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  1. Creatinine, urea, uric acid, water and electrolytes renal handling in the healthy oldest old

    PubMed Central

    Musso, Carlos Guido; Álvarez Gregori, Joaquín; Jauregui, José Ricardo; Macías Núñez, Juan Florencio

    2012-01-01

    Renal physiology in the healthy oldest old has the following characteristics, in comparison with the renal physiology in the young: a reduced creatinine clearance, tubular pattern of creatinine back-filtration, preserved proximal tubule sodium reabsorption and uric acid secretion, reduced sodium reabsorption in the thick ascending loop of Henle, reduced free water clearance, increased urea excretion, presence of medulla hypotonicity, reduced urinary dilution and concentration capabilities, and finally a reduced collecting tubules response to furosemide which expresses a reduced potassium excretion in this segment due to a sort of aldosterone resistance. All physiological changes of the aged kidney are the same in both genders. PMID:24175249

  2. Urea, creatinine, uric acid, and phosphate spaces and their relationship to total body water during chronic hemodialysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ericsson, F.; Odar-Cederloef, I.E.; Eriksson, C.G.; Lindgren, S.; Kjellstrand, C.M.

    1988-07-01

    The authors determined total body water (TBW) with tritium in 11 patients on chronic hemodialysis and compared this space to that estimated by 60% of body weight, and removal spaces of urea, creatinine, uric acid, and phosphate (PO4). The latter spaces were determined by dividing the total amount of substance (measured in total dialysate) by pre- minus post-dialysis concentrations. Body water X 0.6 was more than 10% less than the tritium space, and showed a maximal variation of 10 liters, or 24%. The removal space of urea was 80% of the tritium space, but correlated closely with it. The difference between total body water and urea removal space was variable and dependent on fluid excess (edema) in the patients. Creatinine, uric acid, and phosphate removal spaces were highly variable and not correlated to total body water. The authors suggest that actual measured TBW should be used, rather than estimations using BW X 0.6, for V in K X T/V, where K = clearance, T = duration of dialysis, and V = the removal space of urea. Furthermore, one may need to introduce a correction factor for urea removal space over TBW in the equation to allow better quantification of dialysis in edematous patients and during very fast dialyses.

  3. Relation between creatinine and uric acid excretion.

    PubMed Central

    Nishida, Y

    1992-01-01

    The relation between creatinine and uric acid metabolism was analysed in 77 male patients with primary gout and 62 healthy male subjects. Significant positive correlations between 24 hour urinary creatinine and uric acid excretion were shown in both groups. The mean urinary creatinine and uric acid excretions in the patients with gout were significantly increased as compared with those of normal male controls. These results suggest that there is a close correlation between creatinine and uric acid synthesis. In addition, it seems that accelerated uric acid synthesis seen in some patients with gout is due to increased creatinine synthesis. PMID:1540011

  4. The Urinary Uric Acid/Creatinine Ratio is An Adjuvant Marker for Perinatal Asphyxia

    PubMed Central

    Bhongir, Aparna Varma; Yakama, Akhil Varma Venkata; Saha, Subhajit; Radia, Sejal B.; Pabbati, Jayalakshmi

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess the urinary uric acid/creatinine ratio (UA/Cr) in relation to Apgar score and cord blood gas analysis in identification of perinatal asphyxia and to define the cutoff values. Design case control study. Setting The newborns admitted in the department of pediatrics and NICU of Mediciti Institute of Medical Science, Ghanpur, Medchal mandal, Telangana from May-July 2011 were enrolled. Participants/patients The study was conducted on 31 (18 males, 13 females) controls and 18 (12males, 6 females) asphyxiated neonates. Outcome Measure(s) 5ml of arterial cord blood of newborn collected at the time of birth and spot urine samples were collected within 24-72 hours of life. Cord blood gas analysis were done immediately and Urinary uric acid was measured by modified Uricase method, urinary creatinine by modified kinetic Jaffe's reaction. Results The mean urinary uric acid and creatinine ratio (2.58± 0.48 vs 1.89 ± 0.59) is significantly higher in Asphyxiated group than in the control group. The umbilical cord blood pH had significant positive correlation with 1st minute Apgar score (r= 0.41, p=0.003), 5th minute Apgar (r= 0.44, p=0.002), while urinary UA/Cr ratio had significant negative correlation with cord blood pH (r= -0.63, p=0.002). Urinary UA/Cr ratio with criterion of >2.43 had 80% sensitivity, 87.5% specificity with AUC of 0.84 (p=0.003) had a better predictive value. Conclusions Urinary UA/Cr ratio is easy, non-invasive, painless and economical adjuvant parameter with better predictive value for diagnosing perinatal asphyxia with simple diagnostic equipment. PMID:26998526

  5. Quantifying creatinine and urea in human urine through Raman spectroscopy aiming at diagnosis of kidney disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saatkamp, Cassiano Junior; de Almeida, Maurício Liberal; Bispo, Jeyse Aliana Martins; Pinheiro, Antonio Luiz Barbosa; Fernandes, Adriana Barrinha; Silveira, Landulfo, Jr.

    2016-03-01

    Due to their importance in the regulation of metabolites, the kidneys need continuous monitoring to check for correct functioning, mainly by urea and creatinine urinalysis. This study aimed to develop a model to estimate the concentrations of urea and creatinine in urine by means of Raman spectroscopy (RS) that could be used to diagnose kidney disease. Midstream urine samples were obtained from 54 volunteers with no kidney complaints. Samples were subjected to a standard colorimetric assay of urea and creatinine and submitted to spectroscopic analysis by means of a dispersive Raman spectrometer (830 nm, 350 mW, 30 s). The Raman spectra of urine showed peaks related mainly to urea and creatinine. Partial least squares models were developed using selected Raman bands related to urea and creatinine and the biochemical concentrations in urine measured by the colorimetric method, resulting in r=0.90 and 0.91 for urea and creatinine, respectively, with root mean square error of cross-validation (RMSEcv) of 312 and 25.2 mg/dL, respectively. RS may become a technique for rapid urinalysis, with concentration errors suitable for population screening aimed at the prevention of renal diseases.

  6. Creatinine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Results from creatinine tests may be used in calculations that help assess kidney function: Blood creatinine measurements, ... seen with conditions that result in decreased muscle mass. Levels of 24-hour urine creatinine are evaluated ...

  7. The elevated serum urea:creatinine ratio in canine babesiosis in South Africa is not of renal origin.

    PubMed

    de Scally, M P; Leisewitz, A L; Lobetti, R G; Thompson, P N

    2006-12-01

    Pigmented serum, usually due to free haemoglobin and/or bilirubin, is a common finding in dogs with babesiosis, resulting in interference with all biochemical tests that rely on photochemistry. This is particularly true of urea and creatinine determinations, complicating the diagnosis of acute renal failure, which is a serious complication of babesiosis. A disproportionately raised serum urea concentration of unknown origin occurs in severely anaemic canine babesiosis patients and gives rise to an increased serum urea:creatinine ratio. The assay for cystatin-C, an excellent measure of glomerular filtration rate, is unaffected by free serum haemoglobin, and due to its different intrinsic origins, is free of influence by the metabolic derangements and organ pathology, other than renal disease, encountered in canine babesiosis. Serum cystatin-C was used to compare the concentrations of serum urea and serum creatinine in dogs with the severely anaemic form of canine babesiosis as well as a canine babesiosis-free reference group. Mean serum urea and mean serum urea:creatinine ratio were significantly elevated in the babesia-infected group relative to the reference population in this study. Mean serum creatinine and mean serum cystatin-C were within the reference ranges. Therefore an elevated urea:creatinine ratio in canine babesiosis in the presence of a normal serum creatinine concentration is considered to be caused by an elevated serum urea concentration and is most likely of non-renal origin. Serum creatinine was therefore as specific a measure of renal function as serum cystatin-C in canine babesiosis in this study. The sensitivity of serum creatinine as a measure of renal function was not established by this study. Serum urea, however, proved to be of little use compared to serum cystatin-C and serum creatinine. Serum urea should therefore not be used to diagnose renal failure in canine babesiosis. PMID:17458340

  8. Spectroscopic and structural study of the newly synthesized heteroligand complex of copper with creatinine and urea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gangopadhyay, Debraj; Singh, Sachin Kumar; Sharma, Poornima; Mishra, Hirdyesh; Unnikrishnan, V. K.; Singh, Bachcha; Singh, Ranjan K.

    2016-02-01

    Study of copper complex of creatinine and urea is very important in life science and medicine. In this paper, spectroscopic and structural study of a newly synthesized heteroligand complex of copper with creatinine and urea has been discussed. Structural studies have been carried out using DFT calculations and spectroscopic analyses were carried out by FT-IR, Raman, UV-vis absorption and fluorescence techniques. The copper complex of creatinine and the heteroligand complex were found to have much increased water solubility as compared to pure creatinine. The analysis of FT-IR and Raman spectra helps to understand the coordination properties of the two ligands and to determine the probable structure of the heteroligand complex. The LIBS spectra of the heteroligand complex reveal that the complex is free from other metal impurities. UV-visible absorption spectra and the fluorescence emission spectra of the aqueous solution of Cu-Crn-urea heteroligand complex at different solute concentrations have been analyzed and the complex is found to be rigid and stable in its monomeric form at very low concentrations.

  9. A method for the simultaneous determination of creatinine and uric acid in serum by high-performance-liquid-chromatography evaluated versus reference methods.

    PubMed

    Kock, R; Seitz, S; Delvoux, B; Greiling, H

    1995-01-01

    A high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with isocratic ion-pair-reversed-phase separation and simultaneous UV-detection at 232 nm and 292 nm is proposed as a method for the simultaneous determination of uric acid and creatinine in serum. The only sample preparation required is an appropriate dilution with the eluent and membrane filtration on non-adsorbent 0.2 micron membrane-filtration-devices. The inaccuracy of the method has been determined for NIST-SRM-909 (n = 10) and was + 0.5% for creatinine as well as for uric acid. The imprecision in this case was 0.8% for both analytes. The within-run imprecision for creatinine/uric acid was 0.4-0.5%/0.2-0.4% in the case of standards and 0.6-0.8%/0.4-0.7% in the case of serum-pools. The between-run imprecision for creatinine/uric acid obtained from serum pools was 0.8-1.1%/0.7-1.0%. The results for creatinine have been compared to those from an isotope dilution-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry using [13C, 15N2]creatinine as internal standard and selected mass detection at m/e = 329 and m/e = 332. The results for uric acid have been compared to an HPLC-method published previously (Kock R et al. J Clin Chem Clin Biochem 1989; 27:157-62). The method comparisons (n = 55) for the new combined method presented versus the reference method for creatinine and the candidate reference method for uric acid resulted in coefficients of correlation of r = 1.000 for both analytes. The new combined method presented is useful for the analysis of patient samples where the classical photometric procedures do not give reliable results, as often observed in monitoring after transplantation surgery.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7756438

  10. Determination of creatinine, uric and ascorbic acid in bovine milk and orange juice by hydrophilic interaction HPLC.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Ruiting; Zhou, Si; Zuo, Yuegang; Deng, Yiwei

    2015-09-01

    Creatinine (Cr), uric (UA) and ascorbic acid (AA) are common constituents in human fluids. Their abnormal concentrations in human fluids are associated with various diseases. Thus, apart from the endogenous formation in human body, it is also important to examine their sources from food products. In this study, a rapid and accurate HILIC method was developed for simultaneous determination of Cr, UA and AA in bovine milk and orange juice. Milk samples were pretreated by protein precipitation, centrifugation and filtration, followed by HPLC separation and quantification using a Waters Spherisorb S5NH2 column. The developed method has been successfully applied to determine the concentration of UA, AA and Cr in milk and fruit juice samples. The milk samples tested were found to contain UA and creatinine in the concentration range of 24.1-86.0 and 5.07-11.2 μg mL(-1), respectively. The orange juices contain AA over 212 μg mL(-1). PMID:25842333

  11. Automated determination of urinary Na+, K+, chloride, inorganic phosphate, urea, and creatinine without sample dilution, with the "RA-XT".

    PubMed

    Fesus, P D; Pressac, M; Braconnier, F; Aymard, P

    1989-03-01

    We describe how concentrations of chloride, urea, inorganic phosphate, and creatinine in urine can be measured directly, without manual sample dilution, in a discrete analyzer (the Technicon "RA-XT"). These methods were accurate for concentrations of chloride up to 280 mmol/L, urea up to 500 mmol/L, inorganic phosphate up to 50 mmol/L, and creatinine up to 30 mmol/L. CVs are less than 3% nd results correlate well with those obtained by continuous-flow analysis (SMA-II). All these reagents are stable at room temperature for three weeks. Analyses are easy to perform and infrequent calibration is required. PMID:2920416

  12. Relationship of serum uric acid, serum creatinine and serum cystatin C with maternal and fetal outcomes in rural Indian pregnant women

    PubMed Central

    Yalamati, Padma; Bhongir, Aparna Varma; Betha, Kalpana; Verma, Ritika; Dandge, Shailendra

    2015-01-01

    Background Hypertensive disorders are the most common in pregnancy. Several studies showed a positive correlation between elevated maternal serum uric acid (UA), serum creatinine and adverse maternal and fetal outcomes, but only a few studies are available on serum cystatin C and maternal and fetal outcomes. The present study was undertaken to study the association of serum UA, creatinine and cystatin C with maternal and fetal outcomes. Methods Out of 116 pregnant women 69 women had no hypertension and 47 had hypertension with or without proteinuria. Serum UA, creatinine and cystatin C was measured by modified Uricase method, modified kinetic Jaffe’s reaction and particle-enhanced immunonephelometric assay respectively. Multivariate logistic regression was performed to determine the independent effects of serum UA, creatinine and cystatin C on maternal and fetal outcomes using stata 13.1. Results The adjusted odds ratio (OR) was 3.73 (95% CI: 1.18-11.75; P=0.024) for UA; 15.79 (95% CI: 3.04-81.94; P=0.001) for creatinine and 2.03 (95% CI: 0.70-5.87; P=0.192) for cystatin C in hypertensive disorders of pregnancy. All the three renal parameters were not significantly associated with birth weight, gestational age of delivery and mode of delivery after adjusting for the confounding factors. Conclusions Serum creatinine and uric acid are independent risk factors for hypertensive disorders of pregnancy. High serum uric acid is associated with low birth weight and delivery by caesarian section whereas high serum creatinine with preterm delivery only before adjustment for confounding factors and not after adjustment. Serum cystatin C was not significantly associated with the maternal and fetal outcomes. PMID:26583159

  13. Estimation of amino acids, urea and uric acid in tasar silkworm, Antheraea mylitta Drury.

    PubMed

    Shamitha, G; Rao, A Purushotham

    2008-11-01

    The tasar silkworm, Antheraea mylitta Drury, Andhra local ecorace is an exclusive race of Andhra Pradesh. It is on the verge of extinction due to difficulty of acclimatisation at breeding and rearing stages. As an attempt to protect this race, a method of total indoor rearing has been done. In this context, the estimation of free amino acids, excretory products- urea and uric acid were compared during the fourth and fifth instars of tasar silkworm, reared under outdoor and indoor conditions. The study has revealed that amino acids decreased in the fat body in outdoor and indoor reared larvae in contrast to that in the haemolymph where it has gradually increased from first to third crops. This is an important finding as it reveals that indoor worms seem to adopt proteolytic activity in the haemolymph. Secondly, in the fifth instar the excretory products are more compared to fourth instar in the indoor reared worms. During fifth instar, formation of nitrogenous products lessens as silk synthesis enhances. The present study reveals that decrease in uric acid in fifth instar implies increase in growth rate and silk synthesis in both outdoor and indoor worms. The findings of the present investigation is helpful in the conservation and protection of the A. mylitta, Andhra local ecorace. PMID:19297987

  14. Availability of Blood Urea Nitrogen/Creatinine Ratio in Gastrointestinal Bleeding with Melena in Children

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyu Seon; Kang, Chan Ho

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The aims of our study were to evaluate the blood urea nitrogen to creatinine ratio (BUN/Cr ratio) for distinguishing between an upper and lower gastrointestinal bleeding (GIB), and differentiating between the two most common causes of upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) presenting with melena in children. Methods Retrospective data of patients with GIB presenting with melena were analyzed. The data from 60 cases were reviewed including demographics, laboratory findings, diagnostic modalities and results, treatments, and transfusions. Results Among the 60 cases, UGIB and lower gastrointestinal bleeding (LGIB) were found in 35 cases (58.3%) and 14 cases (23.3%), respectively. The two common causes of UGIB were varices (37.1%), and peptic ulcer diseases (PUD) (31.4%). The BUN/Cr ratio of 30 or greater was higher in UGIB than LGIB (odds ratio [OR], 6.9; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.3-37.2). In UGIB, the BUN/Cr ratio of the varices group was higher than that of the PUD group (p=0.015). The OR for the BUN/Cr ratio appeared as 1.2 per unit increase in the varices group than the PUD group (95% CI, 1.03-1.3). There was no difference between the PUD group and Meckel's diverticulum group. Conclusion The BUN/Cr ratio was not uneven in differentiating UGIB from LGIB of children with melena in our study. This suggests that BUN/Cr ratio should be interpreted carefully. PMID:25866731

  15. Increased serum urea to creatinine ratio and its negative correlation with arterial pressure in canine babesiosis.

    PubMed

    Zygner, Wojciech; Gójska-Zygner, Olga

    2014-09-01

    The increase of the serum urea to creatinine ratio (UCR) was observed in dogs infected with Babesia canis. Previous studies have suggested that decrease of blood pressure can be one of the reasons for this phenomenon. In this work statistically significant increase of the UCR was observed in dogs with babesiosis. Comparison of the UCR between 23 azotaemic dogs and 25 non-azotaemic dogs infected with Babesia canis showed statistically significantly higher mean of the UCR in azotaemic dogs. Correlations between UCR and systolic, diastolic and mean arterial pressure (SAP, DAP and MAP) in 48 dogs infected with B. canis were negative (UCR and SAP: r = -0.3909; UCR and DAP: r = -0.3182; UCR and MAP: r = -0.3682) and statistically significant (p < 0.05). This result may indicate contribution of hypotension in the increase of the UCR in canine babesiosis. However, the correlations were not high, and there was no statistically significant correlation between UCR and arterial pressures in azotaemic dogs. Thus, it seems that decrease of blood pressure in dogs with babesiosis explains only partially the cause of increased UCR in infected dogs. The other authors suggested hyperureagenesis and myocardial injury as a potential reason for the increased UCR in canine babesiosis. Thus, further studies are needed to determine causes of increased UCR in dogs with babesiosis, especially on the connection between UCR changes and the concentrations of plasma cardiac troponins and ammonia, and the occurrence of occult blood on fecal examination. PMID:25119372

  16. Effects of the Hydration State on the Mid-Infrared Spectra of Urea and Creatinine in Relation to Urine Analyses.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Katherine V; Maréchal, Amandine; Rich, Peter R

    2016-06-01

    When analyzing solutes by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy in attenuated total reflection (ATR) mode, drying of samples onto the ATR crystal surface can greatly increase solute band intensities and, therefore, aid detection of minor components. However, analysis of such spectra is complicated by the existence of alternative partial hydration states of some substances that can significantly alter their infrared signatures. This is illustrated here with urea, which is a dominant component of urine. The effects of hydration state on its infrared spectrum were investigated both by incubation in atmospheres of fixed relative humidities and by recording serial spectra during the drying process. Significant changes of absorption band positions and shapes were observed. Decomposition of the CN antisymmetric stretching (νas) band in all states was possible with four components whose relative intensities varied with hydration state. These correspond to the solution (1468 cm(-1)) and dry (1464 cm(-1)) states and two intermediate (1454 cm(-1) and 1443 cm(-1)) forms that arise from specific urea-water and/or urea-urea interactions. Such intermediate forms of other compounds can also be formed, as demonstrated here with creatinine. Recognition of these states and their accommodation in analyses of materials such as dried urine allows more precise decomposition of spectra so that weaker bands of diagnostic interest can be more accurately defined. PMID:27170705

  17. Down-regulation of hepatic urea synthesis by oxypurines: xanthine and uric acid inhibit N-acetylglutamate synthase.

    PubMed

    Nissim, Itzhak; Horyn, Oksana; Nissim, Ilana; Daikhin, Yevgeny; Caldovic, Ljubica; Barcelona, Belen; Cervera, Javier; Tuchman, Mendel; Yudkoff, Marc

    2011-06-24

    We previously reported that isobutylmethylxanthine (IBMX), a derivative of oxypurine, inhibits citrulline synthesis by an as yet unknown mechanism. Here, we demonstrate that IBMX and other oxypurines containing a 2,6-dione group interfere with the binding of glutamate to the active site of N-acetylglutamate synthetase (NAGS), thereby decreasing synthesis of N-acetylglutamate, the obligatory activator of carbamoyl phosphate synthase-1 (CPS1). The result is reduction of citrulline and urea synthesis. Experiments were performed with (15)N-labeled substrates, purified hepatic CPS1, and recombinant mouse NAGS as well as isolated mitochondria. We also used isolated hepatocytes to examine the action of various oxypurines on ureagenesis and to assess the ameliorating affect of N-carbamylglutamate and/or l-arginine on NAGS inhibition. Among various oxypurines tested, only IBMX, xanthine, or uric acid significantly increased the apparent K(m) for glutamate and decreased velocity of NAGS, with little effect on CPS1. The inhibition of NAGS is time- and dose-dependent and leads to decreased formation of the CPS1-N-acetylglutamate complex and consequent inhibition of citrulline and urea synthesis. However, such inhibition was reversed by supplementation with N-carbamylglutamate. The data demonstrate that xanthine and uric acid, both physiologically occurring oxypurines, inhibit the hepatic synthesis of N-acetylglutamate. An important and novel concept emerging from this study is that xanthine and/or uric acid may have a role in the regulation of ureagenesis and, thus, nitrogen homeostasis in normal and disease states. PMID:21540182

  18. Differences in Blood Urea and Creatinine Concentrations in Earthed and Unearthed Subjects during Cycling Exercise and Recovery.

    PubMed

    Sokal, Paweł; Jastrzębski, Zbigniew; Jaskulska, Ewelina; Sokal, Karol; Jastrzębska, Maria; Radzimiński, Lukasz; Dargiewicz, Robert; Zieliński, Piotr

    2013-01-01

    Contact of humans with the earth, either directly (e.g., with bare feet) or using a metal conductor, changes their biochemical parameters. The effects of earthing during physical exercise are unknown. This study was carried out to evaluate selected biochemical parameters in subjects who were earthed during cycling. In a double-blind, crossover study, 42 participants were divided into two groups and earthed during exercise and recovery. One group was earthed in the first week during 30 minutes of cycling exercise and during recovery, and a second group was earthed in the second week. A double-blind technique was applied. Blood samples were obtained before each training session, after 15 and 30 minutes of exercise, and after 40 minutes of recovery. Significantly lower blood urea levels were observed in subjects earthed during exercise and relaxation. These significant differences were noted in both groups earthed at the beginning of exercise (P < 0.0001), after 15 (P < 0.0001) and 30 minutes (P < 0.0001) of exercise, and after 40 minutes of relaxation (P < 0.0001). Creatinine concentrations in earthed subjects during exercise were unchanged. Conclusions. Earthing during exercise lowers blood urea concentrations and may inhibit hepatic protein catabolism or increase renal urea excretion. Exertion under earthing may result in a positive protein balance. PMID:24066011

  19. Pharmacogenetic effects of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors over age-related urea and creatinine variations in patients with dementia due to Alzheimer disease

    PubMed Central

    Berretta, Juliana Marília; Suchi Chen, Elizabeth; Cardoso Smith, Marilia; Ferreira Bertolucci, Paulo Henrique

    2016-01-01

    Background: Renal function declines according to age and vascular risk factors, whereas few data are available regarding genetically-mediated effects of anti-hypertensives over renal function. Objective: To estimate urea and creatinine variations in dementia due to Alzheimer disease (AD) by way of a pharmacogenetic analysis of the anti-hypertensive effects of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEis). Methods: Consecutive outpatients older than 60 years-old with AD and no history of kidney transplant or dialytic therapy were recruited for prospective correlations regarding variations in fasting blood levels of urea and creatinine in one year, considering ACE genotypes of rs1800764 and rs4291 and their respective haplotypes, and treatment with ACEis along with blood pressure variations. Results: For 190 patients, 152 had arterial hypertension, and 122 used ACEis. Minor allele frequencies were 0.492 for rs1800764-C and 0.337 for rs4291-T, both in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. There were no overall significant yearly variations in levels of urea and creatinine, but their concurrent variations were positively correlated (ρ <0.0001). Each A allele of rs4291 led to an yearly urea increase of 3,074 mg/dL, and an yearly creatinine increase of 0.044 mg/dL, while the use of ACEis was protective regarding creatinine variations. The use of ACEis was also protective for carriers of rs1800764-CT/rs4291-AA, while carriers of rs1800764-CT/rs4291-AT had steeper reductions in creatinine levels, particularly when they were treated with ACEis. Conclusions: Effects of ACEis over creatinine variations are genetically mediated and independent of blood pressure variations in older people with AD. PMID:27546928

  20. [Serum uric acid levels and risk of developing preeclampsia].

    PubMed

    Corominas, Ana I; Balconi, Silvia M; Palermo, Mario; Maskin, Bernardo; Damiano, Alicia E

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that preeclampsia is associated to high uric acid levels, but the clinical assessment of this relationship is still under consideration. Our research was to evaluate if periodic doses of uric acid during pregnancy might help to identify a high risk group prior to the onset of preeclampsia. We conducted a retrospective investigation in 79 primary gestates with normal blood pressure and 79 women with preeclampsia who were assisted at Hospital Nacional Posadas during 2010. Serum uric acid levels, creatininemia, uremia, and proteinuria data from the clinical records of the pregnant women were considered. Uric acid levels were similar in both groups during the first half of gestation. However, as of the 20th week, uric acid increased 1.5-times in preeclamptic women with no changes in creatinine and urea, confirming that these patients had no renal complications. Furthermore, we noted that higher levels of uric acid correlated with low birth weight. We also observed that pregnant women with a family history of hypertension were more likely to develop this condition. Moreover, we did not find a direct relationship with the fetal sex or the appearance of clinical symptoms. The analytical evidence suggests that changes in uric acid concentrations may be due to metabolic alterations at the initial stages of preeclampsia. Therefore, we propose that monitoring levels of uric acid during pregnancy might contribute to the early control of this condition. PMID:25555007

  1. Serum Uric Acid in Smokers

    PubMed Central

    Hanna, Bassam E.; Hamed, Jamal M.; Touhala, Luma M.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives To demonstrate the possible effect of smoking on serum uric acid. Methods Subjects enrolled in study were divided into two groups; nonsmokers and smokers, each with 60 male volunteers of the same social class and dietary habit without history of alcohol consumption, diabetes mellitus, hyperuricemia and gout, renal, joint, lung or heart diseases. Fasting blood and random urine samples were obtained from both groups for measurement of uric acid and creatinine. Calculation of both urine uric acid/urine creatinine ratio and fraction excretion of uric acid were done. The results were statistically evaluated by standard statistical methods. Results No significant differences in the age, serum creatinine, spot urine uric acid/urine creatinine ratio and fraction excretion of uric acid between the two groups, serum uric acid was significantly lower in smokers. In smokers there was significant negative correlation of smoking status (average number of cigarette smoked/day, duration of smoking and cumulative amount of smoking) with serum uric acid. Conclusion After exclusion of other factors affecting uric acid level, the significant low serum uric acid level in smokers was attributed to reduce endogenous production as a result of chronic exposure to cigarette smoke that is a significant source of oxidative stress. As this reduction is proportionate with smoking status and predisposes to cardiovascular disease, it is, therefore, recommended for smokers to stop or reduce smoking and introduce serum uric acid estimation as routine test since its cheap and simple to reflect their antioxidant level. Keywords Smokers; Uric acid; CVD. PMID:22334840

  2. Relationship between blood urea, protein, creatinine, triglycerides and macro-mineral concentrations with the quality and quantity of milk in dairy Holstein cows

    PubMed Central

    Nozad, Shahram; Ramin, Ali-Gholi; Moghadam, Gholamali; Asri-Rezaei, Siamak; Babapour, Azadeh; Ramin, Sina

    2012-01-01

    Seventy six high and low producer cows were selected to determine the composition of the blood and milk parameters, and their interrelationships to determine the indices which could be useful to improve the milk yield. The highest mean blood concentrations were found in high producer cows. Mean values for blood urea nitrogen (BUN), serum protein (SPtn), creatinine, triglycerides (TGs), cholesterol, and beta-hydroxybutyric acid (BHB) were 25.10 mg dL-1, 10.15 g dL-1, 0.81, 62.30, 177.10 and 0.16 mmol L-1, and for macro-minerals including SCa, SMg, serum in-organic phosphorus (SIP), SNa and SK were 3.85, 2.66, 4.63, 108.00 and 4.34 mmol L-1, respectively. The highest concentrations for milk parameters, were observed in the high producers, and were significant only for MCa, MIP and MMg. Mean values for milk urea nitrogen (MUN), milk protein (MPtn) and lactose were 19.90 mg dL-1, 0.39 g dL-1, and 4.12% and for macro-minerals, 13.24, 3.88, 11.03, 73.30 and 16.90 mmol L-1, respectively. There were significant positive correlations between the blood and milk parameters except for creatinine/BHB, TGs/cholesterol and MNa/MK which were not significant. The correlations between the blood parameters were greater than in the milk parameters. Creatinine and SPtn, MUN and MPtn were the main parameters in that the relationships between MPtn with BUN, SPtn and creatinine were more noticeable than others. The regression analysis showed that BUN with the SIP and creatinine, MPtn with the BUN and creatinine and MUN with the SIP and SMg were the appropriate parameters in improvement studies related to the milk yield. In conclusion, BUN, SPtn, MUN and MPtn concentrations are the most effective indices for predicting the preferred milk yield. PMID:25653747

  3. Overnight urinary uric acid: creatinine ratio for detection of sleep hypoxemia. Validation study in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and obstructive sleep apnea before and after treatment with nasal continuous positive airway pressure.

    PubMed

    Braghiroli, A; Sacco, C; Erbetta, M; Ruga, V; Donner, C F

    1993-07-01

    During hypoxia ATP degradation to uric acid is increased in animal models and humans. To assess the reliability of an overnight increase in uric acid excretion as a marker of nocturnal hypoxemia, we selected 10 normal volunteers (7 males and 3 females), 29 COPD patients (26 males and 3 females), and 49 subjects with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) (43 males and 6 females). The patients underwent standard polysomnography, which was repeated in 14 subjects with nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP), and were subdivided into two groups: Group D included desaturating subjects who spent at least 1 h at SaO2 < 90% and 15 min below 85%, and Group ND were nondesaturating subjects. The overnight change in the uric acid:creatinine ratio (delta UA:Cr) was negative in normal subjects (-27.5 +/- 9.1 [mean +/- SD]) and ND groups: -19.7 +/- 14.3 in COPD, -16.1 +/- 13.0 in OSA. In both COPD and OSA Group D, the ratio was usually positive: delta UA:Cr was 17.9 +/- 31.4 in Group D COPD (p < 0.001 versus ND) and 10.1 +/- 30.7 in Group D OSA (p < 0.001 versus ND and versus normal subjects) despite 4 of 15 false negative results in COPD and 8 of 20 in OSA. CPAP effective treatment induced a marked reduction ((p = 0.0024) in delta UA:Cr, leading to a negative value. We conclude that delta UA:Cr seems to be a promising index of significant nocturnal tissue hypoxia, with good specificity but poor sensitivity (about 30% false negative), which might be useful for the long-term follow-up of outpatients on nasal CPAP with a positive ratio at baseline. PMID:8317794

  4. Comparison of measurements of canine plasma creatinine, glucose, proteins, urea, alanine aminotransferase, and alkaline phosphatase obtained with Spotchem SP 4430 and Vitros 250 analyzers.

    PubMed

    Trumel, C; Diquélou, A; Germain, C; Palanché, F; Braun, J P

    2005-12-01

    The suitability of the Spotchem 4430 benchtop biochemistry analyzer for canine blood samples was tested for creatinine, glucose, proteins, urea, alkaline phosphatases and alanine aminotransferase. Results obtained from whole blood and corresponding heparin plasma were identical except for proteins which were higher in plasma (n=10). Between series imprecision (n=10) was <5% for substrates and <10% for enzymes. Comparison of results from 100 Li-heparin samples with those measured with a Vitros 250 analyzer showed good correlation (r>0.93). The slopes of the Passing-Bablock's regression ranged from 0.90 to 1.20 and intercepts were low. The mean biases were low, except for creatinine for which the results obtained by Spotchem (Jaffe reaction) were about 20 micromol/L higher than with the Vitros (enzymatic reaction). The results of this study show that the Spotchem analyzer is suitable for use in canine whole blood or plasma when small numbers of tests are to be performed and large analyzers are not available. PMID:16054888

  5. Urea

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Urea ; CASRN : 57 - 13 - 6 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Effects ) a

  6. Correlating the amount of urea, creatinine, and glucose in urine from patients with diabetes mellitus and hypertension with the risk of developing renal lesions by means of Raman spectroscopy and principal component analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bispo, Jeyse Aliana Martins; de Sousa Vieira, Elzo Everton; Silveira, Landulfo; Fernandes, Adriana Barrinha

    2013-08-01

    Patients with diabetes mellitus and hypertension (HT) diseases are predisposed to kidney diseases. The objective of this study was to identify potential biomarkers in the urine of diabetic and hypertensive patients through Raman spectroscopy in order to predict the evolution to complications and kidney failure. Urine samples were collected from control subjects (CTR) and patients with diabetes and HT with no complications (lower risk, LR), high degree of complications (higher risk, HR), and doing blood dialysis (DI). Urine samples were stored frozen (-20°C) before spectral analysis. Raman spectra were obtained using a dispersive spectrometer (830-nm, 300-mW power, and 20-s accumulation). Spectra were then submitted to principal component analysis (PCA) followed by discriminant analysis. The first PCA loading vectors revealed spectral features of urea, creatinine, and glucose. It has been found that the amounts of urea and creatinine decreased as disease evoluted from CTR to LR/HR and DI (PC1, p<0.05), and the amount of glucose increased in the urine of LR/HR compared to CTR (PC3, p<0.05). The discriminating model showed better overall classification rate of 70%. These results could lead to diagnostic information of possible complications and a better disease prognosis.

  7. Significant association between parathyroid hormone and uric acid level in men

    PubMed Central

    Chin, Kok-Yong; Ima Nirwana, Soelaiman; Wan Ngah, Wan Zurinah

    2015-01-01

    Background Previous reports of patients undergoing parathyroidectomy and of patients receiving teriparatide as antiosteoporotic treatment have suggested a plausible relationship between parathyroid hormone (PTH) and uric acid. However, similar data at population level were lacking. The current study aimed to determine the relationship between PTH and uric acid in a group of apparently healthy Malaysian men. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted among 380 Malay and Chinese men aged 20 years and above, residing in the Klang Valley, Malaysia. Their body anthropometry was measured, and their fasting blood samples were collected for biochemical analysis. The relationship between PTH and uric acid was analyzed using regression analysis. Results Increased serum PTH level was significantly associated with increased serum uric acid level (β=0.165; P=0.001). Increased PTH level was also significantly associated with the condition of hyperuricemia in the study population (odds ratio [OR], 1.045; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.017–1.075; P=0.002). All analyses were adjusted for age, body mass index, vitamin D, total calcium, inorganic phosphate, blood urea nitrogen and creatinine levels. Conclusion There is a significant positive relationship between PTH level and uric acid level in Malaysian men. This relationship and its clinical significance should be further investigated in a larger longitudinal study. PMID:26346636

  8. MedlinePlus: Creatinine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Kidney Diseases Resources Creatinine (American Association for Clinical Chemistry) Creatinine - blood Also in Spanish Creatinine - urine Also ... and Albumin/ Creatinine Ratio (American Association for Clinical Chemistry) Urine Protein and Urine Protein to Creatinine Ratio ( ...

