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Sample records for uv ceti stars

  1. Nucleosynthesis of Li-7 in flares on UV Ceti stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karpen, J. T.; Worden, S. P.

    1979-01-01

    The possible production of Li-7 by nuclear reactions in UV Ceti flares has been considered. By utilizing solar observations and theory, a relationship is derived between flare energy and production rates for Li-7; approximately 100 erg of total flare energy is found to denote the formation of a Li-7 atom. Based on this value and best estimates of UV Ceti-type flare rates, it is concluded that less than 10% of the Li-7 observed in the intestellar medium may have been produced by this mechanism. Formation of significant amounts of interstellar deuterium by this method is ruled out.

  2. Optical microflaring on the nearby flare star binary UV Ceti

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, J. H. M. M.; Kanbach, G.; Rau, A.; Steinle, H.

    2016-05-01

    We present extremely high time resolution observations of the visual flare star binary UV Cet obtained with the Optical Pulsar Timing Analyzer (OPTIMA) at the 1.3 m telescope at Skinakas Observatory (SKO) in Crete, Greece. OPTIMA is a fiber-fed optical instrument that uses Single Photon Avalanche Diodes to measure the arrival times of individual optical photons. The time resolution of the observations presented here was 4 μs, allowing to resolve the typical millisecond variability time scales associated with stellar flares. We report the detection of very short impulsive bursts in the blue band with well resolved rise and decay time scales of about 2 s. The overall energetics put these flares at the lower end of the known flare distribution of UV Cet.

  3. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Catalog of binary UV Ceti stars (Tamazian+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamazian, V.; Malkov, O.

    2015-01-01

    A catalogue of nearby UV Ceti type flare stars in (137) visual binary systems is presented in the form of two separate tables of information. The catalogue has developed from Catalogue and Bibliography of UV Cet stars (Gershberg et al., 1999, Cat. J/A+AS/139/555) and the list of nearby flare stars (Pettersen, 1991MmSAI..62..217P) by including more recent and additional information from catalogues of binary stars (WDS, Mason et al., 2001-2014, Cat. B/wds; ORB6, Hartkopf et al. 2006-2014; DM3, Mason+ 2006-2014) and data from the Catalog of Nearby Stars, Preliminary 3rd Version (Gliese et al., 1991, Cat. V/70), from Hipparcos, the New Reduction (van Leeuwen 2007, Cat. I/311) and from SIMBAD. Some issues relating to the mass, luminosity and spectrum relations of flare stars are also discussed. (2 data files).

  4. Microwave observations of the flare stars UV Ceti, AT Microscopii, and AU Microscopii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kundu, M. R.; Jackson, P. D.; White, S. M.; Melozzi, M.

    1987-01-01

    The results of observations of three red dwarf flare star systems, UV Ceti, AT Mic, and AU Mic, made in February and March of 1985, are reported. Flaring was detected from all three systems, and quiescent emission from UV Cet and AU Mic. Models for the quiescent microwave-emitting corona of UV Cet are discussed. The gravitational scale height in current models is similar to or larger than the height of the corona, which is a striking difference from the case of the solar corona and confirms that magnetic structures are required to confine the radio-emitting corona. The role of precipitation into the chromosphere of the energetic particles in such a corona is explored, and it is shown that for plausible parameters it may be the dominant energy loss mechanism.

  5. A search for X-rays from UV Ceti flare stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crannell, C. J.; Markert, T. H.; Moffett, T. J.; Spangler, S. R.

    1975-01-01

    A search of MIT/OSO-7 data was made for evidence of X-ray emission from flares of UV Ceti flare stars. Observations from McDonald Observatory were used to identify the times of optical flares. The only instance of coincident coverage occurred on 1974 January 21 UT at 03:43:26 GMT for delta m(u)=0.86 flare of YZ CMi. No radio coverage of this particular event was obtained. Upper limits (3 sigma) of 0.8, 1.0, and 0.7 photons/sq cm-sec on the observed X-ray flux were set for the energy ranges greater than or approximately equal to 15, greater than or approximately equal to 3, and 1-10 keV, respectively.

  6. UV Spectroscopy of Star-grazing Comets Within the 49 Ceti Debris Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miles, Brittany E.; Roberge, Aki; Welsh, Barry

    2016-06-01

    We present the analysis of time-variable Doppler-shifted absorption features in far-UV spectra of the unusual 49 Ceti debris disk. This nearly edge-on disk is one of the brightest known and is one of the very few containing detectable amounts of circumstellar (CS) gas as well as dust. In our two visits of Hubble Space Telescope STIS spectra, variable absorption features are seen on the wings of lines arising from Cii and Civ but not for any of the other CS absorption lines. Similar variable features have long been seen in spectra of the well-studied β Pictoris debris disk and attributed to the transits of star-grazing comets. We calculated the velocity ranges and apparent column densities of the 49 Cet variable gas, which appears to have been moving at velocities of tens to hundreds of km s‑1 relative to the central star. The velocities in the redshifted variable event seen in the second visit show that the maximum distances of the infalling gas at the time of transit were about 0.05–0.2 au from the central star. A preliminary attempt at a composition analysis of the redshifted event suggests that the C/O ratio in the infalling gas is super-solar, as it is in the bulk of the stable disk gas.

  7. Does UV Ceti Suffer from the MAD Syndrome?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drake, Jeremy J.

    We propose to obtain an EUV spectrum of the nearby flare star UV Ceti with the EUVE spectrometer. UV Ceti is the lowest mass star within the reach of the EUVE spectrometer, and it is of particular interest to study this protypical flare star with respect to recent suggestions of elemental underabundances of active stars. Our spectral analysis of X-ray spectra of UV Ceti obtained with the ROSAT PSPC and ASCA SIS does suggest significant metal underabundances, however, these analyses heavily rely on the spectral modelling of - in comparison to the spectral resolution achievable with EUVE - lower resolution data. In addition we expect to be able to derive differential emission measure distributions and coronal densities if the Fe XIV lines at 211 and 264 Angstroms can be detected. Finally, the proposed EUVE observations of UV Ceti will provide an unprecedented opportunity to study the coronal output on time scales from hours to weeks.

  8. A NEW METHOD FOR CLASSIFYING FLARES OF UV Ceti TYPE STARS: DIFFERENCES BETWEEN SLOW AND FAST FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Dal, H. A.; Evren, S.

    2010-08-15

    In this study, a new method is presented to classify flares derived from the photoelectric photometry of UV Ceti type stars. This method is based on statistical analyses using an independent samples t-test. The data used in analyses were obtained from four flare stars observed between 2004 and 2007. The total number of flares obtained in the observations of AD Leo, EV Lac, EQ Peg, and V1054 Oph is 321 in the standard Johnson U band. As a result flares can be separated into two types, slow and fast, depending on the ratio of flare decay time to flare rise time. The ratio is below 3.5 for all slow flares, while it is above 3.5 for all fast flares. Also, according to the independent samples t-test, there is a difference of about 157 s between equivalent durations of slow and fast flares. In addition, there are significant differences between amplitudes and rise times of slow and fast flares.

  9. A New Method for Classifying Flares of UV Ceti Type Stars: Differences Between Slow and Fast Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dal, H. A.; Evren, S.

    2010-08-01

    In this study, a new method is presented to classify flares derived from the photoelectric photometry of UV Ceti type stars. This method is based on statistical analyses using an independent samples t-test. The data used in analyses were obtained from four flare stars observed between 2004 and 2007. The total number of flares obtained in the observations of AD Leo, EV Lac, EQ Peg, and V1054 Oph is 321 in the standard Johnson U band. As a result flares can be separated into two types, slow and fast, depending on the ratio of flare decay time to flare rise time. The ratio is below 3.5 for all slow flares, while it is above 3.5 for all fast flares. Also, according to the independent samples t-test, there is a difference of about 157 s between equivalent durations of slow and fast flares. In addition, there are significant differences between amplitudes and rise times of slow and fast flares.

  10. A search for slowly varying radio continuum emission from UV Ceti stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spangler, S. R.; Shawhan, S. D.

    1976-01-01

    The paper presents results of a search conducted at the Arecibo Observatory for variable 430-MHz emission from the active flare stars EQ Peg, YZ CMi, and AD Leo. No statistically significant evidence for slowly varying emission is found to a level of 0.05 Jy for AD Leo, 0.018-0.021 Jy for YZ CMi, and 0.009-0.018 Jy for EQ Peg. Upper limits of about 10 trillion K are determined for the brightness temperature of active radio regions on these stars at the time of the observations.

  11. Detection of a compact companion of the mild barium star Xi-1 Ceti

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bohm-Vitense, E.; Johnson, H. R.

    1985-01-01

    In the present paper, the observation of a white dwarf companion of the mild Ba star Xi-1 Ceti (= 65 Ceti = HR 649 = HD 13611) is reported, taking into account also the properties of the mild Ba star and of its companion. The UV spectrum of Xi-1 Ceti is discussed along with an interpretation of this spectrum. Attention is given to the effective temperature of the companion, the absorption bands in the spectrum, the radius and mass of the Xi-1 Ceti companion, and questions regarding the obscuration of the companion by the atmosphere of the Ba star. It is found that the overall energy distribution of the Xi-1 Ceti companion can best be matched with a 14,000 K DA white dwarf of log g = 8 or less. However, the absolute intensity is too small and would require a radius too small and a mass too large for such a gravity.

  12. Discovery of eleven new ZZ Ceti stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castanheira, B. G.; Kepler, S. O.; Mullally, F.; Winget, D. E.; Koester, D.; Voss, B.; Kleinman, S. J.; Nitta, A.; Eisenstein, D. J.; Napiwotzki, R.; Reimers, D.

    2006-04-01

    We report the discovery of eleven new ZZ Cetis using telescopes at OPD (Observatório do Pico dos Dias/LNA) in Brazil, the 4.1 m SOAR (Southern Astrophysical Research) telescope at Cerro Pachon, Chile, and the 2.1 m Otto Struve telescope at McDonald observatory. The candidates were selected from the SDSS (Sloan Digital Sky Survey) and SPY (ESO SN Ia progenitor survey), based on their Teff obtained from optical spectra fitting. This selection criterion yields the highest success rate of detecting new ZZ Cetis, above 90% in the Teff range from 12 000 to 11 000 K. We also report on a DA not observed to vary, with a Teff placing the star close to the blue edge of the instability strip. Among our new pulsators, one is slightly cooler than this star for which pulsations were not detected. Our observations are an important constraint on the location of the blue edge of the ZZ Ceti instability strip. Partially based on observations at Observatório do Pico dos Dias/LNA, the Southern Astrophysical Research telescope, a collaboration between CNPq-Brazil, NOAO, UNC and MSU, and McDonald Observatory of the University of Texas at Austin.

  13. Rotation Modulations and Distributions of the Flare Occurrence Rates on the Surface of Five UV Ceti Type Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dal, Hasan Ali; Evren, Serdar

    2011-04-01

    In this study, we considered stellar spots, stellar flares, and also the relation between these two magnetic proccesses that take place on UV Cet stars. In addition, the hypothesis about slow flares described by Gurzadyan (1986 Ap&SS, 125, 127) was investigated. All of these discussions were based on the results of three years of observations of UV Cet-type stars: AD Leo, EV Lac, V1005 Ori, EQ Peg, and V1054 Oph. First of all, the results show that stellar spot activity occurs on the stellar surface of EV Lac, V1005 Ori, and EQ Peg, while AD Leo does not show any short-term variability and V1054 Oph does not exhibit any variability. We report on new ephemerides for EV Lac, V1005 Ori, and EQ Peg, obtained from time-series analyses. The phases, computed at intervals of 0.10 phase length, where the mean flare occurence rates to obtain maximum amplitude; also, the phases of rotational modulation were compared in order to investigate whether there is any longitudinal relation between stellar flares and spots. Although the results show that flare events are related with spotted areas on stellar surfaces during some of the observing seasons, we did not find any clear correlation among them. Finally, it was tested whether slow flares are fast flares occurring on the opposite side of the stars according to the direction of the observers, as mentioned in a hypothesis developed by Gurzadyan (1986). The flare occurence rates reveal that both slow and fast flares can occur in any rotational phases. The flare occurence rates of both fast and slow flares vary in the same way along the longitudes for all program stars. These results are not expected based on the case mentioned in the hypothesis.

  14. AY Ceti - A flaring, spotted star with a hot companion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, T.; Fekel, F. C., Jr.; Gibson, D. M.

    1985-01-01

    AY Ceti is a late-type single-line spectroscopic binary, a bright X-ray source (L/x/ equal to about 1.5 x 10 to the 31st ergs/s), and a spotted star, as evidenced by its prominent photometric wave. In this paper, observations made with the IUE satellite and the VLA radio interferometer are reported. The 1200-2000 A UV spectrum of AY Cet shows a hot stellar continuum and a very broad Ly-alpha absorption line from a previously unobserved white dwarf secondary. The UV spectrum can be matched to the energy distribution of a (T/eff/ = 18,000 K, log g = 8) model atmosphere. Superposed on this hot continuum are high-excitation emission lines typical of chromospheres and transition regions of active late-type stars, e.g., the spotted RS CVn binaries. It is concluded that the bright lines and soft X-ray emission of AY Cet arise from the cool primary star, rather than from mass transfer and accretion onto the secondary as has recently been proposed for the similar system 56 Peg. Two strong radio flares on AY Cet were observed. The second was rapidly variable and left-hand circularly polarized at levels up to pi(c) = 86 + or - 5 percent at 20 cm wavelength. The most likely emission mechanism is an electron-cyclotron maser.

  15. Coordinated observations of a large impulsive flare on UV Ceti

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Jager, C.; Heise, J.; van Genderen, A. M.; Foing, B. H.; Ilyin, I. V.; Kilkenny, D. S.; Marvridis, L.; Cutispoto, G.; Rodono, M.; Seeds, M. A.; Yuen, K. Ng.; van Driel, W.; Rabattu, X.; Zodi, A. M.; Vilas Boas, J. W. S.; Scalise, E.; Schaal, R. E.; Kaufmann, P.; Waelkens, C.

    1989-02-01

    The characteristics of the major flare observed on UV Ceti on Decemmber 1985 at 01:26 UT during an international observing campaign are described. X-ray observations were obtained with Exosat in the 0.06-0.3 keV bands and 1-6 keV bands; optical photometry was obtained in 11 wavelength bands, and spectra were recorded in the wavelength range 3500 to 7000 A. The results of the data analysis support the Impulsive Explosion Model proposed for stellar flares and disclose some differences with the solar case.

  16. Pioneer 10 observations of the Beta Cephei stars Gamma Pegasi and Delta Ceti

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, Geraldine J.; Ogawa, H. S.; Judge, K. S.; Judge, D. L.

    1987-01-01

    The results of analyzing broad-band Pioneer 10 photometric observations of the low-amplitude pulsating Beta Cephei stars Gamma Pegasi and Delta Ceti are reported. Periods and light curve amplitudes of 3.649 + or - 0.020 hr, 0.05 + or - 0.02 mag for Gamma Peg and 3.869 + or - 0.020 hr, 0.13 + or - 0.02 mag for Delta Ceti are obtained; a power spectrum analysis of the data reveals no other periods. No evidence is found for a phase shift between the light curve maxima in the UV and visible regions. The observed amplitudes combined with published visual and near-UV data suggest a flux and temperature variability of about 200 solar luminosities and 250 K for Gamma Peg and about 600 solar luminosities and 450 K for Delta Cet. These results are compared with others obtained with satellite and ground-based instrumentation.

  17. Asteroseismology of the ZZ Ceti star KUV 08368+4026

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, C.; Fu, J.-N.; Vauclair, G.; Dolez, N.; Fox-Machado, L.; Michel, R.; Chavez, M.; Bertone, E.

    2015-06-01

    Asteroseismology is a unique tool to explore the internal structure of stars through both observational and theoretical research. The internal structure of pulsating hydrogen shell white dwarfs (ZZ Ceti stars) detected by asteroseismology is regarded as the representative of all DA white dwarfs. Observations for KUV 08368+4026, which locates in the middle of the ZZ Ceti instability strip, have been carried out in 1999 and from 2009 to 2012 with either single-site runs or multisite campaigns. Time series photometric data of about 300 h were collected in total. Through data reduction and analysis, 30 frequencies were extracted, including four triplets, two doublets, one single mode and further signals. The independent modes are identified as either l = 1 or l = 2 modes. Hence, a rotation period of 5.52 ± 0.22 d was deduced from the period spacing in the multiplets. Theoretical static models were built and a best-fitting model for KUV 08368+4026 was obtained with 0.692 ± 0.002 M⊙, (2.92 ± 0.02) × 10-3 L⊙ and the hydrogen mass fraction of 10-4 stellar mass.

  18. Amplitude Modulation in the ZZ Ceti Star GD 244

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bognár, Zs.; Paparó, M.; Molnár, L.; Plachy, E.; Sódor, Á.

    2015-06-01

    Previous studies of GD 244 revealed seven pulsation frequencies (two doublets and three single periods) in the light variations of the star. The data obtained at McDonald Observatory between 2003 and 2006, and our additional measurements in 2006 and 2007 at Konkoly Observatory, allow the investigation of the long-term pulsational behaviour of GD 244. We found that the 307.1 s period component of one of the doublets show long-term, periodic amplitude modulation with a time scale of ˜ 740 days. Possible explanations are that nonlinear resonant mode coupling is operating among the rotationally split frequency components, or two modes, unresolved in the yearly data are excited at ˜ 307.1 s. This is the first time that such long-term periodic amplitude modulation is published on a ZZ Ceti star.

  19. An Inventory of Gas in a Debris Disk: Far-UV Spectroscopy of 49 Ceti

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberge, Aki

    2012-10-01

    Debris disks stand between gas-rich protoplanetary disks and mature planetary systems, shedding light on the late stages of planetary system formation. Their dust component has been extensively studied, yet has provided little information about disk chemical composition. More information can be provided by their gas content, but astonishingly little is known about it. Only one debris disk has a fairly complete inventory of its gas, which is surprisingly carbon-rich {Beta Pictoris; Roberge et al. 2006}. Basic questions remain unanswered. What are the typical gas-to-dust mass ratios in debris disks? What is the chemical composition of debris gas and its parent material? The answers to these questions have profound implications for terrestrial planet assembly and the origins of planetary atmospheres.Most detections of debris gas were achieved with line-of-sight UV/optical absorption spectroscopy of edge-on disks, using the central star as the background source. This technique is far more sensitive to small amounts of gas than current emission line studies. The far-UV bandpass is particularly important, since strong transitions of abundant atomic, ionic, and molecular species lie there. We propose extending our intriguing studies of the Beta Pic gas with STIS far-UV spectroscopy of a highly promising debris disk system, 49 Ceti. This well-known disk is edge-on and contains CO gas {e.g. Hughes et al. 2008}. We plan to measure column densities of the most important gas species {CI, CII, OI, CO, SiII, and FeII}, find the relative elemental gas abundances, and determine the total gas mass using a powerful gas disk modeling code {ProDiMo; Woitke, Kamp, & Thi 2009}.

  20. The search for ZZ Ceti stars in the original Kepler mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greiss, S.; Hermes, J. J.; Gänsicke, B. T.; Steeghs, D. T. H.; Bell, Keaton J.; Raddi, R.; Tremblay, P.-E.; Breedt, E.; Ramsay, G.; Koester, D.; Carter, P. J.; Vanderbosch, Z.; Winget, D. E.; Winget, K. I.

    2016-04-01

    We report the discovery of 42 white dwarfs in the original Kepler mission field, including nine new confirmed pulsating hydrogen-atmosphere white dwarfs (ZZ Ceti stars). Guided by the Kepler-Isaac Newton Telescope Survey, we selected white dwarf candidates on the basis of their U - g, g - r, and r - Hα photometric colours. We followed up these candidates with high-signal-to-noise optical spectroscopy from the 4.2-m William Herschel Telescope. Using ground-based, time series photometry, we put our sample of new spectroscopically characterized white dwarfs in the context of the empirical ZZ Ceti instability strip. Prior to our search, only two pulsating white dwarfs had been observed by Kepler. Ultimately, four of our new ZZ Cetis were observed from space. These rich data sets are helping initiate a rapid advancement in the asteroseismic investigation of pulsating white dwarfs, which continues with the extended Kepler mission, K2.

  1. 14 Ceti: a probable Ap-star-descendant entering the Hertzsprung gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aurière, M.; Konstantinova-Antova, R.; Petit, P.; Charbonnel, C.; Van Eck, S.; Donati, J.-F.; Lignières, F.; Roudier, T.

    2012-07-01

    Context. 14 Ceti is a subgiant star of F spectral class that displays variations in the S-index of its Ca ii H & K lines and an X-ray emission that is stronger than the mean observed for its spectral class, which may be due to some magnetic activity. Aims: We attempt to Zeeman-detect and study the magnetic field of 14 Ceti and to infer its origin. Methods: We used the spectropolarimeter Narval at the Telescope Bernard Lyot, Pic du Midi Observatory, and the least squares deconvolution method to create high signal-to-noise ratio Stokes V profiles. We derived the surface-averaged longitudinal magnetic field Bl. We also measured the S-index, and the radial velocity for each observation. Results: 14 Ceti is Zeeman-detected for the 30 observed dates spanning from August 2007 to January 2012. The average longitudinal magnetic field does not reverse its sign, reaches about -35 G, and shows some month-long-timescale variations in our 2008 and 2011-2012 observations. The S-index follows the same long-term trend as Bl. 14 Ceti is confirmed as a single star without H-K emission cores. The strength of the observed surface magnetic field of 14 Ceti is one order of magnitude greater than the observed one for late F main-sequence stars, and is comparable to the values measured in the active late F pre-main-sequence star HR 1817. On the other hand, taking into account the post-main-sequence evolution of an Ap star, an oblique rotator model can explain the strength of the magnetic field of 14 Ceti. The variations with a timescale of months observed for both the Bl and S-index could be due to the rotation. Conclusions: The most probable scenario to explain our observations appears to be that 14 Ceti is the descendant of a cool Ap star. Based on data obtained using the Télescope Bernard Lyot at Observatoire du Pic du Midi, CNRS/INSU and Université de Toulouse, France.

  2. Asteroseismological study of massive ZZ Ceti stars with fully evolutionary models

    SciTech Connect

    Romero, A. D.; Kepler, S. O.; Córsico, A. H.; Althaus, L. G.

    2013-12-10

    We present the first asteroseismological study for 42 massive ZZ Ceti stars based on a large set of fully evolutionary carbon-oxygen core DA white dwarf models characterized by a detailed and consistent chemical inner profile for the core and the envelope. Our sample comprises all of the ZZ Ceti stars with spectroscopic stellar masses between 0.72 and 1.05 M {sub ☉} known to date. The asteroseismological analysis of a set of 42 stars enables study of the ensemble properties of the massive, pulsating white dwarf stars with carbon-oxygen cores, in particular the thickness of the hydrogen envelope and the stellar mass. A significant fraction of stars in our sample have stellar mass that is high enough to crystallize at the effective temperatures of the ZZ Ceti instability strip, which enables us to study the effects of crystallization on the pulsation properties of these stars. Our results show that the phase diagram presented in Horowitz et al. seems to be a good representation of the crystallization process inside white dwarf stars, in agreement with the results from white dwarf luminosity function in globular clusters.

  3. Ultraviolet Spectra of Star-Grazing Comets in the 49 Ceti Disk System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miles, Brittany E.; Roberge, Aki; Welsh, Barry

    2015-01-01

    49 Ceti is a young star that hosts a debris disk with an unusually large amount of carbon monoxide gas. This excess gas has been attributed to frequent collisions of comets within the disk. (Zuckerman & Song, 2012). Since 49 Ceti disk is nearly edge-on to our line of sight, it is a prime target to observe disk gas and evaporated material from star-grazing comets using absorption spectroscopy, as shown by detection of time-variable circumstellar absorption in optical spectra of the star (Montgomery & Welsh 2012). Here we discuss ultraviolet spectra of 49 Ceti taken using the Hubble Space Telescope Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) during two separate visits six days apart. The spectra show time-variable and highly Doppler shifted absorption features from ionized gaseous species. The maximum velocity of the time-variable gas corresponds to a minimum distance from the star of 0.06 AU. These features very likely come from star-grazing comets. Lower limits on element abundances in the gas were found using the apparent optical depth method. The variable comet gas appears carbon rich, despite the disk gas as a whole showing strong absorption features from both carbon and oxygen (Roberge et al., 2014, in press).

  4. The effective temperature of the white-dwarf star and ZZ Ceti candidate Wolf 485A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Digel, S. W.; Shipman, H. L.

    1984-01-01

    Previous multichannel observations of W485A (WD 1327-08) have placed it in the instability strip, the effective temperature range 11,000-13,000 K. In the instability strip, most of the stars (the ZZ Ceti stars) are variable, but W485A has not been detected to be variable. In this paper, high-resolution spectra of W485A and improved hydrogen-line broadening routines are used in the ATLAS model-atmospheres program to find the temperature of W485A; the estimate of effective temperature most consistent with the other data on the star is 14,600 K, outside the instability strip.

  5. Seismological procedures for ZZ Ceti stars and an application to G 117-B15A

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, P.A.

    1997-06-01

    In this paper, we outline the procedure for seismological analysis of the ZZ Ceti stars, which are pulsating white dwarfs with hydrogen atmospheres. We use G 117-B15A as the example for this process and derive constraints on the mass and internal structure. The hydrogen layer mass is either about 10(-4)M* or 10(-7)M* depending on whether the l = 1 mode near 215 s is k = 2 or k = 1, respectively. In both cases, the best fitting mass is 0.60M solar, in agreement with spectroscopic log g values.

  6. Shock-induced polarized hydrogen emission lines in the Mira star o Ceti

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabas, N.; Lèbre, A.; Gillet, D.

    2011-11-01

    Context. In the spectra of variable pulsating stars, especially Mira stars, the detection of intense hydrogen emission lines has been explained by the presence of a radiative and hypersonic shock wave, periodically propagating throughout the stellar atmosphere. Previous observation of the Mira star o Ceti around one of its brightest maximum light led to the detection of a strong level of linear polarization associated to Balmer emissions, although the origin of this phenomenon is not fully explained yet. Aims: With the help of spectropolarimetry, we propose to investigate the nature of shock waves propagating throughout the stellar atmosphere and present, for o Ceti (the prototype of Mira stars), a full observational study of hydrogen emission lines formed in the radiative region of such a shock. Methods: Using the instrument NARVAL mounted on the Télescope Bernard Lyot (TBL) in Pic du Midi Observatory (France), we performed a spectropolarimetric monitoring of o Ceti during three consecutive pulsation cycles. For this survey, the four Stokes parameters (I for intensity, Q and U for linear polarization, and V for circular polarization) were systematically collected, with a particular emphasis on the maxima of luminosity, i.e. when a radiative shock wave is supposed to emerge from the photosphere and starts to propagate outward. Results: On hydrogen Balmer lines, over a large part of the luminosity cycle, we report clear detection of polarimetric structures in Q and U Stokes spectra (and also in V Stokes spectra but to a lesser extent). We report a temporal evolution of these spectropolarimetric signatures, which appear strongly correlated to the presence of an intense shock wave responsible for the hydrogen emission lines. We establish that the hydrogen lines are polarized by a physical process inherent to the mechanism responsible for the emission line formation: the shock wave itself. Two mechanisms are thus considered: a global one that implies a polarization

  7. Outer atmospheres of cool stars. XIV - A model for the chromosphere and transition region of Beta Ceti (G9.5 III)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eriksson, K.; Linsky, J. L.; Simon, T.

    1983-01-01

    In the present chromospheric and transition region model for Beta Ceti, which is consistent with IUE spectra of the Mg II, C II, and C IV resonance lines, the Mg II h and k lines are treated in partial redistribution and the C II and C IV lines in complete redistribution. Computed line fluxes are presented for a range of models to show the range of permitted temperature structures. A comparison of the Beta Ceti model to models previously computed in a similar way for other stars shows a trend of decreasing chromospheric pressures and increasing geometric scales as single stars evolve across the transition region boundary. The present analysis also suggests that transition region pressures drastically decrease and geometric scales rapidly increase as single giant stars evolve to the right, toward the boudnary. Beta Ceti's exceptional X-ray brightness is discussed.

  8. The Impact of the Uncertainties in the 12C(α,γ)16O Reaction Rate on the Asteroseismology of ZZ Ceti Stars: First Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Gerónimo, Francisco C.; Córsico, Alejandro H.; Althaus, Leandro G.; Romero, Alejandra D.

    2015-06-01

    We assess for the first time the impact that the uncertainties affecting the 12C(α,γ)16O reaction rate have on the asteroseismological inferences of ZZ Ceti stars. For our adopted test-case, the well studied DAV star G117-B15A, we found that the incomplete knowledge of the 12C(α,γ)16O nuclear reaction rate results in a moderate dispersion of the structural parameters of the asteroseismological model.

  9. Asteroseismology of the Crystallized ZZ Ceti Star BPM 37093: A Different View (Part II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontaine, G.; Brassard, P.

    2005-07-01

    BPM 37093 is a pulsating white dwarf of the ZZ Ceti type massive enough to have undergone partial crystallization. Recently, on the basis of asteroseismological techniques, Metcalfe et al. (2004) claimed to have measured the fraction of crystallized matter in BPM 37093, a value upward of 90%. If true, this is a most significant achievement, well worthy of further scrutiny. In this spirit, we have reexamined the data available -- 8 periods -- with our own independent model building code and period matching code in parameter space. We present the second and final part of the results of our investigations in this communication.

  10. A 40 Myr OLD GASEOUS CIRCUMSTELLAR DISK AT 49 CETI: MASSIVE CO-RICH COMET CLOUDS AT YOUNG A-TYPE STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Zuckerman, B.; Song, Inseok E-mail: song@physast.uga.edu

    2012-10-20

    The gaseous molecular disk that orbits the main-sequence A-type star 49 Ceti has been known since 1995, but the stellar age and the origin of the observed carbon monoxide molecules have been unknown. We now identify 49 Ceti as a member of the 40 Myr old Argus Association and present a colliding comet model to explain the high CO concentrations seen at 49 Ceti and the 30 Myr old A-type star HD 21997. The model suggests that massive-400 Earth mass-analogs of the Sun's Kuiper Belt are in orbit around some A-type stars, that these large masses are composed primarily of comet-like objects, and that these objects are rich in CO and perhaps also CO{sub 2}. We identify additional early-type members of the Argus Association and the Tucana/Horologium and Columba Associations; some of these stars display excess mid-infrared emission as measured with the Widefield Infrared Survey Explorer.

  11. No first ionization potential fractionation in the active stars AR Piscium and AY Ceti

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanz-Forcada, J.; Affer, L.; Micela, G.

    2009-10-01

    Context: The comparison of coronal and photospheric abundances in cool stars is an essential question to resolve. In the Sun an enhancement of the elements with low first ionization potential (FIP) is observed in the corona with respect to the photosphere. Stars with high levels of activity seem to show a depletion of elements with low FIP when compared to solar standard values; however, the few cases of active stars in which photospheric values are available for comparison lead to confusing results, and an enlargement of the sample is mandatory for solving this longstanding problem. Aims: We calculate in this paper the photospheric and coronal abundances of two well known active binary systems, AR Psc and AY Cet, to get further insight into the complications of coronal abundances. Methods: Coronal abundances of 9 elements were calculated by means of the reconstruction of a detailed emission measure distribution, using a line-based method that considers the lines from different elements separately. Photospheric abundances of 8 elements were calculated using high-resolution optical spectra of the stars. Results: The results once again show a lack of any FIP-related effect in the coronal abundances of the stars. The presence of metal abundance depletion (MAD) or inverse FIP effects in some stars could stem from a mistaken comparison to solar photospheric values or from a deficient calculation of photospheric abundances in fast-rotating stars. Conclusions: The lack of FIP fractionation seems to confirm that Alfvén waves combined with pondermotive forces are dominant in the corona of active stars. Tables 2 and 3 are only available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  12. Ceti Mensa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 1 June 2004 This image was collected January 29, 2004 during southern summer season. The local time at the image location was about 4 pm. The image shows an area in the Ceti Mensa region.

    The THEMIS VIS camera is capable of capturing color images of the martian surface using its five different color filters. In this mode of operation, the spatial resolution and coverage of the image must be reduced to accommodate the additional data volume produced from the use of multiple filters. To make a color image, three of the five filter images (each in grayscale) are selected. Each is contrast enhanced and then converted to a red, green, or blue intensity image. These three images are then combined to produce a full color, single image. Because the THEMIS color filters don't span the full range of colors seen by the human eye, a color THEMIS image does not represent true color. Also, because each single-filter image is contrast enhanced before inclusion in the three-color image, the apparent color variation of the scene is exaggerated. Nevertheless, the color variation that does appear is representative of some change in color, however subtle, in the actual scene. Note that the long edges of THEMIS color images typically contain color artifacts that do not represent surface variation.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -5.2, Longitude 283.6 East (76.4 West). 38 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory

  13. UV-bright stars in globular clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landsman, Wayne B.

    1994-01-01

    This paper highlights globular cluster studies with Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (UIT) in three areas: the discrepancy between observed ultraviolet HB magnitudes and predictions of theoretical HB models; the discovery of two hot subdwarfs in NGC 1851, a globular not previously known to contain such stars; and spectroscopic follow up of newly identified UV-bright stars in M79 and w Cen. I also present results of a recent observation of NGC 6397 with the Voyager ultraviolet spectrometer.

  14. Constraining the Evolution of ZZ Ceti

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukadam, Anjum S.; Kepler, S. O.; Winget, D. E.; Nather, R. E.; Kilic, M.; Mullally, F.; vonHippel, T.; Kleinman, S. J.; Nitta, A.; Guzik, J. A.

    2003-01-01

    We report our analysis of the stability of pulsation periods in the DAV star (pulsating hydrogen atmosphere white dwarf) ZZ Ceti, also called R548. On the basis of observations that span 31 years, we conclude that the period 213.13 s observed in ZZ Ceti drifts at a rate dP/dt 5 (5.5 plus or minus 1.9) x 10(exp -15) ss(sup -1), after correcting for proper motion. Our results are consistent with previous P values for this mode and an improvement over them because of the larger time base. The characteristic stability timescale implied for the pulsation period is |P||P(raised dot)|greater than or equal to 1.2 Gyr, comparable to the theoretical cooling timescale for the star. Our current stability limit for the period 213.13 s is only slightly less than the present measurement for another DAV, G117-B15A, for the period 215.2 s, establishing this mode in ZZ Ceti as the second most stable optical clock known, comparable to atomic clocks and more stable than most pulsars. Constraining the cooling rate of ZZ Ceti aids theoretical evolutionary models and white dwarf cosmochronology. The drift rate of this clock is small enough that we can set interesting limits on reflex motion due to planetary companions.

  15. Tau Ceti: our nearest cousin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Folco, E.; Péricaud, J.; Augereau, J.-C.; Marshall, J.

    2014-12-01

    The 10 Gyr old G8V star τCeti is the closest Solar analogue. It harbors the less massive exo-Kuiper belt detected so far among debris disks stars. With a total disk mass only ten times larger than that of our Kuiper belt, it represents a case study of evolved debris disks. Whether its disk has been continuously eroded by steady-state collisions of planetesimals or recently regenerated by a dynamical instability remains a puzzling question. The detection of the dust points to the existence of (undetected) planetary bodies, which are expected to sculpt the belt and may scatter material inwards to the terrestrial planet region, where hot dust is also observed. Unfortunately, the disk morphology remains unknown. We report a recent Herschel PACS (70μ and 160μ)detection of a 15 au ring-like structure which is in conflict with the earlier SCUBA discovery. The disk is partly resolved by Herschel and we derive its morphology and the dust properties from the images and SED analysis with the GraTer modeling code. τCeti is a unique laboratory to highlight the long-term dynamical evolution of planetary systems and may represent an alternative outcome to the evolution of our Solar system.

  16. ASCA X-ray spectra of the active single stars Beta Ceti and pi(1) Ursae Majoris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drake, S. A.; Singh, K. P.; White, N. E.; Simon, Theodore

    1994-01-01

    We present X-ray spectra obtaiined by ASCA of two single, active stars, the G dwarf pi(1) UMa, and the G9/K0 giant Beta Cet. The spectra of both stars require the presence of at least two plasma components with different temperatures, 0.3-0.4 keV and approximately 0.7 keV, in order for acceptable fits to be obtained. The spectral resolving power and signal-to-noise ratio of the solid state imaging spectrometer (SIS) spectra allow us to formally constrain the coronal abundances of a number of elements. In Beta Cet, we find Mg to be overabundant, while other elements such as O, Ne, and N are underabundant, relative to the solar photospheric values. From the lower signal-to-noise ratio SIS spectrum of pi(1) UMa, we find evidence for underabundances of O, Ne, and Fe. These results are discussed in the context of the present understanding of elemental abundances in solar and stellar coronae.

  17. UV and radiofrequency observations of Wolf-Rayet stars.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, H. M.

    1973-01-01

    Available spectrometric and photometric observations of Wolf-Rayet stars by the OAO 2 spacecraft in the UV range are discussed along with radio astronomical observations of W stars with symmetrical nebulae around them. The scanned spectrum of the WN5 star HD 50896 between 1200 and 1900 A is illustrated together with the photometered spectrum of the WN6 star HD 192163 from 1330 to 3320 A. RF observations of NGC 6888 around HD 192163 are examined relative to interpretation of the properties of a WN6 star ejecting mass into a nebular shell.

  18. Why UV Observatories are crucial to understand massive stars ?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia Garcia, Miriam

    2012-07-01

    Each Ultraviolet (UV) mission has brought a breakthrough to our knowledge of massive stars. The first rocket UV spectra of O-type stars showed powerful P-Cygni profiles, which revealed that O stars have an expanding atmosphere or stellar wind. After IUE, FUSE and HST-STIS we now know that these winds are not static nor homogeneous, with shocks and mechanisms for extra ionization in the outflow. Radiation driven winds are actually one of the main pillars of the current paradigm of massive stars, as through mass-removal they dictate the sequence of evolutionary stages, duration, ionizing power and yields to the ISM, and the fate of the star as supernova. But many questions remain open: the weak-wind problem, the driving mechanism of very metal-poor massive stars (our connection to the first stars), and a proper characterization of wind inhomogeneities and shocks, to name a few. HST-COS and the up-coming WSO spectrographs will play a crucial role in solving these issues --crucial to calculate massive star feedback to the Universe-- thanks to the wealth of UV metallic transitions that offer many diagnostics to these physical phenomena.

  19. High-speed Photometric Observations of ZZ Ceti White Dwarf Candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, E. M.; Limoges, M.-M.; Gianninas, A.; Bergeron, P.; Fontaine, G.; Dufour, P.; O'Malley, C. J.; Guvenen, B.; Biddle, L. I.; Pearson, K.; Deyoe, T. W.; Bullivant, C. W.; Hermes, J. J.; Van Grootel, V.; Grosjean, M.

    2015-06-01

    We present high-speed photometric observations of ZZ Ceti white dwarf candidates drawn from the spectroscopic survey of bright DA stars from the Villanova White Dwarf Catalog by Gianninas et al., and from the recent spectroscopic survey of white dwarfs within 40 parsecs of the Sun by Limoges et al. We report the discovery of six new ZZ Ceti pulsators from these surveys, and several photometrically constant DA white dwarfs, which we then use to refine the location of the ZZ Ceti instability strip.

  20. The UV Brightness of Quiescent Black Holes and Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hynes, Robert I.; Robinson, E. L.; McClintock, J. E.; Haswell, C. A.

    2006-06-01

    HST/STIS observations of quiescent black hole and neutron star soft X-ray transients have suggested that the two may exhibit dramatically different ultraviolet spectra, with neutron stars being more UV bright. We describe new HST/ACS observations providing near-UV detections of another neutron star system, Aql X-1, and three more black hole systems, X-ray Nova Mus 1991, GRO J0422+32, and X-ray Nova Vel 1993, together with upper limits for the neutron star system XTE J2123-058. These more than double the sample available. We will discuss models for the spectral energy distributions of quiescent soft X-ray transients, and the evidence that they are systematically different in the light of this larger and more significant sample.This work was supported by a grant from the Space Telescope Science Institute.

  1. Suggested UV spectral classification criteria for A stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boehm-Vitense, E.

    1982-01-01

    Criteria for determining effective temperature and electron density independently of abundances, for A, late B, and F stars are given. Comparison of IUE data with standard classification techniques, shows that for late B and A stars, temperature classification by UV spectra is more sensitive than classification using visual spectra. The long wavelength wing of the Lyman is recommended for these stars. For A and F stars, the ratio of the Mg (2580 A) and Mg+ (2800A) resonance lines gives a good temperature/electron density (ne) criterion which is nearly independent of metal abundance (Z). The SiI discontinuities give an excellent temperature classification for A and F stars, but it is dependent on Z and ne. If the absolute intensities of either of the Mg lines are added to the criteria, three classification criteria for a three dimensional classification, according to temperature, ne and Z, are obtained.

  2. VOLATILE-RICH CIRCUMSTELLAR GAS IN THE UNUSUAL 49 CETI DEBRIS DISK

    SciTech Connect

    Roberge, Aki; Grady, Carol A.; Welsh, Barry Y.; Kamp, Inga; Weinberger, Alycia J.

    2014-11-20

    We present Hubble Space Telescope Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph far-UV spectra of the edge-on disk around 49 Ceti, one of the very few debris disks showing submillimeter CO emission. Many atomic absorption lines are present in the spectra, most of which arise from circumstellar gas lying along the line-of-sight to the central star. We determined the line-of-sight C I column density, estimated the total carbon column density, and set limits on the O I column density. Surprisingly, no line-of-sight CO absorption was seen. We discuss possible explanations for this non-detection, and present preliminary estimates of the carbon abundances in the line-of-sight gas. The C/Fe ratio is much greater than the solar value, suggesting that 49 Cet harbors a volatile-rich gas disk similar to that of β Pictoris.

  3. Volatile-rich Circumstellar Gas in the Unusual 49 Ceti Debris Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberge, Aki; Welsh, Barry Y.; Kamp, Inga; Weinberger, Alycia J.; Grady, Carol A.

    2014-11-01

    We present Hubble Space Telescope Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph far-UV spectra of the edge-on disk around 49 Ceti, one of the very few debris disks showing submillimeter CO emission. Many atomic absorption lines are present in the spectra, most of which arise from circumstellar gas lying along the line-of-sight to the central star. We determined the line-of-sight C I column density, estimated the total carbon column density, and set limits on the O I column density. Surprisingly, no line-of-sight CO absorption was seen. We discuss possible explanations for this non-detection, and present preliminary estimates of the carbon abundances in the line-of-sight gas. The C/Fe ratio is much greater than the solar value, suggesting that 49 Cet harbors a volatile-rich gas disk similar to that of β Pictoris.

  4. Brucella ceti and Brucellosis in Cetaceans

    PubMed Central

    Guzmán-Verri, Caterina; González-Barrientos, Rocío; Hernández-Mora, Gabriela; Morales, Juan-Alberto; Baquero-Calvo, Elías; Chaves-Olarte, Esteban; Moreno, Edgardo

    2012-01-01

    Since the first case of brucellosis detected in a dolphin aborted fetus, an increasing number of Brucella ceti isolates has been reported in members of the two suborders of cetaceans: Mysticeti and Odontoceti. Serological surveys have shown that cetacean brucellosis may be distributed worldwide in the oceans. Although all B. ceti isolates have been included within the same species, three different groups have been recognized according to their preferred host, bacteriological properties, and distinct genetic traits: B. ceti dolphin type, B. ceti porpoise type, and B. ceti human type. It seems that B. ceti porpoise type is more closely related to B. ceti human isolates and B. pinnipedialis group, while B. ceti dolphin type seems ancestral to them. Based on comparative phylogenetic analysis, it is feasible that the B. ceti ancestor radiated in a terrestrial artiodactyl host close to the Raoellidae family about 58 million years ago. The more likely mode of transmission of B. ceti seems to be through sexual intercourse, maternal feeding, aborted fetuses, placental tissues, vertical transmission from mother to the fetus or through fish or helminth reservoirs. The B. ceti dolphin and porpoise types seem to display variable virulence in land animal models and low infectivity for humans. However, brucellosis in some dolphins and porpoises has been demonstrated to be a severe chronic disease, displaying significant clinical and pathological signs related to abortions, male infertility, neurobrucellosis, cardiopathies, bone and skin lesions, strandings, and death. PMID:22919595

  5. DISCOVERY OF A ZZ CETI IN THE KEPLER MISSION FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Hermes, J. J.; Winget, D. E.; Mullally, Fergal; Howell, Steve B.; Oestensen, R. H.; Bloemen, S.; Williams, Kurtis A.; Telting, John; Southworth, John; Everett, Mark

    2011-11-01

    We report the discovery of the first identified pulsating DA white dwarf, WD J1916+3938 (Kepler ID 4552982), in the field of the Kepler mission. This ZZ Ceti star was first identified through ground-based, time-series photometry, and follow-up spectroscopy confirms that it is a hydrogen-atmosphere white dwarf with T {sub eff} = 11,129 {+-} 115 K and log g = 8.34 {+-} 0.06, placing it within the empirical ZZ Ceti instability strip. The object shows up to 0.5% amplitude variability at several periods between 800 and 1450 s. Extended Kepler observations of WD J1916+3938 could yield the best light curve, to date, of any pulsating white dwarf, allowing us to directly study the interior of an evolved object representative of the fate of the majority of stars in our Galaxy.

  6. The UV + IR Hybrid Star Formation Rate Across NGC6946

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eufrasio, Rafael T.; Lehmer, Bret; Dwek, Eli; Arendt, Richard G.

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge of the star formation rate (SFR) of galaxies is essential to understand galaxy evolution and thus determining reliable, simple tracers of star-forming activity is of paramount importance to astrophysics. For instance, intrinsic ultraviolet (UV) emission from young stars is an excellent tracer of the SFR. Observed UV luminosities, however, have been strongly attenuated by intervening interstellar dust. Since emission from hot dust is readily available from IRAS, Spitzer, and WISE, it is common practice to combine mid-IR emission (around 25 μm) with observed UV in order to obtain an SFR diagnostic of the form Lobs(FUV) + acorr × Lobs(25 μm). Conventionally, a single correction acorr, previously determined for a sample of galaxies, is used. Here we test the reliability of this hybrid SFR diagnostic, allowing for a variable correction factor acorr. For this, we have performed broadband UV-to-IR SED fittings in order to model the star formation histories across the spiral galaxy NGC6946. We have obtained SFRs and stellar masses across the galaxy, from physical scales of 5 kpc down to 500 pc. We find that acorr varies significantly across the galaxy and increases with increasing specific star formation rate (sSFR), the ratio of SFR and stellar mass (or the ratio of young and old stars). The correction acorr does not seem to be correlated to the amount of attenuation AV. Variation of acorr is most likely caused by different mixes of young and old stellar populations across the galaxy. This finding agrees well with our previous results for the interacting spiral galaxy NGC 6872, for which we have demonstrated the variation of acorr and a its correlation with sSFR. Our results show the need of caution when using only two broadband filters in order to determine SFR of individual galaxies or sub-galactic regions. The dust emission most likely overestimates SFR for highly star-forming, high sSFR regions, and underestimates it for more quiescent, low sSFR regions.

  7. Primeras curvas de luz de estrellas variables ZZ Ceti observadas en el CASLEO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corti, M. A.; Romero, A. D.; Kanaan, A.; Kepler, S. O.; Costa, J. E.; Córsico, A. H.; Althaus, L. G.

    2015-08-01

    DA white dwarf stars, ZZ Ceti, are the most numerous class among the pulsating white dwarfs. These stars have atmospheres dominated by hydrogen, and effective temperatures between 10500 and 12300 K. Because of the periodic variations of their luminosity, we can use asteroseismology to study the inner structure and the global properties of these compact and old objects. These techniques basically consists on the comparison between the observed pulsation periods and theoretical periods computed from representative models. In this work we present the first light curves and Fourier transforms of the ZZ Ceti stars WD162813+122452 y BPM37093, obtained with the 2,15 m telescope at CASLEO. Observational data and physical parameters derived for some ZZ Ceti observed candidates are also included.

  8. Calibrating UV Star Formation Rates for Dwarf Galaxies from STARBIRDS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McQuinn, Kristen B. W.; Skillman, Evan D.; Dolphin, Andrew E.; Mitchell, Noah P.

    2015-08-01

    Integrating our knowledge of star formation (SF) traced by observations at different wavelengths is essential for correctly interpreting and comparing SF activity in a variety of systems and environments. This study compares extinction corrected integrated ultraviolet (UV) emission from resolved galaxies with color-magnitude diagram (CMD) based star formation rates (SFRs) derived from resolved stellar populations and CMD fitting techniques in 19 nearby starburst and post-starburst dwarf galaxies. The data sets are from the panchromatic Starburst Irregular Dwarf Survey and include deep legacy GALEX UV imaging, Hubble Space Telescope optical imaging, and Spitzer MIPS imaging. For the majority of the sample, the integrated near-UV fluxes predicted from the CMD-based SFRs—using four different models—agree with the measured, extinction corrected, integrated near-UV fluxes from GALEX images, but the far-UV (FUV) predicted fluxes do not. Furthermore, we find a systematic deviation between the SFRs based on integrated FUV luminosities and existing scaling relations, and the SFRs based on the resolved stellar populations. This offset is not driven by different SF timescales, variations in SFRs, UV attenuation, nor stochastic effects. This first comparison between CMD-based SFRs and an integrated FUV emission SFR indicator suggests that the most likely cause of the discrepancy is the theoretical FUV-SFR calibration from stellar evolutionary libraries and/or stellar atmospheric models. We present an empirical calibration of the FUV-based SFR relation for dwarf galaxies, with uncertainties, which is ˜53% larger than previous relations. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, and obtained from the Hubble Legacy Archive, which is a collaboration between the Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI/NASA), the Space Telescope European Coordinating Facility (ST-ECF/ESA), and the Canadian Astronomy Data Centre (CADC/NRC/CSA).

  9. Time variations of UV emission features of Be stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bahng, J. D. R.

    1975-01-01

    The UV spectra of three Be stars (gamma Cas, sigma Tau, eta Cen) were studied. Of the six Be stars observed in the first four lines of the Balmer series, three stars showed at least one of the Balmer lines to be variable in the equivalent width amounting to a few percent with time scales of 3 to 30 minutes. Photoelectric spectrum scans of five southern Wolf-Rayet stars showed night-to-night variations. A simple model is proposed to account for the behavior of these emission lines. Scans of gamma square Vel showed rapid variations of emission strengths of He II 4686 and C III - IV 4650. These variations have time scales of 1 minute and longer. Night-to-night variations were also found. Scans of four Be stars in H alpha showed a definite variation of 3 to 4 percent, with time scales of 1 minute and longer in sigma Tau. In 48 Per and kappa Dra the variations are not as well established. No variation of any significance was found for nu Gem.

  10. Physical Properties of Known Exoplanet and Host Stars Within Ten Parsecs: X-ray/UV Fluxes, Rotation, Ages, and Potential of Habitability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kullberg, Evan; Guinan, E. F.; Engle, S. G.

    2014-01-01

    We have compiled a catalogue of all exoplanets and their host stars within ten parsecs (32.6 ly) from the Sun. In addition to the physical properties of the exoplanets: estimated mass, orbital period, etc; we have compiled the properties of the host stars. These include: spectral class, effective temperature, luminosity, metallicity, period of rotation, etc. For the stars that have X-Ray observations and UV spectrophotometry, we have measured the X-UV irradiances at the distance of the exoplanets orbiting them. In addition, we estimated the ages of the stellar systems using our Rotation-Age-Activity relationship developed at Villanova over the last ten years. These results were used to evaluate the potential habitability of the exoplanets with particular attention is paid to stars with Super-Earth planets orbiting within the habitable zones of their host stars. These include GJ 581, GJ 876, Tau Ceti, and HD 20794. We focus on the GJ 581 system, since it contains at least two Super-Earth exoplanets on the inner and outer boundaries of the habitable zone (GJ 581c and GJ 581d respectively), and because the host star has recently been observed with the SWIFT satellite and detected to be an X-Ray source with a log(LX 26.1 erg/s (Vitale and France A&A 2013). We also utilized the recently secured FUV-UV HIST/COS spectrophotometry (France et al. ApJ 2013) to compute X-Ray to UV irradiances at GJ 581c and GJ 581d. In addition to the XUV irradiance studies, we have estimated the age of the GJ 581 system from the: rotational period, Lyman Alpha Emission, Mg-II emission, Ca-II emission; using our Rotation-Age-Activity relationship from our Living with a Red Dwarf program. We calculate an average age determination of 7.5±2 Gyr. We discuss how these results affect the relevance of these stars as potential destinations of interstellar travel in the future. We acknowledge the support for this study from NSF/RUI grant AST-1009903, and NASA/CHANDRA GO1-12024X, GO2-13020X and HST

  11. Elemental abundance analyses with DAO spectrograms. VII - The late normal B stars Pi Ceti, 134 Tauri, 21 Aquilae, and Nu Capricorni and the use of Reticon spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adelman, Saul J.

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents elemental abundance analyses of sharp-lined normal late B stars. These stars exhibit mostly near-solar abundances, but each star also shows a few abundances which are a factor of 2 less than solar. The coadded photographic spectrograms are supplemented with Reticon data. A comparison of 261 equivalent widths on 2.4 A/mm spectra of sharp-lined B and A stars shows that the Reticon equivalent widths are about 95 percent of the coadded equivalent mean. The H-gamma profiles of the coadded and Reticon spectra for eight sharp-lined stars show generally good agreement. The generally high quality of the coadded data produced from 10 or more spectrograms is confirmed using the REDUCE graphics-oriented computed reduction code. For five stars, metal lines which fall in the gap between the U and V plates are analyzed using Reticon data.

  12. Symbiotic stars in X-rays and UV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luna, G. J. M.; Sokoloski, J. L.; Mukai, K.; Nelson, T.; Nuñez, N. E.

    2014-10-01

    Until recently, symbiotic binary systems in which a white dwarf accretes from a red giant were thought to be mainly a soft X-ray population. I will describe the detection with the Swift/XRT of 14 white dwarf symbiotics that were not previously known to be X-ray sources. The 14 new X-ray detections were the result of a survey of more than 50 symbiotic stars using Swift fill-in programs during three years. Their X-ray spectra are consistent with thermal emission and fall naturally into three distinct groups. The first group contains those sources with a single, highly absorbed hard component, which we identify as probably coming from an accretion-disk boundary layer. The second group is composed of those sources with a single, soft X-ray spectral component, which likely arises in a region where low-velocity shocks produce X-ray emission, i.e. a colliding-wind region. The third group consists of those sources with both hard and soft X-ray spectral components. Simultaneous Swift/UVOT data allowed us to find that unlike in the optical, where rapid, stochastic brightness variations from the accretion disk typically are not seen, detectable UV flickering is a common property of symbiotic stars. Supporting our physical interpretation of the two X-ray spectral components, the UV photometry shows that symbiotic stars with harder X-ray emission tend to have stronger UV flickering, which is usually associated with accretion through a disk.

  13. The Instability Strip of ZZ Ceti White Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Grootel, V.; Fontaine, G.; Brassard, P.; Dupret, M.-A.

    2015-06-01

    The determination of the location of the theoretical ZZ Ceti instability strip in the log g-Teff diagram has remained a challenge over the years, due to the lack of a suitable treatment for convection in these stars. We report here a detailed stability survey over the whole ZZ Ceti regime, including the low and extremely low masses. We computed to this aim 29 evolutionary sequences of DA models with various masses, chemical layering, and core compositions. These models are characterized by the so-called ML2/α=1.0 convective efficiency and take into account the important feedback effect of convection on the atmospheric structure. We computed pulsation spectra for these models with the Liège nonadiabatic pulsation code MAD, which is the only one to conveniently incorporate a full time-dependent convection treatment and, thus, provides the best available description of the blue edge of the instability strip. On the other hand, given the failure of all nonadiabatic codes to account properly for the red edge of the strip, including MAD, we tested the idea that the red edge is due to energy leakage through the atmosphere. Using this approach, we found that our theoretical ZZ Ceti instability strip accounts remarkably well for the boundaries of the empirical strip.

  14. HAZMAT. I. The evolution of far-UV and near-UV emission from early M stars

    SciTech Connect

    Shkolnik, Evgenya L.; Barman, Travis S. E-mail: barman@lpl.arizona.edu

    2014-10-01

    The spectral energy distribution, variability, and evolution of the high-energy radiation from an M dwarf planet host is crucial in understanding the planet's atmospheric evolution and habitability and in interpreting the planet's spectrum. The star's extreme-UV (EUV), far-UV (FUV), and near-UV (NUV) emission can chemically modify, ionize, and erode the atmosphere over time. This makes determining the lifetime exposure of such planets to stellar UV radiation critical for both the evolution of a planet's atmosphere and our potential to characterize it. Using the early M star members of nearby young moving groups, which sample critical ages in planet formation and evolution, we measure the evolution of the GALEX NUV and FUV flux as a function of age. The median UV flux remains at a 'saturated' level for a few hundred million years, analogous to that observed for X-ray emission. By the age of the Hyades Cluster (650 Myr), we measure a drop in UV flux by a factor of 2-3 followed by a steep drop from old (several Gyrs) field stars. This decline in activity beyond 300 Myr follows roughly t {sup –1}. Despite this clear evolution, there remains a wide range, of 1-2 orders of magnitude, in observed emission levels at every age. These UV data supply the much-needed constraints to M dwarf upper-atmosphere models, which will provide empirically motivated EUV predictions and more accurate age-dependent UV spectra as inputs to planetary photochemical models.

  15. The period structure of the ZZ Ceti variables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgraw, J. T.

    1980-01-01

    The current observational status of the period structure of ZZ Ceti stars is reviewed, and in particular those features which appear to be the most important for theory to explain, or which may be relevant to the directions of theoretical development are discussed. Mechanisms to explain the broad range of period structure are suggested. Multiple nonradial modes, probably corresponding to different radial overtones, may be simultaneously excited in each star. The excitation energy of individual stars is distributed among permitted modes by nonlinear resonant coupling. In addition, rotational splitting of the nonradial modes can produce closely spaced periods which results in modulation of the light curve. Amplitude/spectral complexity correlation results from the appearance in the power spectrum of harmonics and cross-frequencies which are the effects brought on by increasing nonlinearity of the pulsations.

  16. HAZMAT I: The Evolution of X-ray, Far-UV and Near-UV Emission from Early M Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shkolnik, E.; Barman, T.

    2014-03-01

    With the recent discoveries of several super-earths orbiting M dwarfs well within their habitable zones (0.1 to 0.4 AU), and with many more such planets to come, it is critical to assess the evolution of the high-energy radiation environment of these systems. We have begun the HAZMAT (HAbitable Zones and M dwarf Activity across Time) program by first measuring the drop in near-UV and far-UV flux in early M stars from 10 Myr to several Gyr using photometry from NASA's Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX). We focus this study on the confirmed low-mass members of nearby young moving groups, the Hyades cluster, and old field stars. We show a relatively slow decline in UV flux up until at least 650 Myr with a sharper drop in the old M dwarfs. Yet without confirmed M dwarfs in nearby star clusters with ages of 1-2 Gyr, mapping the precise evolution at these older ages is not currently possible. The UV data also provide much-needed constraints to M dwarf upper-atmosphere models, which are currently insufficient for predicting UV emission from M dwarfs. Our analysis will aid empirically motivated upper-atmospheric modeling for the young and old M stars, which can then be used to predict the extreme-UV fluxes most critical to the evolution of a planetary atmosphere. (See HAZMAT II abstract by Peacock et al.) The HAZMAT program is the first comprehensive study of the UV history of M stars.

  17. KIC 11911480: the second ZZ Ceti in the Kepler field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greiss, S.; Gänsicke, B. T.; Hermes, J. J.; Steeghs, D.; Koester, D.; Ramsay, G.; Barclay, T.; Townsley, D. M.

    2014-03-01

    We report the discovery of the second pulsating hydrogen-rich (DA) white dwarf in the Kepler field, KIC 11911480. It was selected from the Kepler-INT Survey (KIS) on the basis of its colours and its variable nature was confirmed using ground-based time series photometry. An atmosphere model fit to an intermediate-resolution spectrum of KIC 11911480 places this DA white dwarf close to the blue edge of the empirical boundaries of the ZZ Ceti instability strip: Teff = 12 160 ± 250 K and log g = 7.94 ± 0.10. Assuming a mass-radius relation and cooling models for DA white dwarfs, the atmospheric parameters yield: MWD = 0.57 ± 0.06 M⊙. We also obtained two quarters (Q12 and Q16) of nearly uninterrupted short-cadence Kepler data on this star. We detect a total of six independent pulsation modes with a ≥3σ confidence in its amplitude power spectrum. These pulsations have periods ranging between 172.9 and 324.5 s, typical of the hotter ZZ Ceti stars. Our preliminary asteroseismic study suggests that KIC 11911480 has a rotation rate of 3.5±0.5 days.

  18. Shock-induced polarized hydrogen emission lines in omicron Ceti

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabas, N.; Lèbre, A.; Gillet, D.

    2012-05-01

    Hydrogen emission lines in Mira variable stars are a well-known phenomenon whose origin has been established as related to the propagation of radiative hypersonic shock waves throughout the stellar atmosphere. A polarimetric observation by McLean and Coyne [1] made on omicron Ceti (the prototype of Mira variable stars) has revealed the existence of linear polarization signatures associated with Balmer emission lines. However, the polarizing mechanism has never been properly explained so far. The study presented here is the first of its kind since it displays the results of a spectropolarimetric survey of omicron Ceti in the Balmer lines. The survey was made with the NARVAL spectropolarimeter (Telescope Bernard Lyot, France) in full Stokes mode. We did not just confirm the appearance of this polarization but we also and above all showed the temporal variation of the linear polarization in the lines. We conclude that the polarizing mechanism is definitely intrinsic to the shock wave propagation throughout the stellar atmosphere of Mira and give some leads about the nature of this mechanism.

  19. Ultraviolet Morphology and Unobscured UV Star Formation Rates of CLASH Brightest Cluster Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donahue, Megan; Connor, Thomas; Fogarty, Kevin; Li, Yuan; Voit, G. Mark; Postman, Marc; Koekemoer, Anton; Moustakas, John; Bradley, Larry; Ford, Holland

    2015-06-01

    Brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) are usually quiescent, but many exhibit star formation. Here we exploit the opportunity provided by rest-frame UV imaging of galaxy clusters in the Cluster Lensing and Supernovae with Hubble (CLASH) Multi-Cycle Treasury Project to reveal the diversity of UV morphologies in BCGs and to compare them with recent simulations of the cool, star-forming gas structures produced by precipitation-driven feedback. All of the CLASH BCGs are detected in the rest-frame UV (280 nm), regardless of their star formation activity, because evolved stellar populations produce a modest amount of UV light that traces the relatively smooth, symmetric, and centrally peaked stellar distribution seen in the near infrared. Ultraviolet morphologies among the BCGs with strong UV excesses exhibit distinctive knots, multiple elongated clumps, and extended filaments of emission that distinctly differ from the smooth profiles of the UV-quiet BCGs. These structures, which are similar to those seen in the few star-forming BCGs observed in the UV at low redshift, are suggestive of bi-polar streams of clumpy star formation, but not of spiral arms or large, kiloparsec-scale disks. Based on the number of streams and lack of culprit companion galaxies, these streams are unlikely to have arisen from multiple collisions with gas-rich galaxies. These star-forming UV structures are morphologically similar to the cold-gas structures produced in simulations of precipitation-driven active galactic nucleus feedback in which jets uplift low-entropy gas to greater altitudes, causing it to condense. Unobscured star formation rates estimated from CLASH UV images using the Kennicutt relation range up to 80 {{M}⊙ } y{{r}-1} in the most extended and highly structured systems. The circumgalactic gas-entropy threshold for star formation in CLASH BCGs at z ˜ 0.2-0.5 is indistinguishable from that for clusters at z\\lt 0.2.

  20. HAZMAT. I. The Evolution of Far-UV and Near-UV Emission from Early M Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shkolnik, Evgenya L.; Barman, Travis S.

    2014-10-01

    The spectral energy distribution, variability, and evolution of the high-energy radiation from an M dwarf planet host is crucial in understanding the planet's atmospheric evolution and habitability and in interpreting the planet's spectrum. The star's extreme-UV (EUV), far-UV (FUV), and near-UV (NUV) emission can chemically modify, ionize, and erode the atmosphere over time. This makes determining the lifetime exposure of such planets to stellar UV radiation critical for both the evolution of a planet's atmosphere and our potential to characterize it. Using the early M star members of nearby young moving groups, which sample critical ages in planet formation and evolution, we measure the evolution of the GALEX NUV and FUV flux as a function of age. The median UV flux remains at a "saturated" level for a few hundred million years, analogous to that observed for X-ray emission. By the age of the Hyades Cluster (650 Myr), we measure a drop in UV flux by a factor of 2-3 followed by a steep drop from old (several Gyrs) field stars. This decline in activity beyond 300 Myr follows roughly t -1. Despite this clear evolution, there remains a wide range, of 1-2 orders of magnitude, in observed emission levels at every age. These UV data supply the much-needed constraints to M dwarf upper-atmosphere models, which will provide empirically motivated EUV predictions and more accurate age-dependent UV spectra as inputs to planetary photochemical models. Based on observations made with the NASA Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX). GALEX was operated for NASA by the California Institute of Technology under NASA contract NAS5-98034.

  1. UV habitability and dM stars: an approach for evaluation of biological survival

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrevaya, Ximena C.; Cortón, Eduardo; Mauas, Pablo J. D.

    2010-02-01

    Dwarf M stars comprise about 75 percent of all stars in the galaxy. For several years planets orbiting M stars have been discarded as suitable places for development of life. This paradigm now has changed and terrestrial-type planets within liquid-water habitable zones (LW-HZ) around M stars are reconsidered as possible hosts for life as we know it. Nevertheless, large amount of UV radiation is emitted during flares by this stars, and it is uncertain how these events could affect biological systems. In particular UV-C λ < 290nm) exhibits the most damaging effects for living organisms. To analyze the hypothesis that UV could set a limit for the development of extraterrestrial life, we studied the effect of UV-C treatment on halophile archaea cultures. Halophile archaea are extremophile organisms, they are exposed to intense solar UV radiation in their natural environment so they are generally regarded as relatively UV tolerant. Halophiles inhabits in hipersaline environments as salt lakes but also have been found in ancient salt deposits as halites and evaporites on Earth. Since evaporites have been detected in Martian meteorites, these organisms are proposed as plausible inhabitants of Mars-like planets. Our preliminary results show that even after UV damage, the surviving cells were able to resume growth with nearly normal kinetics.

  2. KIC 4552982: Outbursts and Asteroseismology from the Longest Pseudo-continuous Light Curve of a ZZ Ceti

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Keaton J.; Hermes, J. J.; Bischoff-Kim, A.; Moorhead, Sean; Montgomery, M. H.; Østensen, Roy; Castanheira, Barbara G.; Winget, D. E.

    2015-08-01

    We present the Kepler light curve of KIC 4552982, the first ZZ Ceti (hydrogen-atmosphere pulsating white dwarf star) discovered in the Kepler field of view. Our data span more than 1.5 years, with a 86% duty cycle, making it the longest pseudo-continuous light curve ever recorded for a ZZ Ceti. This extensive data set provides the most complete coverage to date of amplitude and frequency variations in a cool ZZ Ceti. We detect 20 independent frequencies of variability in the data that we compare with asteroseismic models to demonstrate that this star has a mass {M}*\\gt 0.6 {M}ȯ . We identify a rotationally split pulsation mode and derive a probable rotation period for this star of 17.47 ± 0.04 hr. In addition to pulsation signatures, the Kepler light curve exhibits sporadic, energetic outbursts that increase the star’s relative flux by 2%–17%, last 4–25 hr, and recur on an average timescale of 2.7 days. These are the first detections of a new dynamic white dwarf phenomenon that may be related to the pulsations of this relatively cool ({T}{eff} \\=\\10,860+/- 120 K) ZZ Ceti star near the red edge of the instability strip.

  3. THE PANCHROMATIC HUBBLE ANDROMEDA TREASURY. I. BRIGHT UV STARS IN THE BULGE OF M31

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenfield, Philip; Johnson, L. Clifton; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Williams, Benjamin F.; Gilbert, Karoline M.; Girardi, Leo; Bressan, Alessandro; Lang, Dustin; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Dorman, Claire E.; Lauer, Tod R.; Olsen, Knut A. G.; Bell, Eric F.; Bianchi, Luciana; Caldwell, Nelson; Dolphin, Andrew; Kalirai, Jason; Larsen, Soren S.; Rix, Hans-Walter; and others

    2012-08-20

    As part of the Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury multi-cycle program, we observed a 12' Multiplication-Sign 6.'5 area of the bulge of M31 with the WFC3/UVIS filters F275W and F336W. From these data we have assembled a sample of {approx}4000 UV-bright, old stars, vastly larger than previously available. We use updated Padova stellar evolutionary tracks to classify these hot stars into three classes: Post-AGB stars (P-AGB), Post-Early AGB (PE-AGB) stars, and AGB-manque stars. P-AGB stars are the end result of the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) phase and are expected in a wide range of stellar populations, whereas PE-AGB and AGB-manque (together referred to as the hot post-horizontal branch; HP-HB) stars are the result of insufficient envelope masses to allow a full AGB phase, and are expected to be particularly prominent at high helium or {alpha} abundances when the mass loss on the red giant branch is high. Our data support previous claims that most UV-bright sources in the bulge are likely hot (extreme) horizontal branch (EHB) stars and their progeny. We construct the first radial profiles of these stellar populations and show that they are highly centrally concentrated, even more so than the integrated UV or optical light. However, we find that this UV-bright population does not dominate the total UV luminosity at any radius, as we are detecting only the progeny of the EHB stars that are the likely source of the UV excess. We calculate that only a few percent of main-sequence stars in the central bulge can have gone through the HP-HB phase and that this percentage decreases strongly with distance from the center. We also find that the surface density of hot UV-bright stars has the same radial variation as that of low-mass X-ray binaries. We discuss age, metallicity, and abundance variations as possible explanations for the observed radial variation in the UV-bright population.

