters. In the kidney, deletion of UT-A1/UT-A3 results in polyuria and a severe urine concentrating defect, indicating that intrarenal recycling of urea plays a crucial role in the overall capacity to concentrate urine. Since UT-B has a wide tissue distribution, multiple phenotypic abnormalities have been found in UT-B null mice, such as defective urine concentration, exacerbated heart blockage with aging, depression-like behavior, and earlier male sexual maturation. This review summarizes the new insights of urea transporter functions in different organs, gleaned from studies of urea transporter knockout mice, and explores some of the potential pharmacological prospects of urea transporters. PMID:22745630

  11. Urea transport through composite polyallylamine membranes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ballou, E. V.; Kubo, L. Y.; Spitze, L. A.; Wydeven, T.; Clark, J. A.

    1977-01-01

    Polyallylamine composite reverse osmosis membranes were prepared by plasma polymerization and deposition onto small-pored cellulose acetate/cellulose nitrate films. The polyallylamine coated the porous substrate with a thin uniform polymer film which exhibited water permeability and urea rejection, of interest because of the potential application of reverse osmosis to urine purification in closed environmental systems. The flux of C-14 labeled urea was studied under the influence of osmotic gradients provided by sodium chloride solutions. The urea flux was found to be enhanced by an osmotic pressure gradient in the same direction and diminished, but not prevented, by an opposing osmotic pressure gradient. Consideration is given to the mechanism of the urea transport, as well as to the influence of concentration polarization on the experimental results. The minimization of coupled flow in pores of a critical size range is apparently necessary to improve urea rejection.

  12. Some observations and improvements on SMA 6/60 determinations of creatinine

    PubMed Central

    Close-Moll, Madeleine; Lines, J. G.

    1972-01-01

    Modifications to an earlier SMA 6/60 method for creatinine determinations are reported. The suggested procedure is linear for concentrations up to 15 mg/100 ml, shows no zero drift, and has a satisfactory analytical precision. Effects have been determined upon the analysis for a number of non-creatinine constituents of biological fluids. Recommendations are made for the optimum determination of plasma and urine creatinine. PMID:5070259

  13. Uric acid promotes left ventricular diastolic dysfunction in mice fed a Western diet.

    PubMed

    Jia, Guanghong; Habibi, Javad; Bostick, Brian P; Ma, Lixin; DeMarco, Vincent G; Aroor, Annayya R; Hayden, Melvin R; Whaley-Connell, Adam T; Sowers, James R

    2015-03-01

    The rising obesity rates parallel increased consumption of a Western diet, high in fat and fructose, which is associated with increased uric acid. Population-based data support that elevated serum uric acids are associated with left ventricular hypertrophy and diastolic dysfunction. However, the mechanism by which excess uric acid promotes these maladaptive cardiac effects has not been explored. In assessing the role of Western diet-induced increases in uric acid, we hypothesized that reductions in uric acid would prevent Western diet-induced development of cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, cardiac stiffness, and impaired diastolic relaxation by reducing growth and profibrotic signaling pathways. Four-weeks-old C57BL6/J male mice were fed excess fat (46%) and fructose (17.5%) with or without allopurinol (125 mg/L), a xanthine oxidase inhibitor, for 16 weeks. The Western diet-induced increases in serum uric acid along with increases in cardiac tissue xanthine oxidase activity temporally related to increases in body weight, fat mass, and insulin resistance without changes in blood pressure. The Western diet induced cardiomyocte hypertrophy, myocardial oxidative stress, interstitial fibrosis, and impaired diastolic relaxation. Further, the Western diet enhanced activation of the S6 kinase-1 growth pathway and the profibrotic transforming growth factor-β1/Smad2/3 signaling pathway and macrophage proinflammatory polarization. All results improved with allopurinol treatment, which lowered cardiac xanthine oxidase as well as serum uric acid levels. These findings support the notion that increased production of uric acid with intake of a Western diet promotes cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, inflammation, and oxidative stress that lead to myocardial fibrosis and associated impaired diastolic relaxation. PMID:25489061

  14. Uric Acid Level and Erectile Dysfunction In Patients With Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Solak, Yalcin; Akilli, Hakan; Kayrak, Mehmet; Aribas, Alpay; Gaipov, Abduzhappar; Turk, Suleyman; Perez-Pozo, Santos E.; Covic, Adrian; McFann, Kim; Johnson, Richard J.; Kanbay, Mehmet

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Erectile dysfunction (ED) is a frequent complaint of elderly subjects, and is closely associated with endothelial dysfunction and cardiovascular disease. Uric acid is also associated with endothelial dysfunction, oxidative stress and cardiovascular disease, raising the hypothesis that an increased serum uric acid might predict erectile dysfunction in patients who are at risk for coronary artery disease. Aim To evaluate the association of serum uric acid levels with presence and severity of ED in patients presenting with chest pain of presumed cardiac origin. Methods This is a cross-sectional study of 312 adult male patients with suspected coronary artery disease who underwent exercise stress test (EST) for workup of chest pain and completed a sexual health inventory for men (SHIM) survey form to determine the presence and severity of ED. Routine serum biochemistry (and uric acid levels) were measured. Logistic regression analysis was used to assess risk factors for ED. Main Outcome Measures The short version of the international index of erectile function (IIEF-5) questionnaire diagnosed ED (cutoff score ≤21). Serum Uric acid levels were determined. Patients with chest pain of suspected cardiac origin underwent an exercise stress test. Results 149 of 312 (47.7%) male subjects had ED by survey criteria. Patients with ED were older and had more frequent CAD, hypertension, diabetes, and impaired renal function, and also had significantly higher levels of uric acid, fibrinogen, glucose, CRP, triglycerides compared with patients without ED. Uric acid levels were associated with ED by univariate analysis (OR = 1.36, p = 0.002); however, this association was not observed in multivariate analysis adjusted for eGFR. Conclusion Subjects presenting with chest pain of presumed cardiac origin are more likely to have ED if they have elevated uric acid levels. PMID:24433559

  15. A new approach for noninvasive transdermal determination of blood uric acid levels.

    PubMed

    Ching, Congo Tak-Shing; Yong, Kok-Khun; Yao, Yan-Dong; Shen, Huan-Ting; Hsieh, Shiu-Man; Jheng, Deng-Yun; Sun, Tai-Ping; Shieh, Hsiu-Li

    2014-01-01

    The aims of this study were to investigate the most effective combination of physical forces from laser, electroporation, and reverse iontophoresis for noninvasive transdermal extraction of uric acid, and to develop a highly sensitive uric acid biosensor (UAB) for quantifying the uric acid extracted. It is believed that the combination of these physical forces has additional benefits for extraction of molecules other than uric acid from human skin. A diffusion cell with porcine skin was used to investigate the most effective combination of these physical forces. UABs coated with ZnO₂ nanoparticles and constructed in an array configuration were developed in this study. The results showed that a combination of laser (0.7 W), electroporation (100 V/cm(2)), and reverse iontophoresis (0.5 mA/cm(2)) was the most effective and significantly enhanced transdermal extraction of uric acid. A custom-designed UAB coated with ZnO₂ nanoparticles and constructed in a 1×3 array configuration (UAB-1×3-ZnO₂) demonstrated enough sensitivity (9.4 μA/mM) for quantifying uric acid extracted by the combined physical forces of laser, electroporation, and RI. A good linear relationship (R(2)=0.894) was demonstrated to exist between the concentration of uric acid (0.2-0.8 mM) inside the diffusion cell and the current response of the UAB-1×3-ZnO₂. In conclusion, a new approach to noninvasive transdermal extraction and quantification of uric acid has been established. PMID:25061289

  16. Uric Acid Promotes Left Ventricular Diastolic Dysfunction in Mice Fed a Western Diet

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Guanghong; Habibi, Javad; Bostick, Brian P.; Ma, Lixin; DeMarco, Vincent G.; Aroor, Annayya R.; Hayden, Melvin R.; Whaley-Connell, Adam T.; Sowers, James R.

    2015-01-01

    The rising obesity rates parallel increased consumption of a western diet, high in fat and fructose, which is associated with increased uric acid. Population based data support that elevated serum uric acids are associated with left ventricular hypertrophy and diastolic dysfunction. However, the mechanism by which excess uric acid promotes these maladaptive cardiac effects has not been explored. In assessing the role of western diet-induced increases in uric acid, we hypothesized that reductions in uric acid would prevent western diet-induced development of cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, cardiac stiffness and impaired diastolic relaxation by reducing growth and pro-fibrotic signaling pathways. Four week-old C57BL6/J male mice were fed excess fat (46%) and fructose (17.5%) with or without allopurinol (125mg/L), a xanthine oxidase inhibitor, for 16 weeks. The western diet induced increases in serum uric acid along with increases in cardiac tissue xanthine oxidase activity temporally related to increases in body weight, fat mass, and insulin resistance without changes in blood pressure. The western diet induced cardiomyocte hypertrophy, myocardial oxidative stress, interstitial fibrosis, and impaired diastolic relaxation. Further, the western diet enhanced activation of the S6 kinase-1 growth pathway and the pro-fibrotic transforming growth factor (TGF)-?1/Smad2/3 signaling pathway, and macrophage pro-inflammatory polarization. All results improved with allopurinol treatment, which lowered cardiac xanthine oxidase as well as serum uric acid levels. These findings support the notion that increased production of uric acid with intake of a western diet, promotes cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, inflammation and oxidative stress that lead to myocardial fibrosis and associated impaired diastolic relaxation. PMID:25489061

  17. Serum Uric Acid and Hypertension in Adults: a Paradoxical Relationship in Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Bjornstad, Petter; Wadwa, R. Paul; Sirota, Jeffrey C.; Snell-Bergeon, Janet K.; McFann, Kimberly; Rewers, Marian; Rivard, Christopher J.; Jalal, Diana; Chonchol, Michel B.; Johnson, Richard J.; Maahs, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Adults with type 1 diabetes have lower serum uric acid levels compared to non-diabetic adults. Little is known about the relationship between serum uric acid and blood pressure in type 1 diabetes and whether it differs from the positive relationship found in non-diabetic adults. We assessed the cross-sectional and longitudinal relationships over 6-years between serum uric acid and blood pressure in adults with (35±9 years, n=393) and without (38±9 years n=685) T1D in the Coronary Artery Calcification in Type 1 Diabetes study. In non-diabetic adults, serum uric acid was associated with systolic blood pressure in multivariable-models adjusted for cardiovascular risk-factors. In adults with type 1 diabetes, a negative association was observed between serum uric acid and systolic blood pressure after multivariable-adjustments. A positive association was observed between serum uric acid and systolic blood pressure in non-diabetic adults. In contrast, an inverse relationship was demonstrated after multivariable-adjustments in type 1 diabetes. PMID:24667019

  18. Association between serum uric acid, urinary albumin excretion, and glycated hemoglobin in Type 2 diabetic patient

    PubMed Central

    Neupane, Sunita; Dubey, Raju Kumar; Gautam, Narayan; Agrawal, Krishna Kumar; Jayan, Archana; Shrestha, Sujata; Jha, Amit Chandra

    2016-01-01

    Background: Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a chronic disease characterized by insulin deficiency or peripheral resistance resulting in hyperglycemia. Poor glycemic control leads to diabetic complications. Hyperuricemia has been reported with increased risk of renal insufficiency. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between serum uric acid concentration, degree of urinary albumin excretion (UAE) and glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) in Type 2 DM (T2DM) patients. Materials and Methods: Serum uric acid concentrations, urine microalbumin, and HbA1c were measured in fifty T2DM patients. We then evaluated relationship between uric acid concentrations, degree of UAE and glycemic control as well as other confounding variables. Results: Serum uric acid concentration correlated positively with UAE (r = 0.323, P < 0.05), age (r = 0.337, P < 0.05), age at onset (r = 0.341, P < 0.05), and duration of DM (r = 0.312, P < 0.05). Multiple regression analysis demonstrated that serum uric acid concentration (β = 0.293, P < 0.0001), duration of DM (β = 0.261, P < 0.0001), HbA1c (β = 0.173, P < 0.005), and systolic blood pressure (β = 0.268, P < 0.005) were independent determinants of UAE. Conclusions: Serum uric acid concentration is associated with microalbuminuria and HbA1c in T2DM patients. PMID:27226687

  19. Plasmodium falciparum-Derived Uric Acid Precipitates Induce Maturation of Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    van de Hoef, Diana L.; Coppens, Isabelle; Holowka, Thomas; Ben Mamoun, Choukri; Branch, OraLee; Rodriguez, Ana

    2013-01-01

    Malaria is characterized by cyclical fevers and high levels of inflammation, and while an early inflammatory response contributes to parasite clearance, excessive and persistent inflammation can lead to severe forms of the disease. Here, we show that Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes contain uric acid precipitates in the cytoplasm of the parasitophorous vacuole, which are released when erythrocytes rupture. Uric acid precipitates are highly inflammatory molecules that are considered a danger signal for innate immunity and are the causative agent in gout. We determined that P. falciparum-derived uric acid precipitates induce maturation of human dendritic cells, increasing the expression of cell surface co-stimulatory molecules such as CD80 and CD86, while decreasing human leukocyte antigen-DR expression. In accordance with this, uric acid accounts for a significant proportion of the total stimulatory activity induced by parasite-infected erythrocytes. Moreover, the identification of uric acid precipitates in P. falciparum- and P. vivax-infected erythrocytes obtained directly from malaria patients underscores the in vivo and clinical relevance of our findings. Altogether, our data implicate uric acid precipitates as a potentially important contributor to the innate immune response to Plasmodium infection and may provide a novel target for adjunct therapies. PMID:23405174

  20. Quantitative determination of uric acid using CdTe nanoparticles as fluorescence probes.

    PubMed

    Jin, Dongri; Seo, Min-Ho; Huy, Bui The; Pham, Quoc-Thai; Conte, Maxwell L; Thangadurai, Daniel; Lee, Yong-Ill

    2016-03-15

    A convenient enzymatic optical method for uric acid detection was developed based on the fluorescence quenching of ligand-capped CdTe nanoparticles by H2O2 which was generated from the enzymatic reaction of uric acid. The interactions between the CdTe nanoparticles capped with different ligands (glutathione, 3-mercaptopropionic acid, and thioglycerol) and H2O2 were investigated. The fluorescence quenching studies of GSH-capped CdTe nanoparticles demonstrated an excellent sensitivity to H2O2. The effects of uric acid, uricase and H2O2 on the fluorescence intensity of CdTe nanoparticles were also explored. The detection conditions, reaction time, pH value, incubation period and the concentration of uricase and uric acid were optimized. The detection limit of uric acid was found to be 0.10 µM and the linear range was 0.22-6 µM under the optimized experimental conditions. These results typify that CdTe nanoparticles could be used as a fluorescent probe for uric acid detection. PMID:26433069

  1. De-crystallization of Uric Acid Crystals in Synovial Fluid Using Gold Colloids and Microwave Heating

    PubMed Central

    Kioko, Bridgit; Ogundolie, Taiwo; Adebiyi, Morenike; Ettinoffe, Yehnara; Rhodes, Caleb; Gordon, Brittney; Thompson, Nishone; Mohammed, Muzaffer; Abel, Biebele

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we demonstrated a unique application of our Metal-Assisted and Microwave-Accelerated Evaporative Crystallization (MA-MAEC) technique for the de-crystallization of uric acid crystals, which causes gout in humans when monosodium urate crystals accumulate in the synovial fluid found in the joints of bones. Given the shortcomings of the existing treatments for gout, we investigated whether the MA-MAEC technique can offer an alternative solution to the treatment of gout. Our technique is based on the use of metal nanoparticles (i.e., gold colloids) with low microwave heating to accelerate the de-crystallization process. In this regard, we employed a two-step process; (i) crystallization of uric acid on glass slides, which act as a solid platform to mimic a bone, (ii) de-crystallization of uric acid crystals on glass slides with the addition of gold colloids and low power microwave heating, which act as “nano-bullets” when microwave heated in a solution. We observed that the size and number of the uric acid crystals were reduced by >60% within 10 minutes of low power microwave heating. In addition, the use of gold colloids without microwave heating (i.e. control experiment) did not result in the de-crystallization of the uric acid crystals, which proves the utility of our MA-MAEC technique in the de-crystallization of uric acid. PMID:25745585

  2. The role of uric acid in kidney fibrosis: experimental evidences for the causal relationship.

    PubMed

    Kim, Il Young; Lee, Dong Won; Lee, Soo Bong; Kwak, Ihm Soo

    2014-01-01

    Hyperuricemia is a common finding in chronic kidney disease due to decreased uric acid clearance. The role of uric acid as a risk factor for chronic kidney disease has been largely debated, and recent studies suggested a role of uric acid in the causation and progression of kidney fibrosis, a final common pathway in chronic kidney disease. Uric acid and xanthine oxidase may contribute to kidney fibrosis mainly by inducing inflammation, endothelial dysfunction, oxidative stress, and activation of the renin-angiotensin system. Besides, hyperuricemia induces alterations in renal hemodynamics via afferent arteriolopathy and contributes to the onset and progression of kidney fibrosis. Xanthine oxidase inhibitors may prevent kidney damage via lowering uric acid and/or inhibiting xanthine oxidase. However, there is still no sufficient evidence from interventional clinical researches supporting the causal relationship between uric acid and kidney fibrosis. The effect and role of xanthine oxidase inhibitors in preventing kidney fibrosis and chronic kidney disease progression must be further explored by performing future large scale clinical trials. PMID:24877124

  3. Reagentless uric acid biosensor based on Ni microdiscs-loaded NiO thin film matrix.

    PubMed

    Arora, Kashima; Tomar, Monika; Gupta, Vinay

    2014-09-21

    The development of a noninvasive test for uric acid has been the holy grail of uric acid detection research over the last decade. In the present work, a novel matrix comprising of a NiO thin film (a biocompatible material) loaded with Ni microdiscs was prepared on an ITO-coated glass substrate (Ni/NiO/ITO) with the help of RF sputtering for the reagentless detection of uric acid. The bioelectrode was fabricated by immobilizing uricase using a physical adsorption technique on the surface of the Ni/NiO/ITO electrode. The prepared matrix was found to be efficient in sensing biological processes occurring on the surface of the bioelectrode (Ur/Ni/NiO/ITO) in the presence of the analyte (uric acid) to obtain an electronic output. The biosensor exhibits a high sensitivity (431.09 μA mM(-1)), low Km value (0.15 mM), high apparent enzyme activity (5.07 × 10(-2) units per cm(2)), high shelf life (20 weeks) and good selectivity for the detection of uric acid over a wide concentration range (0.05 mM to 1 mM) without any external mediator in the PBS buffer. The obtained results are encouraging for the realization of a reagentless uric acid biosensor with efficient sensing response characteristics. PMID:25046556

  4. Relationship between serum uric acid level and cardiometabolic risks in nondiabetic patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Rajan, Shirley; Zalpuri, Isheeta; Harrington, Amy; Cimpeanu, Cezar; Song, Xueqin; Fan, Xiaoduo

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between serum levels of uric acid and insulin resistance and metabolic syndrome in nondiabetic patients with schizophrenia. Outpatients diagnosed with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder participated in a multicenter, cross-sectional study. Fasting blood samples were obtained to determine serum levels of metabolic measures. A total of 135 patients were recruited for the study. A significant positive relationship was found between serum levels of uric acid and the homeostasis model of assessing insulin resistance (log transformed, r=0.394, P<0.001), and a significant negative relationship was found between serum levels of uric acid and low-density lipoprotein particle size (log transformed, r=-0.306, P=0.001) after controlling for potential confounding variables. Hierarchical multiple regression suggested that serum uric acid level is a significant predictor of insulin resistance (P=0.001) and of low-density lipoprotein particle size (P<0.015). Further, logistic regression showed that serum uric acid levels strongly predicted the condition of metabolic syndrome (odds ratio 0.630, 95% confidence interval 0.463-0.856, P=0.003). This study suggested that uric acid may be a clinically useful biomarker to indicate cardiometabolic risks in nondiabetic patients with schizophrenia. PMID:26550697

  5. Uric acid is a danger signal of increasing risk for osteoarthritis through inflammasome activation

    PubMed Central

    Denoble, Anna E.; Huffman, Kim M.; Stabler, Thomas V.; Kelly, Susan J.; Hershfield, Michael S.; McDaniel, Gary E.; Coleman, R. Edward; Kraus, Virginia B.

    2011-01-01

    Uric acid (UA) is known to activate the NLRP3 (Nacht, leucine-rich repeat and pyrin domain containing protein 3) inflammasome. When activated, the NLRP3 (also known as NALP3) inflammasome leads to the production of IL-18 and IL-1β. In this cohort of subjects with knee osteoarthritis (OA), synovial fluid uric acid was strongly correlated with synovial fluid IL-18 and IL-1β. Synovial fluid uric acid and IL-18 were strongly and positively associated with OA severity as measured by both radiograph and bone scintigraphy, and synovial fluid IL-1β was associated with OA severity but only by radiograph. Furthermore, synovial fluid IL-18 was associated with a 3-y change in OA severity, on the basis of the radiograph. We conclude that synovial fluid uric acid is a marker of knee OA severity. The correlation of synovial fluid uric acid with the two cytokines (IL-18 and IL-1β) known to be produced by uric acid-activated inflammasomes and the association of synovial fluid IL-18 with OA progression, lend strong support to the potential involvement of the innate immune system in OA pathology and OA progression. PMID:21245324

  6. Activity and Stability of Biofilm Uricase of Lactobacillus plantarum for Uric Acid Biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iswantini, Dyah; Rachmatia, Rescy; Diana, Novita Rose; Nurhidayat, Novik; Akhiruddin; Saprudin, Deden

    2016-01-01

    Research of uric acid biosensor used a Lactobacillus plantarum was successfully conducted. Lactobacillus plantarum could produce uricase that could be used as uric acid biosensor. Therefore, lifetime of bacteria were quite short that caused the bacteria could not detect uric acid for a long time. To avoid this problem, development of biofilm for uric acid biosensor is important. Biofilms is a structured community of bacterial cells, stick together and are able to maintain a bacteria in an extreme environments. The purpose of present study was to determine and compare the activity of uricase produced by L. plantarum, deposited whithin biofilm and planktonic bacteria on glassy carbon electrode (GCEb & GCE), also to determine the stability of biofilm. The optimization process was conducted by using temperature, pH, and substrate concentration as the parameters. It showed that the activity of uricase within biofilm was able to increase the oxidation current. GCEb and GCE yielded the oxidation current in the amount of 47.24 μA and 23.04 μA, respectively, under the same condition. Results indicated that the optimum condition for uric acid biosensor using biofilm were pH 10, temperature of 40 oC, and uric acid concentration of 5 mM. The stability of GCEb decreased after 10 hours used, with decreasing percentage over 86.33%. This low stability probably caused by the unprotected active site of the enzyme that the enzyme is easier to experience the denaturation.

  7. Effect of canagliflozin on serum uric acid in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Davies, M J; Trujillo, A; Vijapurkar, U; Damaraju, C V; Meininger, G

    2015-04-01

    Hyperuricaemia is associated with an increased risk of gout, kidney stones and cardiovascular disease. The present post hoc analysis of pooled data from four placebo-controlled phase III studies assessed the effect of canagliflozin, a sodium-glucose co-transporter 2 inhibitor, on serum uric acid levels in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and in a subset of patients with hyperuricaemia [defined as baseline serum uric acid ≥475 µmol/l (∼8 mg/dl)]. At week 26, canagliflozin 100 and 300 mg were associated with a ∼13% reduction in serum uric acid compared with placebo. In the subset of patients with hyperuricaemia, placebo-subtracted percent reductions in serum uric acid were similar to those in the overall cohort. More patients in the hyperuricaemic group achieved a serum uric acid level of <360 µmol/l (∼6 mg/dl) with both canagliflozin 100 mg (23.5%) and 300 mg (32.4%) compared with placebo (3.1%). Incidences of gout and kidney stones were low and similar across groups. In conclusion, canagliflozin treatment decreased serum uric acid in patients with T2DM, including those with baseline hyperuricaemia. PMID:25600248

  8. Heat Stress Nephropathy From Exercise-Induced Uric Acid Crystalluria: A Perspective on Mesoamerican Nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Roncal-Jimenez, Carlos; García-Trabanino, Ramón; Barregard, Lars; Lanaspa, Miguel A; Wesseling, Catharina; Harra, Tamara; Aragón, Aurora; Grases, Felix; Jarquin, Emmanuel R; González, Marvin A; Weiss, Ilana; Glaser, Jason; Sánchez-Lozada, Laura G; Johnson, Richard J

    2016-01-01

    Mesoamerican nephropathy (MeN), an epidemic in Central America, is a chronic kidney disease of unknown cause. In this article, we argue that MeN may be a uric acid disorder. Individuals at risk for developing the disease are primarily male workers exposed to heat stress and physical exertion that predisposes to recurrent water and volume depletion, often accompanied by urinary concentration and acidification. Uric acid is generated during heat stress, in part consequent to nucleotide release from muscles. We hypothesize that working in the sugarcane fields may result in cyclic uricosuria in which uric acid concentrations exceed solubility, leading to the formation of dihydrate urate crystals and local injury. Consistent with this hypothesis, we present pilot data documenting the common presence of urate crystals in the urine of sugarcane workers from El Salvador. High end-of-workday urinary uric acid concentrations were common in a pilot study, particularly if urine pH was corrected to 7. Hyperuricemia may induce glomerular hypertension, whereas the increased urinary uric acid may directly injure renal tubules. Thus, MeN may result from exercise and heat stress associated with dehydration-induced hyperuricemia and uricosuria. Increased hydration with water and salt, urinary alkalinization, reduction in sugary beverage intake, and inhibitors of uric acid synthesis should be tested for disease prevention. PMID:26455995

  9. Elevated levels of plasma uric acid and its relation to hypertension in arsenic-endemic human individuals in Bangladesh

    SciTech Connect

    Huda, Nazmul; Hossain, Shakhawoat; Rahman, Mashiur; Karim, Md. Rezaul; Islam, Khairul; Mamun, Abdullah Al; Hossain, Md. Imam; Mohanto, Nayan Chandra; Alam, Shahnur; Aktar, Sharmin; Arefin, Afroza; Ali, Nurshad; Salam, Kazi Abdus; Aziz, Abdul; Saud, Zahangir Alam; Miyataka, Hideki; Himeno, Seiichiro; Hossain, Khaled

    2014-11-15

    Blood uric acid has been recognized as a putative marker for cardiovascular diseases (CVDs). CVDs are the major causes of arsenic-related morbidity and mortality. However, the association of arsenic exposure with plasma uric acid (PUA) levels in relation to CVDs has not yet been explored. This study for the first time demonstrated the associations of arsenic exposure with PUA levels and its relationship with hypertension. A total of 483 subjects, 322 from arsenic-endemic and 161 from non-endemic areas in Bangladesh were recruited as study subjects. Arsenic concentrations in the drinking water, hair and nails of the study subjects were measured by inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy. PUA levels were measured using a colorimetric method. We found that PUA levels were significantly (p < 0.001) higher in males and females living in arsenic-endemic areas than those in non-endemic area. Arsenic exposure (water, hair and nail arsenic) levels showed significant positive correlations with PUA levels. In multiple regression analyses, arsenic exposure levels were found to be the most significant contributors on PUA levels among the other variables that included age, body mass index, blood urea nitrogen, and smoking. There were dose–response relationships between arsenic exposure and PUA levels. Furthermore, diastolic and systolic blood pressure showed significant positive correlations with PUA levels. Finally, the average PUA levels were significantly higher in the hypertensive group than those in the normotensive group in both males and females living in arsenic-endemic areas. These results suggest that arsenic exposure-related elevation of PUA levels may be implicated in arsenic-induced CVDs. - Highlights: • PUA levels were higher in arsenic-endemic subjects than in non-endemic subjects. • Drinking water, hair and nail arsenic showed significant associations with PUA levels. • Drinking water, hair and nail arsenic showed dose–response relationships with PUA. • Arsenic-endemic hypertensive study subjects had elevated levels of PUA. • Increased PUA levels may be implicated in arsenic-induced CVDs.

  10. Evaluating an alternative method for rapid urinary creatinine determination.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Erik M; Sobus, Jon R; Strynar, Mark J; Pleil, Joachim D; Nakayama, Shoji F

    2014-01-01

    Creatinine (CR) is an endogenously produced chemical that is routinely assayed in urine specimens to assess kidney function and sample dilution. The industry-standard method for CR determination, known as the kinetic Jaff (KJ) method, relies on an exponential rate of a colorimetric change, and can therefore require automated processing equipment for moderate- to high-throughput analysis (hundreds to thousands of samples per day). This study evaluates an alternative colorimetric method, the "plateau Jaff" (PJ) method, which utilizes the chemistry of the KJ method, a commercially available kit, and a multipoint calibration curve. This method is amenable to moderate-throughput sample analysis and does not require automated processing equipment. Thirty-two spot urine samples from healthy adult volunteers were analyzed for creatinine concentration (CRc) using the KJ and PJ methods. Samples were also analyzed using a liquid chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC-TOF/MS) method, which acted as an analytical control. Replicate measurements of spot samples (natural log-transformed values) were used to estimate method precision, and linear regression models were used to evaluate method accuracy (LC-TOF/MS measurements were considered the analytical benchmark). Measurement precision was comparable across all three methods, with coefficent of variation estimates ranging from 3 to 6%. Regression models generally showed good agreement across methods with R(2) estimates ranging from .996 to .998, slope estimates ranging from .944 to .986, and y-intercept estimates ranging from 0.111 to 0.303. Minor bias (between 2 and 16%) was observed across methods at the tails of the measurement distributions. The provided regression equations can be used to adjust for this bias and to improve CR measurement comparisons across studies employing different methods. Considering these results, the PJ method is a suitable alternative to the industry standard KJ method for urinary CRc determination. It can be implemented for moderate-throughput sample analysis using modest and commonly available lab instrumentation and manual sample preparation techniques. PMID:25072898

  11. Does high serum uric acid level cause aspirin resistance?

    PubMed

    Yildiz, Bekir S; Ozkan, Emel; Esin, Fatma; Alihanoglu, Yusuf I; Ozkan, Hayrettin; Bilgin, Murat; Kilic, Ismail D; Ergin, Ahmet; Kaftan, Havane A; Evrengul, Harun

    2016-06-01

    In patients with coronary artery disease (CAD), though aspirin inhibits platelet activation and reduces atherothrombotic complications, it does not always sufficiently inhibit platelet function, thereby causing a clinical situation known as aspirin resistance. As hyperuricemia activates platelet turnover, aspirin resistance may be specifically induced by increased serum uric acid (SUA) levels. In this study, we thus investigated the association between SUA level and aspirin resistance in patients with CAD. We analyzed 245 consecutive patients with stable angina pectoris (SAP) who in coronary angiography showed more than 50% occlusion in a major coronary artery. According to aspirin resistance, two groups were formed: the aspirin resistance group (Group 1) and the aspirin-sensitive group (Group 2). Compared with those of Group 2, patients with aspirin resistance exhibited significantly higher white blood cell counts, neutrophil counts, neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratios, SUA levels, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein levels, and fasting blood glucose levels. After multivariate analysis, a high level of SUA emerged as an independent predictor of aspirin resistance. The receiver-operating characteristic analysis provided a cutoff value of 6.45 mg/dl for SUA to predict aspirin resistance with 79% sensitivity and 65% specificity. Hyperuricemia may cause aspirin resistance in patients with CAD and high SUA levels may indicate aspirin-resistant patients. Such levels should thus recommend avoiding heart attack and stroke by adjusting aspirin dosage. PMID:26656902

  12. Nitrogen in stored poultry litter: uric Acid and xanthine.

    PubMed

    Mowrer, Jake; Cabrera, Miguel; Rasmussen, Todd; Cassity-Duffey, Kate

    2014-11-01

    Laboratory incubations of four broiler litter (BL) samples at 30C were performed to investigate the effect of water content on the decay of uric acid nitrogen (UAN) and xanthine nitrogen (XN). UAN and XN concentrations increased in all samples during a period of 1 to 8 d before declining for the remaining 30 d. The increases may be the result of guanine and adenine catabolism. The slopes of linear equations fit to the natural log of the observations from 16 sampling points over 38 d were compared using the GLM procedure in SAS and results indicate that both UAN and XN decay significantly ( = 0.05) more rapidly with increasing water content (?). A second study showed significant effects in one of three samples on the decay rate of UAN with additions of flue-gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum or alum at a water content of 750 g kg BL. The decay rate of XN was not significantly affected. Finally, a simple two-point sampling study on the effect of water potential for the estimation of first order rate equation constants showed a positive relationship between the rate of UAN and XN decay over 28 d as a function of water potential (?): UAN = 0.0054 ? + 0.1010 ( = 0.9987) and XN = 0.0066 ? + 0.1101 ( = 0.9285). This is the first study of UAN and XN decay in BL and the findings add to our understanding of mineralizable N from BL. PMID:25602230

  13. Ammonia sanitisation of sewage sludge using urea.

    PubMed

    Fidjeland, Jørgen; Lalander, Cecilia; Jönsson, Håkan; Vinnerås, Björn

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to develop a simple, low-cost treatment for sewage sludge using urea as a sanitising agent. Sewage sludge was spiked with Enterococcus faecalis and Salmonella typhimurium, treated with 0.5, 1, 1.5 and 2% w/w urea at laboratory scale, and the viability was monitored during 4 months of storage at 4, 10 and 22 °C (only 0.5%). A linear relationship was identified between Salmonella spp. inactivation rate and ammonia (NH3) concentration. Temperature had a positive impact on Salmonella spp. inactivation at higher temperatures, but in the range 4-10 °C temperature influenced this inactivation merely by its impact on the ammonia equilibrium. Enterococcus spp. was more persistent and a lag phase of up to 11 weeks was observed. Higher temperature and ammonia concentration reduced the lag phase duration significantly, and also had a clear effect on the inactivation rate for the treatments with 0.5% urea at 22 °C and 2% urea at 4 and 10 °C. Urea sanitisation of sewage sludge can give a 2 log10 reduction of Enterococcus spp. and more than a 5 log10 reduction of Salmonella spp. within 6 weeks with either 0.5% w/w urea at 22 °C or 2% urea at 10 °C. PMID:24185072

  14. Urea Output by L3 Teladorsagia circumcincta and some Properties of Two Urea Producing Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Muhamad, N; Walker, LR; Simcock, DC; Pedley, KC; Simpson, HV; Brown, S

    2013-01-01

    Background Like several other parasites, Teladorsagia circumcincta secretes or excretes urea, but neither the rate of efflux nor the possible metabolic sources of the urea has been considered. Methods Parasites were maintained by passage through sheep. Urea efflux was measured using phenol/hypochlorite after treatment with urea aminohydrolase. The kinetics of creatine amidinohydrolase and arginine amidinohydrolase were characterised by coupling the reactions with urea aminohydrolase and glutamate dehydrogenase. Results Infective L3 T. circumcincta secreted or excreted urea at 25% of the rate of NH3/NH4 +. The rate of urea efflux was about 84 pmol h−1 (103 larvae)−1 over 4 hours, corresponding to about 11 nmol h−1 mg−1 protein. We could not detect urea aminohydrolase activity, but urea production by both creatine amidinohydrolase and arginine amidinohydrolase could be detected. The apparent K m and V max of creatine amidinohydrolase were 1.1 mM and 48 nmol h−1 mg−1 protein, respectively, and the activity was greatest at pH 8. The apparent K m and V max of arginine amidinohydrolase were 0.7 mM and 62 nmol h−1 mg−1 protein, respectively, and the activity was greatest at pH 7.9. Conclusion The activity of creatine amidinohydrolase and arginine amidinohydrolase was sufficient to account for the rate of urea secretion or excretion. PMID:23682271

  15. Higher Serum Uric Acid Is Associated with Higher Bone Mineral Density in Chinese Men with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Dian-dian; Jiao, Pei-lin; Yu, Jing-jia; Wang, Xiao-jing; Zhao, Lin; Xuan, Yan; Sun, Li-hao; Tao, Bei; Wang, Wei-qing; Ning, Guang; Liu, Jian-min; Zhao, Hong-yan

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that oxidative stress is associated with osteoporosis. Serum uric acid (UA) is a strong endogenous antioxidant. Therefore, we investigated the relationship between the serum UA and BMD in Chinese men with T2DM. In this cross-sectional study of 621 men with T2DM, BMDs at lumbar spine (L2–4), femoral neck (FN), and total hip (TH) were measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Serum levels of UA, calcium (Ca), 25-OH vitamin D3 (vitD3), parathyroid hormone (PTH), and creatinine (Cr) were also tested. Data analyses revealed that serum UA levels were positively associated with BMD at all sites (p < 0.05) in men with T2DM after adjusting for multiple confounders. The serum UA levels were positively correlated with body weight (r = 0.322), body mass index (BMI) (r = 0.331), Ca (r = 0.179), and Cr (r = 0.239) (p < 0.001) and were also positively associated with the concentrations of PTH (r = 0.10, p < 0.05). When compared with those in the lowest tertile of UA levels, men with T2DM in the highest tertile had a lower prevalence of osteoporosis or osteopenia (adjusted odds ratio 0.54, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.31–0.95). These data suggest that higher serum levels of UA are associated with higher BMDs and lower risks of osteoporosis in Chinese men with T2DM. PMID:27022396

  16. A comparison of definitions of contrast-induced nephropathy in patients with normal serum creatinine.

    PubMed

    Khatami, Mohammad Reza; Nikravan, Nasrin; Salari-Far, Mojtaba; Davoudi, Safieh; Pahlavan-Sabbagh, Mohammad Reza

    2016-01-01

    Contrast-induced nephropathy (CIN) is the third leading cause of acute kidney injury in hospitalized patients. The prevalence of CIN is reported to range from 0% to 50%, depending not only on patient condition and the procedure used but also the definition of CIN applied. We aimed to determine the best diagnostic indicator of CIN in patients with normal serum creatinine. This study included 206 patients with normal serum creatinine who underwent coronary angiography/angioplasty. Serum creatinine level and glomerular filtration rate (GFR) were measured before and on the second and fifth days after contrast administration. The incidence of CIN based on a 25% increase in serum creatinine was calculated and compared with the incidence based on a 25% decrease in GFR or an increase of at least 0.5 mg/dL in serum creatinine. Of 206 patients, 127 were male (61.7%) and 79 were female (38.3%); the mean age was 59.56±10.3 years. The prevalence of CIN was 30% based on a 25% increase in serum creatinine, 23% based on a 25% decrease in GFR (P<0.012) and 3.8% based on a serum creatinine increase of at least 0.5 mg/dL (P<0.0001). The serum creatinine levels remained within the normal range in the majority of patients with CIN based on the different definitions. In patients with normal serum creatinine, the absolute increase in serum creatinine may describe the prevalence of CIN more accurately than the relative increase in serum creatinine or relative decrease in GFR. PMID:26787573

  17. Enzymatic Characterization of a Prokaryotic Urea Carboxylase

    PubMed Central

    Kanamori, Takeshi; Kanou, Norihisa; Atomi, Haruyuki; Imanaka, Tadayuki

    2004-01-01

    We identified the first prokaryotic urea carboxylase (UCA) from a member of the alpha subclass of the class Proteobacteria, Oleomonas sagaranensis. This enzyme (O. sagaranensis Uca) was composed of 1,171 amino acids, and its N-terminal region resembled the biotin carboxylase domains of various biotin-dependent carboxylases. The C-terminal region of the enzyme harbored the Met-Lys-Met motif found in biotin carboxyl carrier proteins. The primary structure of the enzyme was 45% identical to that of the urea carboxylase domain of urea amidolyase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. O. sagaranensis Uca did not harbor the allophanate hydrolase domain found in the yeast enzyme, but a separate gene with structural similarity was found to be adjacent to the uca gene. Purified recombinant O. sagaranensis Uca displayed ATP-dependent carboxylase activity towards urea (Vmax = 21.2 μmol mg−1 min−1) but not towards acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) and propionyl-CoA, indicating that the gene encoded a bona fide UCA and not an acetyl-CoA or propionyl-CoA carboxylase. The enzyme also exhibited high levels of activity towards acetamide and formamide. Kinetic parameters of the enzyme reaction were determined with ATP, urea, acetamide, and formamide. O. sagaranensis could grow on urea, acetamide, and formamide as sole nitrogen sources; moreover, ATP-dependent urea-degrading activity was found in cells grown with urea but not in cells grown with ammonia. The results suggest that the UCA of this organism may be involved in the assimilation of these compounds as nitrogen sources. Furthermore, orthologues of the O. sagaranensis uca gene were found to be widely distributed among Bacteria. This implies that there are two systems of urea degradation in Bacteria, a pathway catalyzed by the previously described ureases and the UCA-allophanate hydrolase pathway identified in this study. PMID:15090492

  18. Evaluation of dementia by acrolein, amyloid-β and creatinine.

    PubMed

    Igarashi, Kazuei; Yoshida, Madoka; Waragai, Masaaki; Kashiwagi, Keiko

    2015-10-23

    Plasma, urine and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) were examined for biochemical markers of dementia. Protein-conjugated acrolein (PC-Acro) and the amyloid-β (Aβ)40/42 ratio in plasma can be used to detect mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and Alzheimer's disease (AD). In plasma, PC-Acro and the Aβ40/42 ratio in MCI and AD were significantly higher relative to non-demented subjects. Furthermore, urine acrolein metabolite, 3-hydroxypropyl mercapturic acid (3-HPMA)/creatinine (Cre) and amino acid-conjugated acrolein (AC-Acro)/Cre in AD were significantly lower than MCI. It was also shown that reduced urine 3-HPMA/Cre correlated with increased plasma Aβ40/42 ratio in dementia. The Aβ40/PC-Acro ratio in CSF, together with Aβ40 and Aβ40/42 ratio, was lower in AD than MCI. Increased plasma PC-Acro and Aβ40/42 ratio and decreased urine 3-HPMA/Cre correlated with cognitive ability (MMSE). These results indicate that the measurements of acrolein derivatives together with Aβ and Cre in biologic fluids is useful to estimate severity of dementia. PMID:26196945

  19. Is Uric Acid a Missing Link between Previous Gestational Diabetes Mellitus and the Development of Type 2 Diabetes at a Later Time of Life?

    PubMed Central

    Fronczyk, Aneta; Safranow, Krzysztof; Majkowska, Lilianna

    2016-01-01

    Introduction A high level of uric acid (UA) is a strong, independent risk factor for type 2 diabetes mellitus. The relationship between UA levels and the development of type 2 diabetes in women with previous gestational diabetes mellitus (pGDM) remains unclear. The aim of study was to evaluate the UA levels in pGDM women in relation to their current nutritional status and carbohydrate metabolism. Material and Methods 199 women with pGDM diagnoses based on oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTTs) 5–12 years previously and a control group of 50 women without pGDM. The assessment included anthropometric parameters, body composition (Tanita SC-330S), current OGTT, insulin resistance index (HOMA-IR), β-cell function (HOMA-%B), HbA1c, lipids, and uric acid. Results No differences between groups were found in terms of age, time from the index pregnancy, anthropometric parameters, lipids or creatinine levels. The incidences of overweight and obesity were similar. Carbohydrate abnormalities were more frequent in the pGDM group than the control group (43.2% vs 12.0% p<0.001). The women with pGDM had significantly higher fasting glucose, HbA1c, glucose and insulin levels in the OGTTs, but similar HOMA-IR values. Their UA levels were significantly higher (258±58 vs 230±50 μmol/L, p<0.005) and correlated with BMI and the severity of carbohydrate disorders. The normal weight and normoglycemic pGDM women also demonstrated higher UA levels than a similar control subgroup (232±48 vs 208±48 μmol/L, p<0.05). Multivariate analysis revealed significant correlations of UA level with BMI (β = 0.38, 95% CI 0.25–0.51, p<0.0001), creatinine level (β = 0.23, 95% CI 0.11–0.35, p<0.0005), triglycerides (β = 0.20, 95% CI 0.07–0.33, p<0.005) and family history of diabetes (β = 0.13, 95% CI 0.01–0.25, p<0.05). In logistic regression analysis, the association between higher UA level (defined as value ≥297 μmol/L) and presence of any carbohydrate metabolism disorder (IFG, IGT or diabetes) was statistically significant (odds ratio 3.62 [95% CI 1.8–7.3], p<0.001). Conclusions Higher UA levels may be associated with the development of type 2 diabetes in pGDM women, also in these with normal body weights. PMID:27166795

  20. Treatment of renal uric acid stone by extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy combined with sodium bicarbonate: 2 case reports.

    PubMed

    Li, Hao-Yong; Lian, Pei-Yu; Zhou, Zhi-Yan; Song, Peng; Yan, Yi; Liu, Ji-Hong

    2015-01-01

    Uric acid stone is the most comment radiolucent renal stone with high recurrence rate, which would further cause acute upper urinary tract obstruction and kidney failure. Here we report two cases of renal uric acid stone from December 2012 to April 2013. One 43-year-old male patient suffered from chronic uric acid nephrolithiasis caused by the long-term indwelling of bilateral double-J stent. Another 69-year-old patient was also diagnosed with uric acid nephrolithiasis at the right kidney. Both patients were first treated with extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL), followed by 1.5% sodium bicarbonate dissolution therapy. After a week of the treatment, the uric acid stones in both patients were completely dissolved without retrograde infection. In summary, the use of ESWL and sodium bicarbonate dissolution therapy as a combined modality is a safe, effective, inexpensive treatment for uric acid nephrolithiasis. PMID:26550383

  1. Treatment of renal uric acid stone by extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy combined with sodium bicarbonate: 2 case reports

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hao-Yong; Lian, Pei-Yu; Zhou, Zhi-Yan; Song, Peng; Yan, Yi; Liu, Ji-Hong

    2015-01-01

    Uric acid stone is the most comment radiolucent renal stone with high recurrence rate, which would further cause acute upper urinary tract obstruction and kidney failure. Here we report two cases of renal uric acid stone from December 2012 to April 2013. One 43-year-old male patient suffered from chronic uric acid nephrolithiasis caused by the long-term indwelling of bilateral double-J stent. Another 69-year-old patient was also diagnosed with uric acid nephrolithiasis at the right kidney. Both patients were first treated with extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL), followed by 1.5% sodium bicarbonate dissolution therapy. After a week of the treatment, the uric acid stones in both patients were completely dissolved without retrograde infection. In summary, the use of ESWL and sodium bicarbonate dissolution therapy as a combined modality is a safe, effective, inexpensive treatment for uric acid nephrolithiasis. PMID:26550383

  2. Differentiation of uric acid versus non-uric acid kidney stones in the presence of iodine using dual-energy CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J.; Qu, M.; Leng, S.; McCollough, C. H.

    2010-04-01

    In this study, the feasibility of differentiating uric acid from non-uric acid kidney stones in the presence of iodinated contrast material was evaluated using dual-energy CT (DECT). Iodine subtraction was accomplished with a commercial three material decomposition algorithm to create a virtual non-contrast (VNC) image set. VNC images were then used to segment stone regions from tissue background. The DE ratio of each stone was calculated using the CT images acquired at two different energies with DECT using the stone map generated from the VNC images. The performance of DE ratio-based stone differentiation was evaluated at five different iodine concentrations (21, 42, 63, 84 and 105 mg/ml). The DE ratio of stones in iodine solution was found larger than those obtained in non-iodine cases. This is mainly caused by the partial volume effect around the boundary between the stone and iodine solution. The overestimation of the DE ratio leads to substantial overlap between different stone types. To address the partial volume effect, an expectation-maximization (EM) approach was implemented to estimate the contribution of iodine and stone within each image pixel in their mixture area. The DE ratio of each stone was corrected to maximally remove the influence of iodine solutions. The separation of uric-acid and non-uric-acid stone was improved in the presence of iodine solution.

  3. Automated urinalysis technique determines concentration of creatine and creatinine by colorimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rho, J. H.

    1967-01-01

    Continuous urinalysis technique is useful in the study of muscle wastage in primates. Creatinine concentration in urine is determined in an aliquot mixture by a color reaction. Creatine is determined in a second aliquot by converting it to creatinine and measuring the difference in color intensity between the two aliquots.

  4. How we estimate GFR--a pitfall of using a serum creatinine-based formula.

    PubMed

    Refaie, R; Moochhala, S H; Kanagasundaram, N S

    2007-10-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is defined using the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). This has led to a large increase in the diagnosis of CKD in the United Kingdom, the majority of which is in its earlier stages and is detected in non-hospital settings. It is important to be aware that eGFR calculations will reflect inaccuracies in the measured serum creatinine, as the latter is an important component of the calculation. We report a case in which a patient with high muscle-mass who had consumed large quantities of a creatine-containing nutritional supplement presented with apparently reduced renal function on the basis of the serum creatinine and therefore also the eGFR calculation (MDRD equation). Creatine is an amino acid which is a precursor of creatinine, and is known to transiently increase serum creatinine. 6 weeks after discontinuing creatine ingestion, serum creatinine had fallen but still gave rise to an apparently abnormal calculated eGFR. In fact, renal function was shown to be normal when estimated using 24-hour urinary creatinine clearance. This case demonstrates that the upper extreme of muscle mass and ingestion of creatine can affect not only serum creatinine but also the calculated eGFR. Knowledge of common confounding factors and their effects on serum creatinine and eGFR will allow appreciation of the limitations of these measures of renal function, and can prevent unnecessary over-investigation of such patients. PMID:17969491

  5. Serum creatinine role in predicting outcome after cardiac surgery beyond acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Najafi, Mahdi

    2014-01-01

    Serum creatinine is still the most important determinant in the assessment of perioperative renal function and in the prediction of adverse outcome in cardiac surgery. Many biomarkers have been studied to date; still, there is no surrogate for serum creatinine measurement in clinical practice because it is feasible and inexpensive. High levels of serum creatinine and its equivalents have been the most important preoperative risk factor for postoperative renal injury. Moreover, creatinine is the mainstay in predicting risk models and risk factor reduction has enhanced its importance in outcome prediction. The future perspective is the development of new definitions and novel tools for the early diagnosis of acute kidney injury largely based on serum creatinine and a panel of novel biomarkers. PMID:25276301

  6. Effect of uric acid and chemical analogues on oxidation of human low density lipoprotein in vitro.

    PubMed

    Schlotte, V; Sevanian, A; Hochstein, P; Weithmann, K U

    1998-11-01

    Oxidative modification of low density lipoprotein (LDL) is implicated in the early development of atherosclerosis. In the present study, attention has been focused toward the potential protective effects of uric acid and purine-based chemical analogues in copper-promoted oxidative changes to human LDL in vitro. Between 5-100 mumol/l uric acid protected LDL from oxidative degradation in a concentration dependent manner. However, 5 mumol/l were not capable of inhibiting the consumption of LDLs natural antioxidative components, alpha-tocopherol and beta-carotene, but led to a more than two-fold prolongation, up to 3 h, of the lag phase before onset of polyunsaturated acid (PUFA) oxidation. 100 mumol/l uric acid, which is still below the human serum level of 300 mumol/l, reduced consumption of alpha-tocopherol and beta-carotene by about 50% and largely suppressed PUFA oxidation for up to 4 h. A more lipophilic series of methyl analogues of uric acid exhibited less activity. Neither 1,3-dimethyl uric acid, nor the 1,3,7- or 1,7- or 3,7-methylated compounds, all at 100 mumol/l, exceeded the antioxidative potential of 10 mumol/l uric acid. At concentrations up to 100 mumol/l xanthine and its analogues lacked virtually any protective effects toward the LDL constituents. In conclusion, the present study indicates that uric acid at concentrations similar to its physiological levels, and also related analogues are able to suppress oxidative degradation of LDL components. In view of the various mechanisms underlying atherogenesis in vivo, the protective effect in terms of modulating redox reactions and oxidative events in the blood or at the arterial wall appears of potential importance. PMID:9823550

  7. Urea and deuterium mixtures at high pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Donnelly, M. Husband, R. J.; Frantzana, A. D.; Loveday, J. S.; Bull, C. L.; Klotz, S.

    2015-03-28

    Urea, like many network forming compounds, has long been known to form inclusion (guest-host) compounds. Unlike other network formers like water, urea is not known to form such inclusion compounds with simple molecules like hydrogen. Such compounds if they existed would be of interest both for the fundamental insight they provide into molecular bonding and as potential gas storage systems. Urea has been proposed as a potential hydrogen storage material [T. A. Strobel et al., Chem. Phys. Lett. 478, 97 (2009)]. Here, we report the results of high-pressure neutron diffraction studies of urea and D{sub 2} mixtures that indicate no inclusion compound forms up to 3.7 GPa.