  9. Uric acid urine test

    MedlinePlus

    The uric acid urine test measures the level of uric acid in urine. Uric acid level can also be checked using a blood ... help determine the cause of a high uric acid level in the blood. It may also be ...

  10. Lean body mass estimation by creatinine kinetics.

    PubMed

    Keshaviah, P R; Nolph, K D; Moore, H L; Prowant, B; Emerson, P F; Meyer, M; Twardowski, Z J; Khanna, R; Ponferrada, L; Collins, A

    1994-01-01

    A new technique for estimating lean body mass (LBM) from creatinine kinetics has been developed. It is based on the principle that creatinine production is proportional to LBM and that, in the steady state, creatinine production is equal to the sum of creatinine excretion (urinary and dialytic) and metabolic degradation. This technique was applied to 17 normal subjects, 26 stable, chronic hemodialysis (HD) patients, and 71 stable, chronic peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients. In the HD group, LBM was also determined by bioimpedance in 11 patients and calculated from total body water, measured as the volume of urea distribution of a sterile urea infusion, in 15 patients. In normal subjects and in the PD group, LBM was assessed by creatinine kinetics as well as by bioimpedance, near infrared, and anthropometric techniques. In the HD patients, LBM by creatinine kinetics correlated significantly with LBM from total body water and the bioimpedance technique. There was no statistical difference between the total body water and creatinine kinetics techniques, but the bioimpedance values were systematically higher than those obtained by the kinetic technique. In the PD group and in normal volunteers, LBM values by creatinine kinetics correlated significantly with the other methods but were lower. Forty-seven percent of the HD patients and 66% of the PD patients had significantly lower LBM by creatinine kinetics than expected for their sex and age. Estimation of LBM by creatinine kinetics is proposed as a simple and convenient technique for the routine nutritional assessment of dialysis patients. PMID:8161729

  11. Effect of urea inclusion in diets containing corn dried distillers grains on feedlot cattle performance, carcass characteristics, ruminal fermentation, total tract digestibility, and purine derivatives-to-creatinine index.

    PubMed

    Ceconi, I; Ruiz-Moreno, M J; DiLorenzo, N; DiCostanzo, A; Crawford, G I

    2015-01-01

    Increased availability of rapidly fermentable carbohydrates and a great proportion of corn-derived CP in the diet may result in a degradable intake protein (DIP) deficit. Therefore, ruminal DIP deficit may result from high dietary inclusion of processed corn grain and small to moderate inclusion of corn distillers grains (DG). Two experiments were conducted to evaluate the effect of increasing dietary DIP concentration through the inclusion of urea on feedlot cattle performance, carcass characteristics, ruminal fermentation, total tract digestibility, and purine derivatives-to-creatinine (PDC) index. In Exp. 1, 42 steers (428 ± 5 kg initial BW) were assigned randomly to 1 of 3 diets containing (DM basis) 0 (control [CON]), 0.4 (low urea [LU]), or 0.6% urea (high urea [HU]) to provide 6.4, 7.5, or 8.0% dietary DIP, respectively, and 12% high-moisture corn (HMC), 20% corn dried DG with solubles (DDGS), 10% ryegrass haylage, 2.9% dry supplement, and dry-rolled corn (DRC). Steers were fed ad libitum once daily using a Calan gate system. Carcass-adjusted final BW and DMI were similar among treatments (P ≥ 0.58). Carcass-adjusted ADG was greater (P ≤ 0.04) for the HU diet compared with the LU and CON diets and was similar (P = 0.73) between the LU and CON diets. Carcass-adjusted G:F was greater (P = 0.03) for the HU diet compared with the LU diet, tended (P = 0.09) to be greater compared with the CON diet, and was similar (P = 0.61) between the LU and CON diets. Carcass characteristics were similar (P ≥ 0.34) among treatments. In Exp. 2, 4 ruminally cannulated steers (347 ± 18 kg initial BW) were randomly assigned to a replicated 2 × 2 Latin square design. Steers were fed the same CON or HU diet used in Exp. 1 ad libitum once daily. Differences in the PDC index were used as indicators of differences in microbial CP synthesis. Ruminal pH, OM intake, and starch and CP digestibility were not affected by treatment (P ≥ 0.13). Digestibility of OM and NDF and

  12. Folic acid reverses uric acid crystal-induced surface OAT1 internalization by inhibiting RhoA activity in uric acid nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    WU, XINLIN; LIU, JIANXIANG; ZHANG, JIANQING; LIU, HENG; YAN, MIANSHENG; LIANG, BIRONG; XIE, HONGBO; ZHANG, SHIJUN; SUN, BAOGUO; ZHOU, HOUMING

    2016-01-01

    To investigate how organic anion transporter (OAT)-1 is involved in uric acid nephropathy (UAN), a rat model for UAN was established and the serum uric acid, blood urea nitrogen and serum creatinine levels were all measured, and observed to be increased. It was additionally identified that in UAN rats the surface OAT1 expression levels were reduced. By treating HEK cells with monosodium urate (MSU) crystals, it was observed that the cells exhibited a reduction in OAT1 levels. Furthermore, MSU crystals were observed to recruit Ras homolog family member A (RhoA), a small guanosine triphosphatase, to the membrane and activate it. Following RhoA activation, the OAT1 internalization rate was identified to be increased. The dominant-negative RhoA N19 mutation was able to block MSU-induced OAT1 internalization, indicating that the process was RhoA-dependent. Finally, the results indicated that folic acid, a daily nutritional supplement, was capable of rescuing MSU-induced nephropathy and OAT1 internalization. These observations indicated that uric acid crystals were able to reduce the OAT1 membrane distribution through activating RhoA, and that folic acid was capable of preventing MSU-induced OAT1 relocation by inhibiting the RhoA signaling pathway. PMID:26846716

  13. Uric acid test (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Uric acid urine test is performed to check for the amount of uric acid in urine. Urine is collected over a 24 ... testing. The most common reason for measuring uric acid levels is in the diagnosis or treatment of ...

  14. Uric acid utilization by Mycobacterium intracellulare and Mycobacterium scrofulaceum isolates.

    PubMed Central

    Falkinham, J O; George, K L; Parker, B C; Gruft, H

    1983-01-01

    Forty-nine human and environmental isolates of Mycobacterium intracellulare and Mycobacterium scrofulaceum were tested for their ability to grow on uric acid and a number of its degradation products. Nearly all (88 to 90%) strains used uric acid or allantoin as a sole nitrogen source; fewer (47 to 69%) used allantoate, urea, or possibly ureidoglycollate. Enzymatic activities of one representative isolate demonstrated the existence of a uric acid degradation pathway resembling that in other aerobic microorganisms. PMID:6863220

  15. Uric acid - blood

    MedlinePlus

    Uric acid is a chemical created when the body breaks down substances called purines. Purines are found in some ... dried beans and peas, and beer. Most uric acid dissolves in blood and travels to the kidneys. ...

  16. Uric Acid Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? Uric Acid Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: Serum Urate; UA Formal name: Uric Acid Related tests: Synovial Fluid Analysis , Kidney Stone Analysis , ...

  17. Serum uric acid and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels are independent predictors of coronary artery disease in Asian Indian patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Jayashankar, C. A.; Andrews, Henley Punnen; Vijayasarathi; Pinnelli, Venkata BharatKumar; Shashidharan, Basappaji; Nithin Kumar, H. N.; Vemulapalli, Swaapnika

    2016-01-01

    Aim: We aimed to identify the predictors of coronary artery disease (CAD) in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (type 2 DM). Methods: About fifty Asian Indian patients with type 2 DM patients aged >40 years and fifty sex- and age-matched nondiabetic controls were enrolled for this study. Following complete medical history and baseline clinical data, laboratory investigations were performed to assess fasting and postprandial plasma glucose levels, lipid profile, blood urea, serum creatinine, and serum uric acid levels. Results: Body mass index (BMI), waist-to-hip ratio, serum uric acid, serum total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, triglycerides, very LDL cholesterol were significantly higher among diabetic patients compared to controls. On univariate analysis, serum LDL cholesterol (odds ratio [OR]: 29.67, P < 0.001), serum uric acid (OR: 25.65, P < 0.001), low high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol (OR: 21.12, P < 0.001), hypertension (OR: 17.06, P < 0.001), family history of cardiovascular disease (CVD) (OR: 9.43, P = 0.002), and duration of diabetes (OR: 4.65, P = 0.03) were identified as predictors of CVD among diabetic patients. On multivariate regression, only LDL cholesterol (OR: 1.51, P = 0.002) and serum uric acid (OR: 1.21, P = 0.01) were the independent predictors of CAD among diabetic patients. Significant positive correlation of serum uric acid with duration of diabetes (r = 0.38, P = 0.006), BMI (r = 0.35, P = 0.01), triglycerides (r = 0.356, P = 0.01), LDL cholesterol (r = 0.38, P = 0.007), HDL cholesterol (r = −0.514, P < 0.001), and hypertension (r = 0.524, P < 0.001) was observed. Conclusion: Serum LDL cholesterol and hyperuricemia may serve as independent predictors of CAD among Asian Indian subjects with type 2 DM. PMID:27433067

  18. Uric acid - urine

    MedlinePlus

    ... to filter fluids and waste normally (chronic glomerulonephritis ) Lead poisoning Long-term (chronic) alcohol use Risks There are ... Elsevier Saunders; 2011:chap 28. Read More Gout Lead poisoning Liver disease Polycythemia vera Uric acid - blood Update ...

  19. Uric acid - blood

    MedlinePlus

    ... High levels of uric acid can sometimes cause gout or kidney disease. You may have this test ... Alcoholism Chemotherapy-related side effects Diabetes Excessive exercise Gout Hypoparathyroidism Lead poisoning Leukemia Medullary cystic kidney disease ...

  20. Four-week effects of allopurinol and febuxostat treatments on blood pressure and serum creatinine level in gouty men.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun Ah; Seo, Young-Il; Song, Yeong W

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study was to observe the effects of uric acid lowering therapy (UALT), febuxostat and allopurinol, on blood pressure (BP) and serum creatinine level. Post-hoc data were derived from a phase-III, randomised, double-blind, 4-week trial of male gouty patients that compared the safety and efficacy of febuxostat and allopurinol in adults with gout. The subjects were randomly assigned to one of five groups, 35-37 in each group (febuxostat: 40, 80, 120 mg/d; allopurinol: 300 mg/d; control group: placebo). Blood pressure and serum creatinine level were measured at baseline and at weeks 2 and 4. Diastolic BP and creatinine level had decreased significantly in the UALT groups compared to the control group at week 4. Diastolic BP had decreased significantly in the allopurinol group and serum creatinine level had decreased significantly in the febuxostat groups at week 4. After adjusting for confounding variables, serum uric acid changes were found to be significantly correlated with changes in serum creatinine level but were not associated with changes in systolic or diastolic BP. UALT in gouty subjects significantly decreased diastolic BP and serum creatinine level. Changes in uric acid were significantly correlated with those in serum creatinine level, suggesting the feasibility of renal function improvement through UALT in gouty men. PMID:25120316

  1. Stamping SERS for creatinine sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ming; Du, Yong; Zhao, Fusheng; Zeng, Jianbo; Santos, Greggy M.; Mohan, Chandra; Shih, Wei-Chuan

    2015-03-01

    Urine can be obtained easily, readily and non-invasively. The analysis of urine can provide metabolic information of the body and the condition of renal function. Creatinine is one of the major components of human urine associated with muscle metabolism. Since the content of creatinine excreted into urine is relatively constant, it is used as an internal standard to normalize water variations. Moreover, the detection of creatinine concentration in urine is important for the renal clearance test, which can monitor the filtration function of kidney and health status. In more details, kidney failure can be imminent when the creatinine concentration in urine is high. A simple device and protocol for creatinine sensing in urine samples can be valuable for point-of-care applications. We reported quantitative analysis of creatinine in urine samples by using stamping surface enhanced Raman scattering (S-SERS) technique with nanoporous gold disk (NPGD) based SERS substrate. S-SERS technique enables label-free and multiplexed molecular sensing under dry condition, while NPGD provides a robust, controllable, and high-sensitivity SERS substrate. The performance of S-SERS with NGPDs is evaluated by the detection and quantification of pure creatinine and creatinine in artificial urine within physiologically relevant concentration ranges.

  2. Imprinted zeolite modified carbon paste electrode as a potentiometric sensor for uric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khasanah, Miratul; Widati, Alfa Akustia; Fitri, Sarita Aulia

    2016-03-01

    Imprinted zeolite modified carbon paste electrode (carbon paste-IZ) has been developed and applied to determine uric acid by potentiometry. The imprinted zeolite (IZ) was synthesized by the mole ratio of uric acid/Si of 0.0306. The modified electrode was manufactured by mass ratio of carbon, IZ and solid paraffin was 40:25:35. The modified electrode had shown the measurement range of 10-5 M to 10-2 M with Nernst factor of 28.6 mV/decade, the detection limit of 5.86 × 10-6 M and the accuracy of 95.3 - 105.0%. Response time of the electrode for uric acid 10-5 M - 10-2 M was 25 - 44 s. The developed electrode showed the high selectivity toward uric acid in the urea matrix. Life time of the carbon paste-IZ electrode was 10 weeks.

  3. Recognition and Sensing of Creatinine.

    PubMed

    Guinovart, Tomàs; Hernández-Alonso, Daniel; Adriaenssens, Louis; Blondeau, Pascal; Martínez-Belmonte, Marta; Rius, F Xavier; Andrade, Francisco J; Ballester, Pablo

    2016-02-12

    Current methods for creatinine quantification suffer from significant drawbacks when aiming to combine accuracy, simplicity, and affordability. Here, an unprecedented synthetic receptor, an aryl-substituted calix[4]pyrrole with a monophosphonate bridge, is reported that displays remarkable affinity for creatinine and the creatininium cation. The receptor works by including the guest in its deep and polar aromatic cavity and establishing directional interactions in three dimensions. When incorporated into a suitable polymeric membrane, this molecule acts as an ionophore. A highly sensitive and selective potentiometric sensor suitable for the determination of creatinine levels in biological fluids, such as urine or plasma, in an accurate, fast, simple, and cost-effective way has thus been developed. PMID:26749029

  4. Creatinine arm index as alternative for creatinine height index.

    PubMed

    Van Hoeyweghen, R J; De Leeuw, I H; Vandewoude, M F

    1992-10-01

    Nutritional assessment of elderly people is limited due to a lack of age-corrected standards. The objective of this study was to develop a new, more age-independent index for nutritional assessment by correcting the creatinine height index (CHI) for the age-induced changes in its variables. This might improve the differentiation between physiological reduction in muscle mass in elderly people and the changes induced by malnutrition. Seventy-four elderly and 100 young healthy volunteers were compared by anthropometric and biochemical-assessment variables. From the high correlation between total arm length and body length (r = 0.86; P less than 0.001) and the use of an alternative formula to calculate ideal body weight (IBW) from height and wrist circumference, a relatively age-independent estimate of IBW was determined. Creatinine arm index, as an adapted index of CHI, is proposed based on this age-independent IBW estimation and a specific creatinine coefficient for different age groups. PMID:1414958

  5. Blood uric acid in executives

    PubMed Central

    Phoon, W. H.; Pincherle, G.

    1972-01-01

    Phoon, W. H., and Pincherle, G. (1972).Brit. J. industr. Med.,29, 334-337. Blood uric acid in executives. The mean blood uric acid in over 7000 male executives was found to be 5·96 mg/100 ml (standard deviation 1·12). This was significantly higher than the mean level (4·64 mg/100 ml) in 778 females from the same social background. The women showed a rise in mean level with age which was not found in the men. In the men, significant correlations were found with haemoglobin level, cholesterol level, electrocardiographic findings, relative weight, and stated alcohol consumption. These results and the importance of blood uric acid determinations in a screening programme are discussed. PMID:5044606

  6. Approach to managing elevated creatinine.

    PubMed Central

    Tremblay, Richard

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe a systematic approach to finding the underlying cause of an elevated creatinine level. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: This diagnostic approach is based on a synthesis of information from reference works on nephrology, articles found through a MEDLINE search, and the author's personal experience. MAIN MESSAGE: Elevated creatinine levels suggest the differential diagnosis of renal failure (RF). History and a complete physical examination are important, keeping in mind that RF is often asymptomatic in the early stages. After repeating the creatinine test to verify results, baseline tests should be ordered to identify the cause of the RF. Comparing results of serial tests is essential for determining whether RF is acute or chronic, stable or progressive. An ultrasound scan is particularly useful for eliminating an obstructive cause; the size of the kidney can indicate whether disease is acute or chronic. Complementary blood tests and imaging studies might be useful. CONCLUSION: Diagnosing and managing RF can appear complex, but a systematic approach will help you find the cause and treat the condition. PMID:15171676

  7. The cystatin C/creatinine ratio, a marker of glomerular filtration quality: associated factors, reference intervals, and prediction of morbidity and mortality in healthy seniors.

    PubMed

    Purde, Mette-Triin; Nock, Stefan; Risch, Lorenz; Medina Escobar, Pedro; Grebhardt, Chris; Nydegger, Urs E; Stanga, Zeno; Risch, Martin

    2016-03-01

    The ratio of cystatin C (cysC) to creatinine (crea) is regarded as a marker of glomerular filtration quality associated with cardiovascular morbidities. We sought to determine reference intervals for serum cysC-crea ratio in seniors. Furthermore, we sought to determine whether other low-molecular weight molecules exhibit a similar behavior in individuals with altered glomerular filtration quality. Finally, we investigated associations with adverse outcomes. A total of 1382 subjectively healthy Swiss volunteers aged 60 years or older were enrolled in the study. Reference intervals were calculated according to Clinical & Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) guideline EP28-A3c. After a baseline exam, a 4-year follow-up survey recorded information about overall morbidity and mortality. The cysC-crea ratio (mean 0.0124 ± 0.0026 mg/μmol) was significantly higher in women and increased progressively with age. Other associated factors were hemoglobin A1c, mean arterial pressure, and C-reactive protein (P < 0.05 for all). Participants exhibiting shrunken pore syndrome had significantly higher ratios of 3.5-66.5 kDa molecules (brain natriuretic peptide, parathyroid hormone, β2-microglobulin, cystatin C, retinol-binding protein, thyroid-stimulating hormone, α1-acid glycoprotein, lipase, amylase, prealbumin, and albumin) and creatinine. There was no such difference in the ratios of very low-molecular weight molecules (urea, uric acid) to creatinine or in the ratios of molecules larger than 66.5 kDa (transferrin, haptoglobin) to creatinine. The cysC-crea ratio was significantly predictive of mortality and subjective overall morbidity at follow-up in logistic regression models adjusting for several factors. The cysC-crea ratio exhibits age- and sex-specific reference intervals in seniors. In conclusion, the cysC-crea ratio may indicate the relative retention of biologically active low-molecular weight compounds and can independently predict the risk for overall

  8. A creatinine biosensor based on admittance measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ching, Congo Tak-Shing; Sun, Tai-Ping; Jheng, Deng-Yun; Tsai, Hou-Wei; Shieh, Hsiu-Li

    2015-08-01

    Regular check of blood creatinine level is very important as it is a measurement of renal function. Therefore, the objective of this study is to develop a simple and reliable creatinine biosensor based on admittance measurement for precise determination of creatinine. The creatinine biosensor was fabricated with creatinine deiminase immobilized on screen-printed carbon electrodes. Admittance measurement at a specific frequency ranges (22.80 - 84.71 Hz) showed that the biosensor has an excellent linear (r2 > 0.95) response range (50 - 250 uM), which covers the normal physiological and pathological ranges of blood creatinine levels. Intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) showed that the biosensor has excellent reliability and validity (ICC = 0.98). In conclusion, a simple and reliable creatinine biosensor was developed and it is capable of precisely determining blood creatinine levels in both the normal physiological and pathological ranges.

  9. URIC ACID AND TISSUE REPAIR

    PubMed Central

    NERY, Rodrigo Araldi; KAHLOW, Barbara Stadler; SKARE, Thelma L; TABUSHI, Fernando Issamu; CASTRO, Adham do Amaral e

    2015-01-01

    Uric acid, a metabolic product of purines, may exert a role in tissue healing. In this review we will explore its role as an alarm initiating the inflammatory process that is necessary for tissue repair, as a scavenger of oxygen free radicals, as a mobilizer of progenitor endothelial cells and as supporter of adaptive immune system. PMID:26734804

  10. Towards the physiological function of uric acid.

    PubMed

    Becker, B F

    1993-06-01

    Uric acid, or more correctly (at physiological pH values), its monoanion urate, is traditionally considered to be a metabolically inert end-product of purine metabolism in man, without any physiological value. However, this ubiquitous compound has proven to be a selective antioxidant, capable especially of reaction with hydroxyl radicals and hypochlorous acid, itself being converted to innocuous products (allantoin, allantoate, glyoxylate, urea, oxalate). There is now evidence for such processes not only in vitro and in isolated organs, but also in the human lung in vivo. Urate may also serve as an oxidisable cosubstrate for the enzyme cyclooxygenase. As shown for the coronary system, a major site of production of urate is the microvascular endothelium, and there is generally a net release of urate from the human myocardium in vivo. In isolated organ preparations, urate protects against reperfusion damage induced by activated granulocytes, cells known to produce a variety of radicals and oxidants. Intriguingly, urate prevents oxidative inactivation of endothelial enzymes (cyclooxygenase, angiotensin converting enzyme) and preserves the ability of the endothelium to mediate vascular dilatation in the face of oxidative stress, suggesting a particular relationship between the site of urate formation and the need for a biologically potent radical scavenger and antioxidant. PMID:8325534

  11. Fructose and uric acid in diabetic nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Bjornstad, Petter; Lanaspa, Miguel A.; Ishimoto, Takuji; Kosugi, Tomoki; Kume, Shinji; Jalal, Diana; Maahs, David M.; Snell-Bergeon, Janet K.; Johnson, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    Clinical studies have reported associations between serum uric acid levels and the development of diabetic nephropathy, but the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. There is evidence from animal studies that blocking uric acid production protects the kidney from tubulointerstitial injury, which may suggest a causal role for uric acid in the development of diabetic tubular injury. In turn, when fructose, which is endogenously produced in diabetes via the polyol pathway, is metabolised, uric acid is generated from a side-chain reaction driven by ATP depletion and purine nucleotide turnover. For this reason, uric acid derived from endogenous fructose could cause tubulointerstitial injury in diabetes. Accordingly, our research group recently demonstrated that blocking fructose metabolism in a diabetic mouse model mitigated the development of tubulointerstitial injury by lowering tubular uric acid production. In this review we discuss the relationship between uric acid and fructose as a novel mechanism for the development of diabetic tubular injury. PMID:26049401

  12. Fructose and uric acid in diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Bjornstad, Petter; Lanaspa, Miguel A; Ishimoto, Takuji; Kosugi, Tomoki; Kume, Shinji; Jalal, Diana; Maahs, David M; Snell-Bergeon, Janet K; Johnson, Richard J; Nakagawa, Takahiko

    2015-09-01

    Clinical studies have reported associations between serum uric acid levels and the development of diabetic nephropathy, but the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. There is evidence from animal studies that blocking uric acid production protects the kidney from tubulointerstitial injury, which may suggest a causal role for uric acid in the development of diabetic tubular injury. In turn, when fructose, which is endogenously produced in diabetes via the polyol pathway, is metabolised, uric acid is generated from a side-chain reaction driven by ATP depletion and purine nucleotide turnover. For this reason, uric acid derived from endogenous fructose could cause tubulointerstitial injury in diabetes. Accordingly, our research group recently demonstrated that blocking fructose metabolism in a diabetic mouse model mitigated the development of tubulointerstitial injury by lowering tubular uric acid production. In this review we discuss the relationship between uric acid and fructose as a novel mechanism for the development of diabetic tubular injury. PMID:26049401

  13. Total saponins from dioscorea septemloba thunb reduce serum uric acid levels in rats with hyperuricemia through OATP1A1 up-regulation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yan; Chen, Xiao-lin; Xiang, Ting; Sun, Bao-guo; Luo, Hao-xuan; Liu, Meng-ting; Chen, Ze-xiong; Zhang, Shi-jun; Wang, Chang-Jun

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of total saponins of Dioscorea (TSD), an extract of the Chinese herbal Bi Xie, on hyperuricemia and to elucidate the underlying mechanisms. The rat hyperuricemia model was established by administration of adenine. Thirty-two rats were randomly allocated into 4 groups: model group, low/high-dose TSD-treated groups, and allopurinol-treated group. Meanwhile, 8 rats were used as normal controls. Serum uric acid (UA), blood urea nitrogen (BUN), serum creatinine (Scr), and organic anion transporting polypeptide 1A1 (OATP1A1) levels were measured. Comparison between the model group and treatment (allopurinol and TSD) groups showed the serum UA levels were significantly decreased in treatment groups. TSD had similar effects to allopurinol. It was found that the OATP1A1 protein expression levels in treatment groups were higher than in model group and normal controls. And different from the allopurinol-treated groups, TSD-treated group had elevated OATP1A1 expression levels in the stomach, liver, small intestine and large intestine tissues. It was suggested that TSD may facilitate the excretion of UA and lower UA levels by up-regulating OATP1A1 expression. PMID:27072969

  14. Serum Uric Acid Level Predicts Progression of IgA Nephropathy in Females but Not in Males

    PubMed Central

    Shoji, Tatsuya; Shinzawa, Maki; Hasuike, Yukiko; Nagatoya, Katsuyuki; Yamauchi, Atsushi; Hayashi, Terumasa; Kuragano, Takayuki; Moriyama, Toshiki; Isaka, Yoshitaka; Nakanishi, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    Background Immunoglobulin A nephropathy (IgAN) is one of most common forms of glomerulonephritis. At this point, the clinical impact of hyperuricemia on IgAN is not clear. The aim of the present study was to explore the clinical impact of hyperuricemia on the progression of IgAN. Study Design Multicenter retrospective cohort study. Setting & Participants 935 IgAN patients who were diagnosed by kidney biopsy at Osaka University Hospital, Osaka General Hospital, and Osaka Rosai Hospital. were included in this study. Predictor Uric acid levels at renal biopsy. Outcomes The outcome of interest was the time from the kidney biopsy to the time when a 50% increase in the baseline serum creatinine level was observed, which was defined as "progression". Measurements The baseline characteristics according to the kidney biopsy at the time of diagnosis were collected from the medical records, and included age, gender, body mass index, hypertension, diabetes (use of antidiabetic drugs), serum levels of creatinine, urinary protein, smoking status, RAAS blockers and steroid therapy. Results An elevated serum uric acid level was an independent risk factor for progression in female patients (per 1.0 mg/dL, multivariate-adjusted incident rate ratio 1.33 [95% confidence interval 1.07, 1.64], P = 0.008) but not in male patients (1.02 [0.81, 1.29], P = 0.855). To control a confounding effect of renal function on an association between serum uric acid level and progression in female patients, age- and serum creatinine-matched and propensity score-matched analyses were performed, and these results also supported the effect by uric acid on kidney disease progression independent of basal kidney function. Limitations A cohort analyzed retorospectively. Conclusions This study revealed that an elevated uric acid level was an independent risk factor for ESKD in female IgAN patients. Therefore, uric acid might be a treatable target in female IgAN patients. PMID:27560997

  15. The Relation between Serum Uric Acid and HbA1c Is Dependent upon Hyperinsulinemia in Patients with Newly Diagnosed Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Yuliang; Bu, Hemei; Zhao, Sha; Li, Xiaona; Lu, Shan

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The aim of our study was to explore the dependent condition of the relationship between uric acid and blood glucose in type 2 diabetes. Research Design and Methods. We measured the HbA1c, serum uric acid, creatinine, lipids profiles, and so forth of 605 newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes patients, and oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTTs) were performed on each patient. The population was divided into high and low insulin groups. Multiple linear regression analyses were conducted to assess the relationship between uric acid and HbA1c. Results. Serum uric acid and HbA1c levels were low in newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes patients. However, we found no significant relationship between uric acid and HbA1c by regression analysis after adjusting total insulin. The concentration of uric acid was inversely correlated with HbA1c in the high insulin group, regardless of patient sex. However, no associations were found in low insulin group. Conclusions. The negative correlation between uric acid and HbA1c is conditional in newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes patients and is related to hyperinsulinemia. Therefore, uric acid is likely only useful as a biomarker of blood glucose in patients exhibiting hyperinsulinemia. PMID:27403443

  16. The molecular physiology of uric acid homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Asim K; Mount, David B

    2015-01-01

    Uric acid, generated from the metabolism of purines, has proven and emerging roles in human disease. Serum uric acid is determined by production and the net balance of reabsorption or secretion by the kidney and intestine. A detailed understanding of epithelial absorption and secretion of uric acid has recently emerged, aided in particular by the results of genome-wide association studies of hyperuricemia. Novel genetic and regulatory networks with effects on uric acid homeostasis have also emerged. These developments promise to lead to a new understanding of the various diseases associated with hyperuricemia and to novel, targeted therapies for hyperuricemia. PMID:25422986

  17. Association of Serum Uric Acid Concentration with Diabetic Retinopathy and Albuminuria in Taiwanese Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Ching-Chao; Lin, Pi-Chen; Lee, Mei-Yueh; Chen, Szu-Chia; Shin, Shyi-Jang; Hsiao, Pi-Jung; Lin, Kun-Der; Hsu, Wei-Hao

    2016-01-01

    Patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) may experience chronic microvascular complications such as diabetic retinopathy (DR) and diabetic nephropathy (DN) during their lifetime. In clinical studies, serum uric acid concentration has been found to be associated with DR and DN. The goal of this study was to evaluate the relationship between the increases in serum uric acid level and the severity of DR and albuminuria in Taiwanese patients with type 2 DM. We recorded serum uric acid concentration, the severity of DR, and the severity of albuminuria by calculating urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio (UACR) in 385 patients with type 2 DM. In multivariate logistic regression analysis, a high uric acid concentration was a risk factor for albuminuria (odds ratio (OR), 1.227; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.015–1.482; p = 0.034) and DR (OR, 1.264; 95% CI = 1.084–1.473; p = 0.003). We also demonstrated that there was a higher concentration of serum uric acid in the patients with more severe albuminuria and DR. In conclusion, an increased serum uric acid level was significantly correlated with the severity of albuminuria and DR in Taiwanese patients with type 2 DM. PMID:27490538

  18. Association of Serum Uric Acid Concentration with Diabetic Retinopathy and Albuminuria in Taiwanese Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Liang, Ching-Chao; Lin, Pi-Chen; Lee, Mei-Yueh; Chen, Szu-Chia; Shin, Shyi-Jang; Hsiao, Pi-Jung; Lin, Kun-Der; Hsu, Wei-Hao

    2016-01-01

    Patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) may experience chronic microvascular complications such as diabetic retinopathy (DR) and diabetic nephropathy (DN) during their lifetime. In clinical studies, serum uric acid concentration has been found to be associated with DR and DN. The goal of this study was to evaluate the relationship between the increases in serum uric acid level and the severity of DR and albuminuria in Taiwanese patients with type 2 DM. We recorded serum uric acid concentration, the severity of DR, and the severity of albuminuria by calculating urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio (UACR) in 385 patients with type 2 DM. In multivariate logistic regression analysis, a high uric acid concentration was a risk factor for albuminuria (odds ratio (OR), 1.227; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.015-1.482; p = 0.034) and DR (OR, 1.264; 95% CI = 1.084-1.473; p = 0.003). We also demonstrated that there was a higher concentration of serum uric acid in the patients with more severe albuminuria and DR. In conclusion, an increased serum uric acid level was significantly correlated with the severity of albuminuria and DR in Taiwanese patients with type 2 DM. PMID:27490538

  19. Type 2 Diabetes and Uric Acid Nephrolithiasis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maalouf, Naim M.

    2008-09-01

    Type 2 diabetes is associated with an increased propensity for uric acid nephrolithiasis. In individuals with diabetes, this increased risk is due to a lower urine pH that results from obesity, dietary factors, and impaired renal ammoniagenesis. The epidemiology and pathogenesis of uric acid stone disease in patients with diabetes are hereby reviewed, and potential molecular mechanisms are proposed.

  20. Quantification of urinary uric acid in the presence of thymol and thimerosal by high-performance liquid chromatography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Y.; Pietrzyk, R. A.; Whitson, P. A.

    1997-01-01

    A high-performance liquid chromatographic method was developed as an alternative to automated enzymatic analysis of uric acid in human urine preserved with thymol and/or thimerosal. Uric acid (tR = 10 min) and creatinine (tR = 5 min) were separated and quantified during isocratic elution (0.025 M acetate buffer, pH 4.5) from a mu Bondapak C18 column. The uric-acid peak was identified chemically by incubating urine samples with uricase. The thymol/thimerosal peak appeared at 31 min during the washing step and did not interfere with the analysis. We validated the high-performance liquid chromatographic method for linearity, precision and accuracy, and the results were found to be excellent.

  1. Urea metabolism in plants.

    PubMed

    Witte, Claus-Peter

    2011-03-01

    Urea is a plant metabolite derived either from root uptake or from catabolism of arginine by arginase. In agriculture, urea is intensively used as a nitrogen fertilizer. Urea nitrogen enters the plant either directly, or in the form of ammonium or nitrate after urea degradation by soil microbes. In recent years various molecular players of plant urea metabolism have been investigated: active and passive urea transporters, the nickel metalloenzyme urease catalyzing the hydrolysis of urea, and three urease accessory proteins involved in the complex activation of urease. The degradation of ureides derived from purine breakdown has long been discussed as a possible additional metabolic source for urea, but an enzymatic route for the complete hydrolysis of ureides without a urea intermediate has recently been described for Arabidopsis thaliana. This review focuses on the proteins involved in plant urea metabolism and the metabolic sources of urea but also addresses open questions regarding plant urea metabolism in a physiological and agricultural context. The contribution of plant urea uptake and metabolism to fertilizer urea usage in crop production is still not investigated although globally more than half of all nitrogen fertilizer is applied to crops in the form of urea. Nitrogen use efficiency in crop production is generally well below 50% resulting in economical losses and creating ecological problems like groundwater pollution and emission of nitric oxides that can damage the ozone layer and function as greenhouse gasses. Biotechnological approaches to improve fertilizer urea usage bear the potential to increase crop nitrogen use efficiency. PMID:21421389

  2. Plasma Creatinine Clearance in the Dog

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frazier, Loy W.

    1977-01-01

    Lists materials and methods for an experiment that demonstrates the concept of glomerular filtration rate (GFR) using anesthesized dogs. In the dog, GFR is equivalent to the renal plasma clearance of exogenous creatinine. (CS)

  3. 21 CFR 862.1775 - Uric acid test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Uric acid test system. 862.1775 Section 862.1775....1775 Uric acid test system. (a) Identification. A uric acid test system is a device intended to measure uric acid in serum, plasma, and urine. Measurements obtained by this device are used in the...