  4. UV fluxes and effective temperatures of extreme helium stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoenberner, D.; Drilling, J. S.; Lynas-Gray, A. E.; Heber, U.

    1982-01-01

    Low resolution IUE spectra of a complete ensemble of extreme helium stars are presented and their appearance in comparison with normal stars is discussed. Effective temperatures from these observations by means of line blanketed model atmospheres are determined. It is found that the temperatures are in accordance with earlier results from ground based observations.

  5. Formation of Massive Primordial Stars: Intermittent UV Feedback with Episodic Mass Accretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosokawa, Takashi; Hirano, Shingo; Kuiper, Rolf; Yorke, Harold W.; Omukai, Kazuyuki; Yoshida, Naoki

    2016-06-01

    We present coupled stellar evolution (SE) and 3D radiation-hydrodynamic (RHD) simulations of the evolution of primordial protostars, their immediate environment, and the dynamic accretion history under the influence of stellar ionizing and dissociating UV feedback. Our coupled SE RHD calculations result in a wide diversity of final stellar masses covering 10 {M}ȯ ≲ M * ≲ 103 {M}ȯ . The formation of very massive (≳250 {M}ȯ ) stars is possible under weak UV feedback, whereas ordinary massive (a few ×10 {M}ȯ ) stars form when UV feedback can efficiently halt the accretion. This may explain the peculiar abundance pattern of a Galactic metal-poor star recently reported by Aoki et al., possibly the observational signature of very massive precursor primordial stars. Weak UV feedback occurs in cases of variable accretion, in particular when repeated short accretion bursts temporarily exceed 0.01 {M}ȯ {{{yr}}}-1, causing the protostar to inflate. In the bloated state, the protostar has low surface temperature and UV feedback is suppressed until the star eventually contracts, on a thermal adjustment timescale, to create an H ii region. If the delay time between successive accretion bursts is sufficiently short, the protostar remains bloated for extended periods, initiating at most only short periods of UV feedback. Disk fragmentation does not necessarily reduce the final stellar mass. Quite the contrary, we find that disk fragmentation enhances episodic accretion as many fragments migrate inward and are accreted onto the star, thus allowing continued stellar mass growth under conditions of intermittent UV feedback. This trend becomes more prominent as we improve the resolution of our simulations. We argue that simulations with significantly higher resolution than reported previously are needed to derive accurate gas mass accretion rates onto primordial protostars.

  6. Mining the HST "Advanced Spectral Library (ASTRAL) - Hot Stars": The High Definition UV Spectrum of the Ap Star HR 465

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpenter, Kenneth G.; Ayres, T. R.; Nielsen, K. E.; Kober, G. V.; Wahlgren, G. M.; Adelman, S. J.; Cowley, C. R.

    2014-01-01

    The "Advanced Spectral Library (ASTRAL) Project: Hot Stars" is a Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Cycle 21 Treasury Program (GO-13346: Ayres PI). It is designed to collect a definitive set of representative, high-resolution ( 30,000-100,000), high signal/noise (S/N>100), and full UV coverage 1200 - 3000 A) spectra of 21 early-type stars, utilizing the high-performance Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS). The targets span the range of spectral types between early-O and early-A, including both main sequence and evolved stars, fast and slow rotators, as well as chemically peculiar (CP) and magnetic objects. These extremely high-quality STIS UV echelle spectra will be available from the HST archive and, in post-processed and merged form, at http://casa.colorado.edu ayres/ASTRAL/. The UV "atlases" produced by this program will enable investigations of a broad range of problems -- stellar, interstellar, and beyond -- for many years to come. We offer a first look at one of the earliest datasets to come out of this observing program, a "high definition" UV spectrum of the Ap star HR 465, which was chosen as a prototypical example of an A-type magnetic CP star. HR 465 has a global magnetic field of ~2200 Gauss. Earlier analyses of IUE spectra show strong iron-peak element lines, along with heavy elements such as Ga and Pt, while being deficient in the abundance of some ions of low atomic number, such as carbon. We demonstrate the high quality of the ASTRAL data and present the identification of spectral lines for a number of elements. By comparison of the observed spectra with calculated spectra, we also provide estimates of element abundances, emphasizing heavy elements, and place these measurements in the context of earlier results for this and other Ap stars.

  7. Habitable zones and UV habitable zones around host stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jianpo; Zhang, Fenghui; Zhang, Xianfei; Han, Zhanwen

    2010-01-01

    Ultraviolet radiation is a double-edged sword to life. If it is too strong, the terrestrial biological systems will be damaged. And if it is too weak, the synthesis of many biochemical compounds cannot go along. We try to obtain the continuous ultraviolet habitable zones, and compare the ultraviolet habitable zones with the habitable zones of host stars. Using the boundary ultraviolet radiation of ultraviolet habitable zone, we calculate the ultraviolet habitable zones of host stars with masses from 0.08 to 4.00 M ⊙. For the host stars with effective temperatures lower than 4,600 K, the ultraviolet habitable zones are closer than the habitable zones. For the host stars with effective temperatures higher than 7,137 K, the ultraviolet habitable zones are farther than the habitable zones. For a hot subdwarf as a host star, the distance of the ultraviolet habitable zone is about ten times more than that of the habitable zone, which is not suitable for the existence of life.

  8. HAZMAT I: The Evolution of Far- and Near-UV Emission from Early M Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shkolnik, Evgenya; Barman, T. S.; Peacock, S.

    2014-01-01

    With the recent discoveries of several super-earths orbiting M dwarfs well within their habitable zones (0.1 to 0.4 AU), and with many more such planets to come, it is critical to assess the evolution of the high-energy radiation environment of these systems. We have begun the HAZMAT (Habitable Zones and M dwarf Activity across Time) program by first measuring the drop in near-UV and far-UV flux in early M stars from 10 Myr to several Gyr using photometry from NASA's Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX). We focus this study on the confirmed low-mass members of nearby young moving groups, the Hyades cluster, and old field stars. We show a relatively slow decline in UV flux up until at least 650 Myr with a sharper drop in the old M dwarfs. Yet without confirmed M dwarfs in nearby star clusters with ages of 1-2 Gyr, mapping the precise evolution at these older ages is not currently possible. The UV data also provide much-needed constraints to M dwarf upper-atmosphere models, which are insufficient for predicting UV emission from M dwarfs. Our analysis will produce empirically-motivated chromospheric profiles for the young and old M stars, which can then be used to predict the extreme-UV fluxes most critical to the evolution of a planetary atmosphere. The HAZMAT program is the first comprehensive study of the UV history of M stars, and will ultimately tell us if a planet in the canonical habitable zone can indeed be habitable.

  9. Deriving extinction laws with O stars: from the IR to the UV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maíz Apellániz, J.

    2015-05-01

    We have recently derived a family of extinction laws for 30 Doradus that provides better fits to the optical photometry of obscured stars in the Galaxy and the LMC. Simultaneously, we are extending our Galactic O-Star Spectroscopic Survey ({http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011hsa6.conf..467M}{GOSSS}) to fainter, more extinguished stars to obtain accurate spectral types for massive stars with more than 6 magnitudes of V-band extinction. I have combined both lines of research with 2MASS, WISE, and Spitzer photometry to obtain the 1-10 micron extinction law for O stars in the solar neighborhood. I present these results and compare them with the extinction laws in the same wavelength range derived from late-type stars and H II regions. I also discuss plans to extend the newly derived optical-IR extinction laws to the UV.

  10. Variable X-Ray and UV emission from AGB stars: Accretion activity associated with binarity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahai, Raghvendra; Sanz-Forcada, Jorge; Sánchez Contreras, Carmen

    2016-07-01

    Almost all of our current understanding of the late evolutionary stages of (1 — 8) Mʘ stars is based on single-star models. However, binarity can drastically affect late stellar evolution, producing dramatic changes in the history and geometry of mass loss that occurs in stars as they evolve off the AGB to become planetary nebulae (PNe). A variety of binary models have been proposed, which can lead to the generation of accretion disks and magnetic fields, which in turn produce the highly collimated jets that have been proposed as the primary agents for the formation of bipolar and multipolar PNe. However, observational evidence of binarity in AGB stars is sorely lacking simply these stars are very luminous and variable, invalidating standard techniques for binary detection. Using an innovative technique of searching for UV emission from AGB stars with GALEX, we have identified a class of AGB stars with far- ultraviolet excesses (fuvAGB stars), that are likely candidates for active accretion associated with a binary companion. We have carried out a pilot survey for X-ray emission from fuvAGB stars. The X-ray fluxes are found to vary in a stochastic or quasi-periodic manner on roughly hour-long times-scales, and simultaneous UV observations show similar variations in the UV fluxes. We discuss several models for the X-ray emission and its variability and find that the most likely scenario for the origin of the X-ray (and FUV) emission involves accretion activity around a main-sequence companion star, with confinement by strong magnetic fields associated with the companion and/or an accretion disk around it.

  11. The Chemical Composition of τ Ceti and Possible Effects on Terrestrial Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagano, Michael; Truitt, Amanda; Young, Patrick A.; Shim, Sang-Heon

    2015-04-01

    τ Ceti (HD10700), a G8 dwarf with mass 0.78 M ⊙ , is a close (3.65 pc) Sun-like star where five possibly terrestrial planet candidates (minimum masses of 2, 3.1, 3.5, 4.3, and 6.7 M \\oplus ) have recently been discovered. We report abundances of 23 elements using spectra from the MIKE spectrograph on Magellan. We find [Fe/H] = -0.49 and {{T}eff}=5387 K. Using stellar models with the abundances determined here, we calculate the position of the classical habitable zone (HZ) with time. At the current best fit age, 7.63-1.5+0.87 Gy, up to two planets (e and f) may be in the HZ, depending on atmospheric properties. The Mg/Si ratio of the star is found to be 1.78, which is much greater than for Earth (˜1.2). With a system that has such an excess of Mg/Si ratio it is possible that the mineralogical make-up of planets around τ Ceti could be significantly different from that of Earth, with possible oversaturation of MgO, resulting in an increase in the content of olivine and ferropericlase compared with Earth. The increase in MgO would have a drastic impact on the rheology of the mantles of the planets around τ Ceti.

  12. Imitation is the sincerest form of flattery: is 49 Ceti the new Beta Pictoris?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welsh, Barry; Montgomery, S. L.; Alu, D.; Lallement, R.

    2014-01-01

    The young (40Myr) A1-type star 49 Ceti is thought to possess many of the same physical characteristics as Beta Pictoris, whose circumstellar gas and debris dust disks are the most well-studied of all exoplanet systems. As part of a campaign to monitor circumstellar activity in the gas disk(s) surrounding 49 Ceti, we present ground-based high spectral resolution observations (R ~ 60,000) of the visible circumstellar absorption lines recorded in conjunction with ultraviolet observations using the STIS instrument on HST in August 2013 (see presentation by Roberge et al at this conference). Our data, which spans a 6-week observational period, reveals significant variability in the properties of the circumstellar gas absorption which can be attributed to evaporating ionized Ca gas liberated by Kuiper Belt-like objects as they fall towards the central star. Similar behavior has been routinely observed towards Beta Pictoris. However, unlike Beta Pictoris we have observed anomalous behavior of the NaI and CaII IR-triplet lines in this extremely ‘active” debris disk system of 49 Ceti.

  13. Simultaneous UV and optical study of O star winds and UV and optical covariability of O star winds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nichols, Joy S.

    1995-01-01

    Simultaneous ultraviolet and optical observations of 10 bright O stars were organized in several observing campaigns lasting 3-6 days each. The observing campaigns included 12 observatories in the Northern hemisphere obtaining high resolution spectroscopy, photometry, and polarimetry, as well as 24-hour coverage with the IUE (International Ultraviolet Explorer) observatory. Over 600 high dispersion SWP spectra were acquired with IUE at both NASA and VILSPA for the completion of this work. The massive amount of data from these observing campaigns, both from IUE and the ground-based instruments, has been reduced and analyzed. The accompanying paper describes the data acquisition, analysis, and conclusions of the study performed. The most important results of this study are the strong confirmation of the ubiquitous variability of winds of O stars, and the critical correlation between rotation of the star and the wind variability as seen in the ultraviolet and optical spectral lines.

  14. A star-pointing UV-visible spectrometer for remote-sensing of the stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roscoe, Howard K.; Freshwater, Ray A.; Jones, Rod L.; Fish, Debbie J.; Harries, John E.; Wolfenden, Roger; Stone, Phillip

    1994-01-01

    We have constructed a novel instrument for ground-based remote sensing, by mounting a UV-visible spectrometer on a telescope and observing the absorption by atmospheric constituents of light from stars. Potentially, the instrument can observe stratospheric O3, NO3, NO2, and OClO.

  15. Extreme horizontal branch stars - Puzzling objects dominating the UV-light in early-type galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geier, Stephan

    2015-08-01

    Extreme horizontal branch stars (also known as hot subdwarf stars, sdO/Bs) are located at the bluest extension of the horizontal branch in the HR-diagram. They burn helium in their cores and are the sources of the UV-excess in elliptical galaxies and other old stellar populations. However, the formation of those stars is still unclear. SdO/B stars in the field show a high binary fraction and are likely formed via binary interactions with low-mass stars, substellar objects or compact stellar remnants. Similar objects in globular clusters on the other hand have a significantly lower binary fraction and might therefore be formed in a different way. I will review the state-of-the-art and confront theories of sdO/B formation with most recent observational evidence.

  16. Heavy-elements in metal-poor stars: an UV perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siqueira-Mello, C.; Barbuy, B.

    2014-11-01

    The site(s) of the r-process(es) is(are) not completely defined, and several models have been proposed. Observed abundances are the best clues to bring some light to this field, especially the study of the extremely metal-poor (EMP) Galactic halo stars. Many elements can be measured using ground-based facilities already available, but the ultraviolet window also presents a rich opportunity in terms of chemical abundances of heavy elements. In fact, for some elements only the UV transitions are strong enough to be useful. Focusing on the project of the Cassegrain U-Band Brazilian Spectrograph (CUBES), we discuss the science case for heavy elements in metal-poor stars, describing the useful lines of trans-Fe elements present in the UV region. Lines in the far UV are also discussed.

  17. The Disk and Planets of Solar Analogue τCeti

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawler, S. M.; Francesco, J. Di; Kennedy, G.; Sibthorpe, B.; Booth, M.; Vandenbussche, B.; Matthews, B.; Tuomi, M.

    2015-01-01

    τ Ceti is a nearby, mature star very similar to our Sun, with a massive Kuiper belt analogue tep{Greavesetal2004} and possible multiplanet system tep{Tuomietal2013} that has been compared to our Solar System. We present infrared and submillimeter observations of the debris disk from the Herschel Space Observatory and the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT). We find the best model of the disk is a wide annulus ranging from 5-55 AU, inclined from face-on by 30°. tet{Tuomietal2013} report five possible super-Earths tightly nestled inside 1.4 AU, and we model this planetary system and place dynamical constraints on the inner edge of the disk. We find that due to the low masses and fairly circular orbits of the planets, the disk could reach as close to the star as 1.5 AU, with some stable orbits even possible between the two outermost planets. The photometric modelling cannot rule out a disk inner edge as close to the star as 1 AU, though 5-10 AU produces a better fit to the data. Dynamical modelling shows that the 5 planet system is stable with the addition of a Saturn-mass planet on an orbit outside 5 AU, where the Tuomi et al. analysis would not have detected a planet of this mass.

  18. The accuracy of the UV continuum as an indicator of the star formation rate in galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkins, Stephen M.; Gonzalez-Perez, Violeta; Lacey, Cedric G.; Baugh, Carlton M.

    2012-12-01

    The rest-frame intrinsic UV luminosity is often used as an indicator of the instantaneous star formation rate (SFR) in a galaxy. While it is in general a robust indicator of the ongoing star formation activity, the precise value of the calibration relating the UV luminosity to the SFR (Bν) is sensitive to various physical properties, such as the recent star formation and metal enrichment histories, along with the choice of stellar initial mass function (IMF). The distribution of these properties for the star-forming galaxy population then suggests that the adoption of a single calibration is not appropriate unless properly qualified with the uncertainties on the calibration. We investigate, with the aid of the GALFORM semi-analytic model of galaxy formation, the distribution of UV-SFR calibrations obtained using realistic star formation and metal enrichment histories. At z = 0, we find that when the IMF is fixed (to the Kennicutt IMF), the median calibration is Bfuv = 0.9 where SFR/[M⊙ yr-1] = Bν × 10-28 × Lν/[erg s-1 Hz-1]. However, the width of the distribution Bfuv suggests that for a single object there is around a 20 per cent intrinsic uncertainty (at z = 0, rising to ≃30 per cent at z = 6) on the SFR inferred from the FUV luminosity without additional constraints on the star formation history or metallicity. We also find that the median value of the calibration Bfuv is correlated with the SFR and redshift (at z > 3) raising implications for the correct determination of the SFR from the UV.

  19. The Dearth of UV-bright Stars in M32: Implications for Stellar Evolution Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sweigart, Allen V.; Kimble, Randy A.; Bowers, Charles W.

    2008-01-01

    Using the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph on the Hubble Space Telescope, we have obtained deep far ultraviolet images of the compact elliptical galaxy M32. When combined with earlier near-ultraviolet images of the same field, these data enable the construction of an ultraviolet color-magnitude diagram of the hot horizontal branch (HB) population and other hot stars in late phases of stellar evolution. We find few post-asymptotic giant branch (PAGB) stars in the galaxy, implying that these stars either cross the HR diagram more rapidly than expected, and/or that they spend a significant fraction of their time enshrouded in circumstellar material. The predicted luminosity gap between the hot HB and its AGB-Manque (AGBM) progeny is less pronounced than expected, especially when compared to evolutionary tracks with enhanced helium abundances, implying that the presence of hot HB stars in this metal-rich population is not due to (Delta)Y/(Delta)Z greater than or approx. 4. Only a small fraction (approx. 2%) of the HB population is hot enough to produce significant UV emission, yet most of the W emission in this galaxy comes from the hot HB and AGBM stars, implying that PAGB stars are not a significant source of W emission even in those elliptical galaxies with a weak W excess. Subject headings: galaxies: evolution - galaxies: stellar content - galaxies: individual (M32) - stars: evolution - stars: horizontal branch

  20. Star Bursts in the UV Bright Interacting Galaxies NGC 3395 & 3396

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hancock, M.; Weistrop, D.; Nelson, C. H.

    2000-05-01

    We have obtained ultraviolet and visible wavelength images for the interacting galaxies, NGC 3395 and 3396, using the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph on Hubble Space Telescope. IUE observations (Kinney et al. 1993) indicate that both of these galaxies have strong UV emission. Ground based spectra display evidence of extensive star formation. The visible images were obtained using the CCD detector and filter F28X50LP (central wavelength ~ 7230 Angstroms , FWHM ~ 1998 Angstroms). The ultraviolet images were obtained using the F25QTZ filter with the far-UV MAMA detector (central wavelength ~ 1595 Angstroms , FWHM ~ 206 Angstroms), and the F25CN182 filter with the near-UV MAMA detector (central wavelength ~ 2010 Angstroms, FWHM ~ 681 Angstroms). The data were reduced and analyzed using standard IRAF and STSDAS packages and customized software routines. This work has been supported in part by NASA, under contract NAS5-31231. We will present luminosities, luminosity functions, sizes and colors for the UV bright star forming regions. Stellar populations and ages of these knots will be constrained by comparison with star burst models (Leitherer et al. 1999). We will discuss the dependence of the characteristics of the knots on position in the galaxies and the possible relationship to the tidal interaction.

  1. Spectral classification criteria for some early type stars in the UV region/atl>

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamdy, M. A.; Abo Elazm, M. S.; Saad, S. M.; Nafie, H. O.; Abdel Baeth, H. E.

    The aim of this paper is to get new critertia for spectral classification of some early type stars which depend on the flux in the UV region λ λ 1500-2500 by carrying out spectrophotometric analysis of observational ultraviolet data of stars obtained by the S2/68 Ultraviolet Sky Survey Telescope (UVSST) aboard the European Space Research Organization (ESRO) Satellite TD1. We have developed these new criteria based on the Intrinsic Ultraviolet Colour Index (IUI), and the Intrinsic Flux Ratio (IFR). Using these quantities we are going to represent the results of spectral classification of 323 early type stars mainly from spectral type B and A. The results of calculations of the Intrinsic Flux Ratios for the stars under investigation together with their Colour Temperatures (Tc) are given. Comparison between our suggested two new criteria with the MK classification system and Cucchairo (1980) classification system was carried out.

  2. Thirty Days in the Life of Beta Ceti

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayres, Thomas R.

    Coronal flares are common among short-period RS CVn-type binaries; easy and valuable targets for EUVE. Less well known, but equally enigmatic, are flares on normal single stars; particularly G/K giants, whose coronal variability has been poorly documented. For such stars, flare-associated mass ejections might promote angular momentum loss, thereby controlling the lifetime of their magnetic activity (which possibly can be rejuvenated by cannibalism of hot Jupiters!). We propose to obtain an unprecedented 30-day history of the EUV behavior of the archetype active single K0 III giant, Beta Ceti. DS photometry will enable an inventory of flare sizes and frequencies, while the spectrometers will secure high-S/N emission line diagnostics during the quiescent periods, and hopefully also flare decays, for use in semiempirical modeling. The ability to record high-quality spectra over usefully-long time intervals is a unique, vital advantage of EUVE that should be exploited to the fullest extent possible during its final cycle. The study of magnetic activity, and its natural variability, impacts diverse fields of research including: stellar evolution, Sun-Earth relations, and ionizing radiation environments of evolving planetary systems.

  3. Extreme Carbon Overabundance in the 49 Ceti Circumstellar Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberge, Aki; Welsh, Barry; Kamp, Inga; Weinberger, Alycia J.; Grady, Carol A.

    2015-01-01

    We present analysis of C and O absorption in high-resolution HST-STIS FUV spectra of the nearby A1V star 49 Ceti. This disk system is one of the few showing the dust properties of a debris disk, but harboring relatively abundant molecular gas more characteristic of a low-mass protoplanetary disk. Since the disk is nearly edge-on, the line-of-sight to the central star passes through the disk, permitting sensitive probes of the circumstellar gas with absorption spectroscopy.Our FUV spectra show many narrow circumstellar gas lines arising from several atomic species, including neutral carbon (a gas not seen in the local ISM) and neutral oxygen. We present an estimate of the total carbon column density in the line-of-sight gas and limits on the oxygen column density. Comparing the carbon abundance to a previous measurement of the line-of-sight iron abundance, we see that the carbon is extremely overabundant relative to the solar abundance. A similar overabundance is seen in the Beta Pic disk gas, where the carbon brakes other gases from being rapidly blown out by radiation pressure. The carbon in the 49 Cet gas may play a similar role.

  4. The temperatures, masses and pulsation modes of three ZZ Cetis in the Kepler field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greiss, Sandra

    2013-10-01

    Most stars in our Galaxy, including all known planet hosts, will end or have already ended their lives as white dwarfs, dense stellar remnants sustained by electron degeneracy. Here, we propose to obtain COS far-ultraviolet spectroscopy of three pulsating hydrogen-atmosphere {DA} white dwarfs {ZZ Ceti stars} that for which we are obtaining Kepler short-cadence data. Far-ultraviolet spectroscopy of white dwarfs, covering the H2/H2+ quasi-molecular satellites around 1400A and 1600A, is essential to determine accurate atmospheric parameters, and precision asteroseismology of white dwarfs has the potential to probe in detail the structure of their cores and envelopes that is not possible in any other way. A succesful asteroseismologial analysis requires, however, the correct identification of the pulsation modes. Because ZZ Ceti stars have typically only few large-amplitude modes, the mode identification based on their optical light curves is often ambiguous. Because the ratio of ultraviolet-to-optical pulsation amplitudes depends strongly on the pulsatoin mode, our COS data will also enable us to identify the pulsation modes in the Kepler light curves of these three stars. The unique combination of HST and Kepler observations will enable to investigate the atmospheric and internal structure of three white dwarfs with an unprecedented accuracy. The proposed research is part of the PI's doctoral thesis.

  5. KIC 4552982: outbursts and pulsations in the longest-ever pseudo-continuous light curve of a ZZ Ceti

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, K. J.; Hermes, J. J.; Bischoff-Kim, A.; Moorhead, S.; Castanheira, B. G.; Montgomery, M. H.; Winget, D. E.

    2015-09-01

    KIC 4552982 was the first ZZ Ceti (hydrogen-atmosphere pulsating white dwarf) identified to lie in the Kepler field, resulting in the longest pseudo-continuous light curve ever obtained for this type of variable star. In addition to the pulsations, this light curve exhibits stochastic episodes of brightness enhancement unlike any previously studied white dwarf phenomenon. We briefly highlight the basic outburst and pulsation properties in these proceedings.

  6. The formation of massive primordial stars in the presence of moderate UV backgrounds

    SciTech Connect

    Latif, M. A.; Schleicher, D. R. G.; Bovino, S.; Grassi, T.; Spaans, M.

    2014-09-01

    Radiative feedback produced by stellar populations played a vital role in early structure formation. In particular, photons below the Lyman limit can escape the star-forming regions and produce a background ultraviolet (UV) flux, which consequently may influence the pristine halos far away from the radiation sources. These photons can quench the formation of molecular hydrogen by photodetachment of H{sup –}. In this study, we explore the impact of such UV radiation on fragmentation in massive primordial halos of a few times 10{sup 7} M {sub ☉}. To accomplish this goal, we perform high resolution cosmological simulations for two distinct halos and vary the strength of the impinging background UV field in units of J {sub 21} assuming a blackbody radiation spectrum with a characteristic temperature of T {sub rad} = 10{sup 4} K. We further make use of sink particles to follow the evolution for 10,000 yr after reaching the maximum refinement level. No vigorous fragmentation is observed in UV-illuminated halos while the accretion rate changes according to the thermal properties. Our findings show that a few 10{sup 2}-10{sup 4} solar mass protostars are formed when halos are irradiated by J {sub 21} = 10-500 at z > 10 and suggest a strong relation between the strength of the UV flux and mass of a protostar. This mode of star formation is quite different from minihalos, as higher accretion rates of about 0.01-0.1 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1} are observed by the end of our simulations. The resulting massive stars are potential cradles for the formation of intermediate-mass black holes at earlier cosmic times and contribute to the formation of a global X-ray background.

  7. The Formation of Massive Primordial Stars in the Presence of Moderate UV Backgrounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latif, M. A.; Schleicher, D. R. G.; Bovino, S.; Grassi, T.; Spaans, M.

    2014-09-01

    Radiative feedback produced by stellar populations played a vital role in early structure formation. In particular, photons below the Lyman limit can escape the star-forming regions and produce a background ultraviolet (UV) flux, which consequently may influence the pristine halos far away from the radiation sources. These photons can quench the formation of molecular hydrogen by photodetachment of H-. In this study, we explore the impact of such UV radiation on fragmentation in massive primordial halos of a few times 107 M ⊙. To accomplish this goal, we perform high resolution cosmological simulations for two distinct halos and vary the strength of the impinging background UV field in units of J 21 assuming a blackbody radiation spectrum with a characteristic temperature of T rad = 104 K. We further make use of sink particles to follow the evolution for 10,000 yr after reaching the maximum refinement level. No vigorous fragmentation is observed in UV-illuminated halos while the accretion rate changes according to the thermal properties. Our findings show that a few 102-104 solar mass protostars are formed when halos are irradiated by J 21 = 10-500 at z > 10 and suggest a strong relation between the strength of the UV flux and mass of a protostar. This mode of star formation is quite different from minihalos, as higher accretion rates of about 0.01-0.1 M ⊙ yr-1 are observed by the end of our simulations. The resulting massive stars are potential cradles for the formation of intermediate-mass black holes at earlier cosmic times and contribute to the formation of a global X-ray background.

  8. Characterizing Extragalactic Star Formation with GALEX Legacy Photometric Analysis of UV-Bright Stellar Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thilker, David

    At the close of nearly a decade of observing, GALEX has accumulated an unprecedented archive of ultraviolet (UV) images revealing both the scope and intricacy of star formation (SF) in many thousands of galaxies inhabiting the local universe. If the observed hierarchical SF morphology can be quantified systematically, and physically interpreted with multi-wavelength ancillary data and modeling, then the low redshift GALEX legacy will approach completion. However, the GALEX GR6 pipeline database contains a highly incomplete census of young stellar complexes even for very well-studied galaxies. We propose to apply a dedicated photometry algorithm that has been optimized for measuring the properties of irregularly shaped sources in crowded galaxy images containing spatially variant, diffuse intra-clump emission. Structures will be selected in the UV, but we will compile UV-visible-MIR SEDs for each detection utilizing Pan-STARRS1+SDSS and WISE data. These SEDs will then be fit using population-synthesis models to derive estimated stellar mass, age, and extinction. Processing will be completed for the entire diameter-limited GALEX Large Galaxy Atlas (GLGA) sample of 20,000+ galaxies, at a variety of standardized spatial resolutions. Although the precise categorization of the cataloged substructures will depend on galaxy distance, the outcome of our analysis will be a catalog similar to the stellar association surveys of past decades for very nearby galaxies based on resolved stars (e.g. van den Bergh 1964, Hodge 1986, Efremov et al. 1987), except that our investigation will probe a galaxy sample of dramatically larger size using the integrated UV light from such groupings of young stars. Our algorithm is multi-scale in nature and will thus preserve the hierarchical properties of the stellar distribution, by linking sub-clumps to their larger-scale parent feature(s). The resulting database will be a fundamental resource for follow-up multi-wavelength studies probing SF

  9. Coorelated UV/Optical Line Profile Variations in Mild Be Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Myron A.

    Mild classical Be stars offer an opportunity to monitor instabilities near the stars' surfaces that may ultimately be responsible for the "Be (episodic mass loss) phenomenon." In a previous study of the mild-Be prototype lambda Eri, we discovered shortlived "dimple" shaped features in the He I lambda 6678 line of this star ~40% of the time. In 1990 we were awarded three shifts of IUE time simultaneous with optical spectroscopy. Our observations demonstrated that the C IV and perhaps N V resonance doublet usually weaken by 15-25% when a dimple appears in that star's He I lambda 6678 line. In this proposal we ask for four shifts of IUE time to search for this UV/optical line correlation for four other mild Be stars in which dimples have just been discovered. If the C IV lines weaken when optical line "dimples" appear, as was true for our campaign on lambda Eri, then we will have a new density diagnostic from which to estimate the masses of structures responsible for the dimples. If these masses bear out present estimates, we could have a new means to study the circulation between the photosphere and the environs of a Be star.

  10. Star Formation in the Galaxy and the Fluctuating UV Radiation Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollenbach, David; Parravano, Antonio; McKee, Christopher H.; Fonda, Mark (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We examine the formation of massive stars in the Galaxy, the resultant fluctuating UV radiation field, and the effect of this field on the star-forming interstellar medium (ISM). There are substantial fluctuations of the UV radiation field in space (scales of 100's of parsecs) and time (time-scales of order 100 million years) at the solar circle. The Far Ultraviolet (FUV) (6 eV< hv < 13.6 eV) field and the pressure determines whether the thermal balance of the neutral gas results in cold clouds or warm (T - 10(exp 4) neutral medium. We show how to calculate the average fractions of the gas in the cold and warm phases when the interstellar gas is subject to this fluctuating FUV field. The knowledge of how these fractions depend on the gas properties and on the FUV sources is a basic step in building a model of the large scale behavior of the ISM and the mutual relation between the ISM and the star formation rate. Application is made to observations of spiral galaxies which correlate the star formation rate per unit area with the surface density of the gas. We acknowledge support from the NASA Astrophysical Theory program.

  11. DK UMa: A Star on the Ascent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, Theodore

    1999-01-01

    DK UMa (= 24 UMa = HD 82210) is a G4 IV-III star. According to its M(sub v) and B - V color, it is located at the base of the red giant branch, having recently exited from the Hertzsprung Gap. Now poised to start its first ascent along the giant branch, DK UMa is at a significant juncture in its post-main-sequence evolution, offering an important evolutionary comparison for magnetic activity with stars like 31 Comae, which is just entering the Hertzsprung Gap, and older stars like the Hyades giants or P Ceti, which have passed the tip of the giant branch and lie in the so-called 'clump'. As part of a major survey of the ultraviolet and X ray properties of a well-defined sample of evolved giant stars, DK UMa was observed with the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer (EUVE) spacecraft in March 1997, for a total exposure time of 230 kiloseconds. A plot of the extracted short-wavelength (SW) spectrum of this star is shown, where it is compared with similar EUVE exposures for other yellow and red giant stars in the activity survey. In terms of the spectral lines of different ionization stages present in these spectra, the transition region and coronal temperature of DK UMa appears to be intermediate between those of 31 Com and P Ceti. Combining the relative strengths of the EUVE lines with Hubble Space Telescope (HST) data at near UV wavelengths and with ROSAT X-ray fluxes, the differential emission measure (DEM) distributions of these stars form a sequence in coronal temperature, which peaks at 10(exp 7.2) K for 31 Com, at 10(exp 6.8) K for B Ceti, and at intermediate temperatures for DK UMa - consistent with the evolutionary stages represented by the three stars. The integrated fluxes of the strongest emission lines found in the EUVE spectrum of DK UMa are listed, again compared with similar measurements for other giant stars that were observed in the course of other EUVE Guest Observer programs.

  12. Morphology and kinematics of the gas envelope of Mira Ceti

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nhung, P. T.; Hoai, D. T.; Diep, P. N.; Phuong, N. T.; Thao, N. T.; Tuan-Anh, P.; Darriulat, P.

    2016-04-01

    Observations of 12CO(3-2) emission of the circumbinary envelope of Mira Ceti, made by ALMA are analysed. The observed Doppler velocity distribution is made of three components: a blue-shifted south-eastern arc, which can be described as a ring in slow radial expansion, ˜1.7 km s-1, making an angle of ˜50° with the plane of the sky and born some 2000 years ago; a few arcs, probably born at the same epoch as the blue-shifted arc, all sharing Doppler velocities red-shifted by approximately 3±2 km s-1 with respect to the main star; the third, central region dominated by the circumbinary envelope, displaying two outflows in the south-western and north-eastern hemispheres. At short distances from the star, up to ˜1.5″, these hemispheres display very different morphologies: the south-western outflow covers a broad solid angle, expands radially at a rate between 5 and 10 km s-1 and is slightly red shifted; the north-eastern outflow consists of two arms, both blue-shifted, bracketing a broad dark region where emission is suppressed. At distances between ˜1.5″ and ˜2.5″ the asymmetry between the two hemispheres is significantly smaller and detached arcs, particularly spectacular in the north-eastern hemisphere are present. Close to the stars, we observe a mass of gas surrounding Mira B, with a size of a few tens of AU, and having Doppler velocities with respect to Mira B reaching ±1.5 km s-1, which we interpret as gas flowing from Mira A toward Mira B.

  13. Morphology and kinematics of the gas envelope of Mira Ceti

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nhung, P. T.; Hoai, D. T.; Diep, P. N.; Phuong, N. T.; Thao, N. T.; Tuan-Anh, P.; Darriulat, P.

    2016-07-01

    Observations of 12CO(3-2) emission of the circumbinary envelope of Mira Ceti, made by Atacama Large Millimetre/sub-millimetre Array, are analysed. The observed Doppler velocity distribution is made of three components: a blueshifted south-eastern arc, which can be described as a ring in slow radial expansion, ˜1.7 km s-1, making an angle of ˜50° with the plane of the sky and born some 2000 years ago; a few arcs, probably born at the same epoch as the blueshifted arc, all sharing Doppler velocities redshifted by approximately 3±2 km s-1 with respect to the main star; thirdly, a central region dominated by the circumbinary envelope, displaying two outflows in the south-western and north-eastern hemispheres. At short distances from the star, up to ˜1.5 arcsec, these hemispheres display very different morphologies: the south-western outflow covers a broad solid angle, expands radially at a rate between 5 and 10 km s-1 and is slightly redshifted; the north-eastern outflow consists of two arms, both blueshifted, bracketing a broad dark region where emission is suppressed. At distances between ˜1.5 and ˜2.5 arcsec the asymmetry between the two hemispheres is significantly smaller and detached arcs, particularly spectacular in the north-eastern hemisphere are present. Close to the stars, we observe a mass of gas surrounding Mira B, with a size of a few tens of au, and having Doppler velocities with respect to Mira B reaching ±1.5 km s-1, which we interpret as gas flowing from Mira A towards Mira B.

  14. Resolving the Dusty Debris Disk of 49 Ceti

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lieman-Sifry, Jesse; Hughes, A. Meredith

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the dispersal of primordial gas and dust from circumstellar disks is necessary for determining the timeline for giant planet formation. While the current assumption is that the gas and dust evolve simultaneously, there are a few systems that defy this paradigm. The nearby A star 49 Ceti, at a distance of 61 pc, hosts one of only a few known circumstellar disks that exhibits the dust qualities of an older debris disk but still displays a substantial mass of molecular gas, a characteristic normally associated with youth. We present Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array (ALMA) observations at 850μm and a spatial resolution of 0.47x0.39 arcsec that resolve emission from the dust disk for the first time. To investigate the properties of the dust grains and the morphology of the disk, we simultaneously model the high-resolution ALMA data and the unresolved spectral energy distribution (SED). The detected emission reveals a disk that extends from 1.16±0.12AU to 286±7AU with an increase in surface density at 113±2AU that is viewed at an inclination of 79.6±.4°. The increase in surface density corresponds to the inner radius of the gas disk, hinting that similar mechanisms may be responsible for sculpting the gas and dust disks at this late stage of disk evolution.

  15. Star Formation In the Galaxy and the Fluctuating UV Radiation Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollenbach, David; Parravano, Antonio; McKee, Christopher H.; DeVincenzi, D. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We examine the formation of massive stars in the Galaxy, the resultant fluctuating UV (ultraviolet) radiation field, and the effect of this field on the star-forming interstellar medium. There are substantial fluctuations of the UV radiation field in space (scales of 100's of parsecs) and time (time-scales of order 100 million years). The FUV (far ultraviolet) (6 eV less than hv less than 13.6 eV) field and the pressure determines whether the thermal balance of the neutral gas results in cold clouds or warm (T approx. 10(exp 4) K) neutral medium. We show how to calculate the average fractions of the gas in the cold and warm phases when the interstellar gas is subject to this fluctuating FUV field. The knowledge of how these fractions depend on the gas properties and on the FUV sources is a basic step in building a model of the large scale behavior of the ISM (interstellar medium) and the mutual relation between the ISM and the star formation rate.

  16. Star Formation Rates in Cooling Flow Clusters: A UV Pilot Study with Archival XMM-Newton Optical Monitor Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hicks, A. K.; Mushotzky, R.

    2006-01-01

    We have analyzed XMM-Newton Optical Monitor (OM) UV (180-400 nm) data for a sample of 33 galaxies. 30 are cluster member galaxies, and nine of these are central cluster galaxies (CCGs) in cooling flow clusters having mass deposition rates which span a range of 8 - 525 Solar Mass/yr. By comparing the ratio of UV to 2MASS J band fluxes, we find a significant UV excess in many, but not all, cooling flow CCGs, a finding consistent with the outcome of previous studies based on optical imaging data (McNamara & O'Connell 1989; Cardiel, Gorgas, & Aragon-Salamanca 1998; Crawford et al. 1999). This UV excess is a direct indication of the presence of young massive stars, and therefore recent star formation, in these galaxies. Using the Starburst99 spectral energy distribution (SED) model of continuous star formation over a 900 Myr period, we derive star formation rates of 0.2 - 219 solar Mass/yr for the cooling flow sample. For 2/3 of this sample it is possible to equate Chandra/XMM cooling flow mass deposition rates with UV inferred star formation rates, for a combination of starburst lifetime and IMF slope. This is a pilot study of the well populated XMM UV cluster archive and a more extensive follow up study is currently underway.

  17. Star Formation Rates in Cooling Flow Clusters: A UV Pilot Study with Archival XMM-Newton Optical Monitor Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hicks, A. K.; Mushotzky, R.

    2005-01-01

    We have analyzed XMM-Newton Optical Monitor (OM) UV (180-400 nm) data for a sample of 33 galaxies. 30 are cluster member galaxies, and nine of these are central cluster galaxies (CCGs) in cooling flow clusters having mass deposition rates which span a range of 8 - 525 solar mass per year. By comparing the ratio of UV to 2MASS J band fluxes, we find a significant UV excess in many, but not all, cooling flow CCGs, a finding consistent with the outcome of previous studies based on optical imaging data (McNamara & O Connell 1989; Cardiel, Gorgas, & Aragon-Salamanca 1998; Crawford et al. 1999). This UV excess is a direct indication of the presence of young massive stars, and therefore recent star formation, in these galaxies. Using the Starburst99 spectral energy distribution (SED) model of continuous star formation over a 900 Myr period, we derive star formation rates of 0.2 - 219 solar mass per year for the cooling flow sample. For 2/3 of this sample it is possible to equate Chandra/XMM cooling flow mass deposition rates with UV inferred star formation rates, for a combination of starburst lifetime and IMF slope. This is a pilot study of the well populated XMM UV cluster archive and a more extensive follow up study is currently underway.

  18. HAZMAT II: Modeling the Evolution of Extreme-UV Radiation from M Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peacock, Sarah; Barman, Travis S.; Shkolnik, Evgenya

    2015-01-01

    M dwarf stars make up nearly 75% of the Milky Way's stellar population. Due to their low luminosities, the habitable zones around these stars are very close in (~0.1-0.4 AU), increasing the probability of finding terrestrial planets located in these regions. While there is evidence that stars emit their highest levels of far and near ultraviolet (FUV; NUV) radiation in the earliest stages of their evolution while planets are simultaneously forming and accumulating their atmospheres, we are currently unable to directly measure the extreme UV radiation (EUV). High levels of EUV radiation can alter the abundance of important molecules such as H2O, changing the chemistry in extrasolar planet atmospheres. Most previous stellar atmosphere models under-predict FUV and EUV emission from M dwarfs; here we present new models for M stars that include prescriptions for the hot, lowest density, atmospheric layers (chromosphere, transition region and corona), from which this radiation is emitted. By comparing our model spectra to GALEX near and far ultraviolet fluxes, we are able to predict the evolution of EUV radiation for M dwarfs from 10 Myr - 1 Gyr. This research is the next major step in the HAZMAT (HAbitable Zones and M dwarf Activity across Time) project to analyze how the habitable zone evolves with the evolving properties of stellar and planetary atmospheres.

  19. Magnetic field structure in single late-type giants: β Ceti in 2010-2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsvetkova, S.; Petit, P.; Aurière, M.; Konstantinova-Antova, R.; Wade, G. A.; Charbonnel, C.; Decressin, T.; Bogdanovski, R.

    2013-08-01

    Aims: We study the behavior of the magnetic field and the line activity indicators of the single late-type giant β Ceti. Using spectropolarimetric data, we aim to reconstruct the magnetic field structure on the star's surface and to present the first magnetic maps for β Ceti. Methods: The data were obtained using two spectropolarimeters - Narval at the Bernard Lyot Télescope, Pic du Midi, France, and ESPaDOnS at CFHT, Hawaii. Thirty-eight circularly-polarized spectra have been collected in the period June 2010-January 2012. The least square deconvolution method was applied for extracting high signal-to-noise ratio line profiles, from which we measured the surface-averaged longitudinal magnetic field Bl. Chromospheric activity indicators CaII K, Hα, CaII IR (854.2 nm), and radial velocity were simultaneously measured, and their variability was analyzed along with the behavior of Bl. The Zeeman Doppler imaging (ZDI) inversion technique was employed for reconstructing the large-scale magnetic field and two magnetic maps of β Ceti are presented for two periods (June 2010-December 2010 and June 2011-January 2012). Results: The Bl stays with a same positive polarity for the whole observational period and shows significant variations in the interval 0.1-8.2 G. The behavior of the line activity indicators is in good agreement with the Bl variations. Searching for periodic signals in the Stokes V time series, we found a possible rotation period of 215 days. The two ZDI maps show a mainly axisymmetric and poloidal magnetic topology and a simple surface magnetic field configuration dominated by a dipole. Little evolution is observed between the two maps, in spite of a 1 yr interval between both subsets. We also use state-of-the-art stellar evolution models to constrain the evolutionary status of β Ceti. We derive a mass of 3.5 M⊙ and propose that this star is already in the central helium-burning phase. Conclusions: Considering all our results and the evolutionary

  20. Predicting dust extinction properties of star-forming galaxies from Hα/UV ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koyama, Yusei; Kodama, Tadayuki; Hayashi, Masao; Shimakawa, Rhythm; Yamamura, Issei; Egusa, Fumi; Oi, Nagisa; Tanaka, Ichi; Tadaki, Ken-ichi; Takita, Satoshi; Makiuti, Sin'itirou

    2015-10-01

    Using star-forming galaxies sample in the nearby Universe (0.02 < z < 0.10) selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (DR7) and Galaxy Evolution Explorer all-sky survey (GR5), we present a new empirical calibration for predicting dust extinction of galaxies from the Hα-to-FUV flux ratio. We find that the Hα dust extinction (AHα) derived with Hα/Hβ ratio (Balmer decrement) increases with increasing Hα/UV ratio as expected, but there remains a considerable scatter around the relation, which is largely dependent on stellar mass and/or Hα equivalent width (EWHα). At fixed Hα/UV ratio, galaxies with higher stellar mass (or galaxies with lower EWHα) tend to be more highly obscured by dust. We quantify this trend and establish an empirical calibration for predicting AHα with a combination of Hα/UV ratio, stellar mass, and EWHα, with which we can successfully reduce the systematic uncertainties accompanying the simple Hα/UV approach by ˜15-30 per cent. The new recipes proposed in this study will provide a convenient tool for predicting dust extinction level of galaxies particularly when Balmer decrement is not available. By comparing AHα (derived with Balmer decrement) and AUV (derived with IR/UV luminosity ratio) for a subsample of galaxies for which AKARI far-infrared photometry is available, we demonstrate that more massive galaxies tend to have higher extra extinction towards the nebular regions compared to the stellar continuum light. Considering recent studies reporting smaller extra extinction towards nebular regions for high-redshift galaxies, we argue that the dust geometry within high-redshift galaxies resembles low-mass galaxies in the nearby Universe.

  1. Constraints provided by star cluster spectra on the nature of the UV turn-up in giant elliptical galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bica, E.; Alloin, D.

    1988-03-01

    We have linked available ultraviolet observations to the visible and near infrared spectra of some objects from our star cluster and galaxy nucleus samples. We have analyzed the nature of the UV turn-up in giant elliptical galaxies (gE) in the light of our recent population synthesis results which are based upon a library of star cluster integrated spectra in the visible and near infrared. We also investigate how star clusters can provide information on the frequency of occurrence of particular types of stars with respect to the associated populations of a given age and metallicity. We definitely exclude the possibility that the UV turn-up in gE is caused by blue horizontal branch (BHB) stars associated with metal-poor components: even if they were a major contributor to the optical spectrum, their UV turn-up would be unable to account for that observed in gE, simply because it is not steep enough. Furthermore, our previous visible-near infrared synthesis has shown that only 10% of the flux originates from low metallicity components. On the contrary we find strong evidence that this UV turn-up is a result of on-going star formation in gE nuclei. Indeed, young blue clusters and/or H II region spectra match the UV turn-up quite well, without affecting much the optical range where their contribution is less than 2% at 5870 Å. Another possibility would be that the UV turn-up in gE is caused by post AGB stars from metal-rich components: data presently available about their frequency of occurrence in metal-rich galactic clusters, as well as about that of planetary nebulae in the bulge of M31 do not favour this interpretation however.

  2. Does UV CETI Suffer from the MAD Syndrome?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drake, Jeremy

    1999-01-01

    Photometric data have been analysed and searched for events of flaring and other variability. Some flaring has been detected, though probably not at a level that will hinder our continuing spectral analysis. X-ray diagnostics for the very hot coronal emission measure are under investigation in order to determine whether or not the very hot coronal plasma contributes significantly to the observed X-ray flux in the EUV. The key test of the MAD syndrome lies in whether or not the coronal lines indicate a depletion in met- als in the corona relative to the underlying photosphere. While some progress has been made in this direction, not as much work has been accomplished as expected due to the increasing commitments of the PI to the CXO project as it nears launch. A no-cost extension has been granted in order to further the analysis and carry out the next stages of the investigation: to construct an emission measure distribution with which to compute a synthetic continuum to compare with the observed continuum.

  3. Does UV CETI Suffer from the Mad Syndrome?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drake, Jeremy

    1999-01-01

    Photometric data have been analyzed and searched for events of flaring and other variability. Some flaring has been detected, though probably not at a level that will hinder our continuing spectral analysis. X-ray diagnostics for the very hot coronal emission measure are under investigation in order to determine whether or not the very hot coronal plasma contributes significantly to the observed X-ray flux in the (EUV) Extreme Ultraviolet Radiation. The key test of the MAD syndrome lies in whether or not the coronal lines indicate a depletion in metals in the corona relative to the underlying photosphere.

  4. Does UV CETI Suffer from the MAD Syndrome?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drake, Jeremy

    2000-01-01

    Data have been reduced and partially analyzed and models have been fitted. ASCA data indicate a metal-poor corona, with metals down by a factor of 3 or more relative to the photospheric values. EUVE data show a FIP effect, which is expected if the metals are enhanced rather than depleted. An absolute measure of the metal abundance has not yet been performed for the EUVE data. Either the FIP effect is in operation in the presence of a global depletion of metals, or the ASCA analysis is giving the wrong answer. The latter could be the case if the plasma models applied are incomplete. Further investigation into this is warranted prior to publication.

  5. Parameters of Selected Central Stars of Planetary Nebulae from Consistent Optical and UV Spectral Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaschinski, Cornelius Bernhard

    Low mass stars have zero age main sequence masses of roughly 0.8-8.0 solar masses. Once their H and He source is depleted, low mass stars reaching the tip of the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) eject their envelopes becoming Central Stars of Planetary Nebulae (CSPNs). In the main part of this thesis we investigate the stellar parameters of a selected samples of CSPNS in order to further examine the validity of the commonly accepted core mass-luminosity relation of CSPNs. The necessity of such a critical examination was highlighted by a mismatch between the derived stellar parameters from hydrodynamical self-consistent UV analysis and those from a plane-parallel model fit to photospheric H and He absorption lines. The consistently derived masses from the UV analysis showed a wider spread than the masses derived from the optical analysis, which were obtained using theoretical post-AGB evolutionary tracks. This investigation was carried out using the non-local thermodynamic equilibrium atmosphere code "WM-basic", which has been previously used as the basis for the earlier consistent UV analysis performed on the sample of selected CSPNs. First, we improved the code by implementing the Stark broadening effect, so as to model optical H and He lines simultaneously along with the UV spectrum. This allowed a self-consistent re-analysis of the most and least massive of the CSPNs sampled. Using the UV parameter set we then reproduced not only the observed UV spectra but also produced optical line profiles which are nearly identical to those from optical stellar parameter models. The consistent models using the optical parameter set reproduce neither spectrum accurately. The lack of consistency between stellar and wind parameters of the optical parameter set is also evident from a different approach based on an investigation of the dynamical wind parameters. In a subsequent study, we further improved the WM-basic code by implementing the treatment of clumping. The strength of

  6. Characterizing Dust Attenuation in Local Star-forming Galaxies: UV and Optical Reddening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battisti, A. J.; Calzetti, D.; Chary, R.-R.

    2016-02-01

    The dust attenuation for a sample of ∼10,000 local (z ≲ 0.1) star-forming galaxies is constrained as a function of their physical properties. We utilize aperture-matched multiwavelength data available from the Galaxy Evolution Explorer and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey to ensure that regions of comparable size in each galaxy are being analyzed. We follow the method of Calzetti et al. and characterize the dust attenuation through the UV power-law index, β, and the dust optical depth, which is quantified using the difference in Balmer emission line optical depth, {τ }Bl={τ }{{H}β }-{τ }{{H}α }. The observed linear relationship between β and {τ }Bl is similar to the local starburst relation, but the large scatter (σint = 0.44) suggests that there is significant variation in the local universe. We derive a selective attenuation curve over the range 1250 Å < λ < 8320 Å and find that a single attenuation curve is effective for characterizing the majority of galaxies in our sample. This curve has a slightly lower selective attenuation in the UV compared to previously determined curves. We do not see evidence to suggest that a 2175 Å feature is significant in the average attenuation curve. Significant positive correlations are seen between the amount of UV and optical reddening and galaxy metallicity, mass, star formation rate (SFR), and SFR surface density. This provides a potential tool for gauging attenuation where the stellar population is unresolved, such as at high z.

  7. Effect of UV Radiation on the Spectral Fingerprints of Earth-like Planets Orbiting M Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rugheimer, S.; Kaltenegger, L.; Segura, A.; Linsky, J.; Mohanty, S.

    2015-08-01

    We model the atmospheres and spectra of Earth-like planets orbiting the entire grid of M dwarfs for active and inactive stellar models with Teff = 2300 K to Teff = 3800 K and for six observed MUSCLES M dwarfs with UV radiation data. We set the Earth-like planets at the 1 AU equivalent distance and show spectra from the visible to IR (0.4-20 μm) to compare detectability of features in different wavelength ranges with the James Webb Space Telescope and other future ground- and spaced-based missions to characterize exo-Earths. We focus on the effect of UV activity levels on detectable atmospheric features that indicate habitability on Earth, namely, H2O, O3, CH4, N2O, and CH3Cl. To observe signatures of life—O2/O3 in combination with reducing species like CH4—we find that early and active M dwarfs are the best targets of the M star grid for future telescopes. The O2 spectral feature at 0.76 μm is increasingly difficult to detect in reflected light of later M dwarfs owing to low stellar flux in that wavelength region. N2O, another biosignature detectable in the IR, builds up to observable concentrations in our planetary models around M dwarfs with low UV flux. CH3Cl could become detectable, depending on the depth of the overlapping N2O feature. We present a spectral database of Earth-like planets around cool stars for directly imaged planets as a framework for interpreting future light curves, direct imaging, and secondary eclipse measurements of the atmospheres of terrestrial planets in the habitable zone to design and assess future telescope capabilities.

  8. The Origin and Nature of UV Bright stars in Globular Clusters II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferraro, Francesco

    1996-07-01

    We propose an investigation of the UV-bright stellar populations of NGC 1904, NGC 6254, and NGC 5904. These are Galactic globular clusters that are known to be bright at far-UV wavelengths, with the two known to possess extended blue HB tails. These observations will complement data obtained during Cycle 5 and during the UIT Astro-1 flight in December 1990. The object of this investigation is twofold: {a} to explore the relationship between the HB mass distribution in clusters with blue HB tails {BT clusters} to the clusters' structural and dynamical properties and {b} to gain further samples of blue straggler stars in the cores of such clusters. These observations will allow a probe of the variation in mass loss processes close to the tip of the red giant branch. The clusters have been selected as follows: NGC 1904 and NGC 6254 are similar in HB morphology to NGC 6205 for which we have scheduled Cycle 5 observations, and are both more centrally concentrated. In addition, UIT observations indicate a deficit of blue HB stars in the core of NGC1904. NGC 5904 has similar metallicity and concentration to both NGC 1904 & NGC 6254, and was observed by the ANS to be brighter in the far-UV than its optical HB morphology suggests. Our original target list contained also NGC 6266, which has a larger continuous range in HB colour than any other cluster, extending from the red to the blue extreme, and would have provided information about a cluster with high HB mass dispersion. However the exposure times that we derived in Phase 1 using the WFPC2 Exposure Time Calculator provided by the STScI resulted significantly underestimated because of an error in the ETC. As a result of that, we decided to drop NGC 6266, which is highly reddened and requires long exposure times, in order to obtain acceptably good photometric quality on the other 3 clusters.

  9. The Instability Strip of ZZ Ceti White Dwarfs and Its Extension to the Extremely Low Mass Pulsators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Grootel, V.; Fontaine, G.; Brassard, P.; Dupret, M.-A.

    2013-12-01

    The determination of the location of the theoretical ZZ Ceti instability strip in the log g - Teff diagram has remained a challenge over the years, due to the lack of a suitable treatment for convection in these stars. We report here a detailed stability survey over the whole ZZ Ceti regime, including the very low masses where three pulsators have recently been found. With this in mind, we computed twenty-nine evolutionary sequences of DA models with various masses and chemical layering. These models are characterized by the so-called ML2/α = 1.0 convective efficiency and take into account the important feedback effect of convection on the atmospheric structure. We computed power spectra for these models with the Liège nonadiabatic pulsation code MAD, which is the only one to conveniently incorporate a full time-dependent convection treatment and, thus, provides the best available description of the blue edge of the instability strip. On the other hand, given the failure of all nonadiabatic codes to properly account for the red edge of the strip, including MAD, we tested the idea that the red edge is due to energy leakage through the atmosphere. Using this approach, we found that our theoretical ZZ Ceti instability strip accounts remarkably well for the boundaries of the empirical strip.

  10. Keck Observations of the UV-Bright Star Barnard 29 in the Globular Cluster M13 (NGC 6205)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixon, William Van Dyke; Chayer, Pierre; Reid, Iain N.

    2016-06-01

    In color-magnitude diagrams of globular clusters, stars brighter than the horizontal branch and bluer than the red-giant branch are known as UV-bright stars. Most are evolving from the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) to the tip of the white-dwarf cooling curve. To better understand this important phase of stellar evolution, we have analyzed a Keck HIRES echelle spectrum of the UV-bright star Barnard 29 in M13. We begin by fitting the star's H I (Hα, Hβ, and Hγ) and He I lines with a grid of synthetic spectra generated from non-LTE H-He models computed using the TLUSTY code. We find that the shape of the star's Hα profile is not well reproduced with these models. Upgrading from version 200 to version 204M of TLUSTY solves this problem: the Hα profile is now well reproduced. TLUSTY version 204 includes improved calculations for the Stark broadening of hydrogen line profiles. Using these models, we derive stellar parameters of Teff = 21,100 K, log g = 3.05, and log (He/H) = -0.87, values consistent with those of previous authors. The star's Keck spectrum shows photospheric absorption from N II, O II, Mg II, Al III, Si II, Si III, S II, Ar II, and Fe III. The abundances of these species are consistent with published values for the red-giant stars in M13, suggesting that the star's chemistry has changed little since it left the AGB.

  11. Lyman-alpha imagery of comet Kohoutek, and far-UV magnitudes of stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Page, T.

    1974-01-01

    The Apollo-16 S201 electronographic camera backup model was modified for use on the Skylab AMS-SAL, which reduced its 20 deg FOV to about 7 deg unvignetted. Over 500 frames were exposed by automatic sequencer through LiF and CaF2. The Lyman-alpha halo of comet Kohoutek has been analyzed for nine occasions, and its long, pointed tail was imaged in 1250-1600 A only near perihelion. Far-UV magnitudes and colors are being derived for about 200 stars, nebulae, and galaxies. Redshifted Lyman-alpha emission from intergalactic atomic hydrogen was not detected in 7 clusters of galaxies. About 25% of the exposed frames were degraded by water damage, electrical discharges, decline in photocathode sensitivity, and loss of AMS mirror reflectance.

  12. Fluorescence processes and line identifications in the UV spectra of cool stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, Kenneth G.; Johansson, Sveneric

    1988-01-01

    Fluorescence processes active in the outer atmospheres of noncoronal cool stars and the UV lines they produce are summarized. Eight pumping processes and 21 fluorescent line products are discussed. The processes, which produce 12 lines, involves energy levels not previously known to be radiatively populated. Four of these are examples of self-fluorescence, whereby one or more lines of Fe II photo-excite through coincident lines the upper levels of other Fe II lines lines seen in emission, while two others explain the selective excitation of solitary Ni II and Si I lines. Nine of the line products are decays from levels in Fe I and Fe II already known to be radiatively populated.

  13. Gamma-Ray Bursts Trace UV Metrics of Star Formation over 3 < z < 5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greiner, J.; Fox, D. B.; Schady, P.; Krühler, T.; Trenti, M.; Cikota, A.; Bolmer, J.; Elliott, J.; Delvaux, C.; Perna, R.; Afonso, P.; Kann, D. A.; Klose, S.; Savaglio, S.; Schmidl, S.; Schweyer, T.; Tanga, M.; Varela, K.

    2015-08-01

    We present the first uniform treatment of long duration gamma-ray burst (GRB) host galaxy detections and upper limits over the redshift range 3star formation (SF). We contribute deep imaging observations of 13 GRB positions yielding the discovery of 8 new host galaxies. We use this data set in tandem with previously published observations of 31 further GRB positions to estimate or constrain the host galaxy rest-frame ultraviolet (UV; λ =1600 Å) absolute magnitudes MUV. We then use the combined set of 44 MUV estimates and limits to construct the MUV luminosity function (LF) for GRB host galaxies over 3-15.6 mag, and with extrapolations of the assumed Schechter-type LF well beyond this range. We review proposed astrophysical and observational biases for our sample, and find that they are for the most part minimal. We therefore conclude, as the simplest interpretation of our results, that GRBs successfully trace UV metrics of cosmic SF over the range 3star formation processes from z≈ 3 out to the highest redshifts. Partly based on observations collected at the European Organisation for Astronomical Research in the Southern Hemisphere under IDs 089.A-0120(A) and 091.A-0786(A).

  14. Star Formation in the Galaxy and the Fluctuating UV Radiation Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollenbach, David; Parravano, A.; McKee, C.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    We examine the formation of massive stars in the Galaxy, the resultant fluctuating UV radiation field, and the effect of this Field on the star-forming interstellar medium. Following previous researchers such as Habing (1968), we calculate the average interstellar radiation field at the Solar Circle of the Galaxy. However, our new calculations follow more closely the time dependence of the field at any point. We show that there is a significant difference between the mean field and the median field, and that there are substantial fluctuations of the field (on timescales of order 100 million years) at a given point. Far Ultraviolet Radiation (FUV, photon energies of 6 eV - 13.6 eV) has been recognized as the main source of heating of the neutral interstellar gas. Given the pressure of the interstellar medium (ISM) the FUV field determines whether the thermal balance of the neutral gas results in cold (T approximately 50 - 100 K) clouds (CNM), warm (T about 10,000 K) (WNM), for a combination of the two (the two phase ISM) We present results for the time history of the FUV field for points in the local ISM of the Milky Way Galaxy. The presence of this fluctuating heating rate converts CNM to WNM and vice versa. We show how to calculate the average fractions of the gas in the CNM and WNM when the interstellar gas is subject to this fluctuating FUV field. The knowledge of how these fractions depend on the gas properties (i.e. mean density and composition) and on the FUV-sources (i.e. the star formation rate, or the IMF, or the size distribution of associations) is a basic step in building any detailed model of the large scale behavior of the ISM and the mutual relation between the ISM and the SFR.

  15. (F)UV Spectral Analysis of 15 Hot, Hydrogen-Rich Central Stars of PNe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziegler, Marc

    2013-07-01

    The aim of this thesis was the precise determination of basic stellar parameters and metal abundances for a sample of 15 ionizing stars of gaseous nebulae. Strategic lines of metals for the expected parameter range are located in the ultraviolet (UV) and far-ultraviolet (FUV) range. Thus high-resolution, high-S/N UV and FUV observations obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) were used for the analysis. For the calculation of the necessary spectral energy distributions the Tübingen NLTE Model-Atmosphere Package (TMAP) was used. The model atmospheres included most elements from H - Ni in order to account for line-blanketing effects. For each object a small grid of model atmospheres was calculated. As the interstellar medium (ISM) imprints its influence in the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) and especially the FUSE range, the program OWENS was employed to calculate the interstellar absorption features. Both, the photospheric model spectral energy distribution (SED) as well as the ISM models were combined to enable the identification of most of the observed absorption lines. The analyzed sample covers a range of 70 kK < Teff < 136 kK, and surface gravities from log (g/cm/sec^2) = 5.4 - 7.4, thus representing different stages of stellar evolution. For a large number of elements, abundances were determined for the first time in these objects. Lines of C, N, O, F, Ne, Si, P, S, and Ar allowed to determine the corresponding abundances. For none of the objects lines of Ca, Sc, Ti, and V could be found. Only a few objects were rich in Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, and Ni lines. Most of the analyzed stars exhibited only lines of Fe (ionization stages V - VIII) from the iron-group elements. No signs for gravitational settling (the gravitational force exceeds the radiation pressure and elements begin to sink from the atmosphere into deeper layers) were found. This is expected as the values of the surface gravities of

  16. Ten years of the international review meetings on Communication with Extraterrestrial Intelligence /CETI/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pesek, R.; Billingham, J.

    1981-01-01

    The development of ideas on CETI within the international community over the past five years is reviewed, and the outlook for future CETI activities is discussed. The growth of review sessions on CETI held annually by the International Academy of Astronautics (IAA) is considered, with particular attention given to the issue of radio frequency allocation for the search for extraterrestrial intelligence. CETI activities outside the IAA are then examined, including the Viking search for life on Mars, Project Orion for the detection of extrasolar planetary systems, SETI programs undertaken in the U.S. and Soviet Union, and the development of multispectral spectrum analyzers and signal processors. The expected future development of CETI strategies, techniques and instrumentation as well as popular and scientific interest in SETI are discussed, and it is noted that the IAA sessions remain the only regular international forum for the exchange of data on all aspects of CETI.

  17. The effective temperature and surface gravity of the UV-bright star Barnard 29 of Messier 13

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adelman, Saul J.; Aikman, G. C. L.

    1987-01-01

    Comparison of optical region spectrophotometry, IUE low dispersion fluxes, and the H-gamma profile with the predictions of metal-poor model atmospheres were used to derive the photospheric parameters of the UV-bright star Barnard 29. These were found to be T(eff) - 20, 250 K, log g - 3.15 after the application of reddening corrections. A solar He/H ratio and the metallicity of Messier 13 were assumed.

  18. The pulsations of ZZ Ceti stars. III - The driving mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brickhill, A. J.

    1991-08-01

    The outer layers of the variable white dwarfs are in a state of partial ionization. During the pulsation cycle the base of the ionization zone is strongly heated by the radiative layers below, in phase with the pressure perturbation. If this excess heat is not quickly lost at the surface, then the driving effect is strong. The surface flux perturbation tends to be small and delayed in phase because the surface flux is remarkably insensitive to temperature changes in the deeper layers of the ionization zone. This insensitivity is closely associated with the well known inward divergence of the solutions for the equilibrium thermal structure in the convective layers. The mechanism which excites the oscillations could be called 'convective driving'.

  19. Pathology of striped dolphins (Stenella coeruleoalba) infected with Brucella ceti.

    PubMed

    González-Barrientos, R; Morales, J-A; Hernández-Mora, G; Barquero-Calvo, E; Guzmán-Verri, C; Chaves-Olarte, E; Moreno, E

    2010-05-01

    Seventeen striped dolphins (Stenella coeruleoalba) displaying swimming disorders compatible with neurological syndromes were investigated for Brucella infection. Sixteen dolphins had meningoencephalomyelitis. Serum antibody against Brucella antigen was detected in all 14 animals tested and Brucella ceti was isolated from eight out of nine animals. Brucella antigen was detected in the brain by immunofluorescence, but not by immunohistochemical labelling. By contrast, Brucella antigen was demonstrated by immunohistochemistry in the trophoblast of animals with severe placentitis and in the mitral valve of animals with myocarditis. The microscopical lesions observed in the tissues of the infected dolphins were similar to those of chronic brucellosis in man. The severity of brucellosis in S. coeruleoalba indicates that this dolphin species is highly susceptible to infection by B. ceti. PMID:19954790

  20. UV spectral variability in the Herbig Ae star HR 5999. 11: The accretion interpretation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perez, M. R.; Grady, C. A.; The, P. S.

    1993-01-01

    We report recent IUE high- and low-dispersion observations with the IUE long wavelength camera (LWP) and short wavelength camera (SWP) of the Herbig Ae star HR 5999. We have found a dramatic change in the structure of the Mg II h and k lines (2795.5, 2802.7 A) along with some continuum flux excesses especially at the short end of the SWP camera. LWP high dispersion observations of HR 5999 obtained between 1979 and 1990, at times of comparatively low UV continuum fluxes, exhibit P Cygni type m profiles in the Mg II resonance doublet. In contrast, observations made from September 1990 through March 16-18, 1992, with high W continuum fluxes, present Mg II lines with reverse P Cygni profiles indicative of some active episodic accretion. Accreting gas can also be detected in the additional red wings of the various Fe II and Mn II absorption lines, with velocities up to +300-350 km/s (September 1990). By September 10, 1992 the Mg II profile had returned to the type III P Cygni profile similar to those from earlier spectra. The correlation between the presence of large column densities of accreting gas and the continuum light variations supports suggestions by several authors that HR 5999 is surrounded by an optically thick, viscously heated accretion disk. Detection of accreting gas in the line of sight to HR 5999 permits us to place constraints on our viewing geometry for this system. A discussion is included comparing the spectral and physical similarities between HR 5999 and the more evolved proto-planetary candidate system, beta Pictoris.