  8. Mechanisms Underpinning Increased Plasma Creatinine Levels in Patients Receiving Vemurafenib for Advanced Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Hurabielle, Charlotte; Pillebout, Evangéline; Stehlé, Thomas; Pagès, Cécile; Roux, Jennifer; Schneider, Pierre; Chevret, Sylvie; Chaffaut, Cendrine; Boutten, Anne; Mourah, Samia; Basset-Seguin, Nicole; Vidal-Petiot, Emmanuelle; Lebbé, Céleste; Flamant, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Context Serum creatinine has been reported to increase in patients receiving Vemurafenib, yet neither the prevalence nor the mechanism of this adverse event are known. Objective We aimed to evaluate the frequency and the mechanisms of increases in plasma creatinine level in patients receiving Vemurafenib for advanced melanoma. Methods We performed a retrospective monocentric study including consecutive patients treated with Vemurafenib for an advanced melanoma. We collected clinical and biological data concerning renal function before introduction of Vemurafenib and in the course of monthly follow-up visits from March 2013 to December 2014. Cystatin C-derived glomerular filtration rate was evaluated before and after Vemurafenib initiation, as increase in serum cystatin C is specific to a decrease in the glomerular filtration rate. We also performed thorough renal explorations in 3 patients, with measurement of tubular secretion of creatinine before and after Vemurafenib initiation and a renal biopsy in 2 patients. Results 70 patients were included: 97% of them displayed an immediate, and thereafter stable, increase in creatinine (+22.8%) after Vemurafenib initiation. In 44/52 patients in whom Vemurafenib was discontinued, creatinine levels returned to baseline. Serum cystatin C increased, although proportionally less than serum creatinine, showing that creatinine increase under vemurafenib was indeed partly due to a renal function impairment. In addition, renal explorations demonstrated that Vemurafenib induced an inhibition of creatinine tubular secretion. Conclusion Thus, Vemurafenib induces a dual mechanism of increase in plasma creatinine with both an inhibition of creatinine tubular secretion and slight renal function impairment. However, this side effect is mostly reversible when Vemurafenib is discontinued, and should not lead physicians to discontinue the treatment if it is effective. PMID:26930506

  9. Xenobiotic-urea conjugates; chemical or biological?

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Stephen C

    2014-12-01

    1. Although the major pathways involved in drug metabolism have been elucidated, there remain those routes that may be considered as minor, esoteric, or even artifactual. 2. Conjugation with urea, an abundant, non-toxic, small water soluble molecule, is such a disputed and debatable Phase II pathway. 3. The present article collates data gleaned from the literature concerning xenobiotic-urea conjugation, presents pertinent information resurrecting the controversy and poses questions as to the nature of the phenomenon. PMID:25144804

  10. Uric acid: a modulator of prostate cells and activin sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Sangkop, Febbie; Singh, Geeta; Rodrigues, Ely; Gold, Elspeth; Bahn, Andrew

    2016-03-01

    Elevated serum uric acid (SUA) or urate is associated with inflammation and gout. Recent evidence has linked urate to cancers, but little is known about urate effects in prostate cancer. Activins are inflammatory cytokines and negative growth regulators in the prostate. A hallmark of prostate cancer progression is activin insensitivity; however, mechanisms underlying this are unclear. We propose that elevated SUA is associated with prostate cancer counteracting the growth inhibitory effects of activins. The expression of activins A and B, urate transporter GLUT9 and tissue urate levels were examined in human prostate disease. Intracellular and secreted urate and GLUT9 expression were assessed in human prostate cancer cell lines. Furthermore, the effects of urate and probenecid, a known urate transport inhibitor, were determined in combination with activin A. Activin A expression was increased in low-grade prostate cancer, whereas activin B expression was reduced in high-grade prostate cancer. Intracellular urate levels decreased in all prostate pathologies, while GLUT9 expression decreased in benign prostatic hyperplasia, prostatitis and high-grade prostate cancer. Activin responsive LNCaP cells had higher intracellular and lower secreted urate levels than activin-insensitive PC3 cells. GLUT9 expression in prostate cancer cells was progressively lower than in prostate epithelial cells. Elevated extracellular urate was growth promoting in vitro, which was abolished by the gout medication probenecid, and it antagonized the growth inhibitory effects of activins. This study shows for the first time that a change in plasma or intracellular urate levels, possibly involving GLUT9 and a urate efflux transporter, has an impact on prostate cancer cell growth, and that lowering SUA levels in prostate cancer is likely to be therapeutically beneficial. PMID:26910779

  11. 21 CFR 862.1770 - Urea nitrogen test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Urea nitrogen test system. 862.1770 Section 862....1770 Urea nitrogen test system. (a) Identification. A urea nitrogen test system is a device intended to measure urea nitrogen (an end-product of nitrogen metabolism) in whole blood, serum, plasma, and...

  12. 21 CFR 862.1770 - Urea nitrogen test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Urea nitrogen test system. 862.1770 Section 862....1770 Urea nitrogen test system. (a) Identification. A urea nitrogen test system is a device intended to measure urea nitrogen (an end-product of nitrogen metabolism) in whole blood, serum, plasma, and...

  13. 21 CFR 862.1770 - Urea nitrogen test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Urea nitrogen test system. 862.1770 Section 862....1770 Urea nitrogen test system. (a) Identification. A urea nitrogen test system is a device intended to measure urea nitrogen (an end-product of nitrogen metabolism) in whole blood, serum, plasma, and...

  14. 21 CFR 862.1770 - Urea nitrogen test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Urea nitrogen test system. 862.1770 Section 862....1770 Urea nitrogen test system. (a) Identification. A urea nitrogen test system is a device intended to measure urea nitrogen (an end-product of nitrogen metabolism) in whole blood, serum, plasma, and...

  15. 21 CFR 862.1770 - Urea nitrogen test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Urea nitrogen test system. 862.1770 Section 862....1770 Urea nitrogen test system. (a) Identification. A urea nitrogen test system is a device intended to measure urea nitrogen (an end-product of nitrogen metabolism) in whole blood, serum, plasma, and...

  16. Combining creatinine and volume kinetics identifies missed cases of acute kidney injury following cardiac arrest

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Fluid resuscitation in the critically ill often results in a positive fluid balance, potentially diluting the serum creatinine concentration and delaying diagnosis of acute kidney injury (AKI). Methods Dilution during AKI was quantified by combining creatinine and volume kinetics to account for fluid type, and rates of fluid infusion and urine output. The model was refined using simulated patients receiving crystalloids or colloids under four glomerular filtration rate (GFR) change scenarios and then applied to a cohort of critically ill patients following cardiac arrest. Results The creatinine concentration decreased during six hours of fluid infusion at 1 litre-per-hour in simulated patients, irrespective of fluid type or extent of change in GFR (from 0% to 67% reduction). This delayed diagnosis of AKI by 2 to 9 hours. Crystalloids reduced creatinine concentration by 11 to 19% whereas colloids reduced concentration by 36 to 43%. The greatest reduction was at the end of the infusion period. Fluid dilution alone could not explain the rapid reduction of plasma creatinine concentration observed in 39 of 49 patients after cardiac arrest. Additional loss of creatinine production could account for those changes. AKI was suggested in six patients demonstrating little change in creatinine, since a 52 ± 13% reduction in GFR was required after accounting for fluid dilution and reduced creatinine production. Increased injury biomarkers within a few hours of cardiac arrest, including urinary cystatin C and plasma and urinary Neutrophil-Gelatinase-Associated-Lipocalin (biomarker-positive, creatinine-negative patients) also indicated AKI in these patients. Conclusions Creatinine and volume kinetics combined to quantify GFR loss, even in the absence of an increase in creatinine. The model improved disease severity estimation, and demonstrated that diagnostic delays due to dilution are minimally affected by fluid type. Creatinine sampling should be delayed at least one hour following a large fluid bolus to avoid dilution. Unchanged plasma creatinine post cardiac arrest signifies renal injury and loss of function. Trial registration Australian and New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12610001012066. PMID:23327106

  17. Maternal fructose drives placental uric acid production leading to adverse fetal outcomes.

    PubMed

    Asghar, Zeenat A; Thompson, Alysha; Chi, Maggie; Cusumano, Andrew; Scheaffer, Suzanne; Al-Hammadi, Noor; Saben, Jessica L; Moley, Kelle H

    2016-01-01

    Maternal metabolic diseases increase offspring risk for low birth weight and cardiometabolic diseases in adulthood. Excess fructose consumption may confer metabolic risks for both women and their offspring. However, the direct consequences of fructose intake per se are unknown. We assessed the impact of a maternal high-fructose diet on the fetal-placental unit in mice in the absence of metabolic syndrome and determined the association between maternal serum fructose and placental uric acid levels in humans. In mice, maternal fructose consumption led to placental inefficiency, fetal growth restriction, elevated fetal serum glucose and triglyceride levels. In the placenta, fructose induced de novo uric acid synthesis by activating the activities of the enzymes AMP deaminase and xanthine oxidase. Moreover, the placentas had increased lipids and altered expression of genes that control oxidative stress. Treatment of mothers with the xanthine oxidase inhibitor allopurinol reduced placental uric acid levels, prevented placental inefficiency, and improved fetal weights and serum triglycerides. Finally, in 18 women delivering at term, maternal serum fructose levels significantly correlated with placental uric acid levels. These findings suggest that in mice, excess maternal fructose consumption impairs placental function via a xanthine oxidase/uric acid-dependent mechanism, and similar effects may occur in humans. PMID:27125896

  18. Relation between uric acid and metabolic syndrome in subjects with cardiometabolic risk.

    PubMed

    Silva, Hellen Abreu da; Carraro, Júlia Cristina Cardoso; Bressan, Josefina; Hermsdorff, Helen Hermana Miranda

    2015-01-01

    Objective To identify possible relations between serum uric acid levels and metabolic syndrome and its components in a population with cardiometabolic risk. Methods This cross-sectional study included 80 subjects (46 women), with mean age of 48±16 years, seen at the Cardiovascular Health Program. Results The prevalence of hyperuricemia and metabolic syndrome was 6.3% and 47.1%, respectively. Uric acid level was significantly higher in individuals with metabolic syndrome (5.1±1.6mg/dL), as compared to those with no syndrome or with pre-syndrome (3.9±1.2 and 4.1±1.3mg/dL, respectively; p<0.05). The uric acid levels were significantly higher in men presenting abdominal obesity, and among women with abdominal obesity, lower HDL-c levels and higher blood pressure (p<0.05). Conclusion Uric acid concentrations were positively related to the occurrence of metabolic syndrome and its components, and there were differences between genders. Our results indicate serum uric acid as a potential biomarker for patients with cardiometabolic risk. PMID:26018145

  19. Maternal fructose drives placental uric acid production leading to adverse fetal outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Asghar, Zeenat A.; Thompson, Alysha; Chi, Maggie; Cusumano, Andrew; Scheaffer, Suzanne; Al-Hammadi, Noor; Saben, Jessica L.; Moley, Kelle H.

    2016-01-01

    Maternal metabolic diseases increase offspring risk for low birth weight and cardiometabolic diseases in adulthood. Excess fructose consumption may confer metabolic risks for both women and their offspring. However, the direct consequences of fructose intake per se are unknown. We assessed the impact of a maternal high-fructose diet on the fetal-placental unit in mice in the absence of metabolic syndrome and determined the association between maternal serum fructose and placental uric acid levels in humans. In mice, maternal fructose consumption led to placental inefficiency, fetal growth restriction, elevated fetal serum glucose and triglyceride levels. In the placenta, fructose induced de novo uric acid synthesis by activating the activities of the enzymes AMP deaminase and xanthine oxidase. Moreover, the placentas had increased lipids and altered expression of genes that control oxidative stress. Treatment of mothers with the xanthine oxidase inhibitor allopurinol reduced placental uric acid levels, prevented placental inefficiency, and improved fetal weights and serum triglycerides. Finally, in 18 women delivering at term, maternal serum fructose levels significantly correlated with placental uric acid levels. These findings suggest that in mice, excess maternal fructose consumption impairs placental function via a xanthine oxidase/uric acid-dependent mechanism, and similar effects may occur in humans. PMID:27125896

  20. The role of uric acid in the insulin resistance in children and adolescents with obesity

    PubMed Central

    de Miranda, Josiane Aparecida; Almeida, Guilherme Gomide; Martins, Raissa Isabelle Leão; Cunha, Mariana Botrel; Belo, Vanessa Almeida; dos Santos, José Eduardo Tanus; Mourão-Júnior, Carlos Alberto; Lanna, Carla Márcia Moreira

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the association between serum uric acid levels and insulin resistance in children and adolescents with obesity. Methods: Cross-sectional study with 245 children and adolescents (134 obese and 111 controls), aged 8-18 years. The anthropometric variables (weight, height and waist circumference), blood pressure and biochemical parameters were collected. The clinical characteristics of the groups were analyzed by t-test or chi-square test. To evaluate the association between uric acid levels and insulin resistance the Pearson's test and logistic regression were applied. Results: The prevalence of insulin resistance was 26.9%. The anthropometric variables, systolic and diastolic blood pressure and biochemical variables were significantly higher in the obese group (p<0.001), except for the high-density-lipoprotein cholesterol. There was a positive and significant correlation between anthropometric variables and uric acid with HOMA-IR in the obese and in the control groups, which was higher in the obese group and in the total sample. The logistic regression model that included age, gender and obesity, showed an odds ratio of uric acid as a variable associated with insulin resistance of 1.91 (95%CI 1.40-2.62; p<−0.001). Conclusions: The increase in serum uric acid showed a positive statistical correlation with insulin resistance and it is associated with and increased risk of insulin resistance in obese children and adolescents. PMID:26300523

  1. Comparison between Procalcitonin, Brain Natriuretic Peptide, and Uric Acid in Children with Cardiomyopathy and Controls

    PubMed Central

    Noori, Noor Mohammad; Mahjoubifard, Maziar; Shahramian, Iraj; Teimouri, Alireza; Jahangirifard, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    Objective. This study was performed to determine the level of procalcitonin, Brain Natriuretic Peptide (BNP), and uric acid in children with cardiomyopathy in comparison with controls and the association with echocardiographic findings. Methods. The levels of BNP, procalcitonin, and serum uric acid were measured and the amounts of biomarkers compared with echocardiographic findings. Results. In this study mean age of participants was the same (p=0.321). The majority of echocardiographic indices in left and right heart have different means in case and controls (p<0.05). Means of BNP, procalcitonin, and uric acid were 213.814 ± 309.601, 9.326 ± 3.881, and 6.846 ± 1.814 for case group and 2.76 ± 1.013, 1.851 ± 1.466, and 3.317 ± 0.924 for control (p<0.001), respectively. In the patients group there was relationship of Ross classification with BNP (χ2 = 15.845, p<0.05) and with age (χ2 = 8.946, p<0.05). For uric acid and procalcitonin no significant relationships were observed. Conclusions. procalcitonin, uric acid, and BNP had significant relationship with many echocardiographic findings in participants. For patients, procalcitonin did not show correlation. The severity of illness based on the Ross classification showed significant correlation with BNP level and age in patients. PMID:26495299

  2. The associations of serum uric acid level and hyperuricemia with knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Ding, Xiang; Zeng, Chao; Wei, Jie; Li, Hui; Yang, Tuo; Zhang, Yi; Xiong, Yi-Lin; Gao, Shu-Guang; Li, Yu-Sheng; Lei, Guang-Hua

    2016-04-01

    To examine the cross-sectional associations of the serum uric acid level and hyperuricemia (HU) with the radiographic features of osteoarthritis (OA), including osteophytes (OST) and joint space narrowing (JSN), a total of 4685 subjects were included in this study. Blood samples were drawn from all subjects. Serum uric acid and some other indexes were detected. OST and JSN were assessed for each subject according to the Osteoarthritis Research Society International (OARSI) atlas. A multivariable logistic analysis model was applied to test the target associations after adjusting a number of potential confounding factors. The prevalence of OST was increased in the highest tertile of uric acid compared to the lowest in female subjects (OR 1.46, 95 % CI 1.07-1.99, P for trend = 0.02). Meanwhile, a positive association between OST and HU was observed in female subjects (OR 1.43, 95 % CI 1.01-2.03, P = 0.05). However, serum uric acid and HU were not significantly associated with JSN in male subjects. The findings of this study indicated that the serum uric acid concentration and prevalence of HU are positively associated with OST of the knee in the female population. Level of evidence Cross-sectional study, Level III. PMID:26743214

  3. Colorimetric test-systems for creatinine detection based on composite molecularly imprinted polymer membranes.

    PubMed

    Sergeyeva, T A; Gorbach, L A; Piletska, E V; Piletsky, S A; Brovko, O O; Honcharova, L A; Lutsyk, O D; Sergeeva, L M; Zinchenko, O A; El'skaya, A V

    2013-04-01

    An easy-to-use colorimetric test-system for the efficient detection of creatinine in aqueous samples was developed. The test-system is based on composite molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) membranes with artificial receptor sites capable of creatinine recognition. A thin MIP layer was created on the surface of microfiltration polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) membranes using method of photo-initiated grafting polymerization. The MIP layer was obtained by co-polymerization of a functional monomer (e.g. 2-acrylamido-2-methyl-1-propanesulfonic acid, itaconic acid or methacrylic acid) with N, N'-methylenebisacrylamide as a cross-linker. The choice of the functional monomer was based on the results of computational modeling. The creatinine-selective composite MIP membranes were used for measuring creatinine in aqueous samples. Creatinine molecules were selectively adsorbed by the MIP membranes and quantified using color reaction with picrates. The intensity of MIP membranes staining was proportional to creatinine concentration in an analyzed sample. The colorimetric test-system based on the composite MIP membranes was characterized with 0.25 mM detection limit and 0.25-2.5mM linear dynamic range. Storage stability of the MIP membranes was estimated as at least 1 year at room temperature. As compared to the traditional methods of creatinine detection the developed test-system is characterized by simplicity of operation, small size and low cost. PMID:23498699

  4. Calcium Supplementation Increases Blood Creatinine Concentration in a Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Barry, Elizabeth L.; Mott, Leila A.; Melamed, Michal L.; Rees, Judith R.; Ivanova, Anastasia; Sandler, Robert S.; Ahnen, Dennis J.; Bresalier, Robert S.; Summers, Robert W.; Bostick, Roberd M.; Baron, John A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Calcium supplements are widely used among older adults for osteoporosis prevention and treatment. However, their effect on creatinine levels and kidney function has not been well studied. Methods We investigated the effect of calcium supplementation on blood creatinine concentration in a randomized controlled trial of colorectal adenoma chemoprevention conducted between 2004–2013 at 11 clinical centers in the United States. Healthy participants (N = 1,675) aged 45–75 with a history of colorectal adenoma were assigned to daily supplementation with calcium (1200 mg, as carbonate), vitamin D3 (1000 IU), both, or placebo for three or five years. Changes in blood creatinine and total calcium concentration were measured after one year of treatment and multiple linear regression was used to estimate effects on creatinine concentrations. Results After one year of treatment, blood creatinine was 0.013±0.006 mg/dL higher on average among participants randomized to calcium compared to placebo after adjustment for other determinants of creatinine (P = 0.03). However, the effect of calcium treatment appeared to be larger among participants who consumed the most alcohol (2–6 drinks/day) or whose estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was less than 60 ml/min/1.73 m2 at baseline. The effect of calcium treatment on creatinine was only partially mediated by a concomitant increase in blood total calcium concentration and was independent of randomized vitamin D treatment. There did not appear to be further increases in creatinine after the first year of calcium treatment. Conclusions Among healthy adults participating in a randomized clinical trial, daily supplementation with 1200 mg of elemental calcium caused a small increase in blood creatinine. If confirmed, this finding may have implications for clinical and public health recommendations for calcium supplementation. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00153816 PMID:25329821

  5. Differences in urine cadmium associations with kidney outcomes based on serum creatinine and cystatin C

    SciTech Connect

    Weaver, Virginia M.; Kim, Nam-Soo; Lee, Byung-Kook; Parsons, Patrick J.; Department of Environmental Health Sciences, School of Public Health, University at Albany, Albany, NY ; Spector, June; Fadrowski, Jeffrey; Department of Pediatrics, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD ; Jaar, Bernard G.; Welch Center for Prevention, Epidemiology and Clinical Research, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, MD; Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD ; Steuerwald, Amy J.; Department of Environmental Health Sciences, School of Public Health, University at Albany, Albany, NY ; Todd, Andrew C.; and others

    2011-11-15

    Cadmium is a well-known nephrotoxicant; chronic exposure increases risk for chronic kidney disease. Recently, however, associations between urine cadmium and higher creatinine-based estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) have been reported. Analyses utilizing alternate biomarkers of kidney function allow evaluation of potential mechanisms for these observations. We compared associations of urine cadmium with kidney function measures based on serum cystatin C to those with serum creatinine in 712 lead workers. Mean (standard deviation) molybdenum-corrected urine cadmium, Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD) eGFR and multi-variable cystatin C eGFR were 1.02 (0.65) {mu}g/g creatinine, and 97.4 (19.2) and 112.0 (17.7) mL/min/1.73 m{sup 2}, respectively. The eGFR measures were moderately correlated (r{sub s}=0.5; p<0.001). After adjustment, ln (urine cadmium) was not associated with serum cystatin-C-based measures. However, higher ln (urine cadmium) was associated with higher creatinine-based eGFRs including the MDRD and an equation incorporating serum cystatin C and creatinine (beta-coefficient=4.1 mL/min/1.73 m{sup 2}; 95% confidence interval=1.6, 6.6). Urine creatinine was associated with serum creatinine-based but not cystatin-C-based eGFRs. These results support a biomarker-specific, rather than a kidney function, effect underlying the associations observed between higher urine cadmium and creatinine-based kidney function measures. Given the routine use of serum and urine creatinine in kidney and biomarker research, additional research to elucidate the mechanism(s) for these associations is essential.

  6. Differences in urine cadmium associations with kidney outcomes based on serum creatinine and cystatin C.

    PubMed

    Weaver, Virginia M; Kim, Nam-Soo; Lee, Byung-Kook; Parsons, Patrick J; Spector, June; Fadrowski, Jeffrey; Jaar, Bernard G; Steuerwald, Amy J; Todd, Andrew C; Simon, David; Schwartz, Brian S

    2011-11-01

    Cadmium is a well-known nephrotoxicant; chronic exposure increases risk for chronic kidney disease. Recently, however, associations between urine cadmium and higher creatinine-based estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) have been reported. Analyses utilizing alternate biomarkers of kidney function allow evaluation of potential mechanisms for these observations. We compared associations of urine cadmium with kidney function measures based on serum cystatin C to those with serum creatinine in 712 lead workers. Mean (standard deviation) molybdenum-corrected urine cadmium, Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD) eGFR and multi-variable cystatin C eGFR were 1.02 (0.65) μg/g creatinine, and 97.4 (19.2) and 112.0 (17.7) mL/min/1.73 m2, respectively. The eGFR measures were moderately correlated (rs=0.5; p<0.001). After adjustment, ln (urine cadmium) was not associated with serum cystatin-C-based measures. However, higher ln (urine cadmium) was associated with higher creatinine-based eGFRs including the MDRD and an equation incorporating serum cystatin C and creatinine (beta-coefficient=4.1 mL/min/1.73 m2; 95% confidence interval=1.6, 6.6). Urine creatinine was associated with serum creatinine-based but not cystatin-C-based eGFRs. These results support a biomarker-specific, rather than a kidney function, effect underlying the associations observed between higher urine cadmium and creatinine-based kidney function measures. Given the routine use of serum and urine creatinine in kidney and biomarker research, additional research to elucidate the mechanism(s) for these associations is essential. PMID:21871619

  7. Creatinine Change on Vasoconstrictors as Mortality Surrogate in Hepatorenal Syndrome: Systematic Review & Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Belcher, Justin M.; Coca, Steven G.; Parikh, Chirag R.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Hepatorenal syndrome is a severe complication of cirrhosis and associates with significant mortality. Vasoconstrictor medications improve renal function in patients with hepatorenal syndrome. However, it is unclear to what extent changes in serum creatinine during treatment may act as a surrogate for changes in mortality. We have performed a meta-analysis of randomized trials of vasoconstrictors assessing the association between changes in serum creatinine, taken as a continuous variable, and mortality, both while on treatment and during the follow-up period for survivors. Methods The electronic databases of PubMed, Web of Science and Embase were searched for randomized trials evaluating the efficacy of vasoconstrictor therapy for treatment of HRS type 1 or 2. The relative risk (RR) for mortality was calculated against delta creatinine. The proportion of treatment effect explained (PTE) was calculated for delta creatinine. Results Seven trials enrolling 345 patients were included. The correlation between delta creatinine and ln (RR) was moderately good (R2 = 0.61). The intercept and parameter estimate indicated a fall in creatinine while on treatment of 1 mg/dL resulted in a 27% reduction in RR for mortality compared to the control arm. In patients surviving the treatment period, a fall in creatinine while on treatment of 1 mg/dL resulted in a 16% reduction in RR for post-treatment mortality during follow-up. The PTE of delta creatinine for overall mortality was 0.91 and 0.26 for post-treatment mortality. Conclusions Changes in serum creatinine in response to vasoconstrictor therapy appear to be a valid surrogate for mortality, even in the period following the completion of treatment. PMID:26295585

  8. Determination of Urinary Creatinine in Washington State Residents via Liquid Chromatography/Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    West, Caroline E.; Rhodes, Blaine N.

    2014-01-01

    A viable, quick, and reliable method for determining urinary creatinine by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) was developed and used to evaluate spot urine samples collected for the Washington Environmental Biomonitoring Survey (WEBS): part of the Washington State Department of Health, Public Health Laboratories (PHL). 50 µL of urine was mixed with a 1 : 1 acetonitrile/water solution containing deuterated creatinine as the internal standard and then analyzed by LC/MS/MS. Utilizing electrospray ionization (ESI) in positive mode, the transition ions for creatinine and creatinine-d3 were determined to be 114.0 to 44.1 (quantifier), 114.0 to 86.1 (qualifier), and 117.0 to 47.1 (creatinine-d3). The retention time for creatinine was 0.85 minutes. The linear calibration range was 20–4000 mg/L, with a limit of detection at 1.77 mg/L and a limit of quantitation at 5.91 mg/L. LC/MS/MS and the colorimetric Jaffé reaction were associated significantly (Pearson r = 0.9898 and R2 = 0.9797, ρ ≤ 0.0001). The LC/MS/MS method developed at the PHL to determine creatinine in the spot urine samples had shorter retention times, and was more sensitive, reliable, reproducible, and safer than other LC/MS/MS or commercial methods such as the Jaffé reaction or modified versions thereof. PMID:25614740

  9. Synthesis and Characterization of Branched Poly(ester urea)s with Different Branch Density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jiayi; Becker, Matthew

    2015-03-01

    A new class of L-phenylalanine-based poly(ester urea)s (PEU) was developed that possess tunable mechanical properties, water uptake ability and degradation rates. Our preliminary data has shown that 1,6-hexanediol L - phenylalanine-based poly(ester urea)s possesses an elastic modulus nearly double that of poly(lactic acid). My work details the synthesis of a series of L - phenylalanine-based poly(ester urea)s possessing a variation in diol chain length and in branch density and shows how these subtle structural differences influence the mechanical properties and in vitro biodegradation rates. The elastic moduli span a range of values that overlap with several currently clinically available degradable polymers. Increasingly the diol chain lengths increases the amount of flexible segment in the chemical structure, which results in reduced elastic modulus values and increased values of elongation at break. Increasing the amount of branch monomer incorporated into the system reduces the molecular entanglement, which also results in decreased elastic modulus values and increased values of elongation at break. The L - phenylalanine-based poly(ester urea)s also exhibited a diol length dependent degradation process that varied between 1-5 % over 16 weeks. Compared with PLLA, PEUs degrade more quickly and the rate can be tuned by changing the diol chain length. PEUs absorb more water and the water uptake ability can be tuned by changing the branch density. This work was supported by Akron Functional Materials Center.

  10. Winter Wheat and Maize Response to Urea Ammonium Nitrate and a New Urea Formaldehyde Polymer Fertilizer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Slow release nitrogen (N) fertilizers have potential to improve yield and nitrogen use efficiency (NUE) in winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) and maize (Zea mays L.). A slow release urea formaldehyde polymer (UFP) was compared with conventional aqueous urea-ammonium nitrate (UAN) [(NH2)2CO, NH4NO3]...

  11. Falsely elevated serum creatinine levels secondary to the presence of 5-fluorocytosine.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, R T; Marshall, L H; Lefkowitz, L B; Stratton, C W

    1985-08-01

    The Kodak Ektachem (Eastman Kodak Co., Rochester, NY) is a new clinical chemistry analyzer that uses an enzymatic method to measure creatinine. The authors report the case of a patient with falsely elevated creatinine levels that were caused by the presence of 5-fluorocytosine. A review of the literature confirmed that this can occur, but well documented reports are not found. In order to determine the magnitude of this interference, the authors plotted creatinine levels versus 5-FC concentration. Significant interference is seen with therapeutic levels of 5-FC. Both clinicians and pathologists should be aware of this phenomenon. PMID:4025232

  12. Prognostic Significance of Uric Acid Levels in Ischemic Stroke Patients.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xia; Huang, Zhi-Chao; Lu, Tao-Sheng; You, Shou-Jiang; Cao, Yong-Jun; Liu, Chun-Feng

    2016-01-01

    The importance and function of serum uric acid (UA) levels in patients with cardiovascular disease or stroke are unclear. We sought to evaluate the appropriate UA levels for stroke patients and the association between endogenous UA levels and clinical outcomes in acute ischemic stroke (AIS) patients, particularly regarding the possible interaction between gender and UA levels with respect to AIS prognosis. We examined 303 patients who had an onset of ischemic stroke within 48h. Of those, 101 patients received thrombolytic treatment. Serum UA (?mol/L) levels were measured the second morning after admission. Patient prognosis was evaluated 90days after clinical onset by modified Rankin Scale. Patients were divided into four groups according to serum UA quartiles. A binary multivariate logistic regression model was used to assess clinical relevance in regard to functional outcome and endogenous UA levels. Analysis of subgroups by gender and normal glomerular filtration rate were also been done. Poor functional outcome was associated with older age, history of atrial fibrillation, or higher baseline National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale scores. After adjustment for potential confounders, patients with higher UA levels (>380?mol/L) or lower UA levels (?250?mol/L) were 2-3 times more likely to have a poor outcome (OR 2.95, 95% CI 1.14-7.61; OR 2.78, 95% CI 1.02-7.58, respectively) compared to the baseline group (UA level 316-380?mol/L). The same results were observed in thrombolyzed patients. Patients with high and low UA levels were 9-18 times more likely to having poor outcomes compared to the baseline group (UA level: 316-380?mol/L; OR 18.50, 95% CI: 2.041-167.67; OR 9.66, 95% CI 1.42-65.88, respectively). In men, patients with high UA levels were 6 times more likely to have poor outcomes compared to the baseline group (UA level: 279-334?mol/L; OR 6.10, 95% CI 1.62-22.93). However, female patients with UA level 271-337?mol/L were seven times more likely to perform badly compared to the baseline group (UA level >337?mol/L, OR 7.06, 95% CI 1.00-49.81). Serum UA levels in an appropriate range were associated with better outcome in patients with AIS but may be harmful when too high or too low. The association of UA levels with AIS prognosis differed in male and female patients, which highlights the necessity of stratifying by gender in investigations of cerebrovascular risk factors. PMID:26376636

  13. Serum uric acid levels during leprosy reaction episodes

    PubMed Central

    Alves-Junior, Eduardo R.; Arruda, Talita A.; Lopes, Jose C.; Fontes, Cor J.F.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Leprosy reactions are acute inflammatory episodes that occur mainly in the multibacillary forms of the disease. The reactions are classified as type 1 (reverse reaction) or type 2 (erythema nodosum leprosum). Leprosy-associated oxidative stress has been widely demonstrated. Several recent studies have shown uric acid (UA) to have antioxidative effects under pathologic conditions. The objective of this study was to assess serum levels of UA in patients with leprosy reactions, with the aim of monitoring their levels before and after treatment, compared with levels in leprosy patients without reactions. Methods. The study included patients aged 18–69 years assisted at a leprosy treatment reference center in the Central Region of Brazil. Patients who were pregnant; were using immunosuppressant drugs or immunobiologicals; or had an autoimmune disease, human immunodeficiency virus infection, acquired immune deficiency syndrome, or tuberculosis were excluded. Upon recruitment, all individuals were clinically assessed for skin lesions and neural or systemic impairment. Some patients had already completed treatment for leprosy, while others were still undergoing treatment or had initiated treatment after being admitted. The treatment of the reactional episode was started only after the initial evaluation. Laboratory assessments were performed upon admission (baseline) and at approximately 30 and 60 days (time points 1 and 2, respectively). Results. A total of 123 leprosy patients were recruited between June 2012 and June 2015; among them, 56, 42, and 25 presented with type 1, type 2, and no reactions, respectively. Serum UA levels were significantly reduced in patients with type 2 leprosy reactions compared with patients in the control group and remained lower in the two subsequent assessments, after initiation of anti-reaction treatments, with similar values to those recorded before the treatment. Discussion. The decreased serum UA levels in patients with type 2 leprosy reactions might be due to the consumption of UA to neutralize the enhanced production of oxygen- and nitrogen-reactive species that occurs during type 2 reactions. The maintenance of the reduced levels in the follow-up assessments may indicate persistence of oxidative stress in the initial post-treatment stages, despite improved clinical conditions. The results of this study suggest that serum UA may play an antioxidative role during type 2 leprosy reactions. PMID:26989632

  14. Serum uric acid levels during leprosy reaction episodes.

    PubMed

    Morato-Conceicao, Yvelise T; Alves-Junior, Eduardo R; Arruda, Talita A; Lopes, Jose C; Fontes, Cor J F

    2016-01-01

    Background. Leprosy reactions are acute inflammatory episodes that occur mainly in the multibacillary forms of the disease. The reactions are classified as type 1 (reverse reaction) or type 2 (erythema nodosum leprosum). Leprosy-associated oxidative stress has been widely demonstrated. Several recent studies have shown uric acid (UA) to have antioxidative effects under pathologic conditions. The objective of this study was to assess serum levels of UA in patients with leprosy reactions, with the aim of monitoring their levels before and after treatment, compared with levels in leprosy patients without reactions. Methods. The study included patients aged 18-69 years assisted at a leprosy treatment reference center in the Central Region of Brazil. Patients who were pregnant; were using immunosuppressant drugs or immunobiologicals; or had an autoimmune disease, human immunodeficiency virus infection, acquired immune deficiency syndrome, or tuberculosis were excluded. Upon recruitment, all individuals were clinically assessed for skin lesions and neural or systemic impairment. Some patients had already completed treatment for leprosy, while others were still undergoing treatment or had initiated treatment after being admitted. The treatment of the reactional episode was started only after the initial evaluation. Laboratory assessments were performed upon admission (baseline) and at approximately 30 and 60 days (time points 1 and 2, respectively). Results. A total of 123 leprosy patients were recruited between June 2012 and June 2015; among them, 56, 42, and 25 presented with type 1, type 2, and no reactions, respectively. Serum UA levels were significantly reduced in patients with type 2 leprosy reactions compared with patients in the control group and remained lower in the two subsequent assessments, after initiation of anti-reaction treatments, with similar values to those recorded before the treatment. Discussion. The decreased serum UA levels in patients with type 2 leprosy reactions might be due to the consumption of UA to neutralize the enhanced production of oxygen- and nitrogen-reactive species that occurs during type 2 reactions. The maintenance of the reduced levels in the follow-up assessments may indicate persistence of oxidative stress in the initial post-treatment stages, despite improved clinical conditions. The results of this study suggest that serum UA may play an antioxidative role during type 2 leprosy reactions. PMID:26989632

  15. Computed phase diagrams for the system: Sodium hydroxide-uric acid-hydrochloric acid-water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, W. E.; Gregory, T. M.; Füredi-Milhofer, H.

    1987-07-01

    Renal stone formation is made complex by the variety of solid phases that are formed, by the number of components in the aqueous phase, and by the multiplicity of ionic dissociation and association processes that are involved. In the present work we apply phase diagrams calculated by the use of equilibrium constants from the ternary system sodium hydroxide-uric acid-water to simplify and make more rigorous the understanding of the factors governing dissolution and precipitation of uric acid (anhydrous and dihydrate) and sodium urate monohydrate. The system is then examined in terms of four components. Finally, procedures are described for fluids containing more than four components. The isotherms, singular points, and fields of supersaturation and undersaturation are shown in various forms of phase diagrams. This system has two notable features: (1) in the coordinates -log[H 2U] versus -log[NaOH], the solubility isotherms for anhydrous uric acid and uric acid dihydrate approximate straight lines with slopes equal to +1 over a wide range of concentrations. As a result, substantial quantities of sodium acid urate monohydrate can precipitate from solution or dissolve without changing the degree of saturation of uric acid significantly. (2) The solubility isotherm for NaHU·H 2O has a deltoid shape with the low-pH branch having a slope of infinity. As a result of the vertical slope of this isotherm, substantial quantities of uric acid can dissolve or precipitate without changing the degree of saturation of sodium acid urate monohydrate significantly. The H 2U-NaOH singular point has a pH of 6.87 at 310 K in the ternary system.

  16. Copy number polymorphisms near SLC2A9 are associated with serum uric acid concentrations

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Hyperuricemia is associated with multiple diseases, including gout, cardiovascular disease, and renal disease. Serum urate is highly heritable, yet association studies of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and serum uric acid explain a small fraction of the heritability. Whether copy number polymorphisms (CNPs) contribute to uric acid levels is unknown. Results We assessed copy number on a genome-wide scale among 8,411 individuals of European ancestry (EA) who participated in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study. CNPs upstream of the urate transporter SLC2A9 on chromosome 4p16.1 are associated with uric acid (χ2df2=3545, p=3.19×10-23). Effect sizes, expressed as the percentage change in uric acid per deleted copy, are most pronounced among women (3.974.935.87 [ 2.55097.5 denoting percentiles], p=4.57×10-23) and independent of previously reported SNPs in SLC2A9 as assessed by SNP and CNP regression models and the phasing SNP and CNP haplotypes (χ2df2=3190,p=7.23×10-08). Our finding is replicated in the Framingham Heart Study (FHS), where the effect size estimated from 4,089 women is comparable to ARIC in direction and magnitude (1.414.707.88, p=5.46×10-03). Conclusions This is the first study to characterize CNPs in ARIC and the first genome-wide analysis of CNPs and uric acid. Our findings suggests a novel, non-coding regulatory mechanism for SLC2A9-mediated modulation of serum uric acid, and detail a bioinformatic approach for assessing the contribution of CNPs to heritable traits in large population-based studies where technical sources of variation are substantial. PMID:25007794

  17. Serum uric acid concentrations and SLC2A9 genetic variation in Hispanic children: The Viva La Familia Study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Elevated concentrations of serum uric acid are associated with increased risk of gout and renal and cardiovascular diseases. Genetic studies in adults have consistently identified associations of solute carrier family 2, member 9 (SLC2A9), polymorphisms with variation in serum uric acid. However, it...

  18. Uric acid attenuates nitric oxide production by decreasing the interaction between endothelial nitric oxide synthase and calmodulin in human umbilical vein endothelial cells: a mechanism for uric acid-induced cardiovascular disease development.

    PubMed

    Park, Jung-Hyun; Jin, Yoon Mi; Hwang, Soojin; Cho, Du-Hyong; Kang, Duk-Hee; Jo, Inho

    2013-08-01

    The elevated level of uric acid in the body is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular diseases, which is mediated by endothelial dysfunction. However, its underlying mechanism is not fully understood, although dysregulation of endothelial nitric oxide (NO) production is likely to be involved. Using human umbilical vascular endothelial cells (HUVEC), we explored the molecular mechanism of uric acid on endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) activity and NO production. Although high dose of uric acid (12mg/dl for 24h treatment) significantly decreased eNOS activity and NO production, it did not alter eNOS expression and phosphorylations at eNOS-Ser(1177), eNOS-Thr(495) and eNOS-Ser(114). Under this condition, we also found no alterations in the dimerization and acetylation of eNOS, compared with the control. Furthermore, uric acid did not change the activity of arginase II, an enzyme degrading l-arginine, a substrate of eNOS, and intracellular level of calcium, a cofactor for eNOS activation. We also found that uric acid did not alter xanthine oxidase activity, suggesting no involvement of xanthine oxidase-derived O2(-) production in the observed inhibitory effects. In vitro and in cell coimmunoprecipitation studies, however, revealed that uric acid significantly decreased the interaction between eNOS and calmodulin (CaM), an eNOS activator, although it did not change the intracellular CaM level. Like in HUVEC, uric acid also decreased eNOS-CaM interaction in bovine aortic EC. Finally, uric acid attenuated ionomycin-induced increase in the interaction between eNOS and CaM. This study suggests firstly that uric acid decreased eNOS activity and NO production through reducing the binding between eNOS and CaM in EC. Our result may provide molecular mechanism by which uric acid induces endothelial dysfunction. PMID:23624269

  19. EVALUATION OF DISPOSABLE DIAPERS FOR QUANTATIVE MEASUREMENTS OF PESTICIDE METABOLITES AND CREATININE IN URINE SAMPLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This project consisted of a laboratory study to evaluate an extraction and analysis method for quantifying biomarkers of pesticide exposure and creatinine in urine samples collected with commercially-available disposable diapers. For large exposure studies, such as the National ...

  20. Kidney injury biomarkers and urinary creatinine variability in nominally healthy adults

    EPA Science Inventory

    Environmental exposure diagnostics use creatinine concentrations in urine aliquots as the internal standard for dilution normalization of all other excreted metabolites when urinary excretion rate data are not available. This is a reasonable approach for healthy adults as creati...

  1. Measurement of creatinine in human plasma using a functional porous polymer structure sensing motif

    PubMed Central

    Nanda, Sitansu Sekhar; An, Seong Soo A; Yi, Dong Kee

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a new method for detecting creatinine was developed. This novel sensor comprised of two ionic liquids, poly-lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA) and 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium (BMIM) chloride, in the presence of 2′,7′-dichlorofluorescein diacetate (DCFH-DA). PLGA and BMIM chloride formed a functional porous polymer structure (FPPS)-like structure. Creatinine within the FPPS rapidly hydrolyzed and released OH−, which in turn converted DCFH-DA to DCFH, developing an intense green color or green fluorescence. The conversion of DCFH to DCF+ resulted in swelling of FPPS and increased solubility. This DCF+-based sensor could detect creatinine levels with detection limit of 5 µM and also measure the creatinine in blood. This novel method could be used in diagnostic applications for monitoring individuals with renal dysfunction. PMID:26347475

  2. Cystatin C is not a better estimator of GFR than plasma creatinine in the general population.

    PubMed

    Eriksen, Bjørn O; Mathisen, Ulla D; Melsom, Toralf; Ingebretsen, Ole C; Jenssen, Trond G; Njølstad, Inger; Solbu, Marit D; Toft, Ingrid

    2010-12-01

    Accurate measurement of glomerular filtration rate (GFR) is complicated and costly; therefore, GFR is commonly estimated by assessing creatinine or cystatin C concentrations. Because estimates based on cystatin C predict cardiovascular disease better than creatinine, these estimates have been hypothesized to be superior to those based on creatinine, when the GFR is near the normal range. To test this, we measured GFR by iohexol clearance in a representative sample of middle-aged (50-62 years) individuals in the general population, excluding those with coronary heart or kidney disease, stroke or diabetes mellitus. Bias, precision (median and interquartile range of estimated minus measured GFR (mGFR)), and accuracy (percentage of estimates within 30% of mGFR) of published cystatin C and creatinine-based GFR equations were compared in a total of 1621 patients. The cystatin C-based equation with the highest accuracy (94%) had a bias of 3.5 and precision of 18 ml/min per 1.73 m², whereas the most accurate (95%) creatinine-based equation had a bias of 2.9 and precision of 15 ml/min per 1.73 m² The best equation, based on both cystatin C and creatinine, had a bias of 7.6 ml/min per 1.73 m², precision of 15 ml/min per 1.73 m², and accuracy of 92%. Thus, estimates of GFR based on cystatin C were not superior to those based on creatinine in the general population. Hence, the better prediction of cardiovascular disease by cystatin C than creatinine measurements, found by others, may be due to factors other than GFR. PMID:20844470

  3. [Methods of urine analysis for creatinine after long period of storage].

    PubMed

    Pishak, V P; Iarmol'chuk, S G

    2001-01-01

    Our investigations showed that n-cresol (4-methylphenol) stabilized urine and preserves urinal creatinine as long as for 50-d storage at room temperature. This antimicrobial biochemical stabilizer is the core of a novel method of delayed creatinine quantification in urine. It can be useful in metabolic investigations of cosmonauts and nuclear submarine crews, members of alpine, desert, deep-water, Arctic and Antarctic expeditions and in many other cases when samples cannot be analyzed immediately. PMID:11385990

  4. A facile low-cost enzymatic paper-based assay for the determination of urine creatinine.

    PubMed

    Talalak, Kwanrutai; Noiphung, Julaluk; Songjaroen, Temsiri; Chailapakul, Orawon; Laiwattanapaisal, Wanida

    2015-11-01

    Creatinine is one of many markers used to investigate kidney function. This paper describes a low-cost enzymatic paper-based analytical device (enz-PAD) for determining urine creatinine. The disposable dead volumes of creatinine enzyme reagents from an automatic analyser cassette were utilised. Whatman No. 3 paper was cut into long rectangular shapes (4×40 mm(2)) on which the enzyme reagents, R1 and R2, were adsorbed in two consecutive regions. The assay was performed by immersing test strips into urine samples contained in microwells to allow creatinine in the sample to react with immobilised active ingredients and, then, traverse via capillary action to the detection area where chromogen products accumulated. The method is based on hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) formation via creatinine conversion using creatininase, creatinase, and sarcosine oxidase. The liberated H2O2 reacts with 4-aminophenazone and 2,4,6-triiodo-3-hydroxybenzoic acid to form quinoneimine with a pink-red colour at the detection zone. The linear range of the creatinine assay was 2.5-25 mg dL(-1) (r(2)=0.983), and the detection limit was 2.0 mg dL(-1). The colorimetric enz-PAD for the creatinine assay was highly correlated with a conventional alkaline picrate method when real urine samples were evaluated (r(2)=0.977; n=40). This simple and nearly zero-cost paper-based device provides a novel alternative method for screening urinary creatinine and will be highly beneficial for developing countries. PMID:26452908

  5. A perfusion study of the handling of urea and urea analogues by the gills of the dogfish shark (Squalus acanthias)

    PubMed Central

    Liew, Hon Jung; De Boeck, Gudrun; Walsh, Patrick J.

    2013-01-01

    The branchial mechanism of urea retention in elasmobranchs was investigated using an in vitro isolated-perfused head preparation, as well as in vivo samples, in the spiny dogfish shark. Both in vivo and in control saline perfusions containing 350 mmol L−1 urea, calculated intracellular urea concentrations in gill epithelial cells were close to extracellular concentrations. Urea efflux to the external water fell only non-significantly, and calculated gill intracellular urea concentration did not change when perfusate urea concentration was reduced from 350 to 175 mmol L−1 with osmotic compensation by 175 mmol L−1 mannitol. However, when the urea analogues thiourea or acetamide were present in the perfusate at concentrations equimolar (175 mmol L−1) to those of urea (175 mmol L−1), urea efflux rates were increased 4-fold and 6.5-fold respectively, and calculated gill intracellular urea concentrations were depressed by about 55%. Analogue efflux rates were similar to urea efflux rates. Previous studies have argued that either the basolateral or apical membranes provided the limiting permeability barrier, and/or that a back-transporter on the basolateral membranes of gill cells is responsible for urea retention. The present results provide new evidence that the apical membrane is the limiting factor in maintaining gill urea impermeability, and raise the prospect that a urea back-transporter, which can be competitively inhibited by thiourea and acetamide, operates at the apical membrane. PMID:23638369

  6. A perfusion study of the handling of urea and urea analogues by the gills of the dogfish shark (Squalus acanthias).

    PubMed

    Wood, Chris M; Liew, Hon Jung; De Boeck, Gudrun; Walsh, Patrick J

    2013-01-01

    The branchial mechanism of urea retention in elasmobranchs was investigated using an in vitro isolated-perfused head preparation, as well as in vivo samples, in the spiny dogfish shark. Both in vivo and in control saline perfusions containing 350 mmol L(-1) urea, calculated intracellular urea concentrations in gill epithelial cells were close to extracellular concentrations. Urea efflux to the external water fell only non-significantly, and calculated gill intracellular urea concentration did not change when perfusate urea concentration was reduced from 350 to 175 mmol L(-1) with osmotic compensation by 175 mmol L(-1) mannitol. However, when the urea analogues thiourea or acetamide were present in the perfusate at concentrations equimolar (175 mmol L(-1)) to those of urea (175 mmol L(-1)), urea efflux rates were increased 4-fold and 6.5-fold respectively, and calculated gill intracellular urea concentrations were depressed by about 55%. Analogue efflux rates were similar to urea efflux rates. Previous studies have argued that either the basolateral or apical membranes provided the limiting permeability barrier, and/or that a back-transporter on the basolateral membranes of gill cells is responsible for urea retention. The present results provide new evidence that the apical membrane is the limiting factor in maintaining gill urea impermeability, and raise the prospect that a urea back-transporter, which can be competitively inhibited by thiourea and acetamide, operates at the apical membrane. PMID:23638369

  7. Urea synthesis in enterocytes of developing pigs.

    PubMed

    Wu, G

    1995-12-15

    Urea synthesis from ammonia, glutamine and arginine was determined in enterocytes from newborn (0-day-old), 2-21-day-old suckling, and 29-58-day-old post-weaning pigs. Pigs were weaned at 21 days of age. Cells were incubated for 30 min at 37 degrees C in Krebs-Henseleit bicarbonate buffer (pH 7.4) containing (i) 0.5-2 mM NH4Cl plus 0.05-2 mM ornithine and 2 mM aspartate, (ii) 1-5 mM glutamine, or (iii) 0.5-2 mM arginine. In enterocytes from newborn and suckling pigs, there was no measurable synthesis of urea from ammonia, glutamine or arginine, and analysis of amino acids by a sensitive fluorimetric HPLC method revealed the formation of negligible amounts of ornithine from arginine. In contrast, in cells from post-weaning pigs, relatively large amounts of urea and ornithine were produced from ammonia, glutamine and arginine in a dose-dependent manner. To elucidate the mechanism of the developmental change of urea synthesis in pig enterocytes, the activities of urea-cycle enzymes were determined. The activities of enterocyte carbamoyl phosphate synthase I and ornithine carbamoyltransferase were lower in post-weaning pigs than in suckling ones, whereas there was no difference in arginino-succinate lyase. The activities of argininosuccinate synthase and arginase were increased by 4-fold and 50-100-fold, respectively, in enterocytes from post-weaning pigs compared with suckling pigs. The induction of arginase appears to be sufficient to account for the formation of urea from ammonia, glutamine and arginine in post-weaning pig enterocytes. These results demonstrate for the first time the presence of synthesis of urea from extracellular or intramitochondrially generated ammonia in enterocytes of post-weaning pigs. This hitherto unrecognized urea synthesis in these cells may be a first line of defence against the potential toxicity of ammonia produced by the extensive intestinal degradation of glutamine (a major fuel for enterocytes) and derived from diet and luminal micro-organisms. PMID:8554511

  8. The incidence of urea cycle disorders

    PubMed Central

    Summar, Marshall L.; Koelker, Stefan; Freedenberg, Debra; Le Mons, Cynthia; Haberle, Johannes; Lee, Hye-Seung; Kirmse, Brian

    2014-01-01

    A key question for urea cycle disorders is their incidence. In the United States two UCDs, argininosuccinic synthetase and lyase deficiency, are currently detected by newborn screening. We used newborn screening data on over 6 million births and data from the large US and European longitudinal registries to determine how common these conditions are. The incidence for the United States is predicted to be 1 urea cycle disorder patient for every 35,000 births presenting about 113 new patients per year across all age groups. PMID:23972786

  9. 1H NMR relaxation in urea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, R. E.; Bacher, Alfred D.; Dybowski, C.

    2007-11-01

    Proton NMR spin-lattice relaxation times T1 were measured for urea as a function of temperature. An activation energy of 46.3 ± 4.7 kJ/mol was extracted and compared with the range of 38-65 kJ/mol previously reported in the literature as measured by different magnetic resonance techniques. In addition, proton NMR spin-lattice relaxation times in the rotating frame T1 ρ were measured as a function of temperature. These measurements provide acquisition conditions for the 13C and 15N CP/MAS spectra of pure urea in the crystalline phase.

  10. Urea recycling from the renal pelvis in sheep: A study with ( sup 14 C)urea

    SciTech Connect

    Cirio, A.; Boivin, R. )

    1990-05-01

    To test the hypothesis that urea can be recycled from the renal pelvis, (14C)urea diluted in native urine (1 microCi/ml) was perfused (0.5 ml/min) into one of the pelvises of sheep fed either normal (NP) or low (LP)-protein diets. Blood samples were obtained from the ipsilateral renal vein and from the carotid artery throughout the perfusions. 14C activity determinations in urine and plasma demonstrated a flux of (14C)urea from the pelvis to renal vein blood (40,000 in NP and 130,000 disintegrations/min in LP sheep, P less than 0.01). The corresponding flux of native urea was only 1.5 times higher in NP than in LP sheep (6.8 +/- 1.1 vs. 4.7 +/- 2.9 mumol/min, not significant) despite their 8 times higher urinary concentration of urea. The fraction of filtered urea that was reabsorbed in the pelvis was larger in LP sheep (7.5 +/- 3.7 vs. 1.9 +/- 0.7% in NP sheep, P less than 0.05). A fraction of urea is thus actually recycled from the renal pelvis in sheep, and this pelvic retention is enhanced in LP animals. The importance of this phenomenon in the nitrogen economy is discussed.