  4. Theobromine Inhibits Uric Acid Crystallization. A Potential Application in the Treatment of Uric Acid Nephrolithiasis

    PubMed Central

    Grases, Felix; Rodriguez, Adrian; Costa-Bauza, Antonia

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To assess the capacity of methylxanthines (caffeine, theophylline, theobromine and paraxanthine) to inhibit uric acid crystallization, and to evaluate their potential application in the treatment of uric acid nephrolithiasis. Materials and Methods The ability of methylxathines to inhibit uric acid nucleation was assayed turbidimetrically. Crystal morphology and its modification due to the effect of theobromine were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The ability of theobromine to inhibit uric acid crystal growth on calculi fragments resulting from extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) was evaluated using a flow system. Results The turbidimetric assay showed that among the studied methylxanthines, theobromine could markedly inhibit uric acid nucleation. SEM images showed that the presence of theobromine resulted in thinner uric acid crystals. Furthermore, in a flow system theobromine blocked the regrowth of post-ESWL uric acid calculi fragments. Conclusions Theobromine, a natural dimethylxanthine present in high amounts in cocoa, acts as an inhibitor of nucleation and crystal growth of uric acid. Therefore, theobromine may be clinically useful in the treatment of uric acid nephrolithiasis. PMID:25333633

  5. Uric acid lowering therapy in cardiovascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Volterrani, Maurizio; Iellamo, Ferdinando; Sposato, Barbara; Romeo, Franco

    2016-06-15

    Recent evidence would indicate that high serum uric acid (SUA) levels can be a significant and independent risk factor for hypertension and cardiovascular diseases, such as ischemic heart disease and heart failure. In the last few years an independent risk relationship between hyperuricemia, cardiovascular disease and mortality has also been reported. Hyperuricemia has been shown as an independent risk factor for acute myocardial infarction and an independent and conjoint association of either gout and SUA with total and cardiovascular mortality has been reported, with mortality impact in gout patients increasing with rising SUA concentrations, even for SUA levels in the normal to high range. These findings prompted a growing research interest on the possible benefits of uric acid lowering drugs in cardiovascular diseases. Indeed, clinical studies have reported on the beneficial effects of uric acid lowering drugs, in particular of xanthine oxidase inhibitors, in hypertension, ischemic heart disease and heart failure. Two main mechanisms have been claimed to explain the dangerous effects of hyperuricemia and, as a consequence, the benefits of uric acid lowering therapy: endothelial dysfunction and systemic inflammation. This brief review aims to summarize current evidence from human studies on the role of acid uric lowering therapy in cardiovascular diseases for practical and clinical purposes. The possible mechanisms underlying the benefits of acid uric lowering therapy are also addressed. PMID:26386814

  6. Uric Acid, Hyperuricemia and Vascular Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Ming; Yang, Fan; Yang, Irene; Yin, Ying; Luo, Jin Jun; Wang, Hong; Yang, Xiao-Feng

    2011-01-01

    Uric acid is the product of purine metabolism. It is known that hyperuricemia, defined as high levels of blood uric acid, is the major etiological factor of gout. A number of epidemiological reports have increasingly linked hyperuricemia with cardiovascular and neurological diseases. Studies highlighting the pathogenic mechanisms of uric acid point to an inflammatory response as the primary mechanism for inducing gout and possibly contributing to uric acid's vascular effects. Monosodium urate (MSU) crystals induce an inflammatory reaction, which are recognized by Toll-like receptors (TLRs). These TLRs then activate NALP3 inflammasome. MSU also triggers neutrophil activation and further produces immune mediators, which lead to a proinflammatory response. In addition, soluble uric acid can also mediate the generation of free radicals and function as a pro-oxidant. This review summarizes the epidemiological studies of hyperuricemia and cardiovascular disease, takes a brief look at hyperuricemia and its role in neurological diseases, and highlights the studies of the advanced pathological mechanisms of uric acid and inflammation. PMID:22201767

  7. The cockroach Blattella germanica obtains nitrogen from uric acid through a metabolic pathway shared with its bacterial endosymbiont.

    PubMed

    Patiño-Navarrete, Rafael; Piulachs, Maria-Dolors; Belles, Xavier; Moya, Andrés; Latorre, Amparo; Peretó, Juli

    2014-07-01

    Uric acid stored in the fat body of cockroaches is a nitrogen reservoir mobilized in times of scarcity. The discovery of urease in Blattabacterium cuenoti, the primary endosymbiont of cockroaches, suggests that the endosymbiont may participate in cockroach nitrogen economy. However, bacterial urease may only be one piece in the entire nitrogen recycling process from insect uric acid. Thus, in addition to the uricolytic pathway to urea, there must be glutamine synthetase assimilating the released ammonia by the urease reaction to enable the stored nitrogen to be metabolically usable. None of the Blattabacterium genomes sequenced to date possess genes encoding for those enzymes. To test the host's contribution to the process, we have sequenced and analysed Blattella germanica transcriptomes from the fat body. We identified transcripts corresponding to all genes necessary for the synthesis of uric acid and its catabolism to urea, as well as for the synthesis of glutamine, asparagine, proline and glycine, i.e. the amino acids required by the endosymbiont. We also explored the changes in gene expression with different dietary protein levels. It appears that the ability to use uric acid as a nitrogen reservoir emerged in cockroaches after its age-old symbiotic association with bacteria. PMID:25079497

  8. Reagent- and separation-free measurements of urine creatinine concentration using stamping surface enhanced Raman scattering (S-SERS)

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ming; Du, Yong; Zhao, Fusheng; Zeng, Jianbo; Mohan, Chandra; Shih, Wei-Chuan

    2015-01-01

    We report a novel reagent- and separation-free method for urine creatinine concentration measurement using stamping surface enhanced Raman scattering (S-SERS) technique with nanoporous gold disk (NPGD) plasmonic substrates, a label-free, multiplexed molecular sensing and imaging technique recently developed by us. The performance of this new technology is evaluated by the detection and quantification of creatinine spiked in three different liquids: creatinine in water, mixture of creatinine and urea in water, and creatinine in artificial urine within physiologically relevant concentration ranges. Moreover, the potential application of our method is demonstrated by creatinine concentration measurements in urine samples collected from a mouse model of nephritis. The limit of detection of creatinine was 13.2 nM (0.15 µg/dl) and 0.68 mg/dl in water and urine, respectively. Our method would provide an alternative tool for rapid, cost-effective, and reliable urine analysis for non-invasive diagnosis and monitoring of renal function. PMID:25798309

  9. Regulation of uric acid metabolism and excretion.

    PubMed

    Maiuolo, Jessica; Oppedisano, Francesca; Gratteri, Santo; Muscoli, Carolina; Mollace, Vincenzo

    2016-06-15

    Purines perform many important functions in the cell, being the formation of the monomeric precursors of nucleic acids DNA and RNA the most relevant one. Purines which also contribute to modulate energy metabolism and signal transduction, are structural components of some coenzymes and have been shown to play important roles in the physiology of platelets, muscles and neurotransmission. All cells require a balanced quantity of purines for growth, proliferation and survival. Under physiological conditions the enzymes involved in the purine metabolism maintain in the cell a balanced ratio between their synthesis and degradation. In humans the final compound of purines catabolism is uric acid. All other mammals possess the enzyme uricase that converts uric acid to allantoin that is easily eliminated through urine. Overproduction of uric acid, generated from the metabolism of purines, has been proven to play emerging roles in human disease. In fact the increase of serum uric acid is inversely associated with disease severity and especially with cardiovascular disease states. This review describes the enzymatic pathways involved in the degradation of purines, getting into their structure and biochemistry until the uric acid formation. PMID:26316329

  10. Relation of serum uric acid to cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Wu, Audrey H; Gladden, James D; Ahmed, Mustafa; Ahmed, Ali; Filippatos, Gerasimos

    2016-06-15

    This review summarizes recent published literature on the association between serum uric acid and cardiovascular disease, a relationship which is complex and not fully elucidated. Uric acid may be a marker for risk, a causative agent in cardiovascular disease, or both. Various biologic factors can influence serum uric acid levels, and serum uric acid level itself is closely related to conditions such as hypertension, dyslipidemia, obesity, and impaired glucose metabolism, that contribute to cardiovascular disease pathophysiology. Serum uric acid levels have been found to be associated with adverse outcomes, including mortality, in the general population. In addition, serum uric acid is associated with increased risk for incident coronary heart disease, heart failure, and atrial fibrillation. In the setting of established systolic heart failure, serum uric acid is positively associated with disease severity and mortality risk. Whether targeting treatment based on uric acid levels might affect clinical outcomes is still being studied. PMID:26341316

  11. Medullary cystic kidney disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tests that may be done include: 24-hour urine volume and electrolytes Blood urea nitrogen (BUN) Complete blood count (CBC) Creatinine blood test Creatinine clearance - blood and urine Uric acid blood test Urine specific gravity (will ...

  12. Uric acid protects erythrocytes from ozone-induced changes

    SciTech Connect

    Meadows, J.; Smith, R.C.

    1987-08-01

    Uric acid effectively reduced hemolysis and methemoglobin formation in bovine and swine erythrocytes bubbled with ozone in vitro. In bovine erythrocytes, formation of thiobarbituric acid-reactive material was inhibited by uric acid, but there was little immediate protection for the swine cells. Antioxidant protection was due to preferential degradation of the uric acid by ozone. These results provide evidence to support the hypothesis that in plasma, uric acid can provide antioxidant protection for erythrocytes.

  13. Uric acid stones following hepatic transplantation.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Mei-Tsuey; Goldfarb, David S

    2004-12-01

    We report the case of a 52 year old man with a history of insulin-requiring diabetes and hepatitis B with cirrhosis who received an orthotopic liver transplant. One year later he developed renal colic and was found to have a 3 mm stone at the left ureterovesical junction. Numerous other stones formed and infrared spectroscopy analysis demonstrated all to be composed of 100% uric acid. Urine collections demonstrated a low urine pH of 5.1 without hyperuricosuria. His stones were effectively prevented with potassium citrate therapy. Few incidence data are available for uric acid stone occurrence in solid organ recipients. Calcineurin inhibitors are thought to often cause hyperuricemia on the basis of decreased urate excretion. However, this effect would not be expected to cause hyperuricosuria nor uric acid stones. This class of drugs may also be associated with low urine pH, perhaps on the basis of hypoaldosteronism, but the contribution of such a syndrome to uric acid stone formation is not established. PMID:15565437

  14. Quantification of creatinine in biological samples based on the pseudoenzyme activity of copper-creatinine complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagaraja, Padmarajaiah; Avinash, Krishnegowda; Shivakumar, Anantharaman; Krishna, Honnur

    Glomerular filtration rate (GFR), the marker of chronic kidney disease can be analyzed by the concentration of cystatin C or creatinine and its clearance in human urine and serum samples. The determination of cystatin C alone as an indicator of GFR does not provide high accuracy, and is more expensive, thus measurement of creatinine has an important role in estimating GFR. We have made an attempt to quantify creatinine based on its pseudoenzyme activity of creatinine in the presence of copper. Creatinine in the presence of copper oxidizes paraphenylenediamine dihydrochloride (PPDD) which couples with dimethylamino benzoicacid (DMAB) giving green colored chromogenic product with maximum absorbance at 710 nm. Kinetic parameters relating this reaction were evaluated. Analytical curves of creatinine by fixed time and rate methods were linear at 8.8-530 μmol L-1 and 0.221-2.65 mmol L-1, respectively. Recovery of creatinine varied from 97.8 to 107.8%. Limit of detection and limit of quantification were 2.55 and 8.52 μmol L-1 respectively whereas Sandell's sensitivity and molar absorption coefficient values were 0.0407 μg cm-2 and 0.1427 × 104 L mol-1 cm-1 respectively. Precision studies showed that within day imprecision was 0.745-1.26% and day-to-day imprecision was 1.55-3.65%. The proposed method was applied to human urine and serum samples and results were validated in accordance with modified Jaffe's procedure. Wide linearity ranges with good recovery, less tolerance from excipients and application of the method to serum and urine samples are the claims which ascertain much advantage to this method.

  15. THE REGULATION OF UREA-BIOSYNTHESIS ENZYMES IN VERTEBRATES.

    PubMed

    MORA, J; MARTUSCELLI, J; ORTIZ PINEDA, J; SOBERON, G

    1965-07-01

    1. Carbamoyl phosphate synthetase, ornithine transcarbamoylase, the arginine-synthetase system and arginase were measured in the livers of ammoniotelic, ureotelic and uricotelic animals. The chelonian reptiles, whose nitrogen excretory patterns vary according to the habitat, and the Mexican axolotl, a neotenic species, were also studied. 2. The levels of the activities of the first three enzymes mentioned correlate with the amount of nitrogen excreted as urea. 3. The terrestrial turtle, which excretes mainly uric acid, maintains a high arginase activity but has very low levels of the activities of the other three enzymes. 4. The first three enzymes of the urea cycle vary in the phylogenic scale in a co-ordinated manner, which suggests that they are under the same regulatory mechanism. 5. Urea formation from endogenous arginine in vitro has a low efficiency in the Mexican axolotl. 6. The induction of metamorphosis in the Mexican axolotl by the administration of l-tri-iodothyronine, which causes a shift from ammonio-ureotelism to complete ureotelism, is accompanied by an increase mainly in carbamoyl phosphate synthetase and also by an improvement in the efficiency of hydrolysis of endogenous arginine in vitro to give urea. 7. The results obtained by differential centrifugation of the urea-cycle enzymes in rat and Mexican-axolotl livers are presented. The location requirements for the integration of a metabolic cycle are discussed. PMID:14343146

  16. The regulation of urea-biosynthesis enzymes in vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Mora, J.; Martuscelli, J.; Ortiz-Pineda, Juana; Soberón, G.

    1965-01-01

    1. Carbamoyl phosphate synthetase, ornithine transcarbamoylase, the arginine-synthetase system and arginase were measured in the livers of ammoniotelic, ureotelic and uricotelic animals. The chelonian reptiles, whose nitrogen excretory patterns vary according to the habitat, and the Mexican axolotl, a neotenic species, were also studied. 2. The levels of the activities of the first three enzymes mentioned correlate with the amount of nitrogen excreted as urea. 3. The terrestrial turtle, which excretes mainly uric acid, maintains a high arginase activity but has very low levels of the activities of the other three enzymes. 4. The first three enzymes of the urea cycle vary in the phylogenic scale in a co-ordinated manner, which suggests that they are under the same regulatory mechanism. 5. Urea formation from endogenous arginine in vitro has a low efficiency in the Mexican axolotl. 6. The induction of metamorphosis in the Mexican axolotl by the administration of l-tri-iodothyronine, which causes a shift from ammonio-ureotelism to complete ureotelism, is accompanied by an increase mainly in carbamoyl phosphate synthetase and also by an improvement in the efficiency of hydrolysis of endogenous arginine in vitro to give urea. 7. The results obtained by differential centrifugation of the urea-cycle enzymes in rat and Mexican-axolotl livers are presented. The location requirements for the integration of a metabolic cycle are discussed. PMID:14343146

  17. Urine Protein and Urine Protein to Creatinine Ratio

    MedlinePlus

    ... limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? Urine Protein and Urine Protein to Creatinine Ratio Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: 24-Hour Urine Protein; Urine Total Protein; Urine Protein to Creatinine Ratio; ...

  18. Homogentisic acid interference in routine urine creatinine determination.

    PubMed

    Loken, Perry R; Magera, Mark J; Introne, Wendy; Tortorelli, Silvia; Gavrilov, Dimitar; Oglesbee, Devin; Rinaldo, Piero; Matern, Dietrich; Raymond, Kimiyo

    2010-05-01

    We report the artifactual elevation of homogentisic acid (HGA) in urine from alkaptonuric patients after replacing the creatinine method (Jaffe reaction) in our laboratory with an automated enzymatic method. Samples with elevated HGA by GC-MS had lower creatinine values as determined by the enzymatic method than by the Jaffe reaction. The low creatinine values were due to interference by HGA in the enzymatic method. The enzymatic method is unsuitable for creatinine determination in urine of patients with alkaptonuria. PMID:20138792

  19. A stable three-enzyme creatinine biosensor. 3. Immobilization of creatinine amidohydrolase and sensor development.

    PubMed

    Berberich, Jason A; Chan, Andy; Boden, Mark; Russell, Alan J

    2005-03-01

    We describe the development of an extended use amperometric three-enzyme creatinine biosensor and the successful chemical modification and immobilization of the enzyme creatinine amidohydrolase using polyurethane prepolymers. Creatinine amidohydrolase is significantly stabilized by immobilization in polyurethane polymers. The half-life increases from six to more than 80 days in buffer at 37 degrees C. The effect of silver ions leached from amperometric reference electrodes on enzyme and sensor performance is discussed. The use of cellulose acetate cover membranes to prevent silver from reaching the enzyme is investigated. Sensors prepared with cover membranes have half-lives almost an order of magnitude greater than those prepared with no cover membrane over the silver electrode. The complete biosensor has been constructed on a clinical blood analyzer platform and is stable for many days. PMID:16701796

  20. Enzymic assay of creatinine in serum and urine with creatinine iminohydrolase and glutamate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Tanganelli, E; Prencipe, L; Bassi, D; Cambiaghi, S; Murador, E

    1982-07-01

    We describe an assay for creatinine in which it is converted by creatinine iminohydrolase (EC 3.5.4.21) into ammonia and N-methylhydantoin. The ammonia is subsequently assayed by use of alpha-ketoglutarate and glutamate dehydrogenase (EC 1.4.1.3). Use of NADPH as coenzyme eliminates all interferences from endogenous reactions. Endogenous ammonia in the sample is eliminated during a preincubation. The reaction reaches the endpoint in 15 min at working temperatures of 20-37 degrees C. No sample blank or reagent blank is needed. The standard curve is linear at least to 884 mumol (100 mg) of creatinine per liter. Average analytical recovery of creatinine in serum and urine is 99%. Within-run and between-run CVs are less than or equal to 2% and less than or equal to 6% for creatinine values of 335 mumol/L (38 mg/L) and 80 mumol/L (0 mg/L), respectively. Results by the described method (y) compare well with those by Jaffé's kinetic test (y = 1.01x -- 12.8), Berthelot/AutoAnalyzer method after treatment with immobilized creatinine iminohydrolase (y = 0.987x -- 13.2), Jaffé's test run on the SMA 12/60 (y = 1.011x -- 5.8), the Wahlefeld method (y = 1.014x -- 0.88), and Jaffé's test after deproteinization and absorption on fuller's earth (y = 0.985x -- 3.08). The method may be suitable for discrete, including centrifugal, automation. PMID:7083556

  1. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy of creatinine in silver colloid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yue; Chen, Jiesi; Wu, Yanan; Chen, Yanping; Pan, Jianji; Lei, Jinping; Chen, Yongjian; Sun, Liqing; Feng, Shangyuan; Chen, Rong

    2011-11-01

    Surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) technology has already made great progress in bio-molecule detection. It can make the target molecules strongly absorbed onto the surface of metal nanoparticles, and then the Raman signal of its own has been greatly enhanced through physical and chemical enhancement mechanisms. We report the SERS spectra of creatinine in silver colloid, and study the silver colloid enhanced effects on the Raman scattering of creatinine. We can also find that creatinine concentration is linearly related to its SERS peak intensity and the detection limit of creatinine silver sol is found to be 10 mg/dl. In conclusion, we can observe that the silver colloid has very good enhanced effects for the creatinine. The potential applications of SERS in quantitative measurement of the creatinine liquor are demonstrated. The result shows that the SERS approach would provide a unique and fast test method for creatinine detection.

  2. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy of creatinine in silver colloid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yue; Chen, Jiesi; Wu, Yanan; Chen, Yanping; Pan, Jianji; Lei, Jinping; Chen, Yongjian; Sun, Liqing; Feng, Shangyuan; Chen, Rong

    2012-03-01

    Surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) technology has already made great progress in bio-molecule detection. It can make the target molecules strongly absorbed onto the surface of metal nanoparticles, and then the Raman signal of its own has been greatly enhanced through physical and chemical enhancement mechanisms. We report the SERS spectra of creatinine in silver colloid, and study the silver colloid enhanced effects on the Raman scattering of creatinine. We can also find that creatinine concentration is linearly related to its SERS peak intensity and the detection limit of creatinine silver sol is found to be 10 mg/dl. In conclusion, we can observe that the silver colloid has very good enhanced effects for the creatinine. The potential applications of SERS in quantitative measurement of the creatinine liquor are demonstrated. The result shows that the SERS approach would provide a unique and fast test method for creatinine detection.

  3. Urea Utilization by Leptospira

    PubMed Central

    Kadis, Solomon; Pugh, William L.

    1974-01-01

    One representative of each of five different pathogenic serotypes of Leptospira as well as one saprophytic strain were capable of growing on medium containing urea in place of an ammonium salt as a nitrogen source. Growth of all of the organisms tested on 1% urea was substantial, but only those that exhibited strong urease activity could grow to any appreciable extent on urea at a concentration as high as 2%. Intact urea-grown cells of the pathogenic serotypes tested (grippotyphosa and icterohaemorrhagiae) exhibited urease activity, with the level of activity of the former being considerably greater. No urease could be detected in cells of the saprophytic strain. When the pathogenic leptospires were sonicated or treated with toluene, the urease activity was greatly enhanced. When cultivated on NH4Cl, neither intact nor disrupted cells of any of the strains tested exhibited any urease activity. Cells of the grippotyphosa and icterohaemorrhagiae strains exhibited diauxic growth when cultivated in the presence of both NH4Cl and urea, whereas only monophasic growth could be detected for the saprophytic test strain. The experimental data on urea utilization and urease activity, when considered in the light of previously reported findings on leptospiral pathology, renal physiology, and the role of urease in other bacterial infections, suggests a significant role for leptospiral urease (in addition to other factors) in determining localization of the organism in the kidney and contributing to the resultant kidney pathology. PMID:4426709

  4. Uric acid excretion predicts increased aggression in urban adolescents.

    PubMed

    Mrug, Sylvie; Mrug, Michal

    2016-09-01

    Elevated levels of uric acid have been linked with impulsive and disinhibited behavior in clinical and community populations of adults, but no studies have examined uric acid in relation to adolescent aggression. This study examined the prospective role of uric acid in aggressive behavior among urban, low income adolescents, and whether this relationship varies by gender. A total of 84 adolescents (M age 13.36years; 50% male; 95% African American) self-reported on their physical aggression at baseline and 1.5years later. At baseline, the youth also completed a 12-h (overnight) urine collection at home which was used to measure uric acid excretion. After adjusting for baseline aggression and age, greater uric acid excretion predicted more frequent aggressive behavior at follow up, with no significant gender differences. The results suggest that lowering uric acid levels may help reduce youth aggression. PMID:27180134

  5. Independent associations of urine neutrophil gelatinase–associated lipocalin and serum uric acid with interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy in primary glomerulonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Lertrit, Amornpan; Worawichawong, Suchin; Vanavanan, Somlak; Chittamma, Anchalee; Muntham, Dittapol; Radinahamed, Piyanuch; Nampoon, Aumporn; Kitiyakara, Chagriya

    2016-01-01

    The degree of interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy (IFTA) is one of the strongest prognostic factors in glomerulonephritis (GN). In experimental models, high serum uric acid (UA) could contribute to IFTA through direct effects on the renal tubules, but the significance of this process has not been evaluated in patients. Urine neutrophil gelatinase–associated lipocalin (NGAL) is produced by renal tubules following acute or chronic damage. We investigated the relationship between UA and NGAL excretion in primary GN and tested whether these biomarkers are independently associated with IFTA. Urine and blood were collected from patients on the day of kidney biopsy. IFTA was assessed semi-quantitatively. Fifty-one patients with primary GN were enrolled. NGAL/creatinine correlated significantly with proteinuria but not with glomerular filtration rate (GFR). By contrast, UA correlated with GFR but not with proteinuria. NGAL/creatinine did not correlate with UA. Both NGAL/creatinine and UA increased with the severity of IFTA. By multivariate analysis, GFR, NGAL/creatinine, and UA were independently associated with moderate-to-severe IFTA. Combining UA and NGAL/creatinine with classical predictors (proteinuria and GFR) tended to improve discrimination for moderate-to-severe IFTA. Findings that UA was unrelated to urinary NGAL excretion suggest that the two biomarkers reflect different pathways related to the development of IFTA in primary GN. Both NGAL/creatinine and UA were independently associated with moderate-to-severe IFTA. PMID:27143950

  6. Detection of Interstellar Urea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Hsin-Lun; Remijan, Anthony J.; Snyder, Lewis E.; Looney, Leslie W.; Friedel, Douglas N.; Lovas, Francis J.; McCall, Benjamin J.; Hollis, Jan M.

    2010-11-01

    Urea, a molecule discovered in human urine by H. M. Rouelle in 1773, has a significant role in prebiotic chemistry. Previous BIMA observations have suggested that interstellar urea [(NH2)2CO] is a compact hot core molecule such as other large molecules (e.g. methyl formate and acetic acid). We have conducted an extensive search for urea toward the high mass hot molecular core Sgr B2(N-LMH) using BIMA, CARMA and the IRAM 30 m. Because the spectral lines of heavy molecules like urea tend to be weak and hot cores display lines from a wide range of molecules, it is necessary to detect a number of urea lines and apply sophisticated statistical tests before having confidence in an identification. The 1 mm resolution of CARMA enables favorable coupling of the source size and synthesized beam size, which was found to be essential for the detection of weak signals. We have detected a total of 65 spectral lines (32 molecular transitions and 33 unidentified transitions), most of which are narrower than the SEST survey (Nummelin et al. 1998) due to the small synthesized beam (2.5" x 2") of CARMA. It significantly resolves out the contamination by extended emission and reveals the eight weak urea lines that were previously blended with nearby transitions. Our analysis indicates that these lines are likely to be urea since the resulting observed line frequencies are coincident with a set of overlapping connecting urea lines, and the observed line intensities are consistent with the expected line strengths of urea. In addition, we have developed a new statistical approach to examine the spatial correlation between the observed lines by applying the Student's t test to the high resolution channel maps obtained from CARMA. The t test shows consistent spatial distributions from all eight candidate lines, suggesting a common molecular origin, urea. Our t test method could have a broad impact on the next generation of arrays, such as ALMA, because the new arrays will require a method

  7. Role of insulin resistance in uric acid nephrolithiasis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hanhan; Klett, Dane E; Littleton, Raymond; Elder, Jack S; Sammon, Jesse D

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome has been implicated in the pathogenesis of uric acid stones. Although not completely understood, its role is supported by many studies demonstrating increased prevalence of uric acid stones in patients with metabolic syndrome and in particular insulin resistance, a major component of metabolic syndrome. This review presents epidemiologic studies demonstrating the association between metabolic syndrome and nephrolithiasis in general as well as the relationship between insulin resistance and uric acid stone formation, in particular. We also review studies that explore the pathophysiologic relationship between insulin resistance and uric acid nephrolithiasis. PMID:25374817

  8. Measurement of Serum Creatinine – Current Status and Future Goals

    PubMed Central

    Peake, *Michael; Whiting, Malcolm

    2006-01-01

    The first methods for the measurement of creatinine in serum and plasma were published over a century ago. Today, the Jaffe reaction using alkaline picrate remains the cornerstone of most current routine methods, after continuous refinements attempting to overcome inherent analytical interferences and limitations. With the recent introduction of the reporting of estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), inter-laboratory agreement of serum creatinine results has become an important international priority. Expert professional bodies have recommended that all creatinine methods should become traceable to a reference method based on isotope dilution-mass spectrometry (IDMS). It is important that clinical biochemists have a good understanding of the relative performance of routine creatinine methods. Using a new commutable IDMS-traceable reference material (SRM 967), and a validated tandem IDMS assay developed in our laboratory, we assessed the accuracy of nine routine creatinine methods with assistance from other laboratories in our region. Three methods appeared to have patient sample bias that exceeded 5% in the range of creatinine concentrations where eGFR estimations are most important. Companies are currently recalibrating their creatinine assays. This task should be complete in 2007, and then creatinine results for eGFR calculations will require the use of a modified eGFR equation. Laboratories considering calibration changes before this time can seek advice from the Australasian Creatinine Working Group. PMID:17581641

  9. Chemiresistor urea sensor

    DOEpatents

    Glass, Robert S.

    1997-01-01

    A sensor to detect and quantify urea in fluids resulting from hemodialysis procedures, and in blood and other body fluids. The sensor is based upon a chemiresistor, which consists of an interdigitated array of metal fingers between which a resistance measured. The interdigitated array is fabricated on a suitable substrate. The surface of the array of fingers is covered with a coating containing the enzyme urease which catalyzes the hydrolysis of urea to form the ammonium ion, the bicarbonate ion, and hydroxide-chemical products which provide the basis for the measured signal. In a typical application, the sensor could be used at bedside, in conjunction with an appropriate electronics/computer system, in order to determine the hemodialysis endpoint. Also, the chemiresistor used to detect urea, can be utilized with a reference chemiresistor which does not contain urease, and connected in a differential measurement arrangement, such that the reference chemiresistor would cancel out any fluctuations due to background effects.

  10. Urea Cycle Disorders.

    PubMed

    Kleppe, Soledad; Mian, Asad; Lee, Brendan

    2003-07-01

    Urea cycle disorders comprise a group of inborn errors of metabolism that represent unique gene-nutrient interactions whose significant morbidity arises from acute and chronic neurotoxicity associated with often massive hyperammonemia. Current paradigms of treatment are focused on controlling the flux of nitrogen transfer through the hepatic urea cycle by a combination of dietary and pharmacologic approaches. Evolving paradigms include the development of cell and gene therapies. Current research is focused on understanding the pathophysiology of ammonia-mediated toxicity and prevention of neural injury. PMID:12791198

  11. 21 CFR 862.1775 - Uric acid test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Uric acid test system. 862.1775 Section 862.1775 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1775 Uric acid test system. (a) Identification....

  12. Uric Acid Levels in Normotensive Children of Hypertensive Parents

    PubMed Central

    Yildirim, Ali; Keles, Fatma; Kosger, Pelin; Ozdemir, Gokmen; Ucar, Birsen; Kilic, Zubeyir

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated uric acid concentrations in normotensive children of parents with hypertension. Eighty normotensive children from families with and without a history of essential hypertension were included. Concentrations of lipid parameters and uric acid were compared. Demographic and anthropometric characteristics were similar in the groups. Systolic and diastolic blood pressure were higher in the normotensive children of parents with hypertension without statistically significant difference (P > 0.05). Uric acid concentrations were higher in the normotensive children of parents with hypertension (4.61 versus 3.57 mg/dL, P < 0.01). Total cholesterol and triglyceride concentrations were similar in the two groups. Systolic and diastolic blood pressure were significantly higher in control children aged >10 years (P < 0.01). Uric acid levels were significantly higher in all children with more pronounced difference after age 10 of years (P < 0.001). Positive correlations were found between the level of serum uric acid and age, body weight, body mass index, and systolic and diastolic blood pressure in the normotensive children of parents. The higher uric acid levels in the normotensive children of hypertensive parents suggest that uric acid may be a predeterminant of hypertension. Monitoring of uric acid levels in these children may allow for prevention or earlier treatment of future hypertension. PMID:26464873

  13. Effects of moderate-dose versus high-dose trimethoprim on serum creatinine and creatinine clearance and adverse reactions.

    PubMed Central

    Naderer, O; Nafziger, A N; Bertino, J S

    1997-01-01

    The effects of a 10-day course of moderate-dose (10 mg/kg/day) or high-dose (20 mg/kg/day) trimethoprim therapy on serum creatinine, measured creatinine clearance, urinary creatinine excretion, and serum folate were studied in 20 healthy volunteers. Serum creatinine concentrations increased significantly during trimethoprim therapy, began to decrease near day 10, and returned to baseline during the washout phase at both dosage levels. At the same time, measured creatinine clearance and urine creatinine changed in the opposite direction. No clinical or statistical differences were noted between changes in the moderate- versus the high-dose phases. Serum folate concentration decreases during high-dose trimethoprim therapy were statistically significant. Adverse drug reactions in the two groups were statistically different during the first study period, with the high-dose group having a 75% incidence rate and the moderate-dose group having an 11% incidence rate (P < 0.02). Serum creatinine, measured creatinine clearance, and urinary creatinine excretion demonstrated statistically, but not clinically, significant changes during trimethoprim therapy. In addition, high-dose trimethoprim caused significantly more adverse drug reactions than moderate-dose trimethoprim in normal volunteers. PMID:9371351

  14. Linking uric acid metabolism to diabetic complications.

    PubMed

    Kushiyama, Akifumi; Tanaka, Kentaro; Hara, Shigeko; Kawazu, Shoji

    2014-12-15

    Hyperuricemia have been thought to be caused by the ingestion of large amounts of purines, and prevention or treatment of hyperuricemia has intended to prevent gout. Xanthine dehydrogenase/xanthine oxidase (XDH/XO) is rate-limiting enzyme of uric acid generation, and allopurinol was developed as a uric acid (UA) generation inhibitor in the 1950s and has been routinely used for gout prevention since then. Serum UA levels are an important risk factor of disease progression for various diseases, including those related to lifestyle. Recently, other UA generation inhibitors such as febuxostat and topiroxostat were launched. The emergence of these novel medications has promoted new research in the field. Lifestyle-related diseases, such as metabolic syndrome or type 2 diabetes mellitus, often have a common pathological foundation. As such, hyperuricemia is often present among these patients. Many in vitro and animal studies have implicated inflammation and oxidative stress in UA metabolism and vascular injury because XDH/XO act as one of the major source of reactive oxygen species Many studies on UA levels and associated diseases implicate involvement of UA generation in disease onset and/or progression. Interventional studies for UA generation, not UA excretion revealed XDH/XO can be the therapeutic target for vascular injury and renal dysfunction. In this review, the relationship between UA metabolism and diabetic complications is highlighted. PMID:25512781

  15. Linking uric acid metabolism to diabetic complications

    PubMed Central

    Kushiyama, Akifumi; Tanaka, Kentaro; Hara, Shigeko; Kawazu, Shoji

    2014-01-01

    Hyperuricemia have been thought to be caused by the ingestion of large amounts of purines, and prevention or treatment of hyperuricemia has intended to prevent gout. Xanthine dehydrogenase/xanthine oxidase (XDH/XO) is rate-limiting enzyme of uric acid generation, and allopurinol was developed as a uric acid (UA) generation inhibitor in the 1950s and has been routinely used for gout prevention since then. Serum UA levels are an important risk factor of disease progression for various diseases, including those related to lifestyle. Recently, other UA generation inhibitors such as febuxostat and topiroxostat were launched. The emergence of these novel medications has promoted new research in the field. Lifestyle-related diseases, such as metabolic syndrome or type 2 diabetes mellitus, often have a common pathological foundation. As such, hyperuricemia is often present among these patients. Many in vitro and animal studies have implicated inflammation and oxidative stress in UA metabolism and vascular injury because XDH/XO act as one of the major source of reactive oxygen species Many studies on UA levels and associated diseases implicate involvement of UA generation in disease onset and/or progression. Interventional studies for UA generation, not UA excretion revealed XDH/XO can be the therapeutic target for vascular injury and renal dysfunction. In this review, the relationship between UA metabolism and diabetic complications is highlighted. PMID:25512781

  16. Serum creatine, creatinine, and other guanidino compounds in patients with thyroid dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Verhelst, J; Berwaerts, J; Marescau, B; Abs, R; Neels, H; Mahler, C; De Deyn, P P

    1997-09-01

    Serum levels of creatine (CT), creatinine (CTN), urea, guanidinosuccinic acid (GSA), guanidinoacetic acid (GAA), guanidine (G), arginine (Arg), homoarginine (Harg), argininic acid (ArgA), and alpha-keto-delta-guanidinovaleric acid (alpha-K-delta-GVA) were measured in 54 patients with hyperthyroidism, 56 with subclinical hyperthyroidism, 28 with subclinical hypothyroidism, and 51 with hypothyroidism compared with 62 euthyroid controls. In agreement with previous reports, serum CT increased (+35%) and CTN decreased (-17.6%) in hyperthyroidism as compared with normal thyroid function, whereas the opposite was seen in hypothyroidism (-17.7% and +11%, P < .0001). Original findings from this study are a highly significant decrease in GSA (-41.7%) and GAA (-36.8%) in hyperthyroidism and an increase in GSA (+36%) in hypothyroidism (P < .0001). In addition, a slight decrease in hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism was noted for Arg (-6.2% and -13.2%, P = .001) and Harg (-14.8% and -18.1%, P = .05). By contrast, no significant change was seen in levels of urea, G, ArgA, and alpha-K-delta-GVA. No major differences were found for any of the compounds between subclinical hypothyroidism, euthyroidism, and subclinical hyperthyroidism. There was a highly significant positive linear correlation between urea and GSA levels in hyperthyroidism, euthyroidism, and hypothyroidism (r = .68, r = .77, and r = .75, P < .0001), taking into account that for the same increase in urea, GSA increased threefold more in hypothyroid versus hyperthyroid patients. In conclusion, apart from CT and CTN, significant changes can be found in serum levels of GSA, GAA, Arg, and Harg in patients with thyroid dysfunction. Subclinical thyroid dysfunction does not seem to induce changes in serum levels of guanidino compounds. Decreased serum GSA and GAA levels might be an additional indicator of hyperthyroidism. PMID:9284897