  1. The MOSDEF Survey: The Strong Agreement Between Hα and UV-To-FIR Star Formation Rates for z ~ 2 Star-Forming Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shivaei, Irene; Reddy, Naveen; Kriek, Mariska T.; Shapley, Alice E.; Mobasher, Bahram; Coil, Alison L.; Siana, Brian D.; Sanders, Ryan; Price, Sedona; Freeman, William R.; Azadi, Mojegan

    2016-06-01

    We present the first direct comparison between Balmer line and panchromatic SED-based star-formation rates (SFRs) for z ~ 2 galaxies. While dust-corrected SFRs(Hα,Hβ) using Balmer decrements are commonly used at low redshift, it has been argued that Balmer lines may miss optically thick star-forming regions at high redshifts. In order to investigate this possible bias, we compare the SFRs(Hα,Hβ) with independently measured UV-to-far-IR SFRs for star-forming galaxies at z ~ 2. For this comparison we use a sample of galaxies selected from the unique spectroscopic dataset of the MOSFIRE Deep Evolution Field (MOSDEF) survey. The MOSDEF survey is a multi-year project that uses the near-IR MOSFIRE spectrograph on the 10-m Keck I telescope to characterize the gaseous and stellar contents of ~ 1500 rest-frame optically selected galaxies at 1.37 ≤ z ≤ 3.80. In addition to the rest-frame optical spectra, we use data from Spitzer/MIPS 24 μm, Herschel/PACS 100 and 160 μm, and Herschel/SPIRE 250, 350, and 500 μm to measure mid- and far-IR fluxes. We fit the UV-to-far-IR SEDs with the state-of-the-art flexible stellar population synthesis (FSPS) models, which utilize energy balance to fit the stellar and dust emission simultaneously. Comparing the SFR(Hα,Hβ) with the robust UV-to-far-IR SED inferrred SFRs, show us how accurately Balmer decrements predict the obscuration of the nebular lines in order to robustly calculate SFRs for star-forming galaxies at high redshift. Furthermore, we use our data to assess SFR indicators based on modeling the UV-to-mid-IR SEDs or by adding SFR(UV) and SFR(IR), for which the latter is based on the empirical conversions from mid-IR to total IR luminosity. This study shed light on the validity of various SFR indicators, specifically the nebular emission lines, for galaxies at z ~ 2.

  2. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Far-UV spectral atlas of O-type stars (Smith, 2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, M. A.

    2012-10-01

    In this paper, we present a spectral atlas covering the wavelength interval 930-1188Å for O2-O9.5 stars using Far-Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer archival data. The stars selected for the atlas were drawn from three populations: Galactic main-sequence (classes III-V) stars, supergiants, and main-sequence stars in the Magellanic Clouds, which have low metallicities. For several of these stars, we have prepared FITS files comprised of pairs of merged spectra for user access via the Multimission Archive at Space Telescope (MAST). We chose spectra from the first population with spectral types O4, O5, O6, O7, O8, and O9.5 and used them to compile tables and figures with identifications of all possible atmospheric and interstellar medium lines in the region 949-1188Å. Our identified line totals for these six representative spectra are 821 (500), 992 (663), 1077 (749), 1178 (847), 1359 (1001), and 1798 (1392) lines, respectively, where the numbers in parentheses are the totals of lines formed in the atmospheres, according to spectral synthesis models. The total number of unique atmospheric identifications for the six main-sequence O-star template spectra is 1792, whereas the number of atmospheric lines in common to these spectra is 300. The number of identified lines decreases toward earlier types (increasing effective temperature), while the percentages of "missed" features (unknown lines not predicted from our spectral syntheses) drop from a high of 8% at type B0.2, from our recently published B-star far-UV atlas (Cat. J/ApJS/186/175), to 1%-3% for type O spectra. The percentages of overpredicted lines are similar, despite their being much higher for B-star spectra. (4 data files).

  3. High-Resolution Imaging of the Dust Disk around 49 Ceti

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahhaj, Z.; Koerner, D. W.; Sargent, A. I.

    2007-05-01

    Subarcsecond scale Keck images of the young A1 V star, 49 Ceti, resolve emission at λ=12.5 and 17.9 μm from a disk with long axis at position angle (P.A.) 125deg+/-10deg and inclination φ=60deg+/-15deg. At 17.9 μm, the emission is brighter and more extended toward the northwest (NW) than the southeast (SE). Modeling of the mid-infrared images combined with flux densities from the literature indicate that the bulk of the mid-infrared emission comes from very small grains (a~0.1 μm) confined between 30 and 60 AU from the star. This population of dust grains contributes negligibly to the significant excess observed in the spectral energy distribution. Most of the nonphotospheric energy is radiated at longer wavelengths by an outer disk of larger grains (a~15 μm), inner radius ~60 AU, and outer radius ~900 AU. Global properties of the 49 Cet disk show more affinity with the β Pic and HR 4796A disks than with other debris disks. This may be because they are all very young (t<20 Myr), adding strength to the argument that they are transitional objects between Herbig Ae and ``Vega-like'' A stars with more tenuous circumstellar disks.

  4. Probing the Peak Epoch of Cosmic Star Formation (1Star-forming Galaxies Behind the Lensing Clusters: UV Luminosity Function and the Dust Attenuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alavi, Anahita; Siana, Brian D.; Richard, Johan; Rafelski, Marc; Jauzac, Mathilde; Limousin, Marceau; Stark, Daniel; Teplitz, Harry I.

    2016-01-01

    Obtaining a complete census of cosmic star formation requires an understanding of faint star-forming galaxies that are far below the detection limits of current surveys. To search for the faint galaxies, we use the power of strong gravitational lensing from foreground galaxy clusters to boost the detection limits of HST to much fainter luminosities. Using the WFC3/UVIS on board the HST, we obtain deep UV images of 4 lensing clusters with existing deep optical and near-infrared data (three from Frontier Fields survey). Building multiband photometric catalogs and applying a photometric redshift selection, we uncover a large population of dwarf galaxies (-18.5star formation (1star-forming galaxies keeps increasing steeply toward very faint magnitudes (MUV=-12.5). As an important implication of a steep faint-end slope LF, we show that the faint galaxies (-18.5UV background (>50%) at these redshifts. We use this unique sample to investigate further the various properties of dwarf galaxies as it is claimed to deviate from the trends seen for the more massive galaxies. Recent hydro-dynamical simulations and observations of local dwarfs show that these galaxies have episodic bursts of star formation on short time scales (< 10 Myr). We find that the bursty star formation histories (SFHs) cause a large intrinsic scatter in UV colors (β) at MUV > -16, comparing a sample of low mass galaxies from simulations with bursty SFHs with our comprehensive measurements of the observed β values. As this scatter can also be due to the dust extinction, we distinguish these two effects by measuring the dust attenuation using Balmer decrement (Hα/Hβ) ratios from our MOSFIRE/Keck spectroscopy.

  5. On the Discovery of Massive ZZ Ceti Variables and the Peculiar Light Curve of SDSS J1529

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curd, Brandon; Kilic, Mukremin; Gianninas, Alex

    2016-01-01

    We report the discovery of pulsations in three hydrogen atmosphere white dwarfs with masses greater than one solar mass. We identified these white dwarfs through SDSS Data Release 7 spectroscopy. All three objects show monoperiodic oscillations with periods ranging from 203 s to 11 min. With follow-up observations of the confirmed ZZ Ceti stars, it should be possible to detect lower amplitude pulsation modes in order to conduct an in depth asteroseismological analysis and estimate the fraction of their core mass that is crystallized. We also present and discuss the peculiar light curve of J1529, which shows eclipse-like events every 38 min. We compare the light curve of J1529 to that of GD 394 which has similar characteristics (despite being four times hotter) which are thought to be caused by a metal-rich dark spot on the star's surface.

  6. The MOSDEF Survey: The Strong Agreement between Hα and UV-to-FIR Star Formation Rates for z ~ 2 Star-forming Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shivaei, Irene; Kriek, Mariska; Reddy, Naveen A.; Shapley, Alice E.; Barro, Guillermo; Conroy, Charlie; Coil, Alison L.; Freeman, William R.; Mobasher, Bahram; Siana, Brian; Sanders, Ryan; Price, Sedona H.; Azadi, Mojegan; Pasha, Imad; Inami, Hanae

    2016-04-01

    We present the first direct comparison between Balmer line and panchromatic spectral energy distribution (SED)-based star formation rates (SFRs) for z˜ 2 galaxies. For this comparison, we used 17 star-forming galaxies selected from the MOSFIRE Deep Evolution Field (MOSDEF) survey, with 3σ detections for Hα and at least two IR bands (Spitzer/MIPS 24 μm and Herschel/PACS 100 and 160 μm, and in some cases Herschel/SPIRE 250, 350, and 500 μm). The galaxies have total IR (8-1000 μm) luminosities of ˜ 1011.4-1012.4 L⊙ and SFRs of ˜ 30-250 M⊙ yr-1. We fit the UV-to-far-IR SEDs with flexible stellar population synthesis (FSPS) models—which include both stellar and dust emission—and compare the inferred SFRs with the SFR(Hα, Hβ) values corrected for dust attenuation using Balmer decrements. The two SFRs agree with a scatter of 0.17 dex. Our results imply that the Balmer decrement accurately predicts the obscuration of the nebular lines and can be used to robustly calculate SFRs for star-forming galaxies at z˜ 2 with SFRs up to ˜ 200 M⊙ yr-1. We also use our data to assess SFR indicators based on modeling the UV-to-mid-IR SEDs or by adding SFR(UV) and SFR(IR), for which the latter is based on the mid-IR only or on the full IR SED. All these SFRs show a poorer agreement with SFR(Hα, Hβ) and in some cases large systematic biases are observed. Finally, we show that the SFR and dust attenuation derived from the UV-to-near-IR SED alone are unbiased when assuming a delayed exponentially declining star formation history. Based on observations made with the W.M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  7. Utilizing Synthetic Spectra to Refine Lambda Boo Stars' UV Classification Criteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Kwang-Ping; Neff, James E.; Johnson, Dustin; Tarbell, Erik; Romo, Christopher; Steele, Patricia; Gray, Richard O.; Corbally, Christopher J.

    2016-01-01

    Lambda Boo-type stars are a group of late B to early F-type Population I dwarfs that show deficiencies of iron-peak elements (up to 2 dex), but their C, N, O, and S abundances are near solar. This stellar class has recently regained the spotlight because of the directly-imaged planets around a confirmed Lambda Boo star, HR 8799, and a suggested Lambda Boo star Beta Pictoris. The discovery of a giant asteroid belt around Vega, another possible Lambda Boo star, also suggests hidden planets. This possible link between Lambda Boo stars and planet-bearing stars motivates us to study Lambda Boo stars systematically. Since the peculiar nature of the prototype Lambda Bootis was first noticed in 1943, Lambda Boo candidates published in the literature have been selected using widely different criteria. The Lambda Boo label has been applied to almost any peculiar A-type stars that do not fit elsewhere. In order to determine the origin of Lambda Boo stars' unique abundance pattern and to better discriminate between theories explaining the Lambda Boo phenomenon, a consistent working definition of Lambda Boo stars is needed. We have re-evaluated all published Lambda Boo candidates and their available ultraviolet and visible spectra. Using observed and synthetic spectra, we explored the classification of Lambda Boo stars and developed quantitative criteria that discriminate metal-poor stars from bona fide Lambda Boo stars. With model spectra, we demonstrated that the (C I 1657 Angstrom)/ (Al II 1671 Angstrom) line ratio is the best single criterion to distinguish between Lambda Boo stars and metal weak stars, and that one cannot use a single C I/Al II cut-off value as a Lambda Boo classification criterion. The C I/Al II cut-off value is a function of a star's effective temperature and metallicity. Using these stricter Lambda Boo classification criteria, we concluded that neither Beta Pictoris nor Vega should be classified as Lambda Boo stars.

  8. UV-B and B-band Optical Flare Search in AR Lacertae, II Pegasi, and UX Arietis Star Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vander Haagen, G. A.

    2013-11-01

    A high-cadence search was conducted on the known RS CVn-type flare stars AR Lac, II Peg, and UX Ari. Two optical flares were observed in the B-band on AR Lac at 5 milliseconds (ms) resolution for a rate of 0.04 fl/hr. Flare energy of the two B-band fast-flares ranged from 0.55 to 16.7 × 1033 ergs. The UV-B and B-band search of II Peg for 44.5 hours at 5 and 10 ms resolution and UV-B band search of UX Ari for 25.6 hours at 10 ms resolution detected no flare activity.

  9. 3D-HST emission line galaxies at z ∼ 2: discrepancies in the optical/UV star formation rates

    SciTech Connect

    Zeimann, Gregory R.; Ciardullo, Robin; Gebhardt, Henry; Gronwall, Caryl; Schneider, Donald P.; Hagen, Alex; Bridge, Joanna S.; Trump, Jonathan R.; Feldmeier, John

    2014-08-01

    We use Hubble Space Telescope near-IR grism spectroscopy to examine the Hβ line strengths of 260 star-forming galaxies in the redshift range 1.90 < z < 2.35. We show that at these epochs, the Hβ star formation rate (SFR) is a factor of ∼1.8 higher than what would be expected from the systems' rest-frame UV flux density, suggesting a shift in the standard conversion between these quantities and SFR. We demonstrate that at least part of this shift can be attributed to metallicity, as Hβ is more enhanced in systems with lower oxygen abundance. This offset must be considered when measuring the SFR history of the universe. We also show that the relation between stellar and nebular extinction in our z ∼ 2 sample is consistent with that observed in the local universe.

  10. The helium-to-hydrogen ratio of the UV-bright star Barnard 29 of Messier 13

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adelman, S. J.; Aikman, G. C. L.; Hayes, D. S.; Philip, A. G. D.; Sweigart, A. V.

    1994-01-01

    Barnard 29 is the most luminous UV-bright star of the globular cluster Messier 13. Comparison of its reddening corrected optical region spectrophotometry and IUE low dispersion fluxes and its H-gamma profile with the predictions of metal-poor model atmospheres having the metallicity of M 13 indicated T(sub eff) = 20250 K, log g = 3.15. Observations of He I lambda(4026) taken with echelle spectrograph of the Multi-Mirror telescope using a Reticon detector show that He/H = 0.055 +/- 0.020. Some astrophysical implications of this result are discussed.

  11. The MUSCLES Treasury Survey: Intrinsic Lyα Profile Reconstructions and UV, X-ray, and Optical Correlations of Low-mass Exoplanet Host Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youngblood, Allison; France, Kevin; Parke Loyd, R. O.

    2016-01-01

    UV stellar radiation can significantly impact planetary atmospheres through heating and photochemistry, even regulating production of potential biomarkers. Cool stars emit the majority of their UV radiation in the form of emission lines, and the incident UV radiation on close-in habitable-zone planets is significant. Lyα (1215.67 Å) dominates the 912 - 3200 Å spectrum of cool stars, but strong absorption from the interstellar medium (ISM) makes direct observations of the intrinsic Lyα emission of even nearby stars challenging. The MUSCLES Hubble Space Telescope Treasury Survey (Measurements of the Ultraviolet Spectral Characteristics of Low-mass Exoplanetary Systems) has completed observations of 7 M and 4 K stars hosting exoplanets (d < 22 pc) with simultaneous X-ray and ground-based optical spectroscopy for many of the targets. We have reconstructed the intrinsic Lyα profiles using an MCMC technique and used the results to estimate the extreme ultraviolet (100 - 911 Å) spectrum. We also present empirical relations between chromospheric UV and optical lines, e.g., Lyα, Mg II, Ca II H & K, and Hα, for use when direct UV observations of low-mass exoplanet host stars are not possible. The spectra presented here will be made publicly available through MAST to support exoplanet atmosphere modeling.

  12. The Copernicus observations - Interstellar or circumstellar material. [UV spectra of early stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steigman, G.; Strittmatter, P. A.; Williams, R. E.

    1975-01-01

    It is suggested that the sharp absorption lines observed in the ultraviolet spectra of early-type stars by the Copernicus satellite may be entirely accounted for by the circumstellar material in the H II regions and associated transition zones around the observed stars. If this interpretation is correct, the Copernicus results yield little information on the state of any interstellar (as opposed to circumstellar) gas and, in particular, shed little light on the degree of element depletion in interstellar space.

  13. Predicting the Extreme-UV and Lyman-α Fluxes Received by Exoplanets from their Host Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linsky, Jeffrey L.; France, Kevin; Ayres, Thomas R.

    2015-01-01

    Extreme-UV (EUV) radiation from the chromospheres, transition regions, and coronae of host stars (spectral types F, G, K, and M) ionize and heat the outer atmospheres of exoplanets leading to mass loss that is observed during transits and can change the exoplanet's atmosphere. Lyman-α emission from host stars controls the photochemistry in the upper layers of planetary atmospheres by photodissociating important molecules including H_2O, CO_2, CH_4, thereby increasing the oxygen and ozone mixing ratios important for habitability. Both the EUV and strong Lyman-α radiation are largely absorbed by the interstellar medium and must be reconstructed or estimated to understand the radiation environment of exoplanets. In two recent papers, tet{Linsky2013} and tet{Linsky2014}, we have presented robust methods for predicting the intrinsic Lyman-α and EUV fluxes from main sequence cool stars. Solar models and satellite observations (HST, FUSE, and EUVE) provide tests for the feasibility of these methods.

  14. A New Analysis of the Two Classical ZZ Ceti White Dwarfs GD 165 and Ross 548. I. Photometry and Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giammichele, N.; Fontaine, G.; Bergeron, P.; Brassard, P.; Charpinet, S.; Pfeiffer, B.; Vauclair, G.

    2015-12-01

    We present the first of a two-part seismic analysis of the two bright hot ZZ Ceti stars GD 165 and Ross 548. In this first part, we report the results of frequency extraction exercises based on time-series data sets of exceptional quality. We uncovered up to 13 independent pulsation modes in GD 165, regrouped into six main frequency multiplets. These include 9 secure (signal-to-noise ratio, S/N > 4) detections and 4 possible ones (4 ≥ S/N ≥ 3). Likewise, we isolated 11 independent modes in Ross 548 (9 secure and 2 possible detections), also regrouped into 6 multiplets. The multiplet structure is likely caused by rotational splitting. We also provide updated estimates of the time-averaged atmospheric properties of these two pulsators in the light of recent developments on the front of atmospheric modeling for DA white dwarfs.

  15. THE NEWLY DISCOVERED PULSATING LOW-MASS WHITE DWARFS: AN EXTENSION OF THE ZZ CETI INSTABILITY STRIP

    SciTech Connect

    Van Grootel, V.; Dupret, M.-A.; Fontaine, G.; Brassard, P.

    2013-01-01

    In light of the exciting discovery of g-mode pulsations in extremely low-mass, He-core DA white dwarfs, we report on the results of a detailed stability survey aimed at explaining the existence of these new pulsators as well as their location in the spectroscopic Hertzsprung-Russell diagram. To this aim, we calculated some 28 evolutionary sequences of DA models with various masses and chemical layering. These models are characterized by the so-called ML2/{alpha} = 1.0 convective efficiency and take into account the important feedback effect of convection on the atmospheric structure. We pulsated the models with the nonadiabatic code MAD, which incorporates a detailed treatment of time-dependent convection. On the other hand, given the failure of all nonadiabatic codes, including MAD, to account properly for the red edge of the strip, we resurrect the idea that the red edge is due to energy leakage through the atmosphere. We thus estimated the location of that edge by requiring that the thermal timescale in the driving region-located at the base of the H convection zone-be equal to the critical period beyond which l = 1 g-modes cease to exist. Using this approach, we find that our theoretical ZZ Ceti instability strip accounts remarkably well for the boundaries of the empirical strip, including the low-gravity, low-temperature regime where the three new pulsators are found. We also account for the relatively long periods observed in these stars, and thus conclude that they are true ZZ Ceti stars, but with low masses.

  16. CETIS: COMPLEX EFFLUENTS TOXICITY INFORMATION SYSTEM. DATA ENCODING GUIDELINES AND PROCEDURES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The computerized Complex Effluent Toxicity Information System (CETIS) data base includes data extracted from aquatic bioassay reprints as well as facility and receiving water information. Data references are obtained from both published papers and from unpublished results of test...

  17. HAZMAT II: Modeling the Evolution of Extreme--UV Radiation from M Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peacock, S.; Barman, T.; Shkolnik, E.

    2014-03-01

    M dwarf stars make up nearly 75% of the Milky Way's stellar population. Due to their low luminosities, the habitable zones around these stars are very close in (~0.1--0.4 AU), which makes it easier to find terrestrial planets located in these regions. Stars emit their highest levels of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation in the earliest stages of their evolution while planets are simultaneously forming and accumulating their atmospheres. High levels of EUV radiation can alter the abundance of important molecules such as H2O, changing the chemistry in extrasolar planet atmospheres. This research is the next major step in the HAZMAT (HAbitable Zones and M dwarf Activity across Time) project to analyze how the habitable zone evolves with the evolving properties of stellar and planetary atmospheres. Most previous stellar atmosphere models under--predict far ultraviolet (FUV) emission from M dwarfs; here we present new models for M stars that include prescriptions for the hot, lowest density, atmospheric layers (chromosphere, transition region and corona). By comparing our model spectra to GALEX near and far ultraviolet fluxes (see HAZMAT 1 abstract by Shkolnik et al.), we are able to predict the evolution of EUV radiation for M dwarfs from 10 Myr -- 1 Gyr. The results of the HAZMAT project will tell if a planet in the canonical habitable zone is truly habitable by understanding the evolution of planetary atmospheres as they are subject to large amounts of high--energy radiation.

  18. UV-absorbent lignin-based multi-arm star thermoplastic elastomers.

    PubMed

    Yu, Juan; Wang, Jifu; Wang, Chunpeng; Liu, Yupeng; Xu, Yuzhi; Tang, Chuanbing; Chu, Fuxiang

    2015-02-01

    Lignin-grafted copolymers, namely lignin-graft-poly(methyl methacrylate-co-butyl acrylate) (lignin-g-P(MMA-co-BA)), are synthesized via "grafting from" atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) with the aid of lignin-based macroinitiators. By manipulating the monomer feed ratios of MMA/BA, grafted copolymers with tunable glass transition temperatures (-10-40 °C) are obtained. These copolymers are evaluated as sustainable thermoplastic elastomers (TPEs). The results suggest that the mechanical properties of these TPEs lignin-g-P(MMA-co-BA) copolymers are improved significantly by comparing with those of linear P(MMA-co-BA) copolymer counterparts, and the elastic strain recovery is nearly 70%. Lignin-g-P(MMA-co-BA) copolymers exhibit high absorption in the range of the UV spectrum, which might allow for applications in UV-blocking coatings. PMID:25545630

  19. (F)UV spectral analysis of 15 extremely hot, hydrogen-rich central stars of planetary nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziegler, Marc; Rauch, Thomas; Werner, Klaus; Kruk, Jeffrey W.

    2012-08-01

    We present results of a (F)UV spectral analysis of 15 hot, hydrogen-rich central stars of planetary nebulae (CSPNe) of DAO-type (A 7, A 31, A 35, A 39, NGC 3587, NGC 6720, NGC 6853, NGC 7293, PuWe 1, Sh 2-174) and O(H)-type (A 36, Lo 1, LSS 1362, NGC 1360, NGC 4361). The sample covers a wide range of parameters (T eff ~ 70-130 kK, log g = 5.4-7.4). It represents different stages of post-AGB evolution. The derived stellar parameters are crucial constraints for AGB nucleosynthesis and stellar evolutionary calculations. Detailed spectral analyses using fully line-blanketed NLTE model atmospheres including 23 elements from hydrogen to nickel are performed. Additional modeling of the ISM line absorption enables to unambigiously identify nearly all observed lines and to improve both, the photospheric as well as the ISM model.

  20. MEASURING THE EVOLUTIONARY RATE OF COOLING OF ZZ Ceti

    SciTech Connect

    Mukadam, Anjum S.; Fraser, Oliver; Riecken, T. S.; Kronberg, M. E.; Bischoff-Kim, Agnes; Corsico, A. H.; Montgomery, M. H.; Winget, D. E.; Hermes, J. J.; Winget, K. I.; Falcon, Ross E.; Reaves, D.; Kepler, S. O.; Romero, A. D.; Chandler, D. W.; Kuehne, J. W.; Sullivan, D. J.; Von Hippel, T.; Mullally, F.; Shipman, H.; and others

    2013-07-01

    We have finally measured the evolutionary rate of cooling of the pulsating hydrogen atmosphere (DA) white dwarf ZZ Ceti (Ross 548), as reflected by the drift rate of the 213.13260694 s period. Using 41 yr of time-series photometry from 1970 November to 2012 January, we determine the rate of change of this period with time to be dP/dt = (5.2 {+-} 1.4) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -15} s s{sup -1} employing the O - C method and (5.45 {+-} 0.79) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -15} s s{sup -1} using a direct nonlinear least squares fit to the entire lightcurve. We adopt the dP/dt obtained from the nonlinear least squares program as our final determination, but augment the corresponding uncertainty to a more realistic value, ultimately arriving at the measurement of dP/dt = (5.5 {+-} 1.0) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -15} s s{sup -1}. After correcting for proper motion, the evolutionary rate of cooling of ZZ Ceti is computed to be (3.3 {+-} 1.1) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -15} s s{sup -1}. This value is consistent within uncertainties with the measurement of (4.19 {+-} 0.73) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -15} s s{sup -1} for another similar pulsating DA white dwarf, G 117-B15A. Measuring the cooling rate of ZZ Ceti helps us refine our stellar structure and evolutionary models, as cooling depends mainly on the core composition and stellar mass. Calibrating white dwarf cooling curves with this measurement will reduce the theoretical uncertainties involved in white dwarf cosmochronometry. Should the 213.13 s period be trapped in the hydrogen envelope, then our determination of its drift rate compared to the expected evolutionary rate suggests an additional source of stellar cooling. Attributing the excess cooling to the emission of axions imposes a constraint on the mass of the hypothetical axion particle.

  1. FUV, UV, and Optical Observations of the He-sdO Star BD+39 3226

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chayer, Pierre; Green, E. M.; Fontaine, G.

    2014-01-01

    Based on observations carried out with the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer, the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph, the MMT Observatory, and the Keck telescope HIRES spectrograph, we present a spectral analysis of the He-sdO star BD+39 3226. By fitting the MMT spectrum we obtain a gravity that is 0.7 dex higher than the one reported in the literature. The new atmospheric parameters will have an impact on the measurement of the HI column density toward BD+39 3226, and by this very fact on the deuterium abundance. The high-resolution spectra show stellar absorption lines coming from C, N, O, Si, P, S, Fe, and Ni. The spectra also show lines from heavy elements such as Ge, As, and Sn. On the other hand, neither Zr nor Pb absorption lines are detected. The non-detection of lead in BD+39 3226 indicates that the star does not belong to the newly discovered group of lead-rich He-sdO stars. P.C. is supported by the Canadian Space Agency under a Public Works and Government Services of Canada contract.

  2. Automated ground-based star-pointing UV -visible spectrometer for stratospheric measurements.

    PubMed

    Roscoe, H K; Taylor, W H; Evans, J D; Tait, A M; Freshwater, R; Fish, D; Strong, E K; Jones, R L

    1997-08-20

    A novel automated ground-based star-pointing spectrometer system has been constructed for long-term deployment in Antarctica. Similar to our earlier stellar system, a two-dimensional detector array measures the spectra of the star and the adjacent sky, so that auroral emission from the sky can be subtracted from the stellar signal. Some new features are an altitude -azimuth pointing mirror, so that the spectrometer does not move; slip rings to provide its power thereby avoiding flexing of cables and restriction of all-around viewing; and a glazed enclosure around the mirror to ensure protection from rain and snow, made from flat plates to avoid changing the focal length of the telescope. The optical system can also view sunlight scattered from the zenith sky. The system automatically points and tracks selected stars and switches to other views on command. The system is now installed at Halley in Antarctica, and some preliminary measurements of ozone from Antarctica are shown. PMID:18259452

  3. Isolation of Brucella ceti from a Long-finned Pilot Whale (Globicephala melas) and a Sowerby's Beaked Whale (Mesoploden bidens).

    PubMed

    Foster, Geoffrey; Whatmore, Adrian M; Dagleish, Mark P; Baily, Johanna L; Deaville, Rob; Davison, Nicholas J; Koylass, Mark S; Perrett, Lorraine L; Stubberfield, Emma J; Reid, Robert J; Brownlow, Andrew C

    2015-10-01

    Brucella ceti is an emerging zoonotic pathogen that has been recovered from several species of cetaceans in the world's oceans over the past 20 yr. We report the recovery of B. ceti from a Sowerby's beaked whale (Mesoploden bidens) and a long-finned pilot whale (Globicehala melas). Recovery from the testis of a long-finned pilot whale provides further evidence of potential for B. ceti infection to impact the reproductive success of cetaceans, many of which are threatened species. The addition of another two cetacean species to the growing number from which B. ceti has been recovered also further emphasizes the concern for human infections with this organism. PMID:26285099

  4. Constraints on hot star X-ray source characteristics from combinded analysis of X-ray and UV observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macfarlane, J. J.

    1994-01-01

    Results from wind ionization calculations are presented which show how the P-Cygni profiles of 'superionized' species such as O VI can provide information about the X-ray source characteristics of early-type stars. Using detailed radiative and atomic physics models, we find that a significant source of X-ray emission from zeta Pup comes from a region in the wind located within rougly 1 to 2 stellar radii of the photosphere. Our results suggest that X-rays sources in which emission occurs exclusively at large radii (r greater than or approximately equal to a few R(sub *)) are inconsistent with UV P-Cygni profiles for O VI. Instead, we find that X-ray emission from shocks distributed throughout the lower regions of the wind (r approximately equal to 1-2 R(sub *)) is consistent with both X-ray and UV data, as well as mass loss rates deduced from radio and H-alpha observations.

  5. Preparation of a Far-UV Spectral and Line Atlas for B stars near the Main Sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Myron A.

    2009-05-01

    B type stars are major contributors to the total far-UV (949-1225 Å) flux produced in the Milky Way and external galaxies. The final reprocessing of the FUSE satellite dataset, together with the existing archives of the HST/STIS, IUE, and the Copernicus Atlas of τ Sco, permit the construction of a high dispersion atlas of 10 sharp-lined B stars near the main sequence (mostly class III-V). Our atlas segregates the H I and molecular H2 and photospheric lines and, thanks to the synspec synthesis program, lists essentially all noticeable absorption features with known oscillator strengths for specta of types B0, B2, and B8-B9. The atlas will allow the identification of anomalous features in other B-type spectra and the selection of line proxies to compute Teff, anomalous abundance patterns, and possible departures of atmospheric T(τ)'s from nonstandard gradients. We discuss the input constituents for this atlas, show examples of atlas panels, and we display line identifications for the three spectral types noted above. The ~4300 lines we have identified comprise over 12% of the features in our line library. We have been unable to identify fewer than 5% of the visible features in the τ Sco spectrum, and fewer still in the B8 spectrum. Comparable numbers of lines are overpredicted in our syntheses.

  6. A Debris Disk Case Study: 49 Ceti with Herschel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberge, Aki

    2011-01-01

    Gas-poor debris disks represent a fundamentally different class of circumstellar disk than gas-rich protoplanetary disks. Their gas probably originates from the same source as the dust, i.e. planetesimal destruction, but the low gas densities make it difficult to detect. So far, Herschel has detected far-IR gas emission from one debris disk, Beta Pictoris. Here I discuss a well-known debris disk system in the GASPS survey, 49 Ceti. It serves as a case study for modeling low-density gas in optically thin disks. The dust disk appears to be spatially resolved at 70 um. Most interestingly, there appears to be a hint of ClI 158 urn emission at the roughly 2 sigma level. Preliminary modeling suggests that reconciling the sub-mm CO emission from this system with the weak or non-existent far-IR atomic lines may require an unusual chemical composition in the gas of this disk.

  7. Paschen beta emission in the spectrum of Omicron Ceti.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kovar, R. P.; Potter, A. E.; Kovar, N. S.; Trafton, L.

    1972-01-01

    Evaluation of three infrared spectra of Omicron Ceti obtained on Aug. 7 to 11, 1969. The equivalent width of the Paschen beta emission line in these spectra was found to vary by a factor of 2 during this time period. The variation was similar to that for H gamma and H delta as measured by Odell et al. (1970) for the same time span. The equivalent widths of Paschen beta and H gamma on August 7 were used to estimate an opacity ratio of kappa (1.28 micron)/kappa (0.43 micron) about equal to 1:30 and a molecular/atomic hydrogen ratio of about 10. The variation in the strength of Paschen beta and H delta lines is considered to be intrinsic and to have a time scale of less than or about equal to 100,000 sec.

  8. The Be star Gamma Cassiopeiae: X-ray, far-UV, and optical observations in early 1989

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horaguchi, Toshihiro; Kogure, Tomokazu; Hirata, Ryuko; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Matsuoka, Masaru; Murakami, Toshio; Doazan, Vera; Slettebak, Arne; Huang, Chang Chun; Cao, Huilai; Guo, Zihe; Huang, Lin; Tsujita, Joji; Ohshima, Osamu; Ito, Yoshiharu

    1994-02-01

    The state of gamma Cas in early 1989 is presented as the result of joint observations in the X-ray, far-UV, and optical regions. Particular attention has been paid to short- and long-term variations within these spectral ranges. In X-ray observations with the Ginga satellite we have found no specific periodic variabilities in the 64 to 13,000 s range, although a highly variable nature with no appreciable changes in the hardness ratios has been confirmed. The X-ray spectrum has been fitted with that of a thin thermal plasma (16 - 17 keV) with an iron emission line centered at 6.7 keV. For the resonance lines of Si IV, C IV, and N V observed with the IUE satellite in the far-UV region, no high-velocity narrow absorption components were detected. The presence of very broad wings in their profiles extending to expansion velocities (greater than or approximately equal to 1,000 km/s) much larger than the photospheric escape velocity provides evidence for the existence of high-velocity mass-loss processes from the star. The optical spectrum shows that gamma Cas is still in the state of V/R greater than 1 for H alpha, H beta, and H gamma. A series of high-resolution, high-S/N, He I lambda 4481 line profiles and Mg II lambda 4481 line profiles indicates evidence of nonradial pulsation (absolute value of m approx. = 8 - 10) of the star. The UBV photometric observations show that gamma Cas was in a rather stable state in early 1989, although some fluctuation was recorded on time scales of minutes and hours. We cannot find any correlation between the time variations of the X-ray and other wavelength regions. We discuss the X-ray characteristics of gamma Cas, which is uncommon among Be star X-ray sources regarding its spectral feature and variability.

  9. UV Absorption Lines as Metallicity Estimator and the Metal Content of Star-forming Galaxies at z=5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faisst, Andreas; Capak, Peter L.; Davidson, Iary; Kakazu, Yuko; Salvato, Mara; Laigle, Clotilde; Onodera, Masato; Masters, Daniel; COSMOS Team

    2016-01-01

    Probing the metal content of high redshift galaxies is essential to study their formation and evolution in the early universe. However, the spectral features used to measure the metallicity are shifted out of the wavelength range of current spectrographs at high-z and therefore alternative methods must be used.We measure the relation between four prominent UV absorption complexes and metallicity for more than 50 local galaxies and, by using a sample of more than 20 galaxies at z ~ 2 - 3, verify that this relation holds up to z ˜ 3. We then apply this method to a sample of ˜ 220 galaxies at 3.5 < z < 6.0 in COSMOS, for which unique UV spectra from DEIMOS and accurate stellar mass estimates from SPLASH are available. The z ~ 5 galaxies at 9 < log(m/M⊙) < 11 are characterized by 0.3 - 0.4 dex (in units of 12 + log(O/H)) lower metallicities than galaxies at z ˜ 2 but comparable to z ˜ 3 - 3.5 galaxies. In the same stellar mass range, we do not find a significant relation between stellar mass and metallicity (MZ relation), suggesting that the MZ relation at z ~ 5 is very shallow or breaking down. Since we verify a correlation between dust obscuration (measured by β) and UV absorption strength (i.e., metallicity), we argue that the process of dust production and metal enrichment in the first billion years of galaxy formation is more stochastic than at later times. Using a "bathtub" model approach, we find that an exponential build up of stellar mass within a short time of several 100 Myr can explain a shallow MZ relation at z ˜ 5. Furthermore, we find a weak anti-correlation between star-formation rates and UV absorption strength (i.e., metallicity), indicative of these galaxies being fueled by the inflow of pristine (metal-poor) gas. The galaxy sample presented in this work is unique to further test these scenarios using ALMA and the upcoming James Webb Space Telescope.

  10. The Outer Disks of Herbig Stars From the UV to NIR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grady, C.; Fukagawa, M.; Maruta, Y.; Ohta, Y.; Wisniewski, J.; Hashimoto, J.; Okamoto, Y.; Momose, M.; Currie, T.; Mcelwain, M.; Muto, T.; Kotani, T.; Kusakabe, N.; Kudo, T.; Hayashi, M.; Ishii, M.; Iye, M.; Morino, J.-I.; Suenaga, T.; Suto, H.; Suzuki, R.; Takahashi, Y. H.; Takami, H.; Usuda, T.; Tamura, M.

    2014-01-01

    Spatially-resolved imaging of Herbig stars and related objects began with HST, but intensified with commissioning of high-contrast imagers on 8-m class telescopes. The bulk of the data taken from the ground have been polarized intensity imagery at H-band, with the majority of the sources observed as part of the Strategic Exploration of Exoplanets and Disks with Subaru (SEEDS) survey. Sufficiently many systems have been imaged that we discuss disk properties in scattered, polarized light in terms of groups defined by the IR spectral energy distribution. We find novel phenomena in many of the disks, including spiral density waves, and discuss the disks in terms of clearing mechanisms. Some of the disks have sufficient data to map the dust and gas components, including water ice dissociation products.

  11. The outer disks of Herbig stars from the UV to NIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grady, C.; Fukagawa, M.; Maruta, Y.; Ohta, Y.; Wisniewski, J.; Hashimoto, J.; Okamoto, Y.; Momose, M.; Currie, T.; McElwain, M.; Muto, T.; Kotani, T.; Kusakabe, N.; Feldt, M.; Sitko, M.; Follette, K.; Bonnefoy, M.; Henning, T.; Takami, M.; Karr, J.; Kwon, J.; Kudo, T.; Abe, L.; Brandner, W.; Brandt, T.; Carson, J.; Egner, S.; Goto, M.; Guyon, O.; Hayano, Y.; Hayashi, M.; Hayashi, S.; Hodapp, K.; Ishii, M.; Iye, M.; Janson, M.; Kandori, R.; Knapp, G.; Kuzuhara, M.; Matsuo, T.; Miyama, S.; Morino, J.-I.; Moro-Martín, A.; Nishimura, T.; Pyo, T.-S.; Serabyn, E.; Suenaga, T.; Suto, H.; Suzuki, R.; Takahashi, Y. H.; Takato, N.; Terada, H.; Thalmann, C.; Tomono, D.; Turner, E. L.; Watanabe, M.; Yamada, T.; Takami, H.; Usuda, T.; Tamura, M.

    2015-02-01

    Spatially-resolved imaging of Herbig stars and related objects began with HST, but intensified with commissioning of high-contrast imagers on 8-m class telescopes. The bulk of the data taken from the ground have been polarized intensity imagery at H-band, with the majority of the sources observed as part of the Strategic Exploration of Exoplanets and Disks with Subaru (SEEDS) survey. Sufficiently many systems have been imaged that we discuss disk properties in scattered, polarized light in terms of groups defined by the IR spectral energy distribution. We find novel phenomena in many of the disks, including spiral density waves, and discuss the disks in terms of clearing mechanisms. Some of the disks have sufficient data to map the dust and gas components, including water ice dissociation products.

  12. GalevNB: a conversion from N-BODY simulations to observations—its application on the study of UV-excess in star clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Xiaoying; Olczak, Christoph; Guo, Difeng; Spurzem, Rainer

    2015-08-01

    We present GalevNB (Galev for N-body simulations), an utility that converts fundamental stellar properties of N-body simulations into observational properties using the GALEV (GAlaxy EVolutionary synthesis models) package, and thus allowing direct comparisons between observations and N-body simulations. It works by converting fundamental stellar properties, such as stellar mass, temperature, luminosity and metallicity into observational magnitudes for a variety of filters of mainstream instruments/telescopes, such as HST, ESO, SDSS, 2MASS, etc., and into spectra that spans from far-UV (90 Å) to near-IR (160 μm). As an application, we use GalevNB to investigate the secular evolution of spectral energy distribution (SED) and color-magnitude diagram (CMD) of a simulated star cluster over a few hundred million years. The model cluster in this work is evolved using the most recent version of NBODY6++ utilizing many GPU cores in parallel to accelerate multi-node multi-core simulations (Wang et al. 2015), which is the MPI parallel version based on the state-of-the-art direct N-body integrator NBODY6GPU. With the results given by GalevNB, we discover an UV-excess in the integrated SED of the cluster over the whole simulation time. We also identify four candidates that contribute to the FUV peak, core helium burning stars, thermal pulsing asymptotic giant branch (TPAGB) stars, white dwarfs and naked helium stars. Among them, TAGB is a favorable candidate from theoretical point of view (O’connell 1999). On the contrary, white dwarf’s candidate position is controversial (Magris & Bruzual 1993, Landsman et al. 1998) because of low luminosity. The life time of massive star descendants: core helium burning stars and naked helium stars, is very short. Though both of they are very bright at the UV at the early age, their short-term emission makes them become insignificant candidates.

  13. Completing The Characterization Of Stellar Populations In The Galaxy: Final Catalogs Of Unique Galex Uv Sources And Of Milky Way Hot Stars.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianchi, Luciana

    The Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) has performed the first extensive surveys in the Ultraviolet (UV), filling the last gap in our view of the sky across the electromagnetic spectrum. Its legacy is an unprecedented database with more than 200 million source measurements in far-UV and near-UV. The UV surveys offer unique sensitivity for identifying and studying selected classes of astrophysical objects, both stellar and extra- galactic, notably hot stars, star-forming galaxies, and QSOs (redshift ≤sssim2.4). In order to examine the overall content and distribution of UV sources over the sky, and to classify them by astrophysical class, we propose to construct final catalogs of UV unique sources with homogeneous quality (eliminating duplicate measurements of the same source, excluding artifacts, adding science flags, etc). Such catalogs will facilitate a variety of science investigations on UV-selected samples by the community, in addition to our own science goal, as well as planning of observations with future instruments. We will build the catalogs (high-level science product) using recipes developed for our early version (Bianchi et al. 2011a) but with expanded tools, science flags, and corollary data, in addition to the much larger area coverage with respect to our early version. To facilitate UV source classification and characterization, we will also match the catalogs of unique UV sources with existing ground-based surveys, adding optical and infrared magnitudes to the two UV GALEX magnitudes, and construct flags to identify sources with multiple matches. These products will allow us (and the community) to extract UV-selected samples for several projects. We will use our catalogs for our own science goal: an unbiased census of Milky Way hot white dwarfs (WD). Hot WDs are elusive at all wavelengths except the UV, given their very high temperatures to which optical colors are insensitive, and low optical luminosity. From our proposed UV catalogs we will be

  14. A New Analysis of the Two Classical ZZ Ceti White Dwarfs GD 165 and Ross 548. II. Seismic Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giammichele, N.; Fontaine, G.; Brassard, P.; Charpinet, S.

    2016-03-01

    We present the second of a two-part seismic analysis of the bright, hot ZZ Ceti stars GD 165 and Ross 548. In this second part, we report the results of detailed searches in parameter space for identifying an optimal model for each star that can account well for the observed periods, while being consistent with the spectroscopic constraints derived in our first paper. We find optimal models for each target that reproduce the six observed periods well within ∼0.3% on the average. We also find that there is a sensitivity on the core composition for Ross 548, while there is practically none for GD 165. Our optimal model of Ross 548, with its thin envelope, indeed shows weight functions for some confined modes that extend relatively deep into the interior, thus explaining the sensitivity of the period spectrum on the core composition in that star. In contrast, our optimal seismic model of its spectroscopic sibling, GD 165 with its thick envelope, does not trap/confine modes very efficiently, and we find weight functions for all six observed modes that do not extend into the deep core, hence accounting for the lack of sensitivity in that case. Furthermore, we exploit after the fact the observed multiplet structure that we ascribe to rotation. We are able to map the rotation profile in GD 165 (Ross 548) over the outermost ∼20% (∼5%) of its radius, and we find that the profile is consistent with solid-body rotation.

  15. UV-CONTINUUM SLOPES AT z {approx} 4-7 FROM THE HUDF09+ERS+CANDELS OBSERVATIONS: DISCOVERY OF A WELL-DEFINED UV COLOR-MAGNITUDE RELATIONSHIP FOR z {>=} 4 STAR-FORMING GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Bouwens, R. J.; Franx, M.; Labbe, I.; Smit, R.; Illingworth, G. D.; Oesch, P.A.; Gonzalez, V.; Magee, D.; Van Dokkum, P.; Carollo, C. M.

    2012-08-01

    Ultra-deep Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) and WFC3/IR HUDF+HUDF09 data, along with the wide-area GOODS+ERS+CANDELS data over the CDF-S GOODS field, are used to measure UV colors, expressed as the UV-continuum slope {beta}, of star-forming galaxies over a wide range of luminosity (0.1L*{sub z=3} to 2L*{sub z=3}) at high redshift (z {approx} 7 to z {approx} 4). {beta} is measured using all ACS and WFC3/IR passbands uncontaminated by Ly{alpha} and spectral breaks. Extensive tests show that our {beta} measurements are only subject to minimal biases. Using a different selection procedure, Dunlop et al. recently found large biases in their {beta} measurements. To reconcile these different results, we simulated both approaches and found that {beta} measurements for faint sources are subject to large biases if the same passbands are used both to select the sources and to measure {beta}. High-redshift galaxies show a well-defined rest-frame UV color-magnitude (CM) relationship that becomes systematically bluer toward fainter UV luminosities. No evolution is seen in the slope of the UV CM relationship in the first 1.5 Gyr, though there is a small evolution in the zero point to redder colors from z {approx} 7 to z {approx} 4. This suggests that galaxies are evolving along a well-defined sequence in the L{sub UV}-color ({beta}) plane (a 'star-forming sequence'?). Dust appears to be the principal factor driving changes in the UV color {beta} with luminosity. These new larger {beta} samples lead to improved dust extinction estimates at z {approx} 4-7 and confirm that the extinction is essentially zero at low luminosities and high redshifts. Inclusion of the new dust extinction results leads to (1) excellent agreement between the star formation rate (SFR) density at z {approx} 4-8 and that inferred from the stellar mass density; and (2) to higher specific star formation rates (SSFRs) at z {approx}> 4, suggesting that the SSFR may evolve modestly (by factors of {approx}2) from

  16. THE UV CONTINUUM OF z > 1 STAR-FORMING GALAXIES IN THE HUBBLE ULTRAVIOLET ULTRADEEP FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Kurczynski, Peter; Gawiser, Eric; Rafelski, Marc; Teplitz, Harry I.; Acquaviva, Viviana; Brown, Thomas M.; Coe, Dan; Grogin, Norman A.; Koekemoer, Anton M.; De Mello, Duilia F.; Finkelstein, Steven L.; Lee, Kyoung-soo; Scarlata, Claudia; Siana, Brian D.

    2014-09-20

    We estimate the UV continuum slope, β, for 923 galaxies in the range 1 < z < 8 in the Hubble Ultradeep Field (HUDF). These data include 460 galaxies at 1 < z < 2 down to an absolute magnitude M{sub UV}=−14(∼0.006 L{sub z=1}{sup ∗};0.02 L{sub z=0}{sup ∗}), comparable to dwarf galaxies in the local universe. We combine deep HST/UVIS photometry in F225W, F275W, F336W wavebands (UVUDF) with recent data from HST/WFC3/IR (HUDF12). Galaxies in the range 1 < z < 2 are significantly bluer than local dwarf galaxies. We find their mean (median) values <β > = – 1.382(– 1.830) ± 0.002 (random) ± 0.1 (systematic). We find comparable scatter in β (standard deviation = 0.43) to local dwarf galaxies and 30% larger scatter than z > 2 galaxies. We study the trends of β with redshift and absolute magnitude for binned sub-samples and find a modest color-magnitude relation, dβ/dM = –0.11 ± 0.01, and no evolution in dβ/dM with redshift. A modest increase in dust reddening with redshift and luminosity, ΔE(B – V) ∼ 0.1, and a comparable increase in the dispersion of dust reddening at z < 2, appears likely to explain the observed trends. At z > 2, we find trends that are consistent with previous works; combining our data with the literature in the range 1 < z < 8, we find a color evolution with redshift, dβ/dz = –0.09 ± 0.01 for low luminosity (0.05 L{sub z=3}{sup ∗}), and dβ/dz = –0.06 ± 0.01 for medium luminosity (0.25 L{sub z=3}{sup ∗}) galaxies.

  17. Rest-UV Absorption Lines as Metallicity Estimator: The Metal Content of Star-forming Galaxies at z ~ 5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faisst, A. L.; Capak, P. L.; Davidzon, I.; Salvato, M.; Laigle, C.; Ilbert, O.; Onodera, M.; Hasinger, G.; Kakazu, Y.; Masters, D.; McCracken, H. J.; Mobasher, B.; Sanders, D.; Silverman, J. D.; Yan, L.; Scoville, N. Z.

    2016-05-01

    We measure a relation between the depth of four prominent rest-UV absorption complexes and metallicity for local galaxies and verify it up to z∼ 3. We then apply this relation to a sample of 224 galaxies at 3.5\\lt z\\lt 6.0 (< z> =4.8) in the Cosmic Evolution Survey (COSMOS), for which unique UV spectra from the Deep Imaging Multi-object Spectrograph (DEIMOS) and accurate stellar masses from the Spitzer Large Area Survey with Hyper-Suprime-Cam (SPLASH) are available. The average galaxy population at z∼ 5 and {log}(M/{M}ȯ )\\gt 9 is characterized by 0.3–0.4 dex (in units of 12+{log}({{O/H}})) lower metallicities than at z ∼ 2, but comparable to z∼ 3.5. We find galaxies with weak or no Lyα emission to have metallicities comparable to z ∼ 2 galaxies and therefore may represent an evolved subpopulation of z∼ 5 galaxies. We find a correlation between metallicity and dust in good agreement with local galaxies and an inverse trend between metallicity and star-formation rate consistent with observations at z ∼ 2. The relation between stellar mass and metallicity (MZ relation) is similar to z∼ 3.5, but there are indications of it being slightly shallower, in particular for the young, Lyα-emitting galaxies. We show that, within a “bathtub” approach, a shallower MZ relation is expected in the case of a fast (exponential) build-up of stellar mass with an e-folding time of 100–200 Myr. Because of this fast evolution, the process of dust production and metal enrichment as a function of mass could be more stochastic in the first billion years of galaxy formation compared to later times.

  18. Empirically Estimated Far-UV Extinction Curves for Classical T Tauri Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McJunkin, Matthew; France, Kevin; Schindhelm, Eric; Herczeg, Gregory; Schneider, P. Christian; Brown, Alex

    2016-09-01

    Measurements of extinction curves toward young stars are essential for calculating the intrinsic stellar spectrophotometric radiation. This flux determines the chemical properties and evolution of the circumstellar region, including the environment in which planets form. We develop a new technique using H2 emission lines pumped by stellar Lyα photons to characterize the extinction curve by comparing the measured far-ultraviolet H2 line fluxes with model H2 line fluxes. The difference between model and observed fluxes can be attributed to the dust attenuation along the line of sight through both the interstellar and circumstellar material. The extinction curves are fit by a Cardelli et al. (1989) model and the A V (H2) for the 10 targets studied with good extinction fits range from 0.5 to 1.5 mag, with R V values ranging from 2.0 to 4.7. A V and R V are found to be highly degenerate, suggesting that one or the other needs to be calculated independently. Column densities and temperatures for the fluorescent H2 populations are also determined, with averages of log10(N(H2)) = 19.0 and T = 1500 K. This paper explores the strengths and limitations of the newly developed extinction curve technique in order to assess the reliability of the results and improve the method in the future.

  19. HERSCHEL OBSERVATIONS OF GAS AND DUST IN THE UNUSUAL 49 Ceti DEBRIS DISK

    SciTech Connect

    Roberge, A.; Kamp, I.; Montesinos, B.; Dent, W. R. F.; Meeus, G.; Eiroa, C.; Donaldson, J. K.; Olofsson, J.; Moor, A.; Augereau, J.-C.; Thi, W.-F.; Ardila, D. R.; Woitke, P.

    2013-07-01

    We present far-IR/sub-mm imaging and spectroscopy of 49 Ceti, an unusual circumstellar disk around a nearby young A1V star. The system is famous for showing the dust properties of a debris disk, but the gas properties of a low-mass protoplanetary disk. The data were acquired with the Herschel Space Observatory PACS and SPIRE instruments, largely as part of the ''Gas in Protoplanetary Systems'' (GASPS) Open Time Key Programme. Disk dust emission is detected in images at 70, 160, 250, 350, and 500 {mu}m; 49 Cet is significantly extended in the 70 {mu}m image, spatially resolving the outer dust disk for the first time. Spectra covering small wavelength ranges centered on eight atomic and molecular emission lines were obtained, including [O I] 63 {mu}m and [C II] 158 {mu}m. The C II line was detected at the 5{sigma} level-the first detection of atomic emission from the disk. No other emission lines were seen, despite the fact that the O I line is the brightest one observed in Herschel protoplanetary disk spectra. We present an estimate of the amount of circumstellar atomic gas implied by the C II emission. The new far-IR/sub-mm data fills in a large gap in the previous spectral energy distribution (SED) of 49 Cet. A simple model of the new SED confirms the two-component structure of the disk: warm inner dust and cold outer dust that produces most of the observed excess. Finally, we discuss preliminary thermochemical modeling of the 49 Cet gas/dust disk and our attempts to match several observational results simultaneously. Although we are not yet successful in doing so, our investigations shed light on the evolutionary status of the 49 Cet gas, which might not be primordial gas but rather secondary gas coming from comets.

  20. Herschel Observations of Gas and Dust in the Unusual 49 Ceti Debris Disk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberge, A.; Kamp, I.; Montesinos, B.; Dent, W. R. F.; Meeus, G.; Donaldson, J. K.; Olofsson, J.; Moor, A.; Augereau, J.-C.; Howard, C.; Eiroa, C.; Thi, W.-F.; Ardila, D. R.; Sandell, G.; Woitke, P.

    2013-01-01

    We present far-IR/sub-mm imaging and spectroscopy of 49 Ceti, an unusual circumstellar disk around a nearby young A1V star. The system is famous for showing the dust properties of a debris disk, but the gas properties of a low-mass protoplanetary disk. The data were acquired with the Herschel Space Observatory PACS and SPIRE instruments, largely as part of the “Gas in Protoplanetary Systems” (GASPS) Open Time Key Programme. Disk dust emission is detected in images at 70, 160, 250, 350, and 500 micron; 49 Cet is significantly extended in the 70 micron image, spatially resolving the outer dust disk for the first time. Spectra covering small wavelength ranges centered on eight atomic and molecular emission lines were obtained, including [O i] 63 micron and [C ii] 158 micron. The C ii line was detected at the 5 sigma level—the first detection of atomic emission from the disk. No other emission lines were seen, despite the fact that the Oi line is the brightest one observed in Herschel protoplanetary disk spectra. We present an estimate of the amount of circumstellar atomic gas implied by the C ii emission. The new far-IR/sub-mm data fills in a large gap in the previous spectral energy distribution (SED) of 49 Cet. A simple model of the new SED confirms the two-component structure of the disk: warm inner dust and cold outer dust that produces most of the observed excess. Finally, we discuss preliminary thermochemical modeling of the 49 Cet gas/dust disk and our attempts to match several observational results simultaneously. Although we are not yet successful in doing so, our investigations shed light on the evolutionary status of the 49 Cet gas, which might not be primordial gas but rather secondary gas coming from comets.

  1. Analysis of flares in the chromosphere and corona of main- and pre-main-sequence M-type stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crespo-Chacón, I.

    2015-11-01

    This Ph.D. Thesis revolves around flares on main- and pre-main-sequence M-type stars. We use observations in different wavelength ranges with the aim of analysing the effects of flares at different layers of stellar atmospheres. In particular, optical and X-ray observations are used so that we can study how flares affect, respectively, the chromosphere and the corona of stars. In the optical range we carry out a high temporal resolution spectroscopic monitoring of UV Ceti-type stars aimed at detecting non-white-light flares (the most typical kind of solar flares) in stars other than the Sun. With these data we confirm that non-white-light flares are a frequent phenomenon in UV Ceti-type stars, as observed in the Sun. We study and interpret the behaviour of different chromospheric lines during the flares detected on AD Leo. By using a simplified slab model of flares (Jevremović et al. 1998), we are able to determine the physical parameters of the chromospheric flaring plasma (electron density and electron temperature), the temperature of the underlying source, and the surface area covered by the flaring plasma. We also search for possible relationships between the physical parameters of the flaring plasma and other properties such as the flare duration, area, maximum flux and released energy. This work considerably extends the existing sample of stellar flares analysed with good quality spectroscopy in the optical range. In X-rays we take advantage of the great sensitivity, wide energy range, high energy resolution, and continuous time coverage of the EPIC detectors - on-board the XMMNewton satellite - in order to perform time-resolved spectral analysis of coronal flares. In particular, in the UV Ceti-type star CC Eri we study two flares that are weaker than those typically reported in the literature (allowing us to speculate about the role of flares as heating agents of stellar atmospheres); while in the pre-main-sequence M-type star TWA 11B (with no signatures of

  2. Crystallization kinetics study of cerium titanate CeTi2O6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valeš, Václav; Matějová, Lenka; Matěj, Zdeněk; Brunátová, Tereza; Holý, Václav

    2014-02-01

    Cerium titanate CeTi2O6 has been investigated recently for its photocatalytic activity and as a safe analogue to actinide-containing brannerite-like titanates (UTi2O6, PuTi2O6, e.g.) which are intensively studied because of their use for storing nuclear waste. In this paper we report on the monoclinic phase CeTi2O6 obtained from the Ti-Ce oxide mixture prepared by a reverse micelles directed sol-gel method and subsequently annealed. The kinetics of the isothermal crystallization process is investigated by means of Johnson-Mehl-Avrami-Kolmogorov equation. The effective activation energy of the formation of CeTi2O6 particles, which is an important parameter for its synthesis, is estimated.

  3. The UV colours of high-redshift early-type galaxies: evidence for recent star formation and stellar mass assembly over the last 8 billion years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaviraj, S.; Khochfar, S.; Schawinski, K.; Yi, S. K.; Gawiser, E.; Silk, J.; Virani, S. N.; Cardamone, C. N.; van Dokkum, P. G.; Urry, C. M.

    2008-07-01

    We combine deep optical and NIR (UBVRIzJK) photometry from the Multiwavelength Survey by Yale-Chile (MUSYC) with redshifts from the COMBO-17 survey to perform a large-scale study of the rest-frame ultraviolet (UV) properties of 674 high-redshift (0.5 < z < 1) early-type galaxies, drawn from the Extended Chandra Deep Field-South (E-CDFS). Galaxy morphologies are determined through visual inspection of Hubble Space Telescope (HST) images taken from the GEMS survey. We harness the sensitivity of the UV to young (<1-Gyr old) stars to quantify the recent star formation history of early-type galaxies across a range of luminosities [-23.5 < M(V) < -18]. Comparisons to simple stellar populations forming at high redshift indicate that ~1.1 per cent of early-types in this sample are consistent with purely passive ageing since z = 2 - this value drops to ~0.24 per cent and ~0.15 per cent for z = 3 and 5, respectively. Parametrizing the recent star formation (RSF) in terms of the mass fraction of stars less than a Gyr old, we find that the early-type population as a whole shows a typical RSF between 5 and 13 per cent in the redshift range 0.5 < z < 1. Early-types on the broad UV `red sequence' show RSF values less than 5 per cent, while the reddest early-types (which are also the most luminous) are virtually quiescent with RSF values of ~1 per cent. In contrast to their low-redshift (z < 0.1) counterparts, the high-redshift early-types in this sample show a pronounced bimodality in the rest-frame UV-optical colour, with a minor but significant peak centred on the blue cloud. Furthermore, star formation in the most active early-types is a factor of 2 greater at z ~ 0.7 than in the local universe. Given that evolved sources of UV flux (e.g. horizontal branch stars) should be absent at z > 0.5, implying that the UV is dominated by young stars, we find compelling evidence that early-types of all luminosities form stars over the lifetime of the Universe, although the bulk of their

  4. C IV and Si IV in IUE spectra of normal B8-A0 stars: UV identified Be/Ae stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiu, Weihsueh A.; Grady, C. A.; Bruhweiler, Frederick C.

    1988-01-01

    Archival IUE high dispersion spectra of 42 B6-A2 stars within 200 pc were surveyed. Five of the program stars show significant C IV and Si IV absorption. All of the stars with detected C IV have v sin i less than or = 190 km/sec. Sharp absorption cores are present in Si II lambda 1533 in 3 of the objects, indicating that these are previously unrecognized shell stars. Three of the stars have variable or asymmetric C IV profiles which are consistent with the C IV and Si IV being produced in stellar winds. One star has C IV in the form of a shortward-shifted discrete absorption component, similar to those observed in Be stars. The data are compared with similar data for Be and B shell stars.

  5. The debris disc of solar analogue τ Ceti: Herschel observations and dynamical simulations of the proposed multiplanet system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawler, S. M.; Di Francesco, J.; Kennedy, G. M.; Sibthorpe, B.; Booth, M.; Vandenbussche, B.; Matthews, B. C.; Holland, W. S.; Greaves, J.; Wilner, D. J.; Tuomi, M.; Blommaert, J. A. D. L.; de Vries, B. L.; Dominik, C.; Fridlund, M.; Gear, W.; Heras, A. M.; Ivison, R.; Olofsson, G.

    2014-11-01

    τ Ceti is a nearby, mature G-type star very similar to our Sun, with a massive Kuiper Belt analogue and possible multiplanet system that has been compared to our Solar system. We present Herschel Space Observatory images of the debris disc, finding the disc is resolved at 70 μm and 160 μm, and marginally resolved at 250 μm. The Herschel images and infrared photometry from the literature are best modelled using a wide dust annulus with an inner edge between 1 and 10 au and an outer edge at ˜55 au, inclined from face-on by 35° ± 10°, and with no significant azimuthal structure. We model the proposed tightly packed planetary system of five super-Earths and find that the innermost dynamically stable disc orbits are consistent with the inner edge found by the observations. The photometric modelling, however, cannot rule out a disc inner edge as close to the star as 1 au, though larger distances produce a better fit to the data. Dynamical modelling shows that the five-planet system is stable with the addition of a Neptune or smaller mass planet on an orbit outside 5 au, where the radial velocity data analysis would not have detected a planet of this mass.

  6. WFC3IR Imaging of UV-Faint z=6 Quasars: Star-Forming Host Galaxies of AGN in the Early Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mechtley, Matthew

    2012-10-01

    We propose to study the star-forming host galaxies of AGN at z 6 with WFC3/IR in F125W and F160W. Recently, far-infrared {FIR} continuum has been detected in five UV-faint {rest-frame m_1450>20.2} quasars at z 6, suggesting that they have star formation rates {SFRs} of 1000 MSun/yr, comparable to UV-bright z 6 quasars. Such SFRs imply a significant young, UV-bright stellar population. These host galaxies have yet to be seen in starlight, however, since light from the AGN still dominates the rest-frame UV emission.We successfully subtracted the point source in the UV-bright {m_1450=19.03} quasar J1148+5251 down to mu_J>24.4, mu_H>24.9 mag arcsec^-2, giving upper limits of m_1680>22.5, m_2160>23.0 mag for the host galaxy {Program 12332, PI Windhorst}. Uncertainties in the PSF model remain the dominant source of residuals. Since these uncertainties scale with brightness, low-contrast quasars with UV-faint point sources and UV-bright hosts are the best targets for this method.Using the observing and subtraction methods we developed, we propose to observe all 5 FIR-detected, UV-faint z 6 quasars with WFC3/IR in F125W and F160W. We request 5 orbits per quasar, for a total of 25 orbits. This program is beyond the capability of ground-based AO facilities, due to depth and PSF stability required. Observations of these host galaxies are critical to determine:{a} The existence of a luminous stellar component{b} Luminosity and color profiles, to constrain star formation histories{c} Morphologies and sizes, to look for mergers and hierarchical formation processes{d} Stellar mass, to understand formation and co-evolution of SMBHs and galaxy bulges

  7. Comparing FIR, UV and SED star formation rates for IR-luminous galaxies at 1≤z≤2 in CANDELS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pforr, Janine; Dickinson, Mark; Kartaltepe, Jeyhan; Inami, Hanae; Penner, Kyle

    2015-08-01

    Galaxy formation and evolution studies rely on the robust determination of galaxy properties such as stellar masses and star formation rates (SFR). One the one hand these are important to distinguish between star bursting galaxies, normally star forming galaxies and those in the process of quenching and reveal the underlying processes causing these phenomena. On the other hand, they are crucial to derive reliable estimates of global properties like the star formation rate density of the Universe and the stellar mass assembly. We exploit the excellent multi-wavelength data in the GOODS-S, GOODS-N, UDS and COSMOS CANDELS fields ranging from deep ground and space-based optical data, deep-NIR HST data from CANDELS to the deepest FIR PACS data available from CANDELS-Herschel and Pep/GOODS-Herschel to estimate SFRs of IR-luminous galaxies between redshift 1 and 2. We determine SFRs in three different ways:1) from SED-fitting to the optical/IR multi-wavelength data, 2) from far-IR luminosities using 24 micron and Herschel PACS fluxes and 3) from UV slope and UV luminosity measurements. While for the majority of objects the different estimates agree very well, we find a subsample of outliers that are classified as pseudo-quiescent by the SED-fit. We present possible reasons for these misclassifications as well as potential remedies.

  8. Dust Obscuration and Metallicity at High Redshift: New Inferences from UV, Hα, and 8 μm Observations of z ~ 2 Star-forming Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, Naveen A.; Erb, Dawn K.; Pettini, Max; Steidel, Charles C.; Shapley, Alice E.

    2010-04-01

    We use a sample of 90 spectroscopically confirmed Lyman break galaxies with Hα measurements and Spitzer MIPS 24 μm observations to constrain the relationship between rest-frame 8 μm luminosity (L 8) and star formation rate (SFR) for L* galaxies at z ~ 2. We find a tight correlation with 0.24 dex scatter between L 8 and Hα luminosity/SFR for z ~ 2 galaxies with 1010 L sun <~ L IR <~ 1012 L sun. Employing this relationship with a larger sample of 392 galaxies with spectroscopic redshifts, we find that the UV slope β can be used to recover the dust attenuation of the vast majority of moderately luminous L* galaxies at z ~ 2 to within a 0.4 dex scatter using the local correlation. Separately, young galaxies with ages lsim100 Myr appear to be less dusty than their UV slopes would imply based on the local trend and may follow an extinction curve that is steeper than what is typically assumed. Consequently, very young galaxies at high redshift may be significantly less dusty than inferred previously. Our results provide the first direct evidence, independent of the UV slope, for a correlation between UV and bolometric luminosity (L bol) at high redshift, in the sense that UV-faint galaxies are on average less infrared and less bolometrically luminous than their UV-bright counterparts. The L bol-L UV relation indicates that as the SFR increases, L UV turns over (or "saturates") around the value of L* at z ~ 2, implying that dust obscuration may be largely responsible for modulating the bright end of the UV luminosity function. Finally, dust attenuation is found to correlate with oxygen abundance at z ~ 2. Accounting for systematic differences in local and high-redshift metallicity calibrations, we find that L* galaxies at z ~ 2, while at least an order of magnitude more bolometrically luminous, exhibit ratios of metals to dust that are similar to those of local starbursts. This result is expected if high-redshift galaxies are forming their stars in a less metal

  9. Utilizing Synthetic UV Spectra to Explore the Physical Basis for the Classification of Lambda Boötis Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Kwang-Ping; Neff, James E.; Johnson, Dustin M.; Tarbell, Erik S.; Romo, Christopher A.; Prabhaker, Arvind; Steele, Patricia A.; Gray, Richard O.; Corbally, Christopher J.

    2016-04-01

    Lambda Boo-type stars are a group of late B to early F-type Population I dwarfs that show mild to extreme deficiencies of iron-peak elements (up to 2 dex), but their C, N, O, and S abundances are near solar. This intriguing stellar class has recently regained the spotlight because of the directly imaged planets around a confirmed Lambda Boo star, HR 8799, and a suggested Lambda Boo star, Beta Pictoris. The discovery of a giant asteroid belt around Vega, another possible Lambda Boo star, also suggests hidden planets. The possible link between Lambda Boo stars and planet-bearing stars motivates us to study Lambda Boo stars systematically. Since the peculiar nature of the prototype Lambda Boötis was first noticed in 1943, Lambda Boo candidates published in the literature have been selected using widely different criteria. In order to determine the origin of Lambda Boo stars’ unique abundance pattern and to better discriminate between theories explaining the Lambda Boo phenomenon, a consistent working definition of Lambda Boo stars is needed. We have re-evaluated all published Lambda Boo candidates and their available ultraviolet and visible spectra. In this paper, using observed and synthetic spectra, we explore the physical basis for the classification of Lambda Boo stars, and develop quantitative criteria that discriminate metal-poor stars from bona fide Lambda Boo stars. Based on these stricter Lambda Boo classification criteria, we conclude that neither Beta Pictoris nor Vega should be classified as Lambda Boo stars.