  11. [Effects of urea and coated urea on harmful gases concentrations in plastic greenhouse].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xihong; Zeng, Qingru; Mao, Xiaoyun; Zhang, Litian; Liao, Bohan; Tie, Baiqing; Liao, Zongwen

    2006-09-01

    With simulation test and plastic greenhouse experiment, this paper studied the effects of urea and minerals- coated urea on the soil pH and harmful gases concentrations in plastic greenhouse. The results showed that under simulated condition, the application of these'two N fertilizers led to an initial increase of soil pH, which reached the maximum (an increment of > 50%) within the first week and dropped to the initial level by the end of the fifth week. In plastic greenhouse, applying urea and coated urea resulted in the increase of NH3, NO2 and O3 concentrations. The daily volatilization amount of NH3 and NO2 was higher in urea treatment than in coated urea treatment, and the highest value in urea treatment was 42.36 microg x m(-3) x d(-1) for NH3, 41.95 microg x m(-3) x d(-1) for NO2, and 86.00 microg x m(-3) x d(-1) for O3. The volatilization intensity of NH3 and NO2 was influenced by temperature and sunlight, while the O3 concentration was influenced by sunlight. PMID:17147165

  12. The rate and pattern of urea infusion into the rumen of wethers alters nitrogen balance and plasma ammonia.

    PubMed

    Recavarren, M I; Milano, G D

    2014-12-01

    Changes in N balance, urinary excretion of purine derivative (PD), urea, creatinine and ammonia and plasma ammonia, glucose, urea, insulin and IGF-1 were examined in four wethers (37 ± 2.6 kg BW). The animals were fitted with permanent ruminal catheters, fed lucerne hay (9.4 MJ/day; 23 g N/day; 7 g soluble N/day, 6 equal meals/day) and treated with contrasting rates of urea infusion into the rumen: first, a continuous infusion (CT), at 3.2 mg urea-N/min for 10 days and then a discontinuous infusion (DT) at 156 mg urea-N/min for 4 min; in 6 daily doses with the meals for 7 days. N balance was calculated from pooled samples of faeces and urine. Jugular blood samples were collected before and 1.5 h after the morning meal (M1) on days CT10, DT2, DT4 and DT6. N retention decreased during DT (p = 0.01) due to a significant increase of N excretion in urine (4 g/day; p = 0.009) and faeces (1 g/day; p = 0.02). Dry matter (p < 0.001) and N digestibility in vivo (p = 0.01) decreased significantly during DT. Urinary urea and PD excretion were not altered by treatment. Significant linear (p = 0.004) and quadratic (p = 0.001) effects were observed for plasma ammonia in M1 (from 170 CT10 to 235 μm DT2 and returned to 120 μm DT6). No changes were observed in plasma glucose, urea, insulin and IGF-1. Results indicate that changes from CT to DT reduced N retention in sheep due to enhanced urinary N excretion, but it was not associated with changes in urinary urea or PD excretion; or plasma concentrations of insulin and IGF-1. As the dry matter (DM) an N digestibility could account a 0.23 of the decrease in N retention; the largest fraction of the reduction in N retention remained unexplained by the results. PMID:24611997

  13. Comparison of serum iohexol clearance and plasma creatinine clearance in clinically normal horses.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Katherine E; Wilcke, Jeff R; Crisman, Mark V; Ward, Daniel L; McKenzie, Harold C; Scarratt, W Kent

    2009-12-01

    Objective-To determine whether a limited sampling time method based on serum iohexol clearance (Cl(iohexol)) would yield estimates of glomerular filtration rate (GFR) in clinically normal horses similar to those for plasma creatinine clearance (Cl(creatinine)). Animals-10 clinically normal adult horses. Procedures-A bolus of iohexol (150 mg/kg) was administered IV, and serum samples were obtained 5, 20, 40, 60, 120, 240, and 360 minutes after injection. Urinary clearance of exogenous creatinine was measured during three 20-minute periods. The GFR determined by use of serum Cl(iohexol) and plasma Cl(creatinine) was compared with limits of agreement plots. Results-Values obtained for plasma Cl(creatinine) ranged from 1.68 to 2.69 mL/min/kg (mean, 2.11 mL/min/kg). Mean serum Cl(iohexol) was 2.38 mL/min/kg (range, 1.95 to 3.33 mL/min/kg). Limits of agreement plots indicated good agreement between the methods. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance-Use of serum Cl(iohexol) yielded estimates of GFR in clinically normal adult horses similar to those for plasma Cl(creatinine). This study was the first step in the evaluation of the use of serum Cl(iohexol) for estimating GFR in adult horses. PMID:19951127

  14. Estimation of glomerular filtration rate in conscious dogs following a bolus of creatinine. Comparison with simultaneously determined inulin clearance.

    PubMed

    Lee, K E; Behrendt, U; Kaczmarczyk, G; Mohnhaupt, R; Reinhardt, H W

    1983-02-01

    The renal clearance of creatinine was measured following orogastric administration in conscious dogs. Values of creatinine clearance were compared with simultaneously determined values of inulin clearance, when urine volume, glomerular filtration rate and volume status were acutely altered by a variety of experimental manoeuvres. At urine volumes greater than 20 microliters X min-1 X kg-1, creatinine clearance was not significantly different from inulin clearance. At low urine volumes there was some evidence of creatinine reabsorption. It is concluded that the bolus creatinine technique provides reliable estimates of glomerular filtration rate and is particularly applicable to long-term studies in conscious dogs. PMID:6835819

  15. Undernutrition and serum and urinary urea nitrogen of white-tailed deer during winter

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DelGiudice, G.D.; Mech, L.D.; Seal, U.S.

    1994-01-01

    Direct, practical means of assessing undernutrition in deer (Odocoileus spp.) and other ungulates during winter are needed in areas of research and management. We examined the relationship between mass loss and serum urea nitrogen (SUN) and urinary urea nitrogen:creatinine (U:C) in captive white-tailed deer (O. virginianus). During 4 February-5 May 1988, we maintained 7 adult white-tailed deer on various feeding regimes to simulate natural nutritional restriction during winter. Mass loss was greater (P = 0.037) in deer (17.0-32.2%) fed restricted amounts of a low protein low energy diet versus control deer (7.0-17.4%) fed the same diet ad libitum. Serum triiodothyronine (T3) concentrations did not differ (P = 0.191) between groups, but declined (P = 0.001) as nutrition declined. Slopes of percent mass lossSUN and urinary U:C relationships were positive (P = 0.008 and 0.055) in 7 and 6 deer, respectively. Mean U:C was directly related (r2 = 0.52, P = 0.040) to mean cumulative mass loss, whereas mean SUN was not (r2 = 0.29, P = 0.125). Data presented support the potential of urinary U:C as an index of winter nutritional condition of white-tailed deer; however, additional research is required to provide a complete understanding of this index's utility under field conditions.

  16. Positive associations of serum perfluoroalkyl substances with uric acid and hyperuricemia in children from Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Qin, Xiao-Di; Qian, Zhengmin; Vaughn, Michael G; Huang, Jin; Ward, Patrick; Zeng, Xiao-Wen; Zhou, Yang; Zhu, Yu; Yuan, Ping; Li, Meng; Bai, Zhipeng; Paul, Gunther; Hao, Yuan-Tao; Chen, Wen; Chen, Pau-Chung; Dong, Guang-Hui; Lee, Yungling Leo

    2016-05-01

    To investigate the risk of hyperuricemia in relation to Perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) in children from Taiwan, 225 Taiwanese children aged 12-15 years were recruited from 2009 to 2010. Linear and logistic regression models were employed to examine the influence of PFASs on serum uric acid levels. Findings revealed that eight of ten PFASs analyses were detected in >94% of the participants' serum samples. Multivariate linear regression models revealed that perfluorooctanic acid (PFOA) was positively associated with serum uric acid levels (β = 0.1463, p < 0.05). Of all the PFASs analyses, only PFOA showed a significant effect on elevated levels of hyperuricemia (aOR = 2.16, 95%CI: 1.29-3.61). When stratified by gender, the association between serum PFOA and uric acid levels was only evident among boys (aOR = 2.76, 95%CI: 1.37-5.56). In conclusion, PFOA was found to be associated with elevated serum levels of uric acid in Taiwanese children, especially boys. Further research is needed to elucidate these links. PMID:26970855

  17. The association between serum uric acid and metabolic syndrome among adolescents in northeast China

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zi-Nan; Li, Ping; Jiang, Ran-Hua; Li, Ling; Li, Xue; Li, Liang; Liu, Cong; Tian, Cong-Liang

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Data about the association between serum uric acid and metabolic syndrome in healthy adolescents are sparse. This study examined this association and determined the optimal cutoffs for serum uric acid to predict metabolic syndrome among healthy adolescents. Methods: During 2010-2011, we conducted a cross-sectional study of 927 adolescents (53.0% boys) aged 11-16 years from junior and senior high schools in northeast China. All participants received a physical examination and gave venous blood samples. Results: Serum uric acid was positively associated with abdominal obesity, dyslipidemia and hypertension in boys and with abdominal obesity and dyslipidemia in girls. For those with hyperurecemia, the odds ratios (95% CI) for metabolic syndrome were 7.67 (95% CI, 2.58~22.78) for boys and 4.77 (95% CI, 1.01~22.60) for girls. SUA was a better predictor of metabolic syndrome than fasting glucose, though not as good as waist circumference. Conclusions: Among adolescents in China, serum uric acid level may be a useful predictor of metabolic syndrome. PMID:26885044

  18. Construction of an uricase nanoparticles modified au electrode for amperometric determination of uric acid.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Nidhi; Kumar, Arun; Pundir, C S

    2014-10-01

    A method is described for preparation of uricase nanoparticles (100 nm in size) and their direct immobilization onto the Au electrode. The enzyme electrode along with Ag/AgCl as reference and Pt as auxiliary electrode were connected through potentiostat/galvanostat to construct an amperometric uric acid biosensor. The enzyme electrode was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The enzyme electrode detected uric acid level as low as 5.0 μM at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3, within 7 s at pH 8.5 and 40 °C. The biosensor showed a linear working range, 0.005 to 0.8 mM for uric acid with a sensitivity of 0.03 mA μM(-1) cm(-2). The biosensor was evaluated. The biosensor lost only 15 % of its initial activity over a period of 7 months, when stored at 4 °C. The fabricated biosensor was successfully employed for determination of uric acid in human serum and urine. PMID:25141984

  19. Serum Uric Acid, Hyperuricemia and Body Mass Index in Children and Adolescents with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Jin-Ding; Lin, Pei-Ying; Lin, Lan-Ping; Hsu, Shang-Wei; Yen, Chia-Feng; Fang, Wen-Hui; Wu, Sheng-Ru; Chien, Wu-Chien; Loh, Ching-Hui; Chu, Cordia M.

    2009-01-01

    The aims of the preset study were to describe the profile of serum uric acid, the prevalence of hyperuricemia and its risk factors among children and adolescents with intellectual disabilities. We conducted a cross-sectional study of 941 children and adolescents with intellectual disabilities (aged 4-18 years) who participated in annual health…

  20. Volatile disinfection byproducts resulting from chlorination of uric acid: implications for swimming pools.

    TOXLINE Toxicology Bibliographic Information

    Lian L; E Y; Li J; Blatchley ER 3rd

    2014-03-18

    Cyanogen chloride (CNCl) and trichloramine (NCl3) are important disinfection byproducts in chlorinated swimming pools. However, some unknowns exist regarding the precursors of their formation. In this study, uric acid is shown to be an efficient precursor to formation of CNCl and NCl3. The molar yields of CNCl and NCl3 were observed to be as high as 44% (pH = 6.0, chlorine/precursor molar ratio [Cl/P] = 6.4) and 108% (pH = 7.0, Cl/P = 30), respectively, both being strong functions of Cl/P, pH, and temperature. Analysis of swimming pool water samples, combined with the results of experiments involving chlorination of uric acid, and chlorination of body fluid analog mixtures, indicated that uric acid chlorination may account for a large fraction of CNCl formation in swimming pools. Moreover, given that uric acid introduction to pools is attributable to urination, a voluntary action for most swimmers, these findings indicate important benefits to pool water and air chemistry that could result from improved hygiene habits on the part of swimmers.

  1. Volatile disinfection byproducts resulting from chlorination of uric acid: implications for swimming pools.

    PubMed

    Lian, Lushi; E, Yue; Li, Jing; Blatchley, Ernest R

    2014-03-18

    Cyanogen chloride (CNCl) and trichloramine (NCl3) are important disinfection byproducts in chlorinated swimming pools. However, some unknowns exist regarding the precursors of their formation. In this study, uric acid is shown to be an efficient precursor to formation of CNCl and NCl3. The molar yields of CNCl and NCl3 were observed to be as high as 44% (pH = 6.0, chlorine/precursor molar ratio [Cl/P] = 6.4) and 108% (pH = 7.0, Cl/P = 30), respectively, both being strong functions of Cl/P, pH, and temperature. Analysis of swimming pool water samples, combined with the results of experiments involving chlorination of uric acid, and chlorination of body fluid analog mixtures, indicated that uric acid chlorination may account for a large fraction of CNCl formation in swimming pools. Moreover, given that uric acid introduction to pools is attributable to urination, a voluntary action for most swimmers, these findings indicate important benefits to pool water and air chemistry that could result from improved hygiene habits on the part of swimmers. PMID:24568660

  2. The association between blood pressure level and serum uric acid concentration in hemodialysis patients

    PubMed Central

    Roozbeh, Jamshid; Sagheb, Mohammad-Mahdi; Vafaie, Elaheh

    2015-01-01

    Background: High blood pressure is a common condition in hemodialysis patients. Uric acid, which is high in these patients due to decreased clearance, had been shown to positively correlate with blood pressure in animal studies. Objectives: The goal of this investigation was to evaluate the impact of high uric acid level on blood pressure in these patients. Patients and Methods: Ninety-one patients, on three times weekly hemodialysis, were studied. Uric acid levels were measured just before and after hemodialysis along with blood pressures before, during and after each session. Data were analyzed by SPSS 15. A P value less than 0.05 was considered significant. Results: 40 (44%) of patients had serum uric acid ≥6 mg/dl. Before dialysis 51 (61%) and 19 (21%) had high systolic blood and diastolic blood pressures respectively. Also, 50 (55%) were with wide pulse pressure and 63 (69%) had high mean arterial pressure (MAP). Additionally 62 (68%) developed inter-dialysis hypotension. After measuring odds ratio for hyperuricemia in each group, we observed low risk of hypruricemia in the group with high systolic pressure (OR = 0.352; 95% CI: 0.147-0.844; P = 0.01), the high MAP group (OR = 0.382; 95% CI: 0.153-0.955; P = 0.03) and wide pulse pressure group (OR = 0.416; 95% CI: 0.177-0.975; P = 0.04). There was no association between high uric acid level and diastolic pressure (P = 0.11) and inter-dialysis hypotension (P = 0.33). No relationship was found between serum uric acid and KT/V (P = 0.2), normalized protein catabolic rate (nPCR) (P = 0.07) and body mass index (BMI) (P = 0.4). Conclusions: This study showed paradoxical association between high uric acid level and high systolic pressure, high MAP and wide pulse pressure and these effects were independent of dialysis duration, dialysis efficacy and nutrition, assuming that these relationships could be due to reverse epidemiology in dialysis patients. PMID:26312236

  3. Plasma uric acid level indicates tubular interstitial leisions at early stage of IgA nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Hyperuricemia appeared to be a common symptom in IgA nephropathy (IgAN), even in those with normal eGFR. IgAN was characterized by variation of pathological features, especially variable tubulointerstitial lesions. Since tubular reabsorption and excretion appeared to be more important in determination of plasma uric acid levels in persons without obvious decrease of glomerular filtration rate, we took advantage of our IgAN cohort to investigate whether plasma uric acid level associated with tubular interstitial lesions, and could be considered as a maker for tubular interstitial lesions, especially at early stage with normal eGFR. Methods 623 IgAN patients were involved in the present study. Morphological changes were evaluated with Oxford classification scoring system as well as Beijing classification system of IgAN. Statistical analysis was done with SPSS 13.0. Results We found that plasma uric acid level associated with percentage of interstitial fibrosis/tubular atrophy. Higher plasma uric acid levels indicated higher tubulointerstitial scores, either with Oxford system (P = 0.012) or with Beijing classification system (P = 4.8*10-4) in the whole cohort. We also found that in the subgroup of 258 IgAN cases with normal baseline eGFR (eGFR > =90 ml/min/1.73 M2), higher plasma uric acid associated with more severe tubulointerstitial lesions with Beijing scoring system (P = 3.4*10-5). The risk of having more than 10% tubulointerstitial lesions in patients with hyperuricemia increased 58% compared with normal uric acid level. In subgroup with normal eGFR, only hyperuricemia predicted tubulointerstitial leisions, and the risk of having more tubulointerstitial changes increased 100%. Among these patients, hyperuricemia was associated with more tubulointerstitial lesions with a specificity of 60.3%. Specificity increased to 65% among those patients with eGFR > =90 ml/min/1.73 m2. Conclusions Plasma uric acid levels indicate tubular interstitial lesions in IgAN and hyperuricemia may be considered as a marker for tubulointerstitial lesions. PMID:24423013

  4. Continuous Crystallization of Urea-Water Mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hokamura, Taku; Ohkubo, Hidetoshi; Watanabe, Satoshi; Seki, Mitsuo; Murakoshi, Hiromichi

    Ice slurries have been used as environmentally-friendly secondary refrigerants. In addition to such ice slurries, aqueous solutions in slurry-state have also been put to practical use at temperatures below 0 oC. Urea-water mixture is a multi-component substance that has a eutectic point. If we can form a two-phase fluid substance by the liquid-solid phases at the eutectic point, it can be used as a fluid latent heat storage material, which will maintain the secondary refrigerant in a heat exchanger at constant temperature. In the present study, we propose a urea-water mixture as a novel functional thermal fluid that can be used as a fluid latent heat material. To demonstrate its feasibility, we first measured the latent heat and density of a urea-water mixture, and then used a counter-flow double tube heat exchanger to produce a liquid-solid two-phase flow of the urea-water mixture. This work demonstrates that it is possible to make a fluid latent heat storage material continuously from an aqueous solution at the eutectic point by flowing it through a double tube heat exchanger equipped with a stirrer.

  5. APPLICATION OF MILK UREA NITROGEN VALUES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Statistical analyses using both linear and multi-component regression and mixed effects models have been applied to a number of databases relating milk urea nitrogen (MUN) to factors important for N utilization in lactating dairy cows. Concentrations of MUN are highly correlated to BUN, which is a s...

  6. Aldehyde-containing urea-absorbing polysaccharides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, W. A.; Hsu, G. C.; Marsh, H. E., Jr. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A novel aldehyde containing polymer (ACP) is prepared by reaction of a polysaccharide with periodate to introduce aldehyde groups onto the C2 - C3 carbon atoms. By introduction of ether and ester groups onto the pendant primary hydroxyl solubility characteristics are modified. The ACP is utilized to absorb nitrogen bases such as urea in vitro or in vivo.

  7. Characterization of urease from Sporosarcina ureae.

    PubMed

    McCoy, D D; Cetin, A; Hausinger, R P

    1992-01-01

    Alkaline stable (pH 7.75-12.5) urease from Sporosarcina ureae was purified over 400-fold by ion exchange and hydrophobic interaction chromatography. The cytoplasmic enzyme was remarkably active with a specific activity of greater than 9300 mumol urea degraded min-1 mg protein-1 at pH 7.5, where it has optimal activity. Although S. ureae is closely related to Bacillus pasteurii, known to possess a homopolymeric urease containing 1 nickel per subunit [M(r) = 65000], the S. ureae enzyme is comprised of three subunits [apparent M(r) = 63,100 (alpha), 14,500 (beta), and 8500 (gamma)] in an estimated alpha beta gamma 2 stoichiometry and contains 2.1 +/- 0.6 nickel ions per alpha beta gamma 2 unit as measured by atomic absorption spectrometry. Stationary phase cultures sometimes possessed low levels of urease activity, but the specific activity of cell extracts of partially purified urease preparations from such cultures could be elevated by heat treatment, dilution, or dialysis to values comparable to those observed in samples from exponentially grown cells. PMID:1510567

  8. Synthesis and characterization of chitosan alkyl urea.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Jiang, Ji-Zhou; Chen, Wei; Bai, Zheng-Wu

    2016-07-10

    Chitosan is a versatile material employed for various purposes in many fields including the development of chiral stationary phases for enantioseparation. Chitosan alkyl urea is a kind of intermediate used to prepare enantioseparation materials. In order to synthesize the intermediates, in the present work, a new way to prepare chitosan alkyl urea has been established: chitosan was first reacted with methyl chloroformate yielding N-methoxyformylated chitosan, which was then converted to chitosan alkyl urea through amine-ester exchange reaction. With a large excess of methyl chloroformate and primary amine of low stereohindrance, the amino group in chitosan could be almost completely converted to ureido group. The as-prepared chitosan alkyl urea derivatives were characterized by IR, (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR,(1)H-(1)H COSY and (1)H-(13)C HSQC NMR spectra. The chemical shifts of hydrogen and carbon atoms of glucose unit were assigned. It was found that the degree of substitution was obviously lower if cyclopropyl amine, aniline, tert-butyl amine and diethyl amine were used as reactants for the amine-ester exchange reaction. The reason was explained with the aid of theoretical calculations. PMID:27106154

  9. Urea retranslocation from senescing Arabidopsis leaves is promoted by DUR3-mediated urea retrieval from leaf apoplast

    PubMed Central

    Bohner, Anne; Kojima, Soichi; Hajirezaei, Mohammad; Melzer, Michael; von Wirén, Nicolaus

    2015-01-01

    In plants, urea derives either from root uptake or protein degradation. Although large quantities of urea are released during senescence, urea is mainly seen as a short-lived nitrogen (N) catabolite serving urease-mediated hydrolysis to ammonium. Here, we investigated the roles of DUR3 and of urea in N remobilization. During natural leaf senescence urea concentrations and DUR3 transcript levels showed a parallel increase with senescence markers like ORE1 in a plant age- and leaf age-dependent manner. Deletion of DUR3 decreased urea accumulation in leaves, whereas the fraction of urea lost to the leaf apoplast was enhanced. Under natural and N deficiency-induced senescence DUR3 promoter activity was highest in the vasculature, but was also found in surrounding bundle sheath and mesophyll cells. An analysis of petiole exudates from wild-type leaves revealed that N from urea accounted for >13% of amino acid N. Urea export from senescent leaves further increased in ureG-2 deletion mutants lacking urease activity. In the dur3 ureG double insertion line the absence of DUR3 reduced urea export from leaf petioles. These results indicate that urea can serve as an early metabolic marker for leaf senescence, and that DUR3-mediated urea retrieval contributes to the retranslocation of N from urea during leaf senescence. PMID:25440717

  10. Urea retranslocation from senescing Arabidopsis leaves is promoted by DUR3-mediated urea retrieval from leaf apoplast.

    PubMed

    Bohner, Anne; Kojima, Soichi; Hajirezaei, Mohammad; Melzer, Michael; von Wirén, Nicolaus

    2015-02-01

    In plants, urea derives either from root uptake or protein degradation. Although large quantities of urea are released during senescence, urea is mainly seen as a short-lived nitrogen (N) catabolite serving urease-mediated hydrolysis to ammonium. Here, we investigated the roles of DUR3 and of urea in N remobilization. During natural leaf senescence urea concentrations and DUR3 transcript levels showed a parallel increase with senescence markers like ORE1 in a plant age- and leaf age-dependent manner. Deletion of DUR3 decreased urea accumulation in leaves, whereas the fraction of urea lost to the leaf apoplast was enhanced. Under natural and N deficiency-induced senescence DUR3 promoter activity was highest in the vasculature, but was also found in surrounding bundle sheath and mesophyll cells. An analysis of petiole exudates from wild-type leaves revealed that N from urea accounted for >13% of amino acid N. Urea export from senescent leaves further increased in ureG-2 deletion mutants lacking urease activity. In the dur3 ureG double insertion line the absence of DUR3 reduced urea export from leaf petioles. These results indicate that urea can serve as an early metabolic marker for leaf senescence, and that DUR3-mediated urea retrieval contributes to the retranslocation of N from urea during leaf senescence. PMID:25440717

  11. Clinical and biochemical profile of patients with "pure" uric acid nephrolithiasis compared with "pure" calcium oxalate stone formers.

    PubMed

    Negri, Armando Luis; Spivacow, Rodolfo; Del Valle, Elisa; Pinduli, Irene; Marino, Alicia; Fradinger, Erich; Zanchetta, Jose Ruben

    2007-10-01

    The purpose of the present study was to compare the clinical characteristics of "pure" uric acid (UA) stone formers with that of "pure" calcium oxalate (CaOx) stone formers and to determine whether renal handling of UA, urinary pH, and urinary excretion of promoters and inhibitors of stone formation were different between the two groups. Study subjects comprised 59 patients identified by records of stone analysis: 30 of them had "pure" UA stones and 29 had "pure" CaOx nephrolithiasis. Both groups underwent full outpatient evaluation of stone risk analysis that included renal handling of UA and urinary pH. Compared to CaOx stone formers, UA stone formers were older (53.3 +/- 11.8 years vs. 44.5 +/- 10.0 years; P = 0.003); they had higher mean weight (88.6 +/- 12.5 kg vs. 78.0 +/- 11.0 kg; P = 0.001) and body mass index (29.5 +/- 4.2 kg/m(2) vs. 26.3 +/- 3.5 kg/m(2); P = 0.002) with a greater proportion of obese subjects (43.3% vs. 16.1%; P = 0.01). Patients with "pure" UA lithiasis had significantly lower UA clearance, UA fractional excretion, and UA/creatinine ratio, with significantly higher serum UA. The mean urinary pH was significantly lower in UA stone formers compared to CaOx stone formers (5.17 +/- 0.20 vs. 5.93 +/- 0.42; P < 0.0001). Patients with CaOx stones were a decade younger, having higher 24-h urinary calcium excretion (218.5 +/- 56.3 mg/24 h vs. 181.3 +/- 57.1 mg/24 h; P = 0.01) and a higher activity product index for CaOx [AP (CaOx) index]. Overweight/obesity and older age associated with low urine pH were the principal characteristic of "pure" UA stone formers. Impairment in urate excretion associated with increased serum UA was also another characteristic of UA stone formers that resembles patients with primary gout. Patients with pure CaOx stones were younger; they had a low proportion of obese subjects, a higher urinary calcium excretion, and a higher AP index for CaOx. PMID:17786420

  12. Inverse Association Between Serum Uric Acid Levels and Alzheimer's Disease Risk.

    PubMed

    Du, Na; Xu, Donghua; Hou, Xu; Song, Xuejia; Liu, Cancan; Chen, Ying; Wang, Yangang; Li, Xin

    2016-05-01

    The association between Alzheimer's disease and uric acid levels had gained great interest in recent years, but there was still lack of definite evidence. A systematic review and meta-analysis of relevant studies was performed to comprehensively estimate the association. Relevant studies published before October 26, 2014, were searched in PubMed, Embase, and China Biology Medicine (CBM) databases. Study-specific data were combined using random-effects or fixed-effects models of meta-analysis according to between-study heterogeneity. Twenty-four studies (21 case-control and 3 cohort studies) were finally included into the meta-analysis. Those 21 case-control studies included a total of 1128 cases of Alzheimer's disease and 2498 controls without Alzheimer's disease. Those 3 cohort studies included a total of 7327 participants. Meta-analysis showed that patients with Alzheimer's disease had lower levels of uric acid than healthy controls (weighted mean difference (WMD) = -0.77 mg/dl, 95 % CI -2.28 to -0.36, P = 0.0002). High serum uric acid levels were significantly associated with decreased risk of Alzheimer's disease (risk ratio (RR) = 0.66, 95 % CI 0.52-0.85, P = 0.001). There was low risk of publication bias in the meta-analysis. There is an inverse association between serum uric acid levels and Alzheimer's disease. High serum uric acid level is a protective factor of Alzheimer's disease. PMID:26084440

  13. A test of improved force field parameters for urea: molecular-dynamics simulations of urea crystals.

    PubMed

    Özpınar, Gül Altınbaş; Beierlein, Frank R; Peukert, Wolfgang; Zahn, Dirk; Clark, Timothy

    2012-08-01

    Molecular-dynamics (MD) simulations of urea crystals of different shapes (cubic, rectangular prismatic, and sheet) have been performed using our previously published force field for urea. This force field has been validated by calculating values for the cohesive energy, sublimation temperature, and melting point from the MD data. The cohesive energies computed from simulations of cubic and rectangular prismatic urea crystals in vacuo at 300 K agreed very well with the experimental sublimation enthalpies reported at 298 K. We also found very good agreement between the melting points as observed experimentally and from simulations. Annealing the crystals just below the melting point leads to reconstruction to form crystal faces that are consistent with experimental observations. The simulations reveal a melting mechanism that involves surface (corner/edge) melting well below the melting point, and rotational disordering of the urea molecules in the corner/edge regions of the crystal, which then facilitates the translational motion of these molecules. PMID:22281810

  14. The Stockholm CREAtinine Measurements (SCREAM) project: protocol overview and regional representativeness

    PubMed Central

    Runesson, Björn; Gasparini, Alessandro; Qureshi, Abdul Rashid; Norin, Olof; Evans, Marie; Barany, Peter; Wettermark, Björn; Elinder, Carl Gustaf; Carrero, Juan Jesús

    2016-01-01

    Background We here describe the construction of the Stockholm CREAtinine Measurement (SCREAM) cohort and assess its coverage/representativeness of the Stockholm county in Sweden. SCREAM has the principal aims to estimate the burden and consequences of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and to identify inappropriate drug use (prescription of nephrotoxic, contraindicated or ill-dosed drugs). Methods SCREAM is a repository of laboratory data of individuals, residing or accessing healthcare in the region of Stockholm, who underwent creatinine assessments between 2006–11. Laboratory tests were linked to administrative databases with complete information on socioeconomic status, demographic data, healthcare utilization, diagnoses, vital status and dispensed prescription medicines. Results SCREAM identified 1 118 507 adult Stockholm citizens with available creatinine tests between 2006–11. This corresponded to 66% of the complete population in the region. Geographical coverage was uniform, ranging between 62 and 72% throughout its 26 municipalities. Population coverage was higher across older age strata (50% coverage for age range 18–44 years, >75% for 45–64 years and >90% coverage for ≥65 years). Of note, 97 and 98% of all individuals with a diagnosis of diabetes mellitus or cardiovascular disease, respectively, were captured by SCREAM. Further, 89% of all deaths registered in the period occurred in individuals with a creatinine test undertaken. Conclusion SCREAM represents the largest cohort to estimate the burden and healthcare implications of CKD in Sweden. The coverage and representativeness of the region of Stockholm was high and in accordance to both the commonness of creatinine assessment, and the medical indications for creatinine testing. The inclusion of individuals who sought medical care and had a creatinine test undertaken resulted in a slight over-representation of elderly and comorbid patients. PMID:26798472

  15. Label free sensing of creatinine using a 6 GHz CMOS near-field dielectric immunosensor.

    PubMed

    Guha, S; Warsinke, A; Tientcheu, Ch M; Schmalz, K; Meliani, C; Wenger, Ch

    2015-05-01

    In this work we present a CMOS high frequency direct immunosensor operating at 6 GHz (C-band) for label free determination of creatinine. The sensor is fabricated in standard 0.13 μm SiGe:C BiCMOS process. The report also demonstrates the ability to immobilize creatinine molecules on a Si3N4 passivation layer of the standard BiCMOS/CMOS process, therefore, evading any further need of cumbersome post processing of the fabricated sensor chip. The sensor is based on capacitive detection of the amount of non-creatinine bound antibodies binding to an immobilized creatinine layer on the passivated sensor. The chip bound antibody amount in turn corresponds indirectly to the creatinine concentration used in the incubation phase. The determination of creatinine in the concentration range of 0.88-880 μM is successfully demonstrated in this work. A sensitivity of 35 MHz/10 fold increase in creatinine concentration (during incubation) at the centre frequency of 6 GHz is gained by the immunosensor. The results are compared with a standard optical measurement technique and the dynamic range and sensitivity is of the order of the established optical indication technique. The C-band immunosensor chip comprising an area of 0.3 mm(2) reduces the sensing area considerably, therefore, requiring a sample volume as low as 2 μl. The small analyte sample volume and label free approach also reduce the experimental costs in addition to the low fabrication costs offered by the batch fabrication technique of CMOS/BiCMOS process. PMID:25782697

  16. Mucosal production of uric acid by airway epithelial cells contributes to particulate matter-induced allergic sensitization.

    PubMed

    Gold, M J; Hiebert, P R; Park, H Y; Stefanowicz, D; Le, A; Starkey, M R; Deane, A; Brown, A C; Liu, G; Horvat, J C; Ibrahim, Z A; Sukkar, M B; Hansbro, P M; Carlsten, C; VanEeden, S; Sin, D D; McNagny, K M; Knight, D A; Hirota, J A

    2016-05-01

    Exposure to particulate matter (PM), a major component of air pollution, contributes to increased morbidity and mortality worldwide. PM induces innate immune responses and contributes to allergic sensitization, although the mechanisms governing this process remain unclear. Lung mucosal uric acid has also been linked to allergic sensitization. The links among PM exposure, uric acid, and allergic sensitization remain unexplored. We therefore investigated the mechanisms behind PM-induced allergic sensitization in the context of lung mucosal uric acid. PM10 and house dust mite exposure selectively induced lung mucosal uric acid production and secretion in vivo, which did not occur with other challenges (lipopolysaccharide, virus, bacteria, or inflammatory/fibrotic stimuli). PM10-induced uric acid mediates allergic sensitization and augments antigen-specific T-cell proliferation, which is inhibited by uricase. We then demonstrate that human airway epithelial cells secrete uric acid basally and after stimulation through a previously unidentified mucosal secretion system. Our work discovers a previously unknown mechanism of air pollution-induced, uric acid-mediated, allergic sensitization that may be important in the pathogenesis of asthma. PMID:26509876

  17. Conversion of Uric Acid into Ammonium in Oil-Degrading Marine Microbial Communities: a Possible Role of Halomonads.

    PubMed

    Gertler, Christoph; Bargiela, Rafael; Mapelli, Francesca; Han, Xifang; Chen, Jianwei; Hai, Tran; Amer, Ranya A; Mahjoubi, Mouna; Malkawi, Hanan; Magagnini, Mirko; Cherif, Ameur; Abdel-Fattah, Yasser R; Kalogerakis, Nicolas; Daffonchio, Daniele; Ferrer, Manuel; Golyshin, Peter N

    2015-10-01

    Uric acid is a promising hydrophobic nitrogen source for biostimulation of microbial activities in oil-impacted marine environments. This study investigated metabolic processes and microbial community changes in a series of microcosms using sediment from the Mediterranean and the Red Sea amended with ammonium and uric acid. Respiration, emulsification, ammonium and protein concentration measurements suggested a rapid production of ammonium from uric acid accompanied by the development of microbial communities containing hydrocarbonoclastic bacteria after 3 weeks of incubation. About 80 % of uric acid was converted to ammonium within the first few days of the experiment. Microbial population dynamics were investigated by Ribosomal Intergenic Spacer Analysis and Illumina sequencing as well as by culture-based techniques. Resulting data indicated that strains related to Halomonas spp. converted uric acid into ammonium, which stimulated growth of microbial consortia dominated by Alcanivorax spp. and Pseudomonas spp. Several strains of Halomonas spp. were isolated on uric acid as the sole carbon source showed location specificity. These results point towards a possible role of halomonads in the conversion of uric acid to ammonium utilized by hydrocarbonoclastic bacteria. PMID:25916483

  18. Uric acid induces fat accumulation via generation of endoplasmic reticulum stress and SREBP-1c activation in hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yea-Jin; Shin, Hyun-Soo; Choi, Hack Sun; Park, Joo-Won; Jo, Inho; Oh, Eok-Soo; Lee, Kang-Yo; Lee, Byung-Hoon; Johnson, Richard J; Kang, Duk-Hee

    2014-10-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is currently one of the most common types of chronic liver injury. Elevated serum uric acid is a strong predictor of the development of fatty liver as well as metabolic syndrome. Here we demonstrate that uric acid induces triglyceride accumulation by SREBP-1c activation via induction of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in hepatocytes. Uric acid-induced ER stress resulted in an increase of glucose-regulated protein (GRP78/94), splicing of the X-box-binding protein-1 (XBP-1), the phosphorylation of protein kinase RNA-like ER kinase (PERK), and eukaryotic translation initiation factor-2? (eIF-2?) in cultured hepatocytes. Uric acid promoted hepatic lipogenesis through overexpression of the lipogenic enzyme, acetyl-CoA carboxylase 1 (ACC1), fatty acid synthase (FAS), and stearoyl-CoA desaturase 1 (SCD1) via activation of SREBP-1c, which was blocked by probenecid, an organic anion transport blocker in HepG2 cells and primary hepatocytes. A blocker of ER stress, tauroursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA), and an inhibitor of SREBP-1c, metformin, blocked hepatic fat accumulation, suggesting that uric acid promoted fat synthesis in hepatocytes via ER stress-induced activation of SREBP-1c. Uric acid-induced activation of NADPH oxidase preceded ER stress, which further induced mitochondrial ROS production in hepatocytes. These studies provide new insights into the mechanisms by which uric acid stimulates fat accumulation in the liver. PMID:25111690

  19. Uric Acid-Induced Adipocyte Dysfunction Is Attenuated by HO-1 Upregulation: Potential Role of Antioxidant Therapy to Target Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Sodhi, Komal; Hilgefort, Jordan; Banks, George; Gilliam, Chelsea; Stevens, Sarah; Ansinelli, Hayden A.; Getty, Morghan; Abraham, Nader G.; Shapiro, Joseph I.

    2016-01-01

    Increased uric acid levels have been implicated in the pathogenesis of metabolic syndrome. To examine the mechanisms by which this occurs, we hypothesized that an increase in heme oxygenase 1, a potent antioxidant gene, will decrease uric acid levels and adipocyte dysfunction via suppression of ROS and xanthine oxidase (XO) levels. We examined the effect of uric acid on adipogenesis in human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in the presence and absence of cobalt protoporphyrin (CoPP), an HO-1 inducer, and tin mesoporphyrin (SnMP), an HO activity inhibitor. Uric acid increased adipogenesis by increasing NADPH oxidase expression and elevation in the adipogenesis markers C/EBPα, PPARγ, and Mest, while decreasing small lipid droplets and Wnt10b levels. We treated MSCs with fructose, a fuel source that increases uric acid levels. Our results showed that fructose increased XO expression as compared to the control and concomitant treatment with CoPP significantly decreased XO expression and uric acid levels. These beneficial effects of CoPP were reversed by SnMP, supporting a role for HO activity in mediating these effects. These findings demonstrate that increased levels of HO-1 appear crucial in modulating the phenotype of adipocytes exposed to uric acid and in downregulating XO and NADPH oxidase levels. PMID:26681956

  20. MICROWAVE-ASSISTED PREPARATION OF CYCLIC UREAS FROM DIAMINES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rajender S. Varma* and Yong-Jin Kim
    Cyclic ureas are useful intermediates for a variety of pharmaceuticals and pesticides. One of the attractive approaches for the synthesis of cyclic ureas uses condensation of diamines with urea as a carbonyl source under dynamic evacuation. ...

  1. 21 CFR 176.320 - Sodium nitrate-urea complex.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Sodium nitrate-urea complex. 176.320 Section 176... Substances for Use Only as Components of Paper and Paperboard § 176.320 Sodium nitrate-urea complex. Sodium nitrate-urea complex may be safely used as a component of articles intended for use in...

  2. 21 CFR 176.320 - Sodium nitrate-urea complex.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sodium nitrate-urea complex. 176.320 Section 176... Substances for Use Only as Components of Paper and Paperboard 176.320 Sodium nitrate-urea complex. Sodium nitrate-urea complex may be safely used as a component of articles intended for use in...

  3. 21 CFR 176.320 - Sodium nitrate-urea complex.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Sodium nitrate-urea complex. 176.320 Section 176... Substances for Use Only as Components of Paper and Paperboard 176.320 Sodium nitrate-urea complex. Sodium nitrate-urea complex may be safely used as a component of articles intended for use in...

  4. 21 CFR 176.320 - Sodium nitrate-urea complex.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Sodium nitrate-urea complex. 176.320 Section 176... Substances for Use Only as Components of Paper and Paperboard § 176.320 Sodium nitrate-urea complex. Sodium nitrate-urea complex may be safely used as a component of articles intended for use in...

  5. 21 CFR 176.320 - Sodium nitrate-urea complex.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Sodium nitrate-urea complex. 176.320 Section 176... Paperboard § 176.320 Sodium nitrate-urea complex. Sodium nitrate-urea complex may be safely used as a..., packaging, transporting, or holding food, subject to the provisions of this section. (a) Sodium...

  6. 76 FR 15339 - Solid Urea From Russia and Ukraine

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-21

    ... COMMISSION Solid Urea From Russia and Ukraine AGENCY: United States International Trade Commission. ACTION... orders on solid urea from Russia and Ukraine. SUMMARY: The Commission hereby gives notice that it will...)) to determine whether revocation of the antidumping duty orders on solid urea from Russia and...

  7. [EXPERIENCE OF USE OF BLEMAREN® IN THE TREATMENT OF PATIENTS IN URIC ACID AND CALCIUM OXALATE UROLITHIASIS].

    PubMed

    Konstantinova, O V; Yanenko, E K

    2015-01-01

    154 patients with urolithiasis were under outpatient observation for 2-8 years. Among them there were 76 women and 78 men aged 21-66 years, of which 46 patients with uric acid urolithiasis, and 88--with calcium oxalate urolithiasis. Treatment of patients was carried out systematically, depending on their condition. Indications for the application of Blemaren® included the presence of uric acid stones, uric acid and/or oxalate crystalluria. The duration of treatment was 6.1 months. The dosage of the drug varied from 6 to 18 g per day and was selected individually, depending on the purpose of the appointment of Blemaren®. Reduction of the urine pH to 6.2- 6.8-7.2 was the criterion for properly selected dose. To dissolve uric acid stones in the presence of hyperuricemia and/or hyperuricuria, Blemaren® was administered in combination with allopurinol at a dose of 0.1 g 3-4 times a day. Besides pharmacotherapy, treatment included diet therapy. It was found that the morning urine pH in urate urolithiasis is sustainable and has a range of 5.0-6.0, in 80.4% of cases--range of 5.0-5.5. In calcium oxalate urolithiasis this parameter is also stable and has a range of 5.0-6.7, in 82.9% of cases--range of 5.5-6.0. Optimal urine pH to eliminate uric acid and oxalate crystalluria in patients with uric acid and calcium oxalate urolithiasis is the interval of 6.2-6.4. It was shown that Blemaren® is a highly effective agent for treatment and prevention of uric acid and calcium oxalate crystalluria in calcium oxalate and uric acid urolithiasis. Further, its effectiveness in dissolving of uric acid stones in the absence of an infectious inflammatory process is 82.3%. PMID:26859932

  8. Diagnostic Accuracy of Urine Protein/Creatinine Ratio Is Influenced by Urine Concentration

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chih-Yu; Chen, Fu-An; Chen, Chun-Fan; Liu, Wen-Sheng; Shih, Chia-Jen; Ou, Shuo-Ming; Yang, Wu-Chang; Lin, Chih-Ching; Yang, An-Hang

    2015-01-01

    Background The usage of urine protein/creatinine ratio to estimate daily urine protein excretion is prevalent, but relatively little attention has been paid to the influence of urine concentration and its impact on test accuracy. We took advantage of 24-hour urine collection to examine both urine protein/creatinine ratio (UPCR) and daily urine protein excretion, with the latter as the reference standard. Specific gravity from a concomitant urinalysis of the same urine sample was used to indicate the urine concentration. Methods During 2010 to 2014, there were 540 adequately collected 24h urine samples with protein concentration, creatinine concentration, total volume, and a concomitant urinalysis of the same sample. Variables associated with an accurate UPCR estimation were determined by multivariate linear regression analysis. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were generated to determine the discriminant cut-off values of urine creatinine concentration for predicting an accurate UPCR estimation in either dilute or concentrated urine samples. Results Our findings indicated that for dilute urine, as indicated by a low urine specific gravity, UPCR is more likely to overestimate the actual daily urine protein excretion. On the contrary, UPCR of concentrated urine is more likely to result in an underestimation. By ROC curve analysis, the best cut-off value of urine creatinine concentration for predicting overestimation by UPCR of dilute urine (specific gravity ≦ 1.005) was ≦ 38.8 mg/dL, whereas the best cut-off values of urine creatinine for predicting underestimation by UPCR of thick urine were ≧ 63.6 mg/dL (specific gravity ≧ 1.015), ≧ 62.1 mg/dL (specific gravity ≧ 1.020), ≧ 61.5 mg/dL (specific gravity ≧ 1.025), respectively. We also compared distribution patterns of urine creatinine concentration of 24h urine cohort with a concurrent spot urine cohort and found that the underestimation might be more profound in single voided samples. Conclusions The UPCR in samples with low or high specific gravity is more likely to overestimate or underestimate actual daily urine protein amount, respectively, especially in a dilute urine sample with its creatinine below 38.8 mg/dL or a concentrated sample with its creatinine above 61.5 mg/dL. In particular, UPCR results should be interpreted with caution in cases that involve dilute urine samples because its overestimation may lead to an erroneous diagnosis of proteinuric renal disease or an incorrect staging of chronic kidney disease. PMID:26353117

  9. Cystatin C versus Creatinine in Determining Risk Based on Kidney Function

    PubMed Central

    Shlipak, Michael G.; Matsushita, Kunihiro; Ärnlöv, Johan; Inker, Lesley A.; Katz, Ronit; Polkinghorne, Kevan R.; Rothenbacher, Dietrich; Sarnak, Mark J.; Astor, Brad C.; Coresh, Josef; Levey, Andrew S.; Gansevoort, Ron T.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Adding the measurement of cystatin C to that of serum creatinine to determine the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) improves accuracy, but the effect on detection, staging, and risk classification of chronic kidney disease across diverse populations has not been determined. METHODS We performed a meta-analysis of 11 general-population studies (with 90,750 participants) and 5 studies of cohorts with chronic kidney disease (2960 participants) for whom standardized measurements of serum creatinine and cystatin C were available. We compared the association of the eGFR, as calculated by the measurement of creatinine or cystatin C alone or in combination with creatinine, with the rates of death (13,202 deaths in 15 cohorts), death from cardiovascular causes (3471 in 12 cohorts), and end-stage renal disease (1654 cases in 7 cohorts) and assessed improvement in reclassification with the use of cystatin C. RESULTS In the general-population cohorts, the prevalence of an eGFR of less than 60 ml per minute per 1.73 m2 of body-surface area was higher with the cystatin C–based eGFR than with the creatinine-based eGFR (13.7% vs. 9.7%). Across all eGFR categories, the reclassification of the eGFR to a higher value with the measurement of cystatin C, as compared with creatinine, was associated with a reduced risk of all three study outcomes, and reclassification to a lower eGFR was associated with an increased risk. The net reclassification improvement with the measurement of cystatin C, as compared with creatinine, was 0.23 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.18 to 0.28) for death and 0.10 (95% CI, 0.00 to 0.21) for end-stage renal disease. Results were generally similar for the five cohorts with chronic kidney disease and when both creatinine and cystatin C were used to calculate the eGFR. CONCLUSIONS The use of cystatin C alone or in combination with creatinine strengthens the association between the eGFR and the risks of death and end-stage renal disease across diverse populations. (Funded by the National Kidney Foundation and others.) PMID:24004120

  10. Technical note: variation in muscle mass in wild chimpanzees: application of a modified urinary creatinine method.

    PubMed

    Emery Thompson, Melissa; Muller, Martin N; Wrangham, Richard W

    2012-12-01

    Individual body size and composition are important variables for a variety of questions about the behavioral ecology and life histories of non-human primates. Standard methodologies for obtaining body mass involve either capture, which poses risks to the subject, or provisioning, which can disrupt the processes being studied. There are no methods currently available to assess body composition from living animals in the wild. Because of its derivation in muscle, the amount of creatinine that an individual excretes in 24 hours is a reliable and frequently used indicator of relative muscle mass in humans and laboratory animals. Although it is not feasible to collect 24-hour urine samples from wild primates, we apply here a simple method to approximate muscle mass variation from collections of spot urine samples. Specific gravity (SG), an alternative method for assessing urinary water content, is both highly correlated to creatinine and free of mass-dependent effects. Individuals with greater muscle mass should excrete more creatinine for a given SG. We examine this relationship in a dataset of 12,598 urine samples from wild chimpanzees in the Kibale National Park, Uganda. As expected from known differences in body composition, the slope of the relationship between SG and creatinine is significantly greater in adult males than adult females and in adults versus immature individuals. Growth curves generated through this method closely approximate published weight curves for wild chimpanzees. Consistent with the role of testosterone in muscle anabolism, urinary testosterone predicted relative creatinine excretion among adult male chimpanzees. PMID:23077085

  11. Two low-cost digital camera-based platforms for quantitative creatinine analysis in urine.

    PubMed

    Debus, Bruno; Kirsanov, Dmitry; Yaroshenko, Irina; Sidorova, Alla; Piven, Alena; Legin, Andrey

    2015-10-01

    In clinical analysis creatinine is a routine biomarker for the assessment of renal and muscular dysfunctions. Although several techniques have been proposed for a fast and accurate quantification of creatinine in human serum or urine, most of them require expensive or complex apparatus, advanced sample preparation or skilled operators. To circumvent these issues, we propose two home-made platforms based on a CD Spectroscope (CDS) and Computer Screen Photo-assisted Technique (CSPT) for the rapid assessment of creatinine level in human urine. Both systems display a linear range (r(2) = 0.9967 and 0.9972, respectively) from 160 μmol L(-1) to 1.6 mmol L(-1) for standard creatinine solutions (n = 15) with respective detection limits of 89 μmol L(-1) and 111 μmol L(-1). Good repeatability was observed for intra-day (1.7-2.9%) and inter-day (3.6-6.5%) measurements evaluated on three consecutive days. The performance of CDS and CSPT was also validated in real human urine samples (n = 26) using capillary electrophoresis data as reference. Corresponding Partial Least-Squares (PLS) regression models provided for mean relative errors below 10% in creatinine quantification. PMID:26454461

  12. Isolation of a novel uric-acid-degrading microbe Comamonas sp. BT UA and rapid biosensing of uric acid from extracted uricase enzyme.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Tanushree; Sarkar, Priyabrata

    2014-12-01

    Uric-acid-utilizing soil bacteria were isolated, and 16s rRNA sequence was studied for strain identification. The most prominent uricase-producing bacterium was identified as Comamonas sp BT UA. Crude enzyme was extracted, freeze-dried and its Km and Vmax were determined as 40 meu M and 0.047 meu M min-1ml-1 using Line-weaver Burke plot. An activity of 80 U/mg of total protein was observed when cultured at 37 degree C for 84 h at pH 7. The purified enzyme was used to measure uric acid by spectrophotometric method and electrochemical biosensor. In the biosensing system the enzyme was immobilized on the platinum electrode with a biodegradable glutaraldehyde-crosslinked gelatin film having a swelling percentage of 109+/- 3.08, and response was observed by amperometry applying fixed potential. The electrochemical process as obtained by the anodic peak current and scan rate relationship was further configured by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The polymer matrix on the working electrode gave capacitive response for the electrode-electrolyte interaction. The sensitivity of the biosensor was measured as 6.93 meu A meu M -1 with a sensor affinity [Km(app)] of 50 mu M and 95 percent reproducibility after 50 measurements. The spectrophotometric method could be used in the range of 6-1000 mu M, whereas the biosensor generated linear response in the 1.5- 1000 mu M range with a response time of 24 s and limit of detection of 0.56 meu M. Uric acid was estimated in human blood samples by the biosensor and satisfactory results were obtained. PMID:25431410

  13. Creatinine determination according to Jaffe—what does it stand for?

    PubMed Central

    Speeckaert, Marijn M.

    2011-01-01

    In 1886, Max Jaffe discovered a reaction of creatinine with picric acid in an alkaline environment. Although the manuscript describes the nature of a precipitate and does not deal with an analytical assay, Jaffe's landmark paper elucidated the basic principles of the creatinine determination method (originally developed by Otto Folin), which became immensely popular and has easily withstood the test of time. Despite the advent of the enzymatic creatinine analysis, the analytical method is still popular due to its simplicity and low cost. As there is no standard recipe for the ‘Jaffe’ method, much methodological variation has occurred over time. This lack of methodological standardization implies that even in the 21st century, improving the interchangeability of Jaffe results is still an issue. PMID:25984118

  14. Osmoregulation in Drosophila melanogaster selected for urea tolerance.

    PubMed

    Pierce, V A; Mueller, L D; Gibbs, A G

    1999-09-01

    Animals may adapt to hyperosmolar environments by either osmoregulating or osmoconforming. Osmoconforming animals generally accumulate organic osmolytes including sugars, amino acids or, in a few cases, urea. In the latter case, they also accumulate 'urea-counteracting' solutes to mitigate the toxic effects of urea. We examined the osmoregulatory adaptation of Drosophila melanogaster larvae selected to live in 300 mmol l(-)(1) urea. Larvae are strong osmoregulators in environments with high NaCl or sucrose levels, but have increased hemolymph osmolarity on urea food. The increase in osmolarity on urea food is smaller in the selected larvae relative to unselected control larvae, and their respective hemolymph urea concentrations can account for the observed increases in total osmolarity. No other hemolymph components appear to act as urea-counteractants. Urea is calculated to be in equilibrium across body compartments in both selected and control larvae, indicating that the selected larvae are not sequestering it to lower their hemolymph osmolarity. The major physiological adaptation to urea does not appear to involve increased tolerance or improved osmoregulation per se, but rather mechanisms (e.g. metabolism, decreased uptake or increased excretion) that reduce overall urea levels and the consequent toxicity. PMID:10441086

  15. Atomic scale insights into urea-peptide interactions in solution.

    PubMed

    Steinke, Nicola; Gillams, Richard J; Pardo, Luis Carlos; Lorenz, Christian D; McLain, Sylvia E

    2016-01-27

    The mechanism by which proteins are denatured by urea is still not well understood, especially on the atomic scale where these interactions occur in vivo. In this study, the structure of the peptide GPG has been investigated in aqueous urea solutions in order to understand the combination of roles that both urea and water play in protein unfolding. Using a combination of neutron diffraction enhanced by isotopic substitution and computer simulations, it was found, in opposition with previous simulations studies, that urea is preferred over water around polar and charged portions of the peptides. Further, it appears that while urea directly replaces water around the nitrogen groups on GPG that urea and water occupy different positions around the peptide bond carbonyl groups. This suggests that urea may in fact weaken the peptide bond, disrupting the peptide backbone, thus ultimately causing denaturation. PMID:26764567

  16. Creatinine and myoglobin are poor predictors of anaerobic threshold in colorectal cancer and health

    PubMed Central

    Nyasavajjala, Sitaramachandra M; Phillips, Beth E; Lund, Jon N; Williams, John P

    2015-01-01

    Aims Myoglobin is a haem protein produced in skeletal muscles. Serum concentrations of myoglobin have been proposed as a surrogate marker of muscle mass and function in both cachectic cancer patients and healthy non-cancer individuals. Creatinine, a metabolite of creatine phosphate, an energy store found in skeletal muscle, is produced at a constant rate from skeletal muscle. Urinary and plasma creatinine have been used in clinical practice as indicators of skeletal muscle mass in health and disease. Our study aimed to test the hypothesis that plasma myoglobin and creatinine concentration could accurately predict skeletal muscle mass and aerobic capacity in colorectal cancer (CRC) patients and matched healthy controls and thereby an indicative of aerobic performance. Methods We recruited 47 patients with CRC and matching number of healthy volunteers for this study. All participants had their body composition measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry scan, aerobic capacity measured to anaerobic threshold (AT) by cardiopulmonary exercise testing and filled in objective questionnaires to assess the qualitative functions. This study was carried out in accordance with the Declaration of Helsinki, after approval by the local National Health Service (NHS) Research Ethics Committee. Results Age-matched groups had similar serum myoglobin and creatinine concentrations in spite of differences in their aerobic capacity. AT was significantly lower in the CRC group compared with matched controls (1.18 ± 0.44 vs. 1.41 ± 0.71 L/min; P < 0.01). AT had significant correlation with lean muscle mass (LMM) among these groups, but myoglobin and creatinine had poor correlation with LMM and AT. Conclusions Serum myoglobin is a poor predictor of muscle mass, and serum myoglobin and creatinine concentrations do not predict aerobic performance in CRC patients or healthy matched controls. PMID:26136188

  17. Creatinine measurements often yielded false estimates of progression in chronic renal failure

    SciTech Connect

    Walser, M.; Drew, H.H.; LaFrance, N.D.