  17. Immobilization of uricase enzyme on self-assembled gold nanoparticles for application in uric acid biosensor.

    PubMed

    Ahuja, T; Tanwar, V K; Mishra, S K; Kumar, D; Biradar, A M; Rajesh

    2011-06-01

    An enzyme immobilization matrix is described by preparing a self-assembly of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) over a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) of 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES) on an indium-tin-oxide (ITO) coated glass plate. The surface of the GNPs was modified with a mixed (1:9) SAM of 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid (MUA) and 3-mercapto-propionic acid (MPA). The enzyme, uricase was covalently immobilized to the carboxyl groups of the mixed SAM of MUA/MPA through carbodiimide coupling reaction. The whole assembly was constructed on 1 cm2 area of ITO-glass plate and was tested as an amperometric biosensor for the detection of uric acid in aqueous solution. The biosensor assembly was characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and electrochemical techniques. The AFM of the enzyme biosensor assembly reveals an asymmetrical sharp regular island-like structure with an average roughness parameter value of 2.81 nm. Chronoamperometric response was measured as a function of uric acid concentration in aqueous solution (pH 7.4), which exhibits a linear response over a concentration range of 0.07 to 0.63 mM with a sensitivity of 19.27 microAmM(-1) and a response of 25 s with excellent reproducibility. These results are not influenced by the presence of interfering reagents such as ascorbic acid, urea and glucose. GNPs-biomolecule assemblies constructed using this method may facilitate development of new hybrid biosensing materials. PMID:21770094

  18. The urea cycle disorders.

    PubMed

    Helman, Guy; Pacheco-Colón, Ileana; Gropman, Andrea L

    2014-07-01

    The urea cycle is the primary nitrogen-disposal pathway in humans. It requires the coordinated function of six enzymes and two mitochondrial transporters to catalyze the conversion of a molecule of ammonia, the α-nitrogen of aspartate, and bicarbonate into urea. Whereas ammonia is toxic, urea is relatively inert, soluble in water, and readily excreted by the kidney in the urine. Accumulation of ammonia and other toxic intermediates of the cycle lead to predominantly neurologic sequelae. The disorders may present at any age from the neonatal period to adulthood, with the more severely affected patients presenting earlier in life. Patients are at risk for metabolic decompensation throughout life, often triggered by illness, fasting, surgery and postoperative states, peripartum, stress, and increased exogenous protein load. Here the authors address neurologic presentations of ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency in detail, the most common of the urea cycle disorders, neuropathology, neurophysiology, and our studies in neuroimaging. Special attention to late-onset presentations is given. PMID:25192511

  19. Uric Acid and Cardiovascular Events: A Mendelian Randomization Study.

    PubMed

    Kleber, Marcus E; Delgado, Graciela; Grammer, Tanja B; Silbernagel, Günther; Huang, Jie; Krämer, Bernhard K; Ritz, Eberhard; März, Winfried

    2015-11-01

    Obesity and diets rich in uric acid-raising components appear to account for the increased prevalence of hyperuricemia in Westernized populations. Prevalence rates of hypertension, diabetes mellitus, CKD, and cardiovascular disease are also increasing. We used Mendelian randomization to examine whether uric acid is an independent and causal cardiovascular risk factor. Serum uric acid was measured in 3315 patients of the Ludwigshafen Risk and Cardiovascular Health Study. We calculated a weighted genetic risk score (GRS) for uric acid concentration based on eight uric acid-regulating single nucleotide polymorphisms. Causal odds ratios and causal hazard ratios (HRs) were calculated using a two-stage regression estimate with the GRS as the instrumental variable to examine associations with cardiometabolic phenotypes (cross-sectional) and mortality (prospectively) by logistic regression and Cox regression, respectively. Our GRS was not consistently associated with any biochemical marker except for uric acid, arguing against pleiotropy. Uric acid was associated with a range of prevalent diseases, including coronary artery disease. Uric acid and the GRS were both associated with cardiovascular death and sudden cardiac death. In a multivariate model adjusted for factors including medication, causal HRs corresponding to each 1-mg/dl increase in genetically predicted uric acid concentration were significant for cardiovascular death (HR, 1.77; 95% confidence interval, 1.12 to 2.81) and sudden cardiac death (HR, 2.41; 95% confidence interval, 1.16 to 5.00). These results suggest that high uric acid is causally related to adverse cardiovascular outcomes, especially sudden cardiac death. PMID:25788527

  20. The BUN/creatinine ratio in localizing gastrointestinal bleeding in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Felber, S; Rosenthal, P; Henton, D

    1988-01-01

    Localizing the bleeding site in pediatric patients with gastrointestinal hemorrhage may require invasive and costly diagnostic procedures. A simple index to discriminate upper and lower bleeding sources would be invaluable. We evaluated the reliability of the calculated blood urea nitrogen/creatinine (BUN/Cr) ratio in segregating upper from lower gastrointestinal bleeding sites in 40 children. For upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage, the calculated BUN/Cr ratios (mg/mg) ranged from 10 to 140, with a mean value of 34. For lower gastrointestinal bleeders, the BUN/Cr ratios ranged from 3.3 to 30, with a mean value of 16. All BUN/Cr ratios greater than 30 corresponded to patients with documented upper gastrointestinal bleeding sources. Calculation of the BUN/Cr ratio in the initial evaluation of gastrointestinal bleeding may prove useful in guiding the sequence of diagnostic procedures and examinations. PMID:3263488

  1. Creatinine Deiminase Adsorption onto Silicalite-Modified pH-FET for Creation of New Creatinine-Sensitive Biosensor.

    PubMed

    Marchenko, Svitlana V; Soldatkin, Oleksandr O; Kasap, Berna Ozansoy; Kurc, Burcu Akata; Soldatkin, Alexei P; Dzyadevych, Sergei V

    2016-12-01

    In the work, silicalite particles were used for the surface modification of pH-sensitive field-effect transistors (pH-FETs) with the purpose of developing new creatinine-sensitive biosensor. Creatinine deiminase (CD) adsorbed on the surface of silicalite-coated pH-FET served as a bioselective membrane. The biosensor based on CD immobilized in glutaraldehyde vapor (GA) was taken as control. The creatinine-sensitive biosensor obtained by adsorption on silicalite was shown to have better analytical characteristics (two- to threefold increased sensitivity to creatinine, three- to fourfold lesser response and recovery times, a decrease of the detection limit of creatinine determination to 5 μM, etc.).Additionally, the biosensor based on CD adsorbed on silicalite (Sil/CD) was characterized by high signal reproducibility (relative standard deviation (RSD) for creatinine measurement = 2.6 %) and stability during storage (over 13 months). It was experimentally confirmed that the proposed biosensor was not sensitive either to high concentrations of sodium chloride or to the macromolecular protein fractions and can be used for direct quantitative analysis of creatinine in the blood serum.It was concluded that the method of CD adsorption on silicalite is well-suited for the creation of creatinine-sensitive biosensor with improved working characteristics. PMID:27033849

  2. Creatinine Deiminase Adsorption onto Silicalite-Modified pH-FET for Creation of New Creatinine-Sensitive Biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchenko, Svitlana V.; Soldatkin, Oleksandr O.; Kasap, Berna Ozansoy; Kurc, Burcu Akata; Soldatkin, Alexei P.; Dzyadevych, Sergei V.

    2016-03-01

    In the work, silicalite particles were used for the surface modification of pH-sensitive field-effect transistors (pH-FETs) with the purpose of developing new creatinine-sensitive biosensor. Creatinine deiminase (CD) adsorbed on the surface of silicalite-coated pH-FET served as a bioselective membrane. The biosensor based on CD immobilized in glutaraldehyde vapor (GA) was taken as control. The creatinine-sensitive biosensor obtained by adsorption on silicalite was shown to have better analytical characteristics (two- to threefold increased sensitivity to creatinine, three- to fourfold lesser response and recovery times, a decrease of the detection limit of creatinine determination to 5 μM, etc.).

  3. Uric acid as a modulator of glucose and lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Lima, William Gustavo; Martins-Santos, Maria Emília Soares; Chaves, Valéria Ernestânia

    2015-09-01

    In humans, uric acid is the final oxidation product of purine catabolism. The serum uric acid level is based on the balance between the absorption, production and excretion of purine. Uric acid is similarly produced in the liver, adipose tissue and muscle and is primarily excreted through the urinary tract. Several factors, including a high-fructose diet and the use of xenobiotics and alcohol, contribute to hyperuricaemia. Hyperuricaemia belongs to a cluster of metabolic and haemodynamic abnormalities, called metabolic syndrome, characterised by abdominal obesity, glucose intolerance, insulin resistance, dyslipidaemia and hypertension. Hyperuricaemia reduction in the Pound mouse or fructose-fed rats, as well as hyperuricaemia induction by uricase inhibition in rodents and studies using cell culture have suggested that uric acid plays an important role in the development of metabolic syndrome. These studies have shown that high uric acid levels regulate the oxidative stress, inflammation and enzymes associated with glucose and lipid metabolism, suggesting a mechanism for the impairment of metabolic homeostasis. Humans lacking uricase, the enzyme responsible for uric acid degradation, are susceptible to these effects. In this review, we summarise the current knowledge of the effects of uric acid on the regulation of metabolism, primarily focusing on liver, adipose tissue and skeletal muscle. PMID:26133655

  4. Urinary creatinine to serum creatinine ratio and renal failure index in dogs infected with Babesia canis.

    PubMed

    Zygner, Wojciech; Gójska-Zygner, Olga; Wesołowska, Agnieszka; Wędrychowicz, Halina

    2013-09-01

    Urinary creatinine to serum creatinine (UCr/SCr) ratio and renal failure index (RFI) are useful indices of renal damage. Both UCr/SCr ratio and RFI are used in differentiation between prerenal azotaemia and acute tubular necrosis. In this work the authors calculated the UCr/SCr ratio and RFI in dogs infected with Babesia canis and the values of these indices in azotaemic dogs infected with the parasite. The results of this study showed significantly lower UCr/SCr ratio in dogs infected with B. canis than in healthy dogs. Moreover, in azotaemic dogs infected with B. canis the UCr/SCr ratio was significantly lower and the RFI was significantly higher than in non-azotaemic dogs infected with B. canis. The calculated correlation between RFI and duration of the disease before diagnosis and treatment was high, positive and statistically significant (r = 0.89, p < 0.001). The results of this study showed that during the course of canine babesiosis caused by B. canis in Poland acute tubular necrosis may develop. PMID:23990425

  5. Urea distribution in renal failure

    PubMed Central

    Blackmore, D. J.; Elder, W. J.; Bowden, C. H.

    1963-01-01

    An assessment of intracellular urea removed during haemodialysis has been made from urea extraction and plasma urea estimations. An apparent wide variation in the movement of intracellular urea in patients with acute renal failure from obstetric and traumatic causes and with chronic renal failure is reported. A method for the estimation of red cell water urea is presented. In two patients with chronic renal failure the red cell urea level was much higher than would have been expected from the plasma urea level before dialysis. In two obstetric patients there was no such discrepancy. The conclusion is drawn that research should be directed to variations of intracellular metabolism in renal failure before a more rational approach can be made to its management. PMID:16811009

  6. Towards optoelectronic urea biosensors.

    PubMed

    Pokrzywnicka, Marta; Koncki, Robert; Tymecki, Łukasz

    2015-03-01

    Integration of immobilized enzymes with light-emitting diodes (LEDs) leads to the development of optoelectronic enzyme-based biosensors. In this work, urease, used as a model enzyme, immobilized in the form of an open-tubular microbioreactor or biosensing membrane that has been integrated with two red LEDs. It forms complete, fiberless, miniaturized, and extremely economic biooptoelectronic devices useful for nonstationary measurements under flow analysis conditions. Both enzyme-based biodevices, operating according to the paired emitter detector diode (PEDD) principle, allow relatively fast, highly sensitive, and well-reproducible urea detection in the millimolar range of concentrations. Potential analytical applications of the developed urea bioPEDDs have been announced. Both presented constructions will be easily adapted for the development of other optoelectronic biosensors exploring various enzyme-based schemes of biodetection. PMID:25619983

  7. Chemiresistor urea sensor

    DOEpatents

    Glass, R.S.

    1997-12-16

    A sensor is disclosed to detect and quantify urea in fluids resulting from hemodialysis procedures, and in blood and other body fluids. The sensor is based upon a chemiresistor, which consists of an interdigitated array of metal fingers between which a resistance measured. The interdigitated array is fabricated on a suitable substrate. The surface of the array of fingers is covered with a coating containing the enzyme urease which catalyzes the hydrolysis of urea to form the ammonium ion, the bicarbonate ion, and hydroxide-chemical products which provide the basis for the measured signal. In a typical application, the sensor could be used at bedside, in conjunction with an appropriate electronics/computer system, in order to determine the hemodialysis endpoint. Also, the chemiresistor used to detect urea, can be utilized with a reference chemiresistor which does not contain urease, and connected in a differential measurement arrangement, such that the reference chemiresistor would cancel out any fluctuations due to background effects. 16 figs.

  8. Use of polyurea from urea for coating of urea granules.

    PubMed

    Lu, Panfang; Zhang, Yanfei; Jia, Cong; Li, Yufeng; Mao, Zhiquan

    2016-01-01

    A new type of controlled release fertilizers coated with polyurea was prepared. The granulated urea was firstly changed into a liquid urea by heating as the coating liquid. By spraying uniformly the urea was coated with the polyurea synthesized by the reaction of isocyanates with a liquid urea. The effects of different modifiers on N release characteristics of polyurea-coated urea (PCU) were studied. The morphology and chemical structure of PCU coating materials was investigated by SEM and FTIR. We studied the nitrogen release characteristics of the PCU applied in both water and soil, and the biodegradability of PCU coating after buried in soil. The results showed that PCU reduced nitrogen release rate and exhibited excellent controlled release property. The PCU coating materials could biodegrade in soil. This indicated that the low cost PCU products from urea are expected to use in agricultural and horticultural applications. PMID:27119061

  9. The involvement of uric acid in the pathogenesis of preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    Masoura, Sophia; Makedou, Kali; Theodoridis, Theodoros; Kourtis, Anargyros; Zepiridis, Leonidas; Athanasiadis, Apostolos

    2015-01-01

    Preeclampsia is a common disorder of human pregnancy and a major cause of worldwide pregnancy-related maternal and neonatal morbidity and mortality. Oxidative stress, angiogenic imbalance, placental ischemia and an inflammatory response have been proposed to play role in the pathogenesis of the disease. Hyperuricemia is a key biochemical feature in preeclampsia with elevated levels of uric acid being diagnosed as early as the 10(th) week of gestation. Traditionally, elevated uric acid levels were considered a result of renal dysfunction known to exist in preeclampsia. The contribution of uric acid in the pathogenesis of preeclampsia is being recently further investigated. We, hereby, review the possible mechanisms by which uric acid contributes to the development of the disease and its complications both on mother and fetus. PMID:26022211

  10. Automated measurement of urinary creatinine by multichannel kinetic spectrophotometry.

    PubMed

    Ohira, Shin-Ichi; Kirk, Andrea B; Dasgupta, Purnendu K

    2009-01-15

    Urinary creatinine analysis is required for clinical diagnosis, especially for evaluation of renal function. Creatinine adjustment is also widely used to estimate 24-h excretion from spot samples. Few convenient validated approaches are available for in-house creatinine measurement for small- to medium-scale studies. Here we apply the Jáffe reaction to creatinine determination with zone fluidic multichannel kinetic spectrophotometry. Diluted urine sample and reagent, alkaline picric acid, were mixed by a computer-programmed dispenser and rapidly delivered to a four-channel detection cell. The absorbance change was monitored by a flow-through light-emitting diode-photodiode-based detector. Validation results against high-performance liquid chromatography-ultraviolet (HPLC-UV)/mass spectrometry (MS) are presented. Responses for 10-fold diluted samples were linear within clinically relevant ranges (0-250 mg/L after dilution). The system can analyze 70 samples per hour with a limit of detection of 0.76 mg/L. The relative standard deviation was 1.29% at 100 mg/L creatinine (n=225). Correlation with the HPLC (UV quantitation/MS confirmation) system was excellent (linear, r2=0.9906). The developed system allows rapid, simple, cost-effective, and robust creatinine analysis and is suitable for the analysis of large numbers of urine samples. PMID:18977332

  11. An Increase Incidence in Uric Acid Nephrolithiasis: Changing Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Kumari, Asha; Mittal, Pawan; Kumar, Rajender; Goel, Richa; Bansal, Piyush; Kumar, Himanshu Devender; Bhutani, Jaikrit

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Nephrolithiasis is a complex disease affecting all age groups globally. As the causative factors for nephrolithiasis rises significantly, its incidence, prevalence and recurrence continues to baffle clinicians and patients. Aim To study the prevalence of different types of renal stones extracted by Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy (PCNL) and open surgical procedures. Materials and Methods Renal stones from 50 patients were retrieved by Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy (PCNL), Ureterorenoscopy (URS) and open surgical techniques for qualitative tests for detection of calcium, oxalate, uric acid, phosphate, ammonium ion, carbonate, cystine and xanthine. Results Three patients had stone removed by open surgery and rest had undergone PCNL. Nine of the stones were pure of calcium oxalate, 9 were of pure uric acid and 32 were mixed stones. Forty one stones had calcium. Among the mixed stones, oxalate was present in 25 samples (39 of total), uric acid was seen in 17 (25 of total stones), phosphate was present in 23 (23 of total) and carbonate was present in 4 stones (4 of total). Only 1 patient had triple phosphate stone. 12 were of staghorn appearance of which 6 were of struvite type, 6 were pure uric acid and remaining were mixed oxalate-phosphate stones. Conclusion Our study, though in a small number of hospital based patients, found much higher prevalence of uric acid stones and mixed stones than reported by previous hospital based studies in north India (oxalate stones~90%, uric acid~1% and mixed stones~3%). Biochemical analysis of renal stones is warranted in all cases.

  12. Prolonged winter undernutrition and the interpretation of urinary allantoin: creatinine ratios in ungulates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DelGiudice, G.G.; Kerr, K.D.; Mech, L.D.; Seal, U.S.

    2000-01-01

    The urinary allantoin:creatinine (A:C) ratio (expressed in micromoles of allantoin to micromoles of creatinine) has shown potential as an index of recent winter energy intake in preliminary controlled studies of elk (Cervus elaphus) involving mild condition deterioration (up to 11% loss of body mass). To ensure reliable nutritional assessments of free-ranging cervids by measuring A:C ratios of urine in snow, it is essential to extend this work. We assessed the effect of moderate and severe winter nutritional restriction on urinary A:C ratios of captive white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) that lost up to 32% body mass and related these ratios to metabolizable energy intake (MEI), body-mass loss, and other reported nutritional indicators. Deer in the control group were fed a low-protein, low-energy diet ad libitum, whereas deer in the treatment group were fed restricted amounts of the same diet. MEI was below the winter maintenance requirement for all deer, but was lower (P = 0.029) in treatment deer than in control deer. Percent body-mass loss differed between the two groups as the study progressed, and represented the full range of physiological tolerance (0-32% loss). Mean A:C ratios of control deer, which lost up to 17.4% body mass, showed a slight increasing (P = 0.086) trend, whereas initially similar A:C ratios of severely restricted deer increased (P = 0.0002) markedly by the eighth week (0.52 vs. 0.09 |mol:|mol). The urinary A:C ratio was not related (P = 0.839) to recent (2 days prior to urine sampling) MEI, but there was a marginally significant relation (r2 = 0.42, P = 0.110) between the A:C ratio and cumulative percent mass loss. The urinary A:C ratio was directly related to urinary urea nitrogen: creatinine (r2 = 0.59, P < 0.0001) and 3-methylhistidine:creatinine (r2 = 0.43, P < 0.0001) ratios. This study confirms that elevated and increasing A:C ratios may be due either to increasing energy intake or to accelerated tissue catabolism and

  13. Incidence and Risk Factors of Acute Kidney Injury after Radical Cystectomy: Importance of Preoperative Serum Uric Acid Level

    PubMed Central

    Joung, Kyoung-Woon; Choi, Seong-Soo; Kong, Yu-Gyeong; Yu, Jihion; Lim, Jinwook; Hwang, Jai-Hyun; Kim, Young-Kug

    2015-01-01

    Background: Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common complication after surgery and increases costs, morbidity, and mortality of hospitalized patients. While radical cystectomy associates significantly with an increased risk of serious complications, including AKI, risk factors of AKI after radical cystectomy has not been reported. This study was performed to determine the incidence and independent predictors of AKI after radical cystectomy. Methods: All consecutive patients who underwent radical cystectomy in 2001-2013 in a single tertiary-care center were identified. Their demographics, laboratory values, and intraoperative data were recorded. Postoperative AKI was defined and staged according to the Acute Kidney Injury Network criteria on the basis of postoperative changes in creatinine levels. Independent predictors of AKI were identified by univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses. Results: Of the 238 patients who met the eligibility criteria, 91 (38.2%) developed AKI. Univariate logistic regression analyses showed that male gender, high serum uric acid level, and long operation time associated with the development of AKI. On multivariate logistic regression analysis, preoperative serum uric acid concentration (odds ratio [OR] = 1.251; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.048-1.493; P = 0.013) and operation time (OR = 1.005; 95% CI = 1.002-1.008; P = 0.003) remained as independent predictors of AKI after radical cystectomy. Conclusions: AKI after radical cystectomy was a relatively common complication. Its independent risk factors were high preoperative serum uric acid concentration and long operation time. These observations can help to prevent AKI after radical cystectomy. PMID:26283877

  14. Urea and urea nitrate decomposition pathways: a quantum chemistry study.

    PubMed

    Tokmakov, Igor V; Alavi, Saman; Thompson, Donald L

    2006-03-01

    Electronic structure calculations have been performed to investigate the initial steps in the gas-phase decomposition of urea and urea nitrate. The most favorable decomposition pathway for an isolated urea molecule leads to HNCO and NH3. Gaseous urea nitrate formed by the association of urea and HNO3 has two isomeric forms, both of which are acid-base complexes stabilized by the hydrogen-bonding interactions involving the acidic proton of HNO3 and either the O or N atoms of urea, with binding energies (D0(o), calculated at the G2M level with BSSE correction) of 13.7 and 8.3 kcal/mol, respectively, and with estimated standard enthalpies of formation (delta(f)H298(o) of -102.3 and -97.1 kcal/mol, respectively. Both isomers can undergo relatively facile double proton transfer within cyclic hydrogen-bonded structures. In both cases, HNO3 plays a catalytic role for the (1,3) H-shifts in urea by acting as a donor of the first and an acceptor of the second protons transferred in a relay fashion. The double proton transfer in the carbonyl/hydrogen bond complex mediates the keto-enol tautomerization of urea, and in the other complex the result is the breakdown of the urea part to the HNCO and NH3 fragments. The enolic form of urea is not expected to accumulate in significant quantities due to its very fast conversion back to H2NC(O)NH2 which is barrierless in the presence of HNO3. The HNO3-catalyzed breakdown of urea to HNCO and NH3 is predicted to be the most favorable decomposition pathway for gaseous urea nitrate. Thus, HNCO + NH3 + HNO3 and their association products (e.g., ammonium nitrate and isocyanate) are expected to be the major initial products of the urea nitrate decomposition. This prediction is consistent with the experimental T-jump/FTIR data [Hiyoshi et al. 12th Int. Detonation Symp., Aug 11-16, San Diego, CA, 2002]. PMID:16494387

  15. Chemiluminescence of creatinine/H2O2/Co(2+) and its application for selective creatinine detection.

    PubMed

    Hanif, Saima; John, Peter; Gao, Wenyue; Saqib, Muhammad; Qi, Liming; Xu, Guobao

    2016-01-15

    Creatinine is an important biomarker in clinical diagnosis and biomonitoring programs as well as urinary metabolomic/metabonomics research. Current methods are either nonselective, time consuming or require heavy and expensive instruments. In this study, chemiluminescence of creatinine with hydrogen peroxide has been reported for the first time, and its chemiluminescence is remarkably enhanced in the presence of cobalt ions. By utilizing these phenomena, we have developed a sensitive and selective chemiluminescence method for creatinine determination by coupling with flow injection analysis. The calibration curve is linear in the range of 1×10(-7)-3×10(-5)mol/L with a limit of detection (S/N=3) of 7.2×10(-8)mol/L, which is adequate for detecting creatinine in the clinically accepted range. The relative standard deviation for seven measurements of 3×10(-5)mol/L creatinine is 1.2%. The chemiluminescence method was then utilized to detect creatinine in human urine samples after simple dilution with water. It takes less than 1min each measurement and the recoveries for spiked urine samples were 100-103%. The interference study demonstrates that some common species in urine, such as amino acids, ascorbic acid and creatine, have negligible effects on creatinine detection. The present method does not use expensive instruments, enzymes and separation technique. This method has the advantages of sensitivity, selectivity, simplicity, rapidity, and low cost. It holds great promise for basic or comprehensive metabolic panel, drug screening, anti-dopping, and urinary metabolomic/metabonomics research. PMID:26339931

  16. Uric acid as a CNS antioxidant.

    PubMed

    Bowman, Gene L; Shannon, Jackilen; Frei, Balz; Kaye, Jeffrey A; Quinn, Joseph F

    2010-01-01

    Oxidative damage is a consistent finding in a number of central nervous system (CNS) disorders. Uric acid (UA) is a potent hydrophilic antioxidant that is modified by diet and drug. Several lines of evidence suggest that plasma UA may modulate outcomes in neurologic disease, but little attention has been paid to CNS levels of UA. Our objective was to test the hypothesis that cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) UA is determined by plasma UA, modified by blood-brain barrier (BBB) integrity and associated with rate of cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Also, since UA and ascorbic acid may act as antioxidants for one another, we also explored a potential interaction between them in the brain. Thirty-two patients with mild to moderate AD (Mini-Mental Status Exam 19 +/- 5) participated in a longitudinal biomarker study for one year involving standardized clinical assessments. CSF and blood were collected at baseline for UA, ascorbic acid, and albumin. Cognitive measures were collected at baseline and again one year later. CSF UA was independent of age, gender, and AD severity. CSF and plasma UA were positively correlated (r=0.669, p=0.001) and BBB impairment was associated with higher CSF levels of UA (p=0.028). Neither plasma nor CSF UA reached significant association with rates of cognitive decline over 1 year. CSF UA and CSF ascorbic acid were positively correlated (r=0.388, p=0.001). The hypothesis that CSF UA is determined by plasma UA and BBB integrity is supported, as is the hypothesis that UA and ascorbic acid are associated in CSF but not plasma. Adequately powered prospective studies would help assess any role for UA in primary and secondary prevention of AD. PMID:20061611

  17. Uric Acid Nephrolithiasis: Recent Progress and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Ngo, Tin C; Assimos, Dean G

    2007-01-01

    The prevalence of urolithiasis has been increasing for the past few decades in industrialized nations. Uric acid calculi account for a significant percentage of urinary stones. Certain risk factors may be involved in the pathogenesis of uric acid nephrolithiasis, including hyperuricosuria, low urinary volume, and persistently low urinary pH. Patients with medical conditions that promote profound hyperuricosuria are at high risk of developing uric acid calculi. These conditions include chronic diarrheal states; myeloproliferative disorders; insulin resistance, including diabetes mellitus; and monogenic metabolic disorders, such as Lesch-Nyhan syndrome. Computed tomography can provide a definitive diagnosis. Except in cases in which there is severe obstruction, progressive azotemia, serious infection, or unremitting pain, the initial treatment of patients with uric acid nephrolithiasis should be medical dissolution therapy because this approach is successful in the majority of cases. A thorough review of the epidemiology and pathophysiology of uric acid nephrolithiasis is crucial for the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of stones in patients with this condition. PMID:17396168

  18. Renal Transport of Uric Acid: Evolving Concepts and Uncertainties

    PubMed Central

    Bobulescu, Ion Alexandru; Moe, Orson W.

    2013-01-01

    In addition to its role as a metabolic waste product, uric acid has been proposed to be an important molecule with multiple functions in human physiology and pathophysiology and may be linked to human diseases beyond nephrolithiasis and gout. Uric acid homeostasis is determined by the balance between production, intestinal secretion, and renal excretion. The kidney is an important regulator of circulating uric acid levels, by reabsorbing around 90% of filtered urate, while being responsible for 60–70% of total body uric acid excretion. Defective renal handling of urate is a frequent pathophysiologic factor underpinning hyperuricemia and gout. In spite of tremendous advances over the past decade, the molecular mechanisms of renal urate transport are still incompletely understood. Many transport proteins are candidate participants in urate handling, with URAT1 and GLUT9 being the best characterized to date. Understanding these transporters is increasingly important for the practicing clinician as new research unveils their physiology, importance in drug action, and genetic association with uric acid levels in human populations. The future may see the introduction of new drugs that specifically act on individual renal urate transporters for the treatment of hyperuricemia and gout. PMID:23089270

  19. 21 CFR 862.1225 - Creatinine test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Creatinine test system. 862.1225 Section 862.1225 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems §...

  20. 21 CFR 862.1225 - Creatinine test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Creatinine test system. 862.1225 Section 862.1225 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems §...

  1. 21 CFR 862.1225 - Creatinine test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Creatinine test system. 862.1225 Section 862.1225 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems §...

  2. 21 CFR 862.1225 - Creatinine test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Creatinine test system. 862.1225 Section 862.1225 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems §...

  3. 21 CFR 862.1225 - Creatinine test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Creatinine test system. 862.1225 Section 862.1225 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems §...

  4. Evaluating an alternative method for rapid urinary creatinine determination

    EPA Science Inventory

    Creatinine (CR) is an endogenously-produced chemical routinely assayed in urine specimens to assess kidney function, sample dilution. The industry-standard method for CR determination, known as the kinetic Jaffe (KJ) method, relies on an exponential rate of a colorimetric change,...

  5. Prednisone lowers serum uric acid levels in patients with decompensated heart failure by increasing renal uric acid clearance.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chao; Zhen, Yuzhi; Zhao, Qingzhen; Zhai, Jian-Long; Liu, Kunshen; Zhang, Jian-Xin

    2016-07-01

    Clinical studies have shown that large doses of prednisone could lower serum uric acid (SUA) in patients with decompensated heart failure (HF); however, the optimal dose of prednisone and underlying mechanisms are unknown. Thirty-eight patients with decompensated HF were randomized to receive standard HF care alone (n = 10) or with low-dose (15 mg/day, n = 8), medium-dose (30 mg/day, n = 10), or high-dose prednisone (60 mg/day, n = 10), for 10 days. At the end of the study, only high-dose prednisone significantly reduced SUA, whereas low- and medium-dose prednisone and standard HF care had no effect on SUA. The reduction in SUA in high-dose prednisone groups was associated with a significant increase in renal uric acid clearance. In conclusion, prednisone can reduce SUA levels by increasing renal uric acid clearance in patients with decompensated HF. PMID:27144905

  6. National Urea Cycle Disorders Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... urea cycle in regulating nitric oxide in the human body, the study is being conducted by Dr. ... a major discovery in ASA deficiency that transforms human science. The research has been published in Nature ...

  7. Urea phosphate as granular or fluid fertilizers

    SciTech Connect

    Blouin, G.M.

    1984-01-01

    Studies are being conducted of the production and agronomic characteristics of the phosphoric acid-urea adduct, urea phosphate, and of the various granular and fluid fertilizers that can be produced from it. Flowsheets are given for the production of urea phosphate. Characteristics of unpurified and purified urea phosphate are also given. (DLC)

  8. Relationship between Uric Acid Level and Achievement Motivation. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mueller, Ernst F.; French, John R. P., Jr.

    In an investigation of the relationship of uric acid (a metabolic end product) to achievement, this study hypothesized that a person's serum urate level (a factor often associated with gout) is positively related to achievement need as well as indicators of actual achievement. (Speed of promotion and number of yearly publications were chosen as…

  9. Anaerobic Degradation of Uric Acid by Gut Bacteria of Termites †

    PubMed Central

    Potrikus, C. J.; Breznak, John A.