  10. Diagnostic tools for rapid detection and quantification of Weissella ceti NC36 infections in rainbow trout

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Weissellosis in rainbow trout is caused by the gram-positive bacteria Weissella ceti and has been reported in China, Brazil and the United States. This disease can result in high mortality in market-sized fish and thus causes significant losses. Thus far, phenotypic characterization and 16S rRNA seq...

  11. Quantitative analysis of the FUV, UV and optical spectrum of the O3 star HD 93129A.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taresch, G.; Kudritzki, R. P.; Hurwitz, M.; Bowyer, S.; Pauldrach, A. W. A.; Puls, J.; Butler, K.; Lennon, D. J.; Haser, S. M.

    1997-05-01

    Vinfinity_ using the theory of radiation driven winds. HD 93129A is thus the most luminous and most massive star known in our galaxy. The abundance determinations yield clear evidence of contamination with CNO-cycled matter in the atmosphere. The abundances of heavier elements are about solar. The presence of high ionization stages such as OVI can be explained by X-ray emission due to stellar wind shocks of low temperature (2.5x10^6^K) corresponding to the jump velocity of 500km/s obtained from UV and FUV P-Cygni profiles. Their luminosity is 1.6 dex smaller than the luminosity of the high temperature shocks (1.1x10^7^K) observed directly with the ROSAT PSPC. Using effective temperature, gravity, radius and abundances as input parameters we calculate radiation driven wind models for HD 93129A. We find that the theory is able to reproduce the extreme stellar wind properties very precisely.

  12. Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capelato, Hugo Vicente

    1999-01-01

    We will begin our study with a more or less superficial inspection of the "forest" of stars that we see in the skies. The first thing we notice is that, as sources of light, they are much weaker than the Sun. Second, their apparent colors vary; from a bluish-white in most of them to a reddish-yellow, which is rarer. There is also a third aspect, though it is not very obvious to the naked eye: most of the stars group themselves in small families of two, three or more members. A good example is the Alpha Centauri, the closest star to us, which, in fact, is a triple system of stars. Another is the group of 7 stars that make up the Pleiades, which will be discussed later on. In fact, almost half of the stars are double systems with only two members, called binary stars. Most of these double stars, though together, are separated by several astronomical units (one astronomical unit, AU, is the distance from Earth to the sun: see Chapter 1), and revolve around each other over periods of several years. And yet the revolutions of some binary stars, separated by much smaller distances, occur in only a few hours! These stars are so close to each other that they can share enveloping material. Often this exchange occurs in a somewhat violent manner. Local explosions may occur, expelling matter away from the system. In other binary systems, where one of the components is a very compact, dense star, companion material flows more calmly, making up a light disk around the compact star.

  13. Far-UV Spectroscopy of the Planet-hosting Star WASP-13: High-energy Irradiance, Distance, Age, Planetary Mass-loss Rate, and Circumstellar Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fossati, L.; France, K.; Koskinen, T.; Juvan, I. G.; Haswell, C. A.; Lendl, M.

    2015-12-01

    Several transiting hot Jupiters orbit relatively inactive main-sequence stars. For some of those, the {log}{R}{HK}\\prime activity parameter lies below the basal level (-5.1). Two explanations have been proposed so far: (i) the planet affects the stellar dynamo, (ii) the {log}{R}{HK}\\prime measurements are biased by extrinsic absorption, either by the interstellar medium (ISM) or by material local to the system. We present here Hubble Space Telescope/COS far-UV spectra of WASP-13, which hosts an inflated hot Jupiter and has a measured {log}{R}{HK}\\prime value (-5.26), well below the basal level. From the star's spectral energy distribution we obtain an extinction E(B - V) = 0.045 ± 0.025 mag and a distance d = 232 ± 8 pc. We detect at ≳4σ lines belonging to three different ionization states of carbon (C i, C ii, and C iv) and the Si iv doublet at ˜3σ. Using far-UV spectra of nearby early G-type stars of known age, we derive a C iv/C i flux ratio-age relation, from which we estimate WASP-13's age to be 5.1 ± 2.0 Gyr. We rescale the solar irradiance reference spectrum to match the flux of the C iv 1548 doublet. By integrating the rescaled solar spectrum, we obtain an XUV flux at 1 AU of 5.4 erg s-1 cm-2. We use a detailed model of the planet's upper atmosphere, deriving a mass-loss rate of 1.5 × 1011 g s-1. Despite the low {log}{R}{HK}\\prime value, the star shows a far-UV spectrum typical of middle-aged solar-type stars, pointing toward the presence of significant extrinsic absorption. The analysis of a high-resolution spectrum of the Ca ii H&K lines indicates that the ISM absorption could be the origin of the low {log}{R}{HK}\\prime value. Nevertheless, the large uncertainty in the Ca ii ISM abundance does not allow us to firmly exclude the presence of circumstellar gas. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained from MAST at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for

  14. HST/COS Observations of the UV-Bright Star Y453 in the Globular Cluster M4 (NGC 6121)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixon, William V. D.; Chayer, Pierre; Benjamin, Robert A.

    2016-01-01

    Post-AGB stars represent a short-lived phase of stellar evolution during which stars cross the optical color-magnitude diagram from the cool, red tip of the assymptotic giant branch (AGB) to the hot, blue tip of the white-dwarf cooling curve. Their surface chemistry reflects the nuclear-shell burning, mixing, and mass-loss processes characteristic of AGB stars, and their high effective temperatures allow the detection of elements that are unobservable in cool giants. Post-AGB stars in globular clusters offer the additional advantages of known distance, age, and initial chemistry. To better understand the AGB evolution of low-mass stars, we have observed the post-AGB star Y453 in the globular cluster M4 (NGC 6121) with the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) on the Hubble Space Telescope. The star, which has an effective temperature of at least 60,000 K, shows absorption from He, C, N, O, Ne, Si, S, Ti, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, and Ga. While the star's C and O abundances are consistent with those measured in a sample of nitrogen-poor RGB stars in M4, its N abundance is considerably enhanced. The star's low C abundance suggests that it left the AGB before the onset of third dredge-up.This work was supported by NASA grant HST-GO-13721.001-A to the University of Wisconsin, Whitewater. P.C. is supported by the Canadian Space Agency under a contract with NRC Herzberg Astronomy and Astrophysics.

  15. DUST ATTENUATION IN UV-SELECTED STARBURSTS AT HIGH REDSHIFT AND THEIR LOCAL COUNTERPARTS: IMPLICATIONS FOR THE COSMIC STAR FORMATION RATE DENSITY

    SciTech Connect

    Overzier, Roderik A.; Wang Jing; Heckman, Timothy M.; Armus, Lee; Howell, Justin; Buat, Veronique; Meurer, Gerhardt; Siana, Brian; Goncalves, Thiago S.; Martin, D. Christopher; Neill, James D.; Basu-Zych, Antara; Charlot, Stephane; Rich, R. Michael; Salim, Samir; Schiminovich, David

    2011-01-01

    We present a new analysis of the dust obscuration in starburst galaxies at low and high redshifts. This study is motivated by our unique sample of the most extreme UV-selected starburst galaxies in the nearby universe (z < 0.3), found to be good analogs of high-redshift Lyman break galaxies (LBGs) in most of their physical properties. We find that the dust properties of the Lyman break analogs (LBAs) are consistent with the relation derived previously by Meurer et al. (M99) that is commonly used to dust-correct star formation rate (SFR) measurements at a very wide range of redshifts. We directly compare our results with high-redshift samples (LBGs, 'BzK', and submillimeter galaxies at z {approx} 2-3) having IR data either from Spitzer or Herschel. The attenuation in typical LBGs at z {approx} 2-3 and LBAs is very similar. Because LBAs are much better analogs to LBGs compared to previous local star-forming samples, including M99, the practice of dust-correcting the SFRs of high-redshift galaxies based on the local calibration is now placed on a much more solid ground. We illustrate the importance of this result by showing how the locally calibrated relation between UV measurements and extinction is used to estimate the integrated, dust-corrected SFR density at z {approx_equal} 2-6.

  16. Discovering Mira Ceti: Celestial Change and Cosmic Continuity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatch, Robert Alan

    In the short narrative that follows I introduce two new heroes. Although we begin with Fabricius's first sighting in 1596, the new pivot point in the drama is the collaboration between Hevelius and Boulliau that began around 1660. As it happens, Learned Europe paid little attention to Mira in the generation after the first scattered sightings of 1596, indeed, nearly 70 years passed before the New Star was given a working identity. Like Columbus discovering America, Fabricius and Holwarda saw different things - for convenience, I call them Fabricius's Star and Holwarda's Star. Hevelius's Historiola (Danzig, 1662) and Boulliau's Ad astronomos (Paris, 1667) presented a different vision. It made Mira famous. As I shall argue, if Hevelius gave Mira a history, Boulliau gave Mira a future.5 In the end, the New Star not only challenged the ancient cosmos, it became an enduring icon for the New Science, a returning reminder of celestial continuity and cosmic order.

  17. a Search for Companions around Stars Within Five Parsecs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fazio, Giovanni; Megeath, Tom

    2004-09-01

    Each star known within 5 parsecs of the Sun will be observed with IRAC to discover very low mass companions. Simply because of their proximity, these targets promise to provide one of the most sensitive experiments possible with IRAC --- the detection of super-Jupiters around the nearest stars. Depending on distance and separation from the stars, companions with masses as low as 5-20 Mjup can be detected. The sample of 60 stars in 44 systems within 5 parsecs requires 45 IRAC pointings (Proxima Cen requires its own pointing because it is two degrees from alpha Cen). The sample includes 4 white dwarfs, 1 A star (Sirius), 1 F star (Procyon), 2 G stars (alpha Cen A and tau Ceti), 6 K stars, and 46 M stars. These stars comprise 30 single systems, 10 doubles, and 3 triples, as well as the nearest star with a probable extrasolar planet, Gl 876.

  18. Star formation in NGC 4449: MAMA-detector UV imagery and Fabry-Perot Balmer-line imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Robert S.; Home, Allen T.; Smith, Andrew M.; Bruhweiler, Fred C.; Cheng, K.P.; Hintzen, Paul M. N.; Oliversen, Ronald J.

    1994-01-01

    Using far-ultraviolet (FUV) and Balmer-line imagery, we investigate the star formation history of 22 large OB complexes in the Magellanic irregular galaxy NGC 4449. The FUV luminosity of NGC 4449 is comparable to those of late-type spirals and is greater than that of the LMC by approximately 2.4 mag, indicating substantial star formation in the last 10(exp 8) yr. FUV data were taken using a sounding-rocket telescope with a Multianode Microchannel Array (MAMA) detector, and Balmer-line data were taken using the Goddard Fabry-Perot Imager. The resulting imagery shows bright, roughly coincident FUV and H alpha sources throughout the extent of the visible galaxy. We model these sources using cluster-evolution codes. Although all sources are a few Myr old, clear age differences are found. In particular, several of the most recently active star formation regions are located together in the galaxy's northern periphery, which is apparently coincident with a large H I reservoir. The brightest and most massive OB complexes are found along the northeast-southwest surface brightness ridgeline (the 'bar'). Over the entire galaxy, star formation rates are consistent on timescales of 10(exp 6), 10(exp 8), and 10(exp 9) yr. A history of recent star formation is suggested with two main episodes, one predominantly in the bar ending approximately 5 Myr ago, and an ongoing one associated with an observed H I cloud.

  19. Rotational modulation and flares on RS Canum Venaqticorum and BY Draconis stars. XII - Near-to-simultaneous high resolution UV and optical observations of II Pegasi during July 1984

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrne, P. B.; Panagi, P.; Doyle, J. G.; Englebrecht, C. A.; McMahan, R.; Marang, F.; Wegner, G.

    1989-04-01

    Nearly simultaneous high resolution ground-based optical and IUE satellite UV spectroscopy and an optical light curve of the RS CVn star II Peg are presented. It is shown that the chromospheric and transition region radiative losses of the star in July 1984 are lower than previously recorded means. The flux in the Lyman-alpha line is estimated and evidence is given for variability in all of the emission lines. This variability appears to be correlated with the optical spots. Line profiles at two rotational phases for the principal UV emission lines show an excess broadening over and above the combined instrumental plus Doppler broadening.

  20. The star formation rate cookbook at 1 < z < 3: Extinction-corrected relations for UV and [OII]λ3727 luminosities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talia, M.; Cimatti, A.; Pozzetti, L.; Rodighiero, G.; Gruppioni, C.; Pozzi, F.; Daddi, E.; Maraston, C.; Mignoli, M.; Kurk, J.

    2015-10-01

    Aims: In this paper we use a well-controlled spectroscopic sample of galaxies at 1 star formation rate (SFR) estimators. In particular, we use infrared (IR) data to derive empirical calibrations to correct ultraviolet (UV) and [OII]λ3727 luminosities for dust extinction and dust-corrected estimates of SFR. Methods: We selected 286 star-forming galaxies with spectroscopic redshift 1 UV and [OII]λ3727 luminosities for dust extinction. Results: Through the analyses of the correlations between different dust attenuation probes, a set of relations is provided that allows the recovery of the total unattenuated SFR for star-forming galaxies at 1 UV and [OII]λ3727 luminosities. The relation between AIRX and UV continuum slope (β) was tested for our sample and found to be broadly consistent with the literature results at the same redshift, though with a larger dispersion with respect to UV-selected samples. We find a correlation between the rest

  1. A NON-LTE ANALYSIS OF THE HOT SUBDWARF O STAR BD+28 Degree-Sign 4211. I. THE UV SPECTRUM

    SciTech Connect

    Latour, M.; Fontaine, G.; Brassard, P.; Chayer, P.

    2013-08-20

    We present a detailed analysis of the UV spectrum of the calibration star BD+28 Degree-Sign 4211 using high-quality spectra obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope and Far-Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer satellites. To this aim, we compare quantitatively the observed data with model spectra obtained from state-of-the-art non-LTE metal line-blanketed model atmospheres and synthetic spectra calculated with TLUSTY and SYNSPEC. We thus determine in a self-consistent way the abundances of 11 elements with well-defined lines in the UV, namely those of C, N, O, F, Mg, Si, P, S, Ar, Fe, and Ni. The derived abundances range from about solar to 1/10 solar. We find that the overall quality of the derived spectral fits is very satisfying. Our spectral analysis can be used to constrain rather tightly the effective temperature of BD+28 Degree-Sign 4211 to a value of T{sub eff} = 82, 000 {+-} 5000 K. We also estimate conservatively that its surface gravity falls in the range log g = 6.2{sub -0.1}{sup +0.3}. Assuming that the Hipparcos measurement for BD+28 Degree-Sign 4211 is fully reliable and that our model atmospheres are reasonably realistic, we can reconcile our spectroscopic constraints with the available parallax measurement only if the mass of BD+28 Degree-Sign 4211 is significantly less than the canonical value of 0.5 M{sub Sun} for a representative post-extended horizontal branch star.

  2. Obs. of Discr Chromo Em Line Prof Asymm & Var Asymm in UV Spectra of Late-Type Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mullan, Dermott J.

    Based on our observing programs dealing with the Mg II chromospheric emission features among cool post-main-sequence stars, we are in a position to continue the search for asymmetry and profile variations among the three kinds of asymmetry variables identified to date: (i) the radical asymmetry variables which exhibit discrepant asymmetries in Mg II K (V/R < 1) relative to Ca II K (V/R > 1); (11) the circumstellar variables which exhibit changes in their circumstellar thickness and velocities along the line of sight; and (iii) the "non-variables" which may in fact be variables over time scales greater than the one year so far spent in any such investigation. Stars in group (i) also show discrepant Wilson-Bappu line-widths. The radical asymmetry variables occur among objects slightly cooler and more luminous than a Magnetic Topology Transition Locus (M.T.T.L.) lying close to, but distinct from, a previously defined transition locus (formerly known as the Supersonic Transition Locus). The MTTL separates solar-type objects which possess static high temperature coronal material and circulation-type asymmetries, from the non-solartype objects which possess lower temperature outer atmospheres, substantial mass loss, and outflow asymmetries. The MTTL segregates stars according to whether the magnetic field topology dominating their outer atmospheres is open or closed. The radical asymmetry variables, lying close to the MTTL, afford our best opportunity to see the interplay between the archetypal magnetic configurations and to understand the physics involved.

  3. THE UV LUMINOSITY FUNCTION OF STAR-FORMING GALAXIES VIA DROPOUT SELECTION AT REDSHIFTS z {approx} 7 AND 8 FROM THE 2012 ULTRA DEEP FIELD CAMPAIGN

    SciTech Connect

    Schenker, Matthew A.; Ellis, Richard S.; Robertson, Brant E.; Schneider, Evan; Ono, Yoshiaki; Ouchi, Masami; Stark, Daniel P.; McLure, Ross J.; Dunlop, James S.; Bowler, Rebecca A. A.; Curtis-Lake, Emma; Rogers, Alexander B.; Cirasuolo, Michele; Koekemoer, Anton; Charlot, Stephane; Furlanetto, Steven R.

    2013-05-10

    We present a catalog of high-redshift star-forming galaxies selected to lie within the redshift range z {approx_equal} 7-8 using the Ultra Deep Field 2012 (UDF12), the deepest near-infrared (near-IR) exposures yet taken with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). As a result of the increased near-IR exposure time compared to previous HST imaging in this field, we probe {approx}0.65 (0.25) mag fainter in absolute UV magnitude, at z {approx} 7 (8), which increases confidence in a measurement of the faint end slope of the galaxy luminosity function. Through a 0.7 mag deeper limit in the key F105W filter that encompasses or lies just longward of the Lyman break, we also achieve a much-refined color-color selection that balances high redshift completeness and a low expected contamination fraction. We improve the number of dropout-selected UDF sources to 47 at z {approx} 7 and 27 at z {approx} 8. Incorporating brighter archival and ground-based samples, we measure the z {approx_equal} 7 UV luminosity function to an absolute magnitude limit of M{sub UV} = -17 and find a faint end Schechter slope of {alpha}=-1.87{sup +0.18}{sub -0.17}. Using a similar color-color selection at z {approx_equal} 8 that takes our newly added imaging in the F140W filter into account, and incorporating archival data from the HIPPIES and BoRG campaigns, we provide a robust estimate of the faint end slope at z {approx_equal} 8, {alpha}=-1.94{sup +0.21}{sub -0.24}. We briefly discuss our results in the context of earlier work and that derived using the same UDF12 data but with an independent photometric redshift technique.

  4. Dust-obscured star formation and the contribution of galaxies escaping UV/optical color selections at z ~ 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riguccini, L.; Le Floc'h, E.; Ilbert, O.; Aussel, H.; Salvato, M.; Capak, P.; McCracken, H.; Kartaltepe, J.; Sanders, D.; Scoville, N.

    2011-10-01

    Context. A substantial amount of the stellar mass growth across cosmic time occurred within dust-enshrouded environments. So far, identification of complete samples of distant star-forming galaxies from the short wavelength range has been strongly biased by the effect of dust extinction. Nevertheless, the exact amount of star-forming activity that took place in high-redshift dusty galaxies but that has currently been missed by optical surveys has barely been explored. Aims: Our goal is to determine the number of luminous star-forming galaxies at 1.5 ≲ z ≲ 3 that are potentially missed by the traditional color selection techniques because of dust extinction. We also aim at quantifying the contribution of these sources to the IR luminosity and cosmic star formation density at high redshift. Methods: We based our work on a sample of 24 μm sources brighter than 80 μJy and taken from the Spitzer survey of the COSMOS field. Almost all of these sources have accurate photometric redshifts. We applied to this mid-IR selected sample the BzK and BM/BX criteria, as well as the selections of the IRAC peakers and the Optically-Faint IR-bright (OFIR) galaxies. We analyzed the fraction of sources identified with these techniques. We also computed 8 μm rest-frame luminosity from the 24 μm fluxes of our sources, and considering the relationships between L8 μm and LPaα and between L8 μm and LIR, we derived ρIR and then ρSFR for our MIPS sources. Results: The BzK criterion offers an almost complete (~90%) identification of the 24 μm sources at 1.4 < z < 2.5. In contrast, the BM/BX criterion misses 50% of the MIPS sources. We attribute this bias to the effect of extinction, which reddens the typical colors of galaxies. The contribution of these two selections to the IR luminosity density produced by all the sources brighter than 80 μJy are on the same order. Moreover the criterion based on the presence of a stellar bump in their spectra (IRAC peakers) misses up to 40% of

  5. Estimation of Mass-Loss Rates from Emission Line Profiles in the UV Spectra of Cool Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, K. G.; Robinson, R. D.; Harper, G. M.

    1999-01-01

    The photon-scattering winds of cool, low-gravity stars (K-M giants and supergiants) produce absorption features in the strong chromospheric emission lines. This provides us with an opportunity to assess important parameters of the wind, including flow and turbulent velocities, the optical depth of the wind above the region of photon creation, and the star's mass-loss rate. We have used the Lamers et al. Sobolev with Exact Integration (SEI) radiative transfer code along with simple models of the outer atmospheric structure to compute synthetic line profiles for comparison with the observed line profiles. The SEI code has the advantage of being computationally fast and allows a great number of possible wind models to be examined. We therefore use it here to obtain initial first-order estimates of the wind parameters. More sophisticated, but more time-consuming and resource intensive calculations will be performed at a later date, using the SEI-deduced wind parameters as a starting point. A comparison of the profiles over a range of wind velocity laws, turbulence values, and line opacities allows us to constrain the wind parameters, and to estimate the mass-loss rates. We have applied this analysis technique (using lines of Mg II, 0 I, and Fe II) so far to four stars: the normal K5-giant alpha Tau, the hybrid K-giant gamma Dra, the K5 supergiant lambda Vel, and the M-giant gamma Cru. We present in this paper a description of the technique, including the assumptions which go into its use, an assessment of its robustness, and the results of our analysis.

  6. Quantitative UV spectroscopy of early O stars on the Magellanic Clouds: The determination of the stellar metallicities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haser, Stefan M.; Pauldrach, Adalbert W. A.; Lennon, Danny J.; Kudritzki, Rolf-Peter; Lennon, Maguerite; Puls, Joachim; Voels, Stephen A.

    1997-01-01

    Ultraviolet spectra of four O stars in the Magellanic Clouds obtained with the faint object spectrograph of the Hubble Space Telescope are analyzed with respect to their metallicity. The metal abundances are derived from the stellar parameters and the mass loss rate with a two step procedure: hydrodynamic radiation-driven wind models with metallicity as a free parameter are constructed to fit the observed wind momentum rate and thus yield a dynamical metallicity, and synthetic spectra are computed for different metal abundances and compared to the observed spectra in order to obtain a spectroscopic metallicity.

  7. A search variability in the UV spectrum of Pi Aquarii and Fe 3 shell lines of Be stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Several short U1 and U2 observations of Be stars are obtained with the Copernicus satellite. Pi Aquarii (B1 IV-Ve) is observed with the U1 and U2 spectrometers. These scans are compared with earlier observations. Variations in the strengths and profiles of selected shell and photospheric features are examined. In order to study possible changes in the temperature of the circumstellar envelope, features covering a wide range in ionization are observed. Included in the observing program are lines of O VI, N V, Si IV, Si III, S III, Fe III, and N I.

  8. First report of Brucella ceti-associated meningoencephalitis in a long-finned pilot whale Globicephala melas.

    PubMed

    Davison, Nicholas J; Brownlow, Andrew; McGovern, Barry; Dagleish, Mark P; Perrett, Lorraine L; Dale, Emma-Jane; Koylass, Mark; Foster, Geoffrey

    2015-10-27

    Fatal Brucella ceti infection with histological lesions specific to the central nervous system has been described in only 3 species of cetaceans: striped dolphins Stenella coeruleoalba, Atlantic white-sided dolphins Lagenorhynchus acutus and short-beaked common dolphins Delphinus delphis. This paper describes the first report of a B. ceti-associated meningoencephalitis in a long-finned pilot whale Globicephala melas, showing the increasing range of species susceptibility. Brucella was recovered in larger numbers from cerebrospinal fluid than from brain tissue and is the sample of choice for isolation. PMID:26503778

  9. VizieR Online Data Catalog: PHAT X. UV-IR photometry of M31 stars (Williams+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, B. F.; Lang, D.; Dalcanton, J. J.; Dolphin, A. E.; Weisz, D. R.; Bell, E. F.; Bianchi, L.; Byler, N.; Gilbert, K. M.; Girardi, L.; Gordon, K.; Gregersen, D.; Johnson, L. C.; Kalirai, J.; Lauer, T. R.; Monachesi, A.; Rosenfield, P.; Seth, A.; Skillman, E.

    2015-01-01

    The data for the Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury (PHAT) survey were obtained from 2010 July 12 to 2013 October 12 using the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) Wide Field Channel (WFC), the Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) IR (infrared) channel, and the WFC3 UVIS (ultraviolet-optical) channel. The observing strategy is described in detail in Dalcanton et al. (2012ApJS..200...18D). A list of the target names, observing dates, coordinates, orientations, instruments, exposure times, and filters is given in Table 1. Using the ACS and WFC3 cameras aboard HST, we have photometered 414 contiguous WFC3/IR footprints covering 0.5deg2 of the M31 star-forming disk. (4 data files).

  10. Parametric Modeling in Action: High Accuracy Seismology of Kepler DAV Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giammichele, N.; Fontaine, G.; Charpinet, S.; Brassard, P.; Greiss, S.

    2015-06-01

    We summarize here the efforts made on the quantitative seismic analyses performed on two ZZ Ceti stars observed with the Kepler satellite. One of them, KIC 11911480, is located close to the blue edge of the instability strip, while the other, GD 1212, is found at the red edge. We emphasize the need for parameterized modeling and the forward approach to uniquely establish the fundamental parameters of the stars. We show how the internal structures as well as rotation profiles are unravelled to surprisingly large depths for degenerates such as ZZ Ceti stars, which further confirms the loss of stellar angular momentum before the white dwarf stage detected previously in GW Vir pulsating white dwarfs. This opens up interesting prospects for the new mission to come, Kepler-2, in the field of white dwarf asteroseismology.

  11. Determination of the Core Composition of ZZ Ceti Stars through Seismic Means

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giammichele, N.; Fontaine, G.; Charpinet, S.; Brassard, P.

    2015-06-01

    As we know, the exact chemical profile in the core of a white dwarf is still very much uncertain, and comparing results from different investigators yields significant differences with the addition of the numerical noise coming from the accumulated uncertainties through all the various stages of pre-white dwarf evolution. We believe that until significant progress is made on that front, we can only probe the bulk core composition as a whole. In effect, the low sensitivity of the pulsation periods on the core composition can be exploited as long as we rely on the detection of confined modes that have relatively large amplitudes in the core. We show that the bulk composition of Ross 548 can be effectively determined, while that of GD 165 is not easily pinned down due to the lack of detected confined modes in that latter case.

  12. Radiation-driven winds of hot luminous stars. XVIII. The unreliability of stellar and wind parameter determinations from optical vs. UV spectral analysis of selected central stars of planetary nebulae and the possibility of some CSPNs as single-star supernova Ia progenitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, T. L.; Pauldrach, A. W. A.; Kaschinski, C. B.

    2016-08-01

    Context. The uncertainty in the degree to which radiation-driven winds of hot stars might be affected by small inhomogeneities in the density leads to a corresponding uncertainty in the determination of the atmospheric mass loss rates from the strength of optical recombination lines and - since the mass loss rate is not a free parameter but a function of the stellar parameters mass, radius, luminosity, and abundances - in principle also in the determination of these stellar parameters. Furthermore, the optical recombination lines also react sensitively to even small changes in the density structure resulting from the (often assumed instead of computed) velocity law of the outflow. This raises the question of how reliable the parameter determinations from such lines are. Aims: The currently existing severe discrepancy between central stars of planetary nebulae (CSPN) stellar and wind parameters derived from model fits to the optical spectra and those derived using hydrodynamically consistent model fits to the UV spectra is to be reassessed via a simultaneous optical/UV analysis using a state-of-the-art model atmosphere code. Methods: We have modified our hydrodynamically consistent model atmosphere code with an implementation of the usual ad hoc treatment of clumping (small inhomogeneities in the density) in the wind. This allows us to re-evaluate, with respect to their influence on the appearance of the UV spectra and their compatibility with the observations, the parameters determined in an earlier study that had employed clumping in its models to achieve a fit to the observed optical spectra. Results: The discrepancy between the optical and the UV analyses is confirmed to be the result of a missing consistency between stellar and wind parameters in the optical analysis. While clumping in the wind does significantly increase the emission in the optical hydrogen and helium recombination lines, the influence of the density (velocity field) is of the same order as

  13. Chromospherically active stars. 6: Giants with compact hot companions and the barium star scenario

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fekel, Francis C.; Henry, Gregory W.; Busby, Michael R.; Eitter, Joseph J.

    1993-01-01

    We have determined spectroscopic orbits for three chromospherically active giants that have hot compact companions. They are HD 160538 (K0 III + wd, P = 904 days), HD 165141 (G8 III + wd, P approximately 5200 days), and HD 185510 (K0 III + sdB, P = 20.6619 days). By fitting an IUE spectrum with theoretical models, we find the white dwarf companion of HD 165141 has a temperature of about 35000 K. Spectral types and rotational velocities have been determined for the three giants and distances have been estimated. These three systems and 39 Ceti are compared with the barium star mass-transfer scenario. The long-period mild barium giant HD 165141 as well as HD 185510 and 39 Ceti, which have relatively short periods and normal abundance giants, appear to be consistent with this scenario. The last binary, HD 160538, a system with apparently near solar abundances, a white dwarf companion, and orbital characteristics similar to many barium stars, demonstrates that the existence of a white-dwarf companion is insufficient to produce a barium star. The paucity of systems with confirmed white-dwarf companions makes abundance analyses of HD 160538 and HD 165141 of great value in examining the role of metallicity in barium star formation.

  14. Chromospherically active stars. 11: Giant with compact hot companions and the barium star scenario

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fekel, Francis C.; Henry, Gregory W.; Busby, Michael R.; Eitter, Joseph J.

    1993-01-01

    We have determined spectroscopic orbits for three chromsopherically active giants that have hot compact companions. They are HD 160538 (KO III + wd, P = 904 days), HD 165141 (G8 III + wd, P approximately 5200 days), and HD 185510 (KO III + sdB, P = 20.6619 days). By fitting an IUE spectrum with theoretical models, we find the white dwarf companion of HD 165141 has a temperature of about 35,000 K. Spectral types and rotational velocities have been determined for the three giants and distances have been estimated. These three systems and 39 Ceti are compared with the barium star mass-transfer scenario. The long-period mild barium giant HD 165141 as well as HD 185510 and 39 Ceti, which have relatively short periods and normal abundance giants, appear to be consistent with this scenario. The last binary, HD 160538, a system with apparently near solar abundances, a white dwarf companion, and orbital characteristics similar to many barium stars, demonstrates that the existence of a white dwarf companion is insufficient to produce a barium star. The paucity of systems with confirmed white dwarf companions makes abundance analyses of HD 160538 and HD 165141 of great value in examining the role of metallicity in barium star formation.

  15. A Unique Gas-Rich Debris Disk: Herschel Imaging and Spectroscopy of 49 Ceti

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberge, Aki

    2012-01-01

    Gas-poor debris disks represent a fundamentally different class of circumstellar disk than gas-rich protoplanetary disks. Their gas probably originates from the same source as the dust, i.e. planetesimal destruction, but the low gas densities make it difficult to detect. So far, Herschel has detected far-IR gas emission from only one or two debris disks, Beta Pictoris being one of them. Here we present Herschel GASPS observations of a well-known debris disk system, 49 Ceti. The dust disk is spatially resolved in thermal emission at 70 _m. Most interestingly, weak far-IR gas emission is detected. Preliminary modeling suggests that reconciling the sub-mm CO emission seen from this system with the far-IR gas detection and upper limits requires a low gas-to-dust ratio and possibly an unusual gas composition.

  16. UV-TO-FIR ANALYSIS OF SPITZER/IRAC SOURCES IN THE EXTENDED GROTH STRIP. II. PHOTOMETRIC REDSHIFTS, STELLAR MASSES, AND STAR FORMATION RATES

    SciTech Connect

    Barro, G.; Perez-Gonzalez, P. G.; Gallego, J.; Villar, V.; Zamorano, J.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Kajisawa, M.; Yamada, T.; Miyazaki, S.

    2011-04-01

    Based on the ultraviolet to far-infrared photometry already compiled and presented in a companion paper (Paper I), we present a detailed spectral energy distribution (SED) analysis of nearly 80,000 IRAC 3.6 + 4.5 {mu}m selected galaxies in the Extended Groth Strip. We estimate photometric redshifts, stellar masses, and star formation rates (SFRs) separately for each galaxy in this large sample. The catalog includes 76,936 sources with [3.6] {<=} 23.75 (85% completeness level of the IRAC survey) over 0.48 deg{sup 2}. The typical photometric redshift accuracy is {Delta}z/(1 + z) = 0.034, with a catastrophic outlier fraction of just 2%. We quantify the systematics introduced by the use of different stellar population synthesis libraries and initial mass functions in the calculation of stellar masses. We find systematic offsets ranging from 0.1 to 0.4 dex, with a typical scatter of 0.3 dex. We also provide UV- and IR-based SFRs for all sample galaxies, based on several sets of dust emission templates and SFR indicators. We evaluate the systematic differences and goodness of the different SFR estimations using the deep FIDEL 70 {mu}m data available in the Extended Groth Strip. Typical random uncertainties of the IR-bases SFRs are a factor of two, with non-negligible systematic effects at z {approx}> 1.5 observed when only MIPS 24 {mu}m data are available. All data products (SEDs, postage stamps from imaging data, and different estimations of the photometric redshifts, stellar masses, and SFRs of each galaxy) described in this and the companion paper are publicly available, and they can be accessed through our the Web interface utility Rainbow-navigator.

  17. EFFECTS OF CLOUDS AND TROPOSPHERIC AIR QUALITY ON SURFACE UV AT 6 UV RESEARCH SITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This document provides a summary of results of the EPA STAR funded proposal “Effects of Clouds and Tropospheric Pollution on Surface UV at six EPA UV Research Sites”. This project worked to provide high quality UV spectral solar irradiance, erythema (UV Index), oz...

  18. Three Red Variable Stars in SDSS Stripe 82

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olinger, Kyle; Lutz, Julie H.

    2016-06-01

    We examined light curves of stars with g-r values greater than 0.6 in the LSST project's re-reduction of the SDSS Stripe 82 photometric data. A few stars have interesting light curves in which we chose for spectroscopic follow-up with DIS on the Apache Point 3.5-m telescope. In this poster we will report our findings on three of the most interesting red variable stars. One of the stars (GI Cet) has a period of 219.86 days, as determined from the Stripe 82 light curve. Spectra of GI Ceti taken at 3 epochs will be discussed. A second variable, TY Aqr, does not have a period. We will present the light curve and spectra taken in 2013 and 2014. The third variable is very red and a-periodic. The spectrum obtained in 2013 is that of a carbon star.

  19. An observational study of dust nucleation in Mira (o Ceti). I. Variable features of AlO and other Al-bearing species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamiński, T.; Wong, K. T.; Schmidt, M. R.; Müller, H. S. P.; Gottlieb, C. A.; Cherchneff, I.; Menten, K. M.; Keller, D.; Brünken, S.; Winters, J. M.; Patel, N. A.

    2016-07-01

    Context. Dust is efficiently produced by cool giant stars, but the condensation of inorganic dust is poorly understood. Observations of key aluminum bearing molecules around evolved stars has enabled us to investigate the nucleation of alumina (Al2O3) dust in the gas. Aims: We aim to identify and characterize aluminum bearing species in the circumstellar gas of Mira (o Ceti) in order to elucidate their role in the production of Al2O3 dust. Methods: We used multiepoch spectral line observations at (sub-)millimeter, far-infrared, and optical wavelengths including: maps with ALMA that probe the gas distribution in the immediate vicinity of the star at ~30 mas; observations with ALMA, APEX, and Herschel in 2013-2015 for studying cycle and inter-cycle variability of the rotational lines of Al-bearing molecules; optical records as far back as 1965 to examine variations in electronic transitions over time spans of days to decades; and velocity measurements and excitation analysis of the spectral features that constrain the physical parameters of the gas. Results: Three diatomic molecules AlO, AlOH, and AlH, and atomic Al i are the main observable aluminum species in Mira, although a significant fraction of aluminum might reside in other species that have not yet been identified. Strong irregular variability in the (sub-)millimeter and optical features of AlO (possibly the direct precursor of Al2O3) indicates substantial changes in the excitation conditions, or varying abundance that is likely related to shocks in the star. The inhomogeneous distribution of AlO might influence the spatial and temporal characteristics of dust production. Conclusions: We are unable to quantitatively trace aluminum depletion from the gas, but the rich observational material constrains time-dependent chemical networks. Future improvements should include spectroscopic characterization of higher aluminum oxides, coordinated observations of dust and gas species at different variability phases

  20. UV Observations of NGC 205

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcots, Eric M.; Hodge, Paul W.; Eskridge, Paul B.; Boehm-Vitense, Erika; Bertola, Francesco

    1989-01-01

    Low resolution IUE observations of the dwarf elliptical galaxy NGC 205 show that the UV spectral energy distribution (SED) of the galaxy is relatively flat. Spectra centered on the nucleus and on a region north of the nucleus show evidence of recent bursts of star formation which contribute strongly to the UV spectral energy distribution. The UV spectra was fit with a composite spectrum based on a Miller-Scalo initial mass function, an underlying older population (modelled using the UV spectrum of 47 Tuc), and an extinction based on a SMC-like extinction cure. This fit implies that the total mass of young stars (with M equal to or greater than 1 solar mass) in the galaxy is approx. 7x10(5) solar mass, which can be compared to the total mass of globular cluster like stars in the galaxy of approx. 8x10(7) solar mass.

  1. Detection of Variable Gaseous Absorption Features in the Debris Disks Around Young A-type Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montgomery, Sharon L.; Welsh, Barry Y.

    2012-10-01

    We present medium resolution (R = 60,000) absorption measurements of the interstellar Ca II K line observed towards five nearby A-type stars (49 Ceti, 5 Vul, ι Cyg, 2 And, and HD 223884) suspected of possessing circumstellar gas debris disks. The stars were observed on a nightly basis during a six night observing run on the 2.1-meter Otto Struve telescope at the McDonald Observatory, Texas. We have detected nightly changes in the absorption strength of the Ca II K line observed near the stellar radial velocity in three of the stars (49 Ceti, i Cyg and HD 223884). Such changes in absorption suggest the presence of a circumstellar (atomic) gas disk around these stars. In addition to the absorption changes in the main Ca II K line profile, we have also observed weak transient absorption features that randomly appear at redshifted velocities in the spectra of 49 Ceti, 5 Vul, and 2 And. These absorption features are most probably associated with the presence of falling evaporated bodies (exo-comets) that liberate evaporating gas on their approach to the central star. This now brings the total number of systems in which exocomet activity has been observed at Ca II or Na I wavelengths on a nightly basis to seven (β Pic, HR 10, HD 85905, β Car, 49 Ceti, 5 Vul, and 2 And), with 2 And exhibiting weaker and less frequent changes. All of the disk systems presently known to exhibit either type of short-term variability in Ca II K line absorption are rapidly rotating A-type stars (V sin i > 120 km s-1). Most exhibit mid-IR excesses, and many of them are very young (< 20 Myr), thus supporting the argument that many of them are transitional objects between Herbig Ae and "Vega-like" A-type stars with more tenuous circumstellar disks. No mid-IR excess (due to the presence of a dust disk) has yet been detected around either 2 And or HD 223884, both of which have been classified as λ Boötis-type stars. This may indicate that the observed changes in gas absorption for these two

  2. Exploring high temperature magnetic order in CeTi1-xScxGe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sereni, J. G.; Pedrazzini, P.; Gómez Berisso, M.; Chacoma, A.; Encina, S.; Gruner, T.; Caroca-Canales, N.; Geibel, C.

    2015-03-01

    We studied the magnetic, transport, and thermodynamic properties of the alloy CeTi1-xScxGe in order to shed some light into the origin of the exceptionally large antiferromagnetic (AFM) ordering temperature TN = 47 K in pure CeScGe. We observed a complex magnetic phase diagram, which present an interesting dichotomy: Despite strong changes in the nature of the ordered state, from ferromagnetic (FM) for x <= 0.55 to AFM for x > 0.55, the ordering temperature increases smoothly and continuously from TC = 7 K at x = 0.25 to TN = 47 K at x = 1. Within the AFM regime we observe a metamagnetic transition at a critical field increasing from H = 0 at x ≈ 0.55 to μ0 * H ≈ 6 Tesla at x = 1. Furthermore a second transition appears at TL <= TN for x >= 0.65. In contrast to observations in CeRh2Si2 or CeRh3B2, we found no evidence for a strong hybridization of the 4f electrons at large Sc contents. Therefore the exceptionally large TN of CeScGe could be attributed to the unusually strong RKKY interaction in this type of compounds.

  3. Identification of new fluorescence processes in the UV spectra of cool stars from new energy levels of Fe II and Cr II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johansson, Sveneric; Carpenter, Kenneth G.

    1988-01-01

    Two fluorescence processes operating in atmospheres of cool stars, symbiotic stars, and the Sun are presented. Two emission lines, at 1347.03 and 1360.17 A, are identified as fluorescence lines of Cr II and Fe II. The lines are due to transitions from highly excited levels, which are populated radiatively by the hydrogen Lyman alpha line due to accidental wavelength coincidences. Three energy levels, one in Cr II and two in Fe II, are reported.

  4. Modelling UV sky for future UV missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sreejith, A. G.; Safanova, M.; Mohan, R.; Murthy, Jayant

    Software simulators are now widely used in all areas of science, especially in application to astronomical missions: from instrument design to mission planning, and to data interpretation. We present a simulator to model the diffuse ultraviolet sky, where the different contributors are separately calculated and added together to produce a sky image of the size specified by the instrument requirements. Each of the contributors to the background, instrumental dark current, airglow, zodiacal light and diffuse galactic light, is dependent on various factors. Airglow is dependent on the time of day, zodiacal light on the time of year, angle from the Sun and from the ecliptic, and diffuse UV emission depends on the look direction. To provide a full description of any line of sight, we have also added stars. The diffuse UV background light can dominate in many areas of the sky and severely impact space telescopes viewing directions due to over brightness. The simulator, available as a downloadable package and as a simple web-based tool, can be applied to separate missions and instruments. For demonstration, we present the example used for two UV missions: the UVIT instrument on the Indian ASTROSAT mission to be launched in the next year and a prospective wide-field mission to search for transients in the UV.

  5. Local Interstellar Medium Properties and Deuterium Abundances for the Lines of Sight Toward HR 1099, 31 Comae, beta Ceti, and beta Cassiopeiae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piskunov, Nikolai; Wood, Brian E.; Linsky, Jeffrey L.; Dempsey, Robert C.; Ayres, Thomas R.

    1997-01-01

    We analyze Goddard High-Resolution Spectrograph data to infer the properties of local interstellar gas and the Deuterium/Hydrogen (D/H) ratio for lines of sight toward four nearby late-type stars-HR 1099, 31 Comae, beta Ceti, and beta Cassiopeiae. The data consist of spectra of the hydrogen and deuterium Lyman-(alpha) lines, and echelle spectra of the Mg IIh and k lines toward all stars except beta Cas. Spectra of the RS CVn-type spectroscopic binary system HR 1099 were obtained near opposite quadratures to determine the intrinsic stellar emission line profile and the interstellar absorption separately. Multiple-velocity components were found toward HR 1099 and beta Cet. The spectra of 31 Com and beta Cet are particularly interesting because they sample lines of sight toward the north and south Galactic poles, respectively, for which H I and D I column densities were not previously available. The north Galactic pole appears to be a region of low hydrogen density like the 'interstellar tunnel' toward epsilon CMa. The temperature and turbulent velocities of the Local InterStellar Medium (LISM) that we measure for the lines of sight toward HR 1099, 31 Com, beta Cet, and beta Cas are similar to previously measured values (T approx.7000 K and xi = 1.0-1.6 km/s). The deuterium/hydrogen ratios found for these lines of sight are also consistent with previous measurements of other short lines of sight, which suggest D/H approx. 1.6 x 10(sup -5). In contrast, the Mg abundance measured for the beta Cet line of sight (implying a logarithmic depletion of D(Mg) = +0.30 +/- 0.15) is about 5 times larger than the Mg abundance previously observed toward alpha Cen, and about 20 times larger than all other previous measurements for the LISM. These results demonstrate that metal abundances in the LISM vary greatly over distances of only a few parsecs.

  6. The presence of Brucella ceti ST26 in a striped dolphin (Stenella coeruleoalba) with meningoencephalitis from the Mediterranean Sea.

    PubMed

    Alba, Patricia; Terracciano, Giuliana; Franco, Alessia; Lorenzetti, Serena; Cocumelli, Cristiano; Fichi, Gianluca; Eleni, Claudia; Zygmunt, Michel S; Cloeckaert, Axel; Battisti, Antonio

    2013-05-31

    Brucella spp. was isolated from brain, lung and intestinal lymph nodes of a dead adult male striped dolphin (Stenella coeruleoalba) found stranded on the Tyrrhenian coast (Tuscany, Italy) of the Mediterranean Sea in February 2012. Brucella spp. was associated with moderate to severe lesions of meningoencephalitis. A co-infection by Toxoplasma gondii was also demonstrated at brain level by means of molecular and histopathologic methods. The Brucella isolate was further characterized based on a fragment-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) approach, consisting of a set of five specific PCRs, targeting specific chromosomal IS711 locations for marine mammal Brucellae, as described previously. The isolate was thus classified as Brucella ceti I; V fragment-positive (or B. ceti dolphin type), according to previous studies. Multi Locus Sequence Analysis demonstrated that the isolate belongs to Sequence Type 26, while omp2 (omp2a and omp2b genes) sequence analysis further confirmed the isolate belonged to this group of strains. This is the first report of Brucella spp. from marine mammals in the Mediterranean Sea, and represents a further observation that this strain group is associated with hosts of the Family Delphinidae, and particularly with the striped dolphins, also in the Mediterranean area, thus constituting a further biological hazard of concern for this vulnerable subpopulation. PMID:23419820

  7. Herschel PEP/HerMES: the redshift evolution (0 ≤ z ≤ 4) of dust attenuation and of the total (UV+IR) star formation rate density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgarella, D.; Buat, V.; Gruppioni, C.; Cucciati, O.; Heinis, S.; Berta, S.; Béthermin, M.; Bock, J.; Cooray, A.; Dunlop, J. S.; Farrah, D.; Franceschini, A.; Le Floc'h, E.; Lutz, D.; Magnelli, B.; Nordon, R.; Oliver, S. J.; Page, M. J.; Popesso, P.; Pozzi, F.; Riguccini, L.; Vaccari, M.; Viero, M.

    2013-06-01

    Using new homogeneous luminosity functions (LFs) in the far-ultraviolet (FUV) from VVDS and in the far-infrared (FIR) from Herschel/PEP and Herschel/HerMES, we studied the evolution of the dust attenuation with redshift. With this information, we were able to estimate the redshift evolution of the total (FUV + FIR) star formation rate density (SFRDTOT). By integrating SFRDTOT, we followed the mass building and analyzed the redshift evolution of the stellar mass density (SMD). This article aims at providing a complete view of star formation from the local Universe to z ~ 4 and, using assumptions on earlier star formation history, compares this evolution with previously published data in an attempt to draw a homogeneous picture of the global evolution of star formation in galaxies. Our main conclusions are that: 1) the dust attenuation AFUV is found to increase from z = 0 to z ~ 1.2 and then starts to decrease until our last data point at z = 3.6; 2) the estimated SFRD confirms published results to z ~ 2. At z > 2, we observe either a plateau or a small increase up to z ~ 3 and then a likely decrease up to z = 3.6; 3) the peak of AFUV is delayed with respect to the plateau of SFRDTOT and a probable origin might be found in the evolution of the bright ends of the FUV and FIR LFs; 4) using assumptions (exponential rise and linear rise with time) for the evolution of the star formation density from z = 3.6 to zform = 10, we integrated SFRDTOT and obtained a good agreement with the published SMDs. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.

  8. The Pulsating White Dwarf Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontaine, G.; Brassard, P.

    2008-10-01

    We present a summary of what is currently known about the three distinct families of isolated pulsating white dwarfs. These are the GW Vir stars (He/C/O-atmosphere stars with Teff sime 120,000 K), the V777 Her stars (He-atmosphere, Teff sime 25,000 K), and the ZZ Ceti stars (H-atmosphere, Teff sime 12,000 K), all showing multiperiodic luminosity variations caused by low-order and low-degree g-mode instabilities. We also provide, in an Appendix, a very brief overview of the newly found evidence in favor of the existence of a fourth category of oscillating white dwarfs bearing strong similarities with these families of pulsators. We begin our survey with a short historical introduction, followed by a general discussion of pulsating white dwarfs as compact pulsators. We then discuss the class properties of these objects, including an updated census. We next focus on the instability domains for each family of pulsators in the log g - Teff diagram, and present their time-averaged properties in more detail. This is followed by a section on excitation physics, i.e., the causes of the pulsational instabilities, with emphasis on the common properties of the different types of pulsator. We then discuss the time-dependent properties of the pulsating white dwarfs featuring, among other things, a brief "picture tour" across the ZZ Ceti instability strip. We next review the methods used to infer or constrain the angular geometry of a pulsation mode in a white dwarf. These include multicolor photometry and time-resolved spectroscopy, the exploitation of the nonlinear features in the observed light curves, and rotational splitting. We also consider basic adiabatic asteroseismology starting with a discussion of the reaction of the period spectrum to variations of model parameters. We next review the various asteroseismological inferences that have so far been claimed for white dwarfs. We also discuss the potential of exploiting the rates of period change. We finally provide some

  9. Intrinsically variable stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bohm-Vitense, Erika; Querci, Monique

    1987-01-01

    The characteristics of intrinsically variable stars are examined, reviewing the results of observations obtained with the IUE satellite since its launch in 1978. Selected data on both medium-spectral-class pulsating stars (Delta Cep stars, W Vir stars, and related groups) and late-type variables (M, S, and C giants and supergiants) are presented in spectra, graphs, and tables and described in detail. Topics addressed include the calibration of the the period-luminosity relation, Cepheid distance determination, checking stellar evolution theory by the giant companions of Cepheids, Cepheid masses, the importance of the hydrogen convection zone in Cepheids, temperature and abundance estimates for Population II pulsating stars, mass loss in Population II Cepheids, SWP and LWP images of cold giants and supergiants, temporal variations in the UV lines of cold stars, C-rich cold stars, and cold stars with highly ionized emission lines.

  10. Symbiotic stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kafatos, M.; Michalitsianos, A. G.

    1984-01-01

    The physical characteristics of symbiotic star systems are discussed, based on a review of recent observational data. A model of a symbiotic star system is presented which illustrates how a cool red-giant star is embedded in a nebula whose atoms are ionized by the energetic radiation from its hot compact companion. UV outbursts from symbiotic systems are explained by two principal models: an accretion-disk-outburst model which describes how material expelled from the tenuous envelope of the red giant forms an inwardly-spiralling disk around the hot companion, and a thermonuclear-outburst model in which the companion is specifically a white dwarf which superheats the material expelled from the red giant to the point where thermonuclear reactions occur and radiation is emitted. It is suspected that the evolutionary course of binary systems is predetermined by the initial mass and angular momentum of the gas cloud within which binary stars are born. Since red giants and Mira variables are thought to be stars with a mass of one or two solar mass, it is believed that the original cloud from which a symbiotic system is formed can consist of no more than a few solar masses of gas.

  11. The thermal and spatial structure of the solar corona over the cycle and its implication for the coronae of inactive stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Testa, P.; Landi, E.; Saar, S.

    2012-12-01

    We use spectral (SOHO/SUMER and Hinode/EIS) and imaging (Hinode/XRT and SDO/AIA) solar coronal data to systematically measure the thermal structure of different types of solar features (coronal hole, quiet Sun, X-ray bright points, active regions...), and how they vary over the solar cycle. We use a combination of these structures to construct a model for the quiet corona of the inactive G8V star tau Ceti, which is a candidate stellar analog of a solar magnetic minimum. Since tau Ceti is significantly metal-poor relative to the Sun, we reconstruct the solar results with corresponding lower metallicities to generate more appropriate coronal structures.

  12. Statistical error analysis in CCD time-resolved photometry with applications to variable stars and quasars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howell, Steve B.; Warnock, Archibald, III; Mitchell, Kenneth J.

    1988-01-01

    Differential photometric time series obtained from CCD frames are tested for intrinsic variability using a newly developed analysis of variance technique. In general, the objects used for differential photometry will not all be of equal magnitude, so the techniques derived here explicitly correct for differences in the measured variances due to photon statistics. Other random-noise terms are also considered. The technique tests for the presence of intrinsic variability without regard to its random or periodic nature. It is then applied to observations of the variable stars ZZ Ceti and US 943 and the active extragalactic objects OQ 530, US 211, US 844, LB 9743, and OJ 287.

  13. Hydrogen Lines in Mira Stars Through Interferometry and Polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabas, N.; Chiavassa, A.; Millour, F.; Wittkowski, M.

    2015-12-01

    Balmer lines in emission are the most prominent features in Mira stars spectra and have a strong potential as a proxy to study the lower atmosphere's dynamics. In Fabas et al. ([1]), we accumulated spectropolarimetric observations of Balmer lines in emission. As the shock is propagating outwards, linear polarization rate increases and the angle of this polarization evolves. Assuming that linear polarization arises from anisotropic scattering, it has the potential of telling us about the geometric structure of the shock as it propagates and the study of such atmospheric structures can typically be performed with interferometry. In 2012, AMBER data on the Mira star omicron Ceti were collected in which the Brackett γ line is studied. The data show signatures in the interferometric observables around this line. Olivier Chesneau was in the jury evaluating the PhD thesis of N. Fabas and he was seduced by the idea to study these shock waves with interferometry and use polarimetry as a complementary study.

  14. Pulsational mode-typing in line profile variables. I - Four Beta Cephei stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campos, A. J.; Smith, M. A.

    1980-05-01

    The detailed variations of line profiles in the Beta Cephei-type variable stars Gamma Pegasi, Beta Cephei, Delta Ceti and Sigma Scorpii are modeled throughout their pulsation cycles in order to classify the dominant pulsation mode as radial or nonradial. High-dispersion Reticon observations of the variables were obtained for the Si III line at 4567 A, and line profiles broadened by radial or nonradial pulsations, rotation and radial-tangential macroturbulence were calculated based on a model atmosphere. It is found that only a radial pulsation mode can reproduce the radial velocity amplitude, changes in line asymmetry and uniform line width observed in all four stars. Results are in agreement with the color-to-light arguments of Stamford and Watson (1978), and suggest that radial pulsation plays the dominant role in the observed variations in most Beta Cephei stars. Evidence for shocks or moving shells is also found in visual line data for Sigma Scorpii and an ultraviolet line of Beta Cephei, together with evidence of smooth, secular period changes in Beta Cephei and Delta Ceti.

  15. The pulsating central star of the planetary nebula Kohoutek 1-16

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grauer, A. D.; Bond, H. E.

    1984-02-01

    High-speed photometry of the central star of the planetary nebula Kohoutek 1-16 shows it to be a low-amplitude pulsating variable. The dominant period is 28.3 minutes, with a semiamplitude that is usually about 0.01 mag. However, several additional periods sometimes appear in power spectra computed from light curves, and on two occasions a rapid drop into, or emergence from, a state in which no detectable variations were present was observed. Such 'mode switching' is typical of some of the ZZ Ceti-type white dwarf nonradial pulsators, but, at effective temperatures higher than 80,000 K, K1-16 is much too hot to be a ZZ Ceti variable. Spectroscopically and photometrically, the central star of K1-16 closely resembles the previously known hot pulsator PG 1159-035; these two objects represent a new pulsational instability mechanism for extremely hot degenerate or predegenerate stars. It is predicted that the evolutionary contraction of K1-16 will lead to a period decrease so rapid that it should be detectable over an interval of about 2 yr.

  16. Pulsational mode-typing in line profile variables. I - Four Beta Cephei stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campos, A. J.; Smith, M. A.

    1980-01-01

    The detailed variations of line profiles in the Beta Cephei-type variable stars Gamma Pegasi, Beta Cephei, Delta Ceti and Sigma Scorpii are modeled throughout their pulsation cycles in order to classify the dominant pulsation mode as radial or nonradial. High-dispersion Reticon observations of the variables were obtained for the Si III line at 4567 A, and line profiles broadened by radial or nonradial pulsations, rotation and radial-tangential macroturbulence were calculated based on a model atmosphere. It is found that only a radial pulsation mode can reproduce the radial velocity amplitude, changes in line asymmetry and uniform line width observed in all four stars. Results are in agreement with the color-to-light arguments of Stamford and Watson (1978), and suggest that radial pulsation plays the dominant role in the observed variations in most Beta Cephei stars. Evidence for shocks or moving shells is also found in visual line data for Sigma Scorpii and an ultraviolet line of Beta Cephei, together with evidence of smooth, secular period changes in Beta Cephei and Delta Ceti.

  17. High mass stars: starbursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González Delgado, R. M.

    2006-08-01

    Starbursts are the preferred place where massive stars form; the main source of thermal and mechanical heating in the interstellar medium, and the factory where the heavy elements form. Thus, starbursts play an important role in the origin and evolution of galaxies. Starbursts are bright at ultraviolet (UV) wavelengths, and after the pioneering IUE program, high spatial and spectral resolution UV observations of local starburst galaxies, mainly taken with HST and FUSE, have made relevant contributions to the following issues: a) The determination of the initial mass function in violent star forming systems in low and high metallicity environments, and in dense (e.g. in stellar clusters) and diffuse environments. b) The modes of star formation: Starburst clusters are an important mode of star formation. c) The role of starbursts in AGN. d) The interaction between massive stars and the interstellar and intergalactic media. e) The contribution of starbursts to the reionization of the universe. Despite the very significant progress obtained over the past two decades of UV observations of starbursts, there are important problems that still need to be solved. High-spatial resolution UV observations of nearby starbursts are crucial to further progress in understanding the violent star formation processes in galaxies, the interaction between the stellar clusters and the interstellar medium, and the variation of the IMF. Thus, a new UV mission furnished with an intermediate spectral resolution long-slit spectrograph with high spatial resolution and high UV sensitivity is required to further progress in the study of starburst galaxies and their impact on the evolution of galaxies.

  18. Stars and star systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martynov, D. Ia.

    Topics examined include close binary systems, supernovae and their remnants, variable stars, young star groups (e.g., clusters and associations), spherical star clusters, and planetary nebulae. Also considered are the interstellar medium and star formation, systems of galaxies, and current problems in cosmology.

  19. Massive stars: Starbursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González Delgado, Rosa María

    2007-07-01

    Starbursts are the preferred place where massive stars form; the main source of thermal and mechanical heating in the interstellar medium, and the factory where the heavy elements form. Thus, starbursts play an important role in the origin and evolution of galaxies. Starbursts are bright at ultraviolet (UV) wavelengths, and after the pioneering IUE program, high spatial and spectral resolution UV observations of local starburst galaxies, mainly taken with HST and FUSE, have made relevant contributions to the following issues: a) The determination of the initial mass function (IMF) in violent star forming systems in low and high metallicity environments, and in dense (e.g. in stellar clusters) and diffuse environments: A Salpeter IMF with high-mass stars constrains well the UV properties. b) Stellar clusters are an important mode of star formation in starbursts. c) The role of starbursts in AGN: Nuclear starbursts can dominate the UV light in Seyfert 2 galaxies, having bolometric luminosities similar to the estimated bolometric luminosities of the obscured AGN. d) The interaction between massive stars and the interstellar medium: Outflows in cold, warm and coronal phases leave their imprints on the UV interstellar lines. Outflows of a few hundred km s%u22121 are ubiquitous phenomena in starbursts. Despite the very significant progress obtained over the past two decades of UV observations of starbursts, there are important problems that still need to be solved. High-spatial resolution UV observations of nearby starbursts are crucial to further progress in understanding the violent star formation processes in galaxies, the interaction between the stellar clusters and the interstellar medium, and the variation of the IMF. High-spatial resolution spectra are also needed to isolate the light from the center to the disk in UV luminous galaxies found by GALEX. Thus, a new UV mission furnished with an intermediate spectral resolution spectrograph with high spatial

  20. The History of Variable Stars: A Fresh Look

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatch, R. A.

    2012-06-01

    (Abstract only) For historians of astronomy, variable stars are important for a simple reason - stars change. But good evidence suggests this is a very modern idea. Over the millennia, our species has viewed stars as eternal and unchanging, forever fixed in time and space - indeed, the Celestial Dance was a celebration of order, reason, and stability. But everything changed in the period between Copernicus and Newton. According to tradition, two New Stars announced the birth of the New Science. Blazing across the celestial stage, Tycho's Star (1572) and Kepler's Star (1604) appeared dramatically - and just as unexpectedly - disappeared forever. But variable stars were different. Mira Ceti, the oldest, brightest, and most controversial variable star, was important because it appeared and disappeared again and again. Mira was important because it did not go away. The purpose of this essay is to take a fresh look at the history of variable stars. In re-thinking the traditional narrative, I begin with the first sightings of David Fabricius (1596) and his contemporaries - particularly Hevelius (1662) and Boulliau (1667) - to new traditions that unfolded from Newton and Maupertuis to Herschel (1780) and Pigott (1805). The essay concludes with important 19th-century developments, particularly by Argelander (1838), Pickering (1888), and Lockyer (1890). Across three centuries, variable stars prompted astronomers to re-think all the ways that stars were no longer "fixed." New strategies were needed. Astronomers needed to organize, to make continuous observations, to track changing magnitudes, and to explain stellar phases. Importantly - as Mira suggested from the outset - these challenges called for an army of observers with the discipline of Spartans. But recruiting that army required a strategy, a set of theories with shared expectations. Observation and theory worked hand-in-hand. In presenting new historical evidence from neglected printed sources and unpublished

  1. UV SPECTRAL SYNTHESIS OF VEGA

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzpatrick, E. L.

    2010-12-20

    We show that the UV spectrum (1280-3200 A) of the 'superficially normal' A-star Vega, as observed by the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) satellite at a resolution comparable to the star's rotational broadening width, can be fit remarkably well by a single-temperature synthetic spectrum based on LTE atmosphere models and a newly constructed UV line list. If Vega were a normal, equator-on, slow-rotating star, then its spectrum and our analysis would indicate a temperature of T{sub eff} {approx_equal}9550 K, surface gravity of log g {approx_equal}3.7, general surface metallicity of [m/H] {approx_equal}-0.5, and a microturbulence velocity of v{sub turb} {approx_equal}2.0 km s{sup -1}. Given its rapid rotation and nearly pole-on orientation, however, these parameters must be regarded as representing averages across the observed hemisphere. Modeling the complex UV line spectrum has allowed us to determine the specific surface abundances for 17 different chemical elements, including CNO, the light metals, and the iron group elements. The resultant abundance pattern agrees in general with previous results, although there is considerable scatter in the literature. Despite its peculiarities, Vega has turned out to provide a powerful test of the extent of our abilities to model the atmospheric properties of the early A-stars, particularly the detailed UV line spectrum. The value of the measurements from this pilot study will increase as this analysis is extended to more objects in the rich high-dispersion IUE data archive, including both normal and peculiar objects.

  2. Massive Stars: Stellar Populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianchi, Luciana

    2007-07-01

    Massive stars dominate the chemical and dynamical evolution of the ISM, and ultimately of their parent galaxy and the universe, because of their fast evolution and intense supersonic winds. Four decades ago, the first rocket UV spectra of massive stars revealed the importance of mass loss and began to change our understanding of their evolution. Recently, advances in stellar modeling, and the observation of crucial ions in the far-UV spectral range, led to the resolution of long-standing issues in our understanding of massive star atmospheres. A revised (downwards) calibration of Teff for early spectral types is emerging as a result. Meanwhile, HST imaging, and large ground-based telescopes with multislit spectroscopic capabilities, had opened the possibility of resolved studies of stellar populations in Local Group galaxies, which sample a variety of metallicity and environment conditions. More recently, GALEX is providing a global, deep view of the young stellar populations for hundreds of nearby galaxies, revealing their recent star-formation history and modalities. The wide-field coverage and sensitivity of the GALEX UV imaging, easily detecting extremely low levels of star formation, is again changing some of our views on massive star formation in galaxies.

  3. IUE observations of central stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heap, S. R.

    1983-01-01

    IUE satellite data on sixty galactic planetary nebulae (PN) and three PNs in the Magellanic clouds are examined to establish a mass distribution among the central star types. An evolutionary lineage was determined for the observed central stars, based on UV magnitudes, demonstrating that central stars in optically thin nebulae have a narrow distribution around 0.58 solar mass, whereas stars in optically thick nebulae exhibited the highest masses of the sample, implying that highest mass stars in PN are the most difficult to detect. No definitive correlation was found between the mass of an object and its spectral type.

  4. The ultraviolet reddening of Be stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schild, R.

    1983-04-01

    The UV extinction of several bright Be stars is examined in light of Schild's (1978) demonstration of their intrinsic (B-V) color excess. Stars possessing this excess are found not to have the 0.22-micron bump associated with Bless and Savage's (1972) interstellar reddening law. The bright Be stars studied are HD 30076, HD 58011, HD 63462, and HD 105435.

  5. Winds of Binary AGB Stars as Observed by Herschel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, A.; Jorissen, A.; Kerschbaum, F.; Ottensamer, R.; Mečina, M.; Paladini, C.; Cox, N. L. J.; Nowotny, W.; Aringer, B.; Pourbaix, D.; Mohamed, S.; Siopis, C.; Groenewegen, M. A. T.

    2015-08-01

    We present Herschel/PACS observations of the large-scale environments of binary AGB stars as part of the Mass-loss of Evolved StarS (MESS) sample. From the literature we found 18 of the objects to be members of physically bound multiple systems. Several show a large-scale far-IR emission which differs significantly from spherical symmetry. A probable cause is the gravitational force of the companion on the stellar AGB wind and the mass-losing star itself. A spiral pattern is thereby imprinted in the dusty stellar wind. The most remarkable structures are found around o Ceti, W Aquilæ, R Aquarii, and π1 Gruis. The environments of o Cet and W Aql show a spiral pattern while the symbiotic nature of R Aqr is revealed as two opposing arms which reflect a nova outburst. The emission around π1 Gru is dominated by two structures, a disk and an arc, which are presumably not caused by the same companion. We found evidence that π1 Gru is a hierarchical triple system in which a close companion attracts the AGB wind onto the orbital plane and the outer companion forms a spiral arm. These far-IR observations underline the role of a companion as a major external influence in creating asymmetric winds in the AGB phase, even before the star becomes a planetary nebula (PN).

  6. Observing the First Stars in Luminous, Red Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heap, Sally; Lindler, Don

    2010-01-01

    Modern cosmological simulations predict that the first stars are to be found today in luminous, red galaxies. Although observing such stars individually against a background of younger, metal-rich stars is impossible, the first stars should make their presence known by their strong, line-free ultraviolet flux. We have found evidence for a UV-bright stellar population in Sloan spectra of LRG's at z=0.4-0.5. We present arguments for interpreting this UV-bright stellar population as the oldest stars, rather than other types of stellar populations (e.g. young stars or blue straggler stars in the dominant, metal-rich stellar population

  7. Water in star-forming regions with Herschel (WISH). VI. Constraints on UV and X-ray irradiation from a survey of hydrides in low- to high-mass young stellar objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benz, A. O.; Bruderer, S.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Melchior, M.; Wampfler, S. F.; van der Tak, F.; Goicoechea, J. R.; Indriolo, N.; Kristensen, L. E.; Lis, D. C.; Mottram, J. C.; Bergin, E. A.; Caselli, P.; Herpin, F.; Hogerheijde, M. R.; Johnstone, D.; Liseau, R.; Nisini, B.; Tafalla, M.; Visser, R.; Wyrowski, F.

