Science.gov

Sample records for v-notch impact testing

  1. Results of charpy V-notch impact testing of structural steel specimens irradiated at {approximately}30{degrees}C to 1 x 10{sup 16} neutrons/cm{sup 2} in a commercial reactor cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Iskander, S.K.; Stoller, R.E.

    1997-04-01

    A capsule containing Charpy V-notch (CVN) and mini-tensile specimens was irradiated at {approximately} 30{degrees}C ({approximately} 85{degrees}F) in the cavity of a commercial nuclear power plant to a fluence of 1 x 10{sup 16} neutrons/cm{sup 2} (> 1MeV). The capsule included six CVN impact specimens of archival High Flux Isotope Reactor A212 grade B ferritic steel and five CVN impact specimens of a well-studied A36 structural steel. This irradiation was part of the ongoing study of neutron-induced damage effects at the low temperature and flux experienced by reactor supports. The plant operators shut down the plant before the planned exposure was reached. The exposure of these specimens produced no significant irradiation-induced embrittlement. Of interest were the data on unirradiated specimens in the L-T orientation machined from a single plate of A36 structural steel, which is the same specification for the structural steel used in some reactor supports. The average CVN energy of five unirradiated specimens obtained from one region of the plate and tested at room temperature was {approximately} 99 J, while the energy of 11 unirradiated specimens from other locations of the same plate was 45 J, a difference of {approximately} 220%. The CVN impact energies for all 18 specimens ranged from a low of 32 J to a high of 111 J. Moreover, it appears that the University of Kansas CVN impact energy data of the unirradiated specimens at the 100-J level are shifted toward higher temperatures by about 20 K. The results were an example of the extent of scatter possible in CVN impact testing. Generic values for the CVN impact energy of A36 should be used with caution in critical applications.

  2. The evaluation of tempered martensite embrittlement in 4130 steel by instrumented charpy V-notch testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zia-Ebrahimi, F.; Krauss, G.

    1983-06-01

    Tempered martensite embrittlement (TME) was studied in vacuum-melted 4130 steel with either 0.002 or 0.02 wt pct P. TME was observed as a severe decrease in Charpy V-notch impact energy, from 46 ft-lb. at 200 °C to 35 ft-lb. at 300 °C in the low P alloy. The impact energy of the high P alloy was consistently lower than that of the low P alloy in all tempered conditions. Fracture was transgranular for all specimens; therefore, segregation of P to the prior austenitic grain boundaries was not a factor in the o°Currence of TME. Analysis of load-time curves obtained by instrumented Charpy testing revealed that the embrittlement is associated with a drop in the pre-maximum-load and post-unstable-fracture energies. In specimens tempered at 400 °C the deleterious effect of phosphorus on impact energy became pronounced, a result more consistent with classical temper embrittlement rather than TME. A constant decrease in pre-maximum-load energy due to phosphorus content was observed. The pre-maximum-load energy decreases with increasing tempering temperature in the range of 200 °C to 400 °C, a result explained by the change in work hardening rate. Carbon extraction replicas of polished and etched as-quenched specimens revealed the presence of Fe2MoC and/or Fe3C carbides retained after austenitizing. Ductile crack extension close to the notch root was related to the formation of fine micro voids at the retained carbides.

  3. Effects of Notch Misalignment and Tip Radius on Displacement Field in V-Notch Rail Shear Test as Determined by Photogrammetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Charles S.; Oliveras, Ovidio M.

    2011-01-01

    Evolution of the 3D strain field during ASTM-D-7078 v-notch rail shear tests on 8-ply quasi-isotropic carbon fiber/epoxy laminates was determined by optical photogrammetry using an ARAMIS system. Specimens having non-optimal geometry and minor discrepancies in dimensional tolerances were shown to display non-symmetry and/or stress concentration in the vicinity of the notch relative to a specimen meeting the requirements of the standard, but resulting shear strength and modulus values remained within acceptable bounds of standard deviation. Based on these results, and reported difficulty machining specimens to the required tolerances using available methods, it is suggested that a parametric study combining analytical methods and experiment may provide rationale to increase the tolerances on some specimen dimensions, reducing machining costs, increasing the proportion of acceptable results, and enabling a wider adoption of the test method.

  4. Assessment of Ductile-to-Brittle Transition Behavior of Localized Microstructural Regions in a Friction-Stir Welded X80 Pipeline Steel with Miniaturized Charpy V-Notch Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avila, Julian A.; Lucon, Enrico; Sowards, Jeffrey; Mei, Paulo Roberto; Ramirez, Antonio J.

    2016-04-01

    Friction-stir welding (FSW) is an alternative welding process for pipelines. This technology offers sound welds, good repeatability, and excellent mechanical properties. However, it is of paramount importance to determine the toughness of the welds at low temperatures in order to establish the limits of this technology. Ductile-to-brittle transition curves were generated in the present study by using a small-scale instrumented Charpy machine and miniaturized V-notch specimens (Kleinstprobe, KLST); notches were located in base metal, heat-affected, stirred, and hard zones within a FSW joint of API-5L X80 Pipeline Steel. Specimens were tested at temperatures between 77 K (-196 °C) and 298 K (25 °C). Based on the results obtained, the transition temperatures for the base material and heat-affected zone were below 173 K (-100 °C); conversely, for the stirred and hard zones, it was located around 213 K (-60 °C). Fracture surfaces were characterized and showed a ductile fracture mechanism at high impact energies and a mixture of ductile and brittle mechanisms at low impact energies.

  5. Assessment of Ductile-to-Brittle Transition Behavior of Localized Microstructural Regions in a Friction-Stir Welded X80 Pipeline Steel with Miniaturized Charpy V-Notch Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avila, Julian A.; Lucon, Enrico; Sowards, Jeffrey; Mei, Paulo Roberto; Ramirez, Antonio J.

    2016-06-01

    Friction-stir welding (FSW) is an alternative welding process for pipelines. This technology offers sound welds, good repeatability, and excellent mechanical properties. However, it is of paramount importance to determine the toughness of the welds at low temperatures in order to establish the limits of this technology. Ductile-to-brittle transition curves were generated in the present study by using a small-scale instrumented Charpy machine and miniaturized V-notch specimens (Kleinstprobe, KLST); notches were located in base metal, heat-affected, stirred, and hard zones within a FSW joint of API-5L X80 Pipeline Steel. Specimens were tested at temperatures between 77 K (-196 °C) and 298 K (25 °C). Based on the results obtained, the transition temperatures for the base material and heat-affected zone were below 173 K (-100 °C); conversely, for the stirred and hard zones, it was located around 213 K (-60 °C). Fracture surfaces were characterized and showed a ductile fracture mechanism at high impact energies and a mixture of ductile and brittle mechanisms at low impact energies.

  6. Effects of oxidation on the impact energy of Hastelloy S and Hastelloy C-4 Charpy V-notch specimens heated in air at 600 to 800

    SciTech Connect

    Fullam, H.T.

    1981-01-01

    The /sup 90/SrF/sub 2/ heat source being developed at PNL utilizes a Hastelloy S or Hastelloy C-4 outer capsule having a 0.5-in.-thick wall to contain the Hastelloy C-276 inner capsule. The primary objective of the study was to demonstrate that the air oxidation of the outer capsule that could occur during heat-source service would not degrade the ductility and Charpy impact strength of the capsule below the licensing requirements given in Section 1.1. The /sup 90/SrF/sub 2/ heat source under development is intended for general-purpose use. Compatibility considerations limit the interface temperature between the /sup 90/SrF/sub 2/ and Hastelloy C-276 inner capsule to a maximum of 800/sup 0/C. The outer capsule surface temperature will be somewhat less than 800/sup 0/C, and depending on the service, may be substantially lower. The oxidation tests were therefore carried out at 600/sup 0/ to 800/sup 0/C for exposures up to 10,000h to cover the range of temperature the outer capsule might expect to encounter in service. The results showed that the oxidation of Hastelloy S and Hastelloy C-4 in air at 600/sup 0/ to 800/sup 0/C is very slow, and both alloys form adherent oxide layers that serve to protect the underlying metal. Subsurface attack of Hastelloy S and Hastelloy C-4 due to oxidation was greater than expected, considering the slow oxidation rates of the two alloys at 600/sup 0/ to 800/sup 0/C. Estimates of subsurface attack, determined from micrographs of the oxidized specimens, showed erratic results and it was impossible to assign any type of rate equation to the subsurface attack. A conservative estimate of long-term effects can be made using a linear extrapolation of the test results. There were no significant differences between the room-temperature Charpy impact energy of Hastelloy S and Hastelloy C-4 specimens oxidized in air at 600/sup 0/ to 800/sup 0/C and control specimens heated in vacuum.

  7. 46 CFR 54.05-20 - Impact test properties for service of 0 °F and below.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... correlation with drop-weight tests, Charpy V-notch tests may be specially considered by the Commandant in lieu... indicating suitable correlation of Charpy V-notch results with drop-weight NDT or no-break...

  8. 46 CFR 54.05-20 - Impact test properties for service of 0 °F and below.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... correlation with drop-weight tests, Charpy V-notch tests may be specially considered by the Commandant in lieu... indicating suitable correlation of Charpy V-notch results with drop-weight NDT or no-break...

  9. 46 CFR 54.05-17 - Weld toughness test acceptance criteria.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... PRESSURE VESSELS Toughness Tests § 54.05-17 Weld toughness test acceptance criteria. (a) For Charpy V-notch impact tests the energy absorbed in both the weld metal and heat affected zone impact tests in weld... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Weld toughness test acceptance criteria....

  10. 46 CFR 54.05-17 - Weld toughness test acceptance criteria.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... PRESSURE VESSELS Toughness Tests § 54.05-17 Weld toughness test acceptance criteria. (a) For Charpy V-notch impact tests the energy absorbed in both the weld metal and heat affected zone impact tests in weld... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Weld toughness test acceptance criteria....

  11. 46 CFR 54.05-17 - Weld toughness test acceptance criteria.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... PRESSURE VESSELS Toughness Tests § 54.05-17 Weld toughness test acceptance criteria. (a) For Charpy V-notch impact tests the energy absorbed in both the weld metal and heat affected zone impact tests in weld... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Weld toughness test acceptance criteria....

  12. Three-dimensional vibrations of cylindrical elastic solids with V-notches and sharp radial cracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGee, O. G.; Kim, J. W.

    2010-02-01

    This paper provides free vibration data for cylindrical elastic solids, specifically thick circular plates and cylinders with V-notches and sharp radial cracks, for which no extensive previously published database is known to exist. Bending moment and shear force singularities are known to exist at the sharp reentrant corner of a thick V-notched plate under transverse vibratory motion, and three-dimensional (3-D) normal and transverse shear stresses are known to exist at the sharp reentrant terminus edge of a V-notched cylindrical elastic solid under 3-D free vibration. A theoretical analysis is done in this work utilizing a variational Ritz procedure including these essential singularity effects. The procedure incorporates a complete set of admissible algebraic-trigonometric polynomials in conjunction with an admissible set of " edge functions" that explicitly model the 3-D stress singularities which exist along a reentrant terminus edge (i.e., α>180°) of the V-notch. The first set of polynomials guarantees convergence to exact frequencies, as sufficient terms are retained. The second set of edge functions—in addition to representing the corner stress singularities—substantially accelerates the convergence of frequency solutions. This is demonstrated through extensive convergence studies that have been carried out by the investigators. Numerical analysis has been carried out and the results have been given for cylindrical elastic solids with various V-notch angles and depths. The relative depth of the V-notch is defined as (1- c/ a), and the notch angle is defined as (360°- α). For a very small notch angle (1° or less), the notch may be regarded as a "sharp radial crack." Accurate (four significant figure) frequencies are presented for a wide spectrum of notch angles (360°- α), depths (1- c/ a), and thickness ratios ( a/ h for plates and h/ a for cylinders). An extended database of frequencies for completely free thick sectorial, semi-circular, and

  13. 46 CFR 54.05-5 - Toughness test specimens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Toughness test specimens. 54.05-5 Section 54.05-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING PRESSURE VESSELS Toughness Tests § 54.05-5 Toughness test specimens. (a) Charpy V-notch impact tests. Where required,...

  14. 46 CFR 54.05-5 - Toughness test specimens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Toughness test specimens. 54.05-5 Section 54.05-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING PRESSURE VESSELS Toughness Tests § 54.05-5 Toughness test specimens. (a) Charpy V-notch impact tests. Where required,...

  15. Application of boundary integral method to elastic analysis of V-notched beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rzasnicki, W.; Mendelson, A.; Albers, L. U.

    1973-01-01

    A semidirect boundary integral method, using Airy's stress function and its derivatives in Green's boundary integral formula, is used to obtain an accurate numerical solution for elastic stress and strain fields in V-notched beams in pure bending. The proper choice of nodal spacing on the boundary is shown to be necessary to achieve an accurate stress field in the vicinity of the tip of the notch. Excellent agreement is obtained with the results of the collocation method of solution.

  16. Low temperature impact toughness of the main gas pipeline steel after long-term degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruschak, Pavlo O.; Danyliuk, Iryna M.; Bishchak, Roman T.; Vuherer, Tomaž

    2014-12-01

    The correlation of microstructure, temperature and Charpy V-notch impact properties of a steel 17G1S pipeline steel was investigated in this study. Within the concept of physical mesomechanics, the dynamic failure of specimens is represented as a successive process of the loss of shear stability, which takes place at different structural/scale levels of the material. Characteristic stages are analyzed for various modes of failure, moreover, typical levels of loading and oscillation periods, etc. are determined. Relations between low temperature derived through this test, microstructures and Charpy (V-notch) toughness test results are also discussed in this paper.

  17. Performance verification of impact machines for testing plastics

    SciTech Connect

    Siewert, T.A.; Vigliotti, D.P.; Dirling, L.B.; McCowan, C.N.

    1999-12-01

    Valid comparison of impact test energies reported by various organizations and over time depends on consistent performance of impact test machines. This paper investigates the influence of various specimen and test parameters on impact energies in the 1 J to 2 J range for both Charpy V-notch and Izod procedures, leading toward the identification of a suitable material for use in a program to verify machine performance. The authors investigated the influences on the absorbed energy of machine design, test material, specimen cross sectional area, and machine energy range. For comparison to published round robin data on common plastics, this study used some common metallic alloys, including those used in the international verification program for metals impact machines and in informal calibration programs of tensile machines. The alloys that were evaluated include AISI type 4340 steel, and five aluminum alloys: 2014-T6, 2024-T351, 2219-T87, 6061-T6, and 7075-T6. They found that certain metallic alloys have coefficients of variation comparable to those of the best plastics that are reported in the literature. Also, they found that the differences in absorbed energy between two designs of machines are smaller than the differences that can be attributed to the specimens alone.

  18. Performance Verification of Impact Machines for Testing Plastics

    PubMed Central

    Siewert, T. A.; Vigliotti, D. P.; Dirling, L. B.; McCowan, C. N.

    1999-01-01

    Valid comparison of impact test energies reported by various organizations and over time depends on consistent performance of impact test machines. This paper investigates the influence of various specimen and test parameters on impact energies in the 1 J to 2 J range for both Charpy V-notch and Izod procedures, leading toward the identification of a suitable material for use in a program to verify machine performance. We investigated the influences on the absorbed energy of machine design, test material, specimen cross sectional area, and machine energy range. For comparison to published round robin data on common plastics, this study used some common metallic alloys, including those used in the international verification program for metals impact machines and in informal calibration programs of tensile machines. The alloys that were evaluated include AISI type 4340 steel, and five aluminum alloys: 2014-T6, 2024-T351, 2219-T87, 6061-T6, and 7075-T6. We found that certain metallic alloys have coefficients of variation comparable to those of the best plastics that are reported in the literature. Also, we found that the differences in absorbed energy between two designs of machines are smaller than the differences that can be attributed to the specimens alone.

  19. 46 CFR 54.05-20 - Impact test properties for service of 0 °F and below.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... accordance with the drop weight procedure. If, for such materials, there are data indicating suitable correlation with drop-weight tests, Charpy V-notch tests may be specially considered by the Commandant in lieu of drop-weight tests. If the drop-weight test cannot be performed because of material...

  20. 46 CFR 54.05-20 - Impact test properties for service of 0 °F and below.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... accordance with the drop weight procedure. If, for such materials, there are data indicating suitable correlation with drop-weight tests, Charpy V-notch tests may be specially considered by the Commandant in lieu of drop-weight tests. If the drop-weight test cannot be performed because of material...

  1. Impact Tests for Woods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1922-01-01

    Although it is well known that the strength of wood depends greatly upon the time the wood is under the load, little consideration has been given to this fact in testing materials for airplanes. Here, results are given of impact tests on clear, straight grained spruce. Transverse tests were conducted for comparison. Both Izod and Charpy impact tests were conducted. Results are given primarily in tabular and graphical form.

  2. Low temperature impact testing of welded structural wrought iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Zachary

    During the second half of the 19th century, structural wrought iron was commonly used in construction of bridges and other structures. Today, these remaining structures are still actively in use and may fall under the protection of historic preservation agencies. Continued use and protection leads to the need for inspection, maintenance, and repair of the wrought iron within these structures. Welding can be useful to achieve the appropriate repair, rehabilitation, or replacement of wrought iron members. There is currently very little published on modern welding techniques for historic wrought iron. There is also no pre-qualified method for this welding. The demand for welding in the repair of historic structural wrought iron has led to a line of research investigating shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) of historic wrought iron at the University of Colorado Denver. This prior research selected the weld type and other weld specifications to try and achieve a recognized specific welding procedure using modern SMAW technology and techniques. This thesis continues investigating SMAW of historic wrought iron. Specifically, this thesis addresses the toughness of these welds from analysis of the data collected from performing Charpy V-Notch (CVN) Impact Tests. Temperature was varied to observe the material response of the welds at low temperature. The wrought iron used in testing was from a historic vehicle bridge in Minnesota, USA. This area, and many other areas with wrought iron structures, can experience sustained or fluctuating temperatures far below freezing. Investigating the toughness of welds in historic wrought iron at these temperatures is necessary to fully understand material responses of the existing structures in need of maintenance and repair. It was shown that welded wrought iron is tougher and more ductile than non-welded wrought iron. In regards to toughness, welding is an acceptable repair method. Information on wrought iron, low temperature failure

  3. Southern Impact Testing Alliance (SITA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hubbs, Whitney; Roebuck, Brian; Zwiener, Mark; Wells, Brian

    2009-01-01

    Efforts to form this Alliance began in 2008 to showcase the impact testing capabilities within the southern United States. Impact testing customers can utilize SITA partner capabilities to provide supporting data during all program phases-materials/component/ flight hardware design, development, and qualification. This approach would allow programs to reduce risk by providing low cost testing during early development to flush out possible problems before moving on to larger scale1 higher cost testing. Various SITA partners would participate in impact testing depending on program phase-materials characterization, component/subsystem characterization, full-scale system testing for qualification. SITA partners would collaborate with the customer to develop an integrated test approach during early program phases. Modeling and analysis validation can start with small-scale testing to ensure a level of confidence for the next step large or full-scale conclusive test shots. Impact Testing Facility (ITF) was established and began its research in spacecraft debris shielding in the early 1960's and played a malor role in the International Space Station debris shield development. As a result of return to flight testing after the loss of STS-107 (Columbia) MSFC ITF realized the need to expand their capabilities beyond meteoroid and space debris impact testing. MSFC partnered with the Department of Defense and academic institutions as collaborative efforts to gain and share knowledge that would benefit the Space Agency as well as the DoD. MSFC ITF current capabilities include: Hypervelocity impact testing, ballistic impact testing, and environmental impact testing.

  4. Impacting device for testing insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redmon, J. W. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    An electro-mechanical impacting device for testing the bonding of foam insulation to metal is descirbed. The device lightly impacts foam insulation attached to metal to determine whether the insulation is properly bonded to the metal and to determine the quality of the bond. A force measuring device, preferably a load cell mounted on the impacting device, measures the force of the impact and the duration of the time the hammer head is actually in contact with the insulation. The impactor is designed in the form of a handgun having a driving spring which can propel a plunger forward to cause a hammer head to impact the insulation. The device utilizes a trigger mechanism which provides precise adjustements, allowing fireproof operation.

  5. Dynamic impact testing with servohydraulic testing machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardenheier, R.; Rogers, G.

    2006-08-01

    The design concept of “Crashworthiness” requires the information on material behaviour under dynamic impact loading in order to describe and predict the crash behaviour of structures. Especially the transport related industries, like car, railway or aircraft industry, pursue the concept of lightweight design for a while now. The materials' maximum constraint during loading is pushed to permanently increasing figures. This means in terms of crashworthiness that the process of energy absorption in structures and the mechanical behaviour of materials must well understood and can be described appropriately by material models. In close cooperation with experts from various industries and research institutes Instron has developed throughout the past years a new family of servohydraulic testing machines specifically designed to cope with the dynamics of high rate testing. Main development steps are reflected versus their experimental necessities.

  6. AXAF hypervelocity impact test results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, Cynthia L.; Rodriguez, Pedro I.

    1997-01-01

    Composite and honeycomb panels are commonly used for spacecraft structural components. The impact test results and analysis of six different composite and honeycomb combinations for use on the advanced X-ray astrophysics facility (AXAF) are reported. The AXAF consists of an X-ray telescope and the associated detecting devices attached to an octagonal spacecraft with an internal propulsion system. The spacecraft's structural panels and optical bench are made of two different graphite fiber reinforced polyimides or composite panels bonded to either side of an aluminum honeycomb. The instrument is required to have at least a 0.92 probability of no failure of any of the critical elements due to meteoroids and debris. In relation to the no-failure probability determination in its low earth orbit environment, hypervelocity impact testing was performed to determine the ballistic limit range and the extent of damage due to impact. The test results for a power and signal cable bundle located behind a panel are presented. Tests planned for a multilayer insulation (MLI) blanket and four types of cable bundles are discussed.

  7. Plane elasto-plastic analysis of v-notched plate under bending by boundary integral equation method. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rzasnicki, W.

    1973-01-01

    A method of solution is presented, which, when applied to the elasto-plastic analysis of plates having a v-notch on one edge and subjected to pure bending, will produce stress and strain fields in much greater detail than presently available. Application of the boundary integral equation method results in two coupled Fredholm-type integral equations, subject to prescribed boundary conditions. These equations are replaced by a system of simultaneous algebraic equations and solved by a successive approximation method employing Prandtl-Reuss incremental plasticity relations. The method is first applied to number of elasto-static problems and the results compared with available solutions. Good agreement is obtained in all cases. The elasto-plastic analysis provides detailed stress and strain distributions for several cases of plates with various notch angles and notch depths. A strain hardening material is assumed and both plane strain and plane stress conditions are considered.

  8. Auburn Micrometeoroid Impact Test Data Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perrygo, Charles; Best, Steve; Stahl, H. Philip (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This presentation provides an overview and summary of micrometeoroid impact testing performed by Auburn University and an analysis of the test results. The testing at Auburn utilized existing facilities at Auburn to generate hypervelocity impacts into multiple layers of thin Kapton films representative of the NASA concept for the NGST sunshield. The test data consists of impactor particle mass and velocity, and for each film layer, the number and size of holes generated by the initial impact and resulting impact debris. The analysis consists of combining the test data with existing impact effects models and the micrometeoroid environment at the L2 operating location of NGST to predict sunshield degradation.

  9. High Pressure Quick Disconnect Particle Impact Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosales, Keisa R.; Stoltzfus, Joel M.

    2009-01-01

    NASA Johnson Space Center White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) performed particle impact testing to determine whether there is a particle impact ignition hazard in the quick disconnects (QDs) in the Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) on the International Space Station (ISS). Testing included standard supersonic and subsonic particle impact tests on 15-5 PH stainless steel, as well as tests performed on a QD simulator. This paper summarizes the particle impact tests completed at WSTF. Although there was an ignition in Test Series 4, it was determined the ignition was caused by the presence of a machining imperfection. The sum of all the test results indicates that there is no particle impact ignition hazard in the ISS ECLSS QDs. KEYWORDS: quick disconnect, high pressure, particle impact testing, stainless steel

  10. Charpy impact test results on five materials and NIST verification specimens using instrumented 2-mm and 8-mm strikers

    SciTech Connect

    Nanstad, R.K.; Sokolov, M.A.

    1995-04-01

    The Heavy-Section Steel Irradiation Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory is involved in two cooperative projects, with international participants, both of which involve Charpy V-notch impact tests with instrumented strikers of 2mm and 8mm radii. Two heats of A 533 grade B class I pressure vessel steel and a low upper-shelf (LUS) submerged-arc (SA) weld were tested on the same Charpy machine, while one heat of a Russian Cr-Mo-V forging steel and a high upper-shelf (HUS) SA weld were tested on two different machines. The number of replicate tests at any one temperature ranged from 2 to 46 specimens. Prior to testing with each striker, verification specimens at the low, high, and super high energy levels from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) were tested. In the two series of verification tests, the tests with the 2mm striker met the requirements at the low and high energy levels but not at the super high energy. For one plate, the 2mm striker showed somewhat higher average absorbed energies than those for the 8-mm striker at all three test temperatures. For the second plate and the LUS weld, however, the 2mm striker showed somewhat lower energies at both test temperatures. For the Russian forging steel and the HUS weld, tests were conducted over a range of temperatures with tests at one laboratory using the 8mm striker and tests at a second laboratory using the 2mm striker. Lateral expansion was measured for all specimens and the results are compared with the absorbed energy results. The overall results showed generally good agreement (within one standard deviation) in energy measurements by the two strikers. Load-time traces from the instrumented strikers were also compared and used to estimate shear fracture percentage. Four different formulas from the European Structural Integrity Society draft standard for instrumented Charpy test are compared and a new formula is proposed for estimation of percent shear from the force-time trace.