    1980-01-01

    A study was done of anaerobic degradation of uric acid (UA) by representative strains of uricolytic bacteria isolated from guts of Reticulitermes flavipes termites. Streptococcus strain UAD-1 degraded UA incompletely, secreting a fluorescent compound into the medium, unless formate (or a formicogenic compound) was present as a cosubstrate. Formate functioned as a reductant, and its oxidation to CO2 by formate dehydrogenase provided 2H+ + 2e− needed to drive uricolysis to completion. Uricolysis by Streptococcus UAD-1 thus corresponded to the following equation: 1UA + 1formate → 4CO2 + 1acetate + 4NH3. Urea did not appear to be an intermediate in CO2 and NH3 formation during uricolysis by strain UAD-1. Formate dehydrogenase and uricolytic activities of strain UAD-1 were inducible by growth of cells on UA. Bacteroides termitidis strain UAD-50 degraded UA as follows: 1UA → 3.5 CO2 + 0.75acetate + 4NH3. Exogenous formate was neither required for nor stimulatory to uricolysis by strain UAD-50. Studies of UA catabolism by Citrobacter strains were limited, because only small amounts of UA were metabolized by cells in liquid medium. Uricolytic activity of such bacteria in situ could be important to the carbon, nitrogen, and energy economy of R. flavipes. PMID:16345588

  10. Uric acid or 1-methyl uric acid in the urinary bladder increases serum glucose, insulin, true triglyceride, and total cholesterol levels in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Balasubramanian, T

    2003-10-01

    In animals deprived of food for a long period, a drop in the fat mass below 5% of the total body mass results in an increase in blood glucocorticoids and uric acid levels, followed by foraging activity. Since the glucocorticoids increase the uric acid excretion, an increase in the level of uric acid in the bladder urine could be the signal for this feeding behaviour and subsequent fat storage. Accumulation of fat is associated with hyperglycaemia, hyperinsulinaemia, hyperlipidaemia, and hypercholesterolaemia as seen in the metabolic syndrome or hibernation. It is hypothesized that uric acid or its structurally related compound, 1-methyl uric acid (one of the metabolites of the methyl xanthines namely caffeine, theophylline, and theobromine present in coffee, tea, cocoa, and some drugs), can act on the urinary bladder mucosa and increases the blood glucose, insulin, triglyceride, and cholesterol levels. In rats, perfusion of the urinary bladder with saturated aqueous solution of uric acid or 1-methyl uric acid results in a significant increase in the serum levels of glucose, insulin, true triglyceride, and total cholesterol in comparison with perfusion of the bladder with distilled water at 20, 40, and 80 min. The uric acid or the 1-methyl uric acid acts on the urinary bladder mucosa and increases the serum glucose, insulin, true triglyceride, and total cholesterol levels. PMID:15241498

  11. UV-induced effects on chlorination of creatinine.

    PubMed

    Weng, Shih Chi; Li, Jing; Wood, Karl V; Kenttämaa, Hilkka I; Williams, Peggy E; Amundson, Lucas M; Blatchley, Ernest R

    2013-09-15

    Ultraviolet (UV) irradiation is commonly employed for water treatment in swimming pools to complement conventional chlorination, and to reduce the concentration of inorganic chloramine compounds. The approach of combining UV irradiation and chlorination has the potential to improve water quality, as defined by microbial composition. However, relatively little is known about the effects of this process on water chemistry. To address this issue, experiments were conducted to examine the effects of sequential UV254 irradiation/chlorination, as will occur in recirculating system of swimming pools, on disinfection byproduct (DBP) formation. Creatinine, which is present in human sweat and urine, was selected as the target precursor for these experiments. Enhanced formation of dichloromethylamine (CH3NCl2) and inorganic chloramines was observed to result from post-chlorination of UV-irradiated samples. Chlorocreatinine was found to be more sensitive to UV254 irradiation than creatinine; UV254 irradiation of chlorocreatinine resulted in opening of the ring structure, thereby yielding a series of intermediates that were more susceptible to free chlorine attack than their parent compound. The quantum yields for photodegradation of creatinine and chlorocreatinine at 254 nm were estimated at 0.011 ± 0.002 mol/E and 0.144 ± 0.011 mol/E, respectively. The N-Cl bond was found to be common to UV-sensitive chlorinated compounds (e.g., inorganic chloramines, CH3NCl2, and chlorocreatinine); compounds that were less susceptible to UV-based attack generally lacked the N-Cl bond. This suggested that the N-Cl bond is susceptible to UV254 irradiation, and cleavage of the N-Cl bond appears to open or promote reaction pathways that involve free chlorine, thereby enhancing formation of some DBPs and promoting loss of free chlorine. Proposed reaction mechanisms to describe this behavior based on creatinine as a precursor are presented. PMID:23863372

  12. Contribution of the organic anion transporter OAT2 to the renal active tubular secretion of creatinine and mechanism for serum creatinine elevations caused by cobicistat

    PubMed Central

    Lepist, Eve-Irene; Zhang, Xuexiang; Hao, Jia; Huang, Jane; Kosaka, Alan; Birkus, Gabriel; Murray, Bernard P; Bannister, Roy; Cihlar, Tomas; Huang, Yong; Ray, Adrian S

    2014-01-01

    Many xenobiotics including the pharmacoenhancer cobicistat increase serum creatinine by inhibiting its renal active tubular secretion without affecting the glomerular filtration rate. This study aimed to define the transporters involved in creatinine secretion, applying that knowledge to establish the mechanism for xenobiotic-induced effects. The basolateral uptake transporters organic anion transporter OAT2 and organic cation transporters OCT2 and OCT3 were found to transport creatinine. At physiologic creatinine concentrations, the specific activity of OAT2 transport was over twofold higher than OCT2 or OCT3, establishing OAT2 as a likely relevant creatinine transporter and further challenging the traditional view that creatinine is solely transported by a cationic pathway. The apical multidrug and toxin extrusion transporters MATE1 and MATE2-K demonstrated low-affinity and high-capacity transport. All drugs known to affect creatinine inhibited OCT2 and MATE1. Similar to cimetidine and ritonavir, cobicistat had the greatest effect on MATE1 with a 50% inhibition constant of 0.99 μM for creatinine transport. Trimethoprim potently inhibited MATE2-K, whereas dolutegravir preferentially inhibited OCT2. Cimetidine was unique, inhibiting all transporters that interact with creatinine. Thus, the clinical observation of elevated serum creatinine in patients taking cobicistat is likely a result of OCT2 transport, facilitating intracellular accumulation, and MATE1 inhibition. PMID:24646860

  13. Elevated levels of serum creatinine: recommendations for management and referral

    PubMed Central

    Mendelssohn, D C; Barrett, B J; Brownscombe, L M; Ethier, J; Greenberg, D E; Kanani, S D; Levin, A; Toffelmire, E B

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The potential benefits of earlier referral to a nephrologist of patients with elevated levels of serum creatinine include identifying and treating reversible causes of renal failure, slowing the rate of decline associated with progressive renal insufficiency, managing the coexisting conditions associated with chronic renal failure and facilitating efficient entry into dialysis programs for all patients who might benefit. METHODS: A subcommittee of the Canadian Society of Nephrology, which included representatives from family practice and internal medicine, conducted a MEDLINE search for the period 1966 to 1998 using the key words referral and consultation, dialysis, hemodialysis, peritoneal dialysis, renal replacement therapy and kidney diseases. Where published evidence was lacking, conclusions were reached by consensus. GUIDELINES: Earlier referral to nephrologists of patients with elevated creatinine levels is expected to lead to better health care outcomes and lower costs for both the patients and the health care system. All patients with newly discovered renal insufficiency (as evidenced by serum creatinine elevated to a level above the upper limit of the normal range of that laboratory, adjusted for age and height in children) must undergo investigations to determine the potential reversibility of disease, to evaluate the prognosis and to optimize planning of care. All patients with an established, progressive increase in serum creatinine level should be followed with a nephrologist. Adequate preparation for dialysis or transplantation (or both) requires at least 12 months of relatively frequent contact with a renal care team. Nephrologists should provide consultation in a timely manner for any patient with an elevated serum creatinine level. In addition, they should provide advice about what aspects of the condition require particularly urgent or emergency assessment. SPONSORS: This clinical practice guideline has been endorsed by the Canadian

  14. Direct determination of creatinine based on poly(ethyleneimine)/phosphotungstic acid multilayer modified electrode.

    PubMed

    Han, Ping; Xu, Shimei; Feng, Shun; Hao, Yanjun; Wang, Jide

    2016-05-01

    In this work, the direct determination of creatinine was achieved using a poly(ethyleneimine)/phosphotungstic acid multilayer modified electrode with the assistance of Copper(II) ions by cyclic voltammetry. The quantity of creatinine were determined by measuring the redox peak current of Cu(II)-creatinine complex/Cu(I)-creatinine complex. Factors affecting the response current of creatinine at the modified electrode were optimized. A linear relationship between the response current and the concentration of creatinine ranging from 0.125 to 62.5μM was obtained with a detection limit of 0.06μM. The proposed method was applied to determine creatinine in human urine, and satisfied results were gotten which was validated in accordance with high performance liquid chromatography. The proposed electrode provided a promising alternative in routine sensing for creatinine without enzymatic assistance. PMID:26946017

  15. Serum uric acid levels predict the development of albuminuria over 6 years in patients with type 1 diabetes: Findings from the Coronary Artery Calcification in Type 1 Diabetes study

    PubMed Central

    Jalal, Diana I.; Rivard, Christopher J.; Johnson, Richard J.; Maahs, David M.; McFann, Kimberly; Rewers, Marian; Snell-Bergeon, Janet K.

    2010-01-01

    Background. Recent studies suggest that uric acid is a mediator of diabetic nephropathy. We hypothesized that elevated serum uric acid levels are a strong predictor of albuminuria in patients with type 1 diabetes. Methods. We analyzed data from the Coronary Artery Calcification in Type 1 Diabetes study, a prospective observational study. A stepwise logistic regression model was applied to predict the development of micro- or macroalbuminuria after 6 years of follow-up in 324 participants who had no evidence of micro- or macroalbuminuria at baseline. A P-value <0.1 was used as the criteria for entry into and removal from the model. Results. The following factors were selected in the stepwise multivariate model as predictors of micro- or macroalbuminuria at the 6-year follow-up visit: baseline serum uric acid levels, HbA1c and pre-albuminuria. For every 1-mg/dl increase in serum uric acid levels at baseline, there was an 80% increased risk of developing micro- or macroalbuminuria at 6 years (odds ratio 1.8; 95% confidence interval 1.2, 2.8; P = 0.005). Additional covariates considered in the stepwise model were sex, age, duration of diabetes, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor or angiotensin II receptor blocker treatment, waist circumference, waist/hip ratio, body mass index, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, smoking, serum creatinine, cystatin C, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and triglycerides. Conclusion. Elevated serum uric acid levels are a strong predictor of the development of albuminuria in patients with type 1 diabetes. PMID:20064950

  16. Serum uric acid and AKI: is it time?

    PubMed Central

    Kaushik, Manish; Choo, Jason Chon Jun

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a well-recognized complication in hospitalized patients, with associated mortality and morbidity. Studies that aim to prevent or reverse AKI using pharmacological and interventional therapies in clinical practice have been disappointing. Work is continuing to identify potentially modifiable risk factors for AKI. Early identification and modification of these risk factors may help prevent or favorably influence the outcome of AKI. The role of uric acid as a potential risk factor is being revisited in chronic kidney disease and AKI. Apart from the established crystal precipitation with profound hyperuricemia, various non-crystal mechanisms have also been proposed in the pathogenesis of AKI. The association of serum uric acid levels with the development of AKI has been reported in various clinical settings. Together, the results of these studies highlight hyperuricemia as a potential risk factor of AKI and the need for further work on this subject. PMID:26798460

  17. New enzymatic assay for serum urea nitrogen using urea amidolyase.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Shigeki; Iyama, Shigeru; Yamaguchi, Yoshihisa; Kanakura, Yuzuru

    2003-01-01

    We established an enzymatic assay for measurement of serum urea nitrogen using urea amidolyase (EC 3.5.1.45) from yeast species. The method is based on hydrolysis of urea by the enzyme. In this assay, we eliminated endogenous ammonium ion by use of glutamate dehydrogenase (EC 1.4.1.4). Then in the presence of urea amido-lyase, ATP, bicarbonate, magnesium, and potassium ions, ammonium ion was produced proportionally to urea concentration in serum. The concentra-tion of ammonium ion formed was determined by adding GLDH to produce NADP(+) in the presence of 2-oxoglutarate and NADPH. We then monitored the change of absorbance at 340 nm. The inhibitory effect of calcium ion on this assay was eliminated by adding glyco-letherdiamine-N, N, N', N'-tetraacetic acid to the reaction system. The with-in-assay coefficient of variations (CVs) of the present method were 1.80-3.76% (n = 10) at 2.8-19.0 mmol/L, respectively. The day-to-day CVs were 2.23-4.59%. Analytical recovery was 92-115%. The presence of ascorbic acid, bilirubin, hemoglobin, lipemic material, ammo-nium ion, or calcium ion did not affect this assay system. The correlation be-tween values obtained with the present method (y) and those by another enzy-matic method (x) was 0.997 (y = 1.02x - 0.10 mmol/L, Sy/x = 0.841, n = 100), with a mean difference of -0.18 +/- 0.86 mmol/L [(values by reference method - that of present method) +/- SD] using the Bland-Altman technique. J. Clin. Lab. Anal. 17:52-56, 2003. PMID:12640627

  18. Evaluation of Serum Creatinine Changes With Integrase Inhibitor Use in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-1 Infected Adults

    PubMed Central

    Lindeman, Tara A.; Duggan, Joan M.; Sahloff, Eric G.

    2016-01-01

    This retrospective chart review evaluated changes in serum creatinine and creatinine clearance (CrCl) after initiation of an integrase inhibitor (INSTI)-based regimen as initial treatment in human immunodeficiency virus-infected adults. Serum creatinine and CrCl changes were similar to those seen in clinical trials for INSTIs. No renal-related serious adverse events or discontinuations occurred. PMID:27092314

  19. Serum uric acid and pre-eclampsia: an update.

    PubMed

    Bellomo, Gianni

    2012-06-01

    The association between uric acid (UA) and pre-eclampsia has been known for years, but the prognostic value of UA has been debated. This article will review recent evidences, evaluating UA as a prognostic factor for pre-eclampsia, both in the general population and in women with gestational hypertension, and as a predictor of disease severity and adverse maternal-fetal outcome. Finally, studies investigating UA as a putative pathogenic factor for pre-eclampsia are briefly mentioned. PMID:22894626

  20. URIC ACID: A NEW ANTIOXIDANT IN PATIENTS WITH PEMPHIGUS VULGARIS

    PubMed Central

    Yousefi, Maryam; Rahimi, Hoda; Barikbin, Behrooz; Toossi, Parviz; Lotfi, Sara; Hedayati, Mehdi; Younespour, Shima

    2011-01-01

    Background: Increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) and lipid peroxidation are seen in many dermatologic disorders, for example, atopic dermatitis, psoriasis, vitiligo, acne vulgaris, pemphigus vulgaris (PV), lichen planus, and alopecia areata. ROS has an important role in the inflammation process. In PV, increased production of ROS leads to decline of antioxidants in plasma and red blood cells which results in oxidative stress. We aimed to evaluate the level of these antioxidants in PV patients and compare it to the controls. Materials and Methods: Among patients attending the dermatology clinics, 30 patients with PV, who had never been on treatment, were enrolled to the study. The control group consisted of 30 age- and sex-matched healthy non-smoker individuals. Venous blood was collected from the subjects for the evaluation of plasma levels of glutathione peroxidase, vitamin C, selenium, bilirubin, and uric acid. Results: Age mean and standard deviation of the patients (40.83, 12.74) was comparable to the controls (41.96, 13.08). Mean level of uric acid was significantly lower in PV patients compared to the controls (P = 0.006). Other antioxidants were not different between the two groups. Uric acid of the patients with mucosal involvement was significantly lower than patients with mucocutaneous involvement (P = 0.049). Limitations: The blood level of other antioxidants (e.g. malondialdehyde) was not evaluated. Conclusions: Uric acid as an antioxidant in our study had similar changes to previous studies in the field of other diseases but selenium, bilirubin, and glutathione peroxidase did not differ between patients and controls. PMID:21772587

  1. Chronic hyperuricemia, uric acid deposit and cardiovascular risk.

    PubMed

    Grassi, Davide; Ferri, Livia; Desideri, Giovambattista; Di Giosia, Paolo; Cheli, Paola; Del Pinto, Rita; Properzi, Giuliana; Ferri, Claudio

    2013-01-01

    Hyperuricemia is commonly associated with traditional risk factors such as dysglicemia, dyslipidemia, central obesity and abnormal blood pressure, i.e. the metabolic syndrome. Concordantly, recent studies have revived the controversy over the role of circulating uric acid, hyperuricemia, and gout as an independent prognostic factor for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. In this regard, different studies also evaluated the possible role of xanthine inhibitors in inducing blood pressure reduction, increment in flow-mediated dilation, and improved cardiovascular prognosis in various patient settings. The vast majority of these studies have been conducted with either allopurinol or its active metabolite oxypurinol, i.e. two purine-like non-selective inhibitors of xanthine oxidase. More recently, the role of uric acid as a risk factor for cardiovascular disease and the possible protective role exerted by reduction of hyperuricemia to normal level have been evaluated by the use of febuxostat, a selective, non purine-like xanthine oxidase inhibitor. In this review, we will report current evidence on hyperuricemia in cardiovascular disease. The value of uric acid as a biomarker and as a potential therapeutic target for tailored old and novel "cardiometabolic" treatments will be also discussed. PMID:23173592

  2. Chronic Hyperuricemia, Uric Acid Deposit and Cardiovascular Risk

    PubMed Central

    Grassi, Davide; Ferri, Livia; Desideri, Giovambattista; Giosia, Paolo Di; Cheli, Paola; Pinto, Rita Del; Properzi, Giuliana; Ferri, Claudio

    2013-01-01

    Hyperuricemia is commonly associated with traditional risk factors such as dysglicemia, dyslipidemia, central obesity and abnormal blood pressure, i.e. the metabolic syndrome. Concordantly, recent studies have revived the controversy over the role of circulating uric acid, hyperuricemia, and gout as an independent prognostic factor for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. In this regard, different studies also evaluated the possible role of xanthine inhibitors in inducing blood pressure reduction, increment in flow-mediated dilation, and improved cardiovascular prognosis in various patient settings. The vast majority of these studies have been conducted with either allopurinol or its active metabolite oxypurinol, i.e. two purine-like non-selective inhibitors of xanthine oxidase. More recently, the role of uric acid as a risk factor for cardiovascular disease and the possible protective role exerted by reduction of hyperuricemia to normal level have been evaluated by the use of febuxostat, a selective, non purine-like xanthine oxidase inhibitor. In this review, we will report current evidence on hyperuricemia in cardiovascular disease. The value of uric acid as a biomarker and as a potential therapeutic target for tailored old and novel “cardiometabolic” treatments will be also discussed. PMID:23173592

  3. Uric Acid as a Target of Therapy in CKD

    PubMed Central

    Jalal, Diana I.; Chonchol, Michel; Chen, Wei; Targher, Giovanni

    2012-01-01

    The prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) has risen and will continue to rise in the United States and worldwide. This is alarming considering that CKD remains an irreversible condition and patients who progress to chronic kidney failure suffer reduced quality of life and high mortality rates. As such, it is imperative to identify modifiable risk factors to develop strategies to slow CKD progression. One such factor is hyperuricemia. Recent observational studies have associated hyperuricemia with kidney disease. In addition, hyperuricemia is largely prevalent in patients with CKD. Data from experimental studies have revealed several potential mechanisms by which hyperuricemia may contribute to the development and progression of CKD. In this manuscript we offer a critical review of the experimental evidence linking hyperuricemia to CKD, we highlight the gaps in our knowledge on the topic as it stands today, and we review the observational and interventional studies that have examined the potential nephro-protective effect of lowering uric acid in CKD patients . While uric acid may also be linked to cardiovascular disease and mortality in patients with CKD, this review will focus only on uric acid as a potential therapeutic target to prevent kidney disease onset and progression. PMID:23058478

  4. The effect of uric acid on outdoor copper and bronze.

    PubMed

    Bernardi, E; Bowden, D J; Brimblecombe, P; Kenneally, H; Morselli, L

    2009-03-15

    Bird droppings are often quoted as a decay agent for outdoor goods, in particular buildings and statues. Undoubtedly, they represent one of the major causes of aesthetic damage on outdoor materials, but the real chemical damage they are able to induce, in particular on metals, is not so well studied. This work focused on the short term role of uric acid, the main constituent of bird urine, with respect to copper, which make such an important contribution to architectural elements of buildings and outdoor sculpture. Preliminary results of laboratory tests and analyses on real exposed samples showed that uric acid chemically affects copper and bronzes: the surface of the metal is modified and copper urates formed. Also natural patina, formed on statues and roof, react with uric acid, even if it seems to afford some protection toward bird droppings. In general, experimental results confirm that the potential chemical damage by bird droppings is significant when considering external cultural heritage such as statues, metal monuments and buildings with historic copper roofs. PMID:19157513

  5. What Is a Urea Cycle Disorder?

    MedlinePlus

    ... urine and removed from the body. In urea cycle disorders, the nitrogen accumulates in the form of ammonia, a highly toxic substance, resulting in hyperammonemia (elevated blood ... and severity of urea cycle disorders is highly variable. This depends on the ...

  6. Controlling serum uric acid using febuxostat in cancer patients at risk of tumor lysis syndrome.

    PubMed

    Takai, Mihoko; Yamauchi, Takahiro; Fujita, Kei; Lee, Shin; Ookura, Miyuki; Kishi, Shinji; Urasaki, Yoshimasa; Yoshida, Akira; Iwasaki, Hiromichi; Ueda, Takanori

    2014-10-01

    Tumor lysis syndrome (TLS) is a life-threatening oncological emergency, in which control of serum uric acid (S-UA) levels is important. S-UA-lowering efficacy of a new xanthine oxidase inhibitor, febuxostat, was retrospectively evaluated in seven patients with hematological malignancies who were at an intermediate risk of developing TLS. A 10-mg dose of febuxostat was initiated and chemotherapy was started within 24 h of administering the first dose of febuxostat. Febuxostat was continued until at least day 7 of chemotherapy treatment. The UA-lowering treatment was considered effective if febuxostat reduced S-UA levels to ≤7.5 mg/dl by day 5. The mean S-UA level at base line was 6.4±2.6 mg/dl and, on day 5, the mean S-UA level was 4.7±1.8 mg/dl. All the patients achieved S-UA levels ≤7.5 mg/dl. Serum creatinine levels decreased from 0.93±0.25 to 0.85±0.25 mg/dl. The estimated glomerular filtration rate values increased from 69.7±24.5 to 76.9±26.2 ml/min. No adverse reactions were noted during the study period and no patients experienced progressive TLS. Successful control of S-UA and improved renal function were obtained in response to febuxostat treatment in cancer patients at a risk of TLS. PMID:25202361

  7. Endoscopic and Histologic Findings in a Cohort of Uric Acid and Calcium Oxalate Stone Formers

    PubMed Central

    Viers, BR; Lieske, JC; Vrtiska, TJ; Herrera Hernandez, LP; Vaughan, LE; Mehta, RA; Bergstralh, EJ; Rule, AD; Holmes, DR; Krambeck, AE

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To characterize the endoscopic and histologic renal papillary lesions in a cohort of uric acid (UA) stone formers (SF). Methods Data was prospectively obtained during percutaneous nephrolithotomy between 2009–2013. Renal papillae were endoscopically analyzed to quantitate surface area (SA) occupied by plaque or plug, and biopsies were obtained. UA SF were compared to non-SF controls and patients with >50% CaOx in the absence of UA. Results There were 23 UA SF; of which 19 stones (83%) were admixed with CaOx and 4 (17%) were pure. Compared to CaOx SF and controls, UA SF had a higher prevalence of diabetes and obesity, greater serum creatinine and UA, lower eGFR and urine pH, and elevated UA supersaturation. Characteristics of UA SF were compared to 95 CaOx SF, and 19 controls. Overall, 23 (100%) UA SF had endoscopic plaque and 13 (57%) plugs. Endoscopically, UA SF displayed a greater incidence of plugging (57% vs 45% vs 11%; p=0.006) relative to CaOx SF and controls. Likewise, UA SF had a greater %SA of plugging (0.1 vs 0.0; p=0.002) and plaque (2.0 vs 0.9, p=0.006) than controls; but similar amounts to CaOx SF. Histologic plugs were similar in UA and CaOx SF, although CaOx SF demonstrated greater interstitial inflammation on endoscopic biopsy. Conclusions UA and CaOx SF have similar amounts of plaque, while UA SF have more endoscopic but not histological collecting duct plugs. These data suggest overlap between the pathogenesis of UA and CaOx stones. The anchoring site for UA stones remains uncertain. PMID:25681832

  8. Urea Biosynthesis Using Liver Slices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teal, A. R.

    1976-01-01

    Presented is a practical scheme to enable introductory biology students to investigate the mechanism by which urea is synthesized in the liver. The tissue-slice technique is discussed, and methods for the quantitative analysis of metabolites are presented. (Author/SL)

  9. Amphotericin B liposome-induced acrocyanosis and elevated serum creatinine.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiangcai; Jin, Jie; Cai, Chuang; Zheng, Ren; Wang, Yu; Xu, Yingying

    2016-01-01

    A 77-year-old male patient developed acrocyanosis and pain after treatment with amphotericin B liposome 150 mg daily intravenously for disseminated histoplasmosis, and subsequently developed elevated serum creatinine. Amphotericin B liposome was discontinued, and anisodamine was used intravenously to treat acrocyanosis and pain induced by amphotericin B liposome for 9 days and patient was cured. Naranjo adverse drug reaction probability scale score was 5, the World Health Organization-Uppsala Monitoring Centre criteria: Probable, indicating a probable adverse reaction to amphotericin B liposome. PMID:27298506

  10. Amphotericin B liposome-induced acrocyanosis and elevated serum creatinine

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiangcai; Jin, Jie; Cai, Chuang; Zheng, Ren; Wang, Yu; Xu, Yingying

    2016-01-01

    A 77-year-old male patient developed acrocyanosis and pain after treatment with amphotericin B liposome 150 mg daily intravenously for disseminated histoplasmosis, and subsequently developed elevated serum creatinine. Amphotericin B liposome was discontinued, and anisodamine was used intravenously to treat acrocyanosis and pain induced by amphotericin B liposome for 9 days and patient was cured. Naranjo adverse drug reaction probability scale score was 5, the World Health Organization-Uppsala Monitoring Centre criteria: Probable, indicating a probable adverse reaction to amphotericin B liposome. PMID:27298506

  11. Remote calorimetric detection of urea via flow injection analysis.

    PubMed

    Gaddes, David E; Demirel, Melik C; Reeves, W Brian; Tadigadapa, Srinivas

    2015-12-01

    The design and development of a calorimetric biosensing system enabling relatively high throughput sample analysis are reported. The calorimetric biosensor system consists of a thin (∼20 μm) micromachined Y-cut quartz crystal resonator (QCR) as a temperature sensor placed in close proximity to a fluidic chamber packed with an immobilized enzyme. Layer by layer enzyme immobilization of urease is demonstrated and its activity as a function of the number of layers, pH, and time has been evaluated. This configuration enables a sensing system where a transducer element is physically separated from the analyte solution of interest and is thereby free from fouling effects typically associated with biochemical reactions occuring on the sensor surface. The performance of this biosensing system is demonstrated by detection of 1-200 mM urea in phosphate buffer via a flow injection analysis (FIA) technique. Miniaturized fluidic systems were used to provide continuous flow through a reaction column. Under this configuration the biosensor has an ultimate resolution of less than 1 mM urea and showed a linear response between 0-50 mM. This work demonstrates a sensing modality in which the sensor itself is not fouled or contaminated by the solution of interest and the enzyme immobilized Kapton® fluidic reaction column can be used as a disposable cartridge. Such a system enables reuse and reliability for long term sampling measurements. Based on this concept a biosensing system is envisioned which can perform rapid measurements to detect biomarkers such as glucose, creatinine, cholesterol, urea and lactate in urine and blood continuously over extended periods of time. PMID:26479269

  12. 40 CFR 721.9892 - Alkylated urea.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Alkylated urea. 721.9892 Section 721... Alkylated urea. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as an alkylated urea (PMN P-93-1649) is subject to reporting under...

  13. 40 CFR 721.9892 - Alkylated urea.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Alkylated urea. 721.9892 Section 721... Alkylated urea. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as an alkylated urea (PMN P-93-1649) is subject to reporting under...

  14. 21 CFR 184.1923 - Urea.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Urea. 184.1923 Section 184.1923 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DIRECT FOOD....1923 Urea. (a) Urea (CO(NH2)2, CAS Reg. No. 57-13-6) is the diamide of carbonic acid and is also...

  15. 40 CFR 721.9892 - Alkylated urea.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Alkylated urea. 721.9892 Section 721... Alkylated urea. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as an alkylated urea (PMN P-93-1649) is subject to reporting under...

  16. 40 CFR 721.9892 - Alkylated urea.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Alkylated urea. 721.9892 Section 721... Alkylated urea. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as an alkylated urea (PMN P-93-1649) is subject to reporting under...

  17. 40 CFR 721.9892 - Alkylated urea.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Alkylated urea. 721.9892 Section 721... Alkylated urea. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as an alkylated urea (PMN P-93-1649) is subject to reporting under...

  18. Uric acid in metabolic syndrome: From an innocent bystander to a central player

    PubMed Central

    Kanbay, Mehmet; Jensen, Thomas; Solak, Yalcin; Le, Myphuong; Roncal-Jimenez, Carlos; Rivard, Chris; Lanaspa, Miguel A.; Nakagawa, Takahiko; Johnson, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    Uric acid, once viewed as an inert metabolic end-product of purine metabolism, has been recently incriminated in a number of chronic disease states, including hypertension, metabolic syndrome, diabetes, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, and chronic kidney disease. Several experimental and clinical studies support a role for uric acid as a contributory causal factor in these conditions. Here we discuss some of the major mechanisms linking uric acid to metabolic and cardiovascular diseases. At this time the key to understanding the importance of uric acid in these diseases will be the conduct of large clinical trials in which the effect of lowering uric acid on hard clinical outcomes is assessed. Elevated uric acid may turn out to be one of the more important remediable risk factors for metabolic and cardiovascular diseases. PMID:26703429

  19. Detection of urinary creatinine using gold nanoparticles after solid phase extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sittiwong, Jarinya; Unob, Fuangfa

    2015-03-01

    Label-free gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) were utilized in the detection of creatinine in human urine after a sample preparation by extraction of creatinine on sulfonic acid functionalized silica gel. With the proposed sample preparation method, the interfering effects of the urine matrix on creatinine detection by AuNPs were eliminated. Parameters affecting creatinine extraction were investigated. The aggregation of AuNPs induced by creatinine resulted in a change in the surface plasmon resonance signal with a concomitant color change that could be observed by the naked eye and quantified spectrometrically. The effect of AuNP concentration and reaction time on AuNP aggregation was investigated. The method described herein provides a determination of creatinine in a range of 15-40 mg L-1 with a detection limit of 13.7 mg L-1 and it was successfully used in the detection of creatinine in human urine samples.

  20. Uric Acid and Coronary Artery Disease, Two Sides of a Single Coin: A Determinant of Antioxidant System or a Factor in Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Bagheri, Babak; Zargari, Mehryar; Meshkini, Fatemeh; Dinarvand, Kolsoum; Mokhberi, Vahid; Azizi, Soheil

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Uric acid has antioxidant activity and it is expected to protect against coronary artery disease (CAD). Contradictory, it is a component of metabolic syndrome and so a risk factor for CAD. The associations of plasma total antioxidant capacity (TAOC) and uric acid (UA) as well as other risk factors were investigated relative to the occurrence and severity of CAD. Materials and Methods The study population consisted of 148 males and 152 females aged 35-76 years who were classified as CAD cases and controls according to the results of coronary angiography. The severity of CAD was scored on the basis of the number and the extent of lesions at coronary arteries. The concentrations of UA and TAOC were measured by using of FRAP and enzymatic uricase methods. Results The prevalence of hypertension, cigarette smoking and diabetes mellitus was more frequent in CAD cases than controls. Patients with CAD when compared with the controls had increased levels of glucose, triglycerides, creatinine, UA, TAOC and decreased levels of HDL- cholesterol. Serum UA was high positive correlate of serum total and LDL-cholesterol, triglyceride, creatinine, BUN, bilirubin, TAOC and negative correlate of glucose and HDL-C. TAOC and its major determinant UA but not bilirubin and albumin are significantly associated with the prevalence and severity of CAD. In multivariate analysis and in the absence of hypertension, UA but not TAOC would remain and be associated with CAD by the OR of 1.57 (1.07-2.29), p=0.02. If the results adjusted for all major risk factors including hypertension, neither TAOC nor UA would remain in the regression equation. Conclusion The results suggest that TAOC and UA but not bilirubin and albumin are associated with CAD significantly. But, the correlation is not independent and is attributed to the metabolic syndrome. The measurement of UA and TAOC will not improve the prognostic power beyond the classical risk factors. PMID:27042498

  1. Altered Nitrogen Balance and Decreased Urea Excretion in Male Rats Fed Cafeteria Diet Are Related to Arginine Availability

    PubMed Central

    Sabater, David; Arriarán, Sofía; Fernández-López, José-Antonio; Romero, María del Mar; Remesar, Xavier

    2014-01-01

    Hyperlipidic diets limit glucose oxidation and favor amino acid preservation, hampering the elimination of excess dietary nitrogen and the catabolic utilization of amino acids. We analyzed whether reduced urea excretion was a consequence of higher NOx; (nitrite, nitrate, and other derivatives) availability caused by increased nitric oxide production in metabolic syndrome. Rats fed a cafeteria diet for 30 days had a higher intake and accumulation of amino acid nitrogen and lower urea excretion. There were no differences in plasma nitrate or nitrite. NOx and creatinine excretion accounted for only a small part of total nitrogen excretion. Rats fed a cafeteria diet had higher plasma levels of glutamine, serine, threonine, glycine, and ornithine when compared with controls, whereas arginine was lower. Liver carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase I activity was higher in cafeteria diet-fed rats, but arginase I was lower. The high carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase activity and ornithine levels suggest activation of the urea cycle in cafeteria diet-fed rats, but low arginine levels point to a block in the urea cycle between ornithine and arginine, thereby preventing the elimination of excess nitrogen as urea. The ultimate consequence of this paradoxical block in the urea cycle seems to be the limitation of arginine production and/or availability. PMID:24707502

  2. Impulsivity is Associated with Uric Acid: Evidence from Humans and Mice

    PubMed Central

    Sutin, Angelina R.; Cutler, Roy G.; Camandola, Simonetta; Uda, Manuela; Feldman, Neil H.; Cucca, Francesco; Zonderman, Alan B.; Mattson, Mark P.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Schlessinger, David; Terracciano, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Background The ability to control impulses varies greatly, and difficulty with impulse control can have severe consequences; in the extreme, it is the defining feature of many psychiatric disorders. Evidence from disparate lines of research suggests that uric acid is elevated in psychiatric disorders characterized by high impulsivity, such as ADHD and bipolar disorder. The present research tests the hypothesis that impulsivity is associated with higher uric acid in humans and mice. Methods Using two longitudinal, non-clinical community samples (total N=6883), we test whether there is an association between uric acid and normal variation in trait impulsivity measured with the Revised NEO Personality Inventory. We also examined the effect of uric acid on behavior by comparing wild-type mice (WT), which naturally have low levels of uric acid, to mice genetically modified (UOX) to accumulate high levels of uric acid. Results In both human samples, the emotional aspects of trait impulsivity, specifically Impulsiveness and Excitement-Seeking, were associated with higher levels of uric acid concurrently and when uric acid was measured 3–5 years later. Consistent with the human data, the UOX mice displayed significantly more exploratory and novelty-seeking behavior than the WT mice. Conclusion Higher uric acid was associated with impulsivity in both humans and mice. The identification of biological markers of impulsivity may lead to a better understanding of the physiological mechanisms involved in impulsivity, and may suggest potential targets for therapeutic intervention. PMID:23582268

  3. Serum uric acid may not be involved in the development of preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    Chen, Q; Lau, S; Tong, M; Wei, J; Shen, F; Zhao, J; Zhao, M

    2016-02-01

    Higher serum levels of uric acid are associated with preeclampsia and may signal an early change in preeclampsia. However there is less evidence suggesting there is a meaningful association between uric acid and the development of preeclampsia. A total of 877 women with preeclampsia at presentation and 580 normotensive pregnancies were retrospectively recruited from January 2009 to May 2014. In addition, 5556 pregnant women were also prospectively recruited from September 2012 to December 2013. Retrospective serum levels of uric acid were obtained from women with preeclampsia at the time of presentation (n=877), and serum levels of uric acid in the first, second and third trimester were prospectively collected in women who later developed preeclampsia (n=78), as well as those who did not (n=5478). The serum levels of uric acid were significantly increased in women with preeclampsia at presentation from retrospective samples and this increase correlated with the time of onset and the severity of preeclampsia. However, in prospective samples, serum levels of uric acid were not increased in the first and second trimesters in women who later developed preeclampsia compared with those who did not. The serum level of uric acid in the first and second trimesters in women who developed preeclampsia was not different. Our results demonstrate that the serum levels of uric acid were only increased after the presentation of clinical symptoms of preeclampsia. Therefore, it is likely that uric acid is not involved in the development of preeclampsia and cannot be an early prediction biomarker of this disease. PMID:25994995

  4. Two-stage magnetic orientation of uric acid crystals as gout initiators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeuchi, Y.; Miyashita, Y.; Mizukawa, Y.; Iwasaka, M.

    2014-01-01

    The present study focuses on the magnetic behavior of uric acid crystals, which are responsible for gout. Under a sub-Tesla (T)-level magnetic field, rotational motion of the crystals, which were caused by diamagnetic torque, was observed. We used horizontal magnetic fields with a maximum magnitude of 500 mT generated by an electromagnet to observe the magnetic orientation of the uric acid microcrystals by a microscope. The uric acid crystals showed a perpendicular magnetic field orientation with a minimum threshold of 130 mT. We speculate that the distinct diamagnetic anisotropy in the uric acid crystals resulted in their rotational responses.

  5. Measurement of glomerular filtration rate in homozygous sickle cell disease: a comparison of 51Cr-EDTA clearance, creatinine clearance, serum creatinine and beta 2 microglobulin.

    PubMed Central

    Aparicio, S A; Mojiminiyi, S; Kay, J D; Shepstone, B J; de Ceulaer, K; Serjeant, G R

    1990-01-01

    Glomerular filtration rates (GFR) were measured with 51Cr-EDTA in 38 patients (aged 40-75 years) with homozygous sickle cell disease and compared with serum beta 2 microglobulin concentrations in 38 patients and with creatinine clearance in 21 patients. GFR estimated with 51Cr-EDTA was closely correlated with single serum creatinine measurements and the inverse of serum beta 2 microglobulin. Creatinine clearance was also found to be correlated, but values were, on average, 32% below those obtained by the 51Cr-EDTA method, and this difference was significant. It is concluded that measurements of beta 2 microglobulin, single serum creatinine, and creatinine clearance are valuable indicators of GFR in homozygous sickle cell disease. Measurement of beta 2 microglobulin was a useful and reliable method of estimating GFR from single plasma measurements and is therefore a useful means of screening the population. PMID:2115049

  6. Urea biosensor for hemodialysis monitoring

    DOEpatents

    Glass, R.S.