    2016-05-01

    Context. Hydrides are simple compounds containing one or a few hydrogen atoms bonded to a heavier atom. They are fundamental precursor molecules in cosmic chemistry and many hydride ions have become observable in high quality for the first time thanks to the Herschel Space Observatory. Ionized hydrides such as CH+ and OH+ (and also HCO+), which affect the chemistry of molecules such as water, provide complementary information on irradiation by far-UV (FUV) or X-rays and gas temperature. Aims: We explore hydrides of the most abundant heavier elements in an observational survey covering young stellar objects (YSOs) with different mass and evolutionary state. The focus is on hydrides associated with the dense protostellar envelope and outflows, contrary to previous work that focused on hydrides in diffuse foreground clouds. Methods: Twelve YSOs were observed with HIFI on Herschel in six spectral settings providing fully velocity-resolved line profiles as part of the Water in star-forming regions with Herschel (WISH) program. The YSOs include objects of low (Class 0 and I), intermediate, and high mass, with luminosities ranging from 4 L⊙ to 2 × 105 L⊙. Results: The targeted lines of CH+, OH+, H2O+, C+, and CH are detected mostly in blue-shifted absorption. H3O+ and SH+ are detected in emission and only toward some high-mass objects. The observed line parameters and correlations suggest two different origins related to gas entrained by the outflows and to the circumstellar envelope. The derived column densities correlate with bolometric luminosity and envelope mass for all molecules, best for CH, CH+, and HCO+. The column density ratios of CH+/OH+ are estimated from chemical slab models, assuming that the H2 density is given by the specific density model of each object at the beam radius. For the low-mass YSOs the observed ratio can be reproduced for an FUV flux of 2-400 times the interstellar radiation field (ISRF) at the location of the molecules. In two high

  8. HR 4453 - An anomalously bright UV source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polidan, R. S.; Oegerle, W. R.; Margon, B.

    1980-01-01

    Crawford et al. (1979) reported that HR 4453 has an anomalously large UV flux in the 1350-1600 A band. This paper reports results of the UV spectrophotometry of HR 4453 obtained with the Copernicus satellite. Portions of the spectrum from 1120 to 2660 A were scanned, but no stellar signal was detected in any wavelength interval. This result is consistent with both components of the binary being normal A2A stars. UV variability or a source other than HR 4453 must be invoked to explain the observations of Crawford et al.

  9. A Marvelous Star in M33

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polomski, Elisha; Gehrz, R. D.; McQuinn, K.; Paffel, F.; Woodward, C. E.

    2012-05-01

    The end stages of stellar evolution release heavy element enriched dust into the interstellar medium where it is eventually incorporated into star formation regions and later generations of stars. As low mass stars go through this process they bloat in size, pulsate, and expel dust and gas before ultimately transforming into planetary nebulae (PNe). A classic example of this stage of evolution is the well studied class of pulsating stars, the Mira variables. Prior to expelling a PNe, these objects go through a short (tens of thousands of years) stage of evolution where they undergo episodic mass loss and become enshrouded in dust. We report the discovery of an unusual Mira star within the M33 galaxy; IRAC 0134+3029. The source is heavily obscured in the visible, indicating large amounts of enshrouding dust. In addition, Spitzer Space Telescope spectroscopy and imaging show strong thermal emission as well as absorption features from silicates. Examination of the properties of IRAC 0134 suggests that it is the extragalactic analog of the well known "extreme" Mira OH26.5+0.6. We compare spectra and photometry of IRAC 0134 to observations of OH26.5+.6 as well as to the prototype of the Mira class, Omicron Ceti. We also discuss some contradictory archival observations of these objects and suggest possible explanations. This work is based upon observations made with the Spitzer Space Telescope, which is operated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology under NASA contract 1407. The authors were supported in part through contracts 1256406 and 1215746 issued by JPL/Caltech to the University of Minnesota.

  10. Resolving the extended atmosphere and the inner wind of Mira (o Ceti) with long ALMA baselines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, K. T.; Kamiński, T.; Menten, K. M.; Wyrowski, F.

    2016-05-01

    Context. High angular resolution (sub)millimetre observations of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars, now possible with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA), allow direct imaging of these objects' photospheres. The physical properties of the molecular material around these regions, which until now has only been studied by imaging of maser emission and spatially unresolved absorption spectroscopy, can be probed with radiative transfer modelling and compared to hydrodynamical model predictions. The prototypical Mira variable, o Cet (Mira), was observed as a Science Verification target in the 2014 ALMA Long Baseline Campaign, offering the first opportunity to study these physical conditions in detail. Aims: With the longest baseline of 15 km, ALMA produces clearly resolved images of the continuum and molecular line emission/absorption at an angular resolution of ~30 mas at 220 GHz. Models are constructed for Mira's extended atmosphere to investigate the physics and molecular abundances therein. Methods: We imaged the data of 28SiO ν= 0, 2J = 5-4 and H2O v2 = 1JKa,Kc = 55,0-64,3 transitions and extracted spectra from various lines of sight towards Mira's extended atmosphere. In the course of imaging the emission/absorption, we encountered ambiguities in the resulting images and spectra that appear to be related to the performance of the CLEAN algorithm when applied to a combination of extended emission, and compact emission and absorption. We addressed these issues by a series of tests and simulations. We derived the gas density, kinetic temperature, molecular abundance, and outflow/infall velocities in Mira's extended atmosphere by modelling the SiO and H2O lines. Results: We resolve Mira's millimetre continuum emission and our data are consistent with a radio photosphere with a brightness temperature of 2611 ± 51 K. In agreement with recent results obtained with the Very Large Array, we do not confirm the existence of a compact region (<5 mas) of

  11. Wf/pc Cycle 2 Calib: Single Chip UV Calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacKenty, John

    1991-07-01

    THIS PROGRAM CALIBRATES THE QE OF THE WFC AND PC IN THE ULTRAVIOLET (F194W, F230W, AND F284W). This calibration is done using exposures of a UV flux standard star. This program is intended for use only following a UV decontamination.

  12. Wf/pc Cycle 1 Calib: 4-CHIP UV Calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacKenty, John

    1990-12-01

    THIS PROGRAM CALIBRATES THE QE OF THE WFC AND PC IN THE ULTRAVIOLET (F194W, F230W, AND F284W). This calibration is done for each CCD detector using exposures of a UV flux standard star. This program is intended for use only during a UV campaign.

  13. Ultraviolet (UV) Stellar Astronomy - Skylab Experiment S019

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    This 1970 photograph shows Skylab's Ultraviolet (UV) Stellar Astronomy experiment, a scientific airlock-based facility/experiment that would study UV spectra of early-type stars and galaxies. The Marshall Space Flight Center had program management responsibility for the development of Skylab hardware and experiments.

  14. EVOLUTION OF THE SOLAR ACTIVITY OVER TIME AND EFFECTS ON PLANETARY ATMOSPHERES. II. {kappa}{sup 1} Ceti, AN ANALOG OF THE SUN WHEN LIFE AROSE ON EARTH

    SciTech Connect

    Ribas, I.; Garces, A.; Porto de Mello, G. F.; Ferreira, L. D.; Hebrard, E.; Selsis, F.; Catalan, S.; Do Nascimento, J. D.; De Medeiros, J. R. E-mail: garces@ice.csic.e E-mail: leticia@astro.ufrj.b E-mail: eric.hebrard@obs.u-bordeaux1.f E-mail: dias@dfte.ufrn.b

    2010-05-01

    The early evolution of Earth's atmosphere and the origin of life took place at a time when physical conditions at the Earth were radically different from its present state. The radiative input from the Sun was much enhanced in the high-energy spectral domain, and in order to model early planetary atmospheres in detail, a knowledge of the solar radiative input is needed. We present an investigation of the atmospheric parameters, state of evolution, and high-energy fluxes of the nearby star {kappa}{sup 1} Cet, previously thought to have properties resembling those of the early Sun. Atmospheric parameters were derived from the excitation/ionization equilibrium of Fe I and Fe II, profile fitting of H{alpha}, and the spectral energy distribution. The UV irradiance was derived from Far-Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer and Hubble Space Telescope data, and the absolute chromospheric flux from the H{alpha} line core. From careful spectral analysis and the comparison of different methods, we propose for {kappa}{sup 1} Cet the following atmospheric parameters: T{sub eff} = 5665 {+-} 30 K (H{alpha} profile and energy distribution), log g = 4.49 {+-} 0.05 dex (evolutionary and spectroscopic), and [Fe/H] = +0.10 {+-} 0.05 (Fe II lines). The UV radiative properties of {kappa}{sup 1} Cet indicate that its flux is some 35% lower than the current Sun's between 210 and 300 nm, it matches the Sun's at 170 nm, and increases to at least 2-7 times higher than the Sun's between 110 and 140 nm. The use of several indicators ascribes an age to {kappa}{sup 1} Cet in the interval {approx}0.4-0.8 Gyr and the analysis of the theoretical Hertzsprung-Russell diagram (H-R) suggests a mass {approx}1.04 M{sub sun}. This star is thus a very close analog of the Sun when life arose on Earth and Mars is thought to have lost its surface bodies of liquid water. Photochemical models indicate that the enhanced UV emission leads to a significant increase in photodissociation rates compared with those

  15. MLVA-16 typing of 295 marine mammal Brucella isolates from different animal and geographic origins identifies 7 major groups within Brucella ceti and Brucella pinnipedialis

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Since 1994, Brucella strains have been isolated from a wide range of marine mammals. They are currently recognized as two new Brucella species, B. pinnipedialis for the pinniped isolates and B. ceti for the cetacean isolates in agreement with host preference and specific phenotypic and molecular markers. In order to investigate the genetic relationships within the marine mammal Brucella isolates and with reference to terrestrial mammal Brucella isolates, we applied in this study the Multiple Loci VNTR (Variable Number of Tandem Repeats) Analysis (MLVA) approach. A previously published assay comprising 16 loci (MLVA-16) that has been shown to be highly relevant and efficient for typing and clustering Brucella strains from animal and human origin was used. Results 294 marine mammal Brucella strains collected in European waters from 173 animals and a human isolate from New Zealand presumably from marine origin were investigated by MLVA-16. Marine mammal Brucella isolates were shown to be different from the recognized terrestrial mammal Brucella species and biovars and corresponded to 3 major related groups, one specific of the B. ceti strains, one of the B. pinnipedialis strains and the last composed of the human isolate. In the B. ceti group, 3 subclusters were identified, distinguishing a cluster of dolphin, minke whale and porpoise isolates and two clusters mostly composed of dolphin isolates. These results were in accordance with published analyses using other phenotypic or molecular approaches, or different panels of VNTR loci. The B. pinnipedialis group could be similarly subdivided in 3 subclusters, one composed exclusively of isolates from hooded seals (Cystophora cristata) and the two others comprising other seal species isolates. Conclusion The clustering analysis of a large collection of marine mammal Brucella isolates from European waters significantly strengthens the current view of the population structure of these two species, and their

  16. Star Light, Star Bright.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iadevaia, David G.

    1984-01-01

    Presents a technique for obtaining a rough measure of the brightness among different stars. Materials needed include a standard 35-mm camera, a plastic ruler, and a photo enlarger. Although a telescope can be used, it is not essential. (JN)

  17. Radiative and Kinetic Feedback by Low-Mass Primordial Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whalen, Daniel; Hueckstaedt, Robert M.; McConkie, Thomas O.

    2010-03-01

    Ionizing UV radiation and supernova (SN) flows amidst clustered minihalos at high redshift regulated the rise of the first stellar populations in the universe. Previous studies have addressed the effects of very massive primordial stars on the collapse of nearby halos into new stars, but the absence of the odd-even nucleosynthetic signature of pair-instability SNe in ancient metal-poor stars suggests that Population III stars may have been less than 100 M sun. We extend our earlier survey of local UV feedback on star formation to 25-80 M sun stars and include kinetic feedback by SNe for 25-40 M sun stars. We find radiative feedback to be relatively uniform over this mass range, primarily because the larger fluxes of more massive stars are offset by their shorter lifetimes. Our models demonstrate that prior to the rise of global UV backgrounds, Lyman-Werner (LW) photons from nearby stars cannot prevent halos from forming new stars. These calculations also reveal that violent dynamical instabilities can erupt in the UV radiation front enveloping a primordial halo, but that they ultimately have no effect on the formation of a star. Finally, our simulations suggest that relic H II regions surrounding partially evaporated halos may expel LW backgrounds at lower redshifts, allowing stars to form that were previously suppressed. We provide fits to radiative and kinetic feedback on star formation for use in both semianalytic models and numerical simulations.

  18. Protosteller Disks Under the Influence of Winds and UV Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yorke, H. W.

    2003-01-01

    Star formation and the creation of protostellar disks generally occur in a crowded environment. Nearby young stars and protostars can influence the disks of their closets neighbors by a combination of outflows and hard radiation. The central stars themselves can have a stellar wind and may produce sufficient UV and X-ray to ultimately destroy their surrounding disks. Here we describe the results of numerical simulations of the influence that an external UV source and a central star's wind can have on its circumstellar disk. The numerical method (axial symmetry assumed) is described elsewhere. We find that protostellar disks will be destroyed on a relatively short time scale ( 10(sup 5)yr) unless they are well shielded from O-stars. Initially isotropic T-Tauri winds do not significantly influence their disks, but instead are focused toward the rotation axis by the disk wind from photoevaporation.

  19. UV water disinfector

    DOEpatents

    Gadgil, A.; Garud, V.

    1998-07-14

    A UV disinfector with a gravity driven feed water delivery system and an air-suspended bare UV lamp are disclosed. The disinfector is hydrodynamically optimized with a laminerizing, perforated baffle wall, beveled treatment chamber, and outlet weir. 7 figs.

  20. UV water disinfector

    DOEpatents

    Gadgil, Ashok; Garud, Vikas

    1998-07-14

    A UV disinfector with a gravity driven feed water delivery system, and an air-suspended bare UV lamp. The disinfector is hydrodynamically optimized with a laminerizing, perforated baffle wall, beveled treatment chamber, and outlet weir.

  1. Strange stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alcock, Charles; Farhi, Edward; Olinto, Angela

    1986-01-01

    Strange matter, a form of quark matter that is postulated to be absolute stable, may be the true ground stage of the hadrons. If this hypothesis is correct, neutron stars may convert to 'strange stars'. The mass-radius relation for strange stars is very different from that of neutron stars; there is no minimum mass, and for mass of 1 solar mass or less, mass is proportional to the cube of the radius. For masses between 1 solar mass and 2 solar masses, the radii of strange stars are about 10 km, as for neutron stars. Strange stars may have an exposed quark surface, which is capable of radiating at rates greatly exceeding the Eddington limit, but has a low emissivity for X-ray photons. The stars may have a thin crust with the same composition as the preneutron drip outer layer of a conventional neutron star crust. Strange stars cool efficiently via neutrino emission.

  2. Stars and Star Myths.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eason, Oliver

    Myths and tales from around the world about constellations and facts about stars in the constellations are presented. Most of the stories are from Greek and Roman mythology; however, a few Chinese, Japanese, Polynesian, Arabian, Jewish, and American Indian tales are also included. Following an introduction, myths are presented for the following 32…

  3. Be Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, G.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    A Be star (pronounced `bee-ee' star) is a non-supergiant B-type star whose spectrum displays or has displayed one or more Balmer lines in emission and Be is the notation for the spectral classification of such a star (see also CLASSIFICATION OF STELLAR SPECTRA). `Classical' Be stars are believed to have acquired the circumstellar (CS) material that produces the Balmer emission through ejection of...

  4. Triggered star formation in the environment of young massive stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gritschneder, Matthias; Naab, T.; Heitsch, F.; Burkert, A.

    Recent observations with the Spitzer Space Telescope show clear evidence that star formation takes place in the surrounding of young massive O-type stars, which are shaping their environment due to their powerful radiation and stellar winds. In this work we investigate the effect of ionising radiation of massive stars on the ambient interstellar medium (ISM): In particular we want to examine whether the UV-radiation of O-type stars can lead to the observed pillar-like structures and can trigger star formation. We developed a new implementation, based on a parallel Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics code (VINE), that allows an efficient treatment of the effect of ionising radiation from massive stars on their turbulent gaseous environment. Here we present first results at very high resolution. We show that ionising radiation can trigger the collapse of an otherwise stable molecular cloud. The arising structures resemble observed structures (e.g. the pillars of creation in the Eagle Nebula (M16) or the Horsehead Nebula B33). Including the effect of gravitation we find small regions that can be identified as formation places of individual stars. We conclude that ionising radiation from massive stars alone can trigger substantial star formation in molecular clouds.

  5. Spectroscopic Observations of Nearby Low Mass Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vican, Laura; Zuckerman, B. M.; Rodriguez, D.

    2014-01-01

    Young low-mass stars are known to be bright in X-ray and UV due to a high level of magnetic activity. By cross-correlating the GALEX Catalog with the WISE and 2MASS Point Source Catalogs, we have identified more than 2,000 stars whose UV excesses suggest ages in the 10-100 Myr range. We used the Shane 3-m telescope at Lick Observatory on Mount Hamilton, California to observe some of these 2,000 stars spectroscopically. We measured the equivalent width of lithium at 6708 A absorption and H-alpha emission lines. Out of a total of 122 stars observed with the Kast grating spectrometer, we find that roughly 10% have strong lithium absorption features. The high percentage of stars with lithium present is further evidence of the importance of UV emission as a youth indicator for low-mass stars. In addition, we used high-resolution spectra obtained with the Hamilton echelle spectrograph to determine radial velocities for several UV-bright stars. These radial velocities will be useful for the calculation of Galactic UVW space velocities for determination of possible moving group membership. This work is supported by NASA Astrophysics Data Analysis Program award NNX12AH37G to RIT and UCLA and Chilean FONDECYT grant 3130520 to Universidad de Chile. This submission presents work for the GALNYSS project and should be linked to abstracts submitted by David Rodriguez, Laura Vican, and Joel Kastner.

  6. Pulsating Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catelan, M.; Smith, H. A.

    2015-03-01

    This book surveys our understanding of stars which change in brightness because they pulsate. Pulsating variable stars are keys to distance scales inside and beyond the Milky Way galaxy. They test our understanding not only of stellar pulsation theory but also of stellar structure and evolution theory. Moreover, pulsating stars are important probes of the formation and evolution of our own and neighboring galaxies. Our understanding of pulsating stars has greatly increased in recent years as large-scale surveys of pulsating stars in the Milky Way and other Local Group galaxies have provided a wealth of new observations and as space-based instruments have studied particular pulsating stars in unprecedented detail.

  7. Ultraviolet properties of the symbiotic stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slovak, M. H.; Lambert, D. L.

    1982-01-01

    A general discussion of the UV spectra of symbiotic stars, including both the emission lines and the continua, is presented, with AG Pegasi considered as an illustrative example. It is noted that the IUE observations of the symbiotics have revealed UV properties which rival the diversity of the optical features. Nevertheless, the UV data have for the first time permitted the hot component to be studied relatively uncontaminated by the giant companion, which dominates the optical regime. The UV observations provide convincing evidence that many of the symbiotics have hot stellar companions embedded in the enshrouding nebula or accretion shell formed from the wind from one or possibly both of the components.

  8. Reinvestigating the Lambda Boo Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Kwang-Ping; Corbally, C. J.; Gray, R. O.; Murphy, S.; Neff, J. E.; Desai, A.; Newsome, I.; Steele, P.

    2014-01-01

    The peculiar nature of Lambda Bootis was first introduced in 1943. Subsequently, Lambda Boo stars have been slowly recognized as a group of A-type Population I dwarfs that show mild to extreme deficiencies of iron-peak elements, although C, N, O, and S can be near solar. MK classification criteria include broad hydrogen lines, a weak metallic-line spectrum compared to MK standards, coupled with a particularly weak Mg II 4481 line. This intriguing stellar class has recently regained the spotlight because of the directly imaged planets around a confirmed Lambda Boo star-HR 8799 and a probable Lambda Boo star-Beta Pictoris. The possible link between Lambda Boo stars and planet-bearing stars motivates us to study Lambda Boo stars systematically. However, Lambda Boo candidates published in the literature have been selected using widely different criteria. The Lambda Boo class has become somewhat of a "grab bag" for any peculiar A-type stars that didn't fit elsewhere. In order to determine the origin of Lambda Boo stars’ low abundances and to better discriminate between theories explaining the Lambda Boo phenomenon, a refined working definition of Lambda Boo stars is needed. We have re-evaluated all published Lambda Boo candidates and their existing spectra. After applying a consistent set of optical/UV classification criteria, we identified over 60 confirmed and over 20 probable Lambda Boo stars among all stars that have been suggested as Lambda Boo candidates. We are obtaining new observations for those probable Lambda Boo stars. We also have explored the possible link between debris disks and Lambda Boo Stars.

  9. Solar UV variability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donnelly, Richard F.

    1989-01-01

    Measurements from the Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet (SBUV) provide solar UV flux in the 160 to 400 nm wavelength range, backed up by independent measurement in the 115 to 305 nm range from the Solar Mesosphere Explorer (SME). The full disc UV flux from spatially resolved measurements of solar activity was modeled, which provides a better understanding of why the UV variations have their observed temporal and wavelength dependencies. Long term, intermediate term, and short term variations are briefly examined.

  10. Intrinsic ultraviolet (912-3200 A) energy distribution of OB stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Longo, Renata; Stalio, Roberto; Polidan, Ronald S.; Rossi, Lucio

    1989-01-01

    Low-dispersion 500-3200-A spectra of 20 OB stars are used to derive three individual extinction curves in the wavelength range 912-1200 A. The dependence of the intrinsic UV fluxes of OB stars on both spectral type and luminosity is demonstrated. UV color indices are proposed. The results confirm the previous finding that O star spectra are not significantly bluer than the spectrum of the B0 main-sequence star Upsilon Ori.

  11. Co-spatial Long-slit UV/Optical Spectra of Ten Galactic Planetary Nebulae with HST/STIS. II. Nebular Models, Central Star Properties, and He+CNO Synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henry, R. B. C.; Balick, B.; Dufour, R. J.; Kwitter, K. B.; Shaw, R. A.; Miller, T. R.; Buell, J. F.; Corradi, R. L. M.

    2015-11-01

    The goal of the present study is twofold. First, we employ new HST/STIS spectra and photoionization modeling techniques to determine the progenitor masses of eight planetary nebulae (IC 2165, IC 3568, NGC 2440, NGC 3242, NGC 5315, NGC 5882, NGC 7662, and PB 6). Second, for the first time we are able to compare each object’s observed nebular abundances of helium, carbon, and nitrogen with abundance predictions of these same elements by a stellar model that is consistent with each object’s progenitor mass. Important results include the following: (1) the mass range of our objects’ central stars matches well with the mass distribution of other central stars of planetary nebulae and white dwarfs; (2) He/H is above solar in all of our objects, in most cases likely due to the predicted effects of first dredge-up; (3) most of our objects show negligible C enrichment, probably because their low masses preclude third dredge-up; (4) C/O versus O/H for our objects appears to be inversely correlated, which is perhaps consistent with the conclusion of theorists that the extent of atmospheric carbon enrichment from first dredge-up is sensitive to a parameter whose value increases as metallicity declines; (5) stellar model predictions of nebular C and N enrichment are consistent with observed abundances for progenitor star masses ≤1.5 M⊙. Finally, we present the first published photoionization models of NGC 5315 and NGC 5882. Based on observations with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Incorporated, under NASA contract NAS5-26555.

  12. Science with a wide-field UV transient explorer

    SciTech Connect

    Sagiv, I.; Gal-Yam, A.; Ofek, E. O.; Waxman, E.; Trakhtenbrot, B.; Topaz, J.; Aharonson, O.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Phinney, E. S.; Nakar, E.; Maoz, D.; Beichman, C.; Murthy, J.; Worden, S. P.

    2014-04-01

    The time-variable electromagnetic sky has been well-explored at a wide range of wavelengths. In contrast, the ultra-violet (UV) variable sky is relatively poorly explored, even though it offers exciting scientific prospects. Here, we review the potential scientific impact of a wide-field UV survey on the study of explosive and other transient events, as well as known classes of variable objects, such as active galactic nuclei and variable stars. We quantify our predictions using a fiducial set of observational parameters which are similar to those envisaged for the proposed ULTRASAT mission. We show that such a mission would be able to revolutionize our knowledge about massive star explosions by measuring the early UV emission from hundreds of events, revealing key physical parameters of the exploding progenitor stars. Such a mission would also detect the UV emission from many tens of tidal-disruption events of stars by supermassive black holes at galactic nuclei and enable a measurement of the rate of such events. The overlap of such a wide-field UV mission with existing and planned gravitational-wave and high-energy neutrino telescopes makes it especially timely.

  13. Massive Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livio, Mario; Villaver, Eva

    2009-11-01

    Participants; Preface Mario Livio and Eva Villaver; 1. High-mass star formation by gravitational collapse of massive cores M. R. Krumholz; 2. Observations of massive star formation N. A. Patel; 3. Massive star formation in the Galactic center D. F. Figer; 4. An X-ray tour of massive star-forming regions with Chandra L. K. Townsley; 5. Massive stars: feedback effects in the local universe M. S. Oey and C. J. Clarke; 6. The initial mass function in clusters B. G. Elmegreen; 7. Massive stars and star clusters in the Antennae galaxies B. C. Whitmore; 8. On the binarity of Eta Carinae T. R. Gull; 9. Parameters and winds of hot massive stars R. P. Kudritzki and M. A. Urbaneja; 10. Unraveling the Galaxy to find the first stars J. Tumlinson; 11. Optically observable zero-age main-sequence O stars N. R. Walborn; 12. Metallicity-dependent Wolf-Raynet winds P. A. Crowther; 13. Eruptive mass loss in very massive stars and Population III stars N. Smith; 14. From progenitor to afterlife R. A. Chevalier; 15. Pair-production supernovae: theory and observation E. Scannapieco; 16. Cosmic infrared background and Population III: an overview A. Kashlinsky.

  14. STAR System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doverspike, James E.

    The STAR System is a developmental guidance approach to be used with elementary school children in the 5th or 6th grades. Two basic purposes underlie STAR: to increase learning potential and to enhance personal growth and development. STAR refers to 4 basic skills: sensory, thinking, adapting, and revising. Major components of the 4 skills are:…

  15. Narrow Absorption Components in Be Star Winds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grady, C. A.

    1985-01-01

    The stars omega Ori (B2 IIIe), 66 Oph (B2 IVe), and 59 Cyg (B1.5 IVe) are discussed. The extent to which the narrow absorption components in these Be stars differs from narrow components in the O stars and gamma Cas is explored. Any models or mechanisms for the formation of narrow absorption features in the UV resonance lines of Be star spectra must account for the presence of multiple narrow absorption features which are variable in number, radial velocity, and strength. Models predicting a high and low density structure to the stellar wind caused by instabilities in a flow driven by radiation pressure or by variable mass loss may be more successful in describing the behavior of winds in early Be stars. These models appear to be capable of producing single absorption components in the velocity range observed for O stars and very early Be stars.

  16. An asteroseismic constraint on the mass of the axion from the period drift of the pulsating DA white dwarf star L19-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Córsico, Alejandro H.; Romero, Alejandra D.; Althaus, Leandro G.; García-Berro, Enrique; Isern, Jordi; Kepler, S. O.; Miller Bertolami, Marcelo M.; Sullivan, Denis J.; Chote, Paul

    2016-07-01

    We employ an asteroseismic model of L19-2, a relatively massive (Mstar ~ 0.75 Msolar) and hot (Teff ~ 12 100 K) pulsating DA (H-rich atmosphere) white dwarf star (DAV or ZZ Ceti variable), and use the observed values of the temporal rates of period change of its dominant pulsation modes (Π ~ 113 s and Π ~ 192 s), to derive a new constraint on the mass of the axion, the hypothetical non-barionic particle considered as a possible component of the dark matter of the Universe. If the asteroseismic model employed is an accurate representation of L19-2, then our results indicate hints of extra cooling in this star, compatible with emission of axions of mass ma cos2β lesssim 25 meV or an axion-electron coupling constant of gae lesssim 7 × 10‑13.

  17. Interstellar Extinction Toward Young Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McJunkin, Matthew; France, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    We present work on a molecular hydrogen (H2) fluorescence model to characterize the ultraviolet (UV) extinction curve along the line of sight towards young stars with circumstellar disks. Stellar UV radiation plays a strong role in heating the disk gas and driving chemical reactions, so it is important to measure the UV extinction curve in order to reconstruct the intrinsic stellar UV flux impacting the disk. To measure the extinction, we compare modeled H2 fluorescence spectra to observed H2 lines. Lyman-alpha radiation from the stars pumps electronic transitions of H2 in the disk, and we model the flux that is re-emitted through the subsequent fluorescent cascade. We then extract the extinction along the line-of-sight over the 1100-1700 Angstrom wavelength region from the difference between the modeled H2 fluorescence and the HST-COS data. The shape of the extinction curve allows us to characterize the dust grain distribution in the intervening material as well as to recover the intrinsic spectral energy distribution of the stars over a wide wavelength range.

  18. The Controversial Nature of the Diffuse UV Emission in Galaxies: Exploring NGC300

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thilker, David

    2014-10-01

    The wealth of data produced over the past decade by sensitive IR and wide-field UV space facilities has ushered a new era for studies of star formation in galaxies, both at the whole-galaxy and sub-galactic (<~kpc) scale. These data underscore the difficulty of using standard methods, including the dust-corrected UV light, to measure star formation within galaxies, owing to the local variations in stellar population and dust properties. The UV should be a direct tracer of young stellar populations and recent star formation, yet UV colors in the 'diffuse' interarm regions of spiral galaxies are unusually red relative to those of spiral arms, even after accounting for dust attenuation. This suggests a complex mix of moderately aged stars and dust, plus perhaps scattered light. We will unveil the origin of those UV colors with new ACS far-UV (FUV) and WFC3 near-UV (NUV) images of the nearby, prototypical spiral NGC300, which will be combined with B,V,I archival images. By exploiting the dust-insensitivity of the HST FUV-NUV color for resolved stars, we will obtain a census of both O and B stars in order to: (1) uncover the nature of the UV-emitting interarm stellar populations, while estimate the true diffuse fraction; (2) constrain the extinction law in both interarm+arm regions; (3) place UV-based SFR indicators on a secure footing for use both at low and high redshift. The angular resolution and UV capabilities of HST are crucial for this project. By directly addressing the use and limitations of UV colors to trace young stellar populations and dust attenuation in galaxies, this project maximizes the return from the large investment of HST time devoted to high-z surveys.

  19. CH Stars and Barium Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bond, H.; Sion, E.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    The classical barium (or `Ba II') stars are RED GIANT STARS whose spectra show strong absorption lines of barium, strontium and certain other heavy elements, as well as strong features due to carbon molecules. Together with the related class of CH stars, the Ba II stars were crucial in establishing the existence of neutron-capture reactions in stellar interiors that are responsible for the synt...

  20. Hot Stars in the Galactic Halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adelman, Saul J.; Upgren, Arthur R.; Adelman, Carol J.

    2011-03-01

    Participants; Preface; Foreword; Acknowledgements; Part I. Introductory Papers: 1. What is the galaxy's halo population?; 2. Theoretical properties of horizontal-branch stars; 3. A review of A-type horizontal-branch stars; Part II. Surveys: 4. A progress report on the Edinburgh-Cape object survey; 5. A 300 square degree survey of young stars at high galactic latitudes; 6. The isolation of a new sample of B stars in the halo; 7. A northern catalog of FHB/A stars; 8. Recent progress on a continuing survey of galactic globular clusters for blue stragglers; 9. UV observations with FAUST and the galactic model; 10. Hot stars at the South Galactic Pole; Part III. Clusters: 11. Population II horizontal branches: a photometric study of globular clusters; 12. The period-shift effect in Oosterhoff type II globular clusters; 13. UV photometry of hot stars in omega centauri; 14. Spectroscopic and UBV observations of blue stars at the NGP; 15. Population I horizontal branches: probing the halo-to-disk transition; Part IV. Stars: 16. Very hot subdwarf O stars; 17. Quantitative spectroscopy of the very hot subluminous O-stars: K646, PG1159-035, and KPD0005+5106; 18. Analyzing the helium-rich hot sdO stars in the Palomar Green Survey; 19. Late type companions of hot sd O stars; 20. Hot stars in globular clusters; 21. Faint blue stars from the Hamburg Schmidt Survey; 22. Stellar winds and the evolution of sdB's to sdO's; 23. Halo stars in the Vilnius photometric system; 24. Horizontal branch stars in the geneva photometric system; 25. Zeeman observations of FHB stars and hot subdwarf stars; 26. What does a FHB star's spectrum look like?; 27. A technique for distinguishing FHB stars from A-type stars; 28. eEemental abundances of halo A and interloper stars; 29. The mass of blue horizontal branch stars in the globular cluster NGC6397; 30. IUE observations of blue HB stars in the globular clusters M3 and NGC6752; 31. Metallicities and kinematics of the local RR lyraes: lukewarm stars

  1. Hot Stars in the Galactic Halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adelman, Saul J.; Upgren, Arthur R.; Adelman, Carol J.

    1994-08-01

    Participants; Preface; Foreword; Acknowledgements; Part I. Introductory Papers: 1. What is the galaxy's halo population?; 2. Theoretical properties of horizontal-branch stars; 3. A review of A-type horizontal-branch stars; Part II. Surveys: 4. A progress report on the Edinburgh-Cape object survey; 5. A 300 square degree survey of young stars at high galactic latitudes; 6. The isolation of a new sample of B stars in the halo; 7. A northern catalog of FHB/A stars; 8. Recent progress on a continuing survey of galactic globular clusters for blue stragglers; 9. UV observations with FAUST and the galactic model; 10. Hot stars at the South Galactic Pole; Part III. Clusters: 11. Population II horizontal branches: a photometric study of globular clusters; 12. The period-shift effect in Oosterhoff type II globular clusters; 13. UV photometry of hot stars in omega centauri; 14. Spectroscopic and UBV observations of blue stars at the NGP; 15. Population I horizontal branches: probing the halo-to-disk transition; Part IV. Stars: 16. Very hot subdwarf O stars; 17. Quantitative spectroscopy of the very hot subluminous O-stars: K646, PG1159-035, and KPD0005+5106; 18. Analyzing the helium-rich hot sdO stars in the Palomar Green Survey; 19. Late type companions of hot sd O stars; 20. Hot stars in globular clusters; 21. Faint blue stars from the Hamburg Schmidt Survey; 22. Stellar winds and the evolution of sdB's to sdO's; 23. Halo stars in the Vilnius photometric system; 24. Horizontal branch stars in the geneva photometric system; 25. Zeeman observations of FHB stars and hot subdwarf stars; 26. What does a FHB star's spectrum look like?; 27. A technique for distinguishing FHB stars from A-type stars; 28. eEemental abundances of halo A and interloper stars; 29. The mass of blue horizontal branch stars in the globular cluster NGC6397; 30. IUE observations of blue HB stars in the globular clusters M3 and NGC6752; 31. Metallicities and kinematics of the local RR lyraes: lukewarm stars

  2. WSO-UV project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sachkov, Mikhail; Shustov, Boris; Gómez de Castro, Ana Ines

    2014-03-01

    During last three decades, astronomers have enjoyed continuous access to the 100-300 nm ultraviolet (UV) spectral range where the resonance transitions of the most abundant atoms and ions (at temperatures between 3000 and 300 000 K) reside. This UV range is not accessible from ground-based facilities. The successful International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) observatory, the Russian ASTRON mission and successor instruments such as the Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) mission or the COS and STIS spectrographs on-board the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) prove the major impact of observations in the UV wavelength range in modern astronomy. Future access to space-based observatories is expected to be very limited. For the next decade, the post-HST era, the World Space Observatory - Ultraviolet (WSO-UV) will be the only 2-m class UV telescope with capabilities similar to the HST. WSO-UV will be equipped with instruments for imaging and spectroscopy and it will be a facility dedicated, full-time, to UV astronomy. In this article, we briefly outline the current status of the WSO-UV mission and the science management plan.

  3. [Erythemogenic UV rays].

    PubMed

    Sigurgeirsson, Bardur; Wulf, Hans Christian

    2011-07-01

    The UV-index is an international standard measurement of the strength of erythemogenic ultraviolet radiation. It is often published in the media and then refers to the highest expected UV radiation for that day. The highest UV-index value measured in Iceland is seven. Although this is similar to the maximum values from southern Scandinavia, the average UV-index is lower in Iceland compared to other Nordic countries. Around solar noon the UV index is roughly equivalent to the Standard Erythema Dose (SED). During a bright summer day in Iceland the number of Standard Erythema doses can go as high as 32, but is on average in June around twenty. The typical Icelander gets red after 4-6 SED and it is obvious that during solar noon it is easy to sunburn in Iceland if you stay outside without sun protection. PMID:21849709

  4. Substantial reservoirs of molecular hydrogen in the debris disks around young stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thi, W. F.; Blake, G. A.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; van Zadelhoff, G. J.; Horn, J. M.; Becklin, E. E.; Mannings, V.; Sargent, A. I.; van Den Ancker, M. E.; Natta, A.

    2001-01-01

    Circumstellar accretion disks transfer matter from molecular clouds to young stars and to the sites of planet formation. The disks observed around pre-main-sequence stars have properties consistent with those expected for the pre-solar nebula from which our own Solar System formed 4.5 Gyr ago. But the 'debris' disks that encircle more than 15% of nearby main-sequence stars appear to have very small amounts of gas, based on observations of the tracer molecule carbon monoxide: these observations have yielded gas/dust ratios much less than 0.1, whereas the interstellar value is about 100 (ref. 9). Here we report observations of the lowest rotational transitions of molecular hydrogen (H2) that reveal large quantities of gas in the debris disks around the stars beta Pictoris, 49 Ceti and HD135344. The gas masses calculated from the data are several hundreds to a thousand times greater than those estimated from the CO observations, and yield gas/dust ratios of the same order as the interstellar value.

  5. Star Formation in Dwarf Galaxies: Life in a Rough Neighborhood

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, S

    2003-10-16

    Star formation within dwarf galaxies is governed by several factors. Many of these factors are external, including ram-pressure stripping, tidal stripping, and heating by external UV radiation. The latter, in particular, may prevent star formation in the smallest systems. Internal factors include negative feedback in the form of UV radiation, winds and supernovae from massive stars. These act to reduce the star formation efficiency within dwarf systems, which may, in turn, solve several theoretical and observational problems associated with galaxy formation. In this contribution, we discuss our recent work being done to examine the importance of the many factors in the evolution of dwarf galaxies.

  6. Optical and ultraviolet spectroscopy of three F + B binary stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bopp, Bernard W.; Dempsey, Robert C.; Parsons, Sidney B.

    1991-05-01

    Optical and ultraviolet spectroscopy is presented for three F + B objects that are members of the first group of strongly interacting, F II + B systems. The data obtained confirm that HD 59771, HD 242257, and CoD -30 5135 are all binary star systems consisting of a luminous F-type component and a B star. Strong, variable H-alpha emission is seen in all the stars. It is found that the UV spectrum of HD 59771 resembles the spectrum of HD 207739. CoD -30 5135 has the most dramatic mid-UV spectrum seen among the scores of observed cool + hot star systems.

  7. Binary stars and the UVX in early-type galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández-Pérez, Fabiola; Bruzual, Gustavo

    2014-11-01

    We use the Hernández-Pérez and Bruzual (HB13) stellar population synthesis models to study the role of interacting binary pairs as progenitors of extreme horizontal branch (EHB) stars. We assemble a sample of 3417 early-type galaxies observed both in the optical (SDSS-DR8) and the UV (GALEX-GR6). The galaxies in our sample can be classified according to their position in the colour-colour diagram as UV-weak or red-sequence galaxies (˜48 per cent), UV-strong or UVX galaxies (˜9 per cent), and recent star-forming galaxies (˜43 per cent). Analysing this sample using the HB13 models for various choices of basic model parameters, we conclude that (a) the UVr colours of UV-weak and UV-strong galaxies are reproduced by the models as long as the fraction of binary stars is at least 15 per cent. (b) Higher metallicity models (Z = 0.02 and 0.03) reproduce the colours of UV-weak and UV-strong galaxies better than lower Z models. The Z = 0.03 model is slightly bluer than the Z = 0.02 model in the UV-strong region, indicating a weak relationship between UVX and Z. (c) The strength of UVX increases with age in the model population. This is at variance with the results of other models that include binary stars as progenitors of EHB stars.

  8. Hot Massive Stars: The Impact of HST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowther, Paul A.

    We review the contribution of Hubble Space Telescope to the study of hot, luminous stars. Optical and IR imaging have permitted spatially resolved observations of young, massive clusters within Local Group galaxies, such as R136, NGC 3603 and Arches, revealing unprecedented concentrations of very massive O stars. UV spectroscopy of field OB stars in the Magellanic Clouds have provided suitable templates for interpretation of metal-poor star-forming galaxies at high-redshift. Spectacular imaging provides the detailed structure of ejecta nebulae from individual stars, including the Homunculus associated with η Carinae and M1-67, associated with a Wolf-Rayet star. HST has permitted individual massive stars to be spatially resolved in giant HII regions located beyond the Local Group, such as NGC 604, plus individual clusters, dominated by the light of massive stars within starburst galaxies at larger distances, such as NGC 3125. UV spectroscopy of young, massive clusters in the extremely metal-poor HII galaxy I Zw 18 include signatures of large numbers of Wolf-Rayet stars.

  9. THE STAR FORMATION LAW AT LOW SURFACE DENSITY

    SciTech Connect

    Wyder, Ted K.; Martin, D. Christopher; Barlow, Tom A.; Foster, Karl; Friedman, Peter G.; Morrissey, Patrick; Neill, James D.; Neff, Susan G.; Schiminovich, David; Seibert, Mark; Madore, Barry F.; Bianchi, Luciana; Donas, Jose; Milliard, Bruno; Heckman, Timothy M.; Szalay, Alex S.; Lee, Young-Wook; Yi, Sukyoung K.; Rich, R. Michael

    2009-05-10

    We investigate the nature of the star formation law at low gas surface densities using a sample of 19 low surface brightness (LSB) galaxies with existing H I maps in the literature, UV imaging from the Galaxy Evolution Explorer satellite, and optical images from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. All of the LSB galaxies have (NUV - r) colors similar to those for higher surface brightness star-forming galaxies of similar luminosity indicating that their average star formation histories are not very different. Based upon four LSB galaxies with both UV and far-infrared (FIR) data, we find FIR/UV ratios significantly less than 1, implying low amounts of internal UV extinction in LSB galaxies. We use the UV images and H I maps to measure the star formation rate (SFR) and hydrogen gas surface density within the same region for all the galaxies. The LSB galaxy star formation rate surface densities lie below the extrapolation of the power law fit to the SFR surface density as a function of the total gas density for higher surface brightness galaxies. Although there is more scatter, the LSB galaxies also lie below a second version of the star formation law in which the SFR surface density is correlated with the gas density divided by the orbital time in the disk. The downturn seen in both star formation laws is consistent with theoretical models that predict lower star formation efficiencies in LSB galaxies due to the declining molecular fraction with decreasing density.

  10. MEASURING GALAXY STAR FORMATION RATES FROM INTEGRATED PHOTOMETRY: INSIGHTS FROM COLOR-MAGNITUDE DIAGRAMS OF RESOLVED STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Benjamin D.; Weisz, Daniel R.; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Johnson, L. C.; Williams, Benjamin F.; Dale, Daniel A.; Dolphin, Andrew E.; Gil de Paz, Armando; Lee, Janice C.; Skillman, Evan D.; Boquien, Mederic

    2013-07-20

    We use empirical star formation histories (SFHs), measured from Hubble-Space-Telescope-based resolved star color-magnitude diagrams, as input into population synthesis codes to model the broadband spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of 50 nearby dwarf galaxies (6.5 < log M{sub *}/M{sub Sun} < 8.5, with metallicities {approx}10% solar). In the presence of realistic SFHs, we compare the modeled and observed SEDs from the ultraviolet (UV) through near-infrared and assess the reliability of widely used UV-based star formation rate (SFR) indicators. In the FUV through i bands, we find that the observed and modeled SEDs are in excellent agreement. In the Spitzer 3.6 {mu}m and 4.5 {mu}m bands, we find that modeled SEDs systematically overpredict observed luminosities by up to {approx}0.2 dex, depending on treatment of the TP-AGB stars in the synthesis models. We assess the reliability of UV luminosity as a SFR indicator, in light of independently constrained SFHs. We find that fluctuations in the SFHs alone can cause factor of {approx}2 variations in the UV luminosities relative to the assumption of a constant SFH over the past 100 Myr. These variations are not strongly correlated with UV-optical colors, implying that correcting UV-based SFRs for the effects of realistic SFHs is difficult using only the broadband SED. Additionally, for this diverse sample of galaxies, we find that stars older than 100 Myr can contribute from <5%-100% of the present day UV luminosity, highlighting the challenges in defining a characteristic star formation timescale associated with UV emission. We do find a relationship between UV emission timescale and broadband UV-optical color, though it is different than predictions based on exponentially declining SFH models. Our findings have significant implications for the comparison of UV-based SFRs across low-metallicity populations with diverse SFHs.

  11. UV, stress and aging.

    PubMed

    Debacq-Chainiaux, Florence; Leduc, Cedric; Verbeke, Alix; Toussaint, Olivier

    2012-07-01

    Skin is a model of choice in studies on aging. Indeed, skin aging can be modulated by internal and external factors, reflecting its complexity. Two types of skin aging have been identified: intrinsic, mainly genetically determined and extrinsic-also called "photo-aging"-resulting on the impact of environmental stress and more precisely of UV rays. Simplified in vitro models, based on cellular senescence, have been developed to study the relationship between UV and aging. These models vary on the cell type (fibroblasts or keratinocytes, normal or immortalized) and the type of UV used (UVA or UVB). PMID:23467762

  12. UV Completion of Axion

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Kang-Sin

    2008-11-23

    A multiple number of global U(1)s, arising from accidental symmetries up to a certain order of the potential, enjoy lowering the axion decay constant from UV-scale and evading supersymmetric Fayet-Illiopoulos term constraints.

  13. Filling the gap --near UV, optical and near IR extinction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massa, Derck

    2014-10-01

    We propose a SNAP program to obtain STIS low resolution near-UV, optical and near-IR (G430L and G750L) spectra for a set of O7-B7 class III-V stars in the Galaxy and Magellanic Clouds with available IUE or HST/STIS UV spectropotometry, optical photometry and 2MASS IR photometry. Together with the existing data, the new observations will provide complete photometric and spectrophotometric coverage from 1150 to 10000 A and enable us to produce complete extinction curves from the far-UV to the near-IR, with well-determined values of R(V). The proposed set of 150 program sight lines includes the full range of interstellar extinction curve types from both the Galaxy and the Magellanic Clouds. The new data will allow us to examine variability in the near-UV through near-IR spectral regions, including the UV-optical "knee", and the "Very Broad Structure" and to verify the applicability of the near IR extinction law recently derived by Fitzpatrick and Massa (2009). We will examine the response of these features to different interstellar environments and their relationship to other curve features. These are largely unexplored aspects of the extinction curves which will provide additional constraints on the properties of interstellar grains. The curves will be derived using model atmospheres for the program stars, eliminating the need for standard stars.

  14. UV Signature Mutations †

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Sequencing complete tumor genomes and exomes has sparked the cancer field's interest in mutation signatures for identifying the tumor's carcinogen. This review and meta-analysis discusses signatures and their proper use. We first distinguish between a mutagen's canonical mutations – deviations from a random distribution of base changes to create a pattern typical of that mutagen – and the subset of signature mutations, which are unique to that mutagen and permit inference backward from mutations to mutagen. To verify UV signature mutations, we assembled literature datasets on cells exposed to UVC, UVB, UVA, or solar simulator light (SSL) and tested canonical UV mutation features as criteria for clustering datasets. A confirmed UV signature was: ≥60% of mutations are C→T at a dipyrimidine site, with ≥5% CC→TT. Other canonical features such as a bias for mutations on the non-transcribed strand or at the 3' pyrimidine had limited application. The most robust classifier combined these features with criteria for the rarity of non-UV canonical mutations. In addition, several signatures proposed for specific UV wavelengths were limited to specific genes or species; non-signature mutations induced by UV may cause melanoma BRAF mutations; and the mutagen for sunlight-related skin neoplasms may vary between continents. PMID:25354245

  15. UV signature mutations.

    PubMed

    Brash, Douglas E

    2015-01-01

    Sequencing complete tumor genomes and exomes has sparked the cancer field's interest in mutation signatures for identifying the tumor's carcinogen. This review and meta-analysis discusses signatures and their proper use. We first distinguish between a mutagen's canonical mutations—deviations from a random distribution of base changes to create a pattern typical of that mutagen—and the subset of signature mutations, which are unique to that mutagen and permit inference backward from mutations to mutagen. To verify UV signature mutations, we assembled literature datasets on cells exposed to UVC, UVB, UVA, or solar simulator light (SSL) and tested canonical UV mutation features as criteria for clustering datasets. A confirmed UV signature was: ≥60% of mutations are C→T at a dipyrimidine site, with ≥5% CC→TT. Other canonical features such as a bias for mutations on the nontranscribed strand or at the 3' pyrimidine had limited application. The most robust classifier combined these features with criteria for the rarity of non-UV canonical mutations. In addition, several signatures proposed for specific UV wavelengths were limited to specific genes or species; UV's nonsignature mutations may cause melanoma BRAF mutations; and the mutagen for sunlight-related skin neoplasms may vary between continents. PMID:25354245

  16. The DQ Herculis stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Joseph

    1994-01-01

    We review the properties of the DQ Herculis stars: cataclysmic variables containing an accreting, magnetic, rapidly rotating white dwarf. These stars are characterized by strong X-ray emission, high-excitation spectra, and very stable optical and X-ray pulsations in their light curves. There is considerable resemblance to their more famous cousins, the AM Herculis stars, but the latter class is additionally characterized by spin-orbit synchronism and the presence of strong circular polarization. We list eighteen stars passing muster as certain or very likely DQ Her stars. The rotational periods range from 33 s to 2.0 hr. Additional periods can result when the rotating searchlight illuminates other structures in the binary. A single hypothesis explains most of the observed properties: magnetically channeled accretion within a truncated disk. Some accretion flow still seems to proceed directly to the magnetosphere, however. The white dwarfs' magnetic moments are in the range 10(sup 32) - 10(sup 34) G cc, slightly weaker than in AM Her stars but with some probable overlap. The more important reason why DQ Hers have broken synchronism is probably their greater accretion rate and orbital separation. The observed L(sub x)/L(sub V) values are surprisingly low for a radially accreting white dwarf, suggesting that most of the accretion energy is not radiated in a strong shock above the magnetic pole. The fluxes can be more satisfactorily explained if most of the radial infall energy manages to bypass the shock and deposit itse lf directly in the white dwarf photosphere, where it should emerge as extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation. This also provides an adequate source of ionizing photons to power the high-excitation optical and UV emission lines. This is probably the DQ Her analog to the famous 'soft X-ray excess' in AM Her stars. However, unlike the AM Her case, this radiation has not been directly observed, so the analogy must not (yet) be embraced too firmly. There is

  17. The DQ Herculis stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patterson, Joseph

    1994-03-01

    We review the properties of the DQ Herculis stars: cataclysmic variables containing an accreting, magnetic, rapidly rotating white dwarf. These stars are characterized by strong X-ray emission, high-excitation spectra, and very stable optical and X-ray pulsations in their light curves. There is considerable resemblance to their more famous cousins, the AM Herculis stars, but the latter class is additionally characterized by spin-orbit synchronism and the presence of strong circular polarization. We list eighteen stars passing muster as certain or very likely DQ Her stars. The rotational periods range from 33 s to 2.0 hr. Additional periods can result when the rotating searchlight illuminates other structures in the binary. A single hypothesis explains most of the observed properties: magnetically channeled accretion within a truncated disk. Some accretion flow still seems to proceed directly to the magnetosphere, however. The white dwarfs' magnetic moments are in the range 1032 - 1034 G cc, slightly weaker than in AM Her stars but with some probable overlap. The more important reason why DQ Hers have broken synchronism is probably their greater accretion rate and orbital separation. The observed Lx/LV values are surprisingly low for a radially accreting white dwarf, suggesting that most of the accretion energy is not radiated in a strong shock above the magnetic pole. The fluxes can be more satisfactorily explained if most of the radial infall energy manages to bypass the shock and deposit itse lf directly in the white dwarf photosphere, where it should emerge as extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation. This also provides an adequate source of ionizing photons to power the high-excitation optical and UV emission lines. This is probably the DQ Her analog to the famous 'soft X-ray excess' in AM Her stars. However, unlike the AM Her case, this radiation has not been directly observed, so the analogy must not (yet) be embraced too firmly. There is some conventional wisdom

  18. Ultraviolet emission from main-sequence companions of AGB stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz, Roberto; Guerrero, Martín A.

    2016-09-01

    Although the majority of known binary asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars are symbiotic systems (i.e. with a white dwarf as a secondary star), main-sequence companions of AGB stars can be more numerous, even though they are more difficult to find because the primary high luminosity hampers the detection of the companion at visual wavelengths. However, in the ultraviolet the flux emitted by a secondary with Teff > 5500 ˜ 6000 K may prevail over that of the primary, and then it can be used to search for candidates to binary AGB stars. In this work, theoretical atmosphere models are used to calculate the UV excess in the GALEX near- and far-UV bands due to a main-sequence companion. After analysing a sample of confirmed binary AGB stars, we propose as a criterium for binarity: (1) the detection of the AGB star in the GALEX far-UV band and/or (2) a GALEX near-UV observed-to-predicted flux ratio >20. These criteria have been applied to a volume-limited sample of AGB stars within 500 pc of the Sun; 34 out of the sample of 58 AGB stars (˜60 per cent) fulfill them, implying to have a main-sequence companion of spectral type earlier than K0. The excess in the GALEX near- and far-UV bands cannot be attributed to a single temperature companion star, thus suggesting that the UV emission of the secondary might be absorbed by the extended atmosphere and circumstellar envelope of the primary or that UV emission is produced in accretion flows.

  19. UV eclipse observations of CI Cyg

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michalitsianos, A. G.; Kafatos, M.; Stencel, R. E.; Boiarchuk, A. A.

    1982-01-01

    Low spectral resolution observations were obtained with the IUE during the eclipse phase. Additional data obtained by other IUE groups have been included in the eclipse observations, making it possible to examine the UV spectral properties of CI Cyg over nearly an entire orbit which spans early 1979 through mid 1981. Data obtained over this period suggest an overall decline in UV emission, consistent with the decline of optical emission following the outburst of 1975. The short-wavelength spectrum 1200-2000 A is characterized by numerous intense high-excitation emission lines which become more prominent out of eclipse. The LWR wavelength range 2000-3200 A exhibits a few more additional lines of O III, Mg II, and He II which are superimposed on continuum that rises gradually with increasing wavelength. The observations are consistent with a binary star model which involves mass transfer from the extended cool envelope of the primary to the compact secondary.

  20. Advanced Spectral Library (ASTRAL): Cool stars edition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayres, T. R.

    2013-02-01

    ASTRAL is a project to create high-resolution, high-S/N UV (1150-3200 Å) atlases of bright stars utilizing {HST}/STIS. During Cycle 18 (2010-2011), eight cool star targets were observed, including key objects like Procyon and Betelgeuse, churning through 146 orbits in the process. The new spectral atlases are publically available through the project website. Data were obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope.

  1. Star Polymers.

    PubMed

    Ren, Jing M; McKenzie, Thomas G; Fu, Qiang; Wong, Edgar H H; Xu, Jiangtao; An, Zesheng; Shanmugam, Sivaprakash; Davis, Thomas P; Boyer, Cyrille; Qiao, Greg G

    2016-06-22

    Recent advances in controlled/living polymerization techniques and highly efficient coupling chemistries have enabled the facile synthesis of complex polymer architectures with controlled dimensions and functionality. As an example, star polymers consist of many linear polymers fused at a central point with a large number of chain end functionalities. Owing to this exclusive structure, star polymers exhibit some remarkable characteristics and properties unattainable by simple linear polymers. Hence, they constitute a unique class of technologically important nanomaterials that have been utilized or are currently under audition for many applications in life sciences and nanotechnologies. This article first provides a comprehensive summary of synthetic strategies towards star polymers, then reviews the latest developments in the synthesis and characterization methods of star macromolecules, and lastly outlines emerging applications and current commercial use of star-shaped polymers. The aim of this work is to promote star polymer research, generate new avenues of scientific investigation, and provide contemporary perspectives on chemical innovation that may expedite the commercialization of new star nanomaterials. We envision in the not-too-distant future star polymers will play an increasingly important role in materials science and nanotechnology in both academic and industrial settings. PMID:27299693

  2. Radio stars.

    PubMed

    Hjellming, R M; Wade, C M

    1971-09-17

    Up to the present time six classes of radio stars have been established. The signals are almost always very faint and drastically variable. Hence their discovery has owed as much to serendipity as to the highly sophisticated equipment and techniques that have been used. When the variations are regular, as with the pulsars, this characteristic can be exploited very successfully in the search for new objects as well as in the detailed study of those that are already known. The detection of the most erratically variable radio stars, the flare stars and the x-ray stars, is primarily a matter of luck and patience. In the case of the novas, one at least knows where and oughly when to look for radio emission. A very sensitive interferometer is clearly the best instrument to use in the initial detection of a radio star. The fact that weak background sources are frequently present makes it essential to prove that the position of a radio source agrees with that of a star to within a few arc seconds. The potential of radio astronomy for the study of radio stars will not be realized until more powerful instruments than those that are available today can be utilized. So far, we have been able to see only the most luminous of the radio stars. PMID:17836594

  3. Local character of the highest antiferromagnetic temperature of Ce systems in Sc-rich CeTi1 -xScxGe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sereni, J. G.; Pedrazzini, P.; Gómez Berisso, M.; Chacoma, A.; Encina, S.; Gruner, T.; Caroca-Canales, N.; Geibel, C.

    2015-05-01

    The highest antiferromagnetic (AFM) temperature in Ce based compounds has been reported for CeScGe with TN=47 K , but its local or itinerant nature has not been deeply investigated yet. In order to shed more light into this unusually high ordering temperature we have investigated structural, magnetic, transport, and thermal properties of CeTi1 -xScxGe alloys within the range of stability of the CeScSi-type structure: 0.25 ≤x ≤1 . Along this concentration range, this strongly anisotropic system presents a complex magnetic phase diagram with a continuous modification of its magnetic behavior, from ferromagnetism for 0.25 ≤x ≤0.50 (with 7 K≤TC≤16 K ) to AFM for 0.60 ≤x ≤1 (with 19 K≤TN≤47 K ). The onset of the AFM phase is associated to a metamagnetic transition with a critical field increasing from Hcr=0 at x ≈0.55 to ≈6 T at x =1 , coincident with an increasing contribution of the first excited crystal electric field doublet. At a critical point xcr≈0.65 a second transition appears at TL≤TN . In contrast to observations in itinerant systems like CeRh2Si2 or CeRh3B2 , no evidences for significant hybridization of the 4 f electrons at large Sc contents were found. Therefore, the exceptionally large TN of CeScGe can be attributed to an increasing Ruderman-Kittel-Kasuya-Yosida interaction between Ce double layers as Sc content grows.

  4. X-ray sources in regions of star formation. II - The pre-main-sequence G star HDE 283572

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walter, F. M.; Brown, A.; Linsky, J. L.; Rydgren, A. E.; Vrba, F.

    1987-01-01

    This paper reports the detection of HDE 283572, a ninth-magnitude G star 8 arcmin south of RY Tau, as a bright X-ray source. The observations reveal this object to be a fairly massive (about 2 solar masses) pre-main-sequence star associated with the Taurus-Auriga star formation complex. It exhibits few of the characteristics of the classical T Tauri stars and is a good example of a 'naked' T Tauri star. The star is a mid-G subgiant, of about three solar radii and rotates with a period of 1.5 d. The coronal and chromospheric surface fluxes are similar to those of the most active late type stars (excluding T Tauri stars). The X-ray and UV lines most likely arise in different atmospheric structures. Radiative losses are some 1000 times the quiet solar value and compare favorably with those of T Tauri stars.

  5. X-ray sources in regions of star formation. II. The pre-main-sequence G star HDE 283572

    SciTech Connect

    Walter, F.M.; Brown, A.; Linsky, J.L.; Rydgren, A.E.; Vrba, F.

    1987-03-01

    This paper reports the detection of HDE 283572, a ninth-magnitude G star 8 arcmin south of RY Tau, as a bright X-ray source. The observations reveal this object to be a fairly massive (about 2 solar masses) pre-main-sequence star associated with the Taurus-Auriga star formation complex. It exhibits few of the characteristics of the classical T Tauri stars and is a good example of a naked T Tauri star. The star is a mid-G subgiant, of about three solar radii and rotates with a period of 1.5 d. The coronal and chromospheric surface fluxes are similar to those of the most active late type stars (excluding T Tauri stars). The X-ray and UV lines most likely arise in different atmospheric structures. Radiative losses are some 1000 times the quiet solar value and compare favorably with those of T Tauri stars. 49 references.

  6. The UV limits of life on extrasolar planets: an experiment with halophile archaeabacteria at different UV doses.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrevaya, X. C.; Adamo, H. P.; Cortó N, E.; Mauas, P. J. D.

    Terrestial-type planets around M stars are proposed as feasible places for development of life as we know it. Nevertheless many dMe stars emit large amounts of UV radiation during flares and it is unknown if these events could be deleterious for life. Since terrestrial biological systems are particularly vulnerable to this kind of radiation, this fact could set a limit for habitability. Organisms as halophile archaeabacteria were found in ancient evaporites on Earth. Evaporites have been detected in Martian meteorites, so these organisms are proposed as plausible inhabitants of Mars-like planets or other extrasolar planets. We examine the effect of UV-C on the halophile archaea Natrialba magadii. Results show that these organisms are able to survive at the UV doses tested.

  7. IR emission and UV extinction in two open clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hackwell, James A.; Hecht, James H.

    1989-01-01

    Recent models of interstellar extinction have shown the importance of understanding both the UV and IR properties of interstellar dust grains. IRAS data have shown variations in 60 and 100 micron emissions presumably due to the presence of IR cirrus, while recent observations in the UV by Fitzpatrick and Massa have identified components in the UV extinction curve which vary in different star regions. A Draine and Anderson model connects these results by proposing that different size variations in interstellar grains would cause distinct changes in both the IR emission and the UV extinction. In order to test this model it is necessary to make observations in well defined locations away from peculiar extinction regions. In the infrared this means looking away from the galactic plane so as to limit non-local sources of IR radiation. Two open clusters that are out of the galactic plane and which contain a number of late B and early A stars suitable for UV extinction studies, and whose IRAS data show variations in the 60/100 micron ratio were studied. Based on the Drain and Anderson model, variations were expected in their UV extinction curves that correlate with the IR cirrus emission.

  8. Deep UV Luminosity Functions at the Infall Region of the Coma Cluster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammer, D. M.; Hornschemeier, A. E.; Salim, S.; Smith, R.; Jenkins, L.; Mobasher, B.; Miller, N.; Ferguson, H.

    2011-01-01

    We have used deep GALEX observations at the infall region of the Coma cluster to measure the faintest UV luminosity functions (LFs) presented for a rich galaxy cluster thus far. The Coma UV LFs are measured to M(sub uv) = -10.5 in the GALEX FUV and NUV bands, or 3.5 mag fainter than previous studies, and reach the dwarf early-type galaxy population in Coma for the first time. The Schechter faint-end slopes (alpha approximately equal to -1.39 in both GALEX bands) are shallower than reported in previous Coma UV LF studies owing to a flatter LF at faint magnitudes. A Gaussian-plus-Schechter model provides a slightly better parametrization of the UV LFs resulting in a faint-end slope of alpha approximately equal to -1.15 in both GALEX bands. The two-component model gives faint-end slopes shallower than alpha = -1 (a turnover) for the LFs constructed separately for passive and star forming galaxies. The UV LFs for star forming galaxies show a turnover at M(sub UV) approximately equal to -14 owing to a deficit of dwarf star forming galaxies in Coma with stellar masses below M(sub *) = 10(sup 8) solar mass. A similar turnover is identified in recent UV LFs measured for the Virgo cluster suggesting this may be a common feature of local galaxy clusters, whereas the field UV LFs continue to rise at faint magnitudes. We did not identify an excess of passive galaxies as would be expected if the missing dwarf star forming galaxies were quenched inside the cluster. In fact, the LFs for both dwarf passive and star forming galaxies show the same turnover at faint magnitudes. We discuss the possible origin of the missing dwarf star forming galaxies in Coma and their expected properties based on comparisons to local field galaxies.

  9. Statistical Properties of Galactic δ Scuti Stars: Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, S.-W.; Protopapas, P.; Kim, D.-W.; Byun, Y.-I.

    2013-05-01

    We present statistical characteristics of 1578 δ Scuti stars including nearby field stars and cluster member stars within the Milky Way. We obtained 46% of these stars (718 stars) from work by Rodríguez and collected the remaining 54% of stars (860 stars) from other literature. We updated the entries with the latest information of sky coordinates, color, rotational velocity, spectral type, period, amplitude, and binarity. The majority of our sample is well characterized in terms of typical period range (0.02-0.25 days), pulsation amplitudes (<0.5 mag), and spectral types (A-F type). Given this list of δ Scuti stars, we examined relations between their physical properties (i.e., periods, amplitudes, spectral types, and rotational velocities) for field stars and cluster members, and confirmed that the correlations of properties are not significantly different from those reported in Rodríguez's work. All the δ Scuti stars are cross-matched with several X-ray and UV catalogs, resulting in 27 X-ray and 41 UV-only counterparts. These counterparts are interesting targets for further study because of their uniqueness in showing δ Scuti-type variability and X-ray/UV emission at the same time. The compiled catalog can be accessed through the Web interface http://stardb.yonsei.ac.kr/DeltaScuti.

  10. STATISTICAL PROPERTIES OF GALACTIC {delta} SCUTI STARS: REVISITED

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, S.-W.; Kim, D.-W.; Byun, Y.-I.; Protopapas, P. E-mail: kim@mpia-hd.mpg.de

    2013-05-15

    We present statistical characteristics of 1578 {delta} Scuti stars including nearby field stars and cluster member stars within the Milky Way. We obtained 46% of these stars (718 stars) from work by Rodriguez and collected the remaining 54% of stars (860 stars) from other literature. We updated the entries with the latest information of sky coordinates, color, rotational velocity, spectral type, period, amplitude, and binarity. The majority of our sample is well characterized in terms of typical period range (0.02-0.25 days), pulsation amplitudes (<0.5 mag), and spectral types (A-F type). Given this list of {delta} Scuti stars, we examined relations between their physical properties (i.e., periods, amplitudes, spectral types, and rotational velocities) for field stars and cluster members, and confirmed that the correlations of properties are not significantly different from those reported in Rodriguez's work. All the {delta} Scuti stars are cross-matched with several X-ray and UV catalogs, resulting in 27 X-ray and 41 UV-only counterparts. These counterparts are interesting targets for further study because of their uniqueness in showing {delta} Scuti-type variability and X-ray/UV emission at the same time. The compiled catalog can be accessed through the Web interface http://stardb.yonsei.ac.kr/DeltaScuti.

  11. Grids of synthetic spectra for H-poor central stars of planetary nebulae (CSPNe)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, Graziela R.; Bianchi, Luciana; Herald, James E.; Maciel, Walter J.

    2012-08-01

    We present comprehensive grids of model spectra from far-UV to IR, covering the parameter space of [WC] (Keller et al. 2011) and PG1159 stars. Models are calculated with the CMFGEN code, accounting for non-LTE, line blanketing, wind, clumping, and including ions previously neglected. The grids are available at http://dolomiti.pha.jhu.edu/planetarynebulae.html. We used them to analyse UV and far-UV spectra of NGC6905's and NGC5189's central stars.

  12. Cool Stars Sing the Blues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luttermoser, D. G.

    2005-12-01

    A high-dispersion spectral atlas of cool red giant stars in the blue and violet is presented. The spectra were obtained over a six-year time period with the stellar spectrograph of the McMath-Pierce Telescope on Kitt Peak. Both N-type carbon stars and M-type oxygen-rich stars are presented from 3900 to 4600 Å, with the M-type stars containing both semiregular and Mira-type variables. The dominant absorption features in these stars at these wavelength result primarily from neutral metals, especially iron, and the CH and CN diatomic molecules. The Miras also show strong emission lines during some of their pulsation cycle. Many of these emission lines result from fluorescence from the Mg II h & k lines in the UV. For these fluoresced features, comparisons are made between the Miras and the semiregular carbon-rich and oxygen-rich variables. Where the oxygen-rich semiregulars show no hint of fluorescence in these features, the carbon stars show a definite ``filling-in'' of the absorption lines.

  13. GALEX Observes Nearby Cool Stars: Constraints on Ultraviolet Coronal Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheatley, Jonathan; Welsh, Barry

    2016-01-01

    The GALEX ultraviolet mission (1350-2800A) has detected many late-type dwarf stars. Numerous M-type dwarf stars exhibit flaring and coronal activity; we use GALEX UV photometry to measure the variability of coronal emission in the GALEX NUV and FUV wavebands.

  14. A Type Stars as Probes of the Local Interstellar Medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrero, R. F.; Ferlet, R.; Vidal-Madjar, A.

    1984-01-01

    With the aim to sample the Local Interstellar Medium (LISM), it was proposed to use A stars as targets. The Mg II UV lines seem to be the best interstellar absorption candidates. Several hundreths of A stars can be reached within 100 pc. First preliminary results (20 lines of sight) are presented, based on previous Copernicus and actual IUE observations.

  15. UV actinometer film

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coulbert, C. D.; Gupta, A.; Pitts, J.

    1980-01-01

    Cumulative UV radiation can be measured by low-cost polymer film that is unaffacted by visible light. Useful for virtually any surface, film can help paint and plastics manufacturers determine how well their products stand up against UV radiation. Actinometer film uses photochemically sensitive compound that changes its chemical composition in response to solar radiation. Extent of chemical conversion depends on length exposure and can be measured by examining film sample with spectrophotometer. Film can be exposed from several seconds up to month.