    1988-09-01

    In 9 of 22 observation periods (lasting an average of 15 months) in 17 patients with moderate to severe chronic renal failure (GFR 4 to 23 ml/min), rates of progression as estimated from the linear regression on time of 24-hour creatinine clearance (b1) differed significantly from rates of progression as estimated from the regression on time of urinary clearance of 99mTc-DTPA (b2), during all or part of the period of observation. b1 exceeded b2 in four cases and was less than b2 in the other five. Thus there were gradual changes in the fractional tubular secretion of creatinine in individual patients, in both directions. Owing to these changes, measurements of creatinine clearance gave erroneous impressions of the rate or existence of progression during all or a portion of the period of observation in nearly half of these patients. In the 22 studies as a group, using the entire periods of observation, b1 indicated significantly more rapid progression (by 0.18 +/- 0.06 ml/min/month, P less than 0.01) than did b2, and had a significantly greater variance. Measurements of progression based on the rate of change of reciprocal plasma creatinine (multiplied by an average rate of urinary creatinine excretion in each study) were equally misleading, even though less variable. We conclude that sequential creatinine measurements are often misleading as measures of progression and should, when feasible, be replaced by urinary clearance of isotopes in following patients with chronic renal failure.

  18. Comparison of serum creatinine and serum cystatin C as biomarkers to detect sepsis-induced acute kidney injury and to predict mortality in CD-1 mice.

    PubMed

    Leelahavanichkul, Asada; Souza, Ana Carolina P; Street, Jonathan M; Hsu, Victor; Tsuji, Takayuki; Doi, Kent; Li, Lingli; Hu, Xuzhen; Zhou, Hua; Kumar, Parag; Schnermann, Jürgen; Star, Robert A; Yuen, Peter S T

    2014-10-15

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) dramatically increases sepsis mortality, but AKI diagnosis is delayed when based on serum creatinine (SCr) changes, due in part, to decreased creatinine production. During experimental sepsis, we compared serum cystatin C (sCysC), SCr, and blood urea nitrogen (BUN) to inulin glomerular filtration rate (iGFR) before or 3-18 h after cecal ligation and puncture (CLP)-induced sepsis in CD-1 mice. sCysC had a faster increase and reached peak levels more rapidly than SCr in both sepsis and bilateral nephrectomy (BiNx) models. sCysC was a better surrogate of iGFR than SCr during sepsis. Combining sCysC with SCr values into a composite biomarker improved correlation with iGFR better than any biomarker alone or any other combination. We determined the renal contribution to sCysC handling with BiNx. sCysC and SCr were lower post-BiNx/CLP than post-BiNx alone, despite increased inflammatory and nonrenal organ damage biomarkers. Sepsis decreased CysC production in nephrectomized mice without changing body weight or CysC space. Sepsis decreased sCysC production and increased nonrenal clearance, similar to effects of sepsis on SCr. sCysC, SCr, and BUN were measured 6 h postsepsis to link AKI with mortality. Mice with above-median sCysC, BUN, or SCr values 6 h postsepsis died earlier than mice with below-median values, corresponding to a substantial AKI association with sepsis mortality in this model. sCysC performs similarly to SCr in classifying mice at risk for early mortality. We conclude that sCysC detects AKI early and better reflects iGFR in CLP-induced sepsis. This study shows that renal biomarkers need to be evaluated in specific contexts. PMID:25143457

  19. Comparison of serum creatinine and serum cystatin C as biomarkers to detect sepsis-induced acute kidney injury and to predict mortality in CD-1 mice

    PubMed Central

    Leelahavanichkul, Asada; Souza, Ana Carolina P.; Street, Jonathan M.; Hsu, Victor; Tsuji, Takayuki; Doi, Kent; Li, Lingli; Hu, Xuzhen; Zhou, Hua; Kumar, Parag; Schnermann, Jürgen; Star, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) dramatically increases sepsis mortality, but AKI diagnosis is delayed when based on serum creatinine (SCr) changes, due in part, to decreased creatinine production. During experimental sepsis, we compared serum cystatin C (sCysC), SCr, and blood urea nitrogen (BUN) to inulin glomerular filtration rate (iGFR) before or 3–18 h after cecal ligation and puncture (CLP)-induced sepsis in CD-1 mice. sCysC had a faster increase and reached peak levels more rapidly than SCr in both sepsis and bilateral nephrectomy (BiNx) models. sCysC was a better surrogate of iGFR than SCr during sepsis. Combining sCysC with SCr values into a composite biomarker improved correlation with iGFR better than any biomarker alone or any other combination. We determined the renal contribution to sCysC handling with BiNx. sCysC and SCr were lower post-BiNx/CLP than post-BiNx alone, despite increased inflammatory and nonrenal organ damage biomarkers. Sepsis decreased CysC production in nephrectomized mice without changing body weight or CysC space. Sepsis decreased sCysC production and increased nonrenal clearance, similar to effects of sepsis on SCr. sCysC, SCr, and BUN were measured 6 h postsepsis to link AKI with mortality. Mice with above-median sCysC, BUN, or SCr values 6 h postsepsis died earlier than mice with below-median values, corresponding to a substantial AKI association with sepsis mortality in this model. sCysC performs similarly to SCr in classifying mice at risk for early mortality. We conclude that sCysC detects AKI early and better reflects iGFR in CLP-induced sepsis. This study shows that renal biomarkers need to be evaluated in specific contexts. PMID:25143457

  20. Degradability of creatinine under sewer conditions affects its potential to be used as biomarker in sewage epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Thai, Phong K; O'Brien, Jake; Jiang, Guangming; Gernjak, Wolfgang; Yuan, Zhiguo; Eaglesham, Geoff; Mueller, Jochen F

    2014-05-15

    Creatinine was proposed to be used as a population normalising factor in sewage epidemiology but its stability in the sewer system has not been assessed. This study thus aimed to evaluate the fate of creatinine under different sewer conditions using laboratory sewer reactors. The results showed that while creatinine was stable in wastewater only, it degraded quickly in reactors with the presence of sewer biofilms. The degradation followed first order kinetics with significantly higher rate in rising main condition than in gravity sewer condition. Additionally, daily loads of creatinine were determined in wastewater samples collected on Census day from 10 wastewater treatment plants around Australia. The measured loads of creatinine from those samples were much lower than expected and did not correlate with the populations across the sampled treatment plants. The results suggested that creatinine may not be a suitable biomarker for population normalisation purpose in sewage epidemiology, especially in sewer catchment with high percentage of rising mains. PMID:24631876

  1. Urine Galactomannan-to-Creatinine Ratio for Detection of Invasive Aspergillosis in Patients with Hematological Malignancies.

    PubMed

    Reischies, Frederike M J; Raggam, Reinhard B; Prattes, Juergen; Krause, Robert; Eigl, Susanne; List, Agnes; Quehenberger, Franz; Strenger, Volker; Wölfler, Albert; Hoenigl, Martin

    2016-03-01

    Galactomannan (GM) testing of urine specimens may provide important advantages, compared to serum testing, such as easy noninvasive sample collection. We evaluated a total of 632 serial urine samples from 71 patients with underlying hematological malignancies and found that the urine GM/creatinine ratio, i.e., (urine GM level × 100)/urine creatinine level, which takes urine dilution into account, reliably detected invasive aspergillosis and may be a promising diagnostic tool for patients with hematological malignancies. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT01576653.). PMID:26699701

  2. Kidney injury biomarkers and urinary creatinine variability in nominally healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Stiegel, M A; Pleil, J D; Sobus, J R; Angrish, M M; Morgan, M K

    2015-01-01

    Environmental exposure diagnostics use creatinine concentrations in urine aliquots as the internal standard for dilution normalization of all other excreted metabolites when urinary excretion rate data are not available. This is a reasonable approach for healthy adults as creatinine is a human metabolite that is continually produced in skeletal muscles and presumably excreted in the urine at a stable rate. However, creatinine also serves as a biomarker for glomerular filtration rate (efficiency) of the kidneys, so undiagnosed kidney function impairment could affect this commonly applied dilution calculation. The United States Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) has recently conducted a study that collected approximately 2600 urine samples from 50 healthy adults, aged 19-50 years old, in North Carolina in 2009-2011. Urinary ancillary data (creatinine concentration, total void volume, elapsed time between voids), and participant demographic data (race, gender, height, and body weight) were collected. A representative subset of 280 urine samples from 29 participants was assayed using a new kidney injury panel (KIP). In this article, we investigated the relationships of KIP biomarkers within and between subjects and also calculated their interactions with measured creatinine levels. The aims of this work were to document the analytical methods (procedures, sensitivity, stability, etc.), provide summary statistics for the KIP biomarkers in "healthy" adults without diagnosed disease (distribution, fold range, central tendency, variance), and to develop an understanding as to how urinary creatinine level varies with respect to the individual KIP proteins. Results show that new instrumentation and data reduction methods have sufficient sensitivity to measure KIP levels in nominally healthy urine samples, that linear regression between creatinine concentration and urinary excretion explains only about 68% of variability, that KIP markers are poorly correlated with creatinine (r(2) ∼ 0.34), and that statistical outliers of KIP markers are not random, but are clustered within certain subjects. In addition, we interpret these new adverse outcome pathways based in vivo biomarkers for their potential use as intermediary chemicals that may be diagnostic of kidney adverse outcomes to environmental exposure. PMID:26616147

  3. Neurological implications of urea cycle disorders

    PubMed Central

    Summar, M.; Leonard, J. V.

    2013-01-01

    Summary The urea cycle disorders constitute a group of rare congenital disorders caused by a deficiency of the enzymes or transport proteins required to remove ammonia from the body. Via a series of biochemical steps, nitrogen, the waste product of protein metabolism, is removed from the blood and converted into urea. A consequence of these disorders is hyperammonaemia, resulting in central nervous system dysfunction with mental status changes, brain oedema, seizures, coma, and potentially death. Both acute and chronic hyperammonaemia result in alterations of neurotransmitter systems. In acute hyperammonaemia, activation of the NMDA receptor leads to excitotoxic cell death, changes in energy metabolism and alterations in protein expression of the astrocyte that affect volume regulation and contribute to oedema. Neuropathological evaluation demonstrates alterations in the astrocyte morphology. Imaging studies, in particular 1H MRS, can reveal markers of impaired metabolism such as elevations of glutamine and reduction of myoinositol. In contrast, chronic hyperammonaemia leads to adaptive responses in the NMDA receptor and impairments in the glutamate–nitric oxide–cGMP pathway, leading to alterations in cognition and learning. Therapy of acute hyperammonaemia has relied on ammonia-lowering agents but in recent years there has been considerable interest in neuroprotective strategies. Recent studies have suggested restoration of learning abilities by pharmacological manipulation of brain cGMP with phosphodiesterase inhibitors. Thus, both strategies are intriguing areas for potential investigation in human urea cycle disorders. PMID:18038189

  4. Magnetic rotations of uric acid crystals and uratic crystals by static magnetic fields of up to 500 mT.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Yuka; Mizukawa, Yuri; Iwasaka, Masakazu

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, the disease concerning ureteral calculus is increasing possibly due to the changing lifestyles. For example, it is well known that the urinary calculi have a large impact to gout. As eating habitual diseases, gout and the hyper-uricemia are related to the formation of urinary calculus. In the previous studies, therapeutic agents were developed to enhance the uric acid excretion. From the viewpoint of side effects induction by the chemical agents, we are motivated to explore an alternative method to control the formation of ureteral crystals stimulator by physical stimulations. Therefore in the present study, we focused on the behaviors of uric acid crystals under magnetic fields of several hundreds of mT (Tesla). The uric acid crystals were re-crystallized from a suspension of uric acid powder, and the micro-crystals were prepared to be floating in the solution. We generated horizontal magnetic fields of maximum 500 mT by an electromagnet which contained a CCD microscope. A permanent magnet with magnetic fields of 200∼400 mT was also utilized. During the magnetic fields were applied to the uric acid crystals, we observed that the uric acid crystals were oriented by the magnetic fields down to 200 mT at the room temperature. It was speculated that the dimagnetic anisotropy in the uric acid crystals exhibited the rotational responses. The results indicate the possible remote control of the uric acid crystals in living body by the magnetic fields of 200 mT to 500 mT. PMID:24110424

  5. Serum uric acid and the risk of cardiovascular and renal disease.

    PubMed

    Borghi, Claudio; Rosei, Enrico Agabiti; Bardin, Thomas; Dawson, Jesse; Dominiczak, Anna; Kielstein, Jan T; Manolis, Athanasios J; Perez-Ruiz, Fernando; Mancia, Giuseppe

    2015-09-01

    Substantial evidence suggests that chronic hyperuricemia is an independent risk factor for hypertension, metabolic syndrome, chronic kidney disease (CKD) and cardiovascular diseases. This highlights the need for greater attention to serum uric acid levels when profiling patients, and suggests that the threshold above which uricemia is considered abnormal is 6  mg/dl, in light of the available evidence. Another important question is whether lowering serum uric acid can improve cardiovascular and renal outcomes, and what therapeutic mechanism of action could provide more clinical benefits to patients; the available literature shows a trend toward improvement associated with administration of urate-lowering drugs, in particular for the xanthine oxidase inhibitors. The demonstrated efficacy of urate-lowering therapy on outcomes other than gout flares leads to the consideration that treatment may be beneficial even in the absence of overt gout when hyperuricemia accompanies other clinical conditions, such as urate deposition, advanced CKD or cardiovascular risk factors. PMID:26136207

  6. Development of a novel uric-acid-responsive regulatory system in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Liang, Chaoning; Xiong, Dandan; Zhang, Yi; Mu, Shanshan; Tang, Shuang-Yan

    2015-03-01

    A novel uric-acid-responsive regulatory system was developed in Escherichia coli by adapting the HucR-related regulatory elements from Deinococcus radiodurans into E. coli. The induction performance of this system was compared to the performance of both the pBAD and pET systems. Our novel regulatory system was induced in a dose-dependent manner in the presence of uric acid and exhibited low basal expression in its absence. The system was characterized by a wide dynamic range of induction, being compatible with various E. coli strains and not requiring genomic modifications of the bacterial host. E. coli DH5α and DH10B were the most suitable host strains for optimal performance of this system. In conclusion, we developed a regulatory system with potential for applications in both recombinant protein expression and metabolic optimization. PMID:25524699

  7. Serum Cystatin C as a Marker of Renal Function in Critically Ill Patients With Normal Serum Creatinine

    PubMed Central

    Sagheb, Mohammad Mahdi; Namazi, Soha; Geramizadeh, Bita; Karimzadeh, Amin; Oghazian, Mohammad Bagher; Karimzadeh, Iman

    2014-01-01

    Background: Serum creatinine as a classic marker of renal function has several limitations in the detection of renal dysfunction. Objectives: This study assessed the validity of serum cystatin C as a marker of renal function in critically ill patients with normal serum creatinine. Patients and Methods: Eighty adult patients referred to intensive care units with serum creatinine levels < 1.5 mg/dL and without hemodynamic instability were chosen and their serum creatinine and cystatin C levels were measured. A 24-hour urine sample was collected to calculate creatinine clearance (Ccr). Renal dysfunction was defined as Ccr < 80 mL/min/1.73 m2. Results: There were significant correlations between measured Ccr and 1/serum creatinine (R = 0.51, P < 0.001) and 1/serum cystatin C (R = 0.25, P = 0.028). The difference between false negative rates of serum creatinine (93.33%) and cystatin C (80%) in the detection of renal dysfunction was significant (P = 0.032). Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis illustrated that area under the curve of serum creatinine and cystatin C for detecting renal dysfunction were 0.711 and 0.607, respectively; however, this difference was not significant (P = 0.222). Conclusions: Our data demonstrated that serum cystatin C is not superior to serum creatinine in the early detection of renal dysfunction in critically ill patients. PMID:24783172

  8. Variation in the uric acid transporter gene (SLC2A9) and memory performance.

    PubMed

    Houlihan, Lorna M; Wyatt, Niki D; Harris, Sarah E; Hayward, Caroline; Gow, Alan J; Marioni, Riccardo E; Strachan, Mark W J; Price, Jackie F; Starr, John M; Wright, Alan F; Deary, Ian J

    2010-06-01

    Understanding human cognitive ageing is important to improve the health of an increasing elderly population. Serum uric acid levels have been linked to many ageing illnesses and are also linked to cognitive functioning, though the direction of the association is equivocal. SLC2A9, a urate transporter, influences uric acid levels. This study first tested four SLC2A9 SNPs, previously associated with uric acid levels, in approximately 1000 Scots: the Lothian Birth Cohort 1936 (LBC1936). These participants were tested on general cognitive ability at ages 11 and 70. At age 70, they took a battery of diverse cognitive tests. Two replication cohorts were investigated. First, the LBC1921, who were tested on general cognitive ability at age 11. At ages 79 (n = 520), 83 (n = 281) and age 87 (n = 177), they completed cognitive ability test batteries. Second, the Edinburgh Type 2 Diabetes Study (ET2DS) were tested for cognitive abilities aged between 60 and 75 years (n = 1066). All analyses were adjusted for age, gender, body mass index and either childhood cognitive ability test score (LBC) or vocabulary-a measure of prior cognitive ability in ET2DS. Significant associations were detected with SLC2A9 and a general memory factor in LBC1936 and other individual cognitive ability tests (lowest P = 0.0002). The association with logical memory replicated in LBC1921 at all ages (all P < 0.05). These associations were not replicated in ET2DS (all P > 0.1). If the positive associations withstand, then this study could suggest that higher uric acid levels may be associated with increased performance on memory-related tasks. PMID:20197412

  9. Adenosine plasma level correlates with homocysteine and uric acid concentrations in patients with coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Fromonot, J; Deharo, P; Bruzzese, L; Cuisset, T; Quilici, J; Bonatti, S; Fenouillet, E; Mottola, G; Ruf, J; Guieu, R

    2016-03-01

    The role of hyperhomocysteinemia in coronary artery disease (CAD) patients remains unclear. The present study evaluated the relationship between homocysteine (HCys), adenosine plasma concentration (APC), plasma uric acid, and CAD severity evaluated using the SYNTAX score. We also evaluated in vitro the influence of adenosine on HCys production by hepatoma cultured cells (HuH7). Seventy-eight patients (mean age SD: 66.3 11.3; mean SYNTAX score: 19.9 12.3) and 30 healthy subjects (mean age: 61 13) were included. We incubated HuH7 cells with increasing concentrations of adenosine and addressed the effect on HCys level in cell culture supernatant. Patients vs. controls had higher APC (0.82 0.5 ?mol/L vs 0.53 0.14 ?mol/L; p < 0.01), HCys (15 7.6 ?mol/L vs 6.8 3 ?mol/L, p < 0.0001), and uric acid (242.6 97 vs 202 59, p < 0.05) levels. APC was correlated with HCys and uric acid concentrations in patients (Pearson's R = 0.65 and 0.52; p < 0.0001, respectively). The SYNTAX score was correlated with HCys concentration. Adenosine induced a time- and dose-dependent increase in HCys in cell culture. Our data suggest that high APC is associated with HCys and uric acid concentrations in CAD patients. Whether the increased APC participates in atherosclerosis or, conversely, is part of a protective regulation process needs further investigations. PMID:26762617

  10. Quercetin lowers plasma uric acid in pre-hyperuricaemic males: a randomised, double-blinded, placebo-controlled, cross-over trial.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yuanlu; Williamson, Gary

    2016-03-01

    Elevated plasma uric acid concentration is a risk factor for gout, insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Quercetin, a flavonoid found in high levels in onions, tea and apples, inhibits xanthine oxidoreductase in vitro, the final step in intracellular uric acid production, indicating that quercetin might be able to lower blood uric acid in humans. We determined the effects of 4 weeks of oral supplementation of quercetin on plasma uric acid, blood pressure and fasting glucose. This randomised, double-blinded, placebo-controlled, cross-over trial recruited twenty-two healthy males (19-60 years) with baseline plasma uric acid concentration in the higher, but still considered healthy, range (339 (sd 51) µmol/l). The intervention included one tablet containing 500 mg quercetin daily for 4 weeks, compared with placebo, with a 4-week washout period between treatments. The primary outcome was change in concentrations of plasma uric acid after 2 and 4 weeks; secondary outcome measures were changes in fasting plasma glucose, 24-h urinary excretion of uric acid and resting blood pressure. After quercetin treatment, plasma uric acid concentrations were significantly lowered by -26·5 µmol/l (95 % CI, -7·6, -45·5; P=0·008), without affecting fasting glucose, urinary excretion of uric acid or blood pressure. Daily supplementation of 500 mg quercetin, containing the bioavailable amount of quercetin as present in approximately 100 g red onions, for 4 weeks, significantly reduces elevated plasma uric acid concentrations in healthy males. PMID:26785820

  11. Microfabricated electrophoresis chips for simultaneous bioassays of glucose, uric acid, ascorbic acid, and acetaminophen.

    PubMed

    Wang, J; Chatrathi, M P; Tian, B; Polsky, R

    2000-06-01

    A micromachined capillary electrophoresis chip is described for simultaneous measurements of glucose, ascorbic acid, acetaminophen, and uric acid. Fluid control is used to mix the sample and enzyme glucose oxidase (GOx). The enzymatic reaction, a catalyzed aerobic oxidation of glucose to gluconic acid and hydrogen peroxide, occurs along the separation channel. The enzymatically liberated neutral peroxide species is separated electrophoretically from the anionic uric and ascorbic acids in the separation/reaction channel. The three oxidizable species are detected at the downstream gold-coated thick-film amperometric detector at different migration times. Glucose can be detected within less than 100 s, and detection of all electroactive constituents is carried out within 4 min. Measurements of glucose in the presence of acetaminophen, a neutral compound, are accomplished by comparing the responses in the presence and absence of GOx in the running buffer. The reproducibility of the on-chip glucose measurements is improved greatly by using uric acid as an internal standard. Factors influencing the performance, including the GOx concentration, field strength, and detection potential, are optimized. Such coupling of enzymatic assays with electrophoretic separations on a microchip platform holds great promise for rapid testing of metabolites (such as glucose or lactate), as well as for the introduction of high-speed clinical microanalyzers based on multichannel chips. PMID:10857628

  12. Do Uric Acid Deposits in Zooxanthellae Function as Eye-Spots?

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita, Hiroshi; Kobiyama, Atsushi; Koike, Kazuhiko

    2009-01-01

    The symbiosis between zooxanthellae (dinoflagellate genus Symbiodinium) and corals is a fundamental basis of tropical marine ecosystems. However the physiological interactions of the hosts and symbionts are poorly understood. Recently, intracellular crystalline deposits in Symbiodinium were revealed to be uric acid functioning for nutrient storage. This is the first exploration of these enigmatic crystalline materials that had previously been misidentified as oxalic acid, providing new insights into the nutritional strategies of Symbiodinium in oligotrophic tropical waters. However, we believe these deposits also function as eye-spots on the basis of light and electron microscopic observations of motile cells of cultured Symbiodinium. The cells possessed crystalline deposit clusters in rows with each row 100–150 nm thick corresponding to 1/4 the wavelength of light and making them suitable for maximum wave interference and reflection of light. Crystalline clusters in cells observed with a light microscope strongly refracted and polarized light, and reflected or absorbed short wavelength light. The facts that purines, including uric acid, have been identified as the main constituents of light reflectors in many organisms, and that the photoreceptor protein, opsin, was detected in our Symbiodinium strain, support the idea that uric acid deposits in Symbiodinium motile cells may function as a component of an eye-spot. PMID:19609449

  13. 3-D periodic mesoporous nickel oxide for nonenzymatic uric acid sensors with improved sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wei; Cao, Yang; Chen, Yong; Zhou, Yang; Huang, Qingyou

    2015-12-01

    3-D periodic mesoporous nickel oxide (NiO) particles with crystalline walls have been synthesized through the microwave-assisted hard template route toward the KIT-6 silica. It was investigated as a nonenzymatic amperometric sensor for the detection of uric acid. 3-D periodic nickel oxide matrix has been obtained by the hard template route from the KIT-6 silica template. The crystalline nickel oxide belonged to the Ia3d space group, and its structure was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), N2 adsorption-desorption, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The analysis results showed that the microwave-assisted mesoporous NiO materials were more appropriate to be electrochemical sensors than the traditional mesoporous NiO. Cyclic voltammetry (CV) revealed that 3-D periodic NiO exhibited a direct electrocatalytic activity for the oxidation of uric acid in sodium hydroxide solution. The enzyme-less amperometric sensor used in the detection of uric acid with detection limit of 0.005 μM (S/N = 3) over wide linear detection ranges up to 0.374 mM and with a high sensitivity of 756.26 μA mM-1 cm-2, and a possible mechanism was also given in the paper.

  14. Prevention of comorbidity and acute attack of gout by uric acid lowering therapy.

    PubMed

    Joo, Kowoon; Kwon, Seong-Ryul; Lim, Mie-Jin; Jung, Kyong-Hee; Joo, Hoyeon; Park, Won

    2014-05-01

    The object of this study was to evaluate the effect of uric acid lowering therapy in reducing the new development of comorbidities and the frequency of acute attacks in gout patients. We retrospectively reviewed patients who were diagnosed to have gout with at least 3 yr of follow up. They were divided into 2 groups; 53 patients with mean serum uric acid level (sUA)<6 mg/dL and 147 patients with mean sUA≥6 mg/dL. Comorbidities of gout such as hypertension (HTN), type II diabetes mellitus (DM), chronic kidney disease, cardiovascular disease (CVD) and urolithiasis were compared in each group at baseline and at last follow-up visit. Frequency of acute gout attacks were also compared between the groups. During the mean follow up period of 7.6 yr, the yearly rate of acute attack and the new development of HTN, DM, CVD and urolithiasis was lower in the adequately treated group compared to the inadequately treated group. Tight control of uric acid decreases the incidence of acute gout attacks and comorbidities of gout such as HTN, DM, CVD and urolithiasis. PMID:24851021

  15. Poly(o-aminophenol)-modified bienzyme carbon paste electrode for the detection of uric acid.

    PubMed

    Miland, E; Miranda Ordieres, A J; Tuñón Blanco, P; Smyth, M R; Fágáin, C O

    1996-05-01

    A reagentless uric acid selective biosensor constructed by immobilising uricase and horseradish peroxidase (HRP) in carbon paste without the addition of an electron transfer mediator is described. The response of the electrode is based on the enzymatic reduction of hydrogen peroxide in the presence of uric acid. Uricase and HRP were dispersed in the carbon paste and the optimum paste mixture was determined. Poly(o-aminophenol) was electropolymerised at the working surface area of the electrode acting as a conducting polymer layer. Cyclic voltammetry was used to characterise the permselective characteristics of the polymer layer. At an applied potential of 50 mV vs. Ag/AgCl, a linear response was obtained up to 1 x 10(-4) M, with a limit of detection of 3 x 10(-6) M. The sensor had a response time of 37 s. a calibration precision of 2.2% (n = 4) and an estimated sample frequency of 20 h(-1). Responses to the analyte of interest were pH dependent. The sensor was incorporated into a flow injection system for the qualification of uric acid in human serum. Results compared favourably with a standard spectrophotometric method. PMID:18966549

  16. Developing Potent Human Uric Acid Transporter 1 (hURAT1) Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Wempe, Michael F.; Jutabha, Promsuk; Quade, Bettina; Iwen, Timothy J.; Frick, Morin M.; Ross, Ian R.; Rice, Peter J.; Anzai, Naohiko; Endou, Hitoshi

    2011-01-01

    The kidneys are a vital organ in the human body. They serve several purposes including homeostatic functions such as regulating extracellular fluid volume, maintaining acid-base and electrolyte balance, and are essential regarding the excretion of metabolic waste. Furthermore, the kidneys play an important role in uric acid secretion/re-absorption. Abnormalities associated with kidney transporters have been associated with various diseases, such as gout. The current study utilized Xenopus oocytes expressing human uric acid transporter 1 (hURAT1; SLC22A12) as an in vitro method to investigate novel compounds and their ability to inhibit 14C-uric acid uptake via hURAT1. We have prepared and tested a series of 2-ethyl-benzofuran compounds and probed the hURAT1 in vitro inhibitor structure-activity relationship (SAR). Compared to di-methoxy analogs, mono-phenols formed on the C-Ring showed the best in vitro inhibitory potential. Compounds with sub-micromolar (i.e. IC50 < 1000 nM) inhibitors were prepared by brominating the corresponding phenols to produce compounds with potent uricosuric activity. PMID:21449597

  17. Is Serum Uric Acid Level Correlated with Erectile Dysfunction in Coronary Artery Disease Patients?

    PubMed

    Salavati, Alborz; Mehrsai, Abdolrasoul; Allameh, Farzad; Alizadeh, Farimah; Namdari, Farshad; Hosseinian, Mehdi; Salimi, Elaheh; Heidari, Fariba; Pourmand, Gholamreza

    2016-03-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) and vascular insufficiency are consequences of modern lifestyle, and vasogenic erectile dysfunction (ED) is one of the leading causes of sexual dysfunction which could be prevented like ischemic heart disease if the risk factors are discovered and managed. Seventy-five men scheduled for coronary angiography were asked to fill out the IIEF5 questionnaire and underwent serum lipoprotein-a, uric acid, lipid profile, testosterone, Sex Hormone Binding Globulin (SHBG), dehyderoepiandrostendion sulfate (DHEAS) tests; and the results were compared with those of erectile dysfunction patients with and without coronary artery disease. Ten out of 32 CAD patients (30%) and 6 of 43 normal coronary men had ED Prevalence (P=0.04). The average serum uric acid in ED patients with normal coronary was 5.6 (± 0.68) 6.5 ±078 mg/dl in ED patients of CAD group P=0.034. Men with both ED and CAD had significantly higher levels of lipoprotein-a compared to those CAD patients with normal sexual function. Higher uric acid and lipoprotein-a levels are correlated with the presence of ED in patients with CAD. PMID:27107521

  18. Influence of milk urea concentration on fractional urea disappearance rate from milk to blood plasma in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Spek, J W; Dijkstra, J; Bannink, A

    2016-05-01

    The relationship between milk urea nitrogen (MUN; mg of N/dL) and urinary N excretion is affected, among others, by diurnal dynamics in MUN, which in turn is largely influenced by feed intake pattern and characteristics of urea transfer from blood plasma to milk and vice versa. This study aimed to obtain insight in urea transfer characteristics within the mammary gland and from the mammary gland to blood plasma in dairy cows at various concentrations of plasma urea nitrogen (PUN; mg of N/dL) and MUN. Urea transfer from milk to blood plasma and urea transfer within the mammary gland itself was evaluated in a 4×4 Latin square design using 4 lactating multiparous Holstein-Friesian cows (milk production of 39.8±4.70kg/d and 90±3.9 d in milk). Treatments consisted of 4 primed continuous intravenous urea infusions of 0, 5, 10, and 15g of urea/h. Boluses of [(15)N(15)N]urea were injected in cistern milk at 20, 60, and 100 min before the 1700h milking. Milk was collected in portions of approximately 2 L at the 1700h milking. Milk samples were analyzed for urea and enrichment of (15)N-urea. Results from one cow were discarded because of leakage of milk from the teats after injection of boluses of [(15)N(15)N]urea. Increasing urea infusion rate linearly increased PUN from 11.4 (0g of urea/h) to 25.9mg/dL (15g of urea/h) and MUN from 10.3 (0g of urea/h) to 23.5 (15g of urea/h) mg of N/dL. The percentage of injected [(15)N(15)N]urea recovered from milk at the time of injection was not affected by urea infusion rate and varied between 65.1 and 73.0%, indicating that a substantial portion of injected [(15)N(15)N]urea was not accounted for by collected milk. The estimated fractional disappearance rate of (15)N-urea from milk to blood (Kurea; per hour) linearly increased from 0.429 (0g of urea/h) to 0.641 per hour (15g of urea/h). Cistern injected [(15)N(15)N]urea diffused within 20 min after injection toward alveoli milk. Calculations with the average Kurea estimated in this study show that 89% of an initial difference between PUN and MUN will have disappeared after 4 h. In conclusion, urea disappearance from milk in the mammary gland is substantial, as well as the intramammary urea exchange between cistern, duct, and alveoli milk. However, results have to be interpreted with caution given the lack of full recovery of dosed (15)N urea at time of injection. Information on Kurea is useful to quantify the effects of diurnal variation in PUN on MUN, which enhances the utility of MUN as an indicator for N excretion in urine. PMID:26947294

  19. ESTIMATES OF AGE-SPECIFIC URINARY EXCRETION RATES FOR CREATININE AMONG CHILDREN

    EPA Science Inventory

    The results of this study suggest that naïve adjustment by creatinine concentration, without consideration of the age-dependence of the physiological mechanisms controlling its excretion, may introduce sizeable error and is inappropriate when comparing metabolite concentrations a...

  20. A New Equation to Estimate Muscle Mass from Creatinine and Cystatin C

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Cheol-Ho; Kim, Kwang-il; Chin, Ho Jun; Lee, Hajeong

    2016-01-01

    Background With evaluation for physical performance, measuring muscle mass is an important step in detecting sarcopenia. However, there are no methods to estimate muscle mass from blood sampling. Methods To develop a new equation to estimate total-body muscle mass with serum creatinine and cystatin C level, we designed a cross-sectional study with separate derivation and validation cohorts. Total body muscle mass and fat mass were measured using dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) in 214 adults aged 25 to 84 years who underwent physical checkups from 2010 to 2013 in a single tertiary hospital. Serum creatinine and cystatin C levels were also examined. Results Serum creatinine was correlated with muscle mass (P < .001), and serum cystatin C was correlated with body fat mass (P < .001) after adjusting glomerular filtration rate (GFR). After eliminating GFR, an equation to estimate total-body muscle mass was generated and coefficients were calculated in the derivation cohort. There was an agreement between muscle mass calculated by the novel equation and measured by DXA in both the derivation and validation cohort (P < .001, adjusted R2 = 0.829, β = 0.95, P < .001, adjusted R2 = 0.856, β = 1.03, respectively). Conclusion The new equation based on serum creatinine and cystatin C levels can be used to estimate total-body muscle mass. PMID:26849842

  1. HOME AIR NICOTINE LEVELS AND URINE COTININE-CREATININE RATIOS IN PRESCHOOL CHILDREN

    EPA Science Inventory

    We studied urine cotinine excretion in 27 children who attended a research day care center to determine the extent of correlation between urine cotinine-creatinine ratios (CCR) and intensity of nicotine exposure in the home. verage nicotine levels in home air were determined by a...

  2. Difficulties in diagnosing acute kidney injury post liver transplantation using serum creatinine based diagnostic criteria

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Banwari; Davenport, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Renal function in patients with advanced cirrhosis is an important prognostic factor for survival both prior to and following liver transplantation. The importance of renal function is reflected by the introduction of the model for end stage liver disease (MELD) score, which includes serum creatinine. The MELD score has been shown to predict the short term risk of death for transplant wait listed patients and is currently used by many countries to allocate liver transplants on the basis of severity of underlying illness. Changes in serum creatinine are also used to stage acute kidney injury. However prior to liver transplantation the serum creatinine typically over estimates underlying renal function, particularly when a colorimetric Jaffe based assay is used, and paradoxically then under estimates renal function post liver transplantation, particularly when immunophyllins are started early as part of transplant immunosuppression. As acute kidney injury is defined by changes in serum creatinine, this potentially leads to over estimation of the incidence and severity of acute kidney injury in the immediate post-operative period. PMID:25349641

  3. Role of elevated serum uric acid levels at the onset of overt nephropathy in the risk for renal function decline in patients with type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Kentaro; Hara, Shigeko; Hattori, Masakazu; Sakai, Ken; Onishi, Yukiko; Yoshida, Yoko; Kawazu, Shoji; Kushiyama, Akifumi

    2015-01-01

    Aims/Introduction Despite the use of intensive therapies, declining renal function is often observed during the overt nephropathy stage of type 2 diabetes. We aimed at investigating the role of serum uric acid (SUA) levels at the onset of overt nephropathy in the risk of renal function decline in type 2 diabetes patients. Materials and Methods The present cohort study included 290 type 2 diabetes patients who were followed from the onset of overt nephropathy. The relationship between SUA and declining renal function was assessed using Cox regression models after adjusting for known risk factors. Results Over a median 4.8-year follow-up period, 85 patients (4.9/100 person-years) showed serum creatinine (Cr) doubling with a total cumulative incidence of 71.9% at 20 years of follow up. The highest SUA tertile resulted in significantly a higher incidence (7.7/100 person-years) and cumulative incidence at 20 years (85.7%) than the middle (3.9/100 person-years, 54.2%) and lowest (3.0/100 person-years, 55.5%) tertiles. The univariate Cox hazard model resulted in significant risks for Cr doubling related to female sex, short diabetes duration, smoking and elevated levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-c), glycated hemoglobin and SUA tertiles. SUA tertiles remained statistically significant in the multivariate model (highest vs lowest hazard ratio 2.68, 95% confidence interval 1.48−5.00, P = 0.0009). Conclusions Elevated SUA levels within the normal range (men >6.3 mg/dL, women >5.1) at the onset of overt nephropathy resulted in an increased risk for declining renal function in type 2 diabetes patients. PMID:25621139

  4. Discovery of URAT1 SNPs and association between serum uric acid levels and URAT1

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Sung Kweon; Kim, Soriul; Chung, Jae-Yong; Jee, Sun Ha

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Human urate transporter 1 (URAT1) is a member of the organic anion transporter family (SLC22A12) that primarily regulates the renal tubular reabsorption of uric acid. This casecontrol study was designed to analyse whether hURAT1 might also be a candidate gene for hyperuricaemia or hypouricaemia. Setting We recruited 68 healthy volunteers and divided them into two groups: a normal uric acid group and a hyperuricaemia group. We analysed the sequence of the URAT1 gene and found five significant single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). We then selected 900 male subjects from the 262?200 enrolled in the Korean Cancer Prevention Study-II (KCPS-II) cohort for further genetic analysis. Participants DNA samples from 36 individuals with normal uric acid (<4.5?mg/dL) and 32 individuals with hyperuricaemia (>8.5?mg/dL) were sequenced. Five significant SNPs (rs7929627, rs75786299, rs3825017, rs11602903 and rs121907892) were identified. We then chose 900 subjects from the KCPS-II cohort consisting of 450 subjects with normal uric acid (UA <4.1?mg/dL) and 450 subjects with hyperuricaemia (UA >8.7?mg/dL). The groups were matched by age, body mass index, metabolic syndrome and use of anti-hypertensive medication. Primary outcome measures We compared the OR of the incidence of hyperuricaemia by URAT1 genotype. Results The strongest association with hyperuricaemia was observed for rs75786299 (IVS3+11A/G) with an OR of 32.05. rs7929627 (IVS7-103A/G) and rs3825017 (N82N) showed an association with hyperuricaemia with ORs of 2.56 and 2.29, respectively. rs11602903 (788A/T) and rs121907892 (W258X) were negatively correlated with hyperuricaemia with ORs of 0.350 and 0.447, respectively. Individuals carrying the GATAG haplotype (n=32)a relatively common variant consisting of rs7929627, rs75786299 and rs3825017showed the highest risk for hyperuricaemia with an OR of 92.23 (p=9.5510?3). Conclusions These results indicate that five newly described SNPs in the hURAT1 gene are significantly associated with uric acid level (4-2008-0318 and 4-2011-0277). PMID:26603249

  5. Evaluation of the Nova StatSensor® XpressTM Creatinine Point-Of-Care Handheld Analyzer

    PubMed Central

    Kosack, Cara Simone; de Kieviet, Wim; Bayrak, Kubra; Milovic, Anastacija; Page, Anne Laure

    2015-01-01

    Creatinine is a parameter that is required to monitor renal function and is important to follow in patients under treatment with potentially toxic renal drugs, such as the anti-HIV drug Tenofovir. A point of care instrument to measure creatinine would be useful for patients monitoring in resource-limited settings, where more instruments that are sophisticated are not available. The StatSensor Xpress Creatinine (Nova Biomedical Cooperation, Waltham, MA, USA) point of care analyzer was evaluated for its diagnostic performance in indicating drug therapy change. Creatinine was measured in parallel using the Nova StatSensor Xpress Creatinine analyzer and the Vitros 5,1FS (Ortho Clinical Diagnostics, Inc, Rochester, USA), which served as reference standard. The precision (i.e., repeatability and reproducibility) and accuracy of the StatSensor Xpress Creatinine analyzer were calculated using a panel of specimens with normal, low pathological and high pathological values. Two different Nova StatSensor Xpress Creatinine analyzers were used for the assessment of accuracy using repeated measurements. The coefficient of variation of the StatSensor Xpress Creatinine analyzers ranged from 2.3 to 5.9% for repeatability and from 4.2 to 9.0% for between-run reproducibility. The concordance correlation agreement was good except for high values (>600 µmol/L). The Bland-Altman analysis in high pathological specimens suggests that the Nova StatSensor Xpress Creatinine test tends to underestimate high creatinine values (i.e., >600 µmol/L). The Nova StatSensor Xpress Creatinine analyzers showed acceptable to good results in terms of repeatability, inter-device reproducibility and between-run reproducibility over time using quality control reagents. The analyzer was found sufficiently accurate for detecting pathological values in patients (age >10 year) and can be used with a moderate risk of misclassification. PMID:25886375

  6. Correlation of cystatin C and creatinine based estimates of renal function in children with hydronephrosis

    PubMed Central

    Momtaz, Hossein-Emad; Dehghan, Arash; Karimian, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The use of a simple and accurate glomerular filtration rate (GFR) estimating method aiming minute assessment of renal function can be of great clinical importance. Objectives: This study aimed to determine the association of a GFR estimating by equation that includes only cystatin C (Gentian equation) to equation that include only creatinine (Schwartz equation) among children. Patients and Methods: A total of 31 children aged from 1 day to 5 years with the final diagnosis of unilateral or bilateral hydronephrosis referred to Besat hospital in Hamadan, between March 2010 and February 2011 were consecutively enrolled. Schwartz and Gentian equations were employed to determine GFR based on plasma creatinine and cystatin C levels, respectively. Results: The proportion of GFR based on Schwartz equation was 70.19± 24.86 ml/min/1.73 m2, while the level of this parameter based on Gentian method and using cystatin C was 86.97 ± 21.57 ml/min/1.73 m2. The Pearson correlation coefficient analysis showed a strong direct association between the two levels of GFR measured by Schwartz equation based on serum creatinine level and Gentian method and using cystatin C (r = 0.594, P < 0.001). The linear association between GFR values measured with the two methods included cystatin C based GFR = 50.8+ 0.515 × Schwartz GFR. The correlation between GFR values measured by using serum creatinine and serum cystatin C measurements remained meaningful even after adjustment for patients’ gender and age (r = 0.724, P < 0.001). Conclusion: The equation developed based on cystatin C level is comparable with another equation, based on serum creatinine (Schwartz formula) to estimate GFR in children. PMID:27069964

  7. Comparison between Cystatin C- and Creatinine-Estimated Glomerular Filtration Rate in Cardiology Patients

    PubMed Central

    Åkerblom, Axel; Helmersson-Karlqvist, Johanna; Flodin, Mats; Larsson, Anders

    2015-01-01

    Objective Estimation of the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) is essential for identification, evaluation and risk prediction in patients with kidney disease. Estimated GFR (eGFR) is also needed for the correct dosing of drugs eliminated by the kidneys and to identify high-risk individuals in whom coronary angiography or other procedures may lead to kidney failure. Both cystatin C and creatinine are used for the determination of GFR, and we aimed to investigate if eGFR by the two methods differ in cardiology patients. Methods We compared cystatin C and creatinine (CKD-EPI) eGFR calculated from the same request from a cardiology outpatient unit (n = 2,716), a cardiology ward (n = 980), a coronary care unit (n = 1,464), and an advanced coronary care unit (n = 518) in an observational, cross-sectional study. Results The median creatinine eGFR results are approximately 10 ml/min/1.73 m2 higher than the median cystatin C eGFR that is up to 90 ml/min/1.73 m2, irrespective of the level of care. Creatinine eGFR resulted in a less advanced eGFR category in the majority of patients with a cystatin C eGFR <60 ml/min/1.73 m2. Conclusions Our study demonstrates a difference between creatinine and cystatin C eGFR in cardiology patients. It is important to be aware of which marker is used for the reported eGFR to minimize erroneous interpretations of the test results, as this could lead to under- or overmedication. Further studies are needed to determine the best method of estimating the GFR in cardiology units. PMID:26648945

  8. Influence of Muscle Mass and Physical Activity on Serum and Urinary Creatinine and Serum Cystatin C

    PubMed Central

    Baxmann, Alessandra Calábria; Ahmed, Marion Souza; Marques, Natália Cristina; Menon, Viviane Barcellos; Pereira, Aparecido Bernardo; Kirsztajn, Gianna Mastroianni; Heilberg, Ita Pfeferman

    2008-01-01

    Background and objectives: For addressing the influence of muscle mass on serum and urinary creatinine and serum cystatin C, body composition was assessed by skinfold thickness measurement and bioelectrical impedance analyses. Design, setting, participants, & measurements: A total of 170 healthy individuals (92 women, 78 men) were classified as sedentary or with mild or moderate/intense physical activity. Blood, 24-h urine samples, and 24-h food recall were obtained from all individuals. Results: Serum and urinary creatinine correlated significantly with body weight, but the level of correlation with lean mass was even greater. There was no significant correlation between body weight and lean mass with cystatin C. Individuals with moderate/intense physical activity presented significantly lower mean body mass index (23.1 ± 2.5 versus 25.7 ± 3.9 kg/m2) and higher lean mass (55.3 ± 10.0 versus 48.5 ± 10.4%), serum creatinine (1.04 ± 0.12 versus 0.95 ± 0.17 mg/dl), urinary creatinine (1437 ± 471 versus 1231 ± 430 mg/24 h), protein intake (1.4 ± 0.6 versus 1.1 ± 0.6 g/kg per d), and meat intake (0.7 ± 0.3 versus 0.5 ± 0.4 g/kg per d) than the sedentary individuals. Conversely, mean serum cystatin did not differ between these two groups. A multivariate analysis of covariance showed that lean mass was significantly related to serum and urinary creatinine but not with cystatin, even after adjustment for protein/meat intake and physical activity. Conclusions: Cystatin C may represent a more adequate alternative to assess renal function in individuals with higher muscle mass when mild kidney impairment is suspected. PMID:18235143

  9. Urea hydrolysis and calcium carbonate reaction fronts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, D. T.; Redden, G. D.; Henriksen, J.; Fujita, Y.; Guo, L.; Huang, H.

    2010-12-01

    The mobility of toxic or radioactive metal contaminants in subsurface environments can be reduced by the formation of mineral precipitates that form co-precipitates with the contaminants or that isolate them from the mobile fluid phase. An engineering challenge is to control the spatial distribution of precipitation reactions with respect to: 1) the location of a contaminant, and 2) where reactants are introduced into the subsurface. One strategy being explored for immobilizing contaminants, such as Sr-90, involves stimulating mineral precipitation by forming carbonate ions and hydroxide via the in situ, microbially mediated hydrolysis of urea. A series of column experiments have been conducted to explore how the construction or design of such an in situ reactant production strategy can affect the temporal and spatial distribution of calcium carbonate precipitation, and how the distribution is coupled to changes in permeability. The columns were constructed with silica gel as the porous media. An interval midway through the column contained an adsorbed urease enzyme in order to simulate a biologically active zone. A series of influent solutions were injected to characterize hydraulic properties of the column (e.g., bromide tracer), profiles of chemical conditions and reaction products as the enzyme catalyzes urea hydrolysis (e.g., pH, ammonia, urea), and changes that occur due to CaCO3 precipitation with the introduction of a calcium+urea solutions. In one experiment, hydraulic conductivity was reduced as precipitate accumulated in a layer within the column that had a higher fraction of fine grained silica gel. Subsequent reduction of permeability and flow (for a constant head condition) resulted in displacement of the hydrolysis and precipitation reaction profiles upstream. In another experiment, which lacked the physical heterogeneity (fine grained layer), the precipitation reaction did not result in loss of permeability or flow velocity and the reaction profile, characterized by the pH profile and hydrolysis reaction species, was extended downstream of the enzyme zone. Downstream extension of the reaction profile was due partially to the partial mobility of the enzyme in the column. The experiments are helping to illustrate the complexity of transient reaction fronts as well as the needs and challenges for advanced modeling approaches. A modeling platform developed at the Idaho National Laboratory, which is capable of simulating tightly coupled physical-chemical processes (the Reactive Transport simulator), is being applied to pre-experimental simulations and post-experimental interpretation of results.

  10. Action of Urea on Tobacco Mosaic Virus

    PubMed Central

    Buzzell, Anne

    1962-01-01

    The rate of urea degradation is not uniform over the tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) rod, as might be expected since the protein subunits appear to be chemically identical. Only two stable intermediates are formed; the four components with sedimentation constants, S4020, about 80, 120, 140, and 165 correspond to the two intermediates with and without RNA tails. Analysis of the reaction kinetics for the disappearance of whole virus and of the first intermediate was made in terms of a new hypothesis concerning protein bonding. PMID:13875271

  11. The SLC14 gene family of urea transporters.

    PubMed

    Shayakul, Chairat; Hediger, Matthias A

    2004-02-01

    Carrier-mediated urea transport allows rapid urea movement across the cell membrane, which is particularly important in the process of urinary concentration and for rapid urea equilibrium in non-renal tissues. Urea transporters mediate passive urea uptake that is inhibited by phloretin and urea analogues. Facilitated urea transporters are divided into two classes: (1) the renal tubular/testicular type of urea transporter, UT-A1 to -A5, encoded by alternative splicing of the SLC14A2 gene, and (2) the erythrocyte urea transporter UT-B1 encoded by the SLC14A1 gene. The primary structure of urea transporters is unique, consisting of two extended, hydrophobic, membrane-spanning domains and an extracellular glycosylated-connecting loop. UT-A1 is the result of a gene duplication of this two-halves-structure, and the duplicated portions are linked together by a large intracellular hydrophilic loop, carrying several putative protein kinase A (PKA) and -C (PKC) phosphorylation sites. UT-A1 is located in the apical membrane of the kidney inner medullary collecting duct cells, where it is stimulated acutely by cAMP-mediated phosphorylation in response to the antidiuretic hormone vasopressin. Vasopressin also up-regulates UT-A2 mRNA/protein expression in the descending thin limb of the loops of Henle. UT-A1 and UT-A2 are regulated independently and respond differently to changes in dietary protein content. UT-A3 and UT-A4 are located in the rat kidney medulla and UT-A5 in the mouse testis. The widely expressed UT-B participates in urea recycling in the descending vasa recta, as demonstrated by a relatively mild "urea-selective" urinary concentrating defect in transgenic UT-B null mice and individuals with the Jk(null) blood group. PMID:12856182

  12. Urea kinetics of a carnivore, Felis silvestris catus.

    PubMed

    Russell, K; Lobley, G E; Rawlings, J; Millward, D J; Harper, E J

    2000-11-01

    The effect of two levels of dietary protein energy, moderate (20%; MP) and high (70%; HP), on urea kinetics in eleven domestic cats was studied. After a 3-week prefeed, a single dose of [(15)N(15)N]urea was administered, and urine and faeces collected over the subsequent 5 d. For each 24 h period, total urea and enrichment of [(15)N(15)N]- and [(15)N(14)N]urea in urine were determined, and a model applied to calculate urea production, entry into the gastrointestinal tract, recycling to urine or faeces and, by difference, retention by the body and potentially available for anabolism. Urea production and excretion increased with dietary protein level Most of the urea produced was excreted, with only a small proportion entering the gut, and with the pattern of urea disposal not significantly different between the HP and MP diets. Thus, the percentages of urea production available to the gut were 15% (MP) and 12% (HP), of which 57% (MP) and 59% (HP) was recycled in the ornithine cycle, 40% (MP and HP) was potentially available for anabolism and the rest lost as faecal N. As a percentage of urea produced the amount potentially available for anabolism was very low at 6.41% (MP diet) and 4.79% (HP diet). In absolute terms urea entering the gut, being recycled in the ornithine cycle and potentially available for anabolism was significantly higher on the HP diet These results show that cats operate urea turnover, but at a lower rate, and with less nutritional sensitivity than has been reported for other species. PMID:11177172

  13. The electrophoresis of transferrins in urea/polyacrylamide gels.

    PubMed Central

    Evans, R W; Williams, J

    1980-01-01

    The denaturation of transferrin by urea has been studied by (a) electrophoresis in polyacrylamide gels incorporating a urea gradient, (b) measurements of the loss of iron-binding capacity and (c) u.v. difference spectrometry. In human serum transferrin and hen ovotransferrin the N-terminal and C-terminal domains of the iron-free protein were found to denature at different urea concentrations. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 7. PMID:7213345

  14. Preliminary Findings of Serum Creatinine and Estimated Glomerular Filtration Rate (eGFR) in Adolescents with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Jin-Ding; Lin, Lan-Ping; Hsieh, Molly; Lin, Pei-Ying

    2010-01-01

    The present study aimed to describe the kidney function profile--serum creatinine and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), and to examine the relationships of predisposing factors to abnormal serum creatinine in people with intellectual disabilities (ID). Data were collected by a cross-sectional study of 827 aged 15-18 years adolescents…

  15. Beating the system: a study of a creatinine assay and its efficacy in authenticating human urine specimens.

    PubMed

    Villena, Vincent P

    2010-01-01

    Creatinine concentration is commonly used to verify the authenticity of urine specimens submitted for illicit drug screening. This study evaluated creatinine screening of donor urine specimens as a tool for detecting substituted and/or tampered specimens. The study carried out creatinine assay of animal urine, fruit juices, and urine from creatine-supplemented subjects by a modified version of the Jaffe reaction. All specimens were analyzed for creatinine concentration in a chemistry-immuno analyzer. Results showed that urine specimens from common domestic pets, including cats, dogs, and horses, have creatinine values similar to normal human values. Most fruit juices tested contained no detectable creatinine, and the few that did showed poor "urine" chemical integrity. Creatine supplementation by donors was found not to provide an effective means of elevating creatinine concentration in urine when attempting to flush out water-soluble drugs in the body. Thus, the assay for creatinine proved useful for the detection of some but not all adulterated urine specimens. PMID:20109301

  16. Preliminary Findings of Serum Creatinine and Estimated Glomerular Filtration Rate (eGFR) in Adolescents with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Jin-Ding; Lin, Lan-Ping; Hsieh, Molly; Lin, Pei-Ying

    2010-01-01

    The present study aimed to describe the kidney function profile--serum creatinine and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), and to examine the relationships of predisposing factors to abnormal serum creatinine in people with intellectual disabilities (ID). Data were collected by a cross-sectional study of 827 aged 15-18 years adolescents

  17. Uric acid induces endothelial dysfunction by vascular insulin resistance associated with the impairment of nitric oxide synthesis.