  11. Effect of low temperatures on charpy impact toughness of austempered ductile irons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riabov, Mikhail V.; Lerner, Yury S.; Fahmy, Mohammed F.

    2002-10-01

    Impact properties of standard American Society for Testing Materials (ASTM) grades of austempered ductile iron (ADI) were evaluated at subzero temperatures in unnotched and V-notched conditions and compared with ferritic and pearlitic grades of ductile irons (DIs). It was determined that there is a decrease in impact toughness for all ADI grades when there is a decrease in content of retained austenite and a decrease in test temperature, from room temperature (RT) to -60 °C. However, the difference in impact toughness values was not so noticeable for low retained austenite containing grade 5 ADI at both room and subzero temperatures as it was for ADI grade 1. Furthermore, the difference in impact toughness values of V-notched specimens of ADI grades 1 and 5 tested at -40 °C was minimal. The impact behaviors of ADI grade 5 and ferritic DI were found to be more stable than those of ADI grades 1, 2, 3, and 4 and pearlitic DI when the testing temperature was decreased. The impact toughness of ferritic DI was higher than that of ADI grades 1 and 2 at both -40 °C and -60 °C. The impact properties of ADI grades 4 and 5 were found to be higher than that of pearlitic DI at both -40 °C and -60 °C. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM) study of fracture surfaces revealed mixed ductile and quasicleavage rupture morphology types in all ADI samples tested at both -40 °C and -60 °C. With decreasing content of retained austenite and ductility, the number of quasicleavage facets increased from ADI grade 1-5. It was also found that fracture morphology of ADI did not experience significant changes when the testing temperature decreased. Evaluation of the bending angle was used to support impact-testing data. Designers and users of ADI castings may use the data developed in this research as a reference.

  12. Hypervelocity impact testing of cables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jex, D. W.; Adkinson, A. B.; English, J. E.; Linebaugh, C. E.

    1973-01-01

    The physics and electrical results obtained from simulated micrometeoroid testing of certain Skylab cables are presented. The test procedure, electrical circuits, test equipment, and cable types utilized are also explained.

  13. 30 CFR 7.46 - Impact test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Impact test. 7.46 Section 7.46 Mineral... MINING PRODUCTS TESTING BY APPLICANT OR THIRD PARTY Battery Assemblies § 7.46 Impact test. (a) Test... individual cells. At the test temperature range of 65 °F -80 °F (18.3 °C-26.7 °C), apply a dynamic force...

  14. 30 CFR 7.46 - Impact test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Impact test. 7.46 Section 7.46 Mineral... MINING PRODUCTS TESTING BY APPLICANT OR THIRD PARTY Battery Assemblies § 7.46 Impact test. (a) Test... individual cells. At the test temperature range of 65 °F -80 °F (18.3 °C-26.7 °C), apply a dynamic force...

  15. 30 CFR 7.46 - Impact test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Impact test. 7.46 Section 7.46 Mineral... MINING PRODUCTS TESTING BY APPLICANT OR THIRD PARTY Battery Assemblies § 7.46 Impact test. (a) Test... individual cells. At the test temperature range of 65 °F -80 °F (18.3 °C-26.7 °C), apply a dynamic force...

  16. A study of the fracture process and factors that control toughness variability in Charpy V-notch specimens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchard, Real

    La presente etude a ete initiee pour developper une comprehension quantitative du processus de rupture avec les facteurs qui controlent la dispersion des mesures de tenacite lorsque des eprouvettes Charpy entaillees en V sont utilisees. Un grand nombre d'essais ont ete realises pour un acier C-Mn: eprouvettes Charpy testees sous impact, eprouvettes Charpy testees en flexion lente, eprouvettes axisymetriques entaillees et sollicitees en traction et essais de tenacite sur eprouvettes prefissurees. Base sur le concept de la statistique de Weibull, l'approche locale developpee par le groupe Beremin a ete utilisee pour decrire la probabilite de rupture par clivage en fonction de la contrainte appliquee aussi bien qu'en fonction de l'energie Charpy obtenue. Le calcul par elements finis a ete realise pour determiner la distribution de la deformation et des contraintes en pointe d'entaille et de fissure. La nouvelle approche introduite decrit bien les resultats experimentaux. Les points d'initiation du clivage ont ete identifies au MEB et par la suite, avec la technique de faisceau d'ions focalise, sectionnes, polis et examines. L'examen de la microstructure sous le point d'initiation revele clairement que le clivage s'initie par un mecanisme d'empilement de dislocations ou les dislocations sont arretees aux joints de grain, aux interfaces de perlite/ferrite ou de perlite qui agissent comme barrieres physiques.

  17. Solid rocket booster water impact test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bugg, F.

    1982-01-01

    Water impact drop tests were performed on the space shuttle solid rocket boosters (SRB). Peak water impact pressures and pressure/time traces were measured for various impact velocities using a two-dimensional, full-scale SRB aft skirt internal ring model. Passive burst disc-type pressure transducers were calibrated for use on flight SRB's. The effects on impact pressure of small ring configuration changes and application of thermal protection system cork layers were found to be negligible.

  18. Reproducibility of liquid oxygen impact test results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gayle, J. B.

    1975-01-01

    Results for 12,000 impacts on a wide range of materials were studied to determine the reproducibility of the liquid oxygen impact test method. Standard deviations representing the overall variability of results were in close agreement with the expected values for a binomial process. This indicates that the major source of variability is due to the go - no go nature of the test method and that variations due to sampling and testing operations were not significant.

  19. Water impact shock test system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    The basic objective was to design, manufacture, and install a shock test system which, in part, would have the ability to subject test articles weighing up to 1,000 pounds to both half sine and/or full sine pulses having peak levels of up to 50 G's with half sine pulse durations of 100 milliseconds or full sine period duration of 200 milliseconds. The tolerances associated with the aforementioned pulses were +20% and -10% for the peak levels and plus or minus 10% for the pulse durations. The subject shock test system was to be capable of accepting test article sizes of up to 4 feet by 4 feet mounting surface by 4 feet in length.

  20. Light-weight radioisotope heater impact tests

    SciTech Connect

    Reimus, M.A.H.; Rinehart, G.H.; Herrera, A.

    1998-12-31

    The light-weight radioisotope heater unit (LWRHU) is a {sup 238}PuO{sub 2}-fueled heat source designed to provide one thermal watt in each of various locations on a spacecraft. Los Alamos National Laboratory designed, fabricated, and safety tested the LWRHU. The heat source consists of a hot-pressed {sup 238}PuO{sub 2} fuel pellet, a Pt-30Rh vented capsule, a pyrolytic graphite insulator, and a fineweave-pierced fabric graphite aeroshell assembly. To compare the performance of the LWRHUs fabricated for the Cassini mission with the performance of those fabricated for the Galileo mission, and to determine a failure threshold, two types of impact tests were conducted. A post-reentry impact test was performed on one of 180 flight-quality units produced for the Cassini mission and a series of sequential impact tests using simulant-fueled LWRHU capsules were conducted respectively. The results showed that deformation and fuel containment of the impacted Cassini LWRHU was similar to that of a previously tested Galileo LWRHU. Both units sustained minimal deformation of the aeroshell and fueled capsule; the fuel was entirely contained by the platinum capsule. Sequential impacting, in both end-on and side-on orientations, resulted in increased damage with each subsequent impact. Sequential impacting of the LWRHU appears to result in slightly greater damage than a single impact at the final impact velocity of 50 m/s.

  1. Fracture toughness and Charpy impact properties of several RAFMS before and after irradiation in HFIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolov, M. A.; Tanigawa, H.; Odette, G. R.; Shiba, K.; Klueh, R. L.

    2007-08-01

    As part of the development of candidate reduced-activation ferritic steels for fusion applications, several steels, namely F82H, 9Cr-2WVTa steels and F82H weld metal, are being investigated in the joint DOE-JAEA collaboration program. Within this program, three capsules containing a variety of specimen designs were irradiated at two design temperatures in the ORNL High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). Two capsules, RB-11J and RB-12J, were irradiated in the HFIR removable beryllium positions with europium oxide (Eu 2O 3) thermal neutron shields in place. Specimens were irradiated up to 5 dpa. Capsule JP25 was irradiated in the HFIR target position to 20 dpa. The design temperatures were 300 °C and 500 °C. Precracked third-sized V-notch Charpy (3.3 × 3.3 × 25.4 mm) and 0.18 T DC(T) specimens were tested to determine transition and ductile shelf fracture toughness before and after irradiation. The master curve methodology was applied to evaluate the fracture toughness transition temperature, T0. Irradiation induced shifts of T0 and reductions of JQ were compared with Charpy V-notch impact properties. Fracture toughness and Charpy shifts were also compared to hardening results.

  2. 30 CFR 7.46 - Impact test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... MINING PRODUCTS TESTING BY APPLICANT OR THIRD PARTY Battery Assemblies § 7.46 Impact test. (a) Test... at 122 °F (50 °C) for a period of 48 hours. (2) Mount the covers on a battery box of the same design with which the covers are to be approved, including any support blocks, with the battery...

  3. 30 CFR 7.46 - Impact test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... MINING PRODUCTS TESTING BY APPLICANT OR THIRD PARTY Battery Assemblies § 7.46 Impact test. (a) Test... at 122 °F (50 °C) for a period of 48 hours. (2) Mount the covers on a battery box of the same design with which the covers are to be approved, including any support blocks, with the battery...

  4. Permeability After Impact Testing of Composite Laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nettles, Alan T.

    2003-01-01

    Since composite laminates are beginning to be identified for use in reusable launch vehicle propulsion systems, an understanding of their permeance is needed. A foreign object impact event can cause a localized area of permeability (leakage) in a polymer matrix composite and it is the aim of this study to assess a method of quantifying permeability-after-impact results. A simple test apparatus is presented and variables that could affect the measured values of permeability-after-impact were assessed. Once it was determined that valid numbers were being measured, a fiber/resin system was impacted at various impact levels and the resulting permeability measured, first with a leak check solution (qualitative) then using the new apparatus (quantitative). The results showed that as the impact level increased, so did the measured leakage. As the pressure to the specimen was increased, the leak rate was seen to increase in a non-linear fashion for almost all of the specimens tested.

  5. Permeability After Impact Testing of Composite Laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nettles, A.T.; Munafo, Paul (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Since composite laminates are beginning to be identified for use in reusable launch vehicle propulsion systems, an understanding of their permeance is needed. A foreign object impact event can cause a localized area of permeability (leakage) in a polymer matrix composite and it is the aim of this study to assess a method of quantifying permeability-after-impact results. A simple test apparatus is presented and variables that could affect the measured values of permeability-after-impact were assessed. Once it was determined that valid numbers were being measured, a fiber/resin system was impacted at various impact levels and the resulting permeability measured, first with a leak check solution (qualitative) then using the new apparatus (quantitative). The results showed that as the impact level increased, so did the measured leakage. As the pressure to the specimen was increased, the leak rate was seen to increase in a non-linear fashion for almost all of the specimens tested.

  6. Impact testing of textile composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Portanova, Marc

    1995-01-01

    The objectives of this report were to evaluate the impact damage resistance and damage tolerance of a variety of textile composite materials. Static indentation and impact tests were performed on the stitched and unstitched uniweave composites constructed from AS4/3501-6 Carbon/Epoxy with a fiberglass yarn woven in to hold the fibers together while being stitched. Compression and tension were measured after the tests to determine the damage resistance, residual strength and the damage tolerance of the specimens.

  7. Hypervelocity impact testing of spacecraft optical sensors

    SciTech Connect

    1995-07-01

    Hypervelocity tests of spacecraft optical sensors were conducted to determine if the optical signature from an impact inside the optical sensor sunshade resembled signals that have been observed on-orbit. Impact tests were conducted in darkness and with the ejected debris illuminated. The tests were conducted at the Johnson Space Center Hypervelocity Impact Test Facility. The projectile masses and velocities that may be obtained at the facility are most representative of the hypervelocity particles thought to be responsible for a group of anomalous optical sensors responses that have been observed on-orbit. The projectiles are a few micrograms, slightly more massive than the microgram particles thought to be responsible for the signal source. The test velocities were typically 7.3 km/s, which are somewhat slower than typical space particles.

  8. Tests of the Giant Impact Hypothesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, J. H.

    1998-01-01

    The giant impact hypothesis has gained popularity as a means of explaining a volatile-depleted Moon that still has a chemical affinity to the Earth. As Taylor's Axiom decrees, the best models of lunar origin are testable, but this is difficult with the giant impact model. The energy associated with the impact would be sufficient to totally melt and partially vaporize the Earth. And this means that there should he no geological vestige of Barber times. Accordingly, it is important to devise tests that may be used to evaluate the giant impact hypothesis. Three such tests are discussed here. None of these is supportive of the giant impact model, but neither do they disprove it.

  9. Impact testing on composite fan blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johns, R. H.

    1974-01-01

    The results of impact tests on large, fiber composite fan blades for aircraft turbofan engine applications are discussed. Solid composite blades of two different sizes and designs were tested. Both graphite/epoxy and boron/epoxy were evaluated. In addition, a spar-shell blade design was tested that had a boron/epoxy shell bonded to a titanium spar. All blades were tested one at a time in a rotating arm rig to simulate engine operating conditions. Impacting media included small gravel, two inch diameter ice balls, gelatin and RTV foam-simulated birds, as well as starlings and pigeons. The results showed little difference in performance between the graphite and boron/epoxy blades. The results also indicate that composite blades may be able to tolerate ice ball and small bird impacts but need improvement to tolerate birds in the small duck and larger category.

  10. FOD impact testing of composite fan blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johns, R. H.

    1974-01-01

    The results of impact tests on large, fiber composite fan blades for aircraft turbofan engine applications are discussed. Solid composite blades of two different sizes and designs were tested. Both graphite/epoxy and boron/epoxy were evaluated. In addition, a spar-shell blade design was tested that had a boron/epoxy shell bonded to a titanium spar. All blades were tested one at a time in a rotating arm rig to simulate engine operating conditions. Impacting media included small gravel, two inch diameter ice balls, gelatin and RTV foam-simulated birds, as well as starlings and pigeons. The results showed little difference in performance between the graphite and boron/epoxy blades. The results also indicate that composite blades may be able to tolerate ice ball and small bird impacts but need improvement to tolerate birds in the small duck and larger category.

  11. FOD impact testing of composite fan blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johns, R. H.

    1974-01-01

    The results of impact tests on large, fiber composite fan blades for aircraft turbofan engine applications are discussed. Solid composite blades of two different sizes and designs were tested. Both graphite/epoxy and boron/epoxy were evaluated. In addition, a spar-shell blade design was tested that had a boron/epoxy shell bonded to a titanium spar. All blades were tested one at a time in a rotating arm rig to simulate engine operating conditions. Impacting media included small gravel, two inch diameter ice balls, gelatin, and RTV foam-simulated birds, as well as starlings and pigeons. The results showed little difference in performance between the graphite and boron/epoxy blades. The results also indicate that composite blades may be able to tolerate ice ball and small bird impacts but need improvement to tolerate birds in the small duck and larger category.

  12. Mechanical Impact Testing: A Statistical Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engel, Carl D.; Herald, Stephen D.; Davis, S. Eddie

    2005-01-01

    In the decades since the 1950s, when NASA first developed mechanical impact testing of materials, researchers have continued efforts to gain a better understanding of the chemical, mechanical, and thermodynamic nature of the phenomenon. The impact mechanism is a real combustion ignition mechanism that needs understanding in the design of an oxygen system. The use of test data from this test method has been questioned due to lack of a clear method of application of the data and variability found between tests, material batches, and facilities. This effort explores a large database that has accumulated over a number of years and explores its overall nature. Moreover, testing was performed to determine the statistical nature of the test procedure to help establish sample size guidelines for material characterization. The current method of determining a pass/fail criterion based on either light emission or sound report or material charring is questioned.

  13. Defense Waste Processing Facility canister impact testing

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, K.M.; Alzheimer, J.M.

    1989-09-01

    This report summarizes impact testing of seven Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) high level waste canisters during FY 1988. Impact testing was conducted to demonstrate compliance of DWPF canisters with the drop test specification of the Waste Acceptance Preliminary Specification. The prototypical stainless steel canisters were filled with simulated waste to about 85% capacity at Savannah River Laboratory (SRL). They were received from SRL in April 1988. Each canister was approximately 300 cm (9 ft 10 in.) long, and 61 cm (2 ft) in diameter, and weighed about 2150 kg (4740 lb). Each canister was dropped twice from a height of 7 m (23 ft). The first drop was a vertical bottom impact where the bottom of the canister was oriented parallel to the impact pad. The second was a center-of-gravity-over-the-corner top impact. Procedures used to examine the canisters were the application and analysis of strain circles, helium leak testing, dye penetrant examination, and canister dimensional measurements. 39 refs., 39 figs., 11 tabs.

  14. Design of an impact abrasion testing machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, D.; Beeley, P. R.; Baker, A. J.

    1994-04-01

    By using a cam-flat follower-impact shaft with a crank-flat rotating anvil system, the machine to be described can create various impact abrasion conditions to simulate a large range of industrial situations encountered in this field. The main features of the machine are the long working life of the flat rotating anvil, which works in the same way as that of the disk in a pin-on-disk wear tester, and the accurate control of both the impact energy delivered to the specimen and the total sliding distance of the specimen on the anvil. Statistical analysis of test results on the machine with EN24 steel and cast high manganese steel shows that the uncertainty of the population mean is within +/- 4.7% of the sample mean under a 95% confidence level of student distribution, which indicates a very good accuracy of test.

  15. Impact Landing Dynamics Facility Crash Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    By 1972 the Lunar Landing Research Facility was no longer in use for its original purpose. The 400-foot high structure was swiftly modified to allow engineers to study the dynamics of aircraft crashes. 'The Impact Dynamics Research Facility is used to conduct crash testing of full-scale aircraft under controlled conditions. The aircraft are swung by cables from an A-frame structure that is approximately 400 ft. long and 230 foot high. The impact runway can be modified to simulate other grand crash environments, such as packed dirt, to meet a specific test requirement.' 'In 1972, NASA and the FAA embarked on a cooperative effort to develop technology for improved crashworthiness and passenger survivability in general aviation aircraft with little or no increase in weight and acceptable cost. Since then, NASA has 'crashed' dozens of GA aircraft by using the lunar excursion module (LEM) facility originally built for the Apollo program.' This photograph shows Crash Test No. 7.

  16. Impact sensitivity test of liquid explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiutiaev, Andrei; Trebunskih, Valeri; Dolzhikov, Andrei; Zvereva, Irina

    2015-06-01

    The sensitivity of liquid explosive in the presence of gas bubbles increases many times as compared with the liquid without gas bubbles. If we consider that in the liquid as a result of convection, wave motion, shock, etc. gas bubbles are easily generated, the need to develop a method for determining sensitivity of liquid explosives to impact and a detailed study of the ignition explosives with bubbles is obvious. On a mathematical model of a single steam bubbles in the fluid theoretically considered the process of initiating explosive liquid systems to impact. For the experimental investigation, the well-known K-44 -II and the so-called appliance No. 1 were used. Instead of the metal cap in the standard method in this paper there was polyurethane foam cylindrical container with LHE, which is easily deforms by impact. A large number of tests with different liquid explosives were made. It was found that the test LHE to impact in appliance No. 1 with polyurethane foam to a large extent reflect the real mechanical sensitivity due to the small loss of impact energy on the deformation of the metal cap, as well as the best differentiation LHE sensitivity due to the higher resolution method .

  17. New impact sensitivity test of liquid explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiutiaev, Andrei; Trebunskih, Valeri

    The sensitivity of liquid explosive in the presence of gas bubbles increases many times as compared with the liquid without gas bubbles. Local hot spot in this case formed as a result of compression and heating of the gas inside the bubbles. If we consider that in the liquid as a result of convection, wave motion, shock, etc. gas bubbles are easily generated, the need to develop a method for determining sensitivity of liquid explosives to impact and a detailed study of the ignition explosives with bubbles is obvious. On a mathematical model of a single steam bubbles in the fluid theoretically considered the process of initiating explosive liquid systems to impact. For the experimental investigation, the well-known K-44 -II with the metal cap were used. Instead of the metal cap in the standard method in this paper there was polyurethane foam cylindrical container with LHE, which is easily deforms by impact. A large number of tests with different liquid explosives were made. It was found that the test LHE to impact with polyurethane foam to a large extent reflect the real mechanical sensitivity due to the small loss of impact energy on the deformation of the metal cap, as well as the best differentiation LHE sensitivity due to the higher resolution method . Results obtained in the samara state technical university.

  18. Impact Landing Dynamics Facility Crash Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    By 1972 the Lunar Landing Research Facility was no longer in use for its original purpose. The 400-foot high structure was swiftly modified to allow engineers to study the dynamics of aircraft crashes. The Impact Dynamics Research Facility is used to conduct crash testing of full- scale aircraft under controlled conditions. The aircraft are swung by cables from an A-frame structure that is approximately 400 ft. long and 230 foot high. The impact runway can be modified to simulate other grand crash environments, such as packed dirt, to meet a specific test requirement. In 1972, NASA and the FAA embarked on a cooperative effort to develop technology for improved crashworthiness and passenger survivability in general aviation aircraft with little or no increase in weight and cceptable cost. Since then, NASA has 'crashed' dozens of GA aircraft by using the lunar excursion module (LEM) facility originally built for the Apollo program.

  19. 46 CFR 154.605 - Toughness test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Toughness test. 154.605 Section 154.605 Shipping COAST....605 Toughness test. (a) Each toughness test under §§ 154.610 through 154.625 must meet Subpart 54.05 of this chapter. (b) If subsize test specimens are used for the Charpy V-notch toughness test,...

  20. 46 CFR 154.605 - Toughness test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Toughness test. 154.605 Section 154.605 Shipping COAST....605 Toughness test. (a) Each toughness test under §§ 154.610 through 154.625 must meet Subpart 54.05 of this chapter. (b) If subsize test specimens are used for the Charpy V-notch toughness test,...

  1. 46 CFR 54.05-15 - Weldment toughness tests-procedure qualifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... the weld axis (i.e., so that transverse impact specimens result), and with the V-notch normal to the plate surface. The sample weld joint preparation shall be the same as that used in production. The... the weld metal. (2) Three specimens with the notch centered on the fusion line between parent...

  2. 46 CFR 54.05-15 - Weldment toughness tests-procedure qualifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... the weld axis (i.e., so that transverse impact specimens result), and with the V-notch normal to the plate surface. The sample weld joint preparation shall be the same as that used in production. The... the weld metal. (2) Three specimens with the notch centered on the fusion line between parent...

  3. 46 CFR 54.05-15 - Weldment toughness tests-procedure qualifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... the weld axis (i.e., so that transverse impact specimens result), and with the V-notch normal to the plate surface. The sample weld joint preparation shall be the same as that used in production. The... the weld metal. (2) Three specimens with the notch centered on the fusion line between parent...

  4. The GISS sounding temperature impact test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halem, M.; Ghil, M.; Atlas, R.; Susskind, J.; Quirk, W. J.

    1978-01-01

    The impact of DST 5 and DST 6 satellite sounding data on mid-range forecasting was studied. The GISS temperature sounding technique, the GISS time-continuous four-dimensional assimilation procedure based on optimal statistical analysis, the GISS forecast model, and the verification techniques developed, including impact on local precipitation forecasts are described. It is found that the impact of sounding data was substantial and beneficial for the winter test period, Jan. 29 - Feb. 21. 1976. Forecasts started from initial state obtained with the aid of satellite data showed a mean improvement of about 4 points in the 48 and 772 hours Sub 1 scores as verified over North America and Europe. This corresponds to an 8 to 12 hour forecast improvement in the forecast range at 48 hours. An automated local precipitation forecast model applied to 128 cities in the United States showed on an average 15% improvement when satellite data was used for numerical forecasts. The improvement was 75% in the midwest.

  5. 16 CFR 1203.17 - Impact attenuation test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Impact attenuation test. 1203.17 Section 1203.17 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT REGULATIONS SAFETY STANDARD FOR BICYCLE HELMETS The Standard § 1203.17 Impact attenuation test. (a) Impact test instruments and equipment—(1) Measurement...

  6. Measurement Techniques for Hypervelocity Impact Test Fragments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Nicole E.

    2008-01-01

    The ability to classify the size and shape of individual orbital debris fragments provides a better understanding of the orbital debris environment as a whole. The characterization of breakup fragmentation debris has gradually evolved from a simplistic, spherical assumption towards that of describing debris in terms of size, material, and shape parameters. One of the goals of the NASA Orbital Debris Program Office is to develop high-accuracy techniques to measure these parameters and apply them to orbital debris observations. Measurement of the physical characteristics of debris resulting from groundbased, hypervelocity impact testing provides insight into the shapes and sizes of debris produced from potential impacts in orbit. Current techniques for measuring these ground-test fragments require determination of dimensions based upon visual judgment. This leads to reduced accuracy and provides little or no repeatability for the measurements. With the common goal of mitigating these error sources, allaying any misunderstandings, and moving forward in fragment shape determination, the NASA Orbital Debris Program Office recently began using a computerized measurement system. The goal of using these new techniques is to improve knowledge of the relation between commonly used dimensions and overall shape. The immediate objective is to scan a single fragment, measure its size and shape properties, and import the fragment into a program that renders a 3D model that adequately demonstrates how the object could appear in orbit. This information would then be used to aid optical methods in orbital debris shape determination. This paper provides a description of the measurement techniques used in this initiative and shows results of this work. The tradeoffs of the computerized methods are discussed, as well as the means of repeatability in the measurements of these fragments. This paper serves as a general description of methods for the measurement and shape analysis of

  7. Elemental Water Impact Test: Phase 1 20-Inch Hemisphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vassilakos, Gregory J.