  16. Two UV colours of the central part of M 31

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deharveng, J. M.; Laget, M.; Monnet, G.; Vuillemin, A.

    1976-01-01

    Two photographs of the galaxy M 31 have been obtained in the far UV with a Faust rocket experiment and in the near UV with the S 183 experiment aboard Skylab. Only the central part of the galaxy is detected. Reductions provide both the energy received and the angular area over M 31 from which it is emitted. The UV flux is brighter than expected from extrapolation of the visible spectrum. The distribution below 300 A is rather flat and different from previous OAO-2 observations. These results, combined with Lyman continuum flux evaluation, are used to discuss the temperature and the age of the stars which may be responsible for this anomalous UV distribution.

  17. Limits of detection in debris disks around young stars with NaCo/Sparse Aperture Masking observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauchet, L.; Lacour, S.

    2014-09-01

    To understand the formation and evolution of solar systems and planets formations in the stars neighbourhood, we need to obtain information of their state at different time of their evolution. Here, we focus on debris disks around young stars aged of ten to few tens of Myr, we analyze NaCo/Sparse Aperture Masking (SAM) observations in the L' band (3.8 μm) of eight objects (beta Pictoris, AU Mic, 49 Ceti, eta Tel, Fomalhaut, G Lupi, HD182327 and HR8799). The aim is to get limits of detection about the mass of the debris orbiting around their stars. The SAM technique consists in transforming a single telescope into a Fizeau interferometer using a non redundant mask inserted in a pupil plane of the instrument. The analysis of the observations was completed with the sparse aperture mode pipeline. Interference fringes are fitted to obtain complex visibilities of the object, then the closure phases are calibrated and evaluated. Finally, a map of the detection limits is obtained as it is related to the closure phases previously estimated. In order to obtain an estimation of the mass corresponding to the luminosity measured with the reduction pipeline we are using theoretical isochrones interpolated into synthetic color tables. The results are maps of detection limits in unit of Jupiter Mass in a range of up to 450 mas around the stars.

  18. UV Observations of the Galaxy Cluster Abell 1795 with the Optical Monitor on XMM-Newton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mittaz, J. P. D.; Kaastra, J. S.; Tamura, T.; Fabian, A. C.; Mushotzky, F.; Peterson, J. R.; Ikebe, Y.; Lumb, D. H.; Paerels, F.; Stewart, G.

    2000-01-01

    We present the results of an analysis of broad band UV observations of the central regions of Abell 1795 observed with the optical monitor on XMM-Newton. As have been found with other UV observations of the central regions of clusters of galaxies, we find evidence for star formation. However, we also find evidence for absorption in the cD galaxy on a more extended scale than has been seen with optical imaging. We also report the first UV observation of part of the filamentary structure seen in H-alpha, X-rays and very deep U band imaging. The part of the filament we see is very blue with UV colours consistent with a very early (O/B) stellar population. This is the first direct evidence of a dominant population of early type stars at the centre of Abell 1795 and implies very recent star formation. The relationship of this emission to emission at other wavebands is discussed.

  19. The UV Scattering Halo of the Central Source Associated with Eta Carinae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hillier, D. J.; Davidson, K.; Gull, T. R.; Humphreys, R. M.; Iping, R.; Sonneborn, G.

    2004-01-01

    Eta Carinae is one of the most massive and luminous stars within our galaxy. It consists of a compact central source which suffers circumstellar and interstellar extinction, local dense knots which emit strong narrow nebular-like emission lines, and an outer dusty nebula called the Homunculus. The optical spectrum of the central star, first observed directly and without obvious nebular contamination by the HST, can be modeled successfully using a hot star with a radius (at the wind sonic point) of 60\\,R\\odot. The central star is losing mass, via a dense stellar wind, at the prodigious rate of 10(exp -3)\\,M\\odot/yr. Its effective temperature is low (< 10,000\\,K), and is determined entirely by the wind properties. Until now the UV spectrum has not been explained. We show that HST UV spectrum, and the FUSE FUV spectrum, can both be understood using the same underlying model that explains the optical spectrum. To do so, however, it is necessary to take into account the occultation of the central source by dust. It is also important to realize that in the UV, the HST is partially resolving the central source. Due to strong mass loss, the wind is optically thick in UV resonance lines even at large radii. The UV resonance lines are responsible for the UV halo seen around Eta Carinae, and provide a partial explanation of why Eta Carinae can even be seen at UV wavelengths.

  20. Hypervelocity Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Warren R.

    2015-08-01

    Hypervelocity stars (HVSs) travel with such extreme velocities that dynamical ejection via gravitational interaction with a massive black hole (MBH) is their most likely origin. Observers have discovered dozens of unbound main-sequence stars since the first in 2005, and the velocities, stellar nature, spatial distribution, and overall numbers of unbound B stars in the Milky Way halo all fit an MBH origin. Theorists have proposed various mechanisms for ejecting unbound stars, and these mechanisms can be tested with larger and more complete samples. HVSs' properties are linked to the nature and environment of the Milky Way's MBH, and, with future proper motion measurements, their trajectories may provide unique probes of the dark matter halo that surrounds the Milky Way.

  1. Integrated UV fluxes and the HB morphology of Globular Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landsman, W. B.; Catelan, M.; O'Connell, R. W.; Pereira, D.; Stecher, T. P.

    2001-12-01

    The UV ( ~ 1500 Å) flux of a globular cluster will be dominated by its blue horizontal branch (HB) population, provided that such a population is present. Thus, the integrated UV - V color of a globular cluster can provide an indication of its HB morphology, without the need to resolve the cluster into a color-magnitude diagram. To date, UV photometry of extragalactic clusters are available for only a few globulars in M31 (e.g. Bohlin et al. 1993, ApJ, 417, 127), but additional UV photometry of extragalactic globulars is soon expected from GALEX (Yi et al. 2001, AAS, 198, 5501), and from STIS FUV-MAMA observations of M87 (HST program 8643). Here we calibrate the relation between UV flux and HB morphology for Galactic globular clusters. The OAO-2 and ANS data tabulated by deBoer (1985, A&A, 142, 321) are supplemented with photometry of 14 globular clusters observed with the Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (UIT), and a few cluster cores observed with the STIS FUV-MAMA. The UIT data is especially useful since its 40' diameter FOV was sufficient to completely encompass most of the observed clusters, while allowing isolation of hot field and UV-bright stars. We compare the observed Galactic UV color - HB morphology relation with synthetic HB models as a function of age and metallicity. We also estimate the effect of radiative levitation of heavy metals in hot HB stars (e.g. Moehler et al. 2000, , A&A, 360, 120) on the integrated UV flux. This work is funded by STScI grant GO-8358.01.

  2. The UV interstellar extinction in nearby galaxies: M33

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianchi, Luciana

    2001-07-01

    We previously used HST to determine the UV extinction curve in M31. Our result in M31, together with other studies of the Magellanic Clouds and Milky Way, suggests that dust properties vary in different environments and from galaxy to galaxy. Thus average Galactic dust properties cannot be usefully employed to correct for dust effects in different galaxies. We propose to enlarge our sample by studying the UV extinction properties of dust in M33, sampling different galactocentric distances and levels of star formation activity. The extinction curves will be derived by comparing stars with the same spectral type, but different extinction amounts, in M33. This eliminates uncertainties in using standard stars from other galaxies, that may have different intrinsic spectra. For the targets we have U, B, V and UV photometry, and accurate spectral types from ground based spectra. UV extinction gives information on the properties of dust, which is an important tracer of global heavy element abundances. The steepness of the FUV extinction affects the ionisation and molecular chemistry of a galaxy. Knowledge of the extinction curve also allows accurate corrections of observed fluxes: ultimately, relating dust properties to global galaxy parameters will enable better extinction corrections in distant galaxies and AGN. We also request WFPC2 parallel imaging to continue our stellar population studies.

  3. HIRES Dust Imaging of the NGC 6334 Star Forming Complex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, James M.

    1997-01-01

    We present here our final report for the NASA grant "HIRES Dust Imaging of the NGC 6334 Star Forming Complex." This project was designed to study the photodissociation regions surrounding several OB stars in this cloud complex. NGC 6334 is unique in having at least seven distinct massive star forming regions in the same molecular cloud complex. The obvious advantage of studying young stars in the same molecular complex is that the stars all formed in the same global environment. Consequently, global factors like density waves, abundances, global magnetic field strength, and age of the parental molecular cloud cannot contribute to the differences among the star forming regions. Instead, the differences must arise only from local effects such as the mass, age, and UV fields of the individual stars. A study of NGC 6334 will greatly simplify the general problem of comparing different star formation regions by eliminating global effects.

  4. Are You UV Safe?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Capobianco, Brenda; Thiel, Elizabeth Andrew

    2006-01-01

    Students may be slathered with SPF 30 sunscreen all summer at the beach or pool, but what do they know about ultraviolet (UV) light radiation and absorption? The authors of this article found the perfect opportunity to help students find out the science behind this important health precaution, when they developed a series of practical strategies…

  5. STARS no star on Kauai

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, M.

    1993-04-01

    The island of Kuai, home to the Pacific Missile Range Facility, is preparing for the first of a series of Star Wars rocket launches expected to begin early this year. The Strategic Defense Initiative plans 40 launches of the Stategic Target System (STARS) over a 10-year period. The focus of the tests appears to be weapons and sensors designed to combat multiple-warhead ICBMs, which will be banned under the START II Treaty that was signed in January. The focus of this article is to express the dubious value of testing the STARS at a time when their application will not be an anticipated problem.

  6. Really Hot Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-04-01

    ), very blue and very hot, with surface temperatures of a few tens of thousands of degrees. Another property of these exceptional stars is their very strong stellar winds: they continuously eject energetic particles - like the "solar wind" from the Sun - but some 10 to 1000 million times more intensely than our star! These powerful winds exert an enormous pressure on the surrounding interstellar material and forcefully shape those clouds into "bubbles". These photos have now provided the astronomers with sufficient information to understand exactly what is going on in three of those unusual nebulae - while one case still remains ambiguous. The nebulae around BAT99-2, BAT99-49 and AB7 BAT99-2 (cf. PR Photo 09b/03) is one of the hottest WR-stars known in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). Before this star reached this phase of its short life, the strong stellar wind from its progenitor O-type star swept the interstellar medium and created a "bubble", much like a snowplough pushes aside the snow on a road. Part of this "bubble" can still be seen as a large half-ring to the south of the star. When the star did become a WR, the increasingly intense stellar wind impacted on the material previously ejected from the star. This created a new bubble, now visible as a small arc-like structure to the north-west of the star. We are appparently witnessing an ongoing merger of these two bubbles. With its strong ultraviolet (UV) radiation, BAT99-2 is strongly heating its immediate surroundings, in particular the above mentioned arc-like feature that, due to the resulting high excitation, is seen as a violet-pink region in the colour image. The entire field is very complex - the presence of a supernova remnant (SNR) is revealed by a few faint red filaments rather close to the high excitation nebula, to the north-west of the arc-like structure. AB7 (PR Photo 09a/03) and BAT99-49 (PR Photo 09c/03) are both binary stars, consisting of one WR-star and a companion O-type star. Like in the case

  7. Far UV Spectroscopy of eta Carinae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iping, R. C.; Sonneborn, G.; Massa, D.; Hutchings, J. B.; Gull, T. R.; Fisher, Richard (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    We present the first high spectral resolution observations of the Luminous Blue Variable eta Carinae between the Lyman limit and 1180 Angstroms. High resolution spectra (R approximately 20,000) were obtained with the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) satellite on Feb. 1 and Mar. 20, 2000. The observations were made with a 30x30 arcsec aperture and includes the entire Homunculus region. However, the spatial extent of the far UV flux is consistent with a point source. With the limited spatial resolution of the FUSE instrument, we can only constrain the far UV emission to be within +/-5 arcsec of the star. The far UV spectrum of eta Car is dominated by strong absorption features of molecular hydrogen. The observed flux level at 1150 Angstroms is approximately 4\\times 10(exp 12) erg/sq cm/s/Angstrom and decreases approximately linearly to approximately 920 Angstroms where converging HI and HII features completely blanket the spectrum. These observations were obtained as part of the FUSE Early Release Observation program.

  8. Far UV Spectroscopy of eta Carinae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iping, R. C.; Sonneborn, G.; Massa, D. L.; Hutchings, J. B.; Gull, T. R.; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    We present the first high spectral resolution observations of the Luminous Blue Variable eta Carinae between the Lyman limit and 1180 A. High resolution spectra (R approx. 20,000) were obtained with the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) satellite on Feb. 1 and Mar. 20, 2000. The observations were made with a 30 x 30 arcsec aperture and includes the entire Homunculus region. However, the spatial extent of the far UV flux is consistent with a point source. With the limited spatial resolution of the FUSE instrument, we can only constrain the far UV emission to be within +/- 5 arcsec of the star. The far UV spectrum of eta Car is dominated by strong absorption features of molecular hydrogen. The observed flux level at 1150A is approx. 4 times 10(exp 12) erg /cm(exp -2) /sec(exp -1) / A(exp -1) and decreases approximately linearly to approx. 920 A where converging H1 and H2 features completely blanket the spectrum. These observations were obtained as part of the FUSE Early Release Observation program.

  9. UV extinction and IR emission in diffuse H2 regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aannestad, Per A.

    1994-01-01

    During this period, much work was spent in an attempt to use theoretical UV line indices as a basis for spectral calibration of the program stars. Five line indices are shown as functions of effective temperature and log g, calculated with the spectral synthesis programs of Kurucz. Open stars and circles are observed values from Fanelli et al., using the spectral class-effective temperature calibration of Schmidt-Kaler. We conclude that these line indices may be used to determine an effective stellar temperature, but with uncertainties of approximately a few thousand degrees. Also, for the hotter stars, theoretical line opacities are systematically low compared to observations. We have also found that Kurucz's new models appear to represent hot stars very well, even at far-UV wavelengths. This is shown in an example where two spectra of mu Col (spectral class 09.5 V) are compared to a synthetic spectrum for T(sub eff) = 33,000 K, log g = 4.0. Also shown (uppermost curve) is an empirical estimate of the intrinsic flux distribution for 09.5 V stars from Papaj, Wegner, and Krelowski.

  10. Modelling of ground-level UV radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koepke, P.; Schwander, H.; Thomalla, E.

    1996-06-01

    A number of modifications were made on the STAR radiation transmission model for greater ease of use while keeping its fault liability low. The improvements concern the entire aerosol description function of the model, the option of radiation calculation for different receiver geometries, the option of switching off temperature-dependent ozone absorption, and simplications of the STAR menu. The assets of using STAR are documented in the studies on the accuracy of the radiation transmission model. One of these studies gives a detailed comparison of the present model with a simple radiation model which reveals the limitations of approximation models. The other examines the error margin of radiation transmission models as a function of the input parameters available. It was found here that errors can be expected to range between 5 and 15% depending on the quality of the input data sets. A comparative study on the values obtained by measurement and through the model proved this judgement correct, the relative errors lying within the predicted range. Attached to this final report is a comprehensive sensitivity study which quantifies the action of various atmospheric parameters relevant to UV radiation, thus contributing to an elucidation of the process.

  11. UV curable materials development

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, B.G.

    1996-12-01

    Adhesives, coatings, and inks were selected for evaluation based on literature search and possible production applications. A differential photocalorimeter was used to measure degree of cure and allow prediction of optimum processing conditions. UV cure equipment were characterized and the ability to size equipment to specific materials cure needs established. Adhesion tests procedures were developed for the adhesives and solvent resistance testing procedures developed for the coatings and inks.

  12. uv preilluminated gas switches

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, L.P.; Orham, E.L.; Stowers, I.F.; Braucht, J.R.

    1980-06-03

    We have designed, built, and characterized uv preilluminated gas switches for a trigger circuit and a low inductance discharge circuit. These switches have been incorporated into a 54 x 76 x 150 cm pulser module to produce a 1 Ma output current rising at 5 x 10/sup 12/ amps/sec with 1 ns jitter. Twenty such modules will be used on the Nova Inertial Confinement Fusion Laser System for plasma retropulse shutters.

  13. Lyman-Werner UV escape fractions from primordial haloes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schauer, Anna T. P.; Whalen, Daniel J.; Glover, Simon C. O.; Klessen, Ralf S.

    2015-12-01

    Population III (Pop III) stars can regulate star formation in the primordial Universe in several ways. They can ionize nearby haloes, and even if their ionizing photons are trapped by their own haloes, their Lyman-Werner (LW) photons can still escape and destroy H2 in other haloes, preventing them from cooling and forming stars. LW escape fractions are thus a key parameter in cosmological simulations of early reionization and star formation but have not yet been parametrized for realistic haloes by halo or stellar mass. To do so, we perform radiation hydrodynamical simulations of LW UV escape from 9-120 M⊙ Pop III stars in 105-107 M⊙ haloes with ZEUS-MP. We find that photons in the LW lines (i.e. those responsible for destroying H2 in nearby systems) have escape fractions ranging from 0 to 85 per cent. No LW photons escape the most massive halo in our sample, even from the most massive star. Escape fractions for photons elsewhere in the 11.18-13.6 eV energy range, which can be redshifted into the LW lines at cosmological distances, are generally much higher, being above 60 per cent for all but the least massive stars in the most massive haloes. We find that shielding of H2 by neutral hydrogen, which has been neglected in most studies to date, produces escape fractions that are up to a factor of 3 smaller than those predicted by H2 self-shielding alone.

  14. Transverse effects in UV FELs

    SciTech Connect

    Small, D.W.; Wong, R.K.; Colson, W.B.

    1995-12-31

    In an ultraviolet Free Electron Laser (UV FEL), the electron beam size can be approximately the same as the optical mode size. The performance of a UV FEL is studied including the effect of emittance, betatron focusing, and external focusing of the electron beam on the transverse optical mode. The results are applied to the Industrial Laser Consortium`s UV FEL.

  15. Chameleon stars

    SciTech Connect

    Dzhunushaliev, Vladimir; Folomeev, Vladimir; Singleton, Douglas

    2011-10-15

    We consider a gravitating spherically symmetric configuration consisting of a scalar field nonminimally coupled to ordinary matter in the form of a perfect fluid. For this system we find static, regular, asymptotically flat solutions for both relativistic and nonrelativistic cases. It is shown that the presence of the nonminimal interaction leads to substantial changes both in the radial matter distribution of the star and in the star's total mass. A simple stability test indicates that, for the choice of parameters used in the paper, the solutions are unstable.

  16. The friendly stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Martha Evans

    Describes prominent stars such as Vega, Arcturus, and Antares and means of identifying them, discusses the constellations in which they are located, and explains star names, stellar light, distances between stars, and types of stars.

  17. Subdwarf B and O Stars: Which Evolutionary Pathways?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Napiwotzki, R.

    2009-03-01

    Hot subdwarf stars (spectral types subdwarf B and O) are long lived stars producing a large amount of UV radiation. This makes them excellent candidates to explain the UV radiation observed in old populations. However, the origin of both classes of hot subdwarfs is unclear. I review possible single star and binary channels. High resolution observations of hot subdwarfs taken in the course of the Supernova type Ia Progenitor surveY (SPY) are presented. The SPY observations are used for a systematic assessment of the frequency of close binaries among hot subdwarfs. Results are a high binary fraction among the subdwarf B stars - albeit not as high as in a previous investigation, but a very low binary frequency in helium-rich hot subdwarf O stars. Implications for the evolutionary status of hot subdwarfs are discussed.

  18. Near-simultaneous ultraviolet and optical spectrophotometry of T Tauri stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodrich, Robert W.; Herbig, G. H.

    1986-01-01

    A set of near-simultaneous ultraviolet and optical spectra and UBVR(J)I(J) photometry of five T Tauri stars has been analyzed for the shape of the energy distribution shortward of 3000 A. The far-ultraviolet continua of these stars are very much stronger than the level of light scattered from longer wavelengths in the IUE spectrograph. The results, expressed as two-color plots, show that the UV colors of T Tauri stars differ significantly from those expected from their optical spectral types. Although these particular K-type T Tauri stars are not extreme members of the class, they have the UV colors of A stars. The spectral shape of this UV excess is approximately that expected from published chromospheric models of T Tauri stars.

  19. Star Power

    SciTech Connect

    2014-10-17

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory has released ''Star Power,'' a new informational video that uses dramatic and beautiful images and thought-provoking interviews to highlight the importance of the Laboratory's research into magnetic fusion.

  20. Star Power

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2014-11-18

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory has released ''Star Power,'' a new informational video that uses dramatic and beautiful images and thought-provoking interviews to highlight the importance of the Laboratory's research into magnetic fusion.

  1. Population studies I. The Bidelman-MacConnell ''weak-metal'' stars

    SciTech Connect

    Norris, J.; Bessell, M.S.; Pickles, A.J.

    1985-07-01

    We present BVRI and DDO photometry for 309 of the Bidelman-MacConnell ''weak-metal'' stars, together with radial velocities for most of the stars that have (Fe/H)< or =-0.8. Photometric taxonomy is used to classify the sample as giants, dwarfs, red horizontal-branch stars, UV-bright stars, etc., and various calibrations have been adopted to determine (Fe/H), M/sub V/, space motions, and orbital eccentricity e.

  2. Star Numbers and Constellations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Francis, Richard L.

    1993-01-01

    A number for which the number of digits categorizes the number is called a star number. A set of star numbers having a designated property is called a constellation. Discusses nature and cardinality of constellations made up of star square, star prime, star abundant, and star deficient numbers. Presents five related problems for exploration. (MDH)

  3. Fundamental parameters of Wolf-Rayet stars. III. The evolutionary status of WNL stars.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowther, P. A.; Smith, L. J.; Hillier, D. J.; Schmutz, W.

    1995-01-01

    are determined using two independent methods based on the model atmosphere continuum distributions and the observed ubv colours. We find that the UV reddening towards WR25 (WN7+abs) is highly anomalous (R=4.6), confiming the findings of Tapia et al. (1988) for stars in Tr 16 in the Carina nebula.

  4. The ultraviolet energy distributions of late A stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boehm-Vitense, E.

    1981-01-01

    Observed late A star energy distributions for the wavelength range 1400-2500 A are compared. No difference is found between energy distributions of Am stars and those of normal slowly rotating A stars. The fluxes of rapidly rotating stars, however, appear to be increased for wavelengths smaller than 1530 A; this cannot be understood as an effect of pole heating or reduced gravity. In addition, the comparison of the UV energy distributions with model atmosphere energy distributions of Kurucz indicates some problems with the theoretical Si I absorption edges at 1530 A.

  5. IUE observations of symbiotic stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hack, M.

    1982-01-01

    The main photometric and spectroscopic characteristics in the ultraviolet and visual range of the most extensively studied symbiotic stars are reviewed. The main data obtained with IUE concern: (1) the determination of the shape of the UV continuum, which, in some cases, proves without doubt the presence of a hot companion; and the determination of the interstellar extinction by means of the lambda 2200 feature; (2) the measurement of emission lines, which enables us to derive the electron temperature and density of the circumstellar envelope, and, taken together with those lines observed in the visual, give more complete information on which spectroscopic mechanisms operate in the envelope; (3) the observation of absorption lines in the UV, which are present in just a few cases.

  6. The GALEX Catalog of UV Sources in the Magellanic Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thilker, David A.; Bianchi, L.; Simons, R.

    2014-01-01

    The Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) has performed unprecedented imaging surveys of the Magellanic Clouds (MC) and their surrounding areas including the Magellanic Bridge (MB) in near-UV (NUV, 1771-2831 Å) and far-UV (FUV, 1344-1786 Å) bands at 5″ resolution. Substantially more area was covered in the NUV than FUV, particularly in the bright central regions, because of the GALEX FUV detector failure. The 5σ depth of the NUV imaging varies between 20.8 and 22.7 (ABmag). Such imaging provides the first sensitive view of the entire content of hot stars in the Magellanic System, revealing the presence of young populations even in sites with extremely low star-formation rate surface density like the MB, owing to high sensitivity of the UV data to hot stars and the dark sky at these wavelengths. Crowding limits the quality of source detection and photometry from the standard mission pipeline processing. Therefore, we performed custom PSF-fitting photometry of the GALEX data in the MC survey region (<15° from the LMC, <10° from the SMC). After merging multiple detections of sources in overlapping images, the resulting catalog we have produced contains many million unique NUV point sources. This poster provides a first look at the GALEX MC survey and highlights some of the science investigations that the catalog and imaging dataset will make possible.

  7. Electron stars for holographic metallic criticality

    SciTech Connect

    Hartnoll, Sean A.; Tavanfar, Alireza

    2011-02-15

    We refer to the ground state of a gravitating, charged ideal fluid of fermions held at a finite chemical potential as an ''electron star.'' In a holographic setting, electron stars are candidate gravity duals for strongly interacting finite fermion density systems. We show how electron stars develop an emergent Lifshitz scaling at low energies. This IR scaling region is a consequence of the two-way interaction between emergent quantum critical bosonic modes and the finite density of fermions. By integrating from the IR region to an asymptotically AdS{sub 4} spacetime, we compute basic properties of the electron stars, including their electrical conductivity. We emphasize the challenge of connecting UV and IR physics in strongly interacting finite density systems.

  8. Uvs Nuur, Mongolia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    The Uvs Nuur Basin in Mongolia and the Russian Federation is the northernmost of the enclosed basins of Central Asia. It takes its name from Uvs Nuur Lake, a large, shallow and very saline lake, very important for migrating birds. Inscribed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 2003, the site is made up of twelve protected areas representing major biomes of eastern Eurasia. The steppe ecosystem supports a rich diversity of birds and the desert is home to a number of rare gerbil, jerboas and the marbled polecat. The mountains are an important refuge for the endangered snow leopard, mountain sheep, and the Asiatic ibex.

    The image covers an area of 46 x 47.8 km, was acquired on September 4, 2001, and is located near 50.3 degrees north latitude, 90.7 degrees east longitude.

    The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

  9. Characterizing Pale Blue Dots Around FGKM Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rugheimer, Sarah; Kaltenegger, Lisa; Sasselov, Dimitar; Segura, Antigona

    2015-12-01

    Exoplanet characterization of small rocky worlds will be a main focus in the coming decades. For future telescopes like JWST and UVOIR/HDST, an exoplanet’s host star will influence our ability to detect and interpret spectral features, including biosignatures. We present a complete suit of stellar models and a grid of model atmospheres for Earth-like planets at equivalent stages of geological evolution in their HZ for stellar effective temperature from Teff = 2300K to 7000K, sampling the entire FGKM stellar type range. Since M dwarfs are simultaneously the most numerous in the universe, the most active, and the most likely stars to host terrestrial exoplanets, we focus in particular on the range of UV emission possible in each sub M spectral class. The UV emission from a planet's host star dominates the photochemistry and thus the resultant observable spectral features of the planet. Using the latest UV spectra obtained by HST and IUE we model the effect of stellar activity on Earth-like planets. We also model the amount of UV flux reaching the surface for Earth-like planets at various geological epochs ranging from a pre-biotic world through the rise of oxygen and for Earth-like planets orbiting FGKM stars at equivalent stages of evolution. When modeling the remotely detectable spectra of these planets we focus on the primary detectable atmospheric features that indicate habitability on Earth, namely: H2O, CO2, O3, CH4, N2O and CH3Cl. We model spectra of Earth-like planets orbiting our grid of FGKM stars in the VIS/NIR (0.4 - 4 μm) and the IR (5 - 20 μm) range as input for future missions and concepts like UVOIR/HDST and JWST.

  10. Converting neutron stars into strange stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olinto, A. V.

    1991-01-01

    If strange matter is formed in the interior of a neutron star, it will convert the entire neutron star into a strange star. The proposed mechanisms are reviewed for strange matter seeding and the possible strange matter contamination of neutron star progenitors. The conversion process that follows seeding and the recent calculations of the conversion timescale are discussed.

  11. Modelling the UV spectrum of SDSS-III/BOSS galaxies: hints towards the detection of the UV upturn at high-z

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Cras, Claire; Maraston, Claudia; Thomas, Daniel; York, Donald G.

    2016-05-01

    We exploit stellar population models of absorption line indices in the ultraviolet (from 2000 - 3200Å) to study the spectra of massive galaxies. Our central aim is to investigate the occurrence at high-redshift of the UV upturn, i.e. the increased UV emission due to old stars observed in massive galaxies and spiral bulges in the local Universe. We use a large (˜275, 000) sample of z ˜ 0.6 massive (M★/M⊙ > 11.5) galaxies using both individual spectra and stacks and employ a suite of models including a UV contribution from old populations, spanning various effective temperatures, fuel consumptions and metallicities. We find that a subset of our indices; Mg I, Fe I, and BL3096, are able to differentiate between old and young UV ages. We find evidence for old stars contributing to the UV in massive galaxies, rather than star formation. The data favour models with low/medium upturn temperatures (10,000 - 25,000K) consistent with local galaxies, depending on the assumed metallicity, and with a larger fuel (f ˜ 6.5\\cdot 10^{-2} M_{⊙}). Models with one typical temperature are favoured over models with a temperature range, which would be typical of an extended horizontal branch. Old UV-bright populations are found in the whole galaxy sample (92%), with a mass fraction peaking around 20-30%. Upturn galaxies are massive and have redder colours, in agreement with findings in the local Universe. We find that the upturn phenomenon appears at z ˜ 1 and its frequency increases towards lower redshift, as expected by stellar evolution of low mass stars. Our findings will help constrain stellar evolution in the exotic UV upturn phase.

  12. Modelling the UV spectrum of SDSS-III/BOSS galaxies: hints towards the detection of the UV upturn at high-z

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Cras, Claire; Maraston, Claudia; Thomas, Daniel; York, Donald G.

    2016-09-01

    We exploit stellar population models of absorption line indices in the ultraviolet (from 2000 to 3200 Å) to study the spectra of massive galaxies. Our central aim is to investigate the occurrence at high redshift of the UV upturn, i.e. the increased UV emission due to old stars observed in massive galaxies and spiral bulges in the local Universe. We use a large (˜275 000) sample of z ˜ 0.6 massive (M*/M⊙ > 11.5) galaxies using both individual spectra and stacks and employ a suite of models including a UV contribution from old populations, spanning various effective temperatures, fuel consumptions and metallicities. We find that a subset of our indices; Mg I, Fe I, and BL3096, are able to differentiate between old and young UV ages. We find evidence for old stars contributing to the UV in massive galaxies, rather than star formation. The data favour models with low/medium upturn temperatures (10 000-25 000 K) consistent with local galaxies, depending on the assumed metallicity, and with a larger fuel (f ˜ 6.5× 10^{-2} {M}_{⊙}). Models with one typical temperature are favoured over models with a temperature range, which would be typical of an extended horizontal branch. Old UV-bright populations are found in the whole galaxy sample (92 per cent), with a mass fraction peaking around 20-30 per cent. Upturn galaxies are massive and have redder colours, in agreement with findings in the local Universe. We find that the upturn phenomenon appears at z ˜ 1 and its frequency increases towards lower redshift, as expected by stellar evolution of low-mass stars. Our findings will help constrain stellar evolution in the exotic UV upturn phase.

  13. Photosynthesis via Mineral Fluorescence in Harsh UV Radiation Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barge, L. M.; Nealson, K.

    2005-12-01

    Before the development of a protective ozone layer about two billion years ago, the surface ultraviolet flux on Earth would have restricted ancient life to environments that offered some protection from direct solar radiation, such as the deep ocean or under or within rocks. In environments where the visible solar radiation would have been reduced to levels too low for photosynthesis, visible fluorescence resulting from UV irradiation of minerals may have provided a useable energy source. We are investigating the possibility that photosynthesis can occur without direct sunlight, if certain minerals are present that can absorb UV radiation and fluoresce in the visible. There are several common minerals(e.g. fluorite, calcite) that emit strong visible radiation under both short- and long-wave UV light, as well as some that only emit visible radiation under specific UV wavelengths. We will test a variety of minerals that fluoresce at wavelengths utilized by microbial chlorophylls and accessory pigments, and by simulating endolithic communities living under a few centimeters or millimeters of rock, we will measure the intensity of fluorescence and UV radiation received at various depths. We plan to simulate a variety of environments where the surface UV radiation may have a significant impact on the survival of life. These include the early Earth and present-day Mars(where the atmosphere would offer little to no protection against biologically damaging UV radiation), as well as extrasolar planets(a terrestrial planet in the habitable zone around an M-type star, for example, would be subject to an intense UV flux due to high flare activity). If mineral fluorescence proves to be a viable survival mechanism for photosynthetic organisms in harsh radiation environments, there are many implications for the study of ancient life on Earth as well as the search for life elsewhere.

  14. Imaging Variable Stars with HST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karovska, M.

    2012-06-01

    (Abstract only) The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observations of astronomical sources, ranging from objects in our solar system to objects in the early Universe, have revolutionized our knowledge of the Universe its origins and contents. I highlight results from HST observations of variable stars obtained during the past twenty or so years. Multiwavelength observations of numerous variable stars and stellar systems were obtained using the superb HST imaging capabilities and its unprecedented angular resolution, especially in the UV and optical. The HST provided the first detailed images probing the structure of variable stars including their atmospheres and circumstellar environments. AAVSO observations and light curves have been critical for scheduling of many of these observations and provided important information and context for understanding of the imaging results of many variable sources. I describe the scientific results from the imaging observations of variable stars including AGBs, Miras, Cepheids, semiregular variables (including supergiants and giants), YSOs and interacting stellar systems with a variable stellar components. These results have led to an unprecedented understanding of the spatial and temporal characteristics of these objects and their place in the stellar evolutionary chains, and in the larger context of the dynamic evolving Universe.

  15. Imaging Variable Stars with HST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karovska, Margarita

    2011-05-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observations of astronomical sources, ranging from objects in our solar system to objects in the early Universe, have revolutionized our knowledge of the Universe its origins and contents.I will highlight results from HST observations of variable stars obtained during the past twenty or so years. Multiwavelength observations of numerous variable stars and stellar systems were obtained using the superb HST imaging capabilities and its unprecedented angular resolution, especially in the UV and optical. The HST provided the first detailed images probing the structure of variable stars including their atmospheres and circumstellar environments. AAVSO observations and light curves have been critical for scheduling of many of these observations and provided important information and context for understanding of the imaging results of many variable sources. I will describe the scientific results from the imaging observations of variable stars including AGBs, Miras, Cepheids, semi-regular variables (including supergiants and giants), YSOs and interacting stellar systems with a variable stellar components. These results have led to an unprecedented understanding of the spatial and temporal characteristics of these objects and their place in the stellar evolutionary chains, and in the larger context of the dynamic evolving Universe.

  16. UV extinction and IR emission in diffuse H2 regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aannestad, Per A.

    1994-01-01

    HII regions occupy a unique position in our understanding of the physical relationships between stars, the interstellar medium, and galactic structure. Observations show a complex interaction between a newly formed hot star and its surroundings. In particular, the ultraviolet radiation from the stars modifies the pre-existing dust, which again affects both the amount of ionizing radiation absorbed by the gas, and the infrared spectrum emitted by the heated dust. The aim of this project was to use UV and far-UV observations to gain information on the nebular dust, and to use this dust to model the far-IR emission, for a consistent picture of a few selected diffuse HII regions. Using archival data from the IUE and Voyager data banks and computed model atmospheres, we have deduced extinction curves for early-types stars. The requisite spectral resolution turned out to be a major task. We have successfully modelled these curves in terms of a multi-component, multi-size distribution of dust grains, and interpret the differences in the curves as primarily due to the presence or non-presence of intermediate size grains (0.01 to 0.04 micron). Much smaller (0.005 micron) grains must also be present. Finally, we have made calculations of the temperature fluctuations and the corresponding infra-red emission in such small grains.

  17. Christmas star.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biała, J.

    There are continuous attempts to identify the legendary Christmas Star with a real astronomical event accompanying the birth of Jesus from Nazareth. Unfortunately, the date of birth is difficult to establish on the basis of historical records with better accuracy than a few years. During that period a number of peculiar astronomical events were observed and it seem to be impossible to identify the right one unambiguously.

  18. Symbiotic Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munari, U.

    2012-06-01

    Symbiotic stars are interacting binary systems composed of a white dwarf (WD) accreting at high rate from a cool giant companion, which frequently fills its Roche lobe. The WD usually is extremely hot and luminous, and able to ionize a sizeable fraction of the cool giant wind, because it is believed the WD undergoes stable hydrogen nuclear burning on its surface of the material accreted from the companion. This leads to consider symbiotic stars as good candidates for the yet-to-be-identified progenitors of type Ia supernovae. Symbiotic stars display the simultaneous presence of many different types of variability, induced by the cool giant, the accreting WD, the circumstellar dust and ionized gas, with time scales ranging from seconds to decades. The long orbital periods (typically a couple of years) and complex outburst patterns, lasting from a few years to a century, make observations from professionals almost impossible to carry out, and open great opportunities to amateur astronomers to contribute fundamental data to science.

  19. Exceptional Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, S. R.; Hansen, B.; van Kerkwijk, M.; Phinney, E. S.

    2005-12-01

    As part of our Interdisciplinary Scientist effort (PI, Kulkarni) for the Space Interferometry Mission (SIM) we proposed an investigation with SIM of a number of exceptional stars. With SIM we plan to observe dozens of nearby white dwarfs and search for planets surviving the evolution away from the main sequence as well as (newly formed) planets formed in the circumbinary disks of post-AGB binaries or as a result of white dwarf mergers. We propose to measure the proper motion of a sample of X-ray binaries and Be star binaries with the view of understanding the originof high latitude objects and inferring natal kicks and pre-supernova orbits. We plan to observe several compact object binaries to determine the mass of the compact star. Of particular importance is the proposed observation of SS 433 (for which we propose to use the spectrometer on SIM to measure the proper motion of the emission line clumps embedded in the relativistic jets). Separately we are investigating the issue of frame tie between SIM and the ecliptic frame (by observing binary millisecond pulsars with SIM; the position of these objects is very well determined by pulsar timing) and the degree to which highly precise visibility amplitude measurements can be inverted to infer binary parameters.

  20. The ultraviolet-bright stars of Omega Centauri, M3, and M13

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landsman, Wayne B.; O'Connell, Robert W.; Whitney, Jonathan H.; Bohlin, Ralph C.; Hill, Robert S.; Maran, Stephen P.; Parise, Ronald A.; Roberts, Morton S.; Smith, Andrew A.; Stecher, Theodore P.

    1992-01-01

    Two new UV-bright stars detected within 2 arcmin of the center of Omega Cen are spectroscopically investigated with the short-wavelength spectrograph of the IUE. The IUE spectra of the UV-bright stars UIT-1 and UIT-2 in the core of Omega Cen superficially resemble those of Population I mid-B stars. The absorption lines of the core UV-bright stars are significantly weaker than in Population I stars, consistent with their membership in the cluster. Synthetic spectra calculated from low-metallicity Kurucz model stellar atmospheres are compared with the spectra. These objects are insufficiently luminous to be classical hydrogen-burning post-AGB stars. They may be evolved hot horizontal branch stars which have been brightened by more than 3 mag since leaving the zero-age horizontal branch. It is inferred from the spectra and luminosity of the core UV-bright stars that similar objects could provide the source of the UV light in elliptical galaxies.

  1. UVMag: stellar formation, evolution, structure and environment with space UV and visible spectropolarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neiner, C.; Baade, D.; Fullerton, A.; Gry, C.; Hussain, G.; Lèbre, A.; Morin, J.; Petit, P.; Sundqvist, J. O.; ud-Doula, A.; Vidotto, A. A.; Wade, G. A.

    2014-11-01

    Important insights into the formation, structure, evolution and environment of all types of stars can be obtained through the measurement of their winds and possible magnetospheres. However, this has hardly been done up to now mainly because of the lack of UV instrumentation available for long periods of time. To reach this aim, we have designed UVMag, an M-size space mission equipped with a high-resolution spectropolarimeter working in the UV and visible spectral range. The UV domain is crucial in stellar physics as it is very rich in atomic and molecular lines and contains most of the flux of hot stars. Moreover, covering the UV and visible spectral domains at the same time will allow us to study the star and its environment simultaneously. Adding polarimetric power to the spectrograph will multiply tenfold the capabilities of extracting information on stellar magnetospheres, winds, disks, and magnetic fields. Examples of science objectives that can be reached with UVMag are presented for pre-main sequence, main sequence and evolved stars. They will cast new light onto stellar physics by addressing many exciting and important questions. UVMag is currently undergoing a Research & Technology study and will be proposed at the forthcoming ESA call for M-size missions. This spectropolarimeter could also be installed on a large UV and visible observatory (e.g. NASA's LUVOIR project) within a suite of instruments.

  2. Micro UV detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabalo, Jerry B.; Sickenberger, Richard; Underwood, William J.; Sickenberger, David W.

    2004-09-01

    A lightweight, tactical biological agent detection network offers the potential for a detect-to-warn capability against biological aerosol attacks. Ideally, this capability can be achieved by deploying the sensors upwind from the protected assets. The further the distance upwind, the greater the warning time. The technological challenge to this concept is the biological detection technology. Here, cost, size and power are major factors in selecting acceptable technologies. This is in part due to the increased field densities needed to cover the upwind area and the fact that the sensors, when deployed forward, must operate autonomously for long periods of time with little or no long-term logistical support. The Defense Advanced Research Project Agency"s (DARPA) Solid-state Ultraviolet Optical Source (SUVOS) program offers an enabling technology to achieving a detector compatible with this mission. As an optical source, these devices emit excitation wavelengths known to be useful in the detection of biological aerosols. The wavelength band is absorbed by the biological aerosol and results in visible fluorescence. Detection of a biological aerosol is based on the observed intensity of this fluorescence signal compared to a background reference. Historically this has been accomplished with emission sources that are outside the boundaries for low cost, low power sensors. The SUVOS technology, on the other hand, provides the same basic wavelengths needed for the detection process in a small, low power package. ECBC has initiated an effort to develop a network array based on micro UV detectors that utilize the SUVOS technology. This paper presents an overview of the micro UV detector and some of the findings to date. This includes the overall design philosophy, fluid flow calculations to maximize presentation of aerosol particles to the sources, and the fluorescence measurements.

  3. Micro-UV detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabalo, Jerry B.; Sickenberger, Richard; Underwood, William J.; Sickenberger, David W.

    2004-12-01

    A lightweight, tactical biological agent detection network offers the potential for a detect-to-warn capability against biological aerosol attacks. Ideally, this capability can be achieved by deploying the sensors upwind from the protected assets. The further the distance upwind, the greater the warning time. The technological challenge to this concept is the biological detection technology. Here, cost, size and power are major factors in selecting acceptable technologies. This is in part due to the increased field densities needed to cover the upwind area and the fact that the sensors, when deployed forward, must operate autonomously for long periods of time with little or no long-term logistical support. The Defense Advanced Research Project Agency"s (DARPA) Solid-state Ultraviolet Optical Source (SUVOS) program offers an enabling technology to achieving a detector compatible with this mission. As an optical source, these devices emit excitation wavelengths known to be useful in the detection of biological aerosols. The wavelength band is absorbed by the biological aerosol and results in visible fluorescence. Detection of a biological aerosol is based on the observed intensity of this fluorescence signal compared to a background reference. Historically this has been accomplished with emission sources that are outside the boundaries for low cost, low power sensors. The SUVOS technology, on the other hand, provides the same basic wavelengths needed for the detection process in a small, low power package. ECBC has initiated an effort to develop a network array based on micro UV detectors that utilize the SUVOS technology. This paper presents an overview of the micro UV detector and some of the findings to date. This includes the overall design philosophy, fluid flow calculations to maximize presentation of aerosol particles to the sources, and the fluorescence measurements.

  4. HD 207739 - A strange composite star

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parsons, S. B.; Holm, A. V.; Kondo, Y.

    1983-01-01

    This star, classified F8 IIe + B:, has a very unusual ultraviolet spectrum, with abnormally strong and numerous absorption features in the far-UV and exceptionally strong Mg II emission. There is some resemblance to shell and pre-main-sequence B stars, but it more closely matches the strange spectra of the eclipsing systems VV Cep and SX Cas, and it probably has considerable circumstellar material at fairly high temperature. HD 207739 is probably an interacting binary and needs to be monitored for light and velocity variations.

  5. Nebular UV Absorption Lines in Planetary Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinerstein, Harriet

    We propose to continue our Cycle 1 program of studying the Lyman and Werner bands of H_2, seen in absorption against the UV continua of planetary nebula central stars, which arise within neutral-molecular envelopes surrounding the ionized gas. These are the pump lines for a fluorescent cascade of near-infrared emission lines which are observed in many planetary nebulae. By observing the UV lines we can probe the chemical and thermal structure of the envelopes, as well as measure molecular column densities and clarify the excitation processes for the infrared lines. In Cycle 1 we were granted time for three targets, one of which was successfully observed shortly before submission of this proposal. Although the data were not yet available for examination, similar target observed by the project team revealed a rich set of H_2 circumstellar absorption features, demonstrating the feasibility of our program. FUSE spectra also include absorption features from atomic species such as O I and C II, which give rise to important far-infrared fine-structure cooling lines that likewise have been observed from planetary nebulae. In Cycle 2, we add as a secondary goal a search for nebular components of the O VI 032, 1038 AA absorption lines, which trace the presence of hot shocked gas, in nebulae with anomalously strong optical recombination lines of ions of oxygen and nitrogen. This will test a plausible hypothesis for the origin of this anomaly.

  6. Star ratings. Stars of wonder.

    PubMed

    Dawes, David

    2002-09-12

    Analysis of trusts that changed their star-rating over the past two years indicates that a change of chief executive was not a significant factor. The length of time in post and the experience of the chief executive were also insignificant. This has serious implications for the theory behind franchising and the evaluation of franchised trusts. Holding chief executives to account for the organisation's performance within their first 12 months is unlikely to be effective. PMID:12357738

  7. Seismic telescope for astrophysical research from space (STARS) triply reflecting telescope: a space instrument for astrophysics.

    PubMed

    Badiali, M; Amoretti, M

    1997-12-01

    We describe the characteristics of the wide-field, triply reflecting telescope adopted for the European Space Agency project STARS (seismic telescope for astrophysical research from space), operating in the visible and UV range. PMID:18264439

  8. X-ray properties of planet-bearing host stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, Jurgen

    2007-10-01

    We propose to carry out a complete X-ray census of planet-bearing host stars with a distance limit of 30 pc. We specifically propose to obtain well-exposed EPIC spectra of those stars harboring close-in (Porb < 10 days) planets and to carry out detection experiments on planet-bearing stars hitherto not detected in X-rays. With the these data we will characterize the high-energy radiation field for a representative sample of nearby planet-bearing stars, compute the expected evaporation rates due to the host stars' X-ray and UV irradiation, study the metal abundance of the coronae of planet bearing host stars, assess the frequency of flaring events in our sample, construct luminosity distribution functions and place the high-energy environment of the Sun in the context of that for extrasolar planets.

  9. Binary stars.

    PubMed

    Paczynacuteski, B

    1984-07-20

    Most stars in the solar neighborhood are either double or multiple systems. They provide a unique opportunity to measure stellar masses and radii and to study many interesting and important phenomena. The best candidates for black holes are compact massive components of two x-ray binaries: Cygnus X-1 and LMC X-3. The binary radio pulsar PSR 1913 + 16 provides the best available evidence for gravitational radiation. Accretion disks and jets observed in close binaries offer a very good testing ground for models of active galactic nuclei and quasars. PMID:17749544

  10. DUST-SCATTERED ULTRAVIOLET HALOS AROUND BRIGHT STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Murthy, Jayant; Henry, Richard Conn

    2011-06-10

    We have discovered ultraviolet (UV) halos extending as far as 5 deg. around four (of six) bright UV stars using data from the Galaxy Evolution Explorer satellite. These halos are due to scattering of the starlight from nearby thin, foreground dust clouds. We have placed limits of 0.58 {+-} 0.12 and 0.72 {+-} 0.06 on the phase function asymmetry factor (g) in the FUV (1521 A) and NUV (2320 A) bands, respectively. We suggest that these halos are a common feature around bright stars and may be used to explore the scattering function of interstellar grains at small angles.

  11. Deep UV LEDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jung; Amano, Hiroshi; Schowalter, Leo

    2014-06-01

    Deep ultraviolet (DUV) photons interact strongly with a broad range of chemical and biological molecules; compact DUV light sources could enable a wide range of applications in chemi/bio-sensing, sterilization, agriculture, and industrial curing. The much shorter wavelength also results in useful characteristics related to optical diffraction (for lithography) and scattering (non-line-of-sight communication). The family of III-N (AlGaInN) compound semiconductors offers a tunable energy gap from infrared to DUV. While InGaN-based blue light emitters have been the primary focus for the obvious application of solid state lighting, there is a growing interest in the development of efficient UV and DUV light-emitting devices. In the past few years we have witnessed an increasing investment from both government and industry sectors to further the state of DUV light-emitting devices. The contributions in Semiconductor Science and Technology 's special issue on DUV devices provide an up-to-date snapshot covering many relevant topics in this field. Given the expected importance of bulk AlN substrate in DUV technology, we are pleased to include a review article by Hartmann et al on the growth of AlN bulk crystal by physical vapour transport. The issue of polarization field within the deep ultraviolet LEDs is examined in the article by Braut et al. Several commercial companies provide useful updates in their development of DUV emitters, including Nichia (Fujioka et al ), Nitride Semiconductors (Muramoto et al ) and Sensor Electronic Technology (Shatalov et al ). We believe these articles will provide an excellent overview of the state of technology. The growth of AlGaN heterostructures by molecular beam epitaxy, in contrast to the common organo-metallic vapour phase epitaxy, is discussed by Ivanov et al. Since hexagonal boron nitride (BN) has received much attention as both a UV and a two-dimensional electronic material, we believe it serves readers well to include the

  12. Eutactic star closest to a given star

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez, A.; Torres, M.; Aragon, J. L.

    2007-05-15

    A eutactic star is a set of M vectors in R{sup n} (M>n) that are projections of M orthogonal vectors in R{sup M}. Eutactic stars have remarkable properties that have been exploited in several fields such as crystallography, graph theory, wavelets, and quantum measurement theory. In this work we show that given an arbitrary star of vectors, there exists a closest eutactic star in the Frobenius norm. An algorithm for calculating this star is presented. Additionally, the distance between both stars provides a new measure of eutacticity.

  13. Tomographic separation of composite spectra. The components of Plaskett's Star

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bagnuolo, William G., Jr.; Gies, Douglas R.; Wiggs, Michael S.

    1991-01-01

    The UV photospheric lines of Plaskett's Star (HD 47129), a 14.4 day period, double lined O-type spectroscopic binary were analyzed. Archival data from IUE (17 spectra well distributed in orbital phase) were analyzed with several techniques. A cross correlation analysis, which showed that the secondary produces significant lines in the UV, indicates that the mass ratio is q = 1.18 + or - 0.12 (secondary slightly more massive). A tomography algorithm was used to produce the separate spectra of the two stars in six spectral regions. The interpolated spectral classifications of the primary and secondary, 07.3 I and 06.2 I, respectively, were estimated through a comparison of UV line ratios with those in spectral standard stars. The intensity ratio of the stars in the UV is 0.53 + or - 0.05 (primary brighter). The secondary lines appear rotationally broadened, and the projected rotational velocity V sin i for this star is estimated to be 310 + or - 20 km/s. The possible evolutionary history of this system is discussed through a comparison of the positions of the components and evolutionary tracks in the H-R diagram.

  14. STAR FORMATION EFFICIENCY IN THE COOL CORES OF GALAXY CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, Michael; Veilleux, Sylvain; Mushotzky, Richard; Reynolds, Christopher; Rupke, David S. N. E-mail: veilleux@astro.umd.edu

    2011-06-20

    We have assembled a sample of high spatial resolution far-UV (Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys/Solar Blind Channel) and H{alpha} (Maryland-Magellan Tunable Filter) imaging for 15 cool core galaxy clusters. These data provide a detailed view of the thin, extended filaments in the cores of these clusters. Based on the ratio of the far-UV to H{alpha} luminosity, the UV spectral energy distribution, and the far-UV and H{alpha} morphology, we conclude that the warm, ionized gas in the cluster cores is photoionized by massive, young stars in all but a few (A1991, A2052, A2580) systems. We show that the extended filaments, when considered separately, appear to be star forming in the majority of cases, while the nuclei tend to have slightly lower far-UV luminosity for a given H{alpha} luminosity, suggesting a harder ionization source or higher extinction. We observe a slight offset in the UV/H{alpha} ratio from the expected value for continuous star formation which can be modeled by assuming intrinsic extinction by modest amounts of dust (E(B - V) {approx} 0.2) or a top-heavy initial mass function in the extended filaments. The measured star formation rates vary from {approx}0.05 M{sub sun} yr{sup -1} in the nuclei of non-cooling systems, consistent with passive, red ellipticals, to {approx}5 M{sub sun} yr{sup -1} in systems with complex, extended, optical filaments. Comparing the estimates of the star formation rate based on UV, H{alpha}, and infrared luminosities to the spectroscopically determined X-ray cooling rate suggests a star formation efficiency of 14{sup +18}{sub -8}%. This value represents the time-averaged fraction, by mass, of gas cooling out of the intracluster medium, which turns into stars and agrees well with the global fraction of baryons in stars required by simulations to reproduce the stellar mass function for galaxies. This result provides a new constraint on the efficiency of star formation in accreting systems.

  15. Impact of UV-A radiation on erythemal UV and UV-index estimation over Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sang Seo; Lee, Yun Gon; Kim, Jung Hyun

    2015-12-01

    Because total UV (TUV) in the UV-A region is 100 times higher than in the UV-B region, UV-A is a considerable component when calculating erythemal UV (EUV) and UV-index. The ratio of EUV to TUV in the UV-A value [EUV(A)/TUV(A)] is investigated to convert the EUV(A) from TUV(A) for broadband observation. The representative value of EUV(A)/TUV(A), from the simulation study, is 6.9×10-4, changing from 6.1×10-4 to 7.0×10-4 as aerosol optical depth, total ozone and solar zenith angle change. By adopting the observational data of EUV(B) and TUV(A) from UV-biometer measurements at Yonsei University [(37.57°N, 126.95°E), 84 m above sea level], the EUV irradiance increases to 15% of EUV(B) due to the consideration of EUV(A) from the data of TUV(A) observation. Compared to the total EUV observed from the Brewer spectrophotometer at the same site, the EUV(B) from the UV-biometer observes only 95% of total EUV, and its underestimation is caused by neglecting the effect of UV-A. However, the sum of EUV(B) and EUV(A) [EUV(A+B)] from two UV-biometers is 10% larger than the EUV from the Brewer spectrophotometer because of the spectral overlap effect in the range 320-340 nm. The correction factor for the overlap effect adjusts 8% of total EUV.

  16. First-Ever Census of Variable Mira-Type Stars in Galaxy Outside the Local Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-05-01

    "variable star". The percentage is much higher among large, cool stars ("red giants") - in fact, almost all luminous stars of that type are variable. Such stars are known as Mira-variables ; the name comes from the most prominent member of this class, Omicron Ceti in the constellation Cetus (The Whale), also known as "Stella Mira" (The Wonderful Star). Its brightness changes with a period of 332 days and it is about 1500 times brighter at maximum (visible magnitude 2 and one of the fifty brightest stars in the sky) than at minimum (magnitude 10 and only visible in small telescopes) [2]. Stars like Omicron Ceti are nearing the end of their life. They are very large and have sizes from a few hundred to about a thousand times that of the Sun. The brightness variation is due to pulsations during which the star's temperature and size change dramatically. In the following evolutionary phase, Mira-variables will shed their outer layers into surrounding space and become visible as planetary nebulae with a hot and compact star (a "white dwarf") at the middle of a nebula of gas and dust (cf. the "Dumbbell Nebula" - ESO PR Photo 38a-b/98 ). Several thousand Mira-type stars are currently known in the Milky Way galaxy and a few hundred have been found in other nearby galaxies, including the Magellanic Clouds. The peculiar galaxy Centaurus A ESO PR Photo 14a/03 ESO PR Photo 14a/03 [Preview - JPEG: 400 x 451 pix - 53k [Normal - JPEG: 800 x 903 pix - 528k] [Hi-Res - JPEG: 3612 x 4075 pix - 8.4M] ESO PR Photo 14b/03 ESO PR Photo 14b/03 [Preview - JPEG: 570 x 400 pix - 52k [Normal - JPEG: 1140 x 800 pix - 392k] ESO PR Photo 14c/03 ESO PR Photo 14c/03 [Preview - JPEG: 400 x 451 pix - 61k [Normal - JPEG: 800 x 903 pix - 768k] ESO PR Photo 14d/03 ESO PR Photo 14d/03 [Preview - JPEG: 400 x 451 pix - 56k [Normal - JPEG: 800 x 903 pix - 760k] Captions : PR Photo 14a/03 is a colour composite photo of the peculiar galaxy Centaurus A (NGC 5128) , obtained with the Wide-Field Imager (WFI) cam

  17. Young, Ultraviolet-bright Stars Dominate Dust Heating in Star-forming Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Law, Ka-Hei; Gordon, Karl D.; Misselt, K. A.

    2011-09-01

    In star-forming galaxies, dust plays a significant role in shaping the ultraviolet (UV) through infrared (IR) spectrum. Dust attenuates the radiation from stars, and re-radiates the energy through equilibrium and non-equilibrium emission. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), graphite, and silicates contribute to different features in the spectral energy distribution; however, they are all highly opaque in the same spectral region—the UV. Compared to old stellar populations, young populations release a higher fraction of their total luminosity in the UV, making them a good source of the energetic UV photons that can power dust emission. However, given their relative abundance, the question of whether young or old stellar populations provide most of these photons that power the IR emission is an interesting question. Using three samples of galaxies observed with the Spitzer Space Telescope and our dusty radiative transfer model, we find that young stellar populations (on the order of 100 million years old) dominate the dust heating in star-forming galaxies, and old stellar populations (13 billion years old) generally contribute less than 20% of the far-IR luminosity.

  18. YOUNG, ULTRAVIOLET-BRIGHT STARS DOMINATE DUST HEATING IN STAR-FORMING GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Law, Ka-Hei; Gordon, Karl D.; Misselt, K. A. E-mail: kgordon@stsci.edu

    2011-09-10

    In star-forming galaxies, dust plays a significant role in shaping the ultraviolet (UV) through infrared (IR) spectrum. Dust attenuates the radiation from stars, and re-radiates the energy through equilibrium and non-equilibrium emission. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), graphite, and silicates contribute to different features in the spectral energy distribution; however, they are all highly opaque in the same spectral region-the UV. Compared to old stellar populations, young populations release a higher fraction of their total luminosity in the UV, making them a good source of the energetic UV photons that can power dust emission. However, given their relative abundance, the question of whether young or old stellar populations provide most of these photons that power the IR emission is an interesting question. Using three samples of galaxies observed with the Spitzer Space Telescope and our dusty radiative transfer model, we find that young stellar populations (on the order of 100 million years old) dominate the dust heating in star-forming galaxies, and old stellar populations (13 billion years old) generally contribute less than 20% of the far-IR luminosity.

  19. Beryllium and Boron abundances in population II stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The scientific focus of this program was to undertake UV spectroscopic abundance analyses of extremely metal poor stars with attention to determining abundances of light elements such as beryllium and boron. The abundances are likely to reflect primordial abundances within the early galaxy and help to constrain models for early galactic nucleosynthesis. The general metal abundances of these stars are also important for understanding stellar evolution.

  20. Star formation - An overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, N. J., II

    1985-01-01

    Methods for studying star formation are reviewed. Stellar clusters and associations, as well as field stars, provide a fossil record of the star formation process. Regions of current star formation provide a series of snapshots of different epochs of star formation. A simplified picture of individual star formation as it was envisioned in the late 1970s is contrasted with the results of recent observations, in particular the outflow phenomenon.

  1. The cycle-dependence of Far-UV and Middle-UV solar emission: EMD analysis of SOLSTICE and Mg II signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berrilli, Francesco; Lovric, Mija; Federico, Tosone; Cagnazzo, Chiara; Del Moro, Dario; Pietropaolo, Ermanno

    2016-04-01

    The solar Far-UV and Middle-UV variability is extremely relevant for the stratospheric ozone concentration and dynamics. We investigate solar UV variability at decennial time scale using the data of SOLar-STellar Irradiance Comparison Experiment (SOLSTICE) on SORCE and Bremen Mg II composite signal. The Empirical Mode Decomposition (EMD) technique has been applied to Mg II and UV signals to separate intrinsic solar components and focus on 11-y variability. The analysis shows that the star changes the UV spectral distribution during 11-y cycle with a different behaviour during the descending phase of cycle 23 and growing phase of cycle 24. The observed UV major evolution can provide empirically-motivated UV predictions over the cycles. On the other hand, the observed minor differences during the ascending and descending phase of solar cycle can be attributed to physical changes in solar emission or described by an uncorrected time-dependent performance of SOLSTICE UV channels. We shortly discuss both possibilities.

  2. Towards universal hybrid star formation rate estimators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boquien, M.; Kennicutt, R.; Calzetti, D.; Dale, D.; Galametz, M.; Sauvage, M.; Croxall, K.; Draine, B.; Kirkpatrick, A.; Kumari, N.; Hunt, L.; De Looze, I.; Pellegrini, E.; Relaño, M.; Smith, J.-D.; Tabatabaei, F.

    2016-06-01

    Context. To compute the star formation rate (SFR) of galaxies from the rest-frame ultraviolet (UV), it is essential to take the obscuration by dust into account. To do so, one of the most popular methods consists in combining the UV with the emission from the dust itself in the infrared (IR). Yet, different studies have derived different estimators, showing that no such hybrid estimator is truly universal. Aims: In this paper we aim at understanding and quantifying what physical processes fundamentally drive the variations between different hybrid estimators. In so doing, we aim at deriving new universal UV+IR hybrid estimators to correct the UV for dust attenuation at local and global scales, taking the intrinsic physical properties of galaxies into account. Methods: We use the CIGALE code to model the spatially resolved far-UV to far-IR spectral energy distributions of eight nearby star-forming galaxies drawn from the KINGFISH sample. This allows us to determine their local physical properties, and in particular their UV attenuation, average SFR, average specific SFR (sSFR), and their stellar mass. We then examine how hybrid estimators depend on said properties. Results: We find that hybrid UV+IR estimators strongly depend on the stellar mass surface density (in particular at 70 μm and 100 μm) and on the sSFR (in particular at 24 μm and the total infrared). Consequently, the IR scaling coefficients for UV obscuration can vary by almost an order of magnitude: from 1.55 to 13.45 at 24 μm for instance. This result contrasts with other groups who found relatively constant coefficients with small deviations. We exploit these variations to construct a new class of adaptative hybrid estimators based on observed UV to near-IR colours and near-IR luminosity densities per unit area. We find that they can reliably be extended to entire galaxies. Conclusions: The new estimators provide better estimates of attenuation-corrected UV emission than classical hybrid estimators

  3. [Ozone decline and UV increase].

    PubMed

    Winkler, P; Trepte, S

    2004-02-01

    The following results have been obtained from long-term observations on the ozone layer and UV at the Meteorological Observatory Hohenpeigenberg:The seasonally varying decline of the ozone layer determines the maximum exposure to UV. Since ozone decline shows the highest rates in the spring months the UV exposure has most strongly increased in this time of the year. This is especially important because in spring the human skin is not adapted to UV exposure. Weather changes from day to day can induce rapid ozone reductions in spring about -30% which in turn is followed by an increase in UV of about 40%. Clouds, especially the transparent cirrus clouds (high clouds consisting of ice particles) have increased in frequency during spring and fall while a decrease is observed in summer. This change in cloudiness reduces the daily UV dose in spring and fall while it is enhanced in summer. With increasing height above sea level UV rises by roughly 10% per 1000 m (rule of thumb). Snow reflects the UV-radiation by up to 80% enhancing the UV-doses at relevant conditions. Strong volcano eruptions destroy ozone in the stratosphere additionally during 1-2 years after the eruption. Therafter the ozone layer recovers. In April 1993, after the eruption of Mt. Pinatubo (1991), the UV burden was still 40% higher than average. Miniholes and streamers can appear unexpected on a short-time scale and cross over Central Europe within 1-2 days, thus enhancing UV irradiation. The human skin reacts to UV exposure depending on the type of skin. The campaign "Sonne(n) mit Verstand" of the Bavarian Ministries for Environment, for Health and for Education informs about the danger of UV radiation (see www.sonne-mit-ver-stand.de). The German Weather Service informs the public on present developments of the ozone layer and relevant topics byits ozone bulletin, which is also available via internet under (www.dwd.de/deFundE/Observator/MOHp/hp2/ozon/bulletin.htm). PMID:14770335

  4. The void galaxy survey: Star formation properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beygu, B.; Kreckel, K.; van der Hulst, J. M.; Jarrett, T. H.; Peletier, R.; van de Weygaert, R.; van Gorkom, J. H.; Aragon-Calvo, M. A.

    2016-05-01

    We study the star formation properties of 59 void galaxies as part of the Void Galaxy Survey (VGS). Current star formation rates are derived from H α and recent star formation rates from near-UV imaging. In addition, infrared 3.4, 4.6, 12 and 22 μm Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer emission is used as star formation and mass indicator. Infrared and optical colours show that the VGS sample displays a wide range of dust and metallicity properties. We combine these measurements with stellar and H I masses to measure the specific SFRs (SFR/M*) and star formation efficiencies ({SFR/{M }_H I}). We compare the star formation properties of our sample with galaxies in the more moderate density regions of the cosmic web, `the field'. We find that specific SFRs of the VGS galaxies as a function of stellar and H I mass are similar to those of the galaxies in these field regions. Their SFR α is slightly elevated than the galaxies in the field for a given total H I mass. In the global star formation picture presented by Kennicutt-Schmidt, VGS galaxies fall into the regime of low average star formation and correspondingly low H I surface density. Their mean {SFR α /{M}_{H I} and SFR α/M* are of the order of 10- 9.9 yr- 1. We conclude that while the large-scale underdense environment must play some role in galaxy formation and growth through accretion, we find that even with respect to other galaxies in the more mildly underdense regions, the increase in star formation rate is only marginal.

  5. The Galaxy UV Luminosity Function before the Epoch of Reionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, Charlotte A.; Trenti, Michele; Treu, Tommaso

    2015-11-01

    We present a model for the evolution of the galaxy ultraviolet (UV) luminosity function (LF) across cosmic time where star formation is linked to the assembly of dark matter halos under the assumption of a mass-dependent, but redshift-independent, efficiency. We introduce a new self-consistent treatment of the halo star formation history, which allows us to make predictions at z > 10 (lookback time ≲500 Myr), when growth is rapid. With a calibration at a single redshift to set the stellar-to-halo mass ratio, and no further degrees of freedom, our model captures the evolution of the UV LF over all available observations (0 ≲ z ≲ 10). The significant drop in luminosity density of currently detectable galaxies beyond z ˜ 8 is explained by a shift of star formation toward less massive, fainter galaxies. Assuming that star formation proceeds down to atomic cooling halos, we derive a reionization optical depth τ ={0.056}-0.010+0.007, fully consistent with the latest Planck measurement, implying that the universe is fully reionized at z={7.84}-0.98+0.65. In addition, our model naturally produces smoothly rising star formation histories for galaxies with L ≲ L* in agreement with observations and hydrodynamical simulations. Before the epoch of reionization at z > 10 we predict the LF to remain well-described by a Schechter function, but with an increasingly steep faint-end slope (α ˜ -3.5 at z ˜ 16). Finally, we construct forecasts for surveys with James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) and Wide-field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST) and predict that galaxies out to z ˜ 14 will be observed. Galaxies at z > 15 will likely be accessible to JWST and WFIRST only through the assistance of strong lensing magnification.

  6. Legacy ExtraGalactic UV Survey (LEGUS): Revolutionary UV astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ubeda, Leonardo

    2014-06-01

    The Treasury program LEGUS (HST/GO-13364) is a 154-orbit Hubble Space Telescope survey that is obtaining HST/WFC3 and HST/ACS NUV, U, B, V, and I-band imaging of 50 star-forming galaxies at distances of 4-12 Mpc. The LEGUS targets have been carefully selected to uniformly sample a full range of global galaxy properties such as morphology, star formation rate, mass, metallicity, internal structure, and interaction state.We provide a first taste of the type and quality of the data products that will be made available to the community through the website legus.stsci.edu. The data includes: state of the art science-ready mosaics in five wavelengths; band-merged catalogs of stellar sources (including location and photometry), band-merged catalogs of star clusters (locations, photometry, aperture corrections), catalogs of star cluster properties (ages, masses, extinction). and ancillary data available for this galaxy sample such as GALEX, Spitzer and WISE imaging.The above catalogs will enable a wide range of scientific applications, including color-magnitude diagrams and color-color diagrams of both stars and clusters, to derive star formation histories, cluster formation histories, the evolution of stars/association/cluster clustering, and the dependence of these on galactic environment. These are only a few of the potential applications enabled by a diverse sample like LEGUS.