    PubMed

    Choi, You-Jin; Yoon, Yujin; Lee, Kang-Yo; Hien, Tran Thi; Kang, Keon Wook; Kim, Kyong-Cheol; Lee, Jeewoo; Lee, Moo-Yeol; Lee, Seung Mi; Kang, Duk-Hee; Lee, Byung-Hoon

    2014-07-01

    Endothelial dysfunction is defined as impairment of the balance between endothelium-dependent vasodilation and constriction. Despite evidence of uric acid-induced endothelial dysfunction, a relationship with insulin resistance has not been clearly established. In this study, we investigated the role of vascular insulin resistance in uric acid-induced endothelial dysfunction. Uric acid inhibited insulin-induced endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) phosphorylation and NO production more substantially than endothelin-1 expression in HUVECs, with IC50 of 51.0, 73.6, and 184.2, respectively. Suppression of eNOS phosphorylation and NO production by uric acid was PI3K/Akt-dependent, as verified by the transfection with p110. Treatment of rats with the uricase inhibitor allantoxanamide induced mild hyperuricemia and increased mean arterial pressure by 25%. While hyperuricemic rats did not show systemic insulin resistance, they showed impaired vasorelaxation induced by insulin by 56%. A compromised insulin response in terms of the Akt/eNOS pathway was observed in the aortic ring of hyperuricemic rats. Coadministration with allopurinol reduced serum uric acid levels and blood pressure and restored the effect of insulin on Akt-eNOS pathway and vasorelaxation. Taken together, uric acid induced endothelial dysfunction by contributing to vascular insulin resistance in terms of insulin-induced NO production, potentially leading to the development of hypertension.-Choi, Y.-J., Yoon, Y., Lee, K.-Y., Hien, T. T., Kang, K. W., Kim, K.-C., Lee, J., Lee, M.-Y., Lee, S. M., Kang, D.-H., Lee, B.-H. Uric acid induces endothelial dysfunction by vascular insulin resistance associated with the impairment of nitric oxide synthesis. PMID:24652948

  18. Water and urea transport in renal microvillus membrane vesicles

    SciTech Connect

    Verkman, A.S.; Dix, J.A.; Seifter, J.L.

    1985-05-01

    Light scattering was used to measure the water and urea permeability of brush border membrane vesicles (BBMV) isolated from rabbit renal cortex. In stop-flow experiments, exposure of BBMV to a 200 mM inwardly directed mannitol gradient gave a monophasic time course of decreasing BBMV volume corresponding to an osmotic water permeability (Pf) of 1.1 X 10(-2) cm/s at 37 degrees C. The temperature dependence of Pf was biphasic with delta H = 2 kcal/mol for T less than 33 degrees C and delta H = 14 kcal/mol for T greater than 33 degrees C. A 200 mM inwardly directed urea gradient gave a biphasic time course of BBMV volume due to rapid water efflux followed by slower urea influx with urea permeability (Purea) of 2.4 X 10(-6) cm/s. Preincubation of BBMV with increasing (urea) reversibly inhibited both urea flux and thiourea flux according to a single-site inhibition model, suggesting a saturable urea carrier. Comparison of BBMV Pf and Purea with proximal tubule transepithelial water and urea transport rates suggests that the permeability of the tubular apical membrane (BBMV) is high enough to support a transcellular route for both osmotic water and urea transport.

  19. New potent calcimimetics: II. Discovery of benzothiazole trisubstituted ureas.

    PubMed

    Deprez, Pierre; Temal, Taoues; Jary, Hélène; Auberval, Marielle; Lively, Sarah; Guédin, Denis; Vevert, Jean-Paul

    2013-04-15

    Following the identification of trisubstituted ureas as a promising new chemical series of allosteric modulators of the calcium sensing receptor (CaSR), we further explored the SAR around the urea substitution, leading to the discovery of benzothiazole urea compound 13. This compound is a potent calcimimetic with an EC50=20 nM (luciferase assay). Evaluated in an in vivo model of chronic renal failure (short term and long term in 5/6 nephrectomized rats), benzothiazole urea 13 significantly decreased PTH levels after oral administration while keeping calcemia within the normal range. PMID:23499504

  20. Impact on creatinine renal clearance by the interplay of multiple renal transporters: a case study with INCB039110.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Warren, Mark S; Zhang, Xuexiang; Diamond, Sharon; Williams, Bill; Punwani, Naresh; Huang, Jane; Huang, Yong; Yeleswaram, Swamy

    2015-04-01

    Serum creatinine is commonly used as a marker of renal function, but increases in serum creatinine might not represent changes in glomerular filtration rate (GFR). INCB039110 (2-(3-(4-(7H-pyrrolo[2,3-day]pyrimidin-4-yl)-1H-pyrazol-1-yl)-1-(1-(3-fluoro-2-(trifluoromethyl)isonicotinoyl)piperidin-4-yl)azetidin-3-yl)acetonitrile) is an inhibitor of the Janus kinases (JAKs) with selectivity for JAK1. In a phase 1 study, a modest and reversible increase in serum creatinine was observed after treatment with INCB039110. However, a dedicated renal function study with INCB039110, assessed by iohexol plasma clearance, conducted in healthy volunteers indicated no change in GFR. In vitro studies were therefore conducted to investigate the interaction of INCB039110 with five transporters that are likely involved in the renal clearance of creatinine. Cell systems expressing individual or multiple transporters were used, including a novel quintuple-transporter model OAT2/OCT2/OCT3/MATE1/MATE2-K. INCB039110 potently inhibited OCT2-mediated uptake of creatinine as well as MATE1-/MATE2-K-mediated efflux of creatinine. Given the interactions of INCB039110 with multiple transporters affecting creatinine uptake and efflux, an integrated system expressing all five transporters was sought; in that system, INCB039110 caused a dose-dependent decrease in transcellular transport of creatinine with weaker net inhibition compared with the effects on individual transporters. In summary, a molecular mechanism for the increase in serum creatinine by INCB039110 has been established. These studies also underline the limitations of using serum creatinine as a marker of renal function. PMID:25605813

  1. Effect of urea and urea-gamma treatments on cellulose degradation of Thai rice straw and corn stalk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banchorndhevakul, Siriwattana

    2002-08-01

    Cellulose degradation of 20% urea treated and 20% urea-10 kGy gamma treated Thai rice straw and corn stalk showed that combination effect of urea and gamma radiation gave a higher % decrease in neutral detergent fiber (NDF), acid detergent fiber (ADF), acid detergent lignin (ADL), cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin and cutin in comparison with urea effect only for both room temperature storage and room temperature +258 K storage. The results also indicated that cellulose degradation proceeded with time, even at 258 K. A drastic drop to less than half of the original contents in NDF, ADF, and ADL could not be obtained in this study.

  2. Renal clearance of uric acid is linked to insulin resistance and lower excretion of sodium in gout patients.

    PubMed

    Perez-Ruiz, Fernando; Aniel-Quiroga, Maria Angeles; Herrero-Beites, Ana María; Chinchilla, Sandra Pamela; Erauskin, Gorka Garcia; Merriman, Toni

    2015-09-01

    Inefficient renal excretion of uric acid is the main pathophysiological mechanism for hyperuricemia in gout patients. Polymorphisms of renal tubular transporters linked with sodium and monosaccharide transport have yet to be demonstrated. We intended to evaluate the impact of insulin resistance, evaluated with the homeostasis model assessment (HOMA), through a transversal study of non-diabetic patients with gout, with normal renal function, not treated with any medication but colchicine as prophylaxis. One hundred and thirty-three patients were evaluated. Clearance of uric acid was inversely correlated with insulin resistance and directly correlated with fractional excretion of sodium. In multivariate analysis, hypertension and hyperlipidemia, in addition to insulin resistance and fractional excretion of sodium, were associated with renal clearance of uric acid. HOMA cutoff for efficient versus inefficient renal handling of uric acid was 2.72, close to that observed in studies of reference population. The impact of insulin resistance and renal handling of sodium on renal clearance of uric acid may help to explain why hyperuricemia is more commonly associated with diabetes and hypertension. PMID:25763991

  3. Ab initio studies on the photophysics of uric acid and its monohydrates: role of the water molecule.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Shohei; Urashima, Shu-hei; Saigusa, Hiroyuki; Taketsugu, Tetsuya

    2014-02-13

    The photophysical behavior of three lowest-energy tautomers of uric acid and seven most stable isomers of uric acid monohydrate is comprehensively studied by ab initio calculations. Ground-state energies are calculated with the CCSD(T) method, while excitation and ionization energies as well as excited-state potential energy profiles of photoinduced processes are calculated with the CC2 method. For the (1)??* state, it is found that the excitation energy of the monohydrate cluster is significantly lower than that of isolated uric acid when the water molecule is hydrogen-bonded at a specific carbonyl group. The calculated excited-state potential energy profiles suggest that some monohydrate isomers can undergo a migration of the water molecule from one site to another site in the (1)??* state with a small energy barrier. It is also found for both uric acid and its monohydrate that nonradiative decay via the NH bond dissociation in the (1)??* state is likely to occur at higher excitation energies. On the basis of the computational results, possible mechanisms for the absence of specific isomers of uric acid monohydrate from the resonant two-photon ionization spectrum are discussed. PMID:24446809

  4. Quantitative detection of uric acid by electrochemical-surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy using a multilayered Au/Ag substrate.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lili; Blackburn, Jonathan; Brosseau, Christa L

    2015-01-01

    Uric acid is a potential important biomarker in urine and serum samples for early diagnosis of preeclampsia, a life-threatening hypertensive disorder that occurs during pregnancy. Preeclampsia is a leading cause of maternal death, especially in developing nation settings. Quantitative detection of uric acid for rapid and routine diagnosis of early preeclampsia using electrochemical-surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (EC-SERS) is presented herein. A uniform EC-SERS active Au/Ag substrate was developed by depositing nearly monodisperse gold and silver nanoparticles on the carbon working electrode surface of screen printed electrodes. The multilayered Au/Ag substrates were characterized by electron microscopy and used for quantitative detection of uric acid in 0.1 M NaF and synthetic urine at clinically relevant concentrations. These results showed a linear relationship between the EC-SERS signal intensity and the uric acid concentration. Relative errors calculated for selected concentrations were all within the Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments (CLIA) criterion for uric acid analysis (±17%). It is believed that routine and early diagnosis of disease could be possible through such quantitative detection of biomarkers in patient samples using this EC-SERS method. PMID:25483146

  5. Lessons from comparative physiology: could uric acid represent a physiologic alarm signal gone awry in western society?

    PubMed Central

    Sautin, Yuri Y.; Oliver, William J.; Roncal, Carlos; Mu, Wei; Sanchez-Lozada, L. Gabriela; Rodriguez-Iturbe, Bernardo; Nakagawa, Takahiko; Benner, Steven A.

    2009-01-01

    Uric acid has historically been viewed as a purine metabolic waste product excreted by the kidney and gut that is relatively unimportant other than its penchant to crystallize in joints to cause the disease gout. In recent years, however, there has been the realization that uric acid is not biologically inert but may have a wide range of actions, including being both a pro- and anti-oxidant, a neurostimulant, and an inducer of inflammation and activator of the innate immune response. In this paper, we present the hypothesis that uric acid has a key role in the foraging response associated with starvation and fasting. We further suggest that there is a complex interplay between fructose, uric acid and vitamin C, with fructose and uric acid stimulating the foraging response and vitamin C countering this response. Finally, we suggest that the mutations in ascorbate synthesis and uricase that characterized early primate evolution were likely in response to the need to stimulate the foraging “survival” response and might have inadvertently had a role in accelerating the development of bipedal locomotion and intellectual development. Unfortunately, due to marked changes in the diet, resulting in dramatic increases in fructose- and purine-rich foods, these identical genotypic changes may be largely responsible for the epidemic of obesity, diabetes and cardiovascular disease in today’s society. PMID:18649082

  6. Serum creatinine level, a surrogate of muscle mass, predicts mortality in critically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    Thongprayoon, Charat; Cheungpasitporn, Wisit

    2016-01-01

    Serum creatinine (SCr) has been widely used to estimate glomerular filtration rate (GFR). Creatinine generation could be reduced in the setting of low skeletal muscle mass. Thus, SCr has also been used as a surrogate of muscle mass. Low muscle mass is associated with reduced survival in hospitalized patients, especially in the intensive care unit (ICU) settings. Recently, studies have demonstrated high mortality in ICU patients with low admission SCr levels, reflecting that low muscle mass or malnutrition, are associated with increased mortality. However, SCr levels can also be influenced by multiple GFR- and non-GFR-related factors including age, diet, exercise, stress, pregnancy, and kidney disease. Imaging techniques, such as computed tomography (CT) and ultrasound, have recently been studied for muscle mass assessment and demonstrated promising data. This article aims to present the perspectives of the uses of SCr and other methods for prediction of muscle mass and outcomes of ICU patients. PMID:27162688

  7. Serum creatinine level, a surrogate of muscle mass, predicts mortality in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Thongprayoon, Charat; Cheungpasitporn, Wisit; Kashani, Kianoush

    2016-05-01

    Serum creatinine (SCr) has been widely used to estimate glomerular filtration rate (GFR). Creatinine generation could be reduced in the setting of low skeletal muscle mass. Thus, SCr has also been used as a surrogate of muscle mass. Low muscle mass is associated with reduced survival in hospitalized patients, especially in the intensive care unit (ICU) settings. Recently, studies have demonstrated high mortality in ICU patients with low admission SCr levels, reflecting that low muscle mass or malnutrition, are associated with increased mortality. However, SCr levels can also be influenced by multiple GFR- and non-GFR-related factors including age, diet, exercise, stress, pregnancy, and kidney disease. Imaging techniques, such as computed tomography (CT) and ultrasound, have recently been studied for muscle mass assessment and demonstrated promising data. This article aims to present the perspectives of the uses of SCr and other methods for prediction of muscle mass and outcomes of ICU patients. PMID:27162688

  8. Optimization of pH values to formulate the bireagent kit for serum uric acid assay.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ya; Chen, Yuanxiang; Yang, Xiaolan; Zhao, Hua; Hu, Xiaolei; Pu, Jun; Liao, Juan; Long, Gaobo; Liao, Fei

    2015-01-01

    A new formulation of the bireagent kit for serum uric acid assay was developed based on the effects of pH on enzyme stability. At 4 °C, half-lives of uricases from Bacillus fastidious and Arthrobacter globiforms were longer than 15 months at pH 9.2, but became shorter at pH below 8.0; half-lives of ascorbate oxidase and peroxidase were comparable at pH 6.5 and 7.0, but became much shorter at pH higher than 7.4. In the new formulation of the bireagent kit, Reagent A contained peroxidase, 4-aminoantipyrine, and ascorbate oxidase in 50 mM phosphate buffer at pH 6.5; Reagent B contained B. fastidious or A. globiforms uricase in 50 mM sodium borate buffer at pH 9.2; Reagents A and B were mixed at 4:1 to produce a final pH from 7.2 to 7.6 for developing a stable color. The new bireagent kit consumed smaller quantities of three enzymes for the same shelf life. With the new bireagent kit, there were linear responses of absorbance at 546 nm to uric acid up to 34 mM in reaction mixtures and a good correlation of uric acid levels in clinical sera with those by a commercial kit, but stronger resistance to ascorbate. Therefore, the new formulation was advantageous. PMID:24673428

  9. Real-time in vivo uric acid biosensor system for biophysical monitoring of birds.

    PubMed

    Gumus, A; Lee, S; Karlsson, K; Gabrielson, R; Winkler, D W; Erickson, D

    2014-02-21

    Research on birds has long played an important role in ecological investigations, as birds are relatively easily observed, and their high metabolic rates and diurnal habits make them quite evidently responsive to changes in their environments. A mechanistic understanding of such avian responses requires a better understanding of how variation in physiological state conditions avian behavior and integrates the effects of recent environmental changes. There is a great need for sensor systems that will allow free-flying birds to interact with their environment and make unconstrained decisions about their spatial location at the same time that their physiological state is being monitored in real time. We have developed a miniature needle-based enzymatic sensor system suitable for continuous real-time amperometric monitoring of uric acid levels in unconstrained live birds. The sensor system was constructed with Pt/Ir wire and Ag/AgCl paste. Uricase enzyme was immobilized on a 0.7 mm sensing cavity of Nafion/cellulose inner membrane to minimize the influences of background interferents. The sensor response was linear from 0.05 to 0.6 mM uric acid, which spans the normal physiological range for most avian species. We developed a two-electrode potentiostat system that drives the biosensor, reads the output current, and wirelessly transmits the data. In addition to extensive characterization of the sensor and system, we also demonstrate autonomous operation of the system by collecting in vivo extracellular uric acid measurements on a domestic chicken. The results confirm our needle-type sensor system's potential for real-time monitoring of birds' physiological state. Successful application of the sensor in migratory birds could open up a new era of studying both the physiological preparation for migration and the consequences of sustained avian flight. PMID:24326318

  10. A comparison of CKD-EPI estimated glomerular filtration rate and measured creatinine clearance in recently admitted critically ill patients with normal plasma creatinine concentrations

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD-EPI) estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) has been widely integrated into clinical practice. Although useful in screening for CKD, its’ application in critically ill patients with normal plasma creatinine concentrations remains uncertain. The aim of this study was to assess the performance of CKD-EPI eGFR in comparison to creatinine clearance (CLCR) in this setting. Methods This prospective observational study was performed in a tertiary level, university affiliated intensive care unit (ICU). Study participants had to have an expected ICU length of stay > 24 hours, a plasma creatinine concentration < 121 μmol/L, and no history of prior renal replacement therapy or CKD. CKD-EPI eGFR was compared against 8-hour measured urinary CLCR. Data capture occurred within 48 hours of admission. Results One hundred and ten patients (n = 110) were enrolled in the study. 63.6% were male, the mean age was 50.9 (16.9) years, 57.3% received invasive mechanical ventilation, and 30% required vasopressor support. The mean CLCR was 125 (45.1) ml/min/1.73 m2, compared to a CKD-EPI eGFR of 101 (23.7) ml/min/1.73 m2 (P < 0.001). Moderate correlation was evident (r = 0.72), although there was significant bias and imprecision (24.4 +/− 32.5 ml/min/1.73 m2). In those patients with a CKD-EPI eGFR between 60–119 ml/min/1.73 m2 (n = 77), 41.6% displayed augmented renal clearance (CLCR ≥ 130 ml/min/1.73 m2), while 7.8% had a CLCR < 60 ml/min/1.73 m2. Conclusions These data suggest CKD-EPI eGFR and measured CLCR produce significantly disparate results when estimating renal function in this population. Clinicians should consider carefully which value they employ in clinical practice, particularly drug dose modification. PMID:24225349

  11. Elevated serum creatinine and low albumin are associated with poor outcomes in patients with liposarcoma.

    PubMed

    Panotopoulos, Joannis; Posch, Florian; Funovics, Philipp T; Willegger, Madeleine; Scharrer, Anke; Lamm, Wolfgang; Brodowicz, Thomas; Windhager, Reinhard; Ay, Cihan

    2016-03-01

    Low serum albumin levels and impaired kidney function have been associated with decreased survival in patients with a variety of cancer types. In a retrospective cohort study, we analyzed 84 patients with liposarcoma treated at from May 1994 to October 2011. Uni- and multivariable Cox proportional hazard models and competing risk analyses were performed to evaluate the association between putative biomarkers with disease-specific and overall survival. The median age of the study population was 51.7 (range 19.6-83.8) years. In multivariable analysis adjusted for AJCC tumor stage, serum creatinine was highly associated with disease-specific survival (Subdistribution Hazard ratio (SHR) per 1 mg/dl increase = 2.94; 95%CI 1.39-6.23; p = 0.005). High albumin was associated with improved overall and disease-specific survival (Hazard Ratio (HR) per 10 units increase = 0.50; 95%CI 0.26-0.95; p = 0.033 and SHR = 0.64; 95%CI 0.42-1.00; p = 0.049). The serum albumin-creatinine-ratio emerged to be associated with both overall and disease-specific survival after adjusting for AJCC tumor stage (HR = 0.95; 95%CI 0.92-0.99; p = 0.011 and SHR = 0.96; 95%CI 0.93-0.99; p = 0.08). Our study provides evidence for a tumor-stage-independent association between higher creatinine and lower albumin with worse disease-specific survival. Low albumin and a high albumin-creatinine-ratio independently predict poor overall survival. Our work identified novel prognostic biomarkers for prognosis of patients with liposarcoma. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:533-538, 2016. PMID:26222652

  12. Environmental Chemicals in Urine and Blood: Improving Methods for Creatinine and Lipid Adjustment

    PubMed Central

    O’Brien, Katie M.; Upson, Kristen; Cook, Nancy R.; Weinberg, Clarice R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Investigators measuring exposure biomarkers in urine typically adjust for creatinine to account for dilution-dependent sample variation in urine concentrations. Similarly, it is standard to adjust for serum lipids when measuring lipophilic chemicals in serum. However, there is controversy regarding the best approach, and existing methods may not effectively correct for measurement error. Objectives We compared adjustment methods, including novel approaches, using simulated case–control data. Methods Using a directed acyclic graph framework, we defined six causal scenarios for epidemiologic studies of environmental chemicals measured in urine or serum. The scenarios include variables known to influence creatinine (e.g., age and hydration) or serum lipid levels (e.g., body mass index and recent fat intake). Over a range of true effect sizes, we analyzed each scenario using seven adjustment approaches and estimated the corresponding bias and confidence interval coverage across 1,000 simulated studies. Results For urinary biomarker measurements, our novel method, which incorporates both covariate-adjusted standardization and the inclusion of creatinine as a covariate in the regression model, had low bias and possessed 95% confidence interval coverage of nearly 95% for most simulated scenarios. For serum biomarker measurements, a similar approach involving standardization plus serum lipid level adjustment generally performed well. Conclusions To control measurement error bias caused by variations in serum lipids or by urinary diluteness, we recommend improved methods for standardizing exposure concentrations across individuals. Citation O’Brien KM, Upson K, Cook NR, Weinberg CR. 2016. Environmental chemicals in urine and blood: improving methods for creatinine and lipid adjustment. Environ Health Perspect 124:220–227; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1509693 PMID:26219104

  13. Ammonia and urea excretion in the tidepool sculpin (Oligocottus maculosus): sites of excretion, effects of reduced salinity and mechanisms of urea transport.

    PubMed

    Wright, P A; Part, P; Wood, C M

    1995-04-01

    Tidepool sculpins live in a variable environment where water temperature, salinity, gas tensions, and pH can change considerably with the daily tide cycle. Tidepool sculpins are primarily ammoniotelic, with 8-17% of nitrogen wastes excreted as urea. The majority of net ammonia (J(net) amm; 85%) and urea (J(net) urea; 74%) excretion occurred across the gill, with the remainder excreted across the skin, the kidney, and/or gut. Acute (2h) exposure to 50% seawater significantly increased J(net) urea (2.8-fold), but reduced J(net) amm (3.5-fold). In fish exposed to 50% seawater for 1 week, J(net) urea returned to control values, but J(net) amm remained slightly depressed. Unidirectional urea influx (J(in) urea) and efflux (J(out) urea) were measured using(14)C-urea to determine if urea was excreted across the gills by simple diffusion or by a carrier-mediated mechanism. J(in) urea increased in a linear manner with increasing urea water levels (0-11 mmol N l(-1)), while J(out) urea was independent of external urea concentrations. As well, J(net) urea and J(out inurea) were not significantly different from one another, indicating the absence of "back transport". Urea analogs and transport inhibitors added to the water did not have any consistent effect on unidirectional urea flux. These results demonstrate that ammonia and urea excretion rates and sites of excretion in tidepool sculpins are very similar to those found in other marine and freshwater teleosts. Urea and ammonia may play a role in osmoregulation as excretion rates and tissue levels were influenced by changes in water salinity. Finally, we found no evidence for a specific urea carrier; branchial urea excretion is likely dependent on simple diffusion. PMID:24197359

  14. Uric acid photo-oxidation assay: in vitro comparison of sunscreening agents.

    PubMed

    Dunlap, W C; Yamamoto, Y; Inoue, M; Kashiba-Iwatsuki, M; Yamaguchi, M; Tomita, K

    1998-02-01

    We present a new method to evaluate the photo-oxidative activity of sunscreening agents based on the photodynamic oxidation of uric acid. Uric acid was selected as the oxidant probe for its high reactivity to singlet oxygen and oxygen radicals, high sensitivity of detection using electrochemical (EC) techniques, low light absorptivity and high photochemical stability in the UVA/B region of interest, and stability to autoxidation. The method is demonstrated by the photodynamic oxidation of uric acid on co-irradiation with Rose Bengal, a highly efficient photosensitizing dye for the production of singlet oxygen (1O2). Using this assay we found that the relative photodynamic oxidation rates of UVB-absorbing sunscreens in 80% methanol on irradiation with >290 nm light decreased in the order 2-ethylhexyl 4-dimethylaminobenzoate (DMABA-2EH) > 2-ethylhexyl 4-methoxycinnamate (MCA-2EH) and the experimental sunscreens, 1-(1,1-dimethylethyl)-3-octanoyl-4,4-dimethyl- 1,4,5,6,-tetrahydropyridine (ICI-319) and 1-(2-methylpropyl)-3-propionyl-4,4-dimethyl-1,4,5,6-tetrahydropyridine (ICI-855). The relative photodynamic oxidation rates of UVA-absorbing sunscreens decreased in the order 4-tert-butyl-4'-methoxydibenzoylmethane (BMDBM) and 4-(2-propyl)benzophenone (PB) > 2-hydroxy-4'-methoxy-benzophenone (HMB) and 2,2'-dihydroxy-4-methoxybenzophenone (DHMB). We have confirmed the photodynamic activity of DMABA-2EH for the production of singlet oxygen (1O2) using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy and the reagent 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-4-piperidone (4-oxo-TEMP). We failed to detect the photodynamic production of the oxyradicals, superoxide (O2.-) and hydroxyl radical (HO.) using N-tert-butyl-a-phenylnitrone (PBN) and 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrrolidine-1-oxide (DMPO) as a result of photochemical interference caused by these spin-trapping reagents. The uric acid photo-oxidation assay was also used to compare the photodynamic reactivity of light-reflective, microfine oxides TiO2, ZnO and ZrO2 suspended in aqueous 80% methanol. All of the microfine oxides (uncoated) showed greater photodynamic reactivity in equimolar dispersion than did any of the organic UVA- and UVB-absorbing sunscreens in homogeneous solution. In this assay the photodynamic oxidation rates for the microfine oxides decreased in the order ZnO > TiO2 (anatase) > ZrO2 > TiO2 (rutile). PMID:18505485

  15. Multicommutated flow analysis system for determination of creatinine in physiological fluids by Jaffe method.

    PubMed

    Tymecki, Łukasz; Korszun, Jakub; Strzelak, Kamil; Koncki, Robert

    2013-07-17

    For the needs of photometric determination of creatinine according to Jaffe protocol a dedicated paired emitter detector diode (PEDD) detector has been developed. This PEDD device has been constructed in the compact form of flow-through cell (30 μL total volume and 7 mm optical pathlength) integrated with 505 nm LED-based emitter and 525 nm LED-based detector compatible with multicommutated flow analysis (MCFA) system. This fully mechanized MCFA system configured of microsolenoid valves and pumps is operating under microprocessor control. The developed analytical system offers determination of creatinine in the submillimolar range of concentrations with detection limit at ppm level. The throughput offered by the system operating according to multi-point fixed-time procedure for kinetic measurements is 15-40 samples per hour depending on the mode of measurements. The developed PEDD-based MCFA system has been successfully applied for the determination of creatinine in real samples of human urine as well as serum. The developed sampling unit used the system is free from effects caused by differences in sample viscosity. PMID:23830429

  16. Formation of mutagens during the frying of Hawaiian fish: correlation with creatine and creatinine content.

    PubMed

    Marsh, N L; Iwaoka, W T; Mower, H F

    1990-11-01

    Compounds mutagenic toward Salmonella typhimurium strain TA98 in the presence of rat-liver homogenates (S9) were formed when fish flesh was fried at 199 degrees C. Three species of Hawaiian fish commonly consumed in Hawaii (skipjack tuna, Katsuwonus pelamis; yellowfin tuna, Neothunnus macropterus; and milkfish, Chanos chanos) were cooked in an electric skillet, along with samples of sole (Microstomus pacificus). Organic extracts of the fish were tested in the Ames Salmonella mutagenic assay using tester strain TA98 and S9. Basic organic extracts of fried, but not raw, samples exhibited significant mutagenicity. The levels of mutagenicity were also higher among the red flesh Hawaiian fish ('ahi, aku and awa) than with the white flesh sole. Creatine and creatinine contents were highest in the Hawaiian fish and lower in the sole. Creatine levels in the fish were 50-100 times greater than the creatinine content and varied from a high of 645 mg/100 g wet weight of fish for yellowfin tuna to a low value of 251 mg/100 g for sole. Mutagen levels are only approximately related to creatine/creatinine levels suggesting that other components contained in these fish may be as important as the guanidines in determining the levels of mutagen in the cooked fish. PMID:2270090

  17. Detection of urinary estrogen conjugates and creatinine using near infrared spectroscopy in Bornean orangutans (Pongo Pygmaeus).

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, Kodzue; Kuze, Noko; Kobayashi, Toshio; Miyakawa, Etsuko; Narita, Hiromitsu; Inoue-Murayama, Miho; Idani, Gen'ichi; Tsenkova, Roumiana

    2016-01-01

    For promoting in situ conservation, it is important to estimate the density distribution of fertile individuals, and there is a need for developing an easy monitoring method to discriminate between physiological states. To date, physiological state has generally been determined by measuring hormone concentration using radioimmunoassay or enzyme immunoassay (EIA) methods. However, these methods have rarely been applied in situ because of the requirements for a large amount of reagent, instruments, and a radioactive isotope. In addition, the proper storage of the sample (including urine and feces) on site until analysis is difficult. On the other hand, near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy requires no reagent and enables rapid measurement. In the present study, we attempted urinary NIR spectroscopy to determine the estrogen levels of orangutans in Japanese zoos and in the Danum Valley Conservation Area, Sabah, Malaysia. Reflectance NIR spectra were obtained from urine stored using a filter paper. Filter paper is easy to use to store dried urine, even in the wild. Urinary estrogen and creatinine concentrations measured by EIA were used as the reference data of partial least square (PLS) regression of urinary NIR spectra. High accuracies (R(2) > 0.68) were obtained in both estrogen and creatinine regression models. In addition, the PLS regressions in both standards showed higher accuracies (R(2) > 0.70). Therefore, the present study demonstrates that urinary NIR spectra have the potential to estimate the estrogen and creatinine concentrations. PMID:26561334

  18. [Amylase/creatinine clearance in the differential diagnosis of acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Gonzlez Espinoza, G; Garca Garduo, J R; Esquivel Lpez, A; Gutirrez Samperio, C

    1978-01-01

    In the Department of Gastroenterology of "El Centro Mdico La Raza, I.M.S.S.", three groups of 20 patients were studied: group I with acute pancreatitis; group II with acute abdomen without pancreatic pathology, in both groups the diagnosis was demonstrated surgically or in necropsy; group III was formed by 20 normal voluntary persons, and served as control. A 4 per cent amilase/creatinine clearence index was considered as a high normal value. The diagnosis accuracy in group I was 90 per cent. In group II there was five false positive results, in 80 per cent of the cases the results of the amilase/creatinine clearence index was found within normal limits. The difference between group I and group III was significant (P less than 0.002). The difference between group I and group II was also significant (P less than 0.05). There was no significant difference between group II and group III. The amilase/creatinine clearence index has the advantage that it can be obtained with only one blood and urine samples taken simultaneously. We concluded that amilase/creatine clearence index is useful for the differential diagnosis in acute pancreatitis and that is probably due to an alteration in the tubular renal reabsorption. PMID:704529

  19. Genome-Wide Association Study of Serum Creatinine Levels during Vancomycin Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Van Driest, Sara L.; McGregor, Tracy L.; Velez Edwards, Digna R.; Saville, Ben R.; Kitchner, Terrie E.; Hebbring, Scott J.; Brilliant, Murray; Jouni, Hayan; Kullo, Iftikhar J.; Creech, C. Buddy; Kannankeril, Prince J.; Vear, Susan I.; Brothers, Kyle B.; Bowton, Erica A.; Shaffer, Christian M.; Patel, Neelam; Delaney, Jessica T.; Bradford, Yuki; Wilson, Sarah; Olson, Lana M.; Crawford, Dana C.; Potts, Amy L.; Ho, Richard H.; Roden, Dan M.; Denny, Josh C.

    2015-01-01

    Vancomycin, a commonly used antibiotic, can be nephrotoxic. Known risk factors such as age, creatinine clearance, vancomycin dose / dosing interval, and concurrent nephrotoxic medications fail to accurately predict nephrotoxicity. To identify potential genomic risk factors, we performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of serum creatinine levels while on vancomycin in 489 European American individuals and validated findings in three independent cohorts totaling 439 European American individuals. In primary analyses, the chromosome 6q22.31 locus was associated with increased serum creatinine levels while on vancomycin therapy (most significant variant rs2789047, risk allele A, β = -0.06, p = 1.1 x 10-7). SNPs in this region had consistent directions of effect in the validation cohorts, with a meta-p of 1.1 x 10-7. Variation in this region on chromosome 6, which includes the genes TBC1D32/C6orf170 and GJA1 (encoding connexin43), may modulate risk of vancomycin-induced kidney injury. PMID:26030142

  20. Urinary Protein Creatinine Ratio in Normal Zero to Three-Day-Old Indian Neonates

    PubMed Central

    Shivankur, Varun; Kumar, Manoj

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Early neonates (1-7-day-old) may develop acute kidney injury or acute renal failure due to functional (pre-renal, may be caused by decreased renal perfusion), intrinsic (renal, may be caused by acute insult), or obstructive (due to anatomic urinary tract obstruction) causes. Urinary protein estimation is important for diagnosis, follow-up and prognosis of disease. The Protein Creatinine Ratio (PCR) has been successfully used to establish proteinuria in different types of patients. Aim This study was undertaken to establish normal PCR range in neonates, to rule out abnormal protein excretion in sick neonates. Materials and Methods A total of 37 normal early neonates of age 0-3 days were enrolled for this study. Random spot urine samples were collected in paediatric urine bags for protein and creatinine estimation. Results The urinary PCR varied between 0.1-0.8. The range of PCR values obtained was greater in 0-1 day old infants, compared to infants older than one day. Changes in PCR values were due to variations in the creatinine excretion. Conclusion Urinary PCR values ≤ 0.8 indicate normal protein excretion. However, reference intervals of PCR should be established for narrow age groups in case of early neonates, e.g. 0-6h, 6-12h, 12-24h, 24-72h old babies. PMID:27134859

  1. Blood pressure and creatinine clearance in lead-exposed children: the effect of treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Friedlander, M.A.; Brooks, C.T.; Sheehe, P.R.

    1981-01-01

    The authors speculated that normal growth might cause the release of stored lead in children, providing an endogenous source of exposure for years after the acute toxic episode had resolved. The purpose of this study was to answer the following two questions: (1) is a chelation-responsive lead burden present 2 to 5 yr after therapy for acute poisoning; and (2) does blood pressure or creatinine clearance correlate with body lead burden, as demonstrated by chelation. Thirty-eight children who had undergone ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid mobilization testing at least one time during the course of treatment in a lead clinic returned for follow-up care within 2-5 yr. All were asymptomatic. To determine the current level of body lead burden, a single-dose oral chelation with penicillamine was performed. Blood pressure and creatinine clearences were measured. From the data obtained for each child, we generated a geometric ''area'' representing the magnitude of lead burden integrated over the length of carriage of this burden. Multiple regression analysis indicated that after adjustment for the background variables of age, sex, height, and weight, none of the three parameters-mobilization ratio ''area,'' blood lead level, or FEP level-was a significant contributor to the variation observed in the blood pressures or creatinine clearances of the 38 lead-exposed children (P>.05).

  2. Regulation of urea production by glucose infusion in vivo.

    PubMed

    Jahoor, F; Wolfe, R R

    1987-11-01

    We have investigated the acute in vivo regulation of urea production in normal postabsorptive volunteers by administering a primed constant infusion of 15N2-urea to measure urea production during the constant intravenous infusion of equivalent molar quantities of exogenous nitrogen, given as alanine or glutamine, either with or without a simultaneous infusion of glucose at 4 mg.kg-.min-1. These responses were compared with the response to the infusion of glucose alone. Both amino acid infusions elicited significant (P less than 0.05) and identical (26%) increases in urea production over 4 h. When the glucose infusion was added to the amino acid infusions, urea production remained constant, despite the comparable increases in plasma total nonessential amino nitrogen, as were observed with the amino acid infusions alone. Glucose infused alone elicited a significant (P less than 0.05) reduction (18%) in urea production but no corresponding change in plasma total amino nitrogen. We conclude that 1) infused glucose or its hormonal response suppresses urea production by blunting the normal hepatic ureagenic response to a fixed nitrogen load, 2) this suppressive effect is not mediated via a reduction in substrate (nitrogen) supply, and 3) the inhibition of hepatic gluconeogenesis from amino acids represents one component of this suppressive effect, and direct suppression of urea cycle activity probably represents another component. PMID:3688224

  3. Measuring urea persistence, distribution and transport on coastal plain soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The persistence and mobility of urea, an organic form of nitrogen present in animal manures and commercial fertilizers, has rarely been studied and measured, because it is assumed to undergo rapid hydrolysis to ammonia. However, preliminary studies have shown urea to exist in leachate and runoff sev...

  4. 40 CFR 721.9925 - Aminoethylethylene urea methacrylamide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Aminoethylethylene urea methacrylamide... Substances § 721.9925 Aminoethylethylene urea methacrylamide. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as an aminoethylethylene...

  5. Urea kinetics in neonates receiving total parenteral nutrition.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, R A; Griffiths, D M; Jackson, A A

    1993-07-01

    Urea kinetics were measured on 10 occasions in eight neonates who had not received an oral intake from birth and were maintained on total parenteral nutrition. After a prime/intermittent oral dose of 15N15N-urea over 14 hours urine was collected every three to four hours, urea isolated, and kinetics determined from the plateau level of enrichment in urea, measured by isotope ratio mass spectrometry. The total parenteral nutrition provided 393 kJ (94 kcal)/kg/day and 360 mg nitrogen/kg/day. Urea production was mean (SD) 84 (44) mg nitrogen/kg/day, or 50% of intake. Urinary excretion of urea, 39 (16) mg nitrogen/kg/day, was 40% of production. Therefore 54% of urea production was salvaged through the lower bowel, 45 (35) mg nitrogen/kg/day. It is concluded that even in infants who have never had a regular dietary intake the microflora of the lower bowel is sufficiently developed to salvage urea nitrogen for further metabolic interaction, however it is not clear whether the rate of salvage is adequate to satisfy the metabolic demand. PMID:8346947

  6. Molecular Basis of the Apparent Near Ideality of Urea Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Kokubo, Hironori; Rsgen, Jrg; Bolen, D. Wayne; Pettitt, B. Montgomery

    2007-01-01

    Activity coefficients of urea solutions are calculated to explore the mechanism of its solution properties, which form the basis for its well-known use as a strong protein denaturant. We perform free energy simulations of urea solutions in different urea concentrations using two urea models (OPLS and KBFF models) to calculate and decompose the activity coefficients. For the case of urea, we clarify the concept of the ideal solution in different concentration scales and standard states and its effect on our subsequent analysis. The analytical form of activity coefficients depends on the concentration units and standard states. For both models studied, urea displays a weak concentration dependence for excess chemical potential. However, for the OPLS force-field model, this results from contributions that are independent of concentration to the van der Waals and electrostatic components whereas for the KBFF model those components are nontrivial but oppose each other. The strong ideality of urea solutions in some concentration scales (incidentally implying a lack of water perturbation) is discussed in terms of recent data and ideas on the mechanism of urea denaturation of proteins. PMID:17693466

  7. 75 FR 74746 - Solid Urea From Russia and Ukraine

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-01

    ... from Russia and Ukraine (64 FR 62653). Following second five-year reviews by Commerce and the... imports of solid urea from Russia and Ukraine (71 FR 581). The Commission is now conducting third reviews... COMMISSION Solid Urea From Russia and Ukraine AGENCY: United States International Trade Commission....

  8. Structure and permeation mechanism of a mammalian urea transporter

    SciTech Connect

    Levin, Elena J.; Cao, Yu; Enkavi, Giray; Quick, Matthias; Pan, Yaping; Tajkhorshid, Emad; Zhou, Ming

    2012-09-17

    As an adaptation to infrequent access to water, terrestrial mammals produce urine that is hyperosmotic to plasma. To prevent osmotic diuresis by the large quantity of urea generated by protein catabolism, the kidney epithelia contain facilitative urea transporters (UTs) that allow rapid equilibration between the urinary space and the hyperosmotic interstitium. Here we report the first X-ray crystal structure of a mammalian UT, UT-B, at a resolution of 2.36 {angstrom}. UT-B is a homotrimer and each protomer contains a urea conduction pore with a narrow selectivity filter. Structural analyses and molecular dynamics simulations showed that the selectivity filter has two urea binding sites separated by an approximately 5.0 kcal/mol energy barrier. Functional studies showed that the rate of urea conduction in UT-B is increased by hypoosmotic stress, and that the site of osmoregulation coincides with the location of the energy barrier.

  9. Postmortem Blood Sugar and Blood Urea Nitrogen Determinations

    PubMed Central

    Fekete, John F.; Kerenyi, Norbert A.

    1965-01-01

    Glucose and urea nitrogen determinations were made on blood and cerebrospinal fluid samples collected during 160 postmortem examinations in order to determine the usefulness of such tests in diagnosing diabetes and uremia at the time of autopsy. The results indicated that: (1) Blood is unsuitable for postmortem glucose determination, and no postmortem normal can be established. (2) Cerebrospinal fluid gave more uniform but very low glucose values. (3) Diabetics as a group had very high postmortem glucose levels but showed a marked overlap with non-diabetics. (4) Infants less than 3 months of age showed high postmortem glucose values. (5) Postmortem blood urea nitrogen and cerebrospinal fluid urea nitrogen levels were within normal limits in previously healthy persons who died suddenly from accidental causes. (6) Hospital autopsy cases had high urea nitrogen levels. (7) Postmortem urea nitrogen levels higher than 100 mg.% were indicative of uremia. PMID:14285288

  10. Utility of saliva as a sample to assess renal function and estimated glomerular filtration rate.

    PubMed

    Yajamanam, Naresh; Vinapamula, Kiranmayi S; Sivakumar, V; Bitla, Aparna R; Rao, P V L N Srinivasa

    2016-01-01

    Diagnosis of renal diseases by assessing renal parameters in saliva. Biochemical investigations using serum form important component of monitoring patients with renal disease. Utility of saliva, in diagnosis and monitoring of patients with renal disease and for calculation of estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), was studied. Sixty patients with renal disease and sixty ageand sex-matched healthy controls were studied. Urea, creatinine, sodium, potassium, uric acid, calcium, and phosphorus were measured in both serum and saliva. eGFR was calculated using salivary creatinine. Data were expressed as mean ± standard deviation. Comparison and correlation between groups were assessed by Student's t-test and Pearson correlation, respectively. Bland-Altman plot, mountain plot, and intra-class correlation coefficient were used to test agreement. A P <0.05 was considered statistically significant. Statistical analysis was done using Microsoft excel spreadsheets, Medcalc Version 10.0, and SPSS version 11.5. Salivary levels of urea, creatinine, uric acid, sodium, potassium, and phosphorus were higher in patients compared to controls. Potassium and phosphorus levels were higher (P = 0.001) and creatinine, sodium, calcium, and uric acid levels were lower (P = 0.001) in saliva compared to serum in both patients and controls. Positive correlation was observed between serum and salivary urea and creatinine (P < 0.0001). eGFR values calculated from salivary creatinine showed good agreement with those calculated form serum creatinine. Salivary urea (>6 mmol/L) and creatinine (>14.6 μmol/L) and eGFR calculated from salivary creatinine can be used to identify patients with renal disease. PMID:26997384

  11. Identification of a Proteinaceous Component in the Leaf of Moringa Oleifera lam. with Effects on High Serum Creatinine

    PubMed Central

    Sahoo, S.; Raghavendra, K. M.; Biswas, S.

    2014-01-01

    Moringa oleifera Lam. has been an important plant in the history of mankind, both for its nutritional and medicinal uses. Apart from bactericidal effects, the parts of this plant have been effectively used in the treatment of circulatory, respiratory, endocrine, digestive as well as neural disorders. Till date, though, there has been no reported activity of the involvement of any proteinaceous extract from M. oleifera on high levels of serum creatinine. To address this issue, blood samples with high levels of serum creatinine (2 mg/dl and above) were treated with leaf extract from M. oleifera. The crude extract was partially purified initially and eventually purified to completion as well. All these proteinaceous fractions were used to treat samples with high levels of serum creatinine as mentioned above. While the treatment of serum sample having high creatinine with crude extract and partially purified protein fractions showed a decrease of approximately 20% in the levels of serum creatinine over a period of 24 h, the samples treated with purified protein fraction reduced the serum creatinine level by 50%. In light of the fact that increased level of serum creatinine levels have adverse downstream effects on the heart, lungs and other organs, this communication assumes significance because it suggests a way of reducing the level of serum creatinine as an emergency measure. Further, the identification and characterisation of this proteinaceous component and possible in vivo experiments would provide a major tool for the treatment of downstream complications associated with increased serum creatinine via a new sources, albeit a natural one. PMID:24799742

  12. Early-onset metabolic syndrome in mice lacking the intestinal uric acid transporter SLC2A9

    PubMed Central

    DeBosch, Brian J.; Kluth, Oliver; Fujiwara, Hideji; Schürmann, Annette; Moley, Kelle

    2015-01-01

    Excess circulating uric acid, a product of hepatic glycolysis and purine metabolism, often accompanies metabolic syndrome. However, whether hyperuricemia contributes to development of metabolic syndrome or is merely a by-product of other processes that cause this disorder has not been resolved. Additionally, how uric acid is cleared from the circulation is incompletely understood. Here, we present a genetic model of spontaneous, early-onset metabolic syndrome in mice lacking the enterocyte urate transporter Glut9 (encoded by the SLC2A9 gene). Glut9-deficient mice develop impaired enterocyte uric acid transport kinetics, hyperuricemia, hyperuricosuria, spontaneous hypertension, dyslipidemia, and elevated body fat. Allopurinol, a xanthine oxidase inhibitor, can reverse the hypertension and hypercholesterolemia. These data provide evidence that hyperuricemia per se could have deleterious metabolic sequelae. Moreover, these findings suggest that enterocytes may regulate whole-body metabolism, and that enterocyte urate metabolism could potentially be targeted to modulate or prevent metabolic syndrome. PMID:25100214

  13. Fasting Urinary Calcium-to-Creatinine and Oxalate-to-Creatinine Ratios in Dogs with Calcium Oxalate Urolithiasis and Breed-Matched Controls

    PubMed Central

    Furrow, E.; Patterson, E.E.; Armstrong, P.J.; Osborne, C.A.; Lulich, J.P.

    2015-01-01

    Background Hypercalciuria and hyperoxaluria are risk factors for calcium oxalate (CaOx) urolithiasis, but breed-specific reports of urinary metabolites and their relationship with stone status are lacking. Objective To compare urinary metabolites (calcium and oxalate) and blood ionized calcium (iCa) concentrations between CaOx stone formers and breed-matched stone-free controls for the Miniature Schnauzer, Bichon Frise, and Shih Tzu breeds. Animals Forty-seven Miniature Schnauzers (23 cases and 24 controls), 27 Bichons Frise (14 cases and 13 controls), and 15 Shih Tzus (7 cases and 8 controls). Methods Prospective study. Fasting spot urinary calcium-to-creatinine and oxalate-to-creatinine ratios (UCa/Cr and UOx/Cr, respectively) and blood iCa concentrations were measured and compared between cases and controls within and across breeds. Regression models were used to test the effect of patient and environmental factors on these variables. Results UCa/Cr was higher in cases than controls for each of the 3 breeds. In addition to stone status, being on a therapeutic food designed to prevent CaOx stone recurrence was associated with higher UCa/Cr. UOx/Cr did not differ between cases and controls for any of the breeds. Blood iCa was higher in cases than controls in the Miniature Schnauzer and Bichon Frise breeds and had a moderate correlation with UCa/Cr. Conclusions and Clinical Importance Hypercalciuria is associated with CaOx stone status in the Miniature Schnauzer, Bichon Frise, and Shih Tzu breeds. UOx/Cr did not correlate with stone status in these 3 breeds. These findings may influence breed-specific stone prevention recommendations. PMID:25581880

  14. Performance of Creatinine-Based GFR Estimating Equations in Solid Organ Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Shaffi, Saeed Kamran; Uhlig, Katrin; Perrone, Ronald D.; Ruthazer, Robin; Rule, Andrew; Lieske, John C.; Navis, Gerjan; Poggio, Emilio D.; Inker, Lesley A.; Levey, Andrew S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Accurate assessment of kidney function is important for management of solid organ transplant recipients. In other clinical populations, glomerular filtration rate (GFR) is most commonly estimated using the CKD-EPI (Chronic Kidney Disease–Epidemiology Collaboration) creatinine or the 4-variable MDRD (Modification of Diet in Renal Disease) Study equation. The accuracy of these equations compared to other GFR estimating equations in transplant recipients has not been carefully studied. Study Design Diagnostic test study. Setting & Participants Solid organ transplant recipients >6 months post-transplantation from 5 clinical populations [N=3,622, including recipients of kidney (53%), liver (35%) and other or multiple organs (12%)] Index Test Estimated GFR (eGFR) using creatinine-based GFR estimating equations identified from a systematic review of the literature. Performance of the CKD-EPI creatinine and MDRD Study equations was compared to alternative equations. Reference Test Measured GFR (mGFR) from urinary clearance of iothalamate or plasma clearance of iohexol. Measurements Error (difference between the mGFR and eGFR) expressed as P30 (proportion of absolute percent error <30%) and mean absolute error. Results We identified 26 GFR estimating equations. Mean mGFR was 55.1 ± 22.7 (SD) ml/min/1.73 m2. P30 and mean absolute error for the CKD-EPI and MDRD Study equations were 78.9% (99.6% CI, 76.9%–80.8%) for both and 10.6 (99.6% CI, 10.1–11.1) vs. 11.0 (99.6% CI, 10.5–11.5) ml/min/1.73 m2, respectively; these equations were more accurate than any of the alternative equations (p<0.001 for all pair-wise comparisons for both measures). They performed better than or as well as the alternative equations in most subgroups defined by demographic and clinical characteristics, including the type of transplanted organ. Limitations Study population included few non-whites and people with solid organ transplants other than liver and kidneys. Conclusions The CKD-EPI creatinine and MDRD Study equations perform better than the alternative creatinine-based estimating equations in solid organ transplant recipients. They can be used for clinical management. PMID:24703720

  15. Exogenous thyrotropin improves renal function in euthyroid patients, while serum creatinine levels are increased in hypothyroidism

    PubMed Central

    Duranton, Flore; Lacoste, Anouchka; Faurous, Patrick; Deshayes, Emmanuel; Ribstein, Jean; Avignon, Antoine; Mourad, Georges; Argilés, Àngel

    2013-01-01

    Background There is evidence showing that the hypothyroid state results in increased serum creatinine levels. However, whether this is only due to the peripheral thyroid hormones or if thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) is also involved is not known. Methods Serum creatinine levels and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) were assessed in thyroidectomized patients with varying thyroid hormones and TSH levels. Blood samples from Group 1 (21 patients) were obtained 1 month after complete thyroidectomy, while under a hypothyroid state (t1) and a sufficient time after thyroid hormones initiation (euthyroid state, t2). Group 2 (20 euthyroid patients) were sampled after recombinant human thyrotropin injections (rhTSH, t1) and later after rhTSH extinction (t2). Results In Group 1, serum creatinine levels decreased after correction of hypothyroidism (85.3 ± 4.3 versus 78.0 ± 3.9 µmol/L; P = 0.04). In Group 2, serum creatinine levels increased after rhTSH withdrawal (70.6 ± 5.7 µmol/L versus 76.5 ± 5.8 µmol/L; P = 0.007). Between t1 and t2, eGFR varied accordingly [Group 1, 71.7 ± 3.5 versus 81.2 ± 4.5 mL/min/1.73 m² (P = 0.02); Group 2, 97.7 ± 7.4 versus 87.5 ± 5.9 (P = 0.007)]. The changes in TSH and eGFR following supplementation with thyroxine were significantly correlated (r = −0.6, P = 0.0041). Conclusions Iatrogenic hypothyroidism significantly increases serum creatinine and reversibly impairs eGFR, while treatment with rhTSH enhances renal function in euthyroid patients, supporting the existence of an influence of TSH level on renal function. The mechanisms by which peripheral thyroid hormones and TSH influence GFR need to be identified in physiology-orientated studies. PMID:26064512

  16. Effects of slow-release urea and rumen-protected methionine and histidine on performance of dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Giallongo, F; Hristov, A N; Oh, J; Frederick, T; Weeks, H; Werner, J; Lapierre, H; Patton, R A; Gehman, A; Parys, C

    2015-05-01

    This experiment was conducted with the objective to investigate the effects of slow-release urea and rumen-protected (RP) Met and His supplementation of a metabolizable protein (MP)-deficient diet (according to NRC, 2001) on lactation performance of dairy cows. Sixty lactating Holstein cows were used in a 10-wk randomized complete block-design trial. Cows were fed a covariate diet for 2 wk and then assigned to one of the following treatments for an 8-wk experimental period: (1) MP-adequate diet [AMP; 107% of MP requirements, based on the National Research Council (NRC, 2001)]; (2) MP-deficient diet (DMP; 95% of MP requirements); (3) DMP supplemented with slow-release urea (DMPU); (4) DMPU supplemented with RPMet (DMPUM); and (5) DMPUM supplemented with RPHis (DMPUMH). Total-tract apparent digestibility of dry matter, organic matter, neutral detergent fiber, and crude protein, and urinary N and urea-N excretions were decreased by DMP, compared with AMP. Addition of slow-release urea to the DMP diet increased urinary urea-N excretion. Dry matter intake (DMI) and milk yield (on average 44.0±0.9kg/d) were not affected by treatments, except DMPUMH increased DMI and numerically increased milk yield, compared with DMPUM. Milk true protein concentration and yield were increased and milk fat concentration tended to be decreased by DMPUMH, compared with DMPUM. Cows gained less body weight on the DMP diet, compared with AMP. Plasma concentrations of His and Lys were not affected by treatments, whereas supplementation of RPMet increased plasma Met concentration. Plasma concentration of 3-methylhistidine was or tended to be higher for DMP compared with AMP and DMPU, respectively. Addition of RPHis to the DMPUM diet tended to increase plasma glucose and creatinine. In conclusion, feeding a 5% MP-deficient diet (according to NRC, 2001) did not decrease DMI and yields of milk and milk components, despite a reduction in nutrient digestibility. Supplementation of RPHis increased DMI and milk protein concentration and yield. These results are in line with our previous data and suggest that His may have a positive effect on voluntary feed intake and milk production and composition in high-yielding dairy cows fed MP-deficient diets. PMID:25726096

  17. Plasma chemistry references values in psittaciformes.

    PubMed

    Lumeij, J T; Overduin, L M

    1990-04-01

    Reference values for 17 plasma chemical variables in African greys. Amazons, cockatoos and macaws were established for use in avian clinical practice. The inner limits are given for the percentiles P(2.5) and P(97.5) with a probability of 90%. The following variables were studied: urea, creatinine, uric acid, urea/uric acid ratio, osmolality, sodium, potassium, calcium, glucose, aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, gamma glutamyltransferase, lactate dehydrogenase, creatine kinase, bile acids, total protein, albumin/globulin ratio. Differences between methods used and values found in this study and those reported previously are discussed. PMID:18679934

  18. Relationship Between Serum Uric Acid and Bone Mineral Density in the General Population and in Rats with Experimental Hyperuricemia

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dihua; Bobulescu, I. Alexandru; Maalouf, Naim M.; Adams-Huet, Beverley; Poindexter, John; Park, Sun; Wei, Fuxin; Chen, Christopher; Moe, Orson W.; Sakhaee, Khashayar

    2015-01-01

    Higher serum uric acid concentrations have been associated with higher bone mineral density in observational studies of older men and peri- or postmenopausal women, prompting speculation of a potential protective effect of uric acid on bone. Whether this relationship is present in the general population has not been examined and there is no data to support causality. We conducted a cross-sectional analysis of a probability sample of the US population. Demographic data, dietary intake, lifestyle risk factors and physical activity assessment data, serum biochemistry including serum uric acid, and bone mineral density were obtained from 6,759 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES; 2005-2010) participants over 30 years of age. In unadjusted analyses, higher serum uric acid levels were associated with higher bone mineral density at the femoral neck, total hip and lumbar spine in men, pre-menopausal women, and post-menopausal women not treated with estrogen. However, these associations were no longer statistically significant after adjustment for potential confounders, including age, body mass index, black race, alcohol consumption, estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), serum alkaline phosphatase, and C-reactive protein (CRP). This is in contradistinction to some prevailing conclusions in the literature. To further examine the causal effect of higher serum uric acid on skeletal health, including biomechanical properties that are not measurable in humans, we used an established rat model of inducible mild hyperuricemia. There were no differences in bone mineral density, volume density, and biomechanical properties between hyperuricemic rats and normouricemic control animals. Taken together, our data do not support the hypothesis that higher serum uric acid has protective effects on bone health. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved PMID:25491196

  19. Increased Serum Uric Acid Levels Blunt the Antihypertensive Efficacy of Lifestyle Modifications in Children at Cardiovascular Risk.