    2015-01-01

    Spacecraft are being designed based on LS-DYNA simulations of water landing impacts. The Elemental Water Impact Test (EWIT) series was undertaken to assess the accuracy of LS-DYNA water impact simulations. Phase 1 of the EWIT series featured water impact tests of a 20-inch hemisphere dropped from heights of 5 feet and 10 feet. The hemisphere was outfitted with an accelerometer and three pressure gages. The focus of this report is the correlation of analytical models against test data.

  8. 16 CFR 1203.17 - Impact attenuation test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ..., Motorcycle Helmets, 49 CFR 571.218 (S7.1.8). The center of gravity of the drop assembly shall lie within the... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Impact attenuation test. 1203.17 Section... SAFETY STANDARD FOR BICYCLE HELMETS The Standard § 1203.17 Impact attenuation test. (a) Impact...

  9. Galileo battery testing and the impact of test automation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pertuch, W. T.; Dils, C. T.

    1985-01-01

    Test complexity, changes of test specifications, and the demand for tight control of tests led to the development of automated testing used for Galileo and other projects. The use of standardized interfacing, i.e., IEEE-488, with desktop computers and test instruments, resulted in greater reliability, repeatability, and accuracy of both control and data reporting. Increased flexibility of test programming has reduced costs by permitting a wide spectrum of test requirements at one station rather than many stations.

  10. Micrometeorite Impact Test of Flex Solar Array Coupon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, K. H.; Schneider, T. A.; Vaughn, J. A.; Hoang, B.; Wong, F.; Gardiner, G.

    2016-01-01

    Spacecraft with solar arrays operate throughout the near earth environment and are increasingly planned for outer planet missions. An often overlooked test condition for solar arrays that is applicable to these missions is micrometeorite impacts and possibly electrostatic discharge (ESD) events resulting from these impacts. The Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is partnering with Space Systems/Loral, LLC (SSL) to examine the results of simulated micrometeorite impacts on the electrical performance of an advanced, lightweight flexible solar array design. The test is performed at NASA MSFC's Microlight Gas Gun Facility. The SSL-provided coupons consist of three strings, each string with two solar cells in series. Five impacts will be induced at various locations on a powered test coupon under different string voltage (0 volts - 150 volts) and string current (1.1 amperes - 1.65 amperes) conditions. The maximum specified test voltage and current represent margins of 1.5 times for both voltage and current. The test parameters are chosen to demonstrate new array design robustness to any ESD event caused by plasma plumes resulting from a simulated micrometeorite impact. A second unpowered coupon will undergo two impacts: one impact on the front side and one impact on the back side. Following the impact testing, the second coupon will be exposed to a thermal cycle test to determine possible damage propagation and further electrical degradation due to thermally-induced stress. The setup, checkout, and results from the impact testing are discussed. The challenges for impact testing include precise coupon alignment to control impact location; pressure management during the impact process; and measurement of the true transient electrical response during impact on the powered coupon. Results from pre- and post-test visual and electrical functional testing are also discussed.

  11. SMALL-SCALE IMPACT SENSITIVITY TESTING ON EDC37

    SciTech Connect

    HSU, P C; HUST, G; MAIENSCHEIN, J L

    2008-04-28

    EDC37 was tested at LLNL to determine its impact sensitivity in the LLNL's drop hammer system. The results showed that impact sensitivities of the samples were between 86 cm and 156 cm, depending on test methods. EDC37 is a plastic bonded explosive consisting of 90% HMX, 1% nitrocellulose and binder. We recently conducted impact sensitivity testing in our drop hammer system and the results are presented in this report.

  12. Impact Properties of Irradiated HT9 from the Fuel Duct of FFTF

    SciTech Connect

    Byun, Thak Sang; Maloy, S; Toloczko, M; Lewis, William Daniel

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports Charpy impact test data for the ACO-3 duct material (HT9) from the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) and its archive material. Irradiation doses for the specimens were in the range of 3 148 dpa and irradiation temperatures in the range of 378 504 oC. The impact tests were performed for the small V-notched Charpy specimens with dimensions of 3 4 27 mm at an impact speed of 3.2 m/s in a 25J capacity machine. Irradiation lowered the upper-shelf energy (USE) and increased the transition temperatures significantly. The shift of transition temperatures was greater after relatively low temperature irradiation. The USE values were in the range of 5.5 6.7 J before irradiation and decreased to the range of 2 5 J after irradiation. Lower USEs were measured for lower irradiation temperatures and specimens with T-L orientation. For the irradiated specimens, the dose dependences of transition temperature and USE were not significant because of the radiation effect on impact behavior nearly saturated at the lowest dose of about 3 dpa. A comparison showed that the lateral expansion of specimens showed a linear correlation with absorbed impact energy, but with large scatter in the results. The size effect was also discussed to clarify the differences in the impact data of subsize and standard specimens.

  13. Orion MPCV Water Landing Test at Hydro Impact Basin

    NASA Video Gallery

    This is the third Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV) water landing test conducted at the Hydro Impact Basin at NASA Langley Research Center. This test represented the worst-case scenario for l...

  14. Negative Impacts of High-Stakes Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minarechová, Michaela

    2012-01-01

    High-stakes testing is not a new phenomenon in education. It has become part of the education system in many countries. These tests affect the school systems, teachers, students, politicians and parents, whether that is in a positive or negative sense. High-stakes testing is associated with concepts such as a school's accountability, funding…

  15. 16 CFR Figure 9 to Part 1203 - Impact Test Apparatus

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Impact Test Apparatus 9 Figure 9 to Part 1203 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT REGULATIONS SAFETY STANDARD FOR BICYCLE HELMETS Pt. 1203, Fig. 9 Figure 9 to Part 1203—Impact Test Apparatus...

  16. 16 CFR Figure 9 to Part 1203 - Impact Test Apparatus

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Impact Test Apparatus 9 Figure 9 to Part 1203 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT REGULATIONS SAFETY STANDARD FOR BICYCLE HELMETS Pt. 1203, Fig. 9 Figure 9 to Part 1203—Impact Test Apparatus...

  17. 16 CFR Figure 9 to Part 1203 - Impact Test Apparatus

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Impact Test Apparatus 9 Figure 9 to Part 1203 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT REGULATIONS SAFETY STANDARD FOR BICYCLE HELMETS Pt. 1203, Fig. 9 Figure 9 to Part 1203—Impact Test Apparatus...

  18. 16 CFR Figure 9 to Part 1203 - Impact Test Apparatus

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Impact Test Apparatus 9 Figure 9 to Part 1203 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT REGULATIONS SAFETY STANDARD FOR BICYCLE HELMETS Pt. 1203, Fig. 9 Figure 9 to Part 1203—Impact Test Apparatus...

  19. 16 CFR Figure 9 to Part 1203 - Impact Test Apparatus

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Impact Test Apparatus 9 Figure 9 to Part 1203 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT REGULATIONS SAFETY STANDARD FOR BICYCLE HELMETS Pt. 1203, Fig. 9 Figure 9 to Part 1203—Impact Test Apparatus...

  20. 16 CFR 1203.11 - Marking the impact test line.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Marking the impact test line. 1203.11 Section 1203.11 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT REGULATIONS SAFETY STANDARD FOR BICYCLE HELMETS The Standard § 1203.11 Marking the impact test line. Prior...

  1. 16 CFR 1203.11 - Marking the impact test line.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Marking the impact test line. 1203.11 Section 1203.11 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT REGULATIONS SAFETY STANDARD FOR BICYCLE HELMETS The Standard § 1203.11 Marking the impact test line. Prior...

  2. 16 CFR 1203.11 - Marking the impact test line.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Marking the impact test line. 1203.11 Section 1203.11 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT REGULATIONS SAFETY STANDARD FOR BICYCLE HELMETS The Standard § 1203.11 Marking the impact test line. Prior...

  3. 16 CFR 1203.11 - Marking the impact test line.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Marking the impact test line. 1203.11 Section 1203.11 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT REGULATIONS SAFETY STANDARD FOR BICYCLE HELMETS The Standard § 1203.11 Marking the impact test line. Prior...

  4. Preparation of calibrated test packages for particle impact noise detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A standard calibration method for any particle impact noise detection (PIND) test system used to detect loose particles responsible for failures in hybrid circuits was developed along with a procedure for preparing PIND standard test devices. Hybrid packages were seeded with a single gold ball, hermetically sealed, leak tested, and PIND tested. Conclusions are presented.

  5. Laser notching ceramics for reliable fracture toughness testing

    SciTech Connect

    Barth, Holly D.; Elmer, John W.; Freeman, Dennis C.; Schaefer, Ronald D.; Derkach, Oleg; Gallegos, Gilbert F.

    2015-09-19

    A new method for notching ceramics was developed using a picosecond laser for fracture toughness testing of alumina samples. The test geometry incorporated a single-edge-V-notch that was notched using picosecond laser micromachining. This method has been used in the past for cutting ceramics, and is known to remove material with little to no thermal effect on the surrounding material matrix. This study showed that laser-assisted-machining for fracture toughness testing of ceramics was reliable, quick, and cost effective. In order to assess the laser notched single-edge-V-notch beam method, fracture toughness results were compared to results from other more traditional methods, specifically surface-crack in flexure and the chevron notch bend tests. Lastly, the results showed that picosecond laser notching produced precise notches in post-failure measurements, and that the measured fracture toughness results showed improved consistency compared to traditional fracture toughness methods.

  6. Laser notching ceramics for reliable fracture toughness testing

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Barth, Holly D.; Elmer, John W.; Freeman, Dennis C.; Schaefer, Ronald D.; Derkach, Oleg; Gallegos, Gilbert F.

    2015-09-19

    A new method for notching ceramics was developed using a picosecond laser for fracture toughness testing of alumina samples. The test geometry incorporated a single-edge-V-notch that was notched using picosecond laser micromachining. This method has been used in the past for cutting ceramics, and is known to remove material with little to no thermal effect on the surrounding material matrix. This study showed that laser-assisted-machining for fracture toughness testing of ceramics was reliable, quick, and cost effective. In order to assess the laser notched single-edge-V-notch beam method, fracture toughness results were compared to results from other more traditional methods, specificallymore » surface-crack in flexure and the chevron notch bend tests. Lastly, the results showed that picosecond laser notching produced precise notches in post-failure measurements, and that the measured fracture toughness results showed improved consistency compared to traditional fracture toughness methods.« less

  7. Impact Testing for Materials Science at NASA - MSFC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sikapizye, Mitch

    2010-01-01

    The Impact Testing Facility (ITF) at NASA - Marshall Space Flight Center is host to different types of guns used to study the effects of high velocity impacts. The testing facility has been and continues to be utilized for all NASA missions where impact testing is essential. The Facility has also performed tests for the Department of Defense, other corporations, as well as universities across the nation. Current capabilities provided by Marshall include ballistic guns, light gas guns, exploding wire gun, and the Hydrometeor Impact Gun. A new plasma gun has also been developed which would be able to propel particles at velocities of 20km/s. This report includes some of the guns used for impact testing at NASA Marshall and their capabilities.

  8. Impact of uncertainty on modeling and testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coleman, Hugh W.; Brown, Kendall K.

    1995-01-01

    A thorough understanding of the uncertainties associated with the modeling and testing of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) Engine will greatly aid decisions concerning hardware performance and future development efforts. This report will describe the determination of the uncertainties in the modeling and testing of the Space Shuttle Main Engine test program at the Technology Test Bed facility at Marshall Space Flight Center. Section 2 will present a summary of the uncertainty analysis methodology used and discuss the specific applications to the TTB SSME test program. Section 3 will discuss the application of the uncertainty analysis to the test program and the results obtained. Section 4 presents the results of the analysis of the SSME modeling effort from an uncertainty analysis point of view. The appendices at the end of the report contain a significant amount of information relative to the analysis, including discussions of venturi flowmeter data reduction and uncertainty propagation, bias uncertainty documentations, technical papers published, the computer code generated to determine the venturi uncertainties, and the venturi data and results used in the analysis.

  9. Micrometeorite Impact Test of Flex Solar Array Coupon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, K. H.; Schneider, T. A.; Vaughn, J. A.; Hoang, B.; Wong, F.; Gardiner, G.

    2016-01-01

    Spacecraft with solar arrays operate throughout the near earth environment and are planned for outer planet missions. An often overlooked test condition for solar arrays that is applicable to these missions is micrometeoroid impacts and possibly electrostatic discharge (ESD) events resulting from these impacts. NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is partnering with Space Systems/Loral, LLC (SSL) to examine the results of simulated micrometeoroid impacts on the electrical performance of an advanced, lightweight flexible solar array design. The test is performed at MSFC's Micro Light Gas Gun Facility with SSL-provided coupons. Multiple impacts were induced at various locations on a powered test coupon under different string voltage (0V-150V) and string current (1.1A - 1.65A) conditions. The setup, checkout, and results from the impact testing are discussed.

  10. Numerical comparison between different strength after impact test procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klaus, M.; Reimerdes, H. G.

    2010-06-01

    Different procedures are established to investigate the residual properties of sandwich panels after impact damage. Two used procedures for the testing of this properties are compression after impact (CAI) and 4-point bending. In this paper a numerical procedure is presented for a first prediction of the behaviour of pre-damaged sandwich specimens under different boundary conditions (or testing procedures). A sequence of impact experiments using a drop tower is performed to assess the damage tolerance of sandwich panels with aramid paper foldcores and CFRP skins. The tested impact energy range allowed to investigate a variety of damage scenarios from barely visible damages (BVID) to fibre fractures in all plies of the impacted face sheet. Additionally 4-point bending tests are performed with the panels previously damaged by impact loadings to assess the residual bending strength of these samples. The developed numerical procedure is used to reproduce these experiments (the impact as well as the 4-point bending tests). Also the same procedure is employed in an attempt to predict the behaviour of samples with the same build-up in simulated compression after impact tests.

  11. Assessing Individual-Level Impact of Interruptions during Online Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinharay, Sandip; Wan, Ping; Choi, Seung W.; Kim, Dong-In

    2015-01-01

    With an increase in the number of online tests, the number of interruptions during testing due to unexpected technical issues seems to be on the rise. For example, interruptions occurred during several recent state tests. When interruptions occur, it is important to determine the extent of their impact on the examinees' scores. Researchers such as…

  12. Determining the Overall Impact of Interruptions during Online Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinharay, Sandip; Wan, Ping; Whitaker, Mike; Kim, Dong-In; Zhang, Litong; Choi, Seung W.

    2014-01-01

    With an increase in the number of online tests, interruptions during testing due to unexpected technical issues seem unavoidable. For example, interruptions occurred during several recent state tests. When interruptions occur, it is important to determine the extent of their impact on the examinees' scores. There is a lack of research on this…

  13. Transient analysis of an IVHM grapple impact test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, R. G.

    1972-01-01

    A lumped mass model was used to represent the impact condition between a fuel duct and an IVHM in-vessel fuel handling machine. The nonlinear effects of a Bellville spring and the free fall impact of the fuel duct on the IVHM were included. The purpose of the tests was to determine the loads on the fuel duct due to the impact. A comparison between experimental and theoretical results is presented.

  14. LLNL small-scale drop-hammer impact sensitivity test

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, L.R.; Foltz, M.F.

    1995-01-01

    Small-scale safety testing of explosives and other energetic materials is done to determine their sensitivity to various stimuli including friction, static spark, and impact. This testing is typically done to discover potential handling problems for either newly synthesized materials of unknown behavior or materials that have been stored for long periods of time. This report describes the existing ``ERL Type 12 Drop Weight Impact Sensitivity Apparatus``, or ``Drop Hammer Machine``, and the methods used to determine the impact sensitivity of energetic materials, Also discussed are changes made to both the machine and methods since the inception of impact sensitivity testing at LLNL in 1956. The accumulated data for the materials tested in not listed here, the exception being the discussion of those specific materials (primary calibrants: PETN, RDX, Comp-B3,and TNT; secondary calibrants: K-6, RX-26-AF, and TATB) used to calibrate the machine.

  15. Impact Testing of Orbiter Thermal Protection System Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerr, Justin

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the impact testing of the materials used in designing the shuttle orbiter thermal protection system (TPS). Pursuant to the Columbia Accident Investigation Board recommendations a testing program of the TPS system was instituted. This involved using various types of impactors in different sizes shot from various sizes and strengths guns to impact the TPS tiles and the Leading Edge Structural Subsystem (LESS). The observed damage is shown, and the resultant lessons learned are reviewed.

  16. Advantages of impact testing over hardness testing in determining physical integrity of tablets.

    PubMed

    Wilson, K E; Potter, A

    1998-11-01

    An investigation of four different tablet strength tests was carried out on four different placebo formulations (differing in Avicel: Pharmatose ratios). The results analysis compared fatigue failure, work of failure, and impact failure to diametrical compression measurements (hardness). The impact results clearly show how different formulations can have the same hardness, yet their impact resistance can vary by as much as 200%. The impact test used in this work and other tests described are useful in tablet development to understand, compare, and mitigate tablet breakage during subsequent unit operations. PMID:9876556

  17. A Comparison of Quasi-Static Indentation Testing to Low Velocity Impact Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nettles, Alan T.; Douglas, Michael J.

    2001-01-01

    The need for a static test method for modeling low-velocity foreign object impact events to composites would prove to be very beneficial to researchers since much more data can be obtained from a static test than from an impact test. In order to examine if this is feasible, a series of static indentation and low velocity impact tests were carried out and compared. Square specimens of many sizes and thickness were utilized to cover the array of types of low velocity impact events. Laminates with a n/4 stacking sequence were employed since this is by the most common type of engineering laminate. Three distinct flexural rigidities under two different boundary conditions were tested in order to obtain damage due to large deflections, contact stresses and both to examine if the static indentation-impact comparisons are valid under the spectrum of damage modes that can be experienced. Comparisons between static indentation and low velocity impact tests were based on the maximum applied transverse load. The dependent parameters examined included dent depth, back surface crack length, delamination area and to a limited extent, load-deflection behavior. Results showed that no distinct differences could be seen between the static indentation tests and the low velocity impact tests, indicating that static indentation can be used to represent a low velocity impact event.

  18. Impact Testing and Simulation of Composite Airframe Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Karen E.; Littell, Justin D.; Horta, Lucas G.; Annett, Martin S.; Fasanella, Edwin L.; Seal, Michael D., II

    2014-01-01

    Dynamic tests were performed at NASA Langley Research Center on composite airframe structural components of increasing complexity to evaluate their energy absorption behavior when subjected to impact loading. A second objective was to assess the capabilities of predicting the dynamic response of composite airframe structures, including damage initiation and progression, using a state-of-the-art nonlinear, explicit transient dynamic finite element code, LS-DYNA. The test specimens were extracted from a previously tested composite prototype fuselage section developed and manufactured by Sikorsky Aircraft Corporation under the US Army's Survivable Affordable Repairable Airframe Program (SARAP). Laminate characterization testing was conducted in tension and compression. In addition, dynamic impact tests were performed on several components, including I-beams, T-sections, and cruciform sections. Finally, tests were conducted on two full-scale components including a subfloor section and a framed fuselage section. These tests included a modal vibration and longitudinal impact test of the subfloor section and a quasi-static, modal vibration, and vertical drop test of the framed fuselage section. Most of the test articles were manufactured of graphite unidirectional tape composite with a thermoplastic resin system. However, the framed fuselage section was constructed primarily of a plain weave graphite fabric material with a thermoset resin system. Test data were collected from instrumentation such as accelerometers and strain gages and from full-field photogrammetry.

  19. XDT in HTPB propellant from steel flyer plate impact tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Katsumi; Noda, Keiichiro; Hyodo, Yukio; Nakamura, Hiroyuki; Kosaka, Katsuaki; Nakayama, Takashi; Katayama, Masahide; Takeba, Atsushi

    2000-04-01

    Several experiments simulating ground impact explosion following the command destruction of a launch vehicle have been performed using HTPB propellant samples of mass 460 to 940 kg impacted by a steel flyer plate. Impact velocities were varied from 135 m/s to 170 m/s. Strong explosions were observed at impact velocities higher than 150 m/s for tests of solid rocket propellant weighting 460 kg. The XDT (Unknown to Detonation Transition) is studied using a bulk failure reaction model including strain rate effect. Computational results are compared with observed blast waves for various impact velocities. The present model has been successfully applied to 22 inch Critical Diameter tests for SRMU HTPB propellant.

  20. Taylor impact tests and simulations of plastic bonded explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clements, Brad E.; Thompson, Darla; Luscher, D. J.; DeLuca, Racci; Brown, Geoffrey

    2012-03-01

    Taylor impact tests were conducted on plastic bonded explosives PBX 9501 and PBXN-9 for impact velocities between 80 and 214 m/s. High-speed photography was used to image the impact event at a rate of one frame for every 25 μs. For early times, PBXN-9 showed large-deformation mushrooming of the explosive cylinders, followed by fragmentation by an amount proportional to the impact speed, was observed at all velocities. PBX 9501 appeared to be more brittle than PBXN-9, the latter demonstrated a more viscoelastic response. The post-shot fragments were collected and particle size distributions were obtained. The constitutive model ViscoSCRAM was then used to model the Taylor experiments using the finite element code ABAQUS. Prior to the Taylor simulations, ViscoSCRAM was parameterized for the two explosives using uniaxial stress-strain data. Simulating Taylor impact tests validates the model in situations undergoing extreme damage and fragmentation.

  1. a Method for Determining the Impact Force in Crash Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Y.; Isobe, D.; Saito, S.; Fujimoto, H.; Miki, Y.

    2000-11-01

    A method for measuring the impact force in crash testing is developed. In this method, a mass is made to collide with the object being tested and the instantaneous value of the impact force is measured as the inertial force acting on the mass. To realise linear motion with sufficiently small friction acting on the mass, a pneumatic linear bearing is used, and the velocity and acceleration of the mass, the moving part of the bearing, are measured using an optical interferometer. The relative combined standard uncertainty in determining the impact force in a three-point bending test is estimated to be 0.5×10 -2(0.5%) of the maximum value of the impact force.

  2. Fatigue Testing of Metallurgically-Bonded EBR-II Superheater Tubes

    SciTech Connect

    T.C. Totemeier; D.M. Wachs; D.L. Porter

    2008-05-01

    Fatigue crack growth and impact tests were performed on 2¼Cr-1Mo steel specimens machined from ex-service Experimental Breeder Reactor – II (EBR-II) superheater duplex tubes. The tubes had been metallurgically bonded with a 100 µm thick Ni layer; the specimens incorporated this bond layer. Impact tests were performed at temperatures from –50 to 400°C; cracks propagating from the V-notch were arrested by delamination at the bond layer for all tests with one exception at –50°C. Fatigue crack growth tests were performed at room temperature in air and at 400°C in air and humid Ar; cracks were grown at varied levels of constant ?K. In all conditions the presence of the Ni bond layer was found to result in a net retardation of growth as the crack passed through the layer. The mechanism of retardation was identified as a disruption of crack planarity and uniformity after passing through the porous bond layer. Full crack arrest was only observed in a single test performed at near-threshold ?K level (12 MPa?m) at 400°C. In this case the crack tip was blunted by oxidation of the base steel at the steel-nickel interface.

  3. Toughness characterization by small specimen test technique for HIPed joints of F82H steel aiming at first wall fabrication in fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishimoto, H.; Ono, T.; Sakasegawa, H.; Tanigawa, H.; Kohno, Y.; Kohyama, A.

    2013-09-01

    Reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steels (RAFMs), such as F82H steels, have been developed as candidates of structural materials for fusion. In the design of a fusion reactor, cooling channels are built in the first wall of the blanket. One large issue is to determine how to join rectangular tubes to thin panels to fabricate the first wall. Hot Isostatic Pressing (HIPing) is a solution to solve the issue. Because of the thin HIPed walls of the channels, the specimen size for inspection of HIPed interface is limited. In the present research, Small Specimen Test Techniques (SSTT) are screened for the destructive toughness investigation technique of HIPed F82H joints. 1/3 size Charpy V-notch impact (1/3 CVN) and small punch (SP) tests are employed for the present research. The toughness of the HIPed joints is strongly affected by various surface finishing of specimens treated previous to the HIPing. In the present research, several kinds of HIPed joints were surface finished by different methods and investigated by 1/3 CVN impact test. The HIPed F82H joints had different toughness ranging from 20% to 70% of the toughness of the F82H base metal. The SP test is also available for the investigation of toughness change by the HIPing. The sensitivity of 1/3 CVN impact test against toughness change was better than the SP test, it revealed that the SP test has some limitations.

  4. Marshall Space Flight Center's Impact Testing Facility Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finchum, Andy; Hubbs, Whitney; Evans, Steve

    2008-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center s (MSFC) Impact Testing Facility (ITF) serves as an important installation for space and missile related materials science research. The ITF was established and began its research in spacecraft debris shielding in the early 1960s, then played a major role in the International Space Station debris shield development. As NASA became more interested in launch debris and in-flight impact concerns, the ITF grew to include research in a variety of impact genres. Collaborative partnerships with the DoD led to a wider range of impact capabilities being relocated to MSFC as a result of the closure of Particle Impact Facilities in Santa Barbara, California. The Particle Impact Facility had a 30 year history in providing evaluations of aerospace materials and components during flights through rain, ice, and solid particle environments at subsonic through hypersonic velocities. The facility s unique capabilities were deemed a "National Asset" by the DoD. The ITF now has capabilities including environmental, ballistic, and hypervelocity impact testing utilizing an array of air, powder, and two-stage light gas guns to accommodate a variety of projectile and target types and sizes. Numerous upgrades including new instrumentation, triggering circuitry, high speed photography, and optimized sabot designs have been implemented. Other recent research has included rain drop demise characterization tests to obtain data for inclusion in on-going model development. The current and proposed ITF capabilities range from rain to micrometeoroids allowing the widest test parameter range possible for materials investigations in support of space, atmospheric, and ground environments. These test capabilities including hydrometeor, single/multi-particle, ballistic gas guns, exploding wire gun, and light gas guns combined with Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics Code (SPHC) simulations represent the widest range of impact test capabilities in the country.