    1999-01-12

    This research discloses an electrochemical sensor capable of detecting and quantifying urea in fluids resulting from hemodialysis procedures. The sensor is based upon measurement of the pH change produced in an aqueous environment by the products of the enzyme-catalyzed hydrolysis of urea. The sensor may be fabricated using methods amenable to mass fabrication, resulting in low-cost sensors and thus providing the potential for disposable use. In a typical application, the sensor could be used in treatment centers, in conjunction with an appropriate electronics/computer system, in order to determine the hemodialysis endpoint. The sensor can also be utilized to allow at-home testing to determine if dialysis was necessary. Such a home monitor is similar, in principle, to devices used for blood glucose testing by diabetics, and would require a blood droplet sample by using a finger prick. 9 figs.

  7. Urea biosensor for hemodialysis monitoring

    DOEpatents

    Glass, Robert S.

    1999-01-01

    An electrochemical sensor capable of detecting and quantifying urea in fluids resulting from hemodialysis procedures. The sensor is based upon measurement of the pH change produced in an aqueous environment by the products of the enzyme-catalyzed hydrolysis of urea. The sensor may be fabricated using methods amenable to mass fabrication, resulting in low-cost sensors and thus providing the potential for disposable use. In a typical application, the sensor could be used in treatment centers, in conjunction with an appropriate electronics/computer system, in order to determine the hemodialysis endpoint. The sensor can also be utilized to allow at-home testing to determine if dialysis was necessary. Such a home monitor is similar, in principle, to devices used for blood glucose testing by diabetics, and would require a blood droplet sample by using a finger prick.

  8. Effects of varying ruminally undegradable protein supplementation on forage digestion, nitrogen metabolism, and urea kinetics in Nellore cattle fed low-quality tropical forage.

    PubMed

    Batista, E D; Detmann, E; Titgemeyer, E C; Valadares Filho, S C; Valadares, R F D; Prates, L L; Rennó, L N; Paulino, M F

    2016-01-01

    Effects of supplemental RDP and RUP on nutrient digestion, N metabolism, urea kinetics, and muscle protein degradation were evaluated in Nellore heifers () consuming low-quality signal grass hay (5% CP and 80% NDF, DM basis). Five ruminally and abomasally cannulated Nellore heifers (248 ± 9 kg) were used in a 5 × 5 Latin square. Treatments were the control (no supplement) and RDP supplementation to meet 100% of the RDP requirement plus RUP provision to supply 0, 50, 100, or 150% of the RUP requirement. Supplemental RDP (casein plus NPN) was ruminally dosed twice daily, and RUP supply (casein) was continuously infused abomasally. Jugular infusion of [NN]-urea with measurement of enrichment in urine was used to evaluate urea kinetics. The ratio of urinary 3-methylhistidine to creatinine was used to estimate skeletal muscle protein degradation. Forage NDF intake (2.48 kg/d) was not affected ( ≥ 0.37) by supplementation, but supplementation did increase ruminal NDF digestion ( < 0.01). Total N intake (by design) and N retention increased ( < 0.001) with supplementation and also linearly increased with RUP provision. Urea entry rate and gastrointestinal entry rate of urea were increased by supplementation ( < 0.001). Supplementation with RUP linearly increased ( = 0.02) urea entry rate and tended ( = 0.07) to linearly increase gastrointestinal entry rate of urea. Urea use for anabolic purposes tended ( = 0.07) to be increased by supplementation, and RUP provision also tended ( = 0.08) to linearly increase the amount of urea used for anabolism. The fraction of recycled urea N incorporated into microbial N was greater ( < 0.001) for control (22%) than for supplemented (9%) heifers. Urinary 3-methylhistidine:creatinine of control heifers was more than double that of supplemented heifers ( < 0.001). Control heifers reabsorbed a greater ( < 0.001) fraction of urea from the renal tubule than did supplemented heifers. Overall, unsupplemented heifers had greater

  9. High serum creatinine nonlinearity: a renal vital sign?

    PubMed

    Palant, Carlos E; Chawla, Lakhmir S; Faselis, Charles; Li, Ping; Pallone, Thomas L; Kimmel, Paul L; Amdur, Richard L

    2016-08-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) may have nonlinear serum creatinine concentration (SC) trajectories, especially as CKD progresses. Variability in SC is associated with renal failure and death. However, present methods for measuring SC variability are unsatisfactory because they blend information about SC slope and variance. We propose an improved method for defining and calculating a patient's SC slope and variance so that they are mathematically distinct, and we test these methods in a large sample of US veterans, examining the correlation of SC slope and SC nonlinearity (SCNL) and the association of SCNL with time to stage 4 CKD (CKD4) and death. We found a strong correlation between SCNL and rate of CKD progression, time to CKD4, and time to death, even in patients with normal renal function. We therefore argue that SCNL may be a measure of renal autoregulatory dysfunction that provides an early warning sign for CKD progression. PMID:27194712

  10. Potential mechanisms for low uric acid in Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Sampat, Radhika; Young, Sarah; Rosen, Ami; Bernhard, Douglas; Millington, David; Factor, Stewart; Jinnah, H A

    2016-04-01

    Several epidemiologic studies have described an association between low serum uric acid (UA) and Parkinson disease (PD). Uric acid is a known antioxidant, and one proposed mechanism of neurodegeneration in PD is oxidative damage of dopamine neurons. However, other complex metabolic pathways may contribute. The purpose of this study is to elucidate potential mechanisms of low serum UA in PD. Subjects who met diagnostic criteria for definite or probable PD (n = 20) and controls (n = 20) aged 55-80 years were recruited. Twenty-four hour urine samples were collected from all participants, and both uric acid and allantoin were measured and corrected for body mass index (BMI). Urinary metabolites were compared using a twoway ANOVA with diagnosis and sex as the explanatory variables. There were no significant differences between PD and controls for total UA (p = 0.60), UA corrected for BMI (p = 0.37), or in the interaction of diagnosis and sex on UA (p = 0.24). Similarly, there were no significant differences between PD and controls for allantoin (p = 0.47), allantoin corrected for BMI (p = 0.57), or in the interaction of diagnosis and sex on allantoin (p = 0.78). Allantoin/UA ratios also did not significantly differ by diagnosis (p = 0.99). Our results imply that low serum UA in PD may be due to an intrinsic mechanism that alters the homeostatic set point for serum UA in PD, and may contribute to relatively lower protection against oxidative damage. These findings provide indirect support for neuroprotection trials aimed at raising serum UA. PMID:26747026

  11. Rare mutations associating with serum creatinine and chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Sveinbjornsson, Gardar; Mikaelsdottir, Evgenia; Palsson, Runolfur; Indridason, Olafur S; Holm, Hilma; Jonasdottir, Aslaug; Helgason, Agnar; Sigurdsson, Snaevar; Jonasdottir, Adalbjorg; Sigurdsson, Asgeir; Eyjolfsson, Gudmundur Ingi; Sigurdardottir, Olof; Magnusson, Olafur Th; Kong, Augustine; Masson, Gisli; Sulem, Patrick; Olafsson, Isleifur; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Gudbjartsson, Daniel F; Stefansson, Kari

    2014-12-20

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a complex disorder with a strong genetic component. A number of common sequence variants have been found to associate with serum creatinine (SCr), estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and/or CKD. We imputed 24 million single-nucleotide polymorphisms and insertions/deletions identified by whole-genome sequencing of 2230 Icelanders into 81 656 chip-typed individuals and 112 630 relatives of genotyped individuals over the age of 18 with SCr measurements. The large set of sequenced individuals allowed accurate imputation of variants to a minor allele frequency (MAF) of 0.1%. We tested the imputed variants for association with SCr. In addition to replicating established loci, we discovered missense and loss-of-function variants associating with SCr in three solute carriers (SLC6A19, SLC25A45 and SLC47A1) and two E3 ubiquitin ligases (RNF186 and RNF128). All the variants are within coding sequences and all but one are rare (MAF <2%) with SCr effects between 0.085 and 0.129 standard deviations. These rare variants have a larger effect on SCr than previously reported common variants, explaining 0.5% of the variability of SCr in Icelanders in addition to the 1% already accounted for. We tested the five variants associating with SCr for association with CKD in an Icelandic sample of 15 594 cases and 291 428 controls. Three of the variants also associated with CKD. These variants may either affect kidney function or creatinine synthesis and excretion. Of note were four mutations in SLC6A19 that associate with reduced SCr, three of which have been shown to cause Hartnup disease. PMID:25082825

  12. Metabolism of urea by Chlorella vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Hodson, R C; Thompson, J F

    1969-05-01

    Urea metabolism was studied with nitrogen-starved cells of Chlorella vulgaris Beijerinck var. viridis (Chodat), a green alga which apparently lacks urease. Incorporation of radioactivity from urea-(14)C into the alcohol-soluble fraction was virtually eliminated in cell suspensions flushed with 10% CO(2) in air. This same result was obtained when expected acceptors of urea carbon were replenished by adding ornithine and glucose with the urea. Several carbamyl compounds, which might be early products of urea metabolism and a source of the (14)CO(2), were not appreciably labeled. If cells were treated with cyanide at a concentration which inhibited ammonia uptake completely and urea uptake only slightly, more than half of the urea nitrogen taken up was found in the medium as ammonia. Cells under nitrogen gas in the dark were unable to take up urea or ammonia, but the normal rate of uptake was resumed in light. Since 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea did not selectively inhibit this uptake, an active respiration supported by light-dependent oxygen evolution in these cells was ruled out. A tentative scheme for urea metabolism is proposed to consist of an initial energy-dependent splitting of urea into carbon dioxide and ammonia. This reaction in Chlorella is thought to differ from a typical urease-catalyzed reaction by the apparent requirement of a high energy compound, possibly adenosine triphosphate. PMID:5783973

  13. Nitrogen balance studies and Kt/V urea in children undergoing chronic peritoneal dialysis.

    PubMed

    Cano, Francisco J; Azocar, Marta A; Delucchi, Maria A; Rodriguez, Eugenio E; Marin, Verónica S; Diaz, Erick D; Mazuel, Nelly

    2004-01-01

    Currently, urea kinetic modeling has been accepted for the routine evaluation of peritoneal dialysis (PD) through the calculation of Kt/V (normalized whole body urea clearance) and nPNA (normalized protein equivalent of total nitrogen appearance). In pediatric dialysis, the exact meaning of and target values for, those parameters is still under debate. We evaluated the mean values and correlations between Kt/V urea and parameters of nutrition. During a 12-month period, we prospectively performed 186 nitrogen balance studies in pediatric patients on chronic PD. We also assessed daily protein intake (DPI) by nutritional evaluation. Protein, albumin, urea, and creatinine were analyzed in dialysate and urine, collected once monthly. Dialysis adequacy was evaluated using monthly measurements of Kt/V urea and creatinine clearance (CCr) in urine and dialysate. All statistical comparisons were performed using the paired t-test. Two-way analysis of variance for repeated measures was used to calculate correlations. A p value less than 0.05 was considered significant. We studied 20 patients (15 boys, 5 girls) of mean age 5.1 +/- 4.7 years (range: 3 months - 14.8 years). Mean DPI in these patients was 3.52 +/- 1.1 g/kg/day. Weekly total Kt/V urea was 3.41 +/- 1.35, and residual Kt/V urea was 1.69 +/- 1.46. Weekly total and residual CCr were 72.4 +/- 70 L and 45 +/- 44 L respectively. Mean protein catabolic rate (PCR) was 0.84 +/- 0.33 g/ kg/day, showing a net nitrogen balance (NB = DPI - PCR) of +1.37 +/- 0.4 g/kg/day. The mean nPNA was 1.38 +/- 0.40 g/kg/day, with positive correlations with DPI, PCR, and total Kt/V (p < 0.001). Total Kt/V showed significant positive correlations with PCR (p < 0.001) and nPNA (p < 0.001), but not with NB (p = 0.23) and DPI (p = 0.21). A negative correlation was found between all urea kinetic parameters and plasma bicarbonate (p < 0.001). The values of Kt/V urea and nPNA in our patients were higher than those recommended in the adult literature

  14. Uric acid secretion from adipose tissue and its increase in obesity.

    PubMed

    Tsushima, Yu; Nishizawa, Hitoshi; Tochino, Yoshihiro; Nakatsuji, Hideaki; Sekimoto, Ryohei; Nagao, Hirofumi; Shirakura, Takashi; Kato, Kenta; Imaizumi, Keiichiro; Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Tamura, Mizuho; Maeda, Norikazu; Funahashi, Tohru; Shimomura, Iichiro

    2013-09-20

    Obesity is often accompanied by hyperuricemia. However, purine metabolism in various tissues, especially regarding uric acid production, has not been fully elucidated. Here we report, using mouse models, that adipose tissue could produce and secrete uric acid through xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR) and that the production was enhanced in obesity. Plasma uric acid was elevated in obese mice and attenuated by administration of the XOR inhibitor febuxostat. Adipose tissue was one of major organs that had abundant expression and activities of XOR, and adipose tissues in obese mice had higher XOR activities than those in control mice. 3T3-L1 and mouse primary mature adipocytes produced and secreted uric acid into culture medium. The secretion was inhibited by febuxostat in a dose-dependent manner or by gene knockdown of XOR. Surgical ischemia in adipose tissue increased local uric acid production and secretion via XOR, with a subsequent increase in circulating uric acid levels. Uric acid secretion from whole adipose tissue was increased in obese mice, and uric acid secretion from 3T3-L1 adipocytes was increased under hypoxia. Our results suggest that purine catabolism in adipose tissue could be enhanced in obesity. PMID:23913681

  15. Wearable salivary uric acid mouthguard biosensor with integrated wireless electronics.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jayoung; Imani, Somayeh; de Araujo, William R; Warchall, Julian; Valdés-Ramírez, Gabriela; Paixão, Thiago R L C; Mercier, Patrick P; Wang, Joseph

    2015-12-15

    This article demonstrates an instrumented mouthguard capable of non-invasively monitoring salivary uric acid (SUA) levels. The enzyme (uricase)-modified screen printed electrode system has been integrated onto a mouthguard platform along with anatomically-miniaturized instrumentation electronics featuring a potentiostat, microcontroller, and a Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) transceiver. Unlike RFID-based biosensing systems, which require large proximal power sources, the developed platform enables real-time wireless transmission of the sensed information to standard smartphones, laptops, and other consumer electronics for on-demand processing, diagnostics, or storage. The mouthguard biosensor system offers high sensitivity, selectivity, and stability towards uric acid detection in human saliva, covering the concentration ranges for both healthy people and hyperuricemia patients. The new wireless mouthguard biosensor system is able to monitor SUA level in real-time and continuous fashion, and can be readily expanded to an array of sensors for different analytes to enable an attractive wearable monitoring system for diverse health and fitness applications. PMID:26276541

  16. Wearable salivary uric acid mouthguard biosensor with integrated wireless electronics

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jayoung; Imani, Somayeh; de Araujo, William R.; Warchall, Julian; Valdés-Ramírez, Gabriela; Paixão, Thiago R.L.C.; Mercier, Patrick P.; Wang, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    This article demonstrates an instrumented mouthguard capable of non-invasively monitoring salivary uric acid (SUA) levels. The enzyme (uricase)-modified screen printed electrode system has been integrated onto a mouthguard platform along with anatomically-miniaturized instrumentation electronics featuring a potentiostat, microcontroller, and a Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) transceiver. Unlike RFID-based biosensing systems, which require large proximal power sources, the developed platform enables real-time wireless transmission of the sensed information to standard smartphones, laptops, and other consumer electronics for on-demand processing, diagnostics, or storage. The mouthguard biosensor system offers high sensitivity, selectivity, and stability towards uric acid detection in human saliva, covering the concentration ranges for both healthy people and hyperuricemia patients. The new wireless mouthguard biosensor system is able to monitor SUA level in real-time and continuous fashion, and can be readily expanded to an array of sensors for different analytes to enable an attractive wearable monitoring system for diverse health and fitness applications. PMID:26276541

  17. Effect of nitrogen intake on nitrogen recycling and urea transporter abundance in lambs.

    PubMed

    Marini, J C; Klein, J D; Sands, J M; Van Amburgh, M E

    2004-04-01

    Urea recycling in ruminants has been studied extensively in the past, but the mechanisms regulating the amount of urea recycled or excreted remain obscure. To elucidate the role of urea transporters (UT) in N recycling, nine Dorset-Finn ewe lambs (20.8 +/- 0.8 kg) were fed diets containing 15.5, 28.4, and 41.3 g of N/kg of DM for 25 d. Nitrogen balance and urea N kinetics were measured during the last 3 d of the period. Animals were then slaughtered and mucosa samples from the rumen, duodenum, ileum, and cecum, as well as kidney medulla and liver, were collected. Increasing N intake tended to increase N balance quadratically (1.5, 5.1, and 4.4 +/- 0.86 g of N/d, P < 0.09), and linearly increased urinary N excretion (2.4, 10, and 16.5 +/- 0.86 g N/d, P < 0.001) and plasma urea N concentration (4.3, 20.3, and 28.4 +/- 2.62 mg of urea N/dL, P < 0.001), but did not affect fecal N excretion (5.0 +/- 0.5 g of N/d; P < 0.94). Urea N production (2.4, 11.8, and 19.2 +/- 0.83 g of N/d; P < 0.001) and urinary urea N excretion (0.7, 7.0, and 13.4 +/- 0.73 g N/d; P < 0.001) increased linearly with N intake, as well as with the urea N recycled to the gastrointestinal tract (1.8, 4.8, and 5.8 +/- 0.40 g of N/d, P < 0.001). No changes due to N intake were observed for creatinine excretion (518 +/- 82.4 mg/d; P < 0.69) and clearance (46 +/- 10.7 mL/min; P < 0.56), but urea N clearance increased linearly with N intake (14.9, 24.4, and 34.9 +/- 5.9 mL/min; P < 0.04). Urea N reabsorption by the kidney tended to decrease (66.3, 38.5, 29.1 +/- 12.6%; P < 0.06) with increasing N content of the diet. Increasing the level of N intake increased linearly the weight of the liver as a proportion of BW (1.73, 1.88, and 2.22 +/- 0.15%, P < 0.03) but only tended to increase the weight of the kidneys (0.36, 0.37, and 0.50 +/- 0.05%, P < 0.08). Urea transporter B was present in all the tissues analyzed, but UT-A was detected only in kidney medulla, liver, and duodenum. Among animals on the three

  18. Reduced Production of Creatinine Limits Its Use as Marker of Kidney Injury in Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Doi, Kent; Yuen, Peter S.T.; Eisner, Christoph; Hu, Xuzhen; Leelahavanichkul, Asada; Schnermann, Jürgen; Star, Robert A.

    2009-01-01

    Although diagnosis and staging of acute kidney injury uses serum creatinine, acute changes in creatinine lag behind both renal injury and recovery. The risk for mortality increases when acute kidney injury accompanies sepsis; therefore, we sought to explore the limitations of serum creatinine in this setting. In mice, induction of sepsis by cecal ligation and puncture in bilaterally nephrectomized mice increased markers of nonrenal organ injury and serum TNF-α. Serum creatinine, however, was significantly lower in septic animals than in animals subjected to bilateral nephrectomy and sham cecal ligation and puncture. Under these conditions treatment with chloroquine decreased nonrenal organ injury markers but paradoxically increased serum creatinine. Sepsis dramatically decreased production of creatinine in nephrectomized mice, without changes in body weight, hematocrit, or extracellular fluid volume. In conclusion, sepsis reduces production of creatinine, which blunts the increase in serum creatinine after sepsis, potentially limiting the early detection of acute kidney injury. This may partially explain why small absolute increases in serum creatinine levels are associated with poor clinical outcomes. These data support the need for new biomarkers that provide better measures of renal injury, especially in patients with sepsis. PMID:19389851

  19. 21 CFR 184.1923 - Urea.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Urea. 184.1923 Section 184.1923 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1923 Urea. (a) Urea (CO(NH2)2, CAS Reg. No. 57-13-6) is the diamide...

  20. 21 CFR 184.1923 - Urea.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Urea. 184.1923 Section 184.1923 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1923 Urea. (a) Urea (CO(NH2)2, CAS Reg. No. 57-13-6) is the diamide...

  1. 21 CFR 184.1923 - Urea.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Urea. 184.1923 Section 184.1923 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1923 Urea. (a) Urea (CO(NH2)2, CAS Reg. No. 57-13-6) is the diamide...

  2. Luteolin prevents uric acid-induced pancreatic β-cell dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Ying; Shi, Xuhui; Shuai, Xuanyu; Xu, Yuemei; Liu, Yun; Liang, Xiubin; Wei, Dong; Su, Dongming

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Elevated uric acid causes direct injury to pancreatic β-cells. In this study, we examined the effects of luteolin, an important antioxidant, on uric acid-induced β-cell dysfunction. We first evaluated the effect of luteolin on nitric oxide (NO) formation in uric acid-stimulated Min6 cells using the Griess method. Next, we performed transient transfection and reporter assays to measure transcriptional activity of nuclear factor (NF)-κB. Western blotting assays were also performed to assess the effect of luteolin on the expression of MafA and inducible NO synthase (iNOS) in uric acid-treated cells. Finally, we evaluated the effect of luteolin on uric acid-induced inhibition of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) in Min6 cells and freshly isolated mouse pancreatic islets. We found that luteolin significantly inhibited uric acid-induced NO production, which was well correlated with reduced expression of iNOS mRNA and protein. Furthermore, decreased activity of NF-κB was implicated in inhibition by luteolin of increased iNOS expression induced by uric acid. Besides, luteolin significantly increased MafA expression in Min6 cells exposed to uric acid, which was reversed by overexpression of iNOS. Moreover, luteolin prevented uric acid-induced inhibition of GSIS in both Min6 cells and mouse islets. In conclusion, luteolin protects pancreatic β-cells from uric acid-induced dysfunction and may confer benefit on the protection of pancreatic β-cells in hyperuricemia-associated diabetes. PMID:25050113

  3. A comparison of definitions of contrast-induced nephropathy in patients with normal serum creatinine.

    PubMed

    Khatami, Mohammad Reza; Nikravan, Nasrin; Salari-Far, Mojtaba; Davoudi, Safieh; Pahlavan-Sabbagh, Mohammad Reza

    2016-01-01

    Contrast-induced nephropathy (CIN) is the third leading cause of acute kidney injury in hospitalized patients. The prevalence of CIN is reported to range from 0% to 50%, depending not only on patient condition and the procedure used but also the definition of CIN applied. We aimed to determine the best diagnostic indicator of CIN in patients with normal serum creatinine. This study included 206 patients with normal serum creatinine who underwent coronary angiography/angioplasty. Serum creatinine level and glomerular filtration rate (GFR) were measured before and on the second and fifth days after contrast administration. The incidence of CIN based on a 25% increase in serum creatinine was calculated and compared with the incidence based on a 25% decrease in GFR or an increase of at least 0.5 mg/dL in serum creatinine. Of 206 patients, 127 were male (61.7%) and 79 were female (38.3%); the mean age was 59.56±10.3 years. The prevalence of CIN was 30% based on a 25% increase in serum creatinine, 23% based on a 25% decrease in GFR (P<0.012) and 3.8% based on a serum creatinine increase of at least 0.5 mg/dL (P<0.0001). The serum creatinine levels remained within the normal range in the majority of patients with CIN based on the different definitions. In patients with normal serum creatinine, the absolute increase in serum creatinine may describe the prevalence of CIN more accurately than the relative increase in serum creatinine or relative decrease in GFR. PMID:26787573

  4. The Clearance of Creatinine, Inulin, Para-aminohippurate and Phenosulphothalein in the Cat

    PubMed Central

    Osbaldiston, G. W.; Fuhrman, W.

    1970-01-01

    Endogenous creatinine, inulin, para-amino-hippurate and phenolsulphothalein clearances for healthy cats are presented. The values for inulin and para-aminohippurate clearances (ml/kg/min) are similar to those for the dog. Creatinine clearance was less than inulin clearance values. Pnenolsulphothalein clearance may be a better index of glomerular rather than tubular function in the cat. PMID:4246836

  5. Automated urinalysis technique determines concentration of creatine and creatinine by colorimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rho, J. H.

    1967-01-01

    Continuous urinalysis technique is useful in the study of muscle wastage in primates. Creatinine concentration in urine is determined in an aliquot mixture by a color reaction. Creatine is determined in a second aliquot by converting it to creatinine and measuring the difference in color intensity between the two aliquots.

  6. The diurnal variation in urine acidification differs between normal individuals and uric acid stone formers

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, Mary Ann; Maalouf, Naim M.; Poindexter, John; Adams-Huet, Beverley; Sakhaee, Khashayar; Moe, Orson W.

    2012-01-01

    Many biologic functions follow circadian rhythms driven by internal and external cues that synchronize and coordinate organ physiology to diurnal changes in the environment and behavior. Urinary acid-base parameters follow diurnal patterns and it is thought these changes are due to periodic surges in gastric acid secretion. Abnormal urine pH is a risk factor for specific types of nephrolithiasis and uric acid stones are typical of excessively low urine pH. Here we placed 9 healthy volunteers and 10 uric acid stone formers on fixed metabolic diets to study the diurnal pattern of urinary acidification. All showed clear diurnal trends in urinary acidification but none of the patterns were affected by inhibitors of the gastric proton pump. Uric acid stone formers had similar patterns of change through the day but their urine pH was always lower compared to healthy volunteers. Uric acid stone formers excreted more acid (normalized to acid ingestion) with the excess excreted primarily as titratable acid rather than ammonium. Urine base excretion was also lower in uric acid stone formers (normalized to base ingestion) along with lower plasma bicarbonate concentrations during part of the day. Thus, increased net acid presentation to the kidney and the preferential use of buffers, other than ammonium, result in much higher concentrations of un-dissociated uric acid throughout the day and consequently an increased risk of uric acid stones. PMID:22297671

  7. Uric Acid Levels Can Predict Metabolic Syndrome and Hypertension in Adolescents: A 10-Year Longitudinal Study

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Hai-Lun; Pei, Dee; Lue, Ko-Huang; Chen, Yen-Lin

    2015-01-01

    The relationships between uric acid and chronic disease risk factors such as metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and hypertension have been studied in adults. However, whether these relationships exist in adolescents is unknown. We randomly selected 8,005 subjects who were between 10 to 15 years old at baseline. Measurements of uric acid were used to predict the future occurrence of metabolic syndrome, hypertension, and type 2 diabetes. In total, 5,748 adolescents were enrolled and followed for a median of 7.2 years. Using cutoff points of uric acid for males and females (7.3 and 6.2 mg/dl, respectively), a high level of uric acid was either the second or third best predictor for hypertension in both genders (hazard ratio: 2.920 for males, 5.222 for females; p<0.05). However, uric acid levels failed to predict type 2 diabetes mellitus, and only predicted metabolic syndrome in males (hazard ratio: 1.658; p<0.05). The same results were found in multivariate adjusted analysis. In conclusion, a high level of uric acid indicated a higher likelihood of developing hypertension in both genders and metabolic syndrome in males after 10 years of follow-up. However, uric acid levels did not affect the occurrence of type 2 diabetes in both genders. PMID:26618358

  8. Biological Activities of Uric Acid in Infection Due to Enteropathogenic and Shiga-Toxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Crane, John K; Broome, Jacqueline E; Lis, Agnieszka

    2016-04-01

    In previous work, we identified xanthine oxidase (XO) as an important enzyme in the interaction between the host and enteropathogenic Escherichia coli(EPEC) and Shiga-toxigenic E. coli(STEC). Many of the biological effects of XO were due to the hydrogen peroxide produced by the enzyme. We wondered, however, if uric acid generated by XO also had biological effects in the gastrointestinal tract. Uric acid triggered inflammatory responses in the gut, including increased submucosal edema and release of extracellular DNA from host cells. While uric acid alone was unable to trigger a chloride secretory response in intestinal monolayers, it did potentiate the secretory response to cyclic AMP agonists. Uric acid crystals were formed in vivo in the lumen of the gut in response to EPEC and STEC infections. While trying to visualize uric acid crystals formed during EPEC and STEC infections, we noticed that uric acid crystals became enmeshed in the neutrophilic extracellular traps (NETs) produced from host cells in response to bacteria in cultured cell systems and in the intestine in vivo Uric acid levels in the gut lumen increased in response to exogenous DNA, and these increases were enhanced by the actions of DNase I. Interestingly, addition of DNase I reduced the numbers of EPEC bacteria recovered after a 20-h infection and protected against EPEC-induced histologic damage. PMID:26787720

  9. Uric Acid Levels Can Predict Metabolic Syndrome and Hypertension in Adolescents: A 10-Year Longitudinal Study.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hai-Lun; Pei, Dee; Lue, Ko-Huang; Chen, Yen-Lin

    2015-01-01

    The relationships between uric acid and chronic disease risk factors such as metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and hypertension have been studied in adults. However, whether these relationships exist in adolescents is unknown. We randomly selected 8,005 subjects who were between 10 to 15 years old at baseline. Measurements of uric acid were used to predict the future occurrence of metabolic syndrome, hypertension, and type 2 diabetes. In total, 5,748 adolescents were enrolled and followed for a median of 7.2 years. Using cutoff points of uric acid for males and females (7.3 and 6.2 mg/dl, respectively), a high level of uric acid was either the second or third best predictor for hypertension in both genders (hazard ratio: 2.920 for males, 5.222 for females; p<0.05). However, uric acid levels failed to predict type 2 diabetes mellitus, and only predicted metabolic syndrome in males (hazard ratio: 1.658; p<0.05). The same results were found in multivariate adjusted analysis. In conclusion, a high level of uric acid indicated a higher likelihood of developing hypertension in both genders and metabolic syndrome in males after 10 years of follow-up. However, uric acid levels did not affect the occurrence of type 2 diabetes in both genders. PMID:26618358

  10. Extraction of urea and ammonium ion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anselmi, R. T.; Husted, R. R.; Schulz, J. R.

    1977-01-01

    Water purification system keeps urea and ammonium ion concentration below toxic limits in recirculated water of closed loop aquatic habitat. Urea is first converted to ammonium ions and carbon dioxide by enzygmatic action. Ammonium ions are removed by ion exchange. Bioburden is controlled by filtration through 0.45 micron millipore filters.

  11. 21 CFR 184.1923 - Urea.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Urea. 184.1923 Section 184.1923 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) DIRECT FOOD SUBSTANCES AFFIRMED AS GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1923 Urea....

  12. Urinary Creatinine Excretion, Bioelectrical Impedance Analysis, and Clinical Outcomes in Patients with CKD: The CRIC Study

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Dawei; Anderson, Amanda H.; Leonard, Mary B.; Reese, Peter P.; Delafontaine, Patrice; Horwitz, Edward; Kallem, Radhakrishna; Navaneethan, Sankar; Ojo, Akinlolu; Porter, Anna C.; Sondheimer, James H.; Sweeney, H. Lee; Townsend, Raymond R.; Feldman, Harold I.

    2014-01-01

    Background and objectives Previous studies in chronic disease states have demonstrated an association between lower urinary creatinine excretion (UCr) and increased mortality, a finding presumed to reflect the effect of low muscle mass on clinical outcomes. Little is known about the relationship between UCr and other measures of body composition in terms of the ability to predict outcomes of interest. Design, setting, participants, & measurements Using data from the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC), the relationship between UCr, fat free mass (FFM) as estimated by bioelectrical impedance analysis, and (in a subpopulation) whole-body dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry assessment of appendicular lean mass were characterized. The associations of UCr and FFM with mortality and ESRD were compared using Cox proportional hazards models. Results A total of 3604 CRIC participants (91% of the full CRIC cohort) with both a baseline UCr and FFM measurement were included; of these, 232 had contemporaneous dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry measurements. Participants were recruited between July 2003 and March 2007. UCr and FFM were modestly correlated (rho=0.50; P<0.001), while FFM and appendicular lean mass were highly correlated (rho=0.91; P<0.001). Higher urinary urea nitrogen, black race, younger age, and lower serum cystatin C level were all significantly associated with higher UCr. Over a median (interquartile range) of 4.2 (3.1–5.0) years of follow-up, 336 (9.3%) participants died and 510 (14.2%) reached ESRD. Lower UCr was associated with death and ESRD even after adjustment for FFM (adjusted hazard ratio for death per 1 SD higher level of UCr, 0.63 [95% confidence interval, 0.56 to 0.72]; adjusted hazard ratio for ESRD per 1 SD higher level of UCr, 0.70 [95% confidence interval, 0.63 to 0.75]). Conclusions Among a cohort of individuals with CKD, lower UCr is associated with death and ESRD independent of FFM as assessed by bioelectrical impedance analysis. PMID

  13. Raman spectroscopy-based creatinine measurement in urine samples from a multipatient population.

    PubMed

    McMurdy, John W; Berger, Andrew J

    2003-05-01

    Spectroscopic methods of urinalysis offer several advantages over chemical methods, including less sample contact and higher information content. In particular, urine creatinine has been the subject of several spectroscopic studies. We report the first use of Raman spectroscopy to measure creatinine concentrations in unaltered urine samples from a multipatient population. Using near-infrared excitation and a hybrid linear analysis calibration method, a root mean squared error of cross-validation (RMSECV) of 4.9 mg/dL was obtained. The error in the reference chemical method was 1.1 mg/dL. This result shows that the Raman spectroscopy can measure creatinine at clinical levels even in the presence of patient-to-patient variations. Because most assays in urine require creatinine concentration in order to correct for fluctuations in water content, measurement of creatinine is the first step towards more extensive Raman-based urinalysis. PMID:14658677

  14. Urea transport through composite polyallylamine membranes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ballou, E. V.; Kubo, L. Y.; Spitze, L. A.; Wydeven, T.; Clark, J. A.

    1977-01-01

    Polyallylamine composite reverse osmosis membranes were prepared by plasma polymerization and deposition onto small-pored cellulose acetate/cellulose nitrate films. The polyallylamine coated the porous substrate with a thin uniform polymer film which exhibited water permeability and urea rejection, of interest because of the potential application of reverse osmosis to urine purification in closed environmental systems. The flux of C-14 labeled urea was studied under the influence of osmotic gradients provided by sodium chloride solutions. The urea flux was found to be enhanced by an osmotic pressure gradient in the same direction and diminished, but not prevented, by an opposing osmotic pressure gradient. Consideration is given to the mechanism of the urea transport, as well as to the influence of concentration polarization on the experimental results. The minimization of coupled flow in pores of a critical size range is apparently necessary to improve urea rejection.