    PubMed

    Viazzi, Francesca; Rebora, Paola; Giussani, Marco; Orlando, Antonina; Stella, Andrea; Antolini, Laura; Valsecchi, Maria Grazia; Pontremoli, Roberto; Genovesi, Simonetta

    2016-05-01

    Primary hypertension is a growing concern in children because of the obesity epidemic largely attributable to western lifestyles. Serum uric acid is known to be influenced by dietary habits, correlates with obesity, and could represent a risk factor for hypertension. Preliminary studies in children highlighted uric acid as a potentially modifiable risk factor for the prevention and treatment of hypertension. The effect of lifestyle changes (increase of physical activity and dietary modifications) on blood pressure values, weight status, and serum uric acid levels in a cohort of 248 children referred for cardiovascular risk assessment were evaluated over a mean 1.5-year follow-up. At baseline, 48% of children were obese and 50% showed blood pressure values >90th percentile. At follow-up, a significant improvement in weight class (24% obese;P<0.0001) and blood pressure category (22% >90th percentile;P<0.0001) was found. Systolic blood pressure z-score (P<0.0001), uric acid value (P=0.0056), and puberty at baseline (P=0.0048) were independently associated with higher systolic blood pressure z-score at follow-up, whereas a negative association was observed with body mass index z-score decrease during follow-up (P=0.0033). The risk of hypertension at follow-up was associated with body mass index (P=0.0025) and systolic blood pressure (P<0.0001) z-score at baseline and inversely related to delta body mass index (P=0.0002), whereas the risk of showing hypertension ≥99th percentile was more than doubled for each baseline 1 mg/dL increase of serum uric acid (P=0.0130). Uric acid is a powerful determinant of blood pressure over time, independent of lifestyle modifications. PMID:27021006

  20. The Association between Serum Uric Acid Level and Incidence of Metabolic Syndrome according to Menopausal Status in Korean Women

    PubMed Central

    Joo, Jong Kil; Hong, Gil Pyo; Han, Si Eun; Lee, Young Ju; Kim, Seung Chul; Kim, Chang Woon

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study is to investigate the association between serum uric acid level and metabolic syndrome according to menopausal status in Korean women. Methods A total of 2,241 women who visited to the health promotion center at Pusan National University Hospital from 2010 to 2014 were included in this cross-sectional study. Self-report questionnaires and interviews with healthcare providers were used to assess disease history, medication history, menstrual history and body size measuring. Anthropometric measurements and laboratory results were compared as presence of metabolic syndrome and menopausal status by student-t test. Logistic regression analysis was performed between presence of metabolic syndrome and presumable predictive factors, such as age, menopause and serum uric acid. Results The prevalence rate of metabolic syndrome were 7.45% (63/846) in pre-menopausal group and 23.87% (333/1395) in menopausal group. Serum uric acid level was higher in menopausal women than premenopausal women (4.6 1.1 vs. 4.3 0.9. P = 0.000). And, its concentration was also higher in metabolic syndrome than normal women regarding of menopausal statue (premenopause 4.7 1.1 vs. 4.2 0.8, P = 0.001, menopause 4.9 1.3 vs. 4.5 1.0, P = 0.000). Multiple logistic regression analysis showed serum uric acid and age have relationship with metabolic syndrome (OR: 1.453, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.074-1.111, P = 0.000; OR: 1.092, 95% CI: 1.305-1.619, P = 0.000). Conclusion We could find out some potential of uric acid as predictive factor for metabolic syndrome in premenopausal and menopausal group. Further investigation is required to clarify the relationship between serum uric acid, menopause and metabolic syndrome. PMID:25580424

  1. Inducing electrocatalytic functionality in ZnO thin film by N doping to realize a third generation uric acid biosensor.

    PubMed

    Jindal, Kajal; Tomar, Monika; Gupta, Vinay

    2014-05-15

    A third generation uric acid biosensor has been developed by exploiting the electrocatalytic functionality of nitrogen (N) doped zinc oxide (ZnO:N) thin film matrix deposited using pulsed laser deposition technique. The electrochemistry of ZnO:N thin film based electrode is investigated by using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry. The obtained results demonstrate that nitrogen doping in ZnO matrix offers a striking electrocatalytic activity to the immobilized uricase towards the oxidation of analyte (uric acid) and promotes the direct transfer of electrons from active sites of enzyme onto the electrode without any mediator. In contrast to pure ZnO, ZnO:N (8% N) thin film based uric acid biosensor gives a high sensitivity of about 1.38 mA/mM in the absence of mediator. Moreover, ZnO:N derived bio-electrode exhibits excellent selectivity and outstanding analytical stability and reproducibility, which enables a reliable and sensitive determination of uric acid in the serum. The ZnO:N thin film based biosensor exhibits a linear sensing response in the range from 0 to 1.0mM of uric acid concentration and the apparent Michaelis-Menten kinetic parameter (Km) is estimated to be about 0.13 mM which indicates the high affinity of the prepared bio-electrode towards uric acid. The obtained results are encouraging and indicate that the ZnO:N thin film matrix offers a new and promising platform for the development of novel third generation biosensors without using any mediator. PMID:24362079

  2. Nox4 has a crucial role in uric acid‑induced oxidative stress and apoptosis in renal tubular cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhuohang; Sheng, Yiyu; Liu, Cheng; Li, Kuiqing; Huang, Xin; Huang, Jian; Xu, Kewei

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effects of uric acid in promoting tubular cell apoptosis and verify the role of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase 4 (Nox4)‑induced oxidative stress in this process. HK‑2 cells were used as a human proximal tubular cell model and co‑cultured with various concentrations of uric acid with or without pre‑treatment with the Nox4 inhibitor diphenylene iodonium (DPI). The apoptotic rate and the amount of reactive oxygen species (ROS) were examined by flow cytometry. Furthermore, levels of Nox4, phosphorylated (p)‑P38, p‑extracellular signal‑regulated kinase (ERK), B‑cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl‑2) and Bcl‑2‑extra large (Bax) were detected by western blot analysis. The results showed that treatment with uric acid decreased HK‑2 cell viability and promoted apoptosis in a dose‑dependent manner. This was paralleled with an upregulation of Nox4 as well as ROS overproduction, which activated the phosphorylation of P38/ERK and caused an imbalance of Bax/Bcl‑2 in HK‑2 cells. Of note, inhibition of Nox4 with DPI prevented uric acid‑induced cell injury by suppressing ROS generation and P38/ERK activation. In conclusion, it was demonstrated that elevated uric acid promoted ROS‑induced tubular cell apoptosis by upregulating Nox4 expression. The present study therefore provided possible mechanisms and a potential therapeutic target of uric acid‑induced chronic kidney disease. PMID:27052425

  3. Hypothesis: Could Excessive Fructose Intake and Uric Acid Cause Type 2 Diabetes?

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Richard J.; Perez-Pozo, Santos E.; Sautin, Yuri Y.; Manitius, Jacek; Sanchez-Lozada, Laura Gabriela; Feig, Daniel I.; Shafiu, Mohamed; Segal, Mark; Glassock, Richard J.; Shimada, Michiko; Roncal, Carlos; Nakagawa, Takahiko

    2009-01-01

    We propose that excessive fructose intake (>50 g/d) may be one of the underlying etiologies of metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes. The primary sources of fructose are sugar (sucrose) and high fructose corn syrup. First, fructose intake correlates closely with the rate of diabetes worldwide. Second, unlike other sugars, the ingestion of excessive fructose induces features of metabolic syndrome in both laboratory animals and humans. Third, fructose appears to mediate the metabolic syndrome in part by raising uric acid, and there are now extensive experimental and clinical data supporting uric acid in the pathogenesis of metabolic syndrome. Fourth, environmental and genetic considerations provide a potential explanation of why certain groups might be more susceptible to developing diabetes. Finally, we discuss the counterarguments associated with the hypothesis and a potential explanation for these findings. If diabetes might result from excessive intake of fructose, then simple public health measures could have a major impact on improving the overall health of our populace. PMID:19151107

  4. Highly sensitive and selective uric acid biosensor based on RF sputtered NiO thin film.

    PubMed

    Arora, Kashima; Tomar, Monika; Gupta, Vinay

    2011-12-15

    Present study highlights the importance of RF sputtered NiO thin film deposited on platinum coated glass substrate (NiO/Pt/Ti/glass) as a potential matrix for the realization of highly sensitive and selective uric acid biosensor. Uricase has been immobilized successfully onto the surface of NiO matrix by physical adsorption technique. The prepared bioelectrode (uricase/NiO/Pt/Ti/glass) is utilized for sensing uric acid using the cyclic voltammetry and UV visible spectroscopy techniques. The bioelectrode is found to exhibit highly efficient sensing response characteristics with high sensitivity of 1278.48 μA/mM; good linearity of 0.05-1.0 mM, and very low Michaelis-Menten constant (k(m)) of 0.17 mM indicating high affinity of uricase towards the analyte. The enhanced response is due to the development of NiO matrix with good electron transport property and nanoporous morphology for effective loading of enzyme with preferred orientation. PMID:21996325

  5. Association of Serum Uric Acid and Coronary Artery Disease in Premenopausal Women

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jian-wei; He, Ling-jie; Cao, Shu-jun; Yang, Qing; Yang, Shi-wei; Zhou, Yu-jie

    2014-01-01

    Objective To date, no study in the published literature has investigated the role of various serum uric acid (SUA) concentrations in the development of angiographically-proven coronary artery disease (CAD) in premenopausal women. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the role SUA levels may play in the prevalence, severity, and prognosis of CAD in premenopausal women. Methods This cross-sectional retrospective study included 607 premenopausal women who had undergone coronary angiography. The CAD diagnosis was based upon stenosis affecting ?50% of the luminal diameter. Association of the SUA levels with CAD prevalence, severity, and clinical outcomes were assessed by statistical analysis. Results In total, 369 (60.8%) of the patients were diagnosed with CAD. The CAD patients had significantly higher SUA levels than those without CAD (5.31.9 vs. 4.81.7 mg/dL, P?=?0.001). The SUA levels were found to be significantly associated with CAD prevalence (P?=?0.013). Patients with higher levels of SUA also showed increased rates of multivessel disease and composite end-points, such as major adverse cardiac events. Furthermore, multivariate analysis identified abnormally high levels of uric acid (hyperuricemia) as an independent risk factor for CAD (OR 1.51 (1.112.53), P<0.05). Conclusions The SUA levels are significantly associated with the prevalence of CAD. The SUA levels may be a predictor for incidence of major cardiovascular events in premenopausal women. PMID:25184207

  6. Uric acid as a danger signal in gout and its comorbidities.

    PubMed

    Rock, Kenneth L; Kataoka, Hiroshi; Lai, Jiann-Jyh

    2013-01-01

    Uric acid is a waste product of purine catabolism. This molecule comes to clinical attention when it nucleates to form crystals of monosodium urate (MSU) in joints or other tissues, and thereby causes the inflammatory disease of gout. Patients with gout frequently suffer from a number of comorbid conditions including hypertension, diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease. Why MSU crystals trigger inflammation and are associated with comorbidities of gout has been unclear, but recent studies provide new insights into these issues. Rather than simply being a waste product, uric acid could serve a pathophysiological role as a local alarm signal that alerts the immune system to cell injury and helps to trigger both innate and adaptive immune responses. The inflammatory component of these immune responses is caused when urate crystals trigger both inflammasome-dependent and independent pathways to generate the proinflammatory cytokine IL-1. The resulting bioactive IL-1 stimulates the inflammation of gout and might contribute to the development of other comorbidities. Surprisingly, the same mechanisms underlie the inflammatory response to a number of irritant particles, many of which also cause disease. These new insights help to explain the pathogenesis of gout and point to potential new therapeutic targets for this and other sterile inflammatory diseases. PMID:22945591

  7. Bilateral uric acid nephrolithiasis and ureteral hypertrophy in a free-ranging river otter (Lontra canadensis)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grove, Robert A.; Bildfell, Rob; Henny, Charles J.; Buhler, D.R.

    2003-01-01

    We report the first case of uric acid nephrolithiasis in a free-ranging river otter (Lontra canadensis). A 7 yr old male river otter collected from the Skagit River of western Washington (USA) had bilateral nephrolithiasis and severely enlarged ureters (one of 305 examined [0.33%]). The uroliths were 97% uric acid and 3% protein. Microscopic changes in the kidney were confined to expansion of renal calyces, minor loss of medullary tissue, and multifocal atrophy of the cortical tubules. No inflammation was observed in either kidney or the ureters. The ureters were enlarged due to marked hypertrophy of smooth muscle plus dilation of the lumen. Fusion of the major calyces into a single ureteral lumen was several cm distal to that of two adult male otters used as histopathologic control specimens. This case report is part of a large contaminant study of river otters collected from Oregon and Washington. It is important to understand diseases and lesions of the otter as part of our overall evaluation of this population.

  8. Urea production and salvage during pregnancy in normal Jamaican women.

    PubMed

    Forrester, T; Badaloo, A V; Persaud, C; Jackson, A A

    1994-09-01

    The pattern of aggregate nitrogen demand during pregnancy and the fetal and maternal components are unclear. Excess demand enhances efficiency of nitrogen utilization. Urea salvage contributes to enhanced efficiency. Dietary protein intake, urea production, and salvage of urea nitrogen were measured in eight nonpregnant control subjects, and trimesterly in nine pregnant women. Production was measured after prime-intermittent intravenous doses of [15N 15N]-urea by dilution of label in urinary urea. Dietary protein intake was greater in trimester 1 than in nonpregnant women (167 +/- 36 vs 224 +/- 60 mg N.kg-1.d-1), and increased further in trimester 2 (266 +/- 59 mg N.kg-1.d-1). Urea production was not higher during pregnancy. Despite higher protein intake, urea salvage was higher in pregnancy (40 +/- 24 nonpregnant vs 77 +/- 23, 61 +/- 31, and 51 +/- 12 mg N.kg-1.d-1). Therefore, the demand-supply gap for nitrogen was greatest early in pregnancy when fetoplacental growth is slowest, and implies heightened maternal demand. PMID:8074063

  9. Chemical assay of urea for automated sensing in milk.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, D M; Delwiche, M J; Depeters, E J; Bondurant, R H

    1999-09-01

    Results of a new chemical assay for urea involving enzymatic hydrolysis to ammonium and carbonate and subsequent measurement of CO2 partial pressure are presented. The assay is simple to implement in an automated version, and the hardware used is not prone to fouling and damage by raw milk. The assay sensitivity at 24 degrees C is about 0.367 kPa per milligram per deciliter of urea N. The assay has no dependence on milk fat in the sample, and effects of milk proteins and lactose are slight (less than 2% change in sensitivity per change in w/v percent). Observed sensitivities to urea in spiked milk samples were not significantly different from each other or from standards in distilled water or 0.1 M phosphate-buffered saline. The standard error of the assay is about 0.3 mg/dl of urea N (0.1 mM) in standard solution, and about 1 mg/dl of urea N (0.3 mM) in milk in a range of 0 to 30 mg/dl of urea N (0 to 11 mM). The assay holds promise for use in an on-line sensor to measure milk urea N in the milking parlor. PMID:10509259

  10. How the use of creatine supplements can elevate serum creatinine in the absence of underlying kidney pathology.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Lydia; New, David

    2014-01-01

    Serum creatinine is a widely used marker in the assessment of renal function. Elevated creatinine levels suggest kidney dysfunction, prompting the need for further investigation. This report describes a case in which the consumption of the bodybuilding supplement creatine ethyl ester resulted in raised serum creatinine in the absence of true underlying kidney pathology. The abnormalities reversed after discontinuation of the supplement. A case of pseudo renal failure was recognised and kidney function was concluded to be normal. This report aims to address the mechanisms by which the ingestion of creatine ethyl ester can mimic the blood results expected in advanced renal failure, and confronts the problems faced when relying on serum creatinine as a diagnostic tool. PMID:25239988

  11. Urea encapsulation in modified starch matrix for nutrients retention

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naz, Muhammad Yasin; Sulaiman, Shaharin Anwar; Ariff, Mohd. Hazwan Bin Mohd.; Ariwahjoedi, Bambang

    2014-10-01

    It has been estimated that 20-70% of the used urea goes to the environment via leaching, nitrification and volatilization which not only harms the environment but also reduces the urea efficiency. By coating the urea granules, the farmers can achieve high urea performance through controlling the excess release of nitrogen. Up until now, different materials have been tested for nutrients retention. However, most of them are either expensive or unfriendly to the environment. Being cheap and biodegradable materials, the starches may also be used to coat the urea fertilizer for controlling the nutrients release. However, the pure starches do not meet the standards set by many industrial processes due to their slow tacking and too low viscosities and should be modified for getting smooth, compact and mechanically stronger coatings. In these studies, the tapioca starch was modified by reacting it with urea and different masses of borax. The prepared solutions were used to coat the urea granules of 3.45 mm average diameter. Different volumes (1, 1.5 and 2 mL) of each solution were used to coat 30 g of urea fluidized above the minimum level of fluidization. It was noticed that the coating thickness, percent coating, dissolution rate and percent release follow an increasing trend with an increase of solution volume; however, some random results were obtained while investigating the solution volume effects on the percent release. It was seen that the nutrients percent release over time increases with an increase in solution volume from 1 to 1.5 mL and thereafter reaches to a steady state. It confirms that the 1.5 mL of solution for 30 g urea samples will give the optimized coating results.

  12. Molecular Mechanisms of Urea Transport in Health and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Janet D.; Blount, Mitsi A.; Sands, Jeff M.

    2012-01-01

    In the late 1980s, urea permeability measurements produced values that could not be explained by paracellular transport or lipid phase diffusion. The existence of urea transport proteins were thus proposed and less than a decade later, the first urea transporter was cloned. The SLC14A family of urea transporters has two major subgroups, designated SLC14A1 (or UT-B) and Slc14A2 (or UT-A). UT-B and UT-A gene products are glycoproteins located in various extra-renal tissues however, a majority of the resulting isoforms are found in the kidney. The UT-B (Slc14A1) urea transporter was originally isolated from erythrocytes and two isoforms have been reported. In kidney, UT-B is located primarily in the descending vasa recta. The UT-A (Slc14A2) urea transporter yields 6 distinct isoforms, of which 3 are found chiefly in the kidney medulla. UT-A1 and UT-A3 are found in the inner medullary collecting duct (IMCD), while UT-A2 is located in the thin descending limb. These transporters are crucial to the kidney’s ability to concentrate urine. The regulation of urea transporter activity in the IMCD involves acute modification through phosphorylation and subsequent movement to the plasma membrane. UT-A1 and UT-A3 accumulate in the plasma membrane in response to stimulation by vasopressin or hypertonicity. Long term regulation of the urea transporters in the IMCD involves altering protein abundance in response to changes in hydration status, low protein diets, or adrenal steroids. Urea transporters have been studied using animal models of disease including diabetes mellitus, lithium intoxication, hypertension, and nephrotoxic drug responses. Exciting new genetically engineered mouse models are being developed to study these transporters. PMID:23007461

  13. Establishment of a method to detect microalbuminuria by measuring the total urinary protein-to-creatinine ratio in diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Kyoko; Komatsu, Yasuhiro; Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Izumo, Hiroko; Sanoyama, Kyo; Monden, Masami; Takeda, Kyoko; Nakahara, Fumiko; Yoshida, Katsumi

    2011-01-01

    Diabetes and chronic kidney disease (CKD) which are risk facters of cardiovascular disease, are increasing global public health problems. Microalbuminuria is an early sign of progressive cardiovascular and renal disease in individuals with or without diabetes. Screening for microalbuminuria and early treatment are recommended for patients with increased cardiovascular and renal risk factors. However, the procedure used to measure urinary albumin is expensive. Alternatively, the measurement of total urinary protein is simple and inexpensive. Thus, we aimed to establish a method that could predict the presence of microalbuminuria by measuring the total protein-to-creatinine ratio. Spot urine samples were obtained from 150 patients with diabetes mellitus, and the total protein-to-creatinine ratio and the albumin-to-creatinine ratio (ACR) were measured. There was a significant positive correlation between the protein-to-creatinine ratio and the ACR (r = 0.95). The presence of albuminuria (both micro- and macroalbuminuria) could be predicted from the value of the protein-to-creatinine ratio in more than 90% of patients. A receiver-operating characteristic curve analysis revealed that the protein-to-creatinine ratio had a sensitivity and a specificity of 90.8% and 91.9%, respectively, for the detection of albuminuria and a cutoff value of 0.091 g/g creatinine. These results suggest that screening for microalbuminuria can be replaced by the detection of the protein-to-creatinine ratio, which may be cost-effective for patients with cardiovascular risks as well as for the general population. PMID:22008591

  14. A simple and rapid creatinine sensing via DLS selectivity, using calix[4]arene thiol functionalized gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Sutariya, Pinkesh G; Pandya, Alok; Lodha, Anand; Menon, Shobhana K

    2016-01-15

    A new, simple, ultra-sensitive and selective approach has been reported for the "on spot" colorimetric detection of creatinine based on calix[4]arene functionalized gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) with excellent discrimination in the presence of other biomolecules. The lower detection limit of the method is 2.16nM. The gold nanoparticles and p-tert-butylcalix[4]arene were synthesized by microwave assisted method. Specifically, in our study, we used dynamic light scattering (DLS) which is a powerful method for the determination of small changes in particle size, improved selectivity and sensitivity of the creatinine detection system over colorimetric method. The nanoassembly is characterized by Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), DLS, UV-vis and ESI-MS spectroscopy, which demonstrates the binding affinity due its ability of hydrogen bonding and electrostatic interaction between -NH group of creatinine and pSDSC4. It exhibits fast response time (<60s) to creatinine and has long shelf-life (>5 weeks). The developed pSDSC4-AuNPs based creatinine biosensor will be established as simple, reliable and accurate tool for the determination of creatinine in human urine samples. PMID:26592650

  15. Determination of the serum levels of troponin I and creatinine among Sudanese type 2 diabetes mellitus patients

    PubMed Central

    Karar, Tarig; Elfaki, Elyasa Mustafa; Qureshi, Shoeb

    2015-01-01

    Background: Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a significant risk factor for developing cardiac diseases. Hence, we compare the serum levels of cardiac troponin I (CTnI) among type 2 diabetic and healthy patients. We additionally correlated CTnI and creatinine levels with duration of disease. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted at Department of Clinical Chemistry, Sudan University of Sciences and Technology, Khartoum, Sudan, from February 2008 to February 2011. 200 patients diagnosed with DM type 2 from Jabir Abulizz Diabetes Centre in Khartoum state, Sudan, and 100 healthy volunteers were included in this study. Blood samples were collected from both groups, and the serum levels of CTnI, creatinine, fasting plasma glucose and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels were measured. Results: Significant increase in serum levels of CTnI, glucose, HbA1c, and creatinine was observed in diabetic patients compared to healthy controls. In addition, the significant increase in CTnI and creatinine levels was observed among diabetic patients with ischemic heart disease or hypertension when compared with those without ischemic heart disease or hypertension. Further a strong positive correlation was observed between the duration of diabetes and the serum levels of CTnI and creatinine (r = 0.84, P > 0.01) and (r = 0.72, P > 0.01), respectively. Conclusion: The higher levels of CTnI and creatinine may be indicative of progressive cardiovascular disease and nephropathy among diabetic patients. PMID:26604626

  16. Tri-enzyme functionalized ZnO-NPs/CHIT/c-MWCNT/PANI composite film for amperometric determination of creatinine.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Sandeep; Devi, Rooma; Kumar, Ashok; Pundir, C S

    2011-10-15

    A new zinc oxide nanoparticles/chitosan/carboxylated multiwall carbonnanotube/polyaniline (ZnO-NPs/CHIT/c-MWCNT/PANI) composite film has been synthesized on platinum (Pt) electrode using electrochemical techniques. Three enzymes, creatinine amidohydrolase (CA), creatine amidinohydrolase (CI) and sarcosine oxidase (SO) were immobilized on ZnO-NPs/CHIT/c-MWCNT/PANI/Pt electrode to construct the creatinine biosensor. The enzyme electrode was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The enzyme electrode detects creatinine level as low as 0.5 μM at a signal to noise ratio of 3 within 10s at pH 7.5 and 30°C. The fabricated creatinine biosensor showed linear working range of 10-650 μM creatinine with a sensitivity of 0.030 μA μM(-1)cm(-2). The biosensor shows only 15% loss of its initial response over a period of 120 days when stored at 4°C. The fabricated biosensor was successfully employed for determination of creatinine in human blood serum. PMID:21803561

  17. The role of the uncertainty of measurement of serum creatinine concentrations in the diagnosis of acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Kin Tekce, Buket; Tekce, Hikmet; Aktas, Gulali; Uyeturk, Ugur

    2016-03-01

    Uncertainty of measurement is the numeric expression of the errors associated with all measurements taken in clinical laboratories. Serum creatinine concentration is the most common diagnostic marker for acute kidney injury. The goal of this study was to determine the effect of the uncertainty of measurement of serum creatinine concentrations on the diagnosis of acute kidney injury. We calculated the uncertainty of measurement of serum creatinine according to the Nordtest Guide. Retrospectively, we identified 289 patients who were evaluated for acute kidney injury. Of the total patient pool, 233 were diagnosed with acute kidney injury using the AKIN classification scheme and then were compared using statistical analysis. We determined nine probabilities of the uncertainty of measurement of serum creatinine concentrations. There was a statistically significant difference in the number of patients diagnosed with acute kidney injury when uncertainty of measurement was taken into consideration (first probability compared to the fifth p?=?0.023 and first probability compared to the ninth p?=?0.012). We found that the uncertainty of measurement for serum creatinine concentrations was an important factor for correctly diagnosing acute kidney injury. In addition, based on the AKIN classification scheme, minimizing the total allowable error levels for serum creatinine concentrations is necessary for the accurate diagnosis of acute kidney injury by clinicians. PMID:26628060

  18. KEY COMPARISON: CCQM-K12: The determination of creatinine in serum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welch, Michael J.; Phinney, Curtis P.; Parris, Reenie M.; May, Willie E.; Heo, Gwi Suk; Henrion, Andre; O'Conner, Gavin; Schimmel, Heinz

    2003-01-01

    A Key Comparison on the determination of creatinine in human serum organized by the Consultative Committee on Amount of Substance (CCQM) was carried out in 2001. To address the measurement traceability needs of the clinical chemistry community, the CCQM is undertaking Key Comparisons to document the capabilities of national metrology institutes (NMIs) that provide measurement services in this area. This Key Comparison, along with two others recently completed, CCQM-K6 and CCQM-K11, determination of total cholesterol and glucose, respectively, in serum, will provide a basis for evaluating the capabilities of NMIs for the determination of well-defined, organic substances of similar molecular weights and concentrations in human serum. Participants in CCQM-K12 included: National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) [USA], Coordinating Laboratory; Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements (IRMM) [EU]; Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science (KRISS) [S Korea]; Laboratory of the Government Chemist, (LGC) [UK]; and Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) [Germany]. Two frozen human serum materials were analyzed by each of the participants using either ID-GC/MS-based methods (three laboratories) or ID-LC/MS-based methods (two laboratories). Agreement of results among the participants was excellent, in accordance with the agreement found in a pilot study (CCQM-P9) for creatinine in serum. The resulting Key Comparison Reference Values had expanded uncertainties of less than 1% for both materials. In conclusion, five NMIs have demonstrated their ability to make reference measurements of creatinine in serum using isotope dilution-based methods that, when executed properly, provide measurements that are precise, accurate and SI traceable. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCQM, according to the provisions of the Mutual Recognition Arrangement (MRA).

  19. Estimation of Glomerular Filtration Rate Based on Serum Cystatin C versus Creatinine in a Uruguayan Population

    PubMed Central

    Lujambio, Inés; Sottolano, Mariana; Robaina, Sebastián; Carusso, Florencia; da Rosa, Alicia; Ríos, Ana Carina; Olascoaga, Alicia; Gadola, Liliana; Noboa, Oscar; Staessen, Jan A.; Boggia, José

    2014-01-01

    Background. Estimation of glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) from biomarkers has evolved and multiple equations are available to estimate renal function at bedside. Methods. In a random sample of 119 Uruguayans (54.5% women; 56.2 years (mean)), we used Bland and Altman's method and Cohen's kappa statistic to assess concordance on a continuous or categorical (eGFR < 60 versus ≥60 mL/min/1.73 m2) scale between eGFRcys (reference) and eGFR derived from serum creatinine according to the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (eGFRmdrd) or the Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration equations (eGFRepi) or from both serum cystatin C and creatinine (eGFRmix). Results. In all participants, eGFRmdrd, eGFRepi, and eGFRmix were, respectively, 9.7, 11.5, and 5.6 mL/min/1.73 m2 higher (P < 0.0001) than eGFRcys. The prevalence of eGFR <60 mL/min/1.73 m2 was the highest for eGFRcys (21.8%), intermediate for eGFRmix (11.8%), and the lowest for eGFRmdrd (5.9%) and eGFRepi (3.4%). Using eGFRcys as reference, we found only fair agreement with the equations based on creatinine (Cohen's kappa statistic 0.15 to 0.23). Conclusion. Using different equations we reached clinically significant differences in the estimation of renal function. eGFRcys provides lower estimates, resulting in higher prevalence of eGFR <60 mL/min/1.73 m2. PMID:25215234

  20. Reliability of GFR formulas based on serum creatinine, with special reference to the MDRD Study equation.

    PubMed

    Coresh, Josef; Auguste, Priscilla

    2008-01-01

    Estimation of glomerular filtration rate (GFR) is central to the diagnosis, evaluation and management of chronic kidney disease (CKD). This review summarizes data on the performance of equations using serum creatinine to estimate GFR, particularly the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD) Study equation. The size of studies evaluating GFR estimation equations and their level of sophistication in estimating bias, precision, validity and sensitivity to the source population have improved over the past decade. We update our review from 2006, which included 7 studies with over 500 individuals and 12 studies with 50-499 individuals with measured GFR evaluating the MDRD Study and Cockcroft-Gault equations. More recent studies include an individual level pooling analysis of 5504 participants in 10 studies which showed that creatinine calibration to reference methods improved the performance of the MDRD Study equation but increased bias for the Cockcroft-Gault equation. The MDRD Study equation had a bias of 3.0 %, interquartile range of 29.0 % and percentage of estimates within 30 % of the measured GFR value (P(30)) of 82 % for estimates below 60 mL/(min x 1.73 m(2)). Above this value, the bias was greater (8.7 %) and estimates are less useful since 30 % error is a large absolute error in GFR. Results vary across studies but are generally similar with disappointing performance in the high GFR range, which is of particular interest in early diabetic nephropathy. New equations using serum creatinine can reduce the bias present in the high GFR range but are unlikely to dramatically improve precision, suggesting a need for additional markers. Finally, algorithms are needed to tailor clinical practice based on data from GFR estimates and other participant characteristics, including the source population and level of proteinuria. PMID:18569962

  1. 17-Year-Old Boy with Renal Failure and the Highest Reported Creatinine in Pediatric Literature

    PubMed Central

    Master Sankar Raj, Vimal; Garcia, Jessica; Gordillo, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) is on the rise and constitutes a major health burden across the world. Clinical presentations in early CKD are usually subtle. Awareness of the risk factors for CKD is important for early diagnosis and treatment to slow the progression of disease. We present a case report of a 17-year-old African American male who presented in a life threatening hypertensive emergency with renal failure and the highest reported serum creatinine in a pediatric patient. A brief discussion on CKD criteria, complications, and potential red flags for screening strategies is provided. PMID:26199780

  2. Comparing methods for monitoring serum creatinine to predict late renal allograft failure.

    PubMed

    Kasiske, B L; Andany, M A; Hernández, D; Silkensen, J; Rabb, H; McClean, J; Roel, J P; Danielson, B

    2001-11-01

    Few studies have systematically investigated what changes in chronic renal allograft function best predict subsequent graft failure, when these changes occur, and whether they occur soon enough to allow possible intervention. We collected serum creatinine values (mean, 183 +/- 75 values/patient) measured over a maximum follow-up of 22 years in 101 consecutive renal transplant recipients (excluding creatinine levels from periods of acute rejection). We determined the dates of first decline in inverse creatinine (Delta1/Cr; < -20%, -30%, -40%, -50%, and -70%), declines in estimated creatinine clearance (CCr; <55, 45, 35, 25, and 15 mL/min), and declines in measured slope of 1/Cr over time. We used time-dependent covariates in Cox proportional hazards analyses to determine the relative effect of each renal function parameter on outcomes while adjusting for other risk factors. The best predictor of subsequent graft failure was Delta1/Cr. Delta1/Cr less than -40% first occurred at a median of 1.28 years after transplantation in 73 patients, and 67 patients went on to have graft failure a median of 3.28 years after Delta1/Cr less than -40%. The independent relative risk for graft failure attributable to Delta1/Cr less than -40% was 5.91 (95% confidence interval, 3.25 to 10.8; P < 0.0001). A decline in CCr, eg, less than 45 mL/min, also was a strong predictor of subsequent graft failure. Conversely, declines in allograft function estimated from slopes of 1/Cr were poor predictors of graft failure. In analysis limited to patients followed up for 2.5 years or less, Delta1/Cr continued to predict graft failure, suggesting that Delta1/Cr will be a useful predictor in populations with shorter follow-up. If confirmed in other populations, eg, patients treated with calcineurin inhibitors, this simple marker of chronic allograft dysfunction may prove to be a practical tool for defining patients at high risk for late graft failure. PMID:11684561

  3. Relationship between High-Performance Liquid Chromatography Fingerprints and Uric Acid-Lowering Activities of Cichorium intybus L.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Chun-Sheng; Zhang, Bing; Lin, Zhi-Jian; Wang, Xue-Jie; Zhou, Yue; Sun, Xiao-Xia; Xiao, Ming-Liang

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to explore the spectrum-effect relationships between high-performance liquid chromatography fingerprints and the uric acid-lowering activities of chicory. Chemical fingerprints of chicory samples from ten different sources were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography, and then investigated by similarity analysis and hierarchical clustering analysis. Pharmacodynamics experiments were conducted in animals to obtain the uric acid-lowering activity information of each chicory sample. The spectrum-effect relationships between chemical fingerprints and the uric acid-lowering activities of chicory were established by canonical correlation analysis. The structures of potential effective peaks were identified by liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry. The results showed that a close correlation existed between the spectrum and effect of chicory. Aesculin, chlorogenic acid, chicoric acid, isochlorogenic acid A/B/C and 13,14-seco-stigma5(6),14(15)-diene-3α-ol might be the main effective constituents. This work provides a general model of the combination of high-performance liquid chromatography and uric acid-lowering activities to study the spectrum-effect relationships of chicory, which can be used to discover the principle components responsible for the bioactivity. PMID:26007193

  4. Construction of amperometric uric acid biosensor based on uricase immobilized on PBNPs/cMWCNT/PANI/Au composite.

    PubMed

    Rawal, Rachna; Chawla, Sheetal; Chauhan, Nidhi; Dahiya, Tulika; Pundir, C S

    2012-01-01

    A chitosan-glutaraldehyde crosslinked uricase was immobilized onto Prussian blue nanoparticles (PBNPs) absorbed onto carboxylated multiwalled carbon nanotube (c-MWCNT) and polyaniline (PANI) layer, electrochemically deposited on the surface of Au electrode. The nanohybrid-uricase electrode was characterized by scanning electron microscopic (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and cyclic voltammetry. An amperometric uric acid biosensor was fabricated using uricase/c-MWCNT/PBNPs/Au electrode as working electrode, Ag/AgCl as standard and Pt wire as auxiliary electrode connected through a potentiostat. The biosensor showed optimum response within 4s at pH 7.5 and 40°C, when operated at 0.4V vs. Ag/AgCl. The linear working range for uric acid was 0.005-0.8 mM, with a detection limit of 5 μM. The sensor was evaluated with 96% recovery of added uric acid in sera and 4.6 and 5.4% within and between batch of coefficient of variation respectively and a good correlation (r=0.99) with standard enzymic colorimetric method. This sensor measured uric acid in real serum samples. The sensor lost only 37% of its initial activity after its 400 uses over a period of 7 months, when stored at 4°C. PMID:22020190

  5. Effects of nitrocompounds on uric acid-utilizing microorganisms, nitrogen retention, and microbial community in laying hen manure

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A study was conducted to evaluate the effects of nitrocompounds on the growth of uric acid-utilizing microorganisms, nitrogen retention, and microbial community in laying hen manure. There were three treatments: control, 100 mM nitropropanol (NPL), and 100 mM nitropropionic acid (NPC). The mixed la...

  6. Photoresponsive surface molecularly imprinted polymer on ZnO nanorods for uric acid detection in physiological fluids.

    PubMed

    Tang, Qian; Li, Zai-Yong; Wei, Yu-Bo; Yang, Xia; Liu, Lan-Tao; Gong, Cheng-Bin; Ma, Xue-Bing; Lam, Michael Hon-Wah; Chow, Cheuk-Fai

    2016-09-01

    A photoresponsive surface molecularly imprinted polymer for uric acid in physiological fluids was fabricated through a facile and effective method using bio-safe and biocompatible ZnO nanorods as a support. The strategy was carried out by introducing double bonds on the surface of the ZnO nanorods with 3-methacryloxypropyltrimethoxysilane. The surface molecularly imprinted polymer on ZnO nanorods was then prepared by surface polymerization using uric acid as template, water-soluble 5-[(4-(methacryloyloxy)phenyl)diazenyl]isophthalic acid as functional monomer, and triethanolamine trimethacryl ester as cross-linker. The surface molecularly imprinted polymer on ZnO nanorods showed good photoresponsive properties, high recognition ability, and fast binding kinetics toward uric acid, with a dissociation constant of 3.22×10(-5)M in aqueous NaH2PO4 buffer at pH=7.0 and a maximal adsorption capacity of 1.45μmolg(-1). Upon alternate irradiation at 365 and 440nm, the surface molecularly imprinted polymer on ZnO nanorods can quantitatively uptake and release uric acid. PMID:27207036

  7. Uric Acid Is a Genuine Metabolite of Penicillium cyclopium and Stimulates the Expression of Alkaloid Biosynthesis in This Fungus†

    PubMed Central

    Helbig, Florian; Steighardt, Jörg; Roos, Werner

    2002-01-01

    On searching for endogenous, low-molecular-weight effectors of benzodiazepine alkaloid biosynthesis in Penicillium cyclopium uric acid was isolated from ethanolic or autoclaved mycelial extracts of this fungus. The isolation was based on a three-step high-pressure liquid chromatography procedure guided by a microplate bioassay, and uric acid was identified by mass spectrometry and the uricase reaction. Conidiospore suspensions that were treated with this compound during the early phase of outgrowth developed emerged cultures with an enhanced rate of alkaloid production. Uric acid treatment did not increase the in vitro measurable activity of the rate-limiting biosynthetic enzyme, cyclopeptine synthetase. However, these cultures displayed a reduced rate of uptake of the alkaloid precursor l-phenylalanine into the vacuoles of the hyphal cells as assayed in situ. It is suggested that the depressed capacity of vacuolar uptake caused by the contact of outgrowing spores with uric acid liberated from hyphal cells results in an enhanced availability of the precursor l-phenylalanine in the cytoplasm and thus accounts at least in part for the increase in alkaloid production. PMID:11916664

  8. Intake of Added Sugar and Sugar-Sweetened Drink and Serum Uric Acid Concentration in US Men and Women

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fructose-induced hyperuricemia might have a causal role in metabolic syndrome, hypertension, and other chronic disease. However, no study has investigated whether sugar added to foods or sugar-sweetened beverages, which are major sources of fructose, are associated with serum uric acid concentration...

  9. Uric Acid Accumulation in an Arabidopsis Urate Oxidase Mutant Impairs Seedling Establishment by Blocking Peroxisome Maintenance[W

    PubMed Central

    Hauck, Oliver K.; Scharnberg, Jana; Escobar, Nieves Medina; Wanner, Gerhard; Giavalisco, Patrick; Witte, Claus-Peter

    2014-01-01

    Purine nucleotides can be fully catabolized by plants to recycle nutrients. We have isolated a urate oxidase (uox) mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana that accumulates uric acid in all tissues, especially in the developing embryo. The mutant displays a reduced germination rate and is unable to establish autotrophic growth due to severe inhibition of cotyledon development and nutrient mobilization from the lipid reserves in the cotyledons. The uox mutant phenotype is suppressed in a xanthine dehydrogenase (xdh) uox double mutant, demonstrating that the underlying cause is not the defective purine base catabolism, or the lack of UOX per se, but the elevated uric acid concentration in the embryo. Remarkably, xanthine accumulates to similar levels in the xdh mutant without toxicity. This is paralleled in humans, where hyperuricemia is associated with many diseases whereas xanthinuria is asymptomatic. Searching for the molecular cause of uric acid toxicity, we discovered a local defect of peroxisomes (glyoxysomes) mostly confined to the cotyledons of the mature embryos, which resulted in the accumulation of free fatty acids in dry seeds. The peroxisomal defect explains the developmental phenotypes of the uox mutant, drawing a novel link between uric acid and peroxisome function, which may be relevant beyond plants. PMID:25052714

  10. Are There Any Promising Biochemical Correlates of Achievement Behavior and Motivation? The Evidence for Serum Uric Acid and Serum Cholesterol

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kasl, Stanislav V.

    1974-01-01

    This review examines the available evidence in support of the argument that serum uric acid (SUA) possesses considerable promise as an indicator of one type of biochemical influence on achievement behavior. The evidence arguing for further research into the role of serum cholesterol in achievement behavior is also examined. (Author/JR)

  11. Hydrolyzable Polyureas Bearing Hindered Urea Bonds

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Hydrolyzable polymers are widely used materials that have found numerous applications in biomedical, agricultural, plastic, and packaging industrials. They usually contain ester and other hydrolyzable bonds, such as anhydride, acetal, ketal, or imine, in their backbone structures. Here, we report the first design of hydrolyzable polyureas bearing dynamic hindered urea bonds (HUBs) that can reversibly dissociate to bulky amines and isocyanates, the latter of which can be further hydrolyzed by water, driving the equilibrium to facilitate the degradation of polyureas. Polyureas bearing 1-tert-butyl-1-ethylurea bonds that show high dynamicity (high bond dissociation rate), in the form of either linear polymers or cross-linked gels, can be completely degraded by water under mild conditions. Given the simplicity and low cost for the production of polyureas by simply mixing multifunctional bulky amines and isocyanates, the versatility of the structures, and the tunability of the degradation profiles of HUB-bearing polyureas, these materials are potentially of very broad applications. PMID:25406025

  12. Hydrolyzable polyureas bearing hindered urea bonds.

    PubMed

    Ying, Hanze; Cheng, Jianjun

    2014-12-10

    Hydrolyzable polymers are widely used materials that have found numerous applications in biomedical, agricultural, plastic, and packaging industrials. They usually contain ester and other hydrolyzable bonds, such as anhydride, acetal, ketal, or imine, in their backbone structures. Here, we report the first design of hydrolyzable polyureas bearing dynamic hindered urea bonds (HUBs) that can reversibly dissociate to bulky amines and isocyanates, the latter of which can be further hydrolyzed by water, driving the equilibrium to facilitate the degradation of polyureas. Polyureas bearing 1-tert-butyl-1-ethylurea bonds that show high dynamicity (high bond dissociation rate), in the form of either linear polymers or cross-linked gels, can be completely degraded by water under mild conditions. Given the simplicity and low cost for the production of polyureas by simply mixing multifunctional bulky amines and isocyanates, the versatility of the structures, and the tunability of the degradation profiles of HUB-bearing polyureas, these materials are potentially of very broad applications. PMID:25406025

  13. Meta-Analysis of 28,141 Individuals Identifies Common Variants within Five New Loci That Influence Uric Acid Concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Sanna, Serena; Teumer, Alexander; Vitart, Veronique; Perola, Markus; Mangino, Massimo; Albrecht, Eva; Wallace, Chris; Farrall, Martin; Johansson, Åsa; Nyholt, Dale R.; Aulchenko, Yurii; Beckmann, Jacques S.; Bergmann, Sven; Bochud, Murielle; Brown, Morris; Campbell, Harry; Connell, John; Dominiczak, Anna; Homuth, Georg; Lamina, Claudia; McCarthy, Mark I.; Meitinger, Thomas; Mooser, Vincent; Munroe, Patricia; Nauck, Matthias; Peden, John; Prokisch, Holger; Salo, Perttu; Salomaa, Veikko; Samani, Nilesh J.; Schlessinger, David; Uda, Manuela; Völker, Uwe; Waeber, Gérard; Waterworth, Dawn; Wang-Sattler, Rui; Wright, Alan F.; Adamski, Jerzy; Whitfield, John B.; Gyllensten, Ulf; Wilson, James F.; Rudan, Igor; Pramstaller, Peter; Watkins, Hugh; Doering, Angela; Wichmann, H.-Erich; Spector, Tim D.; Peltonen, Leena; Völzke, Henry; Nagaraja, Ramaiah; Vollenweider, Peter; Caulfield, Mark; Illig, Thomas; Gieger, Christian

    2009-01-01

    Elevated serum uric acid levels cause gout and are a risk factor for cardiovascular disease and diabetes. To investigate the polygenetic basis of serum uric acid levels, we conducted a meta-analysis of genome-wide association scans from 14 studies totalling 28,141 participants of European descent, resulting in identification of 954 SNPs distributed across nine loci that exceeded the threshold of genome-wide significance, five of which are novel. Overall, the common variants associated with serum uric acid levels fall in the following nine regions: SLC2A9 (p = 5.2×10−201), ABCG2 (p = 3.1×10−26), SLC17A1 (p = 3.0×10−14), SLC22A11 (p = 6.7×10−14), SLC22A12 (p = 2.0×10−9), SLC16A9 (p = 1.1×10−8), GCKR (p = 1.4×10−9), LRRC16A (p = 8.5×10−9), and near PDZK1 (p = 2.7×10−9). Identified variants were analyzed for gender differences. We found that the minor allele for rs734553 in SLC2A9 has greater influence in lowering uric acid levels in women and the minor allele of rs2231142 in ABCG2 elevates uric acid levels more strongly in men compared to women. To further characterize the identified variants, we analyzed their association with a panel of metabolites. rs12356193 within SLC16A9 was associated with DL-carnitine (p = 4.0×10−26) and propionyl-L-carnitine (p = 5.0×10−8) concentrations, which in turn were associated with serum UA levels (p = 1.4×10−57 and p = 8.1×10−54, respectively), forming a triangle between SNP, metabolites, and UA levels. Taken together, these associations highlight additional pathways that are important in the regulation of serum uric acid levels and point toward novel potential targets for pharmacological intervention to prevent or treat hyperuricemia. In addition, these findings strongly support the hypothesis that transport proteins are key in regulating serum uric acid levels. PMID:19503597

  14. Influence of Ficoll on urea induced denaturation of fibrinogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankaranarayanan, Kamatchi; Meenakshisundaram, N.

    2016-03-01

    Ficoll is a neutral, highly branched polymer used as a molecular crowder in the study of proteins. Ficoll is also part of Ficoll-Paque used in biology laboratories to separate blood to its components (erythrocytes, leukocytes etc.,). Role of Ficoll in the urea induced denaturation of protein Fibrinogen (Fg) has been analyzed using fluorescence, circular dichroism, molecular docking and interfacial studies. Fluorescence studies show that Ficoll prevents quenching of Fg in the presence of urea. From the circular dichroism spectra, Fg shows conformational transition to random coil with urea of 6 M concentration. Ficoll helps to shift this denaturation concentration to 8 M and thus constraints by shielding Fg during the process. Molecular docking studies indicate that Ficoll interacts favorably with the protein than urea. The surface tension and shear viscosity analysis shows clearly that the protein is shielded by Ficoll.

  15. Hydrogen production via urea electrolysis using a gel electrolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Rebecca L.; Botte, Gerardine G.

    2011-03-01

    A technology was demonstrated for the production of hydrogen and other valuable products (nitrogen and clean water) through the electrochemical oxidation of urea in alkaline media. In addition, this process remediates toxic nitrates and prevents gaseous ammonia emissions. Improvements to urea electrolysis were made through replacement of aqueous KOH electrolyte with a poly(acrylic acid) gel electrolyte. A small volume of poly(acrylic acid) gel electrolyte was used to accomplish the electrochemical oxidation of urea improving on the previous requirement for large amounts of aqueous potassium hydroxide. The effect of gel composition was investigated by varying polymer content and KOH concentrations within the polymer matrix in order to determine which is the most advantageous for the electrochemical oxidation of urea and production of hydrogen.

  16. Refinement of the pressure assay for milk urea nitrogen.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, D M; Delwiche, M J; DePeters, E J; BonDurant, R H

    2000-09-01

    We report improvements in the application of a pressure-based assay for urea. The assay involved the enzymatic hydrolysis of urea and subsequent measurement of CO2 partial pressure. Effects of the preservative bronopol on the assay and their implications for laboratory applications are discussed. A method of remediating these effects with cysteine is described. A method is also described wherein these additives can be used to prepare standards of known urea concentration in milk. The improved assay can be used to measure urea N in unadulterated milk or in bronopol preserved milk with an accuracy of +/-0.7 mg/dl (0.25 mM) in the range from 0 to 30 mg/dl (0 to 10.7 mM). PMID:11003237

  17. Microdetermination of urea in urine using p-dimethylaminobenzaldehyde /PDAB/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geiger, P. J.