  5. Quality assurance of absorbed energy in Charpy impact test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocha, C. L. F.; Fabricio, D. A. K.; Costa, V. M.; Reguly, A.

    2016-07-01

    In order to ensure the quality assurance and comply with standard requirements, an intralaboratory study has been performed for impact Charpy tests, involving two operators. The results based on ANOVA (Analysis of Variance) and Normalized Error statistical techniques pointed out that the execution of the tests is appropriate, because the implementation of quality assurance methods showed acceptable results.

  6. Impact Testing of Stainless Steel Material at Cold Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer D. Snow; D. Keith Morton; Robert K. Blandford

    2008-07-01

    Stainless steels are used for the construction of numerous spent nuclear fuel or radioactive material containers that may be subjected to high strains and moderate strain rates during accidental drop events. Mechanical characteristics of these base materials and their welds under dynamic loads in the strain rate range of concern are not well documented. However, a previous paper [1] reported on impact testing and analysis results performed at the Idaho National Laboratory using 304/304L and 316/316L stainless steel base material specimens at room and elevated temperatures. The goal of the work presented herein is to add recently completed impact tensile testing results at -20 degrees F conditions for dual-marked 304/304L and 316/316L stainless steel material specimens (hereafter referred to as 304L and 316L, respectively). Recently completed welded material impact testing at -20 degrees F, room, 300 degrees F, and 600 degrees F is also reported. Utilizing a drop-weight impact test machine and 1/4-inch to 1/2-inch thick dog-bone shaped test specimens, the impact tests achieved strain rates in the 4 to 40 per second range, depending upon the material temperature. Elevated true stress-strain curves for these materials reflecting varying strain rates and temperatures are presented herein.

  7. Impact testing of ductile cast iron: Tension and compression

    SciTech Connect

    Yokoyama, T.; Takata, T.; Sogabe, Y.

    1995-11-01

    Impact tension and compression tests on ferritic ductile cast iron (JIS FCD370) are conducted by means of the split Hopkinson bar technique. Reliable stress-strain relations in tension and compression for ductile cast iron are determined at strain rates of over 10{sup 3}/s. The test results indicate that ductile cast iron shows different strength characteristics in tension and compression under impact loading as well as under quasi-static loading. Microscopic examinations of the post-test specimens reveal that this mechanical behavior is attributed to the presence of spheroidal graphites in a ferritic matrix of ductile cast iron.

  8. An evaluation of the liquid oxygen mechanical impact test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moffett, Gary E.; Schmidt, Naomi E.; Pedley, Michael D.; Linley, Larry J.

    1989-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the repeatability of the ambient LO2 mechanical impact test used by NASA to screen materials for oxygen service (NHB 8060.1B Test 12 Part 1, which is based on the ASTM method). Four materials were tested: Teflon, Vespel SP-21, Viton A, and nylon 6/6. Each test material was subjected to several series of tests that were conducted at different impact energy levels. The results show that the variability from series to series in the reaction threshold energy level is within the precision statement of the ASTM method. However, this precision is considerably broader than the reaction threshold implied by the NHB 8060.1B test criteria.

  9. Impact Testing of Composites for Aircraft Engine Fan Cases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Gary D.; Revilock, Duane M.; Binienda, Wieslaw K.; Nie, Walter Z.; Mackenzie, S. Ben; Todd, Kevin B.

    2001-01-01

    Before composite materials can be considered for use in the fan case of a commercial jet engine, the performance of a composite structure under blade-out loads needs to be demonstrated. The objective of this program is to develop an efficient test and analysis method for evaluating potential composite case concepts. Ballistic impact tests were performed on laminated glass/epoxy composites in order to identify potential failure modes and to provide data for analysis. Flat 7x7 in. panels were impacted with cylindrical titanium projectiles, and 15 in. diameter half-rings were impacted with wedge-shaped titanium projectiles. Composite failure involved local fiber fracture as well as tearing and delamination on a larger scale. A 36 in. diameter full-ring subcomponent was proposed for larger scale testing. Explicit, transient, finite element analyses were used to evaluate impact dynamics and subsequent global deformation for the proposed full-ring subcomponent test. Analyses on half-ring and quarter ring configurations indicated that less expensive smaller scale tests could be used to screen potential composite concepts when evaluation of local impact damage is the primary concern.

  10. Taylor impact tests on PBX composites: imaging and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graff Thompson, Daria; DeLuca, Racci; Archuleta, Jose; Brown, Geoff W.; Koby, Joseph

    2014-05-01

    A series of Taylor impact tests were performed on three plastic bonded explosive (PBX) formulations: PBX 9501, PBXN-9 and HPP (propellant). The first two formulations are HMX-based, and all three have been characterized quasi-statically in tension and compression. The Taylor impact tests use a 500 psi gas gun to launch PBX projectiles (approximately 30 grams, 16 mm diameter, 76 mm long), velocities as high as 215 m/s, at a steel anvil. Tests were performed remotely and no sign of ignition/reaction have been observed to date. Highspeed imaging was used to capture the impact of the specimen onto anvil surface. Side-view contour images have been analyzed using dynamic stress equations from the literature, and additionally, front-view images have been used to estimate a tensile strain failure criterion for initial specimen fracture. Post-test sieve analysis of specimen debris correlates fragmentation with projectile velocity, and these data show interesting differences between composites. Along with other quasi-static and dynamic measurements, Taylor impact images and fragmentation data provide a useful metric for the calibration or evaluation of intermediate-rate model predictions of PBX constituitive response and failure/fragmentation. Intermediate-rate tests involving other impact configurations are being considered.

  11. Taylor Impact Tests on PBX Composites: Imaging and Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Darla; Deluca, Racci

    2013-06-01

    A series of Taylor impact tests were performed on three plastic bonded explosive (PBX) formulations: PBX 9501, PBXN-9 and HPP (propellant). The first two formulations are HMX-based, and all three have been characterized quasi-statically in tension and compression. The Taylor impact tests use a 500 psi gas gun to launch PBX projectiles (approximately 30 grams, 16 mm diameter, 76 mm long) at velocities as high as 215 m/s. Tests were performed remotely and no sign of ignition/reaction have been observed to date. High-speed imaging was used to capture the impact of the specimen onto the surface of a steel anvil. Side-view contour images have been analyzed using dynamic stress equations from the literature, and additionally, front-view images have been used to estimate a tensile strain failure criterion for initial specimen fracture. Post-test sieve analysis of specimen debris correlates fragmentation with projectile velocity, and these data show interesting differences between composites. Along with other quasi-static and dynamic measurements, these impact images and fragmentation data provide a useful metric for the calibration or evaluation of intermediate-rate model predictions of PBX constituitive response and failure/fragmentation. Intermediate-rate tests involving other impact configurations are being considered.

  12. The Impact of Personality and Test Conditions on Mathematical Test Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayes, Heather; Embretson, Susan E.

    2013-01-01

    Online and on-demand tests are increasingly used in assessment. Although the main focus has been cheating and test security (e.g., Selwyn, 2008) the cross-setting equivalence of scores as a function of contrasting test conditions is also an issue that warrants attention. In this study, the impact of environmental and cognitive distractions, as…

  13. Microstructural characterization of Charpy-impact-tested nanostructured bainite

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, Y.T.; Chang, H.T.; Huang, B.M.; Huang, C.Y.; Yang, J.R.

    2015-09-15

    In this work, a possible cause of the extraordinary low impact toughness of nanostructured bainite has been investigated. The microstructure of nanostructured bainite consisted chiefly of carbide-free bainitic ferrite with retained austenite films. X-ray diffractometry (XRD) measurement indicated that no retained austenite existed in the fractured surface of the Charpy-impact-tested specimens. Fractographs showed that cracks propagated mainly along bainitic ferrite platelet boundaries. The change in microstructure after impact loading was verified by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observations, confirming that retained austenite was completely transformed to strain-induced martensite during the Charpy impact test. However, the zone affected by strained-induced martensite was found to be extremely shallow, only to a depth of several micrometers from the fracture surface. It is appropriately concluded that upon impact, as the crack forms and propagates, strain-induced martensitic transformation immediately occurs ahead of the advancing crack tip. The successive martensitic transformation profoundly facilitates the crack propagation, resulting in the extremely low impact toughness of nanostructured bainite. Retained austenite, in contrast to its well-known beneficial role, has a deteriorating effect on toughness during the course of Charpy impact. - Highlights: • The microstructure of nanostructured bainite consisted of nano-sized bainitic ferrite subunits with retained austenite films. • Special sample preparations for SEM, XRD and TEM were made, and the strain-affected structures have been explored. • Retained austenite films were found to transform into martensite after impact loading, as evidenced by XRD and TEM results. • The zone of strain-induced martensite was found to extend to only several micrometers from the fracture surface. • The poor Charpy impact toughness is associated with the fracture of martensite at a high strain rate during

  14. Marshall Space Flight Center's Impact Testing Facility Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Steve; Finchum, Andy; Hubbs, Whitney

    2008-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC) Impact Testing Facility (ITF) serves as an important installation for space and missile related materials science research. The ITF was established and began its research in spacecraft debris shielding in the early 1960% then played a major role in the International Space Station debris shield development. As NASA became more interested in launch debris and in-flight impact concerns, the ITF grew to include research in a variety of impact genres. Collaborative partnerships with the DoD led to a wider range of impact capabilities being relocated to MSFC as a result of the closure of Particle Impact Facilities in Santa Barbara, California. The Particle Impact Facility had a 30 year history in providing evaluations of aerospace materials and components during flights through rain, ice, and solid particle environments at subsonic through hypersonic velocities. The facility's unique capabilities were deemed a "National Asset" by the DoD. The ITF now has capabilities including environmental, ballistic, and hypervelocity impact testing utilizing an array of air, powder, and two-stage light gas guns to accommodate a variety of projectile and target types and sizes. Relocated test equipment was dated and in need of upgrade. Numerous upgrades including new instrumentation, triggering circuitry, high speed photography, and optimized sabot designs have been implemented. Other recent research has included rain drop demise characterization tests to obtain data for inclusion in on-going model development. Future ITF improvements will be focused on continued instrumentation and performance enhancements. These enhancements will allow further, more in-depth, characterization of rain drop demise characterization and evaluation of ice crystal impact. Performance enhancements also include increasing the upper velocity limit of the current environmental guns to allow direct environmental simulation for missile components. The current and proposed

  15. Marshall Space Flight Center's Impact Testing Facility Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Steve; Finchum, Andy; Hubbs, Whitney; Gray, Perry

    2008-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC) Impact Testing Facility (ITF) serves as an important installation for space and missile related materials science research. The ITF was established and began its research in spacecraft debris shielding in the early 1960s, then played a major role in the International Space Station debris shield development. As NASA became more interested in launch debris and in-flight impact concerns, the ITF grew to include research in a variety of impact genres. Collaborative partnerships with the DoD led to a wider range of impact capabilities being relocated to MSFC as a result of the closure of Particle Impact Facilities in Santa Barbara, California, The Particle Impact Facility had a 30 year history in providing evaluations of aerospace materials and components during flights through rain, ice, and solid particle environments at subsonic through hypersonic velocities. The facility's unique capabilities were deemed a 'National Asset' by the DoD, The ITF now has capabilities including environmental, ballistic, and hypervelocity impact testing utilizing an array of air, powder, and two-stage light gas guns to accommodate a variety of projectile and target types and sizes. Relocated test equipment was dated and in need of upgrade. Numerous upgrades including new instrumentation, triggering circuitry, high speed photography, and optimized sabot designs have been implemented. Other recent research has included rain drop demise characterization tests to obtain data for inclusion in on-going model development. Future ITF improvements will be focused on continued instrumentation and performance enhancements. These enhancements will allow further, more in-depth, characterization of rain drop demise characterization and evaluation of ice crystal impact. Performance enhancements also include increasing the upper velocity limit of the current environmental guns to allow direct environmental simulation for missile components. The current and proposed

  16. Impact tests on rubber compression springs for airplane landing gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hohenemser, K

    1930-01-01

    The present report gives the results of tests which were made for the purpose of solving the problem of whether diagrams obtained from pressure tests could be conclusive for the determination of the safe impact coefficients. It is first established that the rubber rings adhere firmly to the compression surfaces during deformation. Suggestions are thus obtained for a constructive simplification of the rubber rings. The hysteresis phenomenon is ascribed to external and internal friction forces. A device for falling tests is then described with which the process of shock absorption with rubber rings was tested.

  17. Effect of aging on impact properties of ASTM A890 Grade 1C super duplex stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Martins, Marcelo Forti, Leonardo Rodrigues Nogueira

    2008-02-15

    Super duplex stainless steels in the solution annealed condition are thermodynamically metastable systems which, when exposed to heat, present a strong tendency to 'seek' the most favorable thermodynamic condition. The main purpose of this study was to characterize the microstructure of a super duplex stainless steel in the as cast and solution annealed conditions, and to determine the influence of aging heat treatments on its impact strength, based on Charpy impact tests applied to V-notched test specimens. The sigma phase was found to begin precipitating at heat treatment temperatures above 760 deg. C and to dissolve completely only above 1040 deg. C, with the highest peak concentration of this phase appearing at close to 850 deg. C. Heat treatments conducted at temperatures of 580 deg. C to 740 deg. C led to a reduction of the energy absorbed in the Charpy impact test in response to the precipitation of a particulate phase with particle sizes ranging from 0.5 {mu}m to 1.0 {mu}m, with a chromium and iron-rich chemical composition.

  18. Hypervelocity Impact Testing of Nickel Hydrogen Battery Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frate, David T.; Nahra, Henry K.

    1996-01-01

    Nickel-Hydrogen (Ni/H2) battery cells have been used on several satellites and are planned for use on the International Space Station. In January 1992, the NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC) conducted hypervelocity impact testing on Ni/H2 cells to characterize their failure modes. The cell's outer construction was a 24 mil-thick Inconel 718 pressure vessel. A sheet of 1.27 cm thick honeycomb was placed in front of the battery cells during testing to simulate the on-orbit box enclosure. Testing was conducted at the NASA White Sands Test Facility (WSTF). The hypervelocity gun used was a 7.6 mm (0.30 caliber) two-stage light gas gun. Test were performed at speeds of 3, 6, and 7 km/sec using aluminum 2017 spherical particles of either 4.8 or 6.4 mm diameter as the projectile. The battery cells were electrically charged to about 75 percent of capacity, then back-filled with hydrogen gas to 900 psi simulating the full charge condition. High speed film at 10,000 frames/sec was taken of the impacts. Impacts in the dome area (top) and the electrode area (middle) of the battery cells were investigated. Five tests on battery cells were performed. The results revealed that in all of the test conditions investigated, the battery cells simply vented their hydrogen gas and some electrolyte, but did not burst or generate any large debris fragments.

  19. Hypervelocity Impact Test Results for a Metallic Thermal Protection System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karr, Katherine L.; Poteet, Carl C.; Blosser, Max L.

    2003-01-01

    Hypervelocity impact tests have been performed on specimens representing metallic thermal protection systems (TPS) developed at NASA Langley Research Center for use on next-generation reusable launch vehicles (RLV). The majority of the specimens tested consists of a foil gauge exterior honeycomb panel, composed of either Inconel 617 or Ti-6Al-4V, backed with 2.0 in. of fibrous insulation and a final Ti-6Al-4V foil layer. Other tested specimens include titanium multi-wall sandwich coupons as well as TPS using a second honeycomb sandwich in place of the foil backing. Hypervelocity impact tests were performed at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center Orbital Debris Simulation Facility. An improved test fixture was designed and fabricated to hold specimens firmly in place during impact. Projectile diameter, honeycomb sandwich material, honeycomb sandwich facesheet thickness, and honeycomb core cell size were examined to determine the influence of TPS configuration on the level of protection provided to the substructure (crew, cabin, fuel tank, etc.) against micrometeoroid or orbit debris impacts. Pictures and descriptions of the damage to each specimen are included.

  20. Statistical modeling for particle impact noise detection testing

    SciTech Connect

    Prairie, R.R. ); Zimmer, W.J. )

    1990-01-01

    Particle Impact Noise Detection (PIND) testing is widely used to test electronic devices for the presence of conductive particles which can cause catastrophic failure. This paper develops a statistical model based on the rate of particles contaminating the part, the rate of particles induced by the test vibration, the escape rate, and the false alarm rate. Based on data from a large number of PIND tests for a canned transistor, the model is shown to fit the observed results closely. Knowledge of the parameters for which this fit is made is important in evaluating the effectiveness of the PIND test procedure and for developing background judgment about the performance of the PIND test. Furthermore, by varying the input parameters to the model, the resulting yield, failure rate and percent fallout can be examined and used to plan and implement PIND test programs.

  1. Influence of thermal conditioning media on Charpy specimen test temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Nanstad, R.K.; Swain, R.L.; Berggren, R.G.

    1989-01-01

    The Charpy V-notch (CVN) impact test is used extensively for determining the toughness of structural materials. Research programs in many technologies concerned with structural integrity perform such testing to obtain Charpy energy vs temperature curves. American Society for Testing and Materials Method E 23 includes rather strict requirements regarding determination and control of specimen test temperature. It specifies minimum soaking times dependent on the use of liquids or gases as the medium for thermally conditioning the specimen. The method also requires that impact of the specimen occur within 5 s removal from the conditioning medium. It does not, however, provide guidance regarding choice of conditioning media. This investigation was primarily conducted to investigate the changes in specimen temperature which occur when water is used for thermal conditioning. A standard CVN impact specimen of low-alloy steel was instrumented with surface-mounted and embedded thermocouples. Dependent on the media used, the specimen was heated or cooled to selected temperatures in the range {minus}100 to 100{degree}C using cold nitrogen gas, heated air, acetone and dry ice, methanol and dry ice, heated oil, or heated water. After temperature stabilization, the specimen was removed from the conditioning medium while the temperatures were recorded four times per second from all thermocouples using a data acquisition system and a computer. The results show that evaporative cooling causes significant changes in the specimen temperatures when water is used for conditioning. Conditioning in the other media did not result in such significant changes. The results demonstrate that, even within the guidelines of E 23, significant test temperature changes can occur which may substantially affect the Charpy impact test results if water is used for temperature conditioning. 7 refs., 11 figs.

  2. Impact Testing of a Stirling Converter's Linear Alternator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suarez, Vicente J.; Goodnight, Thomas W.; Hughes, William O.; Samorezov, Sergey

    2002-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), in conjunction with the NASA John H. Glenn Research Center and Stirling Technology Company, are currently developing a Stirling convertor for a Stirling Radioisotope Generator (SRG). NASA Headquarters and DOE have identified the SRG for potential use as an advanced spacecraft power system for future NASA deep-space and Mars surface missions. Low-level dynamic impact tests were conducted at NASA Glenn Research Center's Structural Dynamics Laboratory as part of the development of this technology. The purpose of this test was to identify dynamic structural characteristics of the Stirling Technology Demonstration Convertor (TDC). This paper addresses the test setup, procedure, and results of the impact testing conducted on the Stirling TDC in May 2001.

  3. Impact testing of a Stirling convertor's linear alternator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suárez, Vicente J.; Goodnight, Thomas W.; Hughes, William O.; Samorezov, Sergey

    2002-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), in conjunction with NASA John H. Glenn Research Center and Stirling Technology Company, are currently developing a Stirling convertor for a Stirling Radioisotope Generator (SRG). NASA Headquarters and DOE have identified the SRG for potential use as an advanced spacecraft power system for future NASA deep-space and Mars surface missions. Low-level dynamic impact tests were conducted at NASA Glenn Research Center's Structural Dynamics Laboratory as part of the development of this technology. The purpose of this test was to identify dynamic structural characteristics of the Stirling Technology Demonstration Convertor (TDC). This paper addresses the test setup, procedure and results of the impact testing conducted on the Stirling TDC in May 2001. .

  4. Large Field Photogrammetry Techniques in Aircraft and Spacecraft Impact Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Littell, Justin D.

    2010-01-01

    The Landing and Impact Research Facility (LandIR) at NASA Langley Research Center is a 240 ft. high A-frame structure which is used for full-scale crash testing of aircraft and rotorcraft vehicles. Because the LandIR provides a unique capability to introduce impact velocities in the forward and vertical directions, it is also serving as the facility for landing tests on full-scale and sub-scale Orion spacecraft mass simulators. Recently, a three-dimensional photogrammetry system was acquired to assist with the gathering of vehicle flight data before, throughout and after the impact. This data provides the basis for the post-test analysis and data reduction. Experimental setups for pendulum swing tests on vehicles having both forward and vertical velocities can extend to 50 x 50 x 50 foot cubes, while weather, vehicle geometry, and other constraints make each experimental setup unique to each test. This paper will discuss the specific calibration techniques for large fields of views, camera and lens selection, data processing, as well as best practice techniques learned from using the large field of view photogrammetry on a multitude of crash and landing test scenarios unique to the LandIR.

  5. Phase transformation and impact properties in the experimentally simulated weld heat-affected zone of a reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Joonoh; Lee, Chang-Hoon; Lee, Tae-Ho; Jang, Min-Ho; Park, Min-Gu; Han, Heung Nam

    2014-12-01

    In this work, the phase transformation and impact properties in the weld heat-affected zone (HAZ) of a reduced activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steel are investigated. The HAZs were experimentally simulated using a Gleeble simulator. The base steel consisted of tempered martensite through normalizing at 1000 °C and tempering at 750 °C, while the HAZs consisted of martensite, δ-ferrite and a small volume of autotempered martensite. The impact properties using a Charpy V-notch impact test revealed that the HAZs showed poor impact properties due to the formation of martensite and δ-ferrite as compared with the base steel. In addition, the impact properties of the HAZs further deteriorated with an increase in the δ-ferrite fraction caused by increasing the peak temperature. The impact properties of the HAZs could be improved through the formation of tempered martensite after post weld heat treatment (PWHT), but they remained lower than that of the base steel because the δ-ferrite remained in the tempered HAZs.

  6. End-on radioisotope thermoelectric generator impact tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reimus, M. A. H.; Hinckley, J. E.

    1997-01-01

    The General-Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) provides power for space missions by transmitting the heat of 238Pu decay to an array of thermoelectric elements in a radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG). The modular GPHS design was developed to address both survivability during launch abort and return from orbit. The first two RTG Impact Tests were designed to provide information on the response of a fully loaded RTG to end-on impact against a concrete target. The results of these tests indicated that at impact velocities up to 57 m/s the converter shell and internal components protect the GPHS capsules from excessive deformation. At higher velocities, some of the internal components of the RTG interact with the GPHS capsules to cause excessive localized deformation and failure.

  7. End-on radioisotope thermoelectric generator impact tests

    SciTech Connect

    Reimus, M.A.; Hinckley, J.E.

    1997-01-01

    The General-Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) provides power for space missions by transmitting the heat of {sup 238}Pu decay to an array of thermoelectric elements in a radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG). The modular GPHS design was developed to address both survivability during launch abort and return from orbit. The first two RTG Impact Tests were designed to provide information on the response of a fully loaded RTG to end-on impact against a concrete target. The results of these tests indicated that at impact velocities up to 57 m/s the converter shell and internal components protect the GPHS capsules from excessive deformation. At higher velocities, some of the internal components of the RTG interact with the GPHS capsules to cause excessive localized deformation and failure. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  8. End-on radioisotope thermoelectric generator impact tests

    SciTech Connect

    Reimus, M.A.H.; Hhinckley, J.E.

    1997-01-01

    The General-Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) provides power for space missions by transmitting the heat of [sup 238]Pu decay to an array of thermoelectric elements in a radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG). The modular GPHS design was developed to address both survivability during launch abort and return from orbit. The first two RTG Impact Tests were designed to provide information on the response of a fully loaded RTG to end-on impact against a concrete target. The results of these tests indicated that at impact velocities up to 57 m/s the converter shell and internal components protect the GPHS capsules from excessive deformation. At higher velocities, some of the internal components of the RTG interact with the GPHS capsules to cause excessive localized deformation and failure.

  9. Taylor Impact Tests and Simulations on PBX 9501

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clements, Brad; Thompson, Darla G.; Luscher, D. J.; Deluca, Racci

    2011-06-01

    Taylor impact tests have been conducted previously on plastic bonded explosives (PBXs) to characterize the stress state of these materials as they impact smooth and flat steel anvil surfaces at speeds of ~100m/s (i.e. Christopher, et al, 11th Detonation Symposium). In 2003, C. Liu and R. Ellis (unpublished, Los Alamos National Laboratory) performed Taylor tests on PBX 9501 up to speeds of 115 m/s, capturing impact images. In the work presented here, we have extended these tests to velocities of 200 m/s using a composite-lined gun barrel and no specimen sabot. Specimen images are used to validate the thermo-mechanical constitutive model ViscoSCRAM. ViscoSCRAM has been parameterized for PBX 9501 in uniaxial stress configurations. Simulating Taylor impact experiments tests the model in situations undergoing extreme damage. In addition, experimental variations to specimen confinement and friction are introduced in an attempt to establish ignition thresholds in this velocity regime.