  15. Mechanisms Underpinning Increased Plasma Creatinine Levels in Patients Receiving Vemurafenib for Advanced Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Hurabielle, Charlotte; Pillebout, Evangéline; Stehlé, Thomas; Pagès, Cécile; Roux, Jennifer; Schneider, Pierre; Chevret, Sylvie; Chaffaut, Cendrine; Boutten, Anne; Mourah, Samia; Basset-Seguin, Nicole; Vidal-Petiot, Emmanuelle; Lebbé, Céleste; Flamant, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Context Serum creatinine has been reported to increase in patients receiving Vemurafenib, yet neither the prevalence nor the mechanism of this adverse event are known. Objective We aimed to evaluate the frequency and the mechanisms of increases in plasma creatinine level in patients receiving Vemurafenib for advanced melanoma. Methods We performed a retrospective monocentric study including consecutive patients treated with Vemurafenib for an advanced melanoma. We collected clinical and biological data concerning renal function before introduction of Vemurafenib and in the course of monthly follow-up visits from March 2013 to December 2014. Cystatin C-derived glomerular filtration rate was evaluated before and after Vemurafenib initiation, as increase in serum cystatin C is specific to a decrease in the glomerular filtration rate. We also performed thorough renal explorations in 3 patients, with measurement of tubular secretion of creatinine before and after Vemurafenib initiation and a renal biopsy in 2 patients. Results 70 patients were included: 97% of them displayed an immediate, and thereafter stable, increase in creatinine (+22.8%) after Vemurafenib initiation. In 44/52 patients in whom Vemurafenib was discontinued, creatinine levels returned to baseline. Serum cystatin C increased, although proportionally less than serum creatinine, showing that creatinine increase under vemurafenib was indeed partly due to a renal function impairment. In addition, renal explorations demonstrated that Vemurafenib induced an inhibition of creatinine tubular secretion. Conclusion Thus, Vemurafenib induces a dual mechanism of increase in plasma creatinine with both an inhibition of creatinine tubular secretion and slight renal function impairment. However, this side effect is mostly reversible when Vemurafenib is discontinued, and should not lead physicians to discontinue the treatment if it is effective. PMID:26930506

  16. Transport characteristics of urea transporter-B.

    PubMed

    Yang, Baoxue

    2014-01-01

    UT-B represents the major urea transporter in erythrocytes, in addition to being expressed in kidney descending vasa recta, brain, spleen, ureter, bladder, and testis. Expression of urea transporter UT-B confers high urea permeability to mammalian erythrocytes. Erythrocyte membranes are also permeable to various urea analogues, suggesting common transport pathways for urea and structurally similar solutes. UT-B is highly permeable to urea and the chemical analogues formamide, acetamide, methylurea, methylformamide, ammonium carbamate, and acrylamide, each with a Ps > 5.0 × 10(-6) cm/s at 10 °C. The amides formamide, acetamide, acrylamide, and butyramide efficiently diffuse across lipid bilayers. The urea analogues dimethylurea, acryalmide, methylurea, thiourea, and methylformamide inhibit UT-B-mediated urea transport by >60 % by a pore-blocking mechanism. UT-B is also a water channel in erythrocytes and has a single-channel water permeability that is similar to aquaporin-1. Whether UT-B is an NH3 channel still needs further study. Urea permeability (Purea) in erythrocytes differs between different mammals. Carnivores (dog, fox, cat) exhibit high Purea. In contrast, herbivores (cow, donkey, sheep) show much lower Purea. Erythrocyte Purea in human and pig (omnivores) was intermediate. Rodents and lagomorphs (mouse, rat, rabbit) have Purea intermediate between carnivores and omnivores. Birds that do not excrete urea and do not express UT-B in their erythrocytes have very low values. In contrast to Purea, water permeability is relatively similar in all mammals studied. This chapter will provide information about the transporter characteristics of UT-B. PMID:25298342

  17. Uric acid and coronary artery disease: An elusive link deserving further attention.

    PubMed

    Biscaglia, Simone; Ceconi, Claudio; Malagù, Michele; Pavasini, Rita; Ferrari, Roberto

    2016-06-15

    Uric acid is the final product of purine metabolism. Classically it is recognized as the cause of gouty arthritis and kidney stones. Western civilization has increased serum levels of uric acid which is no longer considered a benign plasma solute. It has been postulated and recently demonstrated that it can penetrate cell membrane and exerts damaging intracellular actions such as oxidation and inflammation. These observations have stimulated several epidemiological researches suggesting that hyperuricemia is linked or even provokes hypertension and coronary artery disease. In this review we summarize the current evidences regarding uric acid which contribute in the pathophysiology of coronary artery disease. PMID:26318389

  18. [Pitfalls in measuring urinary proteins: age-related changes in urinary creatinine excretion that affect the urine protein/creatinine ratio].

    PubMed

    Yuno, Tomoji; Hisada, Yukimasa; Nishimura, Yasuyuki

    2011-02-01

    Knowing the amount of protein excreted in the urine is important in determining the severity and activity of renal diseases. In general, screening tests have been carried out using the urine dipstick. However, there are limitations in determining the amount of urinary protein excretion using qualitative tests for protein in spot urine samples due to the concentration and dilution of urine. Therefore, when using spot urine samples, it is helpful to calculate the urine protein/creatinine ratio (P/C) by simultaneous measurement of urinary creatinine for determining daily protein excretion. We examined P/C measurements using the dipstick method in 22,718 subjects who visited our hospital for health examinations. The results showed positive rates for qualitative urinary protein (1 + and more) of 4.2% for males and 2.7% for females. Also positive rates for P/C (150 mg/g.cre and more) were found of 7.7% for males and 10.2% for females. The results showed a reversal of positive rates for males and females compared with the results of qualitative urinary protein. In addition, P/C showed a higher positive rate in 70 years old or older both for males and females. The distribution of urinary creatinine levels simultaneously measured by dipstick method showed that the percentage of diluted urine with urinary creatinine level less than 50 mg/dL was 6.8% for males and 18.3% for females overall. Females showed a higher rate and the percentage tended to increase with age both for males and females. From these results, it was suggested that changes in urinary creatinine excretion with age that affect the P/C ratio are large. We then measured the albumin excretion rate in the 24-hour urine as well as examined the correlation between the urinary creatinine concentration and albumin index with regard to age and sex in 1,280 diabetic patients. The results showed that daily urinary creatinine excretion overall in males, overall in females, in males over 80 years old and in females over

  19. LC-MS-MS Measurements of Urinary Creatinine and the Application of Creatinine Normalization Technique on Cotinine in Smokers' 24 Hour Urine

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Hongwei; Xiong, Wei; Zhang, Xiaotao; Song, Dongkui; Tang, Gangling; Hu, Qingyuan

    2012-01-01

    A simple and sensitive high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESI-MS-MS) method was developed and validated for the quantification of creatinine in human urine. The analysis was carried out on an Agilent Zorbax Eclipse XDB-C18 column (2.1 × 150 mm, 3.5 μm). The mobile phase was 0.1% formic acid in water and 0.1% formic acid in acetonitrile (50/50, v/v). Linear calibration curves were obtained in the concentration range of 1–2000.0 ng/mL, with a lower limit of quantification of 0.99 ng/mL. The intra- and interday precision (RSD) values were below 3%. The method was successfully applied to a bioequivalence study of creatinine in Chinese smokers and nonsmokers. The total cotinine in 24 h urine and cotinine : creatinine ratio were also positively associated (Pearson R = 0.942, P < 0.0001). However, cotinine : creatinine ratio varied significantly across smoking groups for the difference of individual. 24 h urinary cotinine was more appropriate for expressing correlation with tar than cotinine : creatinine ratio. PMID:23209947

  20. Urea Output by L3 Teladorsagia circumcincta and some Properties of Two Urea Producing Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Muhamad, N; Walker, LR; Simcock, DC; Pedley, KC; Simpson, HV; Brown, S

    2013-01-01

    Background Like several other parasites, Teladorsagia circumcincta secretes or excretes urea, but neither the rate of efflux nor the possible metabolic sources of the urea has been considered. Methods Parasites were maintained by passage through sheep. Urea efflux was measured using phenol/hypochlorite after treatment with urea aminohydrolase. The kinetics of creatine amidinohydrolase and arginine amidinohydrolase were characterised by coupling the reactions with urea aminohydrolase and glutamate dehydrogenase. Results Infective L3 T. circumcincta secreted or excreted urea at 25% of the rate of NH3/NH4 +. The rate of urea efflux was about 84 pmol h−1 (103 larvae)−1 over 4 hours, corresponding to about 11 nmol h−1 mg−1 protein. We could not detect urea aminohydrolase activity, but urea production by both creatine amidinohydrolase and arginine amidinohydrolase could be detected. The apparent K m and V max of creatine amidinohydrolase were 1.1 mM and 48 nmol h−1 mg−1 protein, respectively, and the activity was greatest at pH 8. The apparent K m and V max of arginine amidinohydrolase were 0.7 mM and 62 nmol h−1 mg−1 protein, respectively, and the activity was greatest at pH 7.9. Conclusion The activity of creatine amidinohydrolase and arginine amidinohydrolase was sufficient to account for the rate of urea secretion or excretion. PMID:23682271

  1. Concentration levels of urea in swimming pool water and reactivity of chlorine with urea.

    PubMed

    De Laat, Joseph; Feng, Wentao; Freyfer, Diab Adams; Dossier-Berne, Florence

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the reactivity of chlorine with urea which is the main nitrogen contaminant introduced into swimming pool water by bathers. In the first part of this study, analyses showed that the mean concentrations of urea and TOC determined from 50 samples of municipal swimming pool were equal to 18.0 μM (s.d. 11.7) and 3.5 mg C L(-1) (s.d. 1.6), respectively. The mean value for the urea contribution to the TOC content was 6.3% (s.d. 3.3). The rate of decomposition of urea in swimming pool water measured during the closure time of the facility was very slow (decay at the rate of ≈ 1% per hour in the presence of 1.6-1.8 mg L(-1) of free chlorine). In the second part of this work, experiments carried out with phosphate buffered solutions of urea ([Urea](0) = 1 mM; [Cl(2)](0)/[Urea](0): 0.5-15 mol/mol; pH 7.4 ± 0.2; reaction time: 0-200 h) showed that long term chlorine demand of urea was about 5 mol Cl(2)/mol of urea. Chlorination led to a complete mineralization of organic carbon into CO(2) for a chlorine dose of 3.5 mol/mol and to the formation of 0.7-0.8 mol NO(3)(-)/mol of urea for chlorine dose of 8-10 mol/mol. Experiments conducted with dilute solutions of urea ([Urea](0) = 50 μM; pH ≈ 7.3) confirmed that the degradation rate of urea by chlorine is very slow under conditions simulating real swimming pool water. PMID:21115186

  2. Enzymatic Characterization of a Prokaryotic Urea Carboxylase

    PubMed Central

    Kanamori, Takeshi; Kanou, Norihisa; Atomi, Haruyuki; Imanaka, Tadayuki

    2004-01-01

    We identified the first prokaryotic urea carboxylase (UCA) from a member of the alpha subclass of the class Proteobacteria, Oleomonas sagaranensis. This enzyme (O. sagaranensis Uca) was composed of 1,171 amino acids, and its N-terminal region resembled the biotin carboxylase domains of various biotin-dependent carboxylases. The C-terminal region of the enzyme harbored the Met-Lys-Met motif found in biotin carboxyl carrier proteins. The primary structure of the enzyme was 45% identical to that of the urea carboxylase domain of urea amidolyase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. O. sagaranensis Uca did not harbor the allophanate hydrolase domain found in the yeast enzyme, but a separate gene with structural similarity was found to be adjacent to the uca gene. Purified recombinant O. sagaranensis Uca displayed ATP-dependent carboxylase activity towards urea (Vmax = 21.2 μmol mg−1 min−1) but not towards acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) and propionyl-CoA, indicating that the gene encoded a bona fide UCA and not an acetyl-CoA or propionyl-CoA carboxylase. The enzyme also exhibited high levels of activity towards acetamide and formamide. Kinetic parameters of the enzyme reaction were determined with ATP, urea, acetamide, and formamide. O. sagaranensis could grow on urea, acetamide, and formamide as sole nitrogen sources; moreover, ATP-dependent urea-degrading activity was found in cells grown with urea but not in cells grown with ammonia. The results suggest that the UCA of this organism may be involved in the assimilation of these compounds as nitrogen sources. Furthermore, orthologues of the O. sagaranensis uca gene were found to be widely distributed among Bacteria. This implies that there are two systems of urea degradation in Bacteria, a pathway catalyzed by the previously described ureases and the UCA-allophanate hydrolase pathway identified in this study. PMID:15090492

  3. Synthesis of positively charged CdTe quantum dots and detection for uric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tiliang; Sun, Xiangying; Liu, Bin

    2011-09-01

    The CdTe dots (QDs) coated with 2-Mercaptoethylamine was prepared in aqueous solution and characterized with fluorescence spectroscopy, UV-Vis absorption spectra, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and infrared spectroscopy. When the λex = 350 nm, the fluorescence peak of positively charged CdTe quantum dots is at 592 nm. The uric acid is able to quench their fluorescence. Under optimum conditions, the change of fluorescence intensity is linearly proportional to the concentration of uric acid in the range 0.4000-3.600 μmol L -1, and the limit of detection calculated according to IUPAC definitions is 0.1030 μmol L -1. Compared with routine method, the present method determines uric acid in human serum with satisfactory results. The mechanism of this strategy is due to the interaction of the tautomeric keto/hydroxyl group of uric acid and the amino group coated at the CdTe QDs.

  4. Creatinine Change on Vasoconstrictors as Mortality Surrogate in Hepatorenal Syndrome: Systematic Review & Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Belcher, Justin M.; Coca, Steven G.; Parikh, Chirag R.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Hepatorenal syndrome is a severe complication of cirrhosis and associates with significant mortality. Vasoconstrictor medications improve renal function in patients with hepatorenal syndrome. However, it is unclear to what extent changes in serum creatinine during treatment may act as a surrogate for changes in mortality. We have performed a meta-analysis of randomized trials of vasoconstrictors assessing the association between changes in serum creatinine, taken as a continuous variable, and mortality, both while on treatment and during the follow-up period for survivors. Methods The electronic databases of PubMed, Web of Science and Embase were searched for randomized trials evaluating the efficacy of vasoconstrictor therapy for treatment of HRS type 1 or 2. The relative risk (RR) for mortality was calculated against delta creatinine. The proportion of treatment effect explained (PTE) was calculated for delta creatinine. Results Seven trials enrolling 345 patients were included. The correlation between delta creatinine and ln (RR) was moderately good (R2 = 0.61). The intercept and parameter estimate indicated a fall in creatinine while on treatment of 1 mg/dL resulted in a 27% reduction in RR for mortality compared to the control arm. In patients surviving the treatment period, a fall in creatinine while on treatment of 1 mg/dL resulted in a 16% reduction in RR for post-treatment mortality during follow-up. The PTE of delta creatinine for overall mortality was 0.91 and 0.26 for post-treatment mortality. Conclusions Changes in serum creatinine in response to vasoconstrictor therapy appear to be a valid surrogate for mortality, even in the period following the completion of treatment. PMID:26295585

  5. Determination of Urinary Creatinine in Washington State Residents via Liquid Chromatography/Tandem Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    West, Caroline E; Rhodes, Blaine N

    2014-01-01

    A viable, quick, and reliable method for determining urinary creatinine by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) was developed and used to evaluate spot urine samples collected for the Washington Environmental Biomonitoring Survey (WEBS): part of the Washington State Department of Health, Public Health Laboratories (PHL). 50 µL of urine was mixed with a 1 : 1 acetonitrile/water solution containing deuterated creatinine as the internal standard and then analyzed by LC/MS/MS. Utilizing electrospray ionization (ESI) in positive mode, the transition ions for creatinine and creatinine-d3 were determined to be 114.0 to 44.1 (quantifier), 114.0 to 86.1 (qualifier), and 117.0 to 47.1 (creatinine-d3). The retention time for creatinine was 0.85 minutes. The linear calibration range was 20-4000 mg/L, with a limit of detection at 1.77 mg/L and a limit of quantitation at 5.91 mg/L. LC/MS/MS and the colorimetric Jaffé reaction were associated significantly (Pearson r = 0.9898 and R (2) = 0.9797, ρ ≤ 0.0001). The LC/MS/MS method developed at the PHL to determine creatinine in the spot urine samples had shorter retention times, and was more sensitive, reliable, reproducible, and safer than other LC/MS/MS or commercial methods such as the Jaffé reaction or modified versions thereof. PMID:25614740

  6. Differences in urine cadmium associations with kidney outcomes based on serum creatinine and cystatin C

    SciTech Connect

    Weaver, Virginia M.; Kim, Nam-Soo; Lee, Byung-Kook; Parsons, Patrick J.; Spector, June; Fadrowski, Jeffrey; Jaar, Bernard G.; Steuerwald, Amy J.; Todd, Andrew C.; and others

    2011-11-15

    Cadmium is a well-known nephrotoxicant; chronic exposure increases risk for chronic kidney disease. Recently, however, associations between urine cadmium and higher creatinine-based estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) have been reported. Analyses utilizing alternate biomarkers of kidney function allow evaluation of potential mechanisms for these observations. We compared associations of urine cadmium with kidney function measures based on serum cystatin C to those with serum creatinine in 712 lead workers. Mean (standard deviation) molybdenum-corrected urine cadmium, Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD) eGFR and multi-variable cystatin C eGFR were 1.02 (0.65) {mu}g/g creatinine, and 97.4 (19.2) and 112.0 (17.7) mL/min/1.73 m{sup 2}, respectively. The eGFR measures were moderately correlated (r{sub s}=0.5; p<0.001). After adjustment, ln (urine cadmium) was not associated with serum cystatin-C-based measures. However, higher ln (urine cadmium) was associated with higher creatinine-based eGFRs including the MDRD and an equation incorporating serum cystatin C and creatinine (beta-coefficient=4.1 mL/min/1.73 m{sup 2}; 95% confidence interval=1.6, 6.6). Urine creatinine was associated with serum creatinine-based but not cystatin-C-based eGFRs. These results support a biomarker-specific, rather than a kidney function, effect underlying the associations observed between higher urine cadmium and creatinine-based kidney function measures. Given the routine use of serum and urine creatinine in kidney and biomarker research, additional research to elucidate the mechanism(s) for these associations is essential.

  7. Effect of urea on biomimetic aggregates.

    PubMed

    Florenzano, F H; Politi, M J

    1997-02-01

    The effect of urea on biomimetic aggregates (aqueous and reversed micelles, vesicles and monolayers) was investigated to obtain insights into the effect of the denaturant on structured macromolecules. Direct evidence obtained from light scattering (static and dynamic), monolayer maximum isothermal compression and ionic conductivity measurements, together with indirect evidence from fluorescence photodissociation, fluorescence suppression, and thermal reactions, strongly indicates the direct interaction mechanism of urea with the aggregates. Preferential solvation of the surfactant headgroups by urea results in an increase in the monomer dissociation degree (when applied), which leads to an increase in the area per headgroup and also in the loss of counterion affinities. PMID:9239302

  8. A new approach for noninvasive transdermal determination of blood uric acid levels

    PubMed Central

    Ching, Congo Tak-Shing; Yong, Kok-Khun; Yao, Yan-Dong; Shen, Huan-Ting; Hsieh, Shiu-Man; Jheng, Deng-Yun; Sun, Tai-Ping; Shieh, Hsiu-Li

    2014-01-01

    The aims of this study were to investigate the most effective combination of physical forces from laser, electroporation, and reverse iontophoresis for noninvasive transdermal extraction of uric acid, and to develop a highly sensitive uric acid biosensor (UAB) for quantifying the uric acid extracted. It is believed that the combination of these physical forces has additional benefits for extraction of molecules other than uric acid from human skin. A diffusion cell with porcine skin was used to investigate the most effective combination of these physical forces. UABs coated with ZnO2 nanoparticles and constructed in an array configuration were developed in this study. The results showed that a combination of laser (0.7 W), electroporation (100 V/cm2), and reverse iontophoresis (0.5 mA/cm2) was the most effective and significantly enhanced transdermal extraction of uric acid. A custom-designed UAB coated with ZnO2 nanoparticles and constructed in a 1×3 array configuration (UAB-1×3-ZnO2) demonstrated enough sensitivity (9.4 μA/mM) for quantifying uric acid extracted by the combined physical forces of laser, electroporation, and RI. A good linear relationship (R2=0.894) was demonstrated to exist between the concentration of uric acid (0.2–0.8 mM) inside the diffusion cell and the current response of the UAB-1×3-ZnO2. In conclusion, a new approach to noninvasive transdermal extraction and quantification of uric acid has been established. PMID:25061289

  9. Uric Acid Spherulites in the Reflector Layer of Firefly Light Organ

    PubMed Central

    Goh, King-Siang; Sheu, Hwo-Shuenn; Hua, Tzu-En; Kang, Mei-Hua; Li, Chia-Wei

    2013-01-01

    Background In firefly light organs, reflector layer is a specialized tissue which is believed to play a key role for increasing the bioluminescence intensity through reflection. However, the nature of this unique tissue remains elusive. In this report, we investigated the role, fine structure and nature of the reflector layer in the light organ of adult Luciola cerata. Principal Findings Our results indicated that the reflector layer is capable of reflecting bioluminescence, and contains abundant uric acid. Electron microscopy (EM) demonstrated that the cytosol of the reflector layer's cells is filled with densely packed spherical granules, which should be the uric acid granules. These granules are highly regular in size (∼700 nm in diameter), and exhibit a radial internal structure. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses revealed that an intense single peak pattern with a d-spacing value of 0.320 nm is specifically detected in the light organ, and is highly similar to the diffraction peak pattern and d-spacing value of needle-formed crystals of monosodium urate monohydrate. However, the molar ratio evaluation of uric acid to various cations (K+, Na+, Ca2+ and Mg2+) in the light organ deduced that only a few uric acid molecules were in the form of urate salts. Thus, non-salt uric acid should be the source of the diffraction signal detected in the light organ. Conclusions In the light organ, the intense single peak diffraction signal might come from a unique needle-like uric acid form, which is different from other known structures of non-salt uric acid form. The finding of a radial structure in the granules of reflector layer implies that the spherical uric acid granules might be formed by the radial arrangement of needle-formed packing matter. PMID:23441187

  10. The quantitative effect of serum albumin, serum urea, and valproic acid on unbound phenytoin concentrations in children.

    PubMed

    ter Heine, Rob; van Maarseveen, Erik M; van der Westerlaken, Monique M L; Braun, Kees P J; Koudijs, Suzanne M; Berg, Maarten J Ten; Malingré, Mirte M

    2014-06-01

    Dosing of phenytoin is difficult in children because of its variable pharmacokinetics and protein binding. Possible covariates for this protein binding have mostly been univariately investigated in small, and often adult, adult populations. We conducted a study to identify and quantify these covariates in children. We extracted data on serum phenytoin concentrations, albumin, triglycerides, urea, total bilirubin and creatinine concentrations and data on coadministration of valproic acid or carbamazepine in 186 children. Using nonlinear mixed effects modeling the effects of covariates on the unbound phenytoin fraction were investigated. Serum albumin, serum urea concentrations, and concomitant valproic acid use significantly influenced the unbound phenytoin fraction. For clinical practice, we recommend that unbound phenytoin concentrations are measured routinely. However, if this is impossible, we suggest to use our model to calculate the unbound concentration. In selected children, close treatment monitoring and dose reductions should be considered to prevent toxicity. PMID:23670246

  11. Elevated levels of plasma uric acid and its relation to hypertension in arsenic-endemic human individuals in Bangladesh

    SciTech Connect

    Huda, Nazmul; Hossain, Shakhawoat; Rahman, Mashiur; Karim, Md. Rezaul; Islam, Khairul; Mamun, Abdullah Al; Hossain, Md. Imam; Mohanto, Nayan Chandra; Alam, Shahnur; Aktar, Sharmin; Arefin, Afroza; Ali, Nurshad; Salam, Kazi Abdus; Aziz, Abdul; Saud, Zahangir Alam; Miyataka, Hideki; Himeno, Seiichiro; Hossain, Khaled

    2014-11-15

    Blood uric acid has been recognized as a putative marker for cardiovascular diseases (CVDs). CVDs are the major causes of arsenic-related morbidity and mortality. However, the association of arsenic exposure with plasma uric acid (PUA) levels in relation to CVDs has not yet been explored. This study for the first time demonstrated the associations of arsenic exposure with PUA levels and its relationship with hypertension. A total of 483 subjects, 322 from arsenic-endemic and 161 from non-endemic areas in Bangladesh were recruited as study subjects. Arsenic concentrations in the drinking water, hair and nails of the study subjects were measured by inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy. PUA levels were measured using a colorimetric method. We found that PUA levels were significantly (p < 0.001) higher in males and females living in arsenic-endemic areas than those in non-endemic area. Arsenic exposure (water, hair and nail arsenic) levels showed significant positive correlations with PUA levels. In multiple regression analyses, arsenic exposure levels were found to be the most significant contributors on PUA levels among the other variables that included age, body mass index, blood urea nitrogen, and smoking. There were dose–response relationships between arsenic exposure and PUA levels. Furthermore, diastolic and systolic blood pressure showed significant positive correlations with PUA levels. Finally, the average PUA levels were significantly higher in the hypertensive group than those in the normotensive group in both males and females living in arsenic-endemic areas. These results suggest that arsenic exposure-related elevation of PUA levels may be implicated in arsenic-induced CVDs. - Highlights: • PUA levels were higher in arsenic-endemic subjects than in non-endemic subjects. • Drinking water, hair and nail arsenic showed significant associations with PUA levels. • Drinking water, hair and nail arsenic showed dose–response relationships with

  12. Association between serum uric acid, urinary albumin excretion, and glycated hemoglobin in Type 2 diabetic patient

    PubMed Central

    Neupane, Sunita; Dubey, Raju Kumar; Gautam, Narayan; Agrawal, Krishna Kumar; Jayan, Archana; Shrestha, Sujata; Jha, Amit Chandra

    2016-01-01

    Background: Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a chronic disease characterized by insulin deficiency or peripheral resistance resulting in hyperglycemia. Poor glycemic control leads to diabetic complications. Hyperuricemia has been reported with increased risk of renal insufficiency. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between serum uric acid concentration, degree of urinary albumin excretion (UAE) and glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) in Type 2 DM (T2DM) patients. Materials and Methods: Serum uric acid concentrations, urine microalbumin, and HbA1c were measured in fifty T2DM patients. We then evaluated relationship between uric acid concentrations, degree of UAE and glycemic control as well as other confounding variables. Results: Serum uric acid concentration correlated positively with UAE (r = 0.323, P < 0.05), age (r = 0.337, P < 0.05), age at onset (r = 0.341, P < 0.05), and duration of DM (r = 0.312, P < 0.05). Multiple regression analysis demonstrated that serum uric acid concentration (β = 0.293, P < 0.0001), duration of DM (β = 0.261, P < 0.0001), HbA1c (β = 0.173, P < 0.005), and systolic blood pressure (β = 0.268, P < 0.005) were independent determinants of UAE. Conclusions: Serum uric acid concentration is associated with microalbuminuria and HbA1c in T2DM patients. PMID:27226687

  13. Uric acid is a danger signal of increasing risk for osteoarthritis through inflammasome activation

    PubMed Central

    Denoble, Anna E.; Huffman, Kim M.; Stabler, Thomas V.; Kelly, Susan J.; Hershfield, Michael S.; McDaniel, Gary E.; Coleman, R. Edward; Kraus, Virginia B.

    2011-01-01

    Uric acid (UA) is known to activate the NLRP3 (Nacht, leucine-rich repeat and pyrin domain containing protein 3) inflammasome. When activated, the NLRP3 (also known as NALP3) inflammasome leads to the production of IL-18 and IL-1β. In this cohort of subjects with knee osteoarthritis (OA), synovial fluid uric acid was strongly correlated with synovial fluid IL-18 and IL-1β. Synovial fluid uric acid and IL-18 were strongly and positively associated with OA severity as measured by both radiograph and bone scintigraphy, and synovial fluid IL-1β was associated with OA severity but only by radiograph. Furthermore, synovial fluid IL-18 was associated with a 3-y change in OA severity, on the basis of the radiograph. We conclude that synovial fluid uric acid is a marker of knee OA severity. The correlation of synovial fluid uric acid with the two cytokines (IL-18 and IL-1β) known to be produced by uric acid-activated inflammasomes and the association of synovial fluid IL-18 with OA progression, lend strong support to the potential involvement of the innate immune system in OA pathology and OA progression. PMID:21245324

  14. Serum Uric Acid and Hypertension in Adults: a Paradoxical Relationship in Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Bjornstad, Petter; Wadwa, R. Paul; Sirota, Jeffrey C.; Snell-Bergeon, Janet K.; McFann, Kimberly; Rewers, Marian; Rivard, Christopher J.; Jalal, Diana; Chonchol, Michel B.; Johnson, Richard J.; Maahs, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Adults with type 1 diabetes have lower serum uric acid levels compared to non-diabetic adults. Little is known about the relationship between serum uric acid and blood pressure in type 1 diabetes and whether it differs from the positive relationship found in non-diabetic adults. We assessed the cross-sectional and longitudinal relationships over 6-years between serum uric acid and blood pressure in adults with (35±9 years, n=393) and without (38±9 years n=685) T1D in the Coronary Artery Calcification in Type 1 Diabetes study. In non-diabetic adults, serum uric acid was associated with systolic blood pressure in multivariable-models adjusted for cardiovascular risk-factors. In adults with type 1 diabetes, a negative association was observed between serum uric acid and systolic blood pressure after multivariable-adjustments. A positive association was observed between serum uric acid and systolic blood pressure in non-diabetic adults. In contrast, an inverse relationship was demonstrated after multivariable-adjustments in type 1 diabetes. PMID:24667019

  15. Serum uric acid and hypertension in adults: a paradoxical relationship in type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Bjornstad, Petter; Paul Wadwa, R; Sirota, Jeffrey C; Snell-Bergeon, Janet K; McFann, Kimberly; Rewers, Marian; Rivard, Christopher J; Jalal, Diana; Chonchol, Michel B; Johnson, Richard J; Maahs, David M

    2014-04-01

    Adults with type 1 diabetes have lower serum uric acid levels compared with nondiabetic adults. Little is known about the relationship between serum uric acid and blood pressure in type 1 diabetes and whether it differs from the positive relationship found in nondiabetic adults. The authors assessed the cross-sectional and longitudinal relationships over 6 years between serum uric acid and blood pressure in adults with (35±9 years [n=393]) and without (38±9 years [n=685]) type 1 diabetes in the Coronary Artery Calcification in Type 1 Diabetes study. In nondiabetic adults, serum uric acid was associated with systolic blood pressure in multivariable models adjusted for cardiovascular risk factors. In adults with type 1 diabetes, a negative association was observed between serum uric acid and systolic blood pressure after multivariable adjustments. A positive association was observed between serum uric acid and systolic blood pressure in nondiabetic adults. In contrast, an inverse relationship was demonstrated after multivariable adjustments in type 1 diabetes. PMID:24667019

  16. Heat Stress Nephropathy From Exercise-Induced Uric Acid Crystalluria: A Perspective on Mesoamerican Nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Roncal-Jimenez, Carlos; García-Trabanino, Ramón; Barregard, Lars; Lanaspa, Miguel A; Wesseling, Catharina; Harra, Tamara; Aragón, Aurora; Grases, Felix; Jarquin, Emmanuel R; González, Marvin A; Weiss, Ilana; Glaser, Jason; Sánchez-Lozada, Laura G; Johnson, Richard J

    2016-01-01

    Mesoamerican nephropathy (MeN), an epidemic in Central America, is a chronic kidney disease of unknown cause. In this article, we argue that MeN may be a uric acid disorder. Individuals at risk for developing the disease are primarily male workers exposed to heat stress and physical exertion that predisposes to recurrent water and volume depletion, often accompanied by urinary concentration and acidification. Uric acid is generated during heat stress, in part consequent to nucleotide release from muscles. We hypothesize that working in the sugarcane fields may result in cyclic uricosuria in which uric acid concentrations exceed solubility, leading to the formation of dihydrate urate crystals and local injury. Consistent with this hypothesis, we present pilot data documenting the common presence of urate crystals in the urine of sugarcane workers from El Salvador. High end-of-workday urinary uric acid concentrations were common in a pilot study, particularly if urine pH was corrected to 7. Hyperuricemia may induce glomerular hypertension, whereas the increased urinary uric acid may directly injure renal tubules. Thus, MeN may result from exercise and heat stress associated with dehydration-induced hyperuricemia and uricosuria. Increased hydration with water and salt, urinary alkalinization, reduction in sugary beverage intake, and inhibitors of uric acid synthesis should be tested for disease prevention. PMID:26455995

  17. Activity and Stability of Biofilm Uricase of Lactobacillus plantarum for Uric Acid Biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iswantini, Dyah; Rachmatia, Rescy; Diana, Novita Rose; Nurhidayat, Novik; Akhiruddin; Saprudin, Deden

    2016-01-01

    Research of uric acid biosensor used a Lactobacillus plantarum was successfully conducted. Lactobacillus plantarum could produce uricase that could be used as uric acid biosensor. Therefore, lifetime of bacteria were quite short that caused the bacteria could not detect uric acid for a long time. To avoid this problem, development of biofilm for uric acid biosensor is important. Biofilms is a structured community of bacterial cells, stick together and are able to maintain a bacteria in an extreme environments. The purpose of present study was to determine and compare the activity of uricase produced by L. plantarum, deposited whithin biofilm and planktonic bacteria on glassy carbon electrode (GCEb & GCE), also to determine the stability of biofilm. The optimization process was conducted by using temperature, pH, and substrate concentration as the parameters. It showed that the activity of uricase within biofilm was able to increase the oxidation current. GCEb and GCE yielded the oxidation current in the amount of 47.24 μA and 23.04 μA, respectively, under the same condition. Results indicated that the optimum condition for uric acid biosensor using biofilm were pH 10, temperature of 40 oC, and uric acid concentration of 5 mM. The stability of GCEb decreased after 10 hours used, with decreasing percentage over 86.33%. This low stability probably caused by the unprotected active site of the enzyme that the enzyme is easier to experience the denaturation.

  18. Uric Acid – Key Ingredient in the Recipe for Cardiorenal Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhary, Kunal; Malhotra, Kunal; Sowers, James; Aroor, Annayya

    2013-01-01

    Elevated serum uric acid levels are a frequent finding in persons with obesity, hypertension, cardiovascular and kidney disease as well as in those with the cardiorenal metabolic syndrome (CRS). The increased consumption of a fructose-rich Western diet has contributed to the increasing incidence of the CRS, obesity and diabetes especially in industrialized populations. There is also increasing evidence that supports a causal role of high dietary fructose driving elevations in uric acid in association with the CRS. Animal and epidemiological studies support the notion that elevated serum uric acid levels play an important role in promoting insulin resistance and hypertension and suggest potential pathophysiological mechanisms that contribute to the development of the CRS and associated cardiovascular disease and chronic kidney disease. To this point, elevated serum levels of uric acid appear to contribute to impaired nitric oxide production/endothelial dysfunction, increased vascular stiffness, inappropriate activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, enhanced oxidative stress, and maladaptive immune and inflammatory responses. These abnormalities, in turn, promote vascular, cardiac and renal fibrosis as well as associated functional abnormalities. Small clinical trials have suggested that uric acid-lowering therapies may be beneficial in such patients; however, a consensus on the treatment of asymptomatic hyperuricemia is lacking. Larger randomized controlled trials need to be performed in order to critically evaluate the beneficial effect of lowering serum uric acid in patients with the CRS and those with diabetes and/or hypertension. PMID:24454316

  19. Quantitative determination of uric acid using CdTe nanoparticles as fluorescence probes.

    PubMed

    Jin, Dongri; Seo, Min-Ho; Huy, Bui The; Pham, Quoc-Thai; Conte, Maxwell L; Thangadurai, Daniel; Lee, Yong-Ill

    2016-03-15

    A convenient enzymatic optical method for uric acid detection was developed based on the fluorescence quenching of ligand-capped CdTe nanoparticles by H2O2 which was generated from the enzymatic reaction of uric acid. The interactions between the CdTe nanoparticles capped with different ligands (glutathione, 3-mercaptopropionic acid, and thioglycerol) and H2O2 were investigated. The fluorescence quenching studies of GSH-capped CdTe nanoparticles demonstrated an excellent sensitivity to H2O2. The effects of uric acid, uricase and H2O2 on the fluorescence intensity of CdTe nanoparticles were also explored. The detection conditions, reaction time, pH value, incubation period and the concentration of uricase and uric acid were optimized. The detection limit of uric acid was found to be 0.10 µM and the linear range was 0.22-6 µM under the optimized experimental conditions. These results typify that CdTe nanoparticles could be used as a fluorescent probe for uric acid detection. PMID:26433069

  20. Higher Serum Uric Acid Is Associated with Higher Bone Mineral Density in Chinese Men with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Dian-dian; Jiao, Pei-lin; Yu, Jing-jia; Wang, Xiao-jing; Zhao, Lin; Xuan, Yan; Sun, Li-hao; Tao, Bei; Wang, Wei-qing; Ning, Guang; Liu, Jian-min; Zhao, Hong-yan

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that oxidative stress is associated with osteoporosis. Serum uric acid (UA) is a strong endogenous antioxidant. Therefore, we investigated the relationship between the serum UA and BMD in Chinese men with T2DM. In this cross-sectional study of 621 men with T2DM, BMDs at lumbar spine (L2–4), femoral neck (FN), and total hip (TH) were measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Serum levels of UA, calcium (Ca), 25-OH vitamin D3 (vitD3), parathyroid hormone (PTH), and creatinine (Cr) were also tested. Data analyses revealed that serum UA levels were positively associated with BMD at all sites (p < 0.05) in men with T2DM after adjusting for multiple confounders. The serum UA levels were positively correlated with body weight (r = 0.322), body mass index (BMI) (r = 0.331), Ca (r = 0.179), and Cr (r = 0.239) (p < 0.001) and were also positively associated with the concentrations of PTH (r = 0.10, p < 0.05). When compared with those in the lowest tertile of UA levels, men with T2DM in the highest tertile had a lower prevalence of osteoporosis or osteopenia (adjusted odds ratio 0.54, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.31–0.95). These data suggest that higher serum levels of UA are associated with higher BMDs and lower risks of osteoporosis in Chinese men with T2DM. PMID:27022396

  1. Association of serum uric acid level with mortality and morbidity of patients with acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Hajizadeh, Reza; Ghaffari, Samad; Salehi, Rezvanieh; Mazani, Sarvin; Aghavali, Sharmin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Investigating the clinical impact of serum uric acid (UA) and its lowering agents on the complications and mortality of acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) can open a new era in STEMI treatment. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of on admission serum UA level on the mortality and morbidity of patients admitted with STEMI. Methods: A number of 608 patients with STEMI were enrolled in this study from December 21, 2012 until February 19, 2014. Patients were followed for 20 months. Male to female ratio was 2.53, and the mean age of patients was 62.6±13.4. The relationship between the level of UA and patients’ mortality and morbidity, left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), atrial and ventricular arrhythmia was analyzed. Results: Patients with high serum UA level had higher Killip class after STEMI (P=0.001). Mean LVEF was measured to be 39.5±9.6 in normal UA group and 34.6±11.6 in high UA group (P=0.001). In comparison with normal UA group, high UA group had significantly higher cTnI (2.68±0.09 vs 4.09±0.42, respectively, P=0.001), increased blood pressure (P=0.009), and higher atrial fibrillation (AF) occurrence (P=0.03), but no association was seen between ventricular tachycardia and serum UA level. Short term and midterm mortality were not different in two groups (P=0.44 and 0.31, respectively). Conclusion: In the current study, high serum UA level in patients with acute myocardial infarction (MI) was not associated with higher in-hospital or midterm mortality, but it was associated with lower LVEF, higher Killip class, elevated cTnI, creatinine, triglyceride, and higher AF. PMID:27489597

  2. Urea and deuterium mixtures at high pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Donnelly, M. Husband, R. J.; Frantzana, A. D.; Loveday, J. S.; Bull, C. L.; Klotz, S.