    1969-01-01

    Adaptation of the p-dimethylaminobenzaldehyde method for determining urea concentration in urine is an improved micromechanical method. Accuracy and precision are satisfactory. This method avoids extra steps of deproteinizing or removing normal urinary chromogens.

  18. Formation of urea and guanidine by irradiation of ammonium cyanide.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lohrmann, R.

    1972-01-01

    Aqueous solutions of ammonium cyanide yield urea, cyanamide and guanidine when exposed to sunlight or an unfiltered 254 nm ultraviolet source. The prebiotic significance of these results is discussed.

  19. IRIS TOXICOLOGICAL REVIEW OF UREA (EXTERNAL REVIEW DRAFT)

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA is conducting a peer review and public comment of the scientific basis supporting the human health hazard and dose-response assessment of Urea that when finalized will appear on the Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) database.

  20. Exploring the cocrystallization potential of urea and benzamide.

    PubMed

    Cysewski, Piotr; Przybyłek, Maciej; Ziółkowska, Dorota; Mroczyńska, Karina

    2016-05-01

    The cocrystallization landscape of benzamide and urea interacting with aliphatic and aromatic carboxylic acids was studied both experimentally and theoretically. Ten new cocrystals of benzamide were synthesized using an oriented samples approach via a fast dropped evaporation technique. Information about types of known bi-component cocrystals augmented with knowledge of simple binary eutectic mixtures was used for the analysis of virtual screening efficiency among 514 potential pairs involving aromatic carboxylic acids interacting with urea or benzamide. Quantification of intermolecular interaction was achieved by estimating the excess thermodynamic functions of binary liquid mixtures under supercooled conditions within a COSMO-RS framework. The smoothed histograms suggest that slightly more potential pairs of benzamide are characterized in the attractive region compared to urea. Finally, it is emphasized that prediction of cocrystals of urea is fairly direct, while it remains ambiguous for benzamide paired with carboxylic acids. The two known simple eutectics of urea are found within the first two quartiles defined by excess thermodynamic functions, and all known cocrystals are outside of this range belonging to the third or fourth quartile. On the contrary, such a simple separation of positive and negative cases of benzamide miscibility in the solid state is not observed. The difference in properties between urea and benzamide R2,2(8) heterosynthons is also documented by alterations of substituent effects. Intermolecular interactions of urea with para substituted benzoic acid analogues are stronger compared to those of benzamide. Also, the amount of charge transfer from amide to aromatic carboxylic acid and vice versa is more pronounced for urea. However, in both cases, the greater the electron withdrawing character of the substituent, the higher the binding energy, and the stronger the supermolecule polarization via the charge transfer mechanism. PMID:27052722

  1. The Use of Serum Uric Acid Concentration as an Indicator of Laparoscopic Sleeve Gastrectomy Success

    PubMed Central

    Menenakos, Evangelos; Doulami, Georgia; Tzanetakou, Irene P.; Natoudi, Maria; Kokoroskos, Nikolaos; Almpanopoulos, Konstantinos; Leandros, Emmanouil; Zografos, George; Theodorou, Dimitrios

    2015-01-01

    Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) effectively reduces weight by restricting gastric capacity and altering gut hormones levels. We designed a prospective study to investigate the correlation of serum uric acid (SUA) concentration and weight loss. SUA and body mass index (BMI) were measured preoperatively and on first postoperative month and year in patients who underwent LSG in our department of bariatric surgery. Data on 55 patients were analyzed. Preoperative SUA concentration had a significant positive correlation with percentage of total weight loss (TWL) on first postoperative month (P = 0.001) and year (P = 0.002). SUA concentration on first postoperative month had a positive correlation with percentage of TWL on first postoperative year (P = 0.004). SUA concentration could be used as a predictor of LSG's success and could help in early detection of patients with rapid loss of weight, in order to prevent complications. PMID:25594659

  2. Cerebral Ischemia Mediates the Effect of Serum Uric Acid on Cognitive Function

    PubMed Central

    Vannorsdall, Tracy D.; Jinnah, H.A.; Gordon, Barry; Kraut, Michael; Schretlen, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose High normal concentrations of serum uric acid (UA) are associated with mild cognitive dysfunction and increased cerebral ischemia as indexed by white matter hyperintensity volumes. We hypothesized that individual differences in white matter hyperintensities mediate the association between UA and mild cognitive dysfunction. Methods One hundred eighty community-dwelling adults aged 20 to 96 years completed neuropsychological testing, laboratory blood studies, and a brain MRI scan. Results Serum UA was associated (P<0.05) with greater white matter hyperintensities and poorer working memory, processing speed, fluency, and verbal memory. Associations remained after controlling for age, sex, race, education, hypertension, diabetes, alcohol abuse, smoking, and body mass. Adding a term for white matter hyperintensity attenuated these associations such that UA no longer predicted cognitive performance. Conclusions Severity of cerebral ischemia might mediate the association between UA and cognitive dysfunction. Even mild elevations in UA appear to contribute to structural and functional brain changes. PMID:18772442

  3. Electrochemical Determination of Uric Acid at CdTe Quantum Dot Modified Glassy Carbon Electrodes.

    PubMed

    Pan, Deng; Rong, Shengzhong; Zhang, Guangteng; Zhang, Yannan; Zhou, Qiang; Liu, Fenghai; Li, Miaojing; Chang, Dong; Pan, Hongzhi

    2015-01-01

    Cyclic voltammetry and differential pulse voltammetry were used to investigate the electrochemical behavior of uric acid (UA) at a CdTe quantum dot (QD) modified the glassy carbon electrode (GCE). CdTe QDs, as new semiconductor nanocrystals, can greatly improve the peak current of UA. The anodic peak current of UA was linear with its concentration between 1.0×10(-6) and 4.0×10(-4) M in 0.1 M pH 5.0 phosphate buffer solution. The LOD for UA at the CdTe electrode (1.0×10(-7) M) was superior to that of the GCE. In addition, we also determined the effects of scan rate, pH, and interferences of UA for the voltammetric behavior and detection. The results indicated that modified electrode possessed excellent reproducibility and stability. Finally, a new and efficient electrochemical sensor for detecting UA was developed. PMID:26525244

  4. Label-free and selective sensing of uric acid with gold nanoclusters as optical probe.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian; Chang, Yong; Wu, Wen Bi; Zhang, Pu; Lie, Shao Qing; Huang, Cheng Zhi

    2016-05-15

    Clinically, the amount of uric acid (UA) in biological fluids is closely related to some diseases such as hyperuricemia and gout, thus it is of great significance to sense UA in clinical samples. In this work, red gold nanoclusters (AuNCs) with relatively high fluorescence quantum yield and strong fluorescence emission were facilely available using bovine serum albumin (BSA) as template. The fluorescence of BSA-protected AuNCs can be sensitively quenched by H2O2, which is further capable of sensing UA through the specific catalytic oxidation with uricase, since it generates stoichiometric quantity of H2O2 by-product. The proposed assay allows for the selective detection of UA in the range of 10-800μM with a detection limit of 6.6μM, which is applicable to sense UA in clinical samples with satisfactory results, suggesting its great potential for diagnostic purposes. PMID:26992526

  5. Fructose and Uric Acid: Is There a Role in Endothelial Function?

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Guanghong; Aroor, Annayya R.; Whaley-Connell, Adam T.; Sowers, James R.

    2014-01-01

    Population level data support that consumption of fructose and fructose-based sweeteners has dramatically increased and suggest that high dietary intake of fructose is an important factor in the development of the cardiorenal metabolic syndrome (CRS). The CRS is a constellation of cardiac, kidney and metabolic disorders including insulin resistance, obesity, metabolic dyslipidemia, high blood pressure, and evidence of early cardiac and kidney disease. The consequences of fructose metabolism may result in intracellular ATP depletion, increased uric acid production, oxidative stress, inflammation, and increased lipogenesis, which are associated with endothelial dysfunction. Endothelial dysfunction is an early manifestation of vascular disease and a driver for the development of CRS. A better understanding of fructose overconsumption in the development of CRS may provide new insights into pathogenesis and future therapeutic strategies. PMID:24760443

  6. Determination of creatinine-related molecules in saliva by reversed-phase liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry and the evaluation of hemodialysis in chronic kidney disease patients.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Mayu; Furuhashi, Mitsuyoshi; Sesoko, Shogo; Kosuge, Kazuhiro; Maeda, Toshio; Todoroki, Kenichiro; Inoue, Koichi; Min, Jun Zhe; Toyo'oka, Toshimasa

    2016-03-10

    The serum concentrations of creatinine (Cre) and urea are used for the determination of the renal function. However, the use of blood is not always suitable due to the invasive, hygienic and infection problems during its sample collection and handling. In contrast, saliva is relatively clean and the samples can be quickly and noninvasively collected and easily stored. Therefore, the simultaneous determination of Arginine (Arg), creatine (Cr) and Cre in the saliva of chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients was performed by UPLC-ESI-MS/MS together with the saliva of healthy volunteers. The evaluation of hemodialysis of CKD patients was also carried out by the determinations before and after the dialysis. An HS-F5 column was used for the simultaneous determination of Arg, Cr and Cre in the saliva. These molecules were rapidly separated within 4 min and sensitively determined by the multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) of the precursor ion [M+H](+) → product ions (m/z 175.1 → 70.1 for Arg; m/z 132.0 → 44.1 for Cr; m/z 114.0 → 44.1 for Cre). The concentration of Cre in the CKD patients was higher than that in the healthy persons. The concentrations of Cre in the saliva of the patients before hemodialysis were moderately correlated with the serum Cre concentrations (R(2) = 0.661). Furthermore, the concentration in the saliva obviously decreased after hemodialysis (before 0.73 mg/dL, after 0.25 mg/dL; p < 0.02). Thus, the proposed detection method using saliva by UPLC-MS/MS is useful for the evaluation of the renal function in CKD patients. The present method offers a new option for monitoring the hemodialysis of CKD patients. PMID:26893090

  7. Low Baseline Urine Creatinine Excretion Rate Predicts Poor Outcomes among Critically Ill Acute Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Chia-Yu; Wu, Yi-Ling; Cheng, Chun-Yu; Lee, Jiann-Der; Huang, Ying-Chih; Lee, Ming-Hsueh; Wu, Chih-Ying; Hsu, Huan-Lin; Lin, Ya-Hui; Huang, Yen-Chu; Yang, Hsin-Ta; Yang, Jen-Tsung; Lee, Meng; Ovbiagele, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    Urinary creatinine excretion rate (CER) is an established marker of muscle mass. Low CER has been linked to poor coronary artery disease outcomes, but a link between CER and acute stroke prognosis has not been previously explored. We prospectively collected data from patients with acute stroke (ischemic or hemorrhagic) within 24 hours from symptom onset in a Neurological and Neurosurgery Intensive Care Unit in Taiwan. Baseline CER (mg/d) was calculated by urine creatinine concentration in morning spot urine multiplies 24-hour urine volume on the second day of admission. Patients were divided into 3 tertiles with highest, middle, and lowest CER. Primary endpoint was poor outcome defined as modified Rankin Scale 3-6 at 6 months. Among 156 critically ill acute stroke patients meeting study entry criteria, average age was 67.9 years, and 83 (53.2%) patients had ischemic stroke. Patients with lowest CER (vs. highest CER) had a high risk of poor outcome at 6-month after adjustment (odds ratio 4.96, 95% confidence interval 1.22 to 20.15, p value = 0.025). In conclusion, low baseline CER, a marker of muscle mass, was independently associated with poor 6-month outcome among critically ill acute stroke patients. We speculate that preservation of muscle mass through exercise or protein-energy supplement might be helpful for improving prognosis in severe stroke patients. PMID:25557376

  8. Adsorption performance of creatinine on dialdehyde nanofibrillated cellulose derived from potato residues.

    PubMed

    Cui, Dongli; Liu, Zehua; Yang, Yaxing; Huang, Rijin; Cheng, Xiaojuan; Fatehi, Pedram; Sun, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Potato residue is vastly produced in the food industry but it is landfilled. This article describes the treatment of purified cellulose derived from potato residues by a high pressure homogenizer to produce nano-fibrillated cellulose (NFC), which was then oxidized by sodium periodate to prepare dialdehyde nano-fibrillated cellulose (DANFC). The produced NFC and DANFC were characterized by a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The orthogonal experiment was induced to obtain the maximum degree of oxidation (DO) on DANFC. The results indicated that the optimal conditions were 40°C and pH 3. Alternatively, the isotherm and kinetic studies for the adsorption of creatinine on DANFC with different DOs (70.5 and 88.8%) were investigated, and the experimental results fitted well into Freundlich isotherm model and pseudo second-order kinetic model. The maximum adsorption capacities of DANFCs with the DO of 70.55 and 88.85% were 6.7 and 17.2 mg g(-1) , respectively, which were achieved under the conditions of 37°C and initial creatinine concentration of 100 mg L(-1) . © 2015 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 32:208-214, 2016. PMID:26400046

  9. Urea Metabolism in Beef Steers Fed Tall Fescue, Orchardgrass, or Gamagrass Hays

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two experiments were conducted to assess effects of endophyte treatments (Exp. 1), forage species, and supplementation (Exp. 2) on urea production, excretion, and recycling in beef steers. Infusion of 15,15N-urea and enrichment of urea in urine samples were used to calculate urea N entry and recyc...

  10. Association between Uric Acid and Metabolic Syndrome in Qazvin Metabolic Diseases Study (QMDS), Iran

    PubMed Central

    Ziaee, Amir; Esmailzadehha, Neda; Ghorbani, Azam; Asefzadeh, Saeed

    2013-01-01

    Background: The prevalence of Metabolic Syndrome (MS) has been increasing worldwide. Although Uric Acid (UA) Levels are often increased in subjects with MS, it is still unclear whether uric acid plays a causal role for MS or is a marker. The purpose of this study was to examine the association between UA and the MS in Qazvin, Iran. Methods: 529 men and 578 women aged 20 – 78 years attended in cross sectional study from September 2010 to April 2011 in Qazvin, Iran. The criteria proposed by new joint Interim societies (JIS) were applied for diagnosis of MS. Hyperuricemia was defined as UA ≥ 7 mg/dL in men and UA ≥ 6 mg/dL in women. Logistic regression analysis was performed to evaluate the relationship between UA quartiles and MS. Results: The prevalence of MS was found to be 39.3%. Prevalence of hyperuricemia was 8.4% in males and 4.1% in females (P=0.004). Mean UA level was higher in males than in females (P<0.001). UA levels increased significantly with an increasing number of MS components in both genders. Prevalence of MS increased across UA quartiles in females; however the increasing trend began from second quartile in males. Using the lowest quartile of UA level as a reference, there were no significant association between UA quartile groups and MS. Conclusion: This study showed that UA levels are not an appropriate predictor of MS in Iranian population. More longitudinal studies are necessary to confirm the role of UA in MS occurrence. PMID:23283048

  11. Electroconvulsive shock increases interstitial concentrations of uric acid in the rat brain.

    PubMed

    Nomikos, G G; Zis, A P; Damsma, G; Fibiger, H C

    1994-10-10

    This study examined the effects of electroconvulsive shock (ECS) on striatal interstitial concentrations of the purine metabolite uric acid (UA) using microdialysis in freely moving rats. UA increased to about 200% of baseline following ECS. Intense seizure activity induced by the convulsant agent flurothyl also resulted in a two-fold increase of UA concentrations suggesting that the ECS-induced UA increase is related to the seizure activity per se. Local administration of tetrodotoxin or perfusion with a Ca(2+)-free solution failed to affect the basal or the ECS-induced increase in UA concentrations. These data indicate that both the basal and the stimulated interstitial concentrations of uric acid are not dependent upon neuronal activity and exocytotic release. The UA response to ECS appears to be refractory to a second ECS delivered 2 but not 24 h after the first. Intrastriatal infusion of allopurinol (1 mM), an inhibitor of UA synthesis, decreased basal UA concentrations to 26% but did not influence the ECS-induced UA increase. Systemic injection of allopurinol (20 mg/kg, i.p.) decreased basal UA concentrations to 25% and prevented the ECS-induced UA elevation. ECS also increased serum concentrations of UA to almost 200% of baseline. Allopurinol (20 mg/kg, i.p.) markedly decreased serum UA concentrations to non-detectable levels and completely abolished the ECS-induced increase. The estimated concentration difference between blood and brain interstitial UA strongly suggests that ECS-induced increase in brain interstitial UA concentrations is of peripheral origin possibly due to disruption of the blood brain barrier during seizure activity. PMID:7828001

  12. Discovery of enantioselectivity of urea inhibitors of soluble epoxide hydrolase.

    PubMed

    Manickam, Manoj; Pillaiyar, Thanigaimalai; Boggu, PullaReddy; Venkateswararao, Eeda; Jalani, Hitesh B; Kim, Nam-Doo; Lee, Seul Ki; Jeon, Jang Su; Kim, Sang Kyum; Jung, Sang-Hun

    2016-07-19

    Soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) hydrolyzes epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) in the metabolic pathway of arachidonic acid and has been considered as an important therapeutic target for chronic diseases such as hypertension, diabetes and inflammation. Although many urea derivatives are known as sEH inhibitors, the enantioselectivity of the inhibitors is not highlighted in spite of the stereoselective hydrolysis of EETs by sEH. In an effort to explore the importance of enantioselectivity in the urea scaffold, a series of enantiomers with the stereocenter adjacent to the urea nitrogen atom were prepared. The selectivity of enantiomers of 1-(α-alkyl-α-phenylmethyl)-3-(3-phenylpropyl)ureas showed wide range differences up to 125 fold with the low IC50 value up to 13 nM. The S-configuration with planar phenyl and small alkyl groups at α-position is crucial for the activity and selectivity. However, restriction of the free rotation of two α-groups with indan-1-yl or 1,2,3,4-tetrahydronaphthalen-1-yl moiety abolishes the selectivity between the enantiomers, despite the increase in activity up to 13 nM. The hydrophilic group like sulfonamido group at para position of 3-phenylpropyl motif of 1-(α-alkyl-α-phenylmethyl-3-(3-phenylpropyl)urea improves the activity as well as enantiomeric selectivity. All these ureas are proved to be specific inhibitor of sEH without inhibition against mEH. PMID:27092411

  13. NiO nanoparticle-based urea biosensor.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, Manisha; Tomar, Monika; Gupta, Vinay

    2013-03-15

    NiO nanoparticles (NiO-NPs) have been exploited successfully for the fabrication of a urea biosensor. A thin film of NiO nanoparticles deposited on an indium tin oxide (ITO) coated glass substrate serves as an efficient matrix for the immobilisation of urease (Ur), the specific enzyme for urea detection. The prepared bioelectrode (Ur/NiO-NP/ITO/glass) is utilised for urea sensing using cyclic voltammetry and UV-visible spectroscopy. NiO nanoparticles act as electro-catalytic species that are based on the shuttling of electrons between Ni(2+) and Ni(3+) in the octahedral site and result in an enhanced electrochemical current response. The prepared bioelectrode (Ur/NiO-NPs/ITO/glass) exhibits a high sensitivity of 21.3 μA/(mM (*) cm(2)) and a good linearity in a wide range (0.83-16.65 Mm) of urea concentrations with fast response time of 5s. The low value of the Michaelis-Menten constant (K(m)=0.34 mM) indicates the high affinity of Ur towards the analyte (urea). The high catalytic activity, along with the redox behaviour of NiO-NPs, makes it an efficient matrix for the realisation of a urea biosensor. PMID:22947517

  14. Urea and ureolytic activity in lakes of different trophic status.

    PubMed

    Siuda, Waldemar; Chróst, Ryszard J

    2006-01-01

    Urea and uraease (U-ase) activity were determined in water samples taken from the surface layers of 17 lakes of different trophic status. Urea concentrations were inversely correlated with the trophic status of the studied lakes and varied from below the detection limit to 25 micromol l(-1). Maximal potential ureolytic activity (V(max)) ranged from 0.2 to 7.0 micromol l(-1) h(-1). The highest urea concentrations and the lowest U-ase activities were recorded in the spring, whereas the lowest urea concentrations and the highest rates of urea hydrolysis were observed late in summer, during heavy phytoplankton blooms. Since in the majority of the Great Mazurian Lakes microplankton growth was limited by nitrogen supply, urea was an important N source for both auto- and heterotrophic planktonic microorganisms throughout the growth period. U-ase activity was mainly related to the seston. Only up to 25% of total activity could be attributed to free enzymes dissolved in lake water. In epilimnetic water samples the bulk of the ureolytic activity originated from seston-attached bacteria. However, a positive, statistically significant correlation between ureolytic activity and chlorophyll a (Chl(a)) concentrations suggests that phytoplankton may also be responsible for at least a some of the observed ureolytic activity in the highly eutrophic Great Mazurian Lakes. PMID:17338274

  15. Analysis of the Sub-Millimeter Rotational Spectrum of Urea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Jessica R.; Fosnight, Alyssa M.; Medvedev, Ivan R.

    2013-06-01

    Urea, ((NH_{2})_{2}CO), has broad presence in biological species. As a byproduct of human metabolism, this molecule is commonly tested for in blood to diagnose different pathologies. Furthermore, urea is seen in interstellar medium and its detection could yield valuable insight into the mechanisms governing star formation. Despite the prevalence of urea, an absence exists in recorded frequencies of this molecule. The new generation of the sub-millimeter telescopes, such as ALMA, HERSCHEL, and SOFIA, allows detection of interstellar molecular spectra at unprecedented spatial and spectral resolutions. The knowledge of the precise frequencies of spectra transitions present in interstellar molecular clouds would alleviate the problem of spectral congestion and aid in molecular identification. This paper reports the most recent investigation of the submillimeter/terahertz gas phase spectrum of urea. Up until now, only the microwave laboratory spectrum of urea's vibrational ground state has been available. This paper reports the high-resolution spectra of urea in the sub-millimeter range, and extends the spectroscopic assignment of the rotational transitions in the vibrational ground state. Additionally, the assignment of the first vibrational state and tentative assignments of two additional vibrational states have been made.

  16. Uric acid is released in the brain during seizure activity and increases severity of seizures in a mouse model for acute limbic seizures.

    PubMed

    Thyrion, Lisa; Raedt, Robrecht; Portelli, Jeanelle; Van Loo, Pieter; Wadman, Wytse J; Glorieux, Griet; Lambrecht, Bart N; Janssens, Sophie; Vonck, Kristl; Boon, Paul

    2016-03-01

    Recent evidence points at an important role of endogenous cell-damage induced pro-inflammatory molecules in the generation of epileptic seizures. Uric acid, under the form of monosodium urate crystals, has shown to have pro-inflammatory properties in the body, but less is known about its role in seizure generation. This study aimed to unravel the contribution of uric acid to seizure generation in a mouse model for acute limbic seizures. We measured extracellular levels of uric acid in the brain and modulated them using complementary pharmacological and genetic tools. Local extracellular uric acid levels increased three to four times during acute limbic seizures and peaked between 50 and 100min after kainic acid infusion. Manipulating uric acid levels through administration of allopurinol or knock-out of urate oxidase significantly altered the number of generalized seizures, decreasing and increasing them by a twofold respectively. Taken together, our results consistently show that uric acid is released during limbic seizures and suggest that uric acid facilitates seizure generalization. PMID:26774005

  17. Reactive oxygen species derived from xanthine oxidase interrupt dimerization of breast cancer resistance protein, resulting in suppression of uric acid excretion to the intestinal lumen.

    PubMed

    Ogura, Jiro; Kuwayama, Kaori; Sasaki, Shunichi; Kaneko, Chihiro; Koizumi, Takahiro; Yabe, Keisuke; Tsujimoto, Takashi; Takeno, Reiko; Takaya, Atsushi; Kobayashi, Masaki; Yamaguchi, Hiroaki; Iseki, Ken

    2015-09-01

    The prevalence of hyperuricemia/gout increases with aging. However, the effect of aging on function for excretion of uric acid to out of the body has not been clarified. We found that ileal uric acid clearance in middle-aged rats (11-12 months) was decreased compared with that in young rats (2 months). In middle-aged rats, xanthine oxidase (XO) activity in the ileum was significantly higher than that in young rats. Inosine-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS), which are derived from XO, also decreased ileal uric acid clearance. ROS derived from XO decreased the active homodimer level of breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP), which is a uric acid efflux transporter, in the ileum. Pre-administration of allopurinol recovered the BCRP homodimer level, resulting in the recovering ileal uric acid clearance. Moreover, we investigated the effects of ROS derived from XO on BCRP homodimer level directly in Caco-2 cells using hypoxanthine. Treatment with hypoxanthine decreased BCRP homodimer level. Treatment with hypoxanthine induced mitochondrial dysfunction, suggesting that the decreasing BCRP homodimer level might be caused by mitochondrial dysfunction. In conclusion, ROS derived from XO decrease BCRP homodimer level, resulting in suppression of function for uric acid excretion to the ileal lumen. ROS derived from XO may cause the suppression of function of the ileum for the excretion of uric acid with aging. The results of our study provide a new insight into the causes of increasing hyperuricemia/gout prevalence with aging. PMID:26119820

  18. Performance of the estimated glomerular filtration rate creatinine and cystatin C based equations in Thai patients with chronic glomerulonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Satirapoj, Bancha; Jirawatsiwaporn, Ketkan; Tangwonglert, Theerasak; Choovichian, Panbubpa

    2015-01-01

    Background Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) is considered the indicator of overall kidney function, and therefore, its assessment has become an important clinical tool in the daily care of chronic glomerulonephritis (CGN) patients. Currently, practical guidelines recommend using Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD-EPI) equations to assess GFR in CKD patients. Methods A cross-sectional study was performed in CGN patients. Standard GFR was measured using 24-hour urine creatinine clearance. GFR was estimated using the Cockcroft-Gault, Modification of Diet in Renal Disease, CKD-EPI equation based creatinine, cystatin C, and combined creatinine and cystatin C. The performance of GFR estimation equations were examined using bias, precision and accuracy and agreement between standard GFR and estimated GFR by calculating Cohen’s k. Results A total of 125 patients (74 male, 59.2%) with mean age 56.1±18.1 years were included. Mean standard GFR was 51.6±32.2 mL/min per 1.73 m2. A significant correlation was found between standard GFR and all estimated GFRs (r=0.573 to 0.660, P<0.001). CKD-EPI-creatinine-cystatin C equation had the smallest absolute bias and the significantly highest accuracy, although it was not significantly different from CKD-EPI-cystatin C equation (P=0.523). CKD-EPI-creatinine-cystatin C equation had the highest accuracy to classify CKD staging (Cohen’s k=0.345), but it underestimated GFR in 32% and overestimated GFR in 18% of the CGN patients. Conclusion CKD-EPI-creatinine-cystatin C equation estimated GFR with little bias, and the highest accuracy among CGN patients. This equation gave a better estimate of GFR than the equation based on serum creatinine. PMID:26527894

  19. Uric acid enhances PKC-dependent eNOS phosphorylation and mediates cellular ER stress: A mechanism for uric acid-induced endothelial dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    LI, PENG; ZHANG, LINA; ZHANG, MEI; ZHOU, CHANGYONG; LIN, NAN

    2016-01-01

    The mechanism by which hyperuricemia induced-endothelial dysfunction contributes to cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) is not yet fully understood. In the present study, we used uric acid (UA) to trigger endothelial dysfunction in cultured endothelial cells, and investigated the effects of induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress induction, and the protein kinase C (PKC)-dependent endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) signaling pathway. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were incubated with 6, 9 or 12 mg/dl UA, ROS scavenger polyethylene glycol-superoxide dismutase (PEG-SOD), ER stress inhibitor 4-phenylbutyric acid (4-PBA), and PKC inhibitor polymyxin B for 6–48 h. Nitric oxide (NO) production, eNOS activity, intracellular ROS, ER stress levels, and the interaction between eNOS and calmodulin (CaM) and cytosolic calcium levels were assessed using fluorescence microscopy and western blot analysis. Apoptosis was assessed by annexin V staining. UA increased HUVEC apoptosis and reduced eNOS activity and NO production in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Intracellular ROS was elevated after 3 h, while ER stress level increased after 6 h. UA did not alter intracellular Ca2+, CaM, or eNOS concentration, or eNOS Ser1177 phosphorylation. However, PKC-dependent eNOS phosphorylation at Thr495 was greatly enhanced, and consequently interaction between eNOS and CaM was reduced. Cellular ROS depletion, ER stress inhibition and PKC activity reduction inhibited the effect of UA on eNOS activity, NO release and apoptosis in HUVECs. Thus, we concluded that UA induced HUVEC apoptosis and endothelial dysfunction by triggering oxidative and ER stress through PKC/eNOS-mediated eNOS activity and NO production. PMID:26935704

  20. Uric acid enhances PKC-dependent eNOS phosphorylation and mediates cellular ER stress: A mechanism for uric acid-induced endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Li, Peng; Zhang, Lina; Zhang, Mei; Zhou, Changyong; Lin, Nan

    2016-04-01

    The mechanism by which hyperuricemia induced-endothelial dysfunction contributes to cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) is not yet fully understood. In the present study, we used uric acid (UA) to trigger endothelial dysfunction in cultured endothelial cells, and investigated the effects of induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress induction, and the protein kinase C (PKC)-dependent endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) signaling pathway. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were incubated with 6, 9 or 12 mg/dl UA, ROS scavenger polyethylene glycol-superoxide dismutase (PEG‑SOD), ER stress inhibitor 4-phenylbutyric acid (4-PBA), and PKC inhibitor polymyxin B for 6-48 h. Nitric oxide (NO) production, eNOS activity, intracellular ROS, ER stress levels, and the interaction between eNOS and calmodulin (CaM) and cytosolic calcium levels were assessed using fluorescence microscopy and western blot analysis. Apoptosis was assessed by annexin V staining. UA increased HUVEC apoptosis and reduced eNOS activity and NO production in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Intracellular ROS was elevated after 3 h, while ER stress level increased after 6 h. UA did not alter intracellular Ca2+, CaM, or eNOS concentration, or eNOS Ser1177 phosphorylation. However, PKC-dependent eNOS phosphorylation at Thr495 was greatly enhanced, and consequently interaction between eNOS and CaM was reduced. Cellular ROS depletion, ER stress inhibition and PKC activity reduction inhibited the effect of UA on eNOS activity, NO release and apoptosis in HUVECs. Thus, we concluded that UA induced HUVEC apoptosis and endothelial dysfunction by triggering oxidative and ER stress through PKC/eNOS-mediated eNOS activity and NO production. PMID:26935704

  1. Recycling of polyurethane-urea RIM

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, H.X.; Kresta, J.E.; Suthar, B.; Li, X.H.

    1997-12-31

    Polyurethane-urea (PUU) RIM are crosslinked materials, which cannot be reprocessed or recycled by using the conventional process. The chemical decrosslinking reaction or transesterification of themosetting polyurethanes by using various inorganic and organic catalysts were investigated. The recycling of waste PUU RIM materials (unpainted, painted and filler reinforced) through decrosslinking (transesterification) using low molecular weight glycols in presence of catalyst was evaluated. It was established that the transestification of PUU RIM can be carried out at the low glycol (EG)/RIM ratio (15/84.5) and that the usual recovery step for the excess glycol (EG) can be avoided resulting in an economical process. The process was scaled up in a 50 gallon reactor at the LymTal International Inc. successfully. It was established that the products from the decrosslinking of PUU RIM are a mixture of the liquid oligomers (LOs) containing urethane, OH and NH{sub 2} groups. These functional groups in LOs exhibit many potential applications as raw materials in the preparation of RIM coatings, adhesives, foams, sealants and composites. PUU RIM made from LOs exhibited promising and interesting results. Both solvent-based and waterborne urethane coatings could be made from LOs. Urethane adhesives made from LOs showed improvement of properties with increasing amounts of LOs. Structural adhesives based on epoxy and LOs were prepared and the effects of equivalent ratios and curing conditions on the adhesive strength of the epoxy/LO adhesives were investigated. Solvent-free coating based on epoxy and LOs was prepared and their properties were determined. Both wood fiber and glass fabric reinforced composites were prepared by using epoxy and LOs and they exhibited interesting properties for different potential applications.

  2. Relationships among anthropometric indices of growth and creatinine and hydroxyproline excretion in preadolescent black and white girls.

    PubMed

    Wakefield, T; Disney, G W; Mason, R L; Beauchene, R E

    1980-09-01

    Relationships among anthropometric indices of growth and creatinine and hydroxyproline excretion were studied over a 2-year longitudinal period in 124 preadolescent girls. Four groups of girls were selected: low-income white (LIW), middle-income white (MIW), low-income black (LIB) and middle-income black (MIB). Changes in body height, weight, subcapsular skinfold, bone density of the phalanx and bone mineral of the radius and ulna were used as indices of growth in relation to creatinine and hydroxyproline excretion. There were no significant differences in subcapsular skinfold among the groups. Bone density of the phalanx and bone mineral of the radius and ulna were significantly greater in blacks than whites at each age. Mean values for urinary creatinine concentration ranged from 0.115 to 0.209 g/dl from 9 to 11 years of age and tended to be greater for the middle-income than the low-income girls. Urinary hydroxyproline (g)/creatinine (g) ranged from 0.072 at 9 to 0.128 at 11 years of age with no significant differences between groups. All measurements showed significant increases with age. Significant positive correlations were seen among several indices in both racial groups and are discussed. INDEX WORDS: Growth, height/weight, hydroxyproline/creatinine excretion, race-income groups, subscapular skinfold, bone density, bone mineral content, preadolescent girls. PMID:7429286

  3. Comparison of CKD-EPI Cystatin C and Creatinine Glomerular Filtration Rate Estimation Equations in Asian Indians.

    PubMed

    Teo, Boon Wee; Sabanayagam, Charumathi; Liao, Jiemin; Toh, Qi Chun; Saw, Sharon; Wong, Tien Yin; Sethi, Sunil

    2014-01-01

    Background. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is identified in the general population using estimated glomerular filtration rates (eGFR) calculated from a serum creatinine-based equation, the chronic kidney disease-epidemiology collaboration (CKD-EPI) equation. Using serum cystatin C in combination may improve eGFR accuracy. We evaluated the new CKD-EPI equations incorporating cystatin C in a population of Asian Indians in classifying CKD across body mass index, diabetes, and hypertension status. Methods. We retrieved standardized serum creatinine and serum cystatin C data from a cohort of 2877 Asian Indians aged 40-80 years from the Singapore Indian Eye Study and calculated eGFR (in mL/min/1.73 m(2)) with the new CKD-EPI equations and serum creatinine only equation. Results. The creatinine only equation mean eGFR (88 ± 17) was similar to using spline Log cystatin C (88 ± 22). The lowest mean eGFR (81 ± 21) was obtained with the spline Log cystatin C-age, sex, and weight equation. The creatinine only equation had the fewest participants (7.1%) with eGFR <60 and spline Log cystatin C-age, sex, and weight equation had the most (16.1%). Conclusions. Using serum cystatin C resulted in widely varying eGFR which significantly affected the classification of chronic kidney disease. PMID:24868463

  4. Amperometric creatinine biosensor based on covalently coimmobilized enzymes onto carboxylated multiwalled carbon nanotubes/polyaniline composite film.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Sandeep; Kumar, Ashok; Pundir, C S

    2011-12-15

    A mixture of commercial creatinine amidohydrolase (CA), creatine amidinohydrolase (CI), and sarcosine oxidase (SO) was coimmobilized covalently via N-ethyl-N'-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDC) and N-hydroxy succinimide (NHS) chemistry onto carboxylated multiwalled carbon nanotube (c-MWCNT)/polyaniline (PANI) nanocomposite film electrodeposited over the surface of a platinum (Pt) electrode. A creatinine biosensor was fabricated using enzyme/c-MWCNT/PANI/Pt as working electrode, Ag/AgCl as reference electrode, and Pt wire as auxiliary electrode connected through potentiostat. The enzyme electrode was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The biosensor detected creatinine levels as low as 0.1 μM, estimated at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3, within 5s at pH 7.5 and 35°C. The optimized biosensor showed a linear response range of 10 to 750 μM creatinine with sensitivity of 40 μA/mM/cm(2). The fabricated biosensor was successfully employed for determination of creatinine in human serum. The biosensor showed only 15% loss in its initial response after 180 days when stored at 4°C. PMID:21906581

  5. Use of protein: creatinine ratio in a random spot urine sample for predicting significant proteinuria in diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Yadav, B K; Adhikari, S; Gyawali, P; Shrestha, R; Poudel, B; Khanal, M

    2010-06-01

    Present study was undertaken during a period of 6 months (September 2008-February 2009) to see an correlation of 24 hours urine protein estimation with random spot protein-creatinine (P:C) ratio among a diabetic patients. The study comprised of 144 patients aged 30-70 years, recruited from Kantipur hospital, Kathmandu. The 24-hr urine sample was collected, followed by spot random urine sample. Both samples were analyzed for protein and creatinine excretion. An informed consent was taken from all participants. Sixteen inadequately collected urine samples as defined by (predicted creatinine--measured creatinine)/predicted creatinine > 0.2 were excluded from analysis. The Spearman's rank correlation between the spot urine P:C ratio and 24-hr total protein were performed by the Statistical Package for Social Service. At the P:C ratio cutoff of 0.15 and reference method (24-hr urine protein) cutoff of 150 mg/day, the correlation coefficient was found to be 0.892 (p < 0.001). The area under ROC curve at different cutoffs was 0.88 at 95.0% CI. The sensitivity and specificity of the P:C ratio to detect significant proteinuria at the cutoff of 0.15 are 96.6% and 74.4%. So the P:C ratio can predict significant proteinuria in diabetic subjects, avoiding the inconvenient 24-hr urine collection but the cutoff should be carefully selected for different patients group under different laboratory procedures and settings. PMID:21222407

  6. FRET-Aptamer Assays for Bone Marker Assessment, C-Telopeptide, Creatinine, and Vitamin D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruno, John G.

    2013-01-01

    Astronauts lose 1.0 to 1.5% of their bone mass per month on long-duration spaceflights. NASA wishes to monitor the bone loss onboard spacecraft to develop nutritional and exercise countermeasures, and make adjustments during long space missions. On Earth, the same technology could be used to monitor osteoporosis and its therapy. Aptamers bind to targets against which they are developed, much like antibodies. However, aptamers do not require animal hosts or cell culture and are therefore easier, faster, and less expensive to produce. In addition, aptamers sometimes exhibit greater affinity and specificity vs. comparable antibodies. In this work, fluorescent dyes and quenchers were added to the aptamers to enable pushbutton, one-step, bind-and-detect fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) assays or tests that can be freeze-dried, rehydrated with body fluids, and used to quantitate bone loss of vitamin D levels with a handheld fluorometer in the spacecraft environment. This work generated specific, rapid, one-step FRET assays for the bone loss marker C-telopeptide (CTx) when extracted from urine, creatinine from urine, and vitamin D congeners in diluted serum. The assays were quantified in nanograms/mL using a handheld fluorometer connected to a laptop computer to convert the raw fluorescence values into concentrations of each analyte according to linear standard curves. DNA aptamers were selected and amplified for several rounds against a 26- amino acid form of CTx, creatinine, and vitamin D. The commonalities between loop structures were studied, and several common loop structures were converted into aptamer beacons with a fluorophore and quencher on each end. In theory, when the aptamer beacon binds its cognate target (CTx bone peptide, creatinine, or vitamin D), it is forced open and no longer quenched, so it gives off fluorescent light (when excited) in proportion to the amount of target present in a sample. This proportional increase in fluorescence is called a "lights on" FRET response. The vitamin D aptamer beacon gives a "lights off" or inversely proportional fluorescence response to the amount of vitamin D present in diluted serum. These FRET-aptamer assays are rapid (<30 minutes), sensitive (low ng/mL detection limits), and quite easy to carry out (add sample, mix, and detect in the handheld reader). Benefits include the speed of the assays as well as the small amount of space taken up by the handheld reader and cuvette assays. The aptamer DNA sequences represent novel additional features of the existing (patent-pending) FRET-aptamer assay platform.

  7. Salvage of blood urea nitrogen in sheep is highly dependent on plasma urea concentration and the efficiency of capture within the diegestive tract

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective was to establish the relationships between transfer of blood urea-N to the digestive tract (GIT) and utilisation of recycled urea-N within the GIT, and to determine which of these two mechanisms of the urea recycling process places greater limits on N salvage by growing sheep. Four gro...

  8. Serum Uric Acid and Renal Transplantation Outcomes: At Least 3-Year Post-transplant Retrospective Multivariate Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Kun; Gao, Baoshan; Wang, Yuantao; Wang, Gang; Wang, Weigang; Zhu, Yaxiang; Yao, Liyu; Gu, Yiming; Chen, Mo; Zhou, Honglan; Fu, Yaowen

    2015-01-01

    Since the association of serum uric acid and kidney transplant graft outcome remains disputable, we sought to evaluate the predictive value of uric acid level for graft survival/function and the factors could affect uric acid as time varies. A consecutive cohort of five hundred and seventy three recipients transplanted during January 2008 to December 2011 were recruited. Data and laboratory values of our interest were collected at 1, 3, 6, 12, 24 and 36 months post-transplant for analysis. Cox proportional hazard model, and multiple regression equation were built to adjust for the possible confounding variables and meet our goals as appropriate. The current cohort study lasts for 41.86 ± 15.49 months. Uric acid level is proven to be negatively associated with eGFR at different time point after adjustment for age, body mass index and male gender (standardized β ranges from -0.15 to -0.30 with all P<0.001).Males with low eGFR but high level of TG were on CSA, diuretics and RAS inhibitors and experienced at least one episode of acute rejection and diabetic issue were associated with a higher mean uric acid level. Hyperuricemia was significantly an independent predictor of pure graft failure (hazard ratio=4.01, 95% CI: 1.25-12.91, P=0.02) after adjustment. But it was no longer an independent risk factor for graft loss after adjustment. Interestingly, higher triglyceride level can make incidence of graft loss (hazard ratio=1.442, for each unit increase millimoles per liter 95% CI: 1.008-2.061, P=0.045) and death (hazard ratio=1.717, 95% CI: 1.105-2.665, P=0.016) more likely. The results of our study suggest that post-transplant elevated serum uric acid level is an independent predictor of long-term graft survival and graft function. Together with the high TG level impact on poor outcomes, further investigations for therapeutic effect are needed. PMID:26208103

  9. Relationship Between Buprenorphine Dosing and Triglyceride Lowering and Creatinine Kinase Elevation in Felines: Possible Human Implications.

    PubMed

    Srinivas, Nuggehally R

    2016-03-01

    Recently published feline data suggest that high doses of buprenorphine can elevate creatinine kinase (CK) and profoundly influence triglyceride levels in an inverted dose versus effect relationship. This intriguing observation in felines, hitherto not documented for buprenorphine, should be considered in human situations for any trends of translatability. The report evaluates the observed effects in domestic cats and what is known about buprenorphine in human subjects. Based on the objective assessment, the following are deduced: (a) although elevated CK levels is a nonissue in humans, one needs to pay attention especially when buprenorphine is used at the high end of therapeutic dose range in the presence of drugs that can impair the hepatic metabolism of buprenorphine; and (b) the potential for triglyceride lowering can be easily confirmed in human trials, and since it may occur at the relevant therapeutic doses of buprenorphine, it may be beneficial in such patients who may have added cardiovascular risk factors. PMID:26861654

  10. Ratio of Urine Albumin to Creatinine Attenuates the Association of Dementia With Hip Fracture Risk

    PubMed Central

    Bůžková, Petra; Fink, Howard A.; Robbins, John A.; Cauley, Jane A.; Fitzpatrick, Annette L.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Microvascular disease is a leading cause of cognitive impairment. Approximately 50% of people with a hip fracture have cognitive impairment. Objective: We tested the hypothesis that microvascular diseases of the brain (lacunar infarcts and white matter disease [WMD]), kidney (albuminuria [≥ 30 mg/g creatinine] and albumin creatinine ratio [ACR]), and eye (retinal vascular disorders) attenuate the association of cognitive impairment with hip fracture risk. Setting: The Cardiovascular Health Cognition Study. Patients: Three thousand, one-hundred six participants (mean age, ∼79 y; 8.84 y median follow-up) with cognitive testing. Subsets received ACR testing (n=2389), brain magnetic resonance imaging scans (n = 2094), and retinal photography (n = 1098). Main Outcome Measure: Incident hip fracture. Results: There were 488 participants (16%) with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and 564 (18%) with dementia. There were 337 incident hip fractures, of which 19% occurred in participants with MCI and 26% in participants with dementia. Adjusted hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence interval for hip fracture in participants with MCI were 2.45 (1.67–3.61) and for dementia 2.35 (1.57–3.52). With doubling of ACR, the HR for fracture was attenuated in participants with dementia compared with participants with normal cognition [interaction HR 0.70 (0.55–0.91)]. No such effect was found in participants with MCI. Albuminuria, lacunar infarcts, WMD, and retinal vascular disease (RVD) did not modify the association of dementia or MCI with hip fracture risk. Conclusions: ACR attenuates part of the risk of hip fracture in people with dementia, suggesting that these disorders share a common pathogenesis. PMID:25148233

  11. Comparing GFR Estimating Equations Using Cystatin C and Creatinine in Elderly Individuals.

    PubMed

    Fan, Li; Levey, Andrew S; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Andresdottir, Margret B; Gudmundsdottir, Hrefna; Indridason, Olafur S; Palsson, Runolfur; Mitchell, Gary; Inker, Lesley A

    2015-08-01

    Current guidelines recommend reporting eGFR using the Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD-EPI) equations unless other equations are more accurate, and recommend the combination of creatinine and cystatin C (eGFRcr-cys) as more accurate than either eGFRcr or eGFRcys alone. However, preferred equations and filtration markers in elderly individuals are debated. In 805 adults enrolled in the community-based Age, Gene/Environment Susceptibility (AGES)-Reykjavik Study, we measured GFR (mGFR) using plasma clearance of iohexol, standardized creatinine and cystatin C, and eGFR using the CKD-EPI, Japanese, Berlin Initiative Study (BIS), and Caucasian and Asian pediatric and adult subjects (CAPA) equations. We evaluated equation performance using bias, precision, and two measures of accuracy. We first compared the Japanese, BIS, and CAPA equations with the CKD-EPI equations to determine the preferred equations, and then compared eGFRcr and eGFRcys with eGFRcr-cys using the preferred equations. Mean (SD) age was 80.3 (4.0) years. Median (25th, 75th) mGFR was 64 (52, 73) ml/min per 1.73 m(2), and the prevalence of decreased GFR was 39% (95% confidence interval, 35.8 to 42.5). Among 24 comparisons with the other equations, CKD-EPI equations performed better in 9, similar in 13, and worse in 2. Using the CKD-EPI equations, eGFRcr-cys performed better than eGFRcr in four metrics, better than eGFRcys in two metrics, and similar to eGFRcys in two metrics. In conclusion, neither the Japanese, BIS, nor CAPA equations were superior to the CKD-EPI equations in this cohort of community-dwelling elderly individuals. Using the CKD-EPI equations, eGFRcr-cys performed better than eGFRcr or eGFRcys. PMID:25527647

  12. Glomerular filtration rate estimation using cystatin C alone or combined with creatinine as a confirmatory test

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Li; Inker, Lesley A.; Rossert, Jerome; Froissart, Marc; Rossing, Peter; Mauer, Michael; Levey, Andrew S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) estimating equations using the combination of creatinine and cystatin C (eGFRcr-cys) are more accurate than equations using either alone (eGFRcr or eGFRcys). New guidelines suggest measuring cystatin C as a confirmatory test when eGFRcr may be inaccurate, but do not specify demographic or clinical conditions in which eGFRcys or eGFRcr-cys are more accurate than eGFRcr nor which estimate to use in such circumstances. Methods We compared the performance of the Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD-EPI) equations in 1119 subjects in the CKD-EPI cystatin C external validation dataset. Subgroups were defined by eGFRcr, age, sex, diabetes status and body mass index (BMI). The reference test was GFR measured using urinary or plasma clearance of exogenous filtration markers. Cystatin C and creatinine assays were traceable to primary reference materials. Accuracy was defined as the absolute difference in eGFR compared with mGFR. Results The mean mGFR was 70 ± 41 (SD) mL/min/1.73 m2. eGFRcys was more accurate than eGFRcr at lower BMI and less accurate at higher BMI, especially at higher levels of eGFRcr. There were small differences in accuracy in people according to the diabetes status. eGFRcr-cys was as accurate or more accurate than eGFRcr or eGFRcys in these and all other subgroups. Conclusions eGFRcr-cys, but not eGFRcys, is more accurate than eGFRcr in most subgroups we studied, suggesting preferential use of eGFRcr-cys when serum cystatin C is measured as a confirmatory test to obtain more accurate eGFR. Further studies are necessary to evaluate diagnostic strategies for using eGFRcys and eGFRcr-cys. PMID:24449101

  13. Quantitative TLC-Image Analysis of Urinary Creatinine Using Iodine Staining and RGB Values.

    PubMed

    Kerr, Emily; West, Caroline; Kradtap Hartwell, Supaporn

    2016-04-01

    Digital image analysis of the separation results of colorless analytes on thin-layer chromatography (TLC) plates usually involves using specially tailored software to analyze the images generated from either a UV scanner or UV lamp station with a digital camera or a densitometer. Here, a low-cost alternative setup for quantitative TLC-digital image analysis is demonstrated using a universal staining reagent (iodine vapor), an office scanner and a commonly available software (Microsoft Paint) for analysis of red, green and blue colors (RGB values). Urinary creatinine is used as a model analyte to represent a sample in complicated biological matrices. Separation was carried out on a silica gel plate using a butanol-NH4OH-H2O (40 : 10 : 50, v/v) mobile phase with a 6-cm solvent front. It is important that the TLC plate be stained evenly and with sufficient staining time. Staining the TLC plate in a 23.4 × 18.8 × 6.8 cm chamber containing about 70 g iodine crystals yielded comparable results for the staining times of 30-60 min. The Green value offered the best results in the linear working range (0.0810-0.9260 mg/mL) and precision (2.03% RSD, n = 10). The detection limit was found to be 0.24 µg per 3 µL spot. Urinary creatinine concentrations determined by TLC-digital image analysis using the green value calibration graph agree well with results obtained from high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC). PMID:26657734

  14. Early and small changes in serum creatinine concentrations are associated with mortality in mechanically ventilated patients.

    PubMed

    Nin, Nicolás; Lombardi, Raúl; Frutos-Vivar, Fernando; Esteban, Andrés; Lorente, José A; Ferguson, Niall D; Hurtado, Javier; Apezteguia, Carlos; Brochard, Laurent; Schortgen, Fréderique; Raymondos, Konstantinos; Tomicic, Vinko; Soto, Luis; González, Marco; Nightingale, Peter; Abroug, Fekri; Pelosi, Paolo; Arabi, Yaseen; Moreno, Rui; Anzueto, Antonio

    2010-08-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that minor changes in serum creatinine concentrations are associated with increased hospital mortality rates. However, whether serum creatinine concentration (SCr) on admission and its change are associated with an increased mortality rate in mechanically ventilated patients is not known. We have conducted an international, prospective, observational cohort study enrolling adult intensive care unit patients under mechanical ventilation (MV). Recursive partitioning was used to determine the values of SCr at the start of MV (SCr0) and the change in SCr ([DeltaSCr] defined as the maximal difference between the value at start of MV [day 0] and the value on MV day 2 at 8:00 am) that best discriminate mortality. In-hospital mortality, adjusted by a proportional hazards model, was the primary outcome variable. A total of 2,807 patients were included; median age was 59 years and median Simplified Acute Physiology Score II was 44. All-cause in-hospital mortality was 44%. The variable that best discriminated outcome was a SCr0 greater than 1.40 mg/dL (mortality, 57% vs. 36% for patients with SCr0

  15. The relationship of ADC values of renal parenchyma with CKD stage and serum creatinine levels

    PubMed Central

    Yalçin-Şafak, Kadihan; Ayyildiz, Muhammet; Ünel, Sacide Yekta; Umarusman-Tanju, Neslihan; Akça, Ahmet; Baysal, Tamer

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the relationship of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values of renal parenchyma with chronic kidney disease (CKD) stage and serum creatinine levels. Materials and methods One hundred and ten patients who had undergone magnetic resonance imaging of the upper abdomen for different reasons were retrospectively studied. A region of interest (ROI) was placed on the renal parenchyma for measurement of ADC values of both kidneys, without any preference for cortex or medulla. Three circular ROIs were placed-one each in the upper pole, interpolar region and lower pole of both kidneys. The mean ADC values were recorded for each patient and the relationship between ADC values and stage of CKD and serum creatinine levels were evaluated. Results Statistically significant difference was determined between the ADC values of the cases according to CKD stages (p < 0.001). Paired comparisons performed to determine the group that caused the difference revealed that median ADC values of healthy subjects who formed the control group was statistically significantly higher than that of the cases with stage 3, stage 4 and stage 5 CKD (p: 0.008; p: 0.008; and p: 0.002, respectively). Sensitivity and specificity were found to be 75.44% and 69.81%, respectively in detecting stage 3, stage 4 and stage 5 CKD among the cases with ADC values of 1151 and lower. Conclusion ADC values can play a role in the evaluation of renal dysfunction. However, population-and protocol-based cut-off ADC values are needed to identify renal dysfunction and to distinguish between different stages of CKD.

  16. Rapid assessment of endogenous creatinine in physiological samples analyzed by reversed-phase liquid chromatography with spectrophotometric detection.