  10. Hypervelocity impact tests on Space Shuttle Orbiter thermal protection material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humes, D. H.

    1977-01-01

    Hypervelocity impact tests were conducted to simulate the damage that meteoroids will produce in the Shuttle Orbiter leading edge structural subsystem material. The nature and extent of the damage is reported and the probability of encountering meteoroids with sufficient energy to produce such damage is discussed.

  11. Low velocity impact testing and nondestructive evaluation of transparent materials

    SciTech Connect

    Brennan, R. E.; Green, W. H.

    2011-06-23

    Advanced transparent materials are used in protective systems for enhancing the survivability of ground vehicles, air vehicles, and personnel in applications such as face shields, riot gear, and vehicle windows. Low velocity impact damage can limit visibility and compromise the structural integrity of a transparent system, increasing the likelihood of further damage or penetration from a high velocity impact strike. For this reason, it is critical to determine damage tolerance levels of transparent systems to indicate whether or not a component should be replaced. In this study, transparent laminate systems will be tested by comparing baseline conditions to experimentally controlled damage states. Destructive testing including air gun and sphere impact testing will be used to replicate low velocity impacts in the field. Characterization of the damaged state will include basic visual inspection as well as nondestructive techniques including cross-polarization, x-ray, and ultrasound. The combination of destructive testing and characterization of the resulting damage can help to establish a damage acceptance criterion for materials used in protective systems.

  12. The effect of low dose irradiation on the impact fracture energy and tensile properties of pure iron and two ferritic martensitic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belianov, I.; Marmy, P.

    1998-10-01

    Two batches of subsize V-notched impact bend specimens and subsize tensile specimens have been irradiated in the Saphir test reactor of the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI). The first batch of specimen has been irradiated at 250°C to a dose of 2.65 × 10 19 n/cm 2 (0.042 dpa) and the second batch has been irradiated at 400°C to a dose of 8.12 × 10 19 n/cm 2 (0.13 dpa). Three different materials in three different microstructures were irradiated: pure iron and two ferritic steels, the alloy MANET 2 and a low activation composition CETA. The results of the impact tests and of the corresponding tensile tests are presented. Despite the very low neutron dose, a significant shift of the ductile to brittle transition temperature (DBTT) is observed. The influence of the test temperature on the impact energy is discussed for the irradiated and unirradiated conditions, with special emphasis on the microstructure.

  13. Vibration testing of impact-damaged composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grady, Joseph E.; Meyn, Erwin H.

    1989-01-01

    A new test is described that can be used to measure changes in the vibration properties of impact damaged composite materials. Impact-induced delamination was observed to significantly affect natural frequencies of vibration and damping properties in cross-ply graphite/epoxy laminates. Natural frequencies are shown to drop by as much as half of their original value, and modal damping ratios can increase by a factor of up to eight when large amounts of damage are present. A simple finite element model of the damaged impact specimens was used to predict the effect of delamination on certain vibration properties. A comparison of the finite element calculations with the experimental measurements suggests that delamination was the dominant mechanism of flexural stiffness loss resulting from the transverse impact.

  14. Analysis-test correlation of airbag impact for Mars landing

    SciTech Connect

    Salama, M.; Davis, G.; Kuo, C.P.

    1994-12-31

    The NASA Mars Pathfinder mission is intended to demonstrate key low cost technologies for use in future science missions to Mars. Among these technologies is the landing system. Upon entering in Martian atmosphere at about 7000 m/sec., the spacecraft will deploy a series of breaking devices (parachute and solid rockets) to slow down its speed to less than 20 m/sec. as it impacts with the Martian ground. To cushion science instruments form the landing impact, an airbag system is inflated to surround the lander approximately five seconds before impact. After multiple bounces, the lander/airbags comes to rest, the airbags are deflated and retracted, and the lander opens up its petals to allow a microrover to begin exploration. Of interest here, is the final landing phase. Specifically, this paper will focus on the methodology used to simulate the nonlinear dynamics of lander/airbags landing impact, and how this simulation correlates with initial tests.

  15. Sloshing roof impact tests of a rectangular tank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minowa, Chikahiro; Ogawa, Nobuyuki; Harada, Iki; Ma, David C.

    Some tanks have been damaged at the roofs due to sloshing impact caused by strong earthquakes. It is, therefore, necessary to consider the impact force in the aseismic design code for tank roofs. However, there are few studies on the earthquake responses of storage and process tank roofs. As a first step to investigate the effects of sloshing impact a series of the shaking table tests of a rectangular tank have been conducted at the National Research Institute for Earth Science and Disaster Prevention (NIED). The results of these shaking table tests are presented in the paper. The test tank is rectangular in shape having dimensions of 5 m x 3 m x 2 m (length x width x height). The tank was constructed of glass-fiber reinforced plastic panels. Every panel had a flange on four edges, and each panel was connected by bolts along the flange. The test tank was set on the NIED shaking table (15 m by 15 m). Two types of liquid were used, water and a viscous liquid (water mixed with polymeric powders). The roof impact pressures and other quantities were measured. During the tests using the 400 pi El-Centro excitation, the roof deformation sensor steel beam was damaged. The response of side walls with different rigidity were measured in the wall bulging tests. The measured vibrations within the panel plates were larger than those in the panel flanges. The viscous liquid of 100 cp had little influence on wall bulging responses. However, the viscous effects on sloshing responses were observed in the sloshing tests. Approximate analyses of rectangular tanks, considering the influence of static water pressure, are also presented in this paper.

  16. Sloshing roof impact tests of a rectangular tank

    SciTech Connect

    Minowa, C.; Ogawa, N.; Harada, I.; Ma, D.C.

    1994-06-01

    Some tanks have been damaged at the roofs due to sloshing impact caused by strong earthquakes. It is, therefore, necessary to consider the impact force in the aseismic design code for tank roofs. However, there are few studies on the earthquake responses of storage and process tank roofs. As a first step to investigate the effects of sloshing impact a series of the shaking table tests of a rectangular tank have been conducted at the National Research Institute for Earth Science and Disaster Prevention (NIED). The results of these shaking table tests are presented in the paper. The test tank is rectangular in shape having dimensions of 5 m {times} 3 m {times} 2 m length {times} width {times} height). The tank was constructed of glass-fiber reinforced plastic panels. Every panel had a flange on four edges, and each panel was connected by bolts along the flange. The test tank was set on the NIED shaking table (15 m by 15 m). Two types of liquid were used, water and a viscous liquid (water mixed with polymeric powders). The roof impact pressures and other quantities were measured. During the tests using the 400 pi El-Centro excitation, the roof deformation sensor steel beam was damaged. The response of side walls with different rigidity were measured in the wall bulging tests. The measured vibrations within the panel plates were larger than those in the panel flanges. The viscous liquid of 100 cp had little influence on wall bulging responses. However, the viscous effects on sloshing responses were observed in the sloshing tests. Approximate analyses of rectangular tanks, considering the influence of static water pressure, are also presented in this paper.

  17. The psychological impact of genetic testing for Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Coon, D W; Davies, H; McKibben, C; Gallagher-Thompson, D

    1999-01-01

    Information regarding one's genetic risk for a particular disease might effectively inform medical, financial, and reproductive decisions and perhaps promote established risk reduction behaviors. However, genetic testing may also lead to significant levels of anxiety, depression, or other forms of distress, especially when psychological coping strategies and social reserves are not adequate to manage positive or inconclusive results. This paper focuses on the psychological impact of predisposition genetic for Alzheimer disease (AD). We present stress and coping models that capture the essence of this impact and discuss the potential role of counseling and follow-up interventions. The discussion draws primarily from the experiences of professionals working with other diseases, and seeks to expand that experience into the AD arena. In addition, we emphasize two issues we believe need additional attention in the psychological literature regarding genetic testing and counseling: (i) the psychosocial vulnerability of individuals being tested and, (ii) the sociocultural context of the AD patient and their family members. PMID:10464586

  18. Impact Tensile Testing of Stainless Steels at Various Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    D. K. Morton

    2008-03-01

    Stainless steels are used for the construction of numerous spent nuclear fuel or radioactive material containers that may be subjected to high strains and moderate strain rates during accidental drop events. Mechanical characteristics of these base materials and their welds under dynamic loads in the strain rate range of concern (1 to 300 per second) are not well documented. However, research is being performed at the Idaho National Laboratory to quantify these characteristics. The work presented herein discusses tensile impact testing of dual-marked 304/304L and 316/316L stainless steel material specimens. Both base material and welded material specimens were tested at -20 oF, room temperature, 300 oF, and 600 oF conditions. Utilizing a drop weight impact test machine and 1/4-inch and 1/2-inch thick dog bone-shaped test specimens, a strain rate range of approximately 4 to 40 per second (depending on initial temperature conditions) was achieved. Factors were determined that reflect the amount of increased strain energy the material can absorb due to strain rate effects. Using the factors, elevated true stress-strain curves for these materials at various strain rates and temperatures were generated. By incorporating the strain rate elevated true stress-strain material curves into an inelastic finite element computer program as the defined material input, significant improvement in the accuracy of the computer analyses was attained. However, additional impact testing is necessary to achieve higher strain rates (up to 300 per second) before complete definition of strain rate effects can be made for accidental drop events and other similar energy-limited impulsive loads. This research approach, using impact testing and a total energy analysis methodology to quantify strain rate effects, can be applied to many other materials used in government and industry.

  19. Program for impact testing of spar-shell fan blades, test report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ravenhall, R.; Salemme, C. T.

    1978-01-01

    Six filament-wound, composite spar-shell fan blades were impact tested in a whirligig relative to foreign object damage resulting from ingestion of birds into the fan blades of a QCSEE-type engine. Four of the blades were tested by injecting a simulated two pound bird into the path of the rotating blade and two were tested by injecting a starling into the path of the blade.

  20. Impact testing of simulated high-level waste glass canisters

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, M.E.; Alzheimer, J.M.; Slate, S.C.

    1985-01-01

    Three Savannah River Laboratory reference high-level waste canisters were subjected to impact tests at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory in Richland, Washington, in June 1983. The purpose of the test was to determine the integrity of the canister, nozzle, and final closure weld and to assess the effects of impacts on the glass. Two of the canisters were fabricated from 304L stainless steel and the third canister from titanium. The titanium canister was subjected to two drops. The first drop was vertical from 9.14 m onto an unyielding surface with the bottom corner of the canister receiving the impact. No failure occurred during this drop. The second drop was vertical from 9.14 m onto an unyielding surface with the corner of the fill nozzle receiving the impact. A large breach in the canister occurred in the region where the fill nozzle joins the dished head. The first stainless steel canister was dropped with the corner of the fill nozzle receiving the impact. The canister showed significant strain with no rupturing in the region where the fill nozzle joins the dished head. The second canister was dropped with the bottom corner receiving the impact and also, dropped horizontally onto an unyielding vertical solid steel cylinder in a puncture test. The bottom drop did not damage the weld and the puncture test did not rupture the canister body. The glass particles in the damaged zone of these canisters were sampled and analyzed for particle size. A comparison was made with control canister in which no impact had occurred. The particle size distribution for the control canisters and the zones of damaged glass were determined down to 1.5 ..mu..m. The quantity of glass fines, smaller than 10 ..mu..m, which must be determined for transportation safety studies, was found to be the largest in the bottom-damaged zone. The total amount of fines smaller than 10 ..mu..m after impact was less than 0.01 wt % of the total amount of glass in the canister.

  1. Space Shuttle Main Engine Debris Testing Methodology and Impact Tolerances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gradl, Paul R.; Stephens, Walter

    2005-01-01

    In the wake of the Space Shuttle Columbia disaster every effort is being made to determine the susceptibility of Space Shuttle elements to debris impacts. Ice and frost debris is formed around the aft heat shield closure of the orbiter and liquid hydrogen feedlines. This debris has been observed to liberate upon lift-off of the shuttle and presents potentially dangerous conditions to the Space Shuttle Main Engine. This paper describes the testing done to determine the impact tolerance of the Space Shuttle Main Engine nozzle coolant tubes to ice strikes originating from the launch pad or other parts of the shuttle.

  2. Hypervelocity Impact Test Facility: A gun for hire

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Calvin R.; Rose, M. F.; Hill, D. C.; Best, S.; Chaloupka, T.; Crawford, G.; Crumpler, M.; Stephens, B.

    1994-01-01

    An affordable technique has been developed to duplicate the types of impacts observed on spacecraft, including the Shuttle, by use of a certified Hypervelocity Impact Facility (HIF) which propels particulates using capacitor driven electric gun techniques. The fully operational facility provides a flux of particles in the 10-100 micron diameter range with a velocity distribution covering the space debris and interplanetary dust particle environment. HIF measurements of particle size, composition, impact angle and velocity distribution indicate that such parameters can be controlled in a specified, tailored test designed for or by the user. Unique diagnostics enable researchers to fully describe the impact for evaluating the 'targets' under full power or load. Users regularly evaluate space hardware, including solar cells, coatings, and materials, exposing selected portions of space-qualified items to a wide range of impact events and environmental conditions. Benefits include corroboration of data obtained from impact events, flight simulation of designs, accelerated aging of systems, and development of manufacturing techniques.

  3. High-pressure oxygen test evaluations. [impact tests/metals - space shuttles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwinghamer, R. J.; Key, C. F.

    1974-01-01

    The relevance of impact sensitivity testing to the development of the space shuttle main engine is discussed in the light of the special requirements for the engine. The background and history of the evolution of liquid and gaseous oxygen testing techniques and philosophy is discussed also. The parameters critical to reliable testing are treated in considerable detail, and test apparatus and procedures are described and discussed. Materials threshold sensitivity determination procedures are considered and a decision logic diagram for sensitivity threshold determination was plotted. Finally, high-pressure materials sensitivity test data are given for selected metallic and nonmetallic materials.

  4. Simulated hail impact testing of photovoltaic solar panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, D.; Wilson, A.; Ross, R.

    1978-01-01

    Techniques used to simulate and study the effect of hail on photovoltaic solar panels are described. Simulated hail stones (frozen ice spheres projected at terminal velocity) or steel balls were applied by air guns, gravity drop, or static loading. Tests with simulated hail and steel balls yielded different results. The impact strength of 10 commercially available flat-plate photovoltaic modules was tested. It was found that none of the six panel designs incorporating clear potting silicone material as the outermost layer remained undamaged by 1-in. simulated hailstones, while a photovoltaic module equipped with a 0.188-in.-thick acrylic cover sheet would be able to withstand the impact of a 2-in.-diameter hailstone.

  5. Radioisotope thermoelectric generator/thin fragment impact test

    SciTech Connect

    Reimus, M. A. H.; Hinckley, J. E.

    1998-01-15

    The General-Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) provides power for space missions by transmitting the heat of {sup 238}Pu decay to an array of thermoelectric elements in a radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG). Because the potential for a launch abort or return from orbit exists for any space mission, the heat source response to credible accident scenarios is being evaluated. This test was designed to provide information on the response of a loaded RTG to impact by a fragment similar to the type of fragment produced by breakup of the spacecraft propulsion module system (PMS). The results of this test indicated that impact of the RTG by a thin aluminum fragment traveling at 306 m/s may result in significant damage to the converter housing, failure of one fueled clad, and release of a small quantity of fuel.

  6. Radioisotope thermoelectric generator/thin fragment impact test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reimus, M. A. H.; Hinckley, J. E.

    1998-01-01

    The General-Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) provides power for space missions by transmitting the heat of 238Pu decay to an array of thermoelectric elements in a radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG). Because the potential for a launch abort or return from orbit exists for any space mission, the heat source response to credible accident scenarios is being evaluated. This test was designed to provide information on the response of a loaded RTG to impact by a fragment similar to the type of fragment produced by breakup of the spacecraft propulsion module system (PMS). The results of this test indicated that impact of the RTG by a thin aluminum fragment traveling at 306 m/s may result in significant damage to the converter housing, failure of one fueled clad, and release of a small quantity of fuel.

  7. Radioisotope thermoelectric generator/thin fragment impact test

    SciTech Connect

    Reimus, M.A.; Hinckley, J.E.

    1998-01-01

    The General-Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) provides power for space missions by transmitting the heat of {sup 238}Pu decay to an array of thermoelectric elements in a radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG). Because the potential for a launch abort or return from orbit exists for any space mission, the heat source response to credible accident scenarios is being evaluated. This test was designed to provide information on the response of a loaded RTG to impact by a fragment similar to the type of fragment produced by breakup of the spacecraft propulsion module system (PMS). The results of this test indicated that impact of the RTG by a thin aluminum fragment traveling at 306 m/s may result in significant damage to the converter housing, failure of one fueled clad, and release of a small quantity of fuel. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  8. Radioisotope thermoelectric generator/thin fragment impact test

    SciTech Connect

    Reimus, M.A.H.; Hinckley, J.E.

    1998-12-31

    The General-Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) provides power for space missions by transmitting the heat of {sup 238}Pu decay to an array of thermoelectric elements in a radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG). Because the potential for a launch abort or return from orbit exists for any space mission, the heat source response to credible accident scenarios is being evaluated. This test was designed to provide information on the response of a loaded RTG to impact by a fragment similar to the type of fragment produced by breakup of the spacecraft propulsion module system (PMS). The results of this test indicated that impact of the RTG by a thin aluminum fragment traveling at 306 m/s may result in significant damage to the convertor housing, failure of one fueled clad, and release of a small quantity of fuel.

  9. Data Reduction and Its Impact on Test-Analysis Correlation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyle, Karen H.; Bark, Lindley W.

    2001-01-01

    A research project has been initiated to improve crash test and analysis correlation. The research has focused on two specimen types: simple metallic beams and plates; and a representative composite fuselage section. Impact tests were performed under carefully controlled conditions. In addition, the specimens were densely instrumented to enable not only correlation with finite element simulations, but to also assess the repeatability of the data. Simulations utilizing a detailed finite element model were executed in a nonlinear transient dynamic code. The results presented in this paper concentrate on the effect of several data reduction processes, to include filtering frequency and sampling rate, on the correlation accuracy.

  10. Charpy impact test results for low-activation ferritic alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Cannon, N.S.; Hu, W.L.; Gelles, D.S.

    1987-05-01

    The objective of this work is to evaluate the shift of the ductile to brittle transition temperature (DBTT) and the reduction of the upper shelf energy (USE) due to neutron irradiation of low activation ferritic alloys. Six low activation ferritic alloys have been tested following irradiation at 365/sup 0/C to 10 dpa and compared with control specimens in order to assess the effect of irradiation on Charpy impact properties.

  11. West Valley Demonstration Project full-scale canister impact tests

    SciTech Connect

    Whittington, K.F.; Alzheimer, J.M.; Lutz, C.E.

    1995-09-01

    Five West Valley Nuclear Services (WVNS) high-level waste (HLW) canisters were impact tested during 1994 to demonstrate compliance with the drop test requirements of the Waste Acceptance Product Specifications. The specifications state that the canistered waste form must be able to survive a 7{minus}m (23 ft) drop unbreached. The 10-gauge (0.125 in. wall thickness) stainless steel canisters were approximately 85% filled with simulated vitrified waste and weighed about 2100 kg (4600 lb). Each canister was dropped vertically from a height of 7 m (23 ft) onto an essentially unyielding surface. The integrity of the canister was determined by the application and analysis of strain circles, dimensional measurements, and helium leak testing. The canisters were also visually inspected before and after the drop for physical damage. The results of the impact test verify that the canisters survived the 7{minus}m drops unbreached. Therefore, these results demonstrate that the reference canister meets the drop test specification of the Waste Acceptance Product Specification.

  12. Arcjet Testing of Micro-Meteoroid Impacted Thermal Protection Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agrawal, Parul; Munk, Michelle M.; Glaab, Louis J.

    2013-01-01

    There are several harsh space environments that could affect thermal protection systems and in turn pose risks to the atmospheric entry vehicles. These environments include micrometeoroid impact, extreme cold temperatures, and ionizing radiation during deep space cruise, all followed by atmospheric entry heating. To mitigate these risks, different thermal protection material samples were subjected to multiple tests, including hyper velocity impact, cold soak, irradiation, and arcjet testing, at various NASA facilities that simulated these environments. The materials included a variety of honeycomb packed ablative materials as well as carbon-based non-ablative thermal protection systems. The present paper describes the results of the multiple test campaign with a focus on arcjet testing of thermal protection materials. The tests showed promising results for ablative materials. However, the carbon-based non-ablative system presented some concerns regarding the potential risks to an entry vehicle. This study provides valuable information regarding the capability of various thermal protection materials to withstand harsh space environments, which is critical to sample return and planetary entry missions.

  13. Understanding the impact of genetic testing for inherited retinal dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Combs, Ryan; McAllister, Marion; Payne, Katherine; Lowndes, Jo; Devery, Sophie; Webster, Andrew R; Downes, Susan M; Moore, Anthony T; Ramsden, Simon; Black, Graeme; Hall, Georgina

    2013-11-01

    The capability of genetic technologies is expanding rapidly in the field of inherited eye disease. New genetic testing approaches will deliver a step change in the ability to diagnose and extend the possibility of targeted treatments. However, evidence is lacking about the benefits of genetic testing to support service planning. Here, we report qualitative data about retinal dystrophy families' experiences of genetic testing in United Kingdom. The data were part of a wider study examining genetic eye service provision. Twenty interviewees from families in which a causative mutation had been identified by a genetic eye clinic were recruited to the study. Fourteen interviewees had chosen to have a genetic test and five had not; one was uncertain. In-depth telephone interviews were conducted allowing a thorough exploration of interviewees' views and experiences of the benefits of genetic counselling and testing. Transcripts were analysed using thematic analysis. Both affected and unaffected interviewees expressed mainly positive views about genetic testing, highlighting benefits such as diagnostic confirmation, risk information, and better preparation for the future. Negative consequences included the burden of knowledge, moral dilemmas around reproduction, and potential impact on insurance. The offer of genetic testing was often taken up, but was felt unnecessary in some cases. Interviewees in the study reported many benefits, suggesting genetic testing should be available to this patient group. The benefits and risks identified will inform future evaluation of models of service delivery. This research was part of a wider study exploring experiences of families with retinal dystrophy. PMID:23403902

  14. Sand Impact Tests of a Half-Scale Crew Module Boilerplate Test Article

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vassilakos, Gregory J.; Hardy, Robin C.

    2012-01-01

    Although the Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV) is being designed primarily for water landings, a further investigation of launch abort scenarios reveals the possibility of an onshore landing at Kennedy Space Center (KSC). To gather data for correlation against simulations of beach landing impacts, a series of sand impact tests were conducted at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC). Both vertical drop tests and swing tests with combined vertical and horizontal velocity were performed onto beds of common construction-grade sand using a geometrically scaled crew module boilerplate test article. The tests were simulated using the explicit, nonlinear, transient dynamic finite element code LS-DYNA. The material models for the sand utilized in the simulations were based on tests of sand specimens. Although the LSDYNA models provided reasonable predictions for peak accelerations, they were not always able to track the response through the duration of the impact. Further improvements to the material model used for the sand were identified based on results from the sand specimen tests.

  15. Machine for development impact tests in sports seats and similar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonçalves, R. M.

    2015-10-01

    This paper describes the stages of development of a machine to perform impact tests in sport seats, seats for spectators and multiple seats. This includes reviews and recommendations for testing laboratories that have needs similar to the laboratory where unfolded this process.The machine was originally developed seeking to meet certain impact tests in accordance with the NBR15925 standards; 15878 and 16031. The process initially included the study of the rules and the election of the tests for which the machine could be developed and yet all reports and outcome of interaction with service providers and raw materials.For operating facility, it was necessary to set entirely the machine control, which included the concept of dialogue with operator, the design of the menu screens and the procedures for submission and registration of results. To ensure reliability in the process, the machine has been successfully calibrated according to the requirements of the Brazilian network of calibration.The criticism to this enterprise covers the technical and economic aspects involved and points out the main obstacles that were needed to overcome.

  16. Single and multiple impact ignition of new and aged high explosives in the Steven Impact Test

    SciTech Connect

    Chidester, S K; DePiero, A H; Garza, R G; Tarver, C M

    1999-06-01

    Threshold impact velocities for ignition of exothermic reaction were determined for several new and aged HMX-based solid high explosives using three types of projectiles in the Steven Test. Multiple impact threshold velocities were found to be approximately 10% lower in damaged charges that did not react in one or more prior impacts. Projectiles with protrusions that concentrate the friction work in a small volume of explosive reduced the threshold velocities by approximately 30%. Flat projectiles required nearly twice as high velocities for ignition as rounded projectiles. Blast overpressure gauges were used for both pristine and damaged charges to quantitatively measure reaction violence. Reactive flow calculations of single and multiple impacts with various projectiles suggest that the ignition rates double in damaged charges.