  7. Future Far-UV Studies of Hot White Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barstow, M. A.

    We are beginning to understand the evolution of the hot white dwarfs, but even with telescopes such as IUE and HST, we have still only observed a modest number of the most interesting objects with the spectral resolution and signal-to-noise required. This is in part arises from the intense competition for HST time, against both optical and IR observations as well as other far-UV bids. A key requirement of any new far-UV telescope is sufficient sensitivity to observe most of the ~100 or so brightest hot white dwarfs at high spectral resolution. A spectral resolving power of at least 30,000 is required for studies of white dwarfs. First it is necessary to detect and resolve photospheric, circumstellar and interstellar absorption features. Interstellar/circumstellar features may have several components that can only be separated in velocity space. For example, it is interesting to note that IUE was unable to resolve the photospheric and circumstellar CIV components of G191-B2B, discovered by the HST STIS instrument, leading to a serious overestimate of the carbon abundance in this star. There may be similar components in other stars observed only by IUE. In those stars that have highly stratified atmospheres, the detailed shape of the absorption lines is sensitive to the atmospheric structure. High-resolution observations of the line shapes can provide us with a direct probe of atmospheric structure.

  8. Disk Evaporation in Star Forming Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollenbach, David; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Young stars produce sufficient ultraviolet photon luminosity and mechanical luminosity in their winds to significantly affect the structure and evolution of the accretion disks surrounding them. The Lyman continuum photons create a nearly static, ionized, isothermal 10(exp 4) K atmosphere forms above the neutral disk at small distances from the star. Further out, they create a photoevaporative flow which relatively rapidly destroys the disk. The resulting slow (10-50 km/s) ionized outflow, which persists for approx. greater than 10(exp 5) years for disk masses M(sub d) approx. 0.3M(sub *), may explain the observational characteristics of many ultracompact HII regions. We compare model results to the observed radio free-free spectra and luminosities of ultracompact HII regions and to the interesting source MWC349, which is observed to produce hydrogen masers. We apply the results to Ae and Be stars in order to determine the lifetimes of disks around such stars. We also apply the results to the early solar nebula to explain the the dispersal of the solar nebula and the differences in hydrogen content in the giant planets. Finally, we model the small bright objects ("proplyds") observed in the Orion Nebula as disks around young, low mass stars which are externally illuminated by the UV photons from the nearby massive star Theta(sup 1) C.

  9. Applying Machine Learning to Star Cluster Classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedorenko, Kristina; Grasha, Kathryn; Calzetti, Daniela; Mahadevan, Sridhar

    2016-01-01

    Catalogs describing populations of star clusters are essential in investigating a range of important issues, from star formation to galaxy evolution. Star cluster catalogs are typically created in a two-step process: in the first step, a catalog of sources is automatically produced; in the second step, each of the extracted sources is visually inspected by 3-to-5 human classifiers and assigned a category. Classification by humans is labor-intensive and time consuming, thus it creates a bottleneck, and substantially slows down progress in star cluster research.We seek to automate the process of labeling star clusters (the second step) through applying supervised machine learning techniques. This will provide a fast, objective, and reproducible classification. Our data is HST (WFC3 and ACS) images of galaxies in the distance range of 3.5-12 Mpc, with a few thousand star clusters already classified by humans as a part of the LEGUS (Legacy ExtraGalactic UV Survey) project. The classification is based on 4 labels (Class 1 - symmetric, compact cluster; Class 2 - concentrated object with some degree of asymmetry; Class 3 - multiple peak system, diffuse; and Class 4 - spurious detection). We start by looking at basic machine learning methods such as decision trees. We then proceed to evaluate performance of more advanced techniques, focusing on convolutional neural networks and other Deep Learning methods. We analyze the results, and suggest several directions for further improvement.

  10. Overview of the observations of symbiotic stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viotti, Roberto

    1993-01-01

    The term Symbiotic stars commonly denotes variable stars whose optical spectra simultaneously present a cool absorption spectrum (typically TiO absorption bands) and emission lines of high ionization energy. This term is now used for the category of variable stars with composite spectrum. The main spectral features of these objects are: (1) the presence of the red continuum typical of a cool star, (2) the rich emission line spectrum, and (3) the UV excess, frequently with the Balmer continuum in emission. In addition to the peculiar spectrum, the very irregular photometric and spectroscopic variability is the major feature of the symbiotic stars. Moreover, the light curve is basic to identify the different phases of activity in a symbiotic star. The physical mechanisms that cause the symbiotic phenomenon and its variety are the focus of this paper. An astronomical phenomenon characterized by a composite stellar spectrum with two apparently conflicting features, and large variability has been observed. Our research set out to find the origin of this behavior and, in particular, to identify and measure the physical mechanism(s) responsible for the observed phenomena.

  11. Elemental Abundances of Mercury-Manganese Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adelman, Saul J.

    We propose to obtain a carefully planned set of multiple high dispersion exposures of three MercuryManganese stars in both the SWP and LWP cameras. These observations will be coadded to increase the S/N ratio so that accurate elemental abundances can be derived for these examples of HgMn stars, each of which represents some extreme class aspect. This will increase of sample of HgMn stars from four to seven. Of particular interest are the abundances of N and Co in which some HgMn stars have shown remarkable underabundances. Comparison of the UV and optical spectra features due to light elements such as N (and C and 0) provide an observational framework to test NLTE models such as those of Takada (1993). This work has already shed some light on some of earlier findings for normal stars. The ability to accurately determine the surface chemical composition of the late B stars through such studies will lead to better tests for theories purporting to explain the origin of the chemical peculiarities seen in this temperature domain.

  12. Modelling of variability of the chemically peculiar star ϕ Draconis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prvák, M.; Liška, J.; Krtička, J.; Mikulášek, Z.; Lüftinger, T.

    2015-12-01

    Context. The presence of heavier chemical elements in stellar atmospheres influences the spectral energy distribution of stars. An uneven surface distribution of these elements, together with flux redistribution and stellar rotation, are commonly believed to be the primary causes of the variability of chemically peculiar (CP) stars. Aims: We aim to model the photometric variability of the CP star ϕ Dra based on the assumption of inhomogeneous surface distribution of heavier elements and compare it to the observed variability of the star. We also intend to identify the processes that contribute most significantly to its photometric variability. Methods: We use a grid of TLUSTY model atmospheres and the SYNSPEC code to model the radiative flux emerging from the individual surface elements of ϕ Dra with different chemical compositions. We integrate the emerging flux over the visible surface of the star at different phases throughout the entire rotational period to synthesise theoretical light curves of the star in several spectral bands. Results: The synthetic light curves in the visible and in the near-UV regions are in very good agreement with the observed variability of the star. The lack of usable far-UV measurements of the star precludes making any conclusions about the correctness of our model in this spectral region. We also obtained 194 new BVRI observations of ϕ Dra and improved its rotational period to P = 1 ḍ 716500(2). Conclusions: We show that the inhomogeneous distribution of elements, flux redistribution, and rotation of the star are fully capable of explaining the stellar variability in the visible and the near-UV regions. The flux redistribution is mainly caused by bound-free transitions of silicon and bound-bound transitions of iron. BVRI photometry of Phi Dra is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/584/A17

  13. Effective temperatures of A and F stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boehm-Vitense, E.

    1982-01-01

    Effective temperatures of late A and early F stars are determined from the observed fluxes in the visual at 1900 A and 1420 A. The observed ratios are compared with those calculated by Kurucz (1979). A correction of the theoretical fluxes at 1900 A brings the effective temperatures obtained from different ratios into reasonable agreement. The effective temperatures determined in this way for late A stars agree well with those obtained from the optical region. For F stars, however, the effective temperatures obtained from the UV are found to be higher than those obtained from the optical region if radiative equilibrium models are used for the comparison. It is thought that this discrepancy may derive from the effects of temperature, pressure, and absorption coefficient inhomogeneities caused by convection.

  14. UBV photometry of hot white dwarf stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheselka, Mathew; Holberg, J. B.; Watkins, Ron; Collins, James; Tweedy, R. W.

    1993-12-01

    Johnson UBV photometry has been obtained for a set of hot degenerate stars, primarily DA and DO white dwarfs from among those detected in the Palomar-Green survey of UV excess objects. Most of our program stars have estimated effective temperatures (Teff) in the range 22,000 to 80,000 K and have no previous photometry. Some objects selected are also x-ray and extreme ultraviolet sources from the ROSAT all sky survey. The importance of precise photometric measurements in the analysis of x-ray data is discussed. A discrepancy between the observed colors and predicted colors is noted, and possibly accounted for by difficulties in defining the atmospheric cutoff of the U band and a general lack of hot stars used to define the photometric transformation between theoretical and observed colors.

  15. Discovery of Iron in PG1159 Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, Klaus; Rauch, Thomas; Kruk, Jeffrey W.

    2010-11-01

    The lack of Fe VII lines in PG1159 stars had led to the conclusion that in some objects iron must be strongly depleted. We have now detected Fe X lines in FUSE spectra of the very hottest PG1159 stars (Teff = 150 000-200 000 KRX J2117.1+3412, K1-16, NGC 246, Longmore4). Surprisingly, we derive a solar iron abundance. It is conspicuous that they are among the most massive PG1159 stars (0.71-0.82 Msolar), in contrast to those objects for which strongest Fe-deficiency was claimed (0.53-0.56 Msolar). Based on new Fe VIII line identifications in SOHO/SUMER UV spectra of the Sun, we were able to detect these lines in FUSE spectra of several ``cooler'' (Teff<~150 000) objects, among them is the prototype PG1159-035. An abundance analysis is in progress.

  16. IUE observations of new A star candidate proto-planetary systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grady, Carol A.

    1994-01-01

    As a result of the detection of accreting gas in the A5e PMS Herbig Ae star, HR 5999, most of the observations for this IUE program were devoted to Herbig Ae stars rather than to main sequence A stars. Mid-UV emission at optical minimum light was detected for UX Ori (A1e), BF Ori (A5e), and CQ Tau (F2e). The presence of accreting gas in HD 45677 and HD 50138 prompted reclassification of these stars as Herbig Be stars rather than as protoplanetary nebulae. Detailed results are discussed.

  17. O stars and Wolf-Rayet stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conti, Peter S.; Underhill, Anne B.; Jordan, Stuart (Editor); Thomas, Richard (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    Basic information is given about O and Wolf-Rayet stars indicating how these stars are defined and what their chief observable properties are. Part 2 of the volume discussed four related themes pertaining to the hottest and most luminous stars. Presented are: an observational overview of the spectroscopic classification and extrinsic properties of O and Wolf-Rayet stars; the intrinsic parameters of luminosity, effective temperature, mass, and composition of the stars, and a discussion of their viability; stellar wind properties; and the related issues concerning the efforts of stellar radiation and wind on the immediate interstellar environment are presented.

  18. Optical and UV spectroscopy of the black hole binary candidate LMC X-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutchings, J. B.; Crampton, D.; Cowley, A. P.; Bianchi, L.; Thompson, I. B.

    1987-01-01

    Both further optical spectroscopy of the binary star identified with LMC X-1, obtained between 1983 and 1985, and a series of IUE UV spectra taken during a 5 day interval in 1984 are presented. The optical data are used to refine the orbital period to 4.2288 days, and improved orbital parameters are derived. The velocity of the optical emission lines is antiphased with the absorption lines and has twice the velocity amplitude. These new results support the estimates of the masses in the system given earlier. The most probable component masses are approximately 20 solar masses for the primary and near 6 solar masses (for the x-ray star), suggesting the the latter may be a black hole. The UV spectra show very weak, low-velocity stellar-wind lines. It is suggested that much of the surrounding medium is highly ionized by the X-ray flux. The 'nonwind' UV spectral lines and the UV continuum temperature are consistent with the optical data, indicating a late O type star of M(bol) = -8.5. There is a weak modulation of absorption-line strengths with orbital phase, suggestive of a lack of axisymmetry in the X-irradiation of the primary star and indicative of a fairly low orbital inclination.

  19. The Moon in the UV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendrix, Amanda

    2014-11-01

    While the Moon has been observed in the UV for decades, the real utility of this spectral region for unlocking some of the Moon’s secrets has only recently been understood. Previously the domain of atmospheric studies, the UV has now emerged as an important spectral region for studying surfaces. The ultraviolet regime is very sensitive to both space weathering effects and composition, including hydration. This presentation will cover a review of early UV lunar observations (e.g., Apollo 17, International Ultraviolet Explorer), as well as early laboratory studies that first shone a light on the importance of this spectral region. The Lyman Alpha Mapping Project (LAMP) instrument, currently in orbit on the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) spacecraft, is providing critical mapping capabilities of UV signatures, including signals from the permanently shadowed regions of the poles. I will discuss some of these exciting results, and extend these to implications for other airless bodies in the solar system.

  20. The Chemical Compositions of Variable Field Horizontal-branch Stars: RR Lyrae Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    For, Bi-Qing; Sneden, Christopher; Preston, George W.

    2011-12-01

    We present a detailed abundance study of 11 RR Lyrae ab-type variables: AS Vir, BS Aps, CD Vel, DT Hya, RV Oct, TY Gru, UV Oct, V1645 Sgr, WY Ant, XZ Aps, and Z Mic. High-resolution and high signal-to-noise ratio echelle spectra of these variables were obtained with the 2.5 m du Pont telescope at the Las Campanas Observatory. We obtained more than 2300 spectra, roughly 200 spectra per star, distributed more or less uniformly throughout the pulsational cycles. A new method has been developed to obtain the initial effective temperatures of our sample stars at a specific pulsational phase. We find that the abundance ratios are generally consistent with those of similar metallicity field stars in different evolutionary states and throughout the pulsational cycles for RR Lyrae stars. TY Gru remains the only n-capture enriched star among the RRab in our sample. A new relation is found between microturbulence and effective temperature among stars of the horizontal-branch population. In addition, the variation of microturbulence as a function of phase is empirically shown to be similar to the theoretical variation. Finally, we conclude that the derived T eff and log g values of our sample stars follow the general trend of a single mass evolutionary track.

  1. THE CHEMICAL COMPOSITIONS OF VARIABLE FIELD HORIZONTAL-BRANCH STARS: RR LYRAE STARS

    SciTech Connect

    For Biqing; Sneden, Christopher; Preston, George W.

    2011-12-01

    We present a detailed abundance study of 11 RR Lyrae ab-type variables: AS Vir, BS Aps, CD Vel, DT Hya, RV Oct, TY Gru, UV Oct, V1645 Sgr, WY Ant, XZ Aps, and Z Mic. High-resolution and high signal-to-noise ratio echelle spectra of these variables were obtained with the 2.5 m du Pont telescope at the Las Campanas Observatory. We obtained more than 2300 spectra, roughly 200 spectra per star, distributed more or less uniformly throughout the pulsational cycles. A new method has been developed to obtain the initial effective temperatures of our sample stars at a specific pulsational phase. We find that the abundance ratios are generally consistent with those of similar metallicity field stars in different evolutionary states and throughout the pulsational cycles for RR Lyrae stars. TY Gru remains the only n-capture enriched star among the RRab in our sample. A new relation is found between microturbulence and effective temperature among stars of the horizontal-branch population. In addition, the variation of microturbulence as a function of phase is empirically shown to be similar to the theoretical variation. Finally, we conclude that the derived T{sub eff} and log g values of our sample stars follow the general trend of a single mass evolutionary track.

  2. Lifestyles of the Stars.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Cocoa Beach, FL. John F. Kennedy Space Center.

    Some general information on stars is provided in this National Aeronautics and Space Administration pamphlet. Topic areas briefly discussed are: (1) the birth of a star; (2) main sequence stars; (3) red giants; (4) white dwarfs; (5) neutron stars; (6) supernovae; (7) pulsars; and (8) black holes. (JN)

  3. Egyptian "Star Clocks"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Symons, Sarah

    Diagonal, transit, and Ramesside star clocks are tables of astronomical information occasionally found in ancient Egyptian temples, tombs, and papyri. The tables represent the motions of selected stars (decans and hour stars) throughout the Egyptian civil year. Analysis of star clocks leads to greater understanding of ancient Egyptian constellations, ritual astronomical activities, observational practices, and pharaonic chronology.

  4. Mapping the Dark Matter From UV Light at High Redshift: An Empirical Approach to Understand Galaxy Statistics

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Kyoung-Soo; Giavalisco, Mauro; Conroy, Charlie; Wechsler, Risa H; Ferguson, Henry C.; Somerville, Rachel S.; Dickinson, Mark E.; Urry, Claudia M.; /Yale Ctr. Astron. Astrophys.

    2009-08-03

    We present a simple formalism to interpret the observations of two galaxy statistics, the UV luminosity function (LF) and two-point correlation functions for star-forming galaxies at z {approx} 4, 5 and 6 in the context of {Lambda}CDM cosmology. Both statistics are the result of how star formation takes place in dark matter halos, and thus are used to constrain how UV light depends on halo properties, in particular halo mass. The two physical quantities we explore are the star formation duty cycle, and the range of UV luminosity that a halo of mass M can have (mean and variance). The former directly addresses the typical duration of star formation activity in halos while the latter addresses the averaged star formation history and regularity of gas inflow into these systems. In the context of this formalism, we explore various physical models consistent with all the available observational data, and find the following: (1) the typical duration of star formation observed in the data is {approx}< 0.4 Gyr (1{sigma}), (2) the inferred scaling law between the observed L{sub UV} and halo mass M from the observed faint-end slope of the luminosity functions is roughly linear out to M {approx} 10{sup 11.5} - 10{sup 12} h{sup -1} M{sub {circle_dot}} at all redshifts probed in this work, and (3) the observed L{sub UV} for a fixed halo mass M decreases with time, implying that the star formation efficiency (after dust extinction) is higher at earlier times. We explore several different physical scenarios relating star formation to halo mass, but find that these scenarios are indistinguishable due to the limited range of halo mass probed by our data. In order to discriminate between different scenarios, we discuss the possibility of using the bright-faint galaxy cross-correlation functions and more robust determination of luminosity-dependent galaxy bias for future surveys.

  5. Mapping the Dark Matter from UV Light at High Redshift: An Empirical Approach to Understand Galaxy Statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kyoung-Soo; Giavalisco, Mauro; Conroy, Charlie; Wechsler, Risa H.; Ferguson, Henry C.; Somerville, Rachel S.; Dickinson, Mark E.; Urry, Claudia M.

    2009-04-01

    We present a simple formalism to interpret the observations of two galaxy statistics, the UV luminosity function (LF) and two-point correlation functions for star-forming galaxies at z~4, 5, and 6 in the context of Λ cold dark matter cosmology. Both statistics are the result of how star formation takes place in dark matter halos, and thus are used to constrain how UV light depends on halo properties, in particular halo mass. The two physical quantities we explore are the star formation duty cycle, and the range of UV luminosity that a halo of mass M can have (mean and variance). The former directly addresses the typical duration of star formation activity in halos, while the latter addresses the averaged star formation history and regularity of gas inflow into these systems. In the context of this formalism, we explore various physical models consistent with all the available observational data, and find the following: (1) the typical duration of star formation observed in the data is lsim0.4 Gyr (1σ) (2) the inferred scaling law between the observed L UV and halo mass M from the observed faint-end slope of the LFs is roughly linear out to M ≈ 1011.5-1012 h -1 M sun at all redshifts probed in this work; and (3) the observed L UV for a fixed halo mass M decreases with time, implying that the star formation efficiency (after dust extinction) is higher at earlier times. We explore several different physical scenarios relating star formation to halo mass, but find that these scenarios are indistinguishable due to the limited range of halo mass probed by our data. In order to discriminate between different scenarios, we discuss the possibility of using the bright-faint galaxy cross-correlation functions and more robust determination of luminosity-dependent galaxy bias for future surveys.

  6. The Orbital Periods and Variability of the Nova-Like BK Lyncis (PG 0917+342) and the Dwarf Nova WW Ceti

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ringwald, F. A.; Thorstensen, J. R.; Honeycutt, R. K.; Robertson, J. W.; Smith, Robert Connon

    1995-12-01

    Long-term light curves of the cataclysmic variable BK Lyn (PG 0917+342) from the Indiana Automated CCD photometric telescope (``RoboScope'') and the Harvard College Observatory plate archive reveal no dwarf nova outbursts. Two radial velocity studies show its orbital period to be 107.97 +/- 0.07 minutes, confirming that it does have an orbital period shorter than the 2 -- 3-hour orbital period gap for cataclysmic variables. Whether this is a nova-like below the period gap or a dwarf nova with rare outbursts resembling WZ Sge is still unclear, but anomalously high angular momentum loss below the period gap may imply that magnetic stellar-wind braking still works below the period gap---but mass-losing secondary stars there are thought to be fully convective, and therefore should not have magnetic braking. If BK Lyn is a genuine nova-like beneath the period gap, it may provide evidence of magnetic activity occurring in the faintest M dwarfs, here in an interacting binary. A radial velocity study resolves a long-standing aliasing problem and shows that the orbital period of the dwarf nova WW Cet is 0.17578 +/- 0.00013 d (4.22 hours). Its long-term light curves from RoboScope, AAVSO, Harvard archive, and VSS, RASNZ observations are examined. WW Cet does not have the characteristic standstills of the Z Cam stars, but does wander in quiescence by well over one magnitude. This and the orbital period become of interest in the context of recent speculation (Livio M., Pringle J. E., 1994, ApJ, 427, 956) that the low states of the VY Scl stars may be produced by star spots moving over L_1, choking off the mass flow, and that dwarf novae with orbital periods between 3 and 4 hours may be rare because of this.

  7. Constraining Galaxy Evolution Using Observed UV-Optical Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heap, Sally

    2007-01-01

    Our understanding of galaxy evolution depends on model spectra of stellar populations, and the models are only as good as the observed spectra and stellar parameters that go into them. We are therefore evaluating modem UV-optical model spectra using Hubble's Next Generation Spectral Library (NGSL) as the reference standard. The NGSL comprises intermediate-resolution (R is approximately 1000) STIS spectra of 378 stars having a wide range in metallicity and age. Unique features of the NGSL include its broad wavelength coverage (1,800-10,100 A) and high-S/N, absolute spectrophotometry. We will report on a systematic comparison of model and observed UV-blue spectra, describe where on the HR diagram significant differences occur, and comment on current approaches to correct the models for these differences.

  8. Star formation in globular clusters and dwarf galaxies and implications for the early evolution of galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Douglas N. C.; Murray, Stephen D.

    1991-01-01

    Based upon the observed properties of globular clusters and dwarf galaxies in the Local Group, we present important theoretical constraints on star formation in these systems. These constraints indicate that protoglobular cluster clouds had long dormant periods and a brief epoch of violent star formation. Collisions between protocluster clouds triggered fragmentation into individual stars. Most protocluster clouds dispersed into the Galactic halo during the star formation epoch. In contrast, the large spread in stellar metallicity in dwarf galaxies suggests that star formation in their pregenitors was self-regulated: we propose the protocluster clouds formed from thermal instability in the protogalactic clouds and show that a population of massive stars is needed to provide sufficient UV flux to prevent the collapsing protogalactic clouds from fragmenting into individual stars. Based upon these constraints, we propose a unified scenario to describe the early epochs of star formation in the Galactic halo as well as the thick and thin components of the Galactic disk.

  9. Neutrino signatures from the first stars

    SciTech Connect

    Daigne, Frederic; Vangioni, Elisabeth; Olive, Keith A.; Sandick, Pearl

    2005-11-15

    Evidence from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) polarization data indicates that the Universe may have been reionized at very high redshift. It is often suggested that the ionizing UV flux originates from an early population of massive or very massive stars. Depending on their mass, such stars can explode either as type II supernovae or pair-instability supernovae, or may entirely collapse into a black hole. The resulting neutrino emission can be quite different in each case. We consider here the relic neutrino background produced by an early burst of Population III stars coupled with a normal mode of star formation at lower redshift. The computation is performed in the framework of hierarchical structure formation and is based on cosmic star formation histories constrained to reproduce the observed star formation rate at redshift z < or approx. 6, the observed chemical abundances in damped Lyman alpha absorbers and in the intergalactic medium, and to allow for an early reionization of the Universe at z{approx}10-20. We find that although the high redshift burst of Population III stars does lead to an appreciable flux of neutrinos at relatively low energy (E{sub {nu}}{approx_equal}1 MeV), the observable neutrino flux is dominated by the normal mode of star formation. We also find that predicted fluxes are at the present level of the SuperK limit. As a consequence, the supernova relic neutrino background has a direct impact on models of chemical evolution and/or supernova dynamics.

  10. Tomographic separation of composite spectra - The components of the O-star spectroscopic binary AO Cassiopeiae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bagnuolo, William G., Jr.; Gies, Douglas R.

    1991-01-01

    The UV photospheric lines of the short-period, double-lined O-star spectroscopic binary AO Cas are analyzed. Archival data from IUE (16 spectra uniformly distributed in orbital phase) were analyzed with a tomography algorithm to produce the separate spectra of the two stars in six spectral regions. The spectral classifications of the primary and secondary, O9.5 III and O8 V, respectively, were estimated through a comparison of UV line ratios with those in spectral standard stars. An intensity ratio of 0.5-0.7 (primary brighter) at 1600 A is compatible with the data.

  11. IUE observations of magnetically controlled stellar winds in the helium peculiar stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shore, Steven N.; Brown, Douglas N.

    1986-01-01

    Dramatic periodic variations in the C IV resonance lines of magnetic helium-weak sn stars HD 5737 = alpha Scl, HD 21699 = HR 1063, and HD 79158 = 36 Lyn are discussed. In all three cases, the 1548,50 doublet is the only non-negligibly variable UV spectral feature. The line profiles are consistent with outflow in a jet-like structure. In HD 21699 this outflow arises from one of the magnetic polar regions. Observations of two additional He-wk sn stars do not reveal strong C IV absorption, implying that the UV characteristics of these stars are less uniform than the optical phenomenology.

  12. Perspectives for hot stars in the next decade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauw, G.

    2016-06-01

    XMM-Newton has deeply changed our picture of X-ray emission of hot, massive stars. High-resolution X-ray spectroscopy as well as monitoring of these objects revealed a number of previously unexpected features that challenge our understanding of the dynamics of the stellar winds of massive stars. In this contribution, I will briefly summarize the results obtained over the past 15 years and highlight the perspectives for the next decade. It is anticipated that coordinated (X-ray and optical or UV) monitoring and time-critical observations of either single or binary massive stars will become the most important topics in this field over the coming years. Synergies with existing or forthcoming X-ray observatories (NuStar, Astro-H, eROSITA) will also play a major role and will further enhance the importance of XMM-Newton in our quest for understanding the physics of hot, massive stars.

  13. A Review in Mixed Chemistry of Low Mass Evolved Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzman-Ramirez, L.

    2015-12-01

    During the late stages of their evolution, Sun-like stars bring the products of nuclear burning to the surface. Although there is a chemical dichotomy between oxygen-rich and carbon-rich evolved stars, the dredge-up itself has never been directly observed. In the last three decades, however, a few stars have been shown to display both carbon- and oxygen-rich material in their circumstellar envelopes. These phenomena is seen in both Galactic Disk and Bulge planetary nebulae. For the Galactic Disk objects the mixed chemistry phenomenon is best explained through a recent dredge-up of carbon produced by nucleosynthesis inside the star during the Asymptotic Giant Branch that changed the surface chemistry of the star. On the contrary, we conclude that the mixed chemistry phenomenon occurring in the Galactic Bulge planetary nebulae is best explained through hydrocarbon chemistry in an ultraviolet (UV)-irradiated, dense torus.

  14. Neutron Stars and NuSTAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhalerao, Varun

    2012-05-01

    My thesis centers around the study of neutron stars, especially those in massive binary systems. To this end, it has two distinct components: the observational study of neutron stars in massive binaries with a goal of measuring neutron star masses and participation in NuSTAR, the first imaging hard X-ray mission, one that is extremely well suited to the study of massive binaries and compact objects in our Galaxy. The Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) is a NASA Small Explorer mission that will carry the first focusing high energy X-ray telescope to orbit. NuSTAR has an order-of-magnitude better angular resolution and has two orders of magnitude higher sensitivity than any currently orbiting hard X-ray telescope. I worked to develop, calibrate, and test CdZnTe detectors for NuSTAR. I describe the CdZnTe detectors in comprehensive detail here - from readout procedures to data analysis. Detailed calibration of detectors is necessary for analyzing astrophysical source data obtained by the NuSTAR. I discuss the design and implementation of an automated setup for calibrating flight detectors, followed by calibration procedures and results. Neutron stars are an excellent probe of fundamental physics. The maximum mass of a neutron star can put stringent constraints on the equation of state of matter at extreme pressures and densities. From an astrophysical perspective, there are several open questions in our understanding of neutron stars. What are the birth masses of neutron stars? How do they change in binary evolution? Are there multiple mechanisms for the formation of neutron stars? Measuring masses of neutron stars helps answer these questions. Neutron stars in high-mass X-ray binaries have masses close to their birth mass, providing an opportunity to disentangle the role of "nature" and "nurture" in the observed mass distributions. In 2006, masses had been measured for only six such objects, but this small sample showed the greatest diversity in masses

  15. Performance Results from In-Flight Commissioning of the Juno Ultraviolet Spectrograph (Juno-UVS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greathouse, Thomas K.; Gladstone, G. R.; Davis, M. W.; Slater, D. C.; Versteeg, M. H.; Persson, K. B.; Winters, G. S.; Persyn, S. C.; Eterno, J. S.

    2012-10-01

    We present a description of the Juno ultraviolet spectrograph (Juno-UVS), results from the successful in-flight commissioning performed between December 5th and 13th 2011, and some predictions of future Jupiter observations. Juno-UVS is a modest power (9.0 W) ultraviolet spectrograph based on the Alice instruments now in flight aboard the European Space Agency’s Rosetta spacecraft, NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft, and the LAMP instrument aboard NASA’s Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter. However, unlike the other Alice spectrographs, Juno-UVS sits aboard a rotationally stabilized spacecraft. The planned 2 rpm rotation rate for the primary mission results in integration times per spatial resolution element per spin of only 17 ms. Thus, data was retrieved from many spins and then remapped and co-added to build up integration times on bright stars to measure the effective area, spatial resolution, map out scan mirror pointing positions, etc. The Juno-UVS scan mirror allows for pointing of the slit approximately ±30° from the spacecraft spin plane. This ability gives Juno-UVS access to half the sky at any given spacecraft orientation. We will describe our process for solving for the pointing of the scan mirror relative to the Juno spacecraft and present our initial half sky survey of UV bright stars complete with constellation overlays. The primary job of Juno-UVS will be to characterize Jupiter’s UV auroral emissions and relate them to in situ particle measurements. The ability to point the slit will facilitate these measurements, allowing Juno-UVS to observe the surface positions of magnetic field lines Juno is flying through giving a direct connection between the particle measurements on the spacecraft to the observed reaction of Jupiter’s atmosphere to those particles. Finally, we will describe planned observations to be made during Earth flyby in October 2013 that will complete the in-flight characterization.

  16. Optical, UV, and EUV Oscillations of SS Cygni in Outburst

    SciTech Connect

    Mauche, C W

    2003-12-19

    I provide a review of observations in the optical, UV (HST), and EUV (EUVE and Chandra LETG) of the rapid periodic oscillations of nonmagnetic, disk-accreting, high mass-accretion rate cataclysmic variables (CVs), with particular emphasis on the dwarf nova SS Cyg in outburst. In addition, I drawn attention to a correlation, valid over nearly six orders of magnitude in frequency, between the frequencies of the quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) of white dwarf, neutron star, and black hole binaries. This correlation identifies the high frequency quasi-coherent oscillations (so-called ''dwarf nova oscillations'') of CVs with the kilohertz QPOs of low mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs), and the low frequency and low coherence QPOs of CVs with the horizontal branch oscillations (or the broad noise component identified as such) of LMXBs. Assuming that the same mechanisms produce the QPOs of white dwarf, neutron star, and black hole binaries, this correlation has important implications for QPO models.

  17. The bolometric and UV attenuation in normal spiral galaxies of the Herschel Reference Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viaene, S.; Baes, M.; Bendo, G.; Boquien, M.; Boselli, A.; Ciesla, L.; Cortese, L.; De Looze, I.; Eales, S.; Fritz, J.; Karczewski, O. Ł.; Madden, S.; Smith, M. W. L.; Spinoglio, L.

    2016-02-01

    The dust in nearby galaxies absorbs a fraction of the UV-optical-near-infrared radiation produced by stars. This energy is consequently re-emitted in the infrared. We investigate the portion of the stellar radiation absorbed by spiral galaxies from the Herschel Reference Survey (HRS) by modelling their UV-to-submillimetre spectral energy distributions. Our models provide an attenuated and intrinsic spectral energy distribution (SED), from which we find that on average 32% of all starlight is absorbed by dust. We define the UV heating fraction as the percentage of dust luminosity that comes from absorbed UV photons and find this to be 56%, on average. This percentage varies with morphological type, with later types having significantly higher UV heating fractions. We find a strong correlation between the UV heating fraction and specific star formation rate and provide a power-law fit. Our models allow us to revisit the IRX - AFUV relations, and derive these quantities directly within a self-consistent framework. We calibrate this relation for different bins of NUV - r colour and provide simple relations to relate these parameters. We investigated the robustness of our method and conclude that the derived parameters are reliable within the uncertainties that are inherent to the adopted SED model. This calls for a deeper investigation of how well extinction and attenuation can be determined through panchromatic SED modelling. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.

  18. The Cambridge Double Star Atlas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacEvoy, Bruce; Tirion, Wil

    2015-12-01

    Preface; What are double stars?; The binary orbit; Double star dynamics; Stellar mass and the binary life cycle; The double star population; Detecting double stars; Double star catalogs; Telescope optics; Preparing to observe; Helpful accessories; Viewing challenges; Next steps; Appendices: target list; Useful formulas; Double star orbits; Double star catalogs; The Greek alphabet.

  19. Symbiotic stars in X-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luna, G. J. M.; Sokoloski, J. L.; Mukai, K.; Nelson, T.

    2013-11-01

    Until recently, symbiotic binary systems in which a white dwarf accretes from a red giant were thought to be mainly a soft X-ray population. Here we describe the detection with the X-ray Telescope (XRT) on the Swift satellite of nine white dwarf symbiotics that were not previously known to be X-ray sources and one that had previously been detected as a supersoft X-ray source. The nine new X-ray detections were the result of a survey of 41 symbiotic stars, and they increase the number of symbiotic stars known to be X-ray sources by approximately 30%. The Swift/XRT telescope detected all of the new X-ray sources at energies greater than 2 keV. Their X-ray spectra are consistent with thermal emission and fall naturally into three distinct groups. The first group contains those sources with a single, highly absorbed hard component that we identify as probably coming from an accretion-disk boundary layer. The second group is composed of those sources with a single, soft X-ray spectral component that probably originates in a region where low-velocity shocks produce X-ray emission, i.e., a colliding-wind region. The third group consists of those sources with both hard and soft X-ray spectral components. We also find that unlike in the optical, where rapid, stochastic brightness variations from the accretion disk typically are not seen, detectable UV flickering is a common property of symbiotic stars. Supporting our physical interpretation of the two X-ray spectral components, simultaneous Swift UV photometry shows that symbiotic stars with harder X-ray emission tend to have stronger UV flickering, which is usually associated with accretion through a disk. To place these new observations in the context of previous work on X-ray emission from symbiotic stars, we modified and extended the α/β/γ classification scheme for symbiotic-star X-ray spectra that was introduced by Muerset et al. based upon observations with the ROSAT satellite, to include a new δ classification

  20. Symbiotic Stars in X-rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luna, G. J. M.; Sokoloski, J. L.; Mukai, K.; Nelson, T.

    2014-01-01

    Until recently, symbiotic binary systems in which a white dwarf accretes from a red giant were thought to be mainly a soft X-ray population. Here we describe the detection with the X-ray Telescope (XRT) on the Swift satellite of 9 white dwarf symbiotics that were not previously known to be X-ray sources and one that was previously detected as a supersoft X-ray source. The 9 new X-ray detections were the result of a survey of 41 symbiotic stars, and they increase the number of symbiotic stars known to be X-ray sources by approximately 30%. Swift/XRT detected all of the new X-ray sources at energies greater than 2 keV. Their X-ray spectra are consistent with thermal emission and fall naturally into three distinct groups. The first group contains those sources with a single, highly absorbed hard component, which we identify as probably coming from an accretion-disk boundary layer. The second group is composed of those sources with a single, soft X-ray spectral component, which likely arises in a region where low-velocity shocks produce X-ray emission, i.e. a colliding-wind region. The third group consists of those sources with both hard and soft X-ray spectral components. We also find that unlike in the optical, where rapid, stochastic brightness variations from the accretion disk typically are not seen, detectable UV flickering is a common property of symbiotic stars. Supporting our physical interpretation of the two X-ray spectral components, simultaneous Swift UV photometry shows that symbiotic stars with harder X-ray emission tend to have stronger UV flickering, which is usually associated with accretion through a disk. To place these new observations in the context of previous work on X-ray emission from symbiotic stars, we modified and extended the alpha/beta/gamma classification scheme for symbiotic-star X-ray spectra that was introduced by Muerset et al. based upon observations with the ROSAT satellite, to include a new sigma classification for sources with

  1. STAR-FORMING GALAXY EVOLUTION IN NEARBY RICH CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Tyler, K. D.; Rieke, G. H.; Bai, L.

    2013-08-20

    Dense environments are known to quench star formation in galaxies, but it is still unknown what mechanism(s) are directly responsible. In this paper, we study the star formation of galaxies in A2029 and compare it to that of Coma, combining indicators at 24 {mu}m, H{alpha}, and UV down to rates of 0.03 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}. We show that A2029's star-forming galaxies follow the same mass-SFR relation as the field. The Coma cluster, on the other hand, has a population of galaxies with star formation rates (SFRs) significantly lower than the field mass-SFR relation, indicative of galaxies in the process of being quenched. Over half of these galaxies also host active galactic nuclei. Ram-pressure stripping and starvation/strangulation are the most likely mechanisms for suppressing the star formation in these galaxies, but we are unable to disentangle which is dominating. The differences we see between the two clusters' populations of star-forming galaxies may be related to their accretion histories, with A2029 having accreted its star-forming galaxies more recently than Coma. Additionally, many early-type galaxies in A2029 are detected at 24 {mu}m and/or in the far-UV, but this emission is not directly related to star formation. Similar galaxies have probably been classified as star forming in previous studies of dense clusters, possibly obscuring some of the effects of the cluster environment on true star-forming galaxies.

  2. Star Formation Histories in CLASH Brightest Cluster Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fogarty, Kevin; Postman, Marc; Donahue, Megan; Moustakas, John; Connor, Thomas; Clash Science Team

    2015-01-01

    The CLASH sample of 25 lensing galaxy clusters contains 11 Brightest Cluster Galaxies (BCG) that exhibit significant unobscured (>5 Msol yr-1) star formation activity. The star formation is inferred from UV emission and from evidence for H-alpha filaments as detected in the ACS and WFC3 observations. We use photometry from the 16-band CLASH imaging along with spectra from the SOAR and SDSS telescopes to examine the star formation histories of these galaxies. Using SED fits to synthetic stellar population and nebular emission models, we constrain the burst histories of the two most UV and H-alpha luminous BCGs in our sample, RXJ1532.9+3021 and MACS1931.8-2635. The BCG in both of these clusters have reddening-corrected UV estimates of star formation rates in excess of 100 solar masses per year. We model the timescales and sizes of the starbursts that can account for the photometric and spectroscopic properties in these BCGs and create maps of their stellar properties on scales of ~350 pc. These maps reveal recent bursts occurring in elongated filaments on relatively long (~0.5-1.0 Gyr) timescales. In addition, we constrain the star formation properties of all of the remaining BCGs in the CLASH sample. These results and their implications for BCG formation and evolution will be presented.

  3. The (BETA) Pictoris Phenomenon Among Herbig Ae/Be Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grady, C. A.; Perez, M. R.; Talavera, A.; Bjorkman, K. S.; deWinter, D.; The, P.-S.; Molster, F. J.; vandenAncker, M. E.; Sitko, M. L.; Morrison, N. D.; Beaver, M. L.; McCollum, B.; Castelaz, M. W.

    1996-01-01

    We present a survey of high dispersion UV and optical spectra of Herbig Ae/Be (HAeBe) and related stars. We find accreting, circumstellar gas over the velocity range +100 to +400 km/s, and absorption profiles similar to those seen toward Beta Pic, in 36% of the 33 HAeBe stars with IUE data as well as in 3 non-emission B stars. We also find evidence of accretion in 7 HAeBe stars with optical data only. Line profile variability appears ubiquitous. As a group, the stars with accreting gas signatures have higher v sin i than the stars with outflowing material, and tend to exhibit large amplitude (greater than or equal to 1(sup m)) optical light variations. All of the program stars with polarimetric variations that are anti-correlated with the optical light, previously interpreted as the signature of a dust disk viewed close to equator-on, also show spectral signatures of accreting gas. These data imply that accretion activity in HAeBe stars is preferentially observed when the line of sight transits the circumstellar dust disk. Our data imply that the spectroscopic signatures of accreting circumstellar material seen in Beta Pic are not unique to that object, but instead are consistent with interpretation of Beta Pic as a comparatively young A star with its associated circumstellar disk.

  4. STAR FORMATION IN THE OUTER DISKS OF SPIRAL GALAXIES: ULTRAVIOLET AND H{alpha} PHOTOMETRY

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, Kate L.; Van Zee, Liese; Skillman, Evan D. E-mail: vanzee@astro.indiana.edu

    2011-12-20

    We present an analysis of ultradeep UV and H{alpha} imaging of five nearby spiral galaxies to study the recent star formation in the outer disk. Using azimuthally averaged ellipse photometry as well as aperture photometry of individual young stellar complexes, we measure how star formation rates (SFRs) and UV and H{alpha} colors vary with radius. We detect azimuthally averaged UV flux to {approx}1.2-1.4 R{sub 25} in most galaxies; at the edge of the detected UV disk, the surface brightnesses are 28-29 mag arcsec{sup -2}, corresponding to SFR surface densities of {approx}3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4} M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} kpc{sup -2}. Additionally, we detect between 120 and 410 young stellar complexes per galaxy, with a significant number of detections out to {approx}1.5 R{sub 25}. We measure radial FUV-NUV profiles, and find that the dispersion in the UV colors of individual young stellar complexes increases with radius. We investigate how radial variations in the frequency of star formation episodes can create color gradients and increasing dispersion in the UV colors of star-forming regions, like those observed in our study. Specifically, we use recently published, high spatial and temporal resolution measurements of {Sigma}{sub SFR} throughout the disk of M33 to estimate the frequency of star formation episodes throughout the disk of a typical spiral galaxy. We use stellar synthesis models of these star formation histories (SFHs) to measure the variations in UV colors and find that we can replicate large dispersions in UV colors based on episodic SFHs.

  5. The winds of O-stars. II - The terminal velocities of stellar winds of O-type stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groenewegen, M. A. T.; Lamers, H. J. G. L. M.; Pauldrach, A. W. A.

    1989-01-01

    The SEI method (Lamers et al., 1987) is used to obtain P Cygni profiles of the UV resonance lines of C IV, N V, and S IV and of the subordinate UV lines of N IV and C III observed in the spectra of 27 O-type stars. Theoretical profiles which include the turbulence effects agree well with the observations, and they can account for the deep absorption troughs, the shape of the violet absorption wings, and the wavelength of the emission peak. The resulting terminal velocities of the stellar winds are found to be systematically lower by about 400 km/s than previous estimates obtained using the Sobolev approximation (Castor and Lamers, 1979), suggesting that the narrow absorption components, observed in the UV resonance lines of O and B stars, reach the terminal velocity of the winds.

  6. Ultraviolet and X-ray Activity and Flaring on Low-Mass Exoplanet Host Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    France, Kevin; Parke Loyd, R. O.; Brown, Alexander

    2015-08-01

    The spectral and temporal behavior of exoplanet host stars is a critical input to models of the chemistry and evolution of planetary atmospheres. High-energy photons (X-ray to NUV) from these stars regulate the atmospheric temperature profiles and photochemistry on orbiting planets, influencing the production of potential “biomarker” gases. We present results from the MUSCLES Treasury Survey, an ongoing study of time-resolved UV and X-ray spectroscopy of nearby M and K dwarf exoplanet host stars. This program uses contemporaneous Hubble Space Telescope and Chandra (or XMM) observations to characterize the time variability of the energetic radiation field incident on the habitable zones planetary systems at d < 15 pc. We find that all exoplanet host stars observed to date exhibit significant levels of chromospheric and transition region UV emission. M dwarf exoplanet host stars display 30 - 2000% UV emission line amplitude variations on timescales of minutes-to-hours. The relative flare/quiescent UV flux amplitudes on old (age > 1 Gyr) planet-hosting M dwarfs are comparable to active flare stars (e.g., AD Leo), despite their lack of flare activity at visible wavelengths. We also detect similar UV flare behavior on a subset of our K dwarf exoplanet host stars. We conclude that strong flares and stochastic variability are common, even on “optically inactive” M dwarfs hosting planetary systems. These results argue that the traditional assumption of weak UV fields and low flare rates on older low-mass stars needs to be revised.

  7. Star Clusters in Early-Type Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vetens, Sidney David; Crocker, Alison Faye

    2016-01-01

    Star formation rates in early-type galaxies are notoriously hard to determine because of their very low specific star formation rates. For this project, we use Hubble Space Telescope photometric data in 4-5 visible and near-UV filters to measure the young stellar clusters in nine early-type galaxies. Aperture photometry colors were compared to colors from synthetic photometry produced by the Flexible Stellar Population Synthesis code (Conroy et. al, ApJ 699, 486-506 (2009)), using a chi-squared likelihood method to estimate the age, metallicity and extinction for each cluster. Masses were determined using the best-fit model, the distance to each galaxy and the measured fluxes. Young clusters were selected below a cutoff age of 100 Myr, and star formation rates for each galaxy were then calculated as the combined mass of the young clusters divided by the cutoff age. Star formation rates computed in this way are far below those computed using the 22 micron emission. While some completeness effects are biasing the cluster-estimated SFRs low, the extreme difference (two orders of magnitude) may also point to SFR overestimation due to contamination from older stars in the 22 micron SFRs.

  8. Dispersal of Disks Around Young Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollenbach, David; DeVincenzi, D. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We review the evidence pertaining to the lifetimes of planet-forming disks and discuss possible disk dispersal mechanisms: 1) viscous accretion of material onto the central source; 2) close stellar encounters; 3) stellar winds; and 4) photoevaporation by ultraviolet radiation. We focus on 3) and 4) and describe the quasi-steady state appearance and the overall evolution of disks under the influence of winds and radiation from the central star and of radiation from external OB stars. Viscous accretion likely dominates disk dispersal in the inner disk (r approx. or less than 10 AU), while photoevaporation is the principal process of disk dispersal outside of r approx. or greater than 10 AU for low mass stars. Disk dispersal timescales are compared and discussed in relation to theoretical estimates for planet formation timescales. Photoevaporation may explain the large differences in the hydrogen content of the giant planets in the solar system. The commonly held belief that our early sun's stellar wind dispersed he solar nebula is called into question. Finally, we model the small bright objects ('proplyds') observed in the Orion Nebula as disks around young, low mass stars which are externally illuminated by the UV (ultraviolet) photons from the nearby massive star Theta(1)C.

  9. Dispersal of Disks Around Young Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollenbach, David

    2001-01-01

    We review the evidence pertaining to the lifetimes of planet-forming disks and discuss possible disk dispersal mechanisms: 1) viscous accretion of material onto the central source, 2) close stellar encounters, 3) stellar winds, and 4) photoevaporation by ultraviolet radiation. We focus on 3) and 4) and describe the quasi-steady state appearance and the overall evolution of disks under the influence of winds and radiation from the central star and of radiation from external OB stars. Viscous accretion likely dominates disk dispersal in the inner disk (r < or approx. equals 10 AU), while photoevaporation is the principal process of disk dispersal outside of r > or approx. equals 10 AU for low mass stars. Disk dispersal timescales are compared and discussed in relation to theoretical estimates for planet formation timescales. Photoevaporation may explain the large differences in the hydrogen content of the giant planets in the solar system. The commonly held belief that our early sun's stellar wind dispersed the solar nebula is called into question. Finally, we model the small bright objects ("proplyds") observed in the Orion Nebula as disks around young, low mass stars which are externally illuminated by the UV photons from the nearby massive star Theta(sup 1)C.

  10. Are We Correctly Measuring the Star Formation in Galaxies?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McQuinn, K. B. W.; Skillman, E. D.; Dolphin, A. E.; Mitchell, N. P.

    2016-06-01

    Integrating our knowledge of star formation (SF) traced by observations at different wavelengths is essential for correctly interpreting and comparing SF activity in a variety of systems and environments. This study compares extinction corrected integrated ultraviolet (UV) emission from resolved galaxies with color-magnitude diagram (CMD) based star formation rates (SFRs) derived from resolved stellar populations and CMD fitting techniques in 19 nearby starburst and post-starburst dwarf galaxies. The data sets are from the panchromatic Starburst Irregular Dwarf Survey and include deep legacy GALEX UV imaging, Hubble Space Telescope optical imaging, and Spitzer MIPS imaging. For the majority of the sample, the integrated near-UV fluxes predicted from the CMD-based SFRs—using four different models—agree with the measured, extinction corrected, integrated near-UV fluxes from GALEX images, but the far-UV (FUV) predicted fluxes do not. Furthermore, we find a systematic deviation between the SFRs based on integrated FUV luminosities and existing scaling relations, and the SFRs based on the resolved stellar populations. This offset is not driven by different SF timescales, variations in SFRs, UV attenuation, nor stochastic effects. This first comparison between CMD-based SFRs and an integrated FUV emission SFR indicator suggests that the most likely cause of the discrepancy is the theoretical FUV-SFR calibration from stellar evolutionary libraries and/or stellar atmospheric models. We present an empirical calibration of the FUV-based SFR relation for dwarf galaxies, with uncertainties, which is 53% larger than previous relations.

  11. The Millennium Star Atlas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinnott, R. W.

    1997-08-01

    Derived from Hipparcos and Tycho observations, the Millennium Star Atlas is a set of 1548 charts covering the entire sky to about magnitude 11. It stands apart from all previous printed atlases in completeness to magnitude 10 and in uniformity around the sky. The generous chart scale has made possible a number of innovations never before seen in a star atlas: arrows on high-proper-motion stars, double-star ticks conveying separation and position angle for a specific modern epoch, distance labels for nearby stars, and variable stars coded by amplitude, period, and type. Among the nonstellar objects plotted, more than 8000 galaxies are shown with aspect ratio and orientation.

  12. The Pistol Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najarro, F.; Figer, D. F.

    1998-06-01

    Results of an spectroscopic investigation of the Pistol star are presented. The near-infrared spectra and photometry data are fit with stellar wind models to find that the star is extraordinarily luminous, L = 106.7±0.5 L⊙, making it one of the most luminous stars known. Coupled with the relatively cool temperature, Teff = 10^{4.17_{ - 0.06}^{ + 0.19} } K, the star is clearly in violation of the Humphreys-Davidson limit. The derived line of sight velocity of the star assures its membership in the Quintuplet cluster. This, along with the inferred extinction, places the star at the Galactic Center.

  13. Classification and properties of UV extinction curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbaro, G.; Mazzei, P.; Morbidelli, L.; Patriarchi, P.; Perinotto, M.

    2001-01-01

    The catalog of Savage et al. (\\cite{ref27}) reporting colour excesses of 1415 stars from ANS photometry offers the opportunity to deeply investigate the characteristics of UV extinction curves which differ from the standard extinction of the diffuse interstellar medium. To this aim we have selected a sample of 252 curves, which have been compared with the relations derived by Cardelli et al. (\\cite{ref4}; CCM in the following) for a variety of R_V values in the range 2.4-5 and have been classified as normal if they fit at least one of the CCM curves or anomalous otherwise. We find that normal curves with small R_V are just as numerous as those with large R_V. The anomalous objects are arranged into two groups according to the strength of the bump at 0.217 mu . For a given value of c_2 this increases along the sequence: type A anomalous, normals and type B anomalous, suggesting that this sequence should correspond to an increase of the amount of small grains along the sightline. Considerations concerning the environmental characteristics indicate that the anomalous behaviour is not necessarily tied to the existence of dense gas clouds along the line of sight.

  14. The sn stars - Magnetically controlled stellar winds among the helium-weak stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shore, Steven N.; Brown, Douglas N.; Sonneborn, George

    1987-01-01

    The paper reports observations of magnetically controlled stellar mass outflows in three helium-weak sn stars: HD 21699 = HR 1063; HD 5737 = Alpha Scl; and HD 79158 = 36 Lyn. IUE observations show that the C IV resonance doublet is variable on the rotational timescale but that there are no other strong-spectrum variations in the UV. Magnetic fields, which reverse sign on the rotational timescale, are present in all three stars. This phenomenology is interpreted in terms of jetlike mass loss above the magnetic poles, and these objects are discussed in the context of a general survey of the C IV and Si IV profiles of other more typical helium-weak stars.

  15. STARS: the Stellar Absorption and Refraction Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yee, Jeng-Hwa; Morrison, Daniel; Murphy, Graham A.; Morgan, M. F.; Humm, David C.; Silverglate, Peter R.; Vervack, Ronald; Paxton, Larry J.

    2002-01-01

    The Stellar Absorption and Refraction Sensor (STARS) is a compact, large-aperture instrument that combines a UV-IR imaging spectrograph with a co-aligned visible-light imager to make simultaneous absorptive and refractive stellar occultation measurements. The absorption measurements provided by the spectrograph allow the determination of vertical profiles of atmospheric constituents. The coincident refraction observations made by the image yield high-precision measurements of atmospheric density, pressure, and temperature and provide independent knowledge of both the refracted light path and Rayleigh extinction, which are critical in reducing the uncertainty in the retrieved constituent profiles in the lower atmosphere. STARS employs a two-axis gimbaled telescope to acquire and track the star and a two-axis, high-precision, fast-steering mirror to correct for spacecraft jitter and maintain the star within the spectrograph field of view. The relative star position measured by the imager provides position feedback to the active tracking loop of the fast-steering mirror. With funding from NASA's Instrument Incubator Program, a laboratory facility has been developed to demonstrate the overall instrument performance and, in particular, its capability to acquire and track a setting, refracting, and scintillating star, to compensate for various degrees of platform jitter, and to provide the pointing knowledge required for accurate determination of the atmospheric quantities. The combination of built-in image tracking and motion compensation capabilities, small size, and limited spacecraft resource requirements makes STARS and its tracking mechanism suitable for deployment on existing and future commercial spacecraft platforms for applications that require high-precision pointing. In this paper, we present details of the instrument design and its expected performance based on our laboratory tests.

  16. Hierarchical Star Formation in LEGUS Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elmegreen, Debra M.; Elmegreen, Bruce

    2014-06-01

    Star formation generally follows a hierarchical distribution in galaxies from kpc scales in giant star complexes down to sub-pc scales in embedded clusters. This hierarchy corresponds to a power law distribution function for the number of star forming regions as a function of size or luminosity. Using the Legacy ExtraGalactic Ultraviolet Survey (LEGUS), we examine six galaxies, NGC 1566, NGC 1705, NGC 2500, NGC 5253, NGC 5477, and IC 4247, which span types from grand design and flocculent spirals to irregulars and starburst irregulars. Power law size and luminosity distributions were measured from Gaussian-blurred images in the NUV and UV using SExtractor. Slopes ranged from -1 to -1.8, with the steepest slopes corresponding to the starburst galaxies. The slopes did not vary from the NUV to the UV. The fraction of light contained within the largest scales ranged from 85 to 95 percent, independent of galaxy type. We acknowledge support from grant HST-GO-13364.

  17. GAS, STARS, AND STAR FORMATION IN ALFALFA DWARF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Huang Shan; Haynes, Martha P.; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Brinchmann, Jarle; Stierwalt, Sabrina; Neff, Susan G. E-mail: haynes@astro.cornell.edu E-mail: jarle@strw.leidenuniv.nl E-mail: susan.g.neff@nasa.gov

    2012-06-15

    We examine the global properties of the stellar and H I components of 229 low H I mass dwarf galaxies extracted from the ALFALFA survey, including a complete sample of 176 galaxies with H I masses <10{sup 7.7} M{sub Sun} and H I line widths <80 km s{sup -1}. Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) data are combined with photometric properties derived from Galaxy Evolution Explorer to derive stellar masses (M{sub *}) and star formation rates (SFRs) by fitting their UV-optical spectral energy distributions (SEDs). In optical images, many of the ALFALFA dwarfs are faint and of low surface brightness; only 56% of those within the SDSS footprint have a counterpart in the SDSS spectroscopic survey. A large fraction of the dwarfs have high specific star formation rates (SSFRs), and estimates of their SFRs and M{sub *} obtained by SED fitting are systematically smaller than ones derived via standard formulae assuming a constant SFR. The increased dispersion of the SSFR distribution at M{sub *} {approx}< 10{sup 8} M{sub Sun} is driven by a set of dwarf galaxies that have low gas fractions and SSFRs; some of these are dE/dSphs in the Virgo Cluster. The imposition of an upper H I mass limit yields the selection of a sample with lower gas fractions for their M{sub *} than found for the overall ALFALFA population. Many of the ALFALFA dwarfs, particularly the Virgo members, have H I depletion timescales shorter than a Hubble time. An examination of the dwarf galaxies within the full ALFALFA population in the context of global star formation (SF) laws is consistent with the general assumptions that gas-rich galaxies have lower SF efficiencies than do optically selected populations and that H I disks are more extended than stellar ones.

  18. Gas, Stars, and Star Formation in Alfalfa Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Shan; Haynes, Martha P.; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Brinchmann, Jarle; Stierwalt, Sabrina; Neff, Susan G.

    2012-01-01

    We examine the global properties of the stellar and Hi components of 229 low H i mass dwarf galaxies extracted from the ALFALFA survey, including a complete sample of 176 galaxies with H i masses <10(sup 7.7) solar mass and Hi line widths <80 kilometers per second. Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) data are combined with photometric properties derived from Galaxy Evolution Explorer to derive stellar masses (M*) and star formation rates (SFRs) by fitting their UV-optical spectral energy distributions (SEDs). In optical images, many of the ALFALFA dwarfs are faint and of low surface brightness; only 56% of those within the SDSS footprint have a counterpart in the SDSS spectroscopic survey. A large fraction of the dwarfs have high specific star formation rates (SSFRs), and estimates of their SFRs and M* obtained by SED fitting are systematically smaller than ones derived via standard formulae assuming a constant SFR. The increased dispersion of the SSFR distribution at M* approximately less than10(exp 8)M(sub 0) is driven by a set of dwarf galaxies that have low gas fractions and SSFRs; some of these are dE/dSphs in the Virgo Cluster. The imposition of an upper Hi mass limit yields the selection of a sample with lower gas fractions for their M* than found for the overall ALFALFA population. Many of the ALFALFA dwarfs, particularly the Virgo members, have H i depletion timescales shorter than a Hubble time. An examination of the dwarf galaxies within the full ALFALFA population in the context of global star formation (SF) laws is consistent with the general assumptions that gas-rich galaxies have lower SF efficiencies than do optically selected populations and that Hi disks are more extended than stellar ones.

  19. A Swift/UVOT NUV Study of RR Lyrae Stars in the Globular Cluster M3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porterfield, Blair; Siegel, M.; Swift; UVOT

    2014-01-01

    We present the first results of a program to monitor RR Lyrae stars in globular clusters with the Swift Ultraviolet Optical Telescope. Although variable stars have their strongest pulsations in the UV, no comprehensive catalog of NUV light curves has ever been produced for RR Lyrae stars. We present uvm2 light curves for 124 variable star candidates in the globular cluster M3. We show that the RR Lyrae stars have strong pulsations in the NUV, with amplitudes up to three magnitudes. We show that the RR Lyrae follow period-amplitude relations in the NUV similar to those they follow in the optical. Our data hint at the existence of a period-metallicity-luminosity relationship in the UV that would make RR Lyrae even more useful standard candles.

  20. Star formation in infrared bright and infrared faint starburst interacting galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamb, Susan A.; Bushouse, Howard A.; Towns, John W.

    1990-01-01

    Short wavelength IUE spectra of Arp 248b and UGC 8315N are combined with optical spectra and interpreted using a combination of spectrum synthesis and spectral diagnostics to place constraints on the massive star populations of the central regions of these galaxies and to deduce information about the star formation histories in the last 10(exp 8) years. The authors find that both galaxies have substantial fractions of their optical light coming from massive stars and that Arp 248b may be dominated in the UV by WR stars. The UV spectra are dominated by radiation from evolved massive stars and the authors place and age on the burst in Arp 248b of a few tens of millions of years.

  1. First detection of nonflare microwave emissions from the coronae of single late-type dwarf stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gary, D. E.; Linsky, J. L.

    1981-01-01

    Results are presented of a search for nonflare microwave radiation from the coronae of nearby late-type dwarf stars comparable to the sun: single stars without evidence for either a large wind or circumstellar envelope. The observing program consisted of flux measurements of six stars over a 24-h period with the VLA in the C configuration at a wavelength of 6 cm with 50 MHz bandwidth. Positive detections at 6 cm were made for Chi 1 Ori (0.6 mJy) and the flare star UV Cet (1.55 mJy), and upper limits were obtained for the stars Pi 1 UMa, Xi Boo A, 70 Oph A and Epsilon Eri. It is suggested that Chi 1 Ori, and possibly UV Cet, represent the first detected members of a new class of radio sources which are driven by gyroresonance emission, i.e. cyclotron emission from nonrelativistic Maxwellian electrons.

  2. Magnetized Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebling, Steven; Anderson, Matthew; Hirschmann, Eric; Lehner, Luis; Motl, Patrick; Neilsen, David; Palenzuela, Carlos; Tohline, Joel

    2008-04-01

    Magnetized neutron stars, whether considered individually or within compact binary systems, demonstrate a number of interesting dynamical effects. Using a distributed adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) code, we evolve such stars and study their dynamics.

  3. Star Formation in Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Topics addressed include: star formation; galactic infrared emission; molecular clouds; OB star luminosity; dust grains; IRAS observations; galactic disks; stellar formation in Magellanic clouds; irregular galaxies; spiral galaxies; starbursts; morphology of galactic centers; and far-infrared observations.

  4. About Exobiology: The Case for Dwarf K Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuntz, M.; Guinan, E. F.

    2016-08-01

    One of the most fundamental topics of exobiology concerns the identification of stars with environments consistent with life. Although it is believed that most types of main-sequence stars might be able to support life, particularly extremophiles, special requirements appear to be necessary for the development and sustainability of advanced life forms. From our study, orange main-sequence stars, ranging from spectral type late-G to mid-K (with a maximum at early K), are most promising. Our analysis considers a variety of aspects, including (1) the frequency of the various types of stars, (2) the speed of stellar evolution in their lifetimes, (3) the size of the stellar climatological habitable zones (CLI-HZs), (4) the strengths and persistence of their magnetic-dynamo-generated X-ray–UV emissions, and (5) the frequency and severity of flares, including superflares; both (4) and (5) greatly reduce the suitability of red dwarfs to host life-bearing planets. The various phenomena show pronounced dependencies on the stellar key parameters such as effective temperature and mass, permitting the assessment of the astrobiological significance of various types of stars. Thus, we developed a “Habitable-Planetary-Real-Estate Parameter” (HabPREP) that provides a measure for stars that are most suitable for planets with life. Early K stars are found to have the highest HabPREP values, indicating that they may be “Goldilocks” stars for life-hosting planets. Red dwarfs are numerous, with long lifetimes, but their narrow CLI-HZs and hazards from magnetic activity make them less suitable for hosting exolife. Moreover, we provide X-ray–far-UV irradiances for G0 V–M5 V stars over a wide range of ages.

  5. STRONG VARIABLE ULTRAVIOLET EMISSION FROM Y GEM: ACCRETION ACTIVITY IN AN ASYMPTOTIC GIANT BRANCH STAR WITH A BINARY COMPANION?

    SciTech Connect

    Sahai, Raghvendra; Neill, James D.; Gil de Paz, Armando; Sanchez Contreras, Carmen

    2011-10-20

    Binarity is believed to dramatically affect the history and geometry of mass loss in asymptotic giant branch (AGB) and post-AGB stars, but observational evidence of binarity is sorely lacking. As part of a project to look for hot binary companions to cool AGB stars using the Galaxy Evolution Explorer archive, we have discovered a late-M star, Y Gem, to be a source of strong and variable UV emission. Y Gem is a prime example of the success of our technique of UV imaging of AGB stars in order to search for binary companions. Y Gem's large and variable UV flux makes it one of the most prominent examples of a late-AGB star with a mass accreting binary companion. The UV emission is most likely due to emission associated with accretion activity and a disk around a main-sequence companion star. The physical mechanism generating the UV emission is extremely energetic, with an integrated luminosity of a few x L{sub sun} at its peak. We also find weak CO J = 2-1 emission from Y Gem with a very narrow line profile (FWHM of 3.4 km s{sup -1}). Such a narrow line is unlikely to arise in an outflow and is consistent with emission from an orbiting, molecular reservoir of radius 300 AU. Y Gem may be the progenitor of the class of post-AGB stars which are binaries and possess disks but no outflows.

  6. UV Treatment for Small Systems

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Center for Environmental Education, Conservation and Research (CECIA) at InterAmerican University of Puerto Rico (IAUPR) has organized the 10th CECIA-IAUPR Biennial Symposium on Potable Water Issues in Puerto Rico. This presentation on UV Treatment for Small Systems will be ...

  7. Near UV Aerosol Group Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torres, Omar

    2013-01-01

    2012-13 Report of research on aerosol and cloud remote sensing using UV observations. The document was presented at the 2013 AEROCENTER Annual Meeting held at the GSFC Visitors Center, May 31, 2013. The Organizers of the meeting are posting the talks to the public Aerocentr website, after the meeting.

  8. QCD in Neutron Stars and Strange Stars

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, Fridolin; Negreiros, Rodrigo

    2011-05-24

    This paper provides an overview of the possible role of Quantum Chromo Dynamics (QCD) for neutron stars and strange stars. The fundamental degrees of freedom of QCD are quarks, which may exist as unconfined (color superconducting) particles in the cores of neutron stars. There is also the theoretical possibility that a significantly large number of up, down, and strange quarks may settle down in a new state of matter known as strange quark matter, which, by hypothesis, could be more stable than even the most stable atomic nucleus, {sup 56}Fe. In the latter case new classes of self-bound, color superconducting objects, ranging from strange quark nuggets to strange quark stars, should exist. The properties of such objects will be reviewed along with the possible existence of deconfined quarks in neutron stars. Implications for observational astrophysics are pointed out.

  9. Dibaryons in neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olinto, Angela V.; Haensel, Pawel; Frieman, Joshua A.

    1991-01-01

    The effects are studied of H-dibaryons on the structure of neutron stars. It was found that H particles could be present in neutron stars for a wide range of dibaryon masses. The appearance of dibaryons softens the equations of state, lowers the maximum neutron star mass, and affects the transport properties of dense matter. The parameter space is constrained for dibaryons by requiring that a 1.44 solar mass neutron star be gravitationally stable.

  10. Chromospheres of Coronal Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linsky, Jeffrey L.; Wood, Brian E.

    1996-01-01

    We summarize the main results obtained from the analysis of ultraviolet emission line profiles of coronal late-type stars observed with the Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph (GHRS) on the Hubble Space Telescope. The excellent GHRS spectra provide new information on magnetohydrodynamic phenomena in the chromospheres and transition regions of these stars. One exciting new result is the discovery of broad components in the transition region lines of active stars that we believe provide evidence for microflare heating in these stars.

  11. Wolf-Rayet Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillier, D.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Wolf-Rayet (W-R) stars are a class of peculiar stars first identified in 1867 by C J E WOLF and G RAYET. Unlike the spectra of most stars, which are dominated by narrow absorption lines, the spectra of W-R stars show broad emission lines. The rich emission line spectrum makes them easy to identify, by spectroscopic observations, even at large distances....

  12. America's Star Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyons, Ray; Lance, Keith Curry

    2009-01-01

    "Library Journal"'s new national rating of public libraries, the "LJ" Index of Public Library Service, identifies 256 "star" libraries. It rates 7,115 public libraries. The top libraries in each group get five, four, or three Michelin guide-like stars. All included libraries, stars or not, can use their scores to learn from their peers and improve…

  13. Managing the star performer.

    PubMed

    Hills, Laura

    2013-01-01

    Our culture seems to be endlessly fascinated with its stars in entertainment, athletics, politics, and business, and holds fast to the idea that extraordinary talent accounts for an individual's extraordinary performance. At first glance, managing a star performer in your medical practice may seem like it would be an easy task. However, there's much more to managing a star performer than many practice managers realize. The concern is how to keep the star performer happy and functioning at a high level without detriment to the rest of the medical practice team. This article offers tips for practice managers who manage star performers. It explores ways to keep the star performer motivated, while at the same time helping the star performer to meld into the existing medical practice team. This article suggests strategies for redefining the star performer's role, for holding the star performer accountable for his or her behavior, and for coaching the star performer. Finally, this article offers practical tips for keeping the star performer during trying times, for identifying and cultivating new star performers, and for managing medical practice prima donnas. PMID:23767124

  14. The Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX). Its legacy of UV surveys, and science highlights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianchi, Luciana

    2014-11-01

    The Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) imaged the sky in the Ultraviolet (UV) for almost a decade, delivering the first sky surveys at these wavelengths. Its database contains far-UV (FUV, λ eff˜1528 Å) and near-UV (NUV, λ eff˜2310 Å) images of most of the sky, including deep UV-mapping of extended galaxies, over 200 million source measurements, and more than 100,000 low-resolution UV spectra. The GALEX archive will remain a long-lasting resource for statistical studies of hot stellar objects, QSOs, star-forming galaxies, nebulae and the interstellar medium. It provides an unprecedented road-map for planning future UV instrumentation and follow-up observing programs in the UV and at other wavelengths. We review the characteristics of the GALEX data, and describe final catalogs and available tools, that facilitate future exploitation of this database. We also recall highlights from the science results uniquely enabled by GALEX data so far.