    PubMed

    Krstulovic, A M; Bertani-Dziedzic, L; Caporusso, J M

    1979-12-01

    An improved and direct analysis of endogenous creatinine levels using the reversed-phase mode of high performance liquid chromatography (RPLC) is described. The analysis is rapid, the sensitivity of the spectrophotometric detection is in the nanomole range, and the sample preparation requires only filtration to remove the particulate matter. Identification of chromatographic peaks was achieved by means of absorbance ratios, stopped-flow UV spectra and prechromatographic incubation of samples with creatinine amidohydrolase. Reported in this paper are representative chromatograms of samples of amniotic fluid, urine, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). The ranges of creatinine concentrations in 10 samples of amniotic fluid, urine and CSF were 0.774--1.850, 99--454.5 and 0.648--1.05 mg/100 ml, respectively. This highly specific and simple assay offers several improvements over previously used methods. PMID:509740

  17. Urea-formaldehyde resins and free formaldehyde content.

    PubMed

    Vargha, V

    1998-01-01

    Specifications of wood adhesives must be in correlation with the requirements for the corresponding wood products, for which they will be used. Formaldehyde emission of wood products bonded with urea-formaldehyde resin based adhesives is strictly regulated by standards and there is a compromise is between formaldehyde emission and performance, such as strength, or water resistance. Since values of formaldehyde emission depend on the test method used, in Europe urea-formaldehyde resins for adhesives may generally be classified according to HCHO emission in the particleboard rating of Emission 0 to Emission I class (E-0 to E-1). According to DIN EN 120, particleboard quality E1 emits <6.5 mg/100 g dry article determined with the perforator method. Although a great number of factors effect the formaldehyde emission of the cured products, such as the hardener system, the type of wood etc., the emission of formaldehyde is in strict correlation with the free formaldehyde content of the resin before the curing process. E1 emission class can be achieved, if the free formaldehyde content of the resin is lower than 0.2% by mass. Urea-formaldehyde resins containing. higher than 0.5% free formaldehyde by mass exceed emission class E2, and are not accepted. Since the free formaldehyde content of the urea-formaldehyde resin effects the emission of formaldehyde in the cured product, low formaldehyde content must be ensured during resin synthesis. This can be achieved by properly selecting synthesis conditions as well as raw materials. The quality of raw materials is an essential and determining factor for the synthesis of urea formaldehyde resins. The principal changes which may take place in the formaldehyde solution on storage are the polymerization and precipitation of the polymer, Cannizzaro reaction, methylal formation, oxydation to formic acid, condensation to hydroxyaldehydes and sugars. Any of these reactions are detrimental to product quality. The state of formaldehyde is also an essential factor, since the reaction of poly(methylene glycol)s with urea leads to methylene ether linkages resulting in emission of formaldehyde during storage and later on during the process of curing. Hydrolysis, isomerisation and decomposition of urea may take place simultaneously during improper storage conditions, such as high humidity, high temperatures, industrial atmosphere. The side products formed affect the reaction with formaldehyde during the synthesis resulting in high free formaldehyde content of urea-formaldehyde resins. The relation between synthesis conditions, free formaldehyde content and performance of urea-formaldehyde resins are discussed in detail. PMID:10526993

  18. Urease immobilized fluorescent gold nanoparticles for urea sensing.

    PubMed

    Parashar, Upendra Kumar; Nirala, Narsingh R; Upadhyay, Chandan; Saxena, P S; Srivastava, Anchal

    2015-05-01

    We report a surfactant-free synthesis of monodispersed gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) with average size of 15 nm. An approach for visual and fluorescent sensing of urea in aqueous solution based on shift in surface plasmon band (SPB) maxima as well as quench in fluorescence intensity. To enable the urea detection, we functionalized the thiol-capped gold nanoparticles with urease, the enzyme specific to urea using carbodiimide chemistry. The visible color changed of the gold colloidal solution from red to blue (or purple); this was evident from quenching in absorbance and fluorescence intensity, is the principle applied here for the sensing of urea. The solution turns blue when the urea concentration exceeds 8 mg/dL which reveals visual lower detection limit. The lower detection limits governed by the fluorescence quenching were found 5 mg/dL (R(2) = 0.99) which is highly sensitive and selective compared to shift in SPB maxima. The approach depicted here seems to be important in clinical diagnosis. PMID:25809996

  19. Ammonium assimilation in Proteus vulgaris, Bacillus pasteurii, and Sporosarcina ureae.

    PubMed

    Mrsdorf, G; Kaltwasser, H

    1989-01-01

    No active uptake of ammonium was detected in Proteus vulgaris, Bacillus pasteurii, and Sporosarcina ureae, which indicates that these bacteria depend on the passive diffusion of ammonia across the cell membrane. In P. vulgaris the glutamine synthetase-glutamate synthase (GS-GOGAT) pathway and glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) were present, and these enzymes exhibited high affinities for ammonium. In B. pasteurii and S. ureae, however, no GS activity was detected, and GOGAT activity was only present in S. ureae. GDH enzymes were present in these two organisms, but showed only low affinity for ammonium, with apparent Km-values of 55.2 mM in B. pasteurii and 36.7 mM in S. ureae, respectively. These observations explain why P. vulgaris is able to grow at neutral pH and low ammonium concentration (2 mM), while B. pasteurii and S. ureae require high ammonium concentration (40 mM) and alkaline pH for growth. PMID:2570557

  20. [Dialysis adequacy: the clinical illogicality of Kt/V urea].

    PubMed

    Basile, Carlo

    2011-01-01

    In the 1980s Gotch and Sargent proposed a mathematical model based on the dialytic removal of urea, introducing the concept of Kt/V urea. The main issue which justifies the fact that Kt/V urea be considered the key of the adequacy of dialysis is that it is related to mortality. However, many studies have highlighted the limits of Kt/V urea: mainly, scaling for the volume of distribution is a confounding factor since gender and body mass index directly affect morbidity and mortality in dialysis patients. On the other hand, several observational studies and preliminary randomized controlled trials have suggested that longer and/or more frequent treatments may lead to better outcomes. In conclusion, an assessment of the amount of dialysis delivered is vital. Kt/V urea, although not perfect, is a useful marker of adequacy. However, the most logical approach in order to diminish the mortality on dialysis must be the individualized prescription of the duration and/or frequency of dialysis treatment, developed through a global assessment of the proven predictors of morbidity and mortality. These parameters include nutrition, albuminemia, mineral metabolism, inflammatory markers, volume control, blood pressure, maintenance of residual renal function, and hemodynamic stability. Each of these variables seems to be associated with the duration and/or frequency of dialysis treatments. Even though several observational studies and preliminary randomized controlled trials seem to confirm these associations, time has come for interventional studies to confirm these complex relationships. PMID:21488028

  1. Blood urea content for evaluating dietary protein quality.

    PubMed

    Bassily, N S; Michael, K G; Said, A K

    1982-01-01

    The protein quality of broad beans was evaluated by using three different methods: the net protein ratio (NPR), the net protein utilization (NPU) and the relative protein value (RPV). Casein was used as a reference protein. The relationship between the values obtained on rats by each method and serum urea concentrations were examined. Serum urea concentration increased by increasing the dietary protein content. It showed a positive correlation of 0.70 and 0.60 for broad beans and casein respectively. NPR values increased by decreasing the level of dietary protein. There was no relationship between the NPR and the serum urea contents in animals fed the casein and broad bean diets. The NPU values indicated that protein utilization was greatest at low dietary protein levels and decreases by increasing the protein content of diet. Serum urea concentration showed an inverse proportion with the NPU values. This was demonstrated by correlations of -0.67 and -0.75 for broad beans and casein respectively. The highest RPV for broad beans was obtained by using the change in body water and the lowest by using the change in body nitrogen as a response parameter. An inverse relationship exists between serum urea concentration and the RPV for broad beans. PMID:7155186

  2. Porous Cross-Linked Polyimide-Urea Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Mary Ann B. (Inventor); Nguyen, Baochau N. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Porous cross-linked polyimide-urea networks are provided. The networks comprise a subunit comprising two anhydride end-capped polyamic acid oligomers in direct connection via a urea linkage. The oligomers (a) each comprise a repeating unit of a dianhydride and a diamine and a terminal anhydride group and (b) are formulated with 2 to 15 of the repeating units. The subunit was formed by reaction of the diamine and a diisocyanate to form a diamine-urea linkage-diamine group, followed by reaction of the diamine-urea linkage-diamine group with the dianhydride and the diamine to form the subunit. The subunit has been cross-linked via a cross-linking agent, comprising three or more amine groups, at a balanced stoichiometry of the amine groups to the terminal anhydride groups. The subunit has been chemically imidized to yield the porous cross-linked polyimide-urea network. Also provided are wet gels, aerogels, and thin films comprising the networks, and methods of making the networks.

  3. Crystal structure of a bacterial homologue of the kidney urea transporter

    SciTech Connect

    Levin, Elena J.; Quick, Matthias; Zhou, Ming

    2010-03-19

    Urea is highly concentrated in the mammalian kidney to produce the osmotic gradient necessary for water re-absorption. Free diffusion of urea across cell membranes is slow owing to its high polarity, and specialized urea transporters have evolved to achieve rapid and selective urea permeation. Here we present the 2.3 {angstrom} structure of a functional urea transporter from the bacterium Desulfovibrio vulgaris. The transporter is a homotrimer, and each subunit contains a continuous membrane-spanning pore formed by the two homologous halves of the protein. The pore contains a constricted selectivity filter that can accommodate several dehydrated urea molecules in single file. Backbone and side-chain oxygen atoms provide continuous coordination of urea as it progresses through the filter, and well-placed {alpha}-helix dipoles provide further compensation for dehydration energy. These results establish that the urea transporter operates by a channel-like mechanism and reveal the physical and chemical basis of urea selectivity.

  4. Improving ammonium and nitrate release from urea using clinoptilolite zeolite and compost produced from agricultural wastes.

    PubMed

    Omar, Latifah; Ahmed, Osumanu Haruna; Ab Majid, Nik Muhamad

    2015-01-01

    Improper use of urea may cause environmental pollution through NH3 volatilization and NO3 (-) leaching from urea. Clinoptilolite zeolite and compost could be used to control N loss from urea by controlling NH4 (+) and NO3 (-) release from urea. Soil incubation and leaching experiments were conducted to determine the effects of clinoptilolite zeolite and compost on controlling NH4 (+) and NO3 (-) losses from urea. Bekenu Series soil (Typic Paleudults) was incubated for 30, 60, and 90 days. A soil leaching experiment was conducted for 30 days. Urea amended with clinoptilolite zeolite and compost significantly reduced NH4 (+) and NO3 (-) release from urea (soil incubation study) compared with urea alone, thus reducing leaching of these ions. Ammonium and NO3 (-) leaching losses during the 30 days of the leaching experiment were highest in urea alone compared with urea with clinoptilolite zeolite and compost treatments. At 30 days of the leaching experiment, NH4 (+) retention in soil with urea amended with clinoptilolite zeolite and compost was better than that with urea alone. These observations were because of the high pH, CEC, and other chemical properties of clinoptilolite zeolite and compost. Urea can be amended with clinoptilolite zeolite and compost to improve NH4 (+) and NO3 (-) release from urea. PMID:25793220

  5. Improving Ammonium and Nitrate Release from Urea Using Clinoptilolite Zeolite and Compost Produced from Agricultural Wastes

    PubMed Central

    Omar, Latifah; Ahmed, Osumanu Haruna; Majid, Nik Muhamad Ab.

    2015-01-01

    Improper use of urea may cause environmental pollution through NH3 volatilization and NO3− leaching from urea. Clinoptilolite zeolite and compost could be used to control N loss from urea by controlling NH4+ and NO3− release from urea. Soil incubation and leaching experiments were conducted to determine the effects of clinoptilolite zeolite and compost on controlling NH4+ and NO3− losses from urea. Bekenu Series soil (Typic Paleudults) was incubated for 30, 60, and 90 days. A soil leaching experiment was conducted for 30 days. Urea amended with clinoptilolite zeolite and compost significantly reduced NH4+ and NO3− release from urea (soil incubation study) compared with urea alone, thus reducing leaching of these ions. Ammonium and NO3− leaching losses during the 30 days of the leaching experiment were highest in urea alone compared with urea with clinoptilolite zeolite and compost treatments. At 30 days of the leaching experiment, NH4+ retention in soil with urea amended with clinoptilolite zeolite and compost was better than that with urea alone. These observations were because of the high pH, CEC, and other chemical properties of clinoptilolite zeolite and compost. Urea can be amended with clinoptilolite zeolite and compost to improve NH4+ and NO3− release from urea. PMID:25793220

  6. Conductimetric Biosensor for the Detection of Uric Acid by Immobilization Uricase on Nata de Coco Membrane—Pt Electrode

    PubMed Central

    Mulyasuryani, Ani; Srihardiastutie, Arie

    2011-01-01

    A conductimetric enzyme biosensor for uric acid detection has been developed. The uricase, as enzyme, is isolated from Candida utilis and immobilized on a nata de coco membrane-Pt electrode. The biosensor demonstrates a linear response to urate over the concentration range 1–6 ppm and has good selectivity properties. The response is affected by the membrane thickness and pH change in the range 7.5–9.5. The response time is three minutes in aqueous solutions and in human serum samples. Application of the biosensor to the determination of uric acid in human serum gave results that compared favourably with those obtained by medical laboratory. The operational stability of the biosensor was not less than three days and the relative error is smaller than 10%. PMID:21792276

  7. Conductimetric biosensor for the detection of uric Acid by immobilization uricase on nata de coco membrane-pt electrode.

    PubMed

    Mulyasuryani, Ani; Srihardiastutie, Arie

    2011-01-01

    A conductimetric enzyme biosensor for uric acid detection has been developed. The uricase, as enzyme, is isolated from Candida utilis and immobilized on a nata de coco membrane-Pt electrode. The biosensor demonstrates a linear response to urate over the concentration range 1-6 ppm and has good selectivity properties. The response is affected by the membrane thickness and pH change in the range 7.5-9.5. The response time is three minutes in aqueous solutions and in human serum samples. Application of the biosensor to the determination of uric acid in human serum gave results that compared favourably with those obtained by medical laboratory. The operational stability of the biosensor was not less than three days and the relative error is smaller than 10%. PMID:21792276

  8. Uric acid and transforming growth factor in fructose-induced production of reactive oxygen species in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Madlala, Hlengiwe P; Maarman, Gerald J; Ojuka, Edward

    2016-04-01

    The consumption of fructose, a major constituent of the modern diet, has raised increasing concern about the effects of fructose on health. Research suggests that excessive intake of fructose (>50 g/d) causes hyperuricemia, insulin resistance, mitochondrial dysfunction, de novo lipogenesis by the liver, and increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in muscle. In a number of tissues, uric acid has been shown to stimulate the production of ROS via activation of transforming growth factor β1 and NADPH (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate) oxidase 4. The role of uric acid in fructose-induced production of ROS in skeletal muscle, however, has not been investigated. This review examines the evidence for fructose-induced production of ROS in skeletal muscle, highlights proposed mechanisms, and identifies gaps in current knowledge. PMID:26946251

  9. Endogenous and Uric Acid-Induced Activation of NLRP3 Inflammasome in Pregnant Women with Preeclampsia

    PubMed Central

    Matias, Mariana Leticia; Romão, Mariana; Weel, Ingrid Cristina; Ribeiro, Vanessa Rocha; Nunes, Priscila Rezeck; Borges, Vera Therezinha; Araújo, João Pessoa; Peraçoli, José Carlos; de Oliveira, Leandro; Peraçoli, Maria Terezinha

    2015-01-01

    Preeclampsia (PE) is a specific syndrome of pregnancy, characterized by hypertension and proteinuria. This pathology is associated with hyperuricemia and elevated serum levels of inflammatory cytokines. Uric acid crystals may activate an intracellular complex called inflammasome, which is important for processing and release of inflammatory cytokines. This study investigated the state of monocyte activation, both endogenous and stimulated with monosodium urate (MSU), by gene expression of NLRP1 and NLRP3 receptors as well as their association with inflammatory cytokines expression. Monocytes were obtained from peripheral blood of 23 preeclamptic pregnant women, 23 normotensive pregnant women (NT) and 23 healthy non-pregnant women (NP). Inflammasome activation was evaluated by the gene expression of NLRP1, NLRP3, caspase-1, IL-1β, IL-18 and TNF-α by RT-qPCR in unstimulated monocytes (endogenous expression), or after cell stimulation with MSU (stimulated expression). The concentration of cytokines was assessed by ELISA. In preeclamptic pregnant women, gene expression of NLRP1, NLRP3, caspase-1, IL-1β and TNF-α by monocytes stimulated or not with MSU was significantly higher than in NT and NP groups. Stimulation of monocytes from preeclamptic and non-pregnant women with MSU induced increased gene expression of NLRP3, caspase-1 and TNF-α in relation to the endogenous expression in these groups, while this was not observed in the NT group. The cytokine determination showed that monocytes from women with PE produced higher endogenous levels of IL-1β, IL-18 and TNF-α compared to the other groups, while the stimulus with MSU led to higher production of these cytokines in preeclamptic group than in the NT group. In conclusion, the results showed increased basal gene expression of NLRP1 and NLRP3 receptors in monocytes from PE group. These cells stimulation with MSU demonstrates that uric acid plays a role in NLRP3 inflammasome activation, suggesting the participation of this inflammatory complex in the pathogenesis of preeclampsia. PMID:26053021

  10. A portable SERS method for the determination of uric acid using a paper-based substrate and multivariate curve resolution.

    PubMed

    Villa, Javier E L; Poppi, Ronei J

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents a portable quantitative method for the on-site determination of uric acid in urine using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) and gold nanoparticle-coated paper as a substrate. A procedure was developed for the rapid preparation of cost-effective SERS substrates that enabled the adequate control of a homogeneous active area and the use of small quantities of gold nanoparticles per substrate. The standard addition method and multivariate curve resolution-alternating least squares (MCR-ALS) were applied to compensate for the matrix effect and to address overlapping bands between uric acid and interference SERS spectra. The proposed methodology demonstrated better performance than conventional univariate methods (in terms of linearity, accuracy and precision), a wide linear range (0-3.5 mmol L(-1)) and an adequate limit of detection (0.11 mmol L(-1)). For the first time, a portable SERS method coupled with chemometrics was developed for the routine analysis of uric acid at clinically relevant concentrations with minimal sample preparation and easy extension for the on-site determination of other biomarkers in complex sample matrices. PMID:26844706

  11. Deactivation of free and stabilized acid phosphatase by urea.

    PubMed

    Gianfreda, L; Marrucci, G; Greco, G

    1986-11-01

    Tests on acid phosphatase (E.G. 3.1.3.2) deactivation by urea have been performed at two pH values. Two conditions have been used: native enzyme operating batch-wise in dilute solution and stabilized enzyme in continuous flow ultrafiltration membrane reactor. Stabilization is achieved by confining the enzyme within a concentrated solution of a linear chain polymer that forms a polarization layer over the membrane. The results provide significant information on the kinetics and thermodynamics of the complex phenomena taking place during deactivation. Deactivation by urea is also compared with thermal deactivation. PMID:18555278

  12. The significance of serum uric acid level in humans with acute paraquat poisoning.

    PubMed

    Zhang, JuanWen; Zhao, Ying; Bai, YunJuan; Lv, GuoCai; Wu, JianPing; Chen, Yu

    2015-01-01

    Hyperuricemia is a strong and independent predictor of all-cause mortality in cardiovascular disease and has been found to play a role in diseases exacerbated by oxidative stress and inflammation. This study aimed to evaluate whether serum uric acid (UA) level is an indicator of outcome in patients with acute paraquat poisoning. A total of 205 subjects who had attempted suicide by oral ingestion of paraquat were admitted to the emergency room between January 2009 and June 2014. Initial serum UA level and other laboratory parameters were measured. A total of 66 patients died during the 30 days after admission, corresponding to a 32.2% cumulative incidence of mortality. UA levels were higher in non-survivors than survivors (P < 0.001) and 30-day mortality increased with increasing baseline serum UA level (P < 0.001). In a prediction analysis for 30-day mortality, the serum UA level had a cut-off concentration of 284 µmol/L in female patients and 352 µmol/L in male patients. Multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression analyses showed that white blood cell counts and UA were independent prognostic factors. In conclusion, we showed that serum UA may be an independent predictor of 30-day mortality in patients with paraquat poisoning. PMID:25772718

  13. Serum Uric Acid, Gender, and Low Ankle Brachial Index in Adults With High Cardiovascular Risk.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Yiqiang; Dong, Ying; Tang, Zheng; Zhang, Fen; Hu, Dayi; Yu, Jinming

    2015-08-01

    Uric acid (UA) has been reported to be associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD) in caucasians. However, it is unclear whether this association remains significant in a Chinese population. The present study aimed to investigate the association between UA and low ankle brachial index (ABI), a measurement of peripheral arterial disease, in Chinese patients. A total of 6262 hospital-based patients with high CVD risk were enrolled. Low ABI was defined as ABI ≤0.9 in either side. Low ABI was detected in 1390 (22.2%) patients. Higher UA was significantly associated with higher risk of low ABI and modified by gender (P = .0045). After adjusting for age, body mass index, total cholesterol, triglyceride, low-density lipoprotein, high-density lipoprotein, fasting glucose, hypertension, and smoking, participants in the highest quartile of UA exhibited 37% (odds ratio [OR]:1.37, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.03-1.82) higher risk of low ABI compared to those in the lowest quartile in men, while OR (95% CI) was 1.69 (1.29-2.22) for women. However, when kidney function was further adjusted, the associations were attenuated in both men and women and were significant only in women. The results were suggestive of higher UA associating with higher risk of low ABI in women, and the association was largely driven by kidney function, especially in men. PMID:25564679

  14. Degradation studies of transparent conductive electrodes on electroactive poly(vinylidene fluoride) for uric acid measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardoso, Vanessa F.; Martins, Pedro; Botelho, Gabriela; Rebouta, Luis; Lanceros-Méndez, Senentxu; Minas, Graca

    2010-08-01

    Biochemical analysis of physiological fluids using, for example, lab-on-a-chip devices requires accurate mixing of two or more fluids. This mixing can be assisted by acoustic microagitation using a piezoelectric material, such as the β-phase of poly(vinylidene fluoride) (β-PVDF). If the analysis is performed using optical absorption spectroscopy and β-PVDF is located in the optical path, the material and its conductive electrodes must be transparent. Moreover, if, to improve the transmission of the ultrasonic waves to the fluids, the piezoelectric transducer is placed inside the fluidic structures, its degradation must be assessed. In this paper, we report on the degradation properties of transparent conductive oxides, namely, indium tin oxide (ITO) and aluminum-doped zinc oxide, when they are used as electrodes for providing acoustic microagitation. The latter promotes mixing of chemicals involved in the measurement of uric acid concentration in physiological fluids. The results are compared with those for aluminum electrodes. We find that β-PVDF samples with ITO electrodes do not degrade either with or without acoustic microagitation.

  15. Uric acid and xanthine oxidase in heart failure - Emerging data and therapeutic implications.

    PubMed

    Doehner, Wolfram; Jankowska, Ewa A; Springer, Jochen; Lainscak, Mitja; Anker, Stefan D

    2016-06-15

    The role of hyperuricaemia as cardiovascular risk factor has exhaustingly been debated for decades. While the association of elevated uric acid (UA) levels with increased mortality risk as convincingly been shown, the question whether UA is independently predictive of just a related effect within a more complex risk factor profile (including metabolic, inflammatory and haemodynamic risk factors) is still a matter of dispute. In heart failure the independent prognostic and functional impact of elevated UA has not only been shown but also the pathophysiologic mechanism(s) and the potential of targeted therapeutic interventions have been investigated in some detail. The emerging picture suggests the increased activity of the enzyme xanthine oxidase (XO) with corresponding increased production of free oxygen radical (ROS) as a main underlying principle with the resulting increase in UA levels being mostly a marker of this up-regulated pathway. While this concept will not diminish the value of UA as a prognostic marker, it provides the basis for a novel metabolic treatment option and the means to identify those patients most eligible for this tailored therapy. This review will summarize the recent evidence on XO as a novel and promising therapeutic target in heart failure. PMID:26318388

  16. Uric acid as a biomarker and a therapeutic target in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Lytvyn, Yuliya; Perkins, Bruce A; Cherney, David Z I

    2015-06-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is a long-standing microvascular complication of diabetes mellitus and is the leading cause of end stage renal disease in developed countries. Current therapeutic strategies used to prevent or delay diabetic nephropathy exert limited clinical protective effects and can have serious adverse effects. Thus, identification of new pharmacologic agents that protect against the initiation and progression of complications of diabetes is of the utmost importance. Uric acid (UA) recently emerged as an inflammatory factor that increases oxidative stress and promotes activation of the renin angiotensin aldosterone system. As a consequence, higher UA levels are associated with various stages of the onset and progression of diabetic nephropathy, including metabolic, cardiovascular and kidney function abnormalities. If UA-lowering drugs, such as the xanthine oxidase inhibitors, block the mechanisms responsible for micro- and macrovascular injury in diabetes, these agents could represent a critical step toward preventing the progression of diabetes. This review focuses on the evidence that supports serum UA levels as a biomarker of renal and cardiovascular risk and as a potential additional therapeutic target in diabetes. PMID:25600084

  17. Serum uric acid levels in patients with myasthenia gravis are inversely correlated with disability.

    PubMed

    Yang, Dehao; Weng, Yiyun; Lin, Haihua; Xie, Feiyan; Yin, Fang; Lou, Kangliang; Zhou, Xuan; Han, Yixiang; Li, Xiang; Zhang, Xu

    2016-03-23

    Uric acid (UA), the final product of purine metabolism, has been reported to be reduced in patients with various neurological disorders and is considered to be a possible indicator for monitoring the disability and progression of multiple sclerosis. However, it remains unclear whether there is a close relationship between UA and myasthenia gravis (MG), or whether UA is primarily deficient or secondarily reduced because of its peroxynitrite scavenging activity. We investigated the correlation between serum UA levels and the clinical characteristics of MG. We assessed 338 serum UA levels obtained in 135 patients with MG, 47 patients with multiple sclerosis, and 156 healthy controls. In addition, we compared serum UA levels when MG patients were stratified according to disease activity and classifications performed by the Myasthenia Gravis Foundation of America, age of onset, duration, and thymus histology (by means of MRI or computed tomography). MG patients had significantly lower serum UA levels than the controls (P<0.001). Moreover, UA levels in patients with MG were inversely correlated with disease activity and disease progression (P=0.013). However, UA levels did not correlate significantly with disease duration, age of onset, and thymus histology. Our findings suggest that serum level of UA was reduced in patients with MG and serum UA might be considered a surrogate biomarker of MG disability and progression. PMID:26836463

  18. The Relationship between Uric Acid Levels and Huntington’s Disease Progression

    PubMed Central

    Auinger, Peggy; Kieburtz, Karl; McDermott, Michael P.

    2009-01-01

    Uric acid (UA) may be associated with the progression of Parkinson’s disease and related neurodegenerative conditions; however, its association with Huntington’s disease (HD) progression has not been explored. A secondary analysis of 347 subjects from the CARE-HD clinical trial was performed to examine the relationship between baseline UA levels and the level of functional decline in HD. Outcomes included change in scores at 30 months for the Unified Huntington’s Disease Rating Scale components. There was less worsening of total functional capacity over time with increasing baseline UA levels (adjusted mean worsening in scores: 3.17, 2.99, 2.95, 2.28, 2.21, from lowest to highest UA quintile, p=0.03). These data suggest a possible association between higher UA levels and slower HD progression, particularly as measured by total functional capacity. If confirmed, UA could be an important predictor and potentially modifiable factor affecting the rate of HD progression. PMID:20063429

  19. Association between serum uric acid and bone health in general population: a large and multicentre study

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Dun; Liu, Wenyue; Huang, Kangmao; Mo, Jian; Yu, Hejun; Wu, Shengjie; Fan, Shunwu

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies proposed that serum uric acid (UA), an endogenous antioxidant, could be a protective factor against bone loss. However, recently, a study with a population of US adults did not note the protective effects of serum UA. Therefore, the exact association between serum UA and bone health remains unclear. We performed a retrospective consecutive cohort study in a Chinese population to examine the association between serum UA and bone health. This cross-sectional study included 17,735 individuals who underwent lumbar spine bone mineral density (BMD) measurements as part of a health examination. In covariance analyses (multivariable-adjusted), a high serum UA level was associated with a high BMD, T-score, and Z-score. In binary logistic regression analyses (multivariable-adjusted), a high serum UA level was associated with low odds ratios (ORs) for at least osteopenia and osteoporosis in male (age ≥50 years) (OR = 0.72–0.60 and OR = 0.49–0.39, respectively) and postmenopausal female participants (OR = 0.61–0.51 and OR = 0.66–0.49, respectively). In conclusion, serum UA is associated with BMD, the T-score, and the Z-score, and has a strong protective effect against at least osteopenia and osteoporosis. PMID:26496032

  20. Serum uric acid level in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Ashtari, Fereshteh; Bahar, Mohammadali; Aghaei, Maryam; Zahed, Arash

    2013-05-01

    Uric acid (UA) is a hydrophilic antioxidant product associated with multiple sclerosis (MS). We conducted a randomized case-control study to evaluate the serum level of UA in different phases of MS in comparison with levels in a healthy control population. Serum UA was checked in 130 patients with relapsing-remitting MS (85 patients in remitting and 45 patients in relapsing phase) and 50 age-matched controls using a quantitative enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The mean concentrations of UA in serum was 6.41(±3.18)mg/dL in patients with remitting MS, 4.76(±1.66)mg/dL in patients with relapsing MS and 6.33(±2.94)mg/dL in controls. There was a significant difference between mean UA concentration in relapsing MS and remitting MS (p<0.001), and between patients with relapsing MS and controls (p=0.002); however, the difference between levels for patients in the remitting phase of MS and the control group was not significant (p=0.87). It seems probable that UA has a role in the prevention of disease activity in MS. PMID:23528410

  1. Uric acid enhances the antitumor immunity of dendritic cell-based vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yihan; Ma, Xuelei; Su, Chao; Peng, Bin; Du, Jing; Jia, Hongyuan; Luo, Min; Fang, Chunju; Wei, Yuquan

    2015-01-01

    Uric acid (UA) released from dying cells has been recognized by the immune system as a danger signal. In response to UA, dendritic cells (DC) in the immune system mature and enhance the T cell response to foreign antigens. It is conceivable that the antitumor immunity of a tumor vaccine could be promoted by the administration of UA. To test this concept, we applied UA as an adjuvant to a DC-based vaccine, and discovered that the administration of UA as an adjuvant significantly enhanced the ability of the tumor lysate-pulsed DC vaccine in delaying the tumor growth. The antitumor activity was achieved with adoptively transferred lymphocytes, and both CD8+ T cells and NK cells were required to achieve effective immunity. This resulted in an increased accumulation of activated CD8+ T cells and an elevated production of IFN-γ. Collectively, our study shows that the administration of UA enhances the antitumor activity of tumor lysate-pulsed DC vaccine, thus providing the preclinical rationale for the application of UA in DC-based vaccine strategies. PMID:26553557

  2. Development of Anodic Titania Nanotubes for Application in High Sensitivity Amperometric Glucose and Uric Acid Biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hsiang-Ching; Zhang, Li-Fan; Lin, Jyh-Ling; Chin, Yuan-Lung; Sun, Tai-Ping

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop novel nanoscale biosensors using titania nanotubes (TNTs) made by anodization. Titania nanotubes were produced on pure titanium sheets by anodization at room temperature. In this research, the electrolyte composition ethylene glycol 250 mL/NH4F 1.5 g/DI water 20 mL was found to produce the best titania nanotubes array films for application in amperometric biosensors. The amperometric results exhibit an excellent linearity for uric acid (UA) concentrations in the range between 2 and 14 mg/dL, with 23.3 (μA·cm−2)·(mg/dL)−1 UA sensitivity, and a correlation coefficient of 0.993. The glucose biosensor presented a good linear relationship in the lower glucose concentration range between 50 and 125 mg/dL, and the corresponding sensitivity was approximately 249.6 (μA·cm−2)·(100 mg/dL)−1 glucose, with a correlation coefficient of 0.973. PMID:24152934

  3. Uric Acid Induces Hepatic Steatosis by Generation of Mitochondrial Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Lanaspa, Miguel A.; Sanchez-Lozada, Laura G.; Choi, Yea-Jin; Cicerchi, Christina; Kanbay, Mehmet; Roncal-Jimenez, Carlos A.; Ishimoto, Takuji; Li, Nanxing; Marek, George; Duranay, Murat; Schreiner, George; Rodriguez-Iturbe, Bernardo; Nakagawa, Takahiko; Kang, Duk-Hee; Sautin, Yuri Y.; Johnson, Richard J.

    2012-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome represents a collection of abnormalities that includes fatty liver, and it currently affects one-third of the United States population and has become a major health concern worldwide. Fructose intake, primarily from added sugars in soft drinks, can induce fatty liver in animals and is epidemiologically associated with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in humans. Fructose is considered lipogenic due to its ability to generate triglycerides as a direct consequence of the metabolism of the fructose molecule. Here, we show that fructose also stimulates triglyceride synthesis via a purine-degrading pathway that is triggered from the rapid phosphorylation of fructose by fructokinase. Generated AMP enters into the purine degradation pathway through the activation of AMP deaminase resulting in uric acid production and the generation of mitochondrial oxidants. Mitochondrial oxidative stress results in the inhibition of aconitase in the Krebs cycle, resulting in the accumulation of citrate and the stimulation of ATP citrate lyase and fatty-acid synthase leading to de novo lipogeneis. These studies provide new insights into the pathogenesis of hepatic fat accumulation under normal and diseased states. PMID:23035112

  4. Serum uric acid levels in patients with myasthenia gravis are inversely correlated with disability

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Dehao; Weng, Yiyun; Lin, Haihua; Xie, Feiyan; Yin, Fang; Lou, Kangliang; Zhou, Xuan; Han, Yixiang; Li, Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Uric acid (UA), the final product of purine metabolism, has been reported to be reduced in patients with various neurological disorders and is considered to be a possible indicator for monitoring the disability and progression of multiple sclerosis. However, it remains unclear whether there is a close relationship between UA and myasthenia gravis (MG), or whether UA is primarily deficient or secondarily reduced because of its peroxynitrite scavenging activity. We investigated the correlation between serum UA levels and the clinical characteristics of MG. We assessed 338 serum UA levels obtained in 135 patients with MG, 47 patients with multiple sclerosis, and 156 healthy controls. In addition, we compared serum UA levels when MG patients were stratified according to disease activity and classifications performed by the Myasthenia Gravis Foundation of America, age of onset, duration, and thymus histology (by means of MRI or computed tomography). MG patients had significantly lower serum UA levels than the controls (P<0.001). Moreover, UA levels in patients with MG were inversely correlated with disease activity and disease progression (P=0.013). However, UA levels did not correlate significantly with disease duration, age of onset, and thymus histology. Our findings suggest that serum level of UA was reduced in patients with MG and serum UA might be considered a surrogate biomarker of MG disability and progression. PMID:26836463

  5. Electrochemical sensor based on nitrogen doped graphene: simultaneous determination of ascorbic acid, dopamine and uric acid.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Zhen-Huan; Zheng, Xiao-Qing; Xu, Jian-Yun; Bao, Wen-Jing; Wang, Feng-Bin; Xia, Xing-Hua

    2012-04-15

    Nitrogen doped graphene (NG) was prepared by thermally annealing graphite oxide and melamine mixture. After characterization by atomic force microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy etc., the electrochemical sensor based on NG was constructed to simultaneously determine small biomolecules such as ascorbic acid (AA), dopamine (DA) and uric acid (UA). Due to its unique structure and properties originating from nitrogen doping, NG shows highly electrocatalytic activity towards the oxidation of AA, DA and UA. The electrochemical sensor shows a wide linear response for AA, DA and UA in the concentration range of 5.0×10(-6) to 1.3×10(-3)M, 5.0×10(-7) to 1.7×10(-4)M and 1.0×10(-7) to 2.0×10(-5)M with detection limit of 2.2×10(-6)M, 2.5×10(-7)M and 4.5×10(-8)M at S/N=3, respectively. These results demonstrate that NG is a promising candidate of advanced electrode material in electrochemical sensing and other electrocatalytic applications. PMID:22342696

  6. Determination of uric acid in human urine and serum by capillary electrophoresis with chemiluminescence detection.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shulin; Wang, Jianshi; Ye, Fanggui; Liu, Yi-Ming

    2008-07-15

    A simple and sensitive method based on capillary electrophoresis (CE) with chemiluminescence (CL) detection has been developed for the determination of uric acid (UA). The sensitive detection was based on the enhancement effect of UA on the CL reaction between luminol and potassium ferricyanide (K3[Fe(CN)6]) in alkaline solution. A laboratory-built reaction flow cell and a photon counter were deployed for the CL detection. Experimental conditions for CL detection were studied in detail to achieve a maximum assay sensitivity. Optimal conditions were found to be 1.0 x 10(-4) M luminol added to the CE running buffer and 1.0 x 10(-4) M K3[Fe(CN)6] in 0.2 M NaOH solution introduced postcolumn. The proposed CE-CL assay showed good repeatability (relative standard deviation [RSD]=3.5%, n=11) and a detection limit of 3.5 x 10(-7) M UA (signal/noise ratio [S/N]=3). A linear calibration curve ranging from 6.0 x 10(-7) to 3.0 x 10(-5) M UA was obtained. The method was evaluated by quantifying UA in human urine and serum samples with satisfactory assay results. PMID:18445465

  7. Effects of composite restorations on nitric oxide and uric acid levels in saliva

    PubMed Central

    Akgul, Nilgun; Gul, Pinar; Alp, Hamit Hakan; Kiziltunc, Ahmet

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims: Dental materials that are used in dentistry should be harmless to oral tissues, and should, therefore, not contain any leachable toxic and diffusible substances capable of causing side effects. This study was intended to investigate the effects on salivary nitric oxide (NO) and uric acid (UA) levels after application of dental composite filling materials to healthy volunteers. Materials and Methods: A total of 52 individuals (32 female and 20 male) participated in the study. Filtek Z250 composite filling material (3M ESPE, St Paul, MN, USA) was applied to healthy volunteers. Saliva samples were collected before restoration (baseline) and 1 h, 1-day, 7 days, and 30 days after restoration. NO concentrations were measured using the Griess reaction method, and UA was measured using an enzymatic method. Data were analyzed using repeated measures ANOVA and the Bonferroni post-hoc test (? =5%). Results: NO values increased statistically significant after 7 days (P < 0.05). In addition, lower UA levels were determined compared to the baseline levels, but the difference was not statistically significant (P > 0.05). There was no correlation between NO and UA levels in saliva (P > 0.05). Conclusion: Composite resins activated the antioxidant system in saliva. However, further studies are now needed to confirm our findings and to permit a definitive conclusion. PMID:26321839

  8. EGCG Attenuates Uric Acid-Induced Inflammatory and Oxidative Stress Responses by Medicating the NOTCH Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Hua; Sun, Jianqin; Chen, Yanqiu; Zong, Min; Li, Shijie; Wang, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Background. The aim of this study is to investigate whether (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) can prevent the UA-induced inflammatory effect of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) and the involved mechanisms in vitro. Methods. HUVEC were subjected to uric acid (UA) with or without EGCG treatment. RT-PCR and western blots were performed to determine the level of inflammation marker. The antioxidant activity was evaluated by measuring scavenged reactive oxygen species (ROS). Functional studies of the role of Notch-1 in HUVEC lines were performed using RNA interference analyses. Results. UA significantly increased the expressions of IL-6, ICAM-1, TNF-α, and MCP-1 and the production of ROS in HUVEC. Meanwhile, the expression of Notch-1 and its downstream effects significantly increased. Using siRNA, inhibition of Notch-1 signaling significantly impeded the expressions of inflammatory cytokines under UA treatment. Interestingly, EGCG suppressed the expressions of inflammatory cytokines and the generation of ROS. Western blot analysis of Notch-1 showed that EGCG significantly decreased the expressions of inflammatory cytokines through Notch-1 signaling pathways. Conclusions. In summary, our findings indicated that Notch-1 plays an important role in the UA-induced inflammatory response, and the downregulation of Notch-1 by EGCG could be an effective approach to decrease inflammation and oxidative stress induced by UA. PMID:26539255

  9. Association of Serum Uric Acid Levels in Psoriasis: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Miao, Xiao; Wang, Hongshen; Wang, Yifei; Li, Fulun; Yang, Qiong; Cui, Rutao; Li, Bin

    2016-05-01

    High levels of serum uric acid (SUAC) are frequently detected in patients with psoriasis. However, the relationship between psoriasis and hyperuricemia remains unknown. Here we conducted a meta-analysis to identify the SUAC levels in subjects with psoriasis and to determine whether there is an associated risk between psoriasis and hyperuricemia.A comprehensive search of the literature from January 1980 to November 2014 across 7 databases (MEDLINE, Embase, Cochrane Central Register, and 4 Chinese databases) was conducted to determine whether there is an associated risk between psoriasis and hyperuricemia.Among the 170 identified reports, 14 observational studies were included in this meta-analysis. We found a significant higher SUAC level (MD 0.68, 95% CI 0.26-1.09; P = 0.002) in patients with psoriasis in Western Europe, but no significant differences were found between the East Asia and India subgroup (MD 1.22, 95% CI -0.13-2.56; P = 0.08) or the Middle East subgroup (MD 0.48, 95% CI -0.49-1.44; P = 0.33). Similar results were obtained from the meta-analysis of SUAC levels in subjects with severe psoriasis.Our meta-analysis showed that the correlation between psoriasis and hyperuricemia was either ethnicity- or region-dependent and that patients with psoriasis in Western Europe were more likely to have hyperuricemia. PMID:27175702

  10. Simultaneous Determination of Dopamine, Uric Acid and Guanine at Polyadenine Film Modified Electrode.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongying; Wang, Xueliang; Wang, Zhaoxia

    2015-01-01

    A polyadenine film (PAE) modified glassy carbon electrode (GCE) was employed for the simultaneous determination of dopamine (DA), uric acid (UA) and guanine (GA). Experimental results showed that this modified electrode had good electrocatalytic properties for the oxidation of DA, UA and GA. Under optimal conditions, DA, UA and GA reflected their electrochemical response into three separated and well-defined oxidation peaks, whose currents increased 47-, 12-, and 7-fold, respectively, compared with those at bare electrode. Moreover, their oxidation peak currents were linear proportional to their concentrations within the ranges of 2.5 - 75, 10 - 750, and 7.5 - 75 μmol L(-1), respectively, and the limits of detection (LOD) (S/N = 3) were 0.075, 0.35, and 0.025 μmol L(-1), respectively. Compared with a variety of modified electrodes, this designed sensor had a wider linear range and lower LOD. Furthermore, the sensor exhibited good stability and reproducibility. PMID:26656810

  11. Serum Uric Acid and Nigral Iron Deposition in Parkinson’s Disease: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae-Hyoung; Lee, Jae-Hyeok

    2014-01-01

    Background Uric acid (UA) is an endogenous antioxidant which is known to reduce oxidative stress and also chelate iron ion. Recent studies have provided evidence that UA may play a neuroprotective role in Parkinson’s disease (PD). However, it is unknown whether UA relates to nigral iron deposition, which is a characteristic pathophysiological alteration in PD. The aim of this study was to determine the potential relationship of these two markers in patients with PD. Methods A total of 30 patients of PD and 25 age- and gender- matched healthy controls underwent 3-Tesla MRI and laboratory tests including serum UA levels. We assessed iron levels by measuring phase shift values using susceptibility-weighted image. Mean phase shift values of the substantia nigra (SN), red nucleus, head of the caudate nucleus, globus pallidus, putamen, thalamus, and frontal white matter were calculated and correlated with serum UA levels. Results Serum UA levels were significantly decreased in the PD patients than in the controls. Phase shift values in bilateral SN were significantly increased in the PD patients than in the controls. There was no significant correlation between serum UA levels and nigral phase shift values. Conclusions As previous studies, low serum UA level and increased nigral iron content in the PD was reconfirmed in this study. However, we failed to find the relationship between these two markers. Our data suggest that serum UA may not be important determinant of nigral iron deposition in PD. PMID:25386854

  12. Optical Method for Cardiovascular Risk Marker Uric Acid Removal Assessment during Dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Holmar, Jana; Fridolin, Ivo; Uhlin, Fredrik; Lauri, Kai; Luman, Merike

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the concentration of uric acid (UA) optically by using the original and processed ultraviolet (UV) absorbance spectra of spent dialysate. Also, the effect of using several wavelengths (multi-wavelength algorithms) for estimation was examined. This paper gives an overview of seven studies carried out in Linköping, Sweden, and Tallinn, Estonia. A total of 60 patients were monitored over their 188 dialysis treatment procedures. Dialysate samples were taken and analysed by means of UA concentration in a chemical laboratory and with a double-beam spectrophotometer. The measured UV absorbance spectra were processed. Three models for the original and three for the first derivate of UV absorbance were created; concentrations of UA from the different methods were finally compared in terms of mean values and SD. The mean concentration (micromol/L) of UA was 49.7 ± 23.0 measured in the chemical laboratory, and 48.9 ± 22.4 calculated with the best estimate among all models. The concentrations were not significantly different (P ≥ 0.17). It was found that using a multi-wavelength and processed signal approach leads to more accurate results, and therefore these approaches should be used in future. PMID:22701094

  13. [Preventive measures in stones due to infection, uric acid and cystine].

    PubMed

    Hess, B; Ackermann, D

    1992-01-01

    General prophylaxis of renal stone formation consists of 1. high fluid intake and 2. modest consumption of protein-rich foods. Specific prophylactic measures are based on pathophysiologic mechanisms of stone formation. In infection-induced renal stones, combined treatment with culture specific antibiotics and complete stone removal is of utmost importance. In all cases where stone fragments cannot be removed completely and/or partial obstruction remains, long-term antibiotics in combination with urine acidification by methionine (urine pH 5.6 to 6.2) are most appropriate. Prophylaxis of uric acid stones primarily consists of reducing purine intake and alkalizing the urine by potassium citrate. Only if this regimen failed or gout occurred, allopurinol should be administered. In patients with cystine stones, urine volume should be increased to greater than 3000 ml/die. Alkalizing the urine to a pH greater than 7.5 rises cystine solubility, whereas cystine excretion may be reduced by a diet low in sodium and/or low in methionine/cysteine. Thiols form mixed thiol-cysteine disulfides that are many times more soluble than cystine in urine; because of their high rate of adverse side-effects, however, these compounds are of lowest priority in the treatment of cystine stones. There is no convincing evidence for the efficacy of high dose ascorbic acid treatment in cystinuria. PMID:1736401

  14. The significance of serum uric acid level in humans with acute paraquat poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, JuanWen; Zhao, Ying; Bai, YunJuan; Lv, GuoCai; Wu, JianPing; Chen, Yu

    2015-01-01

    Hyperuricemia is a strong and independent predictor of all-cause mortality in cardiovascular disease and has been found to play a role in diseases exacerbated by oxidative stress and inflammation. This study aimed to evaluate whether serum uric acid (UA) level is an indicator of outcome in patients with acute paraquat poisoning. A total of 205 subjects who had attempted suicide by oral ingestion of paraquat were admitted to the emergency room between January 2009 and June 2014. Initial serum UA level and other laboratory parameters were measured. A total of 66 patients died during the 30 days after admission, corresponding to a 32.2% cumulative incidence of mortality. UA levels were higher in non-survivors than survivors (P < 0.001) and 30-day mortality increased with increasing baseline serum UA level (P < 0.001). In a prediction analysis for 30-day mortality, the serum UA level had a cut-off concentration of 284 µmol/L in female patients and 352 µmol/L in male patients. Multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression analyses showed that white blood cell counts and UA were independent prognostic factors. In conclusion, we showed that serum UA may be an independent predictor of 30-day mortality in patients with paraquat poisoning. PMID:25772718

  15. Uric acid induces NADPH oxidase-independent neutrophil extracellular trap formation.

    PubMed

    Arai, Yasuyuki; Nishinaka, Yoko; Arai, Toshiyuki; Morita, Makiko; Mizugishi, Kiyomi; Adachi, Souichi; Takaori-Kondo, Akifumi; Watanabe, Tomohiro; Yamashita, Kouhei

    2014-01-10

    Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) are composed of extracellular DNA fibers with antimicrobial peptides that capture and kill microbes. NETs play a critical role in innate host defense and in autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. While the mechanism of NET formation remains unclear, reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced via activation of NADPH oxidase (Nox) are known to be an important requirement. In this study, we investigated the effect of uric acid (UA) on NET formation. UA, a well-known ROS scavenger, was found to suppress Nox-dependent ROS release in a dose-dependent manner. Low concentrations of UA significantly inhibited Nox-dependent NET formation. However, high concentrations of UA unexpectedly induced, rather than inhibited, NET formation. NETs were directly induced by UA alone in a Nox-independent manner, as revealed by experiments using control neutrophils treated with ROS inhibitors or neutrophils of patients with chronic granulomatous disease who have a congenital defect in ROS production. Furthermore, we found that UA-induced NET formation was partially mediated by NF-κB activation. Our study is the first to demonstrate the novel function of UA in NET formation and may provide insight into the management of patients with hyperuricemia. PMID:24326071

  16. Uric Acid-Degrading Bacteria in Guts of Termites [Reticulitermes flavipes (Kollar)] †

    PubMed Central

    Potrikus, C. J.; Breznak, John A.

    1980-01-01

    Uricolytic bacteria were present in guts of Reticulitermes flavipes in populations up to 6 × 104 cells per gut. Of 82 strains isolated under strict anaerobic conditions, most were group N Streptococcus sp., Bacteroides termitidis, and Citrobacter sp. All isolates used uric acid (UA) as an energy source anaerobically, but not aerobically, and NH3 was the major nitrogenous product of uricolysis. However, none of the isolates had an absolute requirement for UA. Utilization of heterocyclic compounds other than UA was limited. Fresh termite gut contents also degraded UA anaerobically, as measured by 14CO2 evolution from [2-14C]UA. The magnitude of anaerobic uricolysis [0.67 pmol of UA catabolized/(gut × h)] was entirely consistent with the population density of uricolytic bacteria in situ. Uricolytic gut bacteria may convert UA in situ to products usable by termites for carbon, nitrogen, energy, or all three. This possibility is consistent with the fact that R. flavipes termites from UA, but they do not void the purine in excreta despite the lack of uricase in their tissues. PMID:16345587

  17. Role of Serum Uric Acid and Ferritin in the Development and Progression of NAFLD

    PubMed Central

    Lombardi, Rosa; Pisano, Giuseppina; Fargion, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), tightly linked to the metabolic syndrome (MS), has emerged as a leading cause of chronic liver disease worldwide. Since it is potentially progressive towards non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and hepatic fibrosis, up to cirrhosis and its associated complications, the need for predictive factors of NAFLD and of its advanced forms is mandatory. Despite the current “gold standard” for the assessment of liver damage in NAFLD being liver biopsy, in recent years, several non-invasive tools have been designed as alternatives to histology, of which fibroscan seems the most promising. Among the different serum markers considered, serum uric acid (SUA) and ferritin have emerged as possible predictors of severity of liver damage in NAFLD. In fact, as widely described in this review, they share common pathogenetic pathways and are both associated with hepatic steatosis and MS, thus suggesting a likely synergistic action. Nevertheless, the power of these serum markers seems to be too low if considered alone, suggesting that they should be included in a wider perspective together with other metabolic and biochemical parameters in order to predict liver damage. PMID:27077854

  18. Effects on milk urea concentration, urine output, and drinking water intake from incremental doses of potassium bicarbonate fed to mid-lactation dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Eriksson, T; Rustas, B-O

    2014-07-01

    Large variation exists in the potassium content of dairy cow feeds and also within a feed type due to soil type and fertilization. Increased ration K concentration causes a subsequent increase in urinary volume and could be expected to also lower milk urea concentration. Six multiparous mid-lactation Swedish Red dairy cows, all fitted with rumen cannulas, were subjected to 3 different levels of K intake in a Latin square experiment with three 2-wk periods to evaluate the effects on concentrations of milk urea and rumen ammonia, urinary output, and drinking water intake. The treatments were achieved by K supplementation on top of a low-K basal ration fed at individual allowances fixed throughout the experiment. The basal ration, consumed at 20.2 kg of dry matter (DM)/d, provided 165 g of crude protein/kg of DM and consisted of grass silage, concentrates, and urea in the proportions 39.3:60.0:0.7 on a DM basis. Potassium bicarbonate supplementation was 0, 616, and 1,142 g/d, respectively, to give total ration K concentrations that were low (LO; 12 g/kg of DM), medium (MED; 23 g/kg of DM), or high (HI; 32 g/kg of DM). Production and composition of milk was not affected by treatment. A linear effect on milk urea concentration was detected, being 4.48, 4.18, and 3.77 mM for LO, MED, and HI, respectively, and a linear tendency for rumen ammonia concentration with 6.65, 6.51, and 5.84 mg of NH?-N/dL for LO, MED, and HI, respectively. Milk urea concentration peaked about 3h after the rumen ammonia peak from the morning feeding, at a level 1.3mM over the baseline. Urinary urea excretion declined linearly (105, 103, and 98 g of urea-N/d for LO, MED, and HI, respectively). Linear increases occurred in urinary output (0.058 0.001 kg of urine/g of K intake; no intercept; coefficient of determination=0.997) and drinking water intake (65.9 2.02 + 0.069 0.004 kg of water/g of K intake; coefficient of determination=0.95). Urinary K concentration leveled off at 12.4 g/L. Urinary creatinine excretion was not affected by K addition, but allantoin excretion increased linearly by 27% from LO to HI, suggesting increased rumen microbial growth. Rumen pH, acetate proportion of total volatile fatty acids, and digestibility of DM, organic matter, and neutral detergent fiber increased linearly with increasing potassium intake. We concluded that increased ration K concentration lowers milk urea concentration with a magnitude significant for the interpretation of milk urea values, but other sources of variation, such as sampling time relative to feeding, may be even more important. PMID:24835966

  19. Kinetic Studies with Ion Selective Electrodes: Determination of Creatinine in Urine with a Picrate Ion Selective Electrode: A Laboratory Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diamandis, E. P.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    The kinetic of the Jaffe reaction with picrate ion selective electrode (ISE) and a kinetic method for determining creatinine in urine is presented. The experiment could be used to familarize students with the application of ISE in kinetic studies and chemical analysis