  17. Testing and simulation of composite laminates under impact loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dang, Xinglai

    Owing to their high stiffness-to-weight and high strength-to-weight ratios, fiber-reinforced polymer-matrix composite laminates are excellent materials for high-performance structures. However, their properties in the thickness direction are very poor as they are weakly bonded by polymeric matrices through laminate interfaces. Accordingly, when a composite laminate is subjected to impact loading, high interlaminar stresses along with the low interlaminar strengths could easily result in interlaminar damage such as delamination. This thesis investigated the response of composite laminates under low-velocity impact and presented numerical techniques for impact simulation. To begin with, instrumented drop-weight impacts ranging from subperforation to perforation levels were introduced to composite laminates having various dimensions and thicknesses. Damaged composite laminates were then subjected to compression-after-impact tests for evaluations of residual properties. Experimental results revealed that perforation was an important damage milestone since impact parameters such as peak force, contact duration, maximum deflection and energy absorption, and residual properties such as compressive stiffness, strength and energy absorption all reached critical levels as perforation took place. It was also found that thickness played a more important role than in-plane dimensions in perforation process. In order to understand more about the relationship between laminate thickness and perforation resistance and to present an economical method to improve perforation resistance, thick laminated composite plates and their assembled counterparts were investigated and compared. An energy profile correlating the impact energy and absorbed energy at all energy levels for each type of composite plates investigated was established and found to be able to address the relationship between energy and damage. Experimental results concluded that increasing thickness was more efficient

  18. The influence of copper precipitation and plastic deformation hardening on the impact-transition temperature of rolled structural steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aróztegui, Juan J.; Urcola, José J.; Fuentes, Manuel

    1989-09-01

    Commercial electric arc melted low-carbon steels, provided as I beams, were characterized both microstructurally and mechanically in the as-rolled, copper precipitation, and plastically pre-deformed conditions. Inclusion size distribution, ferrite grain size, pearlite volume fraction, precipitated volume fraction of copper, and size distribution of these precipitates were deter-mined by conventional quantitative optical and electron metallographic techniques. From the tensile tests conducted at a strain rate of 10-3 s-1 and impact Charpy V-notched tests carried out, stress/strain curves, yield stress, and impact-transition temperature were obtained. The spe-cific fractographic features of the fracture surfaces also were quantitatively characterized. The increases in yield stress and transition temperature experienced upon either aging or work hard-ening were related through empirical relationships. These dependences were analyzed semi-quantitatively by combining microscopic and macroscopic fracture criteria based on measured fundamental properties (fracture stress and yield stress) and observed fractographic parameters (crack nucleation distance and nuclei size). The rationale developed from these fracture criteria allows the semiquantitative prediction of the temperature transition shifts produced upon aging and work hardening. The values obtained are of the right order of magnitude.

  19. Estimating the Impacts of Educational Interventions Using State Tests or Study-Administered Tests. NCEE 2012-4016

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olsen, Robert B.; Unlu, Fatih; Price, Cristofer; Jaciw, Andrew P.

    2011-01-01

    This report examines the differences in impact estimates and standard errors that arise when these are derived using state achievement tests only (as pre-tests and post-tests), study-administered tests only, or some combination of state- and study-administered tests. State tests may yield different evaluation results relative to a test that is…

  20. Cycom 977-2 Composite Material: Impact Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engel, Carl D.; Herald, Stephen; Watkins, Casey

    2005-01-01

    The reaction frequency data from 13A testing by MSFC and WSTF appear well behaved for the sample number used by each and exhibit the same type of energy level dependency. The reaction frequency shift in energy level is unexplained at this time. All the 13A data suggest that only a small amount of material is consumed when reactions take place. At ambient pressure, most of not all reactions are quenched as indicated by the small mass loss. As test pressure is increased in LOX using 13B results. Cycom does not support initiation of reactions or propagations of reactions in GOX at 100 psis based on tests at MSFC and WSTF at 72 ft-lb impact energy. No batch effect was identified in LOX or GOX.

  1. Application of subsize specimens in nuclear plant life extension

    SciTech Connect

    Rosinski, S.T.; Kumar, A.S.; Cannon, S.C.; Hamilton, M.L.

    1991-12-31

    The US Department of Energy is sponsoring a research effort through Sandia National Laboratories and the University of Missour-Rolla to test a correlation for the upper shelf energy (USE) values obtained from the impact testing of subsize Charpy V-notch specimens to those obtained from the testing of full size samples. The program involves the impact testing of unirradiated and irradiated full, half, and third size Charpy V-notch specimens. To verify the applicability of the correlation on LWR materials unirradiated and irradiated full, half, and third size Charpy V-notch specimens of a commercial pressure vessel steel (ASTM A533 Grade B) will be tested. This paper will provide details of the program and present results obtained from the application of the developed correlation methodology to the impact testing of the unirradiated full, half, and third size A533 Grade B Charpy V-notch specimens.

  2. Application of subsize specimens in nuclear plant life extension

    SciTech Connect

    Rosinski, S.T. ); Kumar, A.S. ); Cannon, S.C. ); Hamilton, M.L. )

    1991-01-01

    The US Department of Energy is sponsoring a research effort through Sandia National Laboratories and the University of Missour-Rolla to test a correlation for the upper shelf energy (USE) values obtained from the impact testing of subsize Charpy V-notch specimens to those obtained from the testing of full size samples. The program involves the impact testing of unirradiated and irradiated full, half, and third size Charpy V-notch specimens. To verify the applicability of the correlation on LWR materials unirradiated and irradiated full, half, and third size Charpy V-notch specimens of a commercial pressure vessel steel (ASTM A533 Grade B) will be tested. This paper will provide details of the program and present results obtained from the application of the developed correlation methodology to the impact testing of the unirradiated full, half, and third size A533 Grade B Charpy V-notch specimens.

  3. A Blind Test of the Younger Dryas Impact Hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Holliday, Vance; Surovell, Todd; Johnson, Eileen

    2016-01-01

    The Younger Dryas Impact Hypothesis (YDIH) states that North America was devastated by some sort of extraterrestrial event ~12,800 calendar years before present. Two fundamental questions persist in the debate over the YDIH: Can the results of analyses for purported impact indicators be reproduced? And are the indicators unique to the lower YD boundary (YDB), i.e., ~12.8k cal yrs BP? A test reported here presents the results of analyses that address these questions. Two different labs analyzed identical splits of samples collected at, above, and below the ~12.8ka zone at the Lubbock Lake archaeological site (LL) in northwest Texas. Both labs reported similar variation in levels of magnetic micrograins (>300 mg/kg >12.8ka and <11.5ka, but <150 mg/kg 12.8ka to 11.5ka). Analysis for magnetic microspheres in one split, reported elsewhere, produced very low to nonexistent levels throughout the section. In the other split, reported here, the levels of magnetic microspherules and nanodiamonds are low or nonexistent at, below, and above the YDB with the notable exception of a sample <11,500 cal years old. In that sample the claimed impact proxies were recovered at abundances two to four orders of magnitude above that from the other samples. Reproducibility of at least some analyses are problematic. In particular, no standard criteria exist for identification of magnetic spheres. Moreover, the purported impact proxies are not unique to the YDB. PMID:27391147

  4. A Blind Test of the Younger Dryas Impact Hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Holliday, Vance

    2016-01-01

    The Younger Dryas Impact Hypothesis (YDIH) states that North America was devastated by some sort of extraterrestrial event ~12,800 calendar years before present. Two fundamental questions persist in the debate over the YDIH: Can the results of analyses for purported impact indicators be reproduced? And are the indicators unique to the lower YD boundary (YDB), i.e., ~12.8k cal yrs BP? A test reported here presents the results of analyses that address these questions. Two different labs analyzed identical splits of samples collected at, above, and below the ~12.8ka zone at the Lubbock Lake archaeological site (LL) in northwest Texas. Both labs reported similar variation in levels of magnetic micrograins (>300 mg/kg >12.8ka and <11.5ka, but <150 mg/kg 12.8ka to 11.5ka). Analysis for magnetic microspheres in one split, reported elsewhere, produced very low to nonexistent levels throughout the section. In the other split, reported here, the levels of magnetic microspherules and nanodiamonds are low or nonexistent at, below, and above the YDB with the notable exception of a sample <11,500 cal years old. In that sample the claimed impact proxies were recovered at abundances two to four orders of magnitude above that from the other samples. Reproducibility of at least some analyses are problematic. In particular, no standard criteria exist for identification of magnetic spheres. Moreover, the purported impact proxies are not unique to the YDB. PMID:27391147

  5. An assessment of testing requirement impacts on nuclear thermal propulsion ground test facility design

    SciTech Connect

    Shipers, L.R.; Ottinger, C.A.; Sanchez, L.C.

    1993-10-25

    Programs to develop solid core nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) systems have been under way at the Department of Defense (DoD), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), and the Department of Energy (DOE). These programs have recognized the need for a new ground test facility to support development of NTP systems. However, the different military and civilian applications have led to different ground test facility requirements. The Department of Energy (DOE) in its role as landlord and operator of the proposed research reactor test facilities has initiated an effort to explore opportunities for a common ground test facility to meet both DoD and NASA needs. The baseline design and operating limits of the proposed DoD NTP ground test facility are described. The NASA ground test facility requirements are reviewed and their potential impact on the DoD facility baseline is discussed.

  6. Impact of Laboratory Test Use Strategies in a Turkish Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Yılmaz, Fatma Meriç; Kahveci, Rabia; Aksoy, Altan; Özer Kucuk, Emine; Akın, Tezcan; Mathew, Joseph Lazar; Meads, Catherine; Zengin, Nurullah

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Eliminating unnecessary laboratory tests is a good way to reduce costs while maintain patient safety. The aim of this study was to define and process strategies to rationalize laboratory use in Ankara Numune Training and Research Hospital (ANH) and calculate potential savings in costs. Methods A collaborative plan was defined by hospital managers; joint meetings with ANHTA and laboratory professors were set; the joint committee invited relevant staff for input, and a laboratory efficiency committee was created. Literature was reviewed systematically to identify strategies used to improve laboratory efficiency. Strategies that would be applicable in local settings were identified for implementation, processed, and the impact on clinical use and costs assessed for 12 months. Results Laboratory use in ANH differed enormously among clinics. Major use was identified in internal medicine. The mean number of tests per patient was 15.8. Unnecessary testing for chloride, folic acid, free prostate specific antigen, hepatitis and HIV testing were observed. Test panel use was pinpointed as the main cause of overuse of the laboratory and the Hospital Information System test ordering page was reorganized. A significant decrease (between 12.6–85.0%) was observed for the tests that were taken to an alternative page on the computer screen. The one year study saving was equivalent to 371,183 US dollars. Conclusion Hospital-based committees including laboratory professionals and clinicians can define hospital based problems and led to a standardized approach to test use that can help clinicians reduce laboratory costs through appropriate use of laboratory tests. PMID:27077653

  7. Impact properties of irradiated HT9 from the fuel duct of FFTF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byun, Thak Sang; Daniel Lewis, W.; Toloczko, Mychailo B.; Maloy, Stuart A.

    2012-02-01

    This paper reports Charpy impact test data for the ACO-3 duct material (HT9) from the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) and its archive material. Irradiation doses for the specimens were in the range of 3-148 dpa and irradiation temperatures in the range of 378-504 °C. The impact tests were performed for the small V-notched Charpy specimens with dimensions of 3 × 4 × 27 mm at an impact speed of 3.2 m/s in a 25 J capacity machine. Irradiation lowered the upper-shelf energy (USE) and increased the transition temperatures significantly. The shift of ductile-brittle transition temperatures (ΔDBTT) was greater after relatively low temperature irradiation. The USE values were in the range of 5.5-6.7 J before irradiation and decreased to the range of 2-5 J after irradiation. Lower USEs were measured for lower irradiation temperatures and specimens with T-L orientation. The dose dependences of transition temperature and USE were not significant because of the radiation effect on impact behavior nearly saturated at the lowest dose of about 3 dpa. A comparison showed that the lateral expansion of specimens showed a linear correlation with absorbed impact energy, but with large scatter in the results. Size effect was also discussed to clarify the differences in the impact property data from subsize and standard specimens as well as to provide a basis for comparison of data from different specimens. The USE and ΔDBTT data from different studies were compared.

  8. Impact properties of irradiated HT9 from the fuel duct of FFTF

    SciTech Connect

    Byun, Thak Sang; Lewis, W. Daniel; Toloczko, Mychailo B.; Maloy, Stuart A.

    2012-02-01

    This paper reports Charpy impact test data for the ACO-3 duct material (HT9) from the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) and its archive material. Irradiation doses for the specimens were in the range of 3– 148 dpa and irradiation temperatures in the range of 378–504 *C. The impact tests were performed for the small V-notched Charpy specimens with dimensions of 3 * 4 * 27 mm at an impact speed of 3.2 m/s in a 25 J capacity machine. Irradiation lowered the upper-shelf energy (USE) and increased the transition temperatures significantly. The shift of ductile–brittle transition temperatures (DDBTT) was greater after relatively low temperature irradiation. The USE values were in the range of 5.5–6.7 J before irradiation and decreased to the range of 2–5 J after irradiation. Lower USEs were measured for lower irradiation temperatures and specimens with T-L orientation. The dose dependences of transition temperature and USE were not significant because of the radiation effect on impact behavior nearly saturated at the lowest dose of about 3 dpa. A comparison showed that the lateral expansion of specimens showed a linear correlation with absorbed impact energy, but with large scatter in the results. Size effect was also discussed to clarify the differences in the impact property data from subsize and standard specimens as well as to provide a basis for comparison of data from different specimens. The USE and DDBTT data from different studies were compared.

  9. How Close Is Close Enough? Testing Nonexperimental Estimates of Impact against Experimental Estimates of Impact with Education Test Scores as Outcomes. Discussion Paper No. 1242-02

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilde, Elizabeth Ty; Hollister, Robinson

    2002-01-01

    In this study we test the performance of some nonexperimental estimators of impacts applied to an educational intervention--reduction in class size--where achievement test scores were the outcome. We compare the nonexperimental estimates of the impacts to "true impact" estimates provided by a random-assignment design used to assess the…

  10. How Close Is Close Enough? Testing Nonexperimental Estimates of Impact against Experimental Estimates of Impact with Education Test Scores as Outcomes. Discussion Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilde, Elizabeth Ty; Hollister, Robinson

    This study tested the performance of nonexperimental estimators of impacts applied to a class size reduction intervention with achievement test scores as the outcome. Nonexperimental estimates of impacts were compared to "true impact" estimates provided by a random-assignment design that assessed intervention effects. Data came from Project STAR,…

  11. Dynamic Open-Rotor Composite Shield Impact Test Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seng, Silvia; Frankenberger, Charles; Ruggeri, Charles R.; Revilock, Duane M.; Pereira, J. Michael; Carney, Kelly S.; Emmerling, William C.

    2015-01-01

    The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is working with the European Aviation Safety Agency to determine the certification base for proposed new engines that would not have a containment structure on large commercial aircraft. Equivalent safety to the current fleet is desired by the regulators, which means that loss of a single fan blade will not cause hazard to the aircraft. NASA Glenn and Naval Air Warfare Center (NAWC) China Lake collaborated with the FAA Aircraft Catastrophic Failure Prevention Program to design and test a shield that would protect the aircraft passengers and critical systems from a released blade that could impact the fuselage. This report documents the live-fire test from a full-scale rig at NAWC China Lake. NASA provided manpower and photogrammetry expertise to document the impact and damage to the shields. The test was successful: the blade was stopped from penetrating the shield, which validates the design analysis method and the parameters used in the analysis. Additional work is required to implement the shielding into the aircraft.

  12. Dynamic Impact Analyses and Tests of Concrete Overpacks - 13638

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sanghoon; Cho, Sang-Soon; Kim, Ki-Young; Jeon, Je-Eon; Seo, Ki-Seog

    2013-07-01

    Concrete cask is an option for spent nuclear fuel interim storage which is prevailingly used in US. A concrete cask usually consists of metallic canister which confines the spent nuclear fuel and concrete overpack. When the overpack undergoes a severe missile impact which might be caused by a tornado or an aircraft crash, it should sustain acceptable level of structural integrity so that its radiation shielding capability and the retrievability of canister are maintained. Missile impact against a concrete overpack involves two damage modes, local damage and global damage. Local damage of concrete is usually evaluated by empirical formulas while the global damage is evaluated by finite element analysis. In many cases, those two damage modes are evaluated separately. In this research, a series of numerical simulations are performed using finite element analysis to evaluate the global damage of concrete overpack as well as its local damage under high speed missile impact. We consider two types of concrete overpack, one with steel in-cased concrete without reinforcement and the other with partially-confined reinforced concrete. The numerical simulation results are compared with test results and it is shown that appropriate modeling of material failure is crucial in this analysis and the results are highly dependent on the choice of failure parameters. (authors)

  13. Controlled Impact Demonstration instrumented test dummies installed in plane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    In this photograph are seen some of dummies in the passenger cabin of the B-720 aircraft. NASA Langley Research Center instrumented a large portion of the aircraft and the dummies for loads in a crashworthiness research program. In 1984 NASA Dryden Flight Research Facility and the Federal Aviation Adimistration (FAA) teamed-up in a unique flight experiment called the Controlled Impact Demonstration (CID). The test involved crashing a Boeing 720 aircraft with four JT3C-7 engines burning a mixture of standard fuel with an additive called Anti-misting Kerosene (AMK) designed to supress fire. In a typical aircraft crash, fuel spilled from ruptured fuel tanks forms a fine mist that can be ignited by a number of sources at the crash site. In 1984 the NASA Dryden Flight Research Facility (after 1994 a full-fledged Center again) and the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) teamed-up in a unique flight experiment called the Controlled Impact Demonstration (CID), to test crash a Boeing 720 aircraft using standard fuel with an additive designed to supress fire. The additive, FM-9, a high-molecular-weight long-chain polymer, when blended with Jet-A fuel had demonstrated the capability to inhibit ignition and flame propagation of the released fuel in simulated crash tests. This anti-misting kerosene (AMK) cannot be introduced directly into a gas turbine engine due to several possible problems such as clogging of filters. The AMK must be restored to almost Jet-A before being introduced into the engine for burning. This restoration is called 'degradation' and was accomplished on the B-720 using a device called a 'degrader.' Each of the four Pratt & Whitney JT3C-7 engines had a 'degrader' built and installed by General Electric (GE) to break down and return the AMK to near Jet-A quality. In addition to the AMK research the NASA Langley Research Center was involved in a structural loads measurement experiment, which included having instrumented dummies filling the seats in the

  14. Comparison of Autogenous and Alloplastic Cranioplasty Materials Following Impact Testing.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Robert D; Salt, Craig; Konofaos, Petros

    2015-07-01

    Alloplastic materials are often used when significant defects exist. Benefits include no donor site morbidity, relative ease of use, limitless supply, and predictable durability. Depending on the type of alloplast, limitations include a persistent risk of extrusion and infection. Of particular interest in relation to cranioplasties is the ability of the material to provide neuroprotection. The integrity and neuroprotective properties of autologous bone flaps, polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA), and high-density porous polyethylene (PP) were evaluated following impact testing. Three groups of New Zealand white rabbits (N = 4) underwent a cranioplasty with either a bone flap, PMMA, or PP. In the control group (N = 4), the animals had no cranioplasty. At the end of the eighth week, an impact was delivered to the center of each cranioplasty. At necropsy each cranium and brain was evaluated grossly and histologically. There was a statistical significant difference among groups for the severity of the hemorrhage (P = 0.022) and the grade of cranioplasty disruption (P = 0.0045). Autologous bone was found to be the weakest of the materials tested. In this group severe injury resulted at much lower energy levels than was observed in the control, PMMA, or PP groups. Both PMMA and PP were resistant to fracture and disruption. PMMA provided the greatest neuroprotection, followed by PP. Autologous bone provided the least protection with cranioplasty disruption and severe brain injury occurring in every patient. Brain injury patterns correlated with the degree of cranioplasty disruption regardless of the cranioplasty material. Regardless of the energy of impact, lack of dislodgement generally resulted in no obvious brain injury. PMID:26114508

  15. Evaluation of test methods for dynamic toughness characterization of duplex stainless steel forgings

    SciTech Connect

    Natishan, M.E.; Tregoning, R.L.

    1995-12-31

    Ferralium is a dual-phase stainless steel which consists of roughly equal amounts of ferrite and austenite. Conventional Charpy V-notch impact tests were performed on specimens taken from several locations in three orientations from a forged Ferralium plate to quantify the materials dynamic fracture performance. The Charpy tests were compared with 2.54 cm thick (1T) single edge bend (SE(B)) specimens that were tested in a drop tower to measure dynamic fracture initiation toughness (K{sub Id}). SE(B) specimens were removed from three plate locations and tested in a single orientation. Charpy and K{sub Id} tests were performed over the entire fracture mode transition temperature range, but the bulk of testing was concentrated at a single temperature {minus}2 C to provide a statistically significant number of tests at a representative point in the ferritic fracture mode transition region. Charpy impact energy varied consistently with both orientation and location within the forged plate even though large scatter was present in the results. This large scatter precluded an accurate assessment of the materials fracture performance within the transition region. The scatter in the drop tower (SE(B)) results was much less and indicated that plate location had a minimal affect on performance. The reduced scatter in the SE(B) specimens is attributed to two factors. First, the microstructure of Ferralium, while macroscopically homogeneous, contains ferritic and austenitic phase sizes that approach the dimensions of the standard Charpy specimen. Second, the Charpy testing technique causes more variation than the standard SE(B) K{sub Id} tests within the transition region.

  16. Compression After Impact Testing of Sandwich Structures Using the Four Point Bend Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nettles, Alan T.; Gregory, Elizabeth; Jackson, Justin; Kenworthy, Devon

    2008-01-01

    For many composite laminated structures, the design is driven by data obtained from Compression after Impact (CAI) testing. There currently is no standard for CAI testing of sandwich structures although there is one for solid laminates of a certain thickness and lay-up configuration. Most sandwich CAI testing has followed the basic technique of this standard where the loaded ends are precision machined and placed between two platens and compressed until failure. If little or no damage is present during the compression tests, the loaded ends may need to be potted to prevent end brooming. By putting a sandwich beam in a four point bend configuration, the region between the inner supports is put under a compressive load and a sandwich laminate with damage can be tested in this manner without the need for precision machining. Also, specimens with no damage can be taken to failure so direct comparisons between damaged and undamaged strength can be made. Data is presented that demonstrates the four point bend CAI test and is compared with end loaded compression tests of the same sandwich structure.

  17. RTM370 Polyimide Braided Composites: Characterization and Impact Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chuang, Kathy C.; Revilock, Duane M.; Ruggeri, Charles R.; Criss, Jim M., Jr.; Mintz, Eric A.

    2013-01-01

    RTM370 imide oligomer based on 2,3,3',4'-biphenyl dianhydride (a-BPDA), 3,4'-oxydianiline (3,4'-ODA) and terminated with the 4-phenylethynylphthalic (PEPA) endcap has been shown to exhibit a low melt viscosity (10-30 poise) at 280 C with a pot-life of 1-2 h and a high cured glass transition temperature (Tg) of 370 C. RTM370 resin has been successfully fabricated into composites reinforced with T650-35 carbon fabrics by resin transfer molding (RTM). RTM370 composites display excellent mechanical properties up to 327 C (620 F), and outstanding property retention after aging at 288degC (550 F) for 1000 h, and under hot-wet conditions. In ballistic impact testing, RTM370 triaxial braided T650-35 carbon fiber composites exhibited enhanced energy absorption at 288 C (550 F) compared to ambient temperature.

  18. Current status of small specimen technology in Charpy impact testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurishita, H.; Kayano, H.; Narui, M.; Yamazaki, M.

    1994-09-01

    The current status of small-scale specimen technology in Charpy impact testing for ferritic steels is presented, with emphasis on the effect of the notch dimensions (notch depth, notch root radius and notch angle) on the upper shelf energy (USE) and ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT). The USE for miniaturized specimens, normalized by Bb2 or ( Bb{3}/{2} ( B is the specimen thickness, b the ligament size), is essentially independent of notch geometry and has a linear relationship with the USE of full size specimens, regardless of irradiation and alloy conditions. The DBTT of miniaturized specimens depends strongly on the notch dimensions; this dependence of the DBTT decreases as the DBTT of full size specimens increase due to neutron irradiation or thermal aging. These results may be useful in determining the USE and DBTT for full size specimens from those for miniaturized specimens.

  19. IMPROVED BAR IMPACT TESTS USING A PHOTONIC DOPPLER VELOCIMETER

    SciTech Connect

    Bless, S J; Tolman, J; Levinson, S; Nguyen, J

    2009-08-24

    Bar impact tests, using the techniques described elsewhere in this symposium, were used to measure compressive and tensile strengths of borosilicate glass, soda lime glass, and a glass ceramic. The glass ceramic was 25% crystalline spinel, furnished by Corning Inc. There are two measures of compressive strength: the peak stress that can be transmitted in unconfined compression, and the 'steady state' strength. For borosilicate glass and soda lime glass, these values were similar, being about 1.8 and 1.5 GPa, respectively. The glass ceramic (25% spinel) was almost 50% stronger. Tensile failure in the glass and glass ceramic takes places via surface flaws, and thus tensile strength is an extrinsic, as opposed to intrinsic property.

  20. IMPROVED BAR IMPACT TESTS USING A PHOTONIC DOPPLER VELOCIMETER

    SciTech Connect

    Bless, S. J.; Tolman, J.; Levinson, S.; Nguyen, J.

    2009-12-28

    Bar impact tests, using the techniques described elsewhere in this symposium, were used to measure compressive and tensile strengths of borosilicate glass, soda lime glass, and a glass ceramic. The glass ceramic was 25% crystalline spinel, furnished by Corning Inc. There are two measures of compressive strength: the peak stress that can be transmitted in unconfined compression, and the 'steady state' strength. For borosilicate glass and soda lime glass, these values were similar, being about 1.8 and 1.5 GPa, respectively. The glass ceramic (25% spinel) was almost 50% stronger. Tensile failure in the glass and glass ceramic takes places via surface flaws, and thus tensile strength is an extrinsic, as opposed to intrinsic property.