    2015-03-28

    Urea, like many network forming compounds, has long been known to form inclusion (guest-host) compounds. Unlike other network formers like water, urea is not known to form such inclusion compounds with simple molecules like hydrogen. Such compounds if they existed would be of interest both for the fundamental insight they provide into molecular bonding and as potential gas storage systems. Urea has been proposed as a potential hydrogen storage material [T. A. Strobel et al., Chem. Phys. Lett. 478, 97 (2009)]. Here, we report the results of high-pressure neutron diffraction studies of urea and D{sub 2} mixtures that indicate no inclusion compound forms up to 3.7 GPa.

  3. 21 CFR § 862.1770 - Urea nitrogen test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2015-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2015-04-01 2015-04-01 false Urea nitrogen test system. § 862.1770 Section Â... Systems § 862.1770 Urea nitrogen test system. (a) Identification. A urea nitrogen test system is a device intended to measure urea nitrogen (an end-product of nitrogen metabolism) in whole blood, serum,...

  4. 21 CFR 862.1770 - Urea nitrogen test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Urea nitrogen test system. 862.1770 Section 862....1770 Urea nitrogen test system. (a) Identification. A urea nitrogen test system is a device intended to measure urea nitrogen (an end-product of nitrogen metabolism) in whole blood, serum, plasma, and...

  5. 21 CFR 862.1770 - Urea nitrogen test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Urea nitrogen test system. 862.1770 Section 862....1770 Urea nitrogen test system. (a) Identification. A urea nitrogen test system is a device intended to measure urea nitrogen (an end-product of nitrogen metabolism) in whole blood, serum, plasma, and...

  6. 21 CFR 862.1770 - Urea nitrogen test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Urea nitrogen test system. 862.1770 Section 862....1770 Urea nitrogen test system. (a) Identification. A urea nitrogen test system is a device intended to measure urea nitrogen (an end-product of nitrogen metabolism) in whole blood, serum, plasma, and...

  7. Does high serum uric acid level cause aspirin resistance?

    PubMed

    Yildiz, Bekir S; Ozkan, Emel; Esin, Fatma; Alihanoglu, Yusuf I; Ozkan, Hayrettin; Bilgin, Murat; Kilic, Ismail D; Ergin, Ahmet; Kaftan, Havane A; Evrengul, Harun

    2016-06-01

    In patients with coronary artery disease (CAD), though aspirin inhibits platelet activation and reduces atherothrombotic complications, it does not always sufficiently inhibit platelet function, thereby causing a clinical situation known as aspirin resistance. As hyperuricemia activates platelet turnover, aspirin resistance may be specifically induced by increased serum uric acid (SUA) levels. In this study, we thus investigated the association between SUA level and aspirin resistance in patients with CAD. We analyzed 245 consecutive patients with stable angina pectoris (SAP) who in coronary angiography showed more than 50% occlusion in a major coronary artery. According to aspirin resistance, two groups were formed: the aspirin resistance group (Group 1) and the aspirin-sensitive group (Group 2). Compared with those of Group 2, patients with aspirin resistance exhibited significantly higher white blood cell counts, neutrophil counts, neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratios, SUA levels, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein levels, and fasting blood glucose levels. After multivariate analysis, a high level of SUA emerged as an independent predictor of aspirin resistance. The receiver-operating characteristic analysis provided a cutoff value of 6.45 mg/dl for SUA to predict aspirin resistance with 79% sensitivity and 65% specificity. Hyperuricemia may cause aspirin resistance in patients with CAD and high SUA levels may indicate aspirin-resistant patients. Such levels should thus recommend avoiding heart attack and stroke by adjusting aspirin dosage. PMID:26656902

  8. Association of Serum Uric Acid Levels in Psoriasis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xin; Miao, Xiao; Wang, Hongshen; Wang, Yifei; Li, Fulun; Yang, Qiong; Cui, Rutao; Li, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract High levels of serum uric acid (SUAC) are frequently detected in patients with psoriasis. However, the relationship between psoriasis and hyperuricemia remains unknown. Here we conducted a meta-analysis to identify the SUAC levels in subjects with psoriasis and to determine whether there is an associated risk between psoriasis and hyperuricemia. A comprehensive search of the literature from January 1980 to November 2014 across 7 databases (MEDLINE, Embase, Cochrane Central Register, and 4 Chinese databases) was conducted to determine whether there is an associated risk between psoriasis and hyperuricemia. Among the 170 identified reports, 14 observational studies were included in this meta-analysis. We found a significant higher SUAC level (MD 0.68, 95% CI 0.26–1.09; P = 0.002) in patients with psoriasis in Western Europe, but no significant differences were found between the East Asia and India subgroup (MD 1.22, 95% CI –0.13–2.56; P = 0.08) or the Middle East subgroup (MD 0.48, 95% CI –0.49–1.44; P = 0.33). Similar results were obtained from the meta-analysis of SUAC levels in subjects with severe psoriasis. Our meta-analysis showed that the correlation between psoriasis and hyperuricemia was either ethnicity- or region-dependent and that patients with psoriasis in Western Europe were more likely to have hyperuricemia. PMID:27175702

  9. Serum uric acid in new and recent onset primary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Anand, N. N.; Padma, V.; Prasad, Arun; Alam, Krishna Chaitanya; Javid, M. S. A. Syed Mohammed

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Hyperuricemia is common among adults with prehypertension, especially when the microalbuminuria is present. Hyperuricemia precedes the development of hypertension. Aim: (1) To find the association of hyperuricemia in new-onset hypertensive patients. (2) To find the association of hyperuricemia in hypertensive patients with regard to gender and risk factors such as smoking and central obesity. Material and Methods: A total of 50 adults aged between 20 and 50 years who had mild early hypertension were selected for the study. Fifty controls without hypertension were enrolled and investigated. Results: The association between uric acid (UA) and hypertension was analyzed using Student's t-test and statistical difference were assessed using Pearson coefficient. The study showed a significant difference in UA between the hypertensive subjects and the normotensive controls. There was not a significant difference between waist abnormality, smoking and UA in cases. Males have a higher degree of hyperuricemia than females in hypertensive patients. Conclusion: Serum UA is strongly associated with blood pressure (BP) in new and recent onset primary hypertension. The remarkable association of UA with BP in adults is consistent with recent animal model data and the hypothesis that the UA might have a pathogenic role in the development of hypertension. PMID:26015744

  10. Kidney injury biomarkers and urinary creatinine variability in nominally healthy adults

    EPA Science Inventory

    Environmental exposure diagnostics use creatinine concentrations in urine aliquots as the internal standard for dilution normalization of all other excreted metabolites when urinary excretion rate data are not available. This is a reasonable approach for healthy adults as creati...

  11. Is Uric Acid a Missing Link between Previous Gestational Diabetes Mellitus and the Development of Type 2 Diabetes at a Later Time of Life?

    PubMed Central

    Fronczyk, Aneta; Safranow, Krzysztof; Majkowska, Lilianna

    2016-01-01

    Introduction A high level of uric acid (UA) is a strong, independent risk factor for type 2 diabetes mellitus. The relationship between UA levels and the development of type 2 diabetes in women with previous gestational diabetes mellitus (pGDM) remains unclear. The aim of study was to evaluate the UA levels in pGDM women in relation to their current nutritional status and carbohydrate metabolism. Material and Methods 199 women with pGDM diagnoses based on oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTTs) 5–12 years previously and a control group of 50 women without pGDM. The assessment included anthropometric parameters, body composition (Tanita SC-330S), current OGTT, insulin resistance index (HOMA-IR), β-cell function (HOMA-%B), HbA1c, lipids, and uric acid. Results No differences between groups were found in terms of age, time from the index pregnancy, anthropometric parameters, lipids or creatinine levels. The incidences of overweight and obesity were similar. Carbohydrate abnormalities were more frequent in the pGDM group than the control group (43.2% vs 12.0% p<0.001). The women with pGDM had significantly higher fasting glucose, HbA1c, glucose and insulin levels in the OGTTs, but similar HOMA-IR values. Their UA levels were significantly higher (258±58 vs 230±50 μmol/L, p<0.005) and correlated with BMI and the severity of carbohydrate disorders. The normal weight and normoglycemic pGDM women also demonstrated higher UA levels than a similar control subgroup (232±48 vs 208±48 μmol/L, p<0.05). Multivariate analysis revealed significant correlations of UA level with BMI (β = 0.38, 95% CI 0.25–0.51, p<0.0001), creatinine level (β = 0.23, 95% CI 0.11–0.35, p<0.0005), triglycerides (β = 0.20, 95% CI 0.07–0.33, p<0.005) and family history of diabetes (β = 0.13, 95% CI 0.01–0.25, p<0.05). In logistic regression analysis, the association between higher UA level (defined as value ≥297 μmol/L) and presence of any carbohydrate metabolism disorder (IFG, IGT or

  12. A practical approach to using spot urine protein/creatinine ratios for assessing proteinuria in pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Marnoch, Catherine A; Larson, Lucia; Weitzen, Sherry; Phipps, Maureen G; Sung, C James; Powrie, Raymond O

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study is to assess the diagnostic accuracy of the spot urine protein/creatinine ratio compared with the 24-hour urine protein in pregnancy. Study Design: In this prospective cohort study of inpatient pregnant women, the protein/creatinine ratio and dipstick protein were assessed from a single urine sample collected at the start of the 24-hour urine. Both tests were compared with the 24-hour urine protein for correlation and test characteristics. Results: In the 196 specimens analysed, we found a strong correlation between the spot urine protein/creatinine ratio and 24-hour urine protein (r 2 = 0.78, P < 0.01). A protein/creatinine ratio <0.1 ruled out significant proteinuria (≥300 mg/day) with sensitivity and negative predictive value 100%. A protein/creatinine ratio ≥0.4 detected significant proteinuria (specificity and positive predictive value of 100%). A protein/creatinine ratio ≥4.6 had a specificity and positive predictive value of 100% for detecting severe proteinuria (≥5000 mg/day). Urine dipsticks correlated poorly with the 24-hour urine protein (r 2 = 0.40, P = 0.826). Nineteen percent of dipsticks reading nil or trace were false-negative results. Conclusion: The spot urine protein/creatinine ratio correlated well with the 24-hour urine protein and performed better than the urine dipsticks. Significant proteinuria in pregnancy was excluded if the protein/creatinine ratio was <0.1 and identified when it was ≥0.4.

  13. A facile low-cost enzymatic paper-based assay for the determination of urine creatinine.

    PubMed

    Talalak, Kwanrutai; Noiphung, Julaluk; Songjaroen, Temsiri; Chailapakul, Orawon; Laiwattanapaisal, Wanida

    2015-11-01

    Creatinine is one of many markers used to investigate kidney function. This paper describes a low-cost enzymatic paper-based analytical device (enz-PAD) for determining urine creatinine. The disposable dead volumes of creatinine enzyme reagents from an automatic analyser cassette were utilised. Whatman No. 3 paper was cut into long rectangular shapes (4×40 mm(2)) on which the enzyme reagents, R1 and R2, were adsorbed in two consecutive regions. The assay was performed by immersing test strips into urine samples contained in microwells to allow creatinine in the sample to react with immobilised active ingredients and, then, traverse via capillary action to the detection area where chromogen products accumulated. The method is based on hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) formation via creatinine conversion using creatininase, creatinase, and sarcosine oxidase. The liberated H2O2 reacts with 4-aminophenazone and 2,4,6-triiodo-3-hydroxybenzoic acid to form quinoneimine with a pink-red colour at the detection zone. The linear range of the creatinine assay was 2.5-25 mg dL(-1) (r(2)=0.983), and the detection limit was 2.0 mg dL(-1). The colorimetric enz-PAD for the creatinine assay was highly correlated with a conventional alkaline picrate method when real urine samples were evaluated (r(2)=0.977; n=40). This simple and nearly zero-cost paper-based device provides a novel alternative method for screening urinary creatinine and will be highly beneficial for developing countries. PMID:26452908

  14. [Methods of urine analysis for creatinine after long period of storage].

    PubMed

    Pishak, V P; Iarmol'chuk, S G

    2001-01-01

    Our investigations showed that n-cresol (4-methylphenol) stabilized urine and preserves urinal creatinine as long as for 50-d storage at room temperature. This antimicrobial biochemical stabilizer is the core of a novel method of delayed creatinine quantification in urine. It can be useful in metabolic investigations of cosmonauts and nuclear submarine crews, members of alpine, desert, deep-water, Arctic and Antarctic expeditions and in many other cases when samples cannot be analyzed immediately. PMID:11385990

  15. Paraquat and diquat interference in the analysis of creatinine by the Jaffé reaction.

    PubMed

    Price, L A; Newman, K J; Clague, A E; Wilson, P R; Wenck, D J

    1995-04-01

    Paraquat and diquat were shown to interfere significantly in the measurement of plasma creatinine by the alkaline picrate (Jaffé) reaction in a young man who ingested a massive dose of a mixture of the 2 herbicides. It is likely that these bipyridylium compounds react in a manner similar but at different rates compared with creatinine in the Jaffé reaction. PMID:7567143

  16. Treatment of renal uric acid stone by extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy combined with sodium bicarbonate: 2 case reports

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hao-Yong; Lian, Pei-Yu; Zhou, Zhi-Yan; Song, Peng; Yan, Yi; Liu, Ji-Hong

    2015-01-01

    Uric acid stone is the most comment radiolucent renal stone with high recurrence rate, which would further cause acute upper urinary tract obstruction and kidney failure. Here we report two cases of renal uric acid stone from December 2012 to April 2013. One 43-year-old male patient suffered from chronic uric acid nephrolithiasis caused by the long-term indwelling of bilateral double-J stent. Another 69-year-old patient was also diagnosed with uric acid nephrolithiasis at the right kidney. Both patients were first treated with extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL), followed by 1.5% sodium bicarbonate dissolution therapy. After a week of the treatment, the uric acid stones in both patients were completely dissolved without retrograde infection. In summary, the use of ESWL and sodium bicarbonate dissolution therapy as a combined modality is a safe, effective, inexpensive treatment for uric acid nephrolithiasis. PMID:26550383

  17. Effect of co-trimoxazole and sulfamethoxazole on serum creatinine in normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Roy, M T; First, M R; Myre, S A; Cacini, W

    1982-01-01

    Significant elevation of serum creatinine concentration and reduction in creatinine clearance have been reported following cotrimoxazole therapy in patients with normal and impaired renal function. Both components of co-trimoxazole, trimethoprim and sulfamethoxazole, have been proposed as the causative agent. Ten healthy male volunteers were treated for seven days with either sulfamethoxazole (5 subjects) or co-trimoxazole (5 subjects) in the usual recommended doses. After a one-week recovery period, the subjects were allocated to the alternate treatment regimen for another seven days. Cotrimoxazole caused a mean elevation in the serum creatinine concentration of 0.12 mg/dl over the base-line value (p less than 0.05). Sulfamethoxazole produced an insignificant fall in the serum creatinine level. The increase in the serum creatinine concentration induced by co-trimoxazole was reversed seven days after discontinuation of the drug. From this study, it can be concluded that either trimethoprim alone or an interaction between trimethoprim and sulfamethoxazole is responsible for the increase in serum creatinine observed following co-trimoxazole therapy and that sulfamethoxazole alone is not the causative agent. PMID:7071907

  18. Differentiation of uric acid versus non-uric acid kidney stones in the presence of iodine using dual-energy CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J.; Qu, M.; Leng, S.; McCollough, C. H.

    2010-04-01

    In this study, the feasibility of differentiating uric acid from non-uric acid kidney stones in the presence of iodinated contrast material was evaluated using dual-energy CT (DECT). Iodine subtraction was accomplished with a commercial three material decomposition algorithm to create a virtual non-contrast (VNC) image set. VNC images were then used to segment stone regions from tissue background. The DE ratio of each stone was calculated using the CT images acquired at two different energies with DECT using the stone map generated from the VNC images. The performance of DE ratio-based stone differentiation was evaluated at five different iodine concentrations (21, 42, 63, 84 and 105 mg/ml). The DE ratio of stones in iodine solution was found larger than those obtained in non-iodine cases. This is mainly caused by the partial volume effect around the boundary between the stone and iodine solution. The overestimation of the DE ratio leads to substantial overlap between different stone types. To address the partial volume effect, an expectation-maximization (EM) approach was implemented to estimate the contribution of iodine and stone within each image pixel in their mixture area. The DE ratio of each stone was corrected to maximally remove the influence of iodine solutions. The separation of uric-acid and non-uric-acid stone was improved in the presence of iodine solution.

  19. An amperometric uric acid biosensor based on chitosan-carbon nanotubes electrospun nanofiber on silver nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Numnuam, Apon; Thavarungkul, Panote; Kanatharana, Proespichaya

    2014-06-01

    A novel amperometric uric acid biosensor was fabricated by immobilizing uricase on an electrospun nanocomposite of chitosan-carbon nanotubes nanofiber (Chi-CNTsNF) covering an electrodeposited layer of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) on a gold electrode (uricase/Chi-CNTsNF/AgNPs/Au). The uric acid response was determined at an optimum applied potential of -0.35 V vs Ag/AgCl in a flow-injection system based on the change of the reduction current for dissolved oxygen during oxidation of uric acid by the immobilized uricase. The response was directly proportional to the uric acid concentration. Under the optimum conditions, the fabricated uric acid biosensor had a very wide linear range, 1.0-400 μmol L(-1), with a very low limit of detection of 1.0 μmol L(-1) (s/n = 3). The operational stability of the uricase/Chi-CNTsNF/AgNPs/Au biosensor (up to 205 injections) was excellent and the storage life was more than six weeks. A low Michaelis-Menten constant of 0.21 mmol L(-1) indicated that the immobilized uricase had high affinity for uric acid. The presence of potential common interfering substances, for example ascorbic acid, glucose, and lactic acid, had negligible effects on the performance of the biosensor. When used for analysis of uric acid in serum samples, the results agreed well with those obtained by use of the standard enzymatic colorimetric method (P > 0.05). PMID:24718436

  20. Serum uric acid level in normal pregnant and preeclamptic ladies: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Pramanik, T; Khatiwada, B; Pradhan, P

    2014-09-01

    Preeclampsia is a serious pregnancy complication characterized by hypertension, proteinuria with or without pathological edema. According to some studies, serum uric acid lacks sensitivity and specificity as a diagnostic tool whereas another group of the researchers indicated uricemia as a predictor of preeclampsia in pregnant ladies. The present study was designed to assess whether serum uric acid can be used as a biochemical indicator or not in preeclamptic patients. Pre-eclamptic patients admitted in Nepal Medical College Teaching Hospital from June 2012 to June 2013 were included in this study. Age matched normal healthy pregnant ladies served as control. The record of their blood pressure and serum uric acid level was evaluated. Results showed significantly high blood pressure [SBP 149.42±12.35 vs 109.00±7.93 mm Hg; DBP 96.85±8.32 vs 72.5±7.10 mm Hg], and serum uric acid level [6.27±1.37 vs 4.27±0.61 mg/dl] in pre-eclamptic patients compared to their healthy counterparts. Uric acid is a terminal metabolite of the degradation of nucleotides, which increases their blood levels in patients with preeclampsia increasing its synthesis by damage and death of trophoblastic cells and proliferation. Uricemia in preeclampsia likely results from reduced uric acid clearance from diminished glomerular filtration, increased tubular reabsorption and decreased secretion. Results of the present study indicated association of elevated serum uric acid level with preeclampsia which could be used as a biochemical indicator of preeclampsia in pregnant women. PMID:25799807

  1. Effect of slow-release urea inclusion in diets containing modified corn distillers grains on total tract digestibility and ruminal fermentation in feedlot cattle.

    PubMed

    Ceconi, I; Ruiz-Moreno, M J; DiLorenzo, N; DiCostanzo, A; Crawford, G I

    2015-08-01

    Ruminal degradable intake protein (DIP) deficit may result when cattle are fed diets containing a greater inclusion of processed corn grain and small to moderate inclusion of corn distillers grains (DG). This deficit may arise from greater proportions of rapidly fermentable carbohydrates and RUP in corn grain. Urea-derived N is 100% DIP; however, rates of degradation of carbohydrates and conventional urea (CU) may not match. Therefore, beneficial effects may result from the use of slow-release urea (SRU) sources over CU when added to DIP-deficient diets. An experiment was conducted to evaluate the effect of increasing DIP concentration through inclusion of 1 of 2 SRU sources or CU in DG-containing feedlot diets on ruminal fermentation and total tract digestibility. In addition, an in situ experiment was conducted to characterize N disappearance of urea sources from polyester bags. Four ruminally cannulated steers (initial BW = 588 ± 8 kg) were arranged in a 4 × 4 Latin square design and assigned randomly to 1 of 4 dietary treatments containing 0% (CON) or 0.6% urea in the form of CU (UREA) or SRU as Optigen II (polymer-encapsulated urea; OPTI) or NitroShure (lipid-encapsulated urea; NITRO), and 30% corn earlage, 20% modified corn DG with solubles, 7.8% corn silage, 4.3% dry supplement, and dry-rolled corn (DM basis). Dietary DIP was estimated at 6.6% and 8.3% for CON and urea-containing dietary treatments, respectively. Steers were fed ad libitum once daily. Differences in purine derivatives-to-creatinine (PDC) index between treatments were used as indicators of differences in microbial CP synthesis. Intake of OM, digestibility of OM, NDF, CP, and starch, ruminal pH, total VFA ruminal concentration, and PDC index were not affected by treatment ( ≥ 0.21). Concentration of ammonia-N noticeably peaked at 4 h after feed delivery for cattle fed UREA (treatment × time, = 0.06) and measured at least 5.5 mg/dL for any treatment and at any hour after feed delivery

  2. Nitrous Oxide Gas Fluxes in a Potato Field Following Application of Urea and Coated Urea Fertilizers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Application of urea and other forms of nitrogen (N) fertilizer can generate atmospheric emissions of nitrous oxide (N2O), which is a potent greenhouse gas. Field experiments were conducted on a loamy sand soil in Becker, Minnesota to evaluate the effects of soluble and coated forms of urea on N2O fl...

  3. Winter Wheat and Maize Response to Urea Ammonium Nitrate and a New Urea Formaldehyde Polymer Fertilizer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Slow release nitrogen (N) fertilizers have potential to improve yield and nitrogen use efficiency (NUE) in winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) and maize (Zea mays L.). A slow release urea formaldehyde polymer (UFP) was compared with conventional aqueous urea-ammonium nitrate (UAN) [(NH2)2CO, NH4NO3]...

  4. Synthesis and Characterization of Branched Poly(ester urea)s with Different Branch Density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jiayi; Becker, Matthew

    2015-03-01

    A new class of L-phenylalanine-based poly(ester urea)s (PEU) was developed that possess tunable mechanical properties, water uptake ability and degradation rates. Our preliminary data has shown that 1,6-hexanediol L - phenylalanine-based poly(ester urea)s possesses an elastic modulus nearly double that of poly(lactic acid). My work details the synthesis of a series of L - phenylalanine-based poly(ester urea)s possessing a variation in diol chain length and in branch density and shows how these subtle structural differences influence the mechanical properties and in vitro biodegradation rates. The elastic moduli span a range of values that overlap with several currently clinically available degradable polymers. Increasingly the diol chain lengths increases the amount of flexible segment in the chemical structure, which results in reduced elastic modulus values and increased values of elongation at break. Increasing the amount of branch monomer incorporated into the system reduces the molecular entanglement, which also results in decreased elastic modulus values and increased values of elongation at break. The L - phenylalanine-based poly(ester urea)s also exhibited a diol length dependent degradation process that varied between 1-5 % over 16 weeks. Compared with PLLA, PEUs degrade more quickly and the rate can be tuned by changing the diol chain length. PEUs absorb more water and the water uptake ability can be tuned by changing the branch density. This work was supported by Akron Functional Materials Center.

  5. Uric acid: a modulator of prostate cells and activin sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Sangkop, Febbie; Singh, Geeta; Rodrigues, Ely; Gold, Elspeth; Bahn, Andrew

    2016-03-01

    Elevated serum uric acid (SUA) or urate is associated with inflammation and gout. Recent evidence has linked urate to cancers, but little is known about urate effects in prostate cancer. Activins are inflammatory cytokines and negative growth regulators in the prostate. A hallmark of prostate cancer progression is activin insensitivity; however, mechanisms underlying this are unclear. We propose that elevated SUA is associated with prostate cancer counteracting the growth inhibitory effects of activins. The expression of activins A and B, urate transporter GLUT9 and tissue urate levels were examined in human prostate disease. Intracellular and secreted urate and GLUT9 expression were assessed in human prostate cancer cell lines. Furthermore, the effects of urate and probenecid, a known urate transport inhibitor, were determined in combination with activin A. Activin A expression was increased in low-grade prostate cancer, whereas activin B expression was reduced in high-grade prostate cancer. Intracellular urate levels decreased in all prostate pathologies, while GLUT9 expression decreased in benign prostatic hyperplasia, prostatitis and high-grade prostate cancer. Activin responsive LNCaP cells had higher intracellular and lower secreted urate levels than activin-insensitive PC3 cells. GLUT9 expression in prostate cancer cells was progressively lower than in prostate epithelial cells. Elevated extracellular urate was growth promoting in vitro, which was abolished by the gout medication probenecid, and it antagonized the growth inhibitory effects of activins. This study shows for the first time that a change in plasma or intracellular urate levels, possibly involving GLUT9 and a urate efflux transporter, has an impact on prostate cancer cell growth, and that lowering SUA levels in prostate cancer is likely to be therapeutically beneficial. PMID:26910779

  6. The Stockholm CREAtinine Measurements (SCREAM) project: protocol overview and regional representativeness

    PubMed Central

    Runesson, Björn; Gasparini, Alessandro; Qureshi, Abdul Rashid; Norin, Olof; Evans, Marie; Barany, Peter; Wettermark, Björn; Elinder, Carl Gustaf; Carrero, Juan Jesús

    2016-01-01

    Background We here describe the construction of the Stockholm CREAtinine Measurement (SCREAM) cohort and assess its coverage/representativeness of the Stockholm county in Sweden. SCREAM has the principal aims to estimate the burden and consequences of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and to identify inappropriate drug use (prescription of nephrotoxic, contraindicated or ill-dosed drugs). Methods SCREAM is a repository of laboratory data of individuals, residing or accessing healthcare in the region of Stockholm, who underwent creatinine assessments between 2006–11. Laboratory tests were linked to administrative databases with complete information on socioeconomic status, demographic data, healthcare utilization, diagnoses, vital status and dispensed prescription medicines. Results SCREAM identified 1 118 507 adult Stockholm citizens with available creatinine tests between 2006–11. This corresponded to 66% of the complete population in the region. Geographical coverage was uniform, ranging between 62 and 72% throughout its 26 municipalities. Population coverage was higher across older age strata (50% coverage for age range 18–44 years, >75% for 45–64 years and >90% coverage for ≥65 years). Of note, 97 and 98% of all individuals with a diagnosis of diabetes mellitus or cardiovascular disease, respectively, were captured by SCREAM. Further, 89% of all deaths registered in the period occurred in individuals with a creatinine test undertaken. Conclusion SCREAM represents the largest cohort to estimate the burden and healthcare implications of CKD in Sweden. The coverage and representativeness of the region of Stockholm was high and in accordance to both the commonness of creatinine assessment, and the medical indications for creatinine testing. The inclusion of individuals who sought medical care and had a creatinine test undertaken resulted in a slight over-representation of elderly and comorbid patients. PMID:26798472

  7. Evaluation of "true" creatinine clearance in rats reveals extensive renal secretion.

    PubMed

    Darling, I M; Morris, M E

    1991-10-01

    The renal clearance of endogenous creatinine is widely used to assess glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and renal function in animal investigations. The objective of the present investigation was to evaluate the extent of renal secretion of endogenous creatinine in rats and the effect of probenecid, the classical inhibitor of organic anion transport, on creatinine clearance. Ten female Lewis rats received 3H-inulin (5-muCi i.v. bolus followed by 5 muCi/hr) throughout a 6-hr period. Three hours after initiation of the inulin infusion, probenecid was administered (92.4-mg/kg i.v. bolus followed by 0.59 mg/min/kg). Steady-state serum concentrations of about 500 micrograms/ml probenecid were achieved. Renal clearance was assessed between 1 and 3 hr (control) and between 4 and 6 hr (probenecid treatment). A preliminary study in seven rats demonstrated no time-dependent change in inulin or creatinine clearance between these two study intervals. Creatinine clearances were determined by an alkaline picrate assay which incorporated Fuller's earth (Lloyd reagent) to remove interfering noncreatinine chromogens from serum samples and these values were compared with those using a nonspecific picrate assay. "True" clearance ratios of creatinine to inulin (Clcr/CLin) were greater than unity (2.33 +/- 0.83, mean +/- SD) and were significantly decreased after probenecid treatment (1.26 +/- 0.28, P less than 0.01). Probenecid had no effect on GFR, as assessed by inulin clearance. Using the nonspecific picrate assay, CLcr/CLin was 1.12 +/- 0.41, which was not significantly different from unity and which decreased to 0.53 +/- 0.12 after probenecid treatment. Therefore, creatinine undergoes extensive renal secretion in female Lewis rats. PMID:1796052

  8. Label free sensing of creatinine using a 6 GHz CMOS near-field dielectric immunosensor.

    PubMed

    Guha, S; Warsinke, A; Tientcheu, Ch M; Schmalz, K; Meliani, C; Wenger, Ch

    2015-05-01

    In this work we present a CMOS high frequency direct immunosensor operating at 6 GHz (C-band) for label free determination of creatinine. The sensor is fabricated in standard 0.13 μm SiGe:C BiCMOS process. The report also demonstrates the ability to immobilize creatinine molecules on a Si3N4 passivation layer of the standard BiCMOS/CMOS process, therefore, evading any further need of cumbersome post processing of the fabricated sensor chip. The sensor is based on capacitive detection of the amount of non-creatinine bound antibodies binding to an immobilized creatinine layer on the passivated sensor. The chip bound antibody amount in turn corresponds indirectly to the creatinine concentration used in the incubation phase. The determination of creatinine in the concentration range of 0.88-880 μM is successfully demonstrated in this work. A sensitivity of 35 MHz/10 fold increase in creatinine concentration (during incubation) at the centre frequency of 6 GHz is gained by the immunosensor. The results are compared with a standard optical measurement technique and the dynamic range and sensitivity is of the order of the established optical indication technique. The C-band immunosensor chip comprising an area of 0.3 mm(2) reduces the sensing area considerably, therefore, requiring a sample volume as low as 2 μl. The small analyte sample volume and label free approach also reduce the experimental costs in addition to the low fabrication costs offered by the batch fabrication technique of CMOS/BiCMOS process. PMID:25782697

  9. Maternal fructose drives placental uric acid production leading to adverse fetal outcomes.

    PubMed

    Asghar, Zeenat A; Thompson, Alysha; Chi, Maggie; Cusumano, Andrew; Scheaffer, Suzanne; Al-Hammadi, Noor; Saben, Jessica L; Moley, Kelle H

    2016-01-01

    Maternal metabolic diseases increase offspring risk for low birth weight and cardiometabolic diseases in adulthood. Excess fructose consumption may confer metabolic risks for both women and their offspring. However, the direct consequences of fructose intake per se are unknown. We assessed the impact of a maternal high-fructose diet on the fetal-placental unit in mice in the absence of metabolic syndrome and determined the association between maternal serum fructose and placental uric acid levels in humans. In mice, maternal fructose consumption led to placental inefficiency, fetal growth restriction, elevated fetal serum glucose and triglyceride levels. In the placenta, fructose induced de novo uric acid synthesis by activating the activities of the enzymes AMP deaminase and xanthine oxidase. Moreover, the placentas had increased lipids and altered expression of genes that control oxidative stress. Treatment of mothers with the xanthine oxidase inhibitor allopurinol reduced placental uric acid levels, prevented placental inefficiency, and improved fetal weights and serum triglycerides. Finally, in 18 women delivering at term, maternal serum fructose levels significantly correlated with placental uric acid levels. These findings suggest that in mice, excess maternal fructose consumption impairs placental function via a xanthine oxidase/uric acid-dependent mechanism, and similar effects may occur in humans. PMID:27125896

  10. Individual and simultaneous determination of uric acid and ascorbic acid by flow injection analysis.

    PubMed

    Almuaibed, A M; Townshend, A

    1992-11-01

    Flow injection methods for the individual and simultaneous determination of ascorbic acid and uric acid are proposed. A spectrophotometer and a miniamperometric detector are connected in sequence. The calibration graphs for uric acid obtained by measuring its absorbance at 293 nm and its current at +0.6 V are linear up to at least 80 and 70 mug/ml, respectively, with an rsd (n = 10) of 1 % for both methods at mid-range concentrations. The calibration graph for ascorbic acid with amperometric detection is linear up to 80 mg/l. with an rsd (n = 10) of 0.8% at 30 mg/l. The simultaneous determination of uric acid and ascorbic acid is based on measurement of the absorbance of uric acid at 393 nm and amperometric determination of both analytes at +0.6 V. The average relative errors of the analysis of binary mixtures of uric acid and ascorbic acid are 2.2 and 4.2%, respectively. PMID:18965554