  15. Investigation of the shell stars omicron and theta Per, and of the eclipsing binary beta Lyr

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plavec, M.

    1975-01-01

    All three stars showed rather complicated spectra, which require a very detailed spectroscopic analysis. The far UV spectrum of Beta Lyrae is clearly peculiar, with a multitude of emission lines not observed on any other star so far scanned with Copernicus. This made this star at once the most interesting and also, in a sense, easier to study. The other two stars display a spectrum rich in absorption lines, some of them being fairly broad (as expected for photospheric lines of rapidly rotating objects), some sharp. The later were clearly non-photospheric lines. An attempt was made to distinguish the circumstellar from the interstellar components.

  16. Magnitude calibration of a fixed head star tracker using Astro-1 flight data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rakoczy, John M.; West, Mark E.

    1992-01-01

    The Astro-1 UV astronomy mission was hampered by the failures of the automatic star acquisition procedure. The acquisition procedure depended on the Instrument Pointing Subsystem's Fixed Head Star Trackers (FHST) to acquire, track and identify guidestars of known visual magnitude. During the Astro-1 mission it was suspected that the star magnitudes measured by the FHST were much lower than predicted. A postflight investigation of the Astro-1 flight data confirmed and quantified this suspicion. Star magnitude calibration curves computed from the flight data depict the variance from the preflight calibration curves. These results are helping engineers to plan improvements to the acquisition procedure for the upcoming Astro-2 mission.

  17. Constraining X-ray-Induced Photoevaporation of Protoplanetary Disks Orbiting Low-Mass Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Punzi, Kristina M.; Kastner, Joel H.; Rodriguez, David; Principe, David A.; Vican, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Low-mass, pre-main sequence stars possess intense high-energy radiation fields as a result of their strong stellar magnetic activity. This stellar UV and X-ray radiation may have a profound impact on the lifetimes of protoplanetary disks. We aim to constrain the X-ray-induced photoevaporation rates of protoplanetary disks orbiting low-mass stars by analyzing serendipitous XMM-Newton and Chandra X-ray observations of candidate nearby (D < 100 pc), young (age < 100 Myr) M stars identified in the GALEX Nearby Young-Star Survey (GALNYSS).

  18. Tunable UV source for UV fluorescence remote sensing

    SciTech Connect

    Mead, R.D.; Lowenthal, D.D.; Raymond, T.D.; Alford, W.J.; Smith, A.V.; Johnson, M.S.

    1994-08-01

    Efficient generation of ultraviolet radiation tunable over the 240--410 nm range has been achieved in a system suitable for ultraviolet (uv) fluorescence remote sensing. Light from an Optical Parametric Oscillator/Amplifier turning in the 0.7--2.1 {mu}m range is mixed with the second or third harmonic from a Nd:YAG laser, to obtain up to 30 mJ of broadly tunable output in the ultraviolet.

  19. Ultraviolet Extinction Curves For Nearby T Tauri Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McJunkin, Matthew; France, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    We present empirically-derived fits to the ultraviolet (UV) extinction curves along the line of sight towards young stars with circumstellar disks. Stellar UV radiation plays a strong role in heating the disk gas and driving chemical reactions. Thus, it is important to measure the UV extinction curve in order to reconstruct the intrinsic UV flux irradiating the disk, thereby enabling accurate photochemical modeling of the planet-forming environment. To measure the extinction, we first compare modeled H2 fluorescence spectra to observed H2 lines. Lyman-alpha radiation from the stars pumps electronic transitions of H2 in the disk, and we model the flux that is re-emitted through the subsequent fluorescent cascade. We then extract an initial extinction curve over the 1100-1700 Angstrom wavelength region from the difference between the modeled H2 fluorescence and the HST data. To account for self-absorption in the disk by the optically thick H2, we divide this initial extinction curve by the transmission in each fluorescence line. We then fit the resulting interstellar extinction curve with an interstellar reddening model characterized by an Av and Rv value. The shape of the extinction curve allows us to characterize the dust grain distribution in the intervening material as well as to recover the intrinsic spectral energy distribution of the stars over a wide wavelength range.

  20. Kinematics in the Interacting, Star-Forming Galaxies NGC 3395/3396 and NGC 3991/3994/3995

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weistrop, Donna; Nelson, Charles H.

    1999-01-01

    It has been suggested that induced star formation is more sensitive to galaxy dynamics than to local phenomena and that enhanced star formation is found in galaxies with disturbed velocity structures. We are studying the stellar populations of several UV-bright, interacting galaxies to try to understand the detailed star formation process in these systems. We present preliminary results of an investigation of the kinematics of star-forming regions in the interacting systems NGC 3395/3396 and NGC 3991/3994/3995. Regions of powerful star formation are observed throughout these galaxies. The observatation will be used to investigate rotation curves in the galaxies and motion in the tidal tails.

  1. Strange Quark Star Crusts

    SciTech Connect

    Steiner, Andrew W.

    2007-02-27

    If strange quark matter is absolutely stable, some neutron stars may be strange quark stars. Strange quark stars are usually assumed to have a simple liquid surface. We show that if the surface tension of droplets of quark matter in the vacuum is sufficiently small, droplets of quark matter on the surface of a strange quark star may form a solid crust on top of the strange quark star. This solid crust can significantly modify the predictions for the photon emission for the surface in an observable way.

  2. Physics of Electrodeless UV Lamps and Applications of UV Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cekic, Miodrag; Ruckman, Mark

    2004-12-01

    Electrodeless discharge microwave powered ultraviolet limps are a special class of high power incoherent UV sources, conceptualized forty years ago for industrial processing applications. Because of the nonimaging character of the applications, the need for measuring averaged properties of the lamps' exceeds the motivation to obtain detailed space-resolved discharge parameters. This writing discusses measurements of the average plasma temperature of a 5.8kW high pressure mercury bulb and a XeCl* excimer bulb driven by the microwaves of the same power. First method is based on the black body radiance fit to the self-absorbed 185nm and 254nm mercury lines. The second method is essentially Boltzmann plot method applied to the roto-vibrational levels of B1/2 - X1/2 XeCl* molecular transition with a maximum at 308nm. We also present a procedure for evaluation of effectiveness of different bulb spectra to the given UV curing chemistry system independent from the Beer-Lambert law. Conversely, the procedure can be used for the optimization of the chemistry to the chosen UV lamp radiance spectrum.

  3. X-ray sources in regions of star formation. III - Naked T Tauri stars associated with the Taurus-Auriga complex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walter, Frederick M.; Brown, A.; Mathieu, R. D.; Myers, P. C.; Vrba, F. J.

    1988-01-01

    Ground-based and IRAS optical and IR spectroscopic and photometric observations are reported for 90 stars in or near 59 Einstein Observatory X-ray error circles in the Tau-Aur region. The data are presented in extensive tables and sample spectra and characterized in detail, with particular attention to 28 newly discovered 'naked' T Tau stars, which are shown to be normal stars with no significant IR or UV excess and ages of 1-40 Myr. These stars are found to outnumber normal T Tau stars by a factor of 10 in an area near the Tau-Aur dark clouds, and it is argued that their evolution toward the ZAMS is typical for low-mass stars. The implications of this finding for the time scales of circumstellar-disk dissipation and planet formation are discussed.

  4. Stars and their Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaler, James B.

    1997-03-01

    This unique and informative text describes how stars are classified according to their spectral qualities and temperature. James Kaler explains the alphabet of stellar astronomy, running from cool M stars to hot O stars, and tells the story of their evolution. Before embarking on a voyage of cosmic discovery, the author discusses the fundamental properties of stars, their atomic structure and the formation of spectra. Then, Kaler considers each star type individually and explores its spectra in detail. A review of unusual, hard-to-classify stars, and a discussion of data related to the birth, life and death of stars round out the text. This book is an important resource for all amateur astronomers and students of astronomy. Professionals will find it a refreshing read as well.

  5. Ponderable soliton stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiu, Hong-Yee

    1990-01-01

    The theory of Lee and Pang (1987), who obtained solutions for soliton stars composed of zero-temperature fermions and bosons, is applied here to quark soliton stars. Model soliton stars based on a simple physical model of the proton are computed, and the properties of the solitons are discussed, including the important problem of the existence of a limiting mass and thus the possible formation of black holes of primordial origin. It is shown that there is a definite mass limit for ponderable soliton stars, so that during cooling a soliton star might reach a stage beyond which no equilibrium configuration exists and the soliton star probably will collapse to become a black hole. The radiation of ponderable soliton stars may alter the short-wavelength character of the cosmic background radiation, and may be observed as highly redshifted objects at z of about 100,000.

  6. The X-ray emission of the γ Cassiopeiae stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Myron A.; Lopes de Oliveira, R.; Motch, C.

    2016-09-01

    Long considered as the "odd man out" among X-ray emitting Be stars, γ Cas (B0.5e IV) is now recognized as the prototype of a class of stars that emit hard thermal X-rays. Our classification differs from the historical use of the term " γ Cas stars" defined from optical properties alone. The luminosity output of this class contributes significantly to the hard X-ray production of massive stars in the Galaxy. The γ Cas stars have light curves showing variability on a few broadly-defined timescales and spectra indicative of an optically thin plasma consisting of one or more hot thermal components. By now 9-13 Galactic ≈ B0-1.5e main sequence stars are judged to be members or candidate members of the γ Cas class. Conservative criteria for this designation are for a ≈ B0-1.5e III-V star to have an X-ray luminosity of 1032-1033 ergs s-1, a hot thermal spectrum containing the short wavelength Lyα Fe XXV and Fe XXVI lines and the fluorescence FeK feature all in emission. If thermality cannot be demonstrated, for example from either the presence of these Lyα lines or curvature of the hard continuum of the spectrum of an X-ray active Be star, we call them γ Cas candidates. We discuss the history of the discovery of the complicated characteristics of the variability in the optical, UV, and X-ray domains, leading to suggestions for the physical cause of the production of hard X-rays. These include scenarios in which matter from the Be star accretes onto a degenerate secondary star and interactions between magnetic fields on the Be star and its decretion disk. The greatest aid to the choice of the causal mechanism is the temporal correlations of X-ray light curves and spectra with diagnostics in the optical and UV wavebands. We show why the magnetic star-disk interaction scenario is the most tenable explanation for the creation of hard X-rays on these stars.

  7. The chemical abundances of the Ap star HD94660

    SciTech Connect

    Giarrusso, M.

    2014-05-09

    In this work I present the determination of chemical abundances of the Ap star HD94660, a possible rapid oscillating star. As all the magnetic chemically peculiar objects, it presents CNO underabundance and overabundance of iron peak elements of ∼100 times and of rare earths up to 4 dex with respect to the Sun. The determination was based on the conversion of the observed equivalent widths into abundances simultaneously to the determination of effective temperature and gravity. Since the Balmer lines of early type stars are very sensitive to the surface gravity while the flux distribution is sensitive to the effective temperature, I have adopted an iterative procedure to match the H{sub α} line profile and the observed UV-Vis-NIR magnitudes of HD94660 looking for a consistency between the metallicity of the atmosphere model and the derived abundances. From my spectroscopic analysis, this star belongs to the no-rapid oscillating class.

  8. IC 3418: STAR FORMATION IN A TURBULENT WAKE

    SciTech Connect

    Hester, Janice A.; Neill, James D.; Wyder, Ted K.; Martin, D. Christopher; Seibert, Mark; Madore, Barry F.; Gil de Paz, Armando; Schiminovich, David; Rich, R. Michael

    2010-06-10

    Galaxy Evolution Explorer observations of IC 3418, a low surface brightness galaxy in the Virgo Cluster, revealed a striking 17 kpc UV tail of bright knots and diffuse emission. H{alpha} imaging confirms that star formation is ongoing in the tail. IC 3418 was likely recently ram pressure stripped on its first pass through Virgo. We suggest that star formation is occurring in molecular clouds that formed in IC 3418's turbulent stripped wake. Tides and ram pressure stripping (RPS) of molecular clouds are both disfavored as tail formation mechanisms. The tail is similar to the few other observed star-forming tails, all of which likely formed during RPS. The tails' morphologies reflect the forces present during their formation and can be used to test for dynamical coupling between molecular and diffuse gas, thereby probing the origin of the star-forming molecular gas.

  9. Cool stars, stellar systems, and the sun; Proceedings of the 6th Cambridge Workshop, Seattle, WA, Sept. 18-21, 1989

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallerstein, George (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    The present conference on cool stars, stellar systems, and the sun encompasses stellar chromospheres and coronae, binary stars, the stellar evolution of contracting stars and red giants, stellar evolution abundances of the elements, mass loss and envelopes, and stellar pulsation. Specific issues addressed include theories regarding the acoustic and magnetic heating of stellar chromospheres and coronae, stellar granulation, wave heating in magnetic flux tubes, observations of the solar Ca-II lines, longitudinal-transverse magnetic tube waves in the solar atmosphere, radio emission from rapidly rotating cool giant stars, and spot temperatures and area coverages on active dwarf stars. Also addressed are the optical and UV spectra of RS-CVn stars, emission lines from T-Tauri stars, the spectroscopy of HR1614 group stars, red giants in external galaxies, the rotation of evolved stars, the transition from red giant to planetary nebula, and radiative transfer in the dynamic atmospheres of variable stars.

  10. A SECOND NEUTRON STAR IN M4?

    SciTech Connect

    Kaluzny, J.; Rozanska, A.; Rozyczka, M.; Krzeminski, W.; Thompson, Ian B.

    2012-05-01

    We show that the optical counterpart of the X-ray source CX 1 in M4 is a {approx}20th magnitude star, located in the color-magnitude diagram on (or very close to) the main sequence of the cluster, and exhibiting sinusoidal variations of the flux. We find the X-ray flux to be also periodically variable, with X-ray and optical minima coinciding. Stability of the optical light curve, lack of UV-excess, and unrealistic mean density resulting from period-density relation for semidetached systems speak against the original identification of CX 1 as a cataclysmic variable. We argue that the X-ray active component of this system is a neutron star (probably a millisecond pulsar).

  11. Hot, Massive Stars in I Zw 18

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heap, Sara R.; Lindler, D.; Malumuth, E.

    2011-01-01

    I Zw 18 is one of the most primitive blue, compact dwarf galaxies. The ionized gas in I Zw 18 has a low oxygen abundance (O approx.1/30 Osun) and nitrogen abundance (N-1/100 Nsun) (Pequignot 2008). We have obtained a far-UV spectrum of the northwest massive star cluster of I Zw 18 using Hubble's Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS). The spectrum is compatible with continuous star-formation over the past approx.10 Myr, and a very low metallicity, log Z/Zsun 1.7, although the stellar surface may be enhanced in carbon. Stellar wind lines are very weak, and the edge velocity of wind lines is very low (approx.250 km/s).

  12. Symbiotic Stars on Asiago Archive Plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurdana-Šepić, Rajka; Munari, Ulisse

    2010-01-01

    The Asiago photographic archive has been searched for plates containing the symbiotic stars AS 210, AS 327, AX Per, BF Cyg, CI Cyg, DT Ser, EG And, GH Gem, Hen 2-442, Hen 3-1591, HM Sge, MaC 1-17, NSV 11776, Pe 2-16, Pt 1, PU Vul, RS Oph, T CrB, UV Aur, V1016 Cyg, V1329 Cyg, V352 Aql, V4018 Sgr, Wray 15-1470, and Z And. A total of 1617 good-quality plates imaging the program stars have been found and their brightness has been estimated using the Henden & Munari UBVRCIC local photometric sequences. The results for the objects with most abundant measurements are discussed.

  13. PULSED UV: REALITIES OF ENHANCED DISINFECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Quantitative measurements of the light output from low pressure (LP), medium pressure (MP) and the pulsed UV lamps were made using calibrated spectrometry, chemical actinometry and biodosimetry approaches to compare their relative efficiency in producing germicidal UV energy. Fur...

  14. Ultraviolet Synthetic Spectra for Three Lambda Bootis Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Kwang-Ping; Neff, James E.; Gray, Richard O.; Corbally, Christopher J.; Johnson, Dustin; Tarbell, Erik

    2015-01-01

    Lambda Boo-type stars are a group of late B to early F-type Population I dwarfs that show mild to extreme deficiencies of iron-peak elements (up to 2 dex), but their C, N, O, and S abundances are near solar. We show that the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) spectra (1280-3200 A) of Lambda Bootis, 29 Cygni (a "confirmed" Lambda Boo star), and Vega (a "mild" Lambda Boo star) can be fit remarkably well by single-temperature synthetic spectra. We computed the full resolution synthetic ultraviolet (UV) spectrum covering the IUE wavelength range using Gray's Stellar Spectral Synthesis Program SPECTRUM. To improve the synthetic spectra, we generated a grid of LTE atmosphere models with the appropriate stellar parameters using ATLAS9 and the existing Castelli and Kurucz 2004 models. One of the improvements of their opacity distribution functions (ODFs) is the addition to the line blanketing near 1400 A and 1600 A by the quasi-molecular absorptions of atomic hydrogen undergoing collisions with protons and other neutral hydrogen atoms. New-ODF fluxes reproduce the ultraviolet observations of Lambda Boo stars in a more realistic way than previous computations. We also constructed our own UV line list for the relevant set of absorption features. Modeling the UV line spectra of Lambda Boo stars allows us to confirm their published surface abundances, including CNO and the iron group elements. It also provides further insight into their photospheric conditions (e.g., Teff, log g, [M/H], micro turbulent velocity, etc.). About 40 percent of the published Lambda Boo candidates have existing IUE spectra. We plan to follow this pilot study and perform UV spectral synthesis for all of them.

  15. The High-Energy Radiation Environment of Planets around Low-Mass Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shkolnik, Evgenya; Miles, Brittany; Barman, Travis; Peacock, Sarah

    2015-12-01

    Low-mass stars are the dominant planet hosts averaging about one planet per star. Many of these planets orbit in the canonical habitable zone (HZ) of the star where, if other conditions allowed, liquid water may exist on the surface.A planet’s habitability, including atmospheric retention, is strongly dependent on the star’s ultraviolet (UV) emission, which chemically modifies, ionizes, and even erodes the atmosphere over time including the photodissociation of important diagnostic molecules, e.g. H2O, CH4, and CO2. The UV spectral slope of a low-mass star can enhance atmospheric lifetimes, and increase the detectability of biologically generated gases. But, a different slope may lead to the formation of abiotic oxygen and ozone producing a false-positive biosignature for oxygenic photosynthesis. Realistic constraints on the incident UV flux over a planet’s lifetime are necessary to explore the cumulative effects on the evolution, composition, and fate of a HZ planetary atmosphere.NASA’s Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) provides a unique data set with which to study the broadband UV emission from many hundreds of M dwarfs. The GALEX satellite has imaged nearly 3/4 of the sky simultaneously in two UV bands: near-UV (NUV; 175-275 nm) and far-UV (FUV; 135-175 nm). With these data these, we are able to calculate the mean UV emission and its level of variability at these wavelengths over critical planet formation and evolution time scales to better understand the probable conditions in HZ planetary atmospheres.In the near future, dedicated CubeSats (miniaturized satellites for space research) to monitor M dwarf hosts of transiting exoplanets will provide the best opportunity to measure their UV variability, constrain the probabilities of detecting habitable (and inhabited) planets, and provide the correct context within which to interpret IR transmission and emission spectroscopy of transiting exoplanets.

  16. THE EFFECTS OF EPISODIC STAR FORMATION ON THE FUV-NUV COLORS OF STAR FORMING REGIONS IN OUTER DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, Kate L.; Van Zee, Liese; Dowell, Jayce D. E-mail: vanzee@astro.indiana.edu

    2013-09-20

    We run stellar population synthesis models to examine the effects of a recently episodic star formation history (SFH) on UV and Hα colors of star forming regions. Specifically, the SFHs we use are an episodic sampling of an exponentially declining star formation rate (SFR; τ model) and are intended to simulate the SFHs in the outer disks of spiral galaxies. To enable comparison between our models and observational studies of star forming regions in outer disks, we include in our models sensitivity limits that are based on recent deep UV and Hα observations in the literature. We find significant dispersion in the FUV-NUV colors of simulated star forming regions with frequencies of star formation episodes of 1 × 10{sup –8} to 4 × 10{sup –9} yr{sup –1}. The dispersion in UV colors is similar to that found in the outer disk of nearby spiral galaxies. As expected, we also find large variations in L{sub H{sub α}}/L{sub FUV}. We interpret our models within the context of inside-out disk growth, and find that a radially increasing τ and decreasing metallicity with an increasing radius will only produce modest FUV-NUV color gradients, which are significantly smaller than what is found for some nearby spiral galaxies. However, including moderate extinction gradients with our models can better match the observations with steeper UV color gradients. We estimate that the SFR at which the number of stars emitting FUV light becomes stochastic is ∼2 × 10{sup –6} M{sub ☉} yr{sup –1}, which is substantially lower than the SFR of many star forming regions in outer disks. Therefore, we conclude that stochasticity in the upper end of the initial mass function is not likely to be the dominant cause of dispersion in the FUV-NUV colors of star forming regions in outer disks. Finally, we note that if outer disks have had an episodic SFH similar to that used in this study, this should be taken into account when estimating gas depletion timescales and modeling chemical

  17. UV curable pressure sensitive adhesives

    SciTech Connect

    Glotfelter, C.A.

    1995-12-01

    Pressure sensitive adhesives (PSA`s) have become a ubiquitous element in our society, so much so, that the relative status of a society can be determined by the per capita consumption of PSA`s. We discuss new monomers as components of PSA formulations which enable adhesion to be achieved on a variety of substrates. Since solventless coating systems are desirable, the UV PSA market is of utmost importance to meeting the strict environmental guidelines now being imposed worldwide. In addition, highly ethoxylated monomers have shown promise in water dispersed PSA formulations, and a self-emulsifying acrylate monomer has been developed to offer dispersive abilities without using traditional emulsifying agents. This talk will focus on the effects of the materials described on properties of adhesive strength and shear strength in UV PSA formulations.

  18. Dynamical Expansion of Ionization and Dissociation Front around a Massive Star. II. On the Generality of Triggered Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosokawa, Takashi; Inutsuka, Shu-ichiro

    2006-07-01

    We analyze the dynamical expansion of the H II region, photodissociation region, and the swept-up shell, solving the UV and far-UV radiative transfer and the thermal and chemical processes in the time-dependent hydrodynamics code. Following our previous paper, we investigate the time evolutions with various ambient number densities and central stars. Our calculations show that basic evolution is qualitatively similar among our models with different parameters. The molecular gas is finally accumulated in the shell, and the gravitational fragmentation of the shell is generally expected. The quantitative differences among models are well understood with analytic scaling relations. The detailed physical and chemical structure of the shell is mainly determined by the incident far-UV flux and the column density of the shell, which also follow the scaling relations. The time of shell fragmentation and the mass of the gathered molecular gas are sensitive to the ambient number density. In the case of a low density, the shell fragmentation occurs over a longer timescale, and the accumulated molecular gas is more massive than in the case of a high density. The variations with different central stars are more moderate. The time of the shell fragmentation differs by a factor of several with the various stars of M*=12-101 Msolar. According to our numerical results, we conclude that the expanding H II region should be an efficient trigger for star formation in molecular clouds if the mass of the ambient molecular material is large enough.

  19. Advanced Spectral Library II: Hot Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayres, Thomas

    2013-10-01

    Stars are the bright matter of the Universe. Without them, it would be a dull and dreary place indeed: no light, no heavy elements, no planets, no life. It also is safe to say that stellar spectroscopy is a cornerstone of astrophysics, providing much of what we know concerning temperatures and masses of stars, their compositions, planets, and the dynamics and evolution of the galaxies they inhabit. This is especially true for the satellite ultraviolet, owing to the rich collection of atomic and ionic transitions found there. Unfortunately, the archive of Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph rarely achieves the high S/N of the best ground-based spectra, and relatively few objects have the full wavelength coverage for which the powerful, highly multiplexed, second generation Hubble instrument was designed. Our aim is to collect STIS UV echelle spectra - comparable in S/N and resolution to the best ground-based material - for a diverse sample of representative stars, to build an Advanced Spectral Library; a foundation for astrophysical exploration: stellar, interstellar, and beyond. Our first effort, in Cycle 18, involved cool stars. Now we turn attention to the hot side of the H-R diagram.Our Treasury program will provide detailed stellar "atlases," based on advanced processing of the STIS echellegrams. Members of our broad collaboration will analyze these data for specific purposes, such as dynamics of O-star mass-loss; detection of rare species in sharp-lined B stars; and properties and kinematics of local interstellar clouds; but public release {based on the "ASTRAL-I" model} will enable many other investigations by a much wider community, for decades to come.

  20. Rocket instrument for far-UV spectrophotometry of faint astronomical objects.

    PubMed

    Hartig, G F; Fastie, W G; Davidsen, A F

    1980-03-01

    A sensitive sounding rocket instrument for moderate (~10-A) resolution far-UV (lambda1160-lambda1750-A) spectrophotometry of faint astronomical objects has been developed. The instrument employs a photon-counting microchannel plate imaging detector and a concave grating spectrograph behind a 40-cm Dall-Kirkham telescope. A unique remote-control pointing system, incorporating an SIT vidicon aspect camera, two star trackers, and a tone-encoded command telemetry link, permits the telescope to be oriented to within 5 arc sec of any target for which suitable guide stars can be found. The design, construction, calibration, and flight performance of the instrument are discussed. PMID:20220923

  1. What the UV SED Tells us About Stellar Populations and Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heap, Sara R.

    2011-01-01

    The UV SED parameter b as in f(sub 1) 1(sup b), is commonly used to estimate fundamental properties of high-redshift galaxies including age and metallicity. However, sources and processes other than age and metallicity can influence the value of b. We use the local starforming dwarf galaxy, I Zw 18, in a case study to investigate uncertainties in age and metallicity inferred from b due errors or uncertainties in: mode of star formation (instantaneous starburst vs. continuous SF), dust extinction, nebular continuous emission (2-photon emission, Balmer continuum flux), and presence of older stars.

  2. The AFP-675 Far Ultraviolet Cameras experiment - Observations of the far-UV space environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carruthers, George R.; Morrill, Jeff S.; Dohne, Brian C.; Christensen, Susan A.

    1993-01-01

    The NRL's Far UV Cameras experiment flew aboard the Shuttle Orbiter on STS-39, in 1991: obtaining 105-200 nm measurements of the upper atmosphere, astronomical targets, and the Shuttle environment. Attention is presently given to observations of O2 density vs altitude in the nighttime atmosphere, the nocturnal ionosphere, Space Shuttle FUV glow, and photometry for both the stars and diffuse sources of 12 star fields at high and low galactic latitudes. The first FUV observations of the extended region of reflection nebulosity in Scorpius are included.

  3. Rocket instrument for far-UV spectrophotometry of faint astronomical objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartig, G. F.; Fastie, W. G.; Davidsen, A. F.

    1980-01-01

    A sensitive sounding rocket instrument for moderate (about 10-A) resolution far-UV (1160-1750-A) spectrophotometry of faint astronomical objects has been developed. The instrument employes a photon-counting microchannel plate imaging detector and a concave grating spectrograph behind a 40-cm Dall-Kirkham telescope. A unique remote-control pointing system, incorporating an SIT vidicon aspect camera, two star trackers, and a tone-encoded command telemetry link, permits the telescope to be oriented to within 5 arc sec of any target for which suitable guide stars can be found. The design, construction, calibration, and flight performance of the instrument are discussed.

  4. DETECTION OF IRON IN PG1159 STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Werner, Klaus; Rauch, Thomas; Kruk, Jeffrey W.

    2010-08-10

    Up to now, iron had not been found in any hydrogen-deficient (pre-) white dwarf of spectral type PG1159, despite intense searching in a number of objects. Consequently, an iron deficiency was claimed, in some cases at least 1 dex. The primary indicators were UV lines of Fe VII. Therefore, the search was confined to relatively cool PG1159 stars (T{sub eff} {approx}<150,000 K), otherwise Fe is too strongly ionized for a significant population of Fe VII. In this Letter, we announce the discovery of iron in the very hottest PG1159 stars (T{sub eff} = 150,000-200,000 K; RX J2117.1+3412, K 1-16, Longmore 4, NGC 246, H1504+65), based on the identification of the Fe X {lambda}{lambda}979.3, 1022.9 lines in spectra obtained with the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer. Surprisingly, our analysis results in a solar iron abundance for these stars. It is conspicuous that they are among the most massive PG1159 stars (0.71-0.82 M{sub sun}), in contrast to those objects for which strongest Fe deficiency was claimed (0.53-0.56 M{sub sun}).

  5. Dispersal of Disk Around Young Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeVincenzi, Donald L.; Hollenbach, David

    2000-01-01

    Young stars produce sufficient ultraviolet photon luminosity and mechanical luminosity in their winds to significantly affect the structure and evolution of the accretion disks surrounding them. The Lyman continuum photons create a nearly static, ionized, isothermal 10(exp 4) K atmosphere forms above the neutral disk at small distances from the star. Further out, they create a photoevaporative flow which relatively rapidly destroys the disk. The resulting slow (10-50 km per second) ionized outflow, which persists for greater than or equal to 10(exp 5) years for disk masses Md approx. 0.3M*, may explain the observational characteristics of many ultracompact HII regions. We compare model results to the observed radio free-free Spectra and luminosities of ultracompact HII regions and to the interesting source MWC349, which is observed to produce hydrogen masers. We also apply the results to the early solar nebula to explain the the dispersal of the solar nebula and the differences in hydrogen content in the giant planets. Finally, we model the small bright objects ("proplyds") observed in the Orion Nebula as disks around young, low mass stars which are externally illuminated by the UV photons from the nearby massive star.

  6. The NuSTAR Serendipitous Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lansbury, George B.; NuSTAR

    2015-01-01

    A great breakthrough in studying the cosmic X-ray background (CXB) population is the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR), the first focusing X-ray observatory with high sensitivity at > 10 keV. Here we present results from the NuSTAR serendipitous survey, the largest area (~7 deg2) component of the NuSTAR extragalactic survey programme. The source statistics are relatively good for a high energy X-ray survey, with ~150 detections and ~100 spectroscopically identified sources to-date. Studying the X-ray emission at > 10 keV, where X-rays from the central black hole are relatively unabsorbed, allows intrinsic properties such as column densities and luminosities to be well constrained. The X-ray analysis is supplemented by broad-band UV to mid-IR spectral energy distribution (SED) analyses. The dominant source population sampled by the NuSTAR serendipitous survey is quasars with L(10-40)keV > 1044 erg/s. This population is broadly similar to the population of nearby high-energy selected AGNs sampled by Swift/BAT, but scaled up in luminosity and mass.

  7. XI UV Laser Trigger System

    SciTech Connect

    Brickeen, B.K.; Morelli, G.L.; Paiva, R.A.; Powell, C.A.; Sundvold, P.D.

    1999-01-26

    The X1 accelerator project at Sandia National Laboratory/New Mexico utilizes SF6 insulated, multi-stage, UV laser triggered gas switches. A 265 nm UV laser system was designed and built to generate eight simultaneous output pulses of 10 mJ each with a 13 nsec pulse width. A 1061 nm solid-state Nd:Cr:GSGG laser was frequency quadrupled using a two-stage doubling process. The 1061 nm fundamental laser energy was frequency doubled with a KTP crystal to 530 nm, achieving 65% conversion efficiency. The 530 nm output was frequency doubled with KD*P crystal to 265 nm, achieving conversion efficiency of 31%. The 265 nm beam pulse was split into eight parallel channels with a system of partially reflecting mirrors. Low timing jitter and stable energy output were achieved. The entire optical system was packaged into a rugged, o-ring sealed, aluminum structure 10''x19''x2.75''. The size of the electronics was 12''x8''x8''. Subsequent accelerator system requirements dictated a redesign of the triggering system for an output beam with less angular divergence. An unstable, crossed porro prism resonator was designed and incorporated into the system. The beam divergence of the redesigned system was successfully decreased to 0.97 mrad in the UV. The resulting frequency doubling efficiencies were 55% to 530 nm and 25% to 265 nm. The optical output remained at 10 mJ in each channel with an 11 nsec pulse width.

  8. Massive Compact Stars as Quark Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, Hilário; Barbosa Duarte, Sérgio; de Oliveira, José Carlos T.

    2011-03-01

    High-mass compact stars have been reported recently in the literature, providing strong constraints on the properties of the ultra dense matter beyond the saturation nuclear density. In view of these results, the calculations of quark star or hybrid star equilibrium structure must be compatible with the provided observational data. But since the equations of state used in describing quark matter are in general too soft in comparison with the equation of states used to describe the hadronic or nuclear matter, the calculated quark star models presented in the literature are in general not suitable to explain the stability of highly-compact massive objects. In this work, we present the calculations of a spherically symmetric quark star structure by using an equation of state that takes into account the superconducting color-flavor locked phase of the strange quark matter. In addition, some fundamental aspects of QCD (asymptotic freedom and confinement) are considered by means of a phenomenological description of the deconfined quark phase, the density-dependent quark mass model. The quark matter behavior introduced by this model stiffens the corresponding equation of state. We thus investigate the influence of this model on the mass-radius diagram of quark stars. We obtain massive quark stars due to the stiffness of the equation of state, when a reasonable parameterization of the color superconducting gap is used. Models of quark stars enveloped by a nucleonic crust composed of a nuclear lattice embedded in an electron gas, with nuclei close to neutron drip line, are also discussed.

  9. Fractal dust grains around R Coronae Borealis stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, Edward L.

    1989-01-01

    Discrete dipole approximation calculations of the optical properties of random fractal aggregates of graphite spheroids show a UV absorption feature that is too wide and centered at too long a wavelength to fit the observed interstellar 2200-A feature, but which is a good match to the 2400-A feature seen in the hydrogen-deficient R CrB stars reported by Hecht et al. (1984). Graphite fractal grains also match the UV bump and large long-wavelenvth extinction seen in laboratory studies of carbon smoke published by Bussoletti et al. (1987), which are usually attributed to amorphous carbon.

  10. Dark stars: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freese, Katherine; Rindler-Daller, Tanja; Spolyar, Douglas; Valluri, Monica

    2016-06-01

    Dark stars are stellar objects made (almost entirely) of hydrogen and helium, but powered by the heat from dark matter annihilation, rather than by fusion. They are in hydrostatic and thermal equilibrium, but with an unusual power source. Weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs), among the best candidates for dark matter, can be their own antimatter and can annihilate inside the star, thereby providing a heat source. Although dark matter constitutes only ≲ 0.1% of the stellar mass, this amount is sufficient to power the star for millions to billions of years. Thus, the first phase of stellar evolution in the history of the Universe may have been dark stars. We review how dark stars come into existence, how they grow as long as dark matter fuel persists, and their stellar structure and evolution. The studies were done in two different ways, first assuming polytropic interiors and more recently using the MESA stellar evolution code; the basic results are the same. Dark stars are giant, puffy (∼10 AU) and cool (surface temperatures  ∼10 000 K) objects. We follow the evolution of dark stars from their inception at  ∼1{{M}ȯ} as they accrete mass from their surroundings to become supermassive stars, some even reaching masses  >{{10}6}{{M}ȯ} and luminosities  >{{10}10}{{L}ȯ} , making them detectable with the upcoming James Webb Space Telescope. Once the dark matter runs out and the dark star dies, it may collapse to a black hole; thus dark stars may provide seeds for the supermassive black holes observed throughout the Universe and at early times. Other sites for dark star formation may exist in the Universe today in regions of high dark matter density such as the centers of galaxies. The current review briefly discusses dark stars existing today, but focuses on the early generation of dark stars.

  11. Dark stars: a review.

    PubMed

    Freese, Katherine; Rindler-Daller, Tanja; Spolyar, Douglas; Valluri, Monica

    2016-06-01

    Dark stars are stellar objects made (almost entirely) of hydrogen and helium, but powered by the heat from dark matter annihilation, rather than by fusion. They are in hydrostatic and thermal equilibrium, but with an unusual power source. Weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs), among the best candidates for dark matter, can be their own antimatter and can annihilate inside the star, thereby providing a heat source. Although dark matter constitutes only [Formula: see text]0.1% of the stellar mass, this amount is sufficient to power the star for millions to billions of years. Thus, the first phase of stellar evolution in the history of the Universe may have been dark stars. We review how dark stars come into existence, how they grow as long as dark matter fuel persists, and their stellar structure and evolution. The studies were done in two different ways, first assuming polytropic interiors and more recently using the MESA stellar evolution code; the basic results are the same. Dark stars are giant, puffy (∼10 AU) and cool (surface temperatures  ∼10 000 K) objects. We follow the evolution of dark stars from their inception at  ∼[Formula: see text] as they accrete mass from their surroundings to become supermassive stars, some even reaching masses  >[Formula: see text] and luminosities  >[Formula: see text], making them detectable with the upcoming James Webb Space Telescope. Once the dark matter runs out and the dark star dies, it may collapse to a black hole; thus dark stars may provide seeds for the supermassive black holes observed throughout the Universe and at early times. Other sites for dark star formation may exist in the Universe today in regions of high dark matter density such as the centers of galaxies. The current review briefly discusses dark stars existing today, but focuses on the early generation of dark stars. PMID:27214049

  12. AN ULTRAVIOLET INVESTIGATION OF ACTIVITY ON EXOPLANET HOST STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Shkolnik, Evgenya L.

    2013-03-20

    Using the far-UV (FUV) and near-UV (NUV) photometry from the NASA Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX), we searched for evidence of increased stellar activity due to tidal and/or magnetic star-planet interactions (SPI) in the 272 known FGK planetary hosts observed by GALEX. With the increased sensitivity of GALEX, we are able probe systems with lower activity levels and at larger distances than what has been done to date with X-ray satellites. We compared samples of stars with close-in planets (a < 0.1 AU) to those with far-out planets (a > 0.5 AU) and looked for correlations of excess activity with other system parameters. This statistical investigation found no clear correlations with a, M{sub p} , or M{sub p} /a, in contrast to some X-ray and Ca II studies. However, there is tentative evidence (at a level of 1.8{sigma}) that stars with radial-velocity-(RV)-detected close-in planets are more FUV-active than stars with far-out planets, in agreement with several published X-ray and Ca II results. The case is strengthened to a level of significance to 2.3{sigma} when transit-detected close-in planets are included. This is most likely because the RV-selected sample of stars is significantly less active than the field population of comparable stars, while the transit-selected sample is similarly active. Given the factor of 2-3 scatter in fractional FUV luminosity for a given stellar effective temperature, it is necessary to conduct a time-resolved study of the planet hosts in order to better characterize their UV variability and generate a firmer statistical result.

  13. Dynamical Properties of z ~ 2 Star-forming Galaxies and a Universal Star Formation Relation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouché, N.; Cresci, G.; Davies, R.; Eisenhauer, F.; Förster Schreiber, N. M.; Genzel, R.; Gillessen, S.; Lehnert, M.; Lutz, D.; Nesvadba, N.; Shapiro, K. L.; Sternberg, A.; Tacconi, L. J.; Verma, A.; Cimatti, A.; Daddi, E.; Renzini, A.; Erb, D. K.; Shapley, A.; Steidel, C. C.

    2007-12-01

    We present the first comparison of the dynamical properties of different samples of z~1.4-3.4 star-forming galaxies from spatially resolved imaging spectroscopy from SINFONI/VLT integral field spectroscopy and IRAM CO millimeter interferometry. Our samples include 16 rest-frame UV-selected, 16 rest-frame optically selected, and 13 submillimeter galaxies (SMGs). We find that rest-frame UV and optically bright (K<20) z~2 star forming galaxies are dynamically similar, and follow the same velocity-size relation as disk galaxies at z~0. In the theoretical framework of rotating disks forming from dissipative collapse in dark matter halos, the two samples require a spin parameter <λ> ranging from 0.06 to 0.2. In contrast, bright SMGs (S850μm>=5 mJy) have larger velocity widths and are much more compact. Hence, SMGs have lower angular momenta and higher matter densities than either the UV or optically selected populations. This indicates that dissipative major mergers may dominate the SMGs population, resulting in early spheroids, and that a significant fraction of the UV/optically bright galaxies have evolved less violently, either in a series of minor mergers, or in rapid dissipative collapse from the halo, given that either process may leads to the formation of early disks. These early disks may later evolve into spheroids via disk instabilities or mergers. Because of their small sizes and large densities, SMGs lie at the high surface density end of a universal (out to z=2.5) ``Schmidt-Kennicutt'' relation between gas surface density and star formation rate surface density. The best-fit relation suggests that the star formation rate per unit area scales as the surface gas density to a power of ~1.7, and that the star formation efficiency increases by a factor of 4 between non-starbursts and strong starbursts. Based on observations at the Very Large Telescope (VLT) of the European Southern Observatory (ESO), Paranal, Chile, under programs GTO 073.B-9018, 074.A-9011

  14. CNO behaviour in planet-harbouring stars. I. Nitrogen abundances in stars with planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suárez-Andrés, L.; Israelian, G.; González Hernández, J. I.; Adibekyan, V. Zh.; Delgado Mena, E.; Santos, N. C.; Sousa, S. G.

    2016-06-01

    Context. Carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen (CNO) are key elements in stellar formation and evolution, and their abundances should also have a significant impact on planetary formation and evolution. Aims: We present a detailed spectroscopic analysis of 74 solar-type stars, 42 of which are known to harbour planets. We determine the nitrogen abundances of these stars and investigate a possible connection between N and the presence of planetary companions. Methods: We used VLT/UVES to obtain high-resolution near-UV spectra of our targets. Spectral synthesis of the NH band at 3360 Å was performed with the spectral synthesis codes MOOG and FITTING. Results: We identify several spectral windows from which accurate N abundance can be obtained. Nitrogen distributions for stars with and without planets show that planet hosts are nitrogen-rich when compared to single stars. However, given the linear trend between [N/Fe] vs. [Fe/H], this fact can be explained as being due to the metal-rich nature of planet hosts. Conclusions: We conclude that reliable N abundances can be derived for metal-rich solar type stars from the near UV molecular band at 3360 Å. We confirm a linear trend between [N/Fe] and metallicity expected from standard models of Galactic chemical evolution. Based on observations collected with the UVES spectrograph at the 8-m Very Large Telescope (VLT) - program IDs: 074.C-0134(A), 075.D-0453(A), 086.D-0082(A), 093.D-0328(A), installed at the Cerro Paranal Observatory.

  15. Solar UV Radiation and the Origin of Life on Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heap, Sara R.; Hubeny, Ivan; Lanz, Thierry; Gaidos, Eric; Kasting, James; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    We have started a comprehensive, interdisciplinary study of the influence of solar ultraviolet radiation on the atmosphere of of the early Earth. We plan to model the chemistry of the Earth atmosphere during its evolution, using observed UV flux distributions of early solar analogs as boundary conditions in photochemical models of the Earth's atmosphere. The study has four distinct but interlinked parts: (1) Establishing the radiation of the early Sun; (2) Determining the photochemistry of the early Earth's atmosphere; (3) Estimating the rates of H2 loss from the atmosphere; and (4) Ascertaining how sensitive is the photochemistry to the metallicity of the Sun. We are currently using STIS and EUVE to obtain high-quality far-UV and extreme-UV observations of three early-solar analogs. We will perform a detailed non-LTE study of each stars, and construct theoretical model photosphere, and an empirical model chromospheres, which can be used to extrapolate the continuum to the Lyman continuum region. Given a realistic flux distribution of the early Sun, we will perform photochemical modeling of weakly reducing primitive atmospheres to determine the lifetime and photochemistry of CH4. In particular, we will make estimates of the amount of CH4 present in the prebiotic atmosphere, and estimate the atmospheric CH4 concentration during the Late Archean (2.5-3.0 b.y. ago) and determine whether it would have been sufficiently abundant to help offset reduced solar luminosity at that time. Having obtained a photochemical model, we will solve for the concentrations of greenhouse gasses and important pre-biotic molecules, and perform a detailed radiative transfer calculations to compute the UV flux reaching the surface.

  16. Near UV Observation of HAT-P-16b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, Kyle; Turner, J.

    2013-06-01

    We observed the primary transit of the hot Jupiter HAT-P-16b in the near-UV photometric band on December 29, 2012 in an attempt to detect its magnetic field. Vidotto, Jardine & Helling (2011) postulate that the magnetic field of HAT-P-16b can be constrained if its near-UV light curve shows an early ingress compared to its optical light curve, while its egress remains unswayed. Predicted magnetic fields of Jupiter-like planets should range between 8 G (Reiners & Christensen 2010) and 40 G (Sanchez-Lavega 2004). However, we derived an upper limit of the magnetic field strength of HAT-P-16b to range between 0.0082 and 0.82 G (for a 1--100 G magnetic field strength range for the host star, HAT-P-16). Using these magnetic field values and an assumed B* of 100 G, the Vidotto, Jardine & Helling (2011) method predicts a timing difference of 19--38 mins. We did not detect an early ingress in our night of observing when using a cadence of 45 seconds and an average photometric precision of 2.25 mmag. We present the first near-UV light curve of HAT-P-16b and find a near-UV planetary radius of 1.242+-0.056 (R_Jup) which is consistent with its near-IR radius of R=1.289+-0.066 (R_Jup) (Buchhave 2010). We developed an automated reduction pipeline and a modeling package to process our data. The modeling package utilizes the Levenberg-Marquardt minimization algorithm to find a least-squares best fit and a differential evolution Markov Chain Monte Carlo to find the best fit to the light curve, and uses both the residual permutation (rosary bead) method and time-averaging method (Pont 2006) to constrain the red noise in both fitting methods.

  17. IUE and Einstein survey of late-type giant and supergiant stars and the dividing line

    SciTech Connect

    Haisch, B.M.; Bookbinder, J.A.; Maggio, A.; Vaiana, G.S.; Bennett, J.O. Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, Cambridge, MA Osservatorio Astronomico, Palermo Colorado Univ., Boulder )

    1990-10-01

    Results are presented on an IUE UV survey of 255 late-type G, K, and M stars, complementing the Maggio et al. (1990) Einstein X-ray survey of 380 late-type stars. The large data sample of X-ray and UV detections make it possible to examine the activity relationship between the X-ray and the UV emissions. The results confirm previous finding of a trend involving a steeply-dropping upper envelope of the transition region line fluxes, f(line)/f(V), as the dividing line is approached. This suggests that a sharp decrease in maximum activity accompanies the advancing spectral type, with the dividing line corresponding to this steep gradient region. The results confirm the rotation-activity connection for stars in this region of the H-R diagram. 67 refs.

  18. IUE and Einstein survey of late-type giant and supergiant stars and the dividing line

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haisch, Bernhard M.; Bookbinder, Jay A.; Maggio, A.; Vaiana, G. S.; Bennett, Jeffrey O.

    1990-01-01

    Results are presented on an IUE UV survey of 255 late-type G, K, and M stars, complementing the Maggio et al. (1990) Einstein X-ray survey of 380 late-type stars. The large data sample of X-ray and UV detections make it possible to examine the activity relationship between the X-ray and the UV emissions. The results confirm previous finding of a trend involving a steeply-dropping upper envelope of the transition region line fluxes, f(line)/f(V), as the dividing line is approached. This suggests that a sharp decrease in maximum activity accompanies the advancing spectral type, with the dividing line corresponding to this steep gradient region. The results confirm the rotation-activity connection for stars in this region of the H-R diagram.

  19. First ultraviolet spectropolarimetry of Be stars from the Wisconsin Ultraviolet Photo-Polarimeter Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bjorkman, K. S.; Nordsieck, K. H.; Code, A. D.; Anderson, C. M.; Babler, B. L.; Clayton, G. C.; Magalhaes, A. M.; Meade, M. R.; Nook, M. A.; Schulte-Ladbeck, R. E.

    1991-01-01

    The first UV spectropolarimetric observations of Be stars are presented. They were obtained with the Wisconsin Ultraviolet Photo-Polarimeter Experiment (WUPPE) aboard the Astro-1 mission. WUPPE data on the Be stars Zeta Tau and Pi Aqr, along with near-simultaneous optical data obtained at the Pine Bluff Observatory (PBO). Combined WUPPE and PBO data give polarization as a function of wavelength across a very broad spectral region, from 1400 to 7600 A. Existing Be star models predicted increasing polarization toward shorter wavelengths in the UV, but this is not supported by the WUPPE observations. Instead, the observations show a constant or slightly declining continuum polarization shortward of the Balmer jump, and broad UV polarization dips around 1700 and 1900 A, which may be a result of Fe-line-attenuation effects on the polarized flux. Supporting evidence for this conclusion comes from the optical data, in which decreases in polarization across Fe II lines in Zeta Tau were discovered.

  20. Empirical wind models from detailed UV-line FITS - Tau Scorpii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamann, W.-R.

    Lamers and Rogerson (1978) have conducted a study of the main-sequence BO star Tau Sco. However, the line formation was calculated according to the Sobolev approximation method, and the line fit was, therefore, restricted to the blue wings of the UV resonance lines. The present investigation of this star is based on an employment of the comoving-frame (CMF) method, which was extended to the treatment of overlapping doublets. It has been shown by Hamann (1980) that the results of the CMF method may differ considerably from those of the Sobolev procedure. It is found in the current investigation that the observed UV resonance lines of Tau Sco are well reproduced by theoretical profiles. The CMF calculations allow for a fit of the entire profile range and a correct treatment of the doublets. An empirical model which distinguishes three zones is derived. The line fits firmly establish a large microturbulence of 100 km/s in zones I and II.

  1. Color excesses, intrinsic colors, and absolute magnitudes of Galactic and Large Magellanic Cloud Wolf-Rayet stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vacca, William D.; Torres-Dodgen, Ana V.

    1990-01-01

    A new method of determining the color excesses of WR stars in the Galaxy and the LMC has been developed and is used to determine the excesses for 44 Galactic and 32 LMC WR stars. The excesses are combined with line-free, narrow-band spectrophotometry to derive intrinsic colors of the WR stars of nearly all spectral subtypes. No correlation of UV spectral index or intrinsic colors with spectral subtype is found for the samples of single WN or WC stars. There is evidence that early WN stars in the LMC have flatter UV continua and redder intrinsic colors than early WN stars in the Galaxy. No separation is found between the values derived for Galactic WC stars and those obtained for LMC WC stars. The intrinsic colors are compared with those calculated from model atmospheres of WR stars and generally good agreement is found. Absolute magnitudes are derived for WR stars in the LMC and for those Galactic WR stars located in clusters and associations for which there are reliable distance estimates.

  2. IR/UV and UV/UV double-resonance study of guaiacol and eugenol dimers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longarte, Asier; Redondo, Carolina; Fernández, José A.; Castaño, Fernando

    2005-04-01

    Guaiacol (2-methoxyphenol) and eugenol (4-allyl-2-methoxyphenol) molecules are biologically active phenol derivatives with an intramolecular -OH⋯OCH3 hydrogen bond (H bond). Pulsed supersonic expansions of mixtures of either of the two molecules with He yield weakly bound homodimers as well as other higher-order complexes. A number of complementary and powerful laser spectroscopic techniques, including UV-UV and IR-UV double resonances, have been employed to interrogate the species formed in the expansion in order to get information on their structures and spectroscopic properties. The interpretation of the spectra of eugenol dimer is complex and required a previous investigation on a similar but simpler molecule both to gain insight into the possible structures and support the conclusions. Guaiacol (2-methoxyphenol) has been used for that purpose. The combination of the broad laser study combined with ab initio calculations at the Becke 3 Lee-Yang-Parr/6-31+G(d) level has provided the isomer structures, the potential-energy wells, and shed light on the inter- and intramolecular interactions involved. Guaiacol homodimer has been shown to have a single isomer whereas eugenol dimer has at least two. The comparison between the computed geometries of the dimers, their respective energies, and the vibrational normal modes permits the identification of the spectra.

  3. Environmentally driven star formation during a super galaxy group merger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monroe, Jonathan; Tran, Kim-Vy; Gonzalez, Anthony H.

    2016-01-01

    We find evidence for outside-in growth of galaxies within a merging super galaxy group at a redshift of z~0.37. We utilize Hubble Space Telescope imaging in rest-frame UV and visual to measure color gradients across the super group and internally within 138 individual galaxies that are spectroscopically confirmed members. The group members show enhanced star formation at intermediate environmental densities. The high resolution imaging shows that the group galaxies have bluer disks, i.e. most of the new stars are forming in the disk which supports outside-in growth. These disk-dominated galaxies will likely fade to become S0 members.

  4. The unusual interacting S star binary HR 1105

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ake, Thomas B., III; Johnson, Hollis R.; Bopp, Bernard W.

    1994-01-01

    IUE observations of HR 1105 over its 596-day orbit show strong orbital modulation of both continuum and emission lines. These are most intense just before both conjunctions and nearly disappear near quadratures, the most intense phase being just before the hot component passes in front of the S star. High dispersion observations exhibit a blue-shifted absorption feature in Mg II, representing an outflow of material of about 55 km/s. These observations are consistent with the UV source being an optically thin gas stream between the components of the system, which is partially eclipsed when the S star is in front.

  5. Variable outflow in the O6ef star Lambda Cephei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leep, E. M.; Conti, P. S.

    1979-01-01

    The paper analyzes spectroscopic data from the UV region using the Copernicus satellite on six consecutive days in September, 1975. It is found that the P Cygni lines of C III at 1175 A and of N V at 1238 and 1242 A show little or no variation in their profiles. The results indicate that the changes in the 4686-A H II and H-alpha can be interpreted as a variable outflow near the surface of the star, either due to random density inhomogeneities propagating outward, or the effects of rotation of a nonspherical star, or both. Insufficient data exist at present to distinguish between periodic and random fluctuations.

  6. How Does Abundance Affect the Strength of UV Emission in Elliptical Galaxies?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonneborn, George (Technical Monitor); Brown, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    : the hot stars in M31 seem to have a similar carbon abundance to those stars in galaxies with much brighter UV emission. The fraction of these hot stars in a population should be a strong function of chemical abundances, so this finding warrants further exploration, and we are proceeding with our analysis. Because the UV emission in these galaxies comes from a population of extreme horizontal branch stars, the PI (Brown) presented this result at a June 2003 conference on such stars.

  7. The First Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Naoki

    2010-10-01

    The standard cosmological model predicts that the first cosmological objects are formed when the age of the universe is a few hundred million years. Recent theoretical studies and numerical simulations consistently suggest that the first objects are very massive primordial stars. We introduce the key physics and explain why the first stars are thought to be massive, rather than to be low-mass stars. The state-of-the-art simulations include all the relevant atomic and molecular physics to follow the thermal evolution of a prestellar gas cloud to very high ``stellar'' densities. Evolutionary calculations of the primordial stars suggest the formation of massive blackholes in the early universe. Finally, we show the results from high-resolution simulations of star formation in a low-metallicity gas. Vigorous fragmentation is triggered in a star-forming gas cloud at a metallicity of as low as Z = 10-5Zsolar.

  8. Cooling of dense stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsuruta, S.

    1972-01-01

    Cooling rates were calculated for neutron stars of about one solar mass and 10 km radius, with magnetic fields from zero to about 10 to the 14th power gauss, for extreme cases of maximum and zero superfluidity. The results show that most pulsars are so cold that thermal ionization of surface atoms would be negligible. Nucleon superfluidity and crystallization of heavy nuclei were treated quantitatively, and more realistic hadron star models were chosen. Cooling rates were calculated for a stable hyperon star near the maximum mass limit, a medium weight neutron star, and a light neutron star with neutron-rich heavy nuclei near the minimum mass limit. Results show that cooling rates are a sensitive function of density. The Crab and Vela pulsars are considered, as well as cooling of a massive white dwarf star.

  9. Activity in F stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolff, Sidney C.; Boesgaard, Ann Merchant; Simon, Theodore

    1986-01-01

    Measurements of He I 5876 A and IUE measurements of chromospheric and transition region lines in a large sample of F-type stars are presented. The data show that activity is detectable in nearly all early F-type stars and differs in several of its characteristics from that typically seen in cooler stars with slow rotation and fully developed convective zones. The onset of activity occurs near B-V = 0.28, which corresponds approximately to spectral type F0 and T(eff) = 7300 K. There is no correlation between the level of activity and the abundances of lithium and beryllium in F stars hotter than T(eff) = 6600 K. All but one of the stars in the 6600-7300 K temperature interval are active. The levels of activity in these stars are independent of Rossby number.

  10. Intelligent star tracker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Natalie

    2001-11-01

    Current state-of-the-art commercial star sensors typically weigh 15 pounds, attain 5 to 10 arc-second accuracy, and use roughly 10 watts of power. Unfortunately, the current state-of-the-art commercial star sensors do not meet many of NASA's next-generation spacecraft and instrument needs. Nor do they satisfy Air Force's needs for micro/nano-satellite systems. In an effort to satisfy micro/nano satellite mission needs the Air Force Research Laboratory is developing an intelligent star Tracker, called IntelliStar, which incorporates several novel technologies including Silicon carbide optical housing, MEMs based adaptive optic technologies, smart active pixels, and algebraic coding theory. The design considerations associated with the development of the IntelliStar system are presented along with experimental results which characterize each technologies contribution to overall system performance. In addition to being light weight, the IntelliStar System offers advantages in speed, size, power consumption, and radiation tolerance.

  11. Numerical Simulations of Self-Regulated, Star Forming Galactic Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, D. C.; Struck, C.

    2000-12-01

    While star formation feedback models have been used in the study of galaxy formation, the effects of these processes on the global structure of disks have received less attention. We have adapted Hydra, the adaptive particle-particle, particle-mesh with smoothed particle hydrodynamics code by Couchman et al., to include heating processes deriving from star formation in order to study the effects of this heating on the structure of the disk and on the star formation itself. These processes include mechanical heating from strong stellar winds and supernovae, as well as heating due to photoelectric removal of electrons from grains by UV flux from young OB stars. Mechanisms of this type can be implemented in a simple way within the Hydra code, allowing us to study the density and temperature profiles of the gas, the balance among the multiple thermal phases generated in the disk, and the kinematics of the disk. Preliminary results from numerical simulations of star-forming gas disks of late type spirals are presented. Self-regulating effects of star formation on the global structure of the disk are discussed. We describe and compare the results of different star formation criteria and discuss the effects of particle resolution. This study was funded, in part, by a grant from the George Washington Carver Charitable Trust.

  12. The Role of Radiation Pressure in Assembling Super Star Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsz-Ho Tsang, Benny; Milosavljevic, Milos

    2016-06-01

    Super star clusters are the most extreme star-forming regions of the Universe - they occupy the most massive end of the Kennicutt-Schmidt relation, forming stars at exceptionally high rates and gas surface densities. The radiation feedback from the dense population of massive stars is expected to play a dynamic role during the assembly of the clusters, and represents a potential mechanism for launching large-scale galactic outflows. Observationally, large distances and dust obscuration have been withholding clues about the early stages of massive cluster formation; theoretically, the lack of accurate and efficient radiation transfer schemes in multi-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations has been deterring our understanding of radiative feedback. By extending the adaptive mesh refinement code FLASH with a closure-free, Monte Carlo radiation transport scheme, we perform 3D radiation hydrodynamical simulations of super star cluster formation from the collapse of turbulent molecular clouds. Our simulations probe the star formation in densities typical for starbursts, with both non-ionizing UV and dust-reprocessed IR radiation treated self-consistently. We aim to determine the role of radiation pressure in regulating star formation, and its capacity in driving intense outflows.

  13. High Power UV LED Industrial Curing Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Karlicek, Robert, F., Jr; Sargent, Robert

    2012-05-14

    UV curing is a green technology that is largely underutilized because UV radiation sources like Hg Lamps are unreliable and difficult to use. High Power UV LEDs are now efficient enough to replace Hg Lamps, and offer significantly improved performance relative to Hg Lamps. In this study, a modular, scalable high power UV LED curing system was designed and tested, performing well in industrial coating evaluations. In order to achieve mechanical form factors similar to commercial Hg Lamp systems, a new patent pending design was employed enabling high irradiance at long working distances. While high power UV LEDs are currently only available at longer UVA wavelengths, rapid progress on UVC LEDs and the development of new formulations designed specifically for use with UV LED sources will converge to drive more rapid adoption of UV curing technology. An assessment of the environmental impact of replacing Hg Lamp systems with UV LED systems was performed. Since UV curing is used in only a small portion of the industrial printing, painting and coating markets, the ease of use of UV LED systems should increase the use of UV curing technology. Even a small penetration of the significant number of industrial applications still using oven curing and drying will lead to significant reductions in energy consumption and reductions in the emission of green house gases and solvent emissions.

  14. UV irradiation responses in Giardia intestinalis.

    PubMed

    Einarsson, Elin; Svärd, Staffan G; Troell, Karin

    2015-07-01

    The response to ultraviolet light (UV) radiation, a natural stressor to the intestinal protozoan parasite Giardia intestinalis, was studied to deepen the understanding of how the surrounding environment affects the parasite during transmission. UV radiation at 10 mJ/cm(2) kills Giardia cysts effectively whereas trophozoites and encysting parasites can recover from UV treatment at 100 mJ/cm(2) and 50 mJ/cm(2) respectively. Staining for phosphorylated histone H2A showed that UV treatment induces double-stranded DNA breaks and flow cytometry analyses revealed that UV treatment of trophozoites induces DNA replication arrest. Active DNA replication coupled to DNA repair could be an explanation to why UV light does not kill trophozoites and encysting cells as efficiently as the non-replicating cysts. We also examined UV-induced gene expression responses in both trophozoites and cysts using RNA sequencing (RNA seq). UV radiation induces small overall changes in gene expression in Giardia but cysts show a stronger response than trophozoites. Heat shock proteins, kinesins and Nek kinases are up-regulated, whereas alpha-giardins and histones are down-regulated in UV treated trophozoites. Expression of variable surface proteins (VSPs) is changed in both trophozoites and cysts. Our data show that Giardia cysts have limited ability to repair UV-induced damage and this may have implications for drinking- and waste-water treatment when setting criteria for the use of UV disinfection to ensure safe water. PMID:25825252

  15. Diurnal changes in epidermal UV transmittance of plants in naturally high UV environments.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Paul W; Flint, Stephan D; Slusser, James R; Gao, Wei; Ryel, Ronald J

    2008-06-01

    Studies were conducted on three herbaceous plant species growing in naturally high solar UV environments in the subalpine of Mauna Kea, Hawaii, USA, to determine if diurnal changes in epidermal UV transmittance (T(UV)) occur in these species, and to test whether manipulation of the solar radiation regime could alter these diurnal patterns. Additional field studies were conducted at Logan, Utah, USA, to determine if solar UV was causing diurnal T(UV) changes and to evaluate the relationship between diurnal changes in T(UV) and UV-absorbing pigments. Under clear skies, T(UV), as measured with a UV-A-pulse amplitude modulation fluorometer for leaves of Verbascum thapsus and Oenothera stricta growing in native soils and Vicia faba growing in pots, was highest at predawn and sunset and lowest at midday. These patterns in T(UV) closely tracked diurnal changes in solar radiation and were the result of correlated changes in fluorescence induced by UV-A and blue radiation but not photochemical efficiency (F(v)/F(m)) or initial fluorescence yield (F(o)). The magnitude of the midday reduction in T(UV) was greater for young leaves than for older leaves of Verbascum. Imposition of artificial shade eliminated the diurnal changes in T(UV) in Verbascum, but reduction in solar UV had no effect on diurnal T(UV) changes in Vicia. In Vicia, the diurnal changes in T(UV) occurred without detectable changes in the concentration of whole-leaf UV-absorbing compounds. Results suggest that plants actively control diurnal changes in UV shielding, and these changes occur in response to signals other than solar UV; however, the underlying mechanisms responsible for rapid changes in T(UV) remain unclear. PMID:18346077

  16. Strange Nonchaotic Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindner, John F.; Kohar, Vivek; Kia, Behnam; Hippke, Michael; Learned, John G.; Ditto, William L.

    2015-02-01

    The unprecedented light curves of the Kepler space telescope document how the brightness of some stars pulsates at primary and secondary frequencies whose ratios are near the golden mean, the most irrational number. A nonlinear dynamical system driven by an irrational ratio of frequencies generically exhibits a strange but nonchaotic attractor. For Kepler's "golden" stars, we present evidence of the first observation of strange nonchaotic dynamics in nature outside the laboratory. This discovery could aid the classification and detailed modeling of variable stars.

  17. Nagyszombat and the stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zsoldos, E.

    Péter Pázmány, founder of the University of Nagyszombat, considered stars in terms inherited from medieval times. The theses, connected to the university graduation, soon left this definition, and imagined stars as made from sublunar elements. The 1753 decree of the Empress Maria Theresia ordered university professors to publish textbooks. These textbooks, together with the theses showed a definite improvement, defining stars according to contemporary knowledge.

  18. Are dusty galaxies blue? Insights on UV attenuation from dust-selected galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Casey, C. M.; Cooray, A.; Scoville, N. Z.; Sanders, D. B.; Lee, N.; Finkelstein, S. L.; Capak, P.; Conley, A.; De Zotti, G.; Farrah, D.; Fu, H.; Le Floc'h, E.; Ilbert, O.; Ivison, R. J.; Takeuchi, T. T.

    2014-12-01

    Galaxies' rest-frame ultraviolet (UV) properties are often used to directly infer the degree to which dust obscuration affects the measurement of star formation rates (SFRs). While much recent work has focused on calibrating dust attenuation in galaxies selected at rest-frame ultraviolet wavelengths, locally and at high-z, here we investigate attenuation in dusty, star forming galaxies (DSFGs) selected at far-infrared wavelengths. By combining multiwavelength coverage across 0.15-500 μm in the COSMOS field, in particular making use of Herschel imaging, and a rich data set on local galaxies, we find an empirical variation in the relationship between the rest-frame UV slope (β) and the ratio of infrared-to-ultraviolet emission (L {sub IR}/L {sub UV} ≡ IRX) as a function of infrared luminosity, or total SFR. Both locally and at high-z, galaxies above SFR ≳ 50 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1} deviate from the nominal IRX-β relation toward bluer colors by a factor proportional to their increasing IR luminosity. We also estimate contamination rates of DSFGs on high-z dropout searches of <<1% at z ≲ 4-10, providing independent verification that contamination from very dusty foreground galaxies is low in Lyman-break galaxy searches. Overall, our results are consistent with the physical interpretation that DSFGs, e.g., galaxies with >50 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}, are dominated at all epochs by short-lived, extreme burst events, producing many young O and B stars that are primarily, yet not entirely, enshrouded in thick dust cocoons. The blue rest-frame UV slopes of DSFGs are inconsistent with the suggestion that most DSFGs at z ∼ 2 exhibit steady-state star formation in secular disks.

  19. The Slow Death (Or Rebirth?) of Extended Star Formation in z ~ 0.1 Green Valley Early-type Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Jerome J.; Faber, S. M.; Salim, Samir; Graves, Genevieve J.; Rich, R. Michael

    2012-12-01

    UV observations in the local universe have uncovered a population of early-type galaxies with UV flux consistent with low-level recent or ongoing star formation. Understanding the origin of such star formation remains an open issue. We present resolved UV-optical photometry of a sample of 19 Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) early-type galaxies at z ~ 0.1 drawn from the sample originally selected by Salim & Rich to lie in the bluer part of the green valley in the UV-optical color-magnitude diagram as measured by the Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX). Utilizing high-resolution Hubble Space Telescope (HST) far-UV imaging provides unique insight into the distribution of UV light in these galaxies, which we call "extended star-forming early-type galaxies" (ESF-ETGs) because of extended UV emission that is indicative of recent star formation. The UV-optical color profiles of all ESF-ETGs show red centers and blue outer parts. Their outer colors require the existence of a significant underlying population of older stars in the UV-bright regions. An analysis of stacked SDSS spectra reveals weak LINER-like emission in their centers. Using a cross-matched SDSS DR7/GALEX GR6 catalog, we search for other green valley galaxies with similar properties to these ESF-ETGs and estimate that ≈13% of dust-corrected green valley galaxies of similar stellar mass and UV-optical color are likely ESF-candidates, i.e., ESF-ETGs are not rare. Our results are consistent with star formation that is gradually declining in existing disks, i.e., the ESF-ETGs are evolving onto the red sequence for the first time, or with rejuvenated star formation due to accreted gas in older disks provided that the gas does not disrupt the structure of the galaxy and the resulting star formation is not too recent and bursty. ESF-ETGs may typify an important subpopulation of galaxies that can linger in the green valley for up to several Gyrs, based on their resemblance to nearby gas-rich green valley galaxies

  20. CSTAR star catalogue development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uhde-Lacovara, J. A.

    1986-01-01

    The Continuous Stellar Tracking Attitude Reference (CSTAR) system is an in-house project for the Space Station to provide high accuracy, drift free attitude and angular rate information for the GN&C system. Constraints exist on the star catalogue incorporated in the system. These constraints include the following: mass memory allocated for catalogue storage, star tracker imaging sensitivity, the minimum resolvable separation angle between stars, the width of the field of view of the star tracker, and the desired number of stars to be tracked in a field of view. The Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO) catalogue is the basis reference for this study. As it stands, the SAO does not meet the requirements of any of the above constraints. Star selection algorithms have been devised for catalogue optimization. Star distribution statistics have been obtained to aid in the development of these rules. VAX based software has been developed to implement the star selection algorithms. The software is modular and provides a design tool to tailor the catalogue to available star tracker technology. The SAO catalogue has been optimized for the requirements of the present CSTAR system.