  1. Results of crack-arrest tests on two irradiated high-copper welds

    SciTech Connect

    Iskander, S.K.; Corwin, W.R.; Nanstead, R.K. )

    1990-12-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effect of neutron irradiation on the shift and shape of the lower-bound curve to crack-arrest data. Two submerged-arc welds with copper contents of 0.23 and 0.31 wt % were commercially fabricated in 220-mm-thick plate. Crack-arrest specimens fabricated from these welds were irradiated at a nominal temperature of 288{degree}C to an average fluence of 1.9 {times} 10{sup 19} neutrons/cm{sup 2} (>1 MeV). Evaluation of the results shows that the neutron-irradiation-induced crack-arrest toughness temperature shift is about the same as the Charpy V-notch impact temperature shift at the 41-J energy level. The shape of the lower-bound curves (for the range of test temperatures covered) did not seem to have been altered by irradiation compared to those of the ASME K{sub Ia} curve. 9 refs., 21 figs., 10 tabs.

  2. 49 CFR 572.176 - Knees and knee impact test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Knees and knee impact test procedure. 572.176... Hybrid III 10-Year-Old Child Test Dummy (HIII-10C) § 572.176 Knees and knee impact test procedure. (a) The knee assembly for the purpose of this test is the part of the leg assembly shown in drawing...

  3. 49 CFR 572.166 - Knees and knee impact test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Hybrid III Six-Year-Old Weighted Child Test Dummy § 572.166 Knees and knee impact test procedure. The knee assembly is assembled and tested as specified in 49 CFR 572.126 (Subpart N). ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Knees and knee impact test procedure....

  4. 49 CFR 572.166 - Knees and knee impact test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Hybrid III Six-Year-Old Weighted Child Test Dummy § 572.166 Knees and knee impact test procedure. The knee assembly is assembled and tested as specified in 49 CFR 572.126 (Subpart N). ... 49 Transportation 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Knees and knee impact test procedure....

  5. 49 CFR 572.176 - Knees and knee impact test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Knees and knee impact test procedure. 572.176... Hybrid III 10-Year-Old Child Test Dummy (HIII-10C) § 572.176 Knees and knee impact test procedure. (a) The knee assembly for the purpose of this test is the part of the leg assembly shown in drawing...

  6. 49 CFR 572.166 - Knees and knee impact test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Hybrid III Six-Year-Old Weighted Child Test Dummy § 572.166 Knees and knee impact test procedure. The knee assembly is assembled and tested as specified in 49 CFR 572.126 (Subpart N). ... 49 Transportation 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Knees and knee impact test procedure....

  7. 49 CFR 572.176 - Knees and knee impact test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Knees and knee impact test procedure. 572.176... Hybrid III 10-Year-Old Child Test Dummy (HIII-10C) § 572.176 Knees and knee impact test procedure. (a) The knee assembly for the purpose of this test is the part of the leg assembly shown in drawing...

  8. 49 CFR 572.166 - Knees and knee impact test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Hybrid III Six-Year-Old Weighted Child Test Dummy § 572.166 Knees and knee impact test procedure. The knee assembly is assembled and tested as specified in 49 CFR 572.126 (Subpart N). ... 49 Transportation 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Knees and knee impact test procedure....

  9. 49 CFR 572.166 - Knees and knee impact test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Hybrid III Six-Year-Old Weighted Child Test Dummy § 572.166 Knees and knee impact test procedure. The knee assembly is assembled and tested as specified in 49 CFR 572.126 (Subpart N). ... 49 Transportation 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Knees and knee impact test procedure....

  10. Test Directions as a Critical Component of Test Design: Best Practices and the Impact of Examinee Characteristics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lakin, Joni M.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of test directions is to familiarize examinees with a test so that they respond to items in the manner intended. However, changes in educational measurement as well as the U.S. student population present new challenges to test directions and increase the impact that differential familiarity could have on the validity of test score…

  11. Measurement of Satellite Impact Test Fragments for Modeling Orbital Debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Nicole M.

    2009-01-01

    There are over 13,000 pieces of catalogued objects 10cm and larger in orbit around Earth [ODQN, January 2009, p12]. More than 6000 of these objects are fragments from explosions and collisions. As the earth-orbiting object count increases, debris-generating collisions in the future become a statistical inevitability. To aid in understanding this collision risk, the NASA Orbital Debris Program Office has developed computer models that calculate quantity and orbits of debris both currently in orbit and in future epochs. In order to create a reasonable computer model of the orbital debris environment, it is important to understand the mechanics of creation of debris as a result of a collision. The measurement of the physical characteristics of debris resulting from ground-based, hypervelocity impact testing aids in understanding the sizes and shapes of debris produced from potential impacts in orbit. To advance the accuracy of fragment shape/size determination, the NASA Orbital Debris Program Office recently implemented a computerized measurement system. The goal of this system is to improve knowledge and understanding of the relation between commonly used dimensions and overall shape. The technique developed involves scanning a single fragment with a hand-held laser device, measuring its size properties using a sophisticated software tool, and creating a three-dimensional computer model to demonstrate how the object might appear in orbit. This information is used to aid optical techniques in shape determination. This more automated and repeatable method provides higher accuracy in the size and shape determination of debris.

  12. High-Stakes Standardized Testing & Marginalized Youth: An Examination of the Impact on Those Who Fail

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kearns, Laura-Lee

    2011-01-01

    This study examines the impact of high-stakes, large-scale, standardized literacy testing on youth who have failed the Ontario Secondary School Literacy Test. Interviews with youth indicate that the unintended impact of high-stakes testing is more problematic than policy makers and educators may realize. In contrast to literacy policy's aims to…

  13. 49 CFR 572.136 - Knees and knee impact test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Knees and knee impact test procedure. 572.136... Hybrid III 5th Percentile Female Test Dummy, Alpha Version § 572.136 Knees and knee impact test procedure. (a) Knee assembly. The knee assembly (refer to §§ 572.130(a)(1)(v) and (vi)) for the purpose of...

  14. 49 CFR 572.126 - Knees and knee impact test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Knees and knee impact test procedure. 572.126...-year-old Child Test Dummy, Beta Version § 572.126 Knees and knee impact test procedure. (a) Knee assembly. The knee assembly is part of the leg assembly (drawing 127-4000-1 and -2). (b) When the...

  15. 49 CFR 572.136 - Knees and knee impact test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Knees and knee impact test procedure. 572.136... Hybrid III 5th Percentile Female Test Dummy, Alpha Version § 572.136 Knees and knee impact test procedure. (a) Knee assembly. The knee assembly (refer to §§ 572.130(a)(1)(v) and (vi)) for the purpose of...

  16. 49 CFR 572.126 - Knees and knee impact test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Knees and knee impact test procedure. 572.126...-year-old Child Test Dummy, Beta Version § 572.126 Knees and knee impact test procedure. (a) Knee assembly. The knee assembly is part of the leg assembly (drawing 127-4000-1 and -2). (b) When the...

  17. 49 CFR 572.126 - Knees and knee impact test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Knees and knee impact test procedure. 572.126...-year-old Child Test Dummy, Beta Version § 572.126 Knees and knee impact test procedure. (a) Knee assembly. The knee assembly is part of the leg assembly (drawing 127-4000-1 and -2). (b) When the...

  18. 49 CFR 572.136 - Knees and knee impact test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Knees and knee impact test procedure. 572.136... Hybrid III 5th Percentile Female Test Dummy, Alpha Version § 572.136 Knees and knee impact test procedure. (a) Knee assembly. The knee assembly (refer to §§ 572.130(a)(1)(v) and (vi)) for the purpose of...

  19. 49 CFR 572.126 - Knees and knee impact test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Knees and knee impact test procedure. 572.126...-year-old Child Test Dummy, Beta Version § 572.126 Knees and knee impact test procedure. (a) Knee assembly. The knee assembly is part of the leg assembly (drawing 127-4000-1 and -2). (b) When the...

  20. 49 CFR 572.126 - Knees and knee impact test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Knees and knee impact test procedure. 572.126...-year-old Child Test Dummy, Beta Version § 572.126 Knees and knee impact test procedure. (a) Knee assembly. The knee assembly is part of the leg assembly (drawing 127-4000-1 and -2). (b) When the...

  1. 49 CFR 572.136 - Knees and knee impact test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Knees and knee impact test procedure. 572.136... Hybrid III 5th Percentile Female Test Dummy, Alpha Version § 572.136 Knees and knee impact test procedure. (a) Knee assembly. The knee assembly (refer to §§ 572.130(a)(1)(v) and (vi)) for the purpose of...

  2. 49 CFR 572.136 - Knees and knee impact test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Knees and knee impact test procedure. 572.136... Hybrid III 5th Percentile Female Test Dummy, Alpha Version § 572.136 Knees and knee impact test procedure. (a) Knee assembly. The knee assembly (refer to §§ 572.130(a)(1)(v) and (vi)) for the purpose of...

  3. Instrumented impact and residual tensile strength testing of eight-ply carbon eopoxy specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nettles, A. T.

    1990-01-01

    Instrumented drop weight impact testing was utilized to examine a puncture-type impact on thin carbon-epoxy coupons. Four different material systems with various eight-ply lay-up configurations were tested. Specimens were placed over a 10.3-mm diameter hole and impacted with a smaller tup (4.2-mm diameter) than those used in previous studies. Force-time plots as well as data on absorbed energy and residual tensile strength were gathered and examined. It was found that a critical impact energy level existed for each material tested, at which point tensile strength began to rapidly decrease with increasing impact energy.

  4. Progress in developing DBTT determinations from miniature disk bend tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohse, G.; Ames, M.; Harling, O. K.

    1986-11-01

    Experiments to investigate the possibility of obtaining ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) data using bend tests of 3 mm diameter disks are described. A disk specimen 0.40 mm thick with two V-shaped grooves, 0.10 mm deep at right angles to each other along diameters of the disk face, is found to be suitable. In high strain-rate bend testing of materials which exhibit a Charpy V-notch (CVN) DBTT, such specimens undergo a marked change in load/deflection behavior as temperature is lowered. The temperature at which this transition occurs is 145-178 K below the CVN 68 J (50 ft-1b) temperature for three materials tested. There is some evidence that the miniature test transition correlates more consistently with the temperature at which CVN energy reaches a low value such as 7 J. This test offers interesting possibilities for in-service monitoring of critical components such as reactor pressure vessels. Further testing to investigate more fully the relationship between the miniature test and Charpy V-notch results is required.

  5. Determination of anisotropy in impact toughness of aluminium alloy 2024 T3 plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddiqui, M. H.; Hashmi, F.; Junaid, A.

    The research was aimed to quantify the existence of anisotropy in fracture toughness of aluminium alloy 2024 T3 plate (used in aircraft structural members). It was further needed to establish the direction in which the fracture toughness of aluminium alloy 2024 T3 plate is maximum and minimum. This could help ascertain the structural integrity of aircraft structural components; also while designing new components, the knowledge of variation in toughness with respect to direction helps in economizing dead weight of the aircraft. In this research, pursued at the College of Aeronautical Engineering, the anisotropy in toughness of aluminium alloy 2024 T3 plate was analysed using the Charpy V-notch impact toughness test. The effect of specimen orientation on the impact toughness values of the alloy was investigated and compared with known results to verify the reliability of the work and to ascertain the extent of anisotropy in fracture toughness of the said alloy. Charpy impact tests were carried out on ASTM E 23 standard specimens machined at a reference laboratory at room temperature (23° C +/- 2° C). Four different specimen orientations analysed for the purpose of this study were L-S, L-T, T-S and T-L directions. Subsequently, the results obtained at the research centre were then analysed and correlated with morphology of microstructure of the material to establish the reliability of the experimental results. Moreover, an analysis was also done to cater for the possible errors that could affect the fracture toughness values obtained from experimental results. It was concluded that the T-S orientation of the plate had maximum toughness, whereas, minimum toughness was observed in L-T direction.

  6. Ignition of nonmetallic materials by impact of high-pressure oxygen. II - Evaluation of repeatability of pneumatic impact test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, Naomi; Moffett, Gary E.; Pedley, Michael D.; Linley, Larry J.

    1989-01-01

    The gaseous oxygen pneumatic impact test is used to evaluate the suitability of nonmetallic materials for use in high-pressure oxygen systems. The test was evaluated by testing the reactivity of four materials over a range of impact pressures. The evaluation also investigated the effect of valve opening time and other test variables on the frequency of reaction. The variability of the data obtained for each test material was too large for the test method to be capable of distinguishing other than gross differences in the reactivity of materials. No relation was found between this variability and changes in valve opening time and other test variables. The materials studied were found to be unacceptable for use as reference standards. Because of the high variability of the test data, it is recommended that new methods be developed for evaluating the suitability of materials for use in high-pressure oxygen systems.

  7. The Impact of Socioeconomic Status on High Stakes Testing Reexamined

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Melissa; Johnston, Pattie

    2010-01-01

    High-stakes testing plays a critical role in education today in the United States. Every state uses a high-stakes test to comply with the No Child Left Behind (NCLB) mandate. While many believe high-stakes testing is an acceptable and accurate way to measure students' learning, one has to ask whether high stakes testing is an effective measurement…

  8. Hypervelocity Impact Testing of Space Station Freedom Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christie, Robert J.; Best, Steve R.; Myhre, Craig A.

    1994-01-01

    Solar array coupons designed for the Space Station Freedom electrical power system were subjected to hypervelocity impacts using the HYPER facility in the Space Power Institute at Auburn University and the Meteoroid/Orbital Debris Simulation Facility in the Materials and Processes Laboratory at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. At Auburn, the solar cells and array blanket materials received several hundred impacts from particles in the micron to 100 micron range with velocities typically ranging from 4.5 to 10.5 km/s. This fluence of particles greatly exceeds what the actual components will experience in low earth orbit. These impacts damaged less than one percent of total area of the solar cells and most of the damage was limited to the cover glass. There was no measurable loss of electrical performance. Impacts on the array blanket materials produced even less damage and the blanket materials proved to be an effective shield for the back surface of the solar cells. Using the light gas gun at MSFC, one cell of a four cell coupon was impacted by a 1/4 inch spherical aluminum projectile with a velocity of about 7 km/s. The impact created a neat hole about 3/8 inch in diameter. The cell and coupon were still functional after impact.

  9. A Study of the "toss Factor" in the Impact Testing of Cermets by the Izod Pendulum Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Probst, H B; Mchenry, Howard T

    1957-01-01

    The test method presented shows that the "toss energy" contributed by the apparatus for brittle materials is negligible. The total toss energy is considered to consist of two components. (a) recovered stored elastic energy and (b) kinetic energy contributed directly by the apparatus. The results were verified by high-speed motion pictures of the test in operation. From these photographs, velocities of tossed specimens were obtained and toss energy computed. In addition, impact energies of some titanium carbide base cermets and high-temperature alloys, as measured by the low-capacity Izod pendulum test, compare well with impact energies measured by the NACA drop test.

  10. Tensile and impact properties of V-4Cr-4Ti alloy heats 832665 and 832864

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bray, T. S.; Tsai, H.; Nowicki, L. J.; Billone, M. C.; Smith, D. L.; Johnson, W. R.; Trester, P. W.

    2000-12-01

    Two large heats of V-4Cr-4Ti alloy were produced in the US in the past few years. The first, 832665, was a 500 kg heat procured by the US Department of Energy for basic fusion structural materials research. The second, 832864, was a 1300 kg heat procured by General Atomics for the DIII-D radiative divertor upgrade. Both heats were produced by Oremet-Wah Chang (previously Teledyne Wah Chang of Albany). Tensile properties up to 800°C and Charpy V-notch impact properties down to liquid nitrogen temperature were measured for both heats. The product forms tested for both heats were rolled sheets annealed at 1000°C for 1 h in vacuum. Testing results show the behavior of the two heats to be similar and the reduction of strengths with temperature to be insignificant up to at least 750°C. Ductility of both materials is good in the test temperature range. Impact properties for both heats are excellent - no brittle failures at temperatures above -150°C. Compared to the data for previous smaller laboratory heats of 15-50 kg, the results show that scale-up of vanadium alloy ingot production to sizes useful for reactor blanket design can be successfully achieved as long as reasonable process control is implemented (H. Tsai, et al., Fusion Materials Semiannual Progress Report for Period Ending 30th June 1998, DOE/ER-0313/24, p. 3; H. Tsai, et al., Fusion Materials Semiannual Progress Report for Period Ending 31st December 1998, DOE/ER-0313/25, p. 3).

  11. 16 CFR 1203.11 - Marking the impact test line.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... (HPI), with the brow parallel to the basic plane. Place a 5-kg (11-lb) preload ballast on top of the... helmet coinciding with the intersection of the surface of the helmet with the impact line planes...

  12. Structural identification of short/middle span bridges by rapid impact testing: theory and verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jian; Zhang, Q. Q.; Guo, S. L.; Xu, D. W.; Wu, Z. S.

    2015-06-01

    A structural strain flexibility identification method by processing the multiple-reference impact testing data is proposed. First, a kind of novel long-gauge fiber optic sensor is developed for structural macro-strain monitoring. Second, the multiple-reference impact testing technology is employed, during which both the impacting force and structural strain responses are measured. The impact testing technology has unique merit because it is able to extract exact structural frequency response functions (FRFs), while other test methods, for instance ambient tests, can only output the FRFs with scaled magnitudes. Most importantly, the originality of the article is that a method of identifying the structural strain flexibility characteristic from the impact test data has been proposed, which is useful for structural static strain prediction and capacity evaluation. Examples of a six meter simple supported beam and a multiple-span continuous beam bridge have successfully verified the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  13. Experimental and numerical analysis of Al6063 duralumin using Taylor impact test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruszka, L.; Anaszewicz, Ł.; Janiszewski, J.; Grązka, M.

    2012-08-01

    The paper presents results of experimental and numerical analysis of dynamic behaviour Al6063 duralumin. Dynamical experiments were made using Taylor impact test. Experimental results at next step of study were used in numerical analyses of dynamic yield stress of tested material and model parameters of the Johnson-Cook constitutive equation. The main aim of this analysis is to find out dynamical properties of Al6063 duralumin tested in Taylor impact test.

  14. Soft Soil Impact Testing and Simulation of Aerospace Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fasanella, Edwin L.; Jackson, Karen E.; Kellas, Sotiris

    2008-01-01

    In June 2007, a 38-ft/s vertical drop test of a 5-ft-diameter, 5-ft-long composite fuselage section that was retrofitted with a novel composite honeycomb Deployable Energy Absorber (DEA) was conducted onto unpacked sand. This test was one of a series of tests to evaluate the multi-terrain capabilities of the DEA and to generate test data for model validation. During the test, the DEA crushed approximately 6-in. and left craters in the sand of depths ranging from 7.5- to 9-in. A finite element model of the fuselage section with DEA was developed for execution in LS-DYNA, a commercial nonlinear explicit transient dynamic code. Pre-test predictions were generated in which the sand was represented initially as a crushable foam material MAT_CRUSHABLE_FOAM (Mat 63). Following the drop test, a series of hemispherical penetrometer tests were conducted to assist in soil characterization. The penetrometer weighed 20-lb and was instrumented with a tri-axial accelerometer. Drop tests were performed at 16-ft/s and crater depths were measured. The penetrometer drop tests were simulated as a means for developing a more representative soil model based on a soil and foam material definition MAT_SOIL_AND FOAM (Mat 5) in LS-DYNA. The model of the fuselage with DEA was reexecuted using the updated soil model and test-analysis correlations are presented.

  15. Asteroid Impact and Deflection Assessment (AIDA) mission: science investigation of a binary system and mitigation test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, P.; Cheng, A. F.; Küppers, M.

    2015-10-01

    The Asteroid Impact & Deflection Assessment (AIDA) mission will be the first space experiment to investigate a binary near-Earth asteroid (NEA) and to demonstrate asteroid impact hazard mitigation by using a kinetic impactor. AIDA is a joint ESA-NASA cooperative project, which includes the ESA Asteroid Impact Mission (AIM) rendezvous spacecraft and the NASA Double Asteroid Redirection Test (DART) mission. The primary goals of AIDA are (i) to investigate the binary NEA (65803) Didymos, (ii) to test our ability to impact its moon by an hypervelocity projectile in 2022 and (iii) to measure and characterize the impact deflection both from space with AIM and from ground based observatories.

  16. Reinforced Carbon-Carbon Subcomponent Flat Plate Impact Testing for Space Shuttle Orbiter Return to Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melis, Matthew E.; Brand, Jeremy H.; Pereira, J. Michael; Revilock, Duane M.

    2007-01-01

    Following the tragedy of the Space Shuttle Columbia on February 1, 2003, a major effort commenced to develop a better understanding of debris impacts and their effect on the Space Shuttle subsystems. An initiative to develop and validate physics-based computer models to predict damage from such impacts was a fundamental component of this effort. To develop the models it was necessary to physically characterize Reinforced Carbon-Carbon (RCC) and various debris materials which could potentially shed on ascent and impact the Orbiter RCC leading edges. The validated models enabled the launch system community to use the impact analysis software LS DYNA to predict damage by potential and actual impact events on the Orbiter leading edge and nose cap thermal protection systems. Validation of the material models was done through a three-level approach: fundamental tests to obtain independent static and dynamic material model properties of materials of interest, sub-component impact tests to provide highly controlled impact test data for the correlation and validation of the models, and full-scale impact tests to establish the final level of confidence for the analysis methodology. This paper discusses the second level subcomponent test program in detail and its application to the LS DYNA model validation process. The level two testing consisted of over one hundred impact tests in the NASA Glenn Research Center Ballistic Impact Lab on 6 by 6 in. and 6 by 12 in. flat plates of RCC and evaluated three types of debris projectiles: BX 265 External Tank foam, ice, and PDL 1034 External Tank foam. These impact tests helped determine the level of damage generated in the RCC flat plates by each projectile. The information obtained from this testing validated the LS DYNA damage prediction models and provided a certain level of confidence to begin performing analysis for full-size RCC test articles for returning NASA to flight with STS 114 and beyond.

  17. Materials Characterization Center meeting on impact testing of waste forms. Summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Merz, M.D.; Atteridge, D.; Dudder, G.

    1981-10-01

    A meeting was held on March 25-26, 1981 to discuss impact test methods for waste form materials to be used in nuclear waste repositories. The purpose of the meeting was to obtain guidance for the Materials Characterization Center (MCC) in preparing the MCC-10 Impact Test Method to be approved by the Materials Review Board. The meeting focused on two essential aspects of the test method, namely the mechanical process, or impact, used to effect rapid fracture of a waste form and the analysis technique(s) used to characterize particulates generated by the impact.

  18. The Potential Impact of Not Being Able to Create Parallel Tests on Expected Classification Accuracy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyse, Adam E.

    2011-01-01

    In many practical testing situations, alternate test forms from the same testing program are not strictly parallel to each other and instead the test forms exhibit small psychometric differences. This article investigates the potential practical impact that these small psychometric differences can have on expected classification accuracy. Ten…

  19. Hypervelocity impact testing of non-metallic materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schonberg, William P.

    1990-01-01

    A comparative analysis of impact damage in composite and ceramic specimens and in geometrically similar aluminum specimens is performed to determine the advantages and disadvantages of employing certain composite and ceramic materials in the design of structural wall systems for long-duration spacecraft. A similar analysis of the damage in single panel lexan and multi-plane glass windows shows that glass window systems are rather resilent under hypervelocity impact loadings. It is concluded that thin Kevlar 49, IM6/3501-6 graphite/epoxy, and alumina panels offer no advantage over equivalent aluminum 6061-T6 panels in reducing the penetration threat of hypervelocity projectiles.

  20. Satellite Test of Radiation Impact on Ramtron 512K FRAM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacLeod, Todd C.; Sayyah, Rana; Sims, W. Herb; Varnavas, Kosta A.; Ho, Fat D.

    2009-01-01

    The Memory Test Experiment is a space test of a ferroelectric memory device on a low Earth orbit satellite. The test consists of writing and reading data with a ferroelectric based memory device. Any errors are detected and are stored on board the satellite. The data is send to the ground through telemetry once a day. Analysis of the data can determine the kind of error that was found and will lead to a better understanding of the effects of space radiation on memory systems. The test will be one of the first flight demonstrations of ferroelectric memory in a near polar orbit which allows testing in a varied radiation environment. The memory devices being tested is a Ramtron Inc. 512K memory device. This paper details the goals and purpose of this experiment as well as the development process. The process for analyzing the data to gain the maximum understanding of the performance of the ferroelectric memory device is detailed.

  1. Motivations and psychosocial impact of genetic testing for HNPCC.

    PubMed

    Esplen, M J; Madlensky, L; Butler, K; McKinnon, W; Bapat, B; Wong, J; Aronson, M; Gallinger, S

    2001-09-15

    A type of hereditary colorectal cancer (CRC) known as hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) is associated with MLHI and MSH2 gene mutations. This study consists of a pilot, cross-sectional study of 50 individuals who were engaged in the genetic testing process for HNPCC. The study investigated the motivations and attitudes around genetic testing and current psychosocial functioning through the use of standardized measures, as well as obtained information on disclosure patterns associated with test results. The mean age of the sample was 44.3 years. (SD = 15.0). Twenty-three individuals were identified as "carriers" (13 had a previous history of CRC), seven were "non-carriers" and 20 individuals were still awaiting test results. The primary motivations for participating in genetic testing were similar to previous reports and included: wanting to know if more screening tests were needed, obtaining information about the risk for offspring and increasing certainty around their own risk. The psychosocial scores demonstrated that a subgroup of individuals exhibited distress, with greater distress for those individuals awaiting results or testing positive. There was a high level of satisfaction associated with the experience of testing. Individuals in this study tended to disclose their test results to a variety of family and non-family members. Disclosure was primarily associated with positive experiences however, some individuals reported regret around disclosure of their results. These preliminary findings should be further explored in a larger prospective study design over multiple time points. PMID:11562928

  2. Hypervelocity Impact Testing of IM7/977-3 with Micro-Sized Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, J. G.; Jegley, D. C.; Siochi, E. J.; Wells, B. K.

    2010-01-01

    Ground-based hypervelocity imapct testing was conducted on IM7/977-3 quasi-isotropic flat panels at normal incidence using micron-sized particles (i.e. less than or equal to 100 microns) of soda lime glass and olivine. Testing was performed at room temperature (RT) and 175 C with results from the 175 C test compared to those obtained at RT. Between 10 and 30 particles with velocities ranging from 5 to 13 km/s impacted each panel surface for each test temperature. Panels were ultrasonically scanned prior to and after impact testing to assess internal damage. Post-impact analysis included microscopic examination of the surface, determination of particle speed and location, and photomicroscopy for microcrack assessment. Internal damage was observed by ultrasonic inspection on panels impacted at 175 C, whereas damage for the RT impacted panels was confined to surface divets/craters as determined by microscopic analysis.

  3. The Effectiveness of the Component Impact Test Method for the Side Impact Injury Assessment of the Door Trim

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youn, Younghan; Koo, Jeong-Seo

    The complete evaluation of the side vehicle structure and the occupant protection is only possible by means of the full scale side impact crash test. But, auto part manufacturers such as door trim makers can not conduct the test especially when the vehicle is under the developing process. The main objective of this study is to obtain the design guidelines by a simple component level impact test. The relationship between the target absorption energy and impactor speed were examined using the energy absorbed by the door trim. Since each different vehicle type required different energy levels on the door trim. A simple impact test method was developed to estimate abdominal injury by measuring reaction force of the impactor. The reaction force will be converted to a certain level of the energy by the proposed formula. The target of absorption energy for door trim only and the impact speed of simple impactor are derived theoretically based on the conservation of energy. With calculated speed of dummy and the effective mass of abdomen, the energy allocated in the abdomen area of door trim was calculated. The impactor speed can be calculated based on the equivalent energy of door trim absorbed during the full crash test. With the proposed design procedure for the door trim by a simple impact test method was demonstrated to evaluate the abdominal injury. This paper describes a study that was conducted to determine sensitivity of several design factors for reducing abdominal injury values using the matrix of orthogonal array method. In conclusion, with theoretical considerations and empirical test data, the main objective, standardization of door trim design using the simple impact test method was established.

  4. Impact as a general cause of extinction: A feasibility test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raup, David M.

    1988-01-01

    Large body impact has been implicated as the possible cause of several extinction events. This is entirely plausible if one accepts two propositions: (1) that impacts of large comets and asteroids produce environmental effects severe enough to cause significant species extinctions and (2) that the estimates of comet and asteroid flux for the Phanerozoic are approximately correct. A resonable next step is to investigate the possibility that impact could be a significant factor in the broader Phanerozoic extinction record, not limited merely to a few events of mass extinction. Monte Carlo simulation experiments based on existing flux estimates and reasonable predictions of the relationship between bolide diameter and extinction are discussed. The simulation results raise the serious possibility that large body impact may be a more pervasive factor in extinction than has been assumed heretofore. At the very least, the experiments show that the comet and asteroid flux estimates combined with a reasonable kill curve produces a reasonable extinction record, complete with occasional mass extinctions and the irregular, lower intensity extinctions commonly called background extinction.

  5. Impact of Educational Level on Performance on Auditory Processing Tests

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Cristina F. B.; Rabelo, Camila M.; Silagi, Marcela L.; Mansur, Letícia L.; Schochat, Eliane

    2016-01-01

    Research has demonstrated that a higher level of education is associated with better performance on cognitive tests among middle-aged and elderly people. However, the effects of education on auditory processing skills have not yet been evaluated. Previous demonstrations of sensory-cognitive interactions in the aging process indicate the potential importance of this topic. Therefore, the primary purpose of this study was to investigate the performance of middle-aged and elderly people with different levels of formal education on auditory processing tests. A total of 177 adults with no evidence of cognitive, psychological or neurological conditions took part in the research. The participants completed a series of auditory assessments, including dichotic digit, frequency pattern and speech-in-noise tests. A working memory test was also performed to investigate the extent to which auditory processing and cognitive performance were associated. The results demonstrated positive but weak correlations between years of schooling and performance on all of the tests applied. The factor “years of schooling” was also one of the best predictors of frequency pattern and speech-in-noise test performance. Additionally, performance on the working memory, frequency pattern and dichotic digit tests was also correlated, suggesting that the influence of educational level on auditory processing performance might be associated with the cognitive demand of the auditory processing tests rather than auditory sensory aspects itself. Longitudinal research is required to investigate the causal relationship between educational level and auditory processing skills. PMID:27013958

  6. The Impact of High Stakes Testing: The Australian Story

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klenowski, Val; Wyatt-Smith, Claire

    2012-01-01

    High stakes testing in Australia was introduced in 2008 by way of the National Assessment Program--Literacy and Numeracy (NAPLAN). Currently, every year all students in Years 3, 5, 7 and 9 are assessed on the same days using national tests in Reading, Writing, Language Conventions (Spelling, Grammar and Punctuation) and Numeracy. In 2010 the…

  7. Impact of Educational Level on Performance on Auditory Processing Tests.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Cristina F B; Rabelo, Camila M; Silagi, Marcela L; Mansur, Letícia L; Schochat, Eliane

    2016-01-01

    Research has demonstrated that a higher level of education is associated with better performance on cognitive tests among middle-aged and elderly people. However, the effects of education on auditory processing skills have not yet been evaluated. Previous demonstrations of sensory-cognitive interactions in the aging process indicate the potential importance of this topic. Therefore, the primary purpose of this study was to investigate the performance of middle-aged and elderly people with different levels of formal education on auditory processing tests. A total of 177 adults with no evidence of cognitive, psychological or neurological conditions took part in the research. The participants completed a series of auditory assessments, including dichotic digit, frequency pattern and speech-in-noise tests. A working memory test was also performed to investigate the extent to which auditory processing and cognitive performance were associated. The results demonstrated positive but weak correlations between years of schooling and performance on all of the tests applied. The factor "years of schooling" was also one of the best predictors of frequency pattern and speech-in-noise test performance. Additionally, performance on the working memory, frequency pattern and dichotic digit tests was also correlated, suggesting that the influence of educational level on auditory processing performance might be associated with the cognitive demand of the auditory processing tests rather than auditory sensory aspects itself. Longitudinal research is required to investigate the causal relationship between educational level and auditory processing skills. PMID:27013958

  8. 16 CFR 1203.17 - Impact attenuation test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ..., Motorcycle Helmets, 49 CFR 571.218 (S7.1.8). The center of gravity of the drop assembly shall lie within the... lb), the upper surface of which shall consist of a steel plate at least 12 mm (0.47 in.) thick and... test day) by dropping a spherical impactor onto an elastomeric test medium (MEP). The...

  9. Reconsidering the Impact of High-Stakes Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braun, Henry

    2004-01-01

    Over the last fifteen years, many states have implemented high-stakes tests as part of an effort to strengthen accountability for schools, teachers, and students. Predictably, there has been vigorous disagreement regarding the contributions of such policies to increasing test scores and, more importantly, to improving student learning. A recent…

  10. The production of calibration specimens for impact testing of subsize Charpy specimens

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, D.J.; Corwin, W.R.; Owings, T.D.

    1994-09-01

    Calibration specimens have been manufactured for checking the performance of a pendulum impact testing machine that has been configured for testing subsize specimens, both half-size (5.0 {times} 5.0 {times} 25.4 mm) and third-size (3.33 {times} 3.33 {times} 25.4 mm). Specimens were fabricated from quenched-and-tempered 4340 steel heat treated to produce different microstructures that would result in either high or low absorbed energy levels on testing. A large group of both half- and third-size specimens were tested at {minus}40{degrees}C. The results of the tests were analyzed for average value and standard deviation, and these values were used to establish calibration limits for the Charpy impact machine when testing subsize specimens. These average values plus or minus two standard deviations were set as the acceptable limits for the average of five tests for calibration of the impact testing machine.

  11. On the modeling of the Taylor cylinder impact test for orthotropic textured materials: Calculations and experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Maudlin, P.J.; Bingert, J.F.; House, J.W.

    1997-04-01

    Taylor impact tests using specimens cut from a rolled plate of Ta were conducted. The Ta was well-characterized in terms of flow stress and crystallographic texture. A piece-wise yield surface was interrogated from this orthotropic texture, and used in EPIC-95 3D simulations of the Taylor test. Good agreement was realized between the calculations and the post-test geometries in terms of major and minor side profiles and impact-interface footprints.

  12. Testing and Resilience of the Impact Origin of the Moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Righter, K.; Canup, R. M.

    2016-01-01

    The leading hypothesis for the origin of the Moon is the giant impact model, which grew out of the post-Apollo science community. The hypothesis was able to explain the high E-M system angular momentum, the small lunar core, and consistent with the idea that the early Moon melted substantially. The standard hypothesis requires that the Moon be made entirely from the impactor, strangely at odds with the nearly identical oxygen isotopic composition of the Earth and Moon, compositions that might be expected to be different if Moon came from a distinct impactor. Subsequent geochemical research has highlighted the similarity of both geochemical and isotopic composition of the Earth and Moon, and measured small but significant amounts of volatiles in lunar glassy materials, both of which are seemingly at odds with the standard giant impact model. Here we focus on key geochemical measurements and spacecraft observations that have prompted a healthy re-evaluation of the giant impact model, provide an overview of physical models that are either newly proposed or slightly revised from previous ideas, to explain the new datasets.

  13. IMPACT_S: Integrated Multiprogram Platform to Analyze and Combine Tests of Selection

    PubMed Central

    Vasconcelos, Vitor; Antunes, Agostinho

    2014-01-01

    Among the major goals of research in evolutionary biology are the identification of genes targeted by natural selection and understanding how various regimes of evolution affect the fitness of an organism. In particular, adaptive evolution enables organisms to adapt to changing ecological factors such as diet, temperature, habitat, predatory pressures and prey abundance. An integrative approach is crucial for the identification of non-synonymous mutations that introduce radical changes in protein biochemistry and thus in turn influence the structure and function of proteins. Performing such analyses manually is often a time-consuming process, due to the large number of statistical files generated from multiple approaches, especially when assessing numerous taxa and/or large datasets. We present IMPACT_S, an easy-to-use Graphical User Interface (GUI) software, which rapidly and effectively integrates, filters and combines results from three widely used programs for assessing the influence of selection: Codeml (PAML package), Datamonkey and TreeSAAP. It enables the identification and tabulation of sites detected by these programs as evolving under the influence of positive, neutral and/or negative selection in protein-coding genes. IMPACT_S further facilitates the automatic mapping of these sites onto the three-dimensional structures of proteins. Other useful tools incorporated in IMPACT_S include Jmol, Archaeopteryx, Gnuplot, PhyML, a built-in Swiss-Model interface and a PDB downloader. The relevance and functionality of IMPACT_S is shown through a case study on the toxicoferan-reptilian Cysteine-rich Secretory Proteins (CRiSPs). IMPACT_S is a platform-independent software released under GPLv3 license, freely available online from http://impact-s.sourceforge.net. PMID:25329307

  14. Prognostic impact of stress testing in coronary artery disease

    SciTech Connect

    Severi, S.; Michelassi, C. )

    1991-05-01

    Observational data prospectively collected permit the examination of a complex set of decisions, including the decision not to perform any stress testing. Patients with or without previous myocardial infarction admitted for coronary evaluation and not submitted to any stress testing because of clinical reasons are at a higher risk for subsequent death. For prognostication, no test has been better validated than exercise electrocardiography: it can identify patients at low and high risk for future cardiac events among those without symptoms, with typical chest pain, and with previous myocardial infarction. In patients with triple-vessel disease, the results of exercise also allow those at low and high risk to be recognized. Both exercise radionuclide angiography and {sup 201}Tl scintigraphy (the latter in larger patient populations) have also demonstrated significant prognostic value on patients with or without previous myocardial infarction. Neither one has shown superiority to the other in prognostication. So far, they have been considered the only viable alternatives to exercise electrocardiography stress testing for diagnosis and prognostication. However, their costs limit their extensive application. Preliminary data suggest that intravenous dipyridamole echocardiography can be used for both diagnosis and prognostication of coronary artery disease; moreover, the prognostic information derived from dipyridamole echocardiography testing seems independent of and additive to that provided by exercise electrocardiography. Further prospective studies on larger patient populations are needed to better define the prognostic value of dipyridamole echocardiography testing.47 references.

  15. Impact Testing of Aluminum 2024 and Titanium 6Al-4V for Material Model Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pereira, J. Michael; Revilock, Duane M.; Lerch, Bradley A.; Ruggeri, Charles R.

    2013-01-01

    One of the difficulties with developing and verifying accurate impact models is that parameters such as high strain rate material properties, failure modes, static properties, and impact test measurements are often obtained from a variety of different sources using different materials, with little control over consistency among the different sources. In addition there is often a lack of quantitative measurements in impact tests to which the models can be compared. To alleviate some of these problems, a project is underway to develop a consistent set of material property, impact test data and failure analysis for a variety of aircraft materials that can be used to develop improved impact failure and deformation models. This project is jointly funded by the NASA Glenn Research Center and the FAA William J. Hughes Technical Center. Unique features of this set of data are that all material property data and impact test data are obtained using identical material, the test methods and procedures are extensively documented and all of the raw data is available. Four parallel efforts are currently underway: Measurement of material deformation and failure response over a wide range of strain rates and temperatures and failure analysis of material property specimens and impact test articles conducted by The Ohio State University; development of improved numerical modeling techniques for deformation and failure conducted by The George Washington University; impact testing of flat panels and substructures conducted by NASA Glenn Research Center. This report describes impact testing which has been done on aluminum (Al) 2024 and titanium (Ti) 6Al-4vanadium (V) sheet and plate samples of different thicknesses and with different types of projectiles, one a regular cylinder and one with a more complex geometry incorporating features representative of a jet engine fan blade. Data from this testing will be used in validating material models developed under this program. The material

  16. Failure Behavior Characterization of Mo-Modified Ti Surface by Impact Test and Finite Element Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yong; Qin, Jianfeng; Zhang, Xiangyu; Lin, Naiming; Huang, Xiaobo; Tang, Bin

    2015-07-01

    Using the impact test and finite element simulation, the failure behavior of the Mo-modified layer on pure Ti was investigated. In the impact test, four loads of 100, 300, 500, and 700 N and 104 impacts were adopted. The three-dimensional residual impact dents were examined using an optical microscope (Olympus-DSX500i), indicating that the impact resistance of the Ti surface was improved. Two failure modes cohesive and wearing were elucidated by electron backscatter diffraction and energy-dispersive spectrometer performed in a field-emission scanning electron microscope. Through finite element forward analysis performed at a typical impact load of 300 N, stress-strain distributions in the Mo-modified Ti were quantitatively determined. In addition, the failure behavior of the Mo-modified layer was determined and an ideal failure model was proposed for high-load impact, based on the experimental and finite element forward analysis results.

  17. Ground Testing Of Hypervelocity Impact Effects Of Micrometeoroids And Space Debris On Solar Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schimmerohn, Martin; Rott, Martin; Gerhard, Andreas; Osterholz, Jens; Schafer, Frank; D'Accolti, Gianfelice

    2011-10-01

    Solar arrays are the satellite component most exposed to micrometeoroid and space debris (MM/SD) impacts. The damage potential of hypervelocity impacts (HVI) is characterized by considerable energy released at the impact interface leading to mechanical damage and the generation of plasma. Impact experiments performed in the past indicate that the impact plasma can induce arcing, which consequently may lead to permanent power losses as known from electrostatic discharges. An ESA study is currently ongoing, the objective of which is to study and test the susceptibility of state-of-the art solar arrays to HVI. This paper describes potential failure modes, a ground testing approach to simulate them and its implementation for the test campaign, which will be performed at Fraunhofer EMI using a light gas gun and at Technische Universität München using a plasma-dynamic accelerator. Solar array simulation equipment and comprehensive plasma diagnostics are to be applied for ground testing.

  18. The role of the modified taylor impact test in dynamic material research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagusat, Frank; Rohr, Ingmar

    2015-09-01

    Dynamic material research with strain rates of more than 1000 1/s is experimentally very often done with a Split-Hopkinson Bar, Taylor impact tests or planar plate impact test investigations. At the Ernst-Mach-Institut (EMI), a variant of an inverted classical Taylor impact test is used by application of velocity interferometers of the VISAR type ("Modified Taylor Impact Test", MTT). The conduction of the experiments is similar to that of planar plate impact tests. The data reduction and derivation of dynamic material data can also be restricted to an analysis of the VISAR signal. Due to these properties, nearly each highly dynamic material characterization in our institute done by planar plate investigations is usually accompanied by MTT experiments. The extended possibilities and usefulness of a combined usage of these two highly dynamic characterization methods are explained. Recently, further developed MTT experiments with very small specimen sizes are presented. For the first time, Taylor impact and planar impact specimen can be used for which the load directions even in case of thin plate test material are identical and not perpendicular to each other. Consequences for testing construction elements are discussed.

  19. Impact resistance of current design composite fan blades tested under short-haul operating conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinhagen, C. A.; Salemme, C. T.

    1973-01-01

    Boron/epoxy and graphite/epoxy composite blades were impacted in a rotating whirligig facility with conditions closely simulating those which might be experienced by a STOL engine impacted with various foreign objects. The tip speed of the rotating blades was 800 feet per second. The blades were impacted with simulated birds, real birds, ice balls, and gravel. The results of composite blade impact tests were compared with a titanium blade tested under similar conditions. Neither composite material indicated a clear superiority over the other. Blades made from both composite materials showed more damage than the titanium blades.

  20. The evolution and impact of testing baghouse filter performance.

    PubMed

    Pham, Minh; Clark, Christina; Mckenna, John

    2012-08-01

    In 1995, the US. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) initiated the Environmental Technology Verification (ETV) program for the purpose of generating both independent and credible performance verification of innovative technologies and helping to accelerate acceptance of these products into the marketplace to further benefit the environment and protect public health. The EPA has approved a testing protocol under this program to verify the performance of commercially available filtration products for pulse-jet baghouses in removingfine particulate matter (aerodynamic diameter<2.5 microm; PM2.5). This verification testing protocol was later used as a basis for the development of the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) Method D6830-02 and the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) Method 11057. The South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD) in California and the EPA s Office of Air Quality Planning and Standards (OAQPS) highly encourage the use of ETV/ASTM-verified filtration media. This paper highlights the evolution of the standard test methods, the EPA's and SCAQMD's regulatory activities, the benefits of using verified filtration media, and the importance of including the filter performance testing in future consideration of baghouse permitting, baghouse operation and maintenance (O&M) plans, quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC), and bag monitoring plans. PMID:22916439

  1. Water impact laboratory and flight test results for the space shuttle solid rocket booster aft skirt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kross, D. A.; Murphy, N. C.; Rawls, E. A.

    1984-01-01

    A series of water impact tests was conducted using full-scale segment representations of the Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) aft skirt structure. The baseline reinforced structural design was tested as well as various alternative design concepts. A major portion of the test program consisted of evaluating foam as a load attenuation material. Applied pressures and response strains were measured for impact velocities from 40 feet per second (ft/s) to 110 ft/s. The structural configurations, test articles, test results, and flight results are described.

  2. Normalization of Impact Energy by Laminate Thickness for Compression After Impact Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nettles, A. T.; Hromisin, S. M.

    2013-01-01

    The amount of impact energy used to damage a composite laminate is a critical parameter when assessing residual strength properties. The compression after impact (CAI) strength of impacted laminates is dependent upon how thick the laminate is and this has traditionally been accounted for by normalizing (dividing) the impact energy by the laminate's thickness. However, when comparing CAI strength values for a given lay-up sequence and fiber/resin system, dividing the impact energy by the specimen thickness has been noted by the author to give higher CAI strength values for thicker laminates. A study was thus undertaken to assess the comparability of CAI strength data by normalizing the impact energy by the specimen thickness raised to a power to account for the higher strength of thicker laminates. One set of data from the literature and two generated in this study were analyzed by dividing the impact energy by the specimen thickness to the 1, 1.5, 2, and 2.5 powers. Results show that as laminate thickness and damage severity decreased, the value which the laminate thickness needs to be raised to in order to yield more comparable CAI data increases.

  3. Capabilities of the Impact Testing Facility at Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finchum, Andy; Nehls, Mary; Young, Whitney; Gray, Perry; Suggs, Bart; Lowrey, Nikki M.

    2011-01-01

    The test and analysis capabilities of the Impact Testing Facility at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center are described. Nine different gun systems accommodate a wide range of projectile and target sizes and shapes at velocities from subsonic through hypersonic, to accomplish a broad range of ballistic and hypervelocity impact tests. These gun systems include ballistic and microballistic gas and powder guns, a two-stage light gas gun, and specialty guns for weather encounter studies. The ITF "rain gun" is the only hydrometeor impact gun known to be in existence in the United States that can provide single impact performance data with known raindrop sizes. Simulation of high velocity impact is available using the Smooth Particle Hydrodynamic Code. The Impact Testing Facility provides testing, custom test configuration design and fabrication, and analytical services for NASA, the Department of Defense, academic institutions, international space agencies, and private industry in a secure facility located at Marshall Space Flight Center, on the US Army's Redstone Arsenal in Huntsville, Alabama. This facility performs tests that are subject to International Traffic in Arms Regulations (ITAR) and DoD secret classified restrictions as well as proprietary and unrestricted tests for civil space agencies, academic institutions, and commercial aerospace and defense companies and their suppliers.

  4. Elemental Water Impact Test: Phase 2 36-Inch Aluminum Tank Head

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vassilakos, Gregory J.

    2014-01-01

    Spacecraft are being designed based on LS-DYNA simulations of water landing impacts. The Elemental Water Impact Test (EWIT) series was undertaken to assess the accuracy of LS-DYNA water impact simulations. EWIT Phase 2 featured a 36-inch aluminum tank head. The tank head was outfitted with one accelerometer, twelve pressure transducers, three string potentiometers, and four strain gages. The tank head was dropped from heights of 1 foot and 2 feet. The focus of this report is the correlation of analytical models against test data. As a measure of prediction accuracy, peak responses from the baseline LS-DYNA model were compared to peak responses from the tests.

  5. Held Back: The Impact of Curricular and Pedagogical Factors on Tested Achievement in High School Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agvanian, Zara

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the impact of curricular factors and teaching practices on students' tested achievement in mathematics, explored the best predictors of the tested achievement, and examined differences in the tested achievement among student subgroups. The study utilized qualitative and quantitative methods and triangulated findings from…

  6. VALIDITY OF EFFLUENT AND AMBIENT TOXICITY TESTS FOR PREDICTING BIOLOGICAL IMPACT, BACK RIVER, BALTIMORE HARBOR, MARYLAND

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose for the study was to measure the toxicity of effluents discharged to an estuary using freshwater test species and compare the predictions with the receiving water biological impact. In addition, ambient tests were done in conjunction with salinity tolerance tests to c...

  7. Light airplane crash tests at impact velocities of 13 and 27 m/sec

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alfaro-Bou, E.; Vaughan, V. L., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Two similar general aviation airplanes were crash tested at the Langley impact dynamics research facility at velocities of 13 and 27 m/sec. Other flight parameters were held constant. The facility, instrumentation, tests specimens, and test method are briefly described. Structural damage and accelerometer data are discussed.

  8. The Impact of Variability of Item Parameter Estimators on Test Information Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Jinming

    2012-01-01

    The impact of uncertainty about item parameters on test information functions is investigated. The information function of a test is one of the most important tools in item response theory (IRT). Inaccuracy in the estimation of test information can have substantial consequences on data analyses based on IRT. In this article, the major part (called…

  9. SRB/FWC water impact: Flexible body loads test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Two technical areas were examined: evaluation of potential correction methods for spurious case strain outputs from the pressure transducers during the NSWC tests; and assessing procedures for modifying either the excitation function or the response function to account for hydroelastic effects.

  10. Ventilation System Effectiveness and Tested Indoor Air Quality Impacts

    SciTech Connect

    Rudd, A.; Bergey, D.

    2014-02-01

    Ventilation system effectiveness testing was conducted at two unoccupied, single-family, detached lab homes at the University of Texas - Tyler. Five ventilation system tests were conducted with various whole-building ventilation systems. Multizone fan pressurization testing characterized building and zone enclosure leakage. PFT testing showed multizone air change rates and interzonal airflow. Cumulative particle counts for six particle sizes, and formaldehyde and other Top 20 VOC concentrations were measured in multiple zones. The testing showed that single-point exhaust ventilation was inferior as a whole-house ventilation strategy. It was inferior because the source of outside air was not direct from outside, the ventilation air was not distributed, and no provision existed for air filtration. Indoor air recirculation by a central air distribution system can help improve the exhaust ventilation system by way of air mixing and filtration. In contrast, the supply and balanced ventilation systems showed that there is a significant benefit to drawing outside air from a known outside location, and filtering and distributing that air. Compared to the Exhaust systems, the CFIS and ERV systems showed better ventilation air distribution and lower concentrations of particulates, formaldehyde and other VOCs. System improvement percentages were estimated based on four System Factor Categories: Balance, Distribution, Outside Air Source, and Recirculation Filtration. Recommended System Factors could be applied to reduce ventilation fan airflow rates relative to ASHRAE Standard 62.2 to save energy and reduce moisture control risk in humid climates. HVAC energy savings were predicted to be 8-10%, or $50-$75